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Sample records for biological metal cations

  1. Focused fluorescent probe library for metal cations and biological anions.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Sang Wook; Lee, Jun-Seok; Chang, Young-Tae; Hong, Jong-In

    2013-09-09

    A focused fluorescent probe library for metal cations was developed by combining metal chelators and picolinium/quinolinium moieties as combinatorial blocks connected through a styryl group. Furthermore, metal complexes derived from metal chelators having high binding affinities for metal cations were used to construct a focused probe library for phosphorylated biomolecules. More than 250 fluorescent probes were screened for identifying an ultraselective probe for dTTP.

  2. Structures and physical properties of gaseous metal cationized biological ions.

    PubMed

    Burt, Michael B; Fridgen, Travis D

    2012-01-01

    Metal chelation can alter the activity of free biomolecules by modifying their structures or stabilizing higher energy tautomers. In recent years, mass spectrometric techniques have been used to investigate the effects of metal complexation with proteins, nucleobases and nucleotides, where small conformational changes can have significant physiological consequences. In particular, infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy has emerged as an important tool for determining the structure and reactivity of gas-phase ions. Unlike other mass spectrometric approaches, this method is able to directly resolve structural isomers using characteristic vibrational signatures. Other activation and dissociation methods, such as blackbody infrared radiative dissociation or collision-induced dissociation can also reveal information about the thermochemistry and dissociative pathways of these biological ions. This information can then be used to provide information about the structures of the ionic complexes under study. In this article, we review the use of gas-phase techniques in characterizing metal-bound biomolecules. Particular attention will be given to our own contributions, which detail the ability of metal cations to disrupt nucleobase pairs, direct the self-assembly of nucleobase clusters and stabilize non-canonical isomers of amino acids.

  3. Biologically Relevant Metal-Cation Binding Induces Conformational Changes in Heparin Oligosaccharides as Measured by Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Youjin; Schenauer, Matthew R.; Leary, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    Heparin interacts with many proteins and is involved in biological processes such as anticoagulation, angiogenesis, and antitumorigenic activities. These heparin-protein interactions can be influenced by the binding of various metal ions to these complexes. In particular, physiologically relevant metal cations influence heparin-protein conformations through electronic interactions inherent to this polyanion. In this study, we employed ion mobility mass spectrometry (IMMS) to observe conformational changes that occur in fully-sulfated heparin octasaccharides after the successive addition of metal ions. Our results indicate that binding of positive counter ions causes a decrease in collision cross section (CCS) measurements, thus promoting a more compact octasaccharide structure. PMID:21731426

  4. Simultaneous detection of [metal(II)-tpen]2+ as kinetically inert cationic complexes using pre-capillary derivatization electrophoresis: an application to biological samples.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shingo; Sasamura, Satoru; Hoshi, Suwaru

    2005-05-01

    A high resolution of doubly charged first row transition (Fe, Cu, Zn, Ni, Co, Mn) and heavy metal (Pb, Cd, Hg) ions was achieved in capillary electrophoresis (CE) with high sensitivity (sub-micromol dm(-3) level), using NN,N'N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN) as a pre-capillary derivatizing agent. The non-charged reagent, TPEN, was applied to capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) for the first time. Since complete spatial separation between the complexes and the ligand was carried out in a carrier buffer, which was free of TPEN, kinetic inertness of metal complexes was necessary for the detection in this pre-capillary method. All the nine listed metal complexes were detected: Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Al(3+), Fe(3+), and Co(3+) complexes were undetectable. This, interestingly, suggests that those nine cations form kinetically inert tpen complexes without strong charge-charge interactions between the metal ion and the ligand. It is expected that the hard-soft-acid-base (HSAB) principle governed the kinetics selectivity. With respect to the electrophoretic behavior, the addition of chloride ion and methanol to the carrier significantly improved the resolution. This is due to the formation of ternary complexes or ion aggregates and the solvation effect, respectively. These effects provided a satisfactory baseline resolution among the nine metal ions. An application to biological samples was demonstrated. Some metal ions in human serum and urine were successfully detected in a simple process without the need for deproteinization using a non-coated fused-silica capillary because of the differenciation in the direction of migration between organic matter and complexes.

  5. ADSORPTION METHOD FOR SEPARATING METAL CATIONS

    DOEpatents

    Khym, J.X.

    1959-03-10

    The chromatographic separation of fission product cations is discussed. By use of this method a mixture of metal cations containing Zr, Cb, Ce, Y, Ba, and Sr may be separated from one another. Mentioned as preferred exchange adsorbents are resins containing free sulfonic acid groups. Various eluants, such as tartaric acid, HCl, and citric acid, used at various acidities, are employed to effect the selective elution and separation of the various fission product cations.

  6. Metalated Nitriles: Cation-Controlled Cyclizations

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Fraser F.; Wei, Yunjing; Liu, Wang; Zhang, Zhiyu

    2008-01-01

    Judicious choice of cation allows the selective cyclization of substituted γ-hydroxynitriles to trans- or cis-decalins and trans- or cis-bicyclo[5.4.0]-undecanes. The stereoselectivities are consistent with deprotonations generating two distinctly different metalated nitriles: an internally coordinated nitrile anion with BuLi, and a C-magnesiated nitrile with i-PrMgCl. Employing cations to control the geometry of metalated nitriles permits stereodivergent cyclizations with complete control over the stereochemistry of the quaternary, nitrile-bearing carbon. PMID:17579448

  7. Understanding selectivity of hard and soft metal cations within biological systems using the subvalence concept. I. Application to blood coagulation: direct cation-protein electronic effects vs. indirect interactions through water networks

    PubMed Central

    de Courcy, B.; Pedersen, L. G.; Parisel, O.; Gresh, N.; Silvi, B.; Pilmé, J.; Piquemal, J.-P.

    2010-01-01

    Following a previous study by de Courcy et al. ((2009) Interdiscip. Sci. Comput. Life Sci. 1, 55-60), we demonstrate in this contribution, using quantum chemistry, that metal cations exhibit a specific topological signature in the electron localization of their density interacting with ligands according to its “soft” or “hard” character. Introducing the concept of metal cation subvalence, we show that a metal cation can split its outer-shell density (the so-called subvalent domains or basins) according to it capability to form a partly covalent bond involving charge transfer. Such behaviour is investigated by means of several quantum chemical interpretative methods encompasing the topological analysis of the Electron Localization Function (ELF) and Bader's Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) and two energy decomposition analyses (EDA), namely the Restricted Variational Space (RVS) and Constrained Space Orbital Variations (CSOV) approaches. Further rationalization is performed by computing ELF and QTAIM local properties such as electrostatic distributed moments and local chemical descriptors such as condensed Fukui Functions and dual descriptors. These reactivity indexes are computed within the ELF topological analysis in addition to QTAIM offering access to non atomic reactivity local index, for example on lone pairs. We apply this “subvalence” concept to study the cation selectivity in enzymes involved in blood coagulation (GLA domains of three coagulation factors). We show that the calcium ions are clearly able to form partially covalent charge transfer networks between the subdomain of the metal ion and the carboxylate oxygen lone pairs whereas magnesium does not have such ability. Our analysis also explains the different role of two groups (high affinity and low affinity cation binding sites) present in GLA domains. If the presence of Ca(II) is mandatory in the central “high affinity” region to conserve a proper folding and a charge

  8. Heavy metal cations permeate the TRPV6 epithelial cation channel.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Gergely; Danko, Tamas; Bergeron, Marc J; Balazs, Bernadett; Suzuki, Yoshiro; Zsembery, Akos; Hediger, Matthias A

    2011-01-01

    TRPV6 belongs to the vanilloid family of the transient receptor potential channel (TRP) superfamily. This calcium-selective channel is highly expressed in the duodenum and the placenta, being responsible for calcium absorption in the body and fetus. Previous observations have suggested that TRPV6 is not only permeable to calcium but also to other divalent cations in epithelial tissues. In this study, we tested whether TRPV6 is indeed also permeable to cations such as zinc and cadmium. We found that the basal intracellular calcium concentration was higher in HEK293 cells transfected with hTRPV6 than in non-transfected cells, and that this difference almost disappeared in nominally calcium-free solution. Live cell imaging experiments with Fura-2 and NewPort Green DCF showed that overexpression of human TRPV6 increased the permeability for Ca(2+), Ba(2+), Sr(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), and interestingly also for La(3+) and Gd(3+). These results were confirmed using the patch clamp technique. (45)Ca uptake experiments showed that cadmium, lanthanum and gadolinium were also highly efficient inhibitors of TRPV6-mediated calcium influx at higher micromolar concentrations. Our results suggest that TRPV6 is not only involved in calcium transport but also in the transport of other divalent cations, including heavy metal ions, which may have toxicological implications.

  9. Energies and physicochemical properties of cation-π interactions in biological structures.

    PubMed

    Du, Qi-Shi; Meng, Jian-Zong; Liao, Si-Ming; Huang, Ri-Bo

    2012-04-01

    The cation-π interactions occur frequently within or between proteins due to six (Phe, Tyr, Trp, Arg, Lys, and His) of the twenty natural amino acids potentially interacting with metallic cations via these interactions. In this study, quantum chemical calculations and molecular orbital (MO) theory are used to study the energies and properties of cation-π interactions in biological structures. The cation-π interactions of H⁺ and Li⁺ are similar to hydrogen bonds and lithium bonds, respectively, in which the small, naked cations H⁺ and Li⁺ are buried deep within the π-electron density of aromatic molecules, forming stable cation-π bonds that are much stronger than the cation-π interactions of other alkali metal cations. The cation-π interactions of metallic cations with atomic masses greater than that of Li⁺ arise mainly from the coordinate bond comprising empty valence atomic orbitals (AOs) of metallic cations and π-MOs of aromatic molecules, though electrostatic interactions may also contribute to the cation-π interaction. The binding strength of cation-π interactions is determined by the charge and types of AOs in the metallic cations. Cation-π interaction energies are distance- and orientation-dependent; energies decrease with the distance (r) and the orientation angle (θ). In solution, the cation-π energies decrease with the increase of the dielectric constant (ɛ) of the solvent; however, solvation has less influence on the H⁺-π and H₃O⁺-π interactions than on interactions with other cations. The conclusions from this study provide useful theoretical insights into the nature of cation-π interactions and may contribute to the development of better force field parameters for describing the molecular dynamics of cation-π interactions within and between proteins.

  10. Mechanism of metal cationization in organic SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojciechowski, I.; Delcorte, A.; Gonze, X.; Bertrand, P.

    2001-09-01

    A mechanism for metal cationization of phenyl group containing hydrocarbons is discussed. Intact molecules and their fragments are emitted from a thin organic layer covering a metal surface bombarded by fast ions. It is shown that the process of associative ionization of a neutral hydrocarbon molecule and a neutral excited metal atom, occurring above the surface, may contribute to the yield of cationized molecules. To demonstrate this we have calculated the potential energy curves for the model system C 6H 6+Me (Me=Ag, Cu, Au) making use of the density functional theory. The initial states of the metal atoms approaching the benzene ring along the C 6 symmetry axis were set as the ground, ionic, and excited in ( n-1)d 9ns 2 electronic configuration.

  11. Metal cation uptake and reduction kinetics in microalgal cell culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kare, Anudeep

    This work was conducted to create a bio synthetic process for production of sustainable Nano materials, such as Noble metal nanoparticles with the use of living organisms as catalysts. Dactylococcus, Coelastrella and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii are the different species of algae used through which the Au and Ag nanoparticles are extracted. Under the appropriate bioprocess conditions phototrophic algal cell cultures can catalyze the conversion of soluble metal cations, such as trivalent gold cation (Au+3), to metallic gold nanoparticles (Au0 NP) and silver cation (Ag+) to metallic silver nanoparticles (Ag0 NP). The primary objective of this experiment is to identify the rate-limiting kinetics such as, mixing, biological, pH and so forth to see whether a scalable process can be proposed for production of these high valued materials. It is proposed in the literature that the reducing power required to drive this reaction is derived from the electron flux produced in the algae's photosynthetic apparatus. However, due to the lack of fundamental knowledge about the transport and kinetics, and therefore the bottlenecks and key process parameters, there is currently no scalable, controllable phototrophic system has been developed for the production of metallic nanoparticles.

  12. Electrodialytic matrix isolation for metal cations.

    PubMed

    Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Hiroyama, Yuri; Nakamura, Koretaka; Koda, Takumi; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Toda, Kei

    2015-01-01

    Electrodialytic ion transfer was studied as a matrix isolation tool for heavy metal determinations. An ion transfer device (ITD) was used for the transfer of heavy metal cations. Under optimized flow rates applied voltage and receptor composition, heavy metal ions were quantitatively transferred at concentrations spanning µg L(-1) to mg L(-1). As long as the sample pH was acidic, there was no significant sample pH effect on the transfer efficiencies. Significant salt concentrations (>1 mM NaCl), however, decreased the transfer efficiency. This could be ameliorated (up to 5 mM NaCl) by transient instead of continuous sample introduction. The device was applied to the determination of Fe, Cu and Zn in equine and bovine serum; the reproducibility was better than conventional digestion method.

  13. Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations

    DOEpatents

    O'Neill, Malcolm A.; Pellerin, Patrice J. M.; Warrenfeltz, Dennis; Vidal, Stephane; Darvill, Alan G.; Albersheim, Peter

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations.

  14. Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations

    DOEpatents

    O`Neill, M.A.; Pellerin, P.J.M.; Warrenfeltz, D.; Vidal, S.; Darvill, A.G.; Albersheim, P.

    1999-03-02

    The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations. 15 figs.

  15. Transition-Metal Hydride Radical Cations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue; Shaw, Anthony P; Estes, Deven P; Norton, Jack R

    2016-08-10

    Transition-metal hydride radical cations (TMHRCs) are involved in a variety of chemical and biochemical reactions, making a more thorough understanding of their properties essential for explaining observed reactivity and for the eventual development of new applications. Generally, these species may be treated as the ones formed by one-electron oxidation of diamagnetic analogues that are neutral or cationic. Despite the importance of TMHRCs, the generally sensitive nature of these complexes has hindered their development. However, over the last four decades, many more TMHRCs have been synthesized, characterized, isolated, or hypothesized as reaction intermediates. This comprehensive review focuses on experimental studies of TMHRCs reported through the year 2014, with an emphasis on isolated and observed species. The methods used for the generation or synthesis of TMHRCs are surveyed, followed by a discussion about the stability of these complexes. The fundamental properties of TMHRCs, especially those pertaining to the M-H bond, are described, followed by a detailed treatment of decomposition pathways. Finally, reactions involving TMHRCs as intermediates are described.

  16. Alkali cation specific adsorption onto fcc(111) transition metal electrodes.

    PubMed

    Mills, J N; McCrum, I T; Janik, M J

    2014-07-21

    The presence of alkali cations in electrolyte solutions is known to impact the rate of electrocatalytic reactions, though the mechanism of such impact is not conclusively determined. We use density functional theory (DFT) to examine the specific adsorption of alkali cations to fcc(111) electrode surfaces, as specific adsorption may block catalyst sites or otherwise impact surface catalytic chemistry. Solvation of the cation-metal surface structure was investigated using explicit water models. Computed equilibrium potentials for alkali cation adsorption suggest that alkali and alkaline earth cations will specifically adsorb onto Pt(111) and Pd(111) surfaces in the potential range of hydrogen oxidation and hydrogen evolution catalysis in alkaline solutions.

  17. High capacity nickel battery material doped with alkali metal cations

    DOEpatents

    Jackovitz, John F.; Pantier, Earl A.

    1982-05-18

    A high capacity battery material is made, consisting essentially of hydrated Ni(II) hydroxide, and about 5 wt. % to about 40 wt. % of Ni(IV) hydrated oxide interlayer doped with alkali metal cations selected from potassium, sodium and lithium cations.

  18. The Ziegler—Natta olefin insertion reaction for cationic metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Vidar R.; Siegban, Per E. M.

    1993-09-01

    The catalytic Ziegler—Natta polymerization reaction has been studied for a set of metal cations, in order to identify the role of the positive charge on this process. Geometry optimizations have been performed for the reactant metal—methyl systems, the π-coordinated olefin systems, the transition states for the olefin insertion and finally for the product metal—propyl systems. All valence electrons are correlated. The cations selected for this study are the transition metals Zr + and Ti +, the non-transition metals Be +, Mg +, Al + and finally also Si +. The transition metal cations are found to have very low barriers for the insertion, but the lowest barrier is actually found for Be +. The results are discussed in terms of the ionization energies and the accessibility to valence p and d orbitals. Comparisons are made to previous theoretical work on cationic model systems.

  19. Cation Selectivity in Biological Cation Channels Using Experimental Structural Information and Statistical Mechanical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Finnerty, Justin John

    2015-01-01

    Cation selective channels constitute the gate for ion currents through the cell membrane. Here we present an improved statistical mechanical model based on atomistic structural information, cation hydration state and without tuned parameters that reproduces the selectivity of biological Na+ and Ca2+ ion channels. The importance of the inclusion of step-wise cation hydration in these results confirms the essential role partial dehydration plays in the bacterial Na+ channels. The model, proven reliable against experimental data, could be straightforwardly used for designing Na+ and Ca2+ selective nanopores. PMID:26460827

  20. ABSORPTION METHOD FOR SEPARATING METAL CATIONS

    DOEpatents

    Tompkins, E.R.; Parker, G.W.

    1959-03-10

    An improved method is presented for the chromatographic separation of fission products wherein a substantial reduction in liquid volume is obtained. The process consists in contacting a solution containing fission products with a body of ion-exchange adsorbent to effect adsorption of fission product cations. The loaded exchange resin is then contacted with a small volume of a carboxylic acid eluant, thereby recovering the fission products. The fission product carrying eluate is acidified without increasing its volume to the volume of the original solution, and the acidified eluate is then used as a feed solution for a smaller body of ion-exchange resin effecting readsorption of the fission product cations.

  1. In situ remediation process using divalent metal cations

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Patrick V.; Khandaker, Nadim R.; Krumhansl, James L.; Teter, David M.

    2004-12-14

    An in situ process for treating ambient solid materials (e.g., soils, aquifer solids, sludges) by adding one or more divalent metal cations to the ambient solid material. The added divalent metal cations, such as Cu.sup.2+ or Zn.sup.2+, combine with metal oxide/hydroxides (e.g., ferric oxide/hydroxide or aluminum oxide/hydroxide) already present in the ambient solid material to form an effective sorbent material having a large number of positively-charged surface complexes that binds and immobilizes anionic contaminant species (e.g., arsenic or chromate). Divalent metal cations can be added, for example, by injecting an aqueous solution of CuSO.sub.4 into an aquifer contaminated with arsenic or chromate. Also, sludges can be stabilized against leaching of anionic contaminants through the addition of divalent metal cations. Also, an inexpensive sorbent material can be easily formed by mixing divalent metal cations with soil that has been removed from the ground.

  2. Alkali Metal Cation Transport and Homeostasis in Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Ariño, Joaquín; Ramos, José; Sychrová, Hana

    2010-01-01

    Summary: The maintenance of appropriate intracellular concentrations of alkali metal cations, principally K+ and Na+, is of utmost importance for living cells, since they determine cell volume, intracellular pH, and potential across the plasma membrane, among other important cellular parameters. Yeasts have developed a number of strategies to adapt to large variations in the concentrations of these cations in the environment, basically by controlling transport processes. Plasma membrane high-affinity K+ transporters allow intracellular accumulation of this cation even when it is scarce in the environment. Exposure to high concentrations of Na+ can be tolerated due to the existence of an Na+, K+-ATPase and an Na+, K+/H+-antiporter, which contribute to the potassium balance as well. Cations can also be sequestered through various antiporters into intracellular organelles, such as the vacuole. Although some uncertainties still persist, the nature of the major structural components responsible for alkali metal cation fluxes across yeast membranes has been defined within the last 20 years. In contrast, the regulatory components and their interactions are, in many cases, still unclear. Conserved signaling pathways (e.g., calcineurin and HOG) are known to participate in the regulation of influx and efflux processes at the plasma membrane level, even though the molecular details are obscure. Similarly, very little is known about the regulation of organellar transport and homeostasis of alkali metal cations. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date vision of the mechanisms responsible for alkali metal cation transport and their regulation in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and to establish, when possible, comparisons with other yeasts and higher plants. PMID:20197501

  3. Fluorescence quenching of water-soluble conjugated polymer by metal cations and its application in sensor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Guo; Zhao, Dan; He, Zhi-Ke; Ai, Xin-Ping

    2007-02-01

    The effects of different metal cations on the fluorescence of water-soluble conjugated polymer (CP) and their quenching mechanism have been explored. Most transition metal cations, especially noble metal cations, such as Pd2+, Ru3+, and Pt2+ possessed higher quenching efficiency to CP fluorescence than that of the main group metal cations and other transition metal cations, which have filled or half-full outmost electron layer configurations. Base on this, rapid, sensitive detection of noble metal cations can be realized and a novel quencher-tether-ligand (QTL) probe was developed to detect avidin and streptavidin.

  4. Biological monitoring of toxic metals

    SciTech Connect

    Clarkson, T.W.; Friberg, L.; Nordberg, G.F.; Sager, P.R.

    1988-01-01

    This book is a compendium of papers representing the content of presentations made at the conference on /open quotes/Biological Monitoring of Metals/close quotes/ held in Rochester, New York, June 2-6, 1986. The papers are organized into five sessions entitled: Introduction, Specific Metals, Metals Used in Advanced High Technology, Trends in Analytical Methods, and Biological Media /emdash/ Their Advantages and Pitfalls When Used in Biological Monitoring. The 37 papers presented have been individually abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base. (DT)

  5. Cationic schiff base amphiphiles and their metal complexes: Surface and biocidal activities against bacteria and fungi.

    PubMed

    Negm, N A; Zaki, M F; Salem, M A I

    2010-05-01

    A series of cationic surfactants containing schiff base groups was synthesized by condensation of four fatty amines namely: dodecyl, tetradecyl, hexadecyl and octadecyl amine and 4-diethyl aminobenzaldehyde (1-4), as well as their metal complexes with divalent transition metal ions including Co, Cu and Mn (5-16). The surface activities of the synthesized surfactants were influenced by their chemical structures and the type of the transition metals. The biological activity measurements of the parent cationic schiff bases showed high efficacy against Gram positive and Gram negative bacterial strains and fungi. While on complexation, the biocidal activity was increased remarkably. The biocidal activity of the tested compounds against sulfur reducing bacteria showed promising results in the field of biocide applications. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Metal Cations in G-Quadruplex Folding and Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Debmalya; Mirihana Arachchilage, Gayan; Basu, Soumitra

    2016-09-01

    This review is focused on the structural and physico-chemical aspects of metal cation coordination to G-Quadruplexes (GQ) and their effects on GQ stability and conformation. G-Quadruplex structures are non-canonical secondary structures formed by both DNA and RNA. G-quadruplexes regulate a wide range of important biochemical processes. Besides the sequence requirements, the coordination of monovalent cations in the GQ is essential for its formation and determines the stability and polymorphism of GQ structures. The nature, location and dynamics of the cation coordination and their impact on the overall GQ stability are dependent on several factors such as the ionic radii, hydration energy and the bonding strength to the O6 of guanines. The intracellular monovalent cation concentration and the localized ion concentrations determine the formation of GQs and can potentially dictate their regulatory roles. A wide range of biochemical and biophysical studies on an array of GQ enabling sequences have generated at a minimum the knowledge base that allows us to often predict the stability of GQs in presence of the physiologically relevant metal ions, however, prediction of conformation of such GQs is still out of the realm.

  7. Metal Cations in G-Quadruplex Folding and Stability

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Debmalya; Mirihana Arachchilage, Gayan; Basu, Soumitra

    2016-01-01

    This review is focused on the structural and physicochemical aspects of metal cation coordination to G-Quadruplexes (GQ) and their effects on GQ stability and conformation. G-quadruplex structures are non-canonical secondary structures formed by both DNA and RNA. G-quadruplexes regulate a wide range of important biochemical processes. Besides the sequence requirements, the coordination of monovalent cations in the GQ is essential for its formation and determines the stability and polymorphism of GQ structures. The nature, location, and dynamics of the cation coordination and their impact on the overall GQ stability are dependent on several factors such as the ionic radii, hydration energy, and the bonding strength to the O6 of guanines. The intracellular monovalent cation concentration and the localized ion concentrations determine the formation of GQs and can potentially dictate their regulatory roles. A wide range of biochemical and biophysical studies on an array of GQ enabling sequences have generated at a minimum the knowledge base that allows us to often predict the stability of GQs in the presence of the physiologically relevant metal ions, however, prediction of conformation of such GQs is still out of the realm. PMID:27668212

  8. Structural insights on biologically relevant cationic membranes by ESR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rozenfeld, Julio H K; Duarte, Evandro L; Oliveira, Tiago R; Lamy, M Teresa

    2017-08-23

    Cationic bilayers have been used as models to study membrane fusion, templates for polymerization and deposition of materials, carriers of nucleic acids and hydrophobic drugs, microbicidal agents and vaccine adjuvants. The versatility of these membranes depends on their structure. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is a powerful technique that employs hydrophobic spin labels to probe membrane structure and packing. The focus of this review is the extensive structural characterization of cationic membranes prepared with dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide or diC14-amidine to illustrate how ESR spectroscopy can provide important structural information on bilayer thermotropic behavior, gel and fluid phases, phase coexistence, presence of bilayer interdigitation, membrane fusion and interactions with other biologically relevant molecules.

  9. A sensitive colorimetric and ratiometric chemosensor for trivalent metal cations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xu; Yin, Guohui; Jin, Di; Yan, Xilong; Li, Yang; Chen, Ligong

    2015-03-01

    A novel hydroxyethyl piperazine functionalized cyanine derivative was designed and synthesized. It presents selective colorimetric as well as ratiometric absorption responses to trivalent metal cations (Cr(3+), Fe(3+) and Al(3+)) over a variety of divalent and monovalent metal cations in 3:7 ethanol-water solution. Detection limits of this method for Cr(3+), Fe(3+) and Al(3+) were 3.99 μM, 4.30 μM and 1.85 μM, respectively. The recognition mechanism was attributed to the protonation of the organic probe, which blocked the photoinduced electron transfer (PET) process. In addition, the sensor was also successfully applied to the determination of Cr(3+) in prepared samples.

  10. Alkali metal cation-hexacyclen complexes: effects of alkali metal cation size on the structure and binding energy.

    PubMed

    Austin, C A; Rodgers, M T

    2014-07-24

    Threshold collision-induced dissociation (CID) of alkali metal cation-hexacyclen (ha18C6) complexes, M(+)(ha18C6), with xenon is studied using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry techniques. The alkali metal cations examined here include: Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+). In all cases, M(+) is the only product observed, corresponding to endothermic loss of the intact ha18C6 ligand. The cross-section thresholds are analyzed to extract zero and 298 K M(+)-ha18C6 bond dissociation energies (BDEs) after properly accounting for the effects of multiple M(+)(ha18C6)-Xe collisions, the kinetic and internal energy distributions of the M(+)(ha18C6) and Xe reactants, and the lifetimes for dissociation of the activated M(+)(ha18C6) complexes. Ab initio and density functional theory calculations are used to determine the structures of ha18C6 and the M(+)(ha18C6) complexes, provide molecular constants necessary for the thermodynamic analysis of the energy-resolved CID data, and theoretical estimates for the M(+)-ha18C6 BDEs. Calculations using a polarizable continuum model are also performed to examine solvent effects on the binding. In the absence of solvent, the M(+)-ha18C6 BDEs decrease as the size of the alkali metal cation increases, consistent with the noncovalent nature of the binding in these complexes. However, in the presence of solvent, the ha18C6 ligand exhibits selectivity for K(+) over the other alkali metal cations. The M(+)(ha18C6) structures and BDEs are compared to those previously reported for the analogous M(+)(18-crown-6) and M(+)(cyclen) complexes to examine the effects of the nature of the donor atom (N versus O) and the number donor atoms (six vs four) on the nature and strength of binding.

  11. Selective enrichment of metal-binding proteins based on magnetic core/shell microspheres functionalized with metal cations.

    PubMed

    Fang, Caiyun; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Lu, Haojie

    2015-06-21

    Metal binding proteins play many important roles in a broad range of biological processes. Characterization of metal binding proteins is important for understanding their structure and biological functions, thus leading to a clear understanding of metal associated diseases. The present study is the first to investigate the effectiveness of magnetic microspheres functionalized with metal cations (Ca(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+) and Fe(3+)) as the absorbent matrix in IMAC technology to enrich metal containing/binding proteins. The putative metal binding proteins in rat liver were then globally characterized by using this strategy which is very easy to handle and can capture a number of metal binding proteins effectively. In total, 185 putative metal binding proteins were identified from rat liver including some known less abundant and membrane-bound metal binding proteins such as Plcg1, Acsl5, etc. The identified proteins are involved in many important processes including binding, catalytic activity, translation elongation factor activity, electron carrier activity, and so on.

  12. Infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy of cationized asparagine: effects of metal cation size on gas-phase conformation.

    PubMed

    Heaton, A L; Bowman, V N; Oomens, J; Steill, J D; Armentrout, P B

    2009-05-14

    Gas-phase structures of cationized asparagine (Asn) including complexes with Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), Cs(+), and Ba(2+), as well as protonated Asn, are examined by infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy utilizing light generated by a free electron laser. Experimental spectra for the alkali metal cation complexes exhibit systematic trends, whereas spectra for Ba(2+)(Asn) and H(+)(Asn) are more distinct. To identify the structures formed experimentally, measured IRMPD spectra are compared to spectra calculated at a B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level with several effective core potentials and basis sets evaluated for the heavy metal systems. The dominant conformation ascertained for complexes with the smaller metal cations, Li(+)(Asn) and Na(+)(Asn), is a charge-solvated, tridentate [N,CO,CO] structure that binds the metal cation with the amine group of the amino acid backbone and to the carbonyl oxygen atoms of the backbone and amino acid side chain. For the larger alkali metal cation complexes, K(+)(Asn), Rb(+)(Asn), and Cs(+)(Asn), an additional charge-solvated, tridentate [COOH,CO] structure that binds the metal cation with the two oxygen atoms of the backbone carboxylic acid group and the carbonyl oxygen atom of the Asn side chain may also be present. The Ba(2+)(Asn) spectrum is characteristic of a single charge-solvated [N,CO,CO] conformation, in contrast to Gly, Trp, Arg, Gln, Pro, Ser, Val, and Glu, which all take on a zwitterionic structure when complexed to Ba(2+). In no case do the cationized Asn complexes show definitive evidence of forming a zwitterionic structure in the complexes studied here. For H(+)(Asn), a mixture of two [N,CO] structures, which differ only in the orientation the side chain and are calculated to be nearly identical in energy, explains the experimental spectrum well.

  13. Enantioselective Cyclizations of Silyloxyenynes Catalyzed by Cationic Metal Phosphine Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Brazeau, Jean-François; Zhang, Suyan; Colomer, Ignacio; Corkey, Britton K.; Toste, F. Dean

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of complementary methods for enantioselective transition-metal-catalyzed cyclization with silyloxyenynes has been accomplished using chiral phosphine ligands. Under palladium catalysis, 1,6-silyloxyenynes bearing a terminal alkyne led to the desired 5-membered ring with high enantioselectivities (up to 91% ee). As for reactions under cationic gold catalysis, 1,6- and 1,5-silyloxyenynes bearing an internal alkyne furnished the chiral cyclopentane derivatives with excellent enantiomeric excess (up to 94% ee). Modification of the substrate by incorporating an α,β-unsaturation led to the discovery of a tandem cyclization. Remarkably, using silyloxy-1,3-dien-7-ynes under gold catalysis conditions provided the bicyclic derivatives with excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivities (up to >20:1 dr and 99% ee). PMID:22296571

  14. Biological removal of cationic fission products from nuclear wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ngwenya, N; Chirwa, E M N

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear energy is becoming a preferred energy source amidst rising concerns over the impacts of fossil fuel based energy on global warming and climate change. However, the radioactive waste generated during nuclear power generation contains harmful long-lived fission products such as strontium (Sr). In this study, cationic strontium uptake from solution by microbial cultures obtained from mine wastewater is evaluated. A high strontium removal capacity (q(max)) with maximum loading of 444 mg/g biomass was achieved by a mixed sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) culture. Sr removal in SRB was facilitated by cell surface based electrostatic interactions with the formation of weak ionic bonds, as 68% of the adsorbed Sr(2+) was easily desorbed from the biomass in an ion exchange reaction with MgCl₂. To a lesser extent, precipitation reactions were also found to account for the removal of Sr from aqueous solution as about 3% of the sorbed Sr was precipitated due to the presence of chemical ligands while the remainder occurred as an immobile fraction. Further analysis of the Sr-loaded SRB biomass by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled to energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) confirmed extracellular Sr(2+) precipitation as a result of chemical interaction. In summary, the obtained results demonstrate the prospects of using biological technologies for the remediation of industrial wastewaters contaminated by fission products.

  15. Hydrogen release reactions of Al-based complex hydrides enhanced by vibrational dynamics and valences of metal cations.

    PubMed

    Sato, T; Ramirez-Cuesta, A J; Daemen, L; Cheng, Y-Q; Tomiyasu, K; Takagi, S; Orimo, S

    2016-09-27

    Hydrogen release from Al-based complex hydrides composed of metal cation(s) and [AlH4](-) was investigated using inelastic neutron scattering viewed from vibrational dynamics. The hydrogen release followed the softening of translational and [AlH4](-) librational modes, which was enhanced by vibrational dynamics and the valence(s) of the metal cation(s).

  16. Hydrogen release reactions of Al-based complex hydrides enhanced by vibrational dynamics and valences of metal cations

    DOE PAGES

    Sato, T.; Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal J.; Daemen, Luke L.; ...

    2016-08-31

    Hydrogen release from Al-based complex hydrides composed of metal cation(s) and [AlH4]– was investigated using inelastic neutron scattering viewed from vibrational dynamics. Here, the hydrogen release followed the softening of translational and [AlH4]– librational modes, which was enhanced by vibrational dynamics and the valence(s) of the metal cation(s).

  17. Metal cation/anion adsorption on calcium carbonate: Implications to metal ion concentrations in groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Zachara, J.M.; Cowan, C.E.; Resch, C.T.

    1990-05-01

    This chapter evaluates the sorption behavior of metallic ions on specimen calcite as a basis for determining the importance of calcite relative to other subsurface sorbents, such as layer silicates and oxides, in controlling metal ion concentration in calcareous groundwaters. A review of the literature shows the sorption of both metallic cations and anions on calcite over ranges in pH and CO{sub 2} partial pressure to be consistent with a surface-exchange process where cations exchange with surface Ca and anions exchange with surface CO{sub 3}. A general surface-exchange model was developed to account for the effects of Ca and CO{sub 3} concentrations, pH, and calcite surface area on cation and anion sorption onto calcite. The model was applied to recently developed experimental sorption data of Zn and SeO{sub 3} on specimen calcite in equilibrium CaCO{sub 3}(aq) suspensions. The surface-exchange model was able to describe the effects of pH on both cation and anion sorption, and provided good predictions of the effects of variable CO{sub 2}(g) pressure on Zn sorption and of PO{sub 4} on SeO{sub 3} sorption. The surface-exchange model, combined with sorption constants for other phases, was used to calculate Cd sorption to a hypothetical aquifer material containing a mixture of sorbents. The sorbent concentrations were fixed to those expected in groundwater zones. The multi-sorbent calculation documented the importance of calcite as a sorbent for metallic ions in groundwater.93 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Metal Cationization Extractive Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry of Compounds Containing Multiple Oxygens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Kenneth D.; Spencer, Sandra E.; Glish, Gary L.

    2017-06-01

    Extractive electrospray ionization is an ambient ionization technique that allows real-time sampling of liquid samples, including organic aerosols. Similar to electrospray ionization, the composition of the electrospray solvent used in extractive electrospray ionization can easily be altered to form metal cationized molecules during ionization simply by adding a metal salt to the electrospray solvent. An increase in sensitivity is observed for some molecules that are lithium, sodium, or silver cationized compared with the protonated molecule formed in extractive electrospray ionization with an acid additive. Tandem mass spectrometry of metal cationized molecules can also significantly improve the ability to identify a compound. Tandem mass spectrometry of lithium and silver cationized molecules can result in an increase in the number and uniqueness of dissociation pathways relative to [M + H]+. These results highlight the potential for extractive electrospray ionization with metal cationization in analyzing complex aerosol mixtures. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Metal Cationization Extractive Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry of Compounds Containing Multiple Oxygens.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Kenneth D; Spencer, Sandra E; Glish, Gary L

    2016-11-28

    Extractive electrospray ionization is an ambient ionization technique that allows real-time sampling of liquid samples, including organic aerosols. Similar to electrospray ionization, the composition of the electrospray solvent used in extractive electrospray ionization can easily be altered to form metal cationized molecules during ionization simply by adding a metal salt to the electrospray solvent. An increase in sensitivity is observed for some molecules that are lithium, sodium, or silver cationized compared with the protonated molecule formed in extractive electrospray ionization with an acid additive. Tandem mass spectrometry of metal cationized molecules can also significantly improve the ability to identify a compound. Tandem mass spectrometry of lithium and silver cationized molecules can result in an increase in the number and uniqueness of dissociation pathways relative to [M + H](+). These results highlight the potential for extractive electrospray ionization with metal cationization in analyzing complex aerosol mixtures. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  20. Metal Cationization Extractive Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry of Compounds Containing Multiple Oxygens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Kenneth D.; Spencer, Sandra E.; Glish, Gary L.

    2016-11-01

    Extractive electrospray ionization is an ambient ionization technique that allows real-time sampling of liquid samples, including organic aerosols. Similar to electrospray ionization, the composition of the electrospray solvent used in extractive electrospray ionization can easily be altered to form metal cationized molecules during ionization simply by adding a metal salt to the electrospray solvent. An increase in sensitivity is observed for some molecules that are lithium, sodium, or silver cationized compared with the protonated molecule formed in extractive electrospray ionization with an acid additive. Tandem mass spectrometry of metal cationized molecules can also significantly improve the ability to identify a compound. Tandem mass spectrometry of lithium and silver cationized molecules can result in an increase in the number and uniqueness of dissociation pathways relative to [M + H]+. These results highlight the potential for extractive electrospray ionization with metal cationization in analyzing complex aerosol mixtures.

  1. Systems biology of monovalent cation homeostasis in yeast: the translucent contribution.

    PubMed

    Ariño, Joaquín; Aydar, Ebru; Drulhe, Samuel; Ganser, Daniel; Jorrín, Jesús; Kahm, Matthias; Krause, Falko; Petrezsélyová, Silvia; Yenush, Lynne; Zimmermannová, Olga; van Heusden, G Paul H; Kschischo, Maik; Ludwig, Jost; Palmer, Chris; Ramos, José; Sychrová, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Maintenance of monovalent cation homeostasis (mainly K(+) and Na(+)) is vital for cell survival, and cation toxicity is at the basis of a myriad of relevant phenomena, such as salt stress in crops and diverse human diseases. Full understanding of the importance of monovalent cations in the biology of the cell can only be achieved from a systemic perspective. Translucent is a multinational project developed within the context of the SysMO (System Biology of Microorganisms) initiative and focussed in the study of cation homeostasis using the well-known yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model. The present review summarize how the combination of biochemical, genetic, genomic and computational approaches has boosted our knowledge in this field, providing the basis for a more comprehensive and coherent vision of the role of monovalent cations in the biology of the cell.

  2. Structural resolution of 4-substituted proline diastereomers with ion mobility spectrometry via alkali metal ion cationization.

    PubMed

    Flick, Tawnya G; Campuzano, Iain D G; Bartberger, Michael D

    2015-03-17

    The chirality of substituents on an amino acid can significantly change its mode of binding to a metal ion, as shown here experimentally by traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (TWIMS-MS) of different proline isomeric molecules complexed with alkali metal ions. Baseline separation of the cis- and trans- forms of both hydroxyproline and fluoroproline was achieved using TWIMS-MS via metal ion cationization (Li(+), Na(+), K(+), and Cs(+)). Density functional theory calculations indicate that differentiation of these diastereomers is a result of the stabilization of differing metal-complexed forms adopted by the diastereomers when cationized by an alkali metal cation, [M + X](+) where X = Li, Na, K, and Cs, versus the topologically similar structures of the protonated molecules, [M + H](+). Metal-cationized trans-proline variants exist in a linear salt-bridge form where the metal ion interacts with a deprotonated carboxylic acid and the proton is displaced onto the nitrogen atom of the pyrrolidine ring. In contrast, metal-cationized cis-proline variants adopt a compact structure where the carbonyl of the carboxylic acid, nitrogen atom, and if available, the hydroxyl and fluorine substituent solvate the metal ion. Experimentally, it was observed that the resolution between alkali metal-cationized cis- and trans-proline variants decreases as the size of the metal ion increases. Density functional theory demonstrates that this is due to the decreasing stability of the compact charge-solvated cis-proline structure with increased metal ion radius, likely a result of steric hindrance and/or weaker binding to the larger metal ion. Furthermore, the unique structures adopted by the alkali metal-cationized cis- and trans-proline variants results in these molecules having significantly different quantum mechanically calculated dipole moments, a factor that can be further exploited to improve the diastereomeric resolution when utilizing a drift gas with a

  3. Observation of Accumulated Metal Cation Distribution in Fish by Novel Stigmatic Imaging Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Jun; Ikeda, Shinichiro; Toyoda, Michisato

    2014-02-01

    The accumulation of radioactive substances in biological organisms is a matter of great concern since the incident at the nuclear power plant in Fukushima, Japan. We have developed a novel technique for observing the distribution of accumulated metal cations in fish that employs a new imaging mass spectrometer, MULTUM-IMG2. Distributions of 133Cs and 88Sr in a sliced section of medaka (Oryzias latipes) are obtained with spatial resolution of µm-scale.

  4. Alkaline earth metal cation exchange: effect of mobile counterion and dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Indarawis, Katrina; Boyer, Treavor H

    2012-04-17

    The goal of this research was to provide an improved understanding of the interactions between alkaline earth metals and DOM under conditions that are encountered during drinking water treatment with particular focus on cation exchange. Both magnetically enhanced and nonmagnetic cation exchange resins were converted to Na, Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba mobile counterion forms as a novel approach to investigate the exchange behavior between the cations and the interactions between the cations and DOM. The results show that cation exchange is a robust process for removal of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) considering competition with cations on the resin surface and presence of DOM. DOM was actively involved during the cation exchange process through complexation, adsorption, and coprecipitation reactions. In addition to advancing the understanding of ion exchange processes for water treatment, the results of this work are applicable to membrane pretreatment to minimize fouling, treatment of membrane concentrate, and precipitative softening.

  5. Physical and biological properties of cationic triesters of phosphatidylcholine

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, RC; Ashley, GW; Shida, MM; Rakhmanova, VA; Tarahovsky, YS; Pantazatos, DP; Kennedy, MT; Pozharski, EV; Baker, KA; Jones, RD; Rosenzweig, HS; Choi, KL; Qiu, R; McIntosh, TJ

    1999-01-01

    The properties of a new class of phospholipids, alkyl phosphocholine triesters, are described. These compounds were prepared from phosphatidylcholines through substitution of the phosphate oxygen by reaction with alkyl trifluoromethylsulfonates. Their unusual behavior is ascribed to their net positive charge and absence of intermolecular hydrogen bonding. The O-ethyl, unsaturated derivatives hydrated to generate large, unilamellar liposomes. The phase transition temperature of the saturated derivatives is very similar to that of the precursor phosphatidylcholine and quite insensitive to ionic strength. The dissociation of single molecules from bilayers is unusually facile, as revealed by the surface activity of aqueous liposome dispersions. Vesicles of cationic phospholipids fused with vesicles of anionic lipids. Liquid crystalline cationic phospholipids such as 1, 2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine triflate formed normal lipid bilayers in aqueous phases that interacted with short, linear DNA and supercoiled plasmid DNA to form a sandwich-structured complex in which bilayers were separated by strands of DNA. DNA in a 1:1 (mol) complex with cationic lipid was shielded from the aqueous phase, but was released by neutralizing the cationic charge with anionic lipid. DNA-lipid complexes transfected DNA into cells very effectively. Transfection efficiency depended upon the form of the lipid dispersion used to generate DNA-lipid complexes; in the case of the O-ethyl derivative described here, large vesicle preparations in the liquid crystalline phase were most effective. PMID:10545361

  6. The diastereoselective synthesis of octahedral cationic iridium hydride complexes with a stereogenic metal centre.

    PubMed

    Humbert, Nicolas; Mazet, Clément

    2016-08-23

    We report herein the highly diastereoselective synthesis of octahedral cationic Ir(iii) hydride complexes with a stereogenic metal centre following various strategies. The configurational stability of these compounds has also been investigated.

  7. Facile synthesis of magnetic metal (Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni) oxides nanocrystals via a cation-exchange reaction.

    PubMed

    Ning, Jiajia; Xiao, Guanjun; Wang, Li; Zou, Bo; Liu, Bingbing; Zou, Guangtian

    2011-02-01

    Magnetic metal (Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni) oxides nanocrystals with small size and uniform size distribution are synthesized via a cation-exchange reaction. Two experimental stages are included in the synthesis of metal oxides nanocrystals. Firstly, Cu(OH)2 decomposes to CuO nanocrystals, induced by free metal cations. Compared to CuO nanocrystals produced without any free metal cation, the free metal cation has an important influence on the shape and size of CuO. Secondly, free metal cations exchange with the Cu2+ cation in the CuO nanocrystals to get Mn3O4, Fe2O3, CoO and NiO nanocrystals by cation-exchange reactions. The magnetic properties of these metal oxides nanocrystals have been investigated, all the nanocrystals are superparamagnetic at room temperature.

  8. Promoter Effects of Alkali Metal Cations on the Electrochemical Reduction of Carbon Dioxide

    DOE PAGES

    Resasco, Joaquin; Chen, Leanne D.; Clark, Ezra; ...

    2017-07-24

    The electrochemical reduction of CO2 is known to be influenced by the identity of the alkali metal cation in the electrolyte; however, a satisfactory explanation for this phenomenon has not been developed. Here we present the results of experimental and theoretical studies aimed at elucidating the effects of electrolyte cation size on the intrinsic activity and selectivity of metal catalysts for the reduction of CO2. Experiments were conducted under conditions where the influence of electrolyte polarization is minimal in order to show that cation size affects the intrinsic rates of formation of certain reaction products, most notably for HCOO–, C2H4,more » and C2H5OH over Cu(100)- and Cu(111)-oriented thin films, and for CO and HCOO– over polycrystalline Ag and Sn. Interpretation of the findings for CO2 reduction was informed by studies of the reduction of glyoxal and CO, key intermediates along the reaction pathway to final products. Density functional theory calculations show that the alkali metal cations influence the distribution of products formed as a consequence of electrostatic interactions between solvated cations present at the outer Helmholtz plane and adsorbed species having large dipole moments. As a result, the observed trends in activity with cation size are attributed to an increase in the concentration of cations at the outer Helmholtz plane with increasing cation size.« less

  9. Prediction of mono-, bi-, and trivalent metal cation relative toxicity to the seaweed Gracilaria domingensis (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta) in synthetic seawater.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Luiz Fernando; Zambotti-Villela, Leonardo; Yokoya, Nair Sumie; Bastos, Erick Leite; Stevani, Cassius Vinicius; Colepicolo, Pio

    2013-11-01

    The present study reports a 48-h aquatic metal-toxicity assay based on daily growth rates of the red seaweed Gracilaria domingensis (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta) in synthetic seawater. The median inhibitory concentration (IC50) for each metal cation was experimentally determined, and the ratios of free ions (aqueous complex) were calculated by software minimization of the total equilibrium activity (MINTEQA2) to determine the free median inhibitory concentration (IC50F). A model for predicting the toxicity of 14 metal cations was developed using the generic function approximation algorithm (GFA) with log IC50F values as the dependent variables and the following properties as independent variables: ionic radius (r), atomic number (AN), electronegativity (Xm ), covalent index (Xm (2) r), first hydrolysis constant (|log KOH |), softness index (σp ), ion charge (Z), ionization potential (ΔIP), electrochemical potential (ΔEo ), atomic number divided by ionization potential (AN/ΔIP), and the cation polarizing power for Z(2) /r and Z/AR. The 3-term independent variables were predicted as the best-fit model (log IC50F: -23.64 + 5.59 Z/AR + 0.99 |log KOH | + 37.05 σp ; adjusted r(2) : 0.88; predicted r(2) : 0.68; Friedman lack-of-fit score: 1.6). This mathematical expression can be used to predict metal-biomolecule interactions, as well as the toxicity of mono-, bi-, and trivalent metal cations, which have not been experimentally tested in seaweed to date. Quantitative ion-character relationships allowed the authors to infer that the mechanism of toxicity might involve an interaction between metals and functional groups of biological species containing sulfur or oxygen.

  10. The influence of large cations on the electrochemical properties of tunnel-structured metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yifei; Zhan, Chun; He, Kun; Chen, Hungru; Yao, Wentao; Sharifi-Asl, Soroosh; Song, Boao; Yang, Zhenzhen; Nie, Anmin; Luo, Xiangyi; Wang, Hao; Wood, Stephen M.; Amine, Khalil; Islam, M. Saiful; Lu, Jun; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza

    2016-11-01

    Metal oxides with a tunnelled structure are attractive as charge storage materials for rechargeable batteries and supercapacitors, since the tunnels enable fast reversible insertion/extraction of charge carriers (for example, lithium ions). Common synthesis methods can introduce large cations such as potassium, barium and ammonium ions into the tunnels, but how these cations affect charge storage performance is not fully understood. Here, we report the role of tunnel cations in governing the electrochemical properties of electrode materials by focusing on potassium ions in α-MnO2. We show that the presence of cations inside 2 × 2 tunnels of manganese dioxide increases the electronic conductivity, and improves lithium ion diffusivity. In addition, transmission electron microscopy analysis indicates that the tunnels remain intact whether cations are present in the tunnels or not. Our systematic study shows that cation addition to α-MnO2 has a strong beneficial effect on the electrochemical performance of this material.

  11. Infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy of cationized histidine: effects of metal cation size on gas-phase conformation.

    PubMed

    Citir, Murat; Hinton, Christopher S; Oomens, Jos; Steill, Jeffrey D; Armentrout, P B

    2012-02-16

    The gas phase structures of cationized histidine (His), including complexes with Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+), are examined by infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy utilizing light generated by a free electron laser, in conjunction with quantum chemical calculations. To identify the structures present in the experimental studies, measured IRMPD spectra are compared to spectra calculated at B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) (Li(+), Na(+), and K(+) complexes) and B3LYP/HW*/6-311+G(d,p) (Rb(+) and Cs(+) complexes) levels of theory, where HW* indicates that the Hay-Wadt effective core potential with additional polarization functions was used on the metals. Single point energy calculations were carried out at the B3LYP, B3P86, and MP2(full) levels using the 6-311+G(2d,2p) basis set. On the basis of these experiments and calculations, the only conformation that reproduces the IRMPD action spectra for the complexes of the smaller alkali metal cations, Li(+)(His) and Na(+)(His), is a charge-solvated, tridentate structure where the metal cation binds to the backbone carbonyl oxygen, backbone amino nitrogen, and nitrogen atom of the imidazole side chain, [CO,N(α),N(1)], in agreement with the predicted ground states of these complexes. Spectra of the larger alkali metal cation complexes, K(+)(His), Rb(+)(His), and Cs(+)(His), have very similar spectral features that are considerably more complex than the IRMPD spectra of Li(+)(His) and Na(+)(His). For these complexes, the bidentate [CO,N(1)] conformer in which the metal cation binds to the backbone carbonyl oxygen and nitrogen atom of the imidazole side chain is a dominant contributor, although features associated with the tridentate [CO,N(α),N(1)] conformer remain, and those for the [COOH] conformer are also clearly present. Theoretical results for Rb(+)(His) and Cs(+)(His) indicate that both [CO,N(1)] and [COOH] conformers are low-energy structures, with different levels of theory predicting different

  12. Tuning the LSPR in copper chalcogenide nanoparticles by cation intercalation, cation exchange and metal growth.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Andreas; Kodanek, Torben; Dorfs, Dirk

    2015-12-14

    Localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) of degenerately doped copper chalcogenide nanoparticles (NPs) (Cu2-xSe berzelianite and Cu1.1S covellite) have been modified applying different methods. The comparison of the cation exchange (Cu2-xSe) and intercalation (Cu1.1S) of Ag(I) and Cu(I) has shown that Ag(I) causes a non reversible, air stable shift of the LSPR. This was compared to the influence of Au(I) cation exchange into Cu1.1S platelets under the formation of Cu1.1S-Au2S mixed nanoplatelets. Furthermore, we show the growth of Au domains on Cu2-xSe, and discuss the interaction of the two plasmonic parts of the obtained dual plasmonic Cu2-xSe-Au hybrid particles.

  13. Low-Temperature Cationic Rearrangement in a Bulk Metal Oxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Man-Rong; Retuerto, Maria; Stephens, Peter W; Croft, Mark; Sheptyakov, Denis; Pomjakushin, Vladimir; Deng, Zheng; Akamatsu, Hirofumi; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Sánchez-Benítez, Javier; Saouma, Felix O; Jang, Joon I; Walker, David; Greenblatt, Martha

    2016-08-16

    Cationic rearrangement is a compelling strategy for producing desirable physical properties by atomic-scale manipulation. However, activating ionic diffusion typically requires high temperature, and in some cases also high pressure in bulk oxide materials. Herein, we present the cationic rearrangement in bulk Mn2 FeMoO6 at unparalleled low temperatures of 150-300 (o) C. The irreversible ionic motion at ambient pressure, as evidenced by real-time powder synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction, and second harmonic generation, leads to a transition from a Ni3 TeO6 -type to an ordered-ilmenite structure, and dramatic changes of the electrical and magnetic properties. This work demonstrates a remarkable cationic rearrangement, with corresponding large changes in the physical properties in a bulk oxide at unprecedented low temperatures.

  14. Hydrogen release reactions of Al-based complex hydrides enhanced by vibrational dynamics and valences of metal cations

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, T.; Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal J.; Daemen, Luke L.; Cheng, Yong -Qiang; Tomiyasu, Keisuke; Takagi, Shigeyuki; Orimo, Shin-ichi

    2016-08-31

    Hydrogen release from Al-based complex hydrides composed of metal cation(s) and [AlH4] was investigated using inelastic neutron scattering viewed from vibrational dynamics. Here, the hydrogen release followed the softening of translational and [AlH4] librational modes, which was enhanced by vibrational dynamics and the valence(s) of the metal cation(s).

  15. Hydrogen release reactions of Al-based complex hydrides enhanced by vibrational dynamics and valences of metal cations

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, T.; Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal J.; Daemen, Luke L.; Cheng, Yong -Qiang; Tomiyasu, Keisuke; Takagi, Shigeyuki; Orimo, Shin-ichi

    2016-08-31

    Hydrogen release from Al-based complex hydrides composed of metal cation(s) and [AlH4] was investigated using inelastic neutron scattering viewed from vibrational dynamics. Here, the hydrogen release followed the softening of translational and [AlH4] librational modes, which was enhanced by vibrational dynamics and the valence(s) of the metal cation(s).

  16. Cationic glycosphingolipids in neuronal tissues and their possible biological significance.

    PubMed

    Hikita, Toshiyuki; Tadano-Aritomi, Keiko; Iida-Tanaka, Naoko; Levery, Steven B; Ishizuka, Ineo; Hakomori, Senitiroh

    2002-08-01

    During the course of studies on natural occurrence of sphingosine base in brain, cationic glycosphingolipids bound to carboxymethyl-Sephadex and eluted with triethylamine in organic solvents were isolated and characterized. Four classes of compounds were identified: (i) plasmalopsychosine-A and -B; (ii) glyceroplasmalopsychosine; (iii) glycosphingolipids having de-N-acetyl-hexosamine, e.g., de-N-acetyl-Lc3Cer; (iv) glycosylsphingosine, i.e., lysoglycosphingolipid. Only two kinds, galactosylsphingosine (psychosine) and lactosylsphingosine, were found to occur naturally in brain. All these compounds were isolated from extract of brain white matter. Their occurrence, quantity, and distribution pattern differ from one species to another. Their quantity is much lower than that of regular acidic and neutral glycosphingolipids. They may interact with regular glycosphingolipids in glycosphingolipid-enriched microdomains to elicit signal transduction, to modify cellular phenotype, although studies along this line are highly limited at this time.

  17. Millimolar concentrations of zinc and other metal cations cause sedimentation of DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kejnovsky, E; Kypr, J

    1998-01-01

    We demonstrate that DNA sediments in the presence of millimolar concentrations of zinc or related metal cations and that EDTA entirely dissolves the sediment. The sedimentation is promoted by alkaline pH but the pH dependence is abolished by submillimolar concentrations of phosphate anions. We suspect that the metal cations generate sedimenting particles of insoluble hydroxides or phosphates for which DNA has a strong affinity. The events involved in DNA-metal phosphate co-sedimentation are similar to the processes that enable calcium phosphate-assisted transfection. Hence, work with even submillimolar concentrations of zinc and most other metal cations, which many DNA-binding proteins need for their activities, requires care to avoid the sedimentation of DNA. Literature reporting about zinc effects on DNA is discussed from the point of view of the present results. PMID:9826751

  18. Infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy of cationized methionine: effects of alkali-metal cation size on gas-phase conformation.

    PubMed

    Carl, Damon R; Cooper, Theresa E; Oomens, Jos; Steill, Jeff D; Armentrout, P B

    2010-04-14

    The gas-phase structures of alkali-metal cation complexes of the amino acid methionine (Met) as well as protonated methionine are investigated using infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy utilizing light generated by a free electron laser. Spectra of Li(+)(Met) and Na(+)(Met) are similar and relatively simple, whereas the spectra of K(+)(Met), Rb(+)(Met), and Cs(+)(Met) include distinctive new bands. Measured IRMPD spectra are compared to spectra calculated at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level of theory to identify the conformations present in the experimental studies. For Li(+) and Na(+) complexes, the only conformation present is a charge-solvated, tridentate structure that binds the metal cation to the amine and carbonyl groups of the amino acid backbone and the sulfur atom of the side chain, [N,CO,S]. In addition to the [N,CO,S] conformer, bands corresponding to alkali-metal cation binding to a bidentate zwitterionic structure, [CO(2)(-)], are clearly present for the K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+) complexes. Theoretical calculations of the lowest energy conformations of Rb(+) and Cs(+) complexes suggest that the experimental spectra could also include contributions from two additional charge-solvated structures, tridentate [COOH,S] and bidentate [COOH]. For H(+)(Met), the IRMPD action spectrum is reproduced by multiple low-energy [N,CO,S] conformers, in which the protonated amine group hydrogen bonds to the carbonyl oxygen atom and the sulfur atom of the amino acid side chain. These [N,CO,S] conformers only differ in their side-chain orientations.

  19. In vitro biopharmaceutical evaluation of ciprofloxacin/metal cation complexes for pulmonary administration.

    PubMed

    Brillault, J; Tewes, F; Couet, W; Olivier, J C

    2017-01-15

    Pulmonary delivery of fluoroquinolones (FQs) is an interesting approach to treat lung infections as it may lead to high local concentrations while minimizing systemic exposure. However, FQs have a rapid diffusion through the lung epithelium giving the pulmonary route no advantage compared to the oral route. Interactions between FQs and metal cations form complexes which limit the diffusion through the epithelial barrier and would reduce the absorption of FQs and maintain high concentrations in the lung. The effects of this complexation depend on the FQ and the metal cations and optimum partners should be selected through in vitro experiments prior to aerosol drug formulation. In this study, CIP was chosen as a representative FQ and 5 cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Zn(2+), Al(3+), Cu(2+)) were selected to study the complexation and its effects on permeability, antimicrobial efficacy and cell toxicity. The results showed that the apparent association constants between CIP and cations ranked with the descending order: Cu(2+)>Al(3+)>Zn(2+)>Mg(2+)>Ca(2+). When a target of 80% complexation was reached with the adequate concentrations of cations, the CIP permeability through the Calu-3 lung epithelial cells was decreased of 50%. Toxicity of the CIP on the Calu-3 cells, with an EC50 evaluated at 7μM, was not significantly affected by the presence of the cations. The minimum inhibitory concentration of CIP for Pseudomonas aeruginosa was not affected or slightly increased in the range of cation concentrations tested, except for Mg(2+). In conclusion, permeability was the main parameter that was affected by the metal cation complexation while cell toxicity and antimicrobial activity were not or slightly modified. Cu(2+), with the highest apparent constant of association and with no effect on cell toxicity and antimicrobial activity of the CIP, appeared as a promising cation for the development of a controlled-permeability formulation of CIP for lung treatment. Copyright © 2016

  20. Ultrasonic Absorption Rate Studies of Crown Ether and 222 Cryptate Complexes of Alkali Metal Cations in Nonaqueous Solutions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-30

    Studies of Crown Ether and 222 Cryptate Complexes of Alkali Metal Cations in Nonaqueous Solutions * by Sergio Petrucci and Edward M. Eyring Prepared...STUDIES OF CROWN ETHER AND 222 CRYPTATE COMPLEXES OF ALKALI METAL CATIONS IN NONAQUEOUS SOLUTIONS 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Sergio Petrucci and Edward M...of Crown Ether and 222 Cryptate Complexes of Alkali Metal Cations in Nonaqueous Solutions Sergio Petrucci and Edward M. Eyring Department of

  1. Non-essential metals in chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Paul J

    2011-01-01

    Metal ions and compounds are essential to life and many people routinely take them as food supplements in the form of vitamin and mineral pills. Most non-essential metals are considered to be toxic, nevertheless, many are widely used in imaging, diagnostics and medicine. This short review provides an overview from selected examples of the on-going research within my laboratory that uses metal compounds to either understand biological processes or that exhibit therapeutic properties overcoming the limitations of existing chemotherapies.

  2. Hydrocolloid liquid-core capsules for the removal of heavy-metal cations from water.

    PubMed

    Nussinovitch, A; Dagan, O

    2015-12-15

    Liquid-core capsules with a non-crosslinked alginate fluidic core surrounded by a gellan membrane were produced in a single step to investigate their ability to adsorb heavy metal cations. The liquid-core gellan-alginate capsules, produced by dropping alginate solution with magnesium cations into gellan solution, were extremely efficient at adsorbing lead cations (267 mg Pb(2+)/g dry alginate) at 25 °C and pH 5.5. However, these capsules were very weak and brittle, and an external strengthening capsule was added by using magnesium cations. The membrane was then thinned with the surfactant lecithin, producing capsules with better adsorption attributes (316 mg Pb(+2)/g dry alginate vs. 267 mg Pb(+2)/g dry alginate without lecithin), most likely due to the thinner membrane and enhanced mass transfer. The capsules' ability to adsorb other heavy-metal cations - copper (Cu(2+)), cadmium (Cd(2+)) and nickel (Ni(2+)) - was tested. Adsorption efficiencies were 219, 197 and 65 mg/g, respectively, and were correlated with the cation's affinity to alginate. Capsules with the sorbed heavy metals were regenerated by placing in a 1M nitric acid suspension for 24h. Capsules could undergo three regeneration cycles before becoming damaged. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Step-by-step deposition of synthetic dopamine-eumelanin and metal cations.

    PubMed

    Ball, Vincent; Bour, Jérôme; Michel, Marc

    2013-09-01

    The photoprotection of skin depends mostly on a balance between two natural pigments: the black-brown eumelanin and the yellow-reddish pheomelanin. These pigments as well as their counterpart in the central nervous system, neuromelanin, interact strongly with metal cations like Fe(3+). In the mussel foot proteins, the coordination between catechol groups and these ions is also responsible for the strong hardness the mussel's cuticle. These examples are suggestive that coatings and materials can be made based on such materials, for instance, synthetic eumelanin colloids and metal cations. Herein, we demonstrate that films made from synthetic dopamine-eumelanin colloids and metal cations can be deposited on surfaces in a step-by-step manner. As typical metal cations, we used Cu(2+), Fe(3+), and La(3+) which are known to interact with eumelanins. In all cases, step-by-step deposition is only possible in the absence of water rinse between two deposition steps. It was found that trivalent cations allow for a faster increase in film deposition than Cu(2+). Complementary in PDADMAC-(eumelanin-Fe(3+))m films, iron III was found not to be reduced.

  4. Transition-Metal-Free Synthesis of N-Hydroxy Oxindoles by an Aza-Nazarov-Type Reaction Involving Azaoxyallyl Cations.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wenzhi; Liu, Yahu A; Liao, Xuebin

    2016-10-10

    A novel transition-metal-free method to construct N-hydroxy oxindoles by an aza-Nazarov-type reaction involving azaoxyallyl cation intermediates is described. A variety of functional groups were tolerated under the weak basic reaction conditions and at room temperature. A one-pot process was also developed to make the reaction even more practical. This method provides alternative access to oxindoles and their biologically active derivatives. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. A Bioluminescence Assay System for Imaging Metal Cationic Activities in Urban Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Bae; Naganawa, Ryuichi; Murata, Shingo; Nakayama, Takayoshi; Miller, Simon; Senda, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    A bioluminescence-based assay system was fabricated for an efficient determination of the activities of air pollutants. The following four components were integrated into this assay system: (1) an 8-channel assay platform uniquely designed for simultaneously sensing multiple optical samples, (2) single-chain probes illuminating toxic chemicals or heavy metal cations from air pollutants, (3) a microfluidic system for circulating medium mimicking the human body, and (4) the software manimulating the above system. In the protocol, we briefly introduce how to integrate the components into the system and the application to the illumination of the metal cationic activities in air pollutants.

  6. [Effect of metal cations on the copper induced peroxidation of the low density lipoproteins].

    PubMed

    Dremina, E S; Vlasova, I I; Vakhrusheva, T V; Sharov, V S; Azizova, O A

    1997-01-01

    The effect of metal cations on copper-catalyzed lipid peroxidation (LPO) of low density lipoproteins (LDL) was examined. The presence of metal cations in the incubation media containing LDL (0.8 mg protein/ml) and CuSO4 (0-80 microM) influenced on LPO of LDL as evident by the measurement of TBARS. With the concentrations of CuSO4 less than 10 microM, the metal cations caused an increase in LDL peroxidation. Zn2+ appeared to be the most effective inductor, Mn2+ was less effective, and the influence of Ca2+ and Mg2+ was insignificant. With greater CuSO4 concentrations Mg2+ showed no effect on TBARS formation in LDL while the addition of other nontransition metal cations to the incubation mixture led to the inhibition of LDL peroxidation. The capacity for inhibition decreased in the row Mn2+ > Zn2+ > Ca2+ > Mg2+. The possible mechanism explaining these results may be in the competition of metal ions for copper binding sites on LDL. Our results allow to suggest the existence of two types of copper binding sites on LDL, tight-binding sites which are non-effective in LPO and effective weak-binding sites.

  7. Effects of metal cations and fulvic acid on the adsorption of ciprofloxacin onto goethite.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yinyue; Guo, Yong; Gu, Xueyuan; Gu, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin (CIP) can be strongly adsorbed by ferric oxides, but some influencing factors, such as multivalent cations and soil organic matter, have not been evaluated extensively. In this study, the interaction between CIP and four divalent metals (Ca, Cd, Cu, and Pb) was investigated using potentiometric titration and the results indicated that CIP can bind to the divalent metals in the following affinity order: Cu(II) > Pb(II) > Cd(II) > Ca(II). The effects of metals and fulvic acid (FA) on the adsorption behavior of CIP onto goethite surfaces were also examined using batch experiments. It was found that metal cations enhanced the CIP retention on goethite surfaces in the same order as the affinity order with CIP, indicating that metals likely increased CIP retention through cation bridging. FA was found to promote CIP sorption rather than compete with it, and the coexistence of FA and Cu(II) in the system exhibited an addictive effect with CIP sorption, indicating that they might influence the sorption separately under the studied loading condition. Taken together, our results suggested that the coexistence of divalent cations or soil organic matter will enhance CIP sorption on goethite surfaces, hence reducing its mobility and bioavailability in the environment.

  8. Homogeneous cationic substitution for two-dimensional layered metal oxide nanosheets via a galvanic exchange reaction.

    PubMed

    Lim, Joohyun; Lee, Jang Mee; Park, Boyeon; Jin, Xiaoyan; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2017-01-05

    The galvanic exchange reaction of an exfoliated 2D layered metal oxide nanosheet (NS) with excess substituent metal cations enables the synthesis of a mixed metal oxide 2D NS with controllable cation compositions and physicochemical properties. The reaction of the exfoliated MnO2 NS with Fe(2+) or Sn(2+) ions at 90 °C induces the uniform galvanic replacement of Mn ions with these substituent ions, whereas the same reaction at 25 °C results in the intercalative restacking of the negatively-charged MnO2 NS with Fe(2+) or Sn(2+) cations. Upon the galvanic exchange reaction, the highly anisotropic MnO2 2D NS retains its original 2D morphology and layered structure, which is in stark contrast to 0D nanoparticles yielding hollow nanospheres via the galvanic exchange reaction. This observation is attributable to the thin thickness of the 2D NS allowing the simultaneous replacement of all the component surface-exposed metal ions. The resulting substitution of the MnO2 NS with Fe and Sn ions remarkably improves the electrode performance of the carbon-coated derivatives of the MnO2 NS for lithium ion batteries. The present study clearly demonstrates that the galvanic exchange reaction can provide an efficient method not only to tailor cation compositions but also to improve the functionalities of 2D metal oxide NSs and their carbon-coated derivatives.

  9. Effect of methoxy group position on biological properties of (18)F-labeled benzyl triphenylphosphonium cations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuting; Zhao, Zuoquan; Zhang, Ying; Fang, Wei; Lu, Jie; Zhang, Xianzhong

    2017-06-01

    (18)F-labeled phosphonium cations targeting mitochondrial membrane potential would be promising for positron emission tomography (PET) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of additional methoxy group and its different positions on myocardium uptake and pharmacokinetics properties of (18)F-labeled benzyl triphenylphosphonium cations. In this study, three novel (18)F-labeled phosphonium cations, [(18)F]4-(fluoromethyl)benzyltris(4-methoxyphenyl) phosphonium cation (1b), [(18)F]4-(fluoromethyl)benzyltris(2-methoxyphenyl) phosphonium cation (2b) and [(18)F]4-(fluoromethyl)benzyltris(3-methoxyphenyl) phosphonium cation (3b), were efficiently prepared by a One-Pot method starting from the substitution of non-carried-added fluoride-18. Radiotracers were purified by HPLC. Physicochemical properties, in vitro cell uptake assay, in vivo mice biodistribution and rat micro-PET imaging were investigated. Results suggested that the position of methoxy group exhibited significant effect on the biological properties of (18)F-labeled benzyl triphenylphosphonium cations. The addition of methoxy group on orth- or meta-position of the radiotracers accelerated the radioactivity clearance from liver. The para-radiotracer had the highest uptake in the heart and other non-targeting organs. According to the biodistribution data, 2b (ortho-) displayed the fastest liver clearance and highest heart-to-background ratios. And its rat micro-PET images at 60min post-injection revealed a good visualization of heart and favorable heart-to-background contrast. Nevertheless, 2b exhibited a lower initial liver uptake and quicker liver clearance compared with (99m)Tc-sestamibi. The ortho- compound (2b) displayed the most favorable biological properties as a potential MPI agent to acquire high contrast images early after injection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Persister cells, the biofilm matrix and tolerance to metal cations in biofilm and planktonic Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Joe J; Turner, Raymond J; Ceri, Howard

    2005-07-01

    In this study, we examined Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 biofilm and planktonic cell susceptibility to metal cations. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) required to eradicate 100% of the planktonic population (MBC 100), and the minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) were determined using the MBEC trade mark-high throughput assay. Six metals - Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Al(3+) and Pb(2+)- were each tested at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 27 h of exposure to biofilm and planktonic cultures grown in rich or minimal media. With 2 or 4 h of exposure, biofilms were approximately 2-25 times more tolerant to killing by metal cations than the corresponding planktonic cultures. However, by 27 h of exposure, biofilm and planktonic bacteria were eradicated at approximately the same concentration in every instance. Viable cell counts evaluated at 2 and 27 h of exposure revealed that at high concentrations, most of the metals assayed had killed greater than 99.9% of biofilm and planktonic cell populations. The surviving cells were propogated in vitro and gave rise to biofilm and planktonic cultures with normal sensitivity to metals. Further, retention of copper by the biofilm matrix was investigated using the chelator sodium diethlydithiocarbamate. Formation of visible brown metal-chelates in biofilms treated with Cu(2+) suggests that the biofilm matrix may coordinate and sequester metal cations from the aqueous surroundings. Overall, our data suggest that both metal sequestration in the biofilm matrix and the presence of a small population of 'persister' cells may be contributing factors in the time-dependent tolerance of both planktonic cells and biofilms to high concentrations of metal cations.

  11. Decrease in ciprofloxacin absorption by polyvalent metal cations is not fully attributable to chelation or adsorption.

    PubMed

    Imaoka, Ayuko; Hattori, Michiko; Akiyoshi, Takeshi; Ohtani, Hisakazu

    2014-01-01

    The drug interaction between new quinolone antibiotics (NQs) and polyvalent metal cation products, leading to a significant decrease in the absorption of NQ, is considered to be attributable to the formation of poorly absorbable chelate and physicochemical adsorption of NQs to cation products. To clarify the mechanisms of this drug interaction in detail, we investigated the effects of Al(3+) or Mg(2+) on the membrane permeation profile of ciprofloxacin (CPFX) across human colon carcinoma cell lines (Caco-2) in monolayer culture, and characterized the adsorption nature of CPFX to polyvalent metal cation products under physiological conditions. As a result, Al(3+) or Mg(2+) partially but not fully impaired the permeation of CPFX across Caco-2 monolayer up to 30% or 60% of control, respectively. Physicochemical adsorption of CPFX to cation products was not observed under physiological pH. In conclusion, two possible mechanisms investigated, the decrease in the permeability of CPFX by chelate formation and adsorption of CPFX to polyvalent metal cation products, may partially but not fully explain the extent of the drug interaction clinically observed.

  12. Metal cation dependence of interactions with amino acids: bond dissociation energies of Rb(+) and Cs(+) to the acidic amino acids and their amide derivatives.

