Science.gov

Sample records for biological pattern formation

  1. Biological surface engineering: a simple system for cell pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Yan, L; Altman, M; Lässle, M; Nugent, H; Frankel, F; Lauffenburger, D A; Whitesides, G M; Rich, A

    1999-07-01

    Biological surface engineering using synthetic biological materials has a great potential for advances in our understanding of complex biological phenomena. We developed a simple system to engineer biologically relevant surfaces using a combination of self-assembling oligopeptide monolayers and microcontact printing (muCP). We designed and synthesized two oligopeptides containing a cell adhesion motif (RADS)n (n = 2 and 3) at the N-terminus, followed by an oligo(alanine) linker and a cysteine residue at the C-terminus. The thiol group of cysteine allows the oligopeptides to attach covalently onto a gold-coated surface to form monolayers. We then microfabricated a variety of surface patterns using the cell adhesion peptides in combination with hexa-ethylene glycol thiolate which resist non-specific adsorption of proteins and cells. The resulting patterns consist of areas either supporting or inhibiting cell adhesion, thus they are capable of aligning cells in a well-defined manner, leading to specific cell array and pattern formations.

  2. Biological pattern formation: from basic mechanisms to complex structures

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, A.J.; Meinhardt, H. )

    1994-10-01

    The reliable development of highly complex organisms is an intriguing and fascinating problem. The genetic material is, as a rule, the same in each cell of an organism. How then do cells, under the influence of their common genes, produce spatial patterns Simple models are discussed that describe the generation of patterns out of an initially nearly homogeneous state. They are based on nonlinear interactions of at least two chemicals and on their diffusion. The concepts of local autocatalysis and of long-range inhibition play a fundamental role. Numerical simulations show that the models account for many basic biological observations such as the regeneration of a pattern after excision of tissue or the production of regular (or nearly regular) arrays of organs during (or after) completion of growth. Very complex patterns can be generated in a reproducible way by hierarchical coupling of several such elementary reactions. Applications to animal coats and to the generation of polygonally shaped patterns are provided. It is further shown how to generate a strictly periodic pattern of units that themselves exhibit a complex and polar fine structure. This is illustrated by two examples: the assembly of photoreceptor cells in the eye of [ital Drosophila] and the positioning of leaves and axillary buds in a growing shoot. In both cases, the substructures have to achieve an internal polarity under the influence of some primary pattern-forming system existing in the fly's eye or in the plant. The fact that similar models can describe essential steps in organisms as distantly related as animals and plants suggests that they reveal some universal mechanisms.

  3. Biological pattern formation: from basic mechanisms to complex structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, A. J.; Meinhardt, H.

    1994-10-01

    The reliable development of highly complex organisms is an intriguing and fascinating problem. The genetic material is, as a rule, the same in each cell of an organism. How then do cells, under the influence of their common genes, produce spatial patterns? Simple models are discussed that describe the generation of patterns out of an initially nearly homogeneous state. They are based on nonlinear interactions of at least two chemicals and on their diffusion. The concepts of local autocatalysis and of long-range inhibition play a fundamental role. Numerical simulations show that the models account for many basic biological observations such as the regeneration of a pattern after excision of tissue or the production of regular (or nearly regular) arrays of organs during (or after) completion of growth. Very complex patterns can be generated in a reproducible way by hierarchical coupling of several such elementary reactions. Applications to animal coats and to the generation of polygonally shaped patterns are provided. It is further shown how to generate a strictly periodic pattern of units that themselves exhibit a complex and polar fine structure. This is illustrated by two examples: the assembly of photoreceptor cells in the eye of Drosophila and the positioning of leaves and axillary buds in a growing shoot. In both cases, the substructures have to achieve an internal polarity under the influence of some primary pattern-forming system existing in the fly's eye or in the plant. The fact that similar models can describe essential steps in organisms as distantly related as animals and plants suggests that they reveal some universal mechanisms.

  4. Time rescaling and pattern formation in biological evolution.

    PubMed

    Igamberdiev, Abir U

    2014-09-01

    Biological evolution is analyzed as a process of continuous measurement in which biosystems interpret themselves in the environment resulting in changes of both. This leads to rescaling of internal time (heterochrony) followed by spatial reconstructions of morphology (heterotopy). The logical precondition of evolution is the incompleteness of biosystem's internal description, while the physical precondition is the uncertainty of quantum measurement. The process of evolution is based on perpetual changes in interpretation of information in the changing world. In this interpretation the external biospheric gradients are used for establishment of new features of organization. It is concluded that biological evolution involves the anticipatory epigenetic changes in the interpretation of genetic symbolism which cannot generally be forecasted but can provide canalization of structural transformations defined by the existing organization and leading to predictable patterns of form generation.

  5. Pattern Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, Rebecca

    2006-03-01

    From the stripes of a zebra and the spots on a leopard's back to the ripples on a sandy beach or desert dune, regular patterns arise everywhere in nature. The appearance and evolution of these phenomena has been a focus of recent research activity across several disciplines. This book provides an introduction to the range of mathematical theory and methods used to analyse and explain these often intricate and beautiful patterns. Bringing together several different approaches, from group theoretic methods to envelope equations and theory of patterns in large-aspect ratio-systems, the book also provides insight behind the selection of one pattern over another. Suitable as an upper-undergraduate textbook for mathematics students or as a fascinating, engaging, and fully illustrated resource for readers in physics and biology, Rebecca Hoyle's book, using a non-partisan approach, unifies a range of techniques used by active researchers in this growing field. Accessible description of the mathematical theory behind fascinating pattern formation in areas such as biology, physics and materials science Collects recent research for the first time in an upper level textbook Features a number of exercises - with solutions online - and worked examples

  6. Automated numerical simulation of biological pattern formation based on visual feedback simulation framework

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Mingzhu; Xu, Hui; Zeng, Xingjuan; Zhao, Xin

    2017-01-01

    There are various fantastic biological phenomena in biological pattern formation. Mathematical modeling using reaction-diffusion partial differential equation systems is employed to study the mechanism of pattern formation. However, model parameter selection is both difficult and time consuming. In this paper, a visual feedback simulation framework is proposed to calculate the parameters of a mathematical model automatically based on the basic principle of feedback control. In the simulation framework, the simulation results are visualized, and the image features are extracted as the system feedback. Then, the unknown model parameters are obtained by comparing the image features of the simulation image and the target biological pattern. Considering two typical applications, the visual feedback simulation framework is applied to fulfill pattern formation simulations for vascular mesenchymal cells and lung development. In the simulation framework, the spot, stripe, labyrinthine patterns of vascular mesenchymal cells, the normal branching pattern and the branching pattern lacking side branching for lung branching are obtained in a finite number of iterations. The simulation results indicate that it is easy to achieve the simulation targets, especially when the simulation patterns are sensitive to the model parameters. Moreover, this simulation framework can expand to other types of biological pattern formation. PMID:28225811

  7. Parameter domains for spots and stripes in mechanical models for biological pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, M.; Murray, J. D.

    1995-07-01

    Mechanochemical models for biological pattern formation have been applied to the development of a variety of patterning problems, such as feather germ primordia and cartilage formation in the vertebrate limb. Linear analysis has been the main technique for assessing the pattern formation potential of these models to date. In this paper we carry out a nonlinear analysis and numerical simulations of a generic model in two spatial dimensions. With these methods, we obtain conditions for generating specific spatial patterns such as stripes and spots, and divide the parameter space into domains giving rise to distinct types of pattern. We accomplish our goal through a study of model parameter domains by showing how different mechanical forces affect spatial patterning.

  8. Three-dimensional pattern formation of magnetically labeled microgel beads for biological tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, H.; Inoue, H.; Nakamura, M.

    2009-03-01

    We commenced basic research on the three-dimensional (3D) pattern formation of microgel beads for applications in biological tissue engineering. In this new technique, microgel beads are premagnetized by doping them with magnetic nanoparticles. Living cells will be included in the beads for actual use. If a nonuniform magnetic field is applied to a solution containing these magnetized beads, the beads will align, contact, and form a 3D structure. The structure is controlled by the seed pattern of the magnetic particles plugged in a substrate and the profile of the magnetic field distribution. We constructed tubes, which imitate blood vessels, for demonstration using gel beads whose diameters are of the order of several tens of micrometers. The diameter of the demonstrated tube was less than 0.5 mm and its length was 6.6 mm, although living cells were not included in the beads. Numerical calculations by using the discrete element method were conducted to confirm the formation of the tube and to predict the effect of centrifugal force, which will be applied to fill cells in the space between magnetically patterned beads. Although this unique technology is in the nascent stage, this 3D pattern formation technique by the control of the magnetic field has potential to be one of the effective engineering technologies for manufacturing 3D patterned biological tissues in the future.

  9. The Intersection of Theory and Application in Elucidating Pattern Formation in Developmental Biology

    PubMed Central

    Othmer, Hans G.; Painter, Kevin; Umulis, David; Xue, Chuan

    2009-01-01

    We discuss theoretical and experimental approaches to three distinct developmental systems that illustrate how theory can influence experimental work and vice-versa. The chosen systems – Drosophila melanogaster, bacterial pattern formation, and pigmentation patterns – illustrate the fundamental physical processes of signaling, growth and cell division, and cell movement involved in pattern formation and development. These systems exemplify the current state of theoretical and experimental understanding of how these processes produce the observed patterns, and illustrate how theoretical and experimental approaches can interact to lead to a better understanding of development. As John Bonner said long ago ‘We have arrived at the stage where models are useful to suggest experiments, and the facts of the experiments in turn lead to new and improved models that suggest new experiments. By this rocking back and forth between the reality of experimental facts and the dream world of hypotheses, we can move slowly toward a satisfactory solution of the major problems of developmental biology.’ PMID:19844610

  10. Excitable population dynamics, biological control failure, and spatiotemporal pattern formation in a model ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Andrew; Petrovskii, Sergei

    2009-05-01

    Biological control has been attracting an increasing attention over the last two decades as an environmentally friendly alternative to the more traditional chemical-based control. In this paper, we address robustness of the biological control strategy with respect to fluctuations in the controlling species density. Specifically, we consider a pest being kept under control by its predator. The predator response is assumed to be of Holling type III, which makes the system's kinetics "excitable." The system is studied by means of mathematical modeling and extensive numerical simulations. We show that the system response to perturbations in the predator density can be completely different in spatial and non-spatial systems. In the nonspatial system, an overcritical perturbation of the population density results in a pest outbreak that will eventually decay with time, which can be regarded as a success of the biological control strategy. However, in the spatial system, a similar perturbation can drive the system into a self-sustained regime of spatiotemporal pattern formation with a high pest density, which is clearly a biological control failure. We then identify the parameter range where the biological control can still be successful and describe the corresponding regime of the system dynamics. Finally, we identify the main scenarios of the system response to the population density perturbations and reveal the corresponding structure of the parameter space of the system.

  11. An updated kernel-based Turing model for studying the mechanisms of biological pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Shigeru

    2017-02-07

    The reaction-diffusion model presented by Alan Turing has recently been supported by experimental data and accepted by most biologists. However, scientists have recognized shortcomings when the model is used as the working hypothesis in biological experiments, particularly in studies in which the underlying molecular network is not fully understood. To address some such problems, this report proposes a new version of the Turing model. This alternative model is not represented by partial differential equations, but rather by the shape of an activation-inhibition kernel. Therefore, it is named the kernel-based Turing model (KT model). Simulation of the KT model with kernels of various shapes showed that it can generate all standard variations of the stable 2D patterns (spot, stripes and network), as well as some complex patterns that are difficult to generate with conventional mathematical models. The KT model can be used even when the detailed mechanism is poorly known, as the interaction kernel can often be detected by a simple experiment and the KT model simulation can be performed based on that experimental data. These properties of the KT model complement the shortcomings of conventional models and will contribute to the understanding of biological pattern formation.

  12. Dynamic models of biological pattern formation have some surprising implications for understanding the epigenetics of development.

    PubMed

    Molenaar, Peter C M; Lo, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear epigenetic processes are conceived of in terms of self-organizing dynamic models of biological pattern formation. Epigenetic processes thus conceived generate substantial subject-specific structural variation, for instance, in growing brain networks. It is shown that standard quantitative genetic modeling based on analyses of interindividual phenotypic variation misclassifies the variation generated by nonlinear epigenetic processes as being due to specific environmental influences. A new quantitative genetic model, iFACE, is introduced to correctly identify the structural variation generated by self-organizing epigenetic processes. iFACE is based on time series analysis of intraindividual variation of a single pair of genetically related subjects. The results of an application of iFACE to multilead EEG obtained with a single dizygotic twin pair is presented.

  13. Mathematics and biology: a Kantian view on the history of pattern formation theory.

    PubMed

    Roth, Siegfried

    2011-12-01

    Driesch's statement, made around 1900, that the physics and chemistry of his day were unable to explain self-regulation during embryogenesis was correct and could be extended until the year 1972. The emergence of theories of self-organisation required progress in several areas including chemistry, physics, computing and cybernetics. Two parallel lines of development can be distinguished which both culminated in the early 1970s. Firstly, physicochemical theories of self-organisation arose from theoretical (Lotka 1910-1920) and experimental work (Bray 1920; Belousov 1951) on chemical oscillations. However, this research area gained broader acceptance only after thermodynamics was extended to systems far from equilibrium (1922-1967) and the mechanism of the prime example for a chemical oscillator, the Belousov-Zhabotinski reaction, was deciphered in the early 1970s. Secondly, biological theories of self-organisation were rooted in the intellectual environment of artificial intelligence and cybernetics. Turing wrote his The chemical basis of morphogenesis (1952) after working on the construction of one of the first electronic computers. Likewise, Gierer and Meinhardt's theory of local activation and lateral inhibition (1972) was influenced by ideas from cybernetics. The Gierer-Meinhardt theory provided an explanation for the first time of both spontaneous formation of spatial order and of self-regulation that proved to be extremely successful in elucidating a wide range of patterning processes. With the advent of developmental genetics in the 1980s, detailed molecular and functional data became available for complex developmental processes, allowing a new generation of data-driven theoretical approaches. Three examples of such approaches will be discussed. The successes and limitations of mathematical pattern formation theory throughout its history suggest a picture of the organism, which has structural similarity to views of the organic world held by the philosopher

  14. Pattern Formation in Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karma, Alain

    2011-04-01

    Pattern formation is ubiquitous in nature, from sand ripples formed by wind to the development of a complex biological organism with different organs and a central nervous system. In the realm of materials, patterns are formed invariably when matter is transformed between different solid, liquid or gaseous states far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Material failure is itself mediated by the propagation of cracks that form intricate patterns. Understanding how patterns form and evolve is key to design materials with desired properties and to optimize their performance and safety. This talk will discuss recent progress made to understand three distinct class of patterns including the highly branched snow-flake-like dendritic patterns formed during the solidification process, polycrystalline patterns shaped by grain boundaries, and crack patterns.

  15. Distinguishing Pattern Formation Phenotypes: Applying Minkowski Functionals to Cell Biology Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rericha, Erin; Guven, Can; Parent, Carole; Losert, Wolfgang

    2011-03-01

    Spatial Clustering of proteins within cells or cells themselves frequently occur in cell biology systems. However quantifying the underlying order and determining the regulators of these cluster patterns have proved difficult due to the inherent high noise levels in the systems. For instance the patterns formed by wild type and cyclic-AMP regulatory mutant Dictyostelium cells are visually distinctive, yet the large error bars in measurements of the fractal number, area, Euler number, eccentricity, and wavelength making it difficult to quantitatively distinguish between the patterns. We apply a spatial analysis technique based on Minkowski functionals and develop metrics which clearly separate wild type and mutant cell lines into distinct categories. Having such a metric facilitated the development of a computational model for cellular aggregation and its regulators. Supported by NIH-NGHS Nanotechnology (R01GM085574) and the Burroughs Wellcome Fund.

  16. Biologic Patterns of Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granger, Carl V.; Linn, Richard T.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the use of Rasch analysis to elucidate biological patterns of disability present in the functional ability of persons undergoing medical rehabilitation. Uses two measures, one for inpatients and one for outpatients, to illustrate the approach and provides examples of some biological patterns of disability associated with specific types…

  17. The Role of Mathematical Models in Understanding Pattern Formation in Developmental Biology

    PubMed Central

    Umulis, David M.

    2016-01-01

    In a Wall Street Journal article published on April 5, 2013, E. O. Wilson attempted to make the case that biologists do not really need to learn any mathematics—whenever they run into difficulty with numerical issues, they can find a technician (aka mathematician) to help them out of their difficulty. He formalizes this in Wilsons Principle No. 1: “It is far easier for scientists to acquire needed collaboration from mathematicians and statisticians than it is for mathematicians and statisticians to find scientists able to make use of their equations.” This reflects a complete misunderstanding of the role of mathematics in all sciences throughout history. To Wilson, mathematics is mere number crunching, but as Galileo said long ago, “The laws of Nature are written in the language of mathematics…the symbols are triangles, circles and other geometrical figures, without whose help it is impossible to comprehend a single word.” Mathematics has moved beyond the geometry-based model of Galileo’s time, and in a rebuttal to Wilson, E. Frenkel has pointed out the role of mathematics in synthesizing the general principles in science (Both point and counter-point are available in Wilson and Frenkel in Notices Am Math Soc 60(7):837–838, 2013). We will take this a step further and show how mathematics has been used to make new and experimentally verified discoveries in developmental biology and how mathematics is essential for understanding a problem that has puzzled experimentalists for decades—that of how organisms can scale in size. Mathematical analysis alone cannot “solve” these problems since the validation lies at the molecular level, but conversely, a growing number of questions in biology cannot be solved without mathematical analysis and modeling. Herein, we discuss a few examples of the productive intercourse between mathematics and biology. PMID:25280665

  18. The role of mathematical models in understanding pattern formation in developmental biology.

    PubMed

    Umulis, David M; Othmer, Hans G

    2015-05-01

    In a Wall Street Journal article published on April 5, 2013, E. O. Wilson attempted to make the case that biologists do not really need to learn any mathematics-whenever they run into difficulty with numerical issues, they can find a technician (aka mathematician) to help them out of their difficulty. He formalizes this in Wilsons Principle No. 1: "It is far easier for scientists to acquire needed collaboration from mathematicians and statisticians than it is for mathematicians and statisticians to find scientists able to make use of their equations." This reflects a complete misunderstanding of the role of mathematics in all sciences throughout history. To Wilson, mathematics is mere number crunching, but as Galileo said long ago, "The laws of Nature are written in the language of mathematics[Formula: see text] the symbols are triangles, circles and other geometrical figures, without whose help it is impossible to comprehend a single word." Mathematics has moved beyond the geometry-based model of Galileo's time, and in a rebuttal to Wilson, E. Frenkel has pointed out the role of mathematics in synthesizing the general principles in science (Both point and counter-point are available in Wilson and Frenkel in Notices Am Math Soc 60(7):837-838, 2013). We will take this a step further and show how mathematics has been used to make new and experimentally verified discoveries in developmental biology and how mathematics is essential for understanding a problem that has puzzled experimentalists for decades-that of how organisms can scale in size. Mathematical analysis alone cannot "solve" these problems since the validation lies at the molecular level, but conversely, a growing number of questions in biology cannot be solved without mathematical analysis and modeling. Herein, we discuss a few examples of the productive intercourse between mathematics and biology.

  19. Quantitative model analysis with diverse biological data: applications in developmental pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Pargett, Michael; Umulis, David M

    2013-07-15

    Mathematical modeling of transcription factor and signaling networks is widely used to understand if and how a mechanism works, and to infer regulatory interactions that produce a model consistent with the observed data. Both of these approaches to modeling are informed by experimental data, however, much of the data available or even acquirable are not quantitative. Data that is not strictly quantitative cannot be used by classical, quantitative, model-based analyses that measure a difference between the measured observation and the model prediction for that observation. To bridge the model-to-data gap, a variety of techniques have been developed to measure model "fitness" and provide numerical values that can subsequently be used in model optimization or model inference studies. Here, we discuss a selection of traditional and novel techniques to transform data of varied quality and enable quantitative comparison with mathematical models. This review is intended to both inform the use of these model analysis methods, focused on parameter estimation, and to help guide the choice of method to use for a given study based on the type of data available. Applying techniques such as normalization or optimal scaling may significantly improve the utility of current biological data in model-based study and allow greater integration between disparate types of data. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Biological patterns: Novel indicators for pharmacological assays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Jacqueline U.

    1991-01-01

    Variable gravity testing using the KC-135 demonstrated clearly that biological pattern formation was definitely shown to result from gravity alone, and not from oxygen gradients in solution. Motile pattern formation of spermatozoa are driven by alternate mechanisms, and apparently not affected by short-term changes in gravity. The chemical effects found appear to be secondary to the primary effect of gravity. Cryopreservation may be the remedy to the problem of 'spare' or 'standing order' biological samples for testing of space lab investigations, but further studies are necessary.

  1. Space Biology: Patterns of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salisbury, Frank B.

    1971-01-01

    Present knowledge about Mars is compared with past beliefs about the planet. Biological experiments that indicate life may exist on Mars are interpreted. Life patterns or biological features that might be postulated for extraterrestrial life are presented at the molecular, cellular, organism, and ecosystem levels. (DS)

  2. Space Biology: Patterns of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salisbury, Frank B.

    1971-01-01

    Present knowledge about Mars is compared with past beliefs about the planet. Biological experiments that indicate life may exist on Mars are interpreted. Life patterns or biological features that might be postulated for extraterrestrial life are presented at the molecular, cellular, organism, and ecosystem levels. (DS)

  3. Understanding Alliance Formation Patterns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    different periods. The thesis concludes that alliance formation behaviors differ depending on the prevailing system- level conditions in the different...historical periods, especially under conditions of war and peace and based on the polarity of the international system. The approach presented in the...alliance formation, historical periods, geographical proximity, trade exchange, regime type, national material capability, system-level conditions 15

  4. Pattern Formation in Hydrozoa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berking, Stefan

    The fresh water polyp Hydra is famous for its ability to regenerate missing structures. Even aggregates of single cells transform eventually into normally shaped animals. This indicates a communication within the tissue and within the aggregates which determines the spatial pattern of gene expression. Such pattern-forming systems are thought to play a decisive role in the control of self-organization during embryogenesis. Marine and fresh water hydrozoa appear to allow an access to such a system. Although the molecular components are still mostly unknown, the regulatory properties of the pattern-forming system are increasingly well understood, and this may help eventually to identify the components involved.

  5. Excitability dependent pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakara, Kaumudi; Gholami, Azam; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2014-03-01

    On starvation, the amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum emit the chemo-attractant cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) at specific frequencies. The neighboring amoebae sense cAMP through membrane receptors and produce their own cAMP. Soon the cells synchronize and move via chemotaxis along the gradient of cAMP. The response of the amoebae to the emission of cAMP is seen as spiral waves or target patterns under a dark field microscope. The causal reasons for the selection of one or the other patterns are still unclear. Here we present a possible explanation based on excitability. The excitability of the amoebae depends on the starvation time because the gene expression changes with starvation. Cells starved for longer times are more excitable. In this work, we mix cells of different excitabilities to study the dependence of the emergent patterns on the excitability. Preliminary results show a transition from spirals to target patterns for specific excitabilities. A phase map of the patterns for different combinations of excitability and number densities is obtained. We compare our findings with numerical simulations of existing theoretical models.

  6. Pattern formation at liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidel, Barbara; Knobler, Charles M.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative experimental investigations of pattern formation at a liquid interface are described. The reaction studied is the photoreduction of Fe 3+ in aqueous solution and the subsequent formation of Turnbull's Blue. Both the wavelength of the pattern and the time at which the break in homogeneity occurs have been studied as functions of the concentrations of the reactants and the viscosity of the solvent. Many of the features of the process are consistent with a mechanism in which autocatalysis is enhanced by double diffusion. Preliminary studies of pattern formation in the KI/starch/chloralhydrate system are also presented.

  7. Dynamics of interfacial pattern formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-Jacob, E.; Goldenfeld, N.; Langer, J. S.; Schon, G.

    1983-01-01

    A phenomenological model of dendritic solidification incorporating interfacial kinetics, crystalline anisotropy, and a local approximation for the dynamics of the thermal diffusion field is proposed. The preliminary results are in qualitative agreement with natural dendrite-like pattern formation.

  8. Patterning of cells through patterning of biology.

    PubMed

    Kala, A; Jain, P K; Friedman, S H

    2014-07-01

    For the first time, cells have been patterned on surfaces through the spatial manipulation of native gene expression. By manipulating the inherent biology of the cell, as opposed to the chemical nature of the surfaces they are attached to, we have created a potentially more flexible way of creating patterns of cells that does not depend on the substrate. This was accomplished by bringing an siRNA that targets the expression of pten under the control of light, by modifying it with photocleavable groups. This pten-targeting siRNA has been previously demonstrated to induce dissociation of cells from surfaces. We modified this siRNA with dimethoxy nitro phenyl ethyl photocleavable groups (DMNPE) to allow the activity of the siRNA, and hence pten knockdown, to be toggled with light. Using this approach we demonstrated light dependent cell dissociation only with a DMNPE modified siRNA that targets pten and not with control siRNAs. In addition we demonstrated the ability to make simple patterns of cells through the application of masks during irradiation.

  9. Pattern formation with proportionate growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhar, Deepak

    It is a common observation that as baby animals grow, different body parts grow approximately at same rate. This property, called proportionate growth is remarkable in that it is not encountered easily outside biology. The models of growth that have been studied in Physics so far, e.g diffusion -limited aggregation, surface deposition, growth of crystals from melt etc. involve only growth at the surface, with the inner structure remaining frozen. Interestingly, patterns formed in growing sandpiles provide a very wide variety of patterns that show proportionate growth. One finds patterns with different features, with sharply defined boundaries. In particular, even with very simple rules, one can produce patterns that show striking resemblance to those seen in nature. We can characterize the asymptotic pattern exactly in some special cases. I will discuss in particular the patterns grown on noisy backgrounds. Supported by J. C. Bose fellowship from DST (India).

  10. Pattern formation in the geosciences.

    PubMed

    Goehring, Lucas

    2013-01-01

    Pattern formation is a natural property of nonlinear and non-equilibrium dynamical systems. Geophysical examples of such systems span practically all observable length scales, from rhythmic banding of chemical species within a single mineral crystal, to the morphology of cusps and spits along hundreds of kilometres of coastlines. This article briefly introduces the general principles of pattern formation and argues how they can be applied to open problems in the Earth sciences. Particular examples are then discussed, which summarize the contents of the rest of this Theme Issue.

  11. Pattern formation in the geosciences

    PubMed Central

    Goehring, Lucas

    2013-01-01

    Pattern formation is a natural property of nonlinear and non-equilibrium dynamical systems. Geophysical examples of such systems span practically all observable length scales, from rhythmic banding of chemical species within a single mineral crystal, to the morphology of cusps and spits along hundreds of kilometres of coastlines. This article briefly introduces the general principles of pattern formation and argues how they can be applied to open problems in the Earth sciences. Particular examples are then discussed, which summarize the contents of the rest of this Theme Issue. PMID:24191107

  12. Lysozyme pattern formation in evaporating droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorr, Heather Meloy

    Liquid droplets containing suspended particles deposited on a solid, flat surface generally form ring-like structures due to the redistribution of solute during evaporation (the "coffee ring effect"). The forms of the deposited patterns depend on complex interactions between solute(s), solvent, and substrate in a rapidly changing, far from equilibrium system. Solute self-organization during evaporation of colloidal sessile droplets has attracted the attention of researchers over the past few decades due to a variety of technological applications. Recently, pattern formation during evaporation of various biofluids has been studied due to potential applications in medical screening and diagnosis. Due to the complexity of 'real' biological fluids and other multicomponent systems, a comprehensive understanding of pattern formation during droplet evaporation of these fluids is lacking. In this PhD dissertation, the morphology of the patterns remaining after evaporation of droplets of a simplified model biological fluid (aqueous lysozyme solutions + NaCl) are examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical microscopy. Lysozyme is a globular protein found in high concentration, for example, in human tears and saliva. The drop diameters, D, studied range from the micro- to the macro- scale (1 microm -- 2 mm). In this work, the effect of evaporation conditions, solution chemistry, and heat transfer within the droplet on pattern formation is examined. In micro-scale deposits of aqueous lysozyme solutions (1 microm < D < 50 microm), the protein motion and the resulting dried residue morphology are highly influenced by the decreased evaporation time of the drop. The effect of electrolytes on pattern formation is also investigated by adding varying concentrations NaCl to the lysozyme solutions. Finally, a novel pattern recognition program is described and implemented which classifies deposit images by their solution chemistries. The results presented in this Ph

  13. Pattern formation in Salt Playa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasser, Jana; Goehring, Lucas; Nield, Joanna

    2017-04-01

    Salt Playa, or crusts, often exhibit polygonal salt-ridge patterns with a diameter of roughly 1 m. Several mechanisms, like cracking or wrinkling of the surface crust have been discussed, but none of these can explain the scale of the observed patterns. We investigate a theory where we link the crust pattern to buoyancy-driven flows in the porous ground beneath them. In this model, salinity gradients arise due to evaporation at the ground surface. These gradients lead to the formation of convection cells, much like the convection caused by temperature gradients. The spatial scaling of these convection rolls significantly depends on the evaporation rate, while the onset of convection is controlled by the permeability of the soil. Here we will show a link between surface salt patterns and subsurface dynamics. We investigate the onset of convection, the scaling of convection cells, and the formation of salt crusts in a sandy soil confined to a Hele-Shaw cell in analogue experiments and link subsurface concentration gradients to surface crust patterns by means of a field study. The aim of the experiments and the field study is to explore how porous media convection can affect salt crust patterns in arid environments.

  14. Pattern formation in optical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, C. O.; Larionova, Ye

    2007-02-01

    We review pattern formation in optical resonators. The emphasis is on 'particle-like' structures such as vortices or spatial solitons. On the one hand, similarities impose themselves with other fields of physics (condensed matter, phase transitions, particle physics, fluds/super fluids). On the other hand the feedback is led by the resonator mirrors to bi- and multi-stability of the spatial field structure, which is the basic ingredient for optical information processing. The spatial dimension or the 'parallelism' is the strength of optics compared to electronics (and will have to be employed to fully use the advantages optics offers in information processing). But even in the 'serial' processing tasks of telecoms (e.g. information buffering) spatial resonator solitons can do better than the schemes proposed so far—including 'slow light'. Pattern formation in optical resonators will likely be the key to brain-like information processing like cognition, learning and association; to complement the precise but limited algorithmic capabilities of electronic processing. But even in the short term it will be useful for solving serial optical processing problems. The prospects for technical uses of pattern formation in resonators are one motivation for this research. The fundamental similarities with other fields of physics, on the other hand, inspire transfer of concepts between fields; something that has always proven fruitful for gaining deeper insights or for solving technical problems.

  15. Formate Formation and Formate Conversion in Biological Fuels Production

    PubMed Central

    Crable, Bryan R.; Plugge, Caroline M.; McInerney, Michael J.; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Biomethanation is a mature technology for fuel production. Fourth generation biofuels research will focus on sequestering CO2 and providing carbon-neutral or carbon-negative strategies to cope with dwindling fossil fuel supplies and environmental impact. Formate is an important intermediate in the methanogenic breakdown of complex organic material and serves as an important precursor for biological fuels production in the form of methane, hydrogen, and potentially methanol. Formate is produced by either CoA-dependent cleavage of pyruvate or enzymatic reduction of CO2 in an NADH- or ferredoxin-dependent manner. Formate is consumed through oxidation to CO2 and H2 or can be further reduced via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for carbon fixation or industrially for the production of methanol. Here, we review the enzymes involved in the interconversion of formate and discuss potential applications for biofuels production. PMID:21687599

  16. BIOLOGICAL FORMATION OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN.

    PubMed

    GRAY, C T; GEST, H

    1965-04-09

    From a general standpoint, the formation of molecular hydrogen can be considered a device for disposal of electrons released in metabolic oxidations. We presume that this means of performing anaerobic oxidations is of ancient origin and that the hydrogen-evolving system of strict anaerobes represents a primitive form of cytochrome oxidase, which in aerobes effects the terminal step of respiration, namely the disposal of electrons by combination with molecular oxygen. We further assume that the original pattern of reactions leading to H(2) production has become modified in various ways (with respect to both mechanisms and functions) during the course of biochemical evolution, and we believe that this point of view suggests profitable approaches for clarifying a number of problems in the intermediary metabolism of microorganisms which produce or utilize H(2). Of special general importance in this connection is the basic problem of defining more precisely the fundamental elements in the regulatory control of anaerobic energy metabolism. Among the more specific aspects awaiting further elucidation are: the relations between formation of H(2) and use of H(2) as a primary reductant for biosynthetic purposes; the various forms of direct and indirect interactions between hydrogenase and N(2) reduction systems; and the transitional stages between anaerobic and aerobic energy-metabolism patterns of facultative organisms.

  17. Vascular pattern formation in plants.

    PubMed

    Scarpella, Enrico; Helariutta, Ykä

    2010-01-01

    Reticulate tissue systems exist in most multicellular organisms, and the principles underlying the formation of cellular networks have fascinated philosophers, mathematicians, and biologists for centuries. In particular, the beautiful and varied arrangements of vascular tissues in plants have intrigued mankind since antiquity, yet the organizing signals have remained elusive. Plant vascular tissues form systems of interconnected cell files throughout the plant body. Vascular cells are aligned with one another along continuous lines, and vascular tissues differentiate at reproducible positions within organ environments. However, neither the precise path of vascular differentiation nor the exact geometry of vascular networks is fixed or immutable. Several recent advances converge to reconcile the seemingly conflicting predictability and plasticity of vascular tissue patterns. A control mechanism in which an apical-basal flow of signal establishes a basic coordinate system for body axis formation and vascular strand differentiation, and in which a superimposed level of radial organizing cues elaborates cell patterns, would generate a reproducible tissue configuration in the context of an underlying robust, self-organizing structure, and account for the simultaneous regularity and flexibility of vascular tissue patterns.

  18. Pattern formations and optimal packing.

    PubMed

    Mityushev, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    Patterns of different symmetries may arise after solution to reaction-diffusion equations. Hexagonal arrays, layers and their perturbations are observed in different models after numerical solution to the corresponding initial-boundary value problems. We demonstrate an intimate connection between pattern formations and optimal random packing on the plane. The main study is based on the following two points. First, the diffusive flux in reaction-diffusion systems is approximated by piecewise linear functions in the framework of structural approximations. This leads to a discrete network approximation of the considered continuous problem. Second, the discrete energy minimization yields optimal random packing of the domains (disks) in the representative cell. Therefore, the general problem of pattern formations based on the reaction-diffusion equations is reduced to the geometric problem of random packing. It is demonstrated that all random packings can be divided onto classes associated with classes of isomorphic graphs obtained from the Delaunay triangulation. The unique optimal solution is constructed in each class of the random packings. If the number of disks per representative cell is finite, the number of classes of isomorphic graphs, hence, the number of optimal packings is also finite.

  19. Theory of electrochemical pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christoph, J.; Eiswirth, M.

    2002-03-01

    The spatial coupling in electrochemical systems is mediated by ion migration under the influence of the electric field. Since field effects spread very rapidly, every point of an electrode can communicate with every other one practically instantaneously through migration coupling. Based on mathematical potential theory we present the derivation of a generally applicable reaction-migration equation, which describes the coupling via an integral over the whole electrode area. The corresponding coupling function depends only on the geometry of the electrode setup and has been computed for commonly used electrode shapes (such as ring, disk, ribbon or rectangle). The pattern formation observed in electrochemical systems in the bistable, excitable and oscillatory regime can be reproduced in computer simulations, and the types of patterns occurring under different geometries can be rationalized.

  20. Formation of superhydrophobic/superhydrophilic patterns by combination of nanostructure-imprinted perfluoropolymer and nanostructured silicon oxide for biological droplet generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Taizo; Shimizu, Kazunori; Kaizuma, Yoshihiro; Konishi, Satoshi

    2011-03-01

    In this letter, we report a technology for fabricating superhydrophobic/superhydrophilic patterns using a combination of a nanostructure-imprinted perfluoropolymer and nanostructured silicon oxide. In our previous study, we used a combination of hydrophobic and superhydrophilic materials. However, it was difficult to split low-surface-tension liquids such as biological liquids into droplets solely using hydrophobic/hydrophilic patterns. In this study, the contact angle of the hydrophobic region was enhanced from 109.3° to 155.6° by performing nanostructure imprinting on a damage-reduced perfluoropolymer. The developed superhydrophobic/superhydrophilic patterns allowed the splitting of even those media that contained fetal bovine serum into droplets of a desired shape.

  1. Magnetic Assisted Colloidal Pattern Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ye

    Pattern formation is a mysterious phenomenon occurring at all scales in nature. The beauty of the resulting structures and myriad of resulting properties occurring in naturally forming patterns have attracted great interest from scientists and engineers. One of the most convenient experimental models for studying pattern formation are colloidal particle suspensions, which can be used both to explore condensed matter phenomena and as a powerful fabrication technique for forming advanced materials. In my thesis, I have focused on the study of colloidal patterns, which can be conveniently tracked in an optical microscope yet can also be thermally equilibrated on experimentally relevant time scales, allowing for ground states and transitions between them to be studied with optical tracking algorithms. In particular, I have focused on systems that spontaneously organize due to particle-surface and particle-particle interactions, paying close attention to systems that can be dynamically adjusted with an externally applied magnetic or acoustic field. In the early stages of my doctoral studies, I developed a magnetic field manipulation technique to quantify the adhesion force between particles and surfaces. This manipulation technique is based on the magnetic dipolar interactions between colloidal particles and their "image dipoles" that appear within planar substrate. Since the particles interact with their own images, this system enables massively parallel surface force measurements (>100 measurements) in a single experiment, and allows statistical properties of particle-surface adhesion energies to be extracted as a function of loading rate. With this approach, I was able to probe sub-picoNewton surface interactions between colloidal particles and several substrates at the lowest force loading rates ever achieved. In the later stages of my doctoral studies, I focused on studying patterns formed from particle-particle interaction, which serve as an experimental model of

  2. Emergent pattern formation in an interstitial biofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachreson, Cameron; Wolff, Christian; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.; Toth, Milos

    2017-01-01

    Collective behavior of bacterial colonies plays critical roles in adaptability, survivability, biofilm expansion and infection. We employ an individual-based model of an interstitial biofilm to study emergent pattern formation based on the assumptions that rod-shaped bacteria furrow through a viscous environment and excrete extracellular polymeric substances which bias their rate of motion. Because the bacteria furrow through their environment, the substratum stiffness is a key control parameter behind the formation of distinct morphological patterns. By systematically varying this property (which we quantify with a stiffness coefficient γ ), we show that subtle changes in the substratum stiffness can give rise to a stable state characterized by a high degree of local order and long-range pattern formation. The ordered state exhibits characteristics typically associated with bacterial fitness advantages, even though it is induced by changes in environmental conditions rather than changes in biological parameters. Our findings are applicable to a broad range of biofilms and provide insights into the relationship between bacterial movement and their environment, and basic mechanisms behind self-organization of biophysical systems.

  3. Waves and Patterns in Chemical and Biological Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinney, Harry L.; Krinsky, Valentin I.

    1991-12-01

    These 28 contributions by leading researchers - from such diverse disciplines as chemistry, biology, physics, mathematics, and physiology - describe recent experiments, numerical simulations, and theoretical analyses of the formation of spatial patterns in chemical and biological systems. Chemical patterns have been systematically studied since the field was established by Alan Turing's landmark 1952 paper, "The chemical basis for morphogenesis," yet only recently have new experimental techniques and numerical analyses of reaction-diffusion equations opened the way to understanding stationary and traveling wave patterns. This collection summarizes the exciting developments in this rapidly growing field. It shows that some biological patterns have been found to be strikingly similar to patterns found in simple, well-controlled laboratory chemical systems, that new chemical reactor designs make it possible to sustain chemical patterns and to study transitions between different kinds of patterns, and that nearly 40 years after Turing's paper, the patterns predicted by Turing have finally been observed in laboratory experiments. Harry L. Swinney is Sid Richardson Foundation Regents Chair, Department of Physics, and Director of the Center for Nonlinear Dynamics at the University of Texas at Austin. Valentin I. Krinsky is Head of the Autowave Laboratory, Institute of Biological Physics, Academy of Sciences, Pushchino, USSR. Chapters cover: Spiral, Ring, and Scroll Patterns: Experiments. Spiral, Ring, and Scroll Patterns: Theory and Simulations. Fronts and Turing Patterns. Waves and Patterns in Biological Systems.

  4. Pattern Formation and Complexity Emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, Alexander A.

    2001-03-01

    Success of nonlinear modelling of pattern formation and self-organization encourages speculations on informational and number theoretical foundations of complexity emergence. Pythagorean "unreasonable effectiveness of integers" in natural processes is perhaps extrapolatable even to universal emergence "out-of-nothing" (Leibniz, Wheeler). Because rational numbers (R = M/N) are everywhere dense on real axis, any digital string (hence any "book" from "Library of Babel" of J.L.Borges) is "recorded" infinitely many times in arbitrary many rationals. Furthermore, within any arbitrary small interval there are infinitely many Rs for which (either or both) integers (Ms and Ns) "carry" any given string of any given length. Because any iterational process (such as generation of fractal features of Mandelbrot Set) is arbitrary closely approximatable with rational numbers, the infinite pattern of integers expresses itself in generation of complexity of the world, as well as in emergence of the world itself. This "tunnelling" from Platonic World ("Platonia" of J.Barbour) to a real (physical) world is modern recast of Leibniz's motto ("for deriving all from nothing there suffices a single principle").

  5. Pattern Formation on Networks: from Localised Activity to Turing Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullen, Nick; Wagenknecht, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Networks of interactions between competing species are used to model many complex systems, such as in genetics, evolutionary biology or sociology and knowledge of the patterns of activity they can exhibit is important for understanding their behaviour. The emergence of patterns on complex networks with reaction-diffusion dynamics is studied here, where node dynamics interact via diffusion via the network edges. Through the application of a generalisation of dynamical systems analysis this work reveals a fundamental connection between small-scale modes of activity on networks and localised pattern formation seen throughout science, such as solitons, breathers and localised buckling. The connection between solutions with a single and small numbers of activated nodes and the fully developed system-scale patterns are investigated computationally using numerical continuation methods. These techniques are also used to help reveal a much larger portion of of the full number of solutions that exist in the system at different parameter values. The importance of network structure is also highlighted, with a key role being played by nodes with a certain so-called optimal degree, on which the interaction between the reaction kinetics and the network structure organise the behaviour of the system.

  6. Pattern Formation on Networks: from Localised Activity to Turing Patterns

    PubMed Central

    McCullen, Nick; Wagenknecht, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Networks of interactions between competing species are used to model many complex systems, such as in genetics, evolutionary biology or sociology and knowledge of the patterns of activity they can exhibit is important for understanding their behaviour. The emergence of patterns on complex networks with reaction-diffusion dynamics is studied here, where node dynamics interact via diffusion via the network edges. Through the application of a generalisation of dynamical systems analysis this work reveals a fundamental connection between small-scale modes of activity on networks and localised pattern formation seen throughout science, such as solitons, breathers and localised buckling. The connection between solutions with a single and small numbers of activated nodes and the fully developed system-scale patterns are investigated computationally using numerical continuation methods. These techniques are also used to help reveal a much larger portion of of the full number of solutions that exist in the system at different parameter values. The importance of network structure is also highlighted, with a key role being played by nodes with a certain so-called optimal degree, on which the interaction between the reaction kinetics and the network structure organise the behaviour of the system. PMID:27273339

  7. Molecular bioelectricity in developmental biology: new tools and recent discoveries: control of cell behavior and pattern formation by transmembrane potential gradients.

    PubMed

    Levin, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Significant progress in the molecular investigation of endogenous bioelectric signals during pattern formation in growing tissues has been enabled by recently developed techniques. Ion flows and voltage gradients produced by ion channels and pumps are key regulators of cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Now, instructive roles for bioelectrical gradients in embryogenesis, regeneration, and neoplasm are being revealed through the use of fluorescent voltage reporters and functional experiments using well-characterized channel mutants. Transmembrane voltage gradients (V(mem) ) determine anatomical polarity and function as master regulators during appendage regeneration and embryonic left-right patterning. A state-of-the-art recent study reveals that they can also serve as prepatterns for gene expression domains during craniofacial patterning. Continued development of novel tools and better ways to think about physical controls of cell-cell interactions will lead to mastery of the morphogenetic information stored in physiological networks. This will enable fundamental advances in basic understanding of growth and form, as well as transformative biomedical applications in regenerative medicine.

  8. Geometry-induced protein pattern formation

    PubMed Central

    Thalmeier, Dominik; Halatek, Jacob; Frey, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    Protein patterns are known to adapt to cell shape and serve as spatial templates that choreograph downstream processes like cell polarity or cell division. However, how can pattern-forming proteins sense and respond to the geometry of a cell, and what mechanistic principles underlie pattern formation? Current models invoke mechanisms based on dynamic instabilities arising from nonlinear interactions between proteins but neglect the influence of the spatial geometry itself. Here, we show that patterns can emerge as a direct result of adaptation to cell geometry, in the absence of dynamical instability. We present a generic reaction module that allows protein densities robustly to adapt to the symmetry of the spatial geometry. The key component is an NTPase protein that cycles between nucleotide-dependent membrane-bound and cytosolic states. For elongated cells, we find that the protein dynamics generically leads to a bipolar pattern, which vanishes as the geometry becomes spherically symmetrical. We show that such a reaction module facilitates universal adaptation to cell geometry by sensing the local ratio of membrane area to cytosolic volume. This sensing mechanism is controlled by the membrane affinities of the different states. We apply the theory to explain AtMinD bipolar patterns in Δ EcMinDE Escherichia coli. Due to its generic nature, the mechanism could also serve as a hitherto-unrecognized spatial template in many other bacterial systems. Moreover, the robustness of the mechanism enables self-organized optimization of protein patterns by evolutionary processes. Finally, the proposed module can be used to establish geometry-sensitive protein gradients in synthetic biological systems. PMID:26739566

  9. Geometry-induced protein pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Thalmeier, Dominik; Halatek, Jacob; Frey, Erwin

    2016-01-19

    Protein patterns are known to adapt to cell shape and serve as spatial templates that choreograph downstream processes like cell polarity or cell division. However, how can pattern-forming proteins sense and respond to the geometry of a cell, and what mechanistic principles underlie pattern formation? Current models invoke mechanisms based on dynamic instabilities arising from nonlinear interactions between proteins but neglect the influence of the spatial geometry itself. Here, we show that patterns can emerge as a direct result of adaptation to cell geometry, in the absence of dynamical instability. We present a generic reaction module that allows protein densities robustly to adapt to the symmetry of the spatial geometry. The key component is an NTPase protein that cycles between nucleotide-dependent membrane-bound and cytosolic states. For elongated cells, we find that the protein dynamics generically leads to a bipolar pattern, which vanishes as the geometry becomes spherically symmetrical. We show that such a reaction module facilitates universal adaptation to cell geometry by sensing the local ratio of membrane area to cytosolic volume. This sensing mechanism is controlled by the membrane affinities of the different states. We apply the theory to explain AtMinD bipolar patterns in [Formula: see text] EcMinDE Escherichia coli. Due to its generic nature, the mechanism could also serve as a hitherto-unrecognized spatial template in many other bacterial systems. Moreover, the robustness of the mechanism enables self-organized optimization of protein patterns by evolutionary processes. Finally, the proposed module can be used to establish geometry-sensitive protein gradients in synthetic biological systems.

  10. Anisotropic assembly and pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Brecht, James H.; Uminsky, David T.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the role of anisotropy in two classes of individual-based models for self-organization, collective behavior and self-assembly. We accomplish this via first-order dynamical systems of pairwise interacting particles that incorporate anisotropic interactions. At a continuum level, these models represent the natural anisotropic variants of the well-known aggregation equation. We leverage this framework to analyze the impact of anisotropic effects upon the self-assembly of co-dimension one equilibrium structures, such as micelles and vesicles. Our analytical results reveal the regularizing effect of anisotropy, and isolate the contexts in which anisotropic effects are necessary to achieve dynamical stability of co-dimension one structures. Our results therefore place theoretical limits on when anisotropic effects can be safely neglected. We also explore whether anisotropic effects suffice to induce pattern formation in such particle systems. We conclude with brief numerical studies that highlight various aspects of the models we introduce, elucidate their phase structure and partially validate the analysis we provide.

  11. Pattern formation, logistics, and maximum path probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkaldy, J. S.

    1985-05-01

    The concept of pattern formation, which to current researchers is a synonym for self-organization, carries the connotation of deductive logic together with the process of spontaneous inference. Defining a pattern as an equivalence relation on a set of thermodynamic objects, we establish that a large class of irreversible pattern-forming systems, evolving along idealized quasisteady paths, approaches the stable steady state as a mapping upon the formal deductive imperatives of a propositional function calculus. In the preamble the classical reversible thermodynamics of composite systems is analyzed as an externally manipulated system of space partitioning and classification based on ideal enclosures and diaphragms. The diaphragms have discrete classification capabilities which are designated in relation to conserved quantities by descriptors such as impervious, diathermal, and adiabatic. Differentiability in the continuum thermodynamic calculus is invoked as equivalent to analyticity and consistency in the underlying class or sentential calculus. The seat of inference, however, rests with the thermodynamicist. In the transition to an irreversible pattern-forming system the defined nature of the composite reservoirs remains, but a given diaphragm is replaced by a pattern-forming system which by its nature is a spontaneously evolving volume partitioner and classifier of invariants. The seat of volition or inference for the classification system is thus transferred from the experimenter or theoretician to the diaphragm, and with it the full deductive facility. The equivalence relations or partitions associated with the emerging patterns may thus be associated with theorems of the natural pattern-forming calculus. The entropy function, together with its derivatives, is the vehicle which relates the logistics of reservoirs and diaphragms to the analog logistics of the continuum. Maximum path probability or second-order differentiability of the entropy in isolation are

  12. Pattern formation and collective effects in populations of magnetic microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vach, Peter J.; Walker, Debora; Fischer, Peer; Fratzl, Peter; Faivre, Damien

    2017-03-01

    Self-propelled particles are one prototype of synthetic active matter used to understand complex biological processes, such as the coordination of movement in bacterial colonies or schools of fishes. Collective patterns such as clusters were observed for such systems, reproducing features of biological organization. However, one limitation of this model is that the synthetic assemblies are made of identical individuals. Here we introduce an active system based on magnetic particles at colloidal scales. We use identical but also randomly-shaped magnetic micropropellers and show that they exhibit dynamic and reversible pattern formation.

  13. Pattern Formation in Excitable Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    1997-03-01

    In this talk I give a short review of the history and the current state of theoretical research on spiral wave patterns in excitable media. I start with the theoretical model of wave propagation in excitable media proposed in 1946 by Wiener and Rosenblueth(N. Wiener and A. Rosenblueth, The mathematical formulation of the problem of conduction of impulses in a network of connected excitable elements, specifically in cardiac muscle, Arch. Inst. Cardiol. Mexico 16 (1946) 205). This model describes spiral waves rotating around obstacles. I show how, by taking additionally into account curvature effects and gradual recovery of the medium after passage of an excitation wave, the model is generalized to describe freely rotating spiral waves and the breakup which produces spirals. In the context of this kinematic model, complex dynamics of spiral waves, i.e. their meandering, drift and resonance, is discussed. Instabilities of spiral waves in confined geometries, i.e. inside a circular region and on a sphere, are analyzed. At the end, I show how spiral waves in such systems can be efficiently controlled by application of a delayed global feedback. The talk is based on the review paper(A. S. Mikhailov, V. A. Davydov, and V. S. Zykov, Complex dynamics of spiral waves and motion of curves, Physica D 70 (1994) 1) and the monograph(A. S. Mikhailov, Foundations of Synergetics I, 2nd revised edition (Springer, Berlin, 1994)).

  14. Blood drop patterns: Formation and applications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruoyang; Zhang, Liyuan; Zang, Duyang; Shen, Wei

    2016-05-01

    The drying of a drop of blood or plasma on a solid substrate leads to the formation of interesting and complex patterns. Inter- and intra-cellular and macromolecular interactions in the drying plasma or blood drop are responsible for the final morphologies of the dried patterns. Changes in these cellular and macromolecular components in blood caused by diseases have been suspected to cause changes in the dried drop patterns of plasma and whole blood, which could be used as simple diagnostic tools to identify the health of humans and livestock. However, complex physicochemical driving forces involved in the pattern formation are not fully understood. This review focuses on the scientific development in microscopic observations and pattern interpretation of dried plasma and whole blood samples, as well as the diagnostic applications of pattern analysis. Dried drop patterns of plasma consist of intricate visible cracks in the outer region and fine structures in the central region, which are mainly influenced by the presence and concentration of inorganic salts and proteins during drying. The shrinkage of macromolecular gel and its adhesion to the substrate surface have been thought to be responsible for the formation of the cracks. Dried drop patterns of whole blood have three characteristic zones; their formation as functions of drying time has been reported in the literature. Some research works have applied engineering treatment to the evaporation process of whole blood samples. The sensitivities of the resultant patterns to the relative humidity of the environment, the wettability of the substrates, and the size of the drop have been reported. These research works shed light on the mechanisms of spreading, evaporation, gelation, and crack formation of the blood drops on solid substrates, as well as on the potential applications of dried drop patterns of plasma and whole blood in diagnosis. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Spontaneous Pattern Formation with Incoherent White Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Tal; Carmon, Tal; Buljan, Hrvoje; Segev, Mordechai

    2004-11-01

    We present the first experimental observation of modulation instability and spontaneous pattern formation with incoherent white light emitted from an incandescent light bulb. We show experimentally that modulation instability of white light propagating in a noninstantaneous self-focusing medium is a collective effect, where the entire temporal spectrum of the light beam becomes unstable at the same threshold value and collectively forms a pattern with a single periodicity. We experimentally demonstrate that the temporal spectrum of the evolving perturbation self-adjusts to match the collective pattern formation phenomenon.

  16. Drumlins: A Classic Example of Pattern Formation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, Jeremy C.; Clark, Chris D.; Spagnolo, Matteo; Hahn, Ute; Hughes, Anna L. C.

    2014-05-01

    Drumlins are elongate streamlined hills, typically 250-1000 m long and 120-300 m wide, formed beneath ice sheets. They occur in fields or swarms, covering vast swathes of previously glaciated terrain, and are the most common variant of a continuum of subglacial bedforms. The processes of drumlin formation are currently elusive and contentious, hindering our understanding of the ice-bed interface. Yet, insight into drumlin formation can be gained through studying their spatial distribution and morphometric properties. When viewed from above, drumlins display striking regularity and self-similarity, suggesting that they form through a self-organising pattern forming process. However, the difficulty of observing drumlins forming in situ (i.e. beneath an ice sheet), and a focus upon individual drumlin forms, has hindered both the recognition and understanding of drumlin pattern formation. Hence, the nature of drumlin patterning is poorly understood, especially in comparison to bedforms generated by other geomorphic agents (e.g. dunes and ripples). To address these issues, here we analyse the morphometric properties of a large database of drumlins mapped from palaeo-ice sheet beds at a variety of geological and glaciological settings. Spatial statistical point pattern tests suggest that drumlins are regularly spaced across drumlin fields. However, defects to this regularity occur due to differences in preservation and initial formation conditions. Furthermore, drumlin morphometric parameters frequently conform to a log-normal distribution, common for phenomena which experience incremental growth or fragmentation. Hence, drumlin morphometrics can provide us with insight into how drumlin patterns have evolved. Between separate drumlin fields, variations in patterning and morphometrics vary, highlighting the response of drumlin patterning to local glaciological and geological factors. Hence, we suggest that many of the patterning principles which have been applied to other

  17. Pattern formation in prey-taxis systems.

    PubMed

    Lee, J M; Hillen, T; Lewis, M A

    2009-11-01

    In this paper, we consider spatial predator-prey models with diffusion and prey-taxis. We investigate necessary conditions for pattern formation using a variety of non-linear functional responses, linear and non-linear predator death terms, linear and non-linear prey-taxis sensitivities, and logistic growth or growth with an Allee effect for the prey. We identify combinations of the above non-linearities that lead to spatial pattern formation and we give numerical examples. It turns out that prey-taxis stabilizes the system and for large prey-taxis sensitivity we do not observe pattern formation. We also study and find necessary conditions for global stability for a type I functional response, logistic growth for the prey, non-linear predator death terms, and non-linear prey-taxis sensitivity.

  18. Theory of ocular dominance pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherf, O.; Pawelzik, K.; Wolf, F.; Geisel, T.

    1999-06-01

    We investigate a general and analytically tractable model for the activity-dependent formation of neuronal connectivity patterns. Previous models are contained as limiting cases. As an important example we analyze the formation of ocular dominance patterns in the visual cortex. A linear stability analysis reveals that the model undergoes a Turing-type instability as a function of interaction range and receptive field size. The phase transitions is of second order. After the linear instability the patterns may reorganize which we analyze in terms of a potential for the dynamics. Our analysis demonstrates that the experimentally observed dependency of ocular dominance patterns on interocular correlations of visual experience during development can emerge according to two generic scenarios: either the system is driven through the phase transition during development thereby selecting and stabilizing the first unstable mode or a primary pattern reorganizes towards larger wavelength according their lower energy. Experimentally observing the time course of ocular dominance pattern formation will decide which scenario is realized in the brain.

  19. Biological ice nucleation initiates hailstone formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaud, Alexander B.; Dore, John E.; Leslie, Deborah; Lyons, W. Berry; Sands, David C.; Priscu, John C.

    2014-11-01

    Cloud condensation and ice nuclei in the troposphere are required precursors to cloud and precipitation formation, both of which influence the radiative balance of Earth. The initial stage of hailstone formation (i.e., the embryo) and the subsequent layered growth allow hail to be used as a model for the study of nucleation processes in precipitation. By virtue of the preserved particle and isotopic record captured by hailstones, they represent a unique form of precipitation that allows direct characterization of the particles present during atmospheric ice nucleation. Despite the ecological and economic consequences of hail storms, the dynamics of hailstone nucleation, and thus their formation, are not well understood. Our experiments show that hailstone embryos from three Rocky Mountain storms contained biological ice nuclei capable of freezing water at warm, subzero (°C) temperatures, indicating that biological particles can act as nucleation sites for hailstone formation. These results are corroborated by analysis of δD and δ18O from melted hailstone embryos, which show that the hailstones formed at similarly warm temperatures in situ. Low densities of ice nucleation active abiotic particles were also present in hailstone embryos, but their low concentration indicates they were not likely to have catalyzed ice formation at the warm temperatures determined from water stable isotope analysis. Our study provides new data on ice nucleation occurring at the bottom of clouds, an atmospheric region whose processes are critical to global climate models but which has challenged instrument-based measurements.

  20. Taming contact line instability for pattern formation

    PubMed Central

    Deblais, A.; Harich, R.; Colin, A.; Kellay, H.

    2016-01-01

    Coating surfaces with different fluids is prone to instability producing inhomogeneous films and patterns. The contact line between the coating fluid and the surface to be coated is host to different instabilities, limiting the use of a variety of coating techniques. Here we take advantage of the instability of a receding contact line towards cusp and droplet formation to produce linear patterns of variable spacings. We stabilize the instability of the cusps towards droplet formation by using polymer solutions that inhibit this secondary instability and give rise to long slender cylindrical filaments. We vary the speed of deposition to change the spacing between these filaments. The combination of the two gives rise to linear patterns into which different colloidal particles can be embedded, long DNA molecules can be stretched and particles filtered by size. The technique is therefore suitable to prepare anisotropic structures with variable properties. PMID:27506626

  1. Pattern formation in superdiffusion Oregonator model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Fan; Yan, Jia; Liu, Fu-Cheng; He, Ya-Feng

    2016-10-01

    Pattern formations in an Oregonator model with superdiffusion are studied in two-dimensional (2D) numerical simulations. Stability analyses are performed by applying Fourier and Laplace transforms to the space fractional reaction-diffusion systems. Antispiral, stable turing patterns, and travelling patterns are observed by changing the diffusion index of the activator. Analyses of Floquet multipliers show that the limit cycle solution loses stability at the wave number of the primitive vector of the travelling hexagonal pattern. We also observed a transition between antispiral and spiral by changing the diffusion index of the inhibitor. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11205044 and 11405042), the Research Foundation of Education Bureau of Hebei Province, China (Grant Nos. Y2012009 and ZD2015025), the Program for Young Principal Investigators of Hebei Province, China, and the Midwest Universities Comprehensive Strength Promotion Project.

  2. Quantum pattern formation dynamics of photoinduced nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Kunio; Nasu, Keiichiro

    2008-06-01

    We study the dynamics of quantum pattern formation processes in molecular crystals which is concomitant with photoinduced nucleation. Since the nucleation process in coherent regime is driven by the nonadiabatic transition in each molecule followed by the propagation of phonons, it is necessary to take into account the quantum nature of both electrons and phonons in order to pursue the dynamics of the system. Therefore, we employ a model of localized electrons coupled with a quantized phonon mode and solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation numerically. We found that there is a minimal size of clusters of excited molecules which triggers the photoinduced nucleation process; i.e., nucleation does not take place unless sufficient photoexcitation energy is concentrated within a narrow area of the system. We show that this result means that the spatial distribution of photoexcited molecules plays an important role in the nonlinearity of the dynamics and also in the optical properties observed in experiments. We calculate the conversion ratio, the rate of cluster formation, and correlation functions to reveal the dynamical properties of the pattern formation process; the initial dynamics of the photoinduced structural change is discussed from the viewpoint of pattern formation.

  3. Pattern formation in Active Polar Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, Arvind; Hagan, Michael; Baskaran, Aparna

    2011-03-01

    Systems such as bacterial suspensions or cytoskeletal filaments and motility assays can be described within the paradigm of active polar fluids. These systems have been shown to exhibit pattern formation raging from asters and vortices to traveling stripes. A coarse-grained description of such a fluid is given by a scalar density field and a vector polarization field. We study such a macroscopic description of the system using weakly nonlinear analysis and numerical simulations to map out the emergent pattern formation as a function of the hydrodynamic parameters in the context of two specific microscopic models - a quasi-2D suspension of cytoskeletal filaments and motor proteins and a system of self propelled hard rods that interact through excluded volume interactions. The authors thank the Brandeis MRSEC center for financial support.

  4. Sarcomeric Pattern Formation by Actin Cluster Coalescence

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Benjamin M.; Fischer-Friedrich, Elisabeth; Gov, Nir S.; Safran, Samuel A.

    2012-01-01

    Contractile function of striated muscle cells depends crucially on the almost crystalline order of actin and myosin filaments in myofibrils, but the physical mechanisms that lead to myofibril assembly remains ill-defined. Passive diffusive sorting of actin filaments into sarcomeric order is kinetically impossible, suggesting a pivotal role of active processes in sarcomeric pattern formation. Using a one-dimensional computational model of an initially unstriated actin bundle, we show that actin filament treadmilling in the presence of processive plus-end crosslinking provides a simple and robust mechanism for the polarity sorting of actin filaments as well as for the correct localization of myosin filaments. We propose that the coalescence of crosslinked actin clusters could be key for sarcomeric pattern formation. In our simulations, sarcomere spacing is set by filament length prompting tight length control already at early stages of pattern formation. The proposed mechanism could be generic and apply both to premyofibrils and nascent myofibrils in developing muscle cells as well as possibly to striated stress-fibers in non-muscle cells. PMID:22685394

  5. Fold pattern formation in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Daniel W.; Dabrowski, Marcin; Krotkiewski, Marcin

    2010-05-01

    The vast majority of studies concerned with folding focus on 2D and assume that the resulting fold structures are cylindrically extended in the out of place direction. This simplification is often justified as fold aspect ratios, length/width, are quite large. However, folds always exhibit finite aspect ratios and it is unclear what controls this (cf. Fletcher 1995). Surprisingly little is known about the fold pattern formation in 3D for different in-plane loading conditions. Even more complicated is the pattern formation when several folding events are superposed. Let us take the example of a plane strain pure shear superposed by the same kind of deformation but rotated by 90 degrees. The text book prediction for this event is the formation of an egg carton structure; relevant analogue models either agree and produce type 1 interference patterns or contradict and produce type 2. In order to map out 3D fold pattern formation we have performed a systematic parameter space investigation using BILAMIN, our efficient unstructured mesh finite element Stokes solver. BILAMIN is capable of solving problems with more than half a billion unknowns. This allows us to study fold patterns that emerge in randomly (red noise) perturbed layers. We classify the resulting structures with differential geometry tools. Our results show that there is a relationship between fold aspect ratio and in-plane loading conditions. We propose that this finding can be used to determine the complete parameter set potentially contained in the geometry of three dimensional folds: mechanical properties of natural rocks, maximum strain, and relative strength of the in-plane far-field load components. Furthermore, we show how folds in 3D amplify and that there is a second deformation mode, besides continuous amplification, where compression leads to a lateral rearrangement of blocks of folds. Finally, we demonstrate that the textbook prediction of egg carton shaped dome and basin structures resulting

  6. Biologically active neutrophil chemokine pattern in tonsillitis

    PubMed Central

    RUDACK, C; JÖRG, S; SACHSE, F

    2004-01-01

    To gain an insight into the mechanisms of chronic and acute inflammation, the production of neutrophil chemokines in different types of tonsillitis – hyperplastic tonsillitis (HT), recurrent tonsillitis (RT) and peritonsillar abscesses (PA) – was investigated. The chemokines interleukin-8 (IL-8), growth-related oncogene-α (GRO-α), epithelial cell-derived neutrophil attractant-78 (ENA-78) and granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 (GCP-2) were detected and shown to have different biological activities. With respect to the biological properties of CXC chemokines, the biological activity of the chemokines was identified using a three-step high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique, a bioassay involving measurement of neutrophil chemotaxis in a single Boyden chamber in tissue of HT, RT and PA. Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), the chemokine concentrations were determined in the different tonsillitis entities. The chemokine pattern was dominated in PA by IL-8 and GRO-α and in RT by GRO-α. Hyperplastic tonsils of patients without a history of infection generated about five times lower IL-8 than PA. A protein concentration of GCP-2 was induced in PA and RT, whereas ENA-78 remained the same in all entities. In conclusion, it would appear that IL-8 was up-regulated in acute inflammation, whereas GRO-α dominated in chronic inflammation. ENA-78 seems not to play a pivotal role in inflammatory processes in tonsils. GCP-2 may serve as a substitute chemokine in certain inflammatory conditions as its quantity of mRNA and protein was higher in RT and PA than in HT. PMID:15008987

  7. Pattern formation in cell membrane adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Discher, Dennis; Hategan, A.; Sengupta, K.; Sackmann, E.

