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Sample records for biological part assembly

  1. BioPartsBuilder: a synthetic biology tool for combinatorial assembly of biological parts

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kun; Stracquadanio, Giovanni; Luo, Jingchuan; Boeke, Jef D.; Bader, Joel S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Combinatorial assembly of DNA elements is an efficient method for building large-scale synthetic pathways from standardized, reusable components. These methods are particularly useful because they enable assembly of multiple DNA fragments in one reaction, at the cost of requiring that each fragment satisfies design constraints. We developed BioPartsBuilder as a biologist-friendly web tool to design biological parts that are compatible with DNA combinatorial assembly methods, such as Golden Gate and related methods. It retrieves biological sequences, enforces compliance with assembly design standards and provides a fabrication plan for each fragment. Availability and implementation: BioPartsBuilder is accessible at http://public.biopartsbuilder.org and an Amazon Web Services image is available from the AWS Market Place (AMI ID: ami-508acf38). Source code is released under the MIT license, and available for download at https://github.com/baderzone/biopartsbuilder. Contact: joel.bader@jhu.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26568632

  2. 2ab assembly: a methodology for automatable, high-throughput assembly of standard biological parts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    There is growing demand for robust DNA assembly strategies to quickly and accurately fabricate genetic circuits for synthetic biology. One application of this technology is reconstitution of multi-gene assemblies. Here, we integrate a new software tool chain with 2ab assembly and show that it is robust enough to generate 528 distinct composite parts with an error-free success rate of 96%. Finally, we discuss our findings in the context of its implications for biosafety and biosecurity. PMID:23305072

  3. Unique nucleotide sequence-guided assembly of repetitive DNA parts for synthetic biology applications

    SciTech Connect

    Torella, JP; Lienert, F; Boehm, CR; Chen, JH; Way, JC; Silver, PA

    2014-08-07

    Recombination-based DNA construction methods, such as Gibson assembly, have made it possible to easily and simultaneously assemble multiple DNA parts, and they hold promise for the development and optimization of metabolic pathways and functional genetic circuits. Over time, however, these pathways and circuits have become more complex, and the increasing need for standardization and insulation of genetic parts has resulted in sequence redundancies-for example, repeated terminator and insulator sequences-that complicate recombination-based assembly. We and others have recently developed DNA assembly methods, which we refer to collectively as unique nucleotide sequence (UNS)-guided assembly, in which individual DNA parts are flanked with UNSs to facilitate the ordered, recombination-based assembly of repetitive sequences. Here we present a detailed protocol for UNS-guided assembly that enables researchers to convert multiple DNA parts into sequenced, correctly assembled constructs, or into high-quality combinatorial libraries in only 2-3 d. If the DNA parts must be generated from scratch, an additional 2-5 d are necessary. This protocol requires no specialized equipment and can easily be implemented by a student with experience in basic cloning techniques.

  4. Unique nucleotide sequence (UNS)-guided assembly of repetitive DNA parts for synthetic biology applications

    PubMed Central

    Torella, Joseph P.; Lienert, Florian; Boehm, Christian R.; Chen, Jan-Hung; Way, Jeffrey C.; Silver, Pamela A.

    2016-01-01

    Recombination-based DNA construction methods, such as Gibson assembly, have made it possible to easily and simultaneously assemble multiple DNA parts and hold promise for the development and optimization of metabolic pathways and functional genetic circuits. Over time, however, these pathways and circuits have become more complex, and the increasing need for standardization and insulation of genetic parts has resulted in sequence redundancies — for example repeated terminator and insulator sequences — that complicate recombination-based assembly. We and others have recently developed DNA assembly methods that we refer to collectively as unique nucleotide sequence (UNS)-guided assembly, in which individual DNA parts are flanked with UNSs to facilitate the ordered, recombination-based assembly of repetitive sequences. Here we present a detailed protocol for UNS-guided assembly that enables researchers to convert multiple DNA parts into sequenced, correctly-assembled constructs, or into high-quality combinatorial libraries in only 2–3 days. If the DNA parts must be generated from scratch, an additional 2–5 days are necessary. This protocol requires no specialized equipment and can easily be implemented by a student with experience in basic cloning techniques. PMID:25101822

  5. Biologically-Based Self-Assembling Hydrogels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP014396 TITLE: Biologically-Based Self-Assembling Hydrogels DISTRIBUTION...Based Self-Assembling Hydrogels Brandon L. Seal and Alyssa Panitch Department of Bioengineering, Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85287-9709, U.S.A...Factor Xllla substrate were synthesized and conjugated to methacroylated dextran or acrylated poly(ethylene glycol). Peptide-conjugated dextran was added

  6. Prions: Protein assemblies that convey biological information

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, David W.; Kaufman, Sarah K.; Holmes, Brandon B.; Diamond, Marc I.

    2016-01-01

    Prions derived from the prion protein (PrP) were first characterized as infectious agents that transmit pathology between individuals. However, the majority of cases of neurodegeneration caused by PrP prions occur sporadically. Proteins that self-assemble as cross-beta sheet amyloids are a defining pathological feature of infectious prion disorders and all major age-associated neurodegenerative diseases. In fact, multiple non-infectious proteins exhibit properties of template-driven self-assembly that are strikingly similar to PrP. Evidence suggests that like PrP, many proteins form aggregates that propagate between cells and convert cognate monomer into ordered assemblies. We now recognize that numerous proteins assemble into macromolecular complexes as part of normal physiology, some of which are self-amplifying. This review highlights similarities among infectious and non-infectious neurodegenerative diseases associated with prions, emphasizing the normal and pathogenic roles of higher-order protein assemblies. We propose that studies of the structural and cellular biology of pathological vs. physiological aggregates will be mutually informative. PMID:26844828

  7. Method of forming and assembly of parts

    DOEpatents

    Ripley, Edward B.

    2010-12-28

    A method of assembling two or more parts together that may be metal, ceramic, metal and ceramic parts, or parts that have different CTE. Individual parts are formed and sintered from particles that leave a network of interconnecting porosity in each sintered part. The separate parts are assembled together and then a fill material is infiltrated into the assembled, sintered parts using a method such as capillary action, gravity, and/or pressure. The assembly is then cured to yield a bonded and fully or near-fully dense part that has the desired physical and mechanical properties for the part's intended purpose. Structural strength may be added to the parts by the inclusion of fibrous materials.

  8. Biologically Assembled Quantum Electronic Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-07

    34 2011 APS March Meeting, Dallas,, Texas. A.D. Kent "Random Field Ferromagnetism in Single Crystals on Molecular Magnets" at Quantum Coherent behavior...of Spins II, UCF, Orlando, Florida, December 2012. A.D. Kent "Random Field Dipolar Using Ferromagnetism in Single Crystals of Molecular Magnet Mn12...Xingchen Ye, Jun Chen, Christopher B. Murray. Polymorphism in Self-Assembled AB6 Binary Nanocrystal Superlattices, J. Am. Chem. Soc. (01 2011) 12/22/2011

  9. DNA assembly for plant biology: techniques and tools.

    PubMed

    Patron, Nicola J

    2014-06-01

    As the speed and accuracy of genome sequencing improves, there are ever-increasing resources available for the design and construction of synthetic DNA parts. These can be used to engineer plant genomes to produce new functions or to elucidate the function of endogenous sequences. Until recently the assembly of amplified or cloned sequences into large and complex designs was a limiting step in plant synthetic biology and biotechnology. A number of new methods for assembling DNA molecules have been developed in the last few years, several of which have been applied to the production of molecules used to modify plant genomes.

  10. Biological Nanoplatforms for Self-Assembled Electronics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-24

    Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 NUMBER(S) AFRL -RV-PS-TR-2015-0024 12. DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution is...LIST DTIC/OCP 8725 John J. Kingman Rd, Suite 0944 Ft Belvoir, VA 22060-6218 1 cy AFRL /RVIL Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 2 cys Official... AFRL -RV-PS- AFRL -RV-PS- TR-2015-0024 TR-2015-0024 BIOLOGICAL NANOPLATFORMS FOR SELF- ASSEMBLED ELECTRONICS Stephen Jett University of New Mexico 1

  11. The biological microprocessor, or how to build a computer with biological parts

    PubMed Central

    Moe-Behrens, Gerd HG

    2013-01-01

    Systemics, a revolutionary paradigm shift in scientific thinking, with applications in systems biology, and synthetic biology, have led to the idea of using silicon computers and their engineering principles as a blueprint for the engineering of a similar machine made from biological parts. Here we describe these building blocks and how they can be assembled to a general purpose computer system, a biological microprocessor. Such a system consists of biological parts building an input / output device, an arithmetic logic unit, a control unit, memory, and wires (busses) to interconnect these components. A biocomputer can be used to monitor and control a biological system. PMID:24688733

  12. Engineering colloidal assembly via biological adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiddessen, Amy Lynn

    Due to highly specialized recognition properties, biological receptor-ligand interactions offer valuable tools for engineering the assembly of novel colloidal materials. A unique sub-class of these macromolecules, called selectins, was exploited to develop binary suspensions where particles are programmed to associate reversibly or irreversibly via specific biomolecular cross-linking. Flow cytometry and videomicroscopy were used to examine factors controlling suspension assembly and structure, including biomolecular affinity and density, and individual and total particle volume fractions. By functionalizing small (RA = 0.47 mum) and larger (RB = 2.75 mum) particles with high surface densities of complementary E-selectin/sialyl Lewis X (sLeX) carbohydrate chemistry, a series of structures, from colloidal micelles (large particle coated with smaller particles) and clusters, to rings and elongated chains, was synthesized by decreasing the number ratio, NA/NB, of small (A) to large (B) particles (2 ≤ NA/NB ≤ 200) at low total volume fraction (10-4 ≤ φT ≤ 10-3 ). Using significantly lower surface densities, the low affinity binding between E-selectin and sLeX was exploited to create particles that interact reversibly, and average particle interaction lifetimes were tuned from minutes down to single selectin-carbohydrate bond lifetimes (≈1 s) by reducing sLeX density, a significant step toward assembling ordered microstructures. Particle binding lifetimes were analyzed with a receptor-ligand binding model, yielding estimates for molecular parameters, including on rate, 10-2 s-1 < kon < 10-1 s-1, and unstressed off rate, 0.25 s-1 ≤ kor ≤ 1.0 s-1, that characterize the docking dynamics of particles. Finally, at significantly higher volume fraction (φ T ≥ 10-1) and low number ratio, the rheology of space-filling networks crosslinked by high affinity streptavidin-biotin chemistry was probed to acquire knowledge on bulk properties of biocolloidal suspensions

  13. Supramolecular Assemblies Responsive to Biomolecules toward Biological Applications.

    PubMed

    Shigemitsu, Hajime; Hamachi, Itaru

    2015-10-01

    Stimuli-responsive supramolecular assemblies consisting of small molecules are attractive functional materials for biological applications such as drug delivery, medical diagnosis, enzyme immobilization, and tissue engineering. By use of their dynamic and reversible properties, many supramolecular assemblies responsive to a variety of biomolecules have been designed and synthesized. This review focuses on promising strategies for the construction of such dynamic supramolecular assemblies and their functions. While studies of biomolecule-responsive supramolecular assemblies have mainly been performed in vitro, it has recently been demonstrated that some of them can work in live cells. Supramolecular assemblies now open up new avenues in chemical biology and biofunctional materials.

  14. Self-assembling hybrid diamond-biological quantum devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, A.; Koplovitz, G.; Retzker, A.; Jelezko, F.; Yochelis, S.; Porath, D.; Nevo, Y.; Shoseyov, O.; Paltiel, Y.; Plenio, M. B.

    2014-09-01

    The realization of scalable arrangements of nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond remains a key challenge on the way towards efficient quantum information processing, quantum simulation and quantum sensing applications. Although technologies based on implanting NV-centers in bulk diamond crystals or hybrid device approaches have been developed, they are limited by the achievable spatial resolution and by the intricate technological complexities involved in achieving scalability. We propose and demonstrate a novel approach for creating an arrangement of NV-centers, based on the self-assembling capabilities of biological systems and their beneficial nanometer spatial resolution. Here, a self-assembled protein structure serves as a structural scaffold for surface functionalized nanodiamonds, in this way allowing for the controlled creation of NV-structures on the nanoscale and providing a new avenue towards bridging the bio-nano interface. One-, two- as well as three-dimensional structures are within the scope of biological structural assembling techniques. We realized experimentally the formation of regular structures by interconnecting nanodiamonds using biological protein scaffolds. Based on the achievable NV-center distances of 11 nm, we evaluate the expected dipolar coupling interaction with neighboring NV-centers as well as the expected decoherence time. Moreover, by exploiting these couplings, we provide a detailed theoretical analysis on the viability of multiqubit quantum operations, suggest the possibility of individual addressing based on the random distribution of the NV intrinsic symmetry axes and address the challenges posed by decoherence and imperfect couplings. We then demonstrate in the last part that our scheme allows for the high-fidelity creation of entanglement, cluster states and quantum simulation applications.

  15. Liquid crystal assemblies in biologically inspired systems

    PubMed Central

    Safinya, Cyrus R.; Deek, Joanna; Beck, Roy; Jones, Jayna B.; Leal, Cecilia; Ewert, Kai K.; Li, Youli

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, which is part of a collection in honor of Noel Clark's remarkable career on liquid crystal and soft matter research, we present examples of biologically inspired systems, which form liquid crystal (LC) phases with their LC nature impacting biological function in cells or being important in biomedical applications. One area focuses on understanding network and bundle formation of cytoskeletal polyampholytes (filamentous-actin, microtubules, and neurofilaments). Here, we describe studies on neurofilaments (NFs), the intermediate filaments of neurons, which form open network nematic liquid crystal hydrogels in axons. Synchrotron small-angle-x-ray scattering studies of NF-protein dilution experiments and NF hydrogels subjected to osmotic stress show that neurofilament networks are stabilized by competing long-range repulsion and attractions mediated by the neurofilament's polyampholytic sidearms. The attractions are present both at very large interfilament spacings, in the weak sidearm-interpenetrating regime, and at smaller interfilament spacings, in the strong sidearm-interpenetrating regime. A second series of experiments will describe the structure and properties of cationic liposomes (CLs) complexed with nucleic acids (NAs). CL-NA complexes form liquid crystalline phases, which interact in a structure-dependent manner with cellular membranes enabling the design of complexes for efficient delivery of nucleic acid (DNA, RNA) in therapeutic applications. PMID:24558293

  16. Method of forming and assembly of metal and ceramic parts

    DOEpatents

    Ripley, Edward B

    2014-04-22

    A method of forming and assembling at least two parts together that may be metal, ceramic, or a combination of metal and ceramic parts. Such parts may have different CTE. Individual parts that are formed and sintered from particles leave a network of interconnecting porosity in each sintered part. The separate parts are assembled together and then a fill material is infiltrated into the assembled parts using a method such as capillary action, gravity, and/or pressure. The assembly is then cured to yield a bonded and fully or near-fully dense part that has the desired physical and mechanical properties for the part's intended purpose. Structural strength may be added to the parts by the inclusion of fibrous materials.

  17. Physical mechanisms and biological significance of supramolecular protein self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Kentsis, Alex; Borden, Katherine L B

    2004-04-01

    In living cells, chemical reactions of metabolism, information processing, growth and development are organized in a complex network of interactions. At least in part, the organization of this network is accomplished as a result of physical assembly by supramolecular scaffolds. Indeed, most proteins function in cells within the context of multimeric or supramolecular assemblies. With the increasing availability of atomic structures and molecular thermodynamics, it is possible to recast the problem of non-covalent molecular self-assembly from a unified perspective of structural thermodynamics and kinetics. Here, we present a generalized theory of self-assembly based on Wegner's kinetic model and use it to delineate three physical mechanisms of self-assembly: as limited by association of assembly units (nucleation), by association of monomers (isodesmic), and by conformational reorganization of monomers that is coupled to assembly (conformational). Thus, we discuss actin, tubulin, clathrin, and the capsid of icosahedral cowpea chlorotic mottle virus with respect to assembly of architectural scaffolds that perform largely mechanical functions, and pyruvate dehydrogenase, and RING domain proteins PML, arenaviral Z, and BRCA1:BARD1 with regard to assembly of supramolecular enzymes with metabolic and chemically directive functions. In addition to the biological functions made possible by supramolecular self-assembly, such as mesoscale mechanics of architectural scaffolds and metabolic coupling of supramolecular enzymes, we show that the physical mechanisms of self-assembly and their structural bases are biologically significant as well, having regulatory roles in both formation and function of the assembled structures in health and disease.

  18. PaperClip: rapid multi-part DNA assembly from existing libraries.

    PubMed

    Trubitsyna, Maryia; Michlewski, Gracjan; Cai, Yizhi; Elfick, Alistair; French, Christopher E

    2014-11-10

    Assembly of DNA 'parts' to create larger constructs is an essential enabling technique for bioengineering and synthetic biology. Here we describe a simple method, PaperClip, which allows flexible assembly of multiple DNA parts from currently existing libraries cloned in any vector. No restriction enzymes, mutagenesis of internal restriction sites, or reamplification to add end homology are required. Order of assembly is directed by double stranded oligonucleotides-'Clips'. Clips are formed by ligation of pairs of oligonucleotides corresponding to the ends of each part. PaperClip assembly can be performed by polymerase chain reaction or by cell extract-mediated recombination. Once multi-use Clips have been prepared, assembly of at least six DNA parts in any order can be accomplished with high efficiency within several hours.

  19. Biological Assembly of Hybrid Inorganic Nanomaterials (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    particles [10,11]. In the former, a magnetic particle with three different 60-mer DNA targets to the BRCAI breast- cancer gene was assembled using a sandwich...particle conjugated with anti -rat IgG antibodies and then rat polyclonal antibodies specific to glutathione [15]. The Fe304-metal structures were...specific types of cancers and only become activated when that cancer is present. Peptides designed with multi-functionality have expanded nanoparticle

  20. Method of forming and assembly of metal parts and ceramic parts

    DOEpatents

    Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN

    2011-11-22

    A method of forming and assembling at least two parts together that may be metal, ceramic, or a combination of metal and ceramic parts. Such parts may have different CTE. Individual parts that are formed and sintered from particles leave a network of interconnecting porosity in each sintered part. The separate parts are assembled together and then a fill material is infiltrated into the assembled parts using a method such as capillary action, gravity, and/or pressure. The assembly is then cured to yield a bonded and fully or near-fully dense part that has the desired physical and mechanical properties for the part's intended purpose. Structural strength may be added to the parts by the inclusion of fibrous materials.

  1. Phase diagram for assembly of biologically-active peptide amphiphiles.

    PubMed

    Tsonchev, Stefan; Niece, Krista L; Schatz, George C; Ratner, Mark A; Stupp, Samuel I

    2008-01-17

    We construct a phase diagram for self-assembling biologically active peptide amphiphiles. The structure and stability of the assemblies are studied as a function of pH and salinity of the solution. The general features of the phase diagram are predicted based on theoretical modeling of the self-assembly process, as well as experimental data, and further experiments are performed to verify and ascertain the boundary locations of the diagram. Depending on solution conditions, the amphiphiles can form cylindrical or spherical micelles, intermediate structures between these, or may not assemble at all. We also demonstrate that changing conditions may result in phase transitions among these structures. This type of phase diagram could be useful in the design of certain supramolecular nanostructures by providing information on the necessary conditions to form them.

  2. Precise Truss Assembly using Commodity Parts and Low Precision Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komendera, Erik; Reishus, Dustin; Dorsey, John T.; Doggett, William R.; Correll, Nikolaus

    2013-01-01

    We describe an Intelligent Precision Jigging Robot (IPJR), which allows high precision assembly of commodity parts with low-precision bonding. We present preliminary experiments in 2D that are motivated by the problem of assembling a space telescope optical bench on orbit using inexpensive, stock hardware and low-precision welding. An IPJR is a robot that acts as the precise "jigging", holding parts of a local assembly site in place while an external low precision assembly agent cuts and welds members. The prototype presented in this paper allows an assembly agent (in this case, a human using only low precision tools), to assemble a 2D truss made of wooden dowels to a precision on the order of millimeters over a span on the order of meters. We report the challenges of designing the IPJR hardware and software, analyze the error in assembly, document the test results over several experiments including a large-scale ring structure, and describe future work to implement the IPJR in 3D and with micron precision.

  3. Precise Truss Assembly Using Commodity Parts and Low Precision Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komendera, Erik; Reishus, Dustin; Dorsey, John T.; Doggett, W. R.; Correll, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    Hardware and software design and system integration for an intelligent precision jigging robot (IPJR), which allows high precision assembly using commodity parts and low-precision bonding, is described. Preliminary 2D experiments that are motivated by the problem of assembling space telescope optical benches and very large manipulators on orbit using inexpensive, stock hardware and low-precision welding are also described. An IPJR is a robot that acts as the precise "jigging", holding parts of a local structure assembly site in place, while an external low precision assembly agent cuts and welds members. The prototype presented in this paper allows an assembly agent (for this prototype, a human using only low precision tools), to assemble a 2D truss made of wooden dowels to a precision on the order of millimeters over a span on the order of meters. The analysis of the assembly error and the results of building a square structure and a ring structure are discussed. Options for future work, to extend the IPJR paradigm to building in 3D structures at micron precision are also summarized.

  4. Readout electrode assembly for measuring biological impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, L. D.; Moody, D. L., Jr. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    The invention comprises of a pair of readout ring electrodes which are used in conjunction with apparatus for measuring the electrical impedance between different points in the body of a living animal to determine the amount of blood flow therebetween. The readout electrodes have independently adjustable diameters to permit attachment around different parts of the body between which it is desired to measure electric impedance. The axial spacing between the electrodes is adjusted by a pair of rods which have a first pair of ends fixedly attached to one electrode and a second pair of ends slidably attached to the other electrode. Indicia are provided on the outer surface of the ring electrodes and on the surface of the rods to permit measurement of the circumference and spacing between the ring electrodes.

  5. One-pot DNA construction for synthetic biology: the Modular Overlap-Directed Assembly with Linkers (MODAL) strategy

    PubMed Central

    Casini, Arturo; MacDonald, James T.; Jonghe, Joachim De; Christodoulou, Georgia; Freemont, Paul S.; Baldwin, Geoff S.; Ellis, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Overlap-directed DNA assembly methods allow multiple DNA parts to be assembled together in one reaction. These methods, which rely on sequence homology between the ends of DNA parts, have become widely adopted in synthetic biology, despite being incompatible with a key principle of engineering: modularity. To answer this, we present MODAL: a Modular Overlap-Directed Assembly with Linkers strategy that brings modularity to overlap-directed methods, allowing assembly of an initial set of DNA parts into a variety of arrangements in one-pot reactions. MODAL is accompanied by a custom software tool that designs overlap linkers to guide assembly, allowing parts to be assembled in any specified order and orientation. The in silico design of synthetic orthogonal overlapping junctions allows for much greater efficiency in DNA assembly for a variety of different methods compared with using non-designed sequence. In tests with three different assembly technologies, the MODAL strategy gives assembly of both yeast and bacterial plasmids, composed of up to five DNA parts in the kilobase range with efficiencies of between 75 and 100%. It also seamlessly allows mutagenesis to be performed on any specified DNA parts during the process, allowing the one-step creation of construct libraries valuable for synthetic biology applications. PMID:24153110

  6. Assembly of hair bundles, an amazing problem for cell biology.

    PubMed

    Barr-Gillespie, Peter-G

    2015-08-01

    The hair bundle--the sensory organelle of inner-ear hair cells of vertebrates--exemplifies the ability of a cell to assemble complex, elegant structures. Proper construction of the bundle is required for proper mechanotransduction in response to external forces and to transmit information about sound and movement. Bundles contain tightly controlled numbers of actin-filled stereocilia, which are arranged in defined rows of precise heights. Indeed, many deafness mutations that disable hair-cell cytoskeletal proteins also disrupt bundles. Bundle assembly is a tractable problem in molecular and cellular systems biology; the sequence of structural changes in stereocilia is known, and a modest number of proteins may be involved.

  7. Diversity in virus assembly: biology makes things complicated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlotnick, Adam

    2008-03-01

    Icosahedral viruses have an elegance of geometry that implies a general path of assembly. However, structure alone provides insufficient information. Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus (CCMV), an important system for studying virus assembly, consists of 90 coat protein (CP) homodimers condensed around an RNA genome. The crystal structure (Speir et al, 1995) reveals that assembly causes burial of hydrophobic surface and formation of β hexamers, the intertwining of N-termini of the CPs surrounding a quasi-sixfold. This structural view leads to reasonable and erroneous predictions: (i) CCMV capsids are extremely stable, and (ii) β hexamer formation is critical to assembly. Experimentally, we have found that capsids are based on a network of extremely weak (4-5 kT) pairwise interactions and that pentamer formation is the critical step in assembly kinetics. Because of the fragility of CP-Cp interaction, we can redirect assembly to generate and dissociate tubular nanostructures. The dynamic behavior of CCMV reflects the requirements and peculiarities of an evolved biological system; it does not necessarily reflect the behavior predicted from a more static picture of the virus.

  8. 76 FR 9984 - Airworthiness Directives; B/E Aerospace, Continuous Flow Passenger Oxygen Mask Assembly, Part...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ..., Continuous Flow Passenger Oxygen Mask Assembly, Part Numbers 174006-(), 174080-(), 174085-(), 174095... manufacturer and part number of the oxygen mask assemblies installed, an inspection to determine the manufacturing date and modification status if certain oxygen mask assemblies are installed, and...

  9. An Easy-to-Assemble Three-Part Galvanic Cell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggen, Per-Odd; Skaugrud, Brit

    2015-01-01

    The galvanic cell presented in this article is made of only three parts, is easy to assemble, and can light a red light emitting diode (LED). The three cell components consist of a piece of paper with copper sulfate, a piece of paper with sodium sulfate, and a piece of magnesium ribbon. Within less than 1 h, students have time to discuss the…

  10. Towards biologically active self-assemblies: model nucleotide chimeras.

    PubMed

    Vebert-Nardin, Corinne

    2011-01-01

    With this article, we wish to give an overview of our main research activities assessing the potential of a suitable polymer modification of DNA fragments to self-assemble biologically active nanostructures. Specifically, the grafting of a hydrophobic polymer segment on DNA fragments results in amphiphilic nucleotide-based macromolecules, which, owing to both chemical and physical incompatibility, organize in self-assembled structures either on surfaces or in aqueous solution. Through the combination of the existing know-how in polymer chemistry with modern analytical techniques, we are currently focusing on establishing the mechanism of self-assembly of the polymer-modified nucleotide sequences in solution and on surfaces prior to the assessment of their hybridization capacity once involved in the ensemble. With the evaluation of the potential of the functional nanostructures to undergo biological-like adhesion through hybridization one can eventually foresee that the optimal functionality of these bio-inspired systems could be fine-tuned for biological applications such as drug delivery, gene therapy, tissue engineering and the design of either biomedical devices or biosensors.

  11. 76 FR 41669 - Airworthiness Directives; B/E Aerospace, Continuous Flow Passenger Oxygen Mask Assembly, Part...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ..., Continuous Flow Passenger Oxygen Mask Assembly, Part Numbers 174006-( ), 174080-( ), 174085-( ), 174095... oxygen mask assemblies installed, an inspection to determine the manufacturing date and modification status if certain oxygen mask assemblies are installed, and corrective action for certain oxygen...

  12. A robust gene-stacking method utilizing yeast assembly for plant synthetic biology

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Patrick M.; Vuu, Khanh; Mansoori, Nasim; Ayad, Leïla; Louie, Katherine B.; Bowen, Benjamin P.; Northen, Trent R.; Loqué, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    The advent and growth of synthetic biology has demonstrated its potential as a promising avenue of research to address many societal needs. However, plant synthetic biology efforts have been hampered by a dearth of DNA part libraries, versatile transformation vectors and efficient assembly strategies. Here, we describe a versatile system (named jStack) utilizing yeast homologous recombination to efficiently assemble DNA into plant transformation vectors. We demonstrate how this method can facilitate pathway engineering of molecules of pharmaceutical interest, production of potential biofuels and shuffling of disease-resistance traits between crop species. Our approach provides a powerful alternative to conventional strategies for stacking genes and traits to address many impending environmental and agricultural challenges. PMID:27782150

  13. FLOAT OPERATED RADIAL GATE HOIST ASSEMBLY LIST OF PARTS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FLOAT OPERATED RADIAL GATE HOIST ASSEMBLY - LIST OF PARTS - BASE-CRANK. WASTEWAY NO. 1. WELLTON-MOHAWK CANAL - STA. 99+23.50. United States Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation; Gila Project, Arizona, Wellton-Mohawk Division. Drawing No. 50-D-2511, dated May 3, 1949, Denver Colorado. Sheet 1 of 2 - Wellton-Mohawk Irrigation System, Wasteway No. 1, Wellton-Mohawk Canal, North side of Wellton-Mohawk Canal, bounded by Gila River to North & the Union Pacific Railroad & Gila Mountains to south, Wellton, Yuma County, AZ

  14. Micro-grippers for assembly of LIGA parts

    SciTech Connect

    Feddema, J.; Polosky, M.; Christenson, T.; Spletzer, B.; Simon, R.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes ongoing testing of two microgrippers for assembly of LIGA (Lithographie Galvanoformung Abformung) parts. The goal is to place 100 micron outside diameter (OD) LIGA gears with a 50 micron inner diameter hole onto pins ranging from 35 to 49 microns. The first micro gripper is a vacuum gripper made of a 100 micron OD stainless steel tube. The second micro gripper is a set of tweezers fabricated using the LIGA process. Nickel, Permalloy, and copper materials are tested. The tweezers are actuated by a collet mechanism which is closed by a DC linear motor.

  15. Eugene – A Domain Specific Language for Specifying and Constraining Synthetic Biological Parts, Devices, and Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bilitchenko, Lesia; Liu, Adam; Cheung, Sherine; Weeding, Emma; Xia, Bing; Leguia, Mariana; Anderson, J. Christopher; Densmore, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Background Synthetic biological systems are currently created by an ad-hoc, iterative process of specification, design, and assembly. These systems would greatly benefit from a more formalized and rigorous specification of the desired system components as well as constraints on their composition. Therefore, the creation of robust and efficient design flows and tools is imperative. We present a human readable language (Eugene) that allows for the specification of synthetic biological designs based on biological parts, as well as provides a very expressive constraint system to drive the automatic creation of composite Parts (Devices) from a collection of individual Parts. Results We illustrate Eugene's capabilities in three different areas: Device specification, design space exploration, and assembly and simulation integration. These results highlight Eugene's ability to create combinatorial design spaces and prune these spaces for simulation or physical assembly. Eugene creates functional designs quickly and cost-effectively. Conclusions Eugene is intended for forward engineering of DNA-based devices, and through its data types and execution semantics, reflects the desired abstraction hierarchy in synthetic biology. Eugene provides a powerful constraint system which can be used to drive the creation of new devices at runtime. It accomplishes all of this while being part of a larger tool chain which includes support for design, simulation, and physical device assembly. PMID:21559524

  16. Peptide Self-Assembly for Crafting Functional Biological Materials

    PubMed Central

    Matson, John B.; Zha, R. Helen; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembling, peptide-based scaffolds are frontrunners in the search for biomaterials with widespread impact in regenerative medicine. The inherent biocompatibility and cell signaling capabilities of peptides, in combination with control of secondary structure, has led to the development of a broad range of functional materials with potential for many novel therapies. More recently, membranes formed through complexation of peptide nanostructures with natural biopolymers have led to the development of hierarchically-structured constructs with potentially far-reaching applications in biology and medicine. In this review, we highlight recent advances in peptide-based gels and membranes, including work from our group and others. Specifically, we discuss the application of peptide-based materials in the regeneration of bone and enamel, cartilage, and the central nervous system, as well as the transplantation of islets, wound-healing, cardiovascular therapies, and treatment of erectile dysfunction after prostatectomy PMID:22125413

  17. Standards for plant synthetic biology: a common syntax for exchange of DNA parts.

    PubMed

    Patron, Nicola J; Orzaez, Diego; Marillonnet, Sylvestre; Warzecha, Heribert; Matthewman, Colette; Youles, Mark; Raitskin, Oleg; Leveau, Aymeric; Farré, Gemma; Rogers, Christian; Smith, Alison; Hibberd, Julian; Webb, Alex A R; Locke, James; Schornack, Sebastian; Ajioka, Jim; Baulcombe, David C; Zipfel, Cyril; Kamoun, Sophien; Jones, Jonathan D G; Kuhn, Hannah; Robatzek, Silke; Van Esse, H Peter; Sanders, Dale; Oldroyd, Giles; Martin, Cathie; Field, Rob; O'Connor, Sarah; Fox, Samantha; Wulff, Brande; Miller, Ben; Breakspear, Andy; Radhakrishnan, Guru; Delaux, Pierre-Marc; Loqué, Dominique; Granell, Antonio; Tissier, Alain; Shih, Patrick; Brutnell, Thomas P; Quick, W Paul; Rischer, Heiko; Fraser, Paul D; Aharoni, Asaph; Raines, Christine; South, Paul F; Ané, Jean-Michel; Hamberger, Björn R; Langdale, Jane; Stougaard, Jens; Bouwmeester, Harro; Udvardi, Michael; Murray, James A H; Ntoukakis, Vardis; Schäfer, Patrick; Denby, Katherine; Edwards, Keith J; Osbourn, Anne; Haseloff, Jim

    2015-10-01

    Inventors in the field of mechanical and electronic engineering can access multitudes of components and, thanks to standardization, parts from different manufacturers can be used in combination with each other. The introduction of BioBrick standards for the assembly of characterized DNA sequences was a landmark in microbial engineering, shaping the field of synthetic biology. Here, we describe a standard for Type IIS restriction endonuclease-mediated assembly, defining a common syntax of 12 fusion sites to enable the facile assembly of eukaryotic transcriptional units. This standard has been developed and agreed by representatives and leaders of the international plant science and synthetic biology communities, including inventors, developers and adopters of Type IIS cloning methods. Our vision is of an extensive catalogue of standardized, characterized DNA parts that will accelerate plant bioengineering.

  18. Molecular self-assembly for biological investigations and nanoscale lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheunkar, Sarawut

    Small, diffusible molecules when recognized by their binding partners, such as proteins and antibodies, trigger enzymatic activity, cell communication, and immune response. Progress in analytical methods enabling detection, characterization, and visualization of biological dynamics at the molecular level will advance our exploration of complex biological systems. In this dissertation, analytical platforms were fabricated to capture membrane-associated receptors, which are essential proteins in cell signaling pathways. The neurotransmitter serotonin and its biological precursor were immobilized on gold substrates coated with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of oligo(ethylene glycol)alkanethiols and their reactive derivatives. The SAM-coated substrates present the biologically selective affinity of immobilized molecules to target native membrane-associated receptors. These substrates were also tested for biospecificity using antibodies. In addition, small-molecule-functionalized platforms, expressing neurotransmitter pharmacophores, were employed to examine kinetic interactions between G-protein-coupled receptors and their associated neurotransmitters. The binding interactions were monitored using a quartz crystal microbalance equipped with liquid-flow injection. The interaction kinetics of G-protein-coupled serotonin 1A receptor and 5-hydroxytyptophan-functionalized surfaces were studied in a real-time, label-free environment. Key binding parameters, such as equilibrium dissociation constants, binding rate constants, and dissociative half-life, were extracted. These parameters are critical for understanding and comparing biomolecular interactions in modern biomedical research. By integrating self-assembly, surface functionalization, and nanofabrication, small-molecule microarrays were created for high-throughput screening. A hybrid soft-lithography, called microcontact insertion printing, was used to pattern small molecules at the dilute scales necessary for highly

  19. Our Hidden Past: Biology, Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Ray; Congdon, Charles; Bervin, Barry; Gaulden, Mary Esther; Russell, Liane

    2017-01-01

    After World War II, vacant buildings at Y-12 and a growing new Biology Division for which there was not adequate space at Oak Ridge National Laboratory combined to provide a home for genetic research at Y-12. In January 1949, the Biology Division moved into Building 9210.

  20. GoldenBraid 2.0: a comprehensive DNA assembly framework for plant synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Sarrion-Perdigones, Alejandro; Vazquez-Vilar, Marta; Palací, Jorge; Castelijns, Bas; Forment, Javier; Ziarsolo, Peio; Blanca, José; Granell, Antonio; Orzaez, Diego

    2013-07-01

    Plant synthetic biology aims to apply engineering principles to plant genetic design. One strategic requirement of plant synthetic biology is the adoption of common standardized technologies that facilitate the construction of increasingly complex multigene structures at the DNA level while enabling the exchange of genetic building blocks among plant bioengineers. Here, we describe GoldenBraid 2.0 (GB2.0), a comprehensive technological framework that aims to foster the exchange of standard DNA parts for plant synthetic biology. GB2.0 relies on the use of type IIS restriction enzymes for DNA assembly and proposes a modular cloning schema with positional notation that resembles the grammar of natural languages. Apart from providing an optimized cloning strategy that generates fully exchangeable genetic elements for multigene engineering, the GB2.0 toolkit offers an evergrowing open collection of DNA parts, including a group of functionally tested, premade genetic modules to build frequently used modules like constitutive and inducible expression cassettes, endogenous gene silencing and protein-protein interaction tools, etc. Use of the GB2.0 framework is facilitated by a number of Web resources that include a publicly available database, tutorials, and a software package that provides in silico simulations and laboratory protocols for GB2.0 part domestication and multigene engineering. In short, GB2.0 provides a framework to exchange both information and physical DNA elements among bioengineers to help implement plant synthetic biology projects.

  1. Our Hidden Past: Biology, Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Ray; Russell, Liane; Mazur, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In their new home at "The Mouse House" at Y-12, researchers from ORNL's Biology Division conducted studies that led to standards such as dose rate effects that form the basis for current international standards for radiation exposure in humans.

  2. Critical appraisal: dental amalgam update--part II: biological effects.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Michael J; Swift, Edward J

    2013-12-01

    Dental amalgam restorations have been controversial for over 150 years. In Part I of this Critical Appraisal, the clinical efficacy of dental amalgam was updated. Here in Part II, the biological effects of dental amalgam are addressed.

  3. Fourier-Transform Raman Spectroscopy Of Biological Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Ira W.; Lewis, E. Neil

    1989-12-01

    Although the successful coupling of Raman scattered near-infrared radiation to a Michelson interferometer has recently created an outburst of intense interest in Fourier-transform (FT) Raman spectrometry," extended applications of the technique to macromolecular assemblies of biochemical and biophysical relevance have not progressed as rapidly as studies directed primarily at more conventional chemical characterizations. Since biological materials sampled with visible laser excitation sources typically emit a dominant fluorescence signal originating either from the intrinsic fluorescence of the molecular scatterer or from unrelenting contaminants, the use of near-infrared Nd:YAG laser excitation offers a convenient approach for avoiding this frequently overwhelming effect. In addition, the FT-Raman instrumentation provides a means of eliminating the deleterious resonance and decomposition effects often observed with the more accessible green and blue laser emissions. However, in choosing the incident near-infrared wavelength at, for example, 1064nm, the Raman scattered intensity decreases by factors of eighteen to forty from the Raman emissions induced by the shorter, visible excitations. Depending upon the experiment, this disadvantage is offset by the throughput and multiplex advantages afforded by the interferometric design. Thus, for most chemical systems, near-infrared FT-Raman spectroscopy, clearly provides a means for obtaining vibrational Raman spectra from samples intractable to the use of visible laser sources. In particular, for neat liquids, dilute solutions or polycrystalline materials, the ability to achieve high quality, reproducible spectra is, with moderate experience and perhaps relatively high laser powers, as straightforward as the conventional methods used to obtain Raman spectra with visible excitation and dispersive monochromators. In using near-infrared FT techniques to determine the Raman spectra of biological samples, one encounters new

  4. Electrophoretic separator for purifying biologicals, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, L. R.

    1978-01-01

    A program to develop an engineering model of an electrophoretic separator for purifying biologicals is summarized. An extensive mathematical modeling study and numerous ground based tests were included. Focus was placed on developing an actual electrophoretic separator of the continuous flow type, configured and suitable for flight testing as a space processing applications rocket payload.

  5. High molecular weight DNA assembly in vivo for synthetic biology applications.

    PubMed

    Juhas, Mario; Ajioka, James W

    2017-05-01

    DNA assembly is the key technology of the emerging interdisciplinary field of synthetic biology. While the assembly of smaller DNA fragments is usually performed in vitro, high molecular weight DNA molecules are assembled in vivo via homologous recombination in the host cell. Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are the main hosts used for DNA assembly in vivo. Progress in DNA assembly over the last few years has paved the way for the construction of whole genomes. This review provides an update on recent synthetic biology advances with particular emphasis on high molecular weight DNA assembly in vivo in E. coli, B. subtilis and S. cerevisiae. Special attention is paid to the assembly of whole genomes, such as those of the first synthetic cell, synthetic yeast and minimal genomes.

  6. Programming biological operating systems: genome design, assembly and activation.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Daniel G

    2014-05-01

    The DNA technologies developed over the past 20 years for reading and writing the genetic code converged when the first synthetic cell was created 4 years ago. An outcome of this work has been an extraordinary set of tools for synthesizing, assembling, engineering and transplanting whole bacterial genomes. Technical progress, options and applications for bacterial genome design, assembly and activation are discussed.

  7. Scar-less multi-part DNA assembly design automation

    DOEpatents

    Hillson, Nathan J.

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides a method of a method of designing an implementation of a DNA assembly. In an exemplary embodiment, the method includes (1) receiving a list of DNA sequence fragments to be assembled together and an order in which to assemble the DNA sequence fragments, (2) designing DNA oligonucleotides (oligos) for each of the DNA sequence fragments, and (3) creating a plan for adding flanking homology sequences to each of the DNA oligos. In an exemplary embodiment, the method includes (1) receiving a list of DNA sequence fragments to be assembled together and an order in which to assemble the DNA sequence fragments, (2) designing DNA oligonucleotides (oligos) for each of the DNA sequence fragments, and (3) creating a plan for adding optimized overhang sequences to each of the DNA oligos.

  8. Plant and Animal Gravitational Biology. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Session TA2 includes short reports covering: (1) The Interaction of Microgravity and Ethylene on Soybean Growth and Metabolism; (2) Structure and G-Sensitivity of Root Statocytes under Different Mass Acceleration; (3) Extracellular Production of Taxanes on Cell Surfaces in Simulated Microgravity and Hypergravity; (4) Current Problems of Space Cell Phytobiology; (5) Biological Consequences of Microgravity-Induced Alterations in Water Metabolism of Plant Cells; (6) Localization of Calcium Ions in Chlorella Cells Under Clinorotation; (7) Changes of Fatty Acids Content of Plant Cell Plasma Membranes under Altered Gravity; (8) Simulation of Gravity by Non-Symmetrical Vibrations and Ultrasound; and (9) Response to Simulated weightlessness of In Vitro Cultures of Differentiated Epithelial Follicular Cells from Thyroid.

  9. Two sides of the coin. Part 1. Lipid and surfactant self-assembly revisited.

    PubMed

    Ninham, Barry W; Larsson, Kåre; Lo Nostro, Pierandrea

    2017-04-01

    Hofmeister, specific ion effects, hydration and van der Waals forces at and between interfaces are factors that determine curvature and microstructure in self assembled aggregates of surfactants and lipids; and in microemulsions. Lipid and surfactant head group interactions and between aggregates vary enormously and are highly specific. They act on the hydrophilic side of a bilayer, micelle or other self assembled aggregate. It is only over the last three decades that the origin of Hofmeister effects has become generally understood. Knowledge of their systematics now provides much flexibility in designing nanostructured fluids. The other side of the coin involves equally specific forces. These (opposing) forces work on the hydrophobic side of amphiphilic interfaces. They are due to the interaction of hydrocarbons and other "oils" with hydrophobic tails of surfactants and lipids. The specificity of oleophilic solutes in microemulsions and lipid membranes provides a counterpoint to Hofmeister effects and hydration. Together with global packing constraints these effects determine microstructure. Another factor that has hardly been recognised is the role of dissolved gas. This introduces further, qualitative changes in forces that prescribe microstructure. The systematics of these effects and their interplay are elucidated. Awareness of these competing factors facilitates formulation of self assembled nanostructured fluids. New and predictable geometries that emerge naturally provide insights into a variety of biological phenomena like anaesthetic and pheromone action and transmission of the nervous impulse (see Part 2).

  10. A unified convention for biological assemblies with helical symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chung-Jung; Nussinov, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    Assemblies with helical symmetry can be conveniently formulated in many distinct ways. Here, a new convention is presented which unifies the two most commonly used helical systems for generating helical assemblies from asymmetric units determined by X-ray fibre diffraction and EM imaging. A helical assembly is viewed as being composed of identical repetitive units in a one- or two-dimensional lattice, named 1-­D and 2-D helical systems, respectively. The unification suggests that a new helical description with only four parameters [n 1, n 2, twist, rise], which is called the augmented 1-D helical system, can generate the complete set of helical arrangements, including coverage of helical discontinuities (seams). A unified four-parameter characterization implies similar parameters for similar assemblies, can eliminate errors in reproducing structures of helical assemblies and facilitates the generation of polymorphic ensembles from helical atomic models or EM density maps. Further, guidelines are provided for such a unique description that reflects the structural signature of an assembly, as well as rules for manipulating the helical symmetry presentation. PMID:21795813

  11. A unified convention for biological assemblies with helical symmetry.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung Jung; Nussinov, Ruth

    2011-08-01

    Assemblies with helical symmetry can be conveniently formulated in many distinct ways. Here, a new convention is presented which unifies the two most commonly used helical systems for generating helical assemblies from asymmetric units determined by X-ray fibre diffraction and EM imaging. A helical assembly is viewed as being composed of identical repetitive units in a one- or two-dimensional lattice, named 1-D and 2-D helical systems, respectively. The unification suggests that a new helical description with only four parameters [n(1), n(2), twist, rise], which is called the augmented 1-D helical system, can generate the complete set of helical arrangements, including coverage of helical discontinuities (seams). A unified four-parameter characterization implies similar parameters for similar assemblies, can eliminate errors in reproducing structures of helical assemblies and facilitates the generation of polymorphic ensembles from helical atomic models or EM density maps. Further, guidelines are provided for such a unique description that reflects the structural signature of an assembly, as well as rules for manipulating the helical symmetry presentation.

  12. Interfacial interactions involved in the biological assembly of Chandipura virus nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Sreejith, R; Gulati, Sahil; Gupta, Sanjay

    2013-06-01

    The biological assembly of Chandipura virus nucleocapsid (N) protein has been modeled and the amino acid residues involved in specific intermolecular interactions among N monomers during oligomerisation have been predicted.

  13. Direct Electron Transfer of Enzymes in a Biologically Assembled Conductive Nanomesh Enzyme Platform.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Woo; Lee, Ki-Young; Song, Yong-Won; Choi, Won Kook; Chang, Joonyeon; Yi, Hyunjung

    2016-02-24

    Nondestructive assembly of a nanostructured enzyme platform is developed in combination of the specific biomolecular attraction and electrostatic coupling for highly efficient direct electron transfer (DET) of enzymes with unprecedented applicability and versatility. The biologically assembled conductive nanomesh enzyme platform enables DET-based flexible integrated biosensors and DET of eight different enzyme with various catalytic activities.

  14. Simulations of curved assemblies in soft matter and biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Cong

    Viruses are small infectious agents that replicate only inside living cells of other organisms. In the viral life cycle, the self-assembly of the outer protein shell (capsid) is an essential step. We study this process in the hope of shedding light on development of antiviral drugs, gene therapy and other virus-related technologies that can benefit the humankind. More fundamentally, learning about the process of viral capsid assembly can elucidate the assembly mechanisms of a wide range of complex structures. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations and coarse-grained computational models to study viral capsid assembly in several situations where geometric constraints play a role in dictating assembly outcomes. We first focus on icosahedral viruses with single-stranded RNA genomes, in which case the capsid usually assembles around the genomic RNA. It is consistently observed in experiments that such viral particles are ''overcharged'', meaning the net negative charge on the viral genome is greater than the net positive charge on the viral capsid. We computationally investigate the mechanisms that lead to ``overcharging'', and more broadly, how the encapsidated genome length is influenced by the capsid. We perform both dynamical simulations of the assembly process and equilibrium calculations to determine the optimal genome length (meaning that which maximizes the assembly yield and/or minimizes the free energy of the assembled virus). We find that the optimal genome length is determined by the interplay between capsid size, net capsid charge, distribution of capsid charge and nucleic acid structures. Our simulations demonstrate that overcharging results from a combination of electrostatic screening and the geometric constraints associated with encapsulating a nucleic acid inside of a spherical virus. We then study the assembly of the immature HIV. In contrast to icosahedral viruses, the immature HIV forms an asymmetric particle, consisting of continuous

  15. Biology coming full circle: Joining the whole and the parts

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    The new cover of Experimental Biology and Medicine features the hermeneutic circle of biology, a concept we have adapted from the hermeneutic principle that one understands the whole only in terms of each part and the parts only in terms of the whole. Our hermeneutic circle summarizes the course of experimental biology through 2500 years of the achievements of reductionist research (understanding the parts), which culminates in our ability to rapidly sequence the genome. Rather than returning along the same path in a constructionist approach that simply builds upon this knowledge, but in reverse, an alternative is to close the circle with synthetic constructions that seek to integrate the full complexity of biological and physiological systems (understanding the whole), of which organs-on-chips are one example. This closing of the circle cannot be a comprehensively accurate representation of biology, but it can be a synthetic one that effectively defines particular biological subsystems. The illustration of the hermeneutic circle of biology is also intended to suggest both the multiple cycles that may be required to reach such a synthesis and the expansion of the circle in an outward spiral as knowledge increases. Our commentary explains the symbolism of the new cover in a philosophical and scientific discussion. PMID:25583953

  16. Biology coming full circle: joining the whole and the parts.

    PubMed

    Wikswo, John P; Porter, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    The new cover of Experimental Biology and Medicine features the hermeneutic circle of biology, a concept we have adapted from the hermeneutic principle that one understands the whole only in terms of each part and the parts only in terms of the whole. Our hermeneutic circle summarizes the course of experimental biology through 2500 years of the achievements of reductionist research (understanding the parts), which culminates in our ability to rapidly sequence the genome. Rather than returning along the same path in a constructionist approach that simply builds upon this knowledge, but in reverse, an alternative is to close the circle with synthetic constructions that seek to integrate the full complexity of biological and physiological systems (understanding the whole), of which organs-on-chips are one example. This closing of the circle cannot be a comprehensively accurate representation of biology, but it can be a synthetic one that effectively defines particular biological subsystems. The illustration of the hermeneutic circle of biology is also intended to suggest both the multiple cycles that may be required to reach such a synthesis and the expansion of the circle in an outward spiral as knowledge increases. Our commentary explains the symbolism of the new cover in a philosophical and scientific discussion.

  17. Conformational assembly and biological properties of collagen mimetic peptides and their thermally responsive polymer conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Ohm Divyam

    2011-12-01

    Collagens are one of the most abundant proteins found in body tissues and organs, endowing structural integrity, mechanical strength, and multiple biological functions. Destabilized collagen inside human body leads to various degenerative diseases (ex. osteoarthritis) and ageing. This has continued to motivate the design of synthetic peptides and bio-synthetic polypeptides to closely mimic the native collagens in terms of triple helix structure and stability, potential for higher order assembly, and biological properties. However, the widespread application of de novo collagens has been limited in part by the need for hydroxylated proline in the formation of stable triple helical structures. To address this continued need, a hydroxyproline-free, thermally stable collagen-mimetic peptide (CLP-Cys) was rationally designed via the incorporation of electrostatically stabilized amino acid triplets. CLP-Cys was synthesized via solid phase peptide synthesis. The formation and stability of the triple helical structure were indicated via circular dichroism (CD) experiments and confirmed via differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results. CLP-Cys also self-assembled into nano-rods and micro-fibrils, as evidenced via a combination of dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Given the high thermal stability and its propensity for higher-order assembly, CLP-Cys was further functionalized at both the ends with a thermally responsive polymer, poly(diethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate), (PDEGMEMA) to synthesize a biohybrid triblock copolymer. The CD results indicated that the triple helical form is retained, the thermal unfolding is sustained and helix to coil transition is reversible in the triblock hybrid context. The LCST of PDEGMEMA homopolymer (26 °C) is increased (to 35 °C) upon conjugation to the hydrophilic collagen peptide domain. Further, a combination of static light scattering, Cryo-SEM, TEM and confocal microscopy elucidated that the

  18. Controlled Assembly of Viral Surface Proteins into Biological Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatani-Webster, Eri

    In recent years, therapeutic use of engineered particles on the 1-1,000 nm scale has gained popularity; these nanoparticles have been developed for use in drug delivery, gene therapy, vaccine preparation, and diagnostics. Often, viral proteins are utilized in the design of such species, and outlined here are completed studies on the in vitro assembly of nanoparticles derived from two very different viral systems. The incorporation of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope glycoprotein precursor gp160 into phospholipid bilayer nanodiscs is discussed as a potential platform for vaccine design; efforts were successful, however yield currently limits the practical application of this approach. The utility of bacteriophage lambda procapsids and virus-like particles in therapeutic nanoparticle design is also outlined, as are efforts toward the structural and thermodynamic characterization of a urea-triggered capsid maturation event. It is demonstrated that lambda virus-like particles can be assembled from purified capsid and scaffolding proteins, and that these particles undergo urea-triggered maturation and in vitro decoration protein addition similar to that seen in lambda procapsids. The studies on lambda provided materials for the further development of nanoparticles potentially useful in a clinical setting, as well as shedding light on critical viral assembly and maturation events as they may take place in vivo.

  19. 16 CFR Figure 10 to Part 1203 - Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly 10 Figure 10 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY... Gravity for Drop Assembly ER10MR98.010...

  20. 16 CFR Figure 10 to Part 1203 - Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly 10 Figure 10 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY... Gravity for Drop Assembly ER10MR98.010...

  1. 16 CFR Figure 10 to Part 1203 - Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly 10 Figure 10 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY... Gravity for Drop Assembly ER10MR98.010...

  2. 16 CFR Figure 10 to Part 1203 - Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly 10 Figure 10 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY... Gravity for Drop Assembly ER10MR98.010...

  3. 16 CFR Figure 10 to Part 1203 - Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly 10 Figure 10 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY... Gravity for Drop Assembly ER10MR98.010...

  4. Prediction of phenotypes of missense mutations in human proteins from biological assemblies.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qiong; Xu, Qifang; Dunbrack, Roland L

    2013-02-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most frequent variation in the human genome. Nonsynonymous SNPs that lead to missense mutations can be neutral or deleterious, and several computational methods have been presented that predict the phenotype of human missense mutations. These methods use sequence-based and structure-based features in various combinations, relying on different statistical distributions of these features for deleterious and neutral mutations. One structure-based feature that has not been studied significantly is the accessible surface area within biologically relevant oligomeric assemblies. These assemblies are different from the crystallographic asymmetric unit for more than half of X-ray crystal structures. We find that mutations in the core of proteins or in the interfaces in biological assemblies are significantly more likely to be disease-associated than those on the surface of the biological assemblies. For structures with more than one protein in the biological assembly (whether the same sequence or different), we find the accessible surface area from biological assemblies provides a statistically significant improvement in prediction over the accessible surface area of monomers from protein crystal structures (P = 6e-5). When adding this information to sequence-based features such as the difference between wildtype and mutant position-specific profile scores, the improvement from biological assemblies is statistically significant but much smaller (P = 0.018). Combining this information with sequence-based features in a support vector machine leads to 82% accuracy on a balanced dataset of 50% disease-associated mutations from SwissVar and 50% neutral mutations from human/primate sequence differences in orthologous proteins.

  5. Interest in biology. Part I: A multidimensional construct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Paul L.; Tamir, Pinchas

    Interest in a school subject (e.g., biology) is conceptualized in terms of three components: topics, activities, and motives, each of which has several dimensions. In this study, seven instruments were developed and administered to grade-10 biology students in Israel. Factor analysis provided support for the conceptualization which underlies the development of the instruments. Topic dimensions included biochemical processes, nonhuman organisms, human biology, personal hygiene, and practical applications; the activity dimensions were experiential learning, reception learning, writing/summarizing and group discussion; motives included environmental issues, moral issues, examination success, personal independence, problem solving, and four career dimensions (research, high-status professions, lower-status careers, woodsy-birdsy careers). In an analysis described in Part II of this paper, the students were classified into four groups on the basis of their grade-11 subject enrollment intentions: H (high-level biology), L (low-level biology), P (physical science), and N (no science). Zero-order and multiple correlations were found between interest and other variables and membership/nonmembership of the four groups. Students in Group H were characterized by higher achievement in year-10 biology, higher levels of enjoyment of biology, career orientations towards research or high-status biology-based professions, greater interest in various biology topics, especially reproduction/cell division/genetics, and a greater tendency to regard the Bagrut (grade-12) examination as interesting. Students in Group N displayed lower levels of interest in various topics (especially the microscope, plants, and reproduction), were less motivated to solve problems, had poorer grades in biology (and chemistry), were less likely to perceive biology as useful, were less likely to regard the Bagrut examination as fair, and were less likely to be interested in social modes of learning. There

  6. Chemically directed assembly of nanoparticles for material and biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Myoung-Hwan

    The unique electronic, magnetic, and optical properties of nanoparticles (NPs) make them useful building blocks for nanodevices and biofabrication. Site-selective immobilization/deposition of NPs on surfaces at desired positions is an important fabrication step in realizing the potential of nanomaterials in these applications. In this thesis, my research has focused on developing new strategies for mono- and multilayered-NP deposition on surfaces, increasing the stability of NP-assembles upon various surfaces for practical use of NP-based devices. Chemically directed dithiocarbamate binding of amine groups to NPs in the presence of CS2 was used for enhancing the robustness of NP assembles. Such patterning methodologies have allowed me to use site-directed NP immobilization in applications as diverse as microcontact printing, nanomolding in capillaries, nanoimprint lithography, and photolithography. Also, I have developed a simple and reliable one-step technique to form robust dendrimer-NP nanocomposites using dithiocarbamate-based chemistry. These composites are able to encapsulate and release various therapeutics, providing controllable sustained release and to separate small molecules and biomacromolecules.