    PubMed

    Armentrout, P B; Yang, Bo; Rodgers, M T

    2014-04-24

    Metal cation-amino acid interactions are key components controlling the secondary structure and biological function of proteins, enzymes, and macromolecular complexes comprising these species. Determination of pairwise interactions of alkali metal cations with amino acids provides a thermodynamic vocabulary that begins to quantify these fundamental processes. In the present work, we expand a systematic study of such interactions by examining rubidium and cesium cations binding with the acidic amino acids (AA), aspartic acid (Asp) and glutamic acid (Glu), and their amide derivatives, asparagine (Asn) and glutamine (Gln). These eight complexes are formed using electrospray ionization and their bond dissociation energies (BDEs) are determined experimentally using threshold collision-induced dissociation with xenon in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer. Analyses of the energy-dependent cross sections include consideration of unimolecular decay rates, internal energy of the reactant ions, and multiple ion-neutral collisions. Quantum chemical calculations are conducted at the B3LYP, MP2(full), and M06 levels of theory using def2-TZVPPD basis sets, with results showing reasonable agreement with experiment. At 0 and 298 K, most levels of theory predict that the ground-state conformers for M(+)(Asp) and M(+)(Asn) involve tridentate binding of the metal cation to the backbone carbonyl, amino, and side-chain carbonyl groups, although tridentate binding to the carboxylic acid group and side-chain carbonyl is competitive for M(+)(Asn). For the two longer side-chain amino acids, Glu and Gln, multiple structures are competitive. A comparison of these results to those for the smaller alkali cations, Na(+) and K(+), provides insight into the trends in binding energies associated with the molecular polarizability and dipole moment of the side chain. For all four metal cations, the BDEs are inversely correlated with the size of the metal cation and follow the order Asp < Glu

  13. Alkali metal-cationized serine clusters studied by sonic spray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nanita, Sergio C; Sokol, Ewa; Cooks, R Graham

    2007-05-01

    Serine solutions containing salts of alkali metals yield magic number clusters of the type (Ser(4)+C)(+), (Ser(8)+C)(+), (Ser(12)+C)(+), and (Ser(17)+2C)(+2) (where C = Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), or Cs(+)), in relative abundances which are strongly dependent on the cation size. Strong selectivity for homochirality is involved in the formation of serine tetramers cationized by K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+). This is also the case for the octamers cationized by the smaller alkalis but there is a strong preference for heterochirality in the octamers cationized by the larger alkali cations. Tandem mass spectrometry shows that the octamers and dodecamers cationized by K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+) dissociate mainly by the loss of Ser(4) units, suggesting that the neutral tetramers are the stable building blocks of the observed larger aggregates, (Ser(8)+C)(+) and (Ser(12)+C)(+). Remarkably, although the Ser(4) units are formed with a strong preference for homochirality, they aggregate further regardless of their handedness and, therefore, with a preference for the nominally racemic 4D:4L structure and an overall strong heterochiral preference. The octamers cationized by K(+), Rb(+), or Cs(+) therefore represent a new type of cluster ion that is homochiral in its internal subunits, which then assemble in a random fashion to form octamers. We tentatively interpret the homochirality of these tetramers as a consequence of assembly of the serine molecules around a central metal ion. The data provide additional evidence that the neutral serine octamer is homochiral and is readily cationized by smaller ions.

  14. Enhanced PCBs sorption on biochars as affected by environmental factors: Humic acid and metal cations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Lei; Fang, Guodong; Herath, H M S K; Wang, Yujun; Cang, Long; Xie, Zubin; Zhou, Dongmei

    2013-01-01

    Biochar plays an important role in the behaviors of organic pollutants in the soil environment. The role of humic acid (HA) and metal cations on the adsorption affinity of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to the biochars in an aqueous medium and an extracted solution from a PCBs-contaminated soil was studied using batch experiments. Biochars were produced with pine needles and wheat straw at 350 °C and 550 °C under anaerobic condition. The results showed that the biochars had high adsorption affinity for PCBs. Pine needle chars adsorbed less nonplanar PCBs than planar ones due to dispersive interactions and separation. Coexistence of HA and metal cations increased PCBs sorption on the biochars accounted for HA adsorption and cation complexation. The results will aid in a better understanding of biochar sorption mechanism of contaminants in the environment.

  15. The intrinsic stabilities and structures of alkali metal cationized guanine quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Azargun, M; Jami-Alahmadi, Y; Fridgen, T D

    2017-01-04

    The structures and stabilities of self-assembled guanine quadruplexes, M(9eG)8(+) (M = Na, K, Rb, Cs; 9eG = 9-ethylguanine), have been studied in the gas phase by blackbody infrared radiative dissociation to determine the difference in the stabilizing effect of the alkali metal cations. The order of stabilities to decomposition was determined to be K(+) > Rb(+) > Cs(+) ≫ Na(+), which is consistent with the observation of K(+) being the ion of choice in guanine quadruplexes in nucleic acids. In the gas phase, the sodiated quadruplex was found to lose one 9eG at a time, whereas the quadruplexes of the heavier cations lost a neutral guanine tetrad. Vibrational spectroscopy on the gas-phase quadruplex ions was consistent with the structures in which the metal cations were sandwiched between two guanine tetrads. Electronic structure calculations are also used to compare with the observed stabilities and vibrational spectra.

  16. Adsorption Behavior of Rare Earth Metal Cations in the Interlayer Space of γ-ZrP.

    PubMed

    Takei, Takahiro; Iidzuka, Kiyoaki; Miura, Akira; Yanagida, Sayaka; Kumada, Nobuhiro; Magome, Eisuke; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2016-10-04

    Adsorption competencies of rare earth metal cations in γ-zirconium phosphate were examined by ICP, synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SXRD), and ab initio simulation. The adsorption amounts are around 0.06-0.10 per zirconium phosphate. From the SXRD patterns of the adsorbed samples, the basal spacing estimated by c sin β increased linearly with an increasing ionic radius of rare earth metal cation, though a and b lattice constants show no change. These SXRD patterns can be classified into four groups that have different super lattices. The four superlattices have multiplicities of x131, x241, and x221 for the xabc axis, and the location of the rare earth metal cation in the original unit cell changes depending on the superlattice cell. In the x131 superlattice, Yb and Er occupied the site near the zirconium phosphate layer, though La and Ce in the x221 superlattice remained in the center position between the phosphate sheet. For the ab initio simulation of γ-ZrP with the typical rare earth metal cations (Tb, Eu, Dy, and La), the results of simulation show a similar tendency of the position estimated by SXRD refinements.

  17. Systematic studies of the mass spectrometric properties of alkaline earth metal cationized amino acids and peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küjckelmann, Ulrich; Müller, Dietrich; Weber, Carsten

    1997-07-01

    The results of a systematic study of the gas phase interactions of α-amino acids and peptides (4-15 amino acids) with alkaline earth metals, observed with mass spectrometric techniques, are presented. Furthermore, a model for the cationization with calcium at the C-terminal amino acid arginine in rotaviral polypeptides is presented.

  18. Electrochemical Removal of Metal Cations from Wastewater Monitored by Differential Pulse Polarography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Delphine; Kuhn, Alexander; Sojic, Neso

    2004-01-01

    Electrodeposition eliminates wastewater pollutants such as electrochemically active metal cations, with different pulse polarography (DPP) scrutinizing the kinetics of the treatment process. These mechanisms produce qualitative and quantitative data about the removal process, while students appreciate the use of electrochemistry in resolving…

  19. Enhancing electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution by nickel salicylaldimine complexes with alkali metal cations in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Shao, Haiyan; Muduli, Subas K; Tran, Phong D; Soo, Han Sen

    2016-02-18

    New salicylaldimine nickel complexes, comprising only earth-abundant elements, have been developed for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution in aqueous media. The second-sphere ether functionalities on the periphery of the complexes enhance the electrocatalytic activity in the presence of alkali metal cations. The electrocatalysts demonstrate improved performances especially in the economical and sustainable seawater reaction medium.

  20. Electrochemical Removal of Metal Cations from Wastewater Monitored by Differential Pulse Polarography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Delphine; Kuhn, Alexander; Sojic, Neso

    2004-01-01

    Electrodeposition eliminates wastewater pollutants such as electrochemically active metal cations, with different pulse polarography (DPP) scrutinizing the kinetics of the treatment process. These mechanisms produce qualitative and quantitative data about the removal process, while students appreciate the use of electrochemistry in resolving…

  1. Probing the role of metal cations on the aggregation behavior of amyloid β-peptide at a single molecule level by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yang; Wang, Jianhua; Liu, Chundong

    2016-09-01

    With the development of nanotechnology, understanding of intermolecular interactions on a single molecule level by atomic force spectroscopy (AFM) has played an important role in molecular biology and biomedical science. In recent years, some research suggested that the presence of metal cations is an important regulator in the processes of misfolding and aggregation of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ), which may be an important etiological factor of Alzheimer's disease. However, the knowledge on the principle of interactions between Aβ and metal cations at the single molecule level is still poor understood. In this paper, the amyloid β-protein (Aβ) was fabricated on substrate of mixed thiol-modified gold nanoparticles using self-assembled monolayer method and the adhesion force in the longitudinal direction between metal cations and Aβ42 were investigated by AFM. The role of metal ions on Aβ aggregation is discussed from the perspective of single molecular force. The force results showed that the specific adhesion force F i and the nonspecific force F 0 between a single Aβ-Aβ pair in control experiment were calculated as 42 ± 3 and 80 pN, respectively. However, F i between a single Aβ-Aβ pair in the presence of Cu2+, Zn2+, Ca2+ and Al3+ increased dramatically to 84 ± 6, 89 ± 3, 73 ± 5, 95 ± 5 pN successively, which indicated that unbinding between Aβ proteins is accelerated in the presence of metal cations. What is more, the imaging results showed that substoichiometric copper cations accelerate the formation of fibrils within 3 days. The combined atomic force spectroscopy and imaging analysis indicate that metal cations play a role in promoting the aggregating behavior of Aβ42.

  2. The Effects of Alkali Metal Cations and Common Anions on the Frog Skin Potential

    PubMed Central

    Lindley, Barry D.; Hoshiko, T.

    1964-01-01

    The effects on the potential difference across isolated frog skin (R. catesbeiana, R. pipiens) of changing the ionic composition of the bathing solutions have been examined. Estimates of mean values and precision are presented for the potential changes produced by substituting other alkali metal cations for Na at the outside border and for K at the inside border. In terms of ability to mimic Na at the outside border of bullfrog skin, the selectivity order is Li > Rb, K, Cs; at the outside border of leopard frog skin, Li > Cs, K, Rb. In terms of ability to mimic K at the inside border of bullfrog and leopard frog skin: Rb > Cs > Li > Na. Orders of anion selectivity in terms of sensitivity of the potential for the outside border of bullfrog skin are Br > Cl > NO3 > I > SO4, isethionate and of leopard frog skin are Br, Cl > I, NO3, SO4. An effect of the solution composition (ionic strength?) on the apparent Na-K selectivity of the outside border is described. The results of the investigation have been interpreted and discussed in terms of the application of the constant field equation to the Koefoed-Johnsen-Ussing frog skin model. These observations may be useful in constructing and testing models of biological ionic selectivity. PMID:14127610

  3. Understanding the Effect of Cation Disorder on the Voltage Profile of Lithium Transition-Metal Oxides

    DOE PAGES

    Abdellahi, Aziz; Urban, Alexander; Dacek, Stephen; ...

    2016-07-13

    Cation disorder is a phenomenon that is becoming increasingly important for the design of high-energy lithium transition metal oxide cathodes (LiMO2) for Li-ion batteries. Disordered Li-excess rocksalts have recently been shown to achieve high reversible capacity, while in operando cation disorder has been observed in a large class of ordered compounds. The voltage slope (dV/dxu )is a critical quantity for the design of cation-disordered rocksalts, as it controls the Li capacity accessible at voltages below the stability limit of the electrolyte (~4.5-4.7 V). In this study, we develop a lattice model based on first principles to understand and quantify themore » voltage slope of cation-disordered LiMO2. We show that cation disorder increases the voltage slope of Li transition metal oxides by creating a statistical distribution of transition metal environments around Li sites, as well as by allowing Li occupation of highvoltage tetrahedral sites. We further demonstrate that the voltage slope increase upon disorder is generally smaller for highvoltage transition metals than for low-voltage transition metals due to a more effective screening of Li-M interactions by oxygen electrons. Short-range order in practical disordered compounds is found to further mitigate the voltage slope increase upon disorder. In conclusion, our analysis shows that the additional high-voltage tetrahedral capacity induced by disorder is smaller in Liexcess compounds than in stoichiometric LiMO2 compounds.« less

  4. Ab initio investigation of the structure and alkali metal cation selectivity of 18-crown-6

    SciTech Connect

    Glendening, E.D.; Feller, D.; Thompson, M.A. )

    1994-11-16

    We present an ab inito, quantum mechanical study of 18-crown-6 (18c6) and its interaction with the alkali metal cations Li[sup +], Na[sup +], K[sup +], Rb[sup +], and Cs[sup +]. Geometries, binding energies, and binding enthalpies are evaluated at the restricted Hartree-Fock (RHF) level using standard basis sets (3-21G and 6-31 + G*) and relativistic effective core potentials. Electron correlation effects are determined at the MP2 level, and wave function analysis is performed by the natural bond orbital (NBO) and associated methods. The affinity of 18c6 for the alkali metal cations is quite strong (50-100 kcal mol[sup [minus]1], depending on cation type), arising largely from the electrostatic (ionic) interaction of the cation with the nucleophilic ether backbone. Charge transfer (covalent bonding) contributions are somewhat less important, only 20-50% as strong as the electrostatic interaction. Agreement of the calculated binding enthalpies and experimentally determined quantities is rather poor. For example, the binding energy for K[sup +]/18c6 (-71.5 kcal mol[sup [minus]1]) is about 30 kcal mol[sup [minus]1] stronger than that determined by experiment, and it is not clear how to reconcile this difference. Our calculations clearly show that solvation effects strongly influence cation selectivity. 48 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Pore with gate: modulating hydrogen storage in metal-organic framework materials via cation exchange.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sihai; Callear, Samantha K; Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal J; David, William I F; Sun, Junliang; Blake, Alexander J; Champness, Neil R; Schröder, Martin

    2011-01-01

    A range of anionic metal-organic framework (MOF) materials has been prepared by combination of In(III) with tetracarboxylate isophthalate-based ligands. These materials incorporate organic cations, either H2ppz2+ (ppz = piperazine) or Me2NH2+, that are hydrogen bonded to the pore wall. These cations act as a gate controlling entry of N2 and H2 gas into and out of the porous host. Thus, hysteretic adsorption/desorption for N2 and H2 is observed in these systems, reflecting the role of the bulky hydrogen bonded organic cations in controlling the kinetic trapping of substrates. Post-synthetic cation exchange with Li+ leads to removal of the organic cation and the formation of the corresponding Li+ salts. Replacement of the organic cation with smaller Li+ leads to an increase in internal surface area and pore volume of the framework material, and in some cases to an increase in the isosteric heat of adsorption of H2 at zero coverage, as predicted by theoretical modelling. The structures, characterisation and analysis of these charged porous materials as storage portals for H2 are discussed. Inelastic neutron scattering experiments confirm interaction of H2 with the carboxylate groups of the isophthalate ligands bound to In(III) centres.

  6. Environmental Remediation and Sorption of Metal Cations Using Aluminum Pillared Nano-Bentonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rifai, Rifai; Abou El Safa, Magda

    2015-04-01

    The release of heavy metal cations into the environment is a potential threat to water and soil quality. Some clay minerals play an important role, as physical and chemical barriers, for the isolation of metal-rich wastes and to adsorb heavy metals as well as to avoid their environmental dispersion. In the present study, the bentonitic clay (southeast El-Hammam City, Egypt) was subjected to pillaring using hydroxyl-aluminum solution. The XRD patterns of the Aluminum Pillared Nano-Bentonite (APNB) showed severe alteration of the crystal structure after pillaring. Poly metal solutions with different metal concentrations of Cu, Co, Ni, Zn, Cd and Pb (0.001, 0.005 and 0.01 moles), and pH (1, 2.5, 5 and 6) were subjected to treatment by the APNB. The removal process is very rapid and spontaneous and the contact time may be short (several minutes) for most adsorption to occur. The criterion for environmental remediation of APNB is less stringent and a short contact time is sufficient. The rate of Cu2+, Zn2+, Co2+, Cd2+, Ni2+ and Pb2+sorption remained higher or equal to the CEC. The sorption of metal ions by APNB are complex and probably involve several mechanisms. In general, APNB can be used to immobilize Cu2+, Zn2+, Co2+, Cd2+, Ni2+ and Pb2+ to any extent. For each metal ion, the most effective immobilization occurs over a particular pH around 5. According to the experimental data obtained, the uptake amount of the studied cations by APNB increased with increasing solution pH, sorbent dose and contact time. The preference of the APNB adsorption for heavy metal ions that are through the cation exchange processes decreases in the order: Cu2+>Zn2+>Co2+>Cd2+ >Ni2+ >Pb2+. Keywords: Bentonitic clay, Egypt, Aluminum Pillared Nano-Bentonite, heavy metal, environmental remediation

  7. Nitrogen-Rich Multinuclear Ferrocenophanes as Multichannel Chemosensor Molecules for Transition and Heavy-Metal Cations

    PubMed Central

    Sola, Antonia; Espinosa, Arturo; Tárraga, Alberto; Molina, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    [m.n] Multinuclear ferrocenophanes prepared by aza-Wittig reaction of bisiminophosphoranes derived from 1,1′-diazidoferrocene and isophthaladelhyde or 2,5-diformylthiophene, behave as efficient electrochemical and chromogenic chemosensor molecules for Zn2+, Pb2+, and Hg2+ metal cations. Whereas the OSWV of receptor 3, bearing two m-phenylene units in the bridges, display one oxidation peak, receptor 4 incorporating two thiophene rings in the bridges, exhibits two well-separated oxidation peaks. In both receptors only the addition of Zn2+, Pb2+, and Hg2+ metal cations induced a remarkable anodic shift of ferrocene/ferrocenium redox couple. Likewise, in the absorption spectra of these receptors the low energy band is red-shifted by Δλ = 165 − 209 nm, and these changes promoted a significant color changes which could be used for the naked eye detection of these metal cations. The coordination modes for two representative cases were unveiled by DFT calculations that show an unsual coordination in the [42Pb]2+ complex with the Pb2+ cation in a distorted cubic N4S4 donor cage. PMID:25106019

  8. Acetohydroxamic Acid Complexes with Trivalent f-Block Metal Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Sinkov, Serguei I.; Choppin, Gregory

    2003-11-01

    Acetohydroxamic acid has been studied by optical absorbance spectroscopy as a complex forming reagent for the lighter trivalent lanthanides and actinides (Pu(III) and Am(III)) in aqueous solution at 2.0 M (NaClO4) ionic strength. The highest stoichiometry in all the cases studied has been found to be a 1:4 metal-to-ligand ratio; formation of tetrahydroxamato species requires a high excess of the ligand and alkaline pH, Spectrophotometric monitoring confirmed the presence of Pu(III) by electrochemical reduction of Pu(IV) in the course of the pH titration experiment. The formation constants can be used for optimization of processing flowsheets in the advanced PUREX process.

  9. Ab initio molecular orbital study of cation-{pi} binding between the alkali-metal cations and benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, J.B.; Hay, B.P.; Dixon, D.A.

    1999-03-11

    The authors present optimized geometries and binding energies for alkali-metal cation complexes with benzene. Results are obtained for Li{sup +} through Cs{sup +} at the RHF/6-311G{sup *} and MP2/6-311+G{sup *} levels of theory with K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, and Cs{sup +} represented by relativistic ECPs and associated valence basis sets. RHF/6-311G{sup *} frequencies are used to verify the optimized geometries are minima and used to calculate binding enthalpies. The effects of basis-set superposition error (BSSE) are estimated at both the RHF and MP2 levels. The authors obtain BSSE-corrected MP2/6-311+G{sup *} binding enthalpies (in kcal/mol) of 35.0 (Li{sup +}), 21.0 (Na{sup +}), 16.0 (K{sup +}), 13.3 (Rb{sup +}), and 11.6 (Cs{sup +}). The distances ({angstrom}) between the center of the benzene ring and the cation are 1.865 (Li{sup +}), 2.426 (Na{sup +}), 2.894 (K{sup +}), 3.165 (Rb{sup +}), and 3.414 (Cs{sup +}). Additional single-point CCSD(T)/6-311+G{sup *}//MP2/6-311+G{sup *} and CCSD(T)/6-311+G(2d,2p)//MP2/6-311+G{sup *} calculations indicate that the MP2/6-311+G{sup *} results are well converged with regard to the extent of electron correlation, whereas small changes in binding energy are still observed when larger basis sets are used. Additional calculations using local and nonlocal density functional theory are included for comparison.

  10. Toxic effect of metal cation binary mixtures to the seaweed Gracilaria domingensis (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Mendes, Luiz Fernando; Stevani, Cassius Vinicius; Zambotti-Villela, Leonardo; Yokoya, Nair Sumie; Colepicolo, Pio

    2014-01-01

    The macroalga Gracilaria domingensis is an important resource for the food, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and biotechnology industries. G. domingensis is at a part of the food web foundation, providing nutrients and microelements to upper levels. As seaweed storage metals in the vacuoles, they are considered the main vectors to magnify these toxic elements. This work describes the evaluation of the toxicity of binary mixtures of available metal cations based on the growth rates of G. domingensis over a 48-h exposure. The interactive effects of each binary mixture were determined using a toxic unit (TU) concept that was the sum of the relative contribution of each toxicant and calculated using the ratio between the toxicant concentration and its endpoint. Mixtures of Cd(II)/Cu(II) and Zn(II)/Ca(II) demonstrated to be additive; Cu(II)/Zn(II), Cu(II)/Mg(II), Cu(II)/Ca(II), Zn(II)/Mg(II), and Ca(II)/Mg(II) mixtures were synergistic, and all interactions studied with Cd(II) were antagonistic. Hypotheses that explain the toxicity of binary mixtures at the molecular level are also suggested. These results represent the first effort to characterize the combined effect of available metal cations, based on the TU concept on seaweed in a total controlled medium. The results presented here are invaluable to the understanding of seaweed metal cation toxicity in the marine environment, the mechanism of toxicity action and how the tolerance of the organism.

  11. Tetracycline adsorption on kaolinite: pH, metal cations and humic acid effects.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanping; Geng, Jinju; Wang, Xiaorong; Gu, Xueyuan; Gao, Shixiang

    2011-07-01

    Contamination of environmental matrixes by human and animal wastes containing antibiotics is a growing health concern. Because tetracycline is one of the most widely-used antibiotics in the world, it is important to understand the factors that influence its mobility in soils. This study investigated the effects of pH, background electrolyte cations (Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)), heavy metal Cu(2+) and humic acid (HA) on tetracycline adsorption onto kaolinite. Results showed that tetracycline was greatly adsorbed by kaolinite over pH 3-6, then decreased with the increase of pH, indicating that tetracycline adsorption mainly through ion exchange of cations species and complexation of zwitterions species. In the presence of five types of cations (Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)), tetracycline adsorption decreased in accordance with the increasing of atomic radius and valence of metal cations, which suggested that outer-sphere complexes formed between tetracycline and kaolinite, and the existence of competitor ions lead to the decreasing adsorption. The presence of Cu(2+) greatly enhanced the adsorption probably by acting as a bridge ion between tetracycline species and the edge sites of kaolinite. HA also showed a major effect on the adsorption: at pH < 6, the presence of HA increased the adsorption, while the addition of HA showed little effect on tetracycline adsorption at higher pH. The soil environmental conditions, like pH, metal cations and soil organic matter, strongly influence the adsorption behavior of tetracycline onto kaolinite and need to be considered when assessing the environmental toxicity of tetracycline.

  12. Interaction of alkali metal cations and short chain alcohols: effect of core size on theoretical affinities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, N. L.; Siu, F. M.; Tsang, C. W.

    2000-05-01

    The effect of core size on the calculated binding energies of alkali metal cations (Li +, Na +, K +) to methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, i-propanol, n-butanol, i-butanol, s-butanol, and t-butanol are evaluated using G2(MP2,SVP) protocol. The K + affinities, reported for the first time, were found to be negative if a core size larger than that of neon (2s 22p 6) was used. Given this, we suggest that the 1s 2, 2s 22p 6, and 3s 23p 6 electrons have to be included in the electron correlation treatment for Li +, Na + and K + containing species, respectively. With these core sizes, our G2(MP2,SVP) Li + and Na + affinities are in excellent agreement with values obtained from the newly developed G3 protocol. The nature of alkali metal cation-alcohol interaction is also discussed.

  13. Humic acid metal cation interaction studied by spectromicroscopy techniques in combination with quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Plaschke, M; Rothe, J; Armbruster, M K; Denecke, M A; Naber, A; Geckeis, H

    2010-03-01

    Humic acids (HA) have a high binding capacity towards traces of toxic metal cations, thus affecting their transport in aquatic systems. Eu(III)-HA aggregates are studied by synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) at the carbon K-edge and laser scanning luminescence microscopy (LSLM) at the (5)D(0) --> (7)F(1,2) fluorescence emission lines. Both methods provide the necessary spatial resolution in the sub-micrometre range to resolve characteristic aggregate morphologies: optically dense zones embedded in a matrix of less dense material in STXM images correspond to areas with increased Eu(III) luminescence yield in the LSLM micrographs. In the C 1s-NEXAFS of metal-loaded polyacrylic acid (PAA), used as a HA model compound, a distinct complexation effect is identified. This effect is similar to trends observed in the dense fraction of HA/metal cation aggregates. The strongest complexation effect is observed for the Zr(IV)-HA/PAA system. This effect is confirmed by quantum chemical calculations performed at the ab initio level for model complexes with different metal centres and complex geometries. Without the high spatial resolution of STXM and LSLM and without the combination of molecular modelling with experimental results, the different zones indicating a ;pseudo'-phase separation into strong complexing domains and weaker complexing domains of HA would never have been identified. This type of strategy can be used to study metal interaction with other organic material.

  14. Humic Acid Metal Cation Interaction Studied by Spectromicroscopy Techniques in Combination with Quantum Chemical Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Plaschke, M.; Rothe, J; Armbruster, M; Denecke, M; Naber, A; Geckeis, H

    2010-01-01

    Humic acids (HA) have a high binding capacity towards traces of toxic metal cations, thus affecting their transport in aquatic systems. Eu(III)-HA aggregates are studied by synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) at the carbon K-edge and laser scanning luminescence microscopy (LSLM) at the {sup 5}D{sub 0} {yields} {sup 7}F{sub 1,2} fluorescence emission lines. Both methods provide the necessary spatial resolution in the sub-micrometre range to resolve characteristic aggregate morphologies: optically dense zones embedded in a matrix of less dense material in STXM images correspond to areas with increased Eu(III) luminescence yield in the LSLM micrographs. In the C 1s-NEXAFS of metal-loaded polyacrylic acid (PAA), used as a HA model compound, a distinct complexation effect is identified. This effect is similar to trends observed in the dense fraction of HA/metal cation aggregates. The strongest complexation effect is observed for the Zr(IV)-HA/PAA system. This effect is confirmed by quantum chemical calculations performed at the ab initio level for model complexes with different metal centres and complex geometries. Without the high spatial resolution of STXM and LSLM and without the combination of molecular modelling with experimental results, the different zones indicating a 'pseudo'-phase separation into strong complexing domains and weaker complexing domains of HA would never have been identified. This type of strategy can be used to study metal interaction with other organic material.

  15. Intermediate-range order in simple metal-phosphate glasses: The effect of metal cations on the phosphate anion distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Sales, B.C.; Boatner, L.A.; Ramey, J.O.

    1997-06-01

    The technique of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has been used to probe the phosphate anion distribution in a variety of metal phosphate glasses including glasses made with trivalent metal cations (Al, In, Ga, La). The composition of each glass was chosen so that the average phosphate chain length was between 2 and 4 PO{sub 4} tetrahedra. The widths of the resulting phosphate anion distributions were determined directly from an analysis of the HPLC chromatograms. Literature values for the free energy of formation of the crystalline metal-orthophosphate compounds with respect to P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and the metal oxide, were compared to the chromatogram widths. It was found that the smaller the energy of formation, the wider the distribution of phosphate chains, and the greater the ease of glass formation.

  16. Two anionic metal-organic frameworks with tunable luminescent properties induced by cations

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shu-Mei; Chen, Yan-Fei; Liu, Liyang; Wen, Tian; Zhang, Hua-Bin; Zhang, Jian

    2016-03-15

    Two three-dimensional (3-D) MOFs, [(C{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 4}N)]{sub 3}[H{sub 3}O]{sub 2}[Cd{sub 6}Br(H{sub 2}-DHBDC){sub 8}(DMF){sub 4}] (1; H{sub 4}-DHBDC=2,5-dihydroxy-1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid, DMF=N,N-dimethylformamide) and [(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}NH{sub 2}]{sub 2}[Cd{sub 3}(H2-DHBDC){sub 4}(DMF){sub 2}]·2DMF(2), are prepared from the self-assembly reactions between Cd(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2} and H{sub 4}-DHBDC, respectively. Both anionic frameworks consist of linear trinuclear Cd units (e.g., 1: [Cd{sub 3}BrO{sub 2}(CO{sub 2}){sub 7}] and [Cd{sub 3}O{sub 2}(CO{sub 2}){sub 8}]; 2: [Cd{sub 3}O{sub 2}(CO{sub 2}){sub 8}]) linked by the H{sub 2}-DHBDC ligands. The photoluminescent properties of compound 1 are tunable through cation-exchange with different metal ions. The results demonstrated an effective ion-exchange approach toward the functional modification of MOF materials. - Graphical abstract: Two organic cations induced three-dimensional anionic Cd(II) metal-organic frameworks were synthesized under solvothermal conditions, which showed interesting tunable photoluminescent emissions due to organic cations exchange. - Highlights: • Organic cations induced anionic Cd(II) MOFs. • Cations exchange. • Tunable photoluminescent emissions.

  17. Effect of Transition Metal Cations on Stability Enhancement for Molybdate-Based Hybrid Supercapacitor.

    PubMed

    Watcharatharapong, Teeraphat; Minakshi Sundaram, Manickam; Chakraborty, Sudip; Li, Dan; Shafiullah, G M; Aughterson, Robert D; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2017-05-31

    The race for better electrochemical energy storage systems has prompted examination of the stability in the molybdate framework (MMoO4; M = Mn, Co, or Ni) based on a range of transition metal cations from both computational and experimental approaches. Molybdate materials synthesized with controlled nanoscale morphologies (such as nanorods, agglomerated nanostructures, and nanoneedles for Mn, Co, and Ni elements, respectively) have been used as a cathode in hybrid energy storage systems. The computational and experimental data confirms that the MnMoO4 crystallized in β-form with α-MnMoO4 type whereas Co and Ni cations crystallized in α-form with α-CoMoO4 type structure. Among the various transition metal cations studied, hybrid device comprising NiMoO4 vs activated carbon exhibited excellent electrochemical performance having the specific capacitance 82 F g(-1) at a current density of 0.1 A g(-1) but the cycling stability needed to be significantly improved. The specific capacitance of the NiMoO4 electrode material is shown to be directly related to the surface area of the electrode/electrolyte interface, but the CoMoO4 and MnMoO4 favored a bulk formation that could be suitable for structural stability. The useful insights from the electronic structure analysis and effective mass have been provided to demonstrate the role of cations in the molybdate structure and its influence in electrochemical energy storage. With improved cycling stability, NiMoO4 can be suitable for renewable energy storage. Overall, this study will enable the development of next generation molybdate materials with multiple cation substitution resulting in better cycling stability and higher specific capacitance.

  18. Gas-phase activation of methane by ligated transition-metal cations

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Detlef; Schwarz, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    Motivated by the search for ways of a more efficient usage of the large, unexploited resources of methane, recent progress in the gas-phase activation of methane by ligated transition-metal ions is discussed. Mass spectrometric experiments demonstrate that the ligands can crucially influence both reactivity and selectivity of transition-metal cations in bond-activation processes, and the most reactive species derive from combinations of transition metals with the electronegative elements fluorine, oxygen, and chlorine. Furthermore, the collected knowledge about intramolecular kinetic isotope effects associated with the activation of C–H(D) bonds of methane can be used to distinguish the nature of the bond activation as a mere hydrogen-abstraction, a metal-assisted mechanism or more complex reactions such as formation of insertion intermediates or σ-bond metathesis. PMID:18955709

  19. Interparticle migration of metal cations in stream sediments as a factor in toxics transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackman, A.P.; Kennedy, V.C.; Bhatia, N.

    2001-01-01

    Sorption of metal cations by stream sediments is an important process affecting the movement of released contaminants in the environment. The ability of cations to desorb from one sediment particle and subsequently sorb to another can greatly affect metal transport rates but rates for this process have not been reported. The objective of this study was to determine the rate at which sorbed metals can migrate from contaminated sediment particles to uncontaminated sediment particles as a function of the concentration of the contaminating solution and the duration of the contact with the contaminating solution. Samples of small sediment particles were exposed to solutions containing cobalt, after which they were rinsed and combined with larger uncontaminated sediment particles in the presence of stream water. Initial concentrations of the contaminating solution ranged from 1ng/l to 1000mg/l and exposures to the contaminating solution ranged from 6h to 14 days. The rate of the migration increased with increasing concentrations in the contaminating solution and with decreasing times of exposure to the contaminating solution. Under the conditions of these experiments, the time required for the migration to reach equilibrium was on the order of months or longer. In separate experiments, the kinetics of adsorption and desorption of cobalt were measured as a function of concentration of the contaminating solution. The time required to reach adsorption equilibrium increased with increasing concentration in the contaminating solution. Times to sorption equilibrium were on the order of months. Desorption was much slower than adsorption and, together with intraparticle diffusion, probably controls the rate of migration from contaminated to uncontaminated sediment. The results of this study show that interparticle migration of metal cations can proceed at significant rates that are strongly influenced by the length of time that the metal has been in contact with the sediment

  20. Environmental metabolomics: Biological markers for metal toxicity.

    PubMed

    García-Sevillano, Miguel Ángel; García-Barrera, Tamara; Gómez-Ariza, José Luis

    2015-07-14

    Environmental metabolomics is an emerging field referred to the application of metabolomics to characterize the interactions of living organisms with their environment. In this sense, the importance of monitoring the effects of toxic metals on living organisms has increased as a consequence of natural changes and anthropogenic activities that have led to an increase of toxic metals levels in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. For this purpose, the use of metabolomics based on mass spectrometry to study metal toxicity is gaining importance in recent years. Environmental metabolomics can be used to: discover the mode of action (MOA) of toxic metals through controlled laboratory experiments; evaluate toxicity (biological adverse response to a substance), that may be useful in risk assessment; and develop new biomarkers (based in metabolome shifts discovered through controlled laboratory experiments) that may be applied in environmental biomonitoring (environmental realistic scenario). In this review, it is discussed how metabolomics based on mass spectrometry can be applied to study metal toxicity, considering the most important hallmarks related to metabolomic experiments. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Use of MgO doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation for removing arsenic from water

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Robert C.; Larese, Kathleen Caroline; Bontchev, Ranko Panayotov

    2017-05-30

    Systems and methods for use of magnesium hydroxide, either directly or through one or more precursors, doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation, for removing arsenic from drinking water, including water distribution systems. In one embodiment, magnesium hydroxide, Mg(OH).sub.2 (a strong adsorbent for arsenic) doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation is used to adsorb arsenic. The complex consisting of arsenic adsorbed on Mg(OH).sub.2 doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation is subsequently removed from the water by conventional means, including filtration, settling, skimming, vortexing, centrifugation, magnetic separation, or other well-known separation systems. In another embodiment, magnesium oxide, MgO, is employed, which reacts with water to form Mg(OH).sub.2. The resulting Mg(OH).sub.2 doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation, then adsorbs arsenic, as set forth above. The method can also be used to treat human or animal poisoning with arsenic.

  2. Use of MgO doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation for removing arsenic from water

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Robert C; Holt-Larese, Kathleen C; Bontchev, Ranko

    2013-08-13

    Systems and methods for use of magnesium hydroxide, either directly or through one or more precursors, doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation, for removing arsenic from drinking water, including water distribution systems. In one embodiment, magnesium hydroxide, Mg(OH).sub.2 (a strong adsorbent for arsenic) doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation is used to adsorb arsenic. The complex consisting of arsenic adsorbed on Mg(OH).sub.2 doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation is subsequently removed from the water by conventional means, including filtration, settling, skimming, vortexing, centrifugation, magnetic separation, or other well-known separation systems. In another embodiment, magnesium oxide, MgO, is employed, which reacts with water to form Mg(OH).sub.2. The resulting Mg(OH).sub.2 doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation, then adsorbs arsenic, as set forth above. The method can also be used to treat human or animal poisoning with arsenic.

  3. Synthesis and styrene polymerisation catalysis of eta5- and eta1-pyrrolyl-ligated cationic rare earth metal aminobenzyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Nishiura, Masayoshi; Mashiko, Tomohiro; Hou, Zhaomin

    2008-05-07

    The cationic rare earth metal aminobenzyl complexes bearing mono(pyrrolyl) ligands are synthesised and structurally characterised, and the coordination mode of the pyrrolyl ligands is found to show significant influence on the polymerisation of styrene.

  4. Highly tunable colloidal perovskite nanoplatelets through variable cation, metal, and halide composition

    DOE PAGES

    Weidman, Mark C.; Seitz, Michael; Stranks, Samuel D.; ...

    2016-07-29

    Here, colloidal perovskite nanoplatelets are a promising class of semiconductor nanomaterials-exhibiting bright luminescence, tunable and spectrally narrow absorption and emission features, strongly confined excitonic states, and facile colloidal synthesis. Here, we demonstrate the high degree of spectral tunability achievable through variation of the cation, metal, and halide composition as well as nanoplatelet thickness. We synthesize nanoplatelets of the form L2[ABX3]n-1BX4, where L is an organic ligand (octylammonium, butylammonium), A is a monovalent metal or organic molecular cation (cesium, methylammonium, formamidinium), B is a divalent metal cation (lead, tin), X is a halide anion (chloride, bromide, iodide), and n-1 is themore » number of unit cells in thickness. We show that variation of n, B, and X leads to large changes in the absorption and emission energy, while variation of the A cation leads to only subtle changes but can significantly impact the nanoplatelet stability and photoluminescence quantum yield (with values over 20%). Furthermore, mixed halide nanoplatelets exhibit continuous spectral tunability over a 1.5 eV spectral range, from 2.2 to 3.7 eV. The nanoplatelets have relatively large lateral dimensions (100 nm to 1 μm), which promote self-assembly into stacked superlattice structures-the periodicity of which can be adjusted based on the nanoplatelet surface ligand length. These results demonstrate the versatility of colloidal perovskite nanoplatelets as a material platform, with tunability extending from the deep-UV, across the visible, into the near-IR. In particular, the tin-containing nanoplatelets represent a significant addition to the small but increasingly important family of lead- and cadmium-free colloidal semiconductors.« less

  5. Highly Tunable Colloidal Perovskite Nanoplatelets through Variable Cation, Metal, and Halide Composition.

    PubMed

    Weidman, Mark C; Seitz, Michael; Stranks, Samuel D; Tisdale, William A

    2016-08-23

    Colloidal perovskite nanoplatelets are a promising class of semiconductor nanomaterials-exhibiting bright luminescence, tunable and spectrally narrow absorption and emission features, strongly confined excitonic states, and facile colloidal synthesis. Here, we demonstrate the high degree of spectral tunability achievable through variation of the cation, metal, and halide composition as well as nanoplatelet thickness. We synthesize nanoplatelets of the form L2[ABX3]n-1BX4, where L is an organic ligand (octylammonium, butylammonium), A is a monovalent metal or organic molecular cation (cesium, methylammonium, formamidinium), B is a divalent metal cation (lead, tin), X is a halide anion (chloride, bromide, iodide), and n-1 is the number of unit cells in thickness. We show that variation of n, B, and X leads to large changes in the absorption and emission energy, while variation of the A cation leads to only subtle changes but can significantly impact the nanoplatelet stability and photoluminescence quantum yield (with values over 20%). Furthermore, mixed halide nanoplatelets exhibit continuous spectral tunability over a 1.5 eV spectral range, from 2.2 to 3.7 eV. The nanoplatelets have relatively large lateral dimensions (100 nm to 1 μm), which promote self-assembly into stacked superlattice structures-the periodicity of which can be adjusted based on the nanoplatelet surface ligand length. These results demonstrate the versatility of colloidal perovskite nanoplatelets as a material platform, with tunability extending from the deep-UV, across the visible, into the near-IR. In particular, the tin-containing nanoplatelets represent a significant addition to the small but increasingly important family of lead- and cadmium-free colloidal semiconductors.

  6. The role of metal cation in electron-induced dissociation of tryptophan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feketeová, L.; Wong, M. W.; O'Hair, R. A. J.

    2010-10-01

    The fragmentation of tryptophan (Trp) - metal complexes [Trp+M]+, where M = Cs, K, Na, Li and Ag, induced by 22 eV energy electrons was compared to [Trp+H]+. Additional insights were obtained through the study of collision-induced dissociation (CID) of [Trp+M]+ and through deuterium labelling. The electron-induced dissociation (EID) of [Trp+M]+ resulted in the formation of radical cations via the following pathways: (i) loss of M to form Trp+•, (ii) loss of an H atom to form [(Trp-H)+M]+•, and (iii) bond homolysis to form C2H4NO2M+•. Deuterium labelling suggests that H atom loss can occur from heteroatom and/or C-H positions. Other types of fragment ions observed include: C9H7NM+, C9H8N+, M+, C2H3NO2M+, CO2M+, C10H11N2M+, C10H9NOM+. Formation of C2H4NO2M+• and C9H7NM+ cations suggests that the metal interacts with both the backbone and aromatic side chain, thus implicating π-interactions for all M. CID of [Trp+M]+ resulted in: loss of metal cation (for M = Cs and K); successive loss of NH3 and CO as the dominant channel for M = Na, Li and Ag; formation of C2H3NO2M+. Preliminary DFT calculations were carried out on [Trp+Na]+ and [(Trp-H)+Na]+• which reveal that: the most stable conformation involves chelation by the backbone together with a π -interaction with the indole side chain; loss of H atom from α -CH of the side chain is thermodynamically favoured over losses from other positions, with the resultant radical cation maintaining a (N, O, ring) chelated structure which is stabilized by conjugation.

  7. Investigation of biologically-designed metal-specific chelators for potential metal recovery and waste remediation applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Ockwig, Nathan W.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria, algae and plants produce metal-specific chelators to capture required nutrient or toxic trace metals. Biological systems are thought to be very efficient, honed by evolutionary forces over time. Understanding the approaches used by living organisms to select for specific metals in the environment may lead to design of cheaper and more effective approaches for metal recovery and contaminant-metal remediation. In this study, the binding of a common siderophore, desferrioxamine B (DFO-B), to three aqueous metal cations, Fe(II), Fe(III), and UO{sub 2}(VI) was investigated using classical molecular dynamics. DFO-B has three acetohydroxamate groups and a terminal amine group that all deprotonate with increasing pH. For all three metals, complexes with DFO-B (-2) are the most stable and favored under alkaline conditions. Under more acidic conditions, the metal-DFO complexes involve chelation with both acetohydroxamate and acetylamine groups. The approach taken here allows for detailed investigation of metal binding to biologically-designed organic ligands.

  8. Complexation of Trivalent Metal Cations to Mannuronate Type Alginate Models from a Density Functional Study.

    PubMed

    Menakbi, Chemseddine; Quignard, Francoise; Mineva, Tzonka

    2016-04-21

    Complexation of alginate models, built of β-d-mannuronic units (M) linked by a 1-4 glycosidic bridge, to Al(3+), Sc(3+), Cr(3+), Fe(3+), Ga(3+), and La(3+) cations was studied by applying the quantum chemical density functional theory (DFT) based method. The binding modes and energies were obtained for complexes with one, two, and three truncated alginate chain(s). In all the hydrated structures a monodentate binding mode is established to be the energetically most favored with shorter M(3+)···O(COO(-)) bonds than M(3+)···O(OH) bonds. Coordination bond lengths are found to be specific to each cation and to depend very little on the water in the coordination sphere and on the number of saccharide units used to model an alginate chain. The binding energy tendency Fe(3+) ≈ Cr(3+) > Al(3+) ≈ Ga(3+) ≫ Sc(3+) ≥ La(3+) is not affected by the alginate models, the coordination to water molecules, and the number of chains. A significant covalent contribution that arises predominantly from a charge donation from the carboxylate oxygen to the metal cation was established from the orbital population analysis. An exothermic chain-chain association is predicted by the computed enthalpy variations. A comparison between the structural features of alginate complexation to trivalent and divalent cations is provided and discussed.

  9. Alkali Metal Cation Affinities of Anionic Main Group-Element Hydrides Across the Periodic Table.

    PubMed

    Boughlala, Zakaria; Fonseca Guerra, Célia; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2017-10-05

    We have carried out an extensive exploration of gas-phase alkali metal cation affinities (AMCA) of archetypal anionic bases across the periodic system using relativistic density functional theory at ZORA-BP86/QZ4P//ZORA-BP86/TZ2P. AMCA values of all bases were computed for the lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium cations and compared with the corresponding proton affinities (PA). One purpose of this work is to provide an intrinsically consistent set of values of the 298 K AMCAs of all anionic (XHn-1(-) ) constituted by main group-element hydrides of groups 14-17 along the periods 2-6. In particular, we wish to establish the trend in affinity for a cation as the latter varies from proton to, and along, the alkali cations. Our main purpose is to understand these trends in terms of the underlying bonding mechanism using Kohn-Sham molecular orbital theory together with a quantitative bond energy decomposition analyses (EDA). © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Alkali metal cation doped Al-SBA-15 for carbon dioxide adsorption.

    PubMed

    Zukal, Arnošt; Mayerová, Jana; Čejka, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Mesoporous aluminosilicate adsorbents for carbon dioxide were prepared by the grafting of aluminium into SBA-15 silica using an aqueous solution of aluminium chlorohydrate. As the ion exchange sites are primarily associated with the presence of tetrahedrally coordinated aluminium, extra-framework aluminium on the SBA-15 surface was inserted into the silica matrix by a treatment with an aqueous solution of NH(4)OH. Synthesized mesoporous aluminosilicate preserving all the characteristic features of a mesoporous molecular sieve was finally modified by the alkali metal cation exchange. To examine carbon dioxide adsorption on prepared materials, adsorption isotherms in the temperature range from 0 °C to 60 °C were measured. Based on the known temperature dependence of adsorption isotherms, isosteric adsorption heats giving information on the surface energetics of CO(2) adsorption were calculated and discussed. The comparison of carbon dioxide isotherms obtained on aluminosilicate SBA-15, aluminosilicate SBA-15 containing cations Na(+) and K(+) and activated alumina F-200 reveals that the doping with sodium or potassium cations dramatically enhances adsorption in the region of equilibrium pressures lower than 10 kPa. Therefore, synthesized aluminosilicate adsorbents doped with Na(+) or K(+) cations are suitable for carbon dioxide separation from dilute gas mixtures.

  11. Theoretical study of interaction of urate with li(+), na(+), k(+), be(2+), mg(2+), and ca(2+) metal cations.

    PubMed

    Allen, Reeshemah N; Shukla, M K; Burda, Jaroslav V; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2006-05-11

    The geometries and energetics of complexes of Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Be(2+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+)metal cations with different possible uric acid anions (urate) were studied. The complexes were optimized at the B3LYP level and the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. Complexes of urate with Mg(2+), and Ca(2+)metal cations were also optimized at the MP2/6-31+G(d) level. Single point energy calculations were performed at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level. The interactions of the metal cations at different nucleophilic sites of various possible urate were considered. It was revealed that metal cations would interact with urate in a bi-coordinate manner. In the gas phase, the most preferred position for the interaction of Li(+), Na(+), and K(+) cations is between the N(3) and O(2) sites, while all divalent cations Be(2+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+) prefer binding between the N(7) and O(6) sites of the corresponding urate. The influence of aqueous solvent on the relative stability of different complexes has been examined using the Tomasi's polarized continuum model. The basis set superposition error (BSSE) corrected interaction energy was also computed for complexes. The AIM theory has been applied to analyze the properties of the bond critical points (electron densities and their Laplacians) involved in the coordination between urate and the metal cations. It was revealed that aqueous solvation would have significant effect on the relative stability of complexes obtained by the interaction of urate with Mg(2+) and Ca(2+)cations. Consequently, several complexes were found to exist in the water solution. The effect of metal cations on different NH and CO stretching vibrational modes of uric acid has also been discussed.

  12. Effects of transition metal ion identity and π-cation interactions in metal-bis(peptide) complexes containing phenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Utley, Brandon; Angel, Laurence A

    2010-01-01

    Electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry was used to study the effects of the metal ion identity and π-cation interactions on the dissociation pathways of metal-bis(peptide) complexes, where the metal is either Mn(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), or Zn(2+); and the peptide is either FGGF, GGGG, GF, or GG, where G is glycine and F is phenylalanine. The [(FGGF)(FGGF-H) + M(2+)](+) and [(GGGG)(GGGG-H) + M(2+)](+) complexes dissociated by losing one FGGF or GGGG, respectively. Relative binding affinities were measured using the crossover points, where the parent and product ions were equal in ion abundance and a normalized-collision energy scale. The results indicate the relative binding affinities for FGGF and GGGG follow the same order with respect to the transition metal ion identity: Cu(2+) < Ni(2+) < Mn(2+) ≈ Zn(2+) < Co(2+), and the π-cation interactions in the FGGF complex have a measureable stabilizing effect. In contrast, the main fragmentation channels of [(GF)(GF-H) + M(2+)]+ and [(GG)(GG-H) + M(2+)](+) are loss of CO(2) and 2CO(2) with the [(GF)(GF-H) + M(2+)](+) complex also exhibiting cinnamic acid ,GF, residual glycine, cinnamate and styrene loss.

  13. Gold nanoparticles stabilized by cationic carbosilane dendrons: synthesis and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Peña-González, Cornelia E; Pedziwiatr-Werbicka, Elzbieta; Shcharbin, Dzmitry; Guerrero-Beltrán, Carlos; Abashkin, Viktar; Loznikova, Svetlana; Jiménez, José L; Muñoz-Fernández, M Ángeles; Bryszewska, Maria; Gómez, Rafael; Sánchez-Nieves, Javier; de la Mata, F Javier

    2017-01-16

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and polycationic macromolecules are used as gene carriers. Their behaviour is dependent on several factors, such as the size and type of the framework, charge, etc. We have combined both types of systems and prepared AuNPs covered with cationic carbosilane dendrons with the aim to evaluate their biocompatibility. Water soluble dendronized cationic AuNPs were prepared following a straightforward procedure from dendrons, a gold precursor and a reducing agent in water and were characterized by (1)H NMR, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV), and zeta potential (ZP). The biological properties of dendrons and AuNPs were determined by hemolysis, platelet aggregation and lymphocyte proliferation. These assays reflect modification of dendron properties when covering nanoparticles. For dendrons, hemolysis and platelet aggregation are generation dependent whilst, for AuNPs these properties are related to the bigger size of NPs. On the other hand, none of the systems induced lymphocyte proliferation. Selected cationic dendrons and AuNPs were chosen for gene delivery experiments employing a small interference RNA (siRNA Nef) against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

  14. Strategies to Suppress Cation Vacancies in Metal Oxide Alloys: Consequences for Solar Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Toroker, Maytal; Carter, Emily A.

    2015-09-01

    First-row transition metal oxides (TMOs) are promising alternative materials for inexpensive and efficient solar energy conversion. However, their conversion efficiency can be deleteriously affected by material imperfections, such as atomic vacancies. In this work, we provide examples showing that in some iron-containing TMOs, iron cation vacancy formation can be suppressed via alloying. We calculate within density functional theory+U theory the iron vacancy formation energy in binary rock-salt oxide alloys that contain iron, manganese, nickel, zinc, and/or magnesium. We demonstrate that formation of iron vacancies is less favorable if we choose to alloy iron(II) oxide with metals that cannot readily accept vacancy-generated holes, e.g., magnesium, manganese, nickel, or zinc. Since there are less available sites for holes and the holes are forced to reside on iron cations, the driving force for iron vacancy formation decreases. These results are consistent with an experiment observing a sharp drop in cation vacancy concentration upon alloying iron(II) oxide with manganese.

  15. The effects of mono- and divalent metal cations on the solution structure of caffeine and theophylline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafisi, Shohreh; Monajemi, Majid; Ebrahimi, Saeedeh

    2004-11-01

    The interactions of caffeine and theophylline with potassium +, cobalt 2+ and nickel 2+ ions were studied in aqueous solution at physiological pH with constant ligand concentration and various metal ion contents. Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy and absorption spectra were used to determine the cation binding mode and association constants. Spectroscopic results showed direct and indirect cation interactions for Co 2+, Ni 2+ and K + through O6 and N9 atoms (caffeine) and O6, N9 and N7 atoms (theophylline). The overall binding constants were, K(Co-caffeine)=6.92×10 4 M -1, K(Ni-caffeine)=2.22×10 4 M -1, K(K-caffeine)=5.08×10 3 M -1, K(Co-theophylline)=5.06×10 4 M -1, K(Ni-theophylline)=4.84×10 4 M -1 and K(K-theophylline)=2.13×10 3 M -1. The association constants showed weaker interaction for monovalent cation than divalent metal ions.

  16. Potential-modulated intercalation of alkali cations into metal hexacyanoferrate coated electrodes. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, D.T.

    1998-06-01

    'This program is studying potential-driven cation intercalation and deintercalation in metal hexacyanoferrate compounds, with the eventual goal of creating materials with high selectivity for cesium separations and long cycle lifetimes. The separation of radiocesium from other benign cations has important implications for the cost of processing a variety of cesium contaminated DOE wasteforms. This report summarizes results after nine months of work. Much of the initial efforts have been directed towards quantitatively characterizing the selectivity of nickel hexacyanoferrate derivatized electrodes for intercalating cesium preferentially over other alkali metal cations. Using energy dispersive xray spectroscopy (ex-situ, but non-destructive) and ICP analysis (ex-situ and destructive), the authors have demonstrated that the nickel hexacyanoferrate lattice has a strong preference for intercalated cesium over sodium. For example, when ions are reversibly loaded into a nickel hexacyanoferrate thin film from a solution containing 0.9999 M Na{sup +} and 0.0001 M Cs{sup +}, the film intercalates 40% as much Cs{sup +} as when loaded from pure 1 M Cs{sup +} containing electrolyte (all electrolytes use nitrates as the common anion). The authors have also shown that, contrary to the common assumptions found in the literature, a significant fraction of the thin film is not active initially. A new near infrared laser has been purchased and is being added to the Raman spectroscopy facilities to allow in-situ studies of the intercalation processes.'

  17. Alkali metal cation binding affinities of cytosine in the gas phase: revisited.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Rodgers, M T

    2014-08-14

    Binding of metal cations to the nucleobases can influence base pairing, base stacking and nucleobase tautomerism. Gas-phase condensation of dc discharge generated alkali metal cations and thermally vaporized cytosine (DC/FT) has been found to produce kinetically trapped excited tautomeric conformations of the M(+)(cytosine) complexes, which influences the threshold collision-induced dissociation (TCID) behavior. In order to elucidate the effects of the size of alkali metal cation on the strength of binding to the canonical form of cytosine, the binding affinities of Na(+) and K(+) to cytosine are re-examined here, and studies are extended to include Rb(+) and Cs(+) again using TCID techniques. The M(+)(cytosine) complexes are generated in an electrospray ionization source, which has been shown to produce ground-state tautomeric conformations of M(+)(cytosine). The energy-dependent cross sections are interpreted to yield bond dissociation energies (BDEs) using an analysis that includes consideration of unimolecular decay rates, the kinetic and internal energy distributions of the reactants, and multiple M(+)(cytosine)-Xe collisions. Revised BDEs for the Na(+)(cytosine) and K(+)(cytosine) complexes exceed those previously measured by 31.9 and 25.5 kJ mol(-1), respectively, consistent with the hypothesis proposed by Yang and Rodgers that excited tautomeric conformations are accessed when the complexes are generated by DC/FT ionization. Experimentally measured BDEs are compared to theoretical values calculated at the B3LYP and MP2(full) levels of theory using the 6-311+G(2d,2p)_HW* and def2-TZVPPD basis sets. The B3LYP/def2-TZVPPD level of theory is found to provide the best agreement with the measured BDEs, suggesting that this level of theory can be employed to provide reliable energetics for similar metal-ligand systems.

  18. Design, synthesis, and transfection biology of novel cationic glycolipids for use in liposomal gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, R; Mahidhar, Y V; Chaudhuri, A; Gopal, V; Rao, N M

    2001-11-22

    The molecular structure of the cationic lipids used in gene transfection strongly influences their transfection efficiency. High transfection efficiencies of non-glycerol-based simple monocationic transfection lipids with hydroxyethyl headgroups recently reported by us (Banerjee et al. J. Med. Chem. 1999, 42, 4292-4299) are consistent with the earlier observations that the presence of hydroxyl functionalities in the headgroup region of a cationic lipid contributes favorably in liposomal gene delivery. Using simple sugar molecules as the source of multiple hydroxyl functionalities in the headgroup region of the transfection lipids, we have synthesized four novel simple monocationic transfection lipids, namely, 1-deoxy-1-[dihexadecyl(methyl)ammonio]-D-xylitol (1), 1-deoxy-1-[methyl(ditetradecyl)ammonio]-D-arabinitol (2), 1-deoxy-1-[dihexadecyl(methyl)ammonio]-D-arabinitol (3) and 1-deoxy-1-[methyl(dioctadecyl)ammonio]-D-arabinitol (4), containing hydrophobic aliphatic tails and the hydrophilic arabinosyl or xylose sugar groups linked directly to the positively charged nitrogen atom. Syntheses, chemical characterizations, and the transfection biology of these novel transfection lipids 1-4 are described in this paper. Lipid 1, the xylosyl derivative, showed maximum transfection on COS-1 cells. All the lipids showed transfection with cholesterol as colipid and not with dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE). Radioactive quantitation of free and complexed DNA combined with ethidium bromide exclusion measurements suggest that though nearly 70% of the DNA exists as complexed DNA, the DNA may not have condensed as was observed with other cationic lipids. Presence of additional (more than two) hydroxyl functionalities in the headgroup of the cationic lipids appears to have improved the transfection efficiency and made these lipids less cytotoxic compared to two-hydroxyl derivatives.

  19. A simple method to estimate relative stabilities of polyethers cationized by alkali metal ions.

    PubMed

    Kuki, Ákos; Nagy, Lajos; Shemirani, Ghazaleh; Memboeuf, Antony; Drahos, László; Vékey, Károly; Zsuga, Miklós; Kéki, Sándor

    2012-02-15

    Dissociation of doubly cationized polyethers, namely [P + 2X](2+) into [P + X](+) and X(+), where P = polyethylene glycol (PEG), polypropylene glycol (PPG) and polytetrahydrofuran (PTHF) and X = Na, K and Cs, was studied by means of energy-dependent collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry. It was observed that the collision voltage necessary to obtain 50% fragmentation (CV(50)) determined for the doubly cationized polyethers of higher degree of polymerization varied linearly with the number of degrees of freedom (DOF) values. This observation allowed us to correlate these slopes with the corresponding relative gas-phase dissociation energies for binding of alkali ions to polyethers. The relative dissociation energies determined from the corresponding slopes were found to decrease in the order Na(+)  > K(+)  > Cs(+) for each polyether studied, and an order PPG ≈ PEG > PTHF can be established for each alkali metal ion.

  20. Alkali-metal-cation influx and efflux systems in nonconventional yeast species.

    PubMed

    Ramos, José; Ariño, Joaquín; Sychrová, Hana

    2011-04-01

    To maintain optimal intracellular concentrations of alkali-metal-cations, yeast cells use a series of influx and efflux systems. Nonconventional yeast species have at least three different types of efficient transporters that ensure potassium uptake and accumulation in cells. Most of them have Trk uniporters and Hak K(+)-H(+) symporters and a few yeast species also have the rare K(+) (Na(+))-uptake ATPase Acu. To eliminate surplus potassium or toxic sodium cations, various yeast species use highly conserved Nha Na(+) (K(+))/H(+) antiporters and Na(+) (K(+))-efflux Ena ATPases. The potassium-specific yeast Tok1 channel is also highly conserved among various yeast species and its activity is important for the regulation of plasma membrane potential. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A Study of Complexation-ability of Neutral Schiff Bases to Some Metal Cations

    PubMed Central

    Topal, Giray; Tümerdem, Recep; Basaran, Ismet; Gümüş, Arzu; Cakir, Umit

    2007-01-01

    The constants of the extraction equilibrium and the distribution for dichloromethane as an organic solvent having low dielectric constant of metal cations with chiral Schiff bases, benzaldehydene-(S)-2-amino-3-phenylpropanol (I), ohydroxybenzaldehydene-( S)-2-amino-3-phenyl-propanol (II), benzaldehydene-(S)-2- amino-3-methylbutanol (III) with anionic dyes [4-(2-pyridylazo)-resorcinol mono sodium monohydrate (NaPar), sodium picrat (NaPic) and potassium picrat (KPic)] and some heavy metal chlorides were determined at 25 ºC. All the ligands have given strongest complexation for NaPar. In contrast, similar behaviour for both alkali metal picrates is not apparent in the complexation of corresponding ligands.

  2. Effect of Alkali Metal Cations on Slow Inactivation of Cardiac Na+ Channels

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Claire; Horn, Richard

    1997-01-01

    Human heart Na+ channels were expressed transiently in both mammalian cells and Xenopus oocytes, and Na+ currents measured using 150 mM intracellular Na+. The kinetics of decaying outward Na+ current in response to 1-s depolarizations in the F1485Q mutant depends on the predominant cation in the extracellular solution, suggesting an effect on slow inactivation. The decay rate is lower for the alkali metal cations Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, and Cs+ than for the organic cations Tris, tetramethylammonium, N-methylglucamine, and choline. In whole cell recordings, raising [Na+]o from 10 to 150 mM increases the rate of recovery from slow inactivation at −140 mV, decreases the rate of slow inactivation at relatively depolarized voltages, and shifts steady-state slow inactivation in a depolarized direction. Single channel recordings of F1485Q show a decrease in the number of blank (i.e., null) records when [Na+]o is increased. Significant clustering of blank records when depolarizing at a frequency of 0.5 Hz suggests that periods of inactivity represent the sojourn of a channel in a slow-inactivated state. Examination of the single channel kinetics at +60 mV during 90-ms depolarizations shows that neither open time, closed time, nor first latency is significantly affected by [Na+]o. However raising [Na+]o decreases the duration of the last closed interval terminated by the end of the depolarization, leading to an increased number of openings at the depolarized voltage. Analysis of single channel data indicates that at a depolarized voltage a single rate constant for entry into a slow-inactivated state is reduced in high [Na+]o, suggesting that the binding of an alkali metal cation, perhaps in the ion-conducting pore, inhibits the closing of the slow inactivation gate. PMID:9234168

  3. Changes in the Vibrational Spectra of Zeolites Due to Sorption of Heavy Metal Cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Król, M.; Mozgawa, W.; Barczyk, K.; Bajda, T.; Kozanecki, M.

    2013-11-01

    This work presents the results of spectroscopic (MIR and Raman) studies of zeolite structures after immobilization of heavy metal cations from aqueous solutions. The sorption of Ag+, Cu2+, Cd2+, Pb2+, Zn2+, and Cr3+ ions has been conducted on zeolites belonging to different structural groups, i.e., sodium forms of natural chabazite, mordenite, ferrierite, and clinoptilolite, as well as on synthetic zeolite Y. Systematic changes in intensities and positions of the bands corresponding to the characteristic ring vibrations have been observed in the measured spectra. The most visible changes are observed in the FT-IR spectra of the samples in the range of 850-450 cm-1, and in the Raman spectra in the range of 600-250 cm-1. Depending on the zeolite structure, the bands, which can be regarded as a kind of indicator of ion exchange, were indentifi ed. For example, in the case of IR spectra, these bands are at 766, 703, 648, 578, and 506 cm-1 for zeolite Y, at 733 and 560 cm-1 for mordenite, at 675 cm-1 for clinoptilolite, etc. The degree of changes depends on both the type of cation and its concentration in the initial solution. This is connected with the way of binding of metal ions to the zeolite aluminosilicate framework, i.e., a proportion of the ion exchange and chemisorption in the process. Cations mainly undergoing ion exchange, such as Cd2+ or Pb2+, have the greatest impact on the character of the spectra. On the other hand, Cr3+ ions practically do not modify the spectra of zeolites. Results of IR and Raman spectroscopic studies have been compared with those obtained by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), from which the proportion of ion exchange to chemisorption in the process and the effective cation exchange capacity of the individual samples have been estimated.

  4. New generation super alloy candidates for medical applications: corrosion behavior, cation release and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Reclaru, L; Ziegenhagen, R; Unger, R E; Eschler, P Y; Constantin, F

    2014-12-01

    Three super alloy candidates (X1 CrNiMoMnW 24-22-6-3-2 N, NiCr21 MoNbFe 8-3-5 AlTi, CoNiCr 35-20 Mo 10 BTi) for a prolonged contact with skin are evaluated in comparison with two reference austenitic stainless steels 316L and 904L. Several electrochemical parameters were measured and determined (E(oc), E(corr), i(corr), b(a), b(c), E(b), R(p), E(crev) and coulometric analysis) in order to compare the corrosion behavior. The cation release evaluation and in vitro biological characterization also were performed. In terms of corrosion, the results reveal that the 904L steels presented the best behavior followed by the super austenitic steel X1 CrNiMoMnW 24-22-6-3-2 N. For the other two super alloys (NiCr and CoNiCr types alloys) tested in different conditions (annealed, work hardened and work hardened+age hardened) it was found that their behavior to corrosion was weak and close to the other reference stainless steel, 316L. Regarding the extraction a mixture of cations in relatively high concentrations was noted and therefore a cocktail effect was not excluded. The results obtained in the biological assays WST-1 and TNF-alpha were in correlation with the corrosion and extraction evaluation.

  5. Molecular crowding has no effect on the dilution thermodynamics of the biologically relevant cation mixtures.

    PubMed

    Głogocka, Daria; Przybyło, Magdalena; Langner, Marek

    2017-04-01

    The ionic composition of intracellular space is rigorously maintained in the expense of high-energy expenditure. It has been recently postulated that the cytoplasmic ionic composition is optimized so the energy cost of the fluctuations of calcium ion concentration is minimized. Specifically, thermodynamic arguments have been produced to show that the presence of potassium ions at concentrations higher than 100 mM reduce extend of the energy dissipation required for the dilution of calcium cations. No such effect has been measured when sodium ions were present in the solution or when the other divalent cation magnesium was diluted. The experimental observation has been interpreted as the indication of the formation of ionic clusters composed of calcium, chloride and potassium. In order to test the possibility that such clusters may be preserved in biological space, the thermodynamics of ionic mixtures dilution in solutions containing albumins and model lipid bilayers have been measured. Obtained thermograms clearly demonstrate that the energetics of calcium/potassium mixture is qualitatively different from calcium/sodium mixture indicating that the presence of the biologically relevant quantities of proteins and membrane hydrophilic surfaces do not interfere with the properties of the intracellular aqueous phase.

  6. Assessment of Metal Toxicity in Marine Ecosystems: Comparative Toxicity Potentials for Nine Cationic Metals in Coastal Seawater.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yan; Rosenbaum, Ralph K; Hauschild, Michael Z

    2016-01-05

    This study is a first attempt to develop globally applicable and spatially differentiated marine comparative toxicity potentials (CTPs) or ecotoxicity characterization factors for metals in coastal seawater for use in life cycle assessment. The toxicity potentials are based exclusively on marine ecotoxicity data and take account of metal speciation and bioavailability. CTPs were developed for nine cationic metals (Cd, Cr(III), Co, Cu(II), Fe(III), Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in 64 large marine ecosystems (LMEs) covering all coastal waters in the world. The results showed that the CTP of a specific metal varies 3-4 orders of magnitude across LMEs, largely due to different seawater residence times. Therefore, the highest toxicity potential for metals was found in the LMEs with the longest seawater residence times. Across metals, the highest CTPs were observed for Cd, Pb, and Zn. At the concentration levels occurring in coastal seawaters, Fe acts not as a toxic agent but as an essential nutrient and thus has CTPs of zero.

  7. On the real performance of cation exchange resins in wastewater treatment under conditions of cation competition: the case of heavy metal pollution.

    PubMed

    Prelot, Benedicte; Ayed, Imen; Marchandeau, Franck; Zajac, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Sorption performance of cation-exchange resins Amberlite® IRN77 and Amberlite™ IRN9652 toward Cs(I) and Sr(II) has been tested in single-component aqueous solutions and simulated waste effluents containing other monovalent (Effluent 1) or divalent (Effluent 2) metal cations, as well as nitrate, borate, or carbonate anions. The individual sorption isotherms of each main component were measured by the solution depletion method. The differential molar enthalpy changes accompanying the ion-exchange between Cs+ or Sr2+ ions and protons at the resin surface from single-component nitrate solutions were measured by isothermal titration calorimetry and they showed a higher specificity of the two resins toward cesium. Compared to the retention limits of both resins under such idealized conditions, an important depression in the maximum adsorption capacity toward each main component was observed in multication systems. The overall effect of ion exchange process appeared to be an unpredictable outcome of the individual sorption capacities of the two resins toward various cations as a function of the cation charge, size, and concentration. The cesium retention capacity of the resins was diminished to about 25% of the "ideal" value in Effluent 1 and 50% in Effluent 2; a further decrease to about 15% was observed upon concomitant strontium addition. The uptake of strontium by the resins was found to be less sensitive to the addition of other metal components: the greatest decrease in the amount adsorbed was 60% of the ideal value in the two effluents for Amberlite® IRN77 and 75% for Amberlite™ IRN9652. It was therefore demonstrated that any performance tests carried out under idealized conditions should be exploited with much caution to predict the real performance of cation exchange resins under conditions of cation competition.

  8. Thermal Methane Activation by the Metal-Free Cluster Cation [Si2 O4 ](.)

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Shaodong; Schlangen, Maria; Schwarz, Helmut

    2017-01-31

    The thermal reaction of methane with the metal-free cluster cation [Si2 O4 ](.+) has been examined by using Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry. In addition to generating a methyl radical via hydrogen-atom abstraction, [Si2 O4 ](.+) can selectively oxidize methane to formaldehyde. The mechanisms of these rather efficient reactions have been elucidated by high-level quantum-chemical calculations. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Inosine octamer stabilized by alkali earth metal cations - as studied by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Frańska, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    By using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, inosine was found to be able to form an octamer stabilized by alkali earth metal cation, namely Ca(2+), Sr(2+) and Ba(2+), of which the most stable is that stabilized by Ca(2+) (ion [I8+Ca](2+)). It was established that 9-methylhypoxanthine (M) did not form an analogical octamer, since ion [M8+Ca](2+) was not detected. On the other hand, 9-methylhypoxanthine can form "mixed" octamers together with inosine (ions [InMm+Ca](2+), n + m = 8, were detected).

  10. Impact of spreading olive mill waste water on agricultural soils for leaching of metal micronutrients and cations.

    PubMed

    Aharonov-Nadborny, R; Tsechansky, L; Raviv, M; Graber, E R

    2017-07-01

    Olive mill waste water (OMWW) is an acidic (pH 4-5), saline (EC ∼ 5-10 mS cm(-1)), blackish-red aqueous byproduct of the three phase olive oil production process, with a high chemical oxygen demand (COD) of up to 220,000 mg L(-1). OMWW is conventionally disposed of by uncontrolled dumping into the environment or by semi-controlled spreading on agricultural soils. It was hypothesized that spreading such liquids on agricultural soils could result in the release and mobilization of indigenous soil metals. The effect of OMWW spreading on leaching of metal cations (Na, K, Mg, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn) was tested in four non-contaminated agricultural soils having different textures (sand, clay loam, clay, and loam) and chemical properties. While the OMWW contributed metals to the soil solution, it also mobilized indigenous soil metals as a function of soil clay content, cation exchange capacity (CEC), and soil pH-buffer capacity. Leaching of soil-originated metals from the sandy soil was substantially greater than from the loam and clay soils, while the clay loam was enriched with metals derived from the OMWW. These trends were attributed to cation exchange and organic-metal complex formation. The organic matter fraction of OMWW forms complexes with metal cations; these complexes may be mobile or precipitate, depending on the soil chemical and physical environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Siderophores and mussel foot proteins: the role of catechol, cations, and metal coordination in surface adhesion.

    PubMed

    Maier, Greg P; Butler, Alison

    2017-07-01

    Metal coordination, hydrogen bonding, redox reactions, and covalent crosslinking are seemingly disparate chemical and physicochemical processes that are all accomplished in natural materials by the catechol functional group. This review focuses on the reactivity of catechols in tris-2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl-containing microbial siderophores and synthetic analogs, as well as Dopa-(3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine)-containing mussel foot proteins that adhere to surfaces in aqueous conditions. Mussel foot proteins with a high content of Dopa and cationic amino acids, Lys and Arg, adhere strongly to mica, an aluminosilicate mineral, in aqueous conditions. The siderophore cyclic trichrysobactin, tris-(2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl-D-Lys-L-Ser) and related synthetic analogs in which the tri-Ser macrolactone is replaced by Tren, tris-(2-aminoethyl)amine, also adheres strongly to mica. Variation in the nature of the catechol and cationic groups in synthetic analogs reveals a synergism between the cationic amino acid and the catechol, required for strong aqueous adhesion. Autoxidation and iron(III)-catalyzed oxidation of 2,3-dihydroxy and 3,4-dihydroxy catechols are also considered. These siderophore analogs provide a platform to understand catechol interactions and reactivity on surfaces, which may ultimately improve the design of synthetic materials that address diverse challenges in medicine, materials science, as well as other disciplines, in which surface adhesion in aqueous conditions is important.

  12. Asymmetric partitioning of metals among cluster anions and cations generated via laser ablation of mixed aluminum/Group 6 transition metal targets.