    2004-03-01

    Strong adhesion of highly active cells often nucleates focal adhesions or related structures that are, over time, reinforced by cytoskeleton (actin, etc.). Red cells lack such complex adhesion systems, but they are shown here to also exhibit complex spatial patterns within an adhesive contact zone. While strong adhesion and spreading of the red cell to a dense poly-L-lysine surface appears complete in < 1 s by reflective interference microscopy, over longer times of 10-15 min or more distinct patterns in fluorescently labeled membrane components emerge. The fluorescent lipid Fl-PE (fluorescein phosphoethanolamine), in particular, is seen to diffuse and reorganize (eg. worm-like domains of <500 nm) within the contact zone, independent of whether the cell is intact or ruptured. Lipid patterns are accompanied by visible perturbations in band 3 distribution and weaker perturbations in membrane skeleton actin. Although fluorescent poly-L-lysine is shown to be uniform under cells, pressing down on the membrane quenches the lipid patterns and reveals the topographical basis for pattern formation. Regions of strong contact are thus separated by regions where the membrane is more distant from the surface.

  8. Fast solvers for optimal control problems from pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, Martin; Pearson, John W.; Maini, Philip K.

    2016-01-01

    The modeling of pattern formation in biological systems using various models of reaction-diffusion type has been an active research topic for many years. We here look at a parameter identification (or PDE-constrained optimization) problem where the Schnakenberg and Gierer-Meinhardt equations, two well-known pattern formation models, form the constraints to an objective function. Our main focus is on the efficient solution of the associated nonlinear programming problems via a Lagrange-Newton scheme. In particular we focus on the fast and robust solution of the resulting large linear systems, which are of saddle point form. We illustrate this by considering several two- and three-dimensional setups for both models. Additionally, we discuss an image-driven formulation that allows us to identify parameters of the model to match an observed quantity obtained from an image.

  9. A new mechanism for dendritic pattern formation in dense systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-06-01

    Patterns are often formed when particles cluster: Since patterns reflect the connectivity of different types of material, the emergence of patterns affects the physical and chemical properties of systems and shares a close relationship to their macroscopic functions. A radial dendritic pattern (RDP) is observed in many systems such as snow crystals, polymer crystals and biological systems. Although most of these systems are considered as dense particle suspensions, the mechanism of RDP formation in dense particle systems is not yet understood. It should be noted that the diffusion limited aggregation model is not applicable to RDP formation in dense systems, but in dilute particle systems. Here, we propose a simple model that exhibits RDP formation in a dense particle system. The model potential for the inter-particle interaction is composed of two parts, a repulsive and an attractive force. The repulsive force is applied to all the particles all the time and the attractive force is exerted only among particles inside a circular domain, which expands at a certain speed as a wave front propagating from a preselected centre. It is found that an RDP is formed if the velocity of the wave front that triggers the attractive interaction is of the same order of magnitude as the time scale defined by the aggregation speed.

  10. Pattern formation of stationary transcellular ionic currents in Fucus

    PubMed Central

    Léonetti, M.; Dubois-Violette, E.; Homblé, F.

    2004-01-01

    Stationary and nonstationary spatiotemporal pattern formations emerging from the cellular electric activity are a common feature of biological cells and tissues. The nonstationary ones are well explained in the framework of the cable model. Inversely, the formation of the widespread self-organized stationary patterns of transcellular ionic currents remains elusive, despite their importance in cell polarization, apical growth, and morphogenesis. For example, the nature of the breaking symmetry in the Fucus zygote, a model organism for the experimental investigation of embryonic pattern formation, is still an open question. Using an electrodiffusive model, we report here an unexpected property of the cellular electric activity: a phase-space domain that gives rise to stationary patterns of transcellular ionic currents at finite wavelength. The cable model cannot predict this instability. In agreement with experiments, the characteristic time is an ionic diffusive one (<2 min). The critical radius is of the same order of magnitude as the cell radius (30 μm). The generic salient features are a global positive differential conductance, a negative differential conductance for one ion, and a difference between the diffusive coefficients. Although different, this mechanism is reminiscent of Turing instability. PMID:15232004

  11. Singularity-Driven Pattern Formation by Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Michael P.; Betterton, M. D.

    2000-03-01

    Under special conditions bacteria excrete an attractant and aggregate. The patterns formation is driven by the formation of singularities. The high density regions initially collapse into cylindrical structures, which subsequently destabilize and break up into spherical aggregates. This paper presents a theoretical description of the process. Cylindrical collapse is marginal, which leads to corrections to the collapse laws expected from dimensional analysis. The instability of a collapsing cylinder is composed of two stages: Initially, slow modulations to the cylinder develop, which correspond to a variation of the collapse time along the cylinder axis. Ultimately, one point on the cylinder pinches off. At this final stage of the instability, a front propagates from the pinch into the remainder of the cylinder. The spacing of the resulting spherical aggregates is determined by the front propagation.

  12. Excitable Pattern Formation in Inhomogeneous Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakara, Kaumudi; Gholami, Azam; Zykov, Vladimir; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2015-03-01

    On starvation, the amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum signal via the chemo-attractant cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). The amoebae sense cAMP through membrane receptors and produce their own cAMP. Simultaneously they produce a basal level of Phosphodiesterase, an enzyme that degrades cAMP. Soon a pattern of rotating spiral waves or circular waves is formed at the multi-cellular level. The causal reasons for the selection of one or the other pattern are still unclear. Here we report experimental and theoretical investigations of the pattern-formation of mixtures of cells starved for different times. The excitability of the amoebae depends on the starvation time due to time dependent gene expressions. Cells starved for longer times are known to exhibit increased excitability. We report phase maps of the patterns for mixtures of different combinations of excitability. Numerical simulations of a modified Kessler-Levine model allow us to explain the experimental results and provide new insights into the dynamical behavior of the system. This work is supported by the Max Planck Society.

  13. Studies of patterned surfaces for biological microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmor, Susan Dale

    Over the past 10 years, biological microarrays have developed into an invaluable tool for genetic and protein research. The task to draw meaningful conclusions between variations of genes and their expression requires millions of comparisons between standard and stressed samples, usually the cDNA, RNA, or proteins within cells. For such a project, high-information-density, highly pure arrays are required. In fabricating an array on a uniform or an unpatterned substrate, droplets of solution, if placed too closely, can bleed into each other and can cross-contaminate several array sites. Therefore, a uniform surface limits the density of droplets that can be placed to create an array. When the surface is patterned with a barrier between the droplets, then the density of array sites can be significantly larger (uniform surface, ˜200--500mum center-to-center; patterned surface, 100mum center-to-center and less with present loading technology). We have explored the patterning of surfaces to construct biological microarrays, via altering the surface chemically to create array sites with gold-thiol chemistry, and via a template placed on the surface to outline the elements. In the template strategy, we have investigated poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) films (5--10mum) with holes in a regular array. However, the hydrophobic PDMS repels water to such an extent that the droplets do not wet the template and cannot travel down the wall of the PDMS hole to interact with the surface. As a consequence, if not accurately placed in the array sites, they also do not load into the holes to form filled features. Our current studies focus on altering the surface of the PDMS to allow the droplets to fall into the PDMS holes. To alter the surface and not the bulk, we have experimented with plasma chemistry. To create a temporary contact angle change, oxygen plasma has been employed. However, the PDMS recovers and reverts to it characteristically hydrophobic surface. When we expose PDMS

  14. Dynamics and pattern formation in a cancer network with diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qianqian; Shen, Jianwei

    2015-10-01

    Diffusion is ubiquitous inside cells, and it is capable of inducing spontaneous pattern formation in reaction-diffusion systems on a spatially homogeneous domain. In this paper, we investigate the dynamics of a diffusive cancer network regulated by microRNA and obtain the condition that the network undergoes a Hopf bifurcation and a Turing pattern bifurcation. In addition, we also develop the amplitude equation of the network model by using Taylor series expansion, multi-scaling and further expansion in powers of a small parameter. As a result of these analyses, we obtain the explicit condition on how the dynamics of the diffusive cancer network evolve. These results reveal that this system has rich dynamics, such as spotted stripe and hexagon patterns. The bifurcation diagram helps us understand the biological mechanism in the cancer network. Finally, numerical simulations confirm our analytical results.

  15. The pattern of p53 mutations caused by PAH o-quinones is driven by 8-oxo-dGuo formation while the spectrum of mutations is determined by biological selection for dominance.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Heum; Gelhaus, Stacy; Vedantam, Srilakshmi; Oliva, Andrea L; Batra, Abhita; Blair, Ian A; Troxel, Andrea B; Field, Jeffrey; Penning, Trevor M

    2008-05-01

    PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) are suspect lung cancer carcinogens that must be metabolically converted into DNA-reactive metabolites. P4501A1/P4501B1 plus epoxide hydrolase activate PAH to (+/-)- anti-benzo[ a]pyrene diol epoxide ((+/-)- anti-BPDE), which causes bulky DNA adducts. Alternatively, aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) convert intermediate PAH trans-dihydrodiols to o-quinones, which cause DNA damage by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). In lung cancer, the types or pattern of mutations in p53 are predominantly G to T transversions. The locations of these mutations form a distinct spectrum characterized by single point mutations in a number of hotspots located in the DNA binding domain. One route to the G to T transversions is via oxidative DNA damage. An RP-HPLC-ECD assay was used to detect the formation of 8-oxo-dGuo in p53 cDNA exposed to representative quinones, BP-7,8-dione, BA-3,4-dione, and DMBA-3,4-dione under redox cycling conditions. Concurrently, a yeast reporter system was used to detect mutations in the same cDNA samples. Nanomolar concentrations of PAH o-quinones generated 8-oxo-dGuo (detected by HPLC-ECD) in a concentration dependent manner that correlated in a linear fashion with mutagenic frequency. By contrast, micromolar concentrations of (+/-)- anti-BPDE generated (+)- trans- anti-BPDE-N (2)-dGuo adducts (detected by stable-isotope dilution LC/MS methodology) in p53 cDNA that correlated in a linear fashion with mutagenic frequency, but no 8-oxo-dGuo was detected. Previous studies found that mutations observed with PAH o-quinones were predominately G to T transversions and those observed with (+/-)- anti-BPDE were predominately G to C transversions. However, mutations at guanine bases observed with either PAH-treatment occurred randomly throughout the DNA-binding domain of p53. Here, we find that when the mutants were screened for dominance, the dominant mutations clustered at or near hotspots primarily at the protein

  16. Pattern formation in confined chemical gardens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Wit, Anne; Haudin, Florence; Brau, Fabian; Cartwright, Julyan

    2014-05-01

    Chemical gardens are plant-like mineral structures first described in the seventeenth century and popularly known from chemistry sets for children. They are classically grown in three-dimensional containers by placing a solid metal-salt seed into a silicate solution. When the metal salt starts dissolving in the silicate solution, a semi-permeable membrane forms by precipitation across which water is pumped by osmosis from the silicate solution into the metal salt solution, further dissolving the salt. Above a given pressure, the membrane breaks. The dissolved metal salt solution being generally less dense than the reservoir silicate solution, it rises as a buoyant jet through the broken membrane and further precipitates in contact with the silicate solution, producing a collection of mineral forms that resemble a garden. Such gardens are the subject of increased interest as a model system to understand pattern formation in sea-ice brinicles and hydrothermal vents on the seafloor, among others. All these self-organized precipitation structures at the interface between chemistry, fluid dynamics and mechanics share indeed common chemical, mechanical and electrical properties. In this framework, we study experimentally spatial patterns resulting from the growth of chemical gardens in confined quasi-two-dimensional (2D) geometries upon radial injection of a metallic salt solution into a silicate solution in a horizontal Hele-Shaw cell. We find a large variety of patterns including spirals, fingers, worms, filiform tubes, and flower-like patterns. By exploring the phase space of reactant concentrations and injection flow rates, we observe transitions between these spatio-temporal structures resulting from a coupling between the precipitation reaction, mechanical effects and hydrodynamic instabilities.

  17. Sandpile formation and patterning by revolving rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altshuler, Ernesto; Ramos, Osvanny; Bassler, Kevin; Batista-Leyva, Alfo; Rivera, Aramis

    2002-03-01

    Here we report a remarkable new mechanism of pile formation, which eventually involves patterning. If sand from "Santa Teresa", Cuba, is poured into a cylindrical container with radious 4-6 cm, or smaller, the pile does not build through avalanches, but instead by a "revolving river" mechanism. This novel mechanism can be described as the deposition of a conical layer a few grains thick, which "wraps" the pile clockwise or counterclockwise, depending on the initial conditions. The "growing edge" of the layer consists of a continuous river of sand that flows from the apex of the pile to the base and is a few mm wide. The axial symmetry of the system is spontaneously broken as the direction of the river, clockwise or counterclockwise, is chosen. If the radius of the container is larger than 6-7 cm, the river becomes "intermittent". However, on average, it continues to revolve around the pile, as in the case of the continuous regime observed in smaller piles. The intermittent appearance of the rivers produces an undulating pattern on the pile surface resembling those recently observed for rapid granular flows on an inclined plane, but clearly caused by different mechanisms.

  18. Periodic Pattern Formation of Bacterial Colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Hiroto; Wakita, Jun-ichi; Matsuyama, Tohey; Matsushita, Mitsugu

    1999-04-01

    We have experimentally investigated pattern formation of colonies ofbacterial species Proteus mirabilis, which is famous forforming concentric-ring-like colonies.The colony grows cyclically with the interface repeating an advance anda stop alternately on a surface of a solid agar medium.We distinguish three phases (initial lag phase, the followingmigration and consolidation phases that appear alternately) for the colony growth.When we cut a colony just behind a migrating front shortly after the migrationstarted, the migration ended earlier and the following consolidationlasted longer.However, the following cycles were not influenced by the cut, i.e., thephases of the migration and consolidation were not affected.Global chemical signals governing the colony formation from thecenter were not found to exist.We also quantitatively checked phase entrainment by letting two coloniescollide with each other and found that it does not take place in macroscopic scales.All these experimental results suggest that the most important factorfor the migration is the cell population density.

  19. Effects of patterned topography on biofilm formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, Ravikumar

    2011-12-01

    Bacterial biofilms are a population of bacteria attached to each other and irreversibly to a surface, enclosed in a matrix of self-secreted polymers, among others polysaccharides, proteins, DNA. Biofilms cause persisting infections associated with implanted medical devices and hospital acquired (nosocomial) infections. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are the most common type of nosocomial infections accounting for up to 40% of all hospital acquired infections. Several different strategies, including use of antibacterial agents and genetic cues, quorum sensing, have been adopted for inhibiting biofilm formation relevant to CAUTI surfaces. Each of these methods pertains to certain types of bacteria, processes and has shortcomings. Based on eukaryotic cell topography interaction studies and Ulva linza spore studies, topographical surfaces were suggested as a benign control method for biofilm formation. However, topographies tested so far have not included a systematic variation of size across basic topography shapes. In this study patterned topography was systematically varied in size and shape according to two approaches 1) confinement and 2) wetting. For the confinement approach, using scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy, orienting effects of tested topography based on staphylococcus aureus (s. aureus) (SH1000) and enterobacter cloacae (e. cloacae) (ATCC 700258) bacterial models were identified on features of up to 10 times the size of the bacterium. Psuedomonas aeruginosa (p. aeruginosa) (PAO1) did not show any orientational effects, under the test conditions. Another important factor in medical biofilms is the identification and quantification of phenotypic state which has not been discussed in the literature concerning bacteria topography characterizations. This was done based on antibiotic susceptibility evaluation and also based on gene expression analysis. Although orientational effects occur, phenotypically no difference

  20. Regulation of Spatiotemporal Patterns by Biological Variability: General Principles and Applications to Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Miriam; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Spatiotemporal patterns often emerge from local interactions in a self-organizing fashion. In biology, the resulting patterns are also subject to the influence of the systematic differences between the system’s constituents (biological variability). This regulation of spatiotemporal patterns by biological variability is the topic of our review. We discuss several examples of correlations between cell properties and the self-organized spatiotemporal patterns, together with their relevance for biology. Our guiding, illustrative example will be spiral waves of cAMP in a colony of Dictyostelium discoideum cells. Analogous processes take place in diverse situations (such as cardiac tissue, where spiral waves occur in potentially fatal ventricular fibrillation) so a deeper understanding of this additional layer of self-organized pattern formation would be beneficial to a wide range of applications. One of the most striking differences between pattern-forming systems in physics or chemistry and those in biology is the potential importance of variability. In the former, system components are essentially identical with random fluctuations determining the details of the self-organization process and the resulting patterns. In biology, due to variability, the properties of potentially very few cells can have a driving influence on the resulting asymptotic collective state of the colony. Variability is one means of implementing a few-element control on the collective mode. Regulatory architectures, parameters of signaling cascades, and properties of structure formation processes can be "reverse-engineered" from observed spatiotemporal patterns, as different types of regulation and forms of interactions between the constituents can lead to markedly different correlations. The power of this biology-inspired view of pattern formation lies in building a bridge between two scales: the patterns as a collective state of a very large number of cells on the one hand, and the internal

  1. Biological Superoxide In Manganese Oxide Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, C.; Learman, D.; Zeiner, C.; Santelli, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the strongest sorbents and oxidants within the environment, controlling the fate and transport of numerous elements and the degradation of recalcitrant carbon. Both bacteria and fungi mediate the oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides but the genetic and biochemical mechanisms responsible remain poorly understood. Furthermore, the physiological basis for microbial Mn(II) oxidation remains an enigma. We have recently reported that a common marine bacterium (Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b) oxidizes Mn(II) via reaction with extracellular superoxide (O2-) produced during exponential growth. Here we expand this superoxide-mediated Mn(II) oxidation pathway to fungi, introducing a surprising homology between prokaryotic and eukaryotic metal redox processes. For instance, Stibella aciculosa, a common soil Ascomycete filamentous fungus, precipitates Mn oxides at the base of asexual reproductive structures (synnemata) used to support conidia (Figure 1). This distribution is a consequence of localized production of superoxide (and it's dismutation product hydrogen peroxide, H2O2), leading to abiotic oxidation of Mn(II) by superoxide. Disruption of NADPH oxidase activity using the oxidoreductase inhibitor DPI leads to diminished cell differentiation and subsequent Mn(II) oxidation inhibition. Addition of Cu(II) (an effective superoxide scavenger) leads to a concentration dependent decrease in Mn oxide formation. We predict that due to the widespread production of extracellular superoxide within the fungal and likely bacterial kingdoms, biological superoxide may be an important contributor to the cycling of Mn, as well as other metals (e.g., Hg, Fe). Current and future explorations of the genes and proteins involved in superoxide production and Mn(II) oxidation will ideally lend insight into the physiological and biochemical basis for these processes.

  2. Flow-driven instabilities during pattern formation of Dictyostelium discoideum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholami, A.; Steinbock, O.; Zykov, V.; Bodenschatz, E.

    2015-06-01

    The slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum is a well known model system for the study of biological pattern formation. In the natural environment, aggregating populations of starving Dictyostelium discoideum cells may experience fluid flows that can profoundly change the underlying wave generation process. Here we study the effect of advection on the pattern formation in a colony of homogeneously distributed Dictyostelium discoideum cells described by the standard Martiel-Goldbeter model. The external flow advects the signaling molecule cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) downstream, while the chemotactic cells attached to the solid substrate are not transported with the flow. The evolution of small perturbations in cAMP concentrations is studied analytically in the linear regime and by corresponding numerical simulations. We show that flow can significantly influence the dynamics of the system and lead to a flow-driven instability that initiate downstream traveling cAMP waves. We also show that boundary conditions have a significant effect on the observed patterns and can lead to a new kind of instability.

  3. Photochemical patterning of biological molecules inside a glass capillary.

    PubMed

    Balakirev, Maxim Y; Porte, Stéphanie; Vernaz-Gris, Maud; Berger, Michel; Arié, Jean-Philippe; Fouqué, Brigitte; Chatelain, François

    2005-09-01

    A simple way for photochemical patterning of biological molecules onto the inner wall of fused-silica capillary is described. The method is based on a modification of the inner capillary surface with photoactive benzophenone (BP) derivative. The UV irradiation at 365 nm of the capillary filled with a sample solution results in cross-linking of the solutes to the BP moiety via a stable covalent bond. As a proof of concept, oligonucleotides and proteins were arrayed inside the capillary using an inverted microscope as an irradiation device. We demonstrated that the capillary arrays produced in this way are functional and could be used in different bioassays including DNA hybridization, protein interaction studies, and immunoassays. Having a sensitivity comparable to the fluorophore-based assays in a planar format, the capillary array possesses several advantages including submicroliter sample volume and a short assay time. The capillary format should therefore be considered as a possible alternative to a planar format in a number of low-density array applications such as mutation detection and diagnostic immunoassays.

  4. Efficient Mining of Interesting Patterns in Large Biological Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Md. Mamunur; Karim, Md. Rezaul; Jeong, Byeong-Soo

    2012-01-01

    Pattern discovery in biological sequences (e.g., DNA sequences) is one of the most challenging tasks in computational biology and bioinformatics. So far, in most approaches, the number of occurrences is a major measure of determining whether a pattern is interesting or not. In computational biology, however, a pattern that is not frequent may still be considered very informative if its actual support frequency exceeds the prior expectation by a large margin. In this paper, we propose a new interesting measure that can provide meaningful biological information. We also propose an efficient index-based method for mining such interesting patterns. Experimental results show that our approach can find interesting patterns within an acceptable computation time. PMID:23105928

  5. Flow-Induced Control of Pattern Formation in Chemical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berenstein, Igal; Beta, Carsten

    Since Alan Turing's seminal paper in 1952, the study of spatio-temporal patterns that arise in systems of reacting and diffusing components has grown into an immense and vibrant realm of scientific research. This field includes not only chemical systems but spans many areas of science as diverse as cell and developmental biology, ecology, geosciences, or semiconductor physics. For several decades research in this field has concentrated on the vast variety of patterns that can emerge in reaction-diffusion systems and on the underlying instabilities. In the 1990s, stimulated by the pioneering work of Ott, Grebogi and Yorke, control of pattern formation arose as a new topical focus and gradually developed into an entire new field of research. On the one hand, research interests concentrated on control and suppression of undesired dynamical states, in particular on control of chaos. On the other hand, the design and engineering of particular space-time patterns became a major focus in this field that motivates ongoing scientific effort until today...

  6. Pattern formation in rotating Bénard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantz, M.; Friedrich, R.; Bestehorn, M.; Haken, H.

    1992-12-01

    Using an extension of the Swift-Hohenberg equation we study pattern formation in the Bénard experiment close to the onset of convection in the case of rotating cylindrical fluid containers. For small Taylor numbers we emphasize the existence of slowly rotating patterns and describe behaviour exhibiting defect motion. Finally, we study pattern formation close to the Küppers-Lortz instability. The instability is nucleated at defects and proceeds through front propagation into the bulk patterns.

  7. Effect of environment fluctuations on pattern formation of single species.

    PubMed

    da Silva, L A; Colombo, E H; Anteneodo, C

    2014-07-01

    System-environment interactions are intrinsically nonlinear and dependent on the interplay between many degrees of freedom. The complexity may be even more pronounced when one aims to describe biologically motivated systems. In that case, it is useful to resort to simplified models relying on effective stochastic equations. A natural consideration is to assume that there is a noisy contribution from the environment, such that the parameters that characterize it are not constant but instead fluctuate around their characteristic values. From this perspective, we propose a stochastic generalization of the nonlocal Fisher-KPP equation where, as a first step, environmental fluctuations are Gaussian white noises, both in space and time. We apply analytical and numerical techniques to study how noise affects stability and pattern formation in this context. Particularly, we investigate noise-induced coherence by means of the complementary information provided by the dispersion relation and the structure function.

  8. Pattern formation in a sandpile of ternary granular mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimokawa, Michiko; Suetsugu, Yuki; Hiroshige, Ryoma; Hirano, Takeru; Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu

    2015-06-01

    Pattern formation in a sandpile is investigated by pouring a ternary mixture of grains into a vertical narrow cell. Size segregation in avalanches causes the formation of patterns. Four kinds of patterns emerge: stratification, segregation, upper stratification-lower segregation, and upper segregation-lower stratification. A phase diagram is constructed in a parameter space of θ11/θ33 and θ22/θ33 , where θ11,θ22 , and θ33 are the repose angles of small, intermediate, and large grains, respectively. To qualitatively understand pattern formation, a phenomenological model based on a roll-or-stay rule is proposed. A similar pattern formation is found in a numerical simulation of the phenomenological model. These results suggest that the ratios of the repose angles of three kinds of grains are important for pattern formation in a sandpile.

  9. Temporal control of self-organized pattern formation without morphogen gradients in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Stephen; Li, Bochong; Cao, Yangxiaolu; Schaeffer, David; Ryser, Marc D; You, Lingchong

    2013-01-01

    Diverse mechanisms have been proposed to explain biological pattern formation. Regardless of their specific molecular interactions, the majority of these mechanisms require morphogen gradients as the spatial cue, which are either predefined or generated as a part of the patterning process. However, using Escherichia coli programmed by a synthetic gene circuit, we demonstrate here the generation of robust, self-organized ring patterns of gene expression in the absence of an apparent morphogen gradient. Instead of being a spatial cue, the morphogen serves as a timing cue to trigger the formation and maintenance of the ring patterns. The timing mechanism enables the system to sense the domain size of the environment and generate patterns that scale accordingly. Our work defines a novel mechanism of pattern formation that has implications for understanding natural developmental processes. PMID:24104480

  10. Chemical Pattern Formation in Far-From Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, John Evan

    The diffusive instability was proposed as a mechanism for pattern formation in chemical systems, in the context of biological morphogenesis, by Alan Turing in 1952. The instability gives rise to a chemical pattern with an intrinsic "chemical wavelength" that is independent of the system size. Since 1952, the diffusive instability, or Turing bifurcation, has been invoked to explain pattern formation in a variety of fields. To date there has been no unambiguous observation of such an instability. Model studies of the instability are usually carried out on systems containing two variables. Such works do not address issues that are of fundamental importance in experimental studies. How does one go about finding Turing bifurcations in systems with many parameters and for which the chemical kinetics are only partially known? What is the chemical wavelength? Turing bifurcations cannot occur in systems with all diffusion coefficients exactly equal. How unequal must the diffusion coefficients be for a system to undergo a Turing bifurcation?. Reacting and diffusing systems obey a partial -differential equation which is a sum of a diffusion term and a reaction term. Dropping the diffusion term results in an ordinary differential equation describing the reaction kinetics in a well-mixed system. In this dissertation it is shown that, for systems with an arbitrary number of variables, Turing bifurcations can occur with diffusion coefficients arbitrarily close to equal, provided the corresponding well-mixed system is sufficiently close to a point of coalescence of Hopf and saddle-node bifurcations. Since the bifurcation set can be obtained directly from experiments, one does not need a detailed microscopic theory of the reaction kinetics. Similarly, the chemical wavelength can be estimated from experimental measurements without knowledge of the reaction kinetics.

  11. Non-linear pattern formation in bone growth and architecture.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Phil

    2014-01-01

    The three-dimensional morphology of bone arises through adaptation to its required engineering performance. Genetically and adaptively bone travels along a complex spatiotemporal trajectory to acquire optimal architecture. On a cellular, micro-anatomical scale, what mechanisms coordinate the activity of osteoblasts and osteoclasts to produce complex and efficient bone architectures? One mechanism is examined here - chaotic non-linear pattern formation (NPF) - which underlies in a unifying way natural structures as disparate as trabecular bone, swarms of birds flying, island formation, fluid turbulence, and others. At the heart of NPF is the fact that simple rules operating between interacting elements, and Turing-like interaction between global and local signals, lead to complex and structured patterns. The study of "group intelligence" exhibited by swarming birds or shoaling fish has led to an embodiment of NPF called "particle swarm optimization" (PSO). This theoretical model could be applicable to the behavior of osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes, seeing them operating "socially" in response simultaneously to both global and local signals (endocrine, cytokine, mechanical), resulting in their clustered activity at formation and resorption sites. This represents problem-solving by social intelligence, and could potentially add further realism to in silico computer simulation of bone modeling. What insights has NPF provided to bone biology? One example concerns the genetic disorder juvenile Pagets disease or idiopathic hyperphosphatasia, where the anomalous parallel trabecular architecture characteristic of this pathology is consistent with an NPF paradigm by analogy with known experimental NPF systems. Here, coupling or "feedback" between osteoblasts and osteoclasts is the critical element. This NPF paradigm implies a profound link between bone regulation and its architecture: in bone the architecture is the regulation. The former is the emergent

  12. Non-Linear Pattern Formation in Bone Growth and Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Phil

    2014-01-01

    The three-dimensional morphology of bone arises through adaptation to its required engineering performance. Genetically and adaptively bone travels along a complex spatiotemporal trajectory to acquire optimal architecture. On a cellular, micro-anatomical scale, what mechanisms coordinate the activity of osteoblasts and osteoclasts to produce complex and efficient bone architectures? One mechanism is examined here – chaotic non-linear pattern formation (NPF) – which underlies in a unifying way natural structures as disparate as trabecular bone, swarms of birds flying, island formation, fluid turbulence, and others. At the heart of NPF is the fact that simple rules operating between interacting elements, and Turing-like interaction between global and local signals, lead to complex and structured patterns. The study of “group intelligence” exhibited by swarming birds or shoaling fish has led to an embodiment of NPF called “particle swarm optimization” (PSO). This theoretical model could be applicable to the behavior of osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes, seeing them operating “socially” in response simultaneously to both global and local signals (endocrine, cytokine, mechanical), resulting in their clustered activity at formation and resorption sites. This represents problem-solving by social intelligence, and could potentially add further realism to in silico computer simulation of bone modeling. What insights has NPF provided to bone biology? One example concerns the genetic disorder juvenile Pagets disease or idiopathic hyperphosphatasia, where the anomalous parallel trabecular architecture characteristic of this pathology is consistent with an NPF paradigm by analogy with known experimental NPF systems. Here, coupling or “feedback” between osteoblasts and osteoclasts is the critical element. This NPF paradigm implies a profound link between bone regulation and its architecture: in bone the architecture is the regulation. The former is the

  13. Pattern formation by a moving morphogen source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zartman, Jeremiah J.; Cheung, Lily S.; Niepielko, Matthew G.; Bonini, Christine; Haley, Benjamin; Yakoby, Nir; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2011-08-01

    During Drosophila melanogaster oogenesis, the follicular epithelium that envelops the germline cyst gives rise to an elaborate eggshell, which houses the future embryo and mediates its interaction with the environment. A prominent feature of the eggshell is a pair of dorsal appendages, which are needed for embryo respiration. Morphogenesis of this structure depends on broad, a zinc-finger transcription factor, regulated by the EGFR pathway. While much has been learned about the mechanisms of broad regulation by EGFR, current understanding of processes that shape the spatial pattern of broad expression is incomplete. We propose that this pattern is defined by two different phases of EGFR activation: an early, posterior-to-anterior gradient of EGFR signaling sets the posterior boundary of broad expression, while the anterior boundary is set by a later phase of EGFR signaling, distributed in a dorsoventral gradient. This model can explain the wild-type pattern of broad in D. melanogaster, predicts how this pattern responds to genetic perturbations, and provides insight into the mechanisms driving diversification of eggshell patterning. The proposed model of the broad expression pattern can be used as a starting point for the quantitative analysis of a large number of gene expression patterns in Drosophila oogenesis.

  14. Cooperativity to increase Turing pattern space for synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Diambra, Luis; Senthivel, Vivek Raj; Menendez, Diego Barcena; Isalan, Mark

    2015-02-20

    It is hard to bridge the gap between mathematical formulations and biological implementations of Turing patterns, yet this is necessary for both understanding and engineering these networks with synthetic biology approaches. Here, we model a reaction-diffusion system with two morphogens in a monostable regime, inspired by components that we recently described in a synthetic biology study in mammalian cells.1 The model employs a single promoter to express both the activator and inhibitor genes and produces Turing patterns over large regions of parameter space, using biologically interpretable Hill function reactions. We applied a stability analysis and identified rules for choosing biologically tunable parameter relationships to increase the likelihood of successful patterning. We show how to control Turing pattern sizes and time evolution by manipulating the values for production and degradation relationships. More importantly, our analysis predicts that steep dose-response functions arising from cooperativity are mandatory for Turing patterns. Greater steepness increases parameter space and even reduces the requirement for differential diffusion between activator and inhibitor. These results demonstrate some of the limitations of linear scenarios for reaction-diffusion systems and will help to guide projects to engineer synthetic Turing patterns.

  15. Cooperativity To Increase Turing Pattern Space for Synthetic Biology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    It is hard to bridge the gap between mathematical formulations and biological implementations of Turing patterns, yet this is necessary for both understanding and engineering these networks with synthetic biology approaches. Here, we model a reaction–diffusion system with two morphogens in a monostable regime, inspired by components that we recently described in a synthetic biology study in mammalian cells.1 The model employs a single promoter to express both the activator and inhibitor genes and produces Turing patterns over large regions of parameter space, using biologically interpretable Hill function reactions. We applied a stability analysis and identified rules for choosing biologically tunable parameter relationships to increase the likelihood of successful patterning. We show how to control Turing pattern sizes and time evolution by manipulating the values for production and degradation relationships. More importantly, our analysis predicts that steep dose–response functions arising from cooperativity are mandatory for Turing patterns. Greater steepness increases parameter space and even reduces the requirement for differential diffusion between activator and inhibitor. These results demonstrate some of the limitations of linear scenarios for reaction–diffusion systems and will help to guide projects to engineer synthetic Turing patterns. PMID:25122550

  16. Sequential pattern formation governed by signaling gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jörg, David J.; Oates, Andrew C.; Jülicher, Frank

    2016-10-01

    Rhythmic and sequential segmentation of the embryonic body plan is a vital developmental patterning process in all vertebrate species. However, a theoretical framework capturing the emergence of dynamic patterns of gene expression from the interplay of cell oscillations with tissue elongation and shortening and with signaling gradients, is still missing. Here we show that a set of coupled genetic oscillators in an elongating tissue that is regulated by diffusing and advected signaling molecules can account for segmentation as a self-organized patterning process. This system can form a finite number of segments and the dynamics of segmentation and the total number of segments formed depend strongly on kinetic parameters describing tissue elongation and signaling molecules. The model accounts for existing experimental perturbations to signaling gradients, and makes testable predictions about novel perturbations. The variety of different patterns formed in our model can account for the variability of segmentation between different animal species.

  17. Mechanochemical models for generating biological pattern and form in development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, J. D.; Maini, P. K.; Tranquillo, R. T.

    1988-12-01

    The central issue in development is the formation of spatial patterns of cells in the early embryo. The mechanisms which generate these patterns are unknown. Here we describe the new Oster-Murray mechanochemical approach to the problem, the elements of which are experimentally well documented. By way of illustration we derive one of the basic models from first principles and apply it to a variety of problems of current interest and research. We specifically discuss the formation of skin organ patterns, such as feather and scale germs, cartilage condensations in the developing vertebrate limb and finally wound healing.

  18. Characteristics of pattern formation and evolution in approximations of Physarum transport networks.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Most studies of pattern formation place particular emphasis on its role in the development of complex multicellular body plans. In simpler organisms, however, pattern formation is intrinsic to growth and behavior. Inspired by one such organism, the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum, we present examples of complex emergent pattern formation and evolution formed by a population of simple particle-like agents. Using simple local behaviors based on chemotaxis, the mobile agent population spontaneously forms complex and dynamic transport networks. By adjusting simple model parameters, maps of characteristic patterning are obtained. Certain areas of the parameter mapping yield particularly complex long term behaviors, including the circular contraction of network lacunae and bifurcation of network paths to maintain network connectivity. We demonstrate the formation of irregular spots and labyrinthine and reticulated patterns by chemoattraction. Other Turing-like patterning schemes were obtained by using chemorepulsion behaviors, including the self-organization of regular periodic arrays of spots, and striped patterns. We show that complex pattern types can be produced without resorting to the hierarchical coupling of reaction-diffusion mechanisms. We also present network behaviors arising from simple pre-patterning cues, giving simple examples of how the emergent pattern formation processes evolve into networks with functional and quasi-physical properties including tensionlike effects, network minimization behavior, and repair to network damage. The results are interpreted in relation to classical theories of biological pattern formation in natural systems, and we suggest mechanisms by which emergent pattern formation processes may be used as a method for spatially represented unconventional computation.

  19. Comparing investigation of pattern formation in glow and streamer DBD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ben; Ouyang, Jiting

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate the behaviors of patterns in dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in glow and streamer regimes under different operating conditions (driving frequency and voltage) and external electric/magnetic field to explore the similarity and difference of pattern formation. It is found that patterns in both glow and streamer DBDs can be homogenized by decreasing the driving frequency to a low level. But filamentary streamers can still appear at low frequency when the voltage is much higher. With an additional lateral electric field, patterns in both regimes can be homogenized. However, an axial magnetic field makes the glow DBD homogeneous, while the streamer DBD decreases in filamentary size. In both regimes, dynamics and distribution of the space charges, rather than the surface charges, play the predominant role in the formation of DBD patterns. But the surface charges may also play an important role in pattern formation, especially in streamer DBD.

  20. Annular gel reactor for chemical pattern formation

    DOEpatents

    Nosticzius, Zoltan; Horsthemke, Werner; McCormick, William D.; Swinney, Harry L.; Tam, Wing Y.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an annular gel reactor suitable for the production and observation of spatiotemporal patterns created during a chemical reaction. The apparatus comprises a vessel having at least a first and second chamber separated one from the other by an annular polymer gel layer (or other fine porous medium) which is inert to the materials to be reacted but capable of allowing diffusion of the chemicals into it.

  1. Dendrites, viscous fingers, and the theory of pattern formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, J. S.

    1989-01-01

    Recent developments in the theory of pattern formation in dendritic crystal growth and viscous fingering in fluids are reviewed. Consideration is given to the discovery that weak capillary forces act as singular perturbations which lead to selection mechanisms in dendritic crystal growth and fingering patterns. Other topics include the conventional thermodynamic model of the solidification of a pure substance from its melt, fingering instability, pattern selection, the solvability theory, dendritic growth rates, the bubble effect discovered by Couder et al. (1986), the dynamics of pattern-forming systems, and snowflake formation.

  2. Final Report, December, 1999. Sloan - US Department of Energy joint postdoctoral fellowship in computational molecular biology [Canonical nonlinear methods for modeling and analyzing gene circuits and spatial variations during pattern formation in embryonic development

    SciTech Connect

    Agresar, Grenmarie; Savageau, Michael A.

    1999-12-01

    The modeling and analysis of the complex interactions between genes and metabolites during development require computational approaches. However, existing methods cannot efficiently account for the large number of interacting players, the nonlinear nature of the interactions, or the disparate scales involved. The latter represents a challenge in modeling developmental systems since reaction rates and diffusion times can vary by several orders of magnitude (depending on the molecular system). Modeling processes of this type results in the pathology of stiffness. Numerically, stiffness occurs when, in order to prevent large amplification of errors, typical (non-stiff) algorithms require a step size much smaller than the scale at which the solution in changing. In this work, a new method to solve large stiff systems of equations in the non-linear power law form was developed. The power-law formatism is a proven powerful tool for biological systems modeling, and has many advantages over other formalisms used for this purpose. The advantages include the fact that it is canonical, and that it is an accurate local approximation to any type of interaction. Representative results are presented.

  3. Formation and control of Turing patterns in a coherent quantum fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardizzone, Vincenzo; Lewandowski, Przemyslaw; Luk, M. H.; Tse, Y. C.; Kwong, N. H.; Lücke, Andreas; Abbarchi, Marco; Baudin, Emmanuel; Galopin, Elisabeth; Bloch, Jacqueline; Lemaitre, Aristide; Leung, P. T.; Roussignol, Philippe; Binder, Rolf; Tignon, Jerome; Schumacher, Stefan

    2013-10-01

    Nonequilibrium patterns in open systems are ubiquitous in nature, with examples as diverse as desert sand dunes, animal coat patterns such as zebra stripes, or geographic patterns in parasitic insect populations. A theoretical foundation that explains the basic features of a large class of patterns was given by Turing in the context of chemical reactions and the biological process of morphogenesis. Analogs of Turing patterns have also been studied in optical systems where diffusion of matter is replaced by diffraction of light. The unique features of polaritons in semiconductor microcavities allow us to go one step further and to study Turing patterns in an interacting coherent quantum fluid. We demonstrate formation and control of these patterns. We also demonstrate the promise of these quantum Turing patterns for applications, such as low-intensity ultra-fast all-optical switches.

  4. Formation and control of Turing patterns in a coherent quantum fluid

    PubMed Central

    Ardizzone, Vincenzo; Lewandowski, Przemyslaw; Luk, M. H.; Tse, Y. C.; Kwong, N. H.; Lücke, Andreas; Abbarchi, Marco; Baudin, Emmanuel; Galopin, Elisabeth; Bloch, Jacqueline; Lemaitre, Aristide; Leung, P. T.; Roussignol, Philippe; Binder, Rolf; Tignon, Jerome; Schumacher, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Nonequilibrium patterns in open systems are ubiquitous in nature, with examples as diverse as desert sand dunes, animal coat patterns such as zebra stripes, or geographic patterns in parasitic insect populations. A theoretical foundation that explains the basic features of a large class of patterns was given by Turing in the context of chemical reactions and the biological process of morphogenesis. Analogs of Turing patterns have also been studied in optical systems where diffusion of matter is replaced by diffraction of light. The unique features of polaritons in semiconductor microcavities allow us to go one step further and to study Turing patterns in an interacting coherent quantum fluid. We demonstrate formation and control of these patterns. We also demonstrate the promise of these quantum Turing patterns for applications, such as low-intensity ultra-fast all-optical switches. PMID:24145394

  5. Pattern formation and coarsening in crystalline membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, Daniel A.; Pezzutti, Aldo D.

    2011-03-01

    We study through a Brazovskii-Helfrich Hamiltonian the process of defect formation, annealing and coarsening of two dimensional crystalline membranes. In good agreement with the cosmological model of Kibble and Zurek, proposed to determine the density of topological defects at the onset of a symmetry breaking phase transition, we found that the collision of orientationally uncorrelated domains produces a structure of grains with an average density of topological defects controlled by the temperature of the quench. The strain field of the dislocations and disclinations generated during the phase separation process can induce the buckling of the membrane, slowing down the Lifshitz-Safran mechanism of coarsening observed in flat systems.

  6. Turing pattern formation in the Brusselator system with nonlinear diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambino, G.; Lombardo, M. C.; Sammartino, M.; Sciacca, V.

    2013-10-01

    In this work we investigate the effect of density-dependent nonlinear diffusion on pattern formation in the Brusselator system. Through linear stability analysis of the basic solution we determine the Turing and the oscillatory instability boundaries. A comparison with the classical linear diffusion shows how nonlinear diffusion favors the occurrence of Turing pattern formation. We study the process of pattern formation both in one-dimensional and two-dimensional spatial domains. Through a weakly nonlinear multiple scales analysis we derive the equations for the amplitude of the stationary patterns. The analysis of the amplitude equations shows the occurrence of a number of different phenomena, including stable supercritical and subcritical Turing patterns with multiple branches of stable solutions leading to hysteresis. Moreover, we consider traveling patterning waves: When the domain size is large, the pattern forms sequentially and traveling wave fronts are the precursors to patterning. We derive the Ginzburg-Landau equation and describe the traveling front enveloping a pattern which invades the domain. We show the emergence of radially symmetric target patterns, and, through a matching procedure, we construct the outer amplitude equation and the inner core solution.

  7. Systems approach to developmental biology--designs for robust patterning.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Yoshihiro; Hironaka, Ken-Ichi

    2013-04-01

    Patterning is an important step in animal development that generates spatially non-uniform gene expression patterns or spatially heterogeneous cellular responses. Patterning is realised by the generation and reading of positional information provided by spatial gradients of morphogens, diffusive chemicals in the extracellular environment. To achieve normal development, accurate patterning that is robust against noise is necessary. Here the authors describe how morphogen gradient formation and gradient interpretation processes are designed to achieve highly reproducible patterning. Furthermore, recent advancements in measurement and imaging techniques have enabled researchers to obtain quantitative dynamic and multi-physical data, not only for chemical events, but also for the geometrical and mechanical properties of cells in vivo. The authors briefly review some recent studies on the effects of such non-chemical events on patterning.

  8. Instability-induced pattern formation of photoactivated functional polymers

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosio, Antonio; Maddalena, Pasqualino; Schenker, Iwan; Spolenak, Ralph; Capasso, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Since the pioneering work of Turing on the formation principles of animal coat patterns [Turing AM (1952) Phil Trans R Soc Lond B 237(641):37–72], such as the stripes of a tiger, great effort has been made to understand and explain various phenomena of self-assembly and pattern formation. Prominent examples are the spontaneous demixing in emulsions, such as mixtures of water and oil [Herzig EM, et al. (2007) Nat Mater 6:966–971]; the distribution of matter in the universe [Kibble TWB (1976) J Phys A: Math Gen 9(8):1387]; surface reconstruction in ionic crystals [Clark KW, et al. (2012) Nanotechnol 23(18):185306]; and the pattern formation caused by phase transitions in metal alloys, polymer mixtures and binary Bose–Einstein condensates [Sabbatini J, et al. (2011) Phys Rev Lett 107:230402]. Photoactivated pattern formation in functional polymers has attracted major interest due to its potential applications in molecular electronics and photoresponsive systems. Here we demonstrate that photoactivated pattern formation on azobenzene-containing polymer films can be entirely explained by the physical concept of phase separation. Using experiments and simulations, we show that phase separation is caused by an instability created by the photoactivated transitions between two immiscible states of the polymer. In addition, we have shown in accordance with theory, that polarized light has a striking effect on pattern formation indicated by enhanced phase separation. PMID:25404346

  9. Instability-induced pattern formation of photoactivated functional polymers.

    PubMed

    Galinski, Henning; Ambrosio, Antonio; Maddalena, Pasqualino; Schenker, Iwan; Spolenak, Ralph; Capasso, Federico

    2014-12-02

    Since the pioneering work of Turing on the formation principles of animal coat patterns [Turing AM (1952) Phil Trans R Soc Lond B 237(641):37-72], such as the stripes of a tiger, great effort has been made to understand and explain various phenomena of self-assembly and pattern formation. Prominent examples are the spontaneous demixing in emulsions, such as mixtures of water and oil [Herzig EM, et al. (2007) Nat Mater 6:966-971]; the distribution of matter in the universe [Kibble TWB (1976) J Phys A: Math Gen 9(8):1387]; surface reconstruction in ionic crystals [Clark KW, et al. (2012) Nanotechnol 23(18):185306]; and the pattern formation caused by phase transitions in metal alloys, polymer mixtures and binary Bose-Einstein condensates [Sabbatini J, et al. (2011) Phys Rev Lett 107:230402]. Photoactivated pattern formation in functional polymers has attracted major interest due to its potential applications in molecular electronics and photoresponsive systems. Here we demonstrate that photoactivated pattern formation on azobenzene-containing polymer films can be entirely explained by the physical concept of phase separation. Using experiments and simulations, we show that phase separation is caused by an instability created by the photoactivated transitions between two immiscible states of the polymer. In addition, we have shown in accordance with theory, that polarized light has a striking effect on pattern formation indicated by enhanced phase separation.

  10. Pattern Formation in Drying Drops of Polyelectrolyte - Salt Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Deniz; Belyi, Vladimir A.

    2005-03-01

    We use optical microscopy, AFM, and SEM to investigate salt patterns formed during evaporation of aqueous solutions of sodium poly(styrene sulfonate) and sodium chloride (NaPSS/NaCl). Observed patterns exhibit significantly larger variety than in the simple "drying coffee drop" experiments. We find that varying the concentration ratios of polyelectrolyte/salt solutions leads to formation of qualitatively different patterns, including radially grown salt deposits, concentric rings of salt and other structures. Our results indicate that these patterns are also sensitive to evaporation rate of the droplet. However molecular weight of the polymer appears to have little to no effect on the observed patterns.

  11. Adolescent Sleep Patterns: Biological, Social, and Psychological Influences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carskadon, Mary A., Ed.

    Noting that healthy, adequate sleep fosters longevity and the optimal use of waking hours, and that adolescents, although rarely included in previous studies of sleep, are among the most sleep-deprived populations, this book explores the genesis and development of sleep patterns during adolescence, including biological and cultural factors that…

  12. Adolescent Sleep Patterns: Biological, Social, and Psychological Influences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carskadon, Mary A., Ed.

    Noting that healthy, adequate sleep fosters longevity and the optimal use of waking hours, and that adolescents, although rarely included in previous studies of sleep, are among the most sleep-deprived populations, this book explores the genesis and development of sleep patterns during adolescence, including biological and cultural factors that…

  13. The relationship between growth and pattern formation

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Susan V.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Successful development depends on the creation of spatial gradients of transcription factors within developing fields, and images of graded distributions of gene products populate the pages of developmental biology journals. Therefore the challenge is to understand how the graded levels of intracellular transcription factors are generated across fields of cells. We propose that transcription factor gradients are generated as a result of an underlying gradient of cell cycle lengths. Very long cell cycles will permit accumulation of a high level of a gene product encoded by a large transcription unit, whereas shorter cell cycles will permit progressively fewer transcripts to be completed due to gating of transcription by the cell cycle. We also propose that the gradients of cell cycle lengths are generated by gradients of extracellular morphogens/growth factors. The model of cell cycle gated transcriptional regulation brings focus back to the functional role of morphogens as cell cycle regulators, and proposes a specific and testable mechanism by which morphogens, in their roles as growth factors (how they were originally discovered), also determine cell fate. PMID:27499882

  14. Pattern Formation in Spatially Discrete Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez, Vicenç; Fedotov, Sergei; Horsthemke, Werner

    The preceding chapters have dealt with the spatiotemporal behavior of spatially continuous systems. We now turn our attention to the dynamical behavior and stability properties of spatially discrete systems. A wide variety of phenomena in chemistry, biology, physics, and other fields involve the coupling between nonlinear, discrete units. Examples include arrays of Josephson junctions, chains of coupled diode resonators, coupled chemical or biochemical reactors, myelinated nerve fibers, neuronal networks, and patchy ecosystems. Such networks of coupled nonlinear units often combine dynamical and structural complexity [422]. Cells in living tissues, for example, are arranged in a variety of geometries. One-dimensional rings of cells were already considered by Turing [440]. Other types of lattices, such as open-ended linear arrays, tubes, rectangular and hexagonal arrays, and irregular arrangements in two or three dimensions are also found, see for example [5]. Cells interact with adjacent cells in various distinct ways. For example, signaling between cells may occur via diffusion through gap junctions [352, 230] or by membrane-bound proteins, juxtacrine signaling [339, 340, 471].

  15. [Mechanisms of formation and biological role of protein carbamates].

    PubMed

    Mel'nichuk, D A

    1985-01-01

    Experimental data are presented evidencing for the fact that tissue proteins under conditions in vivo are subjected to enzymic carboxylation with formation of carbaminic groups. In this case a charge variation in definite sites of protein molecule is observed, which specifies variation of the protein conformation and biological properties. Basic regularities of protein carbamate formation reactions are revealed with factors affecting their intensity enumerated. The reactions are shown to be of great biological significance for the respiration processes, realization of hormonal effects of peptide and protein hormones as well as for regulation of tissue homeostasis under conditions of acidic-alkaline state variation in the organism.

  16. (The physics of pattern formation at liquid interfaces)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses pattern formation at liquid interfaces and interfaces within disordered materials. The particular topics discussed are: a racetrack for competing viscous fingers; an experimental realization of periodic boundary conditions; what sets the length scale for patterns between miscible liquids; the fractal dimension of radial Hele-Shaw patterns; detailed analyses of low-contrast Saffman-Taylor flows; and the wetting/absorption properties of polystyrene spheres in binary liquid mixtures. (LSP)

  17. Lateral inhibition-induced pattern formation controlled by the size and geometry of the cell.

    PubMed

    Seirin Lee, Sungrim

    2016-09-07

    Pattern formation in development biology is one of the fundamental processes by which cells change their functions. It is based on the communication of cells via intra- and intercellular dynamics of biochemicals. Thus, the cell is directly involved in biochemical interactions. However, many theoretical approaches describing biochemical pattern formation have usually neglected the cell's role or have simplified the subcellular process without considering cellular aspects despite the cell being the environment where biochemicals interact. On the other hand, recent experimental observations suggest that a change in the physical conditions of cell-to-cell contact can result in a change in cell fate and tissue patterning in a lateral inhibition system. Here we develop a mathematical model by which biochemical dynamics can be directly observed with explicitly expressed cell structure and geometry in higher dimensions, and reconsider pattern formation by lateral inhibition of the Notch-Delta signaling pathway. We explore how the physical characteristic of cell, such as cell geometry or size, influences the biochemical pattern formation in a multi-cellular system. Our results suggest that a property based on cell geometry can be a novel mechanism for symmetry breaking inducing cell asymmetry. We show that cell volume can critically influence cell fate determination and pattern formation at the tissue level, and the surface area of the cell-to-cell contact can directly affect the spatial range of patterning.

  18. Geological pattern formation by growth and dissolution in aqueous systems

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Meakin

    2010-03-01

    Although many geological processes take place on time scales that are very long compared with the human experience, essentially all geological processes, fast or slow, are far from equilibrium processes. Surprisingly often, geological processes lead to the formation of quite simple and distinctive patterns, which hint at an underlying simplicity in many complex geological systems.. The ability to predict the seasons was critically important to early human society, and Halley’s prediction of the return of the comet that bears his name is still considered to be a scientific milestone. Spatial patterns have also attracted attention because of their aesthetic appeal, which depends in subtle ways on a combination of regularity and irregularity. In recent decades, rapid growth in the capabilities of digital computers has facilitated the simulation of pattern formation processes, and computer simulations have become an important tool for evaluating theoretical concepts and for scientific discovery. Computer technology in combination with other technologies such as high resolution digital cameras, scanning microprobes (atomic force microscopy AFM), confocal microscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), for example) has facilitated the quantitative characterization of patterns over a wide range of scales and has enabled rapid advances in our ability to understand the links between large scale pattern formation and microscopic processes. The ability to quantitatively characterize patterns is important because it enables a more rigorous comparison between the predictions of computer models and real world patterns and their formation.In some cases, the idea that patterns with a high degree of regularity have simple origins appears to be justified, but in other cases, such as the formation of almost perfectly circular stone rings due to freeze-thaw cycles simple patterns appear to be the consequence of quite complex processes. In other cases, it has been shown that

  19. Quantification of layered patterns with structural anisotropy: a comparison of biological and geological systems.

    PubMed

    Smolyar, I; Bromage, T; Wikelski, M

    2016-03-01

    Large-scale patterns evident from satellite images of aeolian landforms on Earth and other planets; those of intermediate scale in marine and terrestrial sand ripples and sediment profiles; and small-scale patterns such as lamellae in the bones of vertebrates and annuli in fish scales are each represented by layers of different thicknesses and lengths. Layered patterns are important because they form a record of the state of internal and external factors that regulate pattern formation in these geological and biological systems. It is therefore potentially possible to recognize trends, periodicities, and events in the history of the formation of these systems among the incremental sequences. Though the structures and sizes of these 2-D patterns are typically scale-free, they are also characteristically anisotropic; that is, the number of layers and their absolute thicknesses vary significantly during formation. The aim of the present work is to quantify the structure of layered patterns and to reveal similarities and differences in the processing and interpretation of layered landforms and biological systems. To reach this goal we used N-partite graph and Boolean functions to quantify the structure of layers and plot charts for "layer thickness vs. layer number" and "layer area vs. layer number". These charts serve as a source of information about events in the history of formation of layered systems. The concept of synchronization of layer formation across a 2-D plane is introduced to develop the procedure for plotting "layer thickness vs. layer number" and "layer area vs. layer number", which takes into account the structural anisotropy of layered patterns and increase signal-to-noise ratio in charts. Examples include landforms on Mars and Earth and incremental layers in human and iguana bones.

  20. Vascular tissue differentiation and pattern formation in plants.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2002-01-01

    Vascular tissues, xylem and phloem, are differentiated from meristematic cells, procambium, and vascular cambium. Auxin and cytokinin have been considered essential for vascular tissue differentiation; this is supported by recent molecular and genetic analyses. Xylogenesis has long been used as a model for study of cell differentiation, and many genes involved in late stages of tracheary element formation have been characterized. A number of mutants affecting vascular differentiation and pattern formation have been isolated in Arabidopsis. Studies of some of these mutants have suggested that vascular tissue organization within the bundles and vascular pattern formation at the organ level are regulated by positional information.

  1. Gradient-driven diffusion and pattern formation in crowded mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandigrami, Prithviraj; Grove, Brandy; Konya, Andrew; Selinger, Robin L. B.

    2017-02-01

    Gradient-driven diffusion in crowded, multicomponent mixtures is a topic of high interest because of its role in biological processes such as transport in cell membranes. In partially phase-separated solutions, gradient-driven diffusion affects microstructure, which in turn affects diffusivity; a key question is how this complex coupling controls both transport and pattern formation. To examine these mechanisms, we study a two-dimensional multicomponent lattice gas model, where "tracer" molecules diffuse between a source and a sink separated by a solution of sticky "crowder" molecules that cluster to form dynamically evolving obstacles. In the high-temperature limit, crowders and tracers are miscible, and transport may be predicted analytically. At intermediate temperatures, crowders phase separate into clusters that drift toward the tracer sink. As a result, steady-state tracer diffusivity depends nonmonotonically on both temperature and crowder density, and we observe a variety of complex microstructures. In the low-temperature limit, crowders rapidly aggregate to form obstacles that are kinetically arrested; if crowder density is near the percolation threshold, resulting tracer diffusivity shows scaling behavior with the same scaling exponent as the random resistor network model. Though highly idealized, this simple model reveals fundamental mechanisms governing coupled gradient-driven diffusion, phase separation, and microstructural evolution in crowded mixtures.

  2. Soliton interactions and the formation of solitonic patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, Suzanne M.

    From the stripes of a zebra, to the spirals of cream in a hot cup of coffee, we are surrounded by patterns in the natural world. But why are there patterns? Why drives their formation? In this thesis we study some of the diverse ways patterns can arise due to the interactions between solitary waves in nonlinear systems, sometimes starting from nothing more than random noise. What follows is a set of three studies. In the first, we show how a nonlinear system that supports solitons can be driven to generate exact (regular) Cantor set fractals. As an example, we use numerical simulations to demonstrate the formation of Cantor set fractals by temporal optical solitons. This fractal formation occurs in a cascade of nonlinear optical fibers through the dynamical evolution of a single input soliton. In the second study, we investigate pattern formation initiated by modulation instability in nonlinear partially coherent wave fronts and show that anisotropic noise and/or anisotropic correlation statistics can lead to ordered patterns such as grids and stripes. For the final study, we demonstrate the spontaneous clustering of solitons in partially coherent wavefronts during the final stages of pattern formation initiated by modulation instability and noise. Experimental observations are in agreement with theoretical predictions and are confirmed using numerical simulations.

  3. Polariton Pattern Formation and Photon Statistics of the Associated Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, C. E.; Dzurnak, B.; Egorov, O. A.; Buonaiuto, G.; Walker, P. M.; Cancellieri, E.; Whittaker, D. M.; Clarke, E.; Gavrilov, S. S.; Skolnick, M. S.; Krizhanovskii, D. N.

    2017-07-01

    We report on the formation of a diverse family of transverse spatial polygon patterns in a microcavity polariton fluid under coherent driving by a blue-detuned pump. Patterns emerge spontaneously as a result of energy-degenerate polariton-polariton scattering from the pump state to interfering high-order vortex and antivortex modes, breaking azimuthal symmetry. The interplay between a multimode parametric instability and intrinsic optical bistability leads to a sharp spike in the value of second-order coherence g(2 )(0 ) of the emitted light, which we attribute to the strongly superlinear kinetics of the underlying scattering processes driving the formation of patterns. We show numerically by means of a linear stability analysis how the growth of parametric instabilities in our system can lead to spontaneous symmetry breaking, predicting the formation and competition of different pattern states in good agreement with experimental observations.

  4. Argon ion beam induced surface pattern formation on Si

    SciTech Connect

    Hofsäss, H.; Bobes, O.; Zhang, K.

    2016-01-21

    The development of self-organized surface patterns on Si due to noble gas ion irradiation has been studied extensively in the past. In particular, Ar ions are commonly used and the pattern formation was analyzed as function of ion incidence angle, ion fluence, and ion energies between 250 eV and 140 keV. Very few results exist for the energy regime between 1.5 keV and 10 keV and it appears that pattern formation is completely absent for these ion energies. In this work, we present experimental data on pattern formation for Ar ion irradiation between 1 keV and 10 keV and ion incidence angles between 50° and 75°. We confirm the absence of patterns at least for ion fluences up to 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}. Using the crater function formalism and Monte Carlo simulations, we calculate curvature coefficients of linear continuum models of pattern formation, taking into account contribution due to ion erosion and recoil redistribution. The calculations consider the recently introduced curvature dependence of the erosion crater function as well as the dynamic behavior of the thickness of the ion irradiated layer. Only when taking into account these additional contributions to the linear theory, our simulations clearly show that that pattern formation is strongly suppressed between about 1.5 keV and 10 keV, most pronounced at 3 keV. Furthermore, our simulations are now able to predict whether or not parallel oriented ripple patterns are formed, and in case of ripple formation the corresponding critical angles for the whole experimentally studied energies range between 250 eV and 140 keV.

  5. PMBC: pattern mining from biological sequences with wildcard constraints.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xindong; Zhu, Xingquan; He, Yu; Arslan, Abdullah N

    2013-06-01

    Patterns/subsequences frequently appearing in sequences provide essential knowledge for domain experts, such as molecular biologists, to discover rules or patterns hidden behind the data. Due to the inherent complex nature of the biological data, patterns rarely exactly reproduce and repeat themselves, but rather appear with a slightly different form in each of its appearances. A gap constraint (In this paper, a gap constraint (also referred to as a wildcard) is a character that can be substituted for any character predefined in an alphabet.) provides flexibility for users to capture useful patterns even if their appearances vary in the sequences. In order to find patterns, existing tools require users to explicitly specify gap constraints beforehand. In reality, it is often nontrivial or time-consuming for users to provide proper gap constraint values. In addition, a change made to the gap values may give completely different results, and require a separate time-consuming re-mining procedure. Therefore, it is desirable to automatically and efficiently find patterns without involving user-specified gap requirements. In this paper, we study the problem of frequent pattern mining without user-specified gap constraints and propose PMBC (namely P̲atternM̲ining from B̲iological sequences with wildcard C onstraints) to solve the problem. Given a sequence and a support threshold value (i.e. pattern frequency threshold), PMBC intends to discover all subsequences with their support values equal to or greater than the given threshold value. The frequent subsequences then form patterns later on. Two heuristic methods (one-way vs. two-way scans) are proposed to discover frequent subsequences and estimate their frequency in the sequences. Experimental results on both synthetic and real-world DNA sequences demonstrate the performance of both methods for frequent pattern mining and pattern frequency estimation.

