Science.gov

Sample records for biological test methods

  1. Validation of the orthogonal tilt reconstruction method with a biological test sample.

    PubMed

    Chandramouli, Preethi; Hernandez-Lopez, Rogelio; Wang, Hong-Wei; Leschziner, Andres E

    2011-07-01

    Electron microscopy of frozen-hydrated samples (cryo-EM) can yield high resolution structures of macromolecular complexes by accurately determining the orientation of large numbers of experimental views of the sample relative to an existing 3D model. The "initial model problem", the challenge of obtaining these orientations ab initio, remains a major bottleneck in determining the structure of novel macromolecules, chiefly those lacking internal symmetry. We previously proposed a method for the generation of initial models--orthogonal tilt reconstruction (OTR)--that bypasses limitations inherent to the other two existing methods, random conical tilt (RCT) and angular reconstitution (AR). Here we present a validation of OTR with a biological test sample whose structure was previously solved by RCT: the complex between the yeast exosome and the subunit Rrp44. We show that, as originally demonstrated with synthetic data, OTR generates initial models that do not exhibit the "missing cone" artifacts associated with RCT and show an isotropic distribution of information when compared with the known structure. This eliminates the need for further user intervention to solve these artifacts and makes OTR ideal for automation and the analysis of heterogeneous samples. With the former in mind, we propose a set of simple quantitative criteria that can be used, in combination, to select from a large set of initial reconstructions a subset that can be used as reliable references for refinement to higher resolution.

  2. METHODS FOR USING 3-D ULTRASOUND SPECKLE TRACKING IN BIAXIAL MECHANICAL TESTING OF BIOLOGICAL TISSUE SAMPLES

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Choon Hwai; Park, Dae Woo; Dutta, Debaditya; Simon, Marc; Kim, Kang

    2014-01-01

    Being multilayered and anisotropic, biological tissues such as cardiac and arterial walls are structurally complex, making full assessment and understanding of their mechanical behavior challenging. Current standard mechanical testing uses surface markers to track tissue deformations and does not provide deformation data below the surface. In the study described here, we found that combining mechanical testing with 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking could overcome this limitation. Rat myocardium was tested with a biaxial tester and was concurrently scanned with high-frequency ultrasound in three dimensions. The strain energy function was computed from stresses and strains using an iterative non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Because the strain energy function consists of terms for the base matrix and for embedded fibers, spatially varying fiber orientation was also computed by curve fitting. Using finite-element simulations, we first validated the accuracy of the non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Next, we compared experimentally measured rat myocardium strain energy function values with those in the literature and found a matching order of magnitude. Finally, we retained samples after the experiments for fiber orientation quantification using histology and found that the results satisfactorily matched those computed in the experiments. We conclude that 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking can be a useful addition to traditional mechanical testing of biological tissues and may provide the benefit of enabling fiber orientation computation. PMID:25616585

  3. Biological tracer method

    DOEpatents

    Strong-Gunderson, J.M.; Palumbo, A.V.

    1998-09-15

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. 2 figs.

  4. Biological tracer method

    DOEpatents

    Strong-Gunderson, Janet M.; Palumbo, Anthony V.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer.

  5. Biological induced corrosion of materials II: New test methods and experiences from mir station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klintworth, R.; Reher, H. J.; Viktorov, A. N.; Bohle, D.

    1999-09-01

    During previous long-term manned missions, more than 100 species of microorganisms have been identified on surfaces of materials (bacteria and fungi). Among them were potentially pathogenic ones (saprophytes) which are capable of active growth on artificial substrates, as well as technophilic bacteria and fungi causing damages (destruction and degradation) to various materials (metals and polymers), resulting in failures and disruptions in the functioning of equipment and hardware. Aboard a space vehicle some microclimatic parameters are optimal for microorganism growth: the atmospheric fluid condensate with its specific composition, chemical and/or antropogenic contaminants (human metobolic products, etc.) all are stimulating factors for the development of bacteria and mould fungi on materials of the interior and equipment of an orbital station during its operational phase(s). Especially Russian long-term missions (SALJUT, MIR) have demonstrated that uncontrolled interactions of microorganisms with materials will ultimately lead to the appearence of technological and medical risks, significantly influencing safety and reliability characteristics of individual as well as whole systems and/ or subsystems. For a first conclusion, it could be summarized, that countermeasures and anti-strategies focussing on Microbial Contamination Management (MCM) for the International Space Station (ISS, next long-term manned mission) at least require a new materials test approach. Our respective concept includes a combined age-ing/biocorrosion test sequence. It is represented here, as well as current status of MCM program, e.g. continuous monitoring (microbiological analyses), long-term disinfection, frequent cleaning methods, mathematical modeling of ISS, etc.

  6. Proposed biological testing methods for the United States incineration-at-sea research program

    SciTech Connect

    Strobel, C.J.; Gentile, J.H.; Schimmel, S.C.; Carr, R.S.; Williams, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    As part of the United States Environmental Protection Agency's Incineration-at-Sea research program, a suite of toxicity tests has been selected for assessing the toxicity of incinerator emissions generated during the combustion of chlorinated wastes. The test organisms for the five short-term chronic tests are the inland silverside, Menidia beryllina, the myside Mysidopsis bahia, the red macroalga Champia parvula, the polychaete Dinophilus gyrociliatus, and gametes from the sea urchin Arbacia punctulata. The durations of individual tests range from 2 hours to 7 days. The endpoints include survival, growth and reproductive effects. The results have demonstrated that the proposed methodologies can be used to test the toxicity of gaseous emissions, and that there appears to be no significant toxicity associated with the combustion products of a carrier fuel oil.

  7. Biological detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M; McDowell, Andrew F

    2014-04-15

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  8. Biological detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M; McDowell, Andrew F

    2013-02-26

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  9. Biological detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M.; McDowell, Andrew F.

    2015-11-24

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  10. A specific method for measurement of equine active myeloperoxidase in biological samples and in in vitro tests.

    PubMed

    Franck, Thierry; Kohnen, S; Deby-Dupont, G; Grulke, S; Deby, C; Serteyn, D

    2006-07-01

    An original method called SIEFED (specific immunological extraction followed by enzymatic detection) was developed for the specific detection of the activity of equine myeloperoxidase (MPO). The method consists of the extraction of MPO from aqueous solutions by immobilized anti-MPO antibodies followed by washing (to eliminate proteins and interfering molecules) and measurement of MPO activity using a detection system containing a fluorogenic substrate, hydrogen peroxide, and nitrite as reaction enhancer. The SIEFED technique was applied to study active MPO in horse biological fluids and the effects of 2 polyphenolic molecules, curcumin and resveratrol, on MPO activity. The detection limit of the SIEFED was 0.23 mU/ml. The SIEFED exhibited good precision with intra-assay and interassay coefficients of variation below 10% and 20%, respectively, for MPO activities ranging from 0.25 to 6.4 mU/ml. The activity of MPO was generally higher than 1 mU/ml in the fluids collected from horses with inflammatory diseases. Curcumin and resveratrol exerted a dose-dependent inhibition on MPO activity and, as they were removed before the enzymatic detection of MPO, the results suggest a direct drug-nzyme interaction or an enzyme structure modification by the drug. The SIEFED is a new tool that would be useful for specific detection of active MPO in complex media and for selection of MPO activity modulators.

  11. Method for biological purification

    DOEpatents

    Lucido, John A.; Keenan, Daniel; Premuzic, Eugene T.; Lin, Mow S.; Shelenkova, Ludmila

    2001-03-27

    An apparatus is disclosed for containing a microorganism culture in an active exponential growth and delivering a supply of microorganisms to an environment containing wastes for bio-augmenting the biodegradation of the wastes. The apparatus comprises a bioreactor and an operably connected controller. The bioreactor has a bioreactor chamber for containing a supply of microorganisms, a second chamber for containing a supply of water and inorganic nutrients, and a third chamber for containing a supply of organic nutrients. The bioreactor is operably connected to the controller in which a first pump is operably connected in fluid communication between the bioreactor chamber and the second chamber and third chamber, and a second pump is operably connected in fluid communication between the bioreactor chamber and the environment containing wastes to be biodegraded. The controller further includes a timer and regulator operably connected to the first and second pumps to effectively maintain the microorganisms in exponential growth in the bioreactor chamber and to deliver microorganisms to an environment to be treated. Also, disclosed is a method for bio-augmenting the biodegradation of wastes.

  12. Biomonitoring test procedures and biological criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Kszos, L.A.; Lipschultz, M.J.; Foster, W.E.

    1997-10-01

    The Water Environment Federation recently issued a special publication, Biomonitoring in the Water Environment. In this paper, the authors highlight the contents of the chapter 3, Biomonitoring Test Procedures, identify current trends in test procedures and introduce the concept of biological criteria (biocriteria). The book chapter (and this paper) focuses on freshwater and marine chronic and acute toxicity tests used in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits program to identify effluents and receiving waters containing toxic materials in acutely or chronically toxic concentrations. The two major categories of toxicity tests include acute tests and chronic tests. The USEPA chronic tests required in NPDEs permits have been shortened to 7 days by focusing on the most sensitive life-cycle stages; these tests are often referred to as short-term chronic tests. The type of test(s) required depend on NPDES permit requirements, objectives of the test, available resources, requirements of the test organisms, and effluent characteristics such as variability in flow or toxicity. The permit writer will determine the requirements for toxicity test(s) by considering such factors as dilution, effluent variability, and exposure variability. Whether the required test is acute or chronic, the objective of the test is to estimate the safe or no effect concentration which is defined as the concentration which will permit normal propagation of fish and other aquatic life in the receiving waters. In this paper, the authors review the types of toxicity tests, the commonly used test organisms, and the uses of toxicity test data. In addition, they briefly describe research on new methods and the use of biological criteria.

  13. Unit testing, model validation, and biological simulation.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Gopal P; Jacobs, Travis W; Watts, Mark D; Ghayoomie, S Vahid; Larson, Stephen D; Gerkin, Richard C

    2016-01-01

    The growth of the software industry has gone hand in hand with the development of tools and cultural practices for ensuring the reliability of complex pieces of software. These tools and practices are now acknowledged to be essential to the management of modern software. As computational models and methods have become increasingly common in the biological sciences, it is important to examine how these practices can accelerate biological software development and improve research quality. In this article, we give a focused case study of our experience with the practices of unit testing and test-driven development in OpenWorm, an open-science project aimed at modeling Caenorhabditis elegans. We identify and discuss the challenges of incorporating test-driven development into a heterogeneous, data-driven project, as well as the role of model validation tests, a category of tests unique to software which expresses scientific models. PMID:27635225

  14. Unit testing, model validation, and biological simulation

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Mark D.; Ghayoomie, S. Vahid; Larson, Stephen D.; Gerkin, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    The growth of the software industry has gone hand in hand with the development of tools and cultural practices for ensuring the reliability of complex pieces of software. These tools and practices are now acknowledged to be essential to the management of modern software. As computational models and methods have become increasingly common in the biological sciences, it is important to examine how these practices can accelerate biological software development and improve research quality. In this article, we give a focused case study of our experience with the practices of unit testing and test-driven development in OpenWorm, an open-science project aimed at modeling Caenorhabditis elegans. We identify and discuss the challenges of incorporating test-driven development into a heterogeneous, data-driven project, as well as the role of model validation tests, a category of tests unique to software which expresses scientific models. PMID:27635225

  15. Unit testing, model validation, and biological simulation

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Mark D.; Ghayoomie, S. Vahid; Larson, Stephen D.; Gerkin, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    The growth of the software industry has gone hand in hand with the development of tools and cultural practices for ensuring the reliability of complex pieces of software. These tools and practices are now acknowledged to be essential to the management of modern software. As computational models and methods have become increasingly common in the biological sciences, it is important to examine how these practices can accelerate biological software development and improve research quality. In this article, we give a focused case study of our experience with the practices of unit testing and test-driven development in OpenWorm, an open-science project aimed at modeling Caenorhabditis elegans. We identify and discuss the challenges of incorporating test-driven development into a heterogeneous, data-driven project, as well as the role of model validation tests, a category of tests unique to software which expresses scientific models.

  16. [Viral safety of biologicals: evaluation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) nucleic acid amplification test (NAT) assay and development of concentration method of HCV for sensitive detection by NAT].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Eriko; Yamaguchi, Teruhide

    2010-02-01

    The most important issue for the safety of biological products and blood products derived from human sources is how to prevent transmission of infectious agents. The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major public health problem due to its high prevalence. HCV is mainly transmitted by exposure to blood and highly infectious during the early window period with extremely low viral loads. Therefore it is important to develop more sensitive detection methods for HCV. In the case of blood products, both serological test and nucleic acid amplification test (NAT) are required to detect HCV. Since NAT is highly sensitive, establishment of a new standard is required for validation of NAT assay. NAT guideline and establishment of the standard for HCV RNA and HCV genotype panel is introduced in this review. On the other hand, to enhance the sensitivity of virus detection by NAT, a novel viral concentration method using polyethyleneimine (PEI)-conjugated magnetic beads (PEI beads) was developed. PEI beads concentration method is applicable to a wide range of viruses including HCV. Studies using the national standard for HCV RNA, HCV genotype panel and seroconversion panel, suggest that virus concentration method using PEI-beads is useful for improvement of the sensitivity of HCV detection by NAT and applicable to donor screening for HCV.

  17. Development of a quantitative mass spectrometry multi-attribute method for characterization, quality control testing and disposition of biologics

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Richard S; Nightlinger, Nancy S; Livingston, Brittney; Campbell, Phil; Bailey, Robert; Balland, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory agencies have recently recommended a Quality by Design (QbD) approach for the manufacturing of therapeutic molecules. A QbD strategy requires deep understanding at the molecular level of the attributes that are crucial for safety and efficacy and for insuring that the desired quality of the purified protein drug product is met at the end of the manufacturing process. A mass spectrometry (MS)-based approach to simultaneously monitor the extensive array of product quality attributes (PQAs) present on therapeutic molecules has been developed. This multi-attribute method (MAM) uses a combination of high mass accuracy / high resolution MS data generated by Orbitrap technology and automated identification and relative quantification of PQAs with dedicated software (Pinpoint). The MAM has the potential to replace several conventional electrophoretic and chromatographic methods currently used in Quality Control to release therapeutic molecules. The MAM represents an optimized analytical solution to focus on the attributes of the therapeutic molecule essential for function and implement QbD principles across process development, manufacturing and drug disposition. PMID:26186204

  18. Apparatus for automated testing of biological specimens

    DOEpatents

    Layne, Scott P.; Beugelsdijk, Tony J.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus for performing automated testing of infections biological specimens is disclosed. The apparatus comprise a process controller for translating user commands into test instrument suite commands, and a test instrument suite comprising a means to treat the specimen to manifest an observable result, and a detector for measuring the observable result to generate specimen test results.

  19. Using biological and physico-chemical test methods to assess the role of concrete mixture design in resistance to microbially induced corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, Mitchell Wayne

    Concrete is the most widely used material for construction of wastewater collection, storage, and treatment infrastructure. The chemical and physical characteristics of hydrated portland cement make it susceptible to degradation under highly acidic conditions. As a result, some concrete wastewater infrastructure may be susceptible to a multi-stage degradation process known as microbially induced corrosion, or MIC. MIC begins with the production of aqueous hydrogen sulfide (H2S(aq)) by anaerobic sulfate reducing bacteria present below the waterline. H2S(aq) partitions to the gas phase where it is oxidized to sulfuric acid by the aerobic sulfur oxidizing bacteria Thiobacillus that resides on concrete surfaces above the waterline. Sulfuric acid then attacks the cement paste portion of the concrete matrix through decalcification of calcium hydroxide and calcium silica hydrate coupled with the formation of expansive corrosion products. The attack proceeds inward resulting in reduced service life and potential failure of the concrete structure. There are several challenges associated with assessing a concrete's susceptibility to MIC. First, no standard laboratory tests exist to assess concrete resistance to MIC. Straightforward reproduction of MIC in the laboratory is complicated by the use of microorganisms and hydrogen sulfide gas. Physico-chemical tests simulating MIC by immersing concrete specimens in sulfuric acid offer a convenient alternative, but do not accurately capture the damage mechanisms associated with biological corrosion. Comparison of results between research studies is difficult due to discrepancies that can arise in experimental methods even if current ASTM standards are followed. This thesis presents two experimental methods to evaluate concrete resistance to MIC: one biological and one physico-chemical. Efforts are made to address the critical aspects of each testing method currently absent in the literature. The first method presented is a new test

  20. Fluid dynamics test method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayman, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Test method and apparatus determine fluid effective mass and damping in frequency range where effective mass may be considered as total mass less sum of slosh masses. Apparatus is designed so test tank and its mounting yoke are supported from structural test wall by series of flexures.

  1. Method for detecting biological toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Ligler, F.S.; Campbell, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    Biological toxins are indirectly detected by using polymerase chain reaction to amplify unique nucleic acid sequences coding for the toxins or enzymes unique to toxin synthesis. Buffer, primers coding for the unique nucleic acid sequences and an amplifying enzyme are added to a sample suspected of containing the toxin. The mixture is then cycled thermally to exponentially amplify any of these unique nucleic acid sequences present in the sample. The amplified sequences can be detected by various means, including fluorescence. Detection of the amplified sequences is indicative of the presence of toxin in the original sample. By using more than one set of labeled primers, the method can be used to simultaneously detect several toxins in a sample.

  2. ["Replacement Methods to Animal Testing" as the incentive topic of the German Ministry of Education and Research. Selected results on biological drugs].

    PubMed

    Diekmann, W; Hansper, M

    2001-01-01

    Since 1980, BMBF, in co-operation with the appointed project representative BEO (Biology, Energy, Environment), supports research projects with the central goal of the reduction of animal testing. Beginning with the announcement about promoting "Projects in Replacement Methods to Animal Testing" in 1984, a separate incentive topic of research was fostered within the framework of the biotechnological program of the German Federal Government. It is being updated continuously by current reports. The BMBF incentive topic represents the largest and longest running support activity in the field world-wide. During a time-span of 20 years, about 14 million German Marks (approx. 7 millions per annum) were provided, supporting about 230 projects. To date, all applications judged favourably in regard to contributing to potential and substantial savings could also be funded. The incentive topic is being realised in accordance with the 3R principle, following Russel and Burch. Primary attention is given to tests with high levels of stress or involving large numbers of animals. At present, special attention is given to the development and validation of alternatives to animal testing which are required by law. Emphasis is also put on joint projects by testing and regulation authorities together with industrial users in order to broaden the application of these methods and to aid in accelerating the amendment of respective legal regulations. The BMBF continues to adhere to the objectives of the emphasised support and will furnish funding at the present level in the future. Also, together with representatives of testing- and regulating authorities, of industry, science, respective federal authorities and animal protection, the BMBF has developed a new concept to expand funded activities in the future to include animal testing in basic research in a target-fashioned structure. This will be published shortly through a new public announcement. As a complement to the present

  3. Modern Methods of Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seeber, F

    1939-01-01

    After a brief survey of the commonly used single-value test methods, the importance of the determination of the incipient knock for the octane number is discussed and improvements suggested for the knock testing in the CFR engine. The DVL supercharge test method with its superiority of direct determination of fuel knock in each single cylinder of an airplane engine without involving structural changes, is described and the advantages of a multiple-value method enumerated. A diagrammatic presentation of the knock characteristics is presented.

  4. Ignitability test method. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.; Schimmel, Morry L.

    1990-01-01

    To determine functional performance of initiating devices, the NASA's Langley Research Center's novel ignitability research on percussion primers has been expanded in 1989 to include measurements of function time, the evaluation of six primer lots (five types), and the determination of the effects of the military cold-temperature requirement of -65 F and primer output closure disks. This test method, a major improvement over the prior primer output test methods, fully met all objectives, while showing a significant amount of ignition variability.

  5. LEAKAGE TESTING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    McAdams, Wm.A.; Foss, M.H.

    1958-08-12

    A method of testing containers for leaks is described, particularly the testing of containers or cans in which the uranium slugs for nuelear reactors are jacketed. This method involves the immersion of the can in water under l50 pounds of pressure, then removing, drying, and coating the can with anhydrous copper sulfate. Amy water absorbed by the can under pressure will exude and discolor the copper sulfate in the area about the leak.

  6. Ignitability test method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.; Schimmel, Morry L.

    1989-01-01

    To overcome serious weaknesses in determining the performance of initiating devices, a novel 'ignitability test method', representing actual design interfaces and ignition materials, has been developed. Ignition device output consists of heat, light, gas an burning particles. Past research methods have evaluated these parameters individually. This paper describes the development and demonstration of an ignitability test method combining all these parameters, and the quantitative assessment of the ignition performance of two widely used percussion primers, the M42C1-PA101 and the M42C2-793. The ignition materials used for this evaluation were several powder, granule and pellet sizes of black powder and boron-potassium nitrate. This test method should be useful for performance evaluation of all initiator types, quality assurance, evaluation of ignition interfaces, and service life studies of initiators and ignition materials.

  7. Standard environmental test methods

    SciTech Connect

    Schafer, D R

    1983-12-01

    This guide to uniformity in testing is intended primarily as an aid to persons responsible for designing, developing, and performing environmental tests. It will also be of use to those concerned with production, evaluation, and quality control and assurance. Checklists for preparing the environmental testing portion of product specifications are included, as are copies of Process Standards covering the instrumentation, equipment, and methods for use in environmental testing of Sandia National Laboratories components. Techniques and equipment are constantly improving. This version of SC-4452 reflects current state-of-the-art and practice in environmental testing. Previously existing sections of the document have ben updated and new ones have been added, e.g., Transient Testing on Vibration Machines.

  8. Nonparametric methods for molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Wittkowski, Knut M; Song, Tingting

    2010-01-01

    In 2003, the completion of the Human Genome Project (1) together with advances in computational resources (2) were expected to launch an era where the genetic and genomic contributions to many common diseases would be found. In the years following, however, researchers became increasingly frustrated as most reported 'findings' could not be replicated in independent studies (3). To improve the signal/noise ratio, it was suggested to increase the number of cases to be included to tens of thousands (4), a requirement that would dramatically restrict the scope of personalized medicine. Similarly, there was little success in elucidating the gene-gene interactions involved in complex diseases or even in developing criteria for assessing their phenotypes. As a partial solution to these enigmata, we here introduce a class of statistical methods as the 'missing link' between advances in genetics and informatics. As a first step, we provide a unifying view of a plethora of nonparametric tests developed mainly in the 1940s, all of which can be expressed as u-statistics. Then, we will extend this approach to reflect categorical and ordinal relationships between variables, resulting in a flexible and powerful approach to deal with the impact of (1) multiallelic genetic loci, (2) poly-locus genetic regions, and (3) oligo-genetic and oligo-genomic collaborative interactions on complex phenotypes.

  9. Nonparametric Methods in Molecular Biology

    PubMed Central

    Wittkowski, Knut M.; Song, Tingting

    2010-01-01

    In 2003, the completion of the Human Genome Project[1] together with advances in computational resources[2] were expected to launch an era where the genetic and genomic contributions to many common diseases would be found. In the years following, however, researchers became increasingly frustrated as most reported ‘findings’ could not be replicated in independent studies[3]. To improve the signal/noise ratio, it was suggested to increase the number of cases to be included to tens of thousands[4], a requirement that would dramatically restrict the scope of personalized medicine. Similarly, there was little success in elucidating the gene–gene interactions involved in complex diseases or even in developing criteria for assessing their phenotypes. As a partial solution to these enigmata, we here introduce a class of statistical methods as the ‘missing link’ between advances in genetics and informatics. As a first step, we provide a unifying view of a plethora of non-parametric tests developed mainly in the 1940s, all of which can be expressed as u-statistics. Then, we will extend this approach to reflect categorical and ordinal relationships between variables, resulting in a flexible and powerful approach to deal with the impact of (1) multi-allelic genetic loci, (2) poly-locus genetic regions, and (3) oligo-genetic and oligo-genomic collaborative interactions on complex phenotypes. PMID:20652502

  10. Statistics and Hypothesis Testing in Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maret, Timothy J.; Ziemba, Robert E.

    1997-01-01

    Suggests that early in their education students be taught to use basic statistical tests as rigorous methods of comparing experimental results with scientific hypotheses. Stresses that students learn how to use statistical tests in hypothesis-testing by applying them in actual hypothesis-testing situations. To illustrate, uses questions such as…

  11. [Biological tests of sol-gel biomaterials].

    PubMed

    Ulatowska-Jarza, A; Podbielska, H; Szymonowicz, M; Staniszewska-Kuś, J; Paluch, D

    2000-01-01

    Recently, the sol-gel based biomaterials are extendedly investigated in emphasis on theirs medical applications. In this respect it is important to investigate the influence of sol-gel matrices on biological systems. The results of laboratory and biological testing of water extracts of sol-gels are presented in this work. It was proved that it is possible to construct the sol-gels that are not cytotoxic for which the haemolytic reactions fulfils the foreseen norms. This can be achieved by heating the materials in certain temperatures (higher than 350 degrees C). This effect can also be reached by suitably long aging (minimum 6 months).

  12. Method of measurement in biological systems

    DOEpatents

    Turteltaub, K.W.; Vogel, J.S.; Felton, J.S.; Gledhill, B.L.: Davis, J.C.; Stanker, L.H.

    1993-05-11

    A method is disclosed of quantifying molecules in biological substances, comprising: selecting a biological host in which radioisotopes are present in concentrations equal to or less than those in the ambient biosphere; preparing a long-lived radioisotope labeled reactive chemical specie; administering the chemical specie to the biological host in doses sufficiently low to avoid significant overt damage to the biological system; allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and interaction of the chemical specie with the host throughout the biological system of the host; isolating a reacted fraction of the biological substance from the host in a manner sufficient to avoid contamination of the substance from extraneous sources; converting the fraction of biological substance by suitable means to a material which efficiently produces charged ions in at least one of several possible ion sources without introduction of significant isotopic fractionation; and measuring the radioisotope concentration in the material by means of direct isotopic counting.

  13. The developmental toxicity testing of biologics.

    PubMed

    Hazelden, Keith P

    2013-01-01

    The characteristics of biologic drugs, as compared with small molecules, confer significant advantages for both the drug developer and the prospective patients. The necessity for, and the timing of, developmental toxicity testing in the preclinical program must be considered. Choice of an appropriate test system is of particular importance, one that shows pharmacodynamic activity comparable to man. Where the conventional rodent/non-rodent species show such functional cross-reactivity, those species can be used in developmental testing, but often the only relevant species will be a nonhuman primate, in which case an extended study design (the ePPND) should be the default. Such an approach provides appropriate toxicity screening while reducing animal usage.

  14. A new biological test of water toxicity-yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae conductometric test.

    PubMed

    Dolezalova, Jaroslava; Rumlova, Lubomira

    2014-11-01

    This new biological test of water toxicity is based on monitoring of specific conductivity changes of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae suspension as a result of yeast fermentation activity inhibition in toxic conditions. The test was verified on ten substances with various mechanisms of toxic effect and the results were compared with two standard toxicity tests based on Daphnia magna mobility inhibition (EN ISO 6341) and Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence inhibition (EN ISO 11348-2) and with the results of the S. cerevisiae lethal test (Rumlova and Dolezalova, 2012). The new biological test - S. cerevisiae conductometric test - is an express method developed primarily for field conditions. It is applicable in case of need of immediate information about water toxicity. Fast completion is an advantage of this test (time necessary for test completion is about 60min), the test is simple and the test organism - dried instant yeast - belongs among its biggest advantages because of its long-term storage life and broad availability.

  15. Human Biology, A Guide to Field Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, J. S.; Lourie, J. A.

    The aim of this handbook is to provide, in a form suitable for use in the field, instructions on the whole range of methods required for the fulfillment of human biological studies on a comparative basis. Certain of these methods can be used to carry out the rapid surveys on growth, physique, and genetic constitution. They are also appropriate for…

  16. Method of measurement in biological systems

    DOEpatents

    Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Vogel, John S.; Felton, James S.; Gledhill, Barton L.; Davis, Jay C.

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of quantifying molecules in biological substances comprising: a. selecting a biological host in which radioisotopes are present in concentrations equal to or less than those in the ambient biosphere, b. preparing a long-lived radioisotope labeled reactive chemical specie, c. administering said chemical specie to said biological host in doses sufficiently low to avoid significant overt damage to the biological system thereof, d. allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and interaction of said chemical specie with said host throughout said biological system of said host, e. isolating a reacted fraction of the biological substance from said host in a manner sufficient to avoid contamination of said substance from extraneous sources, f. converting said fraction of biological substance by suitable means to a material which efficiently produces charged ions in at least one of several possible ion sources without introduction of significant isotopic fractionation, and, g. measuring the radioisotope concentration in said material by means of direct isotopic counting.

  17. Method of measurement in biological systems

    DOEpatents

    Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Vogel, John S.; Felton, James S.; Gledhill, Barton L.; Davis, Jay C.; Stanker, Larry H.

    1993-05-11

    Disclosed is a method of quantifying molecules in biological substances, comprising: a. selecting a biological host in which radioisotopes are present in concentrations equal to or less than those in the ambient biosphere, b. preparing a long-lived radioisotope labeled reactive chemical specie, c. administering said chemical specie to said biological host in doses sufficiently low to avoid significant overt damage to the biological system thereof, d. allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and interaction of said chemical specie with said host throughout said biological system of said host, e. isolating a reacted fraction of the biological substance from said host in a manner sufficient to avoid contamination of said substance from extraneous sources, f. converting said fraction of biological substance by suitable means to a material which efficiently produces charged ions in at least one of several possible ion sources without introduction of significant isotopic fractionation, and, g. measuring the radioisotope concentration in said material by means of direct isotopic counting.

  18. Method of measurement in biological systems

    DOEpatents

    Turteltaub, K.W.; Vogel, J.S.; Felton, J.S.; Gledhill, B.L.; Davis, J.C.

    1994-12-27

    Disclosed is a method of quantifying molecules in biological substances comprising: a. selecting a biological host in which radioisotopes are present in concentrations equal to or less than those in the ambient biosphere, b. preparing a long-lived radioisotope labeled reactive chemical specie, c. administering the chemical specie to the biological host in doses sufficiently low to avoid significant overt damage to the biological system, d. allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and interaction of the chemical specie with the host throughout the biological system of the host, e. isolating a reacted fraction of the biological substance from the host in a manner sufficient to avoid contamination of the substance from extraneous sources, f. converting the fraction of biological substance by suitable means to a material which efficiently produces charged ions in at least one of several possible ion sources without introduction of significant isotopic fractionation, and, g. measuring the radioisotope concentration in the material by means of direct isotopic counting. 5 figures.

  19. Accelerated Test Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansen, Ralph

    1995-01-01

    Neural network systems were evaluated for use in predicting wear of mechanical systems. Three different neural network software simulation packages were utilized in order to create models of tribological wear tests. Representative simple, medium, and high complexity simulation packages were selected. Pin-on-disk, rub shoe, and four-ball tribological test data was used for training, testing, and verification of the neural network models. Results showed mixed success. The neural networks were able to predict results with some accuracy if the number of input variables was low or the amount of training data was high. Increased neural network complexity resulted in more accurate results, however there was a point of diminishing return. Medium complexity models were the best trade off between accuracy and computing time requirements. A NASA Technical Memorandum and a Society of Tribologists and Lubrication Engineers paper are being published which detail the work.

  20. Nitric oxide methods in seed biology.

    PubMed

    Bethke, Paul C; Libourel, Igor G L; Vitecek, Jan; Jones, Russell L

    2011-01-01

    The ubiquitous signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role in seed biology. Experiments with this biologically important gas require special provisions because NO in aerobic environments is readily converted into other oxides of nitrogen. In this chapter, we describe methods for the application of NO as a gas, and through the use of NO-donor compounds. We included information on the removal or reduction of NO with NO scavengers. Methods for detecting NO using NO-reactive fluorescent probes, and an apparatus incorporating an oxidizer column are also described.

  1. Report of the Interagency biological methods workshop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gurtz, Martin E.; Muir, Thomas A.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey hosted the Interagency Biological Methods Workshop in Reston, Virginia, during June 22-23, 1993. The purposes of the workshop were to (1) promote better communication among Federal agencies that are using or developing biological methods in water-quality assessment programs for streams and rivers, and (2) facilitate the sharing of data and interagency collaboration. The workshop was attended by 45 biologists representing numerous Federal agencies and programs, and a few regional and State programs that were selected to provide additional perspectives. The focus of the workshop was community assessment methods for fish, invertebrates, and algae; physical habitat characterization; and chemical analyses of biological tissues. Charts comparing program objectives, design features, and sampling methods were compiled from materials that were provided by participating agencies prior to the workshop and formed the basis for small workgroup discussions. Participants noted that differences in methods among programs were often necessitated by differences in program objectives. However, participants agreed that where programs have identified similar data needs, the use of common methods is beneficial. Opportunities discussed for improving data compatibility and information sharing included (1) modifying existing methods, (2) adding parameters, (3) improving access to data through shared databases (potentially with common database structures), and (4) future collaborative efforts that range from research on selected protocol questions to followup meetings and continued discussions.

  2. METHOD FOR TESTING COATINGS

    DOEpatents

    Johns, I.B.; Newton, A.S.

    1958-09-01

    A method is described for detecting pin hole imperfections in coatings on uranium-metal objects. Such coated objects are contacted with a heated atmosphere of gaseous hydrogen and imperfections present in the coatings will allow the uranlum to react with the hydrogen to form uranium hydride. Since uranium hydride is less dense than uranium metal it will swell, causing enlargement of the coating defeot and rendering it visible.

  3. Ultrasonic testing method

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, N.C.

    1989-02-21

    This patent describes an ultrasonic sound scanning method for detection of ultrasonic anomalies in a workpiece having an inspection surface and at least one formation which results in an echo-masked zone in the workpiece, the method including carrying out an inspection pass by (a) directing a beam of ultrasonic sound pulses from a probe along a beam axis through a transmission medium and impinging the beam upon the inspection surface at a selected impingement angle and thence into the workpiece, (b) receiving echo pulses thereby reflected from the workpiece, (c) displaying the echo pulses to reveal those, if any, which indicate the existence of anomalies within the workpiece, and (d) traversing the beam in a pre-selected path along the inspection surface, the improvement comprising: making one or more first inspection passes with the probe oriented so that, relative to the workpiece, the beam lies within one or more first scanning planes which are non-perpendicular to at least one of the return-reflecting formation at its point or respective points of intersection with the first plane or planes, whereby to reduce the volume of the echo-masked zone relative to that which would be generated with the probe oriented in a corresponding number or one or more scanning planes which are perpendicular to at least one return-reflecting formation.

  4. The comparative method in conservation biology.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Diana O; Owens, Ian P F

    2004-07-01

    The phylogenetic comparative approach is a statistical method for analyzing correlations between traits across species. Whilst it has revolutionized evolutionary biology, can it work for conservation biology? Although it is correlative, advocates of the comparative method hope that it will reveal general mechanisms in conservation, provide shortcuts for prioritizing conservation research, and enable us to predict which species will experience (or create) problems in the future. Here, we ask whether these stated management goals are being achieved. We conclude that comparative methods are stimulating research into the ecological mechanisms underlying conservation, and are providing information for preemptive screening of problem species. But comparative analyses of extinction risk to date have tended to be too broad in scope to provide shortcuts to conserving particular endangered species. Correlates of vulnerability to conservation problems are often taxon, region and threat specific, so models must be narrowly focused to be of maximum practical use.

  5. Raise Test Scores: Integrate Biology and Calculus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukens, Jeffrey D.; Feinstein, Sheryl

    This paper presents the results of research that compared the academic achievement of high school students enrolled in an integrated Advanced Placement Biology/Advanced Placement Calculus course with students enrolled in traditional Advanced Placement Biology and Advanced Placement Calculus courses. Study subjects included high school students…

  6. Adverse Outcome Pathways and Systems Biology as Conceptual Approaches to Support Development of 21st Century Test Methods and Extrapolation Tools

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proposed paradigm for “Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century” supports the development of mechanistically-based, high-throughput in vitro assays as a potential cost effective and scientifically-sound alternative to some whole animal hazard testing. To accomplish this long-term...

  7. Algorithmic and analytical methods in network biology.

    PubMed

    Koyutürk, Mehmet

    2010-01-01

    During the genomic revolution, algorithmic and analytical methods for organizing, integrating, analyzing, and querying biological sequence data proved invaluable. Today, increasing availability of high-throughput data pertaining to functional states of biomolecules, as well as their interactions, enables genome-scale studies of the cell from a systems perspective. The past decade witnessed significant efforts on the development of computational infrastructure for large-scale modeling and analysis of biological systems, commonly using network models. Such efforts lead to novel insights into the complexity of living systems, through development of sophisticated abstractions, algorithms, and analytical techniques that address a broad range of problems, including the following: (1) inference and reconstruction of complex cellular networks; (2) identification of common and coherent patterns in cellular networks, with a view to understanding the organizing principles and building blocks of cellular signaling, regulation, and metabolism; and (3) characterization of cellular mechanisms that underlie the differences between living systems, in terms of evolutionary diversity, development and differentiation, and complex phenotypes, including human disease. These problems pose significant algorithmic and analytical challenges because of the inherent complexity of the systems being studied; limitations of data in terms of availability, scope, and scale; intractability of resulting computational problems; and limitations of reference models for reliable statistical inference. This article provides a broad overview of existing algorithmic and analytical approaches to these problems, highlights key biological insights provided by these approaches, and outlines emerging opportunities and challenges in computational systems biology.

  8. Algorithmic and analytical methods in network biology

    PubMed Central

    Koyutürk, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    During genomic revolution, algorithmic and analytical methods for organizing, integrating, analyzing, and querying biological sequence data proved invaluable. Today, increasing availability of high-throughput data pertaining functional states of biomolecules, as well as their interactions, enables genome-scale studies of the cell from a systems perspective. The past decade witnessed significant efforts on the development of computational infrastructure for large-scale modeling and analysis of biological systems, commonly using network models. Such efforts lead to novel insights into the complexity of living systems, through development of sophisticated abstractions, algorithms, and analytical techniques that address a broad range of problems, including the following: (1) inference and reconstruction of complex cellular networks; (2) identification of common and coherent patterns in cellular networks, with a view to understanding the organizing principles and building blocks of cellular signaling, regulation, and metabolism; and (3) characterization of cellular mechanisms that underlie the differences between living systems, in terms of evolutionary diversity, development and differentiation, and complex phenotypes, including human disease. These problems pose significant algorithmic and analytical challenges because of the inherent complexity of the systems being studied; limitations of data in terms of availability, scope, and scale; intractability of resulting computational problems; and limitations of reference models for reliable statistical inference. This article provides a broad overview of existing algorithmic and analytical approaches to these problems, highlights key biological insights provided by these approaches, and outlines emerging opportunities and challenges in computational systems biology. PMID:20836029

  9. Wave basin model tests of technical-biological bank protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenmann, J.

    2012-04-01

    Sloped embankments of inland waterways are usually protected from erosion and other negative im-pacts of ship-induced hydraulic loads by technical revetments consisting of riprap. Concerning the dimensioning of such bank protection there are several design rules available, e.g. the "Principles for the Design of Bank and Bottom Protection for Inland Waterways" or the Code of Practice "Use of Standard Construction Methods for Bank and Bottom Protection on Waterways" issued by the BAW (Federal Waterways Engineering and Research Institute). Since the European Water Framework Directive has been put into action special emphasis was put on natural banks. Therefore the application of technical-biological bank protection is favoured. Currently design principles for technical-biological bank protection on inland waterways are missing. The existing experiences mainly refer to flowing waters with no or low ship-induced hydraulic loads on the banks. Since 2004 the Federal Waterways Engineering and Research Institute has been tracking the re-search and development project "Alternative Technical-Biological Bank Protection on Inland Water-ways" in company with the Federal Institute of Hydrology. The investigation to date includes the ex-amination of waterway sections where technical- biological bank protection is applied locally. For the development of design rules for technical-biological bank protection investigations shall be carried out in a next step, considering the mechanics and resilience of technical-biological bank protection with special attention to ship-induced hydraulic loads. The presentation gives a short introduction into hydraulic loads at inland waterways and their bank protection. More in detail model tests of a willow brush mattress as a technical-biological bank protec-tion in a wave basin are explained. Within the scope of these tests the brush mattresses were ex-posed to wave impacts to determine their resilience towards hydraulic loads. Since the

  10. Unidirectional Fabric Drape Testing Method

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Zaihuan; Yang, Jingzhi; Zhou, Ting; Zhou, Hua

    2015-01-01

    In most cases, fabrics such as curtains, skirts, suit pants and so on are draped under their own gravity parallel to fabric plane while the gravity is perpendicular to fabric plane in traditional drape testing method. As a result, it does not conform to actual situation and the test data is not convincing enough. To overcome this problem, this paper presents a novel method which simulates the real mechanical conditions and ensures the gravity is parallel to the fabric plane. This method applied a low-cost Kinect Sensor device to capture the 3-dimensional (3D) drape profile, thus we obtained the drape degree parameters and aesthetic parameters by 3D reconstruction and image processing and analysis techniques. The experiment was conducted on our self-devised drape-testing instrument by choosing different kinds of weave structure fabrics as our testing samples and the results were compared with those of traditional method and subjective evaluation. Through regression and correlation analysis we found that this novel testing method was significantly correlated with the traditional and subjective evaluation method. We achieved a new, non-contact 3D measurement method for drape testing, namely unidirectional fabric drape testing method. This method is more suitable for evaluating drape behavior because it is more in line with actual mechanical conditions of draped fabrics and has a well consistency with the requirements of visual and aesthetic style of fabrics. PMID:26600387

  11. Unidirectional Fabric Drape Testing Method.

    PubMed

    Mei, Zaihuan; Shen, Wei; Wang, Yan; Yang, Jingzhi; Zhou, Ting; Zhou, Hua

    2015-01-01

    In most cases, fabrics such as curtains, skirts, suit pants and so on are draped under their own gravity parallel to fabric plane while the gravity is perpendicular to fabric plane in traditional drape testing method. As a result, it does not conform to actual situation and the test data is not convincing enough. To overcome this problem, this paper presents a novel method which simulates the real mechanical conditions and ensures the gravity is parallel to the fabric plane. This method applied a low-cost Kinect Sensor device to capture the 3-dimensional (3D) drape profile, thus we obtained the drape degree parameters and aesthetic parameters by 3D reconstruction and image processing and analysis techniques. The experiment was conducted on our self-devised drape-testing instrument by choosing different kinds of weave structure fabrics as our testing samples and the results were compared with those of traditional method and subjective evaluation. Through regression and correlation analysis we found that this novel testing method was significantly correlated with the traditional and subjective evaluation method. We achieved a new, non-contact 3D measurement method for drape testing, namely unidirectional fabric drape testing method. This method is more suitable for evaluating drape behavior because it is more in line with actual mechanical conditions of draped fabrics and has a well consistency with the requirements of visual and aesthetic style of fabrics. PMID:26600387

  12. Vestigial Biological Structures: A Classroom-Applicable Test of Creationist Hypotheses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senter, Phil; Ambrocio, Zenis; Andrade, Julia B.; Foust, Katanya K.; Gaston, Jasmine E.; Lewis, Ryshonda P.; Liniewski, Rachel M.; Ragin, Bobby A.; Robinson, Khanna L.; Stanley, Shane G.

