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Sample records for biological spectroscopy part

  1. Standard biological parts knowledgebase.

    PubMed

    Galdzicki, Michal; Rodriguez, Cesar; Chandran, Deepak; Sauro, Herbert M; Gennari, John H

    2011-02-24

    We have created the Knowledgebase of Standard Biological Parts (SBPkb) as a publically accessible Semantic Web resource for synthetic biology (sbolstandard.org). The SBPkb allows researchers to query and retrieve standard biological parts for research and use in synthetic biology. Its initial version includes all of the information about parts stored in the Registry of Standard Biological Parts (partsregistry.org). SBPkb transforms this information so that it is computable, using our semantic framework for synthetic biology parts. This framework, known as SBOL-semantic, was built as part of the Synthetic Biology Open Language (SBOL), a project of the Synthetic Biology Data Exchange Group. SBOL-semantic represents commonly used synthetic biology entities, and its purpose is to improve the distribution and exchange of descriptions of biological parts. In this paper, we describe the data, our methods for transformation to SBPkb, and finally, we demonstrate the value of our knowledgebase with a set of sample queries. We use RDF technology and SPARQL queries to retrieve candidate "promoter" parts that are known to be both negatively and positively regulated. This method provides new web based data access to perform searches for parts that are not currently possible.

  2. An introduction to biological NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Marion, Dominique

    2013-11-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for biologists interested in the structure, dynamics, and interactions of biological macromolecules. This review aims at presenting in an accessible manner the requirements and limitations of this technique. As an introduction, the history of NMR will highlight how the method evolved from physics to chemistry and finally to biology over several decades. We then introduce the NMR spectral parameters used in structural biology, namely the chemical shift, the J-coupling, nuclear Overhauser effects, and residual dipolar couplings. Resonance assignment, the required step for any further NMR study, bears a resemblance to jigsaw puzzle strategy. The NMR spectral parameters are then converted into angle and distances and used as input using restrained molecular dynamics to compute a bundle of structures. When interpreting a NMR-derived structure, the biologist has to judge its quality on the basis of the statistics provided. When the 3D structure is a priori known by other means, the molecular interaction with a partner can be mapped by NMR: information on the binding interface as well as on kinetic and thermodynamic constants can be gathered. NMR is suitable to monitor, over a wide range of frequencies, protein fluctuations that play a crucial role in their biological function. In the last section of this review, intrinsically disordered proteins, which have escaped the attention of classical structural biology, are discussed in the perspective of NMR, one of the rare available techniques able to describe structural ensembles. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 16 MCP).

  3. An Introduction to Biological NMR Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for biologists interested in the structure, dynamics, and interactions of biological macromolecules. This review aims at presenting in an accessible manner the requirements and limitations of this technique. As an introduction, the history of NMR will highlight how the method evolved from physics to chemistry and finally to biology over several decades. We then introduce the NMR spectral parameters used in structural biology, namely the chemical shift, the J-coupling, nuclear Overhauser effects, and residual dipolar couplings. Resonance assignment, the required step for any further NMR study, bears a resemblance to jigsaw puzzle strategy. The NMR spectral parameters are then converted into angle and distances and used as input using restrained molecular dynamics to compute a bundle of structures. When interpreting a NMR-derived structure, the biologist has to judge its quality on the basis of the statistics provided. When the 3D structure is a priori known by other means, the molecular interaction with a partner can be mapped by NMR: information on the binding interface as well as on kinetic and thermodynamic constants can be gathered. NMR is suitable to monitor, over a wide range of frequencies, protein fluctuations that play a crucial role in their biological function. In the last section of this review, intrinsically disordered proteins, which have escaped the attention of classical structural biology, are discussed in the perspective of NMR, one of the rare available techniques able to describe structural ensembles. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 16 MCP). PMID:23831612

  4. Using Raman spectroscopy to characterize biological materials.

    PubMed

    Butler, Holly J; Ashton, Lorna; Bird, Benjamin; Cinque, Gianfelice; Curtis, Kelly; Dorney, Jennifer; Esmonde-White, Karen; Fullwood, Nigel J; Gardner, Benjamin; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L; Walsh, Michael J; McAinsh, Martin R; Stone, Nicholas; Martin, Francis L

    2016-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy can be used to measure the chemical composition of a sample, which can in turn be used to extract biological information. Many materials have characteristic Raman spectra, which means that Raman spectroscopy has proven to be an effective analytical approach in geology, semiconductor, materials and polymer science fields. The application of Raman spectroscopy and microscopy within biology is rapidly increasing because it can provide chemical and compositional information, but it does not typically suffer from interference from water molecules. Analysis does not conventionally require extensive sample preparation; biochemical and structural information can usually be obtained without labeling. In this protocol, we aim to standardize and bring together multiple experimental approaches from key leaders in the field for obtaining Raman spectra using a microspectrometer. As examples of the range of biological samples that can be analyzed, we provide instructions for acquiring Raman spectra, maps and images for fresh plant tissue, formalin-fixed and fresh frozen mammalian tissue, fixed cells and biofluids. We explore a robust approach for sample preparation, instrumentation, acquisition parameters and data processing. By using this approach, we expect that a typical Raman experiment can be performed by a nonspecialist user to generate high-quality data for biological materials analysis.

  5. Asmparts: assembly of biological model parts.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Guillermo; Carrera, Javier; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2007-12-01

    We propose a new computational tool to produce models of biological systems by assembling models from biological parts. Our software not only takes advantage of modularity, but it also enforces standardisation in part characterisation by considering a model of each part. We have used model parts in SBML to design transcriptional networks. Our software is open source, it works in linux and windows platforms, and it could be used to automatically produce models in a server. Our tool not only facilitates model design, but it will also help to promote the establishment of a registry of model parts.

  6. APD detectors for biological fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazères, S.; Borrel, V.; Magenc, C.; Courrech, J. L.; Bazer-Bachi, R.

    2006-11-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a very convenient and widely used method for studying the molecular background of biological processes [L. Salomé, J.L. Cazeil, A. Lopez, J.F. Tocanne, Eur. Biophys. J. 27 (1998) 391-402]. Chromophores are included in the structure under study and a flash of laser light induces fluorescence (Fluorescence Recovery After Photo-bleaching), the decay of which yields information on the polarity, the speed of rotation, and the speed of diffusion as well as on the temporal and spatial evolution of interactions between molecular species. The method can even be used to study living cells [J.F. Tocanne, L. Cézanne, A. Lopez, Prog. Lipid Res. 33 (1994) 203-237, L. Cezanne, A. Lopez, F. Loste, G. Parnaud, O. Saurel, P. Demange, J.F. Tocanne, Biochemistry 38 (1999) 2779-2786]. This is classically performed with a PM-based system. For biological reasons a decrease of the excitation of the cells is highly desirable. Because the fluorescence response then becomes fainter a significant improvement in detector capability would be welcome. We present here results obtained with an Avalanche Photo Diode (APD)-based system. The small sensitive area of detection allows a very significant improvement in signal/noise ratio, improvement in gain, and the opening-up of a new parameter space. With these new detectors we can begin the study of information transmission between cells through morphine receptors. This work involves both electronics engineers and biophysicists, so results and techniques in both fields will be presented here.

  7. Spectroscopy, colorimetry, and biological chemistry in the nineteenth century.

    PubMed Central

    Rinsler, M G

    1981-01-01

    The development of colorimetry and spectroscopy in the nineteenth century is described. An account is given of the application of their techniques to biological chemistry during that period. PMID:7014652

  8. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy Part III. Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, W. D.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the use of the FT-IR spectrometer in analyses that were previously avoided. Examines some of the applications of this spectroscopy with aqueous solutions, circular internal reflection, samples with low transmission, diffuse reflectance, infrared emission, and the infrared microscope. (TW)

  9. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy Part III. Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, W. D.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the use of the FT-IR spectrometer in analyses that were previously avoided. Examines some of the applications of this spectroscopy with aqueous solutions, circular internal reflection, samples with low transmission, diffuse reflectance, infrared emission, and the infrared microscope. (TW)

  10. Raman Spectroscopy of Optically Trapped Single Biological Micro-Particles

    PubMed Central

    Redding, Brandon; Schwab, Mark J.; Pan, Yong-le

    2015-01-01

    The combination of optical trapping with Raman spectroscopy provides a powerful method for the study, characterization, and identification of biological micro-particles. In essence, optical trapping helps to overcome the limitation imposed by the relative inefficiency of the Raman scattering process. This allows Raman spectroscopy to be applied to individual biological particles in air and in liquid, providing the potential for particle identification with high specificity, longitudinal studies of changes in particle composition, and characterization of the heterogeneity of individual particles in a population. In this review, we introduce the techniques used to integrate Raman spectroscopy with optical trapping in order to study individual biological particles in liquid and air. We then provide an overview of some of the most promising applications of this technique, highlighting the unique types of measurements enabled by the combination of Raman spectroscopy with optical trapping. Finally, we present a brief discussion of future research directions in the field. PMID:26247952

  11. Raman Spectroscopy of Optically Trapped Single Biological Micro-Particles.

    PubMed

    Redding, Brandon; Schwab, Mark; Pan, Yong-le

    2015-08-04

    The combination of optical trapping with Raman spectroscopy provides a powerful method for the study, characterization, and identification of biological micro-particles. In essence, optical trapping helps to overcome the limitation imposed by the relative inefficiency of the Raman scattering process. This allows Raman spectroscopy to be applied to individual biological particles in air and in liquid, providing the potential for particle identification with high specificity, longitudinal studies of changes in particle composition, and characterization of the heterogeneity of individual particles in a population. In this review, we introduce the techniques used to integrate Raman spectroscopy with optical trapping in order to study individual biological particles in liquid and air. We then provide an overview of some of the most promising applications of this technique, highlighting the unique types of measurements enabled by the combination of Raman spectroscopy with optical trapping. Finally, we present a brief discussion of future research directions in the field.

  12. Biological Sensing with Terahertz Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-31

    S.J. and Plaxco, K.W. (2003) “Terahertz circular dichroism spectroscopy: a potential approach to unbiased, in situ life detection.” Astrobiology , 3...detection.” Astrobiology , 3, 489-504 Xu, J., Ramian, G.J., Galan, J.F., Savvidis, P.G., Scopatz, A.M., Birge, R.R., Allen, S.J. and Plaxco, K.W. (2004

  13. Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy of biological tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarov, M M; Shkurinov, A P; Kuleshov, E A; Tuchin, V V

    2008-07-31

    Terahertz absorption spectra and dispersion of biologically important substances such as sugar, water, hemoglobin, lipids and tissues are studied. The characteristic absorption lines in the frequency range of a terahertz spectrometer (0.1-3.5 THz) are found. The refraction indices and absorption coefficients of human tooth enamel and dentine are measured. The method of terahertz phase reflection spectroscopy is developed for strongly absorbing substances. Simple and reliable methods of time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy are developed. (biophotonics)

  14. Nanomechanical spectroscopy of synthetic and biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Junhong; Yang, Ju; Dong, Mingdong; Sahin, Ozgur

    2014-06-01

    We report that atomic force microscopy based high-speed nanomechanical analysis can identify components of complex heterogeneous synthetic and biological membranes from the measured spectrum of nanomechanical properties. We have investigated phase separated ternary lipid bilayers and purple membranes of Halobacterium salinarum. The nanomechanical spectra recorded on these samples identify all membrane components, some of which are difficult to resolve in conventional phase images. This non-destructive approach can aid the design of synthetic lipid bilayers and studies lateral organization of complex heterogeneous cellular membranes.We report that atomic force microscopy based high-speed nanomechanical analysis can identify components of complex heterogeneous synthetic and biological membranes from the measured spectrum of nanomechanical properties. We have investigated phase separated ternary lipid bilayers and purple membranes of Halobacterium salinarum. The nanomechanical spectra recorded on these samples identify all membrane components, some of which are difficult to resolve in conventional phase images. This non-destructive approach can aid the design of synthetic lipid bilayers and studies lateral organization of complex heterogeneous cellular membranes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02643d

  15. Characterization of Biological Molecules with Time-Domain Terahertz Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechel, Meagan; Deibel, Jason; Hussian, Saber; Smith, Stanley; Ganti, Sayta; Moulton, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy is distinctly appealing for characterization of biological molecules because many biological compounds have vibrational modes within the THz range. These vibrational modes often lead to a unique spectrum for each substance, allowing easy differentiation. The aim of this study is to utilize time-domain terahertz spectroscopy to calculate the frequency-dependent absorption coefficient and refractive index for several amino acids and proteins, including bovine and human serum albumin, glycine, and L- and D-histidine. The histidine study seeks to investigate the optical isomer differention capabilities of THz spectroscopy. It is also hoped that the characterization of proteins will lead to further studies examining the conformational changes related to disease detection.

  16. Microcoil NMR spectroscopy: a novel tool for biological high throughput NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hopson, Russell E; Peti, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Microcoil NMR spectroscopy is based on the increase of coil sensitivity for smaller coil diameters (approximately 1/d). Microcoil NMR probes deliver a remarkable mass-based sensitivity increase (8- to 12-fold) when compared with commonly used 5-mm NMR probes. Although microcoil NMR probes are a well established analytical tool for small molecule liquid-state NMR spectroscopy, after spectroscopy only recently have microcoil NMR probes become available for biomolecular NMR spectroscopy. This chapter highlights differences between commercially available microcoil NMR probes suitable for biomolecular NMR spectroscopy. Furthermore, it provides practical guidance for the use of microcoil probes and shows direct applications for structural biology and structural genomics, such as optimal target screening and structure determination, among others.

  17. Our Hidden Past: Biology, Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Ray; Congdon, Charles; Bervin, Barry; Gaulden, Mary Esther; Russell, Liane

    2017-01-01

    After World War II, vacant buildings at Y-12 and a growing new Biology Division for which there was not adequate space at Oak Ridge National Laboratory combined to provide a home for genetic research at Y-12. In January 1949, the Biology Division moved into Building 9210.

  18. BioPartsBuilder: a synthetic biology tool for combinatorial assembly of biological parts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kun; Stracquadanio, Giovanni; Luo, Jingchuan; Boeke, Jef D; Bader, Joel S

    2016-03-15

    Combinatorial assembly of DNA elements is an efficient method for building large-scale synthetic pathways from standardized, reusable components. These methods are particularly useful because they enable assembly of multiple DNA fragments in one reaction, at the cost of requiring that each fragment satisfies design constraints. We developed BioPartsBuilder as a biologist-friendly web tool to design biological parts that are compatible with DNA combinatorial assembly methods, such as Golden Gate and related methods. It retrieves biological sequences, enforces compliance with assembly design standards and provides a fabrication plan for each fragment. BioPartsBuilder is accessible at http://public.biopartsbuilder.org and an Amazon Web Services image is available from the AWS Market Place (AMI ID: ami-508acf38). Source code is released under the MIT license, and available for download at https://github.com/baderzone/biopartsbuilder joel.bader@jhu.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  19. BioPartsBuilder: a synthetic biology tool for combinatorial assembly of biological parts

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kun; Stracquadanio, Giovanni; Luo, Jingchuan; Boeke, Jef D.; Bader, Joel S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Combinatorial assembly of DNA elements is an efficient method for building large-scale synthetic pathways from standardized, reusable components. These methods are particularly useful because they enable assembly of multiple DNA fragments in one reaction, at the cost of requiring that each fragment satisfies design constraints. We developed BioPartsBuilder as a biologist-friendly web tool to design biological parts that are compatible with DNA combinatorial assembly methods, such as Golden Gate and related methods. It retrieves biological sequences, enforces compliance with assembly design standards and provides a fabrication plan for each fragment. Availability and implementation: BioPartsBuilder is accessible at http://public.biopartsbuilder.org and an Amazon Web Services image is available from the AWS Market Place (AMI ID: ami-508acf38). Source code is released under the MIT license, and available for download at https://github.com/baderzone/biopartsbuilder. Contact: joel.bader@jhu.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26568632

  20. Our Hidden Past: Biology, Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Ray; Russell, Liane; Mazur, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In their new home at "The Mouse House" at Y-12, researchers from ORNL's Biology Division conducted studies that led to standards such as dose rate effects that form the basis for current international standards for radiation exposure in humans.

  1. Histochemical analysis of biological tissues using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoharan, Ramasamy; Wang, Yang; Feld, Michael S.

    1996-02-01

    This paper reviews the application of the Raman spectroscopic technique for analysis of biological tissue. The advantages and disadvantages of visible, near-IR and UV excitations are described, and the problems and prospects of using these methodologies for disease diagnosis are addressed. In situ analysis of tissue proteins, lens, cornea, blood constituents, biological stones and several hard tissues is reviewed, and the potentials for diagnosing arterial disease, and cancer in gynecological tissues, soft tissues, breast, colon, bladder and brain are also presented. Recent technological advances in instrumentation allow the use of Raman spectroscopy for real time histochemical analysis of tissues. The capability of Raman microspectroscopy for providing spatial information about the distribution of biochemical constituents in tissues has been demonstrated. The work reviewed indicates the promise of Raman spectroscopy for endoscopic imaging and real-time quantitation of biochemical constituents in clinical situations.

  2. Critical appraisal: dental amalgam update--part II: biological effects.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Michael J; Swift, Edward J

    2013-12-01

    Dental amalgam restorations have been controversial for over 150 years. In Part I of this Critical Appraisal, the clinical efficacy of dental amalgam was updated. Here in Part II, the biological effects of dental amalgam are addressed.

  3. Development and biological applications of optical tweezers and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Chang'an

    Optical tweezers is a three-dimensional manipulation tool that employs a gradient force that originates from the single highly focused laser beam. Raman spectroscopy is a molecular analytical tool that can give a highly unique "fingerprint" for each substance by measuring the unique vibrations of its molecules. The combination of these two optical techniques offers a new tool for the manipulation and identification of single biological cells and microscopic particles. In this thesis, we designed and implemented a Laser-Tweezers-Raman-Spectroscopy (LTRS) system, also called the Raman-tweezers, for the simultaneous capture and analysis of both biological particles and non-biological particles. We show that microparticles can be conveniently captured at the focus of a laser beam and the Raman spectra of trapped particles can be acquired with high quality. The LTRS system overcomes the intrinsic Brownian motion and cell motility of microparticles in solution and provides a promising tool for in situ identifying suspicious agents. In order to increase the signal to noise ratio, several schemes were employed in LTRS system to reduce the blank noise and the fluorescence signal coming from analytes and the surrounding background. These techniques include near-infrared excitation, optical levitation, confocal microscopy, and frequency-shifted Raman difference. The LTRS system has been applied for the study in cell biology at the single cell level. With the built Raman-tweezers system, we studied the dynamic physiological processes of single living cells, including cell cycle, the transcription and translation of recombinant protein in transgenic yeast cells and the T cell activation. We also studied cell damage and associated biochemical processes in optical traps, UV radiations, and evaluated heating by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. These studies show that the Raman-tweezers system is feasible to provide rapid and reliable diagnosis of cellular disorders and can be

  4. Electrophoretic separator for purifying biologicals, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, L. R.

    1978-01-01

    A program to develop an engineering model of an electrophoretic separator for purifying biologicals is summarized. An extensive mathematical modeling study and numerous ground based tests were included. Focus was placed on developing an actual electrophoretic separator of the continuous flow type, configured and suitable for flight testing as a space processing applications rocket payload.

  5. High-resolution waveguide THz spectroscopy of biological molecules.

    PubMed

    Laman, N; Harsha, S Sree; Grischkowsky, D; Melinger, Joseph S

    2008-02-01

    Low-frequency vibrational modes of biological molecules consist of intramolecular modes, which are dependent on the molecule as a whole, as well as intermolecular modes, which arise from hydrogen-bonding interactions and van der Waals forces. Vibrational modes thus contain important information about conformation dynamics of biological molecules, and can also be used for identification purposes. However, conventional Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) often result in broad, overlapping features that are difficult to distinguish. The technique of waveguide THz-TDS has been recently developed, resulting in sharper features. For this technique, an ordered polycrystalline film of the molecule is formed on a metal sample plate. This plate is incorporated into a metal parallel-plate waveguide and probed via waveguide THz-TDS. The planar order of the film reduces the inhomogeneous broadening, and cooling of the samples to 77K reduces the homogenous broadening. This combination results in the line-narrowing of THz vibrational modes, in some cases to an unprecedented degree. Here, this technique has been demonstrated with seven small biological molecules, thymine, deoxycytidine, adenosine, D-glucose, tryptophan, glycine, and L-alanine. The successful demonstration of this technique shows the possibilities and promise for future studies of internal vibrational modes of large biological molecules.

  6. THz-Raman spectroscopy for explosives, chemical, and biological detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carriere, James T. A.; Havermeyer, Frank; Heyler, Randy A.

    2013-05-01

    Raman and Terahertz spectroscopy are both widely used for their ability to safely and remotely identify unknown materials. Each approach has its advantages and disadvantages. Traditional Raman spectroscopy typically measures molecular energy transitions in the 200-5000cm-1 region corresponding to sub-molecular stretching or bending transitions, while Terahertz spectroscopy measures molecular energy transitions in the 1-200cm-1 region (30GHz - 6THz) that correspond to low energy rotational modes or vibrational modes of the entire molecule. Many difficult to detect explosives and other hazardous chemicals are known to have multiple relatively strong transitions in this "Terahertz" (<200cm-1, <6THz) regime, suggesting this method as a powerful complementary approach for identification. However, THz signal generation is often expensive, many THz spectroscopy systems are limited to just a few THz range, and strong water absorption bands in this region can act to mask certain transitions if great care isn't taken during sample preparation. Alternatively, low-frequency or "THz-Raman" spectroscopy, which covers the ~5cm-1 to 200cm-1 (150GHz - 6 THz) regions and beyond, offers a powerful, compact and economical alternative to probe these low energy transitions. We present results from a new approach for extending the range of Raman spectroscopy into the Terahertz regime using an ultra-narrow-band volume holographic grating (VHG) based notch filter system. An integrated, compact Raman system is demonstrated utilizing a single stage spectrometer to show both Stokes and anti-Stokes measurements down to <10cm-1 on traditionally difficult to detect explosives, as well as other chemical and biological samples.

  7. Structural insights on biologically relevant cationic membranes by ESR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rozenfeld, Julio H K; Duarte, Evandro L; Oliveira, Tiago R; Lamy, M Teresa

    2017-08-23

    Cationic bilayers have been used as models to study membrane fusion, templates for polymerization and deposition of materials, carriers of nucleic acids and hydrophobic drugs, microbicidal agents and vaccine adjuvants. The versatility of these membranes depends on their structure. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is a powerful technique that employs hydrophobic spin labels to probe membrane structure and packing. The focus of this review is the extensive structural characterization of cationic membranes prepared with dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide or diC14-amidine to illustrate how ESR spectroscopy can provide important structural information on bilayer thermotropic behavior, gel and fluid phases, phase coexistence, presence of bilayer interdigitation, membrane fusion and interactions with other biologically relevant molecules.

  8. Plant and Animal Gravitational Biology. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Session TA2 includes short reports covering: (1) The Interaction of Microgravity and Ethylene on Soybean Growth and Metabolism; (2) Structure and G-Sensitivity of Root Statocytes under Different Mass Acceleration; (3) Extracellular Production of Taxanes on Cell Surfaces in Simulated Microgravity and Hypergravity; (4) Current Problems of Space Cell Phytobiology; (5) Biological Consequences of Microgravity-Induced Alterations in Water Metabolism of Plant Cells; (6) Localization of Calcium Ions in Chlorella Cells Under Clinorotation; (7) Changes of Fatty Acids Content of Plant Cell Plasma Membranes under Altered Gravity; (8) Simulation of Gravity by Non-Symmetrical Vibrations and Ultrasound; and (9) Response to Simulated weightlessness of In Vitro Cultures of Differentiated Epithelial Follicular Cells from Thyroid.

  9. The biological microprocessor, or how to build a computer with biological parts

    PubMed Central

    Moe-Behrens, Gerd HG

    2013-01-01

    Systemics, a revolutionary paradigm shift in scientific thinking, with applications in systems biology, and synthetic biology, have led to the idea of using silicon computers and their engineering principles as a blueprint for the engineering of a similar machine made from biological parts. Here we describe these building blocks and how they can be assembled to a general purpose computer system, a biological microprocessor. Such a system consists of biological parts building an input / output device, an arithmetic logic unit, a control unit, memory, and wires (busses) to interconnect these components. A biocomputer can be used to monitor and control a biological system. PMID:24688733

  10. Terahertz spectroscopy for chemicals and biological sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hai-Bo

    Terahertz (THz) radiation offers innovative sensing and imaging technologies that can provide information unavailable through other conventional electromagnetic techniques. With the advancement of THz technologies, THz sensing will impact a broad range of areas. This thesis focuses on the use of THz spectroscopy for sensing applications including explosives detection, pharmaceutical identification and biological characterization. Using both a THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) system and a Fourier transform far-infrared spectrometer (FT-FIR), a THz spectral database of explosives and related compounds (ERCs) in the range of 0.1-20 THz was established. The transmission measurements show good agreement with the diffuse reflectance measurements, which are more feasible for practical applications. Density Functional Theory was employed to calculate structures and vibrational modes of several important ERCs and the calculated spectra are in good accordance with the experimental data in the 3-20 THz range. The detection and identification of the explosive RDX using diffusely reflected THz waves were also demonstrated. THz-TDS was applied successfully for pharmaceutical study, such as investigating drug interactions, as well as identifying hydrated and anhydrous drugs, based upon the intermolecular vibrational modes of drug substances. Dehydrations and complex solid state reactions of pharmaceutical materials were studied with THz-TDS and the reaction kinetics was successfully probed. These investigations have opened new avenues for using THz technologies in pharmaceutical science and industry. THz spectra of amino acids, purines and other biomolecules were recorded. Most of these solid-state biocompounds have THz spectral features in the 0.1-3.0 THz range. THz spectroscopy of solid-state proteins and bioactive protein micro suspensions in organic media was studied and their THz absorption features may reflect their collective vibrational modes which could be used to

  11. Sub-terahertz resonance spectroscopy of biological macromolecules and cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Globus, Tatiana; Moyer, Aaron; Gelmont, Boris; Khromova, Tatyana; Sizov, Igor; Ferrance, Jerome

    2013-05-01

    Recently we introduced a Sub-THz spectroscopic system for characterizing vibrational resonance features from biological materials. This new, continuous-wave, frequency-domain spectroscopic sensor operates at room temperature between 315 and 480 GHz with spectral resolution of at least 1 GHz and utilizes the source and detector components from Virginia Diode, Inc. In this work we present experimental results and interpretation of spectroscopic signatures from bacterial cells and their biological macromolecule structural components. Transmission and absorption spectra of the bacterial protein thioredoxin, DNA and lyophilized cells of Escherichia coli (E. coli), as well as spores of Bacillus subtillis and B. atrophaeus have been characterized. Experimental results for biomolecules are compared with absorption spectra calculated using molecular dynamics simulation, and confirm the underlying physics for resonance spectroscopy based on interactions between THz radiation and vibrational modes or groups of modes of atomic motions. Such interactions result in multiple intense and narrow specific resonances in transmission/absorption spectra from nano-gram samples with spectral line widths as small as 3 GHz. The results of this study indicate diverse relaxation dynamic mechanisms relevant to sub-THz vibrational spectroscopy, including long-lasting processes. We demonstrate that high sensitivity in resolved specific absorption fingerprints provides conditions for reliable detection, identification and discrimination capability, to the level of strains of the same bacteria, and for monitoring interactions between biomaterials and reagents in near real-time. Additionally, it creates the basis for the development of new types of advanced biological sensors through integrating the developed system with a microfluidic platform for biomaterial samples.

  12. Negative dielectrophoresis spectroscopy for rare analyte quantification in biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirmani, Syed Abdul Mannan; Gudagunti, Fleming Dackson; Velmanickam, Logeeshan; Nawarathna, Dharmakeerthi; Lima, Ivan T., Jr.

    2017-03-01

    We propose the use of negative dielectrophoresis (DEP) spectroscopy as a technique to improve the detection limit of rare analytes in biological samples. We observe a significant dependence of the negative DEP force on functionalized polystyrene beads at the edges of interdigitated electrodes with respect to the frequency of the electric field. We measured this velocity of repulsion for 0% and 0.8% conjugation of avidin with biotin functionalized polystyrene beads with our automated software through real-time image processing that monitors the Rayleigh scattering from the beads. A significant difference in the velocity of the beads was observed in the presence of as little as 80 molecules of avidin per biotin functionalized bead. This technology can be applied in the detection and quantification of rare analytes that can be useful in the diagnosis and the treatment of diseases, such as cancer and myocardial infarction, with the use of polystyrene beads functionalized with antibodies for the target biomarkers.

  13. Development of Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy in the Biological Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Aronova, M.A.; Leapman, R.D.

    2012-01-01

    The high sensitivity of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) for detecting light elements at the nanoscale makes it a valuable technique for application to biological systems. In particular, EELS provides quantitative information about elemental distributions within subcellular compartments, specific atoms bound to individual macromolecular assemblies, and the composition of bionanoparticles. The EELS data can be acquired either in the fixed beam energy-filtered transmission electron microscope (EFTEM) or in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), and recent progress in the development of both approaches has greatly expanded the range of applications for EELS analysis. Near single atom sensitivity is now achievable for certain elements bound to isolated macromolecules, and it becomes possible to obtain three-dimensional compositional distributions from sectioned cells through EFTEM tomography. PMID:23049161

  14. Rapid biological agent identification by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Stuart; Smith, Wayne W.; Elliott, Susan; Sperry, Jay F.

    1999-11-01

    The Chemical Weapons Convention prohibits the development, production, stockpiling, and use of warfare agents (chemical and biological), and requires their destruction. Yet their use persists and has been included in the terrorist's arsenal. Currently, a number of analytical methods are being developed to perform rapid measurements of trace agents to ensure treaty compliance, as well as safe environments for military personal and the public at large. We have been investigating the ability of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to detect bacterial nucleic acid-base pairs with sufficient sensitivity and selectivity to eliminate the need for enumeration used in polymerase chain reactions and culture growth, required by other measurement techniques. The design of a small volume, fiber optic coupled, electrolytic sample cell is presented along with analysis of DNA and RNA separated from non-toxic bacteria.

  15. Biology coming full circle: joining the whole and the parts.

    PubMed

    Wikswo, John P; Porter, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    The new cover of Experimental Biology and Medicine features the hermeneutic circle of biology, a concept we have adapted from the hermeneutic principle that one understands the whole only in terms of each part and the parts only in terms of the whole. Our hermeneutic circle summarizes the course of experimental biology through 2500 years of the achievements of reductionist research (understanding the parts), which culminates in our ability to rapidly sequence the genome. Rather than returning along the same path in a constructionist approach that simply builds upon this knowledge, but in reverse, an alternative is to close the circle with synthetic constructions that seek to integrate the full complexity of biological and physiological systems (understanding the whole), of which organs-on-chips are one example. This closing of the circle cannot be a comprehensively accurate representation of biology, but it can be a synthetic one that effectively defines particular biological subsystems. The illustration of the hermeneutic circle of biology is also intended to suggest both the multiple cycles that may be required to reach such a synthesis and the expansion of the circle in an outward spiral as knowledge increases. Our commentary explains the symbolism of the new cover in a philosophical and scientific discussion.

  16. Biology coming full circle: Joining the whole and the parts

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    The new cover of Experimental Biology and Medicine features the hermeneutic circle of biology, a concept we have adapted from the hermeneutic principle that one understands the whole only in terms of each part and the parts only in terms of the whole. Our hermeneutic circle summarizes the course of experimental biology through 2500 years of the achievements of reductionist research (understanding the parts), which culminates in our ability to rapidly sequence the genome. Rather than returning along the same path in a constructionist approach that simply builds upon this knowledge, but in reverse, an alternative is to close the circle with synthetic constructions that seek to integrate the full complexity of biological and physiological systems (understanding the whole), of which organs-on-chips are one example. This closing of the circle cannot be a comprehensively accurate representation of biology, but it can be a synthetic one that effectively defines particular biological subsystems. The illustration of the hermeneutic circle of biology is also intended to suggest both the multiple cycles that may be required to reach such a synthesis and the expansion of the circle in an outward spiral as knowledge increases. Our commentary explains the symbolism of the new cover in a philosophical and scientific discussion. PMID:25583953

  17. Terahertz spectroscopy of dry, hydrated, and thermally denatured biological macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipscomb, Dawn; Echchgadda, Ibtissam; Ibey, Bennett L.; Beier, Hope; Thomas, Robert J.; Peralta, Xomalin; Wilmink, Gerald J.

    2012-03-01

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) is an effective technique to probe the intermolecular and collective vibrational modes of biological macromolecules at THz frequencies. To date, the vast majority of spectroscopic studies have been performed on dehydrated biomolecular samples. Given the fact that all biochemical processes occur in aqueous environments and water is required for proper protein folding and function, we hypothesize that valuable information can be gained from spectroscopic studies performed on hydrated biomolecules in their native conformation. In this study, we used a THz-TDS system that exploits photoconductive techniques for THz pulse generation and freespace electro-optical sampling approaches for detection. We used the THz spectrometer to measure the time-dependent electric field of THz waves upon interaction with water, phosphate buffered saline (PBS), and collagen gels. By comparing these waveforms with references, we simultaneously determined each sample's index of refraction (n) and absorption coefficients (μa) as a function of frequency. Our data show that the properties we measure for the water, PBS and collagen are comparable to those reported in the literature. In the future, we plan to examine the effect that both temperature and pH have on the optical properties of other biological macromolecules. Studies will also be performed to compare our results to those generated using molecular dynamics simulations.

  18. Using Fourier transform IR spectroscopy to analyze biological materials

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Matthew J; Trevisan, Júlio; Bassan, Paul; Bhargava, Rohit; Butler, Holly J; Dorling, Konrad M; Fielden, Peter R; Fogarty, Simon W; Fullwood, Nigel J; Heys, Kelly A; Hughes, Caryn; Lasch, Peter; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L; Obinaju, Blessing; Sockalingum, Ganesh D; Sulé-Suso, Josep; Strong, Rebecca J; Walsh, Michael J; Wood, Bayden R; Gardner, Peter; Martin, Francis L

    2015-01-01

    IR spectroscopy is an excellent method for biological analyses. It enables the nonperturbative, label-free extraction of biochemical information and images toward diagnosis and the assessment of cell functionality. Although not strictly microscopy in the conventional sense, it allows the construction of images of tissue or cell architecture by the passing of spectral data through a variety of computational algorithms. Because such images are constructed from fingerprint spectra, the notion is that they can be an objective reflection of the underlying health status of the analyzed sample. One of the major difficulties in the field has been determining a consensus on spectral pre-processing and data analysis. This manuscript brings together as coauthors some of the leaders in this field to allow the standardization of methods and procedures for adapting a multistage approach to a methodology that can be applied to a variety of cell biological questions or used within a clinical setting for disease screening or diagnosis. We describe a protocol for collecting IR spectra and images from biological samples (e.g., fixed cytology and tissue sections, live cells or biofluids) that assesses the instrumental options available, appropriate sample preparation, different sampling modes as well as important advances in spectral data acquisition. After acquisition, data processing consists of a sequence of steps including quality control, spectral pre-processing, feature extraction and classification of the supervised or unsupervised type. A typical experiment can be completed and analyzed within hours. Example results are presented on the use of IR spectra combined with multivariate data processing. PMID:24992094

  19. Using Fourier transform IR spectroscopy to analyze biological materials.

    PubMed

    Baker, Matthew J; Trevisan, Júlio; Bassan, Paul; Bhargava, Rohit; Butler, Holly J; Dorling, Konrad M; Fielden, Peter R; Fogarty, Simon W; Fullwood, Nigel J; Heys, Kelly A; Hughes, Caryn; Lasch, Peter; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L; Obinaju, Blessing; Sockalingum, Ganesh D; Sulé-Suso, Josep; Strong, Rebecca J; Walsh, Michael J; Wood, Bayden R; Gardner, Peter; Martin, Francis L

    2014-08-01

    IR spectroscopy is an excellent method for biological analyses. It enables the nonperturbative, label-free extraction of biochemical information and images toward diagnosis and the assessment of cell functionality. Although not strictly microscopy in the conventional sense, it allows the construction of images of tissue or cell architecture by the passing of spectral data through a variety of computational algorithms. Because such images are constructed from fingerprint spectra, the notion is that they can be an objective reflection of the underlying health status of the analyzed sample. One of the major difficulties in the field has been determining a consensus on spectral pre-processing and data analysis. This manuscript brings together as coauthors some of the leaders in this field to allow the standardization of methods and procedures for adapting a multistage approach to a methodology that can be applied to a variety of cell biological questions or used within a clinical setting for disease screening or diagnosis. We describe a protocol for collecting IR spectra and images from biological samples (e.g., fixed cytology and tissue sections, live cells or biofluids) that assesses the instrumental options available, appropriate sample preparation, different sampling modes as well as important advances in spectral data acquisition. After acquisition, data processing consists of a sequence of steps including quality control, spectral pre-processing, feature extraction and classification of the supervised or unsupervised type. A typical experiment can be completed and analyzed within hours. Example results are presented on the use of IR spectra combined with multivariate data processing.

  20. Spectroscopy of Multilayered Biological Tissues for Diabetes Care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudovsky, Dmitry

    Neurological and vascular complications of diabetes mellitus are known to cause foot ulceration in diabetic patients. Present clinical screening techniques enable the diabetes care provider to triage treatment by identifying diabetic patients at risk of foot ulceration. However, these techniques cannot effectively identify specific areas of the foot at risk of ulceration. This study aims to develop non-invasive optical techniques for accurate assessment of tissue health and viability with spatial resolution on the order of 1 mm². The thesis can be divided into three parts: (1) the use of hyperspectral tissue oximetry to detect microcirculatory changes prior to ulcer formation, (2) development of a two-layer tissue spectroscopy algorithm and its application to detection of callus formation or epidermal degradation prior to ulceration, and (3) multi-layered tissue fluorescence modeling for identification of bacterial growth in existing diabetic foot wounds. The first part of the dissertation describes a clinical study in which hyperspectral tissue oximetry was performed on multiple diabetic subjects at risk of ulceration. Tissue oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations were estimated using the Modified Beer-Lambert law. Then, an ulcer prediction algorithm was developed based on retrospective analysis of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations in sites that were known to ulcerate. The ulcer prediction algorithm exhibited a large sensitivity but low specificity of 95 and 80%, respectively. The second part of the dissertation revisited the hyperspectral data presented in part one with a new and novel two-layer tissue spectroscopy algorithm. This algorithm was able to detect not only oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations, but also the thickness of the epidermis, and the tissue's scattering coefficient. Specifically, change in epidermal thickness provided insight into the formation of diabetic foot ulcers over time. Indeed, callus formation or

  1. Interest in biology. Part I: A multidimensional construct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Paul L.; Tamir, Pinchas

    Interest in a school subject (e.g., biology) is conceptualized in terms of three components: topics, activities, and motives, each of which has several dimensions. In this study, seven instruments were developed and administered to grade-10 biology students in Israel. Factor analysis provided support for the conceptualization which underlies the development of the instruments. Topic dimensions included biochemical processes, nonhuman organisms, human biology, personal hygiene, and practical applications; the activity dimensions were experiential learning, reception learning, writing/summarizing and group discussion; motives included environmental issues, moral issues, examination success, personal independence, problem solving, and four career dimensions (research, high-status professions, lower-status careers, woodsy-birdsy careers). In an analysis described in Part II of this paper, the students were classified into four groups on the basis of their grade-11 subject enrollment intentions: H (high-level biology), L (low-level biology), P (physical science), and N (no science). Zero-order and multiple correlations were found between interest and other variables and membership/nonmembership of the four groups. Students in Group H were characterized by higher achievement in year-10 biology, higher levels of enjoyment of biology, career orientations towards research or high-status biology-based professions, greater interest in various biology topics, especially reproduction/cell division/genetics, and a greater tendency to regard the Bagrut (grade-12) examination as interesting. Students in Group N displayed lower levels of interest in various topics (especially the microscope, plants, and reproduction), were less motivated to solve problems, had poorer grades in biology (and chemistry), were less likely to perceive biology as useful, were less likely to regard the Bagrut examination as fair, and were less likely to be interested in social modes of learning. There

  2. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy: Part II. Advantages of FT-IR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, W. D.

    1987-01-01

    This is Part II in a series on Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Described are various advantages of FT-IR spectroscopy including energy advantages, wavenumber accuracy, constant resolution, polarization effects, and stepping at grating changes. (RH)

  3. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy: Part II. Advantages of FT-IR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, W. D.

    1987-01-01

    This is Part II in a series on Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Described are various advantages of FT-IR spectroscopy including energy advantages, wavenumber accuracy, constant resolution, polarization effects, and stepping at grating changes. (RH)

  4. The year's new drugs & biologics 2015: Part I.

    PubMed

    Graul, A I; Cruces, E; Stringer, M

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 100 new drugs and biologics, including important new line extensions, were approved or launched for the first time globally in 2015. These products are covered in depth in part I of our annual review of the pharma and biotech industry.

  5. Fourier-Transform Raman Spectroscopy Of Biological Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Ira W.; Lewis, E. Neil

    1989-12-01

    Although the successful coupling of Raman scattered near-infrared radiation to a Michelson interferometer has recently created an outburst of intense interest in Fourier-transform (FT) Raman spectrometry," extended applications of the technique to macromolecular assemblies of biochemical and biophysical relevance have not progressed as rapidly as studies directed primarily at more conventional chemical characterizations. Since biological materials sampled with visible laser excitation sources typically emit a dominant fluorescence signal originating either from the intrinsic fluorescence of the molecular scatterer or from unrelenting contaminants, the use of near-infrared Nd:YAG laser excitation offers a convenient approach for avoiding this frequently overwhelming effect. In addition, the FT-Raman instrumentation provides a means of eliminating the deleterious resonance and decomposition effects often observed with the more accessible green and blue laser emissions. However, in choosing the incident near-infrared wavelength at, for example, 1064nm, the Raman scattered intensity decreases by factors of eighteen to forty from the Raman emissions induced by the shorter, visible excitations. Depending upon the experiment, this disadvantage is offset by the throughput and multiplex advantages afforded by the interferometric design. Thus, for most chemical systems, near-infrared FT-Raman spectroscopy, clearly provides a means for obtaining vibrational Raman spectra from samples intractable to the use of visible laser sources. In particular, for neat liquids, dilute solutions or polycrystalline materials, the ability to achieve high quality, reproducible spectra is, with moderate experience and perhaps relatively high laser powers, as straightforward as the conventional methods used to obtain Raman spectra with visible excitation and dispersive monochromators. In using near-infrared FT techniques to determine the Raman spectra of biological samples, one encounters new

  6. Highly Resolved Sub-Terahertz Vibrational Spectroscopy of Biological Macromolecules and Bacteria Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    HIGHLY RESOLVED SUB-TERAHERTZ VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY OF BIOLOGICAL MACROMOLECULES AND BACTERIA CELLS ECBC...SUBTITLE Highly Resolved Sub-Terahertz Vibrational Spectroscopy of Biological Macromolecules and Bacteria Cells 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W911SR-14-P...22 4.3 Bacteria THz Study

  7. Steady-state spectroscopy of new biological probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Zied, Osama K.

    2007-02-01

    The steady state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy of 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO) and (2,2'-bipyridine)-3,3'-diol (BP(OH) II) were studied here free in solution and in human serum albumin (HSA) in order to test their applicability as new biological probes. HBO and BP(OH) II are known to undergo intramolecular proton transfers in the excited state. Their absorption and fluorescence spectra are sensitive to environmental change from hydrophilic to hydrophobic, thus allowing the opportunity to use them as environment-sensitive probes. The effect of water on the steady state spectra of the two molecules also shows unique features which may position them as water sensors in biological systems. For HBO in buffer, fluorescence is only due to the syn-keto tautomer, whereas in HSA the fluorescence is due to four species in equilibrium in the excited state (the syn-keto tautomer, the anti-enol tautomer, the solvated syn-enol tautomer, and the anion species of HBO). Analysis of the fluorescence spectra of HBO in HSA indicates that HBO is exposed to less water in the HBO:HSA complex. For the BP(OH) II molecule, unique absorption due to water was observed in the spectral region of 400-450 nm. This absorption decreases in the presence of HSA due to less accessibility to water as a result of binding to HSA. Fluorescence of BP(OH) II is due solely to the di-keto tautomer after double proton transfer in the excited state. The fluorescence peak of BP(OH) II shows a red-shift upon HSA recognition which is attributed to the hydrophobic environment inside the binding site of HSA. We discuss also the effect of probe-inclusion inside well-defined hydrophobic cavities of cyclodextrins.

  8. Multi-Photon Micro-Spectroscopy of Biological Specimens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana and maize stem sections were used to demonstrate the feasibility of multi- photon fluorescence micro-spectroscopy at subcellular...Micro-spectroscopy, multi-photon fluorescence spectroscopy, second harmonic generation, plant tissues, stem, chloroplast, protoplast, maize , Arabidopsis...thaliana and stem slices of maize (Zea mays) were used as samples to address these issues in a set-up for micro-spectroscopy. 2. MATERIALS AND METHODS

  9. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy: Statistical analysis and biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffarian, Saveez

    2002-01-01

    The experimental design and realization of an apparatus which can be used both for single molecule fluorescence detection and also fluorescence correlation and cross correlation spectroscopy is presented. A thorough statistical analysis of the fluorescence correlation functions including the analysis of bias and errors based on analytical derivations has been carried out. Using the methods developed here, the mechanism of binding and cleavage site recognition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) for their substrates has been studied. We demonstrate that two of the MMP family members, Collagenase (MMP-1) and Gelatinase A (MMP-2) exhibit diffusion along their substrates, the importance of this diffusion process and its biological implications are discussed. We show through truncation mutants that the hemopexin domain of the MMP-2 plays and important role in the substrate diffusion of this enzyme. Single molecule diffusion of the collagenase MMP-1 has been observed on collagen fibrils and shown to be biased. The discovered biased diffusion would make the MMP-1 molecule an active motor, thus making it the first active motor that is not coupled to ATP hydrolysis. The possible sources of energy for this enzyme and their implications are discussed. We propose that a possible source of energy for the enzyme can be in the rearrangement of the structure of collagen fibrils. In a separate application, using the methods developed here, we have observed an intermediate in the intestinal fatty acid binding protein folding process through the changes in its hydrodynamic radius also the fluctuations in the structure of the IFABP in solution were measured using FCS.

  10. Detection of Biological Materials Using Ion Mobility Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rodacy, P.J.; Sterling, J.P.; Butler, M.A.

    1999-03-01

    Traditionally, Ion Mobility Spectroscopy has been used to examine ions of relatively low molecular weight and high ion mobility. In recent years, however, biomolecules such as bradykinin, cytochrome c, bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), apomyoglobin, and lysozyme, have been successfully analyzed, but studies of whole bio-organisms have not been performed. In this study an attempt was made to detect and measure the mobility of two bacteriophages, {lambda}-phage and MS2 using electrospray methods to inject the viruses into the ion mobility spectrometer. Using data from Yeh, et al., which makes a comparison between the diameter of non-biologic particles and the specific particle mobility, the particle mobility for the MS2 virus was estimated to be 10{sup {minus}2} cm{sup 2}/volt-sec. From this mobility the drift time of these particles in our spectrometer was calculated to be approximately 65 msec. The particle mobility for the {lambda}-phage virus was estimated to be 10{sup {minus}3} cm{sup 2}/volt-sec. which would result in a drift time of 0.7 sec. Spectra showing the presence of a viral peak at the expected drift time were not observed. However, changes in the reactant ion peak that could be directly attributed to the presence of the viruses were observed. Virus clustering, excessive collisions, and the electrospray injection method limited the performance of this IMS. However, we believe that an instrument specifically designed to analyze such bioagents and utilizing other injection and ionization methods will succeed in directly detecting viruses and bacteria.

  11. Analytical Chemistry of Surfaces: Part II. Electron Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hercules, David M.; Hercules, Shirley H.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses two surface techniques: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ESCA) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Focuses on fundamental aspects of each technique, important features of instrumentation, and some examples of how ESCA and AES have been applied to analytical surface problems. (JN)

  12. UV-Vis spectroscopy of tyrosine side-groups in studies of protein structure. Part 2: selected applications.

    PubMed

    Antosiewicz, Jan M; Shugar, David

    In Part 2 we discuss application of several different types of UV-Vis spectroscopy, such as normal, difference, and second-derivative UV absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, linear and circular dichroism spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, of the side-chain of tyrosine residues in different molecular environments. We review the ways these spectroscopies can be used to probe complex protein structures.

  13. UV-Vis spectroscopy of tyrosine side-groups in studies of protein structure. Part 2: selected applications.

    PubMed

    Antosiewicz, Jan M; Shugar, David

    2016-06-01

    In Part 2 we discuss application of several different types of UV-Vis spectroscopy, such as normal, difference, and second-derivative UV absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, linear and circular dichroism spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, of the side-chain of tyrosine residues in different molecular environments. We review the ways these spectroscopies can be used to probe complex protein structures.

  14. The Didactics of Biology. A Selected Bibliography for 1979. Part I [and] Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altmann, Antonin, Ed.; Lipertova, Pavla, Ed.

    Selected articles on various aspects of biology teaching published in 1979 have been annotated in this two-part bibliography. Entries from 18 journals representing 11 different countries are presented according to a topic area classification scheme listed in the table of contents. Countries represented include: Australia; Bulgaria; Czechoslovakia;…

  15. The Didactics of Biology. A Selected Bibliography for 1979. Part I [and] Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altmann, Antonin, Ed.; Lipertova, Pavla, Ed.

    Selected articles on various aspects of biology teaching published in 1979 have been annotated in this two-part bibliography. Entries from 18 journals representing 11 different countries are presented according to a topic area classification scheme listed in the table of contents. Countries represented include: Australia; Bulgaria; Czechoslovakia;…

  16. The year's new drugs & biologics 2016: Part I.

    PubMed

    Graul, A I; Pina, P; Cruces, E; Stringer, M

    2017-01-01

    Nearly 90 new drugs and biologics, including important new line extensions, were approved or launched for the first time globally in 2016, a comparatively lower number with respect to previous years. Forty-four new drugs and biologics reached their first markets worldwide in 2016, nearly 10% fewer than the previous year. Seven of the new launches were first-in-class agents, meaning the first drug with a novel mechanism of action to be approved and launched anywhere in the world. In addition, 23 novel line extensions (i.e., new formulations, new combinations and new indications) were introduced last year. The remaining 21 products discussed in this article were approved for the first time during the year just passed, but had not yet been launched as of December 15, 2016. Information on these new arrivals is covered in depth in part I of our annual review of the pharma and biotech industry. Copyright 2017 Clarivate Analytics.

  17. Application of Optical Imaging and Spectroscopy to Radiation Biology

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Gregory M.; Vishwanath, Karthik; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    Optical imaging and spectroscopy is a diverse field that has been of critical importance in a wide range of areas in radiation research. It is capable of spanning a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, and has the sensitivity and specificity needed for molecular and functional imaging. This review will describe the basic principles of optical imaging and spectroscopy, highlighting a few relevant applications to radiation research. PMID:22360397

  18. Evolving together: the biology of symbiosis, part 1

    PubMed Central

    2000-01-01

    Symbioses, prolonged associations between organisms often widely separated phylogenetically, are more common in biology than we once thought and have been neglected as a phenomenon worthy of study on its own merits. Extending along a dynamic continuum from antagonistic to cooperative and often involving elements of both antagonism and mutualism, symbioses involve pathogens, commensals, and mutualists interacting in myriad ways over the evolutionary history of the involved “partners.” In this first of 2 parts, some remarkable examples of symbiosis will be explored, from the coral-algal symbiosis and nitrogen fixation to the great diversity of dietary specializations enabled by the gastrointestinal microbiota of animals. PMID:16389385

  19. Standard virtual biological parts: a repository of modular modeling components for synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Cooling, M T; Rouilly, V; Misirli, G; Lawson, J; Yu, T; Hallinan, J; Wipat, A

    2010-04-01

    Fabrication of synthetic biological systems is greatly enhanced by incorporating engineering design principles and techniques such as computer-aided design. To this end, the ongoing standardization of biological parts presents an opportunity to develop libraries of standard virtual parts in the form of mathematical models that can be combined to inform system design. We present an online Repository, populated with a collection of standardized models that can readily be recombined to model different biological systems using the inherent modularity support of the CellML 1.1 model exchange format. The applicability of this approach is demonstrated by modeling gold-medal winning iGEM machines. The Repository is available online as part of http://models.cellml.org. We hope to stimulate the worldwide community to reuse and extend the models therein, and contribute to the Repository of Standard Virtual Parts thus founded. Systems Model architecture information for the Systems Model described here, along with an additional example and a tutorial, is also available as Supplementary information. The example Systems Model from this manuscript can be found at http://models.cellml.org/workspace/bugbuster. The Template models used in the example can be found at http://models.cellml.org/workspace/SVP_Templates200906.

  20. The year's new drugs & biologics 2014 - Part II: trends & challenges.

    PubMed

    Graul, A I; Serebrov, M; Cruces, E; Tracy, M; Dulsat, C

    2015-02-01

    2014 was a year of continued high activity in the pharma and biotech industry, as evidenced in part I of this annual two-part review article published last month in this journal (1). As of December 23, 2014, a total of 55 new chemical and biological entities had reached their first markets worldwide, together with another 29 important new line extensions. Another 19 products were approved for the first time during the year but not yet launched by December 23. Furthermore, during the now-traditional year-end sprint, several regulatory agencies issued last-minute approvals for other compounds that missed the deadline for inclusion in that article, bringing the total of new approvals for the year to a somewhat higher number. In addition to the successful development, registration and launch of new drugs and biologics, there are various other trends and tendencies that serve as indicators of the overall health and status of the industry. These include the pursuit of novel programs designed by regulators to stimulate the development of drugs for diseases that are currently under-treated; the regular and pragmatic culling by companies of their R&D pipelines; and the decision to unify pipelines, portfolios and sales forces through mergers and acquisitions.

  1. Plasma spectroscopy of uranium and tungsten, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, T. D.

    1973-01-01

    Results of research on uranium and tungsten spectra are summarized. Measurements of visible line spectra and opacities were carried out on shock tube plasmas which, prior to shock compression, were mixtures of rare gases and UF6 or WF6. Opacities were compared to theoretical predictions. Feasibility of light source methods other than the shock tube was explored for future applications in the spectroscopy of heavy metals and ions.

  2. Advances in metabolome information retrieval: turning chemistry into biology. Part I: analytical chemistry of the metabolome.

    PubMed

    Tebani, Abdellah; Afonso, Carlos; Bekri, Soumeya

    2017-08-24

    Metabolites are small molecules produced by enzymatic reactions in a given organism. Metabolomics or metabolic phenotyping is a well-established omics aimed at comprehensively assessing metabolites in biological systems. These comprehensive analyses use analytical platforms, mainly nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, along with associated separation methods to gather qualitative and quantitative data. Metabolomics holistically evaluates biological systems in an unbiased, data-driven approach that may ultimately support generation of hypotheses. The approach inherently allows the molecular characterization of a biological sample with regard to both internal (genetics) and environmental (exosome, microbiome) influences. Metabolomics workflows are based on whether the investigator knows a priori what kind of metabolites to assess. Thus, a targeted metabolomics approach is defined as a quantitative analysis (absolute concentrations are determined) or a semiquantitative analysis (relative intensities are determined) of a set of metabolites that are possibly linked to common chemical classes or a selected metabolic pathway. An untargeted metabolomics approach is a semiquantitative analysis of the largest possible number of metabolites contained in a biological sample. This is part I of a review intending to give an overview of the state of the art of major metabolic phenotyping technologies. Furthermore, their inherent analytical advantages and limits regarding experimental design, sample handling, standardization and workflow challenges are discussed.

  3. Broadband Plasmon Waveguide Resonance Spectroscopy for Probing Biological Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, HAN; OROSZ, KRISTINA S.; TAKAHASHI, HIROMI; SAAVEDRA, S. SCOTT

    2010-01-01

    A commercially available spectrometer has been modified to perform plasmon waveguide resonance (PWR) spectroscopy over a broad spectral bandwidth. When compared to surface plasmon resonance (SPR), PWR has the advantage of allowing measurements in both s- and p-polarizations on a waveguide surface that is silica or glass rather than a noble metal. Here the waveguide is a BK7 glass slide coated with silver and silica layers. The resonance wavelength is sensitive to the optical thickness of the medium adjacent to the silica layer. The sensitivity of this technique is characterized and compared with broadband SPR both experimentally and theoretically. The sensitivity of spectral PWR is comparable to that of spectral SPR for samples with refractive indices close to that of water. The hydrophilic surface of the waveguide allows supported lipid bilayers to be formed spontaneously by vesicle fusion; in contrast, the surface of an SPR chip requires chemical modification to create a supported lipid membrane. Broadband PWR spectroscopy should be a useful technique to study biointerfaces, including ligand binding to transmembrane receptors and adsorption of peripheral proteins on ligand-bearing membranes. PMID:19796490

  4. Vibrational self-consistent field calculations for spectroscopy of biological molecules: new algorithmic developments and applications.

    PubMed

    Roy, Tapta Kanchan; Gerber, R Benny

    2013-06-28

    This review describes the vibrational self-consistent field (VSCF) method and its other variants for computing anharmonic vibrational spectroscopy of biological molecules. The superiority and limitations of this algorithm are discussed with examples. The spectroscopic accuracy of the VSCF method is compared with experimental results and other available state-of-the-art algorithms for various biologically important systems. For large biological molecules with many vibrational modes, the scaling of computational effort is investigated. The accuracy of the vibrational spectra of biological molecules using the VSCF approach for different electronic structure methods is also assessed. Finally, a few open problems and challenges in this field are discussed.

  5. Aquaphotomics: Near Infrared Spectroscopy and Water States in Biological Systems.

    PubMed

    Tsenkova, Roumiana; Kovacs, Zoltan; Kubota, Yosuke

    2015-01-01

    Aquaphotomics is a new discipline that provides a framework for understanding changes in water molecular system presented as a water spectral pattern, to mirror the rest of the solution and to give a holistic description related to system functionality. One of its main purposes is to identify water bands as main coordinates of future absorbance patterns to be used as a system biomarker. This chapter presents the Aquaphotomics methodology and illustrates a way to identify specific water bands using temperature change and addition of solutions of different ionic strength as perturbations. Rapid and precise measurement of low concentration solutes has been given as a strong evidence of the vast information that "the water spectral pattern as molecular mirror" approach provides. Few applications using near infrared spectroscopy and multivariate analysis as main tools of Aquaphotomics have been presented.

  6. Advances in metabolome information retrieval: turning chemistry into biology. Part II: biological information recovery.

    PubMed

    Tebani, Abdellah; Afonso, Carlos; Bekri, Soumeya

    2017-08-25

    This work reports the second part of a review intending to give the state of the art of major metabolic phenotyping strategies. It particularly deals with inherent advantages and limits regarding data analysis issues and biological information retrieval tools along with translational challenges. This Part starts with introducing the main data preprocessing strategies of the different metabolomics data. Then, it describes the main data analysis techniques including univariate and multivariate aspects. It also addresses the challenges related to metabolite annotation and characterization. Finally, functional analysis including pathway and network strategies are discussed. The last section of this review is devoted to practical considerations and current challenges and pathways to bring metabolomics into clinical environments.

  7. Detection of Taurine in Biological Tissues by 33S NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musio, Roberta; Sciacovelli, Oronzo

    2001-12-01

    The potential of 33S NMR spectroscopy for biochemical investigations on taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) is explored. It is demonstrated that 33S NMR spectroscopy allows the selective and unequivocal identification of taurine in biological samples. 33S NMR spectra of homogenated and intact tissues are reported for the first time, together with the spectrum of a living mollusc. Emphasis is placed on the importance of choosing appropriate signal processing methods to improve the quality of the 33S NMR spectra of biological tissues.

  8. Random matrix theory in biological nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Lacelle, S

    1984-01-01

    The statistical theory of energy levels or random matrix theory is presented in the context of the analysis of chemical shifts of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of large biological systems. Distribution functions for the spacing between nearest-neighbor energy levels are discussed for uncorrelated, correlated, and random superposition of correlated energy levels. Application of this approach to the NMR spectra of a vitamin, an antibiotic, and a protein demonstrates the state of correlation of an ensemble of energy levels that characterizes each system. The detection of coherent and dissipative structures in proteins becomes feasible with this statistical spectroscopic technique. PMID:6478032

  9. Frameworks for programming biological function through RNA parts and devices

    PubMed Central

    Win, Maung Nyan; Liang, Joe C.; Smolke, Christina D.

    2009-01-01

    One of the long-term goals of synthetic biology is to reliably engineer biological systems that perform human-defined functions. Currently, researchers face several scientific and technical challenges in designing and building biological systems, one of which is associated with our limited ability to access, transmit, and control molecular information through the design of functional biomolecules exhibiting novel properties. The fields of RNA biology and nucleic acid engineering, along with the tremendous interdisciplinary growth of synthetic biology, are fueling advances in the emerging field of RNA programming in living systems. Researchers are designing functional RNA molecules that exhibit increasingly complex functions and integrating these molecules into cellular circuits to program higher-level biological functions. The continued integration and growth of RNA design and synthetic biology presents exciting potential to transform how we interact with and program biology. PMID:19318211

  10. Instrumentation: Photodiode Array Detectors in UV-VIS Spectroscopy. Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Dianna G.

    1985-01-01

    A previous part (Analytical Chemistry; v57 n9 p1057A) discussed the theoretical aspects of diode ultraviolet-visual (UV-VIS) spectroscopy. This part describes the applications of diode arrays in analytical chemistry, also considering spectroelectrochemistry, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), HPLC data processing, stopped flow, and…

  11. Instrumentation: Photodiode Array Detectors in UV-VIS Spectroscopy. Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Dianna G.

    1985-01-01

    A previous part (Analytical Chemistry; v57 n9 p1057A) discussed the theoretical aspects of diode ultraviolet-visual (UV-VIS) spectroscopy. This part describes the applications of diode arrays in analytical chemistry, also considering spectroelectrochemistry, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), HPLC data processing, stopped flow, and…

  12. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in biology, chemistry, and medicine.

    PubMed

    Perevoshchikova, I V; Kotova, E A; Antonenko, Y N

    2011-05-01

    This review describes the method of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and its applications. FCS is used for investigating processes associated with changes in the mobility of molecules and complexes and allows researchers to study aggregation of particles, binding of fluorescent molecules with supramolecular complexes, lipid vesicles, etc. The size of objects under study varies from a few angstroms for dye molecules to hundreds of nanometers for nanoparticles. The described applications of FCS comprise various fields from simple chemical systems of solution/micelle to sophisticated regulations on the level of living cells. Both the methodical bases and the theoretical principles of FCS are simple and available. The present review is concentrated preferentially on FCS applications for studies on artificial and natural membranes. At present, in contrast to the related approach of dynamic light scattering, FCS is poorly known in Russia, although it is widely employed in laboratories of other countries. The goal of this review is to promote the development of FCS in Russia so that this technique could occupy the position it deserves in modern Russian science.

  13. NIR Raman spectroscopy in medicine and biology: results and aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, B.; Dippel, B.; Erb, I.; Keller, S.; Löchte, T.; Schulz, H.; Tatsch, E.; Wessel, S.

    1999-05-01

    Analyses of biomaterial by 'classical' Raman spectroscopy with excitation in the visible range has not been possible since the fluorescence of many essential constituents of all animal and plant cells and tissues overlays the Raman spectra completely. Fluorescence, however, is virtually avoided, when Raman spectra are excited with the Nd : YAG laser line at 1064 nm. Within seven dissertations we explored different fields of potential applications to medical diagnostics. Identification and qualification of tissues and cells is possible. Tumors show small but significant differences to normal tissues; in order to develop a reliable tool for tumor diagnostics more research is necessary, especially a collection of reference spectra in a data bank is needed. Raman spectra of biomineralization structures in teeth and bones show pathological tissues as well as the development of new mineralized structures. NIR Raman spectra of flowers, leaves, and fruit show, without special preparation, their constituents: alkaloids, the essential oils, natural dyes, flavors, spices and drugs. They allow application to taxonomy, optimizing plant breeding and control of food.

  14. Parts plus pipes: synthetic biology approaches to metabolic engineering

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Patrick M.; Silver, Pamela A.

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic biologists combine modular biological “parts” to create higher-order devices. Metabolic engineers construct biological “pipes” by optimizing the microbial conversion of basic substrates to desired compounds. Many scientists work at the intersection of these two philosophies, employing synthetic devices to enhance metabolic engineering efforts. These integrated approaches promise to do more than simply improve product yields; they can expand the array of products that are tractable to produce biologically. In this review, we explore the application of synthetic biology techniques to next-generation metabolic engineering challenges, as well as the emerging engineering principles for biological design. PMID:22037345

  15. Anomalous Diffusion in Polymer Solution as Probed by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and Its Universal Importance in Biological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushida, Kiminori

    2008-02-01

    Experimental evidence of anomalous diffusion occurring in an inhomogeneous media (hyaluronan aquous solution) was obtained by use of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) combined with other techniques (PFG-NMR and Photochemical reactions). The diffusion coefficient was obtained as a function of diffusion time or diffusion distance. Since this polymer solution can be regarded as a model system of extracellular matrices (ECMs), intercellular communication, which takes part in ECM, is greatly influenced by this anomalous diffusion mode. Therefore universal importance of anomalous diffusion in biological activity is identified in this series of independent experiments to measure diffusion coefficients.

  16. Laser-induced fluorescence-cued, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy biological-agent detection

    SciTech Connect

    Hybl, John D.; Tysk, Shane M.; Berry, Shaun R.; Jordan, Michael P

    2006-12-01

    Methods for accurately characterizing aerosols are required for detecting biological warfare agents. Currently, fluorescence-based biological agent sensors provide adequate detection sensitivity but suffer from high false-alarm rates. Combining single-particle fluorescence analysis with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) provides additional discrimination and potentially reduces false-alarm rates. A transportable UV laser-induced fluorescence-cued LIBS test bed has been developed and used to evaluate the utility of LIBS for biological-agent detection. Analysis of these data indicates that LIBS adds discrimination capability to fluorescence-based biological-agent detectors.However, the data also show that LIBS signatures of biological agent simulants are affected by washing. This may limit the specificity of LIBS and narrow the scope of its applicability in biological-agent detection.

  17. Feasibility Study of Using Short Wave Infrared Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (SWIR-CRDS) for Biological Agent Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Aker, Pam M.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Williams, Richard M.; Valentine, Nancy B.