  6. Pattern, process, inference and prediction in extinction biology.

    PubMed

    Brook, Barry W; Alroy, John

    2017-01-01

    Extinction is a key feature of the evolutionary history of life, and assessments of extinction risk are essential for the effective protection of biodiversity. The goal in assembling this special issue of Biology Letters was to highlight problems and questions at the research frontier of extinction biology, with an emphasis on recent developments in the methodology of inferring the patterns and processes of extinction from a background of often noisy and sparse data. In selecting topics, we sought to illustrate how extinction is not simply a self-evident phenomenon, but the subject of a dynamic and quantitatively rigorous field of natural science, with practical applications to conservation.

  7. Perspectives on the mathematics of biological patterning and morphogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garikipati, Krishna

    2017-02-01

    A central question in developmental biology is how size and position are determined. The genetic code carries instructions on how to control these properties in order to regulate the pattern and morphology of structures in the developing organism. Transcription and protein translation mechanisms implement these instructions. However, this cannot happen without some manner of sampling of epigenetic information on the current patterns and morphological forms of structures in the organism. Any rigorous description of space- and time-varying patterns and morphological forms reduces to one among various classes of spatio-temporal partial differential equations. Reaction-transport equations represent one such class. Starting from simple Fickian diffusion, the incorporation of reaction, phase segregation and advection terms can represent many of the patterns seen in the animal and plant kingdoms. Morphological form, requiring the development of three-dimensional structure, also can be represented by these equations of mass transport, albeit to a limited degree. The recognition that physical forces play controlling roles in shaping tissues leads to the conclusion that (nonlinear) elasticity governs the development of morphological form. In this setting, inhomogeneous growth drives the elasticity problem. The combination of reaction-transport equations with those of elasto-growth makes accessible a potentially unlimited spectrum of patterning and morphogenetic phenomena in developmental biology. This perspective communication is a survey of the partial differential equations of mathematical physics that have been proposed to govern patterning and morphogenesis in developmental biology. Several numerical examples are included to illustrate these equations and the corresponding physics, with the intention of providing physical insight wherever possible.

  8. Pattern Formation in Drying Drops of Polystyrene/Water nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brutin, David; Sobac, Benjamin

    2011-11-01

    We study the pattern formation and the evaporation dynamics of drying drops of polystyrene/water based nanofluids with concentrations ranging from 0.01% to 6%. Cracks formation is evidenced to depend on the nanoparticles concentration. The dynamics of evaporation is recorded using an electronic balance with an accuracy of 10 μg. A top view recording enables to analyze the pattern formation in relation with the mass evolution. We determine several key parameters such as the time of evaporation, the wetting diameter, the final solid deposition diameter, the number and the spacing of the cracks. We evidence a ring formation above a critical concentration. We evidenced by change of the surrounding humidity in the range of 10 to 90% that this pattern remains constant. The pattern formation is influenced by the liquid phase evaporation dynamics but only depends on the concentration in nanoparticles. These results are of great interest regarding the formation of droplets in several areas such as inkjet printing, pharmacology...

  9. Predicting spiral wave patterns from cell properties in a model of biological self-organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geberth, Daniel; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2008-09-01

    In many biological systems, biological variability (i.e., systematic differences between the system components) can be expected to outrank statistical fluctuations in the shaping of self-organized patterns. In principle, the distribution of single-element properties should thus allow predicting features of such patterns. For a mathematical model of a paradigmatic and well-studied pattern formation process, spiral waves of cAMP signaling in colonies of the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, we explore this possibility and observe a pronounced anticorrelation between spiral waves and cell properties (namely, the firing rate) and particularly a clustering of spiral wave tips in regions devoid of spontaneously firing (pacemaker) cells. Furthermore, we observe local inhomogeneities in the distribution of spiral chiralities, again induced by the pacemaker distribution. We show that these findings can be explained by a simple geometrical model of spiral wave generation.

  10. Physical Mechanisms of Pattern Formation in the Early Chick Embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balter, Ariel; Glazier, James; Zaitlen, Benji; Chaplain, Mark; Weijer, Cornelis

    2007-03-01

    Gastrulation marks a critical step in early embryogenesis when the first recognizable patterns are laid down. Although the genome maintains ultimate responsibility for this pattern formation, it cannot actually control the organization of individual cells. The robustness of embryogenic pattern formation suggests that a few simple, physical mechanisms are unleashed and that self-organization results. We perform numerical simulations of early chick gastrulation using an agent based method in which individual cells interact via a handful of behaviors including adhesivity, secretion and chemotaxis. Through these simulations we have identified certain behaviors as being important for various stages and morphological events. For instance, experimental results on primitive streak formation are best reproduced by a model in which the Kohler's Sickle secretes a chemo repellant for streak tip cells, and cell polarization appears to be important for initiating polonaise motion during streak elongation.

  11. Biological diversity of fish communities: pattern and process.

    PubMed

    Magurran, A E; Khachonpisitsak, S; Ahmad, A B

    2011-12-01

    For over 150 years, ecologists have been striving to explain fundamental patterns of biological diversity, such as the observation that communities invariably consist of common and rare species, and to unravel the processes that underpin these patterns. This task is increasingly urgent given the accelerating loss of biological diversity. Although fishes are the most diverse vertebrate taxon and fish communities occur in a wide range of habitats, they have been relatively little studied in the quest to elucidate the processes that shape patterns of biological diversity. Here, some of the topics that investigations of fish assemblages can illuminate are highlighted. These include the characteristics of ecological communities and the role that dispersal limitation plays in structuring them, the distinction between core and occasional species, the insights that evaluating abundance in different currencies can bring and the assessment of community capacity. Questions are identified that future investigations of fish communities might tackle and a case study of a biodiverse ecoregion (Thailand and Peninsula Malaysia) is used to illustrate the need for better links between these ecological questions and effective conservation practice.

  12. The mechanism of Turing pattern formation in a positive feedback system with cross diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiyan; Liu, Tuoqi; Zhang, Jiajun; Zhou, Tianshou

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we analyze a reaction-diffusion (R-D) system with a double negative feedback loop and find cases where self diffusion alone cannot lead to Turing pattern formation but cross diffusion can. Specifically, we first derive a set of sufficient conditions for Turing instability by performing linear stability analysis, then plot two bifurcation diagrams that specifically identify Turing regions in the parameter phase plane, and finally numerically demonstrate representative Turing patterns according to the theoretical predictions. Our analysis combined with previous studies actually implies an interesting fact that Turing patterns can be generated not only in a class of monostable R-D systems where cross diffusion is not necessary but also in a class of bistable R-D systems where cross diffusion is necessary. In addition, our model would be a good candidate for experimentally testing Turing pattern formation from the viewpoint of synthetic biology.

  13. Robust ecological pattern formation induced by demographic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Thomas; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2010-03-01

    We demonstrate that demographic noise can induce persistent spatial pattern formation and temporal oscillations in the Levin-Segel predator-prey model for plankton-herbivore population dynamics. Although the model exhibits a Turing instability in mean field theory, demographic noise greatly enlarges the region of parameter space where pattern formation occurs. To distinguish between patterns generated by fluctuations and those present at the mean field level in real ecosystems, we calculate the power spectrum in the noise-driven case and predict the presence of fat tails not present in the mean field case. These results may account for the prevalence of large-scale ecological patterns, beyond that expected from traditional non-stochastic approaches.

  14. Robust ecological pattern formation induced by demographic noise.

    PubMed

    Butler, Thomas; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2009-09-01

    We demonstrate that demographic noise can induce persistent spatial pattern formation and temporal oscillations in the Levin-Segel predator-prey model for plankton-herbivore population dynamics. Although the model exhibits a Turing instability in mean-field theory, demographic noise greatly enlarges the region of parameter space where pattern formation occurs. To distinguish between patterns generated by fluctuations and those present at the mean-field level in real ecosystems, we calculate the power spectrum in the noise-driven case and predict the presence of fat tails not present in the mean-field case. These results may account for the prevalence of large-scale ecological patterns, beyond that expected from traditional nonstochastic approaches.

  15. Robust ecological pattern formation induced by demographic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Thomas; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2009-09-01

    We demonstrate that demographic noise can induce persistent spatial pattern formation and temporal oscillations in the Levin-Segel predator-prey model for plankton-herbivore population dynamics. Although the model exhibits a Turing instability in mean-field theory, demographic noise greatly enlarges the region of parameter space where pattern formation occurs. To distinguish between patterns generated by fluctuations and those present at the mean-field level in real ecosystems, we calculate the power spectrum in the noise-driven case and predict the presence of fat tails not present in the mean-field case. These results may account for the prevalence of large-scale ecological patterns, beyond that expected from traditional nonstochastic approaches.

  16. Vegetation pattern formation of a water-biomass model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoli; Wang, Wendi; Zhang, Guohong

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a mathematical model with diffusion and cross-diffusion is proposed to describe the interaction between the vegetation and the soil water. Based on the view of Turing pattern, we discuss the conditions of the diffusion-induced instability and the cross-diffusion-induced instability of a homogenous uniform steady state. We find that either a fast diffusion speed of water or a great hydraulic diffusivity due to the suction of roots may drive the instability of the homogenous steady state. Furthermore, we find that both the rain-fall rate and the infiltration feedback parameter can induce the transitions among the vegetation state, pattern formation and bare soil state. It is also found that the "terrain slope" may cause the instability of the homogenous steady state and drive the formation of periodic stripe pattern. Consequently, the diversity of dryland vegetation in reality can be explained as a result of pattern solutions of the model.

  17. Pattern formation in a ferroin-bromate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showalter, Kenneth

    1980-10-01

    Stationary mosaic patterns may spontaneously develop in a thin film of solution containing H2SO4, NaBrO3, KBr, ferroin, and 4-cyclohexene-1,2-dicarboxylic acid. The pattern formation is affected by initial reactant concentrations and depends on the generation of elemental bromine. Depending on initial reactant concentrations, a vivid nonsynchronous oxidation transition may also occur. Results of experiments designed to distinguish between physical and chemical mechanisms are presented.

  18. Pattern recognition software and techniques for biological image analysis.

    PubMed

    Shamir, Lior; Delaney, John D; Orlov, Nikita; Eckley, D Mark; Goldberg, Ilya G

    2010-11-24

    The increasing prevalence of automated image acquisition systems is enabling new types of microscopy experiments that generate large image datasets. However, there is a perceived lack of robust image analysis systems required to process these diverse datasets. Most automated image analysis systems are tailored for specific types of microscopy, contrast methods, probes, and even cell types. This imposes significant constraints on experimental design, limiting their application to the narrow set of imaging methods for which they were designed. One of the approaches to address these limitations is pattern recognition, which was originally developed for remote sensing, and is increasingly being applied to the biology domain. This approach relies on training a computer to recognize patterns in images rather than developing algorithms or tuning parameters for specific image processing tasks. The generality of this approach promises to enable data mining in extensive image repositories, and provide objective and quantitative imaging assays for routine use. Here, we provide a brief overview of the technologies behind pattern recognition and its use in computer vision for biological and biomedical imaging. We list available software tools that can be used by biologists and suggest practical experimental considerations to make the best use of pattern recognition techniques for imaging assays.

  19. Pattern Recognition Software and Techniques for Biological Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shamir, Lior; Delaney, John D.; Orlov, Nikita; Eckley, D. Mark; Goldberg, Ilya G.

    2010-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of automated image acquisition systems is enabling new types of microscopy experiments that generate large image datasets. However, there is a perceived lack of robust image analysis systems required to process these diverse datasets. Most automated image analysis systems are tailored for specific types of microscopy, contrast methods, probes, and even cell types. This imposes significant constraints on experimental design, limiting their application to the narrow set of imaging methods for which they were designed. One of the approaches to address these limitations is pattern recognition, which was originally developed for remote sensing, and is increasingly being applied to the biology domain. This approach relies on training a computer to recognize patterns in images rather than developing algorithms or tuning parameters for specific image processing tasks. The generality of this approach promises to enable data mining in extensive image repositories, and provide objective and quantitative imaging assays for routine use. Here, we provide a brief overview of the technologies behind pattern recognition and its use in computer vision for biological and biomedical imaging. We list available software tools that can be used by biologists and suggest practical experimental considerations to make the best use of pattern recognition techniques for imaging assays. PMID:21124870

  20. Biological consequences of formation and repair of complex DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Magnander, Karin; Elmroth, Kecke

    2012-12-31

    Endogenous processes or genotoxic agents can induce many types of single DNA damage (single-strand breaks, oxidized bases and abasic sites). In addition, ionizing radiation induces complex lesions such as double-strand breaks and clustered damage. To preserve the genomic stability and prevent carcinogenesis, distinct repair pathways have evolved. Despite this, complex DNA damage can cause severe problems and is believed to contribute to the biological consequences observed in cells exposed to genotoxic stress. In this review, the current knowledge of formation and repair of complex DNA damage is summarized and the risks and biological consequences associated with their repair are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Trapping and patterning of biological objects using photovoltaic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jubera, M.; Elvira, I.; García-Cabañes, A.; Bella, J. L.; Carrascosa, M.

    2016-01-01

    Photovoltaic tweezers are a recently proposed technique for manipulation and patterning of micro- and nano-objects. It is based in the dielectrophoretic forces associated to the electric fields induced by illumination of certain ferroelectrics due to the bulk photovoltaic effect. The technique has been applied to the patterning of dielectric and metal micro- and nano-particles. In this work, we report the use of photovoltaic tweezers to pattern biological objects on LiNbO3:Fe. Specifically, spores and pollen grains and their nanometric fragments have been trapped and patterned. 1D and 2D arrangements have been achieved by deposition in air or from a hexane suspension. The quality of patterns obtained with nanometric fragments is even better than previous results using photovoltaic tweezers with inorganic micro- and nano-particles. In fact, 1D patterns with a period of 2 μm, almost half of the minimum reported period achieved with photovoltaic tweezers, have been obtained with pollen fragments.

  2. Spongiosa Primary Development: A Biochemical Hypothesis by Turing Patterns Formations

    PubMed Central

    López-Vaca, Oscar Rodrigo; Garzón-Alvarado, Diego Alexander

    2012-01-01

    We propose a biochemical model describing the formation of primary spongiosa architecture through a bioregulatory model by metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). It is assumed that MMP13 regulates cartilage degradation and the VEGF allows vascularization and advances in the ossification front through the presence of osteoblasts. The coupling of this set of molecules is represented by reaction-diffusion equations with parameters in the Turing space, creating a stable spatiotemporal pattern that leads to the formation of the trabeculae present in the spongy tissue. Experimental evidence has shown that the MMP13 regulates VEGF formation, and it is assumed that VEGF negatively regulates MMP13 formation. Thus, the patterns obtained by ossification may represent the primary spongiosa formation during endochondral ossification. Moreover, for the numerical solution, we used the finite element method with the Newton-Raphson method to approximate partial differential nonlinear equations. Ossification patterns obtained may represent the primary spongiosa formation during endochondral ossification. PMID:23193429

  3. Controlled Pattern Formation in Carbon Nanotube Arrays Using Liquid Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansom, Elijah; Noca, Flavio; Zhou, Jijie; Trevino, Lydia; Gharib, Morteza

    2004-11-01

    Thin liquid films undergoing evaporation and dewetting are subject to instabilities and film breakup. Such films may potentially be used to pattern small particles, even nanometer size ones. This possibility is investigated by studying drying liquid films within mats of vertically oriented carbon nanotubes while varying experimental conditions. Liquids of different surfactant concentration, surface tension, wettability, and viscosity are used while simultaneously varying evaporation rates. Rearrangements of the carbon nanotubes into interesting and perhaps useful patterns of uniformly distributed holes are produced, and controllability of these patterns is demonstrated. Lateral capillary forces acting on the partially immersed carbon nanotubes at the liquid interface and dewetting instabilities inherent in the film are the apparent cause of these patterns. Simple, controlled pattern formation is highly desirable in production of carbon nanotube devices as well as other nanoparticle systems.

  4. A combinatorial code for pattern formation in Drosophila oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yakoby, N.; Bristow, C.A.; Gong, D.; Schafer, X.; Lembong, J.; Zartman, J.J.; Halfon, M.S.; Schüpbach, T.; Shvartsman, S.Y.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Two-dimensional patterning of the follicular epithelium in Drosophila oogenesis is required for the formation of three-dimensional eggshell structures. Our analysis of a large number of published gene expression patterns in the follicle cells suggested that they follow a simple combinatorial code, based on six spatial building blocks and the operations of union, difference, intersection, and addition. The building blocks are related to the distribution of the inductive signals, provided by the highly conserved EGFR and DPP pathways. We demonstrated the validity of the code by testing it against a set of newly identified expression patterns, obtained in a large-scale transcriptional profiling experiment. Using the proposed code, we distinguished 36 distinct patterns for 81 genes expressed in the follicular epithelium and characterized their joint dynamics over four stages of oogenesis. This work provides the first systematic analysis of the diversity and dynamics of two-dimensional gene expression patterns in a developing tissue. PMID:19000837

  5. Self-organized surface ripple pattern formation by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofsäss, Hans; Zhang, Kun; Bobes, Omar

    2016-10-01

    Ion induced ripple pattern formation on solid surfaces has been extensively studied in the past and the theories describing curvature dependent ion erosion as well as redistribution of recoil atoms have been very successful in explaining many features of the pattern formation. Since most experimental studies use noble gas ion irradiation, the incorporation of the ions into the films is usually neglected. In this work we show that the incorporation or implantation of non-volatile ions also leads to a curvature dependent term in the equation of motion of a surface height profile. The implantation of ions can be interpreted as a negative sputter yield; and therefore, the effect of ion implantation is opposite to the one of ion erosion. For angles up to about 50°, implantation of ions stabilizes the surface, whereas above 50°, ion implantation contributes to the destabilization of the surface. We present simulations of the curvature coefficients using the crater function formalism and we compare the simulation results to the experimental data on the ion induced pattern formation using non-volatile ions. We present several model cases, where the incorporation of ions is a crucial requirement for the pattern formation.

  6. Raked Pattern TARs: Evolution and Formation of a Unique Pattern in an Active Sediment Transport Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foroutan, M.; Zimbelman, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    Sedimentation patterns vary with geographic settings, varying fluid regimes and climate conditions. Decoding resultant bedform patterns in aeolian and fluvial environments is one way for extracting the history and formation processes, as well as recognizing the climate change in the region. Some of these patterns are common but some are quite unique comparing what we generally expect from these bedforms on different planets. In this study we describe a quite rare pattern in a pristine region in the Lut desert of Iran named "raked pattern" mega-ripples / TAR-like features, similar to patterns on Mars. We describe this unique pattern and explore their formation by remote sensing analysis and looking at their evolution through multi-temporal satellite images on both planets. These `raked'-appearing TAR-like features have been found on flat beds, but close to highly eroded features such as yardangs. They are oriented perpendicular to the prevailing wind direction, and consist of small equally spaced bedforms, with wavelength and space between mid-points of the features all equal. The `raked' landforms are neatly aligned in parallel groups (i.e., of about 10-30 features in each group) throughout the area; the TAR-like features have sharp boundaries and each patch has an overall `spindle' shape. The `raked' pattern could be evidence of two successive aeolian formation episodes, a special type of topography in the upwind side, or an indication of considerable change in wind direction. We explored these scenarios by studying repeated images during 8 years and monitored their changes. Some regions have been identified with clear evolution through initiation of these patterns in a highly active aeolian region. This curious pattern has not been identified or documented in the literature. Our results show interesting evolutionary stages arose from multi-modal particle size and sediment transport environment for this pattern that implies the formation process for the same

  7. The Cellular Biology of Flexor Tendon Adhesion Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jason K.F.; Lui, Yin H.; Kapacee, Zoher; Kadler, Karl E.; Ferguson, Mark W. J.; McGrouther, Duncan A.

    2009-01-01

    Intrasynovial flexor tendon injuries of the hand can frequently be complicated by tendon adhesions to the surrounding sheath, limiting finger function. We have developed a new tendon injury model in the mouse to investigate the three-dimensional cellular biology of intrasynovial flexor tendon healing and adhesion formation. We investigated the cell biology using markers for inflammation, proliferation, collagen synthesis, apoptosis, and vascularization/myofibroblasts. Quantitative immunohistochemical image analysis and three-dimensional reconstruction with cell mapping was performed on labeled serial sections. Flexor tendon adhesions were also assessed 21 days after wounding using transmission electron microscopy to examine the cell phenotypes in the wound. When the tendon has been immobilized, the mouse can form tendon adhesions in the flexor tendon sheath. The cell biology of tendon healing follows the classic wound healing response of inflammation, proliferation, synthesis, and apoptosis, but the greater activity occurs in the surrounding tissue. Cells that have multiple “fibripositors” and cells with cytoplasmic protrusions that contain multiple large and small diameter fibrils can be found in the wound during collagen synthesis. In conclusion, adhesion formation occurs due to scarring between two damaged surfaces. The mouse model for flexor tendon injury represents a new platform to study adhesion formation that is genetically tractable. PMID:19834058

  8. How does tidal flow affect pattern formation in mussel beds?

    PubMed

    Sherratt, Jonathan A; Mackenzie, Julia J

    2016-10-07

    In the Wadden Sea, mussel beds self-organise into spatial patterns consisting of bands parallel to the shore. A leading explanation for this phenomenon is that mussel aggregation reduces losses from dislodgement and predation, because of the adherence of mussels to one another. Previous mathematical modelling has shown that this can lead to spatial patterning when it is coupled to the advection from the open sea of algae-the main food source for mussels in the Wadden Sea. A complicating factor in this process is that the advection of algae will actually oscillate with the tidal flow. This has been excluded from previous modelling studies, and the present paper concerns the implications of this oscillation for pattern formation. The authors initially consider piecewise constant ("square-tooth") oscillations in advection, which enables analytical investigation of the conditions for pattern formation. They then build on this to study the more realistic case of sinusoidal oscillations. Their analysis shows that future research on the details of pattern formation in mussel beds will require an in-depth understanding of how the tides affect long-range inhibition among mussels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Pattern formation in miniature: the female gametophyte of flowering plants.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, Venkatesan; Alandete-Saez, Monica

    2010-01-01

    Plant reproduction involves gamete production by a haploid generation, the gametophyte. For flowering plants, a defining characteristic in the evolution from the 'naked-seed' plants, or gymnosperms, is a reduced female gametophyte, comprising just seven cells of four different types--a microcosm of pattern formation and gamete specification about which only little is known. However, several genes involved in the differentiation, fertilization and post-fertilization functions of the female gametophyte have been identified and, recently, the morphogenic activity of the plant hormone auxin has been found to mediate patterning and egg cell specification. This article reviews recent progress in understanding the pattern formation, maternal effects and evolution of this essential unit of plant reproduction.

  10. Spontaneous pattern formation in broad-area lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krents, Anton; Anchikov, Dmitry; Molevich, Nonna; Pakhomov, Anton

    2016-10-01

    The paper studies the spontaneous formation of nonlinear optical patterns in broad area lasers. Spatiotemporal transverse dynamics of the laser is described by the Maxwell-Bloch equations (MBE). The instability of the steady-state solution leads to pattern formation. Two different types of instabilities were observed analytically (Hopf and wave). 2D numerical simulation of the MBE with the random initial conditions has been performed using a split-step Fourier method and periodic boundary conditions. Hopf instability leads to homogeneous oscillations, spatiotemporal chaos and spiral waves. In the case of wave instability, the direct numerical simulation showed that space-time (periodic, quasi-periodic, or chaotic) modulation of the uniform profile is observed. The characteristic sizes of excited patterns are in good agreement with analytical predictions. The nonlinear interaction of four travelling waves forms a square optical vortex lattice similar to the vortex lattices observed in superconductors and Bose Einstein condensate.

  11. Dewetting-mediated pattern formation inside the coffee ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weibin; Lan, Ding; Wang, Yuren

    2017-04-01

    The rearrangement of particles in the final stage of droplet evaporation has been investigated by utilizing differential interference contrast microscopy and the formation mechanism of a network pattern inside a coffee ring has been revealed. A tailored substrate with a circular hydrophilic domain is prepared to obtain thin liquid film containing monolayer particles. Real-time bottom-view images show that the evolution of a dry patch could be divided into three stages: rupture initiation, dry patch expansion, and drying of the residual liquid. A growing number of dry patches will repeat these stages to form the network patterns inside the ringlike stain. It can be shown that the suction effect promotes the rupture of the liquid film and the formation of the dry patch. The particle-assembling process is totally controlled by the liquid film dewetting and dominated by the surface tension of the liquid film, which eventually determine the ultimate deposition patterns.

  12. Endothelial cell motility, coordination and pattern formation during vasculogenesis.

    PubMed

    Czirok, Andras

    2013-01-01

    How vascular networks assemble is a fundamental problem of developmental biology that also has medical importance. To explain the organizational principles behind vascular patterning, we must understand how can tissue level structures be controlled through cell behavior patterns like motility and adhesion that, in turn, are determined by biochemical signal transduction processes? We discuss the various ideas that have been proposed as mechanisms for vascular network assembly: cell motility guided by extracellular matrix alignment (contact guidance), chemotaxis guided by paracrine and autocrine morphogens, and multicellular sprouting guided by cell-cell contacts. All of these processes yield emergent patterns, thus endothelial cells can form an interconnected structure autonomously, without guidance from an external pre-pattern. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Simple, simpler, simplest: Spontaneous pattern formation in a commonplace system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strombom, Evelyn H.; Caicedo-Carvajal, Carlos E.; Thyagu, N. Nirmal; Palumbo, Daniel; Shinbrot, Troy

    2012-07-01

    In 1855, Lord Kelvin's brother, James Thomson, wrote a paper describing "certain curious motions" on liquid surfaces. In the present paper, we describe several curious motions produced in the simplest possible manner: by introducing a droplet of food coloring into a shallow dish of water. These motions include the spontaneous formation of labyrinthine stripes, the periodic pulsation leading to chaotic stretching and folding, and the formation of migrating slugs of coloring. We use this simple experiment to demonstrate that the formation of ordered macroscopic patterns is consistent with the requirement of the second law of Thermodynamics that microscopic disorder must increase. This system is suitable for undergraduate experimentation and can be modeled by advanced students in a straightforward finite difference simulation that reproduces the labyrinths and other patterns.

  14. A robust and biologically plausible spike pattern recognition network.

    PubMed

    Larson, Eric; Perrone, Ben P; Sen, Kamal; Billimoria, Cyrus P

    2010-11-17

    The neural mechanisms that enable recognition of spiking patterns in the brain are currently unknown. This is especially relevant in sensory systems, in which the brain has to detect such patterns and recognize relevant stimuli by processing peripheral inputs; in particular, it is unclear how sensory systems can recognize time-varying stimuli by processing spiking activity. Because auditory stimuli are represented by time-varying fluctuations in frequency content, it is useful to consider how such stimuli can be recognized by neural processing. Previous models for sound recognition have used preprocessed or low-level auditory signals as input, but complex natural sounds such as speech are thought to be processed in auditory cortex, and brain regions involved in object recognition in general must deal with the natural variability present in spike trains. Thus, we used neural recordings to investigate how a spike pattern recognition system could deal with the intrinsic variability and diverse response properties of cortical spike trains. We propose a biologically plausible computational spike pattern recognition model that uses an excitatory chain of neurons to spatially preserve the temporal representation of the spike pattern. Using a single neural recording as input, the model can be trained using a spike-timing-dependent plasticity-based learning rule to recognize neural responses to 20 different bird songs with >98% accuracy and can be stimulated to evoke reverse spike pattern playback. Although we test spike train recognition performance in an auditory task, this model can be applied to recognize sufficiently reliable spike patterns from any neuronal system.

  15. Dynamic Pattern Formation in Electron-Beam-Induced Etching [Emergent formation of dynamic topographic patterns in electron beam induced etching

    DOE PAGES

    Martin, Aiden A.; Bahm, Alan; Bishop, James; ...

    2015-12-15

    Here, we report highly ordered topographic patterns that form on the surface of diamond, span multiple length scales, and have a symmetry controlled by the precursor gas species used in electron-beam-induced etching (EBIE). The pattern formation dynamics reveals an etch rate anisotropy and an electron energy transfer pathway that is overlooked by existing EBIE models. Therefore, we, modify established theory such that it explains our results and remains universally applicable to EBIE. Furthermore, the patterns can be exploited in controlled wetting, optical structuring, and other emerging applications that require nano- and microscale surface texturing of a wide band-gap material.

  16. Measurement of endogenous carbon monoxide formation in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Marks, Gerald S; Vreman, Hendrik J; McLaughlin, Brian E; Brien, James F; Nakatsu, Kanji

    2002-04-01

    Endogenous carbon monoxide (CO) formation has been measured in different biological systems using a variety of analytical procedures. The methods include gas chromatography-reduction gas detection, gas chromatography-mass spectroscopic detection, laser sensor-infrared absorption, UV-visible spectrophotometric measurement of CO-hemoglobin or CO-myoglobin complex, and formation of (14)CO from (14)C-heme formed following [2-(14)C]glycine administration. CO formation ranged from a low of 0.029 nmol/mg of protein/h in chorionic villi of term human placenta to a high of 0.28 nmol/mg of protein/h in rat olfactory receptor neurons in culture and rat liver perfusate.

  17. Innate Immune Pattern Recognition: A Cell Biological Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Brubaker, Sky W.; Bonham, Kevin S.; Zanoni, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Receptors of the innate immune system detect conserved determinants of microbial and viral origin. Activation of these receptors initiates signaling events that culminate in an effective immune response. Recently, the view that innate immune signaling events rely on and operate within a complex cellular infrastructure has become an important framework for understanding the regulation of innate immunity. Compartmentalization within this infrastructure provides the cell with the ability to assign spatial information to microbial detection and regulate immune responses. Several cell biological processes play a role in the regulation of innate signaling responses; at the same time, innate signaling can engage cellular processes as a form of defense or to promote immunological memory. In this review, we highlight these aspects of cell biology in pattern-recognition receptor signaling by focusing on signals that originate from the cell surface, from endosomal compartments, and from within the cytosol. PMID:25581309

  18. Visually Inexperienced Chicks Exhibit Spontaneous Preference for Biological Motion Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Regolin, Lucia; Marconato, Fabio

    2005-01-01

    When only a small number of points of light attached to the torso and limbs of a moving organism are visible, the animation correctly conveys the animal's activity. Here we report that newly hatched chicks, reared and hatched in darkness, at their first exposure to point-light animation sequences, exhibit a spontaneous preference to approach biological motion patterns. Intriguingly, this predisposition is not specific for the motion of a hen, but extends to the pattern of motion of other vertebrates, even to that of a potential predator such as a cat. The predisposition seems to reflect the existence of a mechanism in the brain aimed at orienting the young animal towards objects that move semi-rigidly (as vertebrate animals do), thus facilitating learning, i.e., through imprinting, about their more specific features of motion. PMID:15934787

  19. Modeling of pattern development during fibronectin nanofibril formation.

    PubMed

    Pompe, Tilo; Starruss, Jörn; Bobeth, Manfred; Pompe, Wolfgang

    2006-09-01

    Formation of fibrillar fibronectin networks is a major process during embryogenesis and tissue formation, but the molecular details of fibril assembly remain poorly understood. Based on current ideas of fibronectin fibrillogenesis, a stochastic model was developed to enlighten the mechanism of the formation of paired fibronectin nanofibrils by adherent endothelial cells, which has been observed recently. The development of fibronectin clusters and fibrils was investigated by means of Monte Carlo simulations, including diffusion-controlled aggregation and myosin-driven transport of fibronectin-integrin complexes in the vicinity of a focal adhesion. Different evolving growth patterns were summarized in a morphological diagram as a function of the fibronectin substrate and fibronectin-fibronectin interaction energies. The formation of paired nanofibrils was found to occur in a certain region of interaction parameters. Beyond this region branched fibronectin clusters as well as tear-off of fibronectin fibrils were observed.

  20. Cortical Folding Pattern and its Consistency Induced by Biological Growth

    PubMed Central

    Jalil Razavi, Mir; Zhang, Tuo; Liu, Tianming; Wang, Xianqiao

    2015-01-01

    Cortical folding, characterized by convex gyri and concave sulci, has an intrinsic relationship to the brain’s functional organization. Understanding the mechanism of the brain’s convoluted patterns can provide useful clues into normal and pathological brain function. In this paper, the cortical folding phenomenon is interpreted both analytically and computationally, and, in some cases, the findings are validated with experimental observations. The living human brain is modeled as a soft structure with a growing outer cortex and inner core to investigate its developmental mechanism. Analytical interpretations of differential growth of the brain model provide preliminary insight into critical growth ratios for instability and crease formation of the developing brain. Since the analytical approach cannot predict the evolution of cortical complex convolution after instability, non-linear finite element models are employed to study the crease formation and secondary morphological folds of the developing brain. Results demonstrate that the growth ratio of the cortex to core of the brain, the initial thickness, and material properties of both cortex and core have great impacts on the morphological patterns of the developing brain. Lastly, we discuss why cortical folding is highly correlated and consistent by presenting an intriguing gyri-sulci formation comparison. PMID:26404042

  1. Cortical Folding Pattern and its Consistency Induced by Biological Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalil Razavi, Mir; Zhang, Tuo; Liu, Tianming; Wang, Xianqiao

    2015-09-01

    Cortical folding, characterized by convex gyri and concave sulci, has an intrinsic relationship to the brain’s functional organization. Understanding the mechanism of the brain’s convoluted patterns can provide useful clues into normal and pathological brain function. In this paper, the cortical folding phenomenon is interpreted both analytically and computationally, and, in some cases, the findings are validated with experimental observations. The living human brain is modeled as a soft structure with a growing outer cortex and inner core to investigate its developmental mechanism. Analytical interpretations of differential growth of the brain model provide preliminary insight into critical growth ratios for instability and crease formation of the developing brain. Since the analytical approach cannot predict the evolution of cortical complex convolution after instability, non-linear finite element models are employed to study the crease formation and secondary morphological folds of the developing brain. Results demonstrate that the growth ratio of the cortex to core of the brain, the initial thickness, and material properties of both cortex and core have great impacts on the morphological patterns of the developing brain. Lastly, we discuss why cortical folding is highly correlated and consistent by presenting an intriguing gyri-sulci formation comparison.

  2. Wavenumber Locking And Pattern Formation In Spatially Forced Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hagberg, Aric; Meron, Ehud; Manor, Rotem

    2008-01-01

    We study wavenumber locking and pattern formation resulting from weak spatially periodic one-dimensional forcing of two-dimensional systems. We consider systems that support stationary or traveling stripe patterns in the absence of the forcing, and assume that the one-dimensional forcing is aligned with the direction of the stripe patterns. When the forcing wavenumber is about twice as large as the wavenumber of the unforced system we find that the forcing can either select or stabilize a resonant stripe solution at half the forcing wavenumber, or create a new resonant solution. When the wavenumber mismatch is high we find that the wave-vector component of the pattern in the direction of the forcing can stilI lock at half the forcing wavenumber, but a wave-vector component in the orthogonal direction develops to compensate for the total wavenumber. As a result stationary two-dimensional rectangular and oblique patterns form. When the unforced system supports traveling waves resonant rectangular patterns remain stationary but the oblique patterns travel in a direction orthogonal to the traveling-waves.

  3. Kinetics of lamellar formation on sparsely stripped patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Nan; Li, Weihua; Zhang, Hongdong; Qiu, Feng; Shi, An-Chang

    2013-11-01

    Chemical epitaxy based on the self-assembly of block copolymers is viewed as a promising technique to achieve ordered patterns on a large scale. Herein, we study the kinetics of lamellar formation of block copolymers under the direction of sparsely stripped patterns using cell dynamics simulations of the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau theory. First, a scaling law is unveiled with the ordering time of lamellae, tp, with respect to the multiples between the periods of lamellae and stripe patterns, which is consistent with the power law evolution of the correlation length existing in the bulk phase of lamellae. Second, the tolerative windows of perfect order, with deviation from integer multiples, are also estimated from the aspect of kinetics. The results of the ordering time and tolerative windows are of great interest for relevant experiments or applications. Finally, a two-stage evolution is explored during the pattern formation of chemical epitaxy by probing into the evolution of defects, which is of fundamental interest for us to understand the coarsening kinetics of block copolymers under the direction of chemical patterns.

  4. Perspective: network-guided pattern formation of neural dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hütt, Marc-Thorsten; Kaiser, Marcus; Hilgetag, Claus C

    2014-10-05

    The understanding of neural activity patterns is fundamentally linked to an understanding of how the brain's network architecture shapes dynamical processes. Established approaches rely mostly on deviations of a given network from certain classes of random graphs. Hypotheses about the supposed role of prominent topological features (for instance, the roles of modularity, network motifs or hierarchical network organization) are derived from these deviations. An alternative strategy could be to study deviations of network architectures from regular graphs (rings and lattices) and consider the implications of such deviations for self-organized dynamic patterns on the network. Following this strategy, we draw on the theory of spatio-temporal pattern formation and propose a novel perspective for analysing dynamics on networks, by evaluating how the self-organized dynamics are confined by network architecture to a small set of permissible collective states. In particular, we discuss the role of prominent topological features of brain connectivity, such as hubs, modules and hierarchy, in shaping activity patterns. We illustrate the notion of network-guided pattern formation with numerical simulations and outline how it can facilitate the understanding of neural dynamics.

  5. Simulating discrete models of pattern formation by ion beam sputtering.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Alexander K; Kree, Reiner; Yasseri, Taha

    2009-06-03

    A class of simple, (2+1)-dimensional, discrete models is reviewed, which allow us to study the evolution of surface patterns on solid substrates during ion beam sputtering (IBS). The models are based on the same assumptions about the erosion process as the existing continuum theories. Several distinct physical mechanisms of surface diffusion are added, which allow us to study the interplay of erosion-driven and diffusion-driven pattern formation. We present results from our own work on evolution scenarios of ripple patterns, especially for longer timescales, where nonlinear effects become important. Furthermore we review kinetic phase diagrams, both with and without sample rotation, which depict the systematic dependence of surface patterns on the shape of energy depositing collision cascades after ion impact. Finally, we discuss some results from more recent work on surface diffusion with Ehrlich-Schwoebel barriers as the driving force for pattern formation during IBS and on Monte Carlo simulations of IBS with codeposition of surfactant atoms.

  6. Processing biological literature with customizable Web services supporting interoperable formats

    PubMed Central

    Rak, Rafal; Batista-Navarro, Riza Theresa; Carter, Jacob; Rowley, Andrew; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2014-01-01

    Web services have become a popular means of interconnecting solutions for processing a body of scientific literature. This has fuelled research on high-level data exchange formats suitable for a given domain and ensuring the interoperability of Web services. In this article, we focus on the biological domain and consider four interoperability formats, BioC, BioNLP, XMI and RDF, that represent domain-specific and generic representations and include well-established as well as emerging specifications. We use the formats in the context of customizable Web services created in our Web-based, text-mining workbench Argo that features an ever-growing library of elementary analytics and capabilities to build and deploy Web services straight from a convenient graphical user interface. We demonstrate a 2-fold customization of Web services: by building task-specific processing pipelines from a repository of available analytics, and by configuring services to accept and produce a combination of input and output data interchange formats. We provide qualitative evaluation of the formats as well as quantitative evaluation of automatic analytics. The latter was carried out as part of our participation in the fourth edition of the BioCreative challenge. Our analytics built into Web services for recognizing biochemical concepts in BioC collections achieved the highest combined scores out of 10 participating teams. Database URL: http://argo.nactem.ac.uk. PMID:25006225

  7. Processing biological literature with customizable Web services supporting interoperable formats.

    PubMed

    Rak, Rafal; Batista-Navarro, Riza Theresa; Carter, Jacob; Rowley, Andrew; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2014-01-01

    Web services have become a popular means of interconnecting solutions for processing a body of scientific literature. This has fuelled research on high-level data exchange formats suitable for a given domain and ensuring the interoperability of Web services. In this article, we focus on the biological domain and consider four interoperability formats, BioC, BioNLP, XMI and RDF, that represent domain-specific and generic representations and include well-established as well as emerging specifications. We use the formats in the context of customizable Web services created in our Web-based, text-mining workbench Argo that features an ever-growing library of elementary analytics and capabilities to build and deploy Web services straight from a convenient graphical user interface. We demonstrate a 2-fold customization of Web services: by building task-specific processing pipelines from a repository of available analytics, and by configuring services to accept and produce a combination of input and output data interchange formats. We provide qualitative evaluation of the formats as well as quantitative evaluation of automatic analytics. The latter was carried out as part of our participation in the fourth edition of the BioCreative challenge. Our analytics built into Web services for recognizing biochemical concepts in BioC collections achieved the highest combined scores out of 10 participating teams. Database URL: http://argo.nactem.ac.uk.

  8. Clustering and Pattern Formation in Chemorepulsive Active Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebchen, Benno; Marenduzzo, Davide; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Cates, Michael E.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate that migration away from self-produced chemicals (chemorepulsion) generates a generic route to clustering and pattern formation among self-propelled colloids. The clustering instability can be caused either by anisotropic chemical production, or by a delayed orientational response to changes of the chemical environment. In each case, chemorepulsion creates clusters of a self-limiting area which grows linearly with self-propulsion speed. This agrees with recent observations of dynamic clusters in Janus colloids (albeit not yet known to be chemorepulsive). More generally, our results could inform design principles for the self-assembly of chemorepulsive synthetic swimmers and/or bacteria into nonequilibrium patterns.

  9. Clustering and Pattern Formation in Chemorepulsive Active Colloids.

    PubMed

    Liebchen, Benno; Marenduzzo, Davide; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Cates, Michael E

    2015-12-18

    We demonstrate that migration away from self-produced chemicals (chemorepulsion) generates a generic route to clustering and pattern formation among self-propelled colloids. The clustering instability can be caused either by anisotropic chemical production, or by a delayed orientational response to changes of the chemical environment. In each case, chemorepulsion creates clusters of a self-limiting area which grows linearly with self-propulsion speed. This agrees with recent observations of dynamic clusters in Janus colloids (albeit not yet known to be chemorepulsive). More generally, our results could inform design principles for the self-assembly of chemorepulsive synthetic swimmers and/or bacteria into nonequilibrium patterns.

  10. Dynamic phases, pinning, and pattern formation for driven dislocation assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Caizhi; Reichhardt, Charles; Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia J.; Beyerlein, Irene J.

    2015-01-23

    We examine driven dislocation assemblies and show that they can exhibit a set of dynamical phases remarkably similar to those of driven systems with quenched disorder such as vortices in superconductors, magnetic domain walls, and charge density wave materials. These phases include pinned-jammed, fluctuating, and dynamically ordered states, and each produces distinct dislocation patterns as well as specific features in the noise fluctuations and transport properties. Lastly, our work suggests that many of the results established for systems with quenched disorder undergoing plastic depinning transitions can be applied to dislocation systems, providing a new approach for understanding pattern formation and dynamics in these systems.

  11. Dynamic phases, pinning, and pattern formation for driven dislocation assemblies

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Caizhi; Reichhardt, Charles; Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia J.; ...

    2015-01-23

    We examine driven dislocation assemblies and show that they can exhibit a set of dynamical phases remarkably similar to those of driven systems with quenched disorder such as vortices in superconductors, magnetic domain walls, and charge density wave materials. These phases include pinned-jammed, fluctuating, and dynamically ordered states, and each produces distinct dislocation patterns as well as specific features in the noise fluctuations and transport properties. Lastly, our work suggests that many of the results established for systems with quenched disorder undergoing plastic depinning transitions can be applied to dislocation systems, providing a new approach for understanding pattern formation andmore » dynamics in these systems.« less

  12. Boundary-layer model of pattern formation in solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-Jacob, E.; Goldenfeld, N.; Langer, J. S.; Schon, G.

    1984-01-01

    A model of pattern formation in crystal growth is proposed, and its analytic properties are investigated. The principal dynamical variables in this model are the curvature of the solidification front and the thickness (or heat content) of a thermal boundary layer, both taken to be functions of position along the interface. This model is mathematically much more tractable than the realistic, fully nonlocal version of the free-boundary problem, and still recaptures many of the features that seem essential for studying dendritic behavior, for example. Preliminary numerical solutions produce snowflakelike patterns similar to those seen in nature.

  13. Dynamic Phases, Pinning, and Pattern Formation for Driven Dislocation Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Caizhi; Reichhardt, Charles; Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia J.; Beyerlein, Irene J.

    2015-01-01

    We examine driven dislocation assemblies and show that they can exhibit a set of dynamical phases remarkably similar to those of driven systems with quenched disorder such as vortices in superconductors, magnetic domain walls, and charge density wave materials. These phases include pinned-jammed, fluctuating, and dynamically ordered states, and each produces distinct dislocation patterns as well as specific features in the noise fluctuations and transport properties. Our work suggests that many of the results established for systems with quenched disorder undergoing plastic depinning transitions can be applied to dislocation systems, providing a new approach for understanding pattern formation and dynamics in these systems. PMID:25613839

  14. Boundary-layer model of pattern formation in solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-Jacob, E.; Goldenfeld, N.; Langer, J. S.; Schon, G.

    1984-01-01

    A model of pattern formation in crystal growth is proposed, and its analytic properties are investigated. The principal dynamical variables in this model are the curvature of the solidification front and the thickness (or heat content) of a thermal boundary layer, both taken to be functions of position along the interface. This model is mathematically much more tractable than the realistic, fully nonlocal version of the free-boundary problem, and still recaptures many of the features that seem essential for studying dendritic behavior, for example. Preliminary numerical solutions produce snowflakelike patterns similar to those seen in nature.

  15. Patterns of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization in complex biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovanova, O. A.; Korol’kov, V. V.; Kuimova, M. V.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the features of calcium oxalate crystallization in the presence of additives revealed through experimental modeling. The patterns of phase formation are shown for the Ca2+ – C2O4 2– – H2O and Ca2+ – C2O4 2– – PO4 3– – H2O systems with the components and pH of the saline varying over a wide concentrations range. The effect of additives on crystallization of calcium oxalate monohydrate was investigated. It was found that the ionic strength and magnesium ions are inhibitors, and calcium oxalate and hydroxyapatite crystals are catalysts of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization. The basic calcium phosphate (apatite) was found to be most thermodynamically stable, which indicates its special role in kidney stone formation since it is found in virtually all stones.

  16. Pattern formation and self-organization in plasmas interacting with surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trelles, Juan Pablo

    2016-10-01

    Pattern formation and self-organization are fascinating phenomena commonly observed in diverse types of biological, chemical and physical systems, including plasmas. These phenomena are often responsible for the occurrence of coherent structures found in nature, such as recirculation cells and spot arrangements; and their understanding and control can have important implications in technology, e.g. from determining the uniformity of plasma surface treatments to electrode erosion rates. This review comprises theoretical, computational and experimental investigations of the formation of spatiotemporal patterns that result from self-organization events due to the interaction of low-temperature plasmas in contact with confining or intervening surfaces, particularly electrodes. The basic definitions associated to pattern formation and self-organization are provided, as well as some of the characteristics of these phenomena within natural and technological contexts, especially those specific to plasmas. Phenomenological aspects of pattern formation include the competition between production/forcing and dissipation/transport processes, as well as nonequilibrium, stability, bifurcation and nonlinear interactions. The mathematical modeling of pattern formation in plasmas has encompassed from theoretical approaches and canonical models, such as reaction-diffusion systems, to drift-diffusion and nonequilibrium fluid flow models. The computational simulation of pattern formation phenomena imposes distinct challenges to numerical methods, such as high sensitivity to numerical approximations and the occurrence of multiple solutions. Representative experimental and numerical investigations of pattern formation and self-organization in diverse types of low-temperature electrical discharges (low and high pressure glow, dielectric barrier and arc discharges, etc) in contact with solid and liquid electrodes are reviewed. Notably, plasmas in contact with liquids, found in diverse

  17. Thiolated arsenicals in arsenic metabolism: Occurrence, formation, and biological implications.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuzhen; Liu, Guangliang; Cai, Yong

    2016-11-01

    Arsenic (As) is a notoriously toxic pollutant of health concern worldwide with potential risk of cancer induction, but meanwhile it is used as medicines for the treatment of different conditions including hematological cancers. Arsenic can undergo extensive metabolism in biological systems, and both toxicological and therapeutic effects of arsenic compounds are closely related to their metabolism. Recent studies have identified methylated thioarsenicals as a new class of arsenic metabolites in biological systems after exposure of inorganic and organic arsenicals, including arsenite, dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)), dimethylarsinous glutathione (DMA(III)GS), and arsenosugars. The increasing detection of thiolated arsenicals, including monomethylmonothioarsonic acid (MMMTA(V)), dimethylmonothioarsinic acid (DMMTA(V)) and its glutathione conjugate (DMMTA(V)GS), and dimethyldithioarsinic acid (DMDTA(V)) suggests that thioarsenicals may be important metabolites and play important roles in arsenic toxicity and therapeutic effects. Here we summarized the reported occurrence of thioarsenicals in biological systems, the possible formation pathways of thioarsenicals, and their toxicity, and discussed the biological implications of thioarsenicals on arsenic metabolism, toxicity, and therapeutic effects. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Femtosecond Laser Patterning of the Biopolymer Chitosan for Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Estevam-Alves, Regina; Ferreira, Paulo Henrique Dias; Coatrini, Andrey C.; Oliveira, Osvaldo N.; Fontana, Carla Raquel; Mendonca, Cleber Renato

    2016-01-01

    Controlling microbial growth is crucial for many biomedical, pharmaceutical and food industry applications. In this paper, we used a femtosecond laser to microstructure the surface of chitosan, a biocompatible polymer that has been explored for applications ranging from antimicrobial action to drug delivery. The influence of energy density on the features produced on chitosan was investigated by optical and atomic force microscopies. An increase in the hydrophilic character of the chitosan surface was attained upon laser micromachining. Patterned chitosan films were used to observe Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) biofilm formation, revealing an increase in the biofilm formation in the structured regions. Our results indicate that fs-laser micromachining is an attractive option to pattern biocompatible surfaces, and to investigate basic aspects of the relationship between surface topography and bacterial adhesion. PMID:27548153

  19. The LLE, pattern formation and a novel coherent source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, Fabrizio; Brambilla, Massimo; Gatti, Alessandra; Prati, Franco; Lugiato, Luigi A.

    2017-04-01

    The LLE was introduced in order to provide a paradigmatic model for spontaneous spatial pattern formation in the field of nonlinear optics. In the first part of this paper we describe in details its historical evolution. We underline, first of all, that the multimode instability of optical bistability represents an important precursor of the LLE. Next, we illustrate how the original LLE was conceived in order to describe pattern formation in the planes transverse with respect to the longitudinal direction of propagation of light in the nonlinear medium contained in the optical cavity. We emphasize, in particular, the crucial role of the low transmission limit (also called mean field limit or uniform field limit in the literature) in determining the simplicity of the equation. In discussing transverse pattern formation in the LLE, we underline incidentally the presence of very important quantum aspects related to squeezing of quantum fluctuations and to quantum imaging. We consider not only the case of global patterns but also localized structures (cavity solitons and their control). Then we turn to the temporal/longitudinal version of the LLE, formulated by Haelterman et al. [H. Haelterman, S. Trillo, S. Wabnitz, Opt. Commun. 91, 401 (1992)], and to its equivalence with the transverse LLE in 1D, discussing especially the phenomenon of temporal cavity solitons, their experimental observation and their control. Finally for the first part we turn to the very recent topic of broadband frequency combs, observed in a versatile multiwavelength coherent source (driven Kerr microcavity), which is raising a lot of interest and of research activities because of its very favourable physical characteristics, which support quite promising applicative perspectives. Kerr microcavities realize in an ideal manner the basic assumptions of the LLE, and the spontaneous formation of travelling patterns along the microcavity is the crucial mechanism which creates the combs and governs

  20. Modeling cell-death patterning during biofilm formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pushpita; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Levine, Herbert

    2013-12-01

    Self-organization by bacterial cells often leads to the formation of a highly complex spatially-structured biofilm. In such a bacterial biofilm, cells adhere to each other and are embedded in a self-produced extracellular matrix (ECM). Bacillus substilis bacteria utilize localized cell-death patterns which focuses mechanical forces to form wrinkled sheet-like structures in three dimensions. A most intriguing feature underlying this biofilm formation is that vertical buckling and ridge location is biased to occur in region of high cell-death. Here we present a spatially extended model to investigate the role of the bacterial secreted ECM during the biofilm formation and the self-organization of cell-death. Using this reaction-diffusion model we show that the interaction between the cell's motion and the ECM concentration gives rise to a self-trapping instability, leading to variety of cell-death patterns. The resultant spot patterns generated by our model are shown to be in semi-quantitative agreement with recent experimental observation.

  1. Pattern formation in a model for mountain pine beetle dispersal: linking model predictions to data.

    PubMed

    Strohm, S; Tyson, R C; Powell, J A

    2013-10-01

    Pattern formation occurs in a wide range of biological systems. This pattern formation can occur in mathematical models because of diffusion-driven instability or due to the interaction between reaction, diffusion, and chemotaxis. In this paper, we investigate the spatial pattern formation of attack clusters in a system for Mountain Pine Beetle. The pattern formation (aggregation) of the Mountain Pine Beetle in order to attack susceptible trees is crucial for their survival and reproduction. We use a reaction-diffusion equation with chemotaxis to model the interaction between Mountain Pine Beetle, Mountain Pine Beetle pheromones, and susceptible trees. Mathematical analysis is utilized to discover the spacing in-between beetle attacks on the susceptible landscape. The model predictions are verified by analysing aerial detection survey data of Mountain Pine Beetle Attack from the Sawtooth National Recreation Area. We find that the distance between Mountain Pine Beetle attack clusters predicted by our model closely corresponds to the observed attack data in the Sawtooth National Recreation Area. These results clarify the spatial mechanisms controlling the transition from incipient to epidemic populations and may lead to control measures which protect forests from Mountain Pine Beetle outbreak.

  2. Capillary-mediated interface perturbations: Deterministic pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glicksman, Martin E.

    2016-09-01

    Leibniz-Reynolds analysis identifies a 4th-order capillary-mediated energy field that is responsible for shape changes observed during melting, and for interface speed perturbations during crystal growth. Field-theoretic principles also show that capillary-mediated energy distributions cancel over large length scales, but modulate the interface shape on smaller mesoscopic scales. Speed perturbations reverse direction at specific locations where they initiate inflection and branching on unstable interfaces, thereby enhancing pattern complexity. Simulations of pattern formation by several independent groups of investigators using a variety of numerical techniques confirm that shape changes during both melting and growth initiate at locations predicted from interface field theory. Finally, limit cycles occur as an interface and its capillary energy field co-evolve, leading to synchronized branching. Synchronous perturbations produce classical dendritic structures, whereas asynchronous perturbations observed in isotropic and weakly anisotropic systems lead to chaotic-looking patterns that remain nevertheless deterministic.

  3. Langmuir films of chiral lipid molecules and Pattern Formation .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basnet, Prem; Mann, Elizabeth; Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2009-03-01

    Langmuir films of 1,2-bis(10,12 Tricosadiynoyl)-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphoethanolamine form spiral and target patterns when compressed between two movable barriers in a Langmuir trough above 30^0C, up to the chain-melting transition at ˜37^0C. The critical pressure, at which spirals appear, increases with temperature. The patterns themselves also depend on temperature, with single-armed spirals with many defects forming near 30^0C and defect-free target patterns at higher temperatures. The mechanism of spiral formation could be a competition among elasticity, chirality, and the boundary conditions at the core of the domains. Optical anisotropy and the growth rate of internal structures test this suggested mechanism. .

  4. Liquid crystalline pattern formation in drying droplets of biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalyukh, Ivan; Zribi, Olena; Butler, John; Lavrentovich, Oleg; Wong, Gerard

    2006-03-01

    When a droplet of DNA in water dries out, a ring-like deposit is observed along the perimeter, similar to the stains in spilled drops of coffee. However, the dried ring of DNA is a self-similar birefringent pattern composed of extended molecules. We examine dynamics of the pattern formation at the droplet's rim. This gives us an insight into the underlining physics. During the major part of drying process the contact line is pinned so that DNA molecules are brought to the perimeter and extended by the radial capillary flow. Lyotropic nematic phase is formed in which highly concentrated DNA aligns along the triple line to minimize elastic energy. When the contact angle becomes small, the contact line starts to retract and the radial dilative stress causes buckling distortions at the rim which then propagate deep into the elastic liquid- crystalline medium and give rise to the pattern.

  5. A Model of Filamentous Cyanobacteria Leading to Reticulate Pattern Formation

    PubMed Central

    Tamulonis, Carlos; Kaandorp, Jaap

    2014-01-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium, Pseudanabaena, has been shown to produce reticulate patterns that are thought to be the result of its gliding motility. Similar fossilized structures found in the geological record constitute some of the earliest signs of life on Earth. It is difficult to tie these fossils, which are billions of years old, directly to the specific microorganisms that built them. Identifying the physicochemical conditions and microorganism properties that lead microbial mats to form macroscopic structures can lead to a better understanding of the conditions on Earth at the dawn of life. In this article, a cell-based model is used to simulate the formation of reticulate patterns in cultures of Pseudanabaena. A minimal system of long and flexible trichomes capable of gliding motility is shown to be sufficient to produce stable patterns consisting of a network of streams. Varying model parameters indicate that systems with little to no cohesion, high trichome density and persistent movement are conducive to reticulate pattern formation, in conformance with experimental observations. PMID:25370380

  6. Rimming flows and pattern formation inside rapidly rotating cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polezhaev, Denis; Dyakova, Veronika; Kozlov, Victor

    2014-11-01

    The dynamics of fluid and granular medium in a rotating horizontal cylinder is experimentally studied. In a rapidly rotating cylinder liquid and granular medium coat the cylindrical wall under centrifugal force. In the cavity frame gravity field performs rotation and produces oscillatory fluid flow which is responsible for the series of novel effects of pattern formation, namely, axial segregation of heavy particles and pattern formation in the form of sand regular hills extended along the axis of rotation. At least two types of axial segregation are found: a) patterns of spatial period of the same order of magnitude as fluid layer thickness which induced by steady flows generated by inertial waves; b) fine patterns which manifests Gortler - Taylor vortices developing as a consequence of centrifugal instability of viscous boundary layer near the cylindrical wall. Under gravity, intensive fluid shear flow induces partial fluidization of annular layer of granular medium. The oscillatory motion is followed by onset of regular ripples extended along the axis of rotation. The work is supported by Russian Scientific Foundation (project 14-11-00476).

  7. Fluctuations and Pattern Formation in Fluids with Competing Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imperio, A.; Pini, D.; Reatto, L.

    2007-08-01

    One of the most interesting phenomena in the soft-matter realm consists in the spontaneous formation of super-molecular structures (microphases) in condition of thermodynamic equilibrium. A simple mechanism responsible for this self-organization or pattern formation is based on the competition between attractive and repulsive forces with different length scales in the microscopic potential, typically, a short-range attraction against a longer-range repulsion. We analyse this problem by simulations in 2D fluids. We find that, as the temperature is lowered, liquid-vapor phase separation is inhibited by the competition between attraction and repulsion, and replaced by a transition to non-homogeneous phases. The structure of the fluid shows well defined signatures of the presence of both intra- and inter-cluster correlations. Even when the competition between attraction and repulsion is not so strong as to cause microphase formation, it still induces large density fluctuations in a wide region of the temperature-density plane. In this large-fluctuation regime, pattern formation can be triggered by a weak external modulating field.

  8. Heating hydrocarbon containing formations in a checkerboard pattern staged process

    SciTech Connect

    de Rouffignac, Eric Pierre; Pingo-Almada, Monica M; Miller, David Scott

    2009-06-02

    Method for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation are described herein. Methods may include providing heat to two or more first sections of the formation with one or more first heaters in two or more of the first sections. The provided heat may mobilize first hydrocarbons in two or more of the first sections. At least some of the mobilized first hydrocarbons are produced through production wells located in two or more second sections of the formation. The first sections and the second sections are arranged in a checkerboard pattern. A portion of at least one of the second sections proximate at least one production well is provided some heat from the mobilized first hydrocarbons, but is not conductively heated by heat from the first heaters. Heat may be provided to the second sections with one or more second heaters in the second sections to further heat the second sections.

  9. Nonlinear dynamics of pattern formation and pattern recognition in the rabbit olfactory bulb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, Bill

    1986-10-01

    A mathematical model of the process of pattern recognition in the first olfactory sensory cortex of the rabbit is presented. It explains the formation and alteration of spatial patterns in neural activity observed experimentally during classical Pavlovian conditioning. On each inspiration of the animal, a surge of receptor input enters the olfactory bulb. EEG activity recorded at the surface of the bulb undergoes a transition from a low amplitude background state of temporal disorder to coherent oscillation. There is a distinctive spatial pattern of rms amplitude in this oscillation which changes reliably to a second pattern during each successful recognition by the animal of a conditioned stimulus odor. When a new odor is paired as conditioned stimulus, these patterns are replaced by new patterns that stabilize as the animal adapts to the new environment. I will argue that a unification of the theories of pattern formation and associative memory is required to account for these observations. This is achieved in a model of the bulb as a discrete excitable medium with spatially inhomogeneous coupling expressed by a connection matrix. The theory of multiple Hopf bifurcations is employed to find coupled equations for the amplitudes of competing unstable oscillatory modes. These may be created in the system by proper coupling and selectively evoked by specific classes of inputs. This allows a view of limit cycle attractors as “stored” fixed points of a gradient vector field and thereby recovers the more familiar dynamical systems picture of associative memory.

  10. Mechanisms of the formation of biological signaling profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teimouri, Hamid; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2016-12-01

    The formation and growth of multi-cellular organisms and tissues from several genetically identical embryo cells is one of the most fundamental natural phenomena. These processes are stimulated and governed by multiple biological signaling molecules, which are also called morphogens. Embryo cells are able to read and pass genetic information by measuring the non-uniform concentration profiles of signaling molecules. It is widely believed that the establishment of concentration profiles of morphogens, commonly referred as morphogen gradients, is a result of complex biophysical and biochemical processes that might involve diffusion and degradation of locally produced signaling molecules. In this review, we discuss various theoretical aspects of the mechanisms for morphogen gradient formation, including stationary and transient dynamics, the effect of source delocalization, diffusion, different degradation mechanisms, and the role of spatial dimensions. Theoretical predictions are compared with experimental observations. In addition, we analyze the potential alternative mechanisms of the delivery of biological signals in embryo cells and tissues. Current challenges in understanding the mechanisms of morphogen gradients and future directions are also discussed.

  11. The role of optimal vortex formation in biological fluid transport.

    PubMed

    Dabiri, John O; Gharib, Morteza

    2005-08-07

    Animal phyla that require macro-scale fluid transport for functioning have repeatedly and often independently converged on the use of jet flows. During flow initiation these jets form fluid vortex rings, which facilitate mass transfer by stationary pumps (e.g. cardiac chambers) and momentum transfer by mobile systems (e.g. jet-propelled swimmers). Previous research has shown that vortex rings generated in the laboratory can be optimized for efficiency or thrust, based on the jet length-to-diameter ratio (L/D), with peak performance occurring at 3.5biological jets achieve this optimization have been inconclusive, due to the inability to properly account for the diversity of jet kinematics found across animal phyla. We combine laboratory experiments, in situ observations and a framework that reduces the kinematics to a single parameter in order to quantitatively show that individual animal kinematics can be tuned in correlation with optimal vortex ring formation. This new approach identifies simple rules for effective fluid transport, facilitates comparative biological studies of jet flows across animal phyla irrespective of their specific functions and can be extended to unify theories of optimal jet-based and flapping-based vortex ring formation.

