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Sample records for biological samples ii

  1. Spectrophotometric determination of copper(II) in pharmaceutical, biological and water samples by 4-(2'-benzothiazolylazo)-salicylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashem, E. Y.; Seleim, M. M.; El-Zohry, A. M.

    2011-09-01

    A highly sensitive method is proposed to determine copper(II) ions by forming a stable complex through their interaction with 4-(2'-benzothiazolylazo)-salicylic acid (BTAS) at room temperature and pH of about 5.0. The complex gave a maximum absorption at λ = 485 nm with a molar absorptivity coefficient of 2.35·104 l/(mol·cm). The linear range for the copper determination is 0.63-5.04 mg/l. The method can be applied to determine copper ions in different biological specimens like some drugs and water samples.

  2. Biological sample collector

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Gloria A [French Camp, CA

    2010-09-07

    A biological sample collector is adapted to a collect several biological samples in a plurality of filter wells. A biological sample collector may comprise a manifold plate for mounting a filter plate thereon, the filter plate having a plurality of filter wells therein; a hollow slider for engaging and positioning a tube that slides therethrough; and a slide case within which the hollow slider travels to allow the tube to be aligned with a selected filter well of the plurality of filter wells, wherein when the tube is aligned with the selected filter well, the tube is pushed through the hollow slider and into the selected filter well to sealingly engage the selected filter well and to allow the tube to deposit a biological sample onto a filter in the bottom of the selected filter well. The biological sample collector may be portable.

  3. Preservation of Liquid Biological Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi (Inventor); Nimmagudda, Ramalingeshwara (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention related to the preservation of a liquid biological sample. The biological sample is exposed to a preservative containing at least about 0.15 g of sodium benzoate and at least about 0.025 g of citric acid per 100 ml of sample. The biological sample may be collected in a vessel or an absorbent mass. The biological sample may also be exposed to a substrate and/or a vehicle.

  4. Preservation of Liquid Biological Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi (Inventor); Nimmagudda, Ramalingeshwara R. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of preserving a liquid biological sample, comprising the step of: contacting said liquid biological sample with a preservative comprising, sodium benzoate in an amount of at least about 0.15% of the sample (weight/volume) and citric acid in an amount of at least about 0.025% of the sample (weight/volume).

  5. The influence of psychoeducation on regulating biological rhythm in a sample of patients with bipolar II disorder: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Faria, Augusto Duarte; de Mattos Souza, Luciano Dias; de Azevedo Cardoso, Taiane; Pinheiro, Karen Amaral Tavares; Pinheiro, Ricardo Tavares; da Silva, Ricardo Azevedo; Jansen, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Changes in biological rhythm are among the various characteristics of bipolar disorder, and have long been associated with the functional impairment of the disease. There are only a few viable options of psychosocial interventions that deal with this specific topic; one of them is psychoeducation, a model that, although it has been used by practitioners for some time, only recently have studies shown its efficacy in clinical practice. To assess if patients undergoing psychosocial intervention in addition to a pharmacological treatment have better regulation of their biological rhythm than those only using medication. This study is a randomized clinical trial that compares a standard medication intervention to an intervention combined with drugs and psychoeducation. The evaluation of the biological rhythm was made using the Biological Rhythm Interview of Assessment in Neuropsychiatry, an 18-item scale divided in four areas (sleep, activity, social rhythm, and eating pattern). The combined intervention consisted of medication and a short-term psychoeducation model summarized in a protocol of six individual sessions of 1 hour each. The sample consisted of 61 patients with bipolar II disorder, but during the study, there were 14 losses to follow-up. Therefore, the final sample consisted of 45 individuals (26 for standard intervention and 19 for combined). The results showed that, in this sample and time period evaluated, the combined treatment of medication and psychoeducation had no statistically significant impact on the regulation of biological rhythm when compared to standard pharmacological treatment. Although the changes in biological rhythm were not statistically significant during the time period evaluated in this study, it is noteworthy that the trajectory of the score showed a trend towards improvement, which may indicate a positive impact on treatment, though it may take a longer time than expected.

  6. Biological Sampling Variability Study

    SciTech Connect

    Amidan, Brett G.; Hutchison, Janine R.

    2016-11-08

    There are many sources of variability that exist in the sample collection and analysis process. This paper addresses many, but not all, sources of variability. The main focus of this paper was to better understand and estimate variability due to differences between samplers. Variability between days was also studied, as well as random variability within each sampler. Experiments were performed using multiple surface materials (ceramic and stainless steel), multiple contaminant concentrations (10 spores and 100 spores), and with and without the presence of interfering material. All testing was done with sponge sticks using 10-inch by 10-inch coupons. Bacillus atrophaeus was used as the BA surrogate. Spores were deposited using wet deposition. Grime was coated on the coupons which were planned to include the interfering material (Section 3.3). Samples were prepared and analyzed at PNNL using CDC protocol (Section 3.4) and then cultured and counted. Five samplers were trained so that samples were taken using the same protocol. Each sampler randomly sampled eight coupons each day, four coupons with 10 spores deposited and four coupons with 100 spores deposited. Each day consisted of one material being tested. The clean samples (no interfering materials) were run first, followed by the dirty samples (coated with interfering material). There was a significant difference in recovery efficiency between the coupons with 10 spores deposited (mean of 48.9%) and those with 100 spores deposited (mean of 59.8%). There was no general significant difference between the clean and dirty (containing interfering material) coupons or between the two surface materials; however, there was a significant interaction between concentration amount and presence of interfering material. The recovery efficiency was close to the same for coupons with 10 spores deposited, but for the coupons with 100 spores deposited, the recovery efficiency for the dirty samples was significantly larger (65

  7. Electron holography of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Simon, P; Lichte, H; Formanek, P; Lehmann, M; Huhle, R; Carrillo-Cabrera, W; Harscher, A; Ehrlich, H

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we summarise the development of off-axis electron holography on biological samples starting in 1986 with the first results on ferritin from the group of Tonomura. In the middle of the 1990s strong interest was evoked, but then stagnation took place because the results obtained at that stage did not reach the contrast and the resolution achieved by conventional electron microscopy. To date, there exist only a few ( approximately 12) publications on electron holography of biological objects, thus this topic is quite small and concise. The reason for this could be that holography is mostly established in materials science by physicists. Therefore, applications for off-axis holography were powerfully pushed forward in the area of imaging, e.g. electric or magnetic micro- and nanofields. Unstained biological systems investigated by means of off-axis electron holography up to now are ferritin, tobacco mosaic virus, a bacterial flagellum, T5 bacteriophage virus, hexagonal packed intermediate layer of bacteria and the Semliki Forest virus. New results of the authors on collagen fibres and surface layer of bacteria, the so-called S-layer 2D crystal lattice are presented in this review. For the sake of completeness, we will shortly discuss in-line holography of biological samples and off-axis holography of materials related to biological systems, such as biomaterial composites or magnetotactic bacteria.

  8. Biology II Curriculum Guide. Bulletin 1820.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge. Div. of Academic Programs.

    In 1986, the Louisiana State Board of Elementary and Secondary Education requested that an advanced course in Biology II be developed. The resulting curriculum guide contains grade appropriate goals, skills, and competencies; suggested activities; suggested materials of instruction; and minimum time allotments for instruction. Biology II is a…

  9. Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) Report - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.I.

    1994-09-28

    This report describes the results from Phase II of the Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) Program, a joint effort to compare analytical laboratory performance on samples from the Hanford Site`s high-level waste tanks. In Phase II, the program has been expanded to include inorganic constituents in addition to radionuclides. Results from Phase II that exceeded 20% relative percent difference criteria are identified.

  10. Simultaneous detection of [metal(II)-tpen]2+ as kinetically inert cationic complexes using pre-capillary derivatization electrophoresis: an application to biological samples.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shingo; Sasamura, Satoru; Hoshi, Suwaru

    2005-05-01

    A high resolution of doubly charged first row transition (Fe, Cu, Zn, Ni, Co, Mn) and heavy metal (Pb, Cd, Hg) ions was achieved in capillary electrophoresis (CE) with high sensitivity (sub-micromol dm(-3) level), using NN,N'N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN) as a pre-capillary derivatizing agent. The non-charged reagent, TPEN, was applied to capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) for the first time. Since complete spatial separation between the complexes and the ligand was carried out in a carrier buffer, which was free of TPEN, kinetic inertness of metal complexes was necessary for the detection in this pre-capillary method. All the nine listed metal complexes were detected: Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Al(3+), Fe(3+), and Co(3+) complexes were undetectable. This, interestingly, suggests that those nine cations form kinetically inert tpen complexes without strong charge-charge interactions between the metal ion and the ligand. It is expected that the hard-soft-acid-base (HSAB) principle governed the kinetics selectivity. With respect to the electrophoretic behavior, the addition of chloride ion and methanol to the carrier significantly improved the resolution. This is due to the formation of ternary complexes or ion aggregates and the solvation effect, respectively. These effects provided a satisfactory baseline resolution among the nine metal ions. An application to biological samples was demonstrated. Some metal ions in human serum and urine were successfully detected in a simple process without the need for deproteinization using a non-coated fused-silica capillary because of the differenciation in the direction of migration between organic matter and complexes.

  11. Modular microfluidic system for biological sample preparation

    DOEpatents

    Rose, Klint A.; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.; Bailey, Christopher G.; Ness, Kevin Dean

    2015-09-29

    A reconfigurable modular microfluidic system for preparation of a biological sample including a series of reconfigurable modules for automated sample preparation adapted to selectively include a) a microfluidic acoustic focusing filter module, b) a dielectrophoresis bacteria filter module, c) a dielectrophoresis virus filter module, d) an isotachophoresis nucleic acid filter module, e) a lyses module, and f) an isotachophoresis-based nucleic acid filter.

  12. Spectroscopic diagnostics for bacteria in biologic sample

    DOEpatents

    El-Sayed, Mostafa A.; El-Sayed, Ivan H.

    2002-01-01

    A method to analyze and diagnose specific bacteria in a biologic sample using spectroscopy is disclosed. The method includes obtaining the spectra of a biologic sample of a non-infected patient for use as a reference, subtracting the reference from the spectra of an infected sample, and comparing the fingerprint regions of the resulting differential spectrum with reference spectra of bacteria in saline. Using this diagnostic technique, specific bacteria can be identified sooner and without culturing, bacteria-specific antibiotics can be prescribed sooner, resulting in decreased likelihood of antibiotic resistance and an overall reduction of medical costs.

  13. Analysis of Arsenical Metabolites in Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Zavala, Araceli; Drobna, Zuzana; Styblo, Miroslav; Thomas, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Quantitation of iAs and its methylated metabolites in biological samples provides dosimetric information needed to understand dose-response relations. Here, methods are described for separation of inorganic and mono-, di-, and trimethylated arsenicals by thin layer chromatography. This method has been extensively used to track the metabolism of the radionuclide [73As] in a variety of in vitro assay systems. In addition, a hydride generation-cryotrapping-gas chromatography-atomic absorption spectrometric method is described for the quantitation of arsenicals in biological samples. This method uses pH-selective hydride generation to differentiate among arsenicals containing trivalent or pentavalent arsenic. PMID:20396652

  14. Trace Element Analysis of Biological Samples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veillon, Claude

    1986-01-01

    Reviews background of atomic absorption spectrometry techniques. Discusses problems encountered and precautions to be taken in determining trace elements in the parts-per-billion concentration range and below. Concentrates on determining chromium in biological samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption. Considers other elements, matrices, and…

  15. Trace Element Analysis of Biological Samples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veillon, Claude

    1986-01-01

    Reviews background of atomic absorption spectrometry techniques. Discusses problems encountered and precautions to be taken in determining trace elements in the parts-per-billion concentration range and below. Concentrates on determining chromium in biological samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption. Considers other elements, matrices, and…

  16. Biological Sterilization of Returned Mars Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C. C.; Albert, F. G.; Combie, J.; Bodnar, R. J.; Hamilton, V. E.; Jolliff, B. L.; Kuebler, K.; Wang, A.; Lindstrom, D. J.; Morris, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    Martian rock and soil, collected by robotic spacecraft, will be returned to terrestrial laboratories early in the next century. Current plans call for the samples to be immediately placed into biological containment and tested for signs of present or past life and biological hazards. It is recommended that "Controlled distribution of unsterilized materials from Mars should occur only if rigorous analyses determine that the materials do not constitute a biological hazard. If any portion of the sample is removed from containment prior to completion of these analyses it should first be sterilized." While sterilization of Mars samples may not be required, an acceptable method must be available before the samples are returned to Earth. The sterilization method should be capable of destroying a wide range of organisms with minimal effects on the geologic samples. A variety of biological sterilization techniques and materials are currently in use, including dry heat, high pressure steam, gases, plasmas and ionizing radiation. Gamma radiation is routinely used to inactivate viruses and destroy bacteria in medical research. Many commercial sterilizers use Co-60 , which emits gamma photons of 1.17 and 1.33 MeV. Absorbed doses of approximately 1 Mrad (10(exp 8) ergs/g) destroy most bacteria. This study investigates the effects of lethal doses of Co-60 gamma radiation on materials similar to those anticipated to be returned from Mars. The goals are to determine the gamma dose required to kill microorganisms in rock and soil samples and to determine the effects of gamma sterilization on the samples' isotopic, chemical and physical properties. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  17. Biological Sterilization of Returned Mars Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C. C.; Albert, F. G.; Combie, J.; Bodnar, R. J.; Hamilton, V. E.; Jolliff, B. L.; Kuebler, K.; Wang, A.; Lindstrom, D. J.; Morris, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    Martian rock and soil, collected by robotic spacecraft, will be returned to terrestrial laboratories early in the next century. Current plans call for the samples to be immediately placed into biological containment and tested for signs of present or past life and biological hazards. It is recommended that "Controlled distribution of unsterilized materials from Mars should occur only if rigorous analyses determine that the materials do not constitute a biological hazard. If any portion of the sample is removed from containment prior to completion of these analyses it should first be sterilized." While sterilization of Mars samples may not be required, an acceptable method must be available before the samples are returned to Earth. The sterilization method should be capable of destroying a wide range of organisms with minimal effects on the geologic samples. A variety of biological sterilization techniques and materials are currently in use, including dry heat, high pressure steam, gases, plasmas and ionizing radiation. Gamma radiation is routinely used to inactivate viruses and destroy bacteria in medical research. Many commercial sterilizers use Co-60 , which emits gamma photons of 1.17 and 1.33 MeV. Absorbed doses of approximately 1 Mrad (10(exp 8) ergs/g) destroy most bacteria. This study investigates the effects of lethal doses of Co-60 gamma radiation on materials similar to those anticipated to be returned from Mars. The goals are to determine the gamma dose required to kill microorganisms in rock and soil samples and to determine the effects of gamma sterilization on the samples' isotopic, chemical and physical properties. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. [The ethical implications of conserving biological samples].

    PubMed

    Tazzite, A; Roky, R; Avard, D

    2009-09-01

    The conservation and use of biological samples become more and more frequent all around the world. Biobanks of human body substances (blood, urine, DNA, tissues, cells, etc.), and personal data associated with them are created. They have a double character as they are collections of both human biological samples and personal data. In some cases, the gametes, reproductive tissues, embryos, foetal tissue after abortion or even specimens of dead donors are collected and conserved. Although biobanks raise hopes in both the development of new therapies, new drugs and their integration into clinical medicine, they also point to concerns related to ethical questions such as: the principles of information, the consent of the persons concerned, the confidentiality about the personal data, and in some cases discrimination and stigmatisation. Other ethical aspects could raise gradually as research advance. Research being carried out on human sample requires informed free consent from the person who should be able to consent. The donor must be sufficiently informed about the process of research, the purpose, benefits and the risks involved in participating in this research. In the case of persons unable to give consent such minors or persons with mental disabilities, special measures are undertaken. Once the consent was given, the right of withdrawal has been consistently supported by the various declarations and regulations, but some oppose this right for a number of reasons particularly in the case of research on the samples without risk of physical exposure. In this case the notion of human body integrity is different than in research involving therapeutic or clinical intervention. In the case of withdrawal of consent, the samples should be destroyed, but the anonymous results arising from them and their analysis are not affected. What is the case for future uses? Should the researcher obtain again the consent from the donor for a secondary use of the samples? This is a

  19. Atomic force microscopy of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Allison, David P; Mortensen, Ninell P; Sullivan, Claretta J; Doktycz, Mitchel J

    2010-01-01

    The ability to evaluate structural-functional relationships in real time has allowed scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to assume a prominent role in post genomic biological research. In this mini-review, we highlight the development of imaging and ancillary techniques that have allowed SPM to permeate many key areas of contemporary research. We begin by examining the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) by Binnig and Rohrer in 1982 and discuss how it served to team biologists with physicists to integrate high-resolution microscopy into biological science. We point to the problems of imaging nonconductive biological samples with the STM and relate how this led to the evolution of the atomic force microscope (AFM) developed by Binnig, Quate, and Gerber, in 1986. Commercialization in the late 1980s established SPM as a powerful research tool in the biological research community. Contact mode AFM imaging was soon complemented by the development of non-contact imaging modes. These non-contact modes eventually became the primary focus for further new applications including the development of fast scanning methods. The extreme sensitivity of the AFM cantilever was recognized and has been developed into applications for measuring forces required for indenting biological surfaces and breaking bonds between biomolecules. Further functional augmentation to the cantilever tip allowed development of new and emerging techniques including scanning ion-conductance microscopy (SICM), scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM), Kelvin force microscopy (KFM) and scanning near field ultrasonic holography (SNFUH). © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. Atomic force microscopy of biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2010-01-01

    The ability to evaluate structural-functional relationships in real time has allowed scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to assume a prominent role in post genomic biological research. In this mini-review, we highlight the development of imaging and ancillary techniques that have allowed SPM to permeate many key areas of contemporary research. We begin by examining the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) by Binnig and Rohrer in 1982 and discuss how it served to team biologists with physicists to integrate high-resolution microscopy into biological science. We point to the problems of imaging nonconductive biological samples with the STM and relate how this led to the evolution of the atomic force microscope (AFM) developed by Binnig, Quate, and Gerber, in 1986. Commercialization in the late 1980s established SPM as a powerful research tool in the biological research community. Contact mode AFM imaging was soon complemented by the development of non-contact imaging modes. These non-contact modes eventually became the primary focus for further new applications including the development of fast scanning methods. The extreme sensitivity of the AFM cantilever was recognized and has been developed into applications for measuring forces required for indenting biological surfaces and breaking bonds between biomolecules. Further functional augmentation to the cantilever tip allowed development of new and emerging techniques including scanning ion-conductance microscopy (SICM), scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM), Kelvin force microscopy (KFM) and scanning near field ultrasonic holography (SNFUH).

  1. Microradiography of biological samples with Timepix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammer, J.; Weyda, F.; Benes, J.; Sopko, V.; Jakubek, J.; Vondracek, V.

    2011-11-01

    Microradiography is an imaging technique using X-rays in the study of internal structures of objects. This rapid and convenient imaging tool is based on differential X-ray attenuation by various tissues and structures within the biological sample. The non-absorbed radiation is detected with a suitable detector and creates a radiographic image. In order to detect the differential properties of X-rays passing through structures sample with different compositions, an adequate high-quality imaging detector is needed. We describe the recently developed radiographic apparatus, equipped with Timepix semiconductor pixel detector. The detector is used as an imager that counts individual photons of ionizing radiation, emitted by an X-ray tube FeinFocus with tungsten, copper or molybdenum anode. Thanks to the wide dynamic range, time over threshold mode — counter is used as Wilkinson type ADC allowing direct energy measurement in each pixel of Timepix detector and its high spatial resolution better than 1μm, the setup is particularly suitable for radiographic imaging of small biological samples. We are able to visualize some internal biological processes and also to resolve the details of insects (morphology) using different anodes. These anodes generate different energy spectra. These spectra depend on the anode material. The resulting radiographic images varies according to the selected anode. Tiny live insects are an ideal object for our studies.

  2. SYSBIONS: nested sampling for systems biology.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rob; Kirk, Paul; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2015-02-15

    Model selection is a fundamental part of the scientific process in systems biology. Given a set of competing hypotheses, we routinely wish to choose the one that best explains the observed data. In the Bayesian framework, models are compared via Bayes factors (the ratio of evidences), where a model's evidence is the support given to the model by the data. A parallel interest is inferring the distribution of the parameters that define a model. Nested sampling is a method for the computation of a model's evidence and the generation of samples from the posterior parameter distribution. We present a C-based, GPU-accelerated implementation of nested sampling that is designed for biological applications. The algorithm follows a standard routine with optional extensions and additional features. We provide a number of methods for sampling from the prior subject to a likelihood constraint. The software SYSBIONS is available from http://www.theosysbio.bio.ic.ac.uk/resources/sysbions/ m.stumpf@imperial.ac.uk, robert.johnson11@imperial.ac.uk. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  3. Contactless photoacoustic imaging of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berer, Thomas; Hochreiner, Armin; Grün, Hubert; Burgholzer, Peter

    2012-02-01

    In this paper we report on remote photoacoustic imaging using an interferometric technique. By utilizing a two-wave mixing interferometer ultrasonic displacements are measured without any physical contact to the sample. This technique allows measurement of the displacements also on rough surfaces. Mixing a plane reference beam with the speckled beam originating from the sample surface is done in a Bi12SiO20 photorefractive crystal. After data acquisition the structure of the specimen is reconstructed using a Fourier-domain synthetic focusing aperture technique. We show three-dimensional imaging on tissue-mimicking phantoms and biological samples. Furthermore, we show remote photoacoustic measurements on a human forearm in-vivo.

  4. Accelerator mass spectrometry of small biological samples.

    PubMed

    Salehpour, Mehran; Forsgard, Niklas; Possnert, Göran

    2008-12-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an ultra-sensitive technique for isotopic ratio measurements. In the biomedical field, AMS can be used to measure femtomolar concentrations of labeled drugs in body fluids, with direct applications in early drug development such as Microdosing. Likewise, the regenerative properties of cells which are of fundamental significance in stem-cell research can be determined with an accuracy of a few years by AMS analysis of human DNA. However, AMS nominally requires about 1 mg of carbon per sample which is not always available when dealing with specific body substances such as localized, organ-specific DNA samples. Consequently, it is of analytical interest to develop methods for the routine analysis of small samples in the range of a few tens of microg. We have used a 5 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator to study small biological samples using AMS. Different methods are presented and compared. A (12)C-carrier sample preparation method is described which is potentially more sensitive and less susceptible to contamination than the standard procedures.

  5. Speciation of arsenic in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Badal Kumar; Ogra, Yasumitsu; Anzai, Kazunori; Suzuki, Kazuo T

    2004-08-01

    Speciation of arsenicals in biological samples is an essential tool to gain insight into its distribution in tissues and its species-specific toxicity to target organs. Biological samples (urine, hair, fingernail) examined in the present study were collected from 41 people of West Bengal, India, who were drinking arsenic (As)-contaminated water, whereas 25 blood and urine samples were collected from a population who stopped drinking As contaminated water 2 years before the blood collection. Speciation of arsenicals in urine, water-methanol extract of freeze-dried red blood cells (RBCs), trichloroacetic acid treated plasma, and water extract of hair and fingernail was carried out by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-inductively coupled argon plasma mass spectrometry (ICP MS). Urine contained arsenobetaine (AsB, 1.0%), arsenite (iAs(III), 11.3), arsenate (iAs(V), 10.1), monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III), 6.6), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA(V), 10.5), dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III), 13.0), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V), 47.5); fingernail contained iAs(III) (62.4%), iAs(V) (20.2), MMA(V) (5.7), DMA(III) (8.9), and DMA(V) (2.8); hair contained iAs(III) (58.9%), iAs(V) (34.8), MMA(V) (2.9), and DMA(V) (3.4); RBCs contained AsB (22.5%) and DMA(V) (77.5); and blood plasma contained AsB (16.7%), iAs(III) (21.1), MMA(V) (27.1), and DMA(V) (35.1). MMA(III), DMA(III), and iAs(V) were not found in any plasma and RBCs samples, but urine contained all of them. Arsenic in urine, fingernails, and hair are positively correlated with water As, suggesting that any of these measurements could be considered as a biomarker to As exposure. Status of urine and exogenous contamination of hair urgently need speciation of As in these samples, but speciation of As in nail is related to its total As (tAs) concentration. Therefore, total As concentrations of nails could be considered as biomarker to As exposure in the endemic areas.

  6. Measurement of NO in biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Csonka, C; Páli, T; Bencsik, P; Görbe, A; Ferdinandy, P; Csont, T

    2015-01-01

    Although the physiological regulatory function of the gasotransmitter NO (a diatomic free radical) was discovered decades ago, NO is still in the frontline research in biomedicine. NO has been implicated in a variety of physiological and pathological processes; therefore, pharmacological modulation of NO levels in various tissues may have significant therapeutic value. NO is generated by NOS in most of cell types and by non-enzymatic reactions. Measurement of NO is technically difficult due to its rapid chemical reactions with a wide range of molecules, such as, for example, free radicals, metals, thiols, etc. Therefore, there are still several contradictory findings on the role of NO in different biological processes. In this review, we briefly discuss the major techniques suitable for measurement of NO (electron paramagnetic resonance, electrochemistry, fluorometry) and its derivatives in biological samples (nitrite/nitrate, NOS, cGMP, nitrosothiols) and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each method. We conclude that to obtain a meaningful insight into the role of NO and NO modulator compounds in physiological or pathological processes, concomitant assessment of NO synthesis, NO content, as well as molecular targets and reaction products of NO is recommended. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Pharmacology of the Gasotransmitters. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-6 PMID:24990201

  7. 40 CFR Appendix II to Subpart E of... - Sampling Tables

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sampling Tables II Appendix II to Subpart E of Part 205 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE..., Subpt. E, App. II Appendix II to Subpart E of Part 205—Sampling Tables Table 1—Model Year Production...

  8. 40 CFR Appendix II to Subpart E of... - Sampling Tables

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sampling Tables II Appendix II to Subpart E of Part 205 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE..., Subpt. E, App. II Appendix II to Subpart E of Part 205—Sampling Tables Table 1—Model Year Production...

  9. Millimeter wave absorption spectra of biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, O.P.; Hagmann, M.J.; Hill, D.W.; Partlow, L.M.; Bush, L.

    1980-01-01

    A solid-state computer-controlled system has been used to make swept-frequency measurements of absorption of biological specimens from 26.5 to 90.0 GHz. A wide range of samples was used, including solutions of DNA and RNA, and suspensions of BHK-21/C13 cells, Candida albicans, C krusei, and Escherichia coli. Sharp spectra reported by other workers were not observed. The strong absorbance of water (10--30 dB/mm) caused the absorbance of all aqueous preparations that we examined to have a water-like dependence on frequency. Reduction of incident power (to below 1.0 microW), elimination of modulation, and control of temperature to assure cell viability were not found to significantly alter the water-dominated absorbance. Frozen samples of BHK-21/C13 cells tested at dry ice and liquid nitrogen temperatures were found to have average insertion loss reduced to 0.2 dB/cm but still showed no reproducible peaks that could be attributed to absorption spectra. It is concluded that the special resonances reported by others are likely to be in error.

  10. 40 CFR Appendix II to Subpart E - Sampling Tables

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sampling Tables II Appendix II to Subpart E Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS... II to Subpart E—Sampling Tables Table 1—Model Year Production Volume of 50-99 Vehicles Cumulative...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix II to Subpart E - Sampling Tables

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Sampling Tables II Appendix II to Subpart E Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS... II to Subpart E—Sampling Tables Table 1—Model Year Production Volume of 50-99 Vehicles Cumulative...

  12. Synergistic extraction and spectrophotometric determination of copper(II) using 1-(2',4'-dinitro aminophenyl)-4,4,6-trimethyl-1,4-dihydropyrimidine-2-thiol: Analysis of alloys, pharmaceuticals and biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamble, Ganesh S.; Kolekar, Sanjay S.; Anuse, Mansing A.

    2011-05-01

    A simple and selective spectrophotometric method was developed for the determination of copper(II) with 1-(2',4'-dinitro aminophenyl)-4,4,6-trimethyl-1,4-dihydropyrimidine-2-thiol [2',4'-dinitro APTPT] as a chromogenic reagent. The procedure was based on the synergistic extraction of copper(II) with 2',4'-dinitro APTPT in the presence of 0.5 mol L -1 pyridine to give green colored ternary complex of a molar ratio 1:2:2 (M:L:Py) in the pH range 8.7-10.5. It exhibits a maximum absorption of colored complex at 445 nm and 645 nm in chloroform against the reagent blank. Beer's law was followed in the concentration range 10-80 μg mL -1 of copper(II) and optimum range of 20-70 μg mL -1 the metal as evaluated from Ringbom's plot. The molar absorptivity and Sandell's sensitivity of copper(II)-2',4'-dinitro APTPT-pyridine complex in chloroform are 0.87 × 10 3 L mol -1 cm -1 and 0.072 μg cm -2, respectively. The interfering effects of various cations and anions were also studied, and use of suitable masking agents enhances the selectivity of the method. The proposed method is rapid, reproducible and successfully applied for the determination of copper(II) in binary and synthetic mixtures, alloys, pharmaceutical formulations, environmental and fertilizer samples. Comparison of the results with those obtained using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer also tested the validity of the method.

  13. Critical appraisal: dental amalgam update--part II: biological effects.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Michael J; Swift, Edward J

    2013-12-01

    Dental amalgam restorations have been controversial for over 150 years. In Part I of this Critical Appraisal, the clinical efficacy of dental amalgam was updated. Here in Part II, the biological effects of dental amalgam are addressed.

  14. Real sample temperature: a critical issue in the experiments of nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy on biological samples.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongxin; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Kamali, Saeed; Zhou, Zhao Hui; Cramer, Stephen P

    2012-03-01

    There are several practical and intertangled issues which make the experiments of nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) on biological samples difficult to perform. The sample temperature is one of the most important issues. In NRVS the real sample temperatures can be very different from the readings on the temperature sensors. In this study the following have been performed: (i) citing and analyzing various existing NRVS data to assess the real sample temperatures during the NRVS measurements and to understand their trends with the samples' loading conditions; (ii) designing several NRVS measurements with (Et(4)N)[FeCl(4)] to verify these trends; and (iii) proposing a new sample-loading procedure to achieve significantly lower real sample temperatures and to balance among the intertangled experimental issues in biological NRVS measurements.

  15. COMPARISON OF BIOLOGICAL COMMUNITIES: THE PROBLEM OF SAMPLE REPRESENTATIVENESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Obtaining an adequate, representative sample of biological communities or assemblages to make richness or compositional comparisons among sites is a continuing challenge. Traditionally, sample size is based on numbers of replicates or area collected or numbers of individuals enum...

  16. Outdoor Biology Instructional Strategies Trial Edition. Set II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairwell, Kay, Ed.; And Others

    The 24 activities in the Outdoor Biology Instructional Strategies (OBIS) Trial Edition Set II use living organisms such as crabs, birds, crayfish, lichens, and insects to investigate biological interrelationships, organism behavior, and species density to promote greater environmental and sensory awareness. The activities, designed primarily for…

  17. Rapid Automated Sample Preparation for Biological Assays

    SciTech Connect

    Shusteff, M

    2011-03-04

    Our technology utilizes acoustic, thermal, and electric fields to separate out contaminants such as debris or pollen from environmental samples, lyse open cells, and extract the DNA from the lysate. The objective of the project is to optimize the system described for a forensic sample, and demonstrate its performance for integration with downstream assay platforms (e.g. MIT-LL's ANDE). We intend to increase the quantity of DNA recovered from the sample beyond the current {approx}80% achieved using solid phase extraction methods. Task 1: Develop and test an acoustic filter for cell extraction. Task 2: Develop and test lysis chip. Task 3: Develop and test DNA extraction chip. All chips have been fabricated based on the designs laid out in last month's report.

  18. How to analyze those messy biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, S.A. . Dept. of Veterinary Physiology, Pharmacology, and Toxicology)

    1993-03-01

    Extracting drugs, pollutants, or naturally occurring components from tissues is always an analytical challenge. However, there is an increasing need to perform such extractions for the regulation of food safety, the determination of the degree or nature of pollution in various environments, or to isolate a particular class of structural components from cells. The samples may range from blood to whole oysters, milk to fish, calf's liver to crayfish, or beef to bacteria. The author has developed a generic process that greatly simplifies and speeds the isolation of drugs, pollutants, and biomolecules from tissues, bacteria, and processed foods. This process, called matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD; patent pending), allows the analyst to perform sample homogenization, cellular disruption, and sample purification in a single step. The methods that they have developed have shown to reduce solvent usage by 90% and analyst time by 95% when compared with classical procedures for drug isolations from tissue.

  19. Determination of total mercury in biological and geological samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crock, James G.

    2005-01-01

    The analytical chemist is faced with several challenges when determining mercury in biological and geological materials. These challenges include widespread mercury contamination, both in the laboratory and the environment, possible losses of mercury during sample preparation and digestion, the wide range of mercury values commonly observed, ranging from the low nanogram per gram or per liter for background areas to hundreds of milligrams per kilogram in contaminated or ore-bearing areas, great matrix diversity, and sample heterogeneity1. These factors can be naturally occurring or anthropogenic, but must be addressed to provide a precise and accurate analysis. Although there are many instrumental methods available for the successful determination of mercury, no one technique will address all problems or all samples all of the time. The approach for the determination of mercury used at the U.S. Geological Survey, Crustal Imaging and Characterization Team, Denver Laboratories, utilizes a suite of complementary instrumental methods when approaching a study requiring mercury analyses. Typically, a study could require the analysis of waters, leachates or selective digestions of solids, vegetation, and biological materials such as tissue, bone, or shell, soils, rocks, sediments, coals, sludges, and(or) ashes. No one digestion or sample preparation method will be suitable for all of these matrices. The digestions typically employed at our laboratories include: (i) a closed-vessel microwave method using nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide, followed by digestion/dilution with a nitric acid/sodium dichromate solution, (ii) a robotic open test-tube digestion with nitric acid and sodium dichromate, (iii) a sealed Teflon? vessel with nitric acid and sodium dichromate, (iv) a sealed glass bottle with nitric acid and sodium dichromate, or (v) open test tube digestion with nitric and sulfuric acids and vanadium pentoxide. The common factor in all these digestions is that they are

  20. [Publication of biological samples collections catalogues by tumor banks].

    PubMed

    Chabannon, C; Honstettre, A; Daufresne, L-M; Martin, P-M; Bonnetaud, C; Birtwisle-Peyrottes, I; Romain, S; Achache, K; Mery, O; Bordonne, O; Ducord, C; Jacotot, L; Vaglio, P; d'Arnoux, C; Figarella-Branger, D; Hofman, P; Borg, J-P; Atger, V

    2010-02-01

    Biobanks in general, and specifically tumour banks, are considered as essential tools for the development of translational and clinical research in biology and oncology. Biobank tasks include the collection and preservation of biological samples, and their association with information that will be essential for further scientific use ("annotations" that allow for the "qualification" of biological samples in biological resource). A collection is made of a series of biological resource that are representative of a homogeneous group of individuals or patients that are defined on the basis of clinical or biological information. Collections are used by scientists that are aware of their existence. In the absence of a published catalogue, this awareness is most often limited to research teams that are geographically close, or to investigators who already established collaborative projects with medical teams within the hospital that operates the tumour bank. Publications of catalogues, especially digitalized and online catalogues, should foster the development of high-level, large-scale and multicentric scientific projects. In addition, tumour banks will formalize rules that allow publication of collections, and upstream, rules that are used to qualify biological samples in biological resource: this should translate in an improved overall quality of samples and annotations. Tumour bank catalogues remain relatively few; however, some recent achievements established the "proof of concept" and already raise questions regarding rules for publication. It will be important to demonstrate that these high expectations translate into measurable benefits.

  1. Adaptive fractionation therapy: II. Biological effective dose.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingli; Lu, Weiguo; Chen, Quan; Ruchala, Kenneth; Olivera, Gustavo

    2008-10-07

    Radiation therapy is fractionized to differentiate the cell killing between the tumor and organ at risk (OAR). Conventionally, fractionation is done by dividing the total dose into equal fraction sizes. However, as the relative positions (configurations) between OAR and the tumor vary from fractions to fractions, intuitively, we want to use a larger fraction size when OAR and the tumor are far apart and a smaller fraction size when OAR and the tumor are close to each other. Adaptive fractionation accounts for variations of configurations between OAR and the tumor. In part I of this series, the adaptation minimizes the OAR (physical) dose and maintains the total tumor (physical) dose. In this work, instead, the adaptation is based on the biological effective dose (BED). Unlike the linear programming approach in part I, we build a fraction size lookup table using mathematical induction. The lookup table essentially describes the fraction size as a function of the remaining tumor BED, the OAR/tumor dose ratio and the remaining number of fractions. The lookup table is calculated by maximizing the expected survival of OAR and preserving the tumor cell kill. Immediately before the treatment of each fraction, the OAR-tumor configuration and thus the dose ratio can be obtained from the daily setup image, and then the fraction size can be determined by the lookup table. Extensive simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of our method compared with the conventional fractionation method.

  2. A Review of Biological Agent Sampling Methods and ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report This study was conducted to evaluate current sampling and analytical capabilities, from a time and resource perspective, for a large-scale biological contamination incident. The analysis will be useful for strategically directing future research investment.

  3. Marshburn prepares to insert biological samples in the MELFI-1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-07

    ISS034-E-026607 (7 Jan. 2013) --- NASA astronaut Tom Marshburn, Expedition 34 flight engineer, prepares to insert biological samples in the Minus Eighty Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI-1) in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station.

  4. FE Williams inserts Biological Samples into the MELFI-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-02

    ISS032-E-011639 (2 Aug. 2012) --- NASA astronaut Sunita Williams, Expedition 32 flight engineer, prepares to insert biological samples in the Minus Eighty Laboratory Freezer for ISS-2 (MELFI-2) in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.

  5. Observation of biological samples using a scanning microwave microscope.

    PubMed

    Park, Jewook; Hyun, S; Kim, A; Kim, T; Char, K

    2005-01-01

    We present the application of a scanning microwave microscope technique to biological samples. Since dielectric properties of most biological samples originate mainly from the water they contain, we were able to obtain microscope images of biological samples by our scanning microwave microscope technique. As a model system, we have measured the electrical properties of water in the microwave region. The high dielectric constant and the large loss tangent of water were verified. Furthermore, we have measured the properties of water with differing amounts of sodium chloride concentration ranging from de-ionized water to the saturated solution. We have observed a significant change in the resonant frequency and Q value of the resonator as a function of sodium chloride concentration. The concentration dependence of the signals shows that our scanning microwave microscope technique can be useful for investigating the local electric behavior of biological samples with a simple model of ionic conduction.

  6. A sample of Type II-L supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faran, T.; Poznanski, D.; Filippenko, A. V.; Chornock, R.; Foley, R. J.; Ganeshalingam, M.; Leonard, D. C.; Li, W.; Modjaz, M.; Serduke, F. J. D.; Silverman, J. M.

    2014-11-01

    What are Type II-Linear supernovae (SNe II-L)? This class, which has been ill defined for decades, now receives significant attention - both theoretically, in order to understand what happens to stars in the ˜15-25 M⊙ range, and observationally, with two independent studies suggesting that they cannot be cleanly separated photometrically from the regular hydrogen-rich SNe II-P characterized by a marked plateau in their light curve. Here, we analyse the multiband light curves and extensive spectroscopic coverage of a sample of 35 SNe II and find that 11 of them could be SNe II-L. The spectra of these SNe are hydrogen deficient, typically have shallow Hα absorption, may show indirect signs of helium via strong O I λ7774 absorption, and have faster line velocities consistent with a thin hydrogen shell. The light curves can be mostly differentiated from those of the regular, hydrogen-rich SNe II-P by their steeper decline rates and higher luminosity, and we propose to define them based on their decline in the V band: SNe II-L decline by more than 0.5 mag from peak brightness by day 50 after explosion. Using our sample we provide template light curves for SNe II-L and II-P in four photometric bands.

  7. The molecular biology of WHO grade II gliomas.

    PubMed

    Marko, Nicholas F; Weil, Robert J

    2013-02-01

    The WHO grading scheme for glial neoplasms assigns Grade II to 5 distinct tumors of astrocytic or oligodendroglial lineage: diffuse astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, oligoastrocytoma, pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma, and pilomyxoid astrocytoma. Although commonly referred to collectively as among the "low-grade gliomas," these 5 tumors represent molecularly and clinically unique entities. Each is the subject of active basic research aimed at developing a more complete understanding of its molecular biology, and the pace of such research continues to accelerate. Additionally, because managing and predicting the course of these tumors has historically proven challenging, translational research regarding Grade II gliomas continues in the hopes of identifying novel molecular features that can better inform diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic strategies. Unfortunately, the basic and translational literature regarding the molecular biology of WHO Grade II gliomas remains nebulous. The authors' goal for this review was to present a comprehensive discussion of current knowledge regarding the molecular characteristics of these 5 WHO Grade II tumors on the chromosomal, genomic, and epigenomic levels. Additionally, they discuss the emerging evidence suggesting molecular differences between adult and pediatric Grade II gliomas. Finally, they present an overview of current strategies for using molecular data to classify low-grade gliomas into clinically relevant categories based on tumor biology.

  8. The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling Expedition: Metagenomic Characterization of Viruses within Aquatic Microbial Samples

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Shannon J.; Rusch, Douglas B.; Yooseph, Shibu; Halpern, Aaron L.; Heidelberg, Karla B.; Glass, John I.; Andrews-Pfannkoch, Cynthia; Fadrosh, Douglas; Miller, Christopher S.; Sutton, Granger; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J. Craig

    2008-01-01

    Viruses are the most abundant biological entities on our planet. Interactions between viruses and their hosts impact several important biological processes in the world's oceans such as horizontal gene transfer, microbial diversity and biogeochemical cycling. Interrogation of microbial metagenomic sequence data collected as part of the Sorcerer II Global Ocean Expedition (GOS) revealed a high abundance of viral sequences, representing approximately 3% of the total predicted proteins. Cluster analyses of the viral sequences revealed hundreds to thousands of viral genes encoding various metabolic and cellular functions. Quantitative analyses of viral genes of host origin performed on the viral fraction of aquatic samples confirmed the viral nature of these sequences and suggested that significant portions of aquatic viral communities behave as reservoirs of such genetic material. Distributional and phylogenetic analyses of these host-derived viral sequences also suggested that viral acquisition of environmentally relevant genes of host origin is a more abundant and widespread phenomenon than previously appreciated. The predominant viral sequences identified within microbial fractions originated from tailed bacteriophages and exhibited varying global distributions according to viral family. Recruitment of GOS viral sequence fragments against 27 complete aquatic viral genomes revealed that only one reference bacteriophage genome was highly abundant and was closely related, but not identical, to the cyanomyovirus P-SSM4. The co-distribution across all sampling sites of P-SSM4-like sequences with the dominant ecotype of its host, Prochlorococcus supports the classification of the viral sequences as P-SSM4-like and suggests that this virus may influence the abundance, distribution and diversity of one of the most dominant components of picophytoplankton in oligotrophic oceans. In summary, the abundance and broad geographical distribution of viral sequences within

  9. The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling Expedition: metagenomic characterization of viruses within aquatic microbial samples.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Shannon J; Rusch, Douglas B; Yooseph, Shibu; Halpern, Aaron L; Heidelberg, Karla B; Glass, John I; Andrews-Pfannkoch, Cynthia; Fadrosh, Douglas; Miller, Christopher S; Sutton, Granger; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J Craig

    2008-01-23

    Viruses are the most abundant biological entities on our planet. Interactions between viruses and their hosts impact several important biological processes in the world's oceans such as horizontal gene transfer, microbial diversity and biogeochemical cycling. Interrogation of microbial metagenomic sequence data collected as part of the Sorcerer II Global Ocean Expedition (GOS) revealed a high abundance of viral sequences, representing approximately 3% of the total predicted proteins. Cluster analyses of the viral sequences revealed hundreds to thousands of viral genes encoding various metabolic and cellular functions. Quantitative analyses of viral genes of host origin performed on the viral fraction of aquatic samples confirmed the viral nature of these sequences and suggested that significant portions of aquatic viral communities behave as reservoirs of such genetic material. Distributional and phylogenetic analyses of these host-derived viral sequences also suggested that viral acquisition of environmentally relevant genes of host origin is a more abundant and widespread phenomenon than previously appreciated. The predominant viral sequences identified within microbial fractions originated from tailed bacteriophages and exhibited varying global distributions according to viral family. Recruitment of GOS viral sequence fragments against 27 complete aquatic viral genomes revealed that only one reference bacteriophage genome was highly abundant and was closely related, but not identical, to the cyanomyovirus P-SSM4. The co-distribution across all sampling sites of P-SSM4-like sequences with the dominant ecotype of its host, Prochlorococcus supports the classification of the viral sequences as P-SSM4-like and suggests that this virus may influence the abundance, distribution and diversity of one of the most dominant components of picophytoplankton in oligotrophic oceans. In summary, the abundance and broad geographical distribution of viral sequences within

  10. Column solid phase extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of manganese(II) and iron(III) ions in water, food and biological samples using 3-(1-methyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxylic acid on synthesized graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Pourjavid, Mohammad Reza; Sehat, Ali Akbari; Arabieh, Masoud; Yousefi, Seyed Reza; Hosseini, Majid Haji; Rezaee, Mohammad

    2014-02-01

    A modified, selective, highly sensitive and accurate procedure for the determination of trace amounts of manganese and iron ions is established in the presented work. 3-(1-Methyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxylic acid (MPPC) and graphene oxide (GO) were used in a glass column as chelating reagent and as adsorbent respectively prior to their determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The adsorption mechanism of titled metals complexes on GO was investigated by using computational chemistry approach based on PM6 semi-empirical potential energy surface (PES). The effect of some parameters including pH, flow rate and volume of sample and type, volume and concentration of eluent, as well as the adsorption capacity of matrix ions on the recovery of Mn(II) and Fe(III) was investigated. The limit of detection was 145 and 162 ng L(-1) for Mn(II) and Fe(III), respectively. Calibration was linear over the range of 0.31-355 μg L(-1) for Mn(II) and 0.34-380 μg L(-1) for Fe(III) ions. The method was successfully applied for the determination of understudied ions in water, food and biological samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Advances in imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry for biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Boxer, Steven G.; Kraft, Mary L.; Weber, Peter K.

    2008-12-16

    Imaging mass spectrometry combines the power of mass spectrometry to identify complex molecules based on mass with sample imaging. Recent advances in secondary ion mass spectrometry have improved sensitivity and spatial resolution, so that these methods have the potential to bridge between high-resolution structures obtained by X-ray crystallography and cyro-electron microscopy and ultrastructure visualized by conventional light microscopy. Following background information on the method and instrumentation, we address the key issue of sample preparation. Because mass spectrometry is performed in high vacuum, it is essential to preserve the lateral organization of the sample while removing bulk water, and this has been a major barrier for applications to biological systems. Furthermore, recent applications of imaging mass spectrometry to cell biology, microbial communities, and biosynthetic pathways are summarized briefly, and studies of biological membrane organization are described in greater depth.

  12. Advances in imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry for biological samples

    DOE PAGES

    Boxer, Steven G.; Kraft, Mary L.; Weber, Peter K.

    2008-12-16

    Imaging mass spectrometry combines the power of mass spectrometry to identify complex molecules based on mass with sample imaging. Recent advances in secondary ion mass spectrometry have improved sensitivity and spatial resolution, so that these methods have the potential to bridge between high-resolution structures obtained by X-ray crystallography and cyro-electron microscopy and ultrastructure visualized by conventional light microscopy. Following background information on the method and instrumentation, we address the key issue of sample preparation. Because mass spectrometry is performed in high vacuum, it is essential to preserve the lateral organization of the sample while removing bulk water, and this hasmore » been a major barrier for applications to biological systems. Furthermore, recent applications of imaging mass spectrometry to cell biology, microbial communities, and biosynthetic pathways are summarized briefly, and studies of biological membrane organization are described in greater depth.« less

  13. Solid-phase microextraction for the analysis of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Theodoridis, G; Koster, E H; de Jong, G J

    2000-08-04

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) has been introduced for the extraction of organic compounds from environmental samples. This relatively new extraction technique has now also gained a lot of interest in a broad field of analysis including food, biological and pharmaceutical samples. SPME has a number of advantages such as simplicity, low cost, compatibility with analytical systems, automation and the solvent-free extraction. The last few years, SPME has been combined with liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis, besides the generally used coupling to gas chromatography, and has been applied to various biological samples such as, e.g., urine, plasma and hair. The objective of the present paper is a survey of the application of SPME for the analysis of biological samples. Papers about the analysis of biologically active compounds are categorised and reviewed. The impact of SPME on various analytical fields (toxicological, forensic, clinical, biochemical, pharmaceutical, and natural products) is illustrated. The main features of SPME and its modes are briefly described and important aspects about its application for the determination of pharmaceuticals, drugs of abuse and compounds of clinical and toxicological interest are discussed. SPME is compared with other sample pretreatment techniques. The potential of SPME and its main advantages are demonstrated. Special attention is paid to new trends in applications of SPME in bioanalysis.

  14. Amchitka Island, Alaska, Biological Monitoring Report 2011 Sampling Results

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-01

    The Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance (LTS&M) Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) Amchitka Island sites describes how LM plans to conduct its mission to protect human health and the environment at the three nuclear test sites located on Amchitka Island, Alaska. Amchitka Island, near the western end of the Aleutian Islands, is approximately 1,340 miles west-southwest of Anchorage, Alaska. Amchitka is part of the Aleutian Island Unit of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, which is administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). Since World War II, Amchitka has been used by multiple U.S. government agencies for various military and research activities. From 1943 to 1950, it was used as a forward air base for the U.S. Armed Forces. During the middle 1960s and early 1970s, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) used a portion of the island as a site for underground nuclear tests. During the late 1980s and early 1990s, the U.S. Navy constructed and operated a radar station on the island. Three underground nuclear tests were conducted on Amchitka Island. DOD, in conjunction with AEC, conducted the first nuclear test (named Long Shot) in 1965 to provide data that would improve the United States' capability of detecting underground nuclear explosions. The second nuclear test (Milrow) was a weapons-related test conducted by AEC in 1969 as a means to study the feasibility of detonating a much larger device. Cannikin, the third nuclear test on Amchitka, was a weapons-related test detonated on November 6, 1971. With the exception of small concentrations of tritium detected in surface water shortly after the Long Shot test, radioactive fission products from the tests remain in the subsurface at each test location As a continuation of the environmental monitoring that has taken place on Amchitka Island since before 1965, LM in the summer of 2011 collected biological and

  15. An Assay for Thiaminase I in Complex Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Hanes, Jeremiah W.; Kraft, Clifford E.; Begley, Tadhg P.

    2007-01-01

    An alternative method for measuring thiaminase I activity in complex samples is described. This assay is based on the selective consumption of the highly chromophoric 4-nitrothiophenolate by thiaminase I resulting in a large decrease in absorbance at 411 nm. This new assay is simple and sensitive and requires only readily available chemicals and a visible region spectrophotometer. In addition, the assay is optimized for high throughput analysis in 96-well format with complex biological samples. PMID:17603991

  16. Separation methods for taurine analysis in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Mou, Shifen; Ding, Xiaojing; Liu, Yongjian

    2002-12-05

    Taurine plays an important role in a variety of physiological functions, pharmacological actions and pathological conditions. Many methods for taurine analysis, therefore, have been reported to monitor its levels in biological samples. This review discusses the following techniques: sample preparation; separation and determination methods including high-performance liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, ion chromatography, capillary electrophoresis and hyphenation procedures. It covers articles published between 1990 and 2001.

  17. TYPE II-P SUPERNOVAE AS STANDARD CANDLES: THE SDSS-II SAMPLE REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Poznanski, Dovi; Nugent, Peter E.; Filippenko, Alexei V.

    2010-10-01

    We revisit the observed correlation between the H{beta} and Fe II velocities for Type II-P supernovae (SNe II-P) using 28 optical spectra of 13 SNe II-P and demonstrate that it is well modeled by a linear relation with a dispersion of about 300 km s{sup -1}. Using this correlation, we re-analyze the publicly available sample of SNe II-P compiled by D'Andrea et al. and find a Hubble diagram with an intrinsic scatter of 11% in distance, which is nearly as tight as that measured before their sample is added to the existing set. The larger scatter reported in their work is found to be systematic, and most of it can be alleviated by measuring the H{beta} rather than Fe II velocities, due to the low signal-to-noise ratios and early epochs at which many of the optical spectra were obtained. Their sample, while supporting the mounting evidence that SNe II-P are good cosmic rulers, is biased toward intrinsically brighter objects and is not a suitable set to improve upon SN II-P correlation parameters. This will await a dedicated survey.

  18. Home Economics. Sample Test Items. Levels I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Elementary and Secondary Educational Testing.

    A sample of behavioral objectives and related test items that could be developed for content modules in Home Economics levels I and II, this book is intended to enable teachers to construct more valid and reliable test materials. Forty-eight one-page modules are presented, and opposite each module are listed two to seven specific behavioral…

  19. Enhanced Sampling Techniques in Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Rafael C.; Melo, Marcelo C. R.; Schulten, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular Dynamics has emerged as an important research methodology covering systems to the level of millions of atoms. However, insufficient sampling often limits its application. The limitation is due to rough energy landscapes, with many local minima separated by high-energy barriers, which govern the biomolecular motion. Scope of review In the past few decades methods have been developed that address the sampling problem, such as replica-exchange molecular dynamics, metadynamics and simulated annealing. Here we present an overview over theses sampling methods in an attempt to shed light on which should be selected depending on the type of system property studied. Major Conclusions Enhanced sampling methods have been employed for a broad range of biological systems and the choice of a suitable method is connected to biological and physical characteristics of the system, in particular system size. While metadynamics and replica-exchange molecular dynamics are the most adopted sampling methods to study biomolecular dynamics, simulated annealing is well suited to characterize very flexible systems. The use of annealing methods for a long time was restricted to simulation of small proteins; however, a variant of the method, generalized simulated annealing, can be employed at a relatively low computational cost to large macromolecular complexes. General Significance Molecular dynamics trajectories frequently do not reach all relevant conformational substates, for example those connected with biological function, a problem that can be addressed by employing enhanced sampling algorithms. PMID:25450171

  20. Enhanced sampling techniques in molecular dynamics simulations of biological systems.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Rafael C; Melo, Marcelo C R; Schulten, Klaus

    2015-05-01

    Molecular dynamics has emerged as an important research methodology covering systems to the level of millions of atoms. However, insufficient sampling often limits its application. The limitation is due to rough energy landscapes, with many local minima separated by high-energy barriers, which govern the biomolecular motion. In the past few decades methods have been developed that address the sampling problem, such as replica-exchange molecular dynamics, metadynamics and simulated annealing. Here we present an overview over theses sampling methods in an attempt to shed light on which should be selected depending on the type of system property studied. Enhanced sampling methods have been employed for a broad range of biological systems and the choice of a suitable method is connected to biological and physical characteristics of the system, in particular system size. While metadynamics and replica-exchange molecular dynamics are the most adopted sampling methods to study biomolecular dynamics, simulated annealing is well suited to characterize very flexible systems. The use of annealing methods for a long time was restricted to simulation of small proteins; however, a variant of the method, generalized simulated annealing, can be employed at a relatively low computational cost to large macromolecular complexes. Molecular dynamics trajectories frequently do not reach all relevant conformational substates, for example those connected with biological function, a problem that can be addressed by employing enhanced sampling algorithms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Recent developments of molecular dynamics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Hadfield prepares to insert biological samples in the MELFI-1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-07

    View of Canadian Space Agency (CSA) Chris Hadfield,Expedition 34 Flight Engineer (FE),preparing to insert biological samples in the Minus Eighty Laboratory Freezer for International Space Station (ISS) - (MELFI-1),in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Pressurized Module (JPM). Photo was taken during Expedition 34.

  2. Stability of glufosfamide in phosphate buffers and in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuming; Chen, Xiaoyan; Xu, Haiyan; Guan, Zhongmin; Zhong, Dafang

    2006-03-07

    Glufosfamide is a new, potential chemotherapeutic agent currently under investigation. Stability of glufosfamide was investigated in sodium phosphate buffers with different pH and temperature and in biological samples. Glufosfamide and isophosphamide mustard were quantified simultaneously using a liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometric method; precision and accuracy were within 15% for each analyte. Glufosfamide was stable in neutral buffers, but decomposed to form isophosphoramide mustard under acidic and basic conditions, which was pH- and temperature-dependent. The stability of glufosfamide varied in different biological samples. Results indicated that glufosfamide was unstable in some biological samples, such as the small intestine, smooth muscles, pancreas and urine, especially in the small intestine homogenate, with a half-life of 1.1 h. But the pH (<8) and beta-glucosidase of the tissue homogenate was found to have negligible contribution to the degradation of glufosfamide. The enzymatic inhibition experiment with the specific inhibitor, saccharo-1,4-lactone, demonstrated that it was glucuronidase that resulted in the degradation of glufosfamide in small intestine homogenate. Methanol was recommended to be used to homogenize the tissue in an ice water bath, and the container for urine collection should also be maintained in an ice water bath, and all the biological samples collected should be preserved in frozen condition until analysis.

  3. Kuipers prepares to insert biological samples in the MELFI

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-09

    ISS030-E-116886 (9 Feb. 2012) --- European Space Agency astronaut Andre Kuipers, Expedition 30 flight engineer, prepares to insert biological samples in the Minus Eighty Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI-1) in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station.

  4. Hadfield prepares to insert biological samples in the MELFI-1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-07

    ISS034-E-023771 (7 Jan. 2013) --- Canadian Space Agency astronaut Chris Hadfield, Expedition 34 flight engineer, prepares to insert biological samples in the Minus Eighty Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI-1) in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station.

  5. Hadfield prepares to insert biological samples in the MELFI-1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-07

    ISS034-E-023768 (7 Jan. 2013) --- Canadian Space Agency astronaut Chris Hadfield, Expedition 34 flight engineer, prepares to insert biological samples in the Minus Eighty Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI-1) in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station.

  6. Hadfield prepares to insert biological samples in the MELFI-1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-07

    ISS034-E-023786 (7 Jan. 2013) --- Canadian Space Agency astronaut Chris Hadfield, Expedition 34 flight engineer, prepares to insert biological samples in the Minus Eighty Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI-1) in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station. Russian cosmonaut Roman Romanenko, flight engineer, is visible near Hadfield.

  7. Kuipers prepares to insert biological samples in the MELFI

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-09

    ISS030-E-116879 (9 Feb. 2012) --- European Space Agency astronaut Andre Kuipers, Expedition 30 flight engineer, prepares to insert biological samples in the Minus Eighty Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI-1) in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station.

  8. Kuipers prepares to insert biological samples in the MELFI

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-09

    ISS030-E-116878 (9 Feb. 2012) --- European Space Agency astronaut Andre Kuipers, Expedition 30 flight engineer, prepares to insert biological samples in the Minus Eighty Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI-1) in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station.

  9. [Progress in determination of histamine levels in biological samples].

    PubMed

    Wu, Juan-li; Wang, Zhao-pin; Bao, Ai-min

    2012-11-01

    Neuronal histamine is crucially involved in a number of physiological functions as well as in neuropsychiatric diseases. Determination of histamine in biological samples is thus of importance in the clinical studies. The aim of this review is to summarize the progress or effort made in this field, with focus on the high-performance liquid chromatography.

  10. Fast x-ray fluorescence microtomography of hydrated biological samples.

    PubMed

    Lombi, Enzo; de Jonge, Martin D; Donner, Erica; Kopittke, Peter M; Howard, Daryl L; Kirkham, Robin; Ryan, Chris G; Paterson, David

    2011-01-01

    Metals and metalloids play a key role in plant and other biological systems as some of them are essential to living organisms and all can be toxic at high concentrations. It is therefore important to understand how they are accumulated, complexed and transported within plants. In situ imaging of metal distribution at physiological relevant concentrations in highly hydrated biological systems is technically challenging. In the case of roots, this is mainly due to the possibility of artifacts arising during sample preparation such as cross sectioning. Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microtomography has been used to obtain virtual cross sections of elemental distributions. However, traditionally this technique requires long data acquisition times. This has prohibited its application to highly hydrated biological samples which suffer both radiation damage and dehydration during extended analysis. However, recent advances in fast detectors coupled with powerful data acquisition approaches and suitable sample preparation methods can circumvent this problem. We demonstrate the heightened potential of this technique by imaging the distribution of nickel and zinc in hydrated plant roots. Although 3D tomography was still impeded by radiation damage, we successfully collected 2D tomograms of hydrated plant roots exposed to environmentally relevant metal concentrations for short periods of time. To our knowledge, this is the first published example of the possibilities offered by a new generation of fast fluorescence detectors to investigate metal and metalloid distribution in radiation-sensitive, biological samples.

  11. Fast X-Ray Fluorescence Microtomography of Hydrated Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Lombi, Enzo; de Jonge, Martin D.; Donner, Erica; Kopittke, Peter M.; Howard, Daryl L.; Kirkham, Robin; Ryan, Chris G.; Paterson, David

    2011-01-01

    Metals and metalloids play a key role in plant and other biological systems as some of them are essential to living organisms and all can be toxic at high concentrations. It is therefore important to understand how they are accumulated, complexed and transported within plants. In situ imaging of metal distribution at physiological relevant concentrations in highly hydrated biological systems is technically challenging. In the case of roots, this is mainly due to the possibility of artifacts arising during sample preparation such as cross sectioning. Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microtomography has been used to obtain virtual cross sections of elemental distributions. However, traditionally this technique requires long data acquisition times. This has prohibited its application to highly hydrated biological samples which suffer both radiation damage and dehydration during extended analysis. However, recent advances in fast detectors coupled with powerful data acquisition approaches and suitable sample preparation methods can circumvent this problem. We demonstrate the heightened potential of this technique by imaging the distribution of nickel and zinc in hydrated plant roots. Although 3D tomography was still impeded by radiation damage, we successfully collected 2D tomograms of hydrated plant roots exposed to environmentally relevant metal concentrations for short periods of time. To our knowledge, this is the first published example of the possibilities offered by a new generation of fast fluorescence detectors to investigate metal and metalloid distribution in radiation-sensitive, biological samples. PMID:21674049

  12. 9 CFR 113.3 - Sampling of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sampling of biological products. 113.3 Section 113.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... market by a Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service representative. (a) Either an employee of the...

  13. 9 CFR 113.3 - Sampling of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Sampling of biological products. 113.3 Section 113.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... market by a Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service representative. (a) Either an employee of the...

  14. Efficient Sample Preparation from Complex Biological Samples Using a Sliding Lid for Immobilized Droplet Extractions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Sample preparation is a major bottleneck in many biological processes. Paramagnetic particles (PMPs) are a ubiquitous method for isolating analytes of interest from biological samples and are used for their ability to thoroughly sample a solution and be easily collected with a magnet. There are three main methods by which PMPs are used for sample preparation: (1) removal of fluid from the analyte-bound PMPs, (2) removal of analyte-bound PMPs from the solution, and (3) removal of the substrate (with immobilized analyte-bound PMPs). In this paper, we explore the third and least studied method for PMP-based sample preparation using a platform termed Sliding Lid for Immobilized Droplet Extractions (SLIDE). SLIDE leverages principles of surface tension and patterned hydrophobicity to create a simple-to-operate platform for sample isolation (cells, DNA, RNA, protein) and preparation (cell staining) without the need for time-intensive wash steps, use of immiscible fluids, or precise pinning geometries. Compared to other standard isolation protocols using PMPs, SLIDE is able to perform rapid sample preparation with low (0.6%) carryover of contaminants from the original sample. The natural recirculation occurring within the pinned droplets of SLIDE make possible the performance of multistep cell staining protocols within the SLIDE by simply resting the lid over the various sample droplets. SLIDE demonstrates a simple easy to use platform for sample preparation on a range of complex biological samples. PMID:24927449

  15. Efficient sample preparation from complex biological samples using a sliding lid for immobilized droplet extractions.

    PubMed

    Casavant, Benjamin P; Guckenberger, David J; Beebe, David J; Berry, Scott M

    2014-07-01

    Sample preparation is a major bottleneck in many biological processes. Paramagnetic particles (PMPs) are a ubiquitous method for isolating analytes of interest from biological samples and are used for their ability to thoroughly sample a solution and be easily collected with a magnet. There are three main methods by which PMPs are used for sample preparation: (1) removal of fluid from the analyte-bound PMPs, (2) removal of analyte-bound PMPs from the solution, and (3) removal of the substrate (with immobilized analyte-bound PMPs). In this paper, we explore the third and least studied method for PMP-based sample preparation using a platform termed Sliding Lid for Immobilized Droplet Extractions (SLIDE). SLIDE leverages principles of surface tension and patterned hydrophobicity to create a simple-to-operate platform for sample isolation (cells, DNA, RNA, protein) and preparation (cell staining) without the need for time-intensive wash steps, use of immiscible fluids, or precise pinning geometries. Compared to other standard isolation protocols using PMPs, SLIDE is able to perform rapid sample preparation with low (0.6%) carryover of contaminants from the original sample. The natural recirculation occurring within the pinned droplets of SLIDE make possible the performance of multistep cell staining protocols within the SLIDE by simply resting the lid over the various sample droplets. SLIDE demonstrates a simple easy to use platform for sample preparation on a range of complex biological samples.

  16. Analysis of water in Autonomous Biological Systems (ABS) samples.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Y; Kobayashi, K; Seki, K; Mizutani, H; Kawasaki, Y; Koike, J; Ijiri, K; Yamashita, M; Sugiura, K; Poynter, J; MacCallum, T; Anderson, G

    1998-12-01

    Several soluble components, peptidase and amino acids, and carbon isotopic ratio in the water retrieved from flight experiments of Autonomous Biological Systems (ABS) as well as ground control samples are analyzed to interpret the condition, dynamics, material balance of the ABS ecosystems. Organic carbons in flight samples were found to be more abundant compared with the control ones, which suggested the uniform ecosystems in low gravity might easily dissolve more soluble components. The Mir-1997 flight sample showed higher C/N ratio probably because of the dissolution of carbon-rich plant materials.

  17. A large-scale cryoelectronic system for biological sample banking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirley, Stephen G.; Durst, Christopher H. P.; Fuchs, Christian C.; Zimmermann, Heiko; Ihmig, Frank R.