    2007-10-01

    This project focused on determining the feasibility of using short wave infrared (SWIR) cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) as a means for real-time detection of biological aerosols. The first part of the project involved identifying biological agent signatures that could be detected with SWIR CRDS. After an exhaustive search of the open literature it was determined that whole biological spores and/or cells would not be good candidates for direct SWIR CRDS probing because they have no unique SWIR signatures. It was postulated that while whole cells or spores are not good candidates for SWIR CRDS detection, their pyrolysis break-down products might be. A literature search was then conducted to find biological pyrolysis products with low molecular weights and high symmetry since these species most likely would have overtone and combination vibrational bands that can be detected in the SWIR. It was determined that pyrrole, pyridine and picolinamide were good candidates for evaluation. These molecules are formed when proteins and porphyrins, proteins and dipicolinic acid, and dipicolinic acid are pyrolyzed, respectively. The second part of the project involved measuring quantitative SWIR spectra of pyrrole, pyridine and picolinamide in PNNL’s FTIR Spectroscopy Laboratory. Spectral information about these molecules, in the vapor phase is sparse – there were only a few prior studies that measured line positions and no information on absorption cross sections. Absorption cross sections are needed in order to estimate the SWIR CRDS detection sensitivity, and line position determines what type of laser will be needed for the sensor. The results of the spectroscopy studies allowed us to estimate the SWIR CRDS detection sensitivity for pyrrole to be 3 x 1012 molec cm-3 or 0.1 ppmv, and for pyridine it was 1.5 x 1015 molec cm-3 or 0.6 ppmv. These detection sensitivity limits are close what we have measured for ammonia. Given these detection limits we then estimated the

  18. Research of biological liquid albumin based on terahertz time domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuai; Liu, Shang-jian; Zuo, Jian; Zhang, Cun-lin

    2016-11-01

    There is no corresponding fingerprint characteristic spectrum detecting complex ensemble biological samples in liquid, in the paper, such urine of kidney disease patients as samples of the research, using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy emphatically explores response characteristics of the urine albumin in the terahertz spectrum characteristics, and combined with stoichiometric method, we find a certain kind of relationship between terahertz spectrum data and the content of urine albumin, which offsets the defects of other spectroscopy in measuring liquid protein, and in accordance with hospital clinical data. This study established a semi-qualitative method of using terahertz spectroscopy in detecting non-purification of biological liquid sample, which provides a simple, nondestructive, cheap and fast reference method in identifying the early nephropathy for medical test.

  19. Extracting biomarkers of commitment to cancer development: potential role of vibrational spectroscopy in systems biology.

    PubMed

    Theophilou, Georgios; Paraskevaidi, Maria; Lima, Kássio M G; Kyrgiou, Maria; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L; Martin, Francis L

    2015-05-01

    The complex processes driving cancer have so far impeded the discovery of dichotomous biomarkers associated with its initiation and progression. Reductionist approaches utilizing 'omics' technologies have met some success in identifying molecular alterations associated with carcinogenesis. Systems biology is an emerging science that combines high-throughput investigation techniques to define the dynamic interplay between regulatory biological systems in response to internal and external cues. Vibrational spectroscopy has the potential to play an integral role within systems biology research approaches. It is capable of examining global models of carcinogenesis by scrutinizing chemical bond alterations within molecules. The application of infrared or Raman spectroscopic approaches coupled with computational analysis under the systems biology umbrella can assist the transition of biomarker research from the molecular level to the system level. The comprehensive representation of carcinogenesis as a multilevel biological process will inevitably revolutionize cancer-related healthcare by personalizing risk prediction and prevention.

  20. Vibrational spectroscopy and the development of new force fields for biological molecules.

    PubMed

    Gerber, R B; Chaban, G M; Gregurick, S K; Brauer, B

    2003-03-01

    The role of vibrational spectroscopy in the testing of force fields of biological molecules and in the determination of improved force fields is discussed. Analysis shows that quantitative testing of potential energy surfaces by comparison with spectroscopic data generally requires calculations that include anharmonic couplings between different vibrational modes. Applications of the vibrational self-consistent field (VSCF) method to calculations of spectroscopy of biological molecules are presented, and comparison with experiment is used to determine the merits and flaws of various types of force fields. The main conclusions include the following: (1) Potential surfaces from ab initio methods at the level of MP2 yield very satisfactory agreement with spectroscopic experimental data. (2) By the test of spectroscopy, ab initio force fields are considerably superior to the standard versions of force fields such as AMBER or OPLS. (3) Much of the spectroscopic weakness of AMBER and OPLS is due to incorrect description of anharmonic coupling between different vibrational modes. (4) Potential surfaces of the QM/MM (Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics) type, and potentials based on improved versions of semi-empirical electronic structure theory, which are feasible for large biological molecules, yield encouraging results by the test of vibrational spectroscopy.

  1. Invasion Ecology and School Biology--Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, R. V.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests that invasion biology can supply subject matter for teaching evolution, genetics, ecological relationships, and conservation. Describes flowering and non-flowering plant invaders, vertebrates and invertebrates, and two ecological invasions on the southern coast of England. (JN)

  2. Politics & Prejudice: Dissection in Biology Education. Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmore, David R.

    1991-01-01

    The issues, roles, dynamics, rationales and events embroiled in the dissection controversy are discussed. Insights into where the politics of biology education without speciesism or dissection are likely to take science education in the future are provided. (KR)

  3. Strontium: Part II. Chemistry, Biological Aspects and Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britton, G. C.; Johnson, C. H.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews basic information on the Chemistry of strontium and its compounds. Explains biological aspects of strontium and its pharmaceutical applications. Highlights industrial application of strontium and its components. (ML)

  4. Invasion Ecology and School Biology--Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, R. V.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests that invasion biology can supply subject matter for teaching evolution, genetics, ecological relationships, and conservation. Describes flowering and non-flowering plant invaders, vertebrates and invertebrates, and two ecological invasions on the southern coast of England. (JN)

  5. Graphene-based platform for nano-scale infrared near-field spectroscopy of biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatib, Omar; Wood, Joshua D.; Doidge, Gregory P.; Damhorst, Gregory L.; Rangarajan, Aniruddh; Bashir, Rashid; Pop, Eric; Lyding, Joseph W.; Basov, Dimitri N.

    2014-03-01

    In biological and life sciences, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy serves as a noninvasive probe of vibrational fingerprints used to identify chemical and molecular species. Near-field spectroscopy, based on the illumination of an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip with an infrared laser, allows for determination of IR properties of a material at nanometer length scales. However, application of near-field IR spectroscopy to most biological systems has thus far been elusive. Physiological conditions required for experimentation are incompatible with typical implementations of nano-FTIR. Recently it became possible to trap water and small biomolecules underneath large-area graphene sheets grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The graphene layer serves as an IR-transparent cover that allows for a near-field interrogation of the underlying layers. We present near-field nano-imaging and spectroscopy data of unencapsulated Tobacco Mosaic Viruses (TMV), compared to those sandwiched between two large-area graphene sheets, and discuss the applicability of near-field IR spectroscopy to trapped biomolecules in aqueous environments.

  6. Social inclusion enhances biological motion processing: a functional near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Bolling, Danielle Z; Pelphrey, Kevin A; Kaiser, Martha D

    2013-04-01

    Humans are especially tuned to the movements of other people. Neural correlates of this social attunement have been proposed to lie in and around the right posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS) region, which robustly responds to biological motion in contrast to a variety of non-biological motions. This response persists even when no form information is provided, as in point-light displays (PLDs). The aim of the current study was to assess the ability of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to reliably measure brain responses to PLDs of biological motion, and determine the sensitivity of these responses to interpersonal contextual factors. To establish reliability, we measured brain activation to biological motion with fNIRS and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during two separate sessions in an identical group of 12 participants. To establish sensitivity, brain responses to biological motion measured with fNIRS were subjected to an additional social manipulation where participants were either socially included or excluded before viewing PLDs of biological motion. Results revealed comparable brain responses to biological motion using fMRI and fNIRS in the right supramarginal gyrus. Further, social inclusion increased brain responses to biological motion in right supramarginal gyrus and posterior STS. Thus, fNIRS can reliably measure brain responses to biological motion and can detect social experience-dependent modulations of these brain responses.

  7. [Tobacco plant parts similarity analysis based on near-infrared spectroscopy and SIMCA algorithm].

    PubMed

    Yu, Chun-Xia; Ma, Xiang; Zhang, Ye-Hui; Li, Jun-Hui; Zhao, Long-Lian; Xu, Li; Wen, Ya-Dong; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Lu-Da

    2011-04-01

    The appearance features of tobacco reflect its inner quality. Many factors, such as different plant parts, variety and maturity, provide standard and foundation for tobacco production processing. According to the different position of tobacco plant parts, tobacco plants leaves can be divided into five parts as tip, upper-middle, middle, lower-middle and priming leaf respectively. Five hundred tobacco leaf samples (100 each for one of five tobacco plant parts) from Yunnan province in 2008 were collected using near infrared spectroscopy, which all belong to tobacco varieties of K326. The similarity analysis of tobacco plant parts was carried out using mathematical model of SIMCA similarity analysis. The conclusion showed that the tobacco plant parts similarity results based on near-infrared spectroscopy corresponded to the relative tobacco plant parts in Yunnan province. The farther two tobacco plant parts were away from each other, the lower the similarity of corresponding parts was. And the similarity results of adjacent tobacco plant parts were different. The study discussed a method of confirming PC numbers and realized the quantitative similarity analysis between classes. It is instructive in replacement or adjustment of tobacco leaf blending and evaluation of tobacco industrial grading.

  8. Vibrational Spectroscopy for Imaging Single Microbial Cells in Complex Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Jesse P.; Berry, David

    2017-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy is increasingly used for the rapid and non-destructive imaging of environmental and medical samples. Both Raman and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) imaging have been applied to obtain detailed information on the chemical composition of biological materials, ranging from single microbial cells to tissues. Due to its compatibility with methods such as stable isotope labeling for the monitoring of cellular activities, vibrational spectroscopy also holds considerable power as a tool in microbial ecology. Chemical imaging of undisturbed biological systems (such as live cells in their native habitats) presents unique challenges due to the physical and chemical complexity of the samples, potential for spectral interference, and frequent need for real-time measurements. This Mini Review provides a critical synthesis of recent applications of Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy for characterizing complex biological samples, with a focus on developments in single-cell imaging. We also discuss how new spectroscopic methods could be used to overcome current limitations of single-cell analyses. Given the inherent complementarity of Raman and FT-IR spectroscopic methods, we discuss how combining these approaches could enable us to obtain new insights into biological activities either in situ or under conditions that simulate selected properties of the natural environment. PMID:28450860

  9. Vibrational spectroscopy for imaging single microbial cells in complex biological samples

    DOE PAGES

    Harrison, Jesse P.; Berry, David

    2017-04-13

    Here, vibrational spectroscopy is increasingly used for the rapid and non-destructive imaging of environmental and medical samples. Both Raman and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) imaging have been applied to obtain detailed information on the chemical composition of biological materials, ranging from single microbial cells to tissues. Due to its compatibility with methods such as stable isotope labeling for the monitoring of cellular activities, vibrational spectroscopy also holds considerable power as a tool in microbial ecology. Chemical imaging of undisturbed biological systems (such as live cells in their native habitats) presents unique challenges due to the physical and chemical complexity of themore » samples, potential for spectral interference, and frequent need for real-time measurements. This Mini Review provides a critical synthesis of recent applications of Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy for characterizing complex biological samples, with a focus on developments in single-cell imaging. We also discuss how new spectroscopic methods could be used to overcome current limitations of singlecell analyses. Given the inherent complementarity of Raman and FT-IR spectroscopic methods, we discuss how combining these approaches could enable us to obtain new insights into biological activities either in situ or under conditions that simulate selected properties of the natural environment.« less

  10. Topics in Chemical Instrumentation: Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectroscopy: Part I. Instrumentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, W. D.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses: (1) the design of the Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) spectrometer; (2) the computation of the spectrum from the interferogram; and (3) the use of apodization. (Part II will discuss advantages of FT-IR over dispersive techniques and show applications of FT-IR to difficult spectroscopic measurements.) (JN)

  11. Topics in Chemical Instrumentation: Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectroscopy: Part I. Instrumentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, W. D.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses: (1) the design of the Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) spectrometer; (2) the computation of the spectrum from the interferogram; and (3) the use of apodization. (Part II will discuss advantages of FT-IR over dispersive techniques and show applications of FT-IR to difficult spectroscopic measurements.) (JN)

  12. Method And System For Examining Biological Materials Using Low Power Cw Excitation Raman Spectroscopy.

    DOEpatents

    Alfano, Robert R.; Wang, Wubao

    2003-05-06

    A method and system for examining biological materials using low-power cw excitation Raman spectroscopy. A low-power continuous wave (cw) pump laser beam and a low-power cw Stokes (or anti-Stokes) probe laser beam simultaneously illuminate a biological material and traverse the biological material in collinearity. The pump beam, whose frequency is varied, is used to induce Raman emission from the biological material. The intensity of the probe beam, whose frequency is kept constant, is monitored as it leaves the biological material. When the difference between the pump and probe excitation frequencies is equal to a Raman vibrational mode frequency of the biological material, the weak probe signal becomes amplified by one or more orders of magnitude (typically up to about 10.sup.4 -10.sup.6) due to the Raman emission from the pump beam. In this manner, by monitoring the intensity of the probe beam emitted from the biological material as the pump beam is varied in frequency, one can obtain an excitation Raman spectrum for the biological material tested. The present invention may be applied to in the in vivo and/or in vitro diagnosis of diabetes, heart disease, hepatitis, cancers and other diseases by measuring the characteristic excitation Raman lines of blood glucose, cholesterol, serum glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (SGOT)/serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT), tissues and other corresponding Raman-active body constituents, respectively.

  13. Biological capacitance studies of anodes in microbial fuel cells using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhihao; Girguis, Peter; Liang, Peng; Shi, Haifeng; Huang, Guangtuan; Cai, Lankun; Zhang, Lehua

    2015-07-01

    It is known that cell potential increases while anode resistance decreases during the start-up of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Biological capacitance, defined as the apparent capacitance attributed to biological activity including biofilm production, plays a role in this phenomenon. In this research, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was employed to study anode capacitance and resistance during the start-up period of MFCs so that the role of biological capacitance was revealed in electricity generation by MFCs. It was observed that the anode capacitance ranged from 3.29 to 120 mF which increased by 16.8% to 18-20 times over 10-12 days. Notably, lowering the temperature and arresting biological activity via fixation by 4% para formaldehyde resulted in the decrease of biological capacitance by 16.9 and 62.6%, indicating a negative correlation between anode capacitance and anode resistance of MFCs. Thus, biological capacitance of anode should play an important role in power generation by MFCs. We suggest that MFCs are not only biological reactors and/or electrochemical cells, but also biological capacitors, extending the vision on mechanism exploration of electron transfer, reactor structure design and electrode materials development of MFCs.

  14. River Pollution: Part II. Biological Methods for Assessing Water Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1984-01-01

    Discusses methods used in the biological assessment of river quality and such indicators of clean and polluted waters as the Trent Biotic Index, Chandler Score System, and species diversity indexes. Includes a summary of a river classification scheme based on quality criteria related to water use. (JN)

  15. River Pollution: Part II. Biological Methods for Assessing Water Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1984-01-01

    Discusses methods used in the biological assessment of river quality and such indicators of clean and polluted waters as the Trent Biotic Index, Chandler Score System, and species diversity indexes. Includes a summary of a river classification scheme based on quality criteria related to water use. (JN)

  16. LASER BIOLOGY: Laser spectroscopy technique for estimating the efficiency of photosensitisers in biological media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabova, A. V.; Stratonnikov, Aleksandr A.; Loshchenov, V. B.

    2006-06-01

    A fast and highly informative method is presented for estimating the photodynamic activity of photosensitisers. The method makes it possible to determine the rate of photodegradation in erythrocyte-containing biological media in nearly in vivo conditions, estimate the degree of irreversible binding of oxygen dissolved in the medium during laser irradiation in the presence of photosensitisers, and determine the nature of degradation of photosensitisers exposed to light (photobleaching).

  17. Effect of photobleaching on calibration model development in biological Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Barman, Ishan; Kong, Chae-Ryon; Singh, Gajendra P.; Dasari, Ramachandra R.

    2011-01-01

    A major challenge in performing quantitative biological studies using Raman spectroscopy lies in overcoming the influence of the dominant sample fluorescence background. Moreover, the prediction accuracy of a calibration model can be severely compromised by the quenching of the endogenous fluorophores due to the introduction of spurious correlations between analyte concentrations and fluorescence levels. Apparently, functional models can be obtained from such correlated samples, which cannot be used successfully for prospective prediction. This work investigates the deleterious effects of photobleaching on prediction accuracy of implicit calibration algorithms, particularly for transcutaneous glucose detection using Raman spectroscopy. Using numerical simulations and experiments on physical tissue models, we show that the prospective prediction error can be substantially larger when the calibration model is developed on a photobleaching correlated dataset compared to an uncorrelated one. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the application of shifted subtracted Raman spectroscopy (SSRS) reduces the prediction errors obtained with photobleaching correlated calibration datasets compared to those obtained with uncorrelated ones. PMID:21280891

  18. Incorporating Biological Mass Spectrometry into Undergraduate Teaching Labs, Part 1: Identifying Proteins Based on Molecular Mass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnquist, Isaac J.; Beussman, Douglas J.

    2007-01-01

    Biological mass spectrometry is an important analytical technique in drug discovery, proteomics, and research at the biology-chemistry interface. Currently, few hands-on opportunities exist for undergraduate students to learn about this technique. With the 2002 Nobel Prize being awarded, in part, for the development of biological mass…

  19. Incorporating Biological Mass Spectrometry into Undergraduate Teaching Labs, Part 1: Identifying Proteins Based on Molecular Mass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnquist, Isaac J.; Beussman, Douglas J.

    2007-01-01

    Biological mass spectrometry is an important analytical technique in drug discovery, proteomics, and research at the biology-chemistry interface. Currently, few hands-on opportunities exist for undergraduate students to learn about this technique. With the 2002 Nobel Prize being awarded, in part, for the development of biological mass…

  20. Damage-free vibrational spectroscopy of biological materials in the electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Rez, Peter; Aoki, Toshihiro; March, Katia; Gur, Dvir; Krivanek, Ondrej L.; Dellby, Niklas; Lovejoy, Tracy C.; Wolf, Sharon G.; Cohen, Hagai

    2016-03-10

    Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope would be transformative in the study of biological samples, provided that radiation damage could be prevented. However, electron beams typically create high-energy excitations that severely accelerate sample degradation. Here this major difficulty is overcome using an ‘aloof’ electron beam, positioned tens of nanometres away from the sample: high-energy excitations are suppressed, while vibrational modes of energies o1 eV can be ‘safely’ investigated. To demonstrate the potential of aloof spectroscopy, we record electron energy loss spectra from biogenic guanine crystals in their native state, resolving their characteristic C–H, N–H and C=O vibrational signatures with no observable radiation damage. Furthermore, the technique opens up the possibility of non-damaging compositional analyses of organic functional groups, including non-crystalline biological materials, at a spatial resolution of ~10nm, simultaneously combined with imaging in the electron microscope.

  1. Damage-free vibrational spectroscopy of biological materials in the electron microscope

    PubMed Central

    Rez, Peter; Aoki, Toshihiro; March, Katia; Gur, Dvir; Krivanek, Ondrej L.; Dellby, Niklas; Lovejoy, Tracy C.; Wolf, Sharon G.; Cohen, Hagai

    2016-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope would be transformative in the study of biological samples, provided that radiation damage could be prevented. However, electron beams typically create high-energy excitations that severely accelerate sample degradation. Here this major difficulty is overcome using an ‘aloof' electron beam, positioned tens of nanometres away from the sample: high-energy excitations are suppressed, while vibrational modes of energies <1 eV can be ‘safely' investigated. To demonstrate the potential of aloof spectroscopy, we record electron energy loss spectra from biogenic guanine crystals in their native state, resolving their characteristic C–H, N–H and C=O vibrational signatures with no observable radiation damage. The technique opens up the possibility of non-damaging compositional analyses of organic functional groups, including non-crystalline biological materials, at a spatial resolution of ∼10 nm, simultaneously combined with imaging in the electron microscope. PMID:26961578

  2. Application of multivariate analysis and vibrational spectroscopy in classification of biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, A.; Shufan, E.; Lapidot, I.; Tsror, L.; Zeiri, L.; Sahu, R. K.; Moreh, R.; Mordechai, S.; Huleihel, M.

    2015-12-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopies have emerged as powerful tools for chemical analysis. This is due to their ability to provide detailed information about the spatial distribution of chemical composition at the molecular level. A biological sample, i.e. bacteria or fungi, has a typical spectrum. This spectral fingerprint, characterizes the sample and can therefore be used for differentiating between biology samples which belong to different groups, i.e., several different isolates of a given fungi. When the spectral differences between the groups are minute, multivariate analysis should be used to provide a good differentiation. We hereby review several results which demonstrate the differentiation success obtained by combining spectroscopy measurements and multivariate analysis.

  3. Near-infrared spectroscopy and hyperspectral imaging: non-destructive analysis of biological materials.

    PubMed

    Manley, Marena

    2014-12-21

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has come of age and is now prominent among major analytical technologies after the NIR region was discovered in 1800, revived and developed in the early 1950s and put into practice in the 1970s. Since its first use in the cereal industry, it has become the quality control method of choice for many more applications due to the advancement in instrumentation, computing power and multivariate data analysis. NIR spectroscopy is also increasingly used during basic research performed to better understand complex biological systems, e.g. by means of studying characteristic water absorption bands. The shorter NIR wavelengths (800-2500 nm), compared to those in the mid-infrared (MIR) range (2500-15 000 nm) enable increased penetration depth and subsequent non-destructive, non-invasive, chemical-free, rapid analysis possibilities for a wide range of biological materials. A disadvantage of NIR spectroscopy is its reliance on reference methods and model development using chemometrics. NIR measurements and predictions are, however, considered more reproducible than the usually more accurate and precise reference methods. The advantages of NIR spectroscopy contribute to it now often being favoured over other spectroscopic (colourimetry and MIR) and analytical methods, using chemicals and producing chemical waste, such as gas chromatography (GC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). This tutorial review intends to provide a brief overview of the basic theoretical principles and most investigated applications of NIR spectroscopy. In addition, it considers the recent development, principles and applications of NIR hyperspectral imaging. NIR hyperspectral imaging provides NIR spectral data as a set of images, each representing a narrow wavelength range or spectral band. The advantage compared to NIR spectroscopy is that, due to the additional spatial dimension provided by this technology, the images can be analysed and visualised as

  4. The year's new drugs & biologics, 2014: Part I.

    PubMed

    Graul, A I; Cruces, E; Stringer, M

    2015-01-01

    A year-end wrap-up of new drug approvals and launches reveals that activity in the pharmaceutical industry continues at a high level, with 55 new drugs and biologics introduced on their first markets in 2014 (as of December 23, 2014). Additionally, 29 important new line extensions (new formulations, new combinations or new indications for previously marketed products) also reached their first markets during the year. The most active therapeutic group in terms of new launches was anti-infective therapies, with 11 new drugs and biologics launched, most for the treatment of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections or hepatitis C. The most active market for new launches was again the U.S., site of more than half of all new launches in 2014. However new launch activity increased considerably last year in Japan, which actually pulled ahead of the E.U. for the first time in many years. In another important new development, 15 of the new drugs and biologics launched last year had orphan drug status, 5 had breakthrough therapy designation and 3 had Qualified Infectious Disease Product (QIDP) status. Another 19 products were approved for the first time during the year but not yet launched by close of this article; most are slated for launch in the first months of the new year.

  5. Shifted-excitation Raman difference spectroscopy for in vitro and in vivo biological samples analysis

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Martins, Mário Augusto; Ribeiro, Dayana Gonçalves; Pereira dos Santos, Edson Aparecido; Martin, Airton Abrahão; Fontes, Adriana; da Silva Martinho, Herculano

    2010-01-01

    The contamination of the Raman scattering signal with luminescence is a well-known problem when dealing with biological media excited by visible light. The viability of the shifted-excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) technique for luminescence suppression on Raman spectra of biological samples was studied in this work. A tunable Lithrow-configuration diode laser (λ = 785 and 830 nm) coupled (directly or by optical fiber) to a dispersive Raman spectrometer was employed to study two sets of human tissues (tooth and skin) in order to determine the set of experimental parameters suitable for luminescence rejection. It was concluded that systematic and reproducible spectra of biological interest can be acquired by SERDS. PMID:21258495

  6. Characterization of femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (fsLIBS) and applications for biological samples.

    PubMed

    Gill, Ruby K; Knorr, Florian; Smith, Zachary J; Kahraman, Mehmet; Madsen, Dorte; Larsen, Delmar S; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    We characterize the femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (fsLIBS) signal for biological tissues as a function of different excitation parameters with femtosecond laser systems. These parameters include laser energy, depth of focus, and number of pulses per focal volume. We used femtosecond laser pulses of 800 nm and energy between 25 and 123 μJ to generate LIBS signals in biological tissues. As expected, we observed a linear increase in the fsLIBS intensity as a function of the laser energy. In addition, we show that moving the beam out of focus and the presence of overlapping pulses on the same focal area leads to a decrease in fsLIBS intensity due to changes in focal spot size. We also demonstrate that fsLIBS can distinguish between different biological tissue samples.

  7. Evolving together: the biology of symbiosis, part 2

    PubMed Central

    2000-01-01

    Symbiotic trade-offs dominate the world of biology and medicine in colonist-host relationships and between separate, mutually dependent organisms of different species. Infectious and parasitic diseases can be better understood by exploring the dynamic continuum between pathogenicity and mutualism, between antagonism and cooperation—the sliding scale along which microorganisms can move in a moment's notice with a single nucleotide substitution. Organisms practicing piracy or pastoralism may be close genetic relatives. Mergers occur not only between cells but also between genomes; viruses co-opt host genes and in turn insert themselves into host genomes. Separate organisms, from ants to fungi to plants, establish symbiotic ties with each other that bind over deep time, generating much of the diversity we see in nature. PMID:16389348

  8. Method And System For Examining Biological Materials Using Low Power Cw Excitation Raman Spectroscopy.

    DOEpatents

    Alfano, Robert R.; Wang, Wubao

    2000-11-21

    A method and system for examining biological materials using low-power cw excitation Raman spectroscopy. In accordance with the teachings of the invention, a low-power continuous wave (cw) pump laser beam and a low-power cw Stokes (or anti-Stokes) probe laser beam simultaneously illuminate a biological material and traverse the biological material in collinearity. The pump beam, whose frequency is varied, is used to induce Raman emission from the biological material. The intensity of the probe beam, whose frequency is kept constant, is monitored as it leaves the biological material. When the difference between the pump and probe excitation frequencies is equal to a Raman vibrational mode frequency of the biological material, the weak probe signal becomes amplified by one or more orders of magnitude (typically up to about 10.sup.4 -10.sup.6) due to the Raman emission from the pump beam. In this manner, by monitoring the intensity of the probe beam emitted from the biological material as the pump beam is varied in frequency, one can obtain an excitation Raman spectrum for the biological material tested. The present invention may be applied to in the in vivo and/or in vitro diagnosis of diabetes, heart disease, hepatitis, cancers and other diseases by measuring the characteristic excitation Raman lines of blood glucose, cholesterol, serum glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (SGOT)/serum glutamic pyruvic tansaminase (SGPT), tissues and other corresponding Raman-active body constituents, respectively. For example, it may also be used to diagnose diseases associated with the concentration of Raman-active constituents in urine, lymph and saliva It may be used to identify cancer in the breast, cervix, uterus, ovaries and the like by measuring the fingerprint excitation Raman spectra of these tissues. It may also be used to reveal the growing of tumors or cancers by measuring the levels of nitric oxide in tissue.

  9. Using Neutron Spectroscopy to Study Collective Dynamics of Biological and Model Membrane Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rheinstadter, Maikel

    2007-03-01

    Only recently, it has become possible to study collective dynamics of planar lipid bilayers using neutron spectroscopy techniques. By combining different neutron scattering techniques, namely three-axis, backscattering and spin-echo spectroscopy, we present measurements of short and long wavelength collective fluctuations in biomimetic and biological membranes in a large range in momentum and energy transfer, covering time scales from about 0.1ps to almost 1μs and length scales from 3å to about 0.1μm [1-4]. The measurements offer a large window of length and time scales to test and refine theoretical models of dynamics of biomimetic and biological membranes. The objective of this project is to establish dynamics-function relationships in artificial and biological membranes to relate in particular the collective dynamics, i.e., phonons, to key functions of the membranes, as, e.g., transport processes within and across the bilayers. M.C. Rheinst"adter, C. Ollinger, G. Fragneto, F. Demmel, T. Salditt, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 108107 (2004).^2 Maikel C. Rheinst"adter, Tilo Seydel, Franz Demmel, Tim Salditt, Phys. Rev. E 71, 061908 (2005).^3 Maikel C. Rheinst"adter, Wolfgang H"außler, Tim Salditt, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 048103 (2006).^4 Maikel C. Rheinst"adter, Tilo Seydel, Tim Salditt, submitted to PRE, cond-mat/0607514.

  10. Application of terahertz spectroscopy for characterization of biologically active organic molecules in natural environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaliūnas, Mindaugas; Jakštas, Vytautas; Nasser, Kinan E.; Venckevičius, Rimvydas; Urbanowicz, Andrzej; Kašalynas, Irmantas; Valušis, Gintaras

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a comparative research of biologically active organic molecules in its natural environment using the terahertz (THz) time domain spectroscopy (TDS) and Fourier transform spectroscopy (FTS) systems is carried out. Absorption coefficient and refractive index of Nicotiana tabacum L. leaves containing nicotine, Cannabis sativa L. leaves containing tetrahydrocannabinol, and Humulu lupulus L. leaves containing α-acids, active organic molecules that obtain in natural environment, were measured in broad frequency range from 0.1 to 13 THz at room temperature. In the spectra of absorption coefficient the features were found to be unique for N. tabacum, C. sativa and H. lupulus. Moreover, those features can be exploited for identification of C. sativa sex and N. tabacum origin. The refractive index can be also used to characterize different species.

  11. Chalcogenide glass fibers used for in situ infrared spectroscopy in biology and medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keirsse, Julie; Bureau, Bruno; Boussard-Pledel, Catherine; Leroyer, P.; Ropert, M.; Dupont, Virginie; Anne, Marie L.; Ribault, C.; Sire, Olivier; Loreal, Olivier; Adam, Jean Luc

    2004-09-01

    Chalcogenide glass optical fibers possess very low optical losses in the middle infrared range from 2 to 12 mm. They were used to implement remote infrared spectroscopy, known as Fiber Evanescent Wave Spectroscopy (FEWS). Due to their hydrophobic behavior, such sensor is especially suitable for application in biology and medicine where water is a nuisance to detect relevant information. Moreover, the design of the sensor using tapered fibers enables to improve the signal to noise ratio. Then, once coupled with unsupervised analysis technique such as Principle Component Analysis (PCA), it has been shown that this tool is efficient to differentiate between obese and control mice by recording their serum FEWS spectra. The same method has been carried out to detect in situ the both phenotypes of a bacterial culture.

  12. Wide-field spontaneous Raman spectroscopy imaging system for biological tissue interrogation.

    PubMed

    St-Arnaud, K; Aubertin, K; Strupler, M; Jermyn, M; Petrecca, K; Trudel, D; Leblond, F

    2016-10-15

    Raman spectroscopy has shown great promise as a method to discriminate between cancerous and normal tissue/cells for a range of oncology applications using microscopy and tissue interrogation instruments such as handheld probes and needles. Here we are presenting preliminary steps toward the development of a practical handheld macroscopic Raman spectroscopy instrument, demonstrating its capabilities to discriminate between different biological tissue types during ex vivo porcine experiments. The novel probe design can image a field of view of 25  mm2 with a spatial resolution <100  μm and an average spectral resolution of 95  cm-1, covering the fingerprint region between 450 to 1750  cm-1. The ability of the system to produce tissue maps based on molecular characteristics is demonstrated using a neural network machine learning technique.

  13. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy at single-molecule scale and its implications in biology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuling; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2013-02-05

    Single-molecule (SM) spectroscopy has been an exciting area of research offering significant promise and hope in the field of sensor development to detect targets at ultra-low levels down to SM resolution. To the experts and developers in the field of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), this has often been a challenge and a significant opportunity for exploration. Needless to say, the opportunities and excitement of this multidisciplinary area impacts span the fields of physics, chemistry and engineering, along with a significant thrust in applications constituting areas in medicine, biology, environment and agriculture among others. In this review, we will attempt to provide a quick snapshot of the basics of SM-SERS, nanostructures and devices that can enable SM Raman measurement. We will conclude with a discussion on SERS implications in biomedical sciences.

  14. Biologically active quinoline and quinazoline alkaloids part I.

    PubMed

    Shang, Xiao-Fei; Morris-Natschke, Susan L; Liu, Ying-Qian; Guo, Xiao; Xu, Xiao-Shan; Goto, Masuo; Li, Jun-Cai; Yang, Guan-Zhou; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2017-09-13

    Quinoline and quinazoline alkaloids, two important classes of N-based heterocyclic compounds, have attracted tremendous attention from researchers worldwide since the 19th century. Over the past 200 years, many compounds from these two classes were isolated from natural sources, and most of them and their modified analogs possess significant bioactivities. Quinine and camptothecin are two of the most famous and important quinoline alkaloids, and their discoveries opened new areas in antimalarial and anticancer drug development, respectively. In this review, we survey the literature on bioactive alkaloids from these two classes and highlight research achievements prior to the year 2008 (Part I). Over 200 molecules with a broad range of bioactivities, including antitumor, antimalarial, antibacterial and antifungal, antiparasitic and insecticidal, antiviral, antiplatelet, anti-inflammatory, herbicidal, antioxidant and other activities, were reviewed. This survey should provide new clues or possibilities for the discovery of new and better drugs from the original naturally occurring quinoline and quinazoline alkaloids. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. 15 CFR Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 - Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Biological Weapons No. Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to...—Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons Note: Exports and reexports of items in performance of...: (i) Equipment (for producing chemical weapon precursors and chemical warfare agents) described...

  16. 15 CFR Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 - Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Biological Weapons No. Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to...—Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons Note: Exports and reexports of items in performance of...: (i) Equipment (for producing chemical weapon precursors and chemical warfare agents) described...

  17. 15 CFR Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 - Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Biological Weapons No. Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to...—Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons Note: Exports and reexports of items in performance of...: (i) Equipment (for producing chemical weapon precursors and chemical warfare agents) described...

  18. 15 CFR Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 - Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Biological Weapons No. Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to...—Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons Note: Exports and reexports of items in performance of...: (i) Equipment (for producing chemical weapon precursors and chemical warfare agents) described...

  19. 15 CFR Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 - Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Biological Weapons No. Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to...—Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons Note: Exports and reexports of items in performance of...: (i) Equipment (for producing chemical weapon precursors and chemical warfare agents) described...

  20. Coherent optical spectroscopy in a biological semiconductor quantum dot-DNA hybrid system

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically investigate coherent optical spectroscopy of a biological semiconductor quantum dot (QD) coupled to DNA molecules. Coupling with DNAs, the linear optical responses of the peptide QDs will be enhanced significantly in the simultaneous presence of two optical fields. Based on this technique, we propose a scheme to measure the vibrational frequency of DNA and the coupling strength between peptide QD and DNA in all-optical domain. Distinct with metallic quantum dot, biological QD is non-toxic and pollution-free to environment, which will contribute to clinical medicine experiments. This article leads people to know more about the optical behaviors of DNAs-quantum dot system, with the currently popular pump-probe technique. PMID:22340277

  1. Coherent optical spectroscopy in a biological semiconductor quantum dot-DNA hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin-Jin; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2012-02-01

    We theoretically investigate coherent optical spectroscopy of a biological semiconductor quantum dot (QD) coupled to DNA molecules. Coupling with DNAs, the linear optical responses of the peptide QDs will be enhanced significantly in the simultaneous presence of two optical fields. Based on this technique, we propose a scheme to measure the vibrational frequency of DNA and the coupling strength between peptide QD and DNA in all-optical domain. Distinct with metallic quantum dot, biological QD is non-toxic and pollution-free to environment, which will contribute to clinical medicine experiments. This article leads people to know more about the optical behaviors of DNAs-quantum dot system, with the currently popular pump-probe technique.

  2. Coherent optical spectroscopy in a biological semiconductor quantum dot-DNA hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-Jin; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2012-02-16

    We theoretically investigate coherent optical spectroscopy of a biological semiconductor quantum dot (QD) coupled to DNA molecules. Coupling with DNAs, the linear optical responses of the peptide QDs will be enhanced significantly in the simultaneous presence of two optical fields. Based on this technique, we propose a scheme to measure the vibrational frequency of DNA and the coupling strength between peptide QD and DNA in all-optical domain. Distinct with metallic quantum dot, biological QD is non-toxic and pollution-free to environment, which will contribute to clinical medicine experiments. This article leads people to know more about the optical behaviors of DNAs-quantum dot system, with the currently popular pump-probe technique.

  3. Tracing part-per-billion line shifts with direct-frequency-comb Vernier spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siciliani de Cumis, M.; Eramo, R.; Coluccelli, N.; Cassinerio, M.; Galzerano, G.; Laporta, P.; De Natale, P.; Cancio Pastor, P.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate frequency measurements of molecular transitions around 2 μ m are performed by using a direct-frequency-comb spectroscopy approach that combines an Er+ frequency-comb oscillator at 1.5 μ m , a Tm-Ho fiber amplifier, and a Fabry-Perot-filter, high-resolution dispersive spectrometer optical multiplex-detection system. This apparatus has unique performances in terms of a wide dynamic range to integrate the intensity per comb mode, which allows one to measure molecular absorption profiles with high precision. Spectroscopic information about transition frequencies and linewidths is very accurately determined. Relative frequency uncertainties of the order of a few parts in 10-9 are achieved for rovibrational transitions of the CO2 molecule around 5100 cm-1. Moreover, tiny frequency shifts due to molecular collisions and interacting laser power using direct comb spectroscopy are investigated in a systematic way.

  4. Creating parts that allow for rational design: synthetic biology and the problem of context-sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Güttinger, Stephan

    2013-06-01

    The parts-based engineering approach in synthetic biology aims to create pre-characterised biological parts that can be used for the rational design of novel functional systems. Given the context-sensitivity of biological entities, a key question synthetic biologists have to address is what properties these parts should have so that they give a predictable output even when they are used in different contexts. In the first part of this paper I will analyse some of the answers that synthetic biologists have given to this question and claim that the focus of these answers on parts and their properties does not allow us to tackle the problem of context-sensitivity. In the second part of the paper, I will argue that we might have to abandon the notions of parts and their properties in order to understand how independence in biology could be achieved. Using Robert Cummins' account of functional analysis, I will then develop the notion of a capacity and its condition space and show how these notions can help to tackle the problem of context-sensitivity in biology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Spectroscopic-tomography of biological membrane with high-spatial resolution by the imaging-type 2D Fourier spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inui, Asuka; Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Qi, Wei; Takuma, Takashi; Ishimaru, Ichirou

    2011-07-01

    We proposed the imaging-type 2-dimensional Fourier spectroscopy that is the phase-shift interferometry between the objective lights. The proposed method can measure the 2D spectral image at the limited depth. Because of the imaging optical system, the 2D spectral images can be measured in high spatial resolution. And in the depth direction, we can get the spectral distribution only in the focal plane. In this report, we mention about the principle of the proposed wide field imaging-type 2D Fourier spectroscopy. And, we obtained the spectroscopic tomography of biological tissue of mouse's ear. In the visible region, we confirmed the difference of spectral characteristics between blood vessel region and other region. In the near infrared region (λ=900nm~1700nm), we can obtain the high-contrast blood vessel image of mouse's ear in the deeper part by InGaAs camera. Furthermore, in the middle infrared region(λ=8μ~14μm), we have successfully measured the radiation spectroscopic-imaging with wild field of view by the infrared module, such as the house plants. Additionally, we propose correction geometrical model that can convert the mechanical phase-shift value into the substantial phase difference in each oblique optical axes. We successfully verified the effectiveness of the proposed correction geometrical model and can reduce the spectral error into the error range into +/-3nm using the He-Ne laser whose wavelength 632.8nm.

  6. Magnetic nanoparticles in different biological environments analyzed by magnetic particle spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löwa, Norbert; Seidel, Maria; Radon, Patricia; Wiekhorst, Frank

    2017-04-01

    Quantification of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNP) in biological systems like cells, tissue, or organs is of vital importance for development of novel biomedical applications, e.g. magnetofection, drug targeting or hyperthermia. Among others, the recently developed magnetic measurement technique magnetic particle spectroscopy (MPS) provides signals that are specific for MNP. MPS is based on the non-linear magnetic response of MNP exposed to a strong sinusoidal excitation field of up to 25 mT amplitude and 25 kHz frequency. So far, it has been proven a powerful tool for quantification of MNP in biological systems. In this study we investigated in detail the influence of typical biological media on the magnetic behavior of different MNP systems by MPS. The results reveal that amplitude and shape (ratio of harmonics) of the MPS spectra allow for perceptively monitoring changes in MNP magnetism caused by different physiological media. Additionally, the observed linear correlation between MPS amplitude and shape alterations can be used to reduce the quantification uncertainty for MNP suspended in a biological environment.

  7. Damage-free vibrational spectroscopy of biological materials in the electron microscope

    DOE PAGES

    Rez, Peter; Aoki, Toshihiro; March, Katia; ...

    2016-03-10

    Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope would be transformative in the study of biological samples, provided that radiation damage could be prevented. However, electron beams typically create high-energy excitations that severely accelerate sample degradation. Here this major difficulty is overcome using an ‘aloof’ electron beam, positioned tens of nanometres away from the sample: high-energy excitations are suppressed, while vibrational modes of energies o1 eV can be ‘safely’ investigated. To demonstrate the potential of aloof spectroscopy, we record electron energy loss spectra from biogenic guanine crystals in their native state, resolving their characteristic C–H, N–H and C=O vibrational signatures with nomore » observable radiation damage. Furthermore, the technique opens up the possibility of non-damaging compositional analyses of organic functional groups, including non-crystalline biological materials, at a spatial resolution of ~10nm, simultaneously combined with imaging in the electron microscope.« less

  8. Basic Biology of Oxidative Stress and the Cardiovascular System: Part 1 of a 3-Part Series.

    PubMed

    Sack, Michael N; Fyhrquist, Frej Y; Saijonmaa, Outi J; Fuster, Valentin; Kovacic, Jason C

    2017-07-11

    The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a fundamental aspect of normal human biology. However, when ROS generation exceeds endogenous antioxidant capacity, oxidative stress arises. If unchecked, ROS production and oxidative stress mediate tissue and cell damage that can spiral in a cycle of inflammation and more oxidative stress. This article is part 1 of a 3-part series covering the role of oxidative stress in cardiovascular disease. The broad theme of this first paper is the mechanisms and biology of oxidative stress. Specifically, the authors review the basic biology of oxidative stress, relevant aspects of mitochondrial function, and stress-related cell death pathways (apoptosis and necrosis) as they relate to the heart and cardiovascular system. They then explore telomere biology and cell senescence. As important regulators and sensors of oxidative stress, telomeres are segments of repetitive nucleotide sequence at each end of a chromosome that protect the chromosome ends from deterioration. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. All rights reserved.

  9. Fast nonlinear region localisation for nonlinear dielectric spectroscopy of biological suspensions.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Gabriel A; Felice, Carmelo J

    2013-11-15

    The nonlinear properties of biological suspensions have been previously presented as a bulk phenomenon without the influences of the electrodes. However, some authors have showed that the behaviour of a biological suspension is due to the nonlinear characteristics of the electrode-electrolyte interface (EEI), which is modulated by the presence of yeast cells. We have developed a method, complementary to the nonlinear dielectric spectroscopy (NLDS) which is used for the study of the behaviour of EEI with resting cell suspensions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The method allows researchers to detect simply and quickly the voltage and frequency ranges where the metabolic activity of yeasts is detectable. This method does not replace NLDS, and aims to reduce the time during which the electrodes are exposed to corrosion by high voltages. In this paper we applied AC overpotentials (10-630 mV) with frequencies in the range from 1 to 1000 Hz. Also, we measured current harmonic distortion produced by the nonlinearity of the interface. Changes in the transfer function were observed when yeast suspension was used. Apart from the nonlinear response typical of the EEI, we also observed the biological nonlinear behaviour. The changes in the transfer functions were assessed using the overlapping index which was defined in terms of the conditional probability. The methodology was contrasted favourably with Fourier analysis. This novel strategy has the advantages of simplicity, sensitivity, reproducibility and involves basic tools such as the usual measurement of current. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. High-resolution monochromator for iron nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoda, Yoshitaka; Okada, Kyoko; Wang, Hongxin; Cramer, Stephen P.; Seto, Makoto

    2016-12-01

    A new high-resolution monochromator for 14.4-keV X-rays has been designed and developed for the Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy of biological samples. In addition to high resolution, higher flux and stability are especially important for measuring biological samples, because of the very weak signals produced due to the low concentrations of Fe-57. A 24% increase in flux while maintaining a high resolution better than 0.9 meV is achieved in the calculation by adopting an asymmetric reflection of Ge, which is used as the first crystal of the three-bounce high-resolution monochromator. A 20% increase of the exit beam size is acceptable to our biological applications. The higher throughput of the new design has been experimentally verified. A fine rotation mechanics that combines a weak-link hinge with a piezoelectric actuator was used for controlling the photon energy of the monochromatic beam. The resulting stability is sufficient to preserve the intrinsic resolution.

  11. Collective vibrational modes in biological molecules investigated by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Walther, M; Plochocka, P; Fischer, B; Helm, H; Uhd Jepsen, P

    2002-01-01

    We present well-resolved absorption spectra of biological molecules in the far-IR (FIR) spectral region recorded by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). As an illustrative example we discuss the absorption spectra of benzoic acid, its monosubstitutes salicylic acid (2-hydroxy-benzoic acid), 3- and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, and aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) in the spectral region between 18 and 150 cm(-1). The spectra exhibit distinct features originating from low-frequency vibrational modes caused by intra- or intermolecular collective motion and lattice modes. Due to the collective origin of the observed modes the absorption spectra are highly sensitive to the overall structure and configuration of the molecules, as well as their environment. The THz-TDS procedure can provide a direct fingerprint of the molecular structure or conformational state of a compound.

  12. 3D Imaging of Nanoparticle Distribution in Biological Tissue by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Y; Busser, B; Trichard, F; Kulesza, A; Laurent, J M; Zaun, V; Lux, F; Benoit, J M; Panczer, G; Dugourd, P; Tillement, O; Pelascini, F; Sancey, L; Motto-Ros, V

    2016-07-20

    Nanomaterials represent a rapidly expanding area of research with huge potential for future medical applications. Nanotechnology indeed promises to revolutionize diagnostics, drug delivery, gene therapy, and many other areas of research. For any biological investigation involving nanomaterials, it is crucial to study the behavior of such nano-objects within tissues to evaluate both their efficacy and their toxicity. Here, we provide the first account of 3D label-free nanoparticle imaging at the entire-organ scale. The technology used is known as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and possesses several advantages such as speed of operation, ease of use and full compatibility with optical microscopy. We then used two different but complementary approaches to achieve 3D elemental imaging with LIBS: a volume reconstruction of a sliced organ and in-depth analysis. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the quantitative imaging of both endogenous and exogenous elements within entire organs and paves the way for innumerable applications.

  13. 3D Imaging of Nanoparticle Distribution in Biological Tissue by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimenez, Y.; Busser, B.; Trichard, F.; Kulesza, A.; Laurent, J. M.; Zaun, V.; Lux, F.; Benoit, J. M.; Panczer, G.; Dugourd, P.; Tillement, O.; Pelascini, F.; Sancey, L.; Motto-Ros, V.

    2016-07-01

    Nanomaterials represent a rapidly expanding area of research with huge potential for future medical applications. Nanotechnology indeed promises to revolutionize diagnostics, drug delivery, gene therapy, and many other areas of research. For any biological investigation involving nanomaterials, it is crucial to study the behavior of such nano-objects within tissues to evaluate both their efficacy and their toxicity. Here, we provide the first account of 3D label-free nanoparticle imaging at the entire-organ scale. The technology used is known as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and possesses several advantages such as speed of operation, ease of use and full compatibility with optical microscopy. We then used two different but complementary approaches to achieve 3D elemental imaging with LIBS: a volume reconstruction of a sliced organ and in-depth analysis. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the quantitative imaging of both endogenous and exogenous elements within entire organs and paves the way for innumerable applications.

  14. Biological agent identification by nucleic acid base-pair analysis using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Stuart; Smith, Wayne W.; Elliott, Susan; Sperry, Jay F.

    1999-01-01

    Recently, a number of analytical methods have been successfully developed which use nucleic acid sequencing to identify biological warfare agents. However, the effectiveness of these methods, towards the safety and protection of US Armed Forces and their allies are limited by the period required to enumerate the nucleic acid through polymerase chain reactions or culture growth to produce sufficient quantities for analysis. To overcome this limitation, we have been investigating the ability of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to detect nucleic acids with sufficient sensitivity and selectivity to eliminate the need for enumeration. The design of a small volume electrolytic sample cell will be presented along with analysis of the nucleic acid bases and preliminary analysis of model bacteria.

  15. Differential laser-induced perturbation spectroscopy and fluorescence imaging for biological and materials sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Dallas Jonathan

    The field of laser-based diagnostics has been a topic of research in various fields, more specifically for applications in environmental studies, military defense technologies, and medicine, among many others. In this dissertation, a novel laser-based optical diagnostic method, differential laser-induced perturbation spectroscopy (DLIPS), has been implemented in a spectroscopy mode and expanded into an imaging mode in combination with fluorescence techniques. The DLIPS method takes advantage of deep ultraviolet (UV) laser perturbation at sub-ablative energy fluences to photochemically cleave bonds and alter fluorescence signal response before and after perturbation. The resulting difference spectrum or differential image adds more information about the target specimen, and can be used in combination with traditional fluorescence techniques for detection of certain materials, characterization of many materials and biological specimen, and diagnosis of various human skin conditions. The differential aspect allows for mitigation of patient or sample variation, and has the potential to develop into a powerful, noninvasive optical sensing tool. The studies in this dissertation encompass efforts to continue the fundamental research on DLIPS including expansion of the method to an imaging mode. Five primary studies have been carried out and presented. These include the use of DLIPS in a spectroscopy mode for analysis of nitrogen-based explosives on various substrates, classification of Caribbean fruit flies versus Caribbean fruit flies that have been irradiated with gamma rays, and diagnosis of human skin cancer lesions. The nitrogen-based explosives and Caribbean fruit flies have been analyzed with the DLIPS scheme using the imaging modality, providing complementary information to the spectroscopic scheme. In each study, a comparison between absolute fluorescence signals and DLIPS responses showed that DLIPS statistically outperformed traditional fluorescence techniques

  16. Magnetic induction spectroscopy: non-contact measurement of the electrical conductivity spectra of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barai, A.; Watson, S.; Griffiths, H.; Patz, R.

    2012-08-01

    Measurement of the electrical conductivity of biological tissues as a function of frequency, often termed ‘bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS)’, provides valuable information on tissue structure and composition. In implementing BIS though, there can be significant practical difficulties arising from the electrode-sample interface which have likely limited its deployment in industrial applications. In magnetic induction spectroscopy (MIS) these difficulties are eliminated through the use of fully non-contacting inductive coupling between the sensors and sample. However, inductive coupling introduces its own set of technical difficulties, primarily related to the small magnitudes of the induced currents and their proportionality with frequency. This paper describes the design of a practical MIS system incorporating new, highly-phase-stable electronics and compares its performance with that of electrode-based BIS in measurements on biological samples including yeast suspensions in saline (concentration 50-400 g l-1) and solid samples of potato, cucumber, tomato, banana and porcine liver. The shapes of the MIS spectra were in good agreement with those for electrode-based BIS, with a residual maximum discrepancy of 28%. The measurement precision of the MIS was 0.05 S m-1 at 200 kHz, improving to 0.01 S m-1 at a frequency of 20 MHz, for a sample volume of 80 ml. The data-acquisition time for each MIS measurement was 52 s. Given the value of spectroscopic conductivity information and the many advantages of obtaining these data in a non-contacting manner, even through electrically-insulating packaging materials if necessary, it is concluded that MIS is a technique with considerable potential for monitoring bio-industrial processes and product quality.

  17. Magnetic resonance microscopy and spectroscopy reveal kinetics of cryoprotectant permeation in a multicompartmental biological system.

    PubMed Central

    Hagedorn, M; Hsu, E W; Pilatus, U; Wildt, D E; Rall, W R; Blackband, S J

    1996-01-01

    Successful cryopreservation of most multicompartmental biological systems has not been achieved. One prerequisite for success is quantitative information on cryoprotectant permeation into and amongst the compartments. This report describes direct measurements of cryoprotectant permeation into a multicompartmental system using chemical shift selective magnetic resonance (MR) microscopy and MR spectroscopy. We used the developing zebrafish embryo as a model for studying these complex systems because these embryos are composed of two membrane-limited compartments: (i) a large yolk (surrounded by the yolk syncytial layer) and (ii) differentiating blastoderm cells (each surrounded by a plasma membrane). MR images of the spatial distribution of three cryoprotectants (dimethyl sulfoxide, propylene glycol, and methanol) demonstrated that methanol permeated the entire embryo within 15 min. In contrast, the other cryoprotectants exhibited little or no permeation over 2.5 h. MR spectroscopy and microinjections of cryoprotectants into the yolk inferred that the yolk syncytial layer plays a critical role in limiting the permeation of some cryoprotectants throughout the embryo. This study demonstrates the power of MR technology combined with micromanipulation for elucidating key physiological factors in cryobiology. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8755494

  18. Review of short-wave infrared spectroscopy and imaging methods for biological tissue characterization

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Robert H.; Nadeau, Kyle P.; Jaworski, Frank B.; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. We present a review of short-wave infrared (SWIR, defined here as ∼1000 to 2000 nm) spectroscopy and imaging techniques for biological tissue optical property characterization. Studies indicate notable SWIR absorption features of tissue constituents including water (near 1150, 1450, and 1900 nm), lipids (near 1040, 1200, 1400, and 1700 nm), and collagen (near 1200 and 1500 nm) that are much more prominent than corresponding features observed in the visible and near-infrared (VIS-NIR, defined here as ∼400 to 1000 nm). Furthermore, the wavelength dependence of the scattering coefficient has been observed to follow a power-law decay from the VIS-NIR to the SWIR region. Thus, the magnitude of tissue scattering is lower at SWIR wavelengths than that observed at VIS or NIR wavelengths, potentially enabling increased penetration depth of incident light at SWIR wavelengths that are not highly absorbed by the aforementioned chromophores. These aspects of SWIR suggest that the tissue spectroscopy and imaging in this range of wavelengths have the potential to provide enhanced sensitivity (relative to VIS-NIR measurements) to chromophores such as water and lipids, thereby helping to characterize changes in the concentrations of these chromophores due to conditions such as atherosclerotic plaque, breast cancer, and burns. PMID:25803186

  19. Nuclear, biological and chemical warfare. Part I: Medical aspects of nuclear warfare.

    PubMed

    Kasthuri, A S; Pradhan, A B; Dham, S K; Bhalla, I P; Paul, J S

    1990-04-01

    Casualties in earlier wars were due much more to diseases than to weapons. Mention has been made in history of the use of biological agents in warfare, to deny the enemy food and water and to cause disease. In the first world war chemical agents were used to cause mass casualties. Nuclear weapons were introduced in the second world war. Several countries are now involved in developing nuclear, biological and chemical weapon systems, for the mass annihilation of human beings, animals and plants, and to destroy the economy of their enemies. Recently, natural calamities and accidents in nuclear, chemical and biological laboratories and industries have caused mass instantaneous deaths in civilian population. The effects of future wars will not be restricted to uniformed persons. It is time that physicians become aware of the destructive potential of these weapons. Awareness, immediate protective measures and first aid will save a large number of persons. This series of articles will outline the medical aspects of nuclear, biological and chemical weapon systems in three parts. Part I will deal with the biological effects of a nuclear explosion. The short and long term effects due to blast, heat and associated radiation are highlighted. In Part II, the role of biological agents which cause commoner or new disease patterns is mentioned. Some of the accidents from biological warfare laboratories are a testimony to its potential deleterious effects. Part III deals with medical aspects of chemical warfare agents, which in view of their mass effects can overwhelm the existing medical resources, both civilian and military.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Improved preparation of small biological samples for mercury analysis using cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Adair, B M; Cobb, G P

    1999-05-01

    Concentrations of mercury in biological samples collected for environmental studies are often less than 0.1 microgram/g. Low mercury concentrations and small organ sizes in many wildlife species (approximately 0.1 g) increase the difficulty of mercury determination at environmentally relevant concentrations. We have developed a digestion technique to extract mercury from small (0.1 g), biological samples at these relevant concentrations. Mean recoveries (+/- standard error) from validation trials of mercury fortified tissue samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy for analysis ranged from 102 +/- 4.3% (2.5 micrograms/L, n = 15) to 108 +/- 1.4% (25 micrograms/L, n = 15). Recoveries of inorganic mercury were 99 +/- 5 (n = 19) for quality assurance samples analyzed during environmental evaluations conducted during a 24 month period. This technique can be used to determine total mercury concentrations of 60 ng Hg/g sample. Samples can be analyzed in standard laboratories in a short time, at minimal cost. The technique is versatile and can be used to determine mercury concentrations in several different matrices, limiting the time and expense of method development and validation.

  1. Structural investigation of biological material in aqueous environment by means of infrared-ATR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hofer, P; Fringeli, U P

    1979-12-01

    Infrared attenuated total reflection (ATR) spectroscopy may be used to investigate biological material (e.g., membranes, proteins, erythrocytes etc.) under biological conditions provided that adhesion of the sample can be achieved in aqueous environment. Uncharged lipid multilayer model membranes can be attached by hydrophobic interaction when hydrophobic internal reflection plates (e.g., ZnSe, CdTe) are used. However, if an electric field is applied across the membrane, germanium reflection elements would be preferred because of their low electric resistance (approximately 50 omega cm). This material can also be used if cells or proteins are linked chemically to the ATR plate because of the hydrophilic surface which is similar to that of glass and, thus, enables chemical modification by silanization. It has turned out that good adhesion of uncharged and negatively charged model membranes to germanium plates is achieved when they are coated with a monomolecular layer of aminopropylsilane. There is some evidence that erythrocytes remain more stable when adsorbed to a polymerized aminosilane coating (organic silanization) rather than to the corresponding monolayer (aqueous silanization). Negatively charged germanium surfaces have been obtained by succinylation of the aminosilane coating. Furthermore it has been demonstrated that proteins can be bound to the aminosilane coating by means of carbodiimide. Immobilized acetylcholinesterase was still enzymatically active.

  2. Linear dichroism spectroscopy of gas phase biological molecules embedded in superfluid helium droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Wei; Pei, Linsen; Zhang, Jie

    This article presents the current status of gas phase linear dichroism (LD) spectroscopy, including the theoretical background, the experimental technique, and a few examples in the UV/VIS and IR. Orientation and alignment of gas phase samples are achieved using a DC electric field. To reach the necessary degree of alignment, biological molecules vaporized from a heated oven need to be embedded in superfluid helium droplets. Excitation under different polarization directions of the light source relative to the alignment field can then be used to derive the direction of the transition dipole, or the size of the permanent dipole, or both. For biological molecules that have no resonance lines or too many resonance lines, LD offers an additional parameter for spectroscopic assignment and tautomeric and conformational identification. The direction of the vibrational transition dipole is proven more reliable for vibrational and tautomeric assignment than the energy or frequency information, which is often problematic because of its sensitivity to basis sets and calculation methods. Several examples of vibrational LD of nucleic acid bases will be discussed. On the other hand, if a chromophore with a known electronic transition dipole is attached to a biological molecule, as demonstrated in the case of tryptamine, the permanent dipole determined from LD is then representative of the molecular conformation. This method of conformational determination does not rely on detailed spectroscopic assignment, thus it is applicable to molecules that do not have resolvable vibronic bands. However, its application is currently limited to the availability of an effective chromophore, and the search for such a chromophore is an on-going effort.

  3. Eugene – A Domain Specific Language for Specifying and Constraining Synthetic Biological Parts, Devices, and Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bilitchenko, Lesia; Liu, Adam; Cheung, Sherine; Weeding, Emma; Xia, Bing; Leguia, Mariana; Anderson, J. Christopher; Densmore, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Background Synthetic biological systems are currently created by an ad-hoc, iterative process of specification, design, and assembly. These systems would greatly benefit from a more formalized and rigorous specification of the desired system components as well as constraints on their composition. Therefore, the creation of robust and efficient design flows and tools is imperative. We present a human readable language (Eugene) that allows for the specification of synthetic biological designs based on biological parts, as well as provides a very expressive constraint system to drive the automatic creation of composite Parts (Devices) from a collection of individual Parts. Results We illustrate Eugene's capabilities in three different areas: Device specification, design space exploration, and assembly and simulation integration. These results highlight Eugene's ability to create combinatorial design spaces and prune these spaces for simulation or physical assembly. Eugene creates functional designs quickly and cost-effectively. Conclusions Eugene is intended for forward engineering of DNA-based devices, and through its data types and execution semantics, reflects the desired abstraction hierarchy in synthetic biology. Eugene provides a powerful constraint system which can be used to drive the creation of new devices at runtime. It accomplishes all of this while being part of a larger tool chain which includes support for design, simulation, and physical device assembly. PMID:21559524

  4. Biology--Chemistry--Physics, Students' Guide, A Three-Year Sequence, Parts I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Arthur; And Others

    Parts I and II of the students' guide to the three-year integrated biology, chemistry, and physics course being prepared by the Portland Project Committee are contained in this guide. A committee reviewed and selected material developed by the national course improvement groups--Physical Science Study Committee, Chemical Bond Approach, Chemical…

  5. Physical Activity: A Tool for Improving Health (Part 1--Biological Health Benefits)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Patrick J.; Hongu, Nobuko

    2015-01-01

    Extension educators have been promoting and incorporating physical activities into their community-based programs and improving the health of individuals, particularly those with limited resources. This article is the first of a three-part series describing the benefits of physical activity for human health: 1) biological health benefits of…

  6. Physical Activity: A Tool for Improving Health (Part 1--Biological Health Benefits)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Patrick J.; Hongu, Nobuko

    2015-01-01

    Extension educators have been promoting and incorporating physical activities into their community-based programs and improving the health of individuals, particularly those with limited resources. This article is the first of a three-part series describing the benefits of physical activity for human health: 1) biological health benefits of…

  7. GenoLIB: a database of biological parts derived from a library of common plasmid features.

    PubMed

    Adames, Neil R; Wilson, Mandy L; Fang, Gang; Lux, Matthew W; Glick, Benjamin S; Peccoud, Jean

    2015-05-26

    Synthetic biologists rely on databases of biological parts to design genetic devices and systems. The sequences and descriptions of genetic parts are often derived from features of previously described plasmids using ad hoc, error-prone and time-consuming curation processes because existing databases of plasmids and features are loosely organized. These databases often lack consistency in the way they identify and describe sequences. Furthermore, legacy bioinformatics file formats like GenBank do not provide enough information about the purpose of features. We have analyzed the annotations of a library of ∼2000 widely used plasmids to build a non-redundant database of plasmid features. We looked at the variability of plasmid features, their usage statistics and their distributions by feature type. We segmented the plasmid features by expression hosts. We derived a library of biological parts from the database of plasmid features. The library was formatted using the Synthetic Biology Open Language, an emerging standard developed to better organize libraries of genetic parts to facilitate synthetic biology workflows. As proof, the library was converted into GenoCAD grammar files to allow users to import and customize the library based on the needs of their research projects.

  8. Information theory in systems biology. Part II: protein-protein interaction and signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Díaz, José; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-03-01

    By the development of information theory in 1948 by Claude Shannon to address the problems in the field of data storage and data communication over (noisy) communication channel, it has been successfully applied in many other research areas such as bioinformatics and systems biology. In this manuscript, we attempt to review some of the existing literatures in systems biology, which are using the information theory measures in their calculations. As we have reviewed most of the existing information-theoretic methods in gene regulatory and metabolic networks in the first part of the review, so in the second part of our study, the application of information theory in other types of biological networks including protein-protein interaction and signaling networks will be surveyed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Analysis of different parts and tissues of Panax Notoginseng by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Rui; Chen, Jian-Bo; Zhou, Qun; Sun, Su-Qin; Lü, Guang-Hua

    2014-03-01

    The techniques of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were applied to analyze the different parts and tissues of Panax Notoginseng (Sanqi, SQ), i.e. rhizome, main root, rootlet, fibrous root, xylem, cambium, phloem and epidermis. Both the FTIR spectra and second derivative spectra of these various parts and tissues of SQ samples were found to be similar. Their dominant component is starch resulting from the characteristic peaks of starch observed at 3 400, 2 930, 1 645, 1 155, 1,080 and 1,020 cm(-1) on the spectra of all these SQ samples. However, the varieties of peaks were found on the spectra among these specific samples. The rhizome contains more saponins than others on the basis of the largest ratio of the peak intensity at 1,077 cm(-1) to that at 1,152 cm(-1). The peaks located at 1 317 and 780 cm(-1) on the FTIR spectra of the rhizome and its epidermis indicate that the two parts of SQ samples contain large amount of calcium oxalate, and its content in the latter is relative larger than that in former. The fibrous root contains much amount of nitrate owing to the obvious characteristic peaks at 1 384 and 831 cm(-1). For the difference among the various tissues of SQ samples, the peaks at 2,926, 2,854 and 1,740 cm(-1) on the FTIR spectra of epidermis is the strongest among the various tissues of main root indicating the largest amount of esters in epidermis. Protein was also found in the cambium of the main root based on the relative strong peaks of amide I and II band at 1,641 and 1,541 cm(-1), respectively. The results indicate that FTIR spectra with its second derivative spectra can show the characteristic of the various parts and tissues of SQ samples in both the holistic chemical constituents and specific chemical components, including organic macromolecule compounds and small inorganic molecule compounds. FTIR spectroscopy is a useful analytical method for the genuine and rapid identification and quality assessment of SQ samples.

  10. Information theory in systems biology. Part I: Gene regulatory and metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Kavousi, Kaveh; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-03-01

    "A Mathematical Theory of Communication", was published in 1948 by Claude Shannon to establish a framework that is now known as information theory. In recent decades, information theory has gained much attention in the area of systems biology. The aim of this paper is to provide a systematic review of those contributions that have applied information theory in inferring or understanding of biological systems. Based on the type of system components and the interactions between them, we classify the biological systems into 4 main classes: gene regulatory, metabolic, protein-protein interaction and signaling networks. In the first part of this review, we attempt to introduce most of the existing studies on two types of biological networks, including gene regulatory and metabolic networks, which are founded on the concepts of information theory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Spectroscopic characterization of biological agents using FTIR, normal Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna-Pineda, Tatiana; Soto-Feliciano, Kristina; De La Cruz-Montoya, Edwin; Pacheco Londoño, Leonardo C.; Ríos-Velázquez, Carlos; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2007-04-01

    FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) requires a minimum of sample allows fast identification of microorganisms. The use of this technique for characterizing the spectroscopic signatures of these agents and their stimulants has recently gained considerable attention due to the fact that these techniques can be easily adapted for standoff detection from considerable distances. The techniques also show high sensitivity and selectivity and offer near real time detection duty cycles. This research focuses in laying the grounds for the spectroscopic differentiation of Staphylococcus spp., Pseudomonas spp., Bacillus spp., Salmonella spp., Enterobacter aerogenes, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and E. coli, together with identification of their subspecies. In order to achieve the proponed objective, protocols to handle, cultivate and analyze the strains have been developed. Spectroscopic similarities and marked differences have been found for Spontaneous or Normal Raman spectra and for SERS using silver nanoparticles have been found. The use of principal component analysis (PCA), discriminate factor analysis (DFA) and a cluster analysis were used to evaluate the efficacy of identifying potential threat bacterial from their spectra collected on single bacteria. The DFA from the bacteria Raman spectra show a little discrimination between the diverse bacterial species however the results obtained from the SERS demonstrate to be high discrimination technique. The spectroscopic study will be extended to examine the spores produced by selected strains since these are more prone to be used as Biological Warfare Agents due to their increased mobility and possibility of airborne transport. Micro infrared spectroscopy as well as fiber coupled FTIR will also be used as possible sensors of target compounds.