  12. The role of optimal vortex formation in biological fluid transport

    PubMed Central

    Dabiri, John O; Gharib, Morteza

    2005-01-01

    Animal phyla that require macro-scale fluid transport for functioning have repeatedly and often independently converged on the use of jet flows. During flow initiation these jets form fluid vortex rings, which facilitate mass transfer by stationary pumps (e.g. cardiac chambers) and momentum transfer by mobile systems (e.g. jet-propelled swimmers). Previous research has shown that vortex rings generated in the laboratory can be optimized for efficiency or thrust, based on the jet length-to-diameter ratio (L/D), with peak performance occurring at 3.5biological jets achieve this optimization have been inconclusive, due to the inability to properly account for the diversity of jet kinematics found across animal phyla. We combine laboratory experiments, in situ observations and a framework that reduces the kinematics to a single parameter in order to quantitatively show that individual animal kinematics can be tuned in correlation with optimal vortex ring formation. This new approach identifies simple rules for effective fluid transport, facilitates comparative biological studies of jet flows across animal phyla irrespective of their specific functions and can be extended to unify theories of optimal jet-based and flapping-based vortex ring formation. PMID:16048770

  13. Whorl morphogenesis in the dasycladalean algae: the pattern formation viewpoint.

    PubMed Central

    Dumais, J; Harrison, L G

    2000-01-01

    The dasycladalean algae produce diverse whorled structures, among which the best known are the vegetative and reproductive whorls of Acetabularia acetabulum. In this paper, we review the literature pertaining to the origin of these structures. The question is addressed in terms of the necessary pattern-forming events and the possible mechanisms involved, an outlook we call the pattern formation viewpoint. The pattern-forming events involved in the morphogenesis of the vegetative and reproductive whorls of Acetabularia have been used to define five and six morphogenetic stages, respectively. We discuss three published mechanisms which account, at least in part, for the pattern-forming events. The mechanisms are mechanical buckling of the cell wall, reaction-diffusion of morphogen molecules along the cell membrane, and mechanochemical interactions between Ca2+ ions and the cytoskeleton in the cytosol. The numerous differences between these mechanisms provide experimental grounds to test their validity. To date, the results of these experiments point towards reaction diffusion as the most likely patterning mechanism. Finally, we consider the evolutionary origin of the vegetative and reproductive whorls and provide mechanistic explanations for some of the major evolutionary advances. PMID:10724462

  14. Weekly Formative Exams and Creative Grading Enhance Student Learning in an Introductory Biology Course

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, E. G.; Jensen, J.; Nelson, J.; Wiberg, H. K.; Bell, J. D.

    2017-01-01

    First-year students often become discouraged during introductory biology courses when repeated attempts to understand concepts nevertheless result in poor test scores. This challenge is exacerbated by traditional course structures that impose premature judgments on students’ achievements. Repeated testing has been shown to benefit student ability to recognize and recall information, but an effective means to similarly facilitate skill with higher-order problems in introductory courses is needed. Here, we show that an innovative format that uses a creative grading scheme together with weekly formative midterm exams produced significant gains in student success with difficult items requiring analysis and interpretation. This format is designed to promote tenacity and avoid discouragement by providing multiple opportunities to attempt demanding problems on exams, detailed immediate feedback, and strong incentives to retain hope and improve. Analysis of individual performance trajectories with heat maps reveals the diversity of learning patterns and provides rational means for advising students. PMID:28130269

  15. Formation and Biological Targets of Quinones: Cytotoxic versus Cytoprotective Effects

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Quinones represent a class of toxicological intermediates, which can create a variety of hazardous effects in vivo including, acute cytotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and carcinogenesis. In contrast, quinones can induce cytoprotection through the induction of detoxification enzymes, anti-inflammatory activities, and modification of redox status. The mechanisms by which quinones cause these effects can be quite complex. The various biological targets of quinones depend on their rate and site of formation and their reactivity. Quinones are formed through a variety of mechanisms from simple oxidation of catechols/hydroquinones catalyzed by a variety of oxidative enzymes and metal ions to more complex mechanisms involving initial P450-catalyzed hydroxylation reactions followed by two-electron oxidation. Quinones are Michael acceptors, and modification of cellular processes could occur through alkylation of crucial cellular proteins and/or DNA. Alternatively, quinones are highly redox active molecules which can redox cycle with their semiquinone radical anions leading to the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) including superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and ultimately the hydroxyl radical. Production of ROS can alter redox balance within cells through the formation of oxidized cellular macromolecules including lipids, proteins, and DNA. This perspective explores the varied biological targets of quinones including GSH, NADPH, protein sulfhydryls [heat shock proteins, P450s, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), glutathione S-transferase (GST), NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1, (NQO1), kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1), IκB kinase (IKK), and arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR)], and DNA. The evidence strongly suggests that the numerous mechanisms of quinone modulations (i.e., alkylation versus oxidative stress) can be correlated with the known pathology/cytoprotection of the parent compound(s) that is best described by an inverse U-shaped dose–response curve. PMID:27617882

  16. Pattern Formation in Keller-Segel Chemotaxis Models with Logistic Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Ling; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Zengyan

    In this paper, we investigate pattern formation in Keller-Segel chemotaxis models over a multidimensional bounded domain subject to homogeneous Neumann boundary conditions. It is shown that the positive homogeneous steady state loses its stability as chemoattraction rate χ increases. Then using Crandall-Rabinowitz local theory with χ being the bifurcation parameter, we obtain the existence of nonhomogeneous steady states of the system which bifurcate from this homogeneous steady state. Stability of the bifurcating solutions is also established through rigorous and detailed calculations. Our results provide a selection mechanism of stable wavemode which states that the only stable bifurcation branch must have a wavemode number that minimizes the bifurcation value. Finally, we perform extensive numerical simulations on the formation of stable steady states with striking structures such as boundary spikes, interior spikes, stripes, etc. These nontrivial patterns can model cellular aggregation that develop through chemotactic movements in biological systems.

  17. Spatial Pattern of Biological Soil Crust with Fractal Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospina, Abelardo; Florentino, Adriana; Tarquis, Ana M.

    2015-04-01

    Soil surface characteristics are subjected to changes driven by several interactions between water, air, biotic and abiotic components. One of the examples of such interactions is provided through biological soil crusts (BSC) in arid and semi-arid environments. BSC are communities composed of cyanobacteria, fungi, mosses, lichens, algae and liverworts covering the soil surface and play an important role in ecosystem functioning. The characteristics and formation of these BSC influence the soil hydrological balance, control the mass of eroded sediment, increase stability of soil surface, and influence plant productivity through the modification of nitrogen and carbon cycle. This study focus on characterize the spatial arrangements of the BSC based on image analysis and fractal concepts. To this end, RGB images of different types of biological soil crust where taken, each image corresponding to an area of 3.6 cm2 with a resolution of 1024x1024 pixels. For each image and channel, mass dimension and entropy were calculated. Preliminary results indicate that fractal methods are useful to describe changes associated to different types of BSC. Further research is necessary to apply these methodologies to several situations.

  18. Integration and macroevolutionary patterns in the pollination biology of conifers.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Andrew B; Beaulieu, Jeremy M; Crane, Peter R; Knopf, Patrick; Donoghue, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    Integration influences patterns of trait evolution, but the relationship between these patterns and the degree of trait integration is not well understood. To explore this further, we study a specialized pollination mechanism in conifers whose traits are linked through function but not development. This mechanism depends on interactions among three characters: pollen that is buoyant, ovules that face downward at pollination, and the production of a liquid droplet that buoyant grains float through to enter the ovule. We use a well-sampled phylogeny of conifers to test correlated evolution among these characters and specific sequences of character change. Using likelihood models of character evolution, we find that pollen morphology and ovule characters evolve in a concerted manner, where the flotation mechanism breaks down irreversibly following changes in orientation or drop production. The breakdown of this functional constraint, which may be facilitated by the lack of developmental integration among the constituent traits, is associated with increased trait variation and more diverse pollination strategies. Although this functional "release" increases diversity in some ways, the irreversible way in which the flotation mechanism is lost may eventually result in its complete disappearance from seed plant reproductive biology.

  19. Biological Processes Related to Serpentinization: Expected vs Observed Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardace, D.

    2015-12-01

    Serpentinization is a water-rock reaction that drives the evolution of micro- to mega-scale habitability in ultramafic rocks, through the aqueous alteration of olivine and pyroxene in parent rocks, and the production of H2, CH4, and (possibly) biologically useful organic compounds. This process may pervade extensive areas of silicate planetary bodies, in geologic settings as diverse as cratered fracture zones and fault systems in ultramafic rocks, hydrothermal flow systems operating near crust/mantle interfaces, and deep subsurface groundwater flow systems. Serpentinization causes transformations in mineralogy, rock geochemistry, and co-occurring associated water chemistry that together control the feasibilities of prominent microbial metabolisms. Changing activities of aqueous H2, CH4, CO2, CO, organic acids, H+, and other redox-sensitive dissolved species shift the metabolic landscape in serpentinites in predictable ways, providing expected patterns in community metabolic strategies. I discuss emerging patterns in observations from terrestrial sites of serpentinization, marine and continent-hosted, and consider how they may allow testing of some pertinent hypotheses in geomicrobiology in terrestrial and extraterrestrial settings.

  20. The Formation and Biological Significance of N7-Guanine Adducts

    PubMed Central

    Boysen, Gunnar; Pachkowski, Brian F.; Nakamura, Jun; Swenberg, James A

    2009-01-01

    DNA alkylation or adduct formation occurs at nucleophilic sites in DNA, mainly the N7-position of guanine. Ever since identification of the first N7-guanine adduct, several hundred studies on DNA adducts have been reported. Major issues addressed include the relationships between N7-guanine adducts and exposure, mutagenesis, and other biological endpoints. It became quickly apparent that N7-guanine adducts are frequently formed, but may have minimal biological relevance, since they are chemically unstable and do not participate in Watson Crick base pairing. However, N7-guanine adducts have been shown to be excellent biomarkers for internal exposure to direct acting and metabolically activated carcinogens. Questions arise, however, regarding the biological significance for N7-guanine adducts that are readily formed, do not persist, and are not likely to be mutagenic. Thus, we set out to review the current literature to evaluate their formation and the mechanistic evidence for the involvement of N7-guanine adducts in mutagenesis or other biological processes. It was concluded that there is insufficient evidence that N7-guanine adducts can be used beyond confirmation of exposure to the target tissue and demonstration of the molecular dose. There is little to no evidence that N7-guanine adducts or their depurination product, apurinic sites, are the cause of mutations in cells and tissues, since increases in AP sites have not been shown unless toxicity is extant. However, more research is needed to define the extent of chemical depurination versus removal by DNA repair proteins. Interestingly, N7-guanine adducts are clearly present as endogenous background adducts and the endogenous background amounts appear to increase with age. Furthermore, the N7-guanine adducts have been shown to convert to ring opened lesions (FAPy), which are much more persistent and have higher mutagenic potency. Studies in humans are limited in sample size and differences between controls and

  1. Modeling parr-mark pattern formation during the early development of Amago trout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataraman, Chandrasekhar; Sekimura, Toshio; Gaffney, Eamonn A.; Maini, Philip K.; Madzvamuse, Anotida

    2011-10-01

    This paper studies the formation of the large dark patterns, known as parr marks, that form on the Amago trout as it grows from the early larval stages to adulthood. The Amago trout, known as Oncorhynchus masou ishikawa, exhibits stripes during the early stages of development that in turn evolve (through reorientation and peak insertion) to form zigzag spot patterns as the fish grows to adulthood. By considering a standard representation of the Turing model for biological self-organization via interacting and diffusing morphogens, we illustrate that a diffusively driven instability can generate transient patterns consistent with those experimentally observed during the process of parr-mark formation in the early development of the Amago trout. Surface evolution is modeled through an experimentally driven growth function. Our studies conclude that the surface evolution profile, the surface geometry, and the curvature are key factors that play a pivotal role in reaction-diffusion systems in a study motivated by observations of Amago trout parr-mark pattern formation.

  2. Fractal pattern formation in metallic ink sessile droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadj-Achour, Miloud; Brutin, David

    2014-11-01

    We report a fingering instability that occurs during the spreading and evaporation of a nanosuspension droplet. The patterns has a fractal structure similar to those reported by N. Shahidzadeh-Bonn et al. (2008) for salt crystallisation, during evaporation of saturated Na2SO4 on a hydrophilic surface. The fingering instability has been widely studied for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. However, we describe for the first time that a fingering instability is observed for the spreading of a nanosuspension sessile droplet. We demonstrate that in certain cases, the contact line evolves through different spreading regimes according to J. De Coninck et al. (2001) with an enhancement in the evaporation rate due the formation of the fractal patterns.

  3. Pattern formation in diffusive excitable systems under magnetic flow effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mvogo, Alain; Takembo, Clovis N.; Ekobena Fouda, H. P.; Kofané, Timoléon C.

    2017-07-01

    We study the spatiotemporal formation of patterns in a diffusive FitzHugh-Nagumo network where the effect of electromagnetic induction has been introduced in the standard mathematical model by using magnetic flux, and the modulation of magnetic flux on membrane potential is realized by using memristor coupling. We use the multi-scale expansion to show that the system equations can be reduced to a single differential-difference nonlinear equation. The linear stability analysis is performed and discussed with emphasis on the impact of magnetic flux. It is observed that the effect of memristor coupling importantly modifies the features of modulational instability. Our analytical results are supported by the numerical experiments, which reveal that the improved model can lead to nonlinear quasi-periodic spatiotemporal patterns with some features of synchronization. It is observed also the generation of pulses and rhythmics behaviors like breathing or swimming which are important in brain researches.

  4. Pattern formation in transparent media using ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, J.; Bernard, R.; Alti, K.; Dharmadhikari, A. K.; Dharmadhikari, J. A.; Bhatnagar, A.; Santhosh, C.; Mathur, D.

    2013-09-01

    We report results of a systematic study of the morphology of laser-written structures within transparent media like fused silica, borosilicate glass (BK7), and polymethylmethylacrylate (PMMA) using a high-energy, 5.1 MHz repetition rate, femtosecond laser oscillator. Depending on experimental conditions, both smooth channels as well as dot patterns can be laser-written. The periodicity of the written dots is readily controlled by the energy dose, a single parameter that encompasses laser energy, translation speed at fixed repetition rate, and focusing conditions. We discover the importance of the direction in which laser-writing is carried out: the periodicity of the dot patterns written at fixed energy dose but with opposite writing directions is significantly different. In PMMA, extremely large rod-like structures (˜200 µm) are observed whose formation is also dependent on writing direction. We quantify guidance of 632 nm and 830 nm light in structures written in BK7.

  5. The theory of pattern formation on directed networks.

    PubMed

    Asllani, Malbor; Challenger, Joseph D; Pavone, Francesco Saverio; Sacconi, Leonardo; Fanelli, Duccio

    2014-07-31

    Dynamical processes on networks have generated widespread interest in recent years. The theory of pattern formation in reaction-diffusion systems defined on symmetric networks has often been investigated, due to its applications in a wide range of disciplines. Here we extend the theory to the case of directed networks, which are found in a number of different fields, such as neuroscience, computer networks and traffic systems. Owing to the structure of the network Laplacian, the dispersion relation has both real and imaginary parts, at variance with the case for a symmetric, undirected network. The homogeneous fixed point can become unstable due to the topology of the network, resulting in a new class of instabilities, which cannot be induced on undirected graphs. Results from a linear stability analysis allow the instability region to be analytically traced. Numerical simulations show travelling waves, or quasi-stationary patterns, depending on the characteristics of the underlying graph.

  6. The role of auxin signaling in early embryo pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Smit, Margot E; Weijers, Dolf

    2015-12-01

    Pattern formation of the early Arabidopsis embryo generates precursors to all major cell types, and is profoundly controlled by the signaling molecule auxin. Here we discuss recent milestones in our understanding of auxin-dependent embryo patterning. Auxin biosynthesis, transport and response mechanisms interact to generate local auxin accumulation in the early embryo. New auxin-dependent reporters help identifying these sites, while atomic structures of transcriptional response mediators help explain the diverse outputs of auxin signaling. Key auxin outputs are control of cell identity and cell division orientation, and progress has been made towards understanding the cellular basis of each. Importantly, a number of studies have combined computational modeling and experiments to analyze the developmental role, genetic circuitry and molecular mechanisms of auxin-dependent cell division control.

  7. Biological Dynamics Markup Language (BDML): an open format for representing quantitative biological dynamics data

    PubMed Central

    Kyoda, Koji; Tohsato, Yukako; Ho, Kenneth H. L.; Onami, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Recent progress in live-cell imaging and modeling techniques has resulted in generation of a large amount of quantitative data (from experimental measurements and computer simulations) on spatiotemporal dynamics of biological objects such as molecules, cells and organisms. Although many research groups have independently dedicated their efforts to developing software tools for visualizing and analyzing these data, these tools are often not compatible with each other because of different data formats. Results: We developed an open unified format, Biological Dynamics Markup Language (BDML; current version: 0.2), which provides a basic framework for representing quantitative biological dynamics data for objects ranging from molecules to cells to organisms. BDML is based on Extensible Markup Language (XML). Its advantages are machine and human readability and extensibility. BDML will improve the efficiency of development and evaluation of software tools for data visualization and analysis. Availability and implementation: A specification and a schema file for BDML are freely available online at http://ssbd.qbic.riken.jp/bdml/. Contact: sonami@riken.jp Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25414366

  8. Biological Dynamics Markup Language (BDML): an open format for representing quantitative biological dynamics data.

    PubMed

    Kyoda, Koji; Tohsato, Yukako; Ho, Kenneth H L; Onami, Shuichi

    2015-04-01

    Recent progress in live-cell imaging and modeling techniques has resulted in generation of a large amount of quantitative data (from experimental measurements and computer simulations) on spatiotemporal dynamics of biological objects such as molecules, cells and organisms. Although many research groups have independently dedicated their efforts to developing software tools for visualizing and analyzing these data, these tools are often not compatible with each other because of different data formats. We developed an open unified format, Biological Dynamics Markup Language (BDML; current version: 0.2), which provides a basic framework for representing quantitative biological dynamics data for objects ranging from molecules to cells to organisms. BDML is based on Extensible Markup Language (XML). Its advantages are machine and human readability and extensibility. BDML will improve the efficiency of development and evaluation of software tools for data visualization and analysis. A specification and a schema file for BDML are freely available online at http://ssbd.qbic.riken.jp/bdml/. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  9. Weekly Formative Exams and Creative Grading Enhance Student Learning in an Introductory Biology Course.

    PubMed

    Bailey, E G; Jensen, J; Nelson, J; Wiberg, H K; Bell, J D

    2017-01-01

    First-year students often become discouraged during introductory biology courses when repeated attempts to understand concepts nevertheless result in poor test scores. This challenge is exacerbated by traditional course structures that impose premature judgments on students' achievements. Repeated testing has been shown to benefit student ability to recognize and recall information, but an effective means to similarly facilitate skill with higher-order problems in introductory courses is needed. Here, we show that an innovative format that uses a creative grading scheme together with weekly formative midterm exams produced significant gains in student success with difficult items requiring analysis and interpretation. This format is designed to promote tenacity and avoid discouragement by providing multiple opportunities to attempt demanding problems on exams, detailed immediate feedback, and strong incentives to retain hope and improve. Analysis of individual performance trajectories with heat maps reveals the diversity of learning patterns and provides rational means for advising students. © 2017 E. G. Bailey et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2017 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  10. Pattern formation in reverse smouldering combustion: a homogenisation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland Ijioma, Ekeoma; Muntean, Adrian; Ogawa, Toshiyuki

    2013-04-01

    The development of fingering char patterns on the surface of porous thin materials has been investigated in the framework of reverse combustion. This macroscopic characteristic feature of combustible media has also been studied experimentally and through the use of phenomenological models. However, not much attention has been given to the behaviour of the emerging patterns based on characteristic material properties. Starting from a microscopic description of the combustion process, macroscopic models of reverse combustion that are derived by the application of the homogenisation technique are presented. Using proper scaling by means of a small scale parameter ɛ, the results of the formal asymptotic procedure are justified by qualitative multiscale numerical simulations at the microscopic and macroscopic levels. We consider two equilibrium models that are based on effective conductivity contrasts, in a simple adiabatic situation, to investigate the formation of unstable fingering patterns on the surface of a charred material. The behaviour of the emerging patterns is analysed using primarily the Péclet and Lewis numbers as control parameters.

  11. The physics of pattern formation at liquid interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Maher, J.V.

    1992-06-01

    During the past year we have submitted six papers for publication, three related to the dynamics of macroscopic interfaces, and ultimately all related to solidification, and three related to the internal structure of disorderly materials, with possible applications to the processing of composite materials. In addition to completing all these projects during the past year, we have begun two new projects, one on pattern formation and one on aggregation within a composite system. A brief description is given of this research in this paper.

  12. Growth Anisotropy and Pattern Formation in Metal Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorritsma, Louis C.; Bijnagte, Matthieu; Rosenfeld, Georg; Poelsema, Bene

    1997-02-01

    Evidence for the formation of growth induced, ordered checkerboardlike arrangements of mesas has been obtained. These patterns develop on a metal substrate with square symmetry after deposition of tens of monolayers. Its origin is traced back to laterally anisotropic advance rates of island edges in combination with slope selection. The foundation for the mesa arrangement is already laid just after coalescence of the adatom islands in the first monolayer. The results are exemplified in a high resolution surface diffraction study for the growth of Cu on Cu(001).

  13. Pattern formation and mixing in three-dimensional film flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heining, C.; Pollak, T.; Aksel, N.

    2012-04-01

    The effect of inertia on gravity-driven free surface flow over different three-dimensional periodic corrugations is considered analytically, numerically and experimentally. In the case of high bottom amplitudes, compared to the film thickness, the results predict complex free surface structures especially in cases where the topography is not fully flooded by the liquid film. The investigation of the flow field shows a rich variety of pattern formation phenomena depending on the interplay between the geometry of the topography and the inertia of the film. Finally, we show how the complex topographical structure enhances the laminar mixing within the film.

  14. Pattern formation in granular binary mixtures under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin; Narteau, Clement; Rozier, Olivier

    2013-04-01

    We study numerically the formation and evolution of bed forms using a binary granular mixture. The two types of particles may have different dynamic properties and angle of repose. We associate these changes to two different grain sizes, the so-called coarse and thin particles. Our computation are based on a real-space cellular automaton that combines a model of sediment transport with a lattice-gas cellular automaton. Thus, we implement the permanent feedbacks between fluid flow and topography. Keeping constant the strength of the flow, we explore a parameter-space by varying the size of the coarse particles and their proportion within the bed. As a result of avalanches and sediment transport, we systematically find regions of segregation and stratification. In a vast majority of cases, we also observe the formation of an armoring layer mainly composed of coarse particles. Its depth is mainly controlled by the proportion of coarse grains and not by the size of these larger particles. When there is a larger proportion of thin particles, transverse dunes develop on the top of the armoring layer. As this proportion decreases, we may observe barchans or even no clear bed forms. We conclude that the main control parameter for dune pattern formation is the thin sediment availability. Finally, we discuss the processes responsible for the formation of the armoring layer and show how it controls the overall sediment transport.

  15. The Developmental Genetics of Vertebrate Color Pattern Formation: Lessons from Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Irion, Uwe; Singh, Ajeet Pratap; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    Color patterns are prominent features of many animals; they are highly variable and evolve rapidly leading to large diversities even within a single genus. As targets for natural as well as sexual selection, they are of high evolutionary significance. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) has become an important model organism for developmental biology and biomedical research in general, and it is the model organism to study color pattern formation in vertebrates. The fish display a conspicuous pattern of alternating blue and golden stripes on the body and on the anal and tail fins. This pattern is produced by three different types of pigment cells (chromatophores) arranged in precise layers in the hypodermis of the fish. In this essay, we will summarize the recent advances in understanding the developmental and genetic basis for stripe formation in the zebrafish. We will describe the cellular events leading to the formation of stripes during metamorphosis based on long-term lineage imaging. Mutant analysis has revealed that a number of signaling pathways are involved in the establishment and maintenance of the individual pigment cells. However, the striped pattern itself is generated by self-organizing mechanisms requiring interactions between all three pigment cell types. The involvement of integral membrane proteins, including connexins and potassium channels, suggests that direct physical contacts between chromatophores are involved, and that the directed transport of small molecules or bioelectrical coupling is important for these interactions. This mode of patterning by transmitting spatial information between adjacent tissues within three superimposed cell layers is unprecedented in other developmental systems. We propose that variations in the patterns among Danio species are caused by allelic differences in the genes responsible for these interactions. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Formation of Arbitrary Patterns in Ultraviolet Cured Polymer Film via Electrohydrodynamic Patterning

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Electrohydrodynamic patterning of arbitrary patterns is achieved by optimizing the critical parameters (applied voltage and spacer height). The applied voltage has a great influence on the fidelity of L-shaped line structures with different sizes. The L-shaped line structures with high fidelity are obtained by using the moderate applied voltage. The spacer height has a great influence on the fidelity of square structures with different sizes. The square structures with high fidelity are obtained by using the low height spacer. The multi-field coupling transient finite element simulation demonstrates that the lack of polymer owing to the high height spacer leads to the formation of defects. PMID:24723831

  17. Symmetries and pattern formation in hyperbolic versus parabolic models of self-organised aggregation.

    PubMed

    Buono, Pietro-Luciano; Eftimie, Raluca

    2015-10-01

    The study of self-organised collective animal behaviour, such as swarms of insects or schools of fish, has become over the last decade a very active research area in mathematical biology. Parabolic and hyperbolic models have been used intensively to describe the formation and movement of various aggregative behaviours. While both types of models can exhibit aggregation-type patterns, studies on hyperbolic models suggest that these models can display a larger variety of spatial and spatio-temporal patterns compared to their parabolic counterparts. Here we use stability, symmetry and bifurcation theory to investigate this observation more rigorously, an approach not attempted before to compare and contrast aggregation patterns in models for collective animal behaviors. To this end, we consider a class of nonlocal hyperbolic models for self-organised aggregations that incorporate various inter-individual communication mechanisms, and take the formal parabolic limit to transform them into nonlocal parabolic models. We then discuss the symmetry of these nonlocal hyperbolic and parabolic models, and the types of bifurcations present or lost when taking the parabolic limit. We show that the parabolic limit leads to a homogenisation of the inter-individual communication, and to a loss of bifurcation dynamics (in particular loss of Hopf bifurcations). This explains the less rich patterns exhibited by the nonlocal parabolic models. However, for multiple interacting populations, by breaking the population interchange symmetry of the model, one can preserve the Hopf bifurcations that lead to the formation of complex spatio-temporal patterns that describe moving aggregations.

  18. DTW4Omics: comparing patterns in biological time series.

    PubMed

    Cavill, Rachel; Kleinjans, Jos; Briedé, Jacob-Jan

    2013-01-01

    When studying time courses of biological measurements and comparing these to other measurements eg. gene expression and phenotypic endpoints, the analysis is complicated by the fact that although the associated elements may show the same patterns of behaviour, the changes do not occur simultaneously. In these cases standard correlation-based measures of similarity will fail to find significant associations. Dynamic time warping (DTW) is a technique which can be used in these situations to find the optimal match between two time courses, which may then be assessed for its significance. We implement DTW4Omics, a tool for performing DTW in R. This tool extends existing R scripts for DTW making them applicable for "omics" datasets where thousands entities may need to be compared with a range of markers and endpoints. It includes facilities to estimate the significance of the matches between the supplied data, and provides a set of plots to enable the user to easily visualise the output. We illustrate the utility of this approach using a dataset linking the exposure of the colon carcinoma Caco-2 cell line to oxidative stress by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and menadione across 9 timepoints and show that on average 85% of the genes found are not obtained from a standard correlation analysis between the genes and the measured phenotypic endpoints. We then show that when we analyse the genes identified by DTW4Omics as significantly associated with a marker for oxidative DNA damage (8-oxodG), through over-representation, an Oxidative Stress pathway is identified as the most over-represented pathway demonstrating that the genes found by DTW4Omics are biologically relevant. In contrast, when the positively correlated genes were similarly analysed, no pathways were found. The tool is implemented as an R Package and is available, along with a user guide from http://web.tgx.unimaas.nl/svn/public/dtw/.

  19. G-jitter Effects on Transport and Pattern Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatz, Michael F.

    2003-01-01

    The research performed under this grant has led to an number of new insights into two general categories of fluid flows in the presence of time-dependent acceleration, as outlined briefly below. These results have been widely communicated in the scientific community through seven presentations at international conferences (4 invited, 3 contributed), five published papers (4 journal articles and 1 conference proceeding), and images from the research featured on the cover of all 2003 editions of the research journal, Nonlinearity. The work performed under this proposal also contained a substantial educational component by contributed significantly to the scientific training of one postdoctoral associate, one Ph.D. student and five undergraduate researchers. One main area of focus in this research was convective flow with time-dependent acceleration. Convection is one class of behavior that can arise from g-jitter effects. Our research focused on studies of Rayleigh-Benard system, which is an important model for understanding thermal convection; studies of this problem in the presence of acceleration modulations provided insight into the nature of g-jitter induced flow and of the effects of modulation and noise on non-equilibrium pattern formation. Our experiments on vertically vibrated Rayleigh-Benard convection demonstrated the existence of two classes of pure flow patterns (synchronous & subharmonic) patterns) that had long been predicted by theory but never before observed experimentally. Detailed studies of ranges of parameters where both classes of patterns exist simultaneously led to the discovery of a new type of patterns (called superlattices) in systems driven out of thermodynamic equilibrium.

  20. Biology of Bone Formation, Fracture Healing, and Distraction Osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Runyan, Christopher M; Gabrick, Kyle S

    2017-07-01

    Distraction osteogenesis is a bone-regenerative process in which an osteotomy is followed by distraction of the surrounding vascularized bone segments, with formation of new bone within the distraction gap. Distraction osteogenesis is efficacious for reconstructing critical sized bony defects in the appendicular and craniofacial skeleton. To provide opportunity to expand applications of distraction osteogenesis, it is important to have a thorough understanding of the underlying molecular biology and physiology of bone development and fracture healing. To accomplish these objectives a review of the literature was performed using search terms "endochondral ossification, intramembranous ossification, craniofacial skeleton, appendicular skeleton, fracture healing, bone development, and distraction osteogenesis." Bones of the craniofacial and appendicular skeleton have distinct mechanisms of embryonic development. The former develops from growth centers of mesenchymal precursors through intramembranous ossification. The latter forms though endochondral ossification in growth plates. However, both endochondral and intramembranous bone share similar master regulatory transcription factors and downstream growth factors. Fracture healing mirrors the pathway by which these bones developed embryonically. In contrast, bone formed by distraction osteogenesis does so by intramembranous ossification, regardless of whether it occurs within the appendicular or craniofacial skeleton. Understanding molecular pathway differences between bone formation by these mechanisms may allow for optimization and expansion of skeletal reconstruction by distraction osteogenesis.

  1. Predicting Bed Pattern Formation at Duck, North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, N.; van Leeuwen, S. M.; Calvete, D.; Tiessen, M.; Falques, A.

    2006-12-01

    The many field campaigns over the last twenty years have given us great insight into natural beach change. The advent of ARGUS imaging techniques has further contributed enormously to our knowledge of morphological pattern formation, such as cusps, mega-cusps, and transverse, oblique and crescentic bars. More recently work on understanding the physics of the formation of such morphodynamical features has led to the development of stability models, which have yielded insight into the initial growth, and the kinematics of these bed-forms. In this presentation we shall discuss the application of such a model (MORFO60: see Calvete et al, 2005) to observations from Duck, North Carolina. Initial results over about 5 months of data from Duck indicate that results (migration rates, and pattern spacings) are consistent with observations, and that meaningful predictions cluster around periods of high wave energy. Simulations for the whole of 1998 are presently underway. The purpose is to test the viability of the approach under field conditions.

  2. Pattern formation of Rho GTPases in single cell wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Cory M.; Vaughan, Emily M.; Bement, William M.; Edelstein-Keshet, Leah

    2013-01-01

    The Rho GTPases—Rho, Rac, and Cdc42—control an enormous variety of processes, many of which reflect activation of these GTPases in spatially confined and mutually exclusive zones. By using mathematical models and experimental results to establish model parameters, we analyze the formation and segregation of Rho and Cdc42 zones during Xenopus oocyte wound repair and the role played by Abr, a dual guanine nucleotide exchange factor–GTPase-activating protein, in this process. The Rho and Cdc42 zones are found to be best represented as manifestations of spatially modulated bistability, and local positive feedback between Abr and Rho can account for the maintenance and dynamic properties of the Rho zone. In contrast, the invocation of an Abr-independent positive feedback loop is required to account for Cdc42 spatial bistability. In addition, the model replicates the results of previous in vivo experiments in which Abr activity is manipulated. Further, simulating the model with two closely spaced wounds made nonintuitive predictions about the Rho and Cdc42 patterns; these predictions were confirmed by experiment. We conclude that the model is a useful tool for analysis of Rho GTPase signaling and that the Rho GTPases can be fruitfully considered as components of intracellular pattern formation systems. PMID:23264464

  3. Principles of branch formation and branch patterning in Hydrozoa.

    PubMed

    Berking, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    The freshwater polyp Hydra produces buds which separate from the parent. Other Hydrozoa produce branches which remain connected to the parent, thus forming a colony. Some Hydrozoa grow by means of an organ that is like a shoot apical meristem. Others display a sympodial type of growth. In this article, I propose that these different types of branches are organized by a common pattern-forming system. This system has self-organizing properties. It causes branch tip formation and is kept active in the tip when the tip finally differentiates into a hypostome of a polyp. The system does not cause structure formation directly but rather, determines a tissue property called positional value, in such a way that a gradient of values forms in the tissue of the bud or branch. The local value determines the local morphodynamic processes, including differentiation of the hypostome (highest positional value), tentacles and basal disc and of the exoskeleton pattern along the shoot. A high positional value favors the onset of a new self-organizing process and by lateral inhibition, such a process prevents the initiation of a further process in its surroundings. Small quantitative differences in the range of the signals involved determine whether a bud or a branch forms and whether monopodial and sympodial growth follows.

  4. Formamidopyrimidines in DNA: mechanisms of formation, repair, and biological effects.

    PubMed

    Dizdaroglu, Miral; Kirkali, Güldal; Jaruga, Pawel

    2008-12-15

    Oxidatively induced damage to DNA results in a plethora of lesions comprising modified bases and sugars, DNA-protein cross-links, tandem lesions, strand breaks, and clustered lesions. Formamidopyrimidines, 4,6-diamino-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyAde) and 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyGua), are among the major lesions generated in DNA by hydroxyl radical attack, UV radiation, or photosensitization under numerous in vitro and in vivo conditions. They are formed by one-electron reduction of C8-OH-adduct radicals of purines and thus have a common precursor with 8-hydroxypurines generated upon one-electron oxidation. Methodologies using mass spectrometry exist to accurately measure FapyAde and FapyGua in vitro and in vivo. Formamidopyrimidines are repaired by base excision repair. Numerous prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA glycosylases are highly specific for removal of these lesions from DNA in the first step of this repair pathway, indicating their biological importance. FapyAde and FapyGua are bypassed by DNA polymerases with the insertion of the wrong intact base opposite them, leading to mutagenesis. In mammalian cells, the mutagenicity of FapyGua exceeds that of 8-hydroxyguanine, which is thought to be the most mutagenic of the oxidatively induced lesions in DNA. The background and formation levels of the former in vitro and in vivo equal or exceed those of the latter under various conditions. FapyAde and FapyGua exist in living cells at significant background levels and are abundantly generated upon exposure to oxidative stress. Mice lacking the genes that encode specific DNA glycosylases accumulate these lesions in different organs and, in some cases, exhibit a series of pathological conditions including metabolic syndrome and cancer. Animals exposed to environmental toxins accumulate formamidopyrimidines in their organs. Here, we extensively review the mechanisms of formation, measurement, repair, and biological effects of formamidopyrimidines

  5. Probabilistic Analysis of Pattern Formation in Monotonic Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Tyler G.; Garzon, Max H.; Deaton, Russell J.

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by biological systems, self-assembly aims to construct complex structures. It functions through piece-wise, local interactions among component parts and has the potential to produce novel materials and devices at the nanoscale. Algorithmic self-assembly models the product of self-assembly as the output of some computational process, and attempts to control the process of assembly algorithmically. Though providing fundamental insights, these computational models have yet to fully account for the randomness that is inherent in experimental realizations, which tend to be based on trial and error methods. In order to develop a method of analysis that addresses experimental parameters, such as error and yield, this work focuses on the capability of assembly systems to produce a pre-determined set of target patterns, either accurately or perhaps only approximately. Self-assembly systems that assemble patterns that are similar to the targets in a significant percentage are “strong” assemblers. In addition, assemblers should predominantly produce target patterns, with a small percentage of errors or junk. These definitions approximate notions of yield and purity in chemistry and manufacturing. By combining these definitions, a criterion for efficient assembly is developed that can be used to compare the ability of different assembly systems to produce a given target set. Efficiency is a composite measure of the accuracy and purity of an assembler. Typical examples in algorithmic assembly are assessed in the context of these metrics. In addition to validating the method, they also provide some insight that might be used to guide experimentation. Finally, some general results are established that, for efficient assembly, imply that every target pattern is guaranteed to be assembled with a minimum common positive probability, regardless of its size, and that a trichotomy exists to characterize the global behavior of typical efficient, monotonic self

  6. Probabilistic Analysis of Pattern Formation in Monotonic Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Moore, Tyler G; Garzon, Max H; Deaton, Russell J

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by biological systems, self-assembly aims to construct complex structures. It functions through piece-wise, local interactions among component parts and has the potential to produce novel materials and devices at the nanoscale. Algorithmic self-assembly models the product of self-assembly as the output of some computational process, and attempts to control the process of assembly algorithmically. Though providing fundamental insights, these computational models have yet to fully account for the randomness that is inherent in experimental realizations, which tend to be based on trial and error methods. In order to develop a method of analysis that addresses experimental parameters, such as error and yield, this work focuses on the capability of assembly systems to produce a pre-determined set of target patterns, either accurately or perhaps only approximately. Self-assembly systems that assemble patterns that are similar to the targets in a significant percentage are "strong" assemblers. In addition, assemblers should predominantly produce target patterns, with a small percentage of errors or junk. These definitions approximate notions of yield and purity in chemistry and manufacturing. By combining these definitions, a criterion for efficient assembly is developed that can be used to compare the ability of different assembly systems to produce a given target set. Efficiency is a composite measure of the accuracy and purity of an assembler. Typical examples in algorithmic assembly are assessed in the context of these metrics. In addition to validating the method, they also provide some insight that might be used to guide experimentation. Finally, some general results are established that, for efficient assembly, imply that every target pattern is guaranteed to be assembled with a minimum common positive probability, regardless of its size, and that a trichotomy exists to characterize the global behavior of typical efficient, monotonic self-assembly systems

  7. Micron-scale pattern formation in prestressed polygonal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annabattula, R. K.; Onck, P. R.

    2011-02-01

    In this paper we explore the spontaneous formation of micropatterns in thin prestressed polygonal films using finite element simulations. We study films with different size, thickness, and shape, including square, rectangular, pentagonal, and hexagonal films. Patterns form when the films release the internal eigenstrain by buckling-up, after which the films bond-back to the substrate. After an initial symmetric evolution of the buckling profile, the symmetry of the deflection pattern breaks when the wavelength of wriggles near the film edges decreases. During bond back the deflection morphology converges to a fourfold, fivefold, and sixfold ridging pattern for the square, pentagonal and hexagonal films, respectively, showing a close resemblance with experimental film systems of similar size and shape. Rectangular films of large length to width ratio go through a transition in buckling shapes from the initial Euler mode, through the varicose mode into the antisymmetric telephone-cord mode. For all the film shapes, the ratio of the film height to the effective film width scales with the square root of eigenstrain and is independent of thickness. The bond-back mechanism determines the final wrinkle morphology and is governed by the eigenstrain value at the end of the buckling-up stage and the dimensionless parameter (Γ /EWeq)(Weq/t)3, relating the interface energy to the strain energy in the film.

  8. One-dimensional daisyworld: spatial interactions and pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Adams, B; Carr, J; Lenton, T M; White, A

    2003-08-21

    The zero-dimensional daisyworld model of Watson and Lovelock (1983) demonstrates that life can unconsciously regulate a global environment. Here that model is extended to one dimension, incorporating a distribution of incoming solar radiation and diffusion of heat consistent with a spherical planet. Global regulatory properties of the original model are retained. The daisy populations are initially restricted to hospitable regions of the surface but exert both global and local feedback to increase this habitable area, eventually colonizing the whole surface. The introduction of heat diffusion destabilizes the coexistence equilibrium of the two daisy types. In response, a striped pattern consisting of blocks of all black or all white daisies emerges. There are two mechanisms behind this pattern formation. Both are connected to the stability of the system and an overview of the mathematics involved is presented. Numerical experiments show that this pattern is globally determined. Perturbations in one region have an impact over the whole surface but the regulatory properties of the system are not compromised by transient perturbations. The relevance of these results to the Earth and the wider climate modelling field is discussed.

  9. Territorial pattern formation in the absence of an attractive potential.

    PubMed

    Potts, Jonathan R; Lewis, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    Territoriality is a phenomenon exhibited throughout nature. On the individual level, it is the processes by which organisms exclude others of the same species from certain parts of space. On the population level, it is the segregation of space into separate areas, each used by subsections of the population. Proving mathematically that such individual-level processes can cause observed population-level patterns to form is necessary for linking these two levels of description in a non-speculative way. Previous mathematical analysis has relied upon assuming animals are attracted to a central area. This can either be a fixed geographical point, such as a den- or nest-site, or a region where they have previously visited. However, recent simulation-based studies suggest that this attractive potential is not necessary for territorial pattern formation. Here, we construct a partial differential equation (PDE) model of territorial interactions based on the individual-based model (IBM) from those simulation studies. The resulting PDE does not rely on attraction to spatial locations, but purely on conspecific avoidance, mediated via scent-marking. We show analytically that steady-state patterns can form, as long as (i) the scent does not decay faster than it takes the animal to traverse the terrain, and (ii) the spatial scale over which animals detect scent is incorporated into the PDE. As part of the analysis, we develop a general method for taking the PDE limit of an IBM that avoids destroying any intrinsic spatial scale in the underlying behavioral decisions.

  10. The pollination biology of a pavement plain: pollinator visitation patterns.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Mary H

    1980-01-01

    The pollination biology of the 20 plant species of a treeless, pavement plain in the San Bernardino Mountains of southern California was studied throughout one flowering season.Several patterns of pollinator activity recorded during the season underline the necessity for noting the activity of all insect pollinators whether specialized, non-specialized, regular, or occasional: 1) Occasional insect visitors were a feature of the visitation to nine of the twelve entomophilous plant species and were the sole pollinators for three of these twelve species. 2) The eight entomophilous plant species which had open, generalized flower morphologies received the heaviest pollinator visitation, while three of the four entomophilous species with specialized flower morphologies received little visitation. 3) Most regular flower visitors, whether bees, flies, or wasps, appeared to be similar with respect to number of plant species visited regularly, purity of pollen load, length of residence and localization of activity on the site. The question is raised as to whether such similarity of behavior as pollen vectors is a function of the low plant diversity or a feature commonly found when the pollen loads and behavior of different pollinator types are actually monitored.

  11. Ising-like patterns of spatial synchrony in population biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Andrew; Hastings, Alan; Machta, Jon

    2014-03-01

    Systems of coupled dynamical oscillators can undergo a phase transition between synchronous and asynchronous phases. In the case of coupled map lattices, the spontaneous symmetry breaking of a temporal-phase order parameter is known to exhibit Ising-like critical behavior. Here, we investigate a noisy coupled map motivated by the study of spatial synchrony in ecological populations far from the extinction threshold. Ising-like patterns of criticality, as well as spinodal decomposition and homogeneous nucleation, emerge from the nonlinear interactions of environmental fluctuations in habitat quality, local density-dependence in reproduction, and dispersal. In the mean-field limit, the correspondence to the Ising model is exact: the fixed points of our dynamical system are given by the equation of state for Weiss mean-field theory under an appropriate mapping of parameters. We have strong evidence that a quantitative correspondence persists, both near and far from the critical point, in the presence of fluctuations. Our results provide a formal connection between equilibrium statistical physics and population biology. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1344187.

  12. Modeling and interpreting speckle pattern formation in swept-source optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, Valentin; Vitkin, I. Alex; Doronin, Alexander; Meglinski, Igor

    2017-03-01

    We report on the development of a unified Monte-Carlo based computational model for exploring speckle pattern formation in swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT). OCT is a well-established optical imaging modality capable of acquiring cross-sectional images of turbid media, including biological tissues, utilizing back scattered low coherence light. The obtained OCT images include characteristic features known as speckles. Currently, there is a growing interest to the OCT speckle patterns due to their potential application for quantitative analysis of medium's optical properties. Here we consider the mechanisms of OCT speckle patterns formation for swept-source OCT approaches and introduce further developments of a Monte-Carlo based model for simulation of OCT signals and images. The model takes into account polarization and coherent properties of light, mutual interference of back-scattering waves, and their interference with the reference waves. We present a corresponding detailed description of the algorithm for modeling these light-medium interactions. The developed model is employed for generation of swept-source OCT images, analysis of OCT speckle formation and interpretation of the experimental results. The obtained simulation results are compared with selected analytical solutions and experimental studies utilizing various sizes / concentrations of scattering microspheres.

  13. Pattern formation in granular binary mixtures under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X.; Narteau, C.; Rozier, O.

    2012-12-01

    Polydisperse granular materials are ubiquitous in the field of geomorphology. Nevertheless, it remains a challenge to address the impact of segregation, stratification and mixing on landscape dynamics and sediment transport. Here, we study numerically the formation and evolution of bed forms using a binary granular mixture. The two types of particles may have different dynamic properties and angle of repose. We associate these changes to two different grain sizes, the so-called coarse and thin particles. Our computation are based on a real-space cellular automaton that combines a model of sediment transport with a lattice-gas cellular automaton. Thus, we implement the permanent feedbacks between fluid flow and topography. Keeping constant the strength of the flow, we explore a parameter-space by varying the size of the coarse particles and their proportion within the bed. As a result of avalanches and sediment transport, we systematically find regions of segregation and stratification. In a vast majority of cases, we also observe the formation of an armoring layer mainly composed of coarse particles. Its depth is mainly controlled by the proportion of coarse grains and not by the size of these larger particles. When there is a larger proportion of thin particles, transverse dunes develop on the top of the armoring layer. As this proportion decreases, we may observe barchans or even no clear bed forms. Not surprisingly, we conclude that the main control parameter for dune pattern formation is the thin sediment availability. Finally, we discuss the processes responsible for the formation of the armoring layer and show how it controls the overall sediment transport.

  14. An Integrative Approach for Modeling and Simulation of Heterocyst Pattern Formation in Cyanobacteria Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Sánchez, Alejandro; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Falo, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Heterocyst differentiation in cyanobacteria filaments is one of the simplest examples of cellular differentiation and pattern formation in multicellular organisms. Despite of the many experimental studies addressing the evolution and sustainment of heterocyst patterns and the knowledge of the genetic circuit underlying the behavior of single cyanobacterium under nitrogen deprivation, there is still a theoretical gap connecting these two macroscopic and microscopic processes. As an attempt to shed light on this issue, here we explore heterocyst differentiation under the paradigm of systems biology. This framework allows us to formulate the essential dynamical ingredients of the genetic circuit of a single cyanobacterium into a set of differential equations describing the time evolution of the concentrations of the relevant molecular products. As a result, we are able to study the behavior of a single cyanobacterium under different external conditions, emulating nitrogen deprivation, and simulate the dynamics of cyanobacteria filaments by coupling their respective genetic circuits via molecular diffusion. These two ingredients allow us to understand the principles by which heterocyst patterns can be generated and sustained. In particular, our results point out that, by including both diffusion and noisy external conditions in the computational model, it is possible to reproduce the main features of the formation and sustainment of heterocyst patterns in cyanobacteria filaments as observed experimentally. Finally, we discuss the validity and possible improvements of the model. PMID:25816286

  15. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    PubMed Central

    Geslin, Pierre-Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Moreover, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics. PMID:26582248

  16. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    SciTech Connect

    Geslin, Pierre -Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-11-19

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Furthermore, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics.

  17. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    DOE PAGES

    Geslin, Pierre -Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; ...

    2015-11-19

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growthmore » of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Furthermore, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics.« less

  18. Pattern formation during mixing and segregation of flowing granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Guy; Shattuck, Mark

    1996-02-01

    Powder mixing plays an important role in a number of industries ranging from pharmaceuticals and food to ceramics and mining. Avalanches provide a mechanism for the stretching and folding needed to mix granular solids. However, unlike fluids, when particles dissimilar in size, density, or shape flow, they can spontaneously demix or segregate. Using magnetic resonance imaging, we track the transport of granular solids in a slowly rotating tube both with and without segregation effects. Compared with experiments in a 2-dimensional rotating disk partially filled with colored particles, the mixing kinematics and the granular pattern formation in a tube are changed by an axial flow instability. From simple physical principles we argue how size and density segregation mechanisms can be made to cancel, allowing good mixing of dissimilar particles, and we show experiments verifying this. Further experiments isolate the axial transport in the slowly rotating tube. Axial transport can appear faster with segregation than without.

  19. Mixing dynamics and pattern formation around flow stagnation points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Juan J.; Dentz, Marco

    2016-04-01

    We study the mixing of two reactive fluids in the presence of convective instabilities. Such system is characterized by the formation of unique porosity patterns and mixing dynamics linked to the evolution of vortices and stagnation points. Around them, the fluid-fluid interface is stretched and compressed, which enhances mixing and triggers chemical reactions, and the system can be analyzed using fluid deformation model. We consider velocity fields generated by a double gyre synthetic velocity field and Rayleigh-Bénard and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. The different flow structures can be visualized by the strain rate and the finite time Lyapunov exponents. We show that the mixing enhancement given by the scalar dissipation rate is controlled by the equilibrium between interface compression and diffusion, which depends on the velocity field configuration. Furthermore, we establish a quantitative relation between the mixing rate and the evolution of the potential energy of the fluid when convection is driven by density instabilities.

  20. Pattern formation induced by a differential shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stucchi, L.; Vasquez, Desiderio A.

    2013-02-01

    Fluid flow advecting one substance while others are immobilized can generate an instability in a homogeneous steady state of a reaction-diffusion-advection system. This differential-flow instability leads to the formation of steady spatial patterns in a moving reference frame. We study the effects of shear flow on this instability by considering two layers of fluid moving independently from each other, but allowing the substances to diffuse along and across the layers. We find that shear flow can generate instabilities even if the average flow velocity is zero for both substances. These instabilities are strongly dependent on which substance is advected by the shear flow. We explain these effects using the results of Taylor dispersion, where an effective diffusivity is enhanced by shear flow.

  1. Stochastic Simulations of Pattern Formation in Excitable Media

    PubMed Central

    Vigelius, Matthias; Meyer, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    We present a method for mesoscopic, dynamic Monte Carlo simulations of pattern formation in excitable reaction–diffusion systems. Using a two-level parallelization approach, our simulations cover the whole range of the parameter space, from the noise-dominated low-particle number regime to the quasi-deterministic high-particle number limit. Three qualitatively different case studies are performed that stand exemplary for the wide variety of excitable systems. We present mesoscopic stochastic simulations of the Gray-Scott model, of a simplified model for intracellular Ca oscillations and, for the first time, of the Oregonator model. We achieve simulations with up to particles. The software and the model files are freely available and researchers can use the models to reproduce our results or adapt and refine them for further exploration. PMID:22900025

  2. Modulational instability and pattern formation in discrete dissipative systems.

    PubMed

    Mohamadou, Alidou; Kofané, Timoléon Crépin

    2006-04-01

    We report in this paper the study of modulated wave trains in the one-dimensional (1D) discrete Ginzburg-Landau model. The full linear stability analysis of the nonlinear plane wave solutions is performed by considering both the wave vector (q) of the basic states and the wave vector (Q) of the perturbations as free parameters. In particular, it is shown that a threshold exists for the amplitude and above this threshold, the induced modulational instability leads to the formation of ordered and disordered patterns. The theoretical findings have been numerically tested through direct simulations and have been found to be in agreement with the theoretical prediction. We show numerically that modulational instability is also an indicator of the presence of discrete solitons as were early predicted to exist in Ginzburg-Landau lattices.

  3. Spontaneous pattern formation and pinning in the visual cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Tanya I.

    Bifurcation theory and perturbation theory can be combined with a knowledge of the underlying circuitry of the visual cortex to produce an elegant story explaining the phenomenon of visual hallucinations. A key insight is the application of an important set of ideas concerning spontaneous pattern formation introduced by Turing in 1952. The basic mechanism is a diffusion driven linear instability favoring a particular wavelength that determines the size of the ensuing stripe or spot periodicity of the emerging spatial pattern. Competition between short range excitation and longer range inhibition in the connectivity profile of cortical neurons provides the difference in diffusion length scales necessary for the Turing mechanism to occur and has been proven by Ermentrout and Cowan to be sufficient to explain the generation of a subset of reported geometric hallucinations. Incorporating further details of the cortical circuitry, namely that neurons are also weakly connected to other neurons sharing a particular stimulus orientation or spatial frequency preference at even longer ranges and the resulting shift-twist symmetry of the neuronal connectivity, improves the story. We expand this approach in order to be able to include the tuned responses of cortical neurons to additional visual stimulus features such as motion, color and disparity. We apply a study of nonlinear dynamics similar to the analysis of wave propagation in a crystalline lattice to demonstrate how a spatial pattern formed through the Turing instability can be pinned to the geometric layout of various feature preferences. The perturbation analysis is analogous to solving the Schrodinger equation in a weak periodic potential. Competition between the local isotropic connections which produce patterns of activity via the Turing mechanism and the weaker patchy lateral connections that depend on a neuron's particular set of feature preferences create long wavelength affects analogous to commensurate

  4. Quantifying Contributions of Climate Feedbacks to Global Warming Pattern Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, X.; Zhang, G. J.; Cai, M.

    2013-12-01

    The ';';climate feedback-response analysis method'' (CFRAM) was applied to the NCAR CCSM3.0 simulation to analyze the strength and spatial distribution of climate feedbacks and to quantify their contributions to global and regional surface temperature changes in response to a doubling of CO2. Instead of analyzing the climate sensitivity, the CFRAM directly attributes the temperature change to individual radiative and non-radiative feedbacks. The radiative feedback decomposition is based on hourly model output rather than monthly mean data that are commonly used in climate feedback analysis. This gives a more accurate quantification of the cloud and albedo feedbacks. The process-based decomposition of non-radiative feedback enables us to understand the roles of GCM physical and dynamic processes in climate change. The pattern correlation, the centered root-mean-square (RMS) difference and the ratio of variations (represented by standard deviations) between the partial surface temperature change due to each feedback process and the total surface temperature change in CCSM3.0 simulation are examined to quantify the roles of each feedback process in the global warming pattern formation. The contributions of climate feedbacks to the regional warming are also discussed.

  5. Tree island pattern formation in the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, Joel; D'Odorico, P.; Engel, Victor C.; Redwine, Jed

    2016-01-01

    The Florida Everglades freshwater landscape exhibits a distribution of islands covered by woody vegetation and bordered by marshes and wet prairies. Known as “tree islands”, these ecogeomorphic features can be found in few other low gradient, nutrient limited freshwater wetlands. In the last few decades, however, a large percentage of tree islands have either shrank or disappeared in apparent response to altered water depths and other stressors associated with human impacts on the Everglades. Because the processes determining the formation and spatial organization of tree islands remain poorly understood, it is still unclear what controls the sensitivity of these landscapes to altered conditions. We hypothesize that positive feedbacks between woody plants and soil accretion are crucial to emergence and decline of tree islands. Likewise, positive feedbacks between phosphorus (P) accumulation and trees explain the P enrichment commonly observed in tree island soils. Here, we develop a spatially-explicit model of tree island formation and evolution, which accounts for these positive feedbacks (facilitation) as well as for long range competition and fire dynamics. It is found that tree island patterns form within a range of parameter values consistent with field data. Simulated impacts of reduced water levels, increased intensity of drought, and increased frequency of dry season/soil consuming fires on these feedback mechanisms result in the decline and disappearance of tree islands on the landscape.

  6. Segment formation in Annelids: patterns, processes and evolution.

    PubMed

    Balavoine, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    The debate on the origin of segmentation is a central question in the study of body plan evolution in metazoans. Annelids are the most conspicuously metameric animals as most of the trunk is formed of identical anatomical units. In this paper, I summarize the various patterns of evolution of the metameric body plan in annelids, showing the remarkable evolvability of this trait, similar to what is also found in arthropods. I then review the different modes of segment formation in the annelid tree, taking into account the various processes taking place in the life histories of these animals, including embryogenesis, post-embryonic development, regeneration and asexual reproduction. As an example of the variations that occur at the cellular and genetic level in annelid segment formation, I discuss the processes of teloblastic growth or posterior addition in key groups in the annelid tree. I propose a comprehensive definition for the teloblasts, stem cells that are responsible for sequential segment addition. There are a diversity of different mechanisms used in annelids to produce segments depending on the species, the developmental time and also the life history processes of the worm. A major goal for the future will be to reconstitute an ancestral process (or several ancestral processes) in the ancestor of the whole clade. This in turn will provide key insights in the current debate on ancestral bilaterian segmentation.

  7. Cleavage pattern and mesentoblast formation in Acanthochiton crinitus (Polyplacophora, Mollusca).

    PubMed

    van den Biggelaar, J A

    1996-03-15

    In characteristic spiralian embryos the mesentoblast is the stem cell of the mesodermal bands. It is a derivative of the dorsal quadrant. At least in gastropod molluscs, the ancestral form for the specification of the dorsal quadrant out of four initially equal quadrants is by centralization of one of the four macromeres after the separation of the presumptive ecto- and entoblast cells. Then this macromere is induced by the animal micromeres to produce the mesentoblast. In this paper it is shown that in the embryo of the polyplacophoran Acanthochiton crinitus, specification of the dorsal quadrant and formation of the mesentoblast exactly follow the same pattern. After deletion of the first quartet of micromeres none of the macromeres is centralized, no mesentoblast is formed, and the embryo remains radially symmetrical. Apparently, the mechanism for the specification of the dorsal quadrant and the formation of the mesentoblast has been conserved during the evolution of the main molluscan taxa. It has been discussed whether this mechanism might be a plesiomorphous property, characteristic of less derived spiralian phyla.

  8. Formation of mixed and patterned self-assembled films of alkylphosphonates on commercially pure titanium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudzka, Katarzyna; Sanchez Treviño, Alda Y.; Rodríguez-Valverde, Miguel A.; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel A.

    2016-12-01

    Titanium is extensively employed in biomedical devices, in particular as implant. The self-assembly of alkylphosphonates on titanium surfaces enable the specific adsorption of biomolecules to adapt the implant response against external stimuli. In this work, chemically-tailored cpTi surfaces were prepared by self-assembly of alkylphosphonate molecules. By bringing together attributes of two grafting molecules, aqueous mixtures of two alkylphosphonates were used to obtain mixed self-assembled films. Single self-assembled films were also altered by laser abrasion to produce chemically patterned cpTi surfaces. Both mixed and patterned self-assembled films were confirmed by AFM, ESEM and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Water contact angle measurements also revealed the composition of the self-assembly films. Chemical functionalization with two grafting phosphonate molecules and laser surface engineering may be combined to guide the bone-like formation on cpTi, and the future biological response in the host.

  9. Ternary eutectic dendrites: Pattern formation and scaling properties.

    PubMed

    Rátkai, László; Szállás, Attila; Pusztai, Tamás; Mohri, Tetsuo; Gránásy, László

    2015-04-21

    Extending previous work [Pusztai et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 032401 (2013)], we have studied the formation of eutectic dendrites in a model ternary system within the framework of the phase-field theory. We have mapped out the domain in which two-phase dendritic structures grow. With increasing pulling velocity, the following sequence of growth morphologies is observed: flat front lamellae → eutectic colonies → eutectic dendrites → dendrites with target pattern → partitionless dendrites → partitionless flat front. We confirm that the two-phase and one-phase dendrites have similar forms and display a similar scaling of the dendrite tip radius with the interface free energy. It is also found that the possible eutectic patterns include the target pattern, and single- and multiarm spirals, of which the thermal fluctuations choose. The most probable number of spiral arms increases with increasing tip radius and with decreasing kinetic anisotropy. Our numerical simulations confirm that in agreement with the assumptions of a recent analysis of two-phase dendrites [Akamatsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 105502 (2014)], the Jackson-Hunt scaling of the eutectic wavelength with pulling velocity is obeyed in the parameter domain explored, and that the natural eutectic wavelength is proportional to the tip radius of the two-phase dendrites. Finally, we find that it is very difficult/virtually impossible to form spiraling two-phase dendrites without anisotropy, an observation that seems to contradict the expectations of Akamatsu et al. Yet, it cannot be excluded that in isotropic systems, two-phase dendrites are rare events difficult to observe in simulations.

  10. Ternary eutectic dendrites: Pattern formation and scaling properties

    SciTech Connect

    Rátkai, László; Szállás, Attila; Pusztai, Tamás; Mohri, Tetsuo; Gránásy, László

    2015-04-21

    Extending previous work [Pusztai et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 032401 (2013)], we have studied the formation of eutectic dendrites in a model ternary system within the framework of the phase-field theory. We have mapped out the domain in which two-phase dendritic structures grow. With increasing pulling velocity, the following sequence of growth morphologies is observed: flat front lamellae → eutectic colonies → eutectic dendrites → dendrites with target pattern → partitionless dendrites → partitionless flat front. We confirm that the two-phase and one-phase dendrites have similar forms and display a similar scaling of the dendrite tip radius with the interface free energy. It is also found that the possible eutectic patterns include the target pattern, and single- and multiarm spirals, of which the thermal fluctuations choose. The most probable number of spiral arms increases with increasing tip radius and with decreasing kinetic anisotropy. Our numerical simulations confirm that in agreement with the assumptions of a recent analysis of two-phase dendrites [Akamatsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 105502 (2014)], the Jackson-Hunt scaling of the eutectic wavelength with pulling velocity is obeyed in the parameter domain explored, and that the natural eutectic wavelength is proportional to the tip radius of the two-phase dendrites. Finally, we find that it is very difficult/virtually impossible to form spiraling two-phase dendrites without anisotropy, an observation that seems to contradict the expectations of Akamatsu et al. Yet, it cannot be excluded that in isotropic systems, two-phase dendrites are rare events difficult to observe in simulations.

  11. DETERMINATION OF APPARENT QUANTUM YIELD SPECTRA FOR THE FORMATION OF BIOLOGICALLY LABILE PHOTOPRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantum yield spectra for the photochemical formation of biologically labile photoproducts from dissolved organic matter (DOM) have not been available previously, although they would greatly facilitate attempts to model photoproduct formation rates across latitudinal, seasonal, a...

  12. DETERMINATION OF APPARENT QUANTUM YIELD SPECTRA FOR THE FORMATION OF BIOLOGICALLY LABILE PHOTOPRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantum yield spectra for the photochemical formation of biologically labile photoproducts from dissolved organic matter (DOM) have not been available previously, although they would greatly facilitate attempts to model photoproduct formation rates across latitudinal, seasonal, a...

  13. Intracellular Trafficking in Drosophila Visual System Development: A Basis for Pattern Formation Through Simple Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chih-Chiang; Epstein, Daniel; Hiesinger, P. Robin

    2012-01-01

    Intracellular trafficking underlies cellular functions ranging from membrane remodeling to receptor activation. During multicellular organ development, these basic cell biological functions are required as both passive machinery and active signaling regulators. Exocytosis, endocytosis, and recycling of several key signaling receptors have long been known to actively regulate morphogenesis and pattern formation during Drosophila eye development. Hence, intracellular membrane trafficking not only sets the cell biological stage for receptor-mediated signaling but also actively controls signaling through spatiotemporally regulated receptor localization. In contrast to eye development, the role of intracellular trafficking for the establishment of the eye-to-brain connectivity map has only recently received more attention. It is still poorly understood how guidance receptors are spatiotemporally regulated to serve as meaningful synapse formation signals. Yet, the Drosophila visual system provides some of the most striking examples for the regulatory role of intracellular trafficking during multicellular organ development. In this review we will first highlight the experimental and conceptual advances that motivate the study of intracellular trafficking during Drosophila visual system development. We will then illuminate the development of the eye, the eye-to-brain connectivity map and the optic lobe from the perspective of cell biological dynamics. Finally, we provide a conceptual framework that seeks to explain how the interplay of simple genetically encoded intracellular trafficking events governs the seemingly complex cellular behaviors, which in turn determine the developmental product. PMID:21714102

  14. HGF, EGF and Dexamethasone induced gene expression patterns during formation of tissue in hepatic organoid cultures

    PubMed Central

    Michalopoulos, George K.; Bowen, William C.; Mulé, Karen; Luo, Jianhua

    2007-01-01

    Corticosteroids, HGF and EGF play important roles in hepatic biology. We have previously shown that these molecules are required for formation of tissue with specific histology in complex organoid cultures. Dexamethasone suppresses growth and induces hepatocyte maturation; HGF and EGF are needed for formation of the non-epithelial elements. All three are needed for formation of the biliary epithelium. The gene expression patterns by which corticosteroids, HGF and EGF mediate their effects in hepatic tissue formation are distinct. These patterns affect many gene families and are described in detail. In terms of main findings, Dexamethasone induces expression of both HNF4 and C/EBP-alpha, essential transcription factors for hepatocyte differentiation. It suppresses hepatocyte growth by suppressing many molecules associated with growth in liver and other tissues, including IL6, CXC-Chemokine receptor, Amphiregulin, COX-2, HIF, etc. HGF and EGF induce all members of the TGF-beta family. They also induced multiple CNS-related genes, probably associated with stellate cells. Dexamethasone, as well as HGF and EGF, induce expression of HNF6-beta, associated with biliary epithelium formation. Combined addition of all three molecules is associated with mature histology in which hepatocyte and biliary lineages are separate and HNF4 is expressed only in hepatocyte nuclei. In conclusion, the results provide new and often surprising information on the gene expression alterations by which corticosteroids, HGF and EGF exert their effects on formation of hepatic tissue. The results underscore the usefulness of the organoid cultures for generating information on histogenesis which cannot be obtained by other culture or whole animal models. PMID:12837037

  15. AN EFFICIENT, NON-LINEAR STABILITY ANALYSIS FOR DETECTING PATTERN FORMATION IN REACTION DIFFUSION SYSTEMS

    PubMed Central

    HOLMES, WILLIAM R.