    2009-11-01

    We describe a polymorphic electronic infrastructure for managing biological samples stored over liquid nitrogen. As part of this system we have developed new cryocontainers and carrier plates attached to Flash memory chips to have a redundant and portable set of data at each sample. Our experimental investigations show that basic Flash operation and endurance is adequate for the application down to liquid nitrogen temperatures. This identification technology can provide the best sample identification, documentation and tracking that brings added value to each sample. The first application of the system is in a worldwide collaborative research towards the production of an AIDS vaccine. The functionality and versatility of the system can lead to an essential optimization of sample and data exchange for global clinical studies.

  18. Capillary electrophoresis screening of poisonous anions extracted from biological samples.

    PubMed

    Gillette, Robert; Doyle, Janet M; Miller, Mark L; Montgomery, Madeline A; Mushrush, George W

    2006-02-02

    A method was developed for screening human biological samples for poisonous anions using capillary electrophoresis (CE) employing indirect UV detection. The run buffer consisted of 2.25 mM pyromellitic acid, 1.6 mM triethanolamine, 0.75 mM hexamethonium hydroxide and 6.5mM NaOH at pH 7.7. Biological samples were pretreated using solid phase extraction. The method was applied to the analysis of human blood, plasma, urine, and intestinal contents. Twenty-nine different anions were detectable at aqueous concentrations of 1 part per million (ppm) with a typical analysis time less than 20 min. Intraday migration time R.S.D. and peak area R.S.D. for blood samples were less than 1.1% and 6.3%, respectively. Interday migration time R.S.D. for plasma samples ranged from 7.5% to 10.4%. The new method produced efficient separations of various target anions extracted from complex biological matrices.

  19. Interim Draft: Biological Sampling and Analysis Plan Outline ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Standard Operation Procedures This interim sampling and analysis plan (SAP) outline was developed specifically as an outline of the output that will be generated by a developing on-line tool called the MicroSAP. The goal of the MicroSAP tool is to assist users with development of SAPs needed for site characterization, verification sampling, and post decontamination sampling stages of biological sampling and analysis activities in which the EPA would be responsible for conducting sampling. These activities could include sampling and analysis for a biological contamination incident, a research study, or an exercise. The development of this SAP outline did not consider the initial response of an incident, as it is assumed that the initial response would have been previously completed by another agency during the response, or the clearance phase, as it is assumed that separate committee would be established to make decisions regarding clearing a site. This outline also includes considerations for capturing the associated data quality objectives in the SAP.

  20. Using electron microscopy to calculate optical properties of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenli; Radosevich, Andrew J; Eshein, Adam; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Yi, Ji; Cherkezyan, Lusik; Roy, Hemant K; Szleifer, Igal; Backman, Vadim

    2016-11-01

    The microscopic structural origins of optical properties in biological media are still not fully understood. Better understanding these origins can serve to improve the utility of existing techniques and facilitate the discovery of other novel techniques. We propose a novel analysis technique using electron microscopy (EM) to calculate optical properties of specific biological structures. This method is demonstrated with images of human epithelial colon cell nuclei. The spectrum of anisotropy factor g, the phase function and the shape factor D of the nuclei are calculated. The results show strong agreement with an independent study. This method provides a new way to extract the true phase function of biological samples and provides an independent validation for optical property measurement techniques.

  1. Using electron microscopy to calculate optical properties of biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wenli; Radosevich, Andrew J.; Eshein, Adam; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Yi, Ji; Cherkezyan, Lusik; Roy, Hemant K.; Szleifer, Igal; Backman, Vadim

    2016-01-01

    The microscopic structural origins of optical properties in biological media are still not fully understood. Better understanding these origins can serve to improve the utility of existing techniques and facilitate the discovery of other novel techniques. We propose a novel analysis technique using electron microscopy (EM) to calculate optical properties of specific biological structures. This method is demonstrated with images of human epithelial colon cell nuclei. The spectrum of anisotropy factor g, the phase function and the shape factor D of the nuclei are calculated. The results show strong agreement with an independent study. This method provides a new way to extract the true phase function of biological samples and provides an independent validation for optical property measurement techniques. PMID:27896013

  2. Cryogenic X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy for Biological Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, Enju; Wiegart, Lutz; Pernot, Petra; Howells, Malcolm; Timmins, Joanna; Zontone, Federico; Madsen, Anders

    2009-11-06

    X-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) is well suited for nondestructive, high-resolution biological imaging, especially for thick samples, with the high penetration power of x rays and without limitations imposed by a lens. We developed nonvacuum, cryogenic (cryo-) XDM with hard x rays at 8 keV and report the first frozen-hydrated imaging by XDM. By preserving samples in amorphous ice, the risk of artifacts associated with dehydration or chemical fixation is avoided, ensuring the imaging condition closest to their natural state. The reconstruction shows internal structures of intact D. radiodurans bacteria in their natural contrast.

  3. Analytical methodologies for the determination of benzodiazepines in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Persona, Karolina; Madej, Katarzyna; Knihnicki, Paweł; Piekoszewski, Wojciech

    2015-09-10

    Benzodiazepine drugs belong to important and most widely used medicaments. They demonstrate such therapeutic properties as anxiolytic, sedative, somnifacient, anticonvulsant, diastolic and muscle relaxant effects. However, despite the fact that benzodiazepines possess high therapeutic index and are considered to be relatively safe, their use can be dangerous when: (1) co-administered with alcohol, (2) co-administered with other medicaments like sedatives, antidepressants, neuroleptics or morphine like substances, (3) driving under their influence, (4) using benzodiazepines non-therapeutically as drugs of abuse or in drug-facilitated crimes. For these reasons benzodiazepines are still studied and determined in a variety of biological materials. In this article, sample preparation techniques which have been applied in analysis of benzodiazepine drugs in biological samples have been reviewed and presented. The next part of the article is focused on a review of analytical methods which have been employed for pharmacological, toxicological or forensic study of this group of drugs in the biological matrices. The review was preceded by a description of the physicochemical properties of the selected benzodiazepines and two, very often coexisting in the same analyzed samples, sedative-hypnotic drugs. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Surface plasmon resonance biosensing toward real biological sample analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunche, Audrey; Bolduc, Olivier R.; Masson, Jean-Francois

    2009-05-01

    The development of monolayer chemistry based on amino acid and short peptides decreases significantly the nonspecific adsorption from biological samples such as serum. Nonspecific adsorption of proteins onto the surface of biosensors currently limits the applicability of many biosensing techniques in real biological samples. In order to minimize this problem, a methodology to immobilize short peptides on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors was developed using a short chain alkyl thiol monolayer derived with the selected peptides. The chain length of the alkane thiol linking the amino acid to the gold surface influences the physico-chemical properties of the layer and the amount of nonspecifically adsorbed proteins. Varying the composition of the monolayer with peptides formed from the natural amino acids investigates the physico-chemical properties required to minimize nonspecific adsorption of serum. It was observed from monolayers of single amino acids that the composition of the side chain of the amino acid greatly influences the resistance to nonspecific adsorption, with more polar, ionic and small chains resulting in an improved performance in biological samples. Building peptides of different lengths resulted in a further decrease of the amount of nonspecifically bound proteins from serum. Leaving the terminal carboxylic acid end of the peptide unreacted provides an anchoring point for a molecular receptor in the design of a biosensor. Biosensing will be demonstrated with a model system of β-lactamase.

  5. Injection molded microfluidic devices for biological sample separation and detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Alfredo M.; Simmons, Blake A.; Wallow, Thomas I.; Campbell, K. Jeffery; Mani, Seethambal S.; Mittal, Brita; Crocker, Robert W.; Cummings, Eric B.; Davalos, Rafael V.; Domeier, Linda A.; Hunter, Marion C.; Krafcik, Karen L.; McGraw, Gregory J.; Mosier, Bruce P.; Sickafoose, Shane M.

    2006-01-01

    We are developing a variety of microsystems for the separation and detection of biological samples. At the heart of these systems, inexpensive polymer microfluidic chips carry out sample preparation and analysis. Fabrication of polymer microfluidic chips involves the creation of a master in etched silicon or glass; plating of the master to produce a nickel stamp; large lot chip replication by injection molding; precision chip sealing; and chemical modification of channel surfaces. Separation chips rely on insulator-based dielectrophoresis for the separation of biological particles. Detection chips carry out capillary electrophoresis to detect fluorescent tags that identify specific biological samples. Since the performance and reliability of these microfluidic chips are very sensitive to fluidic impedance, electromagnetic flux, and zeta potential, the microchannel dimensions, shape, and surface chemistry have to be tightly controlled during chip fabrication and use. This paper will present an overview of chip design, fabrication, and testing. Dimensional metrology data, surface chemistry characterization, and chip performance data will be discussed in detail.

  6. Chiral speciation of selenoamino acids in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Chen, Beibei; He, Man; Zhong, Cheng; Hu, Bin

    2014-10-10

    In this paper, the "state of the art" of chiral speciation of selenoamino acids (SeAAs) in biological samples is critically reviewed. The significance and the features of such studies are highlighted. A special focus lies on chiral speciation of SeAAs by hyphenation techniques in which a chiral separation method (such as gas chromatography (GC), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and capillary electrophoresis (CE)) is on-line coupled with an elemental specific detector, especially inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The advances in the development and application of hyphenation techniques in chiral speciation of SeAAs in biological samples are summarized and a perspective for future developments including sophisticated and innovative applications is discussed. Overall, HPLC-ICP-MS is more applicable than GC/CE-ICP-MS for chiral speciation of SeAAs. In the future, more novel chiral HPLC methods with high enantio-resolution, low cost and robustness, and their more applications in real biological samples analysis are expected.

  7. Hadamard transform CE-UV detection for biological samples.

    PubMed

    McReynolds, Jennifer A; Gao, Leyi; Barber-Singh, Jennifer; Shippy, Scott A

    2005-02-01

    A Hadamard transform-capillary electrophoresis-UV (HT-CE-UV) detection technique is described for the analysis of biological samples. Pseudorandom injections of sample and buffer according to a simplex matrix obtained from the corresponding Hadamard matrix is performed with conventional capillaries. Alternating injections are achieved with a novel capillary "T" connector created by drilling conventional capillary dimensions through a 1-cm diameter polycarbonate disc. This connector design coupled with a switching system allows for rapid, electrokinetic injections of solution into alternating sample and buffer capillary arms for UV detection. The standard mixtures of nitric oxide (NO) metabolites, nitrite and nitrate, dissolved in physiological saline solution are injected into the separation capillary according to an 83-element injection sequence to obtain a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) enhancement of ca. 4.5 over a single injection. Nitrite, being the less concentrated metabolite in NO detection and thereby more difficult to detect, was calibrated with the HT-CE-UV method and a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.56 microM was obtained. Rat blood plasma was analyzed with this detection system and demonstrated to be comparable with NO metabolite concentrations of previously published results. This HT-CE-UV method is described where a unique reservoir tube design that contains 8-microL standard nitrite sample volumes is placed over the end of the capillary arm to explore low volume limits for biological samples.

  8. Simultaneous separation and preconcentration of Cr(III), Cu(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) from environmental samples prior to inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometric determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Li, Zhenhua; Du, Xianghui; Li, Ruijun; Chang, Xijun

    2012-02-01

    We have developed a new method of the separation, preconcentration, and determination of Cr(III), Cu(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) ion in water samples. It is based on the use of activated carbon that was modified with rhodamine 6G to yield a solid-phase sorbent. The experimental conditions for adsorption were optimized. Cr(III), Cu(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) can be quantitatively adsorbed at pH 4, and adsorbed Cr(III), Cu(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) can be completely eluted with 1 M hydrochloric acid. The maximum adsorption capacity is 37.8, 47.8, 56.5 and 41.7 mg g -1 for Cr(III), Cu(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II). Cr(III), Cu(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions were then determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The detection limit (3 σ) is under 0.35 ng mL -1, and the relative standard deviation is lower than 3.5% ( n = 11). Common potentially interfering ions do not interfere with the adsorption and determination of the analytes. The method displays selectivity, sensitivity and reproducibility, and was successfully applied to the determination of biological and water samples.

  9. Determination of pyridostigmine bromide and its metabolites in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bin; Moochhala, Shabbir M; Lu, Jia; Tan, Donna; Lai, Mui Hoon

    2006-01-01

    Pyridostigmine bromide (PB) is a quartenary ammonium compound that inhibits the hydrolysis of acetylcholine by competitive reversible binding to acetylcholinesterase. PB is used for the symptomatic treatment of myasthenia gravis and has been applied as a prophylaxis against nerve agents. Many studies on PB have involved the reliance on techniques that extract and quantify PB in biological samples. This article presents an overview of the currently applied methodologies for the determination of PB and its metabolites in various biological samples. Articles published from January 1975 to the July 2005 were taken into consideration for the discussion of the metabolism and analytical method of PB. HPLC and GC methods have been used and discussed in most of the references cited in this review. Other methods such as RIA and CE that have been recently reported are also mentioned in this article. Basic information about the type of sample used for analysis, sample preparation, chromatographic column, mobile phase, detection mode and validation data are summarized in a table.

  10. Analysis of flavonoids in foods and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Paramas, A M; Santos-Buelga, C; Duenas, M; Gonzalez-Manzano, S

    2011-12-01

    Flavonoids are a major class of plant phenolics that are widely distributed in the human diet and have been related to health promotion. They may occur in their natural sources in free forms (aglycones), as glycosylated or acylated derivatives, or as oligomeric and polymerized structures. This structural diversity affects their physicochemical behaviour and complicates their analysis. Thus, there is not a single standardized procedure that can be recommended for all flavonoid groups and/or type of samples, and the procedures have to be optimized depending on the nature of the sample and the target analytes. Furthermore, when dealing with the analysis of flavonoids biological samples (i.e., human and animal fluids and tissues) some differential aspects have to be taken into account; the nature of the compounds that can be found in those samples may differ from that present in plants and food, and flavonoids and metabolites occur in much lower concentrations, which make their analysis still more challenging. In this review the main techniques for extraction and analysis of flavonoids in foodstuffs and biological fluids are revised, as well as their occurrence in foods and beverages and available databases.

  11. Specific fluorogenic probes for ozone in biological and atmospheric samples

    PubMed Central

    Garner, Amanda L.; St Croix, Claudette M.; Pitt, Bruce R.; Leikauf, George D.; Ando, Shin; Koide, Kazunori

    2010-01-01

    Ozone exposure is a growing global health problem, especially in urban areas. While ozone in the stratosphere protects the earth from harmful ultraviolet light, tropospheric or ground-level ozone is toxic and can damage the respiratory tract. It has recently been shown that ozone may be produced endogenously in inflammation and antibacterial responses of the immune system; however, these results have sparked controversy owing to the use of a non-specific colorimetric probe. Here we report the synthesis of fluorescent molecular probes able to unambiguously detect ozone in both biological and atmospheric samples. Unlike other ozone-detection methods, in which interference from different reactive oxygen species is often a problem, these probes are ozone specific. Such probes will prove useful for the study of ozone in environmental science and biology, and so possibly provide some insight into the role of ozone in cells. PMID:20634904

  12. Trainable fusion rules. II. Small sample-size effects.

    PubMed

    Raudys, Sarunas

    2006-12-01

    Profound theoretical analysis is performed of small-sample properties of trainable fusion rules to determine in which situations neural network ensembles can improve or degrade classification results. We consider small sample effects, specific only to multiple classifiers system design in the two-category case of two important fusion rules: (1) linear weighted average (weighted voting), realized either by the standard Fisher classifier or by the single-layer perceptron, and (2) the non-linear Behavior-Knowledge-Space method. The small sample effects include: (i) training bias, i.e. learning sample size influence on generalization error of the base experts or of the fusion rule, (ii) optimistic biased outputs of the experts (self-boasting effect) and (iii) sample size impact on determining optimal complexity of the fusion rule. Correction terms developed to reduce the self-boasting effect are studied. It is shown that small learning sets increase classification error of the expert classifiers and damage correlation structure between their outputs. If the sizes of learning sets used to develop the expert classifiers are too small, non-trainable fusion rules can outperform more sophisticated trainable ones. A practical technique to fight sample size problems is a noise injection technique. The noise injection reduces the fusion rule's complexity and diminishes the expert's boasting bias.

  13. Femtosecond digital lensless holographic microscopy to image biological samples.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Yero, Omel; Calabuig, Alejandro; Tajahuerce, Enrique; Lancis, Jesús; Andrés, Pedro; Garcia-Sucerquia, Jorge

    2013-09-01

    The use of femtosecond laser radiation in digital lensless holographic microscopy (DLHM) to image biological samples is presented. A mode-locked Ti:Sa laser that emits ultrashort pulses of 12 fs intensity FWHM, with 800 nm mean wavelength, at 75 MHz repetition rate is used as a light source. For comparison purposes, the light from a light-emitting diode is also used. A section of the head of a drosophila melanogaster fly is studied with both light sources. The experimental results show very different effects of the pinhole size on the spatial resolution with DLHM. Unaware phenomena on the field of the DLHM are analyzed.

  14. A low temperature scanning force microscope for biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafsson, Mats Gustaf Lennart

    1993-05-01

    An SFM has been constructed capable of operating at 143 K. Two contributions to SFM technology are described: a new method of fabricating tips, and new designs of SFM springs that significantly lower the noise level. The SFM has been used to image several biological samples (including collagen, ferritin, RNA, purple membrane) at 143 K and room temperature. No improvement in resolution resulted from 143 K operation; several possible reasons for this are discussed. Possibly sharper tips may help. The 143 K SFM will allow the study of new categories of samples, such as those prepared by freeze-frame, single molecules (temperature dependence of mechanical properties), etc. The SFM was used to cut single collagen molecules into segments with a precision of {le} 10 nm.

  15. Microsystem strategies for sample preparation in biological detection.

    SciTech Connect

    James, Conrad D.; Galambos, Paul C.; Bennett, Dawn Jonita; Manginell, Monica; Okandan, Murat; Acrivos, Andreas; Brozik, Susan Marie; Khusid, Boris

    2005-03-01

    The objective of this LDRD was to develop microdevice strategies for dealing with samples to be examined in biological detection systems. This includes three sub-components: namely, microdevice fabrication, sample delivery to the microdevice, and sample processing within the microdevice. The first component of this work focused on utilizing Sandia's surface micromachining technology to fabricate small volume (nanoliter) fluidic systems for processing small quantities of biological samples. The next component was to develop interfaces for the surface-micromachined silicon devices. We partnered with Micronics, a commercial company, to produce fluidic manifolds for sample delivery to our silicon devices. Pressure testing was completed to examine the strength of the bond between the pressure-sensitive adhesive layer and the silicon chip. We are also pursuing several other methods, both in house and external, to develop polymer-based fluidic manifolds for packaging silicon-based microfluidic devices. The second component, sample processing, is divided into two sub-tasks: cell collection and cell lysis. Cell collection was achieved using dielectrophoresis, which employs AC fields to collect cells at energized microelectrodes, while rejecting non-cellular particles. Both live and dead Staph. aureus bacteria have been collected using RF frequency dielectrophoresis. Bacteria have been separated from polystyrene microspheres using frequency-shifting dielectrophoresis. Computational modeling was performed to optimize device separation performance, and to predict particle response to the dielectrophoretic traps. Cell lysis is continuing to be pursued using microactuators to mechanically disrupt cell membranes. Novel thermal actuators, which can generate larger forces than previously tested electrostatic actuators, have been incorporated with and tested with cell lysis devices. Significant cell membrane distortion has been observed, but more experiments need to be conducted to

  16. DUS II SOIL GAS SAMPLING AND AIR INJECTION TEST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Noonkester, J.; Jackson, D.; Jones, W.; Hyde, W.; Kohn, J.; Walker, R.

    2012-09-20

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air injection well testing was performed at the Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) site located near the M-Area Settling Basin (referred to as DUS II in this report). The objective of this testing was to determine the effectiveness of continued operation of these systems. Steam injection ended on September 19, 2009 and since this time the extraction operations have utilized residual heat that is present in the subsurface. The well testing campaign began on June 5, 2012 and was completed on June 25, 2012. Thirty-two (32) SVE wells were purged for 24 hours or longer using the active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) system at the DUS II site. During each test five or more soil gas samples were collected from each well and analyzed for target volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The DUS II site is divided into four parcels (see Figure 1) and soil gas sample results show the majority of residual VOC contamination remains in Parcel 1 with lesser amounts in the other three parcels. Several VOCs, including tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), were detected. PCE was the major VOC with lesser amounts of TCE. Most soil gas concentrations of PCE ranged from 0 to 60 ppmv with one well (VEW-22A) as high as 200 ppmv. Air sparging (AS) generally involves the injection of air into the aquifer through either vertical or horizontal wells. AS is coupled with SVE systems when contaminant recovery is necessary. While traditional air sparging (AS) is not a primary component of the DUS process, following the cessation of steam injection, eight (8) of the sixty-three (63) steam injection wells were used to inject air. These wells were previously used for hydrous pyrolysis oxidation (HPO) as part of the DUS process. Air sparging is different from the HPO operations in that the air was injected at a higher rate (20 to 50 scfm) versus HPO (1 to 2 scfm). . At the DUS II site the air injection wells were tested to determine if air sparging affected

  17. The use of contrast agent for imaging biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammer, J.; Weyda, F.; Sopko, V.; Jakubek, J.

    2011-01-01

    The technique of X-ray transmission imaging has been available for over a century and is still among the fastest and easiest approaches to the studies of internal structure of biological samples. Recent advances in semiconductor technology have led to the development of new types of X-ray detectors with direct conversion of interacting X-ray photon to an electric signal. Semiconductor pixel detectors seem to be specially promising; compared to the film technique, they provide single-quantum and real-time digital information about the objects being studied. We describe the recently developed radiographic apparatus, equipped with Medipix2 semiconductor pixel detector. The detector is used as an imager that counts individual photons of ionizing radiation, emitted by an X-ray tube (micro- or nano-focus FeinFocus). Thanks to the wide dynamic range of the Medipix2 detector and its high spatial resolution better than 1μm, the setup is particularly suitable for radiographic imaging of small biological samples, including in-vivo observations with contrast agent (Optiray). Along with the description of the apparatus we provide examples of the use iodine contrast agent as a tracer in various insects as model organisms. The motivation of our work is to develop our imaging techniques as non-destructive and non-invasive. Microradiographic imaging helps detect organisms living in a not visible environment, visualize the internal biological processes and also to resolve the details of their body (morphology). Tiny live insects are an ideal object for our studies.

  18. Consistency of ARESE II Cloud Absorption Estimates and Sampling Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oreopoulos, L.; Marshak, A.; Cahalan, R. F.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Data from three cloudy days (March 3, 21, 29, 2000) of the ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment II (ARESE II) were analyzed. Grand averages of broadband absorptance among three sets of instruments were compared. Fractional solar absorptances were approx. 0.21-0.22 with the exception of March 3 when two sets of instruments gave values smaller by approx. 0.03-0.04. The robustness of these values was investigated by looking into possible sampling problems with the aid of 500 nm spectral fluxes. Grand averages of 500 nm apparent absorptance cover a wide range of values for these three days, namely from a large positive (approx. 0.011) average for March 3, to a small negative (approximately -0.03) for March 21, to near zero (approx. 0.01) for March 29. We present evidence suggesting that a large part of the discrepancies among the three days is due to the different nature of clouds and their non-uniform sampling. Hence, corrections to the grand average broadband absorptance values may be necessary. However, application of the known correction techniques may be precarious due to the sparsity of collocated flux measurements above and below the clouds. Our analysis leads to the conclusion that only March 29 fulfills all requirements for reliable estimates of cloud absorption, that is, the presence of thick, overcast, homogeneous clouds.

  19. Proteomic Challenges: Sample Preparation Techniques for Microgram-Quantity Protein Analysis from Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Feist, Peter; Hummon, Amanda B.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins regulate many cellular functions and analyzing the presence and abundance of proteins in biological samples are central focuses in proteomics. The discovery and validation of biomarkers, pathways, and drug targets for various diseases can be accomplished using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. However, with mass-limited samples like tumor biopsies, it can be challenging to obtain sufficient amounts of proteins to generate high-quality mass spectrometric data. Techniques developed for macroscale quantities recover sufficient amounts of protein from milligram quantities of starting material, but sample losses become crippling with these techniques when only microgram amounts of material are available. To combat this challenge, proteomicists have developed micro-scale techniques that are compatible with decreased sample size (100 μg or lower) and still enable excellent proteome coverage. Extraction, contaminant removal, protein quantitation, and sample handling techniques for the microgram protein range are reviewed here, with an emphasis on liquid chromatography and bottom-up mass spectrometry-compatible techniques. Also, a range of biological specimens, including mammalian tissues and model cell culture systems, are discussed. PMID:25664860

  20. Comparative analysis of toxin detection in biological and enviromental samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogert, Robert A.; Burans, James; O'Brien, Tom; Ligler, Frances S.

    1994-03-01

    The basic recognition schemes underlying the principles of standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and radioimmunoassay (RIA) protocols are increasingly being adapted for use with new detection devices. A direct comparison was made using a fiber optic biosensor that employs evanescent wave detection and an ELISA using avidin-biotin. The assays were developed for the detection of Ricinus communis agglutinin II, also known as ricin or RCA60. Detection limits between the two methods were comparable for ricin in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), however results in complex samples differed slightly. In PBS, sensitivity for ricin was 1 ng/ml using the fiber optic device and 500 pg/ml using the ELISA. The fiber optic sensor could not detect ricin directly in urine or serum spiked with 5 ng/ml ricin, however, the ELISA showed detection but at reduced levels to the PBS control.

  1. Application of Acoustic Techniques for Characterization of Biological Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tittmann, Bernhard R.; Ebert, Anne

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is emerging as a powerful tool in cell biology. Originally developed for high-resolution imaging purposes, the AFM also has unique capabilities as a nano-indenter to probe the dynamic viscoelastic material properties of living cells in culture. In particular, AFM elastography combines imaging and indentation modalities to map the spatial distribution of cell mechanical properties, which in turn reflect the structure and function of the underlying cytoskeleton. Such measurements have contributed to our understanding of cell mechanics and cell biology and appear to be sensitive to the presence of disease in individual cells. Examples of applications and considerations on the effective capability of ultrasonic AFM techniques on biological samples (both mammalian and plant) are reported in this chapter. Included in the discussion is scanning near-field ultrasound holography an acoustic technique which has been used to image structure and in particular nanoparticles inside cells. For illustration an example that is discussed in some detail is a technique for rapid in vitro single-cell elastography. The technique is based on atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM) but (1) requires only a few minutes of scan time, (2) can be used on live cells briefly removed from most of the nutrient fluid, (3) does negligible harm or damage to the cell, (4) provides semi-quantitative information on the distribution of modulus across the cell, and (5) yields data with 1-10 nm resolution. The technique is shown to enable rapid assessment of physical/biochemical signals on the cell modulus and contributes to current understanding of cell mechanics.

  2. Micro-radiography of biological samples with medical contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammer, J.; Weyda, F.; Benes, J.; Sopko, V.; Gelbic, I.

    2013-12-01

    Micro-radiography is an imaging technique that uses X-rays to study the internal structures of objects. This fast and easy imaging tool is based on differential X-ray attenuation by various tissues and structures within biological samples. The experimental setup described is based on the semiconductor pixel X-ray detector Medipix2 and X-ray micro-focus tube. Our micro-radiographic system has been recently used not only for the examination of internal structures of various arthropods and other biological objects but also for tracing some processes in selected model species (we used living larvae of mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus). Low concentrations of iodine, lanthanum or gold particles were used as a tracer (contrast agent). Such contrast agents increase the absorption of X-rays and allow a better visibility of internal structures of model organisms (especially the various cavities, pores, etc.). In addition, the movement of tracers in selected timing experiments demonstrates some physiological functions of digestive and excretory system.

  3. Proteomics: Challenges, Techniques and Possibilities to Overcome Biological Sample Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Chandramouli, Kondethimmanahalli; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Proteomics is the large-scale study of the structure and function of proteins in complex biological sample. Such an approach has the potential value to understand the complex nature of the organism. Current proteomic tools allow large-scale, high-throughput analyses for the detection, identification, and functional investigation of proteome. Advances in protein fractionation and labeling techniques have improved protein identification to include the least abundant proteins. In addition, proteomics has been complemented by the analysis of posttranslational modifications and techniques for the quantitative comparison of different proteomes. However, the major limitation of proteomic investigations remains the complexity of biological structures and physiological processes, rendering the path of exploration paved with various difficulties and pitfalls. The quantity of data that is acquired with new techniques places new challenges on data processing and analysis. This article provides a brief overview of currently available proteomic techniques and their applications, followed by detailed description of advantages and technical challenges. Some solutions to circumvent technical difficulties are proposed. PMID:20948568

  4. Negative dielectrophoresis spectroscopy for rare analyte quantification in biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirmani, Syed Abdul Mannan; Gudagunti, Fleming Dackson; Velmanickam, Logeeshan; Nawarathna, Dharmakeerthi; Lima, Ivan T., Jr.

    2017-03-01

    We propose the use of negative dielectrophoresis (DEP) spectroscopy as a technique to improve the detection limit of rare analytes in biological samples. We observe a significant dependence of the negative DEP force on functionalized polystyrene beads at the edges of interdigitated electrodes with respect to the frequency of the electric field. We measured this velocity of repulsion for 0% and 0.8% conjugation of avidin with biotin functionalized polystyrene beads with our automated software through real-time image processing that monitors the Rayleigh scattering from the beads. A significant difference in the velocity of the beads was observed in the presence of as little as 80 molecules of avidin per biotin functionalized bead. This technology can be applied in the detection and quantification of rare analytes that can be useful in the diagnosis and the treatment of diseases, such as cancer and myocardial infarction, with the use of polystyrene beads functionalized with antibodies for the target biomarkers.

  5. New sensitive assay for cadmium in biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Peterson, D.P.; Sacco-Gibson, N.

    1992-01-01

    OSHA is giving serious consideration to substantially lowering permissible exposure limits (PELs) for air cadmium concentrations in the workplace. Consequently, the issue has been raised that improved methods may be needed to effectively monitor worker populations for cadmium exposure if one of the proposed PELs of 1 or 5 {mu}g/m{sup 3} (down from the current 100 {mu}/gm{sup 3}) is adopted. In this brief report, an assay method is described for accurately and precisely determining cadmium concentrations in blood, urine, or other biological samples that has a detection limit of 0.02 {mu}g/L, considerably lower than methods currently in use. It is straight-forward to carry out and uses commercially available chemicals.

  6. New sensitive assay for cadmium in biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Peterson, D.P.; Sacco-Gibson, N.

    1992-08-01

    OSHA is giving serious consideration to substantially lowering permissible exposure limits (PELs) for air cadmium concentrations in the workplace. Consequently, the issue has been raised that improved methods may be needed to effectively monitor worker populations for cadmium exposure if one of the proposed PELs of 1 or 5 {mu}g/m{sup 3} (down from the current 100 {mu}/gm{sup 3}) is adopted. In this brief report, an assay method is described for accurately and precisely determining cadmium concentrations in blood, urine, or other biological samples that has a detection limit of 0.02 {mu}g/L, considerably lower than methods currently in use. It is straight-forward to carry out and uses commercially available chemicals.

  7. Environmental estrogens in an urban aquatic ecosystem: II. Biological effects.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Melissa M; Minarik, Thomas A; Martinovic-Weigelt, Dalma; Curran, Erin M; Bartell, Stephen E; Schoenfuss, Heiko L

    2013-11-01

    Urban aquatic ecosystems are often overlooked in toxicological studies even though they serve many ecosystem functions and sustain fish populations despite large-scale habitat alterations. However, urban fish populations are likely exposed to a broad range of stressors, including environmental estrogens (EEs) that may affect anatomy, physiology and reproduction of exposed fish. Although significant progress has been made in establishing ecological consequences of EE exposure, these studies have focused largely on hydrologically simple systems that lack the complexity of urban aquatic environments. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the occurrence and biological effects of EEs across a large urbanized aquatic ecosystem. A multi-pronged study design was employed relying on quantitative determination of select EEs by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and repeated biological monitoring of wild-caught and caged fish for indications of endocrine disruption. Over three years, EEs were measured in aqueous samples (n=42 samples) and biological effects assessed in >1200 male fish across the 2000km(2) aquatic ecosystems of the Greater Metropolitan Area of Chicago, IL. Our study demonstrated that in addition to water reclamation plant (WRP) effluents, non-WRP sources contribute significant EE loads to the aquatic ecosystem. While resident and caged male fish responded with the induction of the egg-yolk protein vitellogenin, an indicator of EE exposure, neither resident nor caged sunfish exhibited prevalent histopathological changes to their reproductive organs (i.e., intersex) that have been reported in other studies. Vitellogenin induction was greater in spring than the fall and was not correlated with body condition factor, gonadosomatic index or hepatosomatic index. Exposure effects were not correlated with sites downstream of treated effluent discharge further affirming the complexity of sources and effects of EEs in urban aquatic ecosystems

  8. Monitoring prion protein expression in complex biological samples by SERS for diagnostic applications.

    PubMed

    Manno, D; Filippo, E; Fiore, R; Serra, A; Urso, E; Rizzello, A; Maffia, M

    2010-04-23

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) allows a new insight into the analysis of cell physiology. In this work, the difficulty of producing suitable substrates that, besides permitting the amplification of the Raman signal, do not interact with the biological material causing alteration, has been overcome by a combined method of hydrothermal green synthesis and thermal annealing. The SERS analysis of the cell membrane has been performed with special attention to the cellular prion protein PrP(C). In addition, SERS has also been used to reveal the prion protein-Cu(II) interaction in four different cell models (B104, SH-SY5Y, GN11, HeLa), expressing PrP(C) at different levels. A significant implication of the current work consists of the intriguing possibility of revealing and quantifying prion protein expression in complex biological samples by a cheap SERS-based method, replacing the expensive and time-consuming immuno-assay systems commonly employed.

  9. Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy for Studying Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Happel, Patrick; Thatenhorst, Denis; Dietzel, Irmgard D.

    2012-01-01

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is a scanning probe technique that utilizes the increase in access resistance that occurs if an electrolyte filled glass micro-pipette is approached towards a poorly conducting surface. Since an increase in resistance can be monitored before the physical contact between scanning probe tip and sample, this technique is particularly useful to investigate the topography of delicate samples such as living cells. SICM has shown its potential in various applications such as high resolution and long-time imaging of living cells or the determination of local changes in cellular volume. Furthermore, SICM has been combined with various techniques such as fluorescence microscopy or patch clamping to reveal localized information about proteins or protein functions. This review details the various advantages and pitfalls of SICM and provides an overview of the recent developments and applications of SICM in biological imaging. Furthermore, we show that in principle, a combination of SICM and ion selective micro-electrodes enables one to monitor the local ion activity surrounding a living cell. PMID:23202197

  10. [Psychoactive substances in biological samples--toxicological laboratory data].

    PubMed

    Gomółka, Ewa; Wilimowska, Jolanta; Piekoszewski, Wojciech; Groszek, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    The subject of the research was the analysis of frequency and type of psychoactive substances used, basing on the determinations the blood and/or urine samples, performed in the toxicological laboratory of the Department of Clinical and Industrial Toxicology Jagiellonian University in Kraków in the period from December 2001 to November 2003. From 17,649 performed determinations--45.5% were positive. 50% of the positive determinations were psychoactive substances. The most often psychoactive substance determined was ethyl alcohol (52.86%), next benzodiazepines (17.41%), amphetamines (10.54%), opiates (8.05%), THC (6.87%), barbiturates (3.74%), and occasionally atropine and cocaine. There was observed a variety of mixed, simultaneously taking psychoactive substances, especially ethyl alcohol, opiates, amphetamine derivatives and cannabinoids. The analysis of the occurrence of psychoactive substances in biological samples from patients treated in different hospital departments, others hospitals and ordered by private persons also was performed. In the last two years 369 private patients ordered psychoactive substances determinations and 78 of them were positive.

  11. Determination of iron (III) in food, biological and environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Verma, Chitra; Tapadia, Kavita; Soni, Anupam Bala

    2017-04-15

    The nanodrop spectrophotometric (NDS) determination of iron (III) in water samples has been established. The proposed method is simple, selective and highly sensitive. The extraction of Fe (III)-thiocyanate complex was done by novel organic reagents such as N-phenylacetamide, N-alkylacetamide, (alkyl=butyl, hexyl and octyl group) in chloroform. The Fe (III) extract was examined in the strong acidic (HCl+H2SO4) solution. The maximum value of molar absorptivity was found to be 1.8×10(5)Lmol(-1)cm(-1) at λmax, 477nm (⩾9 fold enrichments) for N-octylacetamide (N-OAA). The method obeys the Beers Law within the range of 0.05μgmL(-1)-6.0μgmL(-1). The detection limit and RSD value of the method were found to be 5ppb and 0.5906% respectively. The correlation coefficient, slope and intercept were calculated and found to be 0.9989, 0.1112, and 0.0048, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of trace amount of iron (III) in food, biological and environmental samples.

  12. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Calculations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Calculations II... FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. II Appendix II to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Calculations (a) This sample fuel economy calculation is applicable...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Calculations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Calculations II... FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. II Appendix II to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Calculations (a) This sample fuel economy calculation is applicable...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Calculations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Calculations II... FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. II Appendix II to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Calculations (a) This sample fuel economy calculation is applicable...

  15. Automated Force Volume Image Processing for Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Junbo; Duval, Jérôme F. L.; Brie, David; Francius, Grégory

    2011-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has now become a powerful technique for investigating on a molecular level, surface forces, nanomechanical properties of deformable particles, biomolecular interactions, kinetics, and dynamic processes. This paper specifically focuses on the analysis of AFM force curves collected on biological systems, in particular, bacteria. The goal is to provide fully automated tools to achieve theoretical interpretation of force curves on the basis of adequate, available physical models. In this respect, we propose two algorithms, one for the processing of approach force curves and another for the quantitative analysis of retraction force curves. In the former, electrostatic interactions prior to contact between AFM probe and bacterium are accounted for and mechanical interactions operating after contact are described in terms of Hertz-Hooke formalism. Retraction force curves are analyzed on the basis of the Freely Jointed Chain model. For both algorithms, the quantitative reconstruction of force curves is based on the robust detection of critical points (jumps, changes of slope or changes of curvature) which mark the transitions between the various relevant interactions taking place between the AFM tip and the studied sample during approach and retraction. Once the key regions of separation distance and indentation are detected, the physical parameters describing the relevant interactions operating in these regions are extracted making use of regression procedure for fitting experiments to theory. The flexibility, accuracy and strength of the algorithms are illustrated with the processing of two force-volume images, which collect a large set of approach and retraction curves measured on a single biological surface. For each force-volume image, several maps are generated, representing the spatial distribution of the searched physical parameters as estimated for each pixel of the force-volume image. PMID:21559483

  16. Integral field spectroscopy of a sample of nearby galaxies. II. Properties of the H ii regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, S. F.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Marino, R. A.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Vílchez, J. M.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Díaz, A. I.; Mast, D.; Monreal-Ibero, A.; García-Benito, R.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Pérez, E.; González Delgado, R.; Husemann, B.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Cid Fernandes, R.; Kehrig, C.; Walcher, C. J.; Gil de Paz, A.; Ellis, S.

    2012-10-01

    We analyse the spectroscopic properties of thousands of H ii regions identified in 38 face-on spiral galaxies. All galaxies were observed out to 2.4 effective radii using integral field spectroscopy (IFS) over the wavelength range ~3700 to ~6900 Å. The near uniform sample has been assembled from the PPAK IFS Nearby Galaxy (PINGS) survey and a sample described in Paper I. We develop a new automatic procedure to detect H ii regions, based on the contrast of the Hα intensity maps extracted from the datacubes. Once detected, the algorithm provides us with the integrated spectra of each individual segmented region. In total, we derive good quality spectroscopic information for ~2600 independent H ii regions/complexes. This is by far the largest H ii region survey of its kind. Our selection criteria and the use of 3D spectroscopy guarantee that we cover the regions in an unbiased way. A well-tested automatic decoupling procedure has been applied to remove the underlying stellar population, deriving the main properties (intensity, dispersion and velocity) of the strongest emission lines in the considered wavelength range (covering from [O ii] λ3727 to [S ii] λ6731). A final catalogue of the spectroscopic properties of H ii regions has been created for each galaxy, which includes information on morphology, spiral structure, gaskinematics, and surface brightness of the underlying stellar population. In the current study, we focus on the understanding of the average properties of the H ii regions and their radial distributions. We find a significant change in the ionisation characteristics of H ii regions within r < 0.25 re due to contamination from sources with different ionising characteristics, as we discuss. We find that the gas-phase oxygen abundance and the Hα equivalent width present a negative and positive gradient, respectively. The distribution of slopes is statistically compatible with a random Gaussian distribution around the mean value, if the radial

  17. EPR Methods for Biological Cu(II): L-Band CW and NARS

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Brian; Kowalski, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Copper has many roles in biology that involve the change of coordination sphere and/or oxidation state of the copper ion. Consequently, the study of copper in heterogeneous environments is an important area in biophysics. EPR is a primary technique for the investigation of paramagnetic copper, which is usually the isolated Cu(II) ion, but sometimes as Cu(II) in different oxidation states of multi-transition ion clusters. The gross geometry of the coordination environment of Cu(II) can often be determined from a simple inspection of the EPR spectrum, recorded in the traditional X-band frequency range (9 – 10 GHz). Identification and quantitation of the coordinating ligand atoms, however, is not so straightforward. In particular, analysis of the superhyperfine structure on the EPR spectrum, to determine the number of coordinated nitrogen atoms, is fraught with difficulty at X-band, despite the observation that the overwhelming number of EPR studies of Cu(II) in the literature have been carried out at X-band. Greater reliability has been demonstrated at S-band (3 – 4 GHz), using the low-field parallel (gz) features. However, analysis relies on clear identification of the outermost superhyperfine line, which has the lowest intensity of all the spectral features. Computer simulations have subsequently indicated that the much more intense perpendicular region of the spectrum can be reliably interpreted at L-band (2 GHz). The present work describes the development of L-band EPR of Cu(II) into a routine method, that is applicable to biological samples. PMID:26478491

  18. Dynamic laser speckle analyzed considering inhomogeneities in the biological sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, Roberto A.; González-Peña, Rolando J.; Viana, Dimitri Campos; Rivera, Fernando Pujaico

    2017-04-01

    Dynamic laser speckle phenomenon allows a contactless and nondestructive way to monitor biological changes that are quantified by second-order statistics applied in the images in time using a secondary matrix known as time history of the speckle pattern (THSP). To avoid being time consuming, the traditional way to build the THSP restricts the data to a line or column. Our hypothesis is that the spatial restriction of the information could compromise the results, particularly when undesirable and unexpected optical inhomogeneities occur, such as in cell culture media. It tested a spatial random approach to collect the points to form a THSP. Cells in a culture medium and in drying paint, representing homogeneous samples in different levels, were tested, and a comparison with the traditional method was carried out. An alternative random selection based on a Gaussian distribution around a desired position was also presented. The results showed that the traditional protocol presented higher variation than the outcomes using the random method. The higher the inhomogeneity of the activity map, the higher the efficiency of the proposed method using random points. The Gaussian distribution proved to be useful when there was a well-defined area to monitor.

  19. Cellular characterization of compression-induceddamage in live biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Chiara; Balzer, Jens; Hahnel, Mark; Rankin, Sara M.; Brown, Katherine A.; Proud, William

    2012-03-01

    Understanding the damage that high intensity compression waves induce in human tissues is critical for developing improved therapies for patients suffering from blast injuries. Experimentally based models of blast injury using live biological samples are needed. In this study we have developed a system to directly assess the effects of dynamic loading conditions on live cells. Here, we describe a confinement chamber designed to subject live cell cultures in a liquid environment to high intensity compression waves using a split Hopkinson pressure bar system. Signals from the strain gauges mounted on the bars and the chamber allow the measurement of parameters such as pressure and duration of the stimulus. The chamber itself also allows recovery of cells subjected to compression for assessment of cellular damage. In these studies we present evidence of increased levels of damage and loss of cellular integrity in cultured mouse mesenchymal stem cells subjected to a high-intensity compression wave with a peak pressure of 7.6 ± 0.8 MPa.

  20. Dynamic laser speckle analyzed considering inhomogeneities in the biological sample.

    PubMed

    Braga, Roberto A; González-Peña, Rolando J; Viana, Dimitri Campos; Rivera, Fernando Pujaico

    2017-04-01

    Dynamic laser speckle phenomenon allows a contactless and nondestructive way to monitor biological changes that are quantified by second-order statistics applied in the images in time using a secondary matrix known as time history of the speckle pattern (THSP). To avoid being time consuming, the traditional way to build the THSP restricts the data to a line or column. Our hypothesis is that the spatial restriction of the information could compromise the results, particularly when undesirable and unexpected optical inhomogeneities occur, such as in cell culture media. It tested a spatial random approach to collect the points to form a THSP. Cells in a culture medium and in drying paint, representing homogeneous samples in different levels, were tested, and a comparison with the traditional method was carried out. An alternative random selection based on a Gaussian distribution around a desired position was also presented. The results showed that the traditional protocol presented higher variation than the outcomes using the random method. The higher the inhomogeneity of the activity map, the higher the efficiency of the proposed method using random points. The Gaussian distribution proved to be useful when there was a well-defined area to monitor.

  1. Ultrasonic microdevices for integrated on-chip biological sample processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, George Michael

    Integrated lab-on-a-chip devices, also known as micro total analysis systems (mu-TAS), are expected to play a leading role in biological research and medicine in the 21st century, and on-chip sample processing is a key function of such devices. A new class of ultrasonic microfluidic sample processing devices is presented, based on a single common fundamental unit---a capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer---and fabricated using a single common process. Arrays of the transducers are integrated with fluidic microchannels, allowing devices with different functions to be realized simply by altering the physical arrangement and electrical drive signals of the array elements. The efficient, in-plane manipulation of particle-laden liquids is achieved by the use of phased, co-planar transducers, allowing the generation of in-plane, cavity-mode standing waves in the microchannels, and permitting the efficient manipulation of suspended particles such as cells by acoustic radiation forces. Fabricated prototype devices include several types of ultrasonic particle filters, flow-through particle fractionators, particle collimators for cell alignment, devices for the ultrasonic lysing of cells, ultrasonic pumps and ultrasonic mixers. As part of the development effort, an investigation of the thin film silicon material known as "permeable polysilicon" was performed, resulting in the discovery that the material's liquid-permeability properties are caused by nanoscale pores that form spontaneously within an unusual morphological growth regime. A new, one-step porous polysilicon process is presented that allows the quick and easy fabrication of porous polysilicon films for a wide range of applications. The process is used to fabricate the ultrasonic immersion transducers used in the device arrays, and allows the convenient fabrication of a wide variety of microstructures that would be difficult or impossible to fabricate by other means. In addition, a new simulation code is

  2. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Calculations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Calculations II Appendix II to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. II Appendix II...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Calculations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Calculations II Appendix II to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. II Appendix II...

  4. Sampling time error in EuroSCORE II.

    PubMed

    Poullis, Michael; Fabri, Brian; Pullan, Mark; Chalmers, John

    2012-05-01

    Seasonal variation in mortality after cardiac surgery exists. EuroSCORE II accrued data over a 12-week period from May to July 2010. We investigated whether the accrual period for EuroSCORE II had a different mortality rate compared with the rest of the year. We found in a study population of 18,706 that the accrual period of EuroSCORE II may introduce bias into the predicted mortality, potentially reducing the accuracy of the new model.

  5. A novel visible spectrophotometric method for the determination of ethamsylate in pharmaceutical preparations and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meiyun; Zhang, Yan; Li, Quanmin

    2010-03-01

    A highly sensitive visible spectrophotometric method has been developed to determine ethamsylate in this paper, which is based on using Cu(II) as spectroscopic probe reagent. The study indicates that in the presence of SCN(-) and KNO(3), Cu(II) is reduced to Cu(I) by ethamsylate at pH 5.0, and the in situ formed Cu(I) reacts with SCN(-) to form into the white emulsion CuSCN that could be stayed upon the surface of water. According to the amount of residual Cu(II), the amount of ethamsylate can be indirectly determined. Under the optimal conditions, Beer's law is applicable in the range of 0.2-9.0 microg/mL (7.60x10(-7)-3.42x10(-5)mol/L) for aqueous standard solution of ethamsylate with linear correlation coefficient of 0.9998. The detection limit and relative standard deviation are 0.12 microg/mL and 1.5%, respectively. And the molar absorption coefficient of the indirect determination of ethamsylate is 1.0x10(5)L/mol cm. The method is successfully applied to determine ethamsylate in pharmaceutical preparations and biological samples.

  6. Estimation of angiotensin peptides in biological samples by LC/MS method.

    PubMed

    Ali, Quaisar; Wu, Yonnie; Nag, Sourashish; Hussain, Tahir

    2014-01-21

    The low abundance of angiotensin peptides in biological tissues such as the kidney cortex, adipose tissue, urine and plasma makes their detection and quantification a challenge. A few available methods used to quantify these peptides involve lengthy processes of sample preparation and are hardly quantitative. Here, we report a mass spectrometry approach for quantifying angiotensin peptides [Ang II, Ang-(1-7)] in the kidney cortex, epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT), urine and plasma of male mice. Tissue homogenates, urine and plasma samples were solid-phase extracted with C18 Sep-Pak cartridges and eluted off proteinaceous compounds. These extracted peptide samples were separated on C18 column with a linear acetonitrile gradient and detected by Q-ToF mass analyzer in ESI+-MS ion mode based on their retention time, accurate mass measurement of peptides, the isotope pattern of doubly charged molecular ion, and quantitation of peak area (or ion count) when referencing to the angiotensin peptide standards. The lower limit of quantitation for each angiotensin peptide was 10 pgmg(-1) with the percent recovery at 100.6%. The intra-batch precision for Ang-(1-7) and Ang II were 24.0 and 12.7%, accuracy 84.0-123.0% and 100.2-116.0% respectively. Using this method, we determined the levels of Ang II and Ang-(1-7) in the kidney cortex, eWAT, urine and plasma. Quantification of angiotensin peptides could help target subtle therapeutics changes against pathophysiological conditions such as obesity, kidney disease and hypertension.

  7. Copper(II)-8-hydroxquinoline coprecipitation system for preconcentration and separation of cobalt(II) and manganese(II) in real samples.

    PubMed

    Soylak, Mustafa; Kaya, Betul; Tuzen, Mustafa

    2007-08-25

    A separation-preconcentration procedure based on the coprecipitation of cobalt(II) and manganese(II) ions with copper(II)-8-hydroxquinoline system has been developed. The analytical parameters including pH, amount of copper(II) as carrier element, amount of 8-hydroxquinoline, sample volume, etc., was investigated for the quantitative recoveries of Co(II) and Mn(II). No interferic effects were observed from the concomitant ions which are present in real samples. The detection limits for analyte ions by three sigma criteria were 0.86microgL(-1) for cobalt and 0.98microgL(-1) for manganese. The validation of the presented preconcentration procedure was performed by the analysis of NIST SRM 2711 Montana soil and GBW 07605 Tea certified reference materials. The procedure presented was applied to the analyte contents of real samples including natural waters and some food samples with successfully analytical results.

  8. Human Ecology: A Perspective for Biology Education. Monograph Series II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    This monograph provides a framework for biology teachers who are rethinking and redesigning their programs. The major focus is on the human ecology perspective in biology programs. The first chapter attempts to define and clarify human ecology through historical review. The second chapter provides support, based on a survey of citizens…

  9. 9 CFR 113.3 - Sampling of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... four samples of all other diagnostic antigens. (7) Diagnostic test kits: Two samples of diagnostic test kits. The licensee or permittee will hold one of these selected samples at the storage temperature... the case of diagnostic test kits in which final packaging consists of multiple microtiter test...

  10. 9 CFR 113.3 - Sampling of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... four samples of all other diagnostic antigens. (7) Diagnostic test kits: Two samples of diagnostic test kits. The licensee or permittee will hold one of these selected samples at the storage temperature... the case of diagnostic test kits in which final packaging consists of multiple microtiter test...

  11. 9 CFR 113.3 - Sampling of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... four samples of all other diagnostic antigens. (7) Diagnostic test kits: Two samples of diagnostic test... the case of diagnostic test kits in which final packaging consists of multiple microtiter test plates... sample shall: (1) Consist of 5 single-dose packages, 2 multiple-dose packages, or 2 diagnostic test...

  12. Novel spectroscopic sensor for the hydroxyl radical scavenging activity measurement of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Bekdeşer, Burcu; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Apak, Reşat

    2012-09-15

    A novel spectroscopic sensor was developed and validated for hydroxyl radical scavenging (HRS) activity estimation using terephthalate (TP) as probe. This sensor was designed by electrostatic immobilization of the chromogenic oxidizing agent of the CUPric Reducing Antioxidant Capacity (CUPRAC) method, Cu(II)-Neocuproine (Cu(II)-Nc) complex, on a Nafion cation-exchange membrane, and the spectrophotometric assay developed in aqueous-alcoholic solutions was integrated to the CUPRAC sensor. Hydroxyl radicals ((•)OH) generated from an equivalent mixture of Fe(II)+EDTA with hydrogen peroxide attacked both the probe and the (•)OH scavengers in 37 °C-incubated solutions for 1/2h. The HRS activity was measured using the decrease in CUPRAC absorbance at 450 nm - arising from the reduction of Cu(II)-Nc reagent to the Cu(I)-neocuproine chelate - of the hydroxylated probe (TP) undergoing radical attack in the presence of (•)OH scavengers. The HRS activity was evaluated as the second-order rate constants of biologically active compounds for (•)OH scavenging and also as the percentage scavenging of a measured compound or sample relative to a reference compound. Using this reaction, a kinetic approach was adopted to assess the HRS activity of amino acids, plasma- and thiol-antioxidants. This assay, applicable to small molecule antioxidants and tissue homogenates, proved to be efficient for serine and albumin for which the widely used TBARS (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances) test is nonresponsive. Under optimal conditions, about half of the probe (TP) was converted into 2-hydroxyterephthalate (hTP), and this monohydroxylated derivative, being the only product of hydroxylation, was a more specific marker of (•)OH than the non-specific malondialdehyde end-product of the TBARS test. The sensor gave a linear response to scavenger concentration in the competition kinetic equation.

  13. Electron Transfer Studies of Ruthenium(II) Complexes with Biologically Important Phenolic Acids and Tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Rajeswari, Angusamy; Ramdass, Arumugam; Muthu Mareeswaran, Paulpandian; Rajagopal, Seenivasan

    2016-03-01

    The ruthenium(II) complexes having 2,2'-bipyridine and phenanthroline derivatives are synthesized and characterized. The photophysical properties of these complexes at pH 12.5 are studied. The electron transfer reaction of biologically important phenolic acids and tyrosine are studied using absorption, emission and transient absorption spectral techniques. Semiclassical theory is applied to calculate the rate of electron transfer between ruthenium(II) complexes and biologically important phenolic acids.

  14. Modular Automated Processing System (MAPS) for analysis of biological samples.

    SciTech Connect

    Gil, Geun-Cheol; Chirica, Gabriela S.; Fruetel, Julia A.; VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Branda, Steven S.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Throckmorton, Daniel J.; Brennan, James S.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2010-10-01

    We have developed a novel modular automated processing system (MAPS) that enables reliable, high-throughput analysis as well as sample-customized processing. This system is comprised of a set of independent modules that carry out individual sample processing functions: cell lysis, protein concentration (based on hydrophobic, ion-exchange and affinity interactions), interferent depletion, buffer exchange, and enzymatic digestion of proteins of interest. Taking advantage of its unique capacity for enclosed processing of intact bioparticulates (viruses, spores) and complex serum samples, we have used MAPS for analysis of BSL1 and BSL2 samples to identify specific protein markers through integration with the portable microChemLab{trademark} and MALDI.

  15. Invasion Ecology and School Biology--Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, R. V.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests that invasion biology can supply subject matter for teaching evolution, genetics, ecological relationships, and conservation. Describes flowering and non-flowering plant invaders, vertebrates and invertebrates, and two ecological invasions on the southern coast of England. (JN)

  16. Politics & Prejudice: Dissection in Biology Education. Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmore, David R.

    1991-01-01

    The issues, roles, dynamics, rationales and events embroiled in the dissection controversy are discussed. Insights into where the politics of biology education without speciesism or dissection are likely to take science education in the future are provided. (KR)

  17. Strontium: Part II. Chemistry, Biological Aspects and Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britton, G. C.; Johnson, C. H.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews basic information on the Chemistry of strontium and its compounds. Explains biological aspects of strontium and its pharmaceutical applications. Highlights industrial application of strontium and its components. (ML)

  18. Invasion Ecology and School Biology--Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, R. V.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests that invasion biology can supply subject matter for teaching evolution, genetics, ecological relationships, and conservation. Describes flowering and non-flowering plant invaders, vertebrates and invertebrates, and two ecological invasions on the southern coast of England. (JN)

  19. Basics of particle therapy II: relative biological effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jinhyun

    2012-01-01

    In the previous review, the physical aspect of heavy particles, with a focus on the carbon beam was introduced. Particle beam therapy has many potential advantages for cancer treatment without increasing severe side effects in normal tissue, these kinds of radiation have different biologic characteristics and have advantages over using conventional photon beam radiation during treatment. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is used for many biological, clinical endpoints among different radiation types and is the only convenient way to transfer the clinical experience in radiotherapy with photons to another type of radiation therapy. However, the RBE varies dependent on the energy of the beam, the fractionation, cell types, oxygenation status, and the biological endpoint studied. Thus this review describes the concerns about RBE related to particle beam to increase interests of the Korean radiation oncologists' society. PMID:23120738

  20. Single photon radioluminescence. II. Signal detection and biological applications.

    PubMed

    Shahrokh, Z; Bicknese, S; Shohet, S B; Verkman, A S

    1992-11-01

    A quantitative theory for excitation of fluorescent molecules by beta decay electrons is reported in the accompanying manuscript; experimental detection methods and biological applications are reported here. The single photon signals produced by an excited fluorophore (single photon radioluminescence, SPR) provide quantitative information about the distance between radioisotope and fluorophore. Instrumentation was constructed for SPR signal detection. Photons produced in a 0.5-ml sample volume were detected by a cooled photomultiplier and photon counting electronics. To minimize electronic noise and drift for detection of very small SPR signals, a mechanical light chopper was used for gated-signal detection, and a pulse height analyzer for noise rejection. SPR signals of approximately 1 cps were reproducibly measurable. The influence of inner filter effect, sample turbidity, and fluorophore environment (lipid, protein, and carbohydrate) on SPR signals were evaluated experimentally. SPR was then applied to measure lipid exchange kinetics, ligand binding, and membrane transport, and to determine an intermolecular distance in an intact membrane. (a. Lipid exchange kinetics.) Transfer of 12-anthroyloxystearic acid (12-AS) from sonicated lipid vesicles and micelles to vesicles containing 3H-cholesterol was measured from the time course of increasing SPR signal. At 22 degrees C, the half-times for 12-AS transfer from vesicles and micelles were 3.3 and 1.1 min, respectively. (b. Ligand binding.) Binding of 3H-oleic acid to albumin in solution, and 3H-2,2'-dihydro-4,4'-diisothiocyanodisulfonic stilbene (3H-H2DIDS) to band 3 on the erythrocyte membranes were detected by the radioluminescence of the intrinsic tryptophans. The SPR signal from 5 microCi 3H-oleic acid bound to 0.3 mM albumin decreased from 13 +/- 2 cps to 3 +/- 2 cps upon addition of nonradioactive oleic acid, giving 2.7 high affinity oleic acid binding sites per albumin. The SPR signal from 1 microCi 3H-H2DIDS

  1. Chorionic villus sampling in continuing pregnancies. II. Cytogenetic reliability.

    PubMed

    Martin, A O; Simpson, J L; Rosinsky, B J; Elias, S

    1986-06-01

    Cytogenetic analysis was performed on 103 chorionic villus samples. Analysis of the 103 samples revealed six abnormalities. In three of the six the abnormalities were confirmed in fetal or neonatal tissue (47,XY, + 13; 46,XY, t(13q13q); 45,X). In three samples the abnormalities detected were not confirmed; in two of the three the abnormalities were detected only in long-term cultures, whereas in the other samples the abnormality was restricted to direct analysis of the villi after overnight incubation. Our initial experience leads us to conclude that certain abnormalities in chorionic villus sampling may not be indicative of fetal abnormalities; 45,X/46,XX or 45,X/46,XY mosaicism is such a complement. Discrepancies between cytogenetic analysis of intact villi processed soon after sampling and of cells grown in culture can be managed by adhering to several suggested guidelines and by liberal use of confirmatory amniocentesis.

  2. Development of a new catalase activity assay for biological samples using optical CUPRAC sensor.

    PubMed

    Bekdeşer, Burcu; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Alkan, Fulya Üstün; Apak, Reşat

    2014-11-11

    A novel catalase activity assay was developed for biological samples (liver and kidney tissue homogenates) using a rapid and low-cost optical sensor-based 'cupric reducing antioxidant capacity' (CUPRAC) method. The reagent, copper(II)-neocuproine (Cu(II)-Nc) complex, was immobilized onto a cation-exchanger film of Nafion, and the absorbance changes associated with the formation of the highly-colored Cu(I)-Nc chelate as a result of reaction with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was measured at 450 nm. When catalase was absent, H2O2 produced the CUPRAC chromophore, whereas catalase, being an effective H2O2 scavenger, completely annihilated the CUPRAC signal due to H2O2. Thus, the CUPRAC absorbance due to H2O2 oxidation concomitant with Cu(I)-Nc formation decreased proportionally with catalase. The developed sensor gave a linear response over a wide concentration range of H2O2 (0.68-78.6 μM). This optical sensor-based method applicable to tissue homogenates proved to be efficient for low hydrogen peroxide concentrations (physiological and nontoxic levels) to which the widely used UV method is not accurately responsive. Thus, conventional problems of the UV method arising from relatively low sensitivity and selectivity, and absorbance disturbance due to gaseous oxygen evolution were overcome. The catalase findings of the proposed method for tissue homogenates were statistically alike with those of HPLC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of a new catalase activity assay for biological samples using optical CUPRAC sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekdeşer, Burcu; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Alkan, Fulya Üstün; Apak, Reşat

    2014-11-01

    A novel catalase activity assay was developed for biological samples (liver and kidney tissue homogenates) using a rapid and low-cost optical sensor-based ‘cupric reducing antioxidant capacity' (CUPRAC) method. The reagent, copper(II)-neocuproine (Cu(II)-Nc) complex, was immobilized onto a cation-exchanger film of Nafion, and the absorbance changes associated with the formation of the highly-colored Cu(I)-Nc chelate as a result of reaction with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was measured at 450 nm. When catalase was absent, H2O2 produced the CUPRAC chromophore, whereas catalase, being an effective H2O2 scavenger, completely annihilated the CUPRAC signal due to H2O2. Thus, the CUPRAC absorbance due to H2O2 oxidation concomitant with Cu(I)-Nc formation decreased proportionally with catalase. The developed sensor gave a linear response over a wide concentration range of H2O2 (0.68-78.6 μM). This optical sensor-based method applicable to tissue homogenates proved to be efficient for low hydrogen peroxide concentrations (physiological and nontoxic levels) to which the widely used UV method is not accurately responsive. Thus, conventional problems of the UV method arising from relatively low sensitivity and selectivity, and absorbance disturbance due to gaseous oxygen evolution were overcome. The catalase findings of the proposed method for tissue homogenates were statistically alike with those of HPLC.

  4. Elemental mapping of biological samples using a scanning proton microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, F.; Grime, G. W.

    1988-03-01

    Elemental mapping using a scanning proton microprobe (SPM) can be a powerful technique for probing trace elements in biology, allowing complex interfaces to be studied in detail, identifying contamination and artefacts present in the specimen, and in certain circumstances obtaining indirect chemical information. Examples used to illustrate the advantages of the technique include the elemental mapping of growing pollen tubes, honey bee brain section, a mouse macrophage cell, human liver section exhibiting primary biliary cirrhosis, and the attack by a mildew fungus on a pea leaf.

  5. Topical Conference on Oportunities in Biology for Physicists II

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, Judy R.

    2004-02-01

    In 2002, the American Physical Society (APS) organized and held the first topical conference in Boston, MA, as a way of informing physicists, particularly those just entering the field, of opportunities emerging at the interface of physics and biology. Because of the tremendous success of the first conference, it was decided to organize a second conference, similar in nature and focus, but with different presentation topic areas. Again the intended audience would be graduate students and postdocs considering applying methods of physics to biological research, and those who advise others on such opportunities.

  6. A data-independent acquisition workflow for qualitative screening of new psychoactive substances in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Kinyua, Juliet; Negreira, Noelia; Ibáñez, María; Bijlsma, Lubertus; Hernández, Félix; Covaci, Adrian; van Nuijs, Alexander L N

    2015-11-01

    Identification of new psychoactive substances (NPS) is challenging. Developing targeted methods for their analysis can be difficult and costly due to their impermanence on the drug scene. Accurate-mass mass spectrometry (AMMS) using a quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) analyzer can be useful for wide-scope screening since it provides sensitive, full-spectrum MS data. Our article presents a qualitative screening workflow based on data-independent acquisition mode (all-ions MS/MS) on liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to QTOFMS for the detection and identification of NPS in biological matrices. The workflow combines and structures fundamentals of target and suspect screening data processing techniques in a structured algorithm. This allows the detection and tentative identification of NPS and their metabolites. We have applied the workflow to two actual case studies involving drug intoxications where we detected and confirmed the parent compounds ketamine, 25B-NBOMe, 25C-NBOMe, and several predicted phase I and II metabolites not previously reported in urine and serum samples. The screening workflow demonstrates the added value for the detection and identification of NPS in biological matrices.

  7. River Pollution: Part II. Biological Methods for Assessing Water Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1984-01-01

    Discusses methods used in the biological assessment of river quality and such indicators of clean and polluted waters as the Trent Biotic Index, Chandler Score System, and species diversity indexes. Includes a summary of a river classification scheme based on quality criteria related to water use. (JN)

  8. River Pollution: Part II. Biological Methods for Assessing Water Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1984-01-01

    Discusses methods used in the biological assessment of river quality and such indicators of clean and polluted waters as the Trent Biotic Index, Chandler Score System, and species diversity indexes. Includes a summary of a river classification scheme based on quality criteria related to water use. (JN)

  9. Determination of platinum, palladium, and lead in biological samples by atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed Central

    Tillery, J B; Johnson, D E

    1975-01-01

    A flameless atomic absorption method for the coextraction of platinum and palladium from biological and environmental samples by high molecular weight amine (HMWA) is given. Also, methods for lead determination in biological samples by use of extraction flameless analysis and direct aspiration-flame analysis are reported. A study of lead contamination of Vacutainer tubes is given. PMID:1227857

  10. Robotic Sample Return II: Addressing Fundamental Exploration Themes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, S. J.; Jolliff, B. L.; Shearer, C.; Robinson, M. S.; Stopar, J. D.; Braden, S. E.; Speyerer, E. J.; Hagerty, J. T.; Denevi, B. W.; Neal, C. R.; Draper, D. S.