  12. BioPartsDB: a synthetic biology workflow web-application for education and research.

    PubMed

    Stracquadanio, Giovanni; Yang, Kun; Boeke, Jef D; Bader, Joel S

    2016-11-15

    Synthetic biology has become a widely used technology, and expanding applications in research, education and industry require progress tracking for team-based DNA synthesis projects. Although some vendors are beginning to supply multi-kilobase sequence-verified constructs, synthesis workflows starting with short oligos remain important for cost savings and pedagogical benefit. We developed BioPartsDB as an open source, extendable workflow management system for synthetic biology projects with entry points for oligos and larger DNA constructs and ending with sequence-verified clones.

  13. High-Field EPR Spectroscopy on Transfer Proteins in Biological Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möbius, K.; Schnegg, A.; Plato, M.; Fuchs, M. R.; Savitsky, A.

    2006-08-01

    In the last decade joint efforts of biologists, chemists, and physicists were made to understand the dominant factors determining specificity and directionality of transmembrane transfer processes in proteins. Characteristic examples of such factors are time varying specific H-bonding patterns and/or polarity effects of the microenvironment. In this overview, a few large paradigm biosystems are surveyed which have been explored lately in our laboratory. Taking advantage of the improved spectral and temporal resolution of high-frequency/high-field EPR at 95 GHz/3.4 T and 360 GHz/12.9 T, as compared to conventional X-band EPR (9.5 GHz/0.34 T), three transfer proteins in action are characterized with respect to structure and dynamics: (1) light-induced electron-transfer intermediates in wild-type and mutant reaction-centre proteins from photosynthetic bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides, (2) light-driven proton-transfer intermediates of site-specifically nitroxide spin-labelled mutants of bacteriorhodopsin proteins from Halobacterium salinarium, (3) refolding intermediates of site-specifically nitroxide spin-labelled mutants of the channel-forming protein domain of Colicin A bacterial toxin produced in Escherichia coli. The information obtained is complementary to that of protein crystallography, solid-state NMR, infrared and optical spectroscopy techniques. A unique strength of high-field EPR is particularly noteworthy: it can provide detailed information on transient intermediates of proteins in biological action. They can be observed and characterized while staying in their working states on biologically relevant time scales.

  14. Tracking Biological Organic Compounds In Atmospheric Deposition In Alpine Environments With Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mladenov, N.; Oldani, K. M.; Williams, M. W.; Schmidt, S. K.; Darcy, J.; Lemons, S.; Reche, I.

    2013-12-01

    Alpine environments, such as those of the Colorado Rocky Mountains, USA and the Sierra Nevada Mountains, Spain, contain undeveloped, barren soils that are carbon-limited. Atmospheric wet and dry deposition of organic carbon (OC) represents a substantial fraction of the OC load available to alpine soils, and includes contributions from atmospheric pollutants, dust, and biological aerosols, such as bacteria, algae, fungi, and plant debris. To evaluate the seasonal variability and sources of atmospheric deposition at these alpine sites, we measured the chemical characteristics of weekly wet and dry deposition and snowpack samples, including characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and water soluble organic matter (WSOM) with fluorescence spectroscopy. The excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra we acquired show the presence of recurring peaks at low excitation and emission wavelengths typically associated with highly biodegradable organic carbon, presumably derived from the aromatic amino acids, tyrosine and tryptophan. Solar simulation experiments demonstrated that amino acid-like fluorescent components were more resistant to photo-degradation than humic- and fulvic-like fluorescent components. Our results also reveal the presence of a unique fluorophore, not previously described, that is found in both Rocky Mountains and the Sierra Nevada snowpack, wet deposition, and dry deposition and may be attributed to fluorescent pigments in bacteria. Biological aerosols may represent a labile source of carbon for alpine soil microbes, and consequently their deposition has important consequences for biogeochemical processes occurring in barren, alpine soils. Excitation emission matrix image of 24 Aug 2010 wet deposition sample from the Soddie site at Niwot Ridge, Colorado showing a unique fluorescent component with dual excitation peaks (285 nm and 340 nm) at 410 nm emission.

  15. Biological effects and physical safety aspects of NMR imaging and in vivo spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.; Budinger, T.F.

    1985-08-01

    An assessment is made of the biological effects and physical hazards of static and time-varying fields associated with the NMR devices that are being used for clinical imaging and in vivo spectroscopy. A summary is given of the current state of knowledge concerning the mechanisms of interaction and the bioeffects of these fields. Additional topics that are discussed include: (1) physical effects on pacemakers and metallic implants such as aneurysm clips, (2) human health studies related to the effects of exposure to nonionizing electromagnetic radiation, and (3) extant guidelines for limiting exposure of patients and medical personnel to the fields produced by NMR devices. On the basis of information available at the present time, it is concluded that the fields associated with the current generation of NMR devices do not pose a significant health risk in themselves. However, rigorous guidelines must be followed to avoid the physical interaction of these fields with metallic implants and medical electronic devices. 476 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Technique for examining biological materials using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and the kubelka-munk function

    DOEpatents

    Alfano, Robert R.; Yang, Yuanlong

    2003-09-02

    Method and apparatus for examining biological materials using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and the Kubelka-Munk function. In one aspect, the method is used to determine whether a tissue sample is cancerous or not and comprises the steps of (a) measuring the diffuse reflectance from the tissue sample at a first wavelength and at a second wavelength, wherein the first wavelength is a wavelength selected from the group consisting of 255-265 nm and wherein the second wavelength is a wavelength selected from the group consisting of 275-285 nm; (b) using the Kubelka-Munk function to transform the diffuse reflectance measurement obtained at the first and second wavelengths; and (c) comparing a ratio or a difference of the transformed Kubelka-Munk measurements at the first and second wavelengths to appropriate standards determine whether or not the tissue sample is cancerous. One can use the spectral profile of KMF between 250 nm to 300 nm to determine whether or not the tissue sample is cancerous or precancerous. According to the value at the first and second wavelengths determine whether or not the malignant tissue is invasive or mixed invasive and in situ or carcinoma in situ.

  17. 3D Imaging of Nanoparticle Distribution in Biological Tissue by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, Y.; Busser, B.; Trichard, F.; Kulesza, A.; Laurent, J. M.; Zaun, V.; Lux, F.; Benoit, J. M.; Panczer, G.; Dugourd, P.; Tillement, O.; Pelascini, F.; Sancey, L.; Motto-Ros, V.

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials represent a rapidly expanding area of research with huge potential for future medical applications. Nanotechnology indeed promises to revolutionize diagnostics, drug delivery, gene therapy, and many other areas of research. For any biological investigation involving nanomaterials, it is crucial to study the behavior of such nano-objects within tissues to evaluate both their efficacy and their toxicity. Here, we provide the first account of 3D label-free nanoparticle imaging at the entire-organ scale. The technology used is known as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and possesses several advantages such as speed of operation, ease of use and full compatibility with optical microscopy. We then used two different but complementary approaches to achieve 3D elemental imaging with LIBS: a volume reconstruction of a sliced organ and in-depth analysis. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the quantitative imaging of both endogenous and exogenous elements within entire organs and paves the way for innumerable applications. PMID:27435424

  18. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and optical polarization imaging of in-vivo biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora-Núñez, A.; Castillejos, Y.; García-Torales, G.; Martínez-Ponce, G.

    2013-11-01

    A number of optical techniques have been reported in the scientific literature as accomplishable methodologies to diagnose diseases in biological tissue, for instance, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and optical polarization imaging (OPI). The skin is the largest organ in the body and consists of three primary layers, namely, the epidermis (the outermost layer exposed to the world), the dermis, and the hypodermis. The epidermis changes from to site to site, mainly because of difference in hydration. A lower water content increase light scattering and reduce the penetration depth of radiation. In this work, two hairless mice have been selected to evaluate their skin features by using DRS and OPI. Four areas of the specimen body were chosen to realize the comparison: back, abdomen, tail, and head. From DRS, it was possible to distinguish the skin nature because of different blood irrigation at dermis. In the other hand, OPI shows pseudo-depolarizing regions in the measured Mueller images related to a spatially varying propagation of the scattered light. This provides information about the cell size in the irradiated skin.

  19. Next generation techniques in the high resolution spectroscopy of biologically relevant molecules.

    PubMed

    Neill, Justin L; Douglass, Kevin O; Pate, Brooks H; Pratt, David W

    2011-04-28

    Recent advances in the technology of test and measurement equipment driven by the computer and telecommunications industries have made possible the development of a new broadband, Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer that operates on principles similar to FTNMR. This technique uses a high sample-rate arbitrary waveform generator to construct a phase-locked chirped microwave pulse that gives a linear frequency sweep over a wide frequency range in 1 μs. The chirped pulse efficiently polarizes the molecular sample at all frequencies lying within this band. The subsequent free induction decay of this polarization is measured with a high-speed digitizer and then fast Fourier-transformed to yield a broadband, frequency-resolved rotational spectrum, spanning up to 11.5 GHz and containing lines that are as narrow as 100 kHz. This new technique is called chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave (CP-FTMW) spectroscopy. The technique offers the potential to determine the structural and dynamical properties of very large molecules solely from fully resolved pure rotational spectra. FTMW double resonance techniques employing a low-resolution UV laser facilitate an easy assignment of overlapping spectra produced by different conformers in the sample. Of particular interest are the energy landscapes of conformationally flexible molecules of biological importance, including studies of their interaction with solvent and/or other weakly bound molecules. An example is provided from the authors' work on p-methoxyphenethylamine, a neurotransmitter, and its complexes with water.

  20. Electron Momentum Spectroscopy and Its Applications to Molecules of Biological Interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng

    2007-11-01

    Energy and wave function are the heart and soul of Schrödinger quantum mechanics. Electron momentum spectroscopy (EMS) so far provides the most stringent test for quantum mechanical models (theory, basis sets and the combination of both) through observables such as binding energy spectra and Dyson orbital momentum distributions. The capability of EMS to measure Dyson orbitals of a molecule as momentum distributions provides a unique opportunity to assess the models of quantum mechanics based on orbitals, rather than on energy dominated (mostly isotropic) properties. Recently, the author introduced a technique called dual space analysis (DSA), which is based on EMS and quantum mechanics to analyze orbital based information in the more familiar position space as well as the less familiar momentum space. In this article, the development of EMS and DSA is reviewed through the applications to molecules of biological interest such as amino acids, nucleic acid bases and recently nucleosides. The emphasis is the applications of DSA to study isomerization processes and chemical bonding mechanisms of these molecules.

  1. Electrical pulse induced biological effects using dielectric spectroscopy and mathematical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, Allen Lawrence

    This dissertation studies the effects of pulsed electric fields (PEFs) on biological cells by measuring the changes in the electrical properties of the pulsed cells and mathematically modeling avascular tumor growth, cell population dynamics, and Ohmic heating. These issues are critical because of the recent use of intense ultrashort PEFs for various biological and medical applications. Recent research using PEFs for tumor treatment motivated an investigation of a simple model for the growth of an avascular tumor. We modeled tumor growth before and after necrotic core formation by incorporating spatial dependence into a one dimensional scaling law. This model emphasized the importance of cell metabolic rate in determining the final steady state size of the tumor. Experimental results showing changes in cell survival and cell cycle due to PEFs led to an investigation of a simple mathematical model for cell population dynamics that considered the cells to be proliferating (dividing) or quiescent (resting). Although some cell populations apparently reached steady state quickly, the proliferating cell population fell below one, meaning that the overall cell population would eventually decay away. This result, which was unaltered by including a transition from the quiescent to proliferating state, emphasized the importance of targeting proliferating cells for successful cancer treatments. Time domain dielectric spectroscopy was used to measure the electrical properties of a biological cell suspension over a wide frequency range with a single pulse following multiple PEFs. Fitting the dielectric properties of a cancer cell (Jurkat) suspension to a double shell model yielded the dielectric parameters of the cell membrane, cytoplasm, nuclear envelope, and nucleoplasm. Decreased cytoplasm and nucleoplasm conductivity and increased suspension conductivity suggestion transport from the cell interior to the exterior consistent with electroporation. Reduced cell membrane

  2. BioPartsDB: a synthetic biology workflow web-application for education and research

    PubMed Central

    Stracquadanio, Giovanni; Yang, Kun; Boeke, Jef D.; Bader, Joel S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Synthetic biology has become a widely used technology, and expanding applications in research, education and industry require progress tracking for team-based DNA synthesis projects. Although some vendors are beginning to supply multi-kilobase sequence-verified constructs, synthesis workflows starting with short oligos remain important for cost savings and pedagogical benefit. We developed BioPartsDB as an open source, extendable workflow management system for synthetic biology projects with entry points for oligos and larger DNA constructs and ending with sequence-verified clones. Availability and Implementation: BioPartsDB is released under the MIT license and available for download at https://github.com/baderzone/biopartsdb. Additional documentation and video tutorials are available at https://github.com/baderzone/biopartsdb/wiki. An Amazon Web Services image is available from the AWS Market Place (ami-a01d07c8). Contact: joel.bader@jhu.edu PMID:27412090

  3. Standards for plant synthetic biology: a common syntax for exchange of DNA parts.

    PubMed

    Patron, Nicola J; Orzaez, Diego; Marillonnet, Sylvestre; Warzecha, Heribert; Matthewman, Colette; Youles, Mark; Raitskin, Oleg; Leveau, Aymeric; Farré, Gemma; Rogers, Christian; Smith, Alison; Hibberd, Julian; Webb, Alex A R; Locke, James; Schornack, Sebastian; Ajioka, Jim; Baulcombe, David C; Zipfel, Cyril; Kamoun, Sophien; Jones, Jonathan D G; Kuhn, Hannah; Robatzek, Silke; Van Esse, H Peter; Sanders, Dale; Oldroyd, Giles; Martin, Cathie; Field, Rob; O'Connor, Sarah; Fox, Samantha; Wulff, Brande; Miller, Ben; Breakspear, Andy; Radhakrishnan, Guru; Delaux, Pierre-Marc; Loqué, Dominique; Granell, Antonio; Tissier, Alain; Shih, Patrick; Brutnell, Thomas P; Quick, W Paul; Rischer, Heiko; Fraser, Paul D; Aharoni, Asaph; Raines, Christine; South, Paul F; Ané, Jean-Michel; Hamberger, Björn R; Langdale, Jane; Stougaard, Jens; Bouwmeester, Harro; Udvardi, Michael; Murray, James A H; Ntoukakis, Vardis; Schäfer, Patrick; Denby, Katherine; Edwards, Keith J; Osbourn, Anne; Haseloff, Jim

    2015-10-01

    Inventors in the field of mechanical and electronic engineering can access multitudes of components and, thanks to standardization, parts from different manufacturers can be used in combination with each other. The introduction of BioBrick standards for the assembly of characterized DNA sequences was a landmark in microbial engineering, shaping the field of synthetic biology. Here, we describe a standard for Type IIS restriction endonuclease-mediated assembly, defining a common syntax of 12 fusion sites to enable the facile assembly of eukaryotic transcriptional units. This standard has been developed and agreed by representatives and leaders of the international plant science and synthetic biology communities, including inventors, developers and adopters of Type IIS cloning methods. Our vision is of an extensive catalogue of standardized, characterized DNA parts that will accelerate plant bioengineering. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Models of ionic transport in biological membranes. Raman spectroscopy as a probe of valinomycin, gramicidin A', and rhodopsin conformations.

    PubMed

    Rothschild, K J; Stanley, H E

    1975-05-01

    There is evidence that membrane proteins can serve as the functional units of ionic transport in biological membranes. Laser Raman spectroscopy has been used to probe specific molecular interactions inside two models of transport membrane proteins, valinomycin and gramicidin A. Conformational changes of these molecules, as well as specific interactions with ions, can be detected and may help elucidate how membrane transport proteins such as Na+ minus K+ ATPase and rhodopsin function. Resonance Raman spectroscopy has also been used to study conformational changes and protein-chromophore interactions in rhodopsin, the membrane protein that acts as the primary unit of visual excitation in the eye.

  5. 2ab assembly: a methodology for automatable, high-throughput assembly of standard biological parts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    There is growing demand for robust DNA assembly strategies to quickly and accurately fabricate genetic circuits for synthetic biology. One application of this technology is reconstitution of multi-gene assemblies. Here, we integrate a new software tool chain with 2ab assembly and show that it is robust enough to generate 528 distinct composite parts with an error-free success rate of 96%. Finally, we discuss our findings in the context of its implications for biosafety and biosecurity. PMID:23305072

  6. Determining iron content in Mediterranean soils in partly vegetated areas, using spectral reflectance and imaging spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomeus, Harm; Epema, Gerrit; Schaepman, Michael

    2007-05-01

    The possibility of quantifying iron content in the topsoil of the slopes of the El Hacho Mountain complex in Southern Spain using imaging spectroscopy is investigated. Laboratory, field and airborne spectrometer (ROSIS) data are acquired, in combination with soil samples, which are analysed for dithionite extractable iron (Fe d) content. Analysis of the properties of two iron related absorption features present in laboratory spectra demonstrates good relations, especially between the standard deviation (S.D.) of the values in an absorption feature and the Fe d content ( R2 = 0.67) as well as the ratio based Redness Index ( R2 = 0.51). Such derived relations are less strong for the ROSIS data ( R2 for S.D. = 0.26 and R2 for Redness Index = 0.22). The spatial distribution of iron in vegetated areas shows a strong sensitivity of these relations with the presence of vegetation. A combination of both methods shows that the overestimation of the Fe d content with the one method is (partly) compensated by the underestimation with the other method.

  7. 40 CFR Appendix E to Part 63 - Monitoring Procedure for Nonthoroughly Mixed Open Biological Treatment Systems at Kraft Pulp...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Mixed Open Biological Treatment Systems at Kraft Pulp Mills Under Unsafe Sampling Conditions E Appendix E to Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS..., App. E Appendix E to Part 63—Monitoring Procedure for Nonthoroughly Mixed Open Biological...

  8. [Study on Different Parts of Wild and Cultivated Gentiana Rigescens with Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Shen, Yun-xia; Zhao, Yan-li; Zhang, Ji; Zuo, Zhi-tian; Wang, Yuan-zhong; Zhang, Qing-zhi

    2016-03-01

    The application of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and their preparations have a long history. With the deepening of the research, the market demand is increasing. However, wild resources are so limited that it can not meet the needs of the market. The development of wild and cultivated samples and research on accumulation dynamics of chemical component are of great significance. In order to compare composition difference of different parts (root, stem, and leaf) of wild and cultivated G. rigescens, Fourier infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and second derivative spectra were used to analyze and evaluate. The second derivative spectra of 60 samples and the rate of affinity (the match values) were measured automatically using the appropriate software (Omnic 8.0). The results showed that the various parts of wild and cultivated G. rigescens. were high similar the peaks at 1732, 1 643, 1 613, 1 510, 1 417, 1 366, 1 322, 1 070 cm(-1) were the characteristic peak of esters, terpenoids and saccharides, respectively. Moreover, the shape and peak intensity were more distinct in the second derivative spectrum of samples. In the second derivative spectrum range of 1 800-600 cm(-1), the fingerprint characteristic peak of samples and gentiopicroside standards were 1 679, 1 613, 1 466, 1 272, 1 204, 1 103, 1 074, 985, 935 cm(-1). The characteristic peak intensity of gentiopicroside of roots of wild and cultivated samples at 1 613 cm(-1) (C-C) was higher than stems and leaves which indicated the higher content of gentiopicroside in root than in stem and leaves. Stems of wild samples at 1 521, 1 462 and 1 452 cm(-1) are the skeletal vibration peak of benzene ring of lignin, and the stem of cultivated sample have stronger peak than other samples which showed that rich lignin in stems. The iInfrared spectrum of samples were similar with the average spectral of root of wild samples, and significant difference was found for the correlation between second derivative spectrum of samples

  9. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 13C NMR spectroscopy of static biological solids

    PubMed Central

    Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We explore the possibility of using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance signals in structural studies of biological solids by solid state NMR without sample spinning. Specifically, we use 2D 13C-13C exchange spectroscopy to probe the peptide backbone torsion angles (ϕ,ψ) in a series of selectively 13C-labeled 40-residue β-amyloid (Aβ1–40) samples, in both fibrillar and non-fibrillar states. Experiments are carried out at 9.39 T and 8 K, using a static double-resonance NMR probe and low-power microwave irradiation at 264 GHz. In frozen solutions of Aβ1–40 fibrils doped with DOTOPA-TEMPO, we observe DNP signal enhancement factors of 16–21. We show that the orientation- and frequency-dependent spin polarization exchange between sequential backbone carbonyl 13C labels can be simulated accurately using a simple expression for the exchange rate, after experimentally determined homogeneous 13C lineshapes are incorporated in the simulations. The experimental 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra place constraints on the ϕ and ψ angles between the two carbonyl labels. Although the data are not sufficient to determine ϕ and ψ uniquely, the data do provide non-trivial constraints that could be included in structure calculations. With DNP at low temperatures, 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra can be obtained from a 3.5 mg sample of Aβ1–40 fibrils in 4 hr or less, despite the broad 13C chemical shift anisotropy line shapes that are observed in static samples. PMID:23562665

  10. Functional near infrared spectroscopy as a potential biological assessment of addiction recovery: preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Jared P; Harris, Kitty S; Shumway, Sterling T; Kimball, Thomas G; Herrera, J Caleb; Dsauza, Cynthia M; Bradshaw, Spencer D

    2015-03-01

    Addiction science has primarily utilized self-report, continued substance use, and relapse factors to explore the process of recovery. However, the entry into successful abstinence substantially reduces our assessment abilities. Advances in neuroscience may be the key to objective understanding, treating, and monitoring long-term success in addiction recovery. To explore functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIR) as a viable technique in the assessment of addiction-cue reactivity. Specifically, prefrontal cortex (PFC) activation to alcohol cues was explored among formally alcohol-dependent individuals, across varying levels of successful abstinence. The aim of the investigation was to identify patterns of PFC activation change consistent with duration of abstinence. A total of 15 formally alcohol-dependent individuals, with abstinence durations ranging from 1 month to 10 years, viewed alcohol images during fNIR PFC assessment. Participants also subjectively rated the same images for affect and arousal level. Subjective ratings of alcohol cues did not significantly correlate with duration of abstinence. As expected, days of abstinence did not significantly correlate with neutral cue fNIR reactivity. However, for alcohol cues, fNIR results showed increased days of abstinence was associated with decreased activation within the dorsolateral and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex regions. The present results suggest that fNIR may be a viable tool in the assessment of addiction-cue reactivity. RESULTS also support previous findings on the importance of dorsolateral and dorsomedial PFC in alcohol-cue activation. The findings build upon these past results suggesting that fNIR-assessed activation may represent a robust biological marker of successful addiction recovery.

  11. ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy in the Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory: Part I--Fundamentals and Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuttlefield, Jennifer D.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2008-01-01

    Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy is a useful technique for measuring the infrared spectra of solids and liquids as well as probing adsorption on particle surfaces. Several examples of the use of FTIR-ATR spectroscopy in different undergraduate chemistry laboratory courses are presented here. These…

  12. ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy in the Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory: Part I--Fundamentals and Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuttlefield, Jennifer D.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2008-01-01

    Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy is a useful technique for measuring the infrared spectra of solids and liquids as well as probing adsorption on particle surfaces. Several examples of the use of FTIR-ATR spectroscopy in different undergraduate chemistry laboratory courses are presented here. These…

  13. Biological activities and phytochemical profiles of extracts from different parts of bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens).

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Akinobu; Zhu, Qinchang; Tan, Hui; Horiba, Hiroki; Ohnuki, Koichiro; Mori, Yasuhiro; Yamauchi, Ryoko; Ishikawa, Hiroya; Iwamoto, Akira; Kawahara, Hiroharu; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2014-06-18

    Besides being a useful building material, bamboo also is a potential source of bioactive substances. Although some studies have been performed to examine its use in terms of the biological activity, only certain parts of bamboo, especially the leaves or shoots, have been studied. Comprehensive and comparative studies among different parts of bamboo would contribute to a better understanding and application of this knowledge. In this study, the biological activities of ethanol and water extracts from the leaves, branches, outer culm, inner culm, knots, rhizomes and roots of Phyllostachys pubescens, the major species of bamboo in Japan, were comparatively evaluated. The phytochemical profiles of these extracts were tentatively determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. The results showed that extracts from different parts of bamboo had different chemical compositions and different antioxidative, antibacterial and antiallergic activities, as well as on on melanin biosynthesis. Outer culm and inner culm were found to be the most important sources of active compounds. 8-C-Glucosylapigenin, luteolin derivatives and chlorogenic acid were the most probable compounds responsible for the anti-allergy activity of these bamboo extracts. Our study suggests the potential use of bamboo as a functional ingredient in cosmetics or other health-related products.

  14. Monitoring of airborne biological particles in outdoor atmosphere. Part 1: Importance, variability and ratios.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Andrés; Amo de Paz, Guillermo; Rastrojo, Alberto; García, Ana M; Alcamí, Antonio; Gutiérrez-Bustillo, A Montserrat; Moreno, Diego A

    2016-03-01

    The first part of this review ("Monitoring of airborne biological particles in outdoor atmosphere. Part 1: Importance, variability and ratios") describes the current knowledge on the major biological particles present in the air regarding their global distribution, concentrations, ratios and influence of meteorological factors in an attempt to provide a framework for monitoring their biodiversity and variability in such a singular environment as the atmosphere. Viruses, bacteria, fungi, pollen and fragments thereof are the most abundant microscopic biological particles in the air outdoors. Some of them can cause allergy and severe diseases in humans, other animals and plants, with the subsequent economic impact. Despite the harsh conditions, they can be found from land and sea surfaces to beyond the troposphere and have been proposed to play a role also in weather conditions and climate change by acting as nucleation particles and inducing water vapour condensation. In regards to their global distribution, marine environments act mostly as a source for bacteria while continents additionally provide fungal and pollen elements. Within terrestrial environments, their abundances and diversity seem to be influenced by the land-use type (rural, urban, coastal) and their particularities. Temporal variability has been observed for all these organisms, mostly triggered by global changes in temperature, relative humidity, et cetera. Local fluctuations in meteorological factors may also result in pronounced changes in the airbiota. Although biological particles can be transported several hundreds of meters from the original source, and even intercontinentally, the time and final distance travelled are strongly influenced by factors such as wind speed and direction. [Int Microbiol 2016; 19(1):1-1 3].

  15. [Nutrition and biological value of food parts of a trade bivalve mollusk Anadara broughtoni].

    PubMed

    Tabakaeva, O V; Tabakaev, A V

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the human diet includes different new products of seafishing, including non-fish--bivalves and gastropods, holothurias, echinoderms, jellyfishes that demands careful studying of their chemical composition. The purpose of the study was to determine the nutritional and biological value of all soft parts of the burrowing bivalve MOLLUSK Anadara broughtoni from the Far East region. It was established thatfood parts of a bivalve were significantly flooded (water content--73.5-84.2%), with the minimum water content in the adductor and maximum in the mantle. Dry solids are presented by organic (89-93%) and mineral (7-11%) components. Organic components consist of protein (14.6-20.7%), lipids (1.8-2.3%), carbohydrates (2.1-2.6%). The analysis of amino-acid composition of proteins of food parts of the mollusk of Anadara broughtonishowed the presence of all essential amino acids with slight differences in their content depending on the localization of the protein. All edible parts have tryptophan as the limiting amino acid. Muscle proteins have maximum level of lysine, methionine, cysteine, phenylalanine and tyrosine; mantle proteins--leucine, isoleucine and threonine; adductor proteins--valine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, methionine and cysteine. Predominant nonessential amino acids forproteins of all food pieces are glycine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, arginine. The coefficient of amino-acid score differences of adductor protein (31.7%) is less than the same of cloak by 3.7%. The indicator "biological value" is maximal for adductor (68.3%), but the differenceformuscle is only 0.83%. Mantle proteins are characterized by minimum biological value (64.6%). The coefficient of utility of amino acid composition of protein is maximalfor muscle (57.83%), and values for a cloak and an adductor differ slightly (55.81 and 55.96%). Taurine content in food parts of a mollusk Anadara broughtoni is rather high compared to with other bivalve mollusks of the Far East region

  16. Biological markers for anxiety disorders, OCD and PTSD - a consensus statement. Part I: Neuroimaging and genetics.

    PubMed

    Bandelow, Borwin; Baldwin, David; Abelli, Marianna; Altamura, Carlo; Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Domschke, Katharina; Fineberg, Naomi A; Grünblatt, Edna; Jarema, Marek; Maron, Eduard; Nutt, David; Pini, Stefano; Vaghi, Matilde M; Wichniak, Adam; Zai, Gwyneth; Riederer, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Biomarkers are defined as anatomical, biochemical or physiological traits that are specific to certain disorders or syndromes. The objective of this paper is to summarise the current knowledge of biomarkers for anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Findings in biomarker research were reviewed by a task force of international experts in the field, consisting of members of the World Federation of Societies for Biological Psychiatry Task Force on Biological Markers and of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology Anxiety Disorders Research Network. The present article (Part I) summarises findings on potential biomarkers in neuroimaging studies, including structural brain morphology, functional magnetic resonance imaging and techniques for measuring metabolic changes, including positron emission tomography and others. Furthermore, this review reports on the clinical and molecular genetic findings of family, twin, linkage, association and genome-wide association studies. Part II of the review focuses on neurochemistry, neurophysiology and neurocognition. Although at present, none of the putative biomarkers is sufficient and specific as a diagnostic tool, an abundance of high-quality research has accumulated that will improve our understanding of the neurobiological causes of anxiety disorders, OCD and PTSD.

  17. 9 CFR 381.78 - Condemnation of carcasses and parts: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological residues. 381.78 Section 381.78 Animals and Animal...; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POULTRY PRODUCTS... carcasses and parts: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological residues. (a) At the time of...

  18. 9 CFR 381.78 - Condemnation of carcasses and parts: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological residues. 381.78 Section 381.78 Animals and Animal...; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POULTRY PRODUCTS... carcasses and parts: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological residues. (a) At the time of...

  19. 9 CFR 381.78 - Condemnation of carcasses and parts: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological residues. 381.78 Section 381.78 Animals and Animal...; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POULTRY PRODUCTS... carcasses and parts: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological residues. (a) At the time of...

  20. 9 CFR 381.78 - Condemnation of carcasses and parts: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological residues. 381.78 Section 381.78 Animals and Animal...; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POULTRY PRODUCTS... carcasses and parts: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological residues. (a) At the time of...

  1. 9 CFR 381.78 - Condemnation of carcasses and parts: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological residues. 381.78 Section 381.78 Animals and Animal...; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POULTRY PRODUCTS... carcasses and parts: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological residues. (a) At the time of...

  2. Synchrotron Radiation Circular Dichroism (SRCD) Spectroscopy: An Emerging Method in Structural Biology for Examining Protein Conformations and Protein Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, B.A.; Sutherland, J.; Gekko, K.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Lin, Y.-H.; Tao, Y.; Wien, F.; Janes, R. W.

    2011-09-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy is a well-established technique in structural biology. The use of synchrotron radiation as an intense light source for these measurements extends the applications possible using lab-based instruments. In recent years, there has been a major growth in synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) beamlines worldwide, including ones at the NSLS, ISA, SRS, HiSOR, BSRF, NSRRC, SOLEIL, Diamond, TERAS, BESSYII, and ANKA synchrotrons. Through the coordinated efforts of beamline scientists and users at these sites, important proof-of-principle studies have been done enabling the method to be developed for novel and productive studies on biological systems. This paper describes the characteristics of SRCD beamlines and some of the new types of applications that have been undertaken using these beamlines.

  3. Real sample temperature: a critical issue in the experiments of nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy on biological samples.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongxin; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Kamali, Saeed; Zhou, Zhao Hui; Cramer, Stephen P

    2012-03-01

    There are several practical and intertangled issues which make the experiments of nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) on biological samples difficult to perform. The sample temperature is one of the most important issues. In NRVS the real sample temperatures can be very different from the readings on the temperature sensors. In this study the following have been performed: (i) citing and analyzing various existing NRVS data to assess the real sample temperatures during the NRVS measurements and to understand their trends with the samples' loading conditions; (ii) designing several NRVS measurements with (Et(4)N)[FeCl(4)] to verify these trends; and (iii) proposing a new sample-loading procedure to achieve significantly lower real sample temperatures and to balance among the intertangled experimental issues in biological NRVS measurements.

  4. Frontiers of two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy. Part 2. Perturbation methods, fields of applications, and types of analytical probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Isao

    2014-07-01

    Noteworthy experimental practices, which are advancing forward the frontiers of the field of two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectroscopy, are reviewed with the focus on various perturbation methods currently practiced to induce spectral changes, pertinent examples of applications in various fields, and types of analytical probes employed. Types of perturbation methods found in the published literature are very diverse, encompassing both dynamic and static effects. Although a sizable portion of publications report the use of dynamic perturbatuions, much greater number of studies employ static effect, especially that of temperature. Fields of applications covered by the literature are also very broad, ranging from fundamental research to practical applications in a number of physical, chemical and biological systems, such as synthetic polymers, composites and biomolecules. Aside from IR spectroscopy, which is the most commonly used tool, many other analytical probes are used in 2D correlation analysis. The ever expanding trend in depth, breadth and versatility of 2D correlation spectroscopy techniques and their broad applications all point to the robust and healthy state of the field.

  5. [Are there pseudophototropic reactions in biology? Part 4: On the reversibility of biologic/synthetic polymere systems (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Patschorke, J

    1979-01-01

    In further research on pseudophototropic behaviour in cellular membranes of halobacteria the reversibility of vinylmethylethermaleic anhydride-copolymeres with biological liquids is tested and the basic principles of different colour generating reactions are studied.

  6. Frontiers of Two-Dimensional Correlation Spectroscopy. Part 1. New concepts and noteworthy developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Isao

    2014-07-01

    A comprehensive survey review of new and noteworthy developments, which are advancing forward the frontiers in the field of 2D correlation spectroscopy during the last four years, is compiled. This review covers books, proceedings, and review articles published on 2D correlation spectroscopy, a number of significant conceptual developments in the field, data pretreatment methods and other pertinent topics, as well as patent and publication trends and citation activities. Developments discussed include projection 2D correlation analysis, concatenated 2D correlation, and correlation under multiple perturbation effects, as well as orthogonal sample design, predicting 2D correlation spectra, manipulating and comparing 2D spectra, correlation strategy based on segmented data blocks, such as moving-window analysis, features like determination of sequential order and enhanced spectral resolution, statistical 2D spectroscopy using covariance and other statistical metrics, hetero-correlation analysis, and sample-sample correlation technique. Data pretreatment operations prior to 2D correlation analysis are discussed, including the correction for physical effects, background and baseline subtraction, selection of reference spectrum, normalization and scaling of data, derivatives spectra and deconvolution technique, and smoothing and noise reduction. Other pertinent topics include chemometrics and statistical considerations, peak position shift phenomena, variable sampling increments, computation and software, display schemes, such as color coded format, slice and power spectra, tabulation, and other schemes.

  7. Laser spectroscopy technique for estimating the efficiency of photosensitisers in biological media

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabova, A V; Stratonnikov, Aleksandr A; Loshchenov, V B

    2006-06-30

    A fast and highly informative method is presented for estimating the photodynamic activity of photosensitisers. The method makes it possible to determine the rate of photodegradation in erythrocyte-containing biological media in nearly in vivo conditions, estimate the degree of irreversible binding of oxygen dissolved in the medium during laser irradiation in the presence of photosensitisers, and determine the nature of degradation of photosensitisers exposed to light (photobleaching). (laser biology)

  8. Biological effects of ultrasound: development of safety guidelines. Part II: general review.

    PubMed

    Nyborg, W L

    2001-03-01

    In the 1920s, the availability of piezoelectric materials and electronic devices made it possible to produce ultrasound (US) in water at high amplitudes, so that it could be detected after propagation through large distances. Laboratory experiments with this new mechanical form of radiation showed that it was capable of producing an astonishing variety of physical, chemical and biologic effects. In this review, the early findings on bioeffects are discussed, especially those from experiments done in the first few decades, as well as the concepts employed in explaining them. Some recent findings are discussed also, noting how the old and the new are related. In the first few decades, bioeffects research was motivated partly by curiosity, and partly by the wish to increase the effectiveness and ensure the safety of therapeutic US. Beginning in the 1970s, the motivation has come also from the need for safety guidelines relevant to diagnostic US. Instrumentation was developed for measuring acoustic pressure in the fields of pulsed and focused US employed, and standards were established for specifying the fields of commercial equipment. Critical levels of US quantities were determined from laboratory experiments, together with biophysical analysis, for bioeffects produced by thermal and nonthermal mechanisms. These are the basis for safety advice and guidelines recommended or being considered by national, international, professional and governmental organizations.

  9. Raman Micro-spectroscopy Study of Healthy and Burned Biological Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarnani, Faranak; Glosser, Robert; Idris, Ahamed

    2011-10-01

    Burn injuries are a significant medical problem, and need to be treated quickly and precisely. Burned skin needs to be removed early, within hours (less than 24 hrs) of injury, when the margins of the burn are still hard to define. Studies show that treating and excising burn wounds soon after the injury prevents the wound from becoming deeper, reduces the release of proinflammatory mediators, and reduces or prevents the systemic inflammatory reaction syndrome. Also, removing burned skin prepares the affected region for skin grafting. Raman micro-spectroscopy could be used as an objective diagnostic method that will assist burn surgeons in distinguishing unburned from burned areas. As a first step in developing a diagnostic tool, we present Raman micro-spectroscopy information from normal and burned ex vivo rat skin.

  10. FTIR and Raman Spectroscopy Applied to Dementia Diagnosis Through Analysis of Biological Fluids.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Jéssica; Correia, Marta; Martins, Ilka; Henriques, Ana Gabriela; Delgadillo, Ivonne; da Cruz E Silva, Odete; Nunes, Alexandra

    2016-04-08

    To date, it is still difficult to perform an early and accurate diagnosis of dementia, therefore significant research has focused on finding new dementia biomarkers that can aid in this respect. There is an urgent need for non-invasive, rapid, and relatively inexpensive procedures for early diagnostics. Studies have demonstrated that of spectroscopic techniques, such as Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman Spectroscopy could be a useful and accurate procedure to diagnose dementia. Given that several biochemical mechanisms related to neurodegeneration and dementia can lead to changes in plasma components and others peripheral body fluids; blood-based samples coupled to spectroscopic analyses can be used as a simple and less invasive approach.

  11. Gelatin embedding: a novel way to preserve biological samples for terahertz imaging and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shuting; Ung, Benjamin; Parrott, Edward P. J.; Pickwell-MacPherson, Emma

    2015-04-01

    Sample dehydration has traditionally been a challenging problem in ex vivo terahertz biomedical experiments as water content changes significantly affect the terahertz properties and can diminish important contrast features. In this paper, we propose a novel method to prevent sample dehydration using gelatin embedding. By looking at terahertz image data and calculating the optical properties of the gelatin-embedded sample, we find that our method successfully preserves the sample for at least 35 h, both for imaging and spectroscopy. Our novel preservation method demonstrates for the first time the capability to simultaneously maintain sample structural integrity and prevent dehydration at room temperature. This is particularly relevant for terahertz studies of freshly excised tissues but could be beneficial for other imaging and spectroscopy techniques.

  12. Surface chemistry and spectroscopy of UG8 asphaltene Langmuir film, part 2.

    PubMed

    Orbulescu, Jhony; Mullins, Oliver C; Leblanc, Roger M

    2010-10-05

    While there has been much focus on asphaltenes in toluene, there has been much less focus on asphaltenes in other solvents. It is important to quantify characteristics of asphaltenes in solvents besides toluene in order to better assess their molecular architecture as well as their fundamental aggregation characteristics. The present work focuses on the investigation of UG8 asphaltene Langmuir films at the air-water interface using chloroform as spreading solvent. The results are compared to the results recently obtained using toluene as spreading solvent. Surface pressure-area isotherms and UV-vis spectroscopy indicate that asphaltenes form smaller nanoaggregates in chloroform than in toluene in similar concentration ranges. Still these nanoaggreates share common features with those in toluene. From the surface pressure-area and compression-decompression isotherms, Brewster angle microscopy, and p-polarized infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy, it was concluded that small size aggregates are spread on the water surface and the compression of the film leads to formation of large aggregates. The films (Langmuir-Schaefer and Langmuir-Blodgett) studied by atomic force microscopy reveal the existence of nanoaggregates spread on the water surface that coexist with large aggregates formed during compression. In addition to these findings, the spreading solvent, chloroform, allows the determination of asphaltene absorption bands using in situ UV-vis spectroscopy at the air-water interface after 15 min waiting time period. The absorbance data carried out after waiting a time period of 1 h shows similar features with the ones carried out after only 15 min; therefore, there is no need to wait 1 h as in the case when toluene is used as spreading solvent. A comparison of the data obtained from chloroform and toluene shows that smaller aggregate sizes are obtained from chloroform as suggested from the surface pressure-area isotherm, in situ UV-vis spectroscopy, and

  13. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy for discontinuity detection in both metallic and nonmetallic parts

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, G.W.

    2000-03-01

    In addition to its basic research applications in physics, materials science, and geophysics, resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) has been used successfully as an applied nondestructive testing (NDT) tool. This paper is intended to provide a practical introduction to RUS based nondestructive testing (NDT), highlighting successful applications and outlining failures, limitations, and potential weaknesses. Vibrational resonances are considered from the perspective of discontinuity detection, and a review of some of the types of RUS measurements is presented. Some example implementations and configurations of RUS systems and their applications are presented. Finally, the paper concludes with a discussion of constraints that limit the effectiveness of RUS.

  14. X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy analyses on the crystallinity of engineered biological hydroxyapatite for medical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poralan, G. M., Jr.; Gambe, J. E.; Alcantara, E. M.; Vequizo, R. M.

    2015-06-01

    Biological hydroxyapatite (BHAp) derived from thermally-treated fish bones was successfully produced. However, the obtained biological HAp was amorphous and thus making it unfavorable for medical application. Consequently, this research exploits and engineers the crystallinity of BHAp powders by addition of CaCO3 and investigates its degree of crystallinity using XRD and IR spectroscopy. On XRD, the HAp powders with [Ca]/[P] ratios 1.42, 1.46, 1.61 and 1.93 have degree of crystallinity equal to 58.08, 72.13, 85.79, 75.85% and crystal size equal to 0.67, 0.74, 0.75, 0.72 nm, respectively. The degree of crystallinity and crystal size of the obtained calcium deficient biological HAp powders increase as their [Ca]/[P] ratio approaches the stoichiometric ratio by addition of CaCO3 as source of Ca2+ ions. These results show the possibility of engineering the crystallinity and crystal size of biological HAp by addition of CaCO3. Moreover, the splitting factor of PO4 vibration matches the result with % crystallinity on XRD. Also, the area of phosphate-substitution site of PO4 vibration shows linear relationship (R2 = 0.994) with crystal size calculated from XRD. It is worth noting that the crystallinity of the biological HAp with [Ca]/[P] ratios 1.42 and 1.48 fall near the range 60-70% for highly resorbable HAp used in the medical application.

  15. Retrieving the optical parameters of biological tissues using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and Fourier series expansions. I. theory and application

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz Morales, Aarón A.; Vázquez y Montiel, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    The determination of optical parameters of biological tissues is essential for the application of optical techniques in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Diffuse Reflection Spectroscopy is a widely used technique to analyze the optical characteristics of biological tissues. In this paper we show that by using diffuse reflectance spectra and a new mathematical model we can retrieve the optical parameters by applying an adjustment of the data with nonlinear least squares. In our model we represent the spectra using a Fourier series expansion finding mathematical relations between the polynomial coefficients and the optical parameters. In this first paper we use spectra generated by the Monte Carlo Multilayered Technique to simulate the propagation of photons in turbid media. Using these spectra we determine the behavior of Fourier series coefficients when varying the optical parameters of the medium under study. With this procedure we find mathematical relations between Fourier series coefficients and optical parameters. Finally, the results show that our method can retrieve the optical parameters of biological tissues with accuracy that is adequate for medical applications. PMID:23082281

  16. Retrieving the optical parameters of biological tissues using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and Fourier series expansions. I. theory and application.

    PubMed

    Muñoz Morales, Aarón A; Vázquez Y Montiel, Sergio

    2012-10-01

    The determination of optical parameters of biological tissues is essential for the application of optical techniques in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Diffuse Reflection Spectroscopy is a widely used technique to analyze the optical characteristics of biological tissues. In this paper we show that by using diffuse reflectance spectra and a new mathematical model we can retrieve the optical parameters by applying an adjustment of the data with nonlinear least squares. In our model we represent the spectra using a Fourier series expansion finding mathematical relations between the polynomial coefficients and the optical parameters. In this first paper we use spectra generated by the Monte Carlo Multilayered Technique to simulate the propagation of photons in turbid media. Using these spectra we determine the behavior of Fourier series coefficients when varying the optical parameters of the medium under study. With this procedure we find mathematical relations between Fourier series coefficients and optical parameters. Finally, the results show that our method can retrieve the optical parameters of biological tissues with accuracy that is adequate for medical applications.

  17. Surface chemistry and spectroscopy of UG8 asphaltene Langmuir film, part 1.

    PubMed

    Orbulescu, Jhony; Mullins, Oliver C; Leblanc, Roger M

    2010-10-05

    This research focuses on a systematic investigation of UG8 asphaltene Langmuir films at the air-water interface using toluene as the spreading solvent. From the surface pressure-area isotherms, it was concluded that small-sized aggregates are spread on the water surface and the compression of the film leads to formation of large aggregates. Our methods provide a stringent test and confirmation for the formation of corresponding asphaltene nanoaggregates that have recently been proposed for bulk solutions. These results were confirmed by compression-decompression isotherms, Brewster angle microscopy, and p-polarized infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy. The transfer of a single layer using both the Langmuir-Schaefer and Langmuir-Blodgett deposition techniques shows different aggregate shapes depending on the technique used as imaged using atomic force microscopy. The films reveal the existence of nanoaggregates spread on the water surface that coexist with large aggregates formed during compression. For the nanoaggregate, the thickness of the Langmuir-Schaefer and Langmuir-Blodgett films determined by AFM is consistent with small aggregation numbers of nanoaggregates determined by Langmuir film compression. In addition to these findings, the spreading solvent, toluene, was found to be trapped within the aggregates as confirmed by in situ UV-vis spectroscopy at the air-water interface. This result was possible only after waiting a time period of 1 h to allow the complete evaporation of the spreading solvent. This is the only study that reveals the presence of the in situ toluene within the UG8 aggregates directly at the air-water interface.

  18. Spectral pre and post processing for infrared and Raman spectroscopy of biological tissues and cells.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Hugh J; Knief, Peter; Keating, Mark E; Bonnier, Franck

    2016-04-07

    Vibrational spectroscopy, both infrared absorption and Raman spectroscopy, have attracted increasing attention for biomedical applications, from in vivo and ex vivo disease diagnostics and screening, to in vitro screening of therapeutics. There remain, however, many challenges related to the accuracy of analysis of physically and chemically inhomogeneous samples, across heterogeneous sample sets. Data preprocessing is required to deal with variations in instrumental responses and intrinsic spectral backgrounds and distortions in order to extract reliable spectral data. Data postprocessing is required to extract the most reliable information from the sample sets, based on often very subtle changes in spectra associated with the targeted pathology or biochemical process. This review presents the current understanding of the factors influencing the quality of spectra recorded and the pre-processing steps commonly employed to improve on spectral quality. It further explores some of the most common techniques which have emerged for classification and analysis of the spectral data for biomedical applications. The importance of sample presentation and measurement conditions to yield the highest quality spectra in the first place is emphasised, as is the potential of model simulated datasets to validate both pre- and post-processing protocols.

  19. Infrared fiber optic evanescent wave spectroscopy: applications in biology and medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyeva, Natalia I.; Bruch, Reinhard F.; Katzir, Abraham

    1999-04-01

    A new powerful and highly sensitive technique for non-invasive biomedical diagnostics in vivo has been developed using Infrared Fiberoptic Evanescent Wave Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (FEW-FTIR). This compact and portable method allows to detect functional chemical groups and bonds via vibrational spectroscopy directly from surfaces including living tissue. Such differences and similarities in molecular structure of tissue and materials can be evaluated online. Operating in the attenuated total reflection (ATR) regime in the middle-infrared (MIR) range, the FEW-FTIR technique provides direct contact between the fiber probe and tissue for non-destructive, non-invasive, fast and remote (few meters) diagnostics and quality control of materials. This method utilizes highly flexible and extremely low loss unclad fibers, for example silver halide fibers. Applications of this method include investigations of normal skin, precancerous and cancerous conditions, monitoring of the process of aging, allergic reactions and radiation damage to the skin. This setup is suitable as well for the detection of the influence of environmental factors (sun, water, pollution, and weather) on skin surfaces. The FEW-FTIR technique is very promising also for fast histological examinations in vitro. In this review, we present recent investigations of skin, breast, lung, stomach, kidney tissues in vivo and ex vivo (during surgery) to define the areas of tumor localization. The main advantages of the FEW-FTIR technique for biomedical, clinical, and environmental applications are discussed.

  20. Integration of biological parts toward the synthesis of a minimal cell.

    PubMed

    Caschera, Filippo; Noireaux, Vincent

    2014-10-01

    Various approaches are taken to construct synthetic cells in the laboratory, a challenging goal that became experimentally imaginable over the past two decades. The construction of protocells, which explores scenarios of the origin of life, has been the original motivations for such projects. With the advent of the synthetic biology era, bottom-up engineering approaches to synthetic cells are now conceivable. The modular design emerges as the most robust framework to construct a minimal cell from natural molecular components. Although significant advances have been made for each piece making this complex puzzle, the integration of the three fundamental parts, information-metabolism-self-organization, into cell-sized liposomes capable of sustained reproduction has failed so far. Our inability to connect these three elements is also a major limitation in this research area. New methods, such as machine learning coupled to high-throughput techniques, should be exploited to accelerate the cell-free synthesis of complex biochemical systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Modelling of a biologically inspired robotic fish driven by compliant parts.

    PubMed

    El Daou, Hadi; Salumäe, Taavi; Chambers, Lily D; Megill, William M; Kruusmaa, Maarja

    2014-03-01

    Inspired by biological swimmers such as fish, a robot composed of a rigid head, a compliant body and a rigid caudal fin was built. It has the geometrical properties of a subcarangiform swimmer of the same size. The head houses a servo-motor which actuates the compliant body and the caudal fin. It achieves this by applying a concentrated moment on a point near the compliant body base. In this paper, the dynamics of the compliant body driving the robotic fish is modelled and experimentally validated. Lighthill's elongated body theory is used to define the hydrodynamic forces on the compliant part and Rayleigh proportional damping is used to model damping. Based on the assumed modes method, an energetic approach is used to write the equations of motion of the compliant body and to compute the relationship between the applied moment and the resulting lateral deflections. Experiments on the compliant body were carried out to validate the model predictions. The results showed that a good match was achieved between the measured and predicted deformations. A discussion of the swimming motions between the real fish and the robot is presented.

  2. Testing biological liquid samples using modified m-line spectroscopy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augusciuk, Elzbieta; Rybiński, Grzegorz

    2005-09-01

    Non-chemical method of detection of sugar concentration in biological (animal and plant source) liquids has been investigated. Simplified set was build to show the easy way of carrying out the survey and to make easy to gather multiple measurements for error detecting and statistics. Method is suggested as easy and cheap alternative for chemical methods of measuring sugar concentration, but needing a lot effort to be made precise.

  3. Interaction of Iron II Complexes with B-DNA. Insights from Molecular Modeling, Spectroscopy and Cellular Biology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattuso, Hugo; Duchanois, Thibaut; Besancenot, Vanessa; Barbieux, Claire; Assfeld, Xavier; Becuwe, Philippe; Gros, Philippe; Grandemange, Stephanie; Monari, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    We report the characterization of the interaction between B-DNA and three terpyridin iron II complexes. Relatively long time-scale molecular dynamics is used in order to characterize the stable interaction modes. By means of molecular modeling and UV-vis spectroscopy, we prove that they may lead to stable interactions with the DNA duplex. Furthermore, the presence of larger π-conjugated moieties also leads to the appearance of intercalation binding mode. Non-covalent stabilizing interactions between the iron complexes and the DNA are also characterized and evidenced by the analysis of the gradient of the electronic density. Finally, the structural deformations induced on the DNA in the different binding modes are also evidenced. The synthesis and chemical characterization of the three complexes is reported, as well as their absorption spectra in presence of DNA duplexes to prove the interaction with DNA. Finally, their effects on human cell cultures have also been evidenced to further enlighten their biological effects.

  4. Intermolecular hydrogen bonds in hetero-complexes of biologically active aromatic molecules probed by the methods of vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, M. A.; Blyzniuk, Iu. N.; Bolbukh, T. V.; Shestopalova, A. V.; Evstigneev, M. P.; Maleev, V. Ya.

    2012-09-01

    By the methods of vibrational spectroscopy (Infrared and Raman) the investigation of the hetero-association of biologically active aromatic compounds: flavin-mononucleotide (FMN), ethidium bromide (EB) and proflavine (PRF) was performed in aqueous solutions. It was shown that between the functional groups (Cdbnd O and NH2) the intermolecular hydrogen bonds are formed in the hetero-complexes FMN-EB and FMN-PRF, additionally stabilizing these structures. An estimation of the enthalpy of Н-bonding obtained from experimental shifts of carbonyl vibrational frequencies has shown that the H-bonds do not dominate in the magnitude of experimentally measured total enthalpy of the hetero-association reactions. The main stabilization is likely due to intermolecular interactions of the molecules in these complexes and their interaction with water environment.

  5. [Studies by means of 1H NMR spectroscopy of complex formation of aromatic biologically active compounds with antibiotic topotecan].

    PubMed

    Mosunov, A A; Kostiukov, V V; Evstigneev, M P

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of heteroassociation of antibiotic topotecan (TPT) with aromatic biologically active compounds (BAC): caffeine, mutagens ethidium bromide and proflavine, antibiotic daunomycin, vitamins flavin-mononucleotide and nicotinamide, has been carried out in the work using 1H NMR spectroscopy data. The equilibrium constants of heteroassociation and induced chemical shifts of the protons have been obtained in the complexes with BAC. It is found that the complex formation TPT-BAC has the nature of stacking of the chromophores, additionally stabilized in the case of proflavine by intermolecular hydrogen bond. Calculation of the basic components of the Gibbs free energy of the complexation reactions is carried out, and the factors which stabilize and destabilize the heterocomplexes of molecules are revealed.

  6. Intermolecular hydrogen bonds in hetero-complexes of biologically active aromatic molecules probed by the methods of vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Semenov, M A; Blyzniuk, Iu N; Bolbukh, T V; Shestopalova, A V; Evstigneev, M P; Maleev, V Ya

    2012-09-01

    By the methods of vibrational spectroscopy (Infrared and Raman) the investigation of the hetero-association of biologically active aromatic compounds: flavin-mononucleotide (FMN), ethidium bromide (EB) and proflavine (PRF) was performed in aqueous solutions. It was shown that between the functional groups (CO and NH(2)) the intermolecular hydrogen bonds are formed in the hetero-complexes FMN-EB and FMN-PRF, additionally stabilizing these structures. An estimation of the enthalpy of Н-bonding obtained from experimental shifts of carbonyl vibrational frequencies has shown that the H-bonds do not dominate in the magnitude of experimentally measured total enthalpy of the hetero-association reactions. The main stabilization is likely due to intermolecular interactions of the molecules in these complexes and their interaction with water environment.

  7. Slow-spinning low-sideband HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy: delicate analysis of biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Renault, Marie; Shintu, Laetitia; Piotto, Martial; Caldarelli, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    High-Resolution Magic-Angle Spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy has become an extremely versatile analytical tool to study heterogeneous systems endowed with liquid-like dynamics. Spinning frequencies of several kHz are however required to obtain NMR spectra, devoid of spinning sidebands, with a resolution approaching that of purely isotropic liquid samples. An important limitation of the method is the large centrifugal forces that can damage the structure of the sample. In this communication, we show that optimizing the sample preparation, particularly avoiding air bubbles, and the geometry of the sample chamber of the HR-MAS rotor leads to high-quality low-sideband NMR spectra even at very moderate spinning frequencies, thus allowing the use of well-established solution-state NMR procedures for the characterization of small and highly dynamic molecules in the most fragile samples, such as live cells and intact tissues. PMID:24284435

  8. Recent applications of /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy to biological systems

    SciTech Connect

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1981-01-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, in conjunction with carbon-13 labelling, is a powerful new analytical technique for the study of metabolic pathways and structural components in intact organelles, cells, and tissues. The technique can provide, rapidly and non-destructively, unique information about: the architecture and dynamics of structural components; the nature of the intracellular environment; and metabolic pathways and relative fluxes of individual carbon atoms. With the aid of results recently obtained by us and those reported by a number of other laboratories, the problems and potentialities of the technique will be reviewed with emphasis on: the viscosities of intracellular fluids; the structure and dynamics of the components of membranes; and the primary and secondary metabolic pathways of carbon in microorganisms, plants, and mammalian cells in culture.

  9. Structural environments of carboxyl groups in natural organic molecules from terrestrial systems. Part 2: 2D NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Ashish P.; Pacheco, Carlos; Hay, Michael B.; Myneni, Satish C. B.

    2007-07-01

    Carboxyl groups are abundant in natural organic molecules (NOM) and play a major role in their reactivity. The structural environments of carboxyl groups in IHSS soil and river humic samples were investigated using 2D NMR (heteronuclear and homonuclear correlation) spectroscopy. Based on the 1H- 13C heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation (HMBC) spectroscopy results, the carboxyl environments in NOM were categorized as Type I (unsubstituted and alkyl-substituted aliphatic/alicyclic), Type II (functionalized carbon substituted), Type IIIa, b (heteroatom and olefin substituted), and Type IVa, b (5-membered heterocyclic aromatic and 6-membered aromatic). The most intense signal in the HMBC spectra comes from the Type I carboxyl groups, including the 2JCH and 3JCH couplings of unsubstituted aliphatic and alicyclic acids, though this spectral region also includes the 3JCH couplings of Type II and III structures. Type II and III carboxyls have small but detectable 2JCH correlations in all NOM samples except for the Suwannee River humic acid. Signals from carboxyls bonded to 5-membered aromatic heterocyclic fragments (Type IVa) are observed in the soil HA and Suwannee River FA, while correlations to 6-membered aromatics (Type IVb) are only observed in Suwannee River HA. In general, aromatic carboxylic acids may be present at concentrations lower than previously imagined in these samples. Vibrational spectroscopy results for these NOM samples, described in an accompanying paper [Hay M. B. and Myneni S. C. B. (2007) Structural environments of carboxyl groups in natural organic molecules from terrestrial systems. Part 1: Infrared spectroscopy. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta (in press)], suggest that Type II and Type III carboxylic acids with α substituents (e.g., -OH, -OR, or -CO 2H) constitute the majority of carboxyl structures in all humic substances examined. Furoic and salicylic acid structures (Type IV) are also feasible fragments, albeit as minor constituents. The

  10. Non-invasive chemically specific measurement of subsurface temperature in biological tissues using surface-enhanced spatially offset Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Benjamin; Stone, Nicholas; Matousek, Pavel

    2016-06-23

    Here we demonstrate for the first time the viability of characterising non-invasively the subsurface temperature of SERS nanoparticles embedded within biological tissues using spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS). The proposed analytical method (T-SESORS) is applicable in general to diffusely scattering (turbid) media and features high sensitivity and high chemical selectivity. The method relies on monitoring the Stokes and anti-Stokes bands of SERS nanoparticles in depth using SORS. The approach has been conceptually demonstrated using a SORS variant, transmission Raman spectroscopy (TRS), by measuring subsurface temperatures within a slab of porcine tissue (5 mm thick). Root-mean-square errors (RMSEs) of 0.20 °C were achieved when measuring temperatures over ranges between 25 and 44 °C. This unique capability complements the array of existing, predominantly surface-based, temperature monitoring techniques. It expands on a previously demonstrated SORS temperature monitoring capability by adding extra sensitivity stemming from SERS to low concentration analytes. The technique paves the way for a wide range of applications including subsurface, chemical-specific, non-invasive temperature analysis within turbid translucent media including: the human body, subsurface monitoring of chemical (e.g. catalytic) processes in manufacture quality and process control and research. Additionally, the method opens prospects for control of thermal treatment of cancer in vivo with direct non-invasive feedback on the temperature of mediating plasmonic nanoparticles.

  11. Estimation of regional hemoglobin concentration in biological tissues using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy with a novel spectral interpretation algorithm.

    PubMed

    Chen, P; Fernald, B; Lin, W

    2011-07-07

    Both in medical research and clinical settings, regional hemoglobin concentrations ([Hb]) in the microcirculation of biological tissues are highly sought. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy has been proven to be a favorable method by which to detect regional [Hb]. This paper introduces a new algorithm to retrieve [Hb] information from diffuse reflectance spectra. The proposed algorithm utilizes the natural logarithmic operation and the differential wavelet transform to effectively quench the scattering effects, and then employs the concept of isosbestic wavelength in the transformed spectra to reduce the effects of hemoglobin oxygenation. As a result, the intensity at the defined isosbestic wavelength of the transformed spectra is a good indicator of [Hb] estimation. The algorithm was derived and validated using theoretical spectra produced by Monte Carlo simulation of photon migration. Its accuracy was further evaluated using liquid tissue phantoms, and its clinical utility with an in vivo clinical study of brain tumors. The results demonstrate the applicability of the algorithm for real-time [Hb] estimations from diffuse reflectance spectra, acquired by means of a fiber-optic spectroscopy system.

  12. Determination of resonance Raman cross-sections for use in biological SERS sensing with femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Silva, W Ruchira; Keller, Emily L; Frontiera, Renee R

    2014-08-05

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a promising technique for in vivo bioanalyte detection, but accurate characterization of SERS biosensors can be challenging due to difficulties in differentiating resonance and surface enhancement contributions to the Raman signal. Here, we quantitate the resonance Raman cross-sections for a commonly used near-infrared SERS dye, 3,3'-diethylthiatricarbocyanine (DTTC). It is typically challenging to measure resonance Raman cross-sections for fluorescent dye molecules due to the overwhelming isoenergetic fluorescence signal. To overcome this issue, we used etalon-based femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy, which is intrinsically designed to acquire a stimulated Raman signal without strong fluorescence or interference from signals resulting from other four-wave mixing pathways. Using this technique, we found that the cross-sections for most of the resonantly enhanced modes in DTTC exceed 10(-25) cm(2)/molecule. These cross-sections lead to high signal magnitude SERS signals from even weakly enhancing SERS substrates, as much of what appears to be a SERS signal is actually coming from the intrinsically strong resonance Raman signal. Our work will lead to a more accurate determination of SERS enhancement factors and SERS substrate characterization in the biologically relevant near-infrared region, ultimately leading to a more widespread use of SERS for biosensing and bioimaging applications.

  13. Systematic review of biological effects of exposure to static electric fields. Part II: Invertebrates and plants.

    PubMed

    Schmiedchen, Kristina; Petri, Anne-Kathrin; Driessen, Sarah; Bailey, William H

    2017-09-27

    The construction of high-voltage direct current (HVDC) lines for the long-distance transport of energy is becoming increasingly popular. This has raised public concern about potential environmental impacts of the static electric fields (EF) produced under and near HVDC power lines. As the second part of a comprehensive literature analysis, the aim of this systematic review was to assess the effects of static EF exposure on biological functions in invertebrates and plants and to provide the basis for an environmental impact assessment of such exposures. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) was used to guide the methodological conduct and reporting. Thirty-three studies - 14 invertebrate and 19 plant studies - met the eligibility criteria and were included in this review. The reported behavioral responses of insects and planarians upon exposure strongly suggest that invertebrates are able to perceive the presence of a static EF. Many other studies reported effects on physiological functions that were expressed as, for example, altered metabolic activity or delayed reproductive and developmental stages in invertebrates. In plants, leaf damage, alterations in germination rates, growth and yield, or variations in the concentration of essential elements, for example, have been reported. However, these physiological responses and changes in plant morphology appear to be secondary to surface stimulation by the static EF or caused by concomitant parameters of the electrostatic environment. Furthermore, all of the included studies suffered from methodological flaws, which lowered credibility in the results. At field levels encountered from natural sources or HVDC lines (< 35kV/m), the available data provide reliable evidence that static EF can trigger behavioral responses in invertebrates, but they do not provide evidence for adverse effects of static EF on other biological functions in invertebrates and plants. At far higher field

  14. Surface excitations in electron spectroscopy. Part I: dielectric formalism and Monte Carlo algorithm.

    PubMed

    Salvat-Pujol, F; Werner, W S M

    2013-05-01

    The theory describing energy losses of charged non-relativistic projectiles crossing a planar interface is derived on the basis of the Maxwell equations, outlining the physical assumptions of the model in great detail. The employed approach is very general in that various common models for surface excitations (such as the specular reflection model) can be obtained by an appropriate choice of parameter values. The dynamics of charged projectiles near surfaces is examined by calculations of the induced surface charge and the depth- and direction-dependent differential inelastic inverse mean free path (DIIMFP) and stopping power. The effect of several simplifications frequently encountered in the literature is investigated: differences of up to 100% are found in heights, widths, and positions of peaks in the DIIMFP. The presented model is implemented in a Monte Carlo algorithm for the simulation of the electron transport relevant for surface electron spectroscopy. Simulated reflection electron energy loss spectra are in good agreement with experiment on an absolute scale. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Surface excitations in electron spectroscopy. Part I: dielectric formalism and Monte Carlo algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Salvat-Pujol, F; Werner, W S M

    2013-01-01

    The theory describing energy losses of charged non-relativistic projectiles crossing a planar interface is derived on the basis of the Maxwell equations, outlining the physical assumptions of the model in great detail. The employed approach is very general in that various common models for surface excitations (such as the specular reflection model) can be obtained by an appropriate choice of parameter values. The dynamics of charged projectiles near surfaces is examined by calculations of the induced surface charge and the depth- and direction-dependent differential inelastic inverse mean free path (DIIMFP) and stopping power. The effect of several simplifications frequently encountered in the literature is investigated: differences of up to 100% are found in heights, widths, and positions of peaks in the DIIMFP. The presented model is implemented in a Monte Carlo algorithm for the simulation of the electron transport relevant for surface electron spectroscopy. Simulated reflection electron energy loss spectra are in good agreement with experiment on an absolute scale. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23794766

  16. Mechanism of hydrodenitrogenation (Part 4) infrared spectroscopy of acidic molybdena catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda, R.