    2014-01-01

    Reaction diffusion systems are often used to study pattern formation in biological systems. However, most methods for understanding their behavior are challenging and can rarely be applied to complex systems common in biological applications. I present a relatively simple and efficient, non-linear stability technique that greatly aids such analysis when rates of diffusion are substantially different. This technique reduces a system of reaction diffusion equations to a system of ordinary differential equations tracking the evolution of a large amplitude, spatially localized perturbation of a homogeneous steady state. Stability properties of this system, determined using standard bifurcation techniques and software, describe both linear and non-linear patterning regimes of the reaction diffusion system. I describe the class of systems this method can be applied to and demonstrate its application. Analysis of Schnakenberg and substrate inhibition models is performed to demonstrate the methods capabilities in simplified settings and show that even these simple models have non-linear patterning regimes not previously detected. The real power of this technique however is its simplicity and applicability to larger complex systems where other non-linear methods become intractable. This is demonstrated through analysis of a chemotaxis regulatory network comprised of interacting proteins and phospholipids. In each case, predictions of this method are verified against results of numerical simulation, linear stability, asymptotic, and / or full PDE bifurcation analyses. PMID:24158538

  16. Regeneration and pattern formation - an interview with Susan Bryant. Interviewed by Richardson, Michael K and Chuong, Cheng-Ming.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Susan Bryant is one of the leading researchers in regeneration and pattern formation. Born in England in 1943, she studied biology at Kings College, London (UK). After a Ph.D. with Angus Bellairs on caudal autotomy and regeneration in lizards, she researched urodele regeneration in Marcus Singer's lab at Case Western Reserve University. Then, at the University of California, Irvine, she adopted the axolotl as a research model for limb regeneration and pattern formation. Her work supported models involving the intercalation of positional values in a polar coordinate system. Fibroblasts, often regarded as "junk" cells, are seen by Susan Bryant as central to patterning. She argues that fibroblasts express positional values needed for regeneration. She also argues that vertebrate species capable of regeneration have evolved steps to plug back into developmental programmes. Susan Bryant thinks that regeneration is essential for a full understanding of development, and believes that developmental biology has suffered though not embracing regeneration. She also believes that deeper knowledge of pattern formation will bring advances in emerging field of tissue engineering. Since 2000, she has served as Dean of Biological Sciences and more recently, as Vice Chancellor for Research, at UC Irvine (USA). She is an advocate of equal opportunities for women and other under-represented groups in academia. She lives in California with husband David Gardiner, her scientific partner for over 20 years. They have two children. We interviewed Susan Bryant in her office in Irvine on October 5th, 2007.

  17. Robust dynamical pattern formation from a multifunctional minimal genetic circuit

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A practical problem during the analysis of natural networks is their complexity, thus the use of synthetic circuits would allow to unveil the natural mechanisms of operation. Autocatalytic gene regulatory networks play an important role in shaping the development of multicellular organisms, whereas oscillatory circuits are used to control gene expression under variable environments such as the light-dark cycle. Results We propose a new mechanism to generate developmental patterns and oscillations using a minimal number of genes. For this, we design a synthetic gene circuit with an antagonistic self-regulation to study the spatio-temporal control of protein expression. Here, we show that our minimal system can behave as a biological clock or memory, and it exhibites an inherent robustness due to a quorum sensing mechanism. We analyze this property by accounting for molecular noise in an heterogeneous population. We also show how the period of the oscillations is tunable by environmental signals, and we study the bifurcations of the system by constructing different phase diagrams. Conclusions As this minimal circuit is based on a single transcriptional unit, it provides a new mechanism based on post-translational interactions to generate targeted spatio-temporal behavior. PMID:20412565

  18. Dynamic auxin transport patterns preceding vein formation revealed by live-imaging of Arabidopsis leaf primordia

    PubMed Central

    Marcos, Danielle; Berleth, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Self-regulatory patterning mechanisms capable of generating biologically meaningful, yet unpredictable cellular patterns offer unique opportunities for obtaining mathematical descriptions of underlying patterning systems properties. The networks of higher-order veins in leaf primordia constitute such a self-regulatory system. During the formation of higher-order veins, vascular precursors are selected from a homogenous field of subepidermal cells in unpredictable positions to eventually connect in complex cellular networks. Auxin transport routes have been implicated in this selection process, but understanding of their role in vascular patterning has been limited by our inability to monitor early auxin transport dynamics in vivo. Here we describe a live-imaging system in emerging Arabidopsis thaliana leaves that uses a PIN1:GFP reporter to visualize auxin transport routes and an Athb8:YFP reporter as a marker for vascular commitment. Live-imaging revealed common features initiating the formation of all higher-order veins. The formation of broad PIN1 expression domains is followed by their restriction, leading to sustained, elevated PIN1 expression in incipient procambial cells files, which then express Athb8. Higher-order PIN1 expression domains (hPEDs) are initiated as freely ending domains that extend toward each other and sometimes fuse with them, creating connected domains. During the restriction and specification phase, cells in wider hPEDs are partitioned into vascular and non-vascular fates: Central cells acquire a coordinated cell axis and express elevated PIN1 levels as well as the pre-procambial marker Athb8, while edge cells downregulate PIN1 and remain isodiametric. The dynamic nature of the early selection process is underscored by the instability of early hPEDs, which can result in dramatic changes in vascular network architecture prior to Athb8 expression, which is correlated with the promotion onto vascular cell fate. PMID:24966861

  19. Refinement and Pattern Formation in Neural Circuits by the Interaction of Traveling Waves with Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, James E. M.; Bair, Wyeth

    2015-01-01

    Traveling waves in the developing brain are a prominent source of highly correlated spiking activity that may instruct the refinement of neural circuits. A candidate mechanism for mediating such refinement is spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP), which translates correlated activity patterns into changes in synaptic strength. To assess the potential of these phenomena to build useful structure in developing neural circuits, we examined the interaction of wave activity with STDP rules in simple, biologically plausible models of spiking neurons. We derive an expression for the synaptic strength dynamics showing that, by mapping the time dependence of STDP into spatial interactions, traveling waves can build periodic synaptic connectivity patterns into feedforward circuits with a broad class of experimentally observed STDP rules. The spatial scale of the connectivity patterns increases with wave speed and STDP time constants. We verify these results with simulations and demonstrate their robustness to likely sources of noise. We show how this pattern formation ability, which is analogous to solutions of reaction-diffusion systems that have been widely applied to biological pattern formation, can be harnessed to instruct the refinement of postsynaptic receptive fields. Our results hold for rich, complex wave patterns in two dimensions and over several orders of magnitude in wave speeds and STDP time constants, and they provide predictions that can be tested under existing experimental paradigms. Our model generalizes across brain areas and STDP rules, allowing broad application to the ubiquitous occurrence of traveling waves and to wave-like activity patterns induced by moving stimuli. PMID:26308406

  20. Refinement and Pattern Formation in Neural Circuits by the Interaction of Traveling Waves with Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Bennett, James E M; Bair, Wyeth

    2015-08-01

    Traveling waves in the developing brain are a prominent source of highly correlated spiking activity that may instruct the refinement of neural circuits. A candidate mechanism for mediating such refinement is spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP), which translates correlated activity patterns into changes in synaptic strength. To assess the potential of these phenomena to build useful structure in developing neural circuits, we examined the interaction of wave activity with STDP rules in simple, biologically plausible models of spiking neurons. We derive an expression for the synaptic strength dynamics showing that, by mapping the time dependence of STDP into spatial interactions, traveling waves can build periodic synaptic connectivity patterns into feedforward circuits with a broad class of experimentally observed STDP rules. The spatial scale of the connectivity patterns increases with wave speed and STDP time constants. We verify these results with simulations and demonstrate their robustness to likely sources of noise. We show how this pattern formation ability, which is analogous to solutions of reaction-diffusion systems that have been widely applied to biological pattern formation, can be harnessed to instruct the refinement of postsynaptic receptive fields. Our results hold for rich, complex wave patterns in two dimensions and over several orders of magnitude in wave speeds and STDP time constants, and they provide predictions that can be tested under existing experimental paradigms. Our model generalizes across brain areas and STDP rules, allowing broad application to the ubiquitous occurrence of traveling waves and to wave-like activity patterns induced by moving stimuli.

  1. Analytic model for ring pattern formation by bacterial swarmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arouh, Scott

    2001-03-01

    We analyze a model proposed by Medvedev, Kaper, and Kopell (the MKK model) for ring formation in two-dimensional bacterial colonies of Proteus mirabilis. We correct the model to formally include a feature crucial of the ring generation mechanism: a bacterial density threshold to the nonlinear diffusivity of the MKK model. We numerically integrate the model equations, and observe the logarithmic profiles of the bacterial densities near the front. These lead us to define a consolidation front distinct from the colony radius. We find that this consolidation front propagates outward toward the colony radius with a nearly constant velocity. We then implement the corrected MKK equations in two dimensions and compare our results with biological experiment. Our numerical results indicate that the two-dimensional corrected MKK model yields smooth (rather than branched) rings, and that colliding colonies merge if grown in phase but not if grown out of phase. We also introduce a model, based on coupling the MKK model to a nutrient field, for simulating experimentally observed branched rings.

  2. Pattern formation and evolution in thin polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Jean-Loup Didier

    2001-07-01

    Thin polymer films are important for many technologies. They are used as coatings, adhesives, lubricants and for device technologies, such as polymer based light-emitting diodes. Several concerns arise when processing and using thin polymer films. Properties of thin polymer films (e.g., viscosity, diffusion, glass transition temperature) are different from bulk properties due to finite size effects (e.g., confinement of the chains) and to interfacial interactions (e.g., presence of the free surface and the substrate). Moreover, the stability of the film on the substrate is of concern. Thin polymer films, of thickness h < 100 nm, fabricated on a substrate may rupture under destabilizing forces, such as van der Waals forces. Rupturing exposes the underlying substrate and the exposed regions will grow, provided that the spreading coefficient is negative. This process is known as dewetting. Thus far, two dewetting morphologies have been identified but little is understood about their formation and evolution. The first morphology consists of circular holes throughout the film and the second morphology is reminiscent of patterns associated with spinodal decomposition processes. In this research, we investigated four problems. First, we examined fundamental questions related to the formation and evolution of patterns on the substrate. We documented the existence of different dynamic stages of evolution associated with different driving forces for both "conventional" morphologies (circular holes and "spinodal-like"). Second, we discovered a new morphology that occurs in a thin random copolymer film on a silicon substrate. This morphology results from heterogeneous interactions of the chain segments with the substrate. Third, we examined flow processes in thin polymer films (chain dynamics near surfaces). We show that a fingering instability develop spontaneously at the moving liquid front when the film is below a critical thickness that depends on the length of the chains

  3. Reptile scale paradigm: Evo-Devo, pattern formation and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheng; Wu, Ping; Baker, Ruth E; Maini, Philip K; Alibardi, Lorenzo; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this perspective is to highlight the merit of the reptile integument as an experimental model. Reptiles represent the first amniotes. From stem reptiles, extant reptiles, birds and mammals have evolved. Mammal hairs and feathers evolved from Therapsid and Sauropsid reptiles, respectively. The early reptilian integument had to adapt to the challenges of terrestrial life, developing a multi-layered stratum corneum capable of barrier function and ultraviolet protection. For better mechanical protection, diverse reptilian scale types have evolved. The evolution of endothermy has driven the convergent evolution of hair and feather follicles: both form multiple localized growth units with stem cells and transient amplifying cells protected in the proximal follicle. This topological arrangement allows them to elongate, molt and regenerate without structural constraints. Another unique feature of reptile skin is the exquisite arrangement of scales and pigment patterns, making them testable models for mechanisms of pattern formation. Since they face the constant threat of damage on land, different strategies were developed to accommodate skin homeostasis and regeneration. Temporally, they can be under continuous renewal or sloughing cycles. Spatially, they can be diffuse or form discrete localized growth units (follicles). To understand how gene regulatory networks evolved to produce increasingly complex ectodermal organs, we have to study how prototypic scale-forming pathways in reptiles are modulated to produce appendage novelties. Despite the fact that there are numerous studies of reptile scales, molecular analyses have lagged behind. Here, we underscore how further development of this novel experimental model will be valuable in filling the gaps of our understanding of the Evo-Devo of amniote integuments.

  4. Formation Control of Multi-agent Systems via Distributed Pattern Decision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurama, Kazunori; Azuma, Shun-Ichi; Sugie, Toshiharu

    This paper deals with a formation control problem of networked multi-agent systems via distributed pattern decision. We assume that several formation patterns are given without a leader which decides what formation pattern the group of agents should form. Each agent has to individually decide a possible formation pattern by watching the configuration of his neighborhood. Our control objective is to achieve one of the given formation patterns as a result of the distributed pattern decisions. We propose a new objective function consisting of formation errors on the cliques of networks, and design a formation controller based on the gradient flow of this clique-based objective function. The effectiveness of the proposed method is illustrated by simulations.

  5. Spatial pattern formation facilitates eradication of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Eisinger, Dirk; Thulke, Hans-Hermann

    2008-04-01

    Control of animal-born diseases is a major challenge faced by applied ecologists and public health managers. To improve cost-effectiveness, the effort required to control such pathogens needs to be predicted as accurately as possible. In this context, we reviewed the anti-rabies vaccination schemes applied around the world during the past 25 years.We contrasted predictions from classic approaches based on theoretical population ecology (which governs rabies control to date) with a newly developed individual-based model. Our spatially explicit approach allowed for the reproduction of pattern formation emerging from a pathogen's spread through its host population.We suggest that a much lower management effort could eliminate the disease than that currently in operation. This is supported by empirical evidence from historic field data. Adapting control measures to the new prediction would save one-third of resources in future control programmes.The reason for the lower prediction is the spatial structure formed by spreading infections in spatially arranged host populations. It is not the result of technical differences between models.Synthesis and applications. For diseases predominantly transmitted by neighbourhood interaction, our findings suggest that the emergence of spatial structures facilitates eradication. This may have substantial implications for the cost-effectiveness of existing disease management schemes, and suggests that when planning management strategies consideration must be given to methods that reflect the spatial nature of the pathogen-host system.

  6. Spatial pattern formation facilitates eradication of infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Eisinger, Dirk; Thulke, Hans-Hermann

    2008-01-01

    Control of animal-born diseases is a major challenge faced by applied ecologists and public health managers. To improve cost-effectiveness, the effort required to control such pathogens needs to be predicted as accurately as possible. In this context, we reviewed the anti-rabies vaccination schemes applied around the world during the past 25 years. We contrasted predictions from classic approaches based on theoretical population ecology (which governs rabies control to date) with a newly developed individual-based model. Our spatially explicit approach allowed for the reproduction of pattern formation emerging from a pathogen's spread through its host population. We suggest that a much lower management effort could eliminate the disease than that currently in operation. This is supported by empirical evidence from historic field data. Adapting control measures to the new prediction would save one-third of resources in future control programmes. The reason for the lower prediction is the spatial structure formed by spreading infections in spatially arranged host populations. It is not the result of technical differences between models. Synthesis and applications. For diseases predominantly transmitted by neighbourhood interaction, our findings suggest that the emergence of spatial structures facilitates eradication. This may have substantial implications for the cost-effectiveness of existing disease management schemes, and suggests that when planning management strategies consideration must be given to methods that reflect the spatial nature of the pathogen–host system. PMID:18784795

  7. Pattern Formation in Dewetting Nanoparticle/Polymer Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esker, Alan; Paul, Rituparna; Karabiyik, Ufuk; Swift, Michael; Hottle, John

    2008-03-01

    Comprised of inorganic cores and flexible organic coronae with 1 -- 2 nm diameter monodisperse sizes, polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) are ideal model nanofillers. Our discovery that one POSS derivative, trisilanolphenyl-POSS (TPP), can form Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films on hydrophobic substrates, allows us to create thin film bilayers of precisely controlled thickness and architecture. Work with poly(t-butylacrylate) (PtBA)/TPP bilayers reveals a two-step dewetting mechanism in which the upper TPP layer dewets first, followed by the formation of isolated holes with intricate, fractal, nanofiller aggregates. Like the PtBA/TPP bilayers, polystyrene (PS)/TPP bilayers also undergo a two-step dewetting mechanism. However, the upper TPP layer initially forms cracks that may arise from mismatches in thermal expansion coefficients. These cracks then serve as nucleation sites for complete dewetting of the entire bilayer. Understanding the rich diversity of surface patterns that can be formed from relatively simple processes is a key feature of this work.

  8. Modeling biological gradient formation: combining partial differential equations and Petri nets.

    PubMed

    Bertens, Laura M F; Kleijn, Jetty; Hille, Sander C; Heiner, Monika; Koutny, Maciej; Verbeek, Fons J

    2016-01-01

    Both Petri nets and differential equations are important modeling tools for biological processes. In this paper we demonstrate how these two modeling techniques can be combined to describe biological gradient formation. Parameters derived from partial differential equation describing the process of gradient formation are incorporated in an abstract Petri net model. The quantitative aspects of the resulting model are validated through a case study of gradient formation in the fruit fly.

  9. Cell patterning on biological gels via cell spraying through a mask.

    PubMed

    Nahmias, Yaakov; Arneja, Abhinav; Tower, Theodore T; Renn, Michael J; Odde, David J

    2005-01-01

    We present an easily applicable and inexpensive method for patterning cells on arbitrary surfaces including biological gels with little loss of viability or function. Single-cell suspensions of human umbilical vein endothelial cells and NIH 3T3 fibroblasts were sprayed with an off-the-shelf airbrush through a mask to create 100-microm scale patterns on collagen gels. Three-dimensional patterns were created by layering a collagen gel on top of the first pattern and patterning the top gel. Coculture of rat hepatocytes with NIH 3T3 patterns on collagen gels resulted in localized increased activity of cytochrome P-450 along the pattern. These results suggest that cell spraying is a useful tool for the study of heterotypic cellular interactions and tissue-engineering applications on biologically relevant matrices, and for the creation of three-dimensional cell patterns in vitro.

  10. Pattern formation of a reaction-diffusion system with self-consistent flow in the amoeboid organism Physarum plasmodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hiroyasu; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki; Ito, Masami

    1999-01-01

    The amoeboid organism, the plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum, moves by forming a spatiotemporal pattern of contraction oscillators. This biological system can be regarded as a reaction-diffusion system with spatial interaction via active flow of protoplasmic sol in the cell. We present a reaction-diffusion system with self-consistent flow on the basis of the physiological evidence that the flow is determined by contraction patterns in the plasmodium. Such a coupling of reaction, diffusion, and advection is characteristic of biological systems, and is expected to be related to control mechanisms of amoeboid behavior. Using weakly nonlinear analysis, we show that the envelope dynamics obeys the complex Ginzburg-Landau (CGL) equation when a bifurcation occurs at finite wave number. The flow term affects the nonlinear term of the CGL equation through the critical wave number squared. A physiological role of pattern formation with the flow is discussed.

  11. Instabilities and pattern formation on the pore scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juel, Anne

    What links a baby's first breath to adhesive debonding, enhanced oil recovery, or even drop-on-demand devices? All these processes involve moving or expanding bubbles displacing fluid in a confined space, bounded by either rigid or elastic walls. In this talk, we show how spatial confinement may either induce or suppress interfacial instabilities and pattern formation in such flows. We demonstrate that a simple change in the bounding geometry can radically alter the behaviour of a fluid-displacing air finger both in rigid and elastic vessels. A rich array of propagation modes, including steady and oscillatory fingers, is uncovered when air displaces oil from axially uniform tubes that have local variations in flow resistance within their cross-sections. Moreover, we show that the experimentally observed states can all be captured by a two-dimensional depth-averaged model for bubble propagation through wide channels. Viscous fingering in Hele-Shaw cells is a classical and widely studied fluid-mechanical instability: when air is injected into the narrow, liquid-filled gap between parallel rigid plates, the axisymmetrically expanding air-liquid interface tends to be unstable to non-axisymmetric disturbances. We show how the introduction of wall elasticity (via the replacement of the upper bounding plate by an elastic membrane) can weaken or even suppress the fingering instability by allowing changes in cell confinement through the flow-induced deflection of the boundary. The presence of a deformable boundary also makes the system prone to additional solid-mechanical instabilities, and these wrinkling instabilities can in turn enhance viscous fingering. The financial support of EPSRC and the Leverhulme Trust is gratefully acknowledged.

  12. Control of distributed autonomous robotic systems using principles of pattern formation in nature and pedestrian behavior.

    PubMed

    Molnar, P; Starke, J

    2001-01-01

    Self-organized and error-resistant control of distributed autonomous robotic units in a manufacturing environment with obstacles where the robotic units have to be assigned to manufacturing targets in a cost effective way, is achieved by using two fundamental principles of nature. First, the selection behavior of modes is used which appears in pattern formation of physical, chemical and biological systems. Coupled selection equations based on these pattern formation principles can be used as dynamical system approach to assignment problems. These differential equations guarantee feasibility of the obtained solutions which is of great importance in industrial applications. Second, a model of behavioral forces is used, which has been successfully applied to describe self-organized crowd behavior of pedestrians. This novel approach includes collision avoidance as well as error resistivity. In particular, in systems where failures are of concern, the suggested approach outperforms conventional methods in covering up for sudden external changes like breakdowns of some robotic units. The capability of this system is demonstrated in computer simulations.

  13. Statistical Comparison of Spatial Point Patterns in Biological Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Burguet, Jasmine; Andrey, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    In biological systems, functions and spatial organizations are closely related. Spatial data in biology frequently consist of, or can be assimilated to, sets of points. An important goal in the quantitative analysis of such data is the evaluation and localization of differences in spatial distributions between groups. Because of experimental replications, achieving this goal requires comparing collections of point sets, a noticeably challenging issue for which no method has been proposed to date. We introduce a strategy to address this problem, based on the comparison of point intensities throughout space. Our method is based on a statistical test that determines whether local point intensities, estimated using replicated data, are significantly different or not. Repeating this test at different positions provides an intensity comparison map and reveals domains showing significant intensity differences. Simulated data were used to characterize and validate this approach. The method was then applied to two different neuroanatomical systems to evaluate its ability to reveal spatial differences in biological data sets. Applied to two distinct neuronal populations within the rat spinal cord, the method generated an objective representation of the spatial segregation established previously on a subjective visual basis. The method was also applied to analyze the spatial distribution of locus coeruleus neurons in control and mutant mice. The results objectively consolidated previous conclusions obtained from visual comparisons. Remarkably, they also provided new insights into the maturation of the locus coeruleus in mutant and control animals. Overall, the method introduced here is a new contribution to the quantitative analysis of biological organizations that provides meaningful spatial representations which are easy to understand and to interpret. Finally, because our approach is generic and punctual structures are widespread at the cellular and histological scales, it

  14. Computational intelligence approaches for pattern discovery in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Gary B

    2008-07-01

    Biology, chemistry and medicine are faced by tremendous challenges caused by an overwhelming amount of data and the need for rapid interpretation. Computational intelligence (CI) approaches such as artificial neural networks, fuzzy systems and evolutionary computation are being used with increasing frequency to contend with this problem, in light of noise, non-linearity and temporal dynamics in the data. Such methods can be used to develop robust models of processes either on their own or in combination with standard statistical approaches. This is especially true for database mining, where modeling is a key component of scientific understanding. This review provides an introduction to current CI methods, their application to biological problems, and concludes with a commentary about the anticipated impact of these approaches in bioinformatics.

  15. Global patterns in threats to vertebrates by biological invasions

    PubMed Central

    Bellard, C.; Genovesi, P.; Jeschke, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Biological invasions as drivers of biodiversity loss have recently been challenged. Fundamentally, we must know where species that are threatened by invasive alien species (IAS) live, and the degree to which they are threatened. We report the first study linking 1372 vertebrates threatened by more than 200 IAS from the completely revised Global Invasive Species Database. New maps of the vulnerability of threatened vertebrates to IAS permit assessments of whether IAS have a major influence on biodiversity, and if so, which taxonomic groups are threatened and where they are threatened. We found that centres of IAS-threatened vertebrates are concentrated in the Americas, India, Indonesia, Australia and New Zealand. The areas in which IAS-threatened species are located do not fully match the current hotspots of invasions, or the current hotspots of threatened species. The relative importance of biological invasions as drivers of biodiversity loss clearly varies across regions and taxa, and changes over time, with mammals from India, Indonesia, Australia and Europe are increasingly being threatened by IAS. The chytrid fungus primarily threatens amphibians, whereas invasive mammals primarily threaten other vertebrates. The differences in IAS threats between regions and taxa can help efficiently target IAS, which is essential for achieving the Strategic Plan 2020 of the Convention on Biological Diversity. PMID:26817767

  16. Global patterns in threats to vertebrates by biological invasions.

    PubMed

    Bellard, C; Genovesi, P; Jeschke, J M

    2016-01-27

    Biological invasions as drivers of biodiversity loss have recently been challenged. Fundamentally, we must know where species that are threatened by invasive alien species (IAS) live, and the degree to which they are threatened. We report the first study linking 1372 vertebrates threatened by more than 200 IAS from the completely revised Global Invasive Species Database. New maps of the vulnerability of threatened vertebrates to IAS permit assessments of whether IAS have a major influence on biodiversity, and if so, which taxonomic groups are threatened and where they are threatened. We found that centres of IAS-threatened vertebrates are concentrated in the Americas, India, Indonesia, Australia and New Zealand. The areas in which IAS-threatened species are located do not fully match the current hotspots of invasions, or the current hotspots of threatened species. The relative importance of biological invasions as drivers of biodiversity loss clearly varies across regions and taxa, and changes over time, with mammals from India, Indonesia, Australia and Europe are increasingly being threatened by IAS. The chytrid fungus primarily threatens amphibians, whereas invasive mammals primarily threaten other vertebrates. The differences in IAS threats between regions and taxa can help efficiently target IAS, which is essential for achieving the Strategic Plan 2020 of the Convention on Biological Diversity.

  17. Convection-driven pattern formation in grass (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, K. E.; Thompson, S. E.

    2010-12-01

    Spatial patterns of 'dead' lawn grass have often been ascribed to Turing-type reaction-diffusion processes related to water scarcity. However, morphologically-similar patterns can also result from fluid convection. Therefore, we present an alternative hypothesis: that the air within the grass canopy is unstable to a convective instability, such that chill damage caused by falling cold air is responsible for the creation of brown and green bands of grass. We model the grass as a uniform porous medium of upright cylindrical rods subject to a temperature gradient and find that the resulting patterns are consistent with several features of small-scale vegetation patterns, including their length scale, rapid onset and transient nature. Finally, the predictions are found to be consistent with measurements made for a particular instance of lawn-patterning in North Carolina. We close by discussing the implications for other plant species. Lawn grass patterning at Duke University.

  18. Hydrologic Connectivity as a Window into Pattern Conditions and Formation Processes in Aquatic Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, L. G.; Choi, J.; Nungesser, M. K.; Harvey, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Patterned aquatic ecosystems exhibit different types and degrees of hydrologic connectivity, from isolated open-water patches in some inland marshes, to cross-slope strings and flarks of striped fens, to along-slope ridges and sloughs of low-gradient subtropical wetlands, to dendritic channels of coastal marshes. The nature and degree of this connectivity are closely linked to landscape function. For example, hydrologic connectivity perpendicular to river channel thalwegs relates to the exchange of sediment and nutrients between channels and floodplains, whereas connectivity parallel to a dominant flow direction affects fish migration or the likelihood of contaminant transport. Characteristics of hydrologic connectivity reflect not only the results of landscape pattern but also the mechanisms responsible for pattern creation. Quantifying those connectivity characteristics provides a robust means to identify landscapes likely formed under a consistent set of processes or to compare the output of landscape simulation models to actual landscapes in order to determine whether the models capture the most relevant landscape formation processes. However, established methods for quantifying isotropic patch connectivity are often ill suited for strongly patterned landscapes or hydroscapes in which directional flow is important. Using graph theory principles, we developed two alternative indices of directional hydrologic connectivity: the maximum flow index (MFI) and directional connectivity index (DCI), which quantify the connectivity of flow paths along a particular axis of interest. The MFI is sensitive to the existence of any hydrologic connection along the direction of interest, whereas the DCI is sensitive to the linearity of connections along that direction. Curves of directional connectivity over a range of angular bearings provide a quantitative, information-dense representation of landscape structure that can be related to subtle differences in the physical-biological

  19. Stretch force guides finger-like pattern of bone formation in suture

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Xiao-Xing; Zhang, Ci; Zhang, Yi-Mei; Cui, Zhen; Wang, Xue-Dong; Liu, Yan; Liu, Da-Wei; Zhou, Yan-Heng

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical tension is widely applied on the suture to modulate the growth of craniofacial bones. Deeply understanding the features of bone formation in expanding sutures could help us to improve the outcomes of clinical treatment and avoid some side effects. Although there are reports that have uncovered some biological characteristics, the regular pattern of sutural bone formation in response to expansion forces is still unknown. Our study was to investigate the shape, arrangement and orientation of new bone formation in expanding sutures and explore related clinical implications. The premaxillary sutures of rat, which histologically resembles the sutures of human beings, became wider progressively under stretch force. Micro-CT detected new bones at day 3. Morphologically, these bones were forming in a finger-like pattern, projecting from the maxillae into the expanded sutures. There were about 4 finger-like bones appearing on the selected micro-CT sections at day 3 and this number increased to about 18 at day 7. The average length of these projections increased from 0.14 mm at day 3 to 0.81 mm at day 7. The volume of these bony protuberances increased to the highest level of 0.12 mm3 at day 7. HE staining demonstrated that these finger-like bones had thick bases connecting with the maxillae and thin fronts stretching into the expanded suture. Nasal sections had a higher frequency of finger-like bones occuring than the oral sections at day 3 and day 5. Masson-stained sections showed stretched fibers embedding into maxillary margins. Osteocalcin-positive osteoblasts changed their shapes from cuboidal to spindle and covered the surfaces of finger-like bones continuously. Alizarin red S and calcein deposited in the inner and outer layers of finger-like bones respectively, which showed that longer and larger bones formed on the nasal side of expanded sutures compared with the oral side. Interestingly, these finger-like bones were almost paralleling with the direction

  20. Biological and Computational Modeling of Mammographic Density and Stromal Patterning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    will be completed. Mammographic Density: Over 559 serial screen-film mammograms were digitized from the 150 women described in Task 1: 75 high... mammograms were digitized from 75 women taking tam oxifen prevention an d 75 controls using a new Howtek MultiRad 860 digitizer. The anonymized...en taking tamoxifen chemoprevention and 75 high-risk women who elected not to tak e tamoxifen using pattern analy sis of 1) serial m ammograms, 2

  1. Video and HTML: Testing Online Tutorial Formats with Biology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Cindy L.; Friehs, Curt G.

    2013-01-01

    This study compared two common types of online information literacy tutorials: a streaming media tutorial using animation and narration and a text-based tutorial with static images. Nine sections of an undergraduate biology lab class (234 students total) were instructed by a librarian on how to use the BIOSIS Previews database. Three sections…

  2. Video and HTML: Testing Online Tutorial Formats with Biology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Cindy L.; Friehs, Curt G.

    2013-01-01

    This study compared two common types of online information literacy tutorials: a streaming media tutorial using animation and narration and a text-based tutorial with static images. Nine sections of an undergraduate biology lab class (234 students total) were instructed by a librarian on how to use the BIOSIS Previews database. Three sections…

  3. Pattern formation during development of the embryonic cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Dastjerdi, F. V.; Consalez, G. G.; Hawkes, R.

    2012-01-01

    The patterning of the embryonic cerebellum is vital to establish the elaborate zone and stripe architecture of the adult. This review considers early stages in cerebellar Purkinje cell patterning, from the organization of the ventricular zone to the development of Purkinje cell clusters—the precursors of the adult stripes. PMID:22493569

  4. Giant Amplification of Noise in Fluctuation-Induced Pattern Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biancalani, Tommaso; Jafarpour, Farshid; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2017-01-01

    The amplitude of fluctuation-induced patterns might be expected to be proportional to the strength of the driving noise, suggesting that such patterns would be difficult to observe in nature. Here, we show that a large class of spatially extended dynamical systems driven by intrinsic noise can exhibit giant amplification, yielding patterns whose amplitude is comparable to that of deterministic Turing instabilities. The giant amplification results from the interplay between noise and nonorthogonal eigenvectors of the linear stability matrix, yielding transients that grow with time, and which, when driven by the ever-present intrinsic noise, lead to persistent large amplitude patterns. This mechanism shows that fluctuation-induced Turing patterns are observable, and are not strongly limited by the amplitude of demographic stochasticity nor by the value of the diffusion coefficients.

  5. Optical Pattern Formation in Cold Atoms: Explaining the Red-Blue Asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittberger, Bonnie; Gauthier, Daniel

    2013-05-01

    The study of pattern formation in atomic systems has provided new insight into fundamental many-body physics and low-light-level nonlinear optics. Pattern formation in cold atoms in particular is of great interest in condensed matter physics and quantum information science because atoms undergo self-organization at ultralow input powers. We recently reported the first observation of pattern formation in cold atoms but found that our results were not accurately described by any existing theoretical model of pattern formation. Previous models describing pattern formation in cold atoms predict that pattern formation should occur using both red and blue-detuned pump beams, favoring a lower threshold for blue detunings. This disagrees with our recent work, in which we only observed pattern formation with red-detuned pump beams. Previous models also assume a two-level atom, which cannot account for the cooling processes that arise when beams counterpropagate through a cold atomic vapor. We describe a new model for pattern formation that accounts for Sisyphus cooling in multi-level atoms, which gives rise to a new nonlinearity via spatial organization of the atoms. This spatial organization causes a sharp red-blue detuning asymmetry, which agrees well with our experimental observations. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the NSF through Grant #PHY-1206040.

  6. Binding the Generations: Household Formation Patterns among Vietnamese Refugees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, David W.

    2002-01-01

    Examines key features of Vietnamese refugees' household formation, reviewing sociohistorical data on household formation and structure in southern Vietnam during the period of the Republic, comparing these data with more recent data on southern and northern Vietnam, and considering U.S. Vietnamese refugee households based on the Office of Refugee…

  7. The role of hydrological transience in peatland pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, P. J.; Baird, A. J.; Belyea, L. R.

    2013-06-01

    The sloping flanks of peatlands are commonly patterned with non-random, contour-parallel stripes of distinct microhabitats such as hummocks, lawns and hollows. Patterning seems to be governed by feedbacks among peatland hydrological processes, plant micro-succession, plant litter production and peat decomposition. An improved understanding of peatland patterning may provide important insights into broader aspects of the long-term development of peatlands and their likely response to future climate change. We recreated a cellular simulation model from the literature, as well as three subtle variants, to explore the controls over peatland patterning. Our models each consist of three submodels, which simulate: peatland water tables in a gridded landscape; a simple representation of microhabitat dynamics in response to water-table depths; and changes in peat hydraulic properties. We found that the strength and nature of simulated patterning was highly dependent on the degree to which water tables had reached a steady state in response to hydrological inputs. Contrary to previous studies, we found that under a true steady state the models predict largely unpatterned landscapes that cycle rapidly between contrasting dry and wet states, dominated by hummocks and hollows, respectively. Realistic patterning only developed when simulated water tables were still transient. Literal interpretation of the degree of hydrological transience required for patterning suggests that the model should be discarded; however, the transient water tables appear to have captured some aspect of real peatland behaviour that generates patterning. Recently-buried peat layers may remain hydrologically active despite no longer reflecting current vegetation patterns, providing a form of ecological memory. Furthermore, the models were highly sensitive to the assumed values of peat hydraulic properties, which we take to indicate that the models are missing an important negative feedback between peat

  8. Effects of Scoring by Section and Independent Scorers' Patterns on Scorer Reliability in Biology Essay Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebuoh, Casmir N.; Ezeudu, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of scoring by section, use of independent scorers and conventional patterns on scorer reliability in Biology essay tests. It was revealed from literature review that conventional pattern of scoring all items at a time in essay tests had been criticized for not being reliable. The study was true experimental study…

  9. Biological invasion hotspots: a trait-based perspective reveals new sub-continental patterns

    Treesearch

    Basil V. Iannone III; Kevin M. Potter; Qinfeng Guo; Andrew M. Liebhold; Bryan C. Pijanowski; Christopher M. Oswalt; Songlin Fei

    2015-01-01

    Invader traits (including plant growth form) may play an important, and perhaps overlooked, role in determining macroscale patterns of biological invasions and therefore warrant greater consideration in future investigations aimed at understanding these patterns. To assess this need, we used empirical data from a national-level survey of forest in the contiguous 48...

  10. Convection-driven pattern formation in lawn grasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Sally; Daniels, Karen

    2009-11-01

    Spatial patterns of 'dead' lawn grass have often been ascribed to Turing-type reaction-diffusion processes related to water scarcity. We present an alternative hypothesis: that the air within the grass canopy is unstable to a convective instability, such that chill damage caused by falling cold air is responsible for the creation of brown and green bands of grass. This hypothesis is consistent with several features of small-scale vegetation patterns, including their length scale, rapid onset and transient nature. We find that the predictions of a porous medium convection model based are consistent with measurements made for a particular instance of lawn-patterning in North Carolina.

  11. Biological control of aragonite formation in stony corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Von Euw, Stanislas; Zhang, Qihong; Manichev, Viacheslav; Murali, Nagarajan; Gross, Juliane; Feldman, Leonard C.; Gustafsson, Torgny; Flach, Carol; Mendelsohn, Richard; Falkowski, Paul G.

    2017-06-01

    Little is known about how stony corals build their calcareous skeletons. There are two prevailing hypotheses: that it is a physicochemically dominated process and that it is a biologically mediated one. Using a combination of ultrahigh-resolution three-dimensional imaging and two-dimensional solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we show that mineral deposition is biologically driven. Randomly arranged, amorphous nanoparticles are initially deposited in microenvironments enriched in organic material; they then aggregate and form ordered aragonitic structures through crystal growth by particle attachment. Our NMR results are consistent with heterogeneous nucleation of the solid mineral phase driven by coral acid-rich proteins. Such a mechanism suggests that stony corals may be able to sustain calcification even under lower pH conditions that do not favor the inorganic precipitation of aragonite.

  12. The biology of dream formation: a review and critique.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Milton

    2002-01-01

    There is great interest in brain function as a result of the new laboratory and imaging techniques in the neurosciences. Psychoanalysis has embraced these contributions without adequate assessment of whether they bridge the mind/brain divide and provide answers to the questions psychoanalysts ask. A review and critique of the biological theories of dreaming highlights their limitations and points out they do not address the semantics, meaning, and content of dreaming nor the pragmatics of dreaming, its function. At best these theories attempt to provide the syntax of dreaming, the form dreaming takes. Brain biology cannot provide the transduction rules to go from neuronal firing to the psychological experience of dreaming or other mind states.

  13. Pattern Learning, Damage and Repair within Biological Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siu, Theodore; Fitzgerald O'Neill, Kate; Shinbrot, Troy

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes damage to neural networks, potentially leading to disability or even death. Nearly one in ten of these patients die, and most of the remainder suffer from symptoms ranging from headaches and nausea to convulsions and paralysis. In vitro studies to develop treatments for TBI have limited in vivo applicability, and in vitro therapies have even proven to worsen the outcome of TBI patients. We propose that this disconnect between in vitro and in vivo outcomes may be associated with the fact that in vitro tests assess indirect measures of neuronal health, but do not investigate the actual function of neuronal networks. Therefore in this talk, we examine both in vitro and in silico neuronal networks that actually perform a function: pattern identification. We allow the networks to execute genetic, Hebbian, learning, and additionally, we examine the effects of damage and subsequent repair within our networks. We show that the length of repaired connections affects the overall pattern learning performance of the network and we propose therapies that may improve function following TBI in clinical settings.

  14. Biological Basis of Tree-Ring Formation: A Crash Course

    PubMed Central

    Rathgeber, Cyrille B. K.; Cuny, Henri E.; Fonti, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Wood is of crucial importance for man and biosphere. In this mini review, we present the fundamental processes involved in tree-ring formation and intra-annual dynamics of cambial activity, along with the influences of the environmental factors. During wood formation, new xylem cells produced by the cambium are undergoing profound transformations, passing through successive differentiation stages, which enable them to perform their functions in trees. Xylem cell formation can be divided in five major phases: (1) the division of a cambial mother cell that creates a new cell; (2) the enlargement of this newly formed cell; (3) the deposition of its secondary wall; (4) the lignification of its cell wall; and finally, (5) its programmed cell death. In most regions of the world cambial activity follows a seasonal cycle. At the beginning of the growing season, when temperature increases, the cambium resumes activity, producing new xylem cells. These cells are disposed along radial files, and start their differentiation program according to their birth date, creating typical developmental strips in the forming xylem. The width of these strips smoothly changes along the growing season. Finally, when climatic conditions deteriorate (temperature or water availability in particular), cambial activity stops, soon followed by cell enlargement, and later on by secondary wall deposition. Without a clear understanding of the xylem formation process, it is not possible to comprehend how annual growth rings and typical wood structures are formed, recording normal seasonal variations of the environment as well as extreme climatic events. PMID:27303426

  15. Dynamics of formation of symmetrical patterns by chemotactic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budrene, Elena O.; Berg, Howard C.

    1995-07-01

    MOTILE cells of Escherichia coli aggregate to form stable patterns of remarkable regularity when grown from a single point on certain substrates. Central to this self-organization is chemotaxis, the motion of bacteria along gradients of a chemical attractant that the cells themselves excrete1. Here we show how these complex patterns develop. The long-range spatial order arises from interactions between two multicellular aggregate structures: a 'swarm ring' that expands radially, and focal aggregates that have lower mobility. Patterning occurs through alternating domination by these two sources of excreted attractant (which we identify here as aspartate). The pattern geometries vary in a systematic way, depending on how long an aggregate remains active; this depends, in turn, on the initial concentration of substrate (here, succinate).

  16. The role of hydrological transience in peatland pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, P. J.; Baird, A. J.; Belyea, L. R.

    2013-10-01

    The sloping flanks of peatlands are commonly patterned with non-random, contour-parallel stripes of distinct micro-habitats such as hummocks, lawns and hollows. Patterning seems to be governed by feedbacks among peatland hydrological processes, plant micro-succession, plant litter production and peat decomposition. An improved understanding of peatland patterning may provide important insights into broader aspects of the long-term development of peatlands and their likely response to future climate change. We recreated a cellular simulation model from the literature, as well as three subtle variants of the model, to explore the controls on peatland patterning. Our models each consist of three submodels, which simulate: peatland water tables in a gridded landscape, micro-habitat dynamics in response to water-table depths, and changes in peat hydraulic properties. We found that the strength and nature of simulated patterning was highly dependent on the degree to which water tables had reached a steady state in response to hydrological inputs. Contrary to previous studies, we found that under a true steady state the models predict largely unpatterned landscapes that cycle rapidly between contrasting dry and wet states, dominated by hummocks and hollows, respectively. Realistic patterning only developed when simulated water tables were still transient. Literal interpretation of the degree of hydrological transience required for patterning suggests that the model should be discarded; however, the transient water tables appear to have inadvertently replicated an ecological memory effect that may be important to peatland patterning. Recently buried peat layers may remain hydrologically active despite no longer reflecting current vegetation patterns, thereby highlighting the potential importance of three-dimensional structural complexity in peatlands to understanding the two-dimensional surface-patterning phenomenon. The models were highly sensitive to the assumed values

  17. Pattern Formation in Mississippi Valley-Type Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelka, Ulrich; Koehn, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Alternating, monomineralic dark and white bands are common features of ore hosting dolostones which are generally termed Zebra textures. These structures consist of coarse grained light and fine grained dark layers and accompany ore bodies of the Mississippi Valley-Type (MVT) worldwide. These deposits frequently develop in large hydrothermal systems, located in the flanks of foreland basins or in fold and thrust belts. The microstructural- and microchemical analysis in this study were performed on samples which were collected in the San Vicente mine. This large MVT deposit is hosted in Triassic/Jurassic Platform Carbonates located in an east-vergent fold and thrust belt of the Peruvian Andes. The thin sections were analyzed with petrographic- and scanning electron microscope. It is observed that one common striking feature is the high density of second-phase particles in the dark bands, whereas the coarser grained layers are virtually particle free. Furthermore, the particle distribution is found to be non-random. The highest particle densities in the samples occur on grain boundaries in the dark bands implying that grain boundaries can capture particles. Based on recent theories and the additional analytical findings, we developed a numerical simulation to study the pattern formation. The modelling is performed in 2D at the scale of a thin section, using a boundary-model coupled with a lattice-particle-code. During the simulation two processes are active, first a reaction takes place that replaces calcite with dolomite driven by a fluid that infiltrates the model, followed by a grain growth processes with an average grain size increase as a function of surface energy reduction. Fluid infiltration in the rock is modelled assuming Darcy Flow and an advection-diffusion equation coupled with a reaction which is a function of concentration. The reaction increases permeability of the solid and thus enhances infiltration. The reaction front in the model shifts particles

  18. Module Based Complexity Formation: Periodic Patterning in Feathers and Hairs

    PubMed Central

    Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Yeh, Chao-Yuan; Jiang, Ting-Xin; Widelitz, Randall

    2012-01-01

    Patterns describe order which emerges from homogeneity. Complex patterns on the integument are striking because of their visibility throughout an organism's lifespan. Periodic patterning is an effective design because the ensemble of hair or feather follicles (modules) allows the generation of complexity, including regional variations and cyclic regeneration, giving the skin appendages a new lease on life. Spatial patterns include the arrangements of feathers and hairs in specified number, size, and spacing. We explore how a field of equivalent progenitor cells can generate periodically arranged modules based on genetic information, physical-chemical rules and developmental timing. Reconstitution experiments suggest a competitive equilibrium regulated by activators / inhibitors involving Turing reaction-diffusion. Temporal patterns result from oscillating stem cell activities within each module (micro-environment regulation), reflected as growth (anagen) and resting (telogen) phases during the cycling of feather and hair follicles. Stimulating modules with activators initiates the spread of regenerative hair waves, while global inhibitors outside each module (macro-environment) prevent this. Different wave patterns can be simulated by Cellular Automata principles. Hormonal status and seasonal changes can modulate appendage phenotypes, leading to “organ metamorphosis”, with multiple ectodermal organ phenotypes generated from the same precursors. We discuss potential evolutionary novel steps using this module based complexity in several amniote integument organs, exemplified by the spectacular peacock feather pattern. We thus explore the application of the acquired knowledge of patterning in tissue engineering. New hair follicles can be generated after wounding. Hairs and feathers can be reconstituted through self-organization of dissociated progenitor cells. PMID:23539312

  19. Effects of Growth and Mutation on Pattern Formation in Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Mengel Pers, Benedicte; Krishna, Sandeep; Chakraborty, Sagar; Pigolotti, Simone; Sekara, Vedran; Semsey, Szabolcs; Jensen, Mogens H.

    2012-01-01

    In many developing tissues, neighboring cells enter different developmental pathways, resulting in a fine-grained pattern of different cell states. The most common mechanism that generates such patterns is lateral inhibition, for example through Delta-Notch coupling. In this work, we simulate growth of tissues consisting of a hexagonal arrangement of cells laterally inhibiting their neighbors. We find that tissue growth by cell division and cell migration tends to produce ordered patterns, whereas lateral growth leads to disordered, patchy patterns. Ordered patterns are very robust to mutations (gene silencing or activation) in single cells. In contrast, mutation in a cell of a disordered tissue can produce a larger and more widespread perturbation of the pattern. In tissues where ordered and disordered patches coexist, the perturbations spread mostly at boundaries between patches. If cell division occurs on time scales faster than the degradation time, disordered patches will appear. Our work suggests that careful experimental characterization of the disorder in tissues could pinpoint where and how the tissue is susceptible to large-scale damage even from single cell mutations. PMID:23144963

  20. Streptococcus pyogenes biofilms-formation, biology, and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, Tomas; Köller, Thomas; Kreikemeyer, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococci, GAS) is an exclusive human bacterial pathogen. The virulence potential of this species is tremendous. Interactions with humans range from asymptomatic carriage over mild and superficial infections of skin and mucosal membranes up to systemic purulent toxic-invasive disease manifestations. Particularly the latter are a severe threat for predisposed patients and lead to significant death tolls worldwide. This places GAS among the most important Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. Many recent reviews have highlighted the GAS repertoire of virulence factors, regulators and regulatory circuits/networks that enable GAS to colonize the host and to deal with all levels of the host immune defense. This covers in vitro and in vivo studies, including animal infection studies based on mice and more relevant, macaque monkeys. It is now appreciated that GAS, like many other bacterial species, do not necessarily exclusively live in a planktonic lifestyle. GAS is capable of microcolony and biofilm formation on host cells and tissues. We are now beginning to understand that this feature significantly contributes to GAS pathogenesis. In this review we will discuss the current knowledge on GAS biofilm formation, the biofilm-phenotype associated virulence factors, regulatory aspects of biofilm formation, the clinical relevance, and finally contemporary treatment regimens and future treatment options.

  1. Streptococcus pyogenes biofilms—formation, biology, and clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Tomas; Köller, Thomas; Kreikemeyer, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococci, GAS) is an exclusive human bacterial pathogen. The virulence potential of this species is tremendous. Interactions with humans range from asymptomatic carriage over mild and superficial infections of skin and mucosal membranes up to systemic purulent toxic-invasive disease manifestations. Particularly the latter are a severe threat for predisposed patients and lead to significant death tolls worldwide. This places GAS among the most important Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. Many recent reviews have highlighted the GAS repertoire of virulence factors, regulators and regulatory circuits/networks that enable GAS to colonize the host and to deal with all levels of the host immune defense. This covers in vitro and in vivo studies, including animal infection studies based on mice and more relevant, macaque monkeys. It is now appreciated that GAS, like many other bacterial species, do not necessarily exclusively live in a planktonic lifestyle. GAS is capable of microcolony and biofilm formation on host cells and tissues. We are now beginning to understand that this feature significantly contributes to GAS pathogenesis. In this review we will discuss the current knowledge on GAS biofilm formation, the biofilm-phenotype associated virulence factors, regulatory aspects of biofilm formation, the clinical relevance, and finally contemporary treatment regimens and future treatment options. PMID:25717441

  2. Intergenerational Patterns of Union Formation and Relationship Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sassler, Sharon; Cunningham, Anna; Lichter, Daniel T.

    2009-01-01

    The authors examine whether young adults who experienced their parents' divorce and new relationships have different relationship trajectories than those who spent their childhoods living with biological parents in married-couple families. The analysis is based on longitudinal reports from more than 1,500 children from Wave 1 of the 1987-1988…

  3. Intergenerational Patterns of Union Formation and Relationship Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sassler, Sharon; Cunningham, Anna; Lichter, Daniel T.

    2009-01-01

    The authors examine whether young adults who experienced their parents' divorce and new relationships have different relationship trajectories than those who spent their childhoods living with biological parents in married-couple families. The analysis is based on longitudinal reports from more than 1,500 children from Wave 1 of the 1987-1988…

  4. Rethinking the nature of fibrolamellar bone: an integrative biological revision of sauropod plexiform bone formation.

    PubMed

    Stein, Koen; Prondvai, Edina

    2014-02-01

    We present novel findings on sauropod bone histology that cast doubt on general palaeohistological concepts concerning the true nature of woven bone in primary cortical bone and its role in the rapid growth and giant body sizes of sauropod dinosaurs. By preparing and investigating longitudinal thin sections of sauropod long bones, of which transverse thin sections were published previously, we found that the amount of woven bone in the primary complex has been largely overestimated. Using comparative cellular and light-extinction characteristics in the two section planes, we revealed that the majority of the bony lamina consists of longitudinally organized primary bone, whereas woven bone is usually represented only by a layer a few cells thin in the laminae. Previous arguments on sauropod biology, which have been based on the overestimated amount, misinterpreted formation process and misjudged role of woven bone in the plexiform bone formation of sauropod dinosaurs, are thereby rejected. To explain the observed pattern in fossil bones, we review the most recent advances in bone biology concerning bone formation processes at the cellular and tissue levels. Differentiation between static and dynamic osteogenesis (SO and DO) and the revealed characteristics of SO- versus DO-derived bone tissues shed light on several questions raised by our palaeohistological results and permit identification of these bone tissues in fossils with high confidence. By presenting the methods generally used for investigating fossil bones, we show that the major cause of overestimation of the amount of woven bone in previous palaeohistological studies is the almost exclusive usage of transverse sections. In these sections, cells and crystallites of the longitudinally organized primary bone are cut transversely, thus cells appear rounded and crystallites remain dark under crossed plane polarizers, thereby giving the false impression of woven bone. In order to avoid further confusion in

  5. Pattern formation of underwater sand ripples with a skewed drive.

    PubMed

    Bundgaard, F; Ellegaard, C; Scheibye-Knudsen, K; Bohr, T; Sams, T

    2004-12-01

    In this paper we present an experimental study of the dynamics of underwater sand ripples when a regular pattern of ripples is subjected to a skewed oscillatory flow, i.e., one not perpendicular to the direction of the ripple crests. Striking patterns with new, superposed ripples on top of the original ones occur very quickly with a characteristic angle, which is, in general, not perpendicular to the flow. A slower, more complex transition then follows, leading to the final state where the ripples are again perpendicular to the flow. We investigate the variation of the superposed pattern as a function of the direction, amplitude, and frequency of the drive, and as a function of the viscosity (by changing the temperature). We quantify the dynamics of the entire transition process and finally study the grain motion around idealized (solid) skewed ripples. This leads to a characteristic mean path of a single particle. The path has a shape close to a parallelogram, with no apparent connection to the pattern of real, superposed ripples. On the other hand, a thin layer of sand sprinkled on the solid ripples leads to qualitatively similar patterns.

  6. Viscoelasticity and pattern formations in stock market indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gündüz, Güngör; Gündüz, Aydın

    2017-06-01

    The viscoelastic and thermodynamic properties of four stock indices, namely, DJI, Nasdaq-100, Nasdaq-Composite, and S&P were analyzed for a period of 30 years from 1986 to 2015. The asset values (or index) can be placed into Aristotelian `potentiality-actuality' framework by using scattering diagram. Thus, the index values can be transformed into vectorial forms in a scattering diagram, and each vector can be split into its horizontal and vertical components. According to viscoelastic theory, the horizontal component represents the conservative, and the vertical component represents the dissipative behavior. The related storage and the loss modulus of these components are determined and then work-like and heat-like terms are calculated. It is found that the change of storage and loss modulus with Wiener noise (W) exhibit interesting patterns. The loss modulus shows a featherlike pattern, whereas the storage modulus shows figurative man-like pattern. These patterns are formed due to branchings in the system and imply that stock indices do have a kind of `fine-order' which can be detected when the change of modulus values are plotted with respect to Wiener noise. In theoretical calculations it is shown that the tips of the featherlike patterns stay at negative W values, but get closer to W = 0 as the drift in the system increases. The shift of the tip point from W = 0 indicates that the price change involves higher number of positive Wiener number corrections than the negative Wiener. The work-like and heat-like terms also exhibit patterns but with different appearance than modulus patterns. The decisional changes of people are reflected as the arrows in the scattering diagram and the propagation path of these vectors resemble the path of crack propagation. The distribution of the angle between two subsequent vectors shows a peak at 90°, indicating that the path mostly obeys the crack path occurring in hard objects. Entropy mimics the Wiener noise in the evolution

  7. Large-scale pattern formation in active particles suspensions: from interacting microtubules to swimming bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranson, Igor

    2006-03-01

    We consider two biological systems of active particles exhibiting large-scale collective behavior: microtubules interacting with molecular motors and hydrodynamically entrained swimming bacteria. Starting from a generic stochastic microscopic model of inelastically colliding polar rods with an anisotropic interaction kernel, we derive set of equations for the local rods concentration and orientation. Above certain critical density of rods the model exhibits orientational instability and onset of large-scale coherence. For the microtubules and molecular motors system we demonstrate that the orientational instability leads to the formation of vortices and asters seen in recent experiments. Similar approach is applied to colonies of swimming bacteria Bacillus subtilis confined in thin fluid film. The model is formulated in term of two-dimensional equations for local density and orientation of bacteria coupled to the low Reynolds number Navier-Stokes equation for the fluid flow velocity. The collective swimming of bacteria is represented by additional source term in the Navier-Stokes equation. We demonstrate that this system exhibits formation of dynamic large-scale patterns with the typical scale determined by the density of bacteria.

  8. Pulsed oxidation and biological evolution in the Ediacaran Doushantuo Formation.

    PubMed

    McFadden, Kathleen A; Huang, Jing; Chu, Xuelei; Jiang, Ganqing; Kaufman, Alan J; Zhou, Chuanming; Yuan, Xunlai; Xiao, Shuhai

    2008-03-04

    Recent geochemical data from Oman, Newfoundland, and the western United States suggest that long-term oxidation of Ediacaran oceans resulted in progressive depletion of a large dissolved organic carbon (DOC) reservoir and potentially triggered the radiation of acanthomorphic acritarchs, algae, macroscopic Ediacara organisms, and, subsequently, motile bilaterian animals. However, the hypothesized coupling between ocean oxidation and evolution is contingent on the reliability of continuous geochemical and paleontological data in individual sections and of intercontinental correlations. Here we report high-resolution geochemical data from the fossil-rich Doushantuo Formation (635-551 Ma) in South China that confirm trends from other broadly equivalent sections and highlight key features that have not been observed in most sections or have received little attention. First, samples from the lower Doushantuo Formation are characterized by remarkably stable delta(13)C(org) (carbon isotope composition of organic carbon) values but variable delta(34)S(CAS) (sulfur isotope composition of carbonate-associated sulfate) values, which are consistent with a large isotopically buffered DOC reservoir and relatively low sulfate concentrations. Second, there are three profound negative delta(13)C(carb) (carbon isotope composition of carbonate) excursions in the Ediacaran Period. The negative delta(13)C(carb) excursions in the middle and upper Doushantuo Formation record pulsed oxidation of the deep oceanic DOC reservoir. The oxidation events appear to be coupled with eukaryote diversity in the Doushantuo basin. Comparison with other early Ediacaran basins suggests spatial heterogeneity of eukaryote distribution and redox conditions. We hypothesize that the distribution of early Ediacaran eukaryotes likely tracked redox conditions and that only after approximately 551 Ma (when Ediacaran oceans were pervasively oxidized) did evolution of oxygen-requiring taxa reach global distribution.

  9. Pulsed oxidation and biological evolution in the Ediacaran Doushantuo Formation

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, Kathleen A.; Huang, Jing; Chu, Xuelei; Jiang, Ganqing; Kaufman, Alan J.; Zhou, Chuanming; Yuan, Xunlai; Xiao, Shuhai

    2008-01-01

    Recent geochemical data from Oman, Newfoundland, and the western United States suggest that long-term oxidation of Ediacaran oceans resulted in progressive depletion of a large dissolved organic carbon (DOC) reservoir and potentially triggered the radiation of acanthomorphic acritarchs, algae, macroscopic Ediacara organisms, and, subsequently, motile bilaterian animals. However, the hypothesized coupling between ocean oxidation and evolution is contingent on the reliability of continuous geochemical and paleontological data in individual sections and of intercontinental correlations. Here we report high-resolution geochemical data from the fossil-rich Doushantuo Formation (635–551 Ma) in South China that confirm trends from other broadly equivalent sections and highlight key features that have not been observed in most sections or have received little attention. First, samples from the lower Doushantuo Formation are characterized by remarkably stable δ13Corg (carbon isotope composition of organic carbon) values but variable δ34SCAS (sulfur isotope composition of carbonate-associated sulfate) values, which are consistent with a large isotopically buffered DOC reservoir and relatively low sulfate concentrations. Second, there are three profound negative δ13Ccarb (carbon isotope composition of carbonate) excursions in the Ediacaran Period. The negative δ13Ccarb excursions in the middle and upper Doushantuo Formation record pulsed oxidation of the deep oceanic DOC reservoir. The oxidation events appear to be coupled with eukaryote diversity in the Doushantuo basin. Comparison with other early Ediacaran basins suggests spatial heterogeneity of eukaryote distribution and redox conditions. We hypothesize that the distribution of early Ediacaran eukaryotes likely tracked redox conditions and that only after ≈551 Ma (when Ediacaran oceans were pervasively oxidized) did evolution of oxygen-requiring taxa reach global distribution. PMID:18299566

  10. Family Formation and Dissolution Patterns: Rural-Urban Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, Lloyd

    Patterns of relationships among the variables of pregnancy status at marriage, marital dissolution probabilities, residence and migration status, and race were ascertained. The data source was the 1967 Survey of Economic Opportunity, a large national probability sample expanded to U.S. population parameters. Relationships among these variables…

  11. Pattern Formations in Polymer-Molecular Motor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David; Humphrey, David; Duggan, Cynthia; Käs, Josef

    2001-03-01

    In previous studies with the microtubule-kinesin system, organized patterns such as asters and rotating vortices have been seen (Nedelec et al, Nature 1997), which were of a dynamic nature and dependent on active motors. A similar system was constructed using actin and myosin, which displays similar patterns, however, with drastically different dynamics. These patterns arise independent of the initial amount of immediate use energy (in the form of ATP), assembling only upon the near exhaustion of available ATP. Further studies have clearly shown that in fact these patterns are not dependent upon the motor activity of the myosin but its propensity to serve as a cross-linking element in an actin network, with the motor activity serving to prevent the arising of order in the system. We believe the dynamic differences inherent between the two polymer-motor systems studied lies primarily in the structural nature of the motor complexes, with the kinesin complex ordering the system by pushing multiple filaments in a parallel direction, and the myosin complexes disordering the system by pushing filaments in an antiparallel manner.

  12. Pattern formation in the wake of triggered pushed fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goh, Ryan; Scheel, Arnd

    2016-08-01

    Pattern-forming fronts are often controlled by an external stimulus which progresses through a stable medium at a fixed speed, rendering it unstable in its wake. By controlling the speed of excitation, such stimuli, or ‘triggers’, can mediate pattern forming fronts which freely invade an unstable equilibrium and control which pattern is selected. In this work, we analytically and numerically study when the trigger perturbs an oscillatory pushed free front. In such a situation, the resulting patterned front, which we call a pushed trigger front, exhibits a variety of phenomenon, including snaking, non-monotonic wave-number selection, and hysteresis. Assuming the existence of a generic oscillatory pushed free front, we use heteroclinic bifurcation techniques to prove the existence of trigger fronts in an abstract setting motivated by the spatial dynamics approach. We then derive a leading order expansion for the selected wave-number in terms of the trigger speed. Furthermore, we show that such a bifurcation curve is governed by the difference of certain strong-stable and weakly-stable spatial eigenvalues associated with the decay of the free pushed front. We also study prototypical examples of these phenomena in the cubic-quintic complex Ginzburg Landau equation and a modified Cahn-Hilliard equation.

  13. Size segregated ring pattern formation in particle impactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saylor, J. R.; Fredericks, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    Typical particle impactors consist of a nozzle that directs a particle laden flow onto a plate, and is designed to capture particles greater than a cutoff diameter. Connected in series as a cascade, with each impactor designed to have a progressively smaller cutoff diameter, the particle size distribution can be measured. Typical impactors utilize a nozzle-to-plate distance S that is on the order of one nozzle diameter W, S / W 1 , and give a nominally Gaussian particle deposition pattern on the plate. We explored conditions where S / W < < 1 and observed deposition patterns consisting of very fine rings. Moreover, we found that the ring diameter increased with decreasing particle diameter and the ring thickness increased with particle diameter. These results suggest a potential method for sizing particles by using the mature technology of impactors in a different way. Potential mechanisms for how these ring patterns are formed will be discussed. We note that prior studies have observed conditions where particle deposition patterns exhibited "halos". These halos appear less distinct than the rings we have observed, and it is unclear whether they are related.