  7. Design of Nanostructured Biological Materials Through Self-Assembly of Peptides and Proteins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    of applications, including scaffolding for tissue repair in regenerative medicine, drug delivery and biological surface engineering. Tirrell and...colleagues [2] designed artificial proteins that undergo self-assembly to form hydrogels responsive to pH and other environmental changes. Ghadiri and...showed that other β-sheet peptide systems can also undergo self-assembly into regular nanofiber structures. Although they share no sequence

  8. The year's new drugs & biologics 2015: Part I.

    PubMed

    Graul, A I; Cruces, E; Stringer, M

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 100 new drugs and biologics, including important new line extensions, were approved or launched for the first time globally in 2015. These products are covered in depth in part I of our annual review of the pharma and biotech industry.

  9. DNA assembly of nanoparticle superstructures for controlled biological delivery and elimination.

    PubMed

    Chou, Leo Y T; Zagorovsky, Kyryl; Chan, Warren C W

    2014-02-01

    The assembly of nanomaterials using DNA can produce complex nanostructures, but the biological applications of these structures remain unexplored. Here, we describe the use of DNA to control the biological delivery and elimination of inorganic nanoparticles by organizing them into colloidal superstructures. The individual nanoparticles serve as building blocks, whose size, surface chemistry and assembly architecture dictate the overall superstructure design. These superstructures interact with cells and tissues as a function of their design, but subsequently degrade into building blocks that can escape biological sequestration. We demonstrate that this strategy reduces nanoparticle retention by macrophages and improves their in vivo tumour accumulation and whole-body elimination. Superstructures can be further functionalized to carry and protect imaging or therapeutic agents against enzymatic degradation. These results suggest a different strategy to engineer nanostructure interactions with biological systems and highlight new directions in the design of biodegradable and multifunctional nanomedicine.

  10. YeastFab: the design and construction of standard biological parts for metabolic engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yakun; Dong, Junkai; Zhou, Tong; Auxillos, Jamie; Li, Tianyi; Zhang, Weimin; Wang, Lihui; Shen, Yue; Luo, Yisha; Zheng, Yijing; Lin, Jiwei; Chen, Guo-Qiang; Wu, Qingyu; Cai, Yizhi; Dai, Junbiao

    2015-01-01

    It is a routine task in metabolic engineering to introduce multicomponent pathways into a heterologous host for production of metabolites. However, this process sometimes may take weeks to months due to the lack of standardized genetic tools. Here, we present a method for the design and construction of biological parts based on the native genes and regulatory elements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have developed highly efficient protocols (termed YeastFab Assembly) to synthesize these genetic elements as standardized biological parts, which can be used to assemble transcriptional units in a single-tube reaction. In addition, standardized characterization assays are developed using reporter constructs to calibrate the function of promoters. Furthermore, the assembled transcription units can be either assayed individually or applied to construct multi-gene metabolic pathways, which targets a genomic locus or a receiving plasmid effectively, through a simple in vitro reaction. Finally, using β-carotene biosynthesis pathway as an example, we demonstrate that our method allows us not only to construct and test a metabolic pathway in several days, but also to optimize the production through combinatorial assembly of a pathway using hundreds of regulatory biological parts. PMID:25956650

  11. YeastFab: the design and construction of standard biological parts for metabolic engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yakun; Dong, Junkai; Zhou, Tong; Auxillos, Jamie; Li, Tianyi; Zhang, Weimin; Wang, Lihui; Shen, Yue; Luo, Yisha; Zheng, Yijing; Lin, Jiwei; Chen, Guo-Qiang; Wu, Qingyu; Cai, Yizhi; Dai, Junbiao

    2015-07-27

    It is a routine task in metabolic engineering to introduce multicomponent pathways into a heterologous host for production of metabolites. However, this process sometimes may take weeks to months due to the lack of standardized genetic tools. Here, we present a method for the design and construction of biological parts based on the native genes and regulatory elements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have developed highly efficient protocols (termed YeastFab Assembly) to synthesize these genetic elements as standardized biological parts, which can be used to assemble transcriptional units in a single-tube reaction. In addition, standardized characterization assays are developed using reporter constructs to calibrate the function of promoters. Furthermore, the assembled transcription units can be either assayed individually or applied to construct multi-gene metabolic pathways, which targets a genomic locus or a receiving plasmid effectively, through a simple in vitro reaction. Finally, using β-carotene biosynthesis pathway as an example, we demonstrate that our method allows us not only to construct and test a metabolic pathway in several days, but also to optimize the production through combinatorial assembly of a pathway using hundreds of regulatory biological parts.

  12. Lineage-Specific Biology Revealed by a Finished Genome Assembly of the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Hillier, LaDeana W.; Zody, Michael C.; Goldstein, Steve; She, Xinwe; Bult, Carol J.; Agarwala, Richa; Cherry, Joshua L.; DiCuccio, Michael; Hlavina, Wratko; Kapustin, Yuri; Meric, Peter; Maglott, Donna; Birtle, Zoë; Marques, Ana C.; Graves, Tina; Zhou, Shiguo; Teague, Brian; Potamousis, Konstantinos; Churas, Christopher; Place, Michael; Herschleb, Jill; Runnheim, Ron; Forrest, Daniel; Amos-Landgraf, James; Schwartz, David C.; Cheng, Ze; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Eichler, Evan E.; Ponting, Chris P.

    2009-01-01

    The mouse (Mus musculus) is the premier animal model for understanding human disease and development. Here we show that a comprehensive understanding of mouse biology is only possible with the availability of a finished, high-quality genome assembly. The finished clone-based assembly of the mouse strain C57BL/6J reported here has over 175,000 fewer gaps and over 139 Mb more of novel sequence, compared with the earlier MGSCv3 draft genome assembly. In a comprehensive analysis of this revised genome sequence, we are now able to define 20,210 protein-coding genes, over a thousand more than predicted in the human genome (19,042 genes). In addition, we identified 439 long, non–protein-coding RNAs with evidence for transcribed orthologs in human. We analyzed the complex and repetitive landscape of 267 Mb of sequence that was missing or misassembled in the previously published assembly, and we provide insights into the reasons for its resistance to sequencing and assembly by whole-genome shotgun approaches. Duplicated regions within newly assembled sequence tend to be of more recent ancestry than duplicates in the published draft, correcting our initial understanding of recent evolution on the mouse lineage. These duplicates appear to be largely composed of sequence regions containing transposable elements and duplicated protein-coding genes; of these, some may be fixed in the mouse population, but at least 40% of segmentally duplicated sequences are copy number variable even among laboratory mouse strains. Mouse lineage-specific regions contain 3,767 genes drawn mainly from rapidly-changing gene families associated with reproductive functions. The finished mouse genome assembly, therefore, greatly improves our understanding of rodent-specific biology and allows the delineation of ancestral biological functions that are shared with human from derived functions that are not. PMID:19468303

  13. Lineage-specific biology revealed by a finished genome assembly of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Church, Deanna M; Goodstadt, Leo; Hillier, Ladeana W; Zody, Michael C; Goldstein, Steve; She, Xinwe; Bult, Carol J; Agarwala, Richa; Cherry, Joshua L; DiCuccio, Michael; Hlavina, Wratko; Kapustin, Yuri; Meric, Peter; Maglott, Donna; Birtle, Zoë; Marques, Ana C; Graves, Tina; Zhou, Shiguo; Teague, Brian; Potamousis, Konstantinos; Churas, Christopher; Place, Michael; Herschleb, Jill; Runnheim, Ron; Forrest, Daniel; Amos-Landgraf, James; Schwartz, David C; Cheng, Ze; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Eichler, Evan E; Ponting, Chris P

    2009-05-05

    The mouse (Mus musculus) is the premier animal model for understanding human disease and development. Here we show that a comprehensive understanding of mouse biology is only possible with the availability of a finished, high-quality genome assembly. The finished clone-based assembly of the mouse strain C57BL/6J reported here has over 175,000 fewer gaps and over 139 Mb more of novel sequence, compared with the earlier MGSCv3 draft genome assembly. In a comprehensive analysis of this revised genome sequence, we are now able to define 20,210 protein-coding genes, over a thousand more than predicted in the human genome (19,042 genes). In addition, we identified 439 long, non-protein-coding RNAs with evidence for transcribed orthologs in human. We analyzed the complex and repetitive landscape of 267 Mb of sequence that was missing or misassembled in the previously published assembly, and we provide insights into the reasons for its resistance to sequencing and assembly by whole-genome shotgun approaches. Duplicated regions within newly assembled sequence tend to be of more recent ancestry than duplicates in the published draft, correcting our initial understanding of recent evolution on the mouse lineage. These duplicates appear to be largely composed of sequence regions containing transposable elements and duplicated protein-coding genes; of these, some may be fixed in the mouse population, but at least 40% of segmentally duplicated sequences are copy number variable even among laboratory mouse strains. Mouse lineage-specific regions contain 3,767 genes drawn mainly from rapidly-changing gene families associated with reproductive functions. The finished mouse genome assembly, therefore, greatly improves our understanding of rodent-specific biology and allows the delineation of ancestral biological functions that are shared with human from derived functions that are not.

  14. The Didactics of Biology. A Selected Bibliography for 1979. Part I [and] Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altmann, Antonin, Ed.; Lipertova, Pavla, Ed.

    Selected articles on various aspects of biology teaching published in 1979 have been annotated in this two-part bibliography. Entries from 18 journals representing 11 different countries are presented according to a topic area classification scheme listed in the table of contents. Countries represented include: Australia; Bulgaria; Czechoslovakia;…

  15. Biological colloid engineering: Self-assembly of dipolar ferromagnetic chains in a functionalized biogenic ferrofluid.

    PubMed

    Ruder, Warren C; Hsu, Chia-Pei D; Edelman, Brent D; Schwartz, Russell; Leduc, Philip R

    2012-08-06

    We have studied the dynamic behavior of nanoparticles in ferrofluids consisting of single-domain, biogenic magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) isolated from Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum (MS-1). Although dipolar chains form in magnetic colloids in zero applied field, when dried upon substrates, the solvent front disorders nanoparticle aggregation. Using avidin-biotin functionalization of the particles and substrate, we generated self-assembled, linear chain motifs that resist solvent front disruption in zero-field. The engineered self-assembly process we describe here provides an approach for the creation of ordered magnetic structures that could impact fields ranging from micro-electro-mechanical systems development to magnetic imaging of biological structures.

  16. Biological passivation of porous silicon by a self-assembled nanometric biofilm of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Stefano, Luca; Rea, Ilaria; de Tommasi, Eduardo; Giardina, Paola; Armenante, Annunziata; Longobardi, Sara; Giocondo, Michele; Rendina, Ivo

    2009-10-01

    Self-assembled monolayers are surfaces consisting of a single layer of molecules on a substrate: widespread examples of chemical and biological nature are alkylsiloxane, fatty acids, and alkanethiolate which can be deposited by different techniques on a large variety of substrates ranging from metals to oxides. We have found that a self-assembled biofilm of proteins can passivate porous silicon (PSi) based optical structures without affecting the transducing properties. Moreover, the protein coated PSi layer can also be used as a functionalized surface for proteomic applications.

  17. Application of machine vision based measurement in precise assembly of miniature parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Cui; Wang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xiwen; Wang, Lin; Luo, Yi

    2010-08-01

    In manufacturing of precise miniature devices, automatic assembly is the trend to replace manual work for better quality and higher yield. Precise measurement is a critical issue during assembly process because the parts are often complicated and quite different in size, shapes, surface condition, etc. The position and orientation error must be determined precisely before assembly. In the developed automatic assembly system, microscopic machine vision and precise linear stages were integrated in the measurement system for higher detection resolution and larger measurement range in working space. As to the extract of contour of parts with different surface condition, dynamic illumination control and different combination of feature detection algorithms were applied. The errors brought by non-perpendicularity among precision linear stages were compensated and the movement errors were reduced with effective measurement strategy. The measuring accuracy was validated with a special fabricated precise template. Assembly tests were done with the developed system and results indicate that the required position and orientation accuracy can be met successfully and consequently the assembly task can be fulfilled.

  18. DNASynth: A Computer Program for Assembly of Artificial Gene Parts in Decreasing Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Robert M.; Wojtowicz-Krawiec, Anna; Plucienniczak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Artificial gene synthesis requires consideration of nucleotide sequence development as well as long DNA molecule assembly protocols. The nucleotide sequence of the molecule must meet many conditions including particular preferences of the host organism for certain codons, avoidance of specific regulatory subsequences, and a lack of secondary structures that inhibit expression. The chemical synthesis of DNA molecule has limitations in terms of strand length; thus, the creation of artificial genes requires the assembly of long DNA molecules from shorter fragments. In the approach presented, the algorithm and the computer program address both tasks: developing the optimal nucleotide sequence to encode a given peptide for a given host organism and determining the long DNA assembly protocol. These tasks are closely connected; a change in codon usage may lead to changes in the optimal assembly protocol, and the lack of a simple assembly protocol may be addressed by changing the nucleotide sequence. The computer program presented in this study was tested with real data from an experiment in a wet biological laboratory to synthesize a peptide. The benefit of the presented algorithm and its application is the shorter time, compared to polymerase cycling assembly, needed to produce a ready synthetic gene. PMID:25629047

  19. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1633 - Test Assembly, Shown in Furniture Calorimeter (Configuration A)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Test Assembly, Shown in Furniture Calorimeter (Configuration A) 1 Figure 1 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633,...

  20. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1633 - Test Assembly, Shown in Furniture Calorimeter (Configuration A)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Test Assembly, Shown in Furniture Calorimeter (Configuration A) 1 Figure 1 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt. 1633,...

  1. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1633 - Test Assembly, Shown in Furniture Calorimeter (Configuration A)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Test Assembly, Shown in Furniture Calorimeter (Configuration A) 1 Figure 1 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt. 1633,...

  2. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1633 - Test Assembly, Shown in Furniture Calorimeter (Configuration A)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Test Assembly, Shown in Furniture Calorimeter (Configuration A) 1 Figure 1 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633,...

  3. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1633 - Test Assembly, Shown in Furniture Calorimeter (Configuration A)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Test Assembly, Shown in Furniture Calorimeter (Configuration A) 1 Figure 1 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633,...

  4. The year's new drugs & biologics 2014 - Part II: trends & challenges.

    PubMed

    Graul, A I; Serebrov, M; Cruces, E; Tracy, M; Dulsat, C

    2015-02-01

    2014 was a year of continued high activity in the pharma and biotech industry, as evidenced in part I of this annual two-part review article published last month in this journal (1). As of December 23, 2014, a total of 55 new chemical and biological entities had reached their first markets worldwide, together with another 29 important new line extensions. Another 19 products were approved for the first time during the year but not yet launched by December 23. Furthermore, during the now-traditional year-end sprint, several regulatory agencies issued last-minute approvals for other compounds that missed the deadline for inclusion in that article, bringing the total of new approvals for the year to a somewhat higher number. In addition to the successful development, registration and launch of new drugs and biologics, there are various other trends and tendencies that serve as indicators of the overall health and status of the industry. These include the pursuit of novel programs designed by regulators to stimulate the development of drugs for diseases that are currently under-treated; the regular and pragmatic culling by companies of their R&D pipelines; and the decision to unify pipelines, portfolios and sales forces through mergers and acquisitions.

  5. Self-Assembling Biological Springs Force Transducers on the Micron Nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Benedek, George; Casparay, Alfred H.

    2016-08-19

    In this project, we are developing a new system for measuring forces within and between nanoscale biological molecules based on mesoscopic springs made of cholesterol helical ribbons. These ribbons self-assemble in a wide variety of complex fluids containing sterol, a mixture of surfactants and water [1] and have spring constants in the range from 0.5 to 500 pN/nm [2-4]. By the end of this project, we have demonstrated that the cholesterol helical ribbons can be used for measuring forces between biological objects and for mapping the strain fields in hydrogels.

  6. Biologically templated assembly of hybrid semiconducting nanomesh for high performance field effect transistors and sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byeon, Hye-Hyeon; Lee, Seung-Woo; Lee, Eun-Hee; Kim, Woong; Yi, Hyunjung

    2016-10-01

    Delicately assembled composites of semiconducting nanomaterials and biological materials provide an attractive interface for emerging applications, such as chemical/biological sensors, wearable health monitoring devices, and therapeutic agent releasing devices. The nanostructure of composites as a channel and a sensing material plays a critical role in the performance of field effect transistors (FETs). Therefore, it is highly desirable to prepare elaborate composite that can allow the fabrication of high performance FETs and also provide high sensitivity and selectivity in detecting specific chemical/biological targets. In this work, we demonstrate that high performance FETs can be fabricated with a hydrodynamically assembled composite, a semiconducting nanomesh, of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (S-SWNTs) and a genetically engineered M13 phage to show strong binding affinity toward SWNTs. The semiconducting nanomesh enables a high on/off ratio (~104) of FETs. We also show that the threshold voltage and the channel current of the nanomesh FETs are sensitive to the change of the M13 phage surface charge. This biological gate effect of the phage enables the detection of biologically important molecules such as dopamine and bisphenol A using nanomesh-based FETs. Our results provide a new insight for the preparation of composite material platform for highly controllable bio/electronics interfaces.

  7. Biologically templated assembly of hybrid semiconducting nanomesh for high performance field effect transistors and sensors

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Hye-Hyeon; Lee, Seung-Woo; Lee, Eun-Hee; Kim, Woong; Yi, Hyunjung

    2016-01-01

    Delicately assembled composites of semiconducting nanomaterials and biological materials provide an attractive interface for emerging applications, such as chemical/biological sensors, wearable health monitoring devices, and therapeutic agent releasing devices. The nanostructure of composites as a channel and a sensing material plays a critical role in the performance of field effect transistors (FETs). Therefore, it is highly desirable to prepare elaborate composite that can allow the fabrication of high performance FETs and also provide high sensitivity and selectivity in detecting specific chemical/biological targets. In this work, we demonstrate that high performance FETs can be fabricated with a hydrodynamically assembled composite, a semiconducting nanomesh, of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (S-SWNTs) and a genetically engineered M13 phage to show strong binding affinity toward SWNTs. The semiconducting nanomesh enables a high on/off ratio (~104) of FETs. We also show that the threshold voltage and the channel current of the nanomesh FETs are sensitive to the change of the M13 phage surface charge. This biological gate effect of the phage enables the detection of biologically important molecules such as dopamine and bisphenol A using nanomesh-based FETs. Our results provide a new insight for the preparation of composite material platform for highly controllable bio/electronics interfaces. PMID:27762315

  8. The Design of a Molecular Assembly Line Based on Biological Molecules

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    and will demonstrate how one can construct a purely synthetic analogue of a polyketide synthase . 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...scaffold in programmed assembly and molecular electronics. It is based on the principles of the biological molecules polyketide synthase and kinesin, and in...stereoselective centers) with any reasonable yield, not including the R&D and process development time. Figure 1.6 shows how a polyketide synthase

  9. Supramolecular disassembly of facially amphiphilic dendrimer assemblies in response to physical, chemical, and biological stimuli.

    PubMed

    Raghupathi, Krishna R; Guo, Jing; Munkhbat, Oyuntuya; Rangadurai, Poornima; Thayumanavan, S

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: Supramolecular assemblies formed from spontaneous self-assembly of amphiphilic macromolecules are explored as biomimetic architectures and for applications in areas such as sensing, drug delivery, and diagnostics. Macromolecular assemblies are usually preferred, compared with their simpler small molecule counterparts, due to their low critical aggregate concentrations (CAC) and high thermodynamic stability. This Account focuses on the structural and functional aspects of assemblies formed from dendrimers, specifically facially amphiphilic dendrons that form micelle or inverse micelle type supramolecular assemblies depending on the nature of the solvent medium. The micelle type assemblies formed from facially amphiphilic dendrons sequester hydrophobic guest molecules in their interiors. The stability of these assemblies is dependent on the relative compatibility of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic functionalities with water, often referred to as hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB). Disruption of the HLB, using an external stimulus, could lead to disassembly of the aggregates, which can then be utilized to cause an actuation event, such as guest molecule release. Studying these possibilities has led to (i) a robust and general strategy for stimulus-induced disassembly and molecular release and (ii) the introduction of a new approach to protein-responsive supramolecular disassembly. The latter strategy provides a particularly novel avenue for impacting biomedical applications. Most of the stimuli-sensitive supramolecular assemblies have been designed to be responsive to factors such pH, temperature, and redox conditions. The reason for this interest stems from the fact that certain disease microenvironments have aberrations in these factors. However, these variations are the secondary imbalances in biology. Imbalances in protein activity are the primary reasons for most, if not all, human pathology. There have been no robust strategies in stimulus

  10. An assembly method for micro parts jointing with given space angle based on projection matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Lie; Wu, Wenrong; Zhang, Juan; Yang, Honggang

    2017-02-01

    It is difficult to assemble micro parts jointing with given space angle as the parts assembled are not on the same flat and the visual depth of microscopic vision is small, which can cause the images gathered by the microscopic vision unintelligible and feature extraction difficult. For the problem, this paper presents an assembly method of micro parts based on projection matching. It can assemble micro parts jointing with given space angle accurately. Firstly, an ideal assembly model is established as the size of the micro parts through the drawing software. Secondly, a graphics algorithm based on the primitive information from CAD is designed. Thirdly, according to the pixel value calibration and the graphics algorithm, the projection pictures are shown on the control interface. Lastly, the control method of micro parts is proposed to assemble them with given space angle. And we accomplished an assembly experiment of micro-tube and micro-column in this way, whose assembly deviation is 0.12∘. Experiment results indicate that the angle between two micro parts assembled can be controlled within the given deviation.

  11. Understanding recognition and self-assembly in biology using the chemist's toolbox. Insight into medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Quirolo, Z B; Benedini, L A; Sequeira, M A; Herrera, M G; Veuthey, T V; Dodero, V I

    2014-01-01

    Medicinal chemistry is intimately connected with basic science such as organic synthesis, chemical biology and biophysical chemistry among other disciplines. The reason of such connections is due to the power of organic synthesis to provide designed molecules; chemical biology to give tools to discover biological and/or pathological pathways and biophysical chemistry which provides the techniques to characterize and the theoretical background to understand molecular behaviour. The present review provides some selective examples of these research areas. Initially, template dsDNA organic synthesis and the spatio-temporal control of transcription are presenting following by the supramolecular entities used in drug delivery, such as liposomes and liquid crystal among others. Finally, peptides and protein self-assembly is connected with biomaterials and as an important event in the balance between health and disease. The final aim of the present review is to show the power of chemical tools not only for the synthesis of new molecules but also to improve our understanding of recognition and self-assembly in the biological context.

  12. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Part 1633 - Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws), in Relation to, Portable Frame...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws), in Relation to, Portable Frame Allowing Burner Height Adjustment 6 Figure 6 to Part 1633... FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt. 1633, Fig. 6 Figure 6 to Part 1633—Burner Assembly Showing...

  13. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Part 1633 - Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws), in Relation to, Portable Frame...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws), in Relation to, Portable Frame Allowing Burner Height Adjustment 6 Figure 6 to Part 1633... FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt. 1633, Fig. 6 Figure 6 to Part 1633—Burner Assembly Showing...

  14. The Dynamics of Microtubule/Motor-Protein Assemblies in Biology and Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelley, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Many important processes in the cell are mediated by stiff microtubule polymers and the active motor proteins moving on them. This includes the transport of subcellular structures (nuclei, chromosomes, organelles) and the self-assembly and positioning of the mitotic spindle. Little is understood of these processes, but they present fascinating problems in fluid-structure interactions. Microtubules and motor proteins are also the building blocks of new biosynthetic active suspensions driven by motor-protein activity. These reduced systems can be probed—and modeled—more easily than can the fully biological ones and demonstrate their own aspects of self-assembly and complex dynamics. I review recent work modeling such systems as fluid-structure interaction problems and as multiscale complex fluids.

  15. Frameworks for programming biological function through RNA parts and devices

    PubMed Central

    Win, Maung Nyan; Liang, Joe C.; Smolke, Christina D.

    2009-01-01

    One of the long-term goals of synthetic biology is to reliably engineer biological systems that perform human-defined functions. Currently, researchers face several scientific and technical challenges in designing and building biological systems, one of which is associated with our limited ability to access, transmit, and control molecular information through the design of functional biomolecules exhibiting novel properties. The fields of RNA biology and nucleic acid engineering, along with the tremendous interdisciplinary growth of synthetic biology, are fueling advances in the emerging field of RNA programming in living systems. Researchers are designing functional RNA molecules that exhibit increasingly complex functions and integrating these molecules into cellular circuits to program higher-level biological functions. The continued integration and growth of RNA design and synthetic biology presents exciting potential to transform how we interact with and program biology. PMID:19318211

  16. Self-assembly of three-dimensional DNA nanostructures and potential biological applications.

    PubMed

    Lo, Pik Kwan; Metera, Kimberly L; Sleiman, Hanadi F

    2010-10-01

    A current challenge in nanoscience is to achieve controlled organization in three-dimensions, to provide tools for biophysics, molecular sensors, enzymatic cascades, drug delivery, tissue engineering, and device fabrication. DNA displays some of the most predictable and programmable interactions of any molecule, natural or synthetic. As a result, 3D-DNA nanostructures have emerged as promising tools for biology and materials science. In this review, strategies for 3D-DNA assembly are discussed. DNA cages, nanotubes, dendritic networks, and crystals are formed, with deliberate variation of their size, shape, persistence length, and porosities. They can exhibit dynamic character, allowing their selective switching with external stimuli. They can encapsulate and position materials into arbitrarily designed patterns, and show promise for numerous biological and materials applications.

  17. Biological Photothermal Nanodots Based on Self-Assembly of Peptide-Porphyrin Conjugates for Antitumor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zou, Qianli; Abbas, Manzar; Zhao, Luyang; Li, Shukun; Shen, Guizhi; Yan, Xuehai

    2017-02-08

    Photothermal agents can harvest light energy and convert it into heat, offering a targeted and remote-controlled way to destroy carcinomatous cells and tissues. Inspired by the biological organization of polypeptides and porphyrins in living systems, here we have developed a supramolecular strategy to fabricate photothermal nanodots through peptide-modulated self-assembly of photoactive porphyrins. The self-assembling nature of porphyrins induces the formation of J-aggregates as substructures of the nanodots, and thus enables the fabrication of nanodots with totally inhibited fluorescence emission and singlet oxygen production, leading to a high light-to-heat conversion efficiency of the nanodots. The peptide moieties not only provide aqueous stability for the nanodots through hydrophilic interactions, but also provide a spatial barrier between porphyrin groups to inhibit the further growth of nanodots through the strong π-stacking interactions. Thermographic imaging reveals that the conversion of light to heat based on the nanodots is efficient in vitro and in vivo, enabling the nanodots to be applied for photothermal acoustic imaging and antitumor therapy. Antitumor therapy results show that these nanodots are highly biocompatible photothermal agents for tumor ablation, demonstrating the feasibility of using bioinspired nanostructures of self-assembling biomaterials for biomedical photoactive applications.

  18. Invasion Ecology and School Biology--Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, R. V.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests that invasion biology can supply subject matter for teaching evolution, genetics, ecological relationships, and conservation. Describes flowering and non-flowering plant invaders, vertebrates and invertebrates, and two ecological invasions on the southern coast of England. (JN)

  19. Strontium: Part II. Chemistry, Biological Aspects and Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britton, G. C.; Johnson, C. H.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews basic information on the Chemistry of strontium and its compounds. Explains biological aspects of strontium and its pharmaceutical applications. Highlights industrial application of strontium and its components. (ML)

  20. A Cell Biological Perspective on Past, Present and Future Investigations of the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Joglekar, Ajit P.

    2016-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a quality control mechanism that ensures accurate chromosome segregation during cell division. It consists of a mechanochemical signal transduction mechanism that senses the attachment of chromosomes to the spindle, and a signaling cascade that inhibits cell division if one or more chromosomes are not attached. Extensive investigations of both these component systems of the SAC have synthesized a comprehensive understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms. This review recounts the milestone results that elucidated the SAC, compiles a simple model of the complex molecular machinery underlying the SAC, and highlights poorly understood facets of the biochemical design and cell biological operation of the SAC that will drive research forward in the near future. PMID:27869759

  1. Multicomponent, Mannich-type assembly process for generating novel, biologically-active 2-arylpiperidines and derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Simon; Martin, Stephen F.

    2014-01-01

    A multicomponent, Mannich-type assembly process commencing with commercially available bromobenzaldehydes was sequenced with [3+2] dipolar cycloaddition reactions involving nitrones and azomethine ylides to generate collections of fused, bicyclic scaffolds based on the 2-arylpiperidine subunit. Use of the 4-pentenoyl group, which served both as an activator in the Mannich-type reaction and a readily-cleaved amine protecting group, allowed sub-libraries to be prepared through piperidine N-functionalization and cross-coupling of the aryl bromide. A number of these derivatives displayed biological activities that had not previously been associated with this substructure. Methods were also developed that allowed rapid conversion of these scaffolds to novel, polycyclic dihydroquinazolin-2-ones, 2-imino-1,3-benzothiazinanes, dihydroisoquinolin-3-ones and bridged tetrahydroquinolines. PMID:25267860

  2. Harnessing biological motors to engineer systems for nanoscale transport and assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Anita; Vogel, Viola

    2008-08-01

    Living systems use biological nanomotors to build life's essential molecules-such as DNA and proteins-as well as to transport cargo inside cells with both spatial and temporal precision. Each motor is highly specialized and carries out a distinct function within the cell. Some have even evolved sophisticated mechanisms to ensure quality control during nanomanufacturing processes, whether to correct errors in biosynthesis or to detect and permit the repair of damaged transport highways. In general, these nanomotors consume chemical energy in order to undergo a series of shape changes that let them interact sequentially with other molecules. Here we review some of the many tasks that biomotors perform and analyse their underlying design principles from an engineering perspective. We also discuss experiments and strategies to integrate biomotors into synthetic environments for applications such as sensing, transport and assembly.

  3. Design, implementation and practice of JBEI-ICE: an open source biological part registry platform and tools.

    PubMed

    Ham, Timothy S; Dmytriv, Zinovii; Plahar, Hector; Chen, Joanna; Hillson, Nathan J; Keasling, Jay D

    2012-10-01

    The Joint BioEnergy Institute Inventory of Composable Elements (JBEI-ICEs) is an open source registry platform for managing information about biological parts. It is capable of recording information about 'legacy' parts, such as plasmids, microbial host strains and Arabidopsis seeds, as well as DNA parts in various assembly standards. ICE is built on the idea of a web of registries and thus provides strong support for distributed interconnected use. The information deposited in an ICE installation instance is accessible both via a web browser and through the web application programming interfaces, which allows automated access to parts via third-party programs. JBEI-ICE includes several useful web browser-based graphical applications for sequence annotation, manipulation and analysis that are also open source. As with open source software, users are encouraged to install, use and customize JBEI-ICE and its components for their particular purposes. As a web application programming interface, ICE provides well-developed parts storage functionality for other synthetic biology software projects. A public instance is available at public-registry.jbei.org, where users can try out features, upload parts or simply use it for their projects. The ICE software suite is available via Google Code, a hosting site for community-driven open source projects.

  4. Incorporating Biological Mass Spectrometry into Undergraduate Teaching Labs, Part 1: Identifying Proteins Based on Molecular Mass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnquist, Isaac J.; Beussman, Douglas J.

    2007-01-01

    Biological mass spectrometry is an important analytical technique in drug discovery, proteomics, and research at the biology-chemistry interface. Currently, few hands-on opportunities exist for undergraduate students to learn about this technique. With the 2002 Nobel Prize being awarded, in part, for the development of biological mass…

  5. River Pollution: Part II. Biological Methods for Assessing Water Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1984-01-01

    Discusses methods used in the biological assessment of river quality and such indicators of clean and polluted waters as the Trent Biotic Index, Chandler Score System, and species diversity indexes. Includes a summary of a river classification scheme based on quality criteria related to water use. (JN)

  6. Biological and polymeric self-assembled hybrid systems: structure and properties of thylakoid/polyelectrolyte complexes.

    PubMed

    Dementiev, A A; Baikov, A A; Ptushenko, V V; Khomutov, G B; Tikhonov, A N

    2005-06-15

    A novel hybrid system composed of biological components and synthetic polymer, thylakoid/polycation complex, has been formed and studied. Effects of complex formation on the structure, electrostatics and functioning of thylakoid membranes have been examined. Thylakoids from bean leaves were used to form complexes with polycation polyallylamine hydrochloride (PAAH) in two systems: (i) thylakoid/polycation complexes formed in an aqueous bulk phase, and (ii) immobilized thylakoid/polycation planar complexes. Immobilized on a solid substrate surface, thylakoid/polycation complexes were prepared using layer-by-layer stepwise alternate adsorption technique, i.e., via the sequential alternate adsorption of thylakoids and polycation molecules. The morphology of built up structures was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. Light-induced electron transport in chloroplasts was studied by the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) method. Spin probe technique was employed to study the structural and electrostatic characteristics of thylakoid membranes. We have found that efficiency of light-induced electron transport in thylakoid membranes and membrane structure were not changed noticeably by PAAH binding to thylakoids in a wide range of PAAH concentrations. The data obtained indicate the physiologically-soft character of polycation interactions with thylakoid membranes and demonstrate effectiveness of interfacial self-assembly approach to fabrication of complex planar functional nanostructures from biological components and synthetic polymers.

  7. Application of the Modular Automated Reconfigurable Assembly System (MARAS) concept to adaptable vision gauging and parts feeding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    By, Andre Bernard; Caron, Ken; Rothenberg, Michael; Sales, Vic

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the first phase results of a collaborative effort between university researchers and a flexible assembly systems integrator to implement a comprehensive modular approach to flexible assembly automation. This approach, named MARAS (Modular Automated Reconfigurable Assembly System), has been structured to support multiple levels of modularity in terms of both physical components and system control functions. The initial focus of the MARAS development has been on parts gauging and feeding operations for cylinder lock assembly. This phase is nearing completion and has resulted in the development of a highly configurable system for vision gauging functions on a wide range of small components (2 mm to 100 mm in size). The reconfigurable concepts implemented in this adaptive Vision Gauging Module (VGM) are now being extended to applicable aspects of the singulating, selecting, and orienting functions required for the flexible feeding of similar mechanical components and assemblies.

  8. The year's new drugs & biologics, 2014: Part I.

    PubMed

    Graul, A I; Cruces, E; Stringer, M

    2015-01-01

    A year-end wrap-up of new drug approvals and launches reveals that activity in the pharmaceutical industry continues at a high level, with 55 new drugs and biologics introduced on their first markets in 2014 (as of December 23, 2014). Additionally, 29 important new line extensions (new formulations, new combinations or new indications for previously marketed products) also reached their first markets during the year. The most active therapeutic group in terms of new launches was anti-infective therapies, with 11 new drugs and biologics launched, most for the treatment of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections or hepatitis C. The most active market for new launches was again the U.S., site of more than half of all new launches in 2014. However new launch activity increased considerably last year in Japan, which actually pulled ahead of the E.U. for the first time in many years. In another important new development, 15 of the new drugs and biologics launched last year had orphan drug status, 5 had breakthrough therapy designation and 3 had Qualified Infectious Disease Product (QIDP) status. Another 19 products were approved for the first time during the year but not yet launched by close of this article; most are slated for launch in the first months of the new year.

  9. Attraction by repulsion: compounds with like charges undergo self-assembly in water that improves in high salt and persists in real biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Garnett, Graham A E; Daze, Kevin D; Peña Diaz, Jorge A; Fagen, Noah; Shaurya, Alok; Ma, Manuel C F; Collins, Mary S; Johnson, Darren W; Zakharov, Lev N; Hof, Fraser

    2016-02-14

    We report a family of highly anionic calixarenes that form discrete homo-dimeric assemblies in pure water, that get stronger in high salt solutions, and that remain assembled in complex, denaturing solutions like real urine. The results reveal the potential of like-charged subunits for self-assembly in high-salt solutions and biological fluids.

  10. Evolving together: the biology of symbiosis, part 2

    PubMed Central

    2000-01-01

    Symbiotic trade-offs dominate the world of biology and medicine in colonist-host relationships and between separate, mutually dependent organisms of different species. Infectious and parasitic diseases can be better understood by exploring the dynamic continuum between pathogenicity and mutualism, between antagonism and cooperation—the sliding scale along which microorganisms can move in a moment's notice with a single nucleotide substitution. Organisms practicing piracy or pastoralism may be close genetic relatives. Mergers occur not only between cells but also between genomes; viruses co-opt host genes and in turn insert themselves into host genomes. Separate organisms, from ants to fungi to plants, establish symbiotic ties with each other that bind over deep time, generating much of the diversity we see in nature. PMID:16389348

  11. Probing self assembly in biological mixed colloids by SANS, deuteration and molecular manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hjelm, R.P.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Hoffman, A.; Alkan-Onyuksel, H.

    1994-12-31

    Small-angle neutron scattering was used to obtain information on the form and molecular arrangement of particles in mixed colloids of bile salts with phosphatidylcholine, and bile salts with monoolein. Both types of systems showed the same general characteristics. The particle form was highly dependent on total lipid concentration. At the highest concentrations the particles were globular mixed micelles with an overall size of 50{Angstrom}. As the concentration was reduced the mixed micelles elongated, becoming rodlike with diameter about 50{Angstrom}. The rods had a radial core-shell structure in which the phosphatidylcholine or monoolein fatty tails were arranged radially to form the core with the headgroups pointing outward to form the shell. The bile salts were at the interface between the shell and core with the hydrophilic parts facing outward as part of the shell. The lengths of the rods increased and became more polydispersed with dilution. At sufficiently low concentrations the mixed micelles transformed into single bilayer vesicles. These results give insight on the physiological function of bile and on the rules governing the self assembly of bile particles in the hepatic duct and the small intestine.

  12. Characterization of Delayed-Particle Emission Signatures for Pyroprocessing. Part 1: ABTR Fuel Assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Durkee, Jr., Joe W.

    2015-06-19

    A three-part study is conducted using the MCNP6 Monte Carlo radiation-transport code to calculate delayed-neutron (DN) and delayed-gamma (DG) emission signatures for nondestructive assay (NDA) metal-fuel pyroprocessing. In Part 1, MCNP6 is used to produce irradiation-induced used nuclear fuel (UNF) isotopic inventories for an Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) preconceptual design fuel assembly (FA) model. The initial fuel inventory consists of uranium mixed with light-water-reactor transuranic (TRU) waste and 10 wt% zirconium (U-LWR-SFTRU-10%Zr). To facilitate understanding, parametric evaluation is done using models for 3% and 5% initial 235U a% enrichments, burnups of 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, …, 120 GWd/MTIHM, and 3-, 5-, 10-, 20-, and 30- year cooling times. Detailed delayed-particle radioisotope source terms for the irradiate FA are created using BAMF-DRT and SOURCES3A. Using simulation tallies, DG activity ratios (DGARs) are developed for 134Cs/137Cs 134Cs/154Eu, and 154Eu/137Cs markers as a function of (1) burnup and (2) actinide mass, including elemental uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium. Spectral-integrated DN emission is also tallied. The study reveals a rich assortment of DGAR behavior as a function of DGAR type, enrichment, burnup, and cooling time. Similarly, DN emission plots show variation as a function of burnup and of actinide mass. Sensitivity of DGAR and DN signatures to initial 235U enrichment, burnup, and cooling time is evident. Comparisons of the ABTR radiation signatures and radiation signatures previously reported for a generic Westinghouse oxide-fuel assembly indicate that there are pronounced differences in the ABTR and Westinghouse oxide-fuel DN and DG signatures. These differences are largely attributable to the initial TRU inventory in the ABTR fuel. The actinide and nonactinide inventories for the

  13. 1994 Baseline biological studies for the Device Assembly Facility at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, Y.E.; Woodward, B.D.; Hunter, R.B.; Greger, P.D.; Saethre, M.B.

    1995-02-01

    This report describes environmental work performed at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) in 1994 by the Basic Environmental Monitoring and Compliance Program (BECAMP). The DAF is located near the Mojave-Great Basin desert transition zone 27 km north of Mercury. The area immediately around the DAF building complex is a gentle slope cut by 1 to 3 m deep arroyos, and occupied by transitional vegetation. In 1994, construction activities were largely limited to work inside the perimeter fence. The DAF was still in a preoperational mode in 1994, and no nuclear materials were present. The DAF facilities were being occupied so there was water in the sewage settling pond, and the roads and lights were in use. Sampling activities in 1994 represent the first year in the proposed monitoring scheme. The proposed biological monitoring plan gives detailed experimental protocols. Plant, lizard, tortoise, small mammal, and bird surveys were performed in 1994. The authors briefly outline procedures employed in 1994. Studies performed on each taxon are reviewed separately then summarized in a concluding section.

  14. 15 CFR Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 - Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Biological Weapons No. Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to...—Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons Note: Exports and reexports of items in performance of...: (i) Equipment (for producing chemical weapon precursors and chemical warfare agents) described...

  15. 15 CFR Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 - Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Biological Weapons No. Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to...—Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons Note: Exports and reexports of items in performance of...: (i) Equipment (for producing chemical weapon precursors and chemical warfare agents) described...

  16. 15 CFR Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 - Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Biological Weapons No. Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to...—Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons Note: Exports and reexports of items in performance of...: (i) Equipment (for producing chemical weapon precursors and chemical warfare agents) described...

  17. 15 CFR Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 - Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Biological Weapons No. Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to...—Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons Note: Exports and reexports of items in performance of...: (i) Equipment (for producing chemical weapon precursors and chemical warfare agents) described...

  18. 15 CFR Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 - Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Biological Weapons No. Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to...—Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons Note: Exports and reexports of items in performance of...: (i) Equipment (for producing chemical weapon precursors and chemical warfare agents) described...

  19. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Part 1633 - Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws), in Relation to, Portable Frame...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws), in Relation to, Portable Frame Allowing Burner Height Adjustment 6 Figure 6 to Part 1633... and Pivots (Shoulder Screws), in Relation to, Portable Frame Allowing Burner Height...

  20. MISSA 2.0: an updated synthetic biology toolbox for assembly of orthogonal CRISPR/Cas systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Yan; Wang, Xing-Hui; Dong, Li; Wang, Zhi-Ping; Liu, Bing; Lv, Jie; Xing, Hui-Li; Han, Chun-Yan; Wang, Xue-Chen; Chen, Qi-Jun

    2017-02-03

    Efficient generation of plants carrying mutations in multiple genes remains a challenge. Using two or more orthogonal CRISPR/Cas systems can generate plants with multi-gene mutations, but assembly of these systems requires a robust, high-capacity toolkit. Here, we describe MISSA 2.0 (multiple-round in vivo site-specific assembly 2.0), an extensively updated toolkit for assembly of two or more CRISPR/Cas systems. We developed a novel suicide donor vector system based on plasmid RK2, which has much higher cloning capacity than the original, plasmid R6K-based system. We validated the utility of MISSA 2.0 by assembling multiple DNA fragments into the E. coli chromosome, and by creating transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana that constitutively or inducibly overexpress multiple genes. We then demonstrated that the higher cloning capacity of the RK2-derived MISSA 2.0 donor vectors facilitated the assembly of two orthogonal CRISPR/Cas systems including SpCas9 and SaCas9, and thus facilitated the creation of transgenic lines harboring these systems. We anticipate that MISSA 2.0 will enable substantial advancements in multiplex genome editing based on two or more orthogonal CRISPR/Cas9 systems, as well as in plant synthetic biology.

  1. MISSA 2.0: an updated synthetic biology toolbox for assembly of orthogonal CRISPR/Cas systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hai-Yan; Wang, Xing-Hui; Dong, Li; Wang, Zhi-Ping; Liu, Bing; Lv, Jie; Xing, Hui-Li; Han, Chun-Yan; Wang, Xue-Chen; Chen, Qi-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Efficient generation of plants carrying mutations in multiple genes remains a challenge. Using two or more orthogonal CRISPR/Cas systems can generate plants with multi-gene mutations, but assembly of these systems requires a robust, high-capacity toolkit. Here, we describe MISSA 2.0 (multiple-round in vivo site-specific assembly 2.0), an extensively updated toolkit for assembly of two or more CRISPR/Cas systems. We developed a novel suicide donor vector system based on plasmid RK2, which has much higher cloning capacity than the original, plasmid R6K-based system. We validated the utility of MISSA 2.0 by assembling multiple DNA fragments into the E. coli chromosome, and by creating transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana that constitutively or inducibly overexpress multiple genes. We then demonstrated that the higher cloning capacity of the RK2-derived MISSA 2.0 donor vectors facilitated the assembly of two orthogonal CRISPR/Cas systems including SpCas9 and SaCas9, and thus facilitated the creation of transgenic lines harboring these systems. We anticipate that MISSA 2.0 will enable substantial advancements in multiplex genome editing based on two or more orthogonal CRISPR/Cas9 systems, as well as in plant synthetic biology. PMID:28155921

  2. Monte Carlo modeling and analyses of YALINA booster subcritical assembly, Part III : low enriched uranium conversion analyses.

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y.

    2011-05-12

    This study investigates the performance of the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly, located in Belarus, during operation with high (90%), medium (36%), and low (21%) enriched uranium fuels in the assembly's fast zone. The YALINA Booster is a zero-power, subcritical assembly driven by a conventional neutron generator. It was constructed for the purpose of investigating the static and dynamic neutronics properties of accelerator driven subcritical systems, and to serve as a fast neutron source for investigating the properties of nuclear reactions, in particular transmutation reactions involving minor-actinides. The first part of this study analyzes the assembly's performance with several fuel types. The MCNPX and MONK Monte Carlo codes were used to determine effective and source neutron multiplication factors, effective delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron lifetime, neutron flux profiles and spectra, and neutron reaction rates produced from the use of three neutron sources: californium, deuterium-deuterium, and deuterium-tritium. In the latter two cases, the external neutron source operates in pulsed mode. The results discussed in the first part of this report show that the use of low enriched fuel in the fast zone of the assembly diminishes neutron multiplication. Therefore, the discussion in the second part of the report focuses on finding alternative fuel loading configurations that enhance neutron multiplication while using low enriched uranium fuel. It was found that arranging the interface absorber between the fast and the thermal zones in a circular rather than a square array is an effective method of operating the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly without downgrading neutron multiplication relative to the original value obtained with the use of the high enriched uranium fuels in the fast zone.

  3. Kinetically Assembled Nanoparticles of Bioactive Macromolecules Exhibit Enhanced Stability and Cell-Targeted Biological Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    York, Adam W.; Zablocki, Kyle R.; Lewis, Daniel R.; Gu, Li; Uhrich, Kathryn E.; Prud’homme, Robert K.

    2012-01-01

    Kinetically assembled nanoparticles are fabricated from an advanced class of bioactive macromolecules that have potential utility in counteracting atherosclerotic plaque development via receptor-level blockage of inflammatory cells. In contrast to micellar analogs that exhibit poor potency and structural integrity under physiologic conditions, these kinetic nanoparticle assemblies maintain structural stability and demonstrate superior bioactivity in mediating oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) uptake in inflammatory cells. PMID:22223224

  4. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Part 1633 - Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws) in Relation to, Portable Frame Allowing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws) in Relation to, Portable Frame Allowing Burner Height Adjustment 6 Figure 6 to Part 1633... FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633, Fig. 6 Figure 6 to Part 1633—Burner Assembly Showing...

  5. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Part 1633 - Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws) in Relation to Portable Frame Allowing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws) in Relation to Portable Frame Allowing Burner Height Adjustment 6 Figure 6 to Part 1633... FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633, Fig. 6 Figure 6 to Part 1633—Burner Assembly Showing...

  6. Biological materials: (Part A): Temperature-responsive polymers and drug delivery, and, (Part B): Polymer modification of fish scale and their nano-mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Xu

    This research has three parts. Two parts deal with novel nanoparticle assemblies for drug delivery, and are described in Part A, while the third part looks at properties of fish scales, an abundant and little-used waste resource, that can be modified to have value in medical and other areas. Part A describes fundamental research into the affects of block sequence of amphiphilic block copolymers prepared from on a new and versatile class of monomers, oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether acrylate (OEGA) and the more hydrophobic di(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (DEGMA). Polymers from these monomers are biologically safe and give polymers with thermoresponsive properties that can be manipulated over a broader temperature range than the more researched N-isopropylacrylamide polymers. Using RAFT polymerization and different Chain Transfer Agents (CTAs) amphiphilic block copolymers were prepared to study the effect of block sequence (hydrophilic OEGA and more hydrophobic DEGMA) on their thermo-responsive properties. Pairing hydrophilic chain ends to a hydrophobic DEGMA block and hydrophobic chain ends to hydrophilic blocks ("mis-matched polarity") significantly affected thermoresponsive properties for linear and star diblock copolymers, but little affected symmetric triblock copolymers. Specifically matching polarity in diblock copolymers yielded nanoparticles with higher cloud points (CP), narrow temperature ranges for coil collapse above CP, and smaller hydrodynamic diameter than mis-matched polarity. Using this knowledge two linear OEGA/DEGMA diblock copolymers were prepared with thiol end groups and assembled into hybrid nanoparticles with a gold nanoparticle core (GNP-polymer hybrids). This design was made using the hypothesis that a hybrid polymer drug carrier with a high CP (50-60 °C) and a diblock structure could be designed with low levels of drug release below 37 °C (body temperature) allowing the drug carrier to reach a target (tumor) site with

  7. Physical Activity: A Tool for Improving Health (Part 1--Biological Health Benefits)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Patrick J.; Hongu, Nobuko

    2015-01-01

    Extension educators have been promoting and incorporating physical activities into their community-based programs and improving the health of individuals, particularly those with limited resources. This article is the first of a three-part series describing the benefits of physical activity for human health: 1) biological health benefits of…

  8. Biology--Chemistry--Physics, Students' Guide, A Three-Year Sequence, Parts I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Arthur; And Others

    Parts I and II of the students' guide to the three-year integrated biology, chemistry, and physics course being prepared by the Portland Project Committee are contained in this guide. A committee reviewed and selected material developed by the national course improvement groups--Physical Science Study Committee, Chemical Bond Approach, Chemical…

  9. GenoLIB: a database of biological parts derived from a library of common plasmid features.

    PubMed

    Adames, Neil R; Wilson, Mandy L; Fang, Gang; Lux, Matthew W; Glick, Benjamin S; Peccoud, Jean

    2015-05-26

    Synthetic biologists rely on databases of biological parts to design genetic devices and systems. The sequences and descriptions of genetic parts are often derived from features of previously described plasmids using ad hoc, error-prone and time-consuming curation processes because existing databases of plasmids and features are loosely organized. These databases often lack consistency in the way they identify and describe sequences. Furthermore, legacy bioinformatics file formats like GenBank do not provide enough information about the purpose of features. We have analyzed the annotations of a library of ∼2000 widely used plasmids to build a non-redundant database of plasmid features. We looked at the variability of plasmid features, their usage statistics and their distributions by feature type. We segmented the plasmid features by expression hosts. We derived a library of biological parts from the database of plasmid features. The library was formatted using the Synthetic Biology Open Language, an emerging standard developed to better organize libraries of genetic parts to facilitate synthetic biology workflows. As proof, the library was converted into GenoCAD grammar files to allow users to import and customize the library based on the needs of their research projects.

  10. Information theory in systems biology. Part II: protein-protein interaction and signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Díaz, José; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-03-01

    By the development of information theory in 1948 by Claude Shannon to address the problems in the field of data storage and data communication over (noisy) communication channel, it has been successfully applied in many other research areas such as bioinformatics and systems biology. In this manuscript, we attempt to review some of the existing literatures in systems biology, which are using the information theory measures in their calculations. As we have reviewed most of the existing information-theoretic methods in gene regulatory and metabolic networks in the first part of the review, so in the second part of our study, the application of information theory in other types of biological networks including protein-protein interaction and signaling networks will be surveyed.

  11. Atomic structure and handedness of the building block of a biological assembly.

    PubMed

    Loquet, Antoine; Habenstein, Birgit; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Vasa, Suresh Kumar; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2013-12-26

    Noncovalent supramolecular assemblies possess in general several unique subunit-subunit interfaces.The basic building block of such an assembly consists of several subunits and contains all unique interfaces. Atomic-resolution structures of monomeric subunits are typically accessed by crystallography or solution NMR and fitted into electron microscopy density maps. However, the structure of the intact building block in the assembled state remains unknown with this hybrid approach. Here, we present the solid-state NMR atomic structure of the building block of the type III secretion system needle. The building block structure consists of a homotetrameric subunit complex with three unique supramolecular interfaces. Side-chain positions at the interfaces were solved at atomic detail. The high-resolution structure reveals unambiguously the helical handedness of the assembly, determined to be right-handed for the type III secretion system needle.Additionally, the axial rise per subunit could be extracted from the tetramer structure and independently validated by mass-per-length measurements.

  12. Information theory in systems biology. Part I: Gene regulatory and metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Kavousi, Kaveh; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-03-01

    "A Mathematical Theory of Communication", was published in 1948 by Claude Shannon to establish a framework that is now known as information theory. In recent decades, information theory has gained much attention in the area of systems biology. The aim of this paper is to provide a systematic review of those contributions that have applied information theory in inferring or understanding of biological systems. Based on the type of system components and the interactions between them, we classify the biological systems into 4 main classes: gene regulatory, metabolic, protein-protein interaction and signaling networks. In the first part of this review, we attempt to introduce most of the existing studies on two types of biological networks, including gene regulatory and metabolic networks, which are founded on the concepts of information theory.

  13. Metagenomic systems biology and metabolic modeling of the human microbiome: from species composition to community assembly rules.

    PubMed

    Levy, Roie; Borenstein, Elhanan

    2014-01-01

    The human microbiome is a key contributor to health and development. Yet little is known about the ecological forces that are at play in defining the composition of such host-associated communities. Metagenomics-based studies have uncovered clear patterns of community structure but are often incapable of distinguishing alternative structuring paradigms. In a recent study, we integrated metagenomic analysis with a systems biology approach, using a reverse ecology framework to model numerous human microbiota species and to infer metabolic interactions between species. Comparing predicted interactions with species composition data revealed that the assembly of the human microbiome is dominated at the community level by habitat filtering. Furthermore, we demonstrated that this habitat filtering cannot be accounted for by known host phenotypes or by the metabolic versatility of the various species. Here we provide a summary of our findings and offer a brief perspective on related studies and on future approaches utilizing this metagenomic systems biology framework.

  14. NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN LOW TEMPERATURE PHYSICS : Part of the Activity Report to the IUPAP General Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallock, Bob; Paalanen, Mikko

    2009-03-01

    Below you find part of the Activity Report to the IUPAP General Assembly, October 2008, by the present and previous Chairmen of C5. It provides an overview of the most important and recent developments in low temperature physics, much in line with the program of LT25. For the field of experimental low temperature physics, the ability to conduct research has been damaged by the dramatic increase in the price of liquid helium. In the United States for example, the price of liquid helium has approximately doubled over the past two years. This has led to a reduction in activity in many laboratories as the funding agencies have not quickly increased support in proportion. The increase in price of liquid helium has accelerated interest in the development and use of alternative cooling systems. In particular, pulse tube coolers are now available that will allow cryostats with modest cooling needs to operate dilution refrigerators without the need for repeated refills of liquid helium from external supply sources. Solid helium research has seen a dramatic resurgence. Torsional oscillator experiments have been interpreted to show that solid helium may undergo a transition to a state in which some of the atoms in the container do not follow the motion of the container, e.g. may be 'supersolid'. The observation is robust, but the interpretation is controversial. The shear modulus of solid helium undergoes a similar signature with respect to temperature. Experiments that should be expected to cause helium to flow give conflicting results. Theory predicts that a perfect solid cannot show supersolid behavior, but novel superfluid-like behavior should be seen in various defects that can exist in the solid, and vorticity may play a significant role. And, recently there have been reports of unusual mass decoupling in films of pure 4He on graphite surfaces as well as 3He-4He mixture films on solid hydrogen surfaces. These may be other examples of unusual superfluid-like behavior

  15. Assembly of Designed Oligonucleotides: a useful tool in synthetic biology for creating high-quality combinatorial DNA libraries.

