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Sample records for biological metal cations

  1. Recognition of metal cations by biological systems.

    PubMed

    Truter, M R

    1975-11-01

    Recognition of metal cations by biological systems can be compared with the geochemical criteria for isomorphous replacement. Biological systems are more highly selective and much more rapid. Methods of maintaining an optimum concentration, including storage and transfer for the essential trace elements, copper and iron, used in some organisms are in part reproducible by coordination chemists while other features have not been reporduced in models. Poisoning can result from a foreign metal taking part in a reaction irreversibly so that the recognition site or molecule is not released. For major nutrients, sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium, there are similarities to the trace metals in selective uptake but differences qualitatively and quantitatively in biological activity. Compounds selective for potassium replace all the solvation sphere with a symmetrical arrangement of oxygen atoms; those selective for sodium give an asymmetrical environment with retention of a solvent molecule. Experiments with naturally occurring antibiotics and synthetic model compounds have shown that flexibility is an important feature of selectivity and that for transfer or carrier properties there is an optimum (as opposed to a maximum) metal-ligand stability constant. Thallium is taken up instead of potassium and will activate some enzymes; it is suggested that the poisonous characteristics arise because the thallium ion may bind more strongly than potassium to part of a site and then fail to bind additional atoms as required for the biological activity. Criteria for the design of selective complexing agents are given with indications of those which might transfer more than one metal at once. PMID:1815

  2. Sequestering ability of phytate toward biologically and environmentally relevant trivalent metal cations.

    PubMed

    Bretti, Clemente; Cigala, Rosalia Maria; Lando, Gabriele; Milea, Demetrio; Sammartano, Silvio

    2012-08-22

    Quantitative parameters for the interactions between phytate (Phy) and Al(3+), Fe(3+), and Cr(3+) were determined potentiometrically in NaNO(3) aqueous solutions at I = 0.10 mol L(-1) and T = 298.15 K. Different complex species were found in a wide pH range. The various species are partially protonated, depending on the pH in which they are formed, and are indicated with the general formula MH(q)Phy (with 0 ≤ q ≤ 6). In all cases, the stability of the FeH(q)Phy species is several log K units higher than that of the analogous AlH(q)Phy and CrH(q)Phy species. For example, for the MH(2)Phy species, the stability trend is log K(2) = 15.81, 20.61, and 16.70 for Al(3+), Fe(3+), and Cr(3+), respectively. The sequestering ability of phytate toward the considered metal cations was evaluated by calculating the pL(0.5) values (i.e., the total ligand concentration necessary to bind 50% of the cation present in trace in solution) at different pH values. In general, phytate results in a quite good sequestering agent toward all three cations in the whole investigated pH range, but the order of pL(0.5) depends on it. For example, at pH 5.0 it is pL(0.5) = 5.33, 5.44, and 5.75 for Fe(3+), Cr(3+), and Al(3+), respectively (Fe(3+) < Cr(3+) < Al(3+)); at pH 7.4 it is pL(0.5) = 9.94, 9.23, and 8.71 (Al(3+) < Cr(3+) < Fe(3+)), whereas at pH 9.0 it is pL(0.5) = 10.42, 10.87, and 8.34 (Al(3+) < Fe(3+) < Cr(3+)). All of the pL(0.5) values, and therefore the sequestering ability, regularly increase with increasing pH, and the dependence of pL(0.5) on pH was modeled using some empirical equations.

  3. Metal cation controls myosin and actomyosin kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Tkachev, Yaroslav V; Ge, Jinghua; Negrashov, Igor V; Nesmelov, Yuri E

    2013-01-01

    We have perturbed myosin nucleotide binding site with magnesium-, manganese-, or calcium-nucleotide complexes, using metal cation as a probe to examine the pathways of myosin ATPase in the presence of actin. We have used transient time-resolved FRET, myosin intrinsic fluorescence, fluorescence of pyrene labeled actin, combined with the steady state myosin ATPase activity measurements of previously characterized D.discoideum myosin construct A639C:K498C. We found that actin activation of myosin ATPase does not depend on metal cation, regardless of the cation-specific kinetics of nucleotide binding and dissociation. The rate limiting step of myosin ATPase depends on the metal cation. The rate of the recovery stroke and the reverse recovery stroke is directly proportional to the ionic radius of the cation. The rate of nucleotide release from myosin and actomyosin, and ATP binding to actomyosin depends on the cation coordination number. PMID:24115140

  4. ADSORPTION METHOD FOR SEPARATING METAL CATIONS

    DOEpatents

    Khym, J.X.

    1959-03-10

    The chromatographic separation of fission product cations is discussed. By use of this method a mixture of metal cations containing Zr, Cb, Ce, Y, Ba, and Sr may be separated from one another. Mentioned as preferred exchange adsorbents are resins containing free sulfonic acid groups. Various eluants, such as tartaric acid, HCl, and citric acid, used at various acidities, are employed to effect the selective elution and separation of the various fission product cations.

  5. Understanding the bioavailability and sequestration of different metal cations in the presence of a biodegradable chelant S,S-EDDS in biological fluids and natural waters.

    PubMed

    Bretti, Clemente; Cigala, Rosalia Maria; De Stefano, Concetta; Lando, Gabriele; Sammartano, Silvio

    2016-05-01

    Ethylenediamine-N,N'-disuccinic acid is a biodegradable alternative to EDTA, therefore its use for the sequestration of Ca(2+), Sn(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+) and Fe(3+) is analyzed. New data on its binding ability towards these cations were obtained with potentiometric, voltammetric and calorimetric measurements at different ionic strengths and at T = 298.15 K. Real multi-component fluids, namely fresh water, urine, sea water, saliva and blood plasma were chosen as case studies to evaluate the sequestering ability of EDDS in comparison with EDTA. Speciation diagrams were drawn in selected conditions, considering all interactions among the "natural" components of the fluid and those studied in this work, EDDS and EDTA (cL = 1 mmol dm(-3)) as sequestering agents and the cited metal cations (cM ∼ 10(-5) mol dm(-3)). The comparison of the sequestering ability of EDDS and EDTA is done using pM and pL0.5. In blood plasma the plasma mobilizing index was adopted. It was found that EDDS is a good alternative to EDTA, which tends to bind Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) more than EDDS. In particular, EDTA cannot be used as a sequestrant for Sn(2+) when cCa > cEDTA. EDDS is more efficient than EDTA at pH < 8, particularly in urine, where carbonate is absent. In sea water, the sequestering ability of EDDS towards Fe(3+) is higher than that of EDTA. In blood plasma, the PMI of EDDS towards Cu(2+) is higher than that of EDTA. Thermodynamic information, in terms of ΔH and ΔS, for the protonation and metal complex formation reactions are reported.

  6. Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations

    DOEpatents

    O`Neill, M.A.; Pellerin, P.J.M.; Warrenfeltz, D.; Vidal, S.; Darvill, A.G.; Albersheim, P.

    1999-03-02

    The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations. 15 figs.

  7. Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations

    DOEpatents

    O'Neill, Malcolm A.; Pellerin, Patrice J. M.; Warrenfeltz, Dennis; Vidal, Stephane; Darvill, Alan G.; Albersheim, Peter

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations.

  8. Transition-Metal Hydride Radical Cations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue; Shaw, Anthony P; Estes, Deven P; Norton, Jack R

    2016-08-10

    Transition-metal hydride radical cations (TMHRCs) are involved in a variety of chemical and biochemical reactions, making a more thorough understanding of their properties essential for explaining observed reactivity and for the eventual development of new applications. Generally, these species may be treated as the ones formed by one-electron oxidation of diamagnetic analogues that are neutral or cationic. Despite the importance of TMHRCs, the generally sensitive nature of these complexes has hindered their development. However, over the last four decades, many more TMHRCs have been synthesized, characterized, isolated, or hypothesized as reaction intermediates. This comprehensive review focuses on experimental studies of TMHRCs reported through the year 2014, with an emphasis on isolated and observed species. The methods used for the generation or synthesis of TMHRCs are surveyed, followed by a discussion about the stability of these complexes. The fundamental properties of TMHRCs, especially those pertaining to the M-H bond, are described, followed by a detailed treatment of decomposition pathways. Finally, reactions involving TMHRCs as intermediates are described. PMID:26828562

  9. Transition-Metal Hydride Radical Cations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue; Shaw, Anthony P; Estes, Deven P; Norton, Jack R

    2016-08-10

    Transition-metal hydride radical cations (TMHRCs) are involved in a variety of chemical and biochemical reactions, making a more thorough understanding of their properties essential for explaining observed reactivity and for the eventual development of new applications. Generally, these species may be treated as the ones formed by one-electron oxidation of diamagnetic analogues that are neutral or cationic. Despite the importance of TMHRCs, the generally sensitive nature of these complexes has hindered their development. However, over the last four decades, many more TMHRCs have been synthesized, characterized, isolated, or hypothesized as reaction intermediates. This comprehensive review focuses on experimental studies of TMHRCs reported through the year 2014, with an emphasis on isolated and observed species. The methods used for the generation or synthesis of TMHRCs are surveyed, followed by a discussion about the stability of these complexes. The fundamental properties of TMHRCs, especially those pertaining to the M-H bond, are described, followed by a detailed treatment of decomposition pathways. Finally, reactions involving TMHRCs as intermediates are described.

  10. Alkali cation specific adsorption onto fcc(111) transition metal electrodes.

    PubMed

    Mills, J N; McCrum, I T; Janik, M J

    2014-07-21

    The presence of alkali cations in electrolyte solutions is known to impact the rate of electrocatalytic reactions, though the mechanism of such impact is not conclusively determined. We use density functional theory (DFT) to examine the specific adsorption of alkali cations to fcc(111) electrode surfaces, as specific adsorption may block catalyst sites or otherwise impact surface catalytic chemistry. Solvation of the cation-metal surface structure was investigated using explicit water models. Computed equilibrium potentials for alkali cation adsorption suggest that alkali and alkaline earth cations will specifically adsorb onto Pt(111) and Pd(111) surfaces in the potential range of hydrogen oxidation and hydrogen evolution catalysis in alkaline solutions.

  11. Cation Selectivity in Biological Cation Channels Using Experimental Structural Information and Statistical Mechanical Simulation.

    PubMed

    Finnerty, Justin John; Peyser, Alexander; Carloni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Cation selective channels constitute the gate for ion currents through the cell membrane. Here we present an improved statistical mechanical model based on atomistic structural information, cation hydration state and without tuned parameters that reproduces the selectivity of biological Na+ and Ca2+ ion channels. The importance of the inclusion of step-wise cation hydration in these results confirms the essential role partial dehydration plays in the bacterial Na+ channels. The model, proven reliable against experimental data, could be straightforwardly used for designing Na+ and Ca2+ selective nanopores. PMID:26460827

  12. Cation Selectivity in Biological Cation Channels Using Experimental Structural Information and Statistical Mechanical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Finnerty, Justin John

    2015-01-01

    Cation selective channels constitute the gate for ion currents through the cell membrane. Here we present an improved statistical mechanical model based on atomistic structural information, cation hydration state and without tuned parameters that reproduces the selectivity of biological Na+ and Ca2+ ion channels. The importance of the inclusion of step-wise cation hydration in these results confirms the essential role partial dehydration plays in the bacterial Na+ channels. The model, proven reliable against experimental data, could be straightforwardly used for designing Na+ and Ca2+ selective nanopores. PMID:26460827

  13. Solvent-dependent cation exchange in metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Brozek, Carl K; Bellarosa, Luca; Soejima, Tomohiro; Clark, Talia V; López, Núria; Dincă, Mircea

    2014-06-01

    We investigated which factors govern the critical steps of cation exchange in metal-organic frameworks by studying the effect of various solvents on the insertion of Ni(2+) into MOF-5 and Co(2+) into MFU-4l. After plotting the extent of cation insertion versus different solvent parameters, trends emerge that offer insight into the exchange processes for both systems. This approach establishes a method for understanding critical aspects of cation exchange in different MOFs and other materials.

  14. High capacity nickel battery material doped with alkali metal cations

    DOEpatents

    Jackovitz, John F.; Pantier, Earl A.

    1982-05-18

    A high capacity battery material is made, consisting essentially of hydrated Ni(II) hydroxide, and about 5 wt. % to about 40 wt. % of Ni(IV) hydrated oxide interlayer doped with alkali metal cations selected from potassium, sodium and lithium cations.

  15. Synthetic receptors as models for alkali metal cation- binding sites in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wall, Stephen L.; Meadows, Eric S.; Barbour, Leonard J.; Gokel, George W.

    2000-06-01

    The alkali metal cations Na+ and K+ have several important physiological roles, including modulating enzyme activity. Recent work has suggested that alkali metal cations may be coordinated by systems, such as the aromatic amino acid side chains. The ability of K+ to interact with an aromatic ring has been assessed by preparing a family of synthetic receptors that incorporate the aromatic side chains of phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan. Thesereceptors are constructed around a diaza-18-crown-6 scaffold, which serves as the primary binding site for an alkali metal cation. The ability of the aromatic rings to coordinate a cation was determined by crystallizing each of the receptors in the presence of K+ and by solving the solid state structures. In all cases, complexation of K+ by the pi system was observed. When possible, the structures of the unbound receptors also were determined for comparison. Further proof that the aromatic ring makes an energetically favorable interaction with the cation was obtained by preparing a receptor in which the arene was perfluorinated. Fluorination of the arene reverses the electrostatics, but the aromaticity is maintained. The fluorinated arene rings do not coordinate the cation in the solid state structure of the K+ complex. Thus, the results of the predicted electrostatic reversal were confirmed. Finally, the biological implications of the alkali metal cation-pi interaction are addressed.

  16. Tuning the adsorption interactions of imidazole derivatives with specific metal cations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haining; Bara, Jason E; Turner, C Heath

    2014-06-01

    In this work, we report a computational study of the interactions between metal cations and imidazole derivatives in the gas phase. We first performed a systematic assessment of various density functionals and basis sets for predicting the binding energies between metal cations and the imidazoles. We find that the M11L functional in combination with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set provides the best compromise between accuracy and computational cost with our metal···imidazole complexes. We then evaluated the binding of a series of metal cations, including Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Ba(2+), Hg(2+), and Pb(2+), with several substituted imidazole derivatives. We find that electron-donating groups increase the metal-binding energy, whereas electron-withdrawing groups decrease the metal-binding energy. Furthermore, the binding energy trends can be rationalized by the hardness of the metal cations and imidazole derivatives, providing a quick way to estimate the metal···imidazole binding strength. This insight can enable efficient screening protocols for identifying effective imidazole-based solvents and membranes for metal adsorption and provide a framework for understanding metal···imidazole interactions in biological systems.

  17. ABSORPTION METHOD FOR SEPARATING METAL CATIONS

    DOEpatents

    Tompkins, E.R.; Parker, G.W.

    1959-03-10

    An improved method is presented for the chromatographic separation of fission products wherein a substantial reduction in liquid volume is obtained. The process consists in contacting a solution containing fission products with a body of ion-exchange adsorbent to effect adsorption of fission product cations. The loaded exchange resin is then contacted with a small volume of a carboxylic acid eluant, thereby recovering the fission products. The fission product carrying eluate is acidified without increasing its volume to the volume of the original solution, and the acidified eluate is then used as a feed solution for a smaller body of ion-exchange resin effecting readsorption of the fission product cations.

  18. In situ remediation process using divalent metal cations

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Patrick V.; Khandaker, Nadim R.; Krumhansl, James L.; Teter, David M.

    2004-12-14

    An in situ process for treating ambient solid materials (e.g., soils, aquifer solids, sludges) by adding one or more divalent metal cations to the ambient solid material. The added divalent metal cations, such as Cu.sup.2+ or Zn.sup.2+, combine with metal oxide/hydroxides (e.g., ferric oxide/hydroxide or aluminum oxide/hydroxide) already present in the ambient solid material to form an effective sorbent material having a large number of positively-charged surface complexes that binds and immobilizes anionic contaminant species (e.g., arsenic or chromate). Divalent metal cations can be added, for example, by injecting an aqueous solution of CuSO.sub.4 into an aquifer contaminated with arsenic or chromate. Also, sludges can be stabilized against leaching of anionic contaminants through the addition of divalent metal cations. Also, an inexpensive sorbent material can be easily formed by mixing divalent metal cations with soil that has been removed from the ground.

  19. Fluorescence quenching of water-soluble conjugated polymer by metal cations and its application in sensor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Guo; Zhao, Dan; He, Zhi-Ke; Ai, Xin-Ping

    2007-02-01

    The effects of different metal cations on the fluorescence of water-soluble conjugated polymer (CP) and their quenching mechanism have been explored. Most transition metal cations, especially noble metal cations, such as Pd2+, Ru3+, and Pt2+ possessed higher quenching efficiency to CP fluorescence than that of the main group metal cations and other transition metal cations, which have filled or half-full outmost electron layer configurations. Base on this, rapid, sensitive detection of noble metal cations can be realized and a novel quencher-tether-ligand (QTL) probe was developed to detect avidin and streptavidin.

  20. Targeting divalent metal cations with Re(I) tetrazolato complexes.

    PubMed

    Fiorini, Valentina; Ranieri, Anna Maria; Muzzioli, Sara; Magee, Karen D M; Zacchini, Stefano; Akabar, Nurshadrina; Stefan, Alessandra; Ogden, Mark I; Massi, Massimiliano; Stagni, Stefano

    2015-12-21

    In order to exploit their potential as versatile luminescent sensors, four new Re(I)-tetrazolato complexes with the general formula fac-[Re(CO)3(diim)(L)], where diim is 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) and L(-) is either the anion 5-(2'-pyridyl)tetrazolato (2-PTZ(-)) or 5-(2'-quinolyl)tetrazolato (2-QTZ(-)), were prepared and fully characterized. In all cases, the regioselective coordination of the Re(I) center through the N2 atom of the tetrazolato ring was observed. This particular feature ensures the availability of the diiminic (N^N) site that was systematically incorporated into the structure of the 2-PTZ(-) and 2-QTZ(-) ligands for further coordination with metal cations. Such a diimine-type coordination mode was preliminarily tested by using the mononuclear Re(I) complexes as N^N ligands for the preparation of two [(N^N)Cu(POP)] cationic species, where POP is the chelating diphosphine bis[2-(diphenylphosphino)phenyl]ether. The X-ray structures of the resulting Re(I)-Cu(I) dyads revealed that the Re(I) mononuclear complexes effectively behaved as chelating N^N ligands with respect to the [Cu(POP)](+) fragment, the coordination of which also resulted in significant modification of the Re(I)-centered luminescence. With these data in hand, the luminescent sensing abilities of the four new Re(I) tetrazolato complexes were screened with respect to divalent metal ions of toxicological and biological importance such as Zn(II), Cd(II) and Cu(II). The interaction of the Re(I) complexes with Zn(II) and Cd(II) was witnessed by the evident blue shift (Δλmax = 22-36 nm) of the emission maxima, which was also accompanied by a significant elongation of the emission lifetimes. On the contrary, the addition of the cupric ion caused substantial quenching of the radiative processes originating from the Re(I) luminophores. PMID:26554352

  1. Alkali Metal Cation versus Proton and Methyl Cation Affinities: Structure and Bonding Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Boughlala, Zakaria; Fonseca Guerra, Célia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We have analyzed the structure and bonding of gas‐phase Cl−X and [HCl−X]+ complexes for X+= H+, CH3 +, Li+, and Na+, using relativistic density functional theory (DFT). We wish to establish a quantitative trend in affinities of the anionic and neutral Lewis bases Cl− and HCl for the various cations. The Cl−X bond becomes longer and weaker along X+ = H+, CH3 +, Li+, and Na+. Our main purpose is to understand the heterolytic bonding mechanism behind the intrinsic (i.e., in the absence of solvent) alkali metal cation affinities (AMCA) and how this compares with and differs from those of the proton affinity (PA) and methyl cation affinity (MCA). Our analyses are based on Kohn–Sham molecular orbital (KS‐MO) theory in combination with a quantitative energy decomposition analysis (EDA) that pinpoints the importance of the different features in the bonding mechanism. Orbital overlap appears to play an important role in determining the trend in cation affinities. PMID:27551660

  2. Alkali Metal Cation versus Proton and Methyl Cation Affinities: Structure and Bonding Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Boughlala, Zakaria; Fonseca Guerra, Célia; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2016-06-01

    We have analyzed the structure and bonding of gas-phase Cl-X and [HCl-X](+) complexes for X(+)= H(+), CH3 (+), Li(+), and Na(+), using relativistic density functional theory (DFT). We wish to establish a quantitative trend in affinities of the anionic and neutral Lewis bases Cl(-) and HCl for the various cations. The Cl-X bond becomes longer and weaker along X(+) = H(+), CH3 (+), Li(+), and Na(+). Our main purpose is to understand the heterolytic bonding mechanism behind the intrinsic (i.e., in the absence of solvent) alkali metal cation affinities (AMCA) and how this compares with and differs from those of the proton affinity (PA) and methyl cation affinity (MCA). Our analyses are based on Kohn-Sham molecular orbital (KS-MO) theory in combination with a quantitative energy decomposition analysis (EDA) that pinpoints the importance of the different features in the bonding mechanism. Orbital overlap appears to play an important role in determining the trend in cation affinities. PMID:27551660

  3. Metal Cations in G-Quadruplex Folding and Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Debmalya; Mirihana Arachchilage, Gayan; Basu, Soumitra

    2016-09-01

    This review is focused on the structural and physico-chemical aspects of metal cation coordination to G-Quadruplexes (GQ) and their effects on GQ stability and conformation. G-Quadruplex structures are non-canonical secondary structures formed by both DNA and RNA. G-quadruplexes regulate a wide range of important biochemical processes. Besides the sequence requirements, the coordination of monovalent cations in the GQ is essential for its formation and determines the stability and polymorphism of GQ structures. The nature, location and dynamics of the cation coordination and their impact on the overall GQ stability are dependent on several factors such as the ionic radii, hydration energy and the bonding strength to the O6 of guanines. The intracellular monovalent cation concentration and the localized ion concentrations determine the formation of GQs and can potentially dictate their regulatory roles. A wide range of biochemical and biophysical studies on an array of GQ enabling sequences have generated at a minimum the knowledge base that allows us to often predict the stability of GQs in presence of the physiologically relevant metal ions, however, prediction of conformation of such GQs is still out of the realm.

  4. Metal Cations in G-Quadruplex Folding and Stability

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Debmalya; Mirihana Arachchilage, Gayan; Basu, Soumitra

    2016-01-01

    This review is focused on the structural and physicochemical aspects of metal cation coordination to G-Quadruplexes (GQ) and their effects on GQ stability and conformation. G-quadruplex structures are non-canonical secondary structures formed by both DNA and RNA. G-quadruplexes regulate a wide range of important biochemical processes. Besides the sequence requirements, the coordination of monovalent cations in the GQ is essential for its formation and determines the stability and polymorphism of GQ structures. The nature, location, and dynamics of the cation coordination and their impact on the overall GQ stability are dependent on several factors such as the ionic radii, hydration energy, and the bonding strength to the O6 of guanines. The intracellular monovalent cation concentration and the localized ion concentrations determine the formation of GQs and can potentially dictate their regulatory roles. A wide range of biochemical and biophysical studies on an array of GQ enabling sequences have generated at a minimum the knowledge base that allows us to often predict the stability of GQs in the presence of the physiologically relevant metal ions, however, prediction of conformation of such GQs is still out of the realm.

  5. Metal Cations in G-Quadruplex Folding and Stability

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Debmalya; Mirihana Arachchilage, Gayan; Basu, Soumitra

    2016-01-01

    This review is focused on the structural and physicochemical aspects of metal cation coordination to G-Quadruplexes (GQ) and their effects on GQ stability and conformation. G-quadruplex structures are non-canonical secondary structures formed by both DNA and RNA. G-quadruplexes regulate a wide range of important biochemical processes. Besides the sequence requirements, the coordination of monovalent cations in the GQ is essential for its formation and determines the stability and polymorphism of GQ structures. The nature, location, and dynamics of the cation coordination and their impact on the overall GQ stability are dependent on several factors such as the ionic radii, hydration energy, and the bonding strength to the O6 of guanines. The intracellular monovalent cation concentration and the localized ion concentrations determine the formation of GQs and can potentially dictate their regulatory roles. A wide range of biochemical and biophysical studies on an array of GQ enabling sequences have generated at a minimum the knowledge base that allows us to often predict the stability of GQs in the presence of the physiologically relevant metal ions, however, prediction of conformation of such GQs is still out of the realm. PMID:27668212

  6. Metal Cations in G-Quadruplex Folding and Stability.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Debmalya; Mirihana Arachchilage, Gayan; Basu, Soumitra

    2016-01-01

    This review is focused on the structural and physicochemical aspects of metal cation coordination to G-Quadruplexes (GQ) and their effects on GQ stability and conformation. G-quadruplex structures are non-canonical secondary structures formed by both DNA and RNA. G-quadruplexes regulate a wide range of important biochemical processes. Besides the sequence requirements, the coordination of monovalent cations in the GQ is essential for its formation and determines the stability and polymorphism of GQ structures. The nature, location, and dynamics of the cation coordination and their impact on the overall GQ stability are dependent on several factors such as the ionic radii, hydration energy, and the bonding strength to the O6 of guanines. The intracellular monovalent cation concentration and the localized ion concentrations determine the formation of GQs and can potentially dictate their regulatory roles. A wide range of biochemical and biophysical studies on an array of GQ enabling sequences have generated at a minimum the knowledge base that allows us to often predict the stability of GQs in the presence of the physiologically relevant metal ions, however, prediction of conformation of such GQs is still out of the realm. PMID:27668212

  7. Molecular modeling of organic corrosion inhibitors: why bare metal cations are not appropriate models of oxidized metal surfaces and solvated metal cations.

    PubMed

    Kokalj, Anton

    2014-01-01

    The applicability of various models of oxidized metal surfaces - bare metal cations, clusters of various size, and extended (periodic) slabs - that are used in the field of quantum-chemical modeling of corrosion inhibitors is examined and discussed. As representative model systems imidazole inhibitor, MgO surface, and solvated Mg(2+) ion are considered by means of density-functional-theory calculations. Although the results of cluster models are prone to cluster size and shape effects, the clusters of moderate size seem useful at least for qualitative purposes. In contrast, the bare metal cations are useless not only as models of oxidized surfaces but also as models of solvated cations, because they bind molecules several times stronger than the more appropriate models. In particular, bare Mg(2+) binds imidazole by 5.9 eV, while the slab model of MgO(001) by only 0.35 eV. Such binding is even stronger for 3+ cations, e.g., bare Al(3+) binds imidazole by 17.9 eV. The reasons for these fantastically strong binding energies are discussed and it is shown that the strong bonding is predominantly due to electron charge transfer from molecule to metal cation, which stems from differences between molecular and metal ionization potentials.

  8. Sensing of biologically important cations such as Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Cu(2+), and Fe(3+) using magnetic nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Mahendran, V; Philip, John

    2013-04-01

    We report a simple approach to the ultrasensitive detection of biologically important metal ions using a magnetic nanoemulsion. The nanoemulsion used in our study was an oil-in-water emulsion droplet of average size ∼190 nm containing ferrimagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles of average size ∼10 nm. In a static magnetic field, the emulsion droplets self-assemble into a nanoarray with distinct interdroplet spacing. In the presence of cations in the solution, the nanofluid array shows a large blue shift in the diffracted Bragg peak and a visually perceivable color change due to changes in the electrical double layer upon the diffusion of cations. The colloidal force-distance measurements in the presence of cations show large variations at the onset of repulsion in the presence of cations. The sensor shows good selectivity to Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Cu(2+), and Fe(3+) ions and offers a rapid response compared to conventional techniques. This approach can be useful for the recognition of biologically important cations. PMID:23477486

  9. A unique binding cavity for divalent cations in the DNA-metal-chromomycin A3 complex.

    PubMed

    Itzhaki, L; Weinberger, S; Livnah, N; Berman, E

    1990-02-15

    Binding of chromomycin A3 (CRA) to calf thymus DNA was investigated in the presence of divalent cations using visible absorption and 1H-nmr spectroscopies. An apparent equilibrium binding constant (approximately 10(11) M-1) was obtained from metal competition experiments using EDTA to remove the metal cation from the DNA-M-CRA (M: metal) complex. The large binding constant of the drug to DNA enabled us to obtain essentially complete complexation of CRA to the short homogeneous d(ATGCAT)2 duplex using stoichiometric amounts of the metal cation. Large induced chemical shifts were observed in the 1H-nmr spectrum of the above complex using the paramagnetic Co2+ cation, indicating that the metal occupies a unique binding site. Since no induced 1H-nmr chemical shifts were observed for the drug-Co2+ mixture, it was concluded that no metal-drug complex is formed. In addition, it was found that bound CRA is negatively charged at physiological pH and binding to the DNA could be affected only by using metal cations whose ionic radius size (less than 0.85 A) and charge (2+) were simultaneously satisfied. Stringent metal cation selectivity for the DNA-M-CRA complex may be intimately connected with the antitumor selectivity of CRA, since different types of cells generally possess widely differing molar concentrations of metal cations.

  10. Observation of Accumulated Metal Cation Distribution in Fish by Novel Stigmatic Imaging Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Jun; Ikeda, Shinichiro; Toyoda, Michisato

    2014-02-01

    The accumulation of radioactive substances in biological organisms is a matter of great concern since the incident at the nuclear power plant in Fukushima, Japan. We have developed a novel technique for observing the distribution of accumulated metal cations in fish that employs a new imaging mass spectrometer, MULTUM-IMG2. Distributions of 133Cs and 88Sr in a sliced section of medaka (Oryzias latipes) are obtained with spatial resolution of µm-scale.

  11. Alkaline earth metal cation exchange: effect of mobile counterion and dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Indarawis, Katrina; Boyer, Treavor H

    2012-04-17

    The goal of this research was to provide an improved understanding of the interactions between alkaline earth metals and DOM under conditions that are encountered during drinking water treatment with particular focus on cation exchange. Both magnetically enhanced and nonmagnetic cation exchange resins were converted to Na, Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba mobile counterion forms as a novel approach to investigate the exchange behavior between the cations and the interactions between the cations and DOM. The results show that cation exchange is a robust process for removal of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) considering competition with cations on the resin surface and presence of DOM. DOM was actively involved during the cation exchange process through complexation, adsorption, and coprecipitation reactions. In addition to advancing the understanding of ion exchange processes for water treatment, the results of this work are applicable to membrane pretreatment to minimize fouling, treatment of membrane concentrate, and precipitative softening.

  12. Cation Exchange Selectivity versus concentration of competing heavy metal cations (Pb2+,Zn2+) : case of Na-montmorillonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oueslati, W.; Mefath, M.; Ben Rhaiem, H.; Ben Haj Amara, A.

    2009-11-01

    Cation Exchange Selectivity (CES) for Wyoming montmorillonite was determined by equilibration of the clay with a mixed equinormal solution containing two competing cations (i.e. Pb2+, Zn2+). This paper aims at characterizing the structural change and selectivity of a Na-dioctahedral smectite (Wy-Na). The quantitative analysis of XRD patterns is achieved using an indirect method based on the comparison of XRD experimental patterns to calculated ones. Two reference samples were prepared by saturation with Pb2+ or Zn2+ (i.e. two heavy metal cations occurring in hold house trash). The resulting complexes were respectively labelled Wy-Pb and Wy-Zn. After that, the Wy-Na sample was dispersed in solutions containing 0.5Pb2+ and 0.5Zn2+ with different concentrations (from 10-2 N to 10-4 N) in order to understand the concentration effect on the selectivity process of the Na-montmorillonite. The XRD quantitative analysis shows that for low concentrations the d001 spacing value corresponds to Wy-Na complex, whereas for high concentrations the d001 spacing value can be attributed to the Wy-Zn and/or Wy-Pb. At low concentrations, the sample presents a homogeneous state and the cation exchange capacity is saturated with Na+ cation which is characterized by one water layer hydration state (1W). For high concentrations, interstratified hydration behavior appears and the clay has a tendency to exchange in minor contribution the Zn2+ cation and in major contribution Pb2+ cation characterized by a mixed hydration state between one (1W) and two water layers (2W).

  13. Effect of heavy metal cations on the activity of cathepsin D (in vitro study).

    PubMed

    Karwowska, Alicja; Łapiński, Radosław; Gacko, Marek; Grzegorczyk, Ewa; Żurawska, Joanna; Karczewski, Jan K

    2012-10-08

    We studied the effect of heavy metal cations: Fe²⁺, Cu²⁺, Zn²⁺, Cd²⁺, Hg²⁺, Pb²⁺ on the activity of cathepsin D in human aorta homogenate and blood serum. The concentration of cations was 1 mmol/l. Hemoglobin was the cathepsin D substrate. The activity of cathepsin D was determined at pH 3.5. Only Hg²⁺ cations inhibit the activity of cathepsin D. Cations Hg²⁺ damage lysosomes and release cathepsin D from these organelles.

  14. Prediction of mono-, bi-, and trivalent metal cation relative toxicity to the seaweed Gracilaria domingensis (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta) in synthetic seawater.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Luiz Fernando; Zambotti-Villela, Leonardo; Yokoya, Nair Sumie; Bastos, Erick Leite; Stevani, Cassius Vinicius; Colepicolo, Pio

    2013-11-01

    The present study reports a 48-h aquatic metal-toxicity assay based on daily growth rates of the red seaweed Gracilaria domingensis (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta) in synthetic seawater. The median inhibitory concentration (IC50) for each metal cation was experimentally determined, and the ratios of free ions (aqueous complex) were calculated by software minimization of the total equilibrium activity (MINTEQA2) to determine the free median inhibitory concentration (IC50F). A model for predicting the toxicity of 14 metal cations was developed using the generic function approximation algorithm (GFA) with log IC50F values as the dependent variables and the following properties as independent variables: ionic radius (r), atomic number (AN), electronegativity (Xm ), covalent index (Xm (2) r), first hydrolysis constant (|log KOH |), softness index (σp ), ion charge (Z), ionization potential (ΔIP), electrochemical potential (ΔEo ), atomic number divided by ionization potential (AN/ΔIP), and the cation polarizing power for Z(2) /r and Z/AR. The 3-term independent variables were predicted as the best-fit model (log IC50F: -23.64 + 5.59 Z/AR + 0.99 |log KOH | + 37.05 σp ; adjusted r(2) : 0.88; predicted r(2) : 0.68; Friedman lack-of-fit score: 1.6). This mathematical expression can be used to predict metal-biomolecule interactions, as well as the toxicity of mono-, bi-, and trivalent metal cations, which have not been experimentally tested in seaweed to date. Quantitative ion-character relationships allowed the authors to infer that the mechanism of toxicity might involve an interaction between metals and functional groups of biological species containing sulfur or oxygen.

  15. Low-Temperature Cationic Rearrangement in a Bulk Metal Oxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Man-Rong; Retuerto, Maria; Stephens, Peter W; Croft, Mark; Sheptyakov, Denis; Pomjakushin, Vladimir; Deng, Zheng; Akamatsu, Hirofumi; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Sánchez-Benítez, Javier; Saouma, Felix O; Jang, Joon I; Walker, David; Greenblatt, Martha

    2016-08-16

    Cationic rearrangement is a compelling strategy for producing desirable physical properties by atomic-scale manipulation. However, activating ionic diffusion typically requires high temperature, and in some cases also high pressure in bulk oxide materials. Herein, we present the cationic rearrangement in bulk Mn2 FeMoO6 at unparalleled low temperatures of 150-300 (o) C. The irreversible ionic motion at ambient pressure, as evidenced by real-time powder synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction, and second harmonic generation, leads to a transition from a Ni3 TeO6 -type to an ordered-ilmenite structure, and dramatic changes of the electrical and magnetic properties. This work demonstrates a remarkable cationic rearrangement, with corresponding large changes in the physical properties in a bulk oxide at unprecedented low temperatures. PMID:27203790

  16. Low-Temperature Cationic Rearrangement in a Bulk Metal Oxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Man-Rong; Retuerto, Maria; Stephens, Peter W; Croft, Mark; Sheptyakov, Denis; Pomjakushin, Vladimir; Deng, Zheng; Akamatsu, Hirofumi; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Sánchez-Benítez, Javier; Saouma, Felix O; Jang, Joon I; Walker, David; Greenblatt, Martha

    2016-08-16

    Cationic rearrangement is a compelling strategy for producing desirable physical properties by atomic-scale manipulation. However, activating ionic diffusion typically requires high temperature, and in some cases also high pressure in bulk oxide materials. Herein, we present the cationic rearrangement in bulk Mn2 FeMoO6 at unparalleled low temperatures of 150-300 (o) C. The irreversible ionic motion at ambient pressure, as evidenced by real-time powder synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction, and second harmonic generation, leads to a transition from a Ni3 TeO6 -type to an ordered-ilmenite structure, and dramatic changes of the electrical and magnetic properties. This work demonstrates a remarkable cationic rearrangement, with corresponding large changes in the physical properties in a bulk oxide at unprecedented low temperatures.

  17. Metal cation inhibitors for controlling denting corrosion in steam generators. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Leidheiser, H. Jr.; Granata, R.D.; Simmons, G.W.; Music, S.; Vedage, H.L.

    1982-12-01

    Metal cations of arsenic, antimony, tin, manganese, zinc, cadmium, indium, and thallium have been evaluated in a preliminary way as possible3 inhibitors for controlling denting corrision observed in steam generators used with pressurized water reactors (PWR). The rationale for this approach was based upon the well-known inhibition effects of metal cations on corrosion rates in electrolyte/metal systems. A review of corrosion inhibition by metal cations (H. Leidheiser, Jr., Corrosion 36, 339 (1982)) has identified eleven inhibition mechanisms. The major test methods used for this evaluation were: (1) Isothermal capsule tests of carbon/steel/Inconel 600 tube bulging rates at temperatures up to 288/sup 0/C in seawater/copper-nickel chloride bulge-accelerating solutions. (2) Immersion weight-loss tests of steel coupled to Inconel 600 in boiling (102/sup 0/C) 3% sodium chloride solutions. In addition, electrochemical measuremens and surface analyses were performed. The major findings of this investigation are presented.

  18. Infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy of cationized methionine: effects of alkali-metal cation size on gas-phase conformation.

    PubMed

    Carl, Damon R; Cooper, Theresa E; Oomens, Jos; Steill, Jeff D; Armentrout, P B

    2010-04-14

    The gas-phase structures of alkali-metal cation complexes of the amino acid methionine (Met) as well as protonated methionine are investigated using infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy utilizing light generated by a free electron laser. Spectra of Li(+)(Met) and Na(+)(Met) are similar and relatively simple, whereas the spectra of K(+)(Met), Rb(+)(Met), and Cs(+)(Met) include distinctive new bands. Measured IRMPD spectra are compared to spectra calculated at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level of theory to identify the conformations present in the experimental studies. For Li(+) and Na(+) complexes, the only conformation present is a charge-solvated, tridentate structure that binds the metal cation to the amine and carbonyl groups of the amino acid backbone and the sulfur atom of the side chain, [N,CO,S]. In addition to the [N,CO,S] conformer, bands corresponding to alkali-metal cation binding to a bidentate zwitterionic structure, [CO(2)(-)], are clearly present for the K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+) complexes. Theoretical calculations of the lowest energy conformations of Rb(+) and Cs(+) complexes suggest that the experimental spectra could also include contributions from two additional charge-solvated structures, tridentate [COOH,S] and bidentate [COOH]. For H(+)(Met), the IRMPD action spectrum is reproduced by multiple low-energy [N,CO,S] conformers, in which the protonated amine group hydrogen bonds to the carbonyl oxygen atom and the sulfur atom of the amino acid side chain. These [N,CO,S] conformers only differ in their side-chain orientations.

  19. Hydrocolloid liquid-core capsules for the removal of heavy-metal cations from water.

    PubMed

    Nussinovitch, A; Dagan, O

    2015-12-15

    Liquid-core capsules with a non-crosslinked alginate fluidic core surrounded by a gellan membrane were produced in a single step to investigate their ability to adsorb heavy metal cations. The liquid-core gellan-alginate capsules, produced by dropping alginate solution with magnesium cations into gellan solution, were extremely efficient at adsorbing lead cations (267 mg Pb(2+)/g dry alginate) at 25 °C and pH 5.5. However, these capsules were very weak and brittle, and an external strengthening capsule was added by using magnesium cations. The membrane was then thinned with the surfactant lecithin, producing capsules with better adsorption attributes (316 mg Pb(+2)/g dry alginate vs. 267 mg Pb(+2)/g dry alginate without lecithin), most likely due to the thinner membrane and enhanced mass transfer. The capsules' ability to adsorb other heavy-metal cations - copper (Cu(2+)), cadmium (Cd(2+)) and nickel (Ni(2+)) - was tested. Adsorption efficiencies were 219, 197 and 65 mg/g, respectively, and were correlated with the cation's affinity to alginate. Capsules with the sorbed heavy metals were regenerated by placing in a 1M nitric acid suspension for 24h. Capsules could undergo three regeneration cycles before becoming damaged.

  20. Inhibition of iron corrosion in 0.5 M sulphuric acid by metal cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathiyanarayanan, S.; Jeyaprabha, C.; Muralidharan, S.; Venkatachari, G.

    2006-09-01

    Corrosion inhibitors are widely used in acid solutions during pickling and descaling. Mostly organic compounds containing N, O, and S groups are employed as inhibitors. In this study, the inhibition performance of metal cations such as Zn 2+, Mn 2+ and Ce 4+ ions in the concentration range 1-10 × 10 -3 M has been found out. The corrosion behaviour of iron in 0.5 M H 2SO 4 in the presence of metal cations is studied using polarization and impedance methods. It is found that the addition of these metal cations inhibits the corrosion markedly. The inhibition effect is in the following order Ce 4+ ≫ Mn 2+ > Zn 2+.

  1. Multicenter bond index analysis of influence of metal cations on the aromaticity of aromatic amino acids: Phenylalanine and tyrosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakiari, A. H.; Farrokhnia, M.; Azami, S. M.

    2008-05-01

    In order to provide insight into the influence of metal cations on the aromaticity of amino acids, evaluation of six-center delocalization indices is accomplished in the context of quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM). Aromaticity of two amino acids, phenylalanine and tyrosine, is investigated as typical amino acids containing aromatic ring in their isolated state and complexed by some metal cations. The results showed that the metal cations affect the most important three connectivities differently. Also, it is shown that the existence of metal cations can increase two-center delocalization in certain parts of the aromatic rings.

  2. BioMe: biologically relevant metals.

    PubMed

    Tus, Alan; Rakipovic, Alen; Peretin, Goran; Tomic, Sanja; Sikic, Mile

    2012-07-01

    In this article, we introduce BioMe (biologically relevant metals), a web-based platform for calculation of various statistical properties of metal-binding sites. Users can obtain the following statistical properties: presence of selected ligands in metal coordination sphere, distribution of coordination numbers, percentage of metal ions coordinated by the combination of selected ligands, distribution of monodentate and bidentate metal-carboxyl, bindings for ASP and GLU, percentage of particular binuclear metal centers, distribution of coordination geometry, descriptive statistics for a metal ion-donor distance and percentage of the selected metal ions coordinated by each of the selected ligands. Statistics is presented in numerical and graphical forms. The underlying database contains information about all contacts within the range of 3 Å from a metal ion found in the asymmetric crystal unit. The stored information for each metal ion includes Protein Data Bank code, structure determination method, types of metal-binding chains [protein, ribonucleic acid (RNA), deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), water and other] and names of the bounded ligands (amino acid residue, RNA nucleotide, DNA nucleotide, water and other) and the coordination number, the coordination geometry and, if applicable, another metal(s). BioMe is on a regular weekly update schedule. It is accessible at http://metals.zesoi.fer.hr.

  3. Dissociation of alkaliated alanine in the gas phase: the role of the metal cation.

    PubMed

    Abirami, Seduraman; Wong, Catherine Chiu Lan; Tsang, Chun Wai; Ma, Ngai Ling

    2005-09-01

    The dissociation of prototypical metal-cationized amino acid complexes, namely, alkaliated alanine ([Ala+M]+, M+ = Li+, Na+, K+), was studied by energy-resolved tandem mass spectrometry with an ion-trap mass analyzer and by density functional theory. Dissociation leads to formation of fragment ions arising from the loss of small neutrals, such as H2O, CO, NH3, (CO+NH3), and the formation of Na+/K+. The order of appearance threshold voltages for different dissociation pathways determined experimentally is consistent with the order of critical energies (energy barriers) obtained theoretically, and this provides the necessary confidence in both experimental and theoretical results. Although not explicitly involved in the reaction, the alkali metal cation plays novel and important roles in the dissociation of alkaliated alanine. The metal cation not only catalyzes the dissociation (via the formation of loosely bound ion-molecule complexes and by stabilizing the more polar intermediates and transition structures), but also affects the dissociation mechanisms, as the cation can alter the shape of the potential energy surfaces. This compression/expansion of the potential energy surface as a function of the alkali metal cation is discussed in detail, and how this affects the competitive loss of H2O versus CO/(CO+NH3) from [Ala+M]+ is illustrated. The present study provides new insights into the origin of the competition between various dissociation channels of alkaliated amino acid complexes.

  4. Cation-network interactions in binary alkali metal borate glasses. A far-infrared study

    SciTech Connect

    Kamitsos, E.I.; Karakassides, M.A.; Chryssikos, G.D.

    1987-10-22

    The far-infrared spectra of compositions probing the glass-forming regions of all five binary alkali metal borate systems chi M/sub 2/O x (1 - chi)B/sub 2/O/sub 3/ (0 < chi less than or equal to 0.40, M = Na; and 0 < chi less than or equal to 0.35, M = K, Rb, Cs) have been measured and analyzed to systematically study the alkali metal cation-network interactions and their compositional dependence. Band deconvolution of the measured spectra showed the presence of two distinct distributions of alkali metal cation sites in Li, Na, and K glasses. Similar results have been obtained for rubidium and cesium borate glasses of compositions chi > 0.25. One distribution of cation sites has been observed for the lower alkali metal content Rb and Cs glasses. The fractions of cations in the two different network sites have also been evaluated. The squares of the frequencies of the cation-motion bands were found to vary linearly with composition, and exhibit kinks at chi similarly ordered 20, for all but the Cs glasses. This behavior was explained on the basis of the network structural changes known to occur at this composition.

  5. The rhizotoxicity of metal cations is related to their strength of binding to hard ligands.

    PubMed

    Kopittke, Peter M; Menzies, Neal W; Wang, Peng; McKenna, Brigid A; Wehr, J Bernhard; Lombi, Enzo; Kinraide, Thomas B; Blamey, F Pax C

    2014-02-01

    Mechanisms whereby metal cations are toxic to plant roots remain largely unknown. Aluminum, for example, has been recognized as rhizotoxic for approximately 100 yr, but there is no consensus on its mode of action. The authors contend that the primary mechanism of rhizotoxicity of many metal cations is nonspecific and that the magnitude of toxic effects is positively related to the strength with which they bind to hard ligands, especially carboxylate ligands of the cell-wall pectic matrix. Specifically, the authors propose that metal cations have a common toxic mechanism through inhibiting the controlled relaxation of the cell wall as required for elongation. Metal cations such as Al(3+) and Hg(2+), which bind strongly to hard ligands, are toxic at relatively low concentrations because they bind strongly to the walls of cells in the rhizodermis and outer cortex of the root elongation zone with little movement into the inner tissues. In contrast, metal cations such as Ca(2+), Na(+), Mn(2+), and Zn(2+) , which bind weakly to hard ligands, bind only weakly to the cell wall and move farther into the root cylinder. Only at high concentrations is their weak binding sufficient to inhibit the relaxation of the cell wall. Finally, different mechanisms would explain why certain metal cations (for example, Tl(+), Ag(+), Cs(+), and Cu(2+)) are sometimes more toxic than expected through binding to hard ligands. The data presented in the present study demonstrate the importance of strength of binding to hard ligands in influencing a range of important physiological processes within roots through nonspecific mechanisms.

  6. A Bioluminescence Assay System for Imaging Metal Cationic Activities in Urban Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Bae; Naganawa, Ryuichi; Murata, Shingo; Nakayama, Takayoshi; Miller, Simon; Senda, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    A bioluminescence-based assay system was fabricated for an efficient determination of the activities of air pollutants. The following four components were integrated into this assay system: (1) an 8-channel assay platform uniquely designed for simultaneously sensing multiple optical samples, (2) single-chain probes illuminating toxic chemicals or heavy metal cations from air pollutants, (3) a microfluidic system for circulating medium mimicking the human body, and (4) the software manimulating the above system. In the protocol, we briefly introduce how to integrate the components into the system and the application to the illumination of the metal cationic activities in air pollutants. PMID:27424913

  7. A Bioluminescence Assay System for Imaging Metal Cationic Activities in Urban Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Bae; Naganawa, Ryuichi; Murata, Shingo; Nakayama, Takayoshi; Miller, Simon; Senda, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    A bioluminescence-based assay system was fabricated for an efficient determination of the activities of air pollutants. The following four components were integrated into this assay system: (1) an 8-channel assay platform uniquely designed for simultaneously sensing multiple optical samples, (2) single-chain probes illuminating toxic chemicals or heavy metal cations from air pollutants, (3) a microfluidic system for circulating medium mimicking the human body, and (4) the software manimulating the above system. In the protocol, we briefly introduce how to integrate the components into the system and the application to the illumination of the metal cationic activities in air pollutants.

  8. Effects of metal cations and fulvic acid on the adsorption of ciprofloxacin onto goethite.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yinyue; Guo, Yong; Gu, Xueyuan; Gu, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin (CIP) can be strongly adsorbed by ferric oxides, but some influencing factors, such as multivalent cations and soil organic matter, have not been evaluated extensively. In this study, the interaction between CIP and four divalent metals (Ca, Cd, Cu, and Pb) was investigated using potentiometric titration and the results indicated that CIP can bind to the divalent metals in the following affinity order: Cu(II) > Pb(II) > Cd(II) > Ca(II). The effects of metals and fulvic acid (FA) on the adsorption behavior of CIP onto goethite surfaces were also examined using batch experiments. It was found that metal cations enhanced the CIP retention on goethite surfaces in the same order as the affinity order with CIP, indicating that metals likely increased CIP retention through cation bridging. FA was found to promote CIP sorption rather than compete with it, and the coexistence of FA and Cu(II) in the system exhibited an addictive effect with CIP sorption, indicating that they might influence the sorption separately under the studied loading condition. Taken together, our results suggested that the coexistence of divalent cations or soil organic matter will enhance CIP sorption on goethite surfaces, hence reducing its mobility and bioavailability in the environment.

  9. The cation-chelation mechanism of metal-ion sorption by polyurethanes.

    PubMed

    Hamon, R F; Khan, A S; Chow, A

    1982-04-01

    The mechanism of sorption of ions by polyurethanes has been investigated through detailed studies of the extraction of cobalt(II) thiocyanate and the salts of several organic acids. Polyether-based polyurethanes. particularly those containing poly(ethylene oxide), were found to be distinctly superior to polyesters in the sorption of salts and performed much better than might be expected by analogy with monomeric liquid solvents. The results were judged to be inconsistent with several possible mechanisms, including adsorption, solvent extraction, weak or strong base anion-exchange, and complexation of metal anions by the polymer. A new proposal, termed the cation chelation mechanism (CCM), was advanced to account for the observations. In this view, a number of cations (including those of the alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, some transition metals, NH(+)(4), RNH(+)(3) and perhaps H(3)O(+)) may be multiply complexed (chelated) by portions of the polymer, thus facilitating the sorption of accompanying anions. As predicted by the mechanism, moderately strong and selective complexation of several cations was observed to occur with the following order of selectivity: Li(+) < Na(+) < Cs(+) < Rb(+) < K(+) approximately NH(+)(4) < Ag(+) approximately Tl(+) < Ba(2+) < Hg(2+) < Pb(2+). Such behaviour parallels that known for many crown and non-cyclic polyethers and is therefore identified with the polyether portions of the polymer, which are thought to adopt helical conformations surrounding the complexed cations. The cation-chelation mechanism may be widely applicable to the sorption of ions of several types by polyether-based polyurethanes, particularly when large, hydrophobic anions (such as anionic metal complexes) are accompanied by an excess of chelatable cations. PMID:18963133

  10. Metal cation dependence of interactions with amino acids: bond dissociation energies of Rb(+) and Cs(+) to the acidic amino acids and their amide derivatives.

    PubMed

    Armentrout, P B; Yang, Bo; Rodgers, M T

    2014-04-24

    Metal cation-amino acid interactions are key components controlling the secondary structure and biological function of proteins, enzymes, and macromolecular complexes comprising these species. Determination of pairwise interactions of alkali metal cations with amino acids provides a thermodynamic vocabulary that begins to quantify these fundamental processes. In the present work, we expand a systematic study of such interactions by examining rubidium and cesium cations binding with the acidic amino acids (AA), aspartic acid (Asp) and glutamic acid (Glu), and their amide derivatives, asparagine (Asn) and glutamine (Gln). These eight complexes are formed using electrospray ionization and their bond dissociation energies (BDEs) are determined experimentally using threshold collision-induced dissociation with xenon in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer. Analyses of the energy-dependent cross sections include consideration of unimolecular decay rates, internal energy of the reactant ions, and multiple ion-neutral collisions. Quantum chemical calculations are conducted at the B3LYP, MP2(full), and M06 levels of theory using def2-TZVPPD basis sets, with results showing reasonable agreement with experiment. At 0 and 298 K, most levels of theory predict that the ground-state conformers for M(+)(Asp) and M(+)(Asn) involve tridentate binding of the metal cation to the backbone carbonyl, amino, and side-chain carbonyl groups, although tridentate binding to the carboxylic acid group and side-chain carbonyl is competitive for M(+)(Asn). For the two longer side-chain amino acids, Glu and Gln, multiple structures are competitive. A comparison of these results to those for the smaller alkali cations, Na(+) and K(+), provides insight into the trends in binding energies associated with the molecular polarizability and dipole moment of the side chain. For all four metal cations, the BDEs are inversely correlated with the size of the metal cation and follow the order Asp < Glu

  11. Tris(triazole) tripodal receptors as selective probes for citrate anion recognition and multichannel transition and heavy metal cation sensing.

    PubMed

    González, María del Carmen; Otón, Francisco; Espinosa, Arturo; Tárraga, Alberto; Molina, Pedro

    2015-02-01

    The three-armed pyrenyl-triazole receptor 1 behaves as a highly selective fluorescent molecular sensor for citrate anions over similar carboxylates such as malate or tartrate. In addition, this receptor senses Cu(2+) cations through absorption and emission channels even in the presence of Hg(2+) metal cations. The related three-armed ferrocenyl-triazole receptor 2 behaves as a highly selective dual (redox and chromogenic) chemosensor molecule for Pb(2+) metal cations.

  12. Electrochemical Removal of Metal Cations from Wastewater Monitored by Differential Pulse Polarography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Delphine; Kuhn, Alexander; Sojic, Neso

    2004-01-01

    Electrodeposition eliminates wastewater pollutants such as electrochemically active metal cations, with different pulse polarography (DPP) scrutinizing the kinetics of the treatment process. These mechanisms produce qualitative and quantitative data about the removal process, while students appreciate the use of electrochemistry in resolving…

  13. MRI probes for sensing biologically relevant metal ions.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Célia S; Tóth, Eva

    2010-03-01

    Given the important role of metal ions in fundamental biological processes, the visualization of their concentration in living animals by repeatable, noninvasive imaging techniques, such as MRI, would be highly desirable. A large number of metal-responsive MRI contrast agents, the majority based on Gd(3+) complexes, have been reported in recent years. The contrast-enhancing properties (relaxivity) of a Gd(3+) complex can be most conveniently modulated by interaction with the sensed metal cation via changes in the number of water molecules bound directly to Gd(3+) or changes in the size of the complex, which represent the two major strategies to develop metal sensitive MRI probes. Here, we survey paramagnetic lanthanide complexes involving Gd(3+) agents and paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer probes designed to detect the most important endogenous metal ions: calcium, zinc, iron and copper. Future work will likely focus on extending applications of these agents to living animals, as well as on exploring new ways of creating molecular MRI probes in order to meet requirements such as higher specificity or lower detection limits.

  14. Nitrogen-rich multinuclear ferrocenophanes as multichannel chemosensor molecules for transition and heavy-metal cations.

    PubMed

    Sola, Antonia; Espinosa, Arturo; Tárraga, Alberto; Molina, Pedro

    2014-08-07

    [m.n] Multinuclear ferrocenophanes prepared by aza-Wittig reaction of bisiminophosphoranes derived from 1,1'-diazidoferrocene and isophthaladelhyde or 2,5-diformylthiophene, behave as efficient electrochemical and chromogenic chemosensor molecules for Zn2+, Pb2+, and Hg2+ metal cations. Whereas the OSWV of receptor 3, bearing two m-phenylene units in the bridges, display one oxidation peak, receptor 4 incorporating two thiophene rings in the bridges, exhibits two well-separated oxidation peaks. In both receptors only the addition of Zn2+, Pb2+, and Hg2+ metal cations induced a remarkable anodic shift of ferrocene/ferrocenium redox couple. Likewise, in the absorption spectra of these receptors the low energy band is red-shifted by Δλ = 165 - 209 nm, and these changes promoted a significant color changes which could be used for the naked eye detection of these metal cations. The coordination modes for two representative cases were unveiled by DFT calculations that show an unsual coordination in the [42Pb]2+ complex with the Pb2+ cation in a distorted cubic N4S4 donor cage.

  15. Eutectic-based ionic liquids with metal-containing anions and cations.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Andrew P; Barron, John C; Ryder, Karl S; Wilson, David

    2007-01-01

    Eutectic mixtures of zinc chloride and donor molecules such as urea and acetamide are described and it is proposed that these constitute a new class of ionic liquids. FAB-MS analysis shows that the liquids are made up of metal-containing anions and cations in which the donor is coordinated to the cation. Data on the viscosity, conductivity, density, phase behaviour and surface tension are presented and these are shown to be significantly different to other related ionic liquids that incorporate quaternary ammonium salts. The conductivity and viscosity are comparable with other ionic liquids and the data fit well to the Hole theory model recently proposed. PMID:17477454

  16. Cation exchange at the secondary building units of metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Brozek, C K; Dincă, M

    2014-08-21

    Cation exchange is an emerging synthetic route for modifying the secondary building units (SBUs) of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). This technique has been used extensively to enhance the properties of nanocrystals and molecules, but the extent of its applications for MOFs is still expanding. To harness cation exchange as a rational tool, we need to elucidate its governing factors. Not nearly enough experimental observations exist for drawing these conclusions, so we provide a conceptual framework for approaching this task. We address which SBUs undergo exchange, why certain ions replace others, how the framework influences the process, the role of the solvent, and current applications. Using these guidelines, certain trends emerge from the available data and missing experiments become obvious. If future studies follow this framework, then a more comprehensive body of observations will furnish a deeper understanding of cation exchange and inspire future applications.

  17. Toxic effect of metal cation binary mixtures to the seaweed Gracilaria domingensis (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Mendes, Luiz Fernando; Stevani, Cassius Vinicius; Zambotti-Villela, Leonardo; Yokoya, Nair Sumie; Colepicolo, Pio

    2014-01-01

    The macroalga Gracilaria domingensis is an important resource for the food, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and biotechnology industries. G. domingensis is at a part of the food web foundation, providing nutrients and microelements to upper levels. As seaweed storage metals in the vacuoles, they are considered the main vectors to magnify these toxic elements. This work describes the evaluation of the toxicity of binary mixtures of available metal cations based on the growth rates of G. domingensis over a 48-h exposure. The interactive effects of each binary mixture were determined using a toxic unit (TU) concept that was the sum of the relative contribution of each toxicant and calculated using the ratio between the toxicant concentration and its endpoint. Mixtures of Cd(II)/Cu(II) and Zn(II)/Ca(II) demonstrated to be additive; Cu(II)/Zn(II), Cu(II)/Mg(II), Cu(II)/Ca(II), Zn(II)/Mg(II), and Ca(II)/Mg(II) mixtures were synergistic, and all interactions studied with Cd(II) were antagonistic. Hypotheses that explain the toxicity of binary mixtures at the molecular level are also suggested. These results represent the first effort to characterize the combined effect of available metal cations, based on the TU concept on seaweed in a total controlled medium. The results presented here are invaluable to the understanding of seaweed metal cation toxicity in the marine environment, the mechanism of toxicity action and how the tolerance of the organism.

  18. Atomic and electronic properties of neutral and cationic metallic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolchin, Andrew Marc

    2000-10-01

    We find optimal atomic and electronic structures for neutral and singly, positively charged clusters of beryllium and beryllium-lithium (of the form BeLik) using density functional theory in the local spin density approximation. Ions are moved with a steepest descent method, and the electronic wave functions optimized using a fictitious dynamics with simulated annealing, as conceived by Car and Parrinello. Shell-like orbitals, filling angular momentum states in the order: 1s 2p 2s 1d, are obtained for the beryllium clusters. The same ordering is found for the BeLik clusters which indicates a departure from the ordering found in pure alkali clusters by the lowering of the 2s level to below the 1d level due to the larger electron affinity of the Be impurity. We similarly calculate an atomic basis to which we relate these shell-like orbitals, and employ a Mulliken population analysis to visualize how the atomic orbitals might hybridize to create them. This analysis also allows us to observe an increasingly metallic behavior with cluster size, by associating the electron density distribution, and in the case of a charged cluster, the distribution of the hole, with atomic sites, and with regions of overlap between atom pairs. We quantitatively show the increase in density associated with bonding as cluster size increases, and the tendency of the hole to distribute itself near the most exterior atomic sites in clusters of high symmetry. Our results are compared with the predictions of the shell/jellium model in the context of our calculated binding energies and ionization potentials.

  19. Noncovalent interactions of metal cations and arenes probed with thallium(I) complexes.

    PubMed

    Jurca, Titel; Korobkov, Ilia; Gorelsky, Serge I; Richeson, Darrin S

    2013-05-20

    The synthesis, characterization, and computational analysis of Tl(I) complexes bearing the bis(imino)pyridine scaffold, [{ArN═CPh}2(NC5H3)]Tl(+)(OTf)(-) (Ar = 2,6-Et2C6H33, 2,5-(t)Bu2C6H3, 4), are reported. The cations of these species showed long Tl-N and Tl-OTf distances indicating only weak or no ligand coordination. Computational analysis of the interactions between the Tl cation and the ligands (orbital populations, bond order, and energy decomposition analysis) point to only minimal covalent interactions of the cation with the ligands. The weak ligand-to-metal donation allows for additional interactions between the Tl cation and arene rings that are either intramolecular, in the case of 3, or intermolecular. From benzene or toluene, 4 crystallizes with inverted sandwich structures having two [{(2,5-(t)Bu2C6H3)N═CPh}2(NC5H3)]Tl(+) cations bridged by either benzene or toluene. A density functional computational description of these Tl-arene contacts required exchange-correlation functionals with long-range exchange corrections (e.g., CAM-B3LYP or LC-PBE) and show that Tl-arene contacts are stabilized by noncovalent interactions.

  20. Electromembrane extraction of heavy metal cations followed by capillary electrophoresis with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Kubáň, Pavel; Strieglerová, Lenka; Gebauer, Petr; Boček, Petr

    2011-04-01

    Electromembrane extraction (EME) was used as an off-line sample pre-treatment method for the determination of heavy metal cations in aqueous samples using CE with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (CE-C(4) D). A short segment of porous polypropylene hollow fibre was penetrated with 1-octanol and 0.5% v/v bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphonic acid and constituted a low cost, single use, disposable supported liquid membrane, which selectively transported and pre-concentrated heavy metal cations into the fibre lumen filled with 100 mM acetic acid acceptor solution. Donor solutions were standard solutions and real samples dissolved in deionized water at neutral pH. At optimized EME conditions (penetration time, 5 s; applied voltage, 75 V; and stirring rate, 750 rpm), 15-42% recoveries of heavy metal cations were achieved for a 5 min extraction time. Repeatability of the EME pre-treatment was examined for six independent EME runs and ranged from 6.6 to 11.1%. Limits of detection for the EME-CE-C(4) D method ranged from 25 to 200 nM, resulting into one to two orders of magnitude improvement compared with CE-C(4) D without sample treatment. The developed EME sample pre-treatment procedure was applied to the analysis of heavy metal cations in tap water and powdered milk samples. Zinc in the real samples was identified and quantified in a background electrolyte solution consisting of 20 mM L-histidine and 30 mM acetic acid at pH 4.95 in about 3 min.

  1. Synthesis and chemistry of cationic d sup 0 metal alkyl complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    The long term goals of this project are to design and synthesize highly unsaturated, electrophilic metal complexes and to explore their use as catalysts, reagents, and/or model systems for olefin polymerization and C-H activation chemistry. During the 1990 budget year we have focused our attention on (i) the ligand C-H activation chemistry of Cp{sub 2}Zr(CH{sub 3})(THF){sup +} and related cationic, d{sup o} Zr alkyl complexes, and (ii) the synthesis of new classes of group 4 metal alkyl complexes with non-Cp{sub 2}M ligand environments.

  2. Interparticle migration of metal cations in stream sediments as a factor in toxics transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackman, A.P.; Kennedy, V.C.; Bhatia, N.

    2001-01-01

    Sorption of metal cations by stream sediments is an important process affecting the movement of released contaminants in the environment. The ability of cations to desorb from one sediment particle and subsequently sorb to another can greatly affect metal transport rates but rates for this process have not been reported. The objective of this study was to determine the rate at which sorbed metals can migrate from contaminated sediment particles to uncontaminated sediment particles as a function of the concentration of the contaminating solution and the duration of the contact with the contaminating solution. Samples of small sediment particles were exposed to solutions containing cobalt, after which they were rinsed and combined with larger uncontaminated sediment particles in the presence of stream water. Initial concentrations of the contaminating solution ranged from 1ng/l to 1000mg/l and exposures to the contaminating solution ranged from 6h to 14 days. The rate of the migration increased with increasing concentrations in the contaminating solution and with decreasing times of exposure to the contaminating solution. Under the conditions of these experiments, the time required for the migration to reach equilibrium was on the order of months or longer. In separate experiments, the kinetics of adsorption and desorption of cobalt were measured as a function of concentration of the contaminating solution. The time required to reach adsorption equilibrium increased with increasing concentration in the contaminating solution. Times to sorption equilibrium were on the order of months. Desorption was much slower than adsorption and, together with intraparticle diffusion, probably controls the rate of migration from contaminated to uncontaminated sediment. The results of this study show that interparticle migration of metal cations can proceed at significant rates that are strongly influenced by the length of time that the metal has been in contact with the sediment

  3. Intermediate-range order in simple metal-phosphate glasses: The effect of metal cations on the phosphate anion distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Sales, B.C.; Boatner, L.A.; Ramey, J.O.

    1997-06-01

    The technique of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has been used to probe the phosphate anion distribution in a variety of metal phosphate glasses including glasses made with trivalent metal cations (Al, In, Ga, La). The composition of each glass was chosen so that the average phosphate chain length was between 2 and 4 PO{sub 4} tetrahedra. The widths of the resulting phosphate anion distributions were determined directly from an analysis of the HPLC chromatograms. Literature values for the free energy of formation of the crystalline metal-orthophosphate compounds with respect to P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and the metal oxide, were compared to the chromatogram widths. It was found that the smaller the energy of formation, the wider the distribution of phosphate chains, and the greater the ease of glass formation.

  4. Highly Tunable Colloidal Perovskite Nanoplatelets through Variable Cation, Metal, and Halide Composition.

    PubMed

    Weidman, Mark C; Seitz, Michael; Stranks, Samuel D; Tisdale, William A

    2016-08-23

    Colloidal perovskite nanoplatelets are a promising class of semiconductor nanomaterials-exhibiting bright luminescence, tunable and spectrally narrow absorption and emission features, strongly confined excitonic states, and facile colloidal synthesis. Here, we demonstrate the high degree of spectral tunability achievable through variation of the cation, metal, and halide composition as well as nanoplatelet thickness. We synthesize nanoplatelets of the form L2[ABX3]n-1BX4, where L is an organic ligand (octylammonium, butylammonium), A is a monovalent metal or organic molecular cation (cesium, methylammonium, formamidinium), B is a divalent metal cation (lead, tin), X is a halide anion (chloride, bromide, iodide), and n-1 is the number of unit cells in thickness. We show that variation of n, B, and X leads to large changes in the absorption and emission energy, while variation of the A cation leads to only subtle changes but can significantly impact the nanoplatelet stability and photoluminescence quantum yield (with values over 20%). Furthermore, mixed halide nanoplatelets exhibit continuous spectral tunability over a 1.5 eV spectral range, from 2.2 to 3.7 eV. The nanoplatelets have relatively large lateral dimensions (100 nm to 1 μm), which promote self-assembly into stacked superlattice structures-the periodicity of which can be adjusted based on the nanoplatelet surface ligand length. These results demonstrate the versatility of colloidal perovskite nanoplatelets as a material platform, with tunability extending from the deep-UV, across the visible, into the near-IR. In particular, the tin-containing nanoplatelets represent a significant addition to the small but increasingly important family of lead- and cadmium-free colloidal semiconductors.

  5. Highly Tunable Colloidal Perovskite Nanoplatelets through Variable Cation, Metal, and Halide Composition.

    PubMed

    Weidman, Mark C; Seitz, Michael; Stranks, Samuel D; Tisdale, William A

    2016-08-23

    Colloidal perovskite nanoplatelets are a promising class of semiconductor nanomaterials-exhibiting bright luminescence, tunable and spectrally narrow absorption and emission features, strongly confined excitonic states, and facile colloidal synthesis. Here, we demonstrate the high degree of spectral tunability achievable through variation of the cation, metal, and halide composition as well as nanoplatelet thickness. We synthesize nanoplatelets of the form L2[ABX3]n-1BX4, where L is an organic ligand (octylammonium, butylammonium), A is a monovalent metal or organic molecular cation (cesium, methylammonium, formamidinium), B is a divalent metal cation (lead, tin), X is a halide anion (chloride, bromide, iodide), and n-1 is the number of unit cells in thickness. We show that variation of n, B, and X leads to large changes in the absorption and emission energy, while variation of the A cation leads to only subtle changes but can significantly impact the nanoplatelet stability and photoluminescence quantum yield (with values over 20%). Furthermore, mixed halide nanoplatelets exhibit continuous spectral tunability over a 1.5 eV spectral range, from 2.2 to 3.7 eV. The nanoplatelets have relatively large lateral dimensions (100 nm to 1 μm), which promote self-assembly into stacked superlattice structures-the periodicity of which can be adjusted based on the nanoplatelet surface ligand length. These results demonstrate the versatility of colloidal perovskite nanoplatelets as a material platform, with tunability extending from the deep-UV, across the visible, into the near-IR. In particular, the tin-containing nanoplatelets represent a significant addition to the small but increasingly important family of lead- and cadmium-free colloidal semiconductors. PMID:27471862

  6. Use of MgO doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation for removing arsenic from water

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Robert C; Holt-Larese, Kathleen C; Bontchev, Ranko

    2013-08-13

    Systems and methods for use of magnesium hydroxide, either directly or through one or more precursors, doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation, for removing arsenic from drinking water, including water distribution systems. In one embodiment, magnesium hydroxide, Mg(OH).sub.2 (a strong adsorbent for arsenic) doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation is used to adsorb arsenic. The complex consisting of arsenic adsorbed on Mg(OH).sub.2 doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation is subsequently removed from the water by conventional means, including filtration, settling, skimming, vortexing, centrifugation, magnetic separation, or other well-known separation systems. In another embodiment, magnesium oxide, MgO, is employed, which reacts with water to form Mg(OH).sub.2. The resulting Mg(OH).sub.2 doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation, then adsorbs arsenic, as set forth above. The method can also be used to treat human or animal poisoning with arsenic.

  7. Characterization of carrageenan hydrogel electrode coatings with immobilized cationic metal complex redox couples

    SciTech Connect

    Crumbliss, A.L.; Perine, S.C.; Edwards, A.K.; Rillema, D.P.

    1992-02-06

    The redox behavior of cationic metal complexes immobilized in a {kappa}-carrageenan hydrogel matrix, which acts as a cation-exchange polymeric electrode coating, is described. Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}, Ru(en){sub 3}{sup 3+}, Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 3+}, and Co(bpy){sub 3}{sup 3+} (bpy = 2,2{prime}-bipyridine; en = ethylenediamine) were immobilized singly and in pairs (Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+} and Co (bpy){sub 3}{sup 3+}) on the surface of a Pt electrode and were characterized by cyclic voltammetry. The redox couples were selected on the basis of their structural similarity and wide range of electron self-exchange rate constants (10{sup 1}-10{sup 9} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). The surface-modified carrageenan hydrogel electrode was found to exhibit superior electrolyte diffusion properties when compared with more commonly used cation-exchange immobilization matrices such as Nafion, and to be stable with respect to leakage of cations into the solution. The carrageenan hydrogel film was also found to be permeable to anionic redox couples such as Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 3-/4-}. All immobilized redox couples exhibited quasi-reversible electrochemical behavior. Evidence supporting a dual-mode mechanism involving physical diffusion and electron hopping for charge propagation through the carrageenan hydrogel is presented. 45 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Multi-physical model of cation and water transport in ionic polymer-metal composite sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zicai; Chang, Longfei; Horiuchi, Tetsuya; Takagi, Kentaro; Aabloo, Alvo; Asaka, Kinji

    2016-03-01

    Ion-migration based electrical potential widely exists not only in natural systems but also in ionic polymer materials. We presented a multi-physical model and investigated the transport process of cation and water of ionic polymer-metal composites based on our thorough understanding on the ionic sensing mechanisms in this paper. The whole transport process was depicted by transport equations concerning convection flux under the total pressure gradient, electrical migration by the built-in electrical field, and the inter-coupling effect between cation and water. With numerical analysis, the influence of critical material parameters, the elastic modulus Ewet, the hydraulic permeability coefficient K, the diffusion coefficient of cation dII and water dWW, and the drag coefficient of water ndW, on the distribution of cation and water was investigated. It was obtained how these parameters correlate to the voltage characteristics (both magnitude and response speed) under a step bending. Additionally, it was found that the effective relative dielectric constant ɛr has little influence on the voltage but is positively correlated to the current. With a series of optimized parameters, the predicted voltage agreed with the experimental results well, which validated our model. Based on our physical model, it was suggested that an ionic polymer sensor can benefit from a higher modulus Ewet, a higher coefficient K and a lower coefficient dII, and a higher constant ɛr.

  9. Overcharging below the nanoscale: Multivalent cations reverse the ion selectivity of a biological channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Giménez, Elena; Alcaraz, Antonio; Aguilella, Vicente M.

    2010-02-01

    We report charge inversion within a nanoscopic biological protein ion channel in salts of multivalent ions. The presence of positive divalent and trivalent counterions reverses the cationic selectivity of the OmpF channel, a general diffusion porin located in the outer membrane of E. coli. We discuss the conditions under which charge inversion can be inferred from the change in sign of the measured quantity, the channel zero current potential. By comparing experimental results in protein channels whose charge has been modified after site-directed mutagenesis, the predictions of current theories of charge inversion are critically examined. It is emphasized that charge inversion does not necessarily increase with the bare surface charge density of the interface and that even this concept of surface charge density may become meaningless in some biological ion channels. Thus, any theory based on electrostatic correlations or chemical binding should explicitly take into account the particular structure of the charged interface.

  10. New generation super alloy candidates for medical applications: corrosion behavior, cation release and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Reclaru, L; Ziegenhagen, R; Unger, R E; Eschler, P Y; Constantin, F

    2014-12-01

    Three super alloy candidates (X1 CrNiMoMnW 24-22-6-3-2 N, NiCr21 MoNbFe 8-3-5 AlTi, CoNiCr 35-20 Mo 10 BTi) for a prolonged contact with skin are evaluated in comparison with two reference austenitic stainless steels 316L and 904L. Several electrochemical parameters were measured and determined (E(oc), E(corr), i(corr), b(a), b(c), E(b), R(p), E(crev) and coulometric analysis) in order to compare the corrosion behavior. The cation release evaluation and in vitro biological characterization also were performed. In terms of corrosion, the results reveal that the 904L steels presented the best behavior followed by the super austenitic steel X1 CrNiMoMnW 24-22-6-3-2 N. For the other two super alloys (NiCr and CoNiCr types alloys) tested in different conditions (annealed, work hardened and work hardened+age hardened) it was found that their behavior to corrosion was weak and close to the other reference stainless steel, 316L. Regarding the extraction a mixture of cations in relatively high concentrations was noted and therefore a cocktail effect was not excluded. The results obtained in the biological assays WST-1 and TNF-alpha were in correlation with the corrosion and extraction evaluation.