  14. Stereomask lithography (SML): a universal multi-object micro-patterning technique for biological applications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Siwei; Chen, Arnold; Revzin, Alexander; Pan, Tingrui

    2011-01-21

    The advent of biological micro-patterning techniques has given new impetus to many areas of biological research, including quantitative biochemical analysis, tissue engineering, biosensing, and regenerative medicine. Derived from photolithography or soft lithography, current bio-patterning approaches have yet to completely address the needs of out-of-cleanroom, universal applicability, high feature resolution, as well as multi-object placement, though many have shown great promise to precisely pattern one specific biomaterial. In this paper, we present a novel versatile biological lithography technique to achieve integrated multi-object patterning with high feature resolution and high adaptability to various biomaterials, referred to as stereomask lithography (SML). Successive patterning of multiple objects is enabled by using unique three-dimensional masks (i.e., the stereomasks), which lay out current micropatterns while protecting pre-existing biological features on the substrate. Furthermore, high-precision reversible alignment among multiple bio-objects is achieved by adopting a peg-in-hole design between the substrate and stereomasks. We demonstrate that the SML technique is capable of constructing a complex biological microenvironment with various bio-functional components at the single-cell resolution, which to the best of our knowledge has not been realized before.

  15. Chirality as a physical aspect of structure formation in biological macromolecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshko, E. V.; Tverdislov, V. A.

    2016-08-01

    A novel regularity of hierarchical structures is found in the formation of chiral biological macromolecular systems. The formation of structures with alternating chirality (helical structures) serves as an instrument of stratification. The ability of a carbon atom to form chiral compounds is an important factor that determined the carbon basis of living systems on the Earth as well as their development through a series of chiral bifurcations. In the course of biological evolution, the helical structures became basic elements of the molecular machines in the cell. The discreteness of structural levels allowed the mechanical degrees of freedom formation in the molecular machines in the cell.

  16. Nonconstant Positive Steady States and Pattern Formation of 1D Prey-Taxis Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Song, Yang; Shao, Lingjie

    2016-08-01

    Prey-taxis is the process that predators move preferentially toward patches with highest density of prey. It is well known to have an important role in biological control and the maintenance of biodiversity. To model the coexistence and spatial distributions of predator and prey species, this paper concerns nonconstant positive steady states of a wide class of prey-taxis systems with general functional responses over 1D domain. Linearized stability of the positive equilibrium is analyzed to show that prey-taxis destabilizes prey-predator homogeneity when prey repulsion (e.g., due to volume-filling effect in predator species or group defense in prey species) is present, and prey-taxis stabilizes the homogeneity otherwise. Then, we investigate the existence and stability of nonconstant positive steady states to the system through rigorous bifurcation analysis. Moreover, we provide detailed and thorough calculations to determine properties such as pitchfork and turning direction of the local branches. Our stability results also provide a stable wave mode selection mechanism for thee reaction-advection-diffusion systems including prey-taxis models considered in this paper. Finally, we provide numerical studies of prey-taxis systems with Holling-Tanner kinetics to illustrate and support our theoretical findings. Our numerical simulations demonstrate that the 2× 2 prey-taxis system is able to model the formation and evolution of various striking patterns, such as spikes, periodic oscillations, and coarsening even when the domain is one-dimensional. These dynamics can model the coexistence and spatial distributions of interacting prey and predator species. We also give some insights on how system parameters influence pattern formation in these models.

  17. Nonconstant Positive Steady States and Pattern Formation of 1D Prey-Taxis Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Song, Yang; Shao, Lingjie

    2017-02-01

    Prey-taxis is the process that predators move preferentially toward patches with highest density of prey. It is well known to have an important role in biological control and the maintenance of biodiversity. To model the coexistence and spatial distributions of predator and prey species, this paper concerns nonconstant positive steady states of a wide class of prey-taxis systems with general functional responses over 1D domain. Linearized stability of the positive equilibrium is analyzed to show that prey-taxis destabilizes prey-predator homogeneity when prey repulsion (e.g., due to volume-filling effect in predator species or group defense in prey species) is present, and prey-taxis stabilizes the homogeneity otherwise. Then, we investigate the existence and stability of nonconstant positive steady states to the system through rigorous bifurcation analysis. Moreover, we provide detailed and thorough calculations to determine properties such as pitchfork and turning direction of the local branches. Our stability results also provide a stable wave mode selection mechanism for thee reaction-advection-diffusion systems including prey-taxis models considered in this paper. Finally, we provide numerical studies of prey-taxis systems with Holling-Tanner kinetics to illustrate and support our theoretical findings. Our numerical simulations demonstrate that the 2× 2 prey-taxis system is able to model the formation and evolution of various striking patterns, such as spikes, periodic oscillations, and coarsening even when the domain is one-dimensional. These dynamics can model the coexistence and spatial distributions of interacting prey and predator species. We also give some insights on how system parameters influence pattern formation in these models.

  18. Self-organized pattern formation in motor-microtubule mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankararaman, Sumithra; Menon, Gautam I.; Sunil Kumar, P. B.

    2004-09-01

    We model the stable self-organized patterns obtained in the nonequilibrium steady states of mixtures of molecular motors and microtubules. In experiments [Nédélec , Nature (London) 389, 305 (1997); Surrey , Science 292, 1167 (2001)] performed in a quasi-two-dimensional geometry, microtubules are oriented by complexes of motor proteins. This interaction yields a variety of patterns, including arrangements of asters, vortices, and disordered configurations. We model this system via a two-dimensional vector field describing the local coarse-grained microtubule orientation and two scalar density fields associated to molecular motors. These scalar fields describe motors which either attach to and move along microtubules or diffuse freely within the solvent. Transitions between single aster, spiral, and vortex states are obtained as a consequence of confinement, as parameters in our model are varied. For systems in which the effects of confinement can be neglected, we present a map of nonequilibrium steady states, which includes arrangements of asters and vortices separately as well as aster-vortex mixtures and fully disordered states. We calculate the steady state distribution of bound and free motors in aster and vortex configurations of microtubules and compare these to our simulation results, providing qualitative arguments for the stability of different patterns in various regimes of parameter space. We study the role of crowding or “saturation” effects on the density profiles of motors in asters, discussing the role of such effects in stabilizing single asters. We also comment on the implications of our results for experiments.

  19. Exploring archetypal dynamics of pattern formation in cellular flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Emily

    2002-01-01

    The application of archetypal analysis to high-dimensional data arising from video-taped images is presented. Included in the analysis are intermittent regimes which have not been analyzed previously by other statistical methods such as principal component analysis (PCA). A hybrid PCA/archetypes technique has been developed to overcome the difficulties of applying archetypes to data sets with points living in a space of dimension higher than about 500. The advantages of the method lie in the creation of patterns typical of the set as a whole, and an expression of the dynamics in terms of these patterns. Archetypes are particularly useful in identifying intermittent regimes, where low energy events that might be missed by a severe principal component truncation are none-the-less crucial to understanding the dynamics. They are part of a suite of data analysis techniques that can be used on dynamic data sets (such as FFT, PCA and other spectral decompositions). This hybrid method extends the application of archetypes to spatio-temporal dynamics in two-dimensional patterns.

  20. Drying Mediated Pattern Formation From a Restricted Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun

    2005-03-01

    There is much interest in causing patterns (of dyes, nanoparticles, or polymers) to emerge spontaneously on surfaces. A main characteristic pattern known as the ``coffee ring'' formed when the contact line of an evaporating drop becomes pinned, ensuring that liquid evaporating from the edge is replenished by liquid from the interior, so that outward flow carries the nonvolatile dispersion to the edge. Here we report the remarkable observation that a complex structure consisting of a periodic family of hundreds of concentric rings with definite spacing can be achieved when solvent evaporates irreversible from a restricted geometry. Each ring is approximately nanometers high and micron wide. The observed micron size rings are governed by the imposed geometry, the solution concentration and the solvent properties. The mechanism, which is believed to be a series of successive pinning and depinning of the contact line as solvent evaporates, will be discussed. This simple yet novel approach affords a means to produce and organize surface patterns in a well-ordered gradient fashion.

  1. Pattern formation in Dictyostelium discoideum aggregates in confined microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallou, Adrien; Hersen, Pascal; di Meglio, Jean-Marc; Kabla, Alexandre

    Dictyostelium Discoideum (Dd) is often viewed as a model system to study the complex collective cell behaviours which shape an embryo. Under starvation, Dd cells form multicellular aggregates which soon elongate, starting to display an anterior-posterior axis by differentiating into two distinct cell populations; prestalk (front) and prespore (rear) cells zones. Different models, either based on positional information or on differentiation followed up by cell sorting, have been proposed to explain the origin and the regulation of this spatial pattern.To decipher between the proposed hypotheses, we have developed am experimental platform where aggregates, made of genetically engineered Dd cells to express fluorescent reporters of cell differentiation in either prestalk or prespore cells, are allowed to develop in 20 to 400 μm wide hydrogel channels. Such a setup allows us to both mimic Dd confined natural soil environment and to follow the patterning dynamics using time-lapse microscopy. Tracking cell lineage commitments and positions in space and time, we demonstrate that Dd cells differentiate first into prestalk and prespore cells prior to sorting into an organized spatial pattern on the basis of collective motions based on differential motility and adhesion mechanisms. A. Hallou would like to thank the University of Cambridge for the Award of an ``Oliver Gatty Studentship in Biophysical and Colloid Science''.

  2. A simplified memory network model based on pattern formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kesheng; Zhang, Xiyun; Wang, Chaoqing; Liu, Zonghua

    2014-12-01

    Many experiments have evidenced the transition with different time scales from short-term memory (STM) to long-term memory (LTM) in mammalian brains, while its theoretical understanding is still under debate. To understand its underlying mechanism, it has recently been shown that it is possible to have a long-period rhythmic synchronous firing in a scale-free network, provided the existence of both the high-degree hubs and the loops formed by low-degree nodes. We here present a simplified memory network model to show that the self-sustained synchronous firing can be observed even without these two necessary conditions. This simplified network consists of two loops of coupled excitable neurons with different synaptic conductance and with one node being the sensory neuron to receive an external stimulus signal. This model can be further used to show how the diversity of firing patterns can be selectively formed by varying the signal frequency, duration of the stimulus and network topology, which corresponds to the patterns of STM and LTM with different time scales. A theoretical analysis is presented to explain the underlying mechanism of firing patterns.

  3. Pattern recognition of HER-1 in biological fluids using stochastic sensing.

    PubMed

    Stefan-van Staden, Raluca-Ioana; Moldoveanu, Iuliana; Gavan, Camelia Stanciu

    2015-04-01

    Stochastic sensing was employed for pattern recognition of HER-1 in biological fluids. Nanostructured materials such as 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphyrin, maltodextrin and α-cyclodextrin were used to modify diamond paste for stochastic sensing of HER-1. Pattern recognition of HER-1 in biological fluids was performed in a linear concentration range between 5.60 × 10(-11) and 9.72 × 10(-7 )mg ml(-1). The lower limits of determination (10(-12 )mg ml(-1) magnitude order) were recorded when maltodextrin and α-cyclodextrin were used for stochastic sensing. The pattern recognition test of HER-1 in biological fluids samples shows high reliability for both qualitative and quantitative assay.

  4. On Pattern Formation Mechanisms for Lepidopteran Wing Patterns and Mammalian Coat Markings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, J. D.

    1981-10-01

    The patterns on wings of Lepidoptera can be generated with a few pattern elements, but no mechanism has been suggested for producing them. I consider two of the basic patterns, namely, central symmetry and dependent patterns. A biochemically plausible model mechanism is proposed for generating major aspects of these patterns, based on a diffusing morphogen that activates a gene or colour-specific enzyme in a threshold manner to generate a stable heterogeneous spatial pattern. The model is applied to the determination stream hypothesis of Kuhn & von Engelhardt (Wilhelm Roux Arch. Entw Mech. Org. 130, 660 (1933)), and results from the model compared with their microcautery experiments on the pupal wing of Ephestia kuhniella. In the case of dependent patterns, results are compared with patterns on specific Papilionidae. For the same mechanism and a fixed set of parameters I demonstrate the important roles of geometry and scale on the spatial patterns obtained. The results and evidence presented here suggest the existence of diffusion fields of the order of several millimetres, which are very much larger than most embryonic fields. The existence of zones of polarizing activity is also indicated. Colour patterns on animals are considered to be genetically determined, but the mechanism is not known. I have previously suggested that a single mechanism that can exhibit an infinite variety of patterns is a candidate for that mechanism, and proposed that a reaction-diffusion system that can be diffusively driven unstable could be responsible for the laying down of the spacing patterns that generates the prepattern for animal coat markings. For illustrative purposes I consider a practical reaction mechanism, which exhibits substrate inhibition, and show that the geometry and scale of the domain (part of the epidermis) play a crucial role in the structural patterns that result. Patterns are obtained for a selection of geometries, and general features are related to the coat

  5. Identification of biologically recycled continental materials in banded iron formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Beard, B. L.; Johnson, C.

    2015-12-01

    The controversy on the origin of banded iron formations (BIFs) has lasted for many decades. Studies prior to the 1970s suggested that Fe in BIFs was supplied from continental riverine inputs[1], but discovery of midocean ridge hydrothermal systems in the 1970s and identification of positive Eu anomaly in BIF samples led to an alternative model where hydrothermal vents provided Fe in BIFs[2]. Although the latter model has became widely accepted, it should be noted that interpretations of Fe sources for BIFs using the abundance and isotopic composition of rare earth elements (REEs) are based on an assumption that transport and deposition of REEs and Fe were coupled. We address the question of Fe sources and pathways for BIFs by combining stable Fe isotopes with radiogenic Nd isotopes as well as REE measurements to test proposals that Fe in BIFs was hydrothermally sourced. The samples investigated are from a type section of the Dales Gorge member of the 2.5 Ga Brockman Iron Formation, the world's most extensive Superior-type BIF that represents the climax of BIF deposition in the geologic record. Large variations were observed in both Fe and Nd isotope compositions of the BIF samples, and there is a positive correlation between the bulk rock ɛNd and δ56Fe values. In addition, there is a negative corelation between ɛNd and Sm/Nd ratios. In order to explain the observed correlations in those isotopic and elemental data, a two-component model, where mixing between a high ɛNd, low Sm/Nd hydrothermal endmember and a low ɛNd, low δ56Fe, but high Sm/Nd continental endmember occurred prior to deposition of the BIF, is required. The low-δ56Fe, high-Sm/Nd endmember is best explained by microbial dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) in the coastal sediments, which fractionated Fe isotopes and REEs and released these components back to water column that were ultimately precipitated in BIFs. The range and distribution of ɛNdvalues in the BIF samples suggest that the amount

  6. Mining maximal cohesive induced subnetworks and patterns by integrating biological networks with gene profile data.

    PubMed

    Alroobi, Rami; Ahmed, Syed; Salem, Saeed

    2013-09-01

    With the availability of vast amounts of protein-protein, protein-DNA interactions, and genome-wide mRNA expression data for several organisms, identifying biological complexes has emerged as a major task in systems biology. Most of the existing approaches for complex identification have focused on utilizing one source of data. Recent research has shown that systematic integration of gene profile data with interaction data yields significant patterns. In this paper, we introduce the problem of mining maximal cohesive subnetworks that satisfy user-defined constraints defined over the gene profiles of the reported subnetworks. Moreover, we introduce the problem of finding maximal cohesive patterns which are sets of cohesive genes. Experiments on Yeast and Human datasets show the effectiveness of the proposed approach by assessing the overlap of the discovered subnetworks with known biological complexes. Moreover, GO enrichment analysis shows that the discovered subnetworks are biologically significant.

  7. The Biological Connection Markup Language: a SBGN-compliant format for visualization, filtering and analysis of biological pathways.

    PubMed

    Beltrame, Luca; Calura, Enrica; Popovici, Razvan R; Rizzetto, Lisa; Guedez, Damariz Rivero; Donato, Michele; Romualdi, Chiara; Draghici, Sorin; Cavalieri, Duccio

    2011-08-01

    Many models and analysis of signaling pathways have been proposed. However, neither of them takes into account that a biological pathway is not a fixed system, but instead it depends on the organism, tissue and cell type as well as on physiological, pathological and experimental conditions. The Biological Connection Markup Language (BCML) is a format to describe, annotate and visualize pathways. BCML is able to store multiple information, permitting a selective view of the pathway as it exists and/or behave in specific organisms, tissues and cells. Furthermore, BCML can be automatically converted into data formats suitable for analysis and into a fully SBGN-compliant graphical representation, making it an important tool that can be used by both computational biologists and 'wet lab' scientists. The XML schema and the BCML software suite are freely available under the LGPL for download at http://bcml.dc-atlas.net. They are implemented in Java and supported on MS Windows, Linux and OS X.

  8. Sex-Specific Pattern Formation During Early Drosophila Development

    PubMed Central

    Manu; Ludwig, Michael Z.; Kreitman, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The deleterious effects of different X-chromosome dosage in males and females are buffered by a process called dosage compensation, which in Drosophila is achieved through a doubling of X-linked transcription in males. The male-specific lethal complex mediates this process, but is known to act only after gastrulation. Recent work has shown that the transcription of X-linked genes is also upregulated in males prior to gastrulation; whether it results in functional dosage compensation is not known. Absent or partial early dosage compensation raises the possibility of sex-biased expression of key developmental genes, such as the segmentation genes controlling anteroposterior patterning. We assess the functional output of early dosage compensation by measuring the expression of even-skipped (eve) with high spatiotemporal resolution in male and female embryos. We show that eve has a sexually dimorphic pattern, suggesting an interaction with either X-chromosome dose or the sex determination system. By manipulating the gene copy number of an X-linked transcription factor, giant (gt), we traced sex-biased eve patterning to gt dose, indicating that early dosage compensation is functionally incomplete. Despite sex-biased eve expression, the gene networks downstream of eve are able to produce sex-independent segmentation, a point that we establish by measuring the proportions of segments in elongated germ-band embryos. Finally, we use a whole-locus eve transgene with modified cis regulation to demonstrate that segment proportions have a sex-dependent sensitivity to subtle changes in Eve expression. The sex independence of downstream segmentation despite this sensitivity to Eve expression implies that additional autosomal gene- or pathway-specific mechanisms are required to ameliorate the effects of partial early dosage compensation. PMID:23410834

  9. Pattern formation and growth kinetics in eutectic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Jing

    Growth patterns during liquid/solid phase transformation are governed by simultaneous effects of heat and mass transfer mechanisms, creation of new interfaces, jump of the crystallization units from liquid to solid and their rearrangement in the solid matrix. To examine how the above processes influence the scale of microstructure, two eutectic systems are chosen for the study: a polymeric system polyethylene glycol-p-dibromobenzene (PEG-DBBZ) and a simple molecular system succinonitrile (SCN)-camphor. The scaling law for SCN-camphor system is found to follow the classical Jackson-Hunt model of circular rod eutectic, where the diffusion in the liquid and the interface energy are the main physics governing the two-phase pattern. In contrast, a significantly different scaling law is observed for the polymer system. The interface kinetics of PEG phase and its solute concentration dependence thus have been critically investigated for the first time by directional solidification technique. A model is then proposed that shows that the two-phase pattern in polymers is governed by the interface diffusion and the interface kinetics. In SCN-camphor system, a new branch of eutectic, elliptical shape rod, is found in thin samples where only one layer of camphor rods is present. It is found that the orientation of the ellipse can change from the major axis in the direction of the thickness to the direction of the width as the velocity and/or the sample thickness is decreased. A theoretical model is developed that predicts the spacing and orientation of the elliptical rods in a thin sample. The single phase growth patterns of SCN-camphor system were also examined with emphasis on the three-dimensional single cell and cell/dendrite transition. For the 3D single cell in a capillary tube, the entire cell shape ahead of the eutectic front can be described by the Saffmann-Taylor finger only at extremely low growth rate. A 3D directional solidification model is developed to

  10. Pattern Formation and Growth Kinetics in Eutectic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Jing

    2007-01-01

    Growth patterns during liquid/solid phase transformation are governed by simultaneous effects of heat and mass transfer mechanisms, creation of new interfaces, jump of the crystallization units from liquid to solid and their rearrangement in the solid matrix. To examine how the above processes influence the scale of microstructure, two eutectic systems are chosen for the study: a polymeric system polyethylene glycol-p-dibromobenzene (PEG-DBBZ) and a simple molecular system succinonitrile (SCN)-camphor. The scaling law for SCN-camphor system is found to follow the classical Jackson-Hunt model of circular rod eutectic, where the diffusion in the liquid and the interface energy are the main physics governing the two-phase pattern. In contrast, a significantly different scaling law is observed for the polymer system. The interface kinetics of PEG phase and its solute concentration dependence thus have been critically investigated for the first time by directional solidification technique. A model is then proposed that shows that the two-phase pattern in polymers is governed by the interface diffusion and the interface kinetics. In SCN-camphor system, a new branch of eutectic, elliptical shape rodl, is found in thin samples where only one layer of camphor rods is present. It is found that the orientation of the ellipse can change from the major axis in the direction of the thickness to the direction of the width as the velocity and/or the sample thickness is decreased. A theoretical model is developed that predicts the spacing and orientation of the elliptical rods in a thin sample. The single phase growth patterns of SCN-camphor system were also examined with emphasis on the three-dimensional single cell and cell/dendrite transition. For the 3D single cell in a capillary tube, the entire cell shape ahead of the eutectic front can be described by the Saffmann-Taylor finger only at extremely low growth rate. A 3D directional solidification model is developed to

  11. Pattern formation in granular and granular-fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Nhat-Hang P.

    Particles and suspensions of particles in fluids are regularly used in many engineering disciplines such as catalysis and reaction engineering, environmental engineering, pharmaceutical engineering, etc. A few issues that are commonly encountered include ensuring homogeneity in pharmaceutical suspensions, predicting particle transport in atmospheric and effluent streams, and manufacturing uniform composite materials. Yet the fundamental study of particle motions in granular media or in highly concentrated granular suspensions has received little attention. Relevant issues of research interest include development of adaptive models that permit wide ranges of particle concentrations, improvement of analyses that allow physical interpretation of particle motions in any medium, of scales ranging from particle size to system size, and accurate validation of theoretical with experimental data. Given the above shortcomings, this dissertation will focus on investigating basic transport behavior of particles in fluids and developing predictive models for granular media and granular suspensions. Emphasis will be given to combining experiments with computations through examples of pattern forming phenomena in a granular medium and a dense granular-fluid system. The background motivation and the objectives of this dissertation are stated in the opening chapter 1. The next three chapters address these objectives in detail. First, chapter 2 presents experimental evidence, descriptions, and characteristics of novel patterns in a dense granular suspension. This is followed by chapter 3 in which a mean-field continuum model is derived to further elucidate the reported patterning phenomena. Chapter 4 uncovers several novel granular patterns experimentally and is concluded with a coarse-grained phenomenological model for granular surface flows. Lastly, chapter 5 closes the dissertation with conclusions and possible future directions. This work provides additional understanding and

  12. Pattern formation in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky-PAMAM dendrimer system.

    PubMed

    Roncaglia, Diana I; Carballido-Landeira, Jorge; Muñuzuri, Alberto P

    2011-04-28

    The Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction was studied under the influence of nanometric confinements induced by a complex polymer, the PAMAM-G4 dendrimers. They are well-defined in both molecular weight and architecture and are capable of molecular inclusion, making "unimolecular active micelles". The effect of such nanocompartments in the BZ reaction is analyzed by changing both the excitability and the concentration of the dendrimer, obtaining a wide range of behaviours, ranging from stationary Turing-like patterns to time dependent structures, such as jumping waves or packet waves.

  13. Pattern formation in a complex plasma in high magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Schwabe, M; Konopka, U; Bandyopadhyay, P; Morfill, G E

    2011-05-27

    Low-pressure room-temperature neon, argon, krypton, and air plasmas were studied in magnetic fields up to flux densities of 2.3 T. Filaments appeared parallel to the magnetic field lines, and patterns such as spirals and concentric circles formed in the perpendicular direction. We link these effects to the magnetization of the ions. We also used a layer of embedded microparticles as probes in the plasma. Their motion changed dramatically from a collective rotation of the whole ensemble in moderate magnetic fields to a rotation in several small vortices centered at the filaments. © 2011 American Physical Society

  14. Spatial pattern formation induced by Gaussian white noise.

    PubMed

    Scarsoglio, Stefania; Laio, Francesco; D'Odorico, Paolo; Ridolfi, Luca

    2011-02-01

    The ability of Gaussian noise to induce ordered states in dynamical systems is here presented in an overview of the main stochastic mechanisms able to generate spatial patterns. These mechanisms involve: (i) a deterministic local dynamics term, accounting for the local rate of variation of the field variable, (ii) a noise component (additive or multiplicative) accounting for the unavoidable environmental disturbances, and (iii) a linear spatial coupling component, which provides spatial coherence and takes into account diffusion mechanisms. We investigate these dynamics using analytical tools, such as mean-field theory, linear stability analysis and structure function analysis, and use numerical simulations to confirm these analytical results.

  15. The Dynamics of Visual Experience, an EEG Study of Subjective Pattern Formation

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Mark A.; Twomey, Deirdre; Glennon, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Background Since the origin of psychological science a number of studies have reported visual pattern formation in the absence of either physiological stimulation or direct visual-spatial references. Subjective patterns range from simple phosphenes to complex patterns but are highly specific and reported reliably across studies. Methodology/Principal Findings Using independent-component analysis (ICA) we report a reduction in amplitude variance consistent with subjective-pattern formation in ventral posterior areas of the electroencephalogram (EEG). The EEG exhibits significantly increased power at delta/theta and gamma-frequencies (point and circle patterns) or a series of high-frequency harmonics of a delta oscillation (spiral patterns). Conclusions/Significance Subjective-pattern formation may be described in a way entirely consistent with identical pattern formation in fluids or granular flows. In this manner, we propose subjective-pattern structure to be represented within a spatio-temporal lattice of harmonic oscillations which bind topographically organized visual-neuronal assemblies by virtue of low frequency modulation. PMID:22292053

  16. A mechanistic description of the formation and evolution of vegetation patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foti, R.; Ramírez, J. A.

    2013-01-01

    Vegetation patterns are a common and well-defined characteristic of many landscapes. In this paper we explore some of the physical mechanisms responsible for the establishment of self-organized, non-random vegetation patterns that arise at the hillslope scale in many areas of the world, especially in arid and semi-arid regions. In doing so, we provide a fundamental mechanistic understanding of the dynamics of vegetation pattern formation and development. Reciprocal effects of vegetation on the hillslope thermodynamics, runoff production and run-on infiltration, root density, surface albedo and soil moisture content are analyzed. In particular, we: (1) present a physically based mechanistic description of processes leading to vegetation pattern formation; (2) quantify the relative impact of each process on pattern formation; and (3) describe the relationships between vegetation patterns and the climatic, hydraulic and topographic characteristics of the system. We validate the model by comparing simulations with observed natural patterns in the areas of Niger near Niamey and Somalia near Garoowe. Our analyses suggest that the phenomenon of pattern formation is primarily driven by run-on infiltration and mechanisms of facilitation/inhibition among adjacent vegetation groups, mediated by vegetation effects on soil properties and controls on soil moisture and albedo. Nonetheless, even in presence of those mechanisms, patterns arise only when the climatic conditions, particularly annual precipitation and net radiation, are favorable.

  17. [Family formation in Flanders: new patterns, different timing].

    PubMed

    Lee, H Y; Rajulton, F; Wijewickrema, S; Lesthaeghe, R

    1987-01-01

    "The article presents a statistical study of the starting age and the speed of transitions in the process of family formation in Flanders. It contrasts two sets of generations, three groups according to educational achievement and three groups with differing religious practice. The methodology of shifted proportional hazard models is used and transition probabilities are fed into a semi-Markovian chain. Higher educational achievement results in later starting points, but not in a differing pace once started. By contrast, lower religious involvement speeds up the transitions to first sexual contact and premarital cohabitation, while it considerably retards the transition to parenthood among the generations born after 1950." (SUMMARY IN ENG AND FRE)

  18. A stochastic multicellular model identifies biological watermarks from disorders in self-organized patterns of phyllotaxis.

    PubMed

    Refahi, Yassin; Brunoud, Géraldine; Farcot, Etienne; Jean-Marie, Alain; Pulkkinen, Minna; Vernoux, Teva; Godin, Christophe

    2016-07-06

    Exploration of developmental mechanisms classically relies on analysis of pattern regularities. Whether disorders induced by biological noise may carry information on building principles of developmental systems is an important debated question. Here, we addressed theoretically this question using phyllotaxis, the geometric arrangement of plant aerial organs, as a model system. Phyllotaxis arises from reiterative organogenesis driven by lateral inhibitions at the shoot apex. Motivated by recurrent observations of disorders in phyllotaxis patterns, we revisited in depth the classical deterministic view of phyllotaxis. We developed a stochastic model of primordia initiation at the shoot apex, integrating locality and stochasticity in the patterning system. This stochastic model recapitulates phyllotactic patterns, both regular and irregular, and makes quantitative predictions on the nature of disorders arising from noise. We further show that disorders in phyllotaxis instruct us on the parameters governing phyllotaxis dynamics, thus that disorders can reveal biological watermarks of developmental systems.

  19. Pattern guided structure formation in polymer films of asymmetric blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raczkowska, J.; Bernasik, A.; Budkowski, A.; Cyganik, P.; Rysz, J.; Raptis, I.; Czuba, P.

    2006-03-01

    Two off-critical blends of poly(2-vinylpyridine) and polystyrene, 2:3 and 3:2 (w:w) PVP:PS, were spin-cast (with varied domain scale R) onto periodically ( λ = 4 μm) patterned substrate. The pattern consisted of two alternating symmetric stripes: Au attracting PVP and neutral self-assembled monolayer. The resulting droplet-type morphologies were recorded with Scanning Force Microscopy and examined with integral geometry approach. PVP-rich islands of the 2:3 PVP:PS films form, for a wide R/ λ range, strongly anisotropic morphologies. They show up, for R/ λ ˜ 0.5, a weak λ/2-substructure of smaller PVP droplets in addition to the domains periodic with λ. The 3:2 blend exhibits morphologies with dominant λ-structure of PVP ribbons, which encircle PS droplets. For R/ λ ˜ 0.5, smaller PS domains are also present but no λ/2-substructure is formed. The | χE|-values of droplet surface density are reduced, as compared to homogeneous substrate, for the 3:2 blend (with | χE| → 0 for R ˜ λ). This effect is absent for the 2:3 mixture.

  20. [The physics of pattern formation of liquid interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    Energy consumption in fabrication of materials for all applications is process dependent. Improvements in the ability to process materials are of great importance to the DOE mission. This project addresses basic science questions related to the processing of materials and is aimed at understanding growth of interfaces and evolution of patterns on interfaces, both macroscopic and microscopic. Three laboratory experiments are proposed: A study of the changes in patterns available to the growth of a macroscopic interface when that interface is grown over one of a variety of ``microscopic`` lattices; a study of reversible aggregation of colloidal particles in a mixed solvent, and of the interactions and relaxations of both solvent and suspended particles when thermodynamic conditions are changed for a liquid matrix with suspended particles or fibres; and, an investigation of the sedimentation of particles in a quasi-two-dimensional viscous fluid, with attention both to the dynamics of the flow and to the roughness of the resulting surface of settled particles.

  1. [The physics of pattern formation of liquid interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    Energy consumption in fabrication of materials for all applications is process dependent. Improvements in the ability to process materials are of great importance to the DOE mission. This project addresses basic science questions related to the processing of materials and is aimed at understanding growth of interfaces and evolution of patterns on interfaces, both macroscopic and microscopic. Three laboratory experiments are proposed: A study of the changes in patterns available to the growth of a macroscopic interface when that interface is grown over one of a variety of microscopic'' lattices; a study of reversible aggregation of colloidal particles in a mixed solvent, and of the interactions and relaxations of both solvent and suspended particles when thermodynamic conditions are changed for a liquid matrix with suspended particles or fibres; and, an investigation of the sedimentation of particles in a quasi-two-dimensional viscous fluid, with attention both to the dynamics of the flow and to the roughness of the resulting surface of settled particles.

  2. Pattern Formation of Bacterial Colonies by Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokita, Rie; Katoh, Takaki; Maeda, Yusuke; Wakita, Jun-ichi; Sano, Masaki; Matsuyama, Tohey; Matsushita, Mitsugu

    2009-07-01

    We have studied the morphological diversity and change in bacterial colonies, using the bacterial species Escherichia coli, as a function of both agar concentration Ca and nutrient concentration Cn. We observed various colony patterns, classified them into four types by pattern characteristics and established a morphological diagram by dividing it into four regions. They are regions A [diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA)-like], B (Eden-like), C (concentric-ring), and D (fluid-spreading). In particular, we have observed a concentric-ring colony growth for E. coli. We focused on the periodic growth in region C and obtained the following results: (i) A colony grows cyclically with the growing front repeating an advance (migration phase) and a momentary rest (consolidation phase) alternately. (ii) The growth width L and the bulge width W in one cycle decrease asymptotically to certain values, when Ca is increased. (iii) L does not depend on Cn, while W is an increasing function of Cn. Plausible mechanisms are proposed to explain the experimental results, by comparing them with those obtained for other bacterial species such as Proteus mirabilis and Bacillus subtilis.

  3. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on the biological characteristics of human skin fibroblasts and hypertrophic scar tissue formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongming; Hu, Chao; Li, Fengyu; Liang, Liming; Liu, Lingying

    2013-06-01

    Burn injury-mediated destruction of the skin barrier normally induces microbial invasion, in turn leading to the development of systemic infection and occasional septic shock by the release of endotoxins. The objective of this work was to study the influence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the biological characteristics of normal skin fibroblasts and to elucidate the influence of LPS in the initial stage of skin wound healing. Twenty patients with hypertrophic scar in proliferative stage were selected randomly and primary cultures were established from fibroblasts derived from their hypertrophic scar tissue and normal skin. Normal skin fibroblasts of passage 3 were stimulated with different concentrations of LPS. LPS stimulated the proliferation and collagen synthesis of fibroblasts within a certain extent of concentrations (0.005-0.5 μg/mL) (P < 0.05), whereas at a concentration of 1 μg/mL inhibited the proliferation and collagen synthesis of fibroblasts (P < 0.05). Collagen synthesis by normal skin fibroblasts after LPS stimulation mimicked those derived from hypertrophic scar tissue. LPS of 0.1 μg/mL had significant effect on normal skin fibroblasts-continuous passage of these fibroblasts resulted in ultrastructural pattern similar to fibroblasts derived from hypertrophic scar tissue, and the findings was substantiated by hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry detection of proliferation cell nuclear antigen, type I procollagen and α-smooth muscle actin. Our results suggest that LPS might convert normal skin fibroblasts to hypertrophic scar tissue fibroblasts and participate in the formation of hypertrophic scar; hence, appropriate concentration of LPS may have no effect or be beneficial to skin wound healing, whereas excessive concentration of LPS may delay the time of wound healing. Copyright © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. STELLAR ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCE PATTERNS: IMPLICATIONS FOR PLANET FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, J. E.

    2010-11-20

    The solar photosphere is depleted in refractory elements compared to most solar twins, with the degree of depletion increasing with an element's condensation temperature. Here, I show that adding 4 Earth masses of Earth-like and carbonaceous-chondrite-like material to the solar convection zone brings the Sun's composition into line with the mean value for the solar twins. The observed solar composition could have arisen if the Sun's convection zone accreted material from the solar nebula that was depleted in refractory elements due to the formation of the terrestrial planets and ejection of rocky protoplanets from the asteroid belt. Most solar analogs are missing 0-10 Earth masses of rocky material compared to the most refractory-rich stars, providing an upper limit to the mass of rocky terrestrial planets that they possess. The missing mass is correlated with stellar metallicity. This suggests that the efficiency of planetesimal formation increases with stellar metallicity. Stars with and without known giant planets show a similar distribution of abundance trends. If refractory depletion is a signature of the presence of terrestrial planets, this suggests that there is not a strong correlation between the presence of terrestrial and giant planets in the same system.

  5. Patterns of Family Formation in Response to Sex Ratio Variation

    PubMed Central

    Schacht, Ryan; Kramer, Karen L.

    2016-01-01

    The impact that unbalanced sex ratios have on health and societal outcomes is of mounting contemporary concern. However, it is increasingly unclear whether it is male- or female-biased sex ratios that are associated with family and social instability. From a socio-demographic perspective, male-biased sex ratios leave many men unable to find a mate, elevating competition among males, disrupting family formation and negatively affecting social stability. In contrast, from a mating-market perspective, males are expected to be less willing to marry and commit to a family when the sex ratio is female-biased and males are rare. Here we use U.S. data to evaluate predictions from these competing frameworks by testing the relationship between the adult sex ratio and measures of family formation. We find that when women are rare men are more likely to marry, be part of a family and be sexually committed to a single partner. Our results do not support claims that male-biased sex ratios lead to negative family outcomes due to a surplus of unmarried men. Rather, our results highlight the need to pay increased attention to female-biased sex ratios. PMID:27556401

  6. Modeling pattern formation in hydra: a route to understanding essential steps in development.

    PubMed

    Meinhardt, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Modeling of pattern formation in hydra has revealed basic mechanisms that underlie the reproducible generation of complex and self-regulating patterns. Organizing regions can be generated by a local self-enhancing reaction that is coupled with an inhibitory effect of longer range. Such reactions enable pattern formation even in an initially almost homogeneous assembly of cells. A long-ranging feedback of the organizer onto the competence to perform the pattern-forming reaction stabilizes the polar axial pattern during growth and allows for regeneration with preserved polarity. Hypostome formation is assumed to be under the control of two positive feedback loops in which Wnt3 is a common element. In addition to the well-established loop employing beta-catenin, a second cell-local loop is involved, possibly with Brachyury as an additional component. This model accounts for the different expression patterns of beta-catenin and Wnt3. Wnt molecules are proposed to play a dual role, functioning as activators and, after processing, as inhibitors. Since Wnt genes code for complete pattern-forming systems, gene duplication and diversification lead to a family of genes whose expression regions have a precise relation to each other. Tentacle formation is an example of positioning a second pattern-forming system by medium-ranging activation and local exclusion exerted by the primary system. A model for bud formation suggests that a transient pre-bud signal is involved that initiates the formation of the foot of the bud, close to the normal foot, as well as close to the bud tip. Many dynamic regulations, as observed in classical and molecular observations, are reproduced in computer simulations. A case is made that hydra can be regarded as a living fossil, documenting an evolutionary early axis formation before trunk formation and bilaterality were invented. Animated simulations are available in the supplementary information accompanying this paper.

  7. AN OVERVIEW OF COMPUTATIONAL LIFE SCIENCE DATABASES & EXCHANGE FORMATS OF RELEVANCE TO CHEMICAL BIOLOGY RESEARCH

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Aaron Smalter; Shan, Yunfeng; Lushington, Gerald; Visvanathan, Mahesh

    2016-01-01

    Databases and exchange formats describing biological entities such as chemicals and proteins, along with their relationships, are a critical component of research in life sciences disciplines, including chemical biology wherein small information about small molecule properties converges with cellular and molecular biology. Databases for storing biological entities are growing not only in size, but also in type, with many similarities between them and often subtle differences. The data formats available to describe and exchange these entities are numerous as well. In general, each format is optimized for a particular purpose or database, and hence some understanding of these formats is required when choosing one for research purposes. This paper reviews a selection of different databases and data formats with the goal of summarizing their purposes, features, and limitations. Databases are reviewed under the categories of 1) protein interactions, 2) metabolic pathways, 3) chemical interactions, and 4) drug discovery. Representation formats will be discussed according to those describing chemical structures, and those describing genomic/proteomic entities. PMID:22934944

  8. A Graph Approach to Mining Biological Patterns in the Binding Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wen

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Protein–RNA interactions play important roles in the biological systems. Searching for regular patterns in the Protein–RNA binding interfaces is important for understanding how protein and RNA recognize each other and bind to form a complex. Herein, we present a graph-mining method for discovering biological patterns in the protein–RNA interfaces. We represented known protein–RNA interfaces using graphs and then discovered graph patterns enriched in the interfaces. Comparison of the discovered graph patterns with UniProt annotations showed that the graph patterns had a significant overlap with residue sites that had been proven crucial for the RNA binding by experimental methods. Using 200 patterns as input features, a support vector machine method was able to classify protein surface patches into RNA-binding sites and non-RNA-binding sites with 84.0% accuracy and 88.9% precision. We built a simple scoring function that calculated the total number of the graph patterns that occurred in a protein–RNA interface. That scoring function was able to discriminate near-native protein–RNA complexes from docking decoys with a performance comparable with that of a state-of-the-art complex scoring function. Our work also revealed possible patterns that might be important for binding affinity. PMID:27892693

  9. A Graph Approach to Mining Biological Patterns in the Binding Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wen; Yan, Changhui

    2017-01-01

    Protein-RNA interactions play important roles in the biological systems. Searching for regular patterns in the Protein-RNA binding interfaces is important for understanding how protein and RNA recognize each other and bind to form a complex. Herein, we present a graph-mining method for discovering biological patterns in the protein-RNA interfaces. We represented known protein-RNA interfaces using graphs and then discovered graph patterns enriched in the interfaces. Comparison of the discovered graph patterns with UniProt annotations showed that the graph patterns had a significant overlap with residue sites that had been proven crucial for the RNA binding by experimental methods. Using 200 patterns as input features, a support vector machine method was able to classify protein surface patches into RNA-binding sites and non-RNA-binding sites with 84.0% accuracy and 88.9% precision. We built a simple scoring function that calculated the total number of the graph patterns that occurred in a protein-RNA interface. That scoring function was able to discriminate near-native protein-RNA complexes from docking decoys with a performance comparable with that of a state-of-the-art complex scoring function. Our work also revealed possible patterns that might be important for binding affinity.

  10. Microcodium: An extensive review and a proposed non-rhizogenic biologically induced origin for its formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabanov, Pavel; Anadón, Pere; Krumbein, Wolfgang E.

    2008-04-01

    Microcodium has been previously described as a mainly Cenozoic calcification pattern ascribed to various organisms. A review of the available literature and our data reveal two peaks in Microcodium abundance; the Moscovian-early Permian and the latest Cretaceous-Paleogene. A detailed analysis of late Paleozoic and Cenozoic examples leads to the following new conclusions. Typical Microcodium-forming unilayered 'corn-cob' aggregates of elongated grains and thick multilayered (palisade) replacing structures cannot be linked to smaller-grained intracellular root calcifications, as became widely accepted after the work of Klappa [Klappa, C.F., 1979. Calcified filaments in Quaternary calcretes: organo-mineral interactions in the subaerial vadose environment. J. Sediment. Petrol. 49, 955-968.] Typical Microcodium is recognized from the early Carboniferous (with doubtful Devonian reports) to Quaternary as a biologically induced mineralization formed via dissolution/precipitation processes in various aerobic Ca-rich soil and subsoil terrestrial environments. Morphology and δ13C signatures of Microcodium suggest that neither plants, algae, or roots and root-associated mycorrhiza regulate the formation of these fossil structures. Non-recrystallized Microcodium grains basically consist of slender (1.5-4 μm) curved radiating monocrystalline prisms with occasionally preserved hyphae-like morphology. Thin (0.5-3 μm) hypha-like canals can also be observed. These supposed hyphae may belong to actinobacteria. However, thin fungal mycelia cannot be excluded. We propose a model of Microcodium formation involving a mycelial saprotrophic organism responsible for substrate corrosion and associated bacteria capable of consuming acidic metabolites and CaCO 3 reprecipitation into the Microcodium structures.

  11. Morphology-induced collective behaviors: dynamic pattern formation in water-floating elements.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kohei; Ngouabeu, Aubery Marchel Tientcheu; Miyashita, Shuhei; Göldi, Maurice; Füchslin, Rudolf Marcel; Pfeifer, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Complex systems involving many interacting elements often organize into patterns. Two types of pattern formation can be distinguished, static and dynamic. Static pattern formation means that the resulting structure constitutes a thermodynamic equilibrium whose pattern formation can be understood in terms of the minimization of free energy, while dynamic pattern formation indicates that the system is permanently dissipating energy and not in equilibrium. In this paper, we report experimental results showing that the morphology of elements plays a significant role in dynamic pattern formation. We prepared three different shapes of elements (circles, squares, and triangles) floating in a water-filled container, in which each of the shapes has two types: active elements that were capable of self-agitation with vibration motors, and passive elements that were mere floating tiles. The system was purely decentralized: that is, elements interacted locally, and subsequently elicited global patterns in a process called self-organized segregation. We showed that, according to the morphology of the selected elements, a different type of segregation occurs. Also, we quantitatively characterized both the local interaction regime and the resulting global behavior for each type of segregation by means of information theoretic quantities, and showed the difference for each case in detail, while offering speculation on the mechanism causing this phenomenon.

  12. Morphology-Induced Collective Behaviors: Dynamic Pattern Formation in Water-Floating Elements

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Kohei; Ngouabeu, Aubery Marchel Tientcheu; Miyashita, Shuhei; Göldi, Maurice; Füchslin, Rudolf Marcel; Pfeifer, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Complex systems involving many interacting elements often organize into patterns. Two types of pattern formation can be distinguished, static and dynamic. Static pattern formation means that the resulting structure constitutes a thermodynamic equilibrium whose pattern formation can be understood in terms of the minimization of free energy, while dynamic pattern formation indicates that the system is permanently dissipating energy and not in equilibrium. In this paper, we report experimental results showing that the morphology of elements plays a significant role in dynamic pattern formation. We prepared three different shapes of elements (circles, squares, and triangles) floating in a water-filled container, in which each of the shapes has two types: active elements that were capable of self-agitation with vibration motors, and passive elements that were mere floating tiles. The system was purely decentralized: that is, elements interacted locally, and subsequently elicited global patterns in a process called self-organized segregation. We showed that, according to the morphology of the selected elements, a different type of segregation occurs. Also, we quantitatively characterized both the local interaction regime and the resulting global behavior for each type of segregation by means of information theoretic quantities, and showed the difference for each case in detail, while offering speculation on the mechanism causing this phenomenon. PMID:22715370

  13. Noise-induced pattern formation in a semiconductor nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Stegemann, G; Balanov, A G; Schöll, E

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the influence of noise upon the dynamics of the current density distribution in a model of a semiconductor nanostructure, namely, a double barrier resonant tunneling diode. We fix the parameters of the device below the Hopf bifurcation, where the only stable state of the system is a spatially inhomogeneous "filamentary" steady state. We show that the addition of weak Gaussian white noise to the system gives rise to spatially inhomogeneous oscillations that can be quite coherent. As the noise intensity grows, the oscillations tend to become more and more spatially homogeneous, while simultaneously the temporal correlation of the oscillations decreases. Thus, while on one hand noise destroys temporal coherence, on the other hand it enhances the spatial coherence of the current density pattern.

  14. Developmental waves in myxobacteria: A distinctive pattern formation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igoshin, Oleg A.; Neu, John; Oster, George

    2004-10-01

    In early stages of their development, starving myxobacteria organize their motion to produce a periodic pattern of traveling cell density waves. These waves arise from coordination of individual cell reversals by contact signaling when they collide. Unlike waves generated by reaction-diffusion instabilities, which annihilate on collision, myxobacteria waves appear to pass through one another unaffected. Here we analyze a mathematical model of these waves developed earlier [Igoshin , Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 98, 14 913 (2001)]. The mechanisms which generate and maintain the density waves are clearly revealed by tracing the reversal loci of individual cells. An evolution equation of reversal point density is derived in the weak-signaling limit. Linear stability analysis determines parameters favorable for the development of the waves. Numerical solutions demonstrate the stability of the fully developed nonlinear waves.

  15. Controlled spin pattern formation in multistable cavity-polariton systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, S. S.; Kulakovskii, V. D.

    2016-12-01

    Theoretical studies are performed of planar cavity-polariton systems under resonant optical excitation. We show that if the cavity is spatially anisotropic, the polariton spin is highly sensitive to the pump polarization direction, which can be used to modulate the circular polarization of the output light. In particular, when the right- and left-circular components of the incident wave have equal intensities and mutually opposite angular momenta, the pump has strictly linear yet angle-dependent polarization and as such brings about a periodic angular variation of the polariton spin. Free motion of polaritons is the other factor determining the shape of the cavity-field distribution. Such externally driven and highly tunable spin patterns represent a counterpart of spin shaping in nonresonantly excited Bose-Einstein condensates of cavity polaritons.

  16. Experimental study of pattern formation during carbon dioxide mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuszter, Gabor; Brau, Fabian; de Wit, Anne

    2015-11-01

    Injection of supercritical carbon dioxide in deep porous aquifers, where mineral carbonation takes place via chemical reactions, is one of the possible long-term storage of this greenhouse gas. This mineralization process is investigated experimentally under controlled conditions in a confined horizontal Hele-Shaw geometry where an aqueous solution of sodium carbonate is injected radially into a solution of calcium chloride. Precipitation of calcium carbonate in various finger, flower or tube-like patterns is observed in the mixing zone between the two solutions. These precipitation structures and their growth dynamics are studied quantitatively as a function of the parameters of the problem, which are the injection rate and the reactant concentrations. In particular, we show the existence of critical concentrations of reactants above which the amount of the calcium carbonate precipitate produced drops significantly.

  17. Pattern formation due to non-linear vortex diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijngaarden, Rinke J.; Surdeanu, R.; Huijbregtse, J. M.; Rector, J. H.; Dam, B.; Einfeld, J.; Wördenweber, R.; Griessen, R.

    Penetration of magnetic flux in YBa 2Cu 3O 7 superconducting thin films in an external magnetic field is visualized using a magneto-optic technique. A variety of flux patterns due to non-linear vortex diffusion is observed: (1) Roughening of the flux front with scaling exponents identical to those observed in burning paper including two distinct regimes where respectively spatial disorder and temporal disorder dominate. In the latter regime Kardar-Parisi-Zhang behavior is found. (2) Fractal penetration of flux with Hausdorff dimension depending on the critical current anisotropy. (3) Penetration as ‘flux-rivers’. (4) The occurrence of commensurate and incommensurate channels in films with anti-dots as predicted in numerical simulations by Reichhardt, Olson and Nori. It is shown that most of the observed behavior is related to the non-linear diffusion of vortices by comparison with simulations of the non-linear diffusion equation appropriate for vortices.

  18. Laser-based techniques for living cell pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, Béla; Smausz, Tomi; Papdi, Bence; Bor, Zsolt; Szabó, András; Kolozsvári, Lajos; Fotakis, Costas; Nógrádi, Antal

    2008-10-01

    In the production of biosensors or artificial tissues a basic step is the immobilization of living cells along the required pattern. In this paper the ability of some promising laser-based methods to influence the interaction between cells and various surfaces is presented. In the first set of experiments laser-induced patterned photochemical modification of polymer foils was used to achieve guided adherence and growth of cells to the modified areas: (a) Polytetrafluoroethylene was irradiated with ArF excimer laser ( λ=193 nm, FWHM=20 ns, F=9 mJ/cm2) in presence of triethylene tetramine liquid photoreagent; (b) a thin carbon layer was produced by KrF excimer laser ( λ=248 nm, FWHM=30 ns, F=35 mJ/cm2) irradiation on polyimide surface to influence the cell adherence. It was found that the incorporation of amine groups in the PTFE polymer chain instead of the fluorine atoms can both promote and prevent the adherence of living cells (depending on the applied cell types) on the treated surfaces, while the laser generated carbon layer on polyimide surface did not effectively improve adherence. Our attempts to influence the cell adherence by morphological modifications created by ArF laser irradiation onto polyethylene terephtalate surface showed a surface roughness dependence. This method was effective only when the Ra roughness parameter of the developed structure did not exceed the 0.1 micrometer value. Pulsed laser deposition with femtosecond KrF excimer lasers ( F=2.2 J/cm2) was effectively used to deposit structured thin films from biomaterials (endothelial cell growth supplement and collagen embedded in starch matrix) to promote the adherence and growth of cells. These results present evidence that some surface can be successfully altered to induce guided cell growth.

  19. Fractal pattern formation in the Ziff Gulari Barshad model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provata, A.; Noussiou, V. K.

    2007-02-01

    The dynamics of the Ziff-Gulari-Barshad (ZGB) model is studied on three different two-dimensional (2D) lattices: square (sq) lattice, hexagonal-honeycomb (hex-hon) lattice and purely hexagonal (hex) lattice. The effects of the support geometry on the steady state and the dynamics are assessed. In all 2D lattice geometries the ZGB model is shown to exhibit non-equilibrium phase transitions of the first and second order, but the critical values of the kinetic parameters depend crucially on the substrate geometry. Clustering and island formation are observed in all ranges of parameters, but the clusters are fractal only outside the active catalytic region. The fractal dimensions depend on the kinetic parameters.

  20. Pattern formation in stromatolites: insights from mathematical modelling

    PubMed Central

    Cuerno, R.; Escudero, C.; García-Ruiz, J. M.; Herrero, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    To this day, computer models for stromatolite formation have made substantial use of the Kardar–Parisi–Zhang (KPZ) equation. Oddly enough, these studies yielded mutually exclusive conclusions about the biotic or abiotic origin of such structures. We show in this paper that, at our current state of knowledge, a purely biotic origin for stromatolites can neither be proved nor disproved by means of a KPZ-based model. What can be shown, however, is that whatever their (biotic or abiotic) origin might be, some morphologies found in actual stromatolite structures (e.g. overhangs) cannot be formed as a consequence of a process modelled exclusively in terms of the KPZ equation and acting over sufficiently large times. This suggests the need to search for alternative mathematical approaches to model these structures, some of which are discussed in this paper. PMID:21993008

  1. Pattern formation in skyrmionic materials with anisotropic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagemeister, Julian; Vedmedenko, Elena Y.; Wiesendanger, Roland

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic Skyrmions have attracted broad attention during recent years because they are regarded as promising candidates as bits of information in novel data storage devices. A broad range of theoretical and experimental investigations have been conducted with the consideration of axisymmetric Skyrmions in isotropic environments. However, one naturally observes a huge variety of anisotropic behavior in many experimentally relevant materials. In the present work, we investigate the influence of anisotropic environments onto the formation and behavior of the noncollinear spin states of skyrmionic materials by means of Monte Carlo calculations. We find skyrmionic textures which are far from having an axisymmetric shape. Furthermore, we show the possibility to employ periodic modulations of the environment to create skyrmionic tracks.

  2. Genetic oscillations. A Doppler effect in embryonic pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Soroldoni, Daniele; Jörg, David J; Morelli, Luis G; Richmond, David L; Schindelin, Johannes; Jülicher, Frank; Oates, Andrew C

    2014-07-11

    During embryonic development, temporal and spatial cues are coordinated to generate a segmented body axis. In sequentially segmenting animals, the rhythm of segmentation is reported to be controlled by the time scale of genetic oscillations that periodically trigger new segment formation. However, we present real-time measurements of genetic oscillations in zebrafish embryos showing that their time scale is not sufficient to explain the temporal period of segmentation. A second time scale, the rate of tissue shortening, contributes to the period of segmentation through a Doppler effect. This contribution is modulated by a gradual change in the oscillation profile across the tissue. We conclude that the rhythm of segmentation is an emergent property controlled by the time scale of genetic oscillations, the change of oscillation profile, and tissue shortening.

  3. Forging patterns and making waves from biology to geology: a commentary on Turing (1952) 'The chemical basis of morphogenesis'.

    PubMed

    Ball, Philip

    2015-04-19

    Alan Turing was neither a biologist nor a chemist, and yet the paper he published in 1952, 'The chemical basis of morphogenesis', on the spontaneous formation of patterns in systems undergoing reaction and diffusion of their ingredients has had a substantial impact on both fields, as well as in other areas as disparate as geomorphology and criminology. Motivated by the question of how a spherical embryo becomes a decidedly non-spherical organism such as a human being, Turing devised a mathematical model that explained how random fluctuations can drive the emergence of pattern and structure from initial uniformity. The spontaneous appearance of pattern and form in a system far away from its equilibrium state occurs in many types of natural process, and in some artificial ones too. It is often driven by very general mechanisms, of which Turing's model supplies one of the most versatile. For that reason, these patterns show striking similarities in systems that seem superficially to share nothing in common, such as the stripes of sand ripples and of pigmentation on a zebra skin. New examples of 'Turing patterns' in biology and beyond are still being discovered today. This commentary was written to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society.

  4. Surface pattern formation during MeV energy ion beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S. K.; Nair, K. G. M.; Kannan, R. Kamala; Kamruddin, M.; Panigrahi, B. K.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2012-06-05

    Surface patterning during high energy heavy ion irradiation is a relatively recent observation. We report in this paper the results of a study on the formation of self organized ripple patterns on silica surface irradiated with MeV energy gold ions.

  5. Pattern formation at liquid interfaces II. The KI/chloral hydrate/starch system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cliff Zeh-Wen; Knobler, Charles M.

    1992-02-01

    Measurements are reported of pattern formation at a liquid interface produced by a photochemical reaction involving the system KI/chloral hydrate/ starch. The dependence of the wavelength on the concentrations of the reactants, the viscosity, and the height of the sample has been examined. It is concluded that the pattern is produced by a hydrodynamic mechanism.

  6. Pattern formation in the thiourea-iodate-sulfite system: Spatial bistability, waves, and stationary patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horváth, Judit; Szalai, István; De Kepper, Patrick

    2010-06-01

    We present a detailed study of the reaction-diffusion patterns observed in the thiourea-iodate-sulfite (TuIS) reaction, operated in open one-side-fed reactors. Besides spatial bistability and spatio-temporal oscillatory dynamics, this proton autoactivated reaction shows stationary patterns, as a result of two back-to-back Turing bifurcations, in the presence of a low-mobility proton binding agent (sodium polyacrylate). This is the third aqueous solution system to produce stationary patterns and the second to do this through a Turing bifurcation. The stationary pattern forming capacities of the reaction are explored through a systematic design method, which is applicable to other bistable and oscillatory reactions. The spatio-temporal dynamics of this reaction is compared with that of the previous ferrocyanide-iodate-sulfite mixed Landolt system.

  7. Counterion-mediated pattern formation in membranes containing anionic lipids

    PubMed Central

    Slochower, David R.; Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Tourdot, Richard W.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi; Janmey, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Most lipid components of cell membranes are either neutral, like cholesterol, or zwitterionic, like phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin. Very few lipids, such as sphingosine, are cationic at physiological pH. These generally interact only transiently with the lipid bilayer, and their synthetic analogs are often designed to destabilize the membrane for drug or DNA delivery. However, anionic lipids are common in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell membranes. The net charge per anionic phospholipid ranges from −1 for the most abundant anionic lipids such has phosphatidylserine, to near −7 for phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5 trisphosphate, although the effective charge depends on many environmental factors. Anionic phospholipids and other negatively charged lipids such as lipopolysaccharides are not randomly distributed in the lipid bilayer, but are highly restricted to specific leaflets of the bilayer and to regions near transmembrane proteins or other organized structures within the plane of the membrane. This review highlights some recent evidence that counterions, in the form of monovalent or divalent metal ions, polyamines, or cationic protein domains, have a large influence of the lateral distribution of anionic lipids within the membrane, and that lateral demixing of anionic lipids has effects on membrane curvature and protein function that are important for biological control. PMID:24556233

  8. Counterion-mediated pattern formation in membranes containing anionic lipids.

    PubMed

    Slochower, David R; Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Tourdot, Richard W; Radhakrishnan, Ravi; Janmey, Paul A

    2014-06-01

    Most lipid components of cell membranes are either neutral, like cholesterol, or zwitterionic, like phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin. Very few lipids, such as sphingosine, are cationic at physiological pH. These generally interact only transiently with the lipid bilayer, and their synthetic analogs are often designed to destabilize the membrane for drug or DNA delivery. However, anionic lipids are common in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell membranes. The net charge per anionic phospholipid ranges from -1 for the most abundant anionic lipids such as phosphatidylserine, to near -7 for phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5 trisphosphate, although the effective charge depends on many environmental factors. Anionic phospholipids and other negatively charged lipids such as lipopolysaccharides are not randomly distributed in the lipid bilayer, but are highly restricted to specific leaflets of the bilayer and to regions near transmembrane proteins or other organized structures within the plane of the membrane. This review highlights some recent evidence that counterions, in the form of monovalent or divalent metal ions, polyamines, or cationic protein domains, have a large influence on the lateral distribution of anionic lipids within the membrane, and that lateral demixing of anionic lipids has effects on membrane curvature and protein function that are important for biological control. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Reactor-Diffusion Models For Cartilage Pattern Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glimm, Tilmann; Hentschel, H. G. E.

    2004-03-01

    In the early stages of the development of the embryonic chick limb, the sites of future skeletal elements are marked by a prepattern formed by condensations of precartilage cells. A number of different theories have been proposed as to what mechanism determines the characteristic size, shape and number of these condensations. Nevertheless, there is still little definite knowledge on this question. In this talk, we present a model of the limb based on recent experiments and additional hypotheses. In this model, it is a ``reactor-diffusion'' mechanism which gives rise to precartilage condensation. The model consists of a system of nonlinear partial differential equations which govern the spatiotemporal distribution of various types of mesenchymal cells and relevant biomolecules. These biomolecules include Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), transforming growth factor-betas (TGF-βs), the extracellular matrix protein Fibronectin, as well as a laterally-acting inhibitor. We present the results of numerical simulations for the system of PDEs. Also addressed are preliminary results on how this PDE model can be tied in with more biologically realistic cellular automata based models.

  10. Formation of periodic and localized patterns in an oscillating granular layer.

    SciTech Connect

    Aranson, I.; Tsimring, L. S.; Materials Science Division; Bar Ilan Univ.; Univ. of California at San Diego

    1998-02-01

    A simple phenomenological model for pattern formation in a vertically vibrated layer of granular particles is proposed. This model exhibits a variety of stable cellular patterns including standing rolls and squares as well as localized excitations (oscillons and worms), similar to recent experimental observations (Umbanhowar et al., 1996). The model is an order parameter equation for the parametrically excited waves coupled to the mass conservation law. The structure and dynamics of the solutions resemble closely the properties of patterns observed in the experiments.

  11. Things fall apart: Topics in biophysics and pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betterton, Meredith Diane

    2000-11-01

    This thesis is made up of three distinct projects. Chapter 2 considers the effect of electrostatics on the stability of a charged membrane. We show that at low ionic strength and high surface charge density, repulsion between membrane charges renders it unstable to the formation of holes. An edge is unstable to modulations with wavelength longer than the Debye screening length. Hence at low ionic strength, membranes will disintegrate into vesicles. We use these results-to interpret experiments on stable holes in red blood cell ghosts. Chapter 3 discusses cylindrical chemotactic collapse. Under special conditions bacteria excrete an attractant and aggregate. The high density regions initially collapse into cylindrical structures, which subsequently destabilize into spherical aggregates. We present a theoretical description of this process. We show that cylindrical collapse involves a balance in which bacterial attraction and diffusion nearly cancel, leading to corrections to the collapse laws expected from dimensional analysis. The cylinder instability is composed of two stages: Initially, slow modulations to the cylinder develop, which correspond to a variation of the collapse time along the cylinder axis. Ultimately, one point on the cylinder pinches off. At this final stage, a front propagates from the pinch into the remainder of the cylinder. The spacing of the resulting spherical aggregates is determined by the front propagation. Chapter 4 describes penitentes, columns of snow several meters tall which form on glaciers at high altitudes. They form by reflection of sunlight: depressions in the snow receive more reflected sunlight than the top edges, and therefore melt more quickly. Although this explanation is accepted in the literature, no one has previously formulated a mathematical model of penitente formation. This work models the process, aiming to quantify the ideas in the literature. We describe what size and shape penitentes appear, and how this depends

  12. Pattern formation and temporal undulations of plane magnetic droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Chamkor; Das, Arup Kumar; Das, Prasanta Kumar

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we numerically investigate the time-dependent response of a ferrofluid droplet under an impulsively applied uniform magnetic field in a zero gravity environment. It is identified that two characteristic non-dimensional groups, namely, the Laplace number La and the magnetic Bond number Bom , primarily influence the response of the droplet. It is found that the nature of the time response can be either monotonic or undulating depending on the parameters. The transition between the two is smooth. In addition to the previously well-known regimes of elliptic and acicular ferrofluid droplet shapes, a new regime on the La - Bom plane is found where we observe some unique bifurcating patterns at the poles of the droplet. The temporal aperiodic to periodic mode transition on the La - Bom plane is found to be governed by La and the spatial droplet deformation and its final equilibrium configuration is found to be governed by Bom . The mechanism behind the elliptic to non-elliptic or elliptic to bifurcated shape transitions is discussed. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi, India, for the present work.

  13. Patterns of Enquiry in Ecology: 1: Principles of Biological Enquiry and Problems of Ecological Enquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connelly, F. Michael

    This is the first paper in a two-part series describing the patterns of inquiry used in ecology. Ecological knowledge and research are analyzed in terms of two sets of concepts: ecological problem areas, and principles of biological inquiry. Problem areas identified are classification and taxonomy, energetics, nutrition and metabolism, genecology,…

  14. Assessment of the Effectiveness of the Studio Format in Introductory Undergraduate Biology

    PubMed Central

    Rintoul, David A.; Williams, Larry G.