    PubMed

    Acevedo-Rocha, Carlos G; Reetz, Manfred T

    2014-01-01

    The method dubbed Assembly of Designed Oligonucleotides (ADO) is a powerful tool in synthetic biology to create combinatorial DNA libraries for gene, protein, metabolic, and genome engineering. In directed evolution of proteins, ADO benefits from using reduced amino acid alphabets for saturation mutagenesis and/or DNA shuffling, but all 20 canonical amino acids can be also used as building blocks. ADO is performed in a two-step reaction. The first involves a primer-free, polymerase cycling assembly or overlap extension PCR step using carefully designed overlapping oligonucleotides. The second step is a PCR amplification using the outer primers, resulting in a high-quality and bias-free double-stranded DNA library that can be assembled with other gene fragments and/or cloned into a suitable plasmid subsequently. The protocol can be performed in a few hours. In theory, neither the length of the DNA library nor the number of DNA changes has any limits. Furthermore, with the costs of synthetic DNA dropping every year, after an initial investment is made in the oligonucleotides, these can be exchanged for alternative ones with different sequences at any point in the process, fully exploiting the potential of creating highly diverse combinatorial libraries. In the example chosen here, we show the construction of a high-quality combinatorial ADO library targeting sixteen different codons simultaneously with nonredundant degenerate codons encoding various reduced alphabets of four amino acids along the heme region of the monooxygenase P450-BM3.

  16. Analyzing native membrane protein assembly in nanodiscs by combined non-covalent mass spectrometry and synthetic biology

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, Erik; Peetz, Oliver; Hein, Christopher; Laguerre, Aisha; Hoffmann, Beate; Hoffmann, Jan; Dötsch, Volker; Bernhard, Frank; Morgner, Nina

    2017-01-01

    Membrane proteins frequently assemble into higher order homo- or hetero-oligomers within their natural lipid environment. This complex formation can modulate their folding, activity as well as substrate selectivity. Non-disruptive methods avoiding critical steps, such as membrane disintegration, transfer into artificial environments or chemical modifications are therefore essential to analyze molecular mechanisms of native membrane protein assemblies. The combination of cell-free synthetic biology, nanodisc-technology and non-covalent mass spectrometry provides excellent synergies for the analysis of membrane protein oligomerization within defined membranes. We exemplify our strategy by oligomeric state characterization of various membrane proteins including ion channels, transporters and membrane-integrated enzymes assembling up to hexameric complexes. We further indicate a lipid-dependent dimer formation of MraY translocase correlating with the enzymatic activity. The detergent-free synthesis of membrane protein/nanodisc samples and the analysis by LILBID mass spectrometry provide a versatile platform for the analysis of membrane proteins in a native environment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20954.001 PMID:28067619

  17. The 1993 baseline biological studies and proposed monitoring plan for the Device Assembly Facility at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, B.D.; Hunter, R.B.; Greger, P.D.; Saethre, M.B.

    1995-02-01

    This report contains baseline data and recommendations for future monitoring of plants and animals near the new Device Assembly Facility (DAF) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The facility is a large structure designed for safely assembling nuclear weapons. Baseline data was collected in 1993, prior to the scheduled beginning of DAF operations in early 1995. Studies were not performed prior to construction and part of the task of monitoring operational effects will be to distinguish those effects from the extensive disturbance effects resulting from construction. Baseline information on species abundances and distributions was collected on ephemeral and perennial plants, mammals, reptiles, and birds in the desert ecosystems within three kilometers (km) of the DAF. Particular attention was paid to effects of selected disturbances, such as the paved road, sewage pond, and the flood-control dike, associated with the facility. Radiological monitoring of areas surrounding the DAF is not included in this report.

  18. Application of real-time holographic interferometry in the nondestructive inspection of electronic parts and assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Craig P.; Trolinger, James D.

    1991-01-01

    Nondestructive inspection by holographic interferometry (HI) is quickly gaining acceptance in the electronics industry as a sensitive and accurate method of locating manufacturing and assembly flaws in a wide range of electronics, from individual components to assembled modules. This paper describes the specific application of real-time HI in the nondestructive analysis of circuit board heat exchangers and multiple-layer printed wiring boards to locate areas of debonding and delamination. In the application of HI, the choice of a stressing method is often as important as the choice of a specific HI technique. Methods for component stressing include thermal, vibrational, and pressure-induced stressing methods, and these are described in detail. In addition, two techniques for sensitivity enhancement, phase shift interferometry and beam tilt correction, are discussed in detail.

  19. BioPartsDB: a synthetic biology workflow web-application for education and research.

    PubMed

    Stracquadanio, Giovanni; Yang, Kun; Boeke, Jef D; Bader, Joel S

    2016-11-15

    Synthetic biology has become a widely used technology, and expanding applications in research, education and industry require progress tracking for team-based DNA synthesis projects. Although some vendors are beginning to supply multi-kilobase sequence-verified constructs, synthesis workflows starting with short oligos remain important for cost savings and pedagogical benefit. We developed BioPartsDB as an open source, extendable workflow management system for synthetic biology projects with entry points for oligos and larger DNA constructs and ending with sequence-verified clones.

  20. Monte Carlo modeling and analyses of YALINA- booster subcritical assembly Part II : pulsed neutron source.

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, M. Y. A.; Rabiti, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-10-22

    One of the most reliable experimental methods for measuring the kinetic parameters of a subcritical assembly is the Sjoestrand method applied to the reaction rate generated from a pulsed neutron source. This study developed a new analytical methodology for characterizing the kinetic parameters of a subcritical assembly using the Sjoestrand method, which allows comparing the analytical and experimental time dependent reaction rates and the reactivity measurements. In this methodology, the reaction rate, detector response, is calculated due to a single neutron pulse using MCNP/MCNPX computer code or any other neutron transport code that explicitly simulates the fission delayed neutrons. The calculation simulates a single neutron pulse over a long time period until the delayed neutron contribution to the reaction is vanished. The obtained reaction rate is superimposed to itself, with respect to the time, to simulate the repeated pulse operation until the asymptotic level of the reaction rate, set by the delayed neutrons, is achieved. The superimposition of the pulse to itself was calculated by a simple C computer program. A parallel version of the C program is used due to the large amount of data being processed, e.g. by the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The new calculation methodology has shown an excellent agreement with the experimental results available from the YALINA-Booster facility of Belarus. The facility has been driven by a Deuterium-Deuterium or Deuterium-Tritium pulsed neutron source and the (n,p) reaction rate has been experimentally measured by a {sup 3}He detector. The MCNP calculation has utilized the weight window and delayed neutron biasing variance reduction techniques since the detector volume is small compared to the assembly volume. Finally, this methodology was used to calculate the IAEA benchmark of the YALINA-Booster experiment.

  1. BioPartsDB: a synthetic biology workflow web-application for education and research

    PubMed Central

    Stracquadanio, Giovanni; Yang, Kun; Boeke, Jef D.; Bader, Joel S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Synthetic biology has become a widely used technology, and expanding applications in research, education and industry require progress tracking for team-based DNA synthesis projects. Although some vendors are beginning to supply multi-kilobase sequence-verified constructs, synthesis workflows starting with short oligos remain important for cost savings and pedagogical benefit. We developed BioPartsDB as an open source, extendable workflow management system for synthetic biology projects with entry points for oligos and larger DNA constructs and ending with sequence-verified clones. Availability and Implementation: BioPartsDB is released under the MIT license and available for download at https://github.com/baderzone/biopartsdb. Additional documentation and video tutorials are available at https://github.com/baderzone/biopartsdb/wiki. An Amazon Web Services image is available from the AWS Market Place (ami-a01d07c8). Contact: joel.bader@jhu.edu PMID:27412090

  2. Invasive Species Biology, Control, and Research. Part 2. Multiflora Rose (Rosa multiflora)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-01

    this agent should be considered in concert with other biological control methods. The dying canes are incapable of asexual reproduction via layering...two, Multiflora Rose seedlings grow inconspicuously, but quickly become well anchored. Multiflora Rose reproduces asexually by suckering and...mowing the remaining topgrowth eliminates any remaining live plant parts that could asexually reproduce. ERDC TR-08-11 8 Table 1. Herbicides that

  3. Methods for disassembling, replacing and assembling parts of a steam cooling system for a gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Ian D.; Wesorick, Ronald R.

    2002-01-01

    The steam cooling circuit for a gas turbine includes a bore tube assembly supplying steam to circumferentially spaced radial tubes coupled to supply elbows for transitioning the radial steam flow in an axial direction along steam supply tubes adjacent the rim of the rotor. The supply tubes supply steam to circumferentially spaced manifold segments located on the aft side of the 1-2 spacer for supplying steam to the buckets of the first and second stages. Spent return steam from these buckets flows to a plurality of circumferentially spaced return manifold segments disposed on the forward face of the 1-2 spacer. Crossover tubes couple the steam supply from the steam supply manifold segments through the 1-2 spacer to the buckets of the first stage. Crossover tubes through the 1-2 spacer also return steam from the buckets of the second stage to the return manifold segments. Axially extending return tubes convey spent cooling steam from the return manifold segments to radial tubes via return elbows. The bore tube assembly, radial tubes, elbows, manifold segments and crossover tubes are removable from the turbine rotor and replaceable.

  4. Systematic, spatial imaging of large multimolecular assemblies and the emerging principles of supramolecular order in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Understanding biological systems at the level of their relational (emergent) molecular properties in functional protein networks relies on imaging methods, able to spatially resolve a tissue or a cell as a giant, non-random, topologically defined collection of interacting supermolecules executing myriads of subcellular mechanisms. Here, the development and findings of parameter-unlimited functional super-resolution microscopy are described-a technology based on the fluorescence imaging cycler (IC) principle capable of co-mapping thousands of distinct biomolecular assemblies at high spatial resolution and differentiation (<40 nm distances). It is shown that the subcellular and transcellular features of such supermolecules can be described at the compositional and constitutional levels; that the spatial connection, relational stoichiometry, and topology of supermolecules generate hitherto unrecognized functional self-segmentation of biological tissues; that hierarchical features, common to thousands of simultaneously imaged supermolecules, can be identified; and how the resulting supramolecular order relates to spatial coding of cellular functionalities in biological systems. A large body of observations with IC molecular systems microscopy collected over 20 years have disclosed principles governed by a law of supramolecular segregation of cellular functionalities. This pervades phenomena, such as exceptional orderliness, functional selectivity, combinatorial and spatial periodicity, and hierarchical organization of large molecular systems, across all species investigated so far. This insight is based on the high degree of specificity, selectivity, and sensitivity of molecular recognition processes for fluorescence imaging beyond the spectral resolution limit, using probe libraries controlled by ICs.

  5. Synthesis and biological evaluation of polymethoxylated 4-heteroarylcoumarins as tubulin assembly inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Ganina, Olga G; Daras, Etienne; Bourgarel-Rey, Véronique; Peyrot, Vincent; Andresyuk, Alexey N; Finet, Jean-Pierre; Fedorov, Alexey Yu; Beletskaya, Irina P; Combes, Sébastien

    2008-10-01

    A series of syn-restricted polymethoxylated 4-heteroarylcoumarins--the isostuctural analogs of combretastatin A-4--was synthesized by Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction and evaluated for antiproliferative activity. The 4-(1-methyl-1H-indol-5-yl)chromen-2-ones exhibit a potent cytotoxicity against HBL100 epithelial cell line with an IC(50) value amounting to 0.098 and 0.078 microM, respectively. The two compounds, having an indolyl moiety, potent inhibit in vitro microtubule assembly with a substoichiometric mode of action. A structure-activity relationship was discussed and the indolyl moiety was proved to be a good surrogate for the 3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl ring of CA-4.

  6. Test design description, Volume 1B, Part 2; FSP-1R FFTF test assembly (HF191A): Revision

    SciTech Connect

    McWethy, L.M.

    1989-07-01

    The principal objective of the FSP-1 test series is to provide the required fuel behavior data needed for fuel modeling and data on the performance of Reference Flight System prototypic cladding and liners at goal burnup. The test series includes two reconstitutions, designated FSP-1R and FSP-1RR, respectively. The irradiation times specified are: 150 equivalent full power days (EFPDs) for the initial FSP-1, 300 EFPDs for FSP-1R, and 400 EFPDs for FSP-1RR. A TDD-IB, part 1 document was issued to specify the design and fabrication requirements for fuel pins in the FSP-1R test. This TDD-IB, Part 2 document will specify the requirements for encapsulation of the FSP-1R fuel pins and fabrication of the FSP-1R test assembly. 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Assembled core-shell nanostructures of gold nanoparticles with biocompatible polymers toward biology.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongxiang; Li, Qianru; Hao, Xiongwen; Zhang, Yaojun; Zhang, Zhupeng; Li, Chunfang

    2014-03-01

    The present review focuses on core-shell nanostructures of spherical gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) and biocompatible polymers mainly from the view points of preparation approaches, nanocomposite properties and potential applications for biology. The preparation approaches are assorted into direct-reduction, covalent "graft-to", "graft-from" approach, surface bonding and physical adsorption. Various biocompatible polymers are involved such as the thermosensitive polymers, pH-responsive polymers, antibiofouling polymers, conductive polymers and several natural polymers. The encapsulating and loading properties, cellular uptake and drug release control, as well as biorecognition, targeting and sensing potential are discussed in connection with biological systems. These polymeric gold nanocomposites will have a great potential in biotechnology and life science but also face enormous challenge in future applications.

  8. Self Assembly of Biogenic Surfactants at Mineral Surfaces and Their Effect on Biological Iron Acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraemer, S. M.

    2005-12-01

    Microorganisms exude biogenic surfactants to modify the physical and chemical properties of mineral-water interfaces. Surfactants with negatively charged hydrophilic head groups interact strongly with oppositely charged mineral surfaces such as iron or aluminum oxides. Surfactant self assembly at mineral surfaces can result in the formation of admicelles that have a significant effect on the surface charge and hydrophobicity. These effects are exploited by microorganisms to facilitate attachment to mineral surfaces. Similarly, plants exude surfactants into the rhizosphere and change the surface tension and flow of soil water. Other surface active compounds that are typically found in soils and surface waters are humic substances and fatty acids that are produced by degradation of biomass. In general, surface active compounds are ubiquitous in natural systems. In this study we investigated how surfactants influence bio-mineral interactions using the example of siderophore promoted iron acquisition. Siderophore promoted iron acquisition involves the adsorption of a biogenic iron specific ligand (i.e. the siderophore) to iron oxides and the subsequent siderophore promoted iron oxide dissolution. The hypothesis of this project is that the modification of the iron oxide surface charge and hydrophobicity by adsorbed surfactants will have an important effect on siderophore adsorption and dissolution kinetics. We approached this subject by investigating the adsorption of a natural surfactant (rhamnolipids: RhL) and the synthetic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate: SDS) on goethite (α-FeOOH, a common pedogenic iron oxide) and observing the effect of surfactant self assembly on the properties of the mineral water interface. We observed fast adsorption kinetics at pH 3 and slow adsorption at pH 6. The adsorbed surfactants reversed the surface potential of goethite (as evidenced by electrophoretic mobility measurements) at soluble surfactant concentrations below 10 μM (SDS

  9. Simulations of impulsive laser scattering of biological protein assemblies: Application to M13 bacteriophage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykeman, Eric C.; Benson, Daryn; Tsen, K.-T.; Sankey, Otto F.

    2009-10-01

    We develop a theoretical framework, based on a bond-polarizability model, for simulating the impulsive force experienced on a protein or an assembly of proteins from a pulsed light source by coupling the laser electric field to an atomic distortion. The mechanism is impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS) where mechanical distortions produce variation in the electronic polarization through atomic displacements similar to vibrational Raman scattering. The magnitude of the impulsive force is determined from the empirical two-body bond-polarizability model and the intensity of the incident light. We apply the method to the M13 bacteriophage protein capsid system by performing several classical molecular-dynamics simulations that include the additional impulsive laser scattering force at various light intensities and pulse widths. The results of the molecular-dynamics simulations are then qualitatively interpreted with a simple harmonic oscillator model driven by ISRS. The intensity of light required to produce damage to the capsid in the simulations was found to be far higher than what was found in recent pulsed laser scattering experiments of M13 phage, suggesting that the observed inactivation of viruses with ultrashort laser pulses involves processes and/or mechanisms not taken into account in the present simulations.

  10. Waterborne firm coating for temporary protection of parts, providing controlled lubrication during assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Hayner, R.E.

    1987-03-03

    This patent describes a protective, emulsified oil in water, dispersible, lubricant coating composition having a pH in the range of about 7.0 to 10, and capable of application and flow on a threaded solid substrate consisting essentially of: A. about 65 to 99% by weight of a composition comprising: (1) about 0.5 to 30 parts by weight of organic wax components having a melting point above 50/sup 0/C, the wax container ester groups; (2) about 0.5 to 6 parts of a surfactant comprising 2 to 8% of carboxylic acid and about 1 to 5% of an amine, the acid and the amine forming a salt providing at least a portion of a surfactant; (3) about 10 to 30 parts of a coupling agent comprising a C/sub 5/-C/sub 30/ liquid hydrocarbon coupling component and a C/sub 2/-C/sub 20/ alcohol in the ratio of between 1:1 and 10:1 by weight respectively, selected from the group consisting of: mineral spirits, kerosene, ethylene glycol ether, butyl cellosolve, diethylene glycol monoethyl ether, ethylene glycol monopropyl ether, propyl cellosolve, ethyl cellosolve, diethylene glycol monoethyl ether, ethylene glycol monoacetate, diethylene glycol monoproprionate, diethylene glycol monoacetate, propylene glycol monoacetate, ethanol, isopropanol and isobutanol; and (4) about 30 to 97 parts of water the sum of all parts being equal to 100; and (B) about 3.5 to 9% total pigment comprising about 0.4 to 4% by weight carbon black.

  11. Biological activities and phytochemical profiles of extracts from different parts of bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens).

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Akinobu; Zhu, Qinchang; Tan, Hui; Horiba, Hiroki; Ohnuki, Koichiro; Mori, Yasuhiro; Yamauchi, Ryoko; Ishikawa, Hiroya; Iwamoto, Akira; Kawahara, Hiroharu; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2014-06-18

    Besides being a useful building material, bamboo also is a potential source of bioactive substances. Although some studies have been performed to examine its use in terms of the biological activity, only certain parts of bamboo, especially the leaves or shoots, have been studied. Comprehensive and comparative studies among different parts of bamboo would contribute to a better understanding and application of this knowledge. In this study, the biological activities of ethanol and water extracts from the leaves, branches, outer culm, inner culm, knots, rhizomes and roots of Phyllostachys pubescens, the major species of bamboo in Japan, were comparatively evaluated. The phytochemical profiles of these extracts were tentatively determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. The results showed that extracts from different parts of bamboo had different chemical compositions and different antioxidative, antibacterial and antiallergic activities, as well as on on melanin biosynthesis. Outer culm and inner culm were found to be the most important sources of active compounds. 8-C-Glucosylapigenin, luteolin derivatives and chlorogenic acid were the most probable compounds responsible for the anti-allergy activity of these bamboo extracts. Our study suggests the potential use of bamboo as a functional ingredient in cosmetics or other health-related products.

  12. Monitoring of airborne biological particles in outdoor atmosphere. Part 1: Importance, variability and ratios.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Andrés; Amo de Paz, Guillermo; Rastrojo, Alberto; García, Ana M; Alcamí, Antonio; Gutiérrez-Bustillo, A Montserrat; Moreno, Diego A

    2016-03-01

    The first part of this review ("Monitoring of airborne biological particles in outdoor atmosphere. Part 1: Importance, variability and ratios") describes the current knowledge on the major biological particles present in the air regarding their global distribution, concentrations, ratios and influence of meteorological factors in an attempt to provide a framework for monitoring their biodiversity and variability in such a singular environment as the atmosphere. Viruses, bacteria, fungi, pollen and fragments thereof are the most abundant microscopic biological particles in the air outdoors. Some of them can cause allergy and severe diseases in humans, other animals and plants, with the subsequent economic impact. Despite the harsh conditions, they can be found from land and sea surfaces to beyond the troposphere and have been proposed to play a role also in weather conditions and climate change by acting as nucleation particles and inducing water vapour condensation. In regards to their global distribution, marine environments act mostly as a source for bacteria while continents additionally provide fungal and pollen elements. Within terrestrial environments, their abundances and diversity seem to be influenced by the land-use type (rural, urban, coastal) and their particularities. Temporal variability has been observed for all these organisms, mostly triggered by global changes in temperature, relative humidity, et cetera. Local fluctuations in meteorological factors may also result in pronounced changes in the airbiota. Although biological particles can be transported several hundreds of meters from the original source, and even intercontinentally, the time and final distance travelled are strongly influenced by factors such as wind speed and direction. [Int Microbiol 2016; 19(1):1-1 3].

  13. Cytosol-dependent membrane fusion in ER, nuclear envelope and nuclear pore assembly: biological implications.

    PubMed

    Rafikova, Elvira R; Melikov, Kamran; Chernomordik, Leonid V

    2010-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum and nuclear envelope rearrangements after mitosis are often studied in the reconstitution system based on Xenopus egg extract. In our recent work we partially replaced the membrane vesicles in the reconstitution mix with protein-free liposomes to explore the relative contributions of cytosolic and transmembrane proteins. Here we discuss our finding that cytosolic proteins mediate fusion between membranes lacking functional transmembrane proteins and the role of membrane fusion in endoplasmic reticulum and nuclear envelope reorganization. Cytosol-dependent liposome fusion has allowed us to restore, without adding transmembrane nucleoporins, functionality of nuclear pores, their spatial distribution and chromatin decondensation in nuclei formed at insufficient amounts of membrane material and characterized by only partial decondensation of chromatin and lack of nuclear transport. Both the mechanisms and the biological implications of the discovered coupling between spatial distribution of nuclear pores, chromatin decondensation and nuclear transport are discussed.

  14. Magnetic Orientation in Biology:. Virus Structure - Blood Clot Assembly - Cell Guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbet, J.

    2005-07-01

    Our childhood games with permanent magnets leave us with the impression that matter, in general, does not respond to a magnetic field. In reality, virtually everything is subjected to minute forces of attraction, repulsion or orientation. Strong fields combined with better understanding allow us to exploit these effects to tackle biological problems. In particular, the very weak diamagnetic anisotropy associated with individual molecules can give rise to high orientation of well organized structures such as crystals, liquid-crystals, semi-rigid polymers and individual cells. High orientation is often accompanied by better data and superior properties. In some circumstances, such as in crystallization, the orientating torque might induce effects over and above simple orientation. Magnetic field orientation has a number of advantages over other orienting techniques. Drawing or spinning produce fibers and can alter structure or cause damage while template methods invariable work only over a short range. The application of an electric field can cause heating and electrophoresis. In contrast, a magnetic field acts at a distance allowing uniform orientation in bulk and the creation of composites with components having different orientations. The contribution that magnetic orientation has made to a range of biological topics is illustrated by briefly describing a number of examples. For example, it has been a boon to x-ray studies of some non-crystalline filamentous complexes (e.g. fibrin, actin, microtubules, bacterial flagella and filamentous viruses) and is being vigorously exploited in NMR. The blood-clot polymer, fibrin, forms highly oriented gels when polymerized in a strong field and a number of its properties have been elucidated as a result. Magnetically oriented scaffolds of collagen, the major connective tissue protein, and fibrin are being used to study cell contact guidance. Oriented biomaterials might eventually be incorporated into specialized wound

  15. Systematic, spatial imaging of large multimolecular assemblies and the emerging principles of supramolecular order in biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Understanding biological systems at the level of their relational (emergent) molecular properties in functional protein networks relies on imaging methods, able to spatially resolve a tissue or a cell as a giant, non-random, topologically defined collection of interacting supermolecules executing myriads of subcellular mechanisms. Here, the development and findings of parameter-unlimited functional super-resolution microscopy are described—a technology based on the fluorescence imaging cycler (IC) principle capable of co-mapping thousands of distinct biomolecular assemblies at high spatial resolution and differentiation (<40 nm distances). It is shown that the subcellular and transcellular features of such supermolecules can be described at the compositional and constitutional levels; that the spatial connection, relational stoichiometry, and topology of supermolecules generate hitherto unrecognized functional self-segmentation of biological tissues; that hierarchical features, common to thousands of simultaneously imaged supermolecules, can be identified; and how the resulting supramolecular order relates to spatial coding of cellular functionalities in biological systems. A large body of observations with IC molecular systems microscopy collected over 20 years have disclosed principles governed by a law of supramolecular segregation of cellular functionalities. This pervades phenomena, such as exceptional orderliness, functional selectivity, combinatorial and spatial periodicity, and hierarchical organization of large molecular systems, across all species investigated so far. This insight is based on the high degree of specificity, selectivity, and sensitivity of molecular recognition processes for fluorescence imaging beyond the spectral resolution limit, using probe libraries controlled by ICs. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Molecular Recognition published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24375580

  16. Single Cell and Metagenomic Assemblies: Biology Drives Technical Choices and Goals (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema

    Stepanauskas, Ramunas [Bigelow Laboratory

    2016-07-12

    DOE JGI's Tanja Woyke, chair of the Single Cells and Metagenomes session, delivers an introduction, followed by Bigelow Laboratory's Ramunas Stepanauskas on "Single Cell and Metagenomic Assemblies: Biology Drives Technical Choices and Goals" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  17. [Nutrition and biological value of food parts of a trade bivalve mollusk Anadara broughtoni].

    PubMed

    Tabakaeva, O V; Tabakaev, A V

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the human diet includes different new products of seafishing, including non-fish--bivalves and gastropods, holothurias, echinoderms, jellyfishes that demands careful studying of their chemical composition. The purpose of the study was to determine the nutritional and biological value of all soft parts of the burrowing bivalve MOLLUSK Anadara broughtoni from the Far East region. It was established thatfood parts of a bivalve were significantly flooded (water content--73.5-84.2%), with the minimum water content in the adductor and maximum in the mantle. Dry solids are presented by organic (89-93%) and mineral (7-11%) components. Organic components consist of protein (14.6-20.7%), lipids (1.8-2.3%), carbohydrates (2.1-2.6%). The analysis of amino-acid composition of proteins of food parts of the mollusk of Anadara broughtonishowed the presence of all essential amino acids with slight differences in their content depending on the localization of the protein. All edible parts have tryptophan as the limiting amino acid. Muscle proteins have maximum level of lysine, methionine, cysteine, phenylalanine and tyrosine; mantle proteins--leucine, isoleucine and threonine; adductor proteins--valine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, methionine and cysteine. Predominant nonessential amino acids forproteins of all food pieces are glycine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, arginine. The coefficient of amino-acid score differences of adductor protein (31.7%) is less than the same of cloak by 3.7%. The indicator "biological value" is maximal for adductor (68.3%), but the differenceformuscle is only 0.83%. Mantle proteins are characterized by minimum biological value (64.6%). The coefficient of utility of amino acid composition of protein is maximalfor muscle (57.83%), and values for a cloak and an adductor differ slightly (55.81 and 55.96%). Taurine content in food parts of a mollusk Anadara broughtoni is rather high compared to with other bivalve mollusks of the Far East region

  18. T cell synapse assembly: proteins, motors and the underlying cell biology.

    PubMed

    Tooley, Aaron J; Jacobelli, Jordan; Moldovan, Maria-Cristina; Douglas, Adam; Krummel, Matthew F

    2005-02-01

    A tantalizing feature of the 'immunological synapse' is the segregation of transmembrane proteins into activating clusters and their underlying signalosomes. The mechanisms by which transmembrane proteins are initially recruited to and then stably segregated at the synapse remains an outstanding question in the field; and one likely to reveal key modes of signaling regulation. Ongoing real-time imaging approaches and a refocusing of efforts upon understanding the basic cell biology of T cells have all contributed to a developing model of T cell behavior; elementary TCR-derived signaling quickly feeds back into the basic cellular programs controlling cell shape, adhesiveness, motility, as well as some poorly understood aspects of membrane fluidity and segregation. It is increasingly clear that the mechanisms for control at this level are shared between T cells and other cell types and may not be revealed in differential genomic screening. To this end, imaging-based genetic screens are now coming online to aid in identifying the ubiquitous proteins that function at polarized signaling surfaces.

  19. Evolution of the cephalopod head complex by assembly of multiple molluscan body parts: Evidence from Nautilus embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Shigeno, Shuichi; Sasaki, Takenori; Moritaki, Takeya; Kasugai, Takashi; Vecchione, Michael; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2008-01-01

    Cephalopod head parts are among the most complex occurring in all invertebrates. Hypotheses for the evolutionary process require a drastic body-plan transition in relation to the life-style changes from benthos to active nekton. Determining these transitions, however, has been elusive because of scarcity of fossil records of soft tissues and lack of some of the early developmental stages of the basal species. Here we report the first embryological evidence in the nautiloid cephalopod Nautilus pompilius for the morphological development of the head complex by a unique assembly of multiple archetypical molluscan body parts. Using a specialized aquarium system, we successfully obtained a series of developmental stages that enabled us to test previous controversial scenarios. Our results demonstrate that the embryonic organs exhibit body plans that are primarily bilateral and antero-posteriorly elongated at stereotyped positions. The distinct cephalic compartment, foot, brain cords, mantle, and shell resemble the body plans of monoplacophorans and basal gastropods. The numerous digital tentacles of Nautilus develop from simple serial and spatially-patterned bud-like anlagen along the anterior-posterior axis, indicating that origins of digital tentacles or arms of all other cephalopods develop not from the head but from the foot. In middle and late embryos, the primary body plans largely change to those of juveniles or adults, and finally form a "head" complex assembled by anlagen of the foot, cephalic hood, collar, hyponome (funnel), and the foot-derived epidermal covers. We suggest that extensions of the collar-funnel compartment and free epidermal folds derived from multiple topological foot regions may play an important role in forming the head complex, which is thought to be an important feature during the body plan transition.

  20. Copy number variability in Parkinson's disease: assembling the puzzle through a systems biology approach.

    PubMed

    La Cognata, Valentina; Morello, Giovanna; D'Agata, Velia; Cavallaro, Sebastiano

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most common progressive neurodegenerative disorder of aging, was long believed to be a non-genetic sporadic origin syndrome. The proof that several genetic loci are responsible for rare Mendelian forms has represented a revolutionary breakthrough, enabling to reveal molecular mechanisms underlying this debilitating still incurable condition. While single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and small indels constitute the most commonly investigated DNA variations accounting for only a limited number of PD cases, larger genomic molecular rearrangements have emerged as significant PD-causing mutations, including submicroscopic Copy Number Variations (CNVs). CNVs constitute a prevalent source of genomic variations and substantially participate in each individual's genomic makeup and phenotypic outcome. However, the majority of genetic studies have focused their attention on single candidate-gene mutations or on common variants reaching a significant statistical level of acceptance. This gene-centric approach is insufficient to uncover the genetic background of polygenic multifactorial disorders like PD, and potentially masks rare individual CNVs that all together might contribute to disease development or progression. In this review, we will discuss literature and bioinformatic data describing the involvement of CNVs on PD pathobiology. We will analyze the most frequent copy number changes in familiar PD genes and provide a "systems biology" overview of rare individual rearrangements that could functionally act on commonly deregulated molecular pathways. Assessing the global genome-wide burden of CNVs in PD patients may reveal new disease-related molecular mechanisms, and open the window to a new possible genetic scenario in the unsolved PD puzzle.

  1. Analysis of Production Lead Time for Missile Repair Parts: Contracts Dealing with Cable Assemblies and Wiring Harnesses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-04-01

    contracts dealing with cable assemblies and wiring harnesses . Techniques of regression analysis and graphical analysis were employed on the data observations from thirty cable assembly and wiring harness contracts.

  2. 9 CFR 381.78 - Condemnation of carcasses and parts: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological residues. 381.78 Section 381.78 Animals and Animal...; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POULTRY PRODUCTS... carcasses and parts: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological residues. (a) At the time...

  3. 9 CFR 381.78 - Condemnation of carcasses and parts: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological residues. 381.78 Section 381.78 Animals and Animal...; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POULTRY PRODUCTS... carcasses and parts: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological residues. (a) At the time...

  4. 9 CFR 381.78 - Condemnation of carcasses and parts: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological residues. 381.78 Section 381.78 Animals and Animal...; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POULTRY PRODUCTS... carcasses and parts: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological residues. (a) At the time...

  5. 9 CFR 381.78 - Condemnation of carcasses and parts: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological residues. 381.78 Section 381.78 Animals and Animal...; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POULTRY PRODUCTS... carcasses and parts: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological residues. (a) At the time...

  6. 9 CFR 381.78 - Condemnation of carcasses and parts: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological residues. 381.78 Section 381.78 Animals and Animal...; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POULTRY PRODUCTS... carcasses and parts: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological residues. (a) At the time...

  7. Supramolecular assembly of biological molecules purified from bovine nerve cells: from microtubule bundles and necklaces to neurofilament networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Needleman, Daniel J.; Jones, Jayna B.; Raviv, Uri; Ojeda-Lopez, Miguel A.; Miller, H. P.; Li, Y.; Wilson, L.; Safinya, C. R.

    2005-11-01

    With the completion of the human genome project, the biosciences community is beginning the daunting task of understanding the structures and functions of a large number of interacting biological macromolecules. Examples include the interacting molecules involved in the process of DNA condensation during the cell cycle, and in the formation of bundles and networks of filamentous actin proteins in cell attachment, motility and cytokinesis. In this proceedings paper we present examples of supramolecular assembly based on proteins derived from the vertebrate nerve cell cytoskeleton. The axonal cytoskeleton in vertebrate neurons provides a rich example of bundles and networks of neurofilaments, microtubules (MTs) and filamentous actin, where the nature of the interactions, structures, and structure-function correlations remains poorly understood. We describe synchrotron x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and optical imaging data, in reconstituted protein systems purified from bovine central nervous system, which reveal unexpected structures not predicted by current electrostatic theories of polyelectrolyte bundling, including three-dimensional MT bundles and two-dimensional MT necklaces.

  8. Monte Carlo modeling and analyses of YALINA-booster subcritical assembly part 1: analytical models and main neutronics parameters.

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, M. Y. A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-09-11

    This study was carried out to model and analyze the YALINA-Booster facility, of the Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research of Belarus, with the long term objective of advancing the utilization of accelerator driven systems for the incineration of nuclear waste. The YALINA-Booster facility is a subcritical assembly, driven by an external neutron source, which has been constructed to study the neutron physics and to develop and refine methodologies to control the operation of accelerator driven systems. The external neutron source consists of Californium-252 spontaneous fission neutrons, 2.45 MeV neutrons from Deuterium-Deuterium reactions, or 14.1 MeV neutrons from Deuterium-Tritium reactions. In the latter two cases a deuteron beam is used to generate the neutrons. This study is a part of the collaborative activity between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and the Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research of Belarus. In addition, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has a coordinated research project benchmarking and comparing the results of different numerical codes with the experimental data available from the YALINA-Booster facility and ANL has a leading role coordinating the IAEA activity. The YALINA-Booster facility has been modeled according to the benchmark specifications defined for the IAEA activity without any geometrical homogenization using the Monte Carlo codes MONK and MCNP/MCNPX/MCB. The MONK model perfectly matches the MCNP one. The computational analyses have been extended through the MCB code, which is an extension of the MCNP code with burnup capability because of its additional feature for analyzing source driven multiplying assemblies. The main neutronics parameters of the YALINA-Booster facility were calculated using these computer codes with different nuclear data libraries based on ENDF/B-VI-0, -6, JEF-2.2, and JEF-3.1.

  9. Peptide-directed self-assembly of functionalized polymeric nanoparticles. Part II: effects of nanoparticle composition on assembly behavior and multiple drug loading ability.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Xu; Ding, Xiaochu; Moser, Trevor; Gao, Qi; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Heiden, Patricia A

    2015-04-01

    Peptide-functionalized polymeric nanoparticles were designed and self-assembled into continuous nanoparticle fibers and three-dimensional scaffolds via ionic complementary peptide interaction. Different nanoparticle compositions can be designed to be appropriate for each desired drug, so that the release of each drug is individually controlled and the simultaneous sustainable release of multiple drugs is achieved in a single scaffold. A self-assembled scaffold membrane was incubated with NIH3T3 fibroblast cells in a culture dish that demonstrated non-toxicity and non-inhibition on cell proliferation. This type of nanoparticle scaffold combines the advantages of peptide self-assembly and the versatility of polymeric nanoparticle controlled release systems for tissue engineering.

  10. BioBrick assembly standards and techniques and associated software tools.

    PubMed

    Røkke, Gunvor; Korvald, Eirin; Pahr, Jarle; Oyås, Ove; Lale, Rahmi

    2014-01-01

    The BioBrick idea was developed to introduce the engineering principles of abstraction and standardization into synthetic biology. BioBricks are DNA sequences that serve a defined biological function and can be readily assembled with any other BioBrick parts to create new BioBricks with novel properties. In order to achieve this, several assembly standards can be used. Which assembly standards a BioBrick is compatible with, depends on the prefix and suffix sequences surrounding the part. In this chapter, five of the most common assembly standards will be described, as well as some of the most used assembly techniques, cloning procedures, and a presentation of the available software tools that can be used for deciding on the best method for assembling of different BioBricks, and searching for BioBrick parts in the Registry of Standard Biological Parts database.

  11. Qualification Testing of Solid Rocket Booster Diagonal Strut Restraint Cable Assembly Part Number 10176-0031-102/103

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, T. W.

    2006-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum presents qualification test results for solid rocket booster diagonal strut restraint cable part number 101276-00313-102/103. During flight this assembly is exposed to a range of temperatures. MIL-W-83420 shows the breaking strength of the cable as 798 kg (1,760 lb) at room temperature but does not define cable strength at the maximum temperature to which the cable is exposed during the first 2 min of flight; 669 C (1,236 F). The cable, which can be built from different corrosion resistant steel alloys, may also vary in its chemical, physical, and mechanical properties at temperature. Negative margins of safety were produced by analysis of the cable at temperature using standard knockdown factors. However, MSFC-HDBK-5 allows the use of a less conservative safety factor of 1.4 and knockdown factors verified by testing. Test results allowed a calculated knockdown factor of 0.1892 to be determined for the restraint cables, which provides a minimum breaking strength of 151 kg (333 lb) at 677 C (1,250 F) when combined with the minimum breaking strength of 0.317-cm (0.125- or 1/8-in) diameter, type 1 composition rope.

  12. Self-assembled structures and pKa value of oleic acid in systems of biological relevance.

    PubMed

    Salentinig, Stefan; Sagalowicz, Laurent; Glatter, Otto

    2010-07-20

    In the human digestion process, triglycerides are hydrolyzed by lipases to monoglycerides and the corresponding fatty acids. Here we report the self-assembly of structures in biologically relevant, emulsified oleic acid-monoolein mixtures at various pH values and oleic acid concentrations. Small-angle X-ray scattering, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering were used to investigate the structures formed, and to follow their transitions while these factors were varied. The addition of oleic acid to monoolein-based cubosomes was found to increase the critical packing parameter in the system. Structural transitions from bicontinuous cubosomes through hexosomes and micellar cubosomes (Fd3m symmetry) to emulsified microemulsions occur with increasing oleic acid concentration. At sufficiently high oleic acid concentration, the internal particle structure was also found to strongly depend on the pH of the aqueous phase: transformations from emulsified microemulsion through micellar cubosomes, hexosomes, and bicontinuous cubosomes to vesicles can be observed as a function of increasing pH. The reversible transition from liquid crystals to vesicles occurs at intestinal pH values (between pH 7 and 8). The hydrodynamic radius of the particles decreases from around 120 nm for internally structured particles to around 60 nm for vesicles. All transitions with pH are reversible. Finally, the apparent pK(a) for oleic acid in monoolein could be determined from the change of structure with pH. This value is within the physiological pH range of the intestine and depends somewhat on composition.

  13. Elastic-Plastic Nonlinear Response of a Space Shuttle External Tank Stringer. Part 1; Stringer-Feet Imperfections and Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Song, Kyongchan; Elliott, Kenny B.; Raju, Ivatury S.; Warren, Jerry E.

    2012-01-01

    Elastic-plastic, large-deflection nonlinear stress analyses are performed for the external hat-shaped stringers (or stiffeners) on the intertank portion of the Space Shuttle s external tank. These stringers are subjected to assembly strains when the stringers are initially installed on an intertank panel. Four different stringer-feet configurations including the baseline flat-feet, the heels-up, the diving-board, and the toes-up configurations are considered. The assembly procedure is analytically simulated for each of these stringer configurations. The location, size, and amplitude of the strain field associated with the stringer assembly are sensitive to the assumed geometry and assembly procedure. The von Mises stress distributions from these simulations indicate that localized plasticity will develop around the first eight fasteners for each stringer-feet configuration examined. However, only the toes-up configuration resulted in high assembly hoop strains.

  14. Modelling of a biologically inspired robotic fish driven by compliant parts.

    PubMed

    El Daou, Hadi; Salumäe, Taavi; Chambers, Lily D; Megill, William M; Kruusmaa, Maarja

    2014-03-01

    Inspired by biological swimmers such as fish, a robot composed of a rigid head, a compliant body and a rigid caudal fin was built. It has the geometrical properties of a subcarangiform swimmer of the same size. The head houses a servo-motor which actuates the compliant body and the caudal fin. It achieves this by applying a concentrated moment on a point near the compliant body base. In this paper, the dynamics of the compliant body driving the robotic fish is modelled and experimentally validated. Lighthill's elongated body theory is used to define the hydrodynamic forces on the compliant part and Rayleigh proportional damping is used to model damping. Based on the assumed modes method, an energetic approach is used to write the equations of motion of the compliant body and to compute the relationship between the applied moment and the resulting lateral deflections. Experiments on the compliant body were carried out to validate the model predictions. The results showed that a good match was achieved between the measured and predicted deformations. A discussion of the swimming motions between the real fish and the robot is presented.

  15. Thematic mapper flight model preshipment review data package. Volume 4: Appendix. Part D: Focal plane assembly data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The data obtained for the Band 1 thematic mapper flight full band assembly (P/N 50797) are summarized. The data were collected from half band, post amplifier, and full band acceptance test data records.

  16. Molecular biology for the critical care physician part I: terminology and technology.

    PubMed

    Santis, G; Evans, T W

    1999-04-01

    The past few years have seen a profound revolution in biological sciences. The enormous advances in molecular biology are providing novel insights into the etiology and treatment of human disease. These insights will undoubtedly have implications for intensive care research and practice. In this first of two articles, the basic principles and techniques of molecular biology are discussed to provide the intensive care physician with background information on the subject.

  17. 78 FR 23940 - Use of International Standard ISO-10993, “Biological Evaluation of Medical Devices Part 1...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Use of International Standard ISO-10993, ``Biological Evaluation of Medical Devices Part 1: Evaluation and Testing''; Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The...

  18. Nanoscale device architectures derived from biological assemblies: The case of tobacco mosaic virus and (apo)ferritin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calò, Annalisa; Eiben, Sabine; Okuda, Mitsuhiro; Bittner, Alexander M.

    2016-03-01

    Virus particles and proteins are excellent examples of naturally occurring structures with well-defined nanoscale architectures, for example, cages and tubes. These structures can be employed in a bottom-up assembly strategy to fabricate repetitive patterns of hybrid organic-inorganic materials. In this paper, we review methods of assembly that make use of protein and virus scaffolds to fabricate patterned nanostructures with very high spatial control. We chose (apo)ferritin and tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) as model examples that have already been applied successfully in nanobiotechnology. Their interior space and their exterior surfaces can be mineralized with inorganic layers or nanoparticles. Furthermore, their native assembly abilities can be exploited to generate periodic architectures for integration in electrical and magnetic devices. We introduce the state of the art and describe recent advances in biomineralization techniques, patterning and device production with (apo)ferritin and TMV.

  19. The Multinational Arabidopsis Steering Subcommittee for Proteomics Assembles the Largest Proteome Database Resource for Plant Systems Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Weckwerth, Wolfram; Baginsky, Sacha; Van Wijk, Klass; Heazlewood, Joshua; Millar, Harvey

    2009-12-01

    In the past 10 years, we have witnessed remarkable advances in the field of plant molecular biology. The rapid development of proteomic technologies and the speed with which these techniques have been applied to the field have altered our perception of how we can analyze proteins in complex systems. At nearly the same time, the availability of the complete genome for the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana was released; this effort provides an unsurpassed resource for the identification of proteins when researchers use MS to analyze plant samples. Recognizing the growth in this area, the Multinational Arabidopsis Steering Committee (MASC) established a subcommittee for A. thaliana proteomics in 2006 with the objective of consolidating databases, technique standards, and experimentally validated candidate genes and functions. Since the establishment of the Multinational Arabidopsis Steering Subcommittee for Proteomics (MASCP), many new approaches and resources have become available. Recently, the subcommittee established a webpage to consolidate this information (www.masc-proteomics.org). It includes links to plant proteomic databases, general information about proteomic techniques, meeting information, a summary of proteomic standards, and other relevant resources. Altogether, this website provides a useful resource for the Arabidopsis proteomics community. In the future, the website will host discussions and investigate the cross-linking of databases. The subcommittee members have extensive experience in arabidopsis proteomics and collectively have produced some of the most extensive proteomics data sets for this model plant (Table S1 in the Supporting Information has a list of resources). The largest collection of proteomics data from a single study in A. thaliana was assembled into an accessible database (AtProteome; http://fgcz-atproteome.unizh.ch/index.php) and was recently published by the Baginsky lab.1 The database provides links to major Arabidopsis online

  20. Biological materials: Part A. tuning LCST of raft copolymers and gold/copolymer hybrid nanoparticles and Part B. Biobased nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ning

    The research described in this dissertation is comprised of two major parts. The first part studied the effects of asymmetric amphiphilic end groups on the thermo-response of diblock copolymers of (oligo/di(ethylene glycol) methyl ether (meth)acrylates, OEGA/DEGMA) and the hybrid nanoparticles of these copolymers with a gold nanoparticle core. Placing the more hydrophilic end group on the more hydrophilic block significantly increased the cloud point compared to a similar copolymer composition with the end group placement reversed. For a given composition, the cloud point was shifted by as much as 28 °C depending on the placement of end groups. This is a much stronger effect than either changing the hydrophilic/hydrophobic block ratio or replacing the hydrophilic acrylate monomer with the equivalent methacrylate monomer. The temperature range of the coil-globule transition was also altered. Binding these diblock copolymers to a gold core decreased the cloud point by 5-15 °C and narrowed the temperature range of the coil-globule transition. The effects were more pronounced when the gold core was bound to the less hydrophilic block. Given the limited numbers of monomers that are approved safe for in vivo use, employing amphiphilic end group placement is a useful tool to tune a thermo-response without otherwise changing the copolymer composition. The second part of the dissertation investigated the production of value-added nanomaterials from two biorefinery "wastes": lignin and peptidoglycan. Different solvents and spinning methods (melt-, wet-, and electro-spinning) were tested to make lignin/cellulose blended and carbonized fibers. Only electro-spinning yielded fibers having a small enough diameter for efficient carbonization (≤ 5-10 μm), but it was concluded that cellulose was not a suitable binder. Cellulose lignin fibers before carbonization showed up to 90% decrease in moisture uptake compared to pure cellulose. Peptidoglycan (a bacterial cell wall

  1. Large-scale study of the interactions between proteins involved in type IV pilus biology in Neisseria meningitidis: characterization of a subcomplex involved in pilus assembly.

    PubMed

    Georgiadou, Michaella; Castagnini, Marta; Karimova, Gouzel; Ladant, Daniel; Pelicic, Vladimir

    2012-06-01

    The functionally versatile type IV pili (Tfp) are one of the most widespread virulence factors in bacteria. However, despite generating much research interest for decades, the molecular mechanisms underpinning the various aspects of Tfp biology remain poorly understood, mainly because of the complexity of the system. In the human pathogen Neisseria meningitidis for example, 23 proteins are dedicated to Tfp biology, 15 of which are essential for pilus biogenesis. One of the important gaps in our knowledge concerns the topology of this multiprotein machinery. Here we have used a bacterial two-hybrid system to identify and quantify the interactions between 11 Pil proteins from N. meningitidis. We identified 20 different binary interactions, many of which are novel. This represents the most complex interaction network between Pil proteins reported to date and indicates, among other things, that PilE, PilM, PilN and PilO, which are involved in pilus assembly, indeed interact. We focused our efforts on this subset of proteins and used a battery of assays to determine the membrane topology of PilN and PilO, map the interaction domains between PilE, PilM, PilN and PilO, and show that a widely conserved N-terminal motif in PilN is essential for both PilM-PilN interactions and pilus assembly. Finally, we show that PilP (another protein involved in pilus assembly) forms a complex with PilM, PilN and PilO. Taken together, these findings have numerous implications for understanding Tfp biology and provide a useful blueprint for future studies.

  2. [Topical issues of biological safety under current conditions. Part 3. Scientific provision for the national regulation of the biological safety framework in its broad interpretation].

    PubMed

    Onishchenko, G G; Smolensky, V Yu; Ezhlova, E B; Demina, Yu V; Toporkov, V P; Toporkov, A V; Lyapin, M N; Kutyrev, V V

    2014-01-01

    Consequent of investigation concerned with biological safety (BS) framework development in its broad interpretation, reflected in the Russian Federation State Acts, identified have been conceptual entity parameters of the up-to-date broad interpretation of BS, which have formed a part of the developed by the authors system for surveillance (prophylaxis, localization, indication, identification, and diagnostics) and control (prophylaxis, localization, and response/elimination) over the emergency situations of biological (sanitary-epidemiological) character. The System functionality is activated through supplying the content with information data which are concerned with monitoring and control of specific internal and external threats in the sphere of BS provision fixed in the Supplement 2 of the International Health Regulations (IHR, 2005), and with the previously characterized nomenclature of hazardous biological factors. The system is designed as a network-based research-and-practice tool for evaluation of the situation in the sphere of BS provision, as well as assessment of efficacy of management decision making as regards BS control and proper State policy implementation. Most of the system elements either directly or indirectly relate to the scope of activities conducted by Federal Service for Surveillance in the Sphere of Consumers Rights Protection and Human Welfare, being substantial argument for allocating coordination functions in the sphere of BS provision to this government agency and consistent with its function as the State Coordinator on IHR (2005). The data collected serve as materials to Draft Federal Law "Concerning biological safety provision of the population".

  3. Nitrogenase assembly

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yilin; Ribbe, Markus W.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogenase contains two unique metalloclusters: the P-cluster and the M-cluster. The assembly processes of P- and M-clusters are arguably the most complicated processes in bioinorganic chemistry. There is considerable interest in decoding the biosynthetic mechanisms of the P- and M-clusters, because these clusters are not only biologically important, but also chemically unprecedented. Understanding the assembly mechanisms of these unique metalloclusters is crucial for understanding the structure-function relationship of nitrogenase. Here, we review the recent advances in this research area, with an emphasis on our work that provide important insights into the biosynthetic pathways of these high-nuclearity metal centers. PMID:23232096

  4. Thematic mapper flight model preshipment review data package. Volume 4: Appendix. Part B: Scan mirror assembly data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Data from the thematic mapper scan mirror assembly (SMA) acceptance test are presented. Documentation includes: (1) a list of the acceptance test discrepancies; (2) flight 1 SMA test data book; (3) flight 1 SMA environmental report; (4) the configuration verification index; (5) the flight 1 SMA test failure reports; (6) the flight 1 data tapes log; and (7) the requests for deviation/waivers.

  5. Biological uniqueness and the definition of normality. Part 1--The concept of 'intrinsic' homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Schulz, P

    1994-01-01

    The patterns of biochemical and physiological variables values are subject-specific and quite stable over time. Thus, within the limits imposed by physiological requirements, the composition of the 'milieu intérieur' varies between individuals. It follows that having all values of blood constituents within the norm (defined statistically from populations of healthy subjects) might not be sufficient to identify biological normality, and a revised definition of biological normality should take into account inter-individual differences. Our concept of 'intrinsic' homeostasis means that the differences between subjects' concentrations of blood constituents express subject-specific constraints in the organization of their physiology, and that these differences might play a greater role than usually recognized. We list the consequences for medical research of the existence of biological uniqueness and propose to give more importance to the study of biological 'fingerprints' and 'intrinsic' homeostasis in physiology and clinical medicine.

  6. A Multidisciplinary Workshop: Self-Assembling Peptide Systems in Biology, Medicine and Engineering, Crete, Greece, July 1-6, 1999

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-31

    put, "In Nature hybrid species are usually sterile , but in science the reverse is often true. Hybrid subjects are often astonishingly fertile, whereas...will again bring new technologies, techniques and innovations to Biology, allowing Biologists to approach previously unanswerable questions. It is...other fields, most notably Physics, biologists received the technology and techniques necessary to convert biology to an experimental science

  7. In vitro drug release and biological evaluation of biomimetic polymeric micelles self-assembled from amphiphilic deoxycholic acid-phosphorylcholine-chitosan conjugate.

    PubMed

    Wu, Minming; Guo, Kai; Dong, Hongwei; Zeng, Rong; Tu, Mei; Zhao, Jianhao

    2014-12-01

    Novel biomimetic amphiphilic chitosan derivative, deoxycholic acid-phosphorylcholine-chitosan conjugate (DCA-PCCs) was synthesized based on the combination of Atherton-Todd reaction for coupling phosphorylcholine (PC) and carbodiimide coupling reaction for linking deoxycholic acid (DCA) to chitosan. The chemical structure of DCA-PCCs was characterized by (1)H and (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The self-assembly of DCA-PCCs in water was analyzed by fluorescence measurements, dynamic laser light-scattering (DLS), zeta potential and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technologies. The results confirmed that the amphiphilic DCA-PCCs can self-assemble to form nanosized spherical micelles with biomimetic PC shell. In vitro biological evaluation revealed that DCA-PCCs micelles had low toxicity against NIH/3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblasts as well as good hemocompatibility. Using quercetin as a hydrophobic model drug, drug loading and release study suggested that biomimetic DCA-PCCs micelles could be used as a promising nanocarrier avoiding unfavorable biological response for hydrophobic drug delivery applications.

  8. Space biology class as part of science education programs for high schools in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Motoshi; Takaoki, Muneo

    2004-11-01

    Declining incentives and scholastic abilities in science class has been concerned in Japan. The Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology encourages schools to cooperate with research institutions to raise student's interest in natural sciences. The Science Partnership Program (SPP) and the Super Science High-School (SSH) are among such efforts. Our short SPP course consists of an introductory lecture on space biology in general and a brief laboratory practice on plant gravitropism. Space biology class is popular to students, despite of the absence of flight experiments. We suppose that students are delighted when they find that their own knowledge is not a mere theory, but has very practical applications. Space biology is suitable in science class, since it synthesizes mathematics, physics, chemistry and many other subjects that students might think uninteresting.

  9. Energy from biological processes. Volume III. Appendixes, Part B: Agriculture, unconventional crops, and select biomass wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    This volume contains the following working papers written for OTA to assist in preparation of the report, Energy from Biological Processes: The Potential of Producing Energy From Agriculture; Cropland Availability for Biomass Production; Energy From Agriculture: Unconventional Crops; Energy From Aquaculture Biomass Systems: Fresh and Brackish Water Aquatic Plants; Energy From Agriculture: Animal Wastes; and Energy From Agriculture: Agricultural Processing Wastes.

  10. Incorporating Biological Mass Spectrometry into Undergraduate Teaching Labs, Part 2: Peptide Identification via Molecular Mass Determination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnquist, Isaac J.; Beussman, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has become a routine analytical tool in the undergraduate curriculum in the form of GC-MS. While relatively few undergraduate programs have incorporated biological mass spectrometry into their programs, the importance of these techniques, as demonstrated by their recognition with the 2002 Nobel Prize, will hopefully lead to…

  11. Biology-Chemistry-Physics, Teachers' Guide, a Three-Year Sequence, Parts I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Arthur; And Others

    This is one of two teacher's guides for a three-year integrated biology, chemistry, and physics course being prepared by the Portland Project Committee. This committee reviewed and selected material developed by the national course improvement groups--Physical Science Study Committee, Chemical Bond Approach, Chemical Education Materials Study,…

  12. Structure of a proteasome Pba1-Pba2 complex: implications for proteasome assembly, activation, and biological function.

    PubMed

    Stadtmueller, Beth M; Kish-Trier, Erik; Ferrell, Katherine; Petersen, Charisse N; Robinson, Howard; Myszka, David G; Eckert, Debra M; Formosa, Tim; Hill, Christopher P

    2012-10-26

    The 20S proteasome is an essential, 28-subunit protease that sequesters proteolytic sites within a central chamber, thereby repressing substrate degradation until proteasome activators open the entrance/exit gate. Two established activators, Blm10 and PAN/19S, induce gate opening by binding to the pockets between proteasome α-subunits using C-terminal HbYX (hydrophobic-tyrosine-any residue) motifs. Equivalent HbYX motifs have been identified in Pba1 and Pba2, which function in proteasome assembly. Here, we demonstrate that Pba1-Pba2 proteins form a stable heterodimer that utilizes its HbYX motifs to bind mature 20S proteasomes in vitro and that the Pba1-Pba2 HbYX motifs are important for a physiological function of proteasomes, the maintenance of mitochondrial function. Other factors that contribute to proteasome assembly or function also act in the maintenance of mitochondrial function and display complex genetic interactions with one another, possibly revealing an unexpected pathway of mitochondrial regulation involving the Pba1-Pba2 proteasome interaction. Our determination of a proteasome Pba1-Pba2 crystal structure reveals a Pba1 HbYX interaction that is superimposable with those of known activators, a Pba2 HbYX interaction that is different from those reported previously, and a gate structure that is disrupted but not sufficiently open to allow entry of even small peptides. These findings extend understanding of proteasome interactions with HbYX motifs and suggest multiple roles for Pba1-Pba2 interactions throughout proteasome assembly and function.