    2015-01-01

    Lists of vestigial biological structures in biology textbooks are so short that some young-Earth creationist authors claim that scientists have lost confidence in the existence of vestigial structures and can no longer identify any verifiable ones. We tested these hypotheses with a method that is easily adapted to biology classes. We used online…

  13. 2010 Diffraction Methods in Structural Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ana Gonzalez Phone:650-926-8682

    2011-03-10

    Advances in basic methodologies have played a major role in the dramatic progress in macromolecular crystallography over the past decade, both in terms of overall productivity and in the increasing complexity of the systems being successfully tackled. The 2010 Gordon Research Conference on Diffraction Methods in Structural Biology will, as in the past, focus on the most recent developments in methodology, covering all aspects of the process from crystallization to model building and refinement, complemented by examples of structural highlights and complementary methods. Extensive discussion will be encouraged and it is hoped that all attendees will participate by giving oral or poster presentations, the latter using the excellent poster display area available at Bates College. The relatively small size and informal atmosphere of the meeting provides an excellent opportunity for all participants, especially younger scientists, to meet and exchange ideas with leading methods developers.

  14. Molecular Biological Methods in Environmental Engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guocai; Wei, Li; Chang, Chein-Chi; Zhang, Yuhua; Wei, Dong

    2016-10-01

    Bacteria, acting as catalysts, perform the function of degrading pollutants. Molecular biological techniques play an important role in research on the community analysis, the composition and the functions of complex microbial communities. The development of secondary high-throughput pyrosequencing techiniques enhances the understanding of the composition of the microbial community. The literatures of 2015 indicated that 16S rDNA gene as genetic tag is still the important method for bacteria identification and classification. 454 high throughput sequencing and Illumina MiSeq sequencing have been the primary and widely recognized methods to analyze the microbial. This review will provide environmental engineers and microbiologists an overview of important advancements in molecular techniques and highlight the application of these methods in diverse environments. PMID:27620079

  15. Test methods for textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minguet, Pierre J.; Fedro, Mark J.; Gunther, Christian K.

    1994-01-01

    Various test methods commonly used for measuring properties of tape laminate composites were evaluated to determine their suitability for the testing of textile composites. Three different types of textile composites were utilized in this investigation: two-dimensional (2-D) triaxial braids, stitched uniweave fabric, and three-dimensional (3-D) interlock woven fabric. Four 2-D braid architectures, five stitched laminates, and six 3-D woven architectures were tested. All preforms used AS4 fibers and were resin-transfer-molded with Shell RSL-1895 epoxy resin. Ten categories of material properties were investigated: tension, open-hole tension, compression, open-hole compression, in-plane shear, filled-hole tension, bolt bearing, interlaminar tension, interlaminar shear, and interlaminar fracture toughness. Different test methods and specimen sizes were considered for each category of test. Strength and stiffness properties obtained with each of these methods are documented in this report for all the material systems mentioned above.

  16. Multidimensional Computerized Adaptive Testing for Indonesia Junior High School Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Bor-Chen; Daud, Muslem; Yang, Chih-Wei

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a curriculum-based multidimensional computerized adaptive test that was developed for Indonesia junior high school Biology. In adherence to the Indonesian curriculum of different Biology dimensions, 300 items was constructed, and then tested to 2238 students. A multidimensional random coefficients multinomial logit model was…

  17. Testing biodegradability with standardized methods.

    PubMed

    Pagga, U

    1997-12-01

    Laboratory test methods are used by industry laboratories to determine biodegradability, an important parameter for the evaluation of the ecological behaviour of substances. Biodegradability has a key role due to the simple fact that a degradable substance will cause no long term risk in the environment. The great variety of biodegradation processes in the natural environment and in technical plants for treating waste water and solid wastes gave rise to a rather large number of test methods based on different test principles. To guarantee the acceptance of the test results by authorities and customers internationally standardized methods (ISO, OECD) and established quality criteria (GLP, EN 45,000, ISO 9000) are used. PMID:9415981

  18. Comparison of agriculture biology and general biology testing outcomes in Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despain, Deric Walter

    Agriculture education can take scientific topics to higher levels, emphasize scientific concepts, involve hands-on learning, and develop interrelationships with the other sciences, thus making the living and non-living world around them relevant for students. Prior to 1996, agriculture education was not considered adequate to prepare Utah high school students to meet state biology requirements. The appropriateness of making that equalizing decision in 1996 was not tested until this 2014 study, comparing student test scores on the state biology test for general biology and agriculture biology students. The 2008-2012 data were collected from the Utah Department of Education Data and Statistics, utilizing a descriptive comparative post-test only analysis. As seen in this study, not only did B/AS students tend to score lower than their General Biology counterparts, in multiple cases this difference was significant (p ≤ .05). This contrary finding challenges the theoretical foundation of this study. As a result of this study three implications were made; (a) the Utah CRT-Biology test is not a reliable gauge of academic achievement in agriculture biology, (b) agriculture students in the sample population have not been taught with rigorous biology standards, and (c) biology standards taught in agricultural biology classes are not aligned with content tested by the biology portion of the Utah CRT-Biology test standards. The results of this study indicate to stakeholders that there is a gap occurring within the B/AS education, and the need to reevaluate the biology curriculum delivery to its population may possibly be in need of immediate action.

  19. Thermal well-test method

    DOEpatents

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Doughty, Christine A.

    1985-01-01

    A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

  20. Methods for testing transport models

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, C.; Cox, D.

    1991-11-14

    Substantial progress has been made over the past year on six aspects of the work supported by this grant. As a result, we have in hand for the first time a fairly complete set of transport models and improved statistical methods for testing them against large databases. We also have initial results of such tests. These results indicate that careful application of presently available transport theories can reasonably well produce a remarkably wide variety of tokamak data.

  1. Biologically false positive reactions to serological tests for syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Kostant, George H.

    1956-01-01

    The frequency of biologically false positive reactions to serological tests for syphilis depends on a number of factors, including the individual immunological response, the number and type of serological tests performed, and the stage of the disease producing such reactions; the relative importance of such factors is discussed. The author also considers in detail the diseases or conditions giving rise to acute or chronic biologically false positive reactions. A variety of verification tests exists for differentiating the true syphilitic reaction from the biologically false positive reaction, but none is so accurate as the Treponema pallidum immobilization and immune adherence tests, which the author considers should be used when others have proved inconclusive. In the final section of his paper, he indicates the steps to be followed in attempting to distinguish between latent syphilis and biologically false positive reactions in persons with positive serological tests but no anamnestic or clinical evidence of syphilis. PMID:13329848

  2. Thermal well-test method

    DOEpatents

    Tsang, C.F.; Doughty, C.A.

    1984-02-24

    A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir is disclosed. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

  3. Method and apparatus for biological sequence comparison

    DOEpatents

    Marr, Thomas G.; Chang, William I-Wei

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for comparing biological sequences from a known source of sequences, with a subject (query) sequence. The apparatus takes as input a set of target similarity levels (such as evolutionary distances in units of PAM), and finds all fragments of known sequences that are similar to the subject sequence at each target similarity level, and are long enough to be statistically significant. The invention device filters out fragments from the known sequences that are too short, or have a lower average similarity to the subject sequence than is required by each target similarity level. The subject sequence is then compared only to the remaining known sequences to find the best matches. The filtering member divides the subject sequence into overlapping blocks, each block being sufficiently large to contain a minimum-length alignment from a known sequence. For each block, the filter member compares the block with every possible short fragment in the known sequences and determines a best match for each comparison. The determined set of short fragment best matches for the block provide an upper threshold on alignment values. Regions of a certain length from the known sequences that have a mean alignment value upper threshold greater than a target unit score are concatenated to form a union. The current block is compared to the union and provides an indication of best local alignment with the subject sequence.

  4. Method and apparatus for biological sequence comparison

    DOEpatents

    Marr, T.G.; Chang, W.I.

    1997-12-23

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for comparing biological sequences from a known source of sequences, with a subject (query) sequence. The apparatus takes as input a set of target similarity levels (such as evolutionary distances in units of PAM), and finds all fragments of known sequences that are similar to the subject sequence at each target similarity level, and are long enough to be statistically significant. The invention device filters out fragments from the known sequences that are too short, or have a lower average similarity to the subject sequence than is required by each target similarity level. The subject sequence is then compared only to the remaining known sequences to find the best matches. The filtering member divides the subject sequence into overlapping blocks, each block being sufficiently large to contain a minimum-length alignment from a known sequence. For each block, the filter member compares the block with every possible short fragment in the known sequences and determines a best match for each comparison. The determined set of short fragment best matches for the block provide an upper threshold on alignment values. Regions of a certain length from the known sequences that have a mean alignment value upper threshold greater than a target unit score are concatenated to form a union. The current block is compared to the union and provides an indication of best local alignment with the subject sequence. 5 figs.

  5. Special Test Methods for Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, S.

    1984-01-01

    Various methods are described for measuring heat generation in primary and secondary batteries as well as the specific heat of batteries and cell thermal conductance. Problems associated with determining heat generation in large batteries are examined. Special attention is given to monitoring temperature gradients in nickel cadmium cells, the use of auxiliary electrodes for conducting tests on battery charge control, evaluating the linear sweep of current from charge to discharge, and determining zero current voltage. The fast transient behavior of batteries in the microsecond range, and the electrical conductance of nickel sinters in the thickness direction are also considered. Mechanical problems experienced in the vibration of Ni-Cd batteries and tests to simulate cyclic fatigue of the steel table connecting the plates to the comb are considered. Methods of defining the distribution of forces when cells are compressed during battery packaging are also explored.

  6. A poroelastic immersed boundary method with applications to cell biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strychalski, Wanda; Copos, Calina A.; Lewis, Owen L.; Guy, Robert D.

    2015-02-01

    The immersed boundary method is a widely used mixed Eulerian/Lagrangian framework for simulating the motion of elastic structures immersed in viscous fluids. In the traditional immersed boundary method, the fluid and structure move with the same velocity field. In this work, a model based on the immersed boundary method is presented for simulating poroelastic media in which the fluid permeates a porous, elastic structure of small volume fraction that moves with its own velocity field. Two distinct methods for calculating elastic stresses are presented and compared. The methods are validated on a radially symmetric test problem by comparing with a finite difference solution of the classical equations of poroelasticity. Finally, two applications of the modeling framework to cell biology are provided: cellular blebbing and cell crawling. It is shown that in both examples, poroelastic effects are necessary to explain the relevant mechanics.

  7. Biologic concentration testing in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Byron P; Sandborn, William J; Cheifetz, Adam S

    2015-06-01

    Anti-TNF medications have revolutionized the care of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. However, despite an initial robust effect, loss of response is common and long-term results are disappointing. Much of this lack of durability may be due to inadequate dose optimization, and recent studies suggest a correlation between serum drug concentrations and clinical outcomes. Currently, in clinical practice, measurement of drug concentrations and antibodies to drug are typically performed only when a patient presents with active inflammatory bowel disease symptoms or during a potential immune-mediated reaction to anti-TNF ("reactive" setting). However, proactive monitoring of anti-TNF concentrations with titration to a therapeutic window (i.e., therapeutic concentration monitoring) represents a new strategy with many potential clinical benefits including prevention of immunogenicity, less need for IFX rescue therapy, and greater durability of IFX treatment. This review will cover the salient features of anti-TNF pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and provide a rational approach for the use of anti-TNF concentration testing in both the reactive and proactive settings. PMID:25590953

  8. UNDERSTANDINGS OF BSCS BIOLOGY STUDENTS AS DETERMINED BY INSTRUCTIONAL TESTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ROBINSON, JAMES T.

    EIGHT INSTRUCTIONAL TESTS SPANNED THE CURRICULUM OF ONE YEAR OF BIOLOGY STUDY. THE FIRST CONCERNED THE NATURE OF SCIENCE INCLUDED 4 AREAS OF EMPHASIS--THE NATURE AND FUNCTION OF HYPOTHESIS, THE IDEA OF CONTROLS IN EXPERIMENTS, INTERPRETATION OF GRAPHED DATA, AND THE NATURE OF DATA. THE SECOND TEST WAS DESIGNED TO SHOW AN UNDERSTANDING OF…

  9. Modeling the Drug Discovery Process: The Isolation and Biological Testing of Eugenol from Clove Oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, William H.; Smiley, Patricia M.

    2002-01-01

    This experiment describes the isolation and biological testing of eugenol and neutral compounds from commercially available clove oil. By coupling the chemical separation of the components of clove oil (an experiment described in many introductory organic laboratory textbooks) with a simple antibiotic test, the students "discover" the biologically active compound in clove oil. This experiment models one of the primary methods used in the discovery of new pharmaceutical agents.

  10. Methods for analysis of fluoroquinolones in biological fluids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods for analysis of 10 selected fluoroquinolone antibiotics in biological fluids are reviewed. Approaches for sample preparation, detection methods, limits of detection and quantitation and recovery information are provided for both single analyte and multi-analyte fluoroquinolone methods....

  11. Methods in molecular biology: plant cytogenetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cytogenetic studies have contributed greatly to our understanding of genetics, biology, reproduction, and evolution. From early studies in basic chromosome behavior the field has expanded enabling whole genome analysis to the manipulation of chromosomes and their organization. This book covers a ran...

  12. Apparatus and a method for biological treatment of waste waters

    SciTech Connect

    Besik, F.

    1983-12-20

    An apparatus and a method for biological treatment of waste waters achieving biological oxidation of organic matter, biological nitrification and denitrification of nitrogenous compounds and biological removal of phosphorus and clarification of the treated waste water in a single reaction tank in a single suspended growth sludge system without the use of traditional compressors, mixers, recirculation pumps, piping and valving and without the use of the traditional clarifier.

  13. Detection of biological thiols based on a colorimetric method*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuan-yuan; Sun, Yang-yang; Zhang, Yu-juan; Lu, Chen-he; Miao, Jin-feng

    2016-01-01

    Biological thiols (biothiols), an important kind of functional biomolecules, such as cysteine (Cys) and glutathione (GSH), play vital roles in maintaining the stability of the intracellular environment. In past decades, studies have demonstrated that metabolic disorder of biothiols is related to many serious disease processes and will lead to extreme damage in human and numerous animals. We carried out a series of experiments to detect biothiols in biosamples, including bovine plasma and cell lysates of seven different cell lines based on a simple colorimetric method. In a typical test, the color of the test solution could gradually change from blue to colorless after the addition of biothiols. Based on the color change displayed, experimental results reveal that the percentage of biothiols in the embryonic fibroblast cell line is significantly higher than those in the other six cell lines, which provides the basis for the following biothiols-related study. PMID:27704750

  14. 40 CFR 63.1161 - Performance testing and test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... concentration standard for that plant. (d) Test methods. (1) The following test methods in appendix A of 40 CFR... Facilities and Hydrochloric Acid Regeneration Plants § 63.1161 Performance testing and test methods. (a...) or measure the concentration of HCl (and Cl2 for hydrochloric acid regeneration plants) in...

  15. 40 CFR 63.1161 - Performance testing and test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... concentration standard for that plant. (d) Test methods. (1) The following test methods in appendix A of 40 CFR... Facilities and Hydrochloric Acid Regeneration Plants § 63.1161 Performance testing and test methods. (a...) or measure the concentration of HCl (and Cl2 for hydrochloric acid regeneration plants) in...

  16. 40 CFR 63.1161 - Performance testing and test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... concentration standard for that plant. (d) Test methods. (1) The following test methods in appendix A of 40 CFR... Facilities and Hydrochloric Acid Regeneration Plants § 63.1161 Performance testing and test methods. (a...) or measure the concentration of HCl (and Cl2 for hydrochloric acid regeneration plants) in...

  17. Translating biological parameters into clinically useful diagnostic tests.

    PubMed

    Arfken, Cynthia L; Carney, Stuart; Boutros, Nash N

    2009-08-01

    Psychiatry has lagged behind other specialties in developing diagnostic laboratory tests for the purpose of confirming or ruling out a diagnosis. Biological research into the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders has, however, yielded some highly replicable abnormalities that have the potential for development into clinically useful diagnostic tests. To achieve this goal, a process for systematic translation must be developed and implemented. Building on our previous work, we review a proposed process using four clearly defined steps. We conclude that biological parameters currently face challenges in their pathways to becoming diagnostic tests because of both the premature release and premature abandonment of tests. Attention to a systematic translation process aided by these principles may help to avoid these problems.

  18. Methods of biological dosimetry employing chromosome-specific staining

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods are provided to disable the hybridization capacity of shared, high copy repetitive sequences and/or remove such sequences to provide for useful contrast. Still further methods are provided to produce chromosome-specific staining reagents which are made specific to the targeted chromosomal material, which can be one or more whole chromosomes, one or more regions on one or more chromosomes, subsets of chromosomes and/or the entire genome. Probes and test kits are provided for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, in analysis of structural abnormalities, such as translocations, and for biological dosimetry. Further, methods and prenatal test kits are provided to stain targeted chromosomal material of fetal cells, including fetal cells obtained from maternal blood. Still further, the invention provides for automated means to detect and analyse chromosomal abnormalities.

  19. Cosmic heavy ion tracks in mesoscopic biological test objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Facius, R.

    1994-01-01

    Since more than 20 years ago, when the National Academy of Sciences and the National Research Council of the U.S.A. released their report on 'HZE particle effects in manned spaced flight', it has been emphasized how difficult - if not even impossible - it is to assess their radiobiological impact on man from conventional studies where biological test organisms are stochastically exposed to 'large' fluences of heavy ions. An alternative, competing approach had been realized in the BIOSTACK experiments, where the effects of single cosmic as well as accelerator - heavy ions on individual biological test organisms could be investigated. Although presented from the beginning as the preferable approach for terrestrial investigations with accelerator heavy ions too ('The BIOSTACK as an approach to high LET radiation research'), only recently this insight is gaining more widespread recognition. In space flight experiments, additional constraints imposed by the infrastructure of the vehicle or satellite further impede such investigations. Restrictions concern the physical detector systems needed for the registration of the cosmic heavy ions' trajectories as well as the biological systems eligible as test organisms. Such optimized procedures and techniques were developed for the investigations on chromosome aberrations induced by cosmic heavy ions in cells of the stem meristem of lettuce seeds (Lactuca sativa) and for the investigation of the radiobiological response of Wolffia arriza, which is the smallest flowering (water) plant. The biological effects were studied by the coworkers of the Russian Institute of Biomedical Problems (IBMP) which in cooperation with the European Space Agency ESA organized the exposure in the Biosatellites of the Cosmos series. Since biological investigations and physical measurements of particle tracks had to be performed in laboratories widely separated, the preferred fixed contact between biological test objects and the particle detectors

  20. 49 CFR 383.133 - Test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Test methods. 383.133 Section 383.133... STANDARDS; REQUIREMENTS AND PENALTIES Tests § 383.133 Test methods. (a) All tests must be constructed in...) Knowledge tests: (1) States must use the FMCSA pre-approved pool of test questions to develop...

  1. Radioisotopic methods for biological and medical research

    SciTech Connect

    Knoche, H.W.

    1991-01-01

    This book provides a theoretical basis for the effective and safe use of radioactive materials in research. Particular attention is given to the four major topic areas specified in NRC's license application forms: (1) principles and practices of radiation protection; (2) radioactivity measurement, standardization and monitoring techniques, and instruments; (3) mathematics and calculations basic to the use and measurement of radioactivity; (4) biological effects of radiation. Overview and background information, including a section reviewing nuclear physics, is used where needed throughout the text, and problem sets are included in many of the chapters. Appendices for physical constants and conversion factors and for answers to problems are added.

  2. Apparatus and Methods for Manipulation and Optimization of Biological Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Chih-Ming (Inventor); Wong, Pak Kin (Inventor); Sun, Ren (Inventor); Yu, Fuqu (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The invention provides systems and methods for manipulating biological systems, for example to elicit a more desired biological response from a biological sample, such as a tissue, organ, and/or a cell. In one aspect, the invention operates by efficiently searching through a large parametric space of stimuli and system parameters to manipulate, control, and optimize the response of biological samples sustained in the system. In one aspect, the systems and methods of the invention use at least one optimization algorithm to modify the actuator's control inputs for stimulation, responsive to the sensor's output of response signals. The invention can be used, e.g., to optimize any biological system, e.g., bioreactors for proteins, and the like, small molecules, polysaccharides, lipids, and the like. Another use of the apparatus and methods includes is for the discovery of key parameters in complex biological systems.

  3. Microbial Resistant Test Method Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because humans spend most of their time in the indoor environment, environmental analysis of the quality of indoor air has become an important research topic. A major component of the aerosol in the indoor environment consists of biological particles, called bioaerosols, and fur...

  4. Cosmo Cassette: A Microfluidic Microgravity Microbial System For Synthetic Biology Unit Tests and Satellite Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berliner, Aaron J.

    2013-01-01

    Although methods in the design-build-test life cycle of the synthetic biology field have grown rapidly, the expansion has been non-uniform. The design and build stages in development have seen innovations in the form of biological CAD and more efficient means for building DNA, RNA, and other biological constructs. The testing phase of the cycle remains in need of innovation. Presented will be both a theoretical abstraction of biological measurement and a practical demonstration of a microfluidics-based platform for characterizing synthetic biological phenomena. Such a platform demonstrates a design of additive manufacturing (3D printing) for construction of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) to be used in experiments carried out in space. First, the biocompatibility of the polypropylene chassis will be demonstrated. The novel MFCs will be cheaper, and faster to make and iterate through designs. The novel design will contain a manifold switchingdistribution system and an integrated in-chip set of reagent reservoirs fabricated via 3D printing. The automated nature of the 3D printing yields itself to higher resolution switching valves and leads to smaller sized payloads, lower cost, reduced power and a standardized platform for synthetic biology unit tests on Earth and in space. It will be demonstrated that the application of unit testing in synthetic biology will lead to the automatic construction and validation of desired constructs. Unit testing methodologies offer benefits of preemptive problem identification, change of facility, simplicity of integration, ease of documentation, and separation of interface from implementation, and automated design.

  5. The Effect of Gender on the Achievement of Students in Biology Using the Jigsaw Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amedu, Odagboyi Isaiah

    2015-01-01

    This paper examined the effect of gender on the achievement of students in biology using the jigsaw method. The sample was made up of 87 students in SS1 in a secondary school. The study utilized an intact class because the study took place in a normal school term. There were 39 males and 49 females. The Biology Achievement Test (BAT) was…

  6. 40 CFR 63.1161 - Performance testing and test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... (1) The following test methods in appendix A of 40 CFR part 60 shall be used to determine compliance... Facilities and Hydrochloric Acid Regeneration Plants § 63.1161 Performance testing and test methods. (a...) Establishment of hydrochloric acid regeneration plant operating parameters. (1) During the performance test...

  7. 40 CFR 63.1161 - Performance testing and test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... (1) The following test methods in appendix A of 40 CFR part 60 shall be used to determine compliance... Facilities and Hydrochloric Acid Regeneration Plants § 63.1161 Performance testing and test methods. (a...) Establishment of hydrochloric acid regeneration plant operating parameters. (1) During the performance test...

  8. Overview of chemical imaging methods to address biological questions.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Marcel Menezes Lyra; Trepout, Sylvain; Messaoudi, Cédric; Wu, Ting-Di; Ortega, Richard; Guerquin-Kern, Jean-Luc; Marco, Sergio

    2016-05-01

    Chemical imaging offers extensive possibilities for better understanding of biological systems by allowing the identification of chemical components at the tissue, cellular, and subcellular levels. In this review, we introduce modern methods for chemical imaging that can be applied to biological samples. This work is mainly addressed to the biological sciences community and includes the bases of different technologies, some examples of its application, as well as an introduction to approaches on combining multimodal data.

  9. Methods for biological data integration: perspectives and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Gligorijević, Vladimir; Pržulj, Nataša

    2015-01-01

    Rapid technological advances have led to the production of different types of biological data and enabled construction of complex networks with various types of interactions between diverse biological entities. Standard network data analysis methods were shown to be limited in dealing with such heterogeneous networked data and consequently, new methods for integrative data analyses have been proposed. The integrative methods can collectively mine multiple types of biological data and produce more holistic, systems-level biological insights. We survey recent methods for collective mining (integration) of various types of networked biological data. We compare different state-of-the-art methods for data integration and highlight their advantages and disadvantages in addressing important biological problems. We identify the important computational challenges of these methods and provide a general guideline for which methods are suited for specific biological problems, or specific data types. Moreover, we propose that recent non-negative matrix factorization-based approaches may become the integration methodology of choice, as they are well suited and accurate in dealing with heterogeneous data and have many opportunities for further development. PMID:26490630

  10. Testing of Synthetic Biological Membranes for Forward Osmosis Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parodi, Jurek; Mangado, Jaione Romero; Stefanson, Ofir; Flynn, Michael; Mancinelli, Rocco; Kawashima, Brian; Trieu, Serena; Brozell, Adrian; Rosenberg, Kevan

    2016-01-01

    Commercially available forward osmosis membranes have been extensively tested for human space flight wastewater treatment. Despite the improvements achieved in the last decades, there is still a challenge to produce reliable membranes with anti-fouling properties, chemical resistance, and high flux and selectivity. Synthetic biological membranes that mimic the ones present in nature, which underwent millions of years of evolution, represent a potential solution for further development and progress in membrane technology. Biomimetic forward osmosis membranes based on a polymeric support filter and coated with surfactant multilayers have been engineered to investigate how different manufacturing processes impact the performance and structure of the membrane. However, initial results of the first generation prototype membranes tests reveal a high scatter in the data, due to the current testing apparatus set up. The testing apparatus has been upgraded to improve data collection, reduce errors, and to allow higher control of the testing process.

  11. Biological testing of a digested sewage sludge and derived composts.

    PubMed

    Moreira, R; Sousa, J P; Canhoto, C

    2008-11-01

    Aiming to evaluate a possible loss of soil habitat function after amendment with organic wastes, a digested sewage sludge and derived composts produced with green residues, where biologically tested in the laboratory using soil animals (Eisenia andrei and Folsomia candida) and plants (Brassica rapa and Avena sativa). Each waste was tested mimicking a field application of 6ton/ha or 12ton/ha. Avoidance tests did not reveal any impact of sludge and composts to soil biota. Germination and growth tests showed that application of composts were beneficial for both plants. Composts did not affect earthworm's mass increase or reproduction, but the highest sludge amendment revealed negative effects on both parameters. Only the amendment of composts at the highest dose originated an impairment of springtails reproductive output. We suggest that bioassays using different test species may be an additional tool to evaluate effects of amendment of organic wastes in soil. Biological tests are sensitive to pollutants at low concentrations and to interactions undetected by routine chemical analysis.

  12. Error response test system and method using test mask variable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gender, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An error response test system and method with increased functionality and improved performance is provided. The error response test system provides the ability to inject errors into the application under test to test the error response of the application under test in an automated and efficient manner. The error response system injects errors into the application through a test mask variable. The test mask variable is added to the application under test. During normal operation, the test mask variable is set to allow the application under test to operate normally. During testing, the error response test system can change the test mask variable to introduce an error into the application under test. The error response system can then monitor the application under test to determine whether the application has the correct response to the error.

  13. An Improved Method for Completely Uncertain Biological Network Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Bin; Zhao, Muwei; Zhong, Wei; He, Jieyue

    2015-01-01

    With the continuous development of biological experiment technology, more and more data related to uncertain biological networks needs to be analyzed. However, most of current alignment methods are designed for the deterministic biological network. Only a few can solve the probabilistic network alignment problem. However, these approaches only use the part of probabilistic data in the original networks allowing only one of the two networks to be probabilistic. To overcome the weakness of current approaches, an improved method called completely probabilistic biological network comparison alignment (C_PBNA) is proposed in this paper. This new method is designed for complete probabilistic biological network alignment based on probabilistic biological network alignment (PBNA) in order to take full advantage of the uncertain information of biological network. The degree of consistency (agreement) indicates that C_PBNA can find the results neglected by PBNA algorithm. Furthermore, the GO consistency (GOC) and global network alignment score (GNAS) have been selected as evaluation criteria, and all of them proved that C_PBNA can obtain more biologically significant results than those of PBNA algorithm. PMID:26000284

  14. Smoothing Methods for Estimating Test Score Distributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolen, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    Estimation/smoothing methods that are flexible enough to fit a wide variety of test score distributions are reviewed: kernel method, strong true-score model-based method, and method that uses polynomial log-linear models. Applications of these methods include describing/comparing test score distributions, estimating norms, and estimating…

  15. Myasthenia Gravis: Tests and Diagnostic Methods

    MedlinePlus

    ... Affiliations Foundation Focus Newsletter E-Update Test & Diagnostic methods In addition to a complete medical and neurological ... How can I help? About MGFA Test & Diagnostic methods Treatment for MG FAQ's Upcoming Events Spring 2016 ...

  16. 30 CFR 27.31 - Testing methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Testing methods. 27.31 Section 27.31 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS METHANE-MONITORING SYSTEMS Test Requirements § 27.31 Testing methods. A...

  17. 30 CFR 27.31 - Testing methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Testing methods. 27.31 Section 27.31 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS METHANE-MONITORING SYSTEMS Test Requirements § 27.31 Testing methods. A...

  18. 30 CFR 27.31 - Testing methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Testing methods. 27.31 Section 27.31 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS METHANE-MONITORING SYSTEMS Test Requirements § 27.31 Testing methods. A...

  19. 30 CFR 27.31 - Testing methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Testing methods. 27.31 Section 27.31 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS METHANE-MONITORING SYSTEMS Test Requirements § 27.31 Testing methods. A...

  20. Cosmic heavy ion tracks in mesoscopic biological test objects

    SciTech Connect

    Facius, R.

    1994-12-31

    Since more than 20 years ago, when the National Academy of Sciences and the National Research Council of the U.S.A. released their report on `HZE particle effects in manned spaced flight`, it has been emphasized how difficult - if not even impossible - it is to assess their radiobiological impact on man from conventional studies where biological test organisms are stochastically exposed to `large` fluences of heavy ions. An alternative, competing approach had been realized in the BIOSTACK experiments, where the effects of single cosmic as well as accelerator - heavy ions on individual biological test organisms could be investigated. Although presented from the beginning as the preferable approach for terrestrial investigations with accelerator heavy ions too (`The BIOSTACK as an approach to high LET radiation research`), only recently this insight is gaining more widespread recognition. In space flight experiments, additional constraints imposed by the infrastructure of the vehicle or satellite further impede such investigations. Restrictions concern the physical detector systems needed for the registration of the cosmic heavy ions` trajectories as well as the biological systems eligible as test organisms. Such optimized procedures and techniques were developed for the investigations on chromosome aberrations induced by cosmic heavy ions in cells of the stem meristem of lettuce seeds (Lactuca sativa) and for the investigation of the radiobiological response of Wolffia arriza, which is the smallest flowering (water) plant. The biological effects were studied by the coworkers of the Russian Institute of Biomedical Problems (IBMP) which in cooperation with the European Space Agency ESA organized the exposure in the Biosatellites of the Cosmos series.

  1. 40 CFR 80.3 - Test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test methods. 80.3 Section 80.3... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES General Provisions § 80.3 Test methods. The lead and phosphorus content of gasoline shall be determined in accordance with test methods set forth in the appendices to this part....

  2. 40 CFR 80.3 - Test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test methods. 80.3 Section 80.3... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES General Provisions § 80.3 Test methods. The lead and phosphorus content of gasoline shall be determined in accordance with test methods set forth in the appendices to this part....

  3. 40 CFR 63.465 - Test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test methods. 63.465 Section 63.465... Halogenated Solvent Cleaning § 63.465 Test methods. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (f) and (g) of this...) of this section. (i) From tests conducted using EPA reference method 25d. (ii) By...

  4. 40 CFR 63.1546 - Test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Test methods. 63.1546 Section 63.1546... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Primary Lead Smelting § 63.1546 Test methods. (a) The following procedure shall....1543(a)(1) through § 63.1543(a)(9) shall be determined according to the following test methods...

  5. 40 CFR 80.3 - Test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test methods. 80.3 Section 80.3... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES General Provisions § 80.3 Test methods. The lead and phosphorus content of gasoline shall be determined in accordance with test methods set forth in the appendices to this part....

  6. 40 CFR 63.1546 - Test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Test methods. 63.1546 Section 63.1546... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Primary Lead Smelting § 63.1546 Test methods. (a) The following procedure shall....1543(a)(1) through § 63.1543(a)(9) shall be determined according to the following test methods...

  7. Electrokinetic remediation prefield test methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodko, Dalibor (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Methods for determining the parameters critical in designing an electrokinetic soil remediation process including electrode well spacing, operating current/voltage, electroosmotic flow rate, electrode well wall design, and amount of buffering or neutralizing solution needed in the electrode wells at operating conditions are disclosed These methods are preferably performed prior to initiating a full scale electrokinetic remediation process in order to obtain efficient remediation of the contaminants.

  8. Method and apparatus for biological material separation

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Donna L.

    2005-05-10

    There has been invented an apparatus comprising a separation barrier for excluding denser cell materials from less dense cell materials after centrifuging of the cells so that selected materials can be withdrawn from the less dense cell materials without inclusion of the denser cell materials or clogging of sampling equipment with denser cell materials. Cells from which selected material is to be withdrawn are centrifuged, either as cells or cells in media. Once the denser cell materials are isolated in a layer by centrifugal force, an invention screen or seive is submerged in the less dense cell material to a level above the layer of denser cell materials to isolate the denser cell materials from the less dense cell materials, preventing mixing of the denser cell materials back into the less dense cell materials when the cells or the cells in media are no longer being centrifuged and to prevent clogging of sampling equipment with denser cell materials. In a particularly useful application of the invention method and apparatus, plasmid DNA can be withdrawn from less dense cell materials without contamination or interference with denser cell materials.

  9. Bacterial mutagenicity assays: test methods.

    PubMed

    Gatehouse, David

    2012-01-01

    The most widely used assays for detecting chemically induced gene mutations are those employing bacteria. The plate incorporation assay using various Salmonella typhimurium LT2 and E. coli WP2 strains is a short-term bacterial reverse mutation assay specifically designed to detect a wide range of chemical substances capable of causing DNA damage leading to gene mutations. The test is used worldwide as an initial screen to determine the mutagenic potential of new chemicals and drugs.The test uses several strains of S. typhimurium which carry different mutations in various genes of the histidine operon, and E. coli which carry the same AT base pair at the critical mutation site within the trpE gene. These mutations act as hot spots for mutagens that cause DNA damage via different mechanisms. When these auxotrophic bacterial strains are grown on a minimal media agar plates containing a trace of the required amino-acid (histidine or tryptophan), only those bacteria that revert to amino-acid independence (His(+) or Tryp(+)) will grow to form visible colonies. The number of spontaneously induced revertant colonies per plate is relatively constant. However, when a mutagen is added to the plate, the number of revertant colonies per plate is increased, usually in a dose-related manner.This chapter provides detailed procedures for performing the test in the presence and absence of a metabolic activation system (S9-mix), including advice on specific assay variations and any technical problems. PMID:22147566

  10. METHOD OF TESTING FOR LEAKS

    DOEpatents

    Creutz, E.C.; McAdams, Wm.A.; Foss, M.H.

    1958-07-22

    A method is described for detecting minute holes In fuel element jackets. The method comprises submerging the jacketed body in an atmosphere of a radioactive gas under pressure, the radioactive emanations from said gas being sufficientiy penetratIng to penetrate the jacket of the jacketed body. After the jacketed body is removed from the radtoactive gas atmosphere, it is exannined for the presence of emanations from radioactive gas which entered the jacketed body through the minute holes. In this manner, the detectton of radioactive emanations is a positive indication that the fuel element is not perfectly sealed.

  11. [Biological calculation methods and their application in pharmaceutical science].

    PubMed

    Massart, D L

    1998-01-01

    This article gives an introduction to certain mathematical methods, that were developed with biological processes as model. Three methods are described: clustering and the more recently developed genetic algorithms and neural nets. Mainly the last two methods were applied first outside the medical and biological domain but are now used also in the medical and pharmaceutical sciences. There are many applications in the drug discovery field, but these methods are also becoming increasingly important in other domains of the pharmaceutical sciences (such as pharmaceutical technologies).

  12. 7 CFR 58.644 - Test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Test methods. 58.644 Section 58.644 Agriculture... Procedures § 58.644 Test methods. (a) Microbiological. Microbiological determinations shall be made in accordance with the methods described in the latest edition of Standard Methods for the Examination of...

  13. 7 CFR 58.644 - Test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Test methods. 58.644 Section 58.644 Agriculture... Procedures § 58.644 Test methods. (a) Microbiological. Microbiological determinations shall be made in accordance with the methods described in the latest edition of Standard Methods for the Examination of...

  14. Sound and Faulty Arguments Generated by Preservice Biology Teachers When Testing Hypotheses Involving Unobservable Entities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Anton E.

    2002-01-01

    Investigates the responses of a sample of preservice biology teachers enrolled in a teaching methods course to a casual question about why water rose in a jar inverted over a burning candle placed in a pan of water by formulating and testing six hypotheses. (Contains 43 references.) (Author/YDS)

  15. The biocommunication method: On the road to an integrative biology

    PubMed Central

    Witzany, Guenther

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although molecular biology, genetics, and related special disciplines represent a large amount of empirical data, a practical method for the evaluation and overview of current knowledge is far from being realized. The main concepts and narratives in these fields have remained nearly the same for decades and the more recent empirical data concerning the role of noncoding RNAs and persistent viruses and their defectives do not fit into this scenario. A more innovative approach such as applied biocommunication theory could translate empirical data into a coherent perspective on the functions within and between biological organisms and arguably lead to a sustainable integrative biology. PMID:27195071

  16. 30 CFR 36.41 - Testing methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Testing methods. 36.41 Section 36.41 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF... Requirements § 36.41 Testing methods. Mobile diesel-powered transportation equipment submitted...

  17. 16 CFR 1513.4 - Test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Test methods. 1513.4 Section 1513.4... REQUIREMENTS FOR BUNK BEDS § 1513.4 Test methods. (a) Guardrails (see § 1513.3(a)(6)). With no mattress on the... manufacturer's recommended maximum thickness mattress and foundation in place, repeat the test in paragraph...

  18. 16 CFR 1213.4 - Test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Test methods. 1213.4 Section 1213.4... STANDARD FOR ENTRAPMENT HAZARDS IN BUNK BEDS § 1213.4 Test methods. (a) Guardrails (see § 1213.3(a)(6... manufacturer's recommended maximum thickness mattress and foundation in place, repeat the test in paragraph...

  19. 30 CFR 36.41 - Testing methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Testing methods. 36.41 Section 36.41 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF... Requirements § 36.41 Testing methods. Mobile diesel-powered transportation equipment submitted...

  20. A method to measure nanomechanical properties of biological objects

    SciTech Connect

    Ploscariu, Nicoleta; Szoszkiewicz, Robert

    2013-12-23

    We postulate that one will be able to quantitatively infer changes in the mechanical properties of proteins, cells, and other biological objects (BO) by measuring the shifts of several thermally excited resonance frequencies of atomic force microscopy cantilevers in contact with BOs. Here, we provide a method to extract spring constants and molecular damping factors of BOs in biologically relevant phosphate buffered saline medium and using compliant AFM cantilevers with a small aspect ratio (a ratio of length to width)

  1. Analytical methods for kinetic studies of biological interactions: A review.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiwei; Bi, Cong; Li, Zhao; Podariu, Maria; Hage, David S

    2015-09-10

    The rates at which biological interactions occur can provide important information concerning the mechanism and behavior of these processes in living systems. This review discusses several analytical methods that can be used to examine the kinetics of biological interactions. These techniques include common or traditional methods such as stopped-flow analysis and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, as well as alternative methods based on affinity chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. The general principles and theory behind these approaches are examined, and it is shown how each technique can be utilized to provide information on the kinetics of biological interactions. Examples of applications are also given for each method. In addition, a discussion is provided on the relative advantages or potential limitations of each technique regarding its use in kinetic studies.