    2008-01-01

    Kansas State University converted its introductory biology course, previously taught as an audio-tutorial (A-T), to a studio format in 1997. We share with others information about the process involved and present assessment data for the studio format course that address 1) student exam performance in A-T and studio; 2) student course grades in A-T and studio; 3) student and instructor perceptions and attitudes for A-T and studio; 4) student performance in subsequent biology courses for A-T and studio; and 5) gains in student learning for the studio course and other traditional lecture/lab courses. Collectively, these measures demonstrate that the studio format is as effective as or more effective (for some measures) than the A-T approach and traditional approaches in providing an effective learning environment. We discuss the issues involved in comparing course formats. PMID:18519615

  15. Pattern formation, social forces, and diffusion instability in games with success-driven motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbing, Dirk

    2009-02-01

    A local agglomeration of cooperators can support the survival or spreading of cooperation, even when cooperation is predicted to die out according to the replicator equation, which is often used in evolutionary game theory to study the spreading and disappearance of strategies. In this paper, it is shown that success-driven motion can trigger such local agglomeration and may, therefore, be used to supplement other mechanisms supporting cooperation, like reputation or punishment. Success-driven motion is formulated here as a function of the game-theoretical payoffs. It can change the outcome and dynamics of spatial games dramatically, in particular as it causes attractive or repulsive interaction forces. These forces act when the spatial distributions of strategies are inhomogeneous. However, even when starting with homogeneous initial conditions, small perturbations can trigger large inhomogeneities by a pattern-formation instability, when certain conditions are fulfilled. Here, these instability conditions are studied for the prisoner’s dilemma and the snowdrift game. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that asymmetrical diffusion can drive social, economic, and biological systems into the unstable regime, if these would be stable without diffusion.

  16. Polar pattern formation in driven filament systems requires non-binary particle collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Ryo; Weber, Christoph A.; Frey, Erwin; Bausch, Andreas R.

    2015-10-01

    From the self-organization of the cytoskeleton to the synchronous motion of bird flocks, living matter has the extraordinary ability to behave in a concerted manner. The Boltzmann equation for self-propelled particles is frequently used in silico to link a system’s meso- or macroscopic behaviour to the microscopic dynamics of its constituents. But so far such studies have relied on an assumption of simplified binary collisions owing to a lack of experimental data suggesting otherwise. We report here experimentally determined binary-collision statistics by studying a recently introduced molecular system, the high-density actomyosin motility assay. We demonstrate that the alignment induced by binary collisions is too weak to account for the observed ordering transition. The transition density for polar pattern formation decreases quadratically with filament length, indicating that multi-filament collisions drive the observed ordering phenomenon and that a gas-like picture cannot explain the transition of the system to polar order. Our findings demonstrate that the unique properties of biological active-matter systems require a description that goes well beyond that developed in the framework of kinetic theories.

  17. Pattern Formation and Reaction Textures during Dunite Carbonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisabeth, H. P.; Zhu, W.

    2015-12-01

    Alteration of olivine-bearing rocks by fluids is one of the most pervasive geochemical processes on the surface of the Earth. Serpentinized and/or carbonated ultramafic rocks often exhibit characteristic textures on many scales, from polygonal mesh textures on the grain-scale to onion-skin or kernel patterns on the outcrop scale. Strong disequilibrium between pristine ultramafic rocks and common geological fluids such as water and carbon dioxide leads to rapid reactions and coupled mechanical and chemical feedbacks that manifest as characteristic textures. Textural evolution during metasomatic reactions can control effective reaction rates by modulating dynamic porosity and therefore reactant supply and reactive surface area. We run hydrostatic experiments on thermally cracked dunites saturated with carbon dioxide bearing brine at 15 MPa confining pressure and 150°C to explore the evolution of physical properties and reaction textures as carbon mineralization takes place in the sample. Compaction and permeability reduction are observed throughout experiments. Rates of porosity and permeability changes are sensitive to pore fluid chemistry. After reaction, samples are imaged in 3-dimension (3D) using a dual-beam FIB-SEM. Analysis of the high resolution 3D microstructure shows that permeable, highly porous domains are created by olivine dissolution at a characteristic distance from pre-existing crack surfaces while precipitation of secondary minerals such as serpentine and magnesite is limited largely to the primary void space. The porous dissolution channels provide an avenue for fluid ingress, allow reactions to continue and could lead to progressive hierarchical fracturing. Initial modeling of the system indicates that this texture is the result of coupling between dissolution-precipitation reactions and the local stress state of the sample.

  18. Non-linear diffusion and pattern formation in vortex matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijngaarden, Rinke J.; Surdeanu, R.; Huijbregtse, J. M.; Rector, J. H.; Dam, B.; Griessen, R.; Einfeld, J.; Woerdenweber, R.

    2000-03-01

    Penetration of magnetic flux in YBa_2Cu_3O7 superconducting thin films and crystals in externally applied magnetic fields is visualized with a magneto-optical technique. A variety of flux patterns due to non-linear vortex behavior is observed: 1. Roughening of the flux front^1 with scaling exponents identical to those observed in burning paper^2. Two regimes are found where respectively spatial disorder and temporal disorder dominate. In the latter regime Kardar-Parisi-Zhang behavior is found. 2. Roughening of the flux profile similar to the Oslo model for rice-piles. 3. Fractal penetration of flux^3 with Hausdorff dimension depending on the critical current anisotropy. 4. Penetration as 'flux-rivers'. 5. The occurrence of commensurate and incommensurate channels in films with anti-dots as predicted in numerical simulations by Reichhardt, Olson and Nori^4. By comparison with numerical simulations, it is shown that most of the observed behavior can be explained in terms of non-linear diffusion of vortices. ^1R. Surdeanu, R.J. Wijngaarden, E. Visser, J.M. Huijbregtse, J.H. Rector, B. Dam and R. Griessen, Phys.Rev. Lett. 83 (1999) 2054 ^2J. Maunuksela, M. Myllys, O.-P. Kähkönen, J. Timonen, N. Provatas, M.J. Alava, T. Ala-Nissila, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 1515 (1997) ^3R. Surdeanu, R.J. Wijngaarden, B. Dam, J. Rector, R. Griessen, C. Rossel, Z.F. Ren and J.H. Wang, Phys Rev B 58 (1998) 12467 ^4C. Reichhardt, C.J. Olson and F. Nori, Phys. Rev. B 58, 6534 (1998)

  19. Pattern formation in stochastic systems: Magnetized billiards and mitotic spindles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffner, Stuart C.

    vital for spindle formation.

  20. Discovering co-occurring patterns and their biological significance in protein families

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The large influx of biological sequences poses the importance of identifying and correlating conserved regions in homologous sequences to acquire valuable biological knowledge. These conserved regions contain statistically significant residue associations as sequence patterns. Thus, patterns from two conserved regions co-occurring frequently on the same sequences are inferred to have joint functionality. A method for finding conserved regions in protein families with frequent co-occurrence patterns is proposed. The biological significance of the discovered clusters of conserved regions with co-occurrences patterns can be validated by their three-dimensional closeness of amino acids and the biological functionality found in those regions as supported by published work. Methods Using existing algorithms, we discovered statistically significant amino acid associations as sequence patterns. We then aligned and clustered them into Aligned Pattern Clusters (APCs) corresponding to conserved regions with amino acid conservation and variation. When one APC frequently co-occured with another APC, the two APCs have high co-occurrence. We then clustered APCs with high co-occurrence into what we refer to as Co-occurrence APC Clusters (Co-occurrence Clusters). Results Our results show that for Co-occurrence Clusters, the three-dimensional distance between their amino acids is closer than average amino acid distances. For the Co-occurrence Clusters of the ubiquitin and the cytochrome c families, we observed biological significance among the residing amino acids of the APCs within the same cluster. In ubiquitin, the residues are responsible for ubiquitination as well as conventional and unconventional ubiquitin-bindings. In cytochrome c, amino acids in the first co-occurrence cluster contribute to binding of other proteins in the electron transport chain, and amino acids in the second co-occurrence cluster contribute to the stability of the axial heme ligand

  1. Dependence of Initial Value on Pattern Formation for a Logistic Coupled Map Lattice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li; Zhang, Guang; Cui, Haoyue

    2016-01-01

    The logistic coupled map lattices (LCML) have been widely investigated as well as their pattern dynamics. The patterns formation may depend on not only fluctuations of system parameters, but variation of the initial conditions. However, the mathematical discussion is quite few for the effect of initial values so far. The present paper is concerned with the pattern formation for a two-dimensional Logistic coupled map lattice, where any initial value can be linear expressed by corresponding eigenvectors, and patterns formation can be determined by selecting the corresponding eigenvectors. A set of simulations are conducted whose results demonstrate the fact. The method utilized in the present paper could be applied to other discrete systems as well. PMID:27382964

  2. Patterns of Care for Biologic-Dosing Outliers and Nonoutliers in Biologic-Naive Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Delate, Thomas; Meyer, Roxanne; Jenkins, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    Although most biologic medications for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have recommended fixed dosing, actual biologic dosing may vary among real-world patients, since some patients can receive higher (high-dose outliers) or lower (low-dose outliers) doses than what is recommended in medication package inserts. To describe the patterns of care for biologic-dosing outliers and nonoutliers in biologic-naive patients with RA. This was a retrospective, longitudinal cohort study of patients with RA who were not pregnant and were aged ≥ 18 and < 90 years from an integrated health care delivery system. Patients were newly initiated on adalimumab (ADA), etanercept (ETN), or infliximab (IFX) as index biologic therapy between July 1, 2006, and February 28, 2014. Outlier status was defined as a patient having received at least 1 dose < 90% or > 110% of the approved dose in the package insert at any time during the study period. Baseline patient profiles, treatment exposures, and outcomes were collected during the 180 days before and up to 2 years after biologic initiation and compared across index biologic outlier groups. Patients were followed for at least 1 year, with a subanalysis of those patients who remained as members for 2 years. This study included 434 RA patients with 1 year of follow-up and 372 RA patients with 2 years of follow-up. Overall, the vast majority of patients were female (≈75%) and had similar baseline characteristics. Approximately 10% of patients were outliers in both follow-up cohorts. ETN patients were least likely to become outliers, and ADA patients were most likely to become outliers. Of all outliers during the 1-year follow-up, patients were more likely to be a high-dose outlier (55%) than a low-dose outlier (45%). Median 1- and 2-year adjusted total biologic costs (based on wholesale acquisition costs) were higher for ADA and ETA nonoutliers than for IFX nonoutliers. Biologic persistence was highest for IFX patients. Charlson

  3. A biochemical hypothesis on the formation of fingerprints using a turing patterns approach

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Fingerprints represent a particular characteristic for each individual. Characteristic patterns are also formed on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet. Their origin and development is still unknown but it is believed to have a strong genetic component, although it is not the only thing determining its formation. Each fingerprint is a papillary drawing composed by papillae and rete ridges (crests). This paper proposes a phenomenological model describing fingerprint pattern formation using reaction diffusion equations with Turing space parameters. Results Several numerical examples were solved regarding simplified finger geometries to study pattern formation. The finite element method was used for numerical solution, in conjunction with the Newton-Raphson method to approximate nonlinear partial differential equations. Conclusions The numerical examples showed that the model could represent the formation of different types of fingerprint characteristics in each individual. PMID:21711537

  4. Fibroblast-fibronectin patterning and network formation in 3D fibrin matrices.

    PubMed

    Miron-Mendoza, Miguel; Graham, Eric; Manohar, Sujal; Petroll, W Matthew

    2017-06-07

    We previously reported that fibroblasts migrating within 3-D collagen matrices move independently, whereas fibroblasts within 3-D fibrin matrices form an interconnected network. Similar networks have been identified previously during in vivo corneal wound healing. In this study, we investigate the role of fibronectin in mediating this mechanism of collective cell spreading, migration and patterning. To assess cell spreading, corneal fibroblasts were plated within fibrillar collagen or fibrin matrices. To assess migration, compacted cell-populated collagen matrices were nested inside cell-free fibrin matrices. Constructs were cultured in serum-free media containing PDGF, with or without RGD peptide, anti-α5 or anti-fibronectin blocking antibodies. In some experiments, LifeAct and fluorescent fibronectin were used to allow dynamic assessment of cell-induced fibronectin reorganization. 3-D and 4-D imaging were used to assess cell mechanical behavior, connectivity, F-actin, α5 integrin and fibronectin organization. Corneal fibroblasts within 3-D fibrin matrices formed an interconnected network that was lined with cell-secreted fibronectin. Live cell imaging demonstrated that fibronectin tracks were formed at the leading edge of spreading and migrating cells. Furthermore, fibroblasts preferentially migrated through fibronectin tracks laid down by other cells. Interfering with cell-fibronectin binding with RGD, anti α5 integrin or anti fibronectin antibodies inhibited cell spreading and migration through fibrin, but did not affect cell behavior in collagen. In this study, a novel mode of cell patterning was identified in which corneal fibroblasts secrete and attach to fibronectin via α5β1 integrin to facilitate spreading and migration within 3-D fibrin matrices, resulting in the formation of localized fibronectin tracks. Other cells use these fibronectin tracks as conduits, resulting in an interconnected cell-fibronectin network. Copyright © 2017 International

  5. Pattern formation through spatial interactions in a modified Daisyworld model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, Tommaso; Primavera, Leonardo; Lepreti, Fabio; Vecchio, Antonio; Carbone, Vincenzo

    2015-04-01

    The Daisyworld model is based on a hypothetical planet, like the Earth, which receives the radiant energy coming from a Sun-like star, and populated by two kinds of identical plants differing by their colour: white daisies reflecting light and black daisies absorbing light. The interactions and feedbacks between the collective biota of the planet and the incoming radiation form a self-regulating system where the conditions for life are maintained. We investigate a modified version of the Daisyworld model where a spatial dependency on latitude is introduced, and both a variable heat diffusivity along latitude and a simple greenhouse model are included. We show that the spatial interactions between the variables of the system can generate some equilibrium patterns which can locally stabilize the coexistence of the two vegetation types. The feedback on albedo is able to generate new equilibrium solutions which can efficiently self-regulate the planet climate, even for values of the solar luminosity relatively far from the current Earth conditions. The extension to spatial Daisyworld gives room to the possibility of inhomogeneous solar forcing in a curved planet, with explicit differences between poles and equator and the direct use of the heat diffusion equation. As a first approach, to describe a spherical planet, we consider the temperature T(θ,t) and the surface coverage as depending only on time and on latitude θ (-90° ≤ θ ≤ 90°). A second step is the introduction of the greenhouse effect in the model, the process by which outgoing infrared radiation is partly screened by greenhouse gases. This effect can be described by relaxing the black-body radiation hypothesis and by introducing a grayness function g(T) in the heat equation. As a third step, we consider a latitude dependence of the Earth's conductivity, χ = χ(θ). Considering these terms, using spherical coordinates and symmetry with respect to θ, the modified Daisyworld equations reduce to the

  6. Formative Assessment and Increased Student Involvement Increase Grades in an Upper Secondary School Biology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granbom, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This study shows that formative methods and increased student participation has a positive influence on learning measured as grades. The study was conducted during the course Biology A in a Swedish Upper Secondary School. The students constructed grade criteria and defined working methods and type of examination within a given topic, Gene…

  7. Formative Assessment and Increased Student Involvement Increase Grades in an Upper Secondary School Biology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granbom, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This study shows that formative methods and increased student participation has a positive influence on learning measured as grades. The study was conducted during the course Biology A in a Swedish Upper Secondary School. The students constructed grade criteria and defined working methods and type of examination within a given topic, Gene…

  8. The effect of magnesium sulphate on the photochemical formation of microstructures with properties of biological order.

    PubMed

    Bahadur, K; Ranganayaki, S; Maurya, H K

    1979-01-01

    The photochemical formation of microstructures in 1:2:1:1 mixture of ammonium molybdate, diammonium hydrogen phosphate, biological minerals, and formaldehyde showed better results at 9.6 x 10(-5) M concentration of magnesium sulphate in the mixture. The number of particles decreases with increasing concentration of magnesium sulphate.

  9. Pattern cladistics and the 'realism-antirealism debate' in the philosophy of biology.

    PubMed

    Vergara-Silva, Francisco

    2009-06-01

    Despite the amount of work that has been produced on the subject over the years, the 'transformation of cladistics' is still a misunderstood episode in the history of comparative biology. Here, I analyze two outstanding, highly contrasting historiographic accounts on the matter, under the perspective of an influential dichotomy in the philosophy of science: the opposition between Scientific Realism and Empiricism. Placing special emphasis on the notion of 'causal grounding' of morphological characters (sensu Olivier Rieppel) in modern developmental biology's (mechanistic) theories, I arrive at the conclusion that a 'new transformation of cladistics' is philosophically plausible. This 'reformed' understanding of 'pattern cladistics' entails retaining the interpretation of cladograms as 'schemes of synapomorphies', but in association to construing cladogram nodes as 'developmental-genetic taxic homologies', instead of 'standard Darwinian ancestors'. The reinterpretation of pattern cladistics presented here additionally proposes to take Bas Van Fraassen's 'constructive empiricism' as a philosophical stance that could properly support such analysis of developmental-genetic data for systematic purposes. The latter suggestion is justified through a reappraisal of previous ideas developed by prominent pattern cladists (mainly, Colin Patterson), which concerned a scientifically efficient 'observable/non-observable distinction' linked to the conceptual pair 'ontogeny and phylogeny'. Finally, I argue that a robust articulation of Antirealist alternatives in systematics may provide a rational basis for its disciplinary separation from evolutionary biology, as well as for a critical reconsideration of the proper role of certain Scientific Realist positions, currently popular in comparative biology.

  10. Hypothetical way of pollen aperture patterning. 2. Formation of polycolpate patterns and pseudoaperture geometry.

    PubMed

    Pozhidaev

    2000-05-01

    Deviant forms of polycolpate pollen, differing from the typical pattern in the number and arrangement of apertures, are found to be similar in distantly related dicotyledon taxa. The range of variation of common and deviant aperture patterns may be arranged as a continuous series, which may be described as a gradual and geometrically regular transformation of the deviant form with a meridional circular colpus to one of the common polycolpate conditions. Similar series have been observed in the taxa with colporate and pseudocolpate pollen. All possible spatial isomers and their mirror symmetrical variants of the deviant polycolpate and polypseudocolpate pollen have been predicted in terms of the suggested regularities of aperture multiplication. Some of them have been identified in the samples studied.

  11. [Role of biological training in the formation of professional capacities in parasitologists].

    PubMed

    Astanina, S Iu; Dovgalev, A S; Abdiukhina, T I; Imamkuliev, K D; Pautova, E A

    2013-01-01

    A competence approach is the methodological basis for a new educational system. Fundamental training in the formation of physicians' professional capacities plays a crucial and more increasing role in the structure of medical education. Biology as a fundamental natural science discloses the regularities of emergence and development, as well as essential conditions for life maintenance. The investigation has determined the didactic bases (goals and content) of a system for biological training of parasitologists in continuing medical education, which ensure the formation of their professional capacities. A set of methodical conditions for implementing the system of the physicians' biological training in postgraduate and advanced medical education as a tool to upgrade the quality of parasitologists' professional training has been determined.

  12. Data Exchange Format for Biological Pathway Databases (BioPAX) Workshop - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Sander, PhD

    2004-07-28

    In June 2003, the Department of Energy (DOE) allocated funds in support of the development of A Data Exchange Format for Biological Pathway Databases (BioPAX). The primary objective of the BioPAX initiative (http://www.biopax.org) is the development of a single, consensus-based standard for a data exchange format for biological pathway databases that can be widely adopted in a timely manner as a strategy for the interchange of biological pathway data in the life science community. BioPAX Level 1, Version 1.0, released July 2004, supports metabolic pathway data and is initially supported by the BioCyc and WIT databases. This work was developed during community led workshops that were significantly funded by this grant. Subsequent releases of BioPAX will add support for protein-protein interactions, signal transduction pathways, genetic interactions, and other pathway data types.

  13. Effect of substrate temperature on pattern formation of nanoparticles from volatile drops.

    PubMed

    Parsa, Maryam; Harmand, Souad; Sefiane, Khellil; Bigerelle, Maxence; Deltombe, Raphaël

    2015-03-24

    This study investigates pattern formation during evaporation of water-based nanofluid sessile droplets placed on a smooth silicon surface at various temperatures. An infrared thermography technique was employed to observe the temperature distribution along the air-liquid interface of evaporating droplets. In addition, an optical interferometry technique is used to quantify and characterize the deposited patterns. Depending on the substrate temperature, three distinctive deposition patterns are observed: a nearly uniform coverage pattern, a "dual-ring" pattern, and multiple rings corresponding to "stick-slip" pattern. At all substrate temperatures, the internal flow within the drop builds a ringlike cluster of the solute on the top region of drying droplets, which is found essential for the formation of the secondary ring deposition onto the substrate for the deposits with the "dual-ring" pattern. The size of the secondary ring is found to be dependent on the substrate temperature. For the deposits with the rather uniform coverage pattern, the ringlike cluster of the solute does not deposit as a distinct secondary ring; instead, it is deformed by the contact line depinning. In the case of the "stick-slip" pattern, the internal flow behavior is complex and found to be vigorous with rapid circulating flow which appears near the edge of the drop.

  14. Characteristics of Motor Resonance Predict the Pattern of Flash-Lag Effects for Biological Motion

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Klaus; Gordon, Lucy; Cessford, Kari; Lages, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Background When a moving stimulus and a briefly flashed static stimulus are physically aligned in space the static stimulus is perceived as lagging behind the moving stimulus. This vastly replicated phenomenon is known as the Flash-Lag Effect (FLE). For the first time we employed biological motion as the moving stimulus, which is important for two reasons. Firstly, biological motion is processed by visual as well as somatosensory brain areas, which makes it a prime candidate for elucidating the interplay between the two systems with respect to the FLE. Secondly, discussions about the mechanisms of the FLE tend to recur to evolutionary arguments, while most studies employ highly artificial stimuli with constant velocities. Methodology/Principal Finding Since biological motion is ecologically valid it follows complex patterns with changing velocity. We therefore compared biological to symbolic motion with the same acceleration profile. Our results with 16 observers revealed a qualitatively different pattern for biological compared to symbolic motion and this pattern was predicted by the characteristics of motor resonance: The amount of anticipatory processing of perceived actions based on the induced perspective and agency modulated the FLE. Conclusions/Significance Our study provides first evidence for an FLE with non-linear motion in general and with biological motion in particular. Our results suggest that predictive coding within the sensorimotor system alone cannot explain the FLE. Our findings are compatible with visual prediction (Nijhawan, 2008) which assumes that extrapolated motion representations within the visual system generate the FLE. These representations are modulated by sudden visual input (e.g. offset signals) or by input from other systems (e.g. sensorimotor) that can boost or attenuate overshooting representations in accordance with biased neural competition (Desimone & Duncan, 1995). PMID:20062543

  15. BicPAMS: software for biological data analysis with pattern-based biclustering.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Rui; Ferreira, Francisco L; Madeira, Sara C

    2017-02-02

    Biclustering has been largely applied for the unsupervised analysis of biological data, being recognised today as a key technique to discover putative modules in both expression data (subsets of genes correlated in subsets of conditions) and network data (groups of coherently interconnected biological entities). However, given its computational complexity, only recent breakthroughs on pattern-based biclustering enabled efficient searches without the restrictions that state-of-the-art biclustering algorithms place on the structure and homogeneity of biclusters. As a result, pattern-based biclustering provides the unprecedented opportunity to discover non-trivial yet meaningful biological modules with putative functions, whose coherency and tolerance to noise can be tuned and made problem-specific. To enable the effective use of pattern-based biclustering by the scientific community, we developed BicPAMS (Biclustering based on PAttern Mining Software), a software that: 1) makes available state-of-the-art pattern-based biclustering algorithms (BicPAM (Henriques and Madeira, Alg Mol Biol 9:27, 2014), BicNET (Henriques and Madeira, Alg Mol Biol 11:23, 2016), BicSPAM (Henriques and Madeira, BMC Bioinforma 15:130, 2014), BiC2PAM (Henriques and Madeira, Alg Mol Biol 11:1-30, 2016), BiP (Henriques and Madeira, IEEE/ACM Trans Comput Biol Bioinforma, 2015), DeBi (Serin and Vingron, AMB 6:1-12, 2011) and BiModule (Okada et al., IPSJ Trans Bioinf 48(SIG5):39-48, 2007)); 2) consistently integrates their dispersed contributions; 3) further explores additional accuracy and efficiency gains; and 4) makes available graphical and application programming interfaces. Results on both synthetic and real data confirm the relevance of BicPAMS for biological data analysis, highlighting its essential role for the discovery of putative modules with non-trivial yet biologically significant functions from expression and network data. BicPAMS is the first biclustering tool offering the

  16. Pattern formation in the iodate-sulfite-thiosulfate reaction-diffusion system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haimiao; Pojman, John A; Zhao, Yuemin; Pan, Changwei; Zheng, Juhua; Yuan, Ling; Horváth, Attila K; Gao, Qingyu

    2012-01-07

    Sodium polyacrylate-induced pH pattern formation and starch-induced iodine pattern formation were investigated in the iodate-sulfite-thiosulfate (IST) reaction in a one-side fed disc gel reactor (OSFR). As binding agents of the autocatalyst of hydrogen ions or iodide ions, different content of sodium polyacrylate or starch has induced various types of pattern formation. We observed pH pulses, striped patterns, mixed spots and stripes, and hexagonal spots upon increasing the content of sodium polyacrylate and observed iodine pulses, branched patterns, and labyrinthine patterns upon increasing the starch content in the system. Coexistence of a pH front and an iodine front was also studied in a batch IST reaction-diffusion system. Both pH and iodine front instabilities were observed in the presence of sodium polyacrylate, i.e., cellular fronts and transient Turing structures resulting from the decrease in diffusion coefficients of activators. The mechanism of multiple feedback may explain the different patterns in the IST reaction-diffusion system.

  17. Integument pattern formation involves genetic and epigenetic controls: feather arrays simulated by digital hormone models.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ting-Xin; Widelitz, Randall B; Shen, Wei-Min; Will, Peter; Wu, Da-Yu; Lin, Chih-Min; Jung, Han-Sung; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2004-01-01

    Pattern formation is a fundamental morphogenetic process. Models based on genetic and epigenetic control have been proposed but remain controversial. Here we use feather morphogenesis for further evaluation. Adhesion molecules and/or signaling molecules were first expressed homogenously in feather tracts (restrictive mode, appear earlier) or directly in bud or inter-bud regions ( de novo mode, appear later). They either activate or inhibit bud formation, but paradoxically colocalize in the bud. Using feather bud reconstitution, we showed that completely dissociated cells can reform periodic patterns without reference to previous positional codes. The patterning process has the characteristics of being self-organizing, dynamic and plastic. The final pattern is an equilibrium state reached by competition, and the number and size of buds can be altered based on cell number and activator/inhibitor ratio, respectively. We developed a Digital Hormone Model which consists of (1) competent cells without identity that move randomly in a space, (2) extracellular signaling hormones which diffuse by a reaction-diffusion mechanism and activate or inhibit cell adhesion, and (3) cells which respond with topological stochastic actions manifested as changes in cell adhesion. Based on probability, the results are cell clusters arranged in dots or stripes. Thus genetic control provides combinational molecular information which defines the properties of the cells but not the final pattern. Epigenetic control governs interactions among cells and their environment based on physical-chemical rules (such as those described in the Digital Hormone Model). Complex integument patterning is the sum of these two components of control and that is why integument patterns are usually similar but non-identical. These principles may be shared by other pattern formation processes such as barb ridge formation, fingerprints, pigmentation patterning, etc. The Digital Hormone Model can also be applied to

  18. Integument pattern formation involves genetic and epigenetic controls: feather arrays simulated by digital hormone models

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ting-Xin; Widelitz, Randall B.; Shen, Wei-Min; Will, Peter; Wu, Da-Yu; Lin, Chih-Min; Jung, Han-Sung; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Pattern formation is a fundamental morphogenetic process. Models based on genetic and epigenetic control have been proposed but remain controversial. Here we use feather morphogenesis for further evaluation. Adhesion molecules and/or signaling molecules were first expressed homogenously in feather tracts (restrictive mode, appear earlier) or directly in bud or inter-bud regions (de novo mode, appear later). They either activate or inhibit bud formation, but paradoxically co-localize in the bud. Using feather bud reconstitution, we showed that completely dissociated cells can reform periodic patterns without reference to previous positional codes. The patterning process has the characteristics of being self-organizing, dynamic and plastic. The final pattern is an equilibrium state reached by competition, and the number and size of buds can be altered based on cell number and activator/inhibitor ratio, respectively. We developed a Digital Hormone Model which consists of (1) competent cells without identity that move randomly in a space, (2) extracellular signaling hormones which diffuse by a reaction-diffusion mechanism and activate or inhibit cell adhesion, and (3) cells which respond with topological stochastic actions manifested as changes in cell adhesion. Based on probability, the results are cell clusters arranged in dots or stripes. Thus genetic control provides combinational molecular information which defines the properties of the cells but not the final pattern. Epigenetic control governs interactions among cells and their environment based on physical-chemical rules (such as those described in the Digital Hormone Model). Complex integument patterning is the sum of these two components of control and that is why integument patterns are usually similar but non-identical. These principles may be shared by other pattern formation processes such as barb ridge formation, fingerprints, pigmentation patterning, etc. The Digital Hormone Model can also be applied to

  19. On the role of vegetation in the formation of river anabranching patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouzy, B.; D'Odorico, P.; Wütrich, D.; Perona, P.

    2012-04-01

    Part of studies on the couplings between the evolution of riparian vegetation and the river morphodynamics, we investigate the effect of spatial interactions between vegetation located at different positions within the channel. This work generalizes the experimental and theoretical results by Perona et al. and by Crouzy and Perona (both Advances in Water Resources, in Press) on colonization of riverbars by seedlings or large woody debris by relaxing the hypothesis made in those two works of the biomass growth and uprooting being independent on the presence of neighboring plants. While the hypothesis of independent vegetation growth and uprooting is justified for sparse vegetation cover or young seedlings, it fails as soon as the canopy significantly disturbs the flow or changes the sediment stability. Then, flow-mediated interactions between riparian vegetation located at different positions within the channel can be observed. Those interactions are either constructive or destructive. For example, a region favorable to the development of biomass appears on the lee side of a vegetated obstacle (with bleed flow) due to increased deposition of seeds and sediment (Schnauder and Moggridge, 2008) while conversely scouring can be increased laterally due to obstacle-induced flow diversion (Roulund et al., 2005; Melville and Sutherland, 1988; Zong and Nepf, 2008). We focus on the role of vegetation in the formation of the regular vegetated ridge patterns found in ephemeral rivers (see for example the work by Tooth and Nanson, 2004 on anabranching patterns) or as a succession of swales and ridges on the inside of meander bends (scroll bars). From the analysis of aerial images, we obtain the characteristic length scale of the patterns. We show how in the limit where the hydrological (interarrival time of floods) and the biological (germination and growth rates) timescales are comparable the combination between both positive and negative feedbacks between vegetation located at

  20. On the dynamics of Liesegang-type pattern formation in a gaseous system

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Álvarez, Elizeth; Montoya, Fernando; Buhse, Thomas; Rios-Herrera, Wady; Torres-Guzmán, José; Rivera, Marco; Martínez-Mekler, Gustavo; Müller, Markus F.

    2016-01-01

    Liesegang pattern formations are widely spread in nature. In spite of a comparably simple experimental setup under laboratory conditions, a variety of spatio-temporal structures may arise. Presumably because of easier control of the experimental conditions, Liesegang pattern formation was mainly studied in gel systems during more than a century. Here we consider pattern formation in a gas phase, where beautiful but highly complex reaction-diffusion-convection dynamics are uncovered by means of a specific laser technique. A quantitative analysis reveals that two different, apparently independent processes, both highly correlated and synchronized across the extension of the reaction cloud, act on different time scales. Each of them imprints a different structure of salt precipitation at the tube walls. PMID:27025405

  1. Numerical simulation of the zebra pattern formation on a three-dimensional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Darae; Li, Yibao; Choi, Yongho; Yoo, Minhyun; Kang, Dooyoung; Park, Junyoung; Choi, Jaewon; Kim, Junseok

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we numerically investigate the zebra skin pattern formation on the surface of a zebra model in three-dimensional space. To model the pattern formation, we use the Lengyel-Epstein model which is a two component activator and inhibitor system. The concentration profiles of the Lengyel-Epstein model are obtained by solving the corresponding reaction-diffusion equation numerically using a finite difference method. We represent the zebra surface implicitly as the zero level set of a signed distance function and then solve the resulting system on a discrete narrow band domain containing the zebra skin. The values at boundary are dealt with an interpolation using the closet point method. We present the numerical method in detail and investigate the effect of the model parameters on the pattern formation on the surface of the zebra model.

  2. Mechanisms of pattern formation in grazing-incidence ion bombardment of Pt(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Henri; Redinger, Alex; Messlinger, Sebastian; Stoian, Georgiana; Michely, Thomas; Rosandi, Yudi; Urbassek, Herbert M.; Linke, Udo

    2006-06-15

    Ripple patterns forming on Pt(111) due to 5 keV Ar{sup +} grazing-incidence ion bombardment were investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy in a broad temperature range from 100 to 720 K and for ion fluences up to 3x10{sup 20} ions/m{sup 2}. A detailed morphological analysis together with molecular dynamics simulations of single ion impacts allow us to develop atomic scale models for the formation of these patterns. The large difference in step edge versus terrace damage is shown to be crucial for ripple formation under grazing incidence. The importance of distinct diffusion processes--step adatom generation at kinks and adatom lattice gas formation--for temperature dependent transitions in the surface morphology is highlighted. Surprisingly, ion bombardment effects like thermal spike induced adatom production and planar subsurface channeling are important for pattern ordering.

  3. Impact of degree mixing pattern on consensus formation in social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao Fan; Tse, Chi Kong

    The consensus formation process in a social network is affected by a number of factors. This paper studies how the degree mixing pattern of a social network affects the consensus formation process. A social network of more than 50,000 nodes was sampled from the online social services website Twitter. Nodes in the Twitter user network are grouped by their in-degrees and out-degrees. A degree mixing correlation is proposed to measure the randomness of the mixing pattern for each degree group. The DeGroot model is used to simulate the consensus formation processes in the network. Simulation suggests that the non-random degree mixing pattern of social networks can slow down the rate of consensus.

  4. A Theoretical Model of Jigsaw-Puzzle Pattern Formation by Plant Leaf Epidermal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Higaki, Takumi; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Akita, Kae; Takigawa-Imamura, Hisako; Yoshimura, Kenji; Miura, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Plant leaf epidermal cells exhibit a jigsaw puzzle–like pattern that is generated by interdigitation of the cell wall during leaf development. The contribution of two ROP GTPases, ROP2 and ROP6, to the cytoskeletal dynamics that regulate epidermal cell wall interdigitation has already been examined; however, how interactions between these molecules result in pattern formation remains to be elucidated. Here, we propose a simple interface equation model that incorporates both the cell wall remodeling activity of ROP GTPases and the diffusible signaling molecules by which they are regulated. This model successfully reproduces pattern formation observed in vivo, and explains the counterintuitive experimental results of decreased cellulose production and increased thickness. Our model also reproduces the dynamics of three-way cell wall junctions. Therefore, this model provides a possible mechanism for cell wall interdigitation formation in vivo. PMID:27054467

  5. On the dynamics of Liesegang-type pattern formation in a gaseous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Álvarez, Elizeth; Montoya, Fernando; Buhse, Thomas; Rios-Herrera, Wady; Torres-Guzmán, José; Rivera, Marco; Martínez-Mekler, Gustavo; Müller, Markus F.

    2016-03-01

    Liesegang pattern formations are widely spread in nature. In spite of a comparably simple experimental setup under laboratory conditions, a variety of spatio-temporal structures may arise. Presumably because of easier control of the experimental conditions, Liesegang pattern formation was mainly studied in gel systems during more than a century. Here we consider pattern formation in a gas phase, where beautiful but highly complex reaction-diffusion-convection dynamics are uncovered by means of a specific laser technique. A quantitative analysis reveals that two different, apparently independent processes, both highly correlated and synchronized across the extension of the reaction cloud, act on different time scales. Each of them imprints a different structure of salt precipitation at the tube walls.

  6. Wavelength Analysis of Interface between Two Miscible Solutions Observed in Formation of Fractal Pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimokawa, Michiko; Takami, Toshiya

    2014-04-01

    When a droplet of a higher-density solution (HDS) is placed on top of a lower-density solution (LDS), the HDS draws a fractal pattern on the surface of the LDS. Before the fractal pattern is formed, a stick-like pattern with a periodic structure emerges in a region surrounding the surface pattern due to interfacial instability. We experimentally measure the wavelength of this stick-like pattern. The wavelength increases with the volume of the HDS and is independent of the viscosities of the two solutions. To understand the stick generation, we propose a model of miscible viscous fingering whose boundary conditions are similar to those of the experiments. The wavelength obtained from the model agrees with the experimentally obtained wavelength. The formation of the fractal pattern is discussed by comparing it with the viscous fingering.

  7. The Biological Connection Markup Language: a SBGN-compliant format for visualization, filtering and analysis of biological pathways

    PubMed Central

    Rizzetto, Lisa; Guedez, Damariz Rivero; Donato, Michele; Romualdi, Chiara; Draghici, Sorin; Cavalieri, Duccio

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: Many models and analysis of signaling pathways have been proposed. However, neither of them takes into account that a biological pathway is not a fixed system, but instead it depends on the organism, tissue and cell type as well as on physiological, pathological and experimental conditions. Results: The Biological Connection Markup Language (BCML) is a format to describe, annotate and visualize pathways. BCML is able to store multiple information, permitting a selective view of the pathway as it exists and/or behave in specific organisms, tissues and cells. Furthermore, BCML can be automatically converted into data formats suitable for analysis and into a fully SBGN-compliant graphical representation, making it an important tool that can be used by both computational biologists and ‘wet lab’ scientists. Availability and implementation: The XML schema and the BCML software suite are freely available under the LGPL for download at http://bcml.dc-atlas.net. They are implemented in Java and supported on MS Windows, Linux and OS X. Contact: duccio.cavalieri@unifi.it; sorin@wayne.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:21653523

  8. Spinodal instability and pattern formation in thin liquid films confined between two plates.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ruhi; Sharma, Ashutosh; Banerjee, Indrani; Kargupta, Kajari

    2006-04-01

    The instability, morphology and pattern formation engendered by the van der Waals force in a thin liquid film of thickness h confined between two closely placed solid surfaces (at distance d > h) are investigated based on nonlinear 3D simulations. The initial and the final stages of dewetting and pattern formation are found to be crucially dependent on the volumetric (thickness) ratio of air and liquid and its deviation from the location of the maximum of the spinodal parameter versus volumetric ratio curve. On a low energy surface, relatively thinner films and wider air gaps favor initial dewetting of the lower plate by the formation of holes, whereas thicker films with thinner air gaps initially evolve by the formation of columns/bridges that join the upper plate. In the later stage of evolution, the initial holes in thinner films evolve into columns/drops, while a rapid coalescence of columns in the thicker films eventually causes formation of holes. Thus, a phase inversion, either from liquid-in-air to air-in-liquid dispersion or vice versa, occurs during the final stages of evolution. A thin film confined between two high-energy solid surfaces forms columns (bridges) only when its mean thickness, h0, is greater than a critical thickness (hc) or the air gap is smaller than a critical distance. The patterns can be aligned by using a topographically patterned confining surface. Conditions on pattern periodicity, amplitude, and the volumetric ratio of air and liquid in the gap are explored for the formation of various types of ordered patterns including annular rings of columns, concentric ripples, parallel channels and a rectangular array of complex features. The results are of significance in soft lithographies such as LISA, soft stamping and capillary force lithography.

  9. Hormone-Mediated Pattern Formation in Seedling of Plants: a Competitive Growth Dynamics Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Satoshi; Mimura, Masayasu; Ohya, Tomoyuki; Oikawa, Noriko; Okabe, Hirotaka; Kai, Shoichi

    2001-10-01

    An ecologically relevant pattern formation process mediated by hormonal interactions among growing seedlings is modeled based on the experimental observations on the effects of indole acetic acid, which can act as an inhibitor and activator of root growth depending on its concentration. In the absence of any lateral root with constant hormone-sensitivity, the edge effect phenomenon is obtained depending on the secretion rate of hormone from the main root. Introduction of growth-stage-dependent hormone-sensitivity drastically amplifies the initial randomness, resulting in spatially irregular macroscopic patterns. When the lateral root growth is introduced, periodic patterns are obtained whose periodicity depends on the length of lateral roots. The growth-stage-dependent hormone-sensitivity and the lateral root growth are crucial for macroscopic periodic-pattern formation.

  10. Pattern formation in a spatial plant-wrack model with tide effect on the wrack.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gui-Quan; Li, Li; Jin, Zhen; Li, Bai-Lian

    2010-03-01

    Spatial patterns are a subfield of spatial ecology, and these patterns modify the temporal dynamics and stability properties of population densities at a range of spatial scales. Localized ecological interactions can generate striking large-scale spatial patterns in ecosystems through spatial self-organization. Possible mechanisms include oscillating consumer-resource interactions, localized disturbance-recovery processes, and scale-dependent feedback. However, in this paper, our main aim is to study the effect of tide on the pattern formation of a spatial plant-wrack model. We discuss the changes of the wavelength, wave speed, and the conditions of the spatial pattern formation, according to the dispersion relation formula. Both the mathematical analysis and numerical simulations reveal that the tide has great influence on the spatial pattern. More specifically, typical traveling spatial patterns can be obtained. Our obtained results are consistent with the previous observation that wracks exhibit traveling patterns, which is useful to help us better understand the dynamics of the real ecosystems.

  11. Beyond transmission: intergenerational patterns of family formation among middle-class American families.

    PubMed

    Fasang, Anette Eva; Raab, Marcel

    2014-10-01

    Research about parental effects on family behavior focuses on intergenerational transmission: that is, whether children show the same family behavior as their parents. This focus potentially over emphasizes similarity and obscures heterogeneity in parental effects on family behavior. In this study, we make two contributions. First, instead of focusing on isolated focal events, we conceptualize parents' and their children's family formation holistically as the process of union formation and childbearing between ages 15 and 40. We then discuss mechanisms likely to shape these intergenerational patterns. Second, beyond estimating average transmission effects, we innovatively apply multichannel sequence analysis to dyadic sequence data on middle-class American families from the Longitudinal Study of Generations (LSOG; N = 461 parent-child dyads). The results show three salient intergenerational family formation patterns among this population: a strong transmission, a moderated transmission, and an intergenerational contrast pattern. We examine what determines parents' and children's likelihood to sort into a specific intergenerational pattern. For middle-class American families, educational upward mobility is a strong predictor of moderated intergenerational transmission, whereas close emotional bonds between parents and children foster strong intergenerational transmission. We conclude that intergenerational patterns of family formation are generated at the intersection of macro-structural change and family internal psychological dynamics.

  12. Insular dentin formation pattern in human odontogenesis in relation to the scalloped dentino-enamel junction.

    PubMed

    Radlanski, Ralf J; Renz, Herbert

    2007-01-01

    This study is a first report on the modality of early dentin formation in respect to the scalloped pattern of the dentino-enamel junction (DEJ). We applied scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), histological serial sections, and three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions. TEM and SEM showed scallops and secondary scallops on the DEJ of deciduous dental primordia and on deciduous teeth with the enamel cap removed. This peculiar outline of the DEJ requires a specific dentin formation pattern; histological sections showed that dentin formation began at the brims of the scallops, seen as triangular spikes in serial sections. The dentin formation front was not uniform; instead, it was characterized by multiple, insular forming centers, as revealed by our 3D reconstructions. As thicker dentin layers formed, the islands became confluent. Factors are discussed, which may lead to crimpling of the inner enamel epithelium, and maintained as the scalloped pattern of the DEJ develops. Signaling patterns in accordance with the insular dentin formation are unknown so far.

  13. Pattern Formation in Self-Propelled Particles with Density-Dependent Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, F. D. C.; Marchetti, M. C.; Marenduzzo, D.; Tailleur, J.

    2012-06-01

    We study the behavior of interacting self-propelled particles, whose self-propulsion speed decreases with their local density. By combining direct simulations of the microscopic model with an analysis of the hydrodynamic equations obtained by explicitly coarse graining the model, we show that interactions lead generically to the formation of a host of patterns, including moving clumps, active lanes, and asters. This general mechanism could explain many of the patterns seen in recent experiments and simulations.

  14. Biological and physico-chemical formation of Birnessite during the ripening of manganese removal filters.

    PubMed

    Bruins, Jantinus H; Petrusevski, Branislav; Slokar, Yness M; Huysman, Koen; Joris, Koen; Kruithof, Joop C; Kennedy, Maria D

    2015-02-01

    The efficiency of manganese removal in conventional groundwater treatment consisting of aeration followed by rapid sand filtration, strongly depends on the ability of filter media to promote auto-catalytic adsorption of dissolved manganese and its subsequent oxidation. Earlier studies have shown that the compound responsible for the auto-catalytic activity in ripened filters is a manganese oxide called Birnessite. The aim of this study was to determine if the ripening of manganese removal filters and the formation of Birnessite on virgin sand is initiated biologically or physico-chemically. The ripening of virgin filter media in a pilot filter column fed by pre-treated manganese containing groundwater was studied for approximately 600 days. Samples of filter media were taken at regular time intervals, and the manganese oxides formed in the coating were analysed by Raman spectroscopy, Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). From the EPR analyses, it was established that the formation of Birnessite was most likely initiated via biological activity. With the progress of filter ripening and development of the coating, Birnessite formation became predominantly physico-chemical, although biological manganese oxidation continued to contribute to the overall manganese removal. The knowledge that manganese removal in conventional groundwater treatment is initiated biologically could be of help in reducing typically long ripening times by creating conditions that are favourable for the growth of manganese oxidizing bacteria.

  15. “Pop-slide” patterning: Rapid fabrication of microstructured PDMS gasket slides for biological applications

    PubMed Central

    Ramji, Ramesh; Khan, Nafeesa T; Muñoz-Rojas, Andrés; Miller-Jensen, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    We describe a “pop-slide” patterning approach to easily produce thin film microstructures on the surface of glass with varying feature sizes (3 μm – 250 μm) and aspect ratios (0.066 – 3) within 45 minutes. This low cost method does not require specialized equipment while allowing us to produce micro structured gasket layers for sandwich assays and could be readily applied to many biological applications. PMID:26949529

  16. Interlinked nonlinear subnetworks underlie the formation of robust cellular patterns in Arabidopsis epidermis: a dynamic spatial model

    PubMed Central

    Benítez, Mariana; Espinosa-Soto, Carlos; Padilla-Longoria, Pablo; Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R

    2008-01-01

    Background Dynamical models are instrumental for exploring the way information required to generate robust developmental patterns arises from complex interactions among genetic and non-genetic factors. We address this fundamental issue of developmental biology studying the leaf and root epidermis of Arabidopsis. We propose an experimentally-grounded model of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) that are coupled by protein diffusion and comprise a meta-GRN implemented on cellularised domains. Results Steady states of the meta-GRN model correspond to gene expression profiles typical of hair and non-hair epidermal cells. The simulations also render spatial patterns that match the cellular arrangements observed in root and leaf epidermis. As in actual plants, such patterns are robust in the face of diverse perturbations. We validated the model by checking that it also reproduced the patterns of reported mutants. The meta-GRN model shows that interlinked sub-networks contribute redundantly to the formation of robust hair patterns and permits to advance novel and testable predictions regarding the effect of cell shape, signalling pathways and additional gene interactions affecting spatial cell-patterning. Conclusion The spatial meta-GRN model integrates available experimental data and contributes to further understanding of the Arabidopsis epidermal system. It also provides a systems biology framework to explore the interplay among sub-networks of a GRN, cell-to-cell communication, cell shape and domain traits, which could help understanding of general aspects of patterning processes. For instance, our model suggests that the information needed for cell fate determination emerges from dynamic processes that depend upon molecular components inside and outside differentiating cells, suggesting that the classical distinction of lineage versus positional cell differentiation may be instrumental but rather artificial. It also suggests that interlinkage of nonlinear and redundant

  17. Interlinked nonlinear subnetworks underlie the formation of robust cellular patterns in Arabidopsis epidermis: a dynamic spatial model.

    PubMed

    Benítez, Mariana; Espinosa-Soto, Carlos; Padilla-Longoria, Pablo; Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R

    2008-11-17

    Dynamical models are instrumental for exploring the way information required to generate robust developmental patterns arises from complex interactions among genetic and non-genetic factors. We address this fundamental issue of developmental biology studying the leaf and root epidermis of Arabidopsis. We propose an experimentally-grounded model of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) that are coupled by protein diffusion and comprise a meta-GRN implemented on cellularised domains. Steady states of the meta-GRN model correspond to gene expression profiles typical of hair and non-hair epidermal cells. The simulations also render spatial patterns that match the cellular arrangements observed in root and leaf epidermis. As in actual plants, such patterns are robust in the face of diverse perturbations. We validated the model by checking that it also reproduced the patterns of reported mutants. The meta-GRN model shows that interlinked sub-networks contribute redundantly to the formation of robust hair patterns and permits to advance novel and testable predictions regarding the effect of cell shape, signalling pathways and additional gene interactions affecting spatial cell-patterning. The spatial meta-GRN model integrates available experimental data and contributes to further understanding of the Arabidopsis epidermal system. It also provides a systems biology framework to explore the interplay among sub-networks of a GRN, cell-to-cell communication, cell shape and domain traits, which could help understanding of general aspects of patterning processes. For instance, our model suggests that the information needed for cell fate determination emerges from dynamic processes that depend upon molecular components inside and outside differentiating cells, suggesting that the classical distinction of lineage versus positional cell differentiation may be instrumental but rather artificial. It also suggests that interlinkage of nonlinear and redundant sub-networks in larger networks

  18. Microlens formation in microgel/gold colloid composite materials via photothermal patterning.

    PubMed

    Jones, Clinton D; Serpe, Michael J; Schroeder, Laura; Lyon, L Andrew

    2003-05-07

    We report on the nature of photothermally patterned regions inside self-assembled hydrogel nanoparticle materials containing coassembled colloidal Au. These composite materials are prepared from approximately 226-nm diameter particles composed of the environmentally responsive polymer, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAm). Upon centrifugation to achieve a proper volume fraction, these close-packed assemblies display a sharp Bragg diffraction peak in the midvisible region of the spectrum and can be reversibly converted into a nondiffracting glassy material as the temperature is raised above the characteristic phase transition temperature of the polymer. The addition of 16-nm colloidal Au prior to centrifugation allows the homogeneous distribution of metal nanoparticles throughout the close-packed material. Localized heating is then possible upon excitation of the Au plasmon absorption with a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser (lambda = 532 nm). Such localized heating events lead to patterned regions of ordered crystalline phases inside of bulk glassy phases. We illustrate that the nature of the locally patterned area results in the formation of a microlens due to density/refractive index gradient in the patterned crystalline region. The Gaussian power distribution of the incident beam is thought to be a contributing factor in the microlens formation. Microlens formation is shown by observing interference patterns similar to Newton's rings, which change over time as the region is formed. A true hallmark of the lens is also demonstrated by focusing an image through the patterned structure.

  19. A model for the biological precipitation of Precambrian iron-formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laberge, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    A biological model for the precipitation of Precambrian iron formations is presented. Assuming an oxygen deficient atmosphere and water column to allow sufficient Fe solubility, it is proposed that local oxidizing environments, produced biologically, led to precipitation of iron formations. It is further suggested that spheroidal structures about 30 mm in diameter, which are widespread in low grade cherty rion formations, are relict forms of the organic walled microfossil Eosphaera tylerii. The presence of these structures suggests that the organism may have had a siliceous test, which allowed sufficient rigidity for accumulation and preservation. The model involves precipitation of ferric hydrates by oxidation of iron in the photic zone by a variety of photosynthetic organisms. Silica may have formed in the frustules of silica secreting organisms, including Eosphaera tylerii. Iron formates formed, therefore, by a sediment rain of biologically produced ferric hydrates and silica and other organic material. Siderite and hematite formed diagenetically on basin floors, and subsequent metamorphism produced magnetite and iron silicates.

  20. Discovering and validating biological hypotheses from coherent patterns in functional genomics data

    SciTech Connect

    Joachimiak, Marcin Pawel

    2008-08-12

    The area of transcriptomics analysis is among the more established in computational biology, having evolved in both technology and experimental design. Transcriptomics has a strong impetus to develop sophisticated computational methods due to the large amounts of available whole-genome datasets for many species and because of powerful applications in regulatory network reconstruction as well as elucidation and modeling of cellular transcriptional responses. While gene expression microarray data can be noisy and comparisons across experiments challenging, there are a number of sophisticated methods that aid in arriving at statistically and biologically significant conclusions. As such, computational transcriptomics analysis can provide guidance for analysis of results from newer experimental technologies. More recently, search methods have been developed to identify modules of genes, which exhibit coherent expression patterns in only a subset of experimental conditions. The latest advances in these methods allow to integrate multiple data types anddatasets, both experimental and computational, within a single statistical framework accounting for data confidence and relevance to specific biological questions. Such frameworks provide a unified environment for the exploration of specific biological hypothesis and for the discovery of coherent data patterns along with the evidence supporting them.

  1. The influence of biological soil crusts on successional vegetation patterns in a revegetated desert area in the Tengger Desert, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Huang; Zhi-shan, Zhang; Xin-rong, Li

    2014-05-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are an important cover in arid desert landscapes, and have a profound effect on the soil water redistribution, plant growth and vegetation succession. Although a large number of studies have focused on the single-process of BSCs experimentally, relatively few studies have examined the eco-hydrological mechanisms of BSCs influence on successional vegetation patterns in revegetated desert areas. In this study, based on the long term monitoring and focused research on sand-binding vegetation in the Shapotou region (southeastern edge of the Tengger Desert, China) since the 1950s, the characteristics of plant community and BSCs at different successional stages, and the soil water dynamics were investigated. Then a simplified mathematical model describing the coupled dynamics of soil moisture and vegetation in drylands was developed. And finally the role of BSCs on soil water dynamics and vegetation patterns were discussed. Results have showed that BSCs was closely associated with the vegetation succession, such as in the Caragana korshinskii community, moss crusts were the dominate species and in the Artemisia ordosica community, algae crusts were the dominate species. BSCs had a significant effect on soil water infiltration and it was one of the main driving forces to vegetation pattern formations, as algae crusts would induced the tiger bush stripes and moss crusts would lead to the leopard bush spots in arid ecosystems.

  2. A stochastic multicellular model identifies biological watermarks from disorders in self-organized patterns of phyllotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Refahi, Yassin; Brunoud, Géraldine; Farcot, Etienne; Jean-Marie, Alain; Pulkkinen, Minna; Vernoux, Teva; Godin, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Exploration of developmental mechanisms classically relies on analysis of pattern regularities. Whether disorders induced by biological noise may carry information on building principles of developmental systems is an important debated question. Here, we addressed theoretically this question using phyllotaxis, the geometric arrangement of plant aerial organs, as a model system. Phyllotaxis arises from reiterative organogenesis driven by lateral inhibitions at the shoot apex. Motivated by recurrent observations of disorders in phyllotaxis patterns, we revisited in depth the classical deterministic view of phyllotaxis. We developed a stochastic model of primordia initiation at the shoot apex, integrating locality and stochasticity in the patterning system. This stochastic model recapitulates phyllotactic patterns, both regular and irregular, and makes quantitative predictions on the nature of disorders arising from noise. We further show that disorders in phyllotaxis instruct us on the parameters governing phyllotaxis dynamics, thus that disorders can reveal biological watermarks of developmental systems. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14093.001 PMID:27380805

  3. Trickle-down boundary conditions in aeolian dune-field pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, R. C.; Kocurek, G.

    2015-12-01

    One the one hand, wind-blown dune-field patterns emerge within the overarching boundary conditions of climate, tectonics and eustasy implying the presence of these signals in the aeolian geomorphic and stratigraphic record. On the other hand, dune-field patterns are a poster-child of self-organization, in which autogenic processes give rise to patterned landscapes despite remarkable differences in the geologic setting (i.e., Earth, Mars and Titan). How important are climate, tectonics and eustasy in aeolian dune field pattern formation? Here we develop the hypothesis that, in terms of pattern development, dune fields evolve largely independent of the direct influence of 'system-scale' boundary conditions, such as climate, tectonics and eustasy. Rather, these boundary conditions set the stage for smaller-scale, faster-evolving 'event-scale' boundary conditions. This 'trickle-down' effect, in which system-scale boundary conditions indirectly influence the event scale boundary conditions provides the uniqueness and richness of dune-field patterned landscapes. The trickle-down effect means that the architecture of the stratigraphic record of dune-field pattern formation archives boundary conditions, which are spatially and temporally removed from the overarching geologic setting. In contrast, the presence of an aeolian stratigraphic record itself, reflects changes in system-scale boundary conditions that drive accumulation and preservation of aeolian strata.

  4. The RADICLELESS1 gene is required for vascular pattern formation in rice.

    PubMed

    Scarpella, Enrico; Rueb, Saskia; Meijer, Annemarie H

    2003-02-01

    The molecular mechanisms through which the complex patterns of plant vascular tissues are established are largely unknown. The highly ordered, yet simple, striate array of veins of rice leaves represents an attractive system to study the dynamics underlying pattern formation. Here we show that mutation in the RADICLELESS1 (RAL1) gene results in distinctive vascular pattern defects. In ral1 embryonic scutella, secondary veins are absent and in the prematurely aborted and discontinuous primary veins, cells are misaligned to each other. In ral1 leaves, longitudinal and commissural (transverse) veins display altered spacing and the commissural veins additionally show atypical branching and interruptions in their continuity. The vascular pattern alterations of ral1 occur in the context of normally shaped leaf primordia. Anatomical inspection and analysis of the expression of the procambium specification marker Oshox1-GUS and of the auxin-inducible reporter DR5-GUS demonstrates that all the vascular patterning aberrations of ral1 originate from defects in the procambium, which represents the earliest identifiable stage of vascular development. Furthermore, the ral1 mutant is unique in that procambium formation in leaf primordium development is delayed. Finally, the ral1 vascular patterning distortions are associated with a defective response to auxin and with an enhanced sensitivity to cytokinin. ral1 is the first mutant impaired in both procambium development and vascular patterning to be isolated in a monocot species.

  5. Drying bacterial biosaline patterns capable of vital reanimation upon rehydration: novel hibernating biomineralogical life formations.

    PubMed

    Gómez Gómez, José María; Medina, Jesús; Hochberg, David; Mateo-Martí, Eva; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Rull, Fernando

    2014-07-01

    Water is the fundamental molecule for life on Earth. Thus, the search for hibernating life-forms in waterless environments is an important research topic for astrobiology. To date, however, the organizational patterns containing microbial life in extremely dry places, such as the deserts of Earth, the Dry Valleys of Antarctica, or Mars analog regolith, have been poorly characterized. Here, we report on the formation of bacterial biosaline self-organized drying patterns formed over plastic surfaces. These emerge during the evaporation of sessile droplets of aqueous NaCl salt 0.15 M solutions containing Escherichia coli cells. In the present study, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) analyses indicated that the bacterial cells and the NaCl in these biosaline formations are organized in a two-layered characteristic 3-D architectural morphology. A thin filmlike top layer formed by NaCl conjugated to, and intermingled with, "mineralized" bacterial cells covers a bottom layer constructed by the bulk of the nonmineralized bacterial cells; both layers have the same morphological pattern. In addition, optical microscopic time-lapsed movies show that the formation of these patterns is a kinetically fast process that requires the coupled interaction between the salt and the bacterial cells. Apparently, this mutual interaction drives the generative process of self-assembly that underlies the drying pattern formation. Most notably, the bacterial cells inside these drying self-assembled patterns enter into a quiescent suspended anhydrobiotic state resistant to complete desiccation and capable of vital reanimation upon rehydration. We propose that these E. coli biosaline drying patterns represent an excellent experimental model for understanding different aspects of anhydrobiosis phenomena in bacteria as well as for revealing the mechanisms of bacterially induced biomineralization, both highly relevant topics for the search of life in

  6. Influence of oscillatory centrifugal forces on the mechanism of Turing pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiu-Souto, Jacobo; Muñuzuri, Alberto P.

    2015-01-01

    Constantly acting centrifugal forces on Turing pattern forming systems have been observed to induce orientation and wavelength changes on Turing structures. Here, we will consider a periodic modulation of such centrifugal forces and their effects on pattern formation. Depending on the oscillation period the system exhibits a wide variety of stationary (stripes, H0, etc.) or nonstationary patterns (black eyes, etc.), as well as transitions and instabilities such as Eckhaus, zigzag, etc. In this paper, a detailed description of the different patterns and patterning mechanisms will be described and understood within the previous context. The system considered is the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction encapsulated in AOT micelles modeled by the adapted version of the Oregonator model.

  7. An novel frequent probability pattern mining algorithm based on circuit simulation method in uncertain biological networks.

    PubMed

    He, Jieyue; Wang, Chunyan; Qiu, Kunpu; Zhong, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Motif mining has always been a hot research topic in bioinformatics. Most of current research on biological networks focuses on exact motif mining. However, due to the inevitable experimental error and noisy data, biological network data represented as the probability model could better reflect the authenticity and biological significance, therefore, it is more biological meaningful to discover probability motif in uncertain biological networks. One of the key steps in probability motif mining is frequent pattern discovery which is usually based on the possible world model having a relatively high computational complexity. In this paper, we present a novel method for detecting frequent probability patterns based on circuit simulation in the uncertain biological networks. First, the partition based efficient search is applied to the non-tree like subgraph mining where the probability of occurrence in random networks is small. Then, an algorithm of probability isomorphic based on circuit simulation is proposed. The probability isomorphic combines the analysis of circuit topology structure with related physical properties of voltage in order to evaluate the probability isomorphism between probability subgraphs. The circuit simulation based probability isomorphic can avoid using traditional possible world model. Finally, based on the algorithm of probability subgraph isomorphism, two-step hierarchical clustering method is used to cluster subgraphs, and discover frequent probability patterns from the clusters. The experiment results on data sets of the Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI) networks and the transcriptional regulatory networks of E. coli and S. cerevisiae show that the proposed method can efficiently discover the frequent probability subgraphs. The discovered subgraphs in our study contain all probability motifs reported in the experiments published in other related papers. The algorithm of probability graph isomorphism evaluation based on circuit simulation

  8. An novel frequent probability pattern mining algorithm based on circuit simulation method in uncertain biological networks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Motif mining has always been a hot research topic in bioinformatics. Most of current research on biological networks focuses on exact motif mining. However, due to the inevitable experimental error and noisy data, biological network data represented as the probability model could better reflect the authenticity and biological significance, therefore, it is more biological meaningful to discover probability motif in uncertain biological networks. One of the key steps in probability motif mining is frequent pattern discovery which is usually based on the possible world model having a relatively high computational complexity. Methods In this paper, we present a novel method for detecting frequent probability patterns based on circuit simulation in the uncertain biological networks. First, the partition based efficient search is applied to the non-tree like subgraph mining where the probability of occurrence in random networks is small. Then, an algorithm of probability isomorphic based on circuit simulation is proposed. The probability isomorphic combines the analysis of circuit topology structure with related physical properties of voltage in order to evaluate the probability isomorphism between probability subgraphs. The circuit simulation based probability isomorphic can avoid using traditional possible world model. Finally, based on the algorithm of probability subgraph isomorphism, two-step hierarchical clustering method is used to cluster subgraphs, and discover frequent probability patterns from the clusters. Results The experiment results on data sets of the Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI) networks and the transcriptional regulatory networks of E. coli and S. cerevisiae show that the proposed method can efficiently discover the frequent probability subgraphs. The discovered subgraphs in our study contain all probability motifs reported in the experiments published in other related papers. Conclusions The algorithm of probability graph isomorphism

  9. The Impact of Course Delivery Format on Wellness Patterns of University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everhart, Kim; Dimon, Chelsea

    2013-01-01

    University students (N = 103) enrolled in multiple wellness courses at a small northeastern public university completed a questionnaire measuring wellness patterns at the beginning and end of a wellness course delivered totally on line (web-based), in the traditional classroom, or in a mix of the two formats (blended). Attrition of participants…

  10. Global bifurcation analysis and pattern formation in homogeneous diffusive predator-prey systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinfeng; Wei, Junjie; Shi, Junping

    2016-02-01

    The dynamics of a general diffusive predator-prey system is considered. Existence and nonexistence of non-constant positive steady state solutions are shown to identify the ranges of parameters of spatial pattern formation. Bifurcations of spatially homogeneous and nonhomogeneous periodic solutions as well as non-constant steady state solutions are studied.