  13. New glycosylated conjugate copolymer N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminyl-pluronic: Synthesis, self-assembly and biological assays.

    PubMed

    Frizon, Tiago Elias Allievi; Micheletto, Yasmine Miguel Serafini; Westrup, José Luiz; Wakabayashi, Priscila Sayoko Silva; Serafim, Francieli Rocha; Damiani, Adriani Paganini; Longaretti, Luiza Martins; de Andrade, Vanessa Moraes; Giacomelli, Fernando Carlos; Fort, Sébastien; Dal Bó, Alexandre Gonçalves

    2015-09-01

    This work describes the synthesis of a new glycosylated conjugate copolymer, GlcNAc-PEO75-PPO30-PEO75-GlcNAc (GlcNAc-PluronicF68-GlcNAc), using click chemistry from Pluronic(®) F68 and propargyl-2-N-acetamido-2-deoxy-β-D-glucopyranoside. Micelles were prepared by the self-assembly of GlcNAc-PluronicF68-GlcNAc in phosphate-buffered solution. The critical micelle concentration was determined by fluorescence spectroscopy, and the value was found to be equal to 5.8mgmL(-1). The Gibbs free energy (ΔG) of micellization is negative, indicating that the organization of amphiphiles is governed by the hydrophobic effects in an entropy-driven process. The scattering characterization of GlcNAc-PluronicF68-GlcNAc micelles showed a hydrodynamic radius of 8.7nm and negative zeta potential (-21.0±0.9mV). The TEM image evidences the spherical shape of the objects self-assemble into highly regular micelles having a mean diameter of 10nm. The SAXS profile confirmed the spherical shape of the assemblies comprising a swollen PPO core (Rcore=2.25nm) stabilized by PEO chains following Gaussian statistics. The results of the comet assay showed that the GlcNAc-PluronicF68-GlcNAc micelles were not genotoxic, and the cell viability test was higher than 97% for all concentrations, demonstrating that GlcNAc-PluronicF68-GlcNAc is not toxic.

  14. Bibliographical database of radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment: Part 1, through June 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Straume, T.; Ricker, Y.; Thut, M.

    1988-08-29

    This database was constructed to support research in radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment. Relevant publications were identified through detailed searches of national and international electronic databases and through our personal knowledge of the subject. Publications were numbered and key worded, and referenced in an electronic data-retrieval system that permits quick access through computerized searches on publication number, authors, key words, title, year, and journal name. Photocopies of all publications contained in the database are maintained in a file that is numerically arranged by citation number. This report of the database is provided as a useful reference and overview. It should be emphasized that the database will grow as new citations are added to it. With that in mind, we arranged this report in order of ascending citation number so that follow-up reports will simply extend this document. The database cite 1212 publications. Publications are from 119 different scientific journals, 27 of these journals are cited at least 5 times. It also contains reference to 42 books and published symposia, and 129 reports. Information relevant to radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment is widely distributed among the scientific literature, although a few journals clearly dominate. The four journals publishing the largest number of relevant papers are Health Physics, Mutation Research, Radiation Research, and International Journal of Radiation Biology. Publications in Health Physics make up almost 10% of the current database.

  15. Programmable Self-Assembly of DNA-Protein Hybrid Hydrogel for Enzyme Encapsulation with Enhanced Biological Stability.

    PubMed

    Wan, Lan; Chen, Qiaoshu; Liu, Jianbo; Yang, Xiaohai; Huang, Jin; Li, Li; Guo, Xi; Zhang, Jue; Wang, Kemin

    2016-04-11

    A DNA-protein hybrid hydrogel was constructed based on a programmable assembly approach, which served as a biomimetic physiologic matrix for efficient enzyme encapsulation. A dsDNA building block tailored with precise biotin residues was fabricated based on supersandwich hybridization, and then the addition of streptavidin triggered the formation of the DNA-protein hybrid hydrogel. The biocompatible hydrogel, which formed a flower-like porous structure that was 6.7 ± 2.1 μm in size, served as a reservoir system for enzyme encapsulation. Alcohol oxidase (AOx), which served as a representative enzyme, was encapsulated in the hybrid hydrogel using a synchronous assembly approach. The enzyme-encapsulated hydrogel was utilized to extend the duration time for ethanol removal in serum plasma and the enzyme retained 78% activity after incubation with human serum for 24 h. The DNA-protein hybrid hydrogel can mediate the intact immobilization on a streptavidin-modified and positively charged substrate, which is very beneficial to solid-phase biosensing applications. The hydrogel-encapsulated enzyme exhibited improved stability in the presence of various denaturants. For example, the encapsulated enzyme retained 60% activity after incubation at 55 °C for 30 min. The encapsulated enzyme also retains its total activity after five freeze-thaw cycles and even suspended in solution containing organic solvents.

  16. Endobiogeny: A Global Approach to Systems Biology (Part 1 of 2)

    PubMed Central

    Lapraz, Jean-Claude

    2013-01-01

    Endobiogeny is a global systems approach to human biology that may offer an advancement in clinical medicine based in scientific principles of rigor and experimentation and the humanistic principles of individualization of care and alleviation of suffering with minimization of harm. Endobiogeny is neither a movement away from modern science nor an uncritical embracing of pre-rational methods of inquiry but a synthesis of quantitative and qualitative relationships reflected in a systems-approach to life and based on new mathematical paradigms of pattern recognition. PMID:24381827

  17. Endobiogeny: A Global Approach to Systems Biology (Part 2 of 2)

    PubMed Central

    Lapraz, Jean-Claude; Pauly, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    Endobiogeny and the biology of functions are based on four scientific concepts that are known and generally accepted: (1) human physiology is complex and multifactorial and exhibits the properties of a system; (2) the endocrine system manages metabolism, which is the basis of the continuity of life; (3) the metabolic activity managed by the endocrine system results in the output of biomarkers that reflect the functional achievement of specific aspects of metabolism; and (4) when biomarkers are related to each other in ratios, it contextualizes one type of function relative to another to which is it linked anatomically, sequentially, chronologically, biochemically, etc. PMID:24416662

  18. Chemical variability and biological activities of Brassica rapa var. rapifera parts essential oils depending on geographic variation and extraction technique.

    PubMed

    Saka, Boualem; Djouahri, Abderrahmane; Djerrad, Zineb; Souhila, Terfi; Aberrane, Sihem; Sabaou, Nasserdine; Baaliouamer, Aoumeur; Boudarene, Lynda

    2017-02-01

    In the present work, the Brassica rapa var. rapifera parts essential oils and their antioxidant and antimicrobial activities were investigated for the first time depending on geographic origin and extraction technique. GC and GC-MS analyses showed several constituents, including alcohols, aldehydes, esters, ketones, norisoprenoids, terpenic, nitrogen and sulphur compounds, totalizing 38 and 41 compounds in leaves and root essential oils, respectively. Nitrogen compounds were the main volatiles in leaves essential oils and sulphur compounds were the main volatiles in root essential oils. Qualitative and quantitative differences were found among B. rapa var. rapifera parts essential oils collected from different locations and extracted by hydrodistillation (HD) and microwave-assisted hydrodistillation (MAHD) techniques. Furthermore, our findings showed a high variability for both antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. The highlighted variability reflects the high impact of plant part, geographic variation and extraction technique on chemical composition and biological activities, which led to conclude that we should select essential oils to be investigated carefully depending on these factors, in order to isolate the bioactive components or to have the best quality of essential oil in terms of biological activities and preventive effects in food. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. MITOCHONDRIAL DISEASES PART I: MOUSE MODELS OF OXPHOS DEFICIENCIES CAUSED BY DEFECTS ON RESPIRATORY COMPLEX SUBUNITS OR ASSEMBLY FACTORS

    PubMed Central

    Torraco, Alessandra; Peralta, Susana; Iommarini, Luisa; Diaz, Francisca

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are the most common inborn errors of metabolism affecting the oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS). Because the poor knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms, a cure for these disorders is still unavailable and all the treatments currently in use are supportive more than curative. Therefore, in the past decade a great variety of mouse models have been developed to assess the in vivo function of several mitochondrial proteins involved in human diseases. Due to the genetic and physiological similarity to humans, mice represent reliable models to study the pathogenic mechanisms of mitochondrial disorders and are precious to test new therapeutic approaches. Here we summarize the features of several mouse models of mitochondrial diseases directly related to defects in subunits of the OXPHOS complexes or in assembly factors. We discuss how these models recapitulate many human conditions and how they have contributed to the understanding of mitochondrial function in health and disease. PMID:25660179

  20. The organization of biological sequences into constrained and unconstrained parts determines fundamental properties of genotype–phenotype maps

    PubMed Central

    Greenbury, S. F.; Ahnert, S. E.

    2015-01-01

    Biological information is stored in DNA, RNA and protein sequences, which can be understood as genotypes that are translated into phenotypes. The properties of genotype–phenotype (GP) maps have been studied in great detail for RNA secondary structure. These include a highly biased distribution of genotypes per phenotype, negative correlation of genotypic robustness and evolvability, positive correlation of phenotypic robustness and evolvability, shape-space covering, and a roughly logarithmic scaling of phenotypic robustness with phenotypic frequency. More recently similar properties have been discovered in other GP maps, suggesting that they may be fundamental to biological GP maps, in general, rather than specific to the RNA secondary structure map. Here we propose that the above properties arise from the fundamental organization of biological information into ‘constrained' and ‘unconstrained' sequences, in the broadest possible sense. As ‘constrained' we describe sequences that affect the phenotype more immediately, and are therefore more sensitive to mutations, such as, e.g. protein-coding DNA or the stems in RNA secondary structure. ‘Unconstrained' sequences, on the other hand, can mutate more freely without affecting the phenotype, such as, e.g. intronic or intergenic DNA or the loops in RNA secondary structure. To test our hypothesis we consider a highly simplified GP map that has genotypes with ‘coding' and ‘non-coding' parts. We term this the Fibonacci GP map, as it is equivalent to the Fibonacci code in information theory. Despite its simplicity the Fibonacci GP map exhibits all the above properties of much more complex and biologically realistic GP maps. These properties are therefore likely to be fundamental to many biological GP maps. PMID:26609063

  1. The organization of biological sequences into constrained and unconstrained parts determines fundamental properties of genotype-phenotype maps.

    PubMed

    Greenbury, S F; Ahnert, S E

    2015-12-06

    Biological information is stored in DNA, RNA and protein sequences, which can be understood as genotypes that are translated into phenotypes. The properties of genotype-phenotype (GP) maps have been studied in great detail for RNA secondary structure. These include a highly biased distribution of genotypes per phenotype, negative correlation of genotypic robustness and evolvability, positive correlation of phenotypic robustness and evolvability, shape-space covering, and a roughly logarithmic scaling of phenotypic robustness with phenotypic frequency. More recently similar properties have been discovered in other GP maps, suggesting that they may be fundamental to biological GP maps, in general, rather than specific to the RNA secondary structure map. Here we propose that the above properties arise from the fundamental organization of biological information into 'constrained' and 'unconstrained' sequences, in the broadest possible sense. As 'constrained' we describe sequences that affect the phenotype more immediately, and are therefore more sensitive to mutations, such as, e.g. protein-coding DNA or the stems in RNA secondary structure. 'Unconstrained' sequences, on the other hand, can mutate more freely without affecting the phenotype, such as, e.g. intronic or intergenic DNA or the loops in RNA secondary structure. To test our hypothesis we consider a highly simplified GP map that has genotypes with 'coding' and 'non-coding' parts. We term this the Fibonacci GP map, as it is equivalent to the Fibonacci code in information theory. Despite its simplicity the Fibonacci GP map exhibits all the above properties of much more complex and biologically realistic GP maps. These properties are therefore likely to be fundamental to many biological GP maps.

  2. Impact of Two Ant Species on Egg Parasitoids Released as Part of a Biological Control Program

    PubMed Central

    Kergunteuil, Alan; Basso, César; Pintureau, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Biological control using Trichogramma pretiosum Riley (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae), an egg parasitoid wasp, was tested in Uruguay to reduce populations of lepidopteran pests on soybeans. It was observed that the commercial parasitoid dispensers, which were made of cardboard, were vulnerable to small predators that succeeded in entering and emptying the containers of all the eggs parasitized by T. pretiosum. Observations in a soybean crop showed that the only small, common predators present were two ant species. The species responsible for the above mentioned predation was determined from the results of a laboratory experiment in which the behavior of the two common ants was tested. A modification of the dispensers to prevent introduction of this ant has been proposed and successfully tested in the laboratory and in the field. PMID:24738954

  3. Study of cardiovascular disease biomarkers among tobacco consumers, part 2: biomarkers of biological effect

    PubMed Central

    Nordskog, Brian K.; Brown, Buddy G.; Marano, Kristin M.; Campell, Leanne R.; Jones, Bobbette A.; Borgerding, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract An age-stratified, cross-sectional study was conducted in the US among healthy adult male cigarette smokers, moist snuff consumers, and non-tobacco consumers to evaluate cardiovascular biomarkers of biological effect (BoBE). Physiological assessments included flow-mediated dilation, ankle-brachial index, carotid intima-media thickness and expired carbon monoxide. Approximately one-half of the measured serum BoBE showed statistically significant differences; IL-12(p70), sICAM-1 and IL-8 were the BoBE that best differentiated among the three groups. A significant difference in ABI was observed between the cigarette smokers and non-tobacco consumer groups. Significant group and age effect differences in select biomarkers were identified. PMID:25787701

  4. Observations on the biology of Afrotropical Hesperiidae (Lepidoptera). Part 6. Hesperiinae incertae sedis: palm feeders.

    PubMed

    Cock, Matthew J W; Congdon, T Colin E; Collins, Steve C

    2014-07-08

    Partial life histories for 12 Hesperiinae incertae sedis that feed on palms (Arecaceae) are described and illustrated. The genera dealt with are: Perrotia (part), Ploetzia, Zophopetes, Gretna (part), Pteroteinon, Leona, and Caenides (part) (all from Evans' Ploetzia genera group). Although Gamia spp. have been reported to feed on palms, these records are considered to be in error, as caterpillars of this genus feed on Dracaena spp. (Asparagaceae). The life histories of the species documented are fairly uniform, in that caterpillars of most species have rounded brown heads, wider basally, with or without limited black markings, smooth bodies and make simple shelters by rolling leaves. Variation in caterpillar markings and male genitalia of Zophopetes dysmephila (Trimen) and caterpillar and adult markings of Gretna carmen Evans merit further study. In G. carmen, G. waga (Plötz) and G. balenge (Holland), the caterpillars' head and body are covered with hair-like setae, and develop an extensive covering of white waxy powder, which in G. balenge also covers the long setae. Furthermore, the pupa of G. balenge is unusual in having a pair of large, elaborate processes frontally on the head; when disturbed, the pupa vibrates violently and rattles noisily against the sides of the shelter. Ploetzia amygdalis (Mabille) and Pteroteinon laufella (Hewitson) have gregarious caterpillars, whereas the remaining species are solitary. After eclosion, the first instar caterpillars of Gretna spp. moult to the second instar without feeding. The implications of a palm-feeding life-style are discussed, and economic damage and plant quarantine risks to coconut, oil palm and ornamental palms pointed out. The known life histories suggest that all Afrotropical palm-feeding Hesperiidae will belong in the same tribe when the incertae sedis section is further elucidated, although the affinities of Gretna deserve further consideration. 

  5. Test design description for the Fusion Materials Open Test Assembly (Fusion MOTA-2A): Volume 1A, Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, R.E.

    1988-11-01

    This document encompasses the test requirements, hardware design, fabrication, and safety analysis for the Fusion Materials Open Test Assembly experiment for irradiation in FFTF Cycle 11 (Fusion MOTA-2A). Fusion MOTA is equally shared by the US Fusion Material (DOE), Japanese Fusion Materials (MONBUSHO), and BEATRIX-II (IEA) programs. In the interest of providing optimum use of the irradiation space in the Fusion MOTA-2A and LMR MOTA-1G, eight of the Fusion MOTA canisters will be placed in MOTA-1G and an equal number of LMR canisters placed in Fusion MOTA-2A (Powell/Doran 1988). This eliminates the need to process Fusion MOTA-2A through the IEM cell prior to insertion for FFTF Cycle 11A. The LMR MOTA design and safety analysis (Greenslade 1984) is the basis for much of this design and safety analysis report. This design description and safety analysis for the Fusion MOTA-2A is presented per the outline given in Chapter IV of the FTR User`s Guide (Taylor 1978). 35 refs., 17 figs., 9 tabs.

  6. New pyridazine-fluorine derivatives: synthesis, chemistry and biological activity. Part II.

    PubMed

    Tucaliuc, Roxana-Angela; Cotea, Valeriu V; Niculaua, Marius; Tuchilus, Cristina; Mantu, Dorina; Mangalagiu, Ionel I

    2013-09-01

    A comprehensive study concerning synthesis, structure and biological activity of new pyridazine-fluorine (PYF) derivatives is presented. The first synthesis of PYF derivatives in phase-transfer catalysis (PTC) under microwave (MW) and conventional thermal heating (TH) is reported. Under MW irradiation the consumed energy decreases considerably, the amount of used solvent in liquid phase is at least five-fold less comparative with conventional TH, while PTC did not use solvents. Consequently these reactions could be considered environmentally friendly. Also, the reaction time decrease substantially and, in some cases, the yields are higher. A feasible explanation for MW efficiency is presented. Regiochemistry and chorochemistry involved in these reactions are also discussed; the reactions are regioselective and chorospecific or choroselective, respectively. Ten new pyridazine-fluorine cycloadducts are obtained. The in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activities of the PYF compounds were tested. Introduction of a trifluoromethyl moiety on the pyridazine skeleton is leading to an increasing of the antimicrobial activity. Structure-activity correlationships have been done.

  7. Biological markers for anxiety disorders, OCD and PTSD: A consensus statement. Part II: Neurochemistry, neurophysiology and neurocognition

    PubMed Central

    Bandelow, Borwin; Baldwin, David; Abelli, Marianna; Bolea-Alamanac, Blanca; Bourin, Michel; Chamberlain, Samuel R.; Cinosi, Eduardo; Davies, Simon; Domschke, Katharina; Fineberg, Naomi; Grünblatt, Edna; Jarema, Marek; Kim, Yong-Ku; Maron, Eduard; Masdrakis, Vasileios; Mikova, Olya; Nutt, David; Pallanti, Stefano; Pini, Stefano; Ströhle, Andreas; Thibaut, Florence; Vaghix, Matilde M.; Won, Eunsoo; Wedekind, Dirk; Wichniak, Adam; Woolley, Jade; Zwanzger, Peter; Riederer, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Objective Biomarkers are defined as anatomical, biochemical or physiological traits that are specific to certain disorders or syndromes. The objective of this paper is to summarise the current knowledge of biomarkers for anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Methods Findings in biomarker research were reviewed by a task force of international experts in the field, consisting of members of the World Federation of Societies for Biological Psychiatry Task Force on Biological Markers and of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology Anxiety Disorders Research Network. Results The present article (Part II) summarises findings on potential biomarkers in neurochemistry (neurotransmitters such as serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine or GABA, neuropeptides such as cholecystokinin, neurokinins, atrial natriuretic peptide, or oxytocin, the HPA axis, neurotrophic factors such as NGF and BDNF, immunology and CO2 hypersensitivity), neurophysiology (EEG, heart rate variability) and neurocognition. The accompanying paper (Part I) focuses on neuroimaging and genetics. Conclusions Although at present, none of the putative biomarkers is sufficient and specific as a diagnostic tool, an abundance of high quality research has accumulated that should improve our understanding of the neurobiological causes of anxiety disorders, OCD and PTSD. PMID:27419272

  8. Probabilistic Analysis of Pattern Formation in Monotonic Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Tyler G.; Garzon, Max H.; Deaton, Russell J.

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by biological systems, self-assembly aims to construct complex structures. It functions through piece-wise, local interactions among component parts and has the potential to produce novel materials and devices at the nanoscale. Algorithmic self-assembly models the product of self-assembly as the output of some computational process, and attempts to control the process of assembly algorithmically. Though providing fundamental insights, these computational models have yet to fully account for the randomness that is inherent in experimental realizations, which tend to be based on trial and error methods. In order to develop a method of analysis that addresses experimental parameters, such as error and yield, this work focuses on the capability of assembly systems to produce a pre-determined set of target patterns, either accurately or perhaps only approximately. Self-assembly systems that assemble patterns that are similar to the targets in a significant percentage are “strong” assemblers. In addition, assemblers should predominantly produce target patterns, with a small percentage of errors or junk. These definitions approximate notions of yield and purity in chemistry and manufacturing. By combining these definitions, a criterion for efficient assembly is developed that can be used to compare the ability of different assembly systems to produce a given target set. Efficiency is a composite measure of the accuracy and purity of an assembler. Typical examples in algorithmic assembly are assessed in the context of these metrics. In addition to validating the method, they also provide some insight that might be used to guide experimentation. Finally, some general results are established that, for efficient assembly, imply that every target pattern is guaranteed to be assembled with a minimum common positive probability, regardless of its size, and that a trichotomy exists to characterize the global behavior of typical efficient, monotonic self-assembly

  9. Y-12 development organization technical progress report. Part 4, Assembly technology/compatibility and surveillance period ending September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Northcutt, W.G. Jr.

    1993-12-27

    The Super Collider is a high-energy scientific instrument composed of a 53-mile-long ring of proton accelerators designed to collide protons and evaluate the emanating particles. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant is under contract to perform work for the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) and has been asked to develop manufacturing processes for components of the gammas, electrons, muons (GEM) detector. Three welded subassemblies are involved in the fabrication of these conductors. The superconducting cable is enclosed in a stainless steel conduit, which is then enclosed in an aluminum sheath. The ends of the conductor are terminated with a connector assembly joined to the superconductor, the conduit, and the sheath. Initially, the conduit weld was to be a single-pass, autogenous gas-tungsten arc weld. The authors made a great effort to get full penetration without root reinforcement on the inside of the tube. When the authors were unable to meet all of the weld requirements with an autogenous weld, they shifted development efforts to making the weld using an automatic gas-tungsten arc tube welding head with an integral wire feeder. Because reinforcement at the root continued to be a problem, the authors decided to make the weld in two passes. To achieve the desired weld reinforcement on the outside of the tube, the authors developed a welding procedure in which an autogenous pass is used to join the tube ends with the necessary minimum pushthrough on the inside of the tube and filler metal is supplied during the second pass. This two-pass weld required a weld joint with a flat butt for the root pass and a V-groove for the filler metal pass. A 272-ft conduit was made using this two-pass welding procedure for a test at the University of Wisconsin.

  10. Developments in the Tools and Methodologies of Synthetic Biology

    PubMed Central

    Kelwick, Richard; MacDonald, James T.; Webb, Alexander J.; Freemont, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biology is principally concerned with the rational design and engineering of biologically based parts, devices, or systems. However, biological systems are generally complex and unpredictable, and are therefore, intrinsically difficult to engineer. In order to address these fundamental challenges, synthetic biology is aiming to unify a “body of knowledge” from several foundational scientific fields, within the context of a set of engineering principles. This shift in perspective is enabling synthetic biologists to address complexity, such that robust biological systems can be designed, assembled, and tested as part of a biological design cycle. The design cycle takes a forward-design approach in which a biological system is specified, modeled, analyzed, assembled, and its functionality tested. At each stage of the design cycle, an expanding repertoire of tools is being developed. In this review, we highlight several of these tools in terms of their applications and benefits to the synthetic biology community. PMID:25505788

  11. Peptide-directed self-assembly of functionalized polymeric nanoparticles part I: design and self-assembly of peptide-copolymer conjugates into nanoparticle fibers and 3D scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaochu; Janjanam, Jagadeesh; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Thompson, Martin; Heiden, Patricia A

    2014-06-01

    A robust self-assembly of nanoparticles into fibers and 3D scaffolds is designed and fabricated by functionalizing a RAFT-polymerized amphiphilic triblock copolymer with designer ionic complementary peptides so that the assembled core-shell polymeric nanoparticles are directed by peptide assembly into continuous "nanoparticle fibers," ultimately leading to 3D fiber scaffolds. The assembled nanostructure is confirmed by FESEM and optical microscopy. The assembly is not hindered when a protein (insulin) is incorporated within the nanoparticles as an active ingredient. MTS cytotoxicity tests on SW-620 cell lines show that the peptides, copolymers, and peptide-copolymer conjugates are biocompatible. The methodology of self-assembled nanoparticle fibers and 3D scaffolds is intended to combine the advantages of a flexible hydrogel scaffold with the versatility of controlled release nanoparticles to offer unprecedented ability to incorporate desired drug(s) within a self-assembled scaffold system with individual control over the release of each drug.

  12. Blueprints for green biotech: development and application of standards for plant synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Patron, Nicola J

    2016-06-15

    Synthetic biology aims to apply engineering principles to the design and modification of biological systems and to the construction of biological parts and devices. The ability to programme cells by providing new instructions written in DNA is a foundational technology of the field. Large-scale de novo DNA synthesis has accelerated synthetic biology by offering custom-made molecules at ever decreasing costs. However, for large fragments and for experiments in which libraries of DNA sequences are assembled in different combinations, assembly in the laboratory is still desirable. Biological assembly standards allow DNA parts, even those from multiple laboratories and experiments, to be assembled together using the same reagents and protocols. The adoption of such standards for plant synthetic biology has been cohesive for the plant science community, facilitating the application of genome editing technologies to plant systems and streamlining progress in large-scale, multi-laboratory bioengineering projects.

  13. Gaseous VOCs rapidly modify particulate matter and its biological effects - Part 1: Simple VOCs and model PM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebersviller, S.; Lichtveld, K.; Sexton, K. G.; Zavala, J.; Lin, Y.-H.; Jaspers, I.; Jeffries, H. E.

    2012-12-01

    This is the first of a three-part study designed to demonstrate dynamic entanglements among gaseous organic compounds (VOC), particulate matter (PM), and their subsequent potential biological effects. We study these entanglements in increasingly complex VOC and PM mixtures in urban-like conditions in a large outdoor chamber. To the traditional chemical and physical characterizations of gas and PM, we added new measurements of biological effects, using cultured human lung cells as model indicators. These biological effects are assessed here as increases in cellular damage or expressed irritation (i.e., cellular toxic effects) from cells exposed to chamber air relative to cells exposed to clean air. The exposure systems permit virtually gas-only- or PM-only-exposures from the same air stream containing both gases and PM in equilibria, i.e., there are no extractive operations prior to cell exposure. Our simple experiments in this part of the study were designed to eliminate many competing atmospheric processes to reduce ambiguity in our results. Simple volatile and semi-volatile organic gases that have inherent cellular toxic properties were tested individually for biological effect in the dark (at constant humidity). Airborne mixtures were then created with each compound to which we added PM that has no inherent cellular toxic properties for another cellular exposure. Acrolein and p-tolualdehyde were used as model VOCs and mineral oil aerosol (MOA) was selected as a surrogate for organic-containing PM. MOA is appropriately complex in composition to represent ambient PM, and exhibits no inherent cellular toxic effects and thus did not contribute any biological detrimental effects on its own. Chemical measurements, combined with the responses of our biological exposures, clearly demonstrate that gas-phase pollutants can modify the composition of PM (and its resulting detrimental effects on lung cells). We observed that, even if the gas-phase pollutants are not

  14. Biologic Treatments for Sports Injuries II Think Tank-Current Concepts, Future Research, and Barriers to Advancement, Part 1: Biologics Overview, Ligament Injury, Tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    LaPrade, Robert F; Geeslin, Andrew G; Murray, Iain R; Musahl, Volker; Zlotnicki, Jason P; Petrigliano, Frank; Mann, Barton J

    2016-12-01

    Biologic therapies, including stem cells, platelet-rich plasma, growth factors, and other biologically active adjuncts, have recently received increased attention in the basic science and clinical literature. At the 2015 AOSSM Biologics II Think Tank held in Colorado Springs, Colorado, a group of orthopaedic surgeons, basic scientists, veterinarians, and other investigators gathered to review the state of the science for biologics and barriers to implementation of biologics for the treatment of sports medicine injuries. This series of current concepts reviews reports the summary of the scientific presentations, roundtable discussions, and recommendations from this think tank.

  15. Cancer systems biology in the genome sequencing era: part 2, evolutionary dynamics of tumor clonal networks and drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Edwin; Zou, Jinfeng; Zaman, Naif; Beitel, Lenore K; Trifiro, Mark; Paliouras, Miltiadis

    2013-08-01

    A tumor often consists of multiple cell subpopulations (clones). Current chemo-treatments often target one clone of a tumor. Although the drug kills that clone, other clones overtake it and the tumor recurs. Genome sequencing and computational analysis allows to computational dissection of clones from tumors, while singe-cell genome sequencing including RNA-Seq allows profiling of these clones. This opens a new window for treating a tumor as a system in which clones are evolving. Future cancer systems biology studies should consider a tumor as an evolving system with multiple clones. Therefore, topics discussed in Part 2 of this review include evolutionary dynamics of clonal networks, early-warning signals (e.g., genome duplication events) for formation of fast-growing clones, dissecting tumor heterogeneity, and modeling of clone-clone-stroma interactions for drug resistance. The ultimate goal of the future systems biology analysis is to obtain a 'whole-system' understanding of a tumor and therefore provides a more efficient and personalized management strategies for cancer patients.

  16. Implementation and evaluation of a training program as part of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program in Azerbaijan.

    PubMed

    Johnson, April; Akhundova, Gulshan; Aliyeva, Saida; Strelow, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    A training program for animal and human health professionals has been implemented in Azerbaijan through a joint agreement between the United States Defense Threat Reduction Agency and the Government of Azerbaijan. The training program is administered as part of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program, and targets key employees in Azerbaijan's disease surveillance system including physicians, veterinarians, epidemiologists, and laboratory personnel. Training is aimed at improving detection, diagnosis, and response to especially dangerous pathogens (EDPs), although the techniques and methodologies can be applied to other pathogens and diseases of concern. Biosafety and biosecurity training is provided to all trainees within the program. Prior to 2014, a variety of international agencies and organizations provided training, which resulted in gaps related to lack of coordination of training materials and content. In 2014 a new training program was implemented in order to address those gaps. This paper provides an overview of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program training program in Azerbaijan, a description of how the program fits into existing national training infrastructure, and an evaluation of the new program's effectiveness to date. Long-term sustainability of the program is also discussed.

  17. Implementation and evaluation of a training program as part of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program in Azerbaijan

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, April; Akhundova, Gulshan; Aliyeva, Saida; Strelow, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    A training program for animal and human health professionals has been implemented in Azerbaijan through a joint agreement between the United States Defense Threat Reduction Agency and the Government of Azerbaijan. The training program is administered as part of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program, and targets key employees in Azerbaijan's disease surveillance system including physicians, veterinarians, epidemiologists, and laboratory personnel. Training is aimed at improving detection, diagnosis, and response to especially dangerous pathogens (EDPs), although the techniques and methodologies can be applied to other pathogens and diseases of concern. Biosafety and biosecurity training is provided to all trainees within the program. Prior to 2014, a variety of international agencies and organizations provided training, which resulted in gaps related to lack of coordination of training materials and content. In 2014 a new training program was implemented in order to address those gaps. This paper provides an overview of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program training program in Azerbaijan, a description of how the program fits into existing national training infrastructure, and an evaluation of the new program's effectiveness to date. Long-term sustainability of the program is also discussed. PMID:26501051

  18. Biological activity of waste dump substrates in the eastern part of the Kansk-Achinsk coal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trefilova, O. V.; Oskorbin, P. A.

    2014-02-01

    The results of a field experiment for studying the seasonal dynamics of the CO2 (Rall) emitted from the overburden and enclosing rocks of a coal mine are presented as an integral index of their biological activity. The mean rate of the CO2 emission from the control substrate was 1.2 g C/m2 per 24 h. The intensity of Rall for the variant with the application of mineral and complex fertilizers, along with a microbiological preparation, was higher by 28 and 34%, respectively. In the same variants, the Rall values little changed during the whole growing period. The measurements of the potential respiration of the rock mixture in the laboratory showed that a significant part of the CO2 flux was formed at the expense of carbon dioxide of abiotic origin. The values of the CO2 emission are concluded to be overestimated as compared to those for the real level of the biological activity of the substrates studied.

  19. The dynamics of nacre self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, Julyan H.E; Checa, Antonio G

    2006-01-01

    We show how nacre and pearl construction in bivalve and gastropod molluscs can be understood in terms of successive processes of controlled self-assembly from the molecular- to the macro-scale. This dynamics involves the physics of the formation of both solid and liquid crystals and of membranes and fluids to produce a nanostructured hierarchically constructed biological composite of polysaccharides, proteins and mineral, whose mechanical properties far surpass those of its component parts. PMID:17251136

  20. Automated assembly in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Sandanand; Dwivedi, Suren N.; Soon, Toh Teck; Bandi, Reddy; Banerjee, Soumen; Hughes, Cecilia

    1989-01-01

    The installation of robots and their use of assembly in space will create an exciting and promising future for the U.S. Space Program. The concept of assembly in space is very complicated and error prone and it is not possible unless the various parts and modules are suitably designed for automation. Certain guidelines are developed for part designing and for an easy precision assembly. Major design problems associated with automated assembly are considered and solutions to resolve these problems are evaluated in the guidelines format. Methods for gripping and methods for part feeding are developed with regard to the absence of gravity in space. The guidelines for part orientation, adjustments, compliances and various assembly construction are discussed. Design modifications of various fasteners and fastening methods are also investigated.

  1. Nitric Oxide and Redox Regulation in the Liver: Part I General Considerations and Redox biology in Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Diesen, Diana L.; Kuo, Paul C.

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are created in normal hepatocytes and are critical for normal physiological processes including oxidative respiration, growth, regeneration, apoptosis, and microsomal defense. When the levels of oxidation products exceed the capacity of normal antioxidant systems, oxidative stress occurs. This type of stress, in the form of ROS and RNS, can be damaging to all liver cells, including hepatocytes, Kupffer cells, stellate cells, and endothelial cells, through induction of inflammation, ischemia, fibrosis, necrosis, apoptosis, or through malignant transformation by damaging lipids, proteins, and/or DNA. In part I of this review, we will discuss basic redox biology in the liver, including a review of ROS, RNS, and antioxidants, with a focus on nitric oxide as a common source of RNS. We will then review the evidence for oxidative stress as a mechanism of liver injury in hepatitis (alcoholic, viral, non-alcoholic). In part II of this review, we will review oxidative stress in common pathophysiological conditions including ischemia/reperfusion injury, fibrosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, iron overload, Wilson's disease, sepsis and acetaminophen overdose. Finally, biomarkers, proteomic, and antioxidant therapies will be discussed as areas for future therapeutic interventions. PMID:20444470

  2. Enhancement of antigen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses using a self-assembled biologic nanolipoprotein particle vaccine.

    PubMed

    Weilhammer, Dina; Dunkle, Alexis D; Blanchette, Craig D; Fischer, Nicholas O; Corzett, Michele; Lehmann, Doerte; Boone, Tyler; Hoeprich, Paul; Driks, Adam; Rasley, Amy

    2017-03-13

    To address the need for vaccine platforms that induce robust cell-mediated immunity, we investigated the potential of utilizing self-assembling biologic nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs) as an antigen and adjuvant delivery system to induce antigen-specific murine T cell responses. We utilized OT-I and OT-II TCR-transgenic mice to investigate the effects of NLP-mediated delivery of the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) on T cell activation. Delivery of OVA with the TLR4 agonist monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) in the context of NLPs significantly enhanced the activation of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in vitro compared to co-administration of free OVA and MPLA. Upon intranasal immunization of mice harboring TCR-transgenic cells, NLPs enhanced the adjuvant effects of MPLA and the in vivo delivery of OVA, leading to significantly increased expansion of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in lung-draining lymph nodes. Therefore, NLPs are a promising vaccine platform for inducing T cell responses following intranasal administration.

  3. Gaseous VOCs rapidly modify particulate matter and its biological effects - Part 2: Complex urban VOCs and model PM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebersviller, S.; Lichtveld, K.; Sexton, K. G.; Zavala, J.; Lin, Y.-H.; Jaspers, I.; Jeffries, H. E.

    2012-12-01

    This is the second study in a three-part study designed to demonstrate dynamic entanglements among gaseous organic compounds (VOCs), particulate matter (PM), and their subsequent potential biological effects. We study these entanglements in increasingly complex VOC and PM mixtures in urban-like conditions in a large outdoor chamber, both in the dark and in sunlight. To the traditional chemical and physical characterizations of gas and PM, we added new measurements of gas-only- and PM-only-biological effects, using cultured human lung cells as model living receptors. These biological effects are assessed here as increases in cellular damage or expressed irritation (i.e., cellular toxic effects) from cells exposed to chamber air relative to cells exposed to clean air. Our exposure systems permit side-by-side, gas-only- and PM-only-exposures from the same air stream containing both gases and PM in equilibria, i.e., there are no extractive operations prior to cell exposure for either gases or PM. In Part 1 (Ebersviller et al., 2012a), we demonstrated the existence of PM "effect modification" (NAS, 2004) for the case of a single gas-phase toxicant and an inherently non-toxic PM (mineral oil aerosol, MOA). That is, in the presence of the single gas-phase toxicant in the dark, the initially non-toxic PM became toxic to lung cells in the PM-only-biological exposure system. In this Part 2 study, we used sunlit-reactive systems to create a large variety of gas-phase toxicants from a complex mixture of oxides of nitrogen and 54 VOCs representative of those measured in US city air. In these mostly day-long experiments, we have designated the period in the dark just after injection (but before sunrise) as the "Fresh" condition and the period in the dark after sunset as the "Aged" condition. These two conditions were used to expose cells and to collect chemical characterization samples. We used the same inherently non-toxic PM from the Part 1 study as the target PM for "effect

  4. Molecular self-assembly and nanochemistry: A chemical strategy for the synthesis of nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitesides, George M.; Mathias, John P.; Seto, Christopher T.

    1991-12-01

    Molecular self assembly is the spontaneous association of molecules under equilibrium conditions into stable, structurally well-defined aggregates joined by non-covalent bonds. Molecular self-assembly is ubiquitous in biological systems, and underlies the formation of a wide variety of complex biological structures. Understanding self-assembly and the associated non-covalent interactions that connect complementary interacting molecular surfaces in biological aggregates is a central concern in structural biochemistry. Self-assembly is also emerging as a new strategy in chemical synthesis, with the potential of generating non-biological structures having dimensions of 1-10(exp 2) nanometers. Structures in the upper part of this range of sizes are presently inaccessible through chemical synthesis, and the ability to prepare them would open a route to structures comparable in size (and perhaps complementary in function) to those that can be prepared by microlithography and other techniques of microfabrication.

  5. Community assembly of biological soil crusts of different successional stages in a temperate sand ecosystem, as assessed by direct determination and enrichment techniques.

    PubMed

    Langhans, Tanja Margrit; Storm, Christian; Schwabe, Angelika

    2009-08-01

    In temperate regions, biological soil crusts (BSCs: complex communities of cyanobacteria, eukaryotic algae, bryophytes, and lichens) are not well investigated regarding community structure and diversity. Furthermore, studies on succession are rare. For that reason, the community assembly of crusts representing two successional stages (initial, 5 years old; and stable, >20 years old) were analyzed in an inland sand ecosystem in Germany in a plot-based approach (2 x 18 plots, each 20 x 20 cm). Two different methods were used to record the cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algae in these communities comprehensively: determination directly out of the soil and enrichment culture techniques. Additionally, lichens, bryophytes, and phanerogams were determined. We examine four hypotheses: (1) A combination of direct determination and enrichment culture technique is necessary to detect cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algae comprehensively. In total, 45 species of cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algae were detected in the study area with both techniques, including 26 eukaryotic algae and 19 cyanobacteria species. With both determination techniques, 22 identical taxa were detected (11 eukaryotic algae and 11 cyanobacteria). Thirteen taxa were only found by direct determination, and ten taxa were only found in enrichment cultures. Hence, the hypothesis is supported. Additionally, five lichen species (three genera), five bryophyte species (five genera), and 24 vascular plant species occurred. (2) There is a clear difference between the floristic structure of initial and stable crusts. The different successional stages are clearly separated by detrended correspondence analysis, showing a distinct structure of the community assembly in each stage. In the initial crusts, Klebsormidium flaccidum, Klebsormidium cf. klebsii, and Stichococcus bacillaris were important indicator species, whereas the stable crusts are especially characterized by Tortella inclinata. (3) The biodiversity of BSC taxa

  6. Double fiber probe with a single fiber Bragg grating based on the capillary-driven self-assembly fabrication method for dimensional measurement of micro parts.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jiwen; Feng, Kunpeng; Hu, Yang; Li, Junying; Dang, Hong; Tan, Jiubin

    2015-12-28

    Focusing on the ultra-precision dimensional measurement of parts with micro-scale dimensions and high aspect ratios, a two-dimensional double fiber probe with a single fiber Bragg grating (DS-FBG probe) is investigated in detail in this paper. The theoretical analysis of the sensing principle is verified by spectrum simulations of the DS-FBG probe with a modified transfer matrix method using the strain distribution within the DS-FBG probe. The fabrication process and physical principle of the capillary-driven self-assembly of double fibers in the UV adhesive with a low viscosity are demonstrated. Experimental results indicate that resolutions of 30 nm in radial direction and 15 nm in axial direction can be achieved, and the short-term displacement drifts within 90 seconds are 28.0 nm in radial direction and 7.9 nm in axial direction, and the long-term displacement drifts within 1 hour are 61.3 nm in radial direction and 17.3 nm in axial direction. The repeatability of the probing system can reach 60 nm and the measurement result of a standard nozzle is 300.49 μm with a standard deviation of 20 nm.

  7. Impact of Deforestation on Clouds and Rainfall On the Northern Part of the Proposed Mesoamerican Biological Corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, D. K.; Nair, U. S.; Welch, R. M.; Lawton, R. O.

    2004-12-01

    Central America exhibits the typical pattern of complex deforestation now seen throughout the tropics. The region is a mixture of lowlands, mostly converted to agriculture, and mountainous regions, where pristine forests still persist. To protect the biodiversity of this region from further loss, a network of biological corridors and protected areas has been proposed by the governments of Central American countries and international organizations. The present study examines the impact of deforestation in the northern part of Central America on the proposed corridor network, the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor. We use high-resolution numerical model simulations using the Colorado State University Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (CSU RAMS) to study the impact of three types of conditions: 1) pristine, 2) current and 3) extensive deforestation. In addition, GOES-8 satellite imagery is used for comparing with the numerical simulations of cloud formation. Since vegetation in the proposed protected areas would is under maximum stress in the dry season, this study is focused in the dry season month of March. During the dry season, the soil dries progressively from the soil surface down to increasing depths. Contrary to expectations, in-situ measurements of soil moisture in Costa Rica show similar values both in forests and pastures in the dry season. Measured soil moisture values in March are around 10% of the field capacity in the upper few centimeters, increasing to values of around 30% at depths of 1 m. Yet, observations show that the vegetation in pasture regions is stressed at this time while vegetation in the forested regions is not affected, implying that the forest vegetation is accessing deep soil water. Similar behavior is expected in other regions of Central America. This observation has significant implications to the design of the numerical modeling experiments. Currently the vegetation parameterization used in the RAMS does not specify rooting depth

  8. Directed evolution: new parts and optimized function.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Michael J; Arnold, Frances H

    2009-08-01

    Constructing novel biological systems that function in a robust and predictable manner requires better methods for discovering new functional molecules and for optimizing their assembly in novel biological contexts. By enabling functional diversification and optimization in the absence of detailed mechanistic understanding, directed evolution is a powerful complement to 'rational' engineering approaches. Aided by clever selection schemes, directed evolution has generated new parts for genetic circuits, cell-cell communication systems, and non-natural metabolic pathways in bacteria.

  9. Adeno-associated Virus (AAV) Assembly-Activating Protein Is Not an Essential Requirement for Capsid Assembly of AAV Serotypes 4, 5, and 11.

    PubMed

    Earley, Lauriel F; Powers, John M; Adachi, Kei; Baumgart, Joshua T; Meyer, Nancy L; Xie, Qing; Chapman, Michael S; Nakai, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have made great progress in their use for gene therapy; however, fundamental aspects of AAV's capsid assembly remain poorly characterized. In this regard, the discovery of assembly-activating protein (AAP) sheds new light on this crucial part of AAV biology and vector production. Previous studies have shown that AAP is essential for assembly; however, how its mechanistic roles in assembly might differ among AAV serotypes remains uncharacterized. Here, we show that biological properties of AAPs and capsid assembly processes are surprisingly distinct among AAV serotypes 1 to 12. In the study, we investigated subcellular localizations and assembly-promoting functions of AAP1 to -12 (i.e., AAPs derived from AAV1 to -12, respectively) and examined the AAP dependence of capsid assembly processes of these 12 serotypes using combinatorial approaches that involved immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy, barcode-Seq (i. e., a high-throughput quantitative method using DNA barcodes and a next-generation sequencing technology), and quantitative dot blot assays. This study revealed that AAP1 to -12 are all localized in the nucleus with serotype-specific differential patterns of nucleolar association; AAPs and assembled capsids do not necessarily colocalize; AAPs are promiscuous in promoting capsid assembly of other serotypes, with the exception of AAP4, -5, -11, and -12; assembled AAV5, -8, and -9 capsids are excluded from the nucleolus, in contrast to the nucleolar enrichment of assembled AAV2 capsids; and, surprisingly, AAV4, -5, and -11 capsids are not dependent on AAP for assembly. These observations highlight the serotype-dependent heterogeneity of the capsid assembly process and challenge current notions about the role of AAP and the nucleolus in capsid assembly.

  10. Biologic Activity of Autologous, Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor Secreting Alveolar Soft Parts Sarcoma and Clear Cell Sarcoma Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, John; Fisher, David E.; Demetri, George D.; Neuberg, Donna; Allsop, Stephen A.; Fonseca, Catia; Nakazaki, Yukoh; Nemer, David; Raut, Chandrajit P.; George, Suzanne; Morgan, Jeffrey A.; Wagner, Andrew J.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Ritz, Jerome; Lezcano, Cecilia; Mihm, Martin; Canning, Christine; Hodi, F. Stephen; Dranoff, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Alveolar soft parts sarcoma (ASPS) and clear cell sarcoma (CCS) are rare mesenchymal malignancies driven by chromosomal translocations that activate members of the microphthalmia transcription factor (MITF) family. However, in contrast to malignant melanoma, little is known about their immunogenicity. To learn more about the host response to ASPS and CCS, we conducted a phase I clinical trial of vaccination with irradiated, autologous sarcoma cells engineered by adenoviral mediated gene transfer to secrete granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Experimental Design Metastatic tumors from ASPS and CCS patients were resected, processed to single cell suspensions, transduced with a replication defective adenoviral vector encoding GM-CSF, and irradiated. Immunizations were administered subcutaneously and intradermally weekly times three and then every other week. Results Vaccines were successfully manufactured for 11 of the 12 enrolled patients. Eleven subjects received from 3 to 13 immunizations. Toxicities were restricted to grade 1–2 skin reactions at inoculation sites. Vaccination elicited local dendritic cell infiltrates and stimulated T cell mediated delayed type-hypersensitivity reactions to irradiated, autologous tumor cells. Antibody responses to tissue-type plasminogen activator (tTPA) and angiopoietins-1/2 were detected. Tumor biopsies showed programmed death-1 (PD-1) positive CD8+ T cells in association with PD ligand-1 (PD-L1) expressing sarcoma cells. No tumor regressions were observed. Conclusions Vaccination with irradiated, GM-CSF secreting autologous sarcoma cell vaccines is feasible, safe, and biologically active. Concurrent targeting of angiogenic cytokines and antagonism of the PD-1 negative regulatory pathway might intensify immune-mediated tumor destruction. PMID:25805798

  11. Interfacial and mechanical properties of self-assembling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvajal, Daniel

    Self-assembly is a fascinating phenomena where interactions between small subunits allow them to aggregate and form complex structures that can span many length scales. These self-assembled structures are especially important in biology where they are necessary for life as we know it. This dissertation is a study of three very different self-assembling systems, all of which have important connections to biology and biological systems. Drop shape analysis was used to study the interfacial assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers at the oil/water interface. When biologically functionalyzed copolymers are used, this system can serve as a model for receptor-ligand interactions that are used by cells to perform many activities, such as interact with their surroundings. The physical properties of a self-assembling membrane system were quantified using membrane inflation and swelling experiments. These types of membranes may have important applications in medicine such as drug eluting (growth factor eluting) scaffolds to aid in wound healing. The factors affecting the properties of bis(leucine) oxalamide gels were also explored. We believe that this particular system will serve as an appropriate model for biological gels that are made up of fiber-like and/or rod-like structures. During the course of the research presented in this dissertation, many new techniques were developed specifically to allow/aid the study of these distinct self-assembling systems. For example, numerical methods were used to predict drop stability for drop shape analysis experiments and the methods used to create reproducibly create self-assembling membranes were developed specifically for this purpose. The development of these new techniques is an integral part of the thesis and should aid future students who work on these projects. A number ongoing projects and interesting research directions for each one of the projects is also presented.

  12. JAK/STAT signalling--an executable model assembled from molecule-centred modules demonstrating a module-oriented database concept for systems and synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Blätke, Mary Ann; Dittrich, Anna; Rohr, Christian; Heiner, Monika; Schaper, Fred; Marwan, Wolfgang

    2013-06-01

    Mathematical models of molecular networks regulating biological processes in cells or organisms are most frequently designed as sets of ordinary differential equations. Various modularisation methods have been applied to reduce the complexity of models, to analyse their structural properties, to separate biological processes, or to reuse model parts. Taking the JAK/STAT signalling pathway with the extensive combinatorial cross-talk of its components as a case study, we make a natural approach to modularisation by creating one module for each biomolecule. Each module consists of a Petri net and associated metadata and is organised in a database publically accessible through a web interface (). The Petri net describes the reaction mechanism of a given biomolecule and its functional interactions with other components including relevant conformational states. The database is designed to support the curation, documentation, version control, and update of individual modules, and to assist the user in automatically composing complex models from modules. Biomolecule centred modules, associated metadata, and database support together allow the automatic creation of models by considering differential gene expression in given cell types or under certain physiological conditions or states of disease. Modularity also facilitates exploring the consequences of alternative molecular mechanisms by comparative simulation of automatically created models even for users without mathematical skills. Models may be selectively executed as an ODE system, stochastic, or qualitative models or hybrid and exported in the SBML format. The fully automated generation of models of redesigned networks by metadata-guided modification of modules representing biomolecules with mutated function or specificity is proposed.

  13. STAR: a simple TAL effector assembly reaction using isothermal assembly

    PubMed Central

    Gogolok, Sabine; Garcia-Diaz, Claudia; Pollard, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) contain modular programmable DNA binding domains. Fusing TALEs with effector domains creates synthetic transcription factors (TALE-TFs) or nucleases (TALENs), enabling precise gene manipulations. The construction of TALEs remains challenging due to their repetitive sequences. Here we report a simple TALE assembly reaction (STAR) that enables individual laboratories to generate multiple TALEs in a facile manner. STAR uses an isothermal assembly (‘Gibson assembly’) that is labour- and cost-effective, accessible, rapid and scalable. A small 68-part fragment library is employed, and the specific TALE repeat sequence is generated within ~8 hours. Sequence-verified TALENs or TALE-TF plasmids targeting 17 bp target sequences can be produced within three days, without the need for stepwise intermediate plasmid production. We demonstrate the utility of STAR through production of functional TALE-TFs capable of activating human SOX2 expression. STAR addresses some of the shortcomings of existing Golden Gate or solid-phase assembly protocols and enables routine production of TALE-TFs that will complement emerging CRISPR/Cas9-based reagents across diverse applications in mammalian stem cell and synthetic biology. PMID:27615025

  14. Molecular Self-Assembly and Nanochemistry: A Chemical Strategy for the Synthesis of Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitesides, George M.; Mathias, John P.; Seto, Christopher T.

    1991-11-01

    Molecular self-assembly is the spontaneous association of molecules under equilibrium conditions into stable, structurally well-defined aggregates joined by noncovalent bonds. Molecular self-assembly is ubiquitous in biological systems and underlies the formation of a wide variety of complex biological structures. Understanding self-assembly and the associated noncovalent interactions that connect complementary interacting molecular surfaces in biological aggregates is a central concern in structural biochemistry. Self-assembly is also emerging as a new strategy in chemical synthesis, with the potential of generating nonbiological structures with dimensions of 1 to 10^2 nanometers (with molecular weights of 10^4 to 1010 daltons). Structures in the upper part of this range of sizes are presently inaccessible through chemical synthesis, and the ability to prepare them would open a route to structures comparable in size (and perhaps complementary in function) to those that can be prepared by microlithography and other techniques of microfabrication.

  15. Molecular self-assembly and nanochemistry: a chemical strategy for the synthesis of nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Whitesides, G M; Mathias, J P; Seto, C T

    1991-11-29

    Molecular self-assembly is the spontaneous association of molecules under equilibrium conditions into stable, structurally well-defined aggregates joined by noncovalent bonds. Molecular self-assembly is ubiquitous in biological systems and underlies the formation of a wide variety of complex biological structures. Understanding self-assembly and the associated noncovalent interactions that connect complementary interacting molecular surfaces in biological aggregates is a central concern in structural biochemistry. Self-assembly is also emerging as a new strategy in chemical synthesis, with the potential of generating nonbiological structures with dimensions of 1 to 10(2) nanometers (with molecular weights of 10(4) to 10(10) daltons). Structures in the upper part of this range of sizes are presently inaccessible through chemical synthesis, and the ability to prepare them would open a route to structures comparable in size (and perhaps complementary in function) to those that can be prepared by microlithography and other techniques of microfabrication.

  16. Acute and impaired wound healing: pathophysiology and current methods for drug delivery, part 1: normal and chronic wounds: biology, causes, and approaches to care.

    PubMed

    Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N; Hamblin, Michael R; Herman, Ira M

    2012-07-01

    This is the first installment of 2 articles that discuss the biology and pathophysiology of wound healing, review the role that growth factors play in this process, and describe current ways of growth factor delivery into the wound bed. Part 1 discusses the latest advances in clinicians' understanding of the control points that regulate wound healing. Importantly, biological similarities and differences between acute and chronic wounds are considered, including the signaling pathways that initiate cellular and tissue responses after injury, which may be impeded during chronic wound healing.

  17. DeviceEditor visual biological CAD canvas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Biological Computer Aided Design (bioCAD) assists the de novo design and selection of existing genetic components to achieve a desired biological activity, as part of an integrated design-build-test cycle. To meet the emerging needs of Synthetic Biology, bioCAD tools must address the increasing prevalence of combinatorial library design, design rule specification, and scar-less multi-part DNA assembly. Results We report the development and deployment of web-based bioCAD software, DeviceEditor, which provides a graphical design environment that mimics the intuitive visual whiteboard design process practiced in biological laboratories. The key innovations of DeviceEditor include visual combinatorial library design, direct integration with scar-less multi-part DNA assembly design automation, and a graphical user interface for the creation and modification of design specification rules. We demonstrate how biological designs are rendered on the DeviceEditor canvas, and we present effective visualizations of genetic component ordering and combinatorial variations within complex designs. Conclusions DeviceEditor liberates researchers from DNA base-pair manipulation, and enables users to create successful prototypes using standardized, functional, and visual abstractions. Open and documented software interfaces support further integration of DeviceEditor with other bioCAD tools and software platforms. DeviceEditor saves researcher time and institutional resources through correct-by-construction design, the automation of tedious tasks, design reuse, and the minimization of DNA assembly costs. PMID:22373390

  18. What Part of NO Don't You Understand? Some Answers to the Cardinal Questions in Nitric Oxide Biology*

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Bradford G.; Dranka, Brian P.; Bailey, Shannon M.; Lancaster, Jack R.; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) regulates biological processes through signaling mechanisms that exploit its unique biochemical properties as a free radical. For the last several decades, the key aspects of the chemical properties of NO relevant to biological systems have been defined, but it has been a challenge to assign these to specific cellular processes. Nevertheless, it is now clear that the high affinity of NO for transition metal centers, particularly iron, and the rapid reaction of NO with oxygen-derived free radicals can explain many of its biological and pathological properties. Emerging studies also highlight a growing importance of the secondary metabolites of NO-dependent reactions in the post-translational modification of key metabolic and signaling proteins. In this minireview, we emphasize the current understanding of the biochemistry of NO and place it in a biological context. PMID:20410298

  19. Comparative Phytochemical Analysis of Essential Oils from Different Biological Parts of Artemisia herba alba and Their Cytotoxic Effect on Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tilaoui, Mounir; Ait Mouse, Hassan; Jaafari, Abdeslam; Zyad, Abdelmajid

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Carrying out the chemical composition and antiproliferative effects against cancer cells from different biological parts of Artemisia herba alba. Methods Essential oils were studied by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC–MS) and their antitumoral activity was tested against P815 mastocytoma and BSR kidney carcinoma cell lines; also, in order to evaluate the effect on normal human cells, oils were tested against peripheral blood mononuclear cells PBMCs. Results Essential oils from leaves and aerial parts (mixture of capitulum and leaves) were mainly composed by oxygenated sesquiterpenes 39.89% and 46.15% respectively; capitulum oil contained essentially monoterpenes (22.86%) and monocyclic monoterpenes (21.48%); esters constituted the major fraction (62.8%) of stem oil. Essential oils of different biological parts studied demonstrated a differential antiproliferative activity against P815 and BSR cancer cells; P815 cells are the most sensitive to the cytotoxic effect. Leaves and capitulum essential oils are more active than aerial parts. Interestingly, no cytotoxic effect of these essential oils was observed on peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Conclusion Our results showed that the chemical composition variability of essential oils depends on the nature of botanical parts of Artemisia herba alba. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that the differential cytotoxic effect depends not only on the essential oils concentration, but also on the target cells and the botanical parts of essential oils used. PMID:26196123

  20. The biological restoration of central nervous system architecture and function: part 1-foundations and historical landmarks in contemporary stem cell biology.