  11. Strategies to Suppress Cation Vacancies in Metal Oxide Alloys: Consequences for Solar Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Toroker, Maytal; Carter, Emily A.

    2015-09-01

    First-row transition metal oxides (TMOs) are promising alternative materials for inexpensive and efficient solar energy conversion. However, their conversion efficiency can be deleteriously affected by material imperfections, such as atomic vacancies. In this work, we provide examples showing that in some iron-containing TMOs, iron cation vacancy formation can be suppressed via alloying. We calculate within density functional theory+U theory the iron vacancy formation energy in binary rock-salt oxide alloys that contain iron, manganese, nickel, zinc, and/or magnesium. We demonstrate that formation of iron vacancies is less favorable if we choose to alloy iron(II) oxide with metals that cannot readily accept vacancy-generated holes, e.g., magnesium, manganese, nickel, or zinc. Since there are less available sites for holes and the holes are forced to reside on iron cations, the driving force for iron vacancy formation decreases. These results are consistent with an experiment observing a sharp drop in cation vacancy concentration upon alloying iron(II) oxide with manganese.

  12. The effects of mono- and divalent metal cations on the solution structure of caffeine and theophylline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafisi, Shohreh; Monajemi, Majid; Ebrahimi, Saeedeh

    2004-11-01

    The interactions of caffeine and theophylline with potassium +, cobalt 2+ and nickel 2+ ions were studied in aqueous solution at physiological pH with constant ligand concentration and various metal ion contents. Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy and absorption spectra were used to determine the cation binding mode and association constants. Spectroscopic results showed direct and indirect cation interactions for Co 2+, Ni 2+ and K + through O6 and N9 atoms (caffeine) and O6, N9 and N7 atoms (theophylline). The overall binding constants were, K(Co-caffeine)=6.92×10 4 M -1, K(Ni-caffeine)=2.22×10 4 M -1, K(K-caffeine)=5.08×10 3 M -1, K(Co-theophylline)=5.06×10 4 M -1, K(Ni-theophylline)=4.84×10 4 M -1 and K(K-theophylline)=2.13×10 3 M -1. The association constants showed weaker interaction for monovalent cation than divalent metal ions.

  13. Transition metal cations extraction by ester and ketone derivatives of chromogenic azocalix[4]arenes.

    PubMed

    Ak, Metin; Taban, Deniz; Deligöz, Hasalettin

    2008-06-15

    The molecule of azocalix[n]arene is a macrocyclic used effectively in the complexation of the heavy metal pollutants (like silver and mercury). In this work, our main aim is to prepare new chromogenic azocalix[n]arene molecules to elaborate an extractant with high extractant selectivity for metal ions able to detect this type of pollutant. The solvent extraction properties of four acetyls, four methyl ketones and four benzoyls derivatives from azocalix[4]arenes which were prepared by linking 4-ethyl, 4-n-butyl, 4-acetamid anilin and 2-aminothiazol to calix[4]arene through a diazo-coupling reaction, the alkaline earth (Sr2+) and the transition (Ag+, Hg2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Cr3+) metal cations have been determined by extraction studies with metal picrates. Both ketones are better extractants than esters, and show a strong preference for Ag+, while Cu2+ and Cr3+ are the most extracted cation with the esters. Both acetyl and benzoyl esters are good carriers for Ag+ and Hg2+.

  14. [The metallic profile: a new biological concept].

    PubMed

    Goullé, Jean-Pierre; Saussereau, Elodie; Mahieu, Loïc; Bouige, Daniel; Guerbet, Michel; Lacroix, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Considerable advances have been made in metals and metalloids analysis over the past decade. This analysis is a basic stage in deficiency or toxicity assessment. A recently introduced technique, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is progressively replacing atomic absorption. This analysis permits multi-elementary determinations, many ten or so elements, among periodic classification, with an optimal gain in sensitivity in many biological matrices: i.e. whole blood, plasma, urine, hair, nail, and biopsy samples. Moreover, this method allows semi-quantitative determination with an additional thirty supplementary elements, which enables the toxicologist to sufficiently estimate the toxic levels and metal exposure. The authors demonstrate that the ICP-MS could be very useful for a wide range of clinical applications. Furthermore, this procedure offers new exploration possibilities in various fields such as clinical chemistry but also clinical toxicology, forensic toxicology as well as workplace testing or environmental exposure and permits epidemiologic studies. This analytical method in fact also provides a new biologic approach. To our knowledge we are the first to propose the metallic profile.

  15. Investigation of biologically-designed metal-specific chelators for potential metal recovery and waste remediation applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Ockwig, Nathan W.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria, algae and plants produce metal-specific chelators to capture required nutrient or toxic trace metals. Biological systems are thought to be very efficient, honed by evolutionary forces over time. Understanding the approaches used by living organisms to select for specific metals in the environment may lead to design of cheaper and more effective approaches for metal recovery and contaminant-metal remediation. In this study, the binding of a common siderophore, desferrioxamine B (DFO-B), to three aqueous metal cations, Fe(II), Fe(III), and UO{sub 2}(VI) was investigated using classical molecular dynamics. DFO-B has three acetohydroxamate groups and a terminal amine group that all deprotonate with increasing pH. For all three metals, complexes with DFO-B (-2) are the most stable and favored under alkaline conditions. Under more acidic conditions, the metal-DFO complexes involve chelation with both acetohydroxamate and acetylamine groups. The approach taken here allows for detailed investigation of metal binding to biologically-designed organic ligands.

  16. Assessment of Metal Toxicity in Marine Ecosystems: Comparative Toxicity Potentials for Nine Cationic Metals in Coastal Seawater.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yan; Rosenbaum, Ralph K; Hauschild, Michael Z

    2016-01-01

    This study is a first attempt to develop globally applicable and spatially differentiated marine comparative toxicity potentials (CTPs) or ecotoxicity characterization factors for metals in coastal seawater for use in life cycle assessment. The toxicity potentials are based exclusively on marine ecotoxicity data and take account of metal speciation and bioavailability. CTPs were developed for nine cationic metals (Cd, Cr(III), Co, Cu(II), Fe(III), Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in 64 large marine ecosystems (LMEs) covering all coastal waters in the world. The results showed that the CTP of a specific metal varies 3-4 orders of magnitude across LMEs, largely due to different seawater residence times. Therefore, the highest toxicity potential for metals was found in the LMEs with the longest seawater residence times. Across metals, the highest CTPs were observed for Cd, Pb, and Zn. At the concentration levels occurring in coastal seawaters, Fe acts not as a toxic agent but as an essential nutrient and thus has CTPs of zero.

  17. HNS+ and HSN+ cations: Electronic states, spin-rovibronic spectroscopy with planetary and biological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabelsi, Tarek; Ben Yaghlane, Saida; Al Mogren, Muneerah Mogren; Francisco, Joseph S.; Hochlaf, Majdi

    2016-08-01

    Ab initio methods in conjunction with a large basis set are used to compute the potential energy surfaces of the 12 lowest electronic states of the HNS+ and HSN+ isomeric forms. These potentials are used in discussions of the metastability of these cations and plausible mechanisms for the H+/H + SN+/SN, S/S+ + NH+/NH, N/N+ + SH+/SH ion-molecule reactions. Interestingly, the low rovibrational levels of HSN+(12A″) and HNS+(12A″) electronically excited ions are predicted to be long-lived. Both ions are suggested to be a suitable candidate for light-sensitive NOṡ donor in vivo and as a possible marker for the detection of intermediates in nitrites + H2S reactions at the cellular level. The full spin rovibronic levels of HNS+ are presented, which may assist in the experimental identification of HNS+ and HSN+ ions and in elucidating their roles in astrophysical and biological media.

  18. Resorcarene-based receptor: versatile behavior in its interaction with heavy and soft metal cations.

    PubMed

    Danil de Namor, Angela F; Chaaban, Jinane K; Piro, Oscar E; Castellano, Eduardo E

    2006-02-01

    Standard solution Gibbs energies, DeltasG degrees, of the resorcarene-based receptor 5,11,17,23-ethylthiomethylated calix[4]resorcarene, (characterized by 1H NMR and X-ray diffraction studies) in its monomeric state (established through partition experiments) in various solvents are for the first time reported in the area of resorcarene chemistry. Transfer Gibbs energies of from hexane (reference solvent) to other medium are calculated. Agreement between DeltatG degrees (referred to the pure solvents) and standard partition Gibbs energies, DeltapG degrees (solvent mutually saturated) is found. Cation-ligand interactions were investigated through 1H NMR (CD3CN and CD3OD) and conductometric titrations in acetonitrile and methanol. 1H NMR data revealed the sites of interaction of with the metal cation. The composition of the metal-ion complexes (Ag+ and Pb2+ in acetonitrile and Ag+ and Cu2+ in methanol) was established through conductometric titrations. Thus, complexes of 1:1 stoichiometry were formed between and Ag+ and Pb2+ in acetonitrile and Cu2+ in methanol. However, in moving from acetonitrile to methanol, the composition of the silver complex was altered. Thus, two metal cations are hosted by a unit of the ligand. As far as Cu2+ and in acetonitrile is concerned, conductance data suggest that metalates are formed in which up to four units of Cu2+ are taken up per unit of resorcarene. The contrasting behavior of with Cu2+ in acetonitrile relative to methanol is discussed. As far as mercury (II) is concerned, the unusual jump in conductance observed in the titration of Hg2+ with in acetonitrile and methanol after the formation of a multicharged complex (undefined composition) is attributed to the presence of highly charged smaller units (higher mobility) resulting from the departure of pendant arms from the resorcarene backbone. Isolation of these species followed by X-ray diffraction studies corroborated this statement. The thermodynamic characterization of metal

  19. Resorcarene-based receptor: versatile behavior in its interaction with heavy and soft metal cations.

    PubMed

    Danil de Namor, Angela F; Chaaban, Jinane K; Piro, Oscar E; Castellano, Eduardo E

    2006-02-01

    Standard solution Gibbs energies, DeltasG degrees, of the resorcarene-based receptor 5,11,17,23-ethylthiomethylated calix[4]resorcarene, (characterized by 1H NMR and X-ray diffraction studies) in its monomeric state (established through partition experiments) in various solvents are for the first time reported in the area of resorcarene chemistry. Transfer Gibbs energies of from hexane (reference solvent) to other medium are calculated. Agreement between DeltatG degrees (referred to the pure solvents) and standard partition Gibbs energies, DeltapG degrees (solvent mutually saturated) is found. Cation-ligand interactions were investigated through 1H NMR (CD3CN and CD3OD) and conductometric titrations in acetonitrile and methanol. 1H NMR data revealed the sites of interaction of with the metal cation. The composition of the metal-ion complexes (Ag+ and Pb2+ in acetonitrile and Ag+ and Cu2+ in methanol) was established through conductometric titrations. Thus, complexes of 1:1 stoichiometry were formed between and Ag+ and Pb2+ in acetonitrile and Cu2+ in methanol. However, in moving from acetonitrile to methanol, the composition of the silver complex was altered. Thus, two metal cations are hosted by a unit of the ligand. As far as Cu2+ and in acetonitrile is concerned, conductance data suggest that metalates are formed in which up to four units of Cu2+ are taken up per unit of resorcarene. The contrasting behavior of with Cu2+ in acetonitrile relative to methanol is discussed. As far as mercury (II) is concerned, the unusual jump in conductance observed in the titration of Hg2+ with in acetonitrile and methanol after the formation of a multicharged complex (undefined composition) is attributed to the presence of highly charged smaller units (higher mobility) resulting from the departure of pendant arms from the resorcarene backbone. Isolation of these species followed by X-ray diffraction studies corroborated this statement. The thermodynamic characterization of metal

  20. A Water-Stable Cationic Metal-Organic Framework as a Dual Adsorbent of Oxoanion Pollutants.

    PubMed

    Desai, Aamod V; Manna, Biplab; Karmakar, Avishek; Sahu, Amit; Ghosh, Sujit K

    2016-06-27

    A three-dimensional water-stable cationic metal-organic framework (MOF) pillared by a neutral ligand and with Ni(II)  metal nodes has been synthesized employing a rational design approach. Owing to the ordered arrangement of the uncoordinated tetrahedral sulfate (SO4 (2-) ) ions in the channels, the compound has been employed for aqueous-phase ion-exchange applications. The compound exhibits rapid and colorimetric aqueous-phase capture of environmentally toxic oxoanions (with similar geometries) in a selective manner. This system is the first example of a MOF-based system which absorbs both dichromate (Cr2 O7 (2-) ) and permanganate (MnO4 (-) ) ions, with the latter acting as a model for the radioactive contaminant pertechnetate (TcO4 (-) ). PMID:26855323

  1. Electrochemical catalytic treatment of wastewater by metal ion supported on cation exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Bo; Ma, Hongzhu

    2006-10-11

    The electrochemical oxidation of phenol in synthetic wastewater and paper mill wastewater catalyzed by metal ion supported on cation exchange resin in suspended bed electrolytic reactor with graphite electrode has been investigated. The catalyst was characterized by SEM and XPS spectra and the effects of pH, the different metal ion and NaCl on the efficiency of the electrochemical oxidation phenol process were also studied. It was found that the catalyst containing Fe(3+) had the highest electrochemical catalytic activity for the electrochemical oxidation of phenol. When the initial concentration of phenol was 200 ppm, up to 90% chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal was obtained in 10 min. When the catalyst containing Fe(3+) was used to the paper mill wastewater, it still showed high efficiency. The COD removal could get to 75% in 60 min.

  2. Impact of metal cations on the electrocatalytic properties of Pt/C nanoparticles at multiple phase interfaces.

    PubMed

    Durst, Julien; Chatenet, Marian; Maillard, Frédéric

    2012-10-01

    Proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) use carbon-supported nanoparticles based on platinum and its alloys to accelerate the rate of the sluggish oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR). The most common metals alloyed to Pt include Co, Ni and Cu, and are thermodynamically unstable in the PEMFC environment. Their dissolution yields the formation and redistribution of metal cations (M(y+)) within the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). Metal cations can also contaminate the MEA when metallic bipolar plates are used as current collectors. In each case, the electrical performance of the PEMFC severely decreases, an effect that is commonly attributed to the poisoning of the sulfonic acid groups of the perfluorosulfonated membrane (PEM) and the resulting decrease of the proton transport properties. However, the impact of metal cations on the kinetics of electrochemical reactions involving adsorption/desorption and bond-breaking processes remains poorly understood. In this paper, we use model electrodes to highlight the effect of metal cations on Pt/C nanoparticles coated or not with a perfluorosulfonated ionomer for the CO electrooxidation reaction and the oxygen reduction reaction. We show that metal cations negatively impact the ORR kinetics and the mass-transport resistance of molecular oxygen. However, the specific adsorption of sulfonate groups of the Nafion® ionomer locally modifies the double layer structure and increases the tolerance to metal cations, even in the presence of sulphate ions in the electrolyte. The survey is extended by using an ultramicroelectrode with cavity and a solid state cell (SSC) specifically developed for this study. PMID:22903748

  3. The Permeability of the Sodium Channel to Metal Cations in Myelinated Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Hille, Bertil

    1972-01-01

    The relative permeability of sodium channels to eight metal cations is studied in myelinated nerve fibers. Ionic currents under voltage-clamp conditions are measured in Na-free solutions containing the test ion. Measured reversal potentials and the Goldman equation are used to calculate the permeability sequence: Na+ ≈ Li+ > Tl+ > K+. The ratio PK/PNa is 1/12. The permeabilities to Rb+, Cs+, Ca++, and Mg++ are too small to measure. The permeability ratios agree with observations on the squid giant axon and show that the reversal potential ENa differs significantly from the Nernst potential for Na+ in normal axons. Opening and closing rates for sodium channels are relatively insensitive to the ionic composition of the bathing medium, implying that gating is a structural property of the channel rather than a result of the movement or accumulation of particular ions around the channel. A previously proposed pore model of the channel accommodates the permeant metal cations in a partly hydrated form. The observed sequence of permeabilities follows the order expected for binding to a high field strength anion in Eisenman's theory of ion exchange equilibria. PMID:5025743

  4. Cation-dependent intrinsic electrical conductivity in isostructural tetrathiafulvalene-based microporous metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Park, Sarah S; Hontz, Eric R; Sun, Lei; Hendon, Christopher H; Walsh, Aron; Van Voorhis, Troy; Dincă, Mircea

    2015-02-11

    Isostructural metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) M2(TTFTB) (M = Mn, Co, Zn, and Cd; H4TTFTB = tetrathiafulvalene tetrabenzoate) exhibit a striking correlation between their single-crystal conductivities and the shortest S···S interaction defined by neighboring TTF cores, which inversely correlates with the ionic radius of the metal ions. The larger cations cause a pinching of the S···S contact, which is responsible for better orbital overlap between pz orbitals on neighboring S and C atoms. Density functional theory calculations show that these orbitals are critically involved in the valence band of these materials, such that modulation of the S···S distance has an important effect on band dispersion and, implicitly, on the conductivity. The Cd analogue, with the largest cation and shortest S···S contact, shows the largest electrical conductivity, σ = 2.86 (±0.53) × 10(-4) S/cm, which is also among the highest in microporous MOFs. These results describe the first demonstration of tunable intrinsic electrical conductivity in this class of materials and serve as a blueprint for controlling charge transport in MOFs with π-stacked motifs.

  5. Plant cation/H(+) exchangers (CAXs): biological functions and genetic manipulations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inorganic cations play decisive roles in many cellular and physiological processes and are essential components of plant nutrition. Therefore, the uptake of cations and their redistribution must be precisely controlled. Vacuolar antiporters are important elements in mediating the intracellular seque...

  6. Modeling sorption of divalent metal cations on hydrous manganese oxide using the diffuse double layer model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tonkin, J.W.; Balistrieri, L.S.; Murray, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Manganese oxides are important scavengers of trace metals and other contaminants in the environment. The inclusion of Mn oxides in predictive models, however, has been difficult due to the lack of a comprehensive set of sorption reactions consistent with a given surface complexation model (SCM), and the discrepancies between published sorption data and predictions using the available models. The authors have compiled a set of surface complexation reactions for synthetic hydrous Mn oxide (HMO) using a two surface site model and the diffuse double layer SCM which complements databases developed for hydrous Fe (III) oxide, goethite and crystalline Al oxide. This compilation encompasses a range of data observed in the literature for the complex HMO surface and provides an error envelope for predictions not well defined by fitting parameters for single or limited data sets. Data describing surface characteristics and cation sorption were compiled from the literature for the synthetic HMO phases birnessite, vernadite and ??-MnO2. A specific surface area of 746 m2g-1 and a surface site density of 2.1 mmol g-1 were determined from crystallographic data and considered fixed parameters in the model. Potentiometric titration data sets were adjusted to a pH1EP value of 2.2. Two site types (???XOH and ???YOH) were used. The fraction of total sites attributed to ???XOH (??) and pKa2 were optimized for each of 7 published potentiometric titration data sets using the computer program FITEQL3.2. pKa2 values of 2.35??0.077 (???XOH) and 6.06??0.040 (???YOH) were determined at the 95% confidence level. The calculated average ?? value was 0.64, with high and low values ranging from 1.0 to 0.24, respectively. pKa2 and ?? values and published cation sorption data were used subsequently to determine equilibrium surface complexation constants for Ba2+, Ca2+, Cd 2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Mg2+, Mn 2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, Sr2+ and Zn 2+. In addition, average model parameters were used to predict additional

  7. Transition metal cation separations with a resorcinarene-based amino acid stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Allen, Lee J; Harrison, Roger G; Lamb, John D

    2013-03-01

    A resorcinarene-based macrocyclic ligand functionalized with alanine and undecyl groups (AUA) was synthesized and applied to ion chromatographic separations. The selectivity and separation of transition metal ions on a column packed with AUA adsorbed onto 55% cross-linked styrene-divinylbenzene resin are presented. The upper and lower rims of the resorcinarene were modified with amino acids and -C(11)H(23) alkyl chains, respectively. The four carboxylic acid groups on the upper rim act as cation-exchangers while the four -C(11)H(23) alkyl chains serve to anchor the ligand to the resin surface by the hydrophobic effect. A systematic study of the effect of different eluent components including non-metal-chelating (HNO(3)) and chelating acids (oxalic acid, succinic acid, dipicolinic acid, and citric acid) on the retention of transition metal ions was investigated. Six metal ions (Mn(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cd(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+)) were separated on the AUA column within a reasonable time with a single eluent gradient using oxalic acid. The separation is compared to that obtained using a commercial column containing carboxylic acid functional groups. The AUA column containing four preorganized carboxylic acid groups showed selectivity for Cu(2+) when no chelating eluent was present, a selectivity which was not observed with the comparison column.

  8. Organometallic Probe for the Electronics of Base-Stabilized Group 11 Metal Cations.

    PubMed

    Braunschweig, Holger; Ewing, William C; Kramer, Thomas; Mattock, James D; Vargas, Alfredo; Werner, Christine

    2015-08-24

    A number of trimetalloborides have been synthesized through the reactions of base-stabilized coinage metal chlorides with a dimanganaborylene lithium salt in the hope of using this organometallic platform to compare and evaluate the electronics of these popular coinage metal fragments. The adducts of Cu(I), Ag(I), and Au(I) ions, stabilized by tricyclohexylphosphine (PCy3), N-1,3-bis(4-methylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene (ITol), or 1-(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)-3,3,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidin-2-ylidene (CAAC), with [{Cp(CO)2Mn}2B](-) were studied spectroscopically, structurally, and computationally. The geometries of the adducts fall into two classes, one symmetric and one asymmetric, each relying on the combined characteristics of both the metal and ligand. The energetic factors proposed as the causes of the structural differences were investigated by ETS-NOCV (extended transition state-natural orbitals for chemical valence) analysis, which showed the final geometry to be controlled by the competition between the tendency of the coinage metal to adopt a higher or lower coordination number and the willingness of the cationic fragment to participate in back-bonding interactions. PMID:26178571

  9. Structure and bonding in first-row transition metal dicarbide cations MC2+.

    PubMed

    Rayón, Víctor M; Redondo, Pilar; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio

    2007-07-19

    A theoretical study of the first-row transition metal dicarbide cations MC2+ (M=Sc-Zn) has been carried out. Predictions for different molecular properties that could help in their eventual experimental detection have been made. Most MC2+ compounds prefer a C2v symmetric arrangement over the linear geometry. In particular, the C2v isomer is specially favored for early transition metals. Only for CuC2+ is the linear isomer predicted to be the global minimum, although by only 1 kcal/mol. In all cases the isomerization barrier between cyclic and linear species seems to be very small (below 2 kcal/mol). The topological analysis of the electronic density shows that most C2v isomers are T-shaped structures. In general, MC2+ compounds for early transition metals have larger dissociation energies than those formed by late transition metals. In most cases the dissociation energies for MC2+ compounds are much smaller than those obtained for their neutral analogues. An analysis of the bonding in MC2+ compounds in terms of the interactions between the valence orbitals of the fragments helps to interpret their main features.

  10. Biologically active compounds of semi-metals.

    PubMed

    Rezanka, Tomás; Sigler, Karel

    2008-02-01

    Semi-metals (boron, silicon, arsenic and selenium) form organo-metal compounds, some of which are found in nature and affect the physiology of living organisms. They include, e.g., the boron-containing antibiotics aplasmomycin, borophycin, boromycin, and tartrolon or the silicon compounds present in "silicate" bacteria, relatives of the genus Bacillus, which release silicon from aluminosilicates through the secretion of organic acids. Arsenic is incorporated into arsenosugars and arsenobetaines by marine algae and invertebrates, and fungi and bacteria can produce volatile methylated arsenic compounds. Some prokaryotes can use arsenate as a terminal electron acceptor while others can utilize arsenite as an electron donor to generate energy. Selenium is incorporated into selenocysteine that is found in some proteins. Biomethylation of selenide produces methylselenide and dimethylselenide. Selenium analogues of amino acids, antitumor, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anti-infective drugs are often used as analogues of important pharmacological sulfur compounds. Other metalloids, i.e. the rare and toxic tellurium and the radioactive short-lived astatine, have no biological significance. PMID:17991498

  11. Solution-Membrane Equilibrium at Metal-Deposited Cation-Exchange Membranes: Chronopotentiometric Characterization of Metal-Modified Membranes.

    PubMed

    Shahi; Prakash; Ramachandraiah; Rangarajan; Vasudevan

    1999-08-01

    Copper- and lead-deposited interpolymer cationic membranes have been prepared by electroless plating by an ion-exchange method and characterized by chronopotentiometry and cyclic voltammetry. The parameters such as transition time (tau), Itau1/2, the potential drop (E0) across these membranes immediately after the application of constant current (I), and the height of the potential jump (DeltaE) across the membrane at tau have been measured by chronopotentiometry and compared with those of plain membranes. The approximate percentage of metal coverage and the number of ionic sites masked by the deposited metal in terms of NaCl concentration have been estimated from the differences in Itau1/2 values of plain and metal-deposited membranes. The quantity of metal deposited in a unit area of the membrane surface was measured by differential pulse polarography. The oxidation and reduction peak potentials corresponding to Cu(0)/Cu(II) and Pb(0)/Pb(II) couples were identified by cyclic voltammetry at pH 2.8 and 4.5 of 0.2 M CH3COONa-H2SO4. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10395776

  12. Structures of the dehydrogenation products of methane activation by 5d transition metal cations.

    PubMed

    Lapoutre, V J F; Redlich, B; van der Meer, A F G; Oomens, J; Bakker, J M; Sweeney, A; Mookherjee, A; Armentrout, P B

    2013-05-23

    The activation of methane by gas-phase transition metal cations (M(+)) has been studied extensively, both experimentally and using density functional theory (DFT). Methane is exothermically dehydrogenated by several 5d metal ions to form [M,C,2H](+) and H2. However, the structure of the dehydrogenation product has not been established unambiguously. Two types of structures have been considered: a carbene structure where an intact CH2 fragment is bound to the metal (M(+)-CH2) and a carbyne (hydrido-methylidyne) structure with both a CH and a hydrogen bound to the metal separately (H-M(+)-CH). For metal ions with empty d-orbitals, an agostic interaction can occur that could influence the competition between carbene and carbyne structures. In this work, the gas phase [M,C,2H](+) (M = Ta, W, Ir, Pt) products are investigated by infrared multiple-photon dissociation (IR-MPD) spectroscopy using the Free-Electron Laser for IntraCavity Experiments (FELICE). Metal cations are formed in a laser ablation source and react with methane pulsed into a reaction channel downstream. IR-MPD spectra of the [M,C,2H](+) species are measured in the 300-3500 cm(-1) spectral range by monitoring the loss of H (2H in the case of [Ir,C,2H](+)). For each system, the experimental spectrum closely resembles the calculated spectrum of the lowest energy structure calculated using DFT: for Pt, a classic C(2v) carbene structure; for Ta and W, carbene structures that are distorted by agostic interactions; and a carbyne structure for the Ir complex. The Ir carbyne structure was not considered previously. To obtain this agreement, the calculated harmonic frequencies are scaled with a scaling factor of 0.939, which is fairly low and can be attributed to the strong redshift induced by the IR multiple-photon excitation process of these small molecules. These four-atomic species are among the smallest systems studied by IR-FEL based IR-MPD spectroscopy, and their spectra demonstrate the power of IR

  13. The role of multivalent metal cations and organic complexing agents in bitumen-mineral interactions in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Weibing

    A systematic investigation was carried out to study the interactions between bitumen (or hexadecane) and minerals (quartz, kaolinite and illite) in aqueous solutions containing multivalent metal cations Ca2+, Mg2+ and Fe2+/Fe3+, in the absence and presence of organic complexing agents (oxalic acid, EDTA and citric acid). A range of experimental techniques, including coagulation measurement, visualization of bitumen-mineral attachment, metal ion adsorption measurement, zeta potential measurement, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analyses, were employed in the investigation. Free energy changes of adsorption of metal cations on the minerals and bitumen were evaluated using the James & Healy thermodynamic model. Total interaction energies between the minerals and bitumen were calculated using classical DLVO theory. It was observed that while the tested minerals showed varying degrees of mutual-coagulation with bitumen (or hexadecane), the presence of the multivalent metal cations could prominently increase the mutual coagulation. It was also found that such enhancement of the mutual coagulation was only significant when the metal cations formed first-order hydroxyl complexes (such as CaOH +, MgOH+, etc.) or metal hydroxides (such as Fe(OH) 3, Mg(OH)2, etc.). Therefore, the increase of the bitumen-mineral mutual coagulation by the metal cations was strongly pH dependent. Organic complexing agents (oxalic acid, citric acid and EDTA) used in this study, citric acid in particular, significantly reduced or virtually eliminated the mutual coagulation between bitumen (or hexadecane) and minerals caused by metal cations Ca2+, Mg2+, Fe 2+ and Fe3+. Due to its ability to substantially lower the mutual coagulation between bitumen and mineral particles, citric acid was found the most effective in improving bitumen-mineral liberation in solutions containing the multivalent metal cations at pH 8--10. In small scale flotation experiments

  14. Quantum-chemistry based calibration of the alkali metal cation series (Li(+)-Cs(+)) for large-scale polarizable molecular mechanics/dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Dudev, Todor; Devereux, Mike; Meuwly, Markus; Lim, Carmay; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Gresh, Nohad

    2015-02-15

    The alkali metal cations in the series Li(+)-Cs(+) act as major partners in a diversity of biological processes and in bioinorganic chemistry. In this article, we present the results of their calibration in the context of the SIBFA polarizable molecular mechanics/dynamics procedure. It relies on quantum-chemistry (QC) energy-decomposition analyses of their monoligated complexes with representative O-, N-, S-, and Se- ligands, performed with the aug-cc-pVTZ(-f) basis set at the Hartree-Fock level. Close agreement with QC is obtained for each individual contribution, even though the calibration involves only a limited set of cation-specific parameters. This agreement is preserved in tests on polyligated complexes with four and six O- ligands, water and formamide, indicating the transferability of the procedure. Preliminary extensions to density functional theory calculations are reported.

  15. Stabilization of cationic and anionic metal species in contaminated soils using sludge-derived biochar.

    PubMed

    Fang, Shen'en; Tsang, Daniel C W; Zhou, Fengsha; Zhang, Weihua; Qiu, Rongliang

    2016-04-01

    Currently, sludge pyrolysis has been considered as a promising technology to solve disposal problem of municipal sewage sludge, recover sludge heating value, sequester carbon and replenish nutrients in farmland soils. The resultant sludge-derived biochar (SDBC) is potentially an excellent stabilizing agent for metal species. This study applied the SDBC into four soils that had been contaminated in field with cationic Pb(II) and Cd(II)/Ni(II), and anionic Cr(VI) and As(III), respectively. The performance of metal stabilization under various operational and environmental conditions was evaluated with acid batch extraction and column leaching tests. Results indicated the SDBC could effectively stabilize these metals, which was favored by elevated temperature and longer aging. Periodic temperature decrease from 45 to 4 °C resulted in the release of immobilized Cr(VI) and As(III) but not Pb(II). However, a longer aging time offset such metal remobilization. This was possibly because more Pb was strongly bound and even formed stable precipitates, as shown by XRD and sequential extraction results. With increasing time, Cr(VI) was sorbed and partly reduced to Cr(III), while immobilized As(III) was co-oxidized to As(V) as indicated by XPS spectra. Column tests revealed that adding SDBC as a separate layer was unfavorable because the concentrated Cd(II) and Ni(II) in localized positions increased the peak levels of metal release under continuous acid leaching. In contrast, uniformly mixed SDBC could effectively delay the metal breakthrough and reduce their released amounts. Yet, a long-term monitoring may be required for evaluating the potential leaching risks and bioavailability/toxicity of these immobilized and transformed species in the SDBC-amended soils. PMID:26866964

  16. Anion and Cation Modulation in Metal Compounds for Bifunctional Overall Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jingjing; Chen, Sheng; Vasileff, Anthony; Qiao, Shi Zhang

    2016-09-27

    As substitutes for precious cathodic Pt/C and anodic IrO2 in electrolytic water splitting cells, a bifunctional catalyst electrode (Fe- and O-doped Co2P grown on nickel foam) has been fabricated by manipulating the cations and anions of metal compounds. The modified catalyst electrode exhibits both superior HER and OER performances with high activity, favorable kinetics, and outstanding durability. The overall ability toward water splitting is especially extraordinary, requiring a small overpotential of 333.5 mV to gain a 10 mA cm(-2) current density. A study on the electrocatalytic mechanism reveals that the atomic modulation between cation and anion plays an important role in optimizing the electrocatalytic activity, which greatly expands the active sites in the electrocatalyst. Further, the three-dimensional conductive porous network is highly advantageous for the exposure of active species, the transport of bubble products, and the transfer of electrons and charges, which substantially boosts reaction kinetics and structure stability. PMID:27622580

  17. Anion and Cation Modulation in Metal Compounds for Bifunctional Overall Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jingjing; Chen, Sheng; Vasileff, Anthony; Qiao, Shi Zhang

    2016-09-27

    As substitutes for precious cathodic Pt/C and anodic IrO2 in electrolytic water splitting cells, a bifunctional catalyst electrode (Fe- and O-doped Co2P grown on nickel foam) has been fabricated by manipulating the cations and anions of metal compounds. The modified catalyst electrode exhibits both superior HER and OER performances with high activity, favorable kinetics, and outstanding durability. The overall ability toward water splitting is especially extraordinary, requiring a small overpotential of 333.5 mV to gain a 10 mA cm(-2) current density. A study on the electrocatalytic mechanism reveals that the atomic modulation between cation and anion plays an important role in optimizing the electrocatalytic activity, which greatly expands the active sites in the electrocatalyst. Further, the three-dimensional conductive porous network is highly advantageous for the exposure of active species, the transport of bubble products, and the transfer of electrons and charges, which substantially boosts reaction kinetics and structure stability.

  18. Preparation of metallic cation conducting polymers based on sterically hindered phenols containing polymeric systems

    DOEpatents

    Skotheim, Terje A.; Okamoto, Yoshiyuki; Lee, Hung S.

    1989-01-01

    The present invention relates to ion-conducting solvent-free polymeric systems characterized as being cationic single ion conductors. The solvent-free polymer electrolytes comprise a flexible polymer backbone to which is attached a metal salt, such as a lithium, sodium or potassium salt, of a sterically hindered phenol. The solid polymer electrolyte may be prepared either by (1) attaching the hindered phenol directly to a flexible polymeric backbone, followed by neutralization of the phenolic OH's or (2) reacting the hindered phenol with a polymer precursor which is then polymerized to form a flexible polymer having phenolic OH's which are subsequently neutralized. Preferably the hindered phenol-modified polymeric backbone contains a polyether segment. The ionic conductivity of these solvent-free polymer electrolytes has been measured to be in the range of 10.sup.-4 to 10.sup.-7 S cm.sup.-1 at room temperature.

  19. Preparation of metallic cation conducting polymers based on sterically hindered phenols containing polymeric systems

    DOEpatents

    Skotheim, T.A.; Okamoto, Yoshiyuki; Lee, H.S.

    1989-11-21

    The present invention relates to ion-conducting solvent-free polymeric systems characterized as being cationic single ion conductors. The solvent-free polymer electrolytes comprise a flexible polymer backbone to which is attached a metal salt, such as a lithium, sodium or potassium salt, of a sterically hindered phenol. The solid polymer electrolyte may be prepared either by (1) attaching the hindered phenol directly to a flexible polymeric backbone, followed by neutralization of the phenolic OH's or (2) reacting the hindered phenol with a polymer precursor which is then polymerized to form a flexible polymer having phenolic OH's which are subsequently neutralized. Preferably the hindered phenol-modified polymeric backbone contains a polyether segment. The ionic conductivity of these solvent-free polymer electrolytes has been measured to be in the range of 10[sup [minus]4] to 10[sup [minus]7] S cm[sup [minus]1] at room temperature.

  20. Transition metal-catalysed (4 + 3) cycloaddition reactions involving allyl cations.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Israel; Mascareñas, José Luis

    2012-01-28

    In this emerging area article, we focus on novel intramolecular transition metal catalysed (4 + 3)-cycloaddition reactions of allenedienes in which the allene acts as an allylic-cation surrogate. This process has emerged as a powerful tool for the construction not only of complex seven-membered rings containing compounds but also different types of useful molecular skeletons by the proper selection of the catalyst. The transformation proceeds with high chemo- and stereoselectivity mainly because it occurs through an exo-like concerted transition state which exhibits a clear in-plane aromatic character. Despite that, different reaction mechanisms (i.e. stepwise processes) are also possible depending on the nucleophilicity of the diene moiety.

  1. Intracellular acidification-induced alkali metal cation/H+ exchange in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Pretreatment of isolated human neutrophils (resting pHi congruent to 7.25 at pHo 7.40) with 30 mM NH4Cl for 30 min leads to an intracellular acidification (pHi congruen to 6.60) when the NH4Cl prepulse is removed. Thereafter, in 140 mM Na+ medium, pHi recovers exponentially with time (initial rate, approximately 0.12 pH/min) to reach the normal resting pHi by approximately 20 min, a process that is accomplished mainly, if not exclusively, though an exchange of internal H+ for external Na+. This Na+/H+ countertransport is stimulated by external Na+ (Km congruent to 21 mM) and by external Li+ (Km congruent to 14 mM), though the maximal transport rate for Na+ is about twice that for Li+. Both Na+ and Li+ compete as substrates for the same translocation sites on the exchange carrier. Other alkali metal cations, such as K+, Rb+, or Cs+, do not promote pHi recovery, owing to an apparent lack of affinity for the carrier. The exchange system is unaffected by ouabain or furosemide, but can be competitively inhibited by the diuretic amiloride (Ki congruent to 8 microM). The influx of Na+ or Li+ is accompanied by an equivalent counter-reflux of H+, indicating a 1:1 stoichiometry for the exchange reaction, a finding consistent with the lack of voltage sensitivity (i.e., electroneutrality) of pHi recovery. These studies indicate that the predominant mechanism in human neutrophils for pHi regulation after intracellular acidification is an amiloride-sensitive alkali metal cation/H+ exchange that shares a number of important features with similar recovery processes in a variety of other mammalian cell types. PMID:3694176

  2. HNS(+) and HSN(+) cations: Electronic states, spin-rovibronic spectroscopy with planetary and biological implications.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Tarek; Ben Yaghlane, Saida; Al Mogren, Muneerah Mogren; Francisco, Joseph S; Hochlaf, Majdi

    2016-08-28

    Ab initio methods in conjunction with a large basis set are used to compute the potential energy surfaces of the 12 lowest electronic states of the HNS(+) and HSN(+) isomeric forms. These potentials are used in discussions of the metastability of these cations and plausible mechanisms for the H(+)/H + SN(+)/SN, S/S(+) + NH(+)/NH, N/N(+) + SH(+)/SH ion-molecule reactions. Interestingly, the low rovibrational levels of HSN(+)(1(2)A″) and HNS(+)(1(2)A″) electronically excited ions are predicted to be long-lived. Both ions are suggested to be a suitable candidate for light-sensitive NO(⋅) donor in vivo and as a possible marker for the detection of intermediates in nitrites + H2S reactions at the cellular level. The full spin rovibronic levels of HNS(+) are presented, which may assist in the experimental identification of HNS(+) and HSN(+) ions and in elucidating their roles in astrophysical and biological media. PMID:27586922

  3. Oligomycin A complex structures with some divalent metal cations studied by ESI MS and PM5 semiempirical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybylski, Piotr; Brzezinski, Bogumil; Bartl, Franz

    2007-03-01

    The ability of Oligomycin A (OLA) to form complexes with monovalent cations was studied by the ESI mass spectrometry and PM5 semiempirical method. At low cone voltage values the ESI MS spectra indicate that OLA formes stable 1:1 complexes with Mg 2+, Ca 2+, Sr 2+, Ba 2+, Zn 2+ divalent cations irrespective of the stoichiometry. With increasing cone voltages the formation of the [OLA + M + (ClO 4 or Cl)] + complexes was preferred. This process occurred simultaneously with the formation of fragmentary metal cation complexes with the exception of Pb 2+ ions which does not form complexes with OLA molecule. PM5 semiempirical calculations allowed the visualizations of all structures of (OLA + M) 2+ and [OLA + M + (ClO 4or Cl)] + complexes as well as the fragmentary cations.

  4. Structures of Hydrated Alkali Metal Cations, M+(H2O)nAr (m = Li, Na, K, rb and Cs, n = 3-5), Using Infrared Photodissociation Spectroscopy and Thermodynamic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Haochen; van der Linde, Christian; Lisy, James M.

    2014-06-01

    Alkali metal cations play vital roles in chemical and biochemical systems. Lithium is widely used in psychiatric treatment of manic states and bipolar disorder; Sodium and potassium are essential elements, having major biological roles as electrolytes, balancing osmotic pressure on body cells and assisting the electroneurographic signal transmission; Rubidium has seen increasing usage as a supplementation for manic depression and depression treatment; Cesium doped compounds are used as essential catalysts in chemical production and organic synthesis. Since hydrated alkali metal cations are ubiquitous and the basic form of the alkali metal cations in chemical and biochemical systems, their structural and thermodynamic properties serve as the foundation for modeling more complex chemical and biochemical processes, such as ion transport and ion size-selectivity of ionophores and protein channels. By combining mass spectrometry and infrared photodissociation spectroscopy, we have characterized the structures and thermodynamic properties of the hydrated alkali metal cations, i.e. M+(H2O)nAr, (M = Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs, n = 3-5). Ab initio calculations and RRKM-EE (evaporative ensemble) calculations were used to assist in the spectral assignments and thermodynamic analysis. Results showed that the structures of hydrated alkali metal cations were determined predominantly by the competition between non-covalent interactions, i.e. the water---water hydrogen bonding interactions and the water---cation electrostatic interactions. This balance, however, is very delicate and small changes, i.e. different cations, different levels of hydration and different effective temperatures clearly impact the balance.

  5. Development of Comparative Toxicity Potentials of 14 cationic metals in freshwater.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yan; Gandhi, Nilima; Hauschild, Michael Z

    2014-10-01

    Site-dependent and site-generic Comparative Toxicity Potentials (CTPs) (also known as Characterization Factors (CFs)) were calculated for 14 cationic metals (Al(III), Ba, Be, Cd, Co, Cr(III), Cs, Cu(II), Fe(II), Fe(III), Mn(II), Ni, Pb, Sr and Zn), to be applied in Life Cycle Impact Assessment. CTPs were calculated for 7 EU-archetypes, taking bioavailability and speciation pattern into account. The resulting site-dependent CTPs showed up to 2.4-6.5 orders of magnitude variation across archetypes for those metals that form stable hydroxyl compounds in slightly alkaline waters (Al(III), Be, Cr(III), Cu(II) and Fe(III)), emphasizing the importance of using site-dependent CTPs for these metals where possible. For the other metals, CTPs stayed within around 0.9 orders of magnitude, making spatial differentiation less important. In acidic waters (pH<6.4), Al(III) and Cu(II) had the highest CTPs, while Cd ranked highest in other waters. Based on the site-dependent CTPs, site-generic CTPs were developed applying different averaging principle. Emission weighted average of 7 EU-archetype CTPs was recommended as site-generic CTP for use in LCA studies, where receiving location is unclear. Compared to previous studies by Gandhi et al. (2010, 2011a), new site-dependent CTPs were similar or slightly higher for Cd, Co, Ni, Pb and Zn, but 1-2 orders of magnitude higher for Cu. Compared to the default site-generic CTPs in the frequently used characterization models USES-LCA and USEtox, new site-generic CTPs were mostly higher or similar, within up to ∼2 orders of magnitude difference.

  6. The permeability of endplate channels to monovalent and divalent metal cations

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The relative permeability of endplate channels to monovalent and divalent metal ions was determined from reversal potentials. Thallium is the most permeant ion with a permeability ratio relative to Na+ of 2.5. The selectivity among alkali metals is weak with a sequence, Cs+ greater than Rb+ greater than K+ greater than Na+ greater than Li+, and permeability ratios of 1.4, 1.3, 1.1, 1.0, and 0.9. The selectivity among divalent ions is also weak, with a sequence for alkaline earths of Mg++ greater than Ca++ greater than Ba++ greater than Sr++. The transition metal ions Mn++, Co++, Ni++, Zn++, and Cd++ are also permeant. Permeability ratios for divalent ions decreased as the concentration of divalent ion was increased in a manner consistent with the negative surface potential theory of Lewis (1979 J. Physiol. (Lond.). 286: 417--445). With 20 mM XCl2 and 85.5 mM glucosamine.HCl in the external solution, the apparent permeability ratios for the alkaline earth cations (X++) are in the range 0.18--0.25. Alkali metal ions see the endplate channel as a water-filled, neutral pore without high-field-strength sites inside. Their permeability sequence is the same as their aqueous mobility sequence. Divalent ions, however, have a permeability sequence almost opposite from their mobility sequence and must experience some interaction with groups in the channel. In addition, the concentrations of monovalent and divalent ions are increased near the channel mouth by a weak negative surface potential. PMID:6247423

  7. Development of Comparative Toxicity Potentials of 14 cationic metals in freshwater.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yan; Gandhi, Nilima; Hauschild, Michael Z

    2014-10-01

    Site-dependent and site-generic Comparative Toxicity Potentials (CTPs) (also known as Characterization Factors (CFs)) were calculated for 14 cationic metals (Al(III), Ba, Be, Cd, Co, Cr(III), Cs, Cu(II), Fe(II), Fe(III), Mn(II), Ni, Pb, Sr and Zn), to be applied in Life Cycle Impact Assessment. CTPs were calculated for 7 EU-archetypes, taking bioavailability and speciation pattern into account. The resulting site-dependent CTPs showed up to 2.4-6.5 orders of magnitude variation across archetypes for those metals that form stable hydroxyl compounds in slightly alkaline waters (Al(III), Be, Cr(III), Cu(II) and Fe(III)), emphasizing the importance of using site-dependent CTPs for these metals where possible. For the other metals, CTPs stayed within around 0.9 orders of magnitude, making spatial differentiation less important. In acidic waters (pH<6.4), Al(III) and Cu(II) had the highest CTPs, while Cd ranked highest in other waters. Based on the site-dependent CTPs, site-generic CTPs were developed applying different averaging principle. Emission weighted average of 7 EU-archetype CTPs was recommended as site-generic CTP for use in LCA studies, where receiving location is unclear. Compared to previous studies by Gandhi et al. (2010, 2011a), new site-dependent CTPs were similar or slightly higher for Cd, Co, Ni, Pb and Zn, but 1-2 orders of magnitude higher for Cu. Compared to the default site-generic CTPs in the frequently used characterization models USES-LCA and USEtox, new site-generic CTPs were mostly higher or similar, within up to ∼2 orders of magnitude difference. PMID:25048884

  8. Modulation of the Bioactive Conformation of Transforming Growth Factor β: Possible Implications of Cation Binding for Biological Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocharov, Eduard V.; Pavlov, Konstantin V.; Blommers, Marcel J. J.; Arvinte, Tudor; Arseniev, Alexander S.

    In any organism, very precisely adjusted interaction and exchange of information between cells is continuously required. These cooperative interactions involve numerous cytokines, acting through corresponding sets of cell-surface receptors. The transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) superfamily includes a variety of structurally related multifunctional cytokines that play critical roles in maintaining cellular homeostasis and controlling cell fate. Response of a cell to a specific signal it receives should depend upon the current state of the environment, including concentrations of biologically relevant ions. One of the most biologically active ions, calcium, acts upon a specific calcium signaling system that operates over a wide temporal range and regulates many cellular processes in continuous “cross-talk” with the TGF-β signaling system. In addition to that, the structural and dynamical properties of TGF-β molecules, along with detected direct interaction of them with the biologically relevant cations suggest another level of fine regulation of TGF-β activity. The fact that both mono- and divalent cations bind in the same low-affinity sites implies that some competition of cations for interaction with TGF-β can also occur in vivo, contributing to the diversity of TGF-β biological functions.

  9. Synthesis and chemistry of cationic d sup 0 metal alkyl complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, R.F.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop new types of electrophilic metal alkyl complexes for catalytic C-H activation and olefin polymerization chemistry, and associated fundamental mechanistic studies. We have focused our efforts on four classes of early metal alkyl complexes: (1) cationic group 4 Cp{sub 2}M(R){sup +} complexes (1) which are active species in Cp{sub 2}MX{sub 2}-based Ziegler-Natta olefin polymerization catalyst systems and which catalyze productive C-H activation reactions of heterocycles, (2) neutral (dicarbollide)(Cp*)M(R) complexes (2) which are structurally are electronically very similar to 1, (3) half-sandwich complexes CpM(R){sub 2}(L){sub n}{sup +} which are highly coordinatively and electronically unsaturated, and (4) new group 5 (dicarbollide)(Cp)MR{sub 2} and (dicarbollide){sub 2} MR complexes which are more unsaturated than group 5 Cp{sub 2}M systems due to incorporation of the dicarbollide ligand.

  10. Highly stable noble metal nanoparticles dispersible in biocompatible solvents: synthesis of cationic phosphonium gold nanoparticles in water and DMSO.

    PubMed

    Ju-Nam, Yon; Abdussalam-Mohammed, Wanisa; Ojeda, Jesus J

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we report the synthesis of novel cationic phosphonium gold nanoparticles dispersible in water and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for their potential use in biomedical applications. All the cationic-functionalising ligands currently reported in the literature are ammonium-based species. Here, the synthesis and characterisation of an alternative system, based on phosphonioalkylthiosulfate zwitterions and phosphonioalkylthioacetate were carried out. We have also demonstrated that our phosphonioalkylthiosulfate zwitterions readily disproportionate into phosphonioalkylthiolates in situ during the synthesis of gold nanoparticles produced by the borohydride reduction of gold(III) salts. The synthesis of the cationic gold nanoparticles using these phosphonium ligands was carried out in water and DMSO. UV-visible spectroscopic and TEM studies have shown that the phosphonioalkylthiolates bind to the surface of gold nanoparticles which are typically around 10 nm in diameter. The resulting cationic-functionalised gold nanoparticles are dispersible in aqueous media and in DMSO, which is the only organic solvent approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for drug carrier tests. This indicates their potential future use in biological applications. This work shows the synthesis of a new family of phosphonium-based ligands, which behave as cationic masked thiolate ligands in the functionalisation of gold nanoparticles. These highly stable colloidal cationic phosphonium gold nanoparticles dispersed in water and DMSO can offer a great opportunity for the design of novel biorecognition and drug delivery systems.

  11. Effects of cation on electrical responses of ionic polymer-metal composite sensors at various ambient humidities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zicai; Horiuchi, Tetsuya; Takagi, Kentaro; Takeda, Jun; Chang, Longfei; Asaka, Kinji

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of various cations on the electrical responses of ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) sensors at various ambient humidities. Four typical Au-Nafion IPMC samples were prepared with H+, Li+, Na+, and K+ cations. The voltage and current responses of the IPMCs were investigated under static and dynamic bending displacements. The orders of the voltage and current amplitudes were generally Li+ > Na+ > K+ > H+ and depended on the cation transport properties and the water content. The static voltage response first increased to a peak and then slowly decreased to a steady state. A negative steady-state voltage was initially observed for the IPMC with H+ cations under near saturation conditions. The voltage amplitude increased monotonously with increasing frequency from 0.1 to 10 Hz at a high relative humidity (RH, ˜90%), first increased and then decreased at moderate humidity (RH, ˜50%), and decreased continuously at low humidity (RH, ˜20%). The static current response first rapidly increased to a peak and then quickly decayed. During current decay, free oscillation decay occurred at high humidity and attenuated with decreasing humidity. This was confirmed to be the result of cation movement in the IPMC. There are three necessary conditions for oscillation: sufficient migrated cations, high cation mobility, and high stiffness of the polymer network. For the dynamic current response, the amplitude increased with increasing frequency (0.1-10 Hz) and showed good linearity. The underlying physics, mainly involving cation forward migration and back diffusion caused by mechano-chemo-electrical coupling, was clarified.

  12. Imaging metals in biology: balancing sensitivity, selectivity and spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Hare, Dominic J; New, Elizabeth J; de Jonge, Martin D; McColl, Gawain

    2015-10-01

    Metal biochemistry drives a diverse range of cellular processes associated with development, health and disease. Determining metal distribution, concentration and flux defines our understanding of these fundamental processes. A comprehensive analysis of biological systems requires a balance of analytical techniques that inform on metal quantity (sensitivity), chemical state (selectivity) and location (spatial resolution) with a high degree of certainty. A number of approaches are available for imaging metals from whole tissues down to subcellular organelles, as well as mapping metal turnover, protein association and redox state within these structures. Technological advances in micro- and nano-scale imaging are striving to achieve multi-dimensional and in vivo measures of metals while maintaining the native biochemical environment and physiological state. This Tutorial Review discusses state-of-the-art imaging technology as a guide to obtaining novel insight into the biology of metals, with sensitivity, selectivity and spatial resolution in focus. PMID:26505053

  13. Sorption of chlorophenols on microporous minerals: mechanism and influence of metal cations, solution pH, and humic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Hu, Yuanan; Cheng, Hefa

    2016-10-01

    Sorption of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP), 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP) on a range of dealuminated zeolites were investigated to understand the mechanism of their sorption on microporous minerals, while the influence of common metal cations, solution pH, and humic acid was also studied. Sorption of chlorophenols was found to increase with the hydrophobicity of the sorbates and that of the microporous minerals, indicating the important role of hydrophobic interactions, while sorption was also stronger in the micropores of narrower sizes because of greater enhancement of the dispersion interactions. The presence of metal cations could enhance chlorophenol sorption due to the additional electrostatic attraction between metal cations exchanged into the mineral micropores and the chlorophenolates, and this effect was apparent on the mineral sorbent with a high density of surface cations (2.62 sites/nm(2)) in its micropores. Under circum-neutral or acidic conditions, neutral chlorophenol molecules adsorbed into the hydrophobic micropores through displacing the "loosely bound" water molecules, while their sorption was negligible under moderately alkaline conditions due to electrostatic repulsion between the negatively charged zeolite framework and anionic chlorophenolates. The influence of humic acid on sorption of chlorophenols on dealuminated Y zeolites suggests that its molecules did not block the micropores but created a secondary sorption sites by forming a "coating layer" on the external surface of the zeolites. These mechanistic insights could help better understand the interactions of ionizable chlorophenols and metal cations in mineral micropores and guide the selection and design of reusable microporous mineral sorbents for sorptive removal of chlorophenols from aqueous stream. PMID:27364487

  14. Sorption of chlorophenols on microporous minerals: mechanism and influence of metal cations, solution pH, and humic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Hu, Yuanan; Cheng, Hefa

    2016-10-01

    Sorption of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP), 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP) on a range of dealuminated zeolites were investigated to understand the mechanism of their sorption on microporous minerals, while the influence of common metal cations, solution pH, and humic acid was also studied. Sorption of chlorophenols was found to increase with the hydrophobicity of the sorbates and that of the microporous minerals, indicating the important role of hydrophobic interactions, while sorption was also stronger in the micropores of narrower sizes because of greater enhancement of the dispersion interactions. The presence of metal cations could enhance chlorophenol sorption due to the additional electrostatic attraction between metal cations exchanged into the mineral micropores and the chlorophenolates, and this effect was apparent on the mineral sorbent with a high density of surface cations (2.62 sites/nm(2)) in its micropores. Under circum-neutral or acidic conditions, neutral chlorophenol molecules adsorbed into the hydrophobic micropores through displacing the "loosely bound" water molecules, while their sorption was negligible under moderately alkaline conditions due to electrostatic repulsion between the negatively charged zeolite framework and anionic chlorophenolates. The influence of humic acid on sorption of chlorophenols on dealuminated Y zeolites suggests that its molecules did not block the micropores but created a secondary sorption sites by forming a "coating layer" on the external surface of the zeolites. These mechanistic insights could help better understand the interactions of ionizable chlorophenols and metal cations in mineral micropores and guide the selection and design of reusable microporous mineral sorbents for sorptive removal of chlorophenols from aqueous stream.

  15. Preparation of decarboxylic-functionalized weak cation exchanger and application for simultaneous separation of alkali, alkaline earth and transition metals.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yahui; Gan, Yihui; He, Chengxia; Yang, Bingcheng; Guo, Zhimou; Liang, Xinmiao

    2016-06-01

    A novel weak cation exchanger (WCX) with dicarboxyl groups functionalized has been developed by clicking mercaptosuccinic acid onto silica gel. The simple synthesis starts with modification of silica gel with triethoxyvinylsilane, followed by efficient coupling vinyl-bonded silica with mercaptosuccinic acid via a "thiol-ene" click reaction. The obtained WCX demonstrated good separation and high selectivity towards common metals. Simultaneous separation of 10 alkali, alkaline earth and transition metals was achieved within 12min. Ion exchange and complex mechanism dominates the separation process. Its utility was demonstrated for determination of metals in tap water. PMID:27130093

  16. Two anionic metal-organic frameworks with tunable luminescent properties induced by cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shu-Mei; Chen, Yan-Fei; Liu, Liyang; Wen, Tian; Zhang, Hua-Bin; Zhang, Jian

    2016-03-01

    Two three-dimensional (3-D) MOFs, [(C2H5)4N)]3[H3O]2[Cd6Br(H2-DHBDC)8(DMF)4] (1; H4-DHBDC=2,5-dihydroxy-1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid, DMF=N,N-dimethylformamide) and [(CH3)2NH2]2[Cd3(H2-DHBDC)4(DMF)2]·2DMF(2), are prepared from the self-assembly reactions between Cd(CH3COO)2 and H4-DHBDC, respectively. Both anionic frameworks consist of linear trinuclear Cd units (e.g., 1: [Cd3BrO2(CO2)7] and [Cd3O2(CO2)8]; 2: [Cd3O2(CO2)8]) linked by the H2-DHBDC ligands. The photoluminescent properties of compound 1 are tunable through cation-exchange with different metal ions. The results demonstrated an effective ion-exchange approach toward the functional modification of MOF materials.

  17. Rational Design of Particle Mesh Ewald Compatible Lennard-Jones Parameters for +2 Metal Cations in Explicit Solvent

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pengfei; Roberts, Benjamin P.; Chakravorty, Dhruva K.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2013-01-01

    Metal ions play significant roles in biological systems. Accurate molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on these systems require a validated set of parameters. Although there are more detailed ways to model metal ions, the nonbonded model, which employs a 12-6 Lennard-Jones (LJ) term plus an electrostatic potential is still widely used in MD simulations today due to its simple form. However, LJ parameters have limited transferability due to different combining rules, various water models and diverse simulation methods. Recently, simulations employing a Particle Mesh Ewald (PME) treatment for long-range electrostatics have become more and more popular owing to their speed and accuracy. In the present work we have systematically designed LJ parameters for 24 +2 metal (M(II)) cations to reproduce different experimental properties appropriate for the Lorentz-Berthelot combining rules and PME simulations. We began by testing the transferability of currently available M(II) ion LJ parameters. The results showed that there are differences between simulations employing Ewald summation with other simulation methods and that it was necessary to design new parameters specific for PME based simulations. Employing the thermodynamic integration (TI) method and performing periodic boundary MD simulations employing PME, allowed for the systematic investigation of the LJ parameter space. Hydration free energies (HFEs), the ion-oxygen distance in the first solvation shell (IOD) and coordination numbers (CNs) were obtained for various combinations of the parameters of the LJ potential for four widely used water models (TIP3P, SPC/E, TIP4P and TIP4PEW). Results showed that the three simulated properties were highly correlated. Meanwhile, M(II) ions with the same parameters in different water models produce remarkably different HFEs but similar structural properties. It is difficult to reproduce various experimental values simultaneously because the nonbonded model underestimates the

  18. Cell compatible arginine containing cationic polymer: one-pot synthesis and preliminary biological assessment.

    PubMed

    Zavradashvili, Nino; Memanishvili, Tamar; Kupatadze, Nino; Baldi, Lucia; Shen, Xiao; Tugushi, David; Wandrey, Christine; Katsarava, Ramaz

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic cationic polymers are of interest as both nonviral vectors for intracellular gene delivery and antimicrobial agents. For both applications synthetic polymers containing guanidine groups are of special interest since such kind of organic compounds/polymers show a high transfection potential along with antibacterial activity. It is important that the delocalization of the positive charge of the cationic group in guanidine significantly decreases the toxicity compared to the ammonium functionality. One of the most convenient ways for incorporating guanidine groups is the synthesis of polymers composed of the amino acid arginine (Arg) via either application of Arg-based monomers or chemical modification of polymers with derivatives of Arg. It is also important to have biodegradable cationic polymers that will be cleared from the body after their function as transfection or antimicrobial agent is fulfilled. This chapter deals with a two-step/one-pot synthesis of a new biodegradable cationic polymer-poly(ethylene malamide) containing L-arginine methyl ester covalently attached to the macrochains in β-position of the malamide residue via the α-amino group. The goal cationic polymer was synthesized by in situ interaction of arginine methyl ester dihydrochloride with intermediary poly(ethylene epoxy succinimide) formed by polycondensation of di-p-nitrophenyl-trans-epoxy succinate with ethylenediamine. The cell compatibility study with Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and insect Schneider 2 cells (S2) within the concentration range of 0.02-500 mg/mL revealed that the new polymer is not cytotoxic. It formed nanocomplexes with pDNA (120-180 nm in size) at low polymer/DNA weight ratios (WR = 5-10). A preliminarily transfection efficiency of the Arg-containing new cationic polymer was assessed using CHO, S2, H5, and Sf9 cells.

  19. Degradation mechanisms and mitigation strategies of metal cations in recycled fuel for direct methanol fuel cell membrane electrode assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Min-Jee; Park, Ka-Young; Kim, Ki-Beum; Cho, Hyejung; Choi, Hanshin; Park, Jun-Young

    2013-11-01

    Some metal contaminants, such as Al3+, Ni+2, Fe2+ and Cr3+, are produced during reactions in heat exchangers, stacks, and other fuel/water management system components. Due to the gradual build-up of these contaminants generated in the system, direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) deteriorate steadily with increasing operation time. Hence, this study systematically investigates the effects of metal cations by supplying various concentrations of metal solutions to the fuel stream at constant-current densities, with the aim of understanding the mechanism and influence of metal contamination on a DMFC MEA. Various electrochemical diagnostic techniques are used to determine the main cause of MEA degradation, including electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, electrode polarization, and methanol stripping voltammetry. In addition, the critical concentration of metal cations in methanol fuel is investigated for high DMFC MEA stability. Further, various novel methods for mitigating the influence of the metal contaminants on the performance of a DMFC are suggested and verified.

  20. Root development under metal stress in Arabidopsis thaliana requires the H(+)/cation antiporter CAX4

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Arabidopsis vacuolar CAtion eXchangers (CAXs) play a key role in mediating cation influx into the vacuole. In Arabidopsis, there are six CAX genes. However, some members are yet to be characterized fully. In this study, we show that CAX4 is expressed in the root apex and lateral root primordia, ...

  1. Overcharging in biological systems: reversal of electrophoretic mobility of aqueous polyaspartate by multivalent cations.

    PubMed

    Kubíčková, Anna; Křížek, Tomáš; Coufal, Pavel; Vazdar, Mario; Wernersson, Erik; Heyda, Jan; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2012-05-01

    Charge reversal as an extreme case of charge compensation is directly observed by capillary electrophoresis for a negatively charged peptide in aqueous solutions of trivalent cations. Atomistic and coarse-grained simulations provide molecular interpretation of this effect showing that it is largely of electrostatic origin with a minor contribution of chemical specificity of the salt ions.

  2. Behavior of Zn2+, Cd2+, Ba2+ and Pb2+ cations in ferromanganese crusts from the Marcus Wake seamount (Pacific Ocean) in aqueous solutions of metal salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, G. V.; Bogdanova, O. Yu.; Melnikov, M. E.; Lobus, N. V.; Drozdova, A. N.; Shulga, N. A.

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of heavy-metal cations in ore minerals of cobalt-rich ferromanganese crusts from the Marcus Wake seamount in aqueous solutions of metal salts was studied in experiments. The Zn2+ and Cd2+ cations showed high reactivity and Ba2+ and Pb2+ showed low reactivity. It was found that Zn2+ and Cd2+ cations within the ore mineral composition are mainly absorbed (up to 66%) whereas Pb2+ and Ba2+ are chemically bound (up to 70%). Ore minerals in the crusts are characterized by sorption properties and high ionexchange capacity by these cations (1.94-2.62 mg-equiv/g). The capacity values by heavy-metal cations for ore minerals of the crusts from different areas of the Marcus Wake seamount are close to each other.

  3. Gas-Phase Reactions of Doubly Charged Lanthanide Cations with Alkanes and Alkenes. Trends in Metal(2+) Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, John K.; Marcalo, Joaquim; Santos, Marta; Pires de Matos, Antonio; Haire, Richard G.

    2008-12-08

    The gas-phase reactivity of doubly-charged lanthanide cations, Ln2+ (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu), with alkanes (methane, ethane, propane, n-butane) and alkenes (ethene, propene, 1-butene) was studied by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The reaction products consisted of different combinations of doubly-charged organometallic ions?adducts or species formed via metal-ion-induced hydrogen, dihydrogen, alkyl, or alkane eliminations from the hydrocarbons?and singly-charged ions that resulted from electron, hydride, or methide transfers from the hydrocarbons to the metal ions. The only lanthanide cations capable of activating the hydrocarbons to form doubly-charged organometallic ions were La2+, Ce2+, Gd2+, and Tb2+, which have ground-state or low-lying d1 electronic configurations. Lu2+, with an accessible d1 electronic configuration but a rather high electron affinity, reacted only through transfer channels. The remaining Ln2+ reacted via transfer channels or adduct formation. The different accessibilities of d1 electronic configurations and the range of electron affinities of the Ln2+ cations allowed for a detailed analysis of the trends for metal(2+) reactivity and the conditions for occurrence of bond activation, adduct formation, and electron, hydride, and methide transfers.

  4. Potential energy curves and electronic structure of 3d transition metal hydrides and their cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Satyender; Masunov, Artëm E.

    2008-12-01

    We investigate gas-phase neutral and cationic hydrides formed by 3d transition metals from Sc to Cu with density functional theory (DFT) methods. The performance of two exchange-correlation functionals, Boese-Martin for kinetics (BMK) and Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS), in predicting bond lengths and energetics, electronic structures, dipole moments, and ionization potentials is evaluated in comparison with available experimental data. To ensure a unique self-consistent field (SCF) solution, we use stability analysis, Fermi smearing, and continuity analysis of the potential energy curves. Broken-symmetry approach was adapted in order to get the qualitatively correct description of the bond dissociation. We found that on average BMK predicted values of dissociation energies and ionization potentials are closer to experiment than those obtained with high level wave function theory methods. This agreement deteriorates quickly when the fraction of the Hartree-Fock exchange in DFT functional is decreased. Natural bond orbital (NBO) population analysis was used to describe the details of chemical bonding in the systems studied. The multireference character in the wave function description of the hydrides is reproduced in broken-symmetry DFT description, as evidenced by NBO analysis. We also propose a new scheme to correct for spin contamination arising in broken-symmetry DFT approach. Unlike conventional schemes, our spin correction is introduced for each spin-polarized electron pair individually and therefore is expected to yield more accurate energy values. We derive an expression to extract the energy of the pure singlet state from the energy of the broken-symmetry DFT description of the low spin state and the energies of the high spin states (pentuplet and two spin-contaminated triplets in the case of two spin-polarized electron pairs). The high spin states are build with canonical natural orbitals and do not require SCF convergence.

  5. Nanoscale Transformations in Covellite (CuS) Nanocrystals in the Presence of Divalent Metal Cations in a Mild Reducing Environment

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We studied the structural and compositional transformations of colloidal covellite (CuS) nanocrystals (and of djurleite (Cu1.94S) nanocrystals as a control) when exposed to divalent cations, as Cd2+ and Hg2+, at room temperature in organic solvents. All the experiments were run in the absence of phosphines, which are a necessary ingredient for cation exchange reactions involving copper chalcogenides, as they strongly bind to the expelled Cu+ ions. Under these experimental conditions, no remarkable reactivity was indeed seen for both CuS and Cu1.94S nanocrystals. On the other hand, in the covellite structure 2/3 of sulfur atoms form covalent S–S bonds. This peculiarity suggests that the combined presence of electron donors and of foreign metal cations can trigger the entry of both electrons and cations in the covellite lattice, causing reorganization of the anion framework due to the rupture of the S–S bonds. In Cu1.94S, which lacks S–S bonds, this mechanism should not be accessible. This hypothesis was proven by the experimental evidence that adding ascorbic acid increased the fraction of metal ions incorporated in the covellite nanocrystals, while it had no noticeable effect on the Cu1.94S ones. Once inside the covellite particles, Cd2+ and Hg2+ cations engaged in exchange reactions, pushing the expelled Cu+ ions toward the not-yet exchanged regions in the same particles, or out to the solution, from where they could be recaptured by other covellite nanoparticles/domains. Because no good solvating agent for Cu ions was present in solution, they essentially remained in the nanocrystals. PMID:26617434

  6. Potential Modulated Intercalation of Alkali Cations into Metal Hexacyanoferrate Coated Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel T. Schwartz; Bekki Liu; Marlina Lukman; Kavita M. Jeerage; William A. Steen; Haixia Dai; Qiuming Yu; J. Antonio Medina

    2002-02-18

    Nickel hexacyanoferrate is a polynuclear inorganic ion intercalation material that loads (intercalates) and elutes (deintercalates) alkali cations from its structure when electrochemically reduced and oxidized, respectively. Nickel hexacyanoferrrate (NiHCF) is known to preferentially intercalate cesium over all other alkali cations, thus providing a basis for a separation scheme that can tackle DOE's radiocesium contamination problem. This program studied fundamental issues in alkalization intercalation and deintercalation in nickel hexacyanoferrate compounds, with the goal of (1) quantifying the ion exchange selectivity properties from cation mixtures, (2) enhancing ion exchange capacities, and (3) and understanding the electrochemically-switched ion exchange process (ESIX).

  7. Use of zirconium(IV) arsenophosphate columns for cation exchange separation of metal ions interfering in the spectrophotometric determination of uranium with sodium diethyl dithiocarbamate

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, K.G.; Agrawal, S.; Anwar, S.; Varshney, K.

    1985-01-01

    A simple cation exchange method has been developed for the quantitative separation of uranium from some metal ions which generally interfere in its spectrophotometric determination using sodium diethyl dithiocarbamate as a reagent. The method requires only a single bed operation and enables a satisfactory (Error + or - separation of uranium (UO/sub 2/ (II)) up to 1080 ..mu..g from ten metal ions on a 2 g column of zirconium (IV) arsenophosphate cation exchanger in H(I) form.

  8. Density functional theory study of interaction, bonding and affinity of group IIb transition metal cations with nucleic acid bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Sabyasachi; Mandal, Debasish; Ghosh, Deepanwita; Das, Abhijit K.

    2012-05-01

    The structure, bonding, and energetics of the complexes obtained from the interaction between the most stable tautomeric forms of free DNA and RNA bases and Zn2+, Cd2+ and Hg2+ cations have been studied using density functional B3LYP method. The 6-311+G (2df, 2p) basis set along with LANL2DZ pseudopotentials for the cations are used in the calculations. The tautomerization paths of the nucleobases are investigated and transition states between the tautomeric forms of the free bases are located. The relative stability of the complexes and the tautomers of the free nucleobases are discussed referring to MIA and relative energy values. For uracil, thymine and adenine, interaction of the metal cations with the most stable tautomers form the least stable molecular complexes. For cytosine and guanine, the stability of the metalated complexes differs significantly. The enthalpy (ΔH), entropy (TΔS) and free energy (ΔG) of the complexes at 298 K have also been calculated.

  9. Activation of a GH43 ß-xylosidase by divalent metal cations: Slow binding of divalent metal and high substrate specificity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RS223-BX of glycoside hydrolase family 43 is a ß-xylosidase that is strongly activated (kcat/Km as much as 116-fold) by the addition of divalent metal cations, Ca2+, Co2+, Fe2+, Mg2+, Mn2+and Ni2+. Slow activation by Mg2+ was demonstrated (kon 0.0130 s-1 mM-1, koff 0.00789 s-1) at pH 7.0 and 25 °C....

  10. Effect of quaternary ammonium cation loading and pH on heavy metal sorption to Ca bentonite and two organobentonites.

    PubMed

    Oyanedel-Craver, Vinka A; Smith, James A

    2006-09-21

    Sorption of four heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Zn and Hg) to calcium bentonite (Ca bentonite), hexadecyltrimethylammonium bentonite (HDTMA bentonite) and benzyltriethylammonium bentonite (BTEA bentonite) was measured as a function of the quaternary ammonium cation (QAC) loading at 25, 50 and 100% of the clay's cation-exchange capacity (CEC). The effects of pH on the surface charge of the clays and heavy metal sorption were also measured. Sorption of Cd, Pb, and Zn was non-linear and sorption of all three metals by HDTMA and BTEA bentonites decreased as the QAC loading increased from 25 to 100%. In most cases, sorption of these metals to 25% BTEA and 25% HDTMA bentonite was similar to or greater than sorption to Ca bentonite. Hg sorption was linear for both HDTMA and BTEA bentonite. No significant effect on Hg sorption was observed with increasing QAC loading on BTEA bentonite. However, an increase of Hg sorption was detected with increasing QAC loading on HDTMA bentonite. This behavior suggests that a process different than cation exchange was the predominant Hg sorption mechanism. Cd, Pb, and Zn sorption decreased with pH. However, this effect was stronger for Cd and Pb than Zn. Hg sorption varied inversely with pH. QAC loading affected the surface charge of the clays. Twenty-five and 50% loading of BTEA cations increased the negative charge on the clay's surface relative to the untreated clay, without affecting the zero point of charge (ZPC) of the clay. Increased QAC loading on HDTMA bentonite causes the surface charge to become more positive and the ZPC increased. One hundred percent of HDTMA bentonite maintained a positive surface charge over the range of pH values tested. The organoclays studied have considerable capacity for heavy metal sorption. Given that prior studies have demonstrated the strong sorption capacity of organoclays for nonionic organic pollutants, it is likely that organoclays can be useful sorbents for the treatment of effluent streams containing

  11. Monitoring of photoluminescence decay by alkali and alkaline earth metal cations using a photoluminescent bolaamphiphile self-assembly as an optical probe.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunhyung; Kwak, Jinyoung; Lee, Sang-Yup

    2014-05-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) decay induced by the displacement of an ionic fluorescence component, Tb(3+), with alkali and alkaline earth metal cations was investigated using photoluminescent spherical self-assemblies as optical probes. The photoluminescent spherical self-assembly was prepared by the self-organization of a tyrosine-containing bolaamphiphile molecule with a photosensitizer and Tb(3+) ion. The lanthanide ion, Tb(3+), electrically bound to the carboxyl group of the bolaamphiphile molecule, was displaced by alkali and alkaline earth metal cations that had stronger electrophilicity. The PL of the self-assembly decayed remarkably due to the substitution of lanthanide ions with alkali and alkaline earth metal cations. The PL decay showed a positive correlation with cation concentration and was sensitive to the cation valency. Generally, the PL decay was enhanced by the electrophilicity of the cations. However, Ca(2+) showed greater PL decay than Mg(2+) because Ca(2+) could create various complexes with the carboxyl groups of the bolaamphiphile molecule. Microscopic and spectroscopic investigations were conducted to study the photon energy transfer and displacement of Tb(3+) by the cation exchange. This study demonstrated that the PL decay by the displacement of the ionic fluorescent compound was applied to the detection of various cations in aqueous media and is applicable to the development of future optical sensors.