    PubMed

    Waller, Sarah E; Mann, Jennifer E; Jarrold, Caroline Chick

    2013-02-28

    While high-power laser ablation of metal alloys indiscriminately produces gas-phase atomic ions in proportion to the abundance of the various metals in the alloy, gas-phase ions produced by moderate-power laser ablation sources coupled with molecular beams are formed by more complicated mechanisms. A mass spectrometric study that directly compares the mass distributions of cluster anions and cations generated from laser ablation of pure aluminum, an aluminum/molybdenum mixed target, and an aluminum/tungsten mixed target is detailed. Mass spectra of anionic species generated from the mixed targets showed that both tungsten and molybdenum were in higher abundance in the negatively charged species than in the target material. Mass spectra of the cationic species showed primarily Al(+) and aluminum oxide and hydroxide cluster cations. No molybdenum- or tungsten-containing cluster cations were definitively assigned. The asymmetric distribution of aluminum and Group 6 transition metals in cation and anion cluster composition is attributed to the low ionization energy of atomic aluminum and aluminum suboxide clusters. In addition, the propensity of both molybdenum and tungsten to form metal oxide cluster anions under the same conditions that favor metallic aluminum cluster anions is attributed to differences in the optical properties of the surface oxide that is present in the metal powders used to prepare the ablation targets. Mechanisms of mixed metal oxide clusters are considered.

  13. Rules and trends of metal cation driven hydride-transfer mechanisms in metal amidoboranes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Young; Lee, Han Myoung; Seo, Jongcheol; Shin, Seung Koo; Kim, Kwang S

    2010-01-01

    Group I and II metal amidoboranes have been identified as one of the promising families of materials for efficient H(2) storage. However, the underlying mechanism of the dehydrogenation of these materials is not well understood. Thus, the mechanisms and kinetics of H(2) release in metal amidoboranes are investigated using high level ab initio calculations and kinetic simulations. The metal plays the role of catalyst for the hydride transfer with formation of a metal hydride intermediate towards the dehydrogenation. In this process, with increasing ionic character of the metal hydride bond in the intermediate, the stability of the intermediate decreases, while the dehydrogenation process involving ionic recombination of the hydridic H with the protic H proceeds with a reduced barrier. Such correlations lead directly to a U-shaped relationship between the activation energy barrier for H(2) elimination and the ionicity of metal hydride bond. Oligomerized intermediates are formed by the chain reaction of the size-driven catalytic effects of metals, competing with the non-oligomerization pathway. The kinetic rates at low temperatures are determined by the maximum barrier height in the pathway (a Lambda-shaped relation), while those at moderately high temperatures are determined by most of multiple-barriers. This requires kinetic simulations. At the operating temperatures of proton exchange membrane fuel cells, the metal amidoboranes with lithium and sodium release H(2) along both oligomerization and non-oligomerization paths. The sodium amidoboranes show the most accelerated rates, while others release H(2) at similar rates. In addition, we predict that the novel metal amidoborane-based adducts and mixtures would release H(2) with accelerated rates as well as with enhanced reversibility. This comprehensive study is useful for further developments of active metal-based better hydrogen storage materials.

  14. Effects of Alkali Metal Ion Cationization on Fragmentation Pathways of Triazole-Epothilone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xiyan; Luo, Guoan; Chen, Yue; Kong, Xianglei

    2012-06-01

    The collisionally activated dissociation mass spectra of the protonated and alkali metal cationized ions of a triazole-epothilone analogue were studied in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. The fragmentation pathway of the protonated ion was characterized by the loss of the unit of C3H4O3. However, another fragmentation pathway with the loss of C3H2O2 was identified for the complex ions with Na+, K+, Rb+, and Cs+. The branching ratio of the second pathway increases with the increment of the size of alkali metal ions. Theoretical calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) method show the difference in the binding position of the proton and the metal ions. With the increase of the radii of the metal ions, progressive changes in the macrocycle of the compound are induced, which cause the corresponding change in their fragmentation pathways. It has also been found that the interaction energy between the compound and the metal ion decreases with increase in the size of the latter. This is consistent with the experimental results, which show that cesiated complexes readily eject Cs+ when subject to collisions.

  15. Impact of metal cations on the electrocatalytic properties of Pt/C nanoparticles at multiple phase interfaces.

    PubMed

    Durst, Julien; Chatenet, Marian; Maillard, Frédéric

    2012-10-05

    Proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) use carbon-supported nanoparticles based on platinum and its alloys to accelerate the rate of the sluggish oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR). The most common metals alloyed to Pt include Co, Ni and Cu, and are thermodynamically unstable in the PEMFC environment. Their dissolution yields the formation and redistribution of metal cations (M(y+)) within the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). Metal cations can also contaminate the MEA when metallic bipolar plates are used as current collectors. In each case, the electrical performance of the PEMFC severely decreases, an effect that is commonly attributed to the poisoning of the sulfonic acid groups of the perfluorosulfonated membrane (PEM) and the resulting decrease of the proton transport properties. However, the impact of metal cations on the kinetics of electrochemical reactions involving adsorption/desorption and bond-breaking processes remains poorly understood. In this paper, we use model electrodes to highlight the effect of metal cations on Pt/C nanoparticles coated or not with a perfluorosulfonated ionomer for the CO electrooxidation reaction and the oxygen reduction reaction. We show that metal cations negatively impact the ORR kinetics and the mass-transport resistance of molecular oxygen. However, the specific adsorption of sulfonate groups of the Nafion® ionomer locally modifies the double layer structure and increases the tolerance to metal cations, even in the presence of sulphate ions in the electrolyte. The survey is extended by using an ultramicroelectrode with cavity and a solid state cell (SSC) specifically developed for this study.

  16. Resorcarene-based receptor: versatile behavior in its interaction with heavy and soft metal cations.

    PubMed

    Danil de Namor, Angela F; Chaaban, Jinane K; Piro, Oscar E; Castellano, Eduardo E

    2006-02-09

    Standard solution Gibbs energies, DeltasG degrees, of the resorcarene-based receptor 5,11,17,23-ethylthiomethylated calix[4]resorcarene, (characterized by 1H NMR and X-ray diffraction studies) in its monomeric state (established through partition experiments) in various solvents are for the first time reported in the area of resorcarene chemistry. Transfer Gibbs energies of from hexane (reference solvent) to other medium are calculated. Agreement between DeltatG degrees (referred to the pure solvents) and standard partition Gibbs energies, DeltapG degrees (solvent mutually saturated) is found. Cation-ligand interactions were investigated through 1H NMR (CD3CN and CD3OD) and conductometric titrations in acetonitrile and methanol. 1H NMR data revealed the sites of interaction of with the metal cation. The composition of the metal-ion complexes (Ag+ and Pb2+ in acetonitrile and Ag+ and Cu2+ in methanol) was established through conductometric titrations. Thus, complexes of 1:1 stoichiometry were formed between and Ag+ and Pb2+ in acetonitrile and Cu2+ in methanol. However, in moving from acetonitrile to methanol, the composition of the silver complex was altered. Thus, two metal cations are hosted by a unit of the ligand. As far as Cu2+ and in acetonitrile is concerned, conductance data suggest that metalates are formed in which up to four units of Cu2+ are taken up per unit of resorcarene. The contrasting behavior of with Cu2+ in acetonitrile relative to methanol is discussed. As far as mercury (II) is concerned, the unusual jump in conductance observed in the titration of Hg2+ with in acetonitrile and methanol after the formation of a multicharged complex (undefined composition) is attributed to the presence of highly charged smaller units (higher mobility) resulting from the departure of pendant arms from the resorcarene backbone. Isolation of these species followed by X-ray diffraction studies corroborated this statement. The thermodynamic characterization of metal

  17. How Native and Alien Metal Cations Bind ATP: Implications for Lithium as a Therapeutic Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudev, Todor; Grauffel, Cédric; Lim, Carmay

    2017-02-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the major energy currency of the cell, exists in solution mostly as ATP-Mg. Recent experiments suggest that Mg2+ interacts with the highly charged ATP triphosphate group and Li+ can co-bind with the native Mg2+ to form ATP-Mg-Li and modulate the neuronal purine receptor response. However, it is unclear how the negatively charged ATP triphosphate group binds Mg2+ and Li+ (i.e. which phosphate group(s) bind Mg2+/Li+) and how the ATP solution conformation depends on the type of metal cation and the metal-binding mode. Here, we reveal the preferred ATP-binding mode of Mg2+/Li+ alone and combined: Mg2+ prefers to bind ATP tridentately to each of the three phosphate groups, but Li+ prefers to bind bidentately to the terminal two phosphates. We show that the solution ATP conformation depends on the cation and its binding site/mode, but it does not change significantly when Li+ binds to Mg2+-loaded ATP. Hence, ATP-Mg-Li, like Mg2+-ATP, can fit in the ATP-binding site of the host enzyme/receptor, activating specific signaling pathways.

  18. How Native and Alien Metal Cations Bind ATP: Implications for Lithium as a Therapeutic Agent.

    PubMed

    Dudev, Todor; Grauffel, Cédric; Lim, Carmay

    2017-02-14

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the major energy currency of the cell, exists in solution mostly as ATP-Mg. Recent experiments suggest that Mg(2+) interacts with the highly charged ATP triphosphate group and Li(+) can co-bind with the native Mg(2+) to form ATP-Mg-Li and modulate the neuronal purine receptor response. However, it is unclear how the negatively charged ATP triphosphate group binds Mg(2+) and Li(+) (i.e. which phosphate group(s) bind Mg(2+)/Li(+)) and how the ATP solution conformation depends on the type of metal cation and the metal-binding mode. Here, we reveal the preferred ATP-binding mode of Mg(2+)/Li(+) alone and combined: Mg(2+) prefers to bind ATP tridentately to each of the three phosphate groups, but Li(+) prefers to bind bidentately to the terminal two phosphates. We show that the solution ATP conformation depends on the cation and its binding site/mode, but it does not change significantly when Li(+) binds to Mg(2+)-loaded ATP. Hence, ATP-Mg-Li, like Mg(2+)-ATP, can fit in the ATP-binding site of the host enzyme/receptor, activating specific signaling pathways.

  19. The Permeability of the Sodium Channel to Metal Cations in Myelinated Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Hille, Bertil

    1972-01-01

    The relative permeability of sodium channels to eight metal cations is studied in myelinated nerve fibers. Ionic currents under voltage-clamp conditions are measured in Na-free solutions containing the test ion. Measured reversal potentials and the Goldman equation are used to calculate the permeability sequence: Na+ ≈ Li+ > Tl+ > K+. The ratio PK/PNa is 1/12. The permeabilities to Rb+, Cs+, Ca++, and Mg++ are too small to measure. The permeability ratios agree with observations on the squid giant axon and show that the reversal potential ENa differs significantly from the Nernst potential for Na+ in normal axons. Opening and closing rates for sodium channels are relatively insensitive to the ionic composition of the bathing medium, implying that gating is a structural property of the channel rather than a result of the movement or accumulation of particular ions around the channel. A previously proposed pore model of the channel accommodates the permeant metal cations in a partly hydrated form. The observed sequence of permeabilities follows the order expected for binding to a high field strength anion in Eisenman's theory of ion exchange equilibria. PMID:5025743

  20. How Native and Alien Metal Cations Bind ATP: Implications for Lithium as a Therapeutic Agent

    PubMed Central

    Dudev, Todor; Grauffel, Cédric; Lim, Carmay

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the major energy currency of the cell, exists in solution mostly as ATP-Mg. Recent experiments suggest that Mg2+ interacts with the highly charged ATP triphosphate group and Li+ can co-bind with the native Mg2+ to form ATP-Mg-Li and modulate the neuronal purine receptor response. However, it is unclear how the negatively charged ATP triphosphate group binds Mg2+ and Li+ (i.e. which phosphate group(s) bind Mg2+/Li+) and how the ATP solution conformation depends on the type of metal cation and the metal-binding mode. Here, we reveal the preferred ATP-binding mode of Mg2+/Li+ alone and combined: Mg2+ prefers to bind ATP tridentately to each of the three phosphate groups, but Li+ prefers to bind bidentately to the terminal two phosphates. We show that the solution ATP conformation depends on the cation and its binding site/mode, but it does not change significantly when Li+ binds to Mg2+-loaded ATP. Hence, ATP-Mg-Li, like Mg2+-ATP, can fit in the ATP-binding site of the host enzyme/receptor, activating specific signaling pathways. PMID:28195155

  1. HNS+ and HSN+ cations: Electronic states, spin-rovibronic spectroscopy with planetary and biological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabelsi, Tarek; Ben Yaghlane, Saida; Al Mogren, Muneerah Mogren; Francisco, Joseph S.; Hochlaf, Majdi

    2016-08-01

    Ab initio methods in conjunction with a large basis set are used to compute the potential energy surfaces of the 12 lowest electronic states of the HNS+ and HSN+ isomeric forms. These potentials are used in discussions of the metastability of these cations and plausible mechanisms for the H+/H + SN+/SN, S/S+ + NH+/NH, N/N+ + SH+/SH ion-molecule reactions. Interestingly, the low rovibrational levels of HSN+(12A″) and HNS+(12A″) electronically excited ions are predicted to be long-lived. Both ions are suggested to be a suitable candidate for light-sensitive NOṡ donor in vivo and as a possible marker for the detection of intermediates in nitrites + H2S reactions at the cellular level. The full spin rovibronic levels of HNS+ are presented, which may assist in the experimental identification of HNS+ and HSN+ ions and in elucidating their roles in astrophysical and biological media.

  2. Competitive adsorption of metal cations onto two gram positive bacteria: testing the chemical equilibrium model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowle, David A.; Fein, Jeremy B.

    1999-10-01

    In order to test the ability of a surface complexation approach to account for metal-bacteria interactions in near surface fluid-rock systems, we have conducted experiments that measure the extent of adsorption in mixed metal, mixed bacteria systems. This study tests the surface complexation approach by comparing estimated extents of adsorption based on surface complexation modeling to those we observed in the experimental systems. The batch adsorption experiments involved Ca, Cd, Cu, and Pb adsorption onto the surfaces of 2 g positive bacteria: Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus licheniformis. Three types of experiments were performed: 1. Single metal (Ca, Cu, Pb) adsorption onto a mixture of B. licheniformis and B. subtilis; 2. mixed metal (Cd, Cu, and Pb; Ca and Cd) adsorption onto either B. subtilis or B. licheniformis; and 3. mixed or single metal adsorption onto B. subtilis and B. licheniformis. %Independent of the experimental results, and based on the site specific stability constants for Ca, Cd, Cu, and Pb interactions with the carboxyl and phosphate sites on B. licheniformis and B. subtilis determined by Fein et al. (1997), by Daughney et al. (1998) and in this study, we estimate the extent of adsorption that is expected in the above experimental systems. Competitive cation adsorption experiments in both single and double bacteria systems exhibit little adsorption at pH values less than 4. With increasing pH above 4.0, the extent of Ca, Cu, Pb and Cd adsorption also increases due to the increased deprotonation of bacterial surface functional groups. In all cases studied, the estimated adsorption behavior is in excellent agreement with the observations, with only slight differences that were within the uncertainties of the estimation and experimental procedures. Therefore, the results indicate that the use of chemical equilibrium modeling of aqueous metal adsorption onto bacterial surfaces yields accurate predictions of the distribution of metals in complex

  3. Spectroscopic characterization of the uptake of essential and xenobiotic metal cations in cells of the soil bacterium Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed

    Kamnev, A A; Renou-Gonnord, M F; Antonyuk, L P; Colina, M; Chernyshev, A V; Frolov, I; Ignatov, V V

    1997-01-01

    The results of flame (FAAS) or graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric (GFAAS) analyses are presented and discussed on the accumulation of essential metals (Mg, Ca, Mn and Fe contained in the cultivation medium) and traces of each one of the conventionally xenobiotic elements from the group V, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn or Pb, added to the medium in concentrations (0.2 mM) which do not essentially suppress growth of the bacterial culture, in cells of the plant root-associated nitrogen-fixing bacterium Azospirillum brasilense. Along with the essential cations assimilated by the bacterium, Zn and Cu were found to effectively accumulate in the biomass from the environment. The uptake of Co and Ni was significantly less pronounced, whereas Pb and V appeared to be present in cells in much lower concentrations than in the cultivation medium evidently showing no tendency to be assimilated by azospirilla. The effect of the above xenobiotics on the uptake level of the four essential elements provided evidence that they may compete for the formation of biologically active complexes with substances of both intracellular and extracellular localization. The analytical data obtained are compared with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of intact vacuum-dried bacterial cells grown in a standard medium and under the conditions of an increased metal uptake.

  4. Modeling sorption of divalent metal cations on hydrous manganese oxide using the diffuse double layer model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tonkin, J.W.; Balistrieri, L.S.; Murray, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Manganese oxides are important scavengers of trace metals and other contaminants in the environment. The inclusion of Mn oxides in predictive models, however, has been difficult due to the lack of a comprehensive set of sorption reactions consistent with a given surface complexation model (SCM), and the discrepancies between published sorption data and predictions using the available models. The authors have compiled a set of surface complexation reactions for synthetic hydrous Mn oxide (HMO) using a two surface site model and the diffuse double layer SCM which complements databases developed for hydrous Fe (III) oxide, goethite and crystalline Al oxide. This compilation encompasses a range of data observed in the literature for the complex HMO surface and provides an error envelope for predictions not well defined by fitting parameters for single or limited data sets. Data describing surface characteristics and cation sorption were compiled from the literature for the synthetic HMO phases birnessite, vernadite and ??-MnO2. A specific surface area of 746 m2g-1 and a surface site density of 2.1 mmol g-1 were determined from crystallographic data and considered fixed parameters in the model. Potentiometric titration data sets were adjusted to a pH1EP value of 2.2. Two site types (???XOH and ???YOH) were used. The fraction of total sites attributed to ???XOH (??) and pKa2 were optimized for each of 7 published potentiometric titration data sets using the computer program FITEQL3.2. pKa2 values of 2.35??0.077 (???XOH) and 6.06??0.040 (???YOH) were determined at the 95% confidence level. The calculated average ?? value was 0.64, with high and low values ranging from 1.0 to 0.24, respectively. pKa2 and ?? values and published cation sorption data were used subsequently to determine equilibrium surface complexation constants for Ba2+, Ca2+, Cd 2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Mg2+, Mn 2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, Sr2+ and Zn 2+. In addition, average model parameters were used to predict additional

  5. Density Functional Theory of Open-Shell Systems. The 3d-Series Transition-Metal Atoms and Their Cations.

    PubMed

    Luo, Sijie; Averkiev, Boris; Yang, Ke R; Xu, Xuefei; Truhlar, Donald G

    2014-01-14

    The 3d-series transition metals (also called the fourth-period transition metals), Sc to Zn, are very important in industry and biology, but they provide unique challenges to computing the electronic structure of their compounds. In order to successfully describe the compounds by theory, one must be able to describe their components, in particular the constituent atoms and cations. In order to understand the ingredients required for successful computations with density functional theory, it is useful to examine the performance of various exchange-correlation functionals; we do this here for 4s(N)3d(N') transition-metal atoms and their cations. We analyze the results using three ways to compute the energy of the open-shell states: the direct variational method, the weighted-averaged broken symmetry (WABS) method, and a new broken-symmetry method called the reinterpreted broken symmetry (RBS) method. We find the RBS method to be comparable in accuracy with the WABS method. By examining the overall accuracy in treating 18 multiplicity-changing excitations and 10 ionization potentials with the RBS method, 10 functionals are found to have a mean-unsigned error of <5 kcal/mol, with ωB97X-D topping the list. For local density functionals, which are more practical for extended systems, the M06-L functional is the most accurate. And by combining the results with our previous studies of p-block and 4d-series elements as well as databases for alkyl bond dissociation, main-group atomization energies, and π-π noncovalent interactions, we find five functionals, namely, PW6B95, MPW1B95, M08-SO, SOGGA11-X, and MPWB1K, to be highly recommended. We also studied the performance of PW86 and C09 exchange functionals, which have drawn wide interest in recent studies due to their claimed ability to reproduce Hartree-Fock exchange at long distance. By combining them with four correlation functionals, we find the performance of the resulting functionals disappointing both for 3d

  6. Structure and bonding in first-row transition metal dicarbide cations MC2+.

    PubMed

    Rayón, Víctor M; Redondo, Pilar; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio

    2007-07-19

    A theoretical study of the first-row transition metal dicarbide cations MC2+ (M=Sc-Zn) has been carried out. Predictions for different molecular properties that could help in their eventual experimental detection have been made. Most MC2+ compounds prefer a C2v symmetric arrangement over the linear geometry. In particular, the C2v isomer is specially favored for early transition metals. Only for CuC2+ is the linear isomer predicted to be the global minimum, although by only 1 kcal/mol. In all cases the isomerization barrier between cyclic and linear species seems to be very small (below 2 kcal/mol). The topological analysis of the electronic density shows that most C2v isomers are T-shaped structures. In general, MC2+ compounds for early transition metals have larger dissociation energies than those formed by late transition metals. In most cases the dissociation energies for MC2+ compounds are much smaller than those obtained for their neutral analogues. An analysis of the bonding in MC2+ compounds in terms of the interactions between the valence orbitals of the fragments helps to interpret their main features.

  7. The role of multivalent metal cations and organic complexing agents in bitumen-mineral interactions in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Weibing

    A systematic investigation was carried out to study the interactions between bitumen (or hexadecane) and minerals (quartz, kaolinite and illite) in aqueous solutions containing multivalent metal cations Ca2+, Mg2+ and Fe2+/Fe3+, in the absence and presence of organic complexing agents (oxalic acid, EDTA and citric acid). A range of experimental techniques, including coagulation measurement, visualization of bitumen-mineral attachment, metal ion adsorption measurement, zeta potential measurement, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analyses, were employed in the investigation. Free energy changes of adsorption of metal cations on the minerals and bitumen were evaluated using the James & Healy thermodynamic model. Total interaction energies between the minerals and bitumen were calculated using classical DLVO theory. It was observed that while the tested minerals showed varying degrees of mutual-coagulation with bitumen (or hexadecane), the presence of the multivalent metal cations could prominently increase the mutual coagulation. It was also found that such enhancement of the mutual coagulation was only significant when the metal cations formed first-order hydroxyl complexes (such as CaOH +, MgOH+, etc.) or metal hydroxides (such as Fe(OH) 3, Mg(OH)2, etc.). Therefore, the increase of the bitumen-mineral mutual coagulation by the metal cations was strongly pH dependent. Organic complexing agents (oxalic acid, citric acid and EDTA) used in this study, citric acid in particular, significantly reduced or virtually eliminated the mutual coagulation between bitumen (or hexadecane) and minerals caused by metal cations Ca2+, Mg2+, Fe 2+ and Fe3+. Due to its ability to substantially lower the mutual coagulation between bitumen and mineral particles, citric acid was found the most effective in improving bitumen-mineral liberation in solutions containing the multivalent metal cations at pH 8--10. In small scale flotation experiments

  8. Stabilization of cationic and anionic metal species in contaminated soils using sludge-derived biochar.

    PubMed

    Fang, Shen'en; Tsang, Daniel C W; Zhou, Fengsha; Zhang, Weihua; Qiu, Rongliang

    2016-04-01

    Currently, sludge pyrolysis has been considered as a promising technology to solve disposal problem of municipal sewage sludge, recover sludge heating value, sequester carbon and replenish nutrients in farmland soils. The resultant sludge-derived biochar (SDBC) is potentially an excellent stabilizing agent for metal species. This study applied the SDBC into four soils that had been contaminated in field with cationic Pb(II) and Cd(II)/Ni(II), and anionic Cr(VI) and As(III), respectively. The performance of metal stabilization under various operational and environmental conditions was evaluated with acid batch extraction and column leaching tests. Results indicated the SDBC could effectively stabilize these metals, which was favored by elevated temperature and longer aging. Periodic temperature decrease from 45 to 4 °C resulted in the release of immobilized Cr(VI) and As(III) but not Pb(II). However, a longer aging time offset such metal remobilization. This was possibly because more Pb was strongly bound and even formed stable precipitates, as shown by XRD and sequential extraction results. With increasing time, Cr(VI) was sorbed and partly reduced to Cr(III), while immobilized As(III) was co-oxidized to As(V) as indicated by XPS spectra. Column tests revealed that adding SDBC as a separate layer was unfavorable because the concentrated Cd(II) and Ni(II) in localized positions increased the peak levels of metal release under continuous acid leaching. In contrast, uniformly mixed SDBC could effectively delay the metal breakthrough and reduce their released amounts. Yet, a long-term monitoring may be required for evaluating the potential leaching risks and bioavailability/toxicity of these immobilized and transformed species in the SDBC-amended soils.

  9. Quantum-chemistry based calibration of the alkali metal cation series (Li(+)-Cs(+)) for large-scale polarizable molecular mechanics/dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Dudev, Todor; Devereux, Mike; Meuwly, Markus; Lim, Carmay; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Gresh, Nohad

    2015-02-15

    The alkali metal cations in the series Li(+)-Cs(+) act as major partners in a diversity of biological processes and in bioinorganic chemistry. In this article, we present the results of their calibration in the context of the SIBFA polarizable molecular mechanics/dynamics procedure. It relies on quantum-chemistry (QC) energy-decomposition analyses of their monoligated complexes with representative O-, N-, S-, and Se- ligands, performed with the aug-cc-pVTZ(-f) basis set at the Hartree-Fock level. Close agreement with QC is obtained for each individual contribution, even though the calibration involves only a limited set of cation-specific parameters. This agreement is preserved in tests on polyligated complexes with four and six O- ligands, water and formamide, indicating the transferability of the procedure. Preliminary extensions to density functional theory calculations are reported. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Novel Ternary Graphite Intercalation Compounds of Alkali Metal Cations and Amines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maluangnont, Tosapol

    Novel ternary graphite intercalation compounds (GICs) of alkali metal cations and a wide variety of amines have been synthesized by one-pot chemical syntheses. Alkali metals studied includes Li, Na and K. The families of amines employed are nalkylamines, branched alkylamines, and different structural isomers of diamines and polyamines. Intragallery structures of the amine co-intercalates residing between the graphene sheets are proposed based on powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), supplemented by compositional analyses, thermal analyses, and structure optimization when appropriate. A homologous series of M-n-alkylamine-GICs (M = Na, Li) is reported for the first time, with the n-alkylamines of 3-14 carbon atoms (nC3-nC14). The following new GICs with indicated stages and intercalate arrangements are obtained: stage 1, di~ 0.70 nm, monolayer (nC3, nC4); stage 1, di ~ 1.10 nm, bilayer (nC6, nC8); and stage 2, di ~ 1.10 nm, bilayer (nC12, nC14). Here di is the gallery height. Two features new to donor-type GICs found are (i) an intercalate bilayer arrangement with guest alkyl chains parallel to encasing graphene layers, and (ii) the transition from an intercalate bilayer to monolayer arrangement upon evacuation for nC6. GICs containing branched alkylamines co-intercalates are prepared and their intragallery structures compared to those of selected n-alkylamines. A notable difference is observed for amines with 4 carbon atoms. While the linear n-butylamine forms parallel monolayers (di ~ 0.70 nm), the branched analogs (iso-butylamine and sec-butylamine) instead form bilayers with di ~ 1.30 nm. This result contrasts with the general observation that more sterically-hindered intercalates tend to intercalate at lower concentrations. This structural difference is not observed, however, between npropylamine and iso-propylamine (di ~ 0.70 and 0.76 nm respectively). A rare example of a ternary GIC exhibiting cation-directed orientation of the diamine co-intercalate (1

  11. Emergence of symmetry and chirality in crown ether complexes with alkali metal cations.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Haya, Bruno; Hurtado, Paola; Hortal, Ana R; Hamad, Said; Steill, Jeffrey D; Oomens, Jos

    2010-07-08

    Crown ethers provide a valuable benchmark for the comprehension of molecular recognition mediated by inclusion complexes. One of the most relevant crown ethers, 18-crown-6 (18c6), features a flexible six-oxygen cyclic backbone that is well-known for its selective cation binding. This study employs infrared spectroscopy and quantum mechanical calculations to elucidate the structure of the gas-phase complexes formed by the 18c6 ether with the alkali metal cations. It is shown that symmetric and chiral arrangements play a dominant role in the conformational landscape of the 18c6-alkali system. Most stable 18c6-M(+) conformers are found to have symmetries C(3v) and C(2) for Cs(+), D(3d) for K(+), C(1) and D(3d) for Na(+), and D(2) for Li(+). Remarkably, whereas the bare 18c6 ether is achiral, chirality emerges in the C(2) and D(2) 18c6-M(+) conformations, both of which involve pairs of stable atropoisomers capable of acting as enantiomeric selective substrates.

  12. Difference in substrate specificity divides the yeast alkali-metal-cation/H(+) antiporters into two subfamilies.

    PubMed

    Kinclová, Olga; Potier, Serge; Sychrová, Hana

    2002-04-01

    Yeast plasma membrane Na(+)/H(+) antiporters (TC 2.A.36) share a high degree of similarity at the protein level. Expression of four antiporters (Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nha1p, Candida albicans Cnh1p, Zygosaccharomyces rouxii ZrSod2-22p and Schizosaccharomyces pombe sod2p) in a SACCH: cerevisiae mutant strain lacking both Na(+)-ATPase and Na(+)/H(+) antiporter genes made it possible to study the transport properties and contribution to cell salt tolerance of all antiporters under the same conditions. The ZrSod2-22p of the osmotolerant yeast Z. rouxii has the highest transport capacity for lithium and sodium but, like the SCHIZ: pombe sod2p, it does not recognize K(+) and Rb(+) as substrates. The SACCH: cerevisiae Nha1p and C. albicans Cnh1p have a broad substrate specificity for at least four alkali metal cations (Na(+), Li(+), K(+), Rb(+)), but their contribution to overall cell tolerance to high external concentration of toxic Na(+) and Li(+) cations seems to be lower compared to the antiporters of SCHIZ: pombe and especially Z. rouxii.

  13. Dependence of bonding interactions in Layered Double Hydroxides on metal cation chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamim, Mostofa; Dana, Kausik

    2016-12-01

    The evolution of various Infrared bands of Layered Double Hydroxides (LDH) with variable Zn:Al ratio was analyzed to correlate it with the changes in octahedral metal cation chemistry, interlayer carbonate anion and hydroxyl content of LDH. The synthesized phase-pure LDHs were crystallized as hexagonal 2H polytype with a Manasseite structure. The broad and asymmetric hydroxyl stretching region (2400-4000 cm-1) can be deconvoluted into four different bands. With increase in Zn2+:Al3+ metal ratio, the peak position of stretching frequencies of Al3+sbnd OH and carbonate-bridged hydroxyl (water) decrease almost linearly. Individual band's peak position and area under the curve have been successfully correlated with the carbonate and hydroxyl content of LDH. Due to lowering of symmetry of the carbonate anion, the IR-inactive peak νCsbnd O, symm at 1064 cm-1 becomes IR active. The peak position of metal-oxygen bands and carbonate bending modes are practically unaffected by the Zn2+:Al3+ ratio but the area under the individual M-O bands shows a direct correlation.

  14. Cations in Octahedral Sites: A Descriptor for Oxygen Electrocatalysis on Transition-Metal Spinels.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chao; Feng, Zhenxing; Scherer, Günther G; Barber, James; Shao-Horn, Yang; Xu, Zhichuan J

    2017-04-10

    Exploring efficient and low-cost electrocatalysts for the oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen-evolution reaction (OER) is critical for developing renewable energy technologies such as fuel cells, metal-air batteries, and water electrolyzers. A rational design of a catalyst can be guided by identifying descriptors that determine its activity. Here, a descriptor study on the ORR/OER of spinel oxides is presented. With a series of MnCo2 O4 , the Mn in octahedral sites is identified as an active site. This finding is then applied to successfully explain the ORR/OER activities of other transition-metal spinels, including Mnx Co3-x O4 (x = 2, 2.5, 3), Lix Mn2 O4 (x = 0.7, 1), XCo2 O4 (X = Co, Ni, Zn), and XFe2 O4 (X = Mn, Co, Ni). A general principle is concluded that the eg occupancy of the active cation in the octahedral site is the activity descriptor for the ORR/OER of spinels, consolidating the role of electron orbital filling in metal oxide catalysis.

  15. Preparation of metallic cation conducting polymers based on sterically hindered phenols containing polymeric systems

    DOEpatents

    Skotheim, T.A.; Okamoto, Yoshiyuki; Lee, H.S.

    1989-11-21

    The present invention relates to ion-conducting solvent-free polymeric systems characterized as being cationic single ion conductors. The solvent-free polymer electrolytes comprise a flexible polymer backbone to which is attached a metal salt, such as a lithium, sodium or potassium salt, of a sterically hindered phenol. The solid polymer electrolyte may be prepared either by (1) attaching the hindered phenol directly to a flexible polymeric backbone, followed by neutralization of the phenolic OH's or (2) reacting the hindered phenol with a polymer precursor which is then polymerized to form a flexible polymer having phenolic OH's which are subsequently neutralized. Preferably the hindered phenol-modified polymeric backbone contains a polyether segment. The ionic conductivity of these solvent-free polymer electrolytes has been measured to be in the range of 10[sup [minus]4] to 10[sup [minus]7] S cm[sup [minus]1] at room temperature.

  16. Preparation of metallic cation conducting polymers based on sterically hindered phenols containing polymeric systems

    DOEpatents

    Skotheim, Terje A.; Okamoto, Yoshiyuki; Lee, Hung S.

    1989-01-01

    The present invention relates to ion-conducting solvent-free polymeric systems characterized as being cationic single ion conductors. The solvent-free polymer electrolytes comprise a flexible polymer backbone to which is attached a metal salt, such as a lithium, sodium or potassium salt, of a sterically hindered phenol. The solid polymer electrolyte may be prepared either by (1) attaching the hindered phenol directly to a flexible polymeric backbone, followed by neutralization of the phenolic OH's or (2) reacting the hindered phenol with a polymer precursor which is then polymerized to form a flexible polymer having phenolic OH's which are subsequently neutralized. Preferably the hindered phenol-modified polymeric backbone contains a polyether segment. The ionic conductivity of these solvent-free polymer electrolytes has been measured to be in the range of 10.sup.-4 to 10.sup.-7 S cm.sup.-1 at room temperature.

  17. Tools to study distinct metal pools in biology.

    PubMed

    New, Elizabeth J

    2013-03-07

    Current research interests in the field of metals in biology are very diverse, but are underpinned by a common need to study how stimuli affect metal homeostasis. This perspectives article argues for the need to combine information from multiple technical approaches to characterise the different metal pools inside living cells.

  18. Competition between protein ligands and cytoplasmic inorganic anions for the metal cation: a DFT/CDM study.

    PubMed

    Dudev, Todor; Lim, Carmay

    2006-08-16

    Many of the essential metalloproteins are located in the cell, whose cytoplasmic fluid contains several small inorganic anions, such as Cl-, NO2-, NO3-, H2PO4-, and SO4(2-), that play an indispensable role in determining the cell's volume, regulating the cell's pH, signal transduction, muscle contraction, as well as cell growth and metabolism. However, the physical principles governing the competition between these abundant, intracellular anions and protein or nucleic acid residues in binding to cytoplasmic metal cations such as Na+, K+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ are not well understood; hence, we have delineated the physicochemical basis for this competition using density functional theory in conjunction with the continuum dielectric method. The results show that the metal cation can bind to its target protein against a high background concentration of inorganic anions because (i) desolvating a negatively charged Asp/Glu carboxylate in a protein cavity costs much less than desolvating an inorganic anion in aqueous solution and (ii) the metal-binding site acts as a polydentate ligand that uses all its ligating entities to bind the metal cation either directly or indirectly. The results also show that the absolute hydration free energy of the "alien" anion as well as the net charge and relative solvent exposure of the metal-binding protein cavity are the key factors governing the competition between protein and inorganic ligands for a given cytoplasmic metal cation. Increasing the net negative charge of the protein cavity, while decreasing the number of available amide groups for metal binding, protects the metal-bound ligands from being dislodged by cellular anions, thus revealing a "protective" role for carboxylate groups in a protein cavity, in addition to their role in high affinity metal-binding.

  19. Intracellular acidification-induced alkali metal cation/H+ exchange in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Pretreatment of isolated human neutrophils (resting pHi congruent to 7.25 at pHo 7.40) with 30 mM NH4Cl for 30 min leads to an intracellular acidification (pHi congruen to 6.60) when the NH4Cl prepulse is removed. Thereafter, in 140 mM Na+ medium, pHi recovers exponentially with time (initial rate, approximately 0.12 pH/min) to reach the normal resting pHi by approximately 20 min, a process that is accomplished mainly, if not exclusively, though an exchange of internal H+ for external Na+. This Na+/H+ countertransport is stimulated by external Na+ (Km congruent to 21 mM) and by external Li+ (Km congruent to 14 mM), though the maximal transport rate for Na+ is about twice that for Li+. Both Na+ and Li+ compete as substrates for the same translocation sites on the exchange carrier. Other alkali metal cations, such as K+, Rb+, or Cs+, do not promote pHi recovery, owing to an apparent lack of affinity for the carrier. The exchange system is unaffected by ouabain or furosemide, but can be competitively inhibited by the diuretic amiloride (Ki congruent to 8 microM). The influx of Na+ or Li+ is accompanied by an equivalent counter-reflux of H+, indicating a 1:1 stoichiometry for the exchange reaction, a finding consistent with the lack of voltage sensitivity (i.e., electroneutrality) of pHi recovery. These studies indicate that the predominant mechanism in human neutrophils for pHi regulation after intracellular acidification is an amiloride-sensitive alkali metal cation/H+ exchange that shares a number of important features with similar recovery processes in a variety of other mammalian cell types. PMID:3694176

  20. Oligomycin A complex structures with some divalent metal cations studied by ESI MS and PM5 semiempirical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybylski, Piotr; Brzezinski, Bogumil; Bartl, Franz

    2007-03-01

    The ability of Oligomycin A (OLA) to form complexes with monovalent cations was studied by the ESI mass spectrometry and PM5 semiempirical method. At low cone voltage values the ESI MS spectra indicate that OLA formes stable 1:1 complexes with Mg 2+, Ca 2+, Sr 2+, Ba 2+, Zn 2+ divalent cations irrespective of the stoichiometry. With increasing cone voltages the formation of the [OLA + M + (ClO 4 or Cl)] + complexes was preferred. This process occurred simultaneously with the formation of fragmentary metal cation complexes with the exception of Pb 2+ ions which does not form complexes with OLA molecule. PM5 semiempirical calculations allowed the visualizations of all structures of (OLA + M) 2+ and [OLA + M + (ClO 4or Cl)] + complexes as well as the fragmentary cations.

  1. Designing structural features of novel benznidazole-loaded cationic nanoparticles for inducing slow drug release and improvement of biological efficacy.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos-Silva, Alaine M; de Caland, Lilia B; de S L Oliveira, Ana Luíza C; de Araújo-Júnior, Raimundo F; Fernandes-Pedrosa, Matheus F; Cornélio, Alianda Maira; da Silva-Júnior, Arnóbio A

    2017-09-01

    Several polymers have been investigated for producing cationic nanocarriers due to their ability to cross biological barriers. Polycations such as copolymers of polymethylmethacrylate are highlighted due to their biocompatibility and low toxicity. The purpose of this study was to produce small and narrow-sized cationic nanoparticles able to overcome cell membranes and improve the biological activity of benznidazole (BNZ) in normal and cancer cells. The effect of composition and procedure parameters of the used emulsification-solvent evaporation method were controlled for this purpose. The experimental approach included particle size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, atomic force microscopy (AFM), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (ATR- FTIR), drug loading efficiency, and physical stability assays. Spherical and stable (over six weeks) sub 150nm cationic nanoparticles were optimized, with the encapsulation efficiency >80%. The used drug/copolymer ratio modulated the slow drug release, which was adjusted by the parabolic diffusion mathematical model. In addition, the ability of the cationic nanoparticles improve the BNZ uptake in the normal kidney cells (HEK 293) and the human colorectal cancer cells (HT 29) demonstrate that this novel BNZ-loaded cationic has great potential as a chemotherapeutic application of benznidazole. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Structures of Hydrated Alkali Metal Cations, M+(H2O)nAr (m = Li, Na, K, rb and Cs, n = 3-5), Using Infrared Photodissociation Spectroscopy and Thermodynamic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Haochen; van der Linde, Christian; Lisy, James M.

    2014-06-01

    Alkali metal cations play vital roles in chemical and biochemical systems. Lithium is widely used in psychiatric treatment of manic states and bipolar disorder; Sodium and potassium are essential elements, having major biological roles as electrolytes, balancing osmotic pressure on body cells and assisting the electroneurographic signal transmission; Rubidium has seen increasing usage as a supplementation for manic depression and depression treatment; Cesium doped compounds are used as essential catalysts in chemical production and organic synthesis. Since hydrated alkali metal cations are ubiquitous and the basic form of the alkali metal cations in chemical and biochemical systems, their structural and thermodynamic properties serve as the foundation for modeling more complex chemical and biochemical processes, such as ion transport and ion size-selectivity of ionophores and protein channels. By combining mass spectrometry and infrared photodissociation spectroscopy, we have characterized the structures and thermodynamic properties of the hydrated alkali metal cations, i.e. M+(H2O)nAr, (M = Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs, n = 3-5). Ab initio calculations and RRKM-EE (evaporative ensemble) calculations were used to assist in the spectral assignments and thermodynamic analysis. Results showed that the structures of hydrated alkali metal cations were determined predominantly by the competition between non-covalent interactions, i.e. the water---water hydrogen bonding interactions and the water---cation electrostatic interactions. This balance, however, is very delicate and small changes, i.e. different cations, different levels of hydration and different effective temperatures clearly impact the balance.

  3. Development of Comparative Toxicity Potentials of 14 cationic metals in freshwater.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yan; Gandhi, Nilima; Hauschild, Michael Z

    2014-10-01

    Site-dependent and site-generic Comparative Toxicity Potentials (CTPs) (also known as Characterization Factors (CFs)) were calculated for 14 cationic metals (Al(III), Ba, Be, Cd, Co, Cr(III), Cs, Cu(II), Fe(II), Fe(III), Mn(II), Ni, Pb, Sr and Zn), to be applied in Life Cycle Impact Assessment. CTPs were calculated for 7 EU-archetypes, taking bioavailability and speciation pattern into account. The resulting site-dependent CTPs showed up to 2.4-6.5 orders of magnitude variation across archetypes for those metals that form stable hydroxyl compounds in slightly alkaline waters (Al(III), Be, Cr(III), Cu(II) and Fe(III)), emphasizing the importance of using site-dependent CTPs for these metals where possible. For the other metals, CTPs stayed within around 0.9 orders of magnitude, making spatial differentiation less important. In acidic waters (pH<6.4), Al(III) and Cu(II) had the highest CTPs, while Cd ranked highest in other waters. Based on the site-dependent CTPs, site-generic CTPs were developed applying different averaging principle. Emission weighted average of 7 EU-archetype CTPs was recommended as site-generic CTP for use in LCA studies, where receiving location is unclear. Compared to previous studies by Gandhi et al. (2010, 2011a), new site-dependent CTPs were similar or slightly higher for Cd, Co, Ni, Pb and Zn, but 1-2 orders of magnitude higher for Cu. Compared to the default site-generic CTPs in the frequently used characterization models USES-LCA and USEtox, new site-generic CTPs were mostly higher or similar, within up to ∼2 orders of magnitude difference. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Fast detection of oxygen by the naked eye using a stable metal-organic framework containing methyl viologen cations.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yun-Nan; Lu, Tong-Bu

    2013-09-11

    A stable porous metal-organic framework (MOF) containing methyl viologen cations exhibits reversible photochromic, thermochromic and fluorescence changes via host-guest interactions, and can be used for fast and selective detection of oxygen by naked eye recognition of color change within five seconds.

  5. Counter-cation modulation of hydrogen and methane storage in a sodalite-type porous metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yun-Nan; Meng, Miao; Zhong, Di-Chang; Huang, Yong-Liang; Jiang, Long; Lu, Tong-Bu

    2012-12-21

    A μ(4)-Cl bridged anionic sodalite-type porous metal-organic framework (Et(2)NH(2))(3)[(Cu(4)Cl)(3)(TTCA)(8)]·26DEF was synthesized, in which Et(2)NH(2)(+) can be exchanged by Li(+) cations. The results of gas measurements indicate that Et(2)NH(2)(+) and Li(+) are beneficial for methane and hydrogen storage, respectively.

  6. Electrochemical reduction of oxygen in aprotic ionic liquids containing metal cations: Na-O2 system case study.

    PubMed

    Azaceta, Eneko; Lutz, Lukas; Grimaud, Alexis; Vicent-Luna, Jose Manuel; Hamad, Said; Yate, Luis; Cabañero, Geman; Grande, Hans-Jurgen; Anta, Juan Antonio; Tarascon, Jean-Marie; Tena-Zaera, Ramon

    2017-01-19

    Metal-air batteries are intensively studied because of their high theoretical energy storage capability. However, the fundamental science at work dealing with electrodes, electrolytes and reaction products still need to be better understood. In this report, the ionic liquid N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide (PYR14TFSI) is chosen to study the influence of a wide range of metal cations (Mn+) on the electrochemical behavior of oxygen.. We demonstrate the relevance of the Lewis hard-soft acid-base (HSAB) theory to predict satisfactorily the reduction potential of the oxygen reduction in electrolytes containing metal cations. Systems with soft and intermediate Mn+ acidity are shown to facilitate oxygen reduction and metal oxide formation, whereas oxygen reduction is hampered by hard acid cations such as sodium (or lithium). Furthermore, the Density Functional Theory calculations on the energy formation of the resulting metal oxides rationalizes the effect of the Mn* on the oxygen reduction. The case study of Na-O2 system is described in detail. We show that, among others, the Na+ electrolyte concentration controls the electrochemical pathway, (solution precipitation vs. surface deposition) by which discharge product growth. All in all, fundamental insights to design advanced electrolytes for metal-air batteries and Na-air ones in particular are provided.

  7. HNS(+) and HSN(+) cations: Electronic states, spin-rovibronic spectroscopy with planetary and biological implications.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Tarek; Ben Yaghlane, Saida; Al Mogren, Muneerah Mogren; Francisco, Joseph S; Hochlaf, Majdi

    2016-08-28

    Ab initio methods in conjunction with a large basis set are used to compute the potential energy surfaces of the 12 lowest electronic states of the HNS(+) and HSN(+) isomeric forms. These potentials are used in discussions of the metastability of these cations and plausible mechanisms for the H(+)/H + SN(+)/SN, S/S(+) + NH(+)/NH, N/N(+) + SH(+)/SH ion-molecule reactions. Interestingly, the low rovibrational levels of HSN(+)(1(2)A″) and HNS(+)(1(2)A″) electronically excited ions are predicted to be long-lived. Both ions are suggested to be a suitable candidate for light-sensitive NO(⋅) donor in vivo and as a possible marker for the detection of intermediates in nitrites + H2S reactions at the cellular level. The full spin rovibronic levels of HNS(+) are presented, which may assist in the experimental identification of HNS(+) and HSN(+) ions and in elucidating their roles in astrophysical and biological media.

  8. An extended basis set {ital ab} {ital initio} study of alkali metal cation--water clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Feller, D.; Glendening, E.D.; Woon, D.E.; Feyereisen, M.W.

    1995-09-01

    Ionic clusters comprised of a single alkali metal cation and up to eight water molecules were studied at the Hartree--Fock and correlated levels of theory using the correlation consistent sequence of basis sets. Estimates of the degree of convergence in the computed properties with respect to the complete basis set limit were facilitated by the underlying systematic manner in which the correlation consistent sets approach completeness. In favorable cases, improved property values could be obtained by fitting finite basis set results with a simple analytical expression in order to extrapolate to the complete basis set limit. The sensitivity of structures and binding energies were analyzed with regard to the inclusion of valence and core-valence correlation recovery at the MP2, MP4, and CCSD(T) levels of theory. The replacement of metal core electrons and the introduction of relativistic contributions via effective core potentials was compared to corresponding all-electron results. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  9. Synthesis and chemistry of cationic d sup 0 metal alkyl complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, R.F.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop new types of electrophilic metal alkyl complexes for catalytic C-H activation and olefin polymerization chemistry, and associated fundamental mechanistic studies. We have focused our efforts on four classes of early metal alkyl complexes: (1) cationic group 4 Cp{sub 2}M(R){sup +} complexes (1) which are active species in Cp{sub 2}MX{sub 2}-based Ziegler-Natta olefin polymerization catalyst systems and which catalyze productive C-H activation reactions of heterocycles, (2) neutral (dicarbollide)(Cp*)M(R) complexes (2) which are structurally are electronically very similar to 1, (3) half-sandwich complexes CpM(R){sub 2}(L){sub n}{sup +} which are highly coordinatively and electronically unsaturated, and (4) new group 5 (dicarbollide)(Cp)MR{sub 2} and (dicarbollide){sub 2} MR complexes which are more unsaturated than group 5 Cp{sub 2}M systems due to incorporation of the dicarbollide ligand.

  10. From stimuli-responsive polymorphic organic dye crystals to photoluminescent cationic open-framework metal phosphate.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Chuan; Wang, Sue-Lein

    2012-06-20

    Four photoluminescent dye crystals, TPB-n (n = 1-3) and TPCH, have been synthesized in isolation from carbon-carbon coupling of 4,4'-trimethylene-dipyridine (tmdp) in the absence of organic solvent and catalyst via in situ one-pot metal/ligand oxidative-dehydrogenation reactions. Large crystals have been obtained and readily separated from reaction products without the need for purification. Their structures were characterized: TPB and TPCH represent two dissimilar oxidized forms of tmdp dimers; TPCH was less oxidized but accompanied with partial hydrolysis with molecular formula further confirmed by FAB-MASS analysis. They exhibit distinct photoluminescence (PL) with quantum efficiency measured up to 42%. TPB-2 and TPB-3 are two polymorphic dihydrates, stimuli-responsive toward photoluminescence color changes; both can transform to TPB-1 upon gentle heating. Importantly, the three TPB-n crystals establish the first tetrapyridyl-type ligands adapted by metal phosphates to create a cationic luminescent framework, NTHU-12. This study serves as an inspiring route beyond conventional C-C bond formation reactions and has generated four tmdp dimers in isolation. The facile syntheses have resulted in ample production of a rare type of tetrapyridyl ligands, leading to the discovery of the first positively charged hybrid topology in nanoporous solids. The features of the four luminescent tmdp dimers and NTHU-12 embodied in synthesis, structure, and optical property are reported.

  11. Discrete, solvent-free alkaline-earth metal cations: metal···fluorine interactions and ROP catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Sarazin, Yann; Liu, Bo; Roisnel, Thierry; Maron, Laurent; Carpentier, Jean-François

    2011-06-15

    Efficient protocols for the syntheses of well-defined, solvent-free cations of the large alkaline-earth (Ae) metals (Ca, Sr, Ba) and their smaller Zn and Mg analogues have been designed. The reaction of 2,4-di-tert-butyl-6-(morpholinomethyl)phenol ({LO(1)}H), 2-{[bis(2-methoxyethyl)amino]methyl}-4,6-di-tert-butylphenol ({LO(2)}H), 2-[(1,4,7,10-tetraoxa-13-azacyclopentadecan-13-yl)methyl]-4,6-di-tert-butylphenol ({LO(3)}H), and 2-[(1,4,7,10-tetraoxa-13-azacyclo-pentadecan-13-yl)methyl]-1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoropropan-2-ol ({RO(3)}H) with [H(OEt(2))(2)](+)[H(2)N{B(C(6)F(5))(3)}(2)](-) readily afforded the doubly acidic pro-ligands [{LO(1)}HH](+)[X](-) (1), [{LO(2)}HH](+)[X](-) (2), [{LO(3)}HH](+)[X](-) (3), and [{RO(3)}HH](+)[X](-) (4) ([X](-) = [H(2)N{B(C(6)F(5))(3)}(2)](-)). The addition of 2 to Ca[N(SiMe(3))(2)](2)(THF)(2) and Sr[N(SiMe(3))(2)](2)(THF)(2) yielded [{LO(2)}Ca(THF)(0.5)](+)[X](-) (5) and [{LO(2)}Sr(THF)](+)[X](-) (6), respectively. Alternatively, 5 could also be prepared upon treatment of {LO(2)}CaN(SiMe(3))(2) (7) with [H(OEt(2))(2)](+)[X](-). Complexes [{LO(3)}M](+)[X](-) (M = Zn, 8; Mg, 9; Ca, 10; Sr, 11; Ba, 12) and [{RO(3)}M](+)[X](-) (M = Zn, 13; Mg, 14; Ca, 15; Sr, 16; Ba, 17) were synthesized in high yields (70-90%) by reaction of 3 or 4 with the neutral precursors M[N(SiMe(3))(2)](2)(THF)(x) (M = Zn, Mg, x = 0; M = Ca, Sr, Ba, x = 2). All compounds were fully characterized by spectroscopic methods, and the solid-sate structures of compounds 1, 3, 7, 8, 13, 14, {15}(4)·3CD(2)Cl(2), {16}(4)·3CD(2)Cl(2), and {{17}(4)·EtOH}·3CD(2)Cl(2) were determined by X-ray diffraction crystallography. Whereas the complexes are monomeric in the case of Zn and Mg, they form bimetallic cations in the case of Ca, Sr and Ba; there is no contact between the metal and the weakly coordinating anion. In all metal complexes, the multidentate ligand is κ(6)-coordinated to the metal. Strong intramolecular M···F secondary interactions between the metal and F atoms

  12. Ion-chromatographic behavior of alkali metal cations and ammonium ion on zirconium-adsorbing silica gel.

    PubMed

    Ohta, K; Morikawa, H; Tanaka, K; Uwamino, Y; Furukawa, M; Sando, M

    2000-07-07

    The preparation and evaluation of zirconium-adsorbing silica gel (Zr-Silica) as an ion-exchange stationary phase in ion chromatography for inorganic anions and cations was carried out. The Zr-Silica was prepared by the reaction of silanol groups on the surface of the silica gel with zirconium butoxide (Zr(OCH2CH2CH2CH3)4) in ethanol. The ion-exchange characteristics of the Zr-Silica were evaluated using 10 mM tartaric acid at pH 2.5 as eluent. The Zr-Silica was found to act as a cation-exchanger under the eluent conditions. The retention behavior of alkali and alkaline earth metal cations was then investigated. The Zr-Silica column was proved to be suitable for the simultaneous separation of alkali metal cations and ammonium ion. Excellent separation of the cations on a 15 cm Zr-Silica column was achieved in 25 min using 10 mM tartaric acid as eluent.

  13. Imaging metals in biology: balancing sensitivity, selectivity and spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Hare, Dominic J; New, Elizabeth J; de Jonge, Martin D; McColl, Gawain

    2015-10-07

    Metal biochemistry drives a diverse range of cellular processes associated with development, health and disease. Determining metal distribution, concentration and flux defines our understanding of these fundamental processes. A comprehensive analysis of biological systems requires a balance of analytical techniques that inform on metal quantity (sensitivity), chemical state (selectivity) and location (spatial resolution) with a high degree of certainty. A number of approaches are available for imaging metals from whole tissues down to subcellular organelles, as well as mapping metal turnover, protein association and redox state within these structures. Technological advances in micro- and nano-scale imaging are striving to achieve multi-dimensional and in vivo measures of metals while maintaining the native biochemical environment and physiological state. This Tutorial Review discusses state-of-the-art imaging technology as a guide to obtaining novel insight into the biology of metals, with sensitivity, selectivity and spatial resolution in focus.

  14. Selectivity of externally facing ion-binding sites in the Na/K pump to alkali metals and organic cations.

    PubMed

    Ratheal, Ian M; Virgin, Gail K; Yu, Haibo; Roux, Benoît; Gatto, Craig; Artigas, Pablo

    2010-10-26

    The Na/K pump is a P-type ATPase that exchanges three intracellular Na(+) ions for two extracellular K(+) ions through the plasmalemma of nearly all animal cells. The mechanisms involved in cation selection by the pump's ion-binding sites (site I and site II bind either Na(+) or K(+); site III binds only Na(+)) are poorly understood. We studied cation selectivity by outward-facing sites (high K(+) affinity) of Na/K pumps expressed in Xenopus oocytes, under voltage clamp. Guanidinium(+), methylguanidinium(+), and aminoguanidinium(+) produced two phenomena possibly reflecting actions at site III: (i) voltage-dependent inhibition (VDI) of outwardly directed pump current at saturating K(+), and (ii) induction of pump-mediated, guanidinium-derivative-carried inward current at negative potentials without Na(+) and K(+). In contrast, formamidinium(+) and acetamidinium(+) induced K(+)-like outward currents. Measurement of ouabain-sensitive ATPase activity and radiolabeled cation uptake confirmed that these cations are external K(+) congeners. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that bound organic cations induce minor distortion of the binding sites. Among tested metals, only Li(+) induced Na(+)-like VDI, whereas all metals tested except Na(+) induced K(+)-like outward currents. Pump-mediated K(+)-like organic cation transport challenges the concept of rigid structural models in which ion specificity at site I and site II arises from a precise and unique arrangement of coordinating ligands. Furthermore, actions by guanidinium(+) derivatives suggest that Na(+) binds to site III in a hydrated form and that the inward current observed without external Na(+) and K(+) represents cation transport when normal occlusion at sites I and II is impaired. These results provide insights on external ion selectivity at the three binding sites.

  15. Electrostatic interactions in cations and their importance in biology and chemistry.

    PubMed

    Smith, Deborah M; Woerpel, K A

    2006-04-07

    Electrostatic effects exert strongly stabilizing influences on cations, in many cases controlling the conformational preferences of these cations. The lowest energy conformers are ones where the positive charge is brought closest to substituents bearing partial negative charges. These conformational biases, along with stereoelectronic effects, can control the stereoselectivity of reactions involving carbocationic intermediates.

  16. Roles of Cationic and Elemental Calcium in the Electro-Reduction of Solid Metal Oxides in Molten Calcium Chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Guohong; Jiang, Kai; Ma, Meng; Wang, Dihua; Jin, Xianbo; Chen, George Z.

    2007-06-01

    Previous work, mainly from this research group, is re-visited on electrochemical reduction of solid metal oxides, in the form of compacted powder, in molten CaCl2, aiming at further understanding of the roles of cationic and elemental calcium. The discussion focuses on six aspects: 1.) debate on two mechanisms proposed in the literature, i. e. electro-metallothermic reduction and electro-reduction (or electro-deoxidation), for the electrolytic removal of oxygen from solid metals or metal oxides in molten CaCl2; 2.) novel metallic cavity working electrodes for electrochemical investigations of compacted metal oxide powders in high temperature molten salts assisted by a quartz sealed Ag/AgCl reference electrode (650 ºC- 950 ºC); 3.) influence of elemental calcium on the background current observed during electrolysis of solid metal oxides in molten CaCl2; 4.) electrochemical insertion/ inclusion of cationic calcium into solid metal oxides; 5.) typical features of cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry (potentiostatic electrolysis) of metal oxide powders in molten CaCl2; and 6.) some kinetic considerations on the electrolytic removal of oxygen.

  17. Effects of cation on electrical responses of ionic polymer-metal composite sensors at various ambient humidities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zicai; Horiuchi, Tetsuya; Takagi, Kentaro; Takeda, Jun; Chang, Longfei; Asaka, Kinji

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of various cations on the electrical responses of ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) sensors at various ambient humidities. Four typical Au-Nafion IPMC samples were prepared with H+, Li+, Na+, and K+ cations. The voltage and current responses of the IPMCs were investigated under static and dynamic bending displacements. The orders of the voltage and current amplitudes were generally Li+ > Na+ > K+ > H+ and depended on the cation transport properties and the water content. The static voltage response first increased to a peak and then slowly decreased to a steady state. A negative steady-state voltage was initially observed for the IPMC with H+ cations under near saturation conditions. The voltage amplitude increased monotonously with increasing frequency from 0.1 to 10 Hz at a high relative humidity (RH, ˜90%), first increased and then decreased at moderate humidity (RH, ˜50%), and decreased continuously at low humidity (RH, ˜20%). The static current response first rapidly increased to a peak and then quickly decayed. During current decay, free oscillation decay occurred at high humidity and attenuated with decreasing humidity. This was confirmed to be the result of cation movement in the IPMC. There are three necessary conditions for oscillation: sufficient migrated cations, high cation mobility, and high stiffness of the polymer network. For the dynamic current response, the amplitude increased with increasing frequency (0.1-10 Hz) and showed good linearity. The underlying physics, mainly involving cation forward migration and back diffusion caused by mechano-chemo-electrical coupling, was clarified.

  18. Unexpectedly Enhanced Solubility of Aromatic Amino Acids and Peptides in an Aqueous Solution of Divalent Transition-Metal Cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guosheng; Dang, Yaru; Pan, Tingting; Liu, Xing; Liu, Hui; Li, Shaoxian; Zhang, Lijuan; Zhao, Hongwei; Li, Shaoping; Han, Jiaguang; Tai, Renzhong; Zhu, Yiming; Li, Jichen; Ji, Qing; Mole, R. A.; Yu, Dehong; Fang, Haiping

    2016-12-01

    We experimentally observed considerable solubility of tryptophan (Trp) in a CuCl2 aqueous solution, which could reach 2-5 times the solubility of Trp in pure water. Theoretical studies show that the strong cation-π interaction between Cu2 + and the aromatic ring in Trp modifies the electronic distribution of the aromatic ring to enhance significantly the water affinity of Trp. Similar solubility enhancement has also been observed for other divalent transition-metal cations (e.g., Zn2 + and Ni2 + ), another aromatic amino acid (phenylalanine), and three aromatic peptides (Trp-Phe, Phe-Phe, and Trp-Ala-Phe).

  19. Highly stable noble metal nanoparticles dispersible in biocompatible solvents: synthesis of cationic phosphonium gold nanoparticles in water and DMSO.

    PubMed

    Ju-Nam, Yon; Abdussalam-Mohammed, Wanisa; Ojeda, Jesus J

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we report the synthesis of novel cationic phosphonium gold nanoparticles dispersible in water and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for their potential use in biomedical applications. All the cationic-functionalising ligands currently reported in the literature are ammonium-based species. Here, the synthesis and characterisation of an alternative system, based on phosphonioalkylthiosulfate zwitterions and phosphonioalkylthioacetate were carried out. We have also demonstrated that our phosphonioalkylthiosulfate zwitterions readily disproportionate into phosphonioalkylthiolates in situ during the synthesis of gold nanoparticles produced by the borohydride reduction of gold(III) salts. The synthesis of the cationic gold nanoparticles using these phosphonium ligands was carried out in water and DMSO. UV-visible spectroscopic and TEM studies have shown that the phosphonioalkylthiolates bind to the surface of gold nanoparticles which are typically around 10 nm in diameter. The resulting cationic-functionalised gold nanoparticles are dispersible in aqueous media and in DMSO, which is the only organic solvent approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for drug carrier tests. This indicates their potential future use in biological applications. This work shows the synthesis of a new family of phosphonium-based ligands, which behave as cationic masked thiolate ligands in the functionalisation of gold nanoparticles. These highly stable colloidal cationic phosphonium gold nanoparticles dispersed in water and DMSO can offer a great opportunity for the design of novel biorecognition and drug delivery systems.

  20. Preparation of decarboxylic-functionalized weak cation exchanger and application for simultaneous separation of alkali, alkaline earth and transition metals.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yahui; Gan, Yihui; He, Chengxia; Yang, Bingcheng; Guo, Zhimou; Liang, Xinmiao

    2016-06-01

    A novel weak cation exchanger (WCX) with dicarboxyl groups functionalized has been developed by clicking mercaptosuccinic acid onto silica gel. The simple synthesis starts with modification of silica gel with triethoxyvinylsilane, followed by efficient coupling vinyl-bonded silica with mercaptosuccinic acid via a "thiol-ene" click reaction. The obtained WCX demonstrated good separation and high selectivity towards common metals. Simultaneous separation of 10 alkali, alkaline earth and transition metals was achieved within 12min. Ion exchange and complex mechanism dominates the separation process. Its utility was demonstrated for determination of metals in tap water. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. [Heavy metal cation-induced increase in the antimicrobial activity of gramicidin S. Increased sensitivity of metal-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli B to the antibiotic].

    PubMed

    Kuzovnikova, T A; Fedorov, Iu I

    1990-04-01

    Gramicidin S response of metal resistant mutants of E. coli B and the effect of concentrations of Cu2+, Ag+, Co2+ and Cd2+ on the growth and sensitivity of E. coli B to cationic antibiotics, i.e. gramicidin S2+ and streptomycin2+, were studied. It was shown that the metal-cumulating mutants of E. coli B with two different mechanisms of cross resistance to Cu2+, Cd2+ and Ag+ had higher sensitivity to gramicidin S than the initial wild type strain of E. coli B. It was found that in the threshold or higher doses the salts of Cu, Ag, Co and Cd increased the gramicidin S antimicrobial action on actively metabolizing cells of E. coli B. Analysis of the experimental data as well as the literature ones suggested that the synergic action of gramicidin S and the heavy metals stemmed from an increase in the cationic conductivity of the cytoplasma membrane modified by the metals in the threshold doses which induced an increase in the transport and accumulation of the cations in the bacterial cells by the electric field gradient (with the negative sign inside). Withdrawal of Ca2+ and Mg2+ from the E. coli outer structures into the cytoplasm impaired the barrier properties of the outer membrane and promoted binding of the gramicidin S cations to the liberated anionic groups of the E. coli outer structures and potentiation of the gramicidin S antimicrobial activity as was shown in our experiments.

  2. Sorption of chlorophenols on microporous minerals: mechanism and influence of metal cations, solution pH, and humic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Hu, Yuanan; Cheng, Hefa

    2016-10-01

    Sorption of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP), 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP) on a range of dealuminated zeolites were investigated to understand the mechanism of their sorption on microporous minerals, while the influence of common metal cations, solution pH, and humic acid was also studied. Sorption of chlorophenols was found to increase with the hydrophobicity of the sorbates and that of the microporous minerals, indicating the important role of hydrophobic interactions, while sorption was also stronger in the micropores of narrower sizes because of greater enhancement of the dispersion interactions. The presence of metal cations could enhance chlorophenol sorption due to the additional electrostatic attraction between metal cations exchanged into the mineral micropores and the chlorophenolates, and this effect was apparent on the mineral sorbent with a high density of surface cations (2.62 sites/nm(2)) in its micropores. Under circum-neutral or acidic conditions, neutral chlorophenol molecules adsorbed into the hydrophobic micropores through displacing the "loosely bound" water molecules, while their sorption was negligible under moderately alkaline conditions due to electrostatic repulsion between the negatively charged zeolite framework and anionic chlorophenolates. The influence of humic acid on sorption of chlorophenols on dealuminated Y zeolites suggests that its molecules did not block the micropores but created a secondary sorption sites by forming a "coating layer" on the external surface of the zeolites. These mechanistic insights could help better understand the interactions of ionizable chlorophenols and metal cations in mineral micropores and guide the selection and design of reusable microporous mineral sorbents for sorptive removal of chlorophenols from aqueous stream.

  3. Effect of ester chemical structure and peptide bond conformation in fragmentation pathways of differently metal cationized cyclodepsipeptides.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Raja; Sudarslal, S; Ranganayaki, R S; Raghothama, S

    2011-09-21

    Fragmentation behavior of two classes of cyclodepsipeptides, isariins and isaridins, obtained from the fungus Isaria, was investigated in the presence of different metal ions using multistage tandem mass spectrometry (MS(n)) with collision induced dissociation (CID) and validated by NMR spectroscopy. During MS(n) process, both protonated and metal-cationized isariins generated product ions belonging to the identical 'b-ion' series, exhibiting initial backbone cleavage explicitly at the β-ester bond. Fragmentation behavior for the protonated and metal-cationized acyclic methyl ester derivative of isariins was very similar. On the contrary, isaridins during fragmentation produced ions belonging to the 'b' or/and the 'y' ion series depending on the nature of interacting metal ions, due to initial backbone cleavages at the α-ester linkage or/and at a specific amide linkage. Interestingly, independent of the nature of the interacting metal ions, the product ions formed from the acyclic methyl ester derivative of isaridins belonged only to the 'y-type'. Complementary NMR data showed that, while all metal ions were located around the β-ester group of isariins, the metal ion interacting sites varied across the backbone for isaridins. Combined MS and NMR data suggest that the different behavior in sequence specific charge-driven fragmentation of isariins and isaridins is predetermined because of the constituent β-hydroxy acid residue in isariins and the cis peptide bond in isaridins.

  4. Metals in Biology 2016: Molecular Basis of Selection of Metals by Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Guengerich, F Peter

    2016-09-30

    This ninth Metals in Biology Thematic Series deals with the fundamental issue of why certain enzymes prefer individual metals. Why do some prefer sodium and some prefer potassium? Is it just the size? Why does calcium have so many regulatory functions? Why do some proteins have an affinity for zinc? How is the homeostasis of calcium and zinc achieved? How do enzymes discriminate between the similar metals magnesium and manganese? Four Minireviews address these and related questions about metal ion preferences in biological systems. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Ionic polymer-metal composite actuators obtained from radiation-grafted cation- and anion-exchange membranes.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Hyuk; Han, Man Jae; Song, Dae Seock; Jho, Jae Young

    2014-12-24

    Two series of ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs), one cationic and one anionic, are designed and prepared from radiation-grafted ion-exchange membranes. Through examination of the properties of the membranes synthesized from the two grafting monomers and the two base polymers, acrylic acid-grafted poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) and quarternized 4-vinylpyridine-grafted poly(ethylene-co-tetrafluoroethylene) with the appropriate amount of ionic groups are employed for the fabrication of cation and anion IPMCs, respectively. The bending displacement of the cation IPMC is comparable to Nafion-based IPMC under direct- and alternating-current voltage, but back-relaxation is not observed. The actuation performance of the anion IPMC is highly improved over those reported earlier in the literature for the other anion IPMCs.

  6. An imine-based molecular cage with distinct binding sites for small and large alkali metal cations.

    PubMed

    Schouwey, Clément; Scopelliti, Rosario; Severin, Kay

    2013-05-10

    The synthesis of a cylindrical, imine-based cage composed of two trimeric metallamacrocycles is described. The cage acts as a heterotopic receptor for alkali metal cations. The small cations Li(+), Na(+), and K(+) bind to the outside of the cage with good selectivity for Li(+), whereas the larger cations Rb(+) and Cs(+) are bound inside the cage to form unusual π complexes with a good selectivity for Cs(+). Negative heterotopic cooperativity between the two binding sites is observed. The complexation of Cs(+) is associated with a color change, which enables the cage to be used as a specific sensor for Cs(+). Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Exploring the potential of metallic nanoparticles within synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Edmundson, Matthew C; Capeness, Michael; Horsfall, Louise

    2014-12-25

    The fields of metallic nanoparticle study and synthetic biology have a great deal to offer one another. Metallic nanoparticles as a class of material have many useful properties. Their small size allows for more points of contact than would be the case with a similar bulk compound, making nanoparticles excellent candidates for catalysts or for when increased levels of binding are required. Some nanoparticles have unique optical qualities, making them well suited as sensors, while others display para-magnetism, useful in medical imaging, especially by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Many of these metallic nanoparticles could be used in creating tools for synthetic biology, and conversely the use of synthetic biology could itself be utilised to create nanoparticle tools. Examples given here include the potential use of quantum dots (QDs) and gold nanoparticles as sensing mechanisms in synthetic biology, and the use of synthetic biology to create nanoparticle-sensing devices based on current methods of detecting metals and metalloids such as arsenate. There are a number of organisms which are able to produce a range of metallic nanoparticles naturally, such as species of the fungus Phoma which produces anti-microbial silver nanoparticles. The biological synthesis of nanoparticles may have many advantages over their more traditional industrial synthesis. If the proteins involved in biological nanoparticle synthesis can be put into a suitable bacterial chassis then they might be manipulated and the pathways engineered in order to produce more valuable nanoparticles.

  8. Two anionic metal-organic frameworks with tunable luminescent properties induced by cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shu-Mei; Chen, Yan-Fei; Liu, Liyang; Wen, Tian; Zhang, Hua-Bin; Zhang, Jian

    2016-03-01

    Two three-dimensional (3-D) MOFs, [(C2H5)4N)]3[H3O]2[Cd6Br(H2-DHBDC)8(DMF)4] (1; H4-DHBDC=2,5-dihydroxy-1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid, DMF=N,N-dimethylformamide) and [(CH3)2NH2]2[Cd3(H2-DHBDC)4(DMF)2]·2DMF(2), are prepared from the self-assembly reactions between Cd(CH3COO)2 and H4-DHBDC, respectively. Both anionic frameworks consist of linear trinuclear Cd units (e.g., 1: [Cd3BrO2(CO2)7] and [Cd3O2(CO2)8]; 2: [Cd3O2(CO2)8]) linked by the H2-DHBDC ligands. The photoluminescent properties of compound 1 are tunable through cation-exchange with different metal ions. The results demonstrated an effective ion-exchange approach toward the functional modification of MOF materials.