    2014-10-01

    A campaign of automated sample return to specific locations identified by recent mission results as a critical aspect of an integrated exploration strategy is discussed; specific ROIs are identified to inform future hardware choices.

  11. Sampling of vehicle emissions for chemical analysis and biological testing.

    PubMed Central

    Schuetzle, D

    1983-01-01

    Representative dilution tube sampling techniques for particulate and gas phase vehicle emissions are described using Teflon filter media and XAD-2 resin. More than 90% of the total gas (C8-C18) and particulate direct acting Ames assay mutagenicity (TA 98) was found in the particulate phase. The gas and particulate phase material was fractionated by HPLC into nonpolar, moderately polar and highly polar chemical fractions. The moderately polar chemical fraction of the particulates contained more than 50% of the direct acting Ames assay mutagenicity for the total extract. The concentration of oxygenated polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (oxy-PAH) and nitrated PAH (nitro-PAH) identified in the moderately polar particulate fractions are given. Nitro-PAH account for most of the direct-acting (TA 98) Ames assay mutagenicity in these moderately polar fractions. Reactions and kinetic expressions for chemical conversion of PAH are presented. Chemical conversion of PAH to nitro-PAH during dilution tube sampling of particulates on Teflon filters and gases on XAD-2 resin is a minor problem (representing 10-20%, on the average, of the 1-nitropyrene found in extracts) at short (46 min) sampling times, at low sampling temperatures (42 degrees C), and in diluted exhaust containing 3 ppm NO2. Particulate emissions collected from dilution tubes on filter media appear to be representative of what is emitted in the environment as based upon a comparison of highway and laboratory studies. PMID:6186484

  12. Application of scanning electrochemical microscopy to biological samples.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C; Kwak, J; Bard, A J

    1990-01-01

    The scanning electrochemical microscope can be used in the feedback mode in two-dimensional scans over biological substrates to obtain topographic information at the micrometer level. In this mode, the effect of distance between a substrate (either conductive or insulating) and a scanning ultramicroelectrode tip on the electrolytic current flowing at the tip is recorded as a function of the tip x-y position. Scans of the upper surface of a grass leaf and the lower surface of a Ligustrum sinensis leaf (which show open stomata structures) immersed in aqueous solution are shown. Scans of the upper surface of an elodea leaf in the dark and under irradiation, where the tip reaction is the reduction of oxygen produced by photosynthesis, demonstrate the possibility of obtaining information about the distribution of reaction sites on the substrate surface. Images PMID:2308933

  13. Analytical methods for determination of anticoagulant rodenticides in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Imran, Muhammad; Shafi, Humera; Wattoo, Sardar Ali; Chaudhary, Muhammad Taimoor; Usman, Hafiz Faisal

    2015-08-01

    Anticoagulant rodenticides belong to a heterogeneous group of compounds which are used to kill rodents. They bind to enzyme complexes responsible for recycling of vitamin K, thus producing impairment in coagulation process. Rodenticides are among the most common house hold toxicants and exhibit wide variety of toxicities in non-target species especially in human, dogs and cats. This article reviews published analytical methods reported in literature for qualitative and quantitative determination of anticoagulant rodenticides in biological specimens. These techniques include high performance liquid chromatography coupled with ultraviolet and florescence detectors, liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography with high resolution tandem mass spectrometry, ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, gas chromatography mass spectrometry, ion chromatography with fluorescence detection, ion chromatography electrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometry and ion chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

  14. Application of Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy to Biological Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chongmok; Kwak, Juhyoun; Bard, Allen J.

    1990-03-01

    The scanning electrochemical microscope can be used in the feedback mode in two-dimensional scans over biological substrates to obtain topographic information at the micrometer level. In this mode, the effect of distance between a substrate (either conductive or insulating) and a scanning ultramicroelectrode tip on the electrolytic current flowing at the tip is recorded as a function of the tip x-y position. Scans of the upper surface of a grass leaf and the lower surface of a Ligustrum sinensis leaf (which show open stomata structures) immersed in aqueous solution are shown. Scans of the upper surface of an elodea leaf in the dark and under irradiation, where the tip reaction is the reduction of oxygen produced by photosynthesis, demonstrate the possibility of obtaining information about the distribution of reaction sites on the substrate surface.

  15. Energy loss and straggling of MeV ions through biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Lei; Wang Yugang; Xue Jianming; Chen Qizhong; Zhang Weiming; Zhang Yanwen

    2007-10-15

    Energy loss and energy straggling of energetic ions through natural dehydrated biological samples were investigated using transmission technique. Biological samples (onion membrane, egg coat, and tomato coat) with different mass thickness were studied, together with Mylar for comparison. The energy loss and energy straggling of MeV H and He ions after penetrating the biological and Mylar samples were measured. The experimental results show that the average energy losses of MeV ions through the biological samples are consistent with SRIM predictions; however, large deviation in energy straggling is observed between the measured results and the SRIM predictions. Taking into account inhomogeneity in mass density and structure of the biological sample, an energy straggling formula is suggested, and the experimental energy straggling values are well predicted by the proposed formula.

  16. Energy loss and straggling of MeV ions through biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Lie; Wang, Yugang; Xue, Jianming; Chen, Qizhong; Zhang, Weiming; Zhang, Yanwen

    2007-10-15

    Energy loss and energy straggling of energetic ions through natural dehydrated biological samples were investigated using transmission technique. Biological samples (onion membrane, egg coat and tomato coat) with different mass thickness were studied, together with mylar for comparison, in this work. The energy loss and energy straggling of MeV H and He ions after penetrating from the biological and mylar samples were measured. The experimental results show that the average energy losses of MeV ions through the biological samples are consistent with SRIM predictions, however, large deviation in energy straggling is observed between the measured result and the SRIM predictions. Taking into account inhomogeneity in mass density and structure of the biological sample, an energy straggling formula is suggested, and the experimental energy straggling values are well predicated by the proposed formula.

  17. Solid-phase extraction of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions from environmental samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS).

    PubMed

    Duran, Celal; Gundogdu, Ali; Bulut, Volkan Numan; Soylak, Mustafa; Elci, Latif; Sentürk, Hasan Basri; Tüfekci, Mehmet

    2007-07-19

    A new method using a column packed with Amberlite XAD-2010 resin as a solid-phase extractant has been developed for the multi-element preconcentration of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II) ions based on their complex formation with the sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (Na-DDTC) prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometric (FAAS) determinations. Metal complexes sorbed on the resin were eluted by 1 mol L(-1) HNO3 in acetone. Effects of the analytical conditions over the preconcentration yields of the metal ions, such as pH, quantity of Na-DDTC, eluent type, sample volume and flow rate, foreign ions etc. have been investigated. The limits of detection (LOD) of the analytes were found in the range 0.08-0.26 microg L(-1). The method was validated by analyzing three certified reference materials. The method has been applied for the determination of trace elements in some environmental samples.

  18. Experiment kits for processing biological samples inflight on SLS-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, P. D.; Hinds, W. E.; Jaquez, R.; Evans, J.; Dubrovin, L.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes development of an innovative, modular approach to packaging the instruments used to obtain and preserve the inflight rodent tissue and blood samples associated with hematology experiments on the Spacelab Life Sciences-2 (SLS-2) mission. The design approach organized the multitude of instruments into twelve 5- x 6- x l-in. kits which were each used for a particular experiment. Each kit contained the syringes, vials, microscope slides, etc., necessary for processing and storing blood and tissue samples for one rat on a particular day. A total of 1245 components, packaged into 128 kits and stowed in 17 Zero(registered trademark) boxes, were required. Crewmembers found the design easy to use and laid out in a logical, simple configuration which minimized chances for error during the complex procedures in flight. This paper also summarizes inflight performance of the kits on SLS-2.

  19. Micro-differential scanning calorimeter for liquid biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shuyu; Yu, Shifeng; Siedler, Michael S.; Ihnat, Peter M.; Filoti, Dana I.; Lu, Ming; Zuo, Lei

    2016-10-20

    Here, we developed an ultrasensitive micro-DSC (differential scanning calorimeter) for liquid protein sample characterization. Our design integrated vanadium oxide thermistors and flexible polymer substrates with microfluidics chambers to achieve a high sensitivity (6 V/W), low thermal conductivity (0.7 mW/K), high power resolutions (40 nW), and well-defined liquid volume (1 μl) calorimeter sensor in a compact and cost-effective way. Furthermore, we demonstrated the performance of the sensor with lysozyme unfolding. The measured transition temperature and enthalpy change were in accordance with the previous literature data. This micro-DSC could potentially raise the prospect of high-throughput biochemical measurement by parallel operation with miniaturized sample consumption.

  20. Micro-differential scanning calorimeter for liquid biological samples

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Shuyu; Yu, Shifeng; Siedler, Michael S.; ...

    2016-10-20

    Here, we developed an ultrasensitive micro-DSC (differential scanning calorimeter) for liquid protein sample characterization. Our design integrated vanadium oxide thermistors and flexible polymer substrates with microfluidics chambers to achieve a high sensitivity (6 V/W), low thermal conductivity (0.7 mW/K), high power resolutions (40 nW), and well-defined liquid volume (1 μl) calorimeter sensor in a compact and cost-effective way. Furthermore, we demonstrated the performance of the sensor with lysozyme unfolding. The measured transition temperature and enthalpy change were in accordance with the previous literature data. This micro-DSC could potentially raise the prospect of high-throughput biochemical measurement by parallel operation with miniaturizedmore » sample consumption.« less

  1. Soft Robotic Grippers for Biological Sampling on Deep Reefs.

    PubMed

    Galloway, Kevin C; Becker, Kaitlyn P; Phillips, Brennan; Kirby, Jordan; Licht, Stephen; Tchernov, Dan; Wood, Robert J; Gruber, David F

    2016-03-01

    This article presents the development of an underwater gripper that utilizes soft robotics technology to delicately manipulate and sample fragile species on the deep reef. Existing solutions for deep sea robotic manipulation have historically been driven by the oil industry, resulting in destructive interactions with undersea life. Soft material robotics relies on compliant materials that are inherently impedance matched to natural environments and to soft or fragile organisms. We demonstrate design principles for soft robot end effectors, bench-top characterization of their grasping performance, and conclude by describing in situ testing at mesophotic depths. The result is the first use of soft robotics in the deep sea for the nondestructive sampling of benthic fauna.

  2. Soft Robotic Grippers for Biological Sampling on Deep Reefs

    PubMed Central

    Galloway, Kevin C.; Becker, Kaitlyn P.; Phillips, Brennan; Kirby, Jordan; Licht, Stephen; Tchernov, Dan; Gruber, David F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This article presents the development of an underwater gripper that utilizes soft robotics technology to delicately manipulate and sample fragile species on the deep reef. Existing solutions for deep sea robotic manipulation have historically been driven by the oil industry, resulting in destructive interactions with undersea life. Soft material robotics relies on compliant materials that are inherently impedance matched to natural environments and to soft or fragile organisms. We demonstrate design principles for soft robot end effectors, bench-top characterization of their grasping performance, and conclude by describing in situ testing at mesophotic depths. The result is the first use of soft robotics in the deep sea for the nondestructive sampling of benthic fauna. PMID:27625917

  3. Use of STM for analysis of surfaces of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permjakov, N. K.; Ananyan, M. A.; Luskinovich, P. N.; Sorokovoi, V. I.; Saveliev, S. V.

    1999-04-01

    Scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) was used to image the cell surfaces of the olfactory organ of the shark Carcharhinus longimanus and ectoderm of the frog Xenopus laevis blastulae of 1024 stages, as well as human low-density lipoproteins surface. The samples from two of these objects were prepared by using traditional techniques for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The lipoprotein samples were prepared by drying in the air. A comparison of the STM images with the earlier obtained SEM images indicates that there are some earlier unknown details of the surface structures of receptor microvilli and support cell membranes of the olfactory organ of the shark. There was found a fold of membrane on the surface of the ectodermal frog embryo cells, which covered yolk granules. STM images of the lipoprotein surface were obtained without increasing conductivity treatment.

  4. Micro-differential scanning calorimeter for liquid biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuyu; Yu, Shifeng; Siedler, Michael S.; Ihnat, Peter M.; Filoti, Dana I.; Lu, Ming; Zuo, Lei

    2016-10-01

    We developed an ultrasensitive micro-DSC (differential scanning calorimeter) for liquid protein sample characterization. This design integrated vanadium oxide thermistors and flexible polymer substrates with microfluidics chambers to achieve a high sensitivity (6 V/W), low thermal conductivity (0.7 mW/K), high power resolutions (40 nW), and well-defined liquid volume (1 μl) calorimeter sensor in a compact and cost-effective way. We further demonstrated the performance of the sensor with lysozyme unfolding. The measured transition temperature and enthalpy change were in accordance with the previous literature data. This micro-DSC could potentially raise the prospect of high-throughput biochemical measurement by parallel operation with miniaturized sample consumption.

  5. Deep Penetration of Charged Particles in Biological Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui-Jin; Xia, Yue-Yuan; Mu, Yu-Guang; Zhao, Ming-Wen; Ma, Yu-Chen; Liu, Xiang-Dong; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Liu, Ji-Tian; Yu, Zeng-Liang

    2001-02-01

    Experimental evidence of abnormally deep penetration in some botanical targets by low-energy ion beams is presented. The energy spectra of 818 keV He+ ions penetrating a 70 µm thick seed coat of maize, fruit peel of grape and of tomato all have a common feature. The leading edges of these broad spectra indicate that some of the penetrating ions pass through the thick targets easily and only lose a small fraction of their initial incident energy. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and electron microprobe measurements are used to determine the argon concentration in multilayer samples of the seed coat of maize implanted by 200 keV Ar+ ions. The results show that about 10% of the Ar+ ions can penetrate deeper than ~100 µm in these samples.

  6. Effect of ultraviolet C radiation on biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Gršković, Branka; Zrnec, Dario; Popović, Maja; Petek, Maja Jelena; Primorac, Dragan; Mršić, Gordan

    2013-01-01

    Aim To examine the influence of ultraviolet C (UVC) radiation on blood, saliva, semen, and naked DNA samples for preventing DNA cross-contamination on working surfaces in laboratories. Methods Blood, saliva, semen, and DNA isolated from buccal swab samples were obtained from a single male donor and applied to the laboratory working surfaces. UVC radiation was applied to these diluted and undiluted samples with or without previous decontamination of the working surfaces with 10% sodium hypochlorite and 20% ethanol. Genomic DNA was extracted using Chelex. After quantification, DNA was amplified using the AmpFlSTR® NGM™ PCR Amplification Kit. We tested and statistically analyzed DNA concentration, UVC dose, sample volume, radiation time, the number of correctly detected alleles on genetic loci, and the number of correctly detected alleles in four groups in which 16 loci were divided. Results When working surfaces were not decontaminated and were treated only with UVC radiation in the laboratory, the genetic profile for naked DNA could not be obtained after 2 minutes of UVC radiation and for saliva after 54 hours. For blood and semen, a partial genetic profile was obtained even after 250 hours of UVC radiation in the laminar. When working surfaces were decontaminated with 10% sodium hypochlorite and 20% ethanol, genetic profile could not be obtained for naked DNA after 2 minutes, for saliva after 4 hours, for blood after 16 hours, and for semen after 8 hours of UVC radiation in the laboratory. Conclusion It is recommended to carefully and thoroughly clean working surfaces with 10% sodium hypochlorite and 20% ethanol followed by minimal 16-hour UVC exposure (dose approximately 4380 mJ/cm2) for complete and successful decontamination. PMID:23771757

  7. Evaluation of Biological Sample Preparation for Immunosignature-Based Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Chase, Brian Andrew; Legutki, Joseph Barten

    2012-01-01

    To address the need for a universal system to assess health status, we previously described a method termed “immunosignaturing” which splays the entire humoral antibody repertoire across a peptide microarray. Two important issues relative to the potential broad use of immunosignatures are sample preparation and stability. In the present study, we compared the immunosignatures developed from serum, plasma, saliva, and antibodies eluted from blood dried onto filter paper. We found that serum and plasma provide identical immunosignatures. Immunosignatures derived from dried blood also correlated well with those from nondried serum from the same individual. Immunosignatures derived from dried blood were capable of distinguishing naïve mice from those infected with influenza virus. Saliva was applied to the arrays, and the IgA immunosignature correlated strongly with that from dried blood. Finally, we demonstrate that dried blood retains immunosignature information even when exposed to high temperature. This work expands the potential diagnostic uses for immunosignatures. These features suggest that different forms of archival samples can be used for diagnosis development and that in prospective studies samples can be easily procured. PMID:22237890

  8. Simultaneous gas chromatographic determination of dibutyltin and tributyltin compounds in biological and sediment samples

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuda, T.; Nakanishi, H.; Morita, T.; Takebayashi, J.

    1986-11-01

    A method is described for the simultaneous determination of nanogram amounts of dibutyltin and tributyltin compounds in biological and sediment samples. These compounds are converted to the corresponding chlorides with HCl, extracted with ethyl acetate-hexane (3 + 2) for biological samples and with hexane for sediment samples, and hydrogenated with sodium borohydride. The corresponding hydrides, Bu2SnH2 and Bu3SnH, are detected by electron-capture gas chromatography after cleanup by silica gel column chromatography. Detection limits are 1.0-2.0 and 0.5-1.0 ng/g, respectively, for biological and sediment samples.

  9. Copper(II) and nickel(II) complexes of benzyloxybenzaldehyde-4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone: Synthesis, characterization and biological activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prathima, B.; Subba Rao, Y.; Adinarayana Reddy, S.; Reddy, Y. P.; Varada Reddy, A.

    2010-09-01

    Benzyloxybenzaldehyde-4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone ligand (L) has been synthesized from benzyloxybenzaldehyde and 4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazide. Complexes of this ligand with chlorides of Cu(II) and Ni(II) have been prepared. The structure of the ligand (L) is proposed based on elemental analysis, IR and 1H NMR spectra. Its complexes with Cu(II) and Ni(II) ions are characterized from the studies of electronic as well as EPR spectra. On the basis of electronic and EPR studies, rhombically distorted octahedral structure has been proposed for Cu(II) complex while the Ni(II) complex has been found to acquire an octahedral structure. The ligand and their metal complexes have been tested in vitro for their biological effects. Their antibacterial activities against Gram-negative bacteria ( Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae) and Gram-positive bacteria ( Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) have been investigated. The prepared metal complexes exhibit higher antibacterial activities than the parent ligand. The in vitro antioxidant activity of free ligand and its metal(II) complexes have also been investigated and the results however reveal that the ligand exhibits greater antioxidant activity than its complexes.

  10. Copper(II) and nickel(II) complexes of benzyloxybenzaldehyde-4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone: Synthesis, characterization and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Prathima, B; Subba Rao, Y; Adinarayana Reddy, S; Reddy, Y P; Varada Reddy, A

    2010-09-15

    Benzyloxybenzaldehyde-4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone ligand (L) has been synthesized from benzyloxybenzaldehyde and 4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazide. Complexes of this ligand with chlorides of Cu(II) and Ni(II) have been prepared. The structure of the ligand (L) is proposed based on elemental analysis, IR and (1)H NMR spectra. Its complexes with Cu(II) and Ni(II) ions are characterized from the studies of electronic as well as EPR spectra. On the basis of electronic and EPR studies, rhombically distorted octahedral structure has been proposed for Cu(II) complex while the Ni(II) complex has been found to acquire an octahedral structure. The ligand and their metal complexes have been tested in vitro for their biological effects. Their antibacterial activities against Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae) and Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) have been investigated. The prepared metal complexes exhibit higher antibacterial activities than the parent ligand. The in vitro antioxidant activity of free ligand and its metal(II) complexes have also been investigated and the results however reveal that the ligand exhibits greater antioxidant activity than its complexes.

  11. Elemental distribution and sample integrity comparison of freeze-dried and frozen-hydrated biological tissue samples with nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavpetič, P.; Vogel-Mikuš, K.; Jeromel, L.; Ogrinc Potočnik, N.; Pongrac, P.; Drobne, D.; Pipan Tkalec, Ž.; Novak, S.; Kos, M.; Koren, Š.; Regvar, M.; Pelicon, P.

    2015-04-01

    The analysis of biological samples in frozen-hydrated state with micro-PIXE technique at Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI) nuclear microprobe has matured to a point that enables us to measure and examine frozen tissue samples routinely as a standard research method. Cryotome-cut slice of frozen-hydrated biological sample is mounted between two thin foils and positioned on the sample holder. The temperature of the cold stage in the measuring chamber is kept below 130 K throughout the insertion of the samples and the proton beam exposure. Matrix composition of frozen-hydrated tissue is consisted mostly of ice. Sample deterioration during proton beam exposure is monitored during the experiment, as both Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) in on-off axis geometry are recorded together with the events in two PIXE detectors and backscattered ions from the chopper in a single list-mode file. The aim of this experiment was to determine differences and similarities between two kinds of biological sample preparation techniques for micro-PIXE analysis, namely freeze-drying and frozen-hydrated sample preparation in order to evaluate the improvements in the elemental localisation of the latter technique if any. In the presented work, a standard micro-PIXE configuration for tissue mapping at JSI was used with five detection systems operating in parallel, with proton beam cross section of 1.0 × 1.0 μm2 and a beam current of 100 pA. The comparison of the resulting elemental distributions measured at the biological tissue prepared in the frozen-hydrated and in the freeze-dried state revealed differences in elemental distribution of particular elements at the cellular level due to the morphology alteration in particular tissue compartments induced either by water removal in the lyophilisation process or by unsatisfactory preparation of samples for cutting and mounting during the shock-freezing phase of sample preparation.

  12. Application of carrier element free coprecipitation (CEFC) method for determination of Co(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) ions in food and water samples.

    PubMed

    Serencam, Huseyin; Duran, Celal; Ozdes, Duygu; Bektas, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    A simple and highly sensitive separation and preconcentration procedure, which has minimal impact on the environment, has been developed. The procedure is based on the carrier element free coprecipitation (CEFC) of Co(II), Cu(II), and Ni(II) ions by using 2-{4-[2-(1H-indol-3-yl)ethyl]-3-(4-methylbenzyl)-5-oxo-4,5-dihydro- 1H-1,2,4-triazol-l-yl}-N'-(pyridin-2-yl methylidene)acetohydrazide (IMOTPA), as an organic coprecipitant. The levels of analyte ions were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The detection limits for Co(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) ions were found to be 0.40, 0.16 and 0.17 microg L(-1), respectively, and the relative standard deviations for the analyte ions were lower than 3.0%. Spike tests and certified reference material analyses were performed to validate the method. The method was successfully applied for the determination of Co(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) ions levels in sea and stream water as liquid samples and red pepper, black pepper, and peppermint as solid samples.

  13. The year's new drugs & biologics 2014 - Part II: trends & challenges.

    PubMed

    Graul, A I; Serebrov, M; Cruces, E; Tracy, M; Dulsat, C

    2015-02-01

    2014 was a year of continued high activity in the pharma and biotech industry, as evidenced in part I of this annual two-part review article published last month in this journal (1). As of December 23, 2014, a total of 55 new chemical and biological entities had reached their first markets worldwide, together with another 29 important new line extensions. Another 19 products were approved for the first time during the year but not yet launched by December 23. Furthermore, during the now-traditional year-end sprint, several regulatory agencies issued last-minute approvals for other compounds that missed the deadline for inclusion in that article, bringing the total of new approvals for the year to a somewhat higher number. In addition to the successful development, registration and launch of new drugs and biologics, there are various other trends and tendencies that serve as indicators of the overall health and status of the industry. These include the pursuit of novel programs designed by regulators to stimulate the development of drugs for diseases that are currently under-treated; the regular and pragmatic culling by companies of their R&D pipelines; and the decision to unify pipelines, portfolios and sales forces through mergers and acquisitions.

  14. Characterization and purification of glycosaminoglycans from crude biological samples.

    PubMed

    Davies, N P; Roubin, R H; Whitelock, J M

    2008-01-23

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) is a glycosaminoglycan derived from cartilage and commonly used to treat osteoarthritis, psoriasis, and other conditions. The dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) assay has been used often to measure glycosaminoglycan levels in relatively pure samples. In this study, we verified the accuracy of the DMMB assay in measuring CS levels in unpurified extract from bovine trachea and shark cartilage, despite potential interference from salts, proteins, and DNA. We found that the glycosaminoglycan signal obtained was due to CS and not to other glycosaminoglycan species. This was confirmed using fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis, which also revealed that the majority of the CS was monosulfated at the C4 or C6 position. Finally, we used anion-exchange chromatography to purify the bovine extract and obtained complete recovery of the glycosaminoglycans, with no contaminating protein. The results of this study should be very useful for future purification and analysis of this common supplement.

  15. Broad Consent For Research With Biological Samples: Workshop Conclusions

    PubMed Central

    Grady, Christine; Eckstein, Lisa; Berkman, Ben; Brock, Dan; Cook-Deegan, Robert; Fullerton, Stephanie M.; Greely, Hank; Hansson, Mats G.; Hull, Sara; Kim, Scott; Lo, Bernie; Pentz, Rebecca; Rodriguez, Laura; Weil, Carol; Wilfond, Benjamin S.; Wendler, David

    2016-01-01

    Different types of consent are used to obtain human biospecimens for future research. This variation has resulted in confusion regarding what research is permitted, inadvertent constraints on future research, and research proceeding without consent. The NIH Clinical Center’s Department of Bioethics held a workshop to consider the ethical acceptability of addressing these concerns by using broad consent for future research on stored biospecimens. Multiple bioethics scholars, who have written on these issues, discussed the reasons for consent, the range of consent strategies, gaps in our understanding, and concluded with a proposal for broad initial consent coupled with oversight and, when feasible, ongoing provision of information to donors. The manuscript describes areas of agreement as well as areas that need more research and dialogue. Given recent proposed changes to the Common Rule, and new guidance regarding storing and sharing data and samples, this is an important and timely topic. PMID:26305750

  16. Multiphoton imaging of biological samples during freezing and heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, H. G.; Uchugonova, A.; König, K.

    2014-02-01

    We applied multiphoton microscopic imaging to observe freezing and heating effects in plant- and animal cell samples. The experimental setups consisted of a multiphoton imaging system and a heating and cooling stage which allows for precise temperature control from liquid nitrogen temperature (-196°C 77 K) up to +600°C (873 K) with heating/freezing rates between 0.01 K/min and 150 K/min. Two multiphoton imaging systems were used: a system based on a modified optical microscope and a flexible mobile system. To illustrate the imaging capabilities, plant leafs as well as animal cells were microscopically imaged in vivo during freezing based on autofluorescence lifetime and intensity of intrinsic molecules. The measurements illustrate the usefulness of multiphoton imaging to investigate freezing effects on animal and plant cells.

  17. Reaction mechanism of Ru(II) piano-stool complexes: umbrella sampling QM/MM MD study.

    PubMed

    Futera, Zdeněk; Burda, Jaroslav V

    2014-07-15

    Biologically relevant interactions of piano-stool ruthenium(II) complexes with ds-DNA are studied in this article by hybrid quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics (QM/MM) computational technique. The whole reaction mechanism is divided into three phases: (i) hydration of the [Ru(II) (η(6) -benzene)(en)Cl](+) complex, (ii) monoadduct formation between the resulting aqua-Ru(II) complex and N7 position of one of the guanines in the ds-DNA oligomer, and (iii) formation of the intrastrand Ru(II) bridge (cross-link) between two adjacent guanines. Free energy profiles of all the reactions are explored by QM/MM MD umbrella sampling approach where the Ru(II) complex and two guanines represent a quantum core, which is described by density functional theory methods. The combined QM/MM scheme is realized by our own software, which was developed to couple several quantum chemical programs (in this study Gaussian 09) and Amber 11 package. Calculated free energy barriers of the both ruthenium hydration and Ru(II)-N7(G) DNA binding process are in good agreement with experimentally measured rate constants. Then, this method was used to study the possibility of cross-link formation. One feasible pathway leading to Ru(II) guanine-guanine cross-link with synchronous releasing of the benzene ligand is predicted. The cross-linking is an exergonic process with the energy barrier lower than for the monoadduct reaction of Ru(II) complex with ds-DNA. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Cloud-point extraction, preconcentration and spectrophotometric determination of trace quantities of copper in food, water and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Gouda, Ayman A; Amin, Alaa S

    2014-01-01

    A new, simple and sensitive cloud point extraction procedure was presented for the preconcentration and determination of copper(II) ion in food, water and biological samples. The analyte was complexed with a new synthesized reagent, 2-amino-4-(m-tolylazo)pyridine-3-ol (ATAP) as a new complexing agent and Triton X-114 as the surfactant. After centrifugation, dilution of the surfactant-rich phase with 0.4 mL of ethanol acidified with 1.0M HNO3 was performed after phase separation, and the copper contents were measured by spectrophotometry at λmax 608 nm. The influence of analytical parameters including concentration of complexing agent, Triton X-114, pH, equilibration temperature and time, centrifuge rate and time were optimized. The analytical characteristics of the method (e.g. linear range, molar absorptivity, Sandell sensitivity, optimum Ringbom concentration ranges limits of detection and quantification, preconcentration factor, and improvement factors) were obtained. Linearity was obeyed in the range of 4.0-115 ng mL(-1) of Cu(II) ion. The detection and quantification limits of the method were 1.20 and 3.94 ng mL(-1) of Cu(II) ion, respectively. The interference effect of some anions and cations was also tested. The method was applied for determination of copper in food, water and biological samples. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Physicochemical and biological properties of oxovanadium(IV), cobalt(II) and nickel(II) complexes with oxydiacetate anions.

    PubMed

    Wyrzykowski, Dariusz; Kloska, Anna; Pranczk, Joanna; Szczepańska, Aneta; Tesmar, Aleksandra; Jacewicz, Dagmara; Pilarski, Bogusław; Chmurzyński, Lech

    2015-03-01

    The potentiometric and conductometric titration methods have been used to characterize the stability of series of VO(IV)-, Co(II)- and Ni(II)-oxydiacetato complexes in DMSO-water solutions containing 0-50 % (v/v) DMSO. The influence of DMSO as a co-solvent on the stability of the complexes as well as the oxydiacetic acid was evaluated. Furthermore, the reactivity of the complexes towards superoxide free radicals was assessed by employing the nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) assay. The biological properties of the complexes were investigated in relation to their cytoprotective activity against the oxidative damage generated exogenously by using hydrogen peroxide in the Human Dermal Fibroblasts adult (HDFa) cell line as well as to their antimicrobial activity against the bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis). The relationship between physicochemical and biological properties of the complexes was discussed.

  20. Spectral, thermal and biological studies of Mn(II) and Cu(II) complexes with two thiosemicarbazide derivatives.

    PubMed

    Refat, Moamen S; El-Metwaly, Nashwa M

    2012-06-15

    Two derivatives of thiosemicarbazide were prepared. Their complexes were prepared using Mn(II) and Cu(II) salts. All the isolated complexes are characterized using the following spectra: IR, UV-Vis, Mass, (1)H NMR and X-ray diffraction. Magnetic measurements and thermal analysis are the other additive tools for complete investigation. Mononuclear and binuclear complexes are proposed based on elemental analysis mainly. The IR spectra offer the mode of coordination of each ligand with each metal ion. The electronic spectra and magnetic measurements are proposing the structural geometry of the investigated complexes. The octahedral geometry proposed for Mn(II) complexes but the square-planar for Cu(II) complexes. The (1)H NMR spectra were done for all organic compounds used in this study and displaying the most suitable tautomer of them. X-ray diffraction of H(2)L(1) and its complexes show their amorphous nature but H(2)L(2) ligand and its complexes show their nanocrystalline nature. The TG analysis was used to prove the presence of solvent molecules attached with the complexes as covalently or physically. Finally, the biological investigation was carried out for H(2)L(2) ligand and its complexes and displaying the inhibition activity of Cu(II) complex than the Mn(II) one.

  1. Spectral, thermal and biological studies of Mn(II) and Cu(II) complexes with two thiosemicarbazide derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; El-Metwaly, Nashwa M.

    Two derivatives of thiosemicarbazide were prepared. Their complexes were prepared using Mn(II) and Cu(II) salts. All the isolated complexes are characterized using the following spectra: IR, UV-Vis, Mass, 1H NMR and X-ray diffraction. Magnetic measurements and thermal analysis are the other additive tools for complete investigation. Mononuclear and binuclear complexes are proposed based on elemental analysis mainly. The IR spectra offer the mode of coordination of each ligand with each metal ion. The electronic spectra and magnetic measurements are proposing the structural geometry of the investigated complexes. The octahedral geometry proposed for Mn(II) complexes but the square-planar for Cu(II) complexes. The 1H NMR spectra were done for all organic compounds used in this study and displaying the most suitable tautomer of them. X-ray diffraction of H2L1 and its complexes show their amorphous nature but H2L2 ligand and its complexes show their nanocrystalline nature. The TG analysis was used to prove the presence of solvent molecules attached with the complexes as covalently or physically. Finally, the biological investigation was carried out for H2L2 ligand and its complexes and displaying the inhibition activity of Cu(II) complex than the Mn(II) one.

  2. Magnetic separation techniques in sample preparation for biological analysis: a review.

    PubMed

    He, Jincan; Huang, Meiying; Wang, Dongmei; Zhang, Zhuomin; Li, Gongke

    2014-12-01

    Sample preparation is a fundamental and essential step in almost all the analytical procedures, especially for the analysis of complex samples like biological and environmental samples. In past decades, with advantages of superparamagnetic property, good biocompatibility and high binding capacity, functionalized magnetic materials have been widely applied in various processes of sample preparation for biological analysis. In this paper, the recent advancements of magnetic separation techniques based on magnetic materials in the field of sample preparation for biological analysis were reviewed. The strategy of magnetic separation techniques was summarized. The synthesis, stabilization and bio-functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles were reviewed in detail. Characterization of magnetic materials was also summarized. Moreover, the applications of magnetic separation techniques for the enrichment of protein, nucleic acid, cell, bioactive compound and immobilization of enzyme were described. Finally, the existed problems and possible trends of magnetic separation techniques for biological analysis in the future were proposed.

  3. Design and implementation of a high-throughput biological sample processing facility using modern manufacturing principles.

    PubMed

    Downey, Paul; Peakman, Tim C

    2008-04-01

    UK Biobank is a prospective study that is collecting biological samples and health and lifestyle data from 500 000 volunteer participants over a 4-year period. These data will be used to facilitate biological and medical research. Modern manufacturing principles were used to direct the development of the sample processing facility and automated systems. A fit for purpose facility comprising technology, systems, dedicated process, infrastructure and an appropriate staff structure has been implemented that will deliver and maintain a resource that will support the long-term goals of the UK Biobank study. Modern manufacturing principles are appropriate for use in the development of a high throughput biological sample processing facility.

  4. Quantification of sparfloxacin in pharmaceutical dosages and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Shah, Jasmin; Jan, Muhammad Rasul; Khan, Inayatullah; Khan, Muhammad Naeem

    2012-10-01

    A simple and fast method for spectrophotometric determination of sparfloxacin using p-dimethyl-aminobenzaldehyde (DMAB) has been developed. A yellow coloured product formed from reaction between sparfloxacin and DMAB as a result of condensation reaction at room temperature. The maximum absorbance was found at 392 nm with molar absorptivity of 4.9 × 10(3) L mol(-1) cm(-1). All parameters for the reaction, as concentration of DMBA reagent, molarity of sulphuric acid, and reaction temperature were studied. Under the conditions studied, a linear relationship between absorbance of the condensation product and concentration of sparfloxacin in the range of 2.0-80.0 μg mL(-1) was found with good correlation coefficient (0.9997). The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) for the proposed method were found to be 0.22 and 0.75 μg mL(-1) respectively. The repeatability and accuracy (model) of the method was studied at three different concentrations of sparfloxacin and found with value of relative standard deviation less than 2.0%. The method was found selective for determination of sparfloxacin in the presence of commonly used excipients in dosage forms. The developed method was validated statistically and applied successfully to the analysis of the drug in pure form, pharmaceutical preparations, and spiked blood plasma and urine samples with good accuracy (real) and precision. The percentage recovery was found from 99.0-100.0% with relative standard deviation less than 1%. The results of the proposed method were compared statistically with the results of literature HPLC method.

  5. Sample size planning for phase II trials based on success probabilities for phase III.

    PubMed

    Götte, Heiko; Schüler, Armin; Kirchner, Marietta; Kieser, Meinhard

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, high failure rates in phase III trials were observed. One of the main reasons is overoptimistic assumptions for the planning of phase III resulting from limited phase II information and/or unawareness of realistic success probabilities. We present an approach for planning a phase II trial in a time-to-event setting that considers the whole phase II/III clinical development programme. We derive stopping boundaries after phase II that minimise the number of events under side conditions for the conditional probabilities of correct go/no-go decision after phase II as well as the conditional success probabilities for phase III. In addition, we give general recommendations for the choice of phase II sample size. Our simulations show that unconditional probabilities of go/no-go decision as well as the unconditional success probabilities for phase III are influenced by the number of events observed in phase II. However, choosing more than 150 events in phase II seems not necessary as the impact on these probabilities then becomes quite small. We recommend considering aspects like the number of compounds in phase II and the resources available when determining the sample size. The lower the number of compounds and the lower the resources are for phase III, the higher the investment for phase II should be.

  6. Effects of Cd(II) on wastewater biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Bo; Wang, Dong-Bo; Li, Xiao-Ming; Yang, Qi; Luo, Kun; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Tang, Mao-Lin

    2014-12-01

    Short-term and long-term effects of Cd(II) on wastewater biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal were investigated with respect to microorganism abundances, enzyme activities, and polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) and glycogen transformations. Though no obvious effects on wastewater biological nutrient removal were observed after short-term exposure, the long-term exposure of 10 mg L(-)(1) Cd(II) inhibited nitrification and phosphorus uptake. Compared with the absence of Cd(II), the presence of 10 mg L(-1) of Cd(II) decreased total nitrogen and phosphorus removal efficiencies from 97% and 98% to 88% and 18%, respectively. Mechanism studies revealed that Cd(II) affected the transformations of intracellular PHAs and glycogen, and the activities of oxidoreductase and polyphosphate kinase, resulted in the decrease of nitrite oxidizing bacteria and polyphosphate accumulating organisms abundance, which might be the major reason for the negative effects of long-term exposure to 10 mg L(-1) Cd(II) on biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Uniform Sampling Table Method and its Applications II--Evaluating the Uniform Sampling by Experiment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yibin; Chen, Jiaxi; Chen, Xuan; Wang, Min; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    A new method of uniform sampling is evaluated in this paper. The items and indexes were adopted to evaluate the rationality of the uniform sampling. The evaluation items included convenience of operation, uniformity of sampling site distribution, and accuracy and precision of measured results. The evaluation indexes included operational complexity, occupation rate of sampling site in a row and column, relative accuracy of pill weight, and relative deviation of pill weight. They were obtained from three kinds of drugs with different shape and size by four kinds of sampling methods. Gray correlation analysis was adopted to make the comprehensive evaluation by comparing it with the standard method. The experimental results showed that the convenience of uniform sampling method was 1 (100%), odds ratio of occupation rate in a row and column was infinity, relative accuracy was 99.50-99.89%, reproducibility RSD was 0.45-0.89%, and weighted incidence degree exceeded the standard method. Hence, the uniform sampling method was easy to operate, and the selected samples were distributed uniformly. The experimental results demonstrated that the uniform sampling method has good accuracy and reproducibility, which can be put into use in drugs analysis.

  8. Quinolones and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs interacting with copper(II), nickel(II), cobalt(II) and zinc(II): structural features, biological evaluation and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Psomas, George; Kessissoglou, Dimitris P

    2013-05-14

    The structural features of copper(II), nickel(II), cobalt(II) and zinc(II) complexes with the antimicrobial drugs quinolones and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as ligands are discussed. The binding properties of these complexes to biomolecules (calf-thymus DNA, bovine or human serum albumin) are presented and evaluated. The biological activity (antimicrobial, antioxidant and antiproliferative) of selected complexes is investigated. Further perspectives concerning the synthesis and the biological activity of novel complexes with quinolones or NSAIDs attractive to synthetic chemists, biochemists and/or biologists are presented.

  9. [Studies on acetylspiramycin. II. Biological activities of spiramycin components].

    PubMed

    Kondo, A; Sato, K; Shuto, K; Yamashita, K; Ichikawa, S; Takahashi, K; Kita, K; Nishiie, Y; Sano, H; Yamaguchi, K

    1990-09-01

    Acetylspiramycin (ASPM) was fractionated using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The peak fractions were named F1 to F7 successively in order of increasing retention times (Rt), i.e., increasing hydrophobicity, and studied for 1) antibacterial activities (MIC), 2) antibacterial potency against Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633, 3) therapeutic effect on mice infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae III, Staphylococcus aureus Smith, 4) acute toxicity by i.p. administration to mice (LD50) and 5) cytotoxicities to fibroblasts derived from Chinese-hamster lung (CHL), cow pulmonary artery endothelial cells (CPAE) and rat hepatic cells. The results obtained are summarized below. 1. Components F1 and 4'-acetylspiramycin F2 had significantly different biological activities from those of other components: F1 showed the lowest antibacterial potency of 492 micrograms (potency)/mg, F2 showed the highest antibacterial potency of 2,040 micrograms (potency)/mg and correspondingly the lowest LD50 value of 692 mg/kg (the highest toxicity). The therapeutic effect of F2 on infections in mice was found to be the second smallest and was superior only to that of F1. The LD50 value of F1 was 1,200 mg/kg and similar to that of ASPM. 2. Antibacterial potencies of F3, F4, F5 and F6 were 1,165, 1,266, 1,374 and 1,530 micrograms (potency)/mg, respectively; fraction with the higher antibacterial activities corresponded to the longer retention times, i.e., the greater hydrophobicities. The most hydrophobic component, F7, 3-propionyl-3",4"-diacetylspiramycin, however, showed a low antibacterial potency of 1,085 micrograms (potency)/mg, next to the lowest one, F1, a fact which was in contradiction to with the sequential relation between hydrophobicities and potencies from F3 to F6.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Determination of the Biologically Relevant Sampling Depth for Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecological Risk Assessments (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Ecological Risk Assessment Support Center (ERASC) announced the release of the final report, Determination of the Biologically Relevant Sampling Depth for Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecological Risk Assessments. This technical paper provides defensible approximations fo...

  11. The effect of sterilization on biological, organic geochemical and morphological information in natural samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, L. I.; Kvenvolden, K. A.; Philpott, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    The loss of biological, organic geochemical, and morphological science information that may occur should a Mars surface sample be sterilized prior to return to earth is examined. Results of experimental studies are summarized.

  12. Pettit prepares to insert biological samples in the MELFI-1 in the JPM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-01-26

    ISS030-E-050849 (26 Jan. 2012) --- NASA astronaut Don Pettit, Expedition 30 flight engineer, prepares to insert biological samples in the Minus Eighty Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI-1) in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station.

  13. Pettit prepares to insert biological samples in the MELFI-1 in the JPM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-01-26

    ISS030-E-050848 (26 Jan. 2012) --- NASA astronaut Don Pettit, Expedition 30 flight engineer, prepares to insert biological samples in the Minus Eighty Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI-1) in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station.

  14. Pettit prepares to insert biological samples in the MELFI in the JPM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-01-26

    ISS030-E-050864 (26 Jan. 2012) --- NASA astronaut Don Pettit, Expedition 30 flight engineer, prepares to insert biological samples in the Minus Eighty Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI-1) in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station.

  15. Determination of the Biologically Relevant Sampling Depth for Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecological Risk Assessments (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Ecological Risk Assessment Support Center (ERASC) announced the release of the final report, Determination of the Biologically Relevant Sampling Depth for Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecological Risk Assessments. This technical paper provides defensible approximations fo...

  16. Observations of the Ca ii IR Triplet in High Luminosity Quasars: Exploring the Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Aldama, Mary Loli; Marziani, Paola; Dultzin, Deborah; Sulentic, Jack W.; Bressan, Alessandro; Chen, Yang; Stirpe, Giovanna M.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new spectroscopic sample of 11 quasars at intermediate redshift observed with the Infrared Spectrometer and Array Camera (ISAAC) on the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT), covering O i λ8446 and the Ca ii triplet 8498, 8542, 8662. The new observations - that supplement the sample presented by Martínez-Aldama et al. (2015) - allow us to confirm the constraints on physical conditions and location of the region emitting the low ionization lines, as well as the relation between Ca ii and Fe ii.

  17. Synthesis, Structural Characterization, and Biological Activity Studies of Ni(II) and Zn(II) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kavitha, Palakuri; Laxma Reddy, K.

    2014-01-01

    Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes were synthesized from tridentate 3-formyl chromone Schiff bases such as 3-((2-hydroxyphenylimino)methyl)-4H-chromen-4-one (HL1), 2-((4-oxo-4H-chromen-3-yl)methylneamino)benzoic acid (HL2), 3-((3-hydroxypyridin-2-ylimino)methyl)-4H-chromen-4-one (HL3), and 3-((2-mercaptophenylimino)methyl)-4H-chromen-4-one (HL4). All the complexes were characterized in the light of elemental analysis, molar conductance, FTIR, UV-VIS, magnetic, thermal, powder XRD, and SEM studies. The conductance and spectroscopic data suggested that, the ligands act as neutral and monobasic tridentate ligands and form octahedral complexes with general formula [M(L1–4)2]·nH2O (M = Ni(II) and Zn(II)). Metal complexes exhibited pronounced activity against tested bacteria and fungi strains compared to the ligands. In addition metal complexes displayed good antioxidant and moderate nematicidal activities. The cytotoxicity of ligands and their metal complexes have been evaluated by MTT assay. The DNA cleavage activity of the metal complexes was performed using agarose gel electrophoresis in the presence and absence of oxidant H2O2. All metal complexes showed significant nuclease activity in the presence of H2O2. PMID:24948904

  18. Chemical abundances in LMC stellar populations. II. The bar sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van der Swaelmen, M.; Hill, V.; Primas, F.; Cole, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    favour of an episode of enhanced star formation a few Gyr ago, occurring in the central parts of the LMC and leading to the formation of the bar. This is in agreement with recently derived star formation histories. Proposals 072.B-0293(B) and 078.B-0323(A), P.I. Vanessa Hill.Full Tables 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 and abundances tables for the LMC bar and disc samples are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/560/A44Table 11 is also available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. Utility of solid-phase spectrophotometry to determine trace amounts of zinc in environmental and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Amin, Alaa S

    2011-11-15

    A solid-phase spectrophotometric analysis has been proposed for preconcentration and determination of Zn(II) in real samples. The procedure is based on sorption of zinc(II) as 5-(2-benzothiazolylazo)-8-hydroxyquinoline (BTAHQ) complex on dextran-type anion-exchange gel (Sephadex DEAE A-25). The influences of the analytical parameters, including pH of the aqueous solution, amounts of BTAHQ, and sample volume, were investigated. The absorbance of the gel at 675 and 750 nm, packed in a 1.0-mm cell, was measured directly. The molar absorptivities were found to be 2.50×10(7) and 9.55×10(7)L mol(-1) cm(-1) for 500 and 1000 ml, respectively. Calibration was linear over the range of 0.05-1.10 μg L(-1) with a relative standard deviation of less than 1.60% (n=10). The detection and quantification limits of the 500-ml sample method were 12 and 40 ng L(-1) on using 50 mg. For the 1000-ml sample, the detection and quantification limits were 7.5 and 25 ng L(-1) using a 50-mg exchanger. Increasing the sample volume can enhance sensitivity. No considerable interferences were observed from other investigated anions and cations on the Zn(II) determination. The proposed method was applied to determine zinc in environmental samples, including natural water, food, certified reference materials, meat, and biological samples, comparing the results simultaneously with those obtained using a flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer, whereby the validity of the method was tested.

  20. Penicillamine-modified sensor for the voltammetric determination of Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions in natural samples.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ràfols, Clara; Serrano, Núria; Díaz-Cruz, José Manuel; Ariño, Cristina; Esteban, Miquel

    2015-11-01

    A new penicillamine-GCE was developed based on the immobilization of d-penicillamine on aryl diazonium salt monolayers anchored to the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) surface and it was applied for the first time to the simultaneous determination of Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions by stripping voltammetric techniques. The detection and quantification limits at levels of µg L(-1) suggest that the penicillamine-GCE could be fully suitable for the determination of the considered ions in natural samples.

  1. Biology of the tribe Ambelanieae (apocynaceae). Volumes I and II

    SciTech Connect

    Zarucchi, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    The tribe Ambelanieae consists of seventeen species of latex-bearing shrubs and trees in six genera found in the tropical lowlands of norther South America. The center of distribution as well as diversification for the Ambelanieae is the Rio Negro basin of Brazilian Amazonia. This study is based on field observations of representative species from five of the genera, supplemented by the examination of exsiccatae from the major herbaria of the world. The analysis includes a review of the taxonomic history, a presentation of a systematic treatment for the genera and species, and detailed discussions of morphology, anatomy, ecology, pollination, fruit dispersal, phenology, palynology, cytology, and biogeography. The first chromosome numbers for the tribe are reported, indicating that polyploidy occurs within the group. Pollen variability is demonstrated, not only among species of different genera but also within individual pollen samples. In reference to economic uses, some members of the tribe are suggested to hold promise for exploitation of usable latex, lightweight wood, and edible fruits. The presence of potentially important toxic and medicinal principles from several species is indicated by ethnopharmacological observations made in the northwest Amazon basin.

  2. Investigation of reflectance sampling depth in biological tissues for various common illumination/collection configurations.

    PubMed

    Zonios, George

    2014-09-01

    Knowledge of light penetration characteristics is very important in almost all studies in biomedical optics. In this work, the reflectance sampling depth in biological tissues was investigated using Monte Carlo simulations for various common illumination/collection configurations. The analysis shows that the average sampling depth can be described by two simple empirical analytical expressions over the entire typical ranges of absorption and scattering properties relevant to in vivo biological tissue, regardless of the specific illumination/collection configuration details. These results are promising and helpful for the quick, efficient, and accurate design of reflectance studies for various biological tissue applications.

  3. Biology--Chemistry--Physics, Students' Guide, A Three-Year Sequence, Parts I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Arthur; And Others

    Parts I and II of the students' guide to the three-year integrated biology, chemistry, and physics course being prepared by the Portland Project Committee are contained in this guide. A committee reviewed and selected material developed by the national course improvement groups--Physical Science Study Committee, Chemical Bond Approach, Chemical…

  4. Multielement analysis of micro-volume biological samples by ICP-MS with highly efficient sample introduction system.

    PubMed

    Takasaki, Yuka; Inagaki, Kazumi; Sabarudin, Akhmad; Fujii, Shin-Ichiro; Iwahata, Daigo; Takatsu, Akiko; Chiba, Koichi; Umemura, Tomonari

    2011-12-15

    A method for multielement analysis of micro-volume biological sample by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) with a highly efficient sample introduction system was presented. The sample introduction system was the combination of (1) an inert loop injection unit and (2) a high performance concentric nebulizer (HPCN) coupled with a temperature controllable cyclone chamber. The loop injection unit could introduce 20 μL samples into the carrier liquid flow of 10 μL min(-1) producing a stable signal for 100s without any dilution. The injection loop is continuously washed with 0.1M HNO(3) carrier solution during the measurement, thereby much improving sample throughput. The HPCN is a triple tube concentric nebulizer, which can generate fine aerosols and provide a stable and highly measurement sensitivity in ICP-MS at a liquid flow rate less than 10 μL min(-1). With the combination of the chamber heating at 60°C, the sensitivity obtained with the proposed sample introduction system at the liquid flow rate of 10 μL min(-1) was almost the same as that with a common concentric nebulizer and cyclone chamber system at the liquid flow rate of 1 mL min(-1), though the sample consumption rate of the HPCN was two orders of the magnitude lower than that of the common nebulizer. The validation of the proposed system was performed by analyzing the NIST SRM 1577b Bovine Liver. The observed values for 12 elements such as Na, P, S, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, Mo, Cd were in good agreement with their certified values and information value. Satisfactory analytical results for 14 elements such as Na, Mg, P, S, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Y, Ba in Escherichia coli sample were also obtained. The proposed sample introduction system was quite effective in the cases when only micro-volume of biological sample is available.

  5. Evaluation of pump pulsation in respirable size-selective sampling: part II. Changes in sampling efficiency.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Gyung; Lee, Taekhee; Kim, Seung Won; Lee, Larry; Flemmer, Michael M; Harper, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This second, and concluding, part of this study evaluated changes in sampling efficiency of respirable size-selective samplers due to air pulsations generated by the selected personal sampling pumps characterized in Part I (Lee E, Lee L, Möhlmann C et al. Evaluation of pump pulsation in respirable size-selective sampling: Part I. Pulsation measurements. Ann Occup Hyg 2013). Nine particle sizes of monodisperse ammonium fluorescein (from 1 to 9 μm mass median aerodynamic diameter) were generated individually by a vibrating orifice aerosol generator from dilute solutions of fluorescein in aqueous ammonia and then injected into an environmental chamber. To collect these particles, 10-mm nylon cyclones, also known as Dorr-Oliver (DO) cyclones, were used with five medium volumetric flow rate pumps. Those were the Apex IS, HFS513, GilAir5, Elite5, and Basic5 pumps, which were found in Part I to generate pulsations of 5% (the lowest), 25%, 30%, 56%, and 70% (the highest), respectively. GK2.69 cyclones were used with the Legacy [pump pulsation (PP) = 15%] and Elite12 (PP = 41%) pumps for collection at high flows. The DO cyclone was also used to evaluate changes in sampling efficiency due to pulse shape. The HFS513 pump, which generates a more complex pulse shape, was compared to a single sine wave fluctuation generated by a piston. The luminescent intensity of the fluorescein extracted from each sample was measured with a luminescence spectrometer. Sampling efficiencies were obtained by dividing the intensity of the fluorescein extracted from the filter placed in a cyclone with the intensity obtained from the filter used with a sharp-edged reference sampler. Then, sampling efficiency curves were generated using a sigmoid function with three parameters and each sampling efficiency curve was compared to that of the reference cyclone by constructing bias maps. In general, no change in sampling efficiency (bias under ±10%) was observed until pulsations exceeded 25% for the

  6. Evaluation of Pump Pulsation in Respirable Size-Selective Sampling: Part II. Changes in Sampling Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Gyung; Lee, Taekhee; Kim, Seung Won; Lee, Larry; Flemmer, Michael M.; Harper, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This second, and concluding, part of this study evaluated changes in sampling efficiency of respirable size-selective samplers due to air pulsations generated by the selected personal sampling pumps characterized in Part I (Lee E, Lee L, Möhlmann C et al. Evaluation of pump pulsation in respirable size-selective sampling: Part I. Pulsation measurements. Ann Occup Hyg 2013). Nine particle sizes of monodisperse ammonium fluorescein (from 1 to 9 μm mass median aerodynamic diameter) were generated individually by a vibrating orifice aerosol generator from dilute solutions of fluorescein in aqueous ammonia and then injected into an environmental chamber. To collect these particles, 10-mm nylon cyclones, also known as Dorr-Oliver (DO) cyclones, were used with five medium volumetric flow rate pumps. Those were the Apex IS, HFS513, GilAir5, Elite5, and Basic5 pumps, which were found in Part I to generate pulsations of 5% (the lowest), 25%, 30%, 56%, and 70% (the highest), respectively. GK2.69 cyclones were used with the Legacy [pump pulsation (PP) = 15%] and Elite12 (PP = 41%) pumps for collection at high flows. The DO cyclone was also used to evaluate changes in sampling efficiency due to pulse shape. The HFS513 pump, which generates a more complex pulse shape, was compared to a single sine wave fluctuation generated by a piston. The luminescent intensity of the fluorescein extracted from each sample was measured with a luminescence spectrometer. Sampling efficiencies were obtained by dividing the intensity of the fluorescein extracted from the filter placed in a cyclone with the intensity obtained from the filter used with a sharp-edged reference sampler. Then, sampling efficiency curves were generated using a sigmoid function with three parameters and each sampling efficiency curve was compared to that of the reference cyclone by constructing bias maps. In general, no change in sampling efficiency (bias under ±10%) was observed until pulsations exceeded 25% for the

  7. Near infrared fluorescence quenching properties of copper (II) ions for potential applications in biological imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maji, Dolonchampa; Zhou, Mingzhou; Sarder, Pinaki; Achilefu, Samuel

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescence quenching properties of copper(II) ions have been used for designing Cu(II) sensitive fluorescent molecular probes. In this paper, we demonstrate that static quenching plays a key role in free Cu(II)-mediated fluorescence quenching of a near infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye cypate. The Stern-Volmer quenching constant was calculated to be KSV = 970,000 M-1 in 25 mM MES buffer, pH 6.5 at room temperature. We synthesized LS835, a compound containing cypate attached covalently to chelated Cu(II) to study fluorescence quenching by chelated Cu(II). The fluorescence quenching mechanism of chelated Cu(II) is predominantly dynamic or collisional quenching. The quenching efficiency of chelated Cu(II) was calculated to be 58% ± 6% in dimethylsulfoxide at room temperature. Future work will involve further characterization of the mechanism of NIR fluorescence quenching by Cu(II) and testing its reversibility for potential applications in designing fluorophore-quencher based molecular probes for biological imaging.

  8. Procedures for cryogenic X-ray ptychographic imaging of biological samples

    DOE PAGES

    Yusuf, M.; Zhang, F.; Chen, B.; ...

    2017-01-12

    Biological sample-preparation procedures have been developed for imaging human chromosomes under cryogenic conditions. A new experimental setup, developed for imaging frozen samples using beamline I13 at Diamond Light Source, is described. This manuscript describes the equipment and experimental procedures as well as the authors' first ptychographic reconstructions using X-rays.

  9. Analysis of low-angle x-ray scattering peaks from lyophilized biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desouky, Omar S.; Elshemey, Wael M.; Selim, Nabila S.; Ashour, Ahmed H.

    2001-08-01

    Low-angle x-ray scattering (LAXS) from lyophilized blood and its constituents is characterized by the presence of two peaks in the forward direction of scattering. These peaks are found to be sensitive to the variations in the molecular structure of a given sample. The present work aims to explore the nature of LAXS from a variety of lyophilized biological samples. It also aims to investigate the possibility that a certain biological macromolecule is responsible of the production of LAXS peaks. This is carried out through measurements of LAXS from complex biological samples and their basic constituents. Among the measured samples are haemoglobin (Hb), globin, haem, packed red blood cells, bovine albumin, egg albumin, milk, casein, glutamine, alanine, fat, muscle and DNA. A table containing some characteristic parameters of the LAXS profiles of these samples is also presented. Analysis of measured profiles shows that all lyophilized samples produce at least one relatively broad peak at a scattering angle around 10.35°. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of this peak varies considerably among the measured samples. Except for milk and casein, one additional peak at a scattering angle around 4.65° is observed only in the LAXS profiles of proteins or protein-rich samples. This fact strongly suggests protein to be the biological macromolecule from which this characteristic peak originates. The same idea is further strengthened through discussion of some previous observations.

  10. Procedures for cryogenic X-ray ptychographic imaging of biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Yusuf, M.; Zhang, F.; Chen, B.; Bhartiya, A.; Cunnea, K.; Wagner, U.; Cacho-Nerin, F.; Schwenke, J.; Robinson, I. K.

    2017-01-01

    Biological sample-preparation procedures have been developed for imaging human chromosomes under cryogenic conditions. A new experimental setup, developed for imaging frozen samples using beamline I13 at Diamond Light Source, is described. This manuscript describes the equipment and experimental procedures as well as the authors’ first ptychographic reconstructions using X-rays. PMID:28250953

  11. Procedures for cryogenic X-ray ptychographic imaging of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, M; Zhang, F; Chen, B; Bhartiya, A; Cunnea, K; Wagner, U; Cacho-Nerin, F; Schwenke, J; Robinson, I K

    2017-03-01

    Biological sample-preparation procedures have been developed for imaging human chromosomes under cryogenic conditions. A new experimental setup, developed for imaging frozen samples using beamline I13 at Diamond Light Source, is described. This manuscript describes the equipment and experimental procedures as well as the authors' first ptychographic reconstructions using X-rays.

  12. Improvement of heme oxygenase-1-based heme sensor for quantifying free heme in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Taira, Junichi; Nakashima, Yukinori; Yoshihara, Shun; Koga, Shinya; Sueda, Shinji; Komatsu, Hideyuki; Higashimoto, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Toru; Tanioka, Nohito; Shimizu, Hiroko; Morimatsu, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Hiroshi

    2015-11-15

    We recently reported a novel heme sensor using fluorescently labeled heme oxygenase-1; however, its inherent enzyme activity would be a potential obstacle in quantifying heme in biological samples. Here, we found that mutation of the catalytically important residue, Asp140, with histidine in the sensor not only diminished the heme degradation activity but also increased heme binding affinity. The sensor with a visible fluorophore was also found to be beneficial to avoid background emission from endogenous substance in biological samples. By using the improved heme sensor, we succeeded in quantifying free heme in rat hepatic samples for the first time.

  13. Restricted accessed material-copper(II) ion imprinted polymer solid phase extraction combined with inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry for the determination of free Cu(II) in urine and serum samples.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chao; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2013-11-15

    A novel restricted accessed material (RAM)-Cu(II) ion imprinted polymer (IIP) was synthesized by the surface imprinted-emulsion method, and possessed a high selectivity to Cu(II) and good macromolecules exclusion property. And a novel method of RAM-IIP packed microcolumn solid phase extraction (SPE) combined with inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) was developed for the determination of trace free Cu(II) in human body fluids. Under the optimized conditions, the adsorption capacity of RAM-IIP for Cu(II) was 15.9 mg g(-1). With a preconcentration factor of 30, the limit of detection was 0.17 µg L(-1), and the relative standard deviation was 2.2% (n=7, c=1 µg L(-1)). The developed method was validated by the analysis of two Certified Reference Materials, and the determined values were in good agreement with the certified values. This method was also successfully applied for the direct analysis of free Cu(II) in human urine and serum samples. While the total Cu can be determined by the proposed method after microwave digestion. The concentrations of free Cu(II) were much lower than that of total Cu, indicating that Cu is mainly coordinated with macromolecules in these biological samples. From this point of view, the developed method exhibits application potential in speciation of free metal ions and metallic complex molecules in biological samples. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Non-destructive electron microscopy imaging and analysis of biological samples with graphene coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong Bo; Kim, Yong-Jin; Kim, Seong-Min; Yoo, Je Min; Kim, Youngsoo; Gorbachev, Roman; Barbolina, I. I.; Kim, Sang Jin; Kang, Sangmin; Yoon, Myung-Han; Cho, Sung-Pyo; Novoselov, Konstantin S.; Hong, Byung Hee

    2016-12-01

    In electron microscopy (EM), charging of non-conductive biological samples by focused electron beams hinders their high-resolution imaging. Gold or platinum coatings have been commonly used to prevent such sample charging, but it disables further quantitative and qualitative chemical analyses such as energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Here we report that graphene-coating on biological samples enables non-destructive high-resolution imaging by EM as well as chemical analysis by EDS, utilizing graphene’s transparency to electron beams, high conductivity, outstanding mechanical strength and flexibility. We believe that the graphene-coated imaging and analysis would provide us a new opportunity to explore various biological phenomena unseen before due to the limitation in sample preparation and image resolution, which will broaden our understanding on the life mechanism of various living organisms.

  15. Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM) for the imaging of biological samples at sub-nanometer resolution.

    PubMed

    Joens, Matthew S; Huynh, Chuong; Kasuboski, James M; Ferranti, David; Sigal, Yury J; Zeitvogel, Fabian; Obst, Martin; Burkhardt, Claus J; Curran, Kevin P; Chalasani, Sreekanth H; Stern, Lewis A; Goetze, Bernhard; Fitzpatrick, James A J

    2013-12-17

    Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) has long been the standard in imaging the sub-micrometer surface ultrastructure of both hard and soft materials. In the case of biological samples, it has provided great insights into their physical architecture. However, three of the fundamental challenges in the SEM imaging of soft materials are that of limited imaging resolution at high magnification, charging caused by the insulating properties of most biological samples and the loss of subtle surface features by heavy metal coating. These challenges have recently been overcome with the development of the Helium Ion Microscope (HIM), which boasts advances in charge reduction, minimized sample damage, high surface contrast without the need for metal coating, increased depth of field, and 5 angstrom imaging resolution. We demonstrate the advantages of HIM for imaging biological surfaces as well as compare and contrast the effects of sample preparation techniques and their consequences on sub-nanometer ultrastructure.

  16. Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM) for the imaging of biological samples at sub-nanometer resolution

    PubMed Central

    Joens, Matthew S.; Huynh, Chuong; Kasuboski, James M.; Ferranti, David; Sigal, Yury J.; Zeitvogel, Fabian; Obst, Martin; Burkhardt, Claus J.; Curran, Kevin P.; Chalasani, Sreekanth H.; Stern, Lewis A.; Goetze, Bernhard; Fitzpatrick, James A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) has long been the standard in imaging the sub-micrometer surface ultrastructure of both hard and soft materials. In the case of biological samples, it has provided great insights into their physical architecture. However, three of the fundamental challenges in the SEM imaging of soft materials are that of limited imaging resolution at high magnification, charging caused by the insulating properties of most biological samples and the loss of subtle surface features by heavy metal coating. These challenges have recently been overcome with the development of the Helium Ion Microscope (HIM), which boasts advances in charge reduction, minimized sample damage, high surface contrast without the need for metal coating, increased depth of field, and 5 angstrom imaging resolution. We demonstrate the advantages of HIM for imaging biological surfaces as well as compare and contrast the effects of sample preparation techniques and their consequences on sub-nanometer ultrastructure. PMID:24343236

  17. Improved Butanol-Methanol (BUME) Method by Replacing Acetic Acid for Lipid Extraction of Biological Samples.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Mutya; Wang, Miao; Frisch-Daiello, Jessica; Han, Xianlin

    2016-07-01

    Extraction of lipids from biological samples is a critical step in lipidomics, especially for shotgun lipidomics where lipid extracts are directly infused into a mass spectrometer. The butanol-methanol (BUME) extraction method was originally developed to extract lipids from plasma samples with 1 % acetic acid. Considering some lipids are sensitive to acidic environments, we modified this protocol by replacing acetic acid with lithium chloride solution and extended the modified extraction to tissue samples. Although no significant reduction of plasmalogen levels in the acidic BUME extracts of rat heart samples was found, the modified method was established to extract various tissue samples, including rat liver, heart, and plasma. Essentially identical profiles of the majority of lipid classes were obtained from the extracts of the modified BUME and traditional Bligh-Dyer methods. However, it was found that neither the original, nor the modified BUME method was suitable for 4-hydroxyalkenal species measurement in biological samples.