    1990-01-01

    Mo oxide catalysts supported over a complete series of silica-aluminas have been characterized in the oxidic and reduced states, by means of total acidity measurements and by infrared spectroscopy. Ammonia chemisorption was used to titrate the total acidity of the catalysts, and IR absorption of adsorbed pyridine to distinguish Bronsted from Lewis acid sites. The formation of new acidity upon deposition of molybdena on silica-alumina supports was then explained on the basis of a simple surface model. The new acidity is of both Lewis and Bronsted type, the preponderance of one over the other depending on support composition, as well as loading and state of oxidation of Mo. High-alumina supports and low Mo loading favor dispersed Mo species, in particular bidentate and monodentate di-oxo Mo species. The latter is responsible for the new Bronsted acidity. Coordinative unsaturation of polymolybdates is responsible for the new Lewis acidity, which is increased upon reduction of Mo. High-silica supports favor monodentate species (high Bronsted acidity) up to 4 wt % MoO{sub 3}. Beyond that, polymolybdates species and Lewis acidity predominate. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Synthesis, spectroscopy and photochemistry of nitro-azobenzene dyes bearing benzophenone parts.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fang; Wang, Jianchao; Liu, XiaoJiao; Yang, Long; Hu, Nvdan; Xie, Ting; Li, Hongru; Zhang, Shengtao

    2009-05-01

    Novel nitro-azobenzene dyes bearing one or two benzophenone branches were proposed and synthesized to improve their photophysical and photochemical properties. The new dyes exhibited double UV/visible bands, and they displayed weak fluorescence emission as excited at 350 nm. Single crystal X-ray diffraction data showed that two phenyl rings of azobenzene was almost coplanar, and the benzophenone part was neither coplanar nor linear connection with azobenzene via ether bridged bond, which have good fit with molecular geometry optimization calculation results. The cyclic voltammeric results of nitro-azobenzene dyes were firstly reported in this paper, which demonstrated that the electrochemical properties of nitro-azobenzene dyes was altered by the substitution of benzophenone part. Thermal stabilities of the new dyes were studied by the analysis of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermograving (TG) in this paper. Efficient visible-light photoinitiating polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) by the novel nitro-azobenzene dyes was presented and discussed.

  18. Structural environments of carboxyl groups in natural organic molecules from terrestrial systems. Part 1: Infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, Michael B.; Myneni, Satish C. B.

    2007-07-01

    Carboxyls play an important role in the chemistry of natural organic molecules (NOM) in the environment, and their behavior is dependent on local structural environment within the macromolecule. We studied the structural environments of carboxyl groups in dissolved NOM from the Pine Barrens (New Jersey, USA), and IHSS NOM isolates from soils and river waters using attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. It is well established that the energies of the asymmetric stretching vibrations of the carboxylate anion (COO -) are sensitive to the structural environment of the carboxyl group. These energies were compiled from previous infrared studies on small organic acids for a wide variety of carboxyl structural environments and compared with the carboxyl spectral features of the NOM samples. We found that the asymmetric stretching peaks for all NOM samples occur within a narrow range centered at 1578 cm -1, suggesting that all NOM samples examined primarily contain very similar carboxyl structures, independent of sample source and isolation techniques employed. The small aliphatic acids containing hydroxyl (e.g., D-lactate, gluconate), ether/ester (methoxyacetate, acetoxyacetate), and carboxylate (malonate) substitutions on the α-carbon, and the aromatic acids salicylate ( ortho-OH) and furancarboxylate ( O-heterocycle), exhibit strong overlap with the NOM range, indicating that similar structures may be common in NOM. The width of the asymmetric peak suggests that the structural heterogeneity among the predominant carboxyl configurations in NOM is small. Changes in peak area with pH at energies distant from the peak at 1578 cm -1, however, may be indicative of a small fraction of other aromatic carboxyls and aliphatic structures lacking α-substitution. This information is important in understanding NOM-metal and mineral-surface complexation, and in building appropriate structural and mechanistic models of humic materials.

  19. Molecular biology for the critical care physician part I: terminology and technology.

    PubMed

    Santis, G; Evans, T W

    1999-04-01

    The past few years have seen a profound revolution in biological sciences. The enormous advances in molecular biology are providing novel insights into the etiology and treatment of human disease. These insights will undoubtedly have implications for intensive care research and practice. In this first of two articles, the basic principles and techniques of molecular biology are discussed to provide the intensive care physician with background information on the subject.

  20. Assessment of the maturity and biological parameters of compost produced from dairy manure and rice chaff by excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wei; Li, Lingzhi; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Zhenhua; Yu, Guanghui; Shen, Qirong; Shen, Biao

    2012-04-01

    The assessment of maturity and biological parameters is important in the composting process. In this study, excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy was applied to evaluate the maturity and biological parameters of compost produced from the co-composting of dairy and rice chaff. The results from a Pearson correlation analysis between traditional physico-chemical maturity indices and fluorescence regional integration (FRI) parameters showed that among the FRI parameters, P(V,n)/P(III,n) and P(V,n) were suitable for the assessment of compost maturity. Moreover, the FRI parameters could be used to evaluate biological parameters including the germination index (GI) and ribotype evolution which indicate the bacterial community structure and dynamics. P(IV,n) was the most suitable indicator for revealing the community structure and dynamics during the composting process. Fluorescence spectroscopy combined with the FRI analysis could be used as a sensitive and efficient tool for assessing compost maturity and biological parameters.

  1. Low temperature spectroscopy of proteins. Part II: Experiments with single protein complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlin, Yuri; Burin, Alexander; Friedrich, Josef; Köhler, Jürgen

    2007-03-01

    In this part of the review we describe aspects of the physics of proteins at low temperature as they are reflected in the spectra of individual pigment-protein complexes. The focus of this review is on the spectral diffusion of chromophores that are naturally embedded in light-harvesting complexes from purple bacteria. From the spectral diffusion behaviour we can deduce details about the organisation of the energy landscape of the protein and discuss the implications for the motions of the protein in conformational phase space.

  2. Resonant Mie scattering in infrared spectroscopy of biological materials--understanding the 'dispersion artefact'.

    PubMed

    Bassan, Paul; Byrne, Hugh J; Bonnier, Franck; Lee, Joe; Dumas, Paul; Gardner, Peter

    2009-08-01

    Infrared spectroscopic cytology is potentially a powerful clinical tool. However, in order for it to be successful, practitioners must be able to extract reliably a pure absorption spectrum from a measured spectrum that often contains many confounding factors. The most intractable problem to date is the, so called, dispersion artefact which most prominently manifests itself as a sharp decrease in absorbance on the high wavenumber side of the amide I band in the measured spectrum, exhibiting a derivative-like line shape. In this paper we use synchrotron radiation FTIR micro-spectroscopy to record spectra of mono-dispersed poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) spheres of systematically varying size and demonstrate that the spectral distortions in the data can be understood in terms of resonant Mie scattering. A full understanding of this effect will enable us to develop strategies for deconvolving the scattering contribution and recovering the pure absorption spectrum, thus removing one of the last technological barriers to the development of clinical spectroscopic cytology.

  3. [Bone Cell Biology Assessed by Microscopic Approach. Assessment of bone quality using Raman and infrared spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Suda, Hiromi Kimura

    2015-10-01

    Bone quality, which was defined as "the sum total of characteristics of the bone that influence the bone's resistance to fracture" at the National Institute of Health (NIH) conference in 2001, contributes to bone strength in combination with bone mass. Bone mass is often measured as bone mineral density (BMD) and, consequently, can be quantified easily. On the other hand, bone quality is composed of several factors such as bone structure, bone matrix, calcification degree, microdamage, and bone turnover, and it is not easy to obtain data for the various factors. Therefore, it is difficult to quantify bone quality. We are eager to develop new measurement methods for bone quality that make it possible to determine several factors associated with bone quality at the same time. Analytic methods based on Raman and FTIR spectroscopy have attracted a good deal of attention as they can provide a good deal of chemical information about hydroxyapatite and collagen, which are the main components of bone. A lot of studies on bone quality using Raman and FTIR imaging have been reported following the development of the two imaging systems. Thus, both Raman and FTIR imaging appear to be promising new bone morphometric techniques.

  4. An electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) assay measuring the calcification inhibition capacity in biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Ismail, A H; Schäfer, C; Heiss, A; Walter, M; Jahnen-Dechent, W; Leonhardt, S

    2011-08-15

    Pathological calcification of the cardiovascular system is one of the major causes of high mortality and morbidity in dialysis patients. The inhibition of ectopic calcification relies (I) on the formation of calciprotein particles (CPPs), nanospherical complexes of calcium phosphate mineral, fetuin-A and other acidic serum proteins, and (II) on the stabilization of calcium phosphate prenucleation clusters by fetuin-A monomers. In supersaturated serum, mineral ion aggregation leads to a change in the electrical impedance. In this work, we present a method based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to establish an impedance trace of mineral ion clustering in vitro. In the presence of 20 μM of serum protein fetuin-A, a prototypic calcification inhibitor, we measured a change in impedance (Δ(R)) of 195.52 ± 27.78%Ω compared to 430.41 ± 11.36%Ω in inhibitor-free samples. We also identified a CPP-formation dependency on the actual content of ions and protein in the samples under investigation. Two-step ripening of CPP was also observed. The presented method may form the basis of a simple label-free bedside or online test to be used in routine clinical practice for estimating the calcification risk in serum. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Direct determination and speciation of mercury compounds in environmental and biological samples by carbon bed atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Skelly, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    A method was developed for the direct determination of mercury in water and biological samples using a unique carbon bed atomizer for atomic absorption spectroscopy. The method avoided sources of error such as loss of volatile mercury during sample digestion and contamination of samples through added reagents by eliminating sample pretreatment steps. The design of the atomizer allowed use of the 184.9 nm mercury resonance line in the vacuum ultraviolet region, which increased sensitivity over the commonly used spin-forbidden 253.7 nm line. The carbon bed atomizer method was applied to a study of mercury concentrations in water, hair, sweat, urine, blood, breath and saliva samples from a non-occupationally exposed population. Data were collected on the average concentration, the range and distribution of mercury in the samples. Data were also collected illustrating individual variations in mercury concentrations with time. Concentrations of mercury found were significantly higher than values reported in the literature for a ''normal'' population. This is attributed to the increased accuracy gained by eliminating pretreatment steps and increasing atomization efficiency. Absorption traces were obtained for various solutions of pure and complexed mercury compounds. Absorption traces of biological fluids were also obtained. Differences were observed in the absorption-temperatures traces of various compounds. The utility of this technique for studying complexation was demonstrated.

  6. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy-active substrates: adapting the shape of plasmonic nanoparticles for different biological applications.

    PubMed

    Vitol, Elina A; Friedman, Gary; Gogotsi, Yury

    2014-04-01

    We discuss the relationship between the shape of plasmonic nanoparticles and the biological surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) applications which they can enable. As a step forward in developing SERS-active substrates adapted to a particular application, we demonstrate that a modification of the widely used protocol for the sodium citrate mediated reduction of chloroauric acid, which is typically employed only for obtaining spherical gold nanoparticles, can yield flat polygonal nanoparticles at room temperature and a decreased amount of the reducing agent. The significant advantage of the described approach is that it allows for synthesis of nanoparticles with different geometries using a well-established synthesis protocol without the need for any additional chemicals or special synthesis apparatus. By contrasting spherical and anisotropically shaped nanoparticles, we demonstrate that multifaceted nanoparticles with sharp edges are better suitable for SERS analysis of low concentration analytes requiring strong SERS enhancement. On the other hand, gold nanoparticles with isotropic shapes, while giving a smaller enhancement, can provide a more reproducible SERS signal. This is important for analytical applications of complex biological systems where large SERS enhancement may not always be required, whereas data reproducibility and minimal false positive rate are imperative. Using a SERS-active substrate comprising isotropically shaped gold nanoparticles, we demonstrate the differences between Gram-negative (E. coli) and Gram-positive (S. aureus) bacteria, attributable to the outer membrane and peptidoglycan layer, with the level of detail which has not been previously reported with optical spectroscopic techniques.

  7. Investigation of S H bonds in biologically important compounds by sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prange, A.; Dahl, C.; Trüper, H. G.; Behnke, M.; Hahn, J.; Modrow, H.; Hormes, J.

    2002-09-01

    X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy, often provides a direct correlation between observed resonances in the spectrum and molecular bonds in the sample. This can be used as a fingerprint for the presence of a given molecular environment of the absorber atom in a sample. As the white line is found at similar energy positions for S C and S H bonds, this approach is impossible when both types of bond are present simultaneously, as often in biological systems. To develop a criterium for the presence of S H bonds in such samples, reduced glutathione, reduced coenzyme A, cysteine and their corresponding oxidized forms were investigated using sulfur K-edge XANES, revealing a unique feature at 2 475.8 eV in the respective difference spectra. To correlate this structure to S H bonds, H2S and H2S2 were measured, whose difference spectrum also shows a structure at this energy position, whereas it is not present throughout a variety of C S C/C S S C environments. Theoretical investigations suggest its correlation to a Rydberg transition occurring in the case of a S H bond. Using this criterium, the presence of S H bonds is in the purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum during oxidation of intracellular accumulated sulfur, is proved, as expected from biological considerations.

  8. HNS+ and HSN+ cations: Electronic states, spin-rovibronic spectroscopy with planetary and biological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabelsi, Tarek; Ben Yaghlane, Saida; Al Mogren, Muneerah Mogren; Francisco, Joseph S.; Hochlaf, Majdi

    2016-08-01

    Ab initio methods in conjunction with a large basis set are used to compute the potential energy surfaces of the 12 lowest electronic states of the HNS+ and HSN+ isomeric forms. These potentials are used in discussions of the metastability of these cations and plausible mechanisms for the H+/H + SN+/SN, S/S+ + NH+/NH, N/N+ + SH+/SH ion-molecule reactions. Interestingly, the low rovibrational levels of HSN+(12A″) and HNS+(12A″) electronically excited ions are predicted to be long-lived. Both ions are suggested to be a suitable candidate for light-sensitive NOṡ donor in vivo and as a possible marker for the detection of intermediates in nitrites + H2S reactions at the cellular level. The full spin rovibronic levels of HNS+ are presented, which may assist in the experimental identification of HNS+ and HSN+ ions and in elucidating their roles in astrophysical and biological media.

  9. High-extinction virtually imaged phased array-based Brillouin spectroscopy of turbid biological media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiore, Antonio; Zhang, Jitao; Shao, Peng; Yun, Seok Hyun; Scarcelli, Giuliano

    2016-05-01

    Brillouin microscopy has recently emerged as a powerful technique to characterize the mechanical properties of biological tissue, cell, and biomaterials. However, the potential of Brillouin microscopy is currently limited to transparent samples, because Brillouin spectrometers do not have sufficient spectral extinction to reject the predominant non-Brillouin scattered light of turbid media. To overcome this issue, we combined a multi-pass Fabry-Perot interferometer with a two-stage virtually imaged phased array spectrometer. The Fabry-Perot etalon acts as an ultra-narrow band-pass filter for Brillouin light with high spectral extinction and low loss. We report background-free Brillouin spectra from Intralipid solutions and up to 100 μm deep within chicken muscle tissue.

  10. High-extinction virtually imaged phased array-based Brillouin spectroscopy of turbid biological media.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Antonio; Zhang, Jitao; Shao, Peng; Yun, Seok Hyun; Scarcelli, Giuliano

    2016-05-16

    Brillouin microscopy has recently emerged as a powerful technique to characterize the mechanical properties of biological tissue, cell, and biomaterials. However, the potential of Brillouin microscopy is currently limited to transparent samples, because Brillouin spectrometers do not have sufficient spectral extinction to reject the predominant non-Brillouin scattered light of turbid media. To overcome this issue, we combined a multi-pass Fabry-Perot interferometer with a two-stage virtually imaged phased array spectrometer. The Fabry-Perot etalon acts as an ultra-narrow band-pass filter for Brillouin light with high spectral extinction and low loss. We report background-free Brillouin spectra from Intralipid solutions and up to 100 μm deep within chicken muscle tissue.

  11. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of biological tissues usingprojected Magic Angle Spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Rachel W.; Jachmann, Rebecca C.; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Pines, Alexander

    2005-01-27

    High-resolution NMR spectra of materials subject toanisotropic broadening are usually obtained by rotating the sample aboutthe magic angle, which is 54.7 degrees to the static magnetic field. Inprojected Magic Angle Spinning (p-MAS), the sample is spun about twoangles, neither of which is the magic angle. This provides a method ofobtaining isotropic spectra while spinning at shallow angles. The p-MASexperiment may be used in situations where spinning the sample at themagic angle is not possible due to geometric or other constraints,allowing the choice of spinning angle to be determined by factors such asthe shape of the sample, rather than by the spin physics. The applicationof this technique to bovine tissue samples is demonstrated as a proof ofprinciple for future biological or medical applications.

  12. Biological materials: Part A. tuning LCST of raft copolymers and gold/copolymer hybrid nanoparticles and Part B. Biobased nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ning

    The research described in this dissertation is comprised of two major parts. The first part studied the effects of asymmetric amphiphilic end groups on the thermo-response of diblock copolymers of (oligo/di(ethylene glycol) methyl ether (meth)acrylates, OEGA/DEGMA) and the hybrid nanoparticles of these copolymers with a gold nanoparticle core. Placing the more hydrophilic end group on the more hydrophilic block significantly increased the cloud point compared to a similar copolymer composition with the end group placement reversed. For a given composition, the cloud point was shifted by as much as 28 °C depending on the placement of end groups. This is a much stronger effect than either changing the hydrophilic/hydrophobic block ratio or replacing the hydrophilic acrylate monomer with the equivalent methacrylate monomer. The temperature range of the coil-globule transition was also altered. Binding these diblock copolymers to a gold core decreased the cloud point by 5-15 °C and narrowed the temperature range of the coil-globule transition. The effects were more pronounced when the gold core was bound to the less hydrophilic block. Given the limited numbers of monomers that are approved safe for in vivo use, employing amphiphilic end group placement is a useful tool to tune a thermo-response without otherwise changing the copolymer composition. The second part of the dissertation investigated the production of value-added nanomaterials from two biorefinery "wastes": lignin and peptidoglycan. Different solvents and spinning methods (melt-, wet-, and electro-spinning) were tested to make lignin/cellulose blended and carbonized fibers. Only electro-spinning yielded fibers having a small enough diameter for efficient carbonization (≤ 5-10 μm), but it was concluded that cellulose was not a suitable binder. Cellulose lignin fibers before carbonization showed up to 90% decrease in moisture uptake compared to pure cellulose. Peptidoglycan (a bacterial cell wall

  13. Remote detection of similar biological materials using femtosecond filament-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H. L.; Méjean, G.; Liu, W.; Kamali, Y.; Daigle, J.-F.; Azarm, A.; Simard, P. T.; Mathieu, P.; Roy, G.; Simard, J.-R.; Chin, S. L.

    2007-03-01

    We demonstrated the feasibility of remote detection and differentiation of some very similar agricultural-activity related bioaerosols, namely barley, corn, and wheat grain dusts, through nonlinear fluorescence of fragments induced by the high-intensity inside filaments of femtosecond laser pulses in air. The signals were detected in Lidar configuration with targets located at 4.7 m away from the detection system. All the species showed identical spectra, namely those from molecular C2 and CN bands, as well as atomic Si, C, Mg, Al, Na, Ca, Mn, Fe, Sr and K lines. These identical spectral bands and lines reveal similar chemical compositions; however, the relative intensities of the spectra are different showing different element abundances from these three bio-targets. The intensity ratios of different elemental lines were used to distinguish these three samples. Good reproducibility was obtained. We expect that this technique could be used at long distance and thus played as a sensor of similar biological hazards for public and defense security.

  14. Applications of High Resolution Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Environmental and Biological Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Madhavi Z; Labbe, Nicole; Wagner, Rebekah J.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter details the application of LIBS in a number of environmental areas of research such as carbon sequestration and climate change. LIBS has also been shown to be useful in other high resolution environmental applications for example, elemental mapping and detection of metals in plant materials. LIBS has also been used in phytoremediation applications. Other biological research involves a detailed understanding of wood chemistry response to precipitation variations and also to forest fires. A cross-section of Mountain pine (pinceae Pinus pungen Lamb.) was scanned using a translational stage to determine the differences in the chemical features both before and after a fire event. Consequently, by monitoring the elemental composition pattern of a tree and by looking for abrupt changes, one can reconstruct the disturbance history of a tree and a forest. Lastly we have shown that multivariate analysis of the LIBS data is necessary to standardize the analysis and correlate to other standard laboratory techniques. LIBS along with multivariate statistical analysis makes it a very powerful technology that can be transferred from laboratory to field applications with ease.

  15. HNS(+) and HSN(+) cations: Electronic states, spin-rovibronic spectroscopy with planetary and biological implications.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Tarek; Ben Yaghlane, Saida; Al Mogren, Muneerah Mogren; Francisco, Joseph S; Hochlaf, Majdi

    2016-08-28

    Ab initio methods in conjunction with a large basis set are used to compute the potential energy surfaces of the 12 lowest electronic states of the HNS(+) and HSN(+) isomeric forms. These potentials are used in discussions of the metastability of these cations and plausible mechanisms for the H(+)/H + SN(+)/SN, S/S(+) + NH(+)/NH, N/N(+) + SH(+)/SH ion-molecule reactions. Interestingly, the low rovibrational levels of HSN(+)(1(2)A″) and HNS(+)(1(2)A″) electronically excited ions are predicted to be long-lived. Both ions are suggested to be a suitable candidate for light-sensitive NO(⋅) donor in vivo and as a possible marker for the detection of intermediates in nitrites + H2S reactions at the cellular level. The full spin rovibronic levels of HNS(+) are presented, which may assist in the experimental identification of HNS(+) and HSN(+) ions and in elucidating their roles in astrophysical and biological media.

  16. Applications of High Resolution Laser: Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Environmental and Biological Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Madhavi Z.; Labbe, Nicole; Wagner, Rebekah J.

    This chapter details the application of LIBS in a number of environmental areas of research such as carbon sequestration and climate change. LIBS has also been shown to be useful in other high resolution environmental applications for example, elemental mapping and detection of metals in plant materials. LIBS has also been used in phytoremediation applications. Other biological research involves a detailed understanding of wood chemistry response to precipitation variations and also to forest fires. A cross-section of Mountain pine (pinceae Pinus pungen Lamb.) was scanned using a translational stage to determine the differences in the chemical features both before and after a fire event. Consequently, by monitoring the elemental composition pattern of a tree and by looking for abrupt changes, one can reconstruct the disturbance history of a tree and a forest. Lastly we have shown that multivariate analysis of the LIBS data is necessary to standardize the analysis and correlate to other standard laboratory techniques. LIBS along with multivariate statistical analysis makes it a very powerful technology that can be transferred from laboratory to field applications with ease.

  17. Using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to evaluate biological effects induced by photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Lima, Cassio A; Goulart, Viviane P; Correa, Luciana; Zezell, Denise M

    2016-07-01

    Vibrational spectroscopic methods associated with multivariate statistical techniques have been succeeded in discriminating skin lesions from normal tissues. However, there is no study exploring the potential of these techniques to assess the alterations promoted by photodynamic effect in tissue. The present study aims to demonstrate the ability of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy on Attenuated total reflection (ATR) sampling mode associated with principal component-linear discriminant analysis (PC-LDA) to evaluate the biochemical changes caused by photodynamic therapy (PDT) in skin neoplastic tissue. Cutaneous neoplastic lesions, precursors of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), were chemically induced in Swiss mice and submitted to a single session of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-mediated PDT. Tissue sections with 5 μm thickness were obtained from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) and processed prior to the histopathological analysis and spectroscopic measurements. Spectra were collected in mid-infrared region using a FTIR spectrometer on ATR sampling mode. Principal Component-Linear Discriminant Analysis (PC-LDA) was applied on preprocessed second derivatives spectra. Biochemical changes were assessed using PCA-loadings and accuracy of classification was obtained from PC-LDA . Sub-bands of Amide I (1,624 and 1,650 cm(-1) ) and Amide II (1,517 cm(-1) ) indicated a protein overexpression in non-treated and post-PDT neoplastic tissue compared with healthy skin, as well as a decrease in collagen fibers (1,204, 1,236, 1,282, and 1,338 cm(-1) ) and glycogen (1,028, 1,082, and 1,151 cm(-1) ) content. Photosensitized neoplastic tissue revealed shifted peak position and decreased β-sheet secondary structure of proteins (1,624 cm(-1) ) amount in comparison to non-treated neoplastic lesions. PC-LDA score plots discriminated non-treated neoplastic skin spectra from post-PDT cutaneous lesions with accuracy of 92.8%, whereas non-treated neoplastic

  18. High-field EPR spectroscopy applied to biological systems: characterization of molecular switches for electron and ion transfer.

    PubMed

    Möbius, K; Savitsky, A; Schnegg, A; Plato, M; Fuchst, M

    2005-01-07

    -induced electron-transfer intermediates in wild-type and mutant reaction-centre proteins from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, (2) light-driven proton-transfer intermediates of site-specifically nitroxide spin-labelled mutants of bacteriorhodopsin proteins from Halobacterium salinarium, (3) refolding intermediates of site-specifically nitroxide spin-labelled mutants of the channel-forming protein domain of Colicin A bacterial toxin produced in Escherichia coli. The detailed information obtained is complementary to that of protein crystallography, solid-state NMR, infrared and optical spectroscopy techniques. A unique strength of high-field EPR is particularly noteworthy: it can provide highly desired detailed information on transient intermediates of proteins in biological action. They can be observed and characterized while staying in their working states on biologically relevant time scales. The review introduces the audience to origins and basic experiments of EPR in relation to NMR, describes the underlying strategies for extending conventional EPR to high-field/high-frequency EPR, and highlights those details of molecular information that are obtained from high-field EPR in conjunction with genetic engineering and that are not accessible by "classical" spectroscopy. The importance of quantum-chemical interpretation of the experimental data by DFT and advanced semiempirical molecular-orbital theory is emphasized. A short description of the laboratory-built 95 GHz and 360 GHz EPR/ENDOR spectrometers at FU Berlin is also presented. The review concludes with an outlook to future opportunities and challenges of advanced bio-EPR in interdisciplinary research.

  19. Quantitative generalized ratiometric fluorescence spectroscopy for turbid media based on probe encapsulated by biologically localized embedding.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiu-Fang; Chen, Zeng-Ping; Cui, Yin-Yin; Hu, Yuan-Liang; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2016-05-19

    PEBBLE (probe encapsulated by biologically localized embedding) nanosensor encapsulating an intensity-based fluorescence indicator and an inert reference fluorescence dye inside the pores of stable matrix can be used as a generalized wavelength-ratiometric probe. However, the lack of an efficient quantitative model render the choices of inert reference dyes and intensity-based fluorescence indicators used in PEBBLEs based generalized wavelength-ratiometric probes rather limited. In this contribution, an extended quantitative fluorescence model was derived specifically for generalized wavelength-ratiometric probes based on PEBBLE technique (QFMGRP) with a view to simplify the design of PEBBLEs and hence further extend their application potentials. The effectiveness of QFMGRP has been tested on the quantitative determination of free Ca(2+) in both simulated and real turbid media using a Ca(2+) sensitive PEBBLE nanosensor encapsulating Rhod-2 and eosin B inside the micropores of stable polyacrylamide matrix. Experimental results demonstrated that QFMGRP could realize precise and accurate quantification of free Ca(2+) in turbid samples, even though there is serious overlapping between the fluorescence excitation peaks of eosin B and Ca(2+) bound Rhod-2. The average relative predictive error value of QFMGRP for the test simulated turbid samples was 5.9%, about 2-4 times lower than the corresponding values of partial least squares calibration model and the empirical ratiometric model based on the ratio of fluorescence intensities at the excitation peaks of Ca(2+) bound Rhod-2 and eosin B. The recovery rates of QFMGRP for the real and spiked turbid samples varied from 93.1% to 101%, comparable to the corresponding results of atomic absorption spectrometry.

  20. Guidelines for biological treatment of substance use and related disorders, part 1: Alcoholism, first revision.

    PubMed

    Soyka, Michael; Kranzler, Henry R; Hesselbrock, Victor; Kasper, Siegfried; Mutschler, Jochen; Möller, Hans-Jürgen

    2017-03-01

    These practice guidelines for the biological treatment of alcohol use disorders are an update of the first edition, published in 2008, which was developed by an international Task Force of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP). For this 2016 revision, we performed a systematic review (MEDLINE/PUBMED database, Cochrane Library) of all available publications pertaining to the biological treatment of alcoholism and extracted data from national guidelines. The Task Force evaluated the identified literature with respect to the strength of evidence for the efficacy of each medication and subsequently categorised it into six levels of evidence (A-F) and five levels of recommendation (1-5). Thus, the current guidelines provide a clinically and scientifically relevant, evidence-based update of our earlier recommendations. These guidelines are intended for use by clinicians and practitioners who evaluate and treat people with alcohol use disorders and are primarily concerned with the biological treatment of adults with such disorders.

  1. Biological uniqueness and the definition of normality. Part 1--The concept of 'intrinsic' homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Schulz, P

    1994-01-01

    The patterns of biochemical and physiological variables values are subject-specific and quite stable over time. Thus, within the limits imposed by physiological requirements, the composition of the 'milieu intérieur' varies between individuals. It follows that having all values of blood constituents within the norm (defined statistically from populations of healthy subjects) might not be sufficient to identify biological normality, and a revised definition of biological normality should take into account inter-individual differences. Our concept of 'intrinsic' homeostasis means that the differences between subjects' concentrations of blood constituents express subject-specific constraints in the organization of their physiology, and that these differences might play a greater role than usually recognized. We list the consequences for medical research of the existence of biological uniqueness and propose to give more importance to the study of biological 'fingerprints' and 'intrinsic' homeostasis in physiology and clinical medicine.

  2. Design, implementation and practice of JBEI-ICE: an open source biological part registry platform and tools.

    PubMed

    Ham, Timothy S; Dmytriv, Zinovii; Plahar, Hector; Chen, Joanna; Hillson, Nathan J; Keasling, Jay D

    2012-10-01

    The Joint BioEnergy Institute Inventory of Composable Elements (JBEI-ICEs) is an open source registry platform for managing information about biological parts. It is capable of recording information about 'legacy' parts, such as plasmids, microbial host strains and Arabidopsis seeds, as well as DNA parts in various assembly standards. ICE is built on the idea of a web of registries and thus provides strong support for distributed interconnected use. The information deposited in an ICE installation instance is accessible both via a web browser and through the web application programming interfaces, which allows automated access to parts via third-party programs. JBEI-ICE includes several useful web browser-based graphical applications for sequence annotation, manipulation and analysis that are also open source. As with open source software, users are encouraged to install, use and customize JBEI-ICE and its components for their particular purposes. As a web application programming interface, ICE provides well-developed parts storage functionality for other synthetic biology software projects. A public instance is available at public-registry.jbei.org, where users can try out features, upload parts or simply use it for their projects. The ICE software suite is available via Google Code, a hosting site for community-driven open source projects.

  3. [Topical issues of biological safety under current conditions. Part 3. Scientific provision for the national regulation of the biological safety framework in its broad interpretation].

    PubMed

    Onishchenko, G G; Smolensky, V Yu; Ezhlova, E B; Demina, Yu V; Toporkov, V P; Toporkov, A V; Lyapin, M N; Kutyrev, V V

    2014-01-01

    Consequent of investigation concerned with biological safety (BS) framework development in its broad interpretation, reflected in the Russian Federation State Acts, identified have been conceptual entity parameters of the up-to-date broad interpretation of BS, which have formed a part of the developed by the authors system for surveillance (prophylaxis, localization, indication, identification, and diagnostics) and control (prophylaxis, localization, and response/elimination) over the emergency situations of biological (sanitary-epidemiological) character. The System functionality is activated through supplying the content with information data which are concerned with monitoring and control of specific internal and external threats in the sphere of BS provision fixed in the Supplement 2 of the International Health Regulations (IHR, 2005), and with the previously characterized nomenclature of hazardous biological factors. The system is designed as a network-based research-and-practice tool for evaluation of the situation in the sphere of BS provision, as well as assessment of efficacy of management decision making as regards BS control and proper State policy implementation. Most of the system elements either directly or indirectly relate to the scope of activities conducted by Federal Service for Surveillance in the Sphere of Consumers Rights Protection and Human Welfare, being substantial argument for allocating coordination functions in the sphere of BS provision to this government agency and consistent with its function as the State Coordinator on IHR (2005). The data collected serve as materials to Draft Federal Law "Concerning biological safety provision of the population".

  4. High-resolution broadband spectroscopy using externally dispersed interferometry at the Hale telescope: Part 1, data analysis and results

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, David J.; Edelstein, Jerry; Wishnow, Edward H.; Sirk, Martin; Muirhead, Philip S.; Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; Lloyd, James P.; Ishikawa, Yuzo; McDonald, Eliza A.; Shourt, William V.; Vanderburg, Andrew M.

    2016-05-27

    High-resolution broadband spectroscopy at near-infrared wavelengths (950 to 2450 nm) has been performed using externally dispersed interferometry (EDI) at the Hale telescope at Mt. Palomar. Observations of stars were performed with the “TEDI” interferometer mounted within the central hole of the 200-in. primary mirror in series with the comounted TripleSpec near-infrared echelle spectrograph. These are the first multidelay EDI demonstrations on starlight, as earlier measurements used a single delay or laboratory sources. We demonstrate very high (10×) resolution boost, from original 2700 to 27,000 with current set of delays (up to 3 cm), well beyond the classical limits enforced by the slit width and detector pixel Nyquist limit. Significantly, the EDI used with multiple delays rather than a single delay as used previously yields an order of magnitude or more improvement in the stability against native spectrograph point spread function (PSF) drifts along the dispersion direction. We observe a dramatic (20×) reduction in sensitivity to PSF shift using our standard processing. A recently realized method of further reducing the PSF shift sensitivity to zero is described theoretically and demonstrated in a simple simulation which produces a 350× times reduction. We demonstrate superb rejection of fixed pattern noise due to bad detector pixels—EDI only responds to changes in pixel intensity synchronous to applied dithering. This part 1 describes data analysis, results, and instrument noise. Lastly, a section on theoretical photon limited sensitivity is in a companion paper, part 2.

  5. High-resolution broadband spectroscopy using externally dispersed interferometry at the Hale telescope: Part 1, data analysis and results

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, David J.; Edelstein, Jerry; Wishnow, Edward H.; Sirk, Martin; Muirhead, Philip S.; Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; Lloyd, James P.; Ishikawa, Yuzo; McDonald, Eliza A.; Shourt, William V.; Vanderburg, Andrew M.

    2016-05-27

    High-resolution broadband spectroscopy at near-infrared wavelengths (950 to 2450 nm) has been performed using externally dispersed interferometry (EDI) at the Hale telescope at Mt. Palomar. Observations of stars were performed with the “TEDI” interferometer mounted within the central hole of the 200-in. primary mirror in series with the comounted TripleSpec near-infrared echelle spectrograph. These are the first multidelay EDI demonstrations on starlight, as earlier measurements used a single delay or laboratory sources. We demonstrate very high (10×) resolution boost, from original 2700 to 27,000 with current set of delays (up to 3 cm), well beyond the classical limits enforced by the slit width and detector pixel Nyquist limit. Significantly, the EDI used with multiple delays rather than a single delay as used previously yields an order of magnitude or more improvement in the stability against native spectrograph point spread function (PSF) drifts along the dispersion direction. We observe a dramatic (20×) reduction in sensitivity to PSF shift using our standard processing. A recently realized method of further reducing the PSF shift sensitivity to zero is described theoretically and demonstrated in a simple simulation which produces a 350× times reduction. We demonstrate superb rejection of fixed pattern noise due to bad detector pixels—EDI only responds to changes in pixel intensity synchronous to applied dithering. This part 1 describes data analysis, results, and instrument noise. Lastly, a section on theoretical photon limited sensitivity is in a companion paper, part 2.

  6. High-resolution broadband spectroscopy using externally dispersed interferometry at the Hale telescope: Part 1, data analysis and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erskine, David J.; Edelstein, Jerry; Wishnow, Edward H.; Sirk, Martin; Muirhead, Philip S.; Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; Lloyd, James P.; Ishikawa, Yuzo; McDonald, Eliza A.; Shourt, William V.; Vanderburg, Andrew M.

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution broadband spectroscopy at near-infrared wavelengths (950 to 2450 nm) has been performed using externally dispersed interferometry (EDI) at the Hale telescope at Mt. Palomar. Observations of stars were performed with the "TEDI" interferometer mounted within the central hole of the 200-in. primary mirror in series with the comounted TripleSpec near-infrared echelle spectrograph. These are the first multidelay EDI demonstrations on starlight, as earlier measurements used a single delay or laboratory sources. We demonstrate very high (10×) resolution boost, from original 2700 to 27,000 with current set of delays (up to 3 cm), well beyond the classical limits enforced by the slit width and detector pixel Nyquist limit. Significantly, the EDI used with multiple delays rather than a single delay as used previously yields an order of magnitude or more improvement in the stability against native spectrograph point spread function (PSF) drifts along the dispersion direction. We observe a dramatic (20×) reduction in sensitivity to PSF shift using our standard processing. A recently realized method of further reducing the PSF shift sensitivity to zero is described theoretically and demonstrated in a simple simulation which produces a 350× times reduction. We demonstrate superb rejection of fixed pattern noise due to bad detector pixels-EDI only responds to changes in pixel intensity synchronous to applied dithering. This part 1 describes data analysis, results, and instrument noise. A section on theoretical photon limited sensitivity is in a companion paper, part 2.

  7. Raman spectroscopy for the evaluation of the effects of different concentrations of Copper on the chemical composition and biological activity of basil essential oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawaz, Haq; Hanif, Muhammad Asif; Ayub, Muhammad Adnan; Ishtiaq, Faiqa; Kanwal, Nazish; Rashid, Nosheen; Saleem, Muhammad; Ahmad, Mushtaq

    2017-10-01

    The present study is performed to evaluate the effect of different concentrations of Cu as fertilizer on the chemical composition of basil essential oil and its biological activity including antioxidant and antifungal activities by employing Raman spectroscopy. Moreover, the effect of Cu is also determined on the vegetative growth and essential oil yield. Both, antifungal and antioxidant activities were found to be maximum with essential oils obtained at 0.04 mg/l concentration of Cu fertilizer. The results of the GC-MS and Raman spectroscopy have revealed that the linalool and estragole are found to be as a major chemical compound in basil essential oil. The Raman spectral changes associated with these biological components lead to the conclusion that estragole seems to have dominating effect in the biological activities of the basil essential oil as compared to linalool although the latter is observed in greater concentration.

  8. Raman spectroscopy for the evaluation of the effects of different concentrations of Copper on the chemical composition and biological activity of basil essential oil.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Haq; Hanif, Muhammad Asif; Ayub, Muhammad Adnan; Ishtiaq, Faiqa; Kanwal, Nazish; Rashid, Nosheen; Saleem, Muhammad; Ahmad, Mushtaq

    2017-10-05

    The present study is performed to evaluate the effect of different concentrations of Cu as fertilizer on the chemical composition of basil essential oil and its biological activity including antioxidant and antifungal activities by employing Raman spectroscopy. Moreover, the effect of Cu is also determined on the vegetative growth and essential oil yield. Both, antifungal and antioxidant activities were found to be maximum with essential oils obtained at 0.04mg/l concentration of Cu fertilizer. The results of the GC-MS and Raman spectroscopy have revealed that the linalool and estragole are found to be as a major chemical compound in basil essential oil. The Raman spectral changes associated with these biological components lead to the conclusion that estragole seems to have dominating effect in the biological activities of the basil essential oil as compared to linalool although the latter is observed in greater concentration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Space biology class as part of science education programs for high schools in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Motoshi; Takaoki, Muneo

    2004-11-01

    Declining incentives and scholastic abilities in science class has been concerned in Japan. The Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology encourages schools to cooperate with research institutions to raise student's interest in natural sciences. The Science Partnership Program (SPP) and the Super Science High-School (SSH) are among such efforts. Our short SPP course consists of an introductory lecture on space biology in general and a brief laboratory practice on plant gravitropism. Space biology class is popular to students, despite of the absence of flight experiments. We suppose that students are delighted when they find that their own knowledge is not a mere theory, but has very practical applications. Space biology is suitable in science class, since it synthesizes mathematics, physics, chemistry and many other subjects that students might think uninteresting.

  10. Identification of antibody isotypes in biological fluids by means of micro-Raman spectroscopy and chemometric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo-Andrade, C.; Pichardo-Molina, J. L.; Barbosa-Sabanero, G.; Frausto-Reyes, C.

    2008-02-01

    Clinical diagnosis of infections, generally are realized by serological methods, which identifies the antibodies presents in serum or tissue fluids of the patient. Antibodies are proteins present in our bodies that aid in the elimination of pathogens or antigens. Identification of antibodies isotypes is important because can help to predict when and whether patients will recover from infections and are commonly diagnosed by means of indirect methods such as serological test. In the other hand, the majority of these methods requires specific kits for the analysis, special sample preparation, chemical reagents, expensive equipment and require long time for getting results. In this work we show the feasibility to discriminate antibody isotypes in biological fluids like human colostrum by means of Raman spectroscopy and chemometrics. Spectra were obtained using an excitation wavelength of 514 nm over dried samples of human colostrum labeled previously as positives to specific IgG and IgM antibodies against Toxoplasma Gondii by means of ELISA test. Partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was used to discriminate among antibody isotypes by use second derivative of Raman spectra of colostrum samples.

  11. Similarities and differences of copper and zinc cations binding to biologically relevant peptides studied by vibrational spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Schirer, Alicia; El Khoury, Youssef; Faller, Peter; Hellwig, Petra

    2017-03-20

    GHK and DAHK are biological peptides that bind both copper and zinc cations. Here we used infrared and Raman spectroscopies to study the coordination modes of both copper and zinc ions, at pH 6.8 and 8.9, correlating the data with the crystal structures that are only available for the copper-bound form. We found that Cu(II) binds to deprotonated backbone (amidate), the N-terminus and N(π) of the histidine side chain, in both GHK and DAHK, at pH 6.8 and 8.9. The data for the coordination of zinc at pH 6.8 points to two conformers including both nitrogens of a histidine residue. At pH 8.9, vibrational spectra of the ZnGHK complexes show that equilibria between monomers, oligomers exist, where deprotonated histidine residues as well as deprotonated amide nitrogen are involved in the coordination. A common feature is found: zinc cations coordinate to N(τ) and/or N(π) of the His leading to the formation of GHK and DAHK multimers. In contrast, Cu(II) binds His via N(π) regardless of the peptide, in a pH-independent manner.

  12. Utilization of Microwave Spectroscopy to Identify and Probe Reaction Dynamics of Hsno, a Crucial Biological Signaling Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, Matthew; Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Stanton, John F.; Cummins, Christopher; McCarthy, Michael C.

    2016-06-01

    Thionitrous acid (HSNO), a potential key intermediate in biological signaling pathways, has been proposed to link NO and H2S biochemistries. Its existence and stability in vivo, however, remain controversial. By means of Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy, we establish that HSNO is spontaneously formed in high concentration when NO and H2S gases are simply mixed at room temperature in the presence of metallic surfaces. Our measurements reveal that HSNO is formed with high efficiency by the reaction H2S and N2O3 to produce HSNO and HNO2, where N2O3 is a product of NO disproportionation. These studies also suggest that further reaction of HSNO with H2S may form HNO and HSSH. The length of the S--N bond has been derived to high precision from isotopic studies, and is found to be unusually long, 1.84 Å -- the longest S--N bond reported to date for an SNO compound. The present structural and reactivity investigations of this elusive molecule provide a firm fundation to better understand its physiological chemistry and propensity to undergo S--N bond homolysis in vivo.

  13. Application of picosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy to quantitative analysis of boron in meatballs and other biological samples.

    PubMed

    Hedwig, Rinda; Lahna, Kurnia; Lie, Zener Sukra; Pardede, Marincan; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Tjia, May On; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2016-11-10

    This report presents the results of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) study on biological and food samples of high water content using a picosecond (ps) laser at low output energy of 10 mJ and low-pressure helium ambient gas at 2 kPa. Evidence of excellent emission spectra of various analyte elements with very low background is demonstrated for a variety of samples without the need of sample pretreatment. Specifically, limits of detection in the range of sub-ppm are obtained for hazardous Pb and B impurities in carrots and meatballs. This study also shows the inferior performance of LIBS using a nanosecond laser and atmospheric ambient air for a soft sample of high water content and thereby explains its less successful applications in previous attempts. The present result has instead demonstrated the feasibility and favorable results of employing LIBS with a ps laser and low-pressure helium ambient gas as a less costly and more practical alternative to inductively coupled plasma for regular high sensitive inspection of harmful food preservatives and environmental pollutants.

  14. Interaction of Iron II Complexes with B-DNA. Insights from Molecular Modeling, Spectroscopy, and Cellular Biology

    PubMed Central

    Gattuso, Hugo; Duchanois, Thibaut; Besancenot, Vanessa; Barbieux, Claire; Assfeld, Xavier; Becuwe, Philippe; Gros, Philippe C.; Grandemange, Stephanie; Monari, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    We report the characterization of the interaction between B-DNA and three terpyridin iron II complexes. Relatively long time-scale molecular dynamics (MD) is used in order to characterize the stable interaction modes. By means of molecular modeling and UV-vis spectroscopy, we prove that they may lead to stable interactions with the DNA duplex. Furthermore, the presence of larger π-conjugated moieties also leads to the appearance of intercalation binding mode. Non-covalent stabilizing interactions between the iron complexes and the DNA are also characterized and evidenced by the analysis of the gradient of the electronic density. Finally, the structural deformations induced on the DNA in the different binding modes are also evidenced. The synthesis and chemical characterization of the three complexes is reported, as well as their absorption spectra in presence of DNA duplexes to prove the interaction with DNA. Finally, their effects on human cell cultures have also been evidenced to further enlighten their biological effects. PMID:26734600

  15. 33S nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of biological samples obtained with a laboratory model 33S cryogenic probe.

    PubMed

    Hobo, Fumio; Takahashi, Masato; Saito, Yuta; Sato, Naoki; Takao, Tomoaki; Koshiba, Seizo; Maeda, Hideaki

    2010-05-01

    (33)S nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is limited by inherently low NMR sensitivity because of the quadrupolar moment and low gyromagnetic ratio of the (33)S nucleus. We have developed a 10 mm (33)S cryogenic NMR probe, which is operated at 9-26 K with a cold preamplifier and a cold rf switch operated at 60 K. The (33)S NMR sensitivity of the cryogenic probe is as large as 9.8 times that of a conventional 5 mm broadband NMR probe. The (33)S cryogenic probe was applied to biological samples such as human urine, bile, chondroitin sulfate, and scallop tissue. We demonstrated that the system can detect and determine sulfur compounds having SO(4)(2-) anions and -SO(3)(-) groups using the (33)S cryogenic probe, as the (33)S nuclei in these groups are in highly symmetric environments. The NMR signals for other common sulfur compounds such as cysteine are still undetectable by the (33)S cryogenic probe, as the (33)S nuclei in these compounds are in asymmetric environments. If we shorten the rf pulse width or decrease the rf coil diameter, we should be able to detect the NMR signals for these compounds.

  16. YeastFab: the design and construction of standard biological parts for metabolic engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yakun; Dong, Junkai; Zhou, Tong; Auxillos, Jamie; Li, Tianyi; Zhang, Weimin; Wang, Lihui; Shen, Yue; Luo, Yisha; Zheng, Yijing; Lin, Jiwei; Chen, Guo-Qiang; Wu, Qingyu; Cai, Yizhi; Dai, Junbiao

    2015-01-01

    It is a routine task in metabolic engineering to introduce multicomponent pathways into a heterologous host for production of metabolites. However, this process sometimes may take weeks to months due to the lack of standardized genetic tools. Here, we present a method for the design and construction of biological parts based on the native genes and regulatory elements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have developed highly efficient protocols (termed YeastFab Assembly) to synthesize these genetic elements as standardized biological parts, which can be used to assemble transcriptional units in a single-tube reaction. In addition, standardized characterization assays are developed using reporter constructs to calibrate the function of promoters. Furthermore, the assembled transcription units can be either assayed individually or applied to construct multi-gene metabolic pathways, which targets a genomic locus or a receiving plasmid effectively, through a simple in vitro reaction. Finally, using β-carotene biosynthesis pathway as an example, we demonstrate that our method allows us not only to construct and test a metabolic pathway in several days, but also to optimize the production through combinatorial assembly of a pathway using hundreds of regulatory biological parts. PMID:25956650

  17. YeastFab: the design and construction of standard biological parts for metabolic engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yakun; Dong, Junkai; Zhou, Tong; Auxillos, Jamie; Li, Tianyi; Zhang, Weimin; Wang, Lihui; Shen, Yue; Luo, Yisha; Zheng, Yijing; Lin, Jiwei; Chen, Guo-Qiang; Wu, Qingyu; Cai, Yizhi; Dai, Junbiao

    2015-07-27

    It is a routine task in metabolic engineering to introduce multicomponent pathways into a heterologous host for production of metabolites. However, this process sometimes may take weeks to months due to the lack of standardized genetic tools. Here, we present a method for the design and construction of biological parts based on the native genes and regulatory elements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have developed highly efficient protocols (termed YeastFab Assembly) to synthesize these genetic elements as standardized biological parts, which can be used to assemble transcriptional units in a single-tube reaction. In addition, standardized characterization assays are developed using reporter constructs to calibrate the function of promoters. Furthermore, the assembled transcription units can be either assayed individually or applied to construct multi-gene metabolic pathways, which targets a genomic locus or a receiving plasmid effectively, through a simple in vitro reaction. Finally, using β-carotene biosynthesis pathway as an example, we demonstrate that our method allows us not only to construct and test a metabolic pathway in several days, but also to optimize the production through combinatorial assembly of a pathway using hundreds of regulatory biological parts. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Biology-Chemistry-Physics, Teachers' Guide, a Three-Year Sequence, Parts I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Arthur; And Others

    This is one of two teacher's guides for a three-year integrated biology, chemistry, and physics course being prepared by the Portland Project Committee. This committee reviewed and selected material developed by the national course improvement groups--Physical Science Study Committee, Chemical Bond Approach, Chemical Education Materials Study,…

  19. Incorporating Biological Mass Spectrometry into Undergraduate Teaching Labs, Part 2: Peptide Identification via Molecular Mass Determination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnquist, Isaac J.; Beussman, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has become a routine analytical tool in the undergraduate curriculum in the form of GC-MS. While relatively few undergraduate programs have incorporated biological mass spectrometry into their programs, the importance of these techniques, as demonstrated by their recognition with the 2002 Nobel Prize, will hopefully lead to…

  20. Energy from biological processes. Volume III. Appendixes, Part B: Agriculture, unconventional crops, and select biomass wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    This volume contains the following working papers written for OTA to assist in preparation of the report, Energy from Biological Processes: The Potential of Producing Energy From Agriculture; Cropland Availability for Biomass Production; Energy From Agriculture: Unconventional Crops; Energy From Aquaculture Biomass Systems: Fresh and Brackish Water Aquatic Plants; Energy From Agriculture: Animal Wastes; and Energy From Agriculture: Agricultural Processing Wastes.

  1. Incorporating Biological Mass Spectrometry into Undergraduate Teaching Labs, Part 2: Peptide Identification via Molecular Mass Determination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnquist, Isaac J.; Beussman, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has become a routine analytical tool in the undergraduate curriculum in the form of GC-MS. While relatively few undergraduate programs have incorporated biological mass spectrometry into their programs, the importance of these techniques, as demonstrated by their recognition with the 2002 Nobel Prize, will hopefully lead to…

  2. Raman Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerrard, Donald L.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature on Raman spectroscopy from late 1981 to late 1983. Topic areas include: instrumentation and sampling; liquids and solutions; gases and matrix isolation; biological molecules; polymers; high-temperature and high-pressure studies; Raman microscopy; thin films and surfaces; resonance-enhanced and surface-enhanced spectroscopy; and…

  3. Raman Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerrard, Donald L.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature on Raman spectroscopy from late 1981 to late 1983. Topic areas include: instrumentation and sampling; liquids and solutions; gases and matrix isolation; biological molecules; polymers; high-temperature and high-pressure studies; Raman microscopy; thin films and surfaces; resonance-enhanced and surface-enhanced spectroscopy; and…

  4. High-resolution broadband spectroscopy using externally dispersed interferometry at the Hale telescope: Part 1, data analysis and results

    DOE PAGES

    Erskine, David J.; Edelstein, Jerry; Wishnow, Edward H.; ...

    2016-05-27

    High-resolution broadband spectroscopy at near-infrared wavelengths (950 to 2450 nm) has been performed using externally dispersed interferometry (EDI) at the Hale telescope at Mt. Palomar. Observations of stars were performed with the “TEDI” interferometer mounted within the central hole of the 200-in. primary mirror in series with the comounted TripleSpec near-infrared echelle spectrograph. These are the first multidelay EDI demonstrations on starlight, as earlier measurements used a single delay or laboratory sources. We demonstrate very high (10×) resolution boost, from original 2700 to 27,000 with current set of delays (up to 3 cm), well beyond the classical limits enforced bymore » the slit width and detector pixel Nyquist limit. Significantly, the EDI used with multiple delays rather than a single delay as used previously yields an order of magnitude or more improvement in the stability against native spectrograph point spread function (PSF) drifts along the dispersion direction. We observe a dramatic (20×) reduction in sensitivity to PSF shift using our standard processing. A recently realized method of further reducing the PSF shift sensitivity to zero is described theoretically and demonstrated in a simple simulation which produces a 350× times reduction. We demonstrate superb rejection of fixed pattern noise due to bad detector pixels—EDI only responds to changes in pixel intensity synchronous to applied dithering. This part 1 describes data analysis, results, and instrument noise. Lastly, a section on theoretical photon limited sensitivity is in a companion paper, part 2.« less

  5. Final report on LDRD project: Semiconductor surface-emitting microcavity laser spectroscopy for analysis of biological cells and microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Gourley, P.L.; McDonald, A.E.; Gourley, M.F.; Bellum, J.

    1997-08-01

    This article discusses a new intracavity laser technique that uses living or fixed cells as an integral part of the laser. The cells are placed on a GaAs based semiconductor wafer comprising one half of a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser. After placement, the cells are covered with a dielectric mirror to close the laser cavity. When photo-pumped with an external laser, this hybrid laser emits coherent light images and spectra that depend sensitively on the cell size, shape, and dielectric properties. The light spectra can be used to identify different cell types and distinguish normal and abnormal cells. The laser can be used to study single cells in real time as a cell-biology lab-on-a-chip, or to study large populations of cells by scanning the pump laser at high speed. The laser is well-suited to be integrated with other micro-optical or micro-fluidic components to lead to micro-optical-mechanical systems for analysis of fluids, particulates, and biological cells.

  6. Morphomics: An integral part of systems biology of the human placenta.

    PubMed

    Mayhew, T M

    2015-04-01

    The placenta is a transient organ the functioning of which has health consequences far beyond the embryo/fetus. Understanding the biology of any system (organ, organism, single cell, etc) requires a comprehensive and inclusive approach which embraces all the biomedical disciplines and 'omic' technologies and then integrates information obtained from all of them. Among the latest 'omics' is morphomics. The terms morphome and morphomics have been applied incoherently in biology and biomedicine but, recently, they have been given clear and widescale definitions. Morphomics is placed in the context of other 'omics' and its pertinent technologies and tools for sampling and quantitation are reviewed. Emphasis is accorded to the importance of random sampling principles in systems biology and the value of combining 3D quantification with alternative imaging techniques to advance knowledge and understanding of the human placental morphome. By analogy to other 'omes', the morphome is the totality of morphological features within a system and morphomics is the systematic study of those structures. Information about structure is required at multiple levels of resolution in order to understand better the processes by which a given system alters with time, experimental treatment or environmental insult. Therefore, morphomics research includes all imaging techniques at all levels of achievable resolution from gross anatomy and medical imaging, via optical and electron microscopy, to molecular characterisation. Quantification is an important element of all 'omics' studies and, because biological systems exist and operate in 3-dimensional (3D) space, precise descriptions of form, content and spatial relationships require the quantification of structure in 3D. These considerations are relevant to future study contributions to the Human Placenta Project. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Bibliographical database of radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment: Part 1, through June 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Straume, T.; Ricker, Y.; Thut, M.

    1988-08-29

    This database was constructed to support research in radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment. Relevant publications were identified through detailed searches of national and international electronic databases and through our personal knowledge of the subject. Publications were numbered and key worded, and referenced in an electronic data-retrieval system that permits quick access through computerized searches on publication number, authors, key words, title, year, and journal name. Photocopies of all publications contained in the database are maintained in a file that is numerically arranged by citation number. This report of the database is provided as a useful reference and overview. It should be emphasized that the database will grow as new citations are added to it. With that in mind, we arranged this report in order of ascending citation number so that follow-up reports will simply extend this document. The database cite 1212 publications. Publications are from 119 different scientific journals, 27 of these journals are cited at least 5 times. It also contains reference to 42 books and published symposia, and 129 reports. Information relevant to radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment is widely distributed among the scientific literature, although a few journals clearly dominate. The four journals publishing the largest number of relevant papers are Health Physics, Mutation Research, Radiation Research, and International Journal of Radiation Biology. Publications in Health Physics make up almost 10% of the current database.

  8. Do we live in a quantum world? Advances in multidimensional coherent spectroscopies refine our understanding of quantum coherences and structural dynamics of biological systems.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Andrea; Prokhorenko, Valentyn; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2006-10-01

    The issue of quantum effects in biological functions reduces to determining the relevant length and/or time scales over which phase relationships (coherence) in the wave properties of matter are conserved and lead to observable interference effects. Recent advances in femtosecond laser-based two-dimensional spectroscopy and coherent control have made it possible to directly determine the relevant timescales of quantum coherence in biological systems and even manipulate such effects, respectively, and also provide direct information on the interactions between the different degrees of freedom (electronic and nuclear) with sufficient time resolution to catch the very chemical processes driving biological functions in action. The picture that is emerging is that there are primary events in biological processes that occur on timescales commensurate with quantum coherence effects.

  9. Unique nucleotide sequence (UNS)-guided assembly of repetitive DNA parts for synthetic biology applications

    PubMed Central

    Torella, Joseph P.; Lienert, Florian; Boehm, Christian R.; Chen, Jan-Hung; Way, Jeffrey C.; Silver, Pamela A.

    2016-01-01

    Recombination-based DNA construction methods, such as Gibson assembly, have made it possible to easily and simultaneously assemble multiple DNA parts and hold promise for the development and optimization of metabolic pathways and functional genetic circuits. Over time, however, these pathways and circuits have become more complex, and the increasing need for standardization and insulation of genetic parts has resulted in sequence redundancies — for example repeated terminator and insulator sequences — that complicate recombination-based assembly. We and others have recently developed DNA assembly methods that we refer to collectively as unique nucleotide sequence (UNS)-guided assembly, in which individual DNA parts are flanked with UNSs to facilitate the ordered, recombination-based assembly of repetitive sequences. Here we present a detailed protocol for UNS-guided assembly that enables researchers to convert multiple DNA parts into sequenced, correctly-assembled constructs, or into high-quality combinatorial libraries in only 2–3 days. If the DNA parts must be generated from scratch, an additional 2–5 days are necessary. This protocol requires no specialized equipment and can easily be implemented by a student with experience in basic cloning techniques. PMID:25101822

  10. Unique nucleotide sequence-guided assembly of repetitive DNA parts for synthetic biology applications

    SciTech Connect

    Torella, JP; Lienert, F; Boehm, CR; Chen, JH; Way, JC; Silver, PA

    2014-08-07

    Recombination-based DNA construction methods, such as Gibson assembly, have made it possible to easily and simultaneously assemble multiple DNA parts, and they hold promise for the development and optimization of metabolic pathways and functional genetic circuits. Over time, however, these pathways and circuits have become more complex, and the increasing need for standardization and insulation of genetic parts has resulted in sequence redundancies-for example, repeated terminator and insulator sequences-that complicate recombination-based assembly. We and others have recently developed DNA assembly methods, which we refer to collectively as unique nucleotide sequence (UNS)-guided assembly, in which individual DNA parts are flanked with UNSs to facilitate the ordered, recombination-based assembly of repetitive sequences. Here we present a detailed protocol for UNS-guided assembly that enables researchers to convert multiple DNA parts into sequenced, correctly assembled constructs, or into high-quality combinatorial libraries in only 2-3 d. If the DNA parts must be generated from scratch, an additional 2-5 d are necessary. This protocol requires no specialized equipment and can easily be implemented by a student with experience in basic cloning techniques.

  11. Analysis of poly-β-hydroxyalkonates (PHA) during the enhanced biological phosphorus removal process using FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-hua; Mao, Qin-yan; Liu, Yi-xin; Sheng, Guo-ping; Yu, Han-qing; Huang, Xian-huai; Liu, Shao-geng; Ling, Qi; Yan, Guo-bing

    2014-06-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is the main phosphorus removal technique for wastewater treatment. During the anaerobic-aerobic alternative process, the activated sludge experienced the anaerobic storage of polyhydroxy-β-alkonates (PHA) and aerobic degradation, corresponding the infrared peak intensity of sludge at 1 740 cm(-1) increased in the aerobic phase and declined in the anaerobic phase. Compared with PHA standard, this peak was indentified to attribute the carbonyl of PHA. The overlapping peaks of PHA, protein I and II bands were separated using Gaussian peak fitting method. The infrared peak area ratios of PHA versus protein I had a good relationship with the PHA contents measured by gas chromatography, and the correlation coefficient was 0.873. Thus, the ratio of the peak area of PHA versus protein I can be considered as the indicator of the PHA content in the sludge. The infrared spectra of 1 480-1 780 cm(-1) was selected, normalized and transferred to the absorption data. Combined with the chromatography analysis of PHA content in the sludge sample, a model between the Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (ETIR) spectra of the sludge and PHA content was established, which could be used for the prediction of the PHA content in the unknown sample. The PHA content in the sludge sample could be acquired by the infrared spectra of the sludge sample and the established model, and the values fitted well with the results obtained from chromatograph. The results would provide a novel analysis method for the rapid characterization and quantitative determination of the intracellular PHA content in the activated sludge.

  12. On the effect of experimental noise on the classification of biological samples using Raman micro-spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Sinead J.; Kerr, Laura T.; Domijan, Katarina; Hennelly, Bryan M.

    2016-04-01

    Raman micro-spectroscopy is an optoelectronic technique that can be used to evaluate the chemical composition of biological samples and has been shown to be a powerful diagnostic tool for the investigation of various cancer related diseases including bladder, breast, and cervical cancer. Raman scattering is an inherently weak process with approximately 1 in 107 photons undergoing scattering and for this reason, noise from the recording system can have a significant impact on the quality of the signal, and its suitability for diagnostic classification. The main sources of noise in the recorded signal are shot noise, CCD dark current, and CCD readout noise. Shot noise results from the low signal photon count while dark current results from thermally generated electrons in the semiconductor pixels. Both of these noise sources are time dependent; readout noise is time independent but is inherent in each individual recording and results in the fundamental limit of measurement, arising from the internal electronics of the camera. In this paper, each of the aforementioned noise sources are analysed in isolation, and used to experimentally validate a mathematical model. This model is then used to simulate spectra that might be acquired under various experimental conditions including the use of different cameras, different source wavelength, and power etc. Simulated noisy datasets of T24 and RT112 cell line spectra are generated based on true cell Raman spectrum irradiance values (recorded using very long exposure times) and the addition of simulated noise. These datasets are then input to multivariate classification using Principal Components Analysis and Linear Discriminant Analysis. This method enables an investigation into the effect of noise on the sensitivity and specificity of Raman based classification under various experimental conditions and using different equipment.

  13. Surface functionalization of bioactive glasses with natural molecules of biological significance, part II: Grafting of polyphenols extracted from grape skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Ferraris, Sara; Prenesti, Enrico; Verné, Enrica

    2013-12-01

    Polyphenols, as one of the most important family of phytochemicals protective substances from grape fruit, possess various biological activities and health-promoting benefits, for example: inhibition of some degenerative diseases, cardiovascular diseases and certain types of cancers, reduction of plasma oxidative stress and slowing aging. The combination of polyphenols and biomaterials may have good potential to reach good bioavailability and controlled release, as well as to give biological signaling properties to the biomaterial surfaces. In this research, conventional solvent extraction was developed for obtaining polyphenols from dry grape skins. The Folin&Ciocalteu method was used to determine the amount of total polyphenols in the extracts. Surface functionalization of two bioactive glasses (SCNA and CEL2) was performed by grafting the extracted polyphenols on their surfaces. The effectiveness of the functionalization was tested by UV spectroscopy, which analyzes the amount of polyphenols in the uptake solution (before and after functionalization) and on solid samples, and XPS, which analyzes the presence of phenols on the material surface.

  14. The role of interleukin-1 in wound biology. Part II: In vivo and human translational studies.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yajing; Liang, Deyong; Li, Xiangqi; Liu, Hong-Hsing; Zhang, Xun; Zheng, Ming; Dill, David; Shi, Xiaoyou; Qiao, Yanli; Yeomans, David; Carvalho, Brendan; Angst, Martin S; Clark, J David; Peltz, Gary

    2010-12-01

    In the accompanying paper, we demonstrate that genetic variation within Nalp1 could contribute to interstrain differences in wound chemokine production through altering the amount of interleukin (IL)-1 produced. We further investigate the role of IL-1 in incisional wound biology and its effect on wound chemokine production in vivo and whether this mechanism could be active in human subjects. A well-characterized murine model of incisional wounding was used to assess the in vivo role of IL-1 in wound biology. The amount of 7 different cytokines/chemokines produced within an experimentally induced skin incision on a mouse paw and the nociceptive response was analyzed in mice treated with an IL-1 inhibitor. We also investigated whether human IL-1β or IL-1α stimulated the production of chemokines by primary human keratinocytes in vitro, and whether there was a correlation between IL-1β and chemokine levels in 2 experimental human wound paradigms. Administration of an IL-1 receptor antagonist to mice decreased the nociceptive response to an incisional wound, and reduced the production of multiple inflammatory mediators, including keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) and macrophage inhibitory protein (MIP)-1α, within the wounds. IL-1α and IL-1β stimulated IL-8 and GRO-α (human homologues of murine keratinocyte-derived chemokine) production by primary human keratinocytes in vitro. IL-1β levels were highly correlated with IL-8 in human surgical wounds, and at cutaneous sites of human ultraviolet B-induced sunburn injury. IL-1 plays a major role in regulating inflammatory mediator production in wounds through a novel mechanism; by stimulating the production of multiple cytokines and chemokines, it impacts clinically important aspects of wound biology. These data suggest that administration of an IL-1 receptor antagonist within the perioperative period could decrease postsurgical wound pain.

  15. Endobiogeny: A Global Approach to Systems Biology (Part 2 of 2)

    PubMed Central

    Lapraz, Jean-Claude; Pauly, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    Endobiogeny and the biology of functions are based on four scientific concepts that are known and generally accepted: (1) human physiology is complex and multifactorial and exhibits the properties of a system; (2) the endocrine system manages metabolism, which is the basis of the continuity of life; (3) the metabolic activity managed by the endocrine system results in the output of biomarkers that reflect the functional achievement of specific aspects of metabolism; and (4) when biomarkers are related to each other in ratios, it contextualizes one type of function relative to another to which is it linked anatomically, sequentially, chronologically, biochemically, etc. PMID:24416662

  16. Endobiogeny: A Global Approach to Systems Biology (Part 1 of 2)

    PubMed Central

    Lapraz, Jean-Claude

    2013-01-01

    Endobiogeny is a global systems approach to human biology that may offer an advancement in clinical medicine based in scientific principles of rigor and experimentation and the humanistic principles of individualization of care and alleviation of suffering with minimization of harm. Endobiogeny is neither a movement away from modern science nor an uncritical embracing of pre-rational methods of inquiry but a synthesis of quantitative and qualitative relationships reflected in a systems-approach to life and based on new mathematical paradigms of pattern recognition. PMID:24381827

  17. The BioCAT undulator beamline 18ID: a facility for biological non-crystalline diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Advanced Photon Source.