  9. Laccase-mediated transformation of triclosan in aqueous solution with metal cations and humic acid.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kai; Kang, Fuxing; Waigi, Michael Gatheru; Gao, Yanzheng; Huang, Qingguo

    2017-01-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent that is found extensively in natural aquatic environments. Enzyme-catalyzed oxidative coupling reactions (ECOCRs) can be used to remove TCS in aqueous solution, but there is limited information available to indicate how metal cations (MCs) and natural organic matter (NOM) influence the environmental fate of TCS during laccase-mediated ECOCRs. In this study, we demonstrated that the naturally occurring laccase from Pleurotus ostreatus was effective in removing TCS during ECOCRs, and the oligomerization of TCS was identified as the dominant reaction pathway by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The growth inhibition studies of green algae (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Scenedesmus obliquus) proved that laccase-mediated ECOCRs could effectively reduce the toxicity of TCS. The presence of dissolved MCs (Mn(2+), Al(3+), Ca(2+), Cu(2+), and Fe(2+) ions) influenced the removal and transformation of TCS via different mechanisms. Additionally, the transformation of TCS in systems with NOM derived from humic acid (HA) was hindered, and the apparent pseudo first-order kinetics rate constants (k) for TCS decreased as the HA concentration increased, which likely corresponded to the combined effect of both noncovalent (sorption) and covalent binding between TCS and humic molecules. Our results provide a novel insight into the fate and transformation of TCS by laccase-mediated ECOCRs in natural aquatic environments in the presence of MCs and NOM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Rational Design of Particle Mesh Ewald Compatible Lennard-Jones Parameters for +2 Metal Cations in Explicit Solvent.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengfei; Roberts, Benjamin P; Chakravorty, Dhruva K; Merz, Kenneth M

    2013-06-11

    Metal ions play significant roles in biological systems. Accurate molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on these systems require a validated set of parameters. Although there are more detailed ways to model metal ions, the nonbonded model, which employs a 12-6 Lennard-Jones (LJ) term plus an electrostatic potential is still widely used in MD simulations today due to its simple form. However, LJ parameters have limited transferability due to different combining rules, various water models and diverse simulation methods. Recently, simulations employing a Particle Mesh Ewald (PME) treatment for long-range electrostatics have become more and more popular owing to their speed and accuracy. In the present work we have systematically designed LJ parameters for 24 +2 metal (M(II)) cations to reproduce different experimental properties appropriate for the Lorentz-Berthelot combining rules and PME simulations. We began by testing the transferability of currently available M(II) ion LJ parameters. The results showed that there are differences between simulations employing Ewald summation with other simulation methods and that it was necessary to design new parameters specific for PME based simulations. Employing the thermodynamic integration (TI) method and performing periodic boundary MD simulations employing PME, allowed for the systematic investigation of the LJ parameter space. Hydration free energies (HFEs), the ion-oxygen distance in the first solvation shell (IOD) and coordination numbers (CNs) were obtained for various combinations of the parameters of the LJ potential for four widely used water models (TIP3P, SPC/E, TIP4P and TIP4PEW). Results showed that the three simulated properties were highly correlated. Meanwhile, M(II) ions with the same parameters in different water models produce remarkably different HFEs but similar structural properties. It is difficult to reproduce various experimental values simultaneously because the nonbonded model underestimates the

  11. Influence of cation off-stoichiometry on transport properties of metal/Nb-SrTiO3 junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Daisuke; Shimizu, Takuya; Shimakawa, Yuichi

    2015-05-01

    We investigated the influence of the cation off-stoichiometry on the transport properties of junctions consisting of a metal (Ti or Pt) and a Nb-doped SrTiO3 (Nb-STO) epitaxial film. Ti/Nb-STO junctions with a Ti-deficient Nb-STO film show slightly asymmetric I-V characteristics and a large zero-bias differential junction resistance. Junctions with a Sr-deficient film, in contrast, exhibit nearly ohmic I-V characteristics and a differential resistance comparable to that of junctions with a stoichiometric film. We also found that the cation off-stoichiometry of the Nb-STO film has a strong influence on the rectifying and hysteric I-V characteristics of Pt/Nb-STO Schottky junctions. For Schottky junctions with the Ti-deficient film, the junction currents are largely reduced while the hysteric behavior remains. Junctions with the Sr-deficient film, on the other hand, have hysteric I-V characteristics that are comparable to those of junctions with the stoichiometric film. The results show the strong influence of the cation off-stoichiometry of the Nb-STO film on the junction properties. Based on the experimental results including transient behavior measurements, we discuss how the cation off-stoichiometry affects the transport properties of the metal/Nb-STO junctions.

  12. Advancements in the Synthesis and Applications of Cationic N-Heterocycles through Transition Metal-Catalyzed C-H Activation.

    PubMed

    Gandeepan, Parthasarathy; Cheng, Chien-Hong

    2016-02-18

    Cationic N-heterocycles are an important class of organic compounds largely present in natural and bioactive molecules. They are widely used as fluorescent dyes for biological studies, as well as in spectroscopic and microscopic methods. These compounds are key intermediates in many natural and pharmaceutical syntheses. They are also a potential candidate for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Because of these useful applications, the development of new methods for the synthesis of cationic N-heterocycles has received a lot of attention. In particular, many C-H activation methodologies that realize high step- and atom-economies toward these compounds have been developed. In this review, recent advancements in the synthesis and applications of cationic N-heterocycles through C-H activation reactions are summarized. The new C-H activation reactions described in this review are preferred over their classical analogs.

  13. Ozone reactions with alkaline-earth metal cations and dications in the gas phase: room-temperature kinetics and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Feil, S; Koyanagi, G K; Viggiano, A A; Bohme, D K

    2007-12-27

    Room-temperature rate coefficients and product distributions are reported for the reactions of ozone with the cations and dications of the alkaline-earth metals Ca, Sr, and Ba. The measurements were performed with a selected-ion flow tube (SIFT) tandem mass spectrometer in conjunction with either an electrospray (ESI) or an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) ionization source. All the singly charged species react with ozone by O-atom transfer and form monoxide cations rapidly, k = 4.8, 6.7, and 8.7 x 10(-10) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1) for the reactions of Ca+, Sr+, and Ba+, respectively. Further sequential O-atom transfer occurs to form dioxide and trioxide cations. The efficiencies for all O-atom transfer reactions are greater than 10%. The data also signify the catalytic conversion of ozone to oxygen with the alkaline-earth metal and metal oxide cations serving as catalysts. Ca2+ reacts rapidly with O3 by charge separation to form CaO+ and O2+ with a rate coefficient of k = 1.5 x 10(-9) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1). In contrast, the reactions of Sr2+ and Ba2+ are found to be slow and add O3, (k >/= 1.1 x 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1). The initial additions are followed by the rapid sequential addition of up to five O3 molecules with values of k between 1 and 5 x 10(-10) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1). Metal/ozone cluster ions as large as Sr2+(O3)5 and Ba2+(O3)4 were observed for the first time.

  14. Root development under metal stress in Arabidopsis thaliana requires the H(+)/cation antiporter CAX4

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Arabidopsis vacuolar CAtion eXchangers (CAXs) play a key role in mediating cation influx into the vacuole. In Arabidopsis, there are six CAX genes. However, some members are yet to be characterized fully. In this study, we show that CAX4 is expressed in the root apex and lateral root primordia, ...

  15. Surface complexation of heavy metal cations on clay edges: insights from first principles molecular dynamics simulation of Ni(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Liu, Xiandong; Lu, Xiancai; He, Mengjia; Jan Meijer, Evert; Wang, Rucheng

    2017-04-01

    Aiming at an atomistic mechanism of heavy metal cation complexing on clay surfaces, we carried out systematic first principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) simulations to investigate the structures, free energies and acidity constants of Ni(II) complexes formed on edge surfaces of 2:1 phyllosilicates. Three representative complexes were studied, including monodentate complex on the tbnd SiO site, bidentate complex on the tbnd Al(OH)2 site, and tetradentate complex on the octahedral vacancy where Ni(II) fits well into the lattice. The complexes structures were characterized in detail. Computed free energy values indicate that the tetradentate complex is significantly more stable than the other two. The calculated acidity constants indicate that the tetradentate complex can get deprotonated (pKa = 8.4) at the ambient conditions whereas the other two hardly deprotonate due to extremely high pKa values. By comparing with the 2 Site Protolysis Non Electrostatic Surface Complexation and Cation Exchange (2SPNE SC/CE) model, the vacant site has been assigned to the strong site and the other two to the weak site, respectively. Thus a link has been built between atomistic simulations and macroscopic experiments and it is deduced that this should also apply to other heavy metal cations based on additional simulations of Co(II) and Cu(II) and previous simulations of Fe(II) and Cd(II)). This study forms a physical basis for understanding the transport and fixation of heavy metal elements in many geologic environments.

  16. Gas-Phase Reactions of Doubly Charged Lanthanide Cations with Alkanes and Alkenes. Trends in Metal(2+) Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, John K.; Marcalo, Joaquim; Santos, Marta; Pires de Matos, Antonio; Haire, Richard G.

    2008-12-08

    The gas-phase reactivity of doubly-charged lanthanide cations, Ln2+ (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu), with alkanes (methane, ethane, propane, n-butane) and alkenes (ethene, propene, 1-butene) was studied by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The reaction products consisted of different combinations of doubly-charged organometallic ions?adducts or species formed via metal-ion-induced hydrogen, dihydrogen, alkyl, or alkane eliminations from the hydrocarbons?and singly-charged ions that resulted from electron, hydride, or methide transfers from the hydrocarbons to the metal ions. The only lanthanide cations capable of activating the hydrocarbons to form doubly-charged organometallic ions were La2+, Ce2+, Gd2+, and Tb2+, which have ground-state or low-lying d1 electronic configurations. Lu2+, with an accessible d1 electronic configuration but a rather high electron affinity, reacted only through transfer channels. The remaining Ln2+ reacted via transfer channels or adduct formation. The different accessibilities of d1 electronic configurations and the range of electron affinities of the Ln2+ cations allowed for a detailed analysis of the trends for metal(2+) reactivity and the conditions for occurrence of bond activation, adduct formation, and electron, hydride, and methide transfers.

  17. Research Update: Interfacing ultrasmall metal nanoclusters with biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Li; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich

    2017-05-01

    Metal nanoclusters (NCs), a new type of nanomaterial with unique physicochemical properties, show great potential in many biomedical applications. Understanding their behavior in the complex biological environment is critical not only for designing highly efficient NC-based nanomedicines but also for elucidating the biological impact (e.g., toxicity) of these emerging nanomaterials. In this review, we give an overview of recent progress in exploring interactions of metal NCs with biological systems, including protein adsorption onto NCs, NC interactions with cells, and also the in vivo behavior of NCs. We also discuss the biological responses to the interactions, key parameters defining the interactions, and current challenges in the exploration of NCs in the complex biological environment.

  18. Cell compatible arginine containing cationic polymer: one-pot synthesis and preliminary biological assessment.

    PubMed

    Zavradashvili, Nino; Memanishvili, Tamar; Kupatadze, Nino; Baldi, Lucia; Shen, Xiao; Tugushi, David; Wandrey, Christine; Katsarava, Ramaz

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic cationic polymers are of interest as both nonviral vectors for intracellular gene delivery and antimicrobial agents. For both applications synthetic polymers containing guanidine groups are of special interest since such kind of organic compounds/polymers show a high transfection potential along with antibacterial activity. It is important that the delocalization of the positive charge of the cationic group in guanidine significantly decreases the toxicity compared to the ammonium functionality. One of the most convenient ways for incorporating guanidine groups is the synthesis of polymers composed of the amino acid arginine (Arg) via either application of Arg-based monomers or chemical modification of polymers with derivatives of Arg. It is also important to have biodegradable cationic polymers that will be cleared from the body after their function as transfection or antimicrobial agent is fulfilled. This chapter deals with a two-step/one-pot synthesis of a new biodegradable cationic polymer-poly(ethylene malamide) containing L-arginine methyl ester covalently attached to the macrochains in β-position of the malamide residue via the α-amino group. The goal cationic polymer was synthesized by in situ interaction of arginine methyl ester dihydrochloride with intermediary poly(ethylene epoxy succinimide) formed by polycondensation of di-p-nitrophenyl-trans-epoxy succinate with ethylenediamine. The cell compatibility study with Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and insect Schneider 2 cells (S2) within the concentration range of 0.02-500 mg/mL revealed that the new polymer is not cytotoxic. It formed nanocomplexes with pDNA (120-180 nm in size) at low polymer/DNA weight ratios (WR = 5-10). A preliminarily transfection efficiency of the Arg-containing new cationic polymer was assessed using CHO, S2, H5, and Sf9 cells.

  19. Nanoscale Transformations in Covellite (CuS) Nanocrystals in the Presence of Divalent Metal Cations in a Mild Reducing Environment

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We studied the structural and compositional transformations of colloidal covellite (CuS) nanocrystals (and of djurleite (Cu1.94S) nanocrystals as a control) when exposed to divalent cations, as Cd2+ and Hg2+, at room temperature in organic solvents. All the experiments were run in the absence of phosphines, which are a necessary ingredient for cation exchange reactions involving copper chalcogenides, as they strongly bind to the expelled Cu+ ions. Under these experimental conditions, no remarkable reactivity was indeed seen for both CuS and Cu1.94S nanocrystals. On the other hand, in the covellite structure 2/3 of sulfur atoms form covalent S–S bonds. This peculiarity suggests that the combined presence of electron donors and of foreign metal cations can trigger the entry of both electrons and cations in the covellite lattice, causing reorganization of the anion framework due to the rupture of the S–S bonds. In Cu1.94S, which lacks S–S bonds, this mechanism should not be accessible. This hypothesis was proven by the experimental evidence that adding ascorbic acid increased the fraction of metal ions incorporated in the covellite nanocrystals, while it had no noticeable effect on the Cu1.94S ones. Once inside the covellite particles, Cd2+ and Hg2+ cations engaged in exchange reactions, pushing the expelled Cu+ ions toward the not-yet exchanged regions in the same particles, or out to the solution, from where they could be recaptured by other covellite nanoparticles/domains. Because no good solvating agent for Cu ions was present in solution, they essentially remained in the nanocrystals. PMID:26617434

  20. The electronic structure of vanadium monochloride cation (VCl(+)): tackling the complexities of transition metal species.

    PubMed

    DeYonker, Nathan J; Halfen, DeWayne T; Allen, Wesley D; Ziurys, Lucy M

    2014-11-28

    Six electronic states (X (4)Σ(-), A (4)Π, B (4)Δ, (2)Φ, (2)Δ, (2)Σ(+)) of the vanadium monochloride cation (VCl(+)) are described using large basis set coupled cluster theory. For the two lowest quartet states (X (4)Σ(-) and A (4)Π), a focal point analysis (FPA) approach was used that conjoined a correlation-consistent family of basis sets up to aug-cc-pwCV5Z-DK with high-order coupled cluster theory through pentuple (CCSDTQP) excitations. FPA adiabatic excitation energies (T0) and spectroscopic constants (re, r0, Be, B0, D¯e, He, ωe, v0, αe, ωexe) were extrapolated to the valence complete basis set Douglas-Kroll (DK) aug-cc-pV∞Z-DK CCSDT level of theory, and additional treatments accounted for higher-order valence electron correlation, core correlation, and spin-orbit coupling. Due to the delicate interplay between dynamical and static electronic correlation, single reference coupled cluster theory is able to provide the correct ground electronic state (X (4)Σ(-)), while multireference configuration interaction theory cannot. Perturbations from the first- and second-order spin orbit coupling of low-lying states with quartet spin multiplicity reveal an immensely complex rotational spectrum relative to the isovalent species VO, VS, and TiCl. Computational data on the doublet manifold suggest that the lowest-lying doublet state ((2)Γ) has a Te of ∼11 200 cm(-1). Overall, this study shows that laboratory and theoretical rotational spectroscopists must work more closely in tandem to better understand the bonding and structure of molecules containing transition metals.

  1. Potential energy curves and electronic structure of 3d transition metal hydrides and their cations.

    PubMed

    Goel, Satyender; Masunov, Artëm E

    2008-12-07

    We investigate gas-phase neutral and cationic hydrides formed by 3d transition metals from Sc to Cu with density functional theory (DFT) methods. The performance of two exchange-correlation functionals, Boese-Martin for kinetics (BMK) and Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS), in predicting bond lengths and energetics, electronic structures, dipole moments, and ionization potentials is evaluated in comparison with available experimental data. To ensure a unique self-consistent field (SCF) solution, we use stability analysis, Fermi smearing, and continuity analysis of the potential energy curves. Broken-symmetry approach was adapted in order to get the qualitatively correct description of the bond dissociation. We found that on average BMK predicted values of dissociation energies and ionization potentials are closer to experiment than those obtained with high level wave function theory methods. This agreement deteriorates quickly when the fraction of the Hartree-Fock exchange in DFT functional is decreased. Natural bond orbital (NBO) population analysis was used to describe the details of chemical bonding in the systems studied. The multireference character in the wave function description of the hydrides is reproduced in broken-symmetry DFT description, as evidenced by NBO analysis. We also propose a new scheme to correct for spin contamination arising in broken-symmetry DFT approach. Unlike conventional schemes, our spin correction is introduced for each spin-polarized electron pair individually and therefore is expected to yield more accurate energy values. We derive an expression to extract the energy of the pure singlet state from the energy of the broken-symmetry DFT description of the low spin state and the energies of the high spin states (pentuplet and two spin-contaminated triplets in the case of two spin-polarized electron pairs). The high spin states are build with canonical natural orbitals and do not require SCF convergence.

  2. The electronic structure of vanadium monochloride cation (VCl+): Tackling the complexities of transition metal species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeYonker, Nathan J.; Halfen, DeWayne T.; Allen, Wesley D.; Ziurys, Lucy M.

    2014-11-01

    Six electronic states (X 4Σ-, A 4Π, B 4Δ, 2Φ, 2Δ, 2Σ+) of the vanadium monochloride cation (VCl+) are described using large basis set coupled cluster theory. For the two lowest quartet states (X 4Σ- and A 4Π), a focal point analysis (FPA) approach was used that conjoined a correlation-consistent family of basis sets up to aug-cc-pwCV5Z-DK with high-order coupled cluster theory through pentuple (CCSDTQP) excitations. FPA adiabatic excitation energies (T0) and spectroscopic constants (re, r0, Be, B0, bar De, He, ωe, v0, αe, ωexe) were extrapolated to the valence complete basis set Douglas-Kroll (DK) aug-cc-pV∞Z-DK CCSDT level of theory, and additional treatments accounted for higher-order valence electron correlation, core correlation, and spin-orbit coupling. Due to the delicate interplay between dynamical and static electronic correlation, single reference coupled cluster theory is able to provide the correct ground electronic state (X 4Σ-), while multireference configuration interaction theory cannot. Perturbations from the first- and second-order spin orbit coupling of low-lying states with quartet spin multiplicity reveal an immensely complex rotational spectrum relative to the isovalent species VO, VS, and TiCl. Computational data on the doublet manifold suggest that the lowest-lying doublet state (2Γ) has a Te of ˜11 200 cm-1. Overall, this study shows that laboratory and theoretical rotational spectroscopists must work more closely in tandem to better understand the bonding and structure of molecules containing transition metals.

  3. Potential energy curves and electronic structure of 3d transition metal hydrides and their cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Satyender; Masunov, Artëm E.

    2008-12-01

    We investigate gas-phase neutral and cationic hydrides formed by 3d transition metals from Sc to Cu with density functional theory (DFT) methods. The performance of two exchange-correlation functionals, Boese-Martin for kinetics (BMK) and Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS), in predicting bond lengths and energetics, electronic structures, dipole moments, and ionization potentials is evaluated in comparison with available experimental data. To ensure a unique self-consistent field (SCF) solution, we use stability analysis, Fermi smearing, and continuity analysis of the potential energy curves. Broken-symmetry approach was adapted in order to get the qualitatively correct description of the bond dissociation. We found that on average BMK predicted values of dissociation energies and ionization potentials are closer to experiment than those obtained with high level wave function theory methods. This agreement deteriorates quickly when the fraction of the Hartree-Fock exchange in DFT functional is decreased. Natural bond orbital (NBO) population analysis was used to describe the details of chemical bonding in the systems studied. The multireference character in the wave function description of the hydrides is reproduced in broken-symmetry DFT description, as evidenced by NBO analysis. We also propose a new scheme to correct for spin contamination arising in broken-symmetry DFT approach. Unlike conventional schemes, our spin correction is introduced for each spin-polarized electron pair individually and therefore is expected to yield more accurate energy values. We derive an expression to extract the energy of the pure singlet state from the energy of the broken-symmetry DFT description of the low spin state and the energies of the high spin states (pentuplet and two spin-contaminated triplets in the case of two spin-polarized electron pairs). The high spin states are build with canonical natural orbitals and do not require SCF convergence.

  4. Nitrogen dioxide reactions with 46 atomic main-group and transition metal cations in the gas phase: room temperature kinetics and periodicities in reactivity.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Michael J Y; Blagojevic, Voislav; Koyanagi, Gregory K; Bohme, Diethard K

    2013-02-14

    Experimental results are reported for the gas-phase room-temperature kinetics of chemical reactions between nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) and 46 atomic main-group and transition metal cations (M(+)). Measurements were taken with an inductively-coupled plasma/selected-ion flow tube (ICP/SIFT) tandem mass spectrometer in helium buffer gas at a pressure of 0.35 ± 0.01 Torr and at 295 ± 2 K. The atomic cations were produced at ca. 5500 K in an ICP source and allowed to decay radiatively and to thermalize to room temperature by collisions with Ar and He atoms prior to reaction with NO(2). Measured apparent bimolecular rate coefficients and primary reaction product distributions are reported for all 46 atomic metal cations and these provide an overview of trends across and down the periodic table. Three main types of reactions were observed: O-atom transfer to form either MO(+) or NO(+), electron transfer to form NO(2)(+), and addition to form MNO(2)(+). Bimolecular O-atom transfer was observed to predominate. Correlations are presented between reaction efficiency and the O-atom affinity of the metal cation and between the prevalence of NO(+) product formation and the electron recombination energy of the product metal oxide cation. Some second-order reactions are evident with metal cations that react inefficiently. Most interesting of these is the formation of the MNO(+) cation with Rh(+) and Pd(+). The higher-order chemistry with NO(2) is very diverse and includes the formation of numerous NO(2) ion clusters and a number of tri- and tetraoxide metal cations. Group 2 metal dioxide cations (CaO(2)(+), SrO(2)(+), BaO(2)(+)) exhibit a unique reaction with NO(2) to form MO(NO)(+) ions perhaps by NO transfer from NO(2) concurrent with O(2) formation by recombination of a NO(2) and an oxide oxygen.

  5. Correction: A binary catalyst system of a cationic Ru-CNC pincer complex with an alkali metal salt for selective hydroboration of carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chee Koon; Wu, Jie; Hor, T S Andy; Luo, He-Kuan

    2016-12-22

    Correction for 'A binary catalyst system of a cationic Ru-CNC pincer complex with an alkali metal salt for selective hydroboration of carbon dioxide' by Chee Koon Ng et al., Chem. Commun., 2016, 52, 11842-11845.

  6. Trace Metals in the Oceans: Evolution, Biology and Global Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Baar, H.; La Roche, J.

    2003-04-01

    During evolution of prokaryotes and later on eukaryotes several metals became incorporated as essential factors in many biochemical functions in accordance with the abundance of these metals on the planet. The biological role of first row metals can be ranked Fe, Zn, Cu, Mn, Co, Ni. Second row metals Ag and Cd or third row metals like Hg and Pb appear to have no biological function, except possibly for Cd. Iron (Fe) being the fourth most abundant element of the planet has also played a role to temper the evolution of biogenic oxygen in the atmosphere and oceans. Yet eventually O2 has taken over the biosphere where now both atmosphere and ocean are strongly oxidizing. Inside every cell the primordial reducing conditions have remained however. Therefore enzyme systems based on metal couples Fe-Mn and Cu-Zn are required to protect the cell interior from damage by reactive oxygen species. The key role of metals in these and many other enzymes as well as in protein folding is one of the major vectors in biological diversity at both the molecular and the species level. Plankton ecosystems are governed by colimitation of several metals. Co-limitation of plankton growth is consistent also with observed interactions between metals. The supply of Fe to ocean waters is one of the major controls of plankton ecosystems and ocean element cycling (C, Si, N, P) over time scales ranging from weeks to the 100,000 year periodicity of glaciations. Understanding the role of metals in the oceans is crucial for understanding global change of past, present and future.

  7. Potential Modulated Intercalation of Alkali Cations into Metal Hexacyanoferrate Coated Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel T. Schwartz; Bekki Liu; Marlina Lukman; Kavita M. Jeerage; William A. Steen; Haixia Dai; Qiuming Yu; J. Antonio Medina

    2002-02-18

    Nickel hexacyanoferrate is a polynuclear inorganic ion intercalation material that loads (intercalates) and elutes (deintercalates) alkali cations from its structure when electrochemically reduced and oxidized, respectively. Nickel hexacyanoferrrate (NiHCF) is known to preferentially intercalate cesium over all other alkali cations, thus providing a basis for a separation scheme that can tackle DOE's radiocesium contamination problem. This program studied fundamental issues in alkalization intercalation and deintercalation in nickel hexacyanoferrate compounds, with the goal of (1) quantifying the ion exchange selectivity properties from cation mixtures, (2) enhancing ion exchange capacities, and (3) and understanding the electrochemically-switched ion exchange process (ESIX).

  8. Overcharging in biological systems: reversal of electrophoretic mobility of aqueous polyaspartate by multivalent cations.

    PubMed

    Kubíčková, Anna; Křížek, Tomáš; Coufal, Pavel; Vazdar, Mario; Wernersson, Erik; Heyda, Jan; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2012-05-04

    Charge reversal as an extreme case of charge compensation is directly observed by capillary electrophoresis for a negatively charged peptide in aqueous solutions of trivalent cations. Atomistic and coarse-grained simulations provide molecular interpretation of this effect showing that it is largely of electrostatic origin with a minor contribution of chemical specificity of the salt ions.

  9. Overcharging in Biological Systems: Reversal of Electrophoretic Mobility of Aqueous Polyaspartate by Multivalent Cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubíčková, Anna; Křížek, Tomáš; Coufal, Pavel; Vazdar, Mario; Wernersson, Erik; Heyda, Jan; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2012-05-01

    Charge reversal as an extreme case of charge compensation is directly observed by capillary electrophoresis for a negatively charged peptide in aqueous solutions of trivalent cations. Atomistic and coarse-grained simulations provide molecular interpretation of this effect showing that it is largely of electrostatic origin with a minor contribution of chemical specificity of the salt ions.

  10. Thermochromic and solvatochromic Nafion films incorporating cationic metal-chelate complexes.

    PubMed

    Funasako, Yusuke; Mochida, Tomoyuki

    2013-05-21

    Nafion films incorporating cationic nickel complexes [Ni(II)(acac)(R4en)](+) (acac = acetylacetonato, R4en = tetraalkylethylenediamine) that exhibit chromic behavior in response to temperature changes and solvent molecules in the vapor and liquid phases have been prepared.

  11. Determination of metal ions in biological purification of waste waters

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhomirova, L.N.; Spiridonova, N.N.; Mandzhgaladze, I.D.

    1994-12-01

    Chromium, nickel, copper, zinc, and manganese were determined in active sludge extracted for utilization from sewage purification works in biological purification of waste waters. The measurements were carried out by the atomic absorption method and with Merck colorimetric kits for rapid determination of metal ions. The results obtained by the rapid colorimetric method agree fairly well with those obtained by the atomic absorption method, which makes it possible to recommend rapid colorimetric methods for routine analysis of biological objects for the content of ions of heavy metals.

  12. Framework Cationization by Preemptive Coordination of Open Metal Sites for Anion-Exchange Encapsulation of Nucleotides and Coenzymes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiang; Mao, Chengyu; Luong, Karen Tu; Lin, Qipu; Zhai, Quan-Guo; Feng, Pingyun; Bu, Xianhui

    2016-02-18

    Cationic frameworks can selectively trap anions through ion exchange, and have applications in ion chromatography and drug delivery. However, cationic frameworks are much rarer than anionic or neutral ones. Herein, we propose a concept, preemptive coordination (PC), for targeting positively charged metal-organic frameworks (P-MOFs). PC refers to proactive blocking of metal coordination sites to preclude their occupation by neutralizing ligands such as OH(-) . We use 20 MOFs to show that this PC concept is an effective approach for developing P-MOFs whose high stability, porosity, and anion-exchange capability allow immobilization of anionic nucleotides and coenzymes, in addition to charge- and size-selective capture or separation of organic dyes. The CO2 and C2 H2 uptake capacity of 117.9 cm(3)  g(-1) and 148.5 cm(3)  g(-1) , respectively, at 273 K and 1 atm, is exceptionally high among cationic framework materials.

  13. Cation-induced kinetic trapping and enhanced hydrogen adsorption in a modulated anionic metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sihai; Lin, Xiang; Blake, Alexander J; Walker, Gavin S; Hubberstey, Peter; Champness, Neil R; Schröder, Martin

    2009-09-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)--microporous materials constructed by bridging metal centres with organic ligands--show promise for applications in hydrogen storage, which is a key challenge in the development of the 'hydrogen economy'. Their adsorption capacities, however, have remained insufficient for practical applications, and thus strategies to enhance hydrogen-MOF interactions are required. Here we describe an anionic MOF material built from In(III) centres and tetracarboxylic acid ligands (H(4)L) in which kinetic trapping behaviour--where hydrogen is adsorbed at high pressures but not released immediately on lowering the pressure--is modulated by guest cations. With piperazinium dications in its pores, the framework exhibits hysteretic hydrogen adsorption. On exchange of these dications with lithium cations, no hysteresis is seen, but instead there is an enhanced adsorption capacity coupled to an increase in the isosteric heat of adsorption. This is rationalized by the different locations of the cations within the pores, determined with precision by X-ray crystallography.

  14. Density functional theory study of interaction, bonding and affinity of group IIb transition metal cations with nucleic acid bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Sabyasachi; Mandal, Debasish; Ghosh, Deepanwita; Das, Abhijit K.

    2012-05-01

    The structure, bonding, and energetics of the complexes obtained from the interaction between the most stable tautomeric forms of free DNA and RNA bases and Zn2+, Cd2+ and Hg2+ cations have been studied using density functional B3LYP method. The 6-311+G (2df, 2p) basis set along with LANL2DZ pseudopotentials for the cations are used in the calculations. The tautomerization paths of the nucleobases are investigated and transition states between the tautomeric forms of the free bases are located. The relative stability of the complexes and the tautomers of the free nucleobases are discussed referring to MIA and relative energy values. For uracil, thymine and adenine, interaction of the metal cations with the most stable tautomers form the least stable molecular complexes. For cytosine and guanine, the stability of the metalated complexes differs significantly. The enthalpy (ΔH), entropy (TΔS) and free energy (ΔG) of the complexes at 298 K have also been calculated.

  15. Monitoring of photoluminescence decay by alkali and alkaline earth metal cations using a photoluminescent bolaamphiphile self-assembly as an optical probe.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunhyung; Kwak, Jinyoung; Lee, Sang-Yup

    2014-05-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) decay induced by the displacement of an ionic fluorescence component, Tb(3+), with alkali and alkaline earth metal cations was investigated using photoluminescent spherical self-assemblies as optical probes. The photoluminescent spherical self-assembly was prepared by the self-organization of a tyrosine-containing bolaamphiphile molecule with a photosensitizer and Tb(3+) ion. The lanthanide ion, Tb(3+), electrically bound to the carboxyl group of the bolaamphiphile molecule, was displaced by alkali and alkaline earth metal cations that had stronger electrophilicity. The PL of the self-assembly decayed remarkably due to the substitution of lanthanide ions with alkali and alkaline earth metal cations. The PL decay showed a positive correlation with cation concentration and was sensitive to the cation valency. Generally, the PL decay was enhanced by the electrophilicity of the cations. However, Ca(2+) showed greater PL decay than Mg(2+) because Ca(2+) could create various complexes with the carboxyl groups of the bolaamphiphile molecule. Microscopic and spectroscopic investigations were conducted to study the photon energy transfer and displacement of Tb(3+) by the cation exchange. This study demonstrated that the PL decay by the displacement of the ionic fluorescent compound was applied to the detection of various cations in aqueous media and is applicable to the development of future optical sensors.

  16. Novel Metal Cation Resistance Systems from Mutant Fitness Analysis of Denitrifying Pseudomonas stutzeri

    PubMed Central

    Vaccaro, Brian J.; Lancaster, W. Andrew; Thorgersen, Michael P.; Zane, Grant M.; Younkin, Adam D.; Kazakov, Alexey E.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Deutschbauer, Adam; Arkin, Adam P.; Novichkov, Pavel S.; Wall, Judy D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Metal ion transport systems have been studied extensively, but the specificity of a given transporter is often unclear from amino acid sequence data alone. In this study, predicted Cu2+ and Zn2+ resistance systems in Pseudomonas stutzeri strain RCH2 are compared with those experimentally implicated in Cu2+ and Zn2+ resistance, as determined by using a DNA-barcoded transposon mutant library. Mutant fitness data obtained under denitrifying conditions are combined with regulon predictions to yield a much more comprehensive picture of Cu2+ and Zn2+ resistance in strain RCH2. The results not only considerably expand what is known about well-established metal ion exporters (CzcCBA, CzcD, and CusCBA) and their accessory proteins (CzcI and CusF), they also reveal that isolates with mutations in some predicted Cu2+ resistance systems do not show decreased fitness relative to the wild type when exposed to Cu2+. In addition, new genes are identified that have no known connection to Zn2+ (corB, corC, Psest_3226, Psest_3322, and Psest_0618) or Cu2+ resistance (Mrp antiporter subunit gene, Psest_2850, and Psest_0584) but are crucial for resistance to these metal cations. Growth of individual deletion mutants lacking corB, corC, Psest_3226, or Psest_3322 confirmed the observed Zn-dependent phenotypes. Notably, to our knowledge, this is the first time a bacterial homolog of TMEM165, a human gene responsible for a congenital glycosylation disorder, has been deleted and the resulting strain characterized. Finally, the fitness values indicate Cu2+- and Zn2+-based inhibition of nitrite reductase and interference with molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis for nitrate reductase. These results extend the current understanding of Cu2+ and Zn2+ efflux and resistance and their effects on denitrifying metabolism. IMPORTANCE In this study, genome-wide mutant fitness data in P. stutzeri RCH2 combined with regulon predictions identify several proteins of unknown function that are involved

  17. Novel Metal Cation Resistance Systems from Mutant Fitness Analysis of Denitrifying Pseudomonas stutzeri

    SciTech Connect

    Vaccaro, Brian J.; Lancaster, W. Andrew; Thorgersen, Michael P.; Zane, Grant M.; Younkin, Adam D.; Kazakov, Alexey E.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Deutschbauer, Adam; Arkin, Adam P.; Novichkov, Pavel S.; Wall, Judy D.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2016-07-29

    Metal ion transport systems have been studied extensively, but the specificity of a given transporter is often unclear from amino acid sequence data alone. In this study, predicted Cu2+ and Zn2+ resistance systems in Pseudomonas stutzeri strain RCH2 are compared with those experimentally implicated in Cu2+and Zn2+resistance, as determined by using a DNA-barcoded transposon mutant library. Mutant fitness data obtained under denitrifying conditions are combined with regulon predictions to yield a much more comprehensive picture of Cu2+and Zn2+resistance in strain RCH2. The results not only considerably expand what is known about well-established metal ion exporters (CzcCBA, CzcD, and CusCBA) and their accessory proteins (CzcI and CusF), they also reveal that isolates with mutations in some predicted Cu2+ resistance systems do not show decreased fitness relative to the wild type when exposed to Cu2+. In addition, new genes are identified that have no known connection to Zn2+(corB,corC, Psest_3226, Psest_3322, and Psest_0618) or Cu2+resistance (Mrp antiporter subunit gene, Psest_2850, and Psest_0584) but are crucial for resistance to these metal cations. Growth of individual deletion mutants lackingcorB,corC, Psest_3226, or Psest_3322 confirmed the observed Zn-dependent phenotypes. Notably, to our knowledge, this is the first time a bacterial homolog of TMEM165, a human gene responsible for a congenital glycosylation disorder, has been deleted and the resulting strain characterized. Finally, the fitness values indicate Cu2+- and Zn2+ -based inhibition of nitrite reductase and interference with molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis for nitrate reductase. These results extend the current understanding of Cu2+

  18. Novel Metal Cation Resistance Systems from Mutant Fitness Analysis of Denitrifying Pseudomonas stutzeri

    DOE PAGES

    Vaccaro, Brian J.; Lancaster, W. Andrew; Thorgersen, Michael P.; ...

    2016-07-29

    Metal ion transport systems have been studied extensively, but the specificity of a given transporter is often unclear from amino acid sequence data alone. In this study, predicted Cu2+ and Zn2+ resistance systems in Pseudomonas stutzeri strain RCH2 are compared with those experimentally implicated in Cu2+and Zn2+resistance, as determined by using a DNA-barcoded transposon mutant library. Mutant fitness data obtained under denitrifying conditions are combined with regulon predictions to yield a much more comprehensive picture of Cu2+and Zn2+resistance in strain RCH2. The results not only considerably expand what is known about well-established metal ion exporters (CzcCBA, CzcD, and CusCBA) andmore » their accessory proteins (CzcI and CusF), they also reveal that isolates with mutations in some predicted Cu2+ resistance systems do not show decreased fitness relative to the wild type when exposed to Cu2+. In addition, new genes are identified that have no known connection to Zn2+(corB,corC, Psest_3226, Psest_3322, and Psest_0618) or Cu2+resistance (Mrp antiporter subunit gene, Psest_2850, and Psest_0584) but are crucial for resistance to these metal cations. Growth of individual deletion mutants lackingcorB,corC, Psest_3226, or Psest_3322 confirmed the observed Zn-dependent phenotypes. Notably, to our knowledge, this is the first time a bacterial homolog of TMEM165, a human gene responsible for a congenital glycosylation disorder, has been deleted and the resulting strain characterized. Finally, the fitness values indicate Cu2+- and Zn2+ -based inhibition of nitrite reductase and interference with molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis for nitrate reductase. These results extend the current understanding of Cu2+ and Zn2+ efflux and resistance and their effects on denitrifying metabolism. Here in this study, genome-wide mutant fitness data in P. stutzeriRCH2 combined with regulon predictions identify several proteins of unknown function that are involved in resisting zinc

  19. Acid-base status of biological fluids: amount of acid, kind of acid, anion-cation difference, and buffer value.

    PubMed

    Kildeberg, P

    1983-04-01

    A formal concept of amount of substance of 'acid' and 'base' is proposed which is based upon the change in extent of protolytic equilibria in an arbitrary reference state for the components of the system concerned and equally consistent with the Brønsted-Lowry terminology, the older medical 'anion-cation' terminology, and the operational principle of titration. It is shown how this concept allows formulations of the 'acid-base status' of biological fluids in accordance with various types of physiological, biochemical, or clinical problems. Finally, a general expression for buffer value is presented which is valid for any acid, base, or ampholyte at any pH.

  20. Adsorptive kinetic mechanism of heavy metal cations on the surface of graphite oxide and its SiO2 composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheet, Imtithal; Kabbani, Ahmad; Holail, Hanafy

    2017-02-01

    Nanomaterials have gained great attention because of their novel size- and shape-dependent properties, large specific surface area and high reaction activity. Moreover, nanomaterials have a wide range of applications, as in the technological and environmental challenges in the areas of solar energy conversion, catalysis, medicine, and water treatments. In the present study, nanostructured graphite oxide, silica/graphite oxide composites and silica nanoparticles were used for the removal of the heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions by a batch adsorption method and the adsorptive kinetic mechanism of heavy metal cations on the surface of graphite oxide and its SiO2 composite was evaluated. The experimental results revealed a strong adsorption of the metal cations on the surface of graphite oxide, this is reflected in the shifts in wave numbers after adsorption with nanostructured graphite oxide and the big shift in wave numbers (Δv¯) for nickel ions reflects chemosorption type of adsorption. This is confirmed by the coherence between Δv¯, removal percentage and crystal field stabilization energy (CFSE). Silica/ GO (2:3) composite showed the greatest removal percentage at different concentrations compared to pure graphite oxide and silica nanoparticles. The higher removal percentage of nickel ions by silica /GO composite (2:3) was observed at 180 min contact time and basic pH. The kinetic studies showed that silica/ GO (2:3) composite had rapid adsorption rate and efficiency and it was found to follow first order rate expression or an exponential decay of the metal cations from water study.

  1. MetalPDB: a database of metal sites in biological macromolecular structures.

    PubMed

    Andreini, Claudia; Cavallaro, Gabriele; Lorenzini, Serena; Rosato, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    We present here MetalPDB (freely accessible at http://metalweb.cerm.unifi.it), a novel resource aimed at conveying the information available on the three-dimensional (3D) structures of metal-binding biological macromolecules in a consistent and effective manner. This is achieved through the systematic and automated representation of metal-binding sites in proteins and nucleic acids by way of Minimal Functional Sites (MFSs). MFSs are 3D templates that describe the local environment around the metal(s) independently of the larger context of the macromolecular structure embedding the site(s), and are the central objects of MetalPDB design. MFSs are grouped into equistructural (broadly defined as sites found in corresponding positions in similar structures) and equivalent sites (equistructural sites that contain the same metals), allowing users to easily analyse similarities and variations in metal-macromolecule interactions, and to link them to functional information. The web interface of MetalPDB allows access to a comprehensive overview of metal-containing biological structures, providing a basis to investigate the basic principles governing the properties of these systems. MetalPDB is updated monthly in an automated manner.

  2. Organometallic chemistry and the interstellar medium: experimental evidence of coordination between metal cations and polycyclic hydrocarbons in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boissel, P.

    1994-05-01

    The possible importance of organometallic chemistry in the interstellar medium (ISM) has been recently pointed out (Serra et al. 1992, Chaudret et al. 1991). However, quantitative evaluation of its implications suffers from a lack of experimental data concerning coordination complexes between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and metals. Up to now, among the PAH family, gas phase studies of such complexes are limited to metal^+^-benzene (Hettich et al. 1986, Wiley et al. 1992) and Si^+^-naphthalene (Bohme et al. 1989). The present paper reports experimental observation of coordination between metal cations and larger PAHs. Using an ion trap, formation and destruction of Fe(PAH)^+^ and Fe(PAH)_2_^+^ complexes have been studied. These complexes are shown to be stable under collision free conditions. Orders of magnitude for the formation cross section and the dissociation barrier that can be drawn from this preliminary experiment are not in disagreement with those used in astrophysical models.

  3. Comparative toxicity of five metals on various biological subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Fargasova, A. )

    1994-08-01

    Environmental contaminants, including metals, can have toxic effects on many different organisms and affect biological processes at cellular, population, community and ecosystem levels of organization. Metals are of particular interest because they may have a positive effect as micronutrients at low concentrations as well as a toxic effect at higher levels. Numerous efforts have been made to correlate and predict metal-ion toxicities on various aquatic and terrestrial species, according to the physical and chemical properties of the metals. The acute and chronic toxicities of metals have been studied on many freshwater organisms and also on plants. The water flea, Daphnia magna, an important freshwater zooplankter, is a useful test species to study sensitivity to environmental toxicants and has been recognized as a general representative for other freshwater animals. As Khangarot described, little information is available on the effects of metals to tubificid worms, which are widely distributed in the aquatic environment and are useful indicators of varying degrees of aquatic pollution. Most recent hazard evaluation programs recommend algal toxicity tests for initial evaluations of chemicals that are expected to reach surface waters and that have suspected or unknown phytotoxic properties. For higher plants, the accumulation of metals, especially cadmium, was tested when plants grew in sewage sludge-amended soils or in soils of cadmium residues form phosphate fertilizers. No reports were available indicating the effects of these metals on seed germination and root growth. This study was conducted to determine the acute toxicological effects of some metals (As, Pb, Cr, Hg, Cd) on four biological subjects (tubificid worms, Daphnia magna sp., Scenedesmus quadricauda, seeds of Sinapis alba) and to compare their sensitivity to individual test metals. 16 refs., 1 tab.

  4. Thermochemistry of alkali metal cation interactions with histidine: influence of the side chain.

    PubMed

    Armentrout, P B; Citir, Murat; Chen, Yu; Rodgers, M T

    2012-12-06

    The interactions of alkali metal cations (M(+) = Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), Cs(+)) with the amino acid histidine (His) are examined in detail. Experimentally, bond energies are determined using threshold collision-induced dissociation of the M(+)(His) complexes with xenon in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer. Analyses of the energy dependent cross sections provide 0 K bond energies of 2.31 ± 0.11, 1.70 ± 0.08, 1.42 ± 0.06, and 1.22 ± 0.06 eV for complexes of His with Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+), respectively. All bond dissociation energy (BDE) determinations include consideration of unimolecular decay rates, internal energy of reactant ions, and multiple ion-neutral collisions. These experimental results are compared to values obtained from quantum chemical calculations conducted previously at the MP2(full)/6-311+G(2d,2p), B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p), and B3P86/6-311+G(2d,2p) levels with geometries and zero point energies calculated at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level where Rb and Cs use the Hay-Wadt effective core potential and basis set augmented with additional polarization functions (HW*). Additional calculations using the def2-TZVPPD basis set with B3LYP geometries were conducted here at all three levels of theory. Either basis set yields similar results for Na(+)(His) and K(+)(His), which are in reasonable agreement with the experimental BDEs. For Rb(+)(His) and Cs(+)(His), the HW* basis set and ECP underestimate the experimental BDEs, whereas the def2-TZVPPD basis set yields results in good agreement. The effect of the imidazole side chain on the BDEs is examined by comparing the present results with previous thermochemistry for other amino acids. Both polarizability and the local dipole moment of the side chain are influential in the energetics.

  5. Confining the spin between two metal atoms within the carbon cage: redox-active metal–metal bonds in dimetallofullerenes and their stable cation radicals†

    PubMed Central

    Samoylova, Nataliya A.; Avdoshenko, Stanislav M.; Krylov, Denis S.; Thompson, Hannah R.; Kirkhorn, Amelia C.; Rosenkranz, Marco; Schiemenz, Sandra; Ziegs, Frank; Wolter, Anja U. B.; Yang, Shangfeng; Stevenson, Steven; Popov, Alexey A.

    2017-01-01

    Lanthanide–lanthanide bonds are exceptionally rare, and dimetallofullerenes provide a unique possibility to stabilize and study these unusual bonding patterns. The presence of metal–metal bonds and consequences thereof for the electronic properties of M2@C82 (M = Sc, Er, Lu) are addressed by electrochemistry, electron paramagnetic resonance, SQUID magnetometry and other spectroscopic techniques. A simplified non-chromatographic separation procedure is developed for the isolation of Er2@C82 (Cs(6) and C3v(8) cage isomers) and Sc2@C82 (C3v(8) isomer) from fullerene mixtures. Sulfide clusterfullerenes Er2S@C82 with Cs(6) and C3v(8) fullerene cages are synthesized for the first time. The metal–metal bonding orbital of the spd hybrid character in M2@C82 is shown to be the highest occupied molecular orbital, which undergoes reversible single-electron oxidation with a metal-dependent oxidation potential. Sulfide clusterfullerenes with a fullerene-based HOMO have more positive oxidation potentials. The metal-based oxidation of Sc2@C82-C3v is confirmed by the EPR spectrum of the cation radical [Sc2@C82-C3v]+ generated by chemical oxidation in solution. The spectrum exhibits an exceptionally large a(45Sc) hyperfine coupling constant of 199.2 G, indicating a substantial 4s contribution to the metal–metal bonding orbital. The cationic salt [Er2@C82-C3v]+SbCl6− is prepared, and its magnetization behavior is compared to that of pristine Er2@C82-C3v and Er2S@C82-C3v. The formation of the single-electron Er–Er bond in the cation dramatically changes the coupling between magnetic moments of Er ions. PMID:28574078

  6. Rational design of carbonitrile-carboxaldehyde cation receptor models: probing the nature of the heteroatom-metal interaction.

    PubMed

    Rosli, Ahmad Nazmi; Abu Bakar, Maizathul Akmam; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Zain, Sharifuddin Md; Ahmad, Mohd Rais; Abdul Manan, Ninie Suhana; Alias, Yatimah; Woi, Pei Meng

    2014-09-01

    In this work, hybrid functional and G4 methods were employed in the rational design of carbonitrile-carboxaldehyde receptor models for cation recognition. Electron-sharing and ionic interactions between the models and the cations were analyzed utilizing the concepts of overlap population, atomic valence, electrostatic potential, and CHELPG charge in order to elucidate the nature of the heteroatom-metal interaction, the N versus O disparity, and the effect of pH. Receptor fragment models from ionomycin were employed to rationalize the selection of receptor models for discriminating group I cations and enhancing the selectivity for Mg(II) rather than Ca(II), and to examine the effects of keto-enol forms and negatively charged sites. The changes in geometries, overlap population, metal valence, and CHELPG charge upon solvation in heptane medium as compared to the gas phase were negligible. The optimized geometries reveal that the interaction between group II cations and the keto, enol, and enolate forms of 2-cyanoethanal causes 12 % bending of the C-C-N angle from linearity. Overlap populations show that the electron-sharing interaction favors group II cations but that the same mechanism allows Li(I) to compete. The total spin of Li(I) is 17 % greater than that of Ca(II), but the G4 binding energies of the two are separated by more than 50 kcal/mol, favoring group II cations, which may eliminate interference from Li(I). 1,2-Dicyanoethylene, which has only one form, shows similar characteristics. CHELPG analysis shows that Mg(II) transfers 25 and 18 % of its positive charge to 2-cyanoethanal enolate and 1,2-dicyanoethylene, respectively. Hydrogen atoms receive most of the positive charge in both receptors, but the N-termini exhibit strikingly different characteristics. Electrostatic potential contour profiles were found to be in good agreement with the atomic charge distributions. The application of uncharged 1,3-dicarbonyl and 2-cyanocarbonyl receptors and a judicious

  7. Alkali metal mediated resorcarene capsules: an ESI-FTICRMS study on gas-phase structure and cation binding of tetraethyl resorcarene and its per-methylated derivative.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, Marko; Vainiotalo, Pirjo; Rissanen, Kari

    2002-07-01

    Electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI-FTICRMS) with additional ab initio calculations were used to examine the alkali metal cation binding selectivity (i.e., molecular recognition) and host properties of tetraethyl resorcarene (1) and its per-methylated derivative (2). The significance of intramolecular hydrogen bonding for the crown conformation was demonstrated. The presence of intramolecular flip-flop hydrogen bonding in 1 was confirmed both with calculations and in ND3-exchange experiments. All the alkali metal cations formed host-guest complexes by docking inside the cavity of the host. Complexation with the larger cations, especially Cs+, was favored. All the alkali metal cations also formed dimeric resorcarene capsules with 1. The capsules were directly H-bonded species, with no linking solvent molecules. ND3-exchange experiments and molecular modeling revealed the significance of direct intermolecular H-bonding for the crown conformation of 1 and stability of the capsule structure.

  8. Full scale biological treatment of heavy metal contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Vegt, A.L. De; Buisman, C.J.N.

    1995-07-01

    Soil and groundwater beneath a zinc production plant in The Netherlands are contaminated with metals and sulfate. To avoid contamination of nearby drinking water aquifers, a hydro-geological containment system and a biological treatment plant for the extracted ground water have been installed. Currently about 5,000 M{sup 3}/day of groundwater is extracted from a combination of 12 shallow and deep wells. Heavy metals and sulfate have to be removed from the extracted water before it can be discharged into a river. Several water treatment methods have been studied and pilot tested at the site. The preferred and selected process is based on the activity of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and combines sulfate removal and heavy metal removal in one single installation. Anaerobic bacteria reduce sulfate to sulfide resulting in the precipitation of metal sulfides. Excess sulfide is biologically converted to elemental sulfur. A full scale biological treatment system was started up in May 1992. Design, start-up, commissioning and operational experiences are reported in this paper. Concentrations of metals and sulfate in the SRB water treatment plant effluent are well within the limits set by the Dutch Authorities for discharge to surface water.

  9. Tuning the Magnetic Properties of Metal Oxide Nanocrystal Heterostructures by Cation Exchange

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    For three types of colloidal magnetic nanocrystals, we demonstrate that postsynthetic cation exchange enables tuning of the nanocrystal’s magnetic properties and achieving characteristics not obtainable by conventional synthetic routes. While the cation exchange procedure, performed in solution phase approach, was restricted so far to chalcogenide based semiconductor nanocrystals, here ferrite-based nanocrystals were subjected to a Fe2+ to Co2+ cation exchange procedure. This allows tracing of the compositional modifications by systematic and detailed magnetic characterization. In homogeneous magnetite nanocrystals and in gold/magnetite core shell nanocrystals the cation exchange increases the coercivity field, the remanence magnetization, as well as the superparamagnetic blocking temperature. For core/shell nanoheterostructures a selective doping of either the shell or predominantly of the core with Co2+ is demonstrated. By applying the cation exchange to FeO/CoFe2O4 core/shell nanocrystals the Neél temperature of the core material is increased and exchange-bias effects are enhanced so that vertical shifts of the hysteresis loops are obtained which are superior to those in any other system. PMID:23362940

  10. Tuning the magnetic properties of metal oxide nanocrystal heterostructures by cation exchange.

    PubMed

    Sytnyk, Mykhailo; Kirchschlager, Raimund; Bodnarchuk, Maryna I; Primetzhofer, Daniel; Kriegner, Dominik; Enser, Herbert; Stangl, Julian; Bauer, Peter; Voith, Michael; Hassel, Achim Walter; Krumeich, Frank; Ludwig, Frank; Meingast, Arno; Kothleitner, Gerald; Kovalenko, Maksym V; Heiss, Wolfgang

    2013-02-13

    For three types of colloidal magnetic nanocrystals, we demonstrate that postsynthetic cation exchange enables tuning of the nanocrystal's magnetic properties and achieving characteristics not obtainable by conventional synthetic routes. While the cation exchange procedure, performed in solution phase approach, was restricted so far to chalcogenide based semiconductor nanocrystals, here ferrite-based nanocrystals were subjected to a Fe(2+) to Co(2+) cation exchange procedure. This allows tracing of the compositional modifications by systematic and detailed magnetic characterization. In homogeneous magnetite nanocrystals and in gold/magnetite core shell nanocrystals the cation exchange increases the coercivity field, the remanence magnetization, as well as the superparamagnetic blocking temperature. For core/shell nanoheterostructures a selective doping of either the shell or predominantly of the core with Co(2+) is demonstrated. By applying the cation exchange to FeO/CoFe(2)O(4) core/shell nanocrystals the Neél temperature of the core material is increased and exchange-bias effects are enhanced so that vertical shifts of the hysteresis loops are obtained which are superior to those in any other system.

  11. Interaction of metal cations with functionalised hydrocarbons in the gas phase: further experimental evidence for solvation of metal ions by the hydrocarbon chain.

    PubMed

    van Huizen, Nick A; Luider, Theo M; Jobst, Karl J; Terlouw, Johan K; Holmes, John L; Burgers, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    Relative affinity measurements of monovalent metal ions (= Li(+), Cu(+) and Ag(+)) towards aliphatic amines, alcohols and methyl alkanoates (P) have been performed using the kinetic method on the dissociation of metal bound dimer ions of the type P(1)-M(+)-P(2). It was found that the cations' affinity towards long chain (≥C(4) chain length) n- and s-alkylamines, n-alkanols and methyl n- alkanoates was unexpectedly enhanced. This is attributed to a bidentate interaction of the metal ion with the amine, alcohol or ester functional group and the aliphatic chain, paralleling earlier observations on metal bound nitriles. Methyl substitution at the functional group (s-alkylamines compared with n-alkylamines) serves to strengthen only the N•••M(+) bond, and this can be rationalized by the larger proton affinities of s-alkylamines compared to n-alkylamines. This substitution, however, has no effect on the metal ion-hydrocarbon bond. In contrast, methyl substitution remote from the functional group, as in iso-pentylamine, does lead to strengthening of the metal ion-hydrocarbon bond. The cuprous ion affinity of hexadecylamine, C(16)H(33)NH(2) was found to be as large as that for ethylenediamine (352 kJ mol(-1)), known to be a strong copper binding agent. It is argued that such a metal ion-hydrocarbon interaction does not occur in the metal bound dimers.

  12. MetalPDB: a database of metal sites in biological macromolecular structures

    PubMed Central

    Andreini, Claudia; Cavallaro, Gabriele; Lorenzini, Serena; Rosato, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    We present here MetalPDB (freely accessible at http://metalweb.cerm.unifi.it), a novel resource aimed at conveying the information available on the three-dimensional (3D) structures of metal-binding biological macromolecules in a consistent and effective manner. This is achieved through the systematic and automated representation of metal-binding sites in proteins and nucleic acids by way of Minimal Functional Sites (MFSs). MFSs are 3D templates that describe the local environment around the metal(s) independently of the larger context of the macromolecular structure embedding the site(s), and are the central objects of MetalPDB design. MFSs are grouped into equistructural (broadly defined as sites found in corresponding positions in similar structures) and equivalent sites (equistructural sites that contain the same metals), allowing users to easily analyse similarities and variations in metal–macromolecule interactions, and to link them to functional information. The web interface of MetalPDB allows access to a comprehensive overview of metal-containing biological structures, providing a basis to investigate the basic principles governing the properties of these systems. MetalPDB is updated monthly in an automated manner. PMID:23155064

  13. Heavier alkali-metal monosulfides (KS, RbS, CsS, and FrS) and their cations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Edmond P F; Wright, Timothy G

    2005-10-08

    The heavier alkali-metal monosulfides (KS, RbS, CsS, and FrS) have been studied by high-level ab initio calculations. The RCCSD(T) method has been employed, combined with large flexible valence basis sets. All-electron basis sets are used for potassium and sulfur, with effective core potentials being used for the other metals, describing the core electrons. Potential-energy curves are calculated for the lowest two neutral and cationic states: all neutral monosulfide species have a (2)Pi ground state, in contrast with the alkali-metal monoxide species, which undergo a change in the electronic ground state from (2)Pi to (2)Sigma(+) as the group is descended. In the cases of KS, RbS, and CsS, spin-orbit curves are also calculated. We also calculate potential-energy curves for the lowest (3)Sigma(-) and (3)Pi states of the cations. From the potential-energy curves, spectroscopic constants are derived, and for KS the spectroscopic results are compared to experimental spectroscopic values. Ionization energies, dissociation energies, and heats of formation are also calculated; for KS, we explore the effects of relativity and basis set extrapolation on these values.

  14. Metal release from stainless steel in biological environments: A review.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, Yolanda S; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2015-03-29

    Due to its beneficial corrosion resistance, stainless steel is widely used in, e.g., biomedical applications, as surfaces in food contact, and for products intended to come into skin contact. Low levels of metals can be released from the stainless steel surface into solution, even for these highly corrosion resistant alloys. This needs to be considered in risk assessment and management. This review aims to compile the different metal release mechanisms that are relevant for stainless steel when used in different biological settings. These mechanisms include corrosion-induced metal release, dissolution of the surface oxide, friction-induced metal release, and their combinations. The influence of important physicochemical surface properties, different organic species and proteins in solution, and of biofilm formation on corrosion-induced metal release is discussed. Chemical and electrochemical dissolution mechanisms of the surface oxides of stainless steel are presented with a focus on protonation, complexation/ligand-induced dissolution, and reductive dissolution by applying a perspective on surface adsorption of complexing or reducing ligands and proteins. The influence of alloy composition, microstructure, route of manufacture, and surface finish on the metal release process is furthermore discussed as well as the chemical speciation of released metals. Typical metal release patterns are summarized.

  15. Exploring the reactivity of retinol radical cation toward organic and biological molecules: A laser flash photolysis study.

    PubMed

    El-Agamey, Ali; Melø, Thor B; Sliwka, Hans-Richard

    2017-05-01

    Vitamin A (retinol) and various natural retinoids are essential for life. Under oxidative conditions, vitamin A radical cation (RET(+)) can be formed. Many deleterious effects were reported about the formation of carotenoid radical cations in biological environments, on the other hand, little is known about the consequences of the RET(+) formation in these environments. Therefore, it is important to explore the reactivity of RET(+) toward various biological substrates. Here, we employed nanosecond laser flash photolysis (LFP) to generate RET(+) (λmax=580nm in methanol) and examine its reactivity toward a wide range of biological molecules including amino acids, vitamins, carotenoids, naturally-occurring phenols, neurotransmitters such as catecholamines, wide range of phenol derivatives and some selected electron-donors. The results show that the reactivity of RET(+) toward various substrates is strongly dependent on the polarity of solvent. In addition, RET(+) is able to oxidize amino acids, which subsequently can lead to protein damage. However, the presence of vitamins (vitamins E and C), carotenoids and naturally-occurring phenols (e.g. resveratrol, vanillin, dopamine hydrochloride and l-Dopa) can inhibit the damaging effect of retinol(+) by reducing it back to retinol. Vitamin E and carotenoids are the most efficient quenchers for the RET(+) (diffusion-controlled reactions). Importantly, our results clearly indicate that the reactivity of RET(+) is as strong as that of the powerful trichloromethylperoxyl radical (CCl3O2). Thereby, formation of RET(+) in biological media is expected to induce bio-damage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. New Insights into Wear and Biological Effects of Metal-on-Metal Bearings

    PubMed Central

    Catelas, Isabelle; Wimmer, Markus A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Despite the renewed interest in metal-on-metal implants in the past two decades, the underlying wear mechanisms and biological effects are still not fully understood. Methods: This paper first reviews the tribology of metal-on-metal bearings, bringing new insights into the interaction of wear and corrosion, and putting the characteristics and the potential origin of wear particles in perspective with the proposed wear mechanisms. It then summarizes the current knowledge on the biological effects of particles and metal ions in relation to these wear mechanisms. Results: Tribochemical reactions play an important role in the wear of metal-on-metal joints. The generated tribomaterial, which progressively forms by mechanical mixing of the uppermost nanocrystalline zone of the metal surface with proteins from the synovial fluid, governs the wear rate and influences the corrosive behavior of the bearing. Nanometer-sized wear particles may initially originate from the passivation layer covering the implant surface and then detach from this tribolayer. The inflammatory response observed surrounding metal-on-metal implants appears to be lower than that around metal-on-polyethylene implants. However, metallic byproducts, which can complex with proteins, may lead to a T lymphocyte-mediated hypersensitivity response. Conclusions: The tribolayer appears to have beneficial effects on the wear rate. Much information has been gained on wear particle characteristics, but the exact mechanisms of particle detachment remain to be further elucidated. Excessive wear along with a hypersensitivity response may be at the origin of the early adverse tissue reactions that have been recently reported in some patients with metal-on-metal implants. Clinical Relevance: Future development of new methods to improve the tribolayer retention and optimize the tribocorrosive properties of the implant may minimize the clinical impact of implant wear and immune responses. PMID:21543694

  17. Oxoferryl porphyrin cation radicals in model systems: Evidence for variable metal-radical spin coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bill, E.; Bominaar, E. L.; Ding, X.-Q.; Trautwein, A. X.; Winkler, H.; Mandon, D.; Weiss, R.; Gold, A.; Jayaraj, K.; Toney, G. E.

    1990-07-01

    Magnetic properties of frozen solutions of highly oxidized iron porphyrin complexes were investigated by EPR and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The Mössbauer spectra, recorded at low temperatures in various magnetic fields, were analyzed on the basis of spin Hamiltonian simulations. Spin coupling between ferryl iron (FeIV) and porphyrin cation radical was taken into account explicitly. Hyperfine and spin-coupling parameters are given for several complexes, together with zero-field parameters. One of the complexes exhibits weak spin coupling, it is the first model system exhibiting properties comparable to those of the oxoferryl cation radical enzyme Horse Radish Peroxidase I.

  18. The role of metal ions in chemical evolution - Polymerization of alanine and glycine in a cation-exchanged clay environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, J. G.; Levi, N.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of the exchangeable cation on the condensation of glycine and alanine was investigated using a series of homoionic bentonites. A cycling procedure of drying, warming and wetting was employed. Peptide bond formation was observed, and the effectiveness of metal ions to catalyze the condensation was Cu(2+) greater than Ni(2) approximately equals Zn(2+) greater than Na(+). Glycine showed 6% of the monomer incorporated into oligomers with the largest detected being the pentamer. Alanine showed less peptide bond formation (a maximum of 2%) and only the dimer was observed.

  19. The role of metal ions in chemical evolution - Polymerization of alanine and glycine in a cation-exchanged clay environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, J. G.; Levi, N.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of the exchangeable cation on the condensation of glycine and alanine was investigated using a series of homoionic bentonites. A cycling procedure of drying, warming and wetting was employed. Peptide bond formation was observed, and the effectiveness of metal ions to catalyze the condensation was Cu(2+) greater than Ni(2) approximately equals Zn(2+) greater than Na(+). Glycine showed 6% of the monomer incorporated into oligomers with the largest detected being the pentamer. Alanine showed less peptide bond formation (a maximum of 2%) and only the dimer was observed.

  20. Synthesis and spectroscopic studies of a new 1,8-naphthalimide dyad as detector for metal cations and protons.

    PubMed

    Staneva, Desislava; McKena, Mark; Bosch, Paula; Grabchev, Ivo

    2010-07-01

    A new dyad containing two 1,8-naphthalimides has been synthesized. N,N-Dimetylaminoethylamino group has been used as substituent at C-4 position of the 1,8-naphthalimide chromophore structure. The photophysical characteristics of the dyad have been investigated in organic solvents with different polarity. In acetonitrile solution the newly synthesized dyad enhance its fluorescent intensity in the presence of metal cations (Ni(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Pb(2)(+), Zn(2+), Fe(3+)) and protons due to quenching of photoinduced electron transfer.

  1. Photochemical Activity of Uranyl Ion in Acetone Irradiated by Light in the Presence of Metal Cations and Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umreiko, D. S.; Vileishikova, N. P.; Zajogin, A. P.; Komyak, A. I.

    2015-11-01

    The effects of several metal cations and anions on complexation of tetra- and pentavalent uranium in an acetone solution of UO2(ClO4)2·5H2O irradiated by an LED (420-440 nm) were studied using electronic absorption. It was shown that addition of background components to the solution had an insignificant effect on complexation of the lowest-valent uranium. The composition of the UO 2 2 + coordination sphere could change at a certain irradiation time (>90 min) but the system as a whole was maintained.

  2. Organic conductors and superconductors based on bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene radical cation salts with supramolecular tris(oxalato)metallate anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokhorova, T. G.; Yagubskii, E. B.

    2017-02-01

    The results of studies of a family of conductors and superconductors based on bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene radical cation salts with paramagnetic and diamagnetic supramolecular tris(oxalato)metallate anions are collated and analyzed. Methods for the preparation of these salts and various types of packing of conducting layers within the salt structures are considered. The transport properties of crystals of the salts of this family and the effect of guest solvent molecules on these properties are discussed. The contribution of scientists from the Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, RAS, to the research into organic conductors and superconductors is noted. The bibliography includes 70 references.

  3. Binding of monovalent metal cations by the p-sulfonatocalix[4]arene: experimental evidence for cation-pi interactions in water.

    PubMed

    Morel, Jean-Pierre; Morel-Desrosiers, Nicole

    2006-02-07

    Gibbs free energies, enthalpies and entropies for the binding of Na+, K+, Rb+, Cs+, Ag+, Tl+ and NH4+ by the p-sulfonatocalix[4]arene in water are determined by microcalorimetry. Whereas no significant heat effect is detected with Na+ or Ag+, suggesting that these cations are not complexed, weak but selective binding is observed with the other cations. The whole set of thermodynamic parameters, which demonstrate that the cations bind inside the cavity of the calixarene, evidence the importance of the cation-pi interactions for these complexes in water.

  4. Biological and surface-active properties of double-chain cationic amino acid-based surfactants.

    PubMed

    Greber, Katarzyna E; Dawgul, Małgorzata; Kamysz, Wojciech; Sawicki, Wiesław; Łukasiak, Jerzy

    2014-08-01

    Cationic amino acid-based surfactants were synthesized via solid phase peptide synthesis and terminal acylation of their α and ε positions with saturated fatty acids. Five new lipopeptides, N-α-acyl-N-ε-acyl lysine analogues, were obtained. Minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal (fungicidal) concentration were determined on reference strains of bacteria and fungi to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of the lipopeptides. Toxicity to eukaryotic cells was examined via determination of the haemolytic activities. The surface-active properties of these compounds were evaluated by measuring the surface tension and formation of micelles as a function of concentration in aqueous solution. The cationic surfactants demonstrated diverse antibacterial activities dependent on the length of the fatty acid chain. Gram-negative bacteria and fungi showed a higher resistance than Gram-positive bacterial strains. It was found that the haemolytic activities were also chain length-dependent values. The surface-active properties showed a linear correlation between the alkyl chain length and the critical micelle concentration.

  5. Synthesis and biological activity of lipophilic analogs of the cationic antimicrobial active peptide anoplin.

    PubMed

    Chionis, Kostas; Krikorian, Dimitrios; Koukkou, Anna-Irini; Sakarellos-Daitsiotis, Maria; Panou-Pomonis, Eugenia

    2016-11-01

    Anoplin is a short natural cationic antimicrobial peptide which is derived from the venom sac of the solitary wasp, Anoplius samariensis. Due to its short sequence G(1) LLKR(5) IKT(8) LL-NH2 , it is ideal for research tests. In this study, novel analogs of anoplin were prepared and examined for their antimicrobial, hemolytic activity, and proteolytic stability. Specific substitutions were introduced in amino acids Gly(1) , Arg(5) , and Thr(8) and lipophilic groups with different lengths in the N-terminus in order to investigate how these modifications affect their antimicrobial activity. These cationic analogs exhibited higher antimicrobial activity than the native peptide; they are also nontoxic at their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values and resistant to enzymatic degradation. The substituted peptide GLLKF(5) IKK(8) LL-NH2 exhibited high activity against Gram-negative bacterium Zymomonas mobilis (MIC = 7 µg/ml), and the insertion of octanoic, decanoic, and dodecanoic acid residues in its N-terminus increased the antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (MIC = 5 µg/ml). The conformational characteristics of the peptide analogs were studied by circular dichroism. Structure activity studies revealed that the substitution of specific amino acids and the incorporation of lipophilic groups enhanced the amphipathic α-helical conformation inducing better antimicrobial effects. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Effects of Octylphenol and Bisphenol A on the Metal Cation Transporter Channels of Mouse Placentas

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae-Hwan; Ahn, Changhwan; Kang, Hee Young; Hong, Eui-Ju; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Octylphenol (OP) and bisphenol A (BPA) are known as endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). During pregnancy, the expression of steroid hormone receptors is controlled by maternal and fetal nutrition. To evaluate the impact of EDCs during pregnancy, ethinyl estradiol (EE, 0.2 mg/kg/day), OP (50 mg/kg/day), and BPA (50 mg/kg/day) were administered to pregnant mice. The mRNA levels of TRPV6 (transient receptor potential cation channels in subfamily V, member 6) decreased significantly by EE and OP. The PMCA1 (ATPase, Ca++ transporting, plasma membrane 1) mRNA and protein levels decreased significantly by EE, OP, and BPA. CTR1 (solute carrier family 31, member 1) and ATP7A (ATPase, Cu++ transporting, alpha polypeptide) expression decreased significantly by EE, OP, and BPA. The mRNA levels of IREG1 (iron-regulated transporter, member 1) decreased significantly by EE. Hephaestin (HEPH) mRNA levels decreased significantly by EE, OP, and BPA, and protein levels decreased significantly by BPA. As a result of immunohistochemistry analysis, all cation transporter proteins were found in labyrinth of placenta. To confirm the cytosolic level of cations, levels of cation level in fetal serum were measured. EE, OP, and BPA significantly reduced serum calcium and copper levels, and iron levels were reduced by BPA. Taken together, some EDCs, such as OP and BPA, could modulate the calcium, copper, and iron ion-transporting channels during pregnancy. The fetus relies on the mother for ionic transportation, and, therefore, pregnant women should avoid exposure to cation-channel-disrupting chemicals. PMID:27690074

  7. Effects of Octylphenol and Bisphenol A on the Metal Cation Transporter Channels of Mouse Placentas.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Hwan; Ahn, Changhwan; Kang, Hee Young; Hong, Eui-Ju; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2016-09-28

    Octylphenol (OP) and bisphenol A (BPA) are known as endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). During pregnancy, the expression of steroid hormone receptors is controlled by maternal and fetal nutrition. To evaluate the impact of EDCs during pregnancy, ethinyl estradiol (EE, 0.2 mg/kg/day), OP (50 mg/kg/day), and BPA (50 mg/kg/day) were administered to pregnant mice. The mRNA levels of TRPV6 (transient receptor potential cation channels in subfamily V, member 6) decreased significantly by EE and OP. The PMCA1 (ATPase, Ca(++) transporting, plasma membrane 1) mRNA and protein levels decreased significantly by EE, OP, and BPA. CTR1 (solute carrier family 31, member 1) and ATP7A (ATPase, Cu(++) transporting, alpha polypeptide) expression decreased significantly by EE, OP, and BPA. The mRNA levels of IREG1 (iron-regulated transporter, member 1) decreased significantly by EE. Hephaestin (HEPH) mRNA levels decreased significantly by EE, OP, and BPA, and protein levels decreased significantly by BPA. As a result of immunohistochemistry analysis, all cation transporter proteins were found in labyrinth of placenta. To confirm the cytosolic level of cations, levels of cation level in fetal serum were measured. EE, OP, and BPA significantly reduced serum calcium and copper levels, and iron levels were reduced by BPA. Taken together, some EDCs, such as OP and BPA, could modulate the calcium, copper, and iron ion-transporting channels during pregnancy. The fetus relies on the mother for ionic transportation, and, therefore, pregnant women should avoid exposure to cation-channel-disrupting chemicals.

  8. Exploring biologically relevant chemical space with metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Meggers, Eric

    2007-06-01

    Altering biological processes with small synthetic molecules is a general approach for the design of drugs and molecular probes. Medicinal chemistry and chemical biology are focused predominately on the design of organic molecules, whereas inorganic compounds find applications mainly for their reactivity (e.g. cisplatin as a DNA-reactive therapeutic) or imaging properties (e.g. gadolinium complexes as MRI diagnostics). In such inorganic pharmaceuticals or probes, coordination chemistry in the biological environment or at the target site lies at the heart of their modes of action. However, past and very recent results suggest that it is also worth exploring a different aspect of metal complexes: their ability to form structures with unique and defined shapes for the design of 'organic-like' small-molecule probes and drugs. In such metal-organic compounds, the metal has the main purpose to organize the organic ligands in three-dimensional space. It is likely that such an approach will complement the molecular diversity of organic chemistry in the quest for the discovery of compounds with superior biological activities.

  9. Understanding the biological responses of nanostructured metals and surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Terry C.; Reiss, Rebecca A.

    2014-08-01

    Metals produced by Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD) offer distinct advantages for medical applications such as orthopedic devices, in part because of their nanostructured surfaces. We examine the current theoretical foundations and state of knowledge for nanostructured biomaterials surface optimization within the contexts that apply to bulk nanostructured metals, differentiating how their microstructures impact osteogenesis, in particular, for Ultrafine Grained (UFG) titanium. Then we identify key gaps in the research to date, pointing out areas which merit additional focus within the scientific community. For example, we highlight the potential of next-generation DNA sequencing techniques (NGS) to reveal gene and non-coding RNA (ncRNA) expression changes induced by nanostructured metals. While our understanding of bio-nano interactions is in its infancy, nanostructured metals are already being marketed or developed for medical devices such as dental implants, spinal devices, and coronary stents. Our ability to characterize and optimize the biological response of cells to SPD metals will have synergistic effects on advances in materials, biological, and medical science.