  18. Use of nitric acid in sample pretreatment for determination of trace elements in various biological samples by ETAAS.

    PubMed

    Scancar, J; Milacic, R; Falnoga, I; Cemazar, M; Bukovec, P

    2000-07-01

    Trace elements in liquid biological samples may be determined by direct electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). In our previous work it was found that samples containing proteins or DNA may leak out of the graphite tube before the drying step, despite the addition of various modifiers. In order to keep the sample to the graphite tube, samples were diluted before analysis 1 + 1 with 32% v/v nitric acid, or 5 microl of 32% v/v nitric acid was added to the graphite tube before ETAAS determination. Applying the proposed procedure, the concentrations of lead in eluted fractions after gel chromatographic separation of human cerebellar nucleus dentatus supernatant and platinum in isolated DNA samples were determined. The use of nitric acid in sample pretreatment prevent sample leakage out of the graphite tube, provided for even drying and considerably reduced nonspecific absorption in lead determination. The repeatability of measurements was better than + 6%. The accuracy of the procedure was checked by spiking samples. The recoveries for both elements lay between 93--104%. Nitric acid was found to be a better modifier than TRITON X-100.

  19. Quantitating morphological changes in biological samples during scanning electron microscopy sample preparation with correlative super-resolution microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tao; Jorgens, Danielle M.; Nickerson, Andrew; Lin, Li-Jung; Pelz, Joshua; Gray, Joe W.; López, Claudia S.

    2017-01-01

    Sample preparation is critical to biological electron microscopy (EM), and there have been continuous efforts on optimizing the procedures to best preserve structures of interest in the sample. However, a quantitative characterization of the morphological changes associated with each step in EM sample preparation is currently lacking. Using correlative EM and superresolution microscopy (SRM), we have examined the effects of different drying methods as well as osmium tetroxide (OsO4) post-fixation on cell morphology during scanning electron microscopy (SEM) sample preparation. Here, SRM images of the sample acquired under hydrated conditions were used as a baseline for evaluating morphological changes as the sample went through SEM sample processing. We found that both chemical drying and critical point drying lead to a mild cellular boundary retraction of ~60 nm. Post-fixation by OsO4 causes at least 40 nm additional boundary retraction. We also found that coating coverslips with adhesion molecules such as fibronectin prior to cell plating helps reduce cell distortion from OsO4 post-fixation. These quantitative measurements offer useful information for identifying causes of cell distortions in SEM sample preparation and improving current procedures. PMID:28562683

  20. Quantitating morphological changes in biological samples during scanning electron microscopy sample preparation with correlative super-resolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Huang, Tao; Jorgens, Danielle M; Nickerson, Andrew; Lin, Li-Jung; Pelz, Joshua; Gray, Joe W; López, Claudia S; Nan, Xiaolin

    2017-01-01

    Sample preparation is critical to biological electron microscopy (EM), and there have been continuous efforts on optimizing the procedures to best preserve structures of interest in the sample. However, a quantitative characterization of the morphological changes associated with each step in EM sample preparation is currently lacking. Using correlative EM and superresolution microscopy (SRM), we have examined the effects of different drying methods as well as osmium tetroxide (OsO4) post-fixation on cell morphology during scanning electron microscopy (SEM) sample preparation. Here, SRM images of the sample acquired under hydrated conditions were used as a baseline for evaluating morphological changes as the sample went through SEM sample processing. We found that both chemical drying and critical point drying lead to a mild cellular boundary retraction of ~60 nm. Post-fixation by OsO4 causes at least 40 nm additional boundary retraction. We also found that coating coverslips with adhesion molecules such as fibronectin prior to cell plating helps reduce cell distortion from OsO4 post-fixation. These quantitative measurements offer useful information for identifying causes of cell distortions in SEM sample preparation and improving current procedures.

  1. Membrane materials for storing biological samples intended for comparative nanotoxicological testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metelkin, A.; Kuznetsov, D.; Kolesnikov, E.; Chuprunov, K.; Kondakov, S.; Osipov, A.; Samsonova, J.

    2015-11-01

    The study is aimed at identifying the samples of most promising membrane materials for storing dry specimens of biological fluids (Dried Blood Spots, DBS technology). Existing sampling systems using cellulose fiber filter paper have a number of drawbacks such as uneven distribution of the sample spot, dependence of the spot spreading area on the individual biosample properties, incomplete washing-off of the sample due to partially inconvertible sorption of blood components on cellulose fibers, etc. Samples of membrane materials based on cellulose, polymers and glass fiber with applied biosamples were studied using methods of scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy and surface-wetting measurement. It was discovered that cellulose-based membrane materials sorb components of biological fluids inside their structure, while membranes based on glass fiber display almost no interaction with the samples and biological fluid components dry to films in the membrane pores between the structural fibers. This characteristic, together with the fact that membrane materials based on glass fiber possess sufficient strength, high wetting properties and good storage capacity, attests them as promising material for dry samples of biological fluids storage systems.

  2. Recent advances in particle-induced X-ray emission analysis applied to biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangelson, Nolan F.; Hill, Max W.

    1981-03-01

    Papers reporting the application of particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis to biological samples continue to appear regularly in the literature. The majority of these papers deal with blood, hair, and other common body organs while a few deal with biological samples from the environment. A variety of sample preparation methods have been demonstrated, a number of which are improvements, refinements and extensions of the thick- and thin-sample preparation methods reported in the early development of PIXE. While many papers describe the development of PIXE techniques some papers are now describing application of the methods to serious biological problems. The following two factors may help to stimulate more consistent use of the PIXE method. First, each PIXE facility should be organized to give rapid sample processing and should have available several sample preparation and handling methods. Second, those with the skill to use PIXE methods need to become closely associated with researchers knowledgeable in medical and biological sciences and they also need to become more involved in project planning and sample handling.

  3. Determination of selenium in biological samples with an energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoli; Yu, Zhaoshui

    2016-05-01

    Selenium is both a nutrient and a toxin. Selenium-especially organic selenium-is a core component of human nutrition. Thus, it is very important to measure selenium in biological samples. The limited sensitivity of conventional XRF hampers its widespread use in biological samples. Here, we describe the use of high-energy (100kV, 600W) linearly polarized beam energy-dispersive X-Ray fluorescence spectroscopy (EDXRF) in tandem with a three-dimensional optics design to determine 0.1-5.1μgg(-1) levels of selenium in biological samples. The effects of various experimental parameters such as applied voltage, acquisition time, secondary target and various filters were thoroughly investigated. The detection limit of selenium in biological samples via high-energy (100kV, 600W) linearly polarized beam energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy was decreased by one order of magnitude versus conventional XRF (Paltridge et al., 2012) and found to be 0.1μg/g. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to describe EDXRF measurements of Se in biological samples with important implications for the nutrition and analytical chemistry communities.

  4. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils (Phase II) Field Sampling Plan

    SciTech Connect

    G. L. Schwendiman

    2006-07-27

    This Field Sampling Plan describes the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Phase II remediation field sampling activities to be performed at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center located within the Idaho National Laboratory Site. Sampling activities described in this plan support characterization sampling of new sites, real-time soil spectroscopy during excavation, and confirmation sampling that verifies that the remedial action objectives and remediation goals presented in the Final Record of Decision for Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13 have been met.

  5. Advances in metabolome information retrieval: turning chemistry into biology. Part II: biological information recovery.

    PubMed

    Tebani, Abdellah; Afonso, Carlos; Bekri, Soumeya

    2017-08-25

    This work reports the second part of a review intending to give the state of the art of major metabolic phenotyping strategies. It particularly deals with inherent advantages and limits regarding data analysis issues and biological information retrieval tools along with translational challenges. This Part starts with introducing the main data preprocessing strategies of the different metabolomics data. Then, it describes the main data analysis techniques including univariate and multivariate aspects. It also addresses the challenges related to metabolite annotation and characterization. Finally, functional analysis including pathway and network strategies are discussed. The last section of this review is devoted to practical considerations and current challenges and pathways to bring metabolomics into clinical environments.

  6. Chemometric and Statistical Analyses of ToF-SIMS Spectra of Increasingly Complex Biological Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, E S; Wu, L; Fortson, S L; Nelson, D O; Kulp, K S; Wu, K J

    2007-10-24

    Characterizing and classifying molecular variation within biological samples is critical for determining fundamental mechanisms of biological processes that will lead to new insights including improved disease understanding. Towards these ends, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used to examine increasingly complex samples of biological relevance, including monosaccharide isomers, pure proteins, complex protein mixtures, and mouse embryo tissues. The complex mass spectral data sets produced were analyzed using five common statistical and chemometric multivariate analysis techniques: principal component analysis (PCA), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA), soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA), and decision tree analysis by recursive partitioning. PCA was found to be a valuable first step in multivariate analysis, providing insight both into the relative groupings of samples and into the molecular basis for those groupings. For the monosaccharides, pure proteins and protein mixture samples, all of LDA, PLSDA, and SIMCA were found to produce excellent classification given a sufficient number of compound variables calculated. For the mouse embryo tissues, however, SIMCA did not produce as accurate a classification. The decision tree analysis was found to be the least successful for all the data sets, providing neither as accurate a classification nor chemical insight for any of the tested samples. Based on these results we conclude that as the complexity of the sample increases, so must the sophistication of the multivariate technique used to classify the samples. PCA is a preferred first step for understanding ToF-SIMS data that can be followed by either LDA or PLSDA for effective classification analysis. This study demonstrates the strength of ToF-SIMS combined with multivariate statistical and chemometric techniques to classify increasingly complex biological samples

  7. Chromosome aberrations induced in human lymphocytes by U-235 fission neutrons: I. Irradiation of human blood samples in the "dry cell" of the TRIGA Mark II nuclear reactor.

    PubMed

    Fajgelj, A; Lakoski, A; Horvat, D; Remec, I; Skrk, J; Stegnar, P

    1991-11-01

    A set-up for irradiation of biological samples in the TRIGA Mark II research reactor in Ljubljana is described. Threshold activation detectors were used for characterisation of the neutron flux, and the accompanying gamma dose was measured by TLDs. Human peripheral blood samples were irradiated "in vitro" and biological effects evaluated according to the unstable chromosomal aberrations induced. Biological effects of two types of cultivation of irradiated blood samples, the first immediately after irradiation and the second after 96 h storage, were studied. A significant difference in the incidence of chromosomal aberrations between these two types of samples was obtained, while our dose-response curve fitting coefficients alpha 1 = (7.71 +/- 0.09) x 10(-2) Gy-1 (immediate cultivation) and alpha 2 = (11.03 +/- 0.08) x 10(-2) Gy-1 (96 h delayed cultivation) are in both cases lower than could be found in the literature.

  8. Mapping Chemical and Structural Composition of Pharmaceutical and Biological Samples by Raman, Surface-Enhanced Raman and Fluorescence Spectral Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chourpa, Igor; Cohen-Jonathan, Simone; Dubois, Pierre

    Raman spectroscopy is an analytical technique recognised for its structural and conformational specificity. The efficient discrimination of molecular species by Raman is particularly potent for multidimensional microscopic imaging of complex biological environment, as demonstrated in the present book. The commonly admitted problem of Raman, low sensitivity, can often be circumvented due to high output instruments and via approaches like RRS (resonance Raman scattering), SERS (surface-enhanced Raman scattering), TERS (tip-enhanced Raman scattering) or CARS (coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering). In contrast to the latter, RRS and SERS are realizable with less sophisticated set-up based on common Raman systems. Although more invasive than RRS, SERS provides better sensitivity and quenching of fluorescence. SERRS (surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering) spectroscopy can be used in coupling with fluorescence and competes in selectivity and sensitivity with spectrofluorimetry. In the chapter below, we use recent applications made in our group to illustrate the use of Raman and SERRS spectral imaging for characterization of biological samples (animal subcutaneous tissue, human cancer cells) and pharmaceutical samples (microparticles for drug delivery, fibres for wound dressing). After a brief description of experimental details on spectral imaging, the chapter will focus on results concerning (i) biocompatible pharmaceutical materials made of alginates and (ii) anticancer drugs in pharmaceutical forms and in biological systems.

  9. Maryland biological stream survey: Ecological assessment of non-tidal streams sampled in 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, N.E.; Southerland, M.T.; Chaillou, J.C.; Wilson, W.T.; Heimbuch, D.G.

    1998-10-01

    The report summarizes results from the second of three years of sampling for the first round of the statewide Maryland Biological Stream Survey (MBSS or the Survey) and provides an update on the program`s progress in assessing the condition of Maryland`s non-tidal streams. Supported and led by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources (MDNR), the MBSS is a comprehensive program to assess the status of biological resources in Maryland`s non-tidal streams; quantify the extent to which acidic deposition has affected or may be affecting critical biological resources in the state; examine which other water chemistry, physical habitat, and land use factors are important in explaining the current status of biological resources in streams; establish a benchmark for long-term monitoring of trends in these resources; and target future local-scale assessments and mitigation measures needed to restore degraded biological resources.

  10. Preparation, characterization and biological activity of Fe(III), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) and UO 2(II) complexes of new cyclodiphosph(V)azane of sulfaguanidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharaby, Carmen M.

    2005-11-01

    Novel hexachlorocyclodiphosph(V)azane of sulfaguanidine, H 4L, l,3-[ N'-amidino-sulfanilamide]-2,2,2,4,4,4-hexachlorocyclodiphosph(V)azane was prepared and its coordination behaviour towards the transition metal ions Fe(III), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) and UO 2(II) was studied. The structures of the isolated products are proposed based on elemental analyses, IR, UV-vis, 1H NMR, mass spectra, reflectance, magnetic susceptibility measurements and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The hyperfine interactions in the isolated complex compounds were studied using 14.4 keV γ-ray from radioactive 57Co (Mössbauer spectroscopy). The data show that the ligand are coordinated to the metal ions via the sulfonamide O and deprotonated NH atoms in an octahedral manner. The H 4L ligand forms complexes of the general formulae [(MX z) 2(H 2L)H 2O) n] and [(FeSO 4) 2 (H 4L) (H 2O) 4], where X = NO 3 in case of UO 2(II) and Cl in case of Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II). The molar conductance data show that the complexes are non-electrolytes. The thermal behaviour of the complexes was studied and different thermodynamic parameters were calculated using Coats-Redfern method. Most of the prepared complexes showed high bactericidal activity and some of the complexes show more activity compared with the ligand and standards.

  11. Genomes, neurotoxins and biology of Clostridium botulinum Group I and Group II.

    PubMed

    Carter, Andrew T; Peck, Michael W

    2015-05-01

    Recent developments in whole genome sequencing have made a substantial contribution to understanding the genomes, neurotoxins and biology of Clostridium botulinum Group I (proteolytic C. botulinum) and C. botulinum Group II (non-proteolytic C. botulinum). Two different approaches are used to study genomics in these bacteria; comparative whole genome microarrays and direct comparison of complete genome DNA sequences. The properties of the different types of neurotoxin formed, and different neurotoxin gene clusters found in C. botulinum Groups I and II are explored. Specific examples of botulinum neurotoxin genes are chosen for an in-depth discussion of neurotoxin gene evolution. The most recent cases of foodborne botulism are summarised.

  12. Genomes, neurotoxins and biology of Clostridium botulinum Group I and Group II

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Andrew T.; Peck, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in whole genome sequencing have made a substantial contribution to understanding the genomes, neurotoxins and biology of Clostridium botulinum Group I (proteolytic C. botulinum) and C. botulinum Group II (non-proteolytic C. botulinum). Two different approaches are used to study genomics in these bacteria; comparative whole genome microarrays and direct comparison of complete genome DNA sequences. The properties of the different types of neurotoxin formed, and different neurotoxin gene clusters found in C. botulinum Groups I and II are explored. Specific examples of botulinum neurotoxin genes are chosen for an in-depth discussion of neurotoxin gene evolution. The most recent cases of foodborne botulism are summarised. PMID:25445012

  13. Development of a Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscope for Imaging Biological Samples in Physiological Buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibel, Eric Jeffrey

    A near-field scanning optical microscope was constructed for imaging intact biological samples in physiological buffer at a resolution beyond the optical diffraction limit. Images are formed by raster scanning the sample within the near -field of the optical probe, which emits collimated light for a limited distance. The technical challenges that were encountered were making the probe, micropositioning the probe and sample with piezoelectrics, and maintaining the sample-probe separation to within the near-field ( <200 nm). By recording the measurement of probe-sample separation during a scan, a topographic image is generated simultaneously with the near-field optical image. The microscope having both imaging modalities was tested and judged fully operational by imaging fluorescently -labeled microspheres under water. The potential of near-field scanning optical microscopy for future biological research was investigated by imaging a fluorescently-labeled, biological test specimen, the single myofibril. Imaging the intact myofibril in buffered saline without chemical fixation provides a challenging, practical test for the microscope. Near-field fluorescence and topographic images of single myofibrils produced image resolution of <=q300 nm, versus ~500 nm for conventional optical microscopy. Interpretation of the images is facilitated by the protein-specific fluorescence labeling. Increasing sample thickness degrades the resolution of the fluorescence images only. Thus, biological samples having > 1 μm thickness, are the practical limit of sample thickness for generating high resolution near-field optical images, when fluorescence is collected in transmission. In contrast, the method of generating the topographic images (called lateral shear-force microscopy), has the advantage of being insensitive to sample thickness. In the topographic images of myofibrils, the change in topography and/or stiffness from the binding of antibodies was detected. The results of this

  14. Quantitation of vitamin B6 in biological samples by isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hachey, D.L.; Coburn, S.P.; Brown, L.T.; Erbelding, W.F.; DeMark, B.; Klein, P.D.

    1985-11-15

    Methods have been developed for the simultaneous quantitative analysis of vitamin B6 forms in biological samples by isotope dilution mass spectrometry using deuterated forms of pyridoxine, pyridoxal, pyridoxamine, and pyridoxic acid. The biological fluid or tissue sample was homogenized and then treated with a cocktail containing appropriate amounts of each deuterated vitamer, as well as the deuterated, phosphorylated vitamer forms. The individual vitamers were isolated from the homogenate by a complex high-performance liquid chromatographic procedure that provided separate fractions for each of the six vitamers found in biological samples. Aldehydic B6 vitamers were reduced to the alcohol form prior to acetylation and analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The three resulting vitamers were analyzed by electron ionization GC/MS using a silicone capillary column. The methods have been applied to analysis of vitamin B6 in liver, milk, urine, and feces at levels as low as 0.02 nmol/ml.

  15. Covalent binding of biological samples to solid supports for scanning probe microscopy in buffer solution.

    PubMed Central

    Karrasch, S; Dolder, M; Schabert, F; Ramsden, J; Engel, A

    1993-01-01

    Scanning force microscopy allows imaging of biological molecules in their native state in buffer solution. To this end samples have to be fixed to a flat solid support so that they cannot be displaced by the scanning tip. Here we describe a method to achieve the covalent binding of biological samples to glass surfaces. Coverslips were chemically modified with the photoactivatable cross-linker N-5-azido-2-nitrobenzoyloxysuccinimide. Samples are squeezed between derivatized coverslips and then cross-linked to the glass surface by irradiation with ultraviolet light. Such samples can be imaged repeatedly by the scanning force microscope without loss of image quality, whereas identical but not immobilized samples are pushed away by the stylus. Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:8312482

  16. On the accuracy of protein determination in large biological samples by prompt gamma neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasviki, K.; Stamatelatos, I. E.; Yannakopoulou, E.; Papadopoulou, P.; Kalef-Ezra, J.

    2007-10-01

    A prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) facility has been developed for the determination of nitrogen and thus total protein in large volume biological samples or the whole body of small animals. In the present work, the accuracy of nitrogen determination by PGNAA in phantoms of known composition as well as in four raw ground meat samples of about 1 kg mass was examined. Dumas combustion and Kjeldahl techniques were also used for the assessment of nitrogen concentration in the meat samples. No statistically significant differences were found between the concentrations assessed by the three techniques. The results of this work demonstrate the applicability of PGNAA for the assessment of total protein in biological samples of 0.25-1.5 kg mass, such as a meat sample or the body of small animal even in vivo with an equivalent radiation dose of about 40 mSv.

  17. Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) of drugs and poisons from biological samples.

    PubMed

    Junting, L; Peng, C; Suzuki, O

    1998-11-09

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME), a new solvent-free sample preparation technique, was invented by C. Arthur and J. Pawliszyn in 1990. This method mainly was applied for the extraction of volatile and semi-volatile organic pollutants in water samples. However, since 1995, SPME has been developed to various biological samples, such as whole blood, plasma, urine, hair and breath, in order to extract drugs and poisons in forensic field. The main advantages of SPME are: high sensitivity, solventless, small sample volume, simplicity and rapidity. We have reviewed the papers published in recent years about SPME in biological samples, and sorted out main experimental conditions, such as fibers, matrixes, the extraction approaches and time, as well as the acceleration method. We would expect SPME technique to have a promising future for toxicological analysis in forensic practice.

  18. Enhanced biological removal of NOχ from flue gas in a biofilter by Fe(II)Cit/Fe(II)EDTA absorption.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bi-Hong; Jiang, Yan; Cai, Ling-Lin; Liu, Nan; Zhang, Shi-Hang; Li, Wei

    2011-09-01

    A mixed absorbent had been proposed to enhance the chemical absorption-biological reduction process for NO(x) removal from flue gas. The mole ratio of the absorbent of Fe(II)Cit to Fe(II)EDTA was selected to be 3. After the biofilm was formed adequately, some influential factors, such as the concentration of NO, O(2), SO(2) and EBRT were investigated. During the long-term running, the system could keep on a steady NO removal efficiency (up to 90%) and had a flexibility in the sudden changes of operating conditions when the simulated flue gas contained 100-500 ppm NO, 100-800 ppm SO(2), 1-5% (v/v) O(2), and 15% (v/v) CO(2). However, high NO concentration (>800 ppm) and relative short EBRT (<100s) had significant negative effect on NO removal. The results indicate that the new system by using mixed-absorbent can reduce operating costs in comparison with the single Fe(II)EDTA system and possesses great potential for scale-up to industrial applications.

  19. Validation of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in a Low-Income African American Sample of Medical Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grothe, Karen B.; Dutton, Gareth R.; Jones, Glenn N.; Bodenlos, Jamie; Ancona, Martin; Brantley, Phillip J.

    2005-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) are well established with primarily Caucasian samples. However, little is known about its reliability and validity with minority groups. This study evaluated the psychometric properties of the BDI-II in a sample of low-income African American medical outpatients (N = 220).…

  20. Analytical protocol for identification of BMAA and DAB in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Spácil, Zdenek; Eriksson, Johan; Jonasson, Sara; Rasmussen, Ulla; Ilag, Leopold L; Bergman, Birgitta

    2010-01-01

    Beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a non-protein amino acid, thought to be inflicting neurodegenerative diseases related to ALS/PDC in human beings. Due to conflicting data concerning the presence of BMAA in various biological matrixes, we present a robust and sensitive method for high confidence identification of BMAA after derivatization by 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate (AQC). The efficient sample pretreatment in combination with LC-MS/MS SRM enables chromatographic separation of BMAA from the isomer 2,3-diaminobutyric acid (DAB). The method is applicable for selective BMAA/DAB detection in various biological samples ranging from a prokaryotic cyanobacterium to eukaryotic fish.

  1. Determination of cadmium and lead in human biological samples by spectrometric techniques: a review.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Valfredo Azevedo; de Carvalho, Anaildes Lago

    2010-12-01

    The analysis of human biological samples, such as blood, urine, nails, and hair, is generally used for the verification of human exposure to toxic metals. In this review, various spectrometric methods for the determination of cadmium and lead in biological samples are discussed and compared. Several spectrometric techniques are presented and discussed with respect to various characteristics such as sensitivity, selectivity, and cost. Special attention is drawn to the procedures for digestion prior to the determination of cadmium and lead in hair, nails, blood, and urine.

  2. Schiff base triphenylphosphine palladium (II) complexes: Synthesis, structural elucidation, electrochemical and biological evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabbir, Muhammad; Akhter, Zareen; Ahmad, Iqbal; Ahmed, Safeer; Shafiq, Maryam; Mirza, Bushra; McKee, Vickie; Munawar, Khurram Shahzad; Ashraf, Ahmad Raza

    2016-08-01

    The complexes N-(2-oxidophenyl)salicylideneiminatotriphenylphosphine palladium(II) (1) and N-(2-sulfidophenyl)salicylideneiminato triphenylphosphine palladium(II) (2) of tridentate Schiff bases derived from salicylaldehyde and an amino- or thiophenol, have been synthesized and characterized by various spectroscopic, analytical and electro-analytical techniques. X-ray single crystal analysis of complex 1 has revealed its square planar geometry. The thermal analysis has shown the absence of coordinated water and final degradation product is PdO. The alkaline phosphatase studies have indicated that enzymatic activity is concentration dependent which is inversely proportional to the concentration of the compounds. The biological assays (brine shrimp cytotoxicity, DPPH) have reflected their biologically active and mild antioxidant nature. However, results of DNA protection assay have shown that they possess moderate protective activity against hydroxyl free radicals (rad OH). The voltammetric studies ascertain two-electron reduction of the compounds through purely diffusion controlled process and reveal intercalative mode of drug DNA interactions.

  3. Design, spectral characterization and biological studies of transition metal(II) complexes with triazole Schiff bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanif, Muhammad; Chohan, Zahid H.

    2013-03-01

    A new series of three biologically active triazole derived Schiff base ligands L1-L3 have been synthesized in equimolar reaction of 3-amino-1H-1,2,4-triazole with pyrrol-2-carboxaldehyde, 4-bromo-thiophene-2-carboxaldehyde, and 5-iodo-2-hydroxy benzaldehyde. The prepared Schiff bases were used for further complex formation reaction with different metal elements like Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) as chlorides by using a molar ratio of ligand:metal as 2:1. The structure and bonding nature of all the compounds were identified by their physical, spectral and analytical data. All the metal(II) complexes possessed an octahedral geometry except the Cu(II) complexes which showed a distorted octahedral geometry. All the synthesized compounds, were studied for their in vitro antibacterial, and antifungal activities, against four Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Shigella sonnei, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhi) and two Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus) bacterial strains and against six fungal strains (Trichophyton longifusus, Candida albicans, Aspergillus flavus, Microsporum canis, Fusarium solani and Candida glabrata) by using agar-well diffusion method. It has been shown that all the synthesized compounds showed moderate to significant antibacterial activity against one or more bacterial strains. In vitro Brine Shrimp bioassay was also carried out to investigate the cytotoxic properties of these compounds. The data also revealed that the metal complexes showed better activity than the ligands due to chelation/coordination.

  4. Design, spectral characterization and biological studies of transition metal(II) complexes with triazole Schiff bases.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Muhammad; Chohan, Zahid H

    2013-03-01

    A new series of three biologically active triazole derived Schiff base ligands L(1)-L(3) have been synthesized in equimolar reaction of 3-amino-1H-1,2,4-triazole with pyrrol-2-carboxaldehyde, 4-bromo-thiophene-2-carboxaldehyde, and 5-iodo-2-hydroxy benzaldehyde. The prepared Schiff bases were used for further complex formation reaction with different metal elements like Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) as chlorides by using a molar ratio of ligand:metal as 2:1. The structure and bonding nature of all the compounds were identified by their physical, spectral and analytical data. All the metal(II) complexes possessed an octahedral geometry except the Cu(II) complexes which showed a distorted octahedral geometry. All the synthesized compounds, were studied for their in vitro antibacterial, and antifungal activities, against four Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Shigella sonnei, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhi) and two Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus) bacterial strains and against six fungal strains (Trichophyton longifusus, Candida albicans, Aspergillus flavus, Microsporum canis, Fusarium solani and Candida glabrata) by using agar-well diffusion method. It has been shown that all the synthesized compounds showed moderate to significant antibacterial activity against one or more bacterial strains. In vitro Brine Shrimp bioassay was also carried out to investigate the cytotoxic properties of these compounds. The data also revealed that the metal complexes showed better activity than the ligands due to chelation/coordination.

  5. Studies on the Presence of Mycotoxins in Biological Samples: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Escrivá, Laura; Font, Guillermina; Manyes, Lara

    2017-01-01

    Mycotoxins are fungal secondary metabolites with bioaccumulation levels leading to their carry-over into animal fluids, organs, and tissues. As a consequence, mycotoxin determination in biological samples from humans and animals has been reported worldwide. Since most mycotoxins show toxic effects at low concentrations and considering the extremely low levels present in biological samples, the application of reliable detection methods is required. This review summarizes the information regarding the studies involving mycotoxin determination in biological samples over the last 10 years. Relevant data on extraction methodology, detection techniques, sample size, limits of detection, and quantitation are presented herein. Briefly, liquid-liquid extraction followed by LC-MS/MS determination was the most common technique. The most analyzed mycotoxin was ochratoxin A, followed by zearalenone and deoxynivalenol—including their metabolites, enniatins, fumonisins, aflatoxins, T-2 and HT-2 toxins. Moreover, the studies were classified by their purpose, mainly focused on the development of analytical methodologies, mycotoxin biomonitoring, and exposure assessment. The study of tissue distribution, bioaccumulation, carry-over, persistence and transference of mycotoxins, as well as, toxicokinetics and ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion) were other proposed goals for biological sample analysis. Finally, an overview of risk assessment was discussed. PMID:28820481

  6. Spectroscopic analysis of bosentan in biological samples after a liquid-liquid microextraction

    PubMed Central

    Sajedi-Amin, Sanaz; Assadpour-Zeynali, Karim; Panahi-Azar, Vahid; Kebriaeezadeh, Abbas; Khoubnasabjafari, Maryam; Ansarin, Khalil; Jouyban-Gharamaleki, Vahid; Jouyban, Abolghasem

    2015-01-01

    Introduction:Microextraction processes with UV-Vis measurement have been developed and validated for analysis of bosentan in biological samples. Methods:In this work, liquid–liquid microextraction procedures (DLLME & USAEME) were employed for cleanup, pre-concentration, and determination of bosentan in biological samples by UV-Vis spectroscopy at 270 nm. The method was validated and applied to the determination of bosentan in spiked serum, exhaled breath condensate and urine samples. Results:Various experimental factors including type of extraction and dispersive solvents and their volumes, pH, sonication time and centrifuging time were investigated. Under the optimum conditions, the method was linear in the range of 1.0–5.0 μg.mL-1, with coefficient of determination (R2) of > 0.998. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.07 mg.L-1. Recovery of the target analyte in biological samples was 106.2%. The method could be easily applied for higher concentration of bosentan and needs more improvement for application in the pharmacokinetic investigations where more sensitive methods are required. Conclusion:A simple, low cost, precise and accurate spectrophotometric analysis of bosentan in biological samples after liquid-liquid microextraction were developed and validated for routine analyses. PMID:26929923

  7. Association of environmental toxic elements in biological samples of myocardial infarction patients at different stages.

    PubMed

    Afridi, Hassan Imran; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Kazi, Naveed; Kandhro, Ghulam Abbas; Baig, Jameel Ahmed; Jamali, Mohammad Khan; Arain, Mohammad Balal; Shah, Abdul Qadir; Shah, Faheem; Khan, Sumaira; Kolachi, Nida Fatima

    2011-06-01

    The exposure of toxic elements may directly or indirectly associate with different pathogenesis of heart diseases. In the present study, the association of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), lead (Pb), and nickel (Ni) in biological samples (whole blood and urine) and mortality from myocardial infarction (MI) patients at first, second, and third heart attacks was carried out. Both biological samples of 130 MI patients (77 male and 53 female), with ages ranging from 45 to 60 years, and 61 healthy persons (33 male and 28 female) of the same age group were collected. The elements in biological samples were assessed by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometer, prior to microwave-assisted acid digestion. The validity of methodology was checked by the biological certified reference materials. During this study, 78% of 32 patients aged above 50 years, registered after third MI attack, died. In these subjects, the levels of As, Cd, Co, Ni, and Pb in blood samples were higher in MI patients as compared with referents (p < 0.05), while increased by 11.7%, 12.2%, 5.55%, and 7.2%, respectively, in the blood samples of those patients who tolerated the third MI attack (p = 0.12). The high level of understudied toxic elements may play a role in the mortality of MI patients.

  8. The Basket Method for Selecting Balanced Samples. Part II. Applications to Price Estimation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    AD-AI12 949 CLEMSON UNIV SC OEPT OF MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES F/B 12/1 THE BASKET METHOD FOR SELECTING BALANCED SAMPLES. PART 11. APPL-ETC(U) DEC SI K T...1111󈧝 1.4 1.6 MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHARTNN’( 4~ THE BASKET METHOD FOR SELECTING BALANCED SAMPLES - PART II: APPLICATIONS TO PRICE ESTIMATION * K...for Selecting Balanced Samples Part I: Applications to Price Estimation AB9TRACT The "Basket Method" of sampling, a tool designed to achieve

  9. High resolution computational on-chip imaging of biological samples using sparsity constraint (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivenson, Yair; Wu, Chris; Wang, Hongda; Zhang, Yibo; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2017-03-01

    Microscopic imaging of biological samples such as pathology slides is one of the standard diagnostic methods for screening various diseases, including cancer. These biological samples are usually imaged using traditional optical microscopy tools; however, the high cost, bulkiness and limited imaging throughput of traditional microscopes partially restrict their deployment in resource-limited settings. In order to mitigate this, we previously demonstrated a cost-effective and compact lens-less on-chip microscopy platform with a wide field-of-view of >20-30 mm^2. The lens-less microscopy platform has shown its effectiveness for imaging of highly connected biological samples, such as pathology slides of various tissue samples and smears, among others. This computational holographic microscope requires a set of super-resolved holograms acquired at multiple sample-to-sensor distances, which are used as input to an iterative phase recovery algorithm and holographic reconstruction process, yielding high-resolution images of the samples in phase and amplitude channels. Here we demonstrate that in order to reconstruct clinically relevant images with high resolution and image contrast, we require less than 50% of the previously reported nominal number of holograms acquired at different sample-to-sensor distances. This is achieved by incorporating a loose sparsity constraint as part of the iterative holographic object reconstruction. We demonstrate the success of this sparsity-based computational lens-less microscopy platform by imaging pathology slides of breast cancer tissue and Papanicolaou (Pap) smears.

  10. Simulation of a Congress at the Chair of Biology II in Bioengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naranjo, A. V.; Reznichenco, V.; López, N.; Hernández, R.; Bajinay, S.

    2007-11-01

    This work has been developed in the Chair of Biology II, the curricular contents of which correspond to Human Anatomy. This subject is taught in the second semester of the second year of studies in Bioengineering. Our main objective is that the students attending the course may integrate the syllabus contents of Anatomy with those of other subjects in the career. Ever since 1998 we have organized a congress named Congreso Intracátedra de Biología II (Intra Chair Congress on Biology II). This is the last assignment in the semester and is compulsory for regular students of the subject. It consists in simulating a scientific congress with international characteristics. The guidelines for the congress are made known to the students at the beginning of the semester. In groups of up to three members, the students must undertake a work that relates aspects of Anatomy with Bioengineering. Students are expected to investigate on diagnostic and/or therapeutic technology in order to write a paper that must be accepted in advance of the event. The presentation of the work must be made through PowerPoint. The originality of the research work done and the wide range of topics selected are surprising. Problems are tackled from the standpoints both of the various medical fields and of bioengineering despite the fact that they are just students of the second year in Bioengineering.

  11. American Indian/Alaska Native willingness to provide biological samples for research purposes.

    PubMed

    Filippi, Melissa K; Young, Kristin L; Nazir, Niaman; Williams, Chandler; Brown, Travis; Choi, Won S; Greiner, K A; Daley, Christine M

    2012-06-01

    This article examines the willingness of American Indian/Alaska Natives (AI/AN) to provide biological samples for research purposes. Prior cases of abuse and misuse of individuals, materials, and data highlight ethical research concerns. Investigators may be hesitant to engage AI/ANs in research projects. We conducted a survey of AI/ANs in the central plains region of the US over 1 year. This convenience sample completed a series of questions on biological samples and research. Survey results (N=998) indicate that 70.15% of AI/ANs would be willing to provide saliva/spit for a specific study with the proper consent and control of samples. In conclusion, researchers should find ways to work with and for AI/ANs, assuring participant input in the research process.

  12. Ballast water sampling as a critical component of biological invasions risk management.

    PubMed

    David, Matej; Perkovic, Marko

    2004-08-01

    The human mediated transfer of harmful organisms via shipping, specifically via ballast water transport, leading to the loss of biodiversity, alteration of ecosystems, negative impacts on human health and in some regions economic loss, has raised considerable attention especially in the last decade. Ballast water sampling is very important for biological invasions risk management. The complexity of ballast water sampling is a result of both the variety of organism diversity and behaviour, as well as ship design including availability of ballast water sampling points. Furthermore, ballast water sampling methodology is influenced by the objectives of the sampling study. In the course of research conducted in Slovenia, new sampling equipment for ships' ballast water was developed and tested. In this paper new ballast water sampling methods and equipment together with practical shipboard testing results are presented.

  13. Tomographic imaging of transparent biological samples using the pyramid phase microscope

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    We show how a pyramid phase microscope can be used to obtain tomographic information of the spatial variation of refractive index in biological samples using the Radon transform. A method that uses the information provided by the phase microscope for axial and lateral repositioning of the sample when it rotates is also described. Its application to the reconstruction of mouse embryos in the blastocyst stage is demonstrated. PMID:27570696

  14. Method for the concentration and separation of actinides from biological and environmental samples

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1989-05-30

    A method and apparatus for the quantitative recover of actinide values from biological and environmental sample by passing appropriately prepared samples in a mineral acid solution through a separation column of a dialkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide dissolved in tri-n-butyl phosphate on an inert substrate which selectively extracts the actinide values. The actinide values can be eluted either as a group or individually and their presence quantitatively detected by alpha counting. 3 figs.

  15. Method for the concentration and separation of actinides from biological and environmental samples

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the quantitative recover of actinide values from biological and environmental sample by passing appropriately prepared samples in a mineral acid solution through a separation column of a dialkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide dissolved in tri-n-butyl phosphate on an inert substrate which selectively extracts the actinide values. The actinide values can be eluted either as a group or individually and their presence quantitatively detected by alpha counting.

  16. Selective determination of methyl mercury in biological samples by means of programmed temperature gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, R A; Carro, A; Rubí, E; Casais, C; Cela, R

    1993-01-01

    A programmed temperature gas chromatographic method is presented by which it is possible to carry out routine analysis of methyl mercury in biological samples prepared according to the AOAC official first action recommendations without the need for preliminary treatment of the columns. This method greatly extends the life of the columns as well as the useful time for analysis; it has good linearity and repeatability. With the proposed method a total of 36 samples can be analyzed daily.

  17. Proton-induced X-ray and gamma ray emission analysis of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Gene S.; Navon, Eliahu

    1986-04-01

    A 4.1 MeV external proton beam was employed to simultaneously induce X-ray emission (PIXE) and gamma ray emission (PIGE) in biological samples that included human colostrum, spermatozoa, teeth, tree-rings, and follicular fluids. The analytical method was developed to simultaneously determine the elements lithium (Z = 3) through uranium (Z = 92) in the samples. PIXE-PIGE experimental design is described as well as applications in environmental and medical fields.

  18. Photothermal method using a pyroelectric sensor for thermophysical characterization of agricultural and biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frandas, A.; Dadarlat, Dorin; Chirtoc, Mihai; Jalink, Henk; Bicanic, Dane D.; Paris, D.; Antoniow, Jean S.; Egee, Michel; Ungureanu, Costica

    1998-07-01

    The photopyroelectric method in different experimental configurations was used for thermophysical characterization of agricultural and biological samples. The study appears important due to the relation of thermal parameters to the quality of foodstuffs (connected to their preservation, storage and adulteration), migration profiles in biodegradable packages, and the mechanism of desiccation tolerance of seeds. Results are presented on the thermal parameters measurement and their dependence on temperature and water content for samples such as: honey, starch, seeds.

  19. Tomographic imaging of transparent biological samples using the pyramid phase microscope.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Ignacio

    2016-08-01

    We show how a pyramid phase microscope can be used to obtain tomographic information of the spatial variation of refractive index in biological samples using the Radon transform. A method that uses the information provided by the phase microscope for axial and lateral repositioning of the sample when it rotates is also described. Its application to the reconstruction of mouse embryos in the blastocyst stage is demonstrated.

  20. Camels, Cormorants, and Kangaroo Rats: Integration and Synthesis in Organismal Biology After World War II.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Joel B

    2015-01-01

    During the decades following World War II diverse groups of American biologists established a variety of distinctive approaches to organismal biology. Rhetorically, organismal biology could be used defensively to distinguish established research traditions from perceived threats from newly emerging fields such as molecular biology. But, organismal biologists were also interested in integrating biological disciplines and using a focus on organisms to synthesize levels of organization from molecules and cells to populations and communities. Part of this broad movement was the development of an area of research variously referred to as physiological ecology, environmental physiology, or ecophysiology. This area of research was distinctive in its self-conscious blend of field and laboratory practices and its explicit integration with other areas of biology such as ecology, animal behavior, and evolution in order to study adaptation. Comparing the intersecting careers of Knut Schmidt-Nielsen and George Bartholomew highlights two strikingly different approaches to physiological ecology. These alternative approaches to studying the interactions of organisms and environments also differed in important ways from the organismal biology championed by leading figures in the modern synthesis.

  1. Biologic Treatments for Sports Injuries II Think Tank-Current Concepts, Future Research, and Barriers to Advancement, Part 1: Biologics Overview, Ligament Injury, Tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    LaPrade, Robert F; Geeslin, Andrew G; Murray, Iain R; Musahl, Volker; Zlotnicki, Jason P; Petrigliano, Frank; Mann, Barton J

    2016-12-01

    Biologic therapies, including stem cells, platelet-rich plasma, growth factors, and other biologically active adjuncts, have recently received increased attention in the basic science and clinical literature. At the 2015 AOSSM Biologics II Think Tank held in Colorado Springs, Colorado, a group of orthopaedic surgeons, basic scientists, veterinarians, and other investigators gathered to review the state of the science for biologics and barriers to implementation of biologics for the treatment of sports medicine injuries. This series of current concepts reviews reports the summary of the scientific presentations, roundtable discussions, and recommendations from this think tank.

  2. Two-dimensional measurement of the nonlinearity parameter B/A in excised biological samples.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shigemi; Kim, Jung-Ho

    2011-06-01

    The method previously developed for measuring the acoustic nonlinearity parameter B/A in a liquid sample with a volume as small as 0.1 ml [S. Saito, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 127, 51(2010)] has been automated and applied to two-dimensional measurements of excised biological samples using a LabVIEW program. The focus of the sound beam is laterally shifted on the 3 × 3 mm(2) area of the sample while measuring the B/A successively. By displaying the result of 256 time repeated measurements with an interval of 0.2 mm in two dimensions, a C-mode image was generated for B/A. The images of linear properties such as density, sound speed, and attenuation coefficient are also obtained. The image, whose pattern can be different from those of the density and sound speed, has the capability to reveal the detailed structure of the B/A, which varies from region to region in a single biological sample. The application of the method to small samples is also demonstrated by measuring a thermally coagulated biological sample.

  3. Two-dimensional measurement of the nonlinearity parameter B/A in excised biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Shigemi; Kim, Jung-Ho

    2011-06-01

    The method previously developed for measuring the acoustic nonlinearity parameter B/A in a liquid sample with a volume as small as 0.1 ml [S. Saito, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 127, 51(2010)] has been automated and applied to two-dimensional measurements of excised biological samples using a LabVIEW program. The focus of the sound beam is laterally shifted on the 3 × 3 mm2 area of the sample while measuring the B/A successively. By displaying the result of 256 time repeated measurements with an interval of 0.2 mm in two dimensions, a C-mode image was generated for B/A. The images of linear properties such as density, sound speed, and attenuation coefficient are also obtained. The image, whose pattern can be different from those of the density and sound speed, has the capability to reveal the detailed structure of the B/A, which varies from region to region in a single biological sample. The application of the method to small samples is also demonstrated by measuring a thermally coagulated biological sample.

  4. Biological sample evaluation using a line-scan based SWIR hyperspectral imaging system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new line-scan hyperspectral imaging system was developed to enable short wavelength infrared (SWIR) imagery for biological sample evaluation. Critical sensing components include a SWIR imaging spectrograph and an HgCdTe (MCT) focal plane array detector. To date, agricultural applications of infra...

  5. MCT-based SWIR hyperspectral imaging system for evaluation of biological samples

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Hyperspectral imaging has been shown to be a powerful tool for nondestructive evaluation of biological samples. We recently developed a new line-scan-based shortwave infrared (SWIR) hyperspectral imaging system. Critical sensing components of the system include a SWIR spectrograph, an MCT (HgCdTe) a...

  6. Current methods for detecting the presence of botulinum neurotoxins in food and other biological samples

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Current methods for detecting the presence of botulinum neurotoxins in food and other biological samples Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), the causative agents of botulism, are among the most lethal human bacterial toxins and the causative agent of botulism. BoNTs are also classified as Select Agents ...

  7. Fast quantitative retardance imaging of biological samples using quadri-wave interferometry (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aknoun, Sherazade; Bon, Pierre; Savatier, Julien; Monneret, Serge; Wattellier, Benoit F.

    2016-03-01

    We describe the use of polarized spatially coherent illumination to perform linear retardance imaging and measurements of semi-transparent biological samples using a quantitative phase imaging technique [1]. Quantitative phase imaging techniques [2-5] are used in microscopy for the imaging of semi-transparent samples and gives information about the optical path difference (OPD). The strength of those techniques is their non-invasive (the sample is not labelled) and fast approach. However, this high contrast is non-specific and cannot be linked to specific properties of the sample. To overcome this limitation, we propose to use polarized light in combination with QPI. Indeed, anisotropy has been used to reveal ordered fibrous structures in biological samples without any staining or labelling with polarized light microscopy [6-8]. Recent studies have shown polarimetry as a potential diagnostic tool for various dermatological diseases on thick tissue samples [9]. Particularly, specific collagen fibers spatial distribution has been demonstrated to be a signature for the optical diagnosis and prognosis of cancer in tissues [10]. In this paper, we describe a technical improvement of our technique based on high-resolution quadri-wave lateral shearing interferometry (QWLSI) and liquid crystal retarder to perform quantitative linear birefringence measurements on biological samples. The system combines a set of quantitative phase images with different excitation polarizations to create birefringence images. These give information about the local retardance and orientation of biological anisotropic components. We propose using a commercial QWLSI [11] (SID4Bio, Phasics SA, Saint Aubin, France) directly plugged onto a lateral video port of an inverted microscope (TE2000-U, Nikon, Japan). We are able to take retardance images in less than 1 second which allows us to record dynamic phenomena (living cells study) and make high speed acquisitions to reconstruct tissues virtual

  8. Water masers associated with compact molecular clouds and ultracompact H II regions - The extended sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesaroni, R.; Comoretto, G.; Felli, M.; Palla, F.; Brand, J.; Caselli, P.

    We present the results of a survey of water maser emission at 22.2 GHz towards a selected sample of IRAS-PSC sources which are believed to be associated with very young massive stars. The sample consists of 591 sources. The observations have been carried out using the Medicina 32-m radiotelescope, operated by the Istituto di Radioastronomia - C.N.R., Bologna. Whereas previous searches for maser emission have been directed towards known H II regions, the aim of the present survey is to identify new sources in an even earlier evolutionary phase, corresponding to the development of an ultracompact H II region. It is shown that our sample contains a significant number of sources that could be considered good candidates of massive protostellar cores still in the main accretion phase.

  9. Experimental and calculational analyses of actinide samples irradiated in EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Gilai, D.; Williams, M.L.; Cooper, J.H.; Laing, W.R.; Walker, R.L.; Raman, S.; Stelson, P.H.

    1982-10-01

    Higher actinides influence the characteristics of spent and recycled fuel and dominate the long-term hazards of the reactor waste. Reactor irradiation experiments provide useful benchmarks for testing the evaluated nuclear data for these actinides. During 1967 to 1970, several actinide samples were irradiated in the Idaho EBR-II fast reactor. These samples have now been analyzed, employing mass and alpha spectrometry, to determine the heavy element products. A simple spherical model for the EBR-II core and a recent version of the ORIGEN code with ENDF/B-V data were employed to calculate the exposure products. A detailed comparison between the experimental and calculated results has been made. For samples irradiated at locations near the core center, agreement within 10% was obtained for the major isotopes and their first daughters, and within 20% for the nuclides up the chain. A sensitivity analysis showed that the assumed flux should be increased by 10%.

  10. A Sampled Master Oscillator for the PEP-II B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    1999-05-18

    A sampled phase-locked loop synchronizes the PEP-II B Factory rings to their SLAC Linac injector. The injection of both electrons and positrons into the separate rings and into their proper rf buckets requires phase shifting the linac rf with respect to the PEP rings. One of every three machine cycles provides the PEP ring an undisturbed reference while the other two thirds of the time the reference is unusable due to the injection scheme. The ring rf must be tunable about its nominal frequency for machine physics use. A sampled phase-locked loop handles the task of synchronizing the PEP-II rf to the linac while maintaining good phase noise. The input reference is sampled at 120 Hz and provides a ring rf signal with less than 0.1{degree} of rms phase jitter at 476 MHz.

  11. Co(II) and Cd(II) complexes derived from heterocyclic Schiff-Bases: synthesis, structural characterisation, and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Riyadh M; Yousif, Enaam I; Al-Jeboori, Mohamad J

    2013-01-01

    New monomeric cobalt and cadmium complexes with Schiff-bases, namely, N'-[(E)-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)methylidene]furan-2-carbohydrazide (L¹) and N'-[(E)-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)methylidene]thiophene-2-carbohydrazide (L²) are reported. Schiff-base ligands L¹ and L² were derived from condensation of 3-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde (iso-vanillin) with furan-2-carboxylic acid hydrazide and thiophene-2-carboxylic acid hydrazide, respectively. Complexes of the general formula [M(L)₂]Cl₂ (where M = Co(II) or Cd(II), L = L¹ or L²) have been obtained from the reaction of the corresponding metal chloride with the ligands. The ligands and their metal complexes were characterised by spectroscopic methods (FTIR, UV-Vis, ¹H, and ¹³C NMR spectra), elemental analysis, metal content, magnetic measurement, and conductance. These studies revealed the formation of four-coordinate complexes in which the geometry about metal ion is tetrahedral. Biological activity of the ligands and their metal complexes against gram positive bacterial strain Bacillus (G+) and gram negative bacteria Pseudomonas (G-) revealed that the metal complexes become less resistive to the microbial activities as compared to the free ligands.

  12. Co(II) and Cd(II) Complexes Derived from Heterocyclic Schiff-Bases: Synthesis, Structural Characterisation, and Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Riyadh M.; Yousif, Enaam I.; Al-Jeboori, Mohamad J.

    2013-01-01

    New monomeric cobalt and cadmium complexes with Schiff-bases, namely, N′-[(E)-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)methylidene]furan-2-carbohydrazide (L1) and N′-[(E)-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)methylidene]thiophene-2-carbohydrazide (L2) are reported. Schiff-base ligands L1 and L2 were derived from condensation of 3-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde (iso-vanillin) with furan-2-carboxylic acid hydrazide and thiophene-2-carboxylic acid hydrazide, respectively. Complexes of the general formula [M(L)2]Cl2 (where M = Co(II) or Cd(II), L = L1 or L2) have been obtained from the reaction of the corresponding metal chloride with the ligands. The ligands and their metal complexes were characterised by spectroscopic methods (FTIR, UV-Vis, 1H, and 13C NMR spectra), elemental analysis, metal content, magnetic measurement, and conductance. These studies revealed the formation of four-coordinate complexes in which the geometry about metal ion is tetrahedral. Biological activity of the ligands and their metal complexes against gram positive bacterial strain Bacillus (G+) and gram negative bacteria Pseudomonas (G−) revealed that the metal complexes become less resistive to the microbial activities as compared to the free ligands. PMID:24027449

  13. Unfolding biological properties of a versatile dicopper(II) precursor and its two mononuclear copper(II) derivatives.

    PubMed

    Paul, Anup; Hazra, Susanta; Sharma, Gunjan; Guedes da Silva, M Fátima C; Koch, Biplob; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2017-09-01

    Synthesis, inter-conversions and biological study of the dichloro bridged dicopper(II) compound [CuLCl]2 (1) and its two mononuclear derivatives [CuLCl(H2O)]·H2O (2) and [CuLCl(py)] (3) (HL=2-(2-pyridylmethyleneamino)benzenesulfonic acid) are described. The dimeric compound 1 collapses into monomers 2 and 3 in the presence of coordinating solvents, water and pyridine, respectively, and 1 is regenerated upon simple stirring of 2 or 3 in methanol. The reactions of 1 with neutral (present study) and charged (earlier studies) ligands result in monomeric and multimeric compounds, respectively, attesting that it is a versatile dicopper(II) precursor. The anticancer activity of these copper complexes (1-3) was screened against lung (A-549) and breast (MDA-MB-231) human cancer cell lines. The IC50 (half maximal inhibitory concentration) value for one (3) of the compounds suggests preferential cytotoxicity against breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell line. Furthermore, the IC50 value obtained for complex 3 is found to be almost two-fold times cytotoxic than the standard drug cisplatin. In addition, the underlying possible mechanism of its apoptosis-inducing efficacy in MDA-MB-231 cells has been rationalized by using flow cytometry (FACS) and Hoechst 33342/propidium iodide (PI) fluorescence staining. The stimulation of apoptotic induction for complex 3 has further been affirmed by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and mitochondrial aggregations studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The NYC native air sampling pilot project: using HVAC filter data for urban biological incident characterization.

    PubMed

    Ackelsberg, Joel; Leykam, Frederic M; Hazi, Yair; Madsen, Larry C; West, Todd H; Faltesek, Anthony; Henderson, Gavin D; Henderson, Christopher L; Leighton, Terrance

    2011-09-01

    Native air sampling (NAS) is distinguished from dedicated air sampling (DAS) devices (eg, BioWatch) that are deployed to detect aerosol disseminations of biological threat agents. NAS uses filter samples from heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in commercial properties for environmental sampling after DAS detection of biological threat agent incidents. It represents an untapped, scientifically sound, efficient, widely distributed, and comparably inexpensive resource for postevent environmental sampling. Calculations predict that postevent NAS would be more efficient than environmental surface sampling by orders of magnitude. HVAC filter samples could be collected from pre-identified surrounding NAS facilities to corroborate the DAS alarm and delineate the path taken by the bioaerosol plume. The New York City (NYC) Native Air Sampling Pilot Project explored whether native air sampling would be acceptable to private sector stakeholders and could be implemented successfully in NYC. Building trade associations facilitated outreach to and discussions with property owners and managers, who expedited contact with building managers of candidate NAS properties that they managed or owned. Nominal NAS building requirements were determined; procedures to identify and evaluate candidate NAS facilities were developed; data collection tools and other resources were designed and used to expedite candidate NAS building selection and evaluation in Manhattan; and exemplar environmental sampling playbooks for emergency responders were completed. In this sample, modern buildings with single or few corporate tenants were the best NAS candidate facilities. The Pilot Project successfully demonstrated that in one urban setting a native air sampling strategy could be implemented with effective public-private collaboration.

  15. Rapid methods to detect organic mercury and total selenium in biological samples

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Organic mercury (Hg) is a global pollutant of concern and selenium is believed to afford protection against mercury risk though few approaches exist to rapidly assess both chemicals in biological samples. Here, micro-scale and rapid methods to detect organic mercury (< 1.5 ml total sample volume, < 1.5 hour) and total selenium (Se; < 3.0 ml total volume, < 3 hour) from a range of biological samples (10-50 mg) are described. Results For organic Hg, samples are digested using Tris-HCl buffer (with sequential additions of protease, NaOH, cysteine, CuSO4, acidic NaBr) followed by extraction with toluene and Na2S2O3. The final product is analyzed via commercially available direct/total mercury analyzers. For Se, a fluorometric assay has been developed for microplate readers that involves digestion (HNO3-HClO4 and HCl), conjugation (2,3-diaminonaphthalene), and cyclohexane extraction. Recovery of organic Hg (86-107%) and Se (85-121%) were determined through use of Standard Reference Materials and lemon shark kidney tissues. Conclusions The approaches outlined provide an easy, rapid, reproducible, and cost-effective platform for monitoring organic Hg and total Se in biological samples. Owing to the importance of organic Hg and Se in the pathophysiology of Hg, integration of such methods into established research monitoring efforts (that largely focus on screening total Hg only) will help increase understanding of Hg's true risks. PMID:21232132

  16. Effects of different temperature treatments on biological ice nuclei in snow samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Kazutaka; Maki, Teruya; Kakikawa, Makiko; Kobayashi, Fumihisa; Matsuki, Atsushi

    2016-09-01

    The heat tolerance of biological ice nucleation activity (INA) depends on their types. Different temperature treatments may cause varying degrees of inactivation on biological ice nuclei (IN) in precipitation samples. In this study, we measured IN concentration and bacterial INA in snow samples using a drop freezing assay, and compared the results for unheated snow and snow treated at 40 °C and 90 °C. At a measured temperature of -7 °C, the concentration of IN in untreated snow was 100-570 L-1, whereas the concentration in snow treated at 40 °C and 90 °C was 31-270 L-1 and 2.5-14 L-1, respectively. In the present study, heat sensitive IN inactivated by heating at 40 °C were predominant, and ranged 23-78% of IN at -7 °C compared with untreated samples. Ice nucleation active Pseudomonas strains were also isolated from the snow samples, and heating at 40 °C and 90 °C inactivated these microorganisms. Consequently, different temperature treatments induced varying degrees of inactivation on IN in snow samples. Differences in the concentration of IN across a range of treatment temperatures might reflect the abundance of different heat sensitive biological IN components.

  17. Toward greener analytical techniques for the absolute quantification of peptides in pharmaceutical and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Van Eeckhaut, Ann; Mangelings, Debby

    2015-09-10

    Peptide-based biopharmaceuticals represent one of the fastest growing classes of new drug molecules. New reaction types included in the synthesis strategies to reduce the rapid metabolism of peptides, along with the availability of new formulation and delivery technologies, resulted in an increased marketing of peptide drug products. In this regard, the development of analytical methods for quantification of peptides in pharmaceutical and biological samples is of utmost importance. From the sample preparation step to their analysis by means of chromatographic or electrophoretic methods, many difficulties should be tackled to analyze them. Recent developments in analytical techniques emphasize more and more on the use of green analytical techniques. This review will discuss the progresses in and challenges observed during green analytical method development for the quantification of peptides in pharmaceutical and biological samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Synthesis of New Sulfated and Glucuronated Metabolites of Dietary Phenolic Compounds Identified in Human Biological Samples.

    PubMed

    Almeida, A Filipa; Santos, Cláudia N; Ventura, M Rita

    2017-02-23

    (Poly)phenols are a large group of dietary compounds present in fruits and vegetables; their consumption is associated with health beneficial effects. After ingestion, (poly)phenols suffer extensive metabolization, and the identification of their metabolites is an emerging area, because these metabolites are considered the effective bioactive molecules in the human organism. However, a lack of commercially available standards has hampered the study of metabolite bioactivity and the exact structural confirmation in biological samples. New (poly)phenol metabolites previously identified in human samples after the intake of berry juice were chemically synthesized. Efficient chemical reactions were performed with moderate to excellent yields and selectivities. These new compounds could be used as standard chemicals for confirmation of the structure of metabolites in biological samples and will also allow mechanistic studies in cellular models.

  19. Nanocharacterization of Soft Biological Samples in Shear Mode with Quartz Tuning Fork Probes

    PubMed Central

    Otero, Jorge; Gonzalez, Laura; Puig-Vidal, Manel

    2012-01-01

    Quartz tuning forks are extremely good resonators and their use is growing in scanning probe microscopy. Nevertheless, only a few studies on soft biological samples have been reported using these probes. In this work, we present the methodology to develop and use these nanosensors to properly work with biological samples. The working principles, fabrication and experimental setup are presented. The results in the nanocharacterization of different samples in different ambients are presented by using different working modes: amplitude modulation with and without the use of a Phase-Locked Loop (PLL) and frequency modulation. Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria are imaged in nitrogen using amplitude modulation. Microcontact printed antibodies are imaged in buffer using amplitude modulation with a PLL. Finally, metastatic cells are imaged in air using frequency modulation. PMID:22666059

  20. Nanocharacterization of soft biological samples in shear mode with quartz tuning fork probes.

    PubMed

    Otero, Jorge; Gonzalez, Laura; Puig-Vidal, Manel

    2012-01-01

    Quartz tuning forks are extremely good resonators and their use is growing in scanning probe microscopy. Nevertheless, only a few studies on soft biological samples have been reported using these probes. In this work, we present the methodology to develop and use these nanosensors to properly work with biological samples. The working principles, fabrication and experimental setup are presented. The results in the nanocharacterization of different samples in different ambients are presented by using different working modes: amplitude modulation with and without the use of a Phase-Locked Loop (PLL) and frequency modulation. Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria are imaged in nitrogen using amplitude modulation. Microcontact printed antibodies are imaged in buffer using amplitude modulation with a PLL. Finally, metastatic cells are imaged in air using frequency modulation.

  1. Development of a capillary isoelectric focusing immunoassay to measure DJ-1 isoforms in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Besong Agbo, D; Klafki, H; Poschmann, G; Seyfarth, K; Genius, J; Janßen, C; Stühler, K; Wurst, W; Meyer, H E; Klingenspor, M; Wiltfang, J

    2013-12-15

    We report on the development of a novel assay protocol for the separation and detection of charge isoforms of DJ-1 in biological samples by automated capillary isoelectric focusing followed by immunological detection. DJ-1 (PARK7) is considered as a biomarker candidate for Parkinson's disease and may potentially support the differentiation of clinical subtypes of the disease. The new method allows for separation and subsequent relative quantitative comparison of different isoforms of DJ-1 in biological samples. The assay was successfully applied to the analysis of DJ-1 isoform patterns in brains from mice subjected to normal or high-fat diet and revealed statistically significant group differences. Furthermore, in a pooled and concentrated sample of human cerebrospinal fluid that was depleted of albumin and immunoglobulin G, four different charge variants of DJ-1 could be detected. Taken together, the capillary isoelectric focusing immunoassay for DJ-1 represents a promising tool that may ultimately serve in clinical biomarker studies.

  2. Lead Assessment in Biological Samples of Children with Different Gastrointestinal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Shah, Faheem; Ullah, Naeem; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Khan, Ajmal; Kandhro, Ghulam Abbas; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Arain, Mohammad Balal; Khan, Zahid; Farooq, Umar

    2016-01-01

    Lead (Pb) levels have been evaluated in the biological samples of children with different gastrointestinal disorders. Blood, scalp hair, and urine samples of children (of age 4-10 years) complaining about different gastrointestinal disorders were analyzed. For comparison, age matched healthy subjects were also included in this study. Biological samples were digested in a microwave oven prior to Pb determination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Significant differences in Pb profile were found between the diseased and referent children. Elevated Pb contents were observed in case of diseased children than WHO permissible limit, while normal results were obtained for healthy referents. The results were compared with those of healthy children having the same age, socioeconomic status, and residential areas.

  3. Super-resolution atomic force photoactivated microscopy of biological samples (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seunghyun; Kim, Hyemin; Shin, Seungjun; Doh, Junsang; Kim, Chulhong

    2017-03-01

    Optical microscopy (OM) and photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) have previously been used to image the optical absorption of intercellular features of biological cells. However, the optical diffraction limit ( 200 nm) makes it difficult for these modalities to image nanoscale inner cell structures and the distribution of internal cell components. Although super-resolution fluorescence microscopy, such as stimulated emission depletion microscopy (STED) and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), has successfully performed nanoscale biological imaging, these modalities require the use of exogenous fluorescence agents, which are unfavorable for biological samples. Our newly developed atomic force photoactivated microscopy (AFPM) can provide optical absorption images with nanoscale lateral resolution without any exogenous contrast agents. AFPM combines conventional atomic force microscopy (AFM) and an optical excitation system, and simultaneously provides multiple contrasts, such as the topography and magnitude of optical absorption. AFPM can detect the intrinsic optical absorption of samples with 8 nm lateral resolution, easily overcoming the diffraction limit. Using the label-free AFPM system, we have successfully imaged the optical absorption properties of a single melanoma cell (B16F10) and a rosette leaf epidermal cell of Arabidopsis (ecotype Columbia (Col-0)) with nanoscale lateral resolution. The remarkable images show the melanosome distribution of a melanoma cell and the biological structures of a plant cell. AFPM provides superior imaging of optical absorption with a nanoscale lateral resolution, and it promises to become widely used in biological and chemical research.

  4. Zn(II)-coordination modulated ligand photophysical processes – the development of fluorescent indicators for imaging biological Zn(II) ions

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhao; Simmons, J. Tyler; Sreenath, Kesavapillai

    2014-01-01

    Molecular photophysics and metal coordination chemistry are the two fundamental pillars that support the development of fluorescent cation indicators. In this article, we describe how Zn(II)-coordination alters various ligand-centered photophysical processes that are pertinent to developing Zn(II) indicators. The main aim is to show how small organic Zn(II) indicators work under the constraints of specific requirements, including Zn(II) detection range, photophysical requirements such as excitation energy and emission color, temporal and spatial resolutions in a heterogeneous intracellular environment, and fluorescence response selectivity between similar cations such as Zn(II) and Cd(II). In the last section, the biological questions that fluorescent Zn(II) indicators help to answer are described, which have been motivating and challenging this field of research. PMID:25071933

  5. Vibrational Spectroscopy for Imaging Single Microbial Cells in Complex Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Jesse P.; Berry, David

    2017-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy is increasingly used for the rapid and non-destructive imaging of environmental and medical samples. Both Raman and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) imaging have been applied to obtain detailed information on the chemical composition of biological materials, ranging from single microbial cells to tissues. Due to its compatibility with methods such as stable isotope labeling for the monitoring of cellular activities, vibrational spectroscopy also holds considerable power as a tool in microbial ecology. Chemical imaging of undisturbed biological systems (such as live cells in their native habitats) presents unique challenges due to the physical and chemical complexity of the samples, potential for spectral interference, and frequent need for real-time measurements. This Mini Review provides a critical synthesis of recent applications of Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy for characterizing complex biological samples, with a focus on developments in single-cell imaging. We also discuss how new spectroscopic methods could be used to overcome current limitations of single-cell analyses. Given the inherent complementarity of Raman and FT-IR spectroscopic methods, we discuss how combining these approaches could enable us to obtain new insights into biological activities either in situ or under conditions that simulate selected properties of the natural environment. PMID:28450860

  6. Vibrational spectroscopy for imaging single microbial cells in complex biological samples

    DOE PAGES

    Harrison, Jesse P.; Berry, David

    2017-04-13

    Here, vibrational spectroscopy is increasingly used for the rapid and non-destructive imaging of environmental and medical samples. Both Raman and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) imaging have been applied to obtain detailed information on the chemical composition of biological materials, ranging from single microbial cells to tissues. Due to its compatibility with methods such as stable isotope labeling for the monitoring of cellular activities, vibrational spectroscopy also holds considerable power as a tool in microbial ecology. Chemical imaging of undisturbed biological systems (such as live cells in their native habitats) presents unique challenges due to the physical and chemical complexity of themore » samples, potential for spectral interference, and frequent need for real-time measurements. This Mini Review provides a critical synthesis of recent applications of Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy for characterizing complex biological samples, with a focus on developments in single-cell imaging. We also discuss how new spectroscopic methods could be used to overcome current limitations of singlecell analyses. Given the inherent complementarity of Raman and FT-IR spectroscopic methods, we discuss how combining these approaches could enable us to obtain new insights into biological activities either in situ or under conditions that simulate selected properties of the natural environment.« less

  7. Biological sample collections from minors for genetic research: a systematic review of guidelines and position papers.