  12. Selective removal of alkali metal cations from multiply-charged ions via gas-phase ion/ion reactions using weakly coordinating anions.

    PubMed

    Luongo, Carl A; Bu, Jiexun; Burke, Nicole L; Gilbert, Joshua D; Prentice, Boone M; Cummings, Steven; Reed, Christopher A; McLuckey, Scott A

    2015-03-01

    Selective removal of alkali metal cations from mixed cation multiply-charged peptide ions is demonstrated here using gas-phase ion/ion reactions with a series of weakly coordinating anions (WCAs), including hexafluorophosphate (PF6 (-)), tetrakis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate (BARF), tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)borate (TPPB), and carborane (CHB11Cl11 (-)). In all cases, a long-lived complex is generated by dication/anion condensation followed by ion activation to compare proton transfer with alkali ion transfer from the peptide to the anion. The carborane anion was the only anion studied to undergo dissociation exclusively through loss of the metallated anion, regardless of the studied metal adduct. All other anions studied yield varying abundances of protonated and metallated peptide depending on the peptide sequence and the metal identity. Density functional theory calculations suggest that for the WCAs studied, metal ion transfer is most strongly favored thermodynamically, which is consistent with the experimental results. The carborane anion is demonstrated to be a robust reagent for the selective removal of alkali metal cations from peptide cations with mixtures of excess protons and metal cations. PMID:25560986

  13. Selective Removal of Alkali Metal Cations from Multiply-Charged Ions via Gas-Phase Ion/Ion Reactions Using Weakly Coordinating Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luongo, Carl A.; Bu, Jiexun; Burke, Nicole L.; Gilbert, Joshua D.; Prentice, Boone M.; Cummings, Steven; Reed, Christopher A.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-03-01

    Selective removal of alkali metal cations from mixed cation multiply-charged peptide ions is demonstrated here using gas-phase ion/ion reactions with a series of weakly coordinating anions (WCAs), including hexafluorophosphate (PF6 -), tetrakis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate (BARF), tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)borate (TPPB), and carborane (CHB11Cl11 -). In all cases, a long-lived complex is generated by dication/anion condensation followed by ion activation to compare proton transfer with alkali ion transfer from the peptide to the anion. The carborane anion was the only anion studied to undergo dissociation exclusively through loss of the metallated anion, regardless of the studied metal adduct. All other anions studied yield varying abundances of protonated and metallated peptide depending on the peptide sequence and the metal identity. Density functional theory calculations suggest that for the WCAs studied, metal ion transfer is most strongly favored thermodynamically, which is consistent with the experimental results. The carborane anion is demonstrated to be a robust reagent for the selective removal of alkali metal cations from peptide cations with mixtures of excess protons and metal cations.

  14. Interaction studies of human prion protein (HuPrP109-111: methionine-lysine-histidine) tripeptide model with transition metal cations.

    PubMed

    Pitchumani Violet Mary, C; Shankar, R; Vijayakumar, S; Kolandaivel, P

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, the coordination bonds between the Methionine-Lysine-Histidine (Ac-MKH-NHMe) tripeptide model associated with the fifth metal binding site, which triggers the β-sheet formation of human prion protein and the divalent metal cations such as Mn(2+), Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) were studied using B3LYP and M052X levels of theory with LANL2DZ basis set. For each transition divalent metal cation, three different coordination modes (4N, 3NO, and 2NSO) were analyzed. The present result reveals that overall structural parameters of MKH model tripeptide are altered due to the interaction of divalent metal cations. Among these three coordination modes, the 4N-M(2)(+) and 4N2O-Mn(2+) complexes are found to have the larger interaction energy, MIA and deformation energies. The triply deprotonated coordination mode of the Ac-MKH-NHMe tripeptide transfers more amount of charge to the divalent metal cations than the dually and singly deprotonated complexes. Furthermore, the atoms in molecules (AIM) topological analysis confirm that, the interaction between the metal cations Mn(2+), Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) and Ac-MKH-NHMe tripeptide are electrostatic dominant and the coordination modes with triply deprotonation states possess larger electron density at their BCP corresponding to their coordination bonds. The electrostatic potential difference maps of the most stable 4N-M(2+) (M(2+)=Cu(2+) and Zn(2+)) and 4N2O-Mn(2+) reveals that, as the ionic radii of the metal ion increases, the delocalization charges localized on the metal cations are found to be decreased. The Infra-red stretching frequencies of NH, CH, and CH2 groups of each coordination complexes are observed with shift in their stretching frequencies. From these observations we conclude that, the transition divalent metal cations binding in 4N coordination mode will induce more conformational changes of the Prion protein.

  15. Interaction studies of human prion protein (HuPrP109-111: methionine-lysine-histidine) tripeptide model with transition metal cations.

    PubMed

    Pitchumani Violet Mary, C; Shankar, R; Vijayakumar, S; Kolandaivel, P

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, the coordination bonds between the Methionine-Lysine-Histidine (Ac-MKH-NHMe) tripeptide model associated with the fifth metal binding site, which triggers the β-sheet formation of human prion protein and the divalent metal cations such as Mn(2+), Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) were studied using B3LYP and M052X levels of theory with LANL2DZ basis set. For each transition divalent metal cation, three different coordination modes (4N, 3NO, and 2NSO) were analyzed. The present result reveals that overall structural parameters of MKH model tripeptide are altered due to the interaction of divalent metal cations. Among these three coordination modes, the 4N-M(2)(+) and 4N2O-Mn(2+) complexes are found to have the larger interaction energy, MIA and deformation energies. The triply deprotonated coordination mode of the Ac-MKH-NHMe tripeptide transfers more amount of charge to the divalent metal cations than the dually and singly deprotonated complexes. Furthermore, the atoms in molecules (AIM) topological analysis confirm that, the interaction between the metal cations Mn(2+), Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) and Ac-MKH-NHMe tripeptide are electrostatic dominant and the coordination modes with triply deprotonation states possess larger electron density at their BCP corresponding to their coordination bonds. The electrostatic potential difference maps of the most stable 4N-M(2+) (M(2+)=Cu(2+) and Zn(2+)) and 4N2O-Mn(2+) reveals that, as the ionic radii of the metal ion increases, the delocalization charges localized on the metal cations are found to be decreased. The Infra-red stretching frequencies of NH, CH, and CH2 groups of each coordination complexes are observed with shift in their stretching frequencies. From these observations we conclude that, the transition divalent metal cations binding in 4N coordination mode will induce more conformational changes of the Prion protein. PMID:27611644

  16. Rational design of carbonitrile-carboxaldehyde cation receptor models: probing the nature of the heteroatom-metal interaction.

    PubMed

    Rosli, Ahmad Nazmi; Abu Bakar, Maizathul Akmam; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Zain, Sharifuddin Md; Ahmad, Mohd Rais; Abdul Manan, Ninie Suhana; Alias, Yatimah; Woi, Pei Meng

    2014-09-01

    In this work, hybrid functional and G4 methods were employed in the rational design of carbonitrile-carboxaldehyde receptor models for cation recognition. Electron-sharing and ionic interactions between the models and the cations were analyzed utilizing the concepts of overlap population, atomic valence, electrostatic potential, and CHELPG charge in order to elucidate the nature of the heteroatom-metal interaction, the N versus O disparity, and the effect of pH. Receptor fragment models from ionomycin were employed to rationalize the selection of receptor models for discriminating group I cations and enhancing the selectivity for Mg(II) rather than Ca(II), and to examine the effects of keto-enol forms and negatively charged sites. The changes in geometries, overlap population, metal valence, and CHELPG charge upon solvation in heptane medium as compared to the gas phase were negligible. The optimized geometries reveal that the interaction between group II cations and the keto, enol, and enolate forms of 2-cyanoethanal causes 12 % bending of the C-C-N angle from linearity. Overlap populations show that the electron-sharing interaction favors group II cations but that the same mechanism allows Li(I) to compete. The total spin of Li(I) is 17 % greater than that of Ca(II), but the G4 binding energies of the two are separated by more than 50 kcal/mol, favoring group II cations, which may eliminate interference from Li(I). 1,2-Dicyanoethylene, which has only one form, shows similar characteristics. CHELPG analysis shows that Mg(II) transfers 25 and 18 % of its positive charge to 2-cyanoethanal enolate and 1,2-dicyanoethylene, respectively. Hydrogen atoms receive most of the positive charge in both receptors, but the N-termini exhibit strikingly different characteristics. Electrostatic potential contour profiles were found to be in good agreement with the atomic charge distributions. The application of uncharged 1,3-dicarbonyl and 2-cyanocarbonyl receptors and a judicious

  17. Tuning the Magnetic Properties of Metal Oxide Nanocrystal Heterostructures by Cation Exchange

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    For three types of colloidal magnetic nanocrystals, we demonstrate that postsynthetic cation exchange enables tuning of the nanocrystal’s magnetic properties and achieving characteristics not obtainable by conventional synthetic routes. While the cation exchange procedure, performed in solution phase approach, was restricted so far to chalcogenide based semiconductor nanocrystals, here ferrite-based nanocrystals were subjected to a Fe2+ to Co2+ cation exchange procedure. This allows tracing of the compositional modifications by systematic and detailed magnetic characterization. In homogeneous magnetite nanocrystals and in gold/magnetite core shell nanocrystals the cation exchange increases the coercivity field, the remanence magnetization, as well as the superparamagnetic blocking temperature. For core/shell nanoheterostructures a selective doping of either the shell or predominantly of the core with Co2+ is demonstrated. By applying the cation exchange to FeO/CoFe2O4 core/shell nanocrystals the Neél temperature of the core material is increased and exchange-bias effects are enhanced so that vertical shifts of the hysteresis loops are obtained which are superior to those in any other system. PMID:23362940

  18. [Determination of major metal cations in juices and nectars by capillary zone electrophoresis].

    PubMed

    Malinkin, A D; Bessonov, V V; Shumakova, A A; Arianova, E A; Prokof'eva, V I

    2014-01-01

    The method of determination of potassium, sodium, calcium and magnesium cations by capillary zone electrophoresis (using lithium cations as the internal standard) in the juices and nectars was advised. Optimal conditions for electrophoretic separation: pH value of the working buffer (pH 3.6), the concentration of imidazole (contrast agent 15-20 mmol/dm3), the concentration of 18-crown-6 ether (2 mmol/dm3). The method was tested on 15 samples of juices and nectars. The results of determination of potassium and magnesium cations were compared with results obtained by mass spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma. The equation of the linear regression and R-squared value for determinations of magnesium cations were defined as: y = 0.999x + 3.29; R = 0.952; for determination of potassium cations: y = 0.959x + 51.94; R = 0.997; indicating good the correlation between the data obtained by these methods.

  19. Fragmentation of positively-charged biological ions activated with a beam of high-energy cations.

    PubMed

    Chingin, Konstantin; Makarov, Alexander; Denisov, Eduard; Rebrov, Oleksii; Zubarev, Roman A

    2014-01-01

    First results are reported on the fragmentation of multiply protonated polypeptide ions produced in electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) with a beam of high-energy cations as a source of activation. The ion beam is generated with a microwave plasma gun installed on a benchtop Q Exactive mass spectrometer. Precursor polypeptide ions are activated when trapped inside the collision cell of the instrument (HCD cell), and product species are detected in the Orbitrap analyzer. Upon exposure to the beam of air plasma cations (∼100 μA, 5 s), model precursor species such as multiply protonated angiotensin I and ubiquitin dissociated across a variety of pathways. Those pathways include the cleavages of C-CO, C-N as well as N-Cα backbone bonds, accordingly manifested as b/y, a, and c/z fragment ion series in tandem mass spectra. The fragmentation pattern observed includes characteristic fragments of collision-induced dissociation (CID) (b/y/a fragments) as well as electron capture/transfer dissociation (ECD, ETD) (c/z fragments), suggesting substantial contribution of both vibrational and electronic excitation in our experiments. Besides backbone cleavages, notable amounts of nondissociated precursor species were observed with reduced net charge, formed via electron or proton transfer between the colliding partners. Peaks corresponding to increased charge states of the precursor ions were also detected, which is the major distinctive feature of ion beam activation.

  20. Biological and surface-active properties of double-chain cationic amino acid-based surfactants.

    PubMed

    Greber, Katarzyna E; Dawgul, Małgorzata; Kamysz, Wojciech; Sawicki, Wiesław; Łukasiak, Jerzy

    2014-08-01

    Cationic amino acid-based surfactants were synthesized via solid phase peptide synthesis and terminal acylation of their α and ε positions with saturated fatty acids. Five new lipopeptides, N-α-acyl-N-ε-acyl lysine analogues, were obtained. Minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal (fungicidal) concentration were determined on reference strains of bacteria and fungi to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of the lipopeptides. Toxicity to eukaryotic cells was examined via determination of the haemolytic activities. The surface-active properties of these compounds were evaluated by measuring the surface tension and formation of micelles as a function of concentration in aqueous solution. The cationic surfactants demonstrated diverse antibacterial activities dependent on the length of the fatty acid chain. Gram-negative bacteria and fungi showed a higher resistance than Gram-positive bacterial strains. It was found that the haemolytic activities were also chain length-dependent values. The surface-active properties showed a linear correlation between the alkyl chain length and the critical micelle concentration.

  1. Oxoferryl porphyrin cation radicals in model systems: Evidence for variable metal-radical spin coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bill, E.; Bominaar, E. L.; Ding, X.-Q.; Trautwein, A. X.; Winkler, H.; Mandon, D.; Weiss, R.; Gold, A.; Jayaraj, K.; Toney, G. E.

    1990-07-01

    Magnetic properties of frozen solutions of highly oxidized iron porphyrin complexes were investigated by EPR and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The Mössbauer spectra, recorded at low temperatures in various magnetic fields, were analyzed on the basis of spin Hamiltonian simulations. Spin coupling between ferryl iron (FeIV) and porphyrin cation radical was taken into account explicitly. Hyperfine and spin-coupling parameters are given for several complexes, together with zero-field parameters. One of the complexes exhibits weak spin coupling, it is the first model system exhibiting properties comparable to those of the oxoferryl cation radical enzyme Horse Radish Peroxidase I.

  2. Comparative toxicity of five metals on various biological subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Fargasova, A. )

    1994-08-01

    Environmental contaminants, including metals, can have toxic effects on many different organisms and affect biological processes at cellular, population, community and ecosystem levels of organization. Metals are of particular interest because they may have a positive effect as micronutrients at low concentrations as well as a toxic effect at higher levels. Numerous efforts have been made to correlate and predict metal-ion toxicities on various aquatic and terrestrial species, according to the physical and chemical properties of the metals. The acute and chronic toxicities of metals have been studied on many freshwater organisms and also on plants. The water flea, Daphnia magna, an important freshwater zooplankter, is a useful test species to study sensitivity to environmental toxicants and has been recognized as a general representative for other freshwater animals. As Khangarot described, little information is available on the effects of metals to tubificid worms, which are widely distributed in the aquatic environment and are useful indicators of varying degrees of aquatic pollution. Most recent hazard evaluation programs recommend algal toxicity tests for initial evaluations of chemicals that are expected to reach surface waters and that have suspected or unknown phytotoxic properties. For higher plants, the accumulation of metals, especially cadmium, was tested when plants grew in sewage sludge-amended soils or in soils of cadmium residues form phosphate fertilizers. No reports were available indicating the effects of these metals on seed germination and root growth. This study was conducted to determine the acute toxicological effects of some metals (As, Pb, Cr, Hg, Cd) on four biological subjects (tubificid worms, Daphnia magna sp., Scenedesmus quadricauda, seeds of Sinapis alba) and to compare their sensitivity to individual test metals. 16 refs., 1 tab.

  3. Interaction of metal cations with functionalised hydrocarbons in the gas phase: further experimental evidence for solvation of metal ions by the hydrocarbon chain.

    PubMed

    van Huizen, Nick A; Luider, Theo M; Jobst, Karl J; Terlouw, Johan K; Holmes, John L; Burgers, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    Relative affinity measurements of monovalent metal ions (= Li(+), Cu(+) and Ag(+)) towards aliphatic amines, alcohols and methyl alkanoates (P) have been performed using the kinetic method on the dissociation of metal bound dimer ions of the type P(1)-M(+)-P(2). It was found that the cations' affinity towards long chain (≥C(4) chain length) n- and s-alkylamines, n-alkanols and methyl n- alkanoates was unexpectedly enhanced. This is attributed to a bidentate interaction of the metal ion with the amine, alcohol or ester functional group and the aliphatic chain, paralleling earlier observations on metal bound nitriles. Methyl substitution at the functional group (s-alkylamines compared with n-alkylamines) serves to strengthen only the N•••M(+) bond, and this can be rationalized by the larger proton affinities of s-alkylamines compared to n-alkylamines. This substitution, however, has no effect on the metal ion-hydrocarbon bond. In contrast, methyl substitution remote from the functional group, as in iso-pentylamine, does lead to strengthening of the metal ion-hydrocarbon bond. The cuprous ion affinity of hexadecylamine, C(16)H(33)NH(2) was found to be as large as that for ethylenediamine (352 kJ mol(-1)), known to be a strong copper binding agent. It is argued that such a metal ion-hydrocarbon interaction does not occur in the metal bound dimers. PMID:27419899

  4. Interaction of metal cations with functionalised hydrocarbons in the gas phase: further experimental evidence for solvation of metal ions by the hydrocarbon chain.

    PubMed

    van Huizen, Nick A; Luider, Theo M; Jobst, Karl J; Terlouw, Johan K; Holmes, John L; Burgers, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    Relative affinity measurements of monovalent metal ions (= Li(+), Cu(+) and Ag(+)) towards aliphatic amines, alcohols and methyl alkanoates (P) have been performed using the kinetic method on the dissociation of metal bound dimer ions of the type P(1)-M(+)-P(2). It was found that the cations' affinity towards long chain (≥C(4) chain length) n- and s-alkylamines, n-alkanols and methyl n- alkanoates was unexpectedly enhanced. This is attributed to a bidentate interaction of the metal ion with the amine, alcohol or ester functional group and the aliphatic chain, paralleling earlier observations on metal bound nitriles. Methyl substitution at the functional group (s-alkylamines compared with n-alkylamines) serves to strengthen only the N•••M(+) bond, and this can be rationalized by the larger proton affinities of s-alkylamines compared to n-alkylamines. This substitution, however, has no effect on the metal ion-hydrocarbon bond. In contrast, methyl substitution remote from the functional group, as in iso-pentylamine, does lead to strengthening of the metal ion-hydrocarbon bond. The cuprous ion affinity of hexadecylamine, C(16)H(33)NH(2) was found to be as large as that for ethylenediamine (352 kJ mol(-1)), known to be a strong copper binding agent. It is argued that such a metal ion-hydrocarbon interaction does not occur in the metal bound dimers.

  5. The role of metal ions in chemical evolution - Polymerization of alanine and glycine in a cation-exchanged clay environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, J. G.; Levi, N.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of the exchangeable cation on the condensation of glycine and alanine was investigated using a series of homoionic bentonites. A cycling procedure of drying, warming and wetting was employed. Peptide bond formation was observed, and the effectiveness of metal ions to catalyze the condensation was Cu(2+) greater than Ni(2) approximately equals Zn(2+) greater than Na(+). Glycine showed 6% of the monomer incorporated into oligomers with the largest detected being the pentamer. Alanine showed less peptide bond formation (a maximum of 2%) and only the dimer was observed.

  6. Effects of Octylphenol and Bisphenol A on the Metal Cation Transporter Channels of Mouse Placentas

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae-Hwan; Ahn, Changhwan; Kang, Hee Young; Hong, Eui-Ju; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Octylphenol (OP) and bisphenol A (BPA) are known as endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). During pregnancy, the expression of steroid hormone receptors is controlled by maternal and fetal nutrition. To evaluate the impact of EDCs during pregnancy, ethinyl estradiol (EE, 0.2 mg/kg/day), OP (50 mg/kg/day), and BPA (50 mg/kg/day) were administered to pregnant mice. The mRNA levels of TRPV6 (transient receptor potential cation channels in subfamily V, member 6) decreased significantly by EE and OP. The PMCA1 (ATPase, Ca++ transporting, plasma membrane 1) mRNA and protein levels decreased significantly by EE, OP, and BPA. CTR1 (solute carrier family 31, member 1) and ATP7A (ATPase, Cu++ transporting, alpha polypeptide) expression decreased significantly by EE, OP, and BPA. The mRNA levels of IREG1 (iron-regulated transporter, member 1) decreased significantly by EE. Hephaestin (HEPH) mRNA levels decreased significantly by EE, OP, and BPA, and protein levels decreased significantly by BPA. As a result of immunohistochemistry analysis, all cation transporter proteins were found in labyrinth of placenta. To confirm the cytosolic level of cations, levels of cation level in fetal serum were measured. EE, OP, and BPA significantly reduced serum calcium and copper levels, and iron levels were reduced by BPA. Taken together, some EDCs, such as OP and BPA, could modulate the calcium, copper, and iron ion-transporting channels during pregnancy. The fetus relies on the mother for ionic transportation, and, therefore, pregnant women should avoid exposure to cation-channel-disrupting chemicals. PMID:27690074

  7. Ion-exchange and selectivity behavior of thermally treated and. gamma. -irradiated phases of zirconium(IV) arsenophosphate cation exchanger: separation of Al(III) from some metal ions and removal of cations from water

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, K.G.; Varshney, K.; Agrawal, S.

    1983-01-01

    Ion-exchange and selectivity behavior of zirconium(IV) arsenophosphate (ZAP) has been studied systematically after thermal and irradiation treatments. As a result, an increase in the ion-exchange capacity and a complete reversal in the selectivity sequence for some common metal ions has been observed on heating. The modified phase of ZAP has been utilized successfully for the quantitative separation of aluminum from numerous metal ions and for the removal of cations from water. 5 figures, 3 tables.

  8. Metal release from stainless steel in biological environments: A review.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, Yolanda S; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2016-03-01

    Due to its beneficial corrosion resistance, stainless steel is widely used in, e.g., biomedical applications, as surfaces in food contact, and for products intended to come into skin contact. Low levels of metals can be released from the stainless steel surface into solution, even for these highly corrosion resistant alloys. This needs to be considered in risk assessment and management. This review aims to compile the different metal release mechanisms that are relevant for stainless steel when used in different biological settings. These mechanisms include corrosion-induced metal release, dissolution of the surface oxide, friction-induced metal release, and their combinations. The influence of important physicochemical surface properties, different organic species and proteins in solution, and of biofilm formation on corrosion-induced metal release is discussed. Chemical and electrochemical dissolution mechanisms of the surface oxides of stainless steel are presented with a focus on protonation, complexation/ligand-induced dissolution, and reductive dissolution by applying a perspective on surface adsorption of complexing or reducing ligands and proteins. The influence of alloy composition, microstructure, route of manufacture, and surface finish on the metal release process is furthermore discussed as well as the chemical speciation of released metals. Typical metal release patterns are summarized. PMID:26514345

  9. Metal release from stainless steel in biological environments: A review.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, Yolanda S; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2015-03-29

    Due to its beneficial corrosion resistance, stainless steel is widely used in, e.g., biomedical applications, as surfaces in food contact, and for products intended to come into skin contact. Low levels of metals can be released from the stainless steel surface into solution, even for these highly corrosion resistant alloys. This needs to be considered in risk assessment and management. This review aims to compile the different metal release mechanisms that are relevant for stainless steel when used in different biological settings. These mechanisms include corrosion-induced metal release, dissolution of the surface oxide, friction-induced metal release, and their combinations. The influence of important physicochemical surface properties, different organic species and proteins in solution, and of biofilm formation on corrosion-induced metal release is discussed. Chemical and electrochemical dissolution mechanisms of the surface oxides of stainless steel are presented with a focus on protonation, complexation/ligand-induced dissolution, and reductive dissolution by applying a perspective on surface adsorption of complexing or reducing ligands and proteins. The influence of alloy composition, microstructure, route of manufacture, and surface finish on the metal release process is furthermore discussed as well as the chemical speciation of released metals. Typical metal release patterns are summarized.

  10. Mechanism of protodesorption-exchange of heavy metal cations for protons in a heterophase system of H2O-H2SO4-MSO4-cellulose sorbent.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, V A; Nikiforova, T E; Loginova, V A; Koifman, O I

    2015-12-15

    The influence of pH on the distribution of metal cations [Cd(II), Cu(II), Fe(II), Ni(II), Zn(II)] in a four-component heterophase system (H2O-H2SO4-MSO4-cellulose sorbent) was studied. Protodesorption of metal cations was studied with indicator and constant quantities of [MSO4] salts and constant solvent-sorbent ratio. Linear dependence lgКDМ2+=f(рН) with tgα=1/2 of the КDМ2+ metal ions distribution coefficients from the acidity of the aqueous phase is observed in logarithmic coordinates. Depression of the exponent corresponding to proton involvement in protodesorption from 2 (theory) to 0.5 (experiment) indicates that anions of the aqueous phase are involved in the process of exchange of metal cation for proton on the anionic centers of the sorbent, which corresponds to participation of the salt and acid components of the system in molecular non-dissociated form in an equivalent proportion H2SO4/MSO4=1/1. Different behavior of the salt and acid components in ion exchange of cations for cations and cations for protons is due to the differences in the constraint coefficients of their molecular and ionic forms which must be taken into consideration in equations describing thermodynamics of the interphase exchange.

  11. New Insights into Wear and Biological Effects of Metal-on-Metal Bearings

    PubMed Central

    Catelas, Isabelle; Wimmer, Markus A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Despite the renewed interest in metal-on-metal implants in the past two decades, the underlying wear mechanisms and biological effects are still not fully understood. Methods: This paper first reviews the tribology of metal-on-metal bearings, bringing new insights into the interaction of wear and corrosion, and putting the characteristics and the potential origin of wear particles in perspective with the proposed wear mechanisms. It then summarizes the current knowledge on the biological effects of particles and metal ions in relation to these wear mechanisms. Results: Tribochemical reactions play an important role in the wear of metal-on-metal joints. The generated tribomaterial, which progressively forms by mechanical mixing of the uppermost nanocrystalline zone of the metal surface with proteins from the synovial fluid, governs the wear rate and influences the corrosive behavior of the bearing. Nanometer-sized wear particles may initially originate from the passivation layer covering the implant surface and then detach from this tribolayer. The inflammatory response observed surrounding metal-on-metal implants appears to be lower than that around metal-on-polyethylene implants. However, metallic byproducts, which can complex with proteins, may lead to a T lymphocyte-mediated hypersensitivity response. Conclusions: The tribolayer appears to have beneficial effects on the wear rate. Much information has been gained on wear particle characteristics, but the exact mechanisms of particle detachment remain to be further elucidated. Excessive wear along with a hypersensitivity response may be at the origin of the early adverse tissue reactions that have been recently reported in some patients with metal-on-metal implants. Clinical Relevance: Future development of new methods to improve the tribolayer retention and optimize the tribocorrosive properties of the implant may minimize the clinical impact of implant wear and immune responses. PMID:21543694

  12. Zinc (II) complex with a cationic Schiff base ligand: Synthesis, characterization, and biological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sze Koon; Tan, Kong Wai; Ng, Seik Weng; Ooi, Kah Kooi; Ang, Kok Pian; Abdah, Md Akim

    2014-03-01

    A cationic Schiff base ligand, TSB (L) and its Zn (II) complex (1) were synthesized and characterized by using CHN, 1H-NMR, FT-IR, UV, LC-MS, and X-ray methods. Their ability to inhibit topoisomerase I, DNA cleavage activities, and cytotoxicity were studied. X-ray diffraction study shows that the mononuclear complex 1 is four coordinated with distorted tetrahedral geometry. The singly deprotonated Schiff base ligand L acts as a bidentate ON-donor ligand. Complexation of L increases the inhibitory strength on topoisomerase I activity. Complex 1 could fully inhibit topoisomerase I activity at 250 μM, while L did not show any inhibitory effect on topoisomerase I activity. In addition, L and complex 1 could cleave pBR322 DNA in a concentration and time dependent profile. Surprisingly, L has better DNA cleavage activity than complex 1. The cleavage of DNA by complex 1 is altered in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, L and complex 1 are mildly cytotoxic towards human ovarian cancer A2780 and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2.

  13. Full factorial design, physicochemical characterisation and biological assessment of cyclosporine A loaded cationic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Kris; Van den Plas, Dave; Everaert, Arnout; Weyenberg, Wim; Ludwig, Annick

    2012-09-01

    Cyclosporine A loaded poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles coated with chitosan were prepared using the o/w emulsification solvent evaporation method. A 2(3) full factorial design was used to investigate the effect of 3 preparation parameters on the particle size, polydispersity index, zeta potential and drug release. In vitro experiments were performed in order to evaluate the cytotoxicity and anti-inflammatory activity of the developed nanoparticles. Particle sizes varied from 156 nm to 314 nm, and polydispersity index values of 0.07-0.56 were obtained depending on the different preparation parameters. All nanoparticles showed positive zeta potential values. Nanoparticles prepared with the highest concentration chitosan retained a positive zeta potential after dispersion in simulated lachrymal fluid, which supports the possibility of an electrostatic interaction between these particles and the negatively charged mucus layer at the eye. The in vitro release profile of cyclosporine A from the chitosan-coated nanoparticles was strongly dependent on the release medium used. None of the cationic nanoparticle formulations showed significant cytotoxicity compared to the negative control using human epithelial cells (HaCaT). Cyclosporine A encapsulated in the various nanoparticle formulations remained anti-inflammatory active as significant suppression of interleukine-2 secretion in concanavalin A stimulated Jurkat T cells was observed.

  14. Influence of alkali metal cations on the thermal, mechanical and morphological properties of rectorite/chitosan bio-nanocomposite films.

    PubMed

    Babul Reddy, A; Jayaramudu, J; Siva Mohan Reddy, G; Manjula, B; Sadiku, E R

    2015-05-20

    The main theme of this work is to study the influence of ion-exchangeable alkali metal cations, such as: Li(+), Na(+), K(+), and Cs(+) on the thermal, mechanical and morphological properties. In this regard, a set of rectorite/chitosan (REC-CS) bio-nanocomposite films (BNCFs) was prepared by facile reaction of chitosan with ion-exchanged REC clay. The microstructure and morphology of BNCFs were investigated with XRD, TEM, SEM and AFM. Thermal and tensile properties of BNCFs were also investigated. As revealed from TEM and XRD results, the BNCFs featured a mixed morphology. Some intercalated clay sheets, together with nano-sized clay tactoids were obtained in LiREC/CS, NaREC/CS and KREC/CS of the BNCFs. From fractured surface study, via SEM, it was observed that the dispersion of chitosan polymer attaches to (and covers) the clay platelets. FTIR confirmed strong hydrogen bonds between clay and chitosan polymer. In addition, the thermal stabilities significantly varied when alkali metal cations varied from Li(+) to Cs(+). The BNCFs featured high tensile strengths (up to 84 MPa) and tensile moduli (up to 45 GPa). After evaluating these properties of BNCFs, we came to conclusion that these bio-nano composites can be used for packaging applications. PMID:25817663

  15. Alkali metal cation complexation by 1,3-alternate, mono-ionisable calix[4]arene-benzocrown-6 compounds

    DOE PAGES

    Surowiec, Malgorzata A.; Custelcean, Radu; Surowiec, Kazimierz; Bartsch, Richard A.

    2014-04-23

    Alkali metal cation extraction behavior for two series of 1,3-alternate, mono-ionizable calix[4]arene-benzocrown-6 compounds is examined. In Series 1, the proton-ionizable group is a substituent on the benzo group of the polyether ring that directs it away from the crown ether cavity. In Series 2, the proton-ionizable group is attached to one para position in the calixarene framework, thus positioning it over the crown ether ring. Competitive solvent extraction of alkali metal cations from aqueous solutions into chloroform shows high Cs+ efficiency and selectivity. Single-species extraction pH profiles of Cs+ for Series 1 and 2 ligands with the same proton-ionizable groupmore » are very similar. Thus, association of Cs+ with the calixcrown ring is more important than the the proton-ionizable group’s position in relation to the crown ether cavity. Solid-state structures are presented for two unionized ligands from Series 2, as is a crystal containing two different ionized ligand–Cs+ complexes.« less

  16. Alkali metal cation complexation by 1,3-alternate, mono-ionisable calix[4]arene-benzocrown-6 compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Surowiec, Malgorzata A.; Custelcean, Radu; Surowiec, Kazimierz; Bartsch, Richard A.

    2014-04-23

    Alkali metal cation extraction behavior for two series of 1,3-alternate, mono-ionizable calix[4]arene-benzocrown-6 compounds is examined. In Series 1, the proton-ionizable group is a substituent on the benzo group of the polyether ring that directs it away from the crown ether cavity. In Series 2, the proton-ionizable group is attached to one para position in the calixarene framework, thus positioning it over the crown ether ring. Competitive solvent extraction of alkali metal cations from aqueous solutions into chloroform shows high Cs+ efficiency and selectivity. Single-species extraction pH profiles of Cs+ for Series 1 and 2 ligands with the same proton-ionizable group are very similar. Thus, association of Cs+ with the calixcrown ring is more important than the the proton-ionizable group’s position in relation to the crown ether cavity. Solid-state structures are presented for two unionized ligands from Series 2, as is a crystal containing two different ionized ligand–Cs+ complexes.

  17. Influence of alkali metal cations on the thermal, mechanical and morphological properties of rectorite/chitosan bio-nanocomposite films.

    PubMed

    Babul Reddy, A; Jayaramudu, J; Siva Mohan Reddy, G; Manjula, B; Sadiku, E R

    2015-05-20

    The main theme of this work is to study the influence of ion-exchangeable alkali metal cations, such as: Li(+), Na(+), K(+), and Cs(+) on the thermal, mechanical and morphological properties. In this regard, a set of rectorite/chitosan (REC-CS) bio-nanocomposite films (BNCFs) was prepared by facile reaction of chitosan with ion-exchanged REC clay. The microstructure and morphology of BNCFs were investigated with XRD, TEM, SEM and AFM. Thermal and tensile properties of BNCFs were also investigated. As revealed from TEM and XRD results, the BNCFs featured a mixed morphology. Some intercalated clay sheets, together with nano-sized clay tactoids were obtained in LiREC/CS, NaREC/CS and KREC/CS of the BNCFs. From fractured surface study, via SEM, it was observed that the dispersion of chitosan polymer attaches to (and covers) the clay platelets. FTIR confirmed strong hydrogen bonds between clay and chitosan polymer. In addition, the thermal stabilities significantly varied when alkali metal cations varied from Li(+) to Cs(+). The BNCFs featured high tensile strengths (up to 84 MPa) and tensile moduli (up to 45 GPa). After evaluating these properties of BNCFs, we came to conclusion that these bio-nano composites can be used for packaging applications.

  18. Tetrathiafulvalene-based azine ligands for anion and metal cation coordination

    PubMed Central

    Ayadi, Awatef; El Alamy, Aziz; Alévêque, Olivier; Allain, Magali; Zouari, Nabil; Bouachrine, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Summary The synthesis and full characterization of two tetrathiafulvalene-appended azine ligands, namely 2-([2,2’-bi(1,3-dithiolylidene)]-4-yl)-6-((2,4-dinitrophenyl)hydrazono)methyl)pyridine (L1) and 5-([2,2’-bi(1,3-dithiolylidene)]-4-yl)-2-((2,4-dinitrophenyl)hydrazono)methyl)pyridine (L2) are described. The crystal structure of ligand L1 indicates that the ligand is completely planar with the presence of a strong intramolecular N3–H3···O1 hydrogen bonding. Titration experiments with inorganic anions showed that both ligands are suitable candidates for the sensing of fluoride anions. Ligand L2 was reacted with a Re(I) cation to yield the corresponding rhenium tricarbonyl complex 3. In the crystal structure of the newly prepared electroactive rhenium complex the TTF is neutral and the rhenium cation is hexacoordinated. The electrochemical behavior of the three compounds indicates that they are promising for the construction of crystalline radical cation salts. PMID:26425193

  19. Tetrathiafulvalene-based azine ligands for anion and metal cation coordination.

    PubMed

    Ayadi, Awatef; El Alamy, Aziz; Alévêque, Olivier; Allain, Magali; Zouari, Nabil; Bouachrine, Mohammed; El-Ghayoury, Abdelkrim

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis and full characterization of two tetrathiafulvalene-appended azine ligands, namely 2-([2,2'-bi(1,3-dithiolylidene)]-4-yl)-6-((2,4-dinitrophenyl)hydrazono)methyl)pyridine (L1) and 5-([2,2'-bi(1,3-dithiolylidene)]-4-yl)-2-((2,4-dinitrophenyl)hydrazono)methyl)pyridine (L2) are described. The crystal structure of ligand L1 indicates that the ligand is completely planar with the presence of a strong intramolecular N3-H3···O1 hydrogen bonding. Titration experiments with inorganic anions showed that both ligands are suitable candidates for the sensing of fluoride anions. Ligand L2 was reacted with a Re(I) cation to yield the corresponding rhenium tricarbonyl complex 3. In the crystal structure of the newly prepared electroactive rhenium complex the TTF is neutral and the rhenium cation is hexacoordinated. The electrochemical behavior of the three compounds indicates that they are promising for the construction of crystalline radical cation salts. PMID:26425193

  20. Understanding the biological responses of nanostructured metals and surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Terry C.; Reiss, Rebecca A.

    2014-08-01

    Metals produced by Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD) offer distinct advantages for medical applications such as orthopedic devices, in part because of their nanostructured surfaces. We examine the current theoretical foundations and state of knowledge for nanostructured biomaterials surface optimization within the contexts that apply to bulk nanostructured metals, differentiating how their microstructures impact osteogenesis, in particular, for Ultrafine Grained (UFG) titanium. Then we identify key gaps in the research to date, pointing out areas which merit additional focus within the scientific community. For example, we highlight the potential of next-generation DNA sequencing techniques (NGS) to reveal gene and non-coding RNA (ncRNA) expression changes induced by nanostructured metals. While our understanding of bio-nano interactions is in its infancy, nanostructured metals are already being marketed or developed for medical devices such as dental implants, spinal devices, and coronary stents. Our ability to characterize and optimize the biological response of cells to SPD metals will have synergistic effects on advances in materials, biological, and medical science.

  1. Biotic ligand modeling approach: Synthesis of the effect of major cations on the toxicity of metals to soil and aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Ardestani, Masoud M; van Straalen, Nico M; van Gestel, Cornelis A M

    2015-10-01

    The biotic ligand model (BLM) approach is used to assess metal toxicity, taking into account the competition of other cations with the free metal ions for binding to the biotic ligand sites of aquatic and soil organisms. The bioavailable fraction of metals, represented by the free metal ion, is a better measure than the total concentration for assessing their potential risk to the environment. Because BLMs are relating toxicity to the fraction of biotic ligands occupied by the metal, they can be useful for investigating factors affecting metal bioaccumulation and toxicity. In the present review, the effects of major cations on the toxicity of metals to soil and aquatic organisms were comprehensively studied by performing a meta-analysis of BLM literature data. Interactions at the binding sites were shown to be species- and metal-specific. The main factors affecting the relationships between toxicity and conditional binding constants for metal binding at the biotic ligand appeared to be Ca(2+) , Mg(2+) , and protons. Other important characteristics of the exposure medium, such as levels of dissolved organic carbon and concentrations of other cations, should also be considered to obtain a proper assessment of metal toxicity to soil and aquatic organisms.

  2. Biotic ligand modeling approach: Synthesis of the effect of major cations on the toxicity of metals to soil and aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Ardestani, Masoud M; van Straalen, Nico M; van Gestel, Cornelis A M

    2015-10-01

    The biotic ligand model (BLM) approach is used to assess metal toxicity, taking into account the competition of other cations with the free metal ions for binding to the biotic ligand sites of aquatic and soil organisms. The bioavailable fraction of metals, represented by the free metal ion, is a better measure than the total concentration for assessing their potential risk to the environment. Because BLMs are relating toxicity to the fraction of biotic ligands occupied by the metal, they can be useful for investigating factors affecting metal bioaccumulation and toxicity. In the present review, the effects of major cations on the toxicity of metals to soil and aquatic organisms were comprehensively studied by performing a meta-analysis of BLM literature data. Interactions at the binding sites were shown to be species- and metal-specific. The main factors affecting the relationships between toxicity and conditional binding constants for metal binding at the biotic ligand appeared to be Ca(2+) , Mg(2+) , and protons. Other important characteristics of the exposure medium, such as levels of dissolved organic carbon and concentrations of other cations, should also be considered to obtain a proper assessment of metal toxicity to soil and aquatic organisms. PMID:25953362

  3. Spectroscopic and theoretical investigations of vibrational frequencies in binary unsaturated transition-metal carbonyl cations, neutrals, and anions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, M; Andrews, L; Bauschlicher, C W

    2001-07-01

    Figure 18 presents the C-O stretching vibrational frequencies of the first-row transition-metal monocarbonyl cations, neutrals, and anions in solid neon; similar diagrams have been reported for neutral MCO species in solid argon, but three of the early assignments have been changed by recent work and one new assignment added. The laser-ablation method produces mostly neutral atoms with a few percent cations and electrons for capture to make anions; in contrast, thermal evaporation gives only neutral species. Hence, the very recent neon matrix investigations in our laboratory provide carbonyl cations and anions for comparison to neutrals on a level playing field. Several trends are very interesting. First, for all metals, the C-O stretching frequencies follow the order cations > neutrals > anions with large diagnostic 100-200 cm-1 separations, which is consistent with the magnitude of the metal d to CO pi * donation. Second, for a given charge, there is a general increase in C-O stretching vibrational frequencies with increasing metal atomic number, which demonstrates the expected decrease in the metal to CO pi * donation with increasing metal ionization potential. Some of the structure in this plot arises from the extra stability of the filled and half-filled d shell and from the electron pairing that occurs at the middle of the TM row; the plot resembles the "double-humped" graph found for the variation in properties across a row of transition metals. For the anions, the variation with metal atom is the smallest since all of the metals can easily donate charge to the CO ligand. Third, for the early transition-metal Ti, V, and Cr families, the C-O stretching frequencies decrease when going down the family, but the reverse relationship is observed for the late transition-metal Fe, Co, and Ni families. In most of the present discussion, we have referred to neon matrix frequencies; however, the argon matrix frequencies are complementary, and useful information can be

  4. Metal-catalyzed protein tyrosine nitration in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Campolo, Nicolás; Bartesaghi, Silvina; Radi, Rafael

    2014-11-01

    Protein tyrosine nitration is an oxidative postranslational modification that can affect protein structure and function. It is mediated in vivo by the production of nitric oxide-derived reactive nitrogen species (RNS), including peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) and nitrogen dioxide ((•)NO₂). Redox-active transition metals such as iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and manganese (Mn) can actively participate in the processes of tyrosine nitration in biological systems, as they catalyze the production of both reactive oxygen species and RNS, enhance nitration yields and provide site-specificity to this process. Early after the discovery that protein tyrosine nitration can occur under biologically relevant conditions, it was shown that some low molecular weight transition-metal centers and metalloproteins could promote peroxynitrite-dependent nitration. Later studies showed that nitration could be achieved by peroxynitrite-independent routes as well, depending on the transition metal-catalyzed oxidation of nitrite (NO₂(-)) to (•)NO₂ in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Processes like these can be achieved either by hemeperoxidase-dependent reactions or by ferrous and cuprous ions through Fenton-type chemistry. Besides the in vitro evidence, there are now several in vivo studies that support the close relationship between transition metal levels and protein tyrosine nitration. So, the contribution of transition metals to the levels of tyrosine nitrated proteins observed under basal conditions and, specially, in disease states related with high levels of these metal ions, seems to be quite clear. Altogether, current evidence unambiguously supports a central role of transition metals in determining the extent and selectivity of protein tyrosine nitration mediated both by peroxynitrite-dependent and independent mechanisms.

  5. Study of bond Elut® Plexa™ PCX cation exchange resin in flow injection column preconcentration system for metal determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Anthemidis, Aristidis N; Xidia, Sofia; Giakisikli, Georgia

    2012-08-15

    A simple and sensitive on-line solid-phase extraction methodology for preconcentration and determination of trace amounts of Cd(II), Pd(II) and Cu(II) in natural water samples has been developed using the strong cation exchange capability of Bond Elut(®) Plexa™ PCX polymer resin. Plexa PCX is a mixed-mode sorbent, commercially available in a cartridge format and as far as we know, there is no application into the field of metal determination. The analytes were retained on the resin, eluted with 1 mol L(-1) hydrochloric acid and subsequently directed to FAAS for quantification. The influence of chemical and flow variables which affect the performance of the system have been studied, providing the appropriate conditions for the analysis of real samples. For preconcentration time of 90 s, an enrichment factor of 90, 95 and 95 and a detection limit (3 s) of 0.1, 1.8 and 0.5 μg L(-1) for Cd(II), Pb(II) and Cu(II), respectively were obtained along with a sampling frequency of 30 h(-1). The accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated by analyzing certified reference materials. This procedure was successfully applied for metal determination in environmental and biological samples. PMID:22841064

  6. Metal chalcogenide nanoparticle gel networks: Their formation mechanism and application for novel material generation and heavy metal water remediation via cation exchange reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palhares, Leticia F.

    The dissertation research is focused on (1) uncovering the mechanism of metal chalcogenide nanoparticle gel formation; (2) extending the cation exchange reaction protocol to zinc sulfide gel networks, with the goal of accessing new aerogel chemistries and understanding the factors that drive the process; and (3) conducting a quantitative analysis of the ability of ZnS aerogels to remove heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions. The mechanism of metal chalcogenide nanoparticle gel formation was investigated using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy to probe the chemical changes that occur during the gelation process. These techniques suggest that the bonding between the particles in the CdSe nanoparticle gels is due to the oxidation of surface selenide species, forming covalent Se--Se bonds. Treating the gel networks with a suitable reducing agent, such as a thiol, breaks the covalent bond and disperses the gel network. The addition of sodium borohydride, a "pure" reducing agent, also breaks down the gel network, strengthening the hypothesis that the reducing character of the thiols, not their ligation ability, is responsible for the gel network breakdown. UV-Vis spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and Powder X-ray Diffraction were used to analyze the particles after successive gelation-dispersion cycles. The primary particle size decreases after repeated oxidation-reduction cycles, due to nanoparticle surface etching. This trend is observed for CdSe and CdS gel networks, allowing for the proposition that the oxidative-reductive mechanism responsible for the formation-dispersion of the gels is general, applying to other metal chalcogenide nanocrystals as well. The cation exchange reaction previously demonstrated for CdSe gels was extended to ZnS gel networks. The exchange occurs under mild reaction conditions (room temperature, methanol solvent) with exchanging ions of different size, charge and mobility (Ag+, Pb2+, Cd2+ , Cu2+). The

  7. Selective adsorption of cationic dyes from aqueous solution by polyoxometalate-based metal-organic framework composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoxia; Gong, Wenpeng; Luo, Jing; Zou, Chentao; Yang, Yun; Yang, Shuijin

    2016-01-01

    A novel environmental friendly adsorbent H6P2W18O62/MOF-5 was synthesized by a simple one-step reaction under solvothermal conditions and characterized by XRD, FTIR, thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms. The removal rate of H6P2W18O62/MOF-5 was quite greater (85%) than that of MOF-5 (almost zero), showing that the adsorption performance of porous MOF-5 can be improved through the modification of H6P2W18O62. Further study revealed that H6P2W18O62/MOF-5 exhibited a fast adsorption rate and selective adsorption ability towards the cationic dyes in aqueous solution. The removal rate was up to 97% for cationic dyes methylene blue (MB) and 68% for rhodamine B(Rhb) within 10 min. However, anionicdye methyl orange(MO) can only reach to 10%. The influences including initial concentration, contact time, initial solution pH and temperature of MB adsorption onto H6P2W18O62/MOF-5 were investigated in detail. The kinetic study indicated that the adsorption of MB onto H6P2W18O62/MOF-5 followed the pseudo second-order model well. The isotherm obtained from experimental data fitted the Langmuir model, yielding maximum adsorption capacity of 51.81 mg/g. The thermodynamic parameters analysis illustrated that the MB adsorption onto H6P2W18O62 immobilized MOF-5 was spontaneous and endothermic process. Besides, these results implied that designing a novel material polyoxometalate-based metal-organic frameworks is great potential for removing cationic organic pollutants and even extended to improve other specific application.

  8. Electrophysical methods of separation of metal cations in the moving salts solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gofman, V. N.; Tuksov, I. V.; Timchenko, S. N.; Shamanin, I. V.; Poberezhnikov, A. D.; Kazaryan, M. A.

    2016-07-01

    The results of experiments on the excitation of the phenomenon of selective drift of solvated ions under the influence of an external "asymmetric" electric field to the circulating solution of calcium chloride and magnesium salts in a polar liquid dielectric - water are shown. The purpose of the experiments was to determine the influence of the field frequency and amplitude of the field strength on the excitation phenomenon, and the study of the operating characteristics of the testing apparatus - a dividing cell. The dependences of the separation efficiency of solvated cations from the frequency of the external field and the excitation threshold of the phenomenon from the field strength in the separation cell are defined.

  9. Imidazoanthraquinone derivatives for the chromofluorogenic sensing of basic anions and trivalent metal cations.

    PubMed

    Marín-Hernández, Cristina; Santos-Figueroa, Luis E; Moragues, María E; Raposo, M Manuela M; Batista, Rosa M F; Costa, Susana P G; Pardo, Teresa; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón; Sancenón, Félix

    2014-11-21

    Four imidazoanthraquinone derivatives (2a-d) were synthesized and characterized and their coordination behavior against selected anions and cations tested. Acetonitrile solutions of probes showed charge-transfer absorptions in the 407-465 nm range. The four probes emitted in the 533-571 nm interval. The recognition ability of 2a-d was evaluated in the presence of F(-), Cl(-), Br(-), I(-), OCN(-), BzO(-), ClO4(-), AcO(-), HSO4(-), H2PO4(-), and CN(-). Only F(-), AcO(-), and H2PO4(-) induced a new red-shifted absorption band that was attributed to a deprotonation process involving the amine moiety of the imidazole ring. Moreover, upon increasing quantities of F(-), AcO(-), and H2PO4(-), moderate quenching was induced in the emission of 2a-d together with the appearance of a new red-shifted band. The UV-visible and emission behavior of the four probes in the presence of Cu(2+), Co(2+), Mg(2+), Fe(3+), Ba(2+), Fe(2+), Ni(2+), Ca(2+), Zn(2+), Pb(2+), Cd(2+), Cr(3+), Al(3+), K(+), and Li(+) was also assessed. Only addition of Fe(3+), Cr(3+), and Al(3+) caused a new blue-shifted band in 2a-d that was ascribed to a preferential coordination with the acceptor part of the probes. Moreover, an important quenching of the emission was observed which was ascribed to the interaction between these trivalent cations and 2a-d.

  10. Potentiometric stripping analysis of selected heavy metals in biological materials.

    PubMed

    Sattar, A; Ahmad, N; Khan, L A

    1993-01-01

    Different biological materials such as edible oils, refined and unrefined cane and beet sugar and tea (black and green) leaves were assayed for the heavy metals cadmium, copper, lead and zinc. The results revealed significant differences in heavy metal contents within each class of the biological materials (P < 0.05). Cadmium was not detectable in sugar samples. Among the oils, highest amounts of copper (0.263 microgram/g) and lead (0.154 microgram/g) were in corn oil and zinc in olive oil (3.01 micrograms/g) whereas cadmium exhibited a narrow range (0.023-0.033 microgram/g). The samples of beet-sugar generally contained higher levels of the heavy metals than cane-sugar. Black and green tea leaves contained 0.411-0.908 microgram Cd/g, 6.500-9.220 micrograms Cu/g, 2.200-5.238 micrograms Pb/g, and 14.500-25.180 micrograms Zn/g. PMID:8361526

  11. Equilibrium analysis for heavy metal cation removal using cement kiln dust.

    PubMed

    El Zayat, Mohamed; Elagroudy, Sherien; El Haggar, Salah

    2014-01-01

    Ion exchange, reverse osmosis, and chemical precipitation have been investigated extensively for heavy metal uptake. However, they are deemed too expensive to meet stringent effluent characteristics. In this study, cement kiln dust (CKD) was examined for the removal of target heavy metals. Adsorption studies in completely mixed batch reactors were used to generate equilibrium pH adsorption edges. Studies showed the ability of CKD to remove the target heavy metals in a pH range below that of precipitation after an equilibrium reaction time of 24 h. A surface titration experiment indicated negative surface charge of the CKD at pH below 10, meaning that electrostatic attraction of the divalent metals can occur below the pH required for precipitation. However, surface complexation was also important due to the substantive metal removal. Accordingly, a surface complexation model approach that utilizes an electrostatic term in the double-layer description was used to estimate equilibrium constants for the protolysis interactions of the CKD surface as well as equilibria between background ions and the sorbent surface. It was concluded that the removal strength of adsorption is in the order: Pb > Cu > Cd. The experiments were also supported by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR).

  12. Equilibrium analysis for heavy metal cation removal using cement kiln dust.

    PubMed

    El Zayat, Mohamed; Elagroudy, Sherien; El Haggar, Salah

    2014-01-01

    Ion exchange, reverse osmosis, and chemical precipitation have been investigated extensively for heavy metal uptake. However, they are deemed too expensive to meet stringent effluent characteristics. In this study, cement kiln dust (CKD) was examined for the removal of target heavy metals. Adsorption studies in completely mixed batch reactors were used to generate equilibrium pH adsorption edges. Studies showed the ability of CKD to remove the target heavy metals in a pH range below that of precipitation after an equilibrium reaction time of 24 h. A surface titration experiment indicated negative surface charge of the CKD at pH below 10, meaning that electrostatic attraction of the divalent metals can occur below the pH required for precipitation. However, surface complexation was also important due to the substantive metal removal. Accordingly, a surface complexation model approach that utilizes an electrostatic term in the double-layer description was used to estimate equilibrium constants for the protolysis interactions of the CKD surface as well as equilibria between background ions and the sorbent surface. It was concluded that the removal strength of adsorption is in the order: Pb > Cu > Cd. The experiments were also supported by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). PMID:25259489

  13. Dissolution of metal salts in bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide-based ionic liquids: studying the affinity of metal cations toward a "weakly coordinating" anion.

    PubMed

    Bortolini, Olga; Chiappe, Cinzia; Ghilardi, Tiziana; Massi, Alessandro; Pomelli, Christian Silvio

    2015-05-28

    Despite the weakly coordinating ability of the bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide anion ([Tf2N](-)) the corresponding ionic liquids (ILs) are able to dissolve relevant amounts of metal salts having the same anion, M[Tf2N]x. To better understand the metal dissolution process we evaluated the interaction ability of a set of metal cations (Y(III), Al(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Ag(I), Li(I), and Na(I)) toward the [Tf2N](-) anion measuring the relative aptitude to give the corresponding anionic monocharged complex, [M(Tf2N)x+1](-) using the ESI-MS technique. UV-vis and NMR measurements were carried out to verify the consistence between the liquid and the gas phase. Density functional theory calculations have been used to identify the metal-containing species and determine their relative stability. An interesting correlation between interaction ability and chemical properties (Lewis acidity) was found.

  14. Dissolution of metal salts in bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide-based ionic liquids: studying the affinity of metal cations toward a "weakly coordinating" anion.

    PubMed

    Bortolini, Olga; Chiappe, Cinzia; Ghilardi, Tiziana; Massi, Alessandro; Pomelli, Christian Silvio

    2015-05-28

    Despite the weakly coordinating ability of the bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide anion ([Tf2N](-)) the corresponding ionic liquids (ILs) are able to dissolve relevant amounts of metal salts having the same anion, M[Tf2N]x. To better understand the metal dissolution process we evaluated the interaction ability of a set of metal cations (Y(III), Al(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Ag(I), Li(I), and Na(I)) toward the [Tf2N](-) anion measuring the relative aptitude to give the corresponding anionic monocharged complex, [M(Tf2N)x+1](-) using the ESI-MS technique. UV-vis and NMR measurements were carried out to verify the consistence between the liquid and the gas phase. Density functional theory calculations have been used to identify the metal-containing species and determine their relative stability. An interesting correlation between interaction ability and chemical properties (Lewis acidity) was found. PMID:25361174

  15. Cationic methyl complexes of the rare-earth metals: an experimental and computational study on synthesis, structure, and reactivity.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Mathias U; Robert, Dominique; Arndt, Stefan; Zeimentz, Peter M; Spaniol, Thomas P; Yahia, Ahmed; Maron, Laurent; Eisenstein, Odile; Okuda, Jun

    2008-10-20

    Synthesis, structure, and reactivity of two families of rare-earth metal complexes containing discrete methyl cations [LnMe(2-x)(thf)n]((1+x)+) (x = 0, 1; thf = tetrahydrofuran) have been studied. As a synthetic equivalent for the elusive trimethyl complex [LnMe3], lithium methylates of the approximate composition [Li3LnMe6(thf)n] were prepared by treating rare-earth metal trichlorides [LnCl3(thf)n] with 6 equiv of methyllithium in diethyl ether. Heteronuclear complexes of the formula [Li3Ln2Me9L(n)] (Ln = Sc, Y, Tb; L = Et2O, thf) were isolated by crystallization from diethyl ether. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies revealed a heterometallic aggregate of composition [Li3Ln2Me9(thf)n(Et2O)m] with a [LiLn2Me9](2-) core (Ln = Sc, Y, Tb). When tris(tetramethylaluminate) [Ln(AlMe4)3] (Ln = Y, Lu) was reacted with less than 1 equiv of [NR3H][BPh4], the dimethyl cations [LnMe2(thf)n][BPh4] were obtained. The coordination number as well as cis/trans isomer preference was studied by crystallographic and computational methods. Dicationic methyl complexes of the rare-earth metals of the formula [LnMe(thf)n][BAr4]2 (Ln = Sc, Y, La-Nd, Sm, Gd-Lu; Ar = Ph, C6H4F-4) were synthesized, by protonolysis of either the ate complex [Li3LnMe6(thf)n] (Ln = Sc, Y, Gd-Lu) or the tris(tetramethylaluminate) [Ln(AlMe4)3] (Ln = La-Nd, Sm, Dy, Gd) with ammonium borates [NR3H][BAr4] in thf. The number of coordinated thf ligands varied from n = 5 (Ln = Sc, Tm) to n = 6 (Ln = La, Y, Sm, Dy, Ho). The configuration of representative examples was determined by X-ray diffraction studies and confirmed by density-functional theory calculations. The highly polarized bonding between the methyl group and the rare-earth metal center results in the reactivity pattern dominated by the carbanionic character and the pronounced Lewis acidity: The dicationic methyl complex [YMe(thf)6](2+) inserted benzophenone as an electrophile to give the alkoxy complex [Y(OCMePh2)(thf)5](2+). Nucleophilic addition of

  16. Synthesis of macrocyclic bis-hydrazone and their use in metal cations extraction.

    PubMed

    Kandil, Farouk; Chebani, Mohamad Khaled; Al Zoubi, Wail

    2012-01-01

    Two new macrocyclic hydrazone Schiff bases were synthesized by reaction of succindihydrazide and adipdihydrazide with acetylacetone. Hydrazones have been characterized by elemental analyses and IR, mass, (1)H NMR, and (13)C NMR spectral data. Hydrazones have been studied by liquid-liquid extraction towards the s-metal ions (Li(+), Na(+), and K(+)) and d-metal ions (Cu(2+) and Cr(3+)) from aqueous phase to organic phase. The effect of chloroform and dichloromethane as organic solvents over the metal chlorides extraction was investigated at 25 ± 0.1°C by using flame atomic absorption. We found differences between the two solvents in extraction selectivity. PMID:24052837

  17. New electrolyte systems for capillary zone electrophoresis of metal cations and non-ionic organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Y.

    1995-06-19

    Excellent separations of metal ions can be obtained very quickly by capillary electrophoresis provided a weak complexing reagent is incorporated into the electrolyte to alter the effective mobilities of the sample ions. Indirect photometric detection is possible by also adding a UV-sensitive ion to the electrolyte. Separations are described using phthalate, tartrate, lactate or hydroxyisobutyrate as the complexing reagent. A separation of twenty-seven metal ions was achieved in only 6 min using a lactate system. A mechanism for the separation of lanthanides is proposed for the hydroxyisobutyrate system.

  18. Hydrogen storage in a potassium-ion-bound metal-organic framework incorporating crown ether struts as specific cation binding sites.

    PubMed

    Lim, Dae-Woon; Chyun, Seung An; Suh, Myunghyun Paik

    2014-07-21

    To develop a metal-organic framework (MOF) for hydrogen storage, SNU-200 incorporating a 18-crown-6 ether moiety as a specific binding site for selected cations has been synthesized. SNU-200 binds K(+), NH4(+), and methyl viologen (MV(2+)) through single-crystal to single-crystal transformations. It exhibits characteristic gas-sorption properties depending on the bound cation. SNU-200 activated with supercritical CO2 shows a higher isosteric heat (Qst) of H2 adsorption (7.70 kJ mol(-1)) than other zinc-based MOFs. Among the cation inclusions, K(+) is the best for enhancing the isosteric heat of the H2 adsorption (9.92 kJ mol(-1)) as a result of the accessible open metal sites on the K(+) ion. PMID:24939240

  19. A combined experimental and quantum mechanical investigation on some selected metal complexes of L-serine with first row transition metal cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Shilpi; Das, Gunajyoti; Askari, Hassan

    2015-02-01

    In the current study a joint solvent-free synthetic and computational approach has been adopted to explore the coordination properties of L-serine with the doubly charged cations of nickel, copper and zinc. The reaction products were characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance, EDAX-SEM, TEM, TG/DTA, infrared, electronic absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Quantum chemical calculations, carried out in gas and aqueous phase using the BHandHLYP and MP2 methods in conjunction with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set, provide valuable insights concerning the interaction enthalpies and free energies; vibrational and absorption spectra along with various other molecular and electronic properties of the metal complexes. This study reveals that L-serine binds to the metal ions in a bi-dentate manner through its amino and carboxylate groups exhibiting highest binding affinity towards Cu(II) among the three metal ions considered here. As compared to the MP2 method, the spin-delocalized situations of the open-shell Cu(II) complex of L-serine have been better described at the BHandHLYP level. The physical origin of the molecular interactions of L-serine with the metal ions has also been examined by performing energy decomposition analysis (EDA). Effects of the aqueous environment are evident on the structure and stability of the metal complexes. The vibrational spectroscopic data furnished at MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level, which provide a good account of the structural changes inflicted in the molecular geometry of L-serine as a result of metal coordination, are in better agreement with our experimental observations as compared to those produced at the BHandHLYP/6-311++G(d,p) level.

  20. Benchmark calculations of metal carbonyl cations: relativistic vs. electron correlation effects.

    PubMed

    Matito, Eduard; Salvador, Pedro; Styszyński, Jacek

    2013-12-14

    In this paper we present benchmark results for isoelectronic metal carbonyl complexes of the groups 11 and 12 of the periodic table. The focus is on the geometry, vibrational frequencies, bond dissociation energy and chemical bonding. The description of these complexes requires a good balance between electron correlation and relativistic effects. Our results demonstrate that the combination of the effective core potential and the MP2 method gives quantitative results for the first- and the second-row transition metal complexes and only qualitative agreement for the third-row complexes. In order to obtain quantitative results for the whole series the use of four-component or X2C methods is mandatory. The fourth-row transition metal carbonyl complexes from groups 11 and 12 have been studied for the first time. The metal-carbon bond strength pattern along the group is shown to be highly dependent on the correct description of the relativistic effects. Finally, the relativistic effects on the bonding are studied by means of electron density difference maps, the analysis of the bond critical points of the electron density and the mechanism for σ-donation and π-backdonation. Our analysis indicates that the fourth-row complexes exhibit a strong covalent character induced by relativistic effects. PMID:24154704

  1. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of polysaccharide alginate derived cationic surfactant-metal(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Salah M; Hefni, Hassan H

    2016-01-01

    New natural polysaccharide carbohydrate derivatives of sodium alginate surfactant and its cobalt, copper and zinc complexes were synthesized. Structures of the synthesized compounds are reported using FTIR, (1)H NMR and UV-vis. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) value of the alginate surfactant and its metal complexes in aqueous solution was found out from surface tension measurements. Surface tension data at different temperatures served for the evaluation of the temperature-dependent CMC and the thermodynamics of micellization (ΔGmic, ΔHmic, ΔSmic) and adsorption (ΔGads, ΔGads, ΔSads). The surface activities of the synthesized polymeric surfactant and its metal complexes were influenced by their chemical structures and the type of the transition metals. These compounds were evaluated against Gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus), Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and fungi (Candida albicans and Asperigllus niger). The antibacterial and antifungal screening tests of the alginate surfactant metal complexes have shown good results compared to its precursor alginate surfactant.

  2. Crystal phase competition by addition of a second metal cation in solid solution metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Blas, C; Snejko, N; de la Peña-O'Shea, V A; Gallardo, J; Gutiérrez-Puebla, E; Monge, M A; Gándara, F

    2016-03-14

    Herein we report a synthetic study focused on the preparation of solid-solution metal-organic frameworks, MOFs, with the use of two kinds of linkers. In particular, we have explored the system composed by zinc, cobalt, 1,2,4-triazole and 4,4′-hexafluoroisopropylidenebisbenzoic acid (H2hfipbb). During this study, four new MOFs have been isolated, denoted TMPF-88 [M3(hfipbb)2(triazole)2(H2O)], TMPF-90 [M2(triazole)3(OCH2CH3)], TMPF-91 [M2(hfipbb)(triazole)2(H2O)] and TMPF-95 [M5(hfipbb)4(triazole)2(H2O)] (TMPF = transition metal polymeric framework, M = Zn, Co, or mixture of them). The study demonstrates that the addition of a second metal element during the MOF synthesis has a major effect in the formation of new phases, even at very high Zn/Co metal ratios. Furthermore, we show that during the MOF formation reaction, there is a competition among different crystal phases, where kinetically favoured phases of various compositions crystallize in short reaction times, precluding the formation of the pure solid-solution phases of other energetically more stable MOFs.

  3. Ammonium-crown ether supramolecular cation-templated assembly of an unprecedented heterobicluster-metal coordination polymer with enhanced NLO properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinfang; Jia, Ding; Humphrey, Mark G; Meng, Suci; Zaworotko, Michael J; Cifuentes, Marie P; Zhang, Chi

    2016-03-01

    An ammonium-crown ether host-guest supramolecular cation-templated synthetic methodology has been developed to construct a structurally unprecedented heterobicluster-metal coordination polymer (HCM-CP 1) based on tetranuclear clusters [WS4Cu3](+) with different connection environments, pentanuclear clusters [WS4Cu4](2+), and Cu(+) building metal ions. HCM-CP 1 exhibits enhanced NLO properties, which may be ascribed to the incorporation of diverse building cluster components.

  4. Ammonium-crown ether supramolecular cation-templated assembly of an unprecedented heterobicluster-metal coordination polymer with enhanced NLO properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinfang; Jia, Ding; Humphrey, Mark G; Meng, Suci; Zaworotko, Michael J; Cifuentes, Marie P; Zhang, Chi

    2016-03-01

    An ammonium-crown ether host-guest supramolecular cation-templated synthetic methodology has been developed to construct a structurally unprecedented heterobicluster-metal coordination polymer (HCM-CP 1) based on tetranuclear clusters [WS4Cu3](+) with different connection environments, pentanuclear clusters [WS4Cu4](2+), and Cu(+) building metal ions. HCM-CP 1 exhibits enhanced NLO properties, which may be ascribed to the incorporation of diverse building cluster components. PMID:26864604

  5. Fluorescence properties of riboflavin-functionalized mesoporous silica SBA-15 and riboflavin solutions in presence of different metal and organic cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowski, Dawid; Schroeder, Grzegorz; Sawczak, Mirosław; Ossowski, Tadeusz

    2015-10-01

    Riboflavin was covalently linked to mesoporous SBA-15 silica surface via grafting technique. Then fluorescence properties of the system obtained were analyzed in the presence of several metal and organic cations. Both quenching and strengthening of fluorescence as well as significant changes in the maximum fluorescence wavelength were observed. The results were compared with absorption and fluorescence data obtained for riboflavin water solutions.

  6. Control of physicochemical properties and catalytic activity of tris(2,2'-bipyridine)iron(II) encapsulated within the zeolite Y cavity by alkaline earth metal cations.

    PubMed

    Martis, Martin; Mori, Kohsuke; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2014-01-21

    A series of materials containing the tris(2,2'-bipyridine)iron(ii) (Fe(bpy)3(2+)) complex inside zeolite Y cavities with alkaline earth metals (Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+), Ba(2+)) as charge compensating cations have been synthesized via a "ship in the bottle" method. The influence of the alkaline earth metal cations on the physicochemical properties and catalytic activity was investigated. The successful formation of the Fe(bpy)3(2+) complex was verified by XRD, diffuse-reflectance UV-vis spectroscopy, and Fe K-edge XAFS measurements. The BET surface area and the Fe content decreased in the presence of the larger alkaline earth metal, but the intensity of the MLCT adsorption band of Fe(bpy)3(2+) increased with the heavier cation. The electron density of the Fe atoms decreased, and the average interatomic bond distance Fe-N/O and the coordination number increased with the heavier alkaline earth metal cation. The encapsulation of Fe(bpy)3(2+) resulted in the creation of a photocatalytic system able to oxidize styrene to benzaldehyde and styrene oxide under visible light irradiation (λ > 430 nm) in the presence of molecular oxygen.

  7. Knockout of multiple arabidopsis Cation/H+ exchangers suggest isoform-specific roles in metal stress response, germinatin and seed mineral nutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cation/H(+) exchangers encoded by CAX genes play an important role in the vacuolar accumulation of metals including Ca(2+) and Mn(2+). Arabidopsis thaliana CAX1 and CAX3 have been previously shown to differ phylogenetically from CAX2 but the physiological roles of these different transporters are st...

  8. A cage-based cationic body-centered tetragonal metal-organic framework: single-crystal to single-crystal transformation and selective uptake of organic dyes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Di-ming; Shi, Wei; Cheng, Peng

    2015-01-01

    A cage-based cationic body-centered metal-organic framework was successfully synthesized using a custom-designed bifunctional triazolcarboxylate ligand. It shows interesting single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation upon solvent exchange process and selective uptake of organic dyes.

  9. Metal-dithiocarbamate complexes: chemistry and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Hogarth, Graeme

    2012-10-01

    Dithiocarbamates are highly versatile mono-anionic chelating ligands which form stable complexes with all the transition elements and also the majority of main group, lanthanide and actinide elements. They are easily prepared from primary or secondary amines and depending upon the nature of the cation can show good solubility in water or organic solvents. They are related to the thiuram disulfides by a one-electron redox process (followed by dimerisation via sulfur-sulfur bond formation) which is easily carried out upon addition of iodide or ferric salts. Dithiocarbamates are lipophilic and generally bind to metals in a symmetrical chelate fashion but examples of other coordination modes are known, the monodentate and anisobidentate modes being most prevalent. They are planar sterically non-demanding ligands which can be electronically tuned by judicious choice of substituents. They stabilize metals in a wide range of oxidation states, this being attributed to the existence of soft dithiocarbamate and hard thioureide resonance forms, the latter formally resulting from delocalization of the nitrogen lone pair onto the sulfurs, and consequently their complexes tend to have a rich electrochemistry. Tetraethyl thiuramdisulfide (disulfiram or antabuse) has been used as a drug since the 1950s but it is only recently that dithiocarbamate complexes have been explored within the medicinal domain. Over the past two decades anti-cancer activity has been noted for gold and copper complexes, technetium and copper complexes have been used in PET-imaging, dithiocarbamates have been used to treat acute cadmium poisoning and copper complexes also have been investigated as SOD inhibitors.

  10. Metal-dithiocarbamate complexes: chemistry and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Hogarth, Graeme

    2012-10-01

    Dithiocarbamates are highly versatile mono-anionic chelating ligands which form stable complexes with all the transition elements and also the majority of main group, lanthanide and actinide elements. They are easily prepared from primary or secondary amines and depending upon the nature of the cation can show good solubility in water or organic solvents. They are related to the thiuram disulfides by a one-electron redox process (followed by dimerisation via sulfur-sulfur bond formation) which is easily carried out upon addition of iodide or ferric salts. Dithiocarbamates are lipophilic and generally bind to metals in a symmetrical chelate fashion but examples of other coordination modes are known, the monodentate and anisobidentate modes being most prevalent. They are planar sterically non-demanding ligands which can be electronically tuned by judicious choice of substituents. They stabilize metals in a wide range of oxidation states, this being attributed to the existence of soft dithiocarbamate and hard thioureide resonance forms, the latter formally resulting from delocalization of the nitrogen lone pair onto the sulfurs, and consequently their complexes tend to have a rich electrochemistry. Tetraethyl thiuramdisulfide (disulfiram or antabuse) has been used as a drug since the 1950s but it is only recently that dithiocarbamate complexes have been explored within the medicinal domain. Over the past two decades anti-cancer activity has been noted for gold and copper complexes, technetium and copper complexes have been used in PET-imaging, dithiocarbamates have been used to treat acute cadmium poisoning and copper complexes also have been investigated as SOD inhibitors. PMID:22931592

  11. Novel Organic Membrane-based Thin-film Microsensors for the Determination of Heavy Metal Cations

    PubMed Central

    Arida, Hassan A.; Kloock, Joachim P.; Schöning, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    A first step towards the fabrication and electrochemical evaluation of thin-film microsensors based on organic PVC membranes for the determination of Hg(II), Cd(II), Pb(II) and Cu(II) ions in solutions has been realised. The membrane-coating mixture used in the preparation of this new type of microsensors is incorporating PVC as supporting matrix, o-nitrophenyloctylether (o-NPOE) as solvent mediator and a recently synthesized Hg[dimethylglyoxime(phene)]2+ and Bis-(4-hydroxyacetophenone)-ethylenediamine as electroactive materials for Hg(II) and Cd(II), respectively. A set of three commercialised ionophores for Cd(II), Pb(II) and Cu(II) has been also used for comparison. Thin-film microsensors based on these membranes showed a Nernstian response of slope (26-30 mV/dec.) for the respective tested cations. The potentiometric response characteristics (linear range, pH range, detection limit and response time) are comparable with those obtained by conventional membranes as well as coated wire electrodes prepared from the same membrane. The realisation of the new organic membrane-based thin-film microsensors overcomes the problem of an insufficient selectivity of solid-state-based thin-film sensors.

  12. Structural and magnetic characterization of a tetranuclear copper(II) cubane stabilized by intramolecular metal cation-π interactions.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Raffaello; Rivière, Eric; Giorgi, Michel; Jamet, Hélène; Rousselot-Pailley, Pierre; Réglier, Marius; Simaan, A Jalila; Tron, Thierry

    2013-05-20

    A novel tetranuclear copper(II) complex (1) was synthesized from the self-assembly of copper(II) perchlorate and the ligand N-benzyl-1-(2-pyridyl)methaneimine (L(1)). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies revealed that complex 1 consists of a Cu4(OH)4 cubane core, where the four copper(II) centers are linked by μ3-hydroxo bridges. Each copper(II) ion is in a distorted square-pyramidal geometry. X-ray analysis also evidenced an unusual metal cation-π interaction between the copper ions and phenyl substituents of the ligand. Calculations based on the density functional theory method were used to quantify the strength of this metal-π interaction, which appears as an important stabilizing parameter of the cubane core, possibly acting as a driving parameter in the self-aggregation process. In contrast, using the ligand N-phenethyl-1-(2-pyridyl)methaneimine (L(2)), which only differs from L(1) by one methylene group, the same synthetic procedure led to a binuclear bis(μ-hydroxo)copper(II) complex (2) displaying intermolecular π-π interactions or, by a slight variation of the experimental conditions, to a mononuclear complex (3). These complexes were studied by X-ray diffraction techniques. The magnetic properties of complexes 1 and 2 are reported and discussed.