  10. Cages with tetrahedron-like topology formed from the combination of cyclotricatechylene ligands with metal cations.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, Brendan F; FitzGerald, Nicholas J; Robson, Richard

    2010-04-06

    Cage the elephant: anionic tetrahedral assemblies, formed from the combination of cyclotricatechylene anions with transition metal ions, such as vanadium, contain large internal cavities that can act as hosts for alkali metal ions and solvent molecules. With appropriate metal centers, the anionic units can be linked together to form highly symmetric coordination polymers (V blue, O red, C black).

  11. Spontaneous self-assembly of metal-organic cationic nanocages to form monodisperse hollow vesicles in dilute solutions.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Zhang, Jie; Landskron, Kai; Liu, Tianbo

    2008-04-02

    In this communication we report the unprecedented spontaneous self-assembly of cationic nanoporous metal-organic coordination cages (nanocages) into giant hollow vesicle-like structures in polar solvents. Such highly soluble nanocages (macrocations) have separated hydrophobic regions. However, their assembly is not due to hydrophobic interactions but the counterion-mediated attractions, very similar to the unique self-assembly of polyoxometalate macroanions into single-layer, spherical blackberry structures, as characterized by laser light scattering and TEM studies. This is the first study on the solution behavior of metal-organic nanocages and also the first report on the self-assembly of soluble macrocations. Therefore, the blackberry structure is likely to be a universal type of self-assembly for soluble macroions. In addition, the self-assembled nanocages can provide blackberry structures a wide range of organic functionalities that are impossible to reach with purely inorganic systems, which may open the door to many types of applications.

  12. Biotic ligand modeling approach: Synthesis of the effect of major cations on the toxicity of metals to soil and aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Ardestani, Masoud M; van Straalen, Nico M; van Gestel, Cornelis A M

    2015-10-01

    The biotic ligand model (BLM) approach is used to assess metal toxicity, taking into account the competition of other cations with the free metal ions for binding to the biotic ligand sites of aquatic and soil organisms. The bioavailable fraction of metals, represented by the free metal ion, is a better measure than the total concentration for assessing their potential risk to the environment. Because BLMs are relating toxicity to the fraction of biotic ligands occupied by the metal, they can be useful for investigating factors affecting metal bioaccumulation and toxicity. In the present review, the effects of major cations on the toxicity of metals to soil and aquatic organisms were comprehensively studied by performing a meta-analysis of BLM literature data. Interactions at the binding sites were shown to be species- and metal-specific. The main factors affecting the relationships between toxicity and conditional binding constants for metal binding at the biotic ligand appeared to be Ca(2+) , Mg(2+) , and protons. Other important characteristics of the exposure medium, such as levels of dissolved organic carbon and concentrations of other cations, should also be considered to obtain a proper assessment of metal toxicity to soil and aquatic organisms. © 2015 SETAC.

  13. Recombinant pICln Forms Highly Cation-selective Channels when Reconstituted into Artificial and Biological Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Canhui; Breton, Sylvie; Morrison, Rebecca; Cannon, Carolyn L.; Emma, Francesco; Sanchez-Olea, Roberto; Bear, Christine; Strange, Kevin

    1998-01-01

    pICln has been proposed to be the swelling-activated anion channel responsible for ICl, swell, or a channel regulator. We tested the anion channel hypothesis by reconstituting recombinant pICln into artificial and biological membranes. Single channels were observed when pICln was reconstituted into planar lipid bilayers. In the presence of symmetrical 300 mM KCl, the channels had a high open probability and a slope conductance of 48 pS, and were outwardly rectifying. Reduction of trans KCl to 50 mM shifted the reversal potential by −31.2 ± 0.06 mV, demonstrating that the channel is at least seven times more selective for cations than for anions. Consistent with this finding, channel conductance was unaffected by substitution of Cl− with glutamate, but was undetectable when K+ was replaced by N-methyl-d-glucamine. Reconstitution of pICln into liposomes increased 86Rb+ uptake by three- to fourfold, but had no effect on 36Cl− uptake. Phosphorylation of pICln with casein kinase II or mutation of G54, G56, and G58 to alanine decreased channel open probability and 86Rb+ uptake. When added to the external medium bathing Sf9 cells, pICln inserted into the plasma membrane and increased cell cation permeability. Taken together, these observations demonstrate that channel activity is due to pICln and not minor contaminant proteins. However, these findings do not support the hypothesis that pICln is the anion-selective ICl, swell channel. The observed cation channel activity may reflect an as yet to be defined physiological function of pICln, or may be a consequence of in vitro reconstitution of purified, recombinant protein. PMID:9834142

  14. Electronic effect on protonated hydrogen-bonded imidazole trimer and corresponding derivatives cationized by alkali metals (Li+, Na+, and K+)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shihai; Bu, Yuxiang; Li, Ping

    2005-02-01

    The electronic effects on the protonated hydrogen-bonded imidazole trimer (Im)3H+ and the derivatives cationized by alkali metals (Li+, Na+, and K+) are investigated using B3LYP method in conjunction with the 6-311+G* basis set. The prominent characteristics of (Im)3H+ on reduction are the backflow of the transferred proton to its original fragment and the remoteness of the H atom from the attached side bare N atom. The proton transfer occurs on both reduction and oxidation for the corresponding hydrogen-bonded imidazole trimer. For the derivatives cationized by Li+, (Im)3Li+, the backflow of the transferred proton occurs on reduction. The electron detachment from respective highest occupied molecular orbital of (Im)3Na+ and (Im)3K+ causes the proton transferring from the fragment attached by the alkali metal cation to the middle one. The order of the adiabatic ionization potentials of (Im)3M+ is (Im)3H+>(Im)3Li+>(Im)3Na+>(Im)3K+; the order of (Im)3M indicates that (Im)3H is the easicst complex to be ionized. The polarity of (Im)3M+ (M denotes H, Li, Na, and K) increases on both oxidation and reduction. The (Im)3M+ complexes dissociate into (Im)3 and M+ except (Im)3H+, which dissociates preferably into (Im)3+ and H atom, while the neutral complexes [(Im)3M] dissociate into (Im)3 and M. The stabilization energy of (Im)3Li2+, (Im)3Na2+, and (Im)3K2+ indicate that their energies are higher as compared to those of the monomers.

  15. Short cationic lipopeptides as effective antibacterial agents: Design, physicochemical properties and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Azmi, Fazren; Elliott, Alysha G; Marasini, Nirmal; Ramu, Soumya; Ziora, Zyta; Kavanagh, Angela M; Blaskovich, Mark A T; Cooper, Matthew A; Skwarczynski, Mariusz; Toth, Istvan

    2016-05-15

    The spread of drug-resistant bacteria has imparted a sense of urgency in the search for new antibiotics. In an effort to develop a new generation of antibacterial agents, we have designed de novo charged lipopeptides inspired by natural antimicrobial peptides. These short lipopeptides are composed of cationic lysine and hydrophobic lipoamino acids that replicate the amphiphilic properties of natural antimicrobial peptides. The resultant lipopeptides were found to self-assemble into nanoparticles. Some were effective against a variety of Gram-positive bacteria, including strains resistant to methicillin, daptomycin and/or vancomycin. The lipopeptides were not toxic to human kidney and liver cell lines and were highly resistant to tryptic degradation. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of bacteria cells treated with lipopeptide showed membrane-damage and lysis with extrusion of cytosolic contents. With such properties in mind, these lipopeptides have the potential to be developed as new antibacterial agents against drug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria.

  16. Improved formulation of cationic solid lipid nanoparticles displays cellular uptake and biological activity of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Fàbregas, Anna; Prieto-Sánchez, Silvia; Suñé-Pou, Marc; Boyero-Corral, Sofía; Ticó, Josep Ramón; García-Montoya, Encarna; Pérez-Lozano, Pilar; Miñarro, Montserrat; Suñé-Negre, Josep Mª; Hernández-Munain, Cristina; Suñé, Carlos

    2017-01-10

    Non-viral delivery using cationic solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) represents a useful strategy to introduce large DNA and RNA molecules to target cells. A careful selection of components and their amounts is critical to improve transfection efficiency. In this work, a selected and optimized formulation of SLNs was used to efficiently transfect circular DNA and linear RNA molecules into cells. We characterized the main physicochemical characteristics and binding capabilities of these SLNs and show that they deliver DNA and RNA molecules into cells where they display full bioactivity at nontoxic concentrations using fluorescence- and luminescence-based methodologies. Hence, we established a novel and simple SLN formulation as a powerful tool for future therapeutic use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Alkali metal cation complexation by 1,3-alternate, mono-ionisable calix[4]arene-benzocrown-6 compounds

    DOE PAGES

    Surowiec, Malgorzata A.; Custelcean, Radu; Surowiec, Kazimierz; ...

    2014-04-23

    Alkali metal cation extraction behavior for two series of 1,3-alternate, mono-ionizable calix[4]arene-benzocrown-6 compounds is examined. In Series 1, the proton-ionizable group is a substituent on the benzo group of the polyether ring that directs it away from the crown ether cavity. In Series 2, the proton-ionizable group is attached to one para position in the calixarene framework, thus positioning it over the crown ether ring. Competitive solvent extraction of alkali metal cations from aqueous solutions into chloroform shows high Cs+ efficiency and selectivity. Single-species extraction pH profiles of Cs+ for Series 1 and 2 ligands with the same proton-ionizable groupmore » are very similar. Thus, association of Cs+ with the calixcrown ring is more important than the the proton-ionizable group’s position in relation to the crown ether cavity. Solid-state structures are presented for two unionized ligands from Series 2, as is a crystal containing two different ionized ligand–Cs+ complexes.« less

  18. Alkali metal cation complexation by 1,3-alternate, mono-ionisable calix[4]arene-benzocrown-6 compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Surowiec, Malgorzata A.; Custelcean, Radu; Surowiec, Kazimierz; Bartsch, Richard A.

    2014-04-23

    Alkali metal cation extraction behavior for two series of 1,3-alternate, mono-ionizable calix[4]arene-benzocrown-6 compounds is examined. In Series 1, the proton-ionizable group is a substituent on the benzo group of the polyether ring that directs it away from the crown ether cavity. In Series 2, the proton-ionizable group is attached to one para position in the calixarene framework, thus positioning it over the crown ether ring. Competitive solvent extraction of alkali metal cations from aqueous solutions into chloroform shows high Cs+ efficiency and selectivity. Single-species extraction pH profiles of Cs+ for Series 1 and 2 ligands with the same proton-ionizable group are very similar. Thus, association of Cs+ with the calixcrown ring is more important than the the proton-ionizable group’s position in relation to the crown ether cavity. Solid-state structures are presented for two unionized ligands from Series 2, as is a crystal containing two different ionized ligand–Cs+ complexes.

  19. Influence of alkali metal cations on the thermal, mechanical and morphological properties of rectorite/chitosan bio-nanocomposite films.

    PubMed

    Babul Reddy, A; Jayaramudu, J; Siva Mohan Reddy, G; Manjula, B; Sadiku, E R

    2015-05-20

    The main theme of this work is to study the influence of ion-exchangeable alkali metal cations, such as: Li(+), Na(+), K(+), and Cs(+) on the thermal, mechanical and morphological properties. In this regard, a set of rectorite/chitosan (REC-CS) bio-nanocomposite films (BNCFs) was prepared by facile reaction of chitosan with ion-exchanged REC clay. The microstructure and morphology of BNCFs were investigated with XRD, TEM, SEM and AFM. Thermal and tensile properties of BNCFs were also investigated. As revealed from TEM and XRD results, the BNCFs featured a mixed morphology. Some intercalated clay sheets, together with nano-sized clay tactoids were obtained in LiREC/CS, NaREC/CS and KREC/CS of the BNCFs. From fractured surface study, via SEM, it was observed that the dispersion of chitosan polymer attaches to (and covers) the clay platelets. FTIR confirmed strong hydrogen bonds between clay and chitosan polymer. In addition, the thermal stabilities significantly varied when alkali metal cations varied from Li(+) to Cs(+). The BNCFs featured high tensile strengths (up to 84 MPa) and tensile moduli (up to 45 GPa). After evaluating these properties of BNCFs, we came to conclusion that these bio-nano composites can be used for packaging applications.

  20. Biologics formulation factors affecting metal leachables from stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuxia; Schöneich, Christian; Singh, Satish K

    2011-03-01

    An area of increasing concern and scientific scrutiny is the potential contamination of drug products by leachables entering the product during manufacturing and storage. These contaminants may either have a direct safety impact on the patients or act indirectly through the alteration of the physicochemical properties of the product. In the case of biotherapeutics, trace amounts of metal contaminants can arise from various sources, but mainly from contact with stainless steel (ss). The effect of the various factors, buffer species, solution fill volume per unit contact surface area, metal chelators, and pH, on metal leachables from contact with ss over time were investigated individually. Three major metal leachables, iron, chromium, and nickel, were monitored by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry because they are the major components of 316L ss. Iron was primarily used to evaluate the effect of each factor since it is the most abundant. It was observed that each studied factor exhibited its own effect on metal leachables from contact with ss. The effect of buffer species and pH exhibited temperature dependence over the studied temperature range. The metal leachables decreased with the increased fill volume (mL) per unit contact ss surface area (cm(2)) but a plateau was achieved at approximately 3 mL/cm(2). Metal chelators produced the strongest effect in facilitating metal leaching. In order to minimize the metal leachables and optimize biological product stability, each formulation factor must be evaluated for its impact, to balance its risk and benefit in achieving the target drug product shelf life.

  1. Urban Biomining: Biological Extraction of Metals and Materials from Electronics Waste Using a Synthetic Biology Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbina-Navarrete, J.; Rothschild, L.

    2016-12-01

    End-of-life electronics waste (e-waste) containing toxic and valuable materials is a rapidly progressing human health and environmental issue. Using synthetic biology tools, we have developed a recycling method for e-waste. Our innovation is to use a recombinant version of a naturally-occurring silica-degrading enzyme to depolymerize the silica in metal- and glass- containing e-waste components, and subsequently, to use engineered bacterial surfaces to bind and separate metals from a solution. The bacteria with bound metals can then be used as "bio-ink" to print new circuits using a novel plasma jet electronics printing technology. Here, we present the results from our initial studies that focus on the specificity of metal-binding motifs for a cognate metal. The candidate motifs that show high affinity and specificity will be engineered into bacterial surfaces for downstream applications in biologically-mediated metal recycling. Since the chemistry and role of Cu in metalloproteins is relatively well-characterized, we are using Cu as a proxy to elucidate metal and biological ligand interactions with various metals in e-waste. We assess the binding parameters of 3 representative classes of Cu-binding motifs using isothermal titration calorimetry; 1) natural motifs found in metalloproteins, 2) consensus motifs, and 3) rationally designed peptides that are predicted, in silico, to bind Cu. Our results indicate that naturally-occurring motifs have relative high affinity and specificity for Cu (association constant for Cu Ka 104 M-1, Zn Ka 103 M-1) when competing ions are present in the aqueous milieu. However, motifs developed through rational design by applying quantum mechanical methods that take into account complexation energies of the elemental binding partners and molecular geometry of the cognate metal, not only show high affinity for the cognate metal (Cu Ka 106 M-1), but they show specificity and discrimination against other metal ions that would be

  2. Similarities and differences of copper and zinc cations binding to biologically relevant peptides studied by vibrational spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Schirer, Alicia; El Khoury, Youssef; Faller, Peter; Hellwig, Petra

    2017-03-20

    GHK and DAHK are biological peptides that bind both copper and zinc cations. Here we used infrared and Raman spectroscopies to study the coordination modes of both copper and zinc ions, at pH 6.8 and 8.9, correlating the data with the crystal structures that are only available for the copper-bound form. We found that Cu(II) binds to deprotonated backbone (amidate), the N-terminus and N(π) of the histidine side chain, in both GHK and DAHK, at pH 6.8 and 8.9. The data for the coordination of zinc at pH 6.8 points to two conformers including both nitrogens of a histidine residue. At pH 8.9, vibrational spectra of the ZnGHK complexes show that equilibria between monomers, oligomers exist, where deprotonated histidine residues as well as deprotonated amide nitrogen are involved in the coordination. A common feature is found: zinc cations coordinate to N(τ) and/or N(π) of the His leading to the formation of GHK and DAHK multimers. In contrast, Cu(II) binds His via N(π) regardless of the peptide, in a pH-independent manner.

  3. Cholesterol-based cationic lipids for gene delivery: contribution of molecular structure factors to physico-chemical and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Ruilong; Luo, Ting; Li, Hui; Sun, Jingjing; Wang, Zhao; Cao, Amin

    2014-04-01

    In this work, we prepared a series of cholesterol-based cationic (Cho-cat) lipids bearing cholesterol hydrophobe, natural amino acid headgroups (lysine/histidine) and linkage (carbonate ester/ether) bonds. In which, the natural amino acid headgroups made dominant contribution to their physico-chemical and biological properties. Among the lipids, the l-lysine headgroup bearing lipids (Cho-es/et-Lys) showed higher pDNA binding affinity and were able to form larger sized and higher surface charged lipoplexes than that of l-histidine headgroup bearing lipids (Cho-es/et-His), they also demonstrated higher transfection efficacy and higher membrane disruption capacities than that of their l-histidine headgroup bearing counterparts. However, compared to the contributions of the headgroups, the (carbonate ester/ether) linkage bonds showed much less affects. Besides, it could be noted that, Cho-es/et-Lys lipids exhibited very high luciferase gene transfection efficiency that almost reached the transfection level of "gold standard" bPEI-25k, made them potential transfection reagents for practical application. Moreover, the results facilitated the understanding for the structure-activity relationship of the cholesterol-based cationic lipids, and also paved a simple and efficient way for achieving high transfection efficiency by modification of suitable headgroups on lipid gene carriers.

  4. Effect of variations in annealing temperature and metallic cations on nanostructured molybdate thin films.

    PubMed

    Marques, Anapauladeazevedo; Leite, Edsonroberto; Varela, Joséarana; Longo, Elson

    2008-04-29

    Crystalline molybdate thin films were prepared by the complex polymerization method. The AMoO4(A = Ca, Sr, Ba) films were deposited onto Si wafers by the spinning technique. The Mo-O bond in the AMoO4structure was confirmed by FTIR spectra. X-ray diffraction revealed the presence of crystalline scheelite-type phase. The mass, size, and basicity of A2+cations was found to be dependent on the intrinsic characteristics of the materials. The grain size increased in the following order: CaMoO4 < SrMoO4 < BaMoO4. The emission band wavelength was detected at around 576 nm. Our findings suggest that the material's morphology and photoluminescence were both affected by the variations in cations (Ca, Sr, or Ba) and in the thermal treatment.

  5. Effect of Variations in Annealing Temperature and Metallic Cations on Nanostructured Molybdate Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Ana Paula De Azevedo; Leite, Edson Roberto; Varela, José Arana; Longo, Elson

    2008-04-01

    Crystalline molybdate thin films were prepared by the complex polymerization method. The AMoO4 (A = Ca, Sr, Ba) films were deposited onto Si wafers by the spinning technique. The Mo O bond in the AMoO4 structure was confirmed by FTIR spectra. X-ray diffraction revealed the presence of crystalline scheelite-type phase. The mass, size, and basicity of A2+ cations was found to be dependent on the intrinsic characteristics of the materials. The grain size increased in the following order: CaMoO4 < SrMoO4 < BaMoO4. The emission band wavelength was detected at around 576 nm. Our findings suggest that the material’s morphology and photoluminescence were both affected by the variations in cations (Ca, Sr, or Ba) and in the thermal treatment.

  6. Effect of Variations in Annealing Temperature and Metallic Cations on Nanostructured Molybdate Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Crystalline molybdate thin films were prepared by the complex polymerization method. The AMoO4(A = Ca, Sr, Ba) films were deposited onto Si wafers by the spinning technique. The Mo–O bond in the AMoO4structure was confirmed by FTIR spectra. X-ray diffraction revealed the presence of crystalline scheelite-type phase. The mass, size, and basicity of A2+cations was found to be dependent on the intrinsic characteristics of the materials. The grain size increased in the following order: CaMoO4 < SrMoO4 < BaMoO4. The emission band wavelength was detected at around 576 nm. Our findings suggest that the material’s morphology and photoluminescence were both affected by the variations in cations (Ca, Sr, or Ba) and in the thermal treatment. PMID:21777487

  7. Reactions of methyl fluoride with atomic transition-metal and main-group cations: gas-phase room-temperature kinetics and periodicities in reactivity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiang; Koyanagi, Gregory K; Bohme, Diethard K

    2006-09-14

    Reactions of CH(3)F have been surveyed systematically at room temperature with 46 different atomic cations using an inductively coupled plasma/selected-ion flow tube tandem mass spectrometer. Rate coefficients and product distributions were measured for the reactions of fourth-period atomic ions from K(+) to Se(+), of fifth-period atomic ions from Rb(+) to Te(+) (excluding Tc(+)), and of sixth-period atomic ions from Cs(+) to Bi(+). Primary reaction channels were observed corresponding to F atom transfer, CH(3)F addition, HF elimination, and H(2) elimination. The early-transition-metal cations exhibit a much more active chemistry than the late-transition-metal cations, and there are periodic features in the chemical activity and reaction efficiency that maximize with Ti(+), As(+), Y(+), Hf(+), and Pt(+). F atom transfer appears to be thermodynamically controlled, although a periodic variation in efficiency is observed within the early-transition-metal cations which maximizes with Ti(+), Y(+), and Hf(+). Addition of CH(3)F was observed exclusively (>99%) with the late-fourth-period cations from Mn(+) to Ga(+), the fifth-period cations from Ru(+) to Te(+), and the sixth-period cations from Hg(+) to Bi(+) as well as Re(+). Periodic trends are observed in the effective bimolecular rate coefficient for CH(3)F addition, and these are consistent with expected trends in the electrostatic binding energies of the adduct ions and measured trends in the standard free energy of addition. HF elimination is the major reaction channel with As(+), while dehydrogenation dominates the reactions of W(+), Os(+), Ir(+), and Pt(+). Sequential F atom transfer is observed with the early-transition-metal cations, with the number of F atoms transferred increasing across the periodic table from two to four, maximizing at four for the group 5 cations Nb(+)(d(4)) and Ta(+)(d(3)s(1)), and stopping at two with V(+)(d(4)). Sequential CH(3)F addition was observed with many atomic cations and all of

  8. Interactions of platinum metals and their complexes in biological systems.

    PubMed Central

    LeRoy, A F

    1975-01-01

    Platinum-metal oxidation catalysts are to be introduced in exhaust systems of many 1975 model-year automobiles in the U.S. to meet Clean Air Act standards. Small quantities of finely divided catalyst have been found issuing from prototype systems; platinum and palladium compounds may be found also. Although platinum exhibits a remarkable resistance to oxidation and chemical attack, it reacts chemically under some conditions producing coordination complex compounds. Palladium reacts more readily than platinum. Some platinum-metal complexes interact with biological systems as bacteriostatic, bacteriocidal, viricidal, and immunosuppressive agents. Workers chronically exposed to platinum complexes often develop asthma-like respiratory distress and skin reactions called platinosis. Platinum complexes used alone and in combination therapy with other drugs have recently emerged as effective agents in cancer chemotherapy. Understanding toxic and favorable interactions of metal species with living organisms requires basic information on quantities and chemical characteristics of complexes at trace concentrations in biological materials. Some basic chemical kinetic and thermodynamic data are presented to characterize the chemical behavior of the complex cis-[Pt(NH3)2Cl2] used therapeutically. A brief discussion of platinum at manogram levels in biological tissue is discussed. PMID:50943

  9. Interactions of platinum metals and their complexes in biological systems.

    PubMed

    LeRoy, A F

    1975-04-01

    Platinum-metal oxidation catalysts are to be introduced in exhaust systems of many 1975 model-year automobiles in the U.S. to meet Clean Air Act standards. Small quantities of finely divided catalyst have been found issuing from prototype systems; platinum and palladium compounds may be found also. Although platinum exhibits a remarkable resistance to oxidation and chemical attack, it reacts chemically under some conditions producing coordination complex compounds. Palladium reacts more readily than platinum. Some platinum-metal complexes interact with biological systems as bacteriostatic, bacteriocidal, viricidal, and immunosuppressive agents. Workers chronically exposed to platinum complexes often develop asthma-like respiratory distress and skin reactions called platinosis. Platinum complexes used alone and in combination therapy with other drugs have recently emerged as effective agents in cancer chemotherapy. Understanding toxic and favorable interactions of metal species with living organisms requires basic information on quantities and chemical characteristics of complexes at trace concentrations in biological materials. Some basic chemical kinetic and thermodynamic data are presented to characterize the chemical behavior of the complex cis-[Pt(NH3)2Cl2] used therapeutically. A brief discussion of platinum at manogram levels in biological tissue is discussed.

  10. Metal chalcogenide nanoparticle gel networks: Their formation mechanism and application for novel material generation and heavy metal water remediation via cation exchange reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palhares, Leticia F.

    The dissertation research is focused on (1) uncovering the mechanism of metal chalcogenide nanoparticle gel formation; (2) extending the cation exchange reaction protocol to zinc sulfide gel networks, with the goal of accessing new aerogel chemistries and understanding the factors that drive the process; and (3) conducting a quantitative analysis of the ability of ZnS aerogels to remove heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions. The mechanism of metal chalcogenide nanoparticle gel formation was investigated using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy to probe the chemical changes that occur during the gelation process. These techniques suggest that the bonding between the particles in the CdSe nanoparticle gels is due to the oxidation of surface selenide species, forming covalent Se--Se bonds. Treating the gel networks with a suitable reducing agent, such as a thiol, breaks the covalent bond and disperses the gel network. The addition of sodium borohydride, a "pure" reducing agent, also breaks down the gel network, strengthening the hypothesis that the reducing character of the thiols, not their ligation ability, is responsible for the gel network breakdown. UV-Vis spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and Powder X-ray Diffraction were used to analyze the particles after successive gelation-dispersion cycles. The primary particle size decreases after repeated oxidation-reduction cycles, due to nanoparticle surface etching. This trend is observed for CdSe and CdS gel networks, allowing for the proposition that the oxidative-reductive mechanism responsible for the formation-dispersion of the gels is general, applying to other metal chalcogenide nanocrystals as well. The cation exchange reaction previously demonstrated for CdSe gels was extended to ZnS gel networks. The exchange occurs under mild reaction conditions (room temperature, methanol solvent) with exchanging ions of different size, charge and mobility (Ag+, Pb2+, Cd2+ , Cu2+). The

  11. Influence of soil properties on heavy metal sequestration by biochar amendment: 1. Copper sorption isotherms and the release of cations.

    PubMed

    Uchimiya, Minori; Klasson, K Thomas; Wartelle, Lynda H; Lima, Isabel M

    2011-03-01

    The amendment of carbonaceous materials such as biochars and activated carbons is a promising in situ remediation strategy for both organic and inorganic contaminants in soils and sediments. Mechanistic understandings in sorption of heavy metals on amended soil are necessary for appropriate selection and application of carbonaceous materials for heavy metal sequestration in specific soil types. In this study, copper sorption isotherms were obtained for soils having distinct characteristics: clay-rich, alkaline San Joaquin soil with significant heavy metal sorption capacity, and eroded, acidic Norfolk sandy loam soil having low capacity to retain copper. The amendment of acidic pecan shell-derived activated carbon and basic broiler litter biochar lead to a greater enhancement of copper sorption in Norfolk soil than in San Joaquin soil. In Norfolk soil, the amendment of acidic activated carbon enhanced copper sorption primarily via cation exchange mechanism, i.e., release of proton, calcium, and aluminum, while acid dissolution of aluminum cannot be ruled out. For San Joaquin soil, enhanced copper retention by biochar amendment likely resulted from the following additional mechanisms: electrostatic interactions between copper and negatively charged soil and biochar surfaces, sorption on mineral (ash) components, complexation of copper by surface functional groups and delocalized π electrons of carbonaceous materials, and precipitation. Influence of biochar on the release of additional elements (e.g., Al, Ca) must be carefully considered when used as a soil amendment to sequester heavy metals.

  12. Removal of toxic metals during biological treatment of landfill leachates.

    PubMed

    Robinson, T

    2017-05-01

    Progressive implementation of the European Water Framework Directive has resulted in substantial changes in limits for discharges of heavy metals both to watercourses, and to sewer. The objective of this paper is to provide original, real, full-scale data obtained for removal of metals during aerobic biological leachate treatment, and also to report on studies carried out to look at further trace metal removal. Polishing technologies examined and investigated include; the incorporation of ultrafiltration (UF) membranes into biological treatment systems, the use of ion exchange, and of activated carbon polishing processes. Ultrafiltration was able to provide a 60 percent reduction in COD values in treated leachates, compared with COD values found in settled/clarified effluents. Removal rates for COD varied from 30.5 to 79.8 percent. Additionally, ultrafiltration of treated leachates significantly reduced both chromium and nickel concentrations of effluents by 61.6% and 34.3% respectively (median values). Despite mean reductions of chromium (9.7%) and nickel (13.7%) noted during the ion exchange trials, these results would not justify use of this technology for metals removal at full-scale. Further preliminary studies used pulverized activated carbon (PAC) polishing of UF effluents to demonstrate that significant (up to 80 per cent) removal of COD, TOC and heavy metals could readily be achieved by doses of up to 10g/l of suitable activated carbons. Additional evidence is provided that many trace metals are present not in ionic form, but as organic complexes; this is likely to make their removal to low levels more difficult and expensive. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Anisole as an ambidentate ligand: Ab initio molecular orbital study of alkali metal cations binding to anisole

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, J.B.; Hay, B.P.

    1999-12-02

    The authors present optimized geometries and binding energies for alkali metal cation complexes with anisole (methoxybenzene). Results are obtained for Li{sup +} through Cs{sup +} at the RHF/6-311G* and MP2/6-311+G* levels of theory, with K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, and Cs{sup +} represented by relativistic ECPs and associated valence basis sets. RHF/6-311G{sup {minus}} frequencies are used to verify that the optimized geometries are minima and to calculate binding enthalpies. The effects of basis set superposition error (BSSE) are estimated at both the RHF and MP2 levels. The alkali metals bind to anisole in two ways, either predominantly through interactions with the aromatic ring or with the ether oxygen. For binding to the ring, BSSE-corrected MP2/6-311+G* binding enthalpies (in kcal/mol) of {minus}38.1 (Li{sup +}), {minus}23.6 (Na{sup +}), {minus}18.3 (K{sup +}), {minus}15.4 (Rb{sup +}), and {minus}13.6 (Cs{sup +}) were obtained. The average distances (in {angstrom}) between the ring carbons and the cations are 2.33 (Li{sup +}), 2.79 (Na{sup +}), 3.20 (K{sup +}), 3.44 (Rb{sup +}), and 3.70 (Cs{sup +}). For binding to the ether oxygen, the BSSE-corrected MP2/6-311+G* binding enthalpies (in kcal/mol) are {minus}37.6 (Li{sup +}), {minus}25.2 (Na{sup +}), {minus}19.4 (K{sup +}), {minus}16.4 (Rb{sup +}), and {minus}14.3 (Cs{sup +}). The distances (in {angstrom}) between the ether oxygen and the cations are 1.82 (Li{sup +}), 2.24 (Na{sup +}), 2.62 (K{sup +}), 2.87 (Rb{sup +}), and 3.10 (Cs{sup +}). Although the differences in binding energy between the two sites are small, the cations generally prefer to bind to the oxygen.

  14. Zinc (II) complex with a cationic Schiff base ligand: Synthesis, characterization, and biological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sze Koon; Tan, Kong Wai; Ng, Seik Weng; Ooi, Kah Kooi; Ang, Kok Pian; Abdah, Md Akim

    2014-03-01

    A cationic Schiff base ligand, TSB (L) and its Zn (II) complex (1) were synthesized and characterized by using CHN, 1H-NMR, FT-IR, UV, LC-MS, and X-ray methods. Their ability to inhibit topoisomerase I, DNA cleavage activities, and cytotoxicity were studied. X-ray diffraction study shows that the mononuclear complex 1 is four coordinated with distorted tetrahedral geometry. The singly deprotonated Schiff base ligand L acts as a bidentate ON-donor ligand. Complexation of L increases the inhibitory strength on topoisomerase I activity. Complex 1 could fully inhibit topoisomerase I activity at 250 μM, while L did not show any inhibitory effect on topoisomerase I activity. In addition, L and complex 1 could cleave pBR322 DNA in a concentration and time dependent profile. Surprisingly, L has better DNA cleavage activity than complex 1. The cleavage of DNA by complex 1 is altered in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, L and complex 1 are mildly cytotoxic towards human ovarian cancer A2780 and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2.

  15. Pyridylphosphinate metal complexes: synthesis, structural characterisation and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Cross, Jasmine M; Gallagher, Natalie; Gill, Jason H; Jain, Mohit; McNeillis, Archibald W; Rockley, Kimberly L; Tscherny, Fiona H; Wirszycz, Natasha J; Yufit, Dmitry S; Walton, James W

    2016-08-09

    For the first time, a series of 25 pseudo-octahedral pyridylphosphinate metal complexes (Ru, Os, Rh, Ir) has been synthesised and assessed in biological systems. Each metal complex incorporates a pyridylphosphinate ligand, a monodentate halide and a capping η(6)-bound aromatic ligand. Solid- and solution-state analyses of two complexes reveal a structural preference for one of a possible two diastereomers. The metal chlorides hydrolyse rapidly in D2O to form a 1 : 1 equilibrium ratio between the aqua and chloride adducts. The pKa of the aqua adduct depends upon the pyridyl substituent and the metal but has little dependence upon the phosphinate R' group. Toxicity was measured in vitro against non-small cell lung carcinoma H460 cells, with the most potent complexes reporting IC50 values around 50 μM. Binding studies with selected amino acids and nucleobases provide a rationale for the variation in toxicity observed within the series. Finally, an investigation into the ability of the chelating amino acid l-His to displace the phosphinate O-metal bond shows the potential for phosphinate complexes to act as prodrugs that can be activated in the intracellular environment.

  16. Influence of hydroxyl groups on the biological properties of cationic polymethacrylates as gene vectors.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ming; Li, Feng; Yuan, Zhe-fan; Zhuo, Ren-xi

    2010-07-01

    In this study poly(aminoethyl methacrylate) (PAEMA), poly(3-amino-2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate) (PAHPMA), poly(2-(2-aminoethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PAEAEMA) and poly(3-(2-aminoethylamino) 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate) (PAEAHPMA) were synthesized using atom transfer radical polymerization to evaluate the effect of hydroxyl groups on the relative properties of cationic polymeric gene vectors. The results of heparin displacement assays showed that PAHPMA possessed a stronger binding capacity than PAEMA. PAHPMA/DNA complexes and PAEAHPMA/DNA complexes had lower zeta potentials than those of PAEMA and PAEAEMA. MTT assay results indicated that PAHPMA and PAEAHPMA exhibited obviously lower cytotoxicities than PAEMA and PAEAEMA. Subsequently, in vitro gene transfection studies in 293T cells without serum showed that PAHPMA exhibited a lower transfection efficiency than PAEMA and PAEAHPMA/DNA complexes possessed a similar transfection efficiency to PAEAEMA/DNA complexes. Moreover, PAHPMA and PAEAHPMA retained similar transfection efficiencies in DMEM with 10% serum, but PAEMA and PAEAEMA showed slightly lower transfection efficiencies than in the absence of serum. The reason for these phenomena might be attributed to the introduction of hydroxyl groups into PAHPMA and PAEAHPMA, i.e. the existence of hydroxyl groups might increase the binding capacity to DNA and at the same time decrease the surface charge of the polymer/DNA complexes due to the formation of hydrogen bonds between the polymers and DNA. Therefore, a lower zeta potential and stronger binding ability may result in a lower gene transfection efficiency. This effect of hydroxyl groups decreased with increasing amino group density on the polymer. Copyright 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Determinants of the host-guest interactions between α-, β- and γ-cyclodextrins and group IA, IIA and IIIA metal cations: a DFT/PCM study.

    PubMed

    Angelova, S E; Nikolova, V K; Dudev, T M

    2017-06-14

    The most widely used native cyclodextrins are α-, β- and γ-cyclodextrins containing six, seven or eight α-d-glucopyranoside units in the ring, respectively. Although the ligation properties of these host molecules have been extensively studied, a number of questions regarding their metal binding and selectivity remain unaddressed: to what extent do the size and flexibility of the host α-, β- and γ-cyclodextrins influence their metal affinity/selectivity? Which metal is the most preferred binding partner of α-, β- and γ-cyclodextrins? How do the charge, size and preferred coordination number of the metal cation shape its interactions with the host cyclodextrin? Can the guest metal cation inflict structural alterations in the host molecule and, if so, how do these changes correlate with the metal's properties? In the present study, by employing density functional theory (DFT) calculations combined with polarizable continuum model (PCM) computations, we try to answer these questions by evaluating the thermodynamic parameters of the IA, IIA and IIIA group metal binding to α, β- and γ-cyclodextrins. We assess how the interaction between the two binding partners depends on (1) the size, valence state and preferred coordination number of the guest metal cations, (2) the size and flexibility of the host molecule, and (3) the dielectric properties of the environment. The series of group IA (Na(+) and Rb(+)), IIA (Mg(2+) and Sr(2+)) and IIIA (Al(3)+ and In(3+)) metal cations have been chosen for the task as they allow us to study the effect of various metal parameters (variable charge, ionic radius and coordination number) on the strength and form of the interactions with the host cyclodextrins.

  18. Effects of crystal lattice and counterions on the geometries of metal complexes: Hexaaquomagnesium cation as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, Agrinaldo J.; Moura, Gustavo L. C.; Lima, Nathalia B. D.; Simas, Alfredo M.

    2017-04-01

    We address how diverse are crystallographic geometries of several compounds of the same metal complex cation, and also how they contrast from those resulting from quantum chemical calculations on isolated molecules. In a crystal, besides the desired molecule or molecular ion of interest, there are usually present co-crystallized molecules and/or counterions, that, together with the crystal lattice, perturb its geometry. In order to examine the nature and intensity of each of these effects, we present a novel methodology to separate and quantify them. Accordingly, we compared the crystallographic geometries of the hexaaquomagnesium cation in 45 different compounds, each one with different counter ions and other co-crystallized molecules. We show that the resulting perturbations of the counterions on the geometry of the complex behave as pseudorandom around a mean, and are subject to suitable probability distributions. Results indicate that the crystal lattice effect seems to compress the hexaaquomagnesium complex cation by a magnitude which we estimate to be 0.047 Å in its distances, and 6.6% in its volume. This crystal lattice effect is then superimposed to the effect of the counter ions and other molecules, which provokes a further ±0.035 Å variation on the geometries of the compounds. Consequently, perturbations of counterions and the lattice effect, together, amount to a statistical difference of ≈0.05 Å for distances, and ≈5° for the angles. As such, only within these boundaries, may quantum chemical calculations on isolated complexes be compared to crystallographic results.

  19. Selective adsorption of cationic dyes from aqueous solution by polyoxometalate-based metal-organic framework composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoxia; Gong, Wenpeng; Luo, Jing; Zou, Chentao; Yang, Yun; Yang, Shuijin

    2016-01-01

    A novel environmental friendly adsorbent H6P2W18O62/MOF-5 was synthesized by a simple one-step reaction under solvothermal conditions and characterized by XRD, FTIR, thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms. The removal rate of H6P2W18O62/MOF-5 was quite greater (85%) than that of MOF-5 (almost zero), showing that the adsorption performance of porous MOF-5 can be improved through the modification of H6P2W18O62. Further study revealed that H6P2W18O62/MOF-5 exhibited a fast adsorption rate and selective adsorption ability towards the cationic dyes in aqueous solution. The removal rate was up to 97% for cationic dyes methylene blue (MB) and 68% for rhodamine B(Rhb) within 10 min. However, anionicdye methyl orange(MO) can only reach to 10%. The influences including initial concentration, contact time, initial solution pH and temperature of MB adsorption onto H6P2W18O62/MOF-5 were investigated in detail. The kinetic study indicated that the adsorption of MB onto H6P2W18O62/MOF-5 followed the pseudo second-order model well. The isotherm obtained from experimental data fitted the Langmuir model, yielding maximum adsorption capacity of 51.81 mg/g. The thermodynamic parameters analysis illustrated that the MB adsorption onto H6P2W18O62 immobilized MOF-5 was spontaneous and endothermic process. Besides, these results implied that designing a novel material polyoxometalate-based metal-organic frameworks is great potential for removing cationic organic pollutants and even extended to improve other specific application.

  20. Adsorption of heavy metal cations by Na-clinoptilolite: equilibrium and selectivity studies.

    PubMed

    Mihaly-Cozmuta, L; Mihaly-Cozmuta, A; Peter, A; Nicula, C; Tutu, H; Silipas, Dan; Indrea, Emil

    2014-05-01

    This paper summarizes the conclusions of experiments conducted on the adsorption of Cd(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Mn(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+) and Zn(2+) onto zeolite. The focus of the experiments was to establish the influence of the initial pH of the contact solution as well as the selectivity of zeolite on the efficiency of the adsorption process. To this end, experimental adsorption isotherms were established for the pH values ranging from 1 to 4 by using the Na-form of clinoptilolite (particle size range 0.5-1 mm) as an adsorbent. Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Raduschkevich isotherm models were used to validate the experimental data and the Gibbs free energy was calculated based on the distribution coefficient. From the Langmuir model, correlations between the maximum adsorption capacity and selected physical-chemical parameters of the cations studied were established. The results of the experiments suggest that the selectivity of zeolite is strongly influenced by the pH of the contact solution, dehydration energy of cations, diffusion coefficient and the pH at which the precipitation of hydroxides occurs.

  1. Tetraplex structure formation in the thrombin-binding DNA aptamer by metal cations measured by vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mondragon-Sanchez, J A; Liquier, J; Shafer, R H; Taillandier, E

    2004-12-01

    Formation of intramolecular tetraplex structures by the thrombin-binding DNA aptamer (TBA) in the presence of K(+), Pb(2+), Ba(2+), Sr(2+) and Mn(2+) has been studied by vibrational spectroscopy. All tetraplex structures contain G-G Hoogsteen type base pairing, both C2'endo/anti and C2'endo/syn deoxyguanosine glycosidic conformations and local B like form DNA phosphate geometries. Addition of Pb(2+) ions modifies the structure by interacting at the level of the guanine carbonyl groups. The very important downshift of the guanine C6=O6 carbonyl vibration mode in the TBA spectrum induced by the addition of one Pb(2+) ion per TBA molecule is in agreement with a localization of the metal ion between both guanine quartets. FTIR melting experiments show an important stabilization of the tetraplex structure upon addition of Pb(2+) ions (DeltaT = 15 degrees C). This strong interaction of lead cations may be correlated with a change in the geometry of the cage formed by the two guanine quartets. A similar but weaker effect is observed for barium and strontium cations.

  2. The Debaryomyces hansenii NHA1 gene encodes a plasma membrane alkali-metal-cation antiporter with broad substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Velkova, Klara; Sychrova, Hana

    2006-03-15

    Debaryomyces hansenii is a yeast species often found in salty environments. Its genome sequence is known completely, but the mechanisms behind its halotolerance are poorly understood. In the D. hansenii genome, there is a gene strongly homologous to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae NHA1 gene (encoding a plasma membrane Na+/H+ antiporter). We isolated this DhNHA1 gene from two D. hansenii strains (CBS 767 and CBS 1793) differing in their osmotolerance. Both DhNHA1 alleles were heterologously expressed in a S. cerevisiae strain lacking its own systems for the efflux of alkali metal cations (BW31a, ena1-4delta nha1delta). D. hansenii Na+/H+ antiporters were localized in the plasma membrane of BW31a cells, their presence increased BW31a tolerance to sodium, potassium, lithium and also rubidium. Measurements of Na+ and K+ efflux from S. cerevisiae cells expressing DhNHA1 alleles show that the D. hansenii antiporters efficiently transported both cations out of cells. The sodium and potassium transport activity of Nha1 antiporters from both D. hansenii strains was almost identical, indicating that plasma membrane antiporter activity is not one of the factors determining the different levels of halotolerance in the two strains.

  3. Ferrocene-based multichannel molecular chemosensors with high selectivity and sensitivity for Pb(II) and Hg(II) metal cations.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, María; Tárraga, Alberto; Molina, Pedro

    2010-10-07

    The synthesis, electrochemical, optical and cation-sensing properties of ferrocene-imidazoquinoxaline dyads 6, are presented. Dyad 6a behaves as a highly selective redox, chromogenic and fluorescent chemosensor molecule for Pb(2+) cations in CH(3)CN solutions; the oxidation redox peak is anodically shifted (DeltaE(1/2) = 110 mV); in the absorption spectrum a new low-energy band appeared at lambda = 463 nm, and the emission band is red-shifted (Deltalambda = 31 nm) along with an important chelation-enhanced fluorescence factor (CHEF = 276), upon complexation with this metal cation. The dyad 6b, bearing two additional pyridine rings as substituents, has shown its ability for sensing Hg(2+) cations through three different channels: the oxidation peak is anodically higher shifted (DeltaE(1/2) = 300 mV), a new low-energy band appears in the absorption spectrum at lambda = 483 nm, and the emission band was also red-shifted (Deltalambda = 28 nm) and underwent an important chelation-enhanced fluorescent factor (CHEF = 227). The changes in their absorption spectra are accompanied by color changes from yellow to orange which allow their potential use for the "naked eye" detection of these metal cations. Linear sweep voltammetry revealed that Cu(2+) cations induced oxidation of the ferrocene unit in both dyads, which is accompanied by an important increase of the emission band.

  4. Thermal ammonia activation by cationic transition-metal hydrides of the first row--small but mighty.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, Robert; Schlangen, Maria; Schwarz, Helmut

    2012-06-01

    The thermal reactions of cationic 3d transition-metal hydrides MH(+) (M=Sc-Zn, except V and Cu) with ammonia have been studied by gas-phase experiments and computational methods. There are three primary reaction channels: 1) H(2) elimination by N-H bond activation, 2) ligand exchange under the formation of M(NH(3))(+), and 3) proton transfer to yield NH(4)(+). Computational studies of these three reaction channels have been performed for the couples MH(+)/NH(3) (M=Sc-Zn) to elucidate mechanistic aspects and characteristic reaction patterns of the first row. For N-H activation, σ-bond metathesis was found to be operative.

  5. Selective sorption of alkali-metal cations by carboxylic acid resins containing acyclic or cyclic polyether units

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashita, Takashi; Goo, Mija; Lee, Jong Chan; Kim, Jong Seung; Krzykawski, J.; Bartsch, R.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Novel ion-exchange resins have been prepared by condensation polymerization with formaldehyde in formic acid of three polyether carboxylic acids which possess two benzo group substituents. The selectivities and efficiencies of competitive alkali-metal cation sorption from aqueous solutions by these polyether carboxylic acid resins are strongly influenced by (1) the pH of the aqueous solution, (2) the acyclic or cyclic nature of the polyether unit, and (3) the conformational positioning of the carboxylic acid group in the resins derived from cyclic polyether (crown ether) compounds. Good sorption selectivity for Na{sup +} was observed for dibenzo-16-crown-5 resin 3 in which the pendant carboxylic acid group is oriented over the polyether cavity. Resin 3 was utilized as a stationary phase for selective column concentration of Na{sup +} from dilute aqueous solution.

  6. Inhibitory effect of divalent metal cations on zinc uptake via mouse Zrt-/Irt-like protein 8 (ZIP8).

    PubMed

    Koike, Akihiro; Sou, Jyakusho; Ohishi, Akihiro; Nishida, Kentaro; Nagasawa, Kazuki

    2017-03-15

    There is controversy regarding the substrate specificity of ZIP8, a ZIP isoform, involved in regulation of extra- and intracellular zinc levels. Here, we investigated the inhibitory effects of divalent metal cations on zinc uptake via mouse ZIP8 (mZIP8). mZIP8 cDNA was transfected into HEK293T cells by a lipofection method, and its functional expression was evaluated by immunocytochemistry, Western blotting and (65)Zn ((65)ZnCl2) uptake measurement. Transfection of mZIP8 cDNA into HEK293T cells induced expression of mZIP8 in the cells, and increased zinc uptake. mZIP8-mediated zinc uptake depended on extracellular bicarbonate, and the Michaelis constant for the uptake was estimated to be 8.48±2.46μM. In the inhibition study, iron and cadmium competitively, and cobalt, nickel and copper non-competitively inhibited the mZIP8-mediated zinc uptake, the inhibition constants being calculated to be 3.37, 55.5, 80.6, 198 and 48.3μM, respectively. In contrast, magnesium and manganese at concentrations of up to 1500 and 200μM, respectively, had no inhibitory effect on the zinc uptake via mZIP8. In this study, we reveal that the inhibition profiles of divalent metal cations as to zinc uptake via mZIP8 apparently differ from those for mZIP1, especially in the affinity and inhibition manner of nickel. These findings should contribute to identification of ZIP isoforms involved in total cellular zinc transport. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Type of cell death induced by various metal cations in cultured human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Contreras, René García; Sakagami, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Shimada, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Metal ions are released from casting alloys and cause damage to cell structures and local inflammation. However, the cytotoxic mechanism and the type of cell death induced in human gingival fibroblast (HGF) by contact with dental metals have not been well characterized. Here the cytotoxicity of eight metals against HGF was investigated. Cytoxicity of metals against HGF was in the following order: Ag(NH(3))(2)F (most cytotoxic)>AgCl>CuCl(2)>CuCl, CoCl(2)> NiCl(2)>FeCl(2), FeCl(3) (least cytotoxic). None of the metals showed any apparent hormetic growth stimulation at lower concentrations, except for Ag(NH(3))(2)F at 20 or higher population-doubling level of HGF. The sensitivity of HGF against Ag(NH(3))(2)F was reduced during in vitro aging, similar to previous report with sodium fluoride. Contact with Ag(NH(3))(2)F for only one hour induced irreversible cell death, whereas longer duration of contact with AgCl or CuCl(2) was necessary to induce irreversible cell death. These metals induced neither DNA fragmentation nor caspase-3 activation. Pan-caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK) and autophagy inhibitors (3-methyladenine, bafilomycin) did not apparently affect the cytotoxicity of metals, when corrected for the effect of inhibitor alone on growth. We also found that Ag(NH(3))(2)F induced much higher cytotoxicity than AgCl in mouse osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1, possibly inducing necrosis. These data suggest the importance of cautious application of Ag(NH(3))(2)F to the oral cavity.

  8. [Biological toxicity of heavy metals to Caenorhabditis elegans].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yue-e; Zhang, Nan; Jiang, Yu-xin; Guo, Wei; Li, Chao-pin

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the biological toxicity of heavy metals by using Caenorhabditis elegans. The C. elegans at L4 stage were exposed to CdCl, CrCl3, As2O3, PbCh2, HgCl2 with low concentrations and M9 buffer (the control group) for 72 h, respectively, and the effects of heavy metals with different concentrations on the survival time and reproduction of C. elegans were evaluated. After exposure to 2.5, 10 µmol/L HgCl2 and PbCl2, 10 µmol/L CdCl2, and 50 µmol/L CrCl3 for 72 h, respectively, the life spans and survival curves of the C. elegans were different from those in the control group, the differences were statistically significant (all P < 0.05). After exposure to CdCl2, CrCl3, As2O3, PbCl2 and HgCl2 with the con- centrations of 2.5, 50, 100 µmol/L for 72 h, respectively, the generational time and brood size of C. elegans were all different from those in the control group (all P < 0.01). Among the 5 heavy metals at low concentrations, the reproduction toxicity of Hg was bigger than Pb, Cd, Cr, and the toxicity of As was the weakest. Heavy metal exposure can affect the life span and reproductive toxicity of C. elegans.

  9. Electrophysical methods of separation of metal cations in the moving salts solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gofman, V. N.; Tuksov, I. V.; Timchenko, S. N.; Shamanin, I. V.; Poberezhnikov, A. D.; Kazaryan, M. A.

    2016-07-01

    The results of experiments on the excitation of the phenomenon of selective drift of solvated ions under the influence of an external "asymmetric" electric field to the circulating solution of calcium chloride and magnesium salts in a polar liquid dielectric - water are shown. The purpose of the experiments was to determine the influence of the field frequency and amplitude of the field strength on the excitation phenomenon, and the study of the operating characteristics of the testing apparatus - a dividing cell. The dependences of the separation efficiency of solvated cations from the frequency of the external field and the excitation threshold of the phenomenon from the field strength in the separation cell are defined.

  10. A smart organic gel template as metal cation and inorganic anion sensor.

    PubMed

    Malviya, Novina; Das, Mriganka; Mandal, Poulami; Mukhopadhyay, Suman

    2017-09-20

    A carboxamide based molecule has shown unique gelation property in an aqueous mixture of DMF or DMSO. The gel itself has shown aggregation-induced fluorescence enhanced emission (AIEE), which can be utilized effectively in sensing ferrous and ferric ions as both of them switch off the fluorescence completely. An investigation by IR spectroscopy reveals an enhanced π interaction of nitrile group with the iron center and this could be the possible reason behind the complete quenching of AIEE. This molecule was further investigated for the formation of metallogels for a wide array of cations, which in turn can act in tandem to behave as a dynamic array to detect several anions by either switching off or switching on the emission property of the metallogels.

  11. Equilibrium analysis for heavy metal cation removal using cement kiln dust.

    PubMed

    El Zayat, Mohamed; Elagroudy, Sherien; El Haggar, Salah

    2014-01-01

    Ion exchange, reverse osmosis, and chemical precipitation have been investigated extensively for heavy metal uptake. However, they are deemed too expensive to meet stringent effluent characteristics. In this study, cement kiln dust (CKD) was examined for the removal of target heavy metals. Adsorption studies in completely mixed batch reactors were used to generate equilibrium pH adsorption edges. Studies showed the ability of CKD to remove the target heavy metals in a pH range below that of precipitation after an equilibrium reaction time of 24 h. A surface titration experiment indicated negative surface charge of the CKD at pH below 10, meaning that electrostatic attraction of the divalent metals can occur below the pH required for precipitation. However, surface complexation was also important due to the substantive metal removal. Accordingly, a surface complexation model approach that utilizes an electrostatic term in the double-layer description was used to estimate equilibrium constants for the protolysis interactions of the CKD surface as well as equilibria between background ions and the sorbent surface. It was concluded that the removal strength of adsorption is in the order: Pb > Cu > Cd. The experiments were also supported by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR).

  12. A combined experimental and quantum mechanical investigation on some selected metal complexes of L-serine with first row transition metal cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Shilpi; Das, Gunajyoti; Askari, Hassan

    2015-02-01

    In the current study a joint solvent-free synthetic and computational approach has been adopted to explore the coordination properties of L-serine with the doubly charged cations of nickel, copper and zinc. The reaction products were characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance, EDAX-SEM, TEM, TG/DTA, infrared, electronic absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Quantum chemical calculations, carried out in gas and aqueous phase using the BHandHLYP and MP2 methods in conjunction with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set, provide valuable insights concerning the interaction enthalpies and free energies; vibrational and absorption spectra along with various other molecular and electronic properties of the metal complexes. This study reveals that L-serine binds to the metal ions in a bi-dentate manner through its amino and carboxylate groups exhibiting highest binding affinity towards Cu(II) among the three metal ions considered here. As compared to the MP2 method, the spin-delocalized situations of the open-shell Cu(II) complex of L-serine have been better described at the BHandHLYP level. The physical origin of the molecular interactions of L-serine with the metal ions has also been examined by performing energy decomposition analysis (EDA). Effects of the aqueous environment are evident on the structure and stability of the metal complexes. The vibrational spectroscopic data furnished at MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level, which provide a good account of the structural changes inflicted in the molecular geometry of L-serine as a result of metal coordination, are in better agreement with our experimental observations as compared to those produced at the BHandHLYP/6-311++G(d,p) level.

  13. Bimolecular gas-phase exchange of alkali metals between cationized biomolecules and neutral crown ethers

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, M.; Dearden, D.V.; Hofstadler, S.

    1995-12-31

    Electrospray ionization of polypeptides and nucleic acids often yields ions containing sodium or potassium charge carriers. These alkali adducts are frequently the residue of ionic buffers used to preserve protein conformation in solution or artifacts of a natural matrix such as blood plasma. Measures taken in solution to desalinate these samples are hindered by the desire to maintain native conformation. The authors here show that ion-molecule chemistry is an alternate means of removing alkali metal ions from multiply-charged biomolecules. Ion-molecule reactions of multiply charged polypeptides with crown ethers result in adduction of the crown if protons are the only charge bearing species, or desalting if alkali metals are among the charge carriers. Both product ions, the desalted peptide and the crown/alkali metal complex, are observed in the latter case.

  14. New electrolyte systems for capillary zone electrophoresis of metal cations and non-ionic organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Youchun

    1995-06-19

    Excellent separations of metal ions can be obtained very quickly by capillary electrophoresis provided a weak complexing reagent is incorporated into the electrolyte to alter the effective mobilities of the sample ions. Indirect photometric detection is possible by also adding a UV-sensitive ion to the electrolyte. Separations are described using phthalate, tartrate, lactate or hydroxyisobutyrate as the complexing reagent. A separation of twenty-seven metal ions was achieved in only 6 min using a lactate system. A mechanism for the separation of lanthanides is proposed for the hydroxyisobutyrate system.

  15. Determination of some heavy metal cations in molten snow by transient isotachophoresis/ capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Petr, Jan; Gerstmann, Silke; Frank, Hartmut

    2006-09-01

    Online combination of transient ITP and CZE is employed for the determination of Cd(II), Pb(II), Cu(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II). Acetic acid is used for creating the transient isotachophoretic state. alpha-Hydroxyisobutyric acid and 4-aminopyridine are used as BGEs for the separation and indirect UV detection. At optimum conditions, the method allows to determine the metals at levels of 40-120 microg/L, about 50 times more sensitive than conventional CZE. In combination with a 20-fold evaporative concentration, the method is suitable for environmental monitoring of the heavy metals in snow samples.

  16. Hydrogen storage in a potassium-ion-bound metal-organic framework incorporating crown ether struts as specific cation binding sites.

    PubMed

    Lim, Dae-Woon; Chyun, Seung An; Suh, Myunghyun Paik

    2014-07-21

    To develop a metal-organic framework (MOF) for hydrogen storage, SNU-200 incorporating a 18-crown-6 ether moiety as a specific binding site for selected cations has been synthesized. SNU-200 binds K(+), NH4(+), and methyl viologen (MV(2+)) through single-crystal to single-crystal transformations. It exhibits characteristic gas-sorption properties depending on the bound cation. SNU-200 activated with supercritical CO2 shows a higher isosteric heat (Qst) of H2 adsorption (7.70 kJ mol(-1)) than other zinc-based MOFs. Among the cation inclusions, K(+) is the best for enhancing the isosteric heat of the H2 adsorption (9.92 kJ mol(-1)) as a result of the accessible open metal sites on the K(+) ion. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Effect of metallic cations on the efficiency of DNA amplification. Implications for nucleic acid replication during early stages of life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arribas, María; de Vicente, Aránzazu; Arias, Armando; Lázaro, Ester

    2005-04-01

    The process of catalysis of biochemical reactions has been essential since the first organic molecules appeared on Earth. As the complexity of the ensemble of primitive biomolecules was very low, primitive catalysts had necessarily to be very simple molecules or ions. The evolution of catalysts had to be in parallel with the evolution of the molecular species reacting. An example of this parallel evolution is nucleic acid polymerization. Synthesis of primitive short oligonucleotides could have been catalysed by metal ions either in solution or on the surface of minerals such as montmorillonite clays. Some oligonucleotides could start to function as templates for the synthesis of complementary copies and there is experimental evidence supporting the role also played by metal ions in this process. In later stages of evolution, a group of enzymatic proteins, nucleic acid polymerases, has been selected to catalyse nucleic acid replication. The presence of Mg2+ in the active centre of these enzymes suggests that evolution has preserved some of the primitive catalysts, including them as cofactors of more complex molecules. However, the reasons why Mg2+ was selected among other ions that possibly were present in primitive environments are unknown. In this paper we try to approach this question by analysing the amplification efficiency of the polymerase chain reaction of a DNA fragment in the presence of different metal ions. In some cases the conditions of the reaction have been displaced from optimum (by the presence of nucleotide imbalances and a suboptimal Mg2+concentration). The results obtained permit one to draw interesting conclusions about how some metallic cations can help replication to proceed in conditions of limited substrate availability, a circumstance that could have been frequent at prebiotic stages, when nucleic acid synthesis was dependent on the physico-chemical conditions of the environment.

  18. Crystal phase competition by addition of a second metal cation in solid solution metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Blas, C; Snejko, N; de la Peña-O'Shea, V A; Gallardo, J; Gutiérrez-Puebla, E; Monge, M A; Gándara, F

    2016-03-14

    Herein we report a synthetic study focused on the preparation of solid-solution metal-organic frameworks, MOFs, with the use of two kinds of linkers. In particular, we have explored the system composed by zinc, cobalt, 1,2,4-triazole and 4,4′-hexafluoroisopropylidenebisbenzoic acid (H2hfipbb). During this study, four new MOFs have been isolated, denoted TMPF-88 [M3(hfipbb)2(triazole)2(H2O)], TMPF-90 [M2(triazole)3(OCH2CH3)], TMPF-91 [M2(hfipbb)(triazole)2(H2O)] and TMPF-95 [M5(hfipbb)4(triazole)2(H2O)] (TMPF = transition metal polymeric framework, M = Zn, Co, or mixture of them). The study demonstrates that the addition of a second metal element during the MOF synthesis has a major effect in the formation of new phases, even at very high Zn/Co metal ratios. Furthermore, we show that during the MOF formation reaction, there is a competition among different crystal phases, where kinetically favoured phases of various compositions crystallize in short reaction times, precluding the formation of the pure solid-solution phases of other energetically more stable MOFs.

  19. Ammonium-crown ether supramolecular cation-templated assembly of an unprecedented heterobicluster-metal coordination polymer with enhanced NLO properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinfang; Jia, Ding; Humphrey, Mark G; Meng, Suci; Zaworotko, Michael J; Cifuentes, Marie P; Zhang, Chi

    2016-03-07

    An ammonium-crown ether host-guest supramolecular cation-templated synthetic methodology has been developed to construct a structurally unprecedented heterobicluster-metal coordination polymer (HCM-CP 1) based on tetranuclear clusters [WS4Cu3](+) with different connection environments, pentanuclear clusters [WS4Cu4](2+), and Cu(+) building metal ions. HCM-CP 1 exhibits enhanced NLO properties, which may be ascribed to the incorporation of diverse building cluster components.

  20. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of polysaccharide alginate derived cationic surfactant-metal(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Salah M; Hefni, Hassan H

    2016-01-01

    New natural polysaccharide carbohydrate derivatives of sodium alginate surfactant and its cobalt, copper and zinc complexes were synthesized. Structures of the synthesized compounds are reported using FTIR, (1)H NMR and UV-vis. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) value of the alginate surfactant and its metal complexes in aqueous solution was found out from surface tension measurements. Surface tension data at different temperatures served for the evaluation of the temperature-dependent CMC and the thermodynamics of micellization (ΔGmic, ΔHmic, ΔSmic) and adsorption (ΔGads, ΔGads, ΔSads). The surface activities of the synthesized polymeric surfactant and its metal complexes were influenced by their chemical structures and the type of the transition metals. These compounds were evaluated against Gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus), Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and fungi (Candida albicans and Asperigllus niger). The antibacterial and antifungal screening tests of the alginate surfactant metal complexes have shown good results compared to its precursor alginate surfactant.

  1. Benchmark calculations of metal carbonyl cations: relativistic vs. electron correlation effects.

    PubMed

    Matito, Eduard; Salvador, Pedro; Styszyński, Jacek

    2013-12-14

    In this paper we present benchmark results for isoelectronic metal carbonyl complexes of the groups 11 and 12 of the periodic table. The focus is on the geometry, vibrational frequencies, bond dissociation energy and chemical bonding. The description of these complexes requires a good balance between electron correlation and relativistic effects. Our results demonstrate that the combination of the effective core potential and the MP2 method gives quantitative results for the first- and the second-row transition metal complexes and only qualitative agreement for the third-row complexes. In order to obtain quantitative results for the whole series the use of four-component or X2C methods is mandatory. The fourth-row transition metal carbonyl complexes from groups 11 and 12 have been studied for the first time. The metal-carbon bond strength pattern along the group is shown to be highly dependent on the correct description of the relativistic effects. Finally, the relativistic effects on the bonding are studied by means of electron density difference maps, the analysis of the bond critical points of the electron density and the mechanism for σ-donation and π-backdonation. Our analysis indicates that the fourth-row complexes exhibit a strong covalent character induced by relativistic effects.

  2. Spectrophotometric titration of bimetallic metal cation binding in polyamido(amine) dendrimer templates.

    PubMed

    Marvin, Katherine A; Johnson, Justin A; Rodenbusch, Stacia E; Gong, Lucy; Vanden Bout, David A; Stevenson, Keith J

    2012-06-05

    Spectrophotometric titration and a binding isotherm were used to accurately assess the loading capacity of generation four polyamido(amine) (PAMAM) dendrimer templates with terminal alcohol groups (G4-OH). Preparation of bimetallic G4-OH dendrimer-encapsulated metal nanoclusters (DENs) necessitates knowledge of the precise metal-ion binding capacity. The binding of metal ions such as Pt(2+) and Pd(2+) has proven difficult to assess via UV-vis spectroscopy because the absorbance shifts associated with metal-ion binding within the dendrimer template are masked by the absorbance of the PAMAM dendrimer itself. In contrast, the binding of Cu(2+) to G4-OH PAMAM dendrimer results in a strong, distinct absorption band at 300 nm, making UV-vis spectrophotometric titration with copper straightforward. Here we use copper binding as a means to assess the number of binding sites remaining within the PAMAM G4-OH dendrimer after the complexation of a specified molar excess of Pd(2+) or Pt(2+). In addition, we use a binding isotherm to mathematically estimate the loading capacity of the dendrimer in each case. The loading capacities for M(2+) in the G4-OH dendrimer were found to be ∼16 for copper alone, ∼21 for copper combined with palladium, and ∼25 for copper combined with platinum.

  3. Anion size control of the packing in the metallic versus semiconducting chiral radical cation salts (DM-EDT-TTF)2XF6 (X = P, As, Sb).

    PubMed

    Pop, Flavia; Auban-Senzier, Pascale; Canadell, Enric; Avarvari, Narcis

    2016-10-13

    Control of the structural type in metallic enantiopure and racemic radical cation salts is achieved through hydrogen bonding interactions between the chiral donor DM-EDT-TTF and the XF6 anions (X = P, As, Sb), determined by the anion size and the chiral information.

  4. Control of physicochemical properties and catalytic activity of tris(2,2'-bipyridine)iron(II) encapsulated within the zeolite Y cavity by alkaline earth metal cations.

    PubMed

    Martis, Martin; Mori, Kohsuke; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2014-01-21

    A series of materials containing the tris(2,2'-bipyridine)iron(ii) (Fe(bpy)3(2+)) complex inside zeolite Y cavities with alkaline earth metals (Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+), Ba(2+)) as charge compensating cations have been synthesized via a "ship in the bottle" method. The influence of the alkaline earth metal cations on the physicochemical properties and catalytic activity was investigated. The successful formation of the Fe(bpy)3(2+) complex was verified by XRD, diffuse-reflectance UV-vis spectroscopy, and Fe K-edge XAFS measurements. The BET surface area and the Fe content decreased in the presence of the larger alkaline earth metal, but the intensity of the MLCT adsorption band of Fe(bpy)3(2+) increased with the heavier cation. The electron density of the Fe atoms decreased, and the average interatomic bond distance Fe-N/O and the coordination number increased with the heavier alkaline earth metal cation. The encapsulation of Fe(bpy)3(2+) resulted in the creation of a photocatalytic system able to oxidize styrene to benzaldehyde and styrene oxide under visible light irradiation (λ > 430 nm) in the presence of molecular oxygen.

  5. Promotion of the halide effect in the formation of shaped metal nanocrystals via a hybrid cationic, polymeric stabilizer: Octahedra, cubes, and anisotropic growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneed, Brian T.; Golden, Matthew C.; Liu, Yejing; Lee, Hiang K.; Andoni, Ilektra; Young, Allison P.; McMahon, Greg; Erdman, Natasha; Shibata, Masateru; Ling, Xing Yi; Tsung, Chia-Kuang

    2016-06-01

    To promote the effect of halide ions (Cl-, Br-, and I-) in facet-selective growth of {111} and {100} of shaped metal nanocrystals, we utilize PDADMAC, a hybrid cationic, polymeric stabilizer. SERS and synthesis experiments provide evidence supporting that the higher amount of PDADMA+ at surfaces promotes the local adsorption of halides, allowing the creation of Pd cubes, octahedra, and cuboctopods.

  6. Knockout of multiple arabidopsis Cation/H+ exchangers suggest isoform-specific roles in metal stress response, germinatin and seed mineral nutrition

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cation/H(+) exchangers encoded by CAX genes play an important role in the vacuolar accumulation of metals including Ca(2+) and Mn(2+). Arabidopsis thaliana CAX1 and CAX3 have been previously shown to differ phylogenetically from CAX2 but the physiological roles of these different transporters are st...

  7. Modulation of linoleic acid-binding properties of human serum albumin by divalent metal cations.

    PubMed

    Nemashkalova, Ekaterina L; Permyakov, Eugene A; Permyakov, Sergei E; Litus, Ekaterina A

    2017-03-16

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is an abundant multiligand carrier protein, linked to progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Blood HSA serves as a depot of amyloid β (Aβ) peptide. Aβ peptide-buffering properties of HSA depend on interaction with its ligands. Some of the ligands, namely, linoleic acid (LA), zinc and copper ions are involved into AD progression. To clarify the interplay between LA and metal ion binding to HSA, the dependence of LA binding to HSA on Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) levels and structural consequences of these interactions have been explored. Seven LA molecules are bound per HSA molecule in the absence of the metal ions. Zn(2+) binding to HSA causes a loss of one bound LA molecule, while the other metals studied exert an opposite effect (1-2 extra LA molecules are bound). In most cases, the observed effects are not related to the metal-induced changes in HSA quaternary structure. However, the Zn(2+)-induced decline in LA capacity of HSA could be due to accumulation of multimeric HSA forms. Opposite to Ca(2+)/Mg(2+)-binding, Zn(2+) or Cu(2+) association with HSA induces marked changes in its hydrophobic surface. Overall, the divalent metal ions modulate LA capacity and affinity of HSA to a different extent. LA- and Ca(2+)-binding to HSA synergistically support each other. Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) induce more pronounced changes in hydrophobic surface and quaternary structure of HSA and its LA capacity. A misbalanced metabolism of these ions in AD could modify interactions of HSA with LA, other fatty acids and hydrophobic substances, associated with AD.

  8. The development of a biological interface for transition metal implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melton, Kim R.

    The specific goal of this research was to develop an in vitro model for a root-form endosseous dental implant that contains a periodontal ligament and that is biologically integratable into alveolar bone. This objective was based on the following two hypotheses. (1) The chemical attachment of extracellular matrix proteins to the surface of transition metals increases the number of fibroblast cells attached to the surface of the metal. (2) The chemical attachment of extracellular matrix proteins to the surface of transition metals increases the strength of the fibroblast cell attachment to the surface of the metal. The model needed to have a well-controlled surface that was reproducible. Thus, a layer of Au was deposited over a Ti base, and dithiobis(succinimidylpropionate) (DSP) a chemical containing disulfide groups was adsorbed to the Au. Next, extracellular matrix proteins which are periodontal ligament components were attached to the free end group of the chemical that was adsorbed to the Au. This surface served as an attachment substrate on which additional periodontal ligament components such as fibroblast cells could grow. From this model a new implant interface may be developed. This model was tested using the following polypeptides; collagen type I, collagen type IV, fibronectin, and poly-D-lysine. L929 cells were grown on Ti, Ti + Au, Ti + Au + polypeptide, and Ti + Au + DSP + polypeptide. After 72 hours, the live cells were stained with neutral red. The substrates were then subjected to increasing centrifugal forces. The viable stained cells were fixed onto the substrates and cells were counted. The hypotheses were proven for three polypeptides: fibronectin, collagen type I, and poly-D-lysine. The strongest attachment was found with collagen type I. Collagen type IV did not provide any advantage for attachment over uncoated transition metals.

  9. Alkali Metal Ion Complexes with Phosphates, Nucleotides, Amino Acids, and Related Ligands of Biological Relevance. Their Properties in Solution.

    PubMed

    Crea, Francesco; De Stefano, Concetta; Foti, Claudia; Lando, Gabriele; Milea, Demetrio; Sammartano, Silvio

    2016-01-01

    Alkali metal ions play very important roles in all biological systems, some of them are essential for life. Their concentration depends on several physiological factors and is very variable. For example, sodium concentrations in human fluids vary from quite low (e.g., 8.2 mmol dm(-3) in mature maternal milk) to high values (0.14 mol dm(-3) in blood plasma). While many data on the concentration of Na(+) and K(+) in various fluids are available, the information on other alkali metal cations is scarce. Since many vital functions depend on the network of interactions occurring in various biofluids, this chapter reviews their complex formation with phosphates, nucleotides, amino acids, and related ligands of biological relevance. Literature data on this topic are quite rare if compared to other cations. Generally, the stability of alkali metal ion complexes of organic and inorganic ligands is rather low (usually log K < 2) and depends on the charge of the ligand, owing to the ionic nature of the interactions. At the same time, the size of the cation is an important factor that influences the stability: very often, but not always (e.g., for sulfate), it follows the trend Li(+) > Na(+) > K(+) > Rb(+) > Cs(+). For example, for citrate it is: log K ML = 0.88, 0.80, 0.48, 0.38, and 0.13 at 25 °C and infinite dilution. Some considerations are made on the main aspects related to the difficulties in the determination of weak complexes. The importance of the alkali metal ion complexes was also studied in the light of modelling natural fluids and in the use of these cations as probes for different processes. Some empirical relationships are proposed for the dependence of the stability constants of Na(+) complexes on the ligand charge, as well as for correlations among log K values of NaL, KL or LiL species (L = generic ligand).