    PubMed

    Fischetti, R; Stepanov, S; Rosenbaum, G; Barrea, R; Black, E; Gore, D; Heurich, R; Kondrashkina, E; Kropf, A J; Wang, S; Zhang, Ke; Irving, T C; Bunker, G B

    2004-09-01

    The 18ID undulator beamline of the Biophysics Collaborative Access Team at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne, IL, USA, is a high-performance instrument designed for, and dedicated to, the study of partially ordered and disordered biological materials using the techniques of small-angle X-ray scattering, fiber diffraction, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The beamline and associated instrumentation are described in detail and examples of the representative experimental results are presented.

  18. The BioCAT undulator beamline 18ID: A facility for biological non-crystalline diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the APS

    SciTech Connect

    Fischetti, R.; Stepanov, S.; Rosenbaum, G.; Barrea, R.; Black, E.; Gore, D.; Heurich, R.; Kondrashkina, E.; Kropf, A.J.; Wang, S.; Zhang, K.; Irving, T.C.; Bunker, G.B.

    2008-07-02

    The 18ID undulator beamline of the Biophysics Collaborative Access Team at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne, IL, USA, is a high-performance instrument designed for, and dedicated to, the study of partially ordered and disordered biological materials using the techniques of small-angle X-ray scattering, fiber diffraction, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The beamline and associated instrumentation are described in detail and examples of the representative experimental results are presented.

  19. ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy in the Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory: Part II--A Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment on Surface Adsorption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuttlefield, Jennifer D.; Larsen, Sarah C.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2008-01-01

    Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy is a useful technique for measuring the infrared spectra of solids and liquids as well as probing adsorption on particle surfaces. The use of FTIR-ATR spectroscopy in organic and inorganic chemistry laboratory courses as well as in undergraduate research was presented…

  20. ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy in the Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory: Part II--A Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment on Surface Adsorption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuttlefield, Jennifer D.; Larsen, Sarah C.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2008-01-01

    Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy is a useful technique for measuring the infrared spectra of solids and liquids as well as probing adsorption on particle surfaces. The use of FTIR-ATR spectroscopy in organic and inorganic chemistry laboratory courses as well as in undergraduate research was presented…

  1. Chemical variability and biological activities of Brassica rapa var. rapifera parts essential oils depending on geographic variation and extraction technique.

    PubMed

    Saka, Boualem; Djouahri, Abderrahmane; Djerrad, Zineb; Souhila, Terfi; Aberrane, Sihem; Sabaou, Nasserdine; Baaliouamer, Aoumeur; Boudarene, Lynda

    2017-02-01

    In the present work, the Brassica rapa var. rapifera parts essential oils and their antioxidant and antimicrobial activities were investigated for the first time depending on geographic origin and extraction technique. GC and GC-MS analyses showed several constituents, including alcohols, aldehydes, esters, ketones, norisoprenoids, terpenic, nitrogen and sulphur compounds, totalizing 38 and 41 compounds in leaves and root essential oils, respectively. Nitrogen compounds were the main volatiles in leaves essential oils and sulphur compounds were the main volatiles in root essential oils. Qualitative and quantitative differences were found among B. rapa var. rapifera parts essential oils collected from different locations and extracted by hydrodistillation (HD) and microwave-assisted hydrodistillation (MAHD) techniques. Furthermore, our findings showed a high variability for both antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. The highlighted variability reflects the high impact of plant part, geographic variation and extraction technique on chemical composition and biological activities, which led to conclude that we should select essential oils to be investigated carefully depending on these factors, in order to isolate the bioactive components or to have the best quality of essential oil in terms of biological activities and preventive effects in food. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Study of cardiovascular disease biomarkers among tobacco consumers, part 2: biomarkers of biological effect

    PubMed Central

    Nordskog, Brian K.; Brown, Buddy G.; Marano, Kristin M.; Campell, Leanne R.; Jones, Bobbette A.; Borgerding, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract An age-stratified, cross-sectional study was conducted in the US among healthy adult male cigarette smokers, moist snuff consumers, and non-tobacco consumers to evaluate cardiovascular biomarkers of biological effect (BoBE). Physiological assessments included flow-mediated dilation, ankle-brachial index, carotid intima-media thickness and expired carbon monoxide. Approximately one-half of the measured serum BoBE showed statistically significant differences; IL-12(p70), sICAM-1 and IL-8 were the BoBE that best differentiated among the three groups. A significant difference in ABI was observed between the cigarette smokers and non-tobacco consumer groups. Significant group and age effect differences in select biomarkers were identified. PMID:25787701

  3. Impact of Two Ant Species on Egg Parasitoids Released as Part of a Biological Control Program

    PubMed Central

    Kergunteuil, Alan; Basso, César; Pintureau, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Biological control using Trichogramma pretiosum Riley (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae), an egg parasitoid wasp, was tested in Uruguay to reduce populations of lepidopteran pests on soybeans. It was observed that the commercial parasitoid dispensers, which were made of cardboard, were vulnerable to small predators that succeeded in entering and emptying the containers of all the eggs parasitized by T. pretiosum. Observations in a soybean crop showed that the only small, common predators present were two ant species. The species responsible for the above mentioned predation was determined from the results of a laboratory experiment in which the behavior of the two common ants was tested. A modification of the dispensers to prevent introduction of this ant has been proposed and successfully tested in the laboratory and in the field. PMID:24738954

  4. The organization of biological sequences into constrained and unconstrained parts determines fundamental properties of genotype–phenotype maps

    PubMed Central

    Greenbury, S. F.; Ahnert, S. E.

    2015-01-01

    Biological information is stored in DNA, RNA and protein sequences, which can be understood as genotypes that are translated into phenotypes. The properties of genotype–phenotype (GP) maps have been studied in great detail for RNA secondary structure. These include a highly biased distribution of genotypes per phenotype, negative correlation of genotypic robustness and evolvability, positive correlation of phenotypic robustness and evolvability, shape-space covering, and a roughly logarithmic scaling of phenotypic robustness with phenotypic frequency. More recently similar properties have been discovered in other GP maps, suggesting that they may be fundamental to biological GP maps, in general, rather than specific to the RNA secondary structure map. Here we propose that the above properties arise from the fundamental organization of biological information into ‘constrained' and ‘unconstrained' sequences, in the broadest possible sense. As ‘constrained' we describe sequences that affect the phenotype more immediately, and are therefore more sensitive to mutations, such as, e.g. protein-coding DNA or the stems in RNA secondary structure. ‘Unconstrained' sequences, on the other hand, can mutate more freely without affecting the phenotype, such as, e.g. intronic or intergenic DNA or the loops in RNA secondary structure. To test our hypothesis we consider a highly simplified GP map that has genotypes with ‘coding' and ‘non-coding' parts. We term this the Fibonacci GP map, as it is equivalent to the Fibonacci code in information theory. Despite its simplicity the Fibonacci GP map exhibits all the above properties of much more complex and biologically realistic GP maps. These properties are therefore likely to be fundamental to many biological GP maps. PMID:26609063

  5. The organization of biological sequences into constrained and unconstrained parts determines fundamental properties of genotype-phenotype maps.

    PubMed

    Greenbury, S F; Ahnert, S E

    2015-12-06

    Biological information is stored in DNA, RNA and protein sequences, which can be understood as genotypes that are translated into phenotypes. The properties of genotype-phenotype (GP) maps have been studied in great detail for RNA secondary structure. These include a highly biased distribution of genotypes per phenotype, negative correlation of genotypic robustness and evolvability, positive correlation of phenotypic robustness and evolvability, shape-space covering, and a roughly logarithmic scaling of phenotypic robustness with phenotypic frequency. More recently similar properties have been discovered in other GP maps, suggesting that they may be fundamental to biological GP maps, in general, rather than specific to the RNA secondary structure map. Here we propose that the above properties arise from the fundamental organization of biological information into 'constrained' and 'unconstrained' sequences, in the broadest possible sense. As 'constrained' we describe sequences that affect the phenotype more immediately, and are therefore more sensitive to mutations, such as, e.g. protein-coding DNA or the stems in RNA secondary structure. 'Unconstrained' sequences, on the other hand, can mutate more freely without affecting the phenotype, such as, e.g. intronic or intergenic DNA or the loops in RNA secondary structure. To test our hypothesis we consider a highly simplified GP map that has genotypes with 'coding' and 'non-coding' parts. We term this the Fibonacci GP map, as it is equivalent to the Fibonacci code in information theory. Despite its simplicity the Fibonacci GP map exhibits all the above properties of much more complex and biologically realistic GP maps. These properties are therefore likely to be fundamental to many biological GP maps.

  6. High-resolution broadband spectroscopy using externally dispersed interferometry at the Hale telescope: Part 2, photon noise theory

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, David J.; Edelstein, Jerry; Wishnow, Edward; Sirk, Martin; Muirhead, Philip S.; Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; Lloyd, James P.

    2016-10-01

    High-resolution broadband spectroscopy at near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths (950 to 2450 nm) has been performed using externally dispersed interferometry (EDI) at the Hale telescope at Mt. Palomar, with the TEDI interferometer mounted within the central hole of the 200-in. primary mirror in series with the comounted TripleSpec NIR echelle spectrograph. These are the first multidelay EDI demonstrations on starlight. We demonstrated very high (10×) resolution boost and dramatic (20× or more) robustness to point spread function wavelength drifts in the native spectrograph. Data analysis, results, and instrument noise are described in a companion paper (part 1). This part 2 describes theoretical photon limited and readout noise limited behaviors, using simulated spectra and instrument model with noise added at the detector. We show that a single interferometer delay can be used to reduce the high frequency noise at the original resolution (1× boost case), and that except for delays much smaller than the native response peak half width, the fringing and nonfringing noises act uncorrelated and add in quadrature. This is due to the frequency shifting of the noise due to the heterodyning effect. We find a sum rule for the noise variance for multiple delays. The multiple delay EDI using a Gaussian distribution of exposure times has noise-to-signal ratio for photon-limited noise similar to a classical spectrograph with reduced slitwidth and reduced flux, proportional to the square root of resolution boost achieved, but without the focal spot limitation and pixel spacing Nyquist limitations. At low boost (~1×) EDI has ~1.4× smaller noise than conventional, and at >10× boost, EDI has ~1.4× larger noise than conventional. Readout noise is minimized by the use of three or four steps instead of 10 of TEDI. Net noise grows as step phases change from symmetrical arrangement with wavenumber across the band. As a result, for three (or four) steps, we calculate a multiplicative

  7. High-resolution broadband spectroscopy using externally dispersed interferometry at the Hale telescope: Part 2, photon noise theory

    DOE PAGES

    Erskine, David J.; Edelstein, Jerry; Wishnow, Edward; ...

    2016-10-01

    High-resolution broadband spectroscopy at near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths (950 to 2450 nm) has been performed using externally dispersed interferometry (EDI) at the Hale telescope at Mt. Palomar, with the TEDI interferometer mounted within the central hole of the 200-in. primary mirror in series with the comounted TripleSpec NIR echelle spectrograph. These are the first multidelay EDI demonstrations on starlight. We demonstrated very high (10×) resolution boost and dramatic (20× or more) robustness to point spread function wavelength drifts in the native spectrograph. Data analysis, results, and instrument noise are described in a companion paper (part 1). This part 2 describes theoreticalmore » photon limited and readout noise limited behaviors, using simulated spectra and instrument model with noise added at the detector. We show that a single interferometer delay can be used to reduce the high frequency noise at the original resolution (1× boost case), and that except for delays much smaller than the native response peak half width, the fringing and nonfringing noises act uncorrelated and add in quadrature. This is due to the frequency shifting of the noise due to the heterodyning effect. We find a sum rule for the noise variance for multiple delays. The multiple delay EDI using a Gaussian distribution of exposure times has noise-to-signal ratio for photon-limited noise similar to a classical spectrograph with reduced slitwidth and reduced flux, proportional to the square root of resolution boost achieved, but without the focal spot limitation and pixel spacing Nyquist limitations. At low boost (~1×) EDI has ~1.4× smaller noise than conventional, and at >10× boost, EDI has ~1.4× larger noise than conventional. Readout noise is minimized by the use of three or four steps instead of 10 of TEDI. Net noise grows as step phases change from symmetrical arrangement with wavenumber across the band. As a result, for three (or four) steps, we calculate a

  8. High-resolution broadband spectroscopy using externally dispersed interferometry at the Hale telescope: Part 2, photon noise theory

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, David J.; Edelstein, Jerry; Wishnow, Edward; Sirk, Martin; Muirhead, Philip S.; Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; Lloyd, James P.

    2016-10-01

    High-resolution broadband spectroscopy at near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths (950 to 2450 nm) has been performed using externally dispersed interferometry (EDI) at the Hale telescope at Mt. Palomar, with the TEDI interferometer mounted within the central hole of the 200-in. primary mirror in series with the comounted TripleSpec NIR echelle spectrograph. These are the first multidelay EDI demonstrations on starlight. We demonstrated very high (10×) resolution boost and dramatic (20× or more) robustness to point spread function wavelength drifts in the native spectrograph. Data analysis, results, and instrument noise are described in a companion paper (part 1). This part 2 describes theoretical photon limited and readout noise limited behaviors, using simulated spectra and instrument model with noise added at the detector. We show that a single interferometer delay can be used to reduce the high frequency noise at the original resolution (1× boost case), and that except for delays much smaller than the native response peak half width, the fringing and nonfringing noises act uncorrelated and add in quadrature. This is due to the frequency shifting of the noise due to the heterodyning effect. We find a sum rule for the noise variance for multiple delays. The multiple delay EDI using a Gaussian distribution of exposure times has noise-to-signal ratio for photon-limited noise similar to a classical spectrograph with reduced slitwidth and reduced flux, proportional to the square root of resolution boost achieved, but without the focal spot limitation and pixel spacing Nyquist limitations. At low boost (~1×) EDI has ~1.4× smaller noise than conventional, and at >10× boost, EDI has ~1.4× larger noise than conventional. Readout noise is minimized by the use of three or four steps instead of 10 of TEDI. Net noise grows as step phases change from symmetrical arrangement with wavenumber across the band. As a result, for three (or four) steps, we calculate a multiplicative

  9. High-resolution broadband spectroscopy using externally dispersed interferometry at the Hale telescope: part 2, photon noise theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erskine, David J.; Edelstein, Jerry; Wishnow, Edward; Sirk, Martin; Muirhead, Philip S.; Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; Lloyd, James P.

    2016-10-01

    High-resolution broadband spectroscopy at near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths (950 to 2450 nm) has been performed using externally dispersed interferometry (EDI) at the Hale telescope at Mt. Palomar, with the TEDI interferometer mounted within the central hole of the 200-in. primary mirror in series with the comounted TripleSpec NIR echelle spectrograph. These are the first multidelay EDI demonstrations on starlight. We demonstrated very high (10×) resolution boost and dramatic (20× or more) robustness to point spread function wavelength drifts in the native spectrograph. Data analysis, results, and instrument noise are described in a companion paper (part 1). This part 2 describes theoretical photon limited and readout noise limited behaviors, using simulated spectra and instrument model with noise added at the detector. We show that a single interferometer delay can be used to reduce the high frequency noise at the original resolution (1× boost case), and that except for delays much smaller than the native response peak half width, the fringing and nonfringing noises act uncorrelated and add in quadrature. This is due to the frequency shifting of the noise due to the heterodyning effect. We find a sum rule for the noise variance for multiple delays. The multiple delay EDI using a Gaussian distribution of exposure times has noise-to-signal ratio for photon-limited noise similar to a classical spectrograph with reduced slitwidth and reduced flux, proportional to the square root of resolution boost achieved, but without the focal spot limitation and pixel spacing Nyquist limitations. At low boost (˜1×) EDI has ˜1.4× smaller noise than conventional, and at >10× boost, EDI has ˜1.4× larger noise than conventional. Readout noise is minimized by the use of three or four steps instead of 10 of TEDI. Net noise grows as step phases change from symmetrical arrangement with wavenumber across the band. For three (or four) steps, we calculate a multiplicative bandwidth

  10. Quality of Bottled Water Brands in Egypt Part II: Biological Water Examination.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Salam, Magda M; Al-Ghitany, Engy M; Kassem, Mohamed M

    2008-01-01

    People can survive several days without food, but just a few days without water. People buy bottled water for a variety of reasons, including convenience, fashion, and taste or because they think it is safer than tap water. The taste of the water has to do with the way it is treated and the quality of its source, including its natural mineral content. However, taste does not always indicate safeness. Refrigeration has a significant effect on the bacteriological quality of the purchased bottle. To asses the quality of bottled water in Egypt, samples of 14 Egyptian brands of uncarbonated natural bottled water were evaluated within 6 months. Biological examinations of a total of 84 samples were carried out using standard methods comparing them with the Egyptian standards No. 1589/2005. Also bacteriological examinations of 56 samples were carried out after "1-3" months and "3-6" months storage time at room temperature to detect the effect of storage on their quality. More than half (54.8%) of biological parameters were violated the Egyptian standards. A percentage of 28.6% of all bottled water samples were contaminated with coliform, but surprisingly fecal coliforms and E.coli were not detected. Moreover, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were isolated from 5.95% and 3.6%, respectively of all samples. Giardia lamblia cysts has been found in 2.4% of samples, while absence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in all samples was reported. More than half (52%) of the unrefrigerated samples were unacceptable compared to only 19.4% of the refrigerated bottles. These results suggest the need for continuous monitoring for evidence of contamination at source or during the bottling process.

  11. Observations on the biology of Afrotropical Hesperiidae (Lepidoptera). Part 6. Hesperiinae incertae sedis: palm feeders.

    PubMed

    Cock, Matthew J W; Congdon, T Colin E; Collins, Steve C

    2014-07-08

    Partial life histories for 12 Hesperiinae incertae sedis that feed on palms (Arecaceae) are described and illustrated. The genera dealt with are: Perrotia (part), Ploetzia, Zophopetes, Gretna (part), Pteroteinon, Leona, and Caenides (part) (all from Evans' Ploetzia genera group). Although Gamia spp. have been reported to feed on palms, these records are considered to be in error, as caterpillars of this genus feed on Dracaena spp. (Asparagaceae). The life histories of the species documented are fairly uniform, in that caterpillars of most species have rounded brown heads, wider basally, with or without limited black markings, smooth bodies and make simple shelters by rolling leaves. Variation in caterpillar markings and male genitalia of Zophopetes dysmephila (Trimen) and caterpillar and adult markings of Gretna carmen Evans merit further study. In G. carmen, G. waga (Plötz) and G. balenge (Holland), the caterpillars' head and body are covered with hair-like setae, and develop an extensive covering of white waxy powder, which in G. balenge also covers the long setae. Furthermore, the pupa of G. balenge is unusual in having a pair of large, elaborate processes frontally on the head; when disturbed, the pupa vibrates violently and rattles noisily against the sides of the shelter. Ploetzia amygdalis (Mabille) and Pteroteinon laufella (Hewitson) have gregarious caterpillars, whereas the remaining species are solitary. After eclosion, the first instar caterpillars of Gretna spp. moult to the second instar without feeding. The implications of a palm-feeding life-style are discussed, and economic damage and plant quarantine risks to coconut, oil palm and ornamental palms pointed out. The known life histories suggest that all Afrotropical palm-feeding Hesperiidae will belong in the same tribe when the incertae sedis section is further elucidated, although the affinities of Gretna deserve further consideration. 

  12. New pyridazine-fluorine derivatives: synthesis, chemistry and biological activity. Part II.

    PubMed

    Tucaliuc, Roxana-Angela; Cotea, Valeriu V; Niculaua, Marius; Tuchilus, Cristina; Mantu, Dorina; Mangalagiu, Ionel I

    2013-09-01

    A comprehensive study concerning synthesis, structure and biological activity of new pyridazine-fluorine (PYF) derivatives is presented. The first synthesis of PYF derivatives in phase-transfer catalysis (PTC) under microwave (MW) and conventional thermal heating (TH) is reported. Under MW irradiation the consumed energy decreases considerably, the amount of used solvent in liquid phase is at least five-fold less comparative with conventional TH, while PTC did not use solvents. Consequently these reactions could be considered environmentally friendly. Also, the reaction time decrease substantially and, in some cases, the yields are higher. A feasible explanation for MW efficiency is presented. Regiochemistry and chorochemistry involved in these reactions are also discussed; the reactions are regioselective and chorospecific or choroselective, respectively. Ten new pyridazine-fluorine cycloadducts are obtained. The in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activities of the PYF compounds were tested. Introduction of a trifluoromethyl moiety on the pyridazine skeleton is leading to an increasing of the antimicrobial activity. Structure-activity correlationships have been done.

  13. Biological markers for anxiety disorders, OCD and PTSD: A consensus statement. Part II: Neurochemistry, neurophysiology and neurocognition

    PubMed Central

    Bandelow, Borwin; Baldwin, David; Abelli, Marianna; Bolea-Alamanac, Blanca; Bourin, Michel; Chamberlain, Samuel R.; Cinosi, Eduardo; Davies, Simon; Domschke, Katharina; Fineberg, Naomi; Grünblatt, Edna; Jarema, Marek; Kim, Yong-Ku; Maron, Eduard; Masdrakis, Vasileios; Mikova, Olya; Nutt, David; Pallanti, Stefano; Pini, Stefano; Ströhle, Andreas; Thibaut, Florence; Vaghix, Matilde M.; Won, Eunsoo; Wedekind, Dirk; Wichniak, Adam; Woolley, Jade; Zwanzger, Peter; Riederer, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Objective Biomarkers are defined as anatomical, biochemical or physiological traits that are specific to certain disorders or syndromes. The objective of this paper is to summarise the current knowledge of biomarkers for anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Methods Findings in biomarker research were reviewed by a task force of international experts in the field, consisting of members of the World Federation of Societies for Biological Psychiatry Task Force on Biological Markers and of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology Anxiety Disorders Research Network. Results The present article (Part II) summarises findings on potential biomarkers in neurochemistry (neurotransmitters such as serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine or GABA, neuropeptides such as cholecystokinin, neurokinins, atrial natriuretic peptide, or oxytocin, the HPA axis, neurotrophic factors such as NGF and BDNF, immunology and CO2 hypersensitivity), neurophysiology (EEG, heart rate variability) and neurocognition. The accompanying paper (Part I) focuses on neuroimaging and genetics. Conclusions Although at present, none of the putative biomarkers is sufficient and specific as a diagnostic tool, an abundance of high quality research has accumulated that should improve our understanding of the neurobiological causes of anxiety disorders, OCD and PTSD. PMID:27419272

  14. Specialty Tier-Level Cost Sharing and Biologic Agent Use in the Medicare Part D Initial Coverage Period Among Beneficiaries With Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Jalpa A; Hu, Tianyan; Li, Pengxiang; Pettit, Amy R; Yu, Xinyan; Blum, Marissa

    2016-11-01

    To examine associations between specialty tier-level cost sharing and use of biologic agents for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) during Medicare Part D's initial coverage period (ICP). This was a retrospective study using 2007-2010 5% sample Medicare files to examine RA patients with use of a Part D RA biologic agent in the prior year. Patients without low-income subsidies (non-LIS group), who faced specialty tier-level cost sharing, were compared to a control group of low-income subsidy patients (LIS group), who faced nominal out-of-pocket costs in the ICP. Outcomes included use of a Part D or Part B RA biologic agent during the ICP and presence of a ≥30-day continuous gap in treatment among Part D biologic agent users in the ICP. Risk-adjusted outcomes were estimated using logistic regressions, controlling for patient demographic, clinical, and Part D plan characteristics. On average, a 30-day Part D biologic agent supply cost the non-LIS group $484 out of pocket (29.9% cost sharing) versus $5 (0.3% cost sharing) for the LIS group. The non-LIS group was less likely to fill Part D biologic agents (61.2% versus 72.7%, odds ratio [OR] 0.58 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.46-0.72]; P < 0.001), more than twice as likely to receive Part B biologic agents (9.9% versus 4.4%, OR 2.41 [95% CI 1.61-3.60]; P < 0.001), and less likely to use any biologic agent (70.1% versus 76.9%, OR 0.69 [95% CI 0.55-0.88]; P = 0.002). The non-LIS subgroup filling Part D biologic agents had approximately twice the odds of a gap in both Part D biologic agent and any biologic agent availability. Specialty tier-level cost sharing was associated with interruptions in RA biologic agent treatment among Medicare patients. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  15. Photoacoustic detection and optical spectroscopy of high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions in biologic tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Alhamami, Mosa; Kolios, Michael C.; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The aims of this study are: (a) to investigate the capability of photoacoustic (PA) method in detecting high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatments in muscle tissuesin vitro; and (b) to determine the optical properties of HIFU-treated and native tissues in order to assist in the interpretation of the observed contrast in PA detection of HIFU treatments. Methods: A single-element, spherically concaved HIFU transducer with a centre frequency of 1 MHz was utilized to create thermal lesions in chicken breast tissuesin vitro. To investigate the detectability of HIFU treatments photoacoustically, PA detection was performed at 720 and 845 nm on seven HIFU-treated tissue samples. Within each tissue sample, PA signals were acquired from 22 locations equally divided between two regions of interest within two volumes in tissue – a HIFU-treated volume and an untreated volume. Optical spectroscopy was then carried out on 10 HIFU-treated chicken breast specimens in the wavelength range of 500–900 nm, in 1-nm increments, using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere attachment. The authors’ optical spectroscopy raw data (total transmittance and diffuse reflectance) were used to obtain the optical absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of HIFU-induced thermal lesions and native tissues by employing the inverse adding-doubling method. The aforementioned interaction coefficients were subsequently used to calculate the effective attenuation coefficient and light penetration depth of HIFU-treated and native tissues in the wavelength range of 500–900 nm. Results: HIFU-treated tissues produced greater PA signals than native tissues at 720 and 845 nm. At 720 nm, the averaged ratio of the peak-to-peak PA signal amplitude of HIFU-treated tissue to that of native tissue was 3.68 ± 0.25 (mean ± standard error of the mean). At 845 nm, the averaged ratio of the peak-to-peak PA signal amplitude of HIFU-treated tissue to that of native tissue was 3.75

  16. Chemical compositions and biological activities of Scutellaria pinnatifida A. Hamilt aerial parts

    PubMed Central

    Delazar, Abbas; Nazemiyeh, Hossein; Afshar, Fariba Heshmati; Barghi, Niloofar; Esnaashari, Solmaz; Asgharian, Parina

    2017-01-01

    Phytochemical analysis of the methanolic and dichloromethane extracts of the aerial parts of Scutellaria pinnatifida led to the isolation of a phenylpropanoid, 1-o-feruloyl-β-D-glucose (1), two known flavonoids including luteolin-7-o-glucoside (2) and apigenin-7-o-glucoside (3), three known phenylethanoid glycosides composed of phlomisethanoside (4), syringalide A (5), and verbascoside (6), and oleic acid (7). Isolation and structural elucidation of compounds were accomplished by HPLC and spectroscopic methods (UV, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR). The extracts were also evaluated for their radical scavenging activity and insecticidal property by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) assay and contact toxicity method, respectively. Among the extracts, the methanol extract showed the most potent free radical scavenging activity with a RC50 value of 0.044 ± 0.350 mg/mL which could be attributed to the presence of the isolated phenolic compounds. In the case of insecticidal activity, the n-hexane extract displayed the most potent activity and caused 10%, 15%, and 40% mortality to Oryzaephilus mercator at the concentration of 5, 10, and 15 mg/mL after 4 h of exposure. PMID:28626476

  17. Biological materials: (Part A): Temperature-responsive polymers and drug delivery, and, (Part B): Polymer modification of fish scale and their nano-mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Xu

    This research has three parts. Two parts deal with novel nanoparticle assemblies for drug delivery, and are described in Part A, while the third part looks at properties of fish scales, an abundant and little-used waste resource, that can be modified to have value in medical and other areas. Part A describes fundamental research into the affects of block sequence of amphiphilic block copolymers prepared from on a new and versatile class of monomers, oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether acrylate (OEGA) and the more hydrophobic di(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (DEGMA). Polymers from these monomers are biologically safe and give polymers with thermoresponsive properties that can be manipulated over a broader temperature range than the more researched N-isopropylacrylamide polymers. Using RAFT polymerization and different Chain Transfer Agents (CTAs) amphiphilic block copolymers were prepared to study the effect of block sequence (hydrophilic OEGA and more hydrophobic DEGMA) on their thermo-responsive properties. Pairing hydrophilic chain ends to a hydrophobic DEGMA block and hydrophobic chain ends to hydrophilic blocks ("mis-matched polarity") significantly affected thermoresponsive properties for linear and star diblock copolymers, but little affected symmetric triblock copolymers. Specifically matching polarity in diblock copolymers yielded nanoparticles with higher cloud points (CP), narrow temperature ranges for coil collapse above CP, and smaller hydrodynamic diameter than mis-matched polarity. Using this knowledge two linear OEGA/DEGMA diblock copolymers were prepared with thiol end groups and assembled into hybrid nanoparticles with a gold nanoparticle core (GNP-polymer hybrids). This design was made using the hypothesis that a hybrid polymer drug carrier with a high CP (50-60 °C) and a diblock structure could be designed with low levels of drug release below 37 °C (body temperature) allowing the drug carrier to reach a target (tumor) site with

  18. A List of Currently Credible Biology Concepts Judged by a National Panel To Be Important for Inclusion in K-12 Curricula, Parts 1, 2, and 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Benjamin Edwin

    This three-part document identified 114 currently credible biology concepts judged important for inclusion in the K-12 curriculum. The literature related to the production of lists of scientific concepts was reviewed, emphasizing the techniques available for such studies. The technique for this study was to ask individual biological scientists at…

  19. Responsive metal complexes: a click-based "allosteric scorpionate" complex permits the detection of a biological recognition event by EPR/ENDOR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tamanini, Emiliano; Rigby, Stephen E J; Motevalli, Majid; Todd, Matthew H; Watkinson, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Chemical sensing is a mature field, and many effective sensors for small anions and cations have been devised. Metal complexes have been used widely for this purpose, but there are fewer reports of their use in the detection of organic and biological analytes. To date metal complexes have been used in sensing via the direct displacement of a pre-existing ligand by an analyte, or by an adventitious complementarity between the complex and analyte. These strategies do not permit a general approach to the sensing of biological molecules with metal complexes because of the demands to engineer molecular recognition into the complex architecture. We describe a fundamentally new approach to this field-the "allosteric scorpionate" metal complex. The binding partner of a biological analyte is attached to a scorpionate ligand on a metal complex, remote from the metal centre. Binding of the analyte causes a change in the primary coordination sphere at the metal, thereby revealing the presence of the biological molecule. We show that azamacrocyclic complexes with a triazole scorpion ligand may be easily assembled with the [3+2] Huisgens 'click' cycloaddition. We demonstrate the synthesis of a biotin-functionalised cyclam derivative using this methodology. This, and our previously communicated zinc sensor, are to the best of our knowledge the first examples of a triazole being employed as a scorpion ligand on an azamacrocycle. Coordination by the triazole to the metal is perturbed by the binding of avidin to the pendant ligand. This event can be sensitively detected with EPR spectroscopy, and the details of the coordination change probed with ENDOR spectroscopy, confirming the loss of the axial triazole nitrogen donor upon binding to avidin. This represents the first metal complex where remote, 'allosteric' coordination of an analyte has been shown to cause a change in the primary coordination sphere of the metal. Since the synthesis is modular and straightforward, other

  20. Preface - From molecules to molecular materials, biological molecular systems and nanostructures: A collection of contributions presented at the XIIIth International Conference on Molecular Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratajczak, Henryk; Drozd, Marek; Fausto, Rui

    2016-12-01

    This volume contains a series of selected contributions presented at the XIIIth International Conference on Molecular Spectroscopy (ICMS): "From Molecules to Molecular Materials, Biological Molecular Systems and Nanostructures" held in Wrocław, Poland, 9-12 September 2015, under the auspices of the Mayor of Wrocław and the European Academy of Sciences, Arts and Humanities. Wrocław was chosen not accidentally as venue for the conference. With more than a thousand years of history, Wrocław is the location of one of the oldest universities in Central Europe. Being a place where education and science play major roles in the daily life of its inhabitants, Wrocław is also a privileged center for spectroscopy in Poland.

  1. The Introduction of Social Biology into the Curriculum: Part II of the Influence of the British Social Hygiene Council on the Development of Social Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scoggins, Ann

    1977-01-01

    Describes the secondary and college level courses in social biology taught in the early 1960s that first linked the human situation to basic biological principles and concepts. Provides a general description of the present status of social biology in England. (CS)

  2. Gaseous VOCs rapidly modify particulate matter and its biological effects – Part 1: Simple VOCs and model PM

    PubMed Central

    Ebersviller, S.; Lichtveld, K.; Sexton, K. G.; Zavala, J.; Lin, Y-H.; Jaspers, I.; Jeffries, H. E.

    2013-01-01

    This is the first of a three-part study designed to demonstrate dynamic entanglements among gaseous organic compounds (VOC), particulate matter (PM), and their subsequent potential biological effects. We study these entanglements in increasingly complex VOC and PM mixtures in urban-like conditions in a large outdoor chamber. To the traditional chemical and physical characterizations of gas and PM, we added new measurements of gas-only- and PM-only-biological effects, using cultured human lung cells as model indicators. These biological effects are assessed here as increases in cellular damage or expressed irritation (i.e., cellular toxic effects) from cells exposed to chamber air relative to cells exposed to clean air. The exposure systems permit gas-only- or PM-only-exposures from the same air stream containing both gases and PM in equilibria, i.e., there are no extractive operations prior to cell exposure. Our simple experiments in this part of the study were designed to eliminate many competing atmospheric processes to reduce ambiguity in our results. Simple volatile and semi-volatile organic gases that have inherent cellular toxic properties were tested individually for biological effect in the dark (at constant humidity). Airborne mixtures were then created with each compound and PM that has no inherent cellular toxic properties for another cellular exposure. Acrolein and p-tolualdehyde were used as model VOCs and mineral oil aerosol (MOA) was selected as a surrogate for organic-containing PM. MOA is appropriately complex in composition to represent ambient PM, and it exhibits no inherent cellular toxic effects and thus did not contribute any biological detrimental effects on its own. Chemical measurements, combined with the responses of our biological exposures, clearly demonstrate that gas-phase pollutants can modify the composition of PM (and its resulting detrimental effects on lung cells) – even if the gas-phase pollutants are not considered likely to

  3. Gaseous VOCs rapidly modify particulate matter and its biological effects - Part 1: Simple VOCs and model PM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebersviller, S.; Lichtveld, K.; Sexton, K. G.; Zavala, J.; Lin, Y.-H.; Jaspers, I.; Jeffries, H. E.

    2012-02-01

    This is the first of a three-part study designed to demonstrate dynamic entanglements among gaseous organic compounds (VOC), particulate matter (PM), and their subsequent potential biological effects. We study these entanglements in increasingly complex VOC and PM mixtures in urban-like conditions in a large outdoor chamber. To the traditional chemical and physical characterizations of gas and PM, we added new measurements of gas-only- and PM-only-biological effects, using cultured human lung cells as model indicators. These biological effects are assessed here as increases in cellular damage or expressed irritation (i.e., cellular toxic effects) from cells exposed to chamber air relative to cells exposed to clean air. The exposure systems permit gas-only- or PM-only-exposures from the same air stream containing both gases and PM in equilibria, i.e., there are no extractive operations prior to cell exposure. Our simple experiments in this part of the study were designed to eliminate many competing atmospheric processes to reduce ambiguity in our results. Simple volatile and semi-volatile organic gases that have inherent cellular toxic properties were tested individually for biological effect in the dark (at constant humidity). Airborne mixtures were then created with each compound and PM that has no inherent cellular toxic properties for another cellular exposure. Acrolein and p-tolualdehyde were used as model VOCs and mineral oil aerosol (MOA) was selected as a surrogate for organic-containing PM. MOA is appropriately complex in composition to represent ambient PM, and it exhibits no inherent cellular toxic effects and thus did not contribute any biological detrimental effects on its own. Chemical measurements, combined with the responses of our biological exposures, clearly demonstrate that gas-phase pollutants can modify the composition of PM (and its resulting detrimental effects on lung cells) - even if the gas-phase pollutants are not considered likely to

  4. Gaseous VOCs rapidly modify particulate matter and its biological effects - Part 1: Simple VOCs and model PM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebersviller, S.; Lichtveld, K.; Sexton, K. G.; Zavala, J.; Lin, Y.-H.; Jaspers, I.; Jeffries, H. E.

    2012-12-01

    This is the first of a three-part study designed to demonstrate dynamic entanglements among gaseous organic compounds (VOC), particulate matter (PM), and their subsequent potential biological effects. We study these entanglements in increasingly complex VOC and PM mixtures in urban-like conditions in a large outdoor chamber. To the traditional chemical and physical characterizations of gas and PM, we added new measurements of biological effects, using cultured human lung cells as model indicators. These biological effects are assessed here as increases in cellular damage or expressed irritation (i.e., cellular toxic effects) from cells exposed to chamber air relative to cells exposed to clean air. The exposure systems permit virtually gas-only- or PM-only-exposures from the same air stream containing both gases and PM in equilibria, i.e., there are no extractive operations prior to cell exposure. Our simple experiments in this part of the study were designed to eliminate many competing atmospheric processes to reduce ambiguity in our results. Simple volatile and semi-volatile organic gases that have inherent cellular toxic properties were tested individually for biological effect in the dark (at constant humidity). Airborne mixtures were then created with each compound to which we added PM that has no inherent cellular toxic properties for another cellular exposure. Acrolein and p-tolualdehyde were used as model VOCs and mineral oil aerosol (MOA) was selected as a surrogate for organic-containing PM. MOA is appropriately complex in composition to represent ambient PM, and exhibits no inherent cellular toxic effects and thus did not contribute any biological detrimental effects on its own. Chemical measurements, combined with the responses of our biological exposures, clearly demonstrate that gas-phase pollutants can modify the composition of PM (and its resulting detrimental effects on lung cells). We observed that, even if the gas-phase pollutants are not

  5. Insight into the Local Solvent Environment of Biologically Relevant Iron-nitroysl Systems through Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookes, Jennifer Faith

    Iron-nitrosyl systems, particularly in the form of heme proteins, with their iron metal active sites play an important role in biological systems. Heme proteins act as storage, transporters, and receptors for nitric oxide (NO), a signaling molecule that is important in immune, nervous, and cardiovascular systems of mammals. By better understanding the local environment of the active site of NO binding heme proteins we can gain insight into disease in which the NO pathways have been implicated. This is an important step to being able to develop pharmaceuticals targeting NO pathways in humans. Sodium nitroprusside ((SNP, Na2[Fe(CN)5is NO]·2H 2O) investigated as a model system for the active site of nitric oxide binding heme proteins. Using two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2D IR) to obtain dephasing dynamics of the nitrosyl stretch (nuNO) in a series of solvents we are able to better understand the local environment of the more complicated metalloproteins. Rigorous line shape analysis is performed by using nonlinear response theory to simulate 2D IR spectra which are then fit to experimental data in an iterative process to extract frequency-frequency correlation functions (FFCFs). The time scales obtained are then correlated to empirical solvent polarity parameters. The analysis of the 2D IR lineshapes reveal that the spectral diffusion timescale of the nuNO in SNP varies from 0.8 -- 4 ps and is negatively correlated with the empirical solvent polarity scales. We continue to investigate NO binding of metalloproteins through 2D IR experiments on nitrophorin 4 (NP4). NP4 is a pH-sensitive NO transporter protein present in the salivary gland of the blood sucking insect Rhodius prolixus which undergoes a pH sensitive structural change between a closed and open conformation allowing for the storage and delivery of NO. The two structures are observed spectroscopically as two distinct pH-dependent nu NO frequencies at ~1904 and ~1917 cm-1. We obtain FFCFs by globally

  6. Biological activity of waste dump substrates in the eastern part of the Kansk-Achinsk coal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trefilova, O. V.; Oskorbin, P. A.

    2014-02-01

    The results of a field experiment for studying the seasonal dynamics of the CO2 (Rall) emitted from the overburden and enclosing rocks of a coal mine are presented as an integral index of their biological activity. The mean rate of the CO2 emission from the control substrate was 1.2 g C/m2 per 24 h. The intensity of Rall for the variant with the application of mineral and complex fertilizers, along with a microbiological preparation, was higher by 28 and 34%, respectively. In the same variants, the Rall values little changed during the whole growing period. The measurements of the potential respiration of the rock mixture in the laboratory showed that a significant part of the CO2 flux was formed at the expense of carbon dioxide of abiotic origin. The values of the CO2 emission are concluded to be overestimated as compared to those for the real level of the biological activity of the substrates studied.

  7. Implementation and evaluation of a training program as part of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program in Azerbaijan

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, April; Akhundova, Gulshan; Aliyeva, Saida; Strelow, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    A training program for animal and human health professionals has been implemented in Azerbaijan through a joint agreement between the United States Defense Threat Reduction Agency and the Government of Azerbaijan. The training program is administered as part of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program, and targets key employees in Azerbaijan's disease surveillance system including physicians, veterinarians, epidemiologists, and laboratory personnel. Training is aimed at improving detection, diagnosis, and response to especially dangerous pathogens (EDPs), although the techniques and methodologies can be applied to other pathogens and diseases of concern. Biosafety and biosecurity training is provided to all trainees within the program. Prior to 2014, a variety of international agencies and organizations provided training, which resulted in gaps related to lack of coordination of training materials and content. In 2014 a new training program was implemented in order to address those gaps. This paper provides an overview of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program training program in Azerbaijan, a description of how the program fits into existing national training infrastructure, and an evaluation of the new program's effectiveness to date. Long-term sustainability of the program is also discussed. PMID:26501051

  8. Cancer systems biology in the genome sequencing era: part 1, dissecting and modeling of tumor clones and their networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Edwin; Zou, Jinfeng; Zaman, Naif; Beitel, Lenore K; Trifiro, Mark; Paliouras, Miltiadis

    2013-08-01

    Recent tumor genome sequencing confirmed that one tumor often consists of multiple cell subpopulations (clones) which bear different, but related, genetic profiles such as mutation and copy number variation profiles. Thus far, one tumor has been viewed as a whole entity in cancer functional studies. With the advances of genome sequencing and computational analysis, we are able to quantify and computationally dissect clones from tumors, and then conduct clone-based analysis. Emerging technologies such as single-cell genome sequencing and RNA-Seq could profile tumor clones. Thus, we should reconsider how to conduct cancer systems biology studies in the genome sequencing era. We will outline new directions for conducting cancer systems biology by considering that genome sequencing technology can be used for dissecting, quantifying and genetically characterizing clones from tumors. Topics discussed in Part 1 of this review include computationally quantifying of tumor subpopulations; clone-based network modeling, cancer hallmark-based networks and their high-order rewiring principles and the principles of cell survival networks of fast-growing clones. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Implementation and evaluation of a training program as part of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program in Azerbaijan.

    PubMed

    Johnson, April; Akhundova, Gulshan; Aliyeva, Saida; Strelow, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    A training program for animal and human health professionals has been implemented in Azerbaijan through a joint agreement between the United States Defense Threat Reduction Agency and the Government of Azerbaijan. The training program is administered as part of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program, and targets key employees in Azerbaijan's disease surveillance system including physicians, veterinarians, epidemiologists, and laboratory personnel. Training is aimed at improving detection, diagnosis, and response to especially dangerous pathogens (EDPs), although the techniques and methodologies can be applied to other pathogens and diseases of concern. Biosafety and biosecurity training is provided to all trainees within the program. Prior to 2014, a variety of international agencies and organizations provided training, which resulted in gaps related to lack of coordination of training materials and content. In 2014 a new training program was implemented in order to address those gaps. This paper provides an overview of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program training program in Azerbaijan, a description of how the program fits into existing national training infrastructure, and an evaluation of the new program's effectiveness to date. Long-term sustainability of the program is also discussed.

  10. Cancer systems biology in the genome sequencing era: part 2, evolutionary dynamics of tumor clonal networks and drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Edwin; Zou, Jinfeng; Zaman, Naif; Beitel, Lenore K; Trifiro, Mark; Paliouras, Miltiadis

    2013-08-01

    A tumor often consists of multiple cell subpopulations (clones). Current chemo-treatments often target one clone of a tumor. Although the drug kills that clone, other clones overtake it and the tumor recurs. Genome sequencing and computational analysis allows to computational dissection of clones from tumors, while singe-cell genome sequencing including RNA-Seq allows profiling of these clones. This opens a new window for treating a tumor as a system in which clones are evolving. Future cancer systems biology studies should consider a tumor as an evolving system with multiple clones. Therefore, topics discussed in Part 2 of this review include evolutionary dynamics of clonal networks, early-warning signals (e.g., genome duplication events) for formation of fast-growing clones, dissecting tumor heterogeneity, and modeling of clone-clone-stroma interactions for drug resistance. The ultimate goal of the future systems biology analysis is to obtain a 'whole-system' understanding of a tumor and therefore provides a more efficient and personalized management strategies for cancer patients.

  11. Biologic Treatments for Sports Injuries II Think Tank-Current Concepts, Future Research, and Barriers to Advancement, Part 1: Biologics Overview, Ligament Injury, Tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    LaPrade, Robert F; Geeslin, Andrew G; Murray, Iain R; Musahl, Volker; Zlotnicki, Jason P; Petrigliano, Frank; Mann, Barton J

    2016-12-01

    Biologic therapies, including stem cells, platelet-rich plasma, growth factors, and other biologically active adjuncts, have recently received increased attention in the basic science and clinical literature. At the 2015 AOSSM Biologics II Think Tank held in Colorado Springs, Colorado, a group of orthopaedic surgeons, basic scientists, veterinarians, and other investigators gathered to review the state of the science for biologics and barriers to implementation of biologics for the treatment of sports medicine injuries. This series of current concepts reviews reports the summary of the scientific presentations, roundtable discussions, and recommendations from this think tank.

  12. Nitric Oxide and Redox Regulation in the Liver: Part I General Considerations and Redox biology in Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Diesen, Diana L.; Kuo, Paul C.

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are created in normal hepatocytes and are critical for normal physiological processes including oxidative respiration, growth, regeneration, apoptosis, and microsomal defense. When the levels of oxidation products exceed the capacity of normal antioxidant systems, oxidative stress occurs. This type of stress, in the form of ROS and RNS, can be damaging to all liver cells, including hepatocytes, Kupffer cells, stellate cells, and endothelial cells, through induction of inflammation, ischemia, fibrosis, necrosis, apoptosis, or through malignant transformation by damaging lipids, proteins, and/or DNA. In part I of this review, we will discuss basic redox biology in the liver, including a review of ROS, RNS, and antioxidants, with a focus on nitric oxide as a common source of RNS. We will then review the evidence for oxidative stress as a mechanism of liver injury in hepatitis (alcoholic, viral, non-alcoholic). In part II of this review, we will review oxidative stress in common pathophysiological conditions including ischemia/reperfusion injury, fibrosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, iron overload, Wilson's disease, sepsis and acetaminophen overdose. Finally, biomarkers, proteomic, and antioxidant therapies will be discussed as areas for future therapeutic interventions. PMID:20444470

  13. Aryldiones incorporating a [1,4,5]oxadiazepane ring. Part 2: chemistry and biology of the cereal herbicide pinoxaden.

    PubMed

    Muehlebach, Michel; Cederbaum, Fredrik; Cornes, Derek; Friedmann, Adrian A; Glock, Jutta; Hall, Gavin; Indolese, Adriano F; Kloer, Daniel P; Le Goupil, Gael; Maetzke, Thomas; Meier, Hans; Schneider, Rudolf; Stoller, André; Szczepanski, Henry; Wendeborn, Sebastian; Widmer, Hansjuerg

    2011-12-01

    Pinoxaden is a new cereal herbicide that provides outstanding levels of post-emergence activity against a broad spectrum of grass weed species for worldwide selective use in both wheat and barley. Factors influencing activity and tolerance to pinoxaden were in part linked to distinct structural parts of the active ingredient. Three complementary contributions that decisively impact upon the herbicidal potency against grasses were identified: a preferred 2,6-diethyl-4-methyl aromatic substitution pattern, a dione area suitable for proherbicide formation and beneficial adjuvant effects. The uptake and translocation pattern of pinoxaden when coapplied with its tailored adjuvant were analysed by autoradiography, indicating extensive and rapid penetration, followed by effective distribution throughout the plant. Crop injury reduction on incorporation of the [1,4,5]oxadiazepane ring into the aryldione template was reinforced with safener technology. Comparative studies on the behaviour of pinoxaden applied either alone or in combination with the safener cloquintocet-mexyl demonstrated that addition of the safener resulted in significant enhancement of metabolic degradation in wheat and barley, providing excellent crop tolerance and a substantial selectivity margin without adverse effects on weed control. The biological potential of pinoxaden and its active principle pinoxaden dione in terms of grass weed control and tolerance in cereals was fully exploited by inclusion of the safener cloquintocet-mexyl in the formulation in combination with a specific and tailor-made tank-mix adjuvant based on methylated rape seed oil. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Gaseous VOCs rapidly modify particulate matter and its biological effects - Part 2: Complex urban VOCs and model PM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebersviller, S.; Lichtveld, K.; Sexton, K. G.; Zavala, J.; Lin, Y.-H.; Jaspers, I.; Jeffries, H. E.

    2012-12-01

    This is the second study in a three-part study designed to demonstrate dynamic entanglements among gaseous organic compounds (VOCs), particulate matter (PM), and their subsequent potential biological effects. We study these entanglements in increasingly complex VOC and PM mixtures in urban-like conditions in a large outdoor chamber, both in the dark and in sunlight. To the traditional chemical and physical characterizations of gas and PM, we added new measurements of gas-only- and PM-only-biological effects, using cultured human lung cells as model living receptors. These biological effects are assessed here as increases in cellular damage or expressed irritation (i.e., cellular toxic effects) from cells exposed to chamber air relative to cells exposed to clean air. Our exposure systems permit side-by-side, gas-only- and PM-only-exposures from the same air stream containing both gases and PM in equilibria, i.e., there are no extractive operations prior to cell exposure for either gases or PM. In Part 1 (Ebersviller et al., 2012a), we demonstrated the existence of PM "effect modification" (NAS, 2004) for the case of a single gas-phase toxicant and an inherently non-toxic PM (mineral oil aerosol, MOA). That is, in the presence of the single gas-phase toxicant in the dark, the initially non-toxic PM became toxic to lung cells in the PM-only-biological exposure system. In this Part 2 study, we used sunlit-reactive systems to create a large variety of gas-phase toxicants from a complex mixture of oxides of nitrogen and 54 VOCs representative of those measured in US city air. In these mostly day-long experiments, we have designated the period in the dark just after injection (but before sunrise) as the "Fresh" condition and the period in the dark after sunset as the "Aged" condition. These two conditions were used to expose cells and to collect chemical characterization samples. We used the same inherently non-toxic PM from the Part 1 study as the target PM for "effect

  15. Gaseous VOCs rapidly modify particulate matter and its biological effects - Part 2: Complex urban VOCs and model PM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebersviller, S.; Lichtveld, K.; Sexton, K. G.; Zavala, J.; Lin, Y.-H.; Jaspers, I.; Jeffries, H. E.

    2012-03-01

    This is the second study in a three-part study designed to demonstrate dynamic entanglements among gaseous organic compounds (VOCs), particulate matter (PM), and their subsequent potential biological effects. We study these entanglements in increasingly complex VOC and PM mixtures in urban-like conditions in a large outdoor chamber, both in the dark and in sunlight. To the traditional chemical and physical characterizations of gas and PM, we added new measurements of gas-only- and PM-only-biological effects, using cultured human lung cells as model living receptors. These biological effects are assessed here as increases in cellular damage or expressed irritation (i.e., cellular toxic effects) from cells exposed to chamber air relative to cells exposed to clean air. Our exposure systems permit side-by-side, gas-only- and PM-only-exposures from the same air stream containing both gases and PM in equilibria, i.e., there are no extractive operations prior to cell exposure for either gases or PM. In Part 1 (Ebersviller et al., 2012a), we demonstrated the existence of PM "effect modification" (NAS, 2004) for the case of a single gas-phase toxicant and an inherently non-toxic PM (mineral oil aerosol, MOA). That is, in the presence of the single gas-phase toxicant in the dark, the initially non-toxic PM became toxic to lung cells in the PM-only-biological exposure system. In this Part 2 study, we used sunlit-reactive systems to create a large variety of gas-phase toxicants from a complex mixture of oxides of nitrogen and 54 VOCs representative of those measured in US city air. In these mostly day-long experiments, we have designated the period in the dark just after injection (but before sunrise) as the "Fresh" condition and the period in the dark after sunset as the "Aged" condition. These two conditions were used to expose cells and to collect chemical characterization samples. We used the same inherently non-toxic PM from the Part 1 study as the target PM for "effect

  16. Specificity and mechanism of action of alpha-helical membrane-active peptides interacting with model and biological membranes by single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shiyu; Zhao, Guangxu; Huang, Yibing; Cai, Mingjun; Shan, Yuping; Wang, Hongda; Chen, Yuxin

    2016-07-01

    In this study, to systematically investigate the targeting specificity of membrane-active peptides on different types of cell membranes, we evaluated the effects of peptides on different large unilamellar vesicles mimicking prokaryotic, normal eukaryotic, and cancer cell membranes by single-molecule force spectroscopy and spectrum technology. We revealed that cationic membrane-active peptides can exclusively target negatively charged prokaryotic and cancer cell model membranes rather than normal eukaryotic cell model membranes. Using Acholeplasma laidlawii, 3T3-L1, and HeLa cells to represent prokaryotic cells, normal eukaryotic cells, and cancer cells in atomic force microscopy experiments, respectively, we further studied that the single-molecule targeting interaction between peptides and biological membranes. Antimicrobial and anticancer activities of peptides exhibited strong correlations with the interaction probability determined by single-molecule force spectroscopy, which illustrates strong correlations of peptide biological activities and peptide hydrophobicity and charge. Peptide specificity significantly depends on the lipid compositions of different cell membranes, which validates the de novo design of peptide therapeutics against bacteria and cancers.

  17. Specificity and mechanism of action of alpha-helical membrane-active peptides interacting with model and biological membranes by single-molecule force spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shiyu; Zhao, Guangxu; Huang, Yibing; Cai, Mingjun; Shan, Yuping; Wang, Hongda; Chen, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, to systematically investigate the targeting specificity of membrane-active peptides on different types of cell membranes, we evaluated the effects of peptides on different large unilamellar vesicles mimicking prokaryotic, normal eukaryotic, and cancer cell membranes by single-molecule force spectroscopy and spectrum technology. We revealed that cationic membrane-active peptides can exclusively target negatively charged prokaryotic and cancer cell model membranes rather than normal eukaryotic cell model membranes. Using Acholeplasma laidlawii, 3T3-L1, and HeLa cells to represent prokaryotic cells, normal eukaryotic cells, and cancer cells in atomic force microscopy experiments, respectively, we further studied that the single-molecule targeting interaction between peptides and biological membranes. Antimicrobial and anticancer activities of peptides exhibited strong correlations with the interaction probability determined by single-molecule force spectroscopy, which illustrates strong correlations of peptide biological activities and peptide hydrophobicity and charge. Peptide specificity significantly depends on the lipid compositions of different cell membranes, which validates the de novo design of peptide therapeutics against bacteria and cancers. PMID:27363513

  18. The application of time-gated fluorescence spectroscopy to the real-time monitoring of biological metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Zachary; Urayama, Paul

    2012-10-01

    A time-gated fluorescence spectroscopy system capable of nanosecond gating and picosecond control of gate delays is presented. Used in conjunction with pulsed excitation, the system is capable of tracking the temporal evolution of the fluorescence spectrum from solution samples. The system uses a nitrogen discharge laser as the excitation source and a time-gated intensified CCD detector coupled to a spectrograph. Precise synchronization between the laser pulse and ICCD gate is achieved using a constant-fraction optical discriminator. System characterizations are presented, for example, the ability to both spectrally and temporally resolve the content of fluorophore mixtures is confirmed. Biotechnological applications are highlighted, including gated spectroscopy for the real time monitoring of metabolic activity via measurement of endogenous cellular fluorescence.

  19. Robust calibration transfer in noninvasive ethanol measurements, Part I: Mathematical basis for spectral distortions in Fourier transform near-infrared spectroscopy (FT-NIR).

    PubMed

    Ridder, Trent D; Ver Steeg, Benjamin J; Price, Glenn L

    2014-01-01

    Multivariate calibration transfer in spectroscopy is an active area of interest. Many current approaches rely on the measurement of a subset of calibration samples on each instrument produced, an approach that can be impractical in many applications. Furthermore, such methods attempt to model implicitly, rather than explicitly, interinstrument differences. In Part I of this work, a Fourier transform near-infrared spectroscopy (FT-NIR) system designed to perform noninvasive ethanol measurements is discussed. Optical distortions caused by self-apodization, shear, and off-axis detector field of view (FOV) are examined and equations describing their effects are given. The effects of shear and off-axis detector FOV are shown to yield nonlinear distortions of the amplitude and wavenumber axes of measured spectra that cannot be accommodated by typical wavenumber calibration procedures or background correction. The distortions forecast by these equations are verified using laboratory measurements, and an analysis of the spectral complexity caused by the distortions is presented. The theoretical and experimental aspects presented in Part I are incorporated into a new calibration transfer method whose benefits are illustrated in Part II using noninvasive alcohol measurements. Although this work discusses a specific FT-NIR instrument and application, the methods developed form a general framework for modeling the distortions of other types of optical spectrometers to improve instrument standardization and multivariate calibration transfer.

  20. Impact of Deforestation on Clouds and Rainfall On the Northern Part of the Proposed Mesoamerican Biological Corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, D. K.; Nair, U. S.; Welch, R. M.; Lawton, R. O.

    2004-12-01

    Central America exhibits the typical pattern of complex deforestation now seen throughout the tropics. The region is a mixture of lowlands, mostly converted to agriculture, and mountainous regions, where pristine forests still persist. To protect the biodiversity of this region from further loss, a network of biological corridors and protected areas has been proposed by the governments of Central American countries and international organizations. The present study examines the impact of deforestation in the northern part of Central America on the proposed corridor network, the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor. We use high-resolution numerical model simulations using the Colorado State University Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (CSU RAMS) to study the impact of three types of conditions: 1) pristine, 2) current and 3) extensive deforestation. In addition, GOES-8 satellite imagery is used for comparing with the numerical simulations of cloud formation. Since vegetation in the proposed protected areas would is under maximum stress in the dry season, this study is focused in the dry season month of March. During the dry season, the soil dries progressively from the soil surface down to increasing depths. Contrary to expectations, in-situ measurements of soil moisture in Costa Rica show similar values both in forests and pastures in the dry season. Measured soil moisture values in March are around 10% of the field capacity in the upper few centimeters, increasing to values of around 30% at depths of 1 m. Yet, observations show that the vegetation in pasture regions is stressed at this time while vegetation in the forested regions is not affected, implying that the forest vegetation is accessing deep soil water. Similar behavior is expected in other regions of Central America. This observation has significant implications to the design of the numerical modeling experiments. Currently the vegetation parameterization used in the RAMS does not specify rooting depth

  1. UV-Vis spectroscopy of tyrosine side-groups in studies of protein structure. Part 1: basic principles and properties of tyrosine chromophore.

    PubMed

    Antosiewicz, Jan M; Shugar, David

    Spectroscopic properties of tyrosine residues may be employed in structural studies of proteins. Here we discuss several different types of UV-Vis spectroscopy, like normal, difference and second-derivative UV absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, linear and circular dichroism spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, and corresponding optical properties of the tyrosine chromophore, phenol, which are used to study protein structure.

  2. UV-Vis spectroscopy of tyrosine side-groups in studies of protein structure. Part 1: basic principles and properties of tyrosine chromophore.

    PubMed

    Antosiewicz, Jan M; Shugar, David

    2016-06-01

    Spectroscopic properties of tyrosine residues may be employed in structural studies of proteins. Here we discuss several different types of UV-Vis spectroscopy, like normal, difference and second-derivative UV absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, linear and circular dichroism spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, and corresponding optical properties of the tyrosine chromophore, phenol, which are used to study protein structure.

  3. Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy via Plasmonic and Carbonaceous Nanostructures for the Detection, Diagnosis and Treatment of Cancer Part 1: Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Darrigues, Emilie; Nima, Zeid A; Majeed, Waquar; Vang, Kieng Bao; Dantuluri, Vijayalakshmi; Biris, Alexandru R; Zharov, Vladimir; Griffin, Robert J; Biris, Alexandru S

    2017-03-07

    Spectroscopic techniques including Raman, photothermal, photoacoustic, have been intensively studied for the accurate and fast detection of diseases, such as cancer. Additionally, due to the drastic, rapid advances in computer science and the intense use of various multifunctional nanosystems in the medical field, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and Raman spectroscopy have developed quickly as new tools for fundamental analysis in biochemical science and as a new imaging method to aid in early, efficient cancer diagnosis. This review focuses on the major recent advances in Raman instrumentation and the improvement of Raman and SERS substrates that have moved this technology from a proof-of-concept tool to a viable technique. The translation, dissemination, and validation of future Raman and nanosubstrate developments are also discussed, with a focus on their role in cancer diagnostics improvement.

  4. Part per trillion nitric oxide measurement by optical feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the mid-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventrillard, Irène; Gorrotxategi-Carbajo, Paula; Romanini, Daniele

    2017-06-01

    While nitric oxide (NO) is being monitored in various fields of application, there is still a lack of available instruments at a sub-ppb level of sensitivity. We report on the first application of Optical Feedback Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS) to NO trace gas analysis, with a room-temperature quantum-cascade laser at 5.26 µm (1900.5 cm^{-1}). A detection limit of 60 ppt is reached in a single measurement performed in 140 ms. The stability of the instrument allows to average for 10 s down to 8.3 ppt, limited by drift of etalon fringes in the spectra. This work opens the path towards new applications notably in breath analysis and environment sciences.

  5. Study of energetic-particle-irradiation induced biological effect on Rhizopus oryzae through synchrotron-FTIR micro-spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinghua; Qi, Zeming; Huang, Qing; Wei, Xiaoli; Ke, Zhigang; Fang, Yusheng; Tian, Yangchao; Yu, Zengliang

    2013-01-01

    Energetic particles exist ubiquitously and cause varied biological effects such as DNA strand breaks, lipid peroxidation, protein modification, cell apoptosis or death. An emerging biotechnology based on ion-beam technique has been developed to serve as an effective tool for mutation breeding of crops and microbes. In order to improve the effectiveness of ion-beam biotechnology for mutation breeding, it is indispensible to gain a better understanding of the mechanism of the interactions between the energetic ions and biological systems which is still elusive. A new trend is to conduct more comprehensive research which is based on micro-scaled observation of the changes of the cellular structures and compositions under the interactions. For this purpose, advanced synchrotron FTIR (s-FTIR) microscopy was employed to monitor the cellular changes of single fungal hyphae under irradiation of α-particles from 241Am. Intracellular contents of ROS, MDA, GSSG/GSH and activities of CAT and SOD were measured via biochemical assay. Ion-irradiation on Rhizopus oryzae causes localized vacuolation, autolysis of cell wall and membrane, lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and conformational changes of proteins, which have been clearly revealed by the s-FTIR microspectroscopy. The different changes of cell viability, SOD and CAT activities can be explained by the ROS-involved chemical reactions. Evidently, the elevated level of ROS in hyphal cells upon irradiation plays the key role in the caused biological effect. This study demonstrates that s-FTIR microspectroscopy is an effective tool to study the damage of fungal hyphae caused by ionizing radiation and it facilitates the exploit of the mechanism for the interactions between the energetic ions and biological systems.

  6. The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) MIDEX Mission: Using Infrared Spectroscopy to Identify Organic Molecules in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, S. A.

    2002-01-01

    The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) mission is one of four selected for Phase A Concept Study in NASA's current call for MIDEX class missions. ABE is a cooled space telescope equipped with spectrographs covering the 2.5-20 micron spectral range. The ABE mission is devoted to the detection and identification of organic and related molecular species in space. ABE is currently under study at NASA's Ames Research Center in collaboration with Ball Aerospace.

  7. The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) MIDEX Mission Concept: Using Infrared Spectroscopy to Identify Organic Molecules in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandford, Scott A.

    2002-11-01

    The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) mission is one of four selected for Phase A Concept Study in NASA's current call for MIDEX class missions. ABE is a cooled space telescope equipped with spectrographs covering the 2.5-20 micron spectral range. The ABE mission is devoted to the detection and identification of organics and related molecular species in space. ABE is currently under study at NASA's Ames Research Center in collaboration with Ball Aerospace.

  8. Mapping the metal uptake in plants from Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve using synchrotron micro-focused X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Allison

    2015-08-20

    Serpentine soil originates in the Earth’s mantle and contains high concentrations of potentially toxic transition metals. Although serpentine soil limits plant growth, endemic and adapted plants at Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve, located behind SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, can tolerate these conditions. Serpentine soil and seeds belonging to native California and invasive plants were collected at Jasper Ridge. The seeds were grown hydroponically and on serpentine and potting soil to examine the uptake and distribution of ions in the roots and shoots using synchrotron micro-focused X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. The results were used to determine differences between serpentine-tolerant plants. Rye grown on potting soil was enriched in Ni, Fe, Mn, and Cr compared to purple needlegrass grown on serpentine soil. Serpentine vegetation equally suppressed the uptake of Mn, Ni, and Fe in the roots and shoots. The uptake of Ca and Mg affected the uptake of other elements such as K, S, and P.

  9. An assessment of the potential of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the analysis of cesium in liquid samples of biological origin.

    PubMed

    Metzinger, Anikó; Kovács-Széles, Eva; Almási, István; Galbács, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    The present study describes the development of an analytical method for the determination of cesium in biological fluid samples (human urine and blood samples) by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The developed method is based on sample presentation by liquid-to-solid conversion, enhancing the emission signal by drying the liquid into small "pockets" created in a metal support (zinc plate), and allows the analysis to be carried out on as little as 1 μL of sample volume, in a closed sample cell. Absolute detection limits on the Cs I 852.1 nm spectral line were calculated by the IUPAC 3σ method to be 6 ng in the urine sample and 27 ng in the blood serum sample. It is estimated that LIBS may be used to detect highly elevated concentration levels of Cs in fluid samples taken from people potentially exposed to surges of Cs from non-natural sources.

  10. Energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry evaluated for multielement analysis in complex biological matrices.