  2. Analytical methods for kinetic studies of biological interactions: A review.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiwei; Bi, Cong; Li, Zhao; Podariu, Maria; Hage, David S

    2015-09-10

    The rates at which biological interactions occur can provide important information concerning the mechanism and behavior of these processes in living systems. This review discusses several analytical methods that can be used to examine the kinetics of biological interactions. These techniques include common or traditional methods such as stopped-flow analysis and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, as well as alternative methods based on affinity chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. The general principles and theory behind these approaches are examined, and it is shown how each technique can be utilized to provide information on the kinetics of biological interactions. Examples of applications are also given for each method. In addition, a discussion is provided on the relative advantages or potential limitations of each technique regarding its use in kinetic studies. PMID:25700721

  3. ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR KINETIC STUDIES OF BIOLOGICAL INTERACTIONS: A REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiwei; Bi, Cong; Li, Zhao; Podariu, Maria; Hage, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The rates at which biological interactions occur can provide important information concerning the mechanism and behavior of these processes in living systems. This review discusses several analytical methods that can be used to examine the kinetics of biological interactions. These techniques include common or traditional methods such as stopped-flow analysis and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, as well as alternative methods based on affinity chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. The general principles and theory behind these approaches are examined, and it is shown how each technique can be utilized to provide information on the kinetics of biological interactions. Examples of applications are also given for each method. In addition, a discussion is provided on the relative advantages or potential limitations of each technique regarding its use in kinetic studies. PMID:25700721

  4. An investigation on impacts of scheduling configurations on Mississippi biology subject area testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchette, Frances Lenora

    The purpose of this mixed modal study was to compare the results of Biology Subject Area mean scores of students on a 4 x 4 block schedule, A/B block schedule, and traditional year-long schedule for 1A to 5A size schools. This study also reviewed the data to determine if minority or gender issues might influence the test results. Interviews with administrators and teachers were conducted about the type of schedule configuration they use and the influence that the schedule has on student academic performance on the Biology Subject Area Test. Additionally, this research further explored whether schedule configurations allow sufficient time for students to construct knowledge. This study is important to schools, teachers, and administrators because it can assist them in considering the impacts that different types of class schedules have on student performance and if ethnic or gender issues are influencing testing results. This study used the causal-comparative method for the quantitative portion of the study and constant comparative method for the qualitative portion to explore the relationship of school schedules on student academic achievement on the Mississippi Biology Subject Area Test. The aggregate means of selected student scores indicate that the Mississippi Biology Subject Area Test as a measure of student performance reveals no significant difference on student achievement for the three school schedule configurations. The data were adjusted for initial differences of gender, minority, and school size on the three schedule configurations. The results suggest that schools may employ various schedule configurations and expect student performance on the Mississippi Biology Subject Area Test to be unaffected. However, many areas of concern were identified in the interviews that might impact on school learning environments. These concerns relate to effective classroom management, the active involvement of students in learning, the adequacy of teacher education

  5. Apparatus and methods for manipulation and optimization of biological systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Chih-Ming (Inventor); Wong, Pak Kin (Inventor); Sun, Ren (Inventor); Yu, Fuqu (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The invention provides systems and methods for manipulating, e.g., optimizing and controlling, biological systems, e.g., for eliciting a more desired biological response of biological sample, such as a tissue, organ, and/or a cell. In one aspect, systems and methods of the invention operate by efficiently searching through a large parametric space of stimuli and system parameters to manipulate, control, and optimize the response of biological samples sustained in the system, e.g., a bioreactor. In alternative aspects, systems include a device for sustaining cells or tissue samples, one or more actuators for stimulating the samples via biochemical, electromagnetic, thermal, mechanical, and/or optical stimulation, one or more sensors for measuring a biological response signal of the samples resulting from the stimulation of the sample. In one aspect, the systems and methods of the invention use at least one optimization algorithm to modify the actuator's control inputs for stimulation, responsive to the sensor's output of response signals. The compositions and methods of the invention can be used, e.g., to for systems optimization of any biological manufacturing or experimental system, e.g., bioreactors for proteins, e.g., therapeutic proteins, polypeptides or peptides for vaccines, and the like, small molecules (e.g., antibiotics), polysaccharides, lipids, and the like. Another use of the apparatus and methods includes combination drug therapy, e.g. optimal drug cocktail, directed cell proliferations and differentiations, e.g. in tissue engineering, e.g. neural progenitor cells differentiation, and discovery of key parameters in complex biological systems.

  6. 40 CFR 59.207 - Test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Consumer Products § 59.207 Test methods. Each manufacturer or...

  7. 40 CFR 59.207 - Test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Consumer Products § 59.207 Test methods. Each manufacturer or...

  8. 40 CFR 59.207 - Test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Consumer Products § 59.207 Test methods. Each manufacturer or...

  9. 40 CFR 59.207 - Test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Consumer Products § 59.207 Test methods. Each manufacturer or...

  10. Methods of increasing secretion of polypeptides having biological activity

    DOEpatents

    Merino, Sandra

    2014-05-27

    The present invention relates to methods for producing a secreted polypeptide having biological activity, comprising: (a) transforming a fungal host cell with a fusion protein construct encoding a fusion protein, which comprises: (i) a first polynucleotide encoding a signal peptide; (ii) a second polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of an endoglucanase or a portion thereof; and (iii) a third polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of a polypeptide having biological activity; wherein the signal peptide and at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase increases secretion of the polypeptide having biological activity compared to the absence of at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase; (b) cultivating the transformed fungal host cell under conditions suitable for production of the fusion protein; and (c) recovering the fusion protein, a component thereof, or a combination thereof, having biological activity, from the cultivation medium.

  11. Methods of increasing secretion of polypeptides having biological activity

    DOEpatents

    Merino, Sandra

    2013-10-01

    The present invention relates to methods for producing a secreted polypeptide having biological activity, comprising: (a) transforming a fungal host cell with a fusion protein construct encoding a fusion protein, which comprises: (i) a first polynucleotide encoding a signal peptide; (ii) a second polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of an endoglucanase or a portion thereof; and (iii) a third polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of a polypeptide having biological activity; wherein the signal peptide and at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase increases secretion of the polypeptide having biological activity compared to the absence of at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase; (b) cultivating the transformed fungal host cell under conditions suitable for production of the fusion protein; and (c) recovering the fusion protein, a component thereof, or a combination thereof, having biological activity, from the cultivation medium.

  12. Methods of increasing secretion of polypeptides having biological activity

    SciTech Connect

    Merino, Sandra

    2014-10-28

    The present invention relates to methods for producing a secreted polypeptide having biological activity, comprising: (a) transforming a fungal host cell with a fusion protein construct encoding a fusion protein, which comprises: (i) a first polynucleotide encoding a signal peptide; (ii) a second polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of an endoglucanase or a portion thereof; and (iii) a third polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of a polypeptide having biological activity; wherein the signal peptide and at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase increases secretion of the polypeptide having biological activity compared to the absence of at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase; (b) cultivating the transformed fungal host cell under conditions suitable for production of the fusion protein; and (c) recovering the fusion protein, a component thereof, or a combination thereof, having biological activity, from the cultivation medium.

  13. Methods of increasing secretion of polypeptides having biological activity

    SciTech Connect

    Merino, Sandra

    2015-04-14

    The present invention relates to methods for producing a secreted polypeptide having biological activity, comprising: (a) transforming a fungal host cell with a fusion protein construct encoding a fusion protein, which comprises: (i) a first polynucleotide encoding a signal peptide; (ii) a second polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of an endoglucanase or a portion thereof; and (iii) a third polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of a polypeptide having biological activity; wherein the signal peptide and at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase increases secretion of the polypeptide having biological activity compared to the absence of at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase; (b) cultivating the transformed fungal host cell under conditions suitable for production of the fusion protein; and (c) recovering the fusion protein, a component thereof, or a combination thereof, having biological activity, from the cultivation medium.

  14. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles: chemical, physical and biological methods

    PubMed Central

    Iravani, S.; Korbekandi, H.; Mirmohammadi, S.V.; Zolfaghari, B.

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (NPs) have been the subjects of researchers because of their unique properties (e.g., size and shape depending optical, antimicrobial, and electrical properties). A variety of preparation techniques have been reported for the synthesis of silver NPs; notable examples include, laser ablation, gamma irradiation, electron irradiation, chemical reduction, photochemical methods, microwave processing, and biological synthetic methods. This review presents an overview of silver nanoparticle preparation by physical, chemical, and biological synthesis. The aim of this review article is, therefore, to reflect on the current state and future prospects, especially the potentials and limitations of the above mentioned techniques for industries. PMID:26339255

  15. Toxicity testing and instream biological monitoring in evaluating municipal effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Krier, K.; Pontasch, K.

    1995-12-31

    Twelve streams receiving municipal wastewater treatment plant effluents were evaluated in riffle areas above and below the outfall using the Environmental Protection Agency`s Rapid Bioassessment Protocols (RBPs) for benthic macroinvertebrates. Eight of the sites evaluated using RBP 1 exhibited stream health in the downstream riffles equaling or exceeding the upstream riffles. RBP 1 results suggested possible impacts at the remaining four sites, and these sites were more intensely evaluated using RBPs 2 and 3, acute effluent toxicity tests with Daphnia magna, and quantification of periphytic chlorophyll a and ash free dry weight (AFDW). Results from RBP 2 indicated three of the four sites evaluated have similar taxonomic richness above and below the outfall, while one site is heavily impacted by organic pollutants. Toxicity tests with 100% effluent resulted in no mortality with any of the four effluents tested. Relative to the respective upstream sites, chlorophyll a was significantly increased at one downstream site and significantly reduced at another. AFDW was similar above and below the outfalls in all streams. These results suggest that laboratory toxicity tests may not always be adequate predictors of instream biological effects.

  16. Detecting Change in Biological Rhythms: A Multivariate Permutation Test Approach to Fourier-Transformed Data

    PubMed Central

    Blackford, Jennifer Urbano; Salomon, Ronald M.; Waller, Niels G.

    2009-01-01

    Treatment-related changes in neurobiological rhythms are of increasing interest to psychologists, psychiatrists, and biological rhythms researchers. New methods for analyzing change in rhythms are needed, as most common methods disregard the rich complexity of biological processes. Large time series data sets reflect the intricacies of underlying neurobiological processes, but can be difficult to analyze. We propose the use of Fourier methods with multivariate permutation test (MPT) methods for analyzing change in rhythms from time series data. To validate the use of MPT for Fourier-transformed data, we performed Monte Carlo simulations and compared statistical power and family-wise error for MPT to Bonferroni-corrected and uncorrected methods. Results show that MPT provides greater statistical power than Bonferroni-corrected tests, while appropriately controlling family-wise error. We applied this method to human, pre-and post-treatment, serially-sampled neurotransmitter data to confirm the utility of this method using real data. Together, Fourier with MPT methods provides a statistically powerful approach for detecting change in biological rhythms from time series data. PMID:19212840

  17. New conceptual method for directly cooling the target biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yan; Liu, Jing

    2005-01-01

    Hypothermia is a commonly adopted strategy to decrease the cerebral oxygen demands, which is critical for the patient to sustain longer time when subjected to a hypoxia. However, when circulatory arrest occurs, the traditional approaches such as selective brain cooling (SBC), systemic body cooling or perfusing cool blood are often not very helpful due to their slow cooling rates in preventing the tendency of a slight cerebral temperature increase at the onset of circulatory arrest. To resolve such difficult issue, a new conceptual volumetric cooling method (VCM) through minimally invasive injection of physiological coolant was proposed in this study. A heat and fluid transport model based on porous medium configuration was established to describe the thermal responses of brain tissues during hypothermia resuscitation. Theoretical calculations indicated that VCM could significantly improve the cooling rate in the deep part of the biological tissues within a desired period of time. To further test this approach, a series of either in vitro or in vivo animal experiments were performed, which also strongly supported the theoretical predictions and indicated that VCM was well appropriate for the localized cooling of target tissues. The concept of the present VCM could also possibly be extended to more wide clinical situations, when an instant and highly localized cooling for the specific organs or tissues are urgently requested. It also raised challenging issues such as injury or negative effect for the clinical operation of this VCM, which need to be addressed in the coming study.

  18. PE Metrics: Background, Testing Theory, and Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Weimo; Rink, Judy; Placek, Judith H.; Graber, Kim C.; Fox, Connie; Fisette, Jennifer L.; Dyson, Ben; Park, Youngsik; Avery, Marybell; Franck, Marian; Raynes, De

    2011-01-01

    New testing theories, concepts, and psychometric methods (e.g., item response theory, test equating, and item bank) developed during the past several decades have many advantages over previous theories and methods. In spite of their introduction to the field, they have not been fully accepted by physical educators. Further, the manner in which…

  19. 16 CFR 1213.4 - Test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Test methods. 1213.4 Section 1213.4 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR ENTRAPMENT HAZARDS IN BUNK BEDS § 1213.4 Test methods. (a) Guardrails (see §...

  20. 16 CFR 1513.4 - Test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Test methods. 1513.4 Section 1513.4 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BUNK BEDS § 1513.4 Test methods. (a) Guardrails (see § 1513.3(a)(6)). With no mattress on...

  1. 40 CFR 80.3 - Test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test methods. 80.3 Section 80.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES General Provisions § 80.3 Test methods. The lead and phosphorus content...

  2. 40 CFR 80.3 - Test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test methods. 80.3 Section 80.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES General Provisions § 80.3 Test methods. The lead and phosphorus content...

  3. 40 CFR 59.207 - Test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test methods. 59.207 Section 59.207 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL... Compound Emission Standards for Consumer Products § 59.207 Test methods. Each manufacturer or...

  4. Methods for Scaling Icing Test Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David N.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the results of tests at NASA Lewis to evaluate several methods to establish suitable alternative test conditions when the test facility limits the model size or operating conditions. The first method was proposed by Olsen. It can be applied when full-size models are tested and all the desired test conditions except liquid-water content can be obtained in the facility. The other two methods discussed are: a modification of the French scaling law and the AEDC scaling method. Icing tests were made with cylinders at both reference and scaled conditions representing mixed and glaze ice in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel. Reference and scale ice shapes were compared to evaluate each method. The Olsen method was tested with liquid-water content varying from 1.3 to .8 g/m(exp3). Over this range, ice shapes produced using the Olsen method were unchanged. The modified French and AEDC methods produced scaled ice shapes which approximated the reference shapes when model size was reduced to half the reference size for the glaze-ice cases tested.

  5. Prediction and Testing of Biological Networks Underlying Intestinal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mariadason, John M.; Wang, Donghai; Augenlicht, Leonard H.; Chance, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer progresses through an accumulation of somatic mutations, some of which reside in so-called “driver” genes that provide a growth advantage to the tumor. To identify points of intersection between driver gene pathways, we implemented a network analysis framework using protein interactions to predict likely connections – both precedented and novel – between key driver genes in cancer. We applied the framework to find significant connections between two genes, Apc and Cdkn1a (p21), known to be synergistic in tumorigenesis in mouse models. We then assessed the functional coherence of the resulting Apc-Cdkn1a network by engineering in vivo single node perturbations of the network: mouse models mutated individually at Apc (Apc1638N+/−) or Cdkn1a (Cdkn1a−/−), followed by measurements of protein and gene expression changes in intestinal epithelial tissue. We hypothesized that if the predicted network is biologically coherent (functional), then the predicted nodes should associate more specifically with dysregulated genes and proteins than stochastically selected genes and proteins. The predicted Apc-Cdkn1a network was significantly perturbed at the mRNA-level by both single gene knockouts, and the predictions were also strongly supported based on physical proximity and mRNA coexpression of proteomic targets. These results support the functional coherence of the proposed Apc-Cdkn1a network and also demonstrate how network-based predictions can be statistically tested using high-throughput biological data. PMID:20824133

  6. Development of new hole expansion testing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunok; Shang, Jianhui; Beam, Kevin; Samant, Anoop; Hoschouer, Cliff; Dykeman, Jim

    2016-08-01

    This paper introduces a new hole expansion (HE) testing method that could be more relevant to the edge cracking problem observed in stamping advanced high strength steel (AHSS). The new testing method adopted a large hole diameter of 75 mm compared to the standard hole diameter of 10 mm. An inline monitoring system was developed to visually monitor the hole edge cracking during the test and synchronize the load-displacement data with the recorded video for capturing the initial crack. A new hole expansion testing method was found to be effective in evaluating the edge cracking by considering the effects of material properties and trimming methods. It showed a much larger difference, up to 11%, of the HE ratio between DP980 and TRIP780 compared to the standard HE testing method giving less than a 2% difference.

  7. Membrane characteristics for biological blast overpressure testing using blast simulators.

    PubMed

    Alphonse, Vanessa D; Siva Sai Sujith Sajja, Venkata; Kemper, Andrew R; Rizel, Dave V; Duma, Stefan M; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2014-01-01

    Blast simulators often use passive-rupture membranes to generate shock waves similar to free-field blasts. The purpose of this study was to compare rupture patterns and pressure traces of three distinct membrane materials for biological and biomechanical blast studies. An Advanced Blast Simulator (ABS) located at the Center for Injury Biomechanics at Virginia Tech was used to test membrane characteristics. Acetate, Mylar, and aluminum sheets with different thicknesses were used to obtain pressures between 70–210 kPa. Static pressure was measured inside the tube at the test section using piezoelectric pressure sensors. Peak overpressure, positive duration, and positive impulse were calculated for each test. Rupture patterns and characteristic pressure traces were unique to each membrane type and thickness. Shock wave speed ranged between 1.2-1.8 Mach for static overpressures of 70–210 kPa. Acetate membranes fragmented sending pieces down the tube, but produced ideal (Friedlander) pressure traces. Mylar membranes bulged without fragmenting, but produced less-than-ideal pressure traces. Aluminum membranes did not fragment and produced ideal pressure traces. However, the cost of manufacturing and characterizing aluminum membranes should be considered during membrane selection. This study illustrates the advantages and disadvantages of using Mylar, acetate, and aluminum for passive rupture membranes for blast simulators. PMID:25405432

  8. Absorbing Software Testing into the Scrum Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuomikoski, Janne; Tervonen, Ilkka

    In this paper we study, how to absorb software testing into the Scrum method. We conducted the research as an action research during the years 2007-2008 with three iterations. The result showed that testing can and even should be absorbed to the Scrum method. The testing team was merged into the Scrum teams. The teams can now deliver better working software in a shorter time, because testing keeps track of the progress of the development. Also the team spirit is higher, because the Scrum team members are committed to the same goal. The biggest change from test manager’s point of view was the organized Product Owner Team. Test manager don’t have testing team anymore, and in the future all the testing tasks have to be assigned through the Product Backlog.

  9. River Pollution: Part II. Biological Methods for Assessing Water Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1984-01-01

    Discusses methods used in the biological assessment of river quality and such indicators of clean and polluted waters as the Trent Biotic Index, Chandler Score System, and species diversity indexes. Includes a summary of a river classification scheme based on quality criteria related to water use. (JN)

  10. [A method for assessing lipid peroxidation in a biological substrate].

    PubMed

    Shvetsova, M M; Zatolokin, V D; Kaznacheev, N N; Luk'ianchikov, G F

    1990-01-01

    A new method for the assessment of lipid peroxidation permits simultaneous assays of total lipids and formed malonic dialdehyde in the examined chloroform substrate; this will help define the criteria of cellular membrane destruction in various biological media of the body.

  11. Toxicity test method development in southeast Asia

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Use of aquatic toxicity tests is relatively new in southeast Asia. As part of the ASEAN-Canada Cooperative Programme on Marine Science -- Phase 2, which includes development of marine environmental criteria, a need for tropical toxicity data was identified. A step-wise approach was used for test method development (simple, acute tests and easily measured endpoints first, then more complex short-term chronic methods), for test specific selection (using species found throughout the region first, and then considering species with narrower geographic distribution), and for integration of quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) practices into all laboratory activities. Development of test protocols specifically for tropical species included acute and chronic toxicity tests with marine fish, invertebrates and algae. Criteria for test species selection will be reviewed. Method development was based on procedures and endpoints already widely used in North America and Europe (e.g., 96-h LC50 with fish), but adapted for use with tropical species. For example, a bivalve larval development test can use the same endpoints but the duration is only 24 hours. Test method development included research on culture and holding procedures, determination of test conditions (e.g., duration, test containers), and identification of appropriate endpoints. Acute tests with fish and invertebrates were developed first. The next step was development of short-term chronic tests to measure phytoplankton growth, bivalve and echinoderm embryo or larval development, and larval fish growth. The number of species and types of tests was increased in a staged approach, as laboratories became better equipped and personnel gained practical experience. In most cases, method development coincided with training workshops to introduce the principles of toxicity testing.

  12. Personalized Genetic Testing as a Tool for Integrating Ethics Instruction into Biology Courses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tenny R.; Anderson, Misti Ault

    2014-01-01

    Personalized genetic testing (PGT) has been used by some educational institutions as a pedagogical tool for teaching human genetics. While work has been done that examines the potential for PGT to improve students’ interest and understanding of the science involved in genetic testing, there has been less dialogue about how this method might be useful for integrating ethical and societal issues surrounding genetic testing into classroom discussions. Citing the importance of integrating ethics into the biology classroom, we argue that PGT can be an effective educational tool for integrating ethics and science education, and discuss relevant ethical considerations for instructors using this approach. PMID:25574278

  13. Concentrated formulations and methods for neutralizing chemical and biological toxants

    DOEpatents

    Tucker, Mark D.; Betty, Rita G.; Tadros, Maher E.

    2004-04-20

    A formulation and method of making and using that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological toxants, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents. The aqueous formulation is non-toxic and non-corrosive and can be delivered as a long-lasting foam, spray, or fog. The formulation includes solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the CW or BW toxant susceptible to attack, so that a nucleophillic agent can attack the compound via a hydrolysis or oxidation reaction. The formulation can kill up to 99.99999% of bacterial spores within one hour of exposure.

  14. Testing variance components by two jackknife methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The jacknife method, a resampling technique, has been widely used for statistical tests for years. The pseudo value based jacknife method (defined as pseudo jackknife method) is commonly used to reduce the bias for an estimate; however, sometimes it could result in large variaion for an estmimate a...

  15. Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes

    DOEpatents

    Colwell, Frederick S.; Geesey, Gill G.; Gillis, Richard J.; Lehman, R. Michael

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for said microorganisms in said sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure difference in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses.

  16. Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes

    DOEpatents

    Colwell, Frederick S.; Geesey, Gill G.; Gillis, Richard J.; Lehman, R. Michael

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for said microorganisms in said sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure differences in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses.

  17. Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes

    DOEpatents

    Colwell, F.S.; Geesey, G.G.; Gillis, R.J.; Lehman, R.M.

    1997-11-11

    A method and apparatus is described for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for said microorganisms in said sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure differences in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses. 5 figs.

  18. Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes

    DOEpatents

    Colwell, F.S.; Geesey, G.G.; Gillis, R.J.; Lehman, R.M.

    1999-07-13

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for microorganisms in the sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure difference in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses. 5 figs.

  19. Method and apparatus for testing microfilaments

    DOEpatents

    Schleitweiler, Patrick M.; Merten, Jr., Charles W.

    1995-08-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for testing tensile strength of microfilaments. Fibers as small as 0.001 inch in diameter and 0.04 inches in length have been tested, although the method and apparatus of the invention are capable of testing fibers of smaller diameter and length. The invention utilizes a method wherein one or both ends of a microfilament is gripped using resin which is softened sufficiently to accept an end of the microfilament and then allowed to harden. The invention also employs the use of a translation stage capable of controlled three-dimensional movement suited to facilitating gripping of the microfilament.

  20. Method and apparatus for testing microfilaments

    DOEpatents

    Schleitweiler, P.M.; Merten, C.W. Jr.

    1995-08-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for testing tensile strength of microfilaments. Fibers as small as 0.001 inch in diameter and 0.04 inches in length have been tested, although the method and apparatus of the invention are capable of testing fibers of smaller diameter and length. The invention utilizes a method wherein one or both ends of a microfilament is gripped using resin which is softened sufficiently to accept an end of the microfilament and then allowed to harden. The invention also employs the use of a translation stage capable of controlled three-dimensional movement suited to facilitating gripping of the microfilament. 2 figs.

  1. Bayesian methods in virtual screening and chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Bender, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The Naïve Bayesian Classifier, as well as related classification and regression approaches based on Bayes' theorem, has experienced increased attention in the cheminformatics world in recent years. In this contribution, we first review the mathematical framework on which Bayes' methods are built, and then continue to discuss implications of this framework as well as practical experience under which conditions Bayes' methods give the best performance in virtual screening settings. Finally, we present an overview of applications of Bayes' methods to both virtual screening and the chemical biology arena, where applications range from bridging phenotypic and mechanistic space of drug action to the prediction of ligand-target interactions.

  2. Offer of rapid testing and alternative biological samples as practical tools to implement HIV screening programs.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Maria Rita; Soldini, Laura; Di Perri, Giovanni; Tiberi, Simon; Lazzarin, Adriano; Lillo, Flavia B

    2009-10-01

    Implementation of HIV testing has the objective to increase screening, identify and counsel persons with infection, link them to clinical services and reduce transmission. Rapid tests and/or alternative biological samples (like oral fluid) give the option for a better general consent in approaching screening, immediate referral of HIV positives to medical treatment and partner notification. We tested the performance characteristics of an oral fluid-based rapid HIV test (Rapidtest HIV lateral flow-Healthchem diag. LLC) in comparison with routinely utilized methods in a selected population of known positive (N = 121) or negative (N = 754) subjects. The sensitivity of the rapid test was 99.1% (one false negative sample) and the specificity 98.8%. Five negatives showed a faint reactivity, 3 of these were reactive also in the reference test, one with a p24 only reaction in Western blot. If these 3 samples were excluded from the analysis the specificity increases to 99.2%. Results from our study confirm that, although a continuous improvement of the test performance is still needed to minimize false negative and positive results, rapid test and alternative biological samples may contribute to HIV prevention strategies by reaching a larger population particularly when and where regular screening procedures are difficult to obtain. PMID:20128446

  3. The role of molecular methods in evaluating biological treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Rittmann, Bruce E

    2002-01-01

    Methods derived from molecular biology provide powerful new tools to analyze biological treatment processes. Because molecular methods can be used to directly interrogate genetic information about the microbial community, they can provide the fine detail that is impossible with the blunt, nondiscriminating information usually obtained from more traditional measures such as biochemical oxygen demand and volatile suspended solids. Molecular methods allow tracking of critical groups of microorganisms, such as ammonia oxidizers, that comprise a small fraction of the total biomass. Molecular methods also allow tracking of specific metabolic reactions or other functions that are key to the satisfactory performance of a system. Despite their power, molecular methods do not provide sufficient information when used alone. Aggregated measures and quantitative modeling remain necessary to establish mass balances, quantify the function of the microbial community, and connect the results of molecular assays to practice. Several examples involving nitrifying bacteria in activated sludge illustrate the fine detail available with molecular methods and how they can be linked to traditional and quantitative analyses. Other manuscripts in this special issue also provide examples of the value of using molecular tools in combination with traditional methods.

  4. A discussion of molecular biology methods for protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Zawaira, Alexander; Pooran, Anil; Barichievy, Samantha; Chopera, Denis

    2012-05-01

    A number of molecular biology techniques are available to generate variants from a particular start gene for eventual protein expression. We discuss the basic principles of these methods in a repertoire that may be used to achieve the elemental steps in protein engineering. These include site-directed, deletion and insertion mutagenesis. We provide detailed case studies, drawn from our own experiences, packaged together with conceptual discussions and include an analysis of the techniques presented with regards to their uses in protein engineering.

  5. Method And System For Examining Biological Materials Using Low Power Cw Excitation Raman Spectroscopy.

    DOEpatents

    Alfano, Robert R.; Wang, Wubao

    2003-05-06

    A method and system for examining biological materials using low-power cw excitation Raman spectroscopy. A low-power continuous wave (cw) pump laser beam and a low-power cw Stokes (or anti-Stokes) probe laser beam simultaneously illuminate a biological material and traverse the biological material in collinearity. The pump beam, whose frequency is varied, is used to induce Raman emission from the biological material. The intensity of the probe beam, whose frequency is kept constant, is monitored as it leaves the biological material. When the difference between the pump and probe excitation frequencies is equal to a Raman vibrational mode frequency of the biological material, the weak probe signal becomes amplified by one or more orders of magnitude (typically up to about 10.sup.4 -10.sup.6) due to the Raman emission from the pump beam. In this manner, by monitoring the intensity of the probe beam emitted from the biological material as the pump beam is varied in frequency, one can obtain an excitation Raman spectrum for the biological material tested. The present invention may be applied to in the in vivo and/or in vitro diagnosis of diabetes, heart disease, hepatitis, cancers and other diseases by measuring the characteristic excitation Raman lines of blood glucose, cholesterol, serum glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (SGOT)/serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT), tissues and other corresponding Raman-active body constituents, respectively.

  6. Physical methods for investigating structural colours in biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Vukusic, P.; Stavenga, D.G.

    2009-01-01

    Many biological systems are known to use structural colour effects to generate aspects of their appearance and visibility. The study of these phenomena has informed an eclectic group of fields ranging, for example, from evolutionary processes in behavioural biology to micro-optical devices in technologically engineered systems. However, biological photonic systems are invariably structurally and often compositionally more elaborate than most synthetically fabricated photonic systems. For this reason, an appropriate gamut of physical methods and investigative techniques must be applied correctly so that the systems' photonic behaviour may be appropriately understood. Here, we survey a broad range of the most commonly implemented, successfully used and recently innovated physical methods. We discuss the costs and benefits of various spectrometric methods and instruments, namely scatterometers, microspectrophotometers, fibre-optic-connected photodiode array spectrometers and integrating spheres. We then discuss the role of the materials' refractive index and several of the more commonly used theoretical approaches. Finally, we describe the recent developments in the research field of photonic crystals and the implications for the further study of structural coloration in animals. PMID:19158009

  7. Alternative Test Methods for Electronic Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Jeannette

    2004-01-01

    It is common practice within NASA to test electronic parts at the manufacturing lot level to demonstrate, statistically, that parts from the lot tested will not fail in service using generic application conditions. The test methods and the generic application conditions used have been developed over the years through cooperation between NASA, DoD, and industry in order to establish a common set of standard practices. These common practices, found in MIL-STD-883, MIL-STD-750, military part specifications, EEE-INST-002, and other guidelines are preferred because they are considered to be effective and repeatable and their results are usually straightforward to interpret. These practices can sometimes be unavailable to some NASA projects due to special application conditions that must be addressed, such as schedule constraints, cost constraints, logistical constraints, or advances in the technology that make the historical standards an inappropriate choice for establishing part performance and reliability. Alternate methods have begun to emerge and to be used by NASA programs to test parts individually or as part of a system, especially when standard lot tests cannot be applied. Four alternate screening methods will be discussed in this paper: Highly accelerated life test (HALT), forward voltage drop tests for evaluating wire-bond integrity, burn-in options during or after highly accelerated stress test (HAST), and board-level qualification.

  8. ASTM Validates Air Pollution Test Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1973

    1973-01-01

    The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) has validated six basic methods for measuring pollutants in ambient air as the first part of its Project Threshold. Aim of the project is to establish nationwide consistency in measuring pollutants; determining precision, accuracy and reproducibility of 35 standard measuring methods. (BL)

  9. Method and apparatus to image biological interactions in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Weisenberger, Andrew; Bonito, Gregory M.; Reid, Chantal D.; Smith, Mark Frederick

    2015-12-22

    A method to dynamically image the actual translocation of molecular compounds of interest in a plant root, root system, and rhizosphere without disturbing the root or the soil. The technique makes use of radioactive isotopes as tracers to label molecules of interest and to image their distribution in the plant and/or soil. The method allows for the study and imaging of various biological and biochemical interactions in the rhizosphere of a plant, including, but not limited to, mycorrhizal associations in such regions.

  10. Formal methods for test case generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rushby, John (Inventor); De Moura, Leonardo Mendonga (Inventor); Hamon, Gregoire (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The invention relates to the use of model checkers to generate efficient test sets for hardware and software systems. The method provides for extending existing tests to reach new coverage targets; searching *to* some or all of the uncovered targets in parallel; searching in parallel *from* some or all of the states reached in previous tests; and slicing the model relative to the current set of coverage targets. The invention provides efficient test case generation and test set formation. Deep regions of the state space can be reached within allotted time and memory. The approach has been applied to use of the model checkers of SRI's SAL system and to model-based designs developed in Stateflow. Stateflow models achieving complete state and transition coverage in a single test case are reported.

  11. Topology testing of phylogenies using least squares methods

    PubMed Central

    Czarna, Aleksandra; Sanjuán, Rafael; González-Candelas, Fernando; Wróbel, Borys

    2006-01-01

    Background The least squares (LS) method for constructing confidence sets of trees is closely related to LS tree building methods, in which the goodness of fit of the distances measured on the tree (patristic distances) to the observed distances between taxa is the criterion used for selecting the best topology. The generalized LS (GLS) method for topology testing is often frustrated by the computational difficulties in calculating the covariance matrix and its inverse, which in practice requires approximations. The weighted LS (WLS) allows for a more efficient albeit approximate calculation of the test statistic by ignoring the covariances between the distances. Results The goal of this paper is to assess the applicability of the LS approach for constructing confidence sets of trees. We show that the approximations inherent to the WLS method did not affect negatively the accuracy and reliability of the test both in the analysis of biological sequences and DNA-DNA hybridization data (for which character-based testing methods cannot be used). On the other hand, we report several problems for the GLS method, at least for the available implementation. For many data sets of biological sequences, the GLS statistic could not be calculated. For some data sets for which it could, the GLS method included all the possible trees in the confidence set despite a strong phylogenetic signal in the data. Finally, contrary to WLS, for simulated sequences GLS showed undercoverage (frequent non-inclusion of the true tree in the confidence set). Conclusion The WLS method provides a computationally efficient approximation to the GLS useful especially in exploratory analyses of confidence sets of trees, when assessing the phylogenetic signal in the data, and when other methods are not available. PMID:17150093

  12. Progeny Clustering: A Method to Identify Biological Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chenyue W; Kornblau, Steven M; Slater, John H; Qutub, Amina A

    2015-01-01

    Estimating the optimal number of clusters is a major challenge in applying cluster analysis to any type of dataset, especially to biomedical datasets, which are high-dimensional and complex. Here, we introduce an improved method, Progeny Clustering, which is stability-based and exceptionally efficient in computing, to find the ideal number of clusters. The algorithm employs a novel Progeny Sampling method to reconstruct cluster identity, a co-occurrence probability matrix to assess the clustering stability, and a set of reference datasets to overcome inherent biases in the algorithm and data space. Our method was shown successful and robust when applied to two synthetic datasets (datasets of two-dimensions and ten-dimensions containing eight dimensions of pure noise), two standard biological datasets (the Iris dataset and Rat CNS dataset) and two biological datasets (a cell phenotype dataset and an acute myeloid leukemia (AML) reverse phase protein array (RPPA) dataset). Progeny Clustering outperformed some popular clustering evaluation methods in the ten-dimensional synthetic dataset as well as in the cell phenotype dataset, and it was the only method that successfully discovered clinically meaningful patient groupings in the AML RPPA dataset. PMID:26267476

  13. Standard Test Methods for Textile Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, John E.; Portanova, Marc A.

    1996-01-01

    Standard testing methods for composite laminates reinforced with continuous networks of braided, woven, or stitched fibers have been evaluated. The microstructure of these textile' composite materials differs significantly from that of tape laminates. Consequently, specimen dimensions and loading methods developed for tape type composites may not be applicable to textile composites. To this end, a series of evaluations were made comparing testing practices currently used in the composite industry. Information was gathered from a variety of sources and analyzed to establish a series of recommended test methods for textile composites. The current practices established for laminated composite materials by ASTM and the MIL-HDBK-17 Committee were considered. This document provides recommended test methods for determining both in-plane and out-of-plane properties. Specifically, test methods are suggested for: unnotched tension and compression; open and filled hole tension; open hole compression; bolt bearing; and interlaminar tension. A detailed description of the material architectures evaluated is also provided, as is a recommended instrumentation practice.

  14. Development of test methods for textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, John E.; Ifju, Peter G.; Fedro, Mark J.

    1993-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Composite Technology (ACT) Program was initiated in 1990 with the purpose of developing less costly composite aircraft structures. A number of innovative materials and processes were evaluated as a part of this effort. Chief among them are composite materials reinforced with textile preforms. These new forms of composite materials bring with them potential testing problems. Methods currently in practice were developed over the years for composite materials made from prepreg tape or simple 2-D woven fabrics. A wide variety of 2-D and 3-D braided, woven, stitched, and knit preforms were suggested for application in the ACT program. The applicability of existing test methods to the wide range of emerging materials bears investigation. The overriding concern is that the values measured are accurate representations of the true material response. The ultimate objective of this work is to establish a set of test methods to evaluate the textile composites developed for the ACT Program.

  15. Aflatoxin plate kit. Performance Tested Method 081003.

    PubMed

    Trombley, Arthur; Fan, Titan; LaBudde, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The level of total aflatoxin contamination was analyzed in naturally contaminated and spiked samples of corn and peanut using the Aflatoxin Plate Kit. This kit is an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) suitable for rapid testing of grains and peanuts. The assay was evaluated for ruggedness and linearity of the standard curve. The test kit results were then statistically evaluated for accuracy, precision, and correlation to a validated HPLC method (AOAC 994.08). The results were verified by an independent laboratory.

  16. Integrating Formal Methods and Testing 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cukic, Bojan

    2002-01-01

    Traditionally, qualitative program verification methodologies and program testing are studied in separate research communities. None of them alone is powerful and practical enough to provide sufficient confidence in ultra-high reliability assessment when used exclusively. Significant advances can be made by accounting not only tho formal verification and program testing. but also the impact of many other standard V&V techniques, in a unified software reliability assessment framework. The first year of this research resulted in the statistical framework that, given the assumptions on the success of the qualitative V&V and QA procedures, significantly reduces the amount of testing needed to confidently assess reliability at so-called high and ultra-high levels (10-4 or higher). The coming years shall address the methodologies to realistically estimate the impacts of various V&V techniques to system reliability and include the impact of operational risk to reliability assessment. Combine formal correctness verification, process and product metrics, and other standard qualitative software assurance methods with statistical testing with the aim of gaining higher confidence in software reliability assessment for high-assurance applications. B) Quantify the impact of these methods on software reliability. C) Demonstrate that accounting for the effectiveness of these methods reduces the number of tests needed to attain certain confidence level. D) Quantify and justify the reliability estimate for systems developed using various methods.

  17. Transport Test Problems for Hybrid Methods Development

    SciTech Connect

    Shaver, Mark W.; Miller, Erin A.; Wittman, Richard S.; McDonald, Benjamin S.

    2011-12-28

    This report presents 9 test problems to guide testing and development of hybrid calculations for the ADVANTG code at ORNL. These test cases can be used for comparing different types of radiation transport calculations, as well as for guiding the development of variance reduction methods. Cases are drawn primarily from existing or previous calculations with a preference for cases which include experimental data, or otherwise have results with a high level of confidence, are non-sensitive, and represent problem sets of interest to NA-22.

  18. Axial-scanning low-coherence interferometer method for noncontact thickness measurement of biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Do-Hyun; Song, Chul-Gyu; Ilev, Ilko K.; Kang, Jin U.

    2011-02-20

    We investigated a high-precision optical method for measuring the thickness of biological samples regardless of their transparency. The method is based on the precise measurement of optical path length difference of the end surfaces of objects, using a dual-arm axial-scanning low-coherence interferometer. This removes any consideration of the shape, thickness, or transparency of testing objects when performing the measurement. Scanning the reference simplifies the measurement setup, resulting in unambiguous measurement. Using a 1310 nm wavelength superluminescent diode, with a 65 nm bandwidth, the measurement accuracy was as high as 11.6 {mu}m. We tested the method by measuring the thickness of both transparent samples and nontransparent soft biological tissues.

  19. Dormancy and Recovery Testing for Biological Wastewater Processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummerick, Mary F.; Coutts, Janelle L.; Lunn, Griffin M.; Spencer, LaShelle; Khodadad, Christina L.; Birmele, Michele N.; Frances, Someliz; Wheeler, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Resource recovery and recycling waste streams to usable water via biological water processors is a plausible component of an integrated water purification system. Biological processing as a pretreatment can reduce the load of organic carbon and nitrogen compounds entering physiochemical systems downstream. Aerated hollow fiber membrane bioreactors, have been proposed and studied for a number of years as an approach for treating wastewater streams for space exploration.

  20. Optomechanical tests of hydrated biological tissues subjected to laser shaping

    SciTech Connect

    Omel'chenko, A I; Sobol', E N

    2008-03-31

    The mechanical properties of a matrix are studied upon changing the size and shape of biological tissues during dehydration caused by weak laser-induced heating. The cartilage deformation, dehydration dynamics, and hydraulic conductivity are measured upon laser heating. The hydrated state and the shape of samples of separated fascias and cartilaginous tissues were controlled by using computer-aided processing of tissue images in polarised light. (laser biology)

  1. Biological Stability of Drinking Water: Controlling Factors, Methods, and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Prest, Emmanuelle I; Hammes, Frederik; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S

    2016-01-01

    Biological stability of drinking water refers to the concept of providing consumers with drinking water of same microbial quality at the tap as produced at the water treatment facility. However, uncontrolled growth of bacteria can occur during distribution in water mains and premise plumbing, and can lead to hygienic (e.g., development of opportunistic pathogens), aesthetic (e.g., deterioration of taste, odor, color) or operational (e.g., fouling or biocorrosion of pipes) problems. Drinking water contains diverse microorganisms competing for limited available nutrients for growth. Bacterial growth and interactions are regulated by factors, such as (i) type and concentration of available organic and inorganic nutrients, (ii) type and concentration of residual disinfectant, (iii) presence of predators, such as protozoa and invertebrates, (iv) environmental conditions, such as water temperature, and (v) spatial location of microorganisms (bulk water, sediment, or biofilm). Water treatment and distribution conditions in water mains and premise plumbing affect each of these factors and shape bacterial community characteristics (abundance, composition, viability) in distribution systems. Improved understanding of bacterial interactions in distribution systems and of environmental conditions impact is needed for better control of bacterial communities during drinking water production and distribution. This article reviews (i) existing knowledge on biological stability controlling factors and (ii) how these factors are affected by drinking water production and distribution conditions. In addition, (iii) the concept of biological stability is discussed in light of experience with well-established and new analytical methods, enabling high throughput analysis and in-depth characterization of bacterial communities in drinking water. We discussed, how knowledge gained from novel techniques will improve design and monitoring of water treatment and distribution systems in order

  2. Biological Stability of Drinking Water: Controlling Factors, Methods, and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Prest, Emmanuelle I.; Hammes, Frederik; van Loosdrecht, Mark C. M.; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S.