  10. Synthesis and chemistry of cationic d{sup 0} metal alkyl complexes. Progress report, July 1988--May 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, R.F.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this project is to develop new types of electrophilic metal alkyl complexes for catalytic C-H activation and olefin polymerization chemistry, and associated fundamental mechanistic studies. We have focused our efforts on four classes of early metal alkyl complexes: (1) cationic group 4 Cp{sub 2}M(R){sup +} complexes (1) which are active species in Cp{sub 2}MX{sub 2}-based Ziegler-Natta olefin polymerization catalyst systems and which catalyze productive C-H activation reactions of heterocycles, (2) neutral (dicarbollide)(Cp*)M(R) complexes (2) which are structurally are electronically very similar to 1, (3) half-sandwich complexes CpM(R){sub 2}(L){sub n}{sup +} which are highly coordinatively and electronically unsaturated, and (4) new group 5 (dicarbollide)(Cp)MR{sub 2} and (dicarbollide){sub 2} MR complexes which are more unsaturated than group 5 Cp{sub 2}M systems due to incorporation of the dicarbollide ligand.

  11. Structural and magnetic characterization of a tetranuclear copper(II) cubane stabilized by intramolecular metal cation-π interactions.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Raffaello; Rivière, Eric; Giorgi, Michel; Jamet, Hélène; Rousselot-Pailley, Pierre; Réglier, Marius; Simaan, A Jalila; Tron, Thierry

    2013-05-20

    A novel tetranuclear copper(II) complex (1) was synthesized from the self-assembly of copper(II) perchlorate and the ligand N-benzyl-1-(2-pyridyl)methaneimine (L(1)). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies revealed that complex 1 consists of a Cu4(OH)4 cubane core, where the four copper(II) centers are linked by μ3-hydroxo bridges. Each copper(II) ion is in a distorted square-pyramidal geometry. X-ray analysis also evidenced an unusual metal cation-π interaction between the copper ions and phenyl substituents of the ligand. Calculations based on the density functional theory method were used to quantify the strength of this metal-π interaction, which appears as an important stabilizing parameter of the cubane core, possibly acting as a driving parameter in the self-aggregation process. In contrast, using the ligand N-phenethyl-1-(2-pyridyl)methaneimine (L(2)), which only differs from L(1) by one methylene group, the same synthetic procedure led to a binuclear bis(μ-hydroxo)copper(II) complex (2) displaying intermolecular π-π interactions or, by a slight variation of the experimental conditions, to a mononuclear complex (3). These complexes were studied by X-ray diffraction techniques. The magnetic properties of complexes 1 and 2 are reported and discussed.

  12. Influence of both cation and alginate nature on the rheological behavior of transition metal alginate gels.

    PubMed

    Agulhon, Pierre; Robitzer, Mike; Habas, Jean-Pierre; Quignard, Françoise

    2014-11-04

    The rheological properties of several ionotropic alginate hydrogels were investigated according to the nature of the divalent cation (Mn(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+)) and the guluronic fraction of the alginate (HG and LG for "high G-content" and "low G-content"). Six hydrogels (Mn-LG, Mn-HG, Co-LG, Co-HG, Cu-LG and Cu-HG) were synthesized and studied by spectromechanical analyses. On one hand, Cu-HG, Cu-LG and Co-HG behaved as viscoelastic solids: the elastic contribution was higher than the dissipative component in all the frequency range studied (G'>G"). No flow zone (G">G') was detected even at very low values of the shearing frequency. On the other, Mn-HG, Mn-LG and Co-LG presented a spectromechanical behavior that resembled that observed classically for entangled polymers. Indeed, at high frequency, these latter materials could be compared to a viscoelastic solid but at low frequency, the flow zone was described and the viscous character became prevalent with finite relaxation time. Very good correlations with the microscopic structurations of the network were evidenced (rubbery vs. flow zone and fibrillar vs. complex morphology respectively).

  13. Ceruloplasmin revisited: structural and functional roles of various metal cation-binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Bento, Isabel; Peixoto, Cristina; Zaitsev, Vjacheslav N.; Lindley, Peter F.

    2007-02-01

    The three-dimensional molecular structure of human serum ceruloplasmin has been reinvestigated using X-ray synchrotron data collected at 100 K from a crystal frozen to liquid-nitrogen temperature. The three-dimensional molecular structure of human serum ceruloplasmin has been reinvestigated using X-ray synchrotron data collected at 100 K from a crystal frozen to liquid-nitrogen temperature. The resulting model, with an increase in resolution from 3.1 to 2.8 Å, gives an overall improvement of the molecular structure, in particular the side chains. In addition, it enables the clear definition of previously unidentified Ca{sup 2+}-binding and Na{sup +}-binding sites. The Ca{sup 2+} cation is located in domain 1 in a configuration very similar to that found in the activated bovine factor Va. The Na{sup +} sites appear to play a structural role in providing rigidity to the three protuberances on the top surface of the molecule. These features probably help to steer substrates towards the mononuclear copper sites prior to their oxidation and to restrict the size of the approaching substrate. The trinuclear copper centre appears to differ from the room-temperature structure in that a dioxygen moiety is bound in a similar way to that found in the endospore coat protein CotA from Bacillus subtilis.

  14. Metal cations for the determination of fluorescent phosphoinositides by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Otieno, Anthony C; Quainoo, Emmanuel W; Mwongela, Simon M

    2008-12-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (PI) and its phosphorylated derivatives known as phosphoinositides (PIPs), are essential regulators of cell signaling and membrane trafficking, cytoskeletal dynamics, and nuclear functions. Disruption of PI metabolism is associated with disorders such as immune dysfunction, cardiovascular disease, and cancer; therefore, there is currently great interest in studying PIPs and their metabolic enzymes. Here, we describe a method for the separation of fluorescent PI and its seven fluorescent phosphorylated derivatives by CE-LIF. The CE method utilizes a Tris buffer and sodium deoxycholate in the presence of 30% 1-propanol and 5% of a dynamic coating reagent, EOTrol low reverse (EOTrol LR). It is simple, fast, highly sensitive, and it offers LODs in the order of 1.5 amol. The effect of cations such as lithium, sodium, potassium, cesium, barium, manganese, zinc, magnesium, calcium, spermine, and gentamicin were evaluated. Calcium and magnesium provided the best selectivity and resolution for the separation of the analytes while magnesium offered the best data reproducibility. The developed CE method would be useful in the studies of enzymatic activity in the PI and PIPs metabolic pathways using CE-based in vitro and CE cell-based assays, and/or for drug screening.

  15. CO Oxidation by Group 3 Metal Monoxide Cations Supported on [Fe(CO)4 ](2).

    PubMed

    Chi, Chaoxian; Qu, Hui; Meng, Luyan; Kong, Fanchen; Luo, Mingbiao; Zhou, Mingfei

    2017-09-10

    Infrared photodissociation spectroscopy of mass-selected heteronuclear cluster anions in the form of OMFe(CO)5(-) (M=Sc, Y, La) indicates that all these anions involve an 18-electron [Fe(CO)4 ](2-) building block that is bonded with the M center through two bridged carbonyl ligands. The OLaFe(CO)5(-) anion is determined to be a CO-tagged complex involving a [Fe(CO)4 ](2-) [LaO](+) anion core. In contrast, the OYFe(CO)5(-) anion is characterized to have a [Fe(CO)4 ](2-) [Y(η(2) -CO2 )](+) structure involving a side-on bonded CO2 ligand. The CO-tagged complex and the [Fe(CO)4 ](2-) [Sc(η(2) -CO2 )](+) isomer co-exist for the OScFe(CO)5(-) anion. These observations indicate that both the ScO(+) and YO(+) cations supported on [Fe(CO)4 ](2-) are able to oxidize CO to CO2 . Theoretical analyses show that [Fe(CO)4 ](2-) coordination significantly weakens the MO(+) bond and decreases the energy gap of the interacting valence orbitals between MO(+) and CO, leading to the CO oxidation reactions being both thermodynamically exothermic and kinetically facile. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Biological metals and metal-targeting compounds in major neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Barnham, Kevin J; Bush, Ashley I

    2014-10-07

    Multiple abnormalities occur in the homeostasis of essential endogenous brain biometals in age-related neurodegenerative disorders, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. As a result, metals both accumulate in microscopic proteinopathies, and can be deficient in cells or cellular compartments. Therefore, bulk measurement of metal content in brain tissue samples reveal only the "tip of the iceberg", with most of the important changes occurring on a microscopic and biochemical level. Each of the major proteins implicated in these disorders interacts with biological transition metals. Tau and the amyloid protein precursor have important roles in normal neuronal iron homeostasis. Changes in metal distribution, cellular deficiencies, or sequestration in proteinopathies all present abnormalities that can be corrected in animal models by small molecules. These biochemical targets are more complex than the simple excess of metals that are targeted by chelators. In this review we illustrate some of the richness in the science that has developed in the study of metals in neurodegeneration, and explore its novel pharmacology.

  17. Optical probes for the detection of protons, and alkali and alkaline earth metal cations.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Graham R C; Sahoo, Suban K; Kamila, Sukanta; Singh, Narinder; Kaur, Navneet; Hyland, Barry W; Callan, John F

    2015-07-07

    Luminescent sensors and switches continue to play a key role in shaping our understanding of key biochemical processes, assist in the diagnosis of disease and contribute to the design of new drugs and therapies. Similarly, their contribution to the environment cannot be understated as they offer a portable means to undertake field testing for hazardous chemicals and pollutants such as heavy metals. From a physiological perspective, the Group I and II metal ions are among the most important in the periodic table with blood plasma levels of H(+), Na(+) and Ca(2+) being indicators of several possible disease states. In this review, we examine the progress that has been made in the development of luminescent probes for Group I and Group II ions as well as protons. The potential applications of these probes and the mechanism involved in controlling their luminescent response upon analyte binding will also be discussed.

  18. 2013 Gordon Research Conference on metals in biology and seminar on bioinorganic chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2013-01-25

    Typical topics for lectures and posters include: biochemical and biophysical characterization of new metal containing proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids, factors, and chelators from all forms of life; synthesis, detailed characterization, and reaction chemistry of biomimetic compounds; novel crystal and solution structures of biological molecules and synthetic metal-chelates; discussions of the roles that metals play in medicine, maintenance of the environment, and biogeochemical processes; metal homeostasis; application of theory and computations to the structure and mechanism of metal-containing biological systems; and novel applications of spectroscopy to metals in biological systems.

  19. Experimental and quantum chemical modeling studies of the interactions of L-phenylalanine with divalent transition metal cations.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Shilpi; Das, Gunajyoti; Askari, Hassan

    2014-09-22

    Encoded by the UUU and UUC codons of the genetic code, L-phenylalanine (LPA) serves as an important precursor for tyrosine and various other compounds that are necessary to support life on earth. Here, we report the synthesis (both in solid and solvent phases) and characterization of the Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+) complexes of LPA by several analytical, spectral, thermal, and electrochemical techniques. The results reveal that the products formed by following the two synthetic approaches are the same, and the metal ions bind to the LPA molecules in a 1:2 molar ratio (M(+2)/LPA). Complementary geometries of the metal complexes are modeled involving the most predominant LPA conformers predicted at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level. The gaseous and aqueous phase interaction enthalpies and free energies; theoretical IR and UV-vis spectra; HOMO-LUMO energy gaps; dipole moments; Wiberg bond indices as well as the partial atomic charges in LPA and its metallic complexes are calculated and evaluated using B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) as the main computational method. This study also incorporates analyses on the efficacy of the DFT-D2 level in describing dispersion contributions, performance of the BHandHLYP functional for the open-shell Cu(2+)-LPA system, and relative metal binding affinities of the singlet versus triplet states of the Ni(2+)-LPA complex. Metal-π interactions established via the aromatic side chain of LPA add to the thermodynamic stability of the complexes, whereas metal coordination induces considerable intrinsic structural rearrangements in the molecular geometry of LPA. The LPA binding affinity order of the three Lewis acids investigated emerges as Cu(2+) > Ni(2+) > Zn(2+), paralleling the Irving-Williams series. The illustrative evidence offered by the present work suggests that the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level in combination with an empirical dispersion-correction term performs well in describing the vibrational frequencies and cation-π interactions, which are

  20. Coordination Chemistry of Alkali and Alkaline-Earth Cations with Macrocyclic Ligands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietrich, Bernard

    1985-01-01

    Discusses: (l) alkali and alkaline-earth cations in biology (considering naturally occurring lonophores, their X-ray structures, and physiochemical studies); (2) synthetic complexing agents for groups IA and IIA; and (3) ion transport across membranes (examining neutral macrobicyclic ligands as metal cation carriers, transport by anionic carriers,…

  1. Coordination Chemistry of Alkali and Alkaline-Earth Cations with Macrocyclic Ligands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietrich, Bernard

    1985-01-01

    Discusses: (l) alkali and alkaline-earth cations in biology (considering naturally occurring lonophores, their X-ray structures, and physiochemical studies); (2) synthetic complexing agents for groups IA and IIA; and (3) ion transport across membranes (examining neutral macrobicyclic ligands as metal cation carriers, transport by anionic carriers,…

  2. Biologically active metal-independent superoxide dismutase mimics

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.B.; Samuni, A.; Krishna, M.C.; DeGraff, W.G.; Ahn, M.S.; Samuni, U.; Russo, A. )

    1990-03-20

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is an enzyme that detoxifies superoxide (O2.-), a potentially toxic oxygen-derived species. Attempts to increase intracellular concentrations of SOD by direct application are complicated because SOD, being a relatively large molecule, does not readily cross cell membranes. We have identified a set of stable nitroxides that possess SOD-like activity, have the advantage of being low molecular weight, membrane permeable, and metal independent, and at pH 7.0 have reaction rate constants with O2.- ranging from 1.1 x 10(3) to 1.3 x 10(6) M-1 s-1. These SOD mimics protect mammalian cells from damage induced by hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, although they exhibit no catalase-like activity. In addition, the nitroxide SOD mimics rapidly oxidize DNA-FeII and thus may interrupt the Fenton reaction and prevent formation of deleterious OH radicals and/or higher oxidation states of metal ions. Whether by SOD-like activity and/or interception of an electron from redox-active metal ions they protect cells from oxidative stress and may have use in basic and applied biological studies.

  3. Biological monitoring of cobalt in hard metal factory workers.

    PubMed

    Princivalle, Andrea; Iavicoli, Ivo; Cerpelloni, Marzia; Franceschi, Antonia; Manno, Maurizio; Perbellini, Luigi

    2017-02-01

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the cobalt (Co) concentrations in urine along 4 months and their relationship with Co concentrations in blood and haemoglobin (adducts) in 34 workers from a hard metal manufacturing plant where metallic Co and Co oxide were used. Furthermore, the excretion kinetics of Co was investigated and the half-lives of Co in blood, plasma and urine were calculated along 18 days of non-exposure in the same workers. Co was analysed, in all biological samples, by ICP/MS. Wide fluctuations in the urinary Co concentration were observed throughout the work shift and during the work week. A highly significant linear correlation was found between Co concentration (geometrical mean) in urine samples provided each Thursday (end shift) during 16 subsequent weeks and levels of Co-haemoglobin adducts or blood Co concentrations at the end of the same period. The Co elimination kinetics in globin calculated along 18 days without Co exposure was slow, being related to the physiological metabolism of haemoglobin, while in blood, plasma and urine Co half-lives were 12.3, 9.1 and 5.3 days, respectively. Co concentrations in haemoglobin or blood are highly related to the geometrical mean concentration of urinary Co when samples are collected weekly for several subsequent weeks. The biological monitoring of occupational exposure to Co in hard metal facilities provides reliable results by using the Co concentrations in haemoglobin or in whole blood. The urinary findings, though, do not show the same reliability because of their wide daily and weekly fluctuations.

  4. Controlling detrimental effects of metal cations in the quantification of energy metabolites via ultrahigh pressure-liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry by employing acetylacetone as a volatile eluent modifier.

    PubMed

    Siegel, David; Permentier, Hjalmar; Bischoff, Rainer

    2013-06-14

    The majority of energy metabolites involved in glycolysis, the citric acid cycle and the phosphate pentose pathway shows a high affinity for metal cations. In this paper, we demonstrate the negative effect of metal cations on the UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of energy metabolites and suggest acetylacetone (acac) as a volatile, metal-chelating eluent modifier with the potential to remediate these negative effects. For the 52 analytes considered, eluent modification with acac led to significant improvements of almost all analytical figures of merit. Using aqueous standards, peak intensities were increased 2.5-fold on average. In biological matrices (yeast, murine tissue), a 5-fold increase was observed, whereas the number of detectable analytes was increased by 26% from 31 to 39 on average. Limits of detection were improved 4-fold on average (equaling two 1:1 dilution steps), with the most significant improvements seen for efficient metal chelators like citrate (256-fold), salicylate or coenzyme A and acetyl-coenzyme A (16-fold each). The beneficial effect of acac resulted mainly from an increase in averaged column efficiency (number of theoretical plates, N) of 57%. To determine the metal species scavenged by acac, we quantified the metal-acetylacetonate complexes in the UHPLC eluent by ESI-MS/MS. Our results indicate that Al(3+) (342±34pM/min leakage into the column effluent) and Fe(3+) (22±1pM/min leakage into the column effluent), presumably due to mild corrosion inside the analytical column, are responsible for the detrimental effects alleviated by acac. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Macroscopic and bulk-controlled elastic modes in an interaction of interstitial alcali metal cations within a face-centered cubic crystalline fullerine

    SciTech Connect

    Tatarenko, V.A.; Tsysman, C.L.; Oltarzhevskaya, Y.T.

    1994-12-31

    The calculations in a majority of previous works for the fulleride (AqC{sub 60}) crystals were performed within the framework of the rigid-lattice model, neglecting the distoration relaxation of the host fullerene (C{sub 60}) crystal caused by the interstitial alkali-metal (A) cations. However, an each cation is a source of a static distoration field, and the resulting field is a superposition of such fields generated by all cations. This is a reason why the host-crystal distortions depend on the A-cations configurations, i.e. on a type of a spatial bulk distribution of interstitial cations. This paper seeks to find a functional relation between the amplitudes of the doping-induced structure-distortion waves and of statistic concentration ones. A semiphenomenological model is constructed here within the scope of statistical-thermodynamic treatment and using the lattice-statistics simulation method. In this model the effects due to the presence of q solute A cations over available interstices (per unit cell) on the statistic inherent reorientation and/or displacements of the solvent molecules from the average-lattice sites as well as on the lattice parameter a of the elastically-anysotropic cubic C{sub 60} crystal are taken into account.

  6. Macroscopic and bulk-controlled elastic modes in an interaction of interstitial alcali metal cations within a face-centered cubic crystalline fullerine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatarenko, Valentine A.; Tsysman, Constantin L.; Oltarzhevskaya, Yelena T.

    1995-01-01

    The calculations in a majority of previous works for the fulleride (AqC-60) crystals were performed within the framework of the rigid-lattice model, neglecting the distortion relaxation of the host fullerene (C-60) crystal caused by the interstitial alkali-metal (A) cations. However, an each cation is a source of a static distortion field, and the resulting field is a superposition of such fields generated by all cations. This is a reason why the host-crystal distortions depend on the A-cations configurations, i.e. on a type of a spatial bulk distribution of interstitial cations. The given paper seeks to find a functional relation between the amplitudes of the doping-induced structure-distortion waves and of static concentration ones. A semiphenomenological model is constructed here within the scope of statistical-thermodynamic treatment and using the lattice-statistics simulation method(*). In this model the effects due to the presence of q solute A cations over available interstices (per unit cell) on the static inherent reorientation and/or displacements of the solvent molecules from the 'average-lattice' sites' as well as on the lattice parameter a of a elastically-anysotropic 'cubic' C-60 crystal are taken into account.

  7. Encapsulation of Biological and Chemical Agents for Plant Nutrition and Protection: Chitosan/Alginate Microcapsules Loaded with Copper Cations and Trichoderma viride.

    PubMed

    Vinceković, Marko; Jalšenjak, Nenad; Topolovec-Pintarić, Snježana; Đermić, Edyta; Bujan, Marija; Jurić, Slaven

    2016-11-02

    Novel chitosan/alginate microcapsules simultaneously loaded with copper cations and Trichoderma viride have been prepared and characterized. Information about the intermolecular interactions between biopolymers and bioactive agents was obtained by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Encapsulation of T. viride spores and the presence of copper cations in the same compartment does not inhibit their activity. Microcapsule loading capacity and efficiency as well as swelling behavior and release depend on both the size of the microcapsule and bioactive agents. The in vitro copper cation release profile was fitted to a Korsmeyer-Peppas empirical model. Fickian diffusion was found to be a rate-controlling mechanism of release from smaller microcapsules, whereas anomalous transport kinetics controlled release from larger microcapsules. The T. viride spore release profile exhibited exponential release over the initial lag time. The results obtained opened perspectives for the future use of chitosan/alginate microcapsules simultaneously loaded with biological and chemical agents in plant nutrition and protection.

  8. Effect of Siloxane Ring Strain and Cation Charge Density on the Formation of Coordinately Unsaturated Metal Sites on Silica: Insights from DFT Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Ujjal; Zhang, Guanghui; Hu, Bo; Hock, Adam S.; Redfern, Paul C.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous silica (SiO2) is commonly used as a support in heterogeneous catalysis. However, due to the structural disorder and temperature induced change of surface morphology, the structures of silica supported metal catalysts are difficult to determine. Most studies are primarily focused on understanding the interactions of different types of surface hydroxyl groups with metal ions. In comparison, the effect of siloxane ring size on the structure of silica supported metal catalysts and how it affects catalytic activity is poorly understood. Here, we have used density functional theory calculations to understand the effect of siloxane ring strain on structure and activity of different monomeric Lewis acid metal sites on silica. In particular, we have found that large siloxane rings favor strong dative bonding interaction between metal ion and surface hydroxyls, leading to the formation of high-coordinate metal sites. In comparison, metal-silanol interaction is weak in small siloxane rings, resulting in low-coordinate metal sites. The physical origin of this size dependence is associated with siloxane ring strain, and, a correlation between metal-silanol interaction energy and ring strain energy has been observed. In addition to ring strain, the strength of the metal-silanol interaction also depends on the positive charge density of the cations. In fact, a correlation also exists between metal-silanol interaction energy and charge density of several first-row transition and post-transition metals. The theoretical results are compared with the EXAFS data of monomeric Zn(II) and Ga(III) ions grafted on silica. The molecular level insights of how metal ion coordination on silica depends on siloxane ring strain and cation charge density will be useful in the synthesis of new catalysts.

  9. Effect of Siloxane Ring Strain and Cation Charge Density on the Formation of Coordinately Unsaturated Metal Sites on Silica: Insights from Density Functional Theory (DFT) Studies

    DOE PAGES

    Das, Ujjal; Zhang, Guanghui; Hu, Bo; ...

    2015-10-28

    Amorphous silica (SiO2) is commonly used as a support in heterogeneous catalysis. However, due to the structural disorder and temperature induced change of surface morphology, the structures of silica supported metal catalysts are difficult to determine. Most studies are primarily focused on understanding the interactions of different types of surface hydroxyl groups with metal ions. In comparison, the effect of siloxane ring size on the structure of silica supported metal catalysts and how it affects catalytic activity is poorly understood. Here, we have used density functional theory calculations to understand the effect of siloxane ring strain on structure and activitymore » of different monomeric Lewis acid metal sites on silica. In particular, we have found that large siloxane rings favor strong dative bonding interaction between metal ion and surface hydroxyls, leading to the formation of high-coordinate metal sites. In comparison, metal-silanol interaction is weak in small siloxane rings, resulting in low-coordinate metal sites. The physical origin of this size dependence is associated with siloxane ring strain, and, a correlation between metal-silanol interaction energy and ring strain energy has been observed. In addition to ring strain, the strength of the metal-silanol interaction also depends on the positive charge density of the cations. In fact, a correlation also exists between metal-silanol interaction energy and charge density of several first-row transition and post-transition metals. The theoretical results are compared with the EXAFS data of monomeric Zn(II) and Ga(III) ions grafted on silica. In conclusion, the molecular level insights of how metal ion coordination on silica depends on siloxane ring strain and cation charge density will be useful in the synthesis of new catalysts.« less

  10. Effect of Siloxane Ring Strain and Cation Charge Density on the Formation of Coordinately Unsaturated Metal Sites on Silica: Insights from Density Functional Theory (DFT) Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Ujjal; Zhang, Guanghui; Hu, Bo; Hock, Adam S.; Redfern, Paul C.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2015-10-28

    Amorphous silica (SiO2) is commonly used as a support in heterogeneous catalysis. However, due to the structural disorder and temperature induced change of surface morphology, the structures of silica supported metal catalysts are difficult to determine. Most studies are primarily focused on understanding the interactions of different types of surface hydroxyl groups with metal ions. In comparison, the effect of siloxane ring size on the structure of silica supported metal catalysts and how it affects catalytic activity is poorly understood. Here, we have used density functional theory calculations to understand the effect of siloxane ring strain on structure and activity of different monomeric Lewis acid metal sites on silica. In particular, we have found that large siloxane rings favor strong dative bonding interaction between metal ion and surface hydroxyls, leading to the formation of high-coordinate metal sites. In comparison, metal-silanol interaction is weak in small siloxane rings, resulting in low-coordinate metal sites. The physical origin of this size dependence is associated with siloxane ring strain, and, a correlation between metal-silanol interaction energy and ring strain energy has been observed. In addition to ring strain, the strength of the metal-silanol interaction also depends on the positive charge density of the cations. In fact, a correlation also exists between metal-silanol interaction energy and charge density of several first-row transition and post-transition metals. The theoretical results are compared with the EXAFS data of monomeric Zn(II) and Ga(III) ions grafted on silica. In conclusion, the molecular level insights of how metal ion coordination on silica depends on siloxane ring strain and cation charge density will be useful in the synthesis of new catalysts.

  11. Strong cation···π interactions promote the capture of metal ions within metal-seamed nanocapsule.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Harshita; Jin, Ping; Teat, Simon J; Barnes, Charles L; Dalgarno, Scott J; Atwood, Jerry L

    2014-12-10

    Thallium ions are transported to the interior of gallium-seamed pyrogallol[4]arene nanocapsules. In comparison to the capture of Cs ions, the extent of which depends on the type and position of the anion employed in the cesium salt, the enhanced strength of Tl···π vs Cs···π interactions facilitates permanent entrapment of Tl(+) ions on the capsule interior. "Stitching-up" the capsule seam with a tertiary metal (Zn, Rb, or K) affords new trimetallic nanocapsules in solid state.

  12. Distinct reaction pathway promoted by non-divalent-metal cations in a tertiary stabilized hammerhead ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Roychowdhury-Saha, Manami; Burke, Donald H.

    2007-01-01

    Divalent ion sensitivity of hammerhead ribozymes is significantly reduced when the RNA structure includes appropriate tertiary stabilization. Therefore, we investigated the activity of the tertiary stabilized “RzB” hammerhead ribozyme in several nondivalent ions. Ribozyme RzB is active in spermidine and Na+ alone, although the cleavage rates are reduced by more than 1,000-fold relative to the rates observed in Mg2+ and in transition metal ions. The trivalent cobalt hexammine (CoHex) ion is often used as an exchange-inert analog of hydrated magnesium ion. Trans-cleavage rates exceeded 8 min−1 in 20 mM CoHex, which promoted cleavage through outersphere interactions. The stimulation of catalysis afforded by the tertiary structural interactions within RzB does not require Mg2+, unlike other extended hammerhead ribozymes. Site-specific interaction with at least one Mg2+ ion is suggested by CoHex competition experiments. In the presence of a constant, low concentration of Mg2+, low concentrations of CoHex decreased the rate by two to three orders of magnitude relative to the rate in Mg2+ alone. Cleavage rates increased as CoHex concentrations were raised further, but the final fraction cleaved was lower than what was observed in CoHex or Mg2+ alone. These observations suggest that Mg2+ and CoHex compete for binding and that they cause misfolded structures when they are together. The results of this study support the existence of an alternate catalytic mechanism used by nondivalent ions (especially CoHex) that is distinct from the one promoted by divalent metal ions, and they imply that divalent metals influence catalysis through a specific nonstructural role. PMID:17456566

  13. FIA potentiometric and solvent extraction studies of alkali metal and alkaline earth cation complexation by bis(tert-butylbenzo)-21-crown-7

    SciTech Connect

    Attiyat, A.S. ); Christian, G.D. ); McDonough, J.A.; Strzelbicka, B.; Goo, M.J.; Yu, Z.Y.; Bartsch, R.A. )

    1993-07-01

    A flow injection analysis study of the potentiometric selectivity of bis[4(5)-tert-butylbenzo]-21-crown-7 (D(tBB)21C7) for cesium over the other alkali metal cations and three alkaline earth cations has been conducted. A PVC matrix membrane containing D(tBB)21C7 as an ionophore was coated on the tip of a silver wire incorporated in a flow cell. No selectivity for cesium over rubidium and only low selectivity over potassium were noted. However, very high selectivities for cesium over sodium, lithium, strontium, calcium, and magnesium were observed. Selectivity of D(tBB)21C7 in the solvent extraction of alkali metal cations was determined by the picrate extraction method. The percent extraction into deuteriochloroform decreased in the order cesium, rubidium > potassium >> sodium >> lithium. Thus good agreement was observed between the responses of D(tBB)21C7 towards alkali metal cations in polymeric membrane electrodes and in solvent extraction. 19 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  14. Hetero-metal cation control of CuO nanostructures and their high catalytic performance for CO oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hongwen; Zhang, Liqiang; Wu, Kewei; Yu, Qing; Chen, Ru; Yang, Hangsheng; Peng, Xinsheng; Ye, Zhizhen

    2012-11-01

    A controllable synthesis of various morphologies of CuO nanostructures with tuning by hetero-metal cations has been developed in aqueous solution at room temperature. The morphologies of CuO can be engineered from nanosheets to nanoparticles with different length ratios of the long axis to the short axis. The formation of many metal-ion complexes plays an important role in slowing the release rate of OH- and affects the reaction kinetics further. We found that the effect of hetero-metal cations on the final morphology of the CuO nanostructures was the same as that of the cooling temperature. A series of temperature-controlled experiments demonstrated this. Furthermore, among all the synthesized CuO nanostructures, the fascinating colloidal mesoporous CuO quasi-monocrystalline nanosheets prepared at 25 °C with a thickness of ca. 10 nm and large specific surface area of 80.32 m2 g-1 is investigated intensively. These CuO nanosheets demonstrate a superior catalytic activity for CO oxidation, with features of high CO conversion efficiency (47.77 mmolCO g-1CuO h-1 at 200 °C), which is close to that reported for previously investigated supported-CuO catalysts, and a low apparent activation energy Ea (53.3 kJ mol-1).A controllable synthesis of various morphologies of CuO nanostructures with tuning by hetero-metal cations has been developed in aqueous solution at room temperature. The morphologies of CuO can be engineered from nanosheets to nanoparticles with different length ratios of the long axis to the short axis. The formation of many metal-ion complexes plays an important role in slowing the release rate of OH- and affects the reaction kinetics further. We found that the effect of hetero-metal cations on the final morphology of the CuO nanostructures was the same as that of the cooling temperature. A series of temperature-controlled experiments demonstrated this. Furthermore, among all the synthesized CuO nanostructures, the fascinating colloidal mesoporous Cu

  15. Effect of the chelation of metal cation on the antioxidant activity of chondroitin sulfates.

    PubMed

    Ajisaka, Katsumi; Oyanagi, Yutaka; Miyazaki, Tatsuo; Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2016-06-01

    The antioxidant potencies of chondroitin sulfates (CSs) from shark cartilage, salmon cartilage, bovine trachea, and porcine intestinal mucosa were compared by three representative methods for the measurement of the antioxidant activity; DPPH radical scavenging activity, superoxide radical scavenging activity, and hydroxyl radical scavenging activity. CSs from salmon cartilage and bovine trachea showed higher potency in comparison with CSs from shark cartilage and porcine intestinal mucosa. Next, CS from salmon cartilage chelating with Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+), or Zn(2+) were prepared, and their antioxidant potencies were compared. CS chelating with Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) ions showed rather decreased DPPH radical scavenging activity in comparison with CS of H(+) form. In contrast, CS chelating with Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) ion showed remarkably enhanced superoxide radical scavenging activity than CS of H(+) or Na(+) form. Moreover, CS chelating with divalent metal ions, Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+), or Zn(2+), showed noticeably higher hydroxyl radical scavenging activity than CS of H(+) or Na(+) form. The present results revealed that the scavenging activities of, at least, superoxide radical and hydroxyl radical were enhanced by the chelation with divalent metal ions.

  16. Responsive metal complexes: a click-based "allosteric scorpionate" complex permits the detection of a biological recognition event by EPR/ENDOR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tamanini, Emiliano; Rigby, Stephen E J; Motevalli, Majid; Todd, Matthew H; Watkinson, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Chemical sensing is a mature field, and many effective sensors for small anions and cations have been devised. Metal complexes have been used widely for this purpose, but there are fewer reports of their use in the detection of organic and biological analytes. To date metal complexes have been used in sensing via the direct displacement of a pre-existing ligand by an analyte, or by an adventitious complementarity between the complex and analyte. These strategies do not permit a general approach to the sensing of biological molecules with metal complexes because of the demands to engineer molecular recognition into the complex architecture. We describe a fundamentally new approach to this field-the "allosteric scorpionate" metal complex. The binding partner of a biological analyte is attached to a scorpionate ligand on a metal complex, remote from the metal centre. Binding of the analyte causes a change in the primary coordination sphere at the metal, thereby revealing the presence of the biological molecule. We show that azamacrocyclic complexes with a triazole scorpion ligand may be easily assembled with the [3+2] Huisgens 'click' cycloaddition. We demonstrate the synthesis of a biotin-functionalised cyclam derivative using this methodology. This, and our previously communicated zinc sensor, are to the best of our knowledge the first examples of a triazole being employed as a scorpion ligand on an azamacrocycle. Coordination by the triazole to the metal is perturbed by the binding of avidin to the pendant ligand. This event can be sensitively detected with EPR spectroscopy, and the details of the coordination change probed with ENDOR spectroscopy, confirming the loss of the axial triazole nitrogen donor upon binding to avidin. This represents the first metal complex where remote, 'allosteric' coordination of an analyte has been shown to cause a change in the primary coordination sphere of the metal. Since the synthesis is modular and straightforward, other

  17. A new series of polyoxometalate compounds built up of paradodecatungstate anions and transition metal/alkaline-earth metal cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ling; Qin, Chao; Wang, Xinlong; Wang, Enbo; Li, Yangguang

    2008-08-01

    Three new extended frameworks based on the paradodecatungstate cluster and transition metals or alkaline-earth metal have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The 2D layered structure of the compound [Na 8(H 2O) 28][Mn(H 2O) 2(H 2W 12O 42)]·4H 2O ( 1) is formed by the interconnection of 1D [Mn(H 2O) 2(H 2W 12O 42)] n8- and [Na 8(H 2O) 28] n8+ chains. In the compound [Zn 5(H 2O) 20(H 2W 12O 42)]·16H 2O ( 2), two neighboring paratungstate ions [H 2W 12O 42)] 10- are linked by [Zn 4(H 2O) 14] 8+ units, leading to the formation of a 2D layer containing rhombic channels. The anion [Sr 2(H 2O) 6(H 2W 12O 42)] 6- of the compound K[Na 5(H 2O) 6][Sr 2(H 2O) 6(H 2W 12O 42)]·18H 2O ( 3) shows a layer-like structure in which paratungstate-B units act as six-dentate ligands coordinating to six Sr 2+ ions through the terminal oxygen atoms. Interestingly, the strong involvement of the potassium and sodium counteractions leads the neighboring layers to tie together generating a 3D network containing two types of channels. Furthermore, compounds 1- 3 give intense blue luminescent emissions in solid state and the magnetic susceptibility of compound 1 has also been studied.

  18. Adsorption properties of cationic rhodamine B dye onto metals chloride-activated castor bean residue carbons.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Lee Lin; Zaini, Muhammad Abbas Ahmad

    2017-02-01

    This work was aimed to evaluate the feasibility of castor bean residue based activated carbons prepared through metals chloride activation. The activated carbons were characterized for textural properties and surface chemistry, and the adsorption data of rhodamine B were established to investigate the removal performance. Zinc chloride-activated carbon with specific surface area of 395 m(2)/g displayed a higher adsorption capacity of 175 mg/g. Magnesium chloride and iron(III) chloride are less toxic and promising agents for composite chemical activation. The adsorption data obeyed Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetics model. The rate-limiting step in the adsorption of rhodamine B is film diffusion. The positive values of enthalpy and entropy indicate that the adsorption is endothermic and spontaneous at high temperature.

  19. Infrared spectroscopy of hydrated alkali metal cations: Evidence of multiple photon absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Jordan P.; Lisy, James M.

    2011-07-01

    Infrared predissociation spectra of M+(H2O)4-7, where M = alkali metal, are presented. Hydrogen bonding O-H stretching features are strongly dependent on which fragmentation channel is monitored. Spectra recorded by monitoring the loss of multiple waters show a preference for one absorption feature in the hydrogen-bonded region centered at ˜3430-3500 cm-1, which is assigned to linear-type hydrogen bonded OH stretches. Cyclic- and bent-type hydrogen bonded OH stretches have diminished photodissociation cross sections in the multiple ligand loss channels. Evidence from Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus-evaporative ensemble calculations and laser fluence dependence experiments indicates that the multiple water loss channels are primarily the result of multiple photon absorption which we propose could be due to multiple, independent oscillators within a cluster ion each absorbing a photon during a single, 10 ns laser pulse.

  20. Current Understanding of the Binding Sites, Capacity, Affinity, and Biological Significance of Metals in Melanin

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Lian; Simon, John D.

    2008-01-01

    Metal chelation is often invoked as one of the main biological functions of melanin. In order to understand the interaction between metals and melanin, extensive studies have been carried out to determine the nature of the metal binding sites, binding capacity and affinity. These data are central to efforts aimed at elucidating the role metal binding plays in determining the physical, structural, biological, and photochemical properties of melanin. This article examines the current state of understanding of this field. PMID:17580858

  1. Operando EPR for Simultaneous Monitoring of Anionic and Cationic Redox Processes in Li-Rich Metal Oxide Cathodes.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingxue; Dalzini, Annalisa; Li, Xiang; Feng, Xuyong; Chien, Po-Hsiu; Song, Likai; Hu, Yan-Yan

    2017-09-07

    Anionic redox chemistry offers a transformative approach for significantly increasing specific energy capacities of cathodes for rechargeable Li-ion batteries. This study employs operando electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to simultaneously monitor the evolution of both transition metal and oxygen redox reactions, as well as their intertwined couplings in Li2MnO3, Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2, and Li1.2Ni0.13Mn0.54Co0.13O2 cathodes. Reversible O(2-)/O2(n-) redox takes place above 3.0 V, which is clearly distinguished from transition metal redox in the operando EPR on Li2MnO3 cathodes. O(2-)/O2(n-) redox is also observed in Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2, and Li1.2Ni0.13Mn0.54Co0.13O2 cathodes, albeit its overlapping potential ranges with Ni redox. This study further reveals the stabilization of the reversible O redox by Mn and e(-) hole delocalization within the Mn-O complex. The interactions within the cation-anion pairs are essential for preventing O2(n-) from recombination into gaseous O2 and prove to activate Mn for its increasing participation in redox reactions. Operando EPR helps to establish a fundamental understanding of reversible anionic redox chemistry. The gained insights will support the search for structural factors that promote desirable O redox reactions.

  2. Infrared consequence spectroscopy of gaseous protonated and metal ion cationized complexes.

    PubMed

    Fridgen, Travis D

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the new and exciting techniques of infrared consequence spectroscopy (sometimes called action spectroscopy) of gaseous ions are reviewed. These techniques include vibrational predissociation spectroscopy and infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy and they typically complement one another in the systems studied and the information gained. In recent years infrared consequence spectroscopy has provided long-awaited direct evidence into the structures of gaseous ions from organometallic species to strong ionic hydrogen bonded structures to large biomolecules. Much is being learned with respect to the structures of ions without their stabilizing solvent which can be used to better understand the effect of solvent on their structures. This review mainly covers the topics with which the author has been directly involved in research: structures of proton-bound dimers, protonated amino acids and DNA bases, amino acid and DNA bases bound to metal ions and, more recently, solvated ionic complexes. It is hoped that this review reveals the impact that infrared consequence spectroscopy has had on the field of gaseous ion chemistry.

  3. CFA-4 - a fluorinated metal-organic framework with exchangeable interchannel cations.

    PubMed

    Fritzsche, J; Grzywa, M; Denysenko, D; Bon, V; Senkovska, I; Kaskel, S; Volkmer, D

    2017-05-23

    The syntheses and crystal structures of the fluorinated linker 1,4-bis(3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrazole-4-yl)benzene (H2-tfpb; 1) and the novel metal-organic framework family M[CFA-4] (Coordination Framework Augsburg University-4), M[Cu5(tfpb)3] (M = Cu(i), K, Cs, Ca(0.5)), are described. The ligand 1 is fully characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence-, NMR-, IR spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. The copper(i)-containing MOF crystallizes in the hexagonal crystal system within the chiral space group P6322 (no. 182) and the unit cell parameters are as follows: a = 23.630(5) Å, c = 41.390(5) Å, V = 20 015(6) Å(3). M[CFA-4] features a porous 3-D structure constructed from pentanuclear copper(i) secondary building units {Cu(pz)6}(-) (pz = pyrazolate). Cu(I)[CFA-4] is fully characterized by synchrotron single crystal X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, variable temperature powder X-ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy, photoluminescence and gas sorption measurements. Moreover, thermal stability and gas sorption properties of K[CFA-4] and Cu(I)[CFA-4] are compared.

  4. An insight into the interaction of L-proline with the transition metal cations Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+): a gas phase theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Khalili, Behzad

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of Fe(2+), Co(2+), and Ni(2+) with L-proline has been studied. Three modes of interaction have been considered: salt bridged (SB), involving binding in a bi-dentate manner through the carboxylate group of L-proline, charge solvated 1 (CS1) involving carbonyl and hydroxyl oxygen, and charge solvated 2 (CS2) involving carbonyl oxygen and the lone pair of the nitrogen atom. All calculations including geometry optimization, metal ion affinities (MIAs), and frequency calculations of the binding structures of Fe(2+), Co(2+), and Ni(2+) to L-proline were calculated using the hybrid density functional theory (DFT-B3LYP) method. All three cations were found to bind preferentially in a zwitterionic (SB) coordination pattern with the metal ion affinity in the order Ni(2+) ˃ Co(2+) ˃ Fe(2+) in all binding forms. The nature of the binding interaction between metal cations and L-proline was found to be mainly electrostatic. Comparison of the infrared vibrations of the C=O, the N-H and the O-H groups of free L-proline with L-proline-M(2+) in both CS1 and CS2 complex structures indicated a considerable shift to lower frequency during complexation. In order to gain more insight into the nature of the interaction of L-proline with group VIIIB metal ions, comparison of the interaction of L-proline with other cations such as (Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Be(2+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+)) was made. Graphical Abstract L-proline with the transition metal cations Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2.)

  5. Alginate and Algal-Based Beads for the Sorption of Metal Cations: Cu(II) and Pb(II)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shengye; Vincent, Thierry; Faur, Catherine; Guibal, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Alginate and algal-biomass (Laminaria digitata) beads were prepared by homogeneous Ca ionotropic gelation. In addition, glutaraldehyde-crosslinked poly (ethyleneimine) (PEI) was incorporated into algal beads. The three sorbents were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX): the sorption occurs in the whole mass of the sorbents. Sorption experiments were conducted to evaluate the impact of pH, sorption isotherms, and uptake kinetics. A special attention was paid to the effect of drying (air-drying vs. freeze-drying) on the mass transfer properties. For alginate, freeze drying is required for maintaining the porosity of the hydrogel, while for algal-based sorbents the swelling of the material minimizes the impact of the drying procedure. The maximum sorption capacities observed from experiments were 415, 296 and 218 mg Pb g−1 and 112, 77 and 67 mg Cu g−1 for alginate, algal and algal/PEI beads respectively. Though the sorption capacities of algal-beads decreased slightly (compared to alginate beads), the greener and cheaper one-pot synthesis of algal beads makes this sorbent more competitive for environmental applications. PEI in algal beads decreases the sorption properties in the case of the sorption of metal cations under selected experimental conditions. PMID:27598128

  6. Interaction of mono- and divalent metallic cations and of indomethacin on the membrane potential of vascular endothelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Northover, B J

    1975-09-01

    1 Endothelial cells depolarized progressively when heated for 5 h at 45 degrees C in the presence of calcium (1 mM), cupric (0.08 mM) or ferrous (0.04mM) ions. In the absence of these ions, heating caused only slight depolarization. Higher concentrations of these ions caused depolarization even at normal body temperature (37 degrees C). 2 Cuprous and potassium ions, although producing depolarization at 37 degrees C, failed to augment the depolarization due to heating to 45 degrees C. 3 Hydrogen peroxide caused depolarization which was potentiated by the presence of calcium, cupric or ferrous ions, but not by the presence of cuprous or potassium ions. 4 Indomethacin (0.25 mM) reduced the depolarization caused by calcium, cupric or ferrous ions at 37 degrees C and also reduced the potentiation of heat-induced and hydrogen peroxide-induced depolarization which these divalent metallic cations produced. However, indomethacin failed to modify the depolarization caused by cuprous or potassium ions.

  7. Reversible, Selective Trapping of Perchlorate from Water in Record Capacity by a Cationic Metal-Organic Framework.

    PubMed

    Colinas, Ian R; Silva, Rachel C; Oliver, Scott R J

    2016-02-16

    We report the capture of ppm-level aqueous perchlorate in record capacity and kinetics via the complete anion exchange of a cationic metal-organic framework. Ambient conditions were used for both the synthesis of silver 4,4'-bipyridine nitrate (SBN) and the exchange, forming silver 4,4'-bipyridine perchlorate (SBP). The exchange was complete within 90 min, and the capacity was 354 mg/g, representing 99% removal. These values are greater than current anion exchangers such as the resins Amberlite IRA-400 (249 mg/g), Purolite A530E (104 mg/g), and layered double hydroxides (28 mg/g). Moreover, unlike resins and layered double hydroxides, SBN is fully reusable and displays 96% regeneration to SBN in nitrate solution, with new crystal formation allowing the indefinite cycling for perchlorate. We show seven cycles as proof of concept. Perchlorate contamination of water represents a serious health threat because it is a thyroid endocrine disruptor. This noncomplexing anionic pollutant is significantly mobile and environmentally persistent. Removal of other anionic pollutants from water such as chromate, pertechnetate, or arsenate may be possible by this methodology.

  8. Studies on crystal structures, optical and electrical properties of viologen cation salts of d10 metal halide anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Haijuan; Li, Yaru; Xu, Manman; Niu, Yunyin; Hou, Hongwei

    2017-04-01

    Construction of viologen cation salts of d10 metal halide anions (inorganic-organic hybrid materials) with semiconducting properties via supramolecular design and aggregate enable the hybrid materials multifunctionality. Our interest focused on the use of the viologen derivatives as the building units because they were redox-active units and more suited to yield new generation of multifunctional networks. In the present investigation, three new inorganic-organic hybrid semiconductors {[bbpyb]·[AgBr3]}n (1) [1, 3-PMBP][Zn2Cl5.1Br0.9] (2) and [1, 3-PMBP][Zn2Br6] (3) (bbpyb = 1,1″-(1,4-butanediyl)bis[4,4‧-bipyridinium]bis[bromide], 1,3-PMBP = 1,1″-[1,3-phenylene-bis(methylene)]bis-4,4‧-bipyridinium-bisbromide) were synthesized. More importantly, great efforts were devoted to investigate their properties, such as optical and electrical properties. 1-3 exhibited photochromism, which can be ascribed to the intermolecular charge transfer to yield radicals. Fabricating the appropriate inorganic and organic units controllably within photosensitive materials at a molecular level is critical for the development of new photochromic inorganic-organic hybrids.

  9. Alginate and Algal-Based Beads for the Sorption of Metal Cations: Cu(II) and Pb(II).

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengye; Vincent, Thierry; Faur, Catherine; Guibal, Eric

    2016-09-01

    Alginate and algal-biomass (Laminaria digitata) beads were prepared by homogeneous Ca ionotropic gelation. In addition, glutaraldehyde-crosslinked poly (ethyleneimine) (PEI) was incorporated into algal beads. The three sorbents were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX): the sorption occurs in the whole mass of the sorbents. Sorption experiments were conducted to evaluate the impact of pH, sorption isotherms, and uptake kinetics. A special attention was paid to the effect of drying (air-drying vs. freeze-drying) on the mass transfer properties. For alginate, freeze drying is required for maintaining the porosity of the hydrogel, while for algal-based sorbents the swelling of the material minimizes the impact of the drying procedure. The maximum sorption capacities observed from experiments were 415, 296 and 218 mg Pb g(-1) and 112, 77 and 67 mg Cu g(-1) for alginate, algal and algal/PEI beads respectively. Though the sorption capacities of algal-beads decreased slightly (compared to alginate beads), the greener and cheaper one-pot synthesis of algal beads makes this sorbent more competitive for environmental applications. PEI in algal beads decreases the sorption properties in the case of the sorption of metal cations under selected experimental conditions.

  10. Novel electrodialysis cation exchange membrane prepared by 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid; heavy metal ions removal.

    PubMed

    Nemati, M; Hosseini, S M; Shabanian, M

    2017-09-05

    In the present work a novel heterogeneous cation exchange membrane (CEM) composed of poly vinyl chloride (PVC) and 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid based hydrogel (AMAH) was prepared. The membranes were fabricated with different fractions of AMAH to optimize the performance in desalination. The hydrogel was characterized by FT-IR to prove the successful synthesis. The membrane properties such as permselectivity, ionic permeability, flux, water content, electrical resistance, morphology, contact angle and dimensional stability were evaluated. Modified membranes showed acceptable dimensional stabilities, more hydrophilic surface, higher water content and porosity. SEM images revealed the formation of a more porous membrane structure. Membrane permselectivity and transport number showed a relatively constant then decreasing trend in Na(+) and Ba(2+) solutions. The experimental results showed that the incorporation of AMAH into the PVC matrix obviously improved ionic permeability and flux of Na (∼9%) and Ba (∼23%). Membrane electrical resistance was declined about 36% by adding AMAH in the membrane structure. Membranes' performance in potassium and heavy metal ions removal showed a remarkable separation capacity of K(+) (99.9%), Pb(2+) (99.9%) and Ni(2+) (96.9%). Membranes showed desirable potential for scaling removal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Gas sorption and transition-metal cation separation with a thienothiophene based zirconium metal-organic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SK, Mostakim; Grzywa, Maciej; Volkmer, Dirk; Biswas, Shyam

    2015-12-01

    The modulated synthesis of the thienothiophene based zirconium metal-organic framework (MOF) material having formula [Zr6O4(OH)4(DMTDC)6]·4.8DMF·10H2O (1) (H2DMTDC=3,4-dimethylthieno[2,3-b]thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid; DMF=N,N'-dimethylformamide) was carried out by heating a mixture of ZrCl4, H2DMTDC linker and benzoic acid (used as a modulator) with a molar ratio of 1:1:30 in DMF at 150 °C for 24 h. Systematic investigations have been performed in order to realize the effect of ZrCl4/benzoic acid molar ratio on the crystallinity of the material. The activation (i.e., the removal of the guest solvent molecules from the pores) of as-synthesized compound was achieved by stirring it with methanol and subsequently heating under vacuum. A combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), thermogravimetric (TG) and elemental analysis was used to examine the phase purity of the as-synthesized and thermally activated 1. The material displays high thermal stability up to 310 °C in an air atmosphere. As revealed from the XRD measurements, the compound retains its crystallinity when treated with water, acetic acid and 1 M HCl solutions. The N2 and CO2 sorption analyses suggest that the material possesses remarkably high microporosity (SBET=1236 m2 g-1; CO2 uptake=3.5 mmol g-1 at 1 bar and 0 °C). The compound also shows selective adsorption behavior for Cu2+ over Co2+ and Ni2+ ions.

  12. Two iron-regulated cation transporters from tomato complement metal uptake-deficient yeast mutants.

    PubMed

    Eckhardt, U; Mas Marques, A; Buckhout, T J

    2001-03-01

    Although iron deficiency poses severe nutritional problems to crop plants, to date iron transporters have only been characterized from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. To extend our molecular knowledge of Fe transport in crop plants, we have isolated two cDNAs (LeIRT1 and LeIRT2) from a library constructed from roots of iron-deficient tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants, using the Arabidopsis iron transporter cDNA, IRTI, as a probe. Their deduced polypeptides display 64% and 62% identical amino acid residues to the IRT1 protein, respectively. Transcript level analyses revealed that both genes were predominantly expressed in roots. Transcription of LeIRT2 was unaffected by the iron status of the plant, while expression of LeIRT1 was strongly enhanced by iron limitation. The growth defect of an iron uptake-deficient yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) mutant was complemented by LeIRT1 and LeIRT2 when ligated to a yeast expression plasmid. Transport assays revealed that iron uptake was restored in the transformed yeast cells. This uptake was temperature-dependent and saturable, and Fe2+ rather than Fe3+ was the preferred substrate. A number of divalent metal ions inhibited Fe2+ uptake when supplied at 100-fold or 10-fold excess. Manganese, zinc and copper uptake-deficient yeast mutants were also rescued by the two tomato cDNAs, suggesting that their gene products have a broad substrate range. The gene structure was determined by polymerase chain reaction experiments and, surprisingly, both genes are arranged in tandem with a tail-to-tail orientation.

  13. Effect of the cationic composition of sorption solution on the quantification of sorption-desorption parameters of heavy metals in soils.

    PubMed

    Sastre, J; Rauret, G; Vidal, M

    2006-03-01

    We obtained the sorption isotherms of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in clay, clay saline and organic soils. The distribution coefficients (K(d)) were determined in 0.02 eq l(-1) CaCl(2) and in a solution that simulated the soil solution cationic composition. The K(d) values greatly varied with the composition of the sorption solution and the initial metal concentration. The sorption experiments were complemented with the quantification of the extractable metal, to estimate the reversibility of metal sorption. The extraction yields depended on the metal-soil combination, and the initial metal concentration, showing no correlation with previous K(d) values. The effect of the solution composition in mobility predictions was estimated through a Retention Factor, defined as the ratio of the K(d) versus the extraction yield. Results showed that risk was over- or underestimated using the CaCl(2) medium in soils with a markedly different soil solution composition.

  14. Conformational effects on cationization of poly(ethylene glycol) by alkali metal ions in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Kayori; Matsuyama, Shigetomo; Saito, Takeshi; Kinugasa, Shinichi; Nagahata, Ritsuko; Kawabata, Shin-Ichirou

    2005-12-01

    Conformational effects of polymer chains on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) were studied by using an equimolar mixture of uniform poly(ethylene glycol)s (PEGs) and by molecular dynamics simulations. Uniform PEGs with degrees of polymerization n = 8-39 were separated from commercial PEG samples by preparative supercritical fluid chromatography. MALDI-TOFMS spectra of an equimolar mixture of the uniform PEGs in aqueous ethanol were measured by adding a mixture of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (as a matrix reagent) and five alkali metal chlorides (LiCl, NaCl, KCl, RbCl, and CsCl). After optimization of the matrix concentration and laser power, five types of adduct cationized by Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, and Cs+ could be identified simultaneously in the same spectrum. In the lower molecular-mass region around 103, the spectral intensity increase rapidly with increasing molecular mass of PEG; this rapid increase in the spectral intensity started at a lower molecular mass for smaller adduct cations. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to calculated the affinity of PEG for the adduct cations. These experimental and simulated results showed that the observed spectral intensities in MALDI-TOFMS were markedly affected by the species of adduct cations and the degree of polymerization of the PEG, and that they were dependent on the stability of the PEG-cation complex.

  15. Synthesis of metal-metal oxide catalysts and electrocatalysts using a metal cation adsorption/reduction and adatom replacement by more noble ones

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Vukmirovic, Miomir; Sasaki, Kotaro

    2010-04-27

    The invention relates to platinum-metal oxide composite particles and their use as electrocatalysts in oxygen-reducing cathodes and fuel cells. The invention particularly relates to methods for preventing the oxidation of the platinum electrocatalyst in the cathodes of fuel cells by use of these platinum-metal oxide composite particles. The invention additionally relates to methods for producing electrical energy by supplying such a fuel cell with an oxidant, such as oxygen, and a fuel source, such as hydrogen. The invention also relates to methods of making the metal-metal oxide composites.

  16. Effects of various halogen anions and cations of alkali metals on energetics of excess charge recombination in stilbene donor-acceptor capped DNA hairpins.

    PubMed

    Voityuk, Alexander A; Siriwong, Khatcharin; Berlin, Yuri A

    2011-09-21

    DNA hairpin conjugates with a stilbenedicarboxamide (Sa) hole donor and a stilbenediether (Sd) hole acceptor are considered as model systems for studying charge recombination (CR) of excess charges in DNA. Using the method of thermodynamic integration, we estimated the relative free energies of this process in hairpins with three adenine:thymine pairs between Sa and Sd surrounded by 1 M aqueous solutions of ionic compounds M(+)Cl(-) (M = Li, Na, K) and Na(+)X(-) (X = F, Cl, Br, I). The values of this quantity were calculated with respect to the free energy for the same hairpin in the 1 M NaCl aqueous solution. Based on the results obtained, we conclude that halogen anions have no significant influence on the rate of the CR reaction. By contrast, cations of other alkali metals can considerably change the potential barrier of the process, thus affecting the reaction rate. Different results obtained for cations and anions were attributed to the fundamental distinction in the electrostatic interactions of M(+) and X(-) species with negatively charged phosphate groups of the hairpin. In addition, our results show that the relative free energy of CR is larger for cations that are able to be closer to Sd and Sa structural units. The latter correlation suggests that the replacement of Na(+) by cations of other alkali metals enables one to change the CR rate modifying it in either direction.

  17. Lanthanide metal-organic frameworks as multifunctional luminescent sensor for detecting cations, anions and organic solvent molecules in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Gao, Wei; Li, Peng; Zhang, Xiu-Mei; Liu, Jie-Ping

    2017-09-01

    A series of water-stable isostructural mono/bimetallic lanthanide metal-organic frameworks (Ln-MOFs) {[Eu5xTb5(1-x)(OH)6(TZI)3(DMA)1.5(H2O)10.5]·DMA·0.5H2O}n (x = 1.0 (1), 0.5 (3), 0.4 (4), 0.3 (5), 0.2 (6), 0.1 (7), 0.05 (8), 0 (2), H3TZI = 5-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)isophthalic acid) were synthesized. These Ln-MOFs exhibit 3D frameworks in which 1D chains based on pentanuclear [Ln5(μ3-OH)6(COO)5]4+ clusters are linked by TZI backbones. The luminescent investigations revealed that compounds 1 and 2 not only exhibit characteristic Eu3+ and Tb3+ emissions in the red and green regions, respectively, but also can sensitively and selectively detect Fe3+ cations, CO32-, PO43-, AsO43- anions and acetone molecules in aqueous solution. In addition, the luminescent colors of the bimetallic (Tb5(1-x):Eu5x) compounds can easily be tuned by doping isostructural Ln- MOFs with Eu3+ and Tb3+ ions. This work presents some good candidate materials for the potential multifunctional sensors. Eight water-stable isostructural 3D Ln-MOFs {[Eu5xTb5(1-x)(OH)6(TZI)3(DMA)1.5(H2O)10.5]·DMA·0.5H2O}n based on pentanuclear clusters were prepared. The Ln-MOFs represented the rapid and drastic emission quenching induced by Fe3+ cations, CO32-, PO43-, AsO43- anions and acetone molecules in aqueous solution. the luminescence colors of the bimetallic (Tb5(1-x):Eu5x) compounds can easily be tuned by doping isostructural Ln-MOFs with Eu3+ and Tb3+ ions.

  18. Structural (XRD) and thermal (DSC, TGA) and BET analysis of materials derived from non-metal cation pentaborate salts.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Michael A; Horton, Peter N; Hursthouse, Michael B; Knox, David A; Timmis, James L

    2010-04-28

    The synthesis, structural characterization (XRD), and thermal properties of nine non-metal cation (NMC) pentaborate anion salts, [NMC][B(5)O(6)(OH)(4)] (1a-1i) is described (NMC = [NH(3)CMe(2)(CH(2)OH)](+) (a), [O(CH(2)CH(2))(2)NH(2)](+) (b), [NH(3)CMe(CH(2)OH)(2)](+) (c), [2-(2-CH(2)CH(2)OH)PyH](+) (d), [(CH(2))(4)NH(CH(2)CH(2)OH)](+) (e), [(CH(2))(5)NH(CH(2)CH(2)OH)](+) (f), [2-MeImid](+) (g), [Me(3)NCMe(2)(CH(2)OH)](+) (h), [O(CH(2)CH(2))(2)NMe(2)](+) (i). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies on all compounds show that they contain isolated pentaborate anions, H-bonded together in a supramolecular array, with the cations occupying the cavities within the network. Compound 1c was obtained as a partial hydrate (0.16H(2)O). TGA and DSC analysis (in air, 25-1000 degrees C) indicate that compounds 1a-1i thermally decompose via a 2 stage process to B(2)O(3). The first stage (<250 degrees C) is dehydration to condensed polymeric pentaborates {approximate composition: [NMC][B(5)O(8)] (2a-2i)}. Five condensed pentaborates (2a-c, 2e, 2g) were synthesised and characterized by powder XRD and BET analysis. These condensed pentaborates were amorphous. The isolated pentaborates intumesced at approximately 600 degrees C (occupying approximately 10 times their original volume), and then contracted back to black glassy B(2)O(3) solids at 1000 degrees C. The intumescent materials (3a), (3b), (3e), (3g), and a final B(2)O(3) sample (4b) were synthesised and isolated and their porosities determined. BET surface area analysis on the isolated pentaborates (1a-c, 1e, 1g), the condensed pentaborates (2a-c, 2e, 2g), intumesced materials (3a, 3b, 3e, 3g), and B(2)O(3) (4b) showed that they were all 'non-porous' (<1.59 m(2) g(-1)).

  19. Synthesis and Ion-Exchange Properties of Graphene Th(IV) Phosphate Composite Cation Exchanger: Its Applications in the Selective Separation of Lead Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Rangreez, Tauseef Ahmad; Asiri, Abdullah M; Alhogbi, Basma G; Naushad, Mu

    2017-07-24

    In this study, graphene Th(IV) phosphate was prepared by sol-gel precipitation method. The ion-exchange behavior of this cation-exchanger was studied by investigating properties like ion-exchange capacity for various metal ions, the effect of eluent concentration, elution behavior, and thermal effect on ion-exchange capacity (IEC). Several physicochemical properties as Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) study, thermal studies, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies were also carried out. The material possessed an IEC of 1.56 meq·dry·g(-1) of the exchanger and was found to be nano-composite. The selectivity studies showed that the material is selective towards Pb(II) ions. The selectivity of this cation-exchanger was demonstrated in the binary separation of Pb(II) ions from mixture with other metal ions. The recovery was found to be both quantitative and reproducible.

  20. The influence of the metal cations and microhydration on the reaction trajectory of the N3 ↔ O2 thymine proton transfer: Quantum mechanical study.

    PubMed

    Šebesta, Filip; Brela, Mateusz Z; Diaz, Silvia; Miranda, Sebastian; Murray, Jane S; Gutiérrez-Oliva, Soledad; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro; Michalak, Artur; Burda, Jaroslav V

    2017-09-18

    This study involves the intramolecular proton transfer (PT) process on a thymine nucleobase between N3 and O2 atoms. We explore a mechanism for the PT assisted by hexacoordinated divalent metals cations, namely Mg(2+) , Zn(2+) , and Hg(2+) . Our results point out that this reaction corresponds to a two-stage process. The first involves the PT from one of the aqua ligands toward O2. The implications of this stage are the formation of a hydroxo anion bound to the metal center and a positively charged thymine. To proceed to the second stage, a structural change is needed to allow the negatively charged hydroxo ligand to abstract the N3 proton, which represents the final product of the PT reaction. In the presence of the selected hexaaqua cations, the activation barrier is at most 8 kcal/mol. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Selective enrichment of sulfides, thiols and methylthiophosphates from water samples on metal-loaded cation-exchange materials for gas chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Beiner, K; Popp, P; Wennrich, R

    2002-08-30

    The suitability of using metal-loaded sorbents for solid-phase extraction to enrich organic sulfur compounds from water samples was studied. To test the retention behavior of a number of sulfides, thiols and methylthiophosphates, a cation-exchanger was loaded with various metal ions. The elution behavior of sulfur compounds was investigated with different solvents. A combination of Pb2+-modified cation-exchanger as sorbent and CS2 (1%, v/v) in toluene proved to be the most suitable approach for the given problem. Using GC with a pulsed flame photometric detector yielded detection limits of between 0.6 and 2.9 microg/l. The results showed good reproducibility with relative standard deviations of 2-11%.

  2. A comparative study of optical absorption and photocatalytic properties of nanocrystalline single-phase anatase and rutile TiO{sub 2} doped with transition metal cations

    SciTech Connect

    Kernazhitsky, L.; Shymanovska, V.; Gavrilko, T.; Naumov, V.; Kshnyakin, V.; Khalyavka, T.

    2013-02-15

    The effect of nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} doping with transition metal cations (Cu{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 3+}, Co{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 3+}) on their optical absorption and photocatalytic properties was investigated. The obtained metal-doped TiO{sub 2} samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. It is shown that doping effect on anatase (A) and rutile (R) properties is quite different, being much stronger and complicated on A than on R. Contrary to doped R, doped A revealed a significant red shift of the absorption edge along with the band gap narrowing. Photocatalytic activity of anatase increases upon doping in the order: AR/Co>R/Cu>R/Fe>R/Cr, indicating the inhibitory effect of impurity cations. This fact correlates with the decrease in the UV absorption of the doped rutile in the region of the Hg-lamp irradiation at 4.88 eV. - Graphical abstract: A red shift of the absorption edge of nanocrystalline single-phase anatase after doping with transition metal cations. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single-phase anatase and rutile powders surface-doped with transition metal cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absorption edge and band gap of rutile do not change with surface doping. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Band gap of surface-doped anatase reduces being the lowest for A/Fe. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The surface-doping improves photocatalytic activity of anatase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The surface-doping inhibits photocatalytic activity of rutile.

  3. Binding selectivity of dibenzo-18-crown-6 for alkali metal cations in aqueous solution: A density functional theory study using a continuum solvation model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dibenzo-18-crown-6 (DB18C6) exhibits the binding selectivity for alkali metal cations in solution phase. In this study, we investigate the main forces that determine the binding selectivity of DB18C6 for the metal cations in aqueous solution using the density functional theory (DFT) and the conductor-like polarizable continuum model (CPCM). Results The bond dissociation free energies (BDFE) of DB18C6 complexes with alkali metal cations (M+-DB18C6, M = Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs) in aqueous solution are calculated at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p)//B3LYP/6-31 + G(d) level using the CPCM. It is found that the theoretical BDFE is the largest for K+-DB18C6 and decreases as the size of the metal cation gets larger or smaller than that of K+, which agrees well with previous experimental results. Conclusion The solvation energy of M+-DB18C6 in aqueous solution plays a key role in determining the binding selectivity of DB18C6. In particular, the non-electrostatic dispersion interaction between the solute and solvent, which depends strongly on the complex structure, is largely responsible for the different solvation energies of M+-DB18C6. This study shows that the implicit solvation model like the CPCM works reasonably well in predicting the binding selectivity of DB18C6 in aqueous solution. PMID:22873431

  4. A binary catalyst system of a cationic Ru-CNC pincer complex with an alkali metal salt for selective hydroboration of carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chee Koon; Wu, Jie; Hor, T S Andy; Luo, He-Kuan

    2016-09-27

    Binary catalyst systems comprising a cationic Ru-CNC pincer complex and an alkali metal salt were developed for selective hydroboration of CO2 utilizing pinacolborane at r.t. and 1 atm CO2, with the combination of [Ru(CNCBn)(CO)2(H)][PF6] and KOCO2(t)Bu producing formoxyborane in 76% yield. A bicyclic catalytic mechanism was proposed and discussed.

  5. Three Alkali-Metal-Gold-Gallium Systems. Ternary Tunnel Structures and Some Problems with Poorly Ordered Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Smetana, Volodymyr; Miller, Gordon J.; Corbett, John D.

    2012-06-27

    Six new intermetallic compounds have been characterized in the alkali metal (A = Na, Rb, Cs)–gold–gallium systems. Three isostructural compounds with the general composition A0.55Au2Ga2, two others of AAu3Ga2 (A = Rb, Cs), and the related Na13Au41.2Ga30.3 were synthesized via typical high-temperature reactions and their crystal structures determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis: Na0.56(9)Au2Ga2 (I, I4/mcm, a = 8.718(1) Å, c = 4.857(1) Å, Z = 4), Rb0.56(1)Au2Ga2 (II, I4/mcm, a = 8.950(1) Å, c = 4.829(1) Å, Z = 4), Cs0.54(2)Au2Ga2 (III, I4/mcm, a = 9.077(1) Å, c = 4.815(1) Å, Z = 4), RbAu3Ga2 (IV, Pnma, a = 13.384(3) Å, b = 5.577(1) Å, c = 7.017(1) Å, Z = 4), CsAu3Ga2 (V, Pnma, a = 13.511(3) Å, b = 5.614(2) Å, c = 7.146(1) Å, Z = 4), Na13Au41.2(1)Ga30.3(1) (VI, P6 mmm, a = 19.550(3) Å, c = 8.990(2) Å, Z = 2). The first three compounds (I–III) are isostructural with tetragonal K0.55Au2Ga2 and likewise contain planar eight-member Au/Ga rings that stack along c to generate tunnels and that contain varying degrees of disordered Na–Cs cations. The cation dispositions are much more clearly and reasonably defined by electron density mapping than through least-squares refinements with conventional anisotropic ellipsoids. Orthorhombic AAu3Ga2 (IV, V) are ordered ternary Rb and Cs derivatives of the SrZn5 type structure, demonstrating structural variability within the AAu3Ga2 family. All attempts to prepare an isotypic “NaAu3Ga2” were not successful, but yielded only a similar composition Na13Au41.2Ga30.3 (NaAu3.17Ga2.33) (VI) in a very different structure with two types of cation sites. Crystal orbital Hamilton population (COHP) analysis obtained from tight-binding electronic structure calculations for idealized I–IV via linear muffin-tin-orbital (LMTO) methods emphasized the major contributions of heteroatomic Au–Ga bonding to the structural stability of these compounds. The relative minima (pseudogaps) in the DOS curves for IV

  6. Variation in whole DNA methylation in red maple (Acer rubrum) populations from a mining region: association with metal contamination and cation exchange capacity (CEC) in podzolic soils.

    PubMed

    Kalubi, K N; Mehes-Smith, M; Spiers, G; Omri, A

    2017-02-15

    Although a number of publications have provided convincing evidence that abiotic stresses such as drought and high salinity are involved in DNA methylation reports on the effects of metal contamination, pH, and cation exchange on DNA modifications are limited. The main objective of the present study is to determine the relationship between metal contamination and Cation exchange capacity (CEC) on whole DNA modifications. Metal analysis confirms that nickel and copper are the main contaminants in sampled sites within the Greater Sudbury Region (Ontario, Canada) and liming has increased soil pH significantly even after 30 years following dolomitic limestone applications. The estimated CEC values varied significantly among sites, ranging between 1.8 and 10.5 cmol(+) kg(-1), with a strong relationship being observed between CEC and pH (r = 0.96**). Cation exchange capacity, significantly lower in highly metal contaminated sites compared to both reference and less contaminated sites, was higher in the higher organic matter limed compared to unlimed sites. There was a significant variation in the level of cytosine methylation among the metal-contaminated sites. Significant and strong negative correlations between [5mdC]/[dG] and bioavailable nickel (r = -0.71**) or copper (r = -0.72**) contents were observed. The analysis of genomic DNA for adenine methylation in this study showed a very low level of [6N-mdA]/dT] in Acer rubrum plants analyzed ranging from 0 to 0.08%. Significant and very strong positive correlation was observed between [6N-mdA]/dT] and soil bioavailable nickel (r = 0.78**) and copper (r = 0.88**) content. This suggests that the increased bioavailable metal levels associated with contamination by nickel and copper particulates are associated with cytosine and adenine methylation.

  7. Study on preferential adsorption of cationic-style heavy metals using amine-functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONPs-NH2) as efficient adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Sen; Liu, Lili; Yang, Yong; Lin, Kuangfei

    2017-06-01

    Amine-functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONPs-NH2) were successfully synthesized via a simple method, which exhibited excellent adsorbents properties for cationic-type heavy metals. The adsorption and desorption performances of Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Pb2+ and Ni2+ were fully investigated in detail and the possible adsorption mechanism was proposed on the basis of various characterizations as well as the adsorption priority. As a result, the MIONPs-NH2 could remove metal cations rapidly depending on the complexation of amino groups on surface and the adsorption was both sensitive to pH and ionic strength. Moreover, the corresponding competitive adsorption processes and desorption experiments indicated that the as-synthesized sample has the strongest affinity and adsorption priority for Pb2+, followed by Cu2+ and Zn2+, and finally by Cd2+and Ni2+. The present study may provide a helpful direction for the application of the MIONPs-NH2 in wastewater treatments involving multiple heavy metal cations.

  8. Evidence for the involvement of more than one metal cation in the Schiff base deprotonation process during the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Corcoran, T.C.; Ismail, K.Z.; El-Sayed, M.A.

    1987-06-01

    The removal of metal cations inhibits the deprotonation process of the protonated Schiff base during the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin. To understand the nature of the involvement of these cations, a spectroscopic and kinetic study was carried out on bacteriorhodopsin samples in which the native Ca/sup 2 +/ and Mg/sup 2 +/ were replaced by Eu/sup 3 +/, a luminescent cation. The decay of Eu/sup 3 +/ emission in bacteriorhodopsin can be fitted to a minimum of three decay components, which are assigned to Eu/sup 3 +/ emission from three different sites. This is supported by the response of the decay components to the presence of /sup 2/H/sub 2/O and to the changes in the Eu/sup 3 +//bR molar ratio. The number of water molecules coordinated to Eu/sup 3 +/ in each site is determined from the change in its emission lifetime when /sup 2/H/sub 2/O replaces H/sub 2/O. Most of the emission originates from two wet sites of low crystal-field symmetry-e.g., surface sites. Protonated Schiff base deprotonation has no discernible effect on the emission decay of protein-bound Eu/sup 3 +/, suggesting an indirect involvement of metal cations in the deprotonation process. Adding Eu/sup 3 +/ to deionized bacteriorhodopsin increases the emission intensity of each Eu/sup 3 +/ site linearly, but the extent of the deprotonation (and color) changes sigmoidally. This suggests that if only the emitting Eu/sup 3 +/ ions cause the deprotonation and bacteriorhodopsin color change, ions in more than one site must be involved-e.g., by inducing protein conformation changes. The latter could allow deprotonation by the interaction between the protonated Schiff base and a positive field of cations either on the surface or within the protein.