  13. Synthesis and chemistry of cationic d{sup 0} metal alkyl complexes. Progress report, July 1988--May 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, R.F.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this project is to develop new types of electrophilic metal alkyl complexes for catalytic C-H activation and olefin polymerization chemistry, and associated fundamental mechanistic studies. We have focused our efforts on four classes of early metal alkyl complexes: (1) cationic group 4 Cp{sub 2}M(R){sup +} complexes (1) which are active species in Cp{sub 2}MX{sub 2}-based Ziegler-Natta olefin polymerization catalyst systems and which catalyze productive C-H activation reactions of heterocycles, (2) neutral (dicarbollide)(Cp*)M(R) complexes (2) which are structurally are electronically very similar to 1, (3) half-sandwich complexes CpM(R){sub 2}(L){sub n}{sup +} which are highly coordinatively and electronically unsaturated, and (4) new group 5 (dicarbollide)(Cp)MR{sub 2} and (dicarbollide){sub 2} MR complexes which are more unsaturated than group 5 Cp{sub 2}M systems due to incorporation of the dicarbollide ligand.

  14. Coordination Chemistry of Alkali and Alkaline-Earth Cations with Macrocyclic Ligands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietrich, Bernard

    1985-01-01

    Discusses: (l) alkali and alkaline-earth cations in biology (considering naturally occurring lonophores, their X-ray structures, and physiochemical studies); (2) synthetic complexing agents for groups IA and IIA; and (3) ion transport across membranes (examining neutral macrobicyclic ligands as metal cation carriers, transport by anionic carriers,…

  15. Optical probes for the detection of protons, and alkali and alkaline earth metal cations.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Graham R C; Sahoo, Suban K; Kamila, Sukanta; Singh, Narinder; Kaur, Navneet; Hyland, Barry W; Callan, John F

    2015-07-01

    Luminescent sensors and switches continue to play a key role in shaping our understanding of key biochemical processes, assist in the diagnosis of disease and contribute to the design of new drugs and therapies. Similarly, their contribution to the environment cannot be understated as they offer a portable means to undertake field testing for hazardous chemicals and pollutants such as heavy metals. From a physiological perspective, the Group I and II metal ions are among the most important in the periodic table with blood plasma levels of H(+), Na(+) and Ca(2+) being indicators of several possible disease states. In this review, we examine the progress that has been made in the development of luminescent probes for Group I and Group II ions as well as protons. The potential applications of these probes and the mechanism involved in controlling their luminescent response upon analyte binding will also be discussed. PMID:25742963

  16. Optical probes for the detection of protons, and alkali and alkaline earth metal cations.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Graham R C; Sahoo, Suban K; Kamila, Sukanta; Singh, Narinder; Kaur, Navneet; Hyland, Barry W; Callan, John F

    2015-07-01

    Luminescent sensors and switches continue to play a key role in shaping our understanding of key biochemical processes, assist in the diagnosis of disease and contribute to the design of new drugs and therapies. Similarly, their contribution to the environment cannot be understated as they offer a portable means to undertake field testing for hazardous chemicals and pollutants such as heavy metals. From a physiological perspective, the Group I and II metal ions are among the most important in the periodic table with blood plasma levels of H(+), Na(+) and Ca(2+) being indicators of several possible disease states. In this review, we examine the progress that has been made in the development of luminescent probes for Group I and Group II ions as well as protons. The potential applications of these probes and the mechanism involved in controlling their luminescent response upon analyte binding will also be discussed.

  17. Experimental and quantum chemical modeling studies of the interactions of L-phenylalanine with divalent transition metal cations.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Shilpi; Das, Gunajyoti; Askari, Hassan

    2014-09-22

    Encoded by the UUU and UUC codons of the genetic code, L-phenylalanine (LPA) serves as an important precursor for tyrosine and various other compounds that are necessary to support life on earth. Here, we report the synthesis (both in solid and solvent phases) and characterization of the Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+) complexes of LPA by several analytical, spectral, thermal, and electrochemical techniques. The results reveal that the products formed by following the two synthetic approaches are the same, and the metal ions bind to the LPA molecules in a 1:2 molar ratio (M(+2)/LPA). Complementary geometries of the metal complexes are modeled involving the most predominant LPA conformers predicted at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level. The gaseous and aqueous phase interaction enthalpies and free energies; theoretical IR and UV-vis spectra; HOMO-LUMO energy gaps; dipole moments; Wiberg bond indices as well as the partial atomic charges in LPA and its metallic complexes are calculated and evaluated using B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) as the main computational method. This study also incorporates analyses on the efficacy of the DFT-D2 level in describing dispersion contributions, performance of the BHandHLYP functional for the open-shell Cu(2+)-LPA system, and relative metal binding affinities of the singlet versus triplet states of the Ni(2+)-LPA complex. Metal-π interactions established via the aromatic side chain of LPA add to the thermodynamic stability of the complexes, whereas metal coordination induces considerable intrinsic structural rearrangements in the molecular geometry of LPA. The LPA binding affinity order of the three Lewis acids investigated emerges as Cu(2+) > Ni(2+) > Zn(2+), paralleling the Irving-Williams series. The illustrative evidence offered by the present work suggests that the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level in combination with an empirical dispersion-correction term performs well in describing the vibrational frequencies and cation-π interactions, which are

  18. The development of a biological interface for transition metal implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melton, Kim R.

    The specific goal of this research was to develop an in vitro model for a root-form endosseous dental implant that contains a periodontal ligament and that is biologically integratable into alveolar bone. This objective was based on the following two hypotheses. (1) The chemical attachment of extracellular matrix proteins to the surface of transition metals increases the number of fibroblast cells attached to the surface of the metal. (2) The chemical attachment of extracellular matrix proteins to the surface of transition metals increases the strength of the fibroblast cell attachment to the surface of the metal. The model needed to have a well-controlled surface that was reproducible. Thus, a layer of Au was deposited over a Ti base, and dithiobis(succinimidylpropionate) (DSP) a chemical containing disulfide groups was adsorbed to the Au. Next, extracellular matrix proteins which are periodontal ligament components were attached to the free end group of the chemical that was adsorbed to the Au. This surface served as an attachment substrate on which additional periodontal ligament components such as fibroblast cells could grow. From this model a new implant interface may be developed. This model was tested using the following polypeptides; collagen type I, collagen type IV, fibronectin, and poly-D-lysine. L929 cells were grown on Ti, Ti + Au, Ti + Au + polypeptide, and Ti + Au + DSP + polypeptide. After 72 hours, the live cells were stained with neutral red. The substrates were then subjected to increasing centrifugal forces. The viable stained cells were fixed onto the substrates and cells were counted. The hypotheses were proven for three polypeptides: fibronectin, collagen type I, and poly-D-lysine. The strongest attachment was found with collagen type I. Collagen type IV did not provide any advantage for attachment over uncoated transition metals.

  19. Interaction of metal cations with alkylnitriles in the gas phase: solvation of metal ions by the hydrocarbon chain.

    PubMed

    Jobst, Karl J; Terlouw, Johan K; Luider, Theo; van Huizen, Nick A; Burgers, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    Relative affinity measurements of monovalent metal ions (M = Li(+), Na(+), Cu(+)and Ag(+)) toward aliphatic nitriles have been performed using the kinetic method by dissociation of metal bound dimer ions of the type R1C≡N-M(+)-N≡CR(2). It is found, particularly for Cu(+) and Ag(+), that the affinity towards nitriles having long chains (>C(6)) is markedly enhanced. This is attributed to a bidentate interaction of the metal ion with the nitrile moiety and the aliphatic chain. Theoretical calculations on the copper complexes show that these bidentate structures enjoy about 30% greater copper ion affinities compared to their linear counterparts. Such aliphatic interactions also play a major role in the dissociation chemistry of copper bound tetramers of the kind (RC≡N)(4)Cu(2+∙) where the long aliphatic chain R curls around the copper ion to facilitate electron transfer or a redox reaction to produce (RC≡N)(2)Cu(+) + RC≡N(+∙) + RC≡N.

  20. Macroscopic and bulk-controlled elastic modes in an interaction of interstitial alcali metal cations within a face-centered cubic crystalline fullerine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatarenko, Valentine A.; Tsysman, Constantin L.; Oltarzhevskaya, Yelena T.

    1995-01-01

    The calculations in a majority of previous works for the fulleride (AqC-60) crystals were performed within the framework of the rigid-lattice model, neglecting the distortion relaxation of the host fullerene (C-60) crystal caused by the interstitial alkali-metal (A) cations. However, an each cation is a source of a static distortion field, and the resulting field is a superposition of such fields generated by all cations. This is a reason why the host-crystal distortions depend on the A-cations configurations, i.e. on a type of a spatial bulk distribution of interstitial cations. The given paper seeks to find a functional relation between the amplitudes of the doping-induced structure-distortion waves and of static concentration ones. A semiphenomenological model is constructed here within the scope of statistical-thermodynamic treatment and using the lattice-statistics simulation method(*). In this model the effects due to the presence of q solute A cations over available interstices (per unit cell) on the static inherent reorientation and/or displacements of the solvent molecules from the 'average-lattice' sites' as well as on the lattice parameter a of a elastically-anysotropic 'cubic' C-60 crystal are taken into account.

  1. Macroscopic and bulk-controlled elastic modes in an interaction of interstitial alcali metal cations within a face-centered cubic crystalline fullerine

    SciTech Connect

    Tatarenko, V.A.; Tsysman, C.L.; Oltarzhevskaya, Y.T.

    1994-12-31

    The calculations in a majority of previous works for the fulleride (AqC{sub 60}) crystals were performed within the framework of the rigid-lattice model, neglecting the distoration relaxation of the host fullerene (C{sub 60}) crystal caused by the interstitial alkali-metal (A) cations. However, an each cation is a source of a static distoration field, and the resulting field is a superposition of such fields generated by all cations. This is a reason why the host-crystal distortions depend on the A-cations configurations, i.e. on a type of a spatial bulk distribution of interstitial cations. This paper seeks to find a functional relation between the amplitudes of the doping-induced structure-distortion waves and of statistic concentration ones. A semiphenomenological model is constructed here within the scope of statistical-thermodynamic treatment and using the lattice-statistics simulation method. In this model the effects due to the presence of q solute A cations over available interstices (per unit cell) on the statistic inherent reorientation and/or displacements of the solvent molecules from the average-lattice sites as well as on the lattice parameter a of the elastically-anysotropic cubic C{sub 60} crystal are taken into account.

  2. Distinct reaction pathway promoted by non-divalent-metal cations in a tertiary stabilized hammerhead ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Roychowdhury-Saha, Manami; Burke, Donald H.

    2007-01-01

    Divalent ion sensitivity of hammerhead ribozymes is significantly reduced when the RNA structure includes appropriate tertiary stabilization. Therefore, we investigated the activity of the tertiary stabilized “RzB” hammerhead ribozyme in several nondivalent ions. Ribozyme RzB is active in spermidine and Na+ alone, although the cleavage rates are reduced by more than 1,000-fold relative to the rates observed in Mg2+ and in transition metal ions. The trivalent cobalt hexammine (CoHex) ion is often used as an exchange-inert analog of hydrated magnesium ion. Trans-cleavage rates exceeded 8 min−1 in 20 mM CoHex, which promoted cleavage through outersphere interactions. The stimulation of catalysis afforded by the tertiary structural interactions within RzB does not require Mg2+, unlike other extended hammerhead ribozymes. Site-specific interaction with at least one Mg2+ ion is suggested by CoHex competition experiments. In the presence of a constant, low concentration of Mg2+, low concentrations of CoHex decreased the rate by two to three orders of magnitude relative to the rate in Mg2+ alone. Cleavage rates increased as CoHex concentrations were raised further, but the final fraction cleaved was lower than what was observed in CoHex or Mg2+ alone. These observations suggest that Mg2+ and CoHex compete for binding and that they cause misfolded structures when they are together. The results of this study support the existence of an alternate catalytic mechanism used by nondivalent ions (especially CoHex) that is distinct from the one promoted by divalent metal ions, and they imply that divalent metals influence catalysis through a specific nonstructural role. PMID:17456566

  3. Unifying electrostatic mechanism for metal cations in receptors and cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Previously, an electrostatic mechanism was proposed for receptor-ligand action and for cell signaling by phosphate and sulfate. The hypothesis is further elaborated by application to metal ions, mainly calcium, magnesium, zinc, iron, and copper, in receptors and cell signaling. Evidence is provided for involvement of electrostatics in various reaction modes in biosystems. Calcium plays an important role electrochemically in neurotransmission. In some cases, electron transfer and redox processes are also involved. Electrostatics are known to participate in plant biochemistry. Mechanistically, the electrostatic field may act as a conduit for electrons and radicals and in involvement with energetics.

  4. Biologically active metal-independent superoxide dismutase mimics

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.B.; Samuni, A.; Krishna, M.C.; DeGraff, W.G.; Ahn, M.S.; Samuni, U.; Russo, A. )

    1990-03-20

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is an enzyme that detoxifies superoxide (O2.-), a potentially toxic oxygen-derived species. Attempts to increase intracellular concentrations of SOD by direct application are complicated because SOD, being a relatively large molecule, does not readily cross cell membranes. We have identified a set of stable nitroxides that possess SOD-like activity, have the advantage of being low molecular weight, membrane permeable, and metal independent, and at pH 7.0 have reaction rate constants with O2.- ranging from 1.1 x 10(3) to 1.3 x 10(6) M-1 s-1. These SOD mimics protect mammalian cells from damage induced by hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, although they exhibit no catalase-like activity. In addition, the nitroxide SOD mimics rapidly oxidize DNA-FeII and thus may interrupt the Fenton reaction and prevent formation of deleterious OH radicals and/or higher oxidation states of metal ions. Whether by SOD-like activity and/or interception of an electron from redox-active metal ions they protect cells from oxidative stress and may have use in basic and applied biological studies.

  5. Reversible CO binding enables tunable CO/H₂ and CO/N₂ separations in metal-organic frameworks with exposed divalent metal cations.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Eric D; Hudson, Matthew R; Mason, Jarad A; Chavan, Sachin; Crocellà, Valentina; Howe, Joshua D; Lee, Kyuho; Dzubak, Allison L; Queen, Wendy L; Zadrozny, Joseph M; Geier, Stephen J; Lin, Li-Chiang; Gagliardi, Laura; Smit, Berend; Neaton, Jeffrey B; Bordiga, Silvia; Brown, Craig M; Long, Jeffrey R

    2014-07-30

    Six metal-organic frameworks of the M2(dobdc) (M = Mg, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn; dobdc(4-) = 2,5-dioxido-1,4-benzenedicarboxylate) structure type are demonstrated to bind carbon monoxide reversibly and at high capacity. Infrared spectra indicate that, upon coordination of CO to the divalent metal cations lining the pores within these frameworks, the C-O stretching frequency is blue-shifted, consistent with nonclassical metal-CO interactions. Structure determinations reveal M-CO distances ranging from 2.09(2) Å for M = Ni to 2.49(1) Å for M = Zn and M-C-O angles ranging from 161.2(7)° for M = Mg to 176.9(6)° for M = Fe. Electronic structure calculations employing density functional theory (DFT) resulted in good agreement with the trends apparent in the infrared spectra and crystal structures. These results represent the first crystallographically characterized magnesium and zinc carbonyl compounds and the first high-spin manganese(II), iron(II), cobalt(II), and nickel(II) carbonyl species. Adsorption isotherms indicate reversible adsorption, with capacities for the Fe, Co, and Ni frameworks approaching one CO per metal cation site at 1 bar, corresponding to loadings as high as 6.0 mmol/g and 157 cm(3)/cm(3). The six frameworks display (negative) isosteric heats of CO adsorption ranging from 52.7 to 27.2 kJ/mol along the series Ni > Co > Fe > Mg > Mn > Zn, following the Irving-Williams stability order. The reversible CO binding suggests that these frameworks may be of utility for the separation of CO from various industrial gas mixtures, including CO/H2 and CO/N2. Selectivities determined from gas adsorption isotherm data using ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) over a range of gas compositions at 1 bar and 298 K indicate that all six M2(dobdc) frameworks could potentially be used as solid adsorbents to replace current cryogenic distillation technologies, with the choice of M dictating adsorbent regeneration energy and the level of purity of the resulting gases.

  6. 2013 METALS IN BIOLOGY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JANUARY 20-25, 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, Amy

    2013-01-25

    Typical topics for lectures and posters include: biochemical and biophysical characterization of new metal containing proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids, factors, and chelators from all forms of life; synthesis, detailed characterization, and reaction chemistry of biomimetic compounds; novel crystal and solution structures of biological molecules and synthetic metal-chelates; discussions of the roles that metals play in medicine, maintenance of the environment, and biogeochemical processes; metal homeostasis; application of theory and computations to the structure and mechanism of metal-containing biological systems; and novel applications of spectroscopy to metals in biological systems.

  7. Effect of the chelation of metal cation on the antioxidant activity of chondroitin sulfates.

    PubMed

    Ajisaka, Katsumi; Oyanagi, Yutaka; Miyazaki, Tatsuo; Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2016-06-01

    The antioxidant potencies of chondroitin sulfates (CSs) from shark cartilage, salmon cartilage, bovine trachea, and porcine intestinal mucosa were compared by three representative methods for the measurement of the antioxidant activity; DPPH radical scavenging activity, superoxide radical scavenging activity, and hydroxyl radical scavenging activity. CSs from salmon cartilage and bovine trachea showed higher potency in comparison with CSs from shark cartilage and porcine intestinal mucosa. Next, CS from salmon cartilage chelating with Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+), or Zn(2+) were prepared, and their antioxidant potencies were compared. CS chelating with Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) ions showed rather decreased DPPH radical scavenging activity in comparison with CS of H(+) form. In contrast, CS chelating with Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) ion showed remarkably enhanced superoxide radical scavenging activity than CS of H(+) or Na(+) form. Moreover, CS chelating with divalent metal ions, Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+), or Zn(2+), showed noticeably higher hydroxyl radical scavenging activity than CS of H(+) or Na(+) form. The present results revealed that the scavenging activities of, at least, superoxide radical and hydroxyl radical were enhanced by the chelation with divalent metal ions.

  8. Effect of the chelation of metal cation on the antioxidant activity of chondroitin sulfates.

    PubMed

    Ajisaka, Katsumi; Oyanagi, Yutaka; Miyazaki, Tatsuo; Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2016-06-01

    The antioxidant potencies of chondroitin sulfates (CSs) from shark cartilage, salmon cartilage, bovine trachea, and porcine intestinal mucosa were compared by three representative methods for the measurement of the antioxidant activity; DPPH radical scavenging activity, superoxide radical scavenging activity, and hydroxyl radical scavenging activity. CSs from salmon cartilage and bovine trachea showed higher potency in comparison with CSs from shark cartilage and porcine intestinal mucosa. Next, CS from salmon cartilage chelating with Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+), or Zn(2+) were prepared, and their antioxidant potencies were compared. CS chelating with Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) ions showed rather decreased DPPH radical scavenging activity in comparison with CS of H(+) form. In contrast, CS chelating with Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) ion showed remarkably enhanced superoxide radical scavenging activity than CS of H(+) or Na(+) form. Moreover, CS chelating with divalent metal ions, Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+), or Zn(2+), showed noticeably higher hydroxyl radical scavenging activity than CS of H(+) or Na(+) form. The present results revealed that the scavenging activities of, at least, superoxide radical and hydroxyl radical were enhanced by the chelation with divalent metal ions. PMID:26856546

  9. Biological metals and metal-targeting compounds in major neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Barnham, Kevin J; Bush, Ashley I

    2014-10-01

    Multiple abnormalities occur in the homeostasis of essential endogenous brain biometals in age-related neurodegenerative disorders, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. As a result, metals both accumulate in microscopic proteinopathies, and can be deficient in cells or cellular compartments. Therefore, bulk measurement of metal content in brain tissue samples reveal only the "tip of the iceberg", with most of the important changes occurring on a microscopic and biochemical level. Each of the major proteins implicated in these disorders interacts with biological transition metals. Tau and the amyloid protein precursor have important roles in normal neuronal iron homeostasis. Changes in metal distribution, cellular deficiencies, or sequestration in proteinopathies all present abnormalities that can be corrected in animal models by small molecules. These biochemical targets are more complex than the simple excess of metals that are targeted by chelators. In this review we illustrate some of the richness in the science that has developed in the study of metals in neurodegeneration, and explore its novel pharmacology.

  10. Hetero-metal cation control of CuO nanostructures and their high catalytic performance for CO oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hongwen; Zhang, Liqiang; Wu, Kewei; Yu, Qing; Chen, Ru; Yang, Hangsheng; Peng, Xinsheng; Ye, Zhizhen

    2012-11-01

    A controllable synthesis of various morphologies of CuO nanostructures with tuning by hetero-metal cations has been developed in aqueous solution at room temperature. The morphologies of CuO can be engineered from nanosheets to nanoparticles with different length ratios of the long axis to the short axis. The formation of many metal-ion complexes plays an important role in slowing the release rate of OH- and affects the reaction kinetics further. We found that the effect of hetero-metal cations on the final morphology of the CuO nanostructures was the same as that of the cooling temperature. A series of temperature-controlled experiments demonstrated this. Furthermore, among all the synthesized CuO nanostructures, the fascinating colloidal mesoporous CuO quasi-monocrystalline nanosheets prepared at 25 °C with a thickness of ca. 10 nm and large specific surface area of 80.32 m2 g-1 is investigated intensively. These CuO nanosheets demonstrate a superior catalytic activity for CO oxidation, with features of high CO conversion efficiency (47.77 mmolCO g-1CuO h-1 at 200 °C), which is close to that reported for previously investigated supported-CuO catalysts, and a low apparent activation energy Ea (53.3 kJ mol-1).A controllable synthesis of various morphologies of CuO nanostructures with tuning by hetero-metal cations has been developed in aqueous solution at room temperature. The morphologies of CuO can be engineered from nanosheets to nanoparticles with different length ratios of the long axis to the short axis. The formation of many metal-ion complexes plays an important role in slowing the release rate of OH- and affects the reaction kinetics further. We found that the effect of hetero-metal cations on the final morphology of the CuO nanostructures was the same as that of the cooling temperature. A series of temperature-controlled experiments demonstrated this. Furthermore, among all the synthesized CuO nanostructures, the fascinating colloidal mesoporous Cu

  11. Energy decomposition analysis of cation-π, metal ion-lone pair, hydrogen bonded, charge-assisted hydrogen bonded, and π-π interactions.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bhaskar; Srivastava, Hemant Kumar; Gayatri, Gaddamanugu; Sastry, Garikapati Narahari

    2015-03-30

    This study probes the nature of noncovalent interactions, such as cation-π, metal ion-lone pair (M-LP), hydrogen bonding (HB), charge-assisted hydrogen bonding (CAHB), and π-π interactions, using energy decomposition schemes-density functional theory (DFT)-symmetry-adapted perturbation theory and reduced variational space. Among cation-π complexes, the polarization and electrostatic components are the major contributors to the interaction energy (IE) for metal ion-π complexes, while for onium ion-π complexes (NH4+, PH4+, OH3+, and SH3+) the dispersion component is prominent. For M-LP complexes, the electrostatic component contributes more to the IE except the dicationic metal ion complexes with H2 S and PH3 where the polarization component dominates. Although electrostatic component dominates for the HB and CAHB complexes, dispersion is predominant in π-π complexes.

  12. Effect of Siloxane Ring Strain and Cation Charge Density on the Formation of Coordinately Unsaturated Metal Sites on Silica: Insights from DFT Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Ujjal; Zhang, Guanghui; Hu, Bo; Hock, Adam S.; Redfern, Paul C.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous silica (SiO2) is commonly used as a support in heterogeneous catalysis. However, due to the structural disorder and temperature induced change of surface morphology, the structures of silica supported metal catalysts are difficult to determine. Most studies are primarily focused on understanding the interactions of different types of surface hydroxyl groups with metal ions. In comparison, the effect of siloxane ring size on the structure of silica supported metal catalysts and how it affects catalytic activity is poorly understood. Here, we have used density functional theory calculations to understand the effect of siloxane ring strain on structure and activity of different monomeric Lewis acid metal sites on silica. In particular, we have found that large siloxane rings favor strong dative bonding interaction between metal ion and surface hydroxyls, leading to the formation of high-coordinate metal sites. In comparison, metal-silanol interaction is weak in small siloxane rings, resulting in low-coordinate metal sites. The physical origin of this size dependence is associated with siloxane ring strain, and, a correlation between metal-silanol interaction energy and ring strain energy has been observed. In addition to ring strain, the strength of the metal-silanol interaction also depends on the positive charge density of the cations. In fact, a correlation also exists between metal-silanol interaction energy and charge density of several first-row transition and post-transition metals. The theoretical results are compared with the EXAFS data of monomeric Zn(II) and Ga(III) ions grafted on silica. The molecular level insights of how metal ion coordination on silica depends on siloxane ring strain and cation charge density will be useful in the synthesis of new catalysts.

  13. Optical Properties and Biological Applications of Electromagnetically Coupled Metal Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikholeslami, Sassan Nathan

    The optical properties of metallic particles change dramatically as the size shrinks to the nanoscale. The familiar mirror-like sheen of bulk metals is replaced by the bright, sharp, colorful plasmonic resonances of nanoparticles. The resonances of plasmonic metal nanoparticles are highly tunable throughout the visible spectrum, depending on the size, shape, local dielectric environment, and proximity to other optical resonances. Fundamental and applied research in the nanoscience community in the past few decades has sought to understand and exploit these phenomena for biological applications. In this work, discrete nanoparticle assemblies were produced through biomolecular interactions and studied at the single particle level with darkfield spectroscopy. Pairs of gold nanoparticles tethered by DNA were utilized as molecular rulers to study the dynamics of DNA bending by the restriction enzyme EcoRV. These results substantiated that nanoparticle rulers, deemed "plasmon rulers", could measure the dynamics of single biomolecules with high throughput, long lifetime, and high temporal resolution. To extend these concepts for live cell studies, a plasmon ruler comprised of peptide-linked gold nanoparticle satellites around a core particle was synthesized and utilized to optically follow cell signaling pathways in vivo at the single molecule level. The signal provided by these plasmon rulers allowed continuous observation of caspase-3 activation at the single molecule level in living cells for over 2 hours, unambiguously identifying early stage activation of caspase-3 in apoptotic cells. In the last section of this dissertation, an experimental and theoretical study of electomagnetic coupling in asymmetric metal nanoparticle dimers is presented. A "heterodimer" composed of a silver particle and a gold particle is observed to have a novel coupling between a plasmon mode (free electron oscillations) and an inter-band absorption process (bound electron transitions). The

  14. Metal cation cross-linked nanocellulose hydrogels as tissue engineering substrates.

    PubMed

    Zander, Nicole E; Dong, Hong; Steele, Joshua; Grant, John T

    2014-01-01

    The use of cellulose materials for biomedical applications is attractive due to their low cost, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. Specific processing of cellulose to yield nanofibrils further improves mechanical properties and suitability as a tissue engineering substrate due to the similarity to the fibrous structure, porosity, and size-scale of the native extracellular matrix. In order to generate the substrate, nanocellulose hydrogels were fabricated from carboxylated cellulose nanofibrils via hydrogelation using metal salts. Hydrogels cross-linked with Ca(2+) and Fe(3+) were investigated as tissue culture substrates for C3H10T1/2 fibroblast cells. Control substrates as well as those with physically adsorbed and covalently attached fibronectin protein were evaluated with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Significantly more cells were attached to surfaces modified with protein, with the highest number of cells adhered to the calcium cross-linked hydrogels with covalently attached protein.

  15. Cation-π Interactions in Chemistry and Biology: A New View of Benzene, Phe, Tyr, and Trp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, Dennis A.

    1996-01-01

    Cations bind to the π face of an aromatic structure through a surprisingly strong, non-covalent force termed the cation-π interaction. The magnitude and generality of the effect have been established by gas-phase measurements and by studies of model receptors in aqueous media. To first order, the interaction can be considered an electrostatic attraction between a positive charge and the quadrupole moment of the aromatic. A great deal of direct and circumstantial evidence indicates that cation-π interactions are important in a variety of proteins that bind cationic ligands or substrates. In this context, the amino acids phenylalanine (Phe), tyrosine (Tyr), and tryptophan (Trp) can be viewed as polar, yet hydrophobic, residues.

  16. How the spontaneous insertion of amphiphilic imidazolium-based cations changes biological membranes: a molecular simulation study.

    PubMed

    Lim, Geraldine S; Jaenicke, Stephan; Klähn, Marco

    2015-11-21

    The insertion of 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium cations (OMIM(+)) from a diluted aqueous ionic liquid (IL) solution into a model of a bacterial cell membrane is investigated. Subsequently, the mutual interactions of cations inside the membrane and their combined effect on membrane properties are derived. The ionic liquid solution and the membrane model are simulated using molecular dynamics in combination with empirical force fields. A high propensity of OMIM(+) for membrane insertion is observed, with a cation concentration at equilibrium inside the membrane 47 times larger than in the solvent. Once inserted, cations exhibit a weak effective attraction inside the membrane at a distance of 1.3 nm. At this free energy minimum, negatively charged phosphates of the phospholipids are sandwiched between two OMIM(+) to form energetically favorable OMIM(+)-phosphate-OMIM(+) types of coordination. The cation-cation association free energy is 5.9 kJ mol(-1), whereas the activation barrier for dissociation is 10.1 kJ mol(-1). Subsequently, OMIM(+) are inserted into the leaflet of the membrane bilayer that represents the extracellular side. The cations are evenly distributed with mutual cation distances according to the found optimum distance of 1.3 nm. Because of the short length of the cation alkyl chains compared to lipid fatty acids, voids are generated in the hydrophobic core of the membrane. These voids disorder the fatty acids, because they enable fatty acids to curl into these empty spaces and also cause a thinning of the membrane by 0.6 nm. Additionally, the membrane density increases at its center. The presence of OMIM(+) in the membrane facilitates the permeation of small molecules such as ammonia through the membrane, which is chosen as a model case for small polar solutes. The permeability coefficient of the membrane with respect to ammonia increases substantially by a factor of seven. This increase is caused by a reduction of the involved free energy barriers

  17. The biological chemistry of the transition metal "transportome" of Cupriavidus metallidurans.

    PubMed

    Nies, Dietrich H

    2016-05-01

    This review tries to illuminate how the bacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 is able to allocate essential transition metal cations to their target proteins although these metals have similar charge-to-surface ratios and chemical features, exert toxic effects, compete with each other, and occur in the bacterial environment over a huge range of concentrations and speciations. Central to this ability is the "transportome", the totality of all interacting metal import and export systems, which, as an emergent feature, transforms the environmental metal content and speciation into the cellular metal mélange. In a kinetic flow equilibrium resulting from controlled uptake and efflux reactions, the periplasmic and cytoplasmic metal content is adjusted in a way that minimizes toxic effects. A central core function of the transportome is to shape the metal ion composition using high-rate and low-specificity reactions to avoid time and/or energy-requiring metal discrimination reactions. This core is augmented by metal-specific channels that may even deliver metals all the way from outside of the cell to the cytoplasm. This review begins with a description of the basic chemical features of transition metal cations and the biochemical consequences of these attributes, and which transition metals are available to C. metallidurans. It then illustrates how the environment influences the metal content and speciation, and how the transportome adjusts this metal content. It concludes with an outlook on the fate of metals in the cytoplasm. By generalization, insights coming from C. metallidurans shed light on multiple transition metal homoeostatic mechanisms in all kinds of bacteria including pathogenic species, where the "battle" for metals is an important part of the host-pathogen interaction. PMID:27065183

  18. Alginate and Algal-Based Beads for the Sorption of Metal Cations: Cu(II) and Pb(II)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shengye; Vincent, Thierry; Faur, Catherine; Guibal, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Alginate and algal-biomass (Laminaria digitata) beads were prepared by homogeneous Ca ionotropic gelation. In addition, glutaraldehyde-crosslinked poly (ethyleneimine) (PEI) was incorporated into algal beads. The three sorbents were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX): the sorption occurs in the whole mass of the sorbents. Sorption experiments were conducted to evaluate the impact of pH, sorption isotherms, and uptake kinetics. A special attention was paid to the effect of drying (air-drying vs. freeze-drying) on the mass transfer properties. For alginate, freeze drying is required for maintaining the porosity of the hydrogel, while for algal-based sorbents the swelling of the material minimizes the impact of the drying procedure. The maximum sorption capacities observed from experiments were 415, 296 and 218 mg Pb g−1 and 112, 77 and 67 mg Cu g−1 for alginate, algal and algal/PEI beads respectively. Though the sorption capacities of algal-beads decreased slightly (compared to alginate beads), the greener and cheaper one-pot synthesis of algal beads makes this sorbent more competitive for environmental applications. PEI in algal beads decreases the sorption properties in the case of the sorption of metal cations under selected experimental conditions. PMID:27598128

  19. Reversible, Selective Trapping of Perchlorate from Water in Record Capacity by a Cationic Metal-Organic Framework.

    PubMed

    Colinas, Ian R; Silva, Rachel C; Oliver, Scott R J

    2016-02-16

    We report the capture of ppm-level aqueous perchlorate in record capacity and kinetics via the complete anion exchange of a cationic metal-organic framework. Ambient conditions were used for both the synthesis of silver 4,4'-bipyridine nitrate (SBN) and the exchange, forming silver 4,4'-bipyridine perchlorate (SBP). The exchange was complete within 90 min, and the capacity was 354 mg/g, representing 99% removal. These values are greater than current anion exchangers such as the resins Amberlite IRA-400 (249 mg/g), Purolite A530E (104 mg/g), and layered double hydroxides (28 mg/g). Moreover, unlike resins and layered double hydroxides, SBN is fully reusable and displays 96% regeneration to SBN in nitrate solution, with new crystal formation allowing the indefinite cycling for perchlorate. We show seven cycles as proof of concept. Perchlorate contamination of water represents a serious health threat because it is a thyroid endocrine disruptor. This noncomplexing anionic pollutant is significantly mobile and environmentally persistent. Removal of other anionic pollutants from water such as chromate, pertechnetate, or arsenate may be possible by this methodology. PMID:26765213

  20. Chiral Nanostructures from Helical Copolymer-Metal Complexes: Tunable Cation-π Interactions and Sergeants and Soldiers Effect.

    PubMed

    Arias, Sandra; Bergueiro, Julián; Freire, Félix; Quiñoá, Emilio; Riguera, Ricardo

    2016-01-13

    Poly(phenylacetylene) (PPA) copolymers containing (R)- or (S)-MPA as minor chiral pendant can be forced to selectively adopt the right- o left-handed helix, in the presence of small amounts of Na(+) or Ag(+) ("Sergeants and Soldiers Effect") by addition of a donor cosolvent. The helical sense depends exclusively on the chiral monomer/donor cosolvent ratio, and this allows a perfect on/off tuning of the helicity of the copolymer. When the amount of the donor cosolvent is low, the metal ion complex is stabilized by a cation-π interaction, which is selectively cleaved when the amount of cosolvent is higher. Macroscopically chiral nanospheres and nanotubes composed by helical copolymers with P or M helical sense are also described. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to obtain the two enantiomeric helical structures (P and M helicities) and the corresponding nanospheres and nanotubes from a single helical copolymer, by controlled activation/deactivation of the Sergeant and Soldiers Effect with a donor cosolvent. PMID:26578292

  1. Alginate and Algal-Based Beads for the Sorption of Metal Cations: Cu(II) and Pb(II).

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengye; Vincent, Thierry; Faur, Catherine; Guibal, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Alginate and algal-biomass (Laminaria digitata) beads were prepared by homogeneous Ca ionotropic gelation. In addition, glutaraldehyde-crosslinked poly (ethyleneimine) (PEI) was incorporated into algal beads. The three sorbents were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX): the sorption occurs in the whole mass of the sorbents. Sorption experiments were conducted to evaluate the impact of pH, sorption isotherms, and uptake kinetics. A special attention was paid to the effect of drying (air-drying vs. freeze-drying) on the mass transfer properties. For alginate, freeze drying is required for maintaining the porosity of the hydrogel, while for algal-based sorbents the swelling of the material minimizes the impact of the drying procedure. The maximum sorption capacities observed from experiments were 415, 296 and 218 mg Pb g(-1) and 112, 77 and 67 mg Cu g(-1) for alginate, algal and algal/PEI beads respectively. Though the sorption capacities of algal-beads decreased slightly (compared to alginate beads), the greener and cheaper one-pot synthesis of algal beads makes this sorbent more competitive for environmental applications. PEI in algal beads decreases the sorption properties in the case of the sorption of metal cations under selected experimental conditions. PMID:27598128

  2. Current Understanding of the Binding Sites, Capacity, Affinity, and Biological Significance of Metals in Melanin

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Lian; Simon, John D.

    2008-01-01

    Metal chelation is often invoked as one of the main biological functions of melanin. In order to understand the interaction between metals and melanin, extensive studies have been carried out to determine the nature of the metal binding sites, binding capacity and affinity. These data are central to efforts aimed at elucidating the role metal binding plays in determining the physical, structural, biological, and photochemical properties of melanin. This article examines the current state of understanding of this field. PMID:17580858

  3. Gas sorption and transition-metal cation separation with a thienothiophene based zirconium metal-organic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SK, Mostakim; Grzywa, Maciej; Volkmer, Dirk; Biswas, Shyam

    2015-12-01

    The modulated synthesis of the thienothiophene based zirconium metal-organic framework (MOF) material having formula [Zr6O4(OH)4(DMTDC)6]·4.8DMF·10H2O (1) (H2DMTDC=3,4-dimethylthieno[2,3-b]thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid; DMF=N,N'-dimethylformamide) was carried out by heating a mixture of ZrCl4, H2DMTDC linker and benzoic acid (used as a modulator) with a molar ratio of 1:1:30 in DMF at 150 °C for 24 h. Systematic investigations have been performed in order to realize the effect of ZrCl4/benzoic acid molar ratio on the crystallinity of the material. The activation (i.e., the removal of the guest solvent molecules from the pores) of as-synthesized compound was achieved by stirring it with methanol and subsequently heating under vacuum. A combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), thermogravimetric (TG) and elemental analysis was used to examine the phase purity of the as-synthesized and thermally activated 1. The material displays high thermal stability up to 310 °C in an air atmosphere. As revealed from the XRD measurements, the compound retains its crystallinity when treated with water, acetic acid and 1 M HCl solutions. The N2 and CO2 sorption analyses suggest that the material possesses remarkably high microporosity (SBET=1236 m2 g-1; CO2 uptake=3.5 mmol g-1 at 1 bar and 0 °C). The compound also shows selective adsorption behavior for Cu2+ over Co2+ and Ni2+ ions.

  4. Synthesis of metal-metal oxide catalysts and electrocatalysts using a metal cation adsorption/reduction and adatom replacement by more noble ones

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Vukmirovic, Miomir; Sasaki, Kotaro

    2010-04-27

    The invention relates to platinum-metal oxide composite particles and their use as electrocatalysts in oxygen-reducing cathodes and fuel cells. The invention particularly relates to methods for preventing the oxidation of the platinum electrocatalyst in the cathodes of fuel cells by use of these platinum-metal oxide composite particles. The invention additionally relates to methods for producing electrical energy by supplying such a fuel cell with an oxidant, such as oxygen, and a fuel source, such as hydrogen. The invention also relates to methods of making the metal-metal oxide composites.

  5. Selective enrichment of sulfides, thiols and methylthiophosphates from water samples on metal-loaded cation-exchange materials for gas chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Beiner, K; Popp, P; Wennrich, R

    2002-08-30

    The suitability of using metal-loaded sorbents for solid-phase extraction to enrich organic sulfur compounds from water samples was studied. To test the retention behavior of a number of sulfides, thiols and methylthiophosphates, a cation-exchanger was loaded with various metal ions. The elution behavior of sulfur compounds was investigated with different solvents. A combination of Pb2+-modified cation-exchanger as sorbent and CS2 (1%, v/v) in toluene proved to be the most suitable approach for the given problem. Using GC with a pulsed flame photometric detector yielded detection limits of between 0.6 and 2.9 microg/l. The results showed good reproducibility with relative standard deviations of 2-11%. PMID:12236501

  6. Dynamic chiral-at-metal stability of tetrakis(d/l-hfc)Ln(III) complexes capped with an alkali metal cation in solution.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yiji; Zou, Fang; Wan, Shigang; Ouyang, Jie; Lin, Lirong; Zhang, Hui

    2012-06-14

    Chiral tetrakis(β-diketonate) Ln(III) complexes Δ-[NaLa(d-hfc)(4)(CH(3)CN)] (1) and Λ-[NaLa(l-hfc)(4) (CH(3)CN)] (2) (d/l-hfc(-) = 3-heptafluo-robutylryl-(+)/(-)-camphorate) are a pair of enantiomers and crystallize in the same Sohncke space group (P2(1)2(1)2(1)) with dodecahedral (DD) geometry. Typically positive and negative exciton splitting patterns around 320 nm were observed in the solid-state circular dichroism (CD) spectra of complexes 1 and 2, which indicate that their shell configurational chiralities are Δ and Λ, respectively. The apparent bisignate couplets in the solid-state CD spectra of [CsLn(d-hfc)(4)(H(2)O)] [Ln = La (3), Yb (5)] and [CsLn(l-hfc)(4)(H(2)O)] [Ln = La (4), Yb (6)] show that they are a pair of enantiomers and their absolute configurations are denoted Δ and Λ, respectively. The crystallographic data of 5 reveals that its coordination polyhedron is the square antiprism (SAP) geometry and it undergoes a phase transition from triclinic (α phase, P1) to monoclinic (β phase, C2) upon cooling. The difference between the two phases is brought about by the temperature dependent behaviour of the coordination water molecules, but this did not affect the configurational chirality of the Δ-SAP-[Yb(d-hfc)(4)](-) moiety. Furthermore, time-dependent CD, UV-vis and (19)F NMR were applied to study the solution behavior of these complexes. It was found that the chiral-at-metal stability of the three pairs of complexes is different and affected by both the Ln(3+) and M(+) ion size. The results show that the Cs(+) cation can retain the metal center chirality and stablize the structures of [Ln(d/l-hfc)(4)](-) or the dissociated tris(d/l-hfc)Ln(III) species in solution for a longer time than that of the Na(+) cation, and it is important that the Cs(+) ion successfully lock the configurational chirality around the Yb(3+) center of the complex species in solution. This is reasoned by the short Cs(+)···FC, Cs(+)···O-Yb and Cs(+)···Yb(3

  7. Hydration Structures and Thermodynamic Properties of Cationized Biologically Relevant Molecules, M+(Indole)(H2O)n (M = Na, K; n = 3-6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Haochen; Lisy, James

    2015-03-01

    The balance between various noncovalent interactions plays a key role in determining the hydration structures and thermodynamic properties of biologically relevant molecules in biological mediums. Such properties of biologically relevant molecules are closely related to their often unique biological functionalities. The indole moiety is a basic functional group of many important neurotransmitters and hormones and has been used as tractable model for more complex biomolecules. The cationized indole water cluster is a perfect system for the quantitative and systematic study of the competition and cooperation of noncovalent interactions, as electrostatic interactions can be adjusted by introducing different monovalent cations and hydrogen bonding interactions can be adjusted by varying the level of hydration. IRPD spectra with isotopic (H/D) analysis helped unravel the overlapping N-H and O-H stretching modes, a major challenge of earlier studies. Thermodynamic analysis using relative Gibbs free energies, for energy ordering, together with spectral analysis provided unambiguous assignment of spectral features and structural configurations. A systematic hydration model with an in-depth account of noncovalent interactions is presented.

  8. Three Alkali-Metal-Gold-Gallium Systems. Ternary Tunnel Structures and Some Problems with Poorly Ordered Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Smetana, Volodymyr; Miller, Gordon J.; Corbett, John D.

    2012-06-27

    Six new intermetallic compounds have been characterized in the alkali metal (A = Na, Rb, Cs)–gold–gallium systems. Three isostructural compounds with the general composition A0.55Au2Ga2, two others of AAu3Ga2 (A = Rb, Cs), and the related Na13Au41.2Ga30.3 were synthesized via typical high-temperature reactions and their crystal structures determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis: Na0.56(9)Au2Ga2 (I, I4/mcm, a = 8.718(1) Å, c = 4.857(1) Å, Z = 4), Rb0.56(1)Au2Ga2 (II, I4/mcm, a = 8.950(1) Å, c = 4.829(1) Å, Z = 4), Cs0.54(2)Au2Ga2 (III, I4/mcm, a = 9.077(1) Å, c = 4.815(1) Å, Z = 4), RbAu3Ga2 (IV, Pnma, a = 13.384(3) Å, b = 5.577(1) Å, c = 7.017(1) Å, Z = 4), CsAu3Ga2 (V, Pnma, a = 13.511(3) Å, b = 5.614(2) Å, c = 7.146(1) Å, Z = 4), Na13Au41.2(1)Ga30.3(1) (VI, P6 mmm, a = 19.550(3) Å, c = 8.990(2) Å, Z = 2). The first three compounds (I–III) are isostructural with tetragonal K0.55Au2Ga2 and likewise contain planar eight-member Au/Ga rings that stack along c to generate tunnels and that contain varying degrees of disordered Na–Cs cations. The cation dispositions are much more clearly and reasonably defined by electron density mapping than through least-squares refinements with conventional anisotropic ellipsoids. Orthorhombic AAu3Ga2 (IV, V) are ordered ternary Rb and Cs derivatives of the SrZn5 type structure, demonstrating structural variability within the AAu3Ga2 family. All attempts to prepare an isotypic “NaAu3Ga2” were not successful, but yielded only a similar composition Na13Au41.2Ga30.3 (NaAu3.17Ga2.33) (VI) in a very different structure with two types of cation sites. Crystal orbital Hamilton population (COHP) analysis obtained from tight-binding electronic structure calculations for idealized I–IV via linear muffin-tin-orbital (LMTO) methods emphasized the major contributions of heteroatomic Au–Ga bonding to the structural stability of these compounds. The relative minima (pseudogaps) in the DOS curves for IV

  9. Drivers of Tree Species Effects on Phosphorus and Cation Cycling in Plantations at La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, A. E.

    2014-12-01

    Fast-growing trees in secondary forests and plantations in the humid tropics play an important role in the atmospheric CO2 balance owing to their high rates of carbon sequestration. Because plants require nutrients to sustain high CO2 uptake, differences among tree species in traits related to nutrient uptake, retention and recycling could influence ecosystem-scale carbon cycling. A better understanding of the relationships among plant traits, nutrient and carbon cycling will thus improve ecosystem- to global scale modeling of effects of vegetation change on carbon cycling. In an experimental setting in which state factors were similar among four species of tropical trees situated on an Oxisol in replicated, 25-yr-old, mono-dominant plantations, I evaluated various drivers of aboveground storage of phosphorus (P) and cations, measuring nutrient fluxes in litterfall and fine-root growth and storage in biomass and soil to 1-m depth. Because fine roots increase the capacity to scavenge nutrients already on exchange sites within the soil environment, I hypothesized that P and cation uptake would be correlated directly with fine-root growth. The four tree species in this experiment, Hieronyma alchorneoides, Pentaclethra macroloba, Virola koschnyi, and Vochysia guatemalensis differed significantly in net cation uptake over the first 25 years of growth (P = 0.013, Ca; P >0.0001, Mg, Mn, K, Al, Fe, and Sr). For all cations, aboveground tree biomass was highly correlated with fine-root ingrowth length, with P values >0.0001 for all cations except Ca (P = 0.013). In contrast for P, differences among species were only marginally significant (P = 0.062). Similarly, P in aboveground tree biomass was marginally correlated with fine-root ingrowth (P = 0.068). Neither cation nor P uptake was correlated with measures of available P and cations, organic or total P in surface soil. For P, the less significant correlation with fine-root growth suggests that some other mechanism, such

  10. Actinide cation-cation complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyer, N.J.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1994-12-01

    The +5 oxidation state of U, Np, Pu, and Am is a linear dioxo cation (AnO{sub 2}{sup +}) with a formal charge of +1. These cations form complexes with a variety of other cations, including actinide cations. Other oxidation states of actinides do not form these cation-cation complexes with any cation other than AnO{sub 2}{sup +}; therefore, cation-cation complexes indicate something unique about AnO{sub 2}{sup +} cations compared to actinide cations in general. The first cation-cation complex, NpO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, was reported by Sullivan, Hindman, and Zielen in 1961. Of the four actinides that form AnO{sub 2}{sup +} species, the cation-cation complexes of NpO{sub 2}{sup +} have been studied most extensively while the other actinides have not. The only PuO{sub 2}{sup +} cation-cation complexes that have been studied are with Fe{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 3+} and neither one has had its equilibrium constant measured. Actinides have small molar absorptivities and cation-cation complexes have small equilibrium constants; therefore, to overcome these obstacles a sensitive technique is required. Spectroscopic techniques are used most often to study cation-cation complexes. Laser-Induced Photacoustic Spectroscopy equilibrium constants for the complexes NpO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, NpO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}Th{sup 4+}, PuO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, and PuO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}Th{sup 4+} at an ionic strength of 6 M using LIPAS are 2.4 {plus_minus} 0.2, 1.8 {plus_minus} 0.9, 2.2 {plus_minus} 1.5, and {approx}0.8 M{sup {minus}1}.

  11. A comparative study of optical absorption and photocatalytic properties of nanocrystalline single-phase anatase and rutile TiO{sub 2} doped with transition metal cations

    SciTech Connect

    Kernazhitsky, L.; Shymanovska, V.; Gavrilko, T.; Naumov, V.; Kshnyakin, V.; Khalyavka, T.

    2013-02-15

    The effect of nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} doping with transition metal cations (Cu{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 3+}, Co{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 3+}) on their optical absorption and photocatalytic properties was investigated. The obtained metal-doped TiO{sub 2} samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. It is shown that doping effect on anatase (A) and rutile (R) properties is quite different, being much stronger and complicated on A than on R. Contrary to doped R, doped A revealed a significant red shift of the absorption edge along with the band gap narrowing. Photocatalytic activity of anatase increases upon doping in the order: AR/Co>R/Cu>R/Fe>R/Cr, indicating the inhibitory effect of impurity cations. This fact correlates with the decrease in the UV absorption of the doped rutile in the region of the Hg-lamp irradiation at 4.88 eV. - Graphical abstract: A red shift of the absorption edge of nanocrystalline single-phase anatase after doping with transition metal cations. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single-phase anatase and rutile powders surface-doped with transition metal cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absorption edge and band gap of rutile do not change with surface doping. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Band gap of surface-doped anatase reduces being the lowest for A/Fe. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The surface-doping improves photocatalytic activity of anatase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The surface-doping inhibits photocatalytic activity of rutile.

  12. Modeling metal cation-phosphate interactions in nucleic acids: activated dissociation of Mg+, Al+, Cu+, and Zn+ complexes of triethyl phosphate.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Chunhai; Rodgers, M T

    2009-08-12

    Threshold collision-induced dissociation techniques are employed to determine the activation energies (AEs) and bond dissociation energies (BDEs) of metal cation-triethyl phosphate complexes, M(+)(TEP), where M(+) = Mg(+), Al(+), Cu(+), and Zn(+). Activated dissociation resulting in loss of ethene, C(2)H(4), corresponds to the primary and lowest energy pathway for all four systems examined. Sequential loss of additional C(2)H(4) molecules and loss of the intact TEP ligand is also observed at elevated energies. Theoretical calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G* level of theory are used to determine the structures, vibrational frequencies, and rotational constants of neutral TEP and the M(+)(TEP) complexes, transition states, intermediates, and products of the activated dissociation of these complexes. Theoretical AEs and BDEs are determined from single point energy calculations at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p) level using the B3LYP/6-31G* optimized geometries. The agreement between the calculated and measured AEs for elimination of C(2)H(4) is excellent for all four systems. In contrast, less satisfactory agreement between theory and experiment is found for the M(+)-TEP BDEs and may indicate limitations in the competitive model used to analyze these high energy dissociation pathways. The influence of the valence orbital occupation of the metal cation on the binding and activation propensities for elimination of ethene from TEP is examined. The binding of metal cations to TEP is compared to that of the nucleobases to assess the binding preferences of metal cations to nucleic acids.

  13. Precipitation of Metallic Cations by the Acidic Exopolysaccharides from Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Bradyrhizobium (Chamaecytisus) Strain BGA-1

    PubMed Central

    Corzo, J.; León-Barrios, M.; Hernando-Rico, V.; Gutierrez-Navarro, A. M.

    1994-01-01

    The interaction between the acidic exopolysaccharides produced by two Bradyrhizobium strains and several metal cations has been studied. Aqueous solutions in the millimolar range of Fe3+ but not of Fe2+ precipitated the exopolysaccharides from Bradyrhizobium (Chamaecytisus) strain BGA-1 and, to a lesser extent, Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110. The precipitation was pH dependent, with a maximum around pH 3. The precipitate was redissolved by changing the pH and by Fe3+ reduction or chelation. Deacetylation of B. japonicum polysaccharide increased its precipitation by Fe3+. At pH near neutrality, the polysaccharide from Bradyrhizobium (Chamaecytisus) strain BGA-1 stabilized Fe3+ solutions, despite the insolubility of Fe(OH)3. Aluminum precipitated Bradyrhizobium (Chamaecytisus) polysaccharide but not the polysaccharide produced by B. japonicum. The precipitation showed a maximum at about pH 4.8, and the precipitate was redissolved after Al3+ chelation with EDTA. Precipitation was inhibited by increases in the ionic strength over 10 mM. Bradyrhizobium (Chamaecytisus) polysaccharide was also precipitated by Th4+, Sn2+, Mn2+, and Co2+. The presence of Fe3+ increased the exopolysaccharide precipitation by aluminum. No precipitation, gelation, or increase in turbidity of polysaccharide solutions occurred when K+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Cu2+, Cd2+, Pb2+, Zn2+, Hg2+, or U6+ was added at several pH values. The results suggest that the precipitation is based on the interaction between carboxylate groups from different polysaccharide chains and the partially hydrolyzed aquoions of Fe3+, Al3+, Th4+, and Sn2+. PMID:16349466

  14. Evidence for the involvement of more than one metal cation in the Schiff base deprotonation process during the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Corcoran, T.C.; Ismail, K.Z.; El-Sayed, M.A.

    1987-06-01

    The removal of metal cations inhibits the deprotonation process of the protonated Schiff base during the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin. To understand the nature of the involvement of these cations, a spectroscopic and kinetic study was carried out on bacteriorhodopsin samples in which the native Ca/sup 2 +/ and Mg/sup 2 +/ were replaced by Eu/sup 3 +/, a luminescent cation. The decay of Eu/sup 3 +/ emission in bacteriorhodopsin can be fitted to a minimum of three decay components, which are assigned to Eu/sup 3 +/ emission from three different sites. This is supported by the response of the decay components to the presence of /sup 2/H/sub 2/O and to the changes in the Eu/sup 3 +//bR molar ratio. The number of water molecules coordinated to Eu/sup 3 +/ in each site is determined from the change in its emission lifetime when /sup 2/H/sub 2/O replaces H/sub 2/O. Most of the emission originates from two wet sites of low crystal-field symmetry-e.g., surface sites. Protonated Schiff base deprotonation has no discernible effect on the emission decay of protein-bound Eu/sup 3 +/, suggesting an indirect involvement of metal cations in the deprotonation process. Adding Eu/sup 3 +/ to deionized bacteriorhodopsin increases the emission intensity of each Eu/sup 3 +/ site linearly, but the extent of the deprotonation (and color) changes sigmoidally. This suggests that if only the emitting Eu/sup 3 +/ ions cause the deprotonation and bacteriorhodopsin color change, ions in more than one site must be involved-e.g., by inducing protein conformation changes. The latter could allow deprotonation by the interaction between the protonated Schiff base and a positive field of cations either on the surface or within the protein.

  15. Influence of amphotericin B on liquid crystal state of the Cholesterol/Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine monolayer in the presence of different metal cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juan; Shi, Rui-Xin; Sun, Run-Guang; Hao, Chang-Chun; Li, Jun-Hua; Lu, Xiao-Long

    2016-09-01

    Amphotericin B is a very effective antifungal drug, but it has an adverse reaction to the membrane of mammals’ cells. The interaction between AmB and cholesterol (Chol) causes the formation of pores on the membrane to destroy its integrity. In particular, AmB has a significant effect on the permeability of membrane for K+ ions. It has been reported that Na+ ions and Ca2+ ions may have some influence on the interaction between amphotericin B and lipid molecules. In this work, the effects of these metal cations on the physical state and intermolecular interaction of the Cholesterol/ Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (Chol/DPPC) monolayer with and without AmB have been investigated. The addition of AmB induces the change of physical state of the lipid monolayer from liquid-gel phase to liquid phase. Different metal cations could influence the phase transition of the AmB-lipid monolayer. The K+ ions and Ca2+ ions make the obvious phase transition disappear. However, the presence of Na+ ions has little influence on the phase transition of the AmB-lipid monolayer. The addition of AmB and the presence of different metal cations weaken the attractive force on the monolayers. After addition of AmB, the force between the molecules is the strongest in the environment of K+ ions, thus is the weakest in the environment of Ca2+ ions, which may be due to the distribution of these metal cations inside and outside of cells. A large number of K+ ions distribute inside of the cells, thus most of Na+ and Ca2+ ions exist out of the cells. Hence, it may be possible that when AmB molecules are out of the cells, the reaction between the drug and lipid molecules is weaker than that inside the cells. These results may have a great reference value for further studying the toxicity mechanism of AmB and the influence of metal cations on the membrane. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21402114 and 11544009), the Natural Science Basic Research Plan

  16. Influence of amphotericin B on liquid crystal state of the Cholesterol/Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine monolayer in the presence of different metal cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juan; Shi, Rui-Xin; Sun, Run-Guang; Hao, Chang-Chun; Li, Jun-Hua; Lu, Xiao-Long

    2016-09-01

    Amphotericin B is a very effective antifungal drug, but it has an adverse reaction to the membrane of mammals’ cells. The interaction between AmB and cholesterol (Chol) causes the formation of pores on the membrane to destroy its integrity. In particular, AmB has a significant effect on the permeability of membrane for K+ ions. It has been reported that Na+ ions and Ca2+ ions may have some influence on the interaction between amphotericin B and lipid molecules. In this work, the effects of these metal cations on the physical state and intermolecular interaction of the Cholesterol/ Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (Chol/DPPC) monolayer with and without AmB have been investigated. The addition of AmB induces the change of physical state of the lipid monolayer from liquid-gel phase to liquid phase. Different metal cations could influence the phase transition of the AmB-lipid monolayer. The K+ ions and Ca2+ ions make the obvious phase transition disappear. However, the presence of Na+ ions has little influence on the phase transition of the AmB-lipid monolayer. The addition of AmB and the presence of different metal cations weaken the attractive force on the monolayers. After addition of AmB, the force between the molecules is the strongest in the environment of K+ ions, thus is the weakest in the environment of Ca2+ ions, which may be due to the distribution of these metal cations inside and outside of cells. A large number of K+ ions distribute inside of the cells, thus most of Na+ and Ca2+ ions exist out of the cells. Hence, it may be possible that when AmB molecules are out of the cells, the reaction between the drug and lipid molecules is weaker than that inside the cells. These results may have a great reference value for further studying the toxicity mechanism of AmB and the influence of metal cations on the membrane. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21402114 and 11544009), the Natural Science Basic Research Plan

  17. Catalytic oxidation of H2 by N2O in the gas phase: O-atom transport with atomic metal cations.

    PubMed

    Blagojevic, Voislav; Bozović, Andrea; Orlova, Galina; Bohme, Diethard K

    2008-10-16

    Twenty-five atomic cations, M (+), that lie within the thermodynamic window for O-atom transport catalysis of the oxidation of hydrogen by nitrous oxide, have been checked for catalytic activity at room temperature with kinetic measurements using an inductively-coupled plasma/selected-ion flow tube (ICP/SIFT) tandem mass spectrometer. Only 4 of these 25 atomic cations were seen to be catalytic: Fe (+), Os (+), Ir (+), and Pt (+). Two of these, Ir (+) and Pt (+), are efficient catalysts, while Fe (+) and Os (+) are not. Eighteen atomic cations (Cr (+), Mn (+), Co (+), Ni (+), Cu (+), Ge (+), Se (+), Mo (+), Ru (+), Rh (+), Sn (+), Te (+), Re (+), Pb (+), Bi (+), Eu (+), Tm (+), and Yb (+)) react too slowly at room temperature either in their oxidation with N 2O to form MO (+) or in the reduction of MO (+) by H 2. Many of these reactions are known to be spin forbidden and a few actually may lie outside the thermodynamic window. Three alkaline-earth metal monoxide cations, CaO (+), SrO (+), and BaO (+), were observed to favor MOH (+) formation in their reactions with H 2. A potential-energy landscape is computed for the oxidation of H 2 with N 2O catalyzed by Fe (+)( (6)D) that vividly illustrates the operation of an ionic catalyst and qualitatively accounts for the relative inefficiency of this catalyst. PMID:18808088

  18. Biological and Bioelectrochemical Recovery of Critical and Scarce Metals.

    PubMed

    Nancharaiah, Y V; Mohan, S Venkata; Lens, P N L

    2016-02-01

    Metal-bearing solid and liquid wastes are increasingly considered as secondary sources of critical and scarce metals. Undoubtedly, microorganisms are a cost-effective resource for extracting and concentrating diffuse elements from secondary sources. Microbial biotechnology for extracting base metals from ores and treatment of metal-laden wastewaters has already been applied at full scale. By contrast, microbe-metal interactions in the recovery of scarce metals and a few critical metals have received attention, whereas the recovery of many others has been barely explored. Therefore, this article explores and details the potential application of microbial biotechnologies in the recovery of critical and scarce metals. In the past decade bioelectrochemical systems have emerged as a new technology platform for metal recovery coupled to the removal of organic matter. PMID:26763129

  19. Biological and Bioelectrochemical Recovery of Critical and Scarce Metals.

    PubMed

    Nancharaiah, Y V; Mohan, S Venkata; Lens, P N L

    2016-02-01

    Metal-bearing solid and liquid wastes are increasingly considered as secondary sources of critical and scarce metals. Undoubtedly, microorganisms are a cost-effective resource for extracting and concentrating diffuse elements from secondary sources. Microbial biotechnology for extracting base metals from ores and treatment of metal-laden wastewaters has already been applied at full scale. By contrast, microbe-metal interactions in the recovery of scarce metals and a few critical metals have received attention, whereas the recovery of many others has been barely explored. Therefore, this article explores and details the potential application of microbial biotechnologies in the recovery of critical and scarce metals. In the past decade bioelectrochemical systems have emerged as a new technology platform for metal recovery coupled to the removal of organic matter.

  20. Incorporation of transition metals into Mg-Al layered double hydroxides: Coprecipitation of cations vs. their pre-complexation with an anionic chelator

    SciTech Connect

    Tsyganok, Andrey; Sayari, Abdelhamid . E-mail: Abdel.Sayari@science.uottawa.ca

    2006-06-15

    A comparative study on two different methods for preparing Mg-Al layered double hydroxides (LDH) containing various divalent transition metals M (M=Co, Ni, Cu) has been carried out. The first (conventional) method involved coprecipitation of divalent metals M(II) with Mg(II) and Al(III) cations using carbonate under basic conditions. The second approach was based on the ability of transition metals to form stable anionic chelates with edta{sup 4-} (edta{sup 4-}=ethylenediaminetetraacetate) that were synthesized and further introduced into LDH by coprecipitation with Mg and Al. The synthesized LDHs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) methods, thermogravimetry with mass-selective detection of decomposition products (TG-MSD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy techniques. The results obtained were discussed in terms of efficiency of transition metal incorporation into the LDH structure, thermal stability of materials and the ability of metal chelates to intercalate the interlayer space of Mg-Al LDH. Vibrational spectroscopy studies confirmed that the integrity of the metal chelates was preserved upon incorporation into the LDH. - Graphical abstract: Two ways for introducing transition metals M(II) into Mg-Al layered double hydroxides (MY{sup 2-} denotes the edta chelate of transition metal M(II)).0.

  1. Quantification of Site-Specific Cation Exchange in Metal-Organic Frameworks Using Multi-Wavelength Anomalous X-ray Dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Brozek, Carl K.; Cozzolino, Anthony F.; Teat, Simon J.; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Dinc,; #259; Mircea,

    2013-09-23

    We employed multiwavelength anomalous X-ray dispersion to determine the relative cation occupation at two crystallographically distinct metal sites in Fe2+-, Cu2+-, and Zn2+-exchanged versions of the microporous metal–organic framework (MOF) known as MnMnBTT (BTT = 1,3,5-benzenetristetrazolate). By exploiting the dispersive differences between Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn, the extent and location of cation exchange were determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data sets collected near the K edges of Mn2+ and of the substituting metal, and at a wavelength remote from either edge as a reference. Comparing the anomalous dispersion between these measurements indicated that the extent of Mn2+ replacement depends on the identity of the substituting metal. We contrasted two unique methods to analyze this data with a conventional approach and evaluated their limitations with emphasis on the general application of this method to other heterometallic MOFs, where site-specific metal identification is fundamental to tuning catalytic and physical properties.

  2. Trace metal export in urban runoff and its biological significance

    SciTech Connect

    Liston, P.; Maher, W.

    1986-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the levels of selected trace metals present in sediments of a stream draining an urban catchment and to determine the relationship of the trace metal concentrations in the sediment fractions to the trace metal concentrations available for uptake by the resident detritovores. Trace metal concentrations in detritus feeders are of interest as detritovores occupy a key position in stream food chains where the major source of fixed carbon is in the form of organic detritus.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of ionic mobility. I. Alkali metal cations in water at 25 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Song Hi; Rasaiah, Jayendran C.

    1994-10-01

    We describe a series of molecular dynamics simulations performed on model cation-water systems at 25 °C representing the behavior of Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, and Cs+ in an electric field of 1.0 V/nm and in its absence. The TIP4P model was used for water and TIPS potentials were adapted for the ion-water interactions. The structure of the surrounding water molecules around the cations was found to be independent of the applied electric field. Some of the dynamic properties, such as the velocity and force autocorrelation functions of the cations, are also field independent. However, the mean-square displacements of the cations, their average drift velocities, and the distances traveled by them are field dependent. The mobilities of the cations calculated directly from the drift velocity or the distance traveled by the ion are in good agreement with each other and they are in satisfactory agreement with the mobilities determined from the mean-square displacement and the velocity autocorrelation function in the absence of the field. They also show the same trends with ionic radii that are observed experimentally; the magnitudes are, however, smaller than the experimental values in real water by almost a factor of 2. It is found that the water molecules in the first solvation shell around the small Li+ ion are stuck to the ion and move with it as an entity for about 190 ps, while the water molecules around the Na+ ion remain for 35 ps, and those around the large cations stay for 8-11 ps before significant exchange with the surroundings occurs. The picture emerging from this analysis is that of a solvated cation whose mobility is determined by its size as well as the static and dynamic properties of its solvation sheath and the surrounding water. The classical solventberg model describes the mobility of Li+ ions in water adequately but not those of the other ions.

  4. An anionic zeolite-like metal-organic framework (AZMOF) with a Moravia network for organic dye absorption through cation-exchange.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yu; Fan, Cong-Cong; Wei, Yu-Zhen; Du, Jie; Zhu, Hai-Bin; Zhao, Yue

    2016-07-01

    An anionic zeolite-like metal-organic framework (AZMOF) with a twisted partially augmented the net, known as the "Moravia" net, [(CH3)2NH2]6[Sr13(O)3()8(OH)2(H2O)16]·xS (, where S represents non-coordinated solvent molecules, and is the abbreviation of benzo-(1,2;3,4;5,6)-tris-(thiophene-2'-carboxylic acid)), has been solvothermally synthesized and characterized, which possesses an anionic framework and nano-sized sodalite cage. Through cation-exchange, is capable of uptaking large organic cationic dyes including Rhodamine B (RB), Basic Red 2 (BR2), Crystal Violet (CV) and Methylene Blue (MB), amongst which the adsorption capability for RB (up to 545 mg g(-1)), and BR2 (up to 675 mg g(-1)) is the highest for reported absorbants to date. PMID:27301344

  5. Activation of a GH43 β-xylosidase by divalent metal cations: slow binding of divalent metal and high substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Douglas B; Lee, Charles C; Wagschal, Kurt; Braker, Jay D

    2013-05-01

    RS223-BX of glycoside hydrolase family 43 is a β-d-xylosidase that is strongly activated (k(cat)/K(m) as much as 116-fold) by the addition of divalent metal cations, Ca(2+), Co(2+), Fe(2+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+) and Ni(2+). Slow activation by Mg(2+) was demonstrated (k(on) 0.013 s(-1) mM(-1), k(off) 0.008 s(-1)) at pH 7.0 and 25 °C. k(off) and k(on) values are independent of Mg(2+) concentration, but k(off) and k(on) are slower in the presence of increasing levels of substrate 4-nitrophenyl-β-D-xylopyranoside. The kinetics strongly suggest that M(2+) binds to the enzyme rapidly, forming E M(2+), followed by slow isomerization to the activated enzyme, E* M(2+). Moderately high values of kcat (7-30 s(-1)) were found for M(2+)-activated RS223-BX acting on xylobiose (natural substrate) at pH 7.0 and 25 °C. Certain M(2+)-activated RS223-BX exhibit the highest reported values of k(cat)/K(m) of any β-xylosidase acting on natural substrates: for example, at pH 7.0 and 25°C, xylobiose (Mn(2+), 190 s(-1) mM(-1)), xylotriose (Ca(2+), 150 s(-1) mM(-1)) and xylotetraose (Ca(2+), 260 s(-1) mM(-1)). There is potential for the enzyme to add value to industrial saccharification operations at low substrate and high d-glucose and high d-xylose concentrations.

  6. Systematically biological prioritizing remediation sites based on datasets of biological investigations and heavy metals in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Chih; Lin, Yu-Pin; Anthony, Johnathen

    2015-04-01

    Heavy metal pollution has adverse effects on not only the focal invertebrate species of this study, such as reduction in pupa weight and increased larval mortality, but also on the higher trophic level organisms which feed on them, either directly or indirectly, through the process of biomagnification. Despite this, few studies regarding remediation prioritization take species distribution or biological conservation priorities into consideration. This study develops a novel approach for delineating sites which are both contaminated by any of 5 readily bioaccumulated heavy metal soil contaminants and are of high ecological importance for the highly mobile, low trophic level focal species. The conservation priority of each site was based on the projected distributions of 6 moth species simulated via the presence-only maximum entropy species distribution model followed by the subsequent application of a systematic conservation tool. In order to increase the number of available samples, we also integrated crowd-sourced data with professionally-collected data via a novel optimization procedure based on a simulated annealing algorithm. This integration procedure was important since while crowd-sourced data can drastically increase the number of data samples available to ecologists, still the quality or reliability of crowd-sourced data can be called into question, adding yet another source of uncertainty in projecting species distributions. The optimization method screens crowd-sourced data in terms of the environmental variables which correspond to professionally-collected data. The sample distribution data was derived from two different sources, including the EnjoyMoths project in Taiwan (crowd-sourced data) and the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) ?eld data (professional data). The distributions of heavy metal concentrations were generated via 1000 iterations of a geostatistical co-simulation approach. The uncertainties in distributions of the heavy

  7. [(B3O3H3)(n)M]+ (n = 1, 2;M = Cu, Ag, Au): a new class of metal-cation complexes.

    PubMed

    Li, Da-Zhi; Dong, Chen-Chu; Zhang, Shi-Guo

    2013-08-01

    A density functional theory (DFT) investigation into the structures and bonding characteristics of [(B3O3H3)nM](+)(n = 1, 2;M = Cu, Ag, Au) complexes was performed. DFT calculations and natural bond orbital (NBO) analyses indicate that the ΙB metal complexes of boroxine exhibit intriguing bonding characteristics, different from the typical cation-π interactions between ΙB metal-cations and benzene. The complexes of [B3O3H3M](+) and [(B3O3H3)2 M](+) (M = Cu, Ag, and Au) favor the conformation of perfectly planar structures with the C2v and D2h symmetry along one of the threefold molecular axes of boroxine, respectively. Detailed natural resonance theory (NRT) and canonical molecular orbitals (CMOs) analyses show that interaction between the metal cation and the boroxine in [B3O3H3M](+) (M = Cu, Ag, and Au) is mainly ionic, while the ΙB metal-cations←π donation effect is responsible for the binding site. In these complexes, boroxine serves as terminals η(1)-B3O3H3 with one O atom of the B3O3 ring. The infra-red (IR) spectra of [B3O3H3M](+) were simulated to facilitate their future experimental characterization. The complexes all give two IR active modes at about 1,300 and 2,700 cm(-1), which are inactive in pure boroxine. Simultaneously, the B-H stretching modes of the complexes are red-shifted due to the interaction between the metal-cation and boroxine. To explore the possibility of the structural pattern developed in this work forming mesoporous materials, complexes [(B3O3H3M)6](6+) (M = Cu, Ag, and Au) were also studied, which appear to be unique and particular interesting: they are all true minima with D6h symmetries and pore sizes ranging from 12.04 Å to 13.65 Å. PMID:23636641

  8. Photochemical reactions of metal nitrosyl complexes. Mechanisms of NO reactions with biologically relevant metal centers

    DOE PAGES

    Ford, Peter C.

    2001-01-01

    Tmore » he discoveries that nitric oxide (a.k.a. nitrogen monoxide) serves important roles in mammalian bioregulation and immunology have stimulated intense interest in the chemistry and biochemistry of NO and derivatives such as metal nitrosyl complexes. Also of interest are strategies to deliver NO to biological targets on demand. One such strategy would be to employ a precursor which displays relatively low thermal reactivity but is photochemically active to release NO.his proposition led us to investigate laser flash and continuous photolysis kinetics of nitrosyl complexes such as the Roussin's iron-sulfur-nitrosyl cluster anions Fe 2 S 2 ( NO ) 4 2 − and Fe 4 S 3 ( NO ) 7 − and several ruthenium salen and porphyrin nitrosyls.hese include studies using metal-nitrosyl photochemistry as a vehicle for delivering NO to hypoxic cell cultures in order to sensitize γ -radiation damage. Also studied were the rates and mechanisms of NO “on” reactions with model water soluble heme compounds, the ferriheme protein met-myoglobin and various ruthenium complexes using ns laser flash photolysis techniques. An overview of these studies is presented.« less

  9. Effect of metal cation replacement on the electronic structure of metalorganic halide perovskites: Replacement of lead with alkaline-earth metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazoki, Meysam; Jacobsson, T. Jesper; Hagfeldt, Anders; Boschloo, Gerrit; Edvinsson, Tomas

    2016-04-01

    Organic and inorganic lead halogen perovskites, and in particular, C H3N H3Pb I3 , have during the last years emerged as a class of highly efficient solar cell materials. Herein we introduce metalorganic halogen perovskite materials for energy-relevant applications based on alkaline-earth metals. Based on the classical notion of Goldschmidt's rules and quantum mechanical considerations, the three alkaline-earth metals, Ca, Sr, and Ba, are shown to be able to exchange lead in the perovskite structure. The three alkaline-earth perovskites, C H3N H3Ca I3,C H3N H3Sr I3 , and C H3N H3Ba I3 , as well as the reference compound, C H3N H3Pb I3 , are in this paper investigated with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, which predict these compounds to exist as stable perovskite materials, and their electronic properties are explored. A detailed analysis of the projected molecular orbital density of states and electronic band structure from DFT calculations were used for interpretation of the band-gap variations in these materials and for estimation of the effective masses of the electrons and holes. Neglecting spin-orbit effects, the band gap of MACa I3,MASr I3 , and MABa I3 were estimated to be 2.95, 3.6, and 3.3 eV, respectively, showing the relative change expected for metal cation exchange. The shifts in the conduction band (CB) edges for the alkaline-earth perovskites were quantified using scalar relativistic DFT calculations and tight-binding analysis, and were compared to the situation in the more extensively studied lead halide perovskite, C H3N H3Pb I3 , where the change in the work function of the metal is the single most important factor in tuning the CB edge and band gap. The results show that alkaline-earth-based organometallic perovskites will not work as an efficient light absorber in photovoltaic applications but instead could be applicable as charge-selective contact materials. The rather high CB edge and the wide band gap together with the large

  10. Influence of pH and Metal Cations on Aggregative Growth of Non-Slime-forming Strains of Zoogloea ramigera

    PubMed Central

    Angelbeck, Donald I.; Kirsch, Edwin J.