    2016-01-01

    Biological stability of drinking water refers to the concept of providing consumers with drinking water of same microbial quality at the tap as produced at the water treatment facility. However, uncontrolled growth of bacteria can occur during distribution in water mains and premise plumbing, and can lead to hygienic (e.g., development of opportunistic pathogens), aesthetic (e.g., deterioration of taste, odor, color) or operational (e.g., fouling or biocorrosion of pipes) problems. Drinking water contains diverse microorganisms competing for limited available nutrients for growth. Bacterial growth and interactions are regulated by factors, such as (i) type and concentration of available organic and inorganic nutrients, (ii) type and concentration of residual disinfectant, (iii) presence of predators, such as protozoa and invertebrates, (iv) environmental conditions, such as water temperature, and (v) spatial location of microorganisms (bulk water, sediment, or biofilm). Water treatment and distribution conditions in water mains and premise plumbing affect each of these factors and shape bacterial community characteristics (abundance, composition, viability) in distribution systems. Improved understanding of bacterial interactions in distribution systems and of environmental conditions impact is needed for better control of bacterial communities during drinking water production and distribution. This article reviews (i) existing knowledge on biological stability controlling factors and (ii) how these factors are affected by drinking water production and distribution conditions. In addition, (iii) the concept of biological stability is discussed in light of experience with well-established and new analytical methods, enabling high throughput analysis and in-depth characterization of bacterial communities in drinking water. We discussed, how knowledge gained from novel techniques will improve design and monitoring of water treatment and distribution systems in order

  3. Methods to Test Visual Attention Online

    PubMed Central

    Yung, Amanda; Cardoso-Leite, Pedro; Dale, Gillian; Bavelier, Daphne; Green, C. Shawn

    2015-01-01

    Online data collection methods have particular appeal to behavioral scientists because they offer the promise of much larger and much more representative data samples than can typically be collected on college campuses. However, before such methods can be widely adopted, a number of technological challenges must be overcome – in particular in experiments where tight control over stimulus properties is necessary. Here we present methods for collecting performance data on two tests of visual attention. Both tests require control over the visual angle of the stimuli (which in turn requires knowledge of the viewing distance, monitor size, screen resolution, etc.) and the timing of the stimuli (as the tests involve either briefly flashed stimuli or stimuli that move at specific rates). Data collected on these tests from over 1700 online participants were consistent with data collected in laboratory-based versions of the exact same tests. These results suggest that with proper care, timing/stimulus size dependent tasks can be deployed in web-based settings. PMID:25741746

  4. Method for non-destructive testing

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.

    2011-08-30

    Non-destructive testing method may include providing a source material that emits positrons in response to bombardment of the source material with photons. The source material is exposed to photons. The source material is positioned adjacent the specimen, the specimen being exposed to at least some of the positrons emitted by the source material. Annihilation gamma rays emitted by the specimen are detected.

  5. IMPROVED TEST METHODS FOR ELECTRONIC AIR CLEANERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project was to develop a fractional filtration efficiency test protocol for residential electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) that avoids the limitations of the ASHRAE 52.2 method. Specifically, the objectives were to a) determine the change in efficiency that ...

  6. Equated Pooled Booklet Method in DIF Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Ying; Chen, Peihua; Qian, Jiahe; Chang, Hua-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) analysis is an important step in the data analysis of large-scale testing programs. Nowadays, many such programs endorse matrix sampling designs to reduce the load on examinees, such as the balanced incomplete block (BIB) design. These designs pose challenges to the traditional DIF analysis methods. For example,…

  7. 16 CFR 1213.4 - Test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARD FOR ENTRAPMENT HAZARDS IN BUNK BEDS § 1213.4 Test methods. (a) Guardrails (see § 1213.3(a)(6)). With no mattress on the bed, place the wedge block shown in Figure 1, tapered side first, into each opening in the bed structure below the lower edge of the uppermost member of the guardrail and above...

  8. 16 CFR 1513.4 - Test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR BUNK BEDS § 1513.4 Test methods. (a) Guardrails (see § 1513.3(a)(6)). With no mattress on the bed, place the wedge block shown in Figure 1, tapered side first, into each opening in the rigid...

  9. Testing alleged mediumship: methods and results.

    PubMed

    O'keeffe, Ciarán; Wiseman, Richard

    2005-05-01

    Mediums claim to be able to communicate with the deceased. Such claims attract a considerable amount of public interest and, if valid, have important implications for many areas of psychology. For over 100 years, researchers have tested alleged mediums. This work has obtained mixed results and provoked a considerable amount of methodological debate. This paper reviews the key issues in this debate, describes how the authors devised a method of testing that aimed to prevent the many problems that have hindered past research, and how they then used this method to test several professional mediums. The results of this work did not support the existence of genuine mediumistic ability. Competing interpretations of these results are discussed, along with ways in which the methodology presented in the paper could be used to assess conceptually similar, but non-paranormal, claims made in clinical, occupational and forensic contexts.

  10. An evaluation of the whole effluent toxicity test method

    SciTech Connect

    Osteen, D.V.

    1999-12-17

    Whole effluent toxicity (WET) testing has become increasingly more important to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the States in the permitting of wastewater discharges from industry and municipalities. The primary purpose of the WET test is to protect aquatic life by predicting the effect of an effluent on the receiving stream. However, there are both scientific and regulatory concerns that using WET tests to regulate industrial effluents may result in either false positives and/or false negatives. In order to realistically predict the effect of an effluent on the receiving stream, the test should be as representative as possible of the conditions in the receiving stream. Studies (Rand and Petrocelli 1985) suggested several criteria for an ideal aquatic toxicity test organism, one of which is that the organism be indigenous to, or representative of, the ecosystem receiving the effluent. The other component needed in the development of a predictive test is the use of the receiving stream water or similar synthetic water as the control and dilution water in the test method. Use of an indigenous species and receiving water in the test should help reduce the variability in the method and allow the test to predict the effect of the effluent on the receiving stream. The experience with toxicity testing at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has yielded inconclusive data because of the inconsistency and unreliability of the results. The SRS contention is that the WET method in its present form does not adequately mimic actual biological/chemical conditions of the receiving streams and is neither reasonable nor accurate. This paper discusses the rationale for such a position by SRS on toxicity testing in terms of historical permitting requirements, outfall effluent test results, standard test method evaluation, scientific review of alternate test species, and concerns over the test method expressed by other organizations. This paper presents the Savannah River Site

  11. Sound and faulty arguments generated by preservice biology teachers when testing hypotheses involving unobservable entities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Anton E.

    2002-03-01

    A sample of preservice biology teachers (biology majors) enrolled in a teaching methods course formulated and attempted to test six hypotheses to answer a causal question about why water rose in a jar inverted over a burning candle placed in a pan of water. The students submitted a lab report in which arguments and evidence for testing each hypothesis were presented in an if/then/therefore hypothetico-predictive form. Analysis of written arguments revealed considerable success when students were able to manipulate observable hypothesized causes. However, when the hypothesized causes were unobservable, such that they could be only indirectly tested, performance dropped, as shown by use of three types of faulty arguments: (a) arguments that had missing or confused elements, (b) arguments whose predictions did not follow from hypotheses and planned tests, and (c) arguments that failed to consider alternative hypotheses. Science is an enterprise in which unobservable theoretical entities and processes (e.g., atoms, genes, osmosis, and photosynthesis) are often used to explain observable phenomena. Consequently, if it is assumed that effective teaching requires prior understanding, then it follows that these future teachers have yet to develop adequate hypothesis-testing skills and sufficient awareness of the nature of science to teach science in the inquiry mode advocated by reform guidelines.

  12. Biological characteristics of crucian by quantitative inspection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Mengqi

    2015-04-01

    Biological characteristics of crucian by quantitative inspection method Through quantitative inspection method , the biological characteristics of crucian was preliminary researched. Crucian , Belongs to Cypriniformes, Cyprinidae, Carassius auratus, is a kind of main plant-eating omnivorous fish,like Gregarious, selection and ranking. Crucian are widely distributed, perennial water all over the country all have production. Determine the indicators of crucian in the experiment, to understand the growth, reproduction situation of crucian in this area . Using the measured data (such as the scale length ,scale size and wheel diameter and so on) and related functional to calculate growth of crucian in any one year.According to the egg shape, color, weight ,etc to determine its maturity, with the mean egg diameter per 20 eggs and the number of eggs per 0.5 grams, to calculate the relative and absolute fecundity of the fish .Measured crucian were female puberty. Based on the relation between the scale diameter and length and the information, linear relationship between crucian scale diameter and length: y=1.530+3.0649. From the data, the fertility and is closely relative to the increase of age. The older, the more mature gonad development. The more amount of eggs. In addition, absolute fecundity increases with the pituitary gland.Through quantitative check crucian bait food intake by the object, reveals the main food, secondary foods, and chance food of crucian ,and understand that crucian degree of be fond of of all kinds of bait organisms.Fish fertility with weight gain, it has the characteristics of species and populations, and at the same tmes influenced by the age of the individual, body length, body weight, environmental conditions (especially the nutrition conditions), and breeding habits, spawning times factors and the size of the egg. After a series of studies of crucian biological character, provide the ecological basis for local crucian's feeding, breeding

  13. Advantages and limitations of common testing methods for antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Amorati, R; Valgimigli, L

    2015-05-01

    Owing to the importance of antioxidants in the protection of both natural and man-made materials, a large variety of testing methods have been proposed and applied. These include methods based on inhibited autoxidation studies, which are better followed by monitoring the kinetics of oxygen consumption or of the formation of hydroperoxides, the primary oxidation products. Analytical determination of secondary oxidation products (e.g. carbonyl compounds) has also been used. The majority of testing methods, however, do not involve substrate autoxidation. They are based on the competitive bleaching of a probe (e.g. ORAC assay, β-carotene, crocin bleaching assays, and luminol assay), on reaction with a different probe (e.g. spin-trapping and TOSC assay), or they are indirect methods based on the reduction of persistent radicals (e.g. galvinoxyl, DPPH and TEAC assays), or of inorganic oxidizing species (e.g. FRAP, CUPRAC and Folin-Ciocalteu assays). Yet other methods are specific for preventive antioxidants. The relevance, advantages, and limitations of these methods are critically discussed, with respect to their chemistry and the mechanisms of antioxidant activity. A variety of cell-based assays have also been proposed, to investigate the biological activity of antioxidants. Their importance and critical aspects are discussed, along with arguments for the selection of the appropriate testing methods according to the different needs.

  14. High temperature pressurized high frequency testing rig and test method

    DOEpatents

    De La Cruz, Jose; Lacey, Paul

    2003-04-15

    An apparatus is described which permits the lubricity of fuel compositions at or near temperatures and pressures experienced by compression ignition fuel injector components during operation in a running engine. The apparatus consists of means to apply a measured force between two surfaces and oscillate them at high frequency while wetted with a sample of the fuel composition heated to an operator selected temperature. Provision is made to permit operation at or near the flash point of the fuel compositions. Additionally a method of using the subject apparatus to simulate ASTM Testing Method D6079 is disclosed, said method involving using the disclosed apparatus to contact the faces of prepared workpieces under a measured load, sealing the workface contact point into the disclosed apparatus while immersing said contact point between said workfaces in a lubricating media to be tested, pressurizing and heating the chamber and thereby the fluid and workfaces therewithin, using the disclosed apparatus to impart a differential linear motion between the workpieces at their contact point until a measurable scar is imparted to at least one workpiece workface, and then evaluating the workface scar.

  15. Methods and instruments for materials testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansma, Paul (Inventor); Drake, Barney (Inventor); Rehn, Douglas (Inventor); Adams, Jonathan (Inventor); Lulejian, Jason (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Methods and instruments for characterizing a material, such as the properties of bone in a living human subject, using a test probe constructed for insertion into the material and a reference probe aligned with the test probe in a housing. The housing is hand held or placed so that the reference probe contacts the surface of the material under pressure applied either by hand or by the weight of the housing. The test probe is inserted into the material to indent the material while maintaining the reference probe substantially under the hand pressure or weight of the housing allowing evaluation of a property of the material related to indentation of the material by the probe. Force can be generated by a voice coil in a magnet structure to the end of which the test probe is connected and supported in the magnet structure by a flexure, opposing flexures, a linear translation stage, or a linear bearing. Optionally, a measurement unit containing the test probe and reference probe is connected to a base unit with a wireless connection, allowing in the field material testing.

  16. HRI catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process materials: chemical analysis and biological testing

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, C.W.; Later, D.W.

    1985-12-01

    This report presents data from the chemical analysis and biological testing of coal liquefaction materials obtained from the Hydrocarbon Research, Incorporated (HRI) catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process. Materials from both an experimental run and a 25-day demonstration run were analyzed. Chemical methods of analysis included adsorption column chromatography, high-resolution gas chromatography, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, low-voltage probe-inlet mass spectrometry, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The biological activity was evaluated using the standard microbial mutagenicity assay and an initiation/promotion assay for mouse-skin tumorigenicity. Where applicable, the results obtained from the analyses of the CTSL materials have been compared to those obtained from the integrated and nonintegrated two-stage coal liquefaction processes. 18 refs., 26 figs., 22 tabs.

  17. Video and HTML: Testing Online Tutorial Formats with Biology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Cindy L.; Friehs, Curt G.

    2013-01-01

    This study compared two common types of online information literacy tutorials: a streaming media tutorial using animation and narration and a text-based tutorial with static images. Nine sections of an undergraduate biology lab class (234 students total) were instructed by a librarian on how to use the BIOSIS Previews database. Three sections…

  18. Singlepath Salmonella. Performance Tested Method 060401.

    PubMed

    Lindhardt, Charlotte; Schönenbrücher, Holger; Slaghuis, Jörg; Bubert, Andreas; Ossmer, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    Singlepath Salmonella is an immunochromatographic (lateral flow) assay for the presumptive qualitative detection of Salmonella spp. in food. A previous AOAC Performance Tested Method study evaluated Singlepath Salmonella as an effective method for the detection of Salmonella spp. in the following selected foods: dried skimmed milk, black pepper, dried pet food, desiccated coconut, cooked peeled frozen prawns, raw ground beef, and raw ground turkey. In this Emergency Response Validation extension, creamy peanut butter was inoculated with S. enterica. ser. Typhimurium. For low contamination level (1.08 CFU/25 g), a Chi-square value of 0.5 indicated that there was no significant difference between Singlepath Salmonella and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bacteriological Analytical Manual (FDA-BAM) reference method. For high-level and uninoculated control there was 100% agreement between the methods. PMID:20166612

  19. Explosive materials equivalency, test methods and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koger, D. M.; Mcintyre, F. L.

    1980-01-01

    Attention is given to concepts of explosive equivalency of energetic materials based on specific airblast parameters. A description is provided of a wide bandwidth high accuracy instrumentation system which has been used extensively in obtaining pressure time profiles of energetic materials. The object of the considered test method is to determine the maximum output from the detonation of explosive materials in terms of airblast overpressure and positive impulse. The measured pressure and impulse values are compared with known characteristics of hemispherical TNT data to determine the equivalency of the test material in relation to TNT. An investigation shows that meaningful comparisons between various explosives and a standard reference material such as TNT should be based upon the same parameters. The tests should be conducted under the same conditions.

  20. Characterization methods for ultrasonic test systems

    SciTech Connect

    Busse, L.J.; Becker, F.L.; Bowey, R.E.; Doctor, S.R.; Gribble, R.P.; Posakony, G.J.

    1982-07-01

    Methods for the characterization of ultrasonic transducers (search units) and instruments are presented. The instrument system is considered as three separate components consisting of a transducer, a receiver-display, and a pulser. The operation of each component is assessed independently. The methods presented were chosen because they provide the greatest amount of information about component operation and were not chosen based upon such conditions as cost, ease of operation, field implementation, etc. The results of evaluating a number of commercially available ultrasonic test instruments are presented.

  1. Quality in molecular biology testing for inherited thrombophilia disorders.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Peter C; Goodeve, Anne C; Beauchamp, Nicholas J

    2012-09-01

    As the understanding of the genetic basis of the inherited thrombophilias has increased over recent years, their routine diagnostic genetic analysis has also matured. This review considers methods used to test for the factor V (F5) Leiden mutation and prothrombin 20210A (F2 c.*97G>A) allele, and analysis of the SERPINC1, PROC, and PROS1 genes in cases of antithrombin, protein C (PC), and protein S (PS) deficiency, respectively. Issues relating to quality are explored, highlighting where analytical and sample handling errors may occur. Detection of the factor V Leiden mutation and the prothrombin c.*97G>A allele are best performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis as this relatively simple technique allows their discrimination from rare variants of neighboring nucleotides; not possible using the more time-consuming restriction digestion assays. With the advent of low-cost and high-throughput sequence analysis, direct sequencing has become the first-line method to provide a definitive diagnosis of inherited, rather than acquired, deficiencies. Large cohort studies have shown that antithrombin and PC mutations are identified in between 61 and 87% of patients, whereas the detection rate in PS deficiency is substantially lower in around 40% of patients. Large gene deletions make up between 7 and 10% of PS and antithrombin mutations and only 1% of PC mutations, but it is suggested that dosage analysis techniques such as multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification should be used for all three genes as part of routine analysis to ensure mutations are not missed. Best practice guidelines are available from EuroGentest covering a wide variety of the issues raised in this review and all laboratories should participate in appropriate external quality assurance schemes to ensure they continue to offer high quality service.

  2. Method for photo-altering a biological system to improve biological effect

    DOEpatents

    Hill, Richard A.; Doiron, Daniel R.; Crean, David H.

    2000-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a new adjunctive therapy for filtration surgery that does not use chemotherapy agents or radiation, but uses pharmacologically-active sensitizing compounds to produce a titratable, localized, transient, post operative avascular conjunctiva. A photosensitizing agent in a biological system is selectively activated by delivering the photosensitive agent to the biological system and laser activating only a spatially selected portion of the delivered photosensitive agent. The activated portion of the photosensitive agent reacts with the biological system to obtain a predetermined biological effect. As a result, an improved spatial disposition and effectuation of the biological effect by the photosensitive agent in the biological system is achieved.

  3. Persisting Misconceptions: Using Pre- and Post-Tests to Identify Biological Misconceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazario, Gladys M.; Burrowes, Patricia A.; Rodriguez, Julio

    2002-01-01

    Explains a research project conducted at the University of Puerto Rico among students taking biology to develop and test a constructivist learning environment and identify students' misconceptions in biology. Lists the questions on which students showed misconceptions during the pre- and post-tests. (Contains 27 references.) (YDS)

  4. Immersed finite element method and its applications to biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wing Kam; Liu, Yaling; Farrell, David; Zhang, Lucy; Wang, X. Sheldon; Fukui, Yoshio; Patankar, Neelesh; Zhang, Yongjie; Bajaj, Chandrajit; Lee, Junghoon; Hong, Juhee; Chen, Xinyu; Hsu, Huayi

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the newly developed immersed finite element method (IFEM) and its applications to the modeling of biological systems. This work was inspired by the pioneering work of Professor T.J.R. Hughes in solving fluid–structure interaction problems. In IFEM, a Lagrangian solid mesh moves on top of a background Eulerian fluid mesh which spans the entire computational domain. Hence, mesh generation is greatly simplified. Moreover, both fluid and solid domains are modeled with the finite element method and the continuity between the fluid and solid subdomains is enforced via the interpolation of the velocities and the distribution of the forces with the reproducing Kernel particle method (RKPM) delta function. The proposed method is used to study the fluid–structure interaction problems encountered in human cardiovascular systems. Currently, the heart modeling is being constructed and the deployment process of an angioplasty stent has been simulated. Some preliminary results on monocyte and platelet deposition are presented. Blood rheology, in particular, the shear-rate dependent de-aggregation of red blood cell (RBC) clusters and the transport of deformable cells, are modeled. Furthermore, IFEM is combined with electrokinetics to study the mechanisms of nano/bio filament assembly for the understanding of cell motility. PMID:20200602

  5. Extracellular Vesicles: Composition, Biological Relevance, and Methods of Study

    PubMed Central

    Zaborowski, MikoŁaj P.; Balaj, Leonora; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Lai, Charles P.

    2015-01-01

    The release of extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes and microvesicles, is a phenomenon shared by many cell types as a means of communicating with other cells and also potentially removing cell contents. The cargo of EVs includes the proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, and membrane receptors of the cells from which they originate. EVs released into the extracellular space can enter body fluids and potentially reach distant tissues. Once taken up by neighboring and/or distal cells, EVs can transfer functional cargo that may alter the status of recipient cells, thereby contributing to both physiological and pathological processes. In this article, we will focus on EV composition, mechanisms of uptake, and their biological effects on recipient cells. We will also discuss established and recently developed methods used to study EVs, including isolation, quantification, labeling and imaging protocols, as well as RNA analysis. PMID:26955082

  6. Method and apparatus for electrostatically sorting biological cells

    DOEpatents

    Merrill, John T.

    1982-01-01

    An improved method of sorting biological cells in a conventional cell sorter apparatus includes generating a fluid jet containing cells to be sorted, measuring the distance between the centers of adjacent droplets in a zone thereof defined at the point where the fluid jet separates into descrete droplets, setting the distance between the center of a droplet in said separation zone and the position along said fluid jet at which the cell is optically sensed for specific characteristics to be an integral multiple of said center-to-center distance, and disabling a charger from electrically charging a specific droplet if a cell is detected by the optical sensor in a position wherein it will be in the neck area between droplets during droplet formation rather than within a predetermined distance from the droplet center.

  7. Control system health test system and method

    DOEpatents

    Hoff, Brian D.; Johnson, Kris W.; Akasam, Sivaprasad; Baker, Thomas M.

    2006-08-15

    A method is provided for testing multiple elements of a work machine, including a control system, a component, a sub-component that is influenced by operations of the component, and a sensor that monitors a characteristic of the sub-component. In one embodiment, the method is performed by the control system and includes sending a command to the component to adjust a first parameter associated with an operation of the component. Also, the method includes detecting a sensor signal from the sensor reflecting a second parameter associated with a characteristic of the sub-component and determining whether the second parameter is acceptable based on the command. The control system may diagnose at least one of the elements of the work machine when the second parameter of the sub-component is not acceptable.

  8. Method And System For Examining Biological Materials Using Low Power Cw Excitation Raman Spectroscopy.

    DOEpatents

    Alfano, Robert R.; Wang, Wubao

    2000-11-21

    A method and system for examining biological materials using low-power cw excitation Raman spectroscopy. In accordance with the teachings of the invention, a low-power continuous wave (cw) pump laser beam and a low-power cw Stokes (or anti-Stokes) probe laser beam simultaneously illuminate a biological material and traverse the biological material in collinearity. The pump beam, whose frequency is varied, is used to induce Raman emission from the biological material. The intensity of the probe beam, whose frequency is kept constant, is monitored as it leaves the biological material. When the difference between the pump and probe excitation frequencies is equal to a Raman vibrational mode frequency of the biological material, the weak probe signal becomes amplified by one or more orders of magnitude (typically up to about 10.sup.4 -10.sup.6) due to the Raman emission from the pump beam. In this manner, by monitoring the intensity of the probe beam emitted from the biological material as the pump beam is varied in frequency, one can obtain an excitation Raman spectrum for the biological material tested. The present invention may be applied to in the in vivo and/or in vitro diagnosis of diabetes, heart disease, hepatitis, cancers and other diseases by measuring the characteristic excitation Raman lines of blood glucose, cholesterol, serum glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (SGOT)/serum glutamic pyruvic tansaminase (SGPT), tissues and other corresponding Raman-active body constituents, respectively. For example, it may also be used to diagnose diseases associated with the concentration of Raman-active constituents in urine, lymph and saliva It may be used to identify cancer in the breast, cervix, uterus, ovaries and the like by measuring the fingerprint excitation Raman spectra of these tissues. It may also be used to reveal the growing of tumors or cancers by measuring the levels of nitric oxide in tissue.

  9. Assessing Social Isolation: Pilot Testing Different Methods.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Harry Owen; Herbers, Stephanie; Talisman, Samuel; Morrow-Howell, Nancy

    2016-04-01

    Social isolation is a significant public health problem among many older adults; however, most of the empirical knowledge about isolation derives from community-based samples. There has been less attention given to isolation in senior housing communities. The objectives of this pilot study were to test two methods to identify socially isolated residents in low-income senior housing and compare findings about the extent of isolation from these two methods. The first method, self-report by residents, included 47 out of 135 residents who completed in-person interviews. To determine self-report isolation, residents completed the Lubben Social Network Scale 6 (LSNS-6). The second method involved a staff member who reported the extent of isolation on all 135 residents via an online survey. Results indicated that 26% of residents who were interviewed were deemed socially isolated by the LSNS-6. Staff members rated 12% of residents as having some or a lot of isolation. In comparing the two methods, staff members rated 2% of interviewed residents as having a lot of isolation. The combination of self-report and staff report could be more informative than just self-report alone, particularly when participation rates are low. However, researchers should be aware of the potential discrepancy between these two methods. PMID:27276687

  10. Assessing Social Isolation: Pilot Testing Different Methods.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Harry Owen; Herbers, Stephanie; Talisman, Samuel; Morrow-Howell, Nancy

    2016-04-01

    Social isolation is a significant public health problem among many older adults; however, most of the empirical knowledge about isolation derives from community-based samples. There has been less attention given to isolation in senior housing communities. The objectives of this pilot study were to test two methods to identify socially isolated residents in low-income senior housing and compare findings about the extent of isolation from these two methods. The first method, self-report by residents, included 47 out of 135 residents who completed in-person interviews. To determine self-report isolation, residents completed the Lubben Social Network Scale 6 (LSNS-6). The second method involved a staff member who reported the extent of isolation on all 135 residents via an online survey. Results indicated that 26% of residents who were interviewed were deemed socially isolated by the LSNS-6. Staff members rated 12% of residents as having some or a lot of isolation. In comparing the two methods, staff members rated 2% of interviewed residents as having a lot of isolation. The combination of self-report and staff report could be more informative than just self-report alone, particularly when participation rates are low. However, researchers should be aware of the potential discrepancy between these two methods.

  11. A new method of field MRTD test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhibin; Song, Yan; Liu, Xianhong; Xiao, Wenjian

    2014-09-01

    MRTD is an important indicator to measure the imaging performance of infrared camera. In the traditional laboratory test, blackbody is used as simulated heat source which is not only expensive and bulky but also difficult to meet field testing requirements of online automatic infrared camera MRTD. To solve this problem, this paper introduces a new detection device for MRTD, which uses LED as a simulation heat source and branded plated zinc sulfide glass carved four-bar target as a simulation target. By using high temperature adaptability cassegrain collimation system, the target is simulated to be distance-infinite so that it can be observed by the human eyes to complete the subjective test, or collected to complete objective measurement by image processing. This method will use LED to replace blackbody. The color temperature of LED is calibrated by thermal imager, thereby, the relation curve between the LED temperature controlling current and the blackbody simulation temperature difference is established, accurately achieved the temperature control of the infrared target. Experimental results show that the accuracy of the device in field testing of thermal imager MRTD can be limited within 0.1K, which greatly reduces the cost to meet the project requirements with a wide application value.

  12. Singlepath Salmonella. Performance-Tested Method 060401.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lisa; Lindhardt, Charlotte

    2006-01-01

    Singlepath Salmonella is an immunochromatographic (lateral flow) assay for the presumptive qualitative detection of Salmonella spp. in food. The AOAC Performance-Tested Method study evaluated Singlepath Salmonella as an effective method for the detection of Salmonella spp. in the following selected foods: dried skimmed milk, black pepper, dried pet food, desiccated coconut, cooked peeled frozen prawns, raw ground beef, and raw ground turkey. When the foods were inoculated with Salmonella spp. at levels ranging from low [0.23-1.08 colony forming units (CFU)/25 g] to high (2.3-6.0 CFU/25 g), a Chi-square value of 0.9 indicated that there was no significant difference between Singlepath Salmonella and the ISO 6579:2002 reference method. Singlepath Salmonella gave a false-positive rate of 7.3% and a false-negative rate of 2.5%. For the inclusivity study, all 105 Salmonella serovars reacted with Singlepath Salmonella. For the exclusivity study, 58 non-Salmonella spp. were tested. There were no cross-reactions with Singlepath Salmonella from these strains. PMID:16640289

  13. Noise-abatement method for explosives testing.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, H E; Odell, B N; Arganbright, V E

    1980-09-01

    When Lawrence Livermore Laboratory started detonating explosives at its Site 300 test location in the sparsely populated hills east of the Laboratory, residents in neighboring areas complained of sudden loud noises. A combined literature and research study, coupled with an experimental test program, indicated the combination of air temperatures and winds at various elevations was primarily responsible for blast or sound waves being returned to the surface. To solve the noise problem, the Laboratory devised a method for determining the maximum amount of explosives that could be detonated aboveground under various atmospheric conditions without creating excessive noise in populated areas. This method for predicting explosives weight limits using pressure-distance-weight nomograms and the slope of a sound-velocity curve is described in this paper. The sound-velocity curve is computed with temperature information from the U.S. Weather Bureau and wind data from a target-acquisition radar system. By following this method, the Laboratory has been able to detonate thousands of shots without creating excessive noise in nearby communities. PMID:7457390

  14. Experimental test of airplane boarding methods

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Jason H.; Hotchkiss, Jon

    2011-10-26

    We report the results of an experimental comparison of different airplane boarding methods. This test was conducted in a mock 757 fuselage, located on a Southern California soundstage, with 12 rows of six seats and a single aisle. Five methods were tested using 72 passengers of various ages. We found a significant reduction in the boarding times of optimized methods over traditional methods. These improved methods, if properly implemented, could result in a significant savings to airline companies. The process of boarding an airplane is of interest to a variety of groups. The public is interested both as a curiosity, as it is something that they may regularly experience, and as a consumer, as their experiences good or bad can affect their loyalties. Airline companies and their employees also have a stake in an efficient boarding procedure as time saved in the boarding process may result is monetary savings, in the quality of interactions with passengers, and in the application of human resources to the general process of preparing an airplane for departure. A recent study (Nyquist and McFadden, 2008) indicates that the average cost to an airline company for each minute of time spent at the terminal is roughly $30. Thus, each minute saved in the turn-around time of a flight has the potential to generate over $16,000,000 in annual savings (assuming an average of 1500 flights per day). While the boarding process may not be the primary source of delay in returning an airplane to the skies, reducing the boarding time may effectively eliminate passenger boarding as a contributor in any meaningful measure. Consequently, subsequent efforts to streamline the other necessary tasks, such as refueling and maintenance, would be rewarded with a material reduction in time at the gate for each flight.

  15. Experimental test of airplane boarding methods

    DOE PAGES

    Steffen, Jason H.; Hotchkiss, Jon

    2011-10-26

    We report the results of an experimental comparison of different airplane boarding methods. This test was conducted in a mock 757 fuselage, located on a Southern California soundstage, with 12 rows of six seats and a single aisle. Five methods were tested using 72 passengers of various ages. We found a significant reduction in the boarding times of optimized methods over traditional methods. These improved methods, if properly implemented, could result in a significant savings to airline companies. The process of boarding an airplane is of interest to a variety of groups. The public is interested both as a curiosity,more » as it is something that they may regularly experience, and as a consumer, as their experiences good or bad can affect their loyalties. Airline companies and their employees also have a stake in an efficient boarding procedure as time saved in the boarding process may result is monetary savings, in the quality of interactions with passengers, and in the application of human resources to the general process of preparing an airplane for departure. A recent study (Nyquist and McFadden, 2008) indicates that the average cost to an airline company for each minute of time spent at the terminal is roughly $30. Thus, each minute saved in the turn-around time of a flight has the potential to generate over $16,000,000 in annual savings (assuming an average of 1500 flights per day). While the boarding process may not be the primary source of delay in returning an airplane to the skies, reducing the boarding time may effectively eliminate passenger boarding as a contributor in any meaningful measure. Consequently, subsequent efforts to streamline the other necessary tasks, such as refueling and maintenance, would be rewarded with a material reduction in time at the gate for each flight.« less

  16. Test versus analysis: A discussion of methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, T. G.

    1986-01-01

    Some techniques for comparing structural vibration data determined from test and analysis are discussed. Orthogonality is a general category of one group, correlation is a second, synthesis is a third and matrix improvement is a fourth. Advantages and short-comings of the methods are explored with suggestions as to how they can complement one another. The purpose for comparing vibration data from test and analysis for a given structure is to find out whether each is representing the dynamic properties of the structure in the same way. Specifically, whether: mode shapes are alike; the frequencies of the modes are alike; modes appear in the same frequency sequence; and if they are not alike, how to judge which to believe.

  17. [Plasma antioxidant activity--a test for impaired biological functions of endoecology, exotrophy, and inflammation reactions].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N; Krylin, V V; Dmitriev, V A; Iashin, Ia I

    2010-07-01

    The authors discuss the diagnostic value of a test for total serum antioxidant activity determined by an electrochemistry method on a liquid chromatograph (without a column), by using an amperometric detector, as well as the composition of the endogenously synthesized hydrophilic and hydrophobic acceptors of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Uric acid is a major hydrophilic acceptor of ROS; monoenic oleic fatty acid acts as its major lipophilic acceptor. The constant determined by the authors for of 03 oleic acid oxidation during automatic titration in the organic medium is an order of magnitude higher than that for alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene and linoleic fatty acid; its concentration is also an order of magnitude higher. In oxidative stress, the adrenal steroid hormone dehydroepiandrosterone initiates oleic acid synthesis via expression of palmitoyl elongase and steatoryl desaturase. In early steps of phylogenesis in primates, spontaneous mutation resulted in ascorbic acid synthesis gene knockout; phylogenetically, further other mutation knocked out the gene encoding the synthesis of uricase and the conversion of uric acid to alantoin. In primates, uric acid became not only a catabolite of purine bases in vivo, but also the major endogenous hydrophilic acceptor of ROS. This philogenetic order makes it clear why the epithelium in the proximal nephron tubule entirely reabsorbs uric acid (a catabolite?) from primary urine and then secretes it again to urine depending on the impairment of biological functions of endoecology (the intercellular medium being contaminated with biological rubbish), the activation of a biological inflammatory reaction, the cellular production of ROS, and the reduction in serum total antioxidant activity. With each biological reaction, there was an increase in the blood content of uric acid as a hydrophilic acceptor of ROS, by actively lowering its secretion into urine. Uric acid is a diagnostic test of inflammation, or rather compensatory

  18. Biologically Relevant Exposure Science for 21st Century Toxicity Testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    High visibility efforts in toxicity testing and computational toxicology including the recent NRC report, Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: a Vision and Strategy (NRC, 2007), raise important research questions and opportunities for the field of exposure science. The authors ...

  19. Testing systems for biologic markers of genotoxic exposure and effect

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1986-11-19

    Societal interest in genotoxicity stems from two concerns: the fear of carcinogenesis secondary to somatic mutation; and the fear of birth defects and decreasing genetic fitness secondary to heritable mutation. There is a pressing need to identify agents that can cause these effects, to understand the underlying dose-response relationships, to identify exposed populations, and to estimate both the magnitude of exposure and the risk of adverse health effects in such populations. Biologic markers refer either to evidence in surrogate organisms, or to the expressions of exposure and effect in human populations. 21 refs.

  20. In silico model-based inference: a contemporary approach for hypothesis testing in network biology

    PubMed Central

    Klinke, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Inductive inference plays a central role in the study of biological systems where one aims to increase their understanding of the system by reasoning backwards from uncertain observations to identify causal relationships among components of the system. These causal relationships are postulated from prior knowledge as a hypothesis or simply a model. Experiments are designed to test the model. Inferential statistics are used to establish a level of confidence in how well our postulated model explains the acquired data. This iterative process, commonly referred to as the scientific method, either improves our confidence in a model or suggests that we revisit our prior knowledge to develop a new model. Advances in technology impact how we use prior knowledge and data to formulate models of biological networks and how we observe cellular behavior. However, the approach for model-based inference has remained largely unchanged since Fisher, Neyman and Pearson developed the ideas in the early 1900’s that gave rise to what is now known as classical statistical hypothesis (model) testing. Here, I will summarize conventional methods for model-based inference and suggest a contemporary approach to aid in our quest to discover how cells dynamically interpret and transmit information for therapeutic aims that integrates ideas drawn from high performance computing, Bayesian statistics, and chemical kinetics. PMID:25139179

  1. Improved method for azole antifungal susceptibility testing.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, M A; Lapa, E W; Passero, P G

    1988-01-01

    A reproducible method is described for the determination of the MICs of ketoconazole, miconazole, fluconazole, and itraconazole with sharp endpoints when employed with either yeasts or molds. A semisolid medium is used with controlled pH and standardized inoculum. The time of reading results is a critical factor in the conduct of this test. The medium is simple to prepare and has a relatively long refrigerator shelf life in a user-ready state, requiring only the addition of a freshly prepared inoculum after restoration to room temperature. Images PMID:2846651

  2. LASER BIOLOGY: Optomechanical tests of hydrated biological tissues subjected to laser shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omel'chenko, A. I.; Sobol', E. N.

    2008-03-01

    The mechanical properties of a matrix are studied upon changing the size and shape of biological tissues during dehydration caused by weak laser-induced heating. The cartilage deformation, dehydration dynamics, and hydraulic conductivity are measured upon laser heating. The hydrated state and the shape of samples of separated fascias and cartilaginous tissues were controlled by using computer-aided processing of tissue images in polarised light.

  3. Methods for evaluating the biological impact of potentially toxic waste applied to soils

    SciTech Connect

    Neuhauser, E.F.; Loehr, R.C.; Malecki, M.R.

    1985-12-01

    The study was designed to evaluate two methods that can be used to estimate the biological impact of organics and inorganics that may be in wastes applied to land for treatment and disposal. The two methods were the contact test and the artificial soil test. The contact test is a 48 hr test using an adult worm, a small glass vial, and filter paper to which the test chemical or waste is applied. The test is designed to provide close contact between the worm and a chemical similar to the situation in soils. The method provides a rapid estimate of the relative toxicity of chemicals and industrial wastes. The artificial soil test uses a mixture of sand, kaolin, peat, and calcium carbonate as a representative soil. Different concentrations of the test material are added to the artificial soil, adult worms are added and worm survival is evaluated after two weeks. These studies have shown that: earthworms can distinguish between a wide variety of chemicals with a high degree of accuracy.

  4. Biologic data, models, and dosimetric methods for internal emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    The absorbed radiation dose from internal emitters has been and will remain a pivotal factor in assessing risk and therapeutic utility in selecting radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and treatment. Although direct measurements of absorbed dose and dose distributions in vivo have been and will continue to be made in limited situations, the measurement of the biodistribution and clearance of radiopharmaceuticals in human subjects and the use of this data is likely to remain the primary means to approach the calculation and estimation of absorbed dose from internal emitters over the next decade. Since several approximations are used in these schema to calculate dose, attention must be given to inspecting and improving the application of this dosimetric method as better techniques are developed to assay body activity and as more experience is gained in applying these schema to calculating absorbed dose. Discussion of the need for considering small scale dosimetry to calculate absorbed dose at the cellular level will be presented in this paper. Other topics include dose estimates for internal emitters, biologic data mathematical models and dosimetric methods employed. 44 refs.

  5. Synthetic cannabinoids pharmacokinetics and detection methods in biological matrices.

    PubMed

    Castaneto, Marisol S; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Desrosiers, Nathalie A; Hartman, Rebecca L; Gorelick, David A; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-05-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (SC), originally developed as research tools, are now highly abused novel psychoactive substances. We present a comprehensive systematic review covering in vivo and in vitro animal and human pharmacokinetics and analytical methods for identifying SC and their metabolites in biological matrices. Of two main phases of SC research, the first investigated therapeutic applications, and the second abuse-related issues. Administration studies showed high lipophilicity and distribution into brain and fat tissue. Metabolite profiling studies, mostly with human liver microsomes and human hepatocytes, structurally elucidated metabolites and identified suitable SC markers. In general, SC underwent hydroxylation at various molecular sites, defluorination of fluorinated analogs and phase II metabolites were almost exclusively glucuronides. Analytical methods are critical for documenting intake, with different strategies applied to adequately address the continuous emergence of new compounds. Immunoassays have different cross-reactivities for different SC classes, but cannot keep pace with changing analyte targets. Gas chromatography and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry assays - first for a few, then numerous analytes - are available but constrained by reference standard availability, and must be continuously updated and revalidated. In blood and oral fluid, parent compounds are frequently present, albeit in low concentrations; for urinary detection, metabolites must be identified and interpretation is complex due to shared metabolic pathways. A new approach is non-targeted HRMS screening that is more flexible and permits retrospective data analysis. We suggest that streamlined assessment of new SC's pharmacokinetics and advanced HRMS screening provide a promising strategy to maintain relevant assays.