    PubMed

    Farin, Azadeh; Liu, Charles Y; Elder, James B; Langmoen, Iver A; Apuzzo, Michael L J

    2009-01-01

    Since their discovery, stem cells have fascinated scientists with their ultimate potential: the ability to cure disease, repair altered physiology, and reverse neurological deficit. Stem cell science unquestionably promises to eliminate many of the tragic limitations contemporary medicine must acknowledge, and cloning may provide young cells for an aging population. Although it is widely believed that stem cells will transform the way medicine is practiced, therapeutic interventions using stem cell technology are still in their infancy. The 3 most common stem cell sources studied today are umbilical cord blood, bone marrow, and human embryos. Although cord blood is currently used to treat dozens of disorders and bone marrow stem cells have been used clinically since the 1960s, human embryonic stem cells have yet to be successfully applied to any disease. Undeniably, stem cell therapy has the potential to be one of the most powerful therapeutic options available. In this introductory article of a 5-part series on stem cells, we narrate the evolution of modern stem cell science, delineating major landmarks that will prove responsible for taking stem cell technology from the laboratory into revolutionary clinical applications: from the first milestone of identifying the mouse hematopoietic stem cell to the latest feats of producing pluripotent stem cells without embryos at all. In Part 2, we present the evidence demonstrating the certainty of adult mammalian neurogenesis; in Parts 3 and 4, we describe neurosurgical applications of stem cell technology; and in Part 5, we discuss the philosophical and ethical issues surrounding stem cell therapy, as well as future areas of exploration.

  1. Biomimetic polymers responsive to a biological signaling molecule: nitric oxide triggered reversible self-assembly of single macromolecular chains into nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinming; Whittaker, Michael R; Duong, Hien; Li, Yang; Boyer, Cyrille; Davis, Thomas P

    2014-07-21

    Novel nitric oxide (NO) responsive monomers (NAPMA and APUEMA) containing o-phenylenediamine functional groups have been polymerized to form NO-responsive macromolecular chains as truly biomimetic polymers. Upon exposure to NO--a ubiquitous cellular signaling molecule--the NAPMA- and APUEMA-labeled thermoresponsive copolymers exhibited substantial changes in solubility, clearly characterized by tuneable LCST behavior, thereby inducing self-assembly into nanoparticulate structures. Moreover, the NO-triggered self-assembly process in combination with environmentally sensitive fluorescence dyes could be employed to detect and image endogenous NO.

  2. Bacteriophage assembly.

    PubMed

    Aksyuk, Anastasia A; Rossmann, Michael G

    2011-03-01

    Bacteriophages have been a model system to study assembly processes for over half a century. Formation of infectious phage particles involves specific protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions, as well as large conformational changes of assembly precursors. The sequence and molecular mechanisms of phage assembly have been elucidated by a variety of methods. Differences and similarities of assembly processes in several different groups of bacteriophages are discussed in this review. The general principles of phage assembly are applicable to many macromolecular complexes.

  3. From self-organization to self-assembly: a new materialism?

    PubMed

    Vincent, Bernadette Bensaude

    2016-09-01

    While self-organization has been an integral part of academic discussions about the distinctive features of living organisms, at least since Immanuel Kant's Critique of Judgement, the term 'self-assembly' has only been used for a few decades as it became a hot research topic with the emergence of nanotechnology. Could it be considered as an attempt at reducing vital organization to a sort of assembly line of molecules? Considering the context of research on self-assembly I argue that the shift of attention from self-organization to self-assembly does not really challenge the boundary between chemistry and biology. Self-assembly was first and foremost investigated in an engineering context as a strategy for manufacturing without human intervention and did not raise new perspectives on the emergence of vital organization itself. However self-assembly implies metaphysical assumptions that this paper tries to disentangle. It first describes the emergence of self-assembly as a research field in the context of materials science and nanotechnology. The second section outlines the metaphysical implications and will emphasize a sharp contrast between the ontology underlying two practices of self-assembly developed under the umbrella of synthetic biology. And unexpectedly, we shall see that chemists are less on the reductionist side than most synthetic biologists. Finally, the third section ventures some reflections on the kind of design involved in self-assembly practices.

  4. Self-assembled Ni/TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite anodes synthesized via electroless plating and atomic layer deposition on biological scaffolds

    SciTech Connect

    Gerasopoulos, K; Chen, X L; Culver, J N; Wang, Chunsheng; Ghodssi, Reza

    2010-01-01

    Ni(core)/TiO{sub 2}(shell) nanocomposite anodes were fabricated on three-dimensional, self-assembled nanotemplates of Tobacco mosaic virus using atomic layer deposition, exhibiting high capacities and rate capability and extremely low average capacity fading ([similar]0.024% per cycle) for [similar]1000 cycles.

  5. Rapid construction of insulated genetic circuits via synthetic sequence-guided isothermal assembly

    PubMed Central

    Torella, Joseph P.; Boehm, Christian R.; Lienert, Florian; Chen, Jan-Hung; Way, Jeffrey C.; Silver, Pamela A.

    2014-01-01

    In vitro recombination methods have enabled one-step construction of large DNA sequences from multiple parts. Although synthetic biological circuits can in principle be assembled in the same fashion, they typically contain repeated sequence elements such as standard promoters and terminators that interfere with homologous recombination. Here we use a computational approach to design synthetic, biologically inactive unique nucleotide sequences (UNSes) that facilitate accurate ordered assembly. Importantly, our designed UNSes make it possible to assemble parts with repeated terminator and insulator sequences, and thereby create insulated functional genetic circuits in bacteria and mammalian cells. Using UNS-guided assembly to construct repeating promoter-gene-terminator parts, we systematically varied gene expression to optimize production of a deoxychromoviridans biosynthetic pathway in Escherichia coli. We then used this system to construct complex eukaryotic AND-logic gates for genomic integration into embryonic stem cells. Construction was performed by using a standardized series of UNS-bearing BioBrick-compatible vectors, which enable modular assembly and facilitate reuse of individual parts. UNS-guided isothermal assembly is broadly applicable to the construction and optimization of genetic circuits and particularly those requiring tight insulation, such as complex biosynthetic pathways, sensors, counters and logic gates. PMID:24078086

  6. Rapid construction of insulated genetic circuits via synthetic sequence-guided isothermal assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Torella, JP; Boehm, CR; Lienert, F; Chen, JH; Way, JC; Silver, PA

    2013-12-28

    In vitro recombination methods have enabled one-step construction of large DNA sequences from multiple parts. Although synthetic biological circuits can in principle be assembled in the same fashion, they typically contain repeated sequence elements such as standard promoters and terminators that interfere with homologous recombination. Here we use a computational approach to design synthetic, biologically inactive unique nucleotide sequences (UNSes) that facilitate accurate ordered assembly. Importantly, our designed UNSes make it possible to assemble parts with repeated terminator and insulator sequences, and thereby create insulated functional genetic circuits in bacteria and mammalian cells. Using UNS-guided assembly to construct repeating promoter-gene-terminator parts, we systematically varied gene expression to optimize production of a deoxychromoviridans biosynthetic pathway in Escherichia coli. We then used this system to construct complex eukaryotic AND-logic gates for genomic integration into embryonic stem cells. Construction was performed by using a standardized series of UNS-bearing BioBrick-compatible vectors, which enable modular assembly and facilitate reuse of individual parts. UNS-guided isothermal assembly is broadly applicable to the construction and optimization of genetic circuits and particularly those requiring tight insulation, such as complex biosynthetic pathways, sensors, counters and logic gates.

  7. Representations of mechanical assembly sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homem De Mello, Luiz S.; Sanderson, Arthur C.

    1991-01-01

    Five types of representations for assembly sequences are reviewed: the directed graph of feasible assembly sequences, the AND/OR graph of feasible assembly sequences, the set of establishment conditions, and two types of sets of precedence relationships. (precedence relationships between the establishment of one connection between parts and the establishment of another connection, and precedence relationships between the establishment of one connection and states of the assembly process). The mappings of one representation into the others are established. The correctness and completeness of these representations are established. The results presented are needed in the proof of correctness and completeness of algorithms for the generation of mechanical assembly sequences.

  8. Switching from usual brand cigarettes to a tobacco-heating cigarette or snus: Part 3. Biomarkers of biological effect

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, Michael W.; Marano, Kristin M.; Jones, Bobbette A.; Morgan, Walter T.; Stiles, Mitchell F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A randomized, multi-center study of adult cigarette smokers switched to tobacco-heating cigarettes, snus or ultra-low machine yield tobacco-burning cigarettes (50/group) for 24 weeks was conducted. Evaluation of biomarkers of biological effect (e.g. inflammation, lipids, hypercoaguable state) indicated that the majority of consistent and statistically significant improvements over time within each group were observed in markers of inflammation. Consistent and statistically significant differences in pairwise comparisons between product groups were not observed. These findings are relevant to the understanding of biomarkers of biological effect related to cigarette smoking as well as the risk continuum across various tobacco products (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02061917). PMID:26525962

  9. Switching from usual brand cigarettes to a tobacco-heating cigarette or snus: Part 3. Biomarkers of biological effect.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Michael W; Marano, Kristin M; Jones, Bobbette A; Morgan, Walter T; Stiles, Mitchell F

    2015-01-01

    A randomized, multi-center study of adult cigarette smokers switched to tobacco-heating cigarettes, snus or ultra-low machine yield tobacco-burning cigarettes (50/group) for 24 weeks was conducted. Evaluation of biomarkers of biological effect (e.g. inflammation, lipids, hypercoaguable state) indicated that the majority of consistent and statistically significant improvements over time within each group were observed in markers of inflammation. Consistent and statistically significant differences in pairwise comparisons between product groups were not observed. These findings are relevant to the understanding of biomarkers of biological effect related to cigarette smoking as well as the risk continuum across various tobacco products (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02061917).

  10. Observations on the Biology of Afrotropical Hesperiidae (Lepidoptera) with particular reference to Kenya. Part 11. Heteropterinae.

    PubMed

    Cock, Matthew J W; Congdon, T Colin E

    2017-01-30

    Partial life histories from Kenya or Tanzania are presented for Metisella midas midas (Butler), M. medea medea Evans, M. orientalis orientalis Aurivillius, M. quadrisignatus nanda Evans, M. congdoni De Jong & Kielland and M. willemi Wallengren. The ovum of Metisella formosus linda Evans is also illustrated from Zambia. All feed on species of grasses (Poaceae). The convergence of the biology of the grass-feeding skippers, particularly Heteropterinae and Hesperiinae, Baorini is discussed.

  11. On rapeseed meals. Part XXVI. Some remarks on the biological value of rapeseed meal proteins after silage.

    PubMed

    Borowska, J; Cichon, R; Kozłowska, H; Rutkowski

    1978-01-01

    The influence of propionic bacteria on the biological value of potato-rapeseed meal protein ensilage was investigated. The inoculation of the ensilage with Propionibacterium Petersoni T 112 led to the reduction of the content of goitrogenous compounds (isothiocyanates and oxazolidinethiones) and to an increase of the nutritive value (NPU, PER) of the rapeseed protein. The increase of the protein value is greater by the application of propionic bacteria than by toasting of rapeseed meal.

  12. Shoreline ecology program for Prince William Sound, Alaska, following the Exxon Valdez oil spill. Part 3: Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Gilfillan, E.S.; Page, D.S.; Harner, E.J.; Boehm, P.D.

    1995-12-31

    This study describes the biological results of a comprehensive shoreline ecology program designed to assess ecological recovery in Prince William Sound following the Exxon Valdez oil spill on march 24, 1989. The program is an application of the ``Sediment Quality Triad`` approach, combining chemical, toxicological, and biological measurements. The study was designed so that results could be extrapolated to the entire spill zone in Prince William Sound. The spill affected four major shoreline habitat types in Prince William Sound: pebble/gravel, boulder/cobble, sheltered bedrock, and exposed bedrock. The study design had two components: (1) one-time stratified random sampling at 64 sites representing four habitats and four oiling levels (including unoiled reference sites) and (2) periodic sampling at 12 nonrandomly chosen sites that included some of the most heavily oiled locations in the sound. Biological communities on rock surfaces and in intertidal and shallow subtidal sediments were analyzed for differences resulting from to oiling in each of 16 habitat/tide zone combinations. Statistical methods included univariate analyses of individual species abundances and community parameter variables (total abundance, species richness, and Shannon diversity), and multivariate correspondence analysis of community structure. 58 refs., 13 figs., 9 tabs.

  13. Site Alteration Effects from Rocket Exhaust Impingement During a Simulated Viking Mars Landing. Part 2: Chemical and Biological Site Alteration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Husted, R. R.; Smith, I. D.; Fennessey, P. V.

    1977-01-01

    Chemical and biological alteration of a Mars landing site was investigated experimentally and analytically. The experimental testing was conducted using a specially designed multiple nozzle configuration consisting of 18 small bell nozzles. The chemical test results indicate that an engine using standard hydrazine fuel will contaminate the landing site with ammonia (50-500ppm), nitrogen (5-50ppm), aniline (0.01-0.5ppm), hydrogen cyanide (0.01-0.5ppm), and water. A purified fuel, with impurities (mostly aniline) reduced by a factor of 50-100, limits the amount of hydrogen cyanide and aniline to below detectable limits for the Viking science investigations and leaves the amounts of ammonia, nitrogen, and water in the soil unchanged. The large amounts of ammonia trapped in the soil will make interpretation of the organic analysis investigation results more difficult. The biological tests indicate that the combined effects of plume gases, surface heating, surface erosion, and gas composition resulting from the retrorockets will not interfere with the Viking biology investigation.

  14. Biologic Treatments for Sports Injuries II Think Tank—Current Concepts, Future Research, and Barriers to Advancement, Part 3

    PubMed Central

    Zlotnicki, Jason P.; Geeslin, Andrew G.; Murray, Iain R.; Petrigliano, Frank A.; LaPrade, Robert F.; Mann, Barton J.; Musahl, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Focal chondral defects of the articular surface are a common occurrence in the field of orthopaedics. These isolated cartilage injuries, if not repaired surgically with restoration of articular congruency, may have a high rate of progression to posttraumatic osteoarthritis, resulting in significant morbidity and loss of function in the young, active patient. Both isolated and global joint disease are a difficult entity to treat in the clinical setting given the high amount of stress on weightbearing joints and the limited healing potential of native articular cartilage. Recently, clinical interest has focused on the use of biologically active compounds and surgical techniques to regenerate native cartilage to the articular surface, with the goal of restoring normal joint health and overall function. This article presents a review of the current biologic therapies, as discussed at the 2015 American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) Biologics Think Tank, that are used in the treatment of focal cartilage deficiencies. For each of these emerging therapies, the theories for application, the present clinical evidence, and specific areas for future research are explored, with focus on the barriers currently faced by clinicians in advancing the success of these therapies in the clinical setting. PMID:27123466

  15. World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Guidelines for Biological Treatment of Schizophrenia. Part 3: Update 2015 Management of special circumstances: Depression, Suicidality, substance use disorders and pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Alkomiet; Falkai, Peter; Wobrock, Thomas; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Glenthøj, Birte; Gattaz, Wagner F; Thibaut, Florence; Möller, Hans-Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    These updated guidelines are based on the first edition of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for biological treatment of schizophrenia published in the years 2005 and 2006. For this 2015 revision, all available publications pertaining to the biological treatment of schizophrenia were reviewed systematically to allow for an evidence-based update. These guidelines provide evidence-based practice recommendations which are clinically and scientifically relevant. They are intended to be used by all physicians diagnosing and treating patients with schizophrenia. Based on the first version of these guidelines a systematic review, as well as a data extraction from national guidelines have been performed for this update. The identified literature was evaluated with respect to the strength of evidence for its efficacy and subsequently categorised into six levels of evidence (A-F) and five levels of recommendation (1-5). This third part of the updated guidelines covers the management of the following specific treatment circumstances: comorbid depression, suicidality, various comorbid substance use disorders (legal and illegal drugs), and pregnancy and lactation. These guidelines are primarily concerned with the biological treatment (including antipsychotic medication and other pharmacological treatment options) of patients with schizophrenia.

  16. DMSP and DMS dynamics during a mesoscale iron fertilization experiment in the Northeast Pacific Part II: Biological cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merzouk, Anissa; Levasseur, Maurice; Scarratt, Michael G.; Michaud, Sonia; Rivkin, Richard B.; Hale, Michelle S.; Kiene, Ronald P.; Price, Neil M.; Li, William K. W.

    2006-10-01

    Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) and dimethylsulfide (DMS) biological cycling rates were determined during SERIES, a mesoscale iron-fertilization experiment conducted in the high-nutrient low-chlorophyll (HNLC) waters of the northeast subarctic Pacific. The iron fertilization resulted in the rapid development of a nanoplankton assemblage that persisted for 11 days before abruptly crashing. The nanoplankton bloom was followed by a diatom bloom, accompanied by an important increase in bacterial abundance and production. These iron-induced alterations of the plankton assemblage coincided with changes in the size and biological cycling of the DMSP and DMS pools. The initial nanoplankton bloom resulted in increases in particulate DMSP (DMSPp; 77-180 nmol L -1), dissolved DMSP (DMSPd; 1-24 nmol L -1), and biological gross (0.11-0.78 nmol L -1 h -1) and net (0.04-0.74 nmol L -1 h -1) DMS production rates. During the nanoplankton bloom, DMSPd consumption by bacteria exceeded their sulfur demand and the excess sulfur was probably released as DMS, consistent with the high gross DMS production rates observed during that period. The crash of the nanoplankton bloom was marked by the rapid decline of DMSPp, DMSPd, and gross DMS production to their initial values. Following the crash of the nanoplankton bloom, bacterial production and estimated sulfur demand reached transient maxima of 9.3 μg C L -1 d -1 and 14.2 nmol S L -1 d -1, respectively. During this period of high bacterial production, bacterial DMSPd consumption was also very high (6 nmol L -1 h -1), but none of the consumed DMSPd was converted into DMS and a net biological DMS consumption was measured. This transient period initiated a rapid decrease in DMS concentrations inside the iron-enriched patch, which persisted during the following diatom bloom due to low biological gross and net DMS production that prevented the replenishment of DMS. Our results show that the impact of Fe fertilization on DMS production in

  17. Joint assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A joint assembly is provided which includes a drive assembly and a swivel mechanism. The drive assembly features a motor operatively associated with a plurality of drive shafts for driving auxiliary elements, and a plurality of swivel shafts for pivoting the drive assembly. The swivel mechanism engages the swivel shafts and has a fixable element that may be attached to a foundation. The swivel mechanism is adapted to cooperate with the swivel shafts to pivot the drive assembly with at least two degrees of freedom relative to the foundation. The joint assembly allows for all components to remain encased in a tight, compact, and sealed package, making it ideal for space, exploratory, and commercial applications.

  18. Observations on the biology of Afrotropical Hesperiidae (Lepidoptera). Part 9. Hesperiinae incertae sedis: Zingiberales feeders, genera of unknown biology and an overview of the Hesperiinae incertae sedis.

    PubMed

    Cock, Matthew J W; Congdon, T Colin E; Collins, Steve C

    2016-01-15

    The Afrotropical genera that have been recorded to feed on Zingiberales are documented. Partial life histories are presented for Erionota torus Evans (a South-East Asian species established in Mauritius), Semalea arela (Mabille), S. pulvina (Plötz), Xanthodisca vibius (Hewitson), X. rega (Mabille), Hypoleucis ophiusa (Hewitson), Caenides dacena (Hewitson), Osmodes adon (Mabille), Gretna cylinda (Hewitson) and Moltena fiara (Butler). Additional notes from the literature are provided on the genera Leona and Rhabdomantis. Notes on natural enemies of E. torus and M. fiara are included. We find that the Zingiberaceae and Costaceae feeding genera, Semalea, Xanthodiscus, Hypoleucis and Caenides (part) are united by a C-shaped raised rim to the prothoracic spiracle of the pupa. The pupa of Osmodes adon indicates this genus may have no close affinities to other Afrotropical genera for which the life history is known. The pupa of G. cylinda is unlike any other that we have documented and may reflect that this is the only species which we have found to be formed on the open leaf under surface rather than in a shelter. The early stages of M. fiara indicate affinities with Zophopetes and related genera. The paper concludes with a brief comparative discussion of the early stages of the Afrotropical Hesperiinae incertae sedis as a whole. There appear to be useful characters to group species by the ova and pupae but less so by the caterpillars. Based on pupae alone, the Hesperiinae incertae sedis might be divided into nine groups.

  19. Self-Assembly: How Nature Builds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, M. Gail; Falvo, Michael R.; Broadwell, Bethany; Dotger, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    Self-assembly or spontaneous assembly is a process in which materials build themselves without assistance. This process plays a central role in the construction of biological structures and materials such as cells, viruses, and bone, and also in abiotic processes like phase transitions and crystal formation. The principles of self-assembly help…

  20. Clean then Assemble Versus Assemble then Clean: Several Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welker, Roger W.

    2004-01-01

    Cleanliness of manufactured parts and assemblies is a significant issue in many industries including disk drives, semiconductors, aerospace, and medical devices. Clean manufacturing requires cleanroom floor space and cleaning technology that are both expensive to own and expensive to operate. Strategies to reduce these costs are an important consideration. One strategy shown to be effective at reducing costs is to assemble parts into subassemblies and then clean the subassembly, rather than clean the individual parts first and then assemble them. One advantage is that assembly outside of the cleanroom reduces the amount of cleanroom floor space and its associated operating cost premium. A second advantage is that this strategy reduces the number of individual parts that must be cleaned prior to assembly, reducing the number of cleaning baskets, handling and, possibly, reducing the number of cleaners. The assemble then clean strategy also results in a part that is significantly cleaner because contamination generated during the assembly steps are more effectively removed that normally can be achieved by hand wiping after assembly in the cleanroom.

  1. Geometric reasoning about assembly tools

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    Planning for assembly requires reasoning about various tools used by humans, robots, or other automation to manipulate, attach, and test parts and subassemblies. This paper presents a general framework to represent and reason about geometric accessibility issues for a wide variety of such assembly tools. Central to the framework is a use volume encoding a minimum space that must be free in an assembly state to apply a given tool, and placement constraints on where that volume must be placed relative to the parts on which the tool acts. Determining whether a tool can be applied in a given assembly state is then reduced to an instance of the FINDPLACE problem. In addition, the author presents more efficient methods to integrate the framework into assembly planning. For tools that are applied either before or after their target parts are mated, one method pre-processes a single tool application for all possible states of assembly of a product in polynomial time, reducing all later state-tool queries to evaluations of a simple expression. For tools applied after their target parts are mated, a complementary method guarantees polynomial-time assembly planning. The author presents a wide variety of tools that can be described adequately using the approach, and surveys tool catalogs to determine coverage of standard tools. Finally, the author describes an implementation of the approach in an assembly planning system and experiments with a library of over one hundred manual and robotic tools and several complex assemblies.

  2. [Investigation of biologically active compounds at the Department of Organic Chemistry of University of Debrecen 1992-2009. Part III].

    PubMed

    Antus, Sándor

    2010-01-01

    The author briefly reviews the beginning of the carbohydrate chemistry in Hungary with special regard to the results achieved at the Department of Organic Chemistry of University of Debrecen and summarizes the most important synthetic and pharmaceutical results obtained in this field between 1992-2009, part III.

  3. Surface functionalization of bioactive glasses with natural molecules of biological significance, Part I: Gallic acid as model molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Ferraris, Sara; Prenesti, Enrico; Verné, Enrica

    2013-12-01

    Gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, GA) and its derivatives are a group of biomolecules (polyphenols) obtained from plants. They have effects which are potentially beneficial to heath, for example they are antioxidant, anticarcinogenic and antibacterial, as recently investigated in many fields such as medicine, food and plant sciences. The main drawbacks of these molecules are both low stability and bioavailability. In this research work the opportunity to graft GA to bioactive glasses is investigated, in order to deliver the undamaged biological molecule into the body, using the biomaterial surfaces as a localized carrier. GA was considered for functionalization since it is a good model molecule for polyphenols and presents several interesting biological activities, like antibacterial, antioxidant and anticarcinogenic properties. Two different silica based bioactive glasses (SCNA and CEL2), with different reactivity, were employed as substrates. UV photometry combined with the Folin&Ciocalteu reagent was adopted to test the concentration of GA in uptake solution after functionalization. This test verified how much GA consumption occurred with surface modification and it was also used on solid samples to test the presence of GA on functionalized glasses. XPS and SEM-EDS techniques were employed to characterize the modification of material surface properties and functional group composition before and after functionalization.

  4. Surface functionalization of bioactive glasses with natural molecules of biological significance, part II: Grafting of polyphenols extracted from grape skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Ferraris, Sara; Prenesti, Enrico; Verné, Enrica

    2013-12-01

    Polyphenols, as one of the most important family of phytochemicals protective substances from grape fruit, possess various biological activities and health-promoting benefits, for example: inhibition of some degenerative diseases, cardiovascular diseases and certain types of cancers, reduction of plasma oxidative stress and slowing aging. The combination of polyphenols and biomaterials may have good potential to reach good bioavailability and controlled release, as well as to give biological signaling properties to the biomaterial surfaces. In this research, conventional solvent extraction was developed for obtaining polyphenols from dry grape skins. The Folin&Ciocalteu method was used to determine the amount of total polyphenols in the extracts. Surface functionalization of two bioactive glasses (SCNA and CEL2) was performed by grafting the extracted polyphenols on their surfaces. The effectiveness of the functionalization was tested by UV spectroscopy, which analyzes the amount of polyphenols in the uptake solution (before and after functionalization) and on solid samples, and XPS, which analyzes the presence of phenols on the material surface.

  5. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel pyrrolidine-2,5-dione derivatives as potential antidepressant agents. Part 1.

    PubMed

    Wróbel, Martyna Z; Chodkowski, Andrzej; Herold, Franciszek; Gomółka, Anna; Kleps, Jerzy; Mazurek, Aleksander P; Pluciński, Franciszek; Mazurek, Andrzej; Nowak, Gabriel; Siwek, Agata; Stachowicz, Katarzyna; Sławińska, Anna; Wolak, Małgorzata; Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Satała, Grzegorz; Bojarski, Andrzej J; Turło, Jadwiga

    2013-05-01

    A series of 3-(1H-indol-3-yl)pyrrolidine-2,5-dione derivatives was synthesized and their biological activity was evaluated. The chemical structures of the newly prepared compounds were confirmed by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and ESI-HRMS spectra data. All tested compounds proved to be potent 5-HT1A receptor and serotonin transporter protein (SERT) ligands. Among them, compounds 15, 18, 19 and 30 showed significant affinity for 5-HT1A and SERT. Computer docking simulations carried out for compounds 15, 31 and 32 to models of 5-HT1A receptor and SERT confirm the results of biological tests. Due to high affinity for the 5-HT1A receptor and moderate affinity for SERT, compounds 31, 32, 35, and 37 were evaluated for their affinity for D2L, 5-HT6, 5-HT7 and 5-HT2A receptors. In vivo tests, in turn, resulted in determining the functional activity of compounds 15, 18, 19 and 30 to the 5-HT1A receptor. The results of these tests indicate that all of the ligands possess properties characteristic of 5-HT1A receptor agonists.

  6. Observations on the biology of Afrotropical Hesperiidae (Lepidoptera) with particular reference to Kenya. Part 10. Pyrginae, Carcharodini.

    PubMed

    Cock, Matthew J W

    2016-10-05

    Partial life histories are presented for Spialia kituina (Karsch), S. spio (Linnaeus), S. diomus (Hopffer), S. colotes transvaaliae (Trimen), S. dromus (Plötz), S. ploetzi (Aurivillius), S. zebra bifida Higgins and Gomalia elma elma (Trimen). All feed on species of Malvaceae. An earlier record from Kenya of Melhania velutina as the food plant of S. depauperata depauperata (Strand) was based on a misidentification and there are no known records of the food plant of this subspecies. Spialia ferax (Wallengren) stat. rev. is considered a valid species rather than a subspecies of S. diomus, based on significant differences in wing patterns, the shape of the valves, a zone where neither occurs, no signs that a cline is involved, and differences in the colouring and markings of the caterpillars. The convergence of the biology of the chequered skippers of the tribes Carcharodini, Pyrgini and Celaenorrhini is discussed.

  7. Persistence of biological traces at inside parts of a firearm from a case of multiple familial homicide.

    PubMed

    Courts, Cornelius; Gahr, Britta; Madea, Burkhard; Schyma, Christian

    2014-07-01

    Backspatter from wounds caused by contact shots against a biological target had before been shown to be propelled into firearms' barrels where they can persist and be retrieved from as relevant forensic evidence. Herein, that insight was applied to the investigation of a case of multiple familial homicide with a firearm. Samples of backspatter were collected from the firearm using DNA-free swabs. DNA was extracted from the swabs, and 16 STR systems were PCR-amplified to generate DNA profiles of all victims shot by the firearm. The quality of the resulting DNA profiles was sufficient to exclude the perpetrator as donor and to differentiate the three closely related victims thereby proving that all three victims had been shot by the same firearm from very close or contact distance. A key insight gained from this case was that not only a firearms' barrel inside but other inner surfaces may be charged with profilable DNA.

  8. Liaison based assembly design

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, A.; Kholwadwala, D.; Wilson, R.H.

    1996-12-01

    Liaison Based Assembly Design extends the current information infrastructure to support design in terms of kinematic relationships between parts, or liaisons. These liaisons capture information regarding contact, degrees-of-freedom constraints and containment relationships between parts in an assembly. The project involved defining a useful collection of liaison representations, investigating their properties, and providing for maximum use of the data in downstream applications. We tested our ideas by implementing a prototype system involving extensions to Pro/Engineer and the Archimedes assembly planner. With an expanded product model, the design system is more able to capture design intent. When a product update is attempted, increased knowledge availability improves our ability to understand the effect of design changes. Manufacturing and analysis disciplines benefit from having liaison information available, so less time is wasted arguing over incomplete design specifications and our enterprise can be more completely integrated.

  9. A Self-Assembled Aggregate Composed of a Fatty Acid Membrane and the Building Blocks of Biological Polymers Provides a First Step in the Emergence of Protocells

    PubMed Central

    Black, Roy A.; Blosser, Matthew C.

    2016-01-01

    We propose that the first step in the origin of cellular life on Earth was the self-assembly of fatty acids with the building blocks of RNA and protein, resulting in a stable aggregate. This scheme provides explanations for the selection and concentration of the prebiotic components of cells; the stabilization and growth of early membranes; the catalysis of biopolymer synthesis; and the co-localization of membranes, RNA and protein. In this article, we review the evidence and rationale for the formation of the proposed aggregate: (i) the well-established phenomenon of self-assembly of fatty acids to form vesicles; (ii) our published evidence that nucleobases and sugars bind to and stabilize such vesicles; and (iii) the reasons why amino acids likely do so as well. We then explain how the conformational constraints and altered chemical environment due to binding of the components to the membrane could facilitate the formation of nucleosides, oligonucleotides and peptides. We conclude by discussing how the resulting oligomers, even if short and random, could have increased vesicle stability and growth more than their building blocks did, and how competition among these vesicles could have led to longer polymers with complex functions. PMID:27529283

  10. Bio-inspired supramolecular hybrid dendrimers self-assembled from low-generation peptide dendrons for highly efficient gene delivery and biological tracking.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xianghui; Jian, Yeting; Li, Yunkun; Zhang, Xiao; Tu, Zhaoxu; Gu, Zhongwei

    2014-09-23

    Currently, supramolecular self-assembly of dendrons and dendrimers emerges as a powerful and challenging strategy for developing sophisticated nanostructures with excellent performances. Here we report a supramolecular hybrid strategy to fabricate a bio-inspired dendritic system as a versatile delivery nanoplatform. With a rational design, dual-functionalized low-generation peptide dendrons (PDs) self-assemble onto inorganic nanoparticles via coordination interactions to generate multifunctional supramolecular hybrid dendrimers (SHDs). These SHDs exhibit well-defined nanostructure, arginine-rich peptide corona, and fluorescent signaling properties. As expected, our bio-inspired supramolecular hybrid strategy largely enhances the gene transfection efficiency of SHDs approximately 50 000-fold as compared to single PDs at the same R/P ratio. Meanwhile the bio-inspired SHDs also (i) provide low cytotoxicity and serum resistance in gene delivery; (ii) provide inherent fluorescence for tracking intracellular pathways including cellular uptake, endosomal escape, and gene release; and (iii) work as an alternative reference for monitoring desired protein expression. More importantly, in vivo animal experiments demonstrate that SHDs offer considerable gene transfection efficiency (in muscular tissue and in HepG2 tumor xenografts) and real-time bioimaging capabilities. These SHDs will likely stimulate studies on bio-inspired supramolecular hybrid dendritic systems for biomedical applications both in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Self-assembled drug delivery systems. Part 7: hepatocyte-targeted nanoassemblies of an adefovir lipid derivative with cytochrome P450-triggered drug release.

    PubMed

    Du, Lina; Wu, Lailong; Jin, Yiguang; Jia, Junwei; Li, Miao; Wang, Yu

    2014-09-10

    A novel strategy was used in the design of self-assembled drug delivery systems (SADDSs) in this study. The nanoassemblies of an amphiphilic adefovir lipid derivative were prepared and demonstrated to have the functions of hepatocyte targeting, enzyme-triggered drug release and high anti-hepatitis effect. An amphiphilic adefovir lipid derivative, N-lauroyl-1-(3-chlorophenyl)-1,3-propanyl phosphonyl adefovir (LCPA) was prepared and formed the nanoassemblies by injecting the mixture of LCPA and another amphiphilic polymer, d-galactide polyoxyethylene (20) cetyl ether (GPCE) (ca. 20:1, mol/mol) into water. The nanoassemblies were very stable and showed negative charge. LCPA was sensitive to the cytochrome P450 isozymes that were expressed predominantly in the hepatocytes to produce adefovir. GPCE contained a long hydrophilic chain and a galactose ligand targeting the asialoglycoprotein receptors overexpressed on the surface of hepatocytes. The nanoassemblies showed the long-circulating and liver targeting effects according to the results of pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and fluorescence imagination after bolus intravenous administration of the nanoassemblies to the mice. The highly efficient hepatitis B treatment was achieved by 10 day continuous administration of the nanoassemblies to the HBV-infected mice. Many functions were combined in the nanoassemblies, including prodrug, molecular self-assembly, nanotechnology, long-circulating, hepatocyte targeting and hepatocyte over expressing enzyme-triggered drug release.

  12. On Constraints in Assembly Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Calton, T.L.; Jones, R.E.; Wilson, R.H.

    1998-12-17

    Constraints on assembly plans vary depending on product, assembly facility, assembly volume, and many other factors. Assembly costs and other measures to optimize vary just as widely. To be effective, computer-aided assembly planning systems must allow users to express the plan selection criteria that appIy to their products and production environments. We begin this article by surveying the types of user criteria, both constraints and quality measures, that have been accepted by assembly planning systems to date. The survey is organized along several dimensions, including strategic vs. tactical criteria; manufacturing requirements VS. requirements of the automated planning process itself and the information needed to assess compliance with each criterion. The latter strongly influences the efficiency of planning. We then focus on constraints. We describe a framework to support a wide variety of user constraints for intuitive and efficient assembly planning. Our framework expresses all constraints on a sequencing level, specifying orders and conditions on part mating operations in a number of ways. Constraints are implemented as simple procedures that either accept or reject assembly operations proposed by the planner. For efficiency, some constraints are supplemented with special-purpose modifications to the planner's algorithms. Fast replanning enables an interactive plan-view-constrain-replan cycle that aids in constraint discovery and documentation. We describe an implementation of the framework in a computer-aided assembly planning system and experiments applying the system to a number of complex assemblies, including one with 472 parts.

  13. EcoFlex: A Multifunctional MoClo Kit for E. coli Synthetic Biology.

    PubMed

    Moore, Simon J; Lai, Hung-En; Kelwick, Richard J R; Chee, Soo Mei; Bell, David J; Polizzi, Karen Marie; Freemont, Paul S

    2016-10-21

    Golden Gate cloning is a prominent DNA assembly tool in synthetic biology for the assembly of plasmid constructs often used in combinatorial pathway optimization, with a number of assembly kits developed specifically for yeast and plant-based expression. However, its use for synthetic biology in commonly used bacterial systems such as Escherichia coli has surprisingly been overlooked. Here, we introduce EcoFlex a simplified modular package of DNA parts for a variety of applications in E. coli, cell-free protein synthesis, protein purification and hierarchical assembly of transcription units based on the MoClo assembly standard. The kit features a library of constitutive promoters, T7 expression, RBS strength variants, synthetic terminators, protein purification tags and fluorescence proteins. We validate EcoFlex by assembling a 68-part containing (20 genes) plasmid (31 kb), characterize in vivo and in vitro library parts, and perform combinatorial pathway assembly, using pooled libraries of either fluorescent proteins or the biosynthetic genes for the antimicrobial pigment violacein as a proof-of-concept. To minimize pathway screening, we also introduce a secondary module design site to simplify MoClo pathway optimization. In summary, EcoFlex provides a standardized and multifunctional kit for a variety of applications in E. coli synthetic biology.

  14. Modeling Protein Self Assembly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton Buck; Hull, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the structure and function of proteins is an important part of the standards-based science curriculum. Proteins serve vital roles within the cell and malfunctions in protein self assembly are implicated in degenerative diseases. Experience indicates that this topic is a difficult one for many students. We have found that the concept…

  15. Evaluation of polyphenolic fraction isolated from aerial parts of Tribulus pterocarpus on biological properties of blood platelets in vitro.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Morel, Agnieszka; Hamed, Arafa I; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Stochmal, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The antiplatelet and antioxidative activity of polyphenolic fraction isolated from aerial parts of Tribulus pterocarpus in blood platelets stimulated by thrombin was studied. Thrombin as a strong physiological agonist induces the enzymatic peroxidation of endogenous arachidonic acid, the formation of different reactive oxygen species, including superoxide anion radicals ([Formula: see text](·)) and the platelet aggregation. Therefore, the aim of our study was to assess if the polyphenolic fraction from aerial parts of T. pterocarpus may change the biological properties of blood platelets activated by thrombin. We used cytochrome c reduction method to test the ability of this fraction to change [Formula: see text](·) generation in platelets. Arachidonic acid metabolism was measured by the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and by the production of 8-epi-prostaglandin (8-EPI) F(2). Moreover, we determined the effects of the fraction on blood platelet aggregation induced by thrombin. We observed that the polyphenolic fraction from T. pterocarpus reduced [Formula: see text](·), 8-EPI and TBARS production in these cells. The ability of the fraction to decrease the [Formula: see text](·) generation in blood platelets supports the importance of free radicals in platelet functions, including aggregation process. This study may suggest that the tested plant fraction might be a good candidate for protecting blood platelets against changes of their biological functions, which may be associated with the pathogenesis of different cardiovascular disorders.

  16. SWIFT-scalable clustering for automated identification of rare cell populations in large, high-dimensional flow cytometry datasets, part 2: biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mosmann, Tim R; Naim, Iftekhar; Rebhahn, Jonathan; Datta, Suprakash; Cavenaugh, James S; Weaver, Jason M; Sharma, Gaurav

    2014-05-01

    A multistage clustering and data processing method, SWIFT (detailed in a companion manuscript), has been developed to detect rare subpopulations in large, high-dimensional flow cytometry datasets. An iterative sampling procedure initially fits the data to multidimensional Gaussian distributions, then splitting and merging stages use a criterion of unimodality to optimize the detection of rare subpopulations, to converge on a consistent cluster number, and to describe non-Gaussian distributions. Probabilistic assignment of cells to clusters, visualization, and manipulation of clusters by their cluster medians, facilitate application of expert knowledge using standard flow cytometry programs. The dual problems of rigorously comparing similar complex samples, and enumerating absent or very rare cell subpopulations in negative controls, were solved by assigning cells in multiple samples to a cluster template derived from a single or combined sample. Comparison of antigen-stimulated and control human peripheral blood cell samples demonstrated that SWIFT could identify biologically significant subpopulations, such as rare cytokine-producing influenza-specific T cells. A sensitivity of better than one part per million was attained in very large samples. Results were highly consistent on biological replicates, yet the analysis was sensitive enough to show that multiple samples from the same subject were more similar than samples from different subjects. A companion manuscript (Part 1) details the algorithmic development of SWIFT.

  17. Development of drug loaded nanoparticles for tumor targeting. Part 1: synthesis, characterization, and biological evaluation in 2D cell cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Dakdouki, Mohammad H.; Puré, Ellen; Huang, Xuefei

    2013-04-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are being extensively studied as carriers for drug delivery, but they often have limited penetration inside tumors. We envision that by targeting an endocytic receptor on the cell surface, the uptake of NPs can be significantly enhanced through receptor mediated endocytosis. In addition, if the receptor is recycled to the cell surface, the NP cargo can be transported out of the cells, which is then taken up by neighboring cells thus enhancing solid tumor penetration. To validate our hypothesis, in the first of two articles, we report the synthesis of doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded, hyaluronan (HA) coated silica nanoparticles (SNPs) containing a highly fluorescent core to target CD44, a receptor expressed on the cancer cell surface. HA was conjugated onto amine-functionalized SNPs prepared through an oil-water microemulsion method. The immobilization of the cytotoxic drug DOX was achieved through an acid sensitive hydrazone linkage. The NPs were fully characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), zeta potential measurements, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), UV-vis absorbance, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Initial biological evaluation experiments demonstrated that compared to ligand-free SNPs, the uptake of HA-SNPs by the CD44-expressing SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells was significantly enhanced when evaluated in the 2D monolayer cell culture. Mechanistic studies suggested that cellular uptake of HA-SNPs was mainly through CD44 mediated endocytosis. HA-SNPs with immobilized DOX were endocytosed efficiently by the SKOV-3 cells as well. The enhanced tumor penetration and drug delivery properties of HA-SNPs will be evaluated in 3D tumor models in the subsequent paper.Nanoparticles (NPs) are being extensively studied as carriers for drug delivery, but they often have limited penetration inside tumors. We envision that by targeting an endocytic receptor on the cell surface, the uptake of NPs can be

  18. Mechanisms controlling primary and new production in a global ecosystem model - Part I: Validation of the biological simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, E. E.; Coward, A. C.; Nurser, G. A.; de Cuevas, B.; Fasham, M. J. R.; Anderson, T. R.

    2006-12-01

    A global general circulation model coupled to a simple six-compartment ecosystem model is used to study the extent to which global variability in primary and export production can be realistically predicted on the basis of advanced parameterizations of upper mixed layer physics, without recourse to introducing extra complexity in model biology. The "K profile parameterization" (KPP) scheme employed, combined with 6-hourly external forcing, is able to capture short-term periodic and episodic events such as diurnal cycling and storm-induced deepening. The model realistically reproduces various features of global ecosystem dynamics that have been problematic in previous global modelling studies, using a single generic parameter set. The realistic simulation of deep convection in the North Atlantic, and lack of it in the North Pacific and Southern Oceans, leads to good predictions of chlorophyll and primary production in these contrasting areas. Realistic levels of primary production are predicted in the oligotrophic gyres due to high frequency external forcing of the upper mixed layer (accompanying paper Popova et al., 2006) and novel parameterizations of zooplankton excretion. Good agreement is shown between model and observations at various JGOFS time series sites: BATS, KERFIX, Papa and HOT. One exception is the northern North Atlantic where lower grazing rates are needed, perhaps related to the dominance of mesozooplankton there. The model is therefore not globally robust in the sense that additional parameterizations are needed to realistically simulate ecosystem dynamics in the North Atlantic. Nevertheless, the work emphasises the need to pay particular attention to the parameterization of mixed layer physics in global ocean ecosystem modelling as a prerequisite to increasing the complexity of ecosystem models.

  19. Crew Assembly

    NASA Video Gallery

    Train to improve your dexterity and hand-eye coordination by assembling a puzzle.The Train Like an Astronaut project uses the excitement of exploration to challenge students to set goals, practice ...

  20. Seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Roger Neal; Longfritz, William David

    2001-01-01

    A seal assembly that seals a gap formed by a groove comprises a seal body, a biasing element, and a connection that connects the seal body to the biasing element to form the seal assembly. The seal assembly further comprises a concave-shaped center section and convex-shaped contact portions at each end of the seal body. The biasing element is formed from an elastic material and comprises a convex-shaped center section and concave-shaped biasing zones that are opposed to the convex-shaped contact portions. The biasing element is adapted to be compressed to change a width of the seal assembly from a first width to a second width that is smaller than the first width. In the compressed state, the seal assembly can be disposed in the groove. After release of the compressing force, the seal assembly expands. The contact portions will move toward a surface of the groove and the biasing zones will move into contact with another surface of the groove. The biasing zones will bias the contact portions of the seal body against the surface of the groove.

  1. Very large assemblies: Optimizing for automatic generation of assembly sequences

    SciTech Connect

    CALTON,TERRI L.

    2000-02-01

    Sandia's Archimedes 3.0{copyright} Automated Assembly Analysis System has been applied successfully to several large industrial and weapon assemblies. These have included Sandia assemblies such as portions of the B61 bomb, and assemblies from external customers such as Cummins Engine Inc., Raytheon (formerly Hughes) Missile Systems and Sikorsky Aircraft. While Archimedes 3.0{copyright} represents the state-of-the-art in automated assembly planning software, applications of the software made prior to the technological advancements presented here showed several limitations of the system, and identified the need for extensive modifications to support practical analysis of assemblies with several hundred to a few thousand parts. It was believed that there was substantial potential for enhancing Archimedes 3.0{copyright} to routinely handle much larger models and/or to handle more modestly sized assemblies more efficiently. Such a mature assembly analysis capability was needed to support routine application to industrial assemblies that overstressed the system, such as full nuclear weapon assemblies or full-scale aerospace or military vehicles.

  2. Preparation of PEGylated polymeric nanoprobes with aggregation-induced emission feature through the combination of chain transfer free radical polymerization and multicomponent reaction: Self-assembly, characterization and biological imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Wan, Qing; Liu, Meiying; Mao, Liucheng; Jiang, Ruming; Xu, Dazhuang; Huang, Hongye; Dai, Yanfeng; Deng, Fengjie; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2017-03-01

    Self-assembly of amphiphilic luminescent copolymers is a general route to fabricate fluorescent polymeric microparticles (FPMs). In this work, the FPMs with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) feature were fabricated via the combination of the chain transfer free radical polymerization and "one-pot" multicomponent reaction, which conjugated the aldehyde-containing AIE active dye AIE (CHO-An-CHO) and amino-terminated hydrophilic polymer (ATPPEGMA) using mercaptoacetic acid (MTA) as the "lock" molecule. The structure, chemical compositions, optical properties as well as biological properties of the PPEGMA-An-PPEGMA FPMs were characterized and investigated by means of a series of techniques and experiments in detail. We demonstrated the final copolymers showed amphiphilic properties, strong yellow fluorescence and high water dispersibility. Biological evaluation suggested that PPEGMA-An-PPEGMA FPMs possess low cytotoxicity and can be used for cell imaging. More importantly, many other AIE active FPMs are expected to be fabricated using the similar strategy because of the good substrate and monomer applicability of the multicomponent reaction and chain transfer living radical polymerization. Therefore, we could conclude that the strategy described in this work should be of great interest for fabrication of multifunctional AIE active nanoprobes for biomedical applications.

  3. The effect of post-sintering treatments on the fatigue and biological behavior of Ti-6Al-4V ELI parts made by selective laser melting.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, M; Torresani, E; Leoni, M; Fontanari, V; Bandini, M; Pederzolli, C; Potrich, C

    2017-03-28

    Fatigue resistance and biocompatibility are key parameters for the successful implantation of hard-tissue prostheses, which nowadays are more and more frequently manufactured by selective laser melting (SLM). For this purpose, the present paper is aimed at investigating the effect of post-sintering treatments on the fatigue behavior and biological properties of Ti samples produced by SLM. After the building process, all samples are heat treated to achieve a complete stress relief. The remaining ones are tribofinished with the aim of reducing the surface roughness of the as-sintered condition. Part of the tribofinished samples are then subjected to one of the following post-sintering treatments: (i) shot peening, (ii) hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and (iii) electropolishing. It is found that shot peening and HIP are the most effective treatments to improve the high and the very-high cycle fatigue resistance, respectively. At the same time, they preserve the good biocompatibility ensured by the biomedical Titanium Grade 23.

  4. 49 CFR 572.193 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES SID-IIsD Side Impact Crash Test Dummy, Small Adult Female § 572.193 Neck assembly. (a) The neck assembly consists of parts shown in drawing 180-2000. For purposes of this test, the neck assembly is mounted within the...

  5. 49 CFR 572.193 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES SID-IIsD Side Impact Crash Test Dummy, Small Adult Female § 572.193 Neck assembly. (a) The neck assembly consists of parts shown in drawing 180-2000. For purposes of this test, the neck assembly is mounted within the...

  6. 49 CFR 572.184 - Shoulder assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Shoulder assembly. 572.184 Section 572.184... Dummy, 50th Percentile Adult Male § 572.184 Shoulder assembly. (a) The shoulder (175-3000) is part of...) of this section, the shoulder assembly shall meet performance requirements of paragraph (c) of...

  7. In response to an open invitation for comments on AAAS project 2061's Benchmark books on science. Part 1: documentation of serious errors in cell biology.

    PubMed

    Ling, Gilbert

    2006-01-01

    Project 2061 was founded by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) to improve secondary school science education. An in-depth study of ten 9 to 12th grade biology textbooks led to the verdict that none conveyed "Big Ideas" that would give coherence and meaning to the profusion of lavishly illustrated isolated details. However, neither the Project report itself nor the Benchmark books put out earlier by the Project carries what deserves the designation of "Big Ideas." Worse, in the two earliest-published Benchmark books, the basic unit of all life forms--the living cell--is described as a soup enclosed by a cell membrane, that determines what can enter or leave the cell. This is astonishing since extensive experimental evidence has unequivocally disproved this idea 60 years ago. A "new" version of the membrane theory brought in to replace the discredited (sieve) version is the pump model--currently taught as established truth in all high-school and college biology textbooks--was also unequivocally disproved 40 years ago. This comment is written partly in response to Bechmark's gracious open invitation for ideas to improve the books and through them, to improve US secondary school science education.

  8. Biodegradable self-assembled PEG-PCL-PEG micelles for hydrophobic drug delivery, part 2: in vitro and in vivo toxicity evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, ChangYang; Wang, YuJun; Wang, XiuHong; Wei, XiaWei; Wu, QinJie; Wang, BiLan; Dong, PengWei; Chen, LiJuan; Luo, Feng; Qian, ZhiYong

    2011-02-01

    Polymeric micelles, prepared by self-assembly of biodegradable poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ɛ-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-PCL-PEG, PECE) copolymer in aqueous solution, were proved to be a potential carrier for hydrophobic drug honokiol in our previous contribution. In this study, the safety of blank PECE micelles was evaluated in vitro and in vivo before its further application in biomedical field. The average particle size of obtained micelle was 83.47 ± 0.44 nm, and polydisperse index was 0.27 ± 0.01. Also, the zeta potential of prepared micelles was about -0.41 ± 0.02 mV. Otherwise, cytotoxicity of PECE micelles was evaluated by cell viability assay using L929 cells, and in vitro hemolytic test was also performed. In vivo acute toxicity evaluation and histopathological study of PECE micelles were conducted in BALB/c mice by intravenous administration. Furthermore, serum chemistry profile and complete blood count test were performed. In acute toxicity test, the mice were observed continuously for 7 days. For histopathological study, samples including heart, liver, spleen, lung, and kidneys were histochemical prepared and stained with hematoxylin-eosin (H&E). No mortality or significant signs of acute toxicity was observed during the whole observation period, and there is no significant lesion to be shown in histopathological study of major organs. The maximal tolerance dose of PECE micelles (100 mg/mL) by intravenous administration was calculated to be higher than 10 g/kg body weight (b.w.). The results indicated that the obtained PECE micelles was non-toxic after intravenous administration, and could be a safe candidate for hydrophobic drug delivery system.

  9. Hinge assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vandergriff, D.H.

    1999-08-31

    A hinge assembly is disclosed having a first leaf, a second leaf and linking member. The first leaf has a contact surface. The second leaf has a first contact surface and a second contact surface. The linking member pivotally connects to the first leaf and to the second leaf. The hinge assembly is capable of moving from a closed position to an open position. In the closed position, the contact surface of the first leaf merges with the first contact surface of the second leaf. In the open position, the contact surface of the first leaf merges with the second contact surface of the second leaf. The hinge assembly can include a seal on the contact surface of the first leaf. 8 figs.

  10. Hinge assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vandergriff, David Houston

    1999-01-01

    A hinge assembly having a first leaf, a second leaf and linking member. The first leaf has a contact surface. The second leaf has a first contact surface and a second contact surface. The linking member pivotally connects to the first leaf and to the second leaf. The hinge assembly is capable of moving from a closed position to an open position. In the closed position, the contact surface of the first leaf merges with the first contact surface of the second leaf. In the open position, the contact surface of the first leaf merges with the second contact surface of the second leaf. The hinge assembly can include a seal on the contact surface of the first leaf.

  11. Robotically Assembled Aerospace Structures: Digital Material Assembly using a Gantry-Type Assembler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Greenfield; Copplestone, Grace; O'Connor, Molly; Hu, Steven; Nowak, Sebastian; Cheung, Kenneth; Jenett, Benjamin; Cellucci, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    This paper evaluates the development of automated assembly techniques for discrete lattice structures using a multi-axis gantry type CNC machine. These lattices are made of discrete components called digital materials. We present the development of a specialized end effector that works in conjunction with the CNC machine to assemble these lattices. With this configuration we are able to place voxels at a rate of 1.5 per minute. The scalability of digital material structures due to the incremental modular assembly is one of its key traits and an important metric of interest. We investigate the build times of a 5x5 beam structure on the scale of 1 meter (325 parts), 10 meters (3,250 parts), and 30 meters (9,750 parts). Utilizing the current configuration with a single end effector, performing serial assembly with a globally fixed feed station at the edge of the build volume, the build time increases according to a scaling law of n4, where n is the build scale. Build times can be reduced significantly by integrating feed systems into the gantry itself, resulting in a scaling law of n3. A completely serial assembly process will encounter time limitations as build scale increases. Automated assembly for digital materials can assemble high performance structures from discrete parts, and techniques such as built in feed systems, parallelization, and optimization of the fastening process will yield much higher throughput.

  12. Sabot assembly

    DOEpatents

    Bzorgi, Fariborz

    2016-11-08

    A sabot assembly includes a projectile and a housing dimensioned and configured for receiving the projectile. An air pressure cavity having a cavity diameter is disposed between a front end and a rear end of the housing. Air intake nozzles are in fluid communication with the air pressure cavity and each has a nozzle diameter less than the cavity diameter. In operation, air flows through the plurality of air intake nozzles and into the air pressure cavity upon firing of the projectile from a gun barrel to pressurize the air pressure cavity for assisting in separation of the housing from the projectile upon the sabot assembly exiting the gun barrel.

  13. Latch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Frederickson, J.R.; Harper, W.H.; Perez, R.

    1984-08-17

    A latch assembly for releasably securing an article in the form of a canister within a container housing. The assembly includes a cam pivotally mounted on the housing wall and biased into the housing interior. The cam is urged into a disabled position by the canister as it enters the housing and a latch release plate maintains the cam disabled when the canister is properly seated in the housing. Upon displacement of the release plate, the cam snaps into latching engagement against the canister for securing the same within the housing. 2 figs.

  14. Latch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Frederickson, James R.; Harper, William H.; Perez, Raymond

    1986-01-01

    A latch assembly for releasably securing an article in the form of a canister within a container housing. The assembly includes a cam pivotally mounted on the housing wall and biased into the housing interior. The cam is urged into a disabled position by the canister as it enters the housing and a latch release plate maintains the cam disabled when the canister is properly seated in the housing. Upon displacement of the release plate, the cam snaps into latching engagement against the canister for securing the same within the housing.

  15. Assembly Test Article (ATA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricks, Glen A.

    1988-01-01

    The assembly test article (ATA) consisted of two live loaded redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM) segments which were assembled and disassembled to simulate the actual flight segment stacking process. The test assembly joint was flight RSRM design, which included the J-joint insulation design and metal capture feature. The ATA test was performed mid-November through 24 December 1987, at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida. The purpose of the test was: certification that vertical RSRM segment mating and separation could be accomplished without any damage; verification and modification of the procedures in the segment stacking/destacking documents; and certification of various GSE to be used for flight assembly and inspection. The RSRM vertical segment assembly/disassembly is possible without any damage to the insulation, metal parts, or seals. The insulation J-joint contact area was very close to the predicted values. Numerous deviations and changes to the planning documents were made to ensure the flight segments are effectively and correctly stacked. Various GSE were also certified for use on flight segments, and are discussed in detail.