    PubMed

    Hens, Kristien; Nys, Herman; Cassiman, Jean-Jacques; Dierickx, Kris

    2009-08-01

    Stored tissue samples are an important resource for epidemiological genetic research. Genetic research on biological material from minors can yield valuable information on the development and genesis of early-onset genetic disorders and the early interaction of environmental and genetic factors. The use of such tissue raises some specific ethical and governance questions, which are not completely covered by the discussion on biological materials from adults. We have retrieved 29 guidelines and position papers pertaining to the storage and use of biological tissue samples for genetic research, originating from 27 different organizations. Five documents have an international scope, three have an European scope and 21 have a national scope. We discovered that 11 of these documents did not contain a section on biological materials from minors. The content of the remaining 18 documents was categorized according to four themes: consent, principles of non-therapeutic research on vulnerable populations, ethics committee approval and difference between anonymous and identifiable samples. We found out that these themes are not consistently mentioned by each document, but that documents discussing the same themes were mostly in agreement with their recommendations. However, a systematic reflection on the ethical and policy issues arising from the participation of minors in biobank research is missing.

  8. Biological sample collections from minors for genetic research: a systematic review of guidelines and position papers

    PubMed Central

    Hens, Kristien; Nys, Herman; Cassiman, Jean-Jacques; Dierickx, Kris

    2009-01-01

    Stored tissue samples are an important resource for epidemiological genetic research. Genetic research on biological material from minors can yield valuable information on the development and genesis of early-onset genetic disorders and the early interaction of environmental and genetic factors. The use of such tissue raises some specific ethical and governance questions, which are not completely covered by the discussion on biological materials from adults. We have retrieved 29 guidelines and position papers pertaining to the storage and use of biological tissue samples for genetic research, originating from 27 different organizations. Five documents have an international scope, three have an European scope and 21 have a national scope. We discovered that 11 of these documents did not contain a section on biological materials from minors. The content of the remaining 18 documents was categorized according to four themes: consent, principles of non-therapeutic research on vulnerable populations, ethics committee approval and difference between anonymous and identifiable samples. We found out that these themes are not consistently mentioned by each document, but that documents discussing the same themes were mostly in agreement with their recommendations. However, a systematic reflection on the ethical and policy issues arising from the participation of minors in biobank research is missing. PMID:19223929

  9. Solid Phase Microextraction and Related Techniques for Drugs in Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Moein, Mohammad Mahdi; Said, Rana; Bassyouni, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    In drug discovery and development, the quantification of drugs in biological samples is an important task for the determination of the physiological performance of the investigated drugs. After sampling, the next step in the analytical process is sample preparation. Because of the low concentration levels of drug in plasma and the variety of the metabolites, the selected extraction technique should be virtually exhaustive. Recent developments of sample handling techniques are directed, from one side, toward automatization and online coupling of sample preparation units. The primary objective of this review is to present the recent developments in microextraction sample preparation methods for analysis of drugs in biological fluids. Microextraction techniques allow for less consumption of solvent, reagents, and packing materials, and small sample volumes can be used. In this review the use of solid phase microextraction (SPME), microextraction in packed sorbent (MEPS), and stir-bar sorbtive extraction (SBSE) in drug analysis will be discussed. In addition, the use of new sorbents such as monoliths and molecularly imprinted polymers will be presented. PMID:24688797

  10. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in the analysis of biological samples and pharmaceutical drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossipov, K.; Seregina, I. F.; Bolshov, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is widely used in the analysis of biological samples (whole blood, serum, blood plasma, urine, tissues, etc.) and pharmaceutical drugs. The shortcomings of this method related to spectral and non-spectral interferences are manifested in full measure in determination of the target analytes in these complex samples strongly differing in composition. The spectral interferences are caused by similarity of masses of the target component and sample matrix components. Non-spectral interferences are related to the influence of sample matrix components on the physicochemical processes taking place during formation and transportation of liquid sample aerosols into the plasma, on the value and spatial distribution of plasma temperature and on the transmission of the ion beam from the interface to mass spectrometer detector. The review is devoted to analysis of different mechanisms of appearance of non-spectral interferences and to ways for their minimization or elimination. Special attention is paid to the techniques of biological sample preparation, which largely determine the mechanisms of the influence of sample composition on the results of element determination. The ways of lowering non-spectral interferences by instrumental parameter tuning and application of internal standards are considered. The bibliography includes 189 references.

  11. Will Women Diagnosed with Breast Cancer Provide Biological Samples for Research Purposes?

    PubMed

    Harris, Shelley A; Boucher, Beatrice A; Cotterchio, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the response rates for biological sample donation and attitudes towards control recruitment, especially in younger women. The goals of this pilot study were to determine in women recently diagnosed with breast cancer, the proportion of cases willing to provide biological samples and for purposes of control recruitment, contact information for friends or colleagues. A population-based sample of breast cancer cases (n = 417, 25-74 years) was recruited from the Ontario Cancer Registry in 2010 and self-administered questionnaires were completed to determine willingness to provide samples (spot or 24-hr urine, saliva, blood) and contact information for friends/colleagues for control recruitment. Using Χ2 analyses of contingency tables we evaluated if these proportions varied by age group (<45 and 45+) and other factors such as ethnicity, education, income, body mass index (BMI), smoking status and alcohol consumption. Cases were willing to provide blood samples, by visiting a clinic (62%) or by having a nurse visit the home (61%). Moreover, they would provide saliva (73%), and morning or 24-hr urine samples (66% and 52%). Younger cases (≤45) were 3 times (OR) more likely more than older cases to agree to collect morning urine (95% CI: 1.15-8.35). Only 26% of cases indicated they would provide contact information of friends or work colleagues to act as controls. Educated cases were more likely to agree to provide samples, and cases who consumed alcohol were more willing to provide contact information. Ethnicity, income, BMI and smoking had little effect on response rates. Reasonable response rates for biological sample collection should be expected in future case controls studies in younger women, but other methods of control selection must be devised.

  12. A simple assay of taurine concentrations in food and biological samples using taurine dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Motoki; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2012-08-15

    Taurine demonstrates various physiological functions and pharmacological actions. A successful application of taurine dioxygenase (EC 1.14.11.17) for taurine determination is described. The gene encoding taurine dioxygenase was cloned from Escherichia coli strain K-12, and the enzyme was used to determine taurine in commercially available beverages and some biological samples. The measured values obtained using the current method are close to the declared values with the precolumn derivatization ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) procedure. Taurine dioxygenase can be used for taurine determination in food control, biological research, and diagnoses based on urinary taurine concentration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A highly selective and sensitive fluorescence assay for determination of copper(II) and cobalt(II) ions in environmental water and toner samples.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Yi; Lin, Yang-Wei

    2013-02-21

    In this study, a highly selective and sensitive fluorescence assay has been proposed for the determination of copper(II) and cobalt(II) ions in environmental water and toner samples. In the presence of hydrogen peroxide, copper(II) reacted with a new fluorescence reagent Amplex® UltraRed (AUR), forming a fluorescence product only at pH 7.0, while the fluorescence product of cobalt(II) with AUR formed only at pH 9.0. The fluorescence signal obtained was linear with respect to the copper(II) concentration over the range of 1.6-12.0 μM (R(2) = 0.988) and was linear with respect to the cobalt(II) concentration over the range of 45.0 nM to 1.0 μM (R(2) = 0.992). The limits of detection (at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3) for copper(II) and cobalt(II) were 0.17 μM and 14.0 nM, respectively. Our present approach is simpler, faster, and more cost-effective than other techniques for the detection of copper(II) and cobalt(II) ions in environmental water samples and that of copper(II) ions in toner samples.

  14. On-line Determination of Zinc in Water and Biological Samples after Its Preconcentration onto Zincon Anchored Polyurethane Foam.

    PubMed

    Azeem, Sami M Abdel; Hanafi, Hassan A; El-Shahat, M F

    2015-01-01

    A fast and sensitive on-line procedure for the determination of zinc in water and biological samples was developed. Zinc was preconcentrated in a mini-column packed with polyurethane foam (PUF) chemically modified with zincon via -N=N- bonding. The optimal conditions for preconcentration were pH 8.5 and sample flow rate of 4.0 mL min(-1). Quantitative desorption of Zn(II) was obtained by 0.1 mol L(-1) hydrochloric acid and subsequent spectrophotmetric determination using 4-(2-pyridylazo)-resorcinol at 498 nm. The obtained detection limit was found to be 3.0 ng mL(-1), precision (RSD) was 4.8 and 6.7% at 20 and 110 ng mL(-1), respectively, for 60 s preconcentration time and enrichment factor was 31. The linearity range was from 10 to 120 ng mL(-1) and maximum sample throughput was 20 h(-1). Finally, the method was successfully applied to the determination of zinc in tap water, Nile River water and human urine samples with RSD in the range of 1.1 - 8.3%.

  15. Ligandless cloud point extraction of Cr(III), Pb(II), Cu(II), Ni(II), Bi(III), and Cd(II) ions in environmental samples with Tween 80 and flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination.

    PubMed

    Candir, Secil; Narin, Ibrahim; Soylak, Mustafa

    2008-10-19

    A cloud point extraction (CPE) procedure has been developed for the determination trace amounts of Cr(III), Pb(II), Cu(II), Ni(II), Bi(III), and Cd(II) ions by using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The proposed cloud point extraction method was based on cloud point extraction of analyte metal ions without ligand using Tween 80 as surfactant. The surfactant-rich phase was dissolved with 1.0 mL 1.0 mol L(-1) HNO(3) in methanol to decrease the viscosity. The analytical parameters were investigated such as pH, surfactant concentration, incubation temperature, and sample volume, etc. Accuracy of method was checked analysis by reference material and spiked samples. Developed method was applied to several matrices such as water, food and pharmaceutical samples. The detection limits of proposed method were calculated 2.8, 7.2, 0.4, 1.1, 0.8 and 1.7 microg L(-1) for Cr(III), Pb(II), Cu(II), Ni(II), Bi(III), and Cd(II), respectively.

  16. Cloud point extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of cadmium(II), lead(II), palladium(II) and silver(I) in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Shokrollahi, Ardeshir; Niknam, Khodabakhsh; Niknam, Ebrahim; Najibi, Asma; Soylak, Mustafa

    2009-09-15

    The phase-separation phenomenon of non-ionic surfactants occurring in aqueous solution was used for the extraction of cadmium(II), lead(II), palladium(II) and silver(I). The analytical procedure involved the formation of understudy metals complex with bis((1H-benzo [d] imidazol-2yl)ethyl) sulfane (BIES), and quantitatively extracted to the phase rich in octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (Triton X-114) after centrifugation. Methanol acidified with 1molL(-1) HNO(3) was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to its analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The concentration of BIES, pH and amount of surfactant (Triton X-114) was optimized. At optimum conditions, the detection limits of (3 sdb/m) of 1.4, 2.8, 1.6 and 1.4 ng mL(-1) for Cd(2+), Pb(2+), Pd(2+) and Ag(+) along with preconcentration factors of 30 and enrichment factors of 48, 39, 32 and 42 for Cd(2+), Pb(2+), Pd(2+) and Ag(+), respectively, were obtained. The proposed cloud point extraction has been successfully applied for the determination of metal ions in real samples with complicated matrix such as radiology waste, vegetable, blood and urine samples.

  17. A Prototype Ice-Melting Probe for Collecting Biological Samples from Cryogenic Ice at Low Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Ashley

    2017-08-01

    In the Solar System, the surface of an icy moon is composed of irregular ice formations at cryogenic temperatures (<200 K), with an oxidized surface layer and a tenuous atmosphere at very low pressure (<10-6 atm). A lander mission, whose aim is to collect and analyze biological samples from the surface ice, must contain a device that collects samples without refreezing liquid and without sublimation of ice. In addition, if the samples are biological in nature, then precautions must be taken to ensure the samples do not overheat or mix with the oxidized layer. To achieve these conditions, the collector must maintain temperatures close to maintenance or growth conditions of the organism (<293 K), and it must separate or neutralize the oxidized layer and be physically gentle. Here, we describe a device that addresses these requirements and is compatible with low atmospheric pressure while using no pumps. The device contains a heated conical probe with a central orifice, which is forced into surface ice and directs the meltwater upward into a reservoir. The force on the probe is proportional to the height of meltwater (pressure) obtained in the system and allows regulation of the melt rate and temperature of the sample. The device can collect 5-50 mL of meltwater from the surface of an ice block at 233-208 K with an environmental pressure of less than 10-2 atm while maintaining a sample temperature between 273 and 293 K. These conditions maintain most biological samples in a pristine state and maintain the integrity of most organisms' structure and function.

  18. Improved preparation of small biological samples for mercury analysis using cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Adair, B M; Cobb, G P

    1999-05-01

    Concentrations of mercury in biological samples collected for environmental studies are often less than 0.1 microgram/g. Low mercury concentrations and small organ sizes in many wildlife species (approximately 0.1 g) increase the difficulty of mercury determination at environmentally relevant concentrations. We have developed a digestion technique to extract mercury from small (0.1 g), biological samples at these relevant concentrations. Mean recoveries (+/- standard error) from validation trials of mercury fortified tissue samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy for analysis ranged from 102 +/- 4.3% (2.5 micrograms/L, n = 15) to 108 +/- 1.4% (25 micrograms/L, n = 15). Recoveries of inorganic mercury were 99 +/- 5 (n = 19) for quality assurance samples analyzed during environmental evaluations conducted during a 24 month period. This technique can be used to determine total mercury concentrations of 60 ng Hg/g sample. Samples can be analyzed in standard laboratories in a short time, at minimal cost. The technique is versatile and can be used to determine mercury concentrations in several different matrices, limiting the time and expense of method development and validation.

  19. Presence of Atrazine in the Biological Samples of Cattle and Its Consequence Adversity in Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Peighambarzadeh, SZ; Safi, S; Shahtaheri, SJ; Javanbakht, M; Rahimi Forushani, A

    2011-01-01

    Background Cattle can be considered as an important source for herbicides through nutrition. Therefore, herbicide residue in animal products is a potential human exposure to herbicides causing public health problems in human life. Triazines are a group of herbicides primarily used to control broadleaf weeds in corn and other feed ingredients and are considered as possible human carcinogens. To evaluate trace residue of these pollutants molecular imprinted solid phase extraction (MISPE) method has been developed, using biological samples. Methods: Blood samples were taken from the jugular vein of 45 Holstein cows in 3 commercial dairy farms in Khuzestan Province, Iran. Urine samples were also taken from the cows. Results: The mean ± SD concentrations of atrazine in serum and urine samples of the study group (0.739 ± 0.567 ppm and 1.389 ± 0.633 ppm, respectively) were higher (P < 0.05) than the concentrations in serum and urine samples of the control group (0.002 ± 0.005 ppm and 0.012 ± 0.026 ppm, respectively). Conclusion: Atrazine in the feed ingredients ingested by cattle could be transferred into the biological samples and consequently can be considered as a potential hazard for the public health. PMID:23113110

  20. Shifted-excitation Raman difference spectroscopy for in vitro and in vivo biological samples analysis

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Martins, Mário Augusto; Ribeiro, Dayana Gonçalves; Pereira dos Santos, Edson Aparecido; Martin, Airton Abrahão; Fontes, Adriana; da Silva Martinho, Herculano

    2010-01-01

    The contamination of the Raman scattering signal with luminescence is a well-known problem when dealing with biological media excited by visible light. The viability of the shifted-excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) technique for luminescence suppression on Raman spectra of biological samples was studied in this work. A tunable Lithrow-configuration diode laser (λ = 785 and 830 nm) coupled (directly or by optical fiber) to a dispersive Raman spectrometer was employed to study two sets of human tissues (tooth and skin) in order to determine the set of experimental parameters suitable for luminescence rejection. It was concluded that systematic and reproducible spectra of biological interest can be acquired by SERDS. PMID:21258495

  1. Elemental and isotopic imaging of biological samples using NanoSIMS.

    PubMed

    Kilburn, Matt R; Clode, Peta L

    2014-01-01

    With its low detection limits and the ability to analyze most of the elements in the periodic table, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) represents one of the most versatile in situ analytical techniques available, and recent developments have resulted in significant advantages for the use of imaging mass spectrometry in biological and biomedical research. Increases in spatial resolution and sensitivity allow detailed interrogation of samples at relevant scales and chemical concentrations. Advances in dynamic SIMS, specifically with the advent of NanoSIMS, now allow the tracking of stable isotopes within biological systems at subcellular length scales, while static SIMS combines subcellular imaging with molecular identification. In this chapter, we present an introduction to the SIMS technique, with particular reference to NanoSIMS, and discuss its application in biological and biomedical research.

  2. Characterization of femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (fsLIBS) and applications for biological samples.

    PubMed

    Gill, Ruby K; Knorr, Florian; Smith, Zachary J; Kahraman, Mehmet; Madsen, Dorte; Larsen, Delmar S; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    We characterize the femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (fsLIBS) signal for biological tissues as a function of different excitation parameters with femtosecond laser systems. These parameters include laser energy, depth of focus, and number of pulses per focal volume. We used femtosecond laser pulses of 800 nm and energy between 25 and 123 μJ to generate LIBS signals in biological tissues. As expected, we observed a linear increase in the fsLIBS intensity as a function of the laser energy. In addition, we show that moving the beam out of focus and the presence of overlapping pulses on the same focal area leads to a decrease in fsLIBS intensity due to changes in focal spot size. We also demonstrate that fsLIBS can distinguish between different biological tissue samples.

  3. Psychometric Properties of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in a Clinically-Identified Sample of Mexican American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanVoorhis, Carmen R. Wilson; Blumentritt, Tracie L.

    2007-01-01

    We examined the internal consistency reliability, convergent and divergent validity, and factor structure of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) in a sample of 131 Mexican American youth. The BDI-II demonstrated excellent internal consistency reliability (alpha = 0.90) and solid convergent and divergent validity with various clinical scales…

  4. The tertiary structure of group II introns: implications for biological function and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Pyle, Anna Marie

    2015-01-01

    Group II introns are some of the largest ribozymes in nature, and they are a major source of information about RNA assembly and tertiary structural organization. These introns are of biological significance because they are self-splicing mobile elements that have migrated into diverse genomes and played a major role in the genomic organization and metabolism of most life forms. The tertiary structure of group II introns has been the subject of many phylogenetic, genetic, biochemical and biophysical investigations, all of which are consistent with the recent crystal structure of an intact group IIC intron from the alkaliphilic eubacterium Oceanobacillus iheyensis. The crystal structure reveals that catalytic intron domain V is enfolded within the other intronic domains through an elaborate network of diverse tertiary interactions. Within the folded core, DV adopts an activated conformation that readily binds catalytic metal ions and positions them in a manner appropriate for reaction with nucleic acid targets. The tertiary structure of the group II intron reveals new information on motifs for RNA architectural organization, mechanisms of group II intron catalysis, and the evolutionary relationships among RNA processing systems. Guided by the structure and the wealth of previous genetic and biochemical work, it is now possible to deduce the probable location of DVI and the site of additional domains that contribute to the function of the highly derived group IIB and IIA introns. PMID:20446804

  5. Characterization and biological activities of two copper(II) complexes with dipropylenetriamine and diamine as ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AL-Noaimi, Mousa; Choudhary, Mohammad I.; Awwadi, Firas F.; Talib, Wamidh H.; Hadda, Taibi Ben; Yousuf, Sammer; Sawafta, Ashraf; Warad, Ismail

    2014-06-01

    Two new mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes, [Cu(dipn)(Nsbnd N)]Br2(1-2) [dipn = dipropylenetriamine, Nsbnd N = ethylenediamine (en) (1) and propylenediamine (pn) (2)], have been synthesized. These complexes were characterized by spectroscopic and thermal techniques. Crystal structure for 2 shows a distorted trigonal-bipyramidal geometry around Cu(II) ion with one solvate water molecule. Antimicrobial and antiproliferative assays were conducted to evaluate the biological activities of these complexes. The complexes exhibit a promising antimicrobial effect against an array of microbes at 200 μg/mL concentration. The antiproliferative assay shows a high potential of these complexes to target Human keratinocyte cell line with IC50 values of 155 and 152 μM. The absorption spectrum of 2 in water was modeled by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT).

  6. Evidence for a reduced heparin cofactor II biological activity in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Quatraro, A; Dello Russo, P; Marchi, E; Milani, M R; Giugliano, D

    1990-01-01

    A reduction of heparin cofactor II (HCII) biological activity, despite its normal plasma concentration, is reported in insulin-dependent diabetic patients. A good linear correlation between HCII activity and concentration is present in normal controls but not in diabetics. In these subjects HCII activity correlates inversely with fasting blood glucose and glycated proteins but not with Hb A1. These data demonstrate the presence of a depressed HCII activity in the presence of its normal plasma concentration in insulin-dependent diabetics and suggest a role for short-term metabolic control in conditioning this phenomenon.

  7. Applications of PIXE to biological and biomedical samples at the university of gent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maenhaut, W.; Vandenhaute, J.; Duflou, H.; De Reuck, J.

    1987-03-01

    The research on biological and biomedical samples, conducted at the University of Gent during the last 4-5 years and using PIXE as analytical technique, is presented. Our optimized sample/target preparation methods are described, and the accuracy and precision obtainable with them are discussed. Two comprehensive biological/biomedical research projects, initiated at Gent, are presented. The first aims at investigating possible trace element changes in tissues of experimental animals (rats) as a result of liver necrosis or cirrhosis, induced by intraperitoneal injection with CCl 4. The second project involves the determination of the regional distribution of trace elements in the human brain. Eight elements, i.e. K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Se and Rb, are being measured in up to 50 different regions of 12 normal brains, and in selected brain regions from patients with neurological disorders. Some of the results of the two projects are discussed.

  8. Microwave acid digestion and preconcentration neutron activation analysis of biological and diet samples for iodine.

    PubMed

    Rao, R R; Chatt, A

    1991-07-01

    A simple preconcentration neutron activation analysis (PNAA) method has been developed for the determination of low levels of iodine in biological and nutritional materials. The method involves dissolution of the samples by microwave digestion in the presence of acids in closed Teflon bombs and preconcentration of total iodine, after reduction to iodide with hydrazine sulfate, by coprecipitation with bismuth sulfide. The effects of different factors such as acidity, time for complete precipitation, and concentrations of bismuth, sulfide, and diverse ions on the quantitative recovery of iodide have been studied. The absolute detection limit of the PNAA method is 5 ng of iodine. Precision of measurement, expressed in terms of relative standard deviation, is about 5% at 100 ppb and 10% at 20 ppb levels of iodine. The PNAA method has been applied to several biological reference materials and total diet samples.

  9. A rapid and specific method for the detection of indole in complex biological samples.

    PubMed

    Darkoh, Charles; Chappell, Cynthia; Gonzales, Christopher; Okhuysen, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Indole, a bacterial product of tryptophan degradation, has a variety of important applications in the pharmaceutical industry and is a biomarker in biological and clinical specimens. Yet, specific assays to quantitate indole are complex and require expensive equipment and a high level of training. Thus, indole in biological samples is often estimated using the simple and rapid Kovács assay, which nonspecifically detects a variety of commonly occurring indole analogs. We demonstrate here a sensitive, specific, and rapid method for measuring indole in complex biological samples using a specific reaction between unsubstituted indole and hydroxylamine. We compared the hydroxylamine-based indole assay (HIA) to the Kovács assay and confirmed that the two assays are capable of detecting microgram amounts of indole. However, the HIA is specific to indole and does not detect other naturally occurring indole analogs. We further demonstrated the utility of the HIA in measuring indole levels in clinically relevant biological materials, such as fecal samples and bacterial cultures. Mean and median fecal indole concentrations from 53 healthy adults were 2.59 mM and 2.73 mM, respectively, but varied widely (0.30 mM to 6.64 mM) among individuals. We also determined that enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strain H10407 produces 3.3 ± 0.22 mM indole during a 24-h period in the presence of 5 mM tryptophan. The sensitive and specific HIA should be of value in a variety of settings, such as the evaluation of various clinical samples and the study of indole-producing bacterial species in the gut microbiota. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Whole-field fluorescence microscope with digital micromirror device: imaging of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Fukano, Takashi; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2003-07-01

    We have developed a whole-field fluorescence microscope equipped with a Digital Micromirror Device to acquire optically sectioned images by using the fringe-projection technique and the phase-shift method. This system allows free control of optical sectioning strength through computer-controlled alteration of the fringe period projected onto a sample. We have employed this system to image viable cells expressing fluorescent proteins and discussed its biological applications.

  11. Convergent Synthesis of a Deuterium Labeled Serine Dipeptide Lipid for Analysis of Biological Samples.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Christopher; Clark, Robert B; Nichols, Frank C; Smith, Michael B

    2017-03-08

    Bacterial serine dipeptide lipids are known to promote inflammatory processes and are detected in human tissues associated with periodontal disease or atherosclerosis. Accurate quantification of bacterial serine lipid, specifically lipid 654 [((S)-15-methyl-3-((13-methyltetradecanoyl)oxy)hexadecanoyl)glycyl-L-serine, (3S)-L-serine] isolated from Porphyromonas gingivalis,(1) in biological samples requires the preparation of a stable isotope internal standard for sample supplementation and subsequent mass spectrometric analysis. This report describes the convergent synthesis of a deuterium-substituted serine dipeptide lipid, which is an isotopically labeled homologue that represents a dominant form of serine dipeptide lipid recovered in bacteria.

  12. Comparison of various dissolution techniques for determination of Po-210 in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Planinšek, P; Benedik, L; Smodiš, B

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare three wet digestion procedures for dissolution of biological samples in the determination of Po-210. Classical wet ashing over a gas flame with acids in a long-necked Kjeldahl flask, digestion with acids in an Erlenmeyer flask and microwave digestion in a Teflon vessel at temperatures at up to 200°C were investigated. The results obtained showed that the activity concentrations of Po-210 found in the samples analysed were comparable for all the procedures used.

  13. Comparison of two digestion methods for the determination of selenium in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Ducros, V; Ruffieux, D; Belin, N; Favier, A

    1994-08-01

    Two digestion methods for the determination of selenium in biological samples have been compared: a classic digestion in a heating block by means of wet acid-ashing (HNO3-HClO4) and a microwave digestion in an open-vessel system by heating under reflux with HNO3-H2O2. The two methods were used to determine Se in plasma samples and different reference materials. There was no difference between the mean results, and the correlation coefficient for wet acid-ashing versus microwave digestion was 0.94. The two methods yielded accurate results for the certified materials analysed.

  14. Correction of radiation absorption on biological samples using Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Marcelo O.; Conti, Claudio de Carvalho; dos Anjos, Marcelino J.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a method to correct the absorbed radiation (the mass attenuation coefficient curve) in low energy (E < 30 keV) applied to a biological matrix based on the Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio and the effective atomic number. For calibration, scattering measurements were performed on standard samples of radiation produced by a gamma-ray source of 241Am (59.54 keV) also applied to certified biological samples of milk powder, hay powder and bovine liver (NIST 1557B). In addition, six methods of effective atomic number determination were used as described in literature to determinate the Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio (R/C), in order to calculate the mass attenuation coefficient. The results obtained by the proposed method were compared with those obtained using the transmission method. The experimental results were in good agreement with transmission values suggesting that the method to correct radiation absorption presented in this paper is adequate for biological samples.

  15. Assessment of the differential linear coherent scattering coefficient of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conceição, A. L. C.; Antoniassi, M.; Poletti, M. E.

    2010-07-01

    New differential linear coherent scattering coefficient, μ CS, data for four biological tissue types (fat pork, tendon chicken, adipose and fibroglandular human breast tissues) covering a large momentum transfer interval (0.07≤ q≤70.5 nm -1), resulted from combining WAXS and SAXS data, are presented in order to emphasize the need to update the default data-base by including the molecular interference and the large-scale arrangements effect. The results showed that the differential linear coherent scattering coefficient demonstrates influence of the large-scale arrangement, mainly due to collagen fibrils for tendon chicken and fibroglandular breast samples, and triacylglycerides for fat pork and adipose breast samples at low momentum transfer region. While, at high momentum transfer, the μ CS reflects effects of molecular interference related to water for tendon chicken and fibroglandular samples and, fatty acids for fat pork and adipose samples.

  16. Study on the dynamic energy spectra of MeV heavy ions penetrating biological sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, J. M.; Wang, Y. G.; Du, Sy. G. H.; Zhao, W. J.

    In order to study the probability for heavy ions to have a long projectile range in botanic sample, transmission energy spectra of 1.5 MeV F+, 3 MeV F2+ and 1.5 MeV H+ penetrating 100 mum seed cotyledon samples were measured as a function of ion dose. Results show that very fewer ions can penetrate through the samples, though their theoretical ranges are much shorter than sample thickness. Besides, the measured energy spectra of 1.5 MeV and 3.0 MeV F ions change dynamically while increasing the ion dose, they extend to the high energy direction and the count rates of the transmission ions increases quickly. These phenomena can be understood with the special composition and structure of the biological material.

  17. A review of surface wipe sampling compared to biologic monitoring for occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Kibby, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    The potential for adverse health effects from occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs (AD) is well known. Control measures recommended by the NIOSH Alert ([3]) include medical and biologic monitoring, and environmental monitoring where available. At present no guidelines or published best practices exist to guide EHS managers on how to carry out this biologic or environmental monitoring. Studies investigating surface wipe sampling for AD have been numerous in the past decade, but very limited research exists to correlate surface contamination with actual absorption by pharmacists and nurses. This article reviews the studies with concurrent surface wipe sampling and urine monitoring for the same AD, and tests their correlation. Methodologic limitations are reviewed. Twenty-one studies were identified that concurrently measured surface contamination by AD by wipe sampling and AD absorption by urine monitoring. Two studies directly evaluated the AD by wipe sampling and urine levels and neither found a statistically significant correlation. Six studies reported a decrease in both surface and urine levels following interventions to reduce contamination or exposure. Only one study directly evaluated the personal protective equipment and handling techniques employed by the studied workers, which can be viewed as a major confounder of absorption. While no statistically significant correlation was found between wipe sampling and urine monitoring for AD, decreases in urine and wipe levels following interventions to reduce exposure were noted. Limitations in the data and recommendations for future research are reviewed.

  18. Sampling designs matching species biology produce accurate and affordable abundance indices

    PubMed Central

    Farley, Sean; Russell, Gareth J.; Butler, Matthew J.; Selinger, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Wildlife biologists often use grid-based designs to sample animals and generate abundance estimates. Although sampling in grids is theoretically sound, in application, the method can be logistically difficult and expensive when sampling elusive species inhabiting extensive areas. These factors make it challenging to sample animals and meet the statistical assumption of all individuals having an equal probability of capture. Violating this assumption biases results. Does an alternative exist? Perhaps by sampling only where resources attract animals (i.e., targeted sampling), it would provide accurate abundance estimates more efficiently and affordably. However, biases from this approach would also arise if individuals have an unequal probability of capture, especially if some failed to visit the sampling area. Since most biological programs are resource limited, and acquiring abundance data drives many conservation and management applications, it becomes imperative to identify economical and informative sampling designs. Therefore, we evaluated abundance estimates generated from grid and targeted sampling designs using simulations based on geographic positioning system (GPS) data from 42 Alaskan brown bears (Ursus arctos). Migratory salmon drew brown bears from the wider landscape, concentrating them at anadromous streams. This provided a scenario for testing the targeted approach. Grid and targeted sampling varied by trap amount, location (traps placed randomly, systematically or by expert opinion), and traps stationary or moved between capture sessions. We began by identifying when to sample, and if bears had equal probability of capture. We compared abundance estimates against seven criteria: bias, precision, accuracy, effort, plus encounter rates, and probabilities of capture and recapture. One grid (49 km2 cells) and one targeted configuration provided the most accurate results. Both placed traps by expert opinion and moved traps between capture sessions, which

  19. Sampling designs matching species biology produce accurate and affordable abundance indices.

    PubMed

    Harris, Grant; Farley, Sean; Russell, Gareth J; Butler, Matthew J; Selinger, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Wildlife biologists often use grid-based designs to sample animals and generate abundance estimates. Although sampling in grids is theoretically sound, in application, the method can be logistically difficult and expensive when sampling elusive species inhabiting extensive areas. These factors make it challenging to sample animals and meet the statistical assumption of all individuals having an equal probability of capture. Violating this assumption biases results. Does an alternative exist? Perhaps by sampling only where resources attract animals (i.e., targeted sampling), it would provide accurate abundance estimates more efficiently and affordably. However, biases from this approach would also arise if individuals have an unequal probability of capture, especially if some failed to visit the sampling area. Since most biological programs are resource limited, and acquiring abundance data drives many conservation and management applications, it becomes imperative to identify economical and informative sampling designs. Therefore, we evaluated abundance estimates generated from grid and targeted sampling designs using simulations based on geographic positioning system (GPS) data from 42 Alaskan brown bears (Ursus arctos). Migratory salmon drew brown bears from the wider landscape, concentrating them at anadromous streams. This provided a scenario for testing the targeted approach. Grid and targeted sampling varied by trap amount, location (traps placed randomly, systematically or by expert opinion), and traps stationary or moved between capture sessions. We began by identifying when to sample, and if bears had equal probability of capture. We compared abundance estimates against seven criteria: bias, precision, accuracy, effort, plus encounter rates, and probabilities of capture and recapture. One grid (49 km(2) cells) and one targeted configuration provided the most accurate results. Both placed traps by expert opinion and moved traps between capture sessions

  20. Cross-Cultural Validation of the Beck Depression Inventory-II across U.S. and Turkish Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canel-Cinarbas, Deniz; Cui, Ying; Lauridsen, Erica

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) for factorial invariance across Turkish and U.S. college student samples. The results indicated that (a) a two-factor model has an adequate fit for both samples, thus providing evidence of configural invariance, and (b) there is a metric invariance but "no"…

  1. Attempts to develop a new nuclear measurement technique of β-glucuronidase levels in biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünak, T.; Avcibasi, U.; Yildirim, Y.; Çetinkaya, B.

    2003-01-01

    β-Glucuronidase is one of the most important hydrolytic enzymes in living systems and plays an essential role in the detoxification pathway of toxic materials incorporated into the metabolism. Some organs, especially liver and some tumour tissues, have high level of β-glucuronidase activity. As a result the enzymatic activity of some kind of tumour cells, the radiolabelled glucuronide conjugates of cytotoxic, as well as radiotoxic compounds have potentially very valuable diagnostic and therapeutic applications in cancer research. For this reason, a sensitive measurement of β-glucuronidase levels in normal and tumour tissues is a very important step for these kinds of applications. According to the classical measurement method of β-glucuronidase activity, in general, the quantity of phenolphthalein liberated from its glucuronide conjugate, i.e. phenolphthalein-glucuronide, by β-glucuronidase has been measured by use of the spectrophotometric technique. The lower detection limit of phenolphthalein by the spectrophotometric technique is about 1 3 μg. This means that the β-glucuronidase levels could not be detected in biological samples having lower levels of β-glucuronidase activity and therefore the applications of the spectrophotometric technique in cancer research are very seriously limited. Starting from this consideration, we recently attempted to develop a new nuclear technique to measure much lower concentrations of β-glucuronidase in biological samples. To improve the detection limit, phenolphthalein-glucuronide and also phenyl-N-glucuronide were radioiodinated with 131I and their radioactivity was measured by use of the counting technique. Therefore, the quantity of phenolphthalein or aniline radioiodinated with 131I and liberated by the deglucuronidation reactivity of β-glucuronidase was used in an attempt to measure levels lower than the spectrophotometric measurement technique. The results obtained clearly verified that 0.01 pg level of

  2. Attempts to develop a new nuclear measurement technique of β-glucuronidase levels in biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünak, T.; Avcibasi, U.; Yildirim, Y.; Çetinkaya, B.

    2003-01-01

    β-Glucuronidase is one of the most important hydrolytic enzymes in living systems and plays an essential role in the detoxification pathway of toxic materials incorporated into the metabolism. Some organs, especially liver and some tumour tissues, have high level of β-glucuronidase activity. As a result the enzymatic activity of some kind of tumour cells, the radiolabelled glucuronide conjugates of cytotoxic, as well as radiotoxic compounds have potentially very valuable diagnostic and therapeutic applications in cancer research. For this reason, a sensitive measurement of β-glucuronidase levels in normal and tumour tissues is a very important step for these kinds of applications. According to the classical measurement method of β-glucuronidase activity, in general, the quantity of phenolphthalein liberated from its glucuronide conjugate, i.e. phenolphthalein-glucuronide, by β-glucuronidase has been measured by use of the spectrophotometric technique. The lower detection limit of phenolphthalein by the spectrophotometric technique is about 1-3 μg. This means that the β-glucuronidase levels could not be detected in biological samples having lower levels of β-glucuronidase activity and therefore the applications of the spectrophotometric technique in cancer research are very seriously limited. Starting from this consideration, we recently attempted to develop a new nuclear technique to measure much lower concentrations of β-glucuronidase in biological samples. To improve the detection limit, phenolphthalein-glucuronide and also phenyl-N-glucuronide were radioiodinated with 131I and their radioactivity was measured by use of the counting technique. Therefore, the quantity of phenolphthalein or aniline radioiodinated with 131I and liberated by the deglucuronidation reactivity of β-glucuronidase was used in an attempt to measure levels lower than the spectrophotometric measurement technique. The results obtained clearly verified that 0.01 pg level of

  3. UV analysis of Amadori-glycated phosphatidylethanolamine in foods and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Oak, Jeong-Ho; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2002-03-01

    Maillard reactions are among the most important of the chemical and oxidative changes occurring in food and biological samples that contribute to food deterioration and to the pathophysiology of human disease. Although the association of lipid glycation with this process has recently been shown, the number of lipid glycation products in food and biological materials has not been clear. In this study, we synthesized the Amadori products derived from the glycation of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), i.e., Amadori-PEs. Dioleoyl PE was incubated with glucose and lactose for 15 days, and the resultant Amadori-PEs were purified and isolated using solid phase extraction followed by HPLC. With this procedure, essentially pure (>98% purity) Amadori-PEs glycated with glucose (Glc-PE) and with lactose (Lac-PE) were obtained and used as standards in the subsequent studies. To determine the presence of Amadori-PEs in food and biological samples, the carbonyl group of Amadori-PEs was ultraviolet (UV)-labeled with 3-methyl-2-benzothiazolinone hydrazone, and the labeled Amadori-PEs were analyzed with normal phase HPLC-UV (318 nm). The detection limit was 4.5 ng (5 pmol) for Glc-PE and 5.3 ng (5 pmol) for Lac-PE. Among the several food samples examined, infant formula and chocolate contained a high amount of both Glc-PE and Lac-PE over wide concentration ranges, such as 1.5-112 microg/g. Testing biological materials showed Amadori-PE (Glc-PE) was detectable in rat plasma.

  4. DSM-5 section III personality traits and section II personality disorders in a Flemish community sample.

    PubMed

    Bastiaens, Tim; Smits, Dirk; De Hert, Marc; Vanwalleghem, Dominique; Claes, Laurence

    2016-04-30

    The Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5; Krueger et al., 2012) is a dimensional self-report questionnaire designed to measure personality pathology according to the criterion B of the DSM-5 Section III personality model. In the current issue of DSM, this dimensional Section III personality model co-exists with the Section II categorical personality model derived from DSM-IV-TR. Therefore, investigation of the inter-relatedness of both models across populations and languages is warranted. In this study, we first examined the factor structure and reliability of the PID-5 in a Flemish community sample (N=509) by means of exploratory structural equation modeling and alpha coefficients. Next, we investigated the predictive ability of section III personality traits in relation to section II personality disorders through correlations and stepwise regression analyses. Results revealed a five factor solution for the PID-5, with adequate reliability of the facet scales. The variance in Section II personality disorders could be predicted by their theoretically comprising Section III personality traits, but additional Section III personality traits augmented this prediction. Based on current results, we discuss the Section II personality disorder conceptualization and the Section III personality disorder operationalization.

  5. New hybrid materials as Zn(II) sorbents in water samples

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Quintanilla, Damian

    2010-09-15

    Mesoporous silicas have been chemically modified with 5-mercapto-1-methyltetrazole (MTTZ) obtaining hybrid materials denominated MTTZ-MSU-2 and MTTZ-HMS. These materials were employed as Zn(II) sorbents from aqueous media at room temperature. The effect of several variables (stirring time, pH, presence of other metals) has been studied using batch and column techniques. Flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) was used to determinate Zn(II) concentration in the filtrate or in the eluted solution after the adsorption process. The results indicate that under pH 8, the maximum adsorption value was 0.94 {+-} 0.01 and 0.72 {+-} 0.01 mmol Zn(II)/g for MTTZ-MSU-2 and MTTZ-HMS, respectively. In tap water samples, a preconcentration factor of 200 was obtained. On the basis of these results, it can be concluded that it is possible to modify chemically MSU-2 and HMS with 5-mercapto-1-methyltetrazole and to use the resulting modified mesoporous silica as an effective adsorbent for Zn(II) in aqueous media.

  6. Evaluation of a gas chromatography method for azelaic acid determination in selected biological samples.

    PubMed

    Garelnabi, Mahdi; Litvinov, Dmitry; Parthasarathy, Sampath

    2010-09-01

    Azelaic acid (AzA) is the best known dicarboxilic acid to have pharmaceutical benefits and clinical applications and also to be associated with some diseases pathophysiology. We extracted and methylesterified AzA and determined its concentration in human plasma obtained from healthy individuals and also in mice fed AzA containing diet for three months. AzA was detected in Gas Chromatography (GC) and confirmed by Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS), and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMC). Our results have shown that AzA can be determined efficiently in selected biological samples by GC method with 1nM limit of detection (LoD) and the limit of quantification (LoQ); was established at 50nM. Analytical Sensitivity as assayed by hexane demonstrated an analytical sensitivity at 0.050nM. The method has demonstrated 8-10% CV batch repeatability across the sample types and 13-18.9% CV for the Within-Lab Precision analysis. The method has shown that AzA can efficiently be recovered from various sample preparation including liver tissue homogenate (95%) and human plasma (97%). Because of its simplicity and lower limit of quantification, the present method provides a useful tool for determining AzA in various biological sample preparations.

  7. Evaluation of a gas chromatography method for azelaic acid determination in selected biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Garelnabi, Mahdi; Litvinov, Dmitry; Parthasarathy, Sampath

    2010-01-01

    Background: Azelaic acid (AzA) is the best known dicarboxilic acid to have pharmaceutical benefits and clinical applications and also to be associated with some diseases pathophysiology. Materials and Methods: We extracted and methylesterified AzA and determined its concentration in human plasma obtained from healthy individuals and also in mice fed AzA containing diet for three months. Results: AzA was detected in Gas Chromatography (GC) and confirmed by Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS), and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMC). Our results have shown that AzA can be determined efficiently in selected biological samples by GC method with 1nM limit of detection (LoD) and the limit of quantification (LoQ); was established at 50nM. Analytical Sensitivity as assayed by hexane demonstrated an analytical sensitivity at 0.050nM. The method has demonstrated 8-10% CV batch repeatability across the sample types and 13-18.9% CV for the Within-Lab Precision analysis. The method has shown that AzA can efficiently be recovered from various sample preparation including liver tissue homogenate (95%) and human plasma (97%). Conclusions: Because of its simplicity and lower limit of quantification, the present method provides a useful tool for determining AzA in various biological sample preparations. PMID:22558586

  8. Coherent imaging of biological samples with femtosecond pulses at the free-electron laser FLASH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, A. P.; Gorniak, Th; Staier, F.; Yefanov, O. M.; Barth, R.; Christophis, C.; Reime, B.; Gulden, J.; Singer, A.; Pettit, M. E.; Nisius, Th; Wilhein, Th; Gutt, C.; Grübel, G.; Guerassimova, N.; Treusch, R.; Feldhaus, J.; Eisebitt, S.; Weckert, E.; Grunze, M.; Rosenhahn, A.; Vartanyants, I. A.

    2010-03-01

    Coherent x-ray imaging represents a new window to imaging non-crystalline, biological specimens at unprecedented resolutions. The advent of free-electron lasers (FEL) allows extremely high flux densities to be delivered to a specimen resulting in stronger scattered signal from these samples to be measured. In the best case scenario, the diffraction pattern is measured before the sample is destroyed by these intense pulses, as the processes involved in radiation damage may be substantially slower than the pulse duration. In this case, the scattered signal can be interpreted and reconstructed to yield a faithful image of the sample at a resolution beyond the conventional radiation damage limit. We employ coherent x-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) using the free-electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH) in a non-destructive regime to compare images of a biological sample reconstructed using different, single, femtosecond pulses of FEL radiation. Furthermore, for the first time, we demonstrate CXDI, in-line holography and Fourier transform holography (FTH) of the same unicellular marine organism using an FEL and present diffraction data collected using the third harmonic of FLASH, reaching into the water window. We provide quantitative results for the resolution of the CXDI images as a function of pulse intensity, and compare this with the resolutions achieved with in-line holography and FTH.

  9. Controlled power delivery for super-resolution imaging of biological samples using digital micromirror device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiya Peedikakkal, Liyana; Cadby, Ashley

    2017-02-01

    Localization based super resolution images of a biological sample is generally achieved by using high power laser illumination with long exposure time which unfortunately increases photo-toxicity of a sample, making super resolution microscopy, in general, incompatible with live cell imaging. Furthermore, the limitation of photobleaching reduces the ability to acquire time lapse images of live biological cells using fluorescence microscopy. Digital Light Processing (DLP) technology can deliver light at grey scale levels by flickering digital micromirrors at around 290 Hz enabling highly controlled power delivery to samples. In this work, Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) is implemented in an inverse Schiefspiegler telescope setup to control the power and pattern of illumination for super resolution microscopy. We can achieve spatial and temporal patterning of illumination by controlling the DMD pixel by pixel. The DMD allows us to control the power and spatial extent of the laser illumination. We have used this to show that we can reduce the power delivered to the sample to allow for longer time imaging in one area while achieving sub-diffraction STORM imaging in another using higher power densities.

  10. Offer of rapid testing and alternative biological samples as practical tools to implement HIV screening programs.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Maria Rita; Soldini, Laura; Di Perri, Giovanni; Tiberi, Simon; Lazzarin, Adriano; Lillo, Flavia B

    2009-10-01

    Implementation of HIV testing has the objective to increase screening, identify and counsel persons with infection, link them to clinical services and reduce transmission. Rapid tests and/or alternative biological samples (like oral fluid) give the option for a better general consent in approaching screening, immediate referral of HIV positives to medical treatment and partner notification. We tested the performance characteristics of an oral fluid-based rapid HIV test (Rapidtest HIV lateral flow-Healthchem diag. LLC) in comparison with routinely utilized methods in a selected population of known positive (N = 121) or negative (N = 754) subjects. The sensitivity of the rapid test was 99.1% (one false negative sample) and the specificity 98.8%. Five negatives showed a faint reactivity, 3 of these were reactive also in the reference test, one with a p24 only reaction in Western blot. If these 3 samples were excluded from the analysis the specificity increases to 99.2%. Results from our study confirm that, although a continuous improvement of the test performance is still needed to minimize false negative and positive results, rapid test and alternative biological samples may contribute to HIV prevention strategies by reaching a larger population particularly when and where regular screening procedures are difficult to obtain.

  11. RNA sample preparation applied to gene expression profiling for the horse biological passport.

    PubMed

    Bailly-Chouriberry, Ludovic; Baudoin, Florent; Cormant, Florence; Glavieux, Yohan; Loup, Benoit; Garcia, Patrice; Popot, Marie-Agnès; Bonnaire, Yves

    2017-04-05

    The improvement of doping control is an ongoing race. Techniques to fight doping are usually based on the direct detection of drugs or their metabolites by analytical methods such as chromatography hyphenated to mass spectrometry after ad hoc sample preparation. Nowadays, omic methods constitute an attractive development and advances have been achieved particularly by application of molecular biology tools for detection of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS), erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA), or to control human growth hormone misuses. These interesting results across different animal species have suggested that modification of gene expression offers promising new methods of improving the window of detection of banned substances by targeting their effects on blood cell gene expression. In this context, the present study describes the possibility of using a modified version of the dedicated Human IVD (in vitro Diagnostics) PAXgene® Blood RNA Kit for horse gene expression analysis in blood collected on PAXgene® tubes applied to the horse biological passport. The commercial kit was only approved for human blood samples and has required an optimization of specific technical requirements for equine blood samples. Improvements and recommendations were achieved for sample collection, storage and RNA extraction procedure. Following these developments, RNA yield and quality were demonstrated to be suitable for downstream gene expression analysis by qPCR techniques. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Tailored magnetic nanoparticles for direct and sensitive detection of biomolecules in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Fornara, Andrea; Johansson, Petter; Petersson, Karolina; Gustafsson, Stefan; Qin, Jian; Olsson, Eva; Ilver, Dag; Krozer, Anatol; Muhammed, Mamoun; Johansson, Christer

    2008-10-01

    We developed nanoparticles with tailored magnetic properties for direct and sensitive detection of biomolecules in biological samples in a single step. Thermally blocked nanoparticles obtained by thermal hydrolysis, functionalized with specific ligands, are mixed with sample solutions, and the variation of the magnetic relaxation due to surface binding is used to detect the presence of biomolecules. The binding significantly increases the hydrodynamic volume of nanoparticles, thus changing their Brownian relaxation frequency which is measured by a specifically developed AC susceptometer. The system was tested for the presence of Brucella antibodies, a dangerous pathogen causing brucellosis with severe effects both on humans and animals, in serum samples from infected cows and the surface of the nanoparticles was functionalized with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from Brucella abortus. The hydrodynamic volume of LPS-functionalized particles increased by 25-35% as a result of the binding of the antibodies, measured by changes in the susceptibility in an alternating magnetic field. The method has shown high sensitivity, with detection limit of 0.05 microg x mL(-1) of antibody in the biological samples without any pretreatment. This magnetic-based assay is very sensitive, cost-efficient, and versatile, giving a direct indication whether the animal is infected or not, making it suitable for point-of-care applications. The functionalization of tailored magnetic nanoparticles can be modified to suit numerous homogeneous assays for a wide range of applications.

  13. Quantitation of Cytokinins in Biological Samples Using Antibodies Against Zeatin Riboside

    PubMed Central

    Badenoch-Jones, Jane; Letham, David S.; Parker, Charles W.; Rolfe, Barry G.

    1984-01-01

    The cross-reactivity of antibodies elicited in rabbits against zeatin riboside, to a wide range of naturally occurring cytokinins, was examined. As well as to zeatin riboside, the antisera cross-reacted to a considerable extent with zeatin, lupinic acid, zeatin-9-glucoside, zeatin riboside 5′-monophosphate and to a much lesser, but measurable extent, with dihydrozeatin riboside and dihydrozeatin. Chromatographic methods were devised which allowed separation of all these cross-reactive compounds. Four biological samples, extracts of immature Zea mays kernels, immature seeds of Lupinus luteus, and Datura innoxia crown gall tumor tissue, and a sample of Agrobacterium tumefaciens culture supernatant, were purified by these chromatographic methods, using [3H]zeatin riboside as a recovery marker, and at each stage of the purification process, were subjected to radioimmunoassay over a range of dilutions. At each stage of sample purification, sample dilution curves were found to be parallel to the standard curve. Sample cytokinin levels estimated by radioimmunoassay were in close agreement to those available in the literature for similar samples assayed by alternative methods. However, in some samples, unknown cross-reacting compounds were detected. PMID:16663745

  14. Sequential injection anodic stripping voltammetry with monosegmented flow and in-line UV digestion for determination of Zn(II), Cd(II), Pb(II) and Cu(II) in water samples.

    PubMed

    Siriangkhawut, Watsaka; Grudpan, Kate; Jakmunee, Jaroon

    2011-06-15

    A cost-effective sequential injection system incorporating with an in-line UV digestion for breakdown of organic matter prior to voltammetric determination of Zn(II), Cd(II), Pb(II) and Cu(II) by anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) on a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) of a small scale voltammetric cell was developed. A low-cost small scale voltammetric cell was fabricated from disposable pipet tip and microcentrifuge tube with volume of about 3 mL for conveniently incorporated with the SI system. A home-made UV digestion unit was fabricated employing a small size and low wattage UV lamps and flow reactor made from PTFE tubing coiled around the UV lamp. An in-line single standard calibration or a standard addition procedure was developed employing a monosegmented flow technique. Performance of the proposed system was tested for in-line digestion of model water samples containing metal ions and some organic ligands such as strong organic ligand (EDTA) or intermediate organic ligand (humic acid). The wet acid digestion method (USEPA 3010a) was used as a standard digestion method for comparison. Under the optimum conditions, with deposition time of 180 s, linear calibration graphs in range of 10-300 μg L(-1) Zn(II), 5-200 μg L(-1) Cd(II), 10-200 μg L(-1) Pb(II), 20-400 μg L(-1) Cu(II) were obtained with detection limit of 3.6, 0.1, 0.7 and 4.3 μg L(-1), respectively. Relative standard deviation were 4.2, 2.6, 3.1 and 4.7% for seven replicate analyses of 27 μg L(-1) Zn(II), 13 μg L(-1) Cd(II), 13 μg L(-1) Pb(II) and 27 μg L(-1) Cu(II), respectively. The system was validated by certified reference material of trace metals in natural water (SRM 1640 NIST). The developed system was successfully applied for speciation of Cd(II) Pb(II) and Cu(II) in ground water samples collected from nearby zinc mining area.

  15. Synthesis, characterization and biological evaluation of Rutin-zinc(II) flavonoid -metal complex.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Norma Estefania Andrades; Novak, Estela Maria; Maria, Durvanei Augusto; Velosa, Adélia Segin; Pereira, Regina Mara Silva

    2015-09-05

    Synthesis of compounds analogous to natural products from secondary metabolites, such as flavonoids, is a promising source of novel drugs. Rutin (quercetin-3-O-rutinoside) is a natural flavone, which has, in its chemical structure, different sites for coordination with transition metals and the complexation with these metals enhances its biological properties. Rutin-zinc(II), a flavonoid-metal complex, was synthesized and characterized by UV-VIS, FT-IR, elemental analysis and (1)H NMR. The antioxidant and antitumor activities, as well as the cytotoxicity and in vivo toxicity of this complex were evaluated and compared with the free rutin. Rutin-zinc(II) has not shown any cytotoxicity against normal cells (fibroblasts and HUVECs) or toxicity in BALB/c mice, but has shown antioxidant activity in vitro and cytotoxicity against leukemia (KG1, K562 and Jurkat), multiple myeloma (RPMI8226) and melanoma (B16F10 and SK-Mel-28) cell lines in vitro. In Ehrlich ascites carcinoma model, Rutin-zinc(II) modulated the mitochondrial membrane potential and the expression of genes related to cell cycle progression, angiogenesis and apoptosis.

  16. Half-sandwich ruthenium(II) biotin conjugates as biological vectors to cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Babak, Maria V; Plażuk, Damian; Meier, Samuel M; Arabshahi, Homayon John; Reynisson, Jóhannes; Rychlik, Błażej; Błauż, Andrzej; Szulc, Katarzyna; Hanif, Muhammad; Strobl, Sebastian; Roller, Alexander; Keppler, Bernhard K; Hartinger, Christian G

    2015-03-23

    Ruthenium(II)-arene complexes with biotin-containing ligands were prepared so that a novel drug delivery system based on tumor-specific vitamin-receptor mediated endocytosis could be developed. The complexes were characterized by spectroscopic methods and their in vitro anticancer activity in cancer cell lines with various levels of major biotin receptor (COLO205, HCT116 and SW620 cells) was tested in comparison with the ligands. In all cases, coordination of ruthenium resulted in significantly enhanced cytotoxicity. The affinity of Ru(II) -biotin complexes to avidin was investigated and was lower than that of unmodified biotin. Hill coefficients in the range 2.012-2.851 suggest strong positive cooperation between the complexes and avidin. To estimate the likelihood of binding to the biotin receptor/transporter, docking studies with avidin and streptavidin were conducted. These explain, to some extent, the in vitro anticancer activity results and support the conclusion that these novel half-sandwich ruthenium(II)-biotin conjugates may act as biological vectors to cancer cells, although no clear relationship between the cellular Ru content, the cytotoxicity, and the presence of the biotin moiety was observed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Spectroscopic, thermal, catalytic and biological studies of Cu(II) azo dye complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sonbati, A. Z.; Diab, M. A.; El-Bindary, A. A.; Shoair, A. F.; Hussein, M. A.; El-Boz, R. A.

    2017-08-01

    New complexes of copper(II) with azo compounds of 5-amino-2-(aryl diazenyl)phenol (HLn) are prepared and investigated by elemental analyses, molar conductance, IR, 1H NMR, UV-Visible, mass, ESR spectra, magnetic susceptibility measurements and thermal analyses. The complexes have a square planar structure and general formula [Cu(Ln)(OAc)]H2O. Study the catalytic activities of Cu(II) complexes toward oxidation of benzyl alcohol derivatives to carbonyl compounds were tested using H2O2 as the oxidant. The intrinsic binding constants (Kb) of the ligands (HLn) and Cu(II) complexes (1-4) with CT-DNA are determined. The formed compounds have been tested for biological activity of antioxidants, antibacterial against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria and yeast Candida albicans. Antibiotic (Ampicillin) and antifungal against (Colitrimazole) and cytotoxic compounds HL1, HL2, HL3 and complex (1) showed moderate to good activity against S. aureus, E. coli and Candida albicans, and also to be moderate on antioxidants and toxic substances. Molecular docking is used to predict the binding between the ligands with the receptor of breast cancer (2a91).

  18. Synthesis, spectral characterization and biological evaluation of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes with thiosemicarbazone ending by pyrazole and pyridyl rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, T. A.; Abu El-Reash, G. M.; Al-Jahdali, M.; El-Rakhawy, El-Bastawesy R.

    2014-08-01

    Here we present the synthesis of the new Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes with chelating ligand (Z)-(2-((1,3-diphenyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)methylene) hydrazinyl)(pyridin-2-ylamino)methanethiol. All the complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR, UV-vis, magnetic susceptibility measurements and EPR spectral studies. IR spectra of complexes showed that the ligand behaves as NN neutral bidentate, NSN mononegative tridentate and NSNN mononegative tetradentate. The electronic spectra and the magnetic measurements suggested the octahedral geometry for all complexes as well as the EPR confirmed the tetragonal distorted octahedral for Cu(II) complex. Cd(II) complex showed the highest inhibitory antioxidant activity either using ABTS method. The SOD-like activity exhibited those Cd(II) and Zn(II) complexes have strong antioxidative properties. We tested the synthesized compounds for antitumor activity and showed that the ability to kill liver (HePG2) and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells definitely.

  19. Challenges of biological sample preparation for SIMS imaging of elements and molecules at subcellular resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Subhash

    2008-12-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based imaging techniques capable of subcellular resolution characterization of elements and molecules are becoming valuable tools in many areas of biology and medicine. Due to high vacuum requirements of SIMS, the live cells cannot be analyzed directly in the instrument. The sample preparation, therefore, plays a critical role in preserving the native chemical composition for SIMS analysis. This work focuses on the evaluation of frozen-hydrated and frozen freeze-dried sample preparations for SIMS studies of cultured cells with a CAMECA IMS-3f dynamic SIMS ion microscope instrument capable of producing SIMS images with a spatial resolution of 500 nm. The sandwich freeze-fracture method was used for fracturing the cells. The complimentary fracture planes in the plasma membrane were characterized by field-emission secondary electron microscopy (FESEM) in the frozen-hydrated state. The cells fractured at the dorsal surface were used for SIMS analysis. The frozen-hydrated SIMS analysis of individual cells under dynamic primary ion beam (O 2+) revealed local secondary ion signal enhancements correlated with the water image signals of 19(H 3O) +. A preferential removal of water from the frozen cell matrix in the Z-axis was also observed. These complications render the frozen-hydrated sample type less desirable for subcellular dynamic SIMS studies. The freeze-drying of frozen-hydrated cells, either inside the instrument or externally in a freeze-drier, allowed SIMS imaging of subcellular chemical composition. Morphological evaluations of fractured freeze-dried cells with SEM and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) revealed well-preserved mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, and stress fibers. SIMS analysis of fractured freeze-dried cells revealed well-preserved chemical composition of even the most highly diffusible ions like K + and Na + in physiologically relevant concentrations. The high K-low Na signature in individual cells

  20. Determination of acceptance criteria and sample sizes for accelerated stability comparability studies for biologics.

    PubMed

    Yu, Binbing; Zeng, Lingmin; Yang, Harry

    2017-07-22

    Changes of manufacturing processes are common. It is required by the regulatory agencies that manufacturers establish adequate and appropriate comparability between pre-change and post-change products. The goals of comparability assessments are to demonstrate the comparability and consistency of product quality before and after change and to demonstrate that the changes do not have an adverse effect on safety and efficacy of the drug products. Accelerated or stressed stability studies may shed light on drug quality under stressed environmental conditions and on product differences in the degradation pathways. Comparability of accelerated stability data may provide further evidence on the impact of process change. Equivalence test has been recommended to demonstrate the comparability of stability profiles for accelerated stability studies. Selection of appropriate acceptance criteria for determining comparability is one of the most challenging steps in the comparability studies. Because of the inherent heterogeneity of biologics, the stability profiles may vary considerably from batch to batch. It is more challenging to set the acceptance criteria for comparing the accelerated stability data for biologics. In this article, we present an approach for determining the acceptance criteria and necessary sample sizes for accelerated comparability studies for biologics. Copyright © 2017 International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Bioanalytics in Quantitive (Bio)imaging/Mapping of Metallic Elements in Biological Samples.

    PubMed

    Jurowski, Kamil; Buszewski, Bogusław; Piekoszewski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe selected analytical techniques and their applications in the quantitative mapping/(bio)imaging of metals in biological samples. This work presents the advantages and disadvantages as well as the appropriate methods of scope for research. Distribution of metals in biological samples is currently one of the most important issues in physiology, toxicology, pharmacology, and other disciplines where functional information about the distribution of metals is essential. This issue is a subject of research in (bio)imaging/mapping studies, which use a variety of analytical techniques for the identification and determination of metallic elements. Increased interest in analytical techniques enabling the (bio)imaging of metals in a variety of biological material has been observed more recently. Measuring the distribution of trace metals in tissues after a drug dose or ingestion of poison-containing metals allows for the studying of pathomechanisms and the pathophysiology of various diseases and disorders related to the management of metals in human and animal systems.

  2. Multilayer three-dimensional super resolution imaging of thick biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Vaziri, Alipasha; Tang, Jianyong; Shroff, Hari; Shank, Charles V.

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in optical microscopy have enabled biological imaging beyond the diffraction limit at nanometer resolution. A general feature of most of the techniques based on photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) or stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) has been the use of thin biological samples in combination with total internal reflection, thus limiting the imaging depth to a fraction of an optical wavelength. However, to study whole cells or organelles that are typically up to 15 μm deep into the cell, the extension of these methods to a three-dimensional (3D) super resolution technique is required. Here, we report an advance in optical microscopy that enables imaging of protein distributions in cells with a lateral localization precision better than 50 nm at multiple imaging planes deep in biological samples. The approach is based on combining the lateral super resolution provided by PALM with two-photon temporal focusing that provides optical sectioning. We have generated super-resolution images over an axial range of ≈10 μm in both mitochondrially labeled fixed cells, and in the membranes of living S2 Drosophila cells. PMID:19088193

  3. High-resolution monochromator for iron nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoda, Yoshitaka; Okada, Kyoko; Wang, Hongxin; Cramer, Stephen P.; Seto, Makoto

    2016-12-01

    A new high-resolution monochromator for 14.4-keV X-rays has been designed and developed for the Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy of biological samples. In addition to high resolution, higher flux and stability are especially important for measuring biological samples, because of the very weak signals produced due to the low concentrations of Fe-57. A 24% increase in flux while maintaining a high resolution better than 0.9 meV is achieved in the calculation by adopting an asymmetric reflection of Ge, which is used as the first crystal of the three-bounce high-resolution monochromator. A 20% increase of the exit beam size is acceptable to our biological applications. The higher throughput of the new design has been experimentally verified. A fine rotation mechanics that combines a weak-link hinge with a piezoelectric actuator was used for controlling the photon energy of the monochromatic beam. The resulting stability is sufficient to preserve the intrinsic resolution.

  4. Characterizing ion mobility-mass spectrometry conformation space for the analysis of complex biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Fenn, Larissa S.; Kliman, Michal; Mahsut, Ablatt; Zhao, Sophie R.