    1969-01-01

    Aggregative growth of non-slime-forming strains of Zoogloea ramigera was induced by growing the organisms at a depressed pH. Calcium and magnesium ion was found to reverse aggregative growth of the organisms. Conversely, aggregation was stimulated when the available inorganic cation concentration of the growth medium was lowered by the use of a chelating agent. The aggregative effects of pH depression or cation depletion and the dispersal effects of cation supplementation were observed only during cellular growth. The data suggest that aggregate formation of non-slime-forming strains of Z. ramigera may be related to the calcium or magnesium metabolism of the organisms, or both. Images PMID:4976326

  11. [Biological activity of selenorganic compounds at heavy metal salts intoxication].

    PubMed

    Rusetskaya, N Y; Borodulin, V B

    2015-01-01

    Possible mechanisms of the antitoxic action of organoselenium compounds in heavy metal poisoning have been considered. Heavy metal toxicity associated with intensification of free radical oxidation, suppression of the antioxidant system, damage to macromolecules, mitochondria and the genetic material can cause apoptotic cell death or the development of carcinogenesis. Organic selenium compounds are effective antioxidants during heavy metal poisoning; they exhibit higher bioavailability in mammals than inorganic ones and they are able to activate antioxidant defense, bind heavy metal ions and reactive oxygen species formed during metal-induced oxidative stress. One of promising organoselenium compounds is diacetophenonyl selenide (DAPS-25), which is characterized by antioxidant and antitoxic activity, under conditions including heavy metal intoxication.

  12. Interactive influences of bioactive trace metals on biological production in oceanic waters

    SciTech Connect

    Bruland, K.W.; Donat, J.R.; Hutchins, D.A. )

    1991-12-01

    The authors present an overview of the oceanic chemistries of the bioactive trace metals, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn; the authors combine field data with results from laboratory phytoplankton culture-trace metal studies and speculate on the potential influences of these trace metals on oceanic plankton production and species composition. Most field studies have focused on the effects of single metals. However, they propose that synergistic and antagonistic interactions between multiple trace metals could be very important in the oceans. Trace metal antagonisms that may prove particularly important are those between Cu and the potential biolimiting metals Fe, Mn, and Zn. These antagonistic interactions could have the greatest influence on biological productivity in areas of the open ocean isolated from terrestrial inputs, such as the remote high nutrient regions of the Pacific and Antarctic Oceans. The emerging picture of trace metal-biota interactions in these oceanic areas is one in which biology strongly influences distribution and chemical speciation of all these bioactive trace metals. It also seems likely that many of these bioactive trace metals and their speciation may influence levels of primary productivity, species composition, and trophic structure. Future investigations should give more complete consideration to the interactive effects of biologically important trace metals.

  13. CAX-ing a wide net: Cation/H(+) transporters in metal remediation and abiotic stress signalling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cation/proton exchangers (CAXs) are a class of secondary energised ion transporter that are being implicated in an increasing range of cellular and physiological functions. CAXs are primarily Ca(2+) efflux transporters that mediate the sequestration of Ca(2+) from the cytosol, usually into the vacuo...

  14. Specific interactions between alkali metal cations and the KcsA channel studied using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Furutani, Yuji; Shimizu, Hirofumi; Asai, Yusuke; Oiki, Shigetoshi; Kandori, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray structure of KcsA, a eubacterial potassium channel, displays a selectivity filter composed of four parallel peptide strands. The backbone carbonyl oxygen atoms of these strands solvate multiple K+ ions. KcsA structures show different distributions of ions within the selectivity filter in solutions containing different cations. To assess the interactions of cations with the selectivity filter, we used attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. Ion-exchange-induced ATR-FTIR difference spectra were obtained by subtracting the spectrum of KcsA soaked in K+ solution from that obtained in Li+, Na+, Rb+, and Cs+ solutions. Large spectral changes in the amide-I and -II regions were observed upon replacing K+ with smaller-sized cations Li+ and Na+ but not with larger-sized cations Rb+ and Cs+. These results strongly suggest that the selectivity filter carbonyls coordinating Rb+ or Cs+ adopt a conformation similar to those coordinating K+ (cage configuration), but those coordinating Li+ or Na+ adopt a conformation (plane configuration) considerably different from those coordinating K+. We have identified a cation-type sensitive amide-I band at 1681 cm−1 and an insensitive amide-I band at 1659 cm−1. The bands at 1650, 1639, and 1627 cm−1 observed for Na+-coordinating carbonyls were almost identical to those observed in Li+ solution, suggesting that KcsA forms a similar filter structure in Li+ and Na+ solutions. Thus, we conclude that the filter structure adopts a collapsed conformation in Li+ solution that is similar to that in Na+ solution but is in clear contrast to the X-ray crystal structure of KcsA with Li+. PMID:27493853

  15. The Compact and Biologically Relevant Structure of Inter-α-inhibitor Is Maintained by the Chondroitin Sulfate Chain and Divalent Cations.

    PubMed

    Scavenius, Carsten; Nikolajsen, Camilla Lund; Stenvang, Marcel; Thøgersen, Ida B; Wyrożemski, Łukasz; Wisniewski, Hans-Georg; Otzen, Daniel E; Sanggaard, Kristian W; Enghild, Jan J

    2016-02-26

    Inter-α-inhibitor is a proteoglycan of unique structure. The protein consists of three subunits, heavy chain 1, heavy chain 2, and bikunin covalently joined by a chondroitin sulfate chain originating at Ser-10 of bikunin. Inter-α-inhibitor interacts with an inflammation-associated protein, tumor necrosis factor-inducible gene 6 protein, in the extracellular matrix. This interaction leads to transfer of the heavy chains from the chondroitin sulfate of inter-α-inhibitor to hyaluronan and consequently to matrix stabilization. Divalent cations and heavy chain 2 are essential co-factors in this transfer reaction. In the present study, we have investigated how divalent cations in concert with the chondroitin sulfate chain influence the structure and stability of inter-α-inhibitor. The results showed that Mg(2+) or Mn(2+), but not Ca(2+), induced a conformational change in inter-α-inhibitor as evidenced by a decrease in the Stokes radius and a bikunin chondroitin sulfate-dependent increase of the thermodynamic stability. This structure was shown to be essential for the ability of inter-α-inhibitor to participate in extracellular matrix stabilization. In addition, the data revealed that bikunin was positioned adjacent to both heavy chains and that the two heavy chains also were in close proximity. The chondroitin sulfate chain interacted with all protein components and inter-α-inhibitor dissociated when it was degraded. Conventional purification protocols result in the removal of the Mg(2+) found in plasma and because divalent cations influence the conformation and affect function it is important to consider this when characterizing the biological activity of inter-α-inhibitor.

  16. Titanates and Titanate-Metal Compounds in Biological Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Wei; Drury, Jeanie L.; Chung, Whasun Oh; Hobbs, David T.; Wataha, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Metal ions are notorious environmental contaminants, some causing toxicity at exquisitely low (ppm-level) concentrations. Yet, the redox properties of metal ions make them attractive candidates for bio-therapeutics. Titanates are insoluble particulate compounds of titanium and oxygen with crystalline surfaces that bind metal ions; these compounds offer a means to scavenge metal ions in environmental contexts or deliver them in therapeutic contexts while limiting systemic exposure and toxicity. In either application, the toxicological properties of titanates are crucial. To date, the accurate measurement of the in vitro toxicity of titanates has been complicated by their particulate nature, which interferes with many assays that are optical density (OD)-dependent, and at present, little to no in vivo titanate toxicity data exist. Compatibility data garnered thus far for native titanates in vitro are inconsistent and lacking in mechanistic understanding. These data suggest that native titanates have little toxicity toward several oral and skin bacteria species, but do suppress mammalian cell metabolism in a cells-pecific manner. Titanate compounds bind several types of metal ions, including some common environmental toxins, and enhance delivery to bacteria or cells. Substantial work remains to address the practical applicability of titanates. Nevertheless, titanates have promise to serve as novel vehicles for metal-based therapeutics or as a new class of metal scavengers for environmental applications. PMID:26430701

  17. Specific chemical interactions between metal ions and biological solids exemplified by sludge particulates.

    PubMed

    Huang, C P; Wang, Jianmin

    2014-05-01

    The adsorption of metals onto biological surfaces was studied exemplified by municipal sludge particulates of the primary, the secondary, and the tertiary sludge types from four regional wastewater treatment plants. Major factors affecting the extent of metal adsorption including pH, DOM, total biomass, and total metal loading were studied. The acidity-basicity characteristics of the DOM, the metal ions (Lewis acids), and the surface of the sludge particulates make pH the most important parameter in metal adsorption. Change in pH can modify the speciation of the metal ions, the DOM, and the surface acidity of the sludge particulates and subsequently determines the degree of metal distribution between the aqueous phase and the sludge solids. Information on the acidity-basicity characteristics of the DOM and the sludge particulates are used to calculate the stability constant of metal ion-sludge complexes.

  18. Effect of the cationic composition of sorption solution on the quantification of sorption-desorption parameters of heavy metals in soils.

    PubMed

    Sastre, J; Rauret, G; Vidal, M

    2006-03-01

    We obtained the sorption isotherms of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in clay, clay saline and organic soils. The distribution coefficients (K(d)) were determined in 0.02 eq l(-1) CaCl(2) and in a solution that simulated the soil solution cationic composition. The K(d) values greatly varied with the composition of the sorption solution and the initial metal concentration. The sorption experiments were complemented with the quantification of the extractable metal, to estimate the reversibility of metal sorption. The extraction yields depended on the metal-soil combination, and the initial metal concentration, showing no correlation with previous K(d) values. The effect of the solution composition in mobility predictions was estimated through a Retention Factor, defined as the ratio of the K(d) versus the extraction yield. Results showed that risk was over- or underestimated using the CaCl(2) medium in soils with a markedly different soil solution composition. PMID:16203070

  19. Many-body exchange-repulsion in polarizable molecular mechanics. I. Orbital-based approximations and applications to hydrated metal cation complexes.

    PubMed

    Chaudret, Robin; Gresh, Nohad; Parisel, Olivier; Piquemal, Jean-Philip

    2011-11-15

    We have quantified the extent of the nonadditivity of the short-range exchange-repulsion energy, E(exch-rep), in several polycoordinated complexes of alkali, alkaline-earth, transition, and metal cations. This was done by performing ab initio energy decomposition analyses of interaction energies in these complexes. The magnitude of E(exch-rep(n-body, n > 2)) was found to be strongly cation-dependent, ranging from close to zero for some alkali metal complexes to about 6 kcal/mol for the hexahydrated Zn(2+) complex. In all cases, the cation-water molecules, E(exch-rep(three-body)), has been found to be the dominant contribution to many-body exchange-repulsion effects, higher order terms being negligible. As the physical basis of this effect is discussed, a three-center exponential term was introduced in the SIBFA (Sum of Interactions Between Fragments Ab initio computed) polarizable molecular mechanics procedure to model such effects. The three-body correction is added to the two-center (two-body) overlap-like formulation of the short-range repulsion contribution, E(rep), which is grounded on simplified integrals obtained from localized molecular orbital theory. The present term is computed on using mostly precomputed two-body terms and, therefore, does not increase significantly the computational cost of the method. It was shown to match closely E(three-body) in a series of test cases bearing on the complexes of Ca(2+), Zn(2+), and Hg(2+). For example, its introduction enabled to restore the correct tetrahedral versus square planar preference found from quantum chemistry calculations on the tetrahydrate of Hg(2+) and [Hg(H(2)O)(4)](2+). PMID:21793002

  20. [Design and synthesis of imine compound for metal cation logical gates recognition and setup of double-control fluorescent molecule switch].

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Zhu, Yu-lian; Dai, Xue-qin; Zhang, Qi; Huang, Yan

    2011-07-01

    The Schiff base's reduced product N,N-bis(4-methoxybenzyl) ethane-1,2-diamine, which was used as a receptor L, was designed and synthesized for the first time in the present article. It was found that Cu2+ and Fe3+ could quench L in fluorescence observably and Zn2+ and Cd2+ could enhance L remarkably. So the two pair metal cation could set up "OR" logical gate relation with the receptor molecule L, then a logical recognition system be formed. The data of resolved ZnL's single crystal indicated that ZnL belonged to monoclinic (CCDC No. 747994). Integrated spectrum instrument was used to characterize the structure of its alike series of complex compound. According to ZnL's excellent fluorescence character and the ability to exchange with contiguous metal cation, ZnZ+/ZnL/Co2+, Zn2+/ZnL/Nit+ fluorescent molecule switch was designed. It is hoped that the work above could be positive for the development of molecule computer, bio-intellectualized inspection technology (therapy) and instrument.

  1. NMR Localization of Divalent Cations at the Active Site of the Neurospora VS Ribozyme Provides Insights into RNA–Metal-Ion Interactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Metal cations represent key elements of RNA structure and function. In the Neurospora VS ribozyme, metal cations play diverse roles; they are important for substrate recognition, formation of the active site, and shifting the pKa’s of two key nucleobases that contribute to the general acid–base mechanism. Recently, we determined the NMR structure of the A730 loop of the VS ribozyme active site (SLVI) that contributes the general acid (A756) in the enzymatic mechanism of the cleavage reaction. Our studies showed that magnesium (Mg2+) ions are essential to stabilize the formation of the S-turn motif within the A730 loop that exposes the A756 nucleobase for catalysis. In this article, we extend these NMR investigations by precisely mapping the Mg2+-ion binding sites using manganese-induced paramagnetic relaxation enhancement and cadmium-induced chemical-shift perturbation of phosphorothioate RNAs. These experiments identify five Mg2+-ion binding sites within SLVI. Four Mg2+ ions in SLVI are associated with known RNA structural motifs, including the G–U wobble pair and the GNRA tetraloop, and our studies reveal novel insights about Mg2+ ion binding to these RNA motifs. Interestingly, one Mg2+ ion is specifically associated with the S-turn motif, confirming its structural role in the folding of the A730 loop. This Mg2+ ion is likely important for formation of the active site and may play an indirect role in catalysis. PMID:24364590

  2. [Design and synthesis of imine compound for metal cation logical gates recognition and setup of double-control fluorescent molecule switch].

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Zhu, Yu-lian; Dai, Xue-qin; Zhang, Qi; Huang, Yan

    2011-07-01

    The Schiff base's reduced product N,N-bis(4-methoxybenzyl) ethane-1,2-diamine, which was used as a receptor L, was designed and synthesized for the first time in the present article. It was found that Cu2+ and Fe3+ could quench L in fluorescence observably and Zn2+ and Cd2+ could enhance L remarkably. So the two pair metal cation could set up "OR" logical gate relation with the receptor molecule L, then a logical recognition system be formed. The data of resolved ZnL's single crystal indicated that ZnL belonged to monoclinic (CCDC No. 747994). Integrated spectrum instrument was used to characterize the structure of its alike series of complex compound. According to ZnL's excellent fluorescence character and the ability to exchange with contiguous metal cation, ZnZ+/ZnL/Co2+, Zn2+/ZnL/Nit+ fluorescent molecule switch was designed. It is hoped that the work above could be positive for the development of molecule computer, bio-intellectualized inspection technology (therapy) and instrument. PMID:21942034

  3. Effects of nonframework metal cations and phonon scattering mechanisms on the thermal transport properties of polycrystalline zeolite LTA films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenstein, Abraham; Hudiono, Yeny; Graham, Samuel; Nair, Sankar

    2010-03-01

    We present a systematic study to investigate the effects of nonframework cations and the role of phonon scattering mechanisms on the thermal transport properties of zeolite LTA, via experiment and semiempirical lattice dynamics calculations. Our study is motivated by the increasing interest in accurate measurements and mechanistic understanding of the thermal transport properties of zeolite materials. The presence of a nanostructured pore network, extra-framework cations, and tunable framework structure and composition confer interesting thermophysical properties to these materials, making them a good model system to investigate thermal transport in complex materials. Continuous films of zeolite LTA with different nonframework cations (Na+, K+, and Ca+2) were synthesized and characterized. The thermal conductivity was measured using the three-omega method over a wide range of temperature (150-450 K). These are the first thermal conductivity measurements performed on bulk LTA, so they are more accurate than previous measurements, which involved the use of compacted zeolite powders. Our data showed significant dependence of the thermal conductivity on the extra-framework cations as well the temperature. The thermal conductivities of the zeolite LTA samples were modeled with the relaxation time approximation to the Boltzmann transport equation. The full phonon spectra for each type of LTA zeolite were calculated and used in conjunction with semiempirical relaxation time expressions to calculate the thermal conductivity. The results both validated, and suggested the limitations of, this modeling approach. Optical phonons dominated the thermal conductivity and boundarylike scattering was found to be the strongest phonon scattering mechanism, as also observed in MFI zeolite.

  4. A self-cleaving DNA enzyme modified with amines, guanidines and imidazoles operates independently of divalent metal cations (M2+)

    PubMed Central

    Hollenstein, Marcel; Hipolito, Christopher J.; Lam, Curtis H.; Perrin, David M.

    2009-01-01

    The selection of modified DNAzymes represents an important endeavor in expanding the chemical and catalytic properties of catalytic nucleic acids. Few examples of such exist and to date, there is no example where three different modified bases have been simultaneously incorporated for catalytic activity. Herein, dCTP, dATP and dUTP bearing, respectively, a cationic amine, an imidazole and a cationic guanidine, were enzymatically polymerized on a DNA template for the selection of a highly functionalized DNAzyme, called DNAzyme 9-86, that catalyzed (M2+)-independent self-cleavage under physiological conditions at a single ribo(cytosine)phosphodiester linkage with a rate constant of (0.134 ± 0.026) min−1. A pH rate profile analysis revealed pKa's of 7.4 and 8.1, consistent with both general acid and base catalysis. The presence of guanidinium cations permits cleavage at significantly higher temperatures than previously observed for DNAzymes with only amines and imidazoles. Qualitatively, DNAzyme 9-86 presents an unprecedented ensemble of synthetic functionalities while quantitatively it expresses one of the highest reported values for any self-cleaving nucleic acid when investigated under M2+-free conditions at 37°C. PMID:19153138

  5. Differential coordination demands in Fe vs Mn water-soluble cationic metalloporphyrins translates into remarkably different aqueous redox chemistry and biology

    PubMed Central

    Tovmasyan, Artak; Weitner, Tin; Sheng, Huaxin; Lu, MiaoMiao; Rajic, Zrinka; Warner, David S.; Spasojevic, Ivan; Reboucas, Julio S.; Benov, Ludmil; Batinic-Haberle, Ines

    2013-01-01

    The different biological behavior of cationic Fe and Mn pyridylporphyrins in Escherichia coli and mouse studies prompted us to revisit and compare their chemistry. For that purpose the series of ortho and meta isomers of Fe(III) meso-tetrakis-N-alkylpyridylporphyrins, alkyl being methyl to n-octyl, were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, UV/vis spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, lipophilicity, protonation equilibria of axial waters, metal-centered reduction potential, E1/2 for MIIIP/MIIP redox couple (M = Fe, Mn, P=porphyrin), kcat for the catalysis of O2•− dismutation, stability towards peroxide-driven porphyrin oxidative degradation (produced in the catalysis of ascorbate oxidation by MP), ability to affect growth of SOD-deficient E. coli and toxicity to mice. Electron-deficiency of the metal site is modulated by the porphyrin ligand, which renders Fe(III) porphyrins ≥ 5 orders of magnitude more acidic than the analogous Mn(III) porphyrins, as revealed by the pKa1 of axially coordinated waters. The 5 log units difference in the acidity between the Mn and Fe sites in porphyrin translates into the predominance of tetracationic (OH)(H2O)FeP complexes relative to pentacationic (H2O)2MnP species at pH ~7.8. This is evidenced in large differences in the thermodynamic parameters - pKa of axial waters and E1/2 of MIII/MII redox couple. The presence of hydroxo ligand labilizes trans-axial water which results in higher reactivity of Fe- relative to Mn center. The differences in the catalysis of O2•− dismutation (log kcat) between Fe and Mn porphyrins is modest, 2.5-5-fold, due to predominantly outer-sphere, with partial inner-sphere character of two reaction steps. However, the rate constant for the inner-sphere H2O2-based porphyrin oxidative degradation is 18-fold larger for (OH)(H2O)FeP than for (H2O)2MnP. The in vivo consequences of the differences between the Fe- and Mn porphyrins were best demonstrated in SOD-deficient E. coli growth. Based

  6. Complexes With Biologically Active Ligands. Part 1. Synthesis of Coordination Compounds of Diazoxide With Transition- and Main-Group Cations

    PubMed Central

    Supuran, Claudiu T.

    1996-01-01

    Complexes of diazoxide (3-methyl-7-chloro-1,2,4-benzothiadiazine-1,1-dioxide) - an antihypertensive and hyperglycemic pharmacological agent - with a series of transition- and main-group di-, triand tetravalent metal ions were prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, spectroscopic, thermogravimetric, magnetic and conductimetric measurements. The complexes were tested as inhibitors of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA), proving modest activity towards CA II and better inhibition of CA I. PMID:18472790

  7. Notable effects of the metal salts on the formation and decay reactions of α-tocopheroxyl radical in acetonitrile solution. The complex formation between α-tocopheroxyl and metal cations.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Yutaro; Fujii, Miyabi; Matsuoka, Chihiro; Hashimoto, Haruka; Ouchi, Aya; Nagaoka, Shin-ichi; Mukai, Kazuo

    2011-08-18

    The measurement of the UV-vis absorption spectrum of α-tocopheroxyl (α-Toc(•)) radical was performed by reacting aroxyl (ArO(•)) radical with α-tocopherol (α-TocH) in acetonitrile solution including four kinds of alkali and alkaline earth metal salts (MX or MX(2)) (LiClO(4), LiI, NaClO(4), and Mg(ClO(4))(2)), using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The maximum wavelength (λ(max)) of the absorption spectrum of the α-Toc(•) at 425.0 nm increased with increasing concentration of metal salts (0-0.500 M) in acetonitrile, and it approached constant values, suggesting an [α-Toc(•)-M(+) (or M(2+))] complex formation. The stability constants (K) were determined to be 9.2, 2.8, and 45 M(-1) for LiClO(4), NaClO(4), and Mg(ClO(4))(2), respectively. By reacting ArO(•) with α-TocH in acetonitrile, the absorption of ArO(•) disappeared rapidly, while that of α-Toc(•) appeared and then decreased gradually as a result of the bimolecular self-reaction of α-Toc(•) after passing through the maximum. The second-order rate constants (k(s)) obtained for the reaction of α-TocH with ArO(•) increased linearly with an increasing concentration of metal salts. The results indicate that the hydrogen transfer reaction of α-TocH proceeds via an electron transfer intermediate from α-TocH to ArO(•) radicals followed by proton transfer. Both the coordination of metal cations to the one-electron reduced anions of ArO(•) (ArO:(-)) and the coordination of counteranions to the one-electron oxidized cations of α-TocH (α-TocH(•)(+)) may stabilize the intermediate, resulting in the acceleration of electron transfer. A remarkable effect of metal salts on the rate of bimolecular self-reaction (2k(d)) of the α-Toc(•) radical was also observed. The rate constant (2k(d)) decreased rapidly with increasing concentrations of the metal salts. The 2k(d) value decreased at the same concentration of the metal salts in the following order: no metal salt > NaClO(4) > LiClO(4) > Mg

  8. Thermodynamics of metal cation binding by a solid soil-derived humic acid: binding of Fe(III), Pb(II), and Cu(II).

    PubMed

    Ghabbour, Elham A; Shaker, Medhat; El-Toukhy, Ahmed; Abid, Ismail M; Davies, Geoffrey

    2006-04-01

    Metal binding and release by solid humic acids (HAs) in soils and sediments can affect metal mobility and bioavailability. Isotherms for tight binding of Fe(III), Pb(II) and Cu(II) by a solid humic acid at pH2.0 fit the Langmuir binding model. Low pH was chosen to protonate the HA carboxylate groups and avoid metal cation hydrolysis. Binding of Fe(III), Pb(II) and Cu(II) occurs in one detectable step labeled A. Site capacities nu(A) are temperature-independent from 10.0 to 40.0 degrees C and point to binding by charge-neutralization to form solid complexes M(OOC-R)(n)(s), where n appears to be 2 for Pb(II) and 3 for Fe(III). Thermodynamic data pairs (DeltaH(A), DeltaS(A)) for metal binding are linearly correlated with previous data for Ca(II), Co(II) and Mg(II) binding by solid HAs.

  9. Aldimines generated from aza-Wittig reaction between bis(iminophosphoranes) derived from 1,1'-diazidoferrocene and aromatic or heteroaromatic aldehydes: electrochemical and optical behaviour towards metal cations.

    PubMed

    Sola, Antonia; Otón, Francisco; Espinosa, Arturo; Tárraga, Alberto; Molina, Pedro

    2011-12-14

    Aldimine 4 bearing a 2-quinolyl group was prepared by aza-Wittig reaction between the triphenyliminophosphorane derived from the 1,1'-diazidoferrocene and 2-formylquinoline. However, aldimine 5, bearing a pyrene ring, was prepared using the most reactive tributyliminophosphorane derivative and the corresponding 1-formylpyrene. On the other hand, formation of aldimine 8 involves a tandem process, Staudinger reaction/intramolecular aza-Wittig reaction, by using directly 1,1'-diazidoferrocene and 2-(diphenylphosphonyl)benzaldehyde. Aldimine 4 behaves as chemosensor molecule for Ni(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Hg(2+) and Pb(2+) cations through two different channels: electrochemical (ΔE(1/2) = 222-361 mV) and chromogenic (Δλ = 122-153 nm), which can be used for the "naked eye" detection of these metal cations. Aldimine 5 behaves as a highly selective redox (in CH(3)CN) and fluorescent (in CH(3)Cl-DMF) probe for Hg(2+) metal cations even in the presence of a large excess of the other metal cations tested. Aldimine 8 displays electrochemical affinity (ΔE(1/2) = 60-288 mV) to Li(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Zn(2+) and Pb(2+) metal cations, with the phosphorus oxide functionality as a binding site. From the (1)H NMR titration data as well as DFT calculations, different tentative binding modes have been established, for these structurally related ferrocenyl derivatives. PMID:21989479

  10. Improvement of heavy metal biosorption by mycelial dead biomasses (Rhizopus arrhizus, Mucor miehei and Penicillium chrysogenum): pH control and cationic activation.

    PubMed

    Fourest, E; Canal, C; Roux, J C

    1994-08-01

    Fungal mycelial by-products from fermentation industries present a considerable affinity for soluble metal ions (e.g. Zn, Cd, Ni, Pb, Cr, Ag) and could be used in biosorption processes for purification of contaminated effluents. In this work the influence of pH on sorption parameters is characterized by measuring the isotherms of five heavy metals (Ni, Zn, Cd, Ag and Pb) with Rhizopus arrhizus biomass under pH-controlled conditions. The maximum sorption capacity for lead was observed at pH 7.0 (200 mg g-1), while silver uptake was weakly affected. The stability of metal-biosorbent complexes is regularly enhanced by pH neutralization, except for lead. A transition in sorption mechanism was observed above pH 6.0. In addition, comparison of various industrial fungal biomasses (R. arrhizus, Mucor miehei and Penicillium chrysogenum) indicated important variations in zinc-binding and buffering properties (0.24, 0.08 and 0.05 mmol g-1, respectively). Without control, the equilibrium pH (5.8, 3.9 and 4.0) is shown to be related to the initial calcium content of the biosorbent. pH neutralization during metal adsorption increases zinc sorption in all fungi (0.57, 0.52 and 0.33 mmol g-1) but an improvement was also obtained (0.34, 0.33 and 0.10 mmol g-1) by calcium saturation of the biomass before heavy metal accumulation. Breakthrough curves of fixed bed biosorbent columns demonstrated the capacity of the biosorbent process to purify zinc and lead solutions in continuous-flow systems, and confirmed the necessity for cationic activation of the biosorbent before contact with the heavy-metal solution.

  11. {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy of cationic species in CO{sub 2} selective alkaline earth metal porous silicoaluminophosphates prepared via liquid and solid state ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Arevalo-Hidalgo, Ana G.; Dugar, Sneha; Fu, Riqiang; Hernandez-Maldonado, Arturo J.

    2012-07-15

    The location of extraframework cations in Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion-exchanged SAPO-34 was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution. Incorporation of the alkaline earth metal cations onto the SAPO framework was achieved via liquid state ion exchange, coupled partial detemplation/solid-state ion exchange, and combination of both techniques. MAS NMR revealed that the level of ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations near hexagonal prisms (site SI), which are relatively difficult to exchange with the alkaline earth metal due to steric and charge repulsion criteria. In addition, the presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange of otherwise tenacious hydrogen as corroborated by unit cell compositional data as well as enhanced CO{sub 2} adsorption at low partial pressures. The extraframework ammonium species were produced from partial detemplation of the structure-directing agent employed for the SAPO-34 synthesis, tetraethylammonium. - Graphical abstract: MAS NMR was used to elucidate the position the cationic species in alkaline earth metal exchanged silicoaluminophosphates. These species played a significant role during the ion exchange process and, therefore, the materials ultimate CO{sub 2} adsorption performance. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Location of extraframework Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} cations was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Level of Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion exchanged SAPOs are outstanding CO{sub 2} adsorbents.

  12. [General biological phenomenon of cation deposit by chyme structures and its implications for creation of enteral nutrition mixtures].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A A; Poliakova, E P; Ksenofontov, D A

    2012-01-01

    General regularity of mineral elements distribution in enteral digesta of animals with different types of digestion is described. It was established that Mn, Zn, Cu and Ca are commonly concentrated in mucosal structures of digesta. Their concentrations dramatically increase while moving digesta from small intestine to large gut. Potassium and sodium are not so intensively conjugated with enteral mucosa. It is speculated that described phenomenon can be estimated as a general biological law and can be applied for enteral nutritional mixture composition improvement. PMID:22808796

  13. Chemical and biological extraction of metals present in E waste: A hybrid technology

    SciTech Connect

    Pant, Deepak; Joshi, Deepika; Upreti, Manoj K.; Kotnala, Ravindra K.

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hybrid methodology for E waste management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Efficient extraction of metals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trace metal extraction is possible. - Abstract: Management of metal pollution associated with E-waste is widespread across the globe. Currently used techniques for the extraction of metals from E-waste by using either chemical or biological leaching have their own limitations. Chemical leaching is much rapid and efficient but has its own environmental consequences, even the future prospects of associated nanoremediation are also uncertain. Biological leaching on the other hand is comparatively a cost effective technique but at the same moment it is time consuming and the complete recovery of the metal, alone by biological leaching is not possible in most of the cases. The current review addresses the individual issues related to chemical and biological extraction techniques and proposes a hybrid-methodology which incorporates both, along with safer chemicals and compatible microbes for better and efficient extraction of metals from the E-waste.

  14. The structural diversity of DNA-neutral phospholipids-divalent metal cations aggregates: a small-angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction study.

    PubMed

    Uhríková, Daniela; Lengyel, Adrián; Hanulová, Mária; Funari, Sérgio S; Balgavý, Pavol

    2007-04-01

    We investigate the structure of aggregates formed due to DNA interaction with saturated neutral phosphatidylcholines [dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine] in presence of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) cations using simultaneous synchrotron small- and wide-angle X-ray diffractions. For DPPC:DNA = 3:1 mol/base and in the range of 1-50 mM Ca(2+), the diffractograms show structural heterogeneity of aggregates. We observe the coexistence of two lamellar phases in aggregates prepared at 1 mM Ca(2+): L(x) phase with the DNA strands (of unknown organization) intercalated in water layers between adjacent lipid bilayers and L(DPPC) phase of DPPC bilayers without any divalent cations and DNA strands. Aggregates prepared in the range 2-50 mM Ca(2+) show a condensed gel lamellar phase L (g) (c) with the lipid bilayer periodicity d approximately 8.0 nm, and the DNA-DNA interhelical distance d (DNA) approximately 5.1 nm. The increase of temperature induces the decrease in the intensity and the increase in the width of the DNA related peak. In the fluid state, the condensed lamellar phase L (alpha) (c) gradually converts into L(x) phase. The aggregates do not exhibit rippled P(beta) phase. The thermal behaviour of aggregates was investigated in the range 20-80 degrees C. Applying heating-cooling cycles, the aggregates converted into energetically more favourable structure: a condensed lamellar phase L(c) (or L(x)) is preserved or we observe lateral segregation of the DNA strands and metal cations (L(x) phase) in coexistence with L(PC) phase of pure phospholipids. PMID:16865363

  15. Simultaneous determination of inorganic and organic anions, alkali, alkaline earth and transition metal cations by capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductometric detection.

    PubMed

    Kubán, Pavel; Kubán, Petr; Kubán, Vlastimil

    2002-11-01

    Simultaneous separation of up to 22 inorganic and organic anions, alkali, alkaline earth and transition metal cations was achieved in less than 3 min in the capillary electrophoresis system with contactless conductometric detector. The sample was injected from both capillary ends (dual opposite end injection) and anionic and cationic species were detected in the center of the separation capillary. The parameters of the separation electrolyte, such as pH, concentration of the electrolyte, concentration of complexing agents and concentration of 18-crown-6 were studied. Best results were achieved with electrolytes consisting of 8 mM L-histidine, 2.8 mM 2-hydroxyisobutyric acid, 0.32 mM 18-crown-6 at pH 4.25 or 9 mM L-histidine, 4.6 mM lactic acid, 0.38 mM 18-crown-6 at pH 4.25. Other electrolytes containing complexing agents such as malic or tartaric acid at various concentrations could also be used. The detection limits achieved for most cations and anions were 7.5 - 62 micro gL(-1) except for Ba2+ (90 micro gL(-1)), Cd 2+, Cr 3+ and F- (125 micro gL(-1)), and fumarate (250 micro gL(-1)). The repeatability of migration times and peak areas was better than 0.4% and 5.9%, respectively. The developed method was applied for analysis of real samples, such as tap, rain, drainage and surface water samples, plant exudates, plant extracts and ore leachates.

  16. Nanometallomics: an emerging field studying the biological effects of metal-related nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Feng; Gao, Yuxi; Chai, Zhifang; Chen, Chunying

    2014-02-01

    Metallomics, focusing on the global and systematic understanding of the metal uptake, trafficking, role and excretion in biological systems, has attracted more and more attention. Metal-related nanomaterials, including metallic and metal-containing nanomaterials, have unique properties compared to their micro-scaled counterparts and therefore require special attention. The small size effect, surface effect, and quantum size effect directly influence the physicochemical properties of nanostructured materials and their fate and behavior in biota. However, to our knowledge, the metallomics itself did not touch this special category of materials yet. Therefore, the term "nanometallomics" is proposed and the systematic study on the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion (ADME) behavior of metal-related nanomaterials in biological systems and their interactions with genes, proteins and other biomolecules will be reviewed. The ADME behavior of metal-related nanomaterials in the biological systems is influenced by their physicochemical properties, the exposure route, and the microenvironment of the deposition site. Nanomaterials may not only interact directly or indirectly with genes, proteins and other molecules to cause DNA damage, genotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and cytotoxicity, but also stimulate the immune responses, circumvent tumor resistance and inhibit tumor metastasis. Nanometallomics needs to be integrated with other omics sciences, such as genomics, proteomics and metabolomics, to explore the biomedical data and obtain the overall knowledge of underlying mechanisms, and therefore to improve the application performance and to reduce the potential risk of metal-related nanomaterials.

  17. Cationic Ionic Liquids Organic Ligands Based Metal-Organic Frameworks for Fabrication of Core-Shell Microspheres for Hydrophilic Interaction Liquid Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qian; Ma, Junqian; Ma, Siqi; Wang, Shengyu; Li, Lijun; Zhu, Xianghui; Qiao, Xiaoqiang

    2016-08-24

    In this study, new metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) nanocrystals modified SiO2 core-shell microspheres were designed with cationic ionic liquids (ILs) 1,3-bis(4-carboxybutyl)imidazolium bromide (ILI) as organic ligands. By further adjustment the growth cycles, the new ILI-01@SiO2 core-shell stationary phase was facilely fabricated. The developed stationary phase was respectively characterized via element analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. Because the introduction of cationic imidazolium-based ILs ILI for fabrication of the MOFs nanocrystals shell, the new stationary phase exhibits the retention mechanism of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC). Many polar samples, such as amides, vitamins, nucleic acid bases, and nucleosides, were utilized to investigate the performance of the prepared ILI-01@SiO2 column. Compared to the conventional aminosilica column, the new ILI-01@SiO2 column displays high separation selectivity in a shorter separation time. Furthermore, the new ILI-01@SiO2 column was also used for detection of illegal melamine addition in the baby formula. All the above results demonstrate the new ILI-01@SiO2 core-shell stationary phase is of good potentials for high-selectivity separation the polar samples. PMID:27483161

  18. Interaction of metallic clusters with biologically active curcumin molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sanjeev K.; He, Haiying; Liu, Chunhui; Dutta, Ranu; Pandey, Ravindra

    2015-09-01

    We have investigated the interaction of subnano metallic Gd and Au clusters with curcumin, an important biomolecule having pharmacological activity. Gd clusters show different site preference to curcumin and much stronger interaction strength, in support of the successful synthesis of highly stable curcumin-coated Gd nanoparticles as reported recently. It can be attributed to significant charge transfer from the Gd cluster to curcumin together with a relatively strong hybridization of the Gd df-orbitals with curcumin p-orbitals. These results suggest that Gd nanoparticles can effectively be used as delivery carriers for curcumin at the cellular level for therapy and medical imaging applications.

  19. Effects of inorganic acids and divalent hydrated metal cations (Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+)) on γ-AlOOH sol-gel process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Xia, Yuguo; Zhang, Li; Chen, Dairong; Jiao, Xiuling

    2015-11-01

    In-depth understanding of the sol-gel process plays an essential role in guiding the preparation of new materials. Herein, the effects of different inorganic acids (HCl, HNO3 and H2SO4) and divalent hydrated metal cations (Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+)) on γ-AlOOH sol-gel process were studied based on experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In these experiments, the sol originating from the γ-AlOOH suspension was formed only with the addition of HCl and HNO3, but not with H2SO4. Furthermore, the DFT calculations showed that the strong adsorption of HSO4(-) on the surface of the γ-AlOOH particles, and the hydrogen in HSO4(-) pointing towards the solvent lead to an unstable configuration of electric double layer (EDL). In the experiment, the gelation time sequence of γ-AlOOH sol obtained by adding metal ions changed when the ionic strength was equal to or greater than 0.198 mol kg(-1). The DFT calculations demonstrated that the adsorption energy of hydrated metal ions on the γ-AlOOH surface can actually make a difference in the sol-gel process.

  20. CATION EXCHANGER1 Cosegregates with Cadmium Tolerance in the Metal Hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri and Plays a Role in Limiting Oxidative Stress in Arabidopsis Spp.

    PubMed

    Baliardini, Cecilia; Meyer, Claire-Lise; Salis, Pietrino; Saumitou-Laprade, Pierre; Verbruggen, Nathalie

    2015-09-01

    Arabidopsis halleri is a model species for the study of plant adaptation to extreme metallic conditions. In this species, cadmium (Cd) tolerance seems to be constitutive, and the mechanisms underlying the trait are still poorly understood. A previous quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis performed on A. halleri × Arabidopsis lyrata backcross population1 identified the metal-pump gene Heavy Metal ATPase4 as the major genetic determinant for Cd tolerance. However, although necessary, Heavy Metal ATPase4 alone is not sufficient for determining this trait. After fine mapping, a gene encoding a calcium(2+)/hydrogen(+) antiporter, cation/hydrogen(+) exchanger1 (CAX1), was identified as a candidate gene for the second QTL of Cd tolerance in A. halleri. Backcross population1 individuals displaying the A. halleri allele for the CAX1 locus exhibited significantly higher CAX1 expression levels compared with the ones with the A. lyrata allele, and a positive correlation between CAX1 expression and Cd tolerance was observed. Here, we show that this QTL is conditional and that it is only detectable at low external Ca concentration. CAX1 expression in both roots and shoots was higher in A. halleri than in the close Cd-sensitive relative species A. lyrata and Arabidopsis thaliana. Moreover, CAX1 loss of function in A. thaliana led to higher Cd sensitivity at low concentration of Ca, higher sensitivity to methylviologen, and stronger accumulation of reactive oxygen species after Cd treatment. Overall, this study identifies a unique genetic determinant of Cd tolerance in the metal hyperaccumulator A. halleri and offers a new twist for the function of CAX1 in plants. PMID:26162428

  1. CATION EXCHANGER1 Cosegregates with Cadmium Tolerance in the Metal Hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri and Plays a Role in Limiting Oxidative Stress in Arabidopsis Spp.1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Baliardini, Cecilia; Meyer, Claire-Lise; Salis, Pietrino; Saumitou-Laprade, Pierre; Verbruggen, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Arabidopsis halleri is a model species for the study of plant adaptation to extreme metallic conditions. In this species, cadmium (Cd) tolerance seems to be constitutive, and the mechanisms underlying the trait are still poorly understood. A previous quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis performed on A. halleri × Arabidopsis lyrata backcross population1 identified the metal-pump gene Heavy Metal ATPase4 as the major genetic determinant for Cd tolerance. However, although necessary, Heavy Metal ATPase4 alone is not sufficient for determining this trait. After fine mapping, a gene encoding a calcium2+/hydrogen+ antiporter, cation/hydrogen+ exchanger1 (CAX1), was identified as a candidate gene for the second QTL of Cd tolerance in A. halleri. Backcross population1 individuals displaying the A. halleri allele for the CAX1 locus exhibited significantly higher CAX1 expression levels compared with the ones with the A. lyrata allele, and a positive correlation between CAX1 expression and Cd tolerance was observed. Here, we show that this QTL is conditional and that it is only detectable at low external Ca concentration. CAX1 expression in both roots and shoots was higher in A. halleri than in the close Cd-sensitive relative species A. lyrata and Arabidopsis thaliana. Moreover, CAX1 loss of function in A. thaliana led to higher Cd sensitivity at low concentration of Ca, higher sensitivity to methylviologen, and stronger accumulation of reactive oxygen species after Cd treatment. Overall, this study identifies a unique genetic determinant of Cd tolerance in the metal hyperaccumulator A. halleri and offers a new twist for the function of CAX1 in plants. PMID:26162428

  2. Challenge to assess the toxic contribution of metal cation released from nanomaterials for nanotoxicology - the case of ZnO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mingsheng; Li, Jie; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Su, Huanxing; Chen, Hongzheng; Fujita, Daisuke

    2013-05-01

    The identification of physicochemical factors that govern toxic effects of nanomaterials (NMs) is important for the safe design and synthesis of NMs. The release of metal cations from NMs in cell culture medium and the role of the metal cations in cytotoxicity are still under dispute. Here, we report that removal of NMs such as ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) by centrifugation, the procedure commonly used for the estimation of released ion concentration in nanotoxicology, was incomplete even at a relative centrifugal force of 150 000 × g. In this sense, the Zn concentration in supernatant measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry cannot be regarded as the concentration of free Zn2+ ions which were released from ZnO NPs in cell culture medium. This suggests the urgent need to develop relevant analytical techniques for nanotoxicology. The toxic contribution of released Zn2+ ions to the A549 cell lines was estimated to be only about 10%. We conclude that the cytotoxicity associated with ZnO NPs is not a function of the Zn concentration, suggesting that other factors play an important role in the toxic effect of ZnO NPs.The identification of physicochemical factors that govern toxic effects of nanomaterials (NMs) is important for the safe design and synthesis of NMs. The release of metal cations from NMs in cell culture medium and the role of the metal cations in cytotoxicity are still under dispute. Here, we report that removal of NMs such as ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) by centrifugation, the procedure commonly used for the estimation of released ion concentration in nanotoxicology, was incomplete even at a relative centrifugal force of 150 000 × g. In this sense, the Zn concentration in supernatant measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry cannot be regarded as the concentration of free Zn2+ ions which were released from ZnO NPs in cell culture medium. This suggests the urgent need to develop relevant analytical techniques for nanotoxicology. The

  3. Discriminating Properties of Alkali Metal Ions Towards the Constituents of Proteins and Nucleic Acids. Conclusions from Gas-Phase and Theoretical Studies.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Mary T; Armentrout, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative insight into the structures and thermodynamics of alkali metal cations interacting with biological molecules can be obtained from studies in the gas phase combined with theoretical work. In this chapter, the fundamentals of the experimental and theoretical techniques are first summarized and results for such work on complexes of alkali metal cations with amino acids, small peptides, and nucleobases are reviewed. Periodic trends in how these interactions vary as the alkali metal cations get heavier are highlighted.

  4. Possibility of biological micromachining used for metal removal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, D; Li, Y

    1998-04-01

    Besides the physical and chemical machining methods, a biological machining method has been presented. The experimental results show that machining of pure iron, pure copper and constantan by a special bacterium,Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, was possible. A micro gear and grooves on pure copper piece were bio-machined. The depth of the groove so bio-machined was directly dependent on the machining time. The biomachining mechanism has been analyzed from the electron-transport chain (ETC) in the T.ferrooxidans membrane, and its developing direction has been also discussed. PMID:18726199

  5. Biological treatment of heavy metals in acid mine drainage using sulfate reducing bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Alvarez, R; Karri, S; Freeman, S; Field, J A

    2006-01-01

    The uncontrolled release of acid mine drainage (AMD) from abandoned mines and tailing piles threatens water resources in many sites worldwide. AMD introduces elevated concentrations of sulfate ions and dissolved heavy metals as well as high acidity levels to groundwater and receiving surface water. Anaerobic biological processes relying on the activity of sulfate reducing bacteria are being considered for the treatment of AMD and other heavy metal containing effluents. Biogenic sulfides form insoluble complexes with heavy metals resulting in their precipitation. The objective of this study was to investigate the remediation of AMD in sulfate reducing bioreactors inoculated with anaerobic granular sludge and fed with an influent containing ethanol. Biological treatment of an acidic (pH 4.0) synthetic AMD containing high concentrations of heavy metals (100 mg Cu(2+)l(-1); 10 mg Ni(2+)l(-1), 10 mg Zn(2+)l(-1)) increased the effluent pH level to 7.0-7.2 and resulted in metal removal efficiencies exceeding 99.2%. The highest metal precipitation rates attained for Cu, Ni and Zn averaged 92.5, 14.6 and 15.8 mg metal l(-1) of reactor d(-1). The results of this work demonstrate that an ethanol-fed sulfidogenic reactor was highly effective to remove heavy metal contamination and neutralized the acidity of the synthetic wastewater.

  6. BIOLOGICAL RESPONSE TO VARIATION OF ACID-VOLATILE SULFIDES AND METALS IN FIELD-EXPOSED SPIKED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vertical and temporal variations of acid-volatile sulfides (AVS) and simultaneously extracted metals (SEM) in sediment can control biological impacts of metals. To assess the significance of these variations in field sediments, sediments spiked with cadmium, copper, lead, nickel ...

  7. Whole Genome Duplication and Enrichment of Metal Cation Transporters Revealed by De Novo Genome Sequencing of Extremely Halotolerant Black Yeast Hortaea werneckii

    PubMed Central

    Jackman, Shaun; Turk, Martina; Sadowski, Ivan; Nislow, Corey; Jones, Steven; Birol, Inanc; Cimerman, Nina Gunde; Plemenitaš, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Hortaea werneckii, ascomycetous yeast from the order Capnodiales, shows an exceptional adaptability to osmotically stressful conditions. To investigate this unusual phenotype we obtained a draft genomic sequence of a H. werneckii strain isolated from hypersaline water of solar saltern. Two of its most striking characteristics that may be associated with a halotolerant lifestyle are the large genetic redundancy and the expansion of genes encoding metal cation transporters. Although no sexual state of H. werneckii has yet been described, a mating locus with characteristics of heterothallic fungi was found. The total assembly size of the genome is 51.6 Mb, larger than most phylogenetically related fungi, coding for almost twice the usual number of predicted genes (23333). The genome appears to have experienced a relatively recent whole genome duplication, and contains two highly identical gene copies of almost every protein. This is consistent with some previous studies that reported increases in genomic DNA content triggered by exposure to salt stress. In hypersaline conditions transmembrane ion transport is of utmost importance. The analysis of predicted metal cation transporters showed that most types of transporters experienced several gene duplications at various points during their evolution. Consequently they are present in much higher numbers than expected. The resulting diversity of transporters presents interesting biotechnological opportunities for improvement of halotolerance of salt-sensitive species. The involvement of plasma P-type H+ ATPases in adaptation to different concentrations of salt was indicated by their salt dependent transcription. This was not the case with vacuolar H+ ATPases, which were transcribed constitutively. The availability of this genomic sequence is expected to promote the research of H. werneckii. Studying its extreme halotolerance will not only contribute to our understanding of life in hypersaline environments, but should also

  8. On the mechanisms of cation injection in conducting bridge memories: The case of HfO2 in contact with noble metal anodes (Au, Cu, Ag)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadi, M.; Gonon, P.; Vallée, C.; Mannequin, C.; Grampeix, H.; Jalaguier, E.; Jomni, F.; Bsiesy, A.

    2016-03-01

    Resistance switching is studied in HfO2 as a function of the anode metal (Au, Cu, and Ag) in view of its application to resistive memories (resistive random access memories, RRAM). Current-voltage (I-V) and current-time (I-t) characteristics are presented. For Au anodes, resistance transition is controlled by oxygen vacancies (oxygen-based resistive random access memory, OxRRAM). For Ag anodes, resistance switching is governed by cation injection (Conducting Bridge random access memory, CBRAM). Cu anodes lead to an intermediate case. I-t experiments are shown to be a valuable tool to distinguish between OxRRAM and CBRAM behaviors. A model is proposed to explain the high-to-low resistance transition in CBRAMs. The model is based on the theory of low-temperature oxidation of metals (Cabrera-Mott theory). Upon electron injection, oxygen vacancies and oxygen ions are generated in the oxide. Oxygen ions are drifted to the anode, and an interfacial oxide is formed at the HfO2/anode interface. If oxygen ion mobility is low in the interfacial oxide, a negative space charge builds-up at the HfO2/oxide interface. This negative space charge is the source of a strong electric field across the interfacial oxide thickness, which pulls out cations from the anode (CBRAM case). Inversely, if oxygen ions migration through the interfacial oxide is important (or if the anode does not oxidize such as Au), bulk oxygen vacancies govern resistance transition (OxRRAM case).

  9. Tautomeric switching and metal-cation sensing of ligand-equipped 4-hydroxy-/4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinolines.

    PubMed

    Todorov, Aleksandar R; Nieger, Martin; Helaja, Juho

    2012-06-01

    Novel 4-hydroxyquinoline (4HQ) based tautomeric switches are reported. 4HQs equipped with coordinative side arms (8-arylimino and 3-piperidin-1-ylmethyl groups) were synthesized to access O- or N-selective chelation of Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) ions by 4HQ. In the case of the monodentate arylimino group, O chelation of metal ions induces concomitant switching of phenol tautomer to the keto form in nonpolar or aprotic media. This change is accompanied by selective and highly sensitive fluorometric sensing of Zn(2+) ions. In the case of the bidentate 8-(quinolin-8-ylimino)methyl side arm, NMR studies in CD(3) OD indicated that both Cd(2+) and Zn(2+) ions afford N chelation for 4HQ, coexisting with tautomeric switching from quinolin-4(1H)-one to quinolin-4-olate. In corroboration, UV/Vis-monitored metal-ion titrations in toluene and methanol implied similar structural changes. Additionally, fluorescence measurements indicated that the metal-triggered tautomeric switching is associated with compound signaling properties. The results are supported by DFT calculations at the B3LYP 6-31G* level. Several X-ray structures of metal-free and metal-chelating 4HQ are presented to support the solution studies.

  10. Surface coating affects behavior of metallic nanoparticles in a biological environment.

    PubMed

    Jurašin, Darija Domazet; Ćurlin, Marija; Capjak, Ivona; Crnković, Tea; Lovrić, Marija; Babič, Michal; Horák, Daniel; Vinković Vrček, Ivana; Gajović, Srećko

    2016-01-01

    Silver (AgNPs) and maghemite, i.e., superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are promising candidates for new medical applications, which implies the need for strict information regarding their physicochemical characteristics and behavior in a biological environment. The currently developed AgNPs and SPIONs encompass a myriad of sizes and surface coatings, which affect NPs properties and may improve their biocompatibility. This study is aimed to evaluate the effects of surface coating on colloidal stability and behavior of AgNPs and SPIONs in modelled biological environments using dynamic and electrophoretic light scattering techniques, as well as transmission electron microscopy to visualize the behavior of the NP. Three dispersion media were investigated: ultrapure water (UW), biological cell culture medium without addition of protein (BM), and BM supplemented with common serum protein (BMP). The obtained results showed that different coating agents on AgNPs and SPIONs produced different stabilities in the same biological media. The combination of negative charge and high adsorption strength of coating agents proved to be important for achieving good stability of metallic NPs in electrolyte-rich fluids. Most importantly, the presence of proteins provided colloidal stabilization to metallic NPs in biological fluids regardless of their chemical composition, surface structure and surface charge. In addition, an assessment of AgNP and SPION behavior in real biological fluids, rat whole blood (WhBl) and blood plasma (BlPl), revealed that the composition of a biological medium is crucial for the colloidal stability and type of metallic NP transformation. Our results highlight the importance of physicochemical characterization and stability evaluation of metallic NPs in a variety of biological systems including as many NP properties as possible.

  11. Surface coating affects behavior of metallic nanoparticles in a biological environment

    PubMed Central

    Jurašin, Darija Domazet; Ćurlin, Marija; Capjak, Ivona; Crnković, Tea; Lovrić, Marija; Babič, Michal; Horák, Daniel; Gajović, Srećko

    2016-01-01

    Summary Silver (AgNPs) and maghemite, i.e., superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are promising candidates for new medical applications, which implies the need for strict information regarding their physicochemical characteristics and behavior in a biological environment. The currently developed AgNPs and SPIONs encompass a myriad of sizes and surface coatings, which affect NPs properties and may improve their biocompatibility. This study is aimed to evaluate the effects of surface coating on colloidal stability and behavior of AgNPs and SPIONs in modelled biological environments using dynamic and electrophoretic light scattering techniques, as well as transmission electron microscopy to visualize the behavior of the NP. Three dispersion media were investigated: ultrapure water (UW), biological cell culture medium without addition of protein (BM), and BM supplemented with common serum protein (BMP). The obtained results showed that different coating agents on AgNPs and SPIONs produced different stabilities in the same biological media. The combination of negative charge and high adsorption strength of coating agents proved to be important for achieving good stability of metallic NPs in electrolyte-rich fluids. Most importantly, the presence of proteins provided colloidal stabilization to metallic NPs in biological fluids regardless of their chemical composition, surface structure and surface charge. In addition, an assessment of AgNP and SPION behavior in real biological fluids, rat whole blood (WhBl) and blood plasma (BlPl), revealed that the composition of a biological medium is crucial for the colloidal stability and type of metallic NP transformation. Our results highlight the importance of physicochemical characterization and stability evaluation of metallic NPs in a variety of biological systems including as many NP properties as possible. PMID:26977382

  12. Investigation of Metal Bioavailability and Microbial Metal Utilization in Methane Seep Ecosystems through Integration of Geochemical and Biological Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, J. B.; Gadh, V.; Steele, J. A.; Adkins, J. F.; Orphan, V. J.

    2012-12-01

    Methane hydrate seeps are important sources of greenhouse gases and host unique microbial communities that couple anaerobic oxidation of methane and sulfate reduction. Microbial enzymes that catalyze the reactions driving these anaerobic metabolisms require transition metals such as Fe, Ni, Co, Zn, and Mo as essential cofactors. These metals are expected to be drawn down to low concentrations by precipitation as sulfide phases in the highly sulfidic porewaters at methane seep ecosystems. However, in situ concentrations of biologically-important metals in sulfidic methane seep pore fluids and the relative importance of different metals for anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) vs. sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) are unknown. We are integrating geochemical and metagenomic datasets with nano-scale maps of cellular metal distributions to gain insights into metal bioavailability and utilization in methane seep ecosystems. We have measured porewater profiles of dissolved metals (V, Ni, Cu, Co, Fe, Mn, Zn, Mo and W) from three habitat types at Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon: Calyptogena clam beds, microbial mats and sites with low methane flux. Highly sulfidic sediment porewaters beneath microbial mats contained the lowest metal concentrations, suggesting that microbes inhabiting these environments may be limited by metal scarcity. Cobalt occurred at particularly low abundances (≤5 nM in all cores and frequently at sub-nanomolar levels). We also analyzed the taxonomic distribution of ABC (ATP-binding cassette) metal transporters in metagenomes from environmentally-enriched consortia of ANME-2 and SRB from Eel River Basin methane seeps. Our findings suggest that both ANME and SRB possess genes encoding ABC transporters with high affinity for Fe, Ni, Co, Zn and Mo. Combined with our geochemical data, these results imply that ANME-SRB consortia in highly sulfidic environments have specialized mechanisms that allow them to acquire metal micronutrients

  13. Competition effects in cation binding to humic acid: Conditional affinity spectra for fixed total metal concentration conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Calin; Mongin, Sandrine; Rey-Castro, Carlos; Galceran, Josep; Companys, Encarnació; Garcés, José Luis; Salvador, José; Puy, Jaume; Cecilia, Joan; Lodeiro, Pablo; Mas, Francesc

    2010-09-01

    Information on the Pb and Cd binding to a purified Aldrich humic acid (HA) is obtained from the influence of different fixed total metal concentrations on the acid-base titrations of this ligand. NICA (Non-Ideal Competitive Adsorption) isotherm has been used for a global quantitative description of the binding, which has then been interpreted by plotting the Conditional Affinity Spectra of the H + binding at fixed total metal concentrations (CAScTM). This new physicochemical tool, here introduced, allows the interpretation of binding results in terms of distributions of proton binding energies. A large increase in the acidity of the phenolic sites as the total metal concentration increases, especially in presence of Pb, is revealed from the shift of the CAScTM towards lower affinities. The variance of the CAScTM distribution, which can be used as a direct measure of the heterogeneity, also shows a significant dependence on the total metal concentration. A discussion of the factors that influence the heterogeneity of the HA under the conditions of each experiment is provided, so that the smoothed pattern exhibited by the titration curves can be justified.

  14. Quantitative investigations of cation complexation of photochromic 8-benzothiazole-substituted benzopyran: towards metal-ion sensors.

    PubMed

    Zakharova, Marianna I; Coudret, Christophe; Pimienta, Véronique; Micheau, Jean Claude; Delbaere, Stéphanie; Vermeersch, Gaston; Metelitsa, Anatoly V; Voloshin, Nikolai; Minkin, Vladimir I

    2010-02-01

    The photochromic, thermochromic and metallochromic behaviour of a series of three spiro[indoline-8-(benzothiazol-2-yl)-benzopyrans] has been investigated. The thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of their thermal equilibrium between the ring-closed (spiro) and ring-opened (merocyanine) isomeric forms have been determined using UV-Vis absorption and (1)H NMR spectroscopies. By adding Co(ii) and Ni(ii) ions in acetonitrile solution, 1 : 1 and 1 : 2 metal : merocyanine complexes are formed simultaneously. Using appropriate numerical methods, the kinetic analysis of the complexation allowed us to determine accurately key thermodynamic and spectroscopic parameters of the metal complexes. Results showed that the complexation strength is very sensitive to the size of the indoline nitrogen substituent. Complexation can be reversed by shining white light on the coloured complexes which regenerates the inactive spiropyran form, and releases the metallic ion; hence, these systems display fully reversible negative photochromism. The Zn(ii) complexes exhibit intense fluorescence in the 600-800 nm wavelength range. All these behaviours make these spiropyrans bearing benzothiazole heterocycles promising building blocks for the future construction of photodynamic chemosensors for transition metal ions.

  15. Environmental sensing of heavy metals through whole cell microbial biosensors: a synthetic biology approach.

    PubMed

    Bereza-Malcolm, Lara Tess; Mann, Gülay; Franks, Ashley Edwin

    2015-05-15

    Whole cell microbial biosensors are offering an alternative means for rapid, on-site heavy metal detection. Based in microorganisms, biosensing constructs are designed and constructed to produce both qualitative and quantitative outputs in response to heavy metal ions. Previous microbial biosensors designs are focused on single-input constructs; however, development of multiplexed systems is resulting in more flexible designs. The movement of microbial biosensors from laboratory based designs toward on-site, functioning heavy metal detectors has been hindered by the toxic nature of heavy metals, along with the lack of specificity of heavy metals promoter elements. Applying a synthetic biology approach with alternative microbial chassis may increase the robustness of microbial biosensors and mitigate these issues. Before full applications are achieved, further consideration has to be made regarding the risk and regulations of whole cell microbial biosensor use in the environment. To this end, a standard framework for future whole cell microbial biosensor design and use is proposed.

  16. A Novel Physical Approach for Cationic-Thiolate Protected Fluorescent Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Yohei; Lee, Chaiyathat; Yonezawa, Tetsu

    2015-10-01

    Knowledge on the synthesis of cationically charged fluorescent gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) is limited because the electrostatic repulsion between cationic ligands on the surface of NP hinders the formation of small Au NPs (usually less than ca. 2 nm) during nucleation in solvents. We herein propose a novel methodology for a synthesis of water-dispersible, cationic-thiolate protected fluorescent Au NPs by the sputtering of Au into liquid matrix containing thiolate ligands. By controlling mercaptan concentration the size and photophysical characteristics of Au NPs were directly controlled, resulting in near IR fluorescence with a 0.9% of absolute quantum yield. Cationically charged fluorescent metal NPs are promising, especially in biological fields, and this work provides a novel methodology towards the synthesis of a new series of functional metal NPs.

  17. Managing heavy metal toxicity stress in plants: biological and biotechnological tools.

    PubMed

    Ovečka, M; Takáč, T

    2014-01-01

    The maintenance of ion homeostasis in plant cells is a fundamental physiological requirement for sustainable plant growth, development and production. Plants exposed to high concentrations of heavy metals must respond in order to avoid the deleterious effects of heavy metal toxicity at the structural, physiological and molecular levels. Plant strategies for coping with heavy metal toxicity are genotype-specific and, at least to some extent, modulated by environmental conditions. There is considerable interest in the mechanisms underpinning plant metal tolerance, a complex process that enables plants to survive metal ion stress and adapt to maintain growth and development without exhibiting symptoms of toxicity. This review briefly summarizes some recent cell biological, molecular and proteomic findings concerning the responses of plant roots to heavy metal ions in the rhizosphere, metal ion-induced reactions at the cell wall-plasma membrane interface, and various aspects of heavy metal ion uptake and transport in plants via membrane transporters. The molecular and genetic approaches that are discussed are analyzed in the context of their potential practical applications in biotechnological approaches for engineering increased heavy metal tolerance in crops and other useful plants.

  18. [Use of biologically active substances in preventing the toxic action of some heavy metals].

    PubMed

    Degtiareva, T D; Katsnel'son, B A; Pirvalova, L I; Beresneva, O Iu; Gurvich, V B; Kuz'min, S V; Malykh, O L

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents experimental and theoretical rationales for some methods and means of biological prevention of the toxic effects of a number of heavy metals (lead, chromium, arsenic, cadmium) that pollute the environment. Subchronic experiments were made on laboratory animals exposed to the above substances in combination with various biological agents (sodium glutaminate, the adaptogen saparal, pectin-containing enterosorbent, calcium, the multivitamin-multimineral preparation Pikovit, etc.). They have indicated that the complex use of preparations is more beneficial than they are used alone. The results of controlled trials of biologically preventive preparations on children residing in an area exposed to industrial pollution are presented.

  19. A cation trap for anodic stripping voltammetry: NH3-plasma treated carbon nanotubes for adsorption and detection of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yan; Yang, Ran; Chen, Xing; Wang, Lun; Liu, Jin-Huai; Huang, Xing-Jiu

    2012-11-28

    NH(3)-plasma treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (pn-MWCNTs) with cation traps for the detection of ultratrace quantities of Zn(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), and Hg(II) using square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) is described. The pn-MWCNTs use their adsorption performance to enhance the sensitivity. It is found that under optimized conditions Zn(II), Cd(II), Cu(II) and Hg(II) were individually detected at potentials of -1.16, -0.78, -0.268 and 0.108 V, respectively. The detection limit (3σ method) of 0.314, 0.0272, 0.2263, and 0.1439 nM toward Zn(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), and Hg(II) is achievable, respectively. No interference could be seen during the simultaneous detection of Zn(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), and Hg(II). The pn-MWCNTs exhibit excellent selectivity owing to the different ability of adsorption. A study of the ability of pn-MWCNTs in practical application is carried out using a sample of water collected from Dongpu Reservoir in Hefei City, Anhui, China. It is found that the results were favorable when compared against inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) analysis.

  20. Zeolite-type metal organic frameworks immobilized Eu³⁺ for cation sensing in aqueous environment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Yan, Bing

    2015-12-01

    A novel luminescent lanthanide metal organic framework (Ln-MOF) is synthesized by in situ encapsulating Eu(3+) ions to partial replace the transition-metal clusters in the channels of CPM-17-Zn nanocrystals. The Eu(3+) functionalized zeolite-type MOF hybrid system shows excellent luminescence property and photo-stability in aqueous environment for the sensitization and protection from the host framework. Subsequently, as a highly selective and sensitive sensor, its nanocrystals can be used to detect Cd(2+) in aqueous solution. In addition, the possible sensing mechanism based on ion exchange is discussed in detail. This work is one of the few cases for detecting Cd(2+) in aqueous solution based on a zeolite-type MOF. The good fluorescence stability, low detection limit and broad linear range in aqueous environment make this probe to be expected to have potential application in intracellular sensing and imaging of Cd(2+) potentially.

  1. Metal-containing Complexes of Lactams, Imidazoles, and Benzimidazoles and Their Biological Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukalenko, S. S.; Bovykin, B. A.; Shestakova, S. I.; Omel'chenko, A. M.

    1985-07-01

    The results of the latest investigations of the problem of the synthesis of metal-containing complexes of lactams, imidazoles, and benzimidazoles, their structure, and their stability in solutions are surveyed. Some data on their biological activity (pesticide and pharmacological) and the mechanism of their physiological action are presented. The bibliography includes 190 references.

  2. Permeation rate of metal species through supported liquid membranes: diffusional and chemical resistances with cationic and anionic carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Danesi, P.R.; Horwitz, E.P.; Rickert, P.G.

    1983-01-01

    Facilitated transport by means of a mobile carrier in an organic diluent and adsorbed on a polymeric film, through supported liquid membranes (SLM), is a new method for the separation and recovery of metal ions. A permeability coefficient equation for this transport was tested. The facilitated transport of Cu/sup 2 +/ and Fe/sup 3 +/ ions through a SLM was characterized with respect to the membrane resistance. Transport of Am/sup 3 +/ through a SLM was also characterized. (DLC)

  3. Approach to study of heavy metal contamination effect on biological activity in Mediterranean Spanish soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca-Pérez, L.; Gil, C.; Mormeneo, S.; Abad, M.; Cervera, M.; González, A.; Boluda, R.

    2009-04-01

    Heavy metal contaminated soils results in various negative environmental effects such as a decrease in biological diversity, decline crop productivity or human exposure to toxic elements in the others. The influence of heavy metal contamination in Spanish Mediterranean soils on its biological activity was studied. Non-polluted soils and heavy metal contaminated soils were sampled from different sites affected by several industrial activities. Soil characteristics, heavy metals (As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Se, Sr, Zn and V), soil organic matter, microorganism numbers, biomass microbial carbon, soil respiration and dehydrogenase activity were determined. Except to a rice farming soil, the results indicate that soils with high concentrations of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sr and Zn showed low soil respiration, biomass carbon and dehydrogenase activity with respect non-polluted soils with similar characteristics. Our results provide evidence that these parameters are good approach to study of heavy metal contamination effect on biological activity in Mediterranean soils. We would like to thank Spanish government-MICINN for funding and support (MICINN, project CGL2006-09776).

  4. EDTA-Cross-Linked β-Cyclodextrin: An Environmentally Friendly Bifunctional Adsorbent for Simultaneous Adsorption of Metals and Cationic Dyes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feiping; Repo, Eveliina; Yin, Dulin; Meng, Yong; Jafari, Shila; Sillanpää, Mika

    2015-09-01

    The discharge of metals and dyes poses a serious threat to public health and the environment. What is worse, these two hazardous pollutants are often found to coexist in industrial wastewaters, making the treatment more challenging. Herein, we report an EDTA-cross-linked β-cyclodextrin (EDTA-β-CD) bifunctional adsorbent, which was fabricated by an easy and green approach through the polycondensation reaction of β-cyclodextrin with EDTA as a cross-linker, for simultaneous adsorption of metals and dyes. In this setting, cyclodextrin cavities are expected to capture dye molecules through the formation of inclusion complexes and EDTA units as the adsorption sites for metals. The adsorbent was characterized by FT-IR, elemental analysis, SEM, EDX, ζ-potential, and TGA. In a monocomponent system, the adsorption behaviors showed a monolayer adsorption capacity of 1.241 and 1.106 mmol g(-1) for Cu(II) and Cd(II), respectively, and a heterogeneous adsorption capacity of 0.262, 0.169, and 0.280 mmol g(-1) for Methylene Blue, Safranin O, and Crystal Violet, respectively. Interestingly, the Cu(II)-dye binary experiments showed adsorption enhancement of Cu(II), but no significant effect on dyes. The simultaneous adsorption mechanism was further confirmed by FT-IR, thermodynamic study, and elemental mapping. Overall, its facile and green fabrication, efficient sorption performance, and excellent reusability indicate that EDTA-β-CD has potential for practical applications in integrative and efficient treatment of coexistenting toxic pollutants.

  5. Biological and chemical characterization of metal bioavailability in sediments from Lake Roosevelt, Columbia River, Washington, USA.

    PubMed

    Besser, John M; Brumbaugh, William G; Ivey, Chris D; Ingersoll, Christopher G; Moran, Patrick W

    2008-05-01

    We studied the bioavailability and toxicity of copper, zinc, arsenic, cadmium, and lead in sediments from Lake Roosevelt (LR), a reservoir on the Columbia River in Washington, USA that receives inputs of metals from an upstream smelter facility. We characterized chronic sediment toxicity, metal bioaccumulation, and metal concentrations in sediment and pore water from eight study sites: one site upstream in the Columbia River, six sites in the reservoir, and a reference site in an uncontaminated tributary. Total recoverable metal concentrations in LR sediments generally decreased from upstream to downstream in the study area, but sediments from two sites in the reservoir had metal concentrations much lower than adjacent reservoir sites and similar to the reference site, apparently due to erosion of uncontaminated bank soils. Concentrations of acid-volatile sulfide in LR sediments were too low to provide strong controls on metal bioavailability, and selective sediment extractions indicated that metals in most LR sediments were primarily associated with iron and manganese oxides. Oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus) accumulated greatest concentrations of copper from the river sediment, and greatest concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, and lead from reservoir sediments. Chronic toxic effects on amphipods (Hyalella azteca; reduced survival) and midge larvae (Chironomus dilutus; reduced growth) in whole-sediment exposures were generally consistent with predictions of metal toxicity based on empirical and equilibrium partitioning-based sediment quality guidelines. Elevated metal concentrations in pore waters of some LR sediments suggested that metals released from iron and manganese oxides under anoxic conditions contributed to metal bioaccumulation and toxicity. Results of both chemical and biological assays indicate that metals in sediments from both riverine and reservoir habitats of Lake Roosevelt are available to benthic invertebrates. These findings will be used as

  6. Biological and chemical characterization of metal bioavailability in sediments from Lake Roosevelt, Columbia River, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, J.M.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Ivey, C.D.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Moran, P.W.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the bioavailability and toxicity of copper, zinc, arsenic, cadmium, and lead in sediments from Lake Roosevelt (LR), a reservoir on the Columbia River in Washington, USA that receives inputs of metals from an upstream smelter facility. We characterized chronic sediment toxicity, metal bioaccumulation, and metal concentrations in sediment and pore water from eight study sites: one site upstream in the Columbia River, six sites in the reservoir, and a reference site in an uncontaminated tributary. Total recoverable metal concentrations in LR sediments generally decreased from upstream to downstream in the study area, but sediments from two sites in the reservoir had metal concentrations much lower than adjacent reservoir sites and similar to the reference site, apparently due to erosion of uncontaminated bank soils. Concentrations of acid-volatile sulfide in LR sediments were too low to provide strong controls on metal bioavailability, and selective sediment extractions indicated that metals in most LR sediments were primarily associated with iron and manganese oxides. Oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus) accumulated greatest concentrations of copper from the river sediment, and greatest concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, and lead from reservoir sediments. Chronic toxic effects on amphipods (Hyalella azteca; reduced survival) and midge larvae (Chironomus dilutus; reduced growth) in whole-sediment exposures were generally consistent with predictions of metal toxicity based on empirical and equilibrium partitioning-based sediment quality guidelines. Elevated metal concentrations in pore waters of some LR sediments suggested that metals released from iron and manganese oxides under anoxic conditions contributed to metal bioaccumulation and toxicity. Results of both chemical and biological assays indicate that metals in sediments from both riverine and reservoir habitats of Lake Roosevelt are available to benthic invertebrates. These findings will be used as

  7. S/G-1: an ab initio force-field blending frozen Hermite Gaussian densities and distributed multipoles. Proof of concept and first applications to metal cations.

    PubMed

    Chaudret, Robin; Gresh, Nohad; Narth, Christophe; Lagardère, Louis; Darden, Thomas A; Cisneros, G Andrés; Piquemal, Jean-Philip

    2014-09-01

    response level. This opens up the possibility of embodying explicit scalar relativistic effects in molecular mechanics thanks to the direct transferability of ab initio pseudopotentials. Therefore, incorporating GEM-like electron density for a metal cation enable the introduction of nonambiguous short-range quantum effects within any point-dipole based polarizable force field without the need of an extensive parametrization.

  8. Biostable L-DNAzyme for Sensing of Metal Ions in Biological Systems.

    PubMed

    Cui, Liang; Peng, Ruizi; Fu, Ting; Zhang, Xiaobing; Wu, Cuichen; Chen, Huapei; Liang, Hao; Yang, Chaoyong James; Tan, Weihong

    2016-02-01

    DNAzymes, an important type of metal ion-dependent functional nucleic acid, are widely applied in bioanalysis and biomedicine. However, the use of DNAzymes in practical applications has been impeded by the intrinsic drawbacks of natural nucleic acids, such as interferences from nuclease digestion and protein binding, as well as undesired intermolecular interactions with other nucleic acids. On the basis of reciprocal chiral substrate specificity, the enantiomer of D-DNAzyme, L-DNAzyme, could initiate catalytic cleavage activity with the same achiral metal ion as a cofactor. Meanwhile, by using the advantage of nonbiological L-DNAzyme, which is not subject to the interferences of biological matrixes, as recognition units, a facile and stable L-DNAzyme sensor was proposed for sensing metal ions in complex biological samples and live cells.

  9. Inorganic concepts relevant to metal binding, activity, and toxicity in a biological system

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeschele, J.D. . Parke-Davis Pharmaceutical Research Div.); Turner, J.E.; England, M.W. )

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review selected physical and inorganic concepts and factors which might be important in assessing and/or understanding the fact and disposition of a metal system in a biological environment. Hopefully, such inquiries will ultimately permit us to understand, rationalize, and predict differences and trends in biological effects as a function of the basic nature of a metal system and, in optimal cases, serve as input to a system of guidelines for the notion of Chemical Dosimetry.'' The plan of this paper is to first review, in general terms, the basic principles of the Crystal Field Theory (CFT), a unifying theory of bonding in metal complexes. This will provide the necessary theoretical background for the subsequent discussion of selected concepts and factors. 21 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Method for the synthesis of cationic arene complexes of group VII and group VIII metals in strong Broensted acids

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinskaya, M.I.; Kaganovich, V.S.; Kudinov, A.R.