  6. Screening and confirmation methods for GHB determination in biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Ingels, Ann-Sofie M E; Wille, Sarah M R; Samyn, Nele; Lambert, Willy E; Stove, Christophe P

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of reported methods for screening and confirmation of the low-molecular-weight compound and drug of abuse gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) in biological fluids. The polarity of the compound, its endogenous presence, its rapid metabolism after ingestion, and its instability during storage (de novo formation and interconversion between GHB and its lactone form gamma-butyrolactone) are challenges for the analyst and for interpretation of a positive result. First, possible screening procedures for GHB are discussed, including colorimetric, enzymatic, and chromatography-based procedures. Confirmation methods for clinical and forensic cases mostly involve gas chromatography (coupled to mass spectrometry), although liquid chromatography and capillary zone electrophoresis have also been used. Before injection, sample-preparation techniques include (a combination of) liquid-liquid, solid-phase, or headspace extraction, and chemical modification of the polar compound. Also simple "dilute-and-shoot" may be sufficient for urine or serum. Advantages, limitations, and trends are discussed.

  7. Reaction times to weak test lights. [psychophysics biological model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wandell, B. A.; Ahumada, P.; Welsh, D.

    1984-01-01

    Maloney and Wandell (1984) describe a model of the response of a single visual channel to weak test lights. The initial channel response is a linearly filtered version of the stimulus. The filter output is randomly sampled over time. Each time a sample occurs there is some probability increasing with the magnitude of the sampled response - that a discrete detection event is generated. Maloney and Wandell derive the statistics of the detection events. In this paper a test is conducted of the hypothesis that the reaction time responses to the presence of a weak test light are initiated at the first detection event. This makes it possible to extend the application of the model to lights that are slightly above threshold, but still within the linear operating range of the visual system. A parameter-free prediction of the model proposed by Maloney and Wandell for lights detected by this statistic is tested. The data are in agreement with the prediction.

  8. Electrophoresis tests on STS-3 and ground control experiments - A basis for future biological sample selections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D. R.; Lewis, M. L.

    1982-01-01

    Static zone electrophoresis is an electrokinetic method of separating macromolecules and small particles. However, its application for the isolation of biological cells and concentrated protein solutions is limited by sedimentation and convection. Microgravity eliminates or reduces sedimentation, floatation, and density-driven convection arising from either Joule heating or concentration differences. The advantages of such an environment were first demonstrated in space during the Apollo 14 and 16 missions. In 1975 the Electrophoresis Technology Experiment (MA-011) was conducted during the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project flight. In 1979 a project was initiated to repeat the separations of human kidney cells. One of the major objectives of the Electrophoresis Equipment Verification Tests (EEVT) on STS-3 was to repeat and thereby validate the first successful electrophoretic separation of human kidney cells. Attention is given to the EEVT apparatus, the preflight electrophoresis, and inflight operational results.

  9. Test methods for evaluating reformulated fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Croudace, M.C.

    1994-12-31

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) introduced regulations in the 1989 Clean Air Act Amendment governing the reformulation of gasoline and diesel fuels to improve air quality. These statutes drove the need for a fast and accurate method for analyzing product composition, especially aromatic and oxygenate content. The current method, gas chromatography, is slow, expensive, non portable, and requires a trained chemist to perform the analysis. The new mid-infrared spectroscopic method uses light to identify and quantify the different components in fuels. Each individual fuel component absorbs a specific wavelength of light depending on the molecule`s unique chemical structure. The quantity of light absorbed is proportional to the concentration of that fuel component in the mixture. The mid-infrared instrument has significant advantages; it is easy to use, rugged, portable, fully automated and cost effective. It can be used to measure multiple oxygenate or aromatic components in unknown fuel mixtures. Regulatory agencies have begun using this method in field compliance testing; petroleum refiners and marketers use it to monitor compliance, product quality and blending accuracy.

  10. Foucault test: a quantitative evaluation method.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Gustavo; Villa, Jesús; Ivanov, Rumen; González, Efrén; Martínez, Geminiano

    2016-08-01

    Reliable and accurate testing methods are essential to guiding the polishing process during the figuring of optical telescope mirrors. With the natural advancement of technology, the procedures and instruments used to carry out this delicate task have consistently increased in sensitivity, but also in complexity and cost. Fortunately, throughout history, the Foucault knife-edge test has shown the potential to measure transverse aberrations in the order of the wavelength, mainly when described in terms of physical theory, which allows a quantitative interpretation of its characteristic shadowmaps. Our previous publication on this topic derived a closed mathematical formulation that directly relates the knife-edge position with the observed irradiance pattern. The present work addresses the quite unexplored problem of the wavefront's gradient estimation from experimental captures of the test, which is achieved by means of an optimization algorithm featuring a proposed ad hoc cost function. The partial derivatives thereby calculated are then integrated by means of a Fourier-based algorithm to retrieve the mirror's actual surface profile. To date and to the best of our knowledge, this is the very first time that a complete mathematical-grounded treatment of this optical phenomenon is presented, complemented by an image-processing algorithm which allows a quantitative calculation of the corresponding slope at any given point of the mirror's surface, so that it becomes possible to accurately estimate the aberrations present in the analyzed concave device just through its associated foucaultgrams. PMID:27505659

  11. Foucault test: a quantitative evaluation method.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Gustavo; Villa, Jesús; Ivanov, Rumen; González, Efrén; Martínez, Geminiano

    2016-08-01

    Reliable and accurate testing methods are essential to guiding the polishing process during the figuring of optical telescope mirrors. With the natural advancement of technology, the procedures and instruments used to carry out this delicate task have consistently increased in sensitivity, but also in complexity and cost. Fortunately, throughout history, the Foucault knife-edge test has shown the potential to measure transverse aberrations in the order of the wavelength, mainly when described in terms of physical theory, which allows a quantitative interpretation of its characteristic shadowmaps. Our previous publication on this topic derived a closed mathematical formulation that directly relates the knife-edge position with the observed irradiance pattern. The present work addresses the quite unexplored problem of the wavefront's gradient estimation from experimental captures of the test, which is achieved by means of an optimization algorithm featuring a proposed ad hoc cost function. The partial derivatives thereby calculated are then integrated by means of a Fourier-based algorithm to retrieve the mirror's actual surface profile. To date and to the best of our knowledge, this is the very first time that a complete mathematical-grounded treatment of this optical phenomenon is presented, complemented by an image-processing algorithm which allows a quantitative calculation of the corresponding slope at any given point of the mirror's surface, so that it becomes possible to accurately estimate the aberrations present in the analyzed concave device just through its associated foucaultgrams.

  12. Mesh deployable antenna mechanics testing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Li

    Rapid development in spatial technologies and continuous expansion of astronautics applications require stricter and stricter standards in spatial structure. Deployable space structure as a newly invented structural form is being extensively adopted because of its characteristic (i.e. deployability). Deployable mesh reflector antenna is a kind of common deployable antennas. Its reflector consists in a kind of metal mesh. Its electrical properties are highly dependent on its mechanics parameters (including surface accuracy, angle, and position). Therefore, these mechanics parameters have to be calibrated. This paper presents a mesh antenna mechanics testing method that employs both an electronic theodolite and a laser tracker. The laser tracker is firstly used to measure the shape of radial rib deployable antenna. The measurement data are then fitted to a paraboloid by means of error compensation. Accordingly, the focus and the focal axis of the paraboloid are obtained. The following step is to synchronize the coordinate systems of the electronic theodolite and the measured antenna. Finally, in a microwave anechoic chamber environment, the electromechanical axis is calibrated. Testing results verify the effectiveness of the presented method.

  13. [The EDQM Biological Standardisation Programme for the development of methods and reference preparations].

    PubMed

    Buchheit, K-H; Seitz, R

    2014-10-01

    The Biological Standardisation Programme (BSP) of the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines & HealthCare (EDQM) was founded in 1992 with the objective to provide the necessary tools for the quality controls prescribed by the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.). The BSP accomplishes this task by establishing reference standards and materials, as well as standardised control methods. A key aspect of BSP's work on development of methods is the validation of methods which can replace Ph. Eur. tests involving animals. The current area of work includes vaccines (for human and animal use), medicines produced from human plasma, hormones, cytokines, allergens, as well as reference materials and methods for determination of impurities and contaminations. BSP closely collaborates with the World Health Organization (WHO) and national authorities; many reference standards are established in joint projects with WHO. Participants of studies for establishing of reference materials and methods are mainly national control laboratories and manufacturers. BSP has to date run 131 projects, whereby 121 reference materials were established. Method development was the objective of 38 projects, with 21 thereof aiming at replacement of animal tests. BSP is funded by the EDQM (Council of Europe) and by the European Commission. With its activities BSP makes a significant contribution to quality, safety and efficacy of biological medicinal products in Europe and beyond, and serves thereby health and well-being of human beings and animals.

  14. Methods for isolation and viability assessment of biological organisms

    DOEpatents

    Letant, Sonia Edith; Baker, Sarah Elyse; Bond, Tiziana; Chang, Allan Shih-Ping

    2015-02-03

    Isolation of biological or chemical organisms can be accomplished using a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) system. The SERS system can be a single or a stacked plurality of photonic crystal membranes with noble-metal lined through pores for flowing analyte potentially containing the biological or chemical organisms. The through pores can be adapted to trap individual biological or chemical organisms and emit SERS spectra, which can then be detected by a detector and further analyzed for viability of the biological or chemical organism.

  15. The Influence of Alternative Pedagogical Methods in Postsecondary Biology Education: How Do Students Experience a Multimedia Case-Study Environment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolter, Bjorn Hugo Karl

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand how an online, multimedia case study method influenced students' motivation, performance, and perceptions of science in collegiate level biology classes. It utilized a mix-methods design including data from pre- and post-test, student surveys, and focus group interviews to answer one primary…

  16. Australian Biology Test Item Bank, Years 11 and 12. Volume II: Year 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Sewell, Jeffrey J., Ed.

    This document consists of test items which are applicable to biology courses throughout Australia (irrespective of course materials used); assess key concepts within course statement (for both core and optional studies); assess a wide range of cognitive processes; and are relevant to current biological concepts. These items are arranged under…

  17. A Knowledge Base for Teaching Biology Situated in the Context of Genetic Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Zande, Paul; Waarlo, Arend Jan; Brekelmans, Mieke; Akkerman, Sanne F.; Vermunt, Jan D.

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of genomics will impact the daily practice of biology teachers who teach genetics in secondary education. This study reports on the first results of a research project aimed at enhancing biology teacher knowledge for teaching genetics in the context of genetic testing. The increasing body of scientific knowledge…

  18. Expertise for Teaching Biology Situated in the Context of Genetic Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Zande, Paul; Akkerman, Sanne F.; Brekelmans, Mieke; Waarlo, Arend Jan; Vermunt, Jan D.

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary genomics research will impact the daily practice of biology teachers who want to teach up-to-date genetics in secondary education. This article reports on a research project aimed at enhancing biology teachers' expertise for teaching genetics situated in the context of genetic testing. The increasing body of scientific knowledge…

  19. Method for in situ biological conversion of coal to methane

    DOEpatents

    Volkwein, Jon C.

    1995-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for the in situ biological conversion of coal to methane comprising culturing on a coal-containing substrate a consortium of microorganisms capable of degrading the coal into methane under suitable conditions. This consortium of microorganisms can be obtained from an underground cavity such as an abandoned mine which underwent a change from being supplied with sewage to where no sewage was present, since these conditions have favored the development of microorganisms capable of using coal as a carbon source and converting coal to methane. The consortium of microorganisms obtained from such abandoned coal mines can be isolated and introduced to hard-to-reach coal-containing substrates which lack such microorganisms and which would otherwise remain unrecoverable. The present invention comprises a significant advantage in that useable energy can be obtained from a number of abandoned mine sites or other areas wherein coal is no longer being recovered, and such energy can be obtained in a safe, efficient, and inexpensive manner.

  20. Fracture mechanics life analytical methods verification testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Favenesi, J. A.; Clemons, T. G.; Riddell, W. T.; Ingraffea, A. R.; Wawrzynek, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate NASCRAC (trademark) version 2.0, a second generation fracture analysis code, for verification and validity. NASCRAC was evaluated using a combination of comparisons to the literature, closed-form solutions, numerical analyses, and tests. Several limitations and minor errors were detected. Additionally, a number of major flaws were discovered. These major flaws were generally due to application of a specific method or theory, not due to programming logic. Results are presented for the following program capabilities: K versus a, J versus a, crack opening area, life calculation due to fatigue crack growth, tolerable crack size, proof test logic, tearing instability, creep crack growth, crack transitioning, crack retardation due to overloads, and elastic-plastic stress redistribution. It is concluded that the code is an acceptable fracture tool for K solutions of simplified geometries, for a limited number of J and crack opening area solutions, and for fatigue crack propagation with the Paris equation and constant amplitude loads when the Paris equation is applicable.

  1. Testing for Additivity at Select Mixture Groups of Interest Based on Statistical Equivalence Testing Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Stork, LeAnna M.; Gennings, Chris; Carchman, Richard; Carter, Jr., Walter H.; Pounds, Joel G.; Mumtaz, Moiz

    2006-12-01

    Several assumptions, defined and undefined, are used in the toxicity assessment of chemical mixtures. In scientific practice mixture components in the low-dose region, particularly subthreshold doses, are often assumed to behave additively (i.e., zero interaction) based on heuristic arguments. This assumption has important implications in the practice of risk assessment, but has not been experimentally tested. We have developed methodology to test for additivity in the sense of Berenbaum (Advances in Cancer Research, 1981), based on the statistical equivalence testing literature where the null hypothesis of interaction is rejected for the alternative hypothesis of additivity when data support the claim. The implication of this approach is that conclusions of additivity are made with a false positive rate controlled by the experimenter. The claim of additivity is based on prespecified additivity margins, which are chosen using expert biological judgment such that small deviations from additivity, which are not considered to be biologically important, are not statistically significant. This approach is in contrast to the usual hypothesis-testing framework that assumes additivity in the null hypothesis and rejects when there is significant evidence of interaction. In this scenario, failure to reject may be due to lack of statistical power making the claim of additivity problematic. The proposed method is illustrated in a mixture of five organophosphorus pesticides that were experimentally evaluated alone and at relevant mixing ratios. Motor activity was assessed in adult male rats following acute exposure. Four low-dose mixture groups were evaluated. Evidence of additivity is found in three of the four low-dose mixture groups.The proposed method tests for additivity of the whole mixture and does not take into account subset interactions (e.g., synergistic, antagonistic) that may have occurred and cancelled each other out.

  2. COMPUTATIONAL METHODS FOR STUDYING THE INTERACTION BETWEEN POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND BIOLOGICAL MACROMOLECULES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computational Methods for Studying the Interaction between Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Biological Macromolecules .

    The mechanisms for the processes that result in significant biological activity of PAHs depend on the interaction of these molecules or their metabol...

  3. Chaste: A test-driven approach to software development for biological modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitt-Francis, Joe; Pathmanathan, Pras; Bernabeu, Miguel O.; Bordas, Rafel; Cooper, Jonathan; Fletcher, Alexander G.; Mirams, Gary R.; Murray, Philip; Osborne, James M.; Walter, Alex; Chapman, S. Jon; Garny, Alan; van Leeuwen, Ingeborg M. M.; Maini, Philip K.; Rodríguez, Blanca; Waters, Sarah L.; Whiteley, Jonathan P.; Byrne, Helen M.; Gavaghan, David J.

    2009-12-01

    Chaste ('Cancer, heart and soft-tissue environment') is a software library and a set of test suites for computational simulations in the domain of biology. Current functionality has arisen from modelling in the fields of cancer, cardiac physiology and soft-tissue mechanics. It is released under the LGPL 2.1 licence. Chaste has been developed using agile programming methods. The project began in 2005 when it was reasoned that the modelling of a variety of physiological phenomena required both a generic mathematical modelling framework, and a generic computational/simulation framework. The Chaste project evolved from the Integrative Biology (IB) e-Science Project, an inter-institutional project aimed at developing a suitable IT infrastructure to support physiome-level computational modelling, with a primary focus on cardiac and cancer modelling. Program summaryProgram title: Chaste Catalogue identifier: AEFD_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEFD_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: LGPL 2.1 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 5 407 321 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 42 004 554 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Operating system: Unix Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: Yes. Parallelized using MPI. RAM:<90 Megabytes for two of the scenarios described in Section 6 of the manuscript (Monodomain re-entry on a slab or Cylindrical crypt simulation). Up to 16 Gigabytes (distributed across processors) for full resolution bidomain cardiac simulation. Classification: 3. External routines: Boost, CodeSynthesis XSD, CxxTest, HDF5, METIS, MPI, PETSc, Triangle, Xerces Nature of problem: Chaste may be used for solving coupled ODE and PDE systems arising from modelling biological systems. Use of Chaste in two application areas are described in this paper: cardiac electrophysiology and

  4. 40 CFR 63.1208 - What are the test methods?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true What are the test methods? 63.1208 Section 63.1208 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... § 63.1208 What are the test methods? (a) (b) Test methods. You must use the following test methods...

  5. Testing methods and techniques: Environmental testing: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Various devices and techniques are described for testing hardware and components in four special environments: low temperature, high temperature, high pressure, and vibration. Items ranging from an automatic calibrator for pressure transducers to a fixture for testing the susceptibility of materials to ignition by electric spark are included.

  6. Methods of information geometry in computational system biology (consistency between chemical and biological evolution).

    PubMed

    Astakhov, Vadim

    2009-01-01

    Interest in simulation of large-scale metabolic networks, species development, and genesis of various diseases requires new simulation techniques to accommodate the high complexity of realistic biological networks. Information geometry and topological formalisms are proposed to analyze information processes. We analyze the complexity of large-scale biological networks as well as transition of the system functionality due to modification in the system architecture, system environment, and system components. The dynamic core model is developed. The term dynamic core is used to define a set of causally related network functions. Delocalization of dynamic core model provides a mathematical formalism to analyze migration of specific functions in biosystems which undergo structure transition induced by the environment. The term delocalization is used to describe these processes of migration. We constructed a holographic model with self-poetic dynamic cores which preserves functional properties under those transitions. Topological constraints such as Ricci flow and Pfaff dimension were found for statistical manifolds which represent biological networks. These constraints can provide insight on processes of degeneration and recovery which take place in large-scale networks. We would like to suggest that therapies which are able to effectively implement estimated constraints, will successfully adjust biological systems and recover altered functionality. Also, we mathematically formulate the hypothesis that there is a direct consistency between biological and chemical evolution. Any set of causal relations within a biological network has its dual reimplementation in the chemistry of the system environment.

  7. Single-molecule experiments in biological physics: methods and applications.

    PubMed

    Ritort, F

    2006-08-16

    I review single-molecule experiments (SMEs) in biological physics. Recent technological developments have provided the tools to design and build scientific instruments of high enough sensitivity and precision to manipulate and visualize individual molecules and measure microscopic forces. Using SMEs it is possible to manipulate molecules one at a time and measure distributions describing molecular properties, characterize the kinetics of biomolecular reactions and detect molecular intermediates. SMEs provide additional information about thermodynamics and kinetics of biomolecular processes. This complements information obtained in traditional bulk assays. In SMEs it is also possible to measure small energies and detect large Brownian deviations in biomolecular reactions, thereby offering new methods and systems to scrutinize the basic foundations of statistical mechanics. This review is written at a very introductory level, emphasizing the importance of SMEs to scientists interested in knowing the common playground of ideas and the interdisciplinary topics accessible by these techniques. The review discusses SMEs from an experimental perspective, first exposing the most common experimental methodologies and later presenting various molecular systems where such techniques have been applied. I briefly discuss experimental techniques such as atomic-force microscopy (AFM), laser optical tweezers (LOTs), magnetic tweezers (MTs), biomembrane force probes (BFPs) and single-molecule fluorescence (SMF). I then present several applications of SME to the study of nucleic acids (DNA, RNA and DNA condensation) and proteins (protein-protein interactions, protein folding and molecular motors). Finally, I discuss applications of SMEs to the study of the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of small systems and the experimental verification of fluctuation theorems. I conclude with a discussion of open questions and future perspectives.

  8. Dormancy and Recovery Testing for Biological Wastewater Processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummerick, Mary E.; Coutts, Janelle L.; Lunn, Griffin M.; Spencer, LaShelle; Khodadad, Christina L.; Frances, Someliz; Wheller, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Bioreactors, such as aerated membrane type bioreactors have been proposed and studied for a number of years as an alternate approach for treating wastewater streams for space exploration. Several challenges remain before these types of bioreactors can be used in space settings, including transporting the bioreactors with their microbial communities to space, whether that be the International Space Station or beyond, or procedures for safing the systems and placing them into dormant state for later start-up. Little information is available on such operations as it is not common practice for terrestrial systems. This study explored several dormancy processes for established bioreactors to determine optimal storage and recovery conditions. Procedures focused on complete isolation of the microbial communities from an operational standpoint and observing the effects of: 1) storage temperature, and 2) storage with or without the reactor bulk fluid. The first consideration was tested from a microbial integrity and power consumption standpoint; both room temperature (25 C) and cold (4 C) storage conditions were studied. The second consideration was explored; again, for microbial integrity as well as plausible real-world scenarios of how terrestrially established bioreactors would be transported to microgravity and stored for periods of time between operations. Biofilms were stored without the reactor bulk fluid to simulate transport of established biofilms into microgravity, while biofilms stored with the reactor bulk fluid simulated the most simplistic storage condition to implement operations for extended periods of nonuse. Dormancy condition did not have an influence on recovery in initial studies with immature biofilms (48 days old), however, a lengthy recovery time was required (20+ days). Bioreactors with fully established biofilms (13 months) were able to recover from a 7-month dormancy period to steady state operation within 4 days (approximately 1 residence cycle

  9. Dormancy and Recovery Testing for Biological Wastewater Processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummerick, Mary E.; Coutts, Janelle L.; Lunn, Griffin M.; Spencer, LaShelle; Khodadad, Christina L.; Birmele, Michele N.; Frances, Someliz; Wheeler, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Bioreactors, such as the aerated hollow fiber membrane type, have been proposed and studied for a number of years as an alternate approach for treating wastewater streams for space exploration. Several challenges remain to be resolved before these types of bioreactors can be used in space settings, including transporting the bioreactors with intact and active biofilms, whether that be to the International Space Station or beyond, or procedures for safing the systems and placing them into a dormant state for later start-up. Little information is available on such operations as it is not common practice for terrestrial systems. This study explored several dormancy processes for established bioreactors to determine optimal storage and recovery conditions. Procedures focused on complete isolation of the microbial communities from an operational standpoint and observing the effects of: 1) storage temperature, and 2) storage with or without the reactor bulk fluid. The first consideration was tested from a microbial integrity and power consumption standpoint; both ambient temperature (25 C) and cold (4 C) storage conditions were studied. The second consideration was explored; again, for microbial integrity as well as plausible real-world scenarios of how terrestrially established bioreactors would be transported to microgravity and stored for periods of time between operations. Biofilms were stored without the reactor bulk fluid to simulate transport of established biofilms into microgravity, while biofilms stored with the reactor bulk fluid simulated the most simplistic storage condition to implement operations for extended periods of nonuse. Dormancy condition did not have an influence on recovery in initial studies with immature biofilms (48 days old), however a lengthy recovery time was required (20+ days). Bioreactors with fully established biofilms (13 months) were able to recover from a 7-month dormancy period to steady state operation within 4 days (approx. 1

  10. Determining Biology Student Teachers' Cognitive Structure on the Concept of "Diffusion" through the Free Word-Association Test and the Drawing-Writing Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurt, Hakan; Ekici, Gülay; Aktas, Murat; Aksu, Özlem

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to investigate student biology teachers' cognitive structures related to "diffusion" through the free word-association test and the drawing-writing technique. As the research design of the study, the qualitative research method was applied. The data were collected from 44 student biology teachers. The free…

  11. Novel Biological Approaches for Testing the Contributions of Single DSBs and DSB Clusters to the Biological Effects of High LET Radiation.

    PubMed

    Mladenova, Veronika; Mladenov, Emil; Iliakis, George

    2016-01-01

    The adverse biological effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are commonly attributed to the generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). IR-induced DSBs are generated by clusters of ionizations, bear damaged terminal nucleotides, and frequently comprise base damages and single-strand breaks in the vicinity generating a unique DNA damage-clustering effect that increases DSB "complexity." The number of ionizations in clusters of different radiation modalities increases with increasing linear energy transfer (LET), and is thought to determine the long-known LET-dependence of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Multiple ionizations may also lead to the formation of DSB clusters, comprising two or more DSBs that destabilize chromatin further and compromise overall processing. DSB complexity and DSB-cluster formation are increasingly considered in the development of mathematical models of radiation action, which are then "tested" by fitting available experimental data. Despite a plethora of such mathematical models the ultimate goal, i.e., the "a priori" prediction of the radiation effect, has not yet been achieved. The difficulty partly arises from unsurmountable difficulties in testing the fundamental assumptions of such mathematical models in defined biological model systems capable of providing conclusive answers. Recently, revolutionary advances in methods allowing the generation of enzymatic DSBs at random or in well-defined locations in the genome, generate unique testing opportunities for several key assumptions frequently fed into mathematical modeling - including the role of DSB clusters in the overall effect. Here, we review the problematic of DSB-cluster formation in radiation action and present novel biological technologies that promise to revolutionize the way we address the biological consequences of such lesions. We describe new ways of exploiting the I-SceI endonuclease to generate DSB-clusters at random locations in the genome and describe the

  12. Using biological data to test climate change refugia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, T. L.; Maher, S. P.

    2015-12-01

    The concept of refugia has been discussed from theoretical and paleontological perspectives to address how populations persisted during periods of unfavorable climate. Recently, several studies have applied the idea to contemporary landscapes to identify locations that are buffered from climate change effects so as to favor greater persistence of valued resources relative to other areas. Refugia are now being discussed among natural resource agencies as a potential adaptation option in the face of anthropogenic climate change. Using downscaled climate data, we identified hypothetical refugial meadows in the Sierra Nevada and then tested them using survey and genetic data from Belding's ground squirrel (Urocitellus beldingi) populations. We predicted that refugial meadows would show higher genetic diversity, higher rates of occupancy and lower rates of extirpation over time. At each step of the research, we worked with managers to ensure the largest impact. Although no panacea, identifying climate change refugia could be an important strategy for prioritizing habitats for management intervention in order to conserve populations. This research was supported by the California LCC, the Northeast Climate Science Center, and NSF.

  13. A comparison of methods for the determination of sound velocity in biological materials: a case study.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Konrad W; Markowski, Marek

    2013-07-01

    Non-destructive ultrasonic methods for testing biological materials are applied in medicine as well as in food engineering to determine the physical parameters and the quality of agricultural products and raw materials such as meat. The purpose of this work was to identify the simplest and the most accurate of five methods for sound velocity determination across the fibers of the porcine longissimus dorsi muscle. The through-transmission technique (TT) was used for ultrasound signal acquisition with 2MHz transducers. The first two methods (M1, M2) are based on the acquisition of a single ultrasound signal in the analyzed material, another two methods (M3, M4) rely on the acquisition of two ultrasound signals in samples with different thicknesses (two-distance method) and the last method (M5) involves the acquisition of a single ultrasound signal in the analyzed material and the acquisition of a single ultrasound signal in distilled water at the same distance between ultrasonic transducers (relative method). The results were processed by the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test and compared with published data. The mean values of sound velocity obtained with the use of the above methods in pork samples at post-storage, room and vital temperatures were as follows: method M1-1549.2/1581.7/1597.4m/s, method M2-1477.7/1509.8/1597.4m/s, method M3-1552.0/1599.0/1623.3m/s, method M4-1557.4/1598.3/1623.6m/s, method M5-1554.3/1583.7/1598m/s. The experiment indicates that the choice of method for determining sound velocity significantly influences the results. Two of the five analyzed methods (namely M3 and M4), which involved measurements of the time of sound wave propagation through samples of the same material with varied thickness, produced velocity values most consistent with published data.

  14. Comparison of mechanical testing methods for biomaterials: Pipette aspiration, nanoindentation, and macroscale testing.

    PubMed

    Buffinton, Christine Miller; Tong, Kelly J; Blaho, Roberta A; Buffinton, Elise M; Ebenstein, Donna M

    2015-11-01

    Characterization of the mechanical properties of biological materials is often complicated by small volume, irregular geometry, fragility, and environmental sensitivity. Pipette aspiration and nanoindentation testing deal well with these limitations and have seen increasing use in biomaterial characterization, but little research has been done to systematically validate these techniques for soft materials. This study compared the results of pipette aspiration, nanoindentation, and bulk uniaxial tension and compression in determining the small-strain elastic moduli of a range of biomedically-relevant materials, a series of silicone elastomers and polyacrylamide hydrogels. A custom apparatus was developed for pipette aspiration testing, a commercial Hysitron instrument with custom spherical tip was used for nanoindentation, and standard commercial machines were used for tension and compression testing. The measured small-strain elastic moduli ranged from 27 to 368 kPa for the silicones and 11 to 44 kPa for the polyacrylamide gels. All methods detected expected trends in material stiffness, except for the results from one inconsistent silicone. Pipette aspiration and nanoindentation measured similar elastic moduli for silicone materials, but pipette aspiration measured consistently larger stiffness in the hydrogels, which may be explained by the gels' resistance to tension. Despite the difference in size scale among the testing methods, size does not appear to influence the results. These results suggest that both pipette aspiration and nanoindentation are suitable for measuring mechanical properties of soft biomaterials and appear to have no more limitations than bulk techniques. PMID:26295450

  15. Comparison of mechanical testing methods for biomaterials: Pipette aspiration, nanoindentation, and macroscale testing.

    PubMed

    Buffinton, Christine Miller; Tong, Kelly J; Blaho, Roberta A; Buffinton, Elise M; Ebenstein, Donna M

    2015-11-01

    Characterization of the mechanical properties of biological materials is often complicated by small volume, irregular geometry, fragility, and environmental sensitivity. Pipette aspiration and nanoindentation testing deal well with these limitations and have seen increasing use in biomaterial characterization, but little research has been done to systematically validate these techniques for soft materials. This study compared the results of pipette aspiration, nanoindentation, and bulk uniaxial tension and compression in determining the small-strain elastic moduli of a range of biomedically-relevant materials, a series of silicone elastomers and polyacrylamide hydrogels. A custom apparatus was developed for pipette aspiration testing, a commercial Hysitron instrument with custom spherical tip was used for nanoindentation, and standard commercial machines were used for tension and compression testing. The measured small-strain elastic moduli ranged from 27 to 368 kPa for the silicones and 11 to 44 kPa for the polyacrylamide gels. All methods detected expected trends in material stiffness, except for the results from one inconsistent silicone. Pipette aspiration and nanoindentation measured similar elastic moduli for silicone materials, but pipette aspiration measured consistently larger stiffness in the hydrogels, which may be explained by the gels' resistance to tension. Despite the difference in size scale among the testing methods, size does not appear to influence the results. These results suggest that both pipette aspiration and nanoindentation are suitable for measuring mechanical properties of soft biomaterials and appear to have no more limitations than bulk techniques.

  16. A Proposed Framework of Test Administration Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Nathan A.

    2008-01-01

    The widespread application of personal computers to educational and psychological testing has substantially increased the number of test administration methodologies available to testing programs. Many of these mediums are referred to by their acronyms, such as CAT, CBT, CCT, and LOFT. The similarities between the acronyms and the methods…

  17. The gravimetric method for the determination of residual moisture in freeze-dried biological products.

    PubMed

    May, J C; Wheeler, R M; Grim, E

    1989-06-01

    The gravimetric test for the determination of residual moisture in freeze-dried biological products performed in a humidity- and temperature-controlled room with the use of scrupulous gravimetric analytical technique can be used to accurately determine residual moisture in freeze-dried biological products such as antihemophilic factor (human) or honey bee venom allergenic extract. This method determines the first water of hydration of sodium tartrate dihydrate (7.93%) to within 1.3% of the calculated value with a relative standard deviation of 0.3% for 10 replicates. For this gravimetric procedure, freeze-dried samples containing from 1.12 to 4.4% residual moisture had relative standard deviations ranging from 3.6 to 9.1%. Samples containing less than 1.0% residual moisture by the gravimetric method such as intravenous immune globulin and antihemophilic factor (human) had relative standard deviations ranging from 16.7 to 47.0%. Relative standard deviations for residual moisture tests performed on comparable samples by the Karl Fischer and thermogravimetric methods showed similar variability. PMID:2743789

  18. Using the Scientific Method to Motivate Biology Students to Study Precalculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulton, James P.; Sabatino, Linda

    2008-01-01

    During the last two years we have developed a precalculus course customized around biology by using the scientific method as a framework to engage and motivate biology students. Historically, the precalculus and calculus courses required for the Suffolk County Community College biology curriculum were designed using examples from the physical…

  19. [Determination of lithium content in human biological objects (liver, kidney) by the method of flame photometry].

    PubMed

    Luzanova, I S; Voznesenskaia, T V; Menitskaia, V I; Pushchinskaia, E V

    2007-01-01

    The authors give a method of determination of the content of lithium in biological objects (liver, kidney) by the method of flame photometry. It is possible to use this method in forensic medicine in cases of acute intoxication.

  20. Testing with Feedback Yields Potent, but Piecewise, Learning of History and Biology Facts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan, Steven C.; Gopal, Arpita; Rickard, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    Does correctly answering a test question about a multiterm fact enhance memory for the entire fact? We explored that issue in 4 experiments. Subjects first studied Advanced Placement History or Biology facts. Half of those facts were then restudied, whereas the remainder were tested using "5 W" (i.e., "who, what, when, where",…

  1. Collaborative Testing Improves Performance but Not Content Retention in a Large-Enrollment Introductory Biology Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leight, Hayley; Saunders, Cheston; Calkins, Robin; Withers, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Collaborative testing has been shown to improve performance but not always content retention. In this study, we investigated whether collaborative testing could improve both performance and content retention in a large, introductory biology course. Students were semirandomly divided into two groups based on their performances on exam 1. Each group…

  2. 77 FR 22282 - Draft Guidelines on Biologics Quality Monitoring: Testing for the Detection of Mycoplasma...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Draft Guidelines on Biologics Quality Monitoring: Testing for... master seed/cell testing in veterinary vaccines regulated by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection... veterinary vaccines regulated by the APHIS under the Virus-Serum-Toxin Act (VSTA), we are requesting...

  3. Effects of Scoring by Section and Independent Scorers' Patterns on Scorer Reliability in Biology Essay Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebuoh, Casmir N.; Ezeudu, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of scoring by section, use of independent scorers and conventional patterns on scorer reliability in Biology essay tests. It was revealed from literature review that conventional pattern of scoring all items at a time in essay tests had been criticized for not being reliable. The study was true experimental study…

  4. A Computer-Aided Self-Testing System for Biological Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leiblum, M. D.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes the production of a computer-aided, self-testing system for university students enrolled in a first-year course in biological psychology. Project aspects described include selection, acquisition and description of software; question banks and test structures; modes of use (computer or printed version); evaluation; and future plans. (11…

  5. Using Open-Book Tests to Strengthen the Study Skills of Community-College Biology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Gregory

    2006-01-01

    The author observed that students enrolled in first-year college biology courses often had weak study skills. This longitudinal study examined the use of open-book tests to encourage reading and to assess the improvement of college students' study skills. There was a statistically significant improvement from the initial test to the final test…

  6. Novel Biological Approaches for Testing the Contributions of Single DSBs and DSB Clusters to the Biological Effects of High LET Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Mladenova, Veronika; Mladenov, Emil; Iliakis, George

    2016-01-01

    The adverse biological effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are commonly attributed to the generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). IR-induced DSBs are generated by clusters of ionizations, bear damaged terminal nucleotides, and frequently comprise base damages and single-strand breaks in the vicinity generating a unique DNA damage-clustering effect that increases DSB “complexity.” The number of ionizations in clusters of different radiation modalities increases with increasing linear energy transfer (LET), and is thought to determine the long-known LET-dependence of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Multiple ionizations may also lead to the formation of DSB clusters, comprising two or more DSBs that destabilize chromatin further and compromise overall processing. DSB complexity and DSB-cluster formation are increasingly considered in the development of mathematical models of radiation action, which are then “tested” by fitting available experimental data. Despite a plethora of such mathematical models the ultimate goal, i.e., the “a priori” prediction of the radiation effect, has not yet been achieved. The difficulty partly arises from unsurmountable difficulties in testing the fundamental assumptions of such mathematical models in defined biological model systems capable of providing conclusive answers. Recently, revolutionary advances in methods allowing the generation of enzymatic DSBs at random or in well-defined locations in the genome, generate unique testing opportunities for several key assumptions frequently fed into mathematical modeling – including the role of DSB clusters in the overall effect. Here, we review the problematic of DSB-cluster formation in radiation action and present novel biological technologies that promise to revolutionize the way we address the biological consequences of such lesions. We describe new ways of exploiting the I-SceI endonuclease to generate DSB-clusters at random locations in the genome and

  7. Using Collision Cones to Asses Biological Deconiction Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brace, Natalie

    For autonomous vehicles to navigate the world as efficiently and effectively as biological species, improvements are needed in terms of control strategies and estimation algorithms. Reactive collision avoidance is one specific area where biological systems outperform engineered algorithms. To better understand the discrepancy between engineered and biological systems, a collision avoidance algorithm was applied to frames of trajectory data from three biological species (Myotis velifer, Hirundo rustica, and Danio aequipinnatus). The algorithm uses information that can be sensed through visual cues (relative position and velocity) to define collision cones which are used to determine if agents are on a collision course and if so, to find a safe velocity that requires minimal deviation from the original velocity for each individual agent. Two- and three-dimensional versions of the algorithm with constant speed and maximum speed velocity requirements were considered. The obstacles provided to the algorithm were determined by the sensing range in terms of either metric or topological distance. The calculated velocities showed good correlation with observed velocities over the range of sensing parameters, indicating that the algorithm is a good basis for comparison and could potentially be improved with further study.

  8. Thin film composition with biological substance and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Allison A.; Song, Lin

    1999-01-01

    The invention provides a thin-film composition comprising an underlying substrate of a first material including a plurality of attachment sites; a plurality of functional groups chemically attached to the attachment sites of the underlying substrate; and a thin film of a second material deposited onto the attachment sites of the underlying substrate, and a biologically active substance deposited with the thin-film. Preferably the functional groups are attached to a self assembling monolayer attached to the underlying substrate. Preferred functional groups attached to the underlying substrate are chosen from the group consisting of carboxylates, sulfonates, phosphates, optionally substituted, linear or cyclo, alkyl, alkene, alkyne, aryl, alkylaryl, amine, hydroxyl, thiol, silyl, phosphoryl, cyano, metallocenyl, carbonyl, and polyphosphate. Preferred materials for the underlying substrate are selected from the group consisting of a metal, a metal alloy, a plastic, a polymer, a proteic film, a membrane, a glass or a ceramic. The second material is selected from the group consisting of inorganic crystalline structures, inorganic amorphus structures, organic crystalline structures, and organic amorphus structures. Preferred second materials are phosphates, especially calcium phosphates and most particularly calcium apatite. The biologically active molecule is a protein, peptide, DNA segment, RNA segment, nucleotide, polynucleotide, nucleoside, antibiotic, antimicrobal, radioisotope, chelated radioisotope, chelated metal, metal salt, anti-inflamatory, steriod, nonsteriod anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antihistamine, receptor binding agent, or chemotherapeutic agent, or other biologically active material. Preferably the biologically active molecule is an osteogenic factor the compositions listed above.

  9. A Comparative Study of Methods To Validate Formaldehyde Decontamination of Biological Safety Cabinets

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Kerry; Lanser, Janice; Flower, Robert

    1999-01-01

    Methods of validation of formaldehyde decontamination of biological safety cabinets were compared. Decontamination of metal strips inoculated with Mycobacterium bovis, poliovirus, or Bacillus spp. spores was compared with the results obtained with three biological indicators. Conditions for successful decontamination, particularly relative humidity, were defined. The Attest 1291 biological indicator was the only biological indicator which was an aid in the detection of gross decontamination failure. PMID:9925635

  10. 49 CFR 383.133 - Testing methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... such a way as to determine if the applicant possesses the required knowledge and skills contained in... scoring the knowledge and skills tests. (d) Passing scores must meet those standards contained in § 383.135. (e) Knowledge and skills tests shall be based solely on the information contained in the...

  11. 40 CFR 63.365 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR part 60, appendix A, Test Methods 2, 2A, 2C, or 2D, as appropriate. (Method 2D (using orifice....) Record the flow rate at 1-minute intervals throughout the test cycle, taking the first reading within 15...) Test Method 18 or 25A, 40 CFR part 60, appendix A (hereafter referred to as Method 18 or...

  12. Fatigue crack growth automated testing method

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, P.W.; VanDenAvyle, J.A.; Laing, J.

    1989-06-01

    A computer controlled servo-hydraulic mechanical test system has been configured to conduct automated fatigue crack growth testing. This provides two major benefits: it allows continuous cycling of specimens without operator attention over evenings and weekends; and complex load histories, including random loading and spectrum loading, can be applied to the specimens to simulate cyclic loading of engineering structures. The software is written in MTS Multi-User Basic to control test machine output and acquire data at predetermined intervals. Compact tension specimens are cycled according to ASTM specification E647-86. Fatigue crack growth is measured via specimen compliance during the test using a compliance/crack length calibration determined earlier by visual crack length measurements. This setup was used to measure crack growth rates in 6063 aluminum alloy for a variety of cyclic loadings, including spectrum loads. Data collected compared well with tests run manually. 13 figs.

  13. Evaluation of the test method activated sludge, respiration inhibition test proposed by the OECD

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshioka, Y.; Nagase, H.; Ose, Y.; Sato, T.