    PubMed

    Irons, R D; Schenk, E A; Giauque, R D

    1976-12-01

    Energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry were evaluated as methods for routine multielement analysis of biological material. Standard samples included Standard Reference Materials (National Bureau of Standards), compounded mixtures, and supplements that provided a wide range of elemental concentrations for analysis. Elements included in this study were Zn, Pb, Ni, Mn, Fe, Mg, Cu, Ca, As, Se, Br, Rb, and Sr. Standards were analyzed as unknowns by participating laboratories. The two methods were evaluated for sensitivity, precision, and accuracy, and the results compared to those obtained for atomic absorption spectrometric analysis of identical standard unknowns. Both methods compared favorably and both were determined to be highly reliable for such an application. Advantages and disadvantages of each method are compared and discussed.

  11. Elucidation of molecular structures at buried polymer interfaces and biological interfaces using sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Myers, John; Chen, Zhan

    2013-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy has been developed into an important technique to study surfaces and interfaces. It can probe buried interfaces in situ and provide molecular level structural information such as the presence of various chemical moieties, quantitative molecular functional group orientation, and time dependent kinetics or dynamics at such interfaces. This paper focuses on these three most important advantages of SFG and reviews some of the recent progress in SFG studies on interfaces related to polymer materials and biomolecules. The results discussed here demonstrate that SFG can provide important molecular structural information of buried interfaces in situ and in real time, which is difficult to obtain by other surface sensitive analytical techniques. PMID:23710244

  12. X-ray absorption spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation for structural investigation of organometallic molecules of biological interest.

    PubMed Central

    Kincaid, B M; Eisenberger, P; Hodgson, K O; Doniach, S

    1975-01-01

    The technique of x-ray absorption spectroscopy using tuneable, very intense x-rays from a high energy electron storage ring has been applied to study of the estended x-ray absorption fine structure for Cu and Ni tetraphenylporphyrin and methemoglobin. Preliminary analysis shows that the spectra may be interpreted as a super-position of modulations arising from the nearest neighbor nitrogen and pyrrole alpha-carbon coordination sheels of the metal atoms. We estimate that with the observed magnitude of noise to modulation amplitude, relative shifts of 0,5% in the metal-nitrogen to metal-carbon bond distances in the prophyrins should be observable using extended x-ray absorption fine structure and that this technique may provide a method of observing these types of structural changes in solution. PMID:1056033

  13. Biologic Activity of Autologous, Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor Secreting Alveolar Soft Parts Sarcoma and Clear Cell Sarcoma Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, John; Fisher, David E.; Demetri, George D.; Neuberg, Donna; Allsop, Stephen A.; Fonseca, Catia; Nakazaki, Yukoh; Nemer, David; Raut, Chandrajit P.; George, Suzanne; Morgan, Jeffrey A.; Wagner, Andrew J.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Ritz, Jerome; Lezcano, Cecilia; Mihm, Martin; Canning, Christine; Hodi, F. Stephen; Dranoff, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Alveolar soft parts sarcoma (ASPS) and clear cell sarcoma (CCS) are rare mesenchymal malignancies driven by chromosomal translocations that activate members of the microphthalmia transcription factor (MITF) family. However, in contrast to malignant melanoma, little is known about their immunogenicity. To learn more about the host response to ASPS and CCS, we conducted a phase I clinical trial of vaccination with irradiated, autologous sarcoma cells engineered by adenoviral mediated gene transfer to secrete granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Experimental Design Metastatic tumors from ASPS and CCS patients were resected, processed to single cell suspensions, transduced with a replication defective adenoviral vector encoding GM-CSF, and irradiated. Immunizations were administered subcutaneously and intradermally weekly times three and then every other week. Results Vaccines were successfully manufactured for 11 of the 12 enrolled patients. Eleven subjects received from 3 to 13 immunizations. Toxicities were restricted to grade 1–2 skin reactions at inoculation sites. Vaccination elicited local dendritic cell infiltrates and stimulated T cell mediated delayed type-hypersensitivity reactions to irradiated, autologous tumor cells. Antibody responses to tissue-type plasminogen activator (tTPA) and angiopoietins-1/2 were detected. Tumor biopsies showed programmed death-1 (PD-1) positive CD8+ T cells in association with PD ligand-1 (PD-L1) expressing sarcoma cells. No tumor regressions were observed. Conclusions Vaccination with irradiated, GM-CSF secreting autologous sarcoma cell vaccines is feasible, safe, and biologically active. Concurrent targeting of angiogenic cytokines and antagonism of the PD-1 negative regulatory pathway might intensify immune-mediated tumor destruction. PMID:25805798

  14. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy study of high-palladium dental alloys. Part I: behavior at open-circuit potential.

    PubMed

    Sun, D; Monaghan, P; Brantley, W A; Johnston, W M

    2002-05-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to study the in vitro corrosion of three representative high-palladium alloys and a gold-palladium alloy for comparison. The corrosion resistances (measured as the charge transfer resistance R(CT) from an equivalent circuit) of the high-palladium alloys and the gold-palladium alloy were comparable in simulated body fluid and oral environments, and under simulated dental plaque. The great similarity in corrosion behavior for the three high-palladium alloys is largely attributed to their substantial palladium content and passivity in the laboratory test media, and possibly to their similar structure at the submicron level. Differences in composition and microstructure at the micron level and greater, including the effects of heat treatment simulating the firing cycles for dental porcelain, do not have noteworthy effects on the in vitro corrosion of the three high-palladium alloys. Good accuracy and convenience of extracting corrosion characteristics from equivalent circuit modeling, along with the capability of providing intrinsic information about the corrosion mechanism, enable EIS to be an excellent alternative method to conventional potentiodynamic polarization for evaluating the corrosion behavior of noble dental alloys.

  15. Part I: The effects of laboratory curriculum and instruction on undergraduate students' understanding of chemistry. Part II: Raman spectroscopy studies of the synthesis of cuprates in molten hydroxide fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickey, Dawn Kerry

    Part I: The Effects of Laboratory Curriculum and Instruction on Undergraduate Students' Understanding of Chemistry. Shallow learning, that is, acquiring factual and procedural knowledge without a deeper understanding of the underlying ideas, is a typical result of science courses taught via the standard modes of lecture and follow-the-recipe laboratory experiments. To address the problem of shallow learning in general chemistry, my colleagues and I developed, implemented, and assessed a new laboratory program. The design of the curriculum and instruction for the MORE laboratory course was based on research in cognitive science and education. We also developed a new instructional tool, the Model-Observe-Reflect-Explain (MORE) Thinking Frame, to support our curricular and instructional goals. The MORE laboratory curriculum and instruction was tested in two laboratory sections selected at random from the general chemistry course, and was assessed in comparison with two matched Control sections participating in the standard laboratory curriculum. Analysis of the data revealed a consistent picture of students enrolled in the MORE laboratory course developing significantly enhanced metacognitive abilities, understanding of the fundamental chemistry ideas studied in the general chemistry course, and abilities to solve near transfer and isomorphic examination problems compared with the Control group. The design of the Model-Observe-Reflect-Explain (MORE) laboratory instruction around our three principles encouraged and supported students' development of skills for reflection upon and revision of their understanding of the basic chemistry ideas studied in the laboratory, resulting in improved learning and problem-solving. Part II. Raman spectroscopy studies of the synthesis of cuprates in Molten Hydroxide Fluxes. The goal of the research presented here was to refine the model of cuprate synthesis in alkali metal hydroxide melts by using Raman spectroscopy to directly

  16. Transient absorption spectroscopy in biology using the Super-ACO storage ring FEL and the synchrotron radiation combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renault, Eric; Nahon, Laurent; Garzella, David; Nutarelli, Daniele; De Ninno, Giovanni; Hirsch, Matthias; Couprie, Marie Emmanuelle

    2001-12-01

    The Super-ACO storage ring FEL, covering the UV range down to 300 nm with a high average power (300 mW at 350 nm) together with a high stability and long lifetime, is a unique tool for the performance of users applications. We present here the first pump-probe two color experiments on biological species using a storage ring FEL coupled to the synchrotron radiation. The intense UV pulse of the Super-ACO FEL is used to prepare a high initial concentration of chromophores in their first singlet electronic excited state. The nearby bending magnet synchrotron radiation provides, on the other hand a pulsed, white light continuum (UV-IR), naturally synchronized with the FEL pulses and used to probe the photochemical subsequent events and the associated transient species. We have demonstrated the feasibility with a dye molecule (POPOP) observing a two-color effect, signature of excited state absorption and a temporal signature with Acridine. Applications on various chromophores of biological interest are carried out, such as the time-resolved absorption study of the first excited state of Acridine.

  17. Characterization of the initial level and migration of silicone oil lubricant in empty prefilled syringes for biologics using infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bee, Jared S; Frey, Vadim V; Javed, Urooj; Chung, Jonathan; Corcoran, Marta L; Roussel, Paul S; Krause, Stephan O; Cash, Patricia W; Bishop, Steven M; Dimitrova, Mariana N

    2014-01-01

    Glass prefillable syringes are lubricated with silicone oil to ensure functionality and a consistent injection for the end user. If excessive silicone is applied, droplets could potentially result in aggregation of sensitive biopharmaceuticals or clouding of the solution. Therefore, monitoring and optimization of the applied silicone layer is critical for prefilled syringe development. The hydrophobic properties of silicone oil, the potential for assay interference, and the very small quantities applied to prefilled syringes present a challenge for the development of a suitable assay. In this work we present a rapid and simple Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy method for quantitation of total silicone levels applied to prefilled syringes. Level-dependent silicone oil migration occurred over time for empty prefilled syringes stored tip-up. However, migration from all prefilled syringes with between 0.25 and 0.8 mg of initial silicone oil resulted in a stable limiting minimum level of between 0.15 and 0.26 mg of silicone in the syringe reached after 1 to 4 years of empty tip-up storage. The results of the FTIR assay correlated well with non-destructive reflectometry characterization of the syringes. This assay can provide valuable data for selection of a robust initial silicone oil target and quality control of prefilled syringes intended for biopharmaceuticals. Glass prefillable syringes are lubricated with silicone oil to ensure functionality and a consistent injection for the end user. If excessive silicone is applied, droplets could potentially result in aggregation of sensitive biopharmaceuticals or clouding of the solution. Therefore, monitoring and optimization of the applied silicone layer is critical for prefilled syringe development. The hydrophobic properties of silicone oil, the potential for assay interference, and the very small quantities applied to prefilled syringes present a challenge for the development of a suitable assay. In this

  18. Real-time cannula navigation in biological tissue with high temporal and spatial resolution based on impedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Trebbels, Dennis; Jugl, Michael; Zengerle, Roland

    2010-01-01

    In many medical applications a well-directed positioning of a cannula in body tissue is mandatory. Especially the accurate placing of the cannula tip in the tissue is important for efficient drug delivery or for accessing blood vessels and nerves. This paper presents a new approach for a universal cannula navigation system based on tissue classification on the cannula tip by impedance spectroscopy. The cannula serves as coaxial, open ended waveguide which is connected to remote measurement equipment. Objective of the new system is to reach a high spatial and temporal resolution for dynamic cannula guidance. Therefore the proposed coaxial cannula design has been analyzed by Finite Element Simulation to investigate the sensitivity of the cannula tip. For fast tissue impedance spectrum measurement the Time-Domain-Reflectometry method is used in order to achieve a high temporal resolution. Measurement data derived in the laboratory is analyzed and interpreted using the general Cole-Cole model for tissue. Based on the results we propose to use a chirp signal for impedance measurement in order to improve the sensitivity of the system towards specific tissue properties.

  19. The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) MIDEX Mission Concept: Using Infrared Spectroscopy to Identify Organic Molecules in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Ennico, Kimberly; Allamandola, Louis; Bregman, Jesse; Greene, Thomas; Hudgins, Douglas

    2002-01-01

    One of the principal means by which organic compounds are detected and identified in space is by infrared spectroscopy. Past IR telescopic and laboratory studies have shown that much of the carbon in the interstellar medium (ISM) is in complex organic species but the distribution, abundance and evolutionary relationships of these materials are not well understood. The Astrobiology Explorer (ABE) is a MIDEX mission concept designed to conduct IR spectroscopic observations to detect and identify these materials and address outstanding problems in astrobiology, astrochemistry, and astrophysics. ABE's core science program includes observations of planetary nebulae and stellar outflows, protostellar objects, Solar System objects, and galaxies, and lines of sight through dense molecular clouds and the diffuse ISM. ABE is a cryogenically-cooled 60 cm diameter space telescope equipped with 3 cross-dispersed R-2000 spectrometers that share a single common slit. Each spectrometer measures one spectral octave and together cover the entire 2.5-20 micron region simultaneously. The spectrometers use state-of-the-art InSb and Si:As 1024x1024 pixel detectors. ABE would operate in a heliocentric, Earth drift-away orbit and have a core science mission lasting approximately 1.5 years. ABE is currently under study at NASA's Ames Research Center in collaboration with Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp.

  20. Longitudinal monitoring of skin accumulation of nanocarriers and biologicals with fiber optic near infrared fluorescence spectroscopy (FONIRS).

    PubMed

    Griffin, James I; Benchimol, Michael J; Simberg, Dmitri

    2017-02-10

    Systemically injected drug delivery systems distribute into various organs and tissues, including liver, spleen and kidneys. Recent reports pointed out a significant accumulation of systemically injected nanoparticles in the skin. Skin constitutes the largest organ in the body with important immune functions, and accumulation of drug delivery systems could have significant implications for skin toxicity in living subjects. Fiber optic-based near-infrared spectroscopy (FONIRS) setup was developed and tested for measuring of NIR (760nm excitation) emission spectra in the skin. Ex vivo spectral measurements of NIR fluorescence through the skin showed linear response down to 34 femtomole of dye DiR. Following systemic injection of IRDye 800 labeled 500kDa dextran, FONIRS detected an immediate and stable accumulation of fluorescence in the skin. Longitudinal monitoring of skin accumulation and elimination of IRDye 800-labeled therapeutic anti-epidermal growth factor antibody (cetuximab) showed significant signal in the skin after the antibody cleared from circulation. Comparison of skin accumulation of DiR labeled, long-circulating PEGylated liposomes with short-circulating non-PEGylated liposomes showed much higher accumulation of PEGylated liposomes that persisted several days after the liposomes cleared from blood. Measurements with FONIRS enabled to estimate skin concentration of liposomes (percent of injected dose per gram). This simple and practical approach can be used to monitor accumulation of drug delivery systems in preclinical and clinical studies.

  1. Signal sources in elastic light scattering by biological cells and tissues: what can elastic light scattering spectroscopy tell us?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, M.; Wu, Tao T.; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2008-02-01

    We used a unified Mie and fractal model to analyze elastic light spectroscopy of cell suspensions to obtain the size distributions of cells and nuclei, their refractive indices, and the background refractive index fluctuation inside the cell, for different types of cells, including human cervical squamous carcinoma epithelial (SiHa) cells, androgen-independent malignant rat prostate carcinoma epithelial (AT3.1) cells, non-tumorigenic fibroblast (Rat1p) cells in the plateau phase of growth, and tumorigenic fibroblast (Rat1-T1E) cells in the exponential phase of growth. Signal sources contributing to the scattering (μs) and reduced scattering (μ 's) coefficients for these cells of various types or at different growth stages are compared. It is shown that the contribution to μ s from the nucleus is much more important than that from the background refractive index fluctuation. This trend is more significant with increase of the probing wavelength. On the other hand, the background refractive index fluctuation overtakes the nucleus and may even dominate in the contribution to reduced scattering. The implications of the above findings on biomedical light scattering techniques are discussed.

  2. Detection of cancerous biological tissue areas by means of infrared absorption and SERS spectroscopy of intercellular fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velicka, M.; Urboniene, V.; Ceponkus, J.; Pucetaite, M.; Jankevicius, F.; Sablinskas, V.

    2015-08-01

    We present a novel approach to the detection of cancerous kidney tissue areas by measuring vibrational spectra (IR absorption or SERS) of intercellular fluid taken from the tissue. The method is based on spectral analysis of cancerous and normal tissue areas in order to find specific spectral markers. The samples were prepared by sliding the kidney tissue over a substrate - surface of diamond ATR crystal in case of IR absorption or calcium fluoride optical window in case of SERS. For producing the SERS signal the dried fluid film was covered by silver nanoparticle colloidal solution. In order to suppress fluorescence background the measurements were performed in the NIR spectral region with the excitation wavelength of 1064 nm. The most significant spectral differences - spectral markers - were found in the region between 400 and 1800 cm-1, where spectral bands related to various vibrations of fatty acids, glycolipids and carbohydrates are located. Spectral markers in the IR and SERS spectra are different and the methods can complement each other. Both of them have potential to be used directly during surgery. Additionally, IR absorption spectroscopy in ATR mode can be combined with waveguide probe what makes this method usable in vivo.

  3. The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) MIDEX Mission Concept: Using Infrared Spectroscopy to Identify Organic Molecules in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Ennico, Kimberly; Allamandola, Louis; Bregman, Jesse; Greene, Thomas; Hudgins, Douglas

    2002-01-01

    One of the principal means by which organic compounds are detected and identified in space is by infrared spectroscopy. Past IR telescopic and laboratory studies have shown that much of the carbon in the interstellar medium (ISM) is in complex organic species but the distribution, abundance and evolutionary relationships of these materials are not well understood. The Astrobiology Explorer (ABE) is a MIDEX mission concept designed to conduct IR spectroscopic observations to detect and identify these materials and address outstanding problems in astrobiology, astrochemistry, and astrophysics. ABE's core science program includes observations of planetary nebulae and stellar outflows, protostellar objects, Solar System objects, and galaxies, and lines of sight through dense molecular clouds and the diffuse ISM. ABE is a cryogenically-cooled 60 cm diameter space telescope equipped with 3 cross-dispersed R-2000 spectrometers that share a single common slit. Each spectrometer measures one spectral octave and together cover the entire 2.5-20 micron region simultaneously. The spectrometers use state-of-the-art InSb and Si:As 1024x1024 pixel detectors. ABE would operate in a heliocentric, Earth drift-away orbit and have a core science mission lasting approximately 1.5 years. ABE is currently under study at NASA's Ames Research Center in collaboration with Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp.

  4. Classification of chemical and biological warfare agent simulants by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and multivariate statistical techniques.

    PubMed

    Pearman, William F; Fountain, Augustus W

    2006-04-01

    Initial results demonstrating the ability to classify surface-enhanced Raman (SERS) spectra of chemical and biological warfare agent simulants are presented. The spectra of two endospores (B. subtilis and B. atrophaeus), two chemical agent simulants (dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) and diethyl methylphosphonate (DEMP)), and two toxin simulants (ovalbumin and horseradish peroxidase) were studied on multiple substrates fabricated from colloidal gold adsorbed onto a silanized quartz surface. The use of principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical clustering were used to evaluate the efficacy of identifying potential threat agents from their spectra collected on a single substrate. The use of partial least squares-discriminate analysis (PLS-DA) and soft independent modeling of class analogies (SIMCA) on a compilation of data from separate substrates, fabricated under identical conditions, demonstrates both the feasibility and the limitations of this technique for the identification of known but previously unclassified spectra.

  5. Gd3+ vibronic side band spectroscopy. New optical probe of Ca2+ binding sites applied to biological macromolecules.

    PubMed Central

    Iben, I E; Stavola, M; Macgregor, R B; Zhang, X Y; Friedman, J M

    1991-01-01

    A new spectroscopic technique is presented for obtaining infraredlike spectra of the binding sites of Ca2+ and other metals in biological macromolecules. The technique, based on the Ca(2+)-like binding properties of Gd3+, utilizes vibronic side bands (VSB) that appear in Gd3+ fluorescence. In the fluorescence spectrum of Gd3+, the separation in photon frequency between a VSB and its electronic origin at approximately 32,150 cm-1 (approximately 311 nm) is a direct measure of the vibrational frequency of a ligand coordinated to Gd3+ ion. As a consequence, the VSB are uncomplicated by molecular vibrations distant from the Gd3+ binding site. The vibrational spectra resulting from the VSB of Gd3+ coordinated to a Ca2+ binding protein, a phospholipid, and DNA are presented. PMID:1907866

  6. Part-Per-Trillion Level SF6 Detection Using a Quartz Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy-Based Sensor with Single-Mode Fiber-Coupled Quantum Cascade Laser Excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Spagnolo, V.; Patimisco, P.; Borri, Simone; Scamarcio, G.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Kriesel, J.M.

    2012-10-23

    A sensitive spectroscopic sensor based on a hollow-core fiber-coupled quantum cascade laser (QCL) emitting at 10.54 µm and quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) technique is reported. The design and realization of mid-infrared fiber and coupler optics has ensured single-mode QCL beam delivery to the QEPAS sensor . The collimation optics was designed to produce a laser beam of significantly reduced beam size and waist so as to prevent illumination of the quartz tuning fork and micro-resonator tubes. SF6 was selected as the target gas. A minimum detection sensitivity of 50 parts per trillion in 1 s was achieved with a QCL power of 18 mW, corresponding to a normalized noise-equivalent absorption of 2.7x10-10 W•cm-1/Hz1/2.

  7. On-line application of near-infrared spectroscopy for monitoring water levels in parts per million in a manufacturing-scale distillation process.

    PubMed

    Lambertus, Gordon; Shi, Zhenqi; Forbes, Robert; Kramer, Timothy T; Doherty, Steven; Hermiller, James; Scully, Norma; Wong, Sze Wing; LaPack, Mark

    2014-01-01

    An on-line analytical method based on transmission near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for the quantitative determination of water concentrations (in parts per million) was developed and applied to the manufacture of a pharmaceutical intermediate. Calibration models for water analysis, built at the development site and applied at the manufacturing site, were successfully demonstrated during six manufacturing runs at a 250-gallon scale. The water measurements will be used as a forward-processing control point following distillation of a toluene product solution prior to use in a Grignard reaction. The most significant impact of using this NIRS-based process analytical technology (PAT) to replace off-line measurements is the significant reduction in the risk of operator exposure through the elimination of sampling of a severely lachrymatory and mutagenic compound. The work described in this report illustrates the development effort from proof-of-concept phase to manufacturing implementation.

  8. Part-per-trillion level SF6 detection using a quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy-based sensor with single-mode fiber-coupled quantum cascade laser excitation.

    PubMed

    Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Patimisco, Pietro; Borri, Simone; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Bernacki, Bruce E; Kriesel, Jason

    2012-11-01

    A sensitive spectroscopic sensor based on a hollow-core fiber-coupled quantum cascade laser (QCL) emitting at 10.54 μm and quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) technique is reported. The design and realization of mid-IR fiber and coupler optics has ensured single-mode QCL beam delivery to the QEPAS sensor. The collimation optics was designed to produce a laser beam of significantly reduced beam size and waist so as to prevent illumination of the quartz tuning fork and microresonator tubes. SF(6) was selected as the target gas. A minimum detection sensitivity of 50 parts per trillion in 1 s was achieved with a QCL power of 18 mW, corresponding to a normalized noise-equivalent absorption of 2.7×10(-10) W·cm(-1)/Hz(1/2).

  9. The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) MIDEX Mission Concept: Using Infrared Spectroscopy to Identify Organic Molecules in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Vincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    One of the principal means by which organic compounds are detected and identified in space is by infrared spectroscopy. Past IR studies (telescopic and laboratory) have demonstrated that much of the carbon in the interstellar medium (ISM) is in complex organic species of a variety of types, but the distribution, abundance, and evolutionary relationships of these materials are not well understood. The Astrobiology Explorer (ABE) is a MIDEAST mission concept designed to conduct IR spectroscopic observations to detect and identify these materials to address outstanding important problems in astrobiology, astrochemistry, and astrophysics. Systematic studies include the observation of planetary nebulae and stellar outflows, protostellar objects, Solar System Objects, and galaxies, and multiple lines of sight through dense molecular clouds and the diffuse ISM. ABE will also search for evidence of D enrichment in complex molecules in all these environments. The mission is currently under study at NASA's Ames Research Center in collaboration with Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp. ABE is a cryogenically-cooled 60 cm diameter space telescope equipped with 3 cryogenic cross-dispersed spectrographs that share a single common slit. The 3 spectrometers each measure single spectral octaves (2.5-5, 5-10, 10-20 microns) and together cover the entire 2.5 - 20 micron region simultaneously. The spectrometers use state-of-the-art 1024x1024 pixel detectors, with a single InSb array for the 2.5-5 micron region and two Si:As arrays for the 5-10 and 10-20 micron regions. The spectral resolution is wavelength dependent but is greater than 2000 across the entire spectral range. ABE would operate in a heliocentric, Earth drift-away orbit and is designed to take maximum advantage of this environment for cooling, thermal stability, and mission lifetime. ABE would have a core science mission lasting approximately 1.5 years.

  10. The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) MIDEX Mission Concept: Using Infrared Spectroscopy to Identify Organic Molecules in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Vincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    One of the principal means by which organic compounds are detected and identified in space is by infrared spectroscopy. Past IR studies (telescopic and laboratory) have demonstrated that much of the carbon in the interstellar medium (ISM) is in complex organic species of a variety of types, but the distribution, abundance, and evolutionary relationships of these materials are not well understood. The Astrobiology Explorer (ABE) is a MIDEAST mission concept designed to conduct IR spectroscopic observations to detect and identify these materials to address outstanding important problems in astrobiology, astrochemistry, and astrophysics. Systematic studies include the observation of planetary nebulae and stellar outflows, protostellar objects, Solar System Objects, and galaxies, and multiple lines of sight through dense molecular clouds and the diffuse ISM. ABE will also search for evidence of D enrichment in complex molecules in all these environments. The mission is currently under study at NASA's Ames Research Center in collaboration with Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp. ABE is a cryogenically-cooled 60 cm diameter space telescope equipped with 3 cryogenic cross-dispersed spectrographs that share a single common slit. The 3 spectrometers each measure single spectral octaves (2.5-5, 5-10, 10-20 microns) and together cover the entire 2.5 - 20 micron region simultaneously. The spectrometers use state-of-the-art 1024x1024 pixel detectors, with a single InSb array for the 2.5-5 micron region and two Si:As arrays for the 5-10 and 10-20 micron regions. The spectral resolution is wavelength dependent but is greater than 2000 across the entire spectral range. ABE would operate in a heliocentric, Earth drift-away orbit and is designed to take maximum advantage of this environment for cooling, thermal stability, and mission lifetime. ABE would have a core science mission lasting approximately 1.5 years.

  11. Study by micro-Raman spectroscopy of wall paints (external parts and cross-sections) from reales alcazares of Seville (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Rodriguez, José Luis; Centeno, Miguel Angel; Robador, María Dolores; Siguenza, Belinda; Durán, Adrián

    2013-04-01

    the other one by iron oxides. The green and white colours were constituted by atacamite and calcite, respectively. In addition lead white was detected in green colour. The white layers (plaster) located under the colour layers were constituted by calcite, quartz and feldspars. These data confirm the use of fresco technique. The study of the surface (external part) by micro-Raman spectroscopy limited the characterization of the pigments present in these wall pains, due to the presence of a layer of gypsum deposited on the surface. By other hand, the study by Raman spectroscopy of the cross-sections allowed the characterization of different pigments and support used in the manufacture of these wall paints.

  12. What Part of NO Don't You Understand? Some Answers to the Cardinal Questions in Nitric Oxide Biology*

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Bradford G.; Dranka, Brian P.; Bailey, Shannon M.; Lancaster, Jack R.; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) regulates biological processes through signaling mechanisms that exploit its unique biochemical properties as a free radical. For the last several decades, the key aspects of the chemical properties of NO relevant to biological systems have been defined, but it has been a challenge to assign these to specific cellular processes. Nevertheless, it is now clear that the high affinity of NO for transition metal centers, particularly iron, and the rapid reaction of NO with oxygen-derived free radicals can explain many of its biological and pathological properties. Emerging studies also highlight a growing importance of the secondary metabolites of NO-dependent reactions in the post-translational modification of key metabolic and signaling proteins. In this minireview, we emphasize the current understanding of the biochemistry of NO and place it in a biological context. PMID:20410298

  13. Acute and impaired wound healing: pathophysiology and current methods for drug delivery, part 1: normal and chronic wounds: biology, causes, and approaches to care.

    PubMed

    Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N; Hamblin, Michael R; Herman, Ira M

    2012-07-01

    This is the first installment of 2 articles that discuss the biology and pathophysiology of wound healing, review the role that growth factors play in this process, and describe current ways of growth factor delivery into the wound bed. Part 1 discusses the latest advances in clinicians' understanding of the control points that regulate wound healing. Importantly, biological similarities and differences between acute and chronic wounds are considered, including the signaling pathways that initiate cellular and tissue responses after injury, which may be impeded during chronic wound healing.

  14. Acute and Impaired Wound Healing: Pathophysiology and Current Methods for Drug Delivery, Part 1: Normal and Chronic Wounds: Biology, Causes, and Approaches to Care

    PubMed Central

    Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Herman, Ira M.

    2012-01-01

    This is the first installment of 2 articles that discuss the biology and pathophysiology of wound healing, review the role that growth factors play in this process, and describe current ways of growth factor delivery into the wound bed. Part 1 discusses the latest advances in clinicians’ understanding of the control points that regulate wound healing. Importantly, biological similarities and differences between acute and chronic wounds are considered, including the signaling pathways that initiate cellular and tissue responses after injury, which may be impeded during chronic wound healing. PMID:22713781

  15. Comparative Phytochemical Analysis of Essential Oils from Different Biological Parts of Artemisia herba alba and Their Cytotoxic Effect on Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Tilaoui, Mounir; Ait Mouse, Hassan; Jaafari, Abdeslam; Zyad, Abdelmajid

    2015-01-01

    Carrying out the chemical composition and antiproliferative effects against cancer cells from different biological parts of Artemisia herba alba. Essential oils were studied by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and their antitumoral activity was tested against P815 mastocytoma and BSR kidney carcinoma cell lines; also, in order to evaluate the effect on normal human cells, oils were tested against peripheral blood mononuclear cells PBMCs. Essential oils from leaves and aerial parts (mixture of capitulum and leaves) were mainly composed by oxygenated sesquiterpenes 39.89% and 46.15% respectively; capitulum oil contained essentially monoterpenes (22.86%) and monocyclic monoterpenes (21.48%); esters constituted the major fraction (62.8%) of stem oil. Essential oils of different biological parts studied demonstrated a differential antiproliferative activity against P815 and BSR cancer cells; P815 cells are the most sensitive to the cytotoxic effect. Leaves and capitulum essential oils are more active than aerial parts. Interestingly, no cytotoxic effect of these essential oils was observed on peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Our results showed that the chemical composition variability of essential oils depends on the nature of botanical parts of Artemisia herba alba. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that the differential cytotoxic effect depends not only on the essential oils concentration, but also on the target cells and the botanical parts of essential oils used.

  16. Comparative Phytochemical Analysis of Essential Oils from Different Biological Parts of Artemisia herba alba and Their Cytotoxic Effect on Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tilaoui, Mounir; Ait Mouse, Hassan; Jaafari, Abdeslam; Zyad, Abdelmajid

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Carrying out the chemical composition and antiproliferative effects against cancer cells from different biological parts of Artemisia herba alba. Methods Essential oils were studied by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC–MS) and their antitumoral activity was tested against P815 mastocytoma and BSR kidney carcinoma cell lines; also, in order to evaluate the effect on normal human cells, oils were tested against peripheral blood mononuclear cells PBMCs. Results Essential oils from leaves and aerial parts (mixture of capitulum and leaves) were mainly composed by oxygenated sesquiterpenes 39.89% and 46.15% respectively; capitulum oil contained essentially monoterpenes (22.86%) and monocyclic monoterpenes (21.48%); esters constituted the major fraction (62.8%) of stem oil. Essential oils of different biological parts studied demonstrated a differential antiproliferative activity against P815 and BSR cancer cells; P815 cells are the most sensitive to the cytotoxic effect. Leaves and capitulum essential oils are more active than aerial parts. Interestingly, no cytotoxic effect of these essential oils was observed on peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Conclusion Our results showed that the chemical composition variability of essential oils depends on the nature of botanical parts of Artemisia herba alba. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that the differential cytotoxic effect depends not only on the essential oils concentration, but also on the target cells and the botanical parts of essential oils used. PMID:26196123

  17. Infrared differential-absorption Mueller matrix spectroscopy and neural network-based data fusion for biological aerosol standoff detection.

    PubMed

    Carrieri, Arthur H; Copper, Jack; Owens, David J; Roese, Erik S; Bottiger, Jerold R; Everly, Robert D; Hung, Kevin C

    2010-01-20

    An active spectrophotopolarimeter sensor and support system were developed for a military/civilian defense feasibility study concerning the identification and standoff detection of biological aerosols. Plumes of warfare agent surrogates gamma-irradiated Bacillus subtilis and chicken egg white albumen (analytes), Arizona road dust (terrestrial interferent), water mist (atmospheric interferent), and talcum powders (experiment controls) were dispersed inside windowless chambers and interrogated by multiple CO(2) laser beams spanning 9.1-12.0 microm wavelengths (lambda). Molecular vibration and vibration-rotation activities by the subject analyte are fundamentally strong within this "fingerprint" middle infrared spectral region. Distinct polarization-modulations of incident irradiance and backscatter radiance of tuned beams generate the Mueller matrix (M) of subject aerosol. Strings of all 15 normalized elements {M(ij)(lambda)/M(11)(lambda)}, which completely describe physical and geometric attributes of the aerosol particles, are input fields for training hybrid Kohonen self-organizing map feed-forward artificial neural networks (ANNs). The properly trained and validated ANN model performs pattern recognition and type-classification tasks via internal mappings. A typical ANN that mathematically clusters analyte, interferent, and control aerosols with nil overlap of species is illustrated, including sensitivity analysis of performance.

  18. Raman spectroscopy for the detection of organ distribution and clearance of PEGylated reduced graphene oxide and biological consequences.

    PubMed

    Syama, Santhakumar; Paul, Willi; Sabareeswaran, Arumugam; Mohanan, Parayanthala Valappil

    2017-03-28

    Graphene, a 2D carbon material has found vast application in biomedical field because of its exciting physico-chemical properties. The large planar sheet like structure helps graphene to act as an effective carrier of drug or biomolecules in enormous amount. However, limited data available on the biocompatibility of graphene upon interaction with the biological system prompts us to evaluate their toxicity in animal model. In this study organ distribution, clearance and toxicity of PEGylated reduced nanographene (PrGO) on Swiss Albino mice was investigated after intraperitoneal and intravenous administration. Biodistribution and blood clearance was monitored using confocal Raman mapping and indicated that PrGO was distributed on major organs such as brain, liver, kidney, spleen and bone marrow. Presence of PrGO in brain tissue suggests that it has the potential to cross blood brain barrier. Small amount of injected PrGO was found to excrete via urine. Repeated administration of PrGO induced acute liver injury, congestion in kidney and increased splenocytes proliferation in days following exposure. Hence the result of the study recommended that PrGO should undergo intensive safety assessment before clinical application or validated to be safe for medical use.

  19. Part A. Neutron activation analysis of selenium and vanadium in biological matrices. Part B. Isomeric transition activation in aqueous solutions of alkyl bromides

    SciTech Connect

    Ebrahim, A.

    1988-01-01

    Several procedures were evaluated for determination of selenium in biological fluids and vanadium in biological tissues by neutron activation analysis (NAA) employing {sup 77m}Se and {sup 52}V isotopes, respectively. Procedures for determination of total selenium, trimethylselenonium (TMSe) ion and selenite (SeO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}) ion in urine and serum and for total selenoamino acids in urine were developed by utilizing anion exchange chromatography and molecular NAA. A pre-column derivatization of selenoamino acids with o-phthalaldehyde was necessary for their determination. Also an analytical approach was developed for determination of trace vanadium in liver samples from normal and diabetic rats as well as human and cow. Reactions of bromine-80 activated by radiative neutron capture and bromine-82 activated by isomeric transition were investigated in aqueous solutions of bromomethane and 1-bromobutane. Bromine-80 organic yields decreased with decreasing solute concentrations. The tendency for aggregation of the solute molecules diminished as the solute concentration approached zero where the probable state of the solute approached a monomolecular dispersion. Unlike reactions of {sup 80}Br born by {sup 79}Br(n,{gamma}){sup 80}Br reaction, the total organic product yields resulting from the {sup 82m}Br(I.T.){sup 82}Br process showed no solute concentration dependence.

  20. Bottom-Up Engineering of Biological Systems through Standard Bricks: A Modularity Study on Basic Parts and Devices

    PubMed Central

    Pasotti, Lorenzo; Politi, Nicolò; Zucca, Susanna; Cusella De Angelis, Maria Gabriella; Magni, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Background Modularity is a crucial issue in the engineering world, as it enables engineers to achieve predictable outcomes when different components are interconnected. Synthetic Biology aims to apply key concepts of engineering to design and construct new biological systems that exhibit a predictable behaviour. Even if physical and measurement standards have been recently proposed to facilitate the assembly and characterization of biological components, real modularity is still a major research issue. The success of the bottom-up approach strictly depends on the clear definition of the limits in which biological functions can be predictable. Results The modularity of transcription-based biological components has been investigated in several conditions. First, the activity of a set of promoters was quantified in Escherichia coli via different measurement systems (i.e., different plasmids, reporter genes, ribosome binding sites) relative to an in vivo reference promoter. Second, promoter activity variation was measured when two independent gene expression cassettes were assembled in the same system. Third, the interchangeability of input modules (a set of constitutive promoters and two regulated promoters) connected to a fixed output device (a logic inverter) expressing GFP was evaluated. The three input modules provide tunable transcriptional signals that drive the output device. If modularity persists, identical transcriptional signals trigger identical GFP outputs. To verify this, all the input devices were individually characterized and then the input-output characteristic of the logic inverter was derived in the different configurations. Conclusions Promoters activities (referred to a standard promoter) can vary when they are measured via different reporter devices (up to 22%), when they are used within a two-expression-cassette system (up to 35%) and when they drive another device in a functionally interconnected circuit (up to 44%). This paper provides a

  1. Lorentz contact resonance spectroscopy for nanoscale characterisation of structural and mechanical properties of biological, dental and pharmaceutical materials.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Dipesh; Dillon, Eoghan; Hau, Herman; Fu, Dong; Ramzan, Iqbal; Chrzanowski, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    Scanning probe microscopy has been widely used to obtain topographical information and to quantify nanostructural properties of different materials. Qualitative and quantitative imaging is of particular interest to study material-material interactions and map surface properties on a nanoscale (i.e. stiffness and viscoelastic properties). These data are essential for the development of new biomedical materials. Currently, there are limited options to map viscoelastic properties of materials at nanoscale and at high resolutions. Lorentz contact resonance (LCR) is an emerging technique, which allows mapping viscoelasticity of samples with stiffness ranging from a few hundred Pa up to several GPa. Here we demonstrate the applicability of LCR to probe and map the viscoelasticity and stiffness of 'soft' (biological sample: cell treated with nanodiamond), 'medium hard' (pharmaceutical sample: pMDI canister) and 'hard' (human teeth enamel) specimens. The results allowed the identification of nanodiamond on the cells and the qualitative assessment of its distribution based on its nanomechanical properties. It also enabled mapping of the mechanical properties of the cell to demonstrate variability of these characteristics in a single cell. Qualitative imaging of an enamel sample demonstrated variations of stiffness across the specimen and precise identification of enamel prisms (higher stiffness) and enamel interrods (lower stiffness). Similarly, mapping of the pMDI canister wall showed that drug particles were adsorbed to the wall. These particles showed differences in stiffness at nanoscale, which suggested variations in surface composition-multiphasic material. LCR technique emerges as a valuable tool for probing viscoelasticity of samples of varying stiffness's.

  2. Relaxation filtered hyperfine (REFINE) spectroscopy: a novel tool for studying overlapping biological electron paramagnetic resonance signals applied to mitochondrial complex I.

    PubMed

    Maly, Thorsten; MacMillan, Fraser; Zwicker, Klaus; Kashani-Poor, Noushin; Brandt, Ulrich; Prisner, Thomas F

    2004-04-06

    A simple strategy to separate overlapping electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signals in biological systems is presented. Pulsed EPR methods (inversion- and saturation-recovery) allow the determination of the T(1) spin-lattice relaxation times of paramagnetic centers. T(1) may vary by several orders of magnitude depending on the species under investigation. These variations can be employed to study selectively individual species from a spectrum that results from an overlap of two species using an inversion-recovery filtered (IRf) pulsed EPR technique. The feasibility of such an IRf field-swept technique is demonstrated on model compounds (alpha,gamma-bisphenylene-beta-phenylallyl-benzolate, BDPA, and 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidine-1-oxyl, TEMPO) and a simple strategy for the successful analysis of such mixtures is presented. Complex I is a multisubunit membrane protein of the respiratory chain containing several iron-sulfur (FeS) centers, which are observable with EPR spectroscopy. It is not possible to investigate the functionally important FeS cluster N2 separately because this EPR signal always overlaps with the other FeS signals. This cluster can be studied selectively using the IRf field-swept technique and its EPR spectrum is in excellent agreement with previous cw-EPR data from the literature. In addition, the possibility to separate the hyperfine spectra of two spectrally overlapping paramagnetic species is demonstrated by applying this relaxation filter together with hyperfine spectroscopy (REFINE). For the first time, the application of this filter to a three-pulse electron spin-echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) pulse sequence is demonstrated to selectively observe hyperfine spectra on a system containing two paramagnetic species. Finally, REFINE is used to assign the observed nitrogen modulation in complex I to an individual iron-sulfur cluster.

  3. Spectroscopy of Very Hot Plasma in Non-flaring Parts of a Solar Limb Active Region: Spatial and Temporal Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parenti, Susanna; del Zanna, Giulio; Petralia, Antonino; Reale, Fabio; Teriaca, Luca; Testa, Paola; Mason, Helen E.

    2017-09-01

    In this work we investigate the thermal structure of an off-limb active region (AR) in various non-flaring areas, as it provides key information on the way these structures are heated. In particular, we concentrate on the very hot component (> 3 {MK}) as it is a crucial element to distinguish between different heating mechanisms. We present an analysis using Fe and Ca emission lines from both the Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode. A data set covering all ionization stages from Fe x to Fe xix has been used for the thermal analysis (both differential emission measure and emission measure, EM). Ca xiv is used for the SUMER-EIS radiometric cross calibration. We show that the very hot plasma is present and persistent almost everywhere in the core of the limb AR. The off-limb AR is clearly structured in Fe xviii. Almost everywhere, the EM analysis reveals plasma at 10 MK (visible in Fe xix emission), which is down to 0.1% of EM of the main 3 {MK} plasma. We estimate the power-law index of the hot tail of the EM to be between ‑8.5 and ‑4.4. However, the question about the possible existence of a small minor peak at around 10 {MK} remains open. The absence in some part of the AR of the Fe xix and Fe xxiii lines (which fall into our spectral range) enables us to determine an upper limit on the EM at these temperatures. Our results include a new Ca xiv 943.59 Å atomic model.

  4. The biological restoration of central nervous system architecture and function: part 1-foundations and historical landmarks in contemporary stem cell biology.

    PubMed

    Farin, Azadeh; Liu, Charles Y; Elder, James B; Langmoen, Iver A; Apuzzo, Michael L J

    2009-01-01

    Since their discovery, stem cells have fascinated scientists with their ultimate potential: the ability to cure disease, repair altered physiology, and reverse neurological deficit. Stem cell science unquestionably promises to eliminate many of the tragic limitations contemporary medicine must acknowledge, and cloning may provide young cells for an aging population. Although it is widely believed that stem cells will transform the way medicine is practiced, therapeutic interventions using stem cell technology are still in their infancy. The 3 most common stem cell sources studied today are umbilical cord blood, bone marrow, and human embryos. Although cord blood is currently used to treat dozens of disorders and bone marrow stem cells have been used clinically since the 1960s, human embryonic stem cells have yet to be successfully applied to any disease. Undeniably, stem cell therapy has the potential to be one of the most powerful therapeutic options available. In this introductory article of a 5-part series on stem cells, we narrate the evolution of modern stem cell science, delineating major landmarks that will prove responsible for taking stem cell technology from the laboratory into revolutionary clinical applications: from the first milestone of identifying the mouse hematopoietic stem cell to the latest feats of producing pluripotent stem cells without embryos at all. In Part 2, we present the evidence demonstrating the certainty of adult mammalian neurogenesis; in Parts 3 and 4, we describe neurosurgical applications of stem cell technology; and in Part 5, we discuss the philosophical and ethical issues surrounding stem cell therapy, as well as future areas of exploration.

  5. Volcanic SO2 and SiF4 visualization using 2-D thermal emission spectroscopy - Part 1: Slant-columns and their ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stremme, W.; Krueger, A.; Harig, R.; Grutter, M.

    2012-02-01

    The composition and emission rates of volcanic gas plumes provide insight of the geologic internal activity, atmospheric chemistry, aerosol formation and radiative processes around it. Observations are necessary for public security and the aviation industry. Ground-based thermal emission infrared spectroscopy, which uses the radiation of the volcanic gas itself, allows for continuously monitoring during day and night from a safe distance. We present measurements on Popocatépetl volcano based on thermal emission spectroscopy during different campaigns between 2006-2009 using a Scanning Infrared Gas Imaging System (SIGIS). The experimental set-up, measurement geometries and analytical algorithms are described. The equipment was operated from a safe distance of 12 km from the volcano at two different spectral resolutions: 0.5 and 4 cm-1. The 2-dimensional scanning capability of the instrument allows for an on-line visualization of the volcanic SO2 plume and its animation. SiF4 was also identified in the infrared spectra recorded at both resolutions. The SiF4/SO2 molecular ratio can be calculated from each image and used as a highly useful parameter to follow changes in volcanic activity. A small Vulcanian eruption was monitored during the night of 16 to 17 November 2008 and strong ash emission together with a pronounced SO2 cloud was registered around 01:00 a.m. LST (Local Standard Time). Enhanced SiF4/SO2 ratios were observed before and after the eruption. A validation of the results from thermal emission measurements with those from absorption spectra of the moon taken at the same time, as well as an error analysis, are presented. The inferred propagation speed from sequential images is used in a subsequent paper (Part 2) to calculate the emission rates at different distances from the crater.

  6. [Are there pseudophototropic reactions in biology? Part 3: The pseudophototropic behaviour of the cell membrane of halobacteria (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Patschorke, J

    1979-01-01

    The behaviour of coloured membrane portions of "halobacteria" is studied with respect to spectral response and reversibility. The results are in good correlation with colour generating effects of pseudophototropic reactions. The disclosed and dicussed systems are in the range from purely synthetic to purely biological.

  7. Feasibility study for the rapid screening of target molecules using translational diffusion coefficients: diffusion-ordered NMR spectroscopy of biological toxins.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Terry J

    2010-02-01

    A panel of 15 biological toxins ranging between approximately 60-28,000 g/mol was used to evaluate the feasibility of screening aqueous samples for toxin analytes based on their translational diffusion coefficients, D(t). Toxin D(t) values were measured by pulsed-field gradient (1)H NMR spectroscopy using a bipolar pulse pair, longitudinal eddy current delay pulse sequence incorporating water suppression to achieve the maximum dynamic range for toxin signals. To collect data for an effective screening protocol, reference D(t) values were determined from five independent measurements at both 25 and 37 degrees C for all toxins in the panel. In the protocol, D(t) values are measured at both temperatures for a suspected toxin target in a sample, and for assignment as a potential toxin analyte, the measurements are required to fall within +/-0.25 x 10(-6) cm(2)/s of both reference D(t) values for at least one toxin in the panel. Only solution viscosity was found to influence sample D(t) measurements appreciably; however, the measurements are easily corrected for viscosity effects by calculating the D(t) value of the suspected toxin at infinite dilution. In conclusion, the protocol provides a rapid and effective means for screening aqueous samples for all toxins in the panel, narrowing toxin identification to < or = 2 possibilities in virtually all cases.

  8. Structure and function of quinones in biological solar energy transduction: a high-frequency D-band EPR spectroscopy study of model benzoquinones.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Ruchira; Coates, Christopher S; Milikisiyants, Sergey; Poluektov, Oleg G; Lakshmi, K V

    2012-01-12

    Quinones are utilized as charge-transfer cofactors in a wide variety of reactions that are crucial for photosynthesis and respiration. In photosynthetic protein complexes, both Type I and Type II, including oxygenic and anoxygenic reaction centers contain quinone cofactors that are known to participate in electron- and proton-transfer processes. Type II reaction centers, purple bacterial reaction centers, and photosystem II utilize benzoquinone molecules, ubiquinone, and plastoquinone, respectively, to facilitate proton-coupled electron transfer reactions. Here, we report a systematic study of the principal components of the g-tensor of an extensive library of model benzosemiquinone anion radicals in both protic (2-isopropanol) and aprotic (dimethyl sulfoxide) solvents using high-frequency EPR spectroscopy. A detailed comparison of the experimental g-values of the benzosemiquinone models at D-band EPR frequency allows for the discrimination of substituent effects and solvent hydrogen bonds on the principal components of the g-tensor. Further, we compare the primary plastosemiquinone, Q(A)(-), of photosystem II with the substituent and solvent hydrogen bond effects of benzosemiquinone models in vitro. This study significantly extends the experimental basis for elucidating the role of both molecular structure and interactions with environment on the functional tuning of quinone cofactors in biological solar energy transduction.

  9. Near-infrared spectroscopy system with non-contact source and detector for in vivo multi-distance measurement of deep biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funane, Tsukasa; Atsumori, Hirokazu; Kiguchi, Masashi; Tanikawa, Yukari; Okada, Eiji

    2013-03-01

    A non-contact near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) scanning system with a phosphor cell placed on the skin for in vivo measurement of biological tissue was developed and evaluated. Because the phosphor is excited by the light that propagates in the tissue, and the excitation light is cut by optical filters, the light that propagates in the tissue is selectively detected. The non-contact system was extended to create a scanning system that can flexibly change source positions with a galvano scanner. The optical scanning system was used for non-contact measurement of the human forearm muscle, and the dependence of optical-density change (ΔOD) caused by the upper-arm occlusion and release on source-detector distance was observed. The obtained ΔOD demonstrates the effectiveness of using this system for multi-distance human-forearm measurement. Furthermore, a human forehead was measured with the system. To extract a deep-layer signal, a surface-layer subtraction method with short-distance regression was applied to measured data. On the basis of the correlation with a simultaneously measured laser-Doppler flowmetry signal, it was confirmed that the deep-layer signal was successfully extracted. The extraction result demonstrates that the optical scanning system can be used as a multi-distance NIRS system for measuring the human brain activity at the forehead.

  10. Switching from usual brand cigarettes to a tobacco-heating cigarette or snus: Part 3. Biomarkers of biological effect

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, Michael W.; Marano, Kristin M.; Jones, Bobbette A.; Morgan, Walter T.; Stiles, Mitchell F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A randomized, multi-center study of adult cigarette smokers switched to tobacco-heating cigarettes, snus or ultra-low machine yield tobacco-burning cigarettes (50/group) for 24 weeks was conducted. Evaluation of biomarkers of biological effect (e.g. inflammation, lipids, hypercoaguable state) indicated that the majority of consistent and statistically significant improvements over time within each group were observed in markers of inflammation. Consistent and statistically significant differences in pairwise comparisons between product groups were not observed. These findings are relevant to the understanding of biomarkers of biological effect related to cigarette smoking as well as the risk continuum across various tobacco products (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02061917). PMID:26525962

  11. Switching from usual brand cigarettes to a tobacco-heating cigarette or snus: Part 3. Biomarkers of biological effect.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Michael W; Marano, Kristin M; Jones, Bobbette A; Morgan, Walter T; Stiles, Mitchell F

    2015-01-01

    A randomized, multi-center study of adult cigarette smokers switched to tobacco-heating cigarettes, snus or ultra-low machine yield tobacco-burning cigarettes (50/group) for 24 weeks was conducted. Evaluation of biomarkers of biological effect (e.g. inflammation, lipids, hypercoaguable state) indicated that the majority of consistent and statistically significant improvements over time within each group were observed in markers of inflammation. Consistent and statistically significant differences in pairwise comparisons between product groups were not observed. These findings are relevant to the understanding of biomarkers of biological effect related to cigarette smoking as well as the risk continuum across various tobacco products (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02061917).

  12. Biologic Treatments for Sports Injuries II Think Tank—Current Concepts, Future Research, and Barriers to Advancement, Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Iain R.; LaPrade, Robert F.; Musahl, Volker; Geeslin, Andrew G.; Zlotnicki, Jason P.; Mann, Barton J.; Petrigliano, Frank A.

    2016-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are common and result in considerable morbidity. Tears within the tendon substance or at its insertion into the humeral head represent a considerable clinical challenge because of the hostile local environment that precludes healing. Tears often progress without intervention, and current surgical treatments are inadequate. Although surgical implants, instrumentation, and techniques have improved, healing rates have not improved, and a high failure rate remains for large and massive rotator cuff tears. The use of biologic adjuvants that contribute to a regenerative microenvironment have great potential for improving healing rates and function after surgery. This article presents a review of current and emerging biologic approaches to augment rotator cuff tendon and muscle regeneration focusing on the scientific rationale, preclinical, and clinical evidence for efficacy, areas for future research, and current barriers to advancement and implementation. PMID:27099865

  13. Observations on the Biology of Afrotropical Hesperiidae (Lepidoptera) with particular reference to Kenya. Part 11. Heteropterinae.

    PubMed

    Cock, Matthew J W; Congdon, T Colin E

    2017-01-30

    Partial life histories from Kenya or Tanzania are presented for Metisella midas midas (Butler), M. medea medea Evans, M. orientalis orientalis Aurivillius, M. quadrisignatus nanda Evans, M. congdoni De Jong & Kielland and M. willemi Wallengren. The ovum of Metisella formosus linda Evans is also illustrated from Zambia. All feed on species of grasses (Poaceae). The convergence of the biology of the grass-feeding skippers, particularly Heteropterinae and Hesperiinae, Baorini is discussed.

  14. On rapeseed meals. Part XXVI. Some remarks on the biological value of rapeseed meal proteins after silage.

    PubMed

    Borowska, J; Cichon, R; Kozłowska, H; Rutkowski

    1978-01-01

    The influence of propionic bacteria on the biological value of potato-rapeseed meal protein ensilage was investigated. The inoculation of the ensilage with Propionibacterium Petersoni T 112 led to the reduction of the content of goitrogenous compounds (isothiocyanates and oxazolidinethiones) and to an increase of the nutritive value (NPU, PER) of the rapeseed protein. The increase of the protein value is greater by the application of propionic bacteria than by toasting of rapeseed meal.

  15. Site Alteration Effects from Rocket Exhaust Impingement During a Simulated Viking Mars Landing. Part 2: Chemical and Biological Site Alteration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Husted, R. R.; Smith, I. D.; Fennessey, P. V.

    1977-01-01

    Chemical and biological alteration of a Mars landing site was investigated experimentally and analytically. The experimental testing was conducted using a specially designed multiple nozzle configuration consisting of 18 small bell nozzles. The chemical test results indicate that an engine using standard hydrazine fuel will contaminate the landing site with ammonia (50-500ppm), nitrogen (5-50ppm), aniline (0.01-0.5ppm), hydrogen cyanide (0.01-0.5ppm), and water. A purified fuel, with impurities (mostly aniline) reduced by a factor of 50-100, limits the amount of hydrogen cyanide and aniline to below detectable limits for the Viking science investigations and leaves the amounts of ammonia, nitrogen, and water in the soil unchanged. The large amounts of ammonia trapped in the soil will make interpretation of the organic analysis investigation results more difficult. The biological tests indicate that the combined effects of plume gases, surface heating, surface erosion, and gas composition resulting from the retrorockets will not interfere with the Viking biology investigation.

  16. Shoreline ecology program for Prince William Sound, Alaska, following the Exxon Valdez oil spill. Part 3: Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Gilfillan, E.S.; Page, D.S.; Harner, E.J.; Boehm, P.D.

    1995-12-31

    This study describes the biological results of a comprehensive shoreline ecology program designed to assess ecological recovery in Prince William Sound following the Exxon Valdez oil spill on march 24, 1989. The program is an application of the ``Sediment Quality Triad`` approach, combining chemical, toxicological, and biological measurements. The study was designed so that results could be extrapolated to the entire spill zone in Prince William Sound. The spill affected four major shoreline habitat types in Prince William Sound: pebble/gravel, boulder/cobble, sheltered bedrock, and exposed bedrock. The study design had two components: (1) one-time stratified random sampling at 64 sites representing four habitats and four oiling levels (including unoiled reference sites) and (2) periodic sampling at 12 nonrandomly chosen sites that included some of the most heavily oiled locations in the sound. Biological communities on rock surfaces and in intertidal and shallow subtidal sediments were analyzed for differences resulting from to oiling in each of 16 habitat/tide zone combinations. Statistical methods included univariate analyses of individual species abundances and community parameter variables (total abundance, species richness, and Shannon diversity), and multivariate correspondence analysis of community structure. 58 refs., 13 figs., 9 tabs.

  17. Biologic Treatments for Sports Injuries II Think Tank—Current Concepts, Future Research, and Barriers to Advancement, Part 3

    PubMed Central

    Zlotnicki, Jason P.; Geeslin, Andrew G.; Murray, Iain R.; Petrigliano, Frank A.; LaPrade, Robert F.; Mann, Barton J.; Musahl, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Focal chondral defects of the articular surface are a common occurrence in the field of orthopaedics. These isolated cartilage injuries, if not repaired surgically with restoration of articular congruency, may have a high rate of progression to posttraumatic osteoarthritis, resulting in significant morbidity and loss of function in the young, active patient. Both isolated and global joint disease are a difficult entity to treat in the clinical setting given the high amount of stress on weightbearing joints and the limited healing potential of native articular cartilage. Recently, clinical interest has focused on the use of biologically active compounds and surgical techniques to regenerate native cartilage to the articular surface, with the goal of restoring normal joint health and overall function. This article presents a review of the current biologic therapies, as discussed at the 2015 American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) Biologics Think Tank, that are used in the treatment of focal cartilage deficiencies. For each of these emerging therapies, the theories for application, the present clinical evidence, and specific areas for future research are explored, with focus on the barriers currently faced by clinicians in advancing the success of these therapies in the clinical setting. PMID:27123466

  18. Synthetic biology

    PubMed Central

    Bower, Adam G; McClintock, Maria K

    2010-01-01

    The field of synthetic biology has made rapid progress in a number of areas including method development, novel applications and community building. In seeking to make biology “engineerable,” synthetic biology is increasing the accessibility of biological research to researchers of all experience levels and backgrounds. One of the underlying strengths of synthetic biology is that it may establish the framework for a rigorous bottom-up approach to studying biology starting at the DNA level. Building upon the existing framework established largely by the Registry of Standard Biological Parts, careful consideration of future goals may lead to integrated multi- scale approaches to biology. Here we describe some of the current challenges that need to be addressed or considered in detail to continue the development of synthetic biology. Specifically, discussion on the areas of elucidating biological principles, computational methods and experimental construction methodologies are presented. PMID:21326830

  19. DMSP and DMS dynamics during a mesoscale iron fertilization experiment in the Northeast Pacific Part II: Biological cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merzouk, Anissa; Levasseur, Maurice; Scarratt, Michael G.; Michaud, Sonia; Rivkin, Richard B.; Hale, Michelle S.; Kiene, Ronald P.; Price, Neil M.; Li, William K. W.

    2006-10-01

    Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) and dimethylsulfide (DMS) biological cycling rates were determined during SERIES, a mesoscale iron-fertilization experiment conducted in the high-nutrient low-chlorophyll (HNLC) waters of the northeast subarctic Pacific. The iron fertilization resulted in the rapid development of a nanoplankton assemblage that persisted for 11 days before abruptly crashing. The nanoplankton bloom was followed by a diatom bloom, accompanied by an important increase in bacterial abundance and production. These iron-induced alterations of the plankton assemblage coincided with changes in the size and biological cycling of the DMSP and DMS pools. The initial nanoplankton bloom resulted in increases in particulate DMSP (DMSPp; 77-180 nmol L -1), dissolved DMSP (DMSPd; 1-24 nmol L -1), and biological gross (0.11-0.78 nmol L -1 h -1) and net (0.04-0.74 nmol L -1 h -1) DMS production rates. During the nanoplankton bloom, DMSPd consumption by bacteria exceeded their sulfur demand and the excess sulfur was probably released as DMS, consistent with the high gross DMS production rates observed during that period. The crash of the nanoplankton bloom was marked by the rapid decline of DMSPp, DMSPd, and gross DMS production to their initial values. Following the crash of the nanoplankton bloom, bacterial production and estimated sulfur demand reached transient maxima of 9.3 μg C L -1 d -1 and 14.2 nmol S L -1 d -1, respectively. During this period of high bacterial production, bacterial DMSPd consumption was also very high (6 nmol L -1 h -1), but none of the consumed DMSPd was converted into DMS and a net biological DMS consumption was measured. This transient period initiated a rapid decrease in DMS concentrations inside the iron-enriched patch, which persisted during the following diatom bloom due to low biological gross and net DMS production that prevented the replenishment of DMS. Our results show that the impact of Fe fertilization on DMS production in

  20. Observations on the biology of Afrotropical Hesperiidae (Lepidoptera). Part 9. Hesperiinae incertae sedis: Zingiberales feeders, genera of unknown biology and an overview of the Hesperiinae incertae sedis.

    PubMed

    Cock, Matthew J W; Congdon, T Colin E; Collins, Steve C

    2016-01-15

    The Afrotropical genera that have been recorded to feed on Zingiberales are documented. Partial life histories are presented for Erionota torus Evans (a South-East Asian species established in Mauritius), Semalea arela (Mabille), S. pulvina (Plötz), Xanthodisca vibius (Hewitson), X. rega (Mabille), Hypoleucis ophiusa (Hewitson), Caenides dacena (Hewitson), Osmodes adon (Mabille), Gretna cylinda (Hewitson) and Moltena fiara (Butler). Additional notes from the literature are provided on the genera Leona and Rhabdomantis. Notes on natural enemies of E. torus and M. fiara are included. We find that the Zingiberaceae and Costaceae feeding genera, Semalea, Xanthodiscus, Hypoleucis and Caenides (part) are united by a C-shaped raised rim to the prothoracic spiracle of the pupa. The pupa of Osmodes adon indicates this genus may have no close affinities to other Afrotropical genera for which the life history is known. The pupa of G. cylinda is unlike any other that we have documented and may reflect that this is the only species which we have found to be formed on the open leaf under surface rather than in a shelter. The early stages of M. fiara indicate affinities with Zophopetes and related genera. The paper concludes with a brief comparative discussion of the early stages of the Afrotropical Hesperiinae incertae sedis as a whole. There appear to be useful characters to group species by the ova and pupae but less so by the caterpillars. Based on pupae alone, the Hesperiinae incertae sedis might be divided into nine groups.

  1. World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for biological treatment of schizophrenia, part 2: update 2012 on the long-term treatment of schizophrenia and management of antipsychotic-induced side effects.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Alkomiet; Falkai, Peter; Wobrock, Thomas; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Glenthoj, Birte; Gattaz, Wagner F; Thibaut, Florence; Möller, Hans-Jürgen

    2013-02-01

    Abstract These updated guidelines are based on a first edition of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for biological treatment of schizophrenia published in 2006. For this 2012 revision, all available publications pertaining to the biological treatment of schizophrenia were reviewed systematically to allow for an evidence-based update. These guidelines provide evidence-based practice recommendations that are clinically and scientifically meaningful. They are intended to be used by all physicians diagnosing and treating people suffering from schizophrenia. Based on the first version of these guidelines, a systematic review of the MEDLINE/PUBMED database and the Cochrane Library, in addition to data extraction from national treatment guidelines, has been performed for this update. The identified literature was evaluated with respect to the strength of evidence for its efficacy and then categorised into six levels of evidence (A-F) and five levels of recommendation (1-5) ( Bandelow et al. 2008a ,b, World J Biol Psychiatry 9:242, see Table 1 ). This second part of the updated guidelines covers long-term treatment as well as the management of relevant side effects. These guidelines are primarily concerned with the biological treatment (including antipsychotic medication and other pharmacological treatment options) of adults suffering from schizophrenia.

  2. World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Guidelines for Biological Treatment of Schizophrenia, part 1: update 2012 on the acute treatment of schizophrenia and the management of treatment resistance.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Alkomiet; Falkai, Peter; Wobrock, Thomas; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Glenthoj, Birte; Gattaz, Wagner F; Thibaut, Florence; Möller, Hans-Jürgen

    2012-07-01

    These updated guidelines are based on a first edition of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry Guidelines for Biological Treatment of Schizophrenia published in 2005. For this 2012 revision, all available publications pertaining to the biological treatment of schizophrenia were reviewed systematically to allow for an evidence-based update. These guidelines provide evidence-based practice recommendations that are clinically and scientifically meaningful and these guidelines are intended to be used by all physicians diagnosing and treating people suffering from schizophrenia. Based on the first version of these guidelines, a systematic review of the MEDLINE/PUBMED database and the Cochrane Library, in addition to data extraction from national treatment guidelines, has been performed for this update. The identified literature was evaluated with respect to the strength of evidence for its efficacy and then categorised into six levels of evidence (A-F; Bandelow et al. 2008b, World J Biol Psychiatry 9:242). This first part of the updated guidelines covers the general descriptions of antipsychotics and their side effects, the biological treatment of acute schizophrenia and the management of treatment-resistant schizophrenia.

  3. World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Guidelines for Biological Treatment of Schizophrenia. Part 3: Update 2015 Management of special circumstances: Depression, Suicidality, substance use disorders and pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Alkomiet; Falkai, Peter; Wobrock, Thomas; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Glenthøj, Birte; Gattaz, Wagner F; Thibaut, Florence; Möller, Hans-Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    These updated guidelines are based on the first edition of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for biological treatment of schizophrenia published in the years 2005 and 2006. For this 2015 revision, all available publications pertaining to the biological treatment of schizophrenia were reviewed systematically to allow for an evidence-based update. These guidelines provide evidence-based practice recommendations which are clinically and scientifically relevant. They are intended to be used by all physicians diagnosing and treating patients with schizophrenia. Based on the first version of these guidelines a systematic review, as well as a data extraction from national guidelines have been performed for this update. The identified literature was evaluated with respect to the strength of evidence for its efficacy and subsequently categorised into six levels of evidence (A-F) and five levels of recommendation (1-5). This third part of the updated guidelines covers the management of the following specific treatment circumstances: comorbid depression, suicidality, various comorbid substance use disorders (legal and illegal drugs), and pregnancy and lactation. These guidelines are primarily concerned with the biological treatment (including antipsychotic medication and other pharmacological treatment options) of patients with schizophrenia.

  4. Broadband homonuclear correlation spectroscopy driven by combined R2(n)(v) sequences under fast magic angle spinning for NMR structural analysis of organic and biological solids.