  9. Precipitation of Metallic Cations by the Acidic Exopolysaccharides from Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Bradyrhizobium (Chamaecytisus) Strain BGA-1

    PubMed Central

    Corzo, J.; León-Barrios, M.; Hernando-Rico, V.; Gutierrez-Navarro, A. M.

    1994-01-01

    The interaction between the acidic exopolysaccharides produced by two Bradyrhizobium strains and several metal cations has been studied. Aqueous solutions in the millimolar range of Fe3+ but not of Fe2+ precipitated the exopolysaccharides from Bradyrhizobium (Chamaecytisus) strain BGA-1 and, to a lesser extent, Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110. The precipitation was pH dependent, with a maximum around pH 3. The precipitate was redissolved by changing the pH and by Fe3+ reduction or chelation. Deacetylation of B. japonicum polysaccharide increased its precipitation by Fe3+. At pH near neutrality, the polysaccharide from Bradyrhizobium (Chamaecytisus) strain BGA-1 stabilized Fe3+ solutions, despite the insolubility of Fe(OH)3. Aluminum precipitated Bradyrhizobium (Chamaecytisus) polysaccharide but not the polysaccharide produced by B. japonicum. The precipitation showed a maximum at about pH 4.8, and the precipitate was redissolved after Al3+ chelation with EDTA. Precipitation was inhibited by increases in the ionic strength over 10 mM. Bradyrhizobium (Chamaecytisus) polysaccharide was also precipitated by Th4+, Sn2+, Mn2+, and Co2+. The presence of Fe3+ increased the exopolysaccharide precipitation by aluminum. No precipitation, gelation, or increase in turbidity of polysaccharide solutions occurred when K+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Cu2+, Cd2+, Pb2+, Zn2+, Hg2+, or U6+ was added at several pH values. The results suggest that the precipitation is based on the interaction between carboxylate groups from different polysaccharide chains and the partially hydrolyzed aquoions of Fe3+, Al3+, Th4+, and Sn2+. PMID:16349466

  10. Biological and Bioelectrochemical Recovery of Critical and Scarce Metals.

    PubMed

    Nancharaiah, Y V; Mohan, S Venkata; Lens, P N L

    2016-02-01

    Metal-bearing solid and liquid wastes are increasingly considered as secondary sources of critical and scarce metals. Undoubtedly, microorganisms are a cost-effective resource for extracting and concentrating diffuse elements from secondary sources. Microbial biotechnology for extracting base metals from ores and treatment of metal-laden wastewaters has already been applied at full scale. By contrast, microbe-metal interactions in the recovery of scarce metals and a few critical metals have received attention, whereas the recovery of many others has been barely explored. Therefore, this article explores and details the potential application of microbial biotechnologies in the recovery of critical and scarce metals. In the past decade bioelectrochemical systems have emerged as a new technology platform for metal recovery coupled to the removal of organic matter.

  11. Hydration Structures and Thermodynamic Properties of Cationized Biologically Relevant Molecules, M+(Indole)(H2O)n (M = Na, K; n = 3-6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Haochen; Lisy, James

    2015-03-01

    The balance between various noncovalent interactions plays a key role in determining the hydration structures and thermodynamic properties of biologically relevant molecules in biological mediums. Such properties of biologically relevant molecules are closely related to their often unique biological functionalities. The indole moiety is a basic functional group of many important neurotransmitters and hormones and has been used as tractable model for more complex biomolecules. The cationized indole water cluster is a perfect system for the quantitative and systematic study of the competition and cooperation of noncovalent interactions, as electrostatic interactions can be adjusted by introducing different monovalent cations and hydrogen bonding interactions can be adjusted by varying the level of hydration. IRPD spectra with isotopic (H/D) analysis helped unravel the overlapping N-H and O-H stretching modes, a major challenge of earlier studies. Thermodynamic analysis using relative Gibbs free energies, for energy ordering, together with spectral analysis provided unambiguous assignment of spectral features and structural configurations. A systematic hydration model with an in-depth account of noncovalent interactions is presented.

  12. Gas sorption and transition-metal cation separation with a thienothiophene based zirconium metal–organic framework

    SciTech Connect

    SK, Mostakim; Grzywa, Maciej; Volkmer, Dirk; Biswas, Shyam

    2015-12-15

    The modulated synthesis of the thienothiophene based zirconium metal–organic framework (MOF) material having formula [Zr{sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 4}(DMTDC){sub 6}]·4.8DMF·10H{sub 2}O (1) (H{sub 2}DMTDC=3,4-dimethylthieno[2,3-b]thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid; DMF=N,N'-dimethylformamide) was carried out by heating a mixture of ZrCl{sub 4}, H{sub 2}DMTDC linker and benzoic acid (used as a modulator) with a molar ratio of 1:1:30 in DMF at 150 °C for 24 h. Systematic investigations have been performed in order to realize the effect of ZrCl{sub 4}/benzoic acid molar ratio on the crystallinity of the material. The activation (i.e., the removal of the guest solvent molecules from the pores) of as-synthesized compound was achieved by stirring it with methanol and subsequently heating under vacuum. A combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), thermogravimetric (TG) and elemental analysis was used to examine the phase purity of the as-synthesized and thermally activated 1. The material displays high thermal stability up to 310 °C in an air atmosphere. As revealed from the XRD measurements, the compound retains its crystallinity when treated with water, acetic acid and 1 M HCl solutions. The N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} sorption analyses suggest that the material possesses remarkably high microporosity (S{sub BET}=1236 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}; CO{sub 2} uptake=3.5 mmol g{sup −1} at 1 bar and 0 °C). The compound also shows selective adsorption behavior for Cu{sup 2+} over Co{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+} ions. - Graphical abstract: Selective transition-metal cation adsorption by a thienothiophene based zirconium metal–organic framework material. - Highlights: • The modulated synthesis of a thienothiophene based Zr(IV) MOF has been described. • Effect of metal salt/modulator ratio on the crystallinity was thoroughly studied. • The compound showed high thermal and physiochemical stability. • N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} sorption experiments revealed

  13. Influence of amphotericin B on liquid crystal state of the Cholesterol/Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine monolayer in the presence of different metal cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juan; Shi, Rui-Xin; Sun, Run-Guang; Hao, Chang-Chun; Li, Jun-Hua; Lu, Xiao-Long

    2016-09-01

    Amphotericin B is a very effective antifungal drug, but it has an adverse reaction to the membrane of mammals’ cells. The interaction between AmB and cholesterol (Chol) causes the formation of pores on the membrane to destroy its integrity. In particular, AmB has a significant effect on the permeability of membrane for K+ ions. It has been reported that Na+ ions and Ca2+ ions may have some influence on the interaction between amphotericin B and lipid molecules. In this work, the effects of these metal cations on the physical state and intermolecular interaction of the Cholesterol/ Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (Chol/DPPC) monolayer with and without AmB have been investigated. The addition of AmB induces the change of physical state of the lipid monolayer from liquid-gel phase to liquid phase. Different metal cations could influence the phase transition of the AmB-lipid monolayer. The K+ ions and Ca2+ ions make the obvious phase transition disappear. However, the presence of Na+ ions has little influence on the phase transition of the AmB-lipid monolayer. The addition of AmB and the presence of different metal cations weaken the attractive force on the monolayers. After addition of AmB, the force between the molecules is the strongest in the environment of K+ ions, thus is the weakest in the environment of Ca2+ ions, which may be due to the distribution of these metal cations inside and outside of cells. A large number of K+ ions distribute inside of the cells, thus most of Na+ and Ca2+ ions exist out of the cells. Hence, it may be possible that when AmB molecules are out of the cells, the reaction between the drug and lipid molecules is weaker than that inside the cells. These results may have a great reference value for further studying the toxicity mechanism of AmB and the influence of metal cations on the membrane. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21402114 and 11544009), the Natural Science Basic Research Plan

  14. Rational design of biologically important chemosensors: a novel receptor for selective recognition of acetylcholine over ammonium cations.

    PubMed

    Yun, Sunggoo; Kim, Young-Ok; Kim, Dongwook; Kim, Heon Gon; Ihm, Hyejae; Kim, Jung Kyung; Lee, Chi-Wan; Lee, Woo Jin; Yoon, Jungjoo; Oh, Kyung Seok; Yoon, Juyoung; Park, Su-Moon; Kim, Kwang S

    2003-02-20

    [structure: see text] In consideration of competition between cation-pi and hydrogen bond interaction forces, we designed a novel receptor, 1,3,5-tris(pyrrolyl)benzene, which shows high selectivity for acetylcholine (ACh). The selectivity of the receptor for ACh over other ammonium cations is demonstrated by the ion-selective electrode (ISE) method in buffer solution. The binding free energy of the receptor with ACh in chloroform solution is measured to be 3.65 kcal/mol in the presence of chloride anion by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and that in water is estimated to be much greater ( approximately 6 kcal/mol).

  15. Drivers of Tree Species Effects on Phosphorus and Cation Cycling in Plantations at La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, A. E.

    2014-12-01

    Fast-growing trees in secondary forests and plantations in the humid tropics play an important role in the atmospheric CO2 balance owing to their high rates of carbon sequestration. Because plants require nutrients to sustain high CO2 uptake, differences among tree species in traits related to nutrient uptake, retention and recycling could influence ecosystem-scale carbon cycling. A better understanding of the relationships among plant traits, nutrient and carbon cycling will thus improve ecosystem- to global scale modeling of effects of vegetation change on carbon cycling. In an experimental setting in which state factors were similar among four species of tropical trees situated on an Oxisol in replicated, 25-yr-old, mono-dominant plantations, I evaluated various drivers of aboveground storage of phosphorus (P) and cations, measuring nutrient fluxes in litterfall and fine-root growth and storage in biomass and soil to 1-m depth. Because fine roots increase the capacity to scavenge nutrients already on exchange sites within the soil environment, I hypothesized that P and cation uptake would be correlated directly with fine-root growth. The four tree species in this experiment, Hieronyma alchorneoides, Pentaclethra macroloba, Virola koschnyi, and Vochysia guatemalensis differed significantly in net cation uptake over the first 25 years of growth (P = 0.013, Ca; P >0.0001, Mg, Mn, K, Al, Fe, and Sr). For all cations, aboveground tree biomass was highly correlated with fine-root ingrowth length, with P values >0.0001 for all cations except Ca (P = 0.013). In contrast for P, differences among species were only marginally significant (P = 0.062). Similarly, P in aboveground tree biomass was marginally correlated with fine-root ingrowth (P = 0.068). Neither cation nor P uptake was correlated with measures of available P and cations, organic or total P in surface soil. For P, the less significant correlation with fine-root growth suggests that some other mechanism, such

  16. Cationic rare-earth metal trimethylsilylmethyl complexes supported by THF and 12-crown-4 ligands: synthesis and structural characterization.

    PubMed

    Elvidge, Benjamin R; Arndt, Stefan; Zeimentz, Peter M; Spaniol, Thomas P; Okuda, Jun

    2005-09-19

    To expand the limited range of rare-earth metal cationic alkyl complexes known, a series of mono- and dicationic trimethylsilylmethyl complexes supported by THF and 12-crown-4 ligands with [BPh4]-, [BPh3(CH2SiMe3)]-, [B(C6F5)4]-, [B(C6F5)3(CH2SiMe3)]-, and [Al(CH2SiMe3)4]- anions were prepared from corresponding neutral precursors [Ln(CH2SiMe3)3Ln] (Ln = Sc, Y, Lu; L = THF, n = 2 or 3; L = 12-crown-4, n = 1) as solvent-separated ion pairs. The syntheses of the monocationic derivatives [Ln(CH2SiMe3)2(12-crown-4)n(THF)m]+[A]- are all high yielding and proceed rapidly in THF solution at room temperature. A "one pot" procedure using the neutral species directly for the syntheses of a number of lutetium and yttrium dicationic derivatives [Ln(CH2SiMe3)(12-crown-4)n(THF)m]2+[A]-2 with a variety of different anions, a class of compounds previously limited to just a few examples, is presented. When BPh3 is used to generate the ion triple, the presence of 12-crown-4 is required for complete conversion. Addition of a second equiv of 12-crown-4 and a third equiv of [NMe2PhH]+[B(C6F5)4]- abstracts a third alkyl group from [Ln(CH2SiMe3)(12-crown-4)2(THF)x]2+[B(C6F5)4]-2 (Ln = Y, Lu). X-ray crystallography and variable-temperature (VT) NMR spectroscopy reveal a structural diversity within the known series of neutral 12-crown-4 supported tris(trimethylsilylmethyl) complexes [Ln(CH2SiMe3)3(12-crown-4)] (Ln = Sc, Y, Sm, Gd-Lu) in the solid and solution states. The X-ray structure of [Sc(CH2SiMe3)3(12-crown-4)] exhibits incomplete 12-crown-4 coordination. VT NMR spectroscopy indicates fluxional 12-crown-4 coordination on the NMR time scale. X-ray crystallography of only the second structurally characterized dicationic rare-earth metal alkyl complex [Y(CH2SiMe3)(12-crown-4)(THF)3]2+[BPh4]-2 shows exocyclic 12-crown-4 coordination at the 8-coordinate metal center with well separated counteranions. 11B and 19F NMR spectroscopy of all mono- and dicationic rare-earth metal complexes

  17. Influence of pH and metal cations on aggregative growth of non-slime-forming strains of Zoogloea ramigera.

    PubMed

    Angelbeck, D I; Kirsch, E J

    1969-03-01

    Aggregative growth of non-slime-forming strains of Zoogloea ramigera was induced by growing the organisms at a depressed pH. Calcium and magnesium ion was found to reverse aggregative growth of the organisms. Conversely, aggregation was stimulated when the available inorganic cation concentration of the growth medium was lowered by the use of a chelating agent. The aggregative effects of pH depression or cation depletion and the dispersal effects of cation supplementation were observed only during cellular growth. The data suggest that aggregate formation of non-slime-forming strains of Z. ramigera may be related to the calcium or magnesium metabolism of the organisms, or both.

  18. Incorporation of transition metals into Mg-Al layered double hydroxides: Coprecipitation of cations vs. their pre-complexation with an anionic chelator

    SciTech Connect

    Tsyganok, Andrey; Sayari, Abdelhamid . E-mail: Abdel.Sayari@science.uottawa.ca

    2006-06-15

    A comparative study on two different methods for preparing Mg-Al layered double hydroxides (LDH) containing various divalent transition metals M (M=Co, Ni, Cu) has been carried out. The first (conventional) method involved coprecipitation of divalent metals M(II) with Mg(II) and Al(III) cations using carbonate under basic conditions. The second approach was based on the ability of transition metals to form stable anionic chelates with edta{sup 4-} (edta{sup 4-}=ethylenediaminetetraacetate) that were synthesized and further introduced into LDH by coprecipitation with Mg and Al. The synthesized LDHs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) methods, thermogravimetry with mass-selective detection of decomposition products (TG-MSD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy techniques. The results obtained were discussed in terms of efficiency of transition metal incorporation into the LDH structure, thermal stability of materials and the ability of metal chelates to intercalate the interlayer space of Mg-Al LDH. Vibrational spectroscopy studies confirmed that the integrity of the metal chelates was preserved upon incorporation into the LDH. - Graphical abstract: Two ways for introducing transition metals M(II) into Mg-Al layered double hydroxides (MY{sup 2-} denotes the edta chelate of transition metal M(II)).0.

  19. Functional Determinants of Metal Ion Transport and Selectivity in Paralogous Cation Diffusion Facilitator Transporters CzcD and MntE in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Martin, Julia E; Giedroc, David P

    2016-01-19

    Cation diffusion facilitators (CDFs) are a large family of divalent metal transporters that collectively possess broad metal specificity and contribute to intracellular metal homeostasis and virulence in bacterial pathogens. Streptococcus pneumoniae expresses two homologous CDF efflux transporters, MntE and CzcD. Cells lacking mntE or czcD are sensitive to manganese (Mn) or zinc (Zn) toxicity, respectively, and specifically accumulate Mn or Zn, respectively, thus suggesting that MntE selectively transports Mn, while CzcD transports Zn. Here, we probe the origin of this metal specificity using a phenotypic growth analysis of pneumococcal variants. Structural homology to Escherichia coli YiiP predicts that both MntE and CzcD are dimeric and each protomer harbors four pairs of conserved metal-binding sites, termed the A site, the B site, and the C1/C2 binuclear site. We find that single amino acid mutations within both the transmembrane domain A site and the B site in both CDFs result in a cellular metal sensitivity similar to that of the corresponding null mutants. However, multiple mutations in the predicted cytoplasmic C1/C2 cluster of MntE have no impact on cellular Mn resistance, in contrast to the analogous substitutions in CzcD, which do have on impact on cellular Zn resistance. Deletion of the MntE-specific C-terminal tail, present only in Mn-specific bacterial CDFs, resulted in only a modest growth phenotype. Further analysis of MntE-CzcD functional chimeric transporters showed that Asn and Asp in the ND-DD A-site motif of MntE and the most N-terminal His in the HD-HD site A of CzcD (the specified amino acids are underlined) play key roles in transporter metal selectivity. Cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) proteins are divalent metal ion transporters that are conserved in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans and that play important roles in cellular physiology, from metal homeostasis and resistance to type I diabetes in vertebrates. The respiratory

  20. Functional Determinants of Metal Ion Transport and Selectivity in Paralogous Cation Diffusion Facilitator Transporters CzcD and MntE in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Julia E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cation diffusion facilitators (CDFs) are a large family of divalent metal transporters that collectively possess broad metal specificity and contribute to intracellular metal homeostasis and virulence in bacterial pathogens. Streptococcus pneumoniae expresses two homologous CDF efflux transporters, MntE and CzcD. Cells lacking mntE or czcD are sensitive to manganese (Mn) or zinc (Zn) toxicity, respectively, and specifically accumulate Mn or Zn, respectively, thus suggesting that MntE selectively transports Mn, while CzcD transports Zn. Here, we probe the origin of this metal specificity using a phenotypic growth analysis of pneumococcal variants. Structural homology to Escherichia coli YiiP predicts that both MntE and CzcD are dimeric and each protomer harbors four pairs of conserved metal-binding sites, termed the A site, the B site, and the C1/C2 binuclear site. We find that single amino acid mutations within both the transmembrane domain A site and the B site in both CDFs result in a cellular metal sensitivity similar to that of the corresponding null mutants. However, multiple mutations in the predicted cytoplasmic C1/C2 cluster of MntE have no impact on cellular Mn resistance, in contrast to the analogous substitutions in CzcD, which do have on impact on cellular Zn resistance. Deletion of the MntE-specific C-terminal tail, present only in Mn-specific bacterial CDFs, resulted in only a modest growth phenotype. Further analysis of MntE-CzcD functional chimeric transporters showed that Asn and Asp in the ND-DD A-site motif of MntE and the most N-terminal His in the HD-HD site A of CzcD (the specified amino acids are underlined) play key roles in transporter metal selectivity. IMPORTANCE Cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) proteins are divalent metal ion transporters that are conserved in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans and that play important roles in cellular physiology, from metal homeostasis and resistance to type I diabetes in vertebrates

  1. Catalytic oxidation of H2 by N2O in the gas phase: O-atom transport with atomic metal cations.

    PubMed

    Blagojevic, Voislav; Bozović, Andrea; Orlova, Galina; Bohme, Diethard K

    2008-10-16

    Twenty-five atomic cations, M (+), that lie within the thermodynamic window for O-atom transport catalysis of the oxidation of hydrogen by nitrous oxide, have been checked for catalytic activity at room temperature with kinetic measurements using an inductively-coupled plasma/selected-ion flow tube (ICP/SIFT) tandem mass spectrometer. Only 4 of these 25 atomic cations were seen to be catalytic: Fe (+), Os (+), Ir (+), and Pt (+). Two of these, Ir (+) and Pt (+), are efficient catalysts, while Fe (+) and Os (+) are not. Eighteen atomic cations (Cr (+), Mn (+), Co (+), Ni (+), Cu (+), Ge (+), Se (+), Mo (+), Ru (+), Rh (+), Sn (+), Te (+), Re (+), Pb (+), Bi (+), Eu (+), Tm (+), and Yb (+)) react too slowly at room temperature either in their oxidation with N 2O to form MO (+) or in the reduction of MO (+) by H 2. Many of these reactions are known to be spin forbidden and a few actually may lie outside the thermodynamic window. Three alkaline-earth metal monoxide cations, CaO (+), SrO (+), and BaO (+), were observed to favor MOH (+) formation in their reactions with H 2. A potential-energy landscape is computed for the oxidation of H 2 with N 2O catalyzed by Fe (+)( (6)D) that vividly illustrates the operation of an ionic catalyst and qualitatively accounts for the relative inefficiency of this catalyst.

  2. Simultaneous removal of dyes and metal cations using an acid, acid-base and base modified vermiculite as a sustainable and recyclable adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Stawiński, Wojciech; Węgrzyn, Agnieszka; Freitas, Olga; Chmielarz, Lucjan; Mordarski, Grzegorz; Figueiredo, Sónia

    2017-01-15

    The aim of this work was the modification of vermiculite in order to produce a low cost, efficient and sustainable adsorbent for dyes and metals. Three activation methods consisting of acid, base and combined acid/base treatment were applied to improve the of vermiculite's adsorption properties. Adsorbents were tested in single, bi- and tricomponent solutions containing cationic dyes and Cu(2+) cations. The raw material showed low adsorption capacity for dyes and metal. The acid/base treated vermiculite had very good adsorption capacity toward dyes while the maximum adsorption capacity for Cu(2+) did not change comparing to the starting material. The alkaline treated vermiculite was a good adsorbent for metals, while still being able to remove dyes on the level of the not treated material. Moreover, it was shown that the materials may be regenerated and used in several adsorption-desorption cycles. Furthermore, it was possible to separate adsorbed dyes from metals that were desorbed, using as eluents ethanol/NaCl and 0.05M HNO3, respectively. This opens a possibility for sustainable disposal and neutralization of both of the pollutants or for their further applications in other processes.

  3. Cation-water interactions. The M[sup +](H[sub 2]O)[sub n] clusters for alkali metals, M = Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs

    SciTech Connect

    Glendening, E.D.; Feller, D. )

    1995-03-09

    Gas-phase binding energies and enthalpies are reported for small M[sup +](H[sub 2]O)[sub n] clusters consisting of an alkali metal cation (Li[sup +], Na[sup +], K[sup +], Rb[sup +], or Cs[sup +]) with one to six water molecules. Ab initio molecular orbital calculations were performed at the RHF and MP2 levels of theory with split valence basis sets (3-21G, 6-31+G* with effective core potentials for the heavier alkali metals). Comparison with higher level calculations and with experimentally measured bond dissociation energies suggests that the RHF/6-31+G* method provides a reasonable description of cation-water interactions in the smallest (n = 1-3) clusters. Larger clusters, particularly those that involve water-water hydrogen-bonding interactions, require a correlated treatment at the MP2 level. This study serves to calibrate the RHF/6-31+G* and MP2/6-31+G* methods for applications to cation-ligand interactions in more extended systems (e.g., the ion-selective binding of crown ethers and cryptands) for which calculations at higher levels of theory are not currently feasible. 33 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Electrochemical and Fluorescent Ferrocene-Imidazole-Based Dyads as Ion-Pair Receptors for Divalent Metal Cations and Oxoanions.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, María; Espinosa Ferao, Arturo; Tárraga, Alberto; Molina, Pedro

    2015-08-03

    In the tricyclic bis(heteroaryl)substituted ferrocenyl-imidazo-quinoxalines 7 and 8, the presence of redox and fluorescent units at the heteroaromatic core, which can act as a ditopic binding site, made these molecules potential candidates as electro-optical ion-pair recognition receptors. In this context, both molecules behave as ion-pair receptors for cations and anions, which individually had demonstrated their ability to form the corresponding cationic and anionic complexes. These receptors also show an important enhancement of anion binding by co-bound cations, whereas no affinity of the free receptors by the anion is observed. Similarly, receptors 7 and 8 display a dramatic increase in the cation binding by the action of their anionic complexes, while no affinity of the free receptors by the cations was detected. Interestingly, both receptors exhibit a remarkable enhancement of anions and cations binding, although no affinity of the free receptors by the ions is observed. In all cases, the ion-pair formation is detected by a perturbation of the redox potential of the ferrocene moiety and a remarkable enhancement in the emission band.

  5. Ferrocene-based heteroditopic receptors displaying high selectivity toward lead and mercury metal cations through different channels.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, María; Tárraga, Alberto; Molina, Pedro

    2011-02-04

    The synthesis and electrochemical, optical, and ion-sensing properties of ferrocene-imidazophenazine dyads are presented. Dyad 4 behaves as a highly selective chemosensor molecule for Pb(2+) cations in CH(3)-CN/H(2)O (9:1). The emission spectrum (λ(exc) = 317 nm) undergoes an important chelation-enhanced fluorescence effect (CHEF = 47) in the presence of Pb(2+) cations, a new low-energy band appeared at 502 nm, in its UV/vis spectrun, and the oxidation redox peak is anodically shifted (ΔE(1/2) = 230 mV). The presence of Hg(2+) cations also induced a perturbation of the redox potencial although in less extension than those found with Pb(2+) cations. Dyad 7, bearing two fused pyridine rings, has shown its ability for sensing Hg(2+) cations selectively through three channels: electrochemical, optical, and fluorescent; the oxidation redox peak is anodically shifted (ΔE(1/2) = 200 mV), a new low-energy band of the absorption spectrum appeared at 485 nm, and the emission spectrum (λ(exc) = 340 nm) is red-shifted by 32 nm accompanied by a remarkable chelation-enhanced fluorescent effect (CHEF = 165). Linear sweep voltammetry revealed that Cu(2+) cations induced oxidation of the ferrocene unit in both dyads. (1)H NMR studies have been carried out to obtain information about the molecular sites which are involved in the binding process.

  6. Role of sequence in salt-bridge formation for alkali metal cationized GlyArg and ArgGly investigated with IRMPD spectroscopy and theory.

    PubMed

    Prell, James S; Demireva, Maria; Oomens, Jos; Williams, Evan R

    2009-01-28

    The roles of hydrogen bonding, electrostatic interactions, sequence, gas-phase basicity, and molecular geometry in determining the structures of protonated and alkali metal-cationized glycyl-L-arginine (GlyArg) and L-arginylglycine (ArgGly) were investigated using infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy in the spectral range 900-1800 cm(-1) and theory. The IRMPD spectra clearly indicate that GlyArg x M(+), M = Li, Na, and Cs, form similar salt-bridge (SB) structures that do not depend significantly on metal ion size. In striking contrast, ArgGly x Li(+) exists in a charge-solvated (CS) form, whereas ArgGly x M(+), M = K and Cs, form SB structures. SB and CS structures are similarly populated for ArgGly x Na(+). Computed energies of low-energy structures are consistent with these results deduced from the experimental spectra. By comparison to Arg x M(+), GlyArg x M(+) and ArgGly x M(+) have a greater and lesser propensity, respectively, to form SB structures. The greater propensity for GlyArg to adopt SB structures in complexes with smaller metal cations than for ArgGly is due to the ability of alkali metal-cationized GlyArg to adopt a nearly linear arrangement of formal charge sites, a structure unfavorable for ArgGly complexes due to geometric constraints induced by its different amino acid sequence. The amide carbonyl oxygen solvates charge in both the SB and CS form of both dipeptides. ArgGly is calculated to be slightly more basic than GlyArg, indicating that differences in intrinsic basicity do not play a role in the relative SB stabilization of these ions. Loss of a neutral water molecule from complexes in which SB structures are most stable indicates that CS structures are intermediates in the dissociation pathway, but these intermediates do not contribute to the measured IRMPD spectra.

  7. A pH-stat study of the reaction of some transition metal cations with disodium ethylenedinitrilotetraacetate (EDTA) and its analytical application.

    PubMed

    Maccà, Carlo; Soldà, Lidia; Favaro, Gabriella; Pastore, Paolo

    2007-04-30

    The pH-stat titration technique is an autonomous and very powerful tool for performing and monitoring chelatometric titrations of metal cations with great accuracy, poorly known, however, and seldom exploited. Based on measurement of the amount of strong base required to keep the pH of the test solution at a selected value during stepwise known additions of ethylenedinitrilotetraacetate (EDTA), it requires a glass electrode as the only sensor and is easily implemented on potentiometric titrators. It was introduced a quarter of century ago on an empirical basis for a very peculiar purpose (determination of calcium in diary products), but only very recently it was generalised and its fundamentals were thoroughly examined. In this work, pH-static titrations of some transition metal cations of analytical relevance (Co(2+), Cu(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+)) were thoroughly investigated in the acid pH range between 2.3 and 5 or 7 (the highest pH depending on the metal hydroxide or carbonate solubility). The results at higher acidity showed unsuspected properties of such chelation reactions. At moderately acid pH (generally >/=4), indeed, pH-static titrations yield results of high precision and accuracy. On decreasing pH, however, the reaction stoichiomety deviates more and more from the 1:1 ratio between chelating agent and cation, seemingly because of formation of binuclear complexes, an occurrence very seldom mentioned in the current literature. The optimal titration conditions for each metal are defined, and directions for establishing a laboratory protocol for quantitative determinations are given.

  8. Systematically biological prioritizing remediation sites based on datasets of biological investigations and heavy metals in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Chih; Lin, Yu-Pin; Anthony, Johnathen

    2015-04-01

    Heavy metal pollution has adverse effects on not only the focal invertebrate species of this study, such as reduction in pupa weight and increased larval mortality, but also on the higher trophic level organisms which feed on them, either directly or indirectly, through the process of biomagnification. Despite this, few studies regarding remediation prioritization take species distribution or biological conservation priorities into consideration. This study develops a novel approach for delineating sites which are both contaminated by any of 5 readily bioaccumulated heavy metal soil contaminants and are of high ecological importance for the highly mobile, low trophic level focal species. The conservation priority of each site was based on the projected distributions of 6 moth species simulated via the presence-only maximum entropy species distribution model followed by the subsequent application of a systematic conservation tool. In order to increase the number of available samples, we also integrated crowd-sourced data with professionally-collected data via a novel optimization procedure based on a simulated annealing algorithm. This integration procedure was important since while crowd-sourced data can drastically increase the number of data samples available to ecologists, still the quality or reliability of crowd-sourced data can be called into question, adding yet another source of uncertainty in projecting species distributions. The optimization method screens crowd-sourced data in terms of the environmental variables which correspond to professionally-collected data. The sample distribution data was derived from two different sources, including the EnjoyMoths project in Taiwan (crowd-sourced data) and the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) ?eld data (professional data). The distributions of heavy metal concentrations were generated via 1000 iterations of a geostatistical co-simulation approach. The uncertainties in distributions of the heavy

  9. Photochemical reactions of metal nitrosyl complexes. Mechanisms of NO reactions with biologically relevant metal centers

    DOE PAGES

    Ford, Peter C.

    2001-01-01

    Tmore » he discoveries that nitric oxide (a.k.a. nitrogen monoxide) serves important roles in mammalian bioregulation and immunology have stimulated intense interest in the chemistry and biochemistry of NO and derivatives such as metal nitrosyl complexes. Also of interest are strategies to deliver NO to biological targets on demand. One such strategy would be to employ a precursor which displays relatively low thermal reactivity but is photochemically active to release NO.his proposition led us to investigate laser flash and continuous photolysis kinetics of nitrosyl complexes such as the Roussin's iron-sulfur-nitrosyl cluster anions Fe 2 S 2 ( NO ) 4 2 − and Fe 4 S 3 ( NO ) 7 − and several ruthenium salen and porphyrin nitrosyls.hese include studies using metal-nitrosyl photochemistry as a vehicle for delivering NO to hypoxic cell cultures in order to sensitize γ -radiation damage. Also studied were the rates and mechanisms of NO “on” reactions with model water soluble heme compounds, the ferriheme protein met-myoglobin and various ruthenium complexes using ns laser flash photolysis techniques. An overview of these studies is presented.« less

  10. An anionic zeolite-like metal-organic framework (AZMOF) with a Moravia network for organic dye absorption through cation-exchange.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yu; Fan, Cong-Cong; Wei, Yu-Zhen; Du, Jie; Zhu, Hai-Bin; Zhao, Yue

    2016-07-05

    An anionic zeolite-like metal-organic framework (AZMOF) with a twisted partially augmented the net, known as the "Moravia" net, [(CH3)2NH2]6[Sr13(O)3()8(OH)2(H2O)16]·xS (, where S represents non-coordinated solvent molecules, and is the abbreviation of benzo-(1,2;3,4;5,6)-tris-(thiophene-2'-carboxylic acid)), has been solvothermally synthesized and characterized, which possesses an anionic framework and nano-sized sodalite cage. Through cation-exchange, is capable of uptaking large organic cationic dyes including Rhodamine B (RB), Basic Red 2 (BR2), Crystal Violet (CV) and Methylene Blue (MB), amongst which the adsorption capability for RB (up to 545 mg g(-1)), and BR2 (up to 675 mg g(-1)) is the highest for reported absorbants to date.

  11. Spectroscopic study of molecular structure, antioxidant activity and biological effects of metal hydroxyflavonol complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonowicz, Mariola; Regulska, Ewa

    2017-02-01

    Flavonols with varied hydroxyl substitution can act as strong antioxidants. Thanks to their ability to chelate metals as well as to donate hydrogen atoms they have capacity to scavenge free radicals. Their metal complexes are often more active in comparison with free ligands. They exhibit interesting biological properties, e.g. anticancer, antiphlogistic and antibacterial. The relationship between molecular structure and their biological properties was intensively studied using spectroscopic methods (UV-Vis, IR, Raman, NMR, ESI-MS). The aim of this paper is review on spectroscopic analyses of molecular structure and biological activity of hydroxyflavonol metal complexes.

  12. Electrochemical genosensor based on peptide nucleic acid-mediated PCR and asymmetric PCR techniques: Electrostatic interactions with a metal cation.

    PubMed

    Kerman, Kagan; Vestergaard, Mun'delanji; Nagatani, Naoki; Takamura, Yuzuru; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2006-04-01

    The unique structure of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), linking the N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine units that create a neutral backbone, and prevent it from acting as a primer for DNA polymerase, has been utilized in an electrochemical biosensor scheme for simple and sensitive detection of hybridization. When the PNA is targeted against a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) or wild-type site on the gene, PNA-mediated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) clamping method effectively blocks the formation of a PCR product. In our report, PNA probe for PCR clamping was targeted against the wild-type site of alcohol dehydrogenase. The electrostatic interactions between the negatively charged DNA and neutral PNA molecules with redox-active metal cation cobalt(III)hexamine ([Co(NH3)6]3+) were monitored using differential pulse voltammetry. The electrostatic binding of [Co(NH3)6]3+ to DNA provided the basis for the discrimination against PNA/PNA, PNA/DNA, and DNA/DNA hybrid molecules. We have optimized the experimental conditions, such as probe concentration, [Co(NH3)6]3+ concentration, accumulation time for [Co(NH3)6]3+, and target concentration. A new pretreatment method has also been employed to allow fast and simple detection of hybridization reaction between the PCR amplicon and the probe on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) surface. This method was based on the application of a high-temperature treatment (95 degrees C, 5 min), followed by a 1-min incubation in the presence of DNA primers. The excess concentration of DNA primers prevented the rehybridization of the denatured strands, while enabling the target gene sequence to bind with the immobilized probe. Additionally, asymmetric PCR was employed to detect the presence of genetically modified organism in standard Roundup Ready soybean samples. The amplicons of asymmetric PCR, which were predominantly single-stranded DNA as a result of unequal primer concentration, hybridized with the DNA probe on the sensor surface efficiently. The

  13. The electronic structure of vanadium monochloride cation (VCl{sup +}): Tackling the complexities of transition metal species

    SciTech Connect

    DeYonker, Nathan J.; Halfen, DeWayne T.; Ziurys, Lucy M.; Allen, Wesley D.

    2014-11-28

    Six electronic states (X {sup 4}Σ{sup −}, A {sup 4}Π, B {sup 4}Δ, {sup 2}Φ, {sup 2}Δ, {sup 2}Σ{sup +}) of the vanadium monochloride cation (VCl{sup +}) are described using large basis set coupled cluster theory. For the two lowest quartet states (X {sup 4}Σ{sup −} and A {sup 4}Π), a focal point analysis (FPA) approach was used that conjoined a correlation-consistent family of basis sets up to aug-cc-pwCV5Z-DK with high-order coupled cluster theory through pentuple (CCSDTQP) excitations. FPA adiabatic excitation energies (T{sub 0}) and spectroscopic constants (r{sub e}, r{sub 0}, B{sub e}, B{sub 0}, D{sup ¯}{sub e}, H{sub e}, ω{sub e}, v{sub 0}, α{sub e}, ω{sub e}x{sub e}) were extrapolated to the valence complete basis set Douglas-Kroll (DK) aug-cc-pV∞Z-DK CCSDT level of theory, and additional treatments accounted for higher-order valence electron correlation, core correlation, and spin-orbit coupling. Due to the delicate interplay between dynamical and static electronic correlation, single reference coupled cluster theory is able to provide the correct ground electronic state (X {sup 4}Σ{sup −}), while multireference configuration interaction theory cannot. Perturbations from the first- and second-order spin orbit coupling of low-lying states with quartet spin multiplicity reveal an immensely complex rotational spectrum relative to the isovalent species VO, VS, and TiCl. Computational data on the doublet manifold suggest that the lowest-lying doublet state ({sup 2}Γ) has a T{sub e} of ∼11 200 cm{sup −1}. Overall, this study shows that laboratory and theoretical rotational spectroscopists must work more closely in tandem to better understand the bonding and structure of molecules containing transition metals.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of ionic mobility. I. Alkali metal cations in water at 25 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Song Hi; Rasaiah, Jayendran C.

    1994-10-01

    We describe a series of molecular dynamics simulations performed on model cation-water systems at 25 °C representing the behavior of Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, and Cs+ in an electric field of 1.0 V/nm and in its absence. The TIP4P model was used for water and TIPS potentials were adapted for the ion-water interactions. The structure of the surrounding water molecules around the cations was found to be independent of the applied electric field. Some of the dynamic properties, such as the velocity and force autocorrelation functions of the cations, are also field independent. However, the mean-square displacements of the cations, their average drift velocities, and the distances traveled by them are field dependent. The mobilities of the cations calculated directly from the drift velocity or the distance traveled by the ion are in good agreement with each other and they are in satisfactory agreement with the mobilities determined from the mean-square displacement and the velocity autocorrelation function in the absence of the field. They also show the same trends with ionic radii that are observed experimentally; the magnitudes are, however, smaller than the experimental values in real water by almost a factor of 2. It is found that the water molecules in the first solvation shell around the small Li+ ion are stuck to the ion and move with it as an entity for about 190 ps, while the water molecules around the Na+ ion remain for 35 ps, and those around the large cations stay for 8-11 ps before significant exchange with the surroundings occurs. The picture emerging from this analysis is that of a solvated cation whose mobility is determined by its size as well as the static and dynamic properties of its solvation sheath and the surrounding water. The classical solventberg model describes the mobility of Li+ ions in water adequately but not those of the other ions.

  15. [Biological activity of selenorganic compounds at heavy metal salts intoxication].

    PubMed

    Rusetskaya, N Y; Borodulin, V B

    2015-01-01

    Possible mechanisms of the antitoxic action of organoselenium compounds in heavy metal poisoning have been considered. Heavy metal toxicity associated with intensification of free radical oxidation, suppression of the antioxidant system, damage to macromolecules, mitochondria and the genetic material can cause apoptotic cell death or the development of carcinogenesis. Organic selenium compounds are effective antioxidants during heavy metal poisoning; they exhibit higher bioavailability in mammals than inorganic ones and they are able to activate antioxidant defense, bind heavy metal ions and reactive oxygen species formed during metal-induced oxidative stress. One of promising organoselenium compounds is diacetophenonyl selenide (DAPS-25), which is characterized by antioxidant and antitoxic activity, under conditions including heavy metal intoxication.

  16. Interactive influences of bioactive trace metals on biological production in oceanic waters

    SciTech Connect

    Bruland, K.W.; Donat, J.R.; Hutchins, D.A. )

    1991-12-01

    The authors present an overview of the oceanic chemistries of the bioactive trace metals, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn; the authors combine field data with results from laboratory phytoplankton culture-trace metal studies and speculate on the potential influences of these trace metals on oceanic plankton production and species composition. Most field studies have focused on the effects of single metals. However, they propose that synergistic and antagonistic interactions between multiple trace metals could be very important in the oceans. Trace metal antagonisms that may prove particularly important are those between Cu and the potential biolimiting metals Fe, Mn, and Zn. These antagonistic interactions could have the greatest influence on biological productivity in areas of the open ocean isolated from terrestrial inputs, such as the remote high nutrient regions of the Pacific and Antarctic Oceans. The emerging picture of trace metal-biota interactions in these oceanic areas is one in which biology strongly influences distribution and chemical speciation of all these bioactive trace metals. It also seems likely that many of these bioactive trace metals and their speciation may influence levels of primary productivity, species composition, and trophic structure. Future investigations should give more complete consideration to the interactive effects of biologically important trace metals.

  17. Effect of metal cation replacement on the electronic structure of metalorganic halide perovskites: Replacement of lead with alkaline-earth metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazoki, Meysam; Jacobsson, T. Jesper; Hagfeldt, Anders; Boschloo, Gerrit; Edvinsson, Tomas

    2016-04-01

    Organic and inorganic lead halogen perovskites, and in particular, C H3N H3Pb I3 , have during the last years emerged as a class of highly efficient solar cell materials. Herein we introduce metalorganic halogen perovskite materials for energy-relevant applications based on alkaline-earth metals. Based on the classical notion of Goldschmidt's rules and quantum mechanical considerations, the three alkaline-earth metals, Ca, Sr, and Ba, are shown to be able to exchange lead in the perovskite structure. The three alkaline-earth perovskites, C H3N H3Ca I3,C H3N H3Sr I3 , and C H3N H3Ba I3 , as well as the reference compound, C H3N H3Pb I3 , are in this paper investigated with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, which predict these compounds to exist as stable perovskite materials, and their electronic properties are explored. A detailed analysis of the projected molecular orbital density of states and electronic band structure from DFT calculations were used for interpretation of the band-gap variations in these materials and for estimation of the effective masses of the electrons and holes. Neglecting spin-orbit effects, the band gap of MACa I3,MASr I3 , and MABa I3 were estimated to be 2.95, 3.6, and 3.3 eV, respectively, showing the relative change expected for metal cation exchange. The shifts in the conduction band (CB) edges for the alkaline-earth perovskites were quantified using scalar relativistic DFT calculations and tight-binding analysis, and were compared to the situation in the more extensively studied lead halide perovskite, C H3N H3Pb I3 , where the change in the work function of the metal is the single most important factor in tuning the CB edge and band gap. The results show that alkaline-earth-based organometallic perovskites will not work as an efficient light absorber in photovoltaic applications but instead could be applicable as charge-selective contact materials. The rather high CB edge and the wide band gap together with the large

  18. Analysis of inorganic cations in biological samples by the combination of micro-electrodialysis and capillary electrophoresis with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Kubáň, Pavel; Kubáň, Petr; Kiplagat, Isaac K; Boček, Petr

    2011-02-01

    Micro-electrodialysis (μED) and CE were combined for rapid pretreatment and subsequent determination of inorganic cations in biological samples. Combination of μED with CE greatly improved the analytical performance of the latter as the adsorption of high molecular weight compounds present in real samples on the inner capillary wall was eliminated. Fifty microliter of 80-fold diluted human body fluids such as plasma, serum and whole blood was used in the donor compartment of the μED system requiring less than 1 μL of the original body fluid per analysis. Inorganic cations that migrated through a cellulose acetate dialysis membrane with molecular weight cut-off value of 500 Da were collected in the acceptor solution and were then analyzed using CE-C⁴D. Baseline separation of inorganic cations was achieved in a BGE solution consisting of 12.5 mM maleic acid, 15 mM L-arginine and 3 mM 18-crown-6 at pH 5.5. Repeatability of the CE-C⁴D method was better than 0.5% and 2.5% for migration times and peak areas, respectively; limits of detection of all inorganic cations in the presence of 2 mM excess of Na(+) were around 1 μM and calibration curves were linear with correlation coefficients better than 0.998. Repeatability of the sample pretreatment procedure was calculated for six independent electrodialysis runs of artificial and real samples and was better than 11.8%. Recovery values between 96.3 and 110% were achieved for optimized electrodialysis conditions of standard solutions and real samples; lifetime of the dialysis membranes for pretreatment of real samples was estimated to 100 runs. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. NMR Technique for Determining Transition Metal Cation Distribution at Low Concentrations Demonstrated Using Periclase (MgO) and CaO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarty, R. J.; Stebbins, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the distribution of transition metals at or below percent-level concentrations in synthetic minerals using paramagnetic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). In paramagnetic systems, dilute unpaired electron spins can affect the NMR spectra of major mineral components, a phenomenon that is highly sensitive to geometric relationships and bond distance of the paramagnetic and observed atoms. In both 17O and 25Mg or 43Ca spectra of periclase (MgO) and CaO doped with transition metals, we detect paramagnetic shifts and in some cases can assign them to specific bond paths between the observed nuclide and the paramagnetic cation. A binomial distribution model is developed. Comparing computer-simulated spectra to the observed spectra indicates fully random distribution of Ni2+ and Co2+ in MgO but avoidance of neighboring transition metal cations in CaO. Paramagnetic NMR is a promising technique for investigating short range ordering in synthetic and natural minerals, which may prove useful in future minor and trace element studies.

  20. GEMAS: prediction of solid-solution partitioning coefficients (Kd) for cationic metals in soils using mid-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Janik, Leslie J; Forrester, Sean T; Soriano-Disla, José M; Kirby, Jason K; McLaughlin, Michael J; Reimann, Clemens

    2015-02-01

    Partial least squares regression (PLSR) models, using mid-infrared (MIR) diffuse reflectance Fourier-transformed (DRIFT) spectra, were used to predict distribution coefficient (Kd) values for selected added soluble metal cations (Ag(+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Mn(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+), Sn(4+), and Zn(2+)) in 4813 soils of the Geochemical Mapping of Agricultural Soils (GEMAS) program. For the development of the PLSR models, approximately 500 representative soils were selected based on the spectra, and Kd values were determined using a single-point soluble metal or radioactive isotope spike. The optimum models, using a combination of MIR-DRIFT spectra and soil pH, resulted in good predictions for log Kd+1 for Co, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn (R(2) ≥ 0.83) but poor predictions for Ag, Cu, and Sn (R(2)  < 0.50). These models were applied to the prediction of log Kd+1 values in the remaining 4313 unknown soils. The PLSR models provide a rapid and inexpensive tool to assess the mobility and potential availability of selected metallic cations in European soils. Further model development and validation will be needed to enable the prediction of log K(d+1) values in soils worldwide with different soil types and properties not covered in the existing model.

  1. Influence of pH and Metal Cations on Aggregative Growth of Non-Slime-forming Strains of Zoogloea ramigera

    PubMed Central

    Angelbeck, Donald I.; Kirsch, Edwin J.

    1969-01-01

    Aggregative growth of non-slime-forming strains of Zoogloea ramigera was induced by growing the organisms at a depressed pH. Calcium and magnesium ion was found to reverse aggregative growth of the organisms. Conversely, aggregation was stimulated when the available inorganic cation concentration of the growth medium was lowered by the use of a chelating agent. The aggregative effects of pH depression or cation depletion and the dispersal effects of cation supplementation were observed only during cellular growth. The data suggest that aggregate formation of non-slime-forming strains of Z. ramigera may be related to the calcium or magnesium metabolism of the organisms, or both. Images PMID:4976326

  2. Chemical and biological extraction of metals present in E waste: A hybrid technology.

    PubMed

    Pant, Deepak; Joshi, Deepika; Upreti, Manoj K; Kotnala, Ravindra K

    2012-05-01

    Management of metal pollution associated with E-waste is widespread across the globe. Currently used techniques for the extraction of metals from E-waste by using either chemical or biological leaching have their own limitations. Chemical leaching is much rapid and efficient but has its own environmental consequences, even the future prospects of associated nanoremediation are also uncertain. Biological leaching on the other hand is comparatively a cost effective technique but at the same moment it is time consuming and the complete recovery of the metal, alone by biological leaching is not possible in most of the cases. The current review addresses the individual issues related to chemical and biological extraction techniques and proposes a hybrid-methodology which incorporates both, along with safer chemicals and compatible microbes for better and efficient extraction of metals from the E-waste.

  3. Titanates and Titanate-Metal Compounds in Biological Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Wei; Drury, Jeanie L.; Chung, Whasun Oh; Hobbs, David T.; Wataha, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Metal ions are notorious environmental contaminants, some causing toxicity at exquisitely low (ppm-level) concentrations. Yet, the redox properties of metal ions make them attractive candidates for bio-therapeutics. Titanates are insoluble particulate compounds of titanium and oxygen with crystalline surfaces that bind metal ions; these compounds offer a means to scavenge metal ions in environmental contexts or deliver them in therapeutic contexts while limiting systemic exposure and toxicity. In either application, the toxicological properties of titanates are crucial. To date, the accurate measurement of the in vitro toxicity of titanates has been complicated by their particulate nature, which interferes with many assays that are optical density (OD)-dependent, and at present, little to no in vivo titanate toxicity data exist. Compatibility data garnered thus far for native titanates in vitro are inconsistent and lacking in mechanistic understanding. These data suggest that native titanates have little toxicity toward several oral and skin bacteria species, but do suppress mammalian cell metabolism in a cells-pecific manner. Titanate compounds bind several types of metal ions, including some common environmental toxins, and enhance delivery to bacteria or cells. Substantial work remains to address the practical applicability of titanates. Nevertheless, titanates have promise to serve as novel vehicles for metal-based therapeutics or as a new class of metal scavengers for environmental applications. PMID:26430701

  4. The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in the Biological Activities of Metallic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Abdal Dayem, Ahmed; Hossain, Mohammed Kawser; Lee, Soo Bin; Kim, Kyeongseok; Saha, Subbroto Kumar; Yang, Gwang-Mo; Choi, Hye Yeon; Cho, Ssang-Goo

    2017-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) possess unique physical and chemical properties that make them appropriate for various applications. The structural alteration of metallic NPs leads to different biological functions, specifically resulting in different potentials for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The amount of ROS produced by metallic NPs correlates with particle size, shape, surface area, and chemistry. ROS possess multiple functions in cellular biology, with ROS generation a key factor in metallic NP-induced toxicity, as well as modulation of cellular signaling involved in cell death, proliferation, and differentiation. In this review, we briefly explained NP classes and their biomedical applications and describe the sources and roles of ROS in NP-related biological functions in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we also described the roles of metal NP-induced ROS generation in stem cell biology. Although the roles of ROS in metallic NP-related biological functions requires further investigation, modulation and characterization of metallic NP-induced ROS production are promising in the application of metallic NPs in the areas of regenerative medicine and medical devices. PMID:28075405

  5. The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in the Biological Activities of Metallic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Abdal Dayem, Ahmed; Hossain, Mohammed Kawser; Lee, Soo Bin; Kim, Kyeongseok; Saha, Subbroto Kumar; Yang, Gwang-Mo; Choi, Hye Yeon; Cho, Ssang-Goo

    2017-01-10

    Nanoparticles (NPs) possess unique physical and chemical properties that make them appropriate for various applications. The structural alteration of metallic NPs leads to different biological functions, specifically resulting in different potentials for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The amount of ROS produced by metallic NPs correlates with particle size, shape, surface area, and chemistry. ROS possess multiple functions in cellular biology, with ROS generation a key factor in metallic NP-induced toxicity, as well as modulation of cellular signaling involved in cell death, proliferation, and differentiation. In this review, we briefly explained NP classes and their biomedical applications and describe the sources and roles of ROS in NP-related biological functions in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we also described the roles of metal NP-induced ROS generation in stem cell biology. Although the roles of ROS in metallic NP-related biological functions requires further investigation, modulation and characterization of metallic NP-induced ROS production are promising in the application of metallic NPs in the areas of regenerative medicine and medical devices.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of a new inorganic cation-exchanger-Zr(IV) tungstomolybdate: analytical applications for metal content determination in real sample and synthetic mixture.

    PubMed

    Nabi, Syed Ashfaq; Naushad, Mu; Inamuddin

    2007-04-02

    An amorphous sample of inorganic cation-exchanger Zr(IV) tungstomolybdate was prepared by mixing varying ratios of 0.1M aqueous solution of sodium tungstate and 0.1M aqueous solution of sodium molybdate into 0.1M aqueous solution of zirconium oxychloride at pH 1. This cation-exchanger was found to have a good ion-exchange capacity (2.40 mequiv.g(-1) for Na(+)), high thermal and chemical stability. A tentative structural formula was proposed on the basis of chemical composition, FTIR and thermogravimetric analysis. Distribution coefficients (K(d)) values of metal ions in various solvent systems were determined. Some important and analytically difficult quantitative binary separations viz. Ni(II)-Pb(II), Ni(II)-Zn(II), Ni(II)-Cd(II), Mg(II)-Al(III), etc. were achieved. The practical applicability of the cation-exchanger was demonstrated in the separation of Cu(II)-Zn(II) from a synthetic mixture as well as from real samples of pharmaceutical formulation and brass alloy.

  7. Sorption of doubly charged metal ions from ammonium fluoride solutions by KFP-23 cation-exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    Ganyaev, V.P.; Pimneva, L.A.; Pakholkov, V.S.

    1982-10-20

    This report examines the results of a study of sorption of a number of doubly charged cations by the macroporous cation-exchange KFP-12 from 0.1 N MeF/sub 2/ solutions containing NH/sub 4/F in concentrations from 0 to 3.0 M. As the result of an investigation of the sorption, under dynamic conditions, of copper, zinc, cadmium, manganese, cobalt, and nickel ions from ammonium fluoride solutions by KFP-12 cation-exchange resin in the influence of the ionic form (H/sup +/ or NH/sub 4//sup +/) of the resin and of the NH/sub 4/F concentration on the degree of sorption and on the breakthrough capacity was established. The character of bonding and coordination of the sorbed cations with the ionic groups of the resin has been established. The possibilty of thorough purification of ammonium fluoride and (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/BeF/sub 4/ solutions with the aid of KFP-12 resin in NH/sub 4//sup +/ form has been demonstrated. The purification co-efficients were calculated.

  8. CAX-ing a wide net: Cation/H(+) transporters in metal remediation and abiotic stress signalling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cation/proton exchangers (CAXs) are a class of secondary energised ion transporter that are being implicated in an increasing range of cellular and physiological functions. CAXs are primarily Ca(2+) efflux transporters that mediate the sequestration of Ca(2+) from the cytosol, usually into the vacuo...

  9. Efficient inhibition of germination of coat-deficient bacterial spores by multivalent metal cations, including terbium (Tb³+).

    PubMed

    Yi, Xuan; Bond, Colton; Sarker, Mahfuzur R; Setlow, Peter

    2011-08-01

    Release of dipicolinic acid (DPA) and its fluorescence with terbium (Tb(3+)) allow rapid measurement of the germination and viability of spores of Bacillus and Clostridium species. However, germination of coat-deficient Bacillus spores was strongly inhibited by Tb(3+) and some other multivalent cations. Tb(3+) also inhibited germination of coat-deficient Clostridium perfringens spores.

  10. Efficient Inhibition of Germination of Coat-Deficient Bacterial Spores by Multivalent Metal Cations, Including Terbium (Tb3+) ▿

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xuan; Bond, Colton; Sarker, Mahfuzur R.; Setlow, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Release of dipicolinic acid (DPA) and its fluorescence with terbium (Tb3+) allow rapid measurement of the germination and viability of spores of Bacillus and Clostridium species. However, germination of coat-deficient Bacillus spores was strongly inhibited by Tb3+ and some other multivalent cations. Tb3+ also inhibited germination of coat-deficient Clostridium perfringens spores. PMID:21685163

  11. Block of current through T-type calcium channels by trivalent metal cations and nickel in neural rat and human cells.

    PubMed

    Mlinar, B; Enyeart, J J

    1993-09-01

    1. The effects of the trivalent cations yttrium (Y3+), lanthanum (La3+), cerium (Ce3+), neodymium (Nd3+), gadolinium (Gd3+), holmium (Ho3+), erbium (Er3+), ytterbium (Yb3+) and the divalent cation nickel (Ni2+) on the T-type voltage gated calcium channel (VGCC) were characterized by the whole-cell patch clamp technique using rat and human thyroid C cell lines. 2. All the metal cations (M3+) studied, blocked current through T-type VGCC (IT) in a concentration-dependent manner. Smaller trivalents were the best T-channel antagonists and potency varied inversely with ionic radii for the larger M3+ ions. Estimation of half-maximal blocking concentrations (IC50s) for IT carried by 10 mM Ca2+ resulted in the following potency sequence: Ho3+ (IC50 = 0.107 microM) approximately Y3+ (0.117) approximately Yb3+ (0.124) > or = Er3+ (0.153) > Gd3+ (0.267) > Nd3+ (0.429) > Ce3+ (0.728) > La3+ (1.015) > Ni2+ (5.65). 3. Tail current measurements and conditioning protocols were used to study the influence of membrane voltage on the potency of these antagonists. Block of IT by Ni2+, Y3+, La3+ and the lanthanides was voltage independent in the range from -200 to +80 mV. In addition, the antagonists did not affect macroscopic inactivation and deactivation of T-type VGCC. 4. Increasing the extracellular Ca2+ concentration reduced the potency of IT block by Ho3+, indicative of competitive antagonism between this blocker and the permeant ion for a binding site. 5. The results suggest that the mechanism of metal cation block of T-type VGCC is occlusion of the channel pore by the antagonist binding to a Ca2+/M3+ binding site, located out of the membrane electric field. 6. Block of T-type VGCC by Y3+, lanthanides and La3+ differ from the inhibition of high voltage-activated VGCC block in several respects: smaller cations are more potent IT antagonists; block is voltage independent and the antagonists do not permeate T-type channels. These differences suggest corresponding structural

  12. Effects of the spaces available for cations in strongly acidic cation-exchange resins on the exchange equilibria by quaternary ammonium ions and on the hydration states of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yuuya; Ohnaka, Kenji; Fujita, Saki; Kishi, Midori; Yuchi, Akio

    2011-10-01

    The spaces (voids) available for cations in the five exchange resins with varying exchange capacities and cross-linking degrees were estimated, on the basis of the additivity of molar volumes of the constituents. Tetraalkylammonium ions (NR(4)(+); R: Me, Et, Pr) may completely exchange potassium ion on the resin having a larger void radius. In contrast, the ratio of saturated adsorption capacity to exchange capacity of the resin having a smaller void radius decreased with an increase in size of NR(4)(+) ions, due to the interionic contacts. Alkali metal ions could be exchanged quantitatively. While the hydration numbers of K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+) were independent of the void radius, those of Li(+) and Na(+), especially Na(+), decreased with a decrease in void radius. Interionic contacts between the hydrated ions enhance the dehydration. Multivalent metal ions have the hydration numbers, comparable to or rather greater than those in water. A greater void volume available due to exchange stoichiometry released the interionic contacts and occasionally promoted the involvement of water molecules other than directly bound molecules. The close proximity between ions in the conventional ion-exchange resins having higher exchange capacities may induce varying interactions.

  13. Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707 upon biofilm formation on a polystyrene surface acquire a strong antibiotic resistance with minor changes in their tolerance to metal cations and metalloid oxyanions.

    PubMed

    Tremaroli, Valentina; Fedi, Stefano; Turner, Raymond J; Ceri, Howard; Zannoni, Davide

    2008-07-01

    The susceptibility to various biocides was examined in planktonic cells and biofilms of the obligate aerobe, PCBs degrader, Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707. The toxicity of two antibiotics, amikacin and rifampicin, three metalloid oxyanions (AsO2(-), SeO3(2-), TeO3(2-)) and three metal cations (Cd2+, Ni2+, Al3+) was tested at two stages of the biofilm-development (4 and 24 h) and compared to planktonic cells susceptibility. Mature biofilms formed in rich (LB, Luria-Bertani) medium were thicker (23 microm) than biofilms grown in minimal (SA saccarose-arginine) medium (13 microm). Early grown (4 h) SA-biofilms, which consisted of a few sparse/attached cells, were 50-100 times more resistant to antibiotics than planktonic cells. Conversely, minor changes in tolerance to metal(loid)s were seen in both SA- and LB-grown biofilms. In contrast to planktonic cells, no reduction of TeO3(2-) to elemental Te0 or SeO3(2-) to elemental Se0 was seen in KF707 biofilms. The data indicate that: (a) metal tolerance in KF707 biofilms, under the growth and exposure conditions described here, is different than antibiotic tolerance; (b) KF707 planktonic cells and biofilms, are almost equally susceptible to killing by metal cations and oxyanions, and (c) biofilm-tolerance to TeO3(2-) and SeO3(2-) is not linked to metalloid reduction; this means that KF707 planktonic cells and biofilms differ in their physiology and strategy to counteract metalloid toxicity.

  14. Photochemistry of framework-supported M(diimine)(CO)3X complexes in three-dimensional lithium carboxylate metal-organic frameworks: monitoring the effect of framework cations.

    PubMed

    Reade, Thomas J; Murphy, Thomas S; Calladine, James A; Horvath, Raphael; Clark, Ian P; Greetham, Gregory M; Towrie, Michael; Lewis, William; George, Michael W; Champness, Neil R

    2017-01-13

    The structures and photochemical behaviour of two new metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are reported. Reaction of Re(2,2'-bipy-5,5'-dicarboxylic acid)(CO)3Cl or Mn(2,2'-bipy-5,5'-dicarboxylic acid)(CO)3Br with LiCl or LiBr, respectively, produces single crystals of {Li2(DMF)2 [(2,2'-bipy-5,5'-dicarboxylate)Re(CO)3Cl]}n ( RELI: ) or {Li2(DMF)2[(2,2'-bipy-5,5'-dicarboxylate)Mn(CO)3Br]}n ( MNLI: ). The structures formed by the two MOFs comprise one-dimensional chains of carboxylate-bridged Li(I) cations that are cross-linked by units of Re(2,2'-bipy-5,5'-dicarboxylate)(CO)3Cl ( RELI: ) or Mn(2,2'-bipy-5,5'- dicarboxylate)(CO)3Br ( MNLI: ). The photophysical and photochemical behaviour of both RELI: and MNLI: are probed. The rhenium-containing MOF, RELI: , exhibits luminescence and the excited state behaviour, as established by time-resolved infrared measurements, is closer in behaviour to that of unsubstituted [Re(bipy)(CO)3Cl] rather than a related MOF where the Li(I) cations are replaced by Mn(II) cations. These observations are further supported by density functional theory calculations. Upon excitation MNLI: forms a dicarbonyl species which rapidly recombines with the dissociated CO, in a fashion consistent with the majority of the photoejected CO not escaping the MOF channels.This article is part of the themed issue 'Coordination polymers and metal-organic frameworks: materials by design'.

  15. Synthesis and Ion-Exchange Properties of Graphene Th(IV) Phosphate Composite Cation Exchanger: Its Applications in the Selective Separation of Lead Metal Ions

    PubMed Central

    Rangreez, Tauseef Ahmad; Alhogbi, Basma G.; Naushad, Mu.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, graphene Th(IV) phosphate was prepared by sol–gel precipitation method. The ion-exchange behavior of this cation-exchanger was studied by investigating properties like ion-exchange capacity for various metal ions, the effect of eluent concentration, elution behavior, and thermal effect on ion-exchange capacity (IEC). Several physicochemical properties as Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) study, thermal studies, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies were also carried out. The material possessed an IEC of 1.56 meq·dry·g−1 of the exchanger and was found to be nano-composite. The selectivity studies showed that the material is selective towards Pb(II) ions. The selectivity of this cation-exchanger was demonstrated in the binary separation of Pb(II) ions from mixture with other metal ions. The recovery was found to be both quantitative and reproducible. PMID:28737717

  16. NMR Localization of Divalent Cations at the Active Site of the Neurospora VS Ribozyme Provides Insights into RNA–Metal-Ion Interactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Metal cations represent key elements of RNA structure and function. In the Neurospora VS ribozyme, metal cations play diverse roles; they are important for substrate recognition, formation of the active site, and shifting the pKa’s of two key nucleobases that contribute to the general acid–base mechanism. Recently, we determined the NMR structure of the A730 loop of the VS ribozyme active site (SLVI) that contributes the general acid (A756) in the enzymatic mechanism of the cleavage reaction. Our studies showed that magnesium (Mg2+) ions are essential to stabilize the formation of the S-turn motif within the A730 loop that exposes the A756 nucleobase for catalysis. In this article, we extend these NMR investigations by precisely mapping the Mg2+-ion binding sites using manganese-induced paramagnetic relaxation enhancement and cadmium-induced chemical-shift perturbation of phosphorothioate RNAs. These experiments identify five Mg2+-ion binding sites within SLVI. Four Mg2+ ions in SLVI are associated with known RNA structural motifs, including the G–U wobble pair and the GNRA tetraloop, and our studies reveal novel insights about Mg2+ ion binding to these RNA motifs. Interestingly, one Mg2+ ion is specifically associated with the S-turn motif, confirming its structural role in the folding of the A730 loop. This Mg2+ ion is likely important for formation of the active site and may play an indirect role in catalysis. PMID:24364590

  17. A Metal-Organic Compound as Cathode Material with Superhigh Capacity Achieved by Reversible Cationic and Anionic Redox Chemistry for High-Energy Sodium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chun; Huang, Ying; Yuan, Lixia; Liu, Yaojun; Chen, Weilun; Huang, Yangyang; Chen, Kongyao; Han, Jiantao; Liu, Qingju; Huang, Yunhui

    2017-06-06

    Although sodium-ion batteries (SIBs) are considered as alternatives to lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), the electrochemical performances, in particular the energy density, are much lower than LIBs. A metal-organic compound, cuprous 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (CuTCNQ), is presented as a new kind of cathode material for SIBs. It consists of both cationic (Cu(II) ↔Cu(I) ) and anionic (TCNQ(0) ↔TCNQ(-) ↔ TCNQ(2-) ) reversible redox reactions, delivering a discharge capacity as high as 255 mAh g(-1) at a current density of 20 mA g(-1) . The synergistic effect of both redox-active metal cations and organic anions brings an electrochemical transfer of multiple electrons. The transformation of cupric ions to cuprous ions occurs at near 3.80 V vs. Na(+) /Na, while the full reduction of TCNQ(0) to TCNQ(-) happens at 3.00-3.30 V. The remarkably high voltage is attributed to the strong inductive effect of the four cyano groups. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Challenge to assess the toxic contribution of metal cation released from nanomaterials for nanotoxicology--the case of ZnO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingsheng; Li, Jie; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Su, Huanxing; Chen, Hongzheng; Fujita, Daisuke

    2013-06-07

    The identification of physicochemical factors that govern toxic effects of nanomaterials (NMs) is important for the safe design and synthesis of NMs. The release of metal cations from NMs in cell culture medium and the role of the metal cations in cytotoxicity are still under dispute. Here, we report that removal of NMs such as ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) by centrifugation, the procedure commonly used for the estimation of released ion concentration in nanotoxicology, was incomplete even at a relative centrifugal force of 150,000 × g. In this sense, the Zn concentration in supernatant measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry cannot be regarded as the concentration of free Zn(2+) ions which were released from ZnO NPs in cell culture medium. This suggests the urgent need to develop relevant analytical techniques for nanotoxicology. The toxic contribution of released Zn(2+) ions to the A549 cell lines was estimated to be only about 10%. We conclude that the cytotoxicity associated with ZnO NPs is not a function of the Zn concentration, suggesting that other factors play an important role in the toxic effect of ZnO NPs.

  19. Formation of [b3 - 1 + cat]+ ions from metal-cationized tetrapeptides containing beta-alanine, gamma-aminobutyric acid or epsilon-aminocaproic acid residues.

    PubMed

    Osburn, Sandra M; Ochola, Sila O; Talaty, Erach R; Van Stipdonk, Michael J

    2008-11-01

    The presence and position of a single beta-alanine (betaA), gamma-aminobutyric acid (gammaABu) or epsilon-aminocaproic acid (Cap) residue has been shown to have a significant influence on the formation of b(n)+ and y(n)+ product ions from a series of model, protonated peptides. In this study, we examined the effect of the same residues on the formation of analogous [b3 - 1 + cat]+ products from metal (Li+, Na+ and Ag+)-cationized peptides. The larger amino acids suppress formation of b3+ from protonated peptides with general sequence AAXG (where X = beta-alanine, gamma-aminobutyric acid or epsilon-aminocaproic acid), presumably because of the prohibitive effect of larger cyclic intermediates in the 'oxazolone' pathway. However, abundant [b3 - 1 + cat]+ products are generated from metal-cationized versions of AAXG. Using a group of deuterium-labeled and exchanged peptides, we found that formation of [b3 - 1 + cat]+ involves transfer of either amide or alpha-carbon position H atoms, and the tendency to transfer the atom from the alpha-carbon position increases with the size of the amino acid in position X. To account for the transfer of the H atom, a mechanism involving formation of a ketene product as [b3 - 1 + cat]+ is proposed.

  20. A Novel n-Type Organosilane-Metal Ion Hybrid of Rhodamine B and Copper Cation for Low-Temperature Thermoelectric Materials.

    PubMed

    Bertram, John R; Penn, Aubrey; Nee, Matthew J; Rathnayake, Hemali

    2017-03-29

    An n-type organosilane-metal ion hybrid of Rhodamine B-silane and copper cation (Cu-RBS) was investigated as a low-temperature thermoelectric material. Computational analysis revealed the most likely localized binding site of Cu(2+) was to the Rhodamine B core and provided predictions of molecular orbitals and electrostatic potentials upon complexation. The concentration-dependent optical absorption and emission spectra confirmed the effective metal-ligand charge transfer from Cu(2+) to the xanthene core of RBS, indicating the potential for improved electrical properties for the complex relative to RBS. The electrical conductivity and Seebeck thermoelectric (TE) behavior were evaluated and compared with its precursor complex of Rhodamine B and copper cation. While a moderately high electrical conductivity of 4.38 S m(-1) was obtained for the Cu-RBS complex, the relatively low Seebeck coefficient of -26.2 μV/K resulted in a low TE power factor. However, compared to other organic doped materials, these results were promising toward developing n-type thermoelectric materials with no doping agents. Both phase segregation and thin film heterogeneity remain to be optimized; thus, the balance between Cu(2+) domains and RBS domain phases will likely yield higher Seebeck coefficients and improved power factors.

  1. A comparative study of optical absorption and photocatalytic properties of nanocrystalline single-phase anatase and rutile TiO2 doped with transition metal cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kernazhitsky, L.; Shymanovska, V.; Gavrilko, T.; Naumov, V.; Kshnyakin, V.; Khalyavka, T.

    2013-02-01

    The effect of nanocrystalline TiO2 doping with transition metal cations (Cu2+, Fe3+, Co2+, Cr3+) on their optical absorption and photocatalytic properties was investigated. The obtained metal-doped TiO2 samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. It is shown that doping effect on anatase (A) and rutile (R) properties is quite different, being much stronger and complicated on A than on R. Contrary to doped R, doped A revealed a significant red shift of the absorption edge along with the band gap narrowing. Photocatalytic activity of anatase increases upon doping in the order: AR/Co>R/Cu>R/Fe>R/Cr, indicating the inhibitory effect of impurity cations. This fact correlates with the decrease in the UV absorption of the doped rutile in the region of the Hg-lamp irradiation at 4.88 eV.

  2. [Design and synthesis of imine compound for metal cation logical gates recognition and setup of double-control fluorescent molecule switch].

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Zhu, Yu-lian; Dai, Xue-qin; Zhang, Qi; Huang, Yan

    2011-07-01

    The Schiff base's reduced product N,N-bis(4-methoxybenzyl) ethane-1,2-diamine, which was used as a receptor L, was designed and synthesized for the first time in the present article. It was found that Cu2+ and Fe3+ could quench L in fluorescence observably and Zn2+ and Cd2+ could enhance L remarkably. So the two pair metal cation could set up "OR" logical gate relation with the receptor molecule L, then a logical recognition system be formed. The data of resolved ZnL's single crystal indicated that ZnL belonged to monoclinic (CCDC No. 747994). Integrated spectrum instrument was used to characterize the structure of its alike series of complex compound. According to ZnL's excellent fluorescence character and the ability to exchange with contiguous metal cation, ZnZ+/ZnL/Co2+, Zn2+/ZnL/Nit+ fluorescent molecule switch was designed. It is hoped that the work above could be positive for the development of molecule computer, bio-intellectualized inspection technology (therapy) and instrument.

  3. Electrically induced reorganization phenomena of liquid metal film printed on biological skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Cangran; Yi, Liting; Yu, Yang; Liu, Jing

    2016-12-01

    Liquid metal has been demonstrated to be directly printable on biological skin as physiological measurement elements. However, many fundamental issues remained unclear so far. Here, we disclosed an intriguing phenomenon of electrically induced reorganization of liquid metal film. According to the experiments, when applying an external electric field to liquid metal films which were spray printed on biological skin, it would induce unexpected transformations of the liquid metals among different morphologies and configurations. These include shape shift from a large liquid metal film into a tiny sphere and contraction of liquid metal pool into spherical one. For comprehensively understanding the issues, the impacts of the size, voltage, orientations of the liquid metal electrodes, etc., were clarified. Further, effects of various substrates such as in vitro skin and in vivo skin affecting the liquid metal transformations were experimentally investigated. Compared to the intact tissues, the contraction magnitude of the liquid metal electrode appears weaker on in vivo skin of nude mice under the same electric field. The mechanisms lying behind such phenomena were interpreted through theoretical modeling. Lastly, typical applications of applying the current effect into practical elements such as electrical gating devices were also illustrated as an example. The present findings have both fundamental and practical values, which would help design future technical strategies in fabricating electronically controlled liquid metal electronics on skin.