    1986-12-01

    The test method of activated sludge, respiration inhibition test proposed by the OECD was critically carried out and compared with other test methods. Investigation of test conditions showed that the moderate deviation from the test conditions defined by the OECD Test Guidelines did not have much effect on the result, and some modifications were proposed to improve the method. This method had a poor detection limit compared with the LC50 test with Oryzias latipes and EC50 of the growth inhibition test with Tetrahymena pyriformis. The susceptivity of the method was particularly poor for the chemicals which were highly toxic in the other two tests.

  14. 40 CFR 63.547 - Test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gas. (5) EPA Method 23 at 40 CFR part 60, appendix A-7 to determine the dioxins and furans... at 40 CFR part 60, appendix A-1 to select the sampling port location and the number of traverse points. (2) EPA Method 2 at 40 CFR part 60, appendix A-1 or EPA Method 5D at 40 CFR part 60, appendix...

  15. 40 CFR 63.547 - Test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... gas. (5) EPA Method 23 at 40 CFR part 60, appendix A-7 to determine the dioxins and furans... at 40 CFR part 60, appendix A-1 to select the sampling port location and the number of traverse points. (2) EPA Method 2 at 40 CFR part 60, appendix A-1 or EPA Method 5D at 40 CFR part 60, appendix...

  16. Experimental characterization of composites. [load test methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bert, C. W.

    1975-01-01

    The experimental characterization for composite materials is generally more complicated than for ordinary homogeneous, isotropic materials because composites behave in a much more complex fashion, due to macroscopic anisotropic effects and lamination effects. Problems concerning the static uniaxial tension test for composite materials are considered along with approaches for conducting static uniaxial compression tests and static uniaxial bending tests. Studies of static shear properties are discussed, taking into account in-plane shear, twisting shear, and thickness shear. Attention is given to static multiaxial loading, systematized experimental programs for the complete characterization of static properties, and dynamic properties.

  17. Using collision cones to assess biological deconfliction methods

    PubMed Central

    Hedrick, Tyson L.; Theriault, Diane H.; Fuller, Nathan W.; Wu, Zheng; Betke, Margrit; Parrish, Julia K.; Grünbaum, Daniel; Morgansen, Kristi A.

    2016-01-01

    Biological systems consistently outperform autonomous systems governed by engineered algorithms in their ability to reactively avoid collisions. To better understand this discrepancy, a collision avoidance algorithm was applied to frames of digitized video trajectory data from bats, swallows and fish (Myotis velifer, Petrochelidon pyrrhonota and Danio aequipinnatus). Information available from visual cues, specifically relative position and velocity, was provided to the algorithm which used this information to define collision cones that allowed the algorithm to find a safe velocity requiring minimal deviation from the original velocity. The subset of obstacles provided to the algorithm was determined by the animal's sensing range in terms of metric and topological distance. The algorithmic calculated velocities showed good agreement with observed biological velocities, indicating that the algorithm was an informative basis for comparison with the three species and could potentially be improved for engineered applications with further study. PMID:27655669

  18. Methods of information theory and algorithmic complexity for network biology.

    PubMed

    Zenil, Hector; Kiani, Narsis A; Tegnér, Jesper

    2016-03-01

    We survey and introduce concepts and tools located at the intersection of information theory and network biology. We show that Shannon's information entropy, compressibility and algorithmic complexity quantify different local and global aspects of synthetic and biological data. We show examples such as the emergence of giant components in Erdös-Rényi random graphs, and the recovery of topological properties from numerical kinetic properties simulating gene expression data. We provide exact theoretical calculations, numerical approximations and error estimations of entropy, algorithmic probability and Kolmogorov complexity for different types of graphs, characterizing their variant and invariant properties. We introduce formal definitions of complexity for both labeled and unlabeled graphs and prove that the Kolmogorov complexity of a labeled graph is a good approximation of its unlabeled Kolmogorov complexity and thus a robust definition of graph complexity.

  19. Aluminum analysis in biological reference material by nondestructive methods

    SciTech Connect

    Landsberger, S.; Arendt, A.; Keck, B.; Glascock, M.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years, the determination of aluminum in biological materials has become the subject of many research projects. This interest stems from an increasing knowledge of the toxicity of aluminum to both aquatic and human life. Unfortunately, the detection of aluminum in biological materials has proven troublesome. The use of traditional chemical determinations has been shown to be very long and somewhat complicated. Several attempts have been made using neutron activation analysis, but an interfering reaction must be taken into account. In this experiment the rabbit irradiation facilities at the University of Missouri Research Reactor were used. The aluminum concentrations for eight certified reference materials are shown. When US National Bureau of Standards (NBS) value is given as certified or as an information value, results agree very well. The results for NBS 1572 citrus leaves agree, and NBS 1577 results agree very well with that of Glascock et al.

  20. Subscale Test Methods for Combustion Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. E.; Sisco, J. C.; Long, M. R.; Sung, I.-K.

    2005-01-01

    Stated goals for long-life LRE s have been between 100 and 500 cycles: 1) Inherent technical difficulty of accurately defining the transient and steady state thermochemical environments and structural response (strain); 2) Limited statistical basis on failure mechanisms and effects of design and operational variability; and 3) Very high test costs and budget-driven need to protect test hardware (aversion to test-to-failure). Ambitious goals will require development of new databases: a) Advanced materials, e.g., tailored composites with virtually unlimited property variations; b) Innovative functional designs to exploit full capabilities of advanced materials; and c) Different cycles/operations. Subscale testing is one way to address technical and budget challenges: 1) Prototype subscale combustors exposed to controlled simulated conditions; 2) Complementary to conventional laboratory specimen database development; 3) Instrumented with sensors to measure thermostructural response; and 4) Coupled with analysis

  1. Method for imaging informational biological molecules on a semiconductor substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, L. Stephen (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Imaging biological molecules such as DNA at rates several times faster than conventional imaging techniques is carried out using a patterned silicon wafer having nano-machined grooves which hold individual molecular strands and periodically spaced unique bar codes permitting repeatably locating all images. The strands are coaxed into the grooves preferably using gravity and pulsed electric fields which induce electric charge attraction to the molecular strands in the bottom surfaces of the grooves. Differential imaging removes substrate artifacts.

  2. Economical test methods for developmental neurobehavioral toxicity.

    PubMed

    Bignami, G

    1996-04-01

    The assessment of behavioral changes produced by prenatal or early postnatal exposure to potentially noxious agents requires both the designing of ad hoc tests and the adaptation of tests for adult animals to the characteristics of successive developmental stages. The experience in designing tests is still more limited than in the adaptation of tests, but several tests have already proven their usefulness; some examples are the suckling test, the homing test, and evaluations of dam-pup and pup-pup interactions. Functional observational batteries can exploit the development at specified postnatal ages of several reflexes and responses that are absent at birth in altricial rodent species with a short pregnancy such as the rat and the mouse. In neonates, the assessment of early treatment effects can rely not only on deviations from normal responding but also on changes in the time of appearance of otherwise normal response patterns. The same applies to other end points such as responses to pain and various types of spontaneous motor/exploratory activities, including reactivity to a variety of drug challenges that can provide information on the regulatory systems whose development may be affected by early treatments. In particular, the analysis of ontogenetic dissociations (i.e., differential early treatment effects depending jointly on developmental stage at the time of exposure, age of testing, and response end point) can be of considerable value in the study of treatments' mechanisms of action. Overall, it appears that behavioral teratological assessments can be effectively used both proactively, i.e., in risk assessment prior to any human exposure, and reactively. In the latter case, these assessments could have special value in the face of agents suspected to produce borderline changes in developing humans, whose innocuousness or noxiousness can be difficult to establish in the absence of hard evidence of teratogenicity.

  3. Establishing construct validity of the Biology I Subject Area Testing program in Mississippi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippoff, Christy Michelle Hollis

    Science education has undergone many revisions since it was permanently embedded in the country's educational curriculum at the end of the 19th century. Some of these revisions occurred as a direct result of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). This legislation placed more accountability on schools than ever before by requiring that all students pass a series of standardized tests (USDE, 2010). High schools in Mississippi require four areas of standardized testing: English II, Algebra I, U.S. History, and Biology I (Wroten, 2008). The focus of this study is the Biology I Subject Area Test. In an effort to determine the validity of that test, this study explores the importance of the Mississippi Biology I content standards according to the importance ratings and frequency of use ratings by science professionals in Mississippi. The science professionals surveyed for this study were high school science teachers, college science professors and scientists in their professional settings. The science professionals' importance ratings were compared to the importance ratings placed on the content strands by the Mississippi Biology I Subject Area Test. To further determine the test's validity, it is also compared to the National Science Education Standards.

  4. A Knowledge Base for Teaching Biology Situated in the Context of Genetic Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Zande, Paul; Waarlo, Arend Jan; Brekelmans, Mieke; Akkerman, Sanne F.; Vermunt, Jan D.

    2011-10-01

    Recent developments in the field of genomics will impact the daily practice of biology teachers who teach genetics in secondary education. This study reports on the first results of a research project aimed at enhancing biology teacher knowledge for teaching genetics in the context of genetic testing. The increasing body of scientific knowledge concerning genetic testing and the related consequences for decision-making indicate the societal relevance of such a situated learning approach. What content knowledge do biology teachers need for teaching genetics in the personal health context of genetic testing? This study describes the required content knowledge by exploring the educational practice and clinical genetic practices. Nine experienced teachers and 12 respondents representing the clinical genetic practices (clients, medical professionals, and medical ethicists) were interviewed about the biological concepts and ethical, legal, and social aspects (ELSA) of testing they considered relevant to empowering students as future health care clients. The ELSA suggested by the respondents were complemented by suggestions found in the literature on genetic counselling. The findings revealed that the required teacher knowledge consists of multiple layers that are embedded in specific genetic test situations: on the one hand, the knowledge of concepts represented by the curricular framework and some additional concepts (e.g. multifactorial and polygenic disorder) and, on the other hand, more knowledge of ELSA and generic characteristics of genetic test practice (uncertainty, complexity, probability, and morality). Suggestions regarding how to translate these characteristics, concepts, and ELSA into context-based genetics education are discussed.

  5. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 63 - Test Methods

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....2.1A clearly written test method, preferably in the format of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A Test... reference from other methods in appendix A to 40 CFR part 60. Therefore, to obtain reliable results,...

  6. Apparatus and method for testing fuel injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bunch, R.L.; Dillard, H.G.

    1991-03-19

    This patent describes a system for testing the efficacy of a fuel injector having a fuel injection valve and a nozzle with at least one orifice for injecting fuel therethrough. It includes a fluid manifold having fluid passages therein, and having mounting means for receiving a fuel injector to be tested and for holding the fuel injector in fluid communication with the fluid passages and with the nozzle depending from the manifold; means for supplying a testing fluid under pressure to the manifold fluid passages; a support disposed below the nozzle and having a drain port therein; means selectively mountable on the support in a first test phase and extending upwardly therefrom circumjacent the nozzle for providing visual inspection of the nozzle, the means having an opening at the bottom thereof for communication with the drain port; a measuring means selectively mountable on the support and extending upwardly therefrom circumjacent the nozzle in lieu of the visual inspection means in another test phase, the measuring means being closed at the bottom thereof; quick change means.

  7. Performance of Traditional and Molecular Methods for Detecting Biological Agents in Drinking Water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Francy, Donna S.; Bushon, Rebecca N.; Brady, Amie M.G.; Bertke, Erin E.; Kephart, Christopher M.; Likirdopulos, Christina A.; Mailot, Brian E.; Schaefer, Frank W.; Lindquist, H.D. Alan

    2009-01-01

    To reduce the impact from a possible bioterrorist attack on drinking-water supplies, analytical methods are needed to rapidly detect the presence of biological agents in water. To this end, 13 drinking-water samples were collected at 9 water-treatment plants in Ohio to assess the performance of a molecular method in comparison to traditional analytical methods that take longer to perform. Two 100-liter samples were collected at each site during each sampling event; one was seeded in the laboratory with six biological agents - Bacillus anthracis (B. anthracis), Burkholderia cepacia (as a surrogate for Bu. pseudomallei), Francisella tularensis (F. tularensis), Salmonella Typhi (S. Typhi), Vibrio cholerae (V. cholerae), and Cryptospordium parvum (C. parvum). The seeded and unseeded samples were processed by ultrafiltration and analyzed by use of quantiative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), a molecular method, and culture methods for bacterial agents or the immunomagnetic separation/fluorescent antibody (IMS/FA) method for C. parvum as traditional methods. Six replicate seeded samples were also processed and analyzed. For traditional methods, recoveries were highly variable between samples and even between some replicate samples, ranging from below detection to greater than 100 percent. Recoveries were significantly related to water pH, specific conductance, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) for all bacteria combined by culture methods, but none of the water-quality characteristics tested were related to recoveries of C. parvum by IMS/FA. Recoveries were not determined by qPCR because of problems in quantifying organisms by qPCR in the composite seed. Instead, qPCR results were reported as detected, not detected (no qPCR signal), or +/- detected (Cycle Threshold or 'Ct' values were greater than 40). Several sample results by qPCR were omitted from the dataset because of possible problems with qPCR reagents, primers, and probes. For the remaining 14 qPCR results

  8. 77 FR 26162 - Amendments to Sterility Test Requirements for Biological Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-03

    ... clarify and update the sterility test requirements. On March 11, 1976 (41 FR 10427) and March 2, 1979 (44... provide greater consistency with the test methods of USP XXI. Finally, on September 15, 1997 (62 FR 48174... CGMP, and is supported by sterility testing using validated and verified test methods,'' (76 FR...

  9. Bioinformatics for the synthetic biology of natural products: integrating across the Design–Build–Test cycle

    PubMed Central

    Currin, Andrew; Jervis, Adrian J.; Rattray, Nicholas J. W.; Swainston, Neil; Yan, Cunyu; Breitling, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Covering: 2000 to 2016 Progress in synthetic biology is enabled by powerful bioinformatics tools allowing the integration of the design, build and test stages of the biological engineering cycle. In this review we illustrate how this integration can be achieved, with a particular focus on natural products discovery and production. Bioinformatics tools for the DESIGN and BUILD stages include tools for the selection, synthesis, assembly and optimization of parts (enzymes and regulatory elements), devices (pathways) and systems (chassis). TEST tools include those for screening, identification and quantification of metabolites for rapid prototyping. The main advantages and limitations of these tools as well as their interoperability capabilities are highlighted. PMID:27185383

  10. Oil refinery experience with the assessment of refinery effluents and receiving waters using biologically based methods.

    PubMed

    Comber, Michael H I; Girling, Andrew; den Haan, Klaas H; Whale, Graham

    2015-10-01

    The trend in discharges of petroleum-related substances from refineries in Europe shows a consistent picture of declining emissions, since first measured in 1969. This decline coincides with enhanced internal capture or recycling procedures and increasing use of physical and biological treatments. At the same time, and partly in response to legislative drivers, there has been an increase in the use of chronic (long-term) toxicity tests and alternative methods for assessing the quality of effluent discharges. The Whole Effluent Assessment (WEA) approach has also driven the increased conduct of studies addressing the fate of effluent constituents. Such studies have included the use of biodegradation and solid-phase micro-extraction-biomimetic extraction (SPME-BE) methods to address potentially bioaccumulative substances (PBS). In this way, it is then possible to address the persistence and toxicity of these PBS constituents of an effluent. The data collected in various case studies highlights the advantages and pitfalls of using biologically-based methods to assess the potential for refinery effluents to cause environmental impacts.

  11. Methods for the rapid detection of biological and chemical weapons

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, A.; Hemberger, P.H.; Swanson, B.I.

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This work undertook the development of technology for the detection of chemical and biological agents. The project consisted of three tasks: (1) modifying a transportable mass spectrometer for the detection of chemical gents; (2) demonstrating the detection of a specific bacterial DNA sequence using a fluorescence-based single- copy gene detector; and (3) upgrading a surface acoustic wave measurement station.

  12. Rapid method for isolating targeted organic chemicals from biological matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Caton, J.E.; Griest, W.H.; Watson, A.P.; Buchanan, M.V. ); Hazen, K.H. )

    1994-01-01

    The initial development is reported for a novel countercurrent filtration/dialysis and solid phase extractant system for the rapid isolation of low molecular weight target compounds from biological media. Except for piperazine (a highly water-soluble drug), recoveries of 50 - 95% were achieved for chemical warfare agent simulants and anthelmintic drugs extracted from meat, grain, or milk. The results suggest the potential for broad applications to complex samples such as environmental media and physiological specimens which traditionally require extensive fractionation prior to analysis.

  13. Impact of hydrogen peroxide oxygen transfer tests on the performance of the biological nutrient removal process.

    PubMed

    Mahendraker, V; Mavinic, D S; Rabinowitz, B

    2002-02-01

    Knowledge of in-process oxygen transfer is essential to the optimum design and operation of aeration systems in activated sludge processes. In this study, non-steady state H2O2 oxygen transfer tests were performed in a laboratory scale, University of Cape Town configuration biological nutrient removal process (BNR) to measure the in-process oxygen transfer rates. Given the small quantity (about 1 ml @30% concentration) of H2O2 used in the aerobic reactor with a mixed liquor volume of 161 (total system working volume of 33.65 l), no effect on the process performance itself was expected. However, the process performance data obtained indicated results to the contrary. Use of H2O2 in measuring process oxygen transfer rates may not be suitable for BNR processes, as all the major process performance indicators (carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus removal by the system and carbon uptake and phosphorus release in the anaerobic zone) were negatively affected. Evidence in thiswork leads to the conclusion that external addition of H2O2 leads to excessive production of the hydroxyl radical. Since microorganisms do not have enzyme systems capable of acting upon this additional reactive radical, it resulted in loss of process performance. It is also possible that H2O2 could have upset the normal aerobic respiration process by introducing oxidative stress conditions on the catalase, peroxidase and superoxide dismutase enzymes that deal with other oxygen radicals generated as part of the overall process of reducing oxygen to water. Any test that interferes with the system in which the test is being performed is suspect. Therefore, in light of these results, the H2O2 method to test in-process oxygen transfer should be re-evaluated.

  14. 40 CFR Table 3 of Subpart Aaaaaaa... - Test Methods

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test Methods 3 Table 3 of Subpart..., Subpt. AAAAAAA, Table 3 Table 3 of Subpart AAAAAAA of Part 63—Test Methods For * * * You must use * * * 1. Selecting the sampling locations a and the number of traverse points EPA test method 1 or 1A...

  15. 40 CFR Table 3 of Subpart Bbbbbbb... - Test Methods

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test Methods 3 Table 3 of Subpart... 3 Table 3 of Subpart BBBBBBB of Part 63—Test Methods For * * * You must use * * * 1. Selecting the sampling locations a and the number of traverse points EPA test method 1 or 1A in appendix A to part 60....

  16. 40 CFR Table 3 of Subpart Bbbbbbb... - Test Methods

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test Methods 3 Table 3 of Subpart... 3 Table 3 of Subpart BBBBBBB of Part 63—Test Methods For * * * You must use * * * 1. Selecting the sampling locations a and the number of traverse points EPA test method 1 or 1A in appendix A to part 60....

  17. 40 CFR Table 3 of Subpart Aaaaaaa... - Test Methods

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test Methods 3 Table 3 of Subpart..., Subpt. AAAAAAA, Table 3 Table 3 of Subpart AAAAAAA of Part 63—Test Methods For * * * You must use * * * 1. Selecting the sampling locations a and the number of traverse points EPA test method 1 or 1A...

  18. 40 CFR Table 3 of Subpart Aaaaaaa... - Test Methods

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test Methods 3 Table 3 of Subpart..., Subpt. AAAAAAA, Table 3 Table 3 of Subpart AAAAAAA of Part 63—Test Methods For * * * You must use * * * 1. Selecting the sampling locations a and the number of traverse points EPA test method 1 or 1A...

  19. Evaluation of SSME test data reduction methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santi, L. Michael

    1994-01-01

    Accurate prediction of hardware and flow characteristics within the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) during transient and main-stage operation requires a significant integration of ground test data, flight experience, and computational models. The process of integrating SSME test measurements with physical model predictions is commonly referred to as data reduction. Uncertainties within both test measurements and simplified models of the SSME flow environment compound the data integration problem. The first objective of this effort was to establish an acceptability criterion for data reduction solutions. The second objective of this effort was to investigate the data reduction potential of the ROCETS (Rocket Engine Transient Simulation) simulation platform. A simplified ROCETS model of the SSME was obtained from the MSFC Performance Analysis Branch . This model was examined and tested for physical consistency. Two modules were constructed and added to the ROCETS library to independently check the mass and energy balances of selected engine subsystems including the low pressure fuel turbopump, the high pressure fuel turbopump, the low pressure oxidizer turbopump, the high pressure oxidizer turbopump, the fuel preburner, the oxidizer preburner, the main combustion chamber coolant circuit, and the nozzle coolant circuit. A sensitivity study was then conducted to determine the individual influences of forty-two hardware characteristics on fourteen high pressure region prediction variables as returned by the SSME ROCETS model.

  20. Tracer Test Interpretation Methods for Reservior Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Shook, George Michael

    2001-08-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop tools that can be used to interpret tracer tests and obtain estimates of reservoir and operational parameters. These tools (mostly in the form of spreadsheet applications) can be used to optimize geothermal resource management.

  1. Computational Systems Biology in Cancer: Modeling Methods and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Materi, Wayne; Wishart, David S.

    2007-01-01

    In recent years it has become clear that carcinogenesis is a complex process, both at the molecular and cellular levels. Understanding the origins, growth and spread of cancer, therefore requires an integrated or system-wide approach. Computational systems biology is an emerging sub-discipline in systems biology that utilizes the wealth of data from genomic, proteomic and metabolomic studies to build computer simulations of intra and intercellular processes. Several useful descriptive and predictive models of the origin, growth and spread of cancers have been developed in an effort to better understand the disease and potential therapeutic approaches. In this review we describe and assess the practical and theoretical underpinnings of commonly-used modeling approaches, including ordinary and partial differential equations, petri nets, cellular automata, agent based models and hybrid systems. A number of computer-based formalisms have been implemented to improve the accessibility of the various approaches to researchers whose primary interest lies outside of model development. We discuss several of these and describe how they have led to novel insights into tumor genesis, growth, apoptosis, vascularization and therapy. PMID:19936081

  2. 40 CFR 63.547 - Test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... at 40 CFR part 60, appendix A-1 to select the sampling port location and the number of traverse points. (2) EPA Method 2 at 40 CFR part 60, appendix A-1 or EPA Method 5D at 40 CFR part 60, appendix A-3..., or 3B at 40 CFR part 60, appendix A-2 to determine the dry molecular weight of the stack gas. (4)...

  3. Handbook of test methods for evaluating chemical deicers

    SciTech Connect

    Chappelow, C.C.; McElroy, A.D.; Blackburn, R.R.; Darwin, D.; de Noyelles, F.G.

    1992-11-01

    The handbook contains a structured selection of specific test methods for complete characterization of deicing chemicals. Sixty-two specific test methods are defined for the evaluation of chemical deicers in eight principal property performance areas: (1) physicochemical characteristics; (2) deicing performance; (3) compatibility with bare and coated metals; (4) compatibility with metals in concrete; (5) compatibility with concrete and nonmetals; (6) engineering parameters; (7) ecological effects; and (8) health and safety aspects. The 62 specific chemical deicer test methods are composed of 12 primary and 50 supplementary test methods. The primary test methods, which were developed for conducting the more important evaluations, are identified in the report.

  4. Drug susceptibility testing by dilution methods.

    PubMed

    Jeannot, Katy; Plésiat, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Serial twofold dilution methods are widely used to assess the bacteriostatic activities of antibiotics. This can be achieved by dilution of considered drugs in agar medium or in culture broth, and inoculation by calibrated inoculums. Although seemingly simple, these methods are greatly influenced by the experimental conditions used and may lead to discrepant results, in particular with untrained investigators. The present step-by-step protocol has been validated for Pseudomonas species, including P. aeruginosa. Introduction of appropriate control strains is crucial to ascertain minimal inhibitory concentration values and compare the results of independent experiments.

  5. System for and method of freezing biological tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, T. E.; Cygnarowicz, T. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Biological tissue is frozen while a polyethylene bag placed in abutting relationship against opposed walls of a pair of heaters. The bag and tissue are cooled with refrigerating gas at a time programmed rate at least equal to the maximum cooling rate needed at any time during the freezing process. The temperature of the bag, and hence of the tissue, is compared with a time programmed desired value for the tissue temperature to derive an error indication. The heater is activated in response to the error indication so that the temperature of the tissue follows the desired value for the time programmed tissue temperature. The tissue is heated to compensate for excessive cooling of the tissue as a result of the cooling by the refrigerating gas. In response to the error signal, the heater is deactivated while the latent heat of fusion is being removed from the tissue while the tissue is changing phase from liquid to solid.

  6. 40 CFR 60.534 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Wood Heaters § 60.534 Test methods and procedures. Test methods and procedures in appendix A of this...) Method 5H, if a stack location is used. (c) Method 28A shall be used to determine that a wood combustion unit qualifies under the definition of wood heater in § 60.531(a). If such a determination is...

  7. 40 CFR 60.534 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Wood Heaters § 60.534 Test methods and procedures. Test methods and procedures in appendix A of this...) Method 5H, if a stack location is used. (c) Method 28A shall be used to determine that a wood combustion unit qualifies under the definition of wood heater in § 60.531(a). If such a determination is...

  8. 40 CFR 60.534 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Wood Heaters § 60.534 Test methods and procedures. Test methods and procedures in appendix A of this...) Method 5H, if a stack location is used. (c) Method 28A shall be used to determine that a wood combustion unit qualifies under the definition of wood heater in § 60.531(a). If such a determination is...

  9. 40 CFR 61.164 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... results of three 60-minute test runs. (ii) Use the following methods in appendix A to 40 CFR part 60: (A... glass melting furnace. (ii) Use the following methods in appendix A to 40 CFR part 60: (A) Method 1 for... Arsenic Emissions From Glass Manufacturing Plants § 61.164 Test methods and procedures. (a) To...

  10. 40 CFR 61.164 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... results of three 60-minute test runs. (ii) Use the following methods in appendix A to 40 CFR part 60: (A... glass melting furnace. (ii) Use the following methods in appendix A to 40 CFR part 60: (A) Method 1 for... Arsenic Emissions From Glass Manufacturing Plants § 61.164 Test methods and procedures. (a) To...

  11. 40 CFR 61.164 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... results of three 60-minute test runs. (ii) Use the following methods in appendix A to 40 CFR part 60: (A... glass melting furnace. (ii) Use the following methods in appendix A to 40 CFR part 60: (A) Method 1 for... Arsenic Emissions From Glass Manufacturing Plants § 61.164 Test methods and procedures. (a) To...

  12. 40 CFR 61.164 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... results of three 60-minute test runs. (ii) Use the following methods in appendix A to 40 CFR part 60: (A... glass melting furnace. (ii) Use the following methods in appendix A to 40 CFR part 60: (A) Method 1 for... Arsenic Emissions From Glass Manufacturing Plants § 61.164 Test methods and procedures. (a) To...

  13. 40 CFR 60.534 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Wood Heaters § 60.534 Test methods and procedures. Test methods and procedures in appendix A of this...) Method 5H, if a stack location is used. (c) Method 28A shall be used to determine that a wood combustion unit qualifies under the definition of wood heater in § 60.531(a). If such a determination is...

  14. 40 CFR 60.534 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Wood Heaters § 60.534 Test methods and procedures. Test methods and procedures in appendix A of this...) Method 5H, if a stack location is used. (c) Method 28A shall be used to determine that a wood combustion unit qualifies under the definition of wood heater in § 60.531(a). If such a determination is...

  15. 40 CFR 766.16 - Developing the analytical test method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... analytical test method. Because of the matrix differences of the chemicals listed for testing, no one method... to separate the HDDs/HDFs from the sample matrix. Methods are reviewed in the Guidelines under § 766... meet the requirements of the chemical matrix. (d) Analysis. The method of choice is High Resolution...

  16. 40 CFR 63.365 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... be determined by either: (A) Weighing the ethylene oxide gas cylinder(s) used to charge the... CFR part 60, appendix A, Test Methods 2, 2A, 2C, or 2D, as appropriate. (Method 2D (using orifice...) Test Method 18 or 25A, 40 CFR part 60, appendix A (hereafter referred to as Method 18 or...

  17. 40 CFR 63.365 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... be determined by either: (A) Weighing the ethylene oxide gas cylinder(s) used to charge the... CFR part 60, appendix A, Test Methods 2, 2A, 2C, or 2D, as appropriate. (Method 2D (using orifice...) Test Method 18 or 25A, 40 CFR part 60, appendix A (hereafter referred to as Method 18 or...

  18. Low-cycle fatigue testing methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieurade, H. P.

    1978-01-01

    The good design of highly stressed mechanical components requires accurate knowledge of the service behavior of materials. The main methods for solving the problems of designers are: determination of the mechanical properties of the material after cyclic stabilization; plotting of resistance to plastic deformation curves; effect of temperature on the life on low cycle fatigue; and simulation of notched parts behavior.

  19. Experimental Tests of Subjective Bayesian Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li,Yuelin; Krantz, David H.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated Samaniego and Reneau's 1994 novel weight method for eliciting subjective probability estimates. Experiment 1 replicated their experiment (subjects weighed their prior estimate against 10 new observations), with an additional weight judgment against 50 observations. In Experiment 2, subjects gave prior estimates to questions in a…

  20. 40 CFR Appendix Ix to Part 268 - Extraction Procedure (EP) Toxicity Test Method and Structural Integrity Test (Method 1310B)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Extraction Procedure (EP) Toxicity Test Method and Structural Integrity Test (Method 1310B) IX Appendix IX to Part 268 Protection of.... 268, App. IX Appendix IX to Part 268—Extraction Procedure (EP) Toxicity Test Method and...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix Ix to Part 268 - Extraction Procedure (EP) Toxicity Test Method and Structural Integrity Test (Method 1310B)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Extraction Procedure (EP) Toxicity Test Method and Structural Integrity Test (Method 1310B) IX Appendix IX to Part 268 Protection of.... 268, App. IX Appendix IX to Part 268—Extraction Procedure (EP) Toxicity Test Method and...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix Ix to Part 268 - Extraction Procedure (EP) Toxicity Test Method and Structural Integrity Test (Method 1310B)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Extraction Procedure (EP) Toxicity Test Method and Structural Integrity Test (Method 1310B) IX Appendix IX to Part 268 Protection of.... 268, App. IX Appendix IX to Part 268—Extraction Procedure (EP) Toxicity Test Method and...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix Ix to Part 268 - Extraction Procedure (EP) Toxicity Test Method and Structural Integrity Test (Method 1310B)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Extraction Procedure (EP) Toxicity Test Method and Structural Integrity Test (Method 1310B) IX Appendix IX to Part 268 Protection of.... 268, App. IX Appendix IX to Part 268—Extraction Procedure (EP) Toxicity Test Method and...

  4. Method and apparatus for container leakage testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1995-02-14

    An apparatus is described for use in one-hundred percent leak testing of food containers used in conjunction with a tracer gas. The apparatus includes a shell with entrance and exit air locks to create a controlled atmosphere through which a series of containers is conveyed by a conveyor belt. The pressure in the shell is kept lower than the pressure in the containers and the atmosphere is made to flow with the containers so that a tracer gas placed in the packages before sealing them will leak more readily, but the leaked tracer gas will remain associated with the leaking package as it moves through the shell. The leaks are detected with a sniffer probe in fluid communication with a gas chromatograph. The gas chromatograph issues a signal when it detects a leak to an ejector that will eject the leaking container from the conveyor. The system is timed so that the series of containers can move continuously into and out of the shell, past the probe and the ejector, without stopping, yet each package is tested for leaks and removed if leaking. 3 figs.

  5. Field testing method for photovaltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Gerber N.

    For remote areas, where solar photovoltaic modules are the only source of power, it is essential to perform preventive maintenance to insure that the PV system works properly; unfortunately, prices for PV testers range from 1,700 to 8,000. To address this issue, a portable inexpensive tester and analysis methodology have been developed. Assembling a simple tester, which costs $530 and weighs about 5 pounds, and using the Four-Parameters PV Model, we characterized the current-voltage (I-V) curve at environmental testing conditions; and then employing radiation, temperature, and age degradation sensitivity equations, we extrapolated the I-V curve to standard testing conditions. After applying the methodology to three kinds of silicon modules (mono-crystalline, multi-crystalline, and thin-film), we obtained maximum power points up to 97% of the manufacturer's specifications. Therefore, based on these results, it is reasonably accurate and affordable to verify the performance of solar modules in the field.

  6. Method and apparatus for container leakage testing

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus for use in one-hundred percent leak testing of food containers used in conjunction with a tracer gas. The apparatus includes a shell with entrance and exit air locks to create a controlled atmosphere through which a series of containers is conveyed by a conveyor belt. The pressure in the shell is kept lower than the pressure in the containers and the atmosphere is made to flow with the containers so that a tracer gas placed in the packages before sealing them will leak more readily, but the leaked tracer gas will remain associated with the leaking package as it moves through the shell. The leaks are detected with a sniffer probe in fluid communication with a gas chromatograph. The gas chromatograph issues a signal when it detects a leak to an ejector that will eject the leaking container from the conveyor. The system is timed so that the series of containers can move continuously into and out of the shell, past the probe and the ejector, without stopping, yet each package is tested for leaks and removed if leaking.

  7. 76 FR 36019 - Amendments to Sterility Test Requirements for Biological Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ... November 20, 1973 (38 FR 32048), we reorganized and republished the biologics regulations, which included... requirements. On March 11, 1976 (41 FR 10427) and March 2, 1979 (44 FR 11754), we updated Sec. 610.12 to clarify the procedures for repeat testing. On April 18, 1984 (49 FR 15186), we amended Sec. 610.12...

  8. Gender Differences in Caribbean Students' Performance on a Test of Errors in Biological Labelling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soyibo, Kola

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the performance of 11th-grade students from Barbados, Belize, Jamaica, St. Lucia, St. Vincent, and Trinidad (n=1216) on an Errors in Biological Labeling Test (EBLT). Concludes that performance was low in six categories of errors, and that girls performed significantly better on each category of error than did boys. Contains 15…

  9. [Methods of dosimetry in evaluation of electromagnetic fields' biological action].

    PubMed

    Rubtsova, N B; Perov, S Iu

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental dosimetry can be used for adequate evaluation of the effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields. In view of the tough electromagnetic environment in aircraft, pilots' safety is of particular topicality. The dosimetric evaluation is made from the quantitative characteristics of the EMF interaction with bio-objects depending on EM energy absorption in a unit of tissue volume or mass calculated as a specific absorbed rate (SAR) and measured in W/kg. Theoretical dosimetry employs a number of computational methods to determine EM energy, as well as the augmented method of boundary conditions, iterative augmented method of boundary conditions, moments method, generalized multipolar method, finite-element method, time domain finite-difference method, and hybrid methods combining several decision plans modeling the design philosophy of navigation, radiolocation and human systems. Because of difficulties with the experimental SAR estimate, theoretical dosimetry is regarded as the first step in analysis of the in-aircraft conditions of exposure and possible bio-effects.

  10. Ground truth methods for optical cross-section modeling of biological aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalter, J.; Thrush, E.; Santarpia, J.; Chaudhry, Z.; Gilberry, J.; Brown, D. M.; Brown, A.; Carter, C. C.

    2011-05-01

    Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) systems have demonstrated some capability to meet the needs of a fastresponse standoff biological detection method for simulants in open air conditions. These systems are designed to exploit various cloud signatures, such as differential elastic backscatter, fluorescence, and depolarization in order to detect biological warfare agents (BWAs). However, because the release of BWAs in open air is forbidden, methods must be developed to predict candidate system performance against real agents. In support of such efforts, the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab (JHU/APL) has developed a modeling approach to predict the optical properties of agent materials from relatively simple, Biosafety Level 3-compatible bench top measurements. JHU/APL has fielded new ground truth instruments (in addition to standard particle sizers, such as the Aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) or GRIMM aerosol monitor (GRIMM)) to more thoroughly characterize the simulant aerosols released in recent field tests at Dugway Proving Ground (DPG). These instruments include the Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), the Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UVAPS), and the Aspect Aerosol Size and Shape Analyser (Aspect). The SMPS was employed as a means of measuring smallparticle concentrations for more accurate Mie scattering simulations; the UVAPS, which measures size-resolved fluorescence intensity, was employed as a path toward fluorescence cross section modeling; and the Aspect, which measures particle shape, was employed as a path towards depolarization modeling.

  11. Correlation of the five test methods to assess chemical toxicity and relation to physical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshioka, Y.; Ose, Y.; Sato, T.

    1986-08-01

    Biological tests using Orizias latipes (LC50 and oxygen uptake test), Moina macrocopa (LC50), and Dugesia japonica (head regeneration test and LC50) were carried out in order to clarify the mutual relationship of these test methods. The oxygen uptake rate of O. latipes was not effective to assess chemical toxicity. Adding the results of the growth inhibition test of Tetrahymena pyriformis (Yoshioka, Y., Ose, Y., and Sato, T. (1985). Sci. Total Environ. 43, 149-157), the correlation coefficients between each two test methods were calculated. The test results except EC50 and LC50 of D. japonica showed a good relation to each other. We determined the solubility and the n-octanol/water partition coefficient (P) of some chemicals used in the test. Log P interpreted the toxicity in mol/liter unit but not in mg/liter. Solubility was not a useful descripter neither in mol/liter nor in mg/liter unit.

  12. Reservoir Exploration/Testing by Elastomechanical Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Bodvarsson, Gunnar

    1980-12-18

    The purpose of this brief note is to present a preliminary evaluation of the potential of the elastomechanical methods in practical reservoir engineering and related areas. Assuming simple relevant situations, the strength of the field signals will be estimated and compared to other ground surface data such as gravity and D.C. electrical signals that are also of interest in reservoir monitoring. Because of greater difficulty in observing surface strain, we will limit our discussion to vertical ground displacement and tilt signals.

  13. Non-destructive testing method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.

    2011-10-04

    Non-destructive testing apparatus may comprise a photon source and a source material that emits positrons in response to bombardment of the source material with photons. The source material is positionable adjacent the photon source and a specimen so that when the source material is positioned adjacent the photon source it is exposed to photons produced thereby. When the source material is positioned adjacent the specimen, the specimen is exposed to at least some of the positrons emitted by the source material. A detector system positioned adjacent the specimen detects annihilation gamma rays emitted by the specimen. Another embodiment comprises a neutron source and a source material that emits positrons in response to neutron bombardment.

  14. 40 CFR 61.164 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... following methods in appendix A to 40 CFR part 60: (A) Method 1 for sample and velocity traverse. (B) Method... furnace. (ii) Use the following methods in appendix A to 40 CFR part 60: (A) Method 1 for sample and... Arsenic Emissions From Glass Manufacturing Plants § 61.164 Test methods and procedures. (a) To...

  15. Eddy Current Method for Fatigue Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, John W. (Inventor); Fulton, James P. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Todhunter, Ronald G. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Nath, Shridhar C. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Flux-focusing electromagnetic sensor using a ferromagnetic flux-focusing lens simplifies inspections and increases detectability of fatigue cracks and material loss in high conductivity material. A ferrous shield isolates a high-turn pick-up coil from an excitation coil. Use of the magnetic shield produces a null voltage output across the receiving coil in presence of an unflawed sample. Redistribution of the current flow in the sample caused by the presence of flaws. eliminates the shielding condition and a large output voltage is produced, yielding a clear unambiguous flaw signal. Maximum sensor output is obtained when positioned symmetrically above the crack. By obtaining position of maximum sensor output, it is possible to track the fault and locate the area surrounding its tip. Accuracy of tip location is enhanced by two unique features of the sensor; a very high signal-to-noise ratio of the probe's output resulting in an extremely smooth signal peak across the fault, and a rapidly decaying sensor output outside a small area surrounding the crack tip enabling the search region to be clearly defined. Under low frequency operation, material thinning due to corrosion causes incomplete shielding of the pick-up coil. Low frequency output voltage of the probe is therefore a direct indicator of thickness of the test sample. Fatigue testing a conductive material is accomplished by applying load to the material, applying current to the sensor, scanning the material with the sensor, monitoring the sensor output signal, adjusting material load based on the sensor output signal of the sensor, and adjusting position of the sensor based on its output signal.

  16. Enhanced test methods to characterise automotive battery cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, Grietus; Omar, Noshin; Pauwels, Stijn; Leemans, Filip; Verbrugge, Bavo; De Nijs, Wouter; Van den Bossche, Peter; Six, Daan; Van Mierlo, Joeri

    This article evaluates the methods to characterise the behaviour of lithium ion cells of several chemistries and a nickel metal hydride cell for automotive applications like (plug-in) hybrid vehicles and battery electric vehicles. Although existing characterisation test methods are used, it was also indicated to combine test methods in order to speed up the test time and to create an improved comparability of the test results. Also, the existing capacity tests ignore that cells can be charged at several current rates. However, this is of interest for, e.g. fast charging and regenerative braking. Tests for high power and high energy application have been integrated in the enhanced method. The article explains the rationale to ameliorate the test methods. The test plan should make it possible to make an initial division in a group of cells purchased from several suppliers.

  17. Comparison of modal test methods on the Voyager payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanks, B. R.; Miserentino, R.; Ibrahim, S. R.; Lee, S. H.; Wada, B. K.

    1978-01-01

    A comparison of the performance of modern modal data analysis methods on test data from the Voyager Jupiter/Saturn payload is presented. Four different test/data-analysis combinations are compared - multiple-point sine excitation tests, single-point random-excitation tests using two different techniques of manipulating Fourier transform data, and a time-domain method for analyzing random data. Results indicate that all four methods can give comparable results. Of the four, the time-domain approach detects more modes in the test data and, at the same time, shows the greatest promise for reducing the time and cost of modal testing.