    1988-06-01

    A review of the work on the synthesis of the title complexes has been presented. The interaction of (Ru(eta-C/sub 6/H/sub 6/)Cl/sub 2/)/sub 2/ (I) with AgBF/sub 4/ or AgNO/sub 3/ in an aqueous medium gives (Ru(eta-C/sub 6/H/sub 6/)(H/sub 2/O)/sub 3/)/sup 2 +/, which reacts with arenes in CF/sub 3/COOH to form (Ru(eta-C/sub 6/H/sub 6/)(n-arene))/sup 2 +/ (II). The same complexes have been obtained from complex I by reacting it with arenes in heptane in the presence of AlCl/sub 3/. It has been found that cations II form when complex I is boiled directly with arenes in CF/sub 3/COOH, and in the cases of C/sub 6/H/sub 6/, C/sub 6/Me/sub 6/, and naphthalene, they form at room temperature in H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The complexes (Os(eta-Me/sub 3/C/sub 6/H/sub 3/)(n-arene))/sup 2 +/ have been obtained by boiling (Os(eta-Me/sub 3/C/sub 6/H/sub 3/)Cl/sub 2/)/sub 2/ with the arene in CF/sub 3/COOH. The complexes (M(eta-C/sub 4/Me/sub 5/)-(eta-arene))/sup 2 +/ (M = Rh, Ir) have been obtained in a similar manner from (M(eta-C/sub 5/Me/sub 5/)Cl/sub 2/)/sub 2/. Hypotheses regarding the structure of the intermediates formed during the reactions investigated have been advanced.

  11. Specific absorption rate in electrically coupled biological samples between metal plates.

    PubMed

    Joines, W T; Blackman, C F; Spiegel, R J

    1986-01-01

    The specific absorption rate (SAR) in a biological sample irradiated by electromagnetic fields between the metal plates of a transmission line can be altered significantly by the spacing of the metal plates and the distance between neighboring samples. The SAR in spherical biological samples is calculated for a number of neighboring sample arrangements and metal-plate spacings by using the method of images and induced dipole coupling. For a decrease in metal-plate spacing, the derived equations predict an increase in SAR within a sample and a decrease in SAR with a decrease in neighboring-sample spacing. The calculations are compared with measurements made with the aid of an array of 1-in radius metal hemispheres on the lower plate of two parallel plates (thus forming an image system). The hemisphere on which measurements are taken is insulated from the metal plate and is connected via a coaxial center conductor to an HP 3582A spectrum analyzer that measures the voltage and hence the electric field intensity at the hemisphere. Measurements made at a frequency where wavelength is large compared with sample size (48 Hz) are in good agreement with calculations. PMID:3741491

  12. Biologically activated noble metal alloys at the nanoscale: for lithium ion battery anodes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun Jung; Lee, Youjin; Oh, Dahyun; Chen, Tiffany; Ceder, Gerbrand; Belcher, Angela M

    2010-07-14

    We report the synthesis and electrochemical activity of gold and silver noble metals and their alloy nanowires using multiple virus clones as anode materials for lithium ion batteries. Using two clones, one for specificity (p8#9 virus) and one versatility (E4 virus), noble metal nanowires of high-aspect ratio with diameters below 50 nm were successfully synthesized with control over particle sizes, morphologies, and compositions. The biologically derived noble metal alloy nanowires showed electrochemical activities toward lithium even when the electrodes were prepared from bulk powder forms. The improvement in capacity retention was accomplished by alloy formation and surface stabilization. Although the cost of noble metals renders them a less ideal choice for lithium ion batteries, these noble metal/alloy nanowires serve as great model systems to study electrochemically induced transformation at the nanoscale. Given the demonstration of the electrochemical activity of noble metal alloy nanowires with various compositions, the M13 biological toolkit extended its utility for the study on the basic electrochemical property of materials.

  13. Metal-accumulating plants: The biological resource and its commercial exploitation is soil clean-up technology

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, A.J.M.; Reeves, R.D.

    1996-12-31

    This presentation provides a broad overview of metal hyperaccumulator plants and biological accumulation technology. Plants that have been identified as having the greatest potentials for development as phytoremediator crops for metal-contaminated soils are very briefly discussed. Phytoextraction, rhizofiltration, and phytostabilization are briefly defined. Issues pertinent to large scale phytoremediation of soils are discussed, including biological and technological constraints.

  14. Cation-Induced Hydration Effects Cause Lower Critical Solution Temperature Behavior in Protein Solutions.

    PubMed

    Matsarskaia, Olga; Braun, Michal K; Roosen-Runge, Felix; Wolf, Marcell; Zhang, Fajun; Roth, Roland; Schreiber, Frank

    2016-08-11

    The phase behavior of protein solutions is important for numerous phenomena in biology and soft matter. We report a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) phase behavior of aqueous solutions of a globular protein induced by multivalent metal ions around physiological temperatures. The LCST behavior manifests itself via a liquid-liquid phase separation of the protein-salt solution upon heating. Isothermal titration calorimetry and zeta-potential measurements indicate that here cation-protein binding is an endothermic, entropy-driven process. We offer a mechanistic explanation of the LCST. First, cations bind to protein surface groups driven by entropy changes of hydration water. Second, the bound cations bridge to other protein molecules, inducing an entropy-driven attraction causing the LCST. Our findings have general implications for condensation, LCST, and hydration behavior of (bio)polymer solutions as well as the understanding of biological effects of (heavy) metal ions and their hydration. PMID:27414502

  15. Single-Site Heterogeneous Catalysts for Olefin Polymerization Enabled by Cation Exchange in a Metal-Organic Framework.

    PubMed

    Comito, Robert J; Fritzsching, Keith J; Sundell, Benjamin J; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Dincă, Mircea

    2016-08-17

    The manufacture of advanced polyolefins has been critically enabled by the development of single-site heterogeneous catalysts. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) show great potential as heterogeneous catalysts that may be designed and tuned on the molecular level. In this work, exchange of zinc ions in Zn5Cl4(BTDD)3, H2BTDD = bis(1H-1,2,3-triazolo[4,5-b],[4',5'-i])dibenzo[1,4]dioxin) (MFU-4l) with reactive metals serves to establish a general platform for selective olefin polymerization in a high surface area solid promising for industrial catalysis. Characterization of polyethylene produced by these materials demonstrates both molecular and morphological control. Notably, reactivity approaches single-site catalysis, as evidenced by low polydispersity indices, and good molecular weight control. We further show that these new catalysts copolymerize ethylene and propylene. Uniform growth of the polymer around the catalyst particles provides a mechanism for controlling the polymer morphology, a relevant metric for continuous flow processes.

  16. Metal-phosphate binders

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, Beth Ann; Chaps-Cabrera, Jesus Guadalupe

    2009-05-12

    A metal-phosphate binder is provided. The binder may include an aqueous phosphoric acid solution, a metal-cation donor including a metal other than aluminum, an aluminum-cation donor, and a non-carbohydrate electron donor.

  17. Structural, chemical and biological aspects of antioxidants for strategies against metal and metalloid exposure

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the pathophysiology of exposure to heavy metals/metalloid. Beneficial renal effects of some medications, such as chelation therapy depend at least partially on the ability to alleviate oxidative stress. The administration of various natural or synthetic antioxidants has been shown to be of benefit in the prevention and attenuation of metal induced biochemical alterations. These include vitamins, N-acetylcysteine, α-lipoic acid, melatonin, dietary flavonoids and many others. Human studies are limited in this regard. Under certain conditions, surprisingly, the antioxidant supplements may exhibit pro-oxidant properties and even worsen metal induced toxic damage. To date, the evidence is insufficient to recommend antioxidant supplements in subject with exposure to metals. Prospective, controlled clinical trials on safety and effectiveness of different therapeutic antioxidant strategies either individually or in combination with chelating agent are indispensable. The present review focuses on structural, chemical and biological aspects of antioxidants particularly related to their chelating properties. PMID:20716905

  18. PIXE characterization of tissues surrounding metallic prostheses coated with biological glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbotteau, Y.; Irigaray, J. L.; Moretto, Ph.

    2004-01-01

    Biological glasses can be used as coatings for metallic prostheses in order to prevent corrosion. According to their composition, these glasses have different properties. We studied, in vivo, two glasses referred to as BVA and BVH. They are used as coatings of Ti6Al4V metallic implant. BVA glass disappears after 3 months of implantation and is replaced by bone. Prostheses initially coated by this glass have a larger osseous contact perimeter compared to the uncoated prostheses. This ensures a better anchoring of the implant and limits the micro-motions which cause wear debris. BVH glass keeps a constant composition during implantation and it is used like a layer which isolates metal implant from biological environment. In order to characterize the bony environment surrounding implants, we have used PIXE and RBS methods. This paper shows results of the behavior of bony tissue under micro-beam, the quality tests of new bone which replaces the BVA glass coating and the evaluation of corrosion effects. Titanium release in bony tissues begins when the metal surface of the prosthesis is exposed to biological fluids. After a few months of implantation, the titanium contamination is stabilized and remains localized within the first tens of micrometers of surrounding bone.

  19. Versatile Cellulose-Based Carbon Aerogel for the Removal of Both Cationic and Anionic Metal Contaminants from Water.

    PubMed

    Alatalo, Sara-Maaria; Pileidis, Filoklis; Mäkilä, Ermei; Sevilla, Marta; Repo, Eveliina; Salonen, Jarno; Sillanpää, Mika; Titirici, Maria-Magdalena

    2015-11-25

    Hydrothermal carbonization of cellulose in the presence of the globular protein ovalbumin leads to the formation of nitrogen-doped carbon aerogel with a fibrillar continuous carbon network. The protein plays here a double role: (i) a natural source of nitrogen functionalities (2.1 wt %) and (ii) structural directing agent (S(BET) = 38 m(2)/g). The applicability in wastewater treatment, namely, for heavy metal removal, was examined through adsorption of Cr(VI) and Pb(II) ion solely and in a mixed bicomponent aqueous solutions. This cellulose-based carbogel shows an enhanced ability to remove both Cr(VI) (∼68 mg/g) and Pb(II) (∼240 mg/g) from the targeted solutions in comparison to other carbon materials reported in the literature. The presence of competing ions showed little effect on the adsorption efficiency toward Cr(VI) and Pb(II).

  20. Synthesis and crystal structure of a new N-(2,6-dichlorobenzoyl)- N', N″-bis(pyrrolidinyl)-phosphoric triamide as a carrier and competitive bulk liquid membrane transport of six metal cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshnood, Razieh Sanavi; Pourayoubi, Mehrdad; Kasraee, Farideh; Toghraee, Maryam; Dušek, M.; Bereciartua, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    The competitive metal ion transport experiments of Co+2, Cd+2, Ag+, Pb+2, Ni+2, and Cu+2 were carried out by N-(2,6-dichlorobenzoyl)- N', N″-bis(pyrrolidinyl)-phosphoric triamide as a carrier in organic membrane phase. 2,6-Cl2C6H3C(O)NHP(O)[NC4H8]2 has been synthesized and characterized by mass spectrometry IR spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The asymmetric unit of title phosphoric triamide contains one symmetrically independent molecule. The source phase contained equimolar concentrations of metal ions at pH 5 and the receiving phase being buffered at pH 3. The following solvents were examined as membrane: chloroform (CHCl3), nitrobenzene (NB), 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCE), dichloromethane (DCM), dichloromethane/1,2-dichloroethane (DCM/1,2-DCE). The obtained results show that the selectivity and efficiency of transport for these heavy metal cations change with the nature of the ligand and also the organic solvents, which were used as liquid membrane in these experiments. A good selectivity was observed for Pb+2 cation by this ligand in all membrane systems. Moreover, the selectivity of metal cations in DCM is higher than other solvents. A non-linear relationship was found between the percent of transport of Pb+2 cation by this ligand and the compositions of DCM/1,2-DCE and binary solution by this ligand. The effect of several factors such as the nature of carboxylic acids (stearic, fumaric and maleic acid) as surfactant in the membrane phase and the time of transport on transport efficiency of Pb+2 cation were investigated.

  1. The present status of biological effects of toxic metals in the environment: lead, cadmium, and manganese.

    PubMed

    Shukla, G S; Singhal, R L

    1984-08-01

    The number of reports concerning the chemical toxicology of metals which are released in the environment by natural as well as anthropogenic sources, have been increasing constantly. Lead, cadmium, and manganese have found a variety of uses in industry, craft, and agriculture owing to their physical and chemical properties. The environmental burden of heavy metals has been rising substantially by smelter emission in air and waste sewage in water. Further, organic compounds of lead and manganese used as antiknock substances in gasoline are emitted into the atmosphere by automobile exhaustion. Such environmental contamination of air, water, soil, and food is a serious threat to all living kinds. Although these metals are known to produce their toxic effects on a variety of body systems, much emphasis has been placed on their effects on the nervous system owing to apparent association of relatively low or "subclinical" levels of metallic exposure with behavioral and psychological disorders. Clinical and animal data on environmental exposure show that while lead and manganese are most toxic to the nervous system, cadmium exerts profound adverse effects on kidney and the male reproductive system. It appears that the consequences of exposure to lead in adults are less severe than the types of exposure associated with hyperactivity in neonates. Except for a few reports, hyperactivity has indeed been observed in animals exposed to either of these three metals. Experimental work has also shown that these metals produce behavioral changes by altering the metabolism of brain neurotransmitters, especially catecholamines. Recently, it is hypothesized that these metals exert their toxic effect by damaging biological defences which exist in the body to serve as protective mechanisms against exogenous toxins. A voluminous publication list with diverse opinions on the biological effects of metals is available and there is an urgent need to compile assessment of the existing

  2. Nitric oxide as an electron donor, an atom donor, an atom acceptor, and a ligand in reactions with atomic transition-metal and main-group cations in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Blagojevic, Voislav; Flaim, Eric; Jarvis, Michael J Y; Koyanagi, Gregory K; Bohme, Diethard K

    2005-12-15

    The room-temperature reactions of nitric oxide with 46 atomic cations have been surveyed systematically across and down the periodic table using an inductively-coupled plasma/selected-ion flow tube (ICP/SIFT) tandem mass spectrometer. Rate coefficients and product distributions were measured for the reactions of first-row cations from K+ to Se+, of second-row cations from Rb+ to Te+ (excluding Tc+), and of third-row cations from Cs+ to Bi+. Reactions both first and second order in NO were identified. The observed bimolecular reactions were thermodynamically controlled. Efficient exothermic electron transfer was observed with Zn+, As+, Se+, Au+, and Hg+. Bimolecular O-atom transfer was observed with Sc+, Ti+, Y+, Zr+, Nb+, La+, Hf+, Ta+, and W+. Of the remaining 32 atomic ions, all but 8 react in novel termolecular reactions second order in NO to produce NO+ and the metal-nitrosyl molecule, the metal-monoxide cation and nitrous oxide, and/or the metal-nitrosyl cation. K+, Rb+, Cs+, Ga+, In+, Tl+, Pb+, and Bi+ are totally unreactive. Further reactions with NO produce the dioxide cations CaO2+, TiO2+, VO2+, CrO2+, SrO2+, ZrO2+, NbO2+, RuO2+, BaO2+, HfO2+, TaO2+, WO2+, ReO2+, and OsO2+ and the still higher order oxides WO3+, ReO3+, and ReO4+. NO ligation was observed in the formation of CaO+(NO), ScO+(NO), TiO+(NO), VO+(NO)(1-3), VO2+(NO)(1-3), SrO+(NO), SrO2+(NO)1,2, RuO+(NO)(1-3), RuO2+(NO)1,2, OsO+(NO)(1-3), and IrO+(NO). The reported reactivities for bare atomic ions provide a benchmark for reactivities of ligated atomic ions and point to possible second-order NO chemistry in biometallic and metal-surface environments leading to the conversion of NO to N2O and the production of metal-nitrosyl molecules.

  3. Preparation, structural characterization and biological evaluation of L-tyrosinate metal ion complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; El-Korashy, Sabry A.; Ahmed, Ahmed S.

    2008-06-01

    The complexes formed between different metal ions and biological molecules like amino acids play an important role in human life. Sn(II), Sn(IV), Zn(II), Cd(II), Hg(II), Cr(III), Fe(III), La(III), ZrO(II) and UO 2(II) complexes are synthesized with L-tyrosine (tyr). These complexes are characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic measurements, mass, IR, UV-vis and 1H NMR spectra as well as thermogravimetric analysis (TGA/DTG). It has been found from the elemental analysis and the thermal studies that the ligand behaves as bidentate ligand forming chelates with 1:3 (metal:ligand) stoichiometry for trivalent metals and 1:2 for divalent and tetravalent metals. The molar conductance measurements of the complexes in DMSO indicate that the complexes are non-electrolyte. The activation energies and other kinetic parameters were calculated from the Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger equations. The biological activities of the metal complexes have also been studied against different bacteria and fungi.

  4. Mechanical homeostasis of a DOPA-enriched biological coating from mussels in response to metal variation

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Clemens N. Z.; Winter, Alette; Bertinetti, Luca; Masic, Admir; Strauch, Peter; Harrington, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein–metal coordination interactions were recently found to function as crucial mechanical cross-links in certain biological materials. Mussels, for example, use Fe ions from the local environment coordinated to DOPA-rich proteins to stiffen the protective cuticle of their anchoring byssal attachment threads. Bioavailability of metal ions in ocean habitats varies significantly owing to natural and anthropogenic inputs on both short and geological spatio-temporal scales leading to large variations in byssal thread metal composition; however, it is not clear how or if this affects thread performance. Here, we demonstrate that in natural environments mussels can opportunistically replace Fe ions in the DOPA coordination complex with V and Al. In vitro removal of the native DOPA–metal complexes with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and replacement with either Fe or V does not lead to statistically significant changes in cuticle performance, indicating that each metal ion is equally sufficient as a DOPA cross-linking agent, able to account for nearly 85% of the stiffness and hardness of the material. Notably, replacement with Al ions also leads to full recovery of stiffness, but only 82% recovery of hardness. These findings have important implications for the adaptability of this biological material in a dynamically changing and unpredictable habitat. PMID:26311314

  5. Metal-like transport in proteins: A new paradigm for biological electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvankar, Nikhil; Vargas, Madeline; Tuominen, Mark; Lovley, Derek

    2012-02-01

    Electron flow in biologically proteins generally occurs via tunneling or hopping and the possibility of electron delocalization has long been discounted. Here we report metal-like transport in protein nanofilaments, pili, of bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens that challenges this long-standing belief [1]. Pili exhibit conductivities comparable to synthetic organic metallic nanostructures. The temperature, magnetic field and gate-voltage dependence of pili conductivity is akin to that of quasi-1D disordered metals, suggesting a metal-insulator transition. Magnetoresistance (MR) data provide evidence for quantum interference and weak localization at room temperature, as well as a temperature and field-induced crossover from negative to positive MR. Furthermore, pili can be doped with protons. Structural studies suggest the possibility of molecular pi stacking in pili, causing electron delocalization. Reducing the disorder increases the metallic nature of pili. These electronically functional proteins are a new class of electrically conductive biological proteins that can be used to generate future generation of inexpensive and environmentally-sustainable nanomaterials and nanolectronic devices such as transistors and supercapacitors. [1] Malvankar et al. Nature Nanotechnology, 6, 573-579 (2011)

  6. Ultrasound-assisted synthesis of nanosized zero-valent iron for metal cations extraction and wastewater treatment applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, I. Yu; Lysov, D. V.; Levina, V. V.; Mazov, I. N.; Gusev, A. A.; Yudintseva, T. I.; Kuznetsov, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    Nanosized zero-valent iron has shown good results in wastewater treatment and activation of physicochemical processes. Its applications in modern industry are complicated by high production costs of nanomaterials produced via existing synthesis routes. Therefore there is a need of cheap and high-productive methods of nanosized zero-valent iron with advanced functional properties. Improvement of oxidative conditions with additions may find its place in extraction of rare-earth metals, where high cost of nanomaterials could be viable. In this paper we studied an effect of ultrasonic irradiation on specific surface area and particle size of nanosized zero-valent iron synthesized by methods of chemical precipitation with high- temperature reduction in hydrogen flow and sodium borohydride reduction. Obtained results showed significant decrease of particle size and differences in particles morphology depending on presence of ultrasonication during synthesis and on chosen method. For ultrasonic-assisted synthesis with 100% amplitude, particle size calculated from specific surface area was 70 nm for sample synthesized by chemical precipitation with high-temperature reduction and 35 nm for borohydide reduction method compared to 63 nm for reference sample without ultrasonication.

  7. Sorption of metal cations by alginate-based biosorbents. On the correct determination of the thermodynamic parameters.

    PubMed

    Plazinski, Wojciech

    2012-02-15

    The paper is focused on the problem of interpretation of the experimental data related to the thermodynamics of metal ions binding by alginate-based biosorbents. When considering the thermodynamic parameters (i.e., changes in the enthalpy and entropy values; ΔH and ΔS, respectively), one can observe large discrepancies between their values even if the considered systems have very similar features. For instance, the binding of copper, cadmium, and lead can be entropy-driven, enthalpy-driven or both entropy- and enthalpy-driven, depending on the considered report. The aim of this paper is to find the reason for this paradox and to discuss the problem of interpretation of the data being usually the base for estimating ΔH and ΔS values. It appears that both numerous "technical" (e.g., pH, ionic strength) and model-related (e.g., monodentate vs. bidentate binding models) parameters can seriously influence the obtained values of thermodynamic parameters. The significance of these two types of factors is discussed in qualitative and quantitative manners. The proposed methods of distinguishing between the "apparent" and the "real" ΔH and ΔS values can be also related to other types of sorption/adsorption systems. PMID:22142997

  8. Synthesis of planar chiral iridacycles by cationic metal π-coordination: facial selectivity, and conformational and stereochemical consequences.

    PubMed

    Djukic, Jean-Pierre; Iali, Wissam; Pfeffer, Michel; Le Goff, Xavier-Frédéric

    2012-05-01

    Facial selectivity during the π-coordination of pseudo-tetrahedral iridacycles by neutral (Cr(CO)(3)), monocationic (Cp*Ru(+)), and biscationic (Cp*Ir(2+)) metal centers was directly influenced by the coulombic imbalance in the coordination sphere of the chelated Ir center. We also showed by using theoretical calculations that the feasibility of the related metallacycles that displayed metallocenic planar chirality was dependent to the presence of an electron-donating group, such as NMe(2), which contributed to the overall stability of the complexes. When the π-bonded moiety was the strongly electron-withdrawing Cp*Ir(2+) group, the electron donation from NMe(2) resulted in major conformational changes, with a barrier to rotation of about 17 kcal  mol(-1) for this group that became spectroscopically diastereotopic (high-field (1)H NMR spectroscopy). This peculiar property is proposed as a means to introduce a new type of constitutional chirality at the nitrogen center: planar chirality at tertiary aromatic amines. PMID:22473841

  9. Metal-organic frameworks for the storage and delivery of biologically active hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, Phoebe K; Wheatley, Paul S; Aldous, David; Mohideen, M Infas; Tang, Chiu; Hriljac, Joseph A; Megson, Ian L; Chapman, Karena W; De Weireld, Guy; Vaesen, Sebastian; Morris, Russell E

    2012-04-02

    Hydrogen sulfide is an extremely toxic gas that is also of great interest for biological applications when delivered in the correct amount and at the desired rate. Here we show that the highly porous metal-organic frameworks with the CPO-27 structure can bind the hydrogen sulfide relatively strongly, allowing the storage of the gas for at least several months. Delivered gas is biologically active in preliminary vasodilation studies of porcine arteries, and the structure of the hydrogen sulfide molecules inside the framework has been elucidated using a combination of powder X-ray diffraction and pair distribution function analysis.

  10. Biological in vitro and in vivo studies of a series of new asymmetrical cationic [99mTc(N)(DTC-Ln)(PNP)]+ complex (DTC-Ln = alicyclic dithiocarbamate and PNP = diphosphinoamine).

    PubMed

    Bolzati, Cristina; Cavazza-Ceccato, Mario; Agostini, Stefania; Refosco, Fiorenzo; Yamamichi, Yoshihiro; Tokunaga, Shinji; Carta, Davide; Salvarese, Nicola; Bernardini, Daniele; Bandoli, Giuliano

    2010-05-19

    (99m)Tc(N)-DBODC5 is a cationic mixed compound under clinical investigation as potential myocardial imaging agent. In spite of this, analogously to the other cationic (99m)Tc-agents, presents a relatively low first-pass extraction. Thus, modification of (99m)Tc(N)-DBODC(5) direct to increase its first-pass extraction keeping unaltered the favorable imaging properties would be desirable. This work describes the synthesis and biological evaluation of a series of novel cationic (99m)Tc-nitrido complexes, of general formula [(99m)TcN(DTC-Ln)(PNP)](+) (DTC-Ln= alicyclic dithiocarbamates; PNP = diphosphinoamine), as potential radiotracers for myocardial perfusion imaging. The synthesis of cationic (99m)Tc-(N)-complexes were accomplished in two steps. Biodistribution studies were performed in rats and compared with the distribution profiles of (99m)Tc(N)-DBODC5 and (99m)Tc-Sestamibi. The metabolisms of the most promising compounds were evaluated by HPLC methods. Biological studies revealed that most of the complexes have a high initial and persistent heart uptake with rapid clearance from nontarget tissues. Among tested compounds, 2 and 12 showed improved heart uptake with respect to the gold standard (99m)Tc-complexes with favorable heart-to-liver and slightly lower heart-to-lung ratios. Chromatographic profiles of (99m)Tc(N)-radioactivity extracted from tissues and fluids were coincident with the native compound evidencing remarkable in vivo stability of these agents. This study shows that the incorporation of alicyclic dithiocarbamate in the [(99m)Tc(N)(PNP)](+) building block yields to a significant increase of the heart uptake at early injection point suggesting that the first-pass extraction fraction of these novel complexes may be increased with respect to the other cationic (99m)Tc-agents keeping almost unaltered the favorable target/nontarget ratios. PMID:20402465

  11. Four homochiral coordination polymers contain N-acetyl-L-tyrosine and different N-donor ligand: Influence of metal cations, ancillary ligands and coordination modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meng-Li; Song, Hui-Hua

    2013-10-01

    Using the chiral ligand N-acetyl-L-tyrosine (Hacty) and maintaining identical reaction conditions, Zn(II), Co(II), and Cd(II) salts provided four novel homochiral coordination polymers {[Zn(acty)(bipy)2(H2O)2]·NO3·2H2O}n1, {[Co(acty)(bipy)2(H2O)2]·NO3·2H2O}n2, {[Cd(acty)2(bipy)H2O]·H2O}n3, and {[Cd(acty)(bpe)2(Ac)]·6H2O}n4 (bipy=4,4‧-bipyridine; bpe=1,2-di(4-pyridyl)ethane) in the presence of ancillary ligands. Compounds 1 and 2 are isostructural 1D chain structures. The neighboring chains are further linked into a 3D supramolecular structure via π⋯π stacking and hydrogen bond interactions. Compound 3 shows a 2D network and 4 generates 1D infinite chains along the c-axis. Compounds 3 and 4 are further connected into 3D supramolecular network by hydrogen bond interactions. More importantly, coordination in acyl oxygen atoms and ancillary ligands (bpe) as monodentate decorating ligands in 4 are rarely reported. Ancillary ligands and metal cations significantly influence the structure of the complexes. The photoluminescence properties of 1, 3, and 4 were studied at room temperature. Circular dichroism (CD) of the complexes have been investigated.

  12. Reactions of cationic transition metal acetonitrile complexes [M(CH3CN)n]m+ with GaCp*: novel gallium complexes of iron, cobalt, copper and silver.

    PubMed

    Bollermann, Timo; Puls, Arik; Gemel, Christian; Cadenbach, Thomas; Fischer, Roland A

    2009-02-28

    The reactions of the cationic transition metal acetonitrile complexes [M(CH3CN)n]m+ (m = 2: M = Fe, Co and m = 1: M = Cu, Ag) with GaCp* were investigated. The reaction of [Fe(CH3CN)6][BArF]2 (BAr(F) = [B{C6H3(CF3)2}4) with GaCp* leads to [Cp*Fe(GaCp*)3][BAr(F)] (1) via a redox neutral Cp* transfer and [Ga2Cp*][BAr(F)] as a by-product while the formation of [Cp*Co(GaCp*)3][BAr(F)]2 (2) from [Co(CH3CN)6][BAr(F)]2 is accompanied by oxidation of Co(II) to Co(III) with GaCp* as the oxidant. The reactions of [Cu(CH3CN)4][BAr(F)] and Ag[BPh4] with GaCp* lead to the formation of the homoleptic compounds [Cu(GaCp*)4][BAr(F)] (4) and [Ag(GaCp*)4][BPh4] (5), while treatment of Ag[CF3SO3] with GaCp* leads to the dimeric complex [Ag2(GaCp*)3(micro-GaCp*)2][CF3SO3]2 (6). All compounds were characterized by NMR spectroscopy, single crystal X-ray diffraction and elemental analysis. PMID:19462658

  13. Role of the metal cation types around VO4 groups on the nonlinear optical behavior of materials: experimental and theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Su, Xin; Yang, Zhihua; Han, Guopeng; Wang, Ying; Wen, Ming; Pan, Shilie

    2016-09-28

    In order to explore new NLO crystals with superior performances, it is greatly desirable to understand the intrinsic relationship between the macroscopic optical properties and microscopic structural features in crystals. A novel mechanism for nonlinear optical (NLO) effects of vanadate crystals, Li3VO4, KCd4(VO4)3 and Ca3(VO4)2 with distorted (VO4)(3-) groups, has been investigated. Experiments related to the synthesis and structures were determined. In addition, infrared and UV-Vis-NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, as well as electronic band structure calculations, were performed on the reported materials. A comprehensive analysis for the structure-property relationship is given by combining the experimental measurements, the electronic structure calculations and the SHG-weighted electron density to the linear and NLO properties. It was found that the contribution of the (VO4)(3-) anionic group to the second harmonic generation (SHG) response was the dominant anionic group, which plays a vital role to the SHG effects in Li3VO4, KCd4(VO4)3 and Ca3(VO4)2. It was also concluded that the metal cation types and coordination around VO4 groups, the distorted and parallel oriented VO4 tetrahedron decided the SHG coefficient values.

  14. Sequential injection chromatography with post-column reaction/derivatization for the determination of transition metal cations in natural water samples.

    PubMed

    Horstkotte, Burkhard; Jarošová, Patrícia; Chocholouš, Petr; Sklenářová, Hana; Solich, Petr

    2015-05-01

    In this work, the applicability of Sequential Injection Chromatography for the determination of transition metals in water is evaluated for the separation of copper(II), zinc(II), and iron(II) cations. Separations were performed using a Dionex IonPAC™ guard column (50mm×2mm i.d., 9 µm). Mobile phase composition and post-column reaction were optimized by modified SIMPLEX method with subsequent study of the concentration of each component. The mobile phase consisted of 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid as analyte-selective compound, sodium sulfate, and formic acid/sodium formate buffer. Post-column addition of 4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinol was carried out for spectrophotometric detection of the analytes׳ complexes at 530nm. Approaches to achieve higher robustness, baseline stability, and detection sensitivity by on-column stacking of the analytes and initial gradient implementation as well as air-cushion pressure damping for post-column reagent addition were studied. The method allowed the rapid separation of copper(II), zinc(II), and iron(II) within 6.5min including pump refilling and aspiration of sample and 1mmol HNO3 for analyte stacking on the separation column. High sensitivity was achieved applying an injection volume of up to 90µL. A signal repeatability of<2% RSD of peak height was found. Analyte recovery evaluated by spiking of different natural water samples was well suited for routine analysis with sub-micromolar limits of detection.

  15. Role of the metal cation types around VO4 groups on the nonlinear optical behavior of materials: experimental and theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Su, Xin; Yang, Zhihua; Han, Guopeng; Wang, Ying; Wen, Ming; Pan, Shilie

    2016-09-28

    In order to explore new NLO crystals with superior performances, it is greatly desirable to understand the intrinsic relationship between the macroscopic optical properties and microscopic structural features in crystals. A novel mechanism for nonlinear optical (NLO) effects of vanadate crystals, Li3VO4, KCd4(VO4)3 and Ca3(VO4)2 with distorted (VO4)(3-) groups, has been investigated. Experiments related to the synthesis and structures were determined. In addition, infrared and UV-Vis-NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, as well as electronic band structure calculations, were performed on the reported materials. A comprehensive analysis for the structure-property relationship is given by combining the experimental measurements, the electronic structure calculations and the SHG-weighted electron density to the linear and NLO properties. It was found that the contribution of the (VO4)(3-) anionic group to the second harmonic generation (SHG) response was the dominant anionic group, which plays a vital role to the SHG effects in Li3VO4, KCd4(VO4)3 and Ca3(VO4)2. It was also concluded that the metal cation types and coordination around VO4 groups, the distorted and parallel oriented VO4 tetrahedron decided the SHG coefficient values. PMID:27549347

  16. Functionalized Nanoporous Silica for Removal of Heavy Metals from Biological Systems; Adsorption and Application

    SciTech Connect

    Yantasee, Wassana; Rutledge, Ryan D.; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Sukwarotwat, Vichaya; Orr, Galya; Warner, Cynthia L.; Warner, Marvin G.; Fryxell, Glen E.; Wiacek, Robert J.; Timchalk, Charles; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2010-10-01

    Functionalized nanoporous silica, often referred to as self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous supports (SAMMS) have previously demonstrated the ability to serve as very effective heavy metal sorbents in a range of aquatic and environmental systems suggesting they may be advantageously utilized for biomedical applications such as chelation therapy. Herein we evaluate surface chemistries for heavy metal capture from biological fluids, various facets of the materials biocompatibility and the suitability of these materials as potential therapeutics. Of the materials tested, thiol-functionalized SAMMS proved most capable of removing selected heavy metals from biological solutions (i.e. blood, urine, etc.) As a result, thiol SAMMS was further analyzed to assess the material’s performance under a number of different biologically relevant conditions (i.e. variable pH and ionic strength) as well to gauge any potentially negative cellular effects resulting from interaction with the sorbent, such as cellular toxicity or possible chelation of essential minerals. Additionally, cellular uptake studies demonstrated no cell membrane permeation by the silica-based materials generally highlighting their ability to remain cellularly inert and thus non-toxic. As a result, it has been determined that organic ligand-functionalized nanoporous silica materials could be a valuable material for detoxification therapeutics and potentially other biomedical applications as needed.

  17. The use of metabolomics in the study of metals in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Jones, Oliver A H; Dias, Daniel A; Callahan, Damien L; Kouremenos, Konstantinos A; Beale, David J; Roessner, Ute

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics may be defined as the comprehensive quantitative and/or qualitative analysis of all metabolites present in a bio-fluid, cell, tissue, or organism. It is essentially the study of biochemical phenotypes (or metabotypes). Metabolic profiles are context dependent, and vary in response to a variety of factors including environment and environmental stimuli, health status, disease and a myriad of other factors; as such, metabolomics has been applied to a wide range of fields and has been increasingly utilised to the study of the roles played by metals in a range of biological systems as well as, encouragingly, in understanding the underlying biochemical mechanisms. The role of metals (and metalloids) in biological organisms is complex and the majority of studies in this area have been performed in plants but the fields of natural product chemistry, human health and even bacterial corrosion of water distribution systems have been investigated using this technique. In this review some of the novel approaches in which the metabolomics toolbox has been used to unravel the roles of metals and metalloids in a range of biological systems are discussed and suggestions made for future research.

  18. Functionalized Nanoporous Silica for the Removal of Heavy Metals from Biological Systems: Adsorption and Application

    PubMed Central

    Yantasee, Wassana; Rutledge, Ryan D.; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Sukwarotwat, Vichaya; Orr, Galya; Warner, Cynthia L.; Warner, Marvin G.; Fryxell, Glen E.; Wiacek, Robert J.; Timchalk, Charles; Addleman, R. Shane

    2012-01-01

    Surface-functionalized nanoporous silica, often referred to as self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous supports (SAMMS), has previously demonstrated the ability to serve as very effective heavy metal sorbents in a range of aquatic and environmental systems, suggesting that they may be advantageously utilized for biomedical applications such as chelation therapy. Herein we evaluate surface chemistries for heavy metal capture from biological fluids, various facets of the materials’ biocompatibility, and the suitability of these materials as potential therapeutics. Of the materials tested, thiol-functionalized SAMMS proved most capable of removing selected heavy metals from biological solutions (i.e., blood, urine, etc.) Consequentially, thiol-functionalized SAMMS was further analyzed to assess the material’s performance under a number of different biologically relevant conditions (i.e., variable pH and ionic strength) to gauge any potentially negative effects resulting from interaction with the sorbent, such as cellular toxicity or the removal of essential minerals. Additionally, cellular uptake studies demonstrated no cell membrane permeation by the silica-based materials generally highlighting their ability to remain cellularly inert and thus nontoxic. The results show that organic ligand functionalized nanoporous silica could be a valuable material for a range of detoxification therapies and potentially other biomedical applications. PMID:20939537

  19. Fenton-biological treatment of reverse osmosis membrane concentrate from a metal plating wastewater recycle system.

    PubMed

    Huang, R M; He, J Y; Zhao, J; Luo, Q; Huang, C M

    2011-04-01

    Although reverse osmosis (RO) has been widely used in the recycling of metal plating wastewater, organic compounds and heavy metals in the RO concentrate are difficult to remove by conventional treatment. A combination process including Fenton oxidation and a biological aerated filter was used to treat RO concentrate containing complex Cu and Ni from metal plating. During the Fenton treatment, Cu and Ni ions were released due to degradation of organic compounds and then removed by pH adjustment and coagulation. The concentrate was further treated using by a biological aerated filter. Optimum conditions were as follows: initial pH of influent of 4.0; dosage of H2O2 of 5.0 mmol l(-1); ratio of n(Fe2+)/n(H2O2) of 0.8; precipitation pH of Cu and Ni ions of 8.0; and a hydraulic retention time of the biological aerated filter of 2.5 h. The results showed that concentrations of effluent COD, Cu and Ni ions were less than 40 mg l(-1), 0.5 mg l(-1) and 0.3 mg l(-1), respectively; this means the treated effluent meets the emission standards for pollutants from electroplating set by China's Environmental Protection Agency. PMID:21877532

  20. Functionalized nanoporous silica for the removal of heavy metals from biological systems: adsorption and application.

    PubMed

    Yantasee, Wassana; Rutledge, Ryan D; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Sukwarotwat, Vichaya; Orr, Galya; Warner, Cynthia L; Warner, Marvin G; Fryxell, Glen E; Wiacek, Robert J; Timchalk, Charles; Addleman, R Shane

    2010-10-01

    Surface-functionalized nanoporous silica, often referred to as self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous supports (SAMMS), has previously demonstrated the ability to serve as very effective heavy metal sorbents in a range of aquatic and environmental systems, suggesting that they may be advantageously utilized for biomedical applications such as chelation therapy. Herein we evaluate surface chemistries for heavy metal capture from biological fluids, various facets of the materials' biocompatibility, and the suitability of these materials as potential therapeutics. Of the materials tested, thiol-functionalized SAMMS proved most capable of removing selected heavy metals from biological solutions (i.e., blood, urine, etc.) Consequentially, thiol-functionalized SAMMS was further analyzed to assess the material's performance under a number of different biologically relevant conditions (i.e., variable pH and ionic strength) to gauge any potentially negative effects resulting from interaction with the sorbent, such as cellular toxicity or the removal of essential minerals. Additionally, cellular uptake studies demonstrated no cell membrane permeation by the silica-based materials generally highlighting their ability to remain cellularly inert and thus nontoxic. The results show that organic ligand functionalized nanoporous silica could be a valuable material for a range of detoxification therapies and potentially other biomedical applications. PMID:20939537

  1. The influence of humic acid on the biological effects of selected trace metals

    SciTech Connect

    Stackhouse, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of humic acid (HA) on the biological effects of cadmium, hexavalent chromium, and two forms of trivalent chromium was assessed using common freshwater invertebrates. The acute toxicity was determined using Daphnia pulex, while D. magna was used in bioaccumulation studies. Final concentrations of HA tested were 0, 0.5, 5, and 50 mg/l. Humic acid was observed to significantly increase, decrease, or not influence both the acute toxicity and bioaccumulation of cadmium depending on HA concentration and time point examined. Additionally, dialysis studies were used to determine the influence of HA on the bioavailability of the metals. As with the biological effects, HA had little influence on the bioavailability of hexavalent chromium, while having a greater influence on cadmium and chromic chloride. There was a HA concentration dependent pattern of binding (a maximal decrease in percent free metal followed by metal release from HA) observed with cadmium and chromic chloride. This metal release from HA may have resulted from an associated time dependent decrease in pH of the surrounding water. Humic acid had little influence on the bioavailability of chrome lignosulfonate.

  2. The Metals in the Biological Periodic System of the Elements: Concepts and Conjectures.

    PubMed

    Maret, Wolfgang

    2016-01-05

    A significant number of chemical elements are either essential for life with known functions, or present in organisms with poorly defined functional outcomes. We do not know all the essential elements with certainty and we know even less about the functions of apparently non-essential elements. In this article, I discuss a basis for a biological periodic system of the elements and that biochemistry should include the elements that are traditionally part of inorganic chemistry and not only those that are in the purview of organic chemistry. A biological periodic system of the elements needs to specify what "essential" means and to which biological species it refers. It represents a snapshot of our present knowledge and is expected to undergo further modifications in the future. An integrated approach of biometal sciences called metallomics is required to understand the interactions of metal ions, the biological functions that their chemical structures acquire in the biological system, and how their usage is fine-tuned in biological species and in populations of species with genetic variations (the variome).

  3. The Metals in the Biological Periodic System of the Elements: Concepts and Conjectures

    PubMed Central

    Maret, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    A significant number of chemical elements are either essential for life with known functions, or present in organisms with poorly defined functional outcomes. We do not know all the essential elements with certainty and we know even less about the functions of apparently non-essential elements. In this article, I discuss a basis for a biological periodic system of the elements and that biochemistry should include the elements that are traditionally part of inorganic chemistry and not only those that are in the purview of organic chemistry. A biological periodic system of the elements needs to specify what “essential” means and to which biological species it refers. It represents a snapshot of our present knowledge and is expected to undergo further modifications in the future. An integrated approach of biometal sciences called metallomics is required to understand the interactions of metal ions, the biological functions that their chemical structures acquire in the biological system, and how their usage is fine-tuned in biological species and in populations of species with genetic variations (the variome). PMID:26742035

  4. Four homochiral coordination polymers contain N-acetyl-L-tyrosine and different N-donor ligand: Influence of metal cations, ancillary ligands and coordination modes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Meng-Li; Song, Hui-Hua

    2013-10-15

    Using the chiral ligand N-acetyl-L-tyrosine (Hacty) and maintaining identical reaction conditions, Zn(II), Co(II), and Cd(II) salts provided four novel homochiral coordination polymers ([Zn(acty)(bipy){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]·NO{sub 3}·2H{sub 2}O){sub n}1, ([Co(acty)(bipy){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]·NO{sub 3}·2H{sub 2}O){sub n}2, ([Cd(acty){sub 2}(bipy)H{sub 2}O]·H{sub 2}O){sub n}3, and ([Cd(acty)(bpe){sub 2}(Ac)]·6H{sub 2}O){sub n}4 (bipy=4,4′-bipyridine; bpe=1,2-di(4-pyridyl)ethane) in the presence of ancillary ligands. Compounds 1 and 2 are isostructural 1D chain structures. The neighboring chains are further linked into a 3D supramolecular structure via π⋯π stacking and hydrogen bond interactions. Compound 3 shows a 2D network and 4 generates 1D infinite chains along the c-axis. Compounds 3 and 4 are further connected into 3D supramolecular network by hydrogen bond interactions. More importantly, coordination in acyl oxygen atoms and ancillary ligands (bpe) as monodentate decorating ligands in 4 are rarely reported. Ancillary ligands and metal cations significantly influence the structure of the complexes. The photoluminescence properties of 1, 3, and 4 were studied at room temperature. Circular dichroism (CD) of the complexes have been investigated. - Graphical abstract: Four new homochiral coordination polymers were prepared and structurally characterized, which investigate the influence of the ancillary ligands and metal ions on the design and synthesis of coordination polymers. Display Omitted - Highlights: • It is rarely reported that the chiral coordination polymers prepared with N-acetyl-L-tyrosine ligands. • The alkalescent acetyl oxygen atom is difficult to participate in coordination but it is happened in the N-acetyl-L-tyrosine ligands. • The ancillary ligands (4,4′-bipy and bpe) are present in an unusual coordination modes, monodentate decorating ligands in 1, 2 and 4. • Structure comparative analyses results indicate that the

  5. Elucidating the mechanism behind the stabilization of multi-charged metal cations in water: A case study of the electronic states of microhydrated Mg2+, Ca2+ and Al3+”

    SciTech Connect

    Miliordos, Evangelos; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2014-04-21

    Metal atoms typically have second and higher ionization potentials (IPs) that are larger than the IP of water, resulting in the Coulombic explosion of the first few [M(H2O)n]+q (q ≥ 2) clusters as the M+ + (H2O)n + or MOH+ + H3O+(H2O)n energy levels are energetically more stable than the M2+ + (H2O)n ones for small n. We present a theoretical analysis of the various electronic states correlating with the above channels that are involved in the sequential hydration of the Ca2+, Mg2+ and Al3+ cations with up to six water molecules that, for the first time, quantifies their relative shift with the degree of solvation accounting for the observed stabilization of those multi-charged metal cations in an aqueous solution. *

  6. A cationic metal-organic framework consisting of nanoscale cages: capture, separation, and luminescent probing of Cr(2)O7(2-) through a single-crystal to single-crystal process.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinxiong; Xu, Hongyan; Kong, Fanzhen; Wang, Ruihu

    2013-12-16

    Dichromate capture: A 3D cationic metal-organic framework consisting of distorted octahedral and tetrahedral cages was constructed by using Ag(I) and 4,4'-bis(1,2,4-triazole). The complex exhibits fast exchange, high trapping capacity, and good selectivity for Cr2 O7 (2-) through single-crystal to single-crystal transformation. The complex also features a bluish violet luminescence that is distinctly quenched after Cr2 O7 (2-) exchange.

  7. Metal Complexes of Macrocyclic Schiff-Base Ligand: Preparation, Characterisation, and Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Riyadh M.; Yousif, Enaam I.; Hasan, Hasan A.; Al-Jeboori, Mohamad J.

    2013-01-01

    A new macrocyclic multidentate Schiff-base ligand Na4L consisting of two submacrocyclic units (10,21-bis-iminomethyl-3,6,14,17-tricyclo[17.3.1.18,12]tetracosa-1(23),2,6,8,10,12(24),13,17,19,21,-decaene-23,24-disodium) and its tetranuclear metal complexes with Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II) are reported. Na4L was prepared via a template approach, which is based on the condensation reaction of sodium 2,4,6-triformyl phenolate with ethylenediamine in mole ratios of 2 : 3. The tetranuclear macrocyclic-based complexes were prepared from the reaction of the corresponding metal chloride with the ligand. The mode of bonding and overall geometry of the compounds were determined through physicochemical and spectroscopic methods. These studies revealed tetrahedral geometries about Mn, Co, and Zn atoms. However, square planar geometries have been suggested for NiII and CuII complexes. Biological activity of the ligand and its metal complexes against Gram positive bacterial strain Staphylococcus aureus and Gram negative bacteria Escherichia coli revealed that the metal complexes become more potentially resistive to the microbial activities as compared to the free ligand. However, these metal complexes do not exhibit any effects on the activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria. There is therefore no inhibition zone. PMID:23935414

  8. Energy-resolved collision-induced dissociation studies of 1,10-phenanthroline complexes of the late first-row divalent transition metal cations: determination of the third sequential binding energies.

    PubMed

    Nose, Holliness; Chen, Yu; Rodgers, M T

    2013-05-23

    The third sequential binding energies of the late first-row divalent transition metal cations to 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen) are determined by energy-resolved collision-induced dissociation (CID) techniques using a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer. Five late first-row transition metal cations in their +2 oxidation states are examined including: Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+). The kinetic energy dependent CID cross sections for loss of an intact Phen ligand from the M(2+)(Phen)3 complexes are modeled to obtain 0 and 298 K bond dissociation energies (BDEs) after accounting for the effects of the internal energy of the complexes, multiple ion-neutral collisions, and unimolecular decay rates. Electronic structure theory calculations at the B3LYP, BHandHLYP, and M06 levels of theory are employed to determine the structures and theoretical estimates for the first, second, and third sequential BDEs of the M(2+)(Phen)x complexes. B3LYP was found to deliver results that are most consistent with the measured values. Periodic trends in the binding of these complexes are examined and compared to the analogous complexes to the late first-row monovalent transition metal cations, Co(+), Ni(+), Cu(+), and Zn(+), previously investigated. PMID:23565706

  9. Fragmentation study of rutin, a naturally occurring flavone glycoside cationized with different alkali metal ions, using post-source decay matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kéki, S; Deák, G; Zsuga, M

    2001-12-01

    A post-source decay matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric (PSD-MALDI-MS) study of rutin, a naturally occurring flavone glycoside cationized with different alkali metal ions, is reported. The fragmentations of rutin were performed by selecting the [R + Cat]+ peaks for PSD, where R represents a rutin molecule and Cat an alkali metal ion (Li+, Na+, K+). The PSD-MALDI mass spectra showed, depending on Cat, different fragmentation patterns with respect to both the quality and quantity of the fragment ions formed. The intensity of fragmentation decreased in the order Li+ > Na+ > K+. The fragmentation mechanism and an explanation for the observed differences are suggested.

  10. Features of the complexation of 3,3'-dimethoxy-4,4'-dihydroxy-5,5'-bis(di(n-carboxymethyl)aminomethyl)benzophenone with some cations and oxo cations of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Sinitsyna, T.A.; Ivakin, A.A.

    1988-02-01

    The complexation of 3,3'-dimethoxy-4,4'-dihydroxy-5,5'-bis(di(N-carboxymethyl)amino-methyl)benzophenone with Ca/sup 2 +/, Zn/sup 2 +/, Y/sup 3 +/, VO/sup 2 +/, and VO/sub 2//sup +/ cations has been investigated by the methods of IR and PMR spectroscopy. Hypotheses regarding the coordination capacity of the chelating agent in the complexes studied have been advanced on the basis of the data obtained.

  11. Thermodynamics of metal cation binding by a solid soil derived humic acid. 2. Binding of Mn(II), Co(NH3)6aq3+ and Hg(II).

    PubMed

    Ghabbour, Elham A; Shaker, Medhat; El-Toukhy, Ahmed; Abid, Ismail M; Davies, Geoffrey

    2006-07-01

    Metal binding is an important function of humic acids (HAs) in soils, sediments and waters. At pH 2.0, Mn(II) and Co(NH3)6aq3+ bind tightly in one step labeled A to a solid humic acid NHA isolated from a New Hampshire soil. Two consecutive steps are observed for Hg(II) binding. All the binding isotherms fit the Langmuir model in the temperature range 10.0-50.0 degrees C. Stoichiometric site capacities indicate predominant binding by charge-neutralizing HA carboxylate groups for Mn(II) and the second step A of Hg(II) binding. The binding affinity order in step A is Co(NH3)(6)3+>Hg(II)>Mn(II). Metal binding enthalpy and entropy changes fit the linear correlation found previously for binding of other metal cations by solid HAs. Free energy buffering from cooperative enthalpy and entropy changes and lower enthalpies for metal-HA interactions in solution suggest that desolvation of the cations and HA binding sites as well as HA conformational changes to allow for inner-sphere complexation predominate metal binding by hydrated solid HAs.

  12. Detection of heavy-metal ions using liquid crystal droplet patterns modulated by interaction between negatively charged carboxylate and heavy-metal cations.

    PubMed

    Han, Gyeo-Re; Jang, Chang-Hyun

    2014-10-01

    Herein, we demonstrated a simple, sensitive, and rapid label-free detection method for heavy-metal (HM) ions using liquid crystal (LC) droplet patterns on a solid surface. Stearic-acid-doped LC droplet patterns were spontaneously generated on an n-octyltrichlorosilane (OTS)-treated glass substrate by evaporating a solution of the nematic LC, 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB), dissolved in heptane. The optical appearance of the droplet patterns was a dark crossed texture when in contact with air, which represents the homeotropic orientation of the LC. This was caused by the steric interaction between the LC molecules and the alkyl chains of the OTS-treated surface. The dark crossed appearance of the acid-doped LC patterns was maintained after the addition of phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution (pH 8.1 at 25°C). The deprotonated stearic-acid molecules self-assembled through the LC/aqueous interface, thereby supporting the homeotropic anchoring of 5CB. However, the optical image of the acid-doped LC droplet patterns incubated with PBS containing HM ions appeared bright, indicating a planar orientation of 5CB at the aqueous/LC droplet interface. This dark to bright transition of the LC patterns was caused by HM ions attached to the deprotonated carboxylate moiety, followed by the sequential interruption of the self-assembly of the stearic acid at the LC/aqueous interface. The results showed that the acid-doped LC pattern system not only enabled the highly sensitive detection of HM ions at a sub-nanomolar concentration but it also facilitated rapid detection (<10 min) with simple procedures. PMID:25059128

  13. Detection of heavy-metal ions using liquid crystal droplet patterns modulated by interaction between negatively charged carboxylate and heavy-metal cations.

    PubMed

    Han, Gyeo-Re; Jang, Chang-Hyun

    2014-10-01

    Herein, we demonstrated a simple, sensitive, and rapid label-free detection method for heavy-metal (HM) ions using liquid crystal (LC) droplet patterns on a solid surface. Stearic-acid-doped LC droplet patterns were spontaneously generated on an n-octyltrichlorosilane (OTS)-treated glass substrate by evaporating a solution of the nematic LC, 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB), dissolved in heptane. The optical appearance of the droplet patterns was a dark crossed texture when in contact with air, which represents the homeotropic orientation of the LC. This was caused by the steric interaction between the LC molecules and the alkyl chains of the OTS-treated surface. The dark crossed appearance of the acid-doped LC patterns was maintained after the addition of phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution (pH 8.1 at 25°C). The deprotonated stearic-acid molecules self-assembled through the LC/aqueous interface, thereby supporting the homeotropic anchoring of 5CB. However, the optical image of the acid-doped LC droplet patterns incubated with PBS containing HM ions appeared bright, indicating a planar orientation of 5CB at the aqueous/LC droplet interface. This dark to bright transition of the LC patterns was caused by HM ions attached to the deprotonated carboxylate moiety, followed by the sequential interruption of the self-assembly of the stearic acid at the LC/aqueous interface. The results showed that the acid-doped LC pattern system not only enabled the highly sensitive detection of HM ions at a sub-nanomolar concentration but it also facilitated rapid detection (<10 min) with simple procedures.

  14. Toxicological importance of human biomonitoring of metallic and metalloid elements in different biological samples.

    PubMed

    Gil, F; Hernández, A F

    2015-06-01

    Human biomonitoring has become an important tool for the assessment of internal doses of metallic and metalloid elements. These elements are of great significance because of their toxic properties and wide distribution in environmental compartments. Although blood and urine are the most used and accepted matrices for human biomonitoring, other non-conventional samples (saliva, placenta, meconium, hair, nails, teeth, breast milk) may have practical advantages and would provide additional information on health risk. Nevertheless, the analysis of these compounds in biological matrices other than blood and urine has not yet been accepted as a useful tool for biomonitoring. The validation of analytical procedures is absolutely necessary for a proper implementation of non-conventional samples in biomonitoring programs. However, the lack of reliable and useful analytical methodologies to assess exposure to metallic elements, and the potential interference of external contamination and variation in biological features of non-conventional samples are important limitations for setting health-based reference values. The influence of potential confounding factors on metallic concentration should always be considered. More research is needed to ascertain whether or not non-conventional matrices offer definitive advantages over the traditional samples and to broaden the available database for establishing worldwide accepted reference values in non-exposed populations.

  15. Biological Strategies for Improved Osseointegration and Osteoinduction of Porous Metal Orthopedic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Riester, Scott M.; Bonin, Carolina A.; Kremers, Hilal Maradit; Dudakovic, Amel; Kakar, Sanjeev; Cohen, Robert C.; Westendorf, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    The biological interface between an orthopedic implant and the surrounding host tissue may have a dramatic effect upon clinical outcome. Desired effects include bony ingrowth (osseointegration), stimulation of osteogenesis (osteoinduction), increased vascularization, and improved mechanical stability. Implant loosening, fibrous encapsulation, corrosion, infection, and inflammation, as well as physical mismatch may have deleterious clinical effects. This is particularly true of implants used in the reconstruction of load-bearing synovial joints such as the knee, hip, and the shoulder. The surfaces of orthopedic implants have evolved from solid-smooth to roughened-coarse and most recently, to porous in an effort to create a three-dimensional architecture for bone apposition and osseointegration. Total joint surgeries are increasingly performed in younger individuals with a longer life expectancy, and therefore, the postimplantation lifespan of devices must increase commensurately. This review discusses advancements in biomaterials science and cell-based therapies that may further improve orthopedic success rates. We focus on material and biological properties of orthopedic implants fabricated from porous metal and highlight some relevant developments in stem-cell research. We posit that the ideal primary and revision orthopedic load-bearing metal implants are highly porous and may be chemically modified to induce stem cell growth and osteogenic differentiation, while minimizing inflammation and infection. We conclude that integration of new biological, chemical, and mechanical methods is likely to yield more effective strategies to control and modify the implant–bone interface and thereby improve long-term clinical outcomes. PMID:25348836

  16. Polynuclear Speciation of Trivalent Cations near the Surface of an Electrolyte Solution.

    PubMed

    Bera, Mrinal K; Antonio, Mark R

    2015-05-19

    Despite long-standing efforts, there is no agreed upon structural model for electrolyte solutions at air-liquid interfaces. We report the simultaneous detection of the near-surface and bulk coordination environments of a trivalent metal cation (europium) in an aqueous solution by use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Within the first few nanometers of the liquid surface, the cations exhibit oxygen coordination typical of inner-sphere hydration of an aquated Eu(3+) cation. Beyond that, outer-sphere ion-ion correlations are observed that are otherwise not present in the bulk electrolyte. The combination of near-surface and bulk sensitivities to probe metal ion speciation in electrolyte solutions is achieved by detecting electron-yield and X-ray fluorescence signals from an inverted pendant drop. The results provide new knowledge about the near-surface chemistry of aqueous solutions of relevance to aerosols and ion transport processes in chemical separations and biological systems.

  17. Bivalent transition metal complexes of cetirizine: spectroscopic, equilibrium studies and biological activity.

    PubMed

    El-Sherif, Ahmed A; Shoukry, Mohamed M; Abobakr, Lamis O

    2013-08-01

    Metal complexes of cetirizine·2HCl (CTZ=2-[2-[4-[(4-chlorophenyl)phenyl methyl]piperazine-1-yl]-ethoxy]acetic acid, dihydrochloride have been prepared and characterized by elemental analyses, IR, solid reflectance, magnetic moment, molar conductance, and UV-Vis spectra. The analytical data of the complexes show the formation of 1:2 [M:L] ratio, where M represents Ni(II), Co(II) and Cu(II) ions, while L represents the deprotonated CTZ ligand. IR spectra show that CTZ is coordinated to the metal ions in a monodentate manner through carboxylate-O atom. Protonation equilibria of CTZ and its metal complexation by some divalent metal ions were determined in aqueous solution at constant ionic strength (0.1 M NaCl) using an automatic potentiometric technique. Thermodynamic parameters for the protonation equilibria of CTZ were calculated and discussed. The stability order of M(II)-CTZ complexes were found to obey Mn(2+)metal complexes were screened for their biological activity against bacterial species (Bacillus subtillis RCMB 010067, Staphylococcus aureus RCMB 010028, Pseudomonas aeuroginosa RCMB 010043, and Escherichia coli RCMB 010052) and fungi as (Aspergillus flavus RCMB 02568, Pencicillium italicum RCMB 03924, Candida albicans RCMB 05031 and Geotricum candidum RCMB 05097). The activity data show that the metal complexes have antibacterial and antifungal activity more than the parent CTZ ligand against one or more bacterial or fungi species. MIC was evaluated for the isolated complexes. PMID:23685158

  18. Bivalent transition metal complexes of cetirizine: Spectroscopic, equilibrium studies and biological activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sherif, Ahmed A.; Shoukry, Mohamed M.; Abobakr, Lamis O.

    2013-08-01

    Metal complexes of cetirizineṡ2HCl (CTZ = 2-[2-[4-[(4-chlorophenyl)phenyl methyl]piperazine-1-yl]-ethoxy]acetic acid, dihydrochloride have been prepared and characterized by elemental analyses, IR, solid reflectance, magnetic moment, molar conductance, and UV-Vis spectra. The analytical data of the complexes show the formation of 1:2 [M:L] ratio, where M represents Ni(II), Co(II) and Cu(II) ions, while L represents the deprotonated CTZ ligand. IR spectra show that CTZ is coordinated to the metal ions in a monodentate manner through carboxylate-O atom. Protonation equilibria of CTZ and its metal complexation by some divalent metal ions were determined in aqueous solution at constant ionic strength (0.1 M NaCl) using an automatic potentiometric technique. Thermodynamic parameters for the protonation equilibria of CTZ were calculated and discussed. The stability order of M(II)-CTZ complexes were found to obey Mn2+ < Co2+ < Ni2+ < Cu2+, in accordance with the Irving-Williams order. The concentration distribution of the complexes in solution is evaluated as a function of pH. The CTZ ligand and its metal complexes were screened for their biological activity against bacterial species (Bacillus subtillis RCMB 010067, Staphylococcus aureus RCMB 010028, Pseudomonas aeuroginosa RCMB 010043, and Escherichia coli RCMB 010052) and fungi as (Aspergillus flavus RCMB 02568, Pencicillium italicum RCMB 03924, Candida albicans RCMB 05031 and Geotricum candidum RCMB 05097). The activity data show that the metal complexes have antibacterial and antifungal activity more than the parent CTZ ligand against one or more bacterial or fungi species. MIC was evaluated for the isolated complexes.

  19. Comparison of sediments and organisms in identifying sources of biologically available trace metal contamination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomson, E.A.; Luoma, S.N.; Johansson, C.E.; Cain, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    Sediments and an indicator organism (Macoma balthica, a deposit-feeding bivalve) were used to assess the relative importance of secondary sewage, urban runoff, a landfill containing metal-enriched ash wastes and a yacht harbor in contributing to Ag, Cu and Zn enrichment in South San Francisco Bay. Spatial gradients in sediments and organisms showed Cu and Ag enrichment originated from sewage discharge, whereas Zn enrichment originated from both sewage and urban runoff. Elevated concentrations of Cu in the sediments of the yacht harbor resulted from a high abundance of fine particles. The biological availability of Cu, Ag and Zn did not coincide with metal enrichment in sediments. The availability of Cu and Ag was greatest nearest the sewage outfall and greater in winter and spring than in summer. The availability of Zn in urban runoff appeared to be lower than the availability of Zn associated with sewage.

  20. Biological relevance and consequences of chemical- or metal-induced DNA cross-linking

    SciTech Connect

    Paustenbach, D.J.; Finley, B.L.

    1996-03-01

    A vast number of chemicals are known to induce mutagenesis and/or carcinogenesis in mammals. Although disruption of cellular nuclear material resulting ultimately in mutagenesis/carcinogenesis can be accomplished by various mechanisms, the search for biomarkers of chemical-induced toxicity continues. This review focuses on the ability of certain metals or chemicals to bind to DNA in a cross-link fashion in whole animal as well as under in vitro conditions. The methodologies currently used to determine DNA cross-linking are described. The biological relevance of the presence of chemical- or metal-induced DNA cross-linking as a measure of carcinogenesis in humans is still under debate, as there is no clear correlation between the disease and the DNA cross-link reaction. 62 refs., 3 tabs.

  1. Design, spectral characterization and biological studies of transition metal(II) complexes with triazole Schiff bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanif, Muhammad; Chohan, Zahid H.

    2013-03-01

    A new series of three biologically active triazole derived Schiff base ligands L1-L3 have been synthesized in equimolar reaction of 3-amino-1H-1,2,4-triazole with pyrrol-2-carboxaldehyde, 4-bromo-thiophene-2-carboxaldehyde, and 5-iodo-2-hydroxy benzaldehyde. The prepared Schiff bases were used for further complex formation reaction with different metal elements like Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) as chlorides by using a molar ratio of ligand:metal as 2:1. The structure and bonding nature of all the compounds were identified by their physical, spectral and analytical data. All the metal(II) complexes possessed an octahedral geometry except the Cu(II) complexes which showed a distorted octahedral geometry. All the synthesized compounds, were studied for their in vitro antibacterial, and antifungal activities, against four Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Shigella sonnei, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhi) and two Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus) bacterial strains and against six fungal strains (Trichophyton longifusus, Candida albicans, Aspergillus flavus, Microsporum canis, Fusarium solani and Candida glabrata) by using agar-well diffusion method. It has been shown that all the synthesized compounds showed moderate to significant antibacterial activity against one or more bacterial strains. In vitro Brine Shrimp bioassay was also carried out to investigate the cytotoxic properties of these compounds. The data also revealed that the metal complexes showed better activity than the ligands due to chelation/coordination.

  2. Synthesis, Characterization and Biological Evaluation of Transition Metal Complexes Derived from N, S Bidentate Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Md Yusof, Enis Nadia; Ravoof, Thahira Begum S. A.; Tiekink, Edward R. T.; Veerakumarasivam, Abhimanyu; Crouse, Karen Anne; Mohamed Tahir, Mohamed Ibrahim; Ahmad, Haslina

    2015-01-01

    Two bidentate NS ligands were synthesized by the condensation reaction of S-2-methylbenzyldithiocarbazate (S2MBDTC) with 2-methoxybenzaldehyde (2MB) and 3-methoxybenzaldehyde (3MB). The ligands were reacted separately with acetates of Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) yielding 1:2 (metal:ligand) complexes. The metal complexes formed were expected to have a general formula of [M(NS)2] where M = Cu2+, Ni2+, and Zn2+. These compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductivity, magnetic susceptibility and various spectroscopic techniques. The magnetic susceptibility measurements and spectral results supported the predicted coordination geometry in which the Schiff bases behaved as bidentate NS donor ligands coordinating via the azomethine nitrogen and thiolate sulfur. The molecular structures of the isomeric S2M2MBH (1) and S2M3MBH (2) were established by X-ray crystallography to have very similar l-shaped structures. The Schiff bases and their metal complexes were evaluated for their biological activities against estrogen receptor-positive (MCF-7) and estrogen receptor-negative (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cell lines. Only the Cu(II) complexes showed marked cytotoxicity against the cancer cell lines. Both Schiff bases and other metal complexes were found to be inactive. In concordance with the cytotoxicity studies, the DNA binding studies indicated that Cu(II) complexes have a strong DNA binding affinity. PMID:25988384

  3. Design, spectral characterization and biological studies of transition metal(II) complexes with triazole Schiff bases.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Muhammad; Chohan, Zahid H

    2013-03-01

    A new series of three biologically active triazole derived Schiff base ligands L(1)-L(3) have been synthesized in equimolar reaction of 3-amino-1H-1,2,4-triazole with pyrrol-2-carboxaldehyde, 4-bromo-thiophene-2-carboxaldehyde, and 5-iodo-2-hydroxy benzaldehyde. The prepared Schiff bases were used for further complex formation reaction with different metal elements like Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) as chlorides by using a molar ratio of ligand:metal as 2:1. The structure and bonding nature of all the compounds were identified by their physical, spectral and analytical data. All the metal(II) complexes possessed an octahedral geometry except the Cu(II) complexes which showed a distorted octahedral geometry. All the synthesized compounds, were studied for their in vitro antibacterial, and antifungal activities, against four Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Shigella sonnei, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhi) and two Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus) bacterial strains and against six fungal strains (Trichophyton longifusus, Candida albicans, Aspergillus flavus, Microsporum canis, Fusarium solani and Candida glabrata) by using agar-well diffusion method. It has been shown that all the synthesized compounds showed moderate to significant antibacterial activity against one or more bacterial strains. In vitro Brine Shrimp bioassay was also carried out to investigate the cytotoxic properties of these compounds. The data also revealed that the metal complexes showed better activity than the ligands due to chelation/coordination. PMID:23277183

  4. A metal-ion NMR investigation of the antibiotic facilitated transport of monovalent cations through the walls of phospholipid vesicles. II. Sulfur-33 NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Buster, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    A technique has been developed to investigate the antibiotic facilitated transmembrane transport of monovalent cations using {sup 23}Na and {sup 7}Li Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy. The initial portion of this thesis outlines the production and characterization of a model lipid system amenable to the NMR detection of cation transport. Large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) have been prepared from a 4:1 mixture of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol. The presence of the anionic chemical shift reagent dysprosium (III) tripolyphosphate, either inside or outside of the vesicles, allows for the spectroscopic separation of the NMR resonances arising from the inter- and extravesicular cation pools. The cation transporting properties of the channel-forming pentadecapeptide, gramicidin D, have been studied using the NMR technique.

  5. The Cation-π Interaction

    PubMed Central

    DOUGHERTY, DENNIS A.

    2014-01-01

    CONSPECTUS The chemistry community now recognizes the cation-π interaction as a major force for molecular recognition, joining the hydrophobic effect, the hydrogen bond, and the ion pair in determining macromolecular structure and drug-receptor interactions. This Account provides the author’s perspective on the intellectual origins and fundamental nature of the cation-π interaction. Early studies on cyclophanes established that water-soluble, cationic molecules would forgo aqueous solvation to enter a hydrophobic cavity if that cavity was lined with π systems. Important gas phase studies established the fundamental nature of the cation-π interaction. The strength of the cation-π interaction – Li+ binds to benzene with 38 kcal/mol of binding energy; NH4+ with 19 kcal/mol– distinguishes it from the weaker polar-π interactions observed in the benzene dimer or water-benzene complexes. In addition to the substantial intrinsic strength of the cation-π interaction in gas phase studies, the cation-π interaction remains energetically significant in aqueous media and under biological conditions. Many studies have shown that cation-π interactions can enhance binding energies by 2 – 5 kcal/mol, making them competitive with hydrogen bonds and ion pairs in drug-receptor and protein-protein interactions. As with other noncovalent interactions involving aromatic systems, the cation-π interaction includes a substantial electrostatic component. The six (four) Cδ−–Hδ+ bond dipoles of a molecule like benzene (ethylene) combine to produce a region of negative electrostatic potential on the face of the π system. Simple electrostatics facilitate a natural attraction of cations to the surface. The trend for (gas phase) binding energies is Li+>Na+>K+>Rb+: as the ion gets larger the charge is dispersed over a larger sphere and binding interactions weaken, a classical electrostatic effect. On other hand, polarizability does not define these interactions. Cyclohexane

  6. Modeling and interpreting biological effects of mixtures in the environment: introduction to the metal mixture modeling evaluation project.

    PubMed

    Van Genderen, Eric; Adams, William; Dwyer, Robert; Garman, Emily; Gorsuch, Joseph

    2015-04-01

    The fate and biological effects of chemical mixtures in the environment are receiving increased attention from the scientific and regulatory communities. Understanding the behavior and toxicity of metal mixtures poses unique challenges for incorporating metal-specific concepts and approaches, such as bioavailability and metal speciation, in multiple-metal exposures. To avoid the use of oversimplified approaches to assess the toxicity of metal mixtures, a collaborative 2-yr research project and multistakeholder group workshop were conducted to examine and evaluate available higher-tiered chemical speciation-based metal mixtures modeling approaches. The Metal Mixture Modeling Evaluation project and workshop achieved 3 important objectives related to modeling and interpretation of biological effects of metal mixtures: 1) bioavailability models calibrated for single-metal exposures can be integrated to assess mixture scenarios; 2) the available modeling approaches perform consistently well for various metal combinations, organisms, and endpoints; and 3) several technical advancements have been identified that should be incorporated into speciation models and environmental risk assessments for metals.

  7. Schwertmannite and Fe oxides formed by biological low-pH Fe(II) oxidation versus abiotic neutralization: Impact on trace metal sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgos, William D.; Borch, Thomas; Troyer, Lyndsay D.; Luan, Fubo; Larson, Lance N.; Brown, Juliana F.; Lambson, Janna; Shimizu, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    Three low-pH coal mine drainage (CMD) sites in central Pennsylvania were studied to determine similarities in sediment composition, mineralogy, and morphology. Water from one site was used in discontinuous titration/neutralization experiments to produce Fe(III) minerals by abiotic oxidative hydrolysis for comparison with the field precipitates that were produced by biological low-pH Fe(II) oxidation. Even though the hydrology and concentration of dissolved metals of the CMD varied considerably between the three field sites, the mineralogy of the three iron mounds was very similar. Schwertmannite was the predominant mineral precipitated at low-pH (2.5-4.0) along with lesser amounts of goethite. Trace metals such as Zn, Ni and Co were only detected at μmol/g concentrations in the field sediments, and no metals (other than Fe) were removed from the CMD at any of the field sites. Metal cations were not lost from solution in the field because of unfavorable electrostatic attraction to the iron mound minerals. Ferrihydrite was the predominant mineral formed by abiotic neutralization (pH 4.4-8.4, 4 d aging) with lesser amounts of schwertmannite and goethite. In contrast to low-pH precipitation, substantial metal removal occurred in the neutralized CMD. Al was likely removed as hydrobasaluminite and Al(OH) 3, and as a co-precipitate into schwertmannite or ferrihydrite. Zn, Ni and Co were likely removed via adsorption onto and co-precipitation into the freshly formed Fe and Al solids. Mn was likely removed by co-precipitation and, at the highest final pH values, as a Mn oxide. Biological low-pH Fe(II) oxidation can be cost-effectively used to pre-treat CMD and remove Fe and acidity prior to conventional neutralization techniques. A further benefit is that solids formed under these conditions may be of industrial value because they do not contain trace metal or metalloid contaminants.

  8. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: From Cluster Ions to Toxic metal Ions in Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Nicholas B.

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation focused on using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to study cluster ions and toxic metal ions in biology. In Chapter 2, it was shown that primary, secondary and quarternary amines exhibit different clustering characteristics under identical instrument conditions. Carbon chain length also played a role in cluster ion formation. In Chapters 3 and 4, the effects of solvent types/ratios and various instrumental parameters on cluster ion formation were examined. It was found that instrument interface design also plays a critical role in the cluster ion distribution seen in the mass spectrum. In Chapter 5, ESI-MS was used to investigate toxic metal binding to the [Gln11]-amyloid β-protein fragment (1-16). Pb and Cd bound stronger than Zn, even in the presence of excess Zn. Hg bound weaker than Zn. There are endless options for future work on cluster ions. Any molecule that is poorly ionized in positive ion mode can potentially show an increase in ionization efficiency if an appropriate anion is used to produce a net negative charge. It is possible that drug protein or drug/DNA complexes can also be stabilized by adding counter-ions. This would preserve the solution characteristics of the complex in the gas phase. Once in the gas phase, CID could determine the drug binding location on the biomolecule. There are many research projects regarding toxic metals in biology that have yet to be investigated or even discovered. This is an area of research with an almost endless future because of the changing dynamics of biological systems. What is deemed safe today may show toxic effects in the future. Evolutionary changes in protein structures may render them more susceptible to toxic metal binding. As the understanding of toxicity evolves, so does the demand for new toxic metal research. New instrumentation designs and software make it possible to perform research that could not be done in the past. What was undetectable yesterday will

  9. [Changes in biological activity of turf-podzolic soil of different mechanical composition contaminated with heavy metals].

    PubMed

    Pertsovskaia, A F; Plugin, V P; Velikanov, N L; Panikova, E L

    1990-07-01

    It has been shown that soil pollution with heavy metals (copper, nickel) lead to negative changes in parameters characterizing potential biological activity of soil (nitrogen-fixation, breath, invertase activity, bacteria and fungi count). More profound changes were observed in sandy soil compared to loamy soil. A direct relationship of these effects with the content of mobile forms of heavy metals in soil has been established. For the comparative and prognostic investigation of the danger of soil pollution with heavy metals it has been suggested to use a coefficient of differences in the content of mobile forms and a coefficient of biological effect.

  10. [Bioaccumulation and Biomagnification of Heavy Metals in Three Gorges Reservoir and Effect of Biological Factors].