    2009-01-01

    The conformation space occupied by different classes of biomolecules measured by ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) is described for utility in the characterization of complex biological samples. Although the qualitative separation of different classes of biomolecules on the basis of structure or collision cross section is known, there is relatively little quantitative cross-section information available for species apart from peptides. In this report, collision cross sections are measured for a large suite of biologically salient species, including oligonucleotides (n=96), carbohydrates (n=192), and lipids (n=53), which are compared to reported values for peptides (n= 610). In general, signals for each class are highly correlated, and at a given mass, these correlations result in predicted collision cross sections that increase in the order oligonucleotidesbiological samples is described, both in the context of qualitative molecular class identification and in fine structure examination within a class. The latter is demonstrated in IM-MS separations of isobaric oligonucleotides, which are interpreted by molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:19247641

  5. Measurement of Beryllium in Biological Samples by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry: Applications for Studying Chronic Beryllium Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarappa-Zucca, M L; Finkel, R C; Martinelli, R E; McAninch, J E; Nelson, D O; Turtletaub, K W

    2004-04-15

    A method using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has been developed for quantifying attomoles of beryllium (Be) in biological samples. This method provides the sensitivity to trace Be in biological samples at very low doses with the purpose of identifying the molecular targets involved in chronic beryllium disease. Proof of the method was tested by administering 0.001, 0.05, 0.5 and 5.0 {micro}g {sup 9}Be and {sup 10}Be by intraperitoneal injection to male mice and removing spleen, liver, femurs, blood, lung, and kidneys after 24 h exposure. These samples were prepared for AMS analysis by tissue digestion in nitric acid, followed by further organic oxidation with hydrogen peroxide and ammonium persulfate and lastly, precipitation of Be with ammonium hydroxide, and conversion to beryllium oxide at 800 C. The {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratio of the extracted beryllium oxide was measured by AMS and Be in the original sample was calculated. Results indicate that Be levels were dose-dependent in all tissues and the highest levels were measured in the spleen and liver. The measured {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratios spanned 4 orders of magnitude, from 10{sup -10} to 10{sup -14}, with a detection limit of 3.0 x 10{sup -14}, which is equivalent to 0.8 attomoles of {sup 10}Be. These results show that routine quantification of nanogram levels of Be in tissues is possible and that AMS is a sensitive method that can be used in biological studies to understand the molecular dosimetry of Be and mechanisms of toxicity.

  6. Mapping molecular orientational distributions for biological sample in 3D (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HE, Wei; Ferrand, Patrick; Richter, Benjamin; Bastmeyer, Martin; Brasselet, Sophie

    2016-04-01

    Measuring molecular orientation properties is very appealing for scientists in molecular and cell biology, as well as biomedical research. Orientational organization at the molecular scale is indeed an important brick to cells and tissues morphology, mechanics, functions and pathologies. Recent work has shown that polarized fluorescence imaging, based on excitation polarization tuning in the sample plane, is able to probe molecular orientational order in biological samples; however this applies only to information in 2D, projected in the sample plane. To surpass this limitation, we extended this approach to excitation polarization tuning in 3D. The principle is based on the decomposition of any arbitrary 3D linear excitation in a polarization along the longitudinal z-axis, and a polarization in the transverse xy-sample plane. We designed an interferometer with one arm generating radial polarization light (thus producing longitudinal polarization under high numerical aperture focusing), the other arm controlling a linear polarization in the transverse plane. The amplitude ratio between the two arms can vary so as to get any linear polarized excitation in 3D at the focus of a high NA objective. This technique has been characterized by polarimetry imaging at the back focal plane of the focusing objective, and modeled theoretically. 3D polarized fluorescence microscopy is demonstrated on actin stress fibers in non-flat cells suspended on synthetic polymer structures forming supporting pillars, for which heterogeneous actin orientational order could be identified. This technique shows a great potential in structural investigations in 3D biological systems, such as cell spheroids and tissues.

  7. MALDI-MS drug analysis in biological samples: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Steuer, Andrea E; Poetzsch, Michael; Kraemer, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Drug analysis represents a large field in different disciplines. Plasma is commonly considered to be the biosample of choice for that purpose. However, concentrations often do not represent the levels present within deeper compartments and therefore cannot sufficiently explain efficacy or toxicology of drugs. MALDI-MS in drug analysis is of great interest for high-throughput quantification and particularly spatially resolved tissue imaging. The current perspective article will deal with challenges and opportunities of MALDI-MS drug analysis in different biological samples. A particular focus will be on hair samples. Recent applications were included, reviewed for their instrumental setup and sample preparation and pros and cons as well as future perspectives are critically discussed.

  8. Matrix effect marker for multianalyte analysis by LC-MS/MS in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Tudela, Eva; Muñoz, Gloria; Muñoz-Guerra, Jesús A

    2012-07-15

    Matrix effects (ion suppression/enhancement) are a well-observed phenomenon in analyses of biological matrices by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). However, few simple solutions for detecting and minimizing these adverse effects have been described so far in multianalyte analysis, especially in the field of doping control. This study describes an exhaustive characterization of matrix effects in one hundred urine samples fortified with 41 analytes (glucocorticoids and diuretics). It introduces a novel marker to identify samples in which the reliability of the results is compromised because of acute ion suppression. This new strategy strengthens the rigor of the analysis for screening purposes. Once the matrix effect is identified, a selective sample preparation is introduced to minimize the adverse ion suppression effect. That selective extraction together with the use of a deuterated internal standard permits enhancing the ruggedness of the estimation of glucocorticoid concentration in urine.

  9. Spectrochemical analysis of powdered biological samples using transversely excited atmospheric carbon dioxide laser plasma excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zivkovic, Sanja; Momcilovic, Milos; Staicu, Angela; Mutic, Jelena; Trtica, Milan; Savovic, Jelena

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a simple laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) method for quantitative elemental analysis of powdered biological materials based on laboratory prepared calibration samples. The analysis was done using ungated single pulse LIBS in ambient air at atmospheric pressure. Transversely-Excited Atmospheric pressure (TEA) CO2 laser was used as an energy source for plasma generation on samples. The material used for the analysis was a blue-green alga Spirulina, widely used in food and pharmaceutical industries and also in a few biotechnological applications. To demonstrate the analytical potential of this particular LIBS system the obtained spectra were compared to the spectra obtained using a commercial LIBS system based on pulsed Nd:YAG laser. A single sample of known concentration was used to estimate detection limits for Ba, Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn, Si and Sr and compare detection power of these two LIBS systems. TEA CO2 laser based LIBS was also applied for quantitative analysis of the elements in powder Spirulina samples. Analytical curves for Ba, Fe, Mg, Mn and Sr were constructed using laboratory produced matrix-matched calibration samples. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) was used as the reference technique for elemental quantification, and reasonably well agreement between ICP and LIBS data was obtained. Results confirm that, in respect to its sensitivity and precision, TEA CO2 laser based LIBS can be successfully applied for quantitative analysis of macro and micro-elements in algal samples. The fact that nearly all classes of materials can be prepared as powders implies that the proposed method could be easily extended to a quantitative analysis of different kinds of materials, organic, biological or inorganic.

  10. A direct solid sampling analysis method for the detection of silver nanoparticles in biological matrices.

    PubMed

    Feichtmeier, Nadine S; Ruchter, Nadine; Zimmermann, Sonja; Sures, Bernd; Leopold, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Engineered silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are implemented in food contact materials due to their powerful antimicrobial properties and so may enter the human food chain. Hence, it is desirable to develop easy, sensitive and fast analytical screening methods for the determination of AgNPs in complex biological matrices. This study describes such a method using solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). A recently reported novel evaluation strategy uses the atomization delay of the respective GFAAS signal as significant indicator for AgNPs and thereby allows discrimination of AgNPs from ionic silver (Ag(+)) in the samples without elaborate sample pre-treatment. This approach was further developed and applied to a variety of biological samples. Its suitability was approved by investigation of eight different food samples (parsley, apple, pepper, cheese, onion, pasta, maize meal and wheat flour) spiked with ionic silver or AgNPs. Furthermore, the migration of AgNPs from silver-impregnated polypropylene food storage boxes to fresh pepper was observed and a mussel sample obtained from a laboratory exposure study with silver was investigated. The differences in the atomization delays (Δt(ad)) between silver ions and 20-nm AgNPs vary in a range from -2.01 ± 1.38 s for maize meal to +2.06 ± 1.08 s for mussel tissue. However, the differences were significant in all investigated matrices and so indicative of the presence/absence of AgNPs. Moreover, investigation of model matrices (cellulose, gelatine and water) gives the first indication of matrix-dependent trends. Reproducibility and homogeneity tests confirm the applicability of the method.

  11. Autophagy Induction by Endothelial-Monocyte Activating Polypeptide II Contributes to the Inhibition of Malignant Biological Behaviors by the Combination of EMAP II with Rapamycin in Human Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Meng, Fanjie; Li, Shuai; Liu, Libo; Zhao, Lini; Liu, Yunhui; Hu, Yi; Li, Zhen; Yao, Yilong; Xi, Zhuo; Teng, Hao; Xue, Yixue

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of endothelial-monocyte activating polypeptide II (EMAP II) on human glioblastoma (GBM) cells and glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) as well as its possible mechanisms. In this study, EMAP II inhibited the cell viability and decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential in human GBM cells and GSCs, and autophagy inhibitor 3-methyl adenine (3-MA) blocked these effects. Autophagic vacuoles were formed in these cells after EMAP II treatment and this phenomenon was blocked by 3-MA. In addition, the up-regulation of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain-3 (LC3)-II and the down-regulation of autophagic degraded substrate p62/SQSTM1 caused by EMAP II were observed. Cells treated with EMAP-II inhibited the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signal pathway, and PI3K/Akt agonist insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) blocked the effect of EMAP II on the expression of LC3-II and p62/SQSTM1. Cells exposed to EMAP-II experienced mitophagy and ER stress. Furthermore, the inhibition of cell proliferation, migration and invasion of GBM cells and GSCs were more remarkable by the combination of EMAP II and rapamycin than either agent alone in vitro and in vivo. The current study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of EMAP II in human GBM cells and GSCs was induced by autophagy, accompanied by the inhibition of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signal pathway, mitophagy and ER stress. The combination of EMAP II with rapamycin demonstrated the inhibitory effect on the malignant biological behaviors of human GBM cells and GSCs in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26648842

  12. H2S Analysis in Biological Samples Using Gas Chromatography with Sulfur Chemiluminescence Detection

    PubMed Central

    Vitvitsky, Victor; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a metabolite and signaling molecule in biological tissues that regulates many physiological processes. Reliable and sensitive methods for H2S analysis are necessary for a better understanding of H2S biology and for the pharmacological modulation of H2S levels in vivo. In this chapter, we describe the use of gas chromatography coupled to sulfur chemiluminescence detection to measure the rates of H2S production and degradation by tissue homogenates at physiologically relevant concentrations of substrates. This method allows separation of H2S from other sulfur compounds and provides sensitivity of detection to ~15 pg (or 0.5 pmol) of H2S per injected sample. PMID:25725519

  13. Application of FTIR, PIXE, and EBS for trace element analysis in biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatek, W. M.; Lekki, J.; Paluszkiewicz, C.; Preikschas, N.

    1992-02-01

    FTIR (Fourier transform infrared), PIXE (proton induced X-ray emission), EBS (elastic backscattering spectroscopy) are applicable to trace element analysis in biological samples. Recently, we have applied two of these three techniques for investigation of trace element content in renal stones [1]. In this study the FTIR technique was used for chemical composition (phase structure) determination and choice of standards. The PIXE technique was applied for determination of stone elemental composition. Using the EBS technique, we were able to make corrections taking into account beam energy depth dependence and the X-ray attenuation effect. Such an effect is particularly significant for light elements. Combining the three techniques mentioned above it was possible to form a procedure for trace element determination in thick biological targets.

  14. Indonesia: statistical sampling technique in validation of radiation sterilisation dose of biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Hilmy, N; Basril, A; Febrida, A

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the work is to find the best solution for statistical sampling technique in validation of radiation sterilization dose (RSD) for biological tissues, according to ISO standard. As a model for sampling are biological tissues retrieved from one cadaver donor which consist of frozen bone grafts (18 packets), lyophilized allografts (68 packets) and demineralized bone powder grafts (40 packets). The size and type of products vary from long bones, cancellous chips to bone powders, tendons and facia lata, that make the number of bioburden per product could not be treated equally. Frozen samples could not be considered as the same production batch with lyophilized samples, because of different processing and irradiation temperature. The minimum number of uniformed samples needed for validation per production batch size, according to ISO 13409, is from 20 to 79 and 20 of them will be used for the test sample size, i.e. 10 for bio-burden determination and the remaining 10 for verification dose. Based on the number of uniformed grafts, statistical sampling can be carried out on lyophilized and demineralized bone grafts, but not on frozen bone grafts. Bioburden determinations were carried out and validated according to ISO 11737-1. Results of average bioburden determination (cfu/per packet), using sample item portion (SIP) = 1, are 5 cfu/packet for lyophilized bone grafts and 4 cfu/packet for demineralized bone powder grafts. Verification doses obtained were 2.40 kGy for lyophilized grafts and 2.24 kGy for demineralized bone powder grafts. The results of verification dose were accepted and the RSD of 25 kGy is substantiated It can be concluded that a statistical sampling technique can be applied if all the grafts produced in the same process such as lyophilized, demineralized as well as frozen are assumed to be in one production batch regardless of sample uniformity such as size, type and weight; for this ISO 13409 can be applied for the validation of RSD.

  15. Simultaneous preconcentration of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Cd(II) from environmental samples on Amberlite XAD-2000 column and determination by FAAS.

    PubMed

    Duran, Celal; Senturk, Hasan Basri; Elci, Latif; Soylak, Mustafa; Tufekci, Mehmet

    2009-02-15

    A new method for the preconcentration of some trace metals (Co, Ni, Cu, and Cd) as complexed with ammonium pyrrolidynedithiocarbamate (APDC) was developed using a mini-column filled with Amberlite XAD-2000 resin. Metal contents were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) after the metal complexes accumulated on the resin were eluted with 1M HNO(3) in acetone. The effects of the analytical parameters such as sample pH, quantity of complexing agent, eluent type, resin quantity, sample volume, sample flow rate, and matrix ions were investigated on the recovery of the metals from aqueous solutions. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) of the method was <6%. The validation of the method was confirmed using two certified reference materials (CRM TMDW-500 Drinking Water and CRM SA-C Sandy Soil C). The method was successfully applied to some stream waters and mushroom samples from Eastern Black Sea Region (Trabzon city) of Turkey.

  16. Quality of Bottled Water Brands in Egypt Part II: Biological Water Examination.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Salam, Magda M; Al-Ghitany, Engy M; Kassem, Mohamed M

    2008-01-01

    People can survive several days without food, but just a few days without water. People buy bottled water for a variety of reasons, including convenience, fashion, and taste or because they think it is safer than tap water. The taste of the water has to do with the way it is treated and the quality of its source, including its natural mineral content. However, taste does not always indicate safeness. Refrigeration has a significant effect on the bacteriological quality of the purchased bottle. To asses the quality of bottled water in Egypt, samples of 14 Egyptian brands of uncarbonated natural bottled water were evaluated within 6 months. Biological examinations of a total of 84 samples were carried out using standard methods comparing them with the Egyptian standards No. 1589/2005. Also bacteriological examinations of 56 samples were carried out after "1-3" months and "3-6" months storage time at room temperature to detect the effect of storage on their quality. More than half (54.8%) of biological parameters were violated the Egyptian standards. A percentage of 28.6% of all bottled water samples were contaminated with coliform, but surprisingly fecal coliforms and E.coli were not detected. Moreover, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were isolated from 5.95% and 3.6%, respectively of all samples. Giardia lamblia cysts has been found in 2.4% of samples, while absence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in all samples was reported. More than half (52%) of the unrefrigerated samples were unacceptable compared to only 19.4% of the refrigerated bottles. These results suggest the need for continuous monitoring for evidence of contamination at source or during the bottling process.

  17. Measurement of copper in biological samples by flame or electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Evenson, M A

    1988-01-01

    Guidelines presented here allow for copper analysis of biological materials by methods that are very sensitive, that require little sample preparation, that have few chemical or spectral interferences, that are inexpensive, and that require only usual care in contamination control. The commercial instruments for FAAS and ETAAS from Perkin-Elmer, from Varian, and from Instrumentation Laboratories Inc. (Allied Analytical Systems) all work well in either the flame or the flameless mode. Background correction techniques are not essential for copper analysis if care is taken with the sample preparation to minimize the background signals. Different types of burners will work adequately if one makes certain that the viscosity of the sample and the control products are similar to the calibration standards. Further, dilution of samples is preferred over increasing the viscosity of the calibration standards by the addition of a protein containing solution or a substance such as glycerol. A 1:10 dilution of blood plasma or serum with dilute nitric acid or water is all that is necessary for copper analysis by the FFAS methods. Cation and anion effects should be tested by bracketing the concentrations of the ions found in the sample with known amounts of ions in the sample solutions. Increasing the concentrations of the ions thought to interfere while keeping the copper concentration constant is another way to test for ion interferences.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Predicting brain structure in population-based samples with biologically informed genetic scores for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Van der Auwera, Sandra; Wittfeld, Katharina; Shumskaya, Elena; Bralten, Janita; Zwiers, Marcel P; Onnink, A Marten H; Usberti, Niccolo; Hertel, Johannes; Völzke, Henry; Völker, Uwe; Hosten, Norbert; Franke, Barbara; Grabe, Hans J

    2017-04-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with brain structural abnormalities including gray and white matter volume reductions. Whether these alterations are caused by genetic risk variants for schizophrenia is unclear. Previous attempts to detect associations between polygenic factors for schizophrenia and structural brain phenotypes in healthy subjects have been negative or remain non-replicated. In this study, we used genetic risk scores that were based on the accumulated effect of selected risk variants for schizophrenia belonging to specific biological systems like synaptic function, neurodevelopment, calcium signaling, and glutamatergic neurotransmission. We hypothesized that this "biologically informed" approach would provide the missing link between genetic risk for schizophrenia and brain structural phenotypes. We applied whole-brain voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses in two population-based target samples and subsequent regions of interest (ROIs) analyses in an independent replication sample (total N = 2725). No consistent association between the genetic scores and brain volumes were observed in the investigated samples. These results suggest that in healthy subjects with a higher genetic risk for schizophrenia additional factors apart from common genetic variants (e.g., infection, trauma, rare genetic variants, or gene-gene interactions) are required to induce structural abnormalities of the brain. Further studies are recommended to test for possible gene-gene or gene-environment effects. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Cellular characterization of compression induced-damage in live biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Chiara; Balzer, Jens; Hahnel, Mark; Rankin, Sara M.; Brown, Katherine A.; Proud, William G.

    2011-06-01

    Understanding the dysfunctions that high-intensity compression waves induce in human tissues is critical to impact on acute-phase treatments and requires the development of experimental models of traumatic damage in biological samples. In this study we have developed an experimental system to directly assess the impact of dynamic loading conditions on cellular function at the molecular level. Here we present a confinement chamber designed to subject live cell cultures in liquid environment to compression waves in the range of tens of MPa using a split Hopkinson pressure bars system. Recording the loading history and collecting the samples post-impact without external contamination allow the definition of parameters such as pressure and duration of the stimulus that can be related to the cellular damage. The compression experiments are conducted on Mesenchymal Stem Cells from BALB/c mice and the damage analysis are compared to two control groups. Changes in Stem cell viability, phenotype and function are assessed flow cytometry and with in vitro bioassays at two different time points. Identifying the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the damage caused by dynamic loading in live biological samples could enable the development of new treatments for traumatic injuries.

  20. Multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microspectroscopy for monitoring molecular structural change in biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Takayuki; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Ito, Masafumi; Hori, Masaru

    2014-10-01

    Biological applications employing non-equilibrium plasma processing has been attracted much attention. It is essential to monitor the changes in an intracellular structure of the cell during the plasma exposure. In this study, we have analyzed the molecular structure of biological samples using multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microspectroscopy. Two picosecond pulse lasers with fundamental (1064 nm) or the supercontinuum (460-2200 nm) were employed as a pump and Stokes beams of multiplex CARS microspectroscopy, respectively. The pump and the Stokes laser beams were collinearly overlapped and tightly focused into a sample using an objective lens of high numerical aperture. The CARS signal was collected by another microscope objective lens which is placed facing the first one. After passing through a short pass filter, the signal was dispersed by a polychromator, and was detected by a charge-coupled device camera. The sample was sandwiched by a coverslip and a glass bottom dish for the measurements and was placed on a piezo stage. The CARS signals of the quinhydrone crystal at 1655, 1584, 1237 and 1161 cm-1 were assigned to the C-C, C =O stretching, O-H and C-O stretching vibrational modes, respectively.

  1. General guidelines for safe and expeditious international transport of samples subjected to biological dosimetry assessment.

    PubMed

    Di Giorgio, Marina; Radl, Analía; Taja, María R; Bubniak, Ruth; Deminge, Mayra; Sapienza, Carla; Vázquez, Marina; Baciu, Florian; Kenny, Pat

    2014-06-01

    It has been observed that victims of accidental overexposures show better chance of survival if they receive medical treatment early. The increased risk of scenarios involving mass casualties has stimulated the scientific community to develop tools that would help the medical doctors to treat victims. The biological dosimetry has become a routine test to estimate the dose, supplementing physical and clinical dosimetry. In case of radiation emergencies, in order to provide timely and effectively biological dosimetry assistance it is essential to guarantee an adequate transport of blood samples in principal, for providing support to countries that do not have biodosimetry laboratories. The objective of the present paper is to provide general guidelines, summarised in 10 points, for timely and proper receiving and sending of blood samples under National and International regulations, for safe and expeditious international transport. These guidelines cover the classification, packaging, marking, labelling, refrigeration and documentation requirements for the international shipping of blood samples and pellets, to provide assistance missions with a tool that would contribute with the preparedness for an effective biodosimetric response in cases of radiological or nuclear emergencies.

  2. Bayesian model comparison and parameter inference in systems biology using nested sampling.

    PubMed

    Pullen, Nick; Morris, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Inferring parameters for models of biological processes is a current challenge in systems biology, as is the related problem of comparing competing models that explain the data. In this work we apply Skilling's nested sampling to address both of these problems. Nested sampling is a Bayesian method for exploring parameter space that transforms a multi-dimensional integral to a 1D integration over likelihood space. This approach focuses on the computation of the marginal likelihood or evidence. The ratio of evidences of different models leads to the Bayes factor, which can be used for model comparison. We demonstrate how nested sampling can be used to reverse-engineer a system's behaviour whilst accounting for the uncertainty in the results. The effect of missing initial conditions of the variables as well as unknown parameters is investigated. We show how the evidence and the model ranking can change as a function of the available data. Furthermore, the addition of data from extra variables of the system can deliver more information for model comparison than increasing the data from one variable, thus providing a basis for experimental design.

  3. Fast quantitative retardance imaging of biological samples using quandri-wave interferometry (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aknoun, Sherazade; Savatier, Julien; Bon, Pierre; Wattellier, Benoit; Monneret, Serge

    2017-02-01

    We describe a technique based on the use of a high-resolution quadri-wave lateral shearing interferometer to perform quantitative linear birefringence measurements on biological samples [1] such as living cells and tissues. The system combines QPI with different excitation polarizations to create retardance images. This creates a new kind of image contrast based on the local retardance, reveals the structure of sample anisotropic components and adds specificity to label-free phase images. We implemented this technique allowing us to take retardance images in less than 1 second which allows us to make high speed acquisitions to reconstruct tissues virtual slides with different modalities (i.e intensity, phase and retardance). Comparisons between healthy and tumoral 10 µm thick skin tissues and collagen orientation studies in the latter will be presented. [1] S. Aknoun, P. Bon, J. Savatier, B. Wattellier, and S. Monneret, "Quantitative retardance imaging of biological samples using quadriwave lateral shearing interferometry," Opt. Express 23, 16383-16406 (2015).

  4. Bayesian Model Comparison and Parameter Inference in Systems Biology Using Nested Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Pullen, Nick; Morris, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Inferring parameters for models of biological processes is a current challenge in systems biology, as is the related problem of comparing competing models that explain the data. In this work we apply Skilling's nested sampling to address both of these problems. Nested sampling is a Bayesian method for exploring parameter space that transforms a multi-dimensional integral to a 1D integration over likelihood space. This approach focusses on the computation of the marginal likelihood or evidence. The ratio of evidences of different models leads to the Bayes factor, which can be used for model comparison. We demonstrate how nested sampling can be used to reverse-engineer a system's behaviour whilst accounting for the uncertainty in the results. The effect of missing initial conditions of the variables as well as unknown parameters is investigated. We show how the evidence and the model ranking can change as a function of the available data. Furthermore, the addition of data from extra variables of the system can deliver more information for model comparison than increasing the data from one variable, thus providing a basis for experimental design. PMID:24523891

  5. Analytical approaches for assaying metallodrugs in biological samples: recent methodological developments and future trends.

    PubMed

    Timerbaev, Andrei; Sturup, Stefan

    2012-03-01

    Contemporary medicine increasingly relies on metal-based drugs and correspondingly growing in importance is the monitoring of the drugs and their metabolites in biological samples. Over the last decade, a range of analytical techniques have been developed in order to improve administration strategies for clinically approved compounds and understand pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and metabolism of new drugs so as ultimately to make their clinical development more effective. This paper gives an overview of various separation and detection methods, as well as common sample preparation strategies, currently in use to achieve the intended goals. The critical discussion of existing analytical technologies encompasses notably their detection capability, ability to handle biological matrices with minimum pretreatment, sample throughput, and cost efficiency. The main attention is devoted to those applications that are progressed to real-world biosamples and selected examples are given to illustrate the overall performance and applicability of advanced analytical systems. Also emphasized is the emerging role of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), both as a standalone instrument (for determination of metals originating from drug compounds) and as an element-specific detector in combinations with liquid chromatography or capillary electrophoresis (for drug metabolism studies). An increasing number of academic laboratories are using ICP-MS technology today, and this review will focus on the analytical possibilities of ICP-MS which would before long provide the method with the greatest impact on the clinical laboratory.

  6. High resolution x-ray microtomography of biological samples: Requirements and strategies for satisfying them

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, B.W. Jr. ||; Rothman, S.S. |

    1997-02-01

    High resolution x-ray microscopy has been made possible in recent years primarily by two new technologies: microfabricated diffractive lenses for soft x-rays with about 30-50 nm resolution, and high brightness synchrotron x-ray sources. X-ray microscopy occupies a special niche in the array of biological microscopic imaging methods. It extends the capabilities of existing techniques mainly in two areas: a previously unachievable combination of sub-visible resolution and multi-micrometer sample size, and new contrast mechanisms. Because of the soft x-ray wavelengths used in biological imaging (about 1-4 nm), XM is intermediate in resolution between visible light and electron microscopies. Similarly, the penetration depth of soft x-rays in biological materials is such that the ideal sample thickness for XM falls in the range of 0.25 - 10 {mu}m, between that of VLM and EM. XM is therefore valuable for imaging of intermediate level ultrastructure, requiring sub-visible resolutions, in intact cells and subcellular organelles, without artifacts produced by thin sectioning. Many of the contrast producing and sample preparation techniques developed for VLM and EM also work well with XM. These include, for example, molecule specific staining by antibodies with heavy metal or fluorescent labels attached, and sectioning of both frozen and plastic embedded tissue. However, there is also a contrast mechanism unique to XM that exists naturally because a number of elemental absorption edges lie in the wavelength range used. In particular, between the oxygen and carbon absorption edges (2.3 and 4.4 nm wavelength), organic molecules absorb photons much more strongly than does water, permitting element-specific imaging of cellular structure in aqueous media, with no artifically introduced contrast agents. For three-dimensional imaging applications requiring the capabilities of XM, an obvious extension of the technique would therefore be computerized x-ray microtomography (XMT).

  7. Characteristics of low-angle x-ray scattering from some biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshemey, Wael M.; Elsayed, Anwar A.; El-Lakkani, Ali

    1999-12-01

    Design of medical imaging devices based on the detection of low-angle coherent scattering is a subject of increasing interest. The technique is based on the differences in the distribution of photons coherently scattered from different body tissues. Coherent scattering is also useful in monitoring changes that may occur in a healthy tissue (e.g. carcinoma). In this work, low-angle scattering properties of some tissues and tissue-equivalent materials are studied. Special care is given to the possibility of distinguishing between tissues of similar water content (e.g. muscle and blood). For this purpose, a Monte Carlo simulation is updated, introducing molecular form factor data, which include molecular interference effects. This program is used to simulate the angular distribution of scattered photons from two tissue-equivalent materials (lucite and water) and three biological samples (muscle, fat and blood). Simulation results agree well with previously measured angular distributions of scattered photons at 59.54 keV. Scattering from water and lucite is also measured at 8.047 keV. The effects of scattering geometry, sample thickness, incident photon energy and tissue type on the angular distribution of scattered photons are investigated. Results reveal the potential of measuring the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the scattered photon distribution for tissue characterization. Energies up to 13 keV and sample thickness of 0.3 cm reported maximum differences between investigated samples. These conditions are expected to maximize the potential of using coherent scattering set-ups to monitor changes in biological samples even if their water contents are similar. Present results may act as a guide for the optimization of coherent scattering imaging systems.

  8. 3D nanoscale imaging of biological samples with laboratory-based soft X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehlinger, Aurélie; Blechschmidt, Anne; Grötzsch, Daniel; Jung, Robert; Kanngießer, Birgit; Seim, Christian; Stiel, Holger

    2015-09-01

    In microscopy, where the theoretical resolution limit depends on the wavelength of the probing light, radiation in the soft X-ray regime can be used to analyze samples that cannot be resolved with visible light microscopes. In the case of soft X-ray microscopy in the water-window, the energy range of the radiation lies between the absorption edges of carbon (at 284 eV, 4.36 nm) and oxygen (543 eV, 2.34 nm). As a result, carbon-based structures, such as biological samples, posses a strong absorption, whereas e.g. water is more transparent to this radiation. Microscopy in the water-window, therefore, allows the structural investigation of aqueous samples with resolutions of a few tens of nanometers and a penetration depth of up to 10μm. The development of highly brilliant laser-produced plasma-sources has enabled the transfer of Xray microscopy, that was formerly bound to synchrotron sources, to the laboratory, which opens the access of this method to a broader scientific community. The Laboratory Transmission X-ray Microscope at the Berlin Laboratory for innovative X-ray technologies (BLiX) runs with a laser produced nitrogen plasma that emits radiation in the soft X-ray regime. The mentioned high penetration depth can be exploited to analyze biological samples in their natural state and with several projection angles. The obtained tomogram is the key to a more precise and global analysis of samples originating from various fields of life science.

  9. The correlation of arsenic levels in drinking water with the biological samples of skin disorders.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Arain, Muhammad Balal; Baig, Jameel Ahmed; Jamali, Muhammad Khan; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Jalbani, Nusrat; Sarfraz, Raja Adil; Shah, Abdul Qadir; Niaz, Abdul

    2009-01-15

    Arsenic (As) poisoning has become a worldwide public health concern. The skin is quite sensitive to As and skin lesions are the most common and earliest nonmalignant effects associated to chronic As exposure. In 2005-2007, a survey was carried out on surface and groundwater arsenic contamination and relationships between As exposure via the drinking water and related adverse health effects (melanosis and keratosis) on villagers resides on the banks of Manchar lake, southern part of Sindh, Pakistan. We screened the population from arsenic-affected villages, 61 to 73% population were identified patients suffering from chronic arsenic toxicity. The effects of As toxicity via drinking water were estimated by biological samples (scalp hair and blood) of adults (males and females), have or have not skin problem (n=187). The referent samples of both genders were also collected from the areas having low level of As (<10 microg/L) in drinking water (n=121). Arsenic concentration in drinking water and biological samples were analyzed using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The range of arsenic concentrations in lake surface water was 35.2-158 microg/L, which is 3-15 folds higher than World Health Organization [WHO, 2004. Guidelines for drinking-water quality third ed., WHO Geneva Switzerland.]. It was observed that As concentration in the scalp hair and blood samples were above the range of permissible values 0.034-0.319 microg As/g for hair and <0.5-4.2 microg/L for blood. The linear regressions showed good correlations between arsenic concentrations in water versus hair and blood samples of exposed skin diseased subjects (R2=0.852 and 0.718) as compared to non-diseased subjects (R2=0.573 and 0.351), respectively.

  10. Magnetic induction spectroscopy: non-contact measurement of the electrical conductivity spectra of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barai, A.; Watson, S.; Griffiths, H.; Patz, R.

    2012-08-01

    Measurement of the electrical conductivity of biological tissues as a function of frequency, often termed ‘bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS)’, provides valuable information on tissue structure and composition. In implementing BIS though, there can be significant practical difficulties arising from the electrode-sample interface which have likely limited its deployment in industrial applications. In magnetic induction spectroscopy (MIS) these difficulties are eliminated through the use of fully non-contacting inductive coupling between the sensors and sample. However, inductive coupling introduces its own set of technical difficulties, primarily related to the small magnitudes of the induced currents and their proportionality with frequency. This paper describes the design of a practical MIS system incorporating new, highly-phase-stable electronics and compares its performance with that of electrode-based BIS in measurements on biological samples including yeast suspensions in saline (concentration 50-400 g l-1) and solid samples of potato, cucumber, tomato, banana and porcine liver. The shapes of the MIS spectra were in good agreement with those for electrode-based BIS, with a residual maximum discrepancy of 28%. The measurement precision of the MIS was 0.05 S m-1 at 200 kHz, improving to 0.01 S m-1 at a frequency of 20 MHz, for a sample volume of 80 ml. The data-acquisition time for each MIS measurement was 52 s. Given the value of spectroscopic conductivity information and the many advantages of obtaining these data in a non-contacting manner, even through electrically-insulating packaging materials if necessary, it is concluded that MIS is a technique with considerable potential for monitoring bio-industrial processes and product quality.

  11. Multiple replica repulsion technique for efficient conformational sampling of biological systems.

    PubMed

    Malevanets, Anatoly; Wodak, Shoshana J

    2011-08-17

    Here, we propose a technique for sampling complex molecular systems with many degrees of freedom. The technique, termed "multiple replica repulsion" (MRR), does not suffer from poor scaling with the number of degrees of freedom associated with common replica exchange procedures and does not require sampling at high temperatures. The algorithm involves creation of multiple copies (replicas) of the system, which interact with one another through a repulsive potential that can be applied to the system as a whole or to portions of it. The proposed scheme prevents oversampling of the most populated states and provides accurate descriptions of conformational perturbations typically associated with sampling ground-state energy wells. The performance of MRR is illustrated for three systems of increasing complexity. A two-dimensional toy potential surface is used to probe the sampling efficiency as a function of key parameters of the procedure. MRR simulations of the Met-enkephalin pentapeptide, and the 76-residue protein ubiquitin, performed in presence of explicit water molecules and totaling 32 ns each, investigate the ability of MRR to characterize the conformational landscape of the peptide, and the protein native basin, respectively. Results obtained for the enkephalin peptide reflect more closely the extensive conformational flexibility of this peptide than previously reported simulations. Those obtained for ubiquitin show that conformational ensembles sampled by MRR largely encompass structural fluctuations relevant to biological recognition, which occur on the microsecond timescale, or are observed in crystal structures of ubiquitin complexes with other proteins. MRR thus emerges as a very promising simple and versatile technique for modeling the structural plasticity of complex biological systems. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Multiple Replica Repulsion Technique for Efficient Conformational Sampling of Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Malevanets, Anatoly; Wodak, Shoshana J.

    2011-01-01

    Here, we propose a technique for sampling complex molecular systems with many degrees of freedom. The technique, termed “multiple replica repulsion” (MRR), does not suffer from poor scaling with the number of degrees of freedom associated with common replica exchange procedures and does not require sampling at high temperatures. The algorithm involves creation of multiple copies (replicas) of the system, which interact with one another through a repulsive potential that can be applied to the system as a whole or to portions of it. The proposed scheme prevents oversampling of the most populated states and provides accurate descriptions of conformational perturbations typically associated with sampling ground-state energy wells. The performance of MRR is illustrated for three systems of increasing complexity. A two-dimensional toy potential surface is used to probe the sampling efficiency as a function of key parameters of the procedure. MRR simulations of the Met-enkephalin pentapeptide, and the 76-residue protein ubiquitin, performed in presence of explicit water molecules and totaling 32 ns each, investigate the ability of MRR to characterize the conformational landscape of the peptide, and the protein native basin, respectively. Results obtained for the enkephalin peptide reflect more closely the extensive conformational flexibility of this peptide than previously reported simulations. Those obtained for ubiquitin show that conformational ensembles sampled by MRR largely encompass structural fluctuations relevant to biological recognition, which occur on the microsecond timescale, or are observed in crystal structures of ubiquitin complexes with other proteins. MRR thus emerges as a very promising simple and versatile technique for modeling the structural plasticity of complex biological systems. PMID:21843487

  13. On the Applications of IBA Techniques to Biological Samples Analysis: PIXE and RBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcón-González, J. M.; Bernal-Alvarado, J.; García-León, M.; García-Tenorio, R.; García, Y. Morilla; Sosa, M.

    2008-08-01

    The analytical techniques based on ion beams or IBA techniques give quantitative information on elemental concentration in samples of a wide variety of nature. In this work, we focus on PIXE technique, analyzing thick target biological specimens (TTPIXE), using 3 MeV protons produced by an electrostatic accelerator. A nuclear microprobe was used performing PIXE and RBS simultaneously, in order to solve the uncertainties produced in the absolute PIXE quantifying. The advantages of using both techniques and a nuclear microprobe are discussed. Quantitative results are shown to illustrate the multielemental resolution of the PIXE technique; for this, a blood standard was used.

  14. MCT-based SWIR hyperspectral imaging system for evaluation of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seok Min; Lee, Hoonsoo; Baek, Insuck; Kim, Moon S.

    2016-05-01

    Hyperspectral imaging has been shown to be a powerful tool for nondestructive evaluation of biological samples. We recently developed a new line-scan-based shortwave infrared (SWIR) hyperspectral imaging system. Critical sensing components of the system include a SWIR spectrograph, an MCT (HgCdTe) array detector, and a custom-designed illumination source. The system has an effective imaging range from 900 nm to 2500 nm. In this paper, we present SWIR hyperspectral images of plant leaves and fruits, and preliminary SWIR image analysis results.

  15. On the Applications of IBA Techniques to Biological Samples Analysis: PIXE and RBS

    SciTech Connect

    Falcon-Gonzalez, J. M.; Bernal-Alvarado, J.; Sosa, M.; Garcia-Leon, M.; Morilla Garcia, Y.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.

    2008-08-11

    The analytical techniques based on ion beams or IBA techniques give quantitative information on elemental concentration in samples of a wide variety of nature. In this work, we focus on PIXE technique, analyzing thick target biological specimens (TTPIXE), using 3 MeV protons produced by an electrostatic accelerator. A nuclear microprobe was used performing PIXE and RBS simultaneously, in order to solve the uncertainties produced in the absolute PIXE quantifying. The advantages of using both techniques and a nuclear microprobe are discussed. Quantitative results are shown to illustrate the multielemental resolution of the PIXE technique; for this, a blood standard was used.

  16. Thickness determination of biological samples with a zeta-calibrated scanning tunneling microscope.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z H; Hartmann, T; Baumeister, W; Guckenberger, R

    1990-01-01

    A single-tube scanning tunneling microscope has been zeta-calibrated by using atomic steps of crystalline gold and was used for measuring the thickness of two biological samples, metal-coated as well as uncoated. The hexagonal surface layer of the bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans with an open network-type structure shows thickness values that are strongly influenced by the substrate and the preparation method. In contrast, the thickness of the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium with its densely packed less-corrugated structure exhibits very little variation in thickness in coated preparations and the values obtained are in good agreement with x-ray data. Images PMID:2251276

  17. Selective extraction of proteins and other macromolecules from biological samples using molecular imprinted polymers.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Derek; El-Sharif, Hazim F; Reddy, Subrayal M

    2016-11-01

    The accurate determination of intact macromolecules in biological samples, such as blood, plasma, serum, urine, tissue and feces is a challenging problem. The increased interest in macromolecules both as candidate drugs and as biomarkers for diagnostic purposes means that new method development approaches are needed. This review charts developments in the use of molecularly imprinted polymers first for small-molecular-mass compounds then for proteins and other macromolecules. Examples of the development of molecularly imprinted polymers for macromolecules are highlighted. The two main application areas to date are sensors and separation science, particularly SPE. Examples include peptides and polypeptides, lysozyme, hemoglobin, ovalbumin, bovine serum albumin and viruses.

  18. Chlorinated and brominated persistent organic compounds in biological samples from the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, B.; Andersson, R.; Asplund, L.; Litzen, K.; Nylund, K.; Sellstroem, U.; Uvemo, U.; Wahlberg, C.; Wideqvist, U. . Inst. of Applied Environmental Research); Odsjoe, T.; Olsson, M. . Section for Vertebrate Zoology)

    1993-07-01

    Eleven selected biological samples representing different ecosystems, trophic levels, and areas mainly in Sweden have been analyzed for 31 halogenated organic compounds or compound groups. The multiresidue analytical method provides a good opportunity to compare the concentrations of the different compounds in the investigated samples. By the use of ratios of these concentrations, comparisons can be done between species and areas. An attempt to describe an environmental distribution profile is demonstrated for some of the compounds using the concentration ratio between these compounds and 2,2[prime],4,4[prime],5,5[prime]-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 153). Chlorinated paraffins (CPs) were found in all samples and in some of them at higher concentrations than the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The ratio of CP to PCB 153 is higher in the investigated terrestrial species than in the aquatic, which is not the case for the other compounds. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers were also found in all but one sample. The concentrations were highest in industrialized areas but were also present in samples from background areas. Seven major cogeners of PCBs were determined; the sum ranged from 50 to 200,000 ng/g lw in the investigated samples. Three coplanar PCB congeners were also analyzed as well as polychlorinated naphthalenes, which were found at levels between 0.038 and 50 ng/g lw. The latter two groups do not seem to biomagnify in the foot chain of herring to grey seal to the same extent as the major PCB compounds. Pentachlorobenzene was found in only three of the samples, whereas hexachlorobenzene was present in all samples.

  19. A multipurpose scanning near-field optical microscope: Reflectivity and photocurrent on semiconductor and biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cricenti, A.; Generosi, R.; Barchesi, C.; Luce, M.; Rinaldi, M.

    1998-09-01

    A multipurpose scanning near field optical microscope (SNOM) operating at ambient pressure is described with the aim of characterizing the inner parts of biological molecules and any semiconductor or metal microstructure. Therefore, in addition to the requirements of reliability and mechanical stability we have carefully considered analyzing a sample with all available geometries for input/output of photons, in order to get as much information as possible. The SNOM unit consists of two separable cylindrical supports; the lower one contains the sample holder mounted on top of a piezoelectric scanner which is contained in a motor controlled x-y-z stage. A piezo-modulated stretched optical fiber with a few tens of nanometer pinhole and a shear-force apparatus mounted inside the top cylinder allow for topography measurements. The reflectivity of the sample can be measured by applying different methods: the sample can be illuminated on top by an external source, as well as by the optical fiber used for the detection of the reflectivity signal. An aperture in the lower cylinder allows for illumination of the sample on the back: in this case the fiber collects the evanescent wave induced at the top of the sample. Another aperture in the lower cylinder allows measurement of the reflected light which includes a contribution due to the interaction with the fiber. Also photocurrent experiments can be easily performed by illuminating the sample with the fiber and detecting the transmitted signal using a current-voltage converter mounted inside the top cylinder. A video-camera that can reach 170 enlargements is mounted on the top cylinder for positioning the fiber on particular regions of the sample. Reflectivity and photocurrent measurements have been performed on uncoated neurons, CsI compound, Au/GaAs, and PtSi/Si systems, reaching a resolution well below the diffraction limit.

  20. Determination of grayanotoxins in biological samples by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Holstege, D M; Puschner, B; Le, T

    2001-03-01

    A rapid LC-MS/MS method was developed for the quantitative determination of grayanotoxins I, II, and III in rumen contents, feces, and urine. The grayanotoxins were extracted from solid samples with methanol. The methanol extract was diluted with water and cleaned up using a reversed phase solid phase extraction column. HPLC separation was performed by reversed phase HPLC using a gradient of water and methanol containing 1% acetic acid. Determination was by positive ion electrospray ionization and ion trap tandem mass spectrometry. Grayanotoxin I quantitation was based on fragmentation of the sodium adduct ion at m/z 435 to a product ion at m/z 375. Grayanotoxins II and III were quantitated on the basis of fragmentation of the ion at m/z 335 to the product ion at m/z 299. The method detection limits were 0.2 microg/g in rumen contents and feces and 0.05 microg/g in urine. Fortifications at the detection limits and 10 times the detection limits of bovine rumen contents, caprine feces, and ovine urine were recovered in the range 80-114%. The diagnostic utility of the method was tested by analyzing samples submitted to the veterinary toxicology laboratory.

  1. Synthesis, characterization, electrochemical and biological studies on some metal(II) Schiff base complexes containing quinoxaline moiety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justin Dhanaraj, Chellaian; Johnson, Jijo

    2014-01-01

    Novel Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes of Schiff base derived from quinoxaline-2,3-(1,4H)-dione and 4-aminoantipyrine (QDAAP) were synthesized. The ligand and its complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance, magnetic susceptibility measurements, FTIR, UV-Vis., mass and 1H NMR spectral studies. The X band ESR spectrum of the Cu(II) complex at 300 and 77 K were also recorded. Thermal studies of the ligand and its complexes show the presence of coordinated water in the Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes. The coordination behavior of QDAAP is also discussed. All the complexes are mono nuclear and tetrahedral geometry was found for Co(II) complex. For the Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes, octahedral geometry was assigned and for the Cu(II) complex, square planar geometry has been suggested. The grain size of the complexes was estimated using powder XRD. The surface morphology of the compounds was studied using SEM analysis. Electrochemical behavior of the synthesized complexes in DMF at room temperature was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The in vitro biological screening of QDAAP and its metal complexes were tested against bacterial species Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The fungal species include Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus and Candida albicans. The DNA cleavage activity of QDAAP and its complexes were also discussed.

  2. Synthesis, characterization, electrochemical and biological studies on some metal(II) Schiff base complexes containing quinoxaline moiety.

    PubMed

    Dhanaraj, Chellaian Justin; Johnson, Jijo

    2014-01-24

    Novel Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes of Schiff base derived from quinoxaline-2,3-(1,4H)-dione and 4-aminoantipyrine (QDAAP) were synthesized. The ligand and its complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance, magnetic susceptibility measurements, FTIR, UV-Vis., mass and (1)H NMR spectral studies. The X band ESR spectrum of the Cu(II) complex at 300 and 77K were also recorded. Thermal studies of the ligand and its complexes show the presence of coordinated water in the Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes. The coordination behavior of QDAAP is also discussed. All the complexes are mono nuclear and tetrahedral geometry was found for Co(II) complex. For the Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes, octahedral geometry was assigned and for the Cu(II) complex, square planar geometry has been suggested. The grain size of the complexes was estimated using powder XRD. The surface morphology of the compounds was studied using SEM analysis. Electrochemical behavior of the synthesized complexes in DMF at room temperature was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The in vitro biological screening of QDAAP and its metal complexes were tested against bacterial species Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The fungal species include Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus and Candida albicans. The DNA cleavage activity of QDAAP and its complexes were also discussed.

  3. Determination of selenium in biological samples by slurry sampling-electrothermal vaporization-in situ fusion-isotope dilution-microwave-induced nitrogen plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Takafumi; Nishide, Akifumi; Okutsu, Kentaro; Minami, Hirotsugu; Zhang, Qiangbin; Inoue, Sadanobu; Atsuya, Ikuo

    2005-03-01

    Determination of selenium in certified reference biological materials by slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization (ETV)-isotope dilution (ID)-microwave-induced nitrogen plasma mass spectrometry (MIP-MS) was performed. Several parameters such as the heating conditions were studied in order to obtain optimal conditions. A special heating stage called the in situ fusion stage was applied just before the pyrolysis stage in the electrothermal vaporization process in order to fuse the biological sample and to achieve selenium isotope-equilibration between selenium in the sample and the 78Se spike solution. The slurry sample containing an appropriate amount of biological sample, 78Se spike solution, and sodium hydroxide as an alkaline flux was injected into the electrothermal vaporization unit. The slurry sample was in situ fused, pyrolyzed, and then vaporized. The ion counts at m/ z=78 and 80, the spike and reference isotopes, respectively, could be measured accurately without interference caused by argon since nitrogen plasma was used. The analytical utility of the proposed slurry sampling-electrothermal vaporization-in situ fusion-microwave-induced nitrogen plasma mass spectrometry was evaluated by determining the selenium concentration in certified reference biological materials, and the analytical results obtained were in good agreement with the certified values. The limit of detection for selenium was 90 ng g -1. The relative standard deviation of the determination of selenium was 8-15% with a high sample throughput (less than 30 min per sample including a slurry preparation.)

  4. Micro-organism extraction from biological samples using DEP forces enhanced by osmotic shock.

    PubMed

    Bisceglia, Emilie; Cubizolles, Myriam; Mallard, Frédéric; Vinet, Françoise; Français, Olivier; Le Pioufle, Bruno

    2013-03-07

    On the road towards efficient diagnostics of infectious diseases, sample preparation is considered as the key step and remains a real technical challenge. Finding new methods for extraction of micro-organisms from a complex biological sample remains a major challenge prior to pathogen detection and analysis. This paper reports a new technique for capturing and isolating micro-organisms from a complex sample. To achieve the segregation of pathogens and blood cells, dielectrophoretic forces applied to bioparticles previously subjected to an osmotic shock are successfully implemented within a dedicated microfluidic device. Our device involves an electrode array of interdigitated electrodes, coated with an insulating layer, to minimize electrochemical reactions with the electrolyte and to enable long-time use. The electric field intensity inside the device is optimized, considering the insulating layer, for a given frequency bandwidth, enabling the separation of bioparticles by dielectrophoretic forces. Our predictions are based on analytical models, consistent with numerical simulations (using COMSOL Multiphysics) and correlated to experimental results. The method and device have been shown to extract different types of micro-organisms spiked in a blood cell sample. We strongly believe that this new separation approach may open the way towards a simple device for pathogen extraction from blood and more generally complex samples, with potential advantages of genericness and simplicity.

  5. Evaluation of chemical and biological methods for the identification of mutagenic and cytotoxic hazardous waste samples

    SciTech Connect

    Andon, B.; Jackson, M.; Houk, V.; Claxton, L.

    1984-06-01

    To assist in the development of methods for identifying potentially hazardous wastes, the authors have conducted studies on the extraction of toxicants from several solid waste samples. The extracts were tested for toxicity in the Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) Cytotoxicity Test and for mutagenic potential in the Salmonella Histidine Reversion Assay. A new technique was also employed which measured the mutagenicity of neat waste samples by coupling Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) with the Salmonella Histidine Reversion Assay. The wastes selected for study were coke plant waste, herbicide manufacturing acetone-water effluent, and oil refining waste. Three extraction solvents, ethanol (ETOH), dichloromethane (DCM), and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), were chosen based on their solubility and compatibility with bioassay procedures. Each sample was divided into three parts and extracted with each of the three solvents separately. All extracts were tested in the Salmonella assay at five dose levels with five Ames tester strains in the presence and in the absence of an exogenous metabolizing system. DMSO and DCM extracts were utilized for CHO cytotoxicity evaluations. The three neat waste samples and two extracts were assayed with the TLC technique. In addition to the biological assessments, the gross chemical parameters for each sample were determined. Results showed that coke plant waste and herbicide mfg. acetone-water were mutagenic to S. typhimurium with the standard plate test. With the TLC technique, the neat coke plant waste was mutagenic and oil refining waste was toxic. Oil refining waste was also toxic to CHO cells.

  6. Availability of MudPIT data for classification of biological samples

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mass spectrometry is an important analytical tool for clinical proteomics. Primarily employed for biomarker discovery, it is increasingly used for developing methods which may help to provide unambiguous diagnosis of biological samples. In this context, we investigated the classification of phenotypes by applying support vector machine (SVM) on experimental data obtained by MudPIT approach. In particular, we compared the performance capabilities of SVM by using two independent collection of complex samples and different data-types, such as mass spectra (m/z), peptides and proteins. Results Globally, protein and peptide data allowed a better discriminant informative content than experimental mass spectra (overall accuracy higher than 87% in both collection 1 and 2). These results indicate that sequencing of peptides and proteins reduces the experimental noise affecting the raw mass spectra, and allows the extraction of more informative features available for the effective classification of samples. In addition, proteins and peptides features selected by SVM matched for 80% with the differentially expressed proteins identified by the MAProMa software. Conclusions These findings confirm the availability of the most label-free quantitative methods based on processing of spectral count and SEQUEST-based SCORE values. On the other hand, it stresses the usefulness of MudPIT data for a correct grouping of sample phenotypes, by applying both supervised and unsupervised learning algorithms. This capacity permit the evaluation of actual samples and it is a good starting point to translate proteomic methodology to clinical application. PMID:23317455

  7. Biological and biomedical (14)C-accelerator mass spectrometry and graphitization of carbonaceous samples.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ill-Min; Kim, Seung-Hyun

    2013-06-21

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is the ultimate technique for measuring rare isotopes in small samples. Biological and biomedical applications of (14)C-AMS (bio-(14)C-AMS) commenced in the early 1990s and are now widely used in many research fields including pharmacology, toxicology, food, and nutrition. For accurate, precise, and reproducible bio-(14)C-AMS analysis, the graphitization step in sample preparation is the most critical step. So, various sample preparation methods for a process called graphitization have been reported for specific applications. Catalytic graphitization using either a flame-sealed borosilicate tube or a septa-sealed vial is a popular sample preparation method for bio-(14)C-AMS. In this review, we introduce the AMS system, especially for bio-(14)C-AMS. In addition, we also review the graphitization method for bio-(14)C-AMS to promote further understanding and improvement of sample preparation for this technique. Examples of catalytic graphitization methods over the past two decades are described.

  8. A round-robin determination of boron in botanical and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Downing, R G; Strong, P L

    1998-01-01

    The accurate determination of boron (B) at trace and ultratrace concentrations is an important step toward establishing the role of B in biological functions. However, low-level B concentrations are difficult to determine accurately, especially for many botanical and biological matrices. A round-robin study was conducted to assess analytical agreement for low-level B determinations. Ten experienced research groups from analytical laboratories extending across Europe, Asia, and the US participated in this study. These groups represent a cross-section of academic, commercial, and government facilities. The researchers employed both ion-coupled plasma and neutron techniques in the study. Results from this round-robin study indicate good agreement between participating laboratories at the mg/kg level, but at the lowest levels, microg/kg, only three laboratories participated, and agreement was poor. By encouraging discussion among scientists over these data, the secondary goal of this round-robin study is to stimulate continued improvement in analytical procedures and techniques for accurate low-level B determinations. Furthermore, it is intended to encourage the development of a variety of low-level (low mg/kg and microg/kg) B certified reference samples in biological and botanical matrices. The results from the round-robin analyses were compiled and are summarized in this article.

  9. Combined LIBS-Raman for remote detection and characterization of biological samples

    DOE PAGES

    Anderson, Aaron S.; Mukundan, Harshini; Mcinroy, Rhonda E.; ...

    2015-02-07

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Raman Spectroscopy have rich histories in the analysis of a wide variety of samples in both in situ and remote configurations. Our team is working on building a deployable, integrated Raman and LIBS spectrometer (RLS) for the parallel elucidation of elemental and molecular signatures under Earth and Martian surface conditions. Herein, results from remote LIBS and Raman analysis of biological samples such as amino acids, small peptides, mono- and disaccharides, and nucleic acids acquired under terrestrial and Mars conditions are reported, giving rise to some interesting differences. A library of spectra and peaks of interestmore » were compiled, and will be used to inform the analysis of more complex systems, such as large peptides, dried bacterial spores, and biofilms. Lastly, these results will be presented and future applications will be discussed, including the assembly of a combined RLS spectroscopic system and stand-off detection in a variety of environments.« less

  10. Combined LIBS-Raman for remote detection and characterization of biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Aaron S.; Mukundan, Harshini; Mcinroy, Rhonda E.; Clegg, Samuel M.

    2015-02-07

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Raman Spectroscopy have rich histories in the analysis of a wide variety of samples in both in situ and remote configurations. Our team is working on building a deployable, integrated Raman and LIBS spectrometer (RLS) for the parallel elucidation of elemental and molecular signatures under Earth and Martian surface conditions. Herein, results from remote LIBS and Raman analysis of biological samples such as amino acids, small peptides, mono- and disaccharides, and nucleic acids acquired under terrestrial and Mars conditions are reported, giving rise to some interesting differences. A library of spectra and peaks of interest were compiled, and will be used to inform the analysis of more complex systems, such as large peptides, dried bacterial spores, and biofilms. Lastly, these results will be presented and future applications will be discussed, including the assembly of a combined RLS spectroscopic system and stand-off detection in a variety of environments.

  11. Fiber laser-microscope system for femtosecond photodisruption of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Yavaş, Seydi; Erdogan, Mutlu; Gürel, Kutan; Ilday, F Ömer; Eldeniz, Y Burak; Tazebay, Uygar H

    2012-03-01

    We report on the development of a ultrafast fiber laser-microscope system for femtosecond photodisruption of biological targets. A mode-locked Yb-fiber laser oscillator generates few-nJ pulses at 32.7 MHz repetition rate, amplified up to ∼125 nJ at 1030 nm. Following dechirping in a grating compressor, ∼240 fs-long pulses are delivered to the sample through a diffraction-limited microscope, which allows real-time imaging and control. The laser can generate arbitrary pulse patterns, formed by two acousto-optic modulators (AOM) controlled by a custom-developed field-programmable gate array (FPGA) controller. This capability opens the route to fine optimization of the ablation processes and management of thermal effects. Sample position, exposure time and imaging are all computerized. The capability of the system to perform femtosecond photodisruption is demonstrated through experiments on tissue and individual cells.

  12. Analytical Methodologies for the Determination of Endocrine Disrupting Compounds in Biological and Environmental Samples

    PubMed Central

    Sosa-Ferrera, Zoraida; Mahugo-Santana, Cristina; Santana-Rodríguez, José Juan

    2013-01-01

    Endocrine-disruptor compounds (EDCs) can mimic natural hormones and produce adverse effects in the endocrine functions by interacting with estrogen receptors. EDCs include both natural and synthetic chemicals, such as hormones, personal care products, surfactants, and flame retardants, among others. EDCs are characterised by their ubiquitous presence at trace-level concentrations and their wide diversity. Since the discovery of the adverse effects of these pollutants on wildlife and human health, analytical methods have been developed for their qualitative and quantitative determination. In particular, mass-based analytical methods show excellent sensitivity and precision for their quantification. This paper reviews recently published analytical methodologies for the sample preparation and for the determination of these compounds in different environmental and biological matrices by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. The various sample preparation techniques are compared and discussed. In addition, recent developments and advances in this field are presented. PMID:23738329

  13. Combined LIBS-Raman for remote detection and characterization of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Aaron S.; Mukundan, Harshini; McInroy, Rhonda E.; Clegg, Samuel M.

    2015-03-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Raman Spectroscopy have rich histories in the analysis of a wide variety of samples in both in situ and remote configurations. Our team is working on building a deployable, integrated Raman and LIBS spectrometer (RLS) for the parallel elucidation of elemental and molecular signatures under Earth and Martian surface conditions. Herein, results from remote LIBS and Raman analysis of biological samples such as amino acids, small peptides, mono- and disaccharides, and nucleic acids acquired under terrestrial and Mars conditions are reported, giving rise to some interesting differences. A library of spectra and peaks of interest were compiled, and will be used to inform the analysis of more complex systems, such as large peptides, dried bacterial spores, and biofilms. These results will be presented and future applications will be discussed, including the assembly of a combined RLS spectroscopic system and stand-off detection in a variety of environments.

  14. Fiber laser-microscope system for femtosecond photodisruption of biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Yavaş, Seydi; Erdogan, Mutlu; Gürel, Kutan; Ilday, F. Ömer; Eldeniz, Y. Burak; Tazebay, Uygar H.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the development of a ultrafast fiber laser-microscope system for femtosecond photodisruption of biological targets. A mode-locked Yb-fiber laser oscillator generates few-nJ pulses at 32.7 MHz repetition rate, amplified up to ∼125 nJ at 1030 nm. Following dechirping in a grating compressor, ∼240 fs-long pulses are delivered to the sample through a diffraction-limited microscope, which allows real-time imaging and control. The laser can generate arbitrary pulse patterns, formed by two acousto-optic modulators (AOM) controlled by a custom-developed field-programmable gate array (FPGA) controller. This capability opens the route to fine optimization of the ablation processes and management of thermal effects. Sample position, exposure time and imaging are all computerized. The capability of the system to perform femtosecond photodisruption is demonstrated through experiments on tissue and individual cells. PMID:22435105

  15. Colorimetric estimation of inorganic phosphate in colored and/or turbid biological samples: assay of phosphohydrolases.

    PubMed

    Upreti, G C

    1984-03-01

    A simple method of inorganic phosphate determination for colored and/or turbid biological samples is described. The procedure is mild, and so is suitable for routine phosphohydrolase assays. Following deproteinization by ice-cold trichloroacetic (or silicotungstic) acid, the sample was treated with acid-washed charcoal to remove interference due to color. The phosphate in the colorless supernatant was assayed either by measuring the phosphomolybdate spectrophotometrically at 310 nm, following its extraction in organic solvents or by a modified Fiske and Subbarow method. The turbidity interference in the latter case was eliminated either by centrifugation, by sodium dodecyl sulfate treatment, or by extraction of reduced phosphomolybdate blue color by cyclohexanone. Though deproteinization by silicotungstic acid eliminated the turbidity problem, its use in conjunction with charcoal treatment was not convenient.

  16. An introduction to sample preparation and imaging by cryo-electron microscopy for structural biology

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Rebecca F.; Walker, Matt; Siebert, C. Alistair; Muench, Stephen P.; Ranson, Neil A.

    2016-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (EM) is a versatile technique that can be used to image biological specimens ranging from intact eukaryotic cells to individual proteins >150 kDa. There are several strategies for preparing samples for imaging by EM, including negative staining and cryogenic freezing. In the last few years, cryo-EM has undergone a ‘resolution revolution’, owing to both advances in imaging hardware, image processing software, and improvements in sample preparation, leading to growing number of researchers using cryo-EM as a research tool. However, cryo-EM is still a rapidly growing field, with unique challenges. Here, we summarise considerations for imaging of a range of specimens from macromolecular complexes to cells using EM. PMID:26931652

  17. An efficient and sensitive method for preparing cDNA libraries from scarce biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Catherine H.; Veksler-Lublinsky, Isana; Ambros, Victor

    2015-01-01

    The preparation and high-throughput sequencing of cDNA libraries from samples of small RNA is a powerful tool to quantify known small RNAs (such as microRNAs) and to discover novel RNA species. Interest in identifying the small RNA repertoire present in tissues and in biofluids has grown substantially with the findings that small RNAs can serve as indicators of biological conditions and disease states. Here we describe a novel and straightforward method to clone cDNA libraries from small quantities of input RNA. This method permits the generation of cDNA libraries from sub-picogram quantities of RNA robustly, efficiently and reproducibly. We demonstrate that the method provides a significant improvement in sensitivity compared to previous cloning methods while maintaining reproducible identification of diverse small RNA species. This method should have widespread applications in a variety of contexts, including biomarker discovery from scarce samples of human tissue or body fluids. PMID:25056322

  18. Electrochemical DNA hybridization sensors applied to real and complex biological samples.

    PubMed

    Tosar, J P; Brañas, G; Laíz, J

    2010-12-15

    DNA hybridization biosensors, also known as genosensors, are analytical devices for the detection of specific DNA "target" sequences in solution, upon hybridization of the targets with complementary "probes" immobilized on a solid substrate. Electrochemical genosensors hold great promise to serve as devices suitable for point-of-care diagnostics and multiplexed platforms for fast, simple and inexpensive nucleic acids analysis. Although a lot of progress has been made in the past few years, the performance of genosensors in complex biological samples has been assayed in only a small fraction of published research articles. This review covers such a group of reports, from the year 2000 onwards. Special attention is played in the nature and complexity of the samples and in the way matrix effects were treated and specificity controls were performed.

  19. Biobanks for research. Ethical and legal aspects in human biological samples collections in France.

    PubMed

    Noiville, Christine

    2012-06-01

    Because they gather huge quantities of human biological samples and information allowing for better understanding of diseases, biobanks appear as a very powerful tool for boosting both medical research and public health as a whole. Although France does not really appear as a leader in biobanking compared to China or UK, biobanks and other samples collections abound in our country and have then been regulated, even though french law does not use the term biobank as such. The present article gives an overview of the current legal framework and explores the remaining ethical and legal issues, concerning particularly the protection of donors, the sharing of biobanks content and the sharing of biobanks benefits. The article explains how these universal questions arise in this country and what answers (sometimes specific) they get or could get in the following years.

  20. Proton Transmitting Energy Spectra and Transmission Electron Microscope Examinations of Biological Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chun-yu; Xia, Yue-yuan; Zhang, Jian-hua; Mu, Yu-guang; Wang, Rui-jin; Liu, Ji-tian; Liu, Xiang-dong; Yu, Zeng-liang

    1999-02-01

    Transmission energy spectra of 530 keV H+ ion penetrating 140 μm thick seed coat of maize and fruit peel of grape with thickness of 100 μm were measured. The result indicates that these thick biological targets, as seen by the penetrating ions, are inhomogeneous, and there are open "channel like" paths along which the incident ions can transmit the targets easily. While most of the incident ions are stopped in the targets, some of the transmitting ions only lose a small fraction of their initial incident energy. The transmission energy spectra show a pure electronic stopping feature. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) micrographes taken from the samples of seed coat of maize and fruit peel of tomato with thickness of 60 μm indicate that 150 keV electron beam from the TEM can penetrate the thick samples to give very good images with clear contrasts.

  1. High-performance liquid chromatography using electrochemical detection for the determination of prazosin in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Rathinavelu, A; Malave, A

    1995-08-04

    For the quantitation of prazosin a sensitive high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method was developed. This HPLC analysis method uses an electrochemical detection technique for the identification and quantitation of prazosin. In this assay the serum samples were deproteinized by using a simple acetonitrile precipitation technique that was followed by n-hexane extraction. Prazosin in the deproteinized serum sample was separated by an isocratic elution with an ODS Hypersil HPLC column (150 x 4.6 mm) using a mobile phase consisting of 0.05 M Na2HPO4-acetonitrile (60:40), pH 8.4. Prazosin that was eluted from the column was detected using a Coulochem II electrochemical detector. The precision of this assay method was assessed by performing inter- and intra-assay analyses by spiking prazosin free fetal bovine serum samples with 20 and 40 ng/ml concentrations of prazosin. In the intra-assay the recovery was 95.40 +/- 4.82% and 97.80 +/- 3.40%, respectively, for 20 and 40 ng/ml concentrations of prazosin that were used to spike the serum samples. This electrochemical detection HPLC assay method could be very useful in monitoring plasma levels of prazosin.