    PubMed

    Hou, Guangjin; Yan, Si; Trébosc, Julien; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Polenova, Tatyana

    2013-07-01

    We recently described a family of experiments for R2n(v) Driven Spin Diffusion (RDSD) spectroscopy suitable for homonuclear correlation experiments under fast MAS conditions [G. Hou, S. Yan, S.J. Sun, Y. Han, I.J. Byeon, J. Ahn, J. Concel, A. Samoson, A.M. Gronenborn, T. Polenova, Spin diffusion drive by R-symmetry sequencs: applications to homonuclear correlation spectroscopy in MAS NMR of biological and organic solids, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 133 (2011) 3943-3953]. In these RDSD experiments, since the broadened second-order rotational resonance conditions are dominated by the radio frequency field strength and the phase shifts, as well as the size of reintroduced dipolar couplings, the different R2n(v) sequences display unique polarization transfer behaviors and different recoupling frequency bandwidths. Herein, we present a series of modified R2n(v) sequences, dubbed COmbined R2n(v)-Driven (CORD), that yield broadband homonuclear dipolar recoupling and give rise to uniform distribution of cross peak intensities across the entire correlation spectrum. We report NMR experiments and numerical simulations demonstrating that these CORD spin diffusion sequences are suitable for broadband recoupling at a wide range of magnetic fields and MAS frequencies, including fast-MAS conditions (νr=40 kHz and above). Since these CORD sequences are largely insensitive to dipolar truncation, they are well suited for the determination of long-range distance constraints, which are indispensable for the structural characterization of a broad range of systems. Using U-(13)C,(15)N-alanine and U-(13)C,(15)N-histidine, we show that under fast-MAS conditions, the CORD sequences display polarization transfer efficiencies within broadband frequency regions that are generally higher than those offered by other existing spin diffusion pulse schemes. A 89-residue U-(13)C,(15)N-dynein light chain (LC8) protein has also been used to demonstrate that the CORD sequences exhibit uniformly high cross peak

  5. Potential radionuclide emissions from stacks on the Hanford site, Part 2: Dose assessment methodology using portable low-resolution gamma spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, J.M.

    1995-02-01

    In September 1992, the Westinghouse Hanford Company began developing an in situ measurement method to assess gamma radiation emanating from high-efficiency particulate air filters using portable low-resolution gamma spectroscopy. The purpose of the new method was to assess radioactive exhaust stack air emissions from empirical data rather than from theoretical models and to determine the potential unabated dose to an offsite theoretical maximally exposed individual. In accordance with Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61, Subpart H, {open_quotes}National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants{close_quotes}, stacks that have the potential to emit {ge} 1 {mu}Sv y{sup {minus}1} (0.1 mrem y{sup {minus}1}) to the maximally exposed individual are considered {open_quotes}major{close_quotes} and must meet the continuous monitoring requirements. After the method was tested and verified, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10, approved its use in June 1993. Of the 125 stacks operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company, 22 were targeted for evaluation by this method, and 15 were assessed. (The method could not be applied at seven stacks because of excessive background radiation or because no gamma emitting particles appear in the emission stream.) The most significant result from this study was the redesignation of the T Plant main stack. The stack was assessed as being {open_quotes}minor{close_quotes}, and it now only requires periodic confirmatory measurements and meets federally imposed sampling requirements.

  6. [Investigation of biologically active compounds at the Department of Organic Chemistry of University of Debrecen 1992-2009. Part III].

    PubMed

    Antus, Sándor

    2010-01-01

    The author briefly reviews the beginning of the carbohydrate chemistry in Hungary with special regard to the results achieved at the Department of Organic Chemistry of University of Debrecen and summarizes the most important synthetic and pharmaceutical results obtained in this field between 1992-2009, part III.

  7. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel pyrrolidine-2,5-dione derivatives as potential antidepressant agents. Part 1.

    PubMed

    Wróbel, Martyna Z; Chodkowski, Andrzej; Herold, Franciszek; Gomółka, Anna; Kleps, Jerzy; Mazurek, Aleksander P; Pluciński, Franciszek; Mazurek, Andrzej; Nowak, Gabriel; Siwek, Agata; Stachowicz, Katarzyna; Sławińska, Anna; Wolak, Małgorzata; Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Satała, Grzegorz; Bojarski, Andrzej J; Turło, Jadwiga

    2013-05-01

    A series of 3-(1H-indol-3-yl)pyrrolidine-2,5-dione derivatives was synthesized and their biological activity was evaluated. The chemical structures of the newly prepared compounds were confirmed by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and ESI-HRMS spectra data. All tested compounds proved to be potent 5-HT1A receptor and serotonin transporter protein (SERT) ligands. Among them, compounds 15, 18, 19 and 30 showed significant affinity for 5-HT1A and SERT. Computer docking simulations carried out for compounds 15, 31 and 32 to models of 5-HT1A receptor and SERT confirm the results of biological tests. Due to high affinity for the 5-HT1A receptor and moderate affinity for SERT, compounds 31, 32, 35, and 37 were evaluated for their affinity for D2L, 5-HT6, 5-HT7 and 5-HT2A receptors. In vivo tests, in turn, resulted in determining the functional activity of compounds 15, 18, 19 and 30 to the 5-HT1A receptor. The results of these tests indicate that all of the ligands possess properties characteristic of 5-HT1A receptor agonists.

  8. Composition and effects of inhalable size fractions of atmospheric aerosols in the polluted atmosphere. Part II. In vitro biological potencies.

    PubMed

    Novák, Jiří; Hilscherová, Klára; Landlová, Linda; Čupr, Pavel; Kohút, Lukáš; Giesy, John P; Klánová, Jana

    2014-02-01

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM) in ambient air has been shown to lead to adverse health consequences. Six size fractions of PM with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 10μm (PM10) and gas phase were collected at six localities with different major pollution sources. Extracts of samples were assessed for AhR-mediated toxicity, (anti-)estrogenicity, (anti-)androgenicity and genotoxicity. The biological responses were interpreted relative to chemical characterization. Historically, for regulatory purposes, evaluation of air pollution was based mainly on assessment of the sum of PM10. In the case of AhR-mediated activity, PM1 was responsible for more than 75% of the activity of the particulate fraction from all localities. The assessed effects were correlated with concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), organic carbon content and specific surface area of the PM. A significant proportion of biologically active chemicals seems to be present in the gas phase of air. The results suggest that an average daily exposure based just on the concentrations of contaminants contained in PM10, as regulated in EU legislation so far, is not a sufficient indicator of contaminants in air particulates and adoption of standards more similar to other countries and inclusion of other parameters besides mass should be considered. © 2013.

  9. Surface functionalization of bioactive glasses with natural molecules of biological significance, Part I: Gallic acid as model molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Ferraris, Sara; Prenesti, Enrico; Verné, Enrica

    2013-12-01

    Gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, GA) and its derivatives are a group of biomolecules (polyphenols) obtained from plants. They have effects which are potentially beneficial to heath, for example they are antioxidant, anticarcinogenic and antibacterial, as recently investigated in many fields such as medicine, food and plant sciences. The main drawbacks of these molecules are both low stability and bioavailability. In this research work the opportunity to graft GA to bioactive glasses is investigated, in order to deliver the undamaged biological molecule into the body, using the biomaterial surfaces as a localized carrier. GA was considered for functionalization since it is a good model molecule for polyphenols and presents several interesting biological activities, like antibacterial, antioxidant and anticarcinogenic properties. Two different silica based bioactive glasses (SCNA and CEL2), with different reactivity, were employed as substrates. UV photometry combined with the Folin&Ciocalteu reagent was adopted to test the concentration of GA in uptake solution after functionalization. This test verified how much GA consumption occurred with surface modification and it was also used on solid samples to test the presence of GA on functionalized glasses. XPS and SEM-EDS techniques were employed to characterize the modification of material surface properties and functional group composition before and after functionalization.

  10. A lab-on-a-chip for hypoxic patch clamp measurements combined with optical tweezers and spectroscopy- first investigations of single biological cells.

    PubMed

    Alrifaiy, Ahmed; Borg, Johan; Lindahl, Olof A; Ramser, Kerstin

    2015-04-18

    The response and the reaction of the brain system to hypoxia is a vital research subject that requires special instrumentation. With this research subject in focus, a new multifunctional lab-on-a-chip (LOC) system with control over the oxygen content for studies on biological cells was developed. The chip was designed to incorporate the patch clamp technique, optical tweezers and absorption spectroscopy. The performance of the LOC was tested by a series of experiments. The oxygen content within the channels of the LOC was monitored by an oxygen sensor and verified by simultaneously studying the oxygenation state of chicken red blood cells (RBCs) with absorption spectra. The chicken RBCs were manipulated optically and steered in three dimensions towards a patch-clamp micropipette in a closed microfluidic channel. The oxygen level within the channels could be changed from a normoxic value of 18% O 2 to an anoxic value of 0.0-0.5% O 2. A time series of 3 experiments were performed, showing that the spectral transfer from the oxygenated to the deoxygenated state occurred after about 227 ± 1 s and a fully developed deoxygenated spectrum was observed after 298 ± 1 s, a mean value of 3 experiments. The tightness of the chamber to oxygen diffusion was verified by stopping the flow into the channel system while continuously recording absorption spectra showing an unchanged deoxygenated state during 5400 ± 2 s. A transfer of the oxygenated absorption spectra was achieved after 426 ± 1 s when exposing the cell to normoxic buffer. This showed the long time viability of the investigated cells. Successful patching and sealing were established on a trapped RBC and the whole-cell access (Ra) and membrane (Rm) resistances were measured to be 5.033 ± 0.412 M Ω and 889.7 ± 1.74 M Ω respectively.

  11. Observations on the biology of Afrotropical Hesperiidae (Lepidoptera) with particular reference to Kenya. Part 10. Pyrginae, Carcharodini.

    PubMed

    Cock, Matthew J W

    2016-10-05

    Partial life histories are presented for Spialia kituina (Karsch), S. spio (Linnaeus), S. diomus (Hopffer), S. colotes transvaaliae (Trimen), S. dromus (Plötz), S. ploetzi (Aurivillius), S. zebra bifida Higgins and Gomalia elma elma (Trimen). All feed on species of Malvaceae. An earlier record from Kenya of Melhania velutina as the food plant of S. depauperata depauperata (Strand) was based on a misidentification and there are no known records of the food plant of this subspecies. Spialia ferax (Wallengren) stat. rev. is considered a valid species rather than a subspecies of S. diomus, based on significant differences in wing patterns, the shape of the valves, a zone where neither occurs, no signs that a cline is involved, and differences in the colouring and markings of the caterpillars. The convergence of the biology of the chequered skippers of the tribes Carcharodini, Pyrgini and Celaenorrhini is discussed.

  12. Persistence of biological traces at inside parts of a firearm from a case of multiple familial homicide.

    PubMed

    Courts, Cornelius; Gahr, Britta; Madea, Burkhard; Schyma, Christian

    2014-07-01

    Backspatter from wounds caused by contact shots against a biological target had before been shown to be propelled into firearms' barrels where they can persist and be retrieved from as relevant forensic evidence. Herein, that insight was applied to the investigation of a case of multiple familial homicide with a firearm. Samples of backspatter were collected from the firearm using DNA-free swabs. DNA was extracted from the swabs, and 16 STR systems were PCR-amplified to generate DNA profiles of all victims shot by the firearm. The quality of the resulting DNA profiles was sufficient to exclude the perpetrator as donor and to differentiate the three closely related victims thereby proving that all three victims had been shot by the same firearm from very close or contact distance. A key insight gained from this case was that not only a firearms' barrel inside but other inner surfaces may be charged with profilable DNA. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  13. Meniscal allograft transplantation. Part 1: systematic review of graft biology, graft shrinkage, graft extrusion, graft sizing, and graft fixation.

    PubMed

    Samitier, Gonzalo; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Taylor, Dean C; Rill, Brian; Lock, Terrence; Moutzouros, Vasilius; Kolowich, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    To provide a systematic review of the literature regarding five topics in meniscal allograft transplantation: graft biology, shrinkage, extrusion, sizing, and fixation. A systematic literature search was conducted using the PubMed (MEDLINE), ScienceDirect, and EBSCO-CINAHL databases. Articles were classified only in one topic, but information contained could be reported into other topics. Information was classified according to type of study (animal, in vitro human, and in vivo human) and level of evidence (for in vivo human studies). Sixty-two studies were finally included: 30 biology, 3 graft shrinkage, 11 graft extrusion, 17 graft size, and 6 graft fixation (some studies were categorized in more than one topic). These studies corresponded to 22 animal studies, 22 in vitro human studies, and 23 in vivo human studies (7 level II, 10 level III, and 6 level IV). The principal conclusions were as follows: (a) Donor cells decrease after MAT and grafts are repopulated with host cells form synovium; (b) graft preservation alters collagen network (deep freezing) and causes cell apoptosis with loss of viable cells (cryopreservation); (c) graft shrinkage occurs mainly in lyophilized and gamma-irradiated grafts (less with cryopreservation); (d) graft extrusion is common but has no clinical/functional implications; (e) overall, MRI is not superior to plain radiograph for graft sizing; (f) graft width size matching is more important than length size matching; (g) height appears to be the most important factor influencing meniscal size; (h) bone fixation better restores contact mechanics than suture fixation, but there are no differences for pullout strength or functional results; and (i) suture fixation has more risk of graft extrusion compared to bone fixation. Systematic review of level II-IV studies, Level IV.

  14. [Cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis CAE and Raman spectroscopy as a method identification of beta-glucans, used as biologically and therapeutically active biomaterials].

    PubMed

    Pielesz, Anna; Biniaś, Włodzimierz; Paluch, Jadwiga

    2012-01-01

    The formation of AGEs progressively increases with normal aging, even in the absence of disease (the pathogenesis of diabetes associated vascular disorders and neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease). However, they are formed at accelerated rates in age-related diseases. The polysaccharides might play a role in wound healing, both internally and externally, and also that they could play a role against inflammation and may lead to the production of better medicines to be used as supplements in cancer treatment. The acid hydrolysis was studied with H2SO4 at 80% concentration to determine the most effective procedure for total hydrolysis of beta-glucan. The standard of beta-glucans acid hydrolysate were compared for commercial oat and oatmeal, mushrooms: Pleurotus ostreatus, Fungus and yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The following materials and reagents were used in the examination: reference beta-(1 --> 3)-(1 --> 6)-glucan, oat and oatmeal, mushrooms: Pleurotus ostreatus, Fungus and yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Raman spectra of the sample solutions (beta-glucan acid hydrolysates) were recorded on a MAGNA-IR 860 with FT-Raman accessory. Sample was irradiated with a 1064 nm line of the T10-8S Nd spectra-physics model: YAG laser and scattered radiation were collected at 180 degrees, using 4 cm(-1) resolution. The polysaccharide was hydrolyzed into component monosaccharides with 80% H2SO4 at 0 degrees C for 30 minutes and monosaccharide derivatives were subjected to electrophoresis, as in a ealier authors study, on a strip of cellulose acetate membrane (CA-SYS-MINI Cellulose Acetate Systems) in 0.2 M Ca(OAc)2 (pH 7.5) at 10 mA, max. 240 V for 1.5 h. The strips were stained with 0.5% toluidine blue in 3% HOAc solution and then rinsed in distilled water and air-dried. A part of the hexoses (for example glucose) are converted, to products such as 5-hydroxymethylfurfural. Various coloured substances, through the Maillard

  15. Body temperature variability (Part 1): a review of the history of body temperature and its variability due to site selection, biological rhythms, fitness, and aging.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Greg

    2006-12-01

    Body temperature is a complex, non-linear data point, subject to many sources of internal and external variation. While these sources of variation significantly complicate interpretation of temperature data, disregarding knowledge in favor of oversimplifying complex issues would represent a significant departure from practicing evidence-based medicine. Part 1 of this review outlines the historical work of Wunderlich on temperature and the origins of the concept that a healthy normal temperature is 98.6 degrees F (37.0 degrees C). Wunderlich's findings and methodology are reviewed and his results are contrasted with findings from modern clinical thermometry. Endogenous sources of temperature variability, including variations caused by site of measurement, circadian, menstrual, and annual biological rhythms, fitness, and aging are discussed. Part 2 will review the effects of exogenous masking agents - external factors in the environment, diet, or lifestyle that can influence body temperature, as well as temperature findings in disease states.

  16. Volcanic SO2 and SiF4 visualization using 2-D thermal emission spectroscopy - Part 2: Wind propagation and emission rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, A.; Stremme, W.; Harig, R.; Grutter, M.

    2013-01-01

    A technique for measuring two-dimensional (2-D) plumes of volcanic gases with thermal emission spectroscopy was described in Part 1 by Stremme et al. (2012a). In that paper the instrumental aspects as well as retrieval strategies for obtaining the slant column images of SO2 and SiF4, as well as animations of particular events observed at the Popocatépetl volcano, were presented. This work focuses on the procedures for determining the propagation speed of the gases and estimating an emission rate from the given image sequences. A 2-D column density distribution of a volcanic gas, available as time-consecutive frames, provides information of a projected wind field and the average velocity at which the volcanic plume is propagating. This information is valuable since the largest uncertainties when calculating emission rates of the gases using remote sensing techniques arise from propagation velocities which are often inadequately assumed. The presented reconstruction method solves the equation of continuity as an ill-posed problem using mainly a Tikhonov-like regularisation. It is observed from the available data sets that if the main direction of propagation is perpendicular to the line-of-sight, the algorithm works well for SO2, which has the strongest signals, and also for SiF4 in some favourable cases. Due to the similarity of the algorithm used here with the reconstruction methods used for profile retrievals based on optimal estimation theory, diagnostic tools like the averaging kernels can be calculated in an analogous manner and the information can be quantified as degrees of freedom. Thus, it is shown that the combination of wind field and column distribution of the gas plume can provide the emission rate of the volcano both during day and night.

  17. Volcanic SO2 and SiF4 visualization using 2-D thermal emission spectroscopy - Part 2: Wind propagation and emission fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, A.; Stremme, W.; Harig, R.; Grutter, M.

    2012-07-01

    The technique for measuring two-dimensional (2-D) plumes of volcanic gases with thermal emission spectroscopy was described in Part 1 by Stremme et al. (2012). In that paper the instrumental aspects as well as retrieval strategies for obtaining the slant column images of SO2 and SiF4, as well as animations of particular events observed at the Popocatépetl volcano, were presented. This work focuses on the procedures for determining the propagation speed of the gases and estimating an emission flux from the given image sequences. A 2-D column density distribution of a volcanic gas, available as time-consecutive frames, provides information of a wind-field and the average velocity at which the volcanic plume is propagating. The presented reconstruction method solves the equation of continuity as an ill-posed problem using mainly a Tikhonov-like regularization. It is observed from the available data sets that if the main direction of propagation is perpendicular to the line-of-sight, the algorithm works well for SO2 which has the strongest signals, and also for SiF4 in some favourable cases. Due to the similarity of the algorithm used here with the reconstruction methods used for profile retrievals based on optimal estimation theory, diagnostic tools like the averaging kernels can be calculated analogously and the information can be quantified as degrees of freedom. Thus, it is shown that the combination of wind-field and column distribution of the gas plume can provide the emission flux of the volcano both during day and night.

  18. Observations on the biology of Afrotropical Hesperiidae (Lepidoptera). Part 7. Hesperiinae incertae sedis: grass and bamboo feeders.

    PubMed

    Cock, Matthew J W; Congdon, T Colin E

    2014-10-10

    Partial life histories for 17 Hesperiinae incertae sedis that feed on grasses or bamboos (Poaceae) are described and illustrated. The genera dealt with are: Astictopterus (from Evans' (1937) Astictopterus group), Prosopalpus, Kedestes (from Evans' (1937) Ampittia group), Ceratrichia, Pardaleodes, Ankola (From Evans' (1937) Ceratrichia and Acleros groups), Perrotia (part), Chondrolepis, and Monza (part) (all from Evans' Ploetzia genera group). The Poaceae-feeders comprise a relatively small proportion of the Afrotropical Hesperiinae fauna, particularly the mainland Afrotropical fauna. The caterpillars shown here are fairly homogeneous, with the head wider nearer the base, and lacking obvious setae on the body. Wax glands have been noted over most of the ventral surface A1-A8 in the final instar of Ceratrichia, Pardaleodes and Monza, but are absent in Chondrolepis, and either absent or not documented for other genera. The short double frontal projection of Tsitana uitenhaga is unusual, but pupae of the congeneric species have not been documented. The pupae of Kedestes spp. generally have extensive black or dark areas. The pupae of Pardaleodes and Ankola are very flimsy and collapse after emergence. All known pupae of Chondrolepis spp. have a short, blunt downturned frontal projection, not seen for any other Afrotropical genera, although Semalea spp. may have a short blunt projection. The remaining pupae are all generally similar and undistinguished. These are not substantial differences, but suggest that pupal characters may be useful in grouping some of the genera of Afrotropical Hesperiinae incertae sedis.

  19. Chemical and biological studies of a new cigarette that primarily heats tobacco. Part 1. Chemical composition of mainstream smoke.

    PubMed

    Borgerding, M F; Bodnar, J A; Chung, H L; Mangan, P P; Morrison, C C; Risner, C H; Rogers, J C; Simmons, D F; Uhrig, M S; Wendelboe, F N; Wingate, D E; Winkler, L S

    1998-03-01

    A new-technology cigarette has been developed. While the new cigarette burns some tobacco, it does not use tobacco as the fuel to sustain combustion and provide heat to the cigarette. Rather, the new cigarette primarily heats tobacco thereby reducing products of smoke formation mechanisms such as tobacco combustion, tobacco pyrolysis and pyrosynthesis. The mainstream smoke composition from a cigarette based on the new design (TOB-HT) has been characterized in comparative chemical testing with two reference cigarettes using the FTC puffing regimen. Thermal properties, UV absorption characteristics, elemental composition and materials balance studies all suggest a simplified smoke aerosol. Twenty-five smoke constituents ("target compounds") identified by the scientific community as compounds that may contribute to the diseases statistically associated with smoking have also been measured. Mainstream smoke concentrations of most target compounds are significantly lower with the TOB-HT cigarette when compared with reference cigarettes in the ultra-light "tar" and light "tar" categories. Taken together, chemical analysis results suggest simplified TOB-HT smoke chemistry with marked reductions in specific chemicals reported to be biologically active.

  20. Chemical and biological studies of a new cigarette that primarily heats tobacco. Part 1. Chemical composition of mainstream smoke.

    PubMed

    Borgerding, M F; Bodnar, J A; Chung, H L; Mangan, P P; Morrison, C C; Risner, C H; Rogers, J C; Simmons, D F; Uhrig, M S; Wendelboe, F N; Wingate, D E; Winkler, L S

    1998-07-01

    A new-technology cigarette has been developed. While the new cigarette burns some tobacco, it does not use tobacco as the fuel to sustain combustion and provide heat to the cigarette. Rather, the new cigarette primarily heats tobacco thereby reducing products of smoke formation mechanisms such as tobacco combustion, tobacco pyrolysis and pyrosynthesis. The mainstream smoke composition from a cigarette based on the new design (TOB-HT) has been characterized in comparative chemical testing with two reference cigarettes using the FTC puffing regimen. Thermal properties, UV absorption characteristics, elemental composition and materials balance studies all suggest a simplified smoke aerosol. Twenty-five smoke constituents ("target compounds") identified by the scientific community as compounds that may contribute to the diseases statistically associated with smoking have also been measured. Mainstream smoke concentrations of most target compounds are significantly lower with the TOB-HT cigarette when compared with reference cigarettes in the ultra-light "tar" and light "tar" categories. Taken together, chemical analysis results suggest simplified TOB-HT smoke chemistry with marked reductions in specific chemicals reported to be biologically active.

  1. Evaluation of polyphenolic fraction isolated from aerial parts of Tribulus pterocarpus on biological properties of blood platelets in vitro.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Morel, Agnieszka; Hamed, Arafa I; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Stochmal, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The antiplatelet and antioxidative activity of polyphenolic fraction isolated from aerial parts of Tribulus pterocarpus in blood platelets stimulated by thrombin was studied. Thrombin as a strong physiological agonist induces the enzymatic peroxidation of endogenous arachidonic acid, the formation of different reactive oxygen species, including superoxide anion radicals ([Formula: see text](·)) and the platelet aggregation. Therefore, the aim of our study was to assess if the polyphenolic fraction from aerial parts of T. pterocarpus may change the biological properties of blood platelets activated by thrombin. We used cytochrome c reduction method to test the ability of this fraction to change [Formula: see text](·) generation in platelets. Arachidonic acid metabolism was measured by the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and by the production of 8-epi-prostaglandin (8-EPI) F(2). Moreover, we determined the effects of the fraction on blood platelet aggregation induced by thrombin. We observed that the polyphenolic fraction from T. pterocarpus reduced [Formula: see text](·), 8-EPI and TBARS production in these cells. The ability of the fraction to decrease the [Formula: see text](·) generation in blood platelets supports the importance of free radicals in platelet functions, including aggregation process. This study may suggest that the tested plant fraction might be a good candidate for protecting blood platelets against changes of their biological functions, which may be associated with the pathogenesis of different cardiovascular disorders.

  2. SWIFT-scalable clustering for automated identification of rare cell populations in large, high-dimensional flow cytometry datasets, part 2: biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mosmann, Tim R; Naim, Iftekhar; Rebhahn, Jonathan; Datta, Suprakash; Cavenaugh, James S; Weaver, Jason M; Sharma, Gaurav

    2014-05-01

    A multistage clustering and data processing method, SWIFT (detailed in a companion manuscript), has been developed to detect rare subpopulations in large, high-dimensional flow cytometry datasets. An iterative sampling procedure initially fits the data to multidimensional Gaussian distributions, then splitting and merging stages use a criterion of unimodality to optimize the detection of rare subpopulations, to converge on a consistent cluster number, and to describe non-Gaussian distributions. Probabilistic assignment of cells to clusters, visualization, and manipulation of clusters by their cluster medians, facilitate application of expert knowledge using standard flow cytometry programs. The dual problems of rigorously comparing similar complex samples, and enumerating absent or very rare cell subpopulations in negative controls, were solved by assigning cells in multiple samples to a cluster template derived from a single or combined sample. Comparison of antigen-stimulated and control human peripheral blood cell samples demonstrated that SWIFT could identify biologically significant subpopulations, such as rare cytokine-producing influenza-specific T cells. A sensitivity of better than one part per million was attained in very large samples. Results were highly consistent on biological replicates, yet the analysis was sensitive enough to show that multiple samples from the same subject were more similar than samples from different subjects. A companion manuscript (Part 1) details the algorithmic development of SWIFT.

  3. Development of drug loaded nanoparticles for tumor targeting. Part 1: synthesis, characterization, and biological evaluation in 2D cell cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Dakdouki, Mohammad H.; Puré, Ellen; Huang, Xuefei

    2013-04-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are being extensively studied as carriers for drug delivery, but they often have limited penetration inside tumors. We envision that by targeting an endocytic receptor on the cell surface, the uptake of NPs can be significantly enhanced through receptor mediated endocytosis. In addition, if the receptor is recycled to the cell surface, the NP cargo can be transported out of the cells, which is then taken up by neighboring cells thus enhancing solid tumor penetration. To validate our hypothesis, in the first of two articles, we report the synthesis of doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded, hyaluronan (HA) coated silica nanoparticles (SNPs) containing a highly fluorescent core to target CD44, a receptor expressed on the cancer cell surface. HA was conjugated onto amine-functionalized SNPs prepared through an oil-water microemulsion method. The immobilization of the cytotoxic drug DOX was achieved through an acid sensitive hydrazone linkage. The NPs were fully characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), zeta potential measurements, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), UV-vis absorbance, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Initial biological evaluation experiments demonstrated that compared to ligand-free SNPs, the uptake of HA-SNPs by the CD44-expressing SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells was significantly enhanced when evaluated in the 2D monolayer cell culture. Mechanistic studies suggested that cellular uptake of HA-SNPs was mainly through CD44 mediated endocytosis. HA-SNPs with immobilized DOX were endocytosed efficiently by the SKOV-3 cells as well. The enhanced tumor penetration and drug delivery properties of HA-SNPs will be evaluated in 3D tumor models in the subsequent paper.Nanoparticles (NPs) are being extensively studied as carriers for drug delivery, but they often have limited penetration inside tumors. We envision that by targeting an endocytic receptor on the cell surface, the uptake of NPs can be

  4. Mechanisms controlling primary and new production in a global ecosystem model - Part I: Validation of the biological simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, E. E.; Coward, A. C.; Nurser, G. A.; de Cuevas, B.; Fasham, M. J. R.; Anderson, T. R.

    2006-12-01

    A global general circulation model coupled to a simple six-compartment ecosystem model is used to study the extent to which global variability in primary and export production can be realistically predicted on the basis of advanced parameterizations of upper mixed layer physics, without recourse to introducing extra complexity in model biology. The "K profile parameterization" (KPP) scheme employed, combined with 6-hourly external forcing, is able to capture short-term periodic and episodic events such as diurnal cycling and storm-induced deepening. The model realistically reproduces various features of global ecosystem dynamics that have been problematic in previous global modelling studies, using a single generic parameter set. The realistic simulation of deep convection in the North Atlantic, and lack of it in the North Pacific and Southern Oceans, leads to good predictions of chlorophyll and primary production in these contrasting areas. Realistic levels of primary production are predicted in the oligotrophic gyres due to high frequency external forcing of the upper mixed layer (accompanying paper Popova et al., 2006) and novel parameterizations of zooplankton excretion. Good agreement is shown between model and observations at various JGOFS time series sites: BATS, KERFIX, Papa and HOT. One exception is the northern North Atlantic where lower grazing rates are needed, perhaps related to the dominance of mesozooplankton there. The model is therefore not globally robust in the sense that additional parameterizations are needed to realistically simulate ecosystem dynamics in the North Atlantic. Nevertheless, the work emphasises the need to pay particular attention to the parameterization of mixed layer physics in global ocean ecosystem modelling as a prerequisite to increasing the complexity of ecosystem models.

  5. LASER BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE: A laser-spectroscopy system for fluorescent diagnostics and photodynamic therapy of diseases of eye retina and choroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerovich, G. A.; Shevchik, S. A.; Loshchenov, M. V.; Budzinskaya, M. V.; Ermakova, N. A.; Kharnas, S. S.

    2002-11-01

    A laser-spectroscopy system for the fluorescent diagnostics and photodynamic therapy of pathologic eye-fundus changes combined with the use of the Photosens compound is developed. The system is tested on experimental animals (mice and rabbits).

  6. The effect of post-sintering treatments on the fatigue and biological behavior of Ti-6Al-4V ELI parts made by selective laser melting.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, M; Torresani, E; Leoni, M; Fontanari, V; Bandini, M; Pederzolli, C; Potrich, C

    2017-03-28

    Fatigue resistance and biocompatibility are key parameters for the successful implantation of hard-tissue prostheses, which nowadays are more and more frequently manufactured by selective laser melting (SLM). For this purpose, the present paper is aimed at investigating the effect of post-sintering treatments on the fatigue behavior and biological properties of Ti samples produced by SLM. After the building process, all samples are heat treated to achieve a complete stress relief. The remaining ones are tribofinished with the aim of reducing the surface roughness of the as-sintered condition. Part of the tribofinished samples are then subjected to one of the following post-sintering treatments: (i) shot peening, (ii) hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and (iii) electropolishing. It is found that shot peening and HIP are the most effective treatments to improve the high and the very-high cycle fatigue resistance, respectively. At the same time, they preserve the good biocompatibility ensured by the biomedical Titanium Grade 23.

  7. In response to an open invitation for comments on AAAS project 2061's Benchmark books on science. Part 1: documentation of serious errors in cell biology.

    PubMed

    Ling, Gilbert

    2006-01-01

    Project 2061 was founded by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) to improve secondary school science education. An in-depth study of ten 9 to 12th grade biology textbooks led to the verdict that none conveyed "Big Ideas" that would give coherence and meaning to the profusion of lavishly illustrated isolated details. However, neither the Project report itself nor the Benchmark books put out earlier by the Project carries what deserves the designation of "Big Ideas." Worse, in the two earliest-published Benchmark books, the basic unit of all life forms--the living cell--is described as a soup enclosed by a cell membrane, that determines what can enter or leave the cell. This is astonishing since extensive experimental evidence has unequivocally disproved this idea 60 years ago. A "new" version of the membrane theory brought in to replace the discredited (sieve) version is the pump model--currently taught as established truth in all high-school and college biology textbooks--was also unequivocally disproved 40 years ago. This comment is written partly in response to Bechmark's gracious open invitation for ideas to improve the books and through them, to improve US secondary school science education.

  8. Synthesis, spectroscopy, thermal analysis, magnetic properties and biological activity studies of Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes with Schiff base dye ligands.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Raziyeh Arab; Amani, Saeid

    2012-05-29

    Three azo group-containing Schiff base ligands, namely 1-{3-[(3-hydroxypropylimino) methyl]-4-hydroxyphenylazo}-4-nitrobenzene (2a), 1-{3-[(3-hydroxypropylimino) methyl]-4-hydroxyphenylazo}-2-chloro-4-nitrobenzene (2b) and 1-{3-[(3-hydroxypropylimino) methyl]-4-hydroxyphenylazo}-4-chloro-3-nitrobenzene (2c) were prepared. The ligands were characterized by elemental analysis, FTIR spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, ¹³C- and ¹H-NMR spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. Next the corresponding copper(II) and cobalt(II) metal complexes were synthesized and characterized by the physicochemical and spectroscopic methods of elemental analysis, FTIR spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, magnetic moment measurements, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and (DSC). The room temperature effective magnetic moments of complexes are 1.45, 1.56, 1.62, 2.16, 2.26 and 2.80 B.M. for complexes 3a, 3b, 3c, 4a 4b, and 4c, respectively, indicating that the complexes are paramagnetic with considerable electronic communication between the two metal centers.

  9. CAREERS IN BIOLOGY EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KLINGE, PAUL

    THIS ENTIRE JOURNAL IS DEVOTED TO ARTICLES WHICH DESCRIBE VARIOUS CAREERS IN BIOLOGY EDUCATION. PART 1 CONTAINS ARTICLES ON CLASSROOM CAREERS IN BIOLOGY EDUCATION. THE ARTICLES DISCUSS (1) BIOLOGY TEACHING AT VARIOUS EDUCATIONAL LEVELS, (2) THE BIOLOGY TEACHER AS A RESEARCHER, AND (3) TEACHER AIDES FOR SCIENCE PROGRAMS. PART 2 PRESENTS ARTICLES ON…

  10. Biotechnology of flavonoids and other phenylpropanoid-derived natural products. Part I: Chemical diversity, impacts on plant biology and human health.

    PubMed

    Ververidis, Filippos; Trantas, Emmanouil; Douglas, Carl; Vollmer, Guenter; Kretzschmar, Georg; Panopoulos, Nickolas

    2007-10-01

    Plant natural products derived from phenylalanine and the phenylpropanoid pathway are impressive in their chemical diversity and are the result of plant evolution, which has selected for the acquisition of large repertoires of pigments, structural and defensive compounds, all derived from a phenylpropanoid backbone via the plant-specific phenylpropanoid pathway. These compounds are important in plant growth, development and responses to environmental stresses and thus can have large impacts on agricultural productivity. While plant-based medicines containing phenylpropanoid-derived active components have long been used by humans, the benefits of specific flavonoids and other phenylpropanoid-derived compounds to human health and their potential for long-term health benefits have been only recognized more recently. In this part of the review, we discuss the diversity and biosynthetic origins of phenylpropanoids and particularly of the flavonoid and stilbenoid natural products. We then review data pertaining to the modes of action and biological properties of these compounds, referring on their effects on human health and physiology and their roles as plant defense and antimicrobial compounds. This review continues in Part II discussing the use of biotechnological tools targeting the rational reconstruction of multienzyme pathways in order to modify the production of such compounds in plants and model microbial systems for the benefit of agriculture and forestry.

  11. Toxic essential oils. Part IV: The essential oil of Achillea falcata L. as a source of biologically/pharmacologically active trans-sabinyl esters.

    PubMed

    Radulović, Niko S; Mladenović, Marko Z; Randjelovic, Pavle J; Stojanović, Nikola M; Dekić, Milan S; Blagojević, Polina D

    2015-06-01

    Herein we report on the comprehensive chemical analysis of the essential oils obtained from above- and underground parts of a previously unreported chemotype of Achillea falcata L. (Asteraceae) and, for the first time, on the biological/toxicological profile of its dominant/newly discovered volatile metabolites. Detailed spectral analyses, in combination with chemical synthesis and theoretical study, of selected constituents, enabled the identification of trans-sabinol and its esters - the formate, tiglate (new compounds), acetate, butanoate, isobutanoate, 2-methylbutanoate and 3-methylbutanoate - in both aerial and underground parts of A. falcata. Evaluation of acute toxicity in Artemia salina model, in vitro and in silico (molecular docking) evaluation of acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity and in vivo (mice) evaluation of antinociceptive activity (hot plate, tail immersion and acetylcholine-induced abdominal writhing tests) of trans-sabinol and its esters suggested that they may interact with different targets in crustacean/mammalian organisms. Alongside moderate acute toxicity (LD50 (48 h) = 0.03-0.26 mmol/L), the tested compounds exert influence on both the peripheral and central nervous systems (in the hot plate test, trans-sabinyl tiglate, at 50 mg/kg, produced a 140% baseline increase 15 min after the treatment) and to moderately inhibit acetylcholinesterase (at the concentration of 20 µg/mL, these compounds caused a reduction of acetylcholinesterase activity up to 40%). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Delineating pMDI model reactions with loblolly pine via solution-state NMR spectroscopy. Part 1, Catalyzed reactions with wood models and wood polymers

    Treesearch

    Daniel J. Yelle; John Ralph; Charles R. Frihart

    2011-01-01

    To better understand adhesive interactions with wood, reactions between model compounds of wood and a model compound of polymeric methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (pMDI) were characterized by solution-state NMR spectroscopy. For comparison, finely ground loblolly pine sapwood, milled-wood lignin and holocellulose from the same wood were isolated and derivatized with...

  13. Quantum Effects in Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohseni, Masoud; Omar, Yasser; Engel, Gregory S.; Plenio, Martin B.

    2014-08-01

    List of contributors; Preface; Part I. Introduction: 1. Quantum biology: introduction Graham R. Fleming and Gregory D. Scholes; 2. Open quantum system approaches to biological systems Alireza Shabani, Masoud Mohseni, Seogjoo Jang, Akihito Ishizaki, Martin Plenio, Patrick Rebentrost, Alàn Aspuru-Guzik, Jianshu Cao, Seth Lloyd and Robert Silbey; 3. Generalized Förster resonance energy transfer Seogjoo Jang, Hoda Hossein-Nejad and Gregory D. Scholes; 4. Multidimensional electronic spectroscopy Tomáš Mančal; Part II. Quantum Effects in Bacterial Photosynthetic Energy Transfer: 5. Structure, function, and quantum dynamics of pigment protein complexes Ioan Kosztin and Klaus Schulten; 6. Direct observation of quantum coherence Gregory S. Engel; 7. Environment-assisted quantum transport Masoud Mohseni, Alàn Aspuru-Guzik, Patrick Rebentrost, Alireza Shabani, Seth Lloyd, Susana F. Huelga and Martin B. Plenio; Part III. Quantum Effects in Higher Organisms and Applications: 8. Excitation energy transfer in higher plants Elisabet Romero, Vladimir I. Novoderezhkin and Rienk van Grondelle; 9. Electron transfer in proteins Spiros S. Skourtis; 10. A chemical compass for bird navigation Ilia A. Solov'yov, Thorsten Ritz, Klaus Schulten and Peter J. Hore; 11. Quantum biology of retinal Klaus Schulten and Shigehiko Hayashi; 12. Quantum vibrational effects on sense of smell A. M. Stoneham, L. Turin, J. C. Brookes and A. P. Horsfield; 13. A perspective on possible manifestations of entanglement in biological systems Hans J. Briegel and Sandu Popescu; 14. Design and applications of bio-inspired quantum materials Mohan Sarovar, Dörthe M. Eisele and K. Birgitta Whaley; 15. Coherent excitons in carbon nanotubes Leonas Valkunas and Darius Abramavicius; Glossary; References; Index.

  14. The Compositional Evolution of C/2012 S1 (ISON) from Ground-Based High-Resolution Infrared Spectroscopy as Part of a Worldwide Observing Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russo, N. Dello; Vervack, R. J., Jr.; Kawakita, H.; Cochran, A.; McKay, A. J.; Harris, W. M.; Weaver, H.A.; Lisse, C. M.; DiSanti, M. A.; Kobayashi, H.

    2015-01-01

    Volatile production rates, relative abundances, rotational temperatures, and spatial distributions in the coma were measured in C/2012 S1 (ISON) using long-slit high-dispersion (lambda/delta lambda approximately 2.5 times 10 (sup 4)) infrared spectroscopy as part of a worldwide observing campaign. Spectra were obtained on Universal Time 2013 October 26 and 28 with NIRSPEC (Near Infrared Spectrometer) at the W.M. Keck Observatory, and Universal Time 2013 November 19 and 20 with CSHELL (Cryogenic Echelle Spectrograph) at the NASA IRTF (Infrared Telescope Facility). H2O was detected on all dates, with production rates increasing markedly from (8.7 plus or minus 1.5) times 10 (sup 27) molecules per second on October 26 (Heliocentric Distance = 1.12 Astronomical Units) to (3.7 plus or minus 0.4) times 10 (sup 29) molecules per second on November 20 (Heliocentric Distance = 0.43 Astronomical Units). Short-term variability of H2O production is also seen as observations on November 19 show an increase in H2O production rate of nearly a factor of two over a period of about 6 hours. C2H6, CH3OH and CH4 abundances in ISON (International Scientific Optical Network) are slightly depleted relative to H2O when compared to mean values for comets measured at infrared wavelengths. On the November dates, C2H2, HCN and OCS abundances relative to H2O appear to be within the range of mean values, whereas H2CO and NH3 were significantly enhanced. There is evidence that the abundances with respect to H2O increased for some species but not others between October 28 (Heliocentric Distance = 1.07 Astronomical Units) and November 19 (Heliocentric Distance = 0.46 Astronomical Units). The high mixing ratios of H2CO to CH3OH and C2H2 to C2H6 on November 19, and changes in the mixing ratios of some species with respect to H2O between October 28 to November 19, indicates compositional changes that may be the result of a transition from sampling radiation-processed outer layers in this dynamically

  15. The Compositional Evolution of C/2012 S1 (ISON) from Ground-Based High-Resolution Infrared Spectroscopy as Part of a Worldwide Observing Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russo, N. Dello; Vervack, R. J., Jr.; Kawakita, H.; Cochran, A.; McKay, A. J.; Harris, W. M.; Weaver, H.A.; Lisse, C. M.; DiSanti, M. A.; Kobayashi, H.

    2015-01-01

    Volatile production rates, relative abundances, rotational temperatures, and spatial distributions in the coma were measured in C/2012 S1 (ISON) using long-slit high-dispersion (lambda/delta lambda approximately 2.5 times 10 (sup 4)) infrared spectroscopy as part of a worldwide observing campaign. Spectra were obtained on Universal Time 2013 October 26 and 28 with NIRSPEC (Near Infrared Spectrometer) at the W.M. Keck Observatory, and Universal Time 2013 November 19 and 20 with CSHELL (Cryogenic Echelle Spectrograph) at the NASA IRTF (Infrared Telescope Facility). H2O was detected on all dates, with production rates increasing markedly from (8.7 plus or minus 1.5) times 10 (sup 27) molecules per second on October 26 (Heliocentric Distance = 1.12 Astronomical Units) to (3.7 plus or minus 0.4) times 10 (sup 29) molecules per second on November 20 (Heliocentric Distance = 0.43 Astronomical Units). Short-term variability of H2O production is also seen as observations on November 19 show an increase in H2O production rate of nearly a factor of two over a period of about 6 hours. C2H6, CH3OH and CH4 abundances in ISON (International Scientific Optical Network) are slightly depleted relative to H2O when compared to mean values for comets measured at infrared wavelengths. On the November dates, C2H2, HCN and OCS abundances relative to H2O appear to be within the range of mean values, whereas H2CO and NH3 were significantly enhanced. There is evidence that the abundances with respect to H2O increased for some species but not others between October 28 (Heliocentric Distance = 1.07 Astronomical Units) and November 19 (Heliocentric Distance = 0.46 Astronomical Units). The high mixing ratios of H2CO to CH3OH and C2H2 to C2H6 on November 19, and changes in the mixing ratios of some species with respect to H2O between October 28 to November 19, indicates compositional changes that may be the result of a transition from sampling radiation-processed outer layers in this dynamically

  16. The compositional evolution of C/2012 S1 (ISON) from ground-based high-resolution infrared spectroscopy as part of a worldwide observing campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dello Russo, N.; Vervack, R. J.; Kawakita, H.; Cochran, A.; McKay, A. J.; Harris, W. M.; Weaver, H. A.; Lisse, C. M.; DiSanti, M. A.; Kobayashi, H.; Biver, N.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Crovisier, J.; Opitom, C.; Jehin, E.

    2016-03-01

    Volatile production rates, relative abundances, rotational temperatures, and spatial distributions in the coma were measured in C/2012 S1 (ISON) using long-slit high-dispersion (λ/Δλ ∼ 2.5 × 104) infrared spectroscopy as part of a worldwide observing campaign. Spectra were obtained on UT 2013 October 26 and 28 with NIRSPEC at the W.M. Keck Observatory, and UT 2013 November 19 and 20 with CSHELL at the NASA IRTF. H2O was detected on all dates, with production rates increasing markedly from (8.7 ± 1.5) × 1027 molecules s-1 on October 26 (Rh = 1.12 AU) to (3.7 ± 0.4) × 1029 molecules s-1 on November 20 (Rh = 0.43 AU). Short-term variability of H2O production is also seen as observations on November 19 show an increase in H2O production rate of nearly a factor of two over a period of about 6 h. C2H6, CH3OH and CH4 abundances in ISON are slightly depleted relative to H2O when compared to mean values for comets measured at infrared wavelengths. On the November dates, C2H2, HCN and OCS abundances relative to H2O appear to be within the range of mean values, whereas H2CO and NH3 were significantly enhanced. There is evidence that the abundances with respect to H2O increased for some species but not others between October 28 (Rh = 1.07 AU) and November 19 (Rh = 0.46 AU). The high mixing ratios of H2CO/CH3OH and C2H2/C2H6 on November 19, and changes in the mixing ratios of some species with respect to H2O between October 28 to November 19, indicates compositional changes that may be the result of a transition from sampling radiation-processed outer layers in this dynamically new comet to sampling more pristine natal material as the outer processed layer was increasingly eroded and the thermal wave propagated into the nucleus as the comet approached perihelion for the first time. On November 19 and 20, the spatial distribution for dust appears asymmetric and enhanced in the antisolar direction, whereas spatial distributions for volatiles (excepting CN) appear

  17. 15N-CPMAS nuclear magnetic resonace spectroscopy and biological stability of soil organic nitrogen in whole soil and particle-size fractions

    Treesearch

    R.J. DiCosty; D.P. Weliky; S.J. Anderson; E.A. Paul

    2003-01-01

    Soil organic nitrogen was quantified by solid-state 15N cross-polarization nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) during a 14-month laboratory incubation of a sandy loam soil amended with 15N-clover. In whole soil and particle-size fractions, the clover-derived N was always 85-90% amide, 5 10% guanidinium N of...

  18. In Situ Adsorption Studies at the Solid/Liquid Interface:Characterization of Biological Surfaces and Interfaces Using SumFrequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy,and Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Diana Christine

    2006-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) have been used to study the molecular surface structure, surface topography and mechanical properties, and quantitative adsorbed amount of biological molecules at the solid-liquid interface. The molecular-level behavior of designed peptides adsorbed on hydrophobic polystyrene and hydrophilic silica substrates has been examined as a model of protein adsorption on polymeric biomaterial surfaces. Proteins are such large and complex molecules that it is difficult to identify the features in their structure that lead to adsorption and interaction with solid surfaces. Designed peptides which possess secondary structure provide simple model systems for understanding protein adsorption. Depending on the amino acid sequence of a peptide, different secondary structures (α-helix and β-sheet) can be induced at apolar (air/liquid or air/solid) interfaces. Having a well-defined secondary structure allows experiments to be carried out under controlled conditions, where it is possible to investigate the affects of peptide amino acid sequence and chain length, concentration, buffering effects, etc. on adsorbed peptide structure. The experiments presented in this dissertation demonstrate that SFG vibrational spectroscopy can be used to directly probe the interaction of adsorbing biomolecules with a surface or interface. The use of well designed model systems aided in isolation of the SFG signal of the adsorbing species, and showed that surface functional groups of the substrate are sensitive to surface adsorbates. The complementary techniques of AFM and QCM allowed for deconvolution of the effects of surface topography and coverage from the observed SFG spectra. Initial studies of biologically relevant surfaces are also presented: SFG spectroscopy was used to study the surface composition of common soil bacteria for use in bioremediation of nuclear waste.

  19. Determination of a biological absorber depth utilizing multiple source-detector separations and multiple frequency values of near-infrared time-resolved spectroscopy

    PubMed

    Hemelt; Kang

    1999-07-01

    Visualization of the photon path in scattering media is attempted through the use of frequency response analysis of near-infrared time-resolved spectroscopy (NIR-TRS) spectra. The effect of the source-detector distances and the modulation frequency on the photon path is examined. It was found that the use of multifrequency information could lead to the possibility of obtaining the information of an absorber's depth without increasing the number of measurements.

  20. A novel hybrid tobacco product that delivers a tobacco flavour note with vapour aerosol (Part 2): In vitro biological assessment and comparison with different tobacco-heating products.

    PubMed

    Breheny, Damien; Adamson, Jason; Azzopardi, David; Baxter, Andrew; Bishop, Emma; Carr, Tony; Crooks, Ian; Hewitt, Katherine; Jaunky, Tomasz; Larard, Sophie; Lowe, Frazer; Oke, Oluwatobiloba; Taylor, Mark; Santopietro, Simone; Thorne, David; Zainuddin, Benjamin; Gaça, Marianna; Liu, Chuan; Murphy, James; Proctor, Christopher

    2017-08-01

    This study assessed the toxicological and biological responses of aerosols from a novel hybrid tobacco product. Toxicological responses from the hybrid tobacco product were compared to those from a commercially available Tobacco Heating Product (c-THP), a prototype THP (p-THP) and a 3R4F reference cigarette, using in vitro test methods which were outlined as part of a framework to substantiate the risk reduction potential of novel tobacco and nicotine products. Exposure matrices used included total particulate matter (TPM), whole aerosol (WA), and aqueous aerosol extracts (AqE) obtained after machine-puffing the test products under the Health Canada Intense smoking regime. Levels of carbonyls and nicotine in these matrices were measured to understand the aerosol dosimetry of the products. The hybrid tobacco product tested negative across the in vitro assays including mutagenicity, genotoxicity, cytotoxicity, tumour promotion, oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. All the THPs tested demonstrated significantly reduced responses in these in vitro assays when compared to 3R4F. The findings suggest these products have the potential for reduced health risks. Further pre-clinical and clinical assessments are required to substantiate the risk reduction of these novel products at individual and population levels. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Automated system for the on-line monitoring of powder blending processes using near-infrared spectroscopy. Part I. System development and control.

    PubMed

    Hailey, P A; Doherty, P; Tapsell, P; Oliver, T; Aldridge, P K

    1996-03-01

    An automated system for the on-line monitoring of powder blending processes is described. The system employs near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy using fibre-optics and a graphical user interface (GUI) developed in the LabVIEW environment. The complete supervisory control and data analysis (SCADA) software controls blender and spectrophotometer operation and performs statistical spectral data analysis in real time. A data analysis routine using standard deviation is described to demonstrate an approach to the real-time determination of blend homogeneity.

  2. Studies of the electronic structure and biological activity of chosen 1,4-benzodiazepines by 35Cl NQR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronisz, K.; Ostafin, M.; Poleshchuk, O. Kh.; Mielcarek, J.; Nogaj, B.

    2006-11-01

    Selected derivatives of 1,4-benzodiazepine: lorazepam, lormetazepam, oxazepam and temazepam, used as active substances in anxiolytic drugs, have been studied by 35Cl NQR method in order to find the correlation between electronic structure and biological activity. The 35Cl NQR resonance frequencies ( νQ) measured at 77 K have been correlated with the following parameters characterising their biological activity: biological half-life period ( t0.5), affinity to benzodiazepine receptor (IC 50) and mean dose equivalent. The results of experimental study of some benzodiazepine derivatives by nuclear quadrupole resonance of 35Cl nuclei are compared with theoretical results based on DFT calculations which were carried out by means of Gaussian'98 W software.

  3. BIOLOGICAL WARFARE

    PubMed Central

    Beeston, John

    1953-01-01

    The use of biological agents as controlled weapons of war is practical although uncertain. Three types of agents are feasible, including pathogenic organisms and biological pests, toxins, and synthetic hormones regulating plant growth. These agents may be chosen for selective effects varying from prolonged incipient illness to death of plants, man and domestic animals. For specific preventive and control measures required to combat these situations, there must be careful and detailed planning. The nucleus of such a program is available within the existing framework of public health activities. Additional research and expansion of established activities in time of attack are necessary parts of biological warfare defense. PMID:13059641

  4. Degradation of all-vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFB) investigated by electrochemical impedance and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: Part 2 electrochemical degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derr, Igor; Bruns, Michael; Langner, Joachim; Fetyan, Abdulmonem; Melke, Julia; Roth, Christina

    2016-09-01

    Electrochemical degradation (ED) of carbon felt electrodes was investigated by cycling of a flow through all-vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) and conducting half-cell measurements with two reference electrodes inside the test bench. ED was detected using half-cell and full-cell electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) at different states of charge (SOC). Reversing the polarity of the battery to recover cell performance was performed with little success. Renewing the electrolyte after a certain amount of cycles restored the capacity of the battery. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals that the amount of surface functional increases by more than a factor of 3 for the negative side as well as for the positive side. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images show a peeling of the fiber surface after cycling the felts, which leads to a loss of electrochemically active surface area (ECSA). Long term cycling shows that ED has a stronger impact on the negative half-cell [V(II)/V(III)] than the positive half-cell [V(IV)/V(V)] and that the negative half-cell is the rate-determining half-cell for the VRFB.

  5. Klimt artwork (Part II): material investigation by backscattering Fe-57 Mössbauer- and Raman- spectroscopy, SEM and p-XRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, B. F. O.; Lehmann, R.; Wengerowsky, D.; Blumers, M.; Sansano, A.; Rull, F.; Schmidt, H.-J.; Dencker, F.; Niebur, A.; Klingelhöfer, G.; Sindelar, R.; Renz, F.

    2016-12-01

    In a rediscovered Klimt-artwork " Trompetender Putto" material tests have been conducted. We report studies on different points of the painting. The spots are of different colors, mainly taken in spots of the painting not restaurated. MIMOS II Fe-57 Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed mainly haematite and nano particle oxides in red and red/brown colors. Brown colors also contain crystallized goethite. In brown/ochre colors the same pigments as in brown colors are observed, but there is less quantity of goethite and more quantity of haematite. The green colors show Fe-rich clays, like celadonite or glauconite and or lepidocrocite as main component. Raman spectroscopy revealed cinnabar in red colors of the Scarf; and massicot in brown/ochre points, i.e. in the Left Wing of the "Putto". With scanning electron microscopy, various layers of the original and of overpainting could be recognized. The investigations of sample 1 show three layers of colored materials, which were identified as zinc-white, cinnabar and galena as well as carbon compounds. In sample 2 four layers could be detected. These are identified (bottom to top) as gypsum and lead-white (layer 1), zinc-white (layer 2), lead-white and cinnabar (layer 3) and titanium-white (layer 4). The elementary composition was examined with the portable X-ray-fluorescence analysis for qualitative manner at different points.

  6. Applications of FT-IR spectroscopy to the studies of esterification and crosslinking of cellulose by polycarboxylic acids: Part II. The performance of the crosslinked cotton fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Weishu; Yang, Charles Q.

    1998-06-01

    Durable press finishing processes are commonly used in the textile industry to produce wrinkle-free cotton fabrics and garments. A durable press finishing agent forms covalent bands with cellulosic hydroxyl groups, thus crosslinking the cellulose molecules. The crosslinking of cellulose increases wrinkle resistance of the treated cotton fabric and reduces fabric mechanical strength. Wrinkle recovery angle (WRA) and tensile strength are the two most important parameters used to evaluate the performance of the crosslinked cotton fabrics and garments. In this study, we investigated the correlation between WRA and tensile strength on one hand, and the amount of crosslinkages formed by the crosslinking agents including dimethyloldihydroxylethyleneurea (DMDHEU) and 1,2,3,4-butanetetracarboxylic acid (BTCA) determined by FT-IR spectroscopy on the other hand. Linear regression curves between the carbonyl band absorbance, and WRA and tensile strength of the treated cotton fabric were developed. The data indicated that FT-IR spectroscopy is a reliable technique for predicting the performance of durable press finished cotton fabrics, therefore can be used as a convenient instrumental method for quality control in the textile and garment industry.

  7. Fast time-resolved i.r. spectroscopy of biological molecules in aqueous solution: The reaction kinetics of myoglobin with carbon monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Andrew J.; Glyn, Paul; Healy, Michael A.; Hodges, P. Michael; Jenkins, Timothy; Poliakoff, Martyn; Turner, James J.

    The recombination of myoglobin (Mb) and CO, generated by the u.v. flash photolysis of carboxymyoglobin (MbCO) is monitored by time-resolved i.r. spectroscopy (TRIR) on a microsecond timescale. The TRIR measurements are made on the ν(CO) i.r. band of MbCO centered at 1945 cm -1. Experiments have been performed over a wide range of concentrations of both Mb and CO and the rate constants derived are in excellent agreement with those obtained by conventional flash photolysis. The results represent a significant improvement in sensitivity over previous i.r. experiments of this type.

  8. Investigation of statistics strategies for improving the discriminating power of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for chemical and biological warfare agent simulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munson, Chase A.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Piehler, Thuvan; McNesby, Kevin L.; Miziolek, Andrzej W.

    2005-08-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy spectra of bacterial spores, molds, pollens and nerve agent simulants have been acquired. The performance of several statistical methodologies-linear correlation, principal components analysis, and soft independent model of class analogy-has been evaluated for their ability to differentiate between the various samples. The effect of data selection (total spectra, peak intensities, and intensity ratios) and pre-treatments (e.g., averaging) on the statistical models have also been studied. Results indicate the use of spectral averaging and weighting schemes may be used to significantly improve sample differentiation.

  9. Electronic Spectroscopy & Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Maroncelli, Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-06-08

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Electronic Spectroscopy and Dynamics was held at Colby College, Waterville, NH from 07/19/2009 thru 07/24/2009. The Conference was well-attended with participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. The GRC on Electronic Spectroscopy & Dynamics showcases some of the most recent experimental and theoretical developments in electronic spectroscopy that probes the structure and dynamics of isolated molecules, molecules embedded in clusters and condensed phases, and bulk materials. Electronic spectroscopy is an important tool in many fields of research, and this GRC brings together experts having diverse backgrounds in physics, chemistry, biophysics, and materials science, making the meeting an excellent opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of ideas and techniques. Topics covered in this GRC include high-resolution spectroscopy, biological molecules in the gas phase, electronic structure theory for excited states, multi-chromophore and single-molecule spectroscopies, and excited state dynamics in chemical and biological systems.

  10. Photoacoustic spectroscopy for chemical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holthoff, Ellen L.; Pellegrino, Paul M.

    2012-06-01

    The Global War on Terror has made rapid detection and identification of chemical and biological agents a priority for Military and Homeland Defense applications. Reliable real-time detection of these threats is complicated by our enemy's use of a diverse range of materials. Therefore, an adaptable platform is necessary. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is a useful monitoring technique that is well suited for trace detection of gaseous media. This method routinely exhibits detection limits at the parts-per-billion (ppb) or sub-ppb range. The versatility of PAS also allows for the investigation of solid and liquid analytes. Current research utilizes quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) in combination with an air-coupled solid-phase photoacoustic cell design for the detection of condensed phase material films deposited on a surface. Furthermore, variation of the QCL pulse repetition rate allows for identification and molecular discrimination of analytes based solely on photoacoustic spectra collected at different film depths.

  11. Metalloprotein structures at ambient conditions and in real-time: biological crystallography and spectroscopy using X-ray free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kern, Jan; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko

    2015-09-02

    We have studied the structure of enzymes and the chemistry at the catalytic sites, intensively and have acquired an understanding of the atomic-scale chemistry which requires a new approach beyond steady state X-ray crystallography and X-ray spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures. Following the dynamic changes in the geometric and electronic structure of metallo-enzymes at ambient conditions, while overcoming the severe X-ray-induced changes to the redox active catalytic center, is key for deriving reaction mechanisms. Such studies become possible by the intense and ultra-short femtosecond (fs) X-ray pulses from an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) by acquiring a signal before the sample is destroyed. Our review describes the recent and pioneering uses of XFELs to study the protein structure and dynamics of metallo-enzymes using crystallography and scattering, as well as the chemical structure and dynamics of the catalytic complexes (charge, spin, and covalency) using spectroscopy during the reaction to understand the electron-transfer processes and elucidate the mechanism.

  12. Metalloprotein structures at ambient conditions and in real-time: biological crystallography and spectroscopy using X-ray free electron lasers

    DOE PAGES

    Kern, Jan; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko

    2015-09-02

    We have studied the structure of enzymes and the chemistry at the catalytic sites, intensively and have acquired an understanding of the atomic-scale chemistry which requires a new approach beyond steady state X-ray crystallography and X-ray spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures. Following the dynamic changes in the geometric and electronic structure of metallo-enzymes at ambient conditions, while overcoming the severe X-ray-induced changes to the redox active catalytic center, is key for deriving reaction mechanisms. Such studies become possible by the intense and ultra-short femtosecond (fs) X-ray pulses from an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) by acquiring a signal before the samplemore » is destroyed. Our review describes the recent and pioneering uses of XFELs to study the protein structure and dynamics of metallo-enzymes using crystallography and scattering, as well as the chemical structure and dynamics of the catalytic complexes (charge, spin, and covalency) using spectroscopy during the reaction to understand the electron-transfer processes and elucidate the mechanism.« less

  13. Metalloprotein structures at ambient conditions and in real-time: biological crystallography and spectroscopy using X-ray free electron lasers

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Jan; Yachandra, Vittal K; Yano, Junko

    2016-01-01

    Although the structure of enzymes and the chemistry at the catalytic sites have been studied intensively, an understanding of the atomic-scale chemistry requires a new approach beyond steady state X-ray crystallography and X-ray spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures. Following the dynamic changes in the geometric and electronic structure of metallo-enzymes at ambient conditions, while overcoming the severe X-ray damage to the redox active catalytic center, is key for deriving reaction mechanisms. Such studies become possible by the intense and ultra-short femtosecond (fs) X-ray pulses from an X-ray free electron by acquiring a signal before the sample is destroyed. This review describes the recent and pioneering uses of XFELs to study the protein structure and dynamics of metallo-enzymes using crystallography, scattering, as well as the chemical structure and dynamics of the catalytic complexes (charge, spin, and covalency) using spectroscopy during the reaction to understand the electron-transfer processes and elucidate the mechanism. PMID:26342144

  14. The structure and function of quinones in biological solar energy transduction: a cyclic voltammetry, EPR, and hyperfine sub-level correlation (HYSCORE) spectroscopy study of model naphthoquinones.

    PubMed

    Coates, Christopher S; Ziegler, Jessica; Manz, Katherine; Good, Jacob; Kang, Bernard; Milikisiyants, Sergey; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Hao, Sijie; Golbeck, John H; Lakshmi, K V

    2013-06-20

    Quinones function as electron transport cofactors in photosynthesis and cellular respiration. The versatility and functional diversity of quinones is primarily due to the diverse midpoint potentials that are tuned by the substituent effects and interactions with surrounding amino acid residues in the binding site in the protein. In the present study, a library of substituted 1,4-naphthoquinones are analyzed by cyclic voltammetry in both protic and aprotic solvents to determine effects of substituent groups and hydrogen bonds on the midpoint potential. We use continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to determine the influence of substituent groups on the electronic properties of the 1,4-naphthoquinone models in an aprotic solvent. The results establish a correlation between the presence of substituent group(s) and the modification of electronic properties and a corresponding shift in the midpoint potential of the naphthoquinone models. Further, we use pulsed EPR spectroscopy to determine the effect of substituent groups on the strength and planarity of the hydrogen bonds of naphthoquinone models in a protic solvent. This study provides support for the tuning of the electronic properties of quinone cofactors by the influence of substituent groups and hydrogen bonding interactions.

  15. The complementary nature of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and angle-resolved x-ray diffraction part II: Analysis of oxides on dental alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerber, S. J.; Barr, T. L.; Mann, G. P.; Brantley, W. A.; Papazoglou, E.; Mitchell, J. C.

    1998-06-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and angle-resolved x-ray diffraction (ARXRD) were used to analyze the oxide layer on three palladium-gallium-based dental casting alloys. The oxide layers were approximately 10 Μm thick. The use of the techniques helped to determine which mechanism was responsible for oxide formation—either (a) oxide layer growth via diffusion of oxygen through the scale to the metal, causing the scale to grow at the metal-oxide interface, or (b) an oxide layer formed by metal ions diffusing through the scale to the surface and reacting with oxygen, causing the scale to grow at the oxide-air interface. The oxide growth mechanisms were correlated to previous layer adhesion results determined with biaxial flexure testing.

  16. Multifrequency EPR Spectroscopy: A Toolkit for the Characterization of Mono- and Di-nuclear Metal Ion Centers in Complex Biological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Graeme R.

    Metalloenzymes are ubiquitous in nature containing complex metal ion cofactors intimately involved in the enzymes' biological function. The application of multifrequency continuous wave and orientation selective pulsed EPR in conjunction with computer simulation and density functional theory calculations has proven to be a powerful toolkit for the geometric and electronic structural characterization of these metal ion cofactors in the resting enzyme, enzyme-substrate and -product complexes, which in turn provides a detailed understanding of the enzymes' catalytic mechanism. In this chapter, a brief description of the multifrequency EPR toolkit used to structurally (geometric and electronic) characterize metal ion binding sites in complex biological systems and its application in the structural characterization of (i) molybdenum containing enzymes and model complexes, (ii) mono- and di-nuclear copper(II) cyclic peptide complexes (marine and synthetic analogues) and (iii) dinuclear metal ion centers in purple acid phosphatases will be presented.

  17. A Unifying Mathematical Framework for Genetic Robustness, Environmental Robustness, Network Robustness and their Trade-off on Phenotype Robustness in Biological Networks Part I: Gene Regulatory Networks in Systems and Evolutionary Biology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Lin, Ying-Po

    2013-01-01

    Robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are ubiquitous systematic properties observed in biological systems at different levels. The underlying principles for robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are universal to both complex biological systems and sophisticated engineering systems. In many biological networks, network robustness should be enough to confer intrinsic robustness in order to tolerate intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic robustness for buffering genetic variations, and environmental robustness for resisting environmental disturbances. With this, the phenotypic stability of biological network can be maintained, thus guaranteeing phenotype robustness. This paper presents a survey on biological systems and then develops a unifying mathematical framework for investigating the principles of both robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation in systems and evolutionary biology. Further, from the unifying mathematical framework, it was discovered that the phenotype robustness criterion for biological networks at different levels relies upon intrinsic robustness + genetic robustness + environmental robustness ≦ network robustness. When this is true, the phenotype robustness can be maintained in spite of intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic variations, and environmental disturbances. Therefore, the trade-offs between intrinsic robustness, genetic robustness, environmental robustness, and network robustness in systems and evolutionary biology can also be investigated through their corresponding phenotype robustness criterion from the systematic point of view.