  16. The Emergence of Modularity in Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Dirk M.; Jeng, Alice; Deem, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss modularity and hierarchy in biological systems. We review examples from protein structure, genetics, and biological networks of modular partitioning of the geometry of biological space. We review theories to explain modular organization of biology, with a focus on explaining how biology may spontaneously organize to a structured form. That is, we seek to explain how biology nucleated from among the many possibilities in chemistry. The emergence of modular organization of biological structure will be described as a symmetry-breaking phase transition, with modularity as the order parameter. Experimental support for this description will be reviewed. Examples will be presented from pathogen structure, metabolic networks, gene networks, and protein-protein interaction networks. Additional examples will be presented from ecological food networks, developmental pathways, physiology, and social networks. There once were two watchmakers, named Hora and Tempus, who manufactured very fine watches. Both of them were highly regarded, and the phones in their workshops rang frequently — new customers were constantly calling them. However, Hora prospered, while Tempus became poorer and poorer and finally lost his shop. What was the reason? The watches the men made consisted of about 1,000 parts each. Tempus had so constructed his that if he had one partly assembled and had to put it down — to answer the phone say— it immediately fell to pieces and had to be reassembled from the elements. The better the customers liked his watches, the more they phoned him, the more difficult it became for him to find enough uninterrupted time to finish a watch. The watches that Hora made were no less complex than those of Tempus. But he had designed them so that he could put together subassemblies of about ten elements each. Ten of these subassemblies, again, could be put together into a larger subassembly; and a system of ten of the latter sub-assemblies

  17. The Archimedes 2 mechanical assembly planning system

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, S.G.; Wilson, R.H.; Jones, R.E.; Calton, T.L.; Ames, A.L.

    1996-03-01

    We describe the implementation and performance of Archimedes 2, an integrated mechanical assembly planning system. Archimedes 2 includes two planners, two assembly sequence animation facilities, and an associated robotic workcell. Both planners use full 3 dimensional data. A rudimentary translator from high level assembly plans to control code for the robotic workcell has also been implemented. We can translate data from a commercial CAD system into input data for the system, which has allowed us to plan assembly sequences for many industrial assemblies. Archimedes 2 has been used to plan sequences for assemblies consisting of 5 to 109 parts. We have also successfully taken a CAD model of an assembly, produced an optimized assembly sequence for it, and translated the plan into robot code, which successfully assembles the device specified in the model.

  18. Furnace assembly

    DOEpatents

    Panayotou, Nicholas F.; Green, Donald R.; Price, Larry S.

    1985-01-01

    A method of and apparatus for heating test specimens to desired elevated temperatures for irradiation by a high energy neutron source. A furnace assembly is provided for heating two separate groups of specimens to substantially different, elevated, isothermal temperatures in a high vacuum environment while positioning the two specimen groups symmetrically at equivalent neutron irradiating positions.

  19. Furnace assembly

    DOEpatents

    Panayotou, N.F.; Green, D.R.; Price, L.S.

    A method of and apparatus for heating test specimens to desired elevated temperatures for irradiation by a high energy neutron source. A furnace assembly is provided for heating two separate groups of specimens to substantially different, elevated, isothermal temperatures in a high vacuum environment while positioning the two specimen groups symmetrically at equivalent neutron irradiating positions.

  20. Simple one step synthesis of nonionic dithiol surfactants and their self-assembling with silver nanoparticles: Characterization, surface properties, biological activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd-Elaal, Ali A.; Tawfik, Salah M.; Shaban, Samy M.

    2015-07-01

    Simple esterification of 2-mercaptoacetic acid and polyethylene glycol with different molecular weights was done to form the desired nonionic dithiol surfactants. The chemical structures of synthesized thiol surfactants were confirmed using FT-IR and 1H NMR spectra. The surface activity of the synthesized surfactants was determined by measurement of the surface tension at different temperatures. The surface activity measurements showed their high tendency towards adsorption and micellization. The thermodynamic parameters of micellization (ΔGmic, ΔHmic and ΔSmic) and adsorption (ΔGads, ΔGads and ΔSads) showed their tendency toward adsorption at the interfaces and also micellization in the bulk of their solutions. The nanostructure of the synthesized nonionic dithiol surfactants with silver nanoparticles was prepared and investigated using UV and TEM techniques. Screening tests of the synthesized dithiol surfactants and their nanostructure with silver nanoparticles, against gram positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis and Microccus luteus), gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Bordatella pertussis) and fungi (Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans) showed that they are highly active biocides. The presence of silver nanoparticles enhancement the biological activities of the individual synthesized nonionic dithiol surfactants.

  1. Planning Assembly Of Large Truss Structures In Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Mello, Luiz S. Homem; Desai, Rajiv S.

    1992-01-01

    Report dicusses developmental algorithm used in systematic planning of sequences of operations in which large truss structures assembled in outer space. Assembly sequence represented by directed graph called "assembly graph", in which each arc represents joining of two parts or subassemblies. Algorithm generates assembly graph, working backward from state of complete assembly to initial state, in which all parts disassembled. Working backward more efficient than working forward because it avoids intermediate dead ends.

  2. Sensor assembly

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Thomas E.; Nelson, Drew V.

    2004-04-13

    A ribbon-like sensor assembly is described wherein a length of an optical fiber embedded within a similar lengths of a prepreg tow. The fiber is ""sandwiched"" by two layers of the prepreg tow which are merged to form a single consolidated ribbon. The consolidated ribbon achieving a generally uniform distribution of composite filaments near the embedded fiber such that excess resin does not ""pool"" around the periphery of the embedded fiber.

  3. Dump assembly

    DOEpatents

    Goldmann, Louis H.

    1986-01-01

    A dump assembly having a fixed conduit and a rotatable conduit provided with overlapping plates, respectively, at their adjacent ends. The plates are formed with openings, respectively, normally offset from each other to block flow. The other end of the rotatable conduit is provided with means for securing the open end of a filled container thereto. Rotation of the rotatable conduit raises and inverts the container to empty the contents while concurrently aligning the conduit openings to permit flow of material therethrough.

  4. Seeing Circuits Assemble

    PubMed Central

    Lichtman, Jeff W.; Smith, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Developmental neurobiology has been greatly invigorated by a recent string of breakthroughs in molecular biology and optical physics that permit direct in vivo observation of neural circuit assembly. The imaging done thus far suggests that as brains are built, a significant amount of unbuilding is also occurring. We offer the view that this tumult is the result of the intersecting behaviors of the many single-celled creatures (i.e., neurons, glia, and progenitors) that inhabit brains. New tools will certainly be needed if we wish to monitor the myriad cooperative and competitive interactions at play in the cellular society that builds brains. PMID:18995818

  5. Design of polymer motifs for nucleic acid recognition and assembly stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhun

    This dissertation describes the synthesis and assembly of bio-functional polymers and the applications of these polymers to drug encapsulation, delivery, and multivalent biomimetic macromolecular recognition between synthetic polymer and nucleic acids. The main content is divided into three parts: (1) polyacidic domains as strongly stabilizing design elements for aqueous phase polyacrylate diblock assembly; (2) small molecule/polymer recognition triggered macromolecular assembly and drug encapsulation; (3) trizaine derivatized polymer as a novel class of "bifacial polymer nucleic acid" (bPoNA) and applications of bPoNA to nanoparticle loading of DNA/RNA, silencing delivery as well as control of aptamer function. Through the studies in part (1) and part (2), it was demonstrated that well-designed polymer motifs are not only able to enhance assemblies driven by non-specific hydrophobic effect, but are also able to direct assemblies based on specific recognitions. In part (3) of this dissertation, this concept was further extended by the design of polyacrylate polymers that are capable of discrete and robust hybridization with nucleic acids. This surprising finding demonstrated both fundamental and practical applications. Overall, these studies provided insights into the rational design elements for improving the bio-functions of synthetic polymers, and significantly expanded the scope of biological applications in which polymers synthesized via controlled radical polymerization may play a role.

  6. BIOLOGICAL WARFARE

    PubMed Central

    Beeston, John

    1953-01-01

    The use of biological agents as controlled weapons of war is practical although uncertain. Three types of agents are feasible, including pathogenic organisms and biological pests, toxins, and synthetic hormones regulating plant growth. These agents may be chosen for selective effects varying from prolonged incipient illness to death of plants, man and domestic animals. For specific preventive and control measures required to combat these situations, there must be careful and detailed planning. The nucleus of such a program is available within the existing framework of public health activities. Additional research and expansion of established activities in time of attack are necessary parts of biological warfare defense. PMID:13059641

  7. Shingle assembly

    DOEpatents

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

    2007-02-20

    A barrier, such as a PV module, is secured to a base by a support to create a shingle assembly with a venting region defined between the barrier and base for temperature regulation. The first edge of one base may be interengageable with the second edge of an adjacent base to be capable of resisting first and second disengaging forces oriented perpendicular to the edges and along planes oriented parallel to and perpendicular to the base. A deflector may be used to help reduce wind uplift forces.

  8. Dump assembly

    DOEpatents

    Goldmann, L.H.

    1984-12-06

    This is a claim for a dump assembly having a fixed conduit and a rotatable conduit provided with overlapping plates, respectively, at their adjacent ends. The plates are formed with openings, respectively, normally offset from each other to block flow. The other end of the rotatable conduit is provided with means for securing the open end of a filled container thereto. Rotation of the rotatable conduit raises and inverts the container to empty the contents while concurrently aligning the conduit openings to permit flow of material therethrough. 4 figs.

  9. Pushrod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Potter, Jerry D.

    1987-01-01

    A pushrod assembly including a carriage mounted on a shaft for movement therealong and carrying a pushrod engageable with a load to be moved. A magnet is mounted on a supporting bracket for movement along such shaft. Means are provided for adjustably spacing said magnet away from said carriage to obtain a selected magnetic attractive or coupling force therebetween. Movement of the supporting bracket and the magnet carried thereby pulls the carriage along with it until the selected magnetic force is exceeded by a resistance load acting on the carriage.

  10. Pushrod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Potter, J.D.

    1984-03-30

    A pushrod assembly including a carriage mounted on a shaft for movement therealong and carrying a pushrod engageable with a load to be moved is described. A magnet is mounted on a supporting bracket for movement along such shaft. Means are provided for adjustably spacing magnet away from the carriage to obtain a selected magnetic attractive or coupling force therebetween. Movement of the supporting bracket and the magnet carried thereby pulls the carriage along with it until the selected magnetic force is exceeded by a resistance load acting on the carriage.

  11. Ameliorated de novo transcriptome assembly using Illumina paired end sequence data with Trinity Assembler

    PubMed Central

    Bankar, Kiran Gopinath; Todur, Vivek Nagaraj; Shukla, Rohit Nandan; Vasudevan, Madavan

    2015-01-01

    Advent of Next Generation Sequencing has led to possibilities of de novo transcriptome assembly of organisms without availability of complete genome sequence. Among various sequencing platforms available, Illumina is the most widely used platform based on data quality, quantity and cost. Various de novo transcriptome assemblers are also available today for construction of de novo transcriptome. In this study, we aimed at obtaining an ameliorated de novo transcriptome assembly with sequence reads obtained from Illumina platform and assembled using Trinity Assembler. We found that, primary transcriptome assembly obtained as a result of Trinity can be ameliorated on the basis of transcript length, coverage, and depth and protein homology. Our approach to ameliorate is reproducible and could enhance the sensitivity and specificity of the assembled transcriptome which could be critical for validation of the assembled transcripts and for planning various downstream biological assays. PMID:26484285

  12. AutoAssemblyD: a graphical user interface system for several genome assemblers

    PubMed Central

    Veras, Adonney Allan de Oliveira; de Sá, Pablo Henrique Caracciolo Gomes; Azevedo, Vasco; Silva, Artur; Ramos, Rommel Thiago Jucá

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies have increased the amount of biological data generated. Thus, bioinformatics has become important because new methods and algorithms are necessary to manipulate and process such data. However, certain challenges have emerged, such as genome assembly using short reads and high-throughput platforms. In this context, several algorithms have been developed, such as Velvet, Abyss, Euler-SR, Mira, Edna, Maq, SHRiMP, Newbler, ALLPATHS, Bowtie and BWA. However, most such assemblers do not have a graphical interface, which makes their use difficult for users without computing experience given the complexity of the assembler syntax. Thus, to make the operation of such assemblers accessible to users without a computing background, we developed AutoAssemblyD, which is a graphical tool for genome assembly submission and remote management by multiple assemblers through XML templates. Availability AssemblyD is freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/autoassemblyd. It requires Sun jdk 6 or higher. PMID:24143057

  13. Self-assembled polyhydroxy fatty acids vesicles: a mechanism for plant cutin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Heredia-Guerrero, José A; Benítez, José J; Heredia, Antonio

    2008-03-01

    Despite its biological importance, the mechanism of formation of cutin, the polymeric matrix of plant cuticles, has not yet been fully clarified. Here, for the first time, we show the participation in the process of lipid vesicles formed by the self-assembly of endogenous polyhydroxy fatty acids. The accumulation and fusion of these vesicles (cutinsomes) at the outer part of epidermal cell wall is proposed as the mechanism for early cuticle formation.

  14. Self-Assembly of Biomolecular Soft Matter

    PubMed Central

    Zha, R. Helen; Palmer, Liam C.; Cui, Honggang; Bitton, Ronit

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembly programmed by molecular structure and guided dynamically by energy dissipation is a ubiquitous phenomenon in biological systems that build functional structures from the nanoscale to macroscopic dimensions. This paper describes examples of one-dimensional self-assembly of peptide amphiphiles and the consequent biological functions that emerge in these systems. We also discuss here hierarchical self-assembly of supramolecular peptide nanostructures and polysaccharides, and some new results are reported on supramolecular crystals formed by highly charged peptide amphiphiles. Reflecting on presentations at this Faraday Discussion, the paper ends with a discussion of some of the future opportunities and challenges of the field. PMID:24611266

  15. Metagenomic Assembly: Overview, Challenges and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ghurye, Jay S.; Cepeda-Espinoza, Victoria; Pop, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    Advances in sequencing technologies have led to the increased use of high throughput sequencing in characterizing the microbial communities associated with our bodies and our environment. Critical to the analysis of the resulting data are sequence assembly algorithms able to reconstruct genes and organisms from complex mixtures. Metagenomic assembly involves new computational challenges due to the specific characteristics of the metagenomic data. In this survey, we focus on major algorithmic approaches for genome and metagenome assembly, and discuss the new challenges and opportunities afforded by this new field. We also review several applications of metagenome assembly in addressing interesting biological problems. PMID:27698619

  16. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Presents information on the teaching of nutrition (including new information relating to many current O-level syllabi) and part 16 of a reading list for A- and S-level biology. Also includes a note on using earthworms as a source of material for teaching meiosis. (JN)

  17. Assembly auxiliary system for narrow cabins of spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Li, Shiqi; Wang, Junfeng

    2015-09-01

    Due to the narrow space and complex structure of spacecraft cabin, the existing asssembly systems can not well suit for the assembly process of cabin products. This paper aims to introduce an assembly auxiliary system for cabin products. A hierarchical-classification method is proposed to re-adjust the initial assembly relationship of cabin into a new hierarchical structure for efficient assembly planning. An improved ant colony algorithm based on three assembly principles is established for searching a optimizational assembly sequence of cabin parts. A mixed reality assembly environment is constructed with enhanced information to promote interaction efficiency of assembly training and guidance. Based on the machine vision technology, the inspection of left redundant objects and measurement of parts distance in inner cabin are efficiently performed. The proposed system has been applied to the assembly work of a spacecraft cabin with 107 parts, which includes cabin assembly planning, assembly training and assembly quality inspection. The application result indicates that the proposed system can be an effective assistant tool to cabin assembly works and provide an intuitive and real assembly experience for workers. This paper presents an assembly auxiliary system for spacecraft cabin products, which can provide technical support to the spacecraft cabin assembly industry.

  18. Biologically Self-Assembled Memristive Circuit Elements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    and sonication for 5 min ( Branson 1510). DNA Binding to TiO2 Nanoparticles DNA binding to TiO2 particles was determined by varying the...X. Li, D.A.A. Ohlberg, W. Wu, D.R. Stewart, and R.S. Williams . “A hybrid nanomemristor/transistor logic circuit capable of self-programming,” PNAS

  19. A Unifying Mathematical Framework for Genetic Robustness, Environmental Robustness, Network Robustness and their Trade-off on Phenotype Robustness in Biological Networks Part I: Gene Regulatory Networks in Systems and Evolutionary Biology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Lin, Ying-Po

    2013-01-01

    Robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are ubiquitous systematic properties observed in biological systems at different levels. The underlying principles for robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are universal to both complex biological systems and sophisticated engineering systems. In many biological networks, network robustness should be enough to confer intrinsic robustness in order to tolerate intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic robustness for buffering genetic variations, and environmental robustness for resisting environmental disturbances. With this, the phenotypic stability of biological network can be maintained, thus guaranteeing phenotype robustness. This paper presents a survey on biological systems and then develops a unifying mathematical framework for investigating the principles of both robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation in systems and evolutionary biology. Further, from the unifying mathematical framework, it was discovered that the phenotype robustness criterion for biological networks at different levels relies upon intrinsic robustness + genetic robustness + environmental robustness ≦ network robustness. When this is true, the phenotype robustness can be maintained in spite of intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic variations, and environmental disturbances. Therefore, the trade-offs between intrinsic robustness, genetic robustness, environmental robustness, and network robustness in systems and evolutionary biology can also be investigated through their corresponding phenotype robustness criterion from the systematic point of view.

  20. A Unifying Mathematical Framework for Genetic Robustness, Environmental Robustness, Network Robustness and their Trade-offs on Phenotype Robustness in Biological Networks. Part III: Synthetic Gene Networks in Synthetic Biology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Lin, Ying-Po

    2013-01-01

    Robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are ubiquitous systematic properties that are observed in biological systems at many different levels. The underlying principles for robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are universal to both complex biological systems and sophisticated engineering systems. In many biological networks, network robustness should be large enough to confer: intrinsic robustness for tolerating intrinsic parameter fluctuations; genetic robustness for buffering genetic variations; and environmental robustness for resisting environmental disturbances. Network robustness is needed so phenotype stability of biological network can be maintained, guaranteeing phenotype robustness. Synthetic biology is foreseen to have important applications in biotechnology and medicine; it is expected to contribute significantly to a better understanding of functioning of complex biological systems. This paper presents a unifying mathematical framework for investigating the principles of both robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation for synthetic gene networks in synthetic biology. Further, from the unifying mathematical framework, we found that the phenotype robustness criterion for synthetic gene networks is the following: if intrinsic robustness + genetic robustness + environmental robustness ≦ network robustness, then the phenotype robustness can be maintained in spite of intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic variations, and environmental disturbances. Therefore, the trade-offs between intrinsic robustness, genetic robustness, environmental robustness, and network robustness in synthetic biology can also be investigated through corresponding phenotype robustness criteria from the systematic point of view. Finally, a robust synthetic design that involves network evolution algorithms with desired behavior under intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic variations, and environmental

  1. Bottom-up design of biomimetic assemblies.

    PubMed

    Tu, Raymond S; Tirrell, Matthew

    2004-09-22

    Nature has evolved the ability to assemble a variety of molecules into functional architectures that can specifically bind cellular ligands. Mimicking this strategy requires the design of a set of multifaceted molecules, where elements that direct assembly were conjugated to biologically specific components. The development of functional molecular building-blocks that assemble to form compartments for therapeutics addresses the desire to have controllable morphologies that interact with biological interfaces at nanometer length scales. The practical application of such 'bottom-up' assemblies requires the ability to predict the type of aggregated structure and to synthesize molecules in a highly controlled fashion. This bottom-up approach results in a molecular platform that mimics biological systems with potential for encapsulating and delivering drug molecules.

  2. RETORT ASSEMBLY

    DOEpatents

    Loomis, C.C.; Ash, W.J.

    1957-11-26

    An improved retort assembly useful in the thermal reduction of volatilizable metals such as magnesium and calcium is described. In this process a high vacuum is maintained in the retort, however the retort must be heated to very high temperatures while at the same time the unloading end must bo cooled to condense the metal vapors, therefore the retention of the vacuum is frequently difficult due to the thermal stresses involved. This apparatus provides an extended condenser sleeve enclosed by the retort cover which forms the vacuum seal. Therefore, the seal is cooled by the fluid in the condenser sleeve and the extreme thermal stresses found in previous designs together with the deterioration of the sealing gasket caused by the high temperatures are avoided.

  3. Swivel assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Pixton, David S.; Briscoe, Michael; Bradford, Kline; Rawle, Michael; Bartholomew, David B.; McPherson, James

    2007-03-20

    A swivel assembly for a downhole tool string comprises a first and second coaxial housing cooperatively arranged. The first housing comprises a first transmission element in communication with surface equipment. The second housing comprises a second transmission element in communication with the first transmission element. The second housing further comprises a third transmission element adapted for communication with a network integrated into the downhole tool string. The second housing may be rotational and adapted to transmit a signal between the downhole network and the first housing. Electronic circuitry is in communication with at least one of the transmission elements. The electronic circuitry may be externally mounted to the first or second housing. Further, the electronic circuitry may be internally mounted in the second housing. The electronic circuitry may be disposed in a recess in either first or second housing of the swivel.

  4. Thermocouple assembly

    DOEpatents

    Thermos, Anthony Constantine; Rahal, Fadi Elias

    2002-01-01

    A thermocouple assembly includes a thermocouple; a plurality of lead wires extending from the thermocouple; an insulating jacket extending along and enclosing the plurality of leads; and at least one internally sealed area within the insulating jacket to prevent fluid leakage along and within the insulating jacket. The invention also provides a method of preventing leakage of a fluid along and through an insulating jacket of a thermocouple including the steps of a) attaching a plurality of lead wires to a thermocouple; b) adding a heat sensitive pseudo-wire to extend along the plurality of lead wires; c) enclosing the lead wires and pseudo-wire inside an insulating jacket; d) locally heating axially spaced portions of the insulating jacket to a temperature which melts the pseudo-wire and fuses it with an interior surface of the jacket.

  5. Chemical synthetic biology: a mini-review

    PubMed Central

    Chiarabelli, Cristiano; Stano, Pasquale; Luisi, Pier Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Chemical synthetic biology (CSB) is a branch of synthetic biology (SB) oriented toward the synthesis of chemical structures alternative to those present in nature. Whereas SB combines biology and engineering with the aim of synthesizing biological structures or life forms that do not exist in nature – often based on genome manipulation, CSB uses and assembles biological parts, synthetic or not, to create new and alternative structures. A short epistemological note will introduce the theoretical concepts related to these fields, whereas the text will be largely devoted to introduce and comment two main projects of CSB, carried out in our laboratory in the recent years. The “Never Born Biopolymers” project deals with the construction and the screening of RNA and peptide sequences that are not present in nature, whereas the “Minimal Cell” project focuses on the construction of semi-synthetic compartments (usually liposomes) containing the minimal and sufficient number of components to perform the basic function of a biological cell. These two topics are extremely important for both the general understanding of biology in terms of function, organization, and development, and for applied biotechnology. PMID:24065964

  6. Adaptive Accommodation Control Method for Complex Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sungchul; Kim, Munsang; Park, Shinsuk

    Robotic systems have been used to automate assembly tasks in manufacturing and in teleoperation. Conventional robotic systems, however, have been ineffective in controlling contact force in multiple contact states of complex assemblythat involves interactions between complex-shaped parts. Unlike robots, humans excel at complex assembly tasks by utilizing their intrinsic impedance, forces and torque sensation, and tactile contact clues. By examining the human behavior in assembling complex parts, this study proposes a novel geometry-independent control method for robotic assembly using adaptive accommodation (or damping) algorithm. Two important conditions for complex assembly, target approachability and bounded contact force, can be met by the proposed control scheme. It generates target approachable motion that leads the object to move closer to a desired target position, while contact force is kept under a predetermined value. Experimental results from complex assembly tests have confirmed the feasibility and applicability of the proposed method.

  7. Constraint-based interactive assembly planning

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.E.; Wilson, R.H.; Calton, T.L.

    1997-03-01

    The constraints on assembly plans vary depending on the product, assembly facility, assembly volume, and many other factors. This paper describes the principles and implementation of a framework that supports a wide variety of user-specified constraints for interactive assembly planning. Constraints from many sources can be expressed on a sequencing level, specifying orders and conditions on part mating operations in a number of ways. All constraints are implemented as filters that either accept or reject assembly operations proposed by the planner. For efficiency, some constraints are supplemented with special-purpose modifications to the planner`s algorithms. Replanning is fast enough to enable a natural plan-view-constrain-replan cycle that aids in constraint discovery and documentation. We describe an implementation of the framework in a computer-aided assembly planning system and experiments applying the system to several complex assemblies. 12 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Chemical Reactions Directed Peptide Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Rasale, Dnyaneshwar B.; Das, Apurba K.

    2015-01-01

    Fabrication of self-assembled nanostructures is one of the important aspects in nanoscience and nanotechnology. The study of self-assembled soft materials remains an area of interest due to their potential applications in biomedicine. The versatile properties of soft materials can be tuned using a bottom up approach of small molecules. Peptide based self-assembly has significant impact in biology because of its unique features such as biocompatibility, straight peptide chain and the presence of different side chain functionality. These unique features explore peptides in various self-assembly process. In this review, we briefly introduce chemical reaction-mediated peptide self-assembly. Herein, we have emphasised enzymes, native chemical ligation and photochemical reactions in the exploration of peptide self-assembly. PMID:25984603

  9. Chemical reactions directed Peptide self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Rasale, Dnyaneshwar B; Das, Apurba K

    2015-05-13

    Fabrication of self-assembled nanostructures is one of the important aspects in nanoscience and nanotechnology. The study of self-assembled soft materials remains an area of interest due to their potential applications in biomedicine. The versatile properties of soft materials can be tuned using a bottom up approach of small molecules. Peptide based self-assembly has significant impact in biology because of its unique features such as biocompatibility, straight peptide chain and the presence of different side chain functionality. These unique features explore peptides in various self-assembly process. In this review, we briefly introduce chemical reaction-mediated peptide self-assembly. Herein, we have emphasised enzymes, native chemical ligation and photochemical reactions in the exploration of peptide self-assembly.

  10. Workload analyse of assembling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghenghea, L. D.

    2015-11-01

    The workload is the most important indicator for managers responsible of industrial technological processes no matter if these are automated, mechanized or simply manual in each case, machines or workers will be in the focus of workload measurements. The paper deals with workload analyses made to a most part manual assembling technology for roller bearings assembling process, executed in a big company, with integrated bearings manufacturing processes. In this analyses the delay sample technique have been used to identify and divide all bearing assemblers activities, to get information about time parts from 480 minutes day work time that workers allow to each activity. The developed study shows some ways to increase the process productivity without supplementary investments and also indicated the process automation could be the solution to gain maximum productivity.

  11. The A, C, G, and T of Genome Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Wajid, Bilal; Sohail, Muhammad U.; Ekti, Ali R.; Serpedin, Erchin

    2016-01-01

    Genome assembly in its two decades of history has produced significant research, in terms of both biotechnology and computational biology. This contribution delineates sequencing platforms and their characteristics, examines key steps involved in filtering and processing raw data, explains assembly frameworks, and discusses quality statistics for the assessment of the assembled sequence. Furthermore, the paper explores recent Ubuntu-based software environments oriented towards genome assembly as well as some avenues for future research. PMID:27247941

  12. j5 DNA assembly design automation software.

    PubMed

    Hillson, Nathan J; Rosengarten, Rafael D; Keasling, Jay D

    2012-01-20

    Recent advances in Synthetic Biology have yielded standardized and automatable DNA assembly protocols that enable a broad range of biotechnological research and development. Unfortunately, the experimental design required for modern scar-less multipart DNA assembly methods is frequently laborious, time-consuming, and error-prone. Here, we report the development and deployment of a web-based software tool, j5, which automates the design of scar-less multipart DNA assembly protocols including SLIC, Gibson, CPEC, and Golden Gate. The key innovations of the j5 design process include cost optimization, leveraging DNA synthesis when cost-effective to do so, the enforcement of design specification rules, hierarchical assembly strategies to mitigate likely assembly errors, and the instruction of manual or automated construction of scar-less combinatorial DNA libraries. Using a GFP expression testbed, we demonstrate that j5 designs can be executed with the SLIC, Gibson, or CPEC assembly methods, used to build combinatorial libraries with the Golden Gate assembly method, and applied to the preparation of linear gene deletion cassettes for E. coli. The DNA assembly design algorithms reported here are generally applicable to broad classes of DNA construction methodologies and could be implemented to supplement other DNA assembly design tools. Taken together, these innovations save researchers time and effort, reduce the frequency of user design errors and off-target assembly products, decrease research costs, and enable scar-less multipart and combinatorial DNA construction at scales unfeasible without computer-aided design.

  13. Dynamics of assembly production flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezaki, Takahiro; Yanagisawa, Daichi; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2015-06-01

    Despite recent developments in management theory, maintaining a manufacturing schedule remains difficult because of production delays and fluctuations in demand and supply of materials. The response of manufacturing systems to such disruptions to dynamic behavior has been rarely studied. To capture these responses, we investigate a process that models the assembly of parts into end products. The complete assembly process is represented by a directed tree, where the smallest parts are injected at leaves and the end products are removed at the root. A discrete assembly process, represented by a node on the network, integrates parts, which are then sent to the next downstream node as a single part. The model exhibits some intriguing phenomena, including overstock cascade, phase transition in terms of demand and supply fluctuations, nonmonotonic distribution of stockout in the network, and the formation of a stockout path and stockout chains. Surprisingly, these rich phenomena result from only the nature of distributed assembly processes. From a physical perspective, these phenomena provide insight into delay dynamics and inventory distributions in large-scale manufacturing systems.

  14. Electrical Connector Assembly

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-05-01

    hereinafter 5 appear, a feature of the invention is the provision of an 6 electrical connector assembly including a female connector 7 assembly comprising...urging of the male connector assembly 3 into the female connector assembly, a leading edge of ehe 4 retention ring engages the claw fingers forcing...assembly barrel portion to pass through the female connector 3 assembly annular wall central opening, and permitting entry of 9 the pin into the sleeve

  15. Bioinspired assembly of small molecules in cell milieu.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huaimin; Feng, Zhaoqianqi; Xu, Bing

    2017-03-30

    Self-assembly, the autonomous organization of components to form patterns or structures, is a prevalent process in nature at all scales. Particularly, biological systems offer remarkable examples of diverse structures (as well as building blocks) and processes resulting from self-assembly. The exploration of bioinspired assemblies not only allows for mimicking the structures of living systems, but it also leads to functions for applications in different fields that benefit humans. In the last several decades, efforts on understanding and controlling self-assembly of small molecules have produced a large library of candidates for developing the biomedical applications of assemblies of small molecules. Moreover, recent findings in biology have provided new insights on the assemblies of small molecules to modulate essential cellular processes (such as apoptosis). These observations indicate that the self-assembly of small molecules, as multifaceted entities and processes to interact with multiple proteins, can have profound biological impacts on cells. In this review, we illustrate that the generation of assemblies of small molecules in cell milieu with their interactions with multiple cellular proteins for regulating cellular processes can result in primary phenotypes, thus providing a fundamentally new molecular approach for controlling cell behavior. By discussing the correlation between molecular assemblies in nature and the assemblies of small molecules in cell milieu, illustrating the functions of the assemblies of small molecules, and summarizing some guiding principles, we hope this review will stimulate more molecular scientists to explore the bioinspired self-assembly of small molecules in cell milieu.

  16. Backward assembly planning with DFA analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sukhan (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An assembly planning system that operates based on a recursive decomposition of assembly into subassemblies, and analyzes assembly cost in terms of stability, directionality, and manipulability to guide the generation of preferred assembly plans is presented. The planning in this system incorporates the special processes, such as cleaning, testing, labeling, etc. that must occur during the assembly, and handles nonreversible as well as reversible assembly tasks through backward assembly planning. In order to increase the planning efficiency, the system avoids the analysis of decompositions that do not correspond to feasible assembly tasks. This is achieved by grouping and merging those parts that can not be decomposable at the current stage of backward assembly planning due to the requirement of special processes and the constraint of interconnection feasibility. The invention includes methods of evaluating assembly cost in terms of the number of fixtures (or holding devices) and reorientations required for assembly, through the analysis of stability, directionality, and manipulability. All these factors are used in defining cost and heuristic functions for an AO* search for an optimal plan.

  17. Amphiphiles for DNA Supramolecular Assemblies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-15

    to drug or biomolecule delivery systems. In order to take advantage of forces that hold nucleic acid helices together, (Watson- Crick/Hoogsteen...supramolecular assemblies that highlight the underlying principles are evident in numerous biological (e.g., lipids) and synthetic (e.g., nanofibers ) systems.2...3). Additionally, they form hydrogels and organogels. The supramolecular systems obtained are promising in many aspects and could lead to new types

  18. M13 Bacteriophage-Based Self-Assembly Structures and Their Functional Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jong-Sik; Kim, Won-Geun; Kim, Chuntae; Park, Geun-Tae; Heo, Jeong; Yoo, So Y; Oh, Jin-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Controlling the assembly of basic structural building blocks in a systematic and orderly fashion is an emerging issue in various areas of science and engineering such as physics, chemistry, material science, biological engineering, and electrical engineering. The self-assembly technique, among many other kinds of ordering techniques, has several unique advantages and the M13 bacteriophage can be utilized as part of this technique. The M13 bacteriophage (Phage) can easily be modified genetically and chemically to demonstrate specific functions. This allows for its use as a template to determine the homogeneous distribution and percolated network structures of inorganic nanostructures under ambient conditions. Inexpensive and environmentally friendly synthesis can be achieved by using the M13 bacteriophage as a novel functional building block. Here, we discuss recent advances in the application of M13 bacteriophage self-assembly structures and the future of this technology. PMID:26146494

  19. Reconstitution of a nanomachine driving the assembly of proteins into bacterial outer membranes

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hsin-Hui; Belousoff, Matthew J.; Noinaj, Nicholas; Lu, Jingxiong; Holt, Stephen A.; Tan, Khershing; Selkrig, Joel; Webb, Chaille T.; Buchanan, Susan K.; Martin, Lisandra L.; Lithgow, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    In biological membranes, various protein secretion devices function as nanomachines, and measuring the internal movements of their component parts is a major technological challenge. The translocation assembly module (the TAM) is a nanomachine required for virulence of bacterial pathogens. We have reconstituted a membrane containing the TAM onto a gold surface for characterization by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D) and Magnetic Contrast Neutron Reflectrometry (MCNR). The MCNR studies provided structural resolution down to 1Å, enabling accurate measurement of protein domains projecting from the membrane layer. Here, we show that dynamic movements within the TamA component of the TAM are initiated in the presence of a substrate protein, Ag43, and that these movements recapitulate an initial stage in membrane protein assembly. The reconstituted system provides a powerful new means to study molecular movements in biological membranes, and the technology is widely applicable to studying the dynamics of diverse cellular nanomachines. PMID:25341963

  20. Reconstitution of a nanomachine driving the assembly of proteins into bacterial outer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hsin-Hui; Leyton, Denisse L.; Shiota, Takuya; Belousoff, Matthew J.; Noinaj, Nicholas; Lu, Jingxiong; Holt, Stephen A.; Tan, Khershing; Selkrig, Joel; Webb, Chaille T.; Buchanan, Susan K.; Martin, Lisandra L.; Lithgow, Trevor

    2014-10-01

    In biological membranes, various protein secretion devices function as nanomachines, and measuring the internal movements of their component parts is a major technological challenge. The translocation and assembly module (TAM) is a nanomachine required for virulence of bacterial pathogens. We have reconstituted a membrane containing the TAM onto a gold surface for characterization by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and magnetic contrast neutron reflectrometry (MCNR). The MCNR studies provided structural resolution down to 1 Å, enabling accurate measurement of protein domains projecting from the membrane layer. Here we show that dynamic movements within the TamA component of the TAM are initiated in the presence of a substrate protein, Ag43, and that these movements recapitulate an initial stage in membrane protein assembly. The reconstituted system provides a powerful new means to study molecular movements in biological membranes, and the technology is widely applicable to studying the dynamics of diverse cellular nanomachines.

  1. Crusts: biological

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, Jayne; Elias, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Biological soil crusts, a community of cyanobacteria, lichens, mosses, and fungi, are an essential part of dryland ecosystems. They are critical in the stabilization of soils, protecting them from wind and water erosion. Similarly, these soil surface communities also stabilized soils on early Earth, allowing vascular plants to establish. They contribute nitrogen and carbon to otherwise relatively infertile dryland soils, and have a strong influence on hydrologic cycles. Their presence can also influence vascular plant establishment and nutrition.

  2. Nanoscale assemblies and their biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Doll, Tais A. P. F.; Raman, Senthilkumar; Dey, Raja; Burkhard, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Nanoscale assemblies are a unique class of materials, which can be synthesized from inorganic, polymeric or biological building blocks. The multitude of applications of this class of materials ranges from solar and electrical to uses in food, cosmetics and medicine. In this review, we initially highlight characteristic features of polymeric nanoscale assemblies as well as those built from biological units (lipids, nucleic acids and proteins). We give special consideration to protein nanoassemblies found in nature such as ferritin protein cages, bacterial microcompartments and vaults found in eukaryotic cells and designed protein nanoassemblies, such as peptide nanofibres and peptide nanotubes. Next, we focus on biomedical applications of these nanoscale assemblies, such as cell targeting, drug delivery, bioimaging and vaccine development. In the vaccine development section, we report in more detail the use of virus-like particles and self-assembling polypeptide nanoparticles as new vaccine delivery platforms. PMID:23303217

  3. Proceedings from the National Cancer Institute's Second International Workshop on the Biology, Prevention, and Treatment of Relapse after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Part I. Biology of relapse after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gress, Ronald E; Miller, Jeffrey S; Battiwalla, Minoo; Bishop, Michael R; Giralt, Sergio A; Hardy, Nancy M; Kröger, Nicolaus; Wayne, Alan S; Landau, Dan A; Wu, Catherine J

    2013-11-01

    In the National Cancer Institute's Second Workshop on the Biology, Prevention, and Treatment of Relapse after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, the Scientific/Educational Session on the Biology of Relapse discussed recent advances in understanding some of the host-, disease-, and transplantation-related contributions to relapse, emphasizing concepts with potential therapeutic implications. Relapse after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) represents tumor escape, from the cytotoxic effects of the conditioning regimen and from immunologic control mediated by reconstituted lymphocyte populations. Factors influencing the biology of the therapeutic graft-versus-malignancy (GVM) effect-and relapse-include conditioning regimen effects on lymphocyte populations and homeostasis, immunologic niches, and the tumor microenvironment; reconstitution of lymphocyte populations and establishment of functional immune competence; and genetic heterogeneity within the malignancy defining potential for clonal escape. Recent developments in T cell and natural killer cell homeostasis and reconstitution are reviewed, with implications for prevention and treatment of relapse, as is the application of modern genome sequencing to defining the biologic basis of GVM, clonal escape, and relapse after HSCT.

  4. DNA Assembly in 3D Printed Fluidics

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, William G.; Nielsen, Alec A. K.; Keating, Steven J.; Levy, Taylor J.; Wang, Che-Wei; Rivera, Jaime J.; Mondragón-Palomino, Octavio; Carr, Peter A.; Voigt, Christopher A.; Oxman, Neri; Kong, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The process of connecting genetic parts—DNA assembly—is a foundational technology for synthetic biology. Microfluidics present an attractive solution for minimizing use of costly reagents, enabling multiplexed reactions, and automating protocols by integrating multiple protocol steps. However, microfluidics fabrication and operation can be expensive and requires expertise, limiting access to the technology. With advances in commodity digital fabrication tools, it is now possible to directly print fluidic devices and supporting hardware. 3D printed micro- and millifluidic devices are inexpensive, easy to make and quick to produce. We demonstrate Golden Gate DNA assembly in 3D-printed fluidics with reaction volumes as small as 490 nL, channel widths as fine as 220 microns, and per unit part costs ranging from $0.61 to $5.71. A 3D-printed syringe pump with an accompanying programmable software interface was designed and fabricated to operate the devices. Quick turnaround and inexpensive materials allowed for rapid exploration of device parameters, demonstrating a manufacturing paradigm for designing and fabricating hardware for synthetic biology. PMID:26716448

  5. The PLOS ONE Synthetic Biology Collection: Six Years and Counting

    PubMed Central

    Peccoud, Jean; Isalan, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Since it was launched in 2006, PLOS ONE has published over fifty articles illustrating the many facets of the emerging field of synthetic biology. This article reviews these publications by organizing them into broad categories focused on DNA synthesis and assembly techniques, the development of libraries of biological parts, the use of synthetic biology in protein engineering applications, and the engineering of gene regulatory networks and metabolic pathways. Finally, we review articles that describe enabling technologies such as software and modeling, along with new instrumentation. In order to increase the visibility of this body of work, the papers have been assembled into the PLOS ONE Synthetic Biology Collection (www.ploscollections.org/synbio). Many of the innovative features of the PLOS ONE web site will help make this collection a resource that will support a lively dialogue between readers and authors of PLOS ONE synthetic biology papers. The content of the collection will be updated periodically by including relevant articles as they are published by the journal. Thus, we hope that this collection will continue to meet the publishing needs of the synthetic biology community. PMID:22916228

  6. Archimedes : An experiment in automating mechanical assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Strip, D. ); Maciejewski, A.A. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    Archimedes is a prototype mechanical assembly system which generates and executes robot assembly programs from a CAD model input. The system addresses the unrealized potential for flexibility in robotic mechanical assembly applications by automating the programming task. Input is a solid model of the finished assembly. Using this model. Archimedes deduces geometric assembly constraints and then produces an assembly plan that satisfies the geometric constraints, as well as other constraints such as stability and accessibility. A retargetable plan compiler converts the generic plan into robot and cell specific code, including recognition routines for a vision system. In the prototype system the code is executed in a workcell containing an Adept Two robot, a vision system, and other parts handling equipment. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Latching relay switch assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Duimstra, Frederick A.

    1991-01-01

    A latching relay switch assembly which includes a coil section and a switch or contact section. The coil section includes at least one permanent magnet and at least one electromagnet. The respective sections are, generally, arranged in separate locations or cavities in the assembly. The switch is latched by a permanent magnet assembly and selectively switched by an overriding electromagnetic assembly.

  8. Biology and Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Sheila; Oberg, Kristina; Unnerstad, Gunilla

    1999-01-01

    Researchers studied English and Swedish biology student teachers' perceptions of teaching health as part of biology. As part of the study, the students investigated secondary students' understanding of health. Surveys and interviews were effective in collecting student teachers' views. They indicated that student teachers' perceptions changed over…

  9. Scaffold oriented synthesis. Part 4: design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel 5-substituted indazoles as potent and selective kinase inhibitors employing heterocycle forming and multicomponent reactions.

    PubMed

    Akritopoulou-Zanze, Irini; Wakefield, Brian D; Gasiecki, Alan; Kalvin, Douglas; Johnson, Eric F; Kovar, Peter; Djuric, Stevan W

    2011-03-01

    We report the synthesis and biological evaluation of 5-substituted indazoles as kinase inhibitors. The compounds were synthesized in a parallel synthesis fashion from readily available starting materials employing heterocycle forming and multicomponent reactions and were evaluated against a panel of kinase assays. Potent inhibitors were identified for Gsk3β, Rock2, and Egfr.

  10. Probe tip heating assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, Roger William; Oh, Yunje

    2016-10-25

    A heating assembly configured for use in mechanical testing at a scale of microns or less. The heating assembly includes a probe tip assembly configured for coupling with a transducer of the mechanical testing system. The probe tip assembly includes a probe tip heater system having a heating element, a probe tip coupled with the probe tip heater system, and a heater socket assembly. The heater socket assembly, in one example, includes a yoke and a heater interface that form a socket within the heater socket assembly. The probe tip heater system, coupled with the probe tip, is slidably received and clamped within the socket.

  11. Co-translational assembly of protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Wells, Jonathan N; Bergendahl, L Therese; Marsh, Joseph A

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of biological macromolecules is a fundamental attribute of cellular life. Proteins, in particular, often form stable complexes with one another. Although the importance of protein complexes is widely recognized, we still have only a very limited understanding of the mechanisms underlying their assembly within cells. In this article, we review the available evidence for one such mechanism, namely the coupling of protein complex assembly to translation at the polysome. We discuss research showing that co-translational assembly can occur in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms and can have important implications for the correct functioning of the complexes that result. Co-translational assembly can occur for both homomeric and heteromeric protein complexes and for both proteins that are translated directly into the cytoplasm and those that are translated into or across membranes. Finally, we discuss the properties of proteins that are most likely to be associated with co-translational assembly.

  12. Statistical Tolerance and Clearance Analysis for Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S.; Yi, C.

    1996-01-01

    Tolerance is inevitable because manufacturing exactly equal parts is known to be impossible. Furthermore, the specification of tolerances is an integral part of product design since tolerances directly affect the assemblability, functionality, manufacturability, and cost effectiveness of a product. In this paper, we present statistical tolerance and clearance analysis for the assembly. Our proposed work is expected to make the following contributions: (i) to help the designers to evaluate products for assemblability, (ii) to provide a new perspective to tolerance problems, and (iii) to provide a tolerance analysis tool which can be incorporated into a CAD or solid modeling system.

  13. Milli-Biology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-30

    processes. These results are described in subsequent sections on Folding, Moteins, RALA, Digital Materials, Microfluidics , Molecular Assembly...machines, the restricted part set allows components to be fed directly from the heads. Digital material assemblers. Microfluidics We explored... droplet sizes ranging from 10 micron to sub-micron. One particular instance of this emulsion is shown in the figure (decalin/PFE/water with nile red and

  14. Short Synthetic Terminators for Assembly of Transcription Units in Vitro and Stable Chromosomal Integration in Yeast S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    MacPherson, Murray; Saka, Yasushi

    2017-01-20

    Assembly of synthetic genetic circuits is central to synthetic biology. Yeast S. cerevisiae, in particular, has proven to be an ideal chassis for synthetic genome assemblies by exploiting its efficient homologous recombination. However, this property of efficient homologous recombination poses a problem for multigene assemblies in yeast, since repeated usage of standard parts, such as transcriptional terminators, can lead to rearrangements of the repeats in assembled DNA constructs in vivo. To address this issue in developing a library of orthogonal genetic components for yeast, we designed a set of short synthetic terminators based on a consensus sequence with random linkers to avoid repetitive sequences. We constructed a series of expression vectors with these synthetic terminators for efficient assembly of synthetic genes using Gateway recombination reactions. We also constructed two BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) vectors for assembling multiple transcription units with the synthetic terminators in vitro and their integration in the yeast genome. The tandem array of synthetic genes integrated in the genome by this method is highly stable because there are few homologous segments in the synthetic constructs. Using this system of assembly and genomic integration of transcription units, we tested the synthetic terminators and their influence on the proximal transcription units. Although all the synthetic terminators have the common consensus with the identical length, they showed different activities and impacts on the neighboring transcription units.

  15. Inlet nozzle assembly

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Knight, R.C.; Precechtel, D.R.; Smith, B.G.

    1985-09-09

    An inlet nozzle assembly for directing coolant into the duct tube of a fuel assembly attached thereto. The nozzle assembly includes a shell for housing separable components including an orifice plate assembly, a neutron shield block, a neutron shield plug, and a diffuser block. The orifice plate assembly includes a plurality of stacked plates of differently configurated and sized openings for directing coolant therethrough in a predesigned flow pattern.

  16. Biologically-synthesized inorganic nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Ryan M.; Stone, Morley O.; Naik, Rajesh R.

    2004-06-01

    A hallmark of biological systems is their ability to self-assemble. This self-assembly can occur on the molecular, macromolecular and mesoscale. In this work, we have chosen to exploit biology's ability to self-assemble by incorporating additional functionality within the final structure. Our research efforts have been directed at not only understanding how biological organisms control nucleation and growth of inorganic materials, but also how this activity can be controlled in vitro. In previous work, we have demonstrated how peptides can be selected from a combinatorial library that possesses catalytic activity with respect to inorganic nucleation and deposition. We have engineered some of these peptide sequences into self-assembling protein structures. The goal of the project was to create an organic/inorganic hybrid that retained the "memory" properties of the organic, but possessed the superior optical and electronic properties of the inorganic.

  17. Self-Assembly Behavior of Pullulan Abietate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradwell, Sheila; Esker, Alan; Glasser, Wolgang; Heinze, Thomas

    2003-03-01

    Wood is one of nature's most fascinating biological composites due to its toughness and resistance to fracture properties. These properties stem from the self-assembly of cellulose microfibrils in an amorphous matrix of hemicellulose and lignin. In recent years, science has looked to nature for guidance in preparing synthetic materials with desirable physical properties. In order to study the self-assembly process in wood, a model system composed of a polysaccharide, pullulan abietate, and a biomimetic cellulose substrate prepared by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique has been developed. Interfacial tension and surface plasmon resonance measurements used to study the self-assembly process will be discussed for different pullulan derivatives.

  18. Tilt assembly for tracking solar collector assembly

    DOEpatents

    Almy, Charles; Peurach, John; Sandler, Reuben

    2012-01-24

    A tilt assembly is used with a solar collector assembly of the type comprising a frame, supporting a solar collector, for movement about a tilt axis by pivoting a drive element between first and second orientations. The tilt assembly comprises a drive element coupler connected to the drive element and a driver, the driver comprising a drive frame, a drive arm and a drive arm driver. The drive arm is mounted to the drive frame for pivotal movement about a drive arm axis. Movement on the drive arm mimics movement of the drive element. Drive element couplers can extend in opposite directions from the outer portion of the drive arm, whereby the assembly can be used between adjacent solar collector assemblies in a row of solar collector assemblies.

  19. Biologic Treatments for Sports Injuries II Think Tank-Current Concepts, Future Research, and Barriers to Advancement, Part 2: Rotator Cuff.

    PubMed

    Murray, Iain R; LaPrade, Robert F; Musahl, Volker; Geeslin, Andrew G; Zlotnicki, Jason P; Mann, Barton J; Petrigliano, Frank A

    2016-03-01

    Rotator cuff tears are common and result in considerable morbidity. Tears within the tendon substance or at its insertion into the humeral head represent a considerable clinical challenge because of the hostile local environment that precludes healing. Tears often progress without intervention, and current surgical treatments are inadequate. Although surgical implants, instrumentation, and techniques have improved, healing rates have not improved, and a high failure rate remains for large and massive rotator cuff tears. The use of biologic adjuvants that contribute to a regenerative microenvironment have great potential for improving healing rates and function after surgery. This article presents a review of current and emerging biologic approaches to augment rotator cuff tendon and muscle regeneration focusing on the scientific rationale, preclinical, and clinical evidence for efficacy, areas for future research, and current barriers to advancement and implementation.

  20. Scaffold oriented synthesis. Part 3: design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel 5-substituted indazoles as potent and selective kinase inhibitors employing [2+3] cycloadditions.

    PubMed

    Akritopoulou-Zanze, Irini; Wakefield, Brian D; Gasiecki, Alan; Kalvin, Douglas; Johnson, Eric F; Kovar, Peter; Djuric, Stevan W

    2011-03-01

    We report the synthesis and biological evaluation of 5-substituted indazoles and amino indazoles as kinase inhibitors. The compounds were synthesized in a parallel synthesis fashion from readily available starting materials employing [2+3] cycloaddition reactions and were evaluated against a panel of kinase assays. Potent inhibitors were identified for numerous kinases such as Rock2, Gsk3β, Aurora2 and Jak2.

  1. A small linear peptide encompassing the NGF N-terminus partly mimics the biological activities of the entire neurotrophin in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Travaglia, Alessio; Pietropaolo, Adriana; Di Martino, Rossana; Nicoletti, Vincenzo G; La Mendola, Diego; Calissano, Pietro; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2015-08-19

    Ever since the discovery of its neurite growth promoting activity in sympathetic and sensory ganglia, nerve growth factor (NGF) became the prototype of the large family of neurotrophins. The use of primary cultures and clonal cell lines has revealed several distinct actions of NGF and other neurotrophins. Among several models of NGF activity, the clonal cell line PC12 is the most widely employed. Thus, in the presence of NGF, through the activation of the transmembrane protein TrkA, these cells undergo a progressive mitotic arrest and start to grow electrically excitable neuritis. A vast number of studies opened intriguing aspects of NGF mechanisms of action, its biological properties, and potential use as therapeutic agents. In this context, identifying and utilizing small portions of NGF is of great interest and involves several human diseases including Alzheimer's disease. Here we report the specific action of the peptide encompassing the 1-14 sequence of the human NGF (NGF(1-14)), identified on the basis of scattered indications present in literature. The biological activity of NGF(1-14) was tested on PC12 cells, and its binding with TrkA was predicted by means of a computational approach. NGF(1-14) does not elicit the neurite outgrowth promoting activity, typical of the whole protein, and it only has a moderate action on PC12 proliferation. However, this peptide exerts, in a dose and time dependent fashion, an effective and specific NGF-like action on some highly conserved and biologically crucial intermediates of its intracellular targets such as Akt and CREB. These findings indicate that not all TrkA pathways must be at all times operative, and open the possibility of testing each of them in relation with specific NGF needs, biological actions, and potential therapeutic use.

  2. Biologic Treatments for Sports Injuries II Think Tank-Current Concepts, Future Research, and Barriers to Advancement, Part 3: Articular Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Zlotnicki, Jason P; Geeslin, Andrew G; Murray, Iain R; Petrigliano, Frank A; LaPrade, Robert F; Mann, Barton J; Musahl, Volker

    2016-04-01

    Focal chondral defects of the articular surface are a common occurrence in the field of orthopaedics. These isolated cartilage injuries, if not repaired surgically with restoration of articular congruency, may have a high rate of progression to posttraumatic osteoarthritis, resulting in significant morbidity and loss of function in the young, active patient. Both isolated and global joint disease are a difficult entity to treat in the clinical setting given the high amount of stress on weightbearing joints and the limited healing potential of native articular cartilage. Recently, clinical interest has focused on the use of biologically active compounds and surgical techniques to regenerate native cartilage to the articular surface, with the goal of restoring normal joint health and overall function. This article presents a review of the current biologic therapies, as discussed at the 2015 American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) Biologics Think Tank, that are used in the treatment of focal cartilage deficiencies. For each of these emerging therapies, the theories for application, the present clinical evidence, and specific areas for future research are explored, with focus on the barriers currently faced by clinicians in advancing the success of these therapies in the clinical setting.

  3. Integrated risk assessment for WFD ecological status classification applied to Llobregat river basin (Spain). Part I-Fuzzy approach to aggregate biological indicators.

    PubMed

    Gottardo, S; Semenzin, E; Giove, S; Zabeo, A; Critto, A; de Zwart, D; Ginebreda, A; Marcomini, A

    2011-10-15

    Water Framework Directive (WFD) requirements and recommendations for Ecological Status (ES) classification of surface water bodies do not address all issues that Member States have to face in the implementation process, such as selection of appropriate stressor-specific environmental indicators, definition of class boundaries, aggregation of heterogeneous data and information and uncertainty evaluation. In this context the "One-Out, All-Out" (OOAO) principle is the suggested approach to lead the entire classification procedure and ensure conservative results. In order to support water managers in achieving a more comprehensive and realistic evaluation of ES, an Integrated Risk Assessment (IRA) methodology was developed. It is based on the Weight of Evidence approach and implements a Fuzzy Inference System in order to hierarchically aggregate a set of environmental indicators, which are grouped into five Lines of Evidence (i.e. Biology, Chemistry, Ecotoxicology, Physico-chemistry and Hydromorphology). The whole IRA methodology has been implemented as an individual module into a freeware GIS (Geographic Information System)-based Decision Support System (DSS), named MODELKEY DSS. The paper focuses on the conceptual and mathematical procedure underlying the evaluation of the most complex Line of Evidence, i.e. Biology, which identifies the biological communities that are potentially at risk and the stressors that are most likely responsible for the observed alterations. The results obtained from testing the procedure through application of the MODELKEY DSS to the Llobregat case study are reported and discussed.

  4. Solar radiation assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, S.D.

    1987-04-21

    A Solar transmission system is described comprising at least one radiation permeable assembly. A light aperture is adapted to be mounted in the envelope of a building. The light aperture has at least one layer of first glazing forming part of the building envelope. A generally rectangular frame is supported on the building and around an outer side of the aperture. A layer of second glazing comprises an outer facing of the frame. Ventilation means at the top and bottom of the frame, includes means for enabling air flow through the frame, and includes means for inhibiting rain from entering the frame. Support means connectible between the frame and the building, enable the frame to be moved away from the building, whereby the glazing of the light aperture may be made accessible.

  5. Firearm trigger assembly

    DOEpatents

    Crandall, David L.; Watson, Richard W.

    2010-02-16

    A firearm trigger assembly for use with a firearm includes a trigger mounted to a forestock of the firearm so that the trigger is movable between a rest position and a triggering position by a forwardly placed support hand of a user. An elongated trigger member operatively associated with the trigger operates a sear assembly of the firearm when the trigger is moved to the triggering position. An action release assembly operatively associated with the firearm trigger assembly and a movable assembly of the firearm prevents the trigger from being moved to the triggering position when the movable assembly is not in the locked position.