  18. Contrasting methods for symbolic analysis of biological regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilds, Roy; Glass, Leon

    2009-12-01

    Symbolic dynamics offers a powerful technique to relate the structure and dynamics of complex networks. We contrast the predictions of two methods of symbolic dynamics for the analysis of monotonic networks suggested by models of genetic control systems.

  19. Computational Biology Methods for Characterization of Pluripotent Cells.

    PubMed

    Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent cells are a powerful tool for regenerative medicine and drug discovery. Several techniques have been developed to induce pluripotency, or to extract pluripotent cells from different tissues and biological fluids. However, the characterization of pluripotency requires tedious, expensive, time-consuming, and not always reliable wet-lab experiments; thus, an easy, standard quality-control protocol of pluripotency assessment remains to be established. Here to help comes the use of high-throughput techniques, and in particular, the employment of gene expression microarrays, which has become a complementary technique for cellular characterization. Research has shown that the transcriptomics comparison with an Embryonic Stem Cell (ESC) of reference is a good approach to assess the pluripotency. Under the premise that the best protocol is a computer software source code, here I propose and explain line by line a software protocol coded in R-Bioconductor for pluripotency assessment based on the comparison of transcriptomics data of pluripotent cells with an ESC of reference. I provide advice for experimental design, warning about possible pitfalls, and guides for results interpretation.

  20. Metabolomics methods for the synthetic biology of secondary metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Quoc-Thai; Merlo, Maria E; Medema, Marnix H; Jankevics, Andris; Breitling, Rainer; Takano, Eriko

    2012-07-16

    Many microbial secondary metabolites are of high biotechnological value for medicine, agriculture, and the food industry. Bacterial genome mining has revealed numerous novel secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters, which encode the potential to synthesize a large diversity of compounds that have never been observed before. The stimulation or "awakening" of this cryptic microbial secondary metabolism has naturally attracted the attention of synthetic microbiologists, who exploit recent advances in DNA sequencing and synthesis to achieve unprecedented control over metabolic pathways. One of the indispensable tools in the synthetic biology toolbox is metabolomics, the global quantification of small biomolecules. This review illustrates the pivotal role of metabolomics for the synthetic microbiology of secondary metabolism, including its crucial role in novel compound discovery in microbes, the examination of side products of engineered metabolic pathways, as well as the identification of major bottlenecks for the overproduction of compounds of interest, especially in combination with metabolic modeling. We conclude by highlighting remaining challenges and recent technological advances that will drive metabolomics towards fulfilling its potential as a cornerstone technology of synthetic microbiology.

  1. Evaluation of chemical and biological methods for the identification of mutagenic and cytotoxic hazardous waste samples

    SciTech Connect

    Andon, B.; Jackson, M.; Houk, V.; Claxton, L.

    1984-06-01

    To assist in the development of methods for identifying potentially hazardous wastes, the authors have conducted studies on the extraction of toxicants from several solid waste samples. The extracts were tested for toxicity in the Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) Cytotoxicity Test and for mutagenic potential in the Salmonella Histidine Reversion Assay. A new technique was also employed which measured the mutagenicity of neat waste samples by coupling Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) with the Salmonella Histidine Reversion Assay. The wastes selected for study were coke plant waste, herbicide manufacturing acetone-water effluent, and oil refining waste. Three extraction solvents, ethanol (ETOH), dichloromethane (DCM), and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), were chosen based on their solubility and compatibility with bioassay procedures. Each sample was divided into three parts and extracted with each of the three solvents separately. All extracts were tested in the Salmonella assay at five dose levels with five Ames tester strains in the presence and in the absence of an exogenous metabolizing system. DMSO and DCM extracts were utilized for CHO cytotoxicity evaluations. The three neat waste samples and two extracts were assayed with the TLC technique. In addition to the biological assessments, the gross chemical parameters for each sample were determined. Results showed that coke plant waste and herbicide mfg. acetone-water were mutagenic to S. typhimurium with the standard plate test. With the TLC technique, the neat coke plant waste was mutagenic and oil refining waste was toxic. Oil refining waste was also toxic to CHO cells.

  2. A DIAMOND method of inducing classification rules for biological data.

    PubMed

    Li, Han-Lin; Huang, Yao-Huei

    2011-08-01

    Identifying the classification rules for patients, based on a given dataset, is an important role in medical tasks. For example, the rules for estimating the likelihood of survival for patients undergoing breast cancer surgery are critical in treatment planning. Many well-known classification methods (as decision tree methods and hyper-plane methods) assume that classes can be separated by a linear function. However, these methods suffer when the boundaries between the classes are non-linear. This study presents a novel method, called DIAMOND, to induce classification rules from datasets containing non-linear interactions between the input data and the classes to be predicted. Given a set of objects with some classes, DIAMOND separates the objects into different cubes, and assigns each cube to a class. Via the unions of these cubes, DIAMOND uses mixed-integer programs to induce classification rules with better rates of accuracy, support and compact. This study uses three practical datasets (Iris flower, HSV patients, and breast cancer patients) to illustrate the advantages of DIAMOND over some current methods.

  3. Causal attributions of obese men and women in genetic testing: implications of genetic/biological attributions.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, Anja; Dierk, Jan-Michael; Conradt, Matthias; Schlumberger, Pia; Hinney, Anke; Hebebrand, Johannes; Rief, Winfried

    2009-09-01

    The present study sought to investigate genetic/biological attributions of obesity, their associations with a predisposition to obesity and their crossectional and longitudinal implications for weight regulation in obese individuals presenting for genetic testing and counselling. A total of 421 obese men and women underwent psychological and anthropometric assessment and a mutation screen of the melanocortin-4 receptor gene. At study entry, women revealed more genetic/biological attributions than men on the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire adapted to obesity (86.2% versus 59.7%). Genetic/biological attributions of obesity were associated in both sexes with a family history of obesity, assessed through Stunkard's Figure Rating Scale. In both sexes, genetic/biological attributions were unrelated to weight regulation beliefs and behaviour (i.e. self-efficacy, controllability beliefs, restrained eating and physical activity), assessed through standardised questionnaires or interview at baseline and at six-month follow-up. In addition, causal attributions and weight regulation beliefs and behaviour were not predictive of body mass index at six-month follow-up. Overall, the results indicate that causal attributions of obesity to genetic/biological factors in obese individuals presenting for genetic screening and counselling are crossectionally and longitudinally unrelated to weight regulation and longer-term weight outcome. Those who attribute their obesity to genetic/biological factors likely have a familial obesity risk. PMID:20205024

  4. 40 CFR 60.123 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test methods and procedures. 60.123 Section 60.123 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Smelters § 60.123 Test methods and procedures. (a) In conducting the performance tests required in §...

  5. 40 CFR 60.123 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test methods and procedures. 60.123 Section 60.123 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Smelters § 60.123 Test methods and procedures. (a) In conducting the performance tests required in §...

  6. 40 CFR 60.123 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test methods and procedures. 60.123 Section 60.123 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Smelters § 60.123 Test methods and procedures. (a) In conducting the performance tests required in §...

  7. A new test method for young age strength of shotcrete

    SciTech Connect

    Teramoto, Shozo

    1995-12-31

    As a method for testing the young-age strength of shotcrete used as tunnel supports, use of the Parotester, which is designed to measure the hardness of paper rolls at printing factories, has been considered. This paper reports the results of laboratory tests conducted to establish this method as a means of strength testing.

  8. Visual relevance of display image quality testing by photometric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andren, Boerje; Breidne, Magnus; Hansson, L. A.; Persson, Bo

    1993-09-01

    The two major international test methods for evaluation of the image quality of video display terminals are the ISO 9241-3 international standard and the MPR test. In this paper we make an attempt to compare the visual relevance of these two test methods.

  9. A Residual Mass Ballistic Testing Method to Compare Armor Materials or Components (Residual Mass Ballistic Testing Method)

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin Langhorst; Thomas M Lillo; Henry S Chu

    2014-05-01

    A statistics based ballistic test method is presented for use when comparing multiple groups of test articles of unknown relative ballistic perforation resistance. The method is intended to be more efficient than many traditional methods for research and development testing. To establish the validity of the method, it is employed in this study to compare test groups of known relative ballistic performance. Multiple groups of test articles were perforated using consistent projectiles and impact conditions. Test groups were made of rolled homogeneous armor (RHA) plates and differed in thickness. After perforation, each residual projectile was captured behind the target and its mass was measured. The residual masses measured for each test group were analyzed to provide ballistic performance rankings with associated confidence levels. When compared to traditional V50 methods, the residual mass (RM) method was found to require fewer test events and be more tolerant of variations in impact conditions.

  10. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program - SSST Testing Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Sandstrom, Mary M.; Brown, Geoffrey W.; Preston, Daniel N.; Pollard, Colin J.; Warner, Kirstin F.; Remmers, Daniel L.; Sorensen, Daniel N.; Whinnery, LeRoy L.; Phillips, Jason J.; Shelley, Timothy J.; Reyes, Jose A.; Hsu, Peter C.; Reynolds, John G.

    2013-03-25

    The Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) program is conducting a proficiency study for Small- Scale Safety and Thermal (SSST) testing of homemade explosives (HMEs). Described here are the methods used for impact, friction, electrostatic discharge, and differential scanning calorimetry analysis during the IDCA program. These methods changed throughout the Proficiency Test and the reasons for these changes are documented in this report. The most significant modifications in standard testing methods are: 1) including one specified sandpaper in impact testing among all the participants, 2) diversifying liquid test methods for selected participants, and 3) including sealed sample holders for thermal testing by at least one participant. This effort, funded by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), is putting the issues of safe handling of these materials in perspective with standard military explosives. The study is adding SSST testing results for a broad suite of different HMEs to the literature. Ultimately the study will suggest new guidelines and methods and possibly establish the SSST testing accuracies needed to develop safe handling practices for HMEs. Each participating testing laboratory uses identical test materials and preparation methods wherever possible. The testing performers involved are Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Indian Head Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center, (NSWC IHD), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/RXQL). These tests are conducted as a proficiency study in order to establish some consistency in test protocols, procedures, and experiments and to compare results when these testing variables cannot be made consistent.

  11. Standard test method for size of anthracite

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This method covering screen analysis of anthracite is used to determine the percentage of undersize or oversize in ny given commercial size. The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as the standard. Procedure, in case th coal is wet, air-dryit before screening. Determine the undersize first. For broken, egg, and stove sizes, up-end each piece by hand on the screen, to determine whether in any position it passes through the screen. For nut, pea, buckwheat, and rice sizes, shake the screens gently with a reciprocating horizontal motion, so as to avoid breakage ofthe coal, until practically no more coal will pass through the openings. Screen the coal in such increments as will allow the pieces to be in direct contact with the screen openings after the completion of the shaking of each increment.

  12. Methods of testing parameterizations: Vertical ocean mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tziperman, Eli

    1992-01-01

    The ocean's velocity field is characterized by an exceptional variety of scales. While the small-scale oceanic turbulence responsible for the vertical mixing in the ocean is of scales a few centimeters and smaller, the oceanic general circulation is characterized by horizontal scales of thousands of kilometers. In oceanic general circulation models that are typically run today, the vertical structure of the ocean is represented by a few tens of discrete grid points. Such models cannot explicitly model the small-scale mixing processes, and must, therefore, find ways to parameterize them in terms of the larger-scale fields. Finding a parameterization that is both reliable and plausible to use in ocean models is not a simple task. Vertical mixing in the ocean is the combined result of many complex processes, and, in fact, mixing is one of the less known and less understood aspects of the oceanic circulation. In present models of the oceanic circulation, the many complex processes responsible for vertical mixing are often parameterized in an oversimplified manner. Yet, finding an adequate parameterization of vertical ocean mixing is crucial to the successful application of ocean models to climate studies. The results of general circulation models for quantities that are of particular interest to climate studies, such as the meridional heat flux carried by the ocean, are quite sensitive to the strength of the vertical mixing. We try to examine the difficulties in choosing an appropriate vertical mixing parameterization, and the methods that are available for validating different parameterizations by comparing model results to oceanographic data. First, some of the physical processes responsible for vertically mixing the ocean are briefly mentioned, and some possible approaches to the parameterization of these processes in oceanographic general circulation models are described in the following section. We then discuss the role of the vertical mixing in the physics of the

  13. The stability of the reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs) and biological antioxidant potential (BAP) tests on stored horse blood.

    PubMed

    Celi, P; Sullivan, M; Evans, D

    2010-02-01

    Increasing interest in the role of oxidative stress (OS) in equine medicine has highlighted the need to develop reliable methods to quantify it. In this study we describe the effect of refrigeration (at 4 degrees C) on the stability of the reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs) and biological antioxidant potential (BAP) tests carried out on 15 healthy horses. Blood samples, collected from the jugular vein, were immediately placed on ice and analysed using both the d-ROMs and BAP tests. Samples were also refrigerated at 4 degrees C and tested after 3, 7 and 24 h. The average results were similar for up to 24 h and minimal variations were found for each horse. The findings suggest that refrigeration is suitable for preserving equine blood samples for these assays and this approach will provide veterinarians with a technically simple, reliable test to measure OS under field conditions.

  14. Methods for the Joint Meta-Analysis of Multiple Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trikalinos, Thomas A.; Hoaglin, David C.; Small, Kevin M.; Terrin, Norma; Schmid, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    Existing methods for meta-analysis of diagnostic test accuracy focus primarily on a single index test. We propose models for the joint meta-analysis of studies comparing multiple index tests on the same participants in paired designs. These models respect the grouping of data by studies, account for the within-study correlation between the tests'…

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF A METHOD FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF THE BIOLOGICAL COMPONENT OF INDOOR/OUTDOOR PM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes the initital development of sampling methods and analysis techniques for quantifying and identifying the various biological components of indoor and outdoor particulate matter (PM). Both indoor and outdoor biological PM (BioPM) need to be measured to determin...

  16. Examples of testing global identifiability of biological and biomedical models with the DAISY software.

    PubMed

    Saccomani, Maria Pia; Audoly, Stefania; Bellu, Giuseppina; D'Angiò, Leontina

    2010-04-01

    DAISY (Differential Algebra for Identifiability of SYstems) is a recently developed computer algebra software tool which can be used to automatically check global identifiability of (linear and) nonlinear dynamic models described by differential equations involving polynomial or rational functions. Global identifiability is a fundamental prerequisite for model identification which is important not only for biological or medical systems but also for many physical and engineering systems derived from first principles. Lack of identifiability implies that the parameter estimation techniques may not fail but any obtained numerical estimates will be meaningless. The software does not require understanding of the underlying mathematical principles and can be used by researchers in applied fields with a minimum of mathematical background. We illustrate the DAISY software by checking the a priori global identifiability of two benchmark nonlinear models taken from the literature. The analysis of these two examples includes comparison with other methods and demonstrates how identifiability analysis is simplified by this tool. Thus we illustrate the identifiability analysis of other two examples, by including discussion of some specific aspects related to the role of observability and knowledge of initial conditions in testing identifiability and to the computational complexity of the software. The main focus of this paper is not on the description of the mathematical background of the algorithm, which has been presented elsewhere, but on illustrating its use and on some of its more interesting features. DAISY is available on the web site http://www.dei.unipd.it/ approximately pia/.

  17. Examples of Testing Global Identifiability of Biological and Biomedical Models with the DAISY Software

    PubMed Central

    Saccomani, Maria Pia; Audoly, Stefania; Bellu, Giuseppina; D’Angiò, Leontina

    2010-01-01

    DAISY (Differential Algebra for Identifiability of SYstems) is a recently developed computer algebra software tool which can be used to automatically check global identifiability of (linear and) nonlinear dynamic models described by differential equations involving polynomial or rational functions. Global identifiability is a fundamental prerequisite for model identification which is important not only for biological or medical systems but also for many physical and engineering systems derived from first principles. Lack of identifiability implies that the parameter estimation techniques may not fail but any obtained numerical estimates will be meaningless. The software does not require understanding of the underlying mathematical principles and can be used by researchers in applied fields with a minimum of mathematical background. We illustrate the DAISY software by checking the a priori global identifiability of two benchmark nonlinear models taken from the literature. The analysis of these two examples includes comparison with other methods and demonstrates how identifiability analysis is simplified by this tool. Thus we illustrate the identifiability analysis of other two examples, by including discussion of some specific aspects related to the role of observability and knowledge of initial conditions in testing identifiability and to the computational complexity of the software. The main focus of this paper is not on the description of the mathematical background of the algorithm, which has been presented elsewhere, but on illustrating its use and on some of its more interesting features. DAISY is available on the web site http://www.dei.unipd.it/~pia/. PMID:20185123

  18. Demonstration recommendations for accelerated testing of concrete decontamination methods

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, K.S.; Ally, M.R.; Brown, C.H.; Morris, M.I.; Wilson-Nichols, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    A large number of aging US Department of Energy (DOE) surplus facilities located throughout the US require deactivation, decontamination, and decommissioning. Although several technologies are available commercially for concrete decontamination, emerging technologies with potential to reduce secondary waste and minimize the impact and risk to workers and the environment are needed. In response to these needs, the Accelerated Testing of Concrete Decontamination Methods project team described the nature and extent of contaminated concrete within the DOE complex and identified applicable emerging technologies. Existing information used to describe the nature and extent of contaminated concrete indicates that the most frequently occurring radiological contaminants are {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}U (and its daughters), {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, and tritium. The total area of radionuclide-contaminated concrete within the DOE complex is estimated to be in the range of 7.9 {times} 10{sup 8} ft{sup 2}or approximately 18,000 acres. Concrete decontamination problems were matched with emerging technologies to recommend demonstrations considered to provide the most benefit to decontamination of concrete within the DOE complex. Emerging technologies with the most potential benefit were biological decontamination, electro-hydraulic scabbling, electrokinetics, and microwave scabbling.

  19. Limitations of methods to test density-dependent fecundity hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Beja, Pedro; Palma, Luis

    2008-03-01

    1. Two main hypotheses are usually invoked to explain density dependence in fecundity: the habitat heterogeneity hypothesis (HHH) and the individual adjustment hypothesis (IAH). Although simple methods have been proposed to discriminate between the two hypotheses, their adequacy was tested for only a limited set of real and model populations. 2. In a computer simulation study based on a stochastic territory-based approach, Ferrer, Newton & Casado (2006, Journal of Animal Ecology, 75, 111-117) argued that a strong negative relationship between mean fecundity and its skewness in stable or increasing populations provides critical support for HHH, as this relationship should be lacking under IAH. A negative relationship between mean fecundity and its coefficient of variation (CV) was predicted under both hypotheses, although with a lower slope under IAH. 3. We used a comparable simulation approach, with model populations parameterized from an increasing Bonelli's eagle Hieraaetus fasciatus population (1992-2006), to show that both HHH and IAH can produce indistinguishable relationships between mean fecundity and both its CV and its skewness. 4. Strong negative correlations between the mean and both its CV and its skewness can emerge as statistical artifacts under biologically plausible assumptions, and so they may be largely inadequate to infer mechanisms underlying density dependence in demographic parameters. PMID:18254920

  20. 7 CFR 58.930 - Official test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Procedures § 58.930 Official test methods. (a) Chemical. Chemical analysis, except where otherwise prescribed... of Analysis of the AOAC or by the latest edition of Standard Methods for the Examination of Dairy... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Official test methods. 58.930 Section...

  1. 7 CFR 58.930 - Official test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Procedures § 58.930 Official test methods. (a) Chemical. Chemical analysis, except where otherwise prescribed... of Analysis of the AOAC or by the latest edition of Standard Methods for the Examination of Dairy... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Official test methods. 58.930 Section...

  2. 40 CFR 60.386 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Processing Plants § 60.386 Test methods and procedures. (a) In conducting the performance tests required in... holder of Method 5 may be operated without heaters if the gas stream being sampled is at ambient temperature. For gas streams above ambient temperature, the Method 5 sampling train shall be operated with...

  3. Hearing Tests on Mobile Devices: Evaluation of the Reference Sound Level by Means of Biological Calibration

    PubMed Central

    Kipiński, Lech; Grysiński, Tomasz; Kręcicki, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Background Hearing tests carried out in home setting by means of mobile devices require previous calibration of the reference sound level. Mobile devices with bundled headphones create a possibility of applying the predefined level for a particular model as an alternative to calibrating each device separately. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the reference sound level for sets composed of a mobile device and bundled headphones. Methods Reference sound levels for Android-based mobile devices were determined using an open access mobile phone app by means of biological calibration, that is, in relation to the normal-hearing threshold. The examinations were conducted in 2 groups: an uncontrolled and a controlled one. In the uncontrolled group, the fully automated self-measurements were carried out in home conditions by 18- to 35-year-old subjects, without prior hearing problems, recruited online. Calibration was conducted as a preliminary step in preparation for further examination. In the controlled group, audiologist-assisted examinations were performed in a sound booth, on normal-hearing subjects verified through pure-tone audiometry, recruited offline from among the workers and patients of the clinic. In both the groups, the reference sound levels were determined on a subject’s mobile device using the Bekesy audiometry. The reference sound levels were compared between the groups. Intramodel and intermodel analyses were carried out as well. Results In the uncontrolled group, 8988 calibrations were conducted on 8620 different devices representing 2040 models. In the controlled group, 158 calibrations (test and retest) were conducted on 79 devices representing 50 models. Result analysis was performed for 10 most frequently used models in both the groups. The difference in reference sound levels between uncontrolled and controlled groups was 1.50 dB (SD 4.42). The mean SD of the reference sound level determined for devices within the same model

  4. A new approach for biological online testing of stack gas condensate from municipal waste incinerators.

    PubMed

    Elsner, Dorothea; Fomin, Anette

    2002-01-01

    A biological testing system for the monitoring of stack gas condensates of municipal waste incinerators has been developed using Euglena gracilis as a test organism. The motility, velocity and cellular form of the organisms were the endpoints, calculated by an image analysis system. All endpoints showed statistically significant changes in a short time when organisms were exposed to samples collected during combustion situations with increased pollutant concentrations. The velocity of the organisms proved to be the most appropriate endpoint. A semi-continuous system with E. gracilis for monitoring stack gas condensate is proposed, which could result in an online system for testing stack gas condensates in the future.

  5. A New Method for Incremental Testing of Finite State Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedrosa, Lehilton Lelis Chaves; Moura, Arnaldo Vieira

    2010-01-01

    The automatic generation of test cases is an important issue for conformance testing of several critical systems. We present a new method for the derivation of test suites when the specification is modeled as a combined Finite State Machine (FSM). A combined FSM is obtained conjoining previously tested submachines with newly added states. This new concept is used to describe a fault model suitable for incremental testing of new systems, or for retesting modified implementations. For this fault model, only the newly added or modified states need to be tested, thereby considerably reducing the size of the test suites. The new method is a generalization of the well-known W-method and the G-method, but is scalable, and so it can be used to test FSMs with an arbitrarily large number of states.

  6. ASTM test methods for composite characterization and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, John E.

    1994-01-01

    A discussion of the American Society for Testing and Materials is given. Under the topic of composite materials characterization and evaluation, general industry practice and test methods for textile composites are presented.

  7. 40 CFR 60.344 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Manufacturing Plants § 60.344 Test methods and procedures. (a) In conducting the performance tests required in... the average pressure loss of the gas stream through the scrubber and the average scrubbing...

  8. Sensible method for updating motif instances in an increased biological network.

    PubMed

    Kim, W Y; Kurmar, S

    2015-07-15

    A network motif is defined as an over-represented subgraph pattern in a network. Network motif based techniques have been widely applied in analyses of biological networks such as transcription regulation networks (TRNs), protein-protein interaction networks (PPIs), and metabolic networks. The detection of network motifs involves the computationally expensive enumeration of subgraphs, NP-complete graph isomorphism testing, and significance testing through the generation of many random graphs to determine the statistical uniqueness of a given subgraph. These computational obstacles make network motif analysis unfeasible for many real-world applications. We observe that the fast growth of biotechnology has led to the rapid accretion of molecules (vertices) and interactions (edges) to existing biological network databases. Even with a small percentage of additions, revised networks can have a large number of differing motif instances. Currently, no existing algorithms recalculate motif instances in 'updated' networks in a practical manner. In this paper, we introduce a sensible method for efficiently recalculating motif instances by performing motif enumeration from only updated vertices and edges. Preliminary experimental results indicate that our method greatly reduces computational time by eliminating the repeated enumeration of overlapped subgraph instances detected in earlier versions of the network. The software program implementing this algorithm, defined as SUNMI (Sensible Update of Network Motif Instances), is currently a stand-alone java program and we plan to upgrade it as a web-interactive program that will be available through http://faculty.washington.edu/kimw6/research.htm in near future. Meanwhile it is recommended to contact authors to obtain the stand-alone SUNMI program. PMID:25869675

  9. Overview of Non-Volatile Testing and Screening Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irom, Farokh

    2001-01-01

    Testing methods for memories and non-volatile memories have become increasingly sophisticated as they become denser and more complex. High frequency and faster rewrite times as well as smaller feature sizes have led to many testing challenges. This paper outlines several testing issues posed by novel memories and approaches to testing for radiation and reliability effects. We discuss methods for measurements of Total Ionizing Dose (TID).

  10. High throughput instruments, methods, and informatics for systems biology.

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Cowie, Jim R.; Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Wylie, Brian Neil; Davidson, George S.; Haaland, David Michael; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Aragon, Anthony D.; Keenan, Michael Robert; Boyack, Kevin W.; Thomas, Edward Victor; Werner-Washburne, Margaret C.; Mosquera-Caro, Monica P.; Martinez, M. Juanita; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Willman, Cheryl L.

    2003-12-01

    High throughput instruments and analysis techniques are required in order to make good use of the genomic sequences that have recently become available for many species, including humans. These instruments and methods must work with tens of thousands of genes simultaneously, and must be able to identify the small subsets of those genes that are implicated in the observed phenotypes, or, for instance, in responses to therapies. Microarrays represent one such high throughput method, which continue to find increasingly broad application. This project has improved microarray technology in several important areas. First, we developed the hyperspectral scanner, which has discovered and diagnosed numerous flaws in techniques broadly employed by microarray researchers. Second, we used a series of statistically designed experiments to identify and correct errors in our microarray data to dramatically improve the accuracy, precision, and repeatability of the microarray gene expression data. Third, our research developed new informatics techniques to identify genes with significantly different expression levels. Finally, natural language processing techniques were applied to improve our ability to make use of online literature annotating the important genes. In combination, this research has improved the reliability and precision of laboratory methods and instruments, while also enabling substantially faster analysis and discovery.

  11. Comparison of HEPA filter test methods in corrosive environments

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, L.P.; Fernandez, S.J.; Motes, B.G.

    1980-07-01

    An evaluation of the three HEPA filter test methods in corrosive environments was conducted: the dioctyl phthalate (DOP) method (US Standard Method ANSI N-101.1-1972), the sodium chloride method (British Standard 3928:1969), and the soda-fluorescein or uranine method (French Standard AFNOR STD NFX 44-011). The effects of humidity, temperature and oxides of nitrogen (NO/sub x/) on each method was examined. The experimental design used in the evaluation measured and separated both the effect of each variable and any interaction between variables on the test method. Recommendations for changes in the standard methods to reduce erratic online results are presented.

  12. A Method of Partly Automated Testing of Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, Mike; Visser, Willem; Washington, Rich; Artho, Cyrille; Goldberg, Allen; Haveland, Klaus; Pasareanu, Corina; Khurshid, Sarfraz; Roflu, Grigore

    2007-01-01

    A method of automated testing of software has been developed that provides an alternative to the conventional mostly manual approach for software testing. The method combines (1) automated generation of test cases on the basis of systematic exploration of the input domain of the software to be tested with (2) run-time analysis in which execution traces are monitored, verified against temporal-logic specifications, and analyzed by concurrency-error-detection algorithms. In this new method, the user only needs to provide the temporal logic specifications against which the software will be tested and the abstract description of the input domain.

  13. Status and applications of echinoid (phylum echinodermata) toxicity test methods

    SciTech Connect

    Bay, S.; Burgess, R.; Nacci, D.

    1993-01-01

    The use of echinoderms for toxicity testing has focused primarily on sea urchins and sand dollars (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, Arbacia punctulata, Lytechinus pictus, and Dendraster excentricus, for example). The status and relative sensitivity of various test methods are described. The most frequently used test methods consist of short-term exposures of sea urchin sperm or embryos; these tests can be easily conducted at all times of the year by using species with complementary spawning cycles or laboratory conditioned populations of a single species. Data from reference toxicant and effluent toxicity tests are summarized. Information on the precision and sensitivity of echinoid test methods are limited and preclude rigorous comparisons with other test methods. The available data indicate that the sensitivity and precision of these methods are comparable to short-term chronic methods for other marine invertebrates and fish. Recent application of the sperm test in toxicity identification evaluations (TIEs) and studies of effluent toxicity decay and sediment toxicity illustrate the versatility of this rapid (10 to 60 min exposure) test method. Embryo tests typically use a 48 to 96 h exposure period and measure the occurrence of embryo malformations. Most recent applications of the embryo test have been for the assessment of sediment elutriate toxicity. Adult echinoderms are not frequently used to assess effluent or receiving water toxicity. Recent studies have had success in using the adult life stage of urchins and sand dollars to assess the effects of contaminated sediment on growth, behavior, and bioaccumulation.

  14. Ergodicity test of the eddy correlation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Hu, Y.; Yu, Y.; Lü, S.

    2014-07-01

    for the ensemble average, a large rate of error would occur with use of the eddy correction method due to losing the low frequency component information of the larger vortex. When the multi-station observation was compared with the single-station observation, the wide sense of stationary random process originating from the multi-station observation expanded from a vortex which was about 1000 m smaller than a boundary layer scale to the turbulent vortex, which was larger than the boundary layer scale of 2000 m. Therefore, the calculation of the turbulence average or variance and turbulent flux could effectively meet the ergodic assumption, and the results would be approximate to the actual values. Regardless of vertical velocity and temperature, if the ergodic stationary random processes could be met, then the variance of the vortexes in the different temporal scales could follow M-O similarity theory; in the case of the non-ergodic random process, its vortex variance deviated from the M-O similarity relations. The exploration of ergodicity in the atmospheric turbulence measurements is doubtlessly helpful to understanding the issues in atmospheric turbulent flux observation, and provides a theoretical basis for overcoming related difficulties.

  15. Evaluation of new aquatic toxicity test methods for oil dispersants

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, C.B.; Clark, J.R.; Bragin, G.E.

    1994-12-31

    Current aquatic toxicity test methods used for dispersant registration do not address real world exposure scenarios. Current test methods require 48 or 96 hour constant exposure conditions. In contrast, environmentally realistic exposures can be described as a pulse in which the initial concentration declines over time. Recent research using a specially designed testing apparatus (the California system) has demonstrated that exposure to Corexit 9527{reg_sign} under pulsed exposure conditions may be 3 to 22 times less toxic compared to continuous exposure scenarios. The objectives of this study were to compare results of toxicity tests using the California test system to results from standardized tests, evaluate sensitivity of regional (Holmesimysis cast and Atherinops affinis) vs. standard test species (Mysidopsis bahia and Menidia beryllina) and determine if tests using the California test system and method are reproducible. All tests were conducted using Corexit 9527{reg_sign} as the test material. Standard toxicity tests conducted with M. bahia and H. cast resulted in LC50s similar to those from tests using the California apparatus. LC50s from tests conducted in the authors` laboratory with the California system and standard test species were within a factor of 2 to 6 of data previously reported for west coast species. Results of tests conducted with H. cast in the laboratory compared favorably to data reported by Singer et al. 1991.

  16. 3D printing method for freeform fabrication of optical phantoms simulating heterogeneous biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Minjie; Shen, Shuwei; Yang, Jie; Dong, Erbao; Xu, Ronald

    2014-03-01

    The performance of biomedical optical imaging devices heavily relies on appropriate calibration. However, many of existing calibration phantoms for biomedical optical devices are based on homogenous materials without considering the multi-layer heterogeneous structures observed in biological tissue. Using such a phantom for optical calibration may result in measurement bias. To overcome this problem, we propose a 3D printing method for freeform fabrication of tissue simulating phantoms with multilayer heterogeneous structure. The phantom simulates not only the morphologic characteristics of biological tissue but also absorption and scattering properties. The printing system is based on a 3D motion platform with coordinated control of the DC motors. A special jet nozzle is designed to mix base, scattering, and absorption materials at different ratios. 3D tissue structures are fabricated through layer-by-layer printing with selective deposition of phantom materials of different ingredients. Different mixed ratios of base, scattering and absorption materials have been tested in order to optimize the printing outcome. A spectrometer and a tissue spectrophotometer are used for characterizing phantom absorption and scattering properties. The goal of this project is to fabricate skin tissue simulating phantoms as a traceable standard for the calibration of biomedical optical spectral devices.

  17. Development and testing of hyperbaric atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence microscopy for biological applications.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, D P; McNally, H A; Dean, J B

    2012-05-01

    A commercially available atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscope were installed and tested inside a custom-designed hyperbaric chamber to provide the capability to study the effects of hyperbaric gases on biological preparations, including cellular mechanism of oxidative stress. In this report, we list details of installing and testing atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy inside a hyperbaric chamber. The pressure vessel was designed to accommodate a variety of imaging equipment and ensures full functionality at ambient and hyperbaric conditions (≤85 psi). Electrical, gas and fluid lines were installed to enable remote operation of instrumentation under hyperbaric conditions, and to maintain viable biological samples with gas-equilibrated superfusate and/or drugs. Systems were installed for vibration isolation and temperature regulation to maintain atomic force microscopy performance during compression and decompression. Results of atomic force microscopy testing demonstrate sub-nanometre resolution at hyperbaric pressure in dry scans and fluid scans, in both contact mode and tapping mode. Noise levels were less when measurements were taken under hyperbaric pressure with air, helium (He) and nitrogen (N(2) ). Atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy measurements were made on a variety of living cell cultures exposed to hyperbaric gases (He, N(2) , O(2) , air). In summary, atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy were installed and tested for use at hyperbaric pressures and enables the study of cellular and molecular effects of hyperbaric gases and pressure per se in biological preparations.

  18. Expertise for Teaching Biology Situated in the Context of Genetic Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van der Zande, Paul; Akkerman, Sanne F.; Brekelmans, Mieke; Waarlo, Arend Jan; Vermunt, Jan D.

    2012-07-01

    Contemporary genomics research will impact the daily practice of biology teachers who want to teach up-to-date genetics in secondary education. This article reports on a research project aimed at enhancing biology teachers' expertise for teaching genetics situated in the context of genetic testing. The increasing body of scientific knowledge concerning genetic testing and the related consequences for decision-making indicate the societal relevance of an educational approach based on situated learning. What expertise do biology teachers need for teaching genetics in the personal health context of genetic testing? This article describes the required expertise by exploring the educational practice. Nine experienced teachers were interviewed about the pedagogical content, moral and interpersonal expertise areas concerning how to teach genetics in the personal health context of genetic testing, and the lessons of five of them were observed. The findings showed that the required teacher expertise encompasses specific pedagogical content expertise, interpersonal expertise and a preference for teacher roles and teaching approaches for the moral aspects of teaching in this context. A need for further development of teaching and learning activities for (reflection on) moral reasoning came to the fore. Suggestions regarding how to apply this expertise into context-based genetics education are discussed.

  19. Electrochemical methods for generation of a biological proton motive force

    DOEpatents

    Zeikus, Joseph Gregory; Shin, Hyoun S.; Jain, Mahendra K.

    2008-12-02

    Disclosed are methods using neutral red to mediate the interconversion of chemical and electrical energy. Electrically reduced neutral red has been found to promote cell growth and formation of reduced products by reversibly increasing the ratio of the reduced:oxidized forms of NAD(H) or NADP(H). Electrically reduced neutral red is able to serve as the sole source of reducing power for microbial cell growth. Neutral red is also able to promote conversion of chemical energy to electrical energy by facilitating the transfer of electrons from microbial reducing power to a fuel cell cathode.

  20. BEO-Life, a Test and Refurbishment Support for Biological Research Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engeln, I.; Hueser, D.; Reese, C.; Schoenfeld, R.

    Since the ISS commenced its operational phase, the need of ground based test and refurbishment support, facilitating the utilisation of the station and especially its facilities for biological research, becomes increasingly important.. The onboard biological research facilities (e.g. BIOLAB) are designed and built for a life time of 10 years, requiring the regular exchange of the integrated life support systems. The exact conditioning of the atmosphere in these systems plays an important role for the scientific outcome. The composition of the air (O2, N2 and CO2) as well as the humidity and the temperature inside the experiment chambers containing the plants and cell-cultures needs to be adjustable for various types of experiments. Since the various ingredients for a life support system are consumables, which consumption depends on the number of performed experiments, the life support systems needs to be refurbished from time to time. Our contribution to this challenge is BEO- Life, which offers a unique test, refurbishment and qualification environment for maintenance and re-supply for life support systems of the ISS onboard biological facilities. BEO-Life provides the ground support for all these tasks, such as tests, maintenance, verification and procedures. To fulfil the demanding requirements for the automatic and stable conditioning of the life support system, a complex arrangement of pumps, valves, sensors and an electronic system including software with exact control algorithms is provided. Beside the refurbishment activities, BEO-Life will support preliminary ground-based investigations of scientists before utilisation of the ISS biological research facilities, too. In conclusion, we offer a novel service element for the ground-based maintenance of biological research facilities onboard the ISS. This service can be easily adapted to the needs of users for preparatory work.

  1. Test methods and design allowables for fibrous composites. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Topics discussed include extreme/hostile environment testing, establishing design allowables, and property/behavior specific testing. Papers are presented on environmental effects on the high strain rate properties of graphite/epoxy composite, the low-temperature performance of short-fiber reinforced thermoplastics, the abrasive wear behavior of unidirectional and woven graphite fiber/PEEK, test methods for determining design allowables for fiber reinforced composites, and statistical methods for calculating material allowables for MIL-HDBK-17. Attention is also given to a test method to measure the response of composite materials under reversed cyclic loads, a through-the-thickness strength specimen for composites, the use of torsion tubes to measure in-plane shear properties of filament-wound composites, the influlence of test fixture design on the Iosipescu shear test for fiber composite materials, and a method for monitoring in-plane shear modulus in fatigue testing of composites.

  2. Planar biaxial testing of soft biological tissue using rakes: A critical analysis of protocol and fitting process.

    PubMed

    Fehervary, Heleen; Smoljkić, Marija; Vander Sloten, Jos; Famaey, Nele

    2016-08-01

    Mechanical characterization of soft biological tissue is becoming more and more prevalent. Despite the growing use of planar biaxial testing for soft tissue characterization, testing conditions and subsequent data analysis have not been standardized and vary widely. This also influences the quality of the result of the parameter fitting. Moreover, the testing conditions and data analysis are often not or incompletely reported, which impedes the proper comparison of parameters obtained from different studies. With a focus on planar biaxial tests using rakes, this paper investigates varying testing conditions and varying data analysis methods and their effect on the quality of the parameter fitting results. By means of a series of finite element simulations, aspects such as number of rakes, rakes׳ width, loading protocol, constitutive model, material stiffness and anisotropy are evaluated based on the degree of homogeneity of the stress field, and on the correlation between the experimentally obtained stress and the stress derived from the constitutive model. When calculating the aforementioned stresses, different definitions of the section width and deformation gradient are used in literature, each of which are looked into. Apart from this degree of homogeneity and correlation, also the effect on the quality of the parameter fitting result is evaluated. The results show that inhomogeneities can be reduced to a minimum for wise choices of testing conditions and analysis methods, but never completely eliminated. Therefore, a new parameter optimization procedure is proposed that corrects for the inhomogeneities in the stress field and induces significant improvements to the fitting results. Recommendations are made for best practice in rake-based planar biaxial testing of soft biological tissues and subsequent parameter fitting, and guidelines are formulated for reporting thereof in publications.

  3. A direct solid sampling analysis method for the detection of silver nanoparticles in biological matrices.

    PubMed

    Feichtmeier, Nadine S; Ruchter, Nadine; Zimmermann, Sonja; Sures, Bernd; Leopold, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Engineered silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are implemented in food contact materials due to their powerful antimicrobial properties and so may enter the human food chain. Hence, it is desirable to develop easy, sensitive and fast analytical screening methods for the determination of AgNPs in complex biological matrices. This study describes such a method using solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). A recently reported novel evaluation strategy uses the atomization delay of the respective GFAAS signal as significant indicator for AgNPs and thereby allows discrimination of AgNPs from ionic silver (Ag(+)) in the samples without elaborate sample pre-treatment. This approach was further developed and applied to a variety of biological samples. Its suitability was approved by investigation of eight different food samples (parsley, apple, pepper, cheese, onion, pasta, maize meal and wheat flour) spiked with ionic silver or AgNPs. Furthermore, the migration of AgNPs from silver-impregnated polypropylene food storage boxes to fresh pepper was observed and a mussel sample obtained from a laboratory exposure study with silver was investigated. The differences in the atomization delays (Δt(ad)) between silver ions and 20-nm AgNPs vary in a range from -2.01 ± 1.38 s for maize meal to +2.06 ± 1.08 s for mussel tissue. However, the differences were significant in all investigated matrices and so indicative of the presence/absence of AgNPs. Moreover, investigation of model matrices (cellulose, gelatine and water) gives the first indication of matrix-dependent trends. Reproducibility and homogeneity tests confirm the applicability of the method.