  4. The Compact and Biologically Relevant Structure of Inter-α-inhibitor Is Maintained by the Chondroitin Sulfate Chain and Divalent Cations*

    PubMed Central

    Scavenius, Carsten; Nikolajsen, Camilla Lund; Stenvang, Marcel; Thøgersen, Ida B.; Wyrożemski, Łukasz; Wisniewski, Hans-Georg; Otzen, Daniel E.; Sanggaard, Kristian W.; Enghild, Jan J.

    2016-01-01

    Inter-α-inhibitor is a proteoglycan of unique structure. The protein consists of three subunits, heavy chain 1, heavy chain 2, and bikunin covalently joined by a chondroitin sulfate chain originating at Ser-10 of bikunin. Inter-α-inhibitor interacts with an inflammation-associated protein, tumor necrosis factor-inducible gene 6 protein, in the extracellular matrix. This interaction leads to transfer of the heavy chains from the chondroitin sulfate of inter-α-inhibitor to hyaluronan and consequently to matrix stabilization. Divalent cations and heavy chain 2 are essential co-factors in this transfer reaction. In the present study, we have investigated how divalent cations in concert with the chondroitin sulfate chain influence the structure and stability of inter-α-inhibitor. The results showed that Mg2+ or Mn2+, but not Ca2+, induced a conformational change in inter-α-inhibitor as evidenced by a decrease in the Stokes radius and a bikunin chondroitin sulfate-dependent increase of the thermodynamic stability. This structure was shown to be essential for the ability of inter-α-inhibitor to participate in extracellular matrix stabilization. In addition, the data revealed that bikunin was positioned adjacent to both heavy chains and that the two heavy chains also were in close proximity. The chondroitin sulfate chain interacted with all protein components and inter-α-inhibitor dissociated when it was degraded. Conventional purification protocols result in the removal of the Mg2+ found in plasma and because divalent cations influence the conformation and affect function it is important to consider this when characterizing the biological activity of inter-α-inhibitor. PMID:26728454

  5. Bioanalytics in Quantitive (Bio)imaging/Mapping of Metallic Elements in Biological Samples.

    PubMed

    Jurowski, Kamil; Buszewski, Bogusław; Piekoszewski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe selected analytical techniques and their applications in the quantitative mapping/(bio)imaging of metals in biological samples. This work presents the advantages and disadvantages as well as the appropriate methods of scope for research. Distribution of metals in biological samples is currently one of the most important issues in physiology, toxicology, pharmacology, and other disciplines where functional information about the distribution of metals is essential. This issue is a subject of research in (bio)imaging/mapping studies, which use a variety of analytical techniques for the identification and determination of metallic elements. Increased interest in analytical techniques enabling the (bio)imaging of metals in a variety of biological material has been observed more recently. Measuring the distribution of trace metals in tissues after a drug dose or ingestion of poison-containing metals allows for the studying of pathomechanisms and the pathophysiology of various diseases and disorders related to the management of metals in human and animal systems.

  6. Organochlorines, heavy metals, and the biology of North American accipiters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, N.F.R.; Snyder, H.A.; Lincer, J.L.; Reynolds, R.T.

    1973-01-01

    Analyses of eggs of three species of North American accipitrine hawks for organochlorines and heavy metals indicate that contamination with DDE may be the primary cause of recent population declines of two of the species, Cooper's hawk and sharp-shinned hawk.

  7. Notable effects of the metal salts on the formation and decay reactions of α-tocopheroxyl radical in acetonitrile solution. The complex formation between α-tocopheroxyl and metal cations.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Yutaro; Fujii, Miyabi; Matsuoka, Chihiro; Hashimoto, Haruka; Ouchi, Aya; Nagaoka, Shin-ichi; Mukai, Kazuo

    2011-08-18

    The measurement of the UV-vis absorption spectrum of α-tocopheroxyl (α-Toc(•)) radical was performed by reacting aroxyl (ArO(•)) radical with α-tocopherol (α-TocH) in acetonitrile solution including four kinds of alkali and alkaline earth metal salts (MX or MX(2)) (LiClO(4), LiI, NaClO(4), and Mg(ClO(4))(2)), using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The maximum wavelength (λ(max)) of the absorption spectrum of the α-Toc(•) at 425.0 nm increased with increasing concentration of metal salts (0-0.500 M) in acetonitrile, and it approached constant values, suggesting an [α-Toc(•)-M(+) (or M(2+))] complex formation. The stability constants (K) were determined to be 9.2, 2.8, and 45 M(-1) for LiClO(4), NaClO(4), and Mg(ClO(4))(2), respectively. By reacting ArO(•) with α-TocH in acetonitrile, the absorption of ArO(•) disappeared rapidly, while that of α-Toc(•) appeared and then decreased gradually as a result of the bimolecular self-reaction of α-Toc(•) after passing through the maximum. The second-order rate constants (k(s)) obtained for the reaction of α-TocH with ArO(•) increased linearly with an increasing concentration of metal salts. The results indicate that the hydrogen transfer reaction of α-TocH proceeds via an electron transfer intermediate from α-TocH to ArO(•) radicals followed by proton transfer. Both the coordination of metal cations to the one-electron reduced anions of ArO(•) (ArO:(-)) and the coordination of counteranions to the one-electron oxidized cations of α-TocH (α-TocH(•)(+)) may stabilize the intermediate, resulting in the acceleration of electron transfer. A remarkable effect of metal salts on the rate of bimolecular self-reaction (2k(d)) of the α-Toc(•) radical was also observed. The rate constant (2k(d)) decreased rapidly with increasing concentrations of the metal salts. The 2k(d) value decreased at the same concentration of the metal salts in the following order: no metal salt > NaClO(4) > LiClO(4) > Mg

  8. Green Synthesis of Metallic Nanoparticles via Biological Entities

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Monaliben; Fawcett, Derek; Sharma, Shashi; Tripathy, Suraj Kumar; Poinern, Gérrard Eddy Jai

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology is the creation, manipulation and use of materials at the nanometre size scale (1 to 100 nm). At this size scale there are significant differences in many material properties that are normally not seen in the same materials at larger scales. Although nanoscale materials can be produced using a variety of traditional physical and chemical processes, it is now possible to biologically synthesize materials via environment-friendly green chemistry based techniques. In recent years, the convergence between nanotechnology and biology has created the new field of nanobiotechnology that incorporates the use of biological entities such as actinomycetes algae, bacteria, fungi, viruses, yeasts, and plants in a number of biochemical and biophysical processes. The biological synthesis via nanobiotechnology processes have a significant potential to boost nanoparticles production without the use of harsh, toxic, and expensive chemicals commonly used in conventional physical and chemical processes. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of recent trends in synthesizing nanoparticles via biological entities and their potential applications. PMID:28793638

  9. Hydrothermal assembly of (3,6)-connected networks with classical mineral structures constructed from Anderson-type heteropolymolybdate and metal cations

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Bo; Liu Shuxia . E-mail: liusx@nenu.edu.cn; Xie Linhua; Yu Miao; Zhang Chundan; Sun Chunyan; Cheng Haiyan

    2006-06-15

    A series of 3D heteropolymolybdates, (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}{l_brace}[M(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}]{sub 2}[TeMo{sub 6}O{sub 24}]{r_brace}.H{sub 2}O (M=Mn(1), Co(2), Ni(3), Cu(4), and Zn(5)) and [Ln(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]{sub 2}[TeMo{sub 6}O{sub 24}].3H{sub 2}O (Ln=La(6), Ce(7), and Nd(8)), has been isolated from hydrothermal reactions and characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, X-ray crystallography and magnetic properties. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that compounds 1-8 possess unusual (3,6)-connected networks constructed from Anderson-type anions [TeMo{sub 6}O{sub 24}]{sup 6-} and transion metal or rare-earth metal cations. Compounds 1-5 are of highly symmetrical structures with pyrite-like topology in which [TeMo{sub 6}O{sub 24}]{sup 6-} anions act as 6-connected sites and transition metal cations act as 3-connected sites. Compounds 6-8 crystallize in symmetrical space groups lower than that of 1-5 exhibiting rutile-like topology with [TeMo{sub 6}O{sub 24}]{sup 6-} anions acting as 6-connected sites and rare-earth metal cations acting as 3-connected sites. The magnetic properties of 1-4 are also presented. - Graphical abstract: Utilization of mild-hydrothermal synthesis successfully provides a series of new 3D Anderson-based compounds: (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}{l_brace}[M(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}]{sub 2} [TeMo{sub 6}O{sub 24}]{r_brace}.H{sub 2}O (M=Mn, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn), which exhibits pyrite-like topology and [Ln(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]{sub 2}[TeMo{sub 6}O{sub 24}].3H{sub 2}O (Ln=La, Ce and Nd), which exhibits rutile-like topology. Display Omitted.

  10. Metal ions in biological catalysis: from enzyme databases to general principles.

    PubMed

    Andreini, Claudia; Bertini, Ivano; Cavallaro, Gabriele; Holliday, Gemma L; Thornton, Janet M

    2008-11-01

    We analysed the roles and distribution of metal ions in enzymatic catalysis using available public databases and our new resource Metal-MACiE (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/thornton-srv/databases/Metal_MACiE/home.html). In Metal-MACiE, a database of metal-based reaction mechanisms, 116 entries covering 21% of the metal-dependent enzymes and 70% of the types of enzyme-catalysed chemical transformations are annotated according to metal function. We used Metal-MACiE to assess the functions performed by metals in biological catalysis and the relative frequencies of different metals in different roles, which can be related to their individual chemical properties and availability in the environment. The overall picture emerging from the overview of Metal-MACiE is that redox-inert metal ions are used in enzymes to stabilize negative charges and to activate substrates by virtue of their Lewis acid properties, whereas redox-active metal ions can be used both as Lewis acids and as redox centres. Magnesium and zinc are by far the most common ions of the first type, while calcium is relatively less used. Magnesium, however, is most often bound to phosphate groups of substrates and interacts with the enzyme only transiently, whereas the other metals are stably bound to the enzyme. The most common metal of the second type is iron, which is prevalent in the catalysis of redox reactions, followed by manganese, cobalt, molybdenum, copper and nickel. The control of the reactivity of redox-active metal ions may involve their association with organic cofactors to form stable units. This occurs sometimes for iron and nickel, and quite often for cobalt and molybdenum.

  11. Differential coordination demands in Fe versus Mn water-soluble cationic metalloporphyrins translate into remarkably different aqueous redox chemistry and biology.

    PubMed

    Tovmasyan, Artak; Weitner, Tin; Sheng, Huaxin; Lu, MiaoMiao; Rajic, Zrinka; Warner, David S; Spasojevic, Ivan; Reboucas, Julio S; Benov, Ludmil; Batinic-Haberle, Ines

    2013-05-20

    The different biological behavior of cationic Fe and Mn pyridylporphyrins in Escherichia coli and mouse studies prompted us to revisit and compare their chemistry. For that purpose, the series of ortho and meta isomers of Fe(III) meso-tetrakis-N-alkylpyridylporphyrins, alkyl being methyl to n-octyl, were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, UV/vis spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, lipophilicity, protonation equilibria of axial waters, metal-centered reduction potential, E(1/2) for M(III)P/M(II)P redox couple (M = Fe, Mn, P = porphyrin), kcat for the catalysis of O2(•-) dismutation, stability toward peroxide-driven porphyrin oxidative degradation (produced in the catalysis of ascorbate oxidation by MP), ability to affect growth of SOD-deficient E. coli, and toxicity to mice. Electron-deficiency of the metal site is modulated by the porphyrin ligand, which renders Fe(III) porphyrins ≥5 orders of magnitude more acidic than the analogous Mn(III) porphyrins, as revealed by the pKa1 of axially coordinated waters. The 5 log units difference in the acidity between the Mn and Fe sites in porphyrin translates into the predominance of tetracationic (OH)(H2O)FeP complexes relative to pentacationic (H2O)2MnP species at pH ∼7.8. This is additionally evidenced in large differences in the E(1/2) values of M(III)P/M(II)P redox couples. The presence of hydroxo ligand labilizes trans-axial water which results in higher reactivity of Fe relative to Mn center. The differences in the catalysis of O2(•-) dismutation (log kcat) between Fe and Mn porphyrins is modest, 2.5-5-fold, due to predominantly outer-sphere, with partial inner-sphere character of two reaction steps. However, the rate constant for the inner-sphere H2O2-based porphyrin oxidative degradation is 18-fold larger for (OH)(H2O)FeP than for (H2O)2MnP. The in vivo consequences of the differences between the Fe and Mn porphyrins were best demonstrated in SOD-deficient E. coli growth. On the basis of

  12. Differential coordination demands in Fe vs Mn water-soluble cationic metalloporphyrins translates into remarkably different aqueous redox chemistry and biology

    PubMed Central

    Tovmasyan, Artak; Weitner, Tin; Sheng, Huaxin; Lu, MiaoMiao; Rajic, Zrinka; Warner, David S.; Spasojevic, Ivan; Reboucas, Julio S.; Benov, Ludmil; Batinic-Haberle, Ines

    2013-01-01

    The different biological behavior of cationic Fe and Mn pyridylporphyrins in Escherichia coli and mouse studies prompted us to revisit and compare their chemistry. For that purpose the series of ortho and meta isomers of Fe(III) meso-tetrakis-N-alkylpyridylporphyrins, alkyl being methyl to n-octyl, were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, UV/vis spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, lipophilicity, protonation equilibria of axial waters, metal-centered reduction potential, E1/2 for MIIIP/MIIP redox couple (M = Fe, Mn, P=porphyrin), kcat for the catalysis of O2•− dismutation, stability towards peroxide-driven porphyrin oxidative degradation (produced in the catalysis of ascorbate oxidation by MP), ability to affect growth of SOD-deficient E. coli and toxicity to mice. Electron-deficiency of the metal site is modulated by the porphyrin ligand, which renders Fe(III) porphyrins ≥ 5 orders of magnitude more acidic than the analogous Mn(III) porphyrins, as revealed by the pKa1 of axially coordinated waters. The 5 log units difference in the acidity between the Mn and Fe sites in porphyrin translates into the predominance of tetracationic (OH)(H2O)FeP complexes relative to pentacationic (H2O)2MnP species at pH ~7.8. This is evidenced in large differences in the thermodynamic parameters - pKa of axial waters and E1/2 of MIII/MII redox couple. The presence of hydroxo ligand labilizes trans-axial water which results in higher reactivity of Fe- relative to Mn center. The differences in the catalysis of O2•− dismutation (log kcat) between Fe and Mn porphyrins is modest, 2.5-5-fold, due to predominantly outer-sphere, with partial inner-sphere character of two reaction steps. However, the rate constant for the inner-sphere H2O2-based porphyrin oxidative degradation is 18-fold larger for (OH)(H2O)FeP than for (H2O)2MnP. The in vivo consequences of the differences between the Fe- and Mn porphyrins were best demonstrated in SOD-deficient E. coli growth. Based

  13. Chemical and biological extraction of metals present in E waste: A hybrid technology

    SciTech Connect

    Pant, Deepak; Joshi, Deepika; Upreti, Manoj K.; Kotnala, Ravindra K.

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hybrid methodology for E waste management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Efficient extraction of metals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trace metal extraction is possible. - Abstract: Management of metal pollution associated with E-waste is widespread across the globe. Currently used techniques for the extraction of metals from E-waste by using either chemical or biological leaching have their own limitations. Chemical leaching is much rapid and efficient but has its own environmental consequences, even the future prospects of associated nanoremediation are also uncertain. Biological leaching on the other hand is comparatively a cost effective technique but at the same moment it is time consuming and the complete recovery of the metal, alone by biological leaching is not possible in most of the cases. The current review addresses the individual issues related to chemical and biological extraction techniques and proposes a hybrid-methodology which incorporates both, along with safer chemicals and compatible microbes for better and efficient extraction of metals from the E-waste.

  14. Nanometallomics: an emerging field studying the biological effects of metal-related nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Feng; Gao, Yuxi; Chai, Zhifang; Chen, Chunying

    2014-02-01

    Metallomics, focusing on the global and systematic understanding of the metal uptake, trafficking, role and excretion in biological systems, has attracted more and more attention. Metal-related nanomaterials, including metallic and metal-containing nanomaterials, have unique properties compared to their micro-scaled counterparts and therefore require special attention. The small size effect, surface effect, and quantum size effect directly influence the physicochemical properties of nanostructured materials and their fate and behavior in biota. However, to our knowledge, the metallomics itself did not touch this special category of materials yet. Therefore, the term "nanometallomics" is proposed and the systematic study on the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion (ADME) behavior of metal-related nanomaterials in biological systems and their interactions with genes, proteins and other biomolecules will be reviewed. The ADME behavior of metal-related nanomaterials in the biological systems is influenced by their physicochemical properties, the exposure route, and the microenvironment of the deposition site. Nanomaterials may not only interact directly or indirectly with genes, proteins and other molecules to cause DNA damage, genotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and cytotoxicity, but also stimulate the immune responses, circumvent tumor resistance and inhibit tumor metastasis. Nanometallomics needs to be integrated with other omics sciences, such as genomics, proteomics and metabolomics, to explore the biomedical data and obtain the overall knowledge of underlying mechanisms, and therefore to improve the application performance and to reduce the potential risk of metal-related nanomaterials.

  15. {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy of cationic species in CO{sub 2} selective alkaline earth metal porous silicoaluminophosphates prepared via liquid and solid state ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Arevalo-Hidalgo, Ana G.; Dugar, Sneha; Fu, Riqiang; Hernandez-Maldonado, Arturo J.

    2012-07-15

    The location of extraframework cations in Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion-exchanged SAPO-34 was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution. Incorporation of the alkaline earth metal cations onto the SAPO framework was achieved via liquid state ion exchange, coupled partial detemplation/solid-state ion exchange, and combination of both techniques. MAS NMR revealed that the level of ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations near hexagonal prisms (site SI), which are relatively difficult to exchange with the alkaline earth metal due to steric and charge repulsion criteria. In addition, the presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange of otherwise tenacious hydrogen as corroborated by unit cell compositional data as well as enhanced CO{sub 2} adsorption at low partial pressures. The extraframework ammonium species were produced from partial detemplation of the structure-directing agent employed for the SAPO-34 synthesis, tetraethylammonium. - Graphical abstract: MAS NMR was used to elucidate the position the cationic species in alkaline earth metal exchanged silicoaluminophosphates. These species played a significant role during the ion exchange process and, therefore, the materials ultimate CO{sub 2} adsorption performance. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Location of extraframework Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} cations was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Level of Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion exchanged SAPOs are outstanding CO{sub 2} adsorbents.

  16. Trends in lipoplex physical properties dependent on cationic lipid structure, vehicle and complexation procedure do not correlate with biological activity.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, M E; Rusalov, D; Enas, J; Wheeler, C J

    2001-04-01

    Using a group of structurally related cytofectins, the effects of different vehicle constituents and mixing techniques on the physical properties and biological activity of lipoplexes were systematically examined. Physical properties were examined using a combination of dye accessibility assays, centrifugation, gel electrophoresis and dynamic light scattering. Biological activity was examined using in vitro transfection. Lipoplexes were formulated using two injection vehicles commonly used for in vivo delivery (PBS pH 7.2 and 0.9% saline), and a sodium phosphate vehicle previously shown to enhance the biological activity of naked pDNA and lipoplex formulations. Phosphate was found to be unique in its effect on lipoplexes. Specifically, the accessible pDNA in lipoplexes formulated with cytofectins containing a gamma-amine substitution in the headgroup was dependent on alkyl side chain length and sodium phosphate concentration, but the same effects were not observed when using cytofectins containing a beta-OH headgroup substitution. The physicochemical features of the phosphate anion, which give rise to this effect in gamma-amine cytofectins, were deduced using a series of phosphate analogs. The effects of the formulation vehicle on transfection were found to be cell type-dependent; however, of the formulation variables examined, the liposome/pDNA mixing method had the greatest effect on transgene expression in vitro. Thus, though predictive physical structure relationships involving the vehicle and cytofectin components of the lipoplex were uncovered, they did not extrapolate to trends in biological activity.

  17. Discriminating Properties of Alkali Metal Ions Towards the Constituents of Proteins and Nucleic Acids. Conclusions from Gas-Phase and Theoretical Studies.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Mary T; Armentrout, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative insight into the structures and thermodynamics of alkali metal cations interacting with biological molecules can be obtained from studies in the gas phase combined with theoretical work. In this chapter, the fundamentals of the experimental and theoretical techniques are first summarized and results for such work on complexes of alkali metal cations with amino acids, small peptides, and nucleobases are reviewed. Periodic trends in how these interactions vary as the alkali metal cations get heavier are highlighted.

  18. Interaction of metallic clusters with biologically active curcumin molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sanjeev K.; He, Haiying; Liu, Chunhui; Dutta, Ranu; Pandey, Ravindra

    2015-09-01

    We have investigated the interaction of subnano metallic Gd and Au clusters with curcumin, an important biomolecule having pharmacological activity. Gd clusters show different site preference to curcumin and much stronger interaction strength, in support of the successful synthesis of highly stable curcumin-coated Gd nanoparticles as reported recently. It can be attributed to significant charge transfer from the Gd cluster to curcumin together with a relatively strong hybridization of the Gd df-orbitals with curcumin p-orbitals. These results suggest that Gd nanoparticles can effectively be used as delivery carriers for curcumin at the cellular level for therapy and medical imaging applications.

  19. An ab initio study of the selective of alkali and alkaline earth metal cations for crown ethers

    SciTech Connect

    Feller, D.F.; Glendening, E.D.; Thompson, M.A.; Hill, S.E.

    1997-12-31

    Crown ethers are a class of macrocyclic polyether that are known to preferentially bind certain cations in potentially complex mixtures of other cations. They are being considered as candidates for separating radioactive cesium (137Cs) and strontium (90Sr) from the high level waste tanks on the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. We present the results of RHF and Mp2 calculations on a variety of crown ethers, including 12-crown-4, 18-crown-6 and Clark Still`s 18-crown-6 derivative. Gas phase calculations show that 18-crown-6 most strongly blinds lithium, but our results indicate that potassium selectivity is recovered with the inclusion of even a small number of waters of hydration in the calculations. Several polarized Gaussian basis sets were used in an effort to derive convergence estimates for the binding enthalpies. The only available experimental values, obtained from FT-ICR experiments by A.R. Katritzky, et al, are over 30 kcal/mol smaller than our best estimate for K+/18-crown-6.

  20. An ab initio study of the selective binding of alkali and alkaline earth metal cations for crown ethers

    SciTech Connect

    Feller, D.F.; Glendening, E.D.; Thompson, M.A.

    1995-12-31

    Crown ethers are a class of macrocyclic polyether that are known to preferentially bind certain cations in potentially complex mixtures of other cations. They are being considered as candidates for separating radioactive cesium ({sup 137}Cs) and strontium ({sup 90}Sr) from the high level waste tanks on the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. We present the results of RHF and MP2 calculations on a variety of crown ethers, including 18-crown-6, which is known to prefer potassium in polar solvents. Gas phase calculations show that 18-crown-6 most strongly binds lithium, but our results indicate that potassium selectivity is recovered with the inclusion of even a small number of waters of hydration in the calculations. A variety of Gaussian basis sets (3-21G, 6-31+G* and correlation consistent) were employed in an effort to derive convergence estimates for the binding enthalpies. The only available experimental values, obtained from FT-ICR experiments by A.R. Katritzky et al., Rapid Comm. Mass Spect., 6, 25 (1992), are over 30 kcal/mol smaller than our best estimate for K+/18-crown-6.

  1. Cationic Ionic Liquids Organic Ligands Based Metal-Organic Frameworks for Fabrication of Core-Shell Microspheres for Hydrophilic Interaction Liquid Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qian; Ma, Junqian; Ma, Siqi; Wang, Shengyu; Li, Lijun; Zhu, Xianghui; Qiao, Xiaoqiang

    In this study, new metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) nanocrystals modified SiO2 core-shell microspheres were designed with cationic ionic liquids (ILs) 1,3-bis(4-carboxybutyl)imidazolium bromide (ILI) as organic ligands. By further adjustment the growth cycles, the new ILI-01@SiO2 core-shell stationary phase was facilely fabricated. The developed stationary phase was respectively characterized via element analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. Because the introduction of cationic imidazolium-based ILs ILI for fabrication of the MOFs nanocrystals shell, the new stationary phase exhibits the retention mechanism of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC). Many polar samples, such as amides, vitamins, nucleic acid bases, and nucleosides, were utilized to investigate the performance of the prepared ILI-01@SiO2 column. Compared to the conventional aminosilica column, the new ILI-01@SiO2 column displays high separation selectivity in a shorter separation time. Furthermore, the new ILI-01@SiO2 column was also used for detection of illegal melamine addition in the baby formula. All the above results demonstrate the new ILI-01@SiO2 core-shell stationary phase is of good potentials for high-selectivity separation the polar samples.

  2. Investigation of Metal Bioavailability and Microbial Metal Utilization in Methane Seep Ecosystems through Integration of Geochemical and Biological Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, J. B.; Gadh, V.; Steele, J. A.; Adkins, J. F.; Orphan, V. J.

    2012-12-01

    Methane hydrate seeps are important sources of greenhouse gases and host unique microbial communities that couple anaerobic oxidation of methane and sulfate reduction. Microbial enzymes that catalyze the reactions driving these anaerobic metabolisms require transition metals such as Fe, Ni, Co, Zn, and Mo as essential cofactors. These metals are expected to be drawn down to low concentrations by precipitation as sulfide phases in the highly sulfidic porewaters at methane seep ecosystems. However, in situ concentrations of biologically-important metals in sulfidic methane seep pore fluids and the relative importance of different metals for anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) vs. sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) are unknown. We are integrating geochemical and metagenomic datasets with nano-scale maps of cellular metal distributions to gain insights into metal bioavailability and utilization in methane seep ecosystems. We have measured porewater profiles of dissolved metals (V, Ni, Cu, Co, Fe, Mn, Zn, Mo and W) from three habitat types at Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon: Calyptogena clam beds, microbial mats and sites with low methane flux. Highly sulfidic sediment porewaters beneath microbial mats contained the lowest metal concentrations, suggesting that microbes inhabiting these environments may be limited by metal scarcity. Cobalt occurred at particularly low abundances (≤5 nM in all cores and frequently at sub-nanomolar levels). We also analyzed the taxonomic distribution of ABC (ATP-binding cassette) metal transporters in metagenomes from environmentally-enriched consortia of ANME-2 and SRB from Eel River Basin methane seeps. Our findings suggest that both ANME and SRB possess genes encoding ABC transporters with high affinity for Fe, Ni, Co, Zn and Mo. Combined with our geochemical data, these results imply that ANME-SRB consortia in highly sulfidic environments have specialized mechanisms that allow them to acquire metal micronutrients

  3. Effects of inorganic acids and divalent hydrated metal cations (Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+)) on γ-AlOOH sol-gel process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Xia, Yuguo; Zhang, Li; Chen, Dairong; Jiao, Xiuling

    2015-11-07

    In-depth understanding of the sol-gel process plays an essential role in guiding the preparation of new materials. Herein, the effects of different inorganic acids (HCl, HNO3 and H2SO4) and divalent hydrated metal cations (Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+)) on γ-AlOOH sol-gel process were studied based on experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In these experiments, the sol originating from the γ-AlOOH suspension was formed only with the addition of HCl and HNO3, but not with H2SO4. Furthermore, the DFT calculations showed that the strong adsorption of HSO4(-) on the surface of the γ-AlOOH particles, and the hydrogen in HSO4(-) pointing towards the solvent lead to an unstable configuration of electric double layer (EDL). In the experiment, the gelation time sequence of γ-AlOOH sol obtained by adding metal ions changed when the ionic strength was equal to or greater than 0.198 mol kg(-1). The DFT calculations demonstrated that the adsorption energy of hydrated metal ions on the γ-AlOOH surface can actually make a difference in the sol-gel process.

  4. Effect of cation driven loading of dibenzo-18-crown-6 in Nafion-117 membrane on the diffusion and transport behavior of alkali metal ions.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, A; Goswami, A

    2009-10-01

    The possibility of enhancing the selectivity to separate the alkali metal ions was studied by loading dibenzo-18-crown-6 (DB18C6) in Li(+), Na(+), K(+), and Cs(+) form of cation exchange membrane, Nafion-117 (M-Naf-Cr where M = Li, Na, K, and Cs). DB18C6 was incorporated in Nafion-117 in corresponding ionic forms. Presence of DB18C6 in Nafion-117 was confirmed by FTIR. Self-diffusion and ion exchange kinetics of the alkali metal ions were studied in these membranes. It was observed that the diffusion in the membrane slowed down drastically from Li(+) to all other monovalent alkali metal ions. Two compartment cell experiments were done with DB18C6 loaded Cs(+)- form of Nafion-117 (Cs-Naf-Cr) membrane to study the transport of Na(+) and Cs(+) ions. No transport of ions was observed. When the same experiment were performed by replacing Li(+) of Li-Naf-Cr with Cs(+) (Cs-Li-Naf-Cr), transport of Cs(+) and H(+) were observed at much faster time scale compared to Cs-Naf-Cr. The selectivity of Cs(+) over Li(+) was enhanced by a factor of about 6 when Li-Naf-Cr was used in place Li(+) form of Nafion-117 for the transport experiments.

  5. CATION EXCHANGER1 Cosegregates with Cadmium Tolerance in the Metal Hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri and Plays a Role in Limiting Oxidative Stress in Arabidopsis Spp.

    PubMed

    Baliardini, Cecilia; Meyer, Claire-Lise; Salis, Pietrino; Saumitou-Laprade, Pierre; Verbruggen, Nathalie

    2015-09-01

    Arabidopsis halleri is a model species for the study of plant adaptation to extreme metallic conditions. In this species, cadmium (Cd) tolerance seems to be constitutive, and the mechanisms underlying the trait are still poorly understood. A previous quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis performed on A. halleri × Arabidopsis lyrata backcross population1 identified the metal-pump gene Heavy Metal ATPase4 as the major genetic determinant for Cd tolerance. However, although necessary, Heavy Metal ATPase4 alone is not sufficient for determining this trait. After fine mapping, a gene encoding a calcium(2+)/hydrogen(+) antiporter, cation/hydrogen(+) exchanger1 (CAX1), was identified as a candidate gene for the second QTL of Cd tolerance in A. halleri. Backcross population1 individuals displaying the A. halleri allele for the CAX1 locus exhibited significantly higher CAX1 expression levels compared with the ones with the A. lyrata allele, and a positive correlation between CAX1 expression and Cd tolerance was observed. Here, we show that this QTL is conditional and that it is only detectable at low external Ca concentration. CAX1 expression in both roots and shoots was higher in A. halleri than in the close Cd-sensitive relative species A. lyrata and Arabidopsis thaliana. Moreover, CAX1 loss of function in A. thaliana led to higher Cd sensitivity at low concentration of Ca, higher sensitivity to methylviologen, and stronger accumulation of reactive oxygen species after Cd treatment. Overall, this study identifies a unique genetic determinant of Cd tolerance in the metal hyperaccumulator A. halleri and offers a new twist for the function of CAX1 in plants. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Possibility of biological micromachining used for metal removal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, D; Li, Y

    1998-04-01

    Besides the physical and chemical machining methods, a biological machining method has been presented. The experimental results show that machining of pure iron, pure copper and constantan by a special bacterium,Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, was possible. A micro gear and grooves on pure copper piece were bio-machined. The depth of the groove so bio-machined was directly dependent on the machining time. The biomachining mechanism has been analyzed from the electron-transport chain (ETC) in the T.ferrooxidans membrane, and its developing direction has been also discussed.

  7. [Biological prevention of combined effects of toxic metals and organic substances].

    PubMed

    Degtriareva, T D; Katsnel'son, B A; Minigalieva, I A; Soloboeva, Iu I; Brezgina, S V; Beresnova, O Iu; Beresneva, T A; Slyshkina, T V; Makarenko, N P

    2007-01-01

    The antitoxic activity of several biological prophylactic complexes was studied in subchronic experiments on inbred albino rats exposed to a metal combination of leadchromium-arsenic-manganese-vanadium and benzo(a)pyrene, as well as phenol or naphthalene, and combinations of naphthalene-lead and phenol-naphthalene-lead. It has been shown that upon simultaneous exposure to the study combination of metals and organic poisons, it is advisable to use a biological prophylactic complex involving glutamic acid, a pectin enterosorbent, the multivitamin agent "Vitrum-Kids", calcium, vitamin C, glycine, methionine, and "Iodomarin".

  8. Challenge to assess the toxic contribution of metal cation released from nanomaterials for nanotoxicology - the case of ZnO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mingsheng; Li, Jie; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Su, Huanxing; Chen, Hongzheng; Fujita, Daisuke

    2013-05-01

    The identification of physicochemical factors that govern toxic effects of nanomaterials (NMs) is important for the safe design and synthesis of NMs. The release of metal cations from NMs in cell culture medium and the role of the metal cations in cytotoxicity are still under dispute. Here, we report that removal of NMs such as ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) by centrifugation, the procedure commonly used for the estimation of released ion concentration in nanotoxicology, was incomplete even at a relative centrifugal force of 150 000 × g. In this sense, the Zn concentration in supernatant measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry cannot be regarded as the concentration of free Zn2+ ions which were released from ZnO NPs in cell culture medium. This suggests the urgent need to develop relevant analytical techniques for nanotoxicology. The toxic contribution of released Zn2+ ions to the A549 cell lines was estimated to be only about 10%. We conclude that the cytotoxicity associated with ZnO NPs is not a function of the Zn concentration, suggesting that other factors play an important role in the toxic effect of ZnO NPs.The identification of physicochemical factors that govern toxic effects of nanomaterials (NMs) is important for the safe design and synthesis of NMs. The release of metal cations from NMs in cell culture medium and the role of the metal cations in cytotoxicity are still under dispute. Here, we report that removal of NMs such as ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) by centrifugation, the procedure commonly used for the estimation of released ion concentration in nanotoxicology, was incomplete even at a relative centrifugal force of 150 000 × g. In this sense, the Zn concentration in supernatant measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry cannot be regarded as the concentration of free Zn2+ ions which were released from ZnO NPs in cell culture medium. This suggests the urgent need to develop relevant analytical techniques for nanotoxicology. The

  9. Removal of strontium and transuranics from Hanford tank waste via addition of metal cations and chemical oxidant: FY 1995 test results

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, R.J.; Zacher, A.H.; Schmidt, A.J.; Elmore, M.R.; Elliott, K.R.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Gano, S.R.

    1995-09-01

    Chelating organics and some of their degradation products in the Hanford tank waste, such as EDTA, HEDTA, and NTA act to solubilize strontium and transuranics (TRU) in the tank waste supernatant. Displacement of strontium and TRU will facilitate the removal of these radionuclides via precipitation/filtration, ion exchange, or solvent extraction so that low-level waste feed specifications can be met. Pacific Northwest Laboratory has investigated two methods for releasing organic-complexed strontium and TRU components to allow for effective pretreatment of tank waste supernatant: metal cation addition (to promote displacement and flocculation) and chemical oxidant (pennanganate) addition (to promote chelator destruction/defunctionalization and possibly flocculation). These methods, which can be conducted at near-ambient. temperatures and pressures, could be deployed as intank processes.

  10. Biological cost of tolerance to heavy metals in the mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Mireji, P O; Keating, J; Hassanali, A; Mbogo, C M; Muturi, M N; Githure, J I; Beier, J C

    2010-06-01

    The global rate of heavy metal pollution is rapidly increasing in various habitats. Anopheles malaria vector species (Diptera: Culicidae) appear to tolerate many aquatic habitats with metal pollutants, despite their normal proclivity for 'clean' water (i.e. low levels of organic matter). Investigations were conducted to establish whether there are biological costs for tolerance to heavy metals in Anopheles gambiae Giles sensu stricto and to assess the potential impact of heavy metal pollution on mosquito ecology. Anopheles gambiae s.s. were selected for cadmium, copper or lead tolerance through chronic exposure of immature stages to solutions of the metals for three successive generations. Biological costs were assessed in the fourth generation by horizontal life table analysis. Tolerance in larvae to cadmium (as cadmium chloride, CdCl(2)), copper [as copper II nitrate hydrate, Cu(NO(3))(2) 2.5 H(2)O] and lead [as lead II nitrate, Pb(NO(3))(2)], monitored by changes in LC(50) concentrations of the metals, changed from 6.07 microg/L, 12.42 microg/L and 493.32 microg/L to 4.45 microg/L, 25.02 microg/L and 516.69 microg/L, respectively, after three generations of exposure. The metal-selected strains had a significantly lower magnitude of egg viability, larval and pupal survivorship, adult emergence, fecundity and net reproductive rate than the control strain. The population doubling times were significantly longer and the instantaneous birth rates lower in most metal-selected strains relative to the control strain. Our results suggest that although An. gambiae s.s. displays the potential to develop tolerance to heavy metals, particularly copper, this may occur at a significant biological cost, which can adversely affect its ecological fitness.

  11. On the mechanisms of cation injection in conducting bridge memories: The case of HfO{sub 2} in contact with noble metal anodes (Au, Cu, Ag)

    SciTech Connect

    Saadi, M.; Gonon, P. Vallée, C.; Mannequin, C.; Bsiesy, A.; Grampeix, H.; Jalaguier, E.; Jomni, F.

    2016-03-21

    Resistance switching is studied in HfO{sub 2} as a function of the anode metal (Au, Cu, and Ag) in view of its application to resistive memories (resistive random access memories, RRAM). Current-voltage (I-V) and current-time (I-t) characteristics are presented. For Au anodes, resistance transition is controlled by oxygen vacancies (oxygen-based resistive random access memory, OxRRAM). For Ag anodes, resistance switching is governed by cation injection (Conducting Bridge random access memory, CBRAM). Cu anodes lead to an intermediate case. I-t experiments are shown to be a valuable tool to distinguish between OxRRAM and CBRAM behaviors. A model is proposed to explain the high-to-low resistance transition in CBRAMs. The model is based on the theory of low-temperature oxidation of metals (Cabrera-Mott theory). Upon electron injection, oxygen vacancies and oxygen ions are generated in the oxide. Oxygen ions are drifted to the anode, and an interfacial oxide is formed at the HfO{sub 2}/anode interface. If oxygen ion mobility is low in the interfacial oxide, a negative space charge builds-up at the HfO{sub 2}/oxide interface. This negative space charge is the source of a strong electric field across the interfacial oxide thickness, which pulls out cations from the anode (CBRAM case). Inversely, if oxygen ions migration through the interfacial oxide is important (or if the anode does not oxidize such as Au), bulk oxygen vacancies govern resistance transition (OxRRAM case).

  12. Whole Genome Duplication and Enrichment of Metal Cation Transporters Revealed by De Novo Genome Sequencing of Extremely Halotolerant Black Yeast Hortaea werneckii

    PubMed Central

    Jackman, Shaun; Turk, Martina; Sadowski, Ivan; Nislow, Corey; Jones, Steven; Birol, Inanc; Cimerman, Nina Gunde; Plemenitaš, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Hortaea werneckii, ascomycetous yeast from the order Capnodiales, shows an exceptional adaptability to osmotically stressful conditions. To investigate this unusual phenotype we obtained a draft genomic sequence of a H. werneckii strain isolated from hypersaline water of solar saltern. Two of its most striking characteristics that may be associated with a halotolerant lifestyle are the large genetic redundancy and the expansion of genes encoding metal cation transporters. Although no sexual state of H. werneckii has yet been described, a mating locus with characteristics of heterothallic fungi was found. The total assembly size of the genome is 51.6 Mb, larger than most phylogenetically related fungi, coding for almost twice the usual number of predicted genes (23333). The genome appears to have experienced a relatively recent whole genome duplication, and contains two highly identical gene copies of almost every protein. This is consistent with some previous studies that reported increases in genomic DNA content triggered by exposure to salt stress. In hypersaline conditions transmembrane ion transport is of utmost importance. The analysis of predicted metal cation transporters showed that most types of transporters experienced several gene duplications at various points during their evolution. Consequently they are present in much higher numbers than expected. The resulting diversity of transporters presents interesting biotechnological opportunities for improvement of halotolerance of salt-sensitive species. The involvement of plasma P-type H+ ATPases in adaptation to different concentrations of salt was indicated by their salt dependent transcription. This was not the case with vacuolar H+ ATPases, which were transcribed constitutively. The availability of this genomic sequence is expected to promote the research of H. werneckii. Studying its extreme halotolerance will not only contribute to our understanding of life in hypersaline environments, but should also

  13. On the mechanisms of cation injection in conducting bridge memories: The case of HfO2 in contact with noble metal anodes (Au, Cu, Ag)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadi, M.; Gonon, P.; Vallée, C.; Mannequin, C.; Grampeix, H.; Jalaguier, E.; Jomni, F.; Bsiesy, A.

    2016-03-01

    Resistance switching is studied in HfO2 as a function of the anode metal (Au, Cu, and Ag) in view of its application to resistive memories (resistive random access memories, RRAM). Current-voltage (I-V) and current-time (I-t) characteristics are presented. For Au anodes, resistance transition is controlled by oxygen vacancies (oxygen-based resistive random access memory, OxRRAM). For Ag anodes, resistance switching is governed by cation injection (Conducting Bridge random access memory, CBRAM). Cu anodes lead to an intermediate case. I-t experiments are shown to be a valuable tool to distinguish between OxRRAM and CBRAM behaviors. A model is proposed to explain the high-to-low resistance transition in CBRAMs. The model is based on the theory of low-temperature oxidation of metals (Cabrera-Mott theory). Upon electron injection, oxygen vacancies and oxygen ions are generated in the oxide. Oxygen ions are drifted to the anode, and an interfacial oxide is formed at the HfO2/anode interface. If oxygen ion mobility is low in the interfacial oxide, a negative space charge builds-up at the HfO2/oxide interface. This negative space charge is the source of a strong electric field across the interfacial oxide thickness, which pulls out cations from the anode (CBRAM case). Inversely, if oxygen ions migration through the interfacial oxide is important (or if the anode does not oxidize such as Au), bulk oxygen vacancies govern resistance transition (OxRRAM case).

  14. Surface coating affects behavior of metallic nanoparticles in a biological environment

    PubMed Central

    Jurašin, Darija Domazet; Ćurlin, Marija; Capjak, Ivona; Crnković, Tea; Lovrić, Marija; Babič, Michal; Horák, Daniel; Gajović, Srećko

    2016-01-01

    Summary Silver (AgNPs) and maghemite, i.e., superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are promising candidates for new medical applications, which implies the need for strict information regarding their physicochemical characteristics and behavior in a biological environment. The currently developed AgNPs and SPIONs encompass a myriad of sizes and surface coatings, which affect NPs properties and may improve their biocompatibility. This study is aimed to evaluate the effects of surface coating on colloidal stability and behavior of AgNPs and SPIONs in modelled biological environments using dynamic and electrophoretic light scattering techniques, as well as transmission electron microscopy to visualize the behavior of the NP. Three dispersion media were investigated: ultrapure water (UW), biological cell culture medium without addition of protein (BM), and BM supplemented with common serum protein (BMP). The obtained results showed that different coating agents on AgNPs and SPIONs produced different stabilities in the same biological media. The combination of negative charge and high adsorption strength of coating agents proved to be important for achieving good stability of metallic NPs in electrolyte-rich fluids. Most importantly, the presence of proteins provided colloidal stabilization to metallic NPs in biological fluids regardless of their chemical composition, surface structure and surface charge. In addition, an assessment of AgNP and SPION behavior in real biological fluids, rat whole blood (WhBl) and blood plasma (BlPl), revealed that the composition of a biological medium is crucial for the colloidal stability and type of metallic NP transformation. Our results highlight the importance of physicochemical characterization and stability evaluation of metallic NPs in a variety of biological systems including as many NP properties as possible. PMID:26977382

  15. IR study on the binding mode of metal cations to chemically modified Bombyx mori and Tussah silk fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddei, Paola; Monti, Patrizia; Freddi, Giuliano; Arai, Takayuki; Tsukada, Masuhiro

    2003-06-01

    Bombyx mori ( B. mori) and Tussah ( Antheraea pernyi) silk fibres were modified by treatment with tannic acid (TA) or ethylenediaminetetraacetic (EDTA) dianhydride, subsequently treated with Cu 2+ and Co 2+ solutions, at alkaline pH, and analysed by attenuated total reflectance/infrared spectroscopy to evaluate the changes induced in their structure by metal binding. The spectral changes were correlated to metal binding results obtained by inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. Upon Co 2+ complexation, the spectra of all the B. mori and Tussah silk samples showed a decrease in intensity of the Amide I band with a trend related to the metal uptake. The most relevant changes in the whole spectra were observed for the EDTA- and TA-modified samples in the case of B. mori and Tussah silks, respectively. Upon Cu 2+ complexation, the decrease in intensity of the Amide I band follows the trend of the metal uptake only in the case of Tussah silk. Moreover, the most relevant changes with respect to the untreated sample were observed for the TA-modified B. mori silk sample. The spectral changes were explained by considering the different affinities of the fibres for the modifying reagent, the amount of the metal bound and the relative stability of the complexes formed.

  16. Tautomeric switching and metal-cation sensing of ligand-equipped 4-hydroxy-/4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinolines.

    PubMed

    Todorov, Aleksandar R; Nieger, Martin; Helaja, Juho

    2012-06-04

    Novel 4-hydroxyquinoline (4HQ) based tautomeric switches are reported. 4HQs equipped with coordinative side arms (8-arylimino and 3-piperidin-1-ylmethyl groups) were synthesized to access O- or N-selective chelation of Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) ions by 4HQ. In the case of the monodentate arylimino group, O chelation of metal ions induces concomitant switching of phenol tautomer to the keto form in nonpolar or aprotic media. This change is accompanied by selective and highly sensitive fluorometric sensing of Zn(2+) ions. In the case of the bidentate 8-(quinolin-8-ylimino)methyl side arm, NMR studies in CD(3) OD indicated that both Cd(2+) and Zn(2+) ions afford N chelation for 4HQ, coexisting with tautomeric switching from quinolin-4(1H)-one to quinolin-4-olate. In corroboration, UV/Vis-monitored metal-ion titrations in toluene and methanol implied similar structural changes. Additionally, fluorescence measurements indicated that the metal-triggered tautomeric switching is associated with compound signaling properties. The results are supported by DFT calculations at the B3LYP 6-31G* level. Several X-ray structures of metal-free and metal-chelating 4HQ are presented to support the solution studies. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Environmental sensing of heavy metals through whole cell microbial biosensors: a synthetic biology approach.

    PubMed

    Bereza-Malcolm, Lara Tess; Mann, Gülay; Franks, Ashley Edwin

    2015-05-15

    Whole cell microbial biosensors are offering an alternative means for rapid, on-site heavy metal detection. Based in microorganisms, biosensing constructs are designed and constructed to produce both qualitative and quantitative outputs in response to heavy metal ions. Previous microbial biosensors designs are focused on single-input constructs; however, development of multiplexed systems is resulting in more flexible designs. The movement of microbial biosensors from laboratory based designs toward on-site, functioning heavy metal detectors has been hindered by the toxic nature of heavy metals, along with the lack of specificity of heavy metals promoter elements. Applying a synthetic biology approach with alternative microbial chassis may increase the robustness of microbial biosensors and mitigate these issues. Before full applications are achieved, further consideration has to be made regarding the risk and regulations of whole cell microbial biosensor use in the environment. To this end, a standard framework for future whole cell microbial biosensor design and use is proposed.

  18. Spectral, XRD, SEM and biological activities of transition metal complexes of polydentate ligands containing thiazole moiety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelakantan, M. A.; Marriappan, S. S.; Dharmaraja, J.; Jeyakumar, T.; Muthukumaran, K.

    2008-11-01

    Metal complexes of o-vanillidene-2-aminobenzothiazole have been prepared and characterized by elemental and spectral (vibrational, electronic, 1H NMR and EPR) data as well as magnetic susceptibility measurements and thermo gravimetric analysis (TG/DTA). The low molar conductance values reveal the non-electrolytic nature of these complexes. The elemental analysis suggests that the stoichiometry to be 1:2 (metal:ligand). Magnetic susceptibility data coupled with electronic spectra suggest that two ligands coordinate to each metal atom by phenolic oxygen and imino nitrogen to form high spin octahedral complex with Co(II), Mn(II) and Ni(II). The fifth and sixth position of metal ion is satisfied with water molecules. The thermal behaviour (TG/DTA) of the synthesised complexes shows that the complexes loss water molecules in the first step followed by decomposition of the ligand. Spin Hamiltonian parameters predict a distorted tetrahedral geometry for the copper complex. XRD and SEM analysis provide the crystalline nature and the morphology of the metal complexes. The in vitro biological activity of the metal chelates is tested against the Gram positive bacteria ( Bacillus amyloliquifacians) and gram negative bacteria ( Pseudomonas species), fungus ( Aspergillus niger) and yeast ( Sacchromyces cereviaceae). Most of the metal chelates exhibited higher biological activities.

  19. Influence of biological media on the structure and behavior of ferrocene-containing cationic lipid/DNA complexes used for DNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Golan, Sharon; Aytar, Burcu S; Muller, John P E; Kondo, Yukishige; Lynn, David M; Abbott, Nicholas L; Talmon, Yeshayahu

    2011-06-07

    Biological media affect the physicochemical properties of cationic lipid-DNA complexes (lipoplexes) and can influence their ability to transfect cells. To develop new lipids for efficient DNA delivery, the influence of serum-containing media on the structures and properties of the resulting lipoplexes must be understood. To date, however, a clear and general picture of how serum-containing media influences the structures of lipoplexes has not been established. Some studies suggest that serum can disintegrate lipoplexes formed using certain types of cationic lipids, resulting in the inhibition of transfection. Other studies have demonstrated that lipoplexes formulated from other lipids are stable in the presence of serum and are able to transfect cells efficiently. In this article, we describe the influence of serum-containing media on lipoplexes formed using the redox-active cationic lipid bis(n-ferrocenylundecyl)dimethylammonium bromide (BFDMA). This lipoplex system promotes markedly decreased levels of transgene expression in COS-7 cells as serum concentrations are increased from 0 to 2, 5, 10, and 50% (v/v). To understand the cause of this decrease in transfection efficiency, we used cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and measurements of zeta potential to characterize lipoplexes in cell culture media supplemented with 0, 2, 5, 10, and 50% serum. Cryo-TEM revealed that in serum-free media BFDMA lipoplexes form onionlike, multilamellar nanostructures. However, the presence of serum in the media caused disassociation of the intact multilamellar lipoplexes. At low serum concentrations (2 and 5%), DNA threads appeared to separate from the complex, leaving the nanostructure of the lipoplexes disrupted. At higher serum concentration (10%), disassociation increased and bundles of multilamellae were discharged from the main multilamellar complex. In contrast, lipoplexes characterized in serum-free aqueous salt (Li(2)SO(4)) medium and in OptiMEM cell

  20. Managing heavy metal toxicity stress in plants: biological and biotechnological tools.

    PubMed

    Ovečka, M; Takáč, T

    2014-01-01

    The maintenance of ion homeostasis in plant cells is a fundamental physiological requirement for sustainable plant growth, development and production. Plants exposed to high concentrations of heavy metals must respond in order to avoid the deleterious effects of heavy metal toxicity at the structural, physiological and molecular levels. Plant strategies for coping with heavy metal toxicity are genotype-specific and, at least to some extent, modulated by environmental conditions. There is considerable interest in the mechanisms underpinning plant metal tolerance, a complex process that enables plants to survive metal ion stress and adapt to maintain growth and development without exhibiting symptoms of toxicity. This review briefly summarizes some recent cell biological, molecular and proteomic findings concerning the responses of plant roots to heavy metal ions in the rhizosphere, metal ion-induced reactions at the cell wall-plasma membrane interface, and various aspects of heavy metal ion uptake and transport in plants via membrane transporters. The molecular and genetic approaches that are discussed are analyzed in the context of their potential practical applications in biotechnological approaches for engineering increased heavy metal tolerance in crops and other useful plants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Biological and chemical characterization of metal bioavailability in sediments from Lake Roosevelt, Columbia River, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, J.M.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Ivey, C.D.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Moran, P.W.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the bioavailability and toxicity of copper, zinc, arsenic, cadmium, and lead in sediments from Lake Roosevelt (LR), a reservoir on the Columbia River in Washington, USA that receives inputs of metals from an upstream smelter facility. We characterized chronic sediment toxicity, metal bioaccumulation, and metal concentrations in sediment and pore water from eight study sites: one site upstream in the Columbia River, six sites in the reservoir, and a reference site in an uncontaminated tributary. Total recoverable metal concentrations in LR sediments generally decreased from upstream to downstream in the study area, but sediments from two sites in the reservoir had metal concentrations much lower than adjacent reservoir sites and similar to the reference site, apparently due to erosion of uncontaminated bank soils. Concentrations of acid-volatile sulfide in LR sediments were too low to provide strong controls on metal bioavailability, and selective sediment extractions indicated that metals in most LR sediments were primarily associated with iron and manganese oxides. Oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus) accumulated greatest concentrations of copper from the river sediment, and greatest concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, and lead from reservoir sediments. Chronic toxic effects on amphipods (Hyalella azteca; reduced survival) and midge larvae (Chironomus dilutus; reduced growth) in whole-sediment exposures were generally consistent with predictions of metal toxicity based on empirical and equilibrium partitioning-based sediment quality guidelines. Elevated metal concentrations in pore waters of some LR sediments suggested that metals released from iron and manganese oxides under anoxic conditions contributed to metal bioaccumulation and toxicity. Results of both chemical and biological assays indicate that metals in sediments from both riverine and reservoir habitats of Lake Roosevelt are available to benthic invertebrates. These findings will be used as

  2. Analysis of metal cations and inorganic anions in olive oil mill waste waters by atomic absorption spectroscopy and ion chromatography. Detection of metals bound mainly to the organic polymeric fraction.

    PubMed

    Arienzo, M; Capasso, R

    2000-04-01

    Metal cations were quantitatively detected by atomic absorption spectrometry in samples of olive oil mill waste waters obtained by a pressure process (omww(1)) (K, 17.1; Mg, 2.72; Ca, 2.24; Na, 0.40; Fe, 0.123; Zn, 0.0630; Mn, 0.0147; Cu, 0.00860 g L(-)(1)) and a centrifugation process (omww(2)) (K, 9.80; Mg, 1.65; Ca, 1.35; Na, 0. 162; Fe, 0.0330; Zn, 0.0301; Mn, 0.00910; Cu, 0.00980 g L(-)(1)). The inorganic anions, determined in the same samples by ion chromatography, proved to be Cl(-), H(2)PO(4)(-), F(-), SO(4)(2)(-), and NO(3)(-) (1.61, 1.05, 0.66, 0.52, and 0.023 g L(-)(1), respectively, in omww(1) and 0.61, 0.40, 0.25, 0.20, and 0.0090 g L(-)(1), respectively, in omww(2)). Most of the metal cations were revealed to be bound to the omww organic polymeric fraction (opf), composed of polysaccharides, phenol polymers, and proteins. Opf relative molecular weight was substantially estimated in the range between 1000 and 30000 Da for approximately 75% and in the range from 30000 to 100000 Da for approximately 25%. The free residual cations pool proved to be neutralized by the inorganic counteranions. Finally, the possible exploitation of this material in agriculture and in environmental biotechnology processes is also discussed in the light of its chemical and biochemical oxygen demand parameters.

  3. Metals in biomass: from the biological system of elements to reasons of fractionation and element use.

    PubMed

    Fränzle, Stefan; Markert, Bernd

    2007-09-01

    Metal ions generally share the ability/ tendency of interacting with biological material by forming complexes, except possibly for the heavy alkali metals K, Rb and Cs. This is unrelated to the metals being either essential for sustaining life and its reproduction, apparently insignificant for biology, although perhaps undergoing bioconcentration or even being outright toxic, even at low admission levels. Yet, those different kinds of metal-biomass interactions should in some way depend on properties describing coordination chemistries of these very metals. Nevertheless, both ubiquitously essential metals and others sometimes used in biology should share these properties in numeric terms, since it can be anticipated that they will be distinguished from non-essential and/or toxic ones. These features noted above include bioconcentration, the involvement of metal ions such as Zn, Mg, Cu, Fe, etc. in biocatalysis as crucial components of metalloenzymes and the introduction of a certain set of essential metals common to (almost) all living beings (K, Mg, Mo, Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn), which occurred probably very early in biological evolution by 'natural selection of the chemical elements' (more exactly speaking, of the metallomes). The approach is semiempirical and consists of three consecutive steps: 1) derivation of a regression equation which links complex stability data of different complexes containing the same metal ion to electrochemical data pertinent to the (replaced) ligands, thus describing properties of metal ions in complexes, 2) a graphical representation of the properties--two typical numbers c and x for each metal ion--in some map across the c/x-space, which additionally contains information about biological functions of these metal ions, i.e. whether they are essential in general (e.g. Mg, Mn, Zn) or, for a few organisms of various kinds (e.g. Cd, V), not essential (e.g. rare earth element ions) or even generally highly toxic (Hg, U). It is hypothesized that

  4. Quantitative investigations of cation complexation of photochromic 8-benzothiazole-substituted benzopyran: towards metal-ion sensors.

    PubMed

    Zakharova, Marianna I; Coudret, Christophe; Pimienta, Véronique; Micheau, Jean Claude; Delbaere, Stéphanie; Vermeersch, Gaston; Metelitsa, Anatoly V; Voloshin, Nikolai; Minkin, Vladimir I

    2010-02-01

    The photochromic, thermochromic and metallochromic behaviour of a series of three spiro[indoline-8-(benzothiazol-2-yl)-benzopyrans] has been investigated. The thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of their thermal equilibrium between the ring-closed (spiro) and ring-opened (merocyanine) isomeric forms have been determined using UV-Vis absorption and (1)H NMR spectroscopies. By adding Co(ii) and Ni(ii) ions in acetonitrile solution, 1 : 1 and 1 : 2 metal : merocyanine complexes are formed simultaneously. Using appropriate numerical methods, the kinetic analysis of the complexation allowed us to determine accurately key thermodynamic and spectroscopic parameters of the metal complexes. Results showed that the complexation strength is very sensitive to the size of the indoline nitrogen substituent. Complexation can be reversed by shining white light on the coloured complexes which regenerates the inactive spiropyran form, and releases the metallic ion; hence, these systems display fully reversible negative photochromism. The Zn(ii) complexes exhibit intense fluorescence in the 600-800 nm wavelength range. All these behaviours make these spiropyrans bearing benzothiazole heterocycles promising building blocks for the future construction of photodynamic chemosensors for transition metal ions.

  5. Transition metal associations with primary biological particles in sea spray aerosol generated in a wave channel.

    PubMed

    Guasco, Timothy L; Cuadra-Rodriguez, Luis A; Pedler, Byron E; Ault, Andrew P; Collins, Douglas B; Zhao, Defeng; Kim, Michelle J; Ruppel, Matthew J; Wilson, Scott C; Pomeroy, Robert S; Grassian, Vicki H; Azam, Farooq; Bertram, Timothy H; Prather, Kimberly A

    2014-01-21

    In the ocean, breaking waves generate air bubbles which burst at the surface and eject sea spray aerosol (SSA), consisting of sea salt, biogenic organic species, and primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP). Our overall understanding of atmospheric biological particles of marine origin remains poor. Here, we perform a control experiment, using an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer to measure the mass spectral signatures of individual particles generated by bubbling a salt solution before and after addition of heterotrophic marine bacteria. Upon addition of bacteria, an immediate increase occurs in the fraction of individual particle mass spectra containing magnesium, organic nitrogen, and phosphate marker ions. These biological signatures are consistent with 21% of the supermicrometer SSA particles generated in a previous study using breaking waves in an ocean-atmosphere wave channel. Interestingly, the wave flume mass spectral signatures also contain metal ions including silver, iron, and chromium. The nascent SSA bioparticles produced in the wave channel are hypothesized to be as follows: (1) whole or fragmented bacterial cells which bioaccumulated metals and/or (2) bacteria-derived colloids or biofilms which adhered to the metals. This study highlights the potential for transition metals, in combination with specific biomarkers, to serve as unique indicators for the presence of marine PBAP, especially in metal-impacted coastal regions.

  6. New method for calculating comparative toxicity potential of cationic metals in freshwater: application to copper, nickel, and zinc.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Nilima; Diamond, Miriam L; van de Meent, Dik; Huijbregts, Mark A J; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M; Guinée, Jeroen

    2010-07-01

    Current practice in chemical hazard ranking and toxic impact assessments is to estimate fate and toxicity assuming the chemical exists in dissolved and particulate phases and, for metals, that all dissolved species are equally bioavailable. This introduces significant error since metal effects are related to the truly dissolved phase and free metal ion within it, not the total dissolved phase. We introduce a Bioavailability Factor (BF) to the calculation of hazard or Comparative Toxicity Potentials (CTPs) (also known as Characterization Factors; CFs) for use in Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA). The method uses for calculation (1) USEtox for environmental fate, (2) WHAM 6.0 for metal partitioning and speciation in aquatic systems, and (3) Biotic Ligand Model (BLM) for average toxicity. For 12 EU water-types, we calculated medians (range) of CTPs of 1.5 x 10(4) (1.5 x 10(2) to 1.2 x 10(5)), 5.6 x 10(4) (9.4 x 10(3) to 4.1 x 10(5)), and 2.1 x 10(4) (7 x 10(3) to 5.8 x 10(4)) day*m(3)/kg for Cu, Ni, and Zn, respectively, which are up to approximately 1000 times lower than previous values. The greatest contributor to variability in CTPs was the BF, followed by toxicity Effect Factor (EF). The importance of the choice of water-type is shown by changes in the relative ranking of CTPs, which are equally influenced by water chemistry and inherent metal-specific differences.

  7. Metal-phosphate binders

    DOEpatents

    Howe, Beth Ann [Lewistown, IL; Chaps-Cabrera, Jesus Guadalupe [Coahuila, MX

    2009-05-12

    A metal-phosphate binder is provided. The binder may include an aqueous phosphoric acid solution, a metal-cation donor including a metal other than aluminum, an aluminum-cation donor, and a non-carbohydrate electron donor.

  8. Influence of Transition Metal Cationization versus Sodium Cationization and Protonation on the Gas-Phase Tautomeric Conformations and Stability of Uracil: Application to [Ura+Cu]+ and [Ura+Ag]+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinyemi, T. E.; Wu, R. R.; Nei, Y.-W.; Cunningham, N. A.; Roy, H. A.; Steill, J. D.; Berden, G.; Oomens, J.; Rodgers, M. T.

    2017-09-01

    The gas-phase conformations of transition metal cation-uracil complexes, [Ura+Cu]+ and [Ura+Ag]+, were examined via infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. IRMPD action spectra were measured over the IR fingerprint and hydrogen-stretching regions. Structures and linear IR spectra of the stable tautomeric conformations of these complexes were initially determined at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level. The four most stable structures computed were also examined at the B3LYP/def2-TZVPPD level to improve the accuracy of the predicted IR spectra. Two very favorable modes of binding are found for [Ura+Cu]+ and [Ura+Ag]+ that involve O2N3 bidentate binding to the 2-keto-4-hydroxy minor tautomer and O4 monodentate binding to the canonical 2,4-diketo tautomer of Ura. Comparisons between the measured IRMPD and calculated IR spectra enable elucidation of the conformers present in the experiments. These comparisons indicate that both favorable binding modes are represented in the experimental tautomeric conformations of [Ura+Cu]+ and [Ura+Ag]+. B3LYP suggests that Cu+ exhibits a slight preference for O4 binding, whereas Ag+ exhibits a slight preference for O2N3 binding. In contrast, MP2 suggests that both Cu+ and Ag+ exhibit a more significant preference for O2N3 binding. The relative band intensities suggest that O4 binding conformers comprise a larger portion of the population for [Ura+Ag]+ than [Ura+Cu]+. The dissociation behavior and relative stabilities of the [Ura+M]+ complexes, M+ = Cu+, Ag+, H+, and Na+) are examined via energy-resolved collision-induced dissociation experiments. The IRMPD spectra, dissociation behaviors, and binding preferences of Cu+ and Ag+ are compared with previous and present results for those of H+ and Na+. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. Influence of Transition Metal Cationization versus Sodium Cationization and Protonation on the Gas-Phase Tautomeric Conformations and Stability of Uracil: Application to [Ura+Cu](+) and [Ura+Ag]().

    PubMed

    Akinyemi, T E; Wu, R R; Nei, Y-W; Cunningham, N A; Roy, H A; Steill, J D; Berden, G; Oomens, J; Rodgers, M T

    2017-09-11

    The gas-phase conformations of transition metal cation-uracil complexes, [Ura+Cu](+) and [Ura+Ag](+), were examined via infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. IRMPD action spectra were measured over the IR fingerprint and hydrogen-stretching regions. Structures and linear IR spectra of the stable tautomeric conformations of these complexes were initially determined at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level. The four most stable structures computed were also examined at the B3LYP/def2-TZVPPD level to improve the accuracy of the predicted IR spectra. Two very favorable modes of binding are found for [Ura+Cu](+) and [Ura+Ag](+) that involve O2N3 bidentate binding to the 2-keto-4-hydroxy minor tautomer and O4 monodentate binding to the canonical 2,4-diketo tautomer of Ura. Comparisons between the measured IRMPD and calculated IR spectra enable elucidation of the conformers present in the experiments. These comparisons indicate that both favorable binding modes are represented in the experimental tautomeric conformations of [Ura+Cu](+) and [Ura+Ag](+). B3LYP suggests that Cu(+) exhibits a slight preference for O4 binding, whereas Ag(+) exhibits a slight preference for O2N3 binding. In contrast, MP2 suggests that both Cu(+) and Ag(+) exhibit a more significant preference for O2N3 binding. The relative band intensities suggest that O4 binding conformers comprise a larger portion of the population for [Ura+Ag](+) than [Ura+Cu](+). The dissociation behavior and relative stabilities of the [Ura+M](+) complexes, M(+) = Cu(+), Ag(+), H(+), and Na(+)) are examined via energy-resolved collision-induced dissociation experiments. The IRMPD spectra, dissociation behaviors, and binding preferences of Cu(+) and Ag(+) are compared with previous and present results for those of H(+) and Na(+). Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  10. Metal cation detection in positive ion mode electrospray ionization mass spectrometry using a tetracationic salt as a gas-phase ion-pairing agent: evaluation of the effect of chelating agents on detection sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chengdong; Dodbiba, Edra; Padivitage, Nilusha L T; Breitbach, Zachary S; Armstrong, Daniel W

    2012-12-30

    The detection of metal cations continues to be essential in many scientific and industrial areas of interest. The most common electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) approach involves chelating the metal ions and detecting the organometallic complex in the negative ion mode. However, it is well known that negative ion mode ESI-MS is generally less sensitive than the positive ion mode. To achieve greater sensitivity, it is necessary to examine the feasibility of detecting the chelated metal cations in positive ion mode ESI-MS. Since highly solvated native metal cations have relatively low ionization efficiency in ESI-MS, and can be difficult to detect in the positive ion mode, a tetracationic ion-pairing agent was added to form a complex with the negatively charged metal chelate. The use of the ion-pairing agent leads to the generation of an overall positively charged complex, which can be detected at higher m/z values in the positive ion mode by electrospray ionization linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry. Thirteen chelating agents with diverse structures were evaluated in this study. The nature of the chelating agent played as important a role as was previously determined for cationic pairing agents. The detection limits of six metal cations reached sub-picogram levels and significant improvements were observed when compared to negative ion mode detection where the metal-chelates were monitored without adding the ion-pairing reagent (IPR). Also, selective reaction monitoring (SRM) analyses were performed on the ternary complexes, which improved detection limits by one to three orders of magnitude. With this method it was possible to analyze the metal cations in the positive ion mode ESI-MS with the advantage of speed, sensitivity and selectivity. The optimum solution pH for this type of analysis is 5-7. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) further increases the sensitivity. Speciation is straightforward making this a broadly useful approach for the

  11. Inorganic concepts relevant to metal binding, activity, and toxicity in a biological system

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeschele, J.D. . Parke-Davis Pharmaceutical Research Div.); Turner, J.E.; England, M.W. )

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review selected physical and inorganic concepts and factors which might be important in assessing and/or understanding the fact and disposition of a metal system in a biological environment. Hopefully, such inquiries will ultimately permit us to understand, rationalize, and predict differences and trends in biological effects as a function of the basic nature of a metal system and, in optimal cases, serve as input to a system of guidelines for the notion of Chemical Dosimetry.'' The plan of this paper is to first review, in general terms, the basic principles of the Crystal Field Theory (CFT), a unifying theory of bonding in metal complexes. This will provide the necessary theoretical background for the subsequent discussion of selected concepts and factors. 21 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Biostable L-DNAzyme for Sensing of Metal Ions in Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    DNAzymes, an important type of metal ion-dependent functional nucleic acid, are widely applied in bioanalysis and biomedicine. However, the use of DNAzymes in practical applications has been impeded by the intrinsic drawbacks of natural nucleic acids, such as interferences from nuclease digestion and protein binding, as well as undesired intermolecular interactions with other nucleic acids. On the basis of reciprocal chiral substrate specificity, the enantiomer of D-DNAzyme, L-DNAzyme, could initiate catalytic cleavage activity with the same achiral metal ion as a cofactor. Meanwhile, by using the advantage of nonbiological L-DNAzyme, which is not subject to the interferences of biological matrixes, as recognition units, a facile and stable L-DNAzyme sensor was proposed for sensing metal ions in complex biological samples and live cells. PMID:26691677

  13. Biologically activated noble metal alloys at the nanoscale: for lithium ion battery anodes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun Jung; Lee, Youjin; Oh, Dahyun; Chen, Tiffany; Ceder, Gerbrand; Belcher, Angela M

    2010-07-14

    We report the synthesis and electrochemical activity of gold and silver noble metals and their alloy nanowires using multiple virus clones as anode materials for lithium ion batteries. Using two clones, one for specificity (p8#9 virus) and one versatility (E4 virus), noble metal nanowires of high-aspect ratio with diameters below 50 nm were successfully synthesized with control over particle sizes, morphologies, and compositions. The biologically derived noble metal alloy nanowires showed electrochemical activities toward lithium even when the electrodes were prepared from bulk powder forms. The improvement in capacity retention was accomplished by alloy formation and surface stabilization. Although the cost of noble metals renders them a less ideal choice for lithium ion batteries, these noble metal/alloy nanowires serve as great model systems to study electrochemically induced transformation at the nanoscale. Given the demonstration of the electrochemical activity of noble metal alloy nanowires with various compositions, the M13 biological toolkit extended its utility for the study on the basic electrochemical property of materials.

  14. Noble-Metal-Free Janus-like Structures by Cation Exchange for Z-Scheme Photocatalytic Water Splitting under Broadband Light Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qichen; Liu, Dong; Zhang, Ning; Ye, Wei; Ju, Huanxin; Shi, Lei; Long, Ran; Zhu, Junfa; Xiong, Yujie

    2017-03-15

    Z-scheme water splitting is a promising approach based on high-performance photocatalysis by harvesting broadband solar energy. Its efficiency depends on the well-defined interfaces between two semiconductors for the charge kinetics and their exposed surfaces for chemical reactions. Herein, we report a facile cation-exchange approach to obtain compounds with both properties without the need for noble metals by forming Janus-like structures consisting of γ-MnS and Cu7 S4 with high-quality interfaces. The Janus-like γ-MnS/Cu7 S4 structures displayed dramatically enhanced photocatalytic hydrogen production rates of up to 718 μmol g(-1)  h(-1) under full-spectrum irradiation. Upon further integration with an MnOx oxygen-evolution cocatalyst, overall water splitting was accomplished with the Janus structures. This work provides insight into the surface and interface design of hybrid photocatalysts, and offers a noble-metal-free approach to broadband photocatalytic hydrogen production.

  15. Extraction behavior of divalent metal cations in ionic liquid chelate extraction systems using 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imides and thenoyltrifluoroacetone.

    PubMed

    Kidani, Keiji; Hirayama, Naoki; Imura, Hisanori

    2008-10-01

    The extraction behavior of several divalent metal cations (M(2+)) in ionic liquid chelate extraction systems was investigated using several 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ionic liquids ([Rmim][Tf(2)N]) as extraction solvent and thenoyltrifluoroacetone (Htta) as extractant. The behavior was compared with that using less hydrophobic 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphates ([Rmim][PF(6)]). The extracted species in the [Rmim][Tf(2)N] systems were neutral M(tta)(2) for M = Cu and anionic M(tta)(3)(-) for M = Mn, Co, Ni, Zn and Cd. Conversion of ionic liquid anion from PF(6)(-) to more hydrophobic Tf(2)N(-) resulted in changing the species extracted for Ni(2+) from hydrated neutral complex to hydrophobic anionic one. Furthermore, the extractability for these metals was governed by the hydrophobicity of ionic liquid ions. Thus, in the ionic liquid chelate extraction system, selection of a suitable ionic liquid as extraction phase seems to be an important factor for enhancement of extraction selectivity.

  16. Zeolite-type metal organic frameworks immobilized Eu³⁺ for cation sensing in aqueous environment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Yan, Bing

    2015-12-01

    A novel luminescent lanthanide metal organic framework (Ln-MOF) is synthesized by in situ encapsulating Eu(3+) ions to partial replace the transition-metal clusters in the channels of CPM-17-Zn nanocrystals. The Eu(3+) functionalized zeolite-type MOF hybrid system shows excellent luminescence property and photo-stability in aqueous environment for the sensitization and protection from the host framework. Subsequently, as a highly selective and sensitive sensor, its nanocrystals can be used to detect Cd(2+) in aqueous solution. In addition, the possible sensing mechanism based on ion exchange is discussed in detail. This work is one of the few cases for detecting Cd(2+) in aqueous solution based on a zeolite-type MOF. The good fluorescence stability, low detection limit and broad linear range in aqueous environment make this probe to be expected to have potential application in intracellular sensing and imaging of Cd(2+) potentially.

  17. S/G-1: an ab initio force-field blending frozen Hermite Gaussian densities and distributed multipoles. Proof of concept and first applications to metal cations.

    PubMed

    Chaudret, Robin; Gresh, Nohad; Narth, Christophe; Lagardère, Louis; Darden, Thomas A; Cisneros, G Andrés; Piquemal, Jean-Philip

    2014-09-04

    response level. This opens up the possibility of embodying explicit scalar relativistic effects in molecular mechanics thanks to the direct transferability of ab initio pseudopotentials. Therefore, incorporating GEM-like electron density for a metal cation enable the introduction of nonambiguous short-range quantum effects within any point-dipole based polarizable force field without the need of an extensive parametrization.