  18. A Unifying Mathematical Framework for Genetic Robustness, Environmental Robustness, Network Robustness and their Trade-offs on Phenotype Robustness in Biological Networks. Part III: Synthetic Gene Networks in Synthetic Biology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Lin, Ying-Po

    2013-01-01

    Robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are ubiquitous systematic properties that are observed in biological systems at many different levels. The underlying principles for robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are universal to both complex biological systems and sophisticated engineering systems. In many biological networks, network robustness should be large enough to confer: intrinsic robustness for tolerating intrinsic parameter fluctuations; genetic robustness for buffering genetic variations; and environmental robustness for resisting environmental disturbances. Network robustness is needed so phenotype stability of biological network can be maintained, guaranteeing phenotype robustness. Synthetic biology is foreseen to have important applications in biotechnology and medicine; it is expected to contribute significantly to a better understanding of functioning of complex biological systems. This paper presents a unifying mathematical framework for investigating the principles of both robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation for synthetic gene networks in synthetic biology. Further, from the unifying mathematical framework, we found that the phenotype robustness criterion for synthetic gene networks is the following: if intrinsic robustness + genetic robustness + environmental robustness ≦ network robustness, then the phenotype robustness can be maintained in spite of intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic variations, and environmental disturbances. Therefore, the trade-offs between intrinsic robustness, genetic robustness, environmental robustness, and network robustness in synthetic biology can also be investigated through corresponding phenotype robustness criteria from the systematic point of view. Finally, a robust synthetic design that involves network evolution algorithms with desired behavior under intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic variations, and environmental

  19. A Unifying Mathematical Framework for Genetic Robustness, Environmental Robustness, Network Robustness and their Trade-off on Phenotype Robustness in Biological Networks Part I: Gene Regulatory Networks in Systems and Evolutionary Biology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Lin, Ying-Po

    2013-01-01

    Robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are ubiquitous systematic properties observed in biological systems at different levels. The underlying principles for robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are universal to both complex biological systems and sophisticated engineering systems. In many biological networks, network robustness should be enough to confer intrinsic robustness in order to tolerate intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic robustness for buffering genetic variations, and environmental robustness for resisting environmental disturbances. With this, the phenotypic stability of biological network can be maintained, thus guaranteeing phenotype robustness. This paper presents a survey on biological systems and then develops a unifying mathematical framework for investigating the principles of both robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation in systems and evolutionary biology. Further, from the unifying mathematical framework, it was discovered that the phenotype robustness criterion for biological networks at different levels relies upon intrinsic robustness + genetic robustness + environmental robustness ≦ network robustness. When this is true, the phenotype robustness can be maintained in spite of intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic variations, and environmental disturbances. Therefore, the trade-offs between intrinsic robustness, genetic robustness, environmental robustness, and network robustness in systems and evolutionary biology can also be investigated through their corresponding phenotype robustness criterion from the systematic point of view. PMID:23515240

  20. A Unifying Mathematical Framework for Genetic Robustness, Environmental Robustness, Network Robustness and their Trade-offs on Phenotype Robustness in Biological Networks. Part III: Synthetic Gene Networks in Synthetic Biology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Lin, Ying-Po

    2013-01-01

    Robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are ubiquitous systematic properties that are observed in biological systems at many different levels. The underlying principles for robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are universal to both complex biological systems and sophisticated engineering systems. In many biological networks, network robustness should be large enough to confer: intrinsic robustness for tolerating intrinsic parameter fluctuations; genetic robustness for buffering genetic variations; and environmental robustness for resisting environmental disturbances. Network robustness is needed so phenotype stability of biological network can be maintained, guaranteeing phenotype robustness. Synthetic biology is foreseen to have important applications in biotechnology and medicine; it is expected to contribute significantly to a better understanding of functioning of complex biological systems. This paper presents a unifying mathematical framework for investigating the principles of both robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation for synthetic gene networks in synthetic biology. Further, from the unifying mathematical framework, we found that the phenotype robustness criterion for synthetic gene networks is the following: if intrinsic robustness + genetic robustness + environmental robustness ≦ network robustness, then the phenotype robustness can be maintained in spite of intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic variations, and environmental disturbances. Therefore, the trade-offs between intrinsic robustness, genetic robustness, environmental robustness, and network robustness in synthetic biology can also be investigated through corresponding phenotype robustness criteria from the systematic point of view. Finally, a robust synthetic design that involves network evolution algorithms with desired behavior under intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic variations, and environmental

  1. Quarkonium spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Scharre, D.L.

    1981-06-01

    Recent experimental investigations of heavy quark-antiquark bound state systems are reviewed. Results from SPEAR on charmonium spectroscopy and from DORIS and CESR on bottomonium spectroscopy are presented. The current status of the search for top is also discussed.

  2. Ionic strength and composition govern the elasticity of biological membranes. A study of model DMPC bilayers by force- and transmission IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Šegota, Suzana; Vojta, Danijela; Pletikapić, Galja; Baranović, Goran

    2015-02-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy was used to quantify the ion mixture effect of seawater (SW), particularly the contribution of Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) as dominant divalent cations, on the thermotropic phase behaviour of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-posphocholine (DMPC) bilayers. The changed character of the main transition at 24 °C from sharp to gradual in films and the 1 °C shift of the main transition temperature in dispersions reflect the interactions of lipid headgroups with the ions in SW. Force spectroscopy was used to quantify the nanomechanical hardness of a DMPC supported lipid bilayer (SLB). Considering the electrostatic and ion binding equilibrium contributions while systematically probing the SLB in various salt solutions, we showed that ionic strength had a decisive influence on its nanomechanics. The mechanical hardness of DMPC SLBs in the liquid crystalline phase linearly increases with the increasing fraction of all ion-bound lipids in a series of monovalent salt solutions. It also linearly increases in the gel phase but almost three times faster (the corresponding slopes are 4.9 nN/100 mM and 13.32 nN/100 mM, respectively). We also showed that in the presence of divalent ions (Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) the bilayer mechanical hardness was unproportionally increased, and that was accompanied with the decrease of Na(+) ion and increase of Cl(-) ion bound lipids. The underlying process is a cooperative and competitive ion binding in both the gel and the liquid crystalline phase. Bilayer hardness thus turned out to be very sensitive to ionic strength as well as to ionic composition of the surrounding medium. In particular, the indicated correlation helped us to emphasize the colligative properties of SW as a naturally occurring complex ion mixture.

  3. Cobalt complexes with pyrazole ligands as catalyst precursors for the peroxidative oxidation of cyclohexane: X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies and biological applications.

    PubMed

    Silva, Telma F S; Martins, Luísa M D R S; Guedes da Silva, M Fátima C; Kuznetsov, Maxim L; Fernandes, Alexandra R; Silva, Ana; Pan, Chun-Jern; Lee, Jyh-Fu; Hwang, Bing-Joe; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2014-04-01

    [CoCl(μ-Cl)(Hpz(Ph))3]2 (1) and [CoCl2(Hpz(Ph))4] (2) were obtained by reaction of CoCl2 with HC(pz(Ph))3 and Hpz(Ph), respectively (Hpz(Ph)=3-phenylpyrazole). The compounds were isolated as air-stable solids and fully characterized by IR and far-IR spectroscopy, MS(ESI+/-), elemental analysis, cyclic voltammetry (CV), controlled potential electrolysis, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Electrochemical studies showed that 1 and 2 undergo single-electron irreversible Co(II)→Co(III) oxidations and Co(II)→Co(I) reductions at potentials measured by CV, which also allowed, in the case of dinuclear complex 1, the detection of electronic communication between the Co centers through the chloride bridging ligands. The electrochemical behavior of models of 1 and 2 were also investigated by density functional theory (DFT) methods, which indicated that the vertical oxidation of 1 and 2 (that before structural relaxation) affects mostly the chloride and pyrazolyl ligands, whereas adiabatic oxidation (that after the geometry relaxation) and reduction are mostly metal centered. Compounds 1 and 2 and, for comparative purposes, other related scorpionate and pyrazole cobalt complexes, exhibit catalytic activity for the peroxidative oxidation of cyclohexane to cyclohexanol and cyclohexanone under mild conditions (room temperature, aqueous H2O2). In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies indicated that the species derived from complexes 1 and 2 during the oxidation of cyclohexane (i.e., Ox-1 and Ox-2, respectively) are analogous and contain a Co(III) site. Complex 2 showed low in vitro cytotoxicity toward the HCT116 colorectal carcinoma and MCF7 breast adenocarcinoma cell lines.

  4. Vibrational spectroscopy

    Treesearch

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Rajai Atalla

    2010-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy is an important tool in modern chemistry. In the past two decades, thanks to significant improvements in instrumentation and the development of new interpretive tools, it has become increasingly important for studies of lignin. This chapter presents the three important instrumental methods-Raman spectroscopy, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and...

  5. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Presents information on the teaching of nutrition (including new information relating to many current O-level syllabi) and part 16 of a reading list for A- and S-level biology. Also includes a note on using earthworms as a source of material for teaching meiosis. (JN)

  6. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Presents information on the teaching of nutrition (including new information relating to many current O-level syllabi) and part 16 of a reading list for A- and S-level biology. Also includes a note on using earthworms as a source of material for teaching meiosis. (JN)

  7. /sup 18/O isotope effect in /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Part 9. Hydrolysis of benzyl phosphate by phosphatase enzymes and in acidic aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Parente, J.E.; Risley, J.M.; Van Etten, R.L.

    1984-12-26

    The /sup 18/O isotope-induced shifts in /sup 13/C and /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to establish the position of bond cleavage in the phosphatase-catalyzed and acid-catalyzed hydrolysis reactions of benzyl phosphate. The application of the /sup 18/O-isotope effect in NMR spectroscopy affords a continuous, nondestructive assay method for following the kinetics and position of bond cleavage in the hydrolytic process. The technique provides advantages over most discontinuous methods in which the reaction components must be isolated and converted to volatile derivatives prior to analysis. In the present study, (..cap alpha..-/sup 13/C,ester-/sup 18/O)benzyl phosphate and (ester-/sup 18/O)benzyl phosphate were synthesized for use in enzymatic and nonenzymatic studies. Hydrolysis reactions catalyzed by the alkaline phosphatase from E. coli and by the acid phosphatases isolated from human prostate and human liver were all accompanied by cleavage of the substrate phosphorus-oxygen bond consistent with previously postulated mechanisms involving covalent phosphoenzyme intermediates. An extensive study of the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of benzyl phosphate at 75/sup 0/C revealed that the site of bond cleavage is dependent on pH. At pH less than or equal to 1.3, the hydrolysis proceeds with C-O bond cleavage; at 1.3 < pH < 2.0, there is a mixture of C-O and P-O bond scission, the latter progressively predominating as the pH is raised; at pH greater than or equal to 2.0, the hydrolysis proceeds with exclusive P-O bond scission. (S)-(+)-(..cap alpha..-/sup 2/H)Benzyl phosphate was also synthesized. Hydrolysis of this chiral benzyl derivative demonstrated that the acid-catalyzed C-O bond scission of benzyl phosphate proceeds by an A-1 (S/sub N/1) mechanism with 70% racemization and 30% inversion at carbon. 37 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  8. Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy of Hidden Objects, Part I: Interpretation of the Reflection-Absorption-Scattering Fractions in Near-Infrared (NIR) Spectra of Polyethylene Films.

    PubMed

    Pomerantsev, Alexey L; Rodionova, Oxana Ye; Skvortsov, Alexej N

    2017-01-01

    Investigation of a sample covered by an interfering layer is required in many fields, e.g., for process control, biochemical analysis, and many other applications. This study is based on the analysis of spectra collected by near-infrared (NIR) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Each spectrum is a composition of a useful, target spectrum and a spectrum of an interfering layer. To recover the target spectrum, we suggest using a new phenomenological approach, which employs the multivariate curve resolution (MCR) method. In general terms, the problem is very complex. We start with a specific problem of analyzing a system, which consists of several layers of polyethylene (PE) film and underlayer samples with known spectral properties. To separate information originating from PE layers and the target, we modify the system versus both the number of the PE layers as well as the reflectance properties of the target sample. We consider that the interfering spectrum of the layer can be modeled using three components, which can be tentatively called transmission, absorption, and scattering contributions. The novelty of our approach is that we do not remove the reflectance and scattering effects from the spectra, but study them in detail aiming to use this information to recover the target spectrum.

  9. Influence of High Nitrogen Flux on Crystal Quality of Plasma-Assisted MBE Grown GaN Layers Using Raman Spectroscopy: Part-II

    SciTech Connect

    Asghar, M.; Hussain, I.; Islah u din; Saleemi, F.

    2007-05-09

    We have investigated lattice properties of plasma assisted MBE grown hexagonal GaN layers at varying nitrogen and gallium fluxes using Raman spectroscopy. Room temperature Raman spectra of Ga-rich layers and stoichiometric GaN are similar showing excitation modes at 434 cm-1, 567 cm-1 and 729 cm-1 identified as residual laser line, E{sub 2}{sup H} and A1(LO) mode, respectively. Similarity of Ga-rich and stoichiometric GaN layers is interpreted as the indication of comparable crystal quality of both GaN layers. In contrast, Raman scattering associated with N-rich GaN samples mere exhibit a broad band of excitations in the range of 250-650cm-1 leaving out A1(LO) mode. This typical observation along with intensity distribution of the peaks, is correlated with rough surface, bad crystal quality and high concentration of defects. Based on atomic displacement scheme, the broad band is identified as Ga- vacancies.

  10. Biological detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M; McDowell, Andrew F

    2013-02-26

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  11. Biological detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M; McDowell, Andrew F

    2014-04-15

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  12. Biological detector and method

    SciTech Connect

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M.; McDowell, Andrew F.

    2015-11-24

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  13. New emission factors for Australian vegetation fires measured using open-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy - Part 1: Methods and Australian temperate forest fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paton-Walsh, C.; Smith, T. E. L.; Young, E. L.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Guérette, É.-A.

    2014-10-01

    Biomass burning releases trace gases and aerosol particles that significantly affect the composition and chemistry of the atmosphere. Australia contributes approximately 8% of gross global carbon emissions from biomass burning, yet there are few previous measurements of emissions from Australian forest fires available in the literature. This paper describes the results of field measurements of trace gases emitted during hazard reduction burns in Australian temperate forests using open-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In a companion paper, similar techniques are used to characterise the emissions from hazard reduction burns in the savanna regions of the Northern Territory. Details of the experimental methods are explained, including both the measurement set-up and the analysis techniques employed. The advantages and disadvantages of different ways to estimate whole-fire emission factors are discussed and a measurement uncertainty budget is developed. Emission factors for Australian temperate forest fires are measured locally for the first time for many trace gases. Where ecosystem-relevant data are required, we recommend the following emission factors for Australian temperate forest fires (in grams of gas emitted per kilogram of dry fuel burned) which are our mean measured values: 1620 ± 160 g kg-1 of carbon dioxide; 120 ± 20 g kg-1 of carbon monoxide; 3.6 ± 1.1 g kg-1 of methane; 1.3 ± 0.3 g kg-1 of ethylene; 1.7 ± 0.4 g kg-1 of formaldehyde; 2.4 ± 1.2 g kg-1 of methanol; 3.8 ± 1.3 g kg-1 of acetic acid; 0.4 ± 0.2 g kg-1 of formic acid; 1.6 ± 0.6 g kg-1 of ammonia; 0.15 ± 0.09 g kg-1 of nitrous oxide and 0.5 ± 0.2 g kg-1 of ethane.

  14. Near-infrared spectroscopy for intracoronary detection of lipid-rich plaques to understand atherosclerotic plaque biology in man and guide clinical therapy.

    PubMed

    Erlinge, D

    2015-08-01

    Ischaemic heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. The common denominator for plaques causing acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is lipid accumulation, either as a lipid core or lipid pools. An intracoronary imaging device to detect lipid-rich plaques (LRPs) could therefore identify most of the plaques causing ACS and sudden death. Near-infrared spectroscopy combined with intravascular ultrasound (NIRS-IVUS) is a promising new intracoronary imaging method that is able to specifically quantify lipid accumulation measured as the lipid core burden index (LCBI). NIRS-IVUS is highly specific for the identification of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) culprit plaques usually in the form of a circular LRP. NIRS-IVUS may assist in defining the aetiology of coronary events. The effect of cholesterol-lowering therapy on the lipid core can be measured in coronary plaques in patients, and NIRS-IVUS may be a useful tool for drug development in phase II studies as a surrogate end-point for future ACS. Plaques with a high LCBI have an increased risk of peri-procedural events. NIRS-IVUS can help to define the diameter and length of stents to avoid procedure-related complications. Increased coronary LCBI predicts a higher risk of future cardiovascular events. Lipid core detection using NIRS may help to identify vulnerable plaques to treat them before they cause ACS or sudden death. © 2015 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  15. High resolution UV resonance enhanced two-photon ionization spectroscopy with mass selection of biologically relevant molecules in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chervenkov, S.; Wang, P. Q.; Karaminkov, R.; Chakraborty, T.; Braun, Juergen E.; Neusser, Hans J.

    2005-04-01

    The high resolution Doppler-free resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization (R2PI) spectroscopy with mass selection of jet-cooled (2-12 K) molecular species is a powerful experimental method providing comprehensive information on both isolated molecules and molecular clusters. We have demonstrated for the first time that this technique can be applied to large molecules and provides detailed information on their conformational structure. It allows rotationally resolved (FWHM = 70 MHz) spectra of the vibronic bands of the S1<--S0 electronic transition of the studied molecular systems to be measured. A specially designed computer-assisted fitting routine based on genetic algorithms is used to determine their rotational constants in the ground and excited electronic states, respectively, and the transition moment ratio. To interpret the experimental information and to discriminate and unambiguously assign the observed approach to the study of the neurotransmitter molecule, ephedrine. The results elucidate the role of the intramolecular hydrogen bonds stabilizing the respective conformations and affecting their intrinsic properties.

  16. 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and magnetization of cation deficient Fe2TiO4 and FeCr2O4. Part II: Magnetization data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidbauer, E.

    1987-12-01

    Magnetic properties are reported for synthetic cation deficient Fe2TiO4 and FeCr2O4 particles (<1 μm). Cation deficiency, achieved by oxidation, is characterized by the oxidation parameter z which represents the fraction of Fe2+ ions converted to Fe3+ in the spinel lattice (0≤ z≤1). Fe2TiO4 ( z=0.85) has a Curie temperature T c that can only approximately be given with a value in the range 400 700 K and it has a magnetic moment per formula unit M≈0.50 μB (μB=Bohr's magneton) at 4.2 K, for FeCr2O4 it is T c≥520 K and M (4.2 K) ≈0.16 μB. Magnetic hysteresis parameters at various temperatures show in part characteristic features due to relaxation phenomena. In the Ti-spinel, the latter are caused by a superposition of superparamagnetism and spin relaxation and in the Cr-spinel by superparamagnetism, in agreement with Mössbauer data (part I of this paper). The cation and vacancy distribution and magnetic coupling are discussed in both compositions with respect to magnetic moment data considering magnetic dilution by incorporated vacancies, and in the Ti-spinel also by non magnetic Ti4+.

  17. Optical and plasmonic spectroscopy with cantilever shaped materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tetard, Laurene; Passian, Ali; Farahi, R H; Davison, Brian H; Lereu, Aude; Thundat, Thomas George

    2011-01-01

    Micro- and nanocantilevers, which have traditionally played a vital role in the development of force microscopy, and more recently a special role in biological, chemical and physical sensing and detection, have received comparatively little attention in optical spectroscopy. We present an investigation of the optical response of microcantilevers towards their utilization in integrated spectrometers in a broad part of the spectrum. By discussing the overall actuation mechanism we describe how surface modes may effectively contribute to the final signal. Using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, a series of multilayered microcantilevers are characterized for their spectral response in the range from 7800 to 400 cm{sup -1}. Transmission FTIR and FTIR photothermal spectroscopy are carried out using polystyrene with well-established infrared spectra.

  18. SIMP spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochberg, Yonit; Kuflik, Eric; Murayama, Hitoshi

    2016-05-01

    We study the interactions between strongly interacting massive particle dark matter and the Standard Model via a massive vector boson that is kinetically mixed with the hypercharge gauge boson. The relic abundance is set by 3 → 2 self-interactions of the dark matter, while the interactions with the vector mediator enable kinetic equilibrium between the dark and visible sectors. We show that a wide range of parameters is phenomenologically viable and can be probed in various ways. Astrophysical and cosmological constraints are evaded due to the p-wave nature of dark matter annihilation into visible particles, while direct detection methods using electron recoils can be sensitive to parts of the parameter space. In addition, we propose performing spectroscopy of the strongly coupled dark sector at e + e - colliders, where the energy of a mono-photon can track the resonance structure of the dark sector. Alternatively, some resonances may decay back into Standard Model leptons or jets, realizing `hidden valley' phenomenology at the LHC and ILC in a concrete fashion.

  19. 1,3,4-Thiadiazole Derivatives. Part 91. Synthesis and Biological Activity of Metal Complexes of 5-(2-Aminoethyl)-2-Amino-1,3,4-Thiadiazole

    PubMed Central

    Barboiu, Mihai; Cimpoesu, Marilena; Guran, Cornelia

    1996-01-01

    Metal complexes of the title ligand (L) containing Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) were prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, electronic spectroscopy and conductimetry. The new derivatives, possessing the following formulae, CuL2(OH)2, NiL2Cl2, and [Co2LCl4]n showed in vitro antifungal activity against Aspergillus and Candida spp. PMID:18472898

  20. Structure-activity relationships in hydroxy-2,3-diarylxanthone antioxidants. Fast kinetics spectroscopy as a tool to evaluate the potential for antioxidant activity in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Santos, Clementina M M; Silva, Artur M S; Filipe, Paulo; Santus, René; Patterson, Larry K; Mazière, Jean-Claude; Cavaleiro, José A S; Morlière, Patrice

    2011-05-21

    A structure-activity relationship has been established for eight hydroxy-2,3-diarylxanthones (XH) bearing hydroxy groups on the two aryl rings. One-electron oxidation by superoxide radical-anions (˙O(2)(-)) and ˙Trp radicals as well as reaction with ˙CCl(3)O(2) and ˙CHCl(2)O(2) radicals demonstrates that two OH groups are required for efficient antioxidant reactivity in cetyltrimethylammonium bromide micelles. Hydroxy groups at the meta and para positions on either of the two phenyl rings confer enhanced reactivity, but XH bearing an OH at the para position of either phenyl ring is unreactive. While oxidation is favoured by OH in both meta and para positions of 2-aryl xanthone substituents, addition of a third and/or fourth OH enhances electron-donating capacity. In Cu(2+)-induced lipid peroxidation of human LDL, the lag period preceding the commencement of lipid peroxidation in the presence of XH bearing OH at meta and para positions on the 3-phenyl ring is extended to twice that observed with a comparable concentration of quercetin, a reference antioxidant. These antioxidants are also superior to quercetin in protecting human skin keratinocytes against tert-butylhydroperoxide-induced oxidative stress. While XH antioxidant activity in model biological systems is consistent with the structure-activity relationship, their response is also modulated by the localization of XH and by structural factors.

  1. Structure and function of quinones in biological solar energy transduction: a differential pulse voltammetry, EPR, and hyperfine sublevel correlation (HYSCORE) spectroscopy study of model benzoquinones.

    PubMed

    Weyers, Amanda M; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Milikisiyants, Sergey; Lakshmi, K V

    2009-11-19

    Quinones are widely used electron transport cofactors in photosynthetic reaction centers. Previous studies have suggested that the structure of the quinone cofactors and the protein interactions or "smart" matrix effects from the surrounding environment govern the redox potential and hence the function of quinones in photosynthesis. In the present study, a series of 1,4-benzoquinone models are examined via differential pulse voltammetry to provide relative redox potentials. In parallel, CW and pulsed EPR methods are used to directly determine the electronic properties of each benzoquinone in aprotic and protic environments. The shifts in the redox potential of the quinones are found to be dependent on the nature of the substituent group and the number of substituent groups on the quinone molecule. Further, we establish a direct correlation between the nature of the substituent group and the change in electronic properties of the benzosemiquinone by analysis of the isotropic and anisotropic components of the electron-nuclear hyperfine interactions observed by CW and pulsed EPR studies, respectively. Examination of an extensive library of model quinones in both aprotic and protic solvents indicates that hydrogen-bonding interactions consistently accentuate the effects of the substituent groups of the benzoquinones. This study provides direct support for the tuning and control of quinone cofactors in biological solar energy transduction through interactions with the surrounding protein matrix.

  2. Biological effects and physics of solar and galactic cosmic radiation, Part B; Proceedings of a NATO Advanced Study Institute on Biological Effects and Physics of Solar and Galactic Cosmic Radiation, Algarve, Portugal, Oct. 13-23, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenberg, Charles E. (Editor); Horneck, Gerda (Editor); Stassinopoulos, E. G. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Since there is an increasing interest in establishing lunar bases and exploring Mars by manned missions, it is important to develop appropriate risk estimates and radiation protection guidelines. The biological effects and physics of solar and galactic cosmic radiation are examined with respect to the following: the radiation environment of interplanetary space, the biological responses to radiation in space, and the risk estimates for deep space missions. There is a need for a long-term program where ground-based studies can be augmented by flight experiments and an international standardization with respect to data collection, protocol comparison, and formulation of guidelines for future missions.

  3. Chiroptical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunde, Kevin Edward

    1997-09-01

    The research presented here is of chiroptical spectroscopy. A new type of non-linear chiroptical spectroscopy, two-photon circular dichroism, is developed experimentally and theoretically. A theoretical formalism is developed to describe another new chiroptical spectroscopy, second-harmonic generation circular dichroism. An established type of chiroptical spectroscopy, time-resolved chiroptical luminescence, is applied to two new sets of subject systems. Journal articles related to these topics, as well as other research to which the author has contributed, are reproduced and included as appendices.

  4. Rapid characterization of biomass using near infrared spectroscopy coupled with multivariate data analysis: Part 1. Yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.).

    PubMed

    Nkansah, Kofi; Dawson-Andoh, Benjamin; Slahor, Jeffrey

    2010-06-01

    This paper is the first of a two series papers on the use of near infrared (NIR) coupled with multivariate data analysis (MVDA) as a process analytical technology (PAT) tool for the rapid characterization of physical and chemical properties of two common West Virginian hardwood species, northern red oak (Quercus rubra) and yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.). These two wood species are potential feed stock for the bio-refinery industry. In Part 1, we report our results on yellow-poplar. The results of this study demonstrated that some preprocessing operations on the NIR spectra (first derivative) greatly improved all the prediction models developed in the study. Predictive PLS1 models developed using selective spectra regions, 1300-1800 nm and the full NIR region (800-2400 nm), were similar. The selective spectra region, 1300-1800 nm, included the first and second overtone of the NIR spectrum (1300-1800 nm). Measured and predicted physical and chemical properties of yellow-poplar yielded moderate to high correlation (R2). (c) 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Proceedings from the National Cancer Institute's Second International Workshop on the Biology, Prevention, and Treatment of Relapse after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Part I. Biology of relapse after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gress, Ronald E; Miller, Jeffrey S; Battiwalla, Minoo; Bishop, Michael R; Giralt, Sergio A; Hardy, Nancy M; Kröger, Nicolaus; Wayne, Alan S; Landau, Dan A; Wu, Catherine J

    2013-11-01

    In the National Cancer Institute's Second Workshop on the Biology, Prevention, and Treatment of Relapse after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, the Scientific/Educational Session on the Biology of Relapse discussed recent advances in understanding some of the host-, disease-, and transplantation-related contributions to relapse, emphasizing concepts with potential therapeutic implications. Relapse after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) represents tumor escape, from the cytotoxic effects of the conditioning regimen and from immunologic control mediated by reconstituted lymphocyte populations. Factors influencing the biology of the therapeutic graft-versus-malignancy (GVM) effect-and relapse-include conditioning regimen effects on lymphocyte populations and homeostasis, immunologic niches, and the tumor microenvironment; reconstitution of lymphocyte populations and establishment of functional immune competence; and genetic heterogeneity within the malignancy defining potential for clonal escape. Recent developments in T cell and natural killer cell homeostasis and reconstitution are reviewed, with implications for prevention and treatment of relapse, as is the application of modern genome sequencing to defining the biologic basis of GVM, clonal escape, and relapse after HSCT.

  6. Soybean meal enriched with microelements by biosorption--a new biological feed supplement for laying hens. Part I. Performance and egg traits.

    PubMed

    Witkowska, Z; Chojnacka, K; Korczyński, M; Świniarska, M; Saeid, A; Opaliński, S; Dobrzański, Z

    2014-05-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of soybean meal enriched with Cu(II), Zn(II), Fe(II) and Cr(III) by biosorption on egg traits (egg weight, eggshell strength, eggshell thickness, yolk colour, albumen height) and performance of laying hens. Also, the effect of increased microelement doses in biological form on egg quality parameters and hens performance was investigated. A consumer questionnaire was undertaken to evaluate the organoleptic parameters of the eggs. Generally, our study showed that in the groups fed with the new biological supplement, egg quality parameters improved, including eggshell strength, eggshell thickness, albumen height and yolk colour. The biological form of microelements also improved the feed conversion rate, especially in the group fed with a biological form of Cr(III). Moreover, the new supplement improved organoleptic parameters of the eggs, in comparison to the inorganic form of microelements as well as to chelate. Enriched soybean meal could constitute an alternative for currently used feed additives with microelements. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Scaffold oriented synthesis. Part 4: design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel 5-substituted indazoles as potent and selective kinase inhibitors employing heterocycle forming and multicomponent reactions.

    PubMed

    Akritopoulou-Zanze, Irini; Wakefield, Brian D; Gasiecki, Alan; Kalvin, Douglas; Johnson, Eric F; Kovar, Peter; Djuric, Stevan W

    2011-03-01

    We report the synthesis and biological evaluation of 5-substituted indazoles as kinase inhibitors. The compounds were synthesized in a parallel synthesis fashion from readily available starting materials employing heterocycle forming and multicomponent reactions and were evaluated against a panel of kinase assays. Potent inhibitors were identified for Gsk3β, Rock2, and Egfr.

  8. Amateur Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavin, M.; Murdin, P.

    2003-04-01

    Spectroscopy (see ASTRONOMICAL SPECTROSCOPY) has seen a revival of late. Pioneers in the 19th century such as Angelo Secchi and William Huggins observed spectra visually via large refractors under pristine skies. While the eye can comprehend the brilliant solar spectrum and a few brighter stars aided by a telescope, even low spectral dispersion greatly dilutes starlight. Photo-film can marginally ...

  9. Complexes With Biologically Active Ligands. Part 71 Synthesis and Fungitoxic Activity of Metal Complexes Containing 1,3,5-tris-(8-Hydroxyquinolino)- Trichlorocyclo-Triphosphazatriene

    PubMed Central

    Barboiu, Mihai; Guran, Cornelia; Jitaru, Ioana; Cimpoesu, Marilena

    1996-01-01

    Complexes containing 1,3,5-tris-(8-hydroxyquinolino)-trichlorocyclotriphosphazatriene, a new cyclophosphazene ligand, and Co(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) were prepared. The new complexes, having the general formula [MLCl2], [ML2]Cl2, (M=Cu, Co, Ni); [NiLAc], [NiL2Ac]Ac and [ML3]X3 (M=Ni, Co, X=Cl, Ac) were characterised by elemental analysis, electronic-, IR spectroscopy, and electrical conductivity measurements. Some of them inhibited the growth of several fungi species (Aspergillus and Candida spp.) PMID:18472899

  10. Crusts: biological

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, Jayne; Elias, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Biological soil crusts, a community of cyanobacteria, lichens, mosses, and fungi, are an essential part of dryland ecosystems. They are critical in the stabilization of soils, protecting them from wind and water erosion. Similarly, these soil surface communities also stabilized soils on early Earth, allowing vascular plants to establish. They contribute nitrogen and carbon to otherwise relatively infertile dryland soils, and have a strong influence on hydrologic cycles. Their presence can also influence vascular plant establishment and nutrition.

  11. Adsorption of 6-mercaptopurine and 6-mercaptopurine riboside on silver colloid: a pH dependent surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory study. Part I. 6-Mercaptopurine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeghalmi, A. V.; Leopold, L.; Pînzaru, S.; Chis, V.; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, I.; Schmitt, M.; Popp, J.; Kiefer, W.

    2005-02-01

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) on silver colloid has been applied to characterize the interaction of 6-mercaptopurine (6MP), an active drug used in chemotherapy of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, with a model biological substrate at therapeutical concentrations and as function of the pH value. The adsorption active sites and molecular orientation on the metal surface have been determined on the basis of SERS 'surface selection rules' subsequent to a detailed vibrational analysis of the 6MP tautomeric forms. Therefore, DFT calculations (vibrational wavenumbers, Raman scattering activities, partial atomic charges) of the optimized tautomers and potential energy distribution calculations have been performed. Around neutral pH value reorientation of the molecule has been observed. Under basic conditions the 6MP molecule is probably adsorbed on the silver colloid through the N1 atom of the purine ring and possibly the S atom, and adopts a tilted orientation to the surface. A reduction in the number of adsorbed molecules under basic conditions is proposed, since the SERS spectrum recorded at 10-6 M concentration at neutral pH value resembles the SERS spectra obtained under basic conditions at 10-5 M concentration. At acidic pH values a stronger interaction through the N9 and N3 atoms is suggested with an end-on orientation.

  12. Surface-activated chemical ionization combined with electrospray ionization and mass spectrometry for the analysis of cannabinoids in biological samples. Part I: analysis of 11-nor-9-carboxytetrahydro-cannabinol.

    PubMed

    Conti, Matteo; Tazzari, Valeria; Bertona, Maria; Brambilla, Maura; Brambilla, Paolo

    2011-06-15

    Recently, electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS) has been widely used for the identification of drugs of abuse and their metabolites in biological samples. However, the sensitivity and selectivity of this technique are commonly inadequate for the analysis of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and its metabolites at very low levels, such as those sometimes required in forensic and clinical-legal applications. We coupled electrospray ionization and surface-activated chemical ionization (ESI-SACI) to various types of mass analyzers (ion trap, triple quadrupole and orbitrap) (ESI-SACI-MS) to improve the detection of 11-nor-9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH), the most common marker of THC abuse. The benefits of this approach in terms of sensitivity and selectivity compared with a common ESI-MS approach are clearly demonstrated.

  13. Biology and Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Sheila; Oberg, Kristina; Unnerstad, Gunilla

    1999-01-01

    Researchers studied English and Swedish biology student teachers' perceptions of teaching health as part of biology. As part of the study, the students investigated secondary students' understanding of health. Surveys and interviews were effective in collecting student teachers' views. They indicated that student teachers' perceptions changed over…

  14. Biologic Treatments for Sports Injuries II Think Tank-Current Concepts, Future Research, and Barriers to Advancement, Part 2: Rotator Cuff.

    PubMed

    Murray, Iain R; LaPrade, Robert F; Musahl, Volker; Geeslin, Andrew G; Zlotnicki, Jason P; Mann, Barton J; Petrigliano, Frank A

    2016-03-01

    Rotator cuff tears are common and result in considerable morbidity. Tears within the tendon substance or at its insertion into the humeral head represent a considerable clinical challenge because of the hostile local environment that precludes healing. Tears often progress without intervention, and current surgical treatments are inadequate. Although surgical implants, instrumentation, and techniques have improved, healing rates have not improved, and a high failure rate remains for large and massive rotator cuff tears. The use of biologic adjuvants that contribute to a regenerative microenvironment have great potential for improving healing rates and function after surgery. This article presents a review of current and emerging biologic approaches to augment rotator cuff tendon and muscle regeneration focusing on the scientific rationale, preclinical, and clinical evidence for efficacy, areas for future research, and current barriers to advancement and implementation.

  15. A small linear peptide encompassing the NGF N-terminus partly mimics the biological activities of the entire neurotrophin in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Travaglia, Alessio; Pietropaolo, Adriana; Di Martino, Rossana; Nicoletti, Vincenzo G; La Mendola, Diego; Calissano, Pietro; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2015-08-19

    Ever since the discovery of its neurite growth promoting activity in sympathetic and sensory ganglia, nerve growth factor (NGF) became the prototype of the large family of neurotrophins. The use of primary cultures and clonal cell lines has revealed several distinct actions of NGF and other neurotrophins. Among several models of NGF activity, the clonal cell line PC12 is the most widely employed. Thus, in the presence of NGF, through the activation of the transmembrane protein TrkA, these cells undergo a progressive mitotic arrest and start to grow electrically excitable neuritis. A vast number of studies opened intriguing aspects of NGF mechanisms of action, its biological properties, and potential use as therapeutic agents. In this context, identifying and utilizing small portions of NGF is of great interest and involves several human diseases including Alzheimer's disease. Here we report the specific action of the peptide encompassing the 1-14 sequence of the human NGF (NGF(1-14)), identified on the basis of scattered indications present in literature. The biological activity of NGF(1-14) was tested on PC12 cells, and its binding with TrkA was predicted by means of a computational approach. NGF(1-14) does not elicit the neurite outgrowth promoting activity, typical of the whole protein, and it only has a moderate action on PC12 proliferation. However, this peptide exerts, in a dose and time dependent fashion, an effective and specific NGF-like action on some highly conserved and biologically crucial intermediates of its intracellular targets such as Akt and CREB. These findings indicate that not all TrkA pathways must be at all times operative, and open the possibility of testing each of them in relation with specific NGF needs, biological actions, and potential therapeutic use.

  16. Scaffold oriented synthesis. Part 3: design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel 5-substituted indazoles as potent and selective kinase inhibitors employing [2+3] cycloadditions.

    PubMed

    Akritopoulou-Zanze, Irini; Wakefield, Brian D; Gasiecki, Alan; Kalvin, Douglas; Johnson, Eric F; Kovar, Peter; Djuric, Stevan W

    2011-03-01

    We report the synthesis and biological evaluation of 5-substituted indazoles and amino indazoles as kinase inhibitors. The compounds were synthesized in a parallel synthesis fashion from readily available starting materials employing [2+3] cycloaddition reactions and were evaluated against a panel of kinase assays. Potent inhibitors were identified for numerous kinases such as Rock2, Gsk3β, Aurora2 and Jak2.

  17. Biologic Treatments for Sports Injuries II Think Tank-Current Concepts, Future Research, and Barriers to Advancement, Part 3: Articular Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Zlotnicki, Jason P; Geeslin, Andrew G; Murray, Iain R; Petrigliano, Frank A; LaPrade, Robert F; Mann, Barton J; Musahl, Volker

    2016-04-01

    Focal chondral defects of the articular surface are a common occurrence in the field of orthopaedics. These isolated cartilage injuries, if not repaired surgically with restoration of articular congruency, may have a high rate of progression to posttraumatic osteoarthritis, resulting in significant morbidity and loss of function in the young, active patient. Both isolated and global joint disease are a difficult entity to treat in the clinical setting given the high amount of stress on weightbearing joints and the limited healing potential of native articular cartilage. Recently, clinical interest has focused on the use of biologically active compounds and surgical techniques to regenerate native cartilage to the articular surface, with the goal of restoring normal joint health and overall function. This article presents a review of the current biologic therapies, as discussed at the 2015 American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) Biologics Think Tank, that are used in the treatment of focal cartilage deficiencies. For each of these emerging therapies, the theories for application, the present clinical evidence, and specific areas for future research are explored, with focus on the barriers currently faced by clinicians in advancing the success of these therapies in the clinical setting.

  18. Integrated risk assessment for WFD ecological status classification applied to Llobregat river basin (Spain). Part I-Fuzzy approach to aggregate biological indicators.

    PubMed

    Gottardo, S; Semenzin, E; Giove, S; Zabeo, A; Critto, A; de Zwart, D; Ginebreda, A; Marcomini, A

    2011-10-15

    Water Framework Directive (WFD) requirements and recommendations for Ecological Status (ES) classification of surface water bodies do not address all issues that Member States have to face in the implementation process, such as selection of appropriate stressor-specific environmental indicators, definition of class boundaries, aggregation of heterogeneous data and information and uncertainty evaluation. In this context the "One-Out, All-Out" (OOAO) principle is the suggested approach to lead the entire classification procedure and ensure conservative results. In order to support water managers in achieving a more comprehensive and realistic evaluation of ES, an Integrated Risk Assessment (IRA) methodology was developed. It is based on the Weight of Evidence approach and implements a Fuzzy Inference System in order to hierarchically aggregate a set of environmental indicators, which are grouped into five Lines of Evidence (i.e. Biology, Chemistry, Ecotoxicology, Physico-chemistry and Hydromorphology). The whole IRA methodology has been implemented as an individual module into a freeware GIS (Geographic Information System)-based Decision Support System (DSS), named MODELKEY DSS. The paper focuses on the conceptual and mathematical procedure underlying the evaluation of the most complex Line of Evidence, i.e. Biology, which identifies the biological communities that are potentially at risk and the stressors that are most likely responsible for the observed alterations. The results obtained from testing the procedure through application of the MODELKEY DSS to the Llobregat case study are reported and discussed.

  19. U1-RNP and Toll-like receptors in the pathogenesis of mixed connective tissue diseasePart II. Endosomal TLRs and their biological significance in the pathogenesis of mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Paradowska-Gorycka, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is a chronic autoimmune immunopathological disease of unknown etiology, which is characterized by the presence of various clinical symptoms and the presence of autoantibodies against U1-RNP particles. The U1-RNP component engages immune cells and their receptors in a complex network of interactions that ultimately lead to autoimmunity, inflammation, and tissue injury. The anti-U1-RNP autoantibodies form an immune complex with self-RNA, present in MCTD serum, which can act as endosomal Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands. Inhibition of TLRs by nucleic acids is a promising area of research for the development of novel therapeutic strategies against pathogenic infection, tumorigenesis and autoimmunity. In this review we summarize current knowledge of endogenous TLRs and discuss their biological significance in the pathogenesis of MCTD. In part I we described the structure, biological function and significance of the U1-RNP complex in MCTD.

  20. Part 1. Assessment of carcinogenicity and biologic responses in rats after lifetime inhalation of new-technology diesel exhaust in the ACES bioassay.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Jacob D; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Seagrave, JeanClare; Gigliotti, Andrew P; Chow, Judith; Zielinska, Barbara; Mauderly, Joe L; Seilkop, Steven K; Miller, Rodney A

    2015-01-01

    The Health Effects Institute and its partners conceived and funded a program to characterize the emissions from heavy-duty diesel engines compliant with the 2007 and 2010 on-road emissions standards in the United States and to evaluate indicators of lung toxicity in rats and mice exposed repeatedly to 2007-compliant new-technology diesel exhaust (NTDE*). The a priori hypothesis of this Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) was that 2007-compliant on-road diesel emissions "... will not cause an increase in tumor formation or substantial toxic effects in rats and mice at the highest concentration of exhaust that can be used ... although some biological effects may occur." This hypothesis was tested at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute (LRRI) by exposing rats by chronic inhalation as a carcinogenicity bioassay. Indicators of pulmonary toxicity in rats were measured after 1, 3, 12, 24, and 28-30 months of exposure. Similar indicators of pulmonary toxicity were measured in mice, as an interspecies comparison of the effects of subchronic exposure, after 1 and 3 months of exposure. A previous HEI report (Mauderly and McDonald 2012) described the operation of the engine and exposure systems and the characteristics of the exposure atmospheres during system commissioning. Another HEI report described the biologic responses in mice and rats after subchronic exposure to NTDE (McDonald et al. 2012). The primary motivation for the present chronic study was to evaluate the effects of NTDE in rats in the context of previous studies that had shown neoplastic lung lesions in rats exposed chronically to traditional technology diesel exhaust (TDE) (i.e., exhaust from diesel engines built before the 2007 U.S. requirements went into effect). The hypothesis was largely based on the marked reduction of diesel particulate matter (DPM) in NTDE compared with emissions from older diesel engine and fuel technologies, although other emissions were also reduced. The DPM

  1. Synthesis, characterization, DFT calculation and biological activity of square-planar Ni(II) complexes with tridentate PNO ligands and monodentate pseudohalides. Part II.

    PubMed

    Milenković, Milica; Pevec, Andrej; Turel, Iztok; Vujčić, Miroslava; Milenković, Marina; Jovanović, Katarina; Gligorijević, Nevenka; Radulović, Siniša; Swart, Marcel; Gruden-Pavlović, Maja; Adaila, Kawther; Cobeljić, Božidar; Anđelković, Katarina

    2014-11-24

    Three square-planar complexes of Ni(II) with condensation derivative of 2-(diphenylphosphino)benzaldehyde and 4-phenylsemicarbazide and monodentate pseudohalides have been synthesized and characterized on the basis of the results of X-ray, NMR and IR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. Investigated complexes exhibited moderate antibacterial and cytotoxic activity. The most pronounced cytotoxic activity (in the range of cisplatin) to HeLa cell line was observed for ligand and all the complexes. Azido complex and ligand induced concentration dependent cell cycle arrest in the S phase, as well as decrease of percentage of cells in G1 phase, without significant increase of apoptotic fraction of cells. The interaction of the azido complex and ligand with CT-DNA results in changes in UV-Vis spectra typical for non-covalent bonding. The observed intrinsic binding constant of azido complex-CT-DNA and ligand-CT-DNA were 3.22 × 10(5) M(-1) and 2.79 × 10(5) M(-1). The results of DNA cleavage experiments showed that azido complex nicked supercoiled plasmid DNA.

  2. Consensus paper of the WFSBP Task Force on Biological Markers: Criteria for biomarkers and endophenotypes of schizophrenia part II: Cognition, neuroimaging and genetics.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Andrea; Rujescu, Dan; Gawlik, Micha; Hasan, Alkomiet; Hashimoto, Kenji; Iceta, Sylvain; Jarema, Marek; Kambeitz, Joseph; Kasper, Siegfried; Keeser, Daniel; Kornhuber, Johannes; Koutsouleris, Nikolaos; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Malchow, Berend; Saoud, Mohamed; Spies, Marie; Stöber, Gerald; Thibaut, Florence; Riederer, Peter; Falkai, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Schizophrenia is a group of severe psychiatric disorders with high heritability but only low odds ratios of risk genes. Despite progress in the identification of pathophysiological processes, valid biomarkers of the disease are still lacking. This comprehensive review summarises recent efforts to identify genetic underpinnings, clinical and cognitive endophenotypes and symptom dimensions of schizophrenia and presents findings from neuroimaging studies with structural, functional and spectroscopy magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography. The potential of findings to be biomarkers of schizophrenia is discussed. Recent findings have not resulted in clear biomarkers for schizophrenia. However, we identified several biomarkers that are potential candidates for future research. Among them, copy number variations and links between genetic polymorphisms derived from genome-wide analysis studies, clinical or cognitive phenotypes, multimodal neuroimaging findings including positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and the application of multivariate pattern analyses are promising. Future studies should address the effects of treatment and stage of the disease more precisely and apply combinations of biomarker candidates. Although biomarkers for schizophrenia await validation, knowledge on candidate genomic and neuroimaging biomarkers is growing rapidly and research on this topic has the potential to identify psychiatric endophenotypes and in the future increase insight on individual treatment response in schizophrenia.

  3. Fatty acids, coumarins and polyphenolic compounds of Ficus carica L. cv. Dottato: variation of bioactive compounds and biological activity of aerial parts.

    PubMed

    Marrelli, Mariangela; Statti, Giancarlo A; Tundis, Rosa; Menichini, Francesco; Conforti, Filomena

    2014-01-01

    Leaves, bark and woody part of Ficus carica L. cultivar Dottato collected in different months were examined to assess their chemical composition, antioxidant activity and phototoxicity on C32 human melanoma cells after UVA irradiation. The phytochemical investigation revealed different composition in the coumarin, fatty acid, polyphenol and flavonoid content. The second harvest of leaves and the first harvest of the bark possessed the highest antiradical activity with IC50 values of 64.00 ± 0.59 and 67.00 ± 1.09 μg/mL, respectively. Harvest III of leaves showed the best inhibition of lipid peroxidation (IC50 = 1.48 ± 0.04 μg/mL). Leaf samples of F. carica showed also the best antiproliferative activity in comparison with bark and woody part of F. carica.

  4. Developmental engineering: a new paradigm for the design and manufacturing of cell-based products. Part II: from genes to networks: tissue engineering from the viewpoint of systems biology and network science.

    PubMed

    Lenas, Petros; Moos, Malcolm; Luyten, Frank P

    2009-12-01

    The field of tissue engineering is moving toward a new concept of "in vitro biomimetics of in vivo tissue development." In Part I of this series, we proposed a theoretical framework integrating the concepts of developmental biology with those of process design to provide the rules for the design of biomimetic processes. We named this methodology "developmental engineering" to emphasize that it is not the tissue but the process of in vitro tissue development that has to be engineered. To formulate the process design rules in a rigorous way that will allow a computational design, we should refer to mathematical methods to model the biological process taking place in vitro. Tissue functions cannot be attributed to individual molecules but rather to complex interactions between the numerous components of a cell and interactions between cells in a tissue that form a network. For tissue engineering to advance to the level of a technologically driven discipline amenable to well-established principles of process engineering, a scientifically rigorous formulation is needed of the general design rules so that the behavior of networks of genes, proteins, or cells that govern the unfolding of developmental processes could be related to the design parameters. Now that sufficient experimental data exist to construct plausible mathematical models of many biological control circuits, explicit hypotheses can be evaluated using computational approaches to facilitate process design. Recent progress in systems biology has shown that the empirical concepts of developmental biology that we used in Part I to extract the rules of biomimetic process design can be expressed in rigorous mathematical terms. This allows the accurate characterization of manufacturing processes in tissue engineering as well as the properties of the artificial tissues themselves. In addition, network science has recently shown that the behavior of biological networks strongly depends on their topology and has

  5. Dapson in heterocyclic chemistry, part VIII: synthesis, molecular docking and anticancer activity of some novel sulfonylbiscompounds carrying biologically active 1,3-dihydropyridine, chromene and chromenopyridine moieties

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Several new sulfonebiscompounds having a biologically active 1,2-dihydropyridine-2-one 3–19, acrylamide 20, chromene 21, 22 and chromenopyridine 23, 24 moieties were synthesized and evaluated as potential anticancer agents. The structures of the products were confirmed via elemental analyses and spectral data. The screening tests showed that many of the biscompounds obtained exhibited good anticancer activity against human breast cell line (MCF7) comparable to doxorubicin which was used as reference drug. Compounds 11, 17 and 24 showed IC50 values 35.40 μM, 29.86 μM and 30.99 μM, respectively. In order to elucidate the mechanism of action of the synthesized compounds as anticancer agents, docking on the active site of farnesyltransferase and arginine methyltransferase was also performed and good results were obtained. PMID:22748424

  6. Dapson in heterocyclic chemistry, part VIII: synthesis, molecular docking and anticancer activity of some novel sulfonylbiscompounds carrying biologically active 1,3-dihydropyridine, chromene and chromenopyridine moieties.

    PubMed

    Al-Said, Mansour S; Ghorab, Mostafa M; Nissan, Yassin M

    2012-07-02

    Several new sulfonebiscompounds having a biologically active 1,2-dihydropyridine-2-one 3-19, acrylamide 20, chromene 21, 22 and chromenopyridine 23, 24 moieties were synthesized and evaluated as potential anticancer agents. The structures of the products were confirmed via elemental analyses and spectral data. The screening tests showed that many of the biscompounds obtained exhibited good anticancer activity against human breast cell line (MCF7) comparable to doxorubicin which was used as reference drug. Compounds 11, 17 and 24 showed IC50 values 35.40 μM, 29.86 μM and 30.99 μM, respectively. In order to elucidate the mechanism of action of the synthesized compounds as anticancer agents, docking on the active site of farnesyltransferase and arginine methyltransferase was also performed and good results were obtained.

  7. Development of a Model, Metal-reducing Microbial Community for a System Biology Level Assessment of Desulfovibrio vulgaris as part of a Community

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, Dwayne; Schadt, Christopher; Miller, Lance; Phelps, Tommy; Brown, S. D.; Arkin, Adam; Hazen, Terry; Drake, Megin; Yang, Z.K.; Podar, Mircea

    2010-05-17

    One of the largest experimental gaps is between the simplicity of pure cultures and the complexity of open environmental systems, particularly in metal-contaminated areas. These microbial communities form ecosystem foundations, drive biogeochemical processes, and are relevant for biotechnology and bioremediation. A model, metal-reducing microbial community was constructed as either syntrophic or competitive to study microbial cell to cell interactions, cell signaling and competition for resources. The microbial community was comprised of the metal-reducing Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. Additionally, Methanococcus maripaludis S2 was added to study complete carbon reduction and maintain a low hydrogen partial pressure for syntrophism to occur. Further, considerable work has been published on D. vulgaris and the D. vulgaris/ Mc. maripaludis co-culture both with and without stress. We are extending this work by conducting the same stress conditions on the model community. Additionally, this comprehensive investigation includes physiological and metabolic analyses as well as specially designed mRNA microarrays with the genes for all three organisms on one slide so as to follow gene expression changes in the various cultivation conditions as well as being comparable to the co- and individual cultures. Further, state-of -the-art comprehensive AMT tag proteomics allows for these comparisons at the protein level for a systems biology assessment of a model, metal-reducing microbial community. Preliminary data revealed that lactate oxidation by D. vulgaris was sufficient to support both G. sulfurreducens and M. maripaludis via the excretion of H2 and acetate. Fumarate was utilized by G. sulfurreducens and reduced to succinate since neither of the other two organisms can reduce fumarate. Methane was quantified, suggesting acetate and H2 concentrations were sufficient for M. maripaludis. Steady state community cultivation will allow for

  8. Industrial applications of Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasselli, J. G.; Walder, F.; Petty, C.; Kemeny, G.

    1993-03-01

    In the last two decades, Raman spectroscopy has matured as an important method for the study of molecules and complex molecular systems. This is evident from the number of fine texts and the many review articles which have been published describing theory and applications of Raman spectroscopy over a very broad range of subjects (1-10). Raman spectroscopy is the essential partner to infrared spectroscopy for a complete vibrational analysis of a molecule in structure determinations. From the understanding developed on small molecules, theory was extended to interpret the spectra of larger systems such as polymers, biological molecules, and ordered condensed phases. The contribution of Raman spectroscopy to these areas has been significant. It was the development of commercial lasers in the 1960s which spurred the renewed interest in the Raman technique. But applications were still limited for highly fluorescing or intensely colored systems. In 1986, a breakthrough paper by Hirschfeld and Chase (11) described the use of near-infrared laser excitation and a commercial interferometer-based FT-IR spectrometer to record FT-Raman spectra. Significant advantages included the inherent multiplex, throughput and data processing features of the FT interferometers and the use of a ND:YAG laser (1.064 μm) which dramatically decreased problems with sample fluorescence and decomposition. A deluge of papers describing applications of FT-Raman spectroscopy can be found in the Journal of Raman Spectroscopy, Spectrochimica Acta (special issues 40A ad 47A), and Applied Spectroscopy since then.

  9. Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleeson, Helen F.

    Raman spectroscopy has been used as a tool to study liquid crystals for several decades. There are several features that make Raman spectroscopy an important characterisation method. It is bond-specific, so can provide information about the interaction of liquid crystals with colloidal systems and can offer an insight into phase transitions. The polarization dependence of the scattering can be used to determine order parameters in liquid crystal systems. Finally, the relatively high spatial resolution of the technique (∽1 μm) can be used to explore spatiallydependent order in soft matter systems. This chapter describes the most important ways in which Raman spectroscopy can be used to reveal information about liquid crystal systems, illustrated by examples. Both the theoretical background and experimental considerations are described, providing a comprehensive introduction to anybody interested in using the technique to understand liquid crystal systems.

  10. Cometary spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biver, N.

    2011-04-01

    Cometary spectroscopy from the ultraviolet to the radio wavelength domain provides us with insights on the composition of the gases that are released by the cometary nuclei. While infrared to millimeter spectroscopy give access to the parent molecules that are released directly from the nucleus, visible spectroscopy enables observation of daughter species. Those "radicals" observable in the visible domain have more complex spectroscopic band-like structures and are mainly CN, C2, C3, NH2. Their spectroscopic signatures are easily accessible to amateur astronomers class equipment. Provided that carefully calibrated data are acquired, some simple calculation can readily be done to convert the line intensities into comet molecular outgassing rates and thus provide interesting physical data on comets. In addition to broadband dust measurements, the interested amateur can produce valuable scientific data on comets that will always be welcome from the professional community and certainly useful as the monitoring of comets activity is always essential.

  11. Metabolites from nematophagous fungi and nematicidal natural products from fungi as alternatives for biological control. Part II: metabolites from nematophagous basidiomycetes and non-nematophagous fungi.

    PubMed

    Degenkolb, Thomas; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    In this second section of a two-part mini-review article, we introduce 101 further nematicidal and non-nematicidal secondary metabolites biosynthesized by nematophagous basidiomycetes or non-nematophagous ascomycetes and basidiomycetes. Several of these compounds have promising nematicidal activity and deserve further and more detailed analysis. Thermolides A and B, omphalotins, ophiobolins, bursaphelocides A and B, illinitone A, pseudohalonectrins A and B, dichomitin B, and caryopsomycins A-C are excellent candidates or lead compounds for the development of biocontrol strategies for phytopathogenic nematodes. Paraherquamides, clonostachydiol, and nafuredins offer promising leads for the development of formulations against the intestinal nematodes of ruminants.

  12. Optical spectroscopies diagnose cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfano, Robert R.; Das, Bidyut B.; Glassman, Wenling S.; Pradhan, Asima; Tang, Gui C.

    1992-02-01

    Today's medical professional is looking beyond the conventional procedures of X-rays, nuclear radiation, magnetic resonance, chemical analysis, and ultrasound to diagnose diseases ranging from cancer to heart ailments. In view of the possible dangerous side effects of X-rays and nuclear radiation, a need exists for novel techniques in disease detection that can either eliminate or reduce their use in examinations. For more than half a century, fluorescence, absorption, and light scattering spectroscopies have been widely used as probes to acquire fundamental knowledge about various physical, chemical, and biological processes. Light may offer alternatives to X-rays and nuclear approaches, and in some cases is non-invasive. Optical spectroscopy and laser technology may offer techniques for the detection and characterization of physical and chemical changes that occur in diseased tissue on a microscopic level.

  13. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khanna, S. K.; Lambe, J.

    1983-01-01

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is a useful technique for the study of vibrational modes of molecules adsorbed on the surface of oxide layers in a metal-insulator-metal tunnel junction. The technique involves studying the effects of adsorbed molecules on the tunneling spectrum of such junctions. The data give useful information about the structure, bonding, and orientation of adsorbed molecules. One of the major advantages of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is its sensitivity. It is capable of detecting on the order of 10 to the 10th molecules (a fraction of a monolayer) on a 1 sq mm junction. It has been successfully used in studies of catalysis, biology, trace impurity detection, and electronic excitations. Because of its high sensitivity, this technique shows great promise in the area of solid-state electronic chemical sensing.

  14. Raman spectroscopy in astrobiology.

    PubMed

    Jorge Villar, Susana E; Edwards, Howell G M

    2006-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is proposed as a valuable analytical technique for planetary exploration because it is sensitive to organic and inorganic compounds and able to unambiguously identify key spectral markers in a mixture of biological and geological components; furthermore, sample manipulation is not required and any size of sample can be studied without chemical or mechanical pretreatment. NASA and ESA are considering the adoption of miniaturised Raman spectrometers for inclusion in suites of analytical instrumentation to be placed on robotic landers on Mars in the near future to search for extinct or extant life signals. In this paper we review the advantages and limitations of Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of complex specimens with relevance to the detection of bio- and geomarkers in extremophilic organisms which are considered to be terrestrial analogues of possible extraterrestial life that could have developed on planetary surfaces.

  15. Chemical composition and biological evaluation of the volatile constituents from the aerial parts of Nephrolepis exaltata (L.) and Nephrolepis cordifolia (L.) C. Presl grown in Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Tantawy, Mona E; Shams, Manal M; Afifi, Manal S

    2016-01-01

    The essential oil from the aerial parts of Nephrolepis exaltata and Nephrolepis cordifolia obtained by hydro-distillation were analyzed by gas chromatography/ mass spectrometry. The essential oils exhibited potential antibacterial and antifungal activities against a majority of the selected microorganisms. NEA oil showed promising cytotoxicity in breast, colon and lung carcinoma cells. The results presented indicate that NEA oil could be useful alternative for the treatment of dermatophytosis. Comparative investigation of hydro-distilled volatile constituents from aerial parts (A) of Nephrolepis exaltata (NE) and Nephrolepis cordifolia (NC) (Family Nephrolepidaceae) was carried out. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry revealed that oils differ in composition and percentages of components. Oxygenated compounds were dominant in NEA and NCA. 2,4-Hexadien-1-ol (16.1%), nonanal (14.4%), β-Ionone (6.7%) and thymol (2.7%) were predominant in NEA. β-Ionone (8.0%), eugenol (7.2%) and anethol (4.6%) were the main constituents in NCA. Volatile samples were screened for their antibacterial and antifungal activities using agar diffusion method and minimum inhibitory concentrations. The cytotoxic activity was evaluated using viability assay in breast (MCF-7), colon (HCT-116) and lung carcinoma (A-549) cells by the MTT assay. The results revealed that NEA oil exhibited potential antimicrobial activity against most of the tested organisms and showed promising cytotoxicity.

  16. Variability and connectivity of plaice populations from the Eastern North Sea to the Baltic Sea, part II. Biological evidence of population mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, Clara; Hemmer-Hansen, Jakob; Boje, Jesper; Christensen, Asbjørn; Hüssy, Karin; Sun, Hailu; Clausen, Lotte Worsøe

    2017-02-01

    A multi-disciplinary study was conducted to clarify stock identity and connectivity patterns in the populations of European plaice (Pleuronectes platessa) in the Skagerrak-Kattegat transition area between the Eastern North Sea and the Baltic Sea. Five independent biological studies were carried out in parallel. Genetic markers suggested the existence of different genetic populations in the transition area. Growth backcalculation with otoliths resulted in significant although limited differences in growth rates between North Sea and Skagerrak, indicating weak differentiation or important mixing. Hydrogeographical drift modelling suggested that some North Sea juveniles could settle along the coast line of the Skagerrak and the Kattegat. Tagging data suggested that both juveniles and adult fish from the North Sea perform feeding migrations into Skagerrak in summer/autumn. Finally, survey data suggested that Skagerrak also belongs to the area distribution of North Sea plaice. The outcomes of the individual studies were then combined into an overall synthesis. The existence of some resident components was evidenced, but it was also demonstrated that North Sea plaice migrate for feeding into Skagerrak and might constitute a large share of the catches in this area. The mixing of different populations within a management area has implications for stock assessment and management. Choice must be made to either lump or split the populations, and the feasibility and constraints of both options are discussed. The outcomes of this work have directly influenced the management decisions in 2015.

  17. Pentoxifylline as a modulator of anticancer drug doxorubicin. Part II: Reduction of doxorubicin DNA binding and alleviation of its biological effects.

    PubMed

    Gołuński, Grzegorz; Borowik, Agnieszka; Derewońko, Natalia; Kawiak, Anna; Rychłowski, Michał; Woziwodzka, Anna; Piosik, Jacek

    2016-04-01

    Anticancer drug doxorubicin is commonly used in cancer treatment. However, drug's severe side effects make toxicity reduction important matter. Another biologically active aromatic compound, pentoxifylline, can sequester aromatic compounds in stacking complexes reducing their bioactivity. This work deals with the problem of alleviating doxorubicin side effects by pentoxifylline. We employed a wide spectrum of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cellular assays. In addition, we used the doxorubicin-pentoxifylline mixed association constant to quantitatively assess pentoxifylline influence on the doxorubicin mutagenic activity. Obtained results indicate strong protective effects of pentoxifylline towards doxorubicin, observed on bacteria and human keratinocytes with no such effects observed on the cancer cells. It may be hypothesized that, considering much shorter half-life of pentoxifylline than doxorubicin, simultaneous administration of doxorubicin and pentoxifylline will lead to gradual release of doxorubicin from complexes with pentoxifylline to reach desired therapeutic concentration. Proposed results shed light on the possible doxorubicin chemotherapy modification and its side effects reduction without the loss of its therapeutic potential.

  18. Assessment of some innate immune responses in dab (Limanda limanda L.) from the North Sea as part of an integrated biological effects monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skouras, Andreas; Lang, Thomas; Vobach, Michael; Danischewski, Dirk; Wosniok, Werner; Scharsack, Jörn Peter; Steinhagen, Dieter

    2003-10-01

    The marine flatfish dab (Limanda limanda), which lives in direct contact with contaminated sediments, is frequently used as a sentinel species in international monitoring programmes on the biological effects of contaminants. In this study, immune responses were recorded as indicators of sublethal chronic effects of contaminants, in addition to measurement of the induction of mono-oxygenase ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) in liver cells, the inhibition of acetylcholin esterase (AChE) in muscle and a quantification of grossly visible diseases and parasites. In total, 336 dab were analysed from five sampling areas in the North Sea, including the German Bight, the Dogger Bank, the Firth of Forth, and two locations close to oil and gas platforms (Ekofisk and Danfield). When considering plasma lysozyme levels, pinocytosis and respiratory burst activity of head kidney leucocytes, a clear gradient could be observed with decreased levels in individuals collected from the Firth of Forth and locations near the oil or gas platforms compared with dab from the Dogger Bank or the German Bight. Individuals with induced EROD activity displayed reduced lysozyme and respiratory burst activities. Lysozyme levels were also reduced in dab with lymphocystis or with nematodes. The data obtained indicate that the assessment of innate immune parameters in a monitoring programme provides supplementary information about immunomodulatory effects associated with the exposure of fish to contaminants. In particular, concentrations of plasma lysozyme, which can be analysed in an easy and inexpensive assay, are considered to be an appropriate parameter for use in a battery of other bioindicators.

  19. Fused heterocycles bearing bridgehead nitrogen as potent HIV-1 NNRTIs. Part 4: design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel imidazo[1,2-a]pyrazines.

    PubMed

    Huang, Boshi; Liang, Xin; Li, Cuicui; Chen, Wenmin; Liu, Tao; Li, Xiao; Sun, Yueyue; Fu, Lu; Liu, Huiqing; De Clercq, Erik; Pannecouque, Christophe; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2015-03-26

    Through a structure-guided core-refining approach, a series of novel imidazo[1,2-a]pyrazine derivatives were designed, synthesized and evaluated as HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). Biological results of antiviral assay in MT-4 cell cultures showed that 12 target compounds displayed moderate activities against wild-type (wt) HIV-1 strain (IIIB) with EC50 values ranging from 0.26 μM to 19 μM. Among them, 4a and 5a were found to be the two most active analogues possessing EC50 values of 0.26 μM and 0.32 μM respectively, comparable to delavirdine (DLV, EC50 = 0.54 μM) and nevirapine (NVP, EC50 = 0.31 μM) in a cell-based assay. Additionally, 9 compounds showed RT inhibitory activity superior to that of NVP. Moreover, some predicted drug-like properties of representative compounds 4a and 5a, as well as the structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis were discussed in detail. The binding mode of compound 4a was investigated by molecular simulation studies.

  20. NMR Spectroscopy and Its Value: A Primer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veeraraghavan, Sudha

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is widely used by chemists. Furthermore, the use of NMR spectroscopy to solve structures of macromolecules or to examine protein-ligand interactions is popular. Yet, few students entering graduate education in biological sciences have been introduced to this method or its utility. Over the last six…