  2. Micro-electromembrane extraction across free liquid membranes. Extractions of basic drugs from undiluted biological samples.

    PubMed

    Kubáň, Pavel; Boček, Petr

    2014-04-11

    This contribution describes properties and utilization of free liquid membranes (FLMs) in micro-electromembrane extraction (μ-EME) of analytes from samples with complex matrices. An FLM was formed as a plug of a selected organic solvent, 1-ethyl-2-nitrobenezene (ENB) or 2-nitrophenyloctyl ether, in a narrow bore polymeric tubing and was sandwiched between a plug of aqueous donor and aqueous acceptor solution. The FLM acted as a phase interface that enabled selective transfer of analytes from donor into acceptor solution. Acceptor solution after μ-EME was analysed by capillary electrophoresis (CE). Fundamental characteristics of FLMs were depicted and discussed by presenting experimental data on their performance for various basic operational parameters, such as composition and volume of donor/acceptor solution, applied extraction voltage, thickness of FLM and extraction time. Positively charged basic drugs (nortriptyline, haloperidol and loperamide) and their solutions in water, urine and blood serum served as model samples. It was shown that FLMs may offer fast, efficient and selective pretreatment of crude biological samples providing that basic operational parameters of μ-EME are set properly. At optimised conditions, basic drugs in 1.5μL of a biological sample were transferred across 1.5μL of FLM (ENB) into 1.5μL of acceptor solution in about 5min at an extraction voltage of 100V. Repeatability values of μ-EMEs and CE-UV analyses of the three basic drugs were better than 7.7% for peak areas, recoveries ranged between 19 and 52% and linear relationship was obtained for analytical signal vs. concentration in 1-50mgL(-1) range (r(2) better than 0.996). Limits of detection, defined as 3×S/N, were below 1mgL(-1) for all examined matrices. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. 4D x-ray phase contrast tomography for repeatable motion of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Yagi, Naoto

    2016-09-01

    X-ray phase contrast tomography based on a grating interferometer was applied to fast and dynamic measurements of biological samples. To achieve this, the scanning procedure in the tomographic scan was improved. A triangle-shaped voltage signal from a waveform generator to a Piezo stage was used for the fast phase stepping in the grating interferometer. In addition, an optical fiber coupled x-ray scientific CMOS camera was used to achieve fast and highly efficient image acquisitions. These optimizations made it possible to perform an x-ray phase contrast tomographic measurement within an 8 min scan with density resolution of 2.4 mg/cm3. A maximum volume size of 13 × 13 × 6 mm3 was obtained with a single tomographic measurement with a voxel size of 6.5 μm. The scanning procedure using the triangle wave was applied to four-dimensional measurements in which highly sensitive three-dimensional x-ray imaging and a time-resolved dynamic measurement of biological samples were combined. A fresh tendon in the tail of a rat was measured under a uniaxial stretching and releasing condition. To maintain the freshness of the sample during four-dimensional phase contrast tomography, the temperature of the bathing liquid of the sample was kept below 10° using a simple cooling system. The time-resolved deformation of the tendon and each fascicle was measured with a temporal resolution of 5.7 Hz. Evaluations of cross-sectional area size, length of the axis, and mass density in the fascicle during a stretching process provided a basis for quantitative analysis of the deformation of tendon fascicle.

  4. Direct measurement of lipid-soluble arsenic species in biological samples with HPLC-ICPMS.

    PubMed

    Schmeisser, Ernst; Goessler, Walter; Kienzl, Norbert; Francesconi, Kevin A

    2005-06-01

    Lipid-soluble arsenicals (arsenolipids) occur in a wide range of biological samples where they may play a key role in the biosynthesis of organoarsenic compounds from inorganic arsenic. The study of these compounds has been hindered, however, by the lack of a suitable analytical technique able to separate and measure the various lipid species. As a source of arsenolipids, we used 10 crude fish oils from various regions of the world. Total arsenic analyses on the fish oils, performed with ICPMS following acid digestion with microwave-assisted heating, gave concentrations from 4.3 to 10.5 mg As kg(-1). All of the arsenic was soluble in non-polar solvents such as hexane. Analysis of the fish oils for arsenolipids was performed by normal phase HPLC-ICPMS with various mixtures of organic solvents as mobile phases. Inherent problems of instability associated with the introduction of organic solvents to the plasma were overcome by the use of reduced column flow, a chilled spray chamber, and the addition of oxygen directly to the plasma. All ten fish oils appeared to contain the same 4-6 major arsenolipids, but in varying amounts depending on the origin of the fish. Further chromatography with both normal phase and reversed-phase conditions on some of the oils indicated the presence of many more minor arsenolipids. Quantification was achieved by external calibration against triphenylarsine oxide or triphenylarsine sulfide, and the sum of species following HPLC of the oils matched well the total arsenic results (92-107%). The method was applied to samples of food supplements (fish oil capsules) and a packaged food product (cod liver) whereby arsenolipids were measured and found to be significant arsenic constituents. This study represents the first attempt to directly measure intact arsenolipids and, with appropriate sample preparation, may be suitable for quantitative measurement of these arsenicals in a range of biological samples, including foodstuffs.

  5. Testosterone and progesterone concentrations in blow samples are biologically relevant in belugas (Delphinapterus leucas).

    PubMed

    Richard, Justin T; Robeck, Todd R; Osborn, Steven D; Naples, Lisa; McDermott, Alexa; LaForge, Robert; Romano, Tracy A; Sartini, Becky L

    2016-12-16

    Steroid hormone analysis in blow (respiratory vapor) may provide a minimally invasive way to assess the reproductive status of wild cetaceans. Biological validation of the method is needed to allow for the interpretation of hormone measurements in blow samples. Utilizing samples collected from trained belugas (Delphinapterus leucas, n=20), enzyme immunoassays for testosterone and progesterone were validated for use with beluga blow samples. Testosterone concentrations in 40 matched blood and blow samples collected from 4 male belugas demonstrated a positive correlation (R(2)=0.52, p<0.0001). Progesterone concentrations in 64 matching blood and blow samples from 11 females were also positively correlated (R(2)=0.60, p<0.0001). Testosterone concentrations (mean±SD) in blow samples collected from adult males (119.3±14.2pg/ml) were higher (p<0.01) than that of a juvenile male (<8years) (59.4±6.5pg/ml) or female belugas (54.1±25.7pg/ml). Among adult males, testosterone concentrations in blow demonstrated a seasonal pattern of secretion, with peak secretion occurring during the breeding season (February-April, 136.95±33.8pg/ml). Progesterone concentrations in blow varied by reproductive status; pregnant females (410.6±87.8pg/ml) and females in the luteal phase of the estrous cycle (339.5±51.0pg/ml) had higher (p<0.0001) blow progesterone concentrations than non-pregnant females without a corpus luteum (242.5±27.3pg/ml). Results indicate that blow sample analysis can be used to detect variation in reproductive states associated with large differences in circulating testosterone or progesterone in belugas.

  6. Wavelet data processing of micro-Raman spectra of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camerlingo, C.; Zenone, F.; Gaeta, G. M.; Riccio, R.; Lepore, M.

    2006-02-01

    A wavelet multi-component decomposition algorithm is proposed for processing data from micro-Raman spectroscopy (μ-RS) of biological tissue. The μ-RS has been recently recognized as a promising tool for the biopsy test and in vivo diagnosis of degenerative human tissue pathologies, due to the high chemical and structural information contents of this spectroscopic technique. However, measurements of biological tissues are usually hampered by typically low-level signals and by the presence of noise and background components caused by light diffusion or fluorescence processes. In order to overcome these problems, a numerical method based on discrete wavelet transform is used for the analysis of data from μ-RS measurements performed in vitro on animal (pig and chicken) tissue samples and, in a preliminary form, on human skin and oral tissue biopsy from normal subjects. Visible light μ-RS was performed using a He-Ne laser and a monochromator with a liquid nitrogen cooled charge coupled device equipped with a grating of 1800 grooves mm-1. The validity of the proposed data procedure has been tested on the well-characterized Raman spectra of reference acetylsalicylic acid samples.

  7. Methods to Detect Nitric Oxide and its Metabolites in Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Nathan S.; Grisham, Matthew B.

    2007-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) methodology is a complex and often confusing science and the focus of many debates and discussion concerning NO biochemistry. NO is involved in many physiological processes including regulation of blood pressure, immune response and neural communication. Therefore its accurate detection and quantification is critical to understanding health and disease. Due to the extremely short physiological half life of this gaseous free radical, alternative strategies for the detection of reaction products of NO biochemistry have been developed. The quantification of NO metabolites in biological samples provides valuable information with regards to in vivo NO production, bioavailability and metabolism. Simply sampling a single compartment such as blood or plasma may not always provide an accurate assessment of whole body NO status, particularly in tissues. Therefore, extrapolation of plasma or blood NO status to specific tissues of interest is no longer a valid approach. As a result, methods continue to be developed and validated which allow the detection and quantification of NO and NO-related products/metabolites in multiple compartments of experimental animals in vivo. The methods described in this review is not an exhaustive or comprehensive discussion of all methods available for the detection of NO but rather a description of the most commonly used and practical methods which allow accurate and sensitive quantification of NO products/metabolites in multiple biological matrices under normal physiological conditions. PMID:17664129

  8. Mass-spectrometric profiling of porphyrins in complex biological samples with fundamental, toxicological, and pharmacological applications

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Sarah A.; Streit, Bennett R.; Ferguson, Ethan L.; Jean, Paul A.; McNett, Debra A.; Llames, Louis T.; DuBois, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid, high-throughput, and quantitative evaluations of biological metabolites in complex milieu are increasingly required for biochemical, toxicological, pharmacological, and environmental analyses. They are also essential for the development, testing, and improvement of new commercial chemical products. We demonstrate the application of ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (uHPLC-MS), employing an electrospray ionization source and a high accuracy quadrupole time-of-flight mass analyzer, for the identification and quantification of a series of porphyrin derivatives in liver: a matrix of particular relevance in toxicological or pharmacological testing. Exact mass is used to identify and quantify the metabolites. Chromatography enhances sensitivity and alleviates potential saturation issues by fanning out the contents of a complex sample before their injection into the spectrometer, but is not strictly necessary for the analysis. Extraction and sample treatment procedures are evaluated and matrix effects discussed. Using this method, the known mechanism of action of a well-characterized porphyrinogenic agent was verified in liver extracts from treated rats. The method was also validated for use with bacterial cells. This exact-mass method uses workhorse instruments available in many laboratories, providing a highly flexible alternative to existing HPLC- and MS/MS-based approaches for the simultaneous analysis of multiple compounds in biological media. PMID:25769421

  9. Respondent driven sampling for HIV biological and behavioral surveillance in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Montealegre, Jane R; Johnston, Lisa G; Murrill, Christopher; Monterroso, Edgar

    2013-09-01

    Since 2005, respondent driven sampling (RDS) has been widely used for HIV biological and behavioral surveillance surveys (BBSS) in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). In this manuscript, we provide a focused review of RDS among hard-to-reach high-risk populations in LAC and describe their principal operational, design, and analytical considerations. We reviewed published and unpublished reports, protocols, and manuscripts for RDS studies conducted in LAC between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2011. We abstracted key operational information and generated summary statistics across all studies. Between 2005 and 2011, 87 RDS studies were conducted in 15 countries in LAC (68 % in South America, 18 % in Mexico and Central America, and 14 % in the Caribbean). The target populations were primarily men who have sex with men (43 %), sex workers (29 %), and drug users (26 %). Study considerations included establishing clear eligibility criteria, measuring social network sizes, collecting specimens for biological testing, among others. Most of the reviewed studies are the first in their respective countries to collect data on hard-to-reach populations and the first attempt to use a probability-based sampling method. These RDS studies allowed researchers and public health practitioners in LAC to access hard-to-reach HIV high-risk populations and collect valuable data on the prevalence of HIV and other infections, as well as related risk behaviors.

  10. [The biomonitoring of toxic substances in biological samples of general population].

    PubMed

    Ibarluzea, Jesús; Aurrekoetxea, Juan José; Porta, Miquel; Sunyer, Jordi; Ballester, Ferran

    2016-11-01

    Many of the world's most developed countries have adopted biomonitoring of toxic substances in order to ascertain their levels in biological samples. These substances get into the body through different environmental exposures. Monitoring toxic substances in biological samples should allow us to ascertain their levels in vulnerable groups, assess their evolution over time, make comparisons with levels observed in other countries, identify groups at risk or with high toxic levels and promote research. The main objective of biomonitoring is to act as a policy design tool to facilitate the implementation of particular measures in various sectors: health, environmental, agricultural and livestock or food industry sectors. In Spain, information on levels of toxic substances of environmental origin is provided by specific studies on health effects from environmental sources, such as the INMA project (INfancia y Medio Ambiente [childhood and environment]). In addition, biomonitoring projects have been implemented in Catalonia and the Canary Islands, together with a national biomonitoring programme in the adult working population. However, further progress is needed to develop a system that covers the general population as well as subgroups at risk, which relies on the collaboration of the involved authorities and the participation of professionals from different sectors and citizen organisations interested in the relationship between health and the environment. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization of α-Synuclein Multimer Stoichiometry in Complex Biological Samples by Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Killinger, Bryan A; Moszczynska, Anna

    2016-04-05

    The aberrant aggregation of α-synuclein in the brain is a hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD). In vivo soluble α-synuclein occurs as a monomer and several multimers, the latter of which may be important for the biological function of α-synuclein. Currently, there is a lack of reproducible methods to compare α-synuclein multimer abundance between complex biological samples. Here we developed a method, termed "multimer-PAGE," that combines in-gel chemical cross-linking with several common electrophoretic techniques to measure the stoichiometry of soluble α-synuclein multimers in brain tissue lysates. Results show that soluble α-synuclein from the rat brain exists as several high molecular weight species of approximately 56 kDa (αS56), 80 kDa (αS80), and 100 kDa (αS100) that comigrate with endogenous lipids, detergents, and/or micelles during blue native gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE). Co-extraction of endogenous lipids with α-synuclein was essential for the detection of soluble α-synuclein multimers. Homogenization of brain tissue in small buffer volumes (>50 mg tissue per 1 mL buffer) increased relative lipid extraction and subsequently resulted in abundant soluble multimer detection via multimer-PAGE. α-Synuclein multimers captured by directly cross-linking soluble lysates resembled those observed following multimer-PAGE. The ratio of multimer (αS80) to monomer (αS17) increased linearly with protein input into multimer-PAGE, suggesting to some extent, multimers were also formed during electrophoresis. Overall, soluble α-synuclein maintains lipid interactions following tissue disruption and readily forms multimers when this lipid-protein complex is preserved. Once the multimer-PAGE technique was validated, relative stoichiometric comparisons could be conducted simultaneously between 14 biological samples. Multimer-PAGE provides a simple inexpensive biochemical technique to study the molecular factors influencing α-synuclein multimerization.

  12. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, DFT optimization and biological activities of Schiff bases and their metal (II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, Abdur; Shah, Afzal; Munawar, Khurram Shahzad; Khan, Abdul Aziz; Abbasi, Rashda; Yameen, Muhammad Arfat; Khan, Asad Muhammad; Khan, Abdur Rahman; Qureshi, Irfan Zia; Kraatz, Heinz-Bernhard; Zia-ur-Rehman

    2017-10-01

    A Novel Schiff base, 3-(((4-chlorophenyl)imino)methyl)benzene-1,2-diol (HL1) was successfully synthesized along with a structurally similar Schiff base 3-(((4-bromophenyl)imino)methyl)benzene-1,2-diol (HL2). Both the Schiff bases were used to synthesize their zinc (II) and cobalt (II) complexes. These compounds were characterized by FTIR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and elemental analysis. Metal complexes were confirmed by TGA. Crystals of Schiff bases were also characterized by X-ray analysis and experimental parameters were found in line with the theoretical parameters. Quantum mechanical approach was also used to fine useful structural parameters and to ensure the geometry of metal complexes. The photometric behaviors of all the synthesized compounds were investigated in a wide pH range using BR buffers. The appearance of isosbestic points indicated the existence of Schiff bases in more than one isomeric form. Moreover, these compounds were screened for enzyme inhibition; antibacterial, cytotoxic and in vivo antidiabetic activities and compounds were found active against one or other activity. Results indicate that ZnL22 is a good inhibitor of alkaline phosphatase enzyme and possess highest potential against diabetes, blood cholesterol level and cancer cells. This effort just provides preliminary data for some biological properties. Further investigations are required to precisely determine mechanistic pathways of their use towards drug development.

  13. Synthesis, spectral characterization and biological activity of metal(II) complexes with 4-aminoantipyrine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Leelavathy, C; Arul Antony, S

    2013-09-01

    Novel metal(II) complexes derived from furfurylidene-4-aminoantipyrine and 2-aminobenzothiazole were synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic (IR, (1)H NMR, UV-Vis., ESR and DART-MS) and other analytical methods. IR spectral studies indicate the binding sites of the ligand with the metal ion. Molar conductance data and magnetic susceptibility measurements provide evidence for monomeric and neutral nature of the complexes. The X band ESR spectrum of the Cu(II) complex at 300 and 77K was recorded. The electrochemical behaviour of the complexes in MeCN at 298 K was studied. Thermal studies of the ligand and its complexes show the presence of coordinated water in the complexes. The grain size of the complex was calculated by Scherrer formula using powder XRD. The surface morphology of the complexes was studied using SEM. The in vitro biological screening of the ligand and its complexes were tested against bacterial species S. aureus, E. coli, K. pneumoniae, P. vulgaris and P. aeruginosa and fungal species A. niger, R. stolonifer, A. flavus, R. bataicola and C. albicans. The DNA binding and cleavage activity of the ligand and its complexes were studied. Super oxide dismutase (SOD) activities of the ligand and its complexes have also been measured.

  14. New Cu(II) complexes with pyrazolyl derived Schiff base ligands: Synthesis and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Nádia; Roy, Somnath; Butenko, Nataliya; Cavaco, Isabel; Pinheiro, Teresa; Alho, Irina; Marques, Fernanda; Avecilla, Fernando; Costa Pessoa, João; Correia, Isabel

    2017-09-01

    Since the discovery of cisplatin there has been a continuous pursuit for new metallodrugs showing higher efficacies and lower side effects. In this work, new copper(II) complexes (C1-C6) of Schiff bases derived from pyrazolyl were developed. Through condensation of 5-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carbohydrazide with different aromatic aldehydes - pyridoxal, salicylaldehyde, 3-methoxy-2-hydroxybenzaldehyde, 3-ethoxy-2-hydroxybenzaldehyde and 2-hydroxynaphthene-1-carbaldehyde - a set of new pyrazole based "ONO" tridentate Schiff bases were obtained in moderate to good yields - L1-L6, as well as their Cu(II)-complexes. All compounds were characterized by analytical techniques and their molecular formulae established. The antioxidant potential of all compounds was tested, yielding low activity in most cases, with the exception of L1 and C5. The Cu(II) complexes were tested for their aqueous stability, and for their interaction with biological molecules, namely DNA and HSA (human serum albumin), through fluorescence quenching experiments (and electrophoresis for DNA). With the exception of C3, all the synthesized complexes were able to interact with DNA and HSA. Their cytotoxic activity against two cancer cell lines (MCF7 - breast and PC3 - prostate) was also evaluated. Complexes C5 and C6, with larger aromatic systems, showed much higher cytotoxicity (in the low μM range), than C1-C4, as well as IC50 values much lower than cisplatin. For C6 the results suggest that the mechanisms of cell death do not seem to be mediated by apoptosis, through caspases 3/7 activation, but by involving membrane potential and imbalance in physiological elements such as P, K and Ca. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Initial chemical and biological characterization of hydrotreated solvent refined coal (SRC-II) liquids: a status report

    SciTech Connect

    Weimer, W.C.; Wilson, B.W.; Pelroy, R.A.; Craun, J.C.

    1980-07-01

    This report presents the results of both chemical and biomedical research performed on a solvent refined coal (SRC-II) research material (distillate blend) which was produced by the pilot plant facility at Fort Lewis, Washington. Samples of this distillate blend were subjected to research-scale hydrotreatment by Universal Oil Products, Inc., prior to chemical and biological analysis at PNL. The samples are considered to be, in general, generically representative of raw or hydrotreated materials which might be produced by demonstration or commercial-scale facilities. The above described feedstock and hydrotreated materials were analyzed for chemical composition both prior to and after chemical fractionation. The fractionation procedure used was an acid-base-neutral solvent extraction. The fractions produced, as well as the unfractionated materials, were subjected to microbial mutagenesis testing (Ames assay) and to further chemical analysis. The principal components of the unmodified distillate blend are two and three ringed aromatic and heteroatomic species together with high concentrations of phenolic and polynuclear aromatic components relative to typical levels found in petroleum crudes. The Ames assay mutagenic response for the unfractionated material, as well as the fractions produced by the solvent separation, was reduced considerably in the hydrotreated materials compared to that of the feedstock. Total mutagenic response for the hydrotreated products was approximately 1% of that in the untreated feedstock. The concentrations of two important genetically active compound classes, the polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons and the primary aromatic amines, were considerably reduced in both of the hydrotreated products compared to the feedstock.

  16. Performance tuning non-uniform sampling for sensitivity enhancement of signal-limited biological NMR

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Melissa R.; Wenrich, Broc R.; Stahlfeld, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    Non-uniform sampling (NUS) has been established as a route to obtaining true sensitivity enhancements when recording indirect dimensions of decaying signals in the same total experimental time as traditional uniform incrementation of the indirect evolution period. Theory and experiments have shown that NUS can yield up to two-fold improvements in the intrinsic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of each dimension, while even conservative protocols can yield 20–40 % improvements in the intrinsic SNR of NMR data. Applications of biological NMR that can benefit from these improvements are emerging, and in this work we develop some practical aspects of applying NUS nD-NMR to studies that approach the traditional detection limit of nD-NMR spectroscopy. Conditions for obtaining high NUS sensitivity enhancements are considered here in the context of enabling 1H,15N-HSQC experiments on natural abundance protein samples and 1H,13C-HMBC experiments on a challenging natural product. Through systematic studies we arrive at more precise guidelines to contrast sensitivity enhancements with reduced line shape constraints, and report an alternative sampling density based on a quarter-wave sinusoidal distribution that returns the highest fidelity we have seen to date in line shapes obtained by maximum entropy processing of non-uniformly sampled data. PMID:24682944

  17. An inexpensive and portable microvolumeter for rapid evaluation of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Douglass, John K; Wcislo, William T

    2010-08-01

    We describe an improved microvolumeter (MVM) for rapidly measuring volumes of small biological samples, including live zooplankton, embryos, and small animals and organs. Portability and low cost make this instrument suitable for widespread use, including at remote field sites. Beginning with Archimedes' principle, which states that immersing an arbitrarily shaped sample in a fluid-filled container displaces an equivalent volume, we identified procedures that maximize measurement accuracy and repeatability across a broad range of absolute volumes. Crucial steps include matching the overall configuration to the size of the sample, using reflected light to monitor fluid levels precisely, and accounting for evaporation during measurements. The resulting precision is at least 100 times higher than in previous displacement-based methods. Volumes are obtained much faster than by traditional histological or confocal methods and without shrinkage artifacts due to fixation or dehydration. Calibrations using volume standards confirmed accurate measurements of volumes as small as 0.06 microL. We validated the feasibility of evaluating soft-tissue samples by comparing volumes of freshly dissected ant brains measured with the MVM and by confocal reconstruction.

  18. Phosphatase reactivity of a dicopper(II) complex of a patellamide derivative--possible biological functions of cyclic pseudopeptides.

    PubMed

    Comba, Peter; Gahan, Lawrence R; Hanson, Graeme R; Westphal, Michael

    2012-09-28

    A possible biological function of cyclic pseudo-octapeptides is presented. The dinuclear copper(II) complex of a synthetic analogue ([Cu(2)(H(2)Pat(1))(μ-OH)(OH(2))(2)]) of the naturally occurring ascidiacyclamide is known to have a hydroxo-bridged dicopper(II) site which is able to catalytically transform CO(2) into CO(3)(2-). This complex is shown here to function as a phosphatase mimic, suggesting that the so far unknown biological function of these macrocycles within the ascidians may involve phosphoester hydrolysis.

  19. An enzyme-based DNA preparation method for application to forensic biological samples and degraded stains.

    PubMed

    Lounsbury, Jenny A; Coult, Natalie; Miranian, Daniel C; Cronk, Stephen M; Haverstick, Doris M; Kinnon, Paul; Saul, David J; Landers, James P

    2012-09-01

    Extraction of DNA from forensic samples typically uses either an organic extraction protocol or solid phase extraction (SPE) and these methods generally involve numerous sample transfer, wash and centrifugation steps. Although SPE has been successfully adapted to the microdevice, it can be problematic because of lengthy load times and uneven packing of the solid phase. A closed-tube enzyme-based DNA preparation method has recently been developed which uses a neutral proteinase to lyse cells and degrade proteins and nucleases [14]. Following a 20 min incubation of the buccal or whole blood sample with this proteinase, DNA is polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-ready. This paper describes the optimization and quantitation of DNA yield using this method, and application to forensic biological samples, including UV- and heat-degraded whole blood samples on cotton or blue denim substrates. Results demonstrate that DNA yield can be increased from 1.42 (±0.21)ng/μL to 7.78 (±1.40)ng/μL by increasing the quantity of enzyme per reaction by 3-fold. Additionally, there is a linear relationship between the amount of starting cellular material added and the concentration of DNA in the solution, thereby allowing DNA yield estimations to be made. In addition, short tandem repeat (STR) profile results obtained using DNA prepared with the enzyme method were comparable to those obtained with a conventional SPE method, resulting in full STR profiles (16 of 16 loci) from liquid samples (buccal swab eluate and whole blood), dried buccal swabs and bloodstains and partial profiles from UV or heat-degraded bloodstains on cotton or blue denim substrates. Finally, the DNA preparation method is shown to be adaptable to glass or poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microdevices with little impact on STR peak height but providing a 20-fold reduction in incubation time (as little as 60 s), leading to a ≥1 h reduction in DNA preparation time.

  20. Exploring Earth's Atmospheric Biology using a Platform-Extensible Sampling Payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentry, D.; Rothschild, L.

    2012-12-01

    The interactions between Earth's atmosphere and its biosphere, or aerobiology, remain a significant unknown. What few studies have been done conclusively show that Earth's atmosphere has a rich and dynamic microbial presence[Bowers et al., 2010]; that microbes suspended in air survive over long times (1-2 weeks)[Smith et al., 2010] and travel great distances (>5000 km)[Kellogg and Griffin, 2006]; that some airborne bacteria actively nucleate ice crystals, affecting meteorology[Delort et al., 2010]; and that the presence of microbes in the atmosphere has other planetary-scale effects[Delort et al., 2010]. Basic questions, however, such as the number of microbes present, their activity level and state, the different species present and their variance over time and space, remain largely unquantified. Compounding the significant physical and environmental challenges of reliable aerobiological sampling, collection and analysis of biological samples at altitudes above ~10-20 km has traditionally used ad hoc instrumentation and techniques, yielding primarily qualitative analytical results that lack a common basis for comparison[Bowers et al., 2010]. There is a strong need for broad-basis, repeatable, reliably comparable data about aerobiological basics. We describe here a high-altitude environmental and biological sampling project designed specifically to address these issues. The goal is a robust, reliable, re-usable sampling system, with open reproducibility and adaptability for multiple low-cost flight platforms (including ground-tethered systems, high-altitude balloons, and suborbital sounding rockets); by establishing a common modular payload structure for high-altitude sampling with appeal to a broad user base, we hope to encourage widespread collection of comparable aerobiological data. We are on our third prototype iteration, with demonstrated function of two sample capture modules, a support backbone (tracking, data logging, event response, etc.), a simple ground

  1. Author Contribution to the Pu Handbook II: Chapter 37 LLNL Integrated Sample Preparation Glovebox (TEM) Section

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Mark A.

    2016-10-25

    The development of our Integrated Actinide Sample Preparation Laboratory (IASPL) commenced in 1998 driven by the need to perform transmission electron microscopy studies on naturally aged plutonium and its alloys looking for the microstructural effects of the radiological decay process (1). Remodeling and construction of a laboratory within the Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate facilities at LLNL was required to turn a standard radiological laboratory into a Radiological Materials Area (RMA) and Radiological Buffer Area (RBA) containing type I, II and III workplaces. Two inert atmosphere dry-train glove boxes with antechambers and entry/exit fumehoods (Figure 1), having a baseline atmosphere of 1 ppm oxygen and 1 ppm water vapor, a utility fumehood and a portable, and a third double-walled enclosure have been installed and commissioned. These capabilities, along with highly trained technical staff, facilitate the safe operation of sample preparation processes and instrumentation, and sample handling while minimizing oxidation or corrosion of the plutonium. In addition, we are currently developing the capability to safely transfer small metallographically prepared samples to a mini-SEM for microstructural imaging and chemical analysis. The gloveboxes continue to be the most crucial element of the laboratory allowing nearly oxide-free sample preparation for a wide variety of LLNL-based characterization experiments, which includes transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, optical microscopy, electrical resistivity, ion implantation, X-ray diffraction and absorption, magnetometry, metrological surface measurements, high-pressure diamond anvil cell equation-of-state, phonon dispersion measurements, X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. The sample preparation and materials processing capabilities in the IASPL have also facilitated experimentation at world-class facilities such as the

  2. A retrospective cross-sectional quantitative molecular approach in biological samples from patients with syphilis.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Miguel; Antelo, Minia; Ferreira, Rita; Azevedo, Jacinta; Santo, Irene; Borrego, Maria José; Gomes, João Paulo

    2017-03-01

    Syphilis is the sexually transmitted disease caused by Treponema pallidum, a pathogen highly adapted to the human host. As a multistage disease, syphilis presents distinct clinical manifestations that pose different implications for diagnosis. Nevertheless, the inherent factors leading to diverse disease progressions are still unknown. We aimed to assess the association between treponemal loads and dissimilar disease outcomes, to better understand syphilis. We retrospectively analyzed 309 DNA samples distinct anatomic sites associated with particular syphilis manifestations. All samples had previously tested positive by a PCR-based diagnostic kit. An absolute quantitative real-time PCR procedure was used to precisely quantify the number of treponemal and human cells to determine T. pallidum loads in each sample. In general, lesion exudates presented the highest T. pallidum loads in contrast with blood-derived samples. Within the latter, a higher dispersion of T. pallidum quantities was observed for secondary syphilis. T. pallidum was detected in substantial amounts in 37 samples of seronegative individuals and in 13 cases considered as syphilis-treated. No association was found between treponemal loads and serological results or HIV status. This study suggests a scenario where syphilis may be characterized by: i) heterogeneous and high treponemal loads in primary syphilis, regardless of the anatomic site, reflecting dissimilar duration of chancres development and resolution; ii) high dispersion of bacterial concentrations in secondary syphilis, potentially suggesting replication capability of T. pallidum while in the bloodstream; and iii) bacterial evasiveness, either to the host immune system or antibiotic treatment, while remaining hidden in privileged niches. This work highlights the importance of using molecular approaches to study uncultivable human pathogens, such as T. pallidum, in the infection process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  3. Determination of Iodine-129 in fish samples as new tracer of marine biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusuno, Haruka; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Nagata, Toshi; Miyairi, Yosuke; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2014-05-01

    Most of Iodine-129 in the surface environment is the anthropogenic origin, i.e., the result of the human nuclear activities. In the marine environment, like Pacific ocean, I-129 is transferred from atmosphere and slowly diffuses into deeper layer so that there is steep gradient of I-129 concentration, i.e., the surface layer has high I-129 concentration and it suddenly decreases going deeper. This peculiar depth profile is thus reflected by the isotopic ratio (I-129/I-127) profile because stable iodine (I-127) concentration is almost uniform in the seawater (ca. 60 ppb). Iodine isotopic ratio (I-129/I-127) of marine lives like fish should be determined by their habitats and the ways exchanging iodine with seawater. This means that the iodine isotopic ratio is potential indicator of marine biology. However there have been only few studies using I-129 for marine biology. This is because I-129 is so rare in the marine lives that ordinary analytical techniques cannot detect. Recently, the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry has been developed and demonstrates excellent sensitivity to detect I-129/I-127 ratio as low as 1E-14. However it requires typically 1 mg AgI sample. To obtain such amount of iodine several hundreds gram should be treated in the case of typical fish. In this study "carrier method" was adopted to overcome this difficulty. Our procedure is following: A fish sample was first dried completely then homogenized well. Iodine was extracted into an alkaline solution by the thermal hydrolysis from 0.1 to 0.5g of dried sample. An aliquot of this solution was taken for ICP-MS analysis to determine the stable iodine concentration. The remaining was, added with carrier iodine (about 1 mg), purified by solvent extraction and collected as AgI precipitation. I-129/I-127 ratio of obtained AgI was determined by AMS. From the AMS result and the stable iodine concentration, the isotopic ratio of the fish samples themselves can be calculated. The result of fish

  4. New photoacoustic cell with diamond window for mid-infrared investigations on biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kottmann, Jonas; Rey, Julien M.; Sigrist, Markus W.

    2012-02-01

    We present a new photoacoustic (PA) cell, which is sealed on the sample side with a 163 μm thick chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond window. The investigation of samples containing volatile compounds with an openended PA cell leads to varying conditions in the PA chamber (changing light absorption or relative humidity) and thus causes unstable signals. In contrast the diamond cover ensures stable conditions in the PA chamber and thereby enables sensitive measurements. This is particularly important for the investigation of biological samples with a high water content. Due to the high thermal conductivity of CVD diamond (1800 W/mK) strong PA signals are generated and the broad optical transmission range (250 nm to THz) renders the cell useful for various applications. The performance of the cell is demonstrated by tracking glucose in aqueous keratinocyte solutions with an external-cavity quantum cascade laser (1010-1095 cm-1). These measurements yield a detection limit of 100 mg/dl (SNR=3). Although glucose measurements within the human physiological range (30-500 mg/dl) are feasible, further improvements are needed for non-invasive glucose monitoring of diabetes patients. First in vivo measurements at the human forearm show an additional PA signal induced by blood pulsation at a frequency around 1 Hz and a steadily increasing relative humidity in the PA chamber due to transepidermal water loss if the cell is neither closed with a diamond window nor ventilated with N2.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of biological membranes and membrane proteins using enhanced conformational sampling algorithms☆

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Takaharu; Miyashita, Naoyuki; Im, Wonpil; Feig, Michael; Sugita, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews various enhanced conformational sampling methods and explicit/implicit solvent/membrane models, as well as their recent applications to the exploration of the structure and dynamics of membranes and membrane proteins. Molecular dynamics simulations have become an essential tool to investigate biological problems, and their success relies on proper molecular models together with efficient conformational sampling methods. The implicit representation of solvent/membrane environments is reasonable approximation to the explicit all-atom models, considering the balance between computational cost and simulation accuracy. Implicit models can be easily combined with replica-exchange molecular dynamics methods to explore a wider conformational space of a protein. Other molecular models and enhanced conformational sampling methods are also briefly discussed. As application examples, we introduce recent simulation studies of glycophorin A, phospholamban, amyloid precursor protein, and mixed lipid bilayers and discuss the accuracy and efficiency of each simulation model and method. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Proteins. Guest Editors: J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov. PMID:26766517

  6. Origin and temperature dependence of radiation damage in biological samples at cryogenic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Meents, Alke; Gutmann, Sascha; Wagner, Armin; Schulze-Briese, Clemens

    2010-01-19

    Radiation damage is the major impediment for obtaining structural information from biological samples by using ionizing radiation such as x-rays or electrons. The knowledge of underlying processes especially at cryogenic temperatures is still fragmentary, and a consistent mechanism has not been found yet. By using a combination of single-crystal x-ray diffraction, small-angle scattering, and qualitative and quantitative radiolysis experiments, we show that hydrogen gas, formed inside the sample during irradiation, rather than intramolecular bond cleavage between non-hydrogen atoms, is mainly responsible for the loss of high-resolution information and contrast in diffraction experiments and microscopy. The experiments that are presented in this paper cover a temperature range between 5 and 160 K and reveal that the commonly used temperature in x-ray crystallography of 100 K is not optimal in terms of minimizing radiation damage and thereby increasing the structural information obtainable in a single experiment. At 50 K, specific radiation damage to disulfide bridges is reduced by a factor of 4 compared to 100 K, and samples can tolerate a factor of 2.6 and 3.9 higher dose, as judged by the increase of R(free) values of elastase and cubic insulin crystals, respectively.

  7. [Detection and typing by molecular biology of human papillomavirus in genital samples].

    PubMed

    Suárez Moya, A; Esquivias Gómez, J I; Vidart Aragón, J A; Picazo de la Garza, J J

    2006-06-01

    Recently, there has been a marked increase in human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, and the etiological relationship between some HPV genotypes and genital cancer has been confirmed. Therefore, we used current molecular biology techniques to evaluate the prevalence of these viruses and their genotype in genital samples. We processed 401 genital samples from 281 women and 120 men, all with a diagnosis compatible with HPV infection. Virus was detected using PCR, and positive samples were typed using an array technique which enabled us to detect the 35 most common types of mucous-associated HPV. Of the 401 patients studied, 185 (46.1%) were positive, and only one type of HPV was detected in 133 cases. We found that 41.6% of the women and 56.7% of the men were positive. A total of 260 HPVs were typed; 154 were high oncogenic risk. They infected 16 men (23.5%) and 88 women (75.2%). The difference was statistically significant (p<0.001). Type 6 HPV was the most frequently detected en 64 cases, followed by HVP 16 in 52 cases. We found a 46% prevalence of HPV infection. More than half of these patients were infected by high-risk HPV. The presence of high-risk HPV was significantly higher in women.

  8. Automated system for sampling, counting, and biological analysis of rotifer populations.

    PubMed

    Stelzer, Claus-Peter

    2009-12-01

    Zooplankton organisms with short generation times, such as rotifers, are ideal models to study general ecological and evolutionary questions on the population level, because meaningful experiments can often be completed within a couple of weeks. Yet biological analysis of such populations is often extremely time consuming, owing to abundance estimation by counting, measuring body size, or determining the investment into sexual versus asexual reproduction. An automated system for sampling and analyzing experimental rotifer populations is described. It relies on image analysis of digital photographs taken from subsamples of the culture. The system works completely autonomously for up to several weeks and can sample up to 12 cultures at time intervals down to a few hours. It allows quantitative analysis of female population density at a precision equivalent to that of conventional methods (i.e., manual counts of samples fixed in Lugol solution), and it can also recognize males, which allows detecting temporal variation of sexual reproduction in such cultures. Another parameter that can be automatically measured with the image analysis system is female body size. This feature may be useful for studies of population productivity and/or in competition experiments with clones of different body size. In this article, I describe the basic setup of the system and tests on the efficiency of data collection, and show some example data sets on the population dynamics of different strains of the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus.

  9. Beta camera for static and dynamic imaging of charged-particle emitting radionuclides in biologic samples.

    PubMed

    Ljunggren, K; Strand, S E

    1990-12-01

    A detection system based on microchannel plates has been constructed to image charged particles emitted by radionuclides in biomedical samples. This technique has significant advantages over conventional film autoradiography for investigating the distribution of radiolabeled compounds: shorter acquisition times due to the high sensitivity, easier sample handling, direct quantification and the ability to perform dynamic studies. The detector performance shows a spatial resolution of 0.9 mm for carbon-14 (14C) (0.156 MeV), good linearity and homogeneity. The noise level is below 50/(cm2.sec). Successful imaging with this system has been performed with beta-emitters 14C, sulfur-35 (35S), iodine-131 (131I), yttrium-90 (90Y), and positron emitters gallium-68 (68Ga), and fluorine-18 (18F). Dynamic studies of axonal transport of 35S-methionine in a nerve, and static images of 90Y-labeled monoclonal antibodies in slices of tumors are presented. The system shows promise for rapid quantitative imaging of charged-particle emitting radionuclides in small biologic samples.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of biological membranes and membrane proteins using enhanced conformational sampling algorithms.

    PubMed

    Mori, Takaharu; Miyashita, Naoyuki; Im, Wonpil; Feig, Michael; Sugita, Yuji

    2016-07-01

    This paper reviews various enhanced conformational sampling methods and explicit/implicit solvent/membrane models, as well as their recent applications to the exploration of the structure and dynamics of membranes and membrane proteins. Molecular dynamics simulations have become an essential tool to investigate biological problems, and their success relies on proper molecular models together with efficient conformational sampling methods. The implicit representation of solvent/membrane environments is reasonable approximation to the explicit all-atom models, considering the balance between computational cost and simulation accuracy. Implicit models can be easily combined with replica-exchange molecular dynamics methods to explore a wider conformational space of a protein. Other molecular models and enhanced conformational sampling methods are also briefly discussed. As application examples, we introduce recent simulation studies of glycophorin A, phospholamban, amyloid precursor protein, and mixed lipid bilayers and discuss the accuracy and efficiency of each simulation model and method. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Automated system for sampling, counting, and biological analysis of rotifer populations

    PubMed Central

    Stelzer, Claus-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Zooplankton organisms with short generation times, such as rotifers, are ideal models to study general ecological and evolutionary questions on the population level, because meaningful experiments can often be completed within a couple of weeks. Yet biological analysis of such populations is often extremely time consuming, owing to abundance estimation by counting, measuring body size, or determining the investment into sexual versus asexual reproduction. An automated system for sampling and analyzing experimental rotifer populations is described. It relies on image analysis of digital photographs taken from subsamples of the culture. The system works completely autonomously for up to several weeks and can sample up to 12 cultures at time intervals down to a few hours. It allows quantitative analysis of female population density at a precision equivalent to that of conventional methods (i.e., manual counts of samples fixed in Lugol solution), and it can also recognize males, which allows detecting temporal variation of sexual reproduction in such cultures. Another parameter that can be automatically measured with the image analysis system is female body size. This feature may be useful for studies of population productivity and/or in competition experiments with clones of different body size. In this article, I describe the basic setup of the system and tests on the efficiency of data collection, and show some example data sets on the population dynamics of different strains of the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus. PMID:21151824

  12. Troubleshooting digital macro photography for image acquisition and the analysis of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Liepinsh, Edgars; Kuka, Janis; Dambrova, Maija

    2013-01-01

    For years, image acquisition and analysis have been an important part of life science experiments to ensure the adequate and reliable presentation of research results. Since the development of digital photography and digital planimetric methods for image analysis approximately 20 years ago, new equipment and technologies have emerged, which have increased the quality of image acquisition and analysis. Different techniques are available to measure the size of stained tissue samples in experimental animal models of disease; however, the most accurate method is digital macro photography with software that is based on planimetric analysis. In this study, we described the methodology for the preparation of infarcted rat heart and brain tissue samples before image acquisition, digital macro photography techniques and planimetric image analysis. These methods are useful in the macro photography of biological samples and subsequent image analysis. In addition, the techniques that are described in this study include the automated analysis of digital photographs to minimize user input and exclude the risk of researcher-generated errors or bias during image analysis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Refining and upgrading of synfuels from coal and oil shales by advanced catalytic processes. Sixth interim report Task 9: hydrotreating 400/sup 0/F+ SRC-II oil for biological studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.F.

    1982-04-01

    400/sup 0/F+ SRC-II oil derived from Pittsburgh Seam coal was hydrotreated to provide DOE samples for subsequent biological testing at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Samples containing about 500 ppM nitrogen, 2000 ppM nitrogen, and 5000 ppM nitrogen were prepared. These samples do not represent finished products, but conditions were selected to provide a wide range of processing severities. The feedstock was somewhat higher boiling and more difficult to hydrotreat than another 400/sup 0/F+ SRC-II oil studied previously.

  14. Characterisation of radiation field for irradiation of biological samples at nuclear reactor-comparison of twin detector and recombination methods.

    PubMed

    Golnik, N; Gryziński, M A; Kowalska, M; Meronka, K; Tulik, P

    2014-10-01

    Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection is involved in achieving scientific project on biological dosimetry. The project includes irradiation of blood samples in radiation fields of nuclear reactor. A simple facility for irradiation of biological samples has been prepared at horizontal channel of the nuclear reactor MARIA in NCBJ in Poland. The radiation field, composed mainly of gamma radiation and thermal neutrons, has been characterised in terms of tissue kerma using twin-detector technique and recombination chambers.

  15. Methods for using 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking in biaxial mechanical testing of biological tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Yap, Choon Hwai; Park, Dae Woo; Dutta, Debaditya; Simon, Marc; Kim, Kang

    2015-04-01

    Being multilayered and anisotropic, biological tissues such as cardiac and arterial walls are structurally complex, making the full assessment and understanding of their mechanical behavior challenging. Current standard mechanical testing uses surface markers to track tissue deformations and does not provide deformation data below the surface. In the study described here, we found that combining mechanical testing with 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking could overcome this limitation. Rat myocardium was tested with a biaxial tester and was concurrently scanned with high-frequency ultrasound in three dimensions. The strain energy function was computed from stresses and strains using an iterative non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Because the strain energy function consists of terms for the base matrix and for embedded fibers, spatially varying fiber orientation was also computed by curve fitting. Using finite-element simulations, we first validated the accuracy of the non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Next, we compared experimentally measured rat myocardium strain energy function values with those in the literature and found a matching order of magnitude. Finally, we retained samples after the experiments for fiber orientation quantification using histology and found that the results satisfactorily matched those computed in the experiments. We conclude that 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking can be a useful addition to traditional mechanical testing of biological tissues and may provide the benefit of enabling fiber orientation computation.

  16. METHODS FOR USING 3-D ULTRASOUND SPECKLE TRACKING IN BIAXIAL MECHANICAL TESTING OF BIOLOGICAL TISSUE SAMPLES

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Choon Hwai; Park, Dae Woo; Dutta, Debaditya; Simon, Marc; Kim, Kang

    2014-01-01

    Being multilayered and anisotropic, biological tissues such as cardiac and arterial walls are structurally complex, making full assessment and understanding of their mechanical behavior challenging. Current standard mechanical testing uses surface markers to track tissue deformations and does not provide deformation data below the surface. In the study described here, we found that combining mechanical testing with 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking could overcome this limitation. Rat myocardium was tested with a biaxial tester and was concurrently scanned with high-frequency ultrasound in three dimensions. The strain energy function was computed from stresses and strains using an iterative non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Because the strain energy function consists of terms for the base matrix and for embedded fibers, spatially varying fiber orientation was also computed by curve fitting. Using finite-element simulations, we first validated the accuracy of the non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Next, we compared experimentally measured rat myocardium strain energy function values with those in the literature and found a matching order of magnitude. Finally, we retained samples after the experiments for fiber orientation quantification using histology and found that the results satisfactorily matched those computed in the experiments. We conclude that 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking can be a useful addition to traditional mechanical testing of biological tissues and may provide the benefit of enabling fiber orientation computation. PMID:25616585

  17. Non-protein-bound iron detection in small samples of biological fluids and tissues.

    PubMed

    Paffetti, Patrizia; Perrone, Serafina; Longini, Mariangela; Ferrari, Antonio; Tanganelli, Donatella; Marzocchi, Barbara; Buonocore, Giuseppe

    2006-09-01

    Interest in the pro-oxidative nature of non-protein-bound-iron (NPBI) led to the development of an assay for its detection. The aim was to set up a reliable method of detecting NPBI in small samples of biological fluids and tissue. The method was based on preferential chelation of NPBI by a large excess of the low-affinity ligand nitrilotriacetic acid. To separate NPBI, a two-step filtration procedure was used. All glassware and plasticware were treated to minimize iron contamination. Measurements were performed in plasma, amniotic fluid, bronchoalveolar lavage, and brain tissues. The analytic system detected iron as ferric nitrate standard down to a concentration of 0.01 microM. The 1,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-pyridone-Fe(DHP-Fe) complex eluted with a retention time of about 2.6 min. The standard curve for the DHP-Fe complex was linear between 0.01 and 400 microMin water as well as in plasma, bronchoalveolar lavage, brain tissue, and amniotic fluid. The detection limit was 0.01 muM for all biological fluids and brain tissue. The data show that reliable measurements of NPBI are possible in studies on oxidative stress under experimental and clinical conditions. The possibility of investigating NPBI involvement in free-radical injury might be useful in all human diseases in which oxidative stress occur.

  18. Differential scanning calorimetry as a complementary diagnostic tool for the evaluation of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Garbett, Nichola C; Brock, Guy N

    2016-05-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is a tool for measuring the thermal stability profiles of complex molecular interactions in biological fluids. DSC profiles (thermograms) of biofluids provide specific signatures which are being utilized as a new diagnostic approach for characterizing disease but the development of these approaches is still in its infancy. This article evaluates several approaches for the analysis of thermograms which could increase the utility of DSC for clinical application. Thermograms were analyzed using localized thermogram features and principal components (PCs). The performance of these methods was evaluated alongside six models for the classification of a data set comprised of 300 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and 300 control subjects obtained from the Lupus Family Registry and Repository (LFRR). Classification performance was substantially higher using the penalized algorithms relative to localized features/PCs alone. The models were grouped into two sets, the first having smoother solution vectors but lower classification accuracies than the second with seemingly noisier solution vectors. Coupling thermogram technology with modern classification algorithms provides a powerful diagnostic approach for analysis of biological samples. The solution vectors from the models may reflect important information from the thermogram profiles for discriminating between clinical groups. DSC thermograms show sensitivity to changes in the bulk plasma proteome that correlate with clinical status. To move this technology towards clinical application the development of new approaches is needed to extract discriminatory parameters from DSC profiles for the comparison and diagnostic classification of patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Differential scanning calorimetry as a complementary diagnostic tool for the evaluation of biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Garbett, Nichola C.; Brock, Guy N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is a tool for measuring the thermal stability profiles of complex molecular interactions in biological fluids. DSC profiles (thermograms) of biofluids provide specific signatures which are being utilized as a new diagnostic approach for characterizing disease but the development of these approaches is still in its infancy. Methods This article evaluates several approaches for the analysis of thermograms which could increase the utility of DSC for clinical application. Thermograms were analyzed using localized thermogram features and principal components (PCs). The performance of these methods was evaluated alongside six models for the classification of a data set comprised of 300 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and 300 control subjects obtained from the Lupus Family Registry and Repository (LFRR). Results Classification performance was substantially higher using the penalized algorithms relative to localized features / PCs alone. The models were grouped into two sets, the first having smoother solution vectors but lower classification accuracies than the second with seemingly noisier solution vectors. Conclusions Coupling thermogram technology with modern classification algorithms provides a powerful diagnostic approach for analysis of biological samples. The solution vectors from the models may reflect important information from the thermogram profiles for discriminating between clinical groups. General significance DSC thermograms show sensitivity to changes in the bulk plasma proteome that correlate with clinical status. To move this technology towards clinical application the development of new approaches is needed to extract discriminatory parameters from DSC profiles for the comparison and diagnostic classification of patients. PMID:26459005

  20. Performance of selective and differential media in the primary isolation of yeasts from different biological samples.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jaqueline Otero; Franceschini, Silvio Antônio; Lavrador, Marco Aurélio Sicchiroli; Candido, Regina Célia

    2004-01-01

    In view of the increase in yeast infections, especially polymicrobial ones, differential culture media have acquired increasing importance. The present study evaluated the Sabouraud chloramphenicol, Biggy agar, Pagano Levin agar and CHROMagar Candida media in terms of isolation, number of yeast colony forming units per plate, and inhibition of bacteria and filamentous fungi. To this end, we used 223 biological samples, including feces, and oral, vaginal and anal mucosae from 86 patients presenting or not symptoms of fungal infections. The four media did not differ significantly in terms of detection of yeast-positive cultures. The number of colony forming units per plate ranged from zero to 2.380, with a predominance of counts of 1 to 9 colonies per plate. No significant differences were observed among the four culture media in terms of number of colonies counted, for each kind of biological material. Fifteen species belonging to the genera Candida, Saccharomyces, Cryptococcus, Trichosporon and Rhodotorula were isolated, with C. albicans being the predominant species, followed by C. parapsilosis and R. rubra. CHROMagar Candida and Biggy agar were complementary in the isolation of the different species and favored a greater recovery of polymicrobial cultures. Pagano Levin agar isolated the smallest variety of species. Sabouraud chloramphenicol agar was the least effective in terms of bacterial inhibition and favored a greater development of filamentous fungi. The results suggest that more than one culture medium should be used for an adequate primary isolation.

  1. Blood, sweat, and tears: embedding biological samples in social science research on children.

    PubMed

    Kall, Denise

    2008-01-01

    In the first decade of the 21st Century, calls for interdisciplinary research are commonplace. Yet, relatively few papers discuss how to complete such research successfully. In this paper, I describe the details of data collection focused on five, six and seven-year old children. The project examined the effect of environmental contaminants on children's educational outcomes. It included a primary caregiver interview, a skill test with the child, and a venous blood draw from the child to test for lead, mercury, cadmium, arsenic, nicotine, and cotinine. This paper describes key issues and the solutions I adopted. Challenges discussed here include navigating the Institutional Review Board Process, analyzing the blood, obtaining the supplies needed to draw blood, banking blood for future research, hiring a phlebotomist, and recruiting subjects. While not all details will apply directly to other research projects, this paper provides some perspective on the current realities facing social scientists who decide to collect biological samples.

  2. Biological sample preparation and {sup 41}Ca AMS measurement at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, S.P.H.T.; Southon, J.R.; Bench, G.S.; McAninch, J.E.; Serfass, R.E.; Fang, Y.; King, J.C.; Woodhouse, L.R.

    1994-10-10

    Calcium metabolism in biology may be better understood by the use of {sup 41}Ca labels, although detection by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is required. Methodologies for preparation of urine samples and subsequent AMS measurement were investigated. Novel attempts at preparing CaH{sub 2} were unsuccessful, but CaF{sub 2} of sufficient purity could be produced by precipitation of calcium from urine as oxalate, followed by separation of calcium by cation exchange chromatography and washing the CaF{sub 2} precipitate. The presence of some remaining impurities could be compensated for by selecting the appropriate accelerated ion charge state for AMS. The use of projectile x rays for isobar discrimination was explored as an alternative to the conventional dE/dx device.

  3. A micro flow-meter for closed-loop management of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Accoto, Dino; Damiani, Francesco; Campisi, Michele; Castrataro, Piero; Campolo, Domenico; Guglielmelli, Eugenio; Dario, Paolo

    2005-01-01

    The closed-loop management of biological samples in μTAS requires proper flow-sensors to be inserted in the hydraulic path. The optimal choice between hybrid mounting and monolithic fabrication depends on several design variables, one of which is the technological compatibility between the sensor and the pumping mechanism. Monolithic integration appears to be the eligible solution if both pumps and sensors can be fabricated with the same technological process. In this paper we show that it is actually possible to fabricate a flow-sensor, based on streaming potential detection, with the same soft-lithographic process used for the fabrication of electroosmotic pumps. The device has been fabricated in PDMS and experimentally tested, showing a good linearity. Finally, its time-varying response, related to the aging of the PDMS surface, is discussed.

  4. Use of self-actuating and self-sensing cantilevers for imaging biological samples in fluid

    PubMed Central

    Barbero, R J; Deutschinger, A; Todorov, V; Gray, D S; Belcher, A M; Rangelow, I W; Youcef-Toumi, K

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a detailed investigation into the suitability of atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers with integrated deflection sensor and micro-actuator for imaging of soft biological samples in fluid. The Si cantilevers are actuated using a micro-heater at the bottom end of the cantilever. Sensing is achieved through p-doped resistors connected in a Wheatstone bridge. We investigated the influence of the water on the cantilever dynamics, the actuation and the sensing mechanisms, as well as the crosstalk between sensing and actuation. Successful imaging of yeast cells in water using the integrated sensor and actuator shows the potential of the combination of this actuation and sensing method. This constitutes a major step towards the automation and miniaturization required to establish AFM in routine biomedical diagnostics and in vivo applications. PMID:19801750

  5. Direct and selective spectrophotometric method for the determination of vanadium in steel, environmental and biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Sunitha B.; Pataila, Girija; Pillai, Ajai K.; Gupta, V. K.

    2011-10-01

    A simple, direct and selective spectrophotometric method for determination of vanadium is described. The present methodology is based on the strong oxidizing power of vanadium (V). Vanadium (V) selectively oxidizes leucocrystal violet (LCV) to crystal violet in the presence of phosphoric acid. The violet colored dye obtained shows maximum absorbance at 590 nm. Beer's law is obeyed in the concentration range 0.06-0.6 μg ml -1. The molar absorptivity and Sandell's sensitivity are found to be 6.78 × 10 4 l mol -1 cm -1 and 0.0044 μg cm -2, respectively. The proposed method is simple, direct, and sensitive. It has been successfully applied for the determination of vanadium in various environmental, biological and steel samples.

  6. Statistical inferences with jointly type-II censored samples from two Pareto distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Zinadah, Hanaa H.

    2017-08-01

    In the several fields of industries the product comes from more than one production line, which is required to work the comparative life tests. This problem requires sampling of the different production lines, then the joint censoring scheme is appeared. In this article we consider the life time Pareto distribution with jointly type-II censoring scheme. The maximum likelihood estimators (MLE) and the corresponding approximate confidence intervals as well as the bootstrap confidence intervals of the model parameters are obtained. Also Bayesian point and credible intervals of the model parameters are presented. The life time data set is analyzed for illustrative purposes. Monte Carlo results from simulation studies are presented to assess the performance of our proposed method.

  7. TLC-spectrophometric separation and trace determination of monocrotophos and dichlorvos in enviromental and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Janghel, Etesh K; Rai, J K; Khan, S; Rai, M K; Gupta, V K

    2007-04-01

    Organophosphorus insecticides, monocrotophos and dichlrovos are increasingly being used in agriculture to control insects on a wide range of crops. Their ready access has resulted in misuse in many instances of homicidal and suicidal poisoning cases. This paper describes about a chromogenic spray reagent for the detection/determination of monocrophos and dichlrovos in environmental and biological samples by TLC and spectrophotometric method. Monocrotophos and dichlorvos on alkaline hydrolysis yield N-methyl acetoacetamide and dichlroacetaldehyde respectively, which in turn react with diazotized p-amino acetophenone to give red-violet and red coloured compounds. Other organophosphorus insecticides do not give this reaction. Moreover, organochlorine and synthetic pyrethroid insecticides and constituents of viscera (amino acids, peptides, proteins etc), which are generally coextracted with the insecticides, do not interfere. However, phenolic compounds and hydrolysed product of carbamate insecticides may interfere and differentiate from monocrotophos and dichlrovos by Rf values. The lower limit of detection is 0.2 mg for monocrotophos and 0.1 mg for dichlorovos. The absorption maxima of the reddish-violet and red colour formed by monocrotophos and dichlrovos, are measured at 560 nm and 540 nm respectively. Beer's Law is obeyed over the concentration range of 1.2 to 6.8 mg and 6.2 to 35 mg in the final solution volume of 25 mL. The molar absorptivity and Sandell's sensitivity of monocrotophos and dichlrovos were found to be 7.1 x 10(5) (+100) 1 mole(-1) cm(-1) and 0.008 mg cm(-2), 1.2 x 10(5) 1 mole(-1) cm(-1) and 0.003 mg cm(-2) respectively. The standard deviation and relative standard deviation were found be +/- 0.005 and 2.05% +/- 0.007 and 2.02% respectively. The developed method has been successfully applied to the detection and determination of monocrotophos and dichlrovos in environmental and biological samples.

  8. Molecularly Imprinted Plasmonic Substrates for Specific and Ultrasensitive Immunoassay of Trace Glycoproteins in Biological Samples.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Pir; Tu, Xueying; Liu, Jia; Wang, Yijia; Liu, Zhen

    2017-04-05

    Assays of glycoproteins hold significant biological importance and clinical values, for which immunoassay has been the workhorse tool. As immunoassays are associated with disadvantages such as poor availability of high-specificity antibodies, limited stability of biological reagents, and tedious procedure, innovative alternatives that can overcome these drawbacks are highly desirable. Plasmonic immunosandwich assay (PISA) has emerged as an appealing alternative to immunoassay for fast and sensitive determination of trace glycoproteins in biosamples. Plasmonic substrates play key roles in PISA, not only in determining the specificity but also in greatly influencing the detection sensitivity. Herein, we report a new type of molecularly imprinted plasmonic substrates for rapid and ultrasensitive PISA assay of trace glycoproteins in complex real samples. The substrates were fabricated from glass slides, first coated with self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and then molecularly imprinted with organo-siloxane polymer in the presence of template glycoproteins. The prepared molecularly imprinted substrates exhibited not only a significant plasmonic effect but also excellent binding properties, ensuring the sensitivity as well as the specificity of the assay. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and α-fetoprotein (AFP), glycoproteins that are routinely used as disease markers in clinical diagnosis, were used as representative targets. The limit of detection (LOD) was 3.1 × 10(-12) M for ALP and 1.5 × 10(-14) M for AFP, which is the best among the PISA approaches reported. The sample volume required was only 5 μL, and the total time required was within 30 min for each assay. Specific and ultrasensitive determination of ALP and AFP in human serum was demonstrated. Because many disease biomarkers are glycoproteins, the developed PISA approach holds great promise in disease diagnostics.

  9. Developmental validation of the PrepFiler Forensic DNA Extraction Kit for extraction of genomic DNA from biological samples.

    PubMed

    Brevnov, Maxim G; Pawar, Hemant S; Mundt, Janna; Calandro, Lisa M; Furtado, Manohar R; Shewale, Jaiprakash G

    2009-05-01

    The PrepFiler Forensic DNA Extraction Kit enables isolation of genomic DNA from a variety of biological samples. The kit facilitates reversible binding of DNA with magnetic particles resulting in high DNA recovery from samples with very low and high quantities of biological materials: 0.1 and 40 microL of human blood (donor 2) provided 14 and 2883 ng of DNA, respectively. Following the revised SWGDAM guidelines, performance of the developed method was investigated using different sample types including saliva on swabs, semen stains on cotton fabric, samples exposed to environment, samples with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) inhibitors, blood stains (on denim, cotton cloth, and FTA paper), and touch evidence-type samples. DNA yields for all samples tested were equal or better than those obtained by both phenol-chloroform extraction and commercial kits tested. DNA obtained from these samples was free of detectable PCR inhibitors. Short tandem repeat profiles were complete, conclusive, and devoid of PCR artifacts.

  10. Determination of 9-cis beta-carotene and zeta-carotene in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jian; Yeum, Kyung-Jin; Johnson, Elizabeth J; Krinsky, Norman I; Russell, Robert M; Tang, Guangwen

    2008-09-01

    Concentrations of 9-cis beta-carotene (9-cis betaC) and zeta-carotene (zetaC) in biological samples may provide crucial information on the biological activities of these carotenoids. However, in high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) these carotenoids are often co-eluted. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop a method for 9-cis betaC and zetaC quantitation. Both 9-cis betaC and zetaC have peak absorbance at 400 and 450 nm, respectively, whereas only 9-cis betaC has peak absorbance at 475 nm. We developed a HPLC method to quantitate 9-cis betaC and zetaC by using peak absorbance ratios. The 9-cis betaC/zetaC peak area was monitored at 475, 450 and 400 nm. The 9-cis betaC was quantified by using absorbance value at 475 nm; zetaC was then calculated from the 9-cis betaC/zetaC peak at 400 nm by subtracting 9-cis betaC contribution at 400 nm using the 400-nm/475-nm peak absorbance ratio of 9-cis betaC (0.39). This method was applied to determine 9-cis betaC and zetaC concentrations in serum and breast milk samples (n=12) from American lactating women and serum and breast adipose tissue samples (n=16) from Korean women with either benign or malignant breast tumors. 9-cis betaC concentrations in serum and breast milk of American women, and serum and adipose tissue of Korean women were 7.1+/-0.8 and 1.1+/-0.2 nM, and 15.6+/-1.1 nM and 0.2+/-0.1 nmol/g, respectively. zetaC concentrations in the above samples were 54.2+/-7.2 and 8.3+/-1.8 nM, and 49.0+/-3.9 nM and 0.3+/-0.1 nmol/g, respectively.

  11. Nested sampling for parameter inference in systems biology: application to an exemplar circadian model.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Stuart; Akman, Ozgur E

    2013-07-30

    Model selection and parameter inference are complex problems that have yet to be fully addressed in systems biology. In contrast with parameter optimisation, parameter inference computes both the parameter means and their standard deviations (or full posterior distributions), thus yielding important information on the extent to which the data and the model topology constrain the inferred parameter values. We report on the application of nested sampling, a statistical approach to computing the Bayesian evidence Z, to the inference of parameters, and the estimation of log Z in an established model of circadian rhythms. A ten-fold difference in the coefficient of variation between degradation and transcription parameters is demonstrated. We further show that the uncertainty remaining in the parameter values is reduced by the analysis of increasing numbers of circadian cycles of data, up to 4 cycles, but is unaffected by sampling the data more frequently. Novel algorithms for calculating the likelihood of a model, and a characterisation of the performance of the nested sampling algorithm are also reported. The methods we develop considerably improve the computational efficiency of the likelihood calculation, and of the exploratory step within nested sampling. We have demonstrated in an exemplar circadian model that the estimates of posterior parameter densities (as summarised by parameter means and standard deviations) are influenced predominately by the length of the time series, becoming more narrowly constrained as the number of circadian cycles considered increases. We have also shown the utility of the coefficient of variation for discriminating between highly-constrained and less-well constrained parameters.