  6. Autonomous electrochromic assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Berland, Brian Spencer; Lanning, Bruce Roy; Stowell, Jr., Michael Wayne

    2015-03-10

    This disclosure describes system and methods for creating an autonomous electrochromic assembly, and systems and methods for use of the autonomous electrochromic assembly in combination with a window. Embodiments described herein include an electrochromic assembly that has an electrochromic device, an energy storage device, an energy collection device, and an electrochromic controller device. These devices may be combined into a unitary electrochromic insert assembly. The electrochromic assembly may have the capability of generating power sufficient to operate and control an electrochromic device. This control may occur through the application of a voltage to an electrochromic device to change its opacity state. The electrochromic assembly may be used in combination with a window.

  7. U1-RNP and Toll-like receptors in the pathogenesis of mixed connective tissue diseasePart II. Endosomal TLRs and their biological significance in the pathogenesis of mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Paradowska-Gorycka, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is a chronic autoimmune immunopathological disease of unknown etiology, which is characterized by the presence of various clinical symptoms and the presence of autoantibodies against U1-RNP particles. The U1-RNP component engages immune cells and their receptors in a complex network of interactions that ultimately lead to autoimmunity, inflammation, and tissue injury. The anti-U1-RNP autoantibodies form an immune complex with self-RNA, present in MCTD serum, which can act as endosomal Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands. Inhibition of TLRs by nucleic acids is a promising area of research for the development of novel therapeutic strategies against pathogenic infection, tumorigenesis and autoimmunity. In this review we summarize current knowledge of endogenous TLRs and discuss their biological significance in the pathogenesis of MCTD. In part I we described the structure, biological function and significance of the U1-RNP complex in MCTD.

  8. Oxygen Generation Assembly Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagdigian, Robert; Cloud, Dale

    1999-01-01

    Hamilton Standard Space Systems International (HSSI) is under contract to NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to develop an Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) for the International Space Station (ISS). The International Space Station Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) electrolyzes potable water from the Water Recovery System (WRS) to provide gaseous oxygen to the Space Station module atmosphere. The OGA produces oxygen for metabolic consumption by crew and biological specimens. The OGA also replenishes oxygen lost by experiment ingestion, airlock depressurization, CO2 venting, and leakage. As a byproduct, gaseous hydrogen is generated. The hydrogen will be supplied at a specified pressure range above ambient to support future utilization. Initially, the hydrogen will be vented overboard to space vacuum. This paper describes the OGA integration into the ISS Node 3. It details the development history supporting the design and describes the OGA System characteristics and its physical layout.

  9. Nanoscale Assemblies of Small Molecules Control the Fate of Cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Junfeng; Xu, Bing

    2015-10-01

    Being driven by non-covalent interactions, the formation of functional assemblies (or aggregates) of small molecules at nanoscale is a more common process in water than one would think. While most efforts on self-assembly in cellular environment concentrate on the assemblies of proteins (e.g., microtubules or amyloid fibers), nanoscale assemblies of small molecules are emerging functional entities that exhibit important biological function in cellular environments. This review describes the increasing efforts on the exploration of nanoscale assemblies of small molecules that largely originate from the serendipitous observations in research fields other than nanoscience and technology. Specifically, we describe that nanoscale assemblies of small molecules exhibit unique biological functions in extracellular and intracellular environment, thus inducing various cellular responses, like causing cell death or promoting cell proliferation. We first survey certain common feature of nanoscale molecular assemblies, then discuss several specific examples, such as, nanoscale assemblies of small peptides accumulated in the cells for selectively inhibiting cancer cells via promiscuous interactions with proteins, and nanoscale assemblies of a glycoconjugate for promoting the proliferation of stem cells or for suppressing immune responses. Subsequently, we emphasize the spatiotemporal control of nanoscale assemblies for controlling the cell fate, particularly illustrate a paradigm-shifting approach-enzyme-instructed self-assembly (EISA), that is, the integration of enzymatic reaction and self-assembly-for generating nanoscale assemblies from innocuous monomers for selectively inhibiting cancer cells. Moreover, we introduce a convenient assay for proteomic study of the proteins that interact with nanoscale assemblies of small molecules in cellular environment. Furthermore, we introduce the use of ligand-receptor interaction to catalyze the formation of nanoscale assemblies. By

  10. Developmental engineering: a new paradigm for the design and manufacturing of cell-based products. Part II: from genes to networks: tissue engineering from the viewpoint of systems biology and network science.

    PubMed

    Lenas, Petros; Moos, Malcolm; Luyten, Frank P

    2009-12-01

    The field of tissue engineering is moving toward a new concept of "in vitro biomimetics of in vivo tissue development." In Part I of this series, we proposed a theoretical framework integrating the concepts of developmental biology with those of process design to provide the rules for the design of biomimetic processes. We named this methodology "developmental engineering" to emphasize that it is not the tissue but the process of in vitro tissue development that has to be engineered. To formulate the process design rules in a rigorous way that will allow a computational design, we should refer to mathematical methods to model the biological process taking place in vitro. Tissue functions cannot be attributed to individual molecules but rather to complex interactions between the numerous components of a cell and interactions between cells in a tissue that form a network. For tissue engineering to advance to the level of a technologically driven discipline amenable to well-established principles of process engineering, a scientifically rigorous formulation is needed of the general design rules so that the behavior of networks of genes, proteins, or cells that govern the unfolding of developmental processes could be related to the design parameters. Now that sufficient experimental data exist to construct plausible mathematical models of many biological control circuits, explicit hypotheses can be evaluated using computational approaches to facilitate process design. Recent progress in systems biology has shown that the empirical concepts of developmental biology that we used in Part I to extract the rules of biomimetic process design can be expressed in rigorous mathematical terms. This allows the accurate characterization of manufacturing processes in tissue engineering as well as the properties of the artificial tissues themselves. In addition, network science has recently shown that the behavior of biological networks strongly depends on their topology and has

  11. Coarse-grained Simulations of Viral Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elrad, Oren M.

    2011-12-01

    The formation of viral capsids is a marvel of natural engineering and design. A large number (from 60 to thousands) of protein subunits assemble into complete, reproducible structures under a variety of conditions while avoiding kinetic and thermodynamic traps. Small single-stranded RNA viruses not only assemble their coat proteins in this fashion but also package their genome during the self-assembly process. Recent experiments have shown that the coat proteins are competent to assemble not merely around their own genomes but heterologous RNA, synthetic polyanions and even functionalized gold nanoparticles. Remarkably these viruses can even assemble around cargo not commensurate with their native state by adopting different morphologies. Understanding the properties that confer such exquisite precision and flexibility to the assembly process could aid biomedical research in the search for novel antiviral remedies, drug-delivery vehicles and contrast agents used in bioimaging. At the same time, viral assembly provides an excellent model system for the development of a statistical mechanical understanding of biological self-assembly, in the hopes of that we will identify some universal principles that underly such processes. This work consists of computational studies using coarse-grained representations of viral coat proteins and their cargoes. We find the relative strength of protein-cargo and protein-protein interactions has a profound effect on the assembly pathway, in some cases leading to assembly mechanisms that are markedly different from those found in previous work on the assembly of empty capsids. In the case of polymeric cargo, we find the first evidence for a previously theorized mechanism in which the polymer actively participates in recruiting free subunits to the assembly process through cooperative polymer-protein motions. We find that successful assembly is non-monotonic in protein-cargo affinity, such affinity can be detrimental to assembly if it

  12. Fatty acids, coumarins and polyphenolic compounds of Ficus carica L. cv. Dottato: variation of bioactive compounds and biological activity of aerial parts.

    PubMed

    Marrelli, Mariangela; Statti, Giancarlo A; Tundis, Rosa; Menichini, Francesco; Conforti, Filomena

    2014-01-01

    Leaves, bark and woody part of Ficus carica L. cultivar Dottato collected in different months were examined to assess their chemical composition, antioxidant activity and phototoxicity on C32 human melanoma cells after UVA irradiation. The phytochemical investigation revealed different composition in the coumarin, fatty acid, polyphenol and flavonoid content. The second harvest of leaves and the first harvest of the bark possessed the highest antiradical activity with IC50 values of 64.00 ± 0.59 and 67.00 ± 1.09 μg/mL, respectively. Harvest III of leaves showed the best inhibition of lipid peroxidation (IC50 = 1.48 ± 0.04 μg/mL). Leaf samples of F. carica showed also the best antiproliferative activity in comparison with bark and woody part of F. carica.

  13. Forwardly movable assembly for a firearm

    DOEpatents

    Crandall, David L.; Watson, Richard W.

    2007-06-05

    A forwardly movable assembly for a firearm, the forwardly movable assembly adapted to be disposed in operative relationship relative to the other operative parts of a firearm, the firearm having in operative relationship each with one or more of the others: a barrel, a receiver, and at least one firing mechanism; the forwardly movable assembly comprising: the barrel and the receiver operatively connected with each other; a movable hand support structure to which at least one of the barrel and the receiver is connected, the barrel being movable therewith, the movable hand support structure being adapted to be gripped by an operator of the firearm; the forwardly movable assembly being adapted to be moved forward by an operator upon gripping the movable hand support structure and manually maneuvering the hand support structure forwardly; and, as the forwardly movable assembly is moved forwardly, the firing mechanism is completely disengaged therefrom and held substantially stationary relative thereto.

  14. Assembly planning at the micro scale

    SciTech Connect

    Feddema, J.T.; Xavier, P.; Brown, R.

    1998-05-14

    This paper investigates a new aspect of fine motion planning for the micro domain. As parts approach 1--10 {micro}m or less in outside dimensions, interactive forces such as van der Waals and electrostatic forces become major factors which greatly change the assembly sequence and path plans. It has been experimentally shown that assembly plans in the micro domain are not reversible, motions required to pick up a part are not the reverse of motions required to release a part. This paper develops the mathematics required to determine the goal regions for pick up, holding, and release of a micro-sphere being handled by a rectangular tool.

  15. Membrane module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kaschemekat, J.

    1994-03-15

    A membrane module assembly is described which is adapted to provide a flow path for the incoming feed stream that forces it into prolonged heat-exchanging contact with a heating or cooling mechanism. Membrane separation processes employing the module assembly are also disclosed. The assembly is particularly useful for gas separation or pervaporation. 2 figures.

  16. Membrane module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kaschemekat, Jurgen

    1994-01-01

    A membrane module assembly adapted to provide a flow path for the incoming feed stream that forces it into prolonged heat-exchanging contact with a heating or cooling mechanism. Membrane separation processes employing the module assembly are also disclosed. The assembly is particularly useful for gas separation or pervaporation.

  17. Dapson in heterocyclic chemistry, part VIII: synthesis, molecular docking and anticancer activity of some novel sulfonylbiscompounds carrying biologically active 1,3-dihydropyridine, chromene and chromenopyridine moieties

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Several new sulfonebiscompounds having a biologically active 1,2-dihydropyridine-2-one 3–19, acrylamide 20, chromene 21, 22 and chromenopyridine 23, 24 moieties were synthesized and evaluated as potential anticancer agents. The structures of the products were confirmed via elemental analyses and spectral data. The screening tests showed that many of the biscompounds obtained exhibited good anticancer activity against human breast cell line (MCF7) comparable to doxorubicin which was used as reference drug. Compounds 11, 17 and 24 showed IC50 values 35.40 μM, 29.86 μM and 30.99 μM, respectively. In order to elucidate the mechanism of action of the synthesized compounds as anticancer agents, docking on the active site of farnesyltransferase and arginine methyltransferase was also performed and good results were obtained. PMID:22748424

  18. Dapson in heterocyclic chemistry, part VIII: synthesis, molecular docking and anticancer activity of some novel sulfonylbiscompounds carrying biologically active 1,3-dihydropyridine, chromene and chromenopyridine moieties.

    PubMed

    Al-Said, Mansour S; Ghorab, Mostafa M; Nissan, Yassin M

    2012-07-02

    Several new sulfonebiscompounds having a biologically active 1,2-dihydropyridine-2-one 3-19, acrylamide 20, chromene 21, 22 and chromenopyridine 23, 24 moieties were synthesized and evaluated as potential anticancer agents. The structures of the products were confirmed via elemental analyses and spectral data. The screening tests showed that many of the biscompounds obtained exhibited good anticancer activity against human breast cell line (MCF7) comparable to doxorubicin which was used as reference drug. Compounds 11, 17 and 24 showed IC50 values 35.40 μM, 29.86 μM and 30.99 μM, respectively. In order to elucidate the mechanism of action of the synthesized compounds as anticancer agents, docking on the active site of farnesyltransferase and arginine methyltransferase was also performed and good results were obtained.

  19. Part 1. Assessment of carcinogenicity and biologic responses in rats after lifetime inhalation of new-technology diesel exhaust in the ACES bioassay.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Jacob D; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Seagrave, JeanClare; Gigliotti, Andrew P; Chow, Judith; Zielinska, Barbara; Mauderly, Joe L; Seilkop, Steven K; Miller, Rodney A

    2015-01-01

    The Health Effects Institute and its partners conceived and funded a program to characterize the emissions from heavy-duty diesel engines compliant with the 2007 and 2010 on-road emissions standards in the United States and to evaluate indicators of lung toxicity in rats and mice exposed repeatedly to 2007-compliant new-technology diesel exhaust (NTDE*). The a priori hypothesis of this Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) was that 2007-compliant on-road diesel emissions "... will not cause an increase in tumor formation or substantial toxic effects in rats and mice at the highest concentration of exhaust that can be used ... although some biological effects may occur." This hypothesis was tested at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute (LRRI) by exposing rats by chronic inhalation as a carcinogenicity bioassay. Indicators of pulmonary toxicity in rats were measured after 1, 3, 12, 24, and 28-30 months of exposure. Similar indicators of pulmonary toxicity were measured in mice, as an interspecies comparison of the effects of subchronic exposure, after 1 and 3 months of exposure. A previous HEI report (Mauderly and McDonald 2012) described the operation of the engine and exposure systems and the characteristics of the exposure atmospheres during system commissioning. Another HEI report described the biologic responses in mice and rats after subchronic exposure to NTDE (McDonald et al. 2012). The primary motivation for the present chronic study was to evaluate the effects of NTDE in rats in the context of previous studies that had shown neoplastic lung lesions in rats exposed chronically to traditional technology diesel exhaust (TDE) (i.e., exhaust from diesel engines built before the 2007 U.S. requirements went into effect). The hypothesis was largely based on the marked reduction of diesel particulate matter (DPM) in NTDE compared with emissions from older diesel engine and fuel technologies, although other emissions were also reduced. The DPM

  20. Development of a Model, Metal-reducing Microbial Community for a System Biology Level Assessment of Desulfovibrio vulgaris as part of a Community

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, Dwayne; Schadt, Christopher; Miller, Lance; Phelps, Tommy; Brown, S. D.; Arkin, Adam; Hazen, Terry; Drake, Megin; Yang, Z.K.; Podar, Mircea

    2010-05-17

    One of the largest experimental gaps is between the simplicity of pure cultures and the complexity of open environmental systems, particularly in metal-contaminated areas. These microbial communities form ecosystem foundations, drive biogeochemical processes, and are relevant for biotechnology and bioremediation. A model, metal-reducing microbial community was constructed as either syntrophic or competitive to study microbial cell to cell interactions, cell signaling and competition for resources. The microbial community was comprised of the metal-reducing Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. Additionally, Methanococcus maripaludis S2 was added to study complete carbon reduction and maintain a low hydrogen partial pressure for syntrophism to occur. Further, considerable work has been published on D. vulgaris and the D. vulgaris/ Mc. maripaludis co-culture both with and without stress. We are extending this work by conducting the same stress conditions on the model community. Additionally, this comprehensive investigation includes physiological and metabolic analyses as well as specially designed mRNA microarrays with the genes for all three organisms on one slide so as to follow gene expression changes in the various cultivation conditions as well as being comparable to the co- and individual cultures. Further, state-of -the-art comprehensive AMT tag proteomics allows for these comparisons at the protein level for a systems biology assessment of a model, metal-reducing microbial community. Preliminary data revealed that lactate oxidation by D. vulgaris was sufficient to support both G. sulfurreducens and M. maripaludis via the excretion of H2 and acetate. Fumarate was utilized by G. sulfurreducens and reduced to succinate since neither of the other two organisms can reduce fumarate. Methane was quantified, suggesting acetate and H2 concentrations were sufficient for M. maripaludis. Steady state community cultivation will allow for

  1. Parallel Assembly of LIGA Components

    SciTech Connect

    Christenson, T.R.; Feddema, J.T.

    1999-03-04

    In this paper, a prototype robotic workcell for the parallel assembly of LIGA components is described. A Cartesian robot is used to press 386 and 485 micron diameter pins into a LIGA substrate and then place a 3-inch diameter wafer with LIGA gears onto the pins. Upward and downward looking microscopes are used to locate holes in the LIGA substrate, pins to be pressed in the holes, and gears to be placed on the pins. This vision system can locate parts within 3 microns, while the Cartesian manipulator can place the parts within 0.4 microns.

  2. Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Miller, David H [Redondo Beach, CA

    2012-04-10

    Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies are provided. In an embodiment, by way of example only, a sensor mount assembly includes a busbar, a main body, a backing surface, and a first finger. The busbar has a first end and a second end. The main body is overmolded onto the busbar. The backing surface extends radially outwardly relative to the main body. The first finger extends axially from the backing surface, and the first finger has a first end, a second end, and a tooth. The first end of the first finger is disposed on the backing surface, and the tooth is formed on the second end of the first finger.

  3. Molecular Engineering of Self-assembled Nanoreactors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-15

    with the ability to control enzyme encapsulation/release through conformational shifts in the nanostructure in response to environmental changes; (2...Assembly of enzyme and cofactor on a DNA nanostructure to evaluate the essential parameters for modulating catalysis; (3) Switchable enzyme ...structural DNA nanotechnology with the functionality of biological enzymes to produce 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 13

  4. Self-assembling magnetic "snakes"

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Nickel particles float peacefully in a liquid medium until a giant snake seems to swim by and snatch several particles up, adding to its own mass. The self-assembled "snakes" act like biological systems, but they are not alive and are driven by a magnetic field. The research may someday offer some insight into the organization of life itself. Read more at Wired: http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2009/03/snakes/ Research and video by Alex Snezhko and Igor Aronson, Argonne National Laboratory.

  5. An end-to-end workflow for engineering of biological networks from high-level specifications.

    PubMed

    Beal, Jacob; Weiss, Ron; Densmore, Douglas; Adler, Aaron; Appleton, Evan; Babb, Jonathan; Bhatia, Swapnil; Davidsohn, Noah; Haddock, Traci; Loyall, Joseph; Schantz, Richard; Vasilev, Viktor; Yaman, Fusun

    2012-08-17

    We present a workflow for the design and production of biological networks from high-level program specifications. The workflow is based on a sequence of intermediate models that incrementally translate high-level specifications into DNA samples that implement them. We identify algorithms for translating between adjacent models and implement them as a set of software tools, organized into a four-stage toolchain: Specification, Compilation, Part Assignment, and Assembly. The specification stage begins with a Boolean logic computation specified in the Proto programming language. The compilation stage uses a library of network motifs and cellular platforms, also specified in Proto, to transform the program into an optimized Abstract Genetic Regulatory Network (AGRN) that implements the programmed behavior. The part assignment stage assigns DNA parts to the AGRN, drawing the parts from a database for the target cellular platform, to create a DNA sequence implementing the AGRN. Finally, the assembly stage computes an optimized assembly plan to create the DNA sequence from available part samples, yielding a protocol for producing a sample of engineered plasmids with robotics assistance. Our workflow is the first to automate the production of biological networks from a high-level program specification. Furthermore, the workflow's modular design allows the same program to be realized on different cellular platforms simply by swapping workflow configurations. We validated our workflow by specifying a small-molecule sensor-reporter program and verifying the resulting plasmids in both HEK 293 mammalian cells and in E. coli bacterial cells.

  6. Interconnect assembly for an electronic assembly and assembly method therefor

    DOEpatents

    Gerbsch, Erich William

    2003-06-10

    An interconnect assembly and method for a semiconductor device, in which the interconnect assembly can be used in lieu of wirebond connections to form an electronic assembly. The interconnect assembly includes first and second interconnect members. The first interconnect member has a first surface with a first contact and a second surface with a second contact electrically connected to the first contact, while the second interconnect member has a flexible finger contacting the second contact of the first interconnect member. The first interconnect member is adapted to be aligned and registered with a semiconductor device having a contact on a first surface thereof, so that the first contact of the first interconnect member electrically contacts the contact of the semiconductor device. Consequently, the assembly method does not require any wirebonds, but instead merely entails aligning and registering the first interconnect member with the semiconductor device so that the contacts of the first interconnect member and the semiconductor device make electrically contact, and then contacting the second contact of the first interconnect member with the flexible finger of the second interconnect member.

  7. Metabolites from nematophagous fungi and nematicidal natural products from fungi as alternatives for biological control. Part II: metabolites from nematophagous basidiomycetes and non-nematophagous fungi.

    PubMed

    Degenkolb, Thomas; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    In this second section of a two-part mini-review article, we introduce 101 further nematicidal and non-nematicidal secondary metabolites biosynthesized by nematophagous basidiomycetes or non-nematophagous ascomycetes and basidiomycetes. Several of these compounds have promising nematicidal activity and deserve further and more detailed analysis. Thermolides A and B, omphalotins, ophiobolins, bursaphelocides A and B, illinitone A, pseudohalonectrins A and B, dichomitin B, and caryopsomycins A-C are excellent candidates or lead compounds for the development of biocontrol strategies for phytopathogenic nematodes. Paraherquamides, clonostachydiol, and nafuredins offer promising leads for the development of formulations against the intestinal nematodes of ruminants.

  8. Precedence relationship representations of mechanical assembly sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homendemello, L. S.; Sanderson, A. C.

    1989-01-01

    Two types of precedence relationship representations for mechanical assembly sequences are presented: precedence relationships between the establishment of one connection between two parts and the establishment of another connection, and precedence relationships between the establishment of one connection and states of the assembly process. Precedence relationship representations have the advantage of being very compact. The problem with these representations was how to guarantee their correctness and completeness. Two theorems are presented each of which leads to the generation of one type of precedence relationship representation guaranteeing its correctness and completeness for a class of assemblies.

  9. A trait-based approach for examining microbial community assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prest, T. L.; Nemergut, D.

    2015-12-01

    Microorganisms regulate all of Earth's major biogeochemical cycles and an understanding of how microbial communities assemble is a key part in evaluating controls over many types of ecosystem processes. Rapid advances in technology and bioinformatics have led to a better appreciation for the variation in microbial community structure in time and space. Yet, advances in theory are necessary to make sense of these data and allow us to generate unifying hypotheses about the causes and consequences of patterns in microbial biodiversity and what they mean for ecosystem function. Here, I will present a metaanalysis of microbial community assembly from a variety of successional and post-disturbance systems. Our analysis shows various distinct patterns in community assembly, and the potential importance of nutrients and dispersal in shaping microbial community beta diversity in these systems. We also used a trait-based approach to generate hypotheses about the mechanisms driving patterns of microbial community assembly and the implications for function. Our work reveals the importance of rRNA operon copy number as a community aggregated trait in helping to reconcile differences in community dynamics between distinct types of successional and disturbed systems. Specifically, our results demonstrate that decreases in average copy number can be a common feature of communities across various drivers of ecological succession, supporting a transition from an r-selected to a K-selected community. Importantly, our work supports the scaling of the copy number trait over multiple levels of biological organization, from cells to populations and communities, and has implications for both ecology and evolution. Trait-based approaches are an important next step to generate and test hypotheses about the forces structuring microbial communities and the subsequent consequences for ecosystem function.

  10. Marine biology

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman, H.V.; Webber, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses both taxonomic and ecological topics on marine biology. Full coverage of marine organisms of all five kingdoms is provided, along with interesting and thorough discussion of all major marine habitats. Organization into six major parts allows flexibility. It also provides insight into important topics such as disposal of nuclear waste at sea, the idea that life began on the ocean floor, and how whales, krill, and people interact. A full-color photo chapter reviews questions, and exercises. The contents are: an overview marine biology: fundamental concepts/investigating life in the ocean; the physical ocean, the ocean floor, the nature of water, the nature and motion of ocean water; general ecology, conditions for life in the sea, biological productivity and energy transfer; marine organisms; monera, protista, mycota and metaphyta; the smaller marine animals, the large animals marine habitats, the intertidal zone/benthos of the continental shelf, the photic zone, the deep ocean, the ocean under stress, marine pollution, appendix a: the metric system and conversion factors/ appendix b: prefixes and suffixes/ appendix c: taxonomic classification of common marine organisms, and glossary, and index.

  11. Emerging Technologies for Assembly of Microscale Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Kavaz, Doga; Demirel, Melik C.; Demirci, Utkan

    2013-01-01

    Assembly of cell encapsulating building blocks (i.e., microscale hydrogels) has significant applications in areas including regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, and cell-based in vitro assays for pharmaceutical research and drug discovery. Inspired by the repeating functional units observed in native tissues and biological systems (e.g., the lobule in liver, the nephron in kidney), assembly technologies aim to generate complex tissue structures by organizing microscale building blocks. Novel assembly technologies enable fabrication of engineered tissue constructs with controlled properties including tunable microarchitectural and predefined compositional features. Recent advances in micro- and nano-scale technologies have enabled engineering of microgel based three dimensional (3D) constructs. There is a need for high-throughput and scalable methods to assemble microscale units with a complex 3D micro-architecture. Emerging assembly methods include novel technologies based on microfluidics, acoustic and magnetic fields, nanotextured surfaces, and surface tension. In this review, we survey emerging microscale hydrogel assembly methods offering rapid, scalable microgel assembly in 3D, and provide future perspectives and discuss potential applications. PMID:23184717

  12. Telerobotic truss assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, Philip L.

    1987-01-01

    The ACCESS truss was telerobotically assembled in order to gain experience with robotic assembly of hardware designed for astronaut extravehicular (EVA) assembly. Tight alignment constraints of the ACCESS hardware made telerobotic assembly difficult. A wider alignment envelope and a compliant end effector would have reduced the problem. The manipulator had no linear motion capability, but many of the assembly operations required straight line motion. The manipulator was attached to a motion table in order to provide the X, Y, and Z translations needed. A programmable robot with linear translation capability would have eliminated the need for the motion table and streamlined the assembly. Poor depth perception was a major problem. Shaded paint schemes and alignment lines were helpful in reducing this problem. The four cameras used worked well for only some operations. It was not possible to identify camera locations that worked well for all assembly steps. More cameras or movable cameras would have simplified some operations. The audio feedback system was useful.

  13. Chemical composition and biological evaluation of the volatile constituents from the aerial parts of Nephrolepis exaltata (L.) and Nephrolepis cordifolia (L.) C. Presl grown in Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Tantawy, Mona E; Shams, Manal M; Afifi, Manal S

    2016-01-01

    The essential oil from the aerial parts of Nephrolepis exaltata and Nephrolepis cordifolia obtained by hydro-distillation were analyzed by gas chromatography/ mass spectrometry. The essential oils exhibited potential antibacterial and antifungal activities against a majority of the selected microorganisms. NEA oil showed promising cytotoxicity in breast, colon and lung carcinoma cells. The results presented indicate that NEA oil could be useful alternative for the treatment of dermatophytosis. Comparative investigation of hydro-distilled volatile constituents from aerial parts (A) of Nephrolepis exaltata (NE) and Nephrolepis cordifolia (NC) (Family Nephrolepidaceae) was carried out. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry revealed that oils differ in composition and percentages of components. Oxygenated compounds were dominant in NEA and NCA. 2,4-Hexadien-1-ol (16.1%), nonanal (14.4%), β-Ionone (6.7%) and thymol (2.7%) were predominant in NEA. β-Ionone (8.0%), eugenol (7.2%) and anethol (4.6%) were the main constituents in NCA. Volatile samples were screened for their antibacterial and antifungal activities using agar diffusion method and minimum inhibitory concentrations. The cytotoxic activity was evaluated using viability assay in breast (MCF-7), colon (HCT-116) and lung carcinoma (A-549) cells by the MTT assay. The results revealed that NEA oil exhibited potential antimicrobial activity against most of the tested organisms and showed promising cytotoxicity.

  14. Long-read sequence assembly of the gorilla genome.

    PubMed

    Gordon, David; Huddleston, John; Chaisson, Mark J P; Hill, Christopher M; Kronenberg, Zev N; Munson, Katherine M; Malig, Maika; Raja, Archana; Fiddes, Ian; Hillier, LaDeana W; Dunn, Christopher; Baker, Carl; Armstrong, Joel; Diekhans, Mark; Paten, Benedict; Shendure, Jay; Wilson, Richard K; Haussler, David; Chin, Chen-Shan; Eichler, Evan E

    2016-04-01

    Accurate sequence and assembly of genomes is a critical first step for studies of genetic variation. We generated a high-quality assembly of the gorilla genome using single-molecule, real-time sequence technology and a string graph de novo assembly algorithm. The new assembly improves contiguity by two to three orders of magnitude with respect to previously released assemblies, recovering 87% of missing reference exons and incomplete gene models. Although regions of large, high-identity segmental duplications remain largely unresolved, this comprehensive assembly provides new biological insight into genetic diversity, structural variation, gene loss, and representation of repeat structures within the gorilla genome. The approach provides a path forward for the routine assembly of mammalian genomes at a level approaching that of the current quality of the human genome.

  15. Long-read sequence assembly of the gorilla genome

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, David; Huddleston, John; Chaisson, Mark J. P.; Hill, Christopher M.; Kronenberg, Zev N.; Munson, Katherine M.; Malig, Maika; Raja, Archana; Fiddes, Ian; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Dunn, Christopher; Baker, Carl; Armstrong, Joel; Diekhans, Mark; Paten, Benedict; Shendure, Jay; Wilson, Richard K.; Haussler, David; Chin, Chen-Shan; Eichler, Evan E.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate sequence and assembly of genomes is a critical first step for studies of genetic variation. We generated a high-quality assembly of the gorilla genome using single-molecule, real-time sequence technology and a string graph de novo assembly algorithm. The new assembly improves contiguity by two to three orders of magnitude with respect to previously released assemblies, recovering 87% of missing reference exons and incomplete gene models. Although regions of large, high-identity segmental duplications remain largely unresolved, this comprehensive assembly provides new biological insight into genetic diversity, structural variation, gene loss, and representation of repeat structures within the gorilla genome. The approach provides a path forward for the routine assembly of mammalian genomes at a level approaching that of the current quality of the human genome. PMID:27034376

  16. Assessment of some innate immune responses in dab (Limanda limanda L.) from the North Sea as part of an integrated biological effects monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skouras, Andreas; Lang, Thomas; Vobach, Michael; Danischewski, Dirk; Wosniok, Werner; Scharsack, Jörn Peter; Steinhagen, Dieter

    2003-10-01

    The marine flatfish dab (Limanda limanda), which lives in direct contact with contaminated sediments, is frequently used as a sentinel species in international monitoring programmes on the biological effects of contaminants. In this study, immune responses were recorded as indicators of sublethal chronic effects of contaminants, in addition to measurement of the induction of mono-oxygenase ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) in liver cells, the inhibition of acetylcholin esterase (AChE) in muscle and a quantification of grossly visible diseases and parasites. In total, 336 dab were analysed from five sampling areas in the North Sea, including the German Bight, the Dogger Bank, the Firth of Forth, and two locations close to oil and gas platforms (Ekofisk and Danfield). When considering plasma lysozyme levels, pinocytosis and respiratory burst activity of head kidney leucocytes, a clear gradient could be observed with decreased levels in individuals collected from the Firth of Forth and locations near the oil or gas platforms compared with dab from the Dogger Bank or the German Bight. Individuals with induced EROD activity displayed reduced lysozyme and respiratory burst activities. Lysozyme levels were also reduced in dab with lymphocystis or with nematodes. The data obtained indicate that the assessment of innate immune parameters in a monitoring programme provides supplementary information about immunomodulatory effects associated with the exposure of fish to contaminants. In particular, concentrations of plasma lysozyme, which can be analysed in an easy and inexpensive assay, are considered to be an appropriate parameter for use in a battery of other bioindicators.

  17. Pentoxifylline as a modulator of anticancer drug doxorubicin. Part II: Reduction of doxorubicin DNA binding and alleviation of its biological effects.

    PubMed

    Gołuński, Grzegorz; Borowik, Agnieszka; Derewońko, Natalia; Kawiak, Anna; Rychłowski, Michał; Woziwodzka, Anna; Piosik, Jacek

    2016-04-01

    Anticancer drug doxorubicin is commonly used in cancer treatment. However, drug's severe side effects make toxicity reduction important matter. Another biologically active aromatic compound, pentoxifylline, can sequester aromatic compounds in stacking complexes reducing their bioactivity. This work deals with the problem of alleviating doxorubicin side effects by pentoxifylline. We employed a wide spectrum of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cellular assays. In addition, we used the doxorubicin-pentoxifylline mixed association constant to quantitatively assess pentoxifylline influence on the doxorubicin mutagenic activity. Obtained results indicate strong protective effects of pentoxifylline towards doxorubicin, observed on bacteria and human keratinocytes with no such effects observed on the cancer cells. It may be hypothesized that, considering much shorter half-life of pentoxifylline than doxorubicin, simultaneous administration of doxorubicin and pentoxifylline will lead to gradual release of doxorubicin from complexes with pentoxifylline to reach desired therapeutic concentration. Proposed results shed light on the possible doxorubicin chemotherapy modification and its side effects reduction without the loss of its therapeutic potential.

  18. Variability and connectivity of plaice populations from the Eastern North Sea to the Baltic Sea, part II. Biological evidence of population mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, Clara; Hemmer-Hansen, Jakob; Boje, Jesper; Christensen, Asbjørn; Hüssy, Karin; Sun, Hailu; Clausen, Lotte Worsøe

    2017-02-01

    A multi-disciplinary study was conducted to clarify stock identity and connectivity patterns in the populations of European plaice (Pleuronectes platessa) in the Skagerrak-Kattegat transition area between the Eastern North Sea and the Baltic Sea. Five independent biological studies were carried out in parallel. Genetic markers suggested the existence of different genetic populations in the transition area. Growth backcalculation with otoliths resulted in significant although limited differences in growth rates between North Sea and Skagerrak, indicating weak differentiation or important mixing. Hydrogeographical drift modelling suggested that some North Sea juveniles could settle along the coast line of the Skagerrak and the Kattegat. Tagging data suggested that both juveniles and adult fish from the North Sea perform feeding migrations into Skagerrak in summer/autumn. Finally, survey data suggested that Skagerrak also belongs to the area distribution of North Sea plaice. The outcomes of the individual studies were then combined into an overall synthesis. The existence of some resident components was evidenced, but it was also demonstrated that North Sea plaice migrate for feeding into Skagerrak and might constitute a large share of the catches in this area. The mixing of different populations within a management area has implications for stock assessment and management. Choice must be made to either lump or split the populations, and the feasibility and constraints of both options are discussed. The outcomes of this work have directly influenced the management decisions in 2015.

  19. Fused heterocycles bearing bridgehead nitrogen as potent HIV-1 NNRTIs. Part 4: design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel imidazo[1,2-a]pyrazines.

    PubMed

    Huang, Boshi; Liang, Xin; Li, Cuicui; Chen, Wenmin; Liu, Tao; Li, Xiao; Sun, Yueyue; Fu, Lu; Liu, Huiqing; De Clercq, Erik; Pannecouque, Christophe; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2015-03-26

    Through a structure-guided core-refining approach, a series of novel imidazo[1,2-a]pyrazine derivatives were designed, synthesized and evaluated as HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). Biological results of antiviral assay in MT-4 cell cultures showed that 12 target compounds displayed moderate activities against wild-type (wt) HIV-1 strain (IIIB) with EC50 values ranging from 0.26 μM to 19 μM. Among them, 4a and 5a were found to be the two most active analogues possessing EC50 values of 0.26 μM and 0.32 μM respectively, comparable to delavirdine (DLV, EC50 = 0.54 μM) and nevirapine (NVP, EC50 = 0.31 μM) in a cell-based assay. Additionally, 9 compounds showed RT inhibitory activity superior to that of NVP. Moreover, some predicted drug-like properties of representative compounds 4a and 5a, as well as the structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis were discussed in detail. The binding mode of compound 4a was investigated by molecular simulation studies.

  20. Nickel-quinolones interaction. Part 5-Biological evaluation of nickel(II) complexes with first-, second- and third-generation quinolones.

    PubMed

    Skyrianou, Kalliopi C; Perdih, Franc; Papadopoulos, Athanasios N; Turel, Iztok; Kessissoglou, Dimitris P; Psomas, George

    2011-10-01

    The nickel(II) complexes with the quinolone antibacterial agents oxolinic acid, flumequine, enrofloxacin and sparfloxacin in the presence of the N,N'-donor heterocyclic ligand 2,2'-bipyridylamine have been synthesized and characterized. The quinolones act as bidentate ligands coordinated to Ni(II) ion through the pyridone oxygen and a carboxylato oxygen. The crystal structure of [(2,2'-bipyridylamine)bis(sparfloxacinato)nickel(II)] has been determined by X-ray crystallography. UV study of the interaction of the complexes with calf-thymus DNA (CT DNA) has shown that they bind to CT DNA with [(2,2'-bipyridylamine)bis(flumequinato)nickel(II)] exhibiting the highest binding constant to CT DNA. The cyclic voltammograms of the complexes have shown that in the presence of CT DNA the complexes can bind to CT DNA by the intercalative binding mode which has also been verified by DNA solution viscosity measurements. Competitive study with ethidium bromide (EB) has shown that the complexes can displace the DNA-bound EB indicating that they bind to DNA in strong competition with EB. The complexes exhibit good binding propensity to human or bovine serum albumin protein having relatively high binding constant values. The biological properties of the [Ni(quinolonato)(2)(2,2'-bipyridylamine)] complexes have been evaluated in comparison to the previously reported Ni(II) quinolone complexes [Ni(quinolonato)(2)(H(2)O)(2)], [Ni(quinolonato)(2)(2,2'-bipyridine)] and [Ni(quinolonato)(2)(1,10-phenanthroline)]. The quinolones and their Ni(II) complexes have been tested for their antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity. They have been also tested in vitro for their inhibitory activity against soybean lipoxygenase.

  1. Persistent organic pollutants in a marine bivalve on the Marennes-Oléron Bay and the Gironde Estuary (French Atlantic Coast) - part 2: potential biological effects.

    PubMed

    Luna-Acosta, A; Bustamante, P; Budzinski, H; Huet, V; Thomas-Guyon, H

    2015-05-01

    Contaminant effects on defence responses of ecologically and economically important organisms, such as the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, are likely to influence their ability to resist infectious diseases, particularly at the young stages. The aim of this study was to explore the potential relationships between organic contaminants accumulated in the soft tissues of juvenile oysters, defence responses and physiological condition. Oysters were transplanted during summer and winter periods in different sites in the Marennes-Oléron Bay, the first area of oyster production in France, and in the Gironde Estuary, the biggest estuary in Occidental Europe. Amongst the battery of biochemical and physiological biomarkers applied in the present work [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), malondyaldehyde (MDA), catecholase, laccase and lysozyme in gills, digestive glands, mantle and haemolymph, glycogen, proteins and lipids in the digestive gland and the condition index at the whole-organism level], MDA and lysozyme in the digestive gland and SOD, GPx and laccase in plasma contributed in order to significantly discriminate the sites in which oysters bioaccumulated different levels of heavy polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HPAHs), polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs), polybromodiphenylethers (PBDEs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs) and lindane. These results strengthen the hypothesis that it is possible to differentiate sites depending on their contamination levels and biological effects by carrying out studies with transplanted juvenile oysters. In addition, correlations were found between antioxidant and immune-defence responses, and PAH and DDT body burdens in the first area of oyster production in France (the Marennes-Oléron Bay) and where considerable oyster mortalities have been reported. This result suggests that the presence of organic chemical contaminants in the Marennes-Oléron Bay may influence defence responses in juveniles of C

  2. Virus Assemblies as Templates for Nanocircuits

    SciTech Connect

    James N Culver; Michael T Harris

    2011-08-31

    The goals of this project were directed at the identification and characterization of bio-mineralization processes and patterning methods for the development of nano scale materials and structures with novel energy and conductive traits. This project utilized a simple plant virus as a model template to investigate methods to attach and coat metals and other inorganic compounds onto biologically based nanotemplates. Accomplishments include: the development of robust biological nanotemplates with enhanced inorganic coating activities; novel coating strategies that allow for the deposition of a continuous inorganic layer onto a bio-nanotemplate even in the absence of a reducing agent; three-dimensional patterning methods for the assemble of nano-featured high aspect ratio surfaces and the demonstrated use of these surfaces in enhancing battery and energy storage applications. Combined results from this project have significantly advanced our understanding and ability to utilize the unique self-assembly properties of biologically based molecules to produce novel materials at the nanoscale level.

  3. Systems biology and the origins of life? Part I. Are biochemical networks possible ancestors of living systems? Reproduction, identity and sensitivity to signals of biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Ricard, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    The set of these two theoretical papers offers an alternative to the hypothesis of a primordial RNA-world. The basic idea of these papers is to consider that the first prebiotic systems could have been networks of catalysed reactions encapsulated by a membrane. In order to test this hypothesis it was attempted to list the main obligatory features of living systems and see whether encapsulated biochemical networks could possibly display these features. The traits of living systems are the following: the ability they have to reproduce; the fact they possess an identity; the fact that biological events should be considered in the context of a history; the fact that living systems are able to evolve by selection of alterations of their structure and self-organization. The aim of these two papers is precisely to show that encapsulated biochemical networks can possess these properties and can be considered good candidates for the first prebiotic systems. In the present paper it is shown that if the proteinoids are not very specific catalysts and if some of the reactions of the network are autocatalytic whereas others are not, the resulting system does not reach a steady-state and tends to duplicate. In the same line, these biochemical networks possess an identity, viz. an information, defined from the probability of occurrence of these nodes. Moreover interaction of two ligands can increase, or decrease, this information. In the first case, the system is defined as emergent, in the second case it is considered integrated. Another property of living systems is that their behaviour is defined in the context of a time-arrow. For instance, they are able to sense whether the intensity of a signal is reached after an increase, or a decrease. This property can be mimicked by a simple physico-chemical system made up of the diffusion of a ligand followed by its chemical transformation catalysed by a proteinoid displaying inhibition by excess substrate. Under these conditions the

  4. Algorithms for automated DNA assembly

    PubMed Central

    Densmore, Douglas; Hsiau, Timothy H.-C.; Kittleson, Joshua T.; DeLoache, Will; Batten, Christopher; Anderson, J. Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Generating a defined set of genetic constructs within a large combinatorial space provides a powerful method for engineering novel biological functions. However, the process of assembling more than a few specific DNA sequences can be costly, time consuming and error prone. Even if a correct theoretical construction scheme is developed manually, it is likely to be suboptimal by any number of cost metrics. Modular, robust and formal approaches are needed for exploring these vast design spaces. By automating the design of DNA fabrication schemes using computational algorithms, we can eliminate human error while reducing redundant operations, thus minimizing the time and cost required for conducting biological engineering experiments. Here, we provide algorithms that optimize the simultaneous assembly of a collection of related DNA sequences. We compare our algorithms to an exhaustive search on a small synthetic dataset and our results show that our algorithms can quickly find an optimal solution. Comparison with random search approaches on two real-world datasets show that our algorithms can also quickly find lower-cost solutions for large datasets. PMID:20335162

  5. A facile and green strategy for the synthesis of Au, Ag and Au-Ag alloy nanoparticles using aerial parts of R. hypocrateriformis extract and their biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Godipurge, S S; Yallappa, S; Biradar, Naveen J; Biradar, J S; Dhananjaya, B L; Hegde, Gajanan; Jagadish, K; Hegde, Gurumurthy

    2016-12-01

    A facile and green strategy is reported here to synthesize gold (Au), silver (Ag) and gold-silver (Au-Ag) alloy nanoparticles (NPs) through bio-reduction reactions of aqueous corresponding metal precursors mediated by extracts of aerial parts of R. hypocrateriformis, which act as both reducing and stabilizing agents, under microwave irradiation. UV-vis spectrophotometer, XRD, FT-IR, FESEM/TEM, TGA and EDAX analysis were used to characterize the obtained NPs. The formation of NPs is evident from their surface plasmon resonance peak observed at λmax=∼550, 450 and 500nm for Au, Ag and Au-Ag alloy NPs respectively. XRD pattern revealed that fcc structure, while FT-IR spectra signify the presence of phytochemicals adsorbed on NPs. Such a biofunctionalized NPs were characterized by their weight loss, 30% due to thermal degradation of plant phytochemicals observed in TG analysis. The spherical shape of Au, Ag and Au-Ag alloy NPs (∼10-50nm) is observed by FE-SEM/TEM images. EDAX analysis confirms the expected elemental composition. Moreover, these NPs showed enhanced antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anticancer activities, though it is more pronounced for Au-Ag alloy NPs, which is due to the combining effect of phytochemicals, Au and Ag metals. Thus, the biosynthesized NPs could be applied as effective growth inhibitors for various biomedical applications.

  6. Metabolites from nematophagous fungi and nematicidal natural products from fungi as an alternative for biological control. Part I: metabolites from nematophagous ascomycetes.

    PubMed

    Degenkolb, Thomas; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes are estimated to cause global annual losses of more than US$ 100 billion. The number of registered nematicides has declined substantially over the last 25 years due to concerns about their non-specific mechanisms of action and hence their potential toxicity and likelihood to cause environmental damage. Environmentally beneficial and inexpensive alternatives to chemicals, which do not affect vertebrates, crops, and other non-target organisms, are therefore urgently required. Nematophagous fungi are natural antagonists of nematode parasites, and these offer an ecophysiological source of novel biocontrol strategies. In this first section of a two-part review article, we discuss 83 nematicidal and non-nematicidal primary and secondary metabolites found in nematophagous ascomycetes. Some of these substances exhibit nematicidal activities, namely oligosporon, 4',5'-dihydrooligosporon, talathermophilins A and B, phomalactone, aurovertins D and F, paeciloxazine, a pyridine carboxylic acid derivative, and leucinostatins. Blumenol A acts as a nematode attractant. Other substances, such as arthrosporols and paganins, play a decisive role in the life cycle of the producers, regulating the formation of reproductive or trapping organs. We conclude by considering the potential applications of these beneficial organisms in plant protection strategies.

  7. Construction and engineering of large biochemical pathways via DNA assembler

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zengyi; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-01-01

    Summary DNA assembler enables rapid construction and engineering of biochemical pathways in a one-step fashion by exploitation of the in vivo homologous recombination mechanism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It has many applications in pathway engineering, metabolic engineering, combinatorial biology, and synthetic biology. Here we use two examples including the zeaxanthin biosynthetic pathway and the aureothin biosynthetic gene cluster to describe the key steps in the construction of pathways containing multiple genes using the DNA assembler approach. Methods for construct design, pathway assembly, pathway confirmation, and functional analysis are shown. The protocol for fine genetic modifications such as site-directed mutagenesis for engineering the aureothin gene cluster is also illustrated. PMID:23996442

  8. DNA Assembly Tools and Strategies for the Generation of Plasmids.

    PubMed

    Baek, Chang-Ho; Liss, Michael; Clancy, Kevin; Chesnut, Jonathan; Katzen, Federico

    2014-10-01

    Since the discovery of restriction enzymes and the generation of the first recombinant DNA molecule over 40 years ago, molecular biology has evolved into a multidisciplinary field that has democratized the conversion of a digitized DNA sequence stored in a computer into its biological counterpart, usually as a plasmid, stored in a living cell. In this article, we summarize the most relevant tools that allow the swift assembly of DNA sequences into useful plasmids for biotechnological purposes. We cover the main components and stages in a typical DNA assembly workflow, namely in silico design, de novo gene synthesis, and in vitro and in vivo sequence assembly methodologies.

  9. Splice assembly tool and method of splicing

    DOEpatents

    Silva, Frank A.

    1980-01-01

    A splice assembly tool for assembling component parts of an electrical conductor while producing a splice connection between electrical cables therewith, comprises a first structural member adaptable for supporting force applying means thereon, said force applying means enabling a rotary force applied manually thereto to be converted to a longitudinal force for subsequent application against a first component part of said electrical connection, a second structural member adaptable for engaging a second component part in a manner to assist said first structural member in assembling the component parts relative to one another and transmission means for conveying said longitudinal force between said first and said second structural members, said first and said second structural members being coupled to one another by said transmission means, wherein at least one of said component parts comprises a tubular elastomeric sleeve and said force applying means provides a relatively high mechanical advantage when said rotary force is applied thereto so as to facilitate assembly of said at least one tubular elastomeric sleeve about said other component part in an interference fit manner.

  10. Nanopropulsion by biocatalytic self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Leckie, Joy; Hope, Alexander; Hughes, Meghan; Debnath, Sisir; Fleming, Scott; Wark, Alastair W; Ulijn, Rein V; Haw, Mark D

    2014-09-23

    A number of organisms and organelles are capable of self-propulsion at the micro- and nanoscales. Production of simple man-made mimics of biological transportation systems may prove relevant to achieving movement in artificial cells and nano/micronscale robotics that may be of biological and nanotechnological importance. We demonstrate the propulsion of particles based on catalytically controlled molecular self-assembly and fiber formation at the particle surface. Specifically, phosphatase enzymes (acting as the engine) are conjugated to a quantum dot (the vehicle), and are subsequently exposed to micellar aggregates (fuel) that upon biocatalytic dephosphorylation undergo fibrillar self-assembly, which in turn causes propulsion. The motion of individual enzyme/quantum dot conjugates is followed directly using fluorescence microscopy. While overall movement remains random, the enzyme-conjugates exhibit significantly faster transport in the presence of the fiber forming system, compared to controls without fuel, a non-self-assembling substrate, or a substrate which assembles into spherical, rather than fibrous structures upon enzymatic dephosphorylation. When increasing the concentration of the fiber-forming fuel, the speed of the conjugates increases compared to non-self-assembling substrate, although directionality remains random.

  11. Large branched self-assembled DNA complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosch, Paul; Wälti, Christoph; Middelberg, Anton P. J.; Davies, A. Giles

    2007-04-01

    Many biological molecules have been demonstrated to self-assemble into complex structures and networks by using their very efficient and selective molecular recognition processes. The use of biological molecules as scaffolds for the construction of functional devices by self-assembling nanoscale complexes onto the scaffolds has recently attracted significant attention and many different applications in this field have emerged. In particular DNA, owing to its inherent sophisticated self-organization and molecular recognition properties, has served widely as a scaffold for various nanotechnological self-assembly applications, with metallic and semiconducting nanoparticles, proteins, macromolecular complexes, inter alia, being assembled onto designed DNA scaffolds. Such scaffolds may typically contain multiple branch-points and comprise a number of DNA molecules selfassembled into the desired configuration. Previously, several studies have used synthetic methods to produce the constituent DNA of the scaffolds, but this typically constrains the size of the complexes. For applications that require larger self-assembling DNA complexes, several tens of nanometers or more, other techniques need to be employed. In this article, we discuss a generic technique to generate large branched DNA macromolecular complexes.

  12. A simple thermodynamic model for quantitatively addressing cooperativity in multicomponent self-assembly processes--part 1: Theoretical concepts and application to monometallic coordination complexes and bimetallic helicates possessing identical binding sites.

    PubMed

    Hamacek, Josef; Borkovec, Michal; Piguet, Claude

    2005-09-05

    A thermodynamic model has been developed for quantitatively estimating cooperativity in supramolecular polymetallic [M(m)L(n)] assemblies, as the combination of two simple indexes measuring intermetallic (I(c)MM) and interligand (I(c)LL) interactions. The usual microscopic intermolecular metal-ligand affinities (f(i)(M,L)) and intermetallic interaction parameters (uMM), adapted to the description of successive intermolecular binding of metal ions to a preorganized receptor, are completed with interligand interactions (uLL) and effective concentrations (c(eff)), accounting for the explicit free energy associated with the aggregation of the ligands forming the receptor. Application to standard monometallic pseudo-octahedral complexes [M(L)(n)(H2O)(6 - n)] (M = Co, Ni, Hf, L = ammonia, fluoride, imidazole, n = 1-6) systematically shows negative cooperativity (uLL < 1), which can be modulated by the electronic structures, charges, and sizes of the entering ligands and of the metal ions. Extension to the self-assembly of more sophisticated bimetallic helicates possessing identical binding sites is discussed, together with the origin of the positively cooperative formation of [Eu2(L3)3].

  13. Synthetic Biology - The Synthesis of Biology.

    PubMed

    Ausländer, Simon; Ausländer, David; Fussenegger, Martin

    2016-12-11

    Synthetic biology envisages the engineering of man-made living biomachines from standardized components that can perform pre-defined functions in a (self-)controlled manner. Different research strategies and interdisciplinary efforts are pursued to implement engineering principles to biology. The "top-down" strategy exploits nature's incredible diversity of existing, natural parts to construct synthetic compositions of genetic, metabolic or signalling networks with predictable and controllable properties. This mainly application-driven approach results in living factories that produce drugs, biofuels, biomaterials and fine chemicals and results in living pills that are based on engineered cells with the capacity to autonomously detect and treat disease states in vivo. In contrast, the "bottom-up" strategy seeks to be independent of existing living systems by designing biological systems from scratch and synthesizing artificial biological entities not found in nature. This more knowledge-driven approach investigates the reconstruction of minimal biological systems that are capable of performing basic biological phenomena, such as self-organization, self-replication and self-sustainability. Moreover, the syntheses of artificial biological units, such as synthetic nucleotides or amino acids, and their implementation into polymers inside living cells currently set the boundaries between natural and artificial biological systems. In particular, the in vitro design, synthesis and transfer of complete genomes into host cells and the application of efficient genome-wide intervention techniques point to the future of synthetic biology: the creation of living designer cells with tailored desirable properties for biomedicine and biotechnology.

  14. Bioinformatics for the synthetic biology of natural products: integrating across the Design–Build–Test cycle

    PubMed Central

    Currin, Andrew; Jervis, Adrian J.; Rattray, Nicholas J. W.; Swainston, Neil; Yan, Cunyu; Breitling, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Covering: 2000 to 2016 Progress in synthetic biology is enabled by powerful bioinformatics tools allowing the integration of the design, build and test stages of the biological engineering cycle. In this review we illustrate how this integration can be achieved, with a particular focus on natural products discovery and production. Bioinformatics tools for the DESIGN and BUILD stages include tools for the selection, synthesis, assembly and optimization of parts (enzymes and regulatory elements), devices (pathways) and systems (chassis). TEST tools include those for screening, identification and quantification of metabolites for rapid prototyping. The main advantages and limitations of these tools as well as their interoperability capabilities are highlighted. PMID:27185383

  15. Reverse engineering of complex biological body parts by squared distance enabled non-uniform rational B-spline technique and layered manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Pandithevan, Ponnusamy

    2015-02-01

    In tissue engineering, the successful modeling of scaffold for the replacement of damaged body parts depends mainly on external geometry and internal architecture in order to avoid the adverse effects such as pain and lack of ability to transfer the load to the surrounding bone. Due to flexibility in controlling the parameters, layered manufacturing processes are widely used for the fabrication of bone tissue engineering scaffold with the given computer-aided design model. This article presents a squared distance minimization approach for weight optimization of non-uniform rational B-spline curve and surface to modify the geometry that exactly fits into the defect region automatically and thus to fabricate the scaffold specific to subject and site. The study showed that though the errors associated in the B-spline curve and surface were minimized by squared distance method than point distance method and tangent distance method, the errors could be minimized further in the rational B-spline curve and surface as the optimal weight could change the shape that desired for the defect site. In order to measure the efficacy of the present approach, the results were compared with point distance method and tangent distance method in optimizing the non-rational and rational B-spline curve and surface fitting for the defect site. The optimized geometry then allowed to construct the scaffold in fused deposition modeling system as an example. The result revealed that the squared distance-based weight optimization of the rational curve and surface in making the defect specific geometry best fits into the defect region than the other methods used.

  16. Dynamic self-assembly of 'living' polymeric chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Binghui; Shi, Yunfeng

    2017-01-01

    We report a dynamic self-assembly system of 'living' polymeric chains sustained by chemistry using reactive molecular dynamics simulations. The linear polymeric chains consist of self-assembled nanoparticles connected by metastable linker molecules. As such, the polymeric chains, once assembled, undergo spontaneous dissociation driven by thermodynamics. However, with a continuous supply of linker molecules and the stored chemical energy therein, the polymeric chains can survive and maintain a steady state averaged chain length. These dynamically self-assembled polymeric chains are analogous to biological systems that both are thermodynamically metastable, yet dynamically stable upon continuous influx of matter and energy.

  17. Physical limits on computation by assemblies of allosteric proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, John

    2009-03-01

    Assemblies of allosteric proteins are the principle information processing devices in biology. Using the Ca^2+-sensitive cardiac regulatory assembly as a paradigm for Brownian computation, we examine how system complexity and system resetting impose physical limits on computation. Nearest-neighbor-limited interactions among assembly components constrains the topology of the system's macrostate free energy landscape and produces degenerate transition probabilities. As a result, signaling fidelity and deactivation kinetics can not be simultaneously optimized. This imposes an upper limit on the rate of information processing by assemblies of allosteric proteins that couple to a single ligand type.