    PubMed

    Wei, Li-li; Zhou, Qiong; Xie, Cong-xin; Wang, Jun; Li, Jun

    2016-01-15

    Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) reached the maximum water level (175 m) of impoundment in Oct. 2010. In order to reveal the potential influence of the greatest water-level impoundment on the heavy metal pollution in the typical waters of TGR, the content level of trace metals ( Hg, Cd and Pb) in biota and potential biomagnification along the aquatic food chain were investigated in the main stem of TGR from July 2011 to August 2012, as well as the relationship between the trace metal concentrations of aquatic consumers (fish and aquatic invertebrate) and biological factors. Our study showed that no individual data of the three trace metals in biota exceeded the edible safety criteria of aquatic products in China and FAO. In contrast with those before the impoundment of TGR, Hg showed a little higher, while Cd and Pb exhibited a little lower level after the impoundment. Trace metals in TGR exhibited relatively lower concentrations compared with those in reservoirs in other countries. Significant correlations were found between the Cd concentration and body size (body length and body weight) of Cyprinus carpio, as well as the Hg concentration and body size (body length and body weight) of Erythroculter ilishaeformis. As for feeding habits, there was statistically significant difference between trace metal concentrations in herbivorous, planktonic, omnivorous and carnivorous fish. However, no significant difference was found between the metal concentrations in fish with different habitats (pelagic, mesopelagic and benthic). Even so, the overall trend was that fish living in benthic layer had higher heavy metal concentrations than those in pelagic and mesopelagic zones. The regression slopes of log-Hg concentration versus delta(15)N, served as an indicator of trophic magnification factor (TMF). Significant correlations (P < 0.05) were observed for Hg in the food web of TGR. TMF of Hg in TGR indicated lower level (0.046-0.066) in contrast with those in the reservoirs of

  11. [Bioaccumulation and Biomagnification of Heavy Metals in Three Gorges Reservoir and Effect of Biological Factors].

    PubMed

    Wei, Li-li; Zhou, Qiong; Xie, Cong-xin; Wang, Jun; Li, Jun

    2016-01-15

    Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) reached the maximum water level (175 m) of impoundment in Oct. 2010. In order to reveal the potential influence of the greatest water-level impoundment on the heavy metal pollution in the typical waters of TGR, the content level of trace metals ( Hg, Cd and Pb) in biota and potential biomagnification along the aquatic food chain were investigated in the main stem of TGR from July 2011 to August 2012, as well as the relationship between the trace metal concentrations of aquatic consumers (fish and aquatic invertebrate) and biological factors. Our study showed that no individual data of the three trace metals in biota exceeded the edible safety criteria of aquatic products in China and FAO. In contrast with those before the impoundment of TGR, Hg showed a little higher, while Cd and Pb exhibited a little lower level after the impoundment. Trace metals in TGR exhibited relatively lower concentrations compared with those in reservoirs in other countries. Significant correlations were found between the Cd concentration and body size (body length and body weight) of Cyprinus carpio, as well as the Hg concentration and body size (body length and body weight) of Erythroculter ilishaeformis. As for feeding habits, there was statistically significant difference between trace metal concentrations in herbivorous, planktonic, omnivorous and carnivorous fish. However, no significant difference was found between the metal concentrations in fish with different habitats (pelagic, mesopelagic and benthic). Even so, the overall trend was that fish living in benthic layer had higher heavy metal concentrations than those in pelagic and mesopelagic zones. The regression slopes of log-Hg concentration versus delta(15)N, served as an indicator of trophic magnification factor (TMF). Significant correlations (P < 0.05) were observed for Hg in the food web of TGR. TMF of Hg in TGR indicated lower level (0.046-0.066) in contrast with those in the reservoirs of

  12. Spectroscopic Properties of Novel Aromatic Metal Clusters: NaM4 (M=Al, Ga, In) and their Cations and Anions

    SciTech Connect

    Balasubramanian, K; Zhao, C

    2004-03-17

    The ground and several excited states of metal aromatic clusters, namely NaM4 and NaM{sub 4}{sup {+-}} (M=Al, Ga, In) clusters have been investigated by employing complete activespace self-consistent-field (CASSCF) followed by Multi-reference singles and doubles configuration interaction (MRSDCI) computations that included up to 10 million configurations and other methods. The ground states NaM{sub 4}{sup -} of aromatic anions are found to be symmetric C{sub 4v} ({sup 1}A{sub 1}) electronic states with ideal square pyramid geometries. While the ground state of NaIn4 is also predicted to be a symmetric C{sub 4v} ({sup 2}A{sub 1}) square pyramid, the ground state of the NaAl4 cluster is found to have a C{sub 2v} ({sup 2}A{sub 1}) pyramid with a rhombus base and the ground state of NaGa{sub 4} possesses a C{sub 2v} ({sup 2}A{sub 1}) pyramid with a rectangle base. In general these structures exhibit 2 competing geometries, viz., an ideal C{sub 4v} structure and a distorted rhomboidal or rectangular pyramid structure (C{sub 2v}). All of the ground states of the NaM{sub 4}{sup +} (M= Al, Ga, In) cations are computed to be C{sub 2v} ({sup 3}A{sub 2}) pyramids with rhombus bases. The equilibrium geometries, vibrational frequencies, dissociation energies, adiabatic ionization potentials, adiabatic electron affinities for the electronic states of NaM{sub 4} (M=Al, Ga, In) and their ions are computed and compared with experimental results and other theoretical calculations. On the basis of our computed excited states energy separations, we have tentatively suggested assignments to the observed X and A states in the anion photoelectron spectra of Al{sub 4}Na{sup -} reported by Li et al. The X state can be assigned to a C{sub 2v} ({sup 2}A{sub 1}) rhomboidal pyramid. The A state observed in the anion spectrum is assigned to the first excited state ({sup 2}B{sub 1}) of the neutral NaAl{sub 4} with the C{sub 4v} symmetry. The assignments of the excited states are consistent with

  13. Occupational chronic exposure to metals. I. Chromium exposure of stainless steel welders--biological monitoring.

    PubMed

    Angerer, J; Amin, W; Heinrich-Ramm, R; Szadkowski, D; Lehnert, G

    1987-01-01

    External and internal chromate exposure of 103 stainless steel welders who were using manual metal are welding (MMA), metal inert gas welding (MIG) and both methods, were measured by ambient and biological monitoring. At the working places the maximum chromium trioxide concentrations were 80 micrograms/m3. The median values were 4 micrograms/m3 (MMA) and 10 micrograms/m3 (MIG). The median chromium concentrations in erythrocytes, plasma and urine of all welders were less than 0.60, 9.00 and 32.50 micrograms/l. For biological monitoring purposes, chromium levels in erythrocytes and simultaneously in plasma seem to be suitable parameters. According to our results, chromium levels in plasma and urine in the order of 10 and 40 micrograms/l seem to correspond to an external exposure of 100 micrograms chromium trioxide per cubic metre, the technical guiding concentration (TRK-value). Chromium concentrations in erythrocytes greater than 0.60 micrograms/l indicate an external chromate exposure greater than the TRK-value.

  14. Sublethal effects of contamination on the Mediterranean sponge Crambe crambe: metal accumulation and biological responses.

    PubMed

    Cebrian, E; Martí, R; Uriz, J M; Turon, X

    2003-10-01

    The effect of low levels of pollution on the growth, reproduction output, morphology and survival of adult sponges and settlers of the sponge Crambe crambe were examined. We transplanted sponges from a control area to a contaminated site and measured the main environmental variables (chemical and physical) of both sites during the study period. Except some punctual differences in particulate organic matter, silicates, nitrates, and water motion, most environmental variables in the water were similar at both sites during the study months. Mainly copper, lead and OM concentrations in the sediment, and water motion were significantly higher at the polluted site and may be implicated in the biological effects observed: decrease in the percentage of specimens with embryos, increase in shape irregularity and decrease in growth rate. Individuals naturally occurring at the polluted site and those transplanted there for four months accumulated ten times more copper than either untouched or transplant controls. Although lead concentration in sediment did not differ between sites, native specimens from the contaminated site accumulated this metal more than untouched controls. Vanadium concentration also tended to increase in the sponges living at or transplanted to the contaminated site but this difference was not significant. C. crambe is a reliable indicator of metal contamination since it accumulates copper, lead and vanadium in high amounts. At the contaminated site, sponge growth, fecundity and survival were inhibited, whereas sponge irregularity ending in sponge fission was promoted. All these effects may compromise the structure and dynamics of the sponge populations in sheltered, metal-contaminated habitats.

  15. Quantification of transition metals in biological samples and its possible impact on ferro-alloy workers.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sandhya; Ramteke, Dilip S; Wate, Satish R

    2007-10-01

    Increased risk of ill-health and diseases has been associated with employment in the ferro-alloy factory. Since measurement of transition metals in human blood and hair along with respective exposure rates, provides a means of assessing individual risk, it has been the most important part of the study. In the study majority of the elements in the transition series, such as, vanadium (V), chromium (Cr), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), cobalt, (Co) nickel (Ni), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), molybdenum (Mo) and cadmium (Cd) were considered which are randomly emitted from the source, that is, manganese ore (used during ferro-alloy manufacturing process). The commonly available transition, metals, observed in biological samples of ferro-alloy workers, were found to be Fe, Zn, Co, Ni, Cu, Cr, Cd, V Mn and Mo in blood, while in hair, Mn, Fe, Zn, Co, Ni, Cu, Cr, Cd, V and Mo were present in decreasing order Surveillance of bio-concentration of these metals in workers, exposed to close proximity of the coke-ovens and smelting furnaces, revealed that the workers were prone to several physical disorders. PMID:18405124

  16. Quantification of transition metals in biological samples and its possible impact on ferro-alloy workers.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sandhya; Ramteke, Dilip S; Wate, Satish R

    2007-10-01

    Increased risk of ill-health and diseases has been associated with employment in the ferro-alloy factory. Since measurement of transition metals in human blood and hair along with respective exposure rates, provides a means of assessing individual risk, it has been the most important part of the study. In the study majority of the elements in the transition series, such as, vanadium (V), chromium (Cr), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), cobalt, (Co) nickel (Ni), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), molybdenum (Mo) and cadmium (Cd) were considered which are randomly emitted from the source, that is, manganese ore (used during ferro-alloy manufacturing process). The commonly available transition, metals, observed in biological samples of ferro-alloy workers, were found to be Fe, Zn, Co, Ni, Cu, Cr, Cd, V Mn and Mo in blood, while in hair, Mn, Fe, Zn, Co, Ni, Cu, Cr, Cd, V and Mo were present in decreasing order Surveillance of bio-concentration of these metals in workers, exposed to close proximity of the coke-ovens and smelting furnaces, revealed that the workers were prone to several physical disorders.

  17. Synthesis, characterization and biological evaluation of Rutin-zinc(II) flavonoid -metal complex.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Norma Estefania Andrades; Novak, Estela Maria; Maria, Durvanei Augusto; Velosa, Adélia Segin; Pereira, Regina Mara Silva

    2015-09-01

    Synthesis of compounds analogous to natural products from secondary metabolites, such as flavonoids, is a promising source of novel drugs. Rutin (quercetin-3-O-rutinoside) is a natural flavone, which has, in its chemical structure, different sites for coordination with transition metals and the complexation with these metals enhances its biological properties. Rutin-zinc(II), a flavonoid-metal complex, was synthesized and characterized by UV-VIS, FT-IR, elemental analysis and (1)H NMR. The antioxidant and antitumor activities, as well as the cytotoxicity and in vivo toxicity of this complex were evaluated and compared with the free rutin. Rutin-zinc(II) has not shown any cytotoxicity against normal cells (fibroblasts and HUVECs) or toxicity in BALB/c mice, but has shown antioxidant activity in vitro and cytotoxicity against leukemia (KG1, K562 and Jurkat), multiple myeloma (RPMI8226) and melanoma (B16F10 and SK-Mel-28) cell lines in vitro. In Ehrlich ascites carcinoma model, Rutin-zinc(II) modulated the mitochondrial membrane potential and the expression of genes related to cell cycle progression, angiogenesis and apoptosis.

  18. Chemical and biological properties of toxic metals and use of chelating agents for the pharmacological treatment of metal poisoning.

    PubMed

    Sinicropi, Maria Stefania; Amantea, Diana; Caruso, Anna; Saturnino, Carmela

    2010-07-01

    Exposure to toxic metals is a well-known problem in industrialized countries. Metals interfere with a number of physiological processes, including central nervous system (CNS), haematopoietic, hepatic and renal functions. In the evaluation of the toxicity of a particular metal it is crucial to consider many parameters: chemical forms (elemental, organic or inorganic), binding capability, presence of specific proteins that selectively bind metals, etc. Medical treatment of acute and chronic metal toxicity is provided by chelating agents, namely organic compounds capable of interacting with metal ions to form structures called chelates. The present review attempts to provide updated information about the mechanisms, the cellular targets and the effects of toxic metals.

  19. [Determination of trace metals in biological materials by iodides extraction and atomic absorption spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, E; Yamamoto, K; Takano, K; Tutumi, M; Uehara, K; Ohno, T; Tasaka, S

    1983-09-01

    Extraction of arsenic, mercury, gold, silver, antimony, indium, bismuth, tellurium, cadmium, zinc and copper iodides with methylisobutylketone was examined in the sulfuric acid of concentrations from 0 to 15 normalities. Although, arsenic and zinc iodides were extracted from 6 to 12 normalities, extraction of other metal-iodides were carried out in more wide range of sulfuric acid concentrations almost from 2 to 12 normalities. Iron, sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium iodides, these, being chief biological elements of inorganic substances, were not extracted in the least into methylisobutylketone layer from sulfuric acid solution. Copper and zinc were normal elements of biological materials and were extracted into methylisobutylketone layer by this procedures. The flame interferences of copper and zinc were not recognized in determinations of gold, silver, antimony, indium, bismuth, tellurium and cadmium. To investigate the influences of biological elements, mock solutions of human blood and urine were prepared. The addition of mock blood does not excessively interfere with determinations of arsenic, mercury, indium, bismuth, tellurium, cadmium, silver and antimony with the exception of gold. However, with addition of mock urine negative interferences were strongly seen in antimony determination, while in mercury, indium and silver determinations only slight interferences were observed. To examine the influences of sample preparation techniques, gold, silver, indium, cadmium and copper were treated both by wet ashing (nitric acid and sulfuric acid) and dry ashing.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Cationic Noncovalent Interactions: Energetics and Periodic Trends.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, M T; Armentrout, P B

    2016-05-11

    In this review, noncovalent interactions of ions with neutral molecules are discussed. After defining the scope of the article, which excludes anionic and most protonated systems, methods associated with measuring thermodynamic information for such systems are briefly recounted. An extensive set of tables detailing available thermodynamic information for the noncovalent interactions of metal cations with a host of ligands is provided. Ligands include small molecules (H2, NH3, CO, CS, H2O, CH3CN, and others), organic ligands (O- and N-donors, crown ethers and related molecules, MALDI matrix molecules), π-ligands (alkenes, alkynes, benzene, and substituted benzenes), miscellaneous inorganic ligands, and biological systems (amino acids, peptides, sugars, nucleobases, nucleosides, and nucleotides). Hydration of metalated biological systems is also included along with selected proton-based systems: 18-crown-6 polyether with protonated peptides and base-pairing energies of nucleobases. In all cases, the literature thermochemistry is evaluated and, in many cases, reanchored or adjusted to 0 K bond dissociation energies. Trends in these values are discussed and related to a variety of simple molecular concepts. PMID:26953819

  1. Cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes for phosphorescence sensing of biological metal ions.

    PubMed

    You, Youngmin; Cho, Somin; Nam, Wonwoo

    2014-02-17

    Phosphorescence signaling provides a valuable alternative to conventional bioimaging based on fluorescence. The benefits of using phosphorescent molecules include improved sensitivity and capabilities for effective elimination of background signals by time-gated acquisition. Cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes are promising candidates for facilitating phosphorescent bioimaging because they provide synthetic versatility and excellent phosphorescence properties. In this Forum Article, we present our recent studies on the development of phosphorescence sensors for the detection of metal ions based on cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes. The constructs contained cyclometalating (C^N) ligands with the electron densities and band-gap energies of the C^N ligand structures systematically varied. Receptors that chelated zinc, cupric, and chromium ions were tethered to the ligands to create phosphorescence sensors. The alterations in the C^N ligand structures had a profound influence on the phosphorescence responses to metal ions. Mechanistic studies suggested that the phosphorescence responses could be explained on the basis of the modulation of photoinduced electron transfer (PeT) from the receptor to the photoexcited iridium species. The PeT behaviors strictly adhered to the Rehm-Weller principle, and the occurrence of PeT was located in the Marcus-normal region. It is thus anticipated that improved responses will be obtainable by increasing the excited-state reduction potential of the iridium(III) complexes. Femtosecond transient absorption experiments provided evidence for the presence of an additional photophysical mechanism that involved metal-ion-induced alteration of the intraligand charge-transfer (ILCT) transition state. Utility of the mechanism by PeT and ILCT has been demonstrated for the phosphorescence sensing of biologically important transition-metal ions. In particular, the phosphorescence zinc sensor could report the presence of intracellular zinc pools by

  2. Heavy metal accumulations in hair of northern fur seals: Application for biological monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Noda, K.; Saeki, K.; Tatsukawa, R.; Baba, N.; Kiyota, M.; Nitto, H.; Watabe, M.

    1995-12-31

    Hair of northern fur seals had the highest concentrations of many heavy metals among tissues and organs analyzed. Hair could be used as a sensitive indicator for its higher element levels, and can serve as a noninvasive technique for biological monitoring. Significant positive correlation were found between Hg in muscle, Fe in kidney and Cu in liver and those in hair of 42 fur seals from Off-Sanriku, Japan. Using age as a explanatory co-variables, significant multiple regression equations to estimate metal concentrations in internal organs by those in hair were obtained for Hg, Cd, Fe, Cu, Mn. To monitor the seasonal changes in hair concentrations, from the cervical region of 7 fur seals in the Otaru aquarium, Japan, guard hair were clipped during November, 1993 March, 1994 at 7 weeks intervals. Heavy metal levels in hair from the aquarium were compared with those collected in April, 1990--1991 from Off-Sanriku, Japan and from the Pribilof Islands, Alaska which were collected in July, 1992. The levels of Cu, Zn, Mn and Ni in hair in the captive seals gradually increased and were higher than those from Off-Sanriku. Those changes could be associated with growth of hair. In the hair of the breeding animals collected from the island, concentrations of Mn, Ni and Fe were found to be significantly higher than those from Off-Sanriku. increased concentrations of Mn, Ni and Fe were supposed to be caused by exogenous contaminations derived from soil and blood. Fur seal hair seems to be an useful indicator to estimate the internal accumulations of heavy metals provided the seasonal changes and exogenous contamination are taken into account.

  3. Investigation of the soluble metals in tissue as biological response pattern to environmental pollutants (Gammarus fossarum example).

    PubMed

    Filipović Marijić, Vlatka; Dragun, Zrinka; Sertić Perić, Mirela; Matoničkin Kepčija, Renata; Gulin, Vesna; Velki, Mirna; Ečimović, Sandra; Hackenberger, Branimir K; Erk, Marijana

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, Gammarus fossarum was used to investigate the bioaccumulation and toxic effects of aquatic pollutants in the real environmental conditions. The novelty of the study is the evaluation of soluble tissue metal concentrations in gammarids as indicators in early assessment of metal exposure. In the Sutla River, industrially/rurally/agriculturally influenced catchment in North-Western Croatia, physico-chemical water properties pointed to disturbed ecological status, which was reflected on population scale as more than 50 times lower gammarid density compared to the reference location, Črnomerec Stream. Significantly higher levels of soluble toxic metals (Al, As, Cd, Pb, Sb, Sn, Sr) were observed in gammarids from the Sutla River compared to the reference site and reflected the data on higher total dissolved metal levels in the river water at that site. The soluble metal estimates were supplemented with the common multibiomarker approach, which showed significant biological responses for decreased acetylcholinesterase activity and increased total soluble protein concentrations, confirming stressed environmental conditions for biota in the Sutla River. Biomarker of metal exposure, metallothionein, was not induced and therefore, toxic effect of metals was not confirmed on molecular level. Comparable between-site pattern of soluble toxic metals in gammarids and total dissolved metal levels in water suggests that prior to biomarker response and observed toxic impact, soluble metals in tissue might be used as early warning signs of metal impact in the aquatic environment and improve the assessment of water quality.

  4. Investigation of the soluble metals in tissue as biological response pattern to environmental pollutants (Gammarus fossarum example).

    PubMed

    Filipović Marijić, Vlatka; Dragun, Zrinka; Sertić Perić, Mirela; Matoničkin Kepčija, Renata; Gulin, Vesna; Velki, Mirna; Ečimović, Sandra; Hackenberger, Branimir K; Erk, Marijana

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, Gammarus fossarum was used to investigate the bioaccumulation and toxic effects of aquatic pollutants in the real environmental conditions. The novelty of the study is the evaluation of soluble tissue metal concentrations in gammarids as indicators in early assessment of metal exposure. In the Sutla River, industrially/rurally/agriculturally influenced catchment in North-Western Croatia, physico-chemical water properties pointed to disturbed ecological status, which was reflected on population scale as more than 50 times lower gammarid density compared to the reference location, Črnomerec Stream. Significantly higher levels of soluble toxic metals (Al, As, Cd, Pb, Sb, Sn, Sr) were observed in gammarids from the Sutla River compared to the reference site and reflected the data on higher total dissolved metal levels in the river water at that site. The soluble metal estimates were supplemented with the common multibiomarker approach, which showed significant biological responses for decreased acetylcholinesterase activity and increased total soluble protein concentrations, confirming stressed environmental conditions for biota in the Sutla River. Biomarker of metal exposure, metallothionein, was not induced and therefore, toxic effect of metals was not confirmed on molecular level. Comparable between-site pattern of soluble toxic metals in gammarids and total dissolved metal levels in water suggests that prior to biomarker response and observed toxic impact, soluble metals in tissue might be used as early warning signs of metal impact in the aquatic environment and improve the assessment of water quality. PMID:27060638

  5. Comparative Study of the Effects of Long and Short Term Biological Processes on the Cycling of Colloidal Trace Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinedo, P.; Sanudo-Wilhelmy, S. A.; West, A.

    2013-05-01

    Nanoparticle (or colloids), with sizes operationally defined as ranging from 1nm to 1000nm diameter, are thought to play an important role in metal cycling in the ocean due to their high surface area to volume ratio and abundance in marine systems. In coastal waters, the bulk of marine nanoparticles are organic, so short and long term biological processes are expected to influence the dynamics of these types of particles in marine environments. This is, in turn, expected to influence metal concentrations. Here we selected two different environments to study the influence of long-term biological events (phytoplankton blooms) and short-term biological events (diel cycles of photosynthesis and respiration) on the cycling of colloidal trace metals. We focus on Cu and Fe, both biogeochemically important metals but with differing colloidal behavior. Long term processes (West Neck Bay): A bay (West Neck Bay, Long Island) with predictable natural phytoplankton blooms, but with limited inputs of freshwater, nutrients and metals, was selected to study the partitioning of Cu and Fe between colloidal and soluble pools over the course of a bloom. During the bloom, there was a significant build-up of Cu associated with DOM accumulation and a removal of Fe via particle stripping. Fraction-specific metal concentrations, and metal accumulation and removal rates, were found to be significantly correlated with chlorophyll-a concentration and with dissolved organic matter (DOM). Short term processes (Catalina Island): To identify the cyclical variation in metal speciation during diel (24-hour) cycles of photosynthesis and respiration, we conducted a study off Catalina Island, a pristine environment where trace metal cycling is solely controlled by biological processes and changes in the phytoplankton community are well characterized. The speciation of Fe between soluble and colloidal pools showed that Fe has a high affinity for colloidal material and that the distribution between

  6. Sea cucumber-like hydroxyapatite: cation exchange membrane-assisted synthesis and its application in ultra-sensitive heavy metal detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Liu, Yong; Ji, Xiaobo; Banks, Craig E; Zhang, Wei

    2011-04-14

    Sea cucumber-like hydroxyapatite fabricated with the aid of a Nafion N-117 cation exchange membrane was applied to the detection of lead(II) and cadmium(II) in ultra-trace concentration levels. The proposed HAp-modified carbon paste electrode has significantly lower linear ranges and exhibits a larger sensitivity than those reported previously.

  7. Subcellular compartmentalization of Cd and Zn in two bivalves. I. Significance of metal-sensitive fractions (MSF) and biologically detoxified metal (BDM)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, W.G.; Lee, B.-G.; Luoma, S.N.

    2003-01-01

    Many aspects of metal accumulation in aquatic invertebrates (i.e. toxicity, tolerance and trophic transfer) can be understood by examining the subcellular partitioning of accumulated metal. In this paper, we use a compartmentalization approach to interpret the significance of metal, species and size dependence in the subcellular partitioning of Cd and Zn in the bivalves Macoma balthica and Potamocorbula amurensis. Of special interest is the compartmentalization of metal as metal-sensitive fractions (MSF) (i.e. organelles and heat-sensitive proteins, termed 'enzymes' hereafter) and biologically detoxified metal (BDM) (i.e. metallothioneins [MT] and metal-rich granules [MRG]). Clams from San Francisco Bay, CA, were exposed for 14 d to seawater (20??? salinity) containing 3.5 ??g l-1 Cd and 20.5 ??g l-1 Zn, including 109Cd and 65Zn as radiotracers. Uptake was followed by 21 d of depuration. The subcellular partitioning of metal within clams was examined following exposure and loss. P. amurensis accumulated ???22x more Cd and ???2x more Zn than M. balthica. MT played an important role in the storage of Cd in P. amurensis, while organelles were the major site of Zn accumulation. In M. balthica, Cd and Zn partitioned similarly, although the pathway of detoxification was metal-specific (MRG for Cd; MRG and MT for Zn). Upon loss, M. balthica depurated ???40% of Cd with Zn being retained; P. amurensis retained Cd and depurated Zn (???40%). During efflux, Cd and Zn concentrations in the MSF compartment of both clams declined with metal either being lost from the animal or being transferred to the BDM compartment. Subcellular compartmentalization was also size-dependent, with the importance of BDM increasing with clam size; MSF decreased accordingly. We hypothesized that progressive retention of metal as BDM (i.e. MRG) with age may lead to size dependency of metal concentrations often observed in some populations of M. balthica.

  8. Mapping the Metal Uptake in Plants from Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Allison

    2015-08-24

    Serpentine soil originates in the Earth’s mantle and contains high concentrations of potentially toxic transition metals. Although serpentine soil limits plant growth, endemic and adapted plants at Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve, located behind SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, can tolerate these conditions. Serpentine soil and seeds belonging to native California and invasive plants were collected at Jasper Ridge. The seeds were grown hydroponically and on serpentine and potting soil to examine the uptake and distribution of ions in the roots and shoots using synchrotron micro-focused X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. The results were used to determine differences between serpentinetolerant plants. Rye grown on potting soil was enriched in Ni, Fe, Mn, and Cr compared to purple needlegrass grown on serpentine soil. Serpentine vegetation equally suppressed the uptake of Mn, Ni, and Fe in the roots and shoots. The uptake of Ca and Mg affected the uptake of other elements such as K, S, and P.

  9. Designing, syntheses, characterization, computational study and biological activities of silver-phenothiazine metal complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vijay; Upadhyay, Niraj; Manhas, Anu

    2015-11-01

    A noble biologically active compound Ag(I)-PTZ metal complex (1) with spherical morphology was synthesized first time. Entire characterization tool (spectral, elemental, mass and thermal analysis) was supported a distorted tetrahedral structure, where two water compounds were coordinated with Ag(I) including one phenothiazine and one nitrate group. For the better insight, obtained spectral/structural results were supported by 3D molecular modeling. Compound 1 had shown excellent activities against the Salmonella typhimurium and Aspergillus fumigatus with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value 20 mg/L and 25 mg/L. The observed antioxidant radical scavenging activity (in %) of compound 1 (62.74%) was more than control ascorbic acid (28.58%). The observed protein (BSA) binding constant of 1 was 8.86 × 104 M-1, which is similar to binding constant of salicylic acid with BSA protein. Initial studies have revealed that synthesized compound 1 may act as multipurpose drug analogue in future.

  10. The effect of complexation of 3-formylrifamycin SV macrocyclic ether derivatives with metal cations and small nitrogen-containing organic molecules on antibacterial activity against S. aureus and S. epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Przybylski, Piotr; Pyta, Krystian; Czerwonka, Dominika; Kubicka, Marcelina M; Gajecka, Marzena

    2015-09-15

    Spectroscopic studies of ether rifamycins (1-9) have shown that all these compounds tend to be zwitterions with different localizations of intramolecularly transferred proton, which influences their solubility and logP values. According to ESI MS studies, rifamycins 3 and 4 form complexes with Li(+) or Na(+), while the other ones (7-9) coordinate small organic molecules, which can be further replaced by Na(+) cation. Biological assays revealed that the use of 7-9 in the form of complexes with small organic molecules improves their antibacterial potency as a result of changed: logP, solubility and binding mode with bacterial RNA polymerases. PMID:26254943

  11. Correlation between biological agents and levels of heavy metals in municipal sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Bozek, Urszula; Kłapeć, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    deposition of sludge on plots (over 6 months) causes a significant decrease of cadmium level, a decrease in the amount of Salmonella bacteria, and total elimination of Toxocara eggs. In the majority of cases no significant correlation was observed between the level of heavy metals and biological contaminants. A weak correlation was found between the concentrations of lead and chromium and the presence of the eggs of helminths (ATT), as well as between the concentration of zinc and the presence of Salmonella bacteria. PMID:19061266

  12. Hemin/G-quadruplex structure and activity alteration induced by magnesium cations.

    PubMed

    Kosman, J; Juskowiak, B

    2016-04-01

    The influence of metal cations on G-quadruplex structure and peroxidase-mimicking DNAzyme activity was investigated. Experiments revealed a significant role of magnesium ion, which in the presence of potassium cation influenced DNAzyme activity. This ability has been associated with alteration of G-quadruplex topology and consequently affinity to bind hemin molecule. It has been demonstrated that G-quadruplex based on PS2.M sequence under these conditions formed parallel topology, which exhibited lower activity than that observed in standard potassium-containing solution. On the other hand DNAzyme/magnesium ion system based on telomeric sequence, which did not undergo significant structural changes, exhibited higher peroxidase activity upon magnesium ion addition. In both cases, the stabilization effect of magnesium cations on G-quadruplex structure was observed. The mechanism of DNAzyme activity alteration by magnesium ion can be explained by its influence on the pKa value of DNAzyme. Magnesium ion decreased pKa for PS2.M based system but increased it for telomeric DNAzyme. Magnesium cation effect on G-quadruplex structure as well as DNAzyme activity is particularly important since this ion is one of the most common metal cations in biological samples.

  13. Biological monitoring of workers exposed to N-nitrosodiethanolamine in the metal industry.

    PubMed Central

    Monarca, S; Scassellati-Sforzolini, G; Donato, F; Angeli, G; Spiegelhalder, B; Fatigoni, C; Pasquini, R

    1996-01-01

    Biological monitoring of occupational hazards was performed in workers using cutting fluids containing N-nitrosodiethanolamine (NDELA). The study involved a group of 25 male subjects from some metal factories in central Italy who used cutting fluids with an NDELA content of > or = 5 mg/l (high-exposure group) and a group of 37 males exposed to cutting fluids with an NDELA content < 5 mg/l (low-exposure group). For comparison, we recruited a control group consisting of 37 subjects living in the same area. For all subjects, internal dose (urinary excretion of NDELA, mutagens, and thioethers), early biological effects (sister chromatid exchanges in blood peripheral lymphocytes), and urinary excretion of D-glucaric acid (DGA) as an endpoint product in the glucuronidation pathway were assessed. The results showed that only the workers using cutting fluids with NDELA concentrations of > or = 5 mg/l excreted trace amounts of NDELA in their urine. Urine excretion of mutagens was similar in the two exposure groups and in the controls. High-exposure subjects had a higher mean value of urinary thioethers than low-exposure and control subjects, but no differences were found in urinary DGA or lymphocyte sister chromatid exchange among the three groups. Smoking status increased the mean values of all the biomarkers, and coffee drinking was associated with urinary DGA excretion. PMID:8834865

  14. [Biological aspects of occupational exposure to cadmium and several other metals].

    PubMed

    Lauwerys, R; Buchet, J P; Roels, H; Bernard, A; Gennart, J P

    1986-01-01

    We have performed several cross-sectional epidemiological surveys among workers exposed to cadmium, mercury vapour or manganese in order to assess : their early biological or functional effects; the biological tests allowing an assessment of the amount of metal absorbed or stored in the body; the acceptable exposure levels. Studies have also been carried out among persons exposed to inorganic arsenic in order to define its inactivation mechanism and to develop a biological test of exposure. The kidney is the main critical organ following long-term exposure to cadmium. To prevent the occurrence of renal changes in the majority of male workers exposed to cadmium, its concentration in renal cortex should not exceed 215 micrograms/g (wet weight), and that in urine : 10 micrograms/g creatinine. A blood cadmium level of 1 microgram/100 ml has been suggested as maximum tolerable level for long-term exposure. Prolonged exposure to mercury vapour may lead to renal and neurological disturbances. The preclinical signs of nephrotoxicity are correlated with the amount of mercury absorbed which may be assessed by monitoring the mercury level in urine. The neurotoxic effects (particularly tremor) are mainly related to the integrated exposure (duration and intensity). A maximal permissible level of 50 micrograms Hg/g urinary creatinine is proposed to prevent the occurrence of these toxic effects. An exposure to manganese dust for 7 years on the average at a level below the maximum allowable airborne concentration (5 mg/m3) recommended by the ACGIH in the USA may still lead to a slight reduction in psychomotor and spirometric performances and interfere with calcium metabolism.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Solid State Structures of Alkali Metal Ion Complexes Formed by Low-Molecular-Weight Ligands of Biological Relevance.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Katsuyuki; Murayama, Kazutaka; Hu, Ning-Hai

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides structural data, mainly metal binding sites/modes, observed in crystal structures of alkali metal ion complexes containing low-molecular-weight ligands of biological relevance, mostly obtained from the Cambridge Structural Database (the CSD version 5.35 updated to February 2014). These ligands include (i) amino acids and small peptides, (ii) nucleic acid constituents (excluding quadruplexes and other oligonucleotides), (iii) simple carbohydrates, and (iv) naturally occurring antibiotic ionophores. For some representative complexes of these ligands, some details on the environment of the metal coordination and structural characteristics are described. PMID:26860299

  16. Effects of metal cations present naturally in coal on the fate of coal-bound nitrogen in the fixed-bed pyrolysis of 25 coals with different ranks: correlation between inherent Fe cations and N{sub 2} formation from low-rank coals

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuo Ohtsuka; Zhiheng Wu

    2009-09-15

    The fate of coal-N in the fixed-bed pyrolysis of 25 coals with 62-81 wt % (daf) C has been studied with a quartz reactor at 1000 C under ambient pressure to examine the effects of metal cations present naturally in these coals on the partitioning of coal-N into N{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, HCN, tar-N, and char-N. Nitrogen mass balances for all runs fall within the reasonable range of 100 {+-} 5%, and N{sub 2} is the predominant product for all of the coals. As the N{sub 2} yield increases, the sum of NH{sub 3}, HCN, and tar-N is unchanged significantly, whereas the char-N yield decreases almost linearly, showing that most of N{sub 2} originates from char-N. When eight kinds of inherent metals, such as Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Fe, and Ti, are determined by the conventional method and related with the N{sub 2} yield, there exists a strong, direct correlation between the Fe content and N{sub 2} formation for low-rank coals with less than 75 wt % (daf) C. Transmission electron microscopy coupled with an energy-dispersive analysis of X-rays (TEM-EDAX) measurements after pyrolysis at 1000{sup o}C of a German brown coal, which provides the highest N{sub 2} yield of about 60%, reveal the existence of lamella structures because of graphitized carbon as well as nanoscale Fe particles with different sizes and shapes. The mechanism for conversion reactions of char-N to N{sub 2} is discussed in terms of the catalysis by nanoparticles of metallic Fe formed from inherent Fe cations. 34 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Method for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations, medium for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, S.R.; Anderson, K.B.; Song, K.; Yuchs, S.E.; Marshall, C.L.

    1996-12-31

    The problems associated with the disposal of toxic metals in an environmentally acceptable manner continues to plague industry. Such metals as nickel, vanadium, molybdenum, cobalt, iron, and antimony present physiological and ecological challenges that are best addressed through minimization of exposure and dispersion. A method for encapsulating hazardous cations is provided comprising supplying a pretreated substrate containing the cations; contacting the substrate with an organo-silane compound to form a coating on the substrate; and allowing the coating to cure. A medium for containing hazardous cations is also provided, comprising a substrate having ion-exchange capacity and a silane-containing coating on the substrate.

  18. EFFECT OF NITROGEN AND METAL ADDITIONS ON NITROGEN FIXATION ACTIVITY IN BIOLOGICAL SOIL CRUSTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, K.; Lui, D.; Anbar, A. D.; Garcia-Pichel, F.; Hartnett, H. E.

    2009-12-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are diverse consortia of microorganisms that live in intimate association with soils in arid environments. Also called cryptogamic or microbiotic crusts, these communities can include cyanobacteria, algae, heterotrophic bacteria, fungi, lichens, and mosses. Together, these organisms provide many services to their surrounding ecosystems, including reduction of water runoff, promotion of water infiltration, and prevention of soil erosion. The cyanobacteria and algae also provide fixed carbon (C) to the soil through photosynthesis, and because atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (N) in arid environments is low, the major input of biologically available N comes from cyanobacteria capable of converting nitrogen gas (N2) to ammonium (NH4+). Biological soil crusts are easily destroyed by livestock grazing, motor vehicle travel, and many forms of recreational and agricultural land use. Loss of BSC cover can leave the soil vulnerable to intense erosion that can remove the nutrients necessary to sustain plant and animal life, thus accelerating the process of desertification. In order to preserve existing crusts and encourage the development of new crusts, it is crucial to understand the nutrient requirements of metabolism and growth in these microbial communities. This study investigated the affect of nitrogen and metal additions on N2-fixation activity in cyanobacterially-dominated crusts from the Colorado Plateau near Moab, Utah. Although N2-fixation has been studied in this system before, the affect of nutrient additions on N2-fixation activity has not been documented. The goal of this work was to understand how N and metal supplementation affects crust N metabolism. Three experiments were conducted to observe how N2-fixation activity changed with the addition of N, molybdenum (Mo), and vanadium (V). Molybdenum and vanadium were chosen because they are most commonly found at the active site of the enzyme nitrogenase, the molecule responsible

  19. A Study of Different Doped Metal Cations on the Physicochemical Properties and Catalytic Activities of Ce20 M1 Ox (M=Zr, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Sn) Composite Oxides for Nitric Oxide Reduction by Carbon Monoxide.

    PubMed

    Deng, Changshun; Li, Min; Qian, Junning; Hu, Qun; Huang, Meina; Lin, Qingjin; Ruan, Yongshun; Dong, Lihui; Li, Bin; Fan, Minguang

    2016-08-01

    This work is mainly focused on investigating the effects of different doped metal cations on the formation of Ce20 M1 Ox (M=Zr, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Sn) composite oxides and their physicochemical and catalytic properties for NO reduction by CO as a model reaction. The obtained samples were characterized by using N2 physisorption, X-ray diffraction, laser Raman spectroscopy, UV/Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, temperature-programmed reduction by hydrogen and by oxygen (H2 -TPR and O2 -TPD), in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, and the NO+CO model reaction. The results imply that the introduction of M(x+) into the lattice of CeO2 increases the specific surface area and pore volume, especially for variable valence metal cations, and enhances the catalytic performance to a great extent. In this regard, increases in the oxygen vacancies, reduction properties, and chemisorbed O2 (-) (and/or O(-) ) species of these Ce20 M1 Ox composite oxides (M refers to variable valence metals) play significant roles in this reaction. Among the samples, Ce20 Cr1 Ox exhibited the best catalytic performance, mainly because it has the best reducibility and more chemisorbed oxygen, and significant reasons for these attributes may be closely related to favorable synergistic interactions of the vacancies and near-surface Ce(3+) and Cr(3+) . Finally, a possible reaction mechanism was tentatively proposed to understand the reactions.

  20. A Study of Different Doped Metal Cations on the Physicochemical Properties and Catalytic Activities of Ce20 M1 Ox (M=Zr, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Sn) Composite Oxides for Nitric Oxide Reduction by Carbon Monoxide.

    PubMed

    Deng, Changshun; Li, Min; Qian, Junning; Hu, Qun; Huang, Meina; Lin, Qingjin; Ruan, Yongshun; Dong, Lihui; Li, Bin; Fan, Minguang

    2016-08-01

    This work is mainly focused on investigating the effects of different doped metal cations on the formation of Ce20 M1 Ox (M=Zr, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Sn) composite oxides and their physicochemical and catalytic properties for NO reduction by CO as a model reaction. The obtained samples were characterized by using N2 physisorption, X-ray diffraction, laser Raman spectroscopy, UV/Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, temperature-programmed reduction by hydrogen and by oxygen (H2 -TPR and O2 -TPD), in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, and the NO+CO model reaction. The results imply that the introduction of M(x+) into the lattice of CeO2 increases the specific surface area and pore volume, especially for variable valence metal cations, and enhances the catalytic performance to a great extent. In this regard, increases in the oxygen vacancies, reduction properties, and chemisorbed O2 (-) (and/or O(-) ) species of these Ce20 M1 Ox composite oxides (M refers to variable valence metals) play significant roles in this reaction. Among the samples, Ce20 Cr1 Ox exhibited the best catalytic performance, mainly because it has the best reducibility and more chemisorbed oxygen, and significant reasons for these attributes may be closely related to favorable synergistic interactions of the vacancies and near-surface Ce(3+) and Cr(3+) . Finally, a possible reaction mechanism was tentatively proposed to understand the reactions. PMID:27435470

  1. Design of Multichannel Osmium-Based Metalloreceptor for Anions and Cations by Taking Profit from Metal-Ligand Interaction and Construction of Molecular Keypad Lock and Memory Device.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Srikanta; Mardanya, Sourav; Pal, Poulami; Baitalik, Sujoy

    2015-12-21

    A polypyridylimidazole-based bifunctional Os(II) complex of the type [(bpy)2Os(tpy-Hbzim-dipy)](ClO4)2 (1), where tpy-Hbzim-dipy = 4'-[4-(4,5-dipyridin-2-yl-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-phenyl]-2,2';6',2″-terpyridine and bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, has been synthesized and structurally characterized for the construction of multifunctional logic devices. After coordination of an [Os(bpy)2](2+) unit to one of the two bidentate chelating sites, the complex offers a terpyridine motif for binding with cationic guests and an imidazole moiety for interacting with selective anionic species. Consequently, the anion- and cation-binding aspects of the metallorecptor were examined in solution and in the solid state by different spectroscopic and electrochemical methods. The complex behaves as a bifunctional sensor for F(-), AcO(-), CN(-), Fe(2+), and Cu(2+) ions in acetonitrile, whereas it is a highly selective chromogenic chemosensor for only CN(-) and Fe(2+) ions in water. Based on various output signals with a particular set of anionic and cationic inputs, the complex mimics the functions of two-input INHIBIT, OR, NOR, and XNOR logic gates, as well as three-input NOR logic behavior. More importantly, the complicated functions of a keypad lock and memory device were also nicely demonstrated by the complex. Finally, density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations also provide a rationale for properly understanding and interpreting the experimentally observed results. PMID:26687380

  2. Design of Multichannel Osmium-Based Metalloreceptor for Anions and Cations by Taking Profit from Metal-Ligand Interaction and Construction of Molecular Keypad Lock and Memory Device.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Srikanta; Mardanya, Sourav; Pal, Poulami; Baitalik, Sujoy

    2015-12-21

    A polypyridylimidazole-based bifunctional Os(II) complex of the type [(bpy)2Os(tpy-Hbzim-dipy)](ClO4)2 (1), where tpy-Hbzim-dipy = 4'-[4-(4,5-dipyridin-2-yl-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-phenyl]-2,2';6',2″-terpyridine and bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, has been synthesized and structurally characterized for the construction of multifunctional logic devices. After coordination of an [Os(bpy)2](2+) unit to one of the two bidentate chelating sites, the complex offers a terpyridine motif for binding with cationic guests and an imidazole moiety for interacting with selective anionic species. Consequently, the anion- and cation-binding aspects of the metallorecptor were examined in solution and in the solid state by different spectroscopic and electrochemical methods. The complex behaves as a bifunctional sensor for F(-), AcO(-), CN(-), Fe(2+), and Cu(2+) ions in acetonitrile, whereas it is a highly selective chromogenic chemosensor for only CN(-) and Fe(2+) ions in water. Based on various output signals with a particular set of anionic and cationic inputs, the complex mimics the functions of two-input INHIBIT, OR, NOR, and XNOR logic gates, as well as three-input NOR logic behavior. More importantly, the complicated functions of a keypad lock and memory device were also nicely demonstrated by the complex. Finally, density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations also provide a rationale for properly understanding and interpreting the experimentally observed results.

  3. Metal and metalloid containing natural products and a brief overview of their applications in biology, biotechnology and biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Dias, Daniel A; Kouremenos, Konstantinos A; Beale, David J; Callahan, Damien L; Jones, Oliver A H

    2016-02-01

    Bioinorganic natural product chemistry is a relatively unexplored but rapidly developing field with enormous potential for applications in biology, biotechnology (especially in regards to nanomaterial development, synthesis and environmental cleanup) and biomedicine. In this review the occurrence of metals and metalloids in natural products and their synthetic derivatives are reviewed. A broad overview of the area is provided followed by a discussion on the more common metals and metalloids found in natural sources, and an overview of the requirements for future research. Special attention is given to metal hyperaccumulating plants and their use in chemical synthesis and bioremediation, as well as the potential uses of metals and metalloids as therapeutic agents. The potential future applications and development in the field are also discussed.

  4. Generation of Scalable, Metallic High-Aspect Ratio Nanocomposites in a Biological Liquid Medium.

    PubMed

    Cotton Kelly, Kinsey; Wasserman, Jessica R; Deodhar, Sneha; Huckaby, Justin; DeCoster, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this protocol is to describe the synthesis of two novel biocomposites with high-aspect ratio structures. The biocomposites consist of copper and cystine, with either copper nanoparticles (CNPs) or copper sulfate contributing the metallic component. Synthesis is carried out in liquid under biological conditions (37 °C) and the self-assembled composites form after 24 hr. Once formed, these composites are highly stable in both liquid media and in a dried form. The composites scale from the nano- to micro- range in length, and from a few microns to 25 nm in diameter. Field emission scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) demonstrated that sulfur was present in the NP-derived linear structures, while it was absent from the starting CNP material, thus confirming cystine as the source of sulfur in the final nanocomposites. During synthesis of these linear nano- and micro-composites, a diverse range of lengths of structures is formed in the synthesis vessel. Sonication of the liquid mixture after synthesis was demonstrated to assist in controlling average size of the structures by diminishing the average length with increased time of sonication. Since the formed structures are highly stable, do not agglomerate, and are formed in liquid phase, centrifugation may also be used to assist in concentrating and segregating formed composites. PMID:26274773

  5. Using extracellular polymeric substances (EPS)-producing cyanobacteria for the bioremediation of heavy metals: do cations compete for the EPS functional groups and also accumulate inside the cell?

    PubMed

    Pereira, Sara; Micheletti, Ernesto; Zille, Andrea; Santos, Arlete; Moradas-Ferreira, Pedro; Tamagnini, Paula; De Philippis, Roberto

    2011-02-01

    Many cyanobacteria produce extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) mainly of polysaccharidic nature. These EPS can remain associated to the cell surface as sheaths, capsules and/or slimes, or be liberated into the surrounding environment as released polysaccharides (RPS). The ability of EPS-producing cyanobacteria to remove heavy metals from aqueous solutions has been widely reported in the literature, focusing mainly on the biotechnological potential. However, the knowledge of the effects of the metals in the cell's survival/growth is still scarce, particularly when they are simultaneously exposed to more than one metal. This work evaluated the effects of different concentrations of Cu(2+) and/or Pb(2+) in the growth/survival of Gloeothece sp. PCC 6909 and its sheathless mutant Gloeothece sp. CCY 9612. The results obtained clearly showed that both phenotypes are more severely affected by Cu(2+) than Pb(2+), and that the mutant is more sensitive to the former metal than the wild-type. Evident ultrastructural changes were also observed in the wild-type and mutant cells exposed to high levels (10 mg l(-1)) of Cu(2+). Moreover, in bi-metal systems, Pb(2+) was preferentially removed compared with Cu(2+), being the RPS of the mutant that is the most efficient polysaccharide fraction in metal removal. In these systems, the simultaneous presence of Cu(2+) and Pb(2+) caused a mutual inhibition in the adsorption of each metal. PMID:20966085

  6. Chemical and biological methods to evaluate the availability of heavy metals in soils of the Siena urban area (Italy).

    PubMed

    Nannoni, Francesco; Protano, Giuseppe

    2016-10-15

    A biogeochemistry field study was conducted in the Siena urban area (Italy) with the main objective of establishing the relationship between available amounts of heavy metals in soil assessed by a chemical method (soil fractionation) and bioavailability assessed by a biological method (bioaccumulation in earthworm tissues). The total content of traffic-related (Cd, Cu, Pb, Sb, Zn) and geogenic (Co, Cr, Ni, U) heavy metals in uncontaminated and contaminated soils and their concentrations in soil fractions and earthworms were used for this purpose. The bioavailability of heavy metals assessed by earthworms did not always match the availability defined by soil fractionation. Earthworms were a good indicator to assess the bioavailability of Pb and Sb in soil, while due to physiological mechanisms of regulation and excretion, Cd, Cu and Zn tissue levels in these invertebrates gave misleading estimates of their bioavailable pool. No relationship was identified between chemical and biological availability for the geogenic heavy metals, characterized by a narrow range of total contents in soil. The study highlighted that chemical and biological methods should be combined to provide more complete information about heavy element bioavailability in soils. PMID:27281550

  7. Cadmium accumulation by a Citrobacter sp. immobilized on gel and solid supports: applicability to the treatment of liquid wastes containing heavy metal cations

    SciTech Connect

    Macaskie, L.E.; Wates, J.M.; Dean, A.C.R.

    1987-01-01

    Polyacrylamide gel-immobilized cells of a Citrobacter sp. removed cadmium from flows supplemented with glycerol 2-phosphate, the metal uptake mechanism being mediated by the activity of a cell-bound phosphatase that precipitates liberated inorganic phosphate with heavy metals at the cell surface. The constraints of elevated flow rate and temperature were investigated and the results discussed in terms of the kinetics of immobilized enzymes. Loss in activity with respect to cadmium accumulation but not inorganic phosphate liberation was observed at acid pH and was attributed to the pH-dependent solubility of cadmium phosphate. Similarly high concentrations of chloride ions, and traces of cyanide inhibited cadmium uptake and this was attributed to the ability of these anions to complex heavy metals, especially the ability of CN/sup -/ to form complex anions with Cd/sup 2 +/. The data are discussed in terms of the known chemistry of chloride and cyanide-cadmium complexes and the relevance of these factors in the treatment of metal-containing liquid wastes is discussed. The cells immobilized in polyacrylamide provided a convenient small-scale laboratory model system. It was found that the Citrobacter sp. could be immobilized on glass supports with no chemical treatment or modification necessary. Such cells were also effective in metal accumulation and a prototype system more applicable to the treatment of metal-containing streams on a larger scale is described.

  8. N,N',N"-tris(dihydroxyphosphorylmethyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane (Deofix) - a high-affinity, high-specificity chelator for first transition series metal cations with significant deodorant, antimicrobial, and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Laden, Karl; Zaklad, Haim; Simhon, Elliot D; Klein, Joseph Y; Cyjon, Rosa L; Winchell, Harry S

    2003-01-01

    Deofix, N,N',N"-tris(dihydroxyphosphorylmethyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane, is a high-affinity, high-specificity chelator for first transition series cations such as iron, zinc, manganese, and copper. A 1% solution in 50% ethanol was found to be significantly better at reducing underarm malodor than a solution of 0.3% Triclosan in 50% ethanol. Compared to a 50% alcohol control, Deofix was found to produce a significant reduction in malodor for at least 48 hours. Deofix appears to work by reducing the concentration of first transition series metal ions below the levels needed for microbial cell reproduction and by inhibiting oxidative processes by interfering with catalytic formation of free radicals. Deofix has very low levels of toxicity when measured via a number of screening techniques.

  9. A metabolomic study on the biological effects of metal pollutions in oysters Crassostrea sikamea.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chenglong; Wang, Qing; Wu, Huifeng; Tan, Qiaoguo; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2016-01-15

    Metal pollution has become a great threat to organisms in the estuaries in South China. In the present study, the oysters Crassostrea sikamea were collected from one clean (Jiuzhen) and five metal polluted sites (Baijiao, Fugong, Gongqian, Jinshan and Songyu). The tissue metal concentrations in oysters indicated that the five metal sites were polluted by several metals, including Cr, Ni, Co, Cu, Zn, Ag, Cd and Pb with different patterns. Especially, Cu and Zn were the major contaminants in Baijiao, Fugong and Jinshan sites. The metabolic responses in oysters C. sikamea indicated that the metal pollutions in BJ, FG, JS and SY sites induced disturbances in osmotic regulation and energy metabolism via different metabolic pathways. However, the metal pollution in GQ site mainly influenced the osmotic regulation in the oysters C. sikamea. This study demonstrates that NMR-based metabolomics is useful to characterize metabolic responses induced by metal pollution.

  10. Chemistry of (and on) transition metal clusters: a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance study of the reaction of niobium cluster cations with nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Harding, Daniel J; Oliver, Thomas A A; Walsh, Tiffany R; Drewello, Thomas; Woodruff, D Phil; Derrick, Peter J; Mackenzie, Stuart R

    2009-01-01

    The reactions of niobium cluster cations, Nb(+)(n) (n = 2-19), with nitric oxide have been investigated using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR). The overall reaction rate constants are found to be in reasonable agreement with collision rates calculated using the surface charge capture model. The dominant reaction for small clusters (n <9) involves reaction-induced fragmentation resulting in the loss of either NbO or NbN. By contrast, the main reaction observed for the larger clusters (n> 11) is sequential NO chemisorption. Clusters n = 9, 10 exhibit both extremes of behaviour and are the only clusters upon which there is evidence of NO decomposition with N(2) loss observed whenever multiple NO molecules are co-adsorbed. The rate constants for each process have been determined as a function of cluster size.

  11. Investigation of intramolecular proton migration in a series of model, metal-cationized tripeptides using in situ generation of an isotope label.

    PubMed

    Bulleigh, Kellis; Howard, Angela; Do, Trang; Wu, Qun; Anbalagan, Victor; Stipdonk, Michael Van

    2006-01-01

    In this study we used an isotope label, generated in situ, to investigate intramolecular proton migration or scrambling during formation of [b(2)+17+Li](+) products by collision-induced dissociation (CID) of Li(+)-cationized tripeptides. To generate the isotope label, we used a McLafferty-type rearrangement of N-terminally acetylated, C-terminal peptide tert-butyl esters in which all amide positions were exchanged with deuterium. Using a set of small, model peptides, we show that intramolecular proton scrambling occurs during CID, particularly amongst adjacent sites along a peptide backbone, on the time scales employed for low-energy collisional activation in an ion-trap mass spectrometer.

  12. Antiviral cationic peptides as a strategy for innovation in global health therapeutics for dengue virus: high yield production of the biologically active recombinant plectasin peptide.

    PubMed

    Rothan, Hussin A; Mohamed, Zulqarnain; Suhaeb, Abdulrazzaq M; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abd; Yusof, Rohana

    2013-11-01

    Dengue virus infects millions of people worldwide, and there is no vaccine or anti-dengue therapeutic available. Antimicrobial peptides have been shown to possess effective antiviral activity against various viruses. One of the main limitations of developing these peptides as potent antiviral drugs is the high cost of production. In this study, high yield production of biologically active plectasin peptide was inexpensively achieved by producing tandem plectasin peptides as inclusion bodies in E. coli. Antiviral activity of the recombinant peptide towards dengue serotype-2 NS2B-NS3 protease (DENV2 NS2B-NS3pro) was assessed as a target to inhibit dengue virus replication in Vero cells. Single units of recombinant plectasin were collected after applying consecutive steps of refolding, cleaving by Factor Xa, and nickel column purification to obtain recombinant proteins of high purity. The maximal nontoxic dose (MNTD) of the recombinant peptide against Vero cells was 20 μM (100 μg/mL). The reaction velocity of DENV2 NS2B-NS3pro decreased significantly after increasing concentrations of recombinant plectasin were applied to the reaction mixture. Plectasin peptide noncompetitively inhibited DENV2 NS2B-NS3pro at Ki value of 5.03 ± 0.98 μM. The percentage of viral inhibition was more than 80% at the MNTD value of plectasin. In this study, biologically active recombinant plectasin which was able to inhibit dengue protease and viral replication in Vero cells was successfully produced in E. coli in a time- and cost- effective method. These findings are potentially important in the development of potent therapeutics against dengue infection.

  13. The relationship between molecular structure and biological activity of alkali metal salts of vanillic acid: Spectroscopic, theoretical and microbiological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świsłocka, Renata; Piekut, Jolanta; Lewandowski, Włodzimierz

    In this paper we investigate the relationship between molecular structure of alkali metal vanillate molecules and their antimicrobial activity. To this end FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV absorption and 1H, 13C NMR spectra for lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and caesium vanillates in solid state were registered, assigned and analyzed. Microbial activity of studied compounds was tested against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus vulgaris, Bacillus subtilis and Candida albicans. In order to evaluate the dependence between chemical structure and biological activity of alkali metal vanillates the statistical analysis was performed for selected wavenumbers from FT-IR spectra and parameters describing microbial activity of vanillates. The geometrical structures of the compounds studied were optimized and the structural characteristics were determined by density functional theory (DFT) using at B3LYP method with 6-311++G** as basis set. The obtained statistical equations show the existence of correlation between molecular structure of vanillates and their biological properties.

  14. Biosorption of heavy metals in a photo-rotating biological contactor--a batch process study.

    PubMed

    Orandi, Sanaz; Lewis, David M

    2013-06-01

    Metal removal potential of indigenous mining microorganisms from acid mine drainage (AMD) has been well recognised in situ at mine sites. However, their removal capacity requires to be investigated for AMD treatment. In the reported study, the capacity of an indigenous AMD microbial consortium dominated with Klebsormidium sp., immobilised in a photo-rotating biological contactor (PRBC), was investigated for removing various elements from a multi-ion synthetic AMD. The synthetic AMD was composed of major (Cu, Mn, Mg, Zn, Ca, Na, Ni) and trace elements (Fe, Al, Cr, Co, Se, Ag, Mo) at initial concentrations of 2 to 100 mg/L and 0.005 to 1 mg/L, respectively. The PRBC was operated for two 7-day batch periods under pH conditions of 3 and 5. The maximum removal was observed after 3 and 6 days at pH 3 and 5, respectively. Daily water analysis data demonstrated the ability of the algal-microbial biofilm to remove an overall average of 25-40 % of the major elements at pH 3 in the order of Na > Cu > Ca > Mg > Mn > Ni > Zn, whereas a higher removal (35-50 %) was observed at pH 5 in the order of Cu > Mn > Mg > Ca > Ni > Zn > Na. The removal efficiency of the system for trace elements varied extensively between 3 and 80 % at the both pH conditions. The batch data results demonstrated the ability for indigenous AMD algal-microbial biofilm for removing a variety of elements from AMD in a PRBC. The work presents the potential for further development and scale-up to use PBRC inoculated with AMD microorganisms at mine sites for first or secondary AMD treatment. PMID:23011347

  15. Biosorption of heavy metals in a photo-rotating biological contactor--a batch process study.

    PubMed

    Orandi, Sanaz; Lewis, David M

    2013-06-01

    Metal removal potential of indigenous mining microorganisms from acid mine drainage (AMD) has been well recognised in situ at mine sites. However, their removal capacity requires to be investigated for AMD treatment. In the reported study, the capacity of an indigenous AMD microbial consortium dominated with Klebsormidium sp., immobilised in a photo-rotating biological contactor (PRBC), was investigated for removing various elements from a multi-ion synthetic AMD. The synthetic AMD was composed of major (Cu, Mn, Mg, Zn, Ca, Na, Ni) and trace elements (Fe, Al, Cr, Co, Se, Ag, Mo) at initial concentrations of 2 to 100 mg/L and 0.005 to 1 mg/L, respectively. The PRBC was operated for two 7-day batch periods under pH conditions of 3 and 5. The maximum removal was observed after 3 and 6 days at pH 3 and 5, respectively. Daily water analysis data demonstrated the ability of the algal-microbial biofilm to remove an overall average of 25-40 % of the major elements at pH 3 in the order of Na > Cu > Ca > Mg > Mn > Ni > Zn, whereas a higher removal (35-50 %) was observed at pH 5 in the order of Cu > Mn > Mg > Ca > Ni > Zn > Na. The removal efficiency of the system for trace elements varied extensively between 3 and 80 % at the both pH conditions. The batch data results demonstrated the ability for indigenous AMD algal-microbial biofilm for removing a variety of elements from AMD in a PRBC. The work presents the potential for further development and scale-up to use PBRC inoculated with AMD microorganisms at mine sites for first or secondary AMD treatment.

  16. Trace metal bioavailability: Modeling chemical and biological interactions of sediment-bound zinc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luoma, S. N.; Bryan, G.W.; Jenne, Everett A.

    1979-01-01

    Extractable concentrations of sediment-bound Zn, as modified by the physicochemical form of the metal in the sediments, controlled Zn concentrations in the deposit-feeding bivalvesScrobicularia plana (collected from 40 stations in 17 estuaries in southwest England) andMacoma balthica (from 28 stations in San Francisco Bay). Over a wide range of concentrations, a significant correlation was found between ammonium acetate-soluble concentrations of Zn in sediments and Zn concentrations in Scrobicularia. This correlation was insufficiently precise to be of predictive value for Scrobicularia, and did not hold for Macoma over the narrower range of Zn concentrations observed in San Francisco Bay. Strong correlation of Zn concentrations inScrobicularia and the bioavailability of sediment-bound Zn to Macoma with ratios of sorption substrate (oxides of iron and manganese, organic carbon, carbonates, humic materials) concentrations in sediments were found in both the English and San Francisco Bay study areas. These correlations were attributed to substrate competition for sorption of Zn within sediments, assuming: 1) competition for sorption of Zn was largely controlled by the relative concentrations of substrates present in the sediments and 2) the bioavailability of Zn to the deposit feeders was determined by the partitioning of Zn among the substrates. The correlations indicated that the availability of Zn to the bivalves increased when concentrations of either amorphous inorganic oxides or humic substances increased in sediments. Availability was reduced at increased concentrations of organic carbon and, in San Francisco Bay, ammonium acetate-soluble Mn. Concentrations of biologically available Zn in solution and low salinities may also have enhanced Zn uptake, although the roles of these variables were less obvious from the statistical analysis.

  17. Redox-active on-surface polymerization of single-site divalent cations from pure metals by a ketone-functionalized phenanthroline

    SciTech Connect

    Skomski, Daniel; Tempas, Christopher D.; Bukowski, Gregory S.; Smith, Kevin A.; Tait, Steven L.

    2015-03-14

    Metallic iron, chromium, or platinum mixing with a ketone-functionalized phenanthroline ligand on a single crystal gold surface demonstrates redox activity to a well-defined oxidation state and assembly into thermally stable, one dimensional, polymeric chains. The diverging ligand geometry incorporates redox-active sub-units and bi-dentate binding sites. The gold surface provides a stable adsorption environment and directs growth of the polymeric chains, but is inert with regard to the redox chemistry. These systems are characterized by scanning tunnelling microscopy, non-contact atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy under ultra-high vacuum conditions. The relative propensity of the metals to interact with the ketone group is examined, and it is found that Fe and Cr more readily complex the ligand than Pt. The formation and stabilization of well-defined transition metal single-sites at surfaces may open new routes to achieve higher selectivity in heterogeneous catalysts.

  18. Novel biological sources of electrochemiluminescence and potential applications to metals detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, John G.; Collard, Sneed B.; Kuch, David J.; Cornette, Jimmy C.

    1996-11-01

    Electrochemiluminescence (ECL) is an electrochemical means of generating light from certain organic-metal complexes (e.g., Cr, Os, or Ru with bipyridine) and other types of molecules. Thus, it may be possible to develop an ECL-based metals sensor or biosensor consisting of organic molecules coated onto electrodes which emit light only upon complexation of particular metal ions and application of a small voltage. Toxic metals in water sources are of environmental concern. Some marine invertebrates, such as tunicates (i.e., `sea squirts') and molluscs, are noted for their ability to concentrate toxic metals as much as 100 million-fold over ambient seawater concentrations. In the present work, extracts from a tunicate species, as well as synthetic tunicate blood pigments or `tunichromes', oysters, and other organisms are examined for intrinsic ECL in the presence and absence of various metal ions. Results suggest a promising novel, potentially sensitive, and specific means for metal ion detection based on ECL.

  19. Quantifying restoration success and recovery in a metal-polluted stream: A 17-year assessment of physicochemical and biological responses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clements, W.H.; Vieira, N.K.M.; Church, S.E.

    2010-01-01

    Evaluating the effectiveness of stream restoration is often challenging because of the lack of pre-treatment data, narrow focus on physicochemical measures and insufficient post-restoration monitoring. Even when these fundamental elements are present, quantifying restoration success is difficult because of the challenges associated with distinguishing treatment effects from seasonal variation, episodic events and long-term climatic changes.2. We report results of one of the most comprehensive and continuous records of physical, chemical and biological data available to assess restoration success for a stream ecosystem in North America. Over a 17 year period we measured seasonal and annual changes in metal concentrations, physicochemical characteristics, macroinvertebrate communities, and brown trout Salmo trutta populations in the Arkansas River, a metal-contaminated stream in Colorado, USA.3. Although we observed significant improvements in water quality after treatment, the effectiveness of restoration varied temporally, spatially and among biological response variables. The fastest recovery was observed at stations where restoration eliminated point sources of metal contamination. Recovery of macroinvertebrates was significantly delayed at some stations because of residual sediment contamination and because extreme seasonal and episodic variation in metal concentrations prevented recolonization by sensitive species. Synthesis and applications. Because recovery trajectories after the removal of a stressor are often complex or nonlinear, long-term studies are necessary to assess restoration success within the context of episodic events and changes in regional climate. The observed variation in recovery among chemical and biological endpoints highlights the importance of developing objective criteria to assess restoration success. Although the rapid response of macroinvertebrates to reduced metal concentrations is encouraging, we have previously demonstrated that

  20. Comparative analysis of cation/proton antiporter superfamily in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Chuyu; Yang, Xiaohan; Xia, Xinli; Yin, Weilun

    2013-01-01

    The cation/proton antiporter superfamily is associated with the transport of monovalent cations across membranes. This superfamily was annotated in the Arabidopsis genome and some members were functionally characterized. In the present study, a systematic analysis of the cation/proton antiporter genes in diverse plant specieswas reported.We identified 240 cation/proton antiporters in alga, moss, and angiosperm. A phylogenetic tree was constructed showing these 240members are separated into three families, i.e., Na+/H+ exchangers, K+ efflux antiporters, and cation/H+ exchangers. Our analysis revealed that tandem and/or segmental duplications contribute to the expansion of cation/H+ exchangers in the examined angiospermspecies. Sliding windowanalysis of the nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution ratios showed some differences in the evolutionary fate of cation/proton antiporter paralogs. Furthermore, we identified over-represented motifs among these 240 proteins and foundmostmotifs are family specific, demonstrating diverse evolution of the cation/proton antiporters among three families. In addition, we investigated the co-expressed genes of the cation/proton antiporters in Arabidopsis thaliana. The results showed some biological processes are enriched in the co-expressed genes, suggesting the cation/proton antiporters may be involved in these biological processes. Taken together, this study furthers our knowledge on cation/proton antiporters in plants.

  1. Influence of Nano-Crystal Metals on Texture and Biological Properties of Water Soluble Polysaccharides of Medicinal Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churilov, G.; Ivanycheva, J.; Kiryshin, V.

    2015-11-01

    When treating the plants seeds with nano-materials there are some quality and quantity changes of polysaccharides, the molecular mass increase and monosaccharides change that leads to the increase of physiological and pharmacological activity of carbohydrates got from medicinal plants. We have got water soluble polysaccharides and nano-metals combinations containing 0.000165-0.000017 mg/dm3 of the metal. In a case of induced anemia the blood composition has practically restored on the 10th day of the treatment with nanocomposites. The use of pectin polysaccharides (that are attributed to modifiers of biological respond) to get nano-structured materials seems to be actual relative to their physiological activity (radio nuclides persorption, heavy metals ions, bacteria cells and their toxins; lipids metabolism normalization; bowels secreting and motor functions activation and modulation of the endocrine system.

  2. The mechanism of metals precipitation by biologically generated alkalinity in biofilm reactors.

    PubMed

    Remoudaki, E; Hatzikioseyian, A; Kousi, P; Tsezos, M

    2003-09-01

    Microbial strains, characterized by increased tolerance and ability to grow in metal bearing wastewaters as well as by effective metal sequestering capability by both active (bioaccumulative) and passive (biosorptive) processes, were tested as inoculum for metal laden wastewater treatment systems. Their capacity to grow in metal bearing wastewater, using an easily available and inexpensive carbon source such as acetate, was studied in batch experiments. Two principal conclusions were drawn: (1). Growth was observed for all the strains examined suggesting that the strains can be acclimated to metals bearing wastewaters. (2). Solution pH increased from neutral to alkaline values during growth (pH(initial)=7, pH(final)=10). The later was observed systematically for all strains. Metal precipitation, due to the metabolically generated alkalinity is expected as a result.Supporting evidence for this hypothesis was provided during the operation of two pilot moving bed sand filters treating two different metal bearing wastewaters. Acetate was used as carbon source to support the growth and maintenance of microbial biomass on the sand grains of the filters. The characteristics of the sludge produced from the operation of the pilot plants were subsequently studied in the laboratory. Both sludges were significantly loaded with large amounts of metals.A mechanism of metal precipitation induced by the metabolically generated alkalinity, when acetate is used as carbon source, could be proposed as the main process responsible for the metals sequestering inside the moving bed sandfilter reactor. PMID:12909102

  3. Noble metals on the nanoscale: optical and photothermal properties and some applications in imaging, sensing, biology, and medicine.

    PubMed

    Jain, Prashant K; Huang, Xiaohua; El-Sayed, Ivan H; El-Sayed, Mostafa A

    2008-12-01

    Noble metal nanostructures attract much interest because of their unique properties, including large optical field enhancements resulting in the strong scattering and absorption of light. The enhancement in the optical and photothermal properties of noble metal nanoparticles arises from resonant oscillation of their free electrons in the presence of light, also known as localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). The plasmon resonance can either radiate light (Mie scattering), a process that finds great utility in optical and imaging fields, or be rapidly converted to heat (absorption); the latter mechanism of dissipation has opened up applications in several new areas. The ability to integrate metal nanoparticles into biological systems has had greatest impact in biology and biomedicine. In this Account, we discuss the plasmonic properties of gold and silver nanostructures and present examples of how they are being utilized for biodiagnostics, biophysical studies, and medical therapy. For instance, taking advantage of the strong LSPR scattering of gold nanoparticles conjugated with specific targeting molecules allows the molecule-specific imaging and diagnosis of diseases such as cancer. We emphasize in particular how the unique tunability of the plasmon resonance properties of metal nanoparticles through variation of their size, shape, composition, and medium allows chemists to design nanostructures geared for specific bio-applications. We discuss some interesting nanostructure geometries, including nanorods, nanoshells, and nanoparticle pairs, that exhibit dramatically enhanced and tunable plasmon resonances, making them highly suitable for bio-applications. Tuning the nanostructure shape (e.g., nanoprisms, nanorods, or nanoshells) is another means of enhancing the sensitivity of the LSPR to the nanoparticle environment and, thereby, designing effective biosensing agents. Metal nanoparticle pairs or assemblies display distance-dependent plasmon resonances as a

  4. Noble metals on the nanoscale: optical and photothermal properties and some applications in imaging, sensing, biology, and medicine.

    PubMed

    Jain, Prashant K; Huang, Xiaohua; El-Sayed, Ivan H; El-Sayed, Mostafa A

    2008-12-01

    Noble metal nanostructures attract much interest because of their unique properties, including large optical field enhancements resulting in the strong scattering and absorption of light. The enhancement in the optical and photothermal properties of noble metal nanoparticles arises from resonant oscillation of their free electrons in the presence of light, also known as localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). The plasmon resonance can either radiate light (Mie scattering), a process that finds great utility in optical and imaging fields, or be rapidly converted to heat (absorption); the latter mechanism of dissipation has opened up applications in several new areas. The ability to integrate metal nanoparticles into biological systems has had greatest impact in biology and biomedicine. In this Account, we discuss the plasmonic properties of gold and silver nanostructures and present examples of how they are being utilized for biodiagnostics, biophysical studies, and medical therapy. For instance, taking advantage of the strong LSPR scattering of gold nanoparticles conjugated with specific targeting molecules allows the molecule-specific imaging and diagnosis of diseases such as cancer. We emphasize in particular how the unique tunability of the plasmon resonance properties of metal nanoparticles through variation of their size, shape, composition, and medium allows chemists to design nanostructures geared for specific bio-applications. We discuss some interesting nanostructure geometries, including nanorods, nanoshells, and nanoparticle pairs, that exhibit dramatically enhanced and tunable plasmon resonances, making them highly suitable for bio-applications. Tuning the nanostructure shape (e.g., nanoprisms, nanorods, or nanoshells) is another means of enhancing the sensitivity of the LSPR to the nanoparticle environment and, thereby, designing effective biosensing agents. Metal nanoparticle pairs or assemblies display distance-dependent plasmon resonances as a

  5. Biological interaction between transition metals (Ag, Cd and Hg), selenide/sulfide and selenoprotein P.

    PubMed

    Sasakura, C; Suzuki, K T

    1998-09-01

    The interaction between transition metals (Ag+, Cd2+ and Hg2+) and selenium (Se) in the bloodstream was studied in vitro by means of the HPLC--inductively coupled argon plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP MS) method. Transition metal ions and selenide (produced in vitro from selenite in the presence of glutathione) or sulfide (Na2S) formed a (metal-Se/S) complex, which then bound to a plasma protein, selenoprotein P (Sel P), to form a ternary complex, (metal-Se/S)-Sel P. The molar ratios of metals to Se were 1:1 for Hg/Se and Cd/Se, but either 1:1 or 2:1 for Ag/Se, depending on the ratio of their doses. The results indicate that the interaction between transition metals and Se occurs through the general mechanism, i.e., transition metal ions and selenide form the unit complex (metal-Se)n, and then the complex binds to selenoprotein P to form the ternary complex ¿(metal-Se)n¿m--seleno-protein P in the bloodstream. PMID:9833321

  6. Cluster-Continuum Calculations of Hydration Free Energies of Anions and Group 12 Divalent Cations.

    PubMed

    Riccardi, Demian; Guo, Hao-Bo; Parks, Jerry M; Gu, Baohua; Liang, Liyuan; Smith, Jeremy C

    2013-01-01

    Understanding aqueous phase processes involving group 12 metal cations is relevant to both environmental and biological sciences. Here, quantum chemical methods and polarizable continuum models are used to compute the hydration free energies of a series of divalent group 12 metal cations (Zn(2+), Cd(2+), and Hg(2+)) together with Cu(2+) and the anions OH(-), SH(-), Cl(-), and F(-). A cluster-continuum method is employed, in which gas-phase clusters of the ion and explicit solvent molecules are immersed in a dielectric continuum. Two approaches to define the size of the solute-water cluster are compared, in which the number of explicit waters used is either held constant or determined variationally as that of the most favorable hydration free energy. Results obtained with various polarizable continuum models are also presented. Each leg of the relevant thermodynamic cycle is analyzed in detail to determine how different terms contribute to the observed mean signed error (MSE) and the standard deviation of the error (STDEV) between theory and experiment. The use of a constant number of water molecules for each set of ions is found to lead to predicted relative trends that benefit from error cancellation. Overall, the best results are obtained with MP2 and the Solvent Model D polarizable continuum model (SMD), with eight explicit water molecules for anions and 10 for the metal cations, yielding a STDEV of 2.3 kcal mol(-1) and MSE of 0.9 kcal mol(-1) between theoretical and experimental hydration free energies, which range from -72.4 kcal mol(-1) for SH(-) to -505.9 kcal mol(-1) for Cu(2+). Using B3PW91 with DFT-D3 dispersion corrections (B3PW91-D) and SMD yields a STDEV of 3.3 kcal mol(-1) and MSE of 1.6 kcal mol(-1), to which adding MP2 corrections from smaller divalent metal cation water molecule clusters yields very good agreement with the full MP2 results. Using B3PW91-D and SMD, with two explicit water molecules for anions and six for divalent metal cations, also

  7. High-enthalpy hydrogen adsorption in cation-exchanged variants of the microporous metal-organic framework Mn3[(Mn4Cl)3(BTT)8(CH3OH)10]2.