  12. Nested sampling for parameter inference in systems biology: application to an exemplar circadian model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Model selection and parameter inference are complex problems that have yet to be fully addressed in systems biology. In contrast with parameter optimisation, parameter inference computes both the parameter means and their standard deviations (or full posterior distributions), thus yielding important information on the extent to which the data and the model topology constrain the inferred parameter values. Results We report on the application of nested sampling, a statistical approach to computing the Bayesian evidence Z, to the inference of parameters, and the estimation of log Z in an established model of circadian rhythms. A ten-fold difference in the coefficient of variation between degradation and transcription parameters is demonstrated. We further show that the uncertainty remaining in the parameter values is reduced by the analysis of increasing numbers of circadian cycles of data, up to 4 cycles, but is unaffected by sampling the data more frequently. Novel algorithms for calculating the likelihood of a model, and a characterisation of the performance of the nested sampling algorithm are also reported. The methods we develop considerably improve the computational efficiency of the likelihood calculation, and of the exploratory step within nested sampling. Conclusions We have demonstrated in an exemplar circadian model that the estimates of posterior parameter densities (as summarised by parameter means and standard deviations) are influenced predominately by the length of the time series, becoming more narrowly constrained as the number of circadian cycles considered increases. We have also shown the utility of the coefficient of variation for discriminating between highly-constrained and less-well constrained parameters. PMID:23899119

  13. Highly sensitive disposable nucleic acid biosensors for direct bioelectronic detection in raw biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Kuralay, Filiz; Campuzano, Susana; Haake, David A.; Wang, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The development of rapid, low-cost and reliable diagnostic methods is crucial for the identification and treatment of many diseases. Screen-printed gold electrodes (Au/SPEs), coated with a ternary monolayer interface, involving hexanedithiol (HDT), a specific thiolated capture probe (SHCP), and 6-mercapto-1 hexanol (MCH) (SHCP/HDT/MCH) are shown here to offer direct and sensitive detection of nucleic acid hybridization events in untreated raw biological samples (serum, urine and crude bacterial lysate solutions). The composition of the ternary monolayer was modified and tailored to the surface of the Au/SPE. The resulting SHCP/HDT/MCH monolayer has demonstrated to be extremely useful for enhancing the performance of disposable nucleic acid sensors based on screen-printed electrodes. Compared to common SHCP/MCH binary interfaces, the new ternary self-assembled monolayer (SAM) resulted in a 10-fold improvement in the signal (S)-to-noise (N) ratio (S/N) for 1 nM target DNA. The SHCP/HDT/MCH-modified Au/SPEs allowed the direct quantification of the target DNA down to 25 pM (0.25 fmol) and 100 pM (1 fmol) in undiluted/untreated serum and urine samples, respectively, and of 16S rRNA Escherichia coli (E. coli) corresponding to 3000 CFU μL−1 in raw cell lysate samples. The new SAM-coated screen-printed electrodes also displayed favorable non-fouling properties after a 24 h exposure to raw human serum and urine samples, offering great promise as cost-effective nucleic acid sensors for a wide range of decentralized genetic tests. PMID:21807191

  14. Characterization of α-Synuclein Multimer Stoichiometry in Complex Biological Samples by Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The aberrant aggregation of α-synuclein in the brain is a hallmark of Parkinson’s disease (PD). In vivo soluble α-synuclein occurs as a monomer and several multimers, the latter of which may be important for the biological function of α-synuclein. Currently, there is a lack of reproducible methods to compare α-synuclein multimer abundance between complex biological samples. Here we developed a method, termed “multimer-PAGE,” that combines in-gel chemical cross-linking with several common electrophoretic techniques to measure the stoichiometry of soluble α-synuclein multimers in brain tissue lysates. Results show that soluble α-synuclein from the rat brain exists as several high molecular weight species of approximately 56 kDa (αS56), 80 kDa (αS80), and 100 kDa (αS100) that comigrate with endogenous lipids, detergents, and/or micelles during blue native gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE). Co-extraction of endogenous lipids with α-synuclein was essential for the detection of soluble α-synuclein multimers. Homogenization of brain tissue in small buffer volumes (>50 mg tissue per 1 mL buffer) increased relative lipid extraction and subsequently resulted in abundant soluble multimer detection via multimer-PAGE. α-Synuclein multimers captured by directly cross-linking soluble lysates resembled those observed following multimer-PAGE. The ratio of multimer (αS80) to monomer (αS17) increased linearly with protein input into multimer-PAGE, suggesting to some extent, multimers were also formed during electrophoresis. Overall, soluble α-synuclein maintains lipid interactions following tissue disruption and readily forms multimers when this lipid–protein complex is preserved. Once the multimer-PAGE technique was validated, relative stoichiometric comparisons could be conducted simultaneously between 14 biological samples. Multimer-PAGE provides a simple inexpensive biochemical technique to study the molecular factors influencing α-synuclein multimerization

  15. Simultaneous neutron-activation determination of selenium and mercury in biological samples by volatilization.

    PubMed

    Byrne, A R; Kosta, L

    1974-10-01

    A method is described for the determination of selenium together with mercury in biological samples by neutron-activation analysis based on quantitative volatilization of both elements. The technique originally developed for mercury, based on pyrolysis with filtration of undesirable impurities and selective trapping from the gas phase, is now extended to selenium. The radionuclides (197)Hg and (75)Se, from one sample, are trapped separately and counted in a well-type NaI(Tl) detector and gamma-spectrometer for maximum sensitivity. The method has been tested by comparative analyses and analyses of standard biological materials, and gives good results. It is simple and is especially effective in studies of the interaction of mercury and selenium in biological systems; a positive correlation for these elements was found for human tissues. On décrit une méthode pour le dosage du sélénium conjointement au mercure dans les échantillons biologiques par analyse par activation de neutrons basée sur la volatilisation quantitative des deux éléments. La techniqu initialement développée pour le mercure, basée sur la pyrolyse avec filtration des impuretés indésirables et captage sélectif de la phase gazeuse, est maintenant étendue au sélénium. Les radionuclides (197)Hg et (75)Se, d'un échantillon, sont captés séparément dans un détecteur NaI(Tl) du type puits et un spectromètre gamma pour la sensibilité maximale. La méthode a été essayée par des analyses comparatives et des analyses de produits biologiques étalons, et donne de bons résultats. Elle est simple et particulièrement efficace dans les études de l'interaction du mercure et du sélénium dans des systèmes biologiques; on a trouvé une corrélation positive pour ces éléments pour des tissus humains.

  16. Assessment of biological colonization of historic buildings in the former Auschwitz II-Birkenau concentration camp.

    PubMed

    Rajkowska, Katarzyna; Otlewska, Anna; Koziróg, Anna; Piotrowska, Małgorzata; Nowicka-Krawczyk, Paulina; Hachułka, Mariusz; Wolski, Grzegorz J; Kunicka-Styczyńska, Alina; Gutarowska, Beata; Zydzik-Białek, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess biological colonization of wooden and brick buildings in the former Auschwitz II-Birkenau concentration camp, and to identify the organisms colonizing the examined buildings. Microbiological analysis did not reveal increased microbial activity, and the total microbial count of the barrack surfaces did not exceed 10(3) CFU/100 cm(2). However, certain symptoms of biodegradation of the buildings were observed. The predominant microflora consisted of bacteria of the genera Bacillus, Sporosarcina, Pseudomonas, Micrococcus, Streptomyces, and Staphylococcus, as well as fungi of the genera Acremonium, Cladosporium, Alternaria, Humicola, Penicillium, and Chaetomium. The microflora patterns varied both in wooden and brick buildings. The structural elements of wooden and brick barracks, and especially of the floors and lower parts of bathroom walls, were infected by cyanobacteria and algae, with the most numerous being cyanobacteria of the genera Scytonema, Chroococcus, Gloeothece, Leptolyngbya, diatoms of the genus Diadesmis, and chlorophytes of the genera Chlorella and Apatococcus. The outer surfaces of the examined buildings were primarily colonized by lichens and bryophytes, with nearly 30 species identified. The dominant species of lichens belonged to the genera Candelariella, Caloplaca, Lecanora, Lecidea, Lepraria, Physcia, and Protoparmeliopsis, and those of bryophytes to the genera Bryum, Ceratodon, Marchantia, and Tortula. The quantity and species diversity of lichens and mosses were much lower in wooden barracks than in brick ones. The external surfaces of those barracks were only affected by Lecanora conizaeoides, Lecanora symmicta, Lepraria cf. incana, and Strangospora pinicola. The study results revealed vast biodiversity among the species colonizing historic buildings. The presence of these groups of organisms, resulting from their natural expansion in the environment, is undesirable, as their excessive growth and

  17. RNA-seq of human reference RNA samples using a thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Nottingham, Ryan M; Wu, Douglas C; Qin, Yidan; Yao, Jun; Hunicke-Smith, Scott; Lambowitz, Alan M

    2016-04-01

    Next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has revolutionized our ability to analyze transcriptomes. Current RNA-seq methods are highly reproducible, but each has biases resulting from different modes of RNA sample preparation, reverse transcription, and adapter addition, leading to variability between methods. Moreover, the transcriptome cannot be profiled comprehensively because highly structured RNAs, such as tRNAs and snoRNAs, are refractory to conventional RNA-seq methods. Recently, we developed a new method for strand-specific RNA-seq using thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptases (TGIRTs). TGIRT enzymes have higher processivity and fidelity than conventional retroviral reverse transcriptases plus a novel template-switching activity that enables RNA-seq adapter addition during cDNA synthesis without using RNA ligase. Here, we obtained TGIRT-seq data sets for well-characterized human RNA reference samples and compared them to previous data sets obtained for these RNAs by the Illumina TruSeq v2 and v3 methods. We find that TGIRT-seq recapitulates the relative abundance of human transcripts and RNA spike-ins in ribo-depleted, fragmented RNA samples comparably to non-strand-specific TruSeq v2 and better than strand-specific TruSeq v3. Moreover, TGIRT-seq is more strand specific than TruSeq v3 and eliminates sampling biases from random hexamer priming, which are inherent to TruSeq. The TGIRT-seq data sets also show more uniform 5' to 3' gene coverage and identify more splice junctions, particularly near the 5' ends of mRNAs, than do the TruSeq data sets. Finally, TGIRT-seq enables the simultaneous profiling of mRNAs and lncRNAs in the same RNA-seq experiment as structured small ncRNAs, including tRNAs, which are essentially absent with TruSeq.

  18. Self-esteem in adolescents with Angle Class I, II and III malocclusion in a Peruvian sample.

    PubMed

    Florián-Vargas, Karla; Honores, Marcos J Carruitero; Bernabé, Eduardo; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    To compare self-esteem scores in 12 to 16-year-old adolescents with different Angle malocclusion types in a Peruvian sample. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of 276 adolescents (159, 52 and 65 with Angle Class I, II and III malocclusions, respectively) from Trujillo, Peru. Participants were asked to complete the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) and were also clinically examined, so as to have Angle malocclusion classification determined. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to compare RSES scores among adolescents with Class I, II and III malocclusions, with participants' demographic factors being controlled. Mean RSES scores for adolescents with Class I, II and III malocclusions were 20.47 ± 3.96, 21.96 ± 3.27 and 21.26 ± 4.81, respectively. The ANCOVA test showed that adolescents with Class II malocclusion had a significantly higher RSES score than those with Class I malocclusion, but there were no differences between other malocclusion groups. Supplemental analysis suggested that only those with Class II, Division 2 malocclusion might have greater self-esteem when compared to adolescents with Class I malocclusion. This study shows that, in general, self-esteem did not vary according to adolescents' malocclusion in the sample studied. Surprisingly, only adolescents with Class II malocclusion, particularly Class II, Division 2, reported better self-esteem than those with Class I malocclusion. A more detailed analysis assessing the impact of anterior occlusal features should be conducted.

  19. Biological Monitoring of Human Exposure to Neonicotinoids Using Urine Samples, and Neonicotinoid Excretion Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Kouji H.; Tanaka, Keiko; Sakamoto, Hiroko; Imanaka, Mie; Niisoe, Tamon; Hitomi, Toshiaki; Kobayashi, Hatasu; Okuda, Hiroko; Inoue, Sumiko; Kusakawa, Koichi; Oshima, Masayo; Watanabe, Kiyohiko; Yasojima, Makoto; Takasuga, Takumi; Koizumi, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Background Neonicotinoids, which are novel pesticides, have entered into usage around the world because they are selectively toxic to arthropods and relatively non-toxic to vertebrates. It has been suggested that several neonicotinoids cause neurodevelopmental toxicity in mammals. The aim was to establish the relationship between oral intake and urinary excretion of neonicotinoids by humans to facilitate biological monitoring, and to estimate dietary neonicotinoid intakes by Japanese adults. Methodology/Principal Findings Deuterium-labeled neonicotinoid (acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, and imidacloprid) microdoses were orally ingested by nine healthy adults, and 24 h pooled urine samples were collected for 4 consecutive days after dosing. The excretion kinetics were modeled using one- and two-compartment models, then validated in a non-deuterium-labeled neonicotinoid microdose study involving 12 healthy adults. Increased urinary concentrations of labeled neonicotinoids were observed after dosing. Clothianidin was recovered unchanged within 3 days, and most dinotefuran was recovered unchanged within 1 day. Around 10% of the imidacloprid dose was excreted unchanged. Most of the acetamiprid was metabolized to desmethyl-acetamiprid. Spot urine samples from 373 Japanese adults were analyzed for neonicotinoids, and daily intakes were estimated. The estimated average daily intake of these neonicotinoids was 0.53–3.66 μg/day. The highest intake of any of the neonicotinoids in the study population was 64.5 μg/day for dinotefuran, and this was <1% of the acceptable daily intake. PMID:26731104

  20. A capillary zone electrophoresis for determination of thiolic peptides in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rama, Mónica; Abalde, Julio; Herrero, Concepción; Suárez, Cristina; Torres, Enrique

    2009-06-01

    A new method to improve the analyses of thiolic peptides (cysteine, gammaGlu-Cys, glutathione, phytochelatins and desglycyl-phytochelatins) derivatized with monobromobimane (mBrB) in complex biological samples by CZE is described. The method involves a SPE using Sep-Pak Light C18 Cartridges after derivatization and a later CZE analysis. Elution of mBrB-thiols was achieved with 10 mM HCl + 70% methanol v/v in deionised water. Electrophoretic parameters, such as BGE pH and concentration, different organic additives (methanol and trifluoroethanol), applied voltage and capillary length were studied in order to establish suitable analytical conditions. Optimum separation of the mBrB-thiolic peptides was obtained with 100 mM sodium borate buffer at pH 7.60. The electrophoretic conditions were +15 kV, capillary length of 90 cm from inlet to detector (98 cm total length, 50 microm ID), samples were loaded into the capillary by hydrodynamic injection (50 mbar, 20 s) and detection was performed at 390 nm. The improved method showed good reproducibility, linearity and sensitivity. The LODs and LOQs estimated using a standard of GSH were 1.41 and 4.69 microM respectively.

  1. 3D surface scan of biological samples with a Push-broom Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Haibo; Kincaid, Russell; Hruska, Zuzana; Brown, Robert L.; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Cleveland, Thomas E.

    2013-08-01

    The food industry is always on the lookout for sensing technologies for rapid and nondestructive inspection of food products. Hyperspectral imaging technology integrates both imaging and spectroscopy into unique imaging sensors. Its application for food safety and quality inspection has made significant progress in recent years. Specifically, hyperspectral imaging has shown its potential for surface contamination detection in many food related applications. Most existing hyperspectral imaging systems use pushbroom scanning which is generally used for flat surface inspection. In some applications it is desirable to be able to acquire hyperspectral images on circular objects such as corn ears, apples, and cucumbers. Past research describes inspection systems that examine all surfaces of individual objects. Most of these systems did not employ hyperspectral imaging. These systems typically utilized a roller to rotate an object, such as an apple. During apple rotation, the camera took multiple images in order to cover the complete surface of the apple. The acquired image data lacked the spectral component present in a hyperspectral image. This paper discusses the development of a hyperspectral imaging system for a 3-D surface scan of biological samples. The new instrument is based on a pushbroom hyperspectral line scanner using a rotational stage to turn the sample. The system is suitable for whole surface hyperspectral imaging of circular objects. In addition to its value to the food industry, the system could be useful for other applications involving 3-D surface inspection.

  2. Methods of biological fluids sample preparation - biogenic amines, methylxanthines, water-soluble vitamins.

    PubMed

    Płonka, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    In recent years demands on the amount of information that can be obtained from the analysis of a single sample have increased. For time and economic reasons it is necessary to examine at the same time larger number of compounds, and compounds from different groups. This can best be seen in such areas as clinical analysis. In many diseases, the best results for patients are obtained when treatment fits the individual characteristics of the patient. Dosage monitoring is important at the beginning of therapy and in the full process of treatment. In the treatment of many diseases biogenic amines (dopamine, serotonin) and methylxanthines (theophylline, theobromine, caffeine) play an important role. They are used as drugs separately or in combination with others to support and strengthen the action of other drugs - for example, the combination of caffeine and paracetamol. Vitamin supplementation may be also an integral part of the treatment process. Specification of complete sample preparation parameters for extraction of the above compounds from biological matrices has been reviewed. Particular attention was given to the preparation stage and extraction methods. This review provides universal guidance on establishing a common procedures across laboratories to facilitate the preparation and analysis of all discussed compounds. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Assessment of DDT levels in selected environmental media and biological samples from Mexico and Central America.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Maldonado, Iván N; Trejo, Antonio; Ruepert, Clemens; Jovel, Reyna del Carmen; Méndez, Mónica Patricia; Ferrari, Mirtha; Saballos-Sobalvarro, Emilio; Alexander, Carlos; Yáñez-Estrada, Leticia; Lopez, Dania; Henao, Samuel; Pinto, Emilio R; Díaz-Barriga, Fernando

    2010-03-01

    Taking into account the environmental persistence and the toxicity of DDT, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) organized a surveillance program in Mesoamerica which included the detection of residual DDT in environmental (soil) and biological samples (fish tissue and children's blood). This program was carried out in communities from Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama. This paper presents the first report of that program. As expected, the results show that the levels for [summation operator] DDT in soil (outdoor or indoor) and fish samples in the majority of the locations studied are below guidelines. However, in some locations, we found children with high concentrations of DDT as in Mexico (mean level 50.2 ng/mL). Furthermore, in some communities and for some matrices, the DDT/DDE quotient is higher than one and this may reflect a recent DDT exposure. Therefore, more efforts are needed to avoid exposure and to prevent the reintroduction of DDT into the region. In this regard it is important to know that under the surveillance of PAHO and with the support of UNEP, a regional program in Mesoamerica for the collection and disposal of DDT and other POPs stockpiles is in progress. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Biological Monitoring of Human Exposure to Neonicotinoids Using Urine Samples, and Neonicotinoid Excretion Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Harada, Kouji H; Tanaka, Keiko; Sakamoto, Hiroko; Imanaka, Mie; Niisoe, Tamon; Hitomi, Toshiaki; Kobayashi, Hatasu; Okuda, Hiroko; Inoue, Sumiko; Kusakawa, Koichi; Oshima, Masayo; Watanabe, Kiyohiko; Yasojima, Makoto; Takasuga, Takumi; Koizumi, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Neonicotinoids, which are novel pesticides, have entered into usage around the world because they are selectively toxic to arthropods and relatively non-toxic to vertebrates. It has been suggested that several neonicotinoids cause neurodevelopmental toxicity in mammals. The aim was to establish the relationship between oral intake and urinary excretion of neonicotinoids by humans to facilitate biological monitoring, and to estimate dietary neonicotinoid intakes by Japanese adults. Deuterium-labeled neonicotinoid (acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, and imidacloprid) microdoses were orally ingested by nine healthy adults, and 24 h pooled urine samples were collected for 4 consecutive days after dosing. The excretion kinetics were modeled using one- and two-compartment models, then validated in a non-deuterium-labeled neonicotinoid microdose study involving 12 healthy adults. Increased urinary concentrations of labeled neonicotinoids were observed after dosing. Clothianidin was recovered unchanged within 3 days, and most dinotefuran was recovered unchanged within 1 day. Around 10% of the imidacloprid dose was excreted unchanged. Most of the acetamiprid was metabolized to desmethyl-acetamiprid. Spot urine samples from 373 Japanese adults were analyzed for neonicotinoids, and daily intakes were estimated. The estimated average daily intake of these neonicotinoids was 0.53-3.66 μg/day. The highest intake of any of the neonicotinoids in the study population was 64.5 μg/day for dinotefuran, and this was <1% of the acceptable daily intake.

  5. Separation and preconcentration of Cu(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), Fe(III) and Cr(III) ions with coprecipitation method without carrier element and their determination in food and water samples.

    PubMed

    Mendil, Durali; Karatas, Murat; Tuzen, Mustafa

    2015-06-15

    In this study, Cu(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), Fe(III) and Cr(III) were determined in some food and water samples after development 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BCP) coprecipitation procedure using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Effects of some analytical parameter including pH, sample volume, reagent amount, centrifuge rate and time, etc. on the presented coprecipitation system were studied for the quantitative recoveries of Cu(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), Fe(III) and Cr(III) ions. The influences of matrix ions were examined. The recovery values for analyte ions were calculated ⩾ 95%. The relative standard deviation was found 8.0% and the preconcentration factor was found as 25 for all analyte ions. The detection limits (k=3, N=21) were found to be as 0.80 μg L(-1) Cu(II), 3.08 μg L(-1) Pb(II), 0.28 μg L(-1) Zn(II), 0.91 μg L(-1) Fe(III) and 1.82 μg L(-1) Cr(III). NIST SRM 1515 Apple leaves and GBW-07605 Tea certified reference materials were used to confirm the accuracy of the method. The simultaneous coprecipitation method was applied to various water and microwave digested food samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A user-friendly robotic sample preparation program for fully automated biological sample pipetting and dilution to benefit the regulated bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao; Ouyang, Zheng; Zeng, Jianing; Yuan, Long; Zheng, Naiyu; Jemal, Mohammed; Arnold, Mark E

    2012-06-01

    Biological sample dilution is a rate-limiting step in bioanalytical sample preparation when the concentrations of samples are beyond standard curve ranges, especially when multiple dilution factors are needed in an analytical run. We have developed and validated a Microsoft Excel-based robotic sample preparation program (RSPP) that automatically transforms Watson worklist sample information (identification, sequence and dilution factor) to comma-separated value (CSV) files. The Freedom EVO liquid handler software imports and transforms the CSV files to executable worklists (.gwl files), allowing the robot to perform sample dilutions at variable dilution factors. The dynamic dilution range is 1- to 1000-fold and divided into three dilution steps: 1- to 10-, 11- to 100-, and 101- to 1000-fold. The whole process, including pipetting samples, diluting samples, and adding internal standard(s), is accomplished within 1 h for two racks of samples (96 samples/rack). This platform also supports online sample extraction (liquid-liquid extraction, solid-phase extraction, protein precipitation, etc.) using 96 multichannel arms. This fully automated and validated sample dilution and preparation process has been applied to several drug development programs. The results demonstrate that application of the RSPP for fully automated sample processing is efficient and rugged. The RSPP not only saved more than 50% of the time in sample pipetting and dilution but also reduced human errors. The generated bioanalytical data are accurate and precise; therefore, this application can be used in regulated bioanalysis.

  7. Analyzing free zinc(II) ion concentrations in cell biology with fluorescent chelating molecules.

    PubMed

    Maret, Wolfgang

    2015-02-01

    Essential metal ions are tightly controlled in biological systems. An understanding of metal metabolism and homeostasis is being developed from quantitative information of the sizes, concentrations, and dynamics of cellular and subcellular metal ion pools. In the case of human zinc metabolism, minimally 24 proteins of two zinc transporter families and a dozen metallothioneins participate in cellular uptake, extrusion, and re-distribution among cellular compartments. Significantly, zinc(ii) ions are now considered signaling ions in intra- and intercellular communication. Such functions require transients of free zinc ions. It is experimentally quite challenging to distinguish zinc that is protein-bound from zinc that is not bound to proteins. Measurement of total zinc is relatively straightforward with analytical techniques such as atomic absorption/emission spectroscopy or inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Total zinc concentrations of human cells are 200-300 μM. In contrast, the pool of non-protein bound zinc is mostly examined with fluorescence microscopy/spectroscopy. There are two widely applied fluorescence approaches, one employing low molecular weight chelating agents ("probes") and the other metal-binding proteins ("sensors"). The protein sensors, such as the CALWY, Zap/ZifCY, and carbonic anhydrase-based sensors, can be genetically encoded and have certain advantages in terms of controlling intracellular concentration, localization, and calibration. When employed correctly, both probes and sensors can establish qualitative differences in free zinc ion concentrations. However, when quantitative information is sought, the assumptions underlying the applications of probes and sensors must be carefully examined and even then measured pools of free zinc ions remain methodologically defined. A consensus is building that the steady-state free zinc ion concentrations in the cytosol are in the picomolar range but there is no consensus on their

  8. Minimizing the Maximum Expected Sample Size in Two-Stage Phase II Clinical Trials with Continuous Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wason, James M. S.; Mander, Adrian P.

    2012-01-01

    Two-stage designs are commonly used for Phase II trials. Optimal two-stage designs have the lowest expected sample size for a specific treatment effect, for example, the null value, but can perform poorly if the true treatment effect differs. Here we introduce a design for continuous treatment responses that minimizes the maximum expected sample size across all possible treatment effects. The proposed design performs well for a wider range of treatment effects and so is useful for Phase II trials. We compare the design to a previously used optimal design and show it has superior expected sample size properties. PMID:22651118

  9. No Evidence of HTLV-II Infection Among Immonoblot Indeterminate Samples Using Nested PCR in Mashhad, Northeast of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rafatpanah, Houshang; Fathimoghadam, Farhad; Shahabi, Majid; Eftekharzadeh, Iman; Hedayati-Moghaddam, Mohammadreza; Valizadeh, Narges; Tadayon, Mohsen; Shamsian, Seyyed Aliakbar; Bidkhori, Hamidreza; Miri, Raheleh; Bazarbachi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Although HTLV-I infection is endemic in different geographical parts of the world including Northeast of Iran, there have been no documents of HTLV-II infection in this region. It is reported that one possible reason for seroindeterminate state in HTLV western blot is HTLV-II virus. This study aimed to investigate the presence of HTLV-II among blood donors with seroindeterminate western blot results. Materials and Methods: Three ml whole blood obtained from 50 blood donors referring to Mashhad Blood Transfusion Organization who had reactive Elisa for HTLV-I and seroindeterminate HTLV western blot state. A conventional PCR was applied to detect HTLV-I provirus using specific primers while a nested PCR was designed with specific external and internal primers for the detection of HTLV-II. Results: The average age of participants, 39 males and 11 females, was 37.12± 14.36 years. The average OD of the Elisa assay was 1.767± 1.195. The most common indeterminate patterns were Rgp46-II alone (n=12, 27.3%), Rgp46-I alone (n=7, 15.9%), and Rgp46-I with GD21 (n=7, 15.9%).After introducing the DNA to the PCR tests, results revealed 10 (20%) HTLV-I PCR positive samples while no HTLV-II positive sample was detected by nested PCR. There were no significant age, blood group, Optical Density of the Elisa assay, and western blot indeterminate pattern differences between HTLV-I PCR positive and negative samples. Conclusion : No HTLV-II positive sample was detected in this study which confirms the absence of HTLV-II infection in this region. However, high frequency of HTLV-I PCR positive samples among the seroindeterminate cases implies on the important role of molecular techniques for further confirmation of the infection. PMID:24470868

  10. CRISPR-Cas type II-based Synthetic Biology applications in eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Marchisio, Mario Andrea; Huang, Zhiwei

    2017-01-31

    The CRISPR-Cas system has rapidly reached a huge popularity as a new, powerful method for precise DNA editing and genome reengineering. In Synthetic Biology, the CRISPR-Cas type II system has inspired the construction of a novel class of RNA-based transcription factors. In their simplest form, they are made of a CRISPR RNA molecule, which targets a promoter sequence, and a deficient Cas9 (i.e. deprived of any nuclease activity) that has been fused to an activation or a repression domain. Up- and downregulation of single genes in mammalian and yeast cells have been achieved with satisfactory results. Moreover, the construction of CRISPR-based transcription factors is much simpler than the assembly of synthetic proteins such as the Transcription Activator-Like effectors. However, the feasibility of complex synthetic networks fully based on the CRISPR-dCas9 technology has still to be proved and new designs, which take into account different CRISPR types, shall be investigated.

  11. Stable-isotope GC-MS/MS determination of aminoethylcysteine ketimine decarboxylated dimer in biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Tsikas, Dimitrios; Evans, Christopher E.; Denton, Travis T.; Mitschke, Anja; Gutzki, Frank-Mathias; Pinto, John T.; Khomenko, Tetyana; Szabo, Sandor; Cooper, Arthur J.L.

    2012-01-01

    Aminoethylcysteine ketimine decarboxylated dimer [AECK-DD; systematic name: 1,2–3,4–5,6–7,8-octahydro-1,8a-diaza-4,6-dithiafluoren-9(8aH)-one] is a previously described metabolite of cysteamine that has been reported to be present in mammalian brain, urine, plasma, cells in culture and vegetables, and to possess potent anti-oxidative properties. Here, we describe a stable-isotope GC-MS/MS method for specific and sensitive determination of AECK-DD in biological samples. 13C2-AECK-DD was synthesized and used as the internal standard. Derivatization was carried out by N-pentafluorobenzylation with pentafluorobenzyl bromide in acetonitrile. Quantification was performed by selected-reaction monitoring of the mass transitions m/z 328 to m/z 268 for AECK-DD and m/z 330 to m/z 270 for 13C2-AECK-DD in the electron-capture negative-ion chemical ionization mode. The procedure was systematically validated for human plasma and urine samples. AECK-DD was not detectable in human plasma above ~ 4 nM, but was present in urine samples of healthy humans at a maximal concentration of 46 nM. AECK-DD was detectable in rat brain at very low levels of about 8 pmol/g wet weight. Higher levels of AECK-DD were detected in mouse brain (~1 nmol/g wet weight). Among nine dietary vegetables evaluated, only shallots were found to contain trace amounts of AECK-DD (~ 6.8 pmol/g fresh tissue). PMID:22858756

  12. Manual and automated enrichment procedures for biological samples using lipophilic gels.

    PubMed

    Uusijärvi, J; Egestad, B; Sjövall, J

    1989-03-17

    Aspects of the use of lipophilic gels in manual sample preparation procedures are reviewed. Neutral gels with a controlled hydrophobicity are used for sorbent extraction of non-polar and medium polarity compounds from biological fluids. Acidic amphiphilic compounds can be extracted as ion-pairs with decyltrimethylammonium ions. Solvent or detergent extracts of tissues or faeces can be mixed with hydrophobic gels for transfer of analytes from a solvent to a gel phase, permitting subsequent sample preparation in gel bed systems. Hydrophobic gels, alkyl-bonded silica and polystyrene matrices can be used in series for extraction of compounds with a wide range of polarities. Group fractionations are performed on neutral and ion-exchanging lipophilic gels to yield fractions of neutral, basic and acidic metabolites within selected polarity ranges. Selective isolation of phenolic acids on a strong anion exchanger, of ethynylic steroids on a strong cation exchanger in silver form and of oximes of ketonic steroids on a strong cation exchanger in hydrogen form is possible. A computerized system for automatic sample preparation is also described. It consists of an extraction bed, a cation-exchange column and an anion-exchange column. The pumps and switching valves are arranged so that the columns can operate in series or parallel for isolation of neutral, basic and acidic metabolites of amphiphilic compounds and for regeneration of the column beds. Fractions can be collected, or the effluent from the column beds can be diluted with water to permit sorption on a solid phase. The applicability of the automated method to the analysis of bile acids and metabolites of mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate is demonstrated.

  13. Parameters Affecting Spore Recovery from Wipes Used in Biological Surface Sampling ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, Sandra M.; Filliben, James J.; Morrow, Jayne B.

    2011-01-01

    The need for the precise and reliable collection of potential biothreat contaminants has motivated research in developing a better understanding of the variability in biological surface sampling methods. In this context, the objective of this work was to determine parameters affecting the efficiency of extracting Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores from commonly used wipe sampling materials and to describe performance using the interfacial energy concept. In addition, surface thermodynamics was applied to understand and predict surface sampling performance. Wipe materials were directly inoculated with known concentrations of B. anthracis spores and placed into extraction solutions, followed by sonication or vortexing. Experimental factors investigated included wipe material (polyester, cotton, and polyester-rayon), extraction solution (sterile deionized water [H2O], deionized water with 0.04% Tween 80 [H2O-T], phosphate-buffered saline [PBS], and PBS with 0.04% Tween 80 [PBST]), and physical dissociation method (vortexing or sonication). The most efficient extraction from wipes was observed for solutions containing the nonionic surfactant Tween 80. The increase in extraction efficiency due to surfactant addition was attributed to an attractive interfacial energy between Tween 80 and the centrifuge tube wall, which prevented spore adhesion. Extraction solution significantly impacted the extraction efficiency, as determined by statistical analysis (P < 0.05). Moreover, the extraction solution was the most important factor in extraction performance, followed by the wipe material. Polyester-rayon was the most efficient wipe material for releasing spores into solution by rank; however, no statistically significant difference between polyester-rayon and cotton was observed (P > 0.05). Vortexing provided higher spore recovery in H2O and H2O-T than sonication, when all three wipe materials and the reference control were considered (P < 0.05). PMID:21296945

  14. Copper, chromium, manganese, iron, nickel, and zinc levels in biological samples of diabetes mellitus patients.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Kazi, Naveed; Jamali, Mohammad Khan; Arain, Mohammad Bilal; Jalbani, Nussarat; Kandhro, Ghulam Abbas

    2008-04-01

    There is accumulating evidence that the metabolism of several trace elements is altered in diabetes mellitus and that these nutrients might have specific roles in the pathogenesis and progress of this disease. The aim of present study was to compare the level of essential trace elements, chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), and zinc (Zn) in biological samples (whole blood, urine, and scalp hair) of patients who have diabetes mellitus type 2 (n = 257), with those of nondiabetic control subjects (n = 166), age ranged (45-75) of both genders. The element concentrations were measured by means of an atomic absorption spectrophotometer after microwave-induced acid digestion. The validity and accuracy was checked by conventional wet-acid-digestion method and using certified reference materials. The overall recoveries of all elements were found in the range of (97.60-99.49%) of certified values. The results of this study showed that the mean values of Zn, Mn, and Cr were significantly reduced in blood and scalp-hair samples of diabetic patients as compared to control subjects of both genders (p < 0.001). The urinary levels of these elements were found to be higher in the diabetic patients than in the age-matched healthy controls. In contrast, high mean values of Cu and Fe were detected in scalp hair and blood from patients versus the nondiabetic subjects, but the differences found in blood samples was not significant (p < 0.05). These results are consistent with those obtained in other studies, confirming that deficiency and efficiency of some essential trace metals may play a role in the development of diabetes mellitus.

  15. Evaluation of arsenic, cobalt, copper and manganese in biological Samples of Steel mill workers by electrothermal atomic absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Afridi, H I; Kazi, T G; Kazi, N G; Jamali, M K; Arain, M B; Sirajuddin; Kandhro, G A; Shah, A Q; Baig, J A

    2009-02-01

    The determination of trace and toxic elements in biological samples (blood, urine and scalp hair samples) of human beings is an important clinical test. The aim of our present study was to determine the concentration of arsenic (As), copper (Cu), cobalt (Co) and manganese (Mn), in biological samples of male production workers (PW) and quality control workers (QW) of steel mill, with aged 25-55 years, to assess the possible influence of environmental exposure. For comparison purpose, the same biological samples of unexposed healthy males of same age group were collected as control subjects. The determination of all elements in biological samples was carried out by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry, prior to microwave assisted acid digestion. The accuracy of the As, Cu, Co and Mn measurements was tested by simultaneously analyzing certified reference materials (CRMs) and for comparative purposes conventional wet acid digestion method was used on the same CRMs. No significant differences were observed between the analytical results and the certified values, using both methods (paired t-test at P > 0.05). The results indicate that concentrations of As, Cu, Co and Mn in all three biological samples of the exposed workers (QW and PW) were significantly higher than those of the controls. The possible correlation of these elements with the etiology of different physiological disorders is discussed. The results were also demonstrated the need of attention for improvements in workplace, ventilation and industrial hygiene practices.

  16. Biological Low-pH Mn(II) Oxidation in a Manganese Deposit Influenced by Metal-Rich Groundwater

    PubMed Central

    Bohu, Tsing; Akob, Denise M.; Abratis, Michael; Lazar, Cassandre S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mechanisms, key organisms, and geochemical significance of biological low-pH Mn(II) oxidation are largely unexplored. Here, we investigated the structure of indigenous Mn(II)-oxidizing microbial communities in a secondary subsurface Mn oxide deposit influenced by acidic (pH 4.8) metal-rich groundwater in a former uranium mining area. Microbial diversity was highest in the Mn deposit compared to the adjacent soil layers and included the majority of known Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) and two genera of known Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi (MOF). Electron X-ray microanalysis showed that romanechite [(Ba,H2O)2(Mn4+,Mn3+)5O10] was conspicuously enriched in the deposit. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that certain fungal, bacterial, and archaeal groups were firmly associated with the autochthonous Mn oxides. Eight MOB within the Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes and one MOF strain belonging to Ascomycota were isolated at pH 5.5 or 7.2 from the acidic Mn deposit. Soil-groundwater microcosms demonstrated 2.5-fold-faster Mn(II) depletion in the Mn deposit than adjacent soil layers. No depletion was observed in the abiotic controls, suggesting that biological contribution is the main driver for Mn(II) oxidation at low pH. The composition and species specificity of the native low-pH Mn(II) oxidizers were highly adapted to in situ conditions, and these organisms may play a central role in the fundamental biogeochemical processes (e.g., metal natural attenuation) occurring in the acidic, oligotrophic, and metalliferous subsoil ecosystems. IMPORTANCE This study provides multiple lines of evidence to show that microbes are the main drivers of Mn(II) oxidation even at acidic pH, offering new insights into Mn biogeochemical cycling. A distinct, highly adapted microbial community inhabits acidic, oligotrophic Mn deposits and mediates biological Mn oxidation. These data highlight the importance of biological processes for Mn biogeochemical cycling

  17. Depletion of cells and abundant proteins from biological samples by enhanced dielectrophoresis✩

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, C.; Provine, J.; Davis, R.W.; Howe, R.T.

    2016-01-01

    Platforms that are sensitive and specific enough to assay low-abundance protein biomarkers, in a high throughput multiplex format, within a complex biological fluid specimen, are necessary to enable protein biomarker based diagnostics for diseases such as cancer. The signal from an assay for a low-abundance protein biomarker in a biological fluid sample like blood is typically buried in a background that arises from the presence of blood cells and from high-abundance proteins that make up 90% of the assayed protein mass. We present an automated on-chip platform for the depletion of cells and highly abundant serum proteins in blood. Our platform consists of two components, the first of which is a microfluidic mixer that mixes beads containing antibodies against the highly abundant proteins in the whole blood. This complex mixture (consisting of beads, cells, and serum proteins) is then injected into the second component of our microfluidic platform, which comprises a filter trench to capture all the cells and the beads. The size-based trapping of the cells and beads into the filter trench is significantly enhanced by leveraging additional negative dielectrophoretic forces to push the micron sized particles (cells and beads which have captured the highly abundant proteins) down into the trench, allowing the serum proteins of lower abundance to flow through. In general, dielectrophoresis using bare electrodes is incapable of producing forces beyond the low piconewton range that tend to be insufficient for separation applications. However, by using electrodes passivated with atomic layer deposition, we demonstrate the application of enhanced negative DEP electrodes together with size-based flltration induced by the filter trench, to deplete 100% of the micron sized particles in the mixture. PMID:26924893

  18. Methods for the physical characterization and quantification of extracellular vesicles in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Rupert, Déborah L M; Claudio, Virginia; Lässer, Cecilia; Bally, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Our body fluids contain a multitude of cell-derived vesicles, secreted by most cell types, commonly referred to as extracellular vesicles. They have attracted considerable attention for their function as intercellular communication vehicles in a broad range of physiological processes and pathological conditions. Extracellular vesicles and especially the smallest type, exosomes, have also generated a lot of excitement in view of their potential as disease biomarkers or as carriers for drug delivery. In this context, state-of-the-art techniques capable of comprehensively characterizing vesicles in biological fluids are urgently needed. This review presents the arsenal of techniques available for quantification and characterization of physical properties of extracellular vesicles, summarizes their working principles, discusses their advantages and limitations and further illustrates their implementation in extracellular vesicle research. The small size and physicochemical heterogeneity of extracellular vesicles make their physical characterization and quantification an extremely challenging task. Currently, structure, size, buoyant density, optical properties and zeta potential have most commonly been studied. The concentration of vesicles in suspension can be expressed in terms of biomolecular or particle content depending on the method at hand. In addition, common quantification methods may either provide a direct quantitative measurement of vesicle concentration or solely allow for relative comparison between samples. The combination of complementary methods capable of detecting, characterizing and quantifying extracellular vesicles at a single particle level promises to provide new exciting insights into their modes of action and to reveal the existence of vesicle subpopulations fulfilling key biological tasks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Decommissioning samples from the Ft. Lewis, WA, solvent refined coal pilot plant: chemical analysis and biological testing

    SciTech Connect

    Weimer, W.C.; Wright, C.W.

    1985-10-01

    This report presents the results from chemical analyses and limited biological assays of three sets of samples from the Ft. Lewis, WA solvent refined coal (SRC) pilot plant. The samples were collected during the process of decommissioning this facility. Chemical composition was determined for chemical class fractions of the samples by using high-resolution gas chromatography (GC), high-resolution GC/mass spectrometry (MS) and high-resolution MS. Biological activity was measuring using both the histidine reversion microbial mutagenicity assay with Salmonella typhimurium, TA98 and an initiation/promotion mouse-skin tumorigenicity assay. 19 refs., 7 figs., 27 tabs.

  20. Preparation of polysulfone materials on nickel foam for solid-phase microextraction of floxacin in water and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiujuan; Cheng, Ting; Wang, Shuxia; Liu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Haixia

    2017-03-01

    Solid-phase microextraction with polysulfone and molecularly imprinted polymers as coating on nickel foam were used to adsorb and enrich floxacin drugs. The preparation method is simple and reproducible to obtain the materials with controlled thickness. After evaluation by scanning electron microscope and various adsorption experiments, the materials were used to adsorb analytes in water samples and biological samples. Coupling with chromatographic analysis, the method recoveries are satisfactory with 90.0-104.8% and 79.31-107.1% for water and biological samples. The method repeatability by intra- and interday experiments shows that the RSD values for water and biological samples were 1.0-9.9% and 1.7-10.3%, with the quantitative limits of three floxacin drugs as 3.0-6.2 μg L(-1). Graphical Abstract Preparation diagram of polysulfone material.

  1. The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling Expedition: Northwest Atlantic through Eastern Tropical Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Rusch, Douglas B; Halpern, Aaron L; Sutton, Granger; Heidelberg, Karla B; Williamson, Shannon; Yooseph, Shibu; Wu, Dongying; Eisen, Jonathan A; Hoffman, Jeff M; Remington, Karin; Beeson, Karen; Tran, Bao; Smith, Hamilton; Baden-Tillson, Holly; Stewart, Clare; Thorpe, Joyce; Freeman, Jason; Andrews-Pfannkoch, Cynthia; Venter, Joseph E; Li, Kelvin; Kravitz, Saul; Heidelberg, John F; Utterback, Terry; Rogers, Yu-Hui; Falcón, Luisa I; Souza, Valeria; Bonilla-Rosso, Germán; Eguiarte, Luis E; Karl, David M; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Platt, Trevor; Bermingham, Eldredge; Gallardo, Victor; Tamayo-Castillo, Giselle; Ferrari, Michael R; Strausberg, Robert L; Nealson, Kenneth; Friedman, Robert; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J. Craig

    2007-01-01

    The world's oceans contain a complex mixture of micro-organisms that are for the most part, uncharacterized both genetically and biochemically. We report here a metagenomic study of the marine planktonic microbiota in which surface (mostly marine) water samples were analyzed as part of the Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling expedition. These samples, collected across a several-thousand km transect from the North Atlantic through the Panama Canal and ending in the South Pacific yielded an extensive dataset consisting of 7.7 million sequencing reads (6.3 billion bp). Though a few major microbial clades dominate the planktonic marine niche, the dataset contains great diversity with 85% of the assembled sequence and 57% of the unassembled data being unique at a 98% sequence identity cutoff. Using the metadata associated with each sample and sequencing library, we developed new comparative genomic and assembly methods. One comparative genomic method, termed “fragment recruitment,” addressed questions of genome structure, evolution, and taxonomic or phylogenetic diversity, as well as the biochemical diversity of genes and gene families. A second method, termed “extreme assembly,” made possible the assembly and reconstruction of large segments of abundant but clearly nonclonal organisms. Within all abundant populations analyzed, we found extensive intra-ribotype diversity in several forms: (1) extensive sequence variation within orthologous regions throughout a given genome; despite coverage of individual ribotypes approaching 500-fold, most individual sequencing reads are unique; (2) numerous changes in gene content some with direct adaptive implications; and (3) hypervariable genomic islands that are too variable to assemble. The intra-ribotype diversity is organized into genetically isolated populations that have overlapping but independent distributions, implying distinct environmental preference. We present novel methods for measuring the genomic similarity

  2. The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling expedition: northwest Atlantic through eastern tropical Pacific.

    PubMed

    Rusch, Douglas B; Halpern, Aaron L; Sutton, Granger; Heidelberg, Karla B; Williamson, Shannon; Yooseph, Shibu; Wu, Dongying; Eisen, Jonathan A; Hoffman, Jeff M; Remington, Karin; Beeson, Karen; Tran, Bao; Smith, Hamilton; Baden-Tillson, Holly; Stewart, Clare; Thorpe, Joyce; Freeman, Jason; Andrews-Pfannkoch, Cynthia; Venter, Joseph E; Li, Kelvin; Kravitz, Saul; Heidelberg, John F; Utterback, Terry; Rogers, Yu-Hui; Falcón, Luisa I; Souza, Valeria; Bonilla-Rosso, Germán; Eguiarte, Luis E; Karl, David M; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Platt, Trevor; Bermingham, Eldredge; Gallardo, Victor; Tamayo-Castillo, Giselle; Ferrari, Michael R; Strausberg, Robert L; Nealson, Kenneth; Friedman, Robert; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J Craig

    2007-03-01

    The world's oceans contain a complex mixture of micro-organisms that are for the most part, uncharacterized both genetically and biochemically. We report here a metagenomic study of the marine planktonic microbiota in which surface (mostly marine) water samples were analyzed as part of the Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling expedition. These samples, collected across a several-thousand km transect from the North Atlantic through the Panama Canal and ending in the South Pacific yielded an extensive dataset consisting of 7.7 million sequencing reads (6.3 billion bp). Though a few major microbial clades dominate the planktonic marine niche, the dataset contains great diversity with 85% of the assembled sequence and 57% of the unassembled data being unique at a 98% sequence identity cutoff. Using the metadata associated with each sample and sequencing library, we developed new comparative genomic and assembly methods. One comparative genomic method, termed "fragment recruitment," addressed questions of genome structure, evolution, and taxonomic or phylogenetic diversity, as well as the biochemical diversity of genes and gene families. A second method, termed "extreme assembly," made possible the assembly and reconstruction of large segments of abundant but clearly nonclonal organisms. Within all abundant populations analyzed, we found extensive intra-ribotype diversity in several forms: (1) extensive sequence variation within orthologous regions throughout a given genome; despite coverage of individual ribotypes approaching 500-fold, most individual sequencing reads are unique; (2) numerous changes in gene content some with direct adaptive implications; and (3) hypervariable genomic islands that are too variable to assemble. The intra-ribotype diversity is organized into genetically isolated populations that have overlapping but independent distributions, implying distinct environmental preference. We present novel methods for measuring the genomic similarity between

  3. Synthesis, characterization, DFT and biological studies of isatinpicolinohydrazone and its Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Gammal, O. A.; Rakha, T. H.; Metwally, H. M.; Abu El-Reash, G. M.

    2014-06-01

    Isatinpicolinohydrazone (H2IPH) and its Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) complexes have been synthesized and investigated using physicochemical techniques viz. IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, UV-Vis spectrometric methods and magnetic moment measurements. The investigation revealed that H2IPH acts as binegative tetradentate in Zn(II), neutral tridentate in Cd(II) and as neutral bidentate towards Hg(II) complex. Octahedral geometry is proposed for all complexes. The bond length, bond angle, chemical reactivity, energy components (kcal/mol), binding energy (kcal/mol) and dipole moment (Debyes) for all the title compounds were evaluated by DFT and also MEP for the ligand is shown. Theoretical infrared intensities of H2IPH and also the theoretical electronic spectra of the ligand and its complexes were calculated. The thermal behavior and the kinetic parameters of degradation were determined using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger methods. The in vitro antibacterial studies of the complexes proved them as growth inhibiting agents. The DDPH antioxidant of the compounds have been screened. Antitumor activity, carried out in vitro on human mammary gland (breast) MCF7, have shown that Hg(II) complex exhibited potent activity followed by Zn(II), Cd(II) complexes and the ligand.

  4. Characterization and biological studies on Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes of carbohydrazones ending by pyridyl ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu El-Reash, G. M.; El-Gammal, O. A.; Ghazy, S. E.; Radwan, A. H.

    2013-03-01

    The chelating behavior of ligands based on carbohydrazone core modified with pyridine end towards Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) ions have been examined. The ligands derived from the condensation of carbohydrazide with 2-acetylpyridine (H2APC) and 4-acetylpyridine (H2APEC). The 1H NMR, IR data and the binding energy calculations of H2APC revealed the presence of two stereoisomers syn and anti in the solid state and in the solution. The 1H NMR, IR data and the binding energy calculations confirmed the presence of H2APEC in one keto form only in the solid state and in the solution. The spectroscopic data confirmed that H2APC behaves as a monobasic pentadentate in Co(II) and Cu(II) complexes and as mononegative tetradentate in Ni(II) complex. On the other hand, H2APEC acts as a mononegative tridentate in Co(II) complex, neutral tridentate in Ni(II) complex and neutral bidentate in Cu(II) complex. The electronic spectra and the magnetic measurements of complexes as well as the ESR of the copper complexes suggested the octahedral geometry. The bond length and bond angles were evaluated by DFT method using material studio program. The thermal behavior and the kinetic parameters of degradation were determined using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger methods. The antioxidant (DDPH and ABTS methods), anti-hemolytic and in vitro Ehrlich ascites of the compounds have been screened.

  5. Synthesis, characterization, DFT and biological studies of isatinpicolinohydrazone and its Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    El-Gammal, O A; Rakha, T H; Metwally, H M; Abu El-Reash, G M

    2014-06-05

    Isatinpicolinohydrazone (H2IPH) and its Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) complexes have been synthesized and investigated using physicochemical techniques viz. IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, UV-Vis spectrometric methods and magnetic moment measurements. The investigation revealed that H2IPH acts as binegative tetradentate in Zn(II), neutral tridentate in Cd(II) and as neutral bidentate towards Hg(II) complex. Octahedral geometry is proposed for all complexes. The bond length, bond angle, chemical reactivity, energy components (kcal/mol), binding energy (kcal/mol) and dipole moment (Debyes) for all the title compounds were evaluated by DFT and also MEP for the ligand is shown. Theoretical infrared intensities of H2IPH and also the theoretical electronic spectra of the ligand and its complexes were calculated. The thermal behavior and the kinetic parameters of degradation were determined using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger methods. The in vitro antibacterial studies of the complexes proved them as growth inhibiting agents. The DDPH antioxidant of the compounds have been screened. Antitumor activity, carried out in vitro on human mammary gland (breast) MCF7, have shown that Hg(II) complex exhibited potent activity followed by Zn(II), Cd(II) complexes and the ligand.

  6. Mixed ligand Cu(II)N2O2 complexes: biomimetic synthesis, activities in vitro and biological models, theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Yin, Bing; Kang, Yifan; Liu, Ping; Chen, Liang; Wang, Yaoyu; Li, Jianli

    2014-12-15

    Three new mixed ligand Cu(II)N2O2 complexes, namely, [Cu(II)(2-A-6-MBT)2(m-NB)2] (1), [Cu(II)(2-ABT)2(m-NB)2] (2), and [Cu(II)(2-ABT)2(o-NB)2] (3), (2-A-6-MBT = 2-amino-6-methoxybenzothiazole, m-NB = m-nitrobenzoate, 2-ABT = 2-aminobenzothiazole, and o-NB = o-nitrobenzoate), have been prepared by the biomimetic synthesis strategy, and their structures were determined by X-ray crystallography studies and spectral methods. These complexes exhibited the effective superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and catecholase activity. On the basis of the experimental data and computational studies, the structure-activity relationship for these complexes was investigated. The results reveal that electron-accepting abilities of these complexes and coordination geometries have significant effects on the SOD activity and catecholase activity. Then, we found that 1 and 2 exerted potent intracellular antioxidant capacity in the model of H2O2-induced oxidative stress based on HeLa cervical cancer cells, which were screened out by the cytotoxicity assays of different kinds of cells. Furthermore, 1-3 showed the favorable biocompatibility in two different biological models: Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human vascular endothelial cells. These biological experimental data are indicative of the promising application potential of these complexes in biology and pharmacology.

  7. Genotyping of samples from German patients with ocular, cerebral and systemic toxoplasmosis reveals a predominance of Toxoplasma gondii type II.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Daland C; Maksimov, Pavlo; Hotop, Andrea; Groß, Uwe; Däubener, Walter; Liesenfeld, Oliver; Pleyer, Uwe; Conraths, Franz J; Schares, Gereon

    2014-10-01

    Toxoplasmosis is an important zoonosis transmitted from animals to humans world-wide. In order to determine Toxoplasma gondii genotypes in individuals living in Germany and to compare findings with those in animals, we analysed nine independent and unlinked genetic markers (nSAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1 and Apico) by PCR-RFLP in 83 archived T. gondii-positive DNA samples from patients with ocular toxoplasmosis (n=35), toxoplasmic encephalitis (n=32), systemic toxoplasmosis after bone-marrow transplantation (n=15) and congenital toxoplasmosis (n=1). In 46 of these 83 samples the presence of T. gondii DNA was confirmed by conventional end-point PCR. Among these, 17 T. gondii-positive samples were typed at all nine loci. The majority (15/17, 88.2%) of these samples were of T. gondii type II (i.e., including both, the Apico type II and Apico type I variants). In addition, in one sample a T. gondii type II/type III allele combination and in another sample a T. gondii genotype displaying type III alleles at all markers was observed. In the remaining 11 samples, in which T. gondii could only be partially typed, exclusively type II (n=10) or type III (n=1) alleles were observed. Results of the present study suggest that the majority of patients in Germany are infected with type II T. gondii regardless of the clinical manifestation of toxoplasmosis. This finding is in accord with the predominance of type II T. gondii in oocysts isolated from cats and in tissues of other intermediate hosts in Germany. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Counting forbidden patterns in irregularly sampled time series. II. Reliability in the presence of highly irregular sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakellariou, Konstantinos; McCullough, Michael; Stemler, Thomas; Small, Michael

    2016-12-01

    We are motivated by real-world data that exhibit severe sampling irregularities such as geological or paleoclimate measurements. Counting forbidden patterns has been shown to be a powerful tool towards the detection of determinism in noisy time series. They constitute a set of ordinal symbolic patterns that cannot be realised in time series generated by deterministic systems. The reliability of the estimator of the relative count of forbidden patterns from irregularly sampled data has been explored in two recent studies. In this paper, we explore highly irregular sampling frequency schemes. Using numerically generated data, we examine the reliability of the estimator when the sampling period has been drawn from exponential, Pareto and Gamma distributions of varying skewness. Our investigations demonstrate that some statistical properties of the sampling distribution are useful heuristics for assessing the estimator's reliability. We find that sampling in the presence of large chronological gaps can still yield relatively accurate estimates as long as the time series contains sufficiently many densely sampled areas. Furthermore, we show that the reliability of the estimator of forbidden patterns is poor when there is a high number of sampling intervals, which are larger than a typical correlation time of the underlying system.

  9. Field Surveys, IOC Valleys. Volume II, Part II. Biological Resources Survey, Pine and Wah Wah Valleys, Utah.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    contained two or more species of cactus on each site. Grasses included Aristida purpurea, Bromus tectorum, Hilaria jamesii, Oryzopsis hymen - oides, and...TR-48-II-Il 260 tolerances to salinity: Atriplex canescens and Atriplex hymen - elytra can survive very high salinity conditions; Ambrosia dumosa

  10. Conserved motifs II to VI of DNA helicase II from Escherichia coli are all required for biological activity.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, G; Deng, E; Baugh, L R; Hamilton, C M; Maples, V F; Kushner, S R

    1997-01-01

    There are seven conserved motifs (IA, IB, and II to VI) in DNA helicase II of Escherichia coli that have high homology among a large family of proteins involved in DNA metabolism. To address the functional importance of motifs II to VI, we employed site-directed mutagenesis to replace the charged amino acid residues in each motif with alanines. Cells carrying these mutant alleles exhibited higher UV and methyl methanesulfonate sensitivity, increased rates of spontaneous mutagenesis, and elevated levels of homologous recombination, indicating defects in both the excision repair and mismatch repair pathways. In addition, we also changed the highly conserved tyrosine(600) in motif VI to phenylalanine (uvrD309, Y600F). This mutant displayed a moderate increase in UV sensitivity but a decrease in spontaneous mutation rate, suggesting that DNA helicase II may have different functions in the two DNA repair pathways. Furthermore, a mutation in domain IV (uvrD307, R284A) significantly reduced the viability of some E. coli K-12 strains at 30 degrees C but not at 37 degrees C. The implications of these observations are discussed. PMID:9393722

  11. Molecular recognition, fluorescence sensing, and biological assay of phosphate anion derivatives using artificial Zn(II)-Dpa complexes.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Takashi; Ojida, Akio; Hamachi, Itaru

    2009-01-08

    In this Feature Article, we focus on recent advances in our research on molecular recognition and fluorescence sensing of phosphate anion derivatives of biological importance. Because of their significant roles in biological systems, considerable efforts have been devoted to developing detection or determination systems. However, the recognition and sensing of these anion species under aqueous biological conditions using small-molecular chemosensors still remain as a challenging research topic. We have been developing a variety of artificial receptors and fluorescent chemosensors for phosphoproteins and nucleoside polyphosphates in recent years. They consist of a binuclear Zn(II)-dipicolylamine (Dpa) complex as a common binding motif for phosphate anion derivatives. Taking advantage of their strong binding affinities or high sensing abilities, a variety of biological assay systems have also been successfully developed, which includes the enzyme assays such as the kinase, phosphatase and glycosyltransferase reaction, as well as an inhibitor assay for the phosphoprotein-protein surface interaction.

  12. Evaluation of thiosemicarbazone derivative as chelating agent for the simultaneous removal and trace determination of Cd(II) and Pb(II) in food and water samples.

    PubMed

    Koduru, Janardhan Reddy; Lee, Kap Duk

    2014-05-01

    In the present investigation, prepared N-ethyl-3-carbazolecarbaxaldehyde-3-thiosemicarbazone (ECCT) and employed for the simultaneous removal and determination of trace amounts of Cd(II) and Pb(II) from food and water samples. Cd(II) and Pb(II) gave yellow and orange colored complexes with ECCT in acetate buffer at pH 6.0 with λmax, 380 and 440nm, respectively. Both complexes were easily extractable into kerosene at 1:1(M:L) composition. It was in accordance with Beer's law in the range of 0.0-12.0 and 0.0-10.0μgmL(-1) with 0.999 and 0.997 correlation coefficient for Cd(II) and Pb(II) complexes, respectively, indicated a good linearity between the two variables. The molar absorptivity and Sandell's sensitivity were found to be 0.740×10(4)Lmol(-1)cm(-1), 1.52×10(-3)μgcm(-2) for Cd(II) and 1.809×10(4)L mol(-1)cm(-1), 1.15×10(-3)μgcm(-2) for Pb(II). The precision and accuracy of the method was checked for both metal ions by finding the relative standard deviations (n=8), which were 0.689% and 0.443%, with detection limits of 0.00151μgL(-1) and 0.00264μgL(-1) for Cd(II) and Pb(II), respectively. Further validation using certified reference material, NIST 1568b, resulted in determined concentrations of 0.028±0.253μgg(-1) for Cd(II) and 0.046±0.325μgg(-1) for Pb(II). These determined values agree well with the certified values in the reference materials. The interfering effects of various cations and anions were also studied. The proposed method performance was also evaluated in terms of Student 'T' test and Variance 'F' test, which indicated the significance of the present method parameters, as an inter comparison of the experimental values using ICP-OES.

  13. Synthesis, characterization and biological evaluation of novel Ru(II)-arene complexes containing intercalating ligands.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Stefan; Rangasamy, Loganathan; Gligorijević, Nevenka; Aranđelović, Sandra; Radulović, Siniša; Gasser, Gilles; Grgurić-Šipka, Sanja

    2016-07-01

    Three new ruthenium(II)-arene complexes, namely [(η(6)-p-cymene)Ru(Me2dppz)Cl]PF6 (1), [(η(6)-benzene)Ru(Me2dppz)Cl]PF6 (2) and [(η(6)-p-cymene)Ru(aip)Cl]PF6 (3) (Me2dppz=11,12-dimethyldipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine; aip=2-(9-anthryl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f] [1,10] phenanthroline) have been synthesized and characterized using different spectroscopic techniques including elemental analysis. The complexes were found to be well soluble and stable in DMSO. The biological activity of the three complexes was tested in three different human cancer cell lines (A549, MDA-MB-231 and HeLa) and in one human non-cancerous cell line (MRC-5). Complexes 1 and 3, carrying η(6)-p-cymene as the arene ligand, were shown to be toxic in all cell lines in the low micromolar/subnanomolar range, with complex 1 being the most cytotoxic complex of the series. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that complex 1 caused concentration- and time-dependent arrest of the cell cycle in G2-M and S phases in HeLa cells. This event is followed by the accumulation of the sub-G1 DNA content after 48h, in levels higher than cisplatin and in the absence of phosphatidylserine externalization. Fluorescent microscopy and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining revealed that complex 1 induced both apoptotic and necrotic cell morphology characteristics. Drug-accumulation and DNA-binding studies performed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in HeLa cells showed that the total ruthenium uptake increased in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, and that complex 1 accumulated more efficiently than cisplatin at equimolar concentrations. The introduction of a Me2dppz ligand into the ruthenium(II)-p-cymene scaffold was found to allow the discovery of a strongly cytotoxic complex with significantly higher cellular uptake and DNA-binding properties than cisplatin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Nanoparticle sensor for label free detection of swine DNA in mixed biological samples.

    PubMed

    Ali, M E; Hashim, U; Mustafa, S; Man, Y B Che; Yusop, M H M; Bari, M F; Islam, Kh N; Hasan, M F

    2011-05-13

    We used 40 ± 5 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as colorimetric sensor to visually detect swine-specific conserved sequence and nucleotide mismatch in PCR-amplified and non-amplified mitochondrial DNA mixtures to authenticate species. Colloidal GNPs changed color from pinkish-red to gray-purple in 2 mM PBS. Visually observed results were clearly reflected by the dramatic reduction of surface plasmon resonance peak at 530 nm and the appearance of new features in the 620-800 nm regions in their absorption spectra. The particles were stabilized against salt-induced aggregation upon the adsorption of single-stranded DNA. The PCR products, without any additional processing, were hybridized with a 17-base probe prior to exposure to GNPs. At a critical annealing temperature (55 °C) that differentiated matched and mismatched base pairing, the probe was hybridized to pig PCR product and dehybridized from the deer product. The dehybridized probe stuck to GNPs to prevent them from salt-induced aggregation and retained their characteristic red color. Hybridization of a 27-nucleotide probe to swine mitochondrial DNA identified them in pork-venison, pork-shad and venison-shad binary admixtures, eliminating the need of PCR amplification. Thus the assay was applied to authenticate species both in PCR-amplified and non-amplified heterogeneous biological samples. The results were determined visually and validated by absorption spectroscopy. The entire assay (hybridization plus visual detection) was performed in less than 10 min. The LOD (for genomic DNA) of the assay was 6 µg ml(-1) swine DNA in mixed meat samples. We believe the assay can be applied for species assignment in food analysis, mismatch detection in genetic screening and homology studies between closely related species.

  15. Nanoparticle sensor for label free detection of swine DNA in mixed biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, M. E.; Hashim, U.; Mustafa, S.; Che Man, Y. B.; Yusop, M. H. M.; Bari, M. F.; Islam, Kh N.; Hasan, M. F.

    2011-05-01

    We used 40 ± 5 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as colorimetric sensor to visually detect swine-specific conserved sequence and nucleotide mismatch in PCR-amplified and non-amplified mitochondrial DNA mixtures to authenticate species. Colloidal GNPs changed color from pinkish-red to gray-purple in 2 mM PBS. Visually observed results were clearly reflected by the dramatic reduction of surface plasmon resonance peak at 530 nm and the appearance of new features in the 620-800 nm regions in their absorption spectra. The particles were stabilized against salt-induced aggregation upon the adsorption of single-stranded DNA. The PCR products, without any additional processing, were hybridized with a 17-base probe prior to exposure to GNPs. At a critical annealing temperature (55 °C) that differentiated matched and mismatched base pairing, the probe was hybridized to pig PCR product and dehybridized from the deer product. The dehybridized probe stuck to GNPs to prevent them from salt-induced aggregation and retained their characteristic red color. Hybridization of a 27-nucleotide probe to swine mitochondrial DNA identified them in pork-venison, pork-shad and venison-shad binary admixtures, eliminating the need of PCR amplification. Thus the assay was applied to authenticate species both in PCR-amplified and non-amplified heterogeneous biological samples. The results were determined visually and validated by absorption spectroscopy. The entire assay (hybridization plus visual detection) was performed in less than 10 min. The LOD (for genomic DNA) of the assay was 6 µg ml - 1 swine DNA in mixed meat samples. We believe the assay can be applied for species assignment in food analysis, mismatch detection in genetic screening and homology studies between closely related species.

  16. Chemical and biological effects of heavy distillate recycle in the SRC-II process

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B.W.; Pelroy, R.A.; Anderson, R.P.; Freel, J.

    1983-12-01

    Recent work from the Merriam Laboratory continuous coal liquefaction units shows that heavy distillate from the SRC-II process can be recycled to extinction, and hence a distillate product boiling entirely below 310/sup 0/C (590/sup 0/F) (or other selected boiling points) is feasible. In these runs distillate yield was not reduced; gas make was unaffected; and hydrogen consumption was increased only slightly, in keeping with the generally higher hydrogen content of lighter end products. Total distillate yield (C/sub 5/-590/sup 0/F) was 56 wt %, MAF coal in runs with subbituminous coal from the Amax Belle Ayr mine. Product endpoint is well below 371/sup 0/C (700/sup 0/F), the temperature above which coal distillates appear to become genotoxic; and the product was shown to be free of mutagenic activity in the Ames test. Chemical analyses showed both the < 270/sup 0/C (< 518/sup 0/F) and the < 310/sup 0/C (< 590/sup 0/F) distillates to be essentially devoid of several reference polycyclic compounds known to be carcinogenic in laboratory animals. Tests for tumorigenic or carcinogenic activity were not carried out on these materials. However, a comparison of chemical data from the Merriam heavy distillate samples with data on the other SRC-II distillates where carcinogenesis or tumorigenesis data is available leads to the expectation that < 371/sup 0/C (< 700/sup 0/F) materials from the Merriam Laboratory will have greatly reduced tumorigenic and carcinogenic activity in skin painting tests. Other studies suggest the product should be more readily upgraded than full-range (C/sub 5/-900/sup 0/F) distillate.