  18. Physical Limits on Computation by Assemblies of Allosteric Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, John M.

    2008-10-01

    Assemblies of allosteric proteins are the principle information processing devices in biology. Using the Ca2+-sensitive cardiac regulatory assembly as a paradigm for Brownian computation, I examine how system complexity and system resetting impose physical limits on computation. Nearest-neighbor-limited interactions among assembly components constrain the topology of the system’s macrostate free energy landscape and produce degenerate transition probabilities. As a result, signaling fidelity and deactivation kinetics cannot be simultaneously optimized. This imposes an upper limit on the rate of information processing by assemblies of allosteric proteins that couple to a single ligand type.

  19. Composite turbine bucket assembly

    DOEpatents

    Liotta, Gary Charles; Garcia-Crespo, Andres

    2014-05-20

    A composite turbine blade assembly includes a ceramic blade including an airfoil portion, a shank portion and an attachment portion; and a transition assembly adapted to attach the ceramic blade to a turbine disk or rotor, the transition assembly including first and second transition components clamped together, trapping said ceramic airfoil therebetween. Interior surfaces of the first and second transition portions are formed to mate with the shank portion and the attachment portion of the ceramic blade, and exterior surfaces of said first and second transition components are formed to include an attachment feature enabling the transition assembly to be attached to the turbine rotor or disk.

  20. Self-assembly of colloidal surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kegel, Willem

    2012-02-01

    We developed colloidal dumbbells with a rough and a smooth part, based on a method reported in Ref. [1]. Specific attraction between the smooth parts occurs upon addition of non-adsorbing polymers of appropriate size. We present the first results in terms of the assemblies that emerge in these systems. [4pt] [1] D.J. Kraft, W.S. Vlug, C.M. van Kats, A. van Blaaderen, A. Imhof and W.K. Kegel, Self-assembly of colloids with liquid protrusions, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 131, 1182, (2009)

  1. All biology is computational biology

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Here, I argue that computational thinking and techniques are so central to the quest of understanding life that today all biology is computational biology. Computational biology brings order into our understanding of life, it makes biological concepts rigorous and testable, and it provides a reference map that holds together individual insights. The next modern synthesis in biology will be driven by mathematical, statistical, and computational methods being absorbed into mainstream biological training, turning biology into a quantitative science. PMID:28278152

  2. All biology is computational biology.

    PubMed

    Markowetz, Florian

    2017-03-01

    Here, I argue that computational thinking and techniques are so central to the quest of understanding life that today all biology is computational biology. Computational biology brings order into our understanding of life, it makes biological concepts rigorous and testable, and it provides a reference map that holds together individual insights. The next modern synthesis in biology will be driven by mathematical, statistical, and computational methods being absorbed into mainstream biological training, turning biology into a quantitative science.

  3. Development of simulation tools for virus shell assembly. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Bonnie

    2001-01-05

    Prof. Berger's major areas of research have been in applying computational and mathematical techniques to problems in biology, and more specifically to problems in protein folding and genomics. Significant progress has been made in the following areas relating to virus shell assembly: development has been progressing on a second-generation self-assembly simulator which provides a more versatile and physically realistic model of assembly; simulations are being developed and applied to a variety of problems in virus assembly; and collaborative efforts have continued with experimental biologists to verify and inspire the local rules theory and the simulator. The group has also worked on applications of the techniques developed here to other self-assembling structures in the material and biological sciences. Some of this work has been conducted in conjunction with Dr. Sorin Istrail when he was at Sandia National Labs.

  4. Assembly design system based on engineering connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Wensheng

    2016-12-01

    An assembly design system is an important part of computer-aided design systems, which are important tools for realizing product concept design. The traditional assembly design system does not record the connection information of production on the engineering layer; consequently, the upstream design idea cannot be fully used in the downstream design. An assembly design model based on the relationship of engineering connection is presented. In this model, all nodes are divided into two categories: The component and the connection. Moreover, the product is constructed on the basis of the connection relationship of the components. The model is an And/Or graph and has the ability to record all assembly schemes. This model records only the connection information that has engineering application value in the product design. In addition, this model can significantly reduce the number of combinations, and is very favorable for the assembly sequence planning in the downstream. The system contains a connection knowledge system that can be mapped to the connection node, and the connection knowledge obtained in practice can be returned to the knowledge system. Finally, VC++ 6.0 is used to develop a prototype system called Connect-based Assembly Planning (CAP). The relationship between the CAP system and the commercial assembly design system is also established.

  5. Cell-free protein synthesis and assembly on a biochip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyman, Yael; Buxboim, Amnon; Wolf, Sharon G.; Daube, Shirley S.; Bar-Ziv, Roy H.

    2012-06-01

    Biologically active complexes such as ribosomes and bacteriophages are formed through the self-assembly of proteins and nucleic acids. Recapitulating these biological self-assembly processes in a cell-free environment offers a way to develop synthetic biodevices. To visualize and understand the assembly process, a platform is required that enables simultaneous synthesis, assembly and imaging at the nanoscale. Here, we show that a silicon dioxide grid, used to support samples in transmission electron microscopy, can be modified into a biochip to combine in situ protein synthesis, assembly and imaging. Light is used to pattern the biochip surface with genes that encode specific proteins, and antibody traps that bind and assemble the nascent proteins. Using transmission electron microscopy imaging we show that protein nanotubes synthesized on the biochip surface in the presence of antibody traps efficiently assembled on these traps, but pre-assembled nanotubes were not effectively captured. Moreover, synthesis of green fluorescent protein from its immobilized gene generated a gradient of captured proteins decreasing in concentration away from the gene source. This biochip could be used to create spatial patterns of proteins assembled on surfaces.

  6. Molecular biomimetics: nanotechnology through biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarikaya, Mehmet; Tamerler, Candan; Jen, Alex K.-Y.; Schulten, Klaus; Baneyx, François

    2003-09-01

    Proteins, through their unique and specific interactions with other macromolecules and inorganics, control structures and functions of all biological hard and soft tissues in organisms. Molecular biomimetics is an emerging field in which hybrid technologies are developed by using the tools of molecular biology and nanotechnology. Taking lessons from biology, polypeptides can now be genetically engineered to specifically bind to selected inorganic compounds for applications in nano- and biotechnology. This review discusses combinatorial biological protocols, that is, bacterial cell surface and phage-display technologies, in the selection of short sequences that have affinity to (noble) metals, semiconducting oxides and other technological compounds. These genetically engineered proteins for inorganics (GEPIs) can be used in the assembly of functional nanostructures. Based on the three fundamental principles of molecular recognition, self-assembly and DNA manipulation, we highlight successful uses of GEPI in nanotechnology.

  7. Demisable Reaction-Wheel Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roder, Russell; Ahronovich, Eliezer; Davis, Milton C., III

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses the concept of a demisable motor-drive-and-flywheel assembly [reaction-wheel assembly (RWA)] used in controlling the attitude of a spacecraft. Demisable as used here does not have its traditional legal meaning; instead, it signifies susceptible to melting, vaporizing, and/or otherwise disintegrating during re-entry of the spacecraft into the atmosphere of the Earth so as not to pose a hazard to anyone or anything on the ground. Prior RWAs include parts made of metals (e.g., iron, steel, and titanium) that melt at high temperatures and include structures of generally closed character that shield some parts (e.g., magnets) against re-entry heating. In a demisable RWA, the flywheel would be made of aluminum, which melts at a lower temperature. The flywheel web would not be a solid disk but would have a more open, nearly-spoke-like structure so that it would disintegrate more rapidly; hence, the flywheel rim would separate more rapidly so that parts shielded by the rim would be exposed sooner to re-entry heating. In addition, clearances between the flywheel and other components would be made greater, imparting a more open character and thus increasing the exposure of those components.

  8. Laser bottom hole assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, Lance D; Norton, Ryan J; McKay, Ryan P; Mesnard, David R; Fraze, Jason D; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O

    2014-01-14

    There is provided for laser bottom hole assembly for providing a high power laser beam having greater than 5 kW of power for a laser mechanical drilling process to advance a borehole. This assembly utilizes a reverse Moineau motor type power section and provides a self-regulating system that addresses fluid flows relating to motive force, cooling and removal of cuttings.

  9. Liquid rocket valve assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The design and operating characteristics of valve assemblies used in liquid propellant rocket engines are discussed. The subjects considered are as follows: (1) valve selection parameters, (2) major design aspects, (3) design integration of valve subassemblies, and (4) assembly of components and functional tests. Information is provided on engine, stage, and spacecraft checkout procedures.

  10. Turbine disc sealing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Diakunchak, Ihor S.

    2013-03-05

    A disc seal assembly for use in a turbine engine. The disc seal assembly includes a plurality of outwardly extending sealing flange members that define a plurality of fluid pockets. The sealing flange members define a labyrinth flow path therebetween to limit leakage between a hot gas path and a disc cavity in the turbine engine.

  11. Permanent magnet assembly

    DOEpatents

    Chell, Jeremy; Zimm, Carl B.

    2006-12-12

    A permanent magnet assembly is disclosed that is adapted to provide a magnetic field across an arc-shaped gap. Such a permanent magnet assembly can be used, for example, to provide a time-varying magnetic field to an annular region for use in a magnetic refrigerator.

  12. Perspective: Geometrically frustrated assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grason, Gregory M.

    2016-09-01

    This perspective will overview an emerging paradigm for self-organized soft materials, geometrically frustrated assemblies, where interactions between self-assembling elements (e.g., particles, macromolecules, proteins) favor local packing motifs that are incompatible with uniform global order in the assembly. This classification applies to a broad range of material assemblies including self-twisting protein filament bundles, amyloid fibers, chiral smectics and membranes, particle-coated droplets, curved protein shells, and phase-separated lipid vesicles. In assemblies, geometric frustration leads to a host of anomalous structural and thermodynamic properties, including heterogeneous and internally stressed equilibrium structures, self-limiting assembly, and topological defects in the equilibrium assembly structures. The purpose of this perspective is to (1) highlight the unifying principles and consequences of geometric frustration in soft matter assemblies; (2) classify the known distinct modes of frustration and review corresponding experimental examples; and (3) describe outstanding questions not yet addressed about the unique properties and behaviors of this broad class of systems.

  13. High speed door assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shapiro, Carolyn

    1993-01-01

    A high speed door assembly, comprising an actuator cylinder and piston rods, a pressure supply cylinder and fittings, an electrically detonated explosive bolt, a honeycomb structured door, a honeycomb structured decelerator, and a structural steel frame encasing the assembly to close over a 3 foot diameter opening within 50 milliseconds of actuation, to contain hazardous materials and vapors within a test fixture.

  14. High speed door assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shapiro, C.

    1993-04-27

    A high speed door assembly is described, comprising an actuator cylinder and piston rods, a pressure supply cylinder and fittings, an electrically detonated explosive bolt, a honeycomb structured door, a honeycomb structured decelerator, and a structural steel frame encasing the assembly to close over a 3 foot diameter opening within 50 milliseconds of actuation, to contain hazardous materials and vapors within a test fixture.

  15. Air bearing vacuum seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Booth, Rex

    1978-01-01

    An air bearing vacuum seal assembly capable of rotating at the speed of several thousand revolutions per minute using an air cushion to prevent the rotating and stationary parts from touching, and a two stage differential pumping arrangement to maintain the pressure gradient between the air cushion and the vacuum so that the leak rate into the vacuum is, for example, less than 1 .times. 10.sup.-4 Pa m.sup.3 /s. The air bearing vacuum seal has particular application for mounting rotating targets to an evacuated accelerator beam tube for bombardment of the targets with high-power charged particle beams in vacuum.

  16. Operon Gene Order Is Optimized for Ordered Protein Complex Assembly.

    PubMed

    Wells, Jonathan N; Bergendahl, L Therese; Marsh, Joseph A

    2016-02-02

    The assembly of heteromeric protein complexes is an inherently stochastic process in which multiple genes are expressed separately into proteins, which must then somehow find each other within the cell. Here, we considered one of the ways by which prokaryotic organisms have attempted to maximize the efficiency of protein complex assembly: the organization of subunit-encoding genes into operons. Using structure-based assembly predictions, we show that operon gene order has been optimized to match the order in which protein subunits assemble. Exceptions to this are almost entirely highly expressed proteins for which assembly is less stochastic and for which precisely ordered translation offers less benefit. Overall, these results show that ordered protein complex assembly pathways are of significant biological importance and represent a major evolutionary constraint on operon gene organization.

  17. 8. RAIL SPURS AND NORTHEAST PART OF EAST ELEVATION. VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. RAIL SPURS AND NORTHEAST PART OF EAST ELEVATION. VIEW TO NORTH-NORTHWEST. - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Assembly Building, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. Assembly: a resource for assembled genomes at NCBI.

    PubMed

    Kitts, Paul A; Church, Deanna M; Thibaud-Nissen, Françoise; Choi, Jinna; Hem, Vichet; Sapojnikov, Victor; Smith, Robert G; Tatusova, Tatiana; Xiang, Charlie; Zherikov, Andrey; DiCuccio, Michael; Murphy, Terence D; Pruitt, Kim D; Kimchi, Avi

    2016-01-04

    The NCBI Assembly database (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/assembly/) provides stable accessioning and data tracking for genome assembly data. The model underlying the database can accommodate a range of assembly structures, including sets of unordered contig or scaffold sequences, bacterial genomes consisting of a single complete chromosome, or complex structures such as a human genome with modeled allelic variation. The database provides an assembly accession and version to unambiguously identify the set of sequences that make up a particular version of an assembly, and tracks changes to updated genome assemblies. The Assembly database reports metadata such as assembly names, simple statistical reports of the assembly (number of contigs and scaffolds, contiguity metrics such as contig N50, total sequence length and total gap length) as well as the assembly update history. The Assembly database also tracks the relationship between an assembly submitted to the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Consortium (INSDC) and the assembly represented in the NCBI RefSeq project. Users can find assemblies of interest by querying the Assembly Resource directly or by browsing available assemblies for a particular organism. Links in the Assembly Resource allow users to easily download sequence and annotations for current versions of genome assemblies from the NCBI genomes FTP site.

  19. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1998-05-19

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The SRF window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The SRF window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the SRF window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  20. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1997-03-11

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  1. Constrained space camera assembly

    DOEpatents

    Heckendorn, Frank M.; Anderson, Erin K.; Robinson, Casandra W.; Haynes, Harriet B.

    1999-01-01

    A constrained space camera assembly which is intended to be lowered through a hole into a tank, a borehole or another cavity. The assembly includes a generally cylindrical chamber comprising a head and a body and a wiring-carrying conduit extending from the chamber. Means are included in the chamber for rotating the body about the head without breaking an airtight seal formed therebetween. The assembly may be pressurized and accompanied with a pressure sensing means for sensing if a breach has occurred in the assembly. In one embodiment, two cameras, separated from their respective lenses, are installed on a mounting apparatus disposed in the chamber. The mounting apparatus includes means allowing both longitudinal and lateral movement of the cameras. Moving the cameras longitudinally focuses the cameras, and moving the cameras laterally away from one another effectively converges the cameras so that close objects can be viewed. The assembly further includes means for moving lenses of different magnification forward of the cameras.

  2. Mechanisms of Virus Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Perlmutter, Jason D.; Hagan, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are nanoscale entities containing a nucleic acid genome encased in a protein shell called a capsid, and in some cases surrounded by a lipid bilayer membrane. This review summarizes the physics that govern the processes by which capsids assembles within their host cells and in vitro. We describe the thermodynamics and kinetics for assembly of protein subunits into icosahedral capsid shells, and how these are modified in cases where the capsid assembles around a nucleic acid or on a lipid bilayer. We present experimental and theoretical techniques that have been used to characterize capsid assembly, and we highlight aspects of virus assembly which are likely to receive significant attention in the near future. PMID:25532951

  3. Modeling Viral Capsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    I present a review of the theoretical and computational methodologies that have been used to model the assembly of viral capsids. I discuss the capabilities and limitations of approaches ranging from equilibrium continuum theories to molecular dynamics simulations, and I give an overview of some of the important conclusions about virus assembly that have resulted from these modeling efforts. Topics include the assembly of empty viral shells, assembly around single-stranded nucleic acids to form viral particles, and assembly around synthetic polymers or charged nanoparticles for nanotechnology or biomedical applications. I present some examples in which modeling efforts have promoted experimental breakthroughs, as well as directions in which the connection between modeling and experiment can be strengthened. PMID:25663722

  4. Assembly of objects with not fully predefined shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arlotti, M. A.; Dimartino, V.

    1989-01-01

    An assembly problem in a non-deterministic environment, i.e., where parts to be assembled have unknown shape, size and location, is described. The only knowledge used by the robot to perform the assembly operation is given by a connectivity rule and geometrical constraints concerning parts. Once a set of geometrical features of parts has been extracted by a vision system, applying such a rule allows the dtermination of the composition sequence. A suitable sensory apparatus allows the control the whole operation.

  5. Plant synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wusheng; Stewart, C Neal

    2015-05-01

    Plant synthetic biology is an emerging field that combines engineering principles with plant biology toward the design and production of new devices. This emerging field should play an important role in future agriculture for traditional crop improvement, but also in enabling novel bioproduction in plants. In this review we discuss the design cycles of synthetic biology as well as key engineering principles, genetic parts, and computational tools that can be utilized in plant synthetic biology. Some pioneering examples are offered as a demonstration of how synthetic biology can be used to modify plants for specific purposes. These include synthetic sensors, synthetic metabolic pathways, and synthetic genomes. We also speculate about the future of synthetic biology of plants.

  6. Aspects of Tactical Biological Defense

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-03

    Likely Biological Agent Delivery Systems Range I Payload , System (kin) (kg) Remarks Missile Systems Condor I 100 unknown Produced by Argentina...36 10. Likely Biological Agent Delivery Systems ......................................................... 63 11. Bacteria, rickettsia...1. The mass spectrometer which is currently a part of the M93 FOX Nuclear, Biological, Chemical (NBC) Reconnaissance System may be programmed for the

  7. Advanced DNA assembly technologies in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Tsvetanova, Billyana; Peng, Lansha; Liang, Xiquan; Li, Ke; Hammond, Linda; Peterson, Todd C; Katzen, Federico

    2012-05-01

    Recombinant DNA technologies have had a fundamental impact on drug discovery. The continuous emergence of unique gene assembly techniques resulted in the generation of a variety of therapeutic reagents such as vaccines, cancer treatment molecules and regenerative medicine precursors. With the advent of synthetic biology there is a growing need for precise and concerted assembly of multiple DNA fragments of various sizes, including chromosomes. In this article, we summarize the highlights of the recombinant DNA technology since its inception in the early 1970s, emphasizing on the most recent advances, and underscoring their principles, advantages and shortcomings. Current and prior cloning trends are discussed in the context of sequence requirements and scars left behind. Our opinion is that despite the remarkable progress that has enabled the generation and manipulation of very large DNA sequences, a better understanding of the cell's natural circuits is needed in order to fully exploit the current state-of-the-art gene assembly technologies.

  8. Biological Technicians

    MedlinePlus

    ... Biological technicians typically need a bachelor’s degree in biology or a closely related field. It is important ... Biological technicians typically need a bachelor’s degree in biology or a closely related field. It is important ...

  9. Flexible, symmetry-directed approach to assembling protein cages

    PubMed Central

    Sciore, Aaron; Su, Min; Koldewey, Philipp; Eschweiler, Joseph D.; Diffley, Kelsey A.; Linhares, Brian M.; Ruotolo, Brandon T.; Bardwell, James C. A.; Skiniotis, Georgios; Marsh, E. Neil G.

    2016-01-01

    The assembly of individual protein subunits into large-scale symmetrical structures is widespread in nature and confers new biological properties. Engineered protein assemblies have potential applications in nanotechnology and medicine; however, a major challenge in engineering assemblies de novo has been to design interactions between the protein subunits so that they specifically assemble into the desired structure. Here we demonstrate a simple, generalizable approach to assemble proteins into cage-like structures that uses short de novo designed coiled-coil domains to mediate assembly. We assembled eight copies of a C3-symmetric trimeric esterase into a well-defined octahedral protein cage by appending a C4-symmetric coiled-coil domain to the protein through a short, flexible linker sequence, with the approximate length of the linker sequence determined by computational modeling. The structure of the cage was verified using a combination of analytical ultracentrifugation, native electrospray mass spectrometry, and negative stain and cryoelectron microscopy. For the protein cage to assemble correctly, it was necessary to optimize the length of the linker sequence. This observation suggests that flexibility between the two protein domains is important to allow the protein subunits sufficient freedom to assemble into the geometry specified by the combination of C4 and C3 symmetry elements. Because this approach is inherently modular and places minimal requirements on the structural features of the protein building blocks, it could be extended to assemble a wide variety of proteins into structures with different symmetries. PMID:27432965

  10. Flexible, symmetry-directed approach to assembling protein cages.

    PubMed

    Sciore, Aaron; Su, Min; Koldewey, Philipp; Eschweiler, Joseph D; Diffley, Kelsey A; Linhares, Brian M; Ruotolo, Brandon T; Bardwell, James C A; Skiniotis, Georgios; Marsh, E Neil G

    2016-08-02

    The assembly of individual protein subunits into large-scale symmetrical structures is widespread in nature and confers new biological properties. Engineered protein assemblies have potential applications in nanotechnology and medicine; however, a major challenge in engineering assemblies de novo has been to design interactions between the protein subunits so that they specifically assemble into the desired structure. Here we demonstrate a simple, generalizable approach to assemble proteins into cage-like structures that uses short de novo designed coiled-coil domains to mediate assembly. We assembled eight copies of a C3-symmetric trimeric esterase into a well-defined octahedral protein cage by appending a C4-symmetric coiled-coil domain to the protein through a short, flexible linker sequence, with the approximate length of the linker sequence determined by computational modeling. The structure of the cage was verified using a combination of analytical ultracentrifugation, native electrospray mass spectrometry, and negative stain and cryoelectron microscopy. For the protein cage to assemble correctly, it was necessary to optimize the length of the linker sequence. This observation suggests that flexibility between the two protein domains is important to allow the protein subunits sufficient freedom to assemble into the geometry specified by the combination of C4 and C3 symmetry elements. Because this approach is inherently modular and places minimal requirements on the structural features of the protein building blocks, it could be extended to assemble a wide variety of proteins into structures with different symmetries.

  11. Torque-while-turnaround scan mirror assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starkus, C. J.

    1977-01-01

    A scan mirror assembly which is part of a thematic mapper system is described with emphasis on mechanical aspects of the design. Features of the oscillating scan mirror mechanism include: a low level of structural vibration for the impact energies involved in mirror oscillation and return of energy lost during impact to the mirror by applying torque during the instant of impact.

  12. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Using neck brackets 78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum test... to the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal centerline (see § 572.33, Figure 20, except... (horizontal surface at the base of the skull) rotation with respect to the pendulum's longitudinal...

  13. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Using neck brackets 78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum test... to the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal centerline (see § 572.33, Figure 20, except... (horizontal surface at the base of the skull) rotation with respect to the pendulum's longitudinal...

  14. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Using neck brackets 78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum test... to the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal centerline (see § 572.33, Figure 20, except... (horizontal surface at the base of the skull) rotation with respect to the pendulum's longitudinal...

  15. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Using neck brackets 78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum test... to the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal centerline (see § 572.33, Figure 20, except... (horizontal surface at the base of the skull) rotation with respect to the pendulum's longitudinal...

  16. Improved method of solar-cell assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broder, J. D.; Forestieri, A. F.; Mandelkorn, J.

    1979-01-01

    Method bonds solar-cell modules between rigid or flexible base and plastic protective cover. Method relies on using one of several commercially-available, transparent, silicone adhesives as bonding agent. Should it ever be necessary to repair or replace some part of assembly, it may be possible to remove cover without destroying package since adhesive remains flexible.

  17. Report to the General Assembly [of Illinois].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Community Coll. Board, Springfield.

    In this nine-part report to Illinois' General Assembly, the Illinois Community College Board (ICCB) reviews Board powers and duties, and systemwide goals, financial resources, student characteristics and outcomes, educational programs, training and economic development activities, programs for special populations, and current issues of importance…

  18. Building polyhedra by self-assembly: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Ryan; Klobušický, Joseph; Pandey, Shivendra; Gracias, David H; Menon, Govind

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the utility of a mathematical framework based on discrete geometry to model biological and synthetic self-assembly. Our primary biological example is the self-assembly of icosahedral viruses; our synthetic example is surface-tension-driven self-folding polyhedra. In both instances, the process of self-assembly is modeled by decomposing the polyhedron into a set of partially formed intermediate states. The set of all intermediates is called the configuration space, pathways of assembly are modeled as paths in the configuration space, and the kinetics and yield of assembly are modeled by rate equations, Markov chains, or cost functions on the configuration space. We review an interesting interplay between biological function and mathematical structure in viruses in light of this framework. We discuss in particular: (i) tiling theory as a coarse-grained description of all-atom models; (ii) the building game-a growth model for the formation of polyhedra; and (iii) the application of these models to the self-assembly of the bacteriophage MS2. We then use a similar framework to model self-folding polyhedra. We use a discrete folding algorithm to compute a configuration space that idealizes surface-tension-driven self-folding and analyze pathways of assembly and dominant intermediates. These computations are then compared with experimental observations of a self-folding dodecahedron with side 300 μm. In both models, despite a combinatorial explosion in the size of the configuration space, a few pathways and intermediates dominate self-assembly. For self-folding polyhedra, the dominant intermediates have fewer degrees of freedom than comparable intermediates, and are thus more rigid. The concentration of assembly pathways on a few intermediates with distinguished geometric properties is biologically and physically important, and suggests deeper mathematical structure.

  19. Brain oncology. Biology, diagnosis and therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chatel, M.; Darcel, F.; Pecker, J.

    1987-01-01

    The book's contents are as follows: Part I: Oncogenesis. Part II: Neuropathology. Part III: Tumoral Immunobiology and Oncobiology. Part IV: Biological and Diagnostic Imaging. Part V: Clinico-Pathological Studies. Part VI: Neurosurgical Procedures and Radiotherapy Trends. Part VII: Chemotherapy and Immunotherapy.

  20. Internal Aspects of the Skill Transfer of Manual Assembly Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyo, Daisuke

    2009-01-01

    In manual assembly work, parts are often assembled by applying force with a simple tool or by hand. A worker thus needs control the force he or she applies in working, as an appropriate level of force is requisite for minimizing work failures and improving efficiency. The object of this study is to clarify the relationship between the level of…

  1. Amorphous Metals and Composites as Mirrors and Mirror Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, Douglas C. (Inventor); Davis, Gregory L. (Inventor); Agnes, Gregory S. (Inventor); Shapiro, Andrew A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A mirror or mirror assembly fabricated by molding, pressing, assembling, or depositing one or more bulk metal glass (BMG), bulk metal glass composite (BMGMC), or amorphous metal (AM) parts and where the optical surface and backing of the mirror can be fabricated without machining or polishing by utilizing the unique molding capabilities of this class of materials.

  2. DC source assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Jeremy B; Newson, Steve

    2013-02-26

    Embodiments of DC source assemblies of power inverter systems of the type suitable for deployment in a vehicle having an electrically grounded chassis are provided. An embodiment of a DC source assembly comprises a housing, a DC source disposed within the housing, a first terminal, and a second terminal. The DC source also comprises a first capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the first terminal. The DC source assembly further comprises a second capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the second terminal.

  3. Plant and Animal Gravitational Biology. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Session WA2 includes short reports concerning: (1) The Asymmetrical Growth of Otoliths in Fish Affected by Altered Gravity and Causes Kinetosis; (2) Neurobiological Responses of Fish to Altered Gravity conditions: A Review; (3) An Age-Dependent Sensitivity of the Roll-Induced Vestibulocular Reflex to Hypergravity Exposure of Several Days in an Amphibian (Xenopus Laevis); (4) Mechanically-Induced Membrane Wounding During Parabolic Flight; and (5) Erythropoietin Stimulates Increased F Cell Numbers in Bone Marrow Cultures Established in Gravity and Microgravity Conditions.

  4. Machine Intelligence. Part 2. Biological Foundations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    out of associated sets of cortical neurons (free asso- ciation) is the mind thinking. Thinking did not suddenly appear with Cro - Magnon man, it evolved...plays a crucial role in the formation of memories (engrams). Memories are not stored there, but they are not stored anywhere (or at least they are not

  5. EDITORIAL: MEMS in biology and medicine MEMS in biology and medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruitt, Beth L.; Herr, Amy E.

    2011-05-01

    Stimulating—the first word that springs to mind regarding the emerging and expanding role of MEMS in biological inquiry. When invited to guest-edit this special issue on 'MEMS in biology and medicine' for JMM, we jumped at the opportunity. Partly owing to the breadth of the stimulating research in this nascent area and partly owing to the stimulating of biological function made possible with MEMS accessible length and time scales, we were eager to assemble manuscripts detailing some of the most cutting edge biological research being conducted around the globe. In addition to cutting edge engineering, this special issue features challenging biological questions addressed with innovative MEMS technologies. Topics span from Yetisen and colleagues' inquiry into quantifying pollen tube behaviour in response to pistil tissues [1] to Morimoto and colleagues' engineering efforts to produce monodisperse droplets capable of encapsulating single cells (without surface modification) [2]. Questions are bold, including a means to achieve therapeutically-relevant scaling for enrichment of leukocytes from blood (Inglis et al [3]), assessing the dependence of Escherichia coli biofilm formation on bacterial signalling (Meyer et al [4]), and elucidation of adhesion dynamics of circulating tumour cells (Cheung et al [5]) among others. Technologies are diverse, including microfabricated magnetic actuators (Lee et al [6]), stimuli-responsive polymer nanocomposites (Hess et al [7]), and SU-8 electrothermal microgrippers (Chu et al [8]) to name but a few. Contributing authors do indeed span a large swathe of the globe, with contributions from Australia, Italy, China, Canada, Denmark, Japan, the USA and numerous other locations. Collaboration finds a home here—with researchers from macromolecular science and electrical engineering collaborating with the Veterans Affairs Medical Center or neurosurgery researchers working with biological and electrical engineers. The questions posed by

  6. Visualizing viral assemblies in a nanoscale biosphere.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Brian L; Showalter, Shannon P; Dukes, Madeline J; Tanner, Justin R; Demmert, Andrew C; McDonald, Sarah M; Kelly, Deborah F

    2013-01-21

    We present a novel microfluidic platform to examine biological assemblies at high-resolution. We have engineered a functionalized chamber that serves as a "nanoscale biosphere" to capture and maintain rotavirus double-layered particles (DLPs) in a liquid environment. The chamber can be inserted into the column of a transmission electron microscope while being completely isolated from the vacuum system. This configuration allowed us to determine the structure of biological complexes at nanometer-resolution within a self-contained vessel. Images of DLPs were used to calculate the first 3D view of macromolecules in solution. We refer to this new fluidic visualization technology as in situ molecular microscopy.

  7. Engineering microbes with synthetic biology frameworks.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Effendi; Nielsen, David; Solomon, Kevin; Prather, Kristala Jones

    2008-12-01

    Typically, the outcome of biologically engineered unit operations cannot be controlled a priori due to the incorporation of ad hoc design into complex natural systems. To mitigate this problem, synthetic biology presents a systematic approach to standardizing biological components for the purpose of increasing their programmability and robustness when assembled with the aim to achieve novel biological functions. A complex engineered biological system using only standardized biological components is yet to exist. Nevertheless, current attempts to create and to implement modular, standardized biological components pave the way for the future creation of highly predictable artificial biological systems. Although synthetic biology frameworks can be applied to any biological engineering endeavor, this article will focus on providing a brief overview of advances in the field and its recent utilization for the engineering of microbes.

  8. Metrology Techniques for the Assembly of NCSX

    SciTech Connect

    C. Priniski, T. Dodson, M. Duco, S. Raftopoulos, R. Ellis, and A. Brooks

    2009-09-24

    In support of the National Compact Stellerator Experiment (NCSX), stellerator assembly activities continued this past year at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in partnership with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The construction program saw the completion of the first two Half Field-Period Assemblies (HPA), each consisting of three modular coils. The full machine includes six such sub-assemblies. A single HPA consists of three of the NCSX modular coils wound and assembled at PPPL. These geometrically-complex threedimensional coils were wound using computer-aided metrology and CAD models to tolerances within +/- 0.5mm. The assembly of these coils required similar accuracy on a larger scale with the added complexity of more individual parts and fewer degrees of freedom for correction. Several new potential positioning issues developed for which measurement and control techniques were developed. To accomplish this, CAD coordinate-based computer metrology equipment and software similar to the solutions employed for winding the modular coils was used. Given the size of the assemblies, the primary tools were both interferometeraided and Absolute Distance Measurement (ADM)-only based laser trackers. In addition, portable Coordinate Measurement Machine (CMM) arms and some novel indirect measurement techniques were employed. This paper will detail both the use of CAD coordinate-based metrology technology and the techniques developed and employed for dimensional control of NSCX subassemblies. The results achieved and possible improvements to techniques will be discussed.

  9. Designing Assemblies Of Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, F. W.; Kennedy, D.; Butler, R.; Aston, G.; Anderson, M. S.

    1992-01-01

    VICONOPT calculates vibrations and instabilities of assemblies of prismatic plates. Designed for efficient, accurate analysis of buckling and vibration, and for optimum design of panels of composite materials. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  10. Integrated thruster assembly program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The program is reported which has provided technology for a long life, high performing, integrated ACPS thruster assembly suitable for use in 100 typical flights of a space shuttle vehicle over a ten year period. The four integrated thruster assemblies (ITA) fabricated consisted of: propellant injector; a capacitive discharge, air gap torch type igniter assembly; fast response igniter and main propellant valves; and a combined regen-dump film cooled chamber. These flightweight 6672 N (1500 lb) thruster assemblies employed GH2/GO2 as propellants at a chamber pressure of 207 N/sq cm (300 psia). Test data were obtained on thrusted performance, thermal and hydraulic characteristics, dynamic response in pulsing, and cycle life. One thruster was fired in excess of 42,000 times.

  11. Swipe transfer assembly

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, Robert M.; Mills, William C.

    1992-01-01

    The swipe transfer assembly is a mechanical assembly which is used in conjunction with glove boxes and other sealed containments. It is used to pass small samples into or out of glove boxes without an open breach of the containment, and includes a rotational cylinder inside a fixed cylinder, the inside cylinder being rotatable through an arc of approximately 240.degree. relative to the outer cylinder. An offset of 120.degree. from end to end allows only one port to be opened at a time. The assembly is made of stainless steel or aluminum and clear acrylic plastic to enable visual observation. The assembly allows transfer of swipes and smears from radiological and other specially controlled environments.

  12. The proteasome assembly line

    PubMed Central

    Madura, Kiran

    2013-01-01

    The assembly of the proteasome — the cellular machine that eliminates unwanted proteins — is a carefully choreographed affair, involving a complex sequence of steps overseen by dedicated protein chaperones. PMID:19516331

  13. Core assembly storage structure

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jr., Charles E.; Brunings, Jay E.

    1988-01-01

    A structure for the storage of core assemblies from a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor. The structure comprises an enclosed housing having a substantially flat horizontal top plate, a bottom plate and substantially vertical wall members extending therebetween. A plurality of thimble members extend downwardly through the top plate. Each thimble member is closed at its bottom end and has an open end adjacent said top plate. Each thimble member has a length and diameter greater than that of the core assembly to be stored therein. The housing is provided with an inlet duct for the admission of cooling air and an exhaust duct for the discharge of air therefrom, such that when hot core assemblies are placed in the thimbles, the heat generated will by convection cause air to flow from the inlet duct around the thimbles and out the exhaust duct maintaining the core assemblies at a safe temperature without the necessity of auxiliary powered cooling equipment.

  14. Station Assembly Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation depicts the assembly of the International Space Station since Nov. 20, 1998, with the delivery of the Zarya module, through May 16, 2011, with the delivery of the EXPRESS Logistics C...

  15. Rnnotator Assembly Pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jeff

    2010-06-03

    Jeff Martin of the DOE Joint Genome Institute discusses a de novo transcriptome assembly pipeline from short RNA-Seq reads on June 3, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  16. Supramolecular DNA assembly.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Christopher K; Hamblin, Graham D; Sleiman, Hanadi F

    2011-12-01

    The powerful self-assembly features of DNA make it a unique template to finely organize and control matter on the nanometre scale. While DNA alone offers a high degree of fidelity in its self-assembly, a new area of research termed 'supramolecular DNA assembly' has recently emerged. This field combines DNA building blocks with synthetic organic, inorganic and polymeric structures. It thus brings together the toolbox of supramolecular chemistry with the predictable and programmable nature of DNA. The result of this molecular partnership is a variety of hybrid architectures, that expand DNA assembly beyond the boundaries of Watson-Crick base pairing into new structural and functional properties. In this tutorial review we outline this emerging field of study, and describe recent research aiming to synergistically combine the properties inherent to DNA with those of a number of supramolecular scaffolds. This ultimately creates structures with numerous potential applications in materials science, catalysis and medicine.

  17. Steam separator latch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, R.C.; Kobsa, I.R.

    1994-02-01

    A latch assembly removably joins a steam separator assembly to a support flange disposed at a top end of a tubular shroud in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The assembly includes an annular head having a central portion for supporting the steam separator assembly thereon, and an annular head flange extending around a perimeter thereof for supporting the head to the support flange. A plurality of latches are circumferentially spaced apart around the head flange with each latch having a top end, a latch hook at a bottom end thereof, and a pivot support disposed at an intermediate portion therebetween and pivotally joined to the head flange. The latches are pivoted about the pivot supports for selectively engaging and disengaging the latch hooks with the support flange for fixedly joining the head to the shroud or for allowing removal thereof. 12 figures.

  18. Steam separator latch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, Roy C.; Kobsa, Irvin R.

    1994-01-01

    A latch assembly removably joins a steam separator assembly to a support flange disposed at a top end of a tubular shroud in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The assembly includes an annular head having a central portion for supporting the steam separator assembly thereon, and an annular head flange extending around a perimeter thereof for supporting the head to the support flange. A plurality of latches are circumferentially spaced apart around the head flange with each latch having a top end, a latch hook at a bottom end thereof, and a pivot support disposed at an intermediate portion therebetween and pivotally joined to the head flange. The latches are pivoted about the pivot supports for selectively engaging and disengaging the latch hooks with the support flange for fixedly joining the head to the shroud or for allowing removal thereof.

  19. Magnetostrictive valve assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, James A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A magnetostrictive valve assembly includes a housing that defines a passage with a seat being formed therein. A magnetically-biased and axially-compressed magnetostrictive assembly slidingly fitted in the passage is configured as a hollow and open-ended conduit adapted to support a flow of a fluid therethrough. Current-carrying coil(s) disposed about the passage in the region of the magnetostrictive assembly generate a magnetic field in the passage when current flows through the coil(s). A hollow valve body with side ports is coupled on one end thereof to an axial end of the magnetostrictive assembly. The other end of the valve body is designed to seal with the seat formed in the housing's passage when brought into contact therewith.

  20. Automated Assembly Center (AAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauffer, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this project are as follows: to integrate advanced assembly and assembly support technology under a comprehensive architecture; to implement automated assembly technologies in the production of high-visibility DOD weapon systems; and to document the improved cost, quality, and lead time. This will enhance the production of DOD weapon systems by utilizing the latest commercially available technologies combined into a flexible system that will be able to readily incorporate new technologies as they emerge. Automated assembly encompasses the following areas: product data, process planning, information management policies and framework, three schema architecture, open systems communications, intelligent robots, flexible multi-ability end effectors, knowledge-based/expert systems, intelligent workstations, intelligent sensor systems, and PDES/PDDI data standards.

  1. Self-assembly concepts for multicompartment nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Gröschel, André H; Müller, Axel H E

    2015-07-28

    Compartmentalization is ubiquitous to many biological and artificial systems, be it for the separate storage of incompatible matter or to isolate transport processes. Advancements in the synthesis of sequential block copolymers offer a variety of tools to replicate natural design principles with tailor-made soft matter for the precise spatial separation of functionalities on multiple length scales. Here, we review recent trends in the self-assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers to multicompartment nanostructures (MCNs) under (semi-)dilute conditions, with special emphasis on ABC triblock terpolymers. The intrinsic immiscibility of connected blocks induces short-range repulsion into discrete nano-domains stabilized by a third, soluble block or molecular additive. Polymer blocks can be synthesized from an arsenal of functional monomers directing self-assembly through packing frustration or response to various fields. The mobility in solution further allows the manipulation of self-assembly processes into specific directions by clever choice of environmental conditions. This review focuses on practical concepts that direct self-assembly into predictable nanostructures, while narrowing particle dispersity with respect to size, shape and internal morphology. The growing understanding of underlying self-assembly mechanisms expands the number of experimental concepts providing the means to target and manipulate progressively complex superstructures.

  2. Self-assembly concepts for multicompartment nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröschel, André H.; Müller, Axel H. E.

    2015-07-01

    Compartmentalization is ubiquitous to many biological and artificial systems, be it for the separate storage of incompatible matter or to isolate transport processes. Advancements in the synthesis of sequential block copolymers offer a variety of tools to replicate natural design principles with tailor-made soft matter for the precise spatial separation of functionalities on multiple length scales. Here, we review recent trends in the self-assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers to multicompartment nanostructures (MCNs) under (semi-)dilute conditions, with special emphasis on ABC triblock terpolymers. The intrinsic immiscibility of connected blocks induces short-range repulsion into discrete nano-domains stabilized by a third, soluble block or molecular additive. Polymer blocks can be synthesized from an arsenal of functional monomers directing self-assembly through packing frustration or response to various fields. The mobility in solution further allows the manipulation of self-assembly processes into specific directions by clever choice of environmental conditions. This review focuses on practical concepts that direct self-assembly into predictable nanostructures, while narrowing particle dispersity with respect to size, shape and internal morphology. The growing understanding of underlying self-assembly mechanisms expands the number of experimental concepts providing the means to target and manipulate progressively complex superstructures.

  3. Attomolar DNA detection with chiral nanorod assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wei; Kuang, Hua; Xu, Liguang; Ding, Li; Xu, Chuanlai; Wang, Libing; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2013-10-01

    Nanoscale plasmonic assemblies display exceptionally strong chiral optical activity. So far, their structural design was primarily driven by challenges related to metamaterials whose practical applications are remote. Here we demonstrate that gold nanorods assembled by the polymerase chain reaction into DNA-bridged chiral systems have promising analytical applications. The chiroplasmonic activity of side-by-side assembled patterns is attributed to a 7-9 degree twist between the nanorod axes. This results in a strong polarization rotation that matches theoretical expectations. The amplitude of the bisignate ‘wave’ in the circular dichroism spectra of side-by-side assemblies demonstrates excellent linearity with the amount of target DNA. The limit of detection for DNA using side-by-side assemblies is as low as 3.7 aM. This chiroplasmonic method may be particularly useful for biological analytes larger than 2-5 nm which are difficult to detect by methods based on plasmon coupling and ‘hot spots’. Circular polarization increases for inter-nanorod gaps between 2 and 20 nm when plasmonic coupling rapidly decreases. Reaching the attomolar limit of detection for simple and reliable bioanalysis of oligonucleotides may have a crucial role in DNA biomarker detection for early diagnostics of different diseases, forensics and environmental monitoring.

  4. Self-assembly of smallest magnetic particles

    PubMed Central

    Mehdizadeh Taheri, Sara; Michaelis, Maria; Friedrich, Thomas; Förster, Beate; Drechsler, Markus; Römer, Florian M.; Bösecke, Peter; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Weber, Birgit; Rehberg, Ingo; Rosenfeldt, Sabine; Förster, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    The assembly of tiny magnetic particles in external magnetic fields is important for many applications ranging from data storage to medical technologies. The development of ever smaller magnetic structures is restricted by a size limit, where the particles are just barely magnetic. For such particles we report the discovery of a kind of solution assembly hitherto unobserved, to our knowledge. The fact that the assembly occurs in solution is very relevant for applications, where magnetic nanoparticles are either solution-processed or are used in liquid biological environments. Induced by an external magnetic field, nanocubes spontaneously assemble into 1D chains, 2D monolayer sheets, and large 3D cuboids with almost perfect internal ordering. The self-assembly of the nanocubes can be elucidated considering the dipole–dipole interaction of small superparamagnetic particles. Complex 3D geometrical arrangements of the nanodipoles are obtained under the assumption that the orientation of magnetization is freely adjustable within the superlattice and tends to minimize the binding energy. On that basis the magnetic moment of the cuboids can be explained. PMID:26554000

  5. Recuperator assembly and procedures

    DOEpatents

    Kang, Yungmo; McKeirnan, Jr., Robert D.

    2008-08-26

    A construction of recuperator core segments is provided which insures proper assembly of the components of the recuperator core segment, and of a plurality of recuperator core segments. Each recuperator core segment must be constructed so as to prevent nesting of fin folds of the adjacent heat exchanger foils of the recuperator core segment. A plurality of recuperator core segments must be assembled together so as to prevent nesting of adjacent fin folds of adjacent recuperator core segments.

  6. VIRUS instrument collimator assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Jennifer L.; DePoy, Darren L.; Prochaska, Travis; Allen, Richard D.; Williams, Patrick; Rheault, Jean-Philippe; Li, Ting; Nagasawa, Daniel Q.; Akers, Christopher; Baker, David; Boster, Emily; Campbell, Caitlin; Cook, Erika; Elder, Alison; Gary, Alex; Glover, Joseph; James, Michael; Martin, Emily; Meador, Will; Mondrik, Nicholas; Rodriguez-Patino, Marisela; Villanueva, Steven; Hill, Gary J.; Tuttle, Sarah; Vattiat, Brian; Lee, Hanshin; Chonis, Taylor S.; Dalton, Gavin B.; Tacon, Mike

    2014-07-01

    The Visual Integral-Field Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS) instrument is a baseline array 150 identical fiber fed optical spectrographs designed to support observations for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX). The collimator subassemblies of the instrument have been assembled in a production line and are now complete. Here we review the design choices and assembly practices used to produce a suite of identical low-cost spectrographs in a timely fashion using primarily unskilled labor.

  7. 49 CFR 572.154 - Thorax assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (refer to § 572.150(a)(1)(iv)) . The thorax consists of the part of the torso assembly shown in drawing... longitudinal centerline of the probe coincides with the dummy's midsagittal plane, is centered on the torso...

  8. 49 CFR 572.154 - Thorax assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (refer to § 572.150(a)(1)(iv)) . The thorax consists of the part of the torso assembly shown in drawing... longitudinal centerline of the probe coincides with the dummy's midsagittal plane, is centered on the torso...

  9. 49 CFR 572.154 - Thorax assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (refer to § 572.150(a)(1)(iv)) . The thorax consists of the part of the torso assembly shown in drawing... longitudinal centerline of the probe coincides with the dummy's midsagittal plane, is centered on the torso...

  10. 49 CFR 572.154 - Thorax assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (refer to § 572.150(a)(1)(iv)) . The thorax consists of the part of the torso assembly shown in drawing... longitudinal centerline of the probe coincides with the dummy's midsagittal plane, is centered on the torso...

  11. Assembly of LIGA using Electric Fields

    SciTech Connect

    FEDDEMA, JOHN T.; WARNE, LARRY K.; JOHNSON, WILLIAM A.; OGDEN, ALLISON J.; ARMOUR, DAVID L.

    2002-04-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a device that uses electric fields to grasp and possibly levitate LIGA parts. This non-contact form of grasping would solve many of the problems associated with grasping parts that are only a few microns in dimensions. Scaling laws show that for parts this size, electrostatic and electromagnetic forces are dominant over gravitational forces. This is why micro-parts often stick to mechanical tweezers. If these forces can be controlled under feedback control, the parts could be levitated, possibly even rotated in air. In this project, we designed, fabricated, and tested several grippers that use electrostatic and electromagnetic fields to grasp and release metal LIGA parts. The eventual use of this tool will be to assemble metal and non-metal LIGA parts into small electromechanical systems.

  12. Assembly of LIGA Using Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feddema, J. T.; Warne, L. K.; Johnson, W. A.; Ogden, A. J.; Armour, D. L.

    2002-04-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a device that uses electric fields to grasp and possibly levitate LlGA parts. This non-contact form of grasping would solve many of the problems associated with grasping parts that are only a few microns in dimensions. Scaling laws show that for parts this size, electrostatic and electromagnetic forces are dominant over gravitational forces. This is why micro-parts often stick to mechanical tweezers. If these forces can be controlled under feedback control, the parts could be levitated, possibly even rotated in air. In this project, we designed, fabricated, and tested several grippers that use electrostatic and electromagnetic fields to grasp and release metal LlGA parts. The eventual use of this tool will be to assemble metal and non-metal LlGA parts into small electromechanical systems.

  13. Nestedness across biological scales.

    PubMed

    Cantor, Mauricio; Pires, Mathias M; Marquitti, Flavia M D; Raimundo, Rafael L G; Sebastián-González, Esther; Coltri, Patricia P; Perez, S Ivan; Barneche, Diego R; Brandt, Débora Y C; Nunes, Kelly; Daura-Jorge, Fábio G; Floeter, Sergio R; Guimarães, Paulo R

    2017-01-01

    Biological networks pervade nature. They describe systems throughout all levels of biological organization, from molecules regulating metabolism to species interactions that shape ecosystem dynamics. The network thinking revealed recurrent organizational patterns in complex biological systems, such as the formation of semi-independent groups of connected elements (modularity) and non-random distributions of interactions among elements. Other structural patterns, such as nestedness, have been primarily assessed in ecological networks formed by two non-overlapping sets of elements; information on its occurrence on other levels of organization is lacking. Nestedness occurs when interactions of less connected elements form proper subsets of the interactions of more connected elements. Only recently these properties began to be appreciated in one-mode networks (where all elements can interact) which describe a much wider variety of biological phenomena. Here, we compute nestedness in a diverse collection of one-mode networked systems from six different levels of biological organization depicting gene and protein interactions, complex phenotypes, animal societies, metapopulations, food webs and vertebrate metacommunities. Our findings suggest that nestedness emerge independently of interaction type or biological scale and reveal that disparate systems can share nested organization features characterized by inclusive subsets of interacting elements with decreasing connectedness. We primarily explore the implications of a nested structure for each of these studied systems, then theorize on how nested networks are assembled. We hypothesize that nestedness emerges across scales due to processes that, although system-dependent, may share a general compromise between two features: specificity (the number of interactions the elements of the system can have) and affinity (how these elements can be connected to each other). Our findings suggesting occurrence of nestedness

  14. Nestedness across biological scales

    PubMed Central

    Marquitti, Flavia M. D.; Raimundo, Rafael L. G.; Sebastián-González, Esther; Coltri, Patricia P.; Perez, S. Ivan; Brandt, Débora Y. C.; Nunes, Kelly; Daura-Jorge, Fábio G.; Floeter, Sergio R.; Guimarães, Paulo R.

    2017-01-01

    Biological networks pervade nature. They describe systems throughout all levels of biological organization, from molecules regulating metabolism to species interactions that shape ecosystem dynamics. The network thinking revealed recurrent organizational patterns in complex biological systems, such as the formation of semi-independent groups of connected elements (modularity) and non-random distributions of interactions among elements. Other structural patterns, such as nestedness, have been primarily assessed in ecological networks formed by two non-overlapping sets of elements; information on its occurrence on other levels of organization is lacking. Nestedness occurs when interactions of less connected elements form proper subsets of the interactions of more connected elements. Only recently these properties began to be appreciated in one-mode networks (where all elements can interact) which describe a much wider variety of biological phenomena. Here, we compute nestedness in a diverse collection of one-mode networked systems from six different levels of biological organization depicting gene and protein interactions, complex phenotypes, animal societies, metapopulations, food webs and vertebrate metacommunities. Our findings suggest that nestedness emerge independently of interaction type or biological scale and reveal that disparate systems can share nested organization features characterized by inclusive subsets of interacting elements with decreasing connectedness. We primarily explore the implications of a nested structure for each of these studied systems, then theorize on how nested networks are assembled. We hypothesize that nestedness emerges across scales due to processes that, although system-dependent, may share a general compromise between two features: specificity (the number of interactions the elements of the system can have) and affinity (how these elements can be connected to each other). Our findings suggesting occurrence of nestedness

  15. Direct assembling methodologies for high-throughput bioscreening

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Dévora, Jorge I.; Shi, Zhi-dong; Xu, Tao

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few decades, high-throughput (HT) bioscreening, a technique that allows rapid screening of biochemical compound libraries against biological targets, has been widely used in drug discovery, stem cell research, development of new biomaterials, and genomics research. To achieve these ambitions, scaffold-free (or direct) assembly of biological entities of interest has become critical. Appropriate assembling methodologies are required to build an efficient HT bioscreening platform. The development of contact and non-contact assembling systems as a practical solution has been driven by a variety of essential attributes of the bioscreening system, such as miniaturization, high throughput, and high precision. The present article reviews recent progress on these assembling technologies utilized for the construction of HT bioscreening platforms. PMID:22021162

  16. Self-assembly of nanomaterials at fluid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Toor, Anju; Feng, Tao; Russell, Thomas P

    2016-05-01

    Recent developments in the field of the self-assembly of nanoscale materials such as nanoparticles, nanorods and nanosheets at liquid/liquid interfaces are reviewed. Self-assembly behavior of both biological and synthetic particles is discussed. For biological nanoparticles, the nanoparticle assembly at fluid interfaces provides a simple route for directing nanoparticles into 2D or 3D constructs with hierarchical ordering. The interfacial assembly of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) at liquid interfaces would play a key role in applications such as nanotube fractionation, flexible electronic thin-film fabrication and synthesis of porous SWCNT/polymer composites foams. Liquids can be structured by the jamming of nanoparticle surfactants at fluid interfaces. By controlling the interfacial packing of nanoparticle surfactants using external triggers, a new class of materials can be generated that combines the desirable characteristics of fluids such as rapid transport of energy carriers with the structural stability of a solid.

  17. Vented Cavity Radiant Barrier Assembly And Method

    DOEpatents

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L.; Jackaway, Adam D.

    2000-05-16

    A vented cavity radiant barrier assembly (2) includes a barrier (12), typically a PV module, having inner and outer surfaces (18, 22). A support assembly (14) is secured to the barrier and extends inwardly from the inner surface of the barrier to a building surface (14) creating a vented cavity (24) between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. A low emissivity element (20) is mounted at or between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. At least part of the cavity exit (30) is higher than the cavity entrance (28) to promote cooling air flow through the cavity.

  18. Yeast synthetic biology toolbox and applications for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ching-Sung; Kwak, Suryang; Turner, Timothy L; Jin, Yong-Su

    2015-02-01

    Yeasts are efficient biofuel producers with numerous advantages outcompeting bacterial counterparts. While most synthetic biology tools have been developed and customized for bacteria especially for Escherichia coli, yeast synthetic biological tools have been exploited for improving yeast to produce fuels and chemicals from renewable biomass. Here we review the current status of synthetic biological tools and their applications for biofuel production, focusing on the model strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae We describe assembly techniques that have been developed for constructing genes, pathways, and genomes in yeast. Moreover, we discuss synthetic parts for allowing precise control of gene expression at both transcriptional and translational levels. Applications of these synthetic biological approaches have led to identification of effective gene targets that are responsible for desirable traits, such as cellulosic sugar utilization, advanced biofuel production, and enhanced tolerance against toxic products for biofuel production from renewable biomass. Although an array of synthetic biology tools and devices are available, we observed some gaps existing in tool development to achieve industrial utilization. Looking forward, future tool development should focus on industrial cultivation conditions utilizing industrial strains.

  19. Human Assisted Assembly Processes

    SciTech Connect

    CALTON,TERRI L.; PETERS,RALPH R.

    2000-01-01

    Automatic assembly sequencing and visualization tools are valuable in determining the best assembly sequences, but without Human Factors and Figure Models (HFFMs) it is difficult to evaluate or visualize human interaction. In industry, accelerating technological advances and shorter market windows have forced companies to turn to an agile manufacturing paradigm. This trend has promoted computerized automation of product design and manufacturing processes, such as automated assembly planning. However, all automated assembly planning software tools assume that the individual components fly into their assembled configuration and generate what appear to be a perfectly valid operations, but in reality the operations cannot physically be carried out by a human. Similarly, human figure modeling algorithms may indicate that assembly operations are not feasible and consequently force design modifications; however, if they had the capability to quickly generate alternative assembly sequences, they might have identified a feasible solution. To solve this problem HFFMs must be integrated with automated assembly planning to allow engineers to verify that assembly operations are possible and to see ways to make the designs even better. Factories will very likely put humans and robots together in cooperative environments to meet the demands for customized products, for purposes including robotic and automated assembly. For robots to work harmoniously within an integrated environment with humans the robots must have cooperative operational skills. For example, in a human only environment, humans may tolerate collisions with one another if they did not cause much pain. This level of tolerance may or may not apply to robot-human environments. Humans expect that robots will be able to operate and navigate in their environments without collisions or interference. The ability to accomplish this is linked to the sensing capabilities available. Current work in the field of cooperative

  20. Biological Filters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klemetson, S. L.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the 1978 literature review of wastewater treatment. The review is concerned with biological filters, and it covers: (1) trickling filters; (2) rotating biological contractors; and (3) miscellaneous reactors. A list of 14 references is also presented. (HM)