  11. Transverse Mode Structure and Pattern Formation in Oxide Confined Vertical Cavity Semiconductor Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Choquette, K.D.; Geib, K.M.; Hegarty, S.P.; Hou, H.Q.; Huyet, G.; McInerney, J.G.; Porta, P.

    1999-07-06

    We analyze the transverse profiles of oxide-confined vertical cavity laser diodes as a function of aperture size. For small apertures we demonstrate that thermal lensing can be the dominant effect in determining the transverse resonator properties. We also analyze pattern formation in lasers with large apertures where we observe the appearance of tilted waves.

  12. Category Formation in Autism: Can Individuals with Autism Form Categories and Prototypes of Dot Patterns?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gastgeb, Holly Zajac; Dundas, Eva M.; Minshew, Nancy J.; Strauss, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing amount of evidence suggesting that individuals with autism have difficulty with categorization. One basic cognitive ability that may underlie this difficulty is the ability to abstract a prototype. The current study examined prototype and category formation with dot patterns in high-functioning adults with autism and matched…

  13. Is sputtering relevant for ion-induced self-organized pattern formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofsäss, Hans; Bobes, Omar; Zhang, Kun

    2013-04-01

    Recently it was reported that ion-induced mass redistribution rather than sputtering would solely determine ripple pattern formation of ion-irradiated surfaces. We investigate the pattern formation on Si irradiated with Xe ions with energies of 5 and 10 keV. Sputter yield and collision cascade characteristics vary strongly as function of ion energy, ion mass and substrate material and allow us to investigate the contributions of curvature dependent erosion as well as mass redistribution. The experimental results are compared with calculations of the curvature coefficients Sx and Sy. Parameters required for the calculations are extracted from Monte Carlo simulations with program SDTrimSP. The calculated curvature coefficients show that mass redistribution is dominant for parallel ripple formation in most cases. The angle where the pattern orientation changes from parallel to perpendicular ripples is however related to curvature dependent sputtering. We discuss the possibilities to tune the different contributions to pattern formation and examine the possibility to completely eliminate mass redistribution effects.

  14. Category Formation in Autism: Can Individuals with Autism Form Categories and Prototypes of Dot Patterns?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gastgeb, Holly Zajac; Dundas, Eva M.; Minshew, Nancy J.; Strauss, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing amount of evidence suggesting that individuals with autism have difficulty with categorization. One basic cognitive ability that may underlie this difficulty is the ability to abstract a prototype. The current study examined prototype and category formation with dot patterns in high-functioning adults with autism and matched…

  15. Spatial Heterogeneity and Imperfect Mixing in Chemical Reactions: Visualization of Density-Driven Pattern Formation

    DOE PAGES

    Sobel, Sabrina G.; Hastings, Harold M.; Testa, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Imore » mperfect mixing is a concern in industrial processes, everyday processes (mixing paint, bread machines), and in understanding salt water-fresh water mixing in ecosystems. The effects of imperfect mixing become evident in the unstirred ferroin-catalyzed Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, the prototype for chemical pattern formation. Over time, waves of oxidation (high ferriin concentration, blue) propagate into a background of low ferriin concentration (red); their structure reflects in part the history of mixing in the reaction vessel. However, it may be difficult to separate mixing effects from reaction effects. We describe a simpler model system for visualizing density-driven pattern formation in an essentially unmixed chemical system: the reaction of pale yellow Fe 3 + with colorless SCN − to form the blood-red Fe ( SCN ) 2 + complex ion in aqueous solution. Careful addition of one drop of Fe ( NO 3 ) 3 to KSCN yields striped patterns after several minutes. The patterns appear reminiscent of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and convection rolls, arguing that pattern formation is caused by density-driven mixing.« less

  16. Pattern formation based on complex coupling mechanism in dielectric barrier discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Weibo; Dong, Lifang E-mail: pyy1616@163.com; Wang, Yongjie; Zhang, Hao; Pan, Yuyang E-mail: pyy1616@163.com

    2016-08-15

    The pattern formation of cinque-dice square superlattice pattern (CDSSP) is investigated based on the complex coupling mechanism in a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) system. The spatio-temporal structure of CDSSP obtained by using an intensified-charge coupled device indicates that CDSSP is an interleaving of two kinds of subpatterns (mixture of rectangle and square, and dot-line square) which discharge twice in one half voltage, respectively. Selected by the complex coupling of two subpatterns, the CDSSP can be formed and shows good stability. This investigation based on gas discharge theory together with nonlinear theory may provide a deeper understanding for the nonlinear characteristics and even the formation mechanism of patterns in DBD.

  17. Two-dimensionality of yeast colony expansion accompanied by pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Noorbakhsh, Javad; Adams, Rhys M; Samaniego-Evans, Joseph; Agollah, Germaine; Nevozhay, Dmitry; Kuzdzal-Fick, Jennie; Mehta, Pankaj; Balázsi, Gábor

    2014-12-01

    Yeasts can form multicellular patterns as they expand on agar plates, a phenotype that requires a functional copy of the FLO11 gene. Although the biochemical and molecular requirements for such patterns have been examined, the mechanisms underlying their formation are not entirely clear. Here we develop quantitative methods to accurately characterize the size, shape, and surface patterns of yeast colonies for various combinations of agar and sugar concentrations. We combine these measurements with mathematical and physical models and find that FLO11 gene constrains cells to grow near the agar surface, causing the formation of larger and more irregular colonies that undergo hierarchical wrinkling. Head-to-head competition assays on agar plates indicate that two-dimensional constraint on the expansion of FLO11 wild type (FLO11) cells confers a fitness advantage over FLO11 knockout (flo11Δ) cells on the agar surface.

  18. Two-Dimensionality of Yeast Colony Expansion Accompanied by Pattern Formation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Noorbakhsh, Javad; Adams, Rhys M.; Samaniego-Evans, Joseph; Agollah, Germaine; Nevozhay, Dmitry; Kuzdzal-Fick, Jennie; Mehta, Pankaj; Balázsi, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts can form multicellular patterns as they expand on agar plates, a phenotype that requires a functional copy of the FLO11 gene. Although the biochemical and molecular requirements for such patterns have been examined, the mechanisms underlying their formation are not entirely clear. Here we develop quantitative methods to accurately characterize the size, shape, and surface patterns of yeast colonies for various combinations of agar and sugar concentrations. We combine these measurements with mathematical and physical models and find that FLO11 gene constrains cells to grow near the agar surface, causing the formation of larger and more irregular colonies that undergo hierarchical wrinkling. Head-to-head competition assays on agar plates indicate that two-dimensional constraint on the expansion of FLO11 wild type (FLO11) cells confers a fitness advantage over FLO11 knockout (flo11Δ) cells on the agar surface. PMID:25504059

  19. Pattern formation based on complex coupling mechanism in dielectric barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weibo; Dong, Lifang; Wang, Yongjie; Zhang, Hao; Pan, Yuyang

    2016-08-01

    The pattern formation of cinque-dice square superlattice pattern (CDSSP) is investigated based on the complex coupling mechanism in a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) system. The spatio-temporal structure of CDSSP obtained by using an intensified-charge coupled device indicates that CDSSP is an interleaving of two kinds of subpatterns (mixture of rectangle and square, and dot-line square) which discharge twice in one half voltage, respectively. Selected by the complex coupling of two subpatterns, the CDSSP can be formed and shows good stability. This investigation based on gas discharge theory together with nonlinear theory may provide a deeper understanding for the nonlinear characteristics and even the formation mechanism of patterns in DBD.

  20. Nanostructured diffusion-limited-aggregation crystal pattern formation in a reactive microemulsion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Rohit; Srivastava, P. K.

    2014-03-01

    Nanostructured diffusion-limited-aggregation (DLA) crystal pattern formation in microemulsion consisting of water, styrene, cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTACl), potassium persulphate and an oscillating Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reactant is reported. A variety of spatiotemporal patterns like concentric wave, spatial (stripe) and chaotic patterns appear. A colloidal phase composed of numerous nano-sized particles has been observed. The solid phase nucleation has been found to occur in the colloidal phase and has been found to grow in a symmetric crystal pattern with the progress of the reaction finally exhibiting DLA structures. We show that the formation of a nanostructured DLA crystal pattern is governed by spatial structures emerging in the BZ microemulsion system. Without any spatial structure in the microemulsion system only hydrogel of high viscosity is formed. A nano-sized branched crystal pattern was formed with a particle diameter in the range of 60-100 nm, as evident by transmission electron microscope, powder x-ray diffraction and particle size analyser studies.

  1. Discovering local patterns of co - evolution: computational aspects and biological examples

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Co-evolution is the process in which two (or more) sets of orthologs exhibit a similar or correlative pattern of evolution. Co-evolution is a powerful way to learn about the functional interdependencies between sets of genes and cellular functions and to predict physical interactions. More generally, it can be used for answering fundamental questions about the evolution of biological systems. Orthologs that exhibit a strong signal of co-evolution in a certain part of the evolutionary tree may show a mild signal of co-evolution in other branches of the tree. The major reasons for this phenomenon are noise in the biological input, genes that gain or lose functions, and the fact that some measures of co-evolution relate to rare events such as positive selection. Previous publications in the field dealt with the problem of finding sets of genes that co-evolved along an entire underlying phylogenetic tree, without considering the fact that often co-evolution is local. Results In this work, we describe a new set of biological problems that are related to finding patterns of local co-evolution. We discuss their computational complexity and design algorithms for solving them. These algorithms outperform other bi-clustering methods as they are designed specifically for solving the set of problems mentioned above. We use our approach to trace the co-evolution of fungal, eukaryotic, and mammalian genes at high resolution across the different parts of the corresponding phylogenetic trees. Specifically, we discover regions in the fungi tree that are enriched with positive evolution. We show that metabolic genes exhibit a remarkable level of co-evolution and different patterns of co-evolution in various biological datasets. In addition, we find that protein complexes that are related to gene expression exhibit non-homogenous levels of co-evolution across different parts of the fungi evolutionary line. In the case of mammalian evolution, signaling pathways that are

  2. Stochastic reaction and diffusion on growing domains: Understanding the breakdown of robust pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolley, Thomas E.; Baker, Ruth E.; Gaffney, Eamonn A.; Maini, Philip K.

    2011-10-01

    Many biological patterns, from population densities to animal coat markings, can be thought of as heterogeneous spatiotemporal distributions of mobile agents. Many mathematical models have been proposed to account for the emergence of this complexity, but, in general, they have consisted of deterministic systems of differential equations, which do not take into account the stochastic nature of population interactions. One particular, pertinent criticism of these deterministic systems is that the exhibited patterns can often be highly sensitive to changes in initial conditions, domain geometry, parameter values, etc. Due to this sensitivity, we seek to understand the effects of stochasticity and growth on paradigm biological patterning models. In this paper, we extend spatial Fourier analysis and growing domain mapping techniques to encompass stochastic Turing systems. Through this we find that the stochastic systems are able to realize much richer dynamics than their deterministic counterparts, in that patterns are able to exist outside the standard Turing parameter range. Further, it is seen that the inherent stochasticity in the reactions appears to be more important than the noise generated by growth, when considering which wave modes are excited. Finally, although growth is able to generate robust pattern sequences in the deterministic case, we see that stochastic effects destroy this mechanism for conferring robustness. However, through Fourier analysis we are able to suggest a reason behind this lack of robustness and identify possible mechanisms by which to reclaim it.

  3. Formate in urine as a biological indicator of formaldehyde exposure: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Boeniger, M.F.

    1987-11-01

    The presence of a small amount of endogenously derived formate in human urine is normal; however, formate derived from the metabolism of formaldehyde, several other industrial compounds and some pharmaceuticals may elevate the urine formate concentration above the normally expected values. This elevation in the urine formate concentration presents the possibility of using this as a tool for monitoring exposure to chemicals. Unfortunately, the use of urine formate as a technique for monitoring personal chemical exposure has yet to be evaluated. This review identifies several potentially important variables that could alter the extent to which formate is eliminated through the urine and that could affect the accuracy of using urine formate concentration as an indicator of chemical exposure. Some potentially important confounders that have been identified, but not evaluated adequately, include dietary intake, nutritional status and exposure to cigarette smoke. Furthermore, the metabolism and elimination kinetics have yet to be adequately demonstrated in humans. Without having controlled for potential confounders in previous pharmacokinetic studies, it is unknown whether or not the large range and variation observed in human studies is due to the confounders or to innate individual variability. Given the poor understanding of the normal variation of formate concentration in the urine, the use of it as a biological indicator of chemical exposure becomes questionable. Without appreciable skin penetration, as in this case, the reliance upon air monitoring alone may be more practical. The evidence at this time suggests that the use of urine formate to monitor chemical exposure offers a broad opportunity for investigative research. 82 references.

  4. Impact of graphic format on perception of change in biological data: implications for health monitoring in conditions such as asthma.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Jesse; McCaffery, Kirsten J; Hayen, Andrew; Ma, David; Reddel, Helen K

    2012-03-01

    Variation in graphic format can substantially influence interpretation of data. Despite a large body of literature on the optimal design of graphs, little attention has been paid to the format of charts for health monitoring. This study assessed the effect of aspect ratio (x:y ratio) and interconnecting lines on visual identification of change in biological data, such as during asthma exacerbations. Eighty volunteers viewed 72 sets of six consecutive blocks of unidentified biological data, recording if each block of data was increasing, decreasing, or the same as the previous block. Three chart aspect ratios were examined (A, 5.2:1; B, 3.0:1; C, 1.1:1), with or without lines between data points. Datasets from lung function monitoring by asthma patients included a mild/moderate/severe fall ('exacerbation') or no exacerbation. False negative (missing true exacerbations) and false positive (identifying non-existent exacerbations) responses were calculated. 84% of exacerbation blocks were correctly identified. There was a significant interaction between exacerbation severity and aspect ratio (p=0.0048). The most compressed chart (C) had the fewest false negative responses. Moderate falls were missed in 24%, 12%, and 5% of trials on charts A, B, and C, respectively (C vs A: adjusted relative risk 0.19 (95% CI 0.12 to 0.30)). False positive responses were infrequent (A, 2.5%; B, 3.8%; C, 8.3%), increasing slightly if data points were joined with lines (4.3% vs 5.1%, p=0.004) . Compressed charts can improve the visual detection of change in biological data by up to 80%. The aspect ratio of charts should be standardised to facilitate clinical pattern recognition.

  5. Intraflagellar Transport Protein 172 is essential for primary cilia formation and plays a vital role in patterning the mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Gorivodsky, Marat; Mukhopadhyay, Mahua; Wilsch-Braeuninger, Michaela; Phillips, Matthew; Teufel, Andreas; Kim, Changmee; Malik, Nasir; Huttner, Wieland; Westphal, Heiner

    2008-01-01

    IFT172, also known as Selective Lim-domain Binding protein (SLB), is a component of the Intraflagellar Transport (IFT) complex. In order to evaluate the biological role of the Ift172 gene, we generated a loss-of-function mutation in the mouse. The resulting Slb mutant embryos die between E12.5–13.0, and exhibit severe cranio-facial malformations, failure to close the cranial neural tube, holoprosencephaly, heart edema and extensive hemorrhages. Cilia outgrowth in cells of the neuroepithelium is initiated but the axonemes are severely truncated and do not contain visible microtubules. Morphological and molecular analyses revealed a global brain-patterning defect along the dorsal-ventral (DV) and anterior-posterior (AP) axes. We demonstrate that Ift172 gene function is required for early regulation of Fgf8 at the midbrain-hindbrain boundary and maintenance of the isthmic organizer. In addition, Ift172 is required for proper function of the embryonic node, the early embryonic organizer and for formation of the head organizing center (the anterior mesendoderm, or AME). We propose a model suggesting that forebrain and mid-hindbrain growth and AP patterning depends on the early function of Ift172 at gastrulation. Our data suggest that the formation and function of the node and AME in the mouse embryo relies on an indispensable role of Ift172 in cilia morphogenesis and cilia-mediated signaling. PMID:18930042

  6. Using sign patterns to detect the possibility of periodicity in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Culos, G J; Olesky, D D; van den Driessche, P

    2016-04-01

    Many models in the physical and life sciences, formulated as dynamical systems, exhibit a positive steady state, with its local qualitative behavior determined by the eigenvalues of its Jacobian matrix. Our interest lies in detecting if this steady state is linearly stable or if the system has periodic solutions arising from a Hopf bifurcation. We address this by considering the sign pattern of the Jacobian matrix and its set of allowed refined inertias. The refined inertia of a matrix, which is an extension of the classical matrix inertia, is a property of its eigenvalues. A Hopf bifurcation, leading to periodic solutions, may be possible if the sign pattern of the Jacobian matrix allows a specific set of refined inertias. For most systems, we also need to consider magnitude restrictions on the entries of the Jacobian matrix that are a consequence of the particular biological model. The usefulness of sign pattern analysis to detect linear stability or the possibility of periodicity is illustrated with several biological examples, including metabolic-genetic circuits, biochemical reaction networks, predator-prey and competition systems.

  7. Towards the planning and design of disturbance patterns across scales to counter biological invasions.

    PubMed

    Zurlini, Giovanni; Petrosillo, Irene; Jones, Kenneth Bruce; Li, Bai-Lian; Riitters, Kurt Hans; Medagli, Pietro; Marchiori, Silvano; Zaccarelli, Nicola

    2013-10-15

    The way in which disturbances from human land use are patterned in space across scales can have important consequences for efforts to govern human/environment with regard to, but not only, invasive spread-dispersal processes. In this context, we explore the potential of disturbance patterns along a continuum of scales as proxies for identifying the geographical regions prone to spread of invasive plant species. To this end, we build on a previous framework of cross-scale disturbance patterns, exercising the approach for the Apulia region (South Italy). We first review procedures and results introducing disturbance maps and sliding windows to measure composition (amount) and configuration (contagion) of disturbance patterns both for real and simulated landscapes from random, multifractal and hierarchical neutral models. We introduce cross-scale disturbance profiles obtained by clustering locations from real and simulated landscapes, which are used as foils for comparison to the real landscapes on the same pattern transition space. Critical percolation thresholds derived from landscape observations and theoretical works are discussed in order to identify critical scale domains. With reference to the actual land use and invasive alien flora correlates of disturbance patterns, a cross-scale "invasibility" map of the Apulia region is derived, which shows sub-regions and scale domains with different potentials for the invasive spread of undesirable species. We discuss the potential effect of contagious and non-contagious disturbances like climate change and why multifractal-like disturbance patterns might be more desirable than others to counter biological invasions in a multi-scale and multi-level context of adaptive planning, design and management of disturbance.

  8. Exploring biological, chemical and geomorphological patterns in fluvial ecosystems with Structural Equation Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzi, S.; Surridge, B.; Lerner, D. N.:

    2009-04-01

    River ecosystems represent complex networks of interacting biological, chemical and geomorphological processes. These processes generate spatial and temporal patterns in biological, chemical and geomorphological variables, and a growing number of these variables are now being used to characterise the status of rivers. However, integrated analyses of these biological-chemical-geomorphological networks have rarely been undertaken, and as a result our knowledge of the underlying processes and how they generate the resulting patterns remains weak. The apparent complexity of the networks involved, and the lack of coherent datasets, represent two key challenges to such analyses. In this paper we describe the application of a novel technique, Structural Equation Modelling (SEM), to the investigation of biological, chemical and geomorphological data collected from rivers across England and Wales. The SEM approach is a multivariate statistical technique enabling simultaneous examination of direct and indirect relationships across a network of variables. Further, SEM allows a-priori conceptual or theoretical models to be tested against available data. This is a significant departure from the solely exploratory analyses which characterise other multivariate techniques. We took biological, chemical and river habitat survey data collected by the Environment Agency for 400 sites in rivers spread across England and Wales, and created a single, coherent dataset suitable for SEM analyses. Biological data cover benthic macroinvertebrates, chemical data relate to a range of standard parameters (e.g. BOD, dissolved oxygen and phosphate concentration), and geomorphological data cover factors such as river typology, substrate material and degree of physical modification. We developed a number of a-priori conceptual models, reflecting current research questions or existing knowledge, and tested the ability of these conceptual models to explain the variance and covariance within the

  9. Self-organized nanostructured spherulitic crystal pattern formation in Belousov-Zhabotinsky type reaction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Rohit; Srivastava, P. K.

    2013-11-01

    We report the formation of self-organized nanostructured spherulitic crystal pattern in a modified Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) type system. In liquid phase, we observed the reaction system to exhibit well distinguishable spatial patterns including stripe and hexagonal structures. The solid phase nucleation was found to occur in the colloidal phase and nanostructured spherulitic crystal patterns were obtained as one of the final products. Transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the spherulitic crystal pattern. The average diameter of the grown crystals was found to be ˜30-100 nm. In situ UV-Visible spectroscopic measurement exhibited damped oscillatory nature corresponding to ferroin in the reaction system. This oscillation was found to be well conjugated to the spherulitic structures. The paper elucidates the roles of the various possible factors behind such phase-transformation along with the plausible explanation of the corresponding reaction pathways.

  10. Experimental investigation on flame pattern formations of DME-air mixtures in a radial microchannel

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Aiwu; Maruta, Kaoru; Nakamura, Hisashi; Kumar, Sudarshan; Liu, Wei

    2010-09-15

    Flame pattern formations of premixed DME-air mixture in a heated radial channel with a gap distance of 2.5 mm were experimentally investigated. The DME-air mixture was introduced into the radial channel through a delivery tube which connected with the center of the top disk. With an image-intensified high-speed video camera, rich flame pattern formations were identified in this configuration. Regime diagram of all these flame patterns was drawn based on the experimental findings in the equivalence ratio range of 0.6-2.0 and inlet velocity range of 1.0-5.0 m/s. Compared with our previous study on premixed methane-air flames, there are several distinct characteristics for the present study. First, Pelton-wheel-like rotary flames and traveling flames with kink-like structures were observed for the first time. Second, in most cases, flames can be stabilized near the inlet port of the channel, exhibiting a conical or cup-like shape, while the conventional circular flame was only observed under limited conditions. Thirdly, an oscillating flame phenomenon occurred under certain conditions. During the oscillation process, a target appearance was seen at some instance. These pattern formation characteristics are considered to be associated with the low-temperature oxidation of DME. (author)

  11. Toll ligand Spätzle3 controls melanization in the stripe pattern formation in caterpillars.

    PubMed

    KonDo, Yûsuke; Yoda, Shinichi; Mizoguchi, Takayuki; Ando, Toshiya; Yamaguchi, Junichi; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Banno, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Haruhiko

    2017-08-01

    A stripe pattern is an aposematic or camouflage coloration often observed among various caterpillars. However, how this ecologically important pattern is formed is largely unknown. The silkworm dominant mutant Zebra (Ze) has a black stripe in the anterior margin of each dorsal segment. Here, fine linkage mapping of 3,135 larvae revealed a 63-kbp region responsible for the Ze locus, which contained three candidate genes, including the Toll ligand gene spätzle3 (spz-3). Both electroporation-mediated ectopic expression and RNAi analyses showed that, among candidate genes, only processed spz-3 induced melanin pigmentation and that Toll-8 was the candidate receptor gene of spz-3 This Toll ligand/receptor set is also involved in melanization of other mutant Striped (p(S) ), which has broader stripes. Additional knockdown of 5 other spz family and 10 Toll-related genes caused no drastic change in the pigmentation of either mutant, suggesting that only spz-3/Toll-8 is mainly involved in the melanization process rather than pattern formation. The downstream pigmentation gene yellow was specifically up-regulated in the striped region of the Ze mutant, but spz-3 showed no such region-specific expression. Toll signaling pathways are known to be involved in innate immunity, dorsoventral axis formation, and neurotrophic functions. This study provides direct evidence that a Toll signaling pathway is co-opted to control the melanization process and adaptive striped pattern formation in caterpillars.

  12. Artificial selection on egg size perturbs early pattern formation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Miles, Cecelia M; Lott, Susan E; Hendriks, Cris L Luengo; Ludwig, Michael Z; Manu; Williams, Calvin L; Kreitman, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Pattern formation in Drosophila embryogenesis has been widely investigated as a developmental and evolutionary model of robustness. To ask whether genetic variation for pattern formation is suppressed in this system, artificial selection for divergent egg size was used to challenge the scaling of even-skipped (eve) pattern formation in mitotic cycle 14 (stage 5) embryos of Drosophila melanogaster. Three-dimensional confocal imaging revealed shifts in the allometry of eve pair-rule stripes along both anterior–posterior (A–P) and dorsoventral (D–V) axes as a correlated response to egg size selection, indicating the availability of genetic variation for this buffered trait. Environmental perturbation was not required for the manifestation of this variation. The number of nuclei at the cellular blastoderm stage also changed in response to selection, with large-egg selected lines having more than 1000 additional nuclei relative to small-egg lines. This increase in nuclear number in larger eggs does not scale with egg size, however, as nuclear density is inversely correlated with egg length. Nuclear density varies along the A–P axis but does not correlate with the shift in eve stripe allometry between the selection treatments. Despite its macroevolutionary conservation, both eve stripe patterning and blastoderm cell number vary genetically both within and between closely related species.

  13. Pattern Formation in Diffusion Flames Embedded in von Karman Swirling Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayagam, Vedha

    2006-01-01

    Pattern formation is observed in nature in many so-called excitable systems that can support wave propagation. It is well-known in the field of combustion that premixed flames can exhibit patterns through differential diffusion mechanism between heat and mass. However, in the case of diffusion flames where fuel and oxidizer are separated initially there have been only a few observations of pattern formation. It is generally perceived that since diffusion flames do not possess an inherent propagation speed they are static and do not form patterns. But in diffusion flames close to their extinction local quenching can occur and produce flame edges which can propagate along stoichiometric surfaces. Recently, we reported experimental observations of rotating spiral flame edges during near-limit combustion of a downward-facing polymethylmethacrylate disk spinning in quiescent air. These spiral flames, though short-lived, exhibited many similarities to patterns commonly found in quiescent excitable media including compound tip meandering motion. Flame disks that grow or shrink with time depending on the rotational speed and in-depth heat loss history of the fuel disk have also been reported. One of the limitations of studying flame patterns with solid fuels is that steady-state conditions cannot be achieved in air at normal atmospheric pressure for experimentally reasonable fuel thickness. As a means to reproduce the flame patterns observed earlier with solid fuels, but under steady-state conditions, we have designed and built a rotating, porous-disk burner through which gaseous fuels can be injected and burned as diffusion flames. The rotating porous disk generates a flow of air toward the disk by a viscous pumping action, generating what is called the von K rm n boundary layer which is of constant thickness over the entire burner disk. In this note we present a map of the various dynamic flame patterns observed during the combustion of methane in air as a function of

  14. Simultaneous formation of fine and large-area electrode patterns using screen-offset printing and its application to the patterning on adhesive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Ken-ichi; Ushijima, Hirobumi; Nagase, Kazuro; Ikedo, Hiroaki; Mitsui, Ryosuke; Sato, Junya; Takahashi, Seiya; Nakajima, Shin-ichiro; Arai, Masahiro; Kurata, Yuji; Iwata, Shiro

    2016-03-01

    Additive-type printing techniques such as gravure-offset printing and screen printing are effective for low-cost and ecofriendly electrode pattern formation. Gravure-offset printing is effective for fine pattern formation with widths on the order of 10-20 µm, whereas screen printing is effective for the formation of large-area patterns. However, it is difficult to simultaneously form fine and large-area patterns using these printing techniques. In this study, we demonstrate that fine (minimum width of 15 µm) and medium- as well as large-area patterns can be formed simultaneously using our developed screen-offset printing technique, which is a combination of screen printing on a silicone blanket and transfer printing from the blanket to a substrate. Furthermore, we demonstrate the application of our method to printing on adhesive materials, which allows electrode formation without applying heat to the film substrate.

  15. Formation and characteristics of patterns in atmospheric-pressure radio-frequency dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lizhen; Liu, Zhongwei; Mao, Zhiguo; Li, Sen; Chen, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    The patterns in radio-frequency dielectric barrier discharge (RF DBD) are studied at atmospheric pressure of argon (Ar) or helium (He) mixed with nitrogen (N2) gas. When a small amount of N2 is mixed with He or Ar gas, discharge patterns are formed. In a N2/He gas mixture, besides the filament discharge that forms patterns, a glow background discharge is also observed, whereas only the filament discharge forms patterns in a N2/Ar gas mixture. The resolution of the hexagonal pattern as a function of applied power and gas flow rate is then explored. On the basis of spatial-temporal images taken using an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD), we find that there is no interleaving of two transient hexagon sublattices in N2/Ar or N2/He plasma in RF DBD patterns, which are totally different from those in which surface charges dominated in the mid-frequency DBD plasma. This supports our hypothesis that the bulk charges dominate the pattern formation in RF DBD.

  16. Formation and all-optical control of optical patterns in semiconductor microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, R.; Tsang, C. Y.; Tse, Y. C.; Luk, M. H.; Kwong, N. H.; Chan, Chris K. P.; Leung, P. T.; Lewandowski, P.; Schumacher, Stefan; Lafont, O.; Baudin, E.; Tignon, J.

    2016-05-01

    Semiconductor microcavities offer a unique way to combine transient all-optical manipulation of GaAs quantum wells with the benefits of structural advantages of microcavities. In these systems, exciton-polaritons have dispersion relations with very small effective masses. This has enabled prominent effects, for example polaritonic Bose condensation, but it can also be exploited for the design of all-optical communication devices. The latter involves non-equilibrium phase transitions in the spatial arrangement of exciton-polaritons. We consider the case of optical pumping with normal incidence, yielding a spatially homogeneous distribution of exciton-polaritons in optical cavities containing the quantum wells. Exciton-exciton interactions can trigger instabilities if certain threshold behavior requirements are met. Such instabilities can lead, for example, to the spontaneous formation of hexagonal polariton lattices (corresponding to six-spot patterns in the far field), or to rolls (corresponding to two-spot far field patterns). The competition among these patterns can be controlled to a certain degree by applying control beams. In this paper, we summarize the theory of pattern formation and election in microcavities and illustrate the switching between patterns via simulation results.

  17. A new computational approach to simulate pattern formation in Paenibacillus dendritiformis bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Laura Jane

    Under the harsh conditions of limited nutrient and hard growth surface, Paenibacillus dendritiformis in agar plates form two classes of patterns (morphotypes). The first class, called the dendritic morphotype, has radially directed branches. The second class, called the chiral morphotype, exhibits uniform handedness. The dendritic morphotype has been modeled successfully using a continuum model on a regular lattice; however, a suitable computational approach was not known to solve a continuum chiral model. This work details a new computational approach to solving the chiral continuum model of pattern formation in P. dendritiformis. The approach utilizes a random computational lattice and new methods for calculating certain derivative terms found in the model.

  18. Pattern formation on membranes and its role in bacterial cell division.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, Simon; Schwille, Petra

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial cell division is arguably one of the most central processes in biology. Despite the identification of many important molecular players, surprisingly little is yet known about the underlying physicochemical mechanisms. However, self-organized protein patterns play key roles during division of Escherichia coli, where division is initiated by the directed localization of FtsZ to the cell middle by an inhibitor gradient arising from pole-to-pole oscillations of MinCDE proteins. In vitro reconstitution studies have established that both the Min system and FtsZ with its membrane adaptor FtsA form dynamic energy-dependent patterns on membranes. Furthermore, recent in vivo and in vitro approaches have shown that Min patterns display rich dynamics in diverse geometries and respond to the progress of cytokinesis.

  19. Flow-driven instabilities during aggregation and pattern formation of Dictyostelium Discoideum: Experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholami, Azam; Steinbock, Oliver; Zykov, Vladimir; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2013-03-01

    We report the first experimental verification of the Differential Flow Induced Chemical Instability (DIFICI) in a signaling chemotactic biological population, where a differential flow induces traveling waves in the signaling pattern. The traveling wave speed was observed to be proportional to the flow velocity while the wave period was 7 min, which is comparable to that of starved Dictyostelium cells. Analysis and numerical simulations of the Goldbeter model show that the resulting DIFICI wave patterns appear in the oscillatory regime. In the experiments, we observe that the DIFICI wave pattern disappears after 4-5 h of starvation. We extrapolated the Goldbeter model to the experimental situation. This suggests that the dynamics switches from the oscillatory to the excitable regime as the DIFICI waves disappear in the experiment.

  20. Assessing the Biological Contribution to Mineralized Cap Formation in the Little Hot Creek Hot Spring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floyd, J. G.; Beeler, S. R.; Mors, R. A.; Kraus, E. A.; 2016, G.; Piazza, O.; Frantz, C. M.; Loyd, S. J.; Berelson, W.; Stevenson, B. S.; Marenco, P. J.; Spear, J. R.; Corsetti, F. A.

    2016-12-01

    Hot spring environments exhibit unique redox/physical gradients that may create favorable conditions for the presence of life and commonly contain mineral precipitates that could provide a geologic archive of such ecosystems on Earth and potentially other planets. However, it is critical to discern biologic from abiotic formation mechanisms if hot spring-associated minerals are to be used as biosignatures. The study of modern hot spring environments where mineral formation can be directly observed is necessary to better interpret the biogenicity of ancient/extraterrestrial examples. Little Hot Creek (LHC), a hot spring located in the Long Valley Caldera, California, contains mineral precipitates composed of a carbonate base covered with amorphous silica and minor carbonate in close association with microbial mats/biofilms. Geological, geochemical, and microbiological techniques were integrated to investigate the role of biology in mineral formation at LHC. Geochemical measurements indicate that the waters of the spring are near equilibrium with respect to carbonate and undersaturated with respect to silica, implying additional processes are necessary to initiate cap formation. Geochemical modeling, integrating elemental and isotopic data from hot spring water and mineral precipitates, indicate that the abiotic processes of degassing and evaporation drive mineral formation at LHC, without microbial involvement. However, petrographic analysis of LHC caps revealed microbial microfabrics within silica mineral phases, despite the fact that microbial metabolism was not required for mineral precipitation. Our results show that microorganisms in hot spring environments can shape mineral precipitates even in the absence of a control on authigenesis, highlighting the need for structural as well as geochemical investigation in similar systems.

  1. On the mechanism of pattern formation in glow dielectric barrier discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, Yajun; Li, Ben; Ouyang, Jiting

    2016-01-15

    The formation mechanism of pattern in glow dielectric barrier discharge is investigated by two-dimensional fluid modeling. Experimental results are shown for comparison. The simulation results show that the non-uniform distribution of space charges makes the discharge be enhanced in the high-density region but weakened in its neighborhood, which is considered as an activation-inhibition effect. This effect shows through during a current pulse (one discharge event) but also in a certain period of time after discharge that determines a driving frequency range for the non-uniformity of space charges to be enhanced. The effects of applied voltage, surface charge, electrode boundary, and external field are also discussed. All these factors affect the formation of dielectric-barrier-discharge pattern by changing the distribution or the dynamics of space charges and hence the activation-inhibition effect of non-uniform space charges.

  2. Self-organized pattern formation at organic-inorganic interfaces during deposition: Experiment versus modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szillat, F.; Mayr, S. G.

    2011-09-01

    Self-organized pattern formation during physical vapor deposition of organic materials onto rough inorganic substrates is characterized by a complex morphological evolution as a function of film thickness. We employ a combined experimental-theoretical study using atomic force microscopy and numerically solved continuum rate equations to address morphological evolution in the model system: poly(bisphenol A carbonate) on polycrystalline Cu. As the key ingredients for pattern formation, (i) curvature and interface potential driven surface diffusion, (ii) deposition noise, and (iii) interface boundary effects are identified. Good agreement of experiments and theory, fitting only the Hamaker constant and diffusivity within narrow physical parameter windows, corroborates the underlying physics and paves the way for computer-assisted interface engineering.

  3. Collective Behavior of Chiral Active Matter: Pattern Formation and Enhanced Flocking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebchen, Benno; Levis, Demian

    2017-08-01

    We generalize the Vicsek model to describe the collective behavior of polar circle swimmers with local alignment interactions. While the phase transition leading to collective motion in 2D (flocking) occurs at the same interaction to noise ratio as for linear swimmers, as we show, circular motion enhances the polarization in the ordered phase (enhanced flocking) and induces secondary instabilities leading to structure formation. Slow rotations promote macroscopic droplets with late time sizes proportional to the system size (indicating phase separation) whereas fast rotations generate patterns consisting of phase synchronized microflocks with a controllable characteristic size proportional to the average single-particle swimming radius. Our results defy the viewpoint that monofrequent rotations form a vapid extension of the Vicsek model and establish a generic route to pattern formation in chiral active matter with possible applications for understanding and designing rotating microflocks.

  4. Lung adenocarcinoma with giant cyst formation showing a variety of histologic patterns: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Lung cancer with large cyst formation is relatively rare. This is a case report of a patient with lung cystic adenocarcinoma with multiple histologic patterns. This type of lung adenocarcinoma is believed to be the first reported case in English language medical literature. Case presentation A 60-year-old Japanese woman was admitted to hospital complaining of dyspnea and died of respiratory failure. She had been suffering from lung cancer with pleural effusion for five years. Autopsy analysis revealed lung adenocarcinoma with large cyst formation showing a variety of histologic patterns. Conclusions Autopsy analysis of this atypical case of lung cancer may provide insight and lead to a better understanding of the heterogeneity and clonal expansion of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:21108775

  5. Patterns of biofilm formation in intermittent and permanent streams: analysis of biofilm structure and metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artigas, J.; Schwartz, T.; Kirchen, S.; Romaní, A. M.; Fund, K.; Obst, U.; Sabater, S.

    2009-04-01

    The development and functioning of benthic microbial communities in streams is largely dependent on the hydrological conditions. Climate change projections predict that the hydrological characteristics will probably be affected because of the rainfall regime. Hence, rivers from the Mediterranean region will become more similar to those draining arid or desert regions, while temperate streams will suffer of higher water flow fluctuations. In this study, we compared the process of biofilm formation between an intermittent (the Fuirosos, Mediterranean) and a permanent (the Walzbach, Central European) stream. Specifically, we analyzed the succession of bacterial and algal populations in the biofilm through bacterial rDNA sequences analysis (16S rDNA and 16S-23S intergenic sequence) and diatom taxa identification over a 60-days colonization experiment. Moreover, changes in biofilm structural (microbial biomass and extracellular polysaccharide content) and metabolic (extracellular enzyme activities) parameters were also analyzed. The successional patterns of microbial populations in the Fuirosos showed clear discontinutities coinciding with flood episodes while at the Walzbach the time sequence was more gradual. Although both study sites were forested, greater microbial biomass standing stock (algal and bacterial) and greater species biodiversity was detected during biofilm development at the Mediterranean site. The higher bacterial biodiversity may be related to the potential effect of flooding episodes in reducing biological interactions in complex microbial communities, such as the competitive exclusion of species. Moreover, the presence of rapid colonizing diatom species might be an adaptation to hydrological changes. In contrast, species competition could define the more stable environments, such as that observed in the Central European stream. Overall, the hystorical evolutionary pressure from the different bioclimatic regions could be also affecting the microbial

  6. Pattern formation in the flow between two horizontal coaxial cylinders with a partially filled gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutabazi, Innocent; Hegseth, John J.; Andereck, C. David; Wesfreid, Jose E.

    1988-11-01

    Flow between two horizontal coaxial cylinders with a partially filled gap is subject to several types of centrifugal instabilities which lead to the formation of a variety of spatial patterns. An experimental investigation has shown that there are five distinct branches of primary instabilities occurring in the system and that four codimension-2 points are easily reached. Theoretical predictions are in qualitative agreement with the observations.

  7. Formation of acylated growth hormone-releasing peptide-6 by poly(lactide-co-glycolide) and its biological activity.

    PubMed

    Na, Dong Hee; Lee, Jeong Eun; Jang, Sun Woo; Lee, Kang Choon

    2007-06-08

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the formation of acylated impurity resulting from a chemical reaction between the growth hormone-releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6) and poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and the effect of peptide acylation on the in vivo biological activity of GHRP-6. The peptide acylation pattern of GHRP-6 by hydrophilic PLGA polymers with different molecular weights was characterized by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Higher levels of acylated GHRP-6 were produced with the higher molecular weight PLGA, which might be due to the slower degradation rate of the polymer. The evaluation of the biological activity in rats showed that the acylated GHRP-6 had a much lower activity than the intact GHRP-6. This finding suggests that the acylation reaction would decrease the effectiveness of the GHRP-6 formulation such as PLGA microspheres. Therefore, a strategy for stabilizing the GHRP-6 will be necessary for the development of a successful formulation of PLGA microspheres.

  8. Using the web to encourage student-generated questions in large-format introductory biology classes.

    PubMed

    Colbert, James T; Olson, Joanne K; Clough, Michael P

    2007-01-01

    Students rarely ask questions related to course content in large-format introductory classes. The use of a Web-based forum devoted to student-generated questions was explored in a second-semester introductory biology course. Approximately 80% of the enrolled students asked at least one question about course content during each of three semesters during which this approach was implemented. About 95% of the students who posted questions reported reading the instructor's response to their questions. Although doing so did not contribute to their grade in the course, approximately 75% of the students reported reading questions posted by other students in the class. Approximately 60% of the students reported that the Web-based question-asking activity contributed to their learning of biology.

  9. Optical Pattern Formation in Spatially Bunched Atoms: A Self-Consistent Model and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittberger, Bonnie L.; Gauthier, Daniel J.

    2014-05-01

    The nonlinear optics and optomechanical physics communities use different theoretical models to describe how optical fields interact with a sample of atoms. There does not yet exist a model that is valid for finite atomic temperatures but that also produces the zero temperature results that are generally assumed in optomechanical systems. We present a self-consistent model that is valid for all atomic temperatures and accounts for the back-action of the atoms on the optical fields. Our model provides new insights into the competing effects of the bunching-induced nonlinearity and the saturable nonlinearity. We show that it is crucial to keep the fifth and seventh-order nonlinearities that arise when there exists atomic bunching, even at very low optical field intensities. We go on to apply this model to the results of our experimental system where we observe spontaneous, multimode, transverse optical pattern formation at ultra-low light levels. We show that our model accurately predicts our experimentally observed threshold for optical pattern formation, which is the lowest threshold ever reported for pattern formation. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the NSF through Grant #PHY-1206040.

  10. How memory of direct animal interactions can lead to territorial pattern formation

    PubMed Central

    Potts, Jonathan R.; Lewis, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanistic home range analysis (MHRA) is a highly effective tool for understanding spacing patterns of animal populations. It has hitherto focused on populations where animals defend their territories by communicating indirectly, e.g. via scent marks. However, many animal populations defend their territories using direct interactions, such as ritualized aggression. To enable application of MHRA to such populations, we construct a model of direct territorial interactions, using linear stability analysis and energy methods to understand when territorial patterns may form. We show that spatial memory of past interactions is vital for pattern formation, as is memory of ‘safe’ places, where the animal has visited but not suffered recent territorial encounters. Additionally, the spatial range over which animals make decisions to move is key to understanding the size and shape of their resulting territories. Analysis using energy methods, on a simplified version of our system, shows that stability in the nonlinear system corresponds well to predictions of linear analysis. We also uncover a hysteresis in the process of territory formation, so that formation may depend crucially on initial space-use. Our analysis, in one dimension and two dimensions, provides mathematical groundwork required for extending MHRA to situations where territories are defended by direct encounters. PMID:27146687

  11. Formation mechanism of dot-line square superlattice pattern in dielectric barrier discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Weibo; Dong, Lifang E-mail: pyy1616@163.com; Wang, Yongjie; Zhang, Xinpu; Pan, Yuyang E-mail: pyy1616@163.com

    2014-11-15

    We investigate the formation mechanism of the dot-line square superlattice pattern (DLSSP) in dielectric barrier discharge. The spatio-temporal structure studied by using the intensified-charge coupled device camera shows that the DLSSP is an interleaving of three different subpatterns in one half voltage cycle. The dot square lattice discharges first and, then, the two kinds of line square lattices, which form square grid structures discharge twice. When the gas pressure is varied, DLSSP can transform from square superlattice pattern (SSP). The spectral line profile method is used to compare the electron densities, which represent the amounts of surface charges qualitatively. It is found that the amount of surface charges accumulated by the first discharge of DLSSP is less than that of SSP, leading to a bigger discharge area of the following discharge (lines of DLSSP instead of halos of SSP). The spatial distribution of the electric field of the surface charges is simulated to explain the formation of DLSSP. This paper may provide a deeper understanding for the formation mechanism of complex superlattice patterns in DBD.

  12. Density of founder cells affects spatial pattern formation and cooperation in Bacillus subtilis biofilms.

    PubMed

    van Gestel, Jordi; Weissing, Franz J; Kuipers, Oscar P; Kovács, Akos T

    2014-10-01

    In nature, most bacteria live in surface-attached sedentary communities known as biofilms. Biofilms are often studied with respect to bacterial interactions. Many cells inhabiting biofilms are assumed to express 'cooperative traits', like the secretion of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS). These traits can enhance biofilm-related properties, such as stress resilience or colony expansion, while being costly to the cells that express them. In well-mixed populations cooperation is difficult to achieve, because non-cooperative individuals can reap the benefits of cooperation without having to pay the costs. The physical process of biofilm growth can, however, result in the spatial segregation of cooperative from non-cooperative individuals. This segregation can prevent non-cooperative cells from exploiting cooperative neighbors. Here we examine the interaction between spatial pattern formation and cooperation in Bacillus subtilis biofilms. We show, experimentally and by mathematical modeling, that the density of cells at the onset of biofilm growth affects pattern formation during biofilm growth. At low initial cell densities, co-cultured strains strongly segregate in space, whereas spatial segregation does not occur at high initial cell densities. As a consequence, EPS-producing cells have a competitive advantage over non-cooperative mutants when biofilms are initiated at a low density of founder cells, whereas EPS-deficient cells have an advantage at high cell densities. These results underline the importance of spatial pattern formation for competition among bacterial strains and the evolution of microbial cooperation.

  13. AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR17 is essential for pollen wall pattern formation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Tian, Lei; Sun, Ming-Xi; Huang, Xue-Yong; Zhu, Jun; Guan, Yue-Feng; Jia, Qi-Shi; Yang, Zhong-Nan

    2013-06-01

    In angiosperms, pollen wall pattern formation is determined by primexine deposition on the microspores. Here, we show that AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR17 (ARF17) is essential for primexine formation and pollen development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The arf17 mutant exhibited a male-sterile phenotype with normal vegetative growth. ARF17 was expressed in microsporocytes and microgametophytes from meiosis to the bicellular microspore stage. Transmission electron microscopy analysis showed that primexine was absent in the arf17 mutant, which leads to pollen wall-patterning defects and pollen degradation. Callose deposition was also significantly reduced in the arf17 mutant, and the expression of CALLOSE SYNTHASE5 (CalS5), the major gene for callose biosynthesis, was approximately 10% that of the wild type. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that ARF17 can directly bind to the CalS5 promoter. As indicated by the expression of DR5-driven green fluorescent protein, which is an synthetic auxin response reporter, auxin signaling appeared to be specifically impaired in arf17 anthers. Taken together, our results suggest that ARF17 is essential for pollen wall patterning in Arabidopsis by modulating primexine formation at least partially through direct regulation of CalS5 gene expression.

  14. Steady states and linear stability analysis of precipitation pattern formation at geothermal hot springs.

    PubMed

    Chan, Pak Yuen; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2007-10-01

    A dynamical theory of geophysical precipitation pattern formation is presented and applied to irreversible calcium carbonate (travertine) deposition. Specific systems studied here are the terraces and domes observed at geothermal hot springs, such as those at Yellowstone National Park, and speleothems, particularly stalactites and stalagmites. The theory couples the precipitation front dynamics with shallow water flow, including corrections for turbulent drag and curvature effects. In the absence of capillarity and with a laminar flow profile, the theory predicts a one-parameter family of steady state solutions to the moving boundary problem describing the precipitation front. These shapes match the measured shapes near the vent at the top of observed travertine domes well. Closer to the base of the dome, the solutions deviate from observations and circular symmetry is broken by a fluting pattern, which we show is associated with capillary forces causing thin film break-up. We relate our model to that recently proposed for stalactite growth, and calculate the linear stability spectrum of both travertine domes and stalactites. Lastly, we apply the theory to the problem of precipitation pattern formation arising from turbulent flow down an inclined plane and identify a linear instability that underlies scale-invariant travertine terrace formation at geothermal hot springs.

  15. Steady states and linear stability analysis of precipitation pattern formation at geothermal hot springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Pak Yuen; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2007-10-01

    A dynamical theory of geophysical precipitation pattern formation is presented and applied to irreversible calcium carbonate (travertine) deposition. Specific systems studied here are the terraces and domes observed at geothermal hot springs, such as those at Yellowstone National Park, and speleothems, particularly stalactites and stalagmites. The theory couples the precipitation front dynamics with shallow water flow, including corrections for turbulent drag and curvature effects. In the absence of capillarity and with a laminar flow profile, the theory predicts a one-parameter family of steady state solutions to the moving boundary problem describing the precipitation front. These shapes match the measured shapes near the vent at the top of observed travertine domes well. Closer to the base of the dome, the solutions deviate from observations and circular symmetry is broken by a fluting pattern, which we show is associated with capillary forces causing thin film break-up. We relate our model to that recently proposed for stalactite growth, and calculate the linear stability spectrum of both travertine domes and stalactites. Lastly, we apply the theory to the problem of precipitation pattern formation arising from turbulent flow down an inclined plane and identify a linear instability that underlies scale-invariant travertine terrace formation at geothermal hot springs.

  16. How memory of direct animal interactions can lead to territorial pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Potts, Jonathan R; Lewis, Mark A

    2016-05-01

    Mechanistic home range analysis (MHRA) is a highly effective tool for understanding spacing patterns of animal populations. It has hitherto focused on populations where animals defend their territories by communicating indirectly, e.g. via scent marks. However, many animal populations defend their territories using direct interactions, such as ritualized aggression. To enable application of MHRA to such populations, we construct a model of direct territorial interactions, using linear stability analysis and energy methods to understand when territorial patterns may form. We show that spatial memory of past interactions is vital for pattern formation, as is memory of 'safe' places, where the animal has visited but not suffered recent territorial encounters. Additionally, the spatial range over which animals make decisions to move is key to understanding the size and shape of their resulting territories. Analysis using energy methods, on a simplified version of our system, shows that stability in the nonlinear system corresponds well to predictions of linear analysis. We also uncover a hysteresis in the process of territory formation, so that formation may depend crucially on initial space-use. Our analysis, in one dimension and two dimensions, provides mathematical groundwork required for extending MHRA to situations where territories are defended by direct encounters. © 2016 The Author(s).

  17. Mosaic-pattern vegetation formation and dynamics driven by the water-wind crisscross erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Gao-Lin; Wang, Dong; Liu, Yu; Hao, Hong-Min; Fang, Nu-Fang; Shi, Zhi-Hua

    2016-07-01

    Theoretical explanations for vegetation pattern dynamic emphasized on banded pattern-forming systems on the dynamics of the spot pattern. In this context, we explore the patch pattern forming and development in the desertification land. We hypothesized that spatial heterogeneity of microtopography and soil properties with different patch sizes would determine vegetation pattern dynamics theory. The spatial heterogeneity of microtopography and soil properties with different patch sizes were studied. Differences between the inside and outside of the canopy of soil carbon content and soil total nitrogen content were significantly increasing with patches sizes. Sampling location across vegetation patch was the main factor controlling soil properties. Soil nutrient content and saturated hydraulic conductivity were the largest, while bulk density and the coarse sand content were the lowest at the sampling location of half-way between taproot and downslope edge of the canopy. The height of the mound relative to the adjacent soil interspace between shrubs increased as patches diameter increased at the upslope of the taproot. Hydrological and aeolian processes resulted in spatial distributions of soil moisture, nutrition properties, which lead to patch migrated to downslope rather than upslope. A conceptual model was integrated hydrological and nutrient facilitation and competition effects among the plant-soil in mosaic-pattern patch formation and succession process.

  18. Experimental investigation of the dynamics of spontaneous pattern formation during dendritic ice crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirmizi, Shakeel H.; Gill, William N.

    1989-06-01

    The dynamics of spontaneous pattern formation are studied experimentally by observing and recording the evolution of ice crystal patterns which grow freely in a supercooled melt. The sequence of evolution to dendrites is recorded in real time using cine-micrography. In the range of subcoolings from 0.06 to 0.29°C, all the patterns evolved as follows: Smooth disk → Perturbed disk → Disk dendrite → Partially developed dendrite → Fully developed dendrite. The initial smooth disk, the main branch and the side branches all developed perturbations beyond a critical size which depends on the subcooling. The combined effect of the destabilizing thermal gradients ahead of the growing crystal and the stabilizing Gibbs-Thompson capillarity effect dictates the critical size of the unstable structures in terms of the mean curvature of the interface. Detailed analysis of the evolving patterns was done using digital image analysis on the PRIME computer to determine both the manner in which the dendritic growth process replicates itself and the role which the shape and the movement of the interface play in the pattern formation process. Total arc length ST, total area A and the complexity ratio ξ = ST⧸√ A of evolving patterns were computed as a function of time and undercooling for each crystal image. These results permitted us to make some comparisons with theoretical models on pattern evolution. Three distinct phases of evolution were identified: the initial phase when the crystal structure is smooth and free of any perturbations and the complexity ratio is almost a constant, an intermediate phase when the crystal structure develops perturbations which grow quickly in number and in size and the complexity ratio increases rapidly and a final phase when the pattern approaches that of a fully developed dendrite which, on a global scale grows in a shape-perserving manner and has a slowly increasing complexity ratio which seems to approach an asymptote. Two factors were

  19. Tuning the Biological Activity Profile of Antibacterial Polymers via Subunit Substitution Pattern

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Binary nylon-3 copolymers containing cationic and hydrophobic subunits can mimic the biological properties of host-defense peptides, but relationships between composition and activity are not yet well understood for these materials. Hydrophobic subunits in previously studied examples have been limited mostly to cycloalkane-derived structures, with cyclohexyl proving to be particularly promising. The present study evaluates alternative hydrophobic subunits that are isomeric or nearly isomeric with the cyclohexyl example; each has four sp3 carbons in the side chains. The results show that varying the substitution pattern of the hydrophobic subunit leads to relatively small changes in antibacterial activity but causes significant changes in hemolytic activity. We hypothesize that these differences in biological activity profile arise, at least in part, from variations among the conformational propensities of the hydrophobic subunits. The α,α,β,β-tetramethyl unit is optimal among the subunits we have examined, providing copolymers with potent antibacterial activity and excellent prokaryote vs eukaryote selectivity. Bacteria do not readily develop resistance to the new antibacterial nylon-3 copolymers. These findings suggest that variation in subunit conformational properties could be generally valuable in the development of synthetic polymers for biological applications. PMID:24601599

  20. Pattern formation in liquid-vapor systems under periodic potential and shear.

    PubMed

    Coclite, A; Gonnella, G; Lamura, A

    2014-06-01

    In this paper the phase behavior and pattern formation in a sheared nonideal fluid under a periodic potential is studied. An isothermal two-dimensional formulation of a lattice Boltzmann scheme for a liquid-vapor system with the van der Waals equation of state is presented and validated. Shear is applied by moving walls and the periodic potential varies along the flow direction. A region of the parameter space, where in the absence of flow a striped phase with oscillating density is stable, will be considered. At low shear rates the periodic patterns are preserved and slightly distorted by the flow. At high shear rates the striped phase loses its stability and traveling waves on the interface between the liquid and vapor regions are observed. These waves spread over the whole system with wavelength only depending on the length of the system. Velocity field patterns, characterized by a single vortex, will also be shown.

  1. Formation of Ceramic Nanoparticle Patterns Using Electrohydrodynamic Jet Printing with Pin-to-Pin Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dae-Young; Yu, Jae-Hun; Shin, Yun-Soo; Park, Dongho; Yu, Tae-U.; Hwang, Jungho

    2008-03-01

    As one of the direct write technologies, electrohydrodynamic jet printing was used in obtaining fine ceramic lines. We used pin electrodes of various diameters, each of which was located below the substrate, and analyzed the effects of pin diameter on Al2O3 nanoparticle one- and two-dimensional patterns formed with pin (nozzle)-to-pin (ground) electrodes. The onset voltage required to start the formation of a pattern for a 1-µm-diameter electrode was fourfold lower than the voltage required for a 1000-µm-diameter electrode. Additionally, an Al2O3 nanoparticle pattern with a uniform width as fine as 25 µm was obtained despite using the very large diameter of the nozzle (920 µm) used.

  2. Plant development. Integration of growth and patterning during vascular tissue formation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    De Rybel, Bert; Adibi, Milad; Breda, Alice S; Wendrich, Jos R; Smit, Margot E; Novák, Ondřej; Yamaguchi, Nobutoshi; Yoshida, Saiko; Van Isterdael, Gert; Palovaara, Joakim; Nijsse, Bart; Boekschoten, Mark V; Hooiveld, Guido; Beeckman, Tom; Wagner, Doris; Ljung, Karin; Fleck, Christian; Weijers, Dolf

    2014-08-08

    Coordination of cell division and pattern formation is central to tissue and organ development, particularly in plants where walls prevent cell migration. Auxin and cytokinin are both critical for division and patterning, but it is unknown how these hormones converge upon tissue development. We identify a genetic network that reinforces an early embryonic bias in auxin distribution to create a local, nonresponding cytokinin source within the root vascular tissue. Experimental and theoretical evidence shows that these cells act as a tissue organizer by positioning the domain of oriented cell divisions. We further demonstrate that the auxin-cytokinin interaction acts as a spatial incoherent feed-forward loop, which is essential to generate distinct hormonal response zones, thus establishing a stable pattern within a growing vascular tissue. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Nonlinear stability analyses of vegetative pattern formation in an arid environment

    PubMed Central

    Boonkorkuea, N.; Lenbury, Y.; Alvarado, F.J.; Wollkind, D.J.

    2009-01-01

    The development of spontaneous stationary vegetative patterns in an arid isotropic homogeneous environment is investigated by means of various weakly nonlinear stability analyses applied to the appropriate governing equation for this phenomenon. In particular, that process can be represented by a fourth-order partial differential time-evolution logistic equation for the total plant biomass per unit area divided by the carrying capacity of its territory and defined on an unbounded flat spatial domain. Those patterns that consist of parallel stripes, labyrinth-like mazes, rhombic arrays of rectangular patches, and hexagonal distributions of spots or gaps are generated by the balance between the effects of short-range facilitation and long-range competition. Then those theoretical predictions are compared with both relevant observational evidence and existing numerical simulations as well as placed in the context of the results from some recent nonlinear pattern formation studies. PMID:22881129

  4. Turing pattern formation in the chlorine dioxide-iodine- malonic acid reaction-diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setayeshgar, Sima

    The formation of localized structures in the chlorine dioxide-idodine-malonic acid (CDIMA) reaction-diffusion system is investigated numerically using a realistic model of this system. We analyze the one-dimensional patterns formed along the gradients imposed by boundary feeds, and study their linear stability to symmetry- breaking perturbations (the Turing instability) in the plane transverse to these gradients. We establish that an often-invoked simple local linear analysis which neglects longitudinal diffusion is inappropriate for predicting the linear stability of these patterns. Using a fully nonuniform analysis, we investigate the structure of the patterns formed along the gradients and their stability to transverse Turing pattern formation as a function of the values of two control parameters: the malonic acid feed concentration and the size of the reactor in the dimension along the gradients. The results from this investigation are compared with existing experimental results. We also verify that the two-variable reduction of the chemical model employed in the linear stability analysis is justified. Finally, we present numerical solution of the CDIMA system in two dimensions which is in qualitative agreement with experiments. This result also confirms our linear stability analysis, while demonstrating the feasibility of numerical exploration of realistic chemical models.

  5. Formation and maintenance of nitrogen-fixing cell patterns in filamentous cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-García, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacteria forming one-dimensional filaments are paradigmatic model organisms of the transition between unicellular and multicellular living forms. Under nitrogen-limiting conditions, in filaments of the genus Anabaena, some cells differentiate into heterocysts, which lose the possibility to divide but are able to fix environmental nitrogen for the colony. These heterocysts form a quasiregular pattern in the filament, representing a prototype of patterning and morphogenesis in prokaryotes. Recent years have seen advances in the identification of the molecular mechanism regulating this pattern. We use these data to build a theory on heterocyst pattern formation, for which both genetic regulation and the effects of cell division and filament growth are key components. The theory is based on the interplay of three generic mechanisms: local autoactivation, early long-range inhibition, and late long-range inhibition. These mechanisms can be identified with the dynamics of hetR, patS, and hetN expression. Our theory reproduces quantitatively the experimental dynamics of pattern formation and maintenance for wild type and mutants. We find that hetN alone is not enough to play the role as the late inhibitory mechanism: a second mechanism, hypothetically the products of nitrogen fixation supplied by heterocysts, must also play a role in late long-range inhibition. The preponderance of even intervals between heterocysts arises naturally as a result of the interplay between the timescales of genetic regulation and cell division. We also find that a purely stochastic initiation of the pattern, without a two-stage process, is enough to reproduce experimental observations. PMID:27162328

  6. Pattern formation in reaction-diffusion systems: From spiral waves to turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidsen, Joern

    2009-05-01

    Almost all systems we encounter in nature possess some sort of form or structure. In many cases, the structures arise from an initially unstructured state without the action of an agent that predetermines the pattern. Such self-organized structures emerge from cooperative interactions among the constituents of the system and often exhibit properties that are distinct from those of their constituent elements or molecules. For example, chemical waves in reaction-diffusion systems are at the core of a huge variety of physical, chemical, and biological processes. In (quasi) two-dimensional situations, spiral wave patterns are especially prevalent and determine the characteristics of processes such as surface catalytic oxidation reactions, contraction of the heart muscle, and various signaling mechanisms in biological systems. In this talk, I will review and discuss recent theoretical and experimental results regarding the dynamics, properties and stability of spiral waves and their three-dimensional analog (scroll waves). Special emphasis will be given to synchronization defect lines which generically arise in complex-oscillatory media, and the phenomenon of defect-mediated turbulence or filament turbulence where the dynamics of a pattern is dominated by the rapid motion, nucleation, and annihilation of spirals or scroll waves, respectively. The latter is of direct relevance in the context of ventricular fibrillation - a turbulent electrical wave activity that destroys the coherent contraction of the ventricular muscle and its main pumping function leading to sudden cardiac death.

  7. Heating patterns in biological tissue phantoms caused by millimeter wave electromagnetic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Khizhnyak, E P; Ziskin, M C

    1994-09-01

    Distribution of millimeter wavelength electromagnetic energy absorption in surface layers of biological tissue models was studied using methods of Infrared Thermography. 0.1 mm thin-layer phantoms were irradiated in the near field using different types of horn antennas in the 37-78 GHz frequency range. Heating patterns were recorded during microwave irradiation, and surface SAR distributions were calculated. The temperature resolution was better than 0.05 K. It was found that horn antennas produced nonuniform heating patterns in irradiated objects. These nonuniform patterns were due to a geometrical resonance resulting from a secondary wave-mode interaction between an irradiated object and the corresponding critical cross-section of the horn antenna. Local SAR values in hot spots exceeded the spatially averaged values by over 10 times, and the widths of these hot spots at 5 times the average SAR were often 1 mm or less. The location, quantity, number and size of the local field absorption maxima of irradiated objects strongly depended on the frequency of electromagnetic irradiation, with equivalent Q-factors of 500 or more. These findings provide an explanation for a number of frequency-dependent effects of millimeter wave electromagnetic irradiation.

  8. Effectiveness of Biological Surrogates for Predicting Patterns of Marine Biodiversity: A Global Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mellin, Camille; Delean, Steve; Caley, Julian; Edgar, Graham; Meekan, Mark; Pitcher, Roland; Przeslawski, Rachel; Williams, Alan; Bradshaw, Corey

    2011-01-01

    The use of biological surrogates as proxies for biodiversity patterns is gaining popularity, particularly in marine systems where field surveys can be expensive and species richness high. Yet, uncertainty regarding their applicability remains because of inconsistency of definitions, a lack of standard methods for estimating effectiveness, and variable spatial scales considered. We present a Bayesian meta-analysis of the effectiveness of biological surrogates in marine ecosystems. Surrogate effectiveness was defined both as the proportion of surrogacy tests where predictions based on surrogates were better than random (i.e., low probability of making a Type I error; P) and as the predictability of targets using surrogates (R2). A total of 264 published surrogacy tests combined with prior probabilities elicited from eight international experts demonstrated that the habitat, spatial scale, type of surrogate and statistical method used all influenced surrogate effectiveness, at least according to either P or R2. The type of surrogate used (higher-taxa, cross-taxa or subset taxa) was the best predictor of P, with the higher-taxa surrogates outperforming all others. The marine habitat was the best predictor of R2, with particularly low predictability in tropical reefs. Surrogate effectiveness was greatest for higher-taxa surrogates at a <10-km spatial scale, in low-complexity marine habitats such as soft bottoms, and using multivariate-based methods. Comparisons with terr