    PubMed

    Dinca, Mircea; Long, Jeffrey R

    2007-09-12

    Exchange of the guest Mn2+ ions in Mn3[(Mn4Cl)3(BTT)8(CH3OH)10]2 (1-Mn2+; BTT=1,3,5-benzenetristetrazolate) with selected cations results in the formation of isostructural framework compounds 1-M (M=Li+, Cu+, Fe2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+). Similar to the parent compound, the new microporous materials are stable to desolvation and exhibit a high H2 storage capacity, ranging from 2.00 to 2.29 wt % at 77 K and 900 torr. Measurements of the isosteric heat of adsorption at zero coverage reveal a difference of 2 kJ/mol between the weakest and strongest H2-binding materials, which is attributed to variations in the strength of interaction between H2 molecules and unsaturated metal centers within each framework. The Co2+-exchanged compound, 1-Co2+, exhibits an initial enthalpy of adsorption of 10.5 kJ/mol, the highest yet observed for a microporous metal-organic framework.

  8. Selective trans-membrane transport of alkali and alkaline earth cations through graphene oxide membranes based on cation-π interactions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pengzhan; Zheng, Feng; Zhu, Miao; Song, Zhigong; Wang, Kunlin; Zhong, Minlin; Wu, Dehai; Little, Reginald B; Xu, Zhiping; Zhu, Hongwei

    2014-01-28

    Graphene and graphene oxide (G-O) have been demonstrated to be excellent filters for various gases and liquids, showing potential applications in areas such as molecular sieving and water desalination. In this paper, the selective trans-membrane transport properties of alkali and alkaline earth cations through a membrane composed of stacked and overlapped G-O sheets ("G-O membrane") are investigated. The thermodynamics of the ion transport process reveal that the competition between the generated thermal motions and the interactions of cations with the G-O sheets results in the different penetration behaviors to temperature variations for the considered cations (K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), and Ba(2+)). The interactions between the studied metal atoms and graphene are quantified by first-principles calculations based on the plane-wave-basis-set density functional theory (DFT) approach. The mechanism of the selective ion trans-membrane transportation is discussed further and found to be consistent with the concept of cation-π interactions involved in biological systems. The balance between cation-π interactions of the cations considered with the sp(2) clusters of G-O membranes and the desolvation effect of the ions is responsible for the selectivity of G-O membranes toward the penetration of different ions. These results help us better understand the ion transport process through G-O membranes, from which the possibility of modeling the ion transport behavior of cellular membrane using G-O can be discussed further. The selectivity toward different ions also makes G-O membrane a promising candidate in areas of membrane separations.

  9. Growth of Novel Ceramic Layers on Metals via Chemical and Heat Treatments for Inducing Various Biological Functions

    PubMed Central

    Kokubo, Tadashi; Yamaguchi, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    The present authors’ systematic studies on growth of novel ceramic layers on Ti metal and its alloys by chemical and heat treatments for inducing bone-bonding bioactivity and some other biological functions are reviewed. Ti metal formed an apatite on its surface in a simulated body fluid, when heat-treated after exposure to strong acid solutions to form rutile surface layer, or to strong alkali solutions to form sodium titanate surface layer. Both types of Ti metal tightly bonded to the living bone. The alkali and heat treatment was applied to the surface Ti metal of an artificial hip joint and successfully used in the clinic since 2007. The acid and heat treatments was applied to porous Ti metal to induce osteoconductivity as well as osteoinductivity. The resulting product was successfully used in clinical trials for spinal fusion devices. For the Ti-based alloys, the alkali and heat treatment was little modified to form calcium titanate surface layer. Bone-growth promoting Mg, Sr, and Zn ions as well as the antibacterial Ag ion were successfully incorporated into the calcium titanate layer. PMID:26579517

  10. Growth of Novel Ceramic Layers on Metals via Chemical and Heat Treatments for Inducing Various Biological Functions.

    PubMed

    Kokubo, Tadashi; Yamaguchi, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    The present authors' systematic studies on growth of novel ceramic layers on Ti metal and its alloys by chemical and heat treatments for inducing bone-bonding bioactivity and some other biological functions are reviewed. Ti metal formed an apatite on its surface in a simulated body fluid, when heat-treated after exposure to strong acid solutions to form rutile surface layer, or to strong alkali solutions to form sodium titanate surface layer. Both types of Ti metal tightly bonded to the living bone. The alkali and heat treatment was applied to the surface Ti metal of an artificial hip joint and successfully used in the clinic since 2007. The acid and heat treatments was applied to porous Ti metal to induce osteoconductivity as well as osteoinductivity. The resulting product was successfully used in clinical trials for spinal fusion devices. For the Ti-based alloys, the alkali and heat treatment was little modified to form calcium titanate surface layer. Bone-growth promoting Mg, Sr, and Zn ions as well as the antibacterial Ag ion were successfully incorporated into the calcium titanate layer. PMID:26579517

  11. SYNTHESIS OF THERMALLY STABLE CARBOXYMETHYL CELLULOSE/METAL BIODEGRADABLE NANOCOMPOSITES FOR POTENTIAL BIOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A green approach is described that generates bulk quantities of nanocomposites containing transition metals such as Cu, Ag, In and Fe at room temperature using a biodegradable polymer carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) by reacting respective metal salts with sodium salt of CMC in aqu...

  12. Assigning Oxidation States to Some Metal Dioxygen Complexes of Biological Interest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summerville, David A.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The bonding of dioxygen in metal-dioxygen complexes is discussed, paying particular attention to the problems encountered in assigning conventional oxidation numbers to both the metal center and coordinated dioxygen. Complexes of iron, cobalt, chromium, and manganese are considered. (BB)

  13. Atypical behavior in the electron capture induced dissociation of biologically relevant transition metal ion complexes of the peptide hormone oxytocin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinnijenhuis, Anne J.; Mihalca, Romulus; Heeren, Ron M. A.; Heck, Albert J. R.

    2006-07-01

    Doubly protonated ions of the disulfide bond containing nonapeptide hormone oxytocin and oxytocin complexes with different transition metal ions, that have biological relevance under physiological conditions, were subjected to electron capture dissociation (ECD) to probe their structural features in the gas phase. Although, all the ECD spectra were strikingly different, typical ECD behavior was observed for complexes of the nonapeptide hormone oxytocin with Ni2+, Co2+ and Zn2+, i.e., abundant c/z' and a'/y backbone cleavages and ECD characteristic S-S and S-C bond cleavages were observed. We propose that, although in the oxytocin-transition metal ion complexes the metal ions serve as the main initial capture site, the captured electron is transferred to other sites in the complex to form a hydrogen radical, which drives the subsequent typical ECD fragmentations. The complex of oxytocin with Cu2+ displayed noticeably different ECD behavior. The fragment ions were similar to fragment ions typically observed with low-energy collision induced dissociation (CID). We propose that the electrons captured by the oxytocin-Cu2+ complex might be favorably involved in reducing the Cu2+ metal ion to Cu+. Subsequent energy redistribution would explain the observed low-energy CID-type fragmentations. Electron capture resulted also in quite different specific cleavage sites for the complexes of oxytocin with Ni2+, Co2+ and Zn2+. This is an indication for structural differences in these complexes possibly linked to their significantly different biological effects on oxytocin-receptor binding, and suggests that ECD may be used to study subtle structural differences in transition metal ion-peptide complexes.

  14. Structures of Metal-Substituted Human Histone Deacetylase 8 Provide Mechanistic Inferences on Biological Function

    SciTech Connect

    Dowling, Daniel P.; Gattis, Samuel G.; Fierke, Carol A.; Christianson, David W.

    2010-08-23

    The metal-dependent histone deacetylases (HDACs) adopt an {alpha}/{beta} protein fold first identified in rat liver arginase. Despite insignificant overall amino acid sequence identity, these enzymes share a strictly conserved metal binding site with divergent metal specificity and stoichiometry. HDAC8, originally thought to be a Zn{sup 2+}-metallohydrolase, exhibits increased activity with Co{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 2+} cofactors based on k{sub cat}/K{sub M} (Gantt, S. L., Gattis, S. G., and Fierke, C. A. (2006) Biochemistry 45, 6170-6178). Here, we report the first X-ray crystal structures of metallo-substituted HDAC8, Co{sup 2+}-HDAC8, D101L Co{sup 2+}-HDAC8, D101L Mn{sup 2+}-HDAC8, and D101L Fe{sup 2+}-HDAC8, each complexed with the inhibitor M344. Metal content of protein samples in solution is confirmed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. For the crystalline enzymes, peaks in Bijvoet difference Fourier maps calculated from X-ray diffraction data collected near the respective elemental absorption edges confirm metal substitution. Additional solution studies confirm incorporation of Cu{sup 2+}; Fe{sup 3+} and Ni{sup 2+} do not bind under conditions tested. The metal dependence of the substrate K{sub M} values and the K{sub i} values of hydroxamate inhibitors that chelate the active site metal are consistent with substrate-metal coordination in the precatalytic Michaelis complex that enhances catalysis. Additionally, although HDAC8 binds Zn{sup 2+} nearly 106-fold more tightly than Fe{sup 2+}, the affinities for both metal ions are comparable to the readily exchangeable metal concentrations estimated in living cells, suggesting that HDAC8 could bind either or both Fe{sup 2+} or Zn{sup 2+} in vivo.

  15. Specific capture of uranyl protein targets by metal affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Basset, Christian; Dedieu, Alain; Guérin, Philippe; Quéméneur, Eric; Meyer, Daniel; Vidaud, Claude

    2008-03-28

    To improve general understanding of biochemical mechanisms in the field of uranium toxicology, the identification of protein targets needs to be intensified. Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been widely developed as a powerful tool for capturing metal binding proteins from biological extracts. However uranyl cations (UO2(2+)) have particular physico-chemical characteristics which prevent them from being immobilized on classical metal chelating supports. We report here on the first development of an immobilized uranyl affinity chromatography method, based on the cation-exchange properties of aminophosphonate groups for uranyl binding. The cation distribution coefficient and loading capacity on the support were determined. Then the stability of the uranyl-bonded phase under our chromatographic conditions was optimized to promote affinity mechanisms. The successful enrichment of uranyl binding proteins from human serum was then proven using proteomic and mass spectral analysis. PMID:18308325

  16. Changes of toxic metals during biological stabilization and their potential ecological risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hou-cheng; Zeng, Zheng-zhong; Zhang, He-fei; Nan, Zhong-ren

    2015-01-01

    With various disadvantages of pollution control technologies for toxic metal-contaminated soil, we mixed contaminated soil with sludge for in situ composting to stabilize toxic metals, so plants are enriched to take up the toxic metals. When simulating the above, we added toxic metal solution into sewage sludge, and then composed it with steel slag to determine inhibition of the availability of toxic metals. When toxic metals were added into sludge, the potential ecological index and geoaccumulation index of Cd became high while Zn was low. Steel slag had an inhibited availability of Cd, and when the adjunction of steel slag was 7%, the availability of Cd was lowest. Steel slag promoted the availability of Zn, and when the adjunction of steel slag was 27%, the availability of Zn was highest. Results showed that during composting, with increasing steel slag, Cd stabilizing time was reached sooner but Zn stabilizing time was slower, and the availability of all metals became lower. In the end, composting inhibited the potential ecological index of Cd, but it promoted the potential ecological index of Zn. Steel slag promoted the stability of Cd and Zn as Fe/Mn oxide-bound and residual species. Therefore, composting sludge and steel slag could be used as an effective inhibitor of Zn and Cd pollution.

  17. Changes of toxic metals during biological stabilization and their potential ecological risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hou-cheng; Zeng, Zheng-zhong; Zhang, He-fei; Nan, Zhong-ren

    2015-01-01

    With various disadvantages of pollution control technologies for toxic metal-contaminated soil, we mixed contaminated soil with sludge for in situ composting to stabilize toxic metals, so plants are enriched to take up the toxic metals. When simulating the above, we added toxic metal solution into sewage sludge, and then composed it with steel slag to determine inhibition of the availability of toxic metals. When toxic metals were added into sludge, the potential ecological index and geoaccumulation index of Cd became high while Zn was low. Steel slag had an inhibited availability of Cd, and when the adjunction of steel slag was 7%, the availability of Cd was lowest. Steel slag promoted the availability of Zn, and when the adjunction of steel slag was 27%, the availability of Zn was highest. Results showed that during composting, with increasing steel slag, Cd stabilizing time was reached sooner but Zn stabilizing time was slower, and the availability of all metals became lower. In the end, composting inhibited the potential ecological index of Cd, but it promoted the potential ecological index of Zn. Steel slag promoted the stability of Cd and Zn as Fe/Mn oxide-bound and residual species. Therefore, composting sludge and steel slag could be used as an effective inhibitor of Zn and Cd pollution. PMID:26540531

  18. Activation of X-H and X-D bonds (X = O, N, C) by alkaline-earth metal monoxide cations: experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Bozović, Andrea; Bohme, Diethard K

    2009-07-28

    Experimental investigations are reported for reactions of MO (+) (M = Ca, Sr, and Ba) with elemental hydrides water, ammonia and methane proceeding in the gas phase at 295 +/- 3 K in helium buffer gas at a pressure of 0.35 +/- 0.01 Torr. Measurements were taken with an inductively-coupled plasma/selected-ion flow tube (ICP/SIFT) tandem mass spectrometer and a novel electrospray ion source/ion selection quadrupole/selected-ion flow tube/triple quadrupole (ESI/qQ/SIFT/QqQ) mass spectrometer. All three alkaline-earth metal oxide ions exclusively abstract a H-atom from the three hydrides with rate coefficients > 1 x 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). Formation of metal hydroxide ion was followed by sequential addition of water or ammonia, but not methane. Density functional calculations have provided potential energy surfaces for the X-H bond activations leading to H-atom abstraction as well as those for O-atom transfer and H(2)O elimination (with ammonia and methane). A comparison of experimental and theoretical isotope effects points toward a mechanism involving the direct atom transfer from XH and XD to O in MO (+)via a three-centered transition structure. PMID:19588017

  19. Ion mobility studies of electronically excited States of atomic transition metal cations: development of an ion mobility source for guided ion beam experiments.

    PubMed

    Iceman, Christopher; Rue, Chad; Moision, Robert M; Chatterjee, Barun K; Armentrout, P B

    2007-07-01

    The design of an ion mobility source developed to couple to a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer is presented. In these exploratory studies, metal ions are created continuously by electron ionization of the volatile hexacarbonyls of the three group 6 transition metals. These ions are focused into a linear hexapole ion trap, which collects the ions and then creates high intensity pulses of ions, avoiding excessive ion losses resulting from the low duty cycle of pulsed operation. The ion pulses are injected into a six-ring drift cell filled with helium where ions having different electronic configurations can separate because they have different ion mobilities. Such separation is observed for chromium ions and compares favorably with the pioneering work of Kemper and Bowers (J. Phys. Chem.1991, 95, 5134). The results are then extended to Mo(+) and W(+), which also show efficient configuration separation. The source conditions needed for high intensities and good configuration separation are discussed in detail and suggestions for further improvements are also provided.

  20. Innate cation sensitivity in a semiconducting polymer.

    PubMed

    Althagafi, Talal M; Algarni, Saud A; Grell, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Water-gated organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) using the hole transporting semiconducting polymer, poly(2,5-bis(3-hexadecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene) (PBTTT), show an innate response of their threshold voltage to the addition of divalent metal cations to the gating water, without deliberately introducing an ion-sensitive component. A similar threshold response is shown for several divalent cations, but is absent for monovalent cations. Response is absent for transistors using the inorganic semiconductor ZnO, or the similar organic semiconductor poly(3-hexylthiophene) (rrP3HT), instead of PBTTT. We assign innate cation sensitivity to residues of the organometallic Pd(0) complex used as catalyst in PBTTT synthesis which bears strong resemblance to typical metal chelating agents. Organometallic Pd(0) residues are absent from ZnO, and also from rrP3HT which is polymerised with a different type of catalyst. However, when Pd(0) complex is deliberately added to rrP3HT casting solutions, resulting OTFTs also display threshold response to a divalent cation. PMID:27343580

  1. Method for the chromatographic separation of cations from aqueous samples

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Chiarizia, Renato; Dietz, Mark L.

    1997-01-01

    An extraction chromatographic material for extracting metal cations from a iquid stream. The extraction chromatographic material is prepared by adsorbing a diesterified methanediphosphonic acid on an inert particulate support.

  2. Method for the chromatographic separation of cations from aqueous samples

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Chiarizia, R.; Dietz, M.L.

    1997-07-29

    An extraction chromatographic material is described for extracting metal cations from a liquid stream. The extraction chromatographic material is prepared by adsorbing a diesterified methanediphosphonic acid on an inert particulate support. 7 figs.

  3. Method for the chromatographic separation of cations from aqueous samples

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Chiarizia, R.; Dietz, M.L.

    1998-12-22

    An extraction chromatographic material is described for extracting metal cations from a liquid stream. The extraction chromatographic material is prepared by adsorbing a diesterified methane-diphosphonic acid on an inert particulate support. 7 figs.

  4. Method for the chromatographic separation of cations from aqueous samples

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Chiarizia, Renato; Dietz, Mark L.

    1998-12-22

    An extraction chromatographic material for extracting metal cations from a liquid stream. The extraction chromatographic material is prepared by adsorbing a diesterified methanediphosphonic acid on an inert particulate support.

  5. Modelling exchange kinetics of copper at the water-aquatic moss (Fontinalis antipyretica) interface: influence of water cationic composition (Ca, Mg, Na and pH).

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Daniel; Ciffroy, Philippe; Tusseau-Vuillemin, Marie-Hélène; Garnier, Cédric; Garnier, Jean-Marie

    2009-02-01

    The present study investigated the effect of water cationic composition (Ca, Mg, Na, pH) on the bioaccumulation and elimination rates of copper by an aquatic moss (Fontinalis antipyretica), under laboratory conditions. For this purpose, mosses were exposed to copper at an environmentally relevant and usually non-toxic concentration (5 microg L(-1)) in natural waters where cationic composition and concentrations were varied. To describe copper bioaccumulation by aquatic mosses, a two-compartment model was the first-order kinetics, was developed and calibrated under a wide range of water cationic composition. Bioaccumulation rates of Cu in mosses were significantly reduced as the concentrations of competitive cations in solution increased. Hence, in hard-water, Ca and Mg cations play a protective role as they compete with Cu2+ ions for the absorption on transport sites at the organism-water interface. Based on the relationships between each major cation concentration and the exchange kinetics on mosses, the binding constants (K(Ci)(BL)) of each competing cations to the biological surfaces were derived. Using the present cationic-dependent kinetic model, it is now feasible to incorporate water cationic composition in the (re)interpretation of bryophytes contamination levels and in the (re)definition of Water Quality Criteria (WQC) as illustrated through two selected examples of biomonitoring programmes. In the framework of future national water quality guidelines revisions, a such flexible and mechanistic biomonitoring tool (integrating the protective effects of competing cations) may greatly improve the ability of regulators to derive site-specific Cu (metal) guidelines for protecting aquatic biota, while limiting the use of conservative assumptions. PMID:19042004

  6. In vitro analysis of the wear, wear debris and biological activity of surface-engineered coatings for use in metal-on-metal total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Williams, S; Tipper, J L; Ingham, E; Stone, M H; Fisher, J

    2003-01-01

    Extremely low wear rates have been reported for metal-on-metal total hip replacements, but concerns remain about the effects of metal ion release, dissolution rates and toxicity. Surface-engineered coatings have the potential to improve wear resistance and reduce the biological activity of the wear debris produced. The aim of this study was to examine the wear and wear debris generation from surface-engineered coatings: titanium nitride (TiN), chromium nitride (CrN) and chromium carbon nitride (CrCN) applied to a cobalt-chrome alloy (CoCr) substrate. The coatings were articulated against themselves in a simple geometry model. The wear particles generated were characterized and the cytotoxic effect on U937 macrophages and L929 fibroblasts assessed. The CrN and CrCN coatings showed a decrease in wear compared to the CoCr bearings and produced small (less than 40 nm in length) wear particles. The wear particles released from the surface engineered bearings also showed a decreased cytotoxic effect on cells compared to the CoCr alloy debris. The reduced wear volumes coupled with the reduced cytotoxicity per unit volume of wear indicate the potential for the clinical application of this technology.

  7. Square-antiprismatic eight-coordinate complexes of divalent first-row transition metal cations: a density functional theory exploration of the electronic-structural landscape.

    PubMed

    Conradie, Jeanet; Patra, Ashis K; Harrop, Todd C; Ghosh, Abhik

    2015-02-16

    Density functional theory (in the form of the PW91, BP86, OLYP, and B3LYP exchange-correlation functionals) has been used to map out the low-energy states of a series of eight-coordinate square-antiprismatic (D2d) first-row transition metal complexes, involving Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II), along with a pair of tetradentate N4 ligands. Of the five complexes, the Mn(II) and Fe(II) complexes have been synthesized and characterized structurally and spectroscopically, whereas the other three are as yet unknown. Each N4 ligand consists of a pair of terminal imidazole units linked by an o-phenylenediimine unit. The imidazole units are the strongest ligands in these complexes and dictate the spatial disposition of the metal three-dimensional orbitals. Thus, the dx(2)-y(2) orbital, whose lobes point directly at the coordinating imidazole nitrogens, has the highest orbital energy among the five d orbitals, whereas the dxy orbital has the lowest orbital energy. In general, the following orbital ordering (in order of increasing orbital energy) was found to be operative: dxy < dxz = dyz ≤ dz(2) < dx(2)-y(2). The square-antiprism geometry does not lead to large energy gaps between the d orbitals, which leads to an S = 2 ground state for the Fe(II) complex. Nevertheless, the dxy orbital has significantly lower energy relative to that of the dxz and dyz orbitals. Accordingly, the ground state of the Fe(II) complex corresponds unambiguously to a dxy(2)dxz(1)dyz(1)dz(2)(1)dx(2)-y(2)(1) electronic configuration. Unsurprisingly, the Mn(II) complex has an S = 5/2 ground state and no low-energy d-d excited states within 1.0 eV of the ground state. The Co(II) complex, on the other hand, has both a low-lying S = 1/2 state and multiple low-energy S = 3/2 states. Very long metal-nitrogen bonds are predicted for the Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes; these bonds may be too fragile to survive in solution or in the solid state, and the complexes may therefore not be isolable

  8. Square-antiprismatic eight-coordinate complexes of divalent first-row transition metal cations: a density functional theory exploration of the electronic-structural landscape.

    PubMed

    Conradie, Jeanet; Patra, Ashis K; Harrop, Todd C; Ghosh, Abhik

    2015-02-16

    Density functional theory (in the form of the PW91, BP86, OLYP, and B3LYP exchange-correlation functionals) has been used to map out the low-energy states of a series of eight-coordinate square-antiprismatic (D2d) first-row transition metal complexes, involving Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II), along with a pair of tetradentate N4 ligands. Of the five complexes, the Mn(II) and Fe(II) complexes have been synthesized and characterized structurally and spectroscopically, whereas the other three are as yet unknown. Each N4 ligand consists of a pair of terminal imidazole units linked by an o-phenylenediimine unit. The imidazole units are the strongest ligands in these complexes and dictate the spatial disposition of the metal three-dimensional orbitals. Thus, the dx(2)-y(2) orbital, whose lobes point directly at the coordinating imidazole nitrogens, has the highest orbital energy among the five d orbitals, whereas the dxy orbital has the lowest orbital energy. In general, the following orbital ordering (in order of increasing orbital energy) was found to be operative: dxy < dxz = dyz ≤ dz(2) < dx(2)-y(2). The square-antiprism geometry does not lead to large energy gaps between the d orbitals, which leads to an S = 2 ground state for the Fe(II) complex. Nevertheless, the dxy orbital has significantly lower energy relative to that of the dxz and dyz orbitals. Accordingly, the ground state of the Fe(II) complex corresponds unambiguously to a dxy(2)dxz(1)dyz(1)dz(2)(1)dx(2)-y(2)(1) electronic configuration. Unsurprisingly, the Mn(II) complex has an S = 5/2 ground state and no low-energy d-d excited states within 1.0 eV of the ground state. The Co(II) complex, on the other hand, has both a low-lying S = 1/2 state and multiple low-energy S = 3/2 states. Very long metal-nitrogen bonds are predicted for the Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes; these bonds may be too fragile to survive in solution or in the solid state, and the complexes may therefore not be isolable

  9. A study of metal distribution from lignite fuels using trees as biological monitors.

    PubMed

    Sawidis, T; Chettri, M K; Papaioannou, A; Zachariadis, G; Stratis, J

    2001-01-01

    Concentrations of five metals (Cd, Cu, Mn, Fe, Zn) were determined in tree leaves collected from an area with large coal-fired plants in Ptolemais, Macedonia, Greece. The analyses were carried out with flame atomic absorption spectroscopy. Mean heavy metal content in the tree leaves is, in descending order, Fe>Mn>Zn>Cu>Cd. In Populus nigra and Salix babylonica the dense piled leaves and the widespread root system are the reasons for high heavy metal uptake. Conifer trees Pinus nigra and Juniperus arizona, which have a rough leaf surface, also had elevated concentrations. Leaves with a smooth surface were less contaminated. The presence of one metal within leaf cells may reduce the uptake or toxicity of other metals. Fruits accumulated less heavy metal than the corresponding leaves. The most damaged areas are those in the direct vicinity of the coal power plants, and the rate of damage caused in the environment is affected by the main wind direction. All sampling sites in Ptolemais basin are generally more or less polluted when compared with the control site.

  10. The detection of Sr sputtered from metallic and biological matrices by double-resonant photoionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandeweert, Erno; Bastiaansen, Jeroen; Philipsen, Vicky; Lievens, Peter; Silverans, Roger E.; Telle, Helmut H.

    2001-08-01

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) was used to obtain isotope and state selective information on Sr sputtered from metallic and biological matrices. In exploratory experiments Sr atoms were sputtered from bulk metal upon impact of 15 keV Ar+ ions, and probed by stepwise resonant ionization using two-color schemes. Efficient ionization schemes were selected to excite ground-state originating atoms into autoionizing states. Cross sections for photoionization were found to be up to the order of 10-15 cm2. The Sr content in bone fragments was probed utilizing these schemes. Even with minimal sample preparation, a detection limit of ±50ppm Sr in the hydroxiapatite-matrix of the bone was demonstrated, with isotope specificity. While this is inferior to detection limits normally associated with RIMS, these preliminary experiments were carried out for sputtering from untreated, non-conducting matrix materials.

  11. Synthesis, characterization and biological activity of transition metal complexes with Schiff bases derived from 2-nitrobenzaldehyde with glycine and methionine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bibhesh K.; Rajour, Hemant K.; Prakash, Anant

    Schiff bases derived from 2-nitrobenzaldehyde with amino acids (glycine, methionine) and their Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes have been synthesized and characterized by various physico-chemical techniques. From spectral studies, it has been concluded that the ligands acts as bidentate molecule, coordinates metal through azomethine nitrogen and carboxylate oxygen. Mass spectrum explains the successive degradation of the molecular species in solution and justifies ML2 complexes. X-ray powder diffraction helps to determine the cell parameters of the complexes. Molecular structure of the complexes has been optimized by MM2 calculations and suggests a square planar geometry. The ligands and their metal complexes have been tested in vitro against Streptococcus, Staph, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherchia coli bacteria in order to assess their antibacterial potential. The results indicate that the biological activity increases on complexation.

  12. [Biological monitoring of exposure to carcinogenic metallic elements and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in four secondary metallurgical sectors].

    PubMed

    De Palma, G; Corsini, A; Gilberti, E; Gabusi, V; Tagliani, G; Tomasi, C; Gandellini, A; Apostoli, P

    2012-01-01

    This cross-sectional study was aimed at evaluating in a large sample of male foundry workers the current exposure levels to carcinogenic compounds, including metallic elements [arsenic (As), beryllium (Be), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni)] and aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons (PAH) by a biological monitoring approach, using validated biomarkers of exposure. Workers were recruited from 15 aluminium, copper alloy, electric steel and cast iron foundries and provided an end-of-shift urine sample to determine urinary concentrations of As, Be, Cd, Cr, Ni and 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP). Metallic elements were determined either by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (Be, Cd and Cr) or by atomic absorption spectrometry (As, Ni), whereas 1-OHP was determined by high pressure liquid chromatography with fluorimetric detection. Most of the determinations fell within the laboratory's reference values. Age and lifestyle habits (smoking, alcohol, diet) played a significant interfering role.

  13. Functional characterisation of metal(loid) processes in planta through the integration of synchrotron techniques and plant molecular biology

    PubMed Central

    Donner, Erica; Punshon, Tracy; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Lombi, Enzo

    2013-01-01

    Functional characterisation of the genes regulating metal(loid) homeostasis in plants is a major focus of crop biofortification, phytoremediation, and food security research. This paper focuses on the potential for advancing plant metal(loid) research by combining molecular biology and synchrotron-based techniques. Recent advances in x-ray focussing optics and fluorescence detection have greatly improved the potential of synchrotron techniques for plant science research, allowing metal(loids) to be imaged in vivo in hydrated plant tissues at sub-micron resolution. Laterally resolved metal(loid) speciation can also be determined. By using molecular techniques to probe the location of gene expression and protein localisation and combining it with this synchrotron-derived data, functional information can be effectively and efficiently assigned to specific genes. This paper provides a review of the state of the art in this field, and provides examples as to how synchrotron-based methods can be combined with molecular techniques to facilitate functional characterisation of genes in planta. PMID:22200921

  14. Characterization of harbor sediments from the English Channel: assessment of heavy metal enrichment, biological effect and mobility.

    PubMed

    Hamdoun, H; Van-Veen, E; Basset, B; Lemoine, M; Coggan, J; Leleyter, L; Baraud, F

    2015-01-15

    For a full assessment of the environmental risk posed by dredged sediments not only the anthropogenic enrichment of contaminants, but also their mobility and biological impact should be considered. This study reports on the enrichment factor (EF), mobility, and Adverse Effect Index (AEI) of metals and metalloids in nine dredged sediments. Significant enrichment of As, Cd, Pb and Zn with respect to background values is detected, and calculated AEI values for these elements suggest that it is possible that a corresponding biological effect may be observed. Correlation coefficients also reveal a link between mobility in HCl and enrichment for Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb and Zn, however As and Cu do not display such a link, possibly suggesting that the source of contamination for these elements is less recent. Mobility and enrichment are two parameters which are often studied separately; however this paper shows that in some cases strong correlations occur.

  15. Bioavailability of biologically sequestered cadmium and the implications of metal detoxification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, W.G.; Lopez, G.R.

    1997-01-01

    The deposit-feeding oligochaete Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri possesses metallothionein-like proteins and metal-rich granules for storing and detoxifying cadmium (Cd). In this study we investigated the bioavailability of Cd sequestered within this oligochaete by conducting feeding experiments with 109Cd-labeled oligochaetes and the omnivorous grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio. We also make predictions on Cd trophic transfer based on oligochaete subcellular Cd distributions and absorption efficiencies of Cd by shrimp Cytosol [including metallothionein-like proteins and other proteins) and a debris fraction (including metal-rich granules and tissue fragments) isolated from homogenized 109Cd-labeled oligochaetes were embedded in gelatin and fed to shrimp. The 109Cd absorption efficiencies of shrimp fed these subcellular fractions were 84.8 and 48.6%, respectively, and were significantly different (p < 0.001), indicating that 109Cd bound in these fractions was not equally available to a predator. Mass balance equations demonstrate that shrimp fed whole worms absorb 61.5% of the ingested 109Cd, an absorption efficiency similar to that obtained experimentally (57.1%). Furthermore, the majority of the absorbed 109Cd comes from the fraction containing metallothionein-like proteins (i.e. cytosol). 109Cd absorbed from the debris fraction probably comes from the digestion of tissue fragments, rather than metal-rich granules. The ecological significance of these findings is that prey detoxification mechanisms may mediate the bioreduction or bioaccumulation of toxic metals along fond chains by altering metal bioavailability. Another important finding is that trophic transfer of metal can be predicted based on the subcellular metal distribution of prey.

  16. Spectroscopic characterization of metal complexes of novel Schiff base. Synthesis, thermal and biological activity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, M. M.; Mohamed, Gehad G.; Ibrahim, Amr A.

    2009-07-01

    Novel Schiff base (HL) ligand is prepared via condensation of 4-aminoantipyrine and 2-aminobenzoic acid. The ligand is characterized based on elemental analysis, mass, IR and 1H NMR spectra. Metal complexes are reported and characterized based on elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR, solid reflectance, magnetic moment, molar conductance and thermal analyses (TGA, DrTGA and DTA). The molar conductance data reveal that all the metal chelates are non-electrolytes. IR spectra show that HL is coordinated to the metal ions in a uninegatively tridentate manner with NNO donor sites of the azomethine N, amino N and deprotonated caroxylic-O. From the magnetic and solid reflectance spectra, it is found that the geometrical structures of these complexes are octahedral. The thermal behaviour of these chelates shows that the hydrated complexes losses water molecules of hydration in the first step followed immediately by decomposition of the anions and ligand molecules in the subsequent steps. The activation thermodynamic parameters, such as, E*, ΔH*, ΔS* and ΔG* are calculated from the DrTG curves using Coats-Redfern method. The synthesized ligands, in comparison to their metal complexes also were screened for their antibacterial activity against bacterial species, Escherichia Coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus Pyogones and Fungi (Candida). The activity data show that the metal complexes to be more potent/antibacterial than the parent Shciff base ligand against one or more bacterial species.

  17. Role of divalent metal cations in ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by the hepatitis C virus NS3 helicase: Magnesium provides a bridge for ATP to fuel unwinding

    PubMed Central

    Frick, David N.; Banik, Sukalyani; Rypma, Ryan S.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the role of magnesium ions in coupling ATP hydrolysis to the nucleic acid unwinding catalyzed by the NS3 protein encoded by the hepatitis C virus. Analyses of steady-state ATP hydrolysis rates at various RNA and magnesium concentrations were used to determine values for the 15 dissociation constants describing the formation of a productive enzyme-metal-ATP-RNA complex and the 4 rate constants describing hydrolysis of ATP by the possible enzyme-ATP complexes. These values coupled with direct binding studies, specificity studies and analyses of site-directed mutants reveal only one ATP binding site on HCV helicase centered on the catalytic base Glu291. An adjacent residue, Asp290, binds a magnesium ion that forms a bridge to ATP, reorienting the nucleotide in the active site. RNA stimulates hydrolysis while decreasing the affinity of the enzyme for ATP, magnesium, and MgATP. The binding scheme described here explains the unusual regulation of the enzyme by ATP that has been reported previously. Binding of either free magnesium or free ATP to HCV helicase competes with MgATP, the true fuel for helicase movements, and leads to slower hydrolysis and nucleic acid unwinding. PMID:17084859

  18. Synthesis, spectral studies and biological evaluation of 2-aminonicotinic acid metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawaz, Muhammad; Abbasi, Muhammad Waseem; Hisaindee, Soleiman; Zaki, Muhammad Javed; Abbas, Hira Fatima; Mengting, Hu; Ahmed, M. Arif

    2016-05-01

    We synthesized 2-aminonicotinic acid (2-ANA) complexes with metals such as Co(II), Fe(III), Ni(II), Mn(II), Zn(II), Ag(I),Cr(III), Cd(II) and Cu(II) in aqueous media. The complexes were characterized and elucidated using FT-IR, UV-Vis, a fluorescence spectrophotometer and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). TGA data showed that the stoichiometry of complexes was 1:2 metal/ligand except for Ag(I) and Mn(II) where the ratio was 1:1. The metal complexes showed varied antibacterial, fungicidal and nematicidal activities. The silver and zinc complexes showed highest activity against Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus licheniformis respectively. Fusarium oxysporum was highly susceptible to nickel and copper complexes whereas Macrophomina phaseolina was completely inert to the complexes. The silver and cadmium complexes were effective against the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne javanica.

  19. Metal-based biologically active azoles and β-lactams derived from sulfa drugs.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Hossein Pasha; Hadi, Jabbar S; Almayah, Abdulelah A; Bolandnazar, Zeinab; Swadi, Ali G; Ebrahimi, Amirpasha

    2016-03-01

    Metal complexes of Schiff bases derived from sulfamethoxazole (SMZ) and sulfathiazole (STZ), converted to their β-lactam derivatives have been synthesized and experimentally characterized by elemental analysis, spectral (IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, and EI-mass), molar conductance measurements and thermal analysis techniques. The structural and electronic properties of the studied molecules were investigated theoretically by performing density functional theory (DFT) to access reliable results to the experimental values. The spectral and thermal analysis reveals that the Schiff bases act as bidentate ligands via the coordination of azomethine nitrogen to metal ions as well as the proton displacement from the phenolic group through the metal ions; therefore, Cu complexes can attain the square planner arrangement and Zn complexes have a distorted tetrahedral structure. The thermogravimetric (TG/DTG) analyses confirm high stability for all complexes followed by thermal decomposition in different steps. In addition, the antibacterial activities of synthesized compounds have been screened in vitro against various pathogenic bacterial species. Inspection of the results revealed that all newly synthesized complexes individually exhibit varying degrees of inhibitory effects on the growth of the tested bacterial species, therefore, they may be considered as drug candidates for bacterial pathogens. The free Schiff base ligands (1-2) exhibited a broad spectrum antibacterial activity against Gram negative Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Proteus spp., and Gram positive Staphylococcus aureus bacterial strains. The results also indicated that the β-lactam derivatives (3-4) have high antibacterial activities on Gram positive bacteria as well as the metal complexes (5-8), particularly Zn complexes, have a significant activity against all Gram negative bacterial strains. It has been shown that the metal complexes have significantly higher activity than corresponding

  20. Cationically polymerizable monomers derived from renewable sources

    SciTech Connect

    Crivello, J.V.

    1992-10-01

    The objectives of this project are to design and synthesize novel monomers which orginate from renewable biological sources and to carry out their rapid, efficient, pollution-free and energy efficient cationic polymerization to useful products under the influence of ultraviolet light or heat. A summary of the results of the past year's research on cationically polymerizable monomers derived from renewable sources is presented. Three major areas of investigation corresponding to the different classes of naturally occurring starting materials were investigated; epoxidized terpenes and natural rubber and vinyl ethers from alcohols and carbohydrates.

  1. Gas-phase ion-molecule reactions of metal-carbide cations MCn+ (M=Y and La; n=2, 4, and 6) with benzene and cyclohexane investigated by FTICR mass spectrometry and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Dinca, Adriana; Fisher, Keith J; Smith, Derek R; Willett, Gary D

    2005-01-13

    Yttrium- and lanthanum-carbide cluster cations YC(n)(+) and LaC(n)(+) (n = 2, 4, and 6) are generated by laser ablation of carbonaceous material containing Y(2)O(3) or La(2)O(3). YC(2)(+), YC(4)(+), LaC(2)(+), LaC(4)(+), and LaC(6)(+) are selected to undergo gas-phase ion-molecule reactions with benzene and cyclohexane. The FTICR mass spectrometry study shows that the reactions of YC(2)(+) and LaC(2)(+) with benzene produce three main series of cluster ions. They are in the form of M(C(6)H(4))(C(6)H(6))(n)(+), M(C(8)H(4))(C(6)H(6))(n)(+), and M(C(8)H(6))(C(6)H(6))(m)(+) (M = Y and La; n = 0-3; m = 0-2). For YC(4)(+), LaC(4)(+), and LaC(6)(+), benzene addition products in the form of MC(n)(C(6)H(6))(m)(+) (M = Y and La; n = 4, 6; m = 1, 2) are observed. In the reaction with cyclohexane, all the metal-carbide cluster ions are observed to form metal-benzene complexes M(C(6)H(6))(n)(+) (M = Y and La; n= 1-3). Collision-induced-dissociation experiments were performed on the major reaction product ions, and the different levels of energy required for the fragmentation suggest that both covalent bonding and weak electrostatic interaction exist in these organometallic complexes. Several major product ions were calculated using DFT theory, and their ground-state geometries and energies were obtained.

  2. Syntheses and characterization of energetic compounds constructed from alkaline earth metal cations (Sr and Ba) and 1,2-bis(tetrazol-5-yl)ethane

    SciTech Connect

    Xia Zhengqiang; Chen Sanping; Wei Qing; Qiao Chengfang

    2011-07-15

    Two new energetic compounds, [M(BTE)(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}]{sub n} (M=Sr(1), Ba(2)) [H{sub 2}BTE=1,2-bis(tetrazol-5-yl)ethane], have been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that they are isomorphous and exhibit 2D (4,4) net framework, generated by 4-connected Sr{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10}/Ba{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10} SBUs linked up by two independent binding modes of H{sub 2}BTE, and the resulting 2D structure is interconnected by hydrogen-bond and strong face to face {pi}-{pi} stacking interactions between two tetrazole rings to lead to a 3D supramolecular architecture. DSC measurements show that they have significant catalytic effects on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate. Moreover, the photoluminescence properties, thermogravimetric analyses, and flame colors of the as-prepared compounds are also investigated in this paper. - Graphical abstract: Two novel 2D isomorphous alkaline earth metal complexes were assembled by 4-connected Sr{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10}/Ba{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10} SBUs and two independent binding modes of H{sub 2}BTE ligands, and the catalytic performances toward thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate and photoluminescent properties of them were investigated. Highlights: > Two novel alkaline earth energetic coordination polymers have been prepared.{yields} Both structures are layered based on 4-connected Sr{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10}/Ba{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10} SBUs and two distinct H{sub 2}BTE coordination modes.{yields} The dehydrated products of the compounds possess good thermostability and significant catalytic effects on thermal decomposition of AP.

  3. Factors involved in heavy metal poisoning.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, T W

    1977-04-01

    The heavy metals include at least 40 elements but cadmium, lead, and mercury have been most extensively studied. The biological properties of heavy metals are discussed in terms of three important characteristics: the ability to form, irreversibly, complexes and chelates with organic ligands; the properties to form organic-metallic bonds; and the potential to undergo oxidation-reduction reactions. The formation of complexes and chelates within the body is shown to influence greatly the dynamics of transport, distribution, and excretion of several important metal cations. The excretion of uranium is influenced by acid-base balance in the body because uranium forms complexes with bicarbonate anions that are filtered by the kidneys. The biliary excretion of methylmercury depends on the formation of small molecular weight complexes with sulfur-containing amiono acids and the peptides in the liver. The degree of enterohepatic recirculation of a variety of heavy metals appears to depend on the chemical nature of the bilary complexes. The oxidation of elemental to divalent ionic mercury is the crurial step in the retention and tissue deposition of inhaled mercury vapor. That the oxidation process is, at least in part, catalyzed by the enzyme, catalase, explains the effects of ethanol, aminotriazole and the state of acatalasemia on the metabolism of inhaled vapor in man and animals. The formation of covalent bonds between metal cations and the carbon atom usually greatly modifies the biological properties of the metal. Methylarsenic and methylmercury compounds both differ from the inorganic forms in accumulation in animals.

  4. A survey of the concentrations of eleven metals in vaccines, allergenic extracts, toxoids, blood, blood derivatives and other biological products.

    PubMed

    May, J C; Rains, T C; Maienthal, F J; Biddle, G N; Progar, J J

    1986-10-01

    Approximately 85 samples of injectable biological products regulated by the Center for Drugs and Biologics of the United States Food and Drug Administration were surveyed for the presence of 11 elements, namely aluminum, arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, selenium, thallium and zinc, by flame and flameless methods of atomic absorption spectrometry and flame emission spectrometry. The range of products tested included whole blood, red cells, plasma, normal serum albumin, antihemophilic factor, and other products derived from blood; allergenic extracts including honey bee venom and house dust allergenic extracts; vaccines such as measles virus vaccine and typhoid vaccine; and tetanus toxoid. The metal concentrations found in the majority of these products were low or undetectable. The metal levels varied from manufacturer to manufacturer, product and lot-to-lot of the same manufacturer's products. House dust allergenic extracts had the highest concentrations of arsenic (2.4 ppm), cadmium (0.28 ppm), chromium (0.6 ppm) and lead (1.5 ppm) found in the study. A high zinc concentration (24 ppm) in an immune serum globulin was attributed to the zinc-containing rubber stopper in contact with the product. A range of 0.36-3.30 ppm aluminum was found for seven 25% normal serum albumin samples from seven manufacturers. Values of 8.2, 17 and 18 ppm aluminum were found in one manufacturer's 25% normal serum albumin. These aluminum values appeared to be the result of an anomaly in this manufacturer's production that has not been repeated to date.

  5. Harmful metals concentration in sediments and fishes of biologically important estuary, Bay of Bengal

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Study on the accumulation level of heavy metals was conducted on sediment and fishes from estuaries of Bay of Bengal. Heavy metals were determined by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometer (ICP-OES) and the results were compared to permissible limits of WHO/USEPA. The accumulation patterns of Fe and Cd were found predominantly in all samples tested when correlated with other metals. It was found that the concentration of metals such as Cd (3.90 ± 0.25 μg/g), Cr (0.44 ± 0.05 μg/g), Ni (0.33 ± 0.01 μg/g), and Mn (1.1 ± 0.11 μg/g) were exceeding the permissible limit, whereas Fe, Co, Pb, and Zn were found within the limit of WHO/USEPA at station 1. In station 2, Cd (16.5 ± 0.4 μg/g), Mn (0.67 ± 0.11 μg/g), and Cr (0.80 ± 0.01 μg/g) were exceeding the permissible limit, whereas Fe, Co, Pb, Ni, and Zn were found within the limit. This study emphasizes that Cd and Mn levels in both stations, are far higher than the acceptable values set by WHO/USEPA and may therefore present human health hazards. It is therefore mandatory to carry out extensive research to evaluate the possible environmental risk factors in the vicinity of both estuaries with respect to heavy metals. PMID:24355110

  6. Cations bind only weakly to amides in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Okur, Halil I; Kherb, Jaibir; Cremer, Paul S

    2013-04-01

    We investigated salt interactions with butyramide as a simple mimic of cation interactions with protein backbones. The experiments were performed in aqueous metal chloride solutions using two spectroscopic techniques. In the first, which provided information about contact pair formation, the response of the amide I band to the nature and concentration of salt was monitored in bulk aqueous solutions via attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. It was found that molar concentrations of well-hydrated metal cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Li(+)) led to the rise of a peak assigned to metal cation-bound amides (1645 cm(-1)) and a decrease in the peak associated with purely water-bound amides (1620 cm(-1)). In a complementary set of experiments, the effect of cation identity and concentration was investigated at the air/butyramide/water interface via vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy. In these studies, metal ion-amide binding led to the ordering of the adjacent water layer. Such experiments were sensitive to the interfacial partitioning of cations in either a contact pair with the amide or as a solvent separated pair. In both experiments, the ordering of the interactions of the cations was: Ca(2+) > Mg(2+) > Li(+) > Na(+) ≈ K(+). This is a direct cationic Hofmeister series. Even for Ca(2+), however, the apparent equilibrium dissociation constant of the cation with the amide carbonyl oxygen was no tighter than ∼8.5 M. For Na(+) and K(+), no evidence was found for any binding. As such, the interactions of metal cations with amides are far weaker than the analogous binding of weakly hydrated anions.

  7. Municipal waste incinerators: air and biological monitoring of workers for exposure to particles, metals, and organic compounds

    PubMed Central

    Maitre, A; Collot-Fertey, D; Anzivino, L; Marques, M; Hours, M; Stoklov, M

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate occupational exposure to toxic pollutants at municipal waste incinerators (MWIs). Methods: Twenty nine male subjects working near the furnaces in two MWIs, and 17 subjects not occupationally exposed to combustion generated pollutants were studied. Individual air samples were taken throughout the shift; urine samples were collected before and after. Stationary air samples were taken near potential sources of emission. Results: Occupational exposure did not result in the infringement of any occupational threshold limit value. Atmospheric exposure levels to particles and metals were 10–100 times higher in MWIs than at the control site. The main sources were cleaning operations for particles, and residue transfer and disposal operations for metals. MWI workers were not exposed to higher levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons than workers who are routinely in contact with vehicle exhaust. The air concentrations of volatile organic compounds and aldehydes were low and did not appear to pose any significant threat to human health. Only the measurement of chlorinated hydrocarbon levels would seem to be a reliable marker for the combustion of plastics. Urine metal levels were significantly higher at plant 1 than at plant 2 because of high levels of pollutants emanating from one old furnace. Conclusion: While biological monitoring is an easy way of acquiring data on long term personal exposure, air monitoring remains the only method that makes it possible to identify the primary sources of pollutant emission which need to be controlled if occupational exposure and environmental pollution are to be reduced. PMID:12883016

  8. Redox potential tuning by redox-inactive cations in nature's water oxidizing catalyst and synthetic analogues.

    PubMed

    Krewald, Vera; Neese, Frank; Pantazis, Dimitrios A

    2016-04-28

    The redox potential of synthetic oligonuclear transition metal complexes has been shown to correlate with the Lewis acidity of a redox-inactive cation connected to the redox-active transition metals of the cluster via oxo or hydroxo bridges. Such heterometallic clusters are important cofactors in many metalloenzymes, where it is speculated that the redox-inactive constituent ion of the cluster serves to optimize its redox potential for electron transfer or catalysis. A principal example is the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II of natural photosynthesis, a Mn4CaO5 cofactor that oxidizes water into dioxygen, protons and electrons. Calcium is critical for catalytic function, but its precise role is not yet established. In analogy to synthetic complexes it has been suggested that Ca(2+) fine-tunes the redox potential of the manganese cluster. Here we evaluate this hypothesis by computing the relative redox potentials of substituted derivatives of the oxygen-evolving complex with the cations Sr(2+), Gd(3+), Cd(2+), Zn(2+), Mg(2+), Sc(3+), Na(+) and Y(3+) for two sequential transitions of its catalytic cycle. The theoretical approach is validated with a series of experimentally well-characterized Mn3AO4 cubane complexes that are structural mimics of the enzymatic cluster. Our results reproduce perfectly the experimentally observed correlation between the redox potential and the Lewis acidities of redox-inactive cations for the synthetic complexes. However, it is conclusively demonstrated that this correlation does not hold for the oxygen evolving complex. In the enzyme the redox potential of the cluster only responds to the charge of the redox-inactive cations and remains otherwise insensitive to their precise identity, precluding redox-tuning of the metal cluster as a primary role for Ca(2+) in biological water oxidation.

  9. Synthesis, structural characterization and biological studies of some nalidixic acid-metal complexes: Metalloantibiotic complexes of some divalent and trivalent metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Khodir, Fatima A. I.; Refat, Moamen S.

    2015-08-01

    This article describes the synthesis, characterization, computational and biological assessments of some divalent and trivalent metal (Ca(II), Fe(III), Pd(II) and Au(III)) complexes of nalidixic acid (nixH). The structures of these complexes were assigned using elemental analyses and spectral measurements e.g., IR, Raman, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and electronic techniques. These results indicated that, nalidixic acid reacts as a bidentate ligand bound to the metal ion through the oxygen atoms of carbonyl and carboxylate groups. The molar conductance measurements of the complexes in DMSO correspond to be non-electrolyte nature. Thus, these complexes may be formulated as [Ca(nix)(Cl)(H2O)3]. H2O, [Fe(nix)(Cl)2(H2O)2]·3H2O, [Pd(nix)(Cl)(H2O)] and [Au(nix)(Cl)2]. Base on the Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzeger methods, the kinetic thermodynamic parameters (E∗, ΔS∗, ΔH∗ and ΔG∗) of the thermal decomposition reactions have been calculated from thermogravimetric curves of TG and DTG. The nano-scale range of the nalidixic acid complexes have been discussed using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyzer. The computational studies for the synthesized complexes have been estimated.

  10. Synthesis, spectral, thermal and antimicrobial studies of some new tri metallic biologically active ceftriaxone complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Alaa E.

    2011-01-01

    Iron, cobalt, nickel and copper complexes of ceftriaxone were prepared in 1:3 ligand:metal ratio to examine the ligating properties of the different moieties of the drug. The complexes were found to have high percentages of coordinated water molecules. The modes of bonding were discussed depending on the infrared spectral absorption peaks of the different allowed vibrations. The Nujol mull electronic absorption spectra and the magnetic moment values indicated the Oh geometry of the metal ions in the complexes. The ESR spectra of the iron, cobalt, and copper complexes were determined and discussed. The thermal behaviors of the complexes were studied by TG and DTA techniques. The antimicrobial activities of the complexes were examined and compared to that of the ceftriaxone itself.

  11. Effect of Different Metal Ions on the Biological Properties of Cefadroxil

    PubMed Central

    Auda, Sayed H.; Knütter, Ilka; Bretschneider, Beate; Brandsch, Matthias; Mrestani, Yahya; Große, Cornelia; Neubert, Reinhard H. H.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of different metal ions on the intestinal transport and the antibacterial activity of cefadroxil [(6R,7R)-7-{[(2R)-2-amino-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)acetyl]amino}-3-methyl-8-oxo-5-thia-1-azabicyclo[4.2.0]oct-2-ene-2-carboxylic acid] was investigated. The [14C]Gly-Sar uptake via PEPT1 was inhibited by Zn2+ and Cu2+ treatment in a concentration-dependent manner (Ki values 107 ± 23 and 19 ± 5 µM, respectively). Kinetic analysis showed that the Kt of Gly-Sar uptake was increased 2-fold in the presence of zinc sulphate (150 µM) whereas the Vmax value were not affected suggesting that zinc ions inhibited Gly-Sar uptake by PEPT1 in a competitively manner. Ni2+ exhibited moderate inhibitory effect, whereas Co2+, Mg2+, Al3+ ions showed no inhibitory effect on Gly-Sar uptake via PEPT1. Subsequently, we examined the effect of Zn2+ and Al3+ ions on the transepithelial transport of cefadroxil across Caco-2 cells cultured on permeable supports. The results showed that zinc ions inhibited the transepithelial flux of cefadroxil at Caco-2 cell monolayers while Al3+ ions had no effect. The interaction of cephalosporins with the metal ions could suggest negative effects of some metal ions on the clinical aspects of small intestinal peptide and drug transport. Finally, the effect of Zn2+, Cu2+ and Al3+ ions on the antibacterial activity of cefadroxil was tested. It was found that there is no significant difference between the activity of cefadroxil and the cefadroxil metal ion complexes studied against the investigated sensitive bacterial species. PMID:27713232

  12. Metal-Mediated Modulation of Streptococcal Cysteine Protease Activity and Its Biological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Chella Krishnan, Karthickeyan; Mukundan, Santhosh; Landero Figueroa, Julio A.; Caruso, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcal cysteine protease (SpeB), the major secreted protease produced by group A streptococcus (GAS), cleaves both host and bacterial proteins and contributes importantly to the pathogenesis of invasive GAS infections. Modulation of SpeB expression and/or its activity during invasive GAS infections has been shown to affect bacterial virulence and infection severity. Expression of SpeB is regulated by the GAS CovR-CovS two-component regulatory system, and we demonstrated that bacteria with mutations in the CovR-CovS two-component regulatory system are selected for during localized GAS infections and that these bacteria lack SpeB expression and exhibit a hypervirulent phenotype. Additionally, in a separate study, we showed that expression of SpeB can also be modulated by human transferrin- and/or lactoferrin-mediated iron chelation. Accordingly, the goal of this study was to investigate the possible roles of iron and other metals in modulating SpeB expression and/or activity in a manner that would potentiate bacterial virulence. Here, we report that the divalent metals zinc and copper inhibit SpeB activity at the posttranslational level. Utilizing online metal-binding site prediction servers, we identified two putative metal-binding sites in SpeB, one of which involves the catalytic-dyad residues 47Cys and 195His. Based on our findings, we propose that zinc and/or copper availability in the bacterial microenvironment can modulate the proteolytic activity of SpeB in a manner that preserves the integrity of several other virulence factors essential for bacterial survival and dissemination within the host and thereby may exacerbate the severity of invasive GAS infections. PMID:24799625

  13. Biological removal of heavy metals by sulfate reduction using a submerged packed tower

    SciTech Connect

    Neserke, G.; Figueroa, L.; Cook, N.

    1994-12-31

    The Coors Brewing Co. owns and operates two wastewater treatment plants which handle the combined waste of the City of Golden and the Brewery. The discharge permit for Coors contains very strict limits for metals. Silver and mercury are prohibited from discharge at all and copper and zinc are both at low limits. The copper and zinc limits cannot be achieved with the present plant configuration and several programs are underway to reduce the source concentrations to meet the respective limits. Most of the programs are either very expensive or unlikely to produce the needed results soon enough. One possible treatment alternative that has been described in literature is sulfate reduction leading to the generation of hydrogen sulfide. The hydrogen sulfide in turn can precipitate most divalent metals that are available, though there are limits on the precipitation process. The purpose of this research has been to investigate the use of sulfate reduction to remove metals from the effluent of the Coors` Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWTP).

  14. Spectral, biological screening of metal chelates of chalcone based Schiff bases of N-(3-aminopropyl) imidazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalanithi, M.; Rajarajan, M.; Tharmaraj, P.; Sheela, C. D.

    2012-02-01

    Tridentate chelate complexes of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) have been synthesized from the chalcone based ligands 2-[1-(3-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)propylimino)-3-(phenylallyl)]phenol( HL1), 2-[1-(3-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)propylimino)-3-p-tolylallyl]phenol( HL2), 2-[1-(3-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)propylimino)-3-4-nitrophenylallyl]phenol( HL3). Microanalytical data, UV-vis spectrophotometric method, magnetic susceptibility measurements, IR, 1H NMR, Mass, and EPR techniques were used to characterize the structure of chelates. The electronic absorption spectra and magnetic susceptibility measurements suggest a distorted square planar geometry for the copper(II) ion. The other metal complexes show distorted tetrahedral geometry. The coordination of the ligands with metal(II) ions was further confirmed by solution fluorescence spectrum. The antimicrobial activity of the ligands and metal(II) complexes against the species Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albigans and Aspergillus niger has been carried out and compared. The electrochemical behavior of copper(II) complex is studied by cyclic voltammetry.

  15. Exploring the DNA binding mode of transition metal based biologically active compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, N.; Sobha, S.

    2012-01-01

    Few novel 4-aminoantipyrine derived Schiff bases and their metal complexes were synthesized and characterized. Their structural features and other properties were deduced from the elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility and molar conductivity as well as from mass, IR, UV-vis, 1H NMR and EPR spectral studies. The binding of the complexes with CT-DNA was analyzed by electronic absorption spectroscopy, viscosity measurement, and cyclic voltammetry. The interaction of the metal complexes with DNA was also studied by molecular modeling with special reference to docking. The experimental and docking results revealed that the complexes have the ability of interaction with DNA of minor groove binding mode. The intrinsic binding constants ( Kb) of the complexes with CT-DNA were found out which show that they are minor groove binders. Gel electrophoresis assay demonstrated the ability of the complexes to cleave the pUC19 DNA in the presence of AH 2 (ascorbic acid). Moreover, the oxidative cleavage studies using distamycin revealed the minor groove binding for the newly synthesized 4-aminoantipyrine derived Schiff bases and their metal complexes. Evaluation of antibacterial activity of the complexes against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Klebsiella pneumoniae exhibited that the complexes have potent biocidal activity than the free ligands.

  16. Metal based isatin-derived sulfonamides: their synthesis, characterization, coordination behavior and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Chohan, Zahid H; Supuran, Claudiu T; Ben Hadda, Taibi; Nasim, Faiz-Ul-Hassan; Khan, Khalid M

    2009-06-01

    Some isatin derived sulfonamides and their transition metal [Co(II), Cu(II), Ni(II), Zn(II)] complexes have been synthesized and characterized. The structure of synthesized compounds and their nature of bonding have been inferred on the basis of their physical (magnetic susceptibility and conductivity measurements), analytical (elemental analyses) and spectral (IR, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR) properties. An octahedral geometry has been suggested for Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) and square-planar for Cu(II) complexes. In order to assess the antibacterial and antifungal behavior, the ligands and their metal(II) complexes were screened for their in vitro antibacterial activity against four Gram-negative species, Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhi and two Gram-positive species, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis and, for in vitro antifungal activity against Trichophyton longifusus, Candida albicans, Aspergillus flavus, Microsporum canis, Fusarium solani and Candida glaberata. In vitro cytotoxic properties of all the compounds were also studied against Artemia salina by brine shrimp bioassay. The results of average antibacterial/antifungal activity showed that zinc(II) complexes were found to be the most active against one or more bacterial/fungal strains as compared to the other metal complexes. PMID:18825557

  17. Molecularly doped metals.

    PubMed

    Avnir, David

    2014-02-18

    The many millions of organic, inorganic, and bioorganic molecules represent a very rich library of chemical, biological, and physical properties that do not show up among the approximately 100 metals. The ability to imbue metals with any of these molecular properties would open up tremendous potential for the development of new materials. In addition to their traditional features and their traditional applications, metals would have new traits, which would merge their classical virtues such as conductivity and catalytic activity with the diverse properties of these molecules. In this Account, we describe a new materials methodology, which enables, for the first time, the incorporation and entrapment of small organic molecules, polymers, and biomolecules within metals. These new materials are denoted dopant@metal. The creation of dopant@metal yields new properties that are more than or different from the sum of the individual properties of the two components. So far we have developed methods for the doping of silver, copper, gold, iron, palladium, platinum, and some of their alloys, as well as Hg-Ag amalgams. We have successfully altered classical metal properties (such as conductivity), induced unorthodox properties (such as rendering a metal acidic or basic), used metals as heterogeneous matrices for homogeneous catalysts, and formed new metallic catalysts such as metals doped with organometallic complexes. In addition, we have created materials that straddle the border between polymers and metals, we have entrapped enzymes to form bioactive metals, we have induced chirality within metals, we have made corrosion-resistant iron, we formed efficient biocidal materials, and we demonstrated a new concept for batteries. We have developed a variety of methods for synthesizing dopant@metals including aqueous homogeneous and heterogeneous reductions of the metal cations, reductions in DMF, electrochemical entrapments, thermal decompositions of zerovalent metal carbonyls

  18. Molecularly doped metals.

    PubMed

    Avnir, David

    2014-02-18

    The many millions of organic, inorganic, and bioorganic molecules represent a very rich library of chemical, biological, and physical properties that do not show up among the approximately 100 metals. The ability to imbue metals with any of these molecular properties would open up tremendous potential for the development of new materials. In addition to their traditional features and their traditional applications, metals would have new traits, which would merge their classical virtues such as conductivity and catalytic activity with the diverse properties of these molecules. In this Account, we describe a new materials methodology, which enables, for the first time, the incorporation and entrapment of small organic molecules, polymers, and biomolecules within metals. These new materials are denoted dopant@metal. The creation of dopant@metal yields new properties that are more than or different from the sum of the individual properties of the two components. So far we have developed methods for the doping of silver, copper, gold, iron, palladium, platinum, and some of their alloys, as well as Hg-Ag amalgams. We have successfully altered classical metal properties (such as conductivity), induced unorthodox properties (such as rendering a metal acidic or basic), used metals as heterogeneous matrices for homogeneous catalysts, and formed new metallic catalysts such as metals doped with organometallic complexes. In addition, we have created materials that straddle the border between polymers and metals, we have entrapped enzymes to form bioactive metals, we have induced chirality within metals, we have made corrosion-resistant iron, we formed efficient biocidal materials, and we demonstrated a new concept for batteries. We have developed a variety of methods for synthesizing dopant@metals including aqueous homogeneous and heterogeneous reductions of the metal cations, reductions in DMF, electrochemical entrapments, thermal decompositions of zerovalent metal carbonyls

  19. NMR studies of cation transport across membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Shochet, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    /sup 23/Na NMR Studies of cation transport across membranes were conducted both on model and biological membranes. Two ionophores, the carrier monensin and the channel-former gramicidin, were chosen to induce cation transport in large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The distinction between the NMR signals arising from the two sides of the membrane was achieved by the addition of an anionic paramagnetic shift reagent to the outer solution. The kinetics of the cation transport across the membrane was observed simultaneously monitoring the changes in the /sup 23/Na NMR signals of both compartments. Two mathematical models were developed for the estimation of the transport parameters of the monensin- and gramicidin-induced cation transport. The models were able to fit the experimental data very well. A new method for the estimation of the volume trapped inside the vesicles was developed. The method uses the relative areas of the intra- and extravesicular NMR signals arising from a suspension of vesicles bathed in the same medium they contain, as a measure for the relative volumes of these compartments. Sodium transport across biological membranes was studied by /sup 23/ NMR, using suspensions of cultured nerve cells. The sodium influx through voltage-gated channels was studied using the channel modifier batrachotoxin in combination with scorpion toxin.

  20. Do fattening process and biological parameters affect the accumulation of metals in Atlantic bluefin tuna?

    PubMed

    Milatou, Niki; Dassenakis, Manos; Megalofonou, Persefoni

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the current levels of heavy metals and trace elements in Atlantic bluefin tuna muscle tissues and how they are influenced by the fattening process and various life history parameters to ascertain whether the concentrations in muscle tissue exceed the maximum levels defined by the European Commission Decision and to evaluate the health risk posed by fish consumption. A total of 20 bluefin tuna reared in sea cages, ranging from 160 to 295 cm in length and from 80 to 540 kg in weight, were sampled from a bluefin tuna farm in the Ionian Sea. The condition factor K of each specimen was calculated and their age was estimated. Heavy metal and trace element (Hg, Zn, Fe and Cu) contents were determined in muscle tissue using cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry and flame and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The total Hg concentrations ranged from 0.28 to 1.28 mg kg(-1) w/w, Zn from 5.81 to 76.37 mg kg(-1) w/w, Fe from 12.14 to 39.58 mg kg(-1) w/w, and Cu from 0.36 to 0.94 mg kg(-1) w/w. Only 5% of the muscle samples of tuna contained Hg above the maximum level laid down by the European Commission Decision. Moreover, 15% of the muscle samples contained Zn above the maximum level, while Fe and Cu concentrations were within the acceptable tolerable guideline values. The reared bluefin tuna had lower concentrations of Hg than the wild ones from the Mediterranean Sea. Hg and Fe concentrations showed a positive relationship with size and age of bluefin tuna, whereas negative relationships were found for the concentrations of Zn and Cu. The estimated dietary intake values of the analysed metals were mostly below the derived guidelines.

  1. Integrated chemical/biological treatment of paint stripper mixed waste: Metals toxicity and separation

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderberg-Twary, L.; Grumbine, R.K.; Foreman, T.; Hanners, J.L.; Brainard, J.R.; Sauer, N.N.; Unkefer, P.J.

    1995-05-01

    The DOE complex has generated vast quantities of complex heterogeneous mixed wastes. Paint stripper waste (PSW) is a complex waste that arose from decontamination and decommissioning activities. It contains paint stripper, cheesecloth, cellulose-based paints with Pb and Cr, and suspect Pu. Los Alamos National Laboratory has 150--200 barrels of PSW and other national laboratories such as Rocky Flats Plant have many more barrels of heterogeneous waste. Few technologies exist that can treat this complex waste. Our approach to solving this problem is the integration of two established technologies: biodegradation and metals chelation.

  2. Synthesis and biological evaluation of substituted pyrazoles as blockers of divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1).

    PubMed

    Cadieux, Jay A; Zhang, Zaihui; Mattice, Maryanne; Brownlie-Cutts, Alison; Fu, Jianmin; Ratkay, Laszlo G; Kwan, Rainbow; Thompson, Jay; Sanghara, Joseph; Zhong, Jing; Goldberg, Y Paul

    2012-01-01

    Three distinct series of substituted pyrazole blockers of divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) were elaborated from the high-throughput screening pyrazolone hit 1. Preliminary hit-to-lead efforts revealed a preference for electron-withdrawing substituents in the 4-amido-5-hydroxypyrazole series 6a-l. In turn, this preference was more pronounced in a series of 4-aryl-5-hydroxypyrazoles 8a-j. The representative analogs 6f and 12f were found to be efficacious in a rodent model of acute iron hyperabsorption. These three series represent promising starting points for lead optimization efforts aimed at the discovery of DMT1 blockers as iron overload therapeutics.

  3. Predicting the toxicity of metal mixtures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balistrieri, Laurie S.; Mebane, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    The toxicity of single and multiple metal (Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn) solutions to trout is predicted using an approach that combines calculations of: (1) solution speciation; (2) competition and accumulation of cations (H, Ca, Mg, Na, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn) on low abundance, high affinity and high abundance, low affinity biotic ligand sites; (3) a toxicity function that accounts for accumulation and potency of individual toxicants; and (4) biological response. The approach is evaluated by examining water composition from single metal toxicity tests of trout at 50% mortality, results of theoretical calculations of metal accumulation on fish gills and associated mortality for single, binary, ternary, and quaternary metal solutions, and predictions for a field site impacted by acid rock drainage. These evaluations indicate that toxicity of metal mixtures depends on the relative affinity and potency of toxicants for a given aquatic organism, suites of metals in the mixture, dissolved metal concentrations and ratios, and background solution composition (temperature, pH, and concentrations of major ions and dissolved organic carbon). A composite function that incorporates solution composition, affinity and competition of cations for two types of biotic ligand sites, and potencies of hydrogen and individual metals is proposed as a tool to evaluate potential toxicity of environmental solutions to trout.

  4. Metal complexes of the fourth generation quinolone antimicrobial drug gatifloxacin: Synthesis, structure and biological evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeek, Sadeek A.; El-Shwiniy, Walaa H.

    2010-08-01

    Three metal complexes of the fourth generation quinolone antimicrobial agent gatifloxacin (GFLX) with Y(ΙΙΙ), Zr(ΙV) and U(VΙ) have been prepared and characterized with physicochemical and spectroscopic techniques. In these complexes, gatifloxacin acts as a bidentate deprotonated ligand bound to the metal through the ketone oxygen and a carboxylato oxygen. The complexes are six-coordinated with distorted octahedral geometry. The kinetic parameters for gatifloxacin and the three prepared complexes have been evaluated from TGA curves by using Coats-Redfern (CR) and Horowitz-Metzeger (HM) methods. The calculated bond length and force constant, F(U dbnd O), for the UO 2 bond in uranyl complex are 1.7522 Å and 639.46 N m -1. The antimicrobial activity of the complexes has been tested against microorganisms, three bacterial species, such as Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus), Escherichia coli ( E. coli) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ( P. aeruginosa) and two fungi species, penicillium ( P. rotatum) and trichoderma ( T. sp.), showing that they exhibit higher activity than free ligand.

  5. Structural and biological evaluation of some metal complexes of vanillin-4N-(2-pyridyl) thiosemicarbazone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, T. A.; Abu El-Reash, G. M.; Al-Jahdali, M.; El-Rakhawy, El-Bastawesy R.

    2013-12-01

    The synthesis and characterization of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), Hg(II) and U(VI)O2 complexes of vanillin-4N-(2-pyridyl) thiosemicarbazone (H2PVT) are reported. Theoretical calculations have been performed to obtain IR spectra of ligand and its complexes using AM1, Zindo/1, MM+ and PM3, methods. The Schiff base and its metal complexes have been screened for antibacterial Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus saprophyticus. H2VPT shows no apparent digestion effect on the egg albumin while Mn(II), Hg(II) and Cu(II) complexes exhibited a considerable digestion effect following the order Cu(II) > Mn(II) > Hg(II). Moreover, Ni(II) and Co(II) complexes revealed strong digestion effect. Fe(II), Mn(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) acted as metal co- SOD enzyme factors, which are located in different compartments of the cell.

  6. Probing alkali metal-pi interactions with the side chain residue of tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiaxin; Barbour, Leonard J; Gokel, George W

    2002-04-16

    Feeble forces play a significant role in the organization of proteins. These include hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic interactions, salt bridge formation, and steric interactions. The alkali metal cation-pi interaction is a force of potentially profound importance but its consideration in biology has been limited by the lack of experimental evidence. Our previous studies of cation-pi interactions with Na(+) and K(+) involved the side arms of tryptophan (indole), tyrosine (phenol), and phenylalanine (benzene) as the arene donors. The receptor system possesses limiting steric constraints. In this report, we show that direct interactions between alkali metals and arenes occur at or within the van der Waals contact distance.

  7. Multifrequency EPR Spectroscopy: A Toolkit for the Characterization of Mono- and Di-nuclear Metal Ion Centers in Complex Biological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Graeme R.

    Metalloenzymes are ubiquitous in nature containing complex metal ion cofactors intimately involved in the enzymes' biological function. The application of multifrequency continuous wave and orientation selective pulsed EPR in conjunction with computer simulation and density functional theory calculations has proven to be a powerful toolkit for the geometric and electronic structural characterization of these metal ion cofactors in the resting enzyme, enzyme-substrate and -product complexes, which in turn provides a detailed understanding of the enzymes' catalytic mechanism. In this chapter, a brief description of the multifrequency EPR toolkit used to structurally (geometric and electronic) characterize metal ion binding sites in complex biological systems and its application in the structural characterization of (i) molybdenum containing enzymes and model complexes, (ii) mono- and di-nuclear copper(II) cyclic peptide complexes (marine and synthetic analogues) and (iii) dinuclear metal ion centers in purple acid phosphatases will be presented.

  8. ICP-MS multielemental determination of metals potentially released from dental implants and articular prostheses in human biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Sarmiento-González, Alejandro; Marchante-Gayón, Juan Manuel; Tejerina-Lobo, José María; Paz-Jiménez, José; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2005-06-01

    A sector field high-resolution (HR)-ICP-MS and an octapole reaction system (ORS)-ICP-MS have been compared for the simultaneous determination of traces of metals (Ti, V, Cr, Co, Ni, and Mo) released from dental implants and articular prostheses in human biological fluids. Optimum sample treatments were evaluated to minimize matrix effects in urine and whole blood. Urine samples were diluted tenfold with ultrapure water, whereas whole blood samples were digested with high-purity nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide and finally diluted tenfold with ultrapure water. In both matrices, internal standardization (Ga and Y) was employed to avoid potential matrix interferences and ICP-MS signal drift. Spectral interferences arising from the plasma gases or the major components of urine and whole blood were identified by (HR)-ICP-MS at 3,000 resolving power. The capabilities of (HR)-ICP-MS and (ORS)-ICP-MS for the removal of such spectral interferences were evaluated and compared. Results indicate that polyatomic interferences, which hamper the determination of such metallic elements in these biological samples, could be overcome by using a resolving power of 3,000. Using (ORS)-ICP-MS, all those elements could be quantified except Ti and V (due to the polyatomic ions 31P16O and 35Cl16O, respectively). The accuracy of the proposed methodologies by (HR)- and (ORS)-ICP-MS was checked against two reference materials. Good agreement between the given values and the concentrations obtained for all the analytes under scrutiny was found except for Ti and V when analyzed by (ORS)-ICP-MS. PMID:15877222

  9. Biological low pH Mn(II) oxidation in a manganese deposit influenced by metal-rich groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohu, Tsing; Akob, Denise M.; Abratis, Michael; Lazar, Cassandre S.; Küsel, Kirsten

    2016-01-01</