  4. A direct solid sampling analysis method for the detection of silver nanoparticles in biological matrices.

    PubMed

    Feichtmeier, Nadine S; Ruchter, Nadine; Zimmermann, Sonja; Sures, Bernd; Leopold, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Engineered silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are implemented in food contact materials due to their powerful antimicrobial properties and so may enter the human food chain. Hence, it is desirable to develop easy, sensitive and fast analytical screening methods for the determination of AgNPs in complex biological matrices. This study describes such a method using solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). A recently reported novel evaluation strategy uses the atomization delay of the respective GFAAS signal as significant indicator for AgNPs and thereby allows discrimination of AgNPs from ionic silver (Ag(+)) in the samples without elaborate sample pre-treatment. This approach was further developed and applied to a variety of biological samples. Its suitability was approved by investigation of eight different food samples (parsley, apple, pepper, cheese, onion, pasta, maize meal and wheat flour) spiked with ionic silver or AgNPs. Furthermore, the migration of AgNPs from silver-impregnated polypropylene food storage boxes to fresh pepper was observed and a mussel sample obtained from a laboratory exposure study with silver was investigated. The differences in the atomization delays (Δt(ad)) between silver ions and 20-nm AgNPs vary in a range from -2.01 ± 1.38 s for maize meal to +2.06 ± 1.08 s for mussel tissue. However, the differences were significant in all investigated matrices and so indicative of the presence/absence of AgNPs. Moreover, investigation of model matrices (cellulose, gelatine and water) gives the first indication of matrix-dependent trends. Reproducibility and homogeneity tests confirm the applicability of the method. PMID:26483187

  5. Evaluation criteria and test methods for electrochromic windows

    SciTech Connect

    Czanderna, A.W. ); Lampert, C.M. )

    1990-07-01

    Report summarizes the test methods used for evaluating electrochromic (EC) windows, and summarizes what is known about degradation of their performance, and recommends methods and procedures for advancing EC windows for buildings applications. 77 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Outlier Measures and Norming Methods for Computerized Adaptive Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradlow, Eric T.; Weiss, Robert E.

    2001-01-01

    Compares four methods that map outlier statistics to a familiarity probability scale (a "P" value). Explored these methods in the context of computerized adaptive test data from a 1995 nationally administered computerized examination for professionals in the medical industry. (SLD)

  7. 40 CFR 60.446 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Sensitive Tape and Label Surface Coating Operations § 60.446 Test methods and procedures. (a) The VOC... the web substrate. (b) Method 25 shall be used to determine the VOC concentration, in parts...

  8. 40 CFR 60.446 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Sensitive Tape and Label Surface Coating Operations § 60.446 Test methods and procedures. (a) The VOC... the web substrate. (b) Method 25 shall be used to determine the VOC concentration, in parts...

  9. 40 CFR 60.446 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Sensitive Tape and Label Surface Coating Operations § 60.446 Test methods and procedures. (a) The VOC... the web substrate. (b) Method 25 shall be used to determine the VOC concentration, in parts...

  10. Recommendations for Developing Alternative Test Methods for Developmental Neurotoxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is great interest in developing alternative methods for developmental neurotoxicity testing (DNT) that are cost-efficient, use fewer animals and are based on current scientific knowledge of the developing nervous system. Alternative methods will require demonstration of the...

  11. Susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria: myth, magic, or method?

    PubMed Central

    Wexler, H M

    1991-01-01

    The demand for susceptibility testing of anaerobes has increased, yet consensus as to procedure and interpretation in this area has not been achieved. While routine testing of anaerobic isolates is not needed, certain isolates in specific clinical settings should be tested. Also, laboratories may monitor their local antibiograms by doing periodic surveillance batch testing. The National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards has published a protocol of methods approved for susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria. Both agar and broth microdilution are included; however, the broth disk elution method is no longer approved by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards because of method-related interpretive errors. A number of newer methods are undergoing evaluation and seem promising. Clinicians and microbiologists reviewing susceptibility reports should be aware of sources of variability in the test results. Variables in susceptibility testing of anaerobes include the media and methods used, organisms chosen for testing, breakpoints chosen for interpretation, antibiotic, and determination of endpoint. Clustering of MICs around the breakpoint may lead to significant variability in test results. Adherence of testing laboratories to approved methods and careful descriptions of the method and the breakpoints used for interpretation would facilitate interlaboratory comparisons and allow problems of emerging resistance to be noted. A variety of resistance mechanisms occurs in anaerobic bacteria, including the production of beta-lactamase and other drug-inactivating enzymes, alteration of target proteins, and inability of the drug to penetrate the bacterial wall. Antimicrobial resistance patterns in the United States and abroad are described. PMID:1747863

  12. Harmonization of standard toxicity test methods used in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Ingersoll, C.G.; Dwyer, F.J.; Ankley, G.T.

    1995-12-31

    Over the past two years, Environment Canada (EC) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have developed standard methods for conducting toxicity and bioaccumulation tests with freshwater, estuarine, and marine sediments. Existing ASTM methods were used as a basis to harmonize these methods for conducting testing with either field-collected or laboratory-spiked sediments. For freshwater toxicity tests, methods are described by EC and EPA for the amphipod Hyalella azteca and the midges Chironomus tentans and C. riparius. Endpoints include 10- to 14-d survival of growth. Methods are also described by EPA for conducting 28-d bioaccumulation tests with the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus. For estuarine and marine toxicity tests, methods are described for several amphipods (i.e., Rhepoxynius abronius, Ampelisca abdita, Eohaustorius estuarius, Leptocheirus plumulosus). Endpoints include 10-d survival and reburial. EC is also developing methods for conducting toxicity tests with Atlantic, Pacific, and Arctic Canadian species of polychaetes. Methods are described by EPA for conducting 28-d bioaccumulation tests with a variety of mollusks (i.e., Macoma spp.) and polychaetes (i.e., Nereis spp.). Slight inconsistencies in methods between freshwater and estuarine/marine testing or between EC and EPA testing include: (1) static vs. flow-through conditions, (2) sieving of sediment, (3) types and quantity of food, (4) age of test organisms, or (4) duration of the test and required endpoints. Additional research is in progress to: (1) develop chronic toxicity tests with amphipods and midges measuring survival, growth, or reproduction, (2) develop whole-sediment toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) procedures, (3) refine sediment spiking procedures, and (4) field-validate laboratory tests.

  13. Effect of chemical and biological surfactants on activated sludge of MBR system: microscopic analysis and foam test.

    PubMed

    Capodici, Marco; Di Bella, Gaetano; Nicosia, Salvatore; Torregrossa, Michele

    2015-02-01

    A bench-scale MBR unit was operated, under stressing condition, with the aim of stimulating the onset of foaming in the activated sludge. Possible synergies between synthetic surfactants in the wastewater and biological surfactants (Extra-Cellular Polymeric Substances, EPSs) were investigated by changing C/N ratio. The growth of filamentous bacteria was also discussed. The MBR unit provided satisfactory overall carbon removal overall efficiencies: in particular, synthetic surfactants were removed with efficiency higher than 90% and 95% for non-ionic and ionic surfactants, respectively. Lab investigation suggested also the importance to reduce synthetic surfactants presence entering into mixed liquor: otherwise, their presence can significantly worsen the natural foaming caused by biological surfactants (EPSs) produced by bacteria. Finally, a new analytic method based on "ink test" has been proposed as a useful tool to achieve a valuation of EPSs bound fraction.

  14. Apparatus and method for biological purification of waste

    DOEpatents

    Lucido, J.A.; Keenan, D.; Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Shelenkova, L.

    1998-11-24

    An apparatus is disclosed for containing a microorganism culture in an active exponential growth and delivering a supply of microorganisms to an environment containing wastes for bio-augmenting the biodegradation of the wastes. The apparatus comprises a bioreactor and an operably connected controller. The bioreactor has a bioreactor chamber for containing a supply of microorganisms, a second chamber for containing a supply of water and inorganic nutrients, and a third chamber for containing a supply of organic nutrients. The bioreactor is operably connected to the controller in which a first pump is operably connected in fluid communication between the bioreactor chamber and the second chamber and third chamber, and a second pump is operably connected in fluid communication between the bioreactor chamber and the environment containing wastes to be biodegraded. The controller further includes a timer and regulator operably connected to the first and second pumps to effectively maintain the microorganisms in exponential growth in the bioreactor chamber and to deliver microorganisms to an environment to be treated. Also, disclosed is a method for bio-augmenting the biodegradation of wastes. 7 figs.

  15. Apparatus and method for biological purification of waste

    DOEpatents

    Lucido, John A.; Keenan, Daniel; Premuzic, Eugene T.; Lin, Mow S.; Shelenkova, Ludmila

    1998-11-24

    An apparatus is disclosed for containing a microorganism culture in an active exponential growth and delivering a supply of microorganisms to an environment containing wastes for bio-augmenting the biodegradation of the wastes. The apparatus comprises a bioreactor and an operably connected controller. The bioreactor has a bioreactor chamber for containing a supply of microorganisms, a second chamber for containing a supply of water and inorganic nutrients, and a third chamber for containing a supply of organic nutrients. The bioreactor is operably connected to the controller in which a first pump is operably connected in fluid communication between the bioreactor chamber and the second chamber and third chamber, and a second pump is operably connected in fluid communication between the bioreactor chamber and the environment containing wastes to be biodegraded. The controller further includes a timer and regulator operably connected to the first and second pumps to effectively maintain the microorganisms in exponential growth in the bioreactor chamber and to deliver microorganisms to an environment to be treated. Also, disclosed is a method for bio-augmenting the biodegradation of wastes.

  16. Fast and Accurate Microplate Method (Biolog MT2) for Detection of Fusarium Fungicides Resistance/Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Frąc, Magdalena; Gryta, Agata; Oszust, Karolina; Kotowicz, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    The need for finding fungicides against Fusarium is a key step in the chemical plant protection and using appropriate chemical agents. Existing, conventional methods of evaluation of Fusarium isolates resistance to fungicides are costly, time-consuming and potentially environmentally harmful due to usage of high amounts of potentially toxic chemicals. Therefore, the development of fast, accurate and effective detection methods for Fusarium resistance to fungicides is urgently required. MT2 microplates (BiologTM) method is traditionally used for bacteria identification and the evaluation of their ability to utilize different carbon substrates. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no reports concerning the use of this technical tool to determine fungicides resistance of the Fusarium isolates. For this reason, the objectives of this study are to develop a fast method for Fusarium resistance to fungicides detection and to validate the effectiveness approach between both traditional hole-plate and MT2 microplates assays. In presented study MT2 microplate-based assay was evaluated for potential use as an alternative resistance detection method. This was carried out using three commercially available fungicides, containing following active substances: triazoles (tebuconazole), benzimidazoles (carbendazim) and strobilurins (azoxystrobin), in six concentrations (0, 0.0005, 0.005, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2%), for nine selected Fusarium isolates. In this study, the particular concentrations of each fungicides was loaded into MT2 microplate wells. The wells were inoculated with the Fusarium mycelium suspended in PM4-IF inoculating fluid. Before inoculation the suspension was standardized for each isolates into 75% of transmittance. Traditional hole-plate method was used as a control assay. The fungicides concentrations in control method were the following: 0, 0.0005, 0.005, 0.05, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, 25, and 50%. Strong relationships between MT2 microplate and traditional hole

  17. Fast and Accurate Microplate Method (Biolog MT2) for Detection of Fusarium Fungicides Resistance/Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Frąc, Magdalena; Gryta, Agata; Oszust, Karolina; Kotowicz, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    The need for finding fungicides against Fusarium is a key step in the chemical plant protection and using appropriate chemical agents. Existing, conventional methods of evaluation of Fusarium isolates resistance to fungicides are costly, time-consuming and potentially environmentally harmful due to usage of high amounts of potentially toxic chemicals. Therefore, the development of fast, accurate and effective detection methods for Fusarium resistance to fungicides is urgently required. MT2 microplates (Biolog(TM)) method is traditionally used for bacteria identification and the evaluation of their ability to utilize different carbon substrates. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no reports concerning the use of this technical tool to determine fungicides resistance of the Fusarium isolates. For this reason, the objectives of this study are to develop a fast method for Fusarium resistance to fungicides detection and to validate the effectiveness approach between both traditional hole-plate and MT2 microplates assays. In presented study MT2 microplate-based assay was evaluated for potential use as an alternative resistance detection method. This was carried out using three commercially available fungicides, containing following active substances: triazoles (tebuconazole), benzimidazoles (carbendazim) and strobilurins (azoxystrobin), in six concentrations (0, 0.0005, 0.005, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2%), for nine selected Fusarium isolates. In this study, the particular concentrations of each fungicides was loaded into MT2 microplate wells. The wells were inoculated with the Fusarium mycelium suspended in PM4-IF inoculating fluid. Before inoculation the suspension was standardized for each isolates into 75% of transmittance. Traditional hole-plate method was used as a control assay. The fungicides concentrations in control method were the following: 0, 0.0005, 0.005, 0.05, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, 25, and 50%. Strong relationships between MT2 microplate and traditional hole

  18. Electric vehicle chassis dynamometer test methods at JPL and their correlation to track tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marte, J.; Bryant, J.

    1983-01-01

    Early in its electric vehicle (EV) test program, JPL recognized that EV test procedures were too vague and too loosely defined to permit much meaningful data to be obtained from the testing. Therefore, JPL adopted more stringent test procedures and chose the chassis dynamometer rather than the track as its principal test technique. Through the years, test procedures continued to evolve towards a methodology based on chassis dynamometers which would exhibit good correlation with track testing. Based on comparative dynamometer and track test results on the ETV-1 vehicle, the test methods discussed in this report demonstrate a means by which excellent track-to-dynamometer correlation can be obtained.

  19. 40 CFR 63.786 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CFR part 60, appendix A, is the definitive method for determining the VOC content of coatings, as... source may use batch formulation data as a test method in lieu of Method 24 of appendix A to 40 CFR part..., in the event of conflicting results, Method 24 of appendix A of 40 CFR part 60 shall take...

  20. 40 CFR 63.786 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CFR part 60, appendix A, is the definitive method for determining the VOC content of coatings, as... source may use batch formulation data as a test method in lieu of Method 24 of appendix A to 40 CFR part..., in the event of conflicting results, Method 24 of appendix A of 40 CFR part 60 shall take...

  1. 40 CFR 63.786 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR part 60, appendix A, is the definitive method for determining the VOC content of coatings, as... source may use batch formulation data as a test method in lieu of Method 24 of appendix A to 40 CFR part..., in the event of conflicting results, Method 24 of appendix A of 40 CFR part 60 shall take...

  2. 40 CFR 63.786 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CFR part 60, appendix A, is the definitive method for determining the VOC content of coatings, as... source may use batch formulation data as a test method in lieu of Method 24 of appendix A to 40 CFR part..., in the event of conflicting results, Method 24 of appendix A of 40 CFR part 60 shall take...

  3. 40 CFR 63.786 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CFR part 60, appendix A, is the definitive method for determining the VOC content of coatings, as... source may use batch formulation data as a test method in lieu of Method 24 of appendix A to 40 CFR part..., in the event of conflicting results, Method 24 of appendix A of 40 CFR part 60 shall take...

  4. Investigating Item Exposure Control Methods in Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozturk, Nagihan Boztunc; Dogan, Nuri

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of item exposure control methods on measurement precision and on test security under various item selection methods and item pool characteristics. In this study, the Randomesque (with item group sizes of 5 and 10), Sympson-Hetter, and Fade-Away methods were used as item exposure control methods. Moreover,…

  5. Approaching complexity by stochastic methods: From biological systems to turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Rudolf; Peinke, Joachim; Sahimi, Muhammad; Reza Rahimi Tabar, M.

    2011-09-01

    This review addresses a central question in the field of complex systems: given a fluctuating (in time or space), sequentially measured set of experimental data, how should one analyze the data, assess their underlying trends, and discover the characteristics of the fluctuations that generate the experimental traces? In recent years, significant progress has been made in addressing this question for a class of stochastic processes that can be modeled by Langevin equations, including additive as well as multiplicative fluctuations or noise. Important results have emerged from the analysis of temporal data for such diverse fields as neuroscience, cardiology, finance, economy, surface science, turbulence, seismic time series and epileptic brain dynamics, to name but a few. Furthermore, it has been recognized that a similar approach can be applied to the data that depend on a length scale, such as velocity increments in fully developed turbulent flow, or height increments that characterize rough surfaces. A basic ingredient of the approach to the analysis of fluctuating data is the presence of a Markovian property, which can be detected in real systems above a certain time or length scale. This scale is referred to as the Markov-Einstein (ME) scale, and has turned out to be a useful characteristic of complex systems. We provide a review of the operational methods that have been developed for analyzing stochastic data in time and scale. We address in detail the following issues: (i) reconstruction of stochastic evolution equations from data in terms of the Langevin equations or the corresponding Fokker-Planck equations and (ii) intermittency, cascades, and multiscale correlation functions.

  6. BinAligner: a heuristic method to align biological networks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The advances in high throughput omics technologies have made it possible to characterize molecular interactions within and across various species. Alignments and comparison of molecular networks across species will help detect orthologs and conserved functional modules and provide insights on the evolutionary relationships of the compared species. However, such analyses are not trivial due to the complexity of network and high computational cost. Here we develop a mixture of global and local algorithm, BinAligner, for network alignments. Based on the hypotheses that the similarity between two vertices across networks would be context dependent and that the information from the edges and the structures of subnetworks can be more informative than vertices alone, two scoring schema, 1-neighborhood subnetwork and graphlet, were introduced to derive the scoring matrices between networks, besides the commonly used scoring scheme from vertices. Then the alignment problem is formulated as an assignment problem, which is solved by the combinatorial optimization algorithm, such as the Hungarian method. The proposed algorithm was applied and validated in aligning the protein-protein interaction network of Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and that of varicella zoster virus (VZV). Interestingly, we identified several putative functional orthologous proteins with similar functions but very low sequence similarity between the two viruses. For example, KSHV open reading frame 56 (ORF56) and VZV ORF55 are helicase-primase subunits with sequence identity 14.6%, and KSHV ORF75 and VZV ORF44 are tegument proteins with sequence identity 15.3%. These functional pairs can not be identified if one restricts the alignment into orthologous protein pairs. In addition, BinAligner identified a conserved pathway between two viruses, which consists of 7 orthologous protein pairs and these proteins are connected by conserved links. This pathway might be crucial for virus packing and

  7. [Testing the sterilisation effect of autoclaves by means of biological indicators (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Werner, H P; Kindt, R; Borneff, J

    1975-07-01

    Because of the great number of failures with sterilization-programs it seems to be necessary to check up the effect of sterilization not only by the annual official tests but also continuously with biological indicators. Marketable indicators have not to be tested necessarily at present. Therefore six different types of indicators were examined experimentally and under practice-conditions. As to be seen in table 1 samples of the same charge didn't show great differences, in spite of this germ-counts of several charges differed considerably. Reductions of germ-counts after sterilization in the autoclave at 123,5 degrees C (fig. 1) and at 134 degrees C (fig 2), as well as with hot air at 120-125 degrees C (fig 3) and 133-138 degrees C (fig 4) demonstrate the heat-resistance. The individual biological indicators differ in killing-time and times of survival (table 2). Our tests demonstrate that only single biological indicators (table 4) will grant satisfying results in continuous checking of sterilization process. PMID:811008

  8. 49 CFR 230.45 - Method of testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Gauges § 230.45 Method of testing. Steam gauges shall be compared with an accurate test gauge or dead weight tester. While under test load at the MAWP of the boiler to which the gauge will be...

  9. 49 CFR 230.45 - Method of testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Gauges § 230.45 Method of testing. Steam gauges shall be compared with an accurate test gauge or dead weight tester. While under test load at the MAWP of the boiler to which the gauge will be...

  10. 49 CFR 230.45 - Method of testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Gauges § 230.45 Method of testing. Steam gauges shall be compared with an accurate test gauge or dead weight tester. While under test load at the MAWP of the boiler to which the gauge will be...

  11. 49 CFR 230.45 - Method of testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Gauges § 230.45 Method of testing. Steam gauges shall be compared with an accurate test gauge or dead weight tester. While under test load at the MAWP of the boiler to which the gauge will be...

  12. 49 CFR 230.45 - Method of testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Gauges § 230.45 Method of testing. Steam gauges shall be compared with an accurate test gauge or dead weight tester. While under test load at the MAWP of the boiler to which the gauge will be...

  13. 16 CFR 1610.3 - Summary of test method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES The Standard § 1610.3 Summary of test method. The Standard provides methods of testing the flammability of textiles from or intended to be used for apparel; establishes three classes of flammability; sets forth the requirements for classifying textiles; and...

  14. 40 CFR 63.365 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... exhaust continuously during the first evacuation using the procedure found in 40 CFR part 60, appendix A... outlined in the test methods listed in paragraph (b) of this section. (B) Test Method 18 or 25A, 40 CFR... concentration required in § 63.364(e), follow the procedures in PS 8 or PS 9 in 40 CFR part 60, appendix...

  15. 40 CFR 60.34c - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test methods and procedures. 60.34c Section 60.34c Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 60.34c Test methods and procedures. For approval, a State plan...

  16. 40 CFR 63.323 - Test methods and monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test methods and monitoring. 63.323... Perchloroethylene Air Emission Standards for Dry Cleaning Facilities § 63.323 Test methods and monitoring. (a) When... exhaust of the carbon adsorber weekly with a colorimetric detector tube or PCE gas analyzer....

  17. 40 CFR 76.15 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test methods and procedures. 76.15 Section 76.15 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.15 Test methods and procedures. (a)...

  18. 40 CFR 76.15 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test methods and procedures. 76.15 Section 76.15 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.15 Test methods and procedures. (a)...

  19. 40 CFR 76.15 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test methods and procedures. 76.15 Section 76.15 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.15 Test methods and procedures. (a)...

  20. 40 CFR 76.15 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test methods and procedures. 76.15 Section 76.15 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.15 Test methods and procedures. (a)...

  1. 40 CFR 76.15 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test methods and procedures. 76.15 Section 76.15 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.15 Test methods and procedures. (a)...

  2. 16 CFR 1509.6 - Component-spacing test method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Component-spacing test method. 1509.6 Section 1509.6 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR NON-FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS § 1509.6 Component-spacing test method. The apex of...

  3. 16 CFR 1509.6 - Component-spacing test method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Component-spacing test method. 1509.6 Section 1509.6 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR NON-FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS § 1509.6 Component-spacing test method. The apex of...

  4. 40 CFR 61.304 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... performance test according to Method 22 of appendix A of 40 CFR part 60 shall be performed to determine... (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Benzene Emissions From Benzene Transfer Operations § 61.304 Test methods and procedures. (a) The procedures...

  5. 40 CFR 61.304 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... performance test according to Method 22 of appendix A of 40 CFR part 60 shall be performed to determine... (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Benzene Emissions From Benzene Transfer Operations § 61.304 Test methods and procedures. (a) The procedures...

  6. A Cluster-Based Method for Test Construction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boekkooi-Timminga, Ellen

    1990-01-01

    A new test construction model based on the Rasch model is proposed. This model, the cluster-based method, considers groups of interchangeable items rather than individual items and uses integer programing. Results for six test construction problems indicate that the method produces accurate results in small amounts of time. (SLD)

  7. Testing and Validation of the Dynamic Interia Measurement Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Alexander; Herrera, Claudia; Spivey, Natalie; Fladung, William; Cloutier, David

    2015-01-01

    This presentation describes the DIM method and how it measures the inertia properties of an object by analyzing the frequency response functions measured during a ground vibration test (GVT). The DIM method has been in development at the University of Cincinnati and has shown success on a variety of small scale test articles. The NASA AFRC version was modified for larger applications.

  8. 40 CFR 60.74 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test methods and procedures. 60.74 Section 60.74 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for Nitric Acid Plants § 60.74 Test methods and procedures. (a)...

  9. Improved method of HIPOT testing of advanced ignition system product

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, P.C.

    1992-04-01

    A new method of high potential (HIPOT) testing of advanced ignition system (AIS) product was developed. The new incorporated using a silver-filled RTV silicone as the electrodes of the HIPOT tester instead of the preformed, semi-rigid aluminum electrodes of the current tester. Initial results indicate that the developed method was more sensitive to the testing requirements of the HIPOT test. A patent for the combination of the material used and the method of testing developed was attempted but was withdrawn following a patent search by the US Patent Office.

  10. Method and apparatus for globally-accessible automated testing

    DOEpatents

    Layne, Scott P.; Beugelsdijk, Tony J.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sharing integrated testing services with a plurality of autonomous remote clients is disclosed. In the disclosed method, in response to an access request message, a process controller transmits an access enabling message to the remote client. The access enabling message includes instructions performable by a remote client to generate test equipment commands. A process controller interprets and transforms these commands into automated test instrument suite commands, which are provided to laboratory modules to perform the indicated tests. Test data results are then obtained and transmitted to the remote client.

  11. Nondestructive testing methods for 55-gallon, waste storage drums

    SciTech Connect

    Ferris, R.H.; Hildebrand, B.P.; Hockey, R.L.; Riechers, D.M.; Spanner, J.C.; Duncan, D.R.

    1993-06-01

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) authorized Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to conduct a feasibility study to identify promising nondestructive testing (NDT) methods for detecting general and localized (both pitting and pinhole) corrosion in the 55-gal drums that are used to store solid waste materials at the Hanford Site. This document presents results obtained during a literature survey, identifies the relevant reference materials that were reviewed, provides a technical description of the methods that were evaluated, describes the laboratory tests that were conducted and their results, identifies the most promising candidate methods along with the rationale for these selections, and includes a work plan for recommended follow-on activities. This report contains a brief overview and technical description for each of the following NDT methods: magnetic testing techniques; eddy current testing; shearography; ultrasonic testing; radiographic computed tomography; thermography; and leak testing with acoustic detection.

  12. A few nascent methods for measuring mechanical properties of the biological cell.

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, Gayle Echo; de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Corvalan, Carlos; Corwin, Alex David; Campanella, Osvaldo H. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Nivens, David (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Werely, Steven (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Sumali, Anton Hartono; Koch, Steven John

    2006-01-01

    This report summarizes a survey of several new methods for obtaining mechanical and rheological properties of single biological cells, in particular: (1) The use of laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) to measure the natural vibrations of certain cells. (2) The development of a novel micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) for obtaining high-resolution force-displacement curves. (3) The use of the atomic force microscope (AFM) for cell imaging. (4) The adaptation of a novel squeezing-flow technique to micro-scale measurement. The LDV technique was used to investigate the recent finding reported by others that the membranes of certain biological cells vibrate naturally, and that the vibration can be detected clearly with recent instrumentation. The LDV has been reported to detect motions of certain biological cells indirectly through the motion of a probe. In this project, trials on Saccharomyces cerevisiae tested and rejected the hypothesis that the LDV could measure vibrations of the cell membranes directly. The MEMS investigated in the second technique is a polysilicon surface-micromachined force sensor that is able to measure forces to a few pN in both air and water. The simple device consists of compliant springs with force constants as low as 0.3 milliN/m and Moire patterns for nanometer-scale optical displacement measurement. Fields from an electromagnet created forces on magnetic micro beads glued to the force sensors. These forces were measured and agreed well with finite element prediction. It was demonstrated that the force sensor was fully functional when immersed in aqueous buffer. These results show the force sensors can be useful for calibrating magnetic forces on magnetic beads and also for direct measurement of biophysical forces on-chip. The use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) for profiling the geometry of red blood cells was the third technique investigated here. An important finding was that the method commonly used for attaching the cells to a

  13. Phosphorus recycling potential assessment by a biological test applied to wastewater sludge.

    PubMed

    Braak, Etienne; Auby, Sarah; Piveteau, Simon; Guilayn, Felipe; Daumer, Marie-Line

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) recycling as mineral fertilizer from wastewater activated sludge (WAS) depends on the amount that can be dissolved and separated from the organic matter before the final crystallization step. The aim of the biological phosphorus dissolution potential (BPDP) test developed here was to assess the maximum amount of P that could be biologically released from WAS prior that the liquid phase enters the recovery process. It was first developed for sludge combining enhanced biological phosphorus removal and iron chloride. Because carbohydrates are known to induce acidification during the first stage of anaerobic digestion, sucrose was used as a co-substrate. Best results were obtained after 24-48 h, without inoculum, with a sugar/sludge ratio of 0.5 gCOD/gVS and under strict anaerobic conditions. Up to 75% of the total phosphorus in sludge from a wastewater treatment plant combining enhanced biological phosphorus removal and iron chloride phosphorus removal could be dissolved. Finally, the test was applied to assess BPDP from different sludge using alum compounds for P removal. No dissolution was observed when alum polychloride was used and less than 20% when alum sulphate was used. In all the cases, comparison to chemical acidification showed that the biological process was a major contributor to P dissolution. The possibility to crystallize struvite was discussed from the composition of the liquids obtained. The BPDP will be used not only to assess the potential for phosphorus recycling from sludge, but also to study the influence of the co-substrates available for anaerobic digestion of sludge.

  14. Phosphorus recycling potential assessment by a biological test applied to wastewater sludge.

    PubMed

    Braak, Etienne; Auby, Sarah; Piveteau, Simon; Guilayn, Felipe; Daumer, Marie-Line

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) recycling as mineral fertilizer from wastewater activated sludge (WAS) depends on the amount that can be dissolved and separated from the organic matter before the final crystallization step. The aim of the biological phosphorus dissolution potential (BPDP) test developed here was to assess the maximum amount of P that could be biologically released from WAS prior that the liquid phase enters the recovery process. It was first developed for sludge combining enhanced biological phosphorus removal and iron chloride. Because carbohydrates are known to induce acidification during the first stage of anaerobic digestion, sucrose was used as a co-substrate. Best results were obtained after 24-48 h, without inoculum, with a sugar/sludge ratio of 0.5 gCOD/gVS and under strict anaerobic conditions. Up to 75% of the total phosphorus in sludge from a wastewater treatment plant combining enhanced biological phosphorus removal and iron chloride phosphorus removal could be dissolved. Finally, the test was applied to assess BPDP from different sludge using alum compounds for P removal. No dissolution was observed when alum polychloride was used and less than 20% when alum sulphate was used. In all the cases, comparison to chemical acidification showed that the biological process was a major contributor to P dissolution. The possibility to crystallize struvite was discussed from the composition of the liquids obtained. The BPDP will be used not only to assess the potential for phosphorus recycling from sludge, but also to study the influence of the co-substrates available for anaerobic digestion of sludge. PMID:26786893

  15. A supplement to "Methods for collection and analysis of aquatic biological and microbiological samples"

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1979-01-01

    The report contains methods used by the U.S. Geological Survey to collect, preserve, and analyze waters to determine their biological and microbiological properties. It supplements, "Methods for Collection and Analysis of Aquatic Biological and Microbiological Samples" (TWRI, Book 5, Chapter A4, 1977, edited by P. E. Greeson, T. A. Ehlke, G. A. Irwin, B. W. Lium, and K. V. Slack). Included in the supplement are 5 new methods, a new section of selected taxonomic references for Ostracoda, and 6 revised methods.

  16. Isotopic Dilution GC/MS Method for Methionine Determination in Biological Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horj, Elena; Iordache, Andreea; Culea, Monica

    2011-10-01

    The isotopic dilution mass spectrometry technique is the method of choice for sensitive and accurate determination of analytes in biological samples. The aim of this work was to establish a sensitive analytical method for the determination of methionine in different biological media. Quantitation of methionine from the resultant tracer spectrum requires deconvolution of the enrichment of the isotopomers. Deconvolution of the ion abundance ratios to yield tracer-to-tracee ratio for the isotopomer was done using Brauman's least squares approach. Comparison with regression curve calculation method is presented. The method was applied for amino-acids determination in beef, pork and fish meat.

  17. Comparison Between a Rapid Biological Screening Method (EPA 4425) for TCDDs/TCDFs and Chemical Analytical Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Jack W.; Jones, Jennifer M.; McCoy, Daniel L.; Fujita, Akira; Yamamoto, Taichi; Iijima, Satoshi

    2003-08-01

    Seven polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), ten polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) as well as twelve polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are collectively referred to as dioxin-like compounds. The World Health Organization toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) for these persistent chlorinated organic compounds and their measured concentrations are used to produce the toxic equivalency quotient (TEQ) of a sample. TEF values are partially based on a common mechanism involving binding of the chemical to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Biological methods for the determination of TEQs are based on the assumption that all dioxin-related compounds act through the Ah receptor signal transduction pathway. Based on the biochemical response of CYP1A activation via the AhR, in vitro systems that utilize a reporter gene under transcriptional control of CYP1A have been developed. Several investigations have reported on the success of utilizing biological test systems to detect PCDDs, PCDFs, PCBs in environmental samples. The P450 Human Reporter Gene System assay (EPA Method 4425) utilizes a human hepatoma cell line (HepG2) in which a plasmid containing the human CYP1A1 promoter and 5'-flanking sequences with three xenobiotic responsive elements (XREs) fused to the luciferase reporter gene. The enzyme luciferase is produced in the presence of compounds that bind the XREs, and can be detected by a simple assay that measures relative light units with a luminometer. Method 4425, used by Columbia Analytical Services (CAS), has gained acceptance as a rapid and inexpensive approach for screening solvent extracts of environmental samples of soil, sediment, tissue, and water to detect compounds that activate the AhR. Investigations in the U. S. and Japan comparing the results of 4425 and standard high-resolution GC/MS (HRGC/HRMS) will be reported here. The purpose of making these comparisons is to determine if risk assessments for large dioxin sites both before and after remediation

  18. Gamma irradiation: a method to produce an abiotic control for biological activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Stoquart, C; Vázquez-Rodríguez, G A; Servais, P; Barbeau, B

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the feasibility of using gamma irradiation to inhibit the microbial activity of biological powder activated carbon (PAC) without impacting its adsorptive properties. First of all, the range of dose of gamma rays required to produce abiotic PAC was selected on the basis of heterotrophic plate counts (HPC) inactivation and methylene blue (MB) adsorption kinetics. Doses inferior to 10 kGy were not sufficient to inhibit the culture of heterotrophic bacteria. On the other hand, doses superior to 15 kGy were demonstrated to affect the adsorption rate of MB. Consequently, a dose comprised between 10 and 15 kGy was selected for further investigation. In order to validate the adequacy of the range of dose (i.e. 10-15 kGy), adsorption characteristics were tested by monitoring the removal kinetics of refractory dissolved organic carbon (RDOC). No significant differences were observed between irradiated and non-irradiated biological PAC for the adsorption of RDOC. Irradiated, non-irradiated and virgin PAC were also evaluated in terms of abundance of viable (using the LIVE/DEAD BacLight method) bacteria and in terms of heterotrophic biomass activity. The results of the BacLight method demonstrated that attachment of the biofilm on the PAC was not impacted by the irradiation and heterotrophic activity measurements demonstrated that the latter could be radically reduced in the range of dose selected. In conclusion, when using a proper dose, the gamma irradiation of colonized activated carbon drastically reduced the heterotrophic activity on activated carbon without significantly impacting its adsorptive behaviour. PMID:24617066

  19. A validated HPTLC method for determination of terbutaline sulfate in biological samples: Application to pharmacokinetic study

    PubMed Central

    Faiyazuddin, Md.; Rauf, Abdul; Ahmad, Niyaz; Ahmad, Sayeed; Iqbal, Zeenat; Talegaonkar, Sushma; Bhatnagar, Aseem; Khar, Roop K.; Ahmad, Farhan J.

    2011-01-01

    Terbutaline sulfate (TBS) was assayed in biological samples by validated HPTLC method. Densitometric analysis of TBS was carried out at 366 nm on precoated TLC aluminum plates with silica gel 60F254 as a stationary phase and chloroform–methanol (9.0:1.0, v/v) as a mobile phase. TBS was well resolved at RF 0.34 ± 0.02. In all matrices, the calibration curve appeared linear (r2 ⩾ 0.9943) in the tested range of 100–1000 ng spot−1 with a limit of quantification of 18.35 ng spot−1. Drug recovery from biological fluids averaged ⩾95.92%. In both matrices, rapid degradation of drug favored and the T0.5 of drug ranged from 9.92 to 12.41 h at 4 °C and from 6.31 to 9.13 h at 20 °C. Frozen at −20 °C, this drug was stable for at least 2 months (without losses >10%). The maximum plasma concentration (Cpmax) was found to be 5875.03 ± 114 ng mL−1, which is significantly higher than the maximum saliva concentration (Csmax, 1501.69 ± 96 ng mL−1). Therefore, the validated method could be used to carry out pharmacokinetic studies of the TBS from novel drug delivery systems. PMID:23960758

  20. Gamma irradiation: a method to produce an abiotic control for biological activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Stoquart, C; Vázquez-Rodríguez, G A; Servais, P; Barbeau, B

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the feasibility of using gamma irradiation to inhibit the microbial activity of biological powder activated carbon (PAC) without impacting its adsorptive properties. First of all, the range of dose of gamma rays required to produce abiotic PAC was selected on the basis of heterotrophic plate counts (HPC) inactivation and methylene blue (MB) adsorption kinetics. Doses inferior to 10 kGy were not sufficient to inhibit the culture of heterotrophic bacteria. On the other hand, doses superior to 15 kGy were demonstrated to affect the adsorption rate of MB. Consequently, a dose comprised between 10 and 15 kGy was selected for further investigation. In order to validate the adequacy of the range of dose (i.e. 10-15 kGy), adsorption characteristics were tested by monitoring the removal kinetics of refractory dissolved organic carbon (RDOC). No significant differences were observed between irradiated and non-irradiated biological PAC for the adsorption of RDOC. Irradiated, non-irradiated and virgin PAC were also evaluated in terms of abundance of viable (using the LIVE/DEAD BacLight method) bacteria and in terms of heterotrophic biomass activity. The results of the BacLight method demonstrated that attachment of the biofilm on the PAC was not impacted by the irradiation and heterotrophic activity measurements demonstrated that the latter could be radically reduced in the range of dose selected. In conclusion, when using a proper dose, the gamma irradiation of colonized activated carbon drastically reduced the heterotrophic activity on activated carbon without significantly impacting its adsorptive behaviour.

  1. Insects as test systems for assessing the potential role of microgravity in biological development and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernós, I.; Carratalá, M.; González-Jurado, J.; Valverde, J. R.; Calleja, M.; Domingo, A.; Vinós, J.; Cervera, M.; Marco, R.

    Gravity and radiation are undoubtedly the two major environmental factors altered in space. Gravity is a weak force, which creates a permanent potential field acting on the mass of biological systems and their cellular components, strongly reduced in space flights. Developmental systems, particularly at very early stages, provide the larger cellular compartments known, where the effects of alterations in the size of the gravity vector on living organisms can be more effectively tested. The insects, one of the more highly evolved classes of animals in which early development occurs in a syncytial embryo, are systems particularly well suited to test these effects and the specific developmental mechanisms affected. Furthermore, they share some basic features such as small size, short life cycles, relatively high radio-resistance, etc. and show a diversity of developmental strategies and tempos advantageous in experiments of this type in space. Drosophila melanogaster, the current biological paradigm to study development, with so much genetic and evolutionary background available, is clearly the reference organism for these studies. The current evidence on the effects of the physical parameters altered in space flights on insect development indicate a surprising correlation between effects seen on the fast developing and relatively small Drosophila embryo and the more slowly developing and large Carausius morosus system. In relation to the issue of the importance of developmental and environmental constraints in biological evolution, still the missing link in current evolutionary thinking, insects and space facilities for long-term experiments could provide useful experimental settings where to critically assess how development and evolution may be interconnected. Finally, it has to be pointed out that since there are experimental data indicating a possible synergism between microgravity and space radiation, possible effects of space radiation should be taken into

  2. The Iosipescu shear test method as used for testing polymers and composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Donald F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a shear test method for polymers and composite materials, based on the Iosipescu (1967) shear test which was originally developed for use with homogeneous isotropic metals. Special attention is given to the loading fixture for the test, the standard specimen design and shear stress measurements. The range of the test applications is indicated. The method is in the final stages of being accepted as an ASTM standard.

  3. 40 CFR Appendix Ix to Part 268 - Extraction Procedure (EP) Toxicity Test Method and Structural Integrity Test (Method 1310B)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Extraction Procedure (EP) Toxicity Test Method and Structural Integrity Test (Method 1310B) IX Appendix IX to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS...

  4. A mathematical model for the interpretation of nuclear bomb test derived 14C incorporation in biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Samuel; Frisén, Jonas; Spalding, Kirsty L.

    2010-04-01

    Human tissues continually replace dying cells with newborn cells. However, the rate of renewal varies by orders of magnitudes between blood cells, which are renewed every day and neurons, for which renewal is non-existent or limited to specific regions of the brain. Between those extreme are many tissues that turnover on a time scale of years, although no direct measurements have been done. We present here a mathematical method to estimate cell turnover in slowly renewing biological systems. Age distribution of DNA can be estimated from the integration of radiocarbon derived from nuclear bomb-testing during the cold war (1955-1963). For slowly renewing tissues, this method provides a better estimate of the average age of the tissue than direct estimates from the bomb-curve. Moreover, death, birth and turnover rates can be estimated. We highlight this method with data from human fat cells.

  5. Quantum chemical methods for the investigation of photoinitiated processes in biological systems: theory and applications.

    PubMed

    Dreuw, Andreas

    2006-11-13

    With the advent of modern computers and advances in the development of efficient quantum chemical computer codes, the meaningful computation of large molecular systems at a quantum mechanical level became feasible. Recent experimental effort to understand photoinitiated processes in biological systems, for instance photosynthesis or vision, at a molecular level also triggered theoretical investigations in this field. In this Minireview, standard quantum chemical methods are presented that are applicable and recently used for the calculation of excited states of photoinitiated processes in biological molecular systems. These methods comprise configuration interaction singles, the complete active space self-consistent field method, and time-dependent density functional theory and its variants. Semiempirical approaches are also covered. Their basic theoretical concepts and mathematical equations are briefly outlined, and their properties and limitations are discussed. Recent successful applications of the methods to photoinitiated processes in biological systems are described and theoretical tools for the analysis of excited states are presented.

  6. [Application of systems biology method in the research of traditional Chinese medicine].

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Yang, Li-Ping

    2008-05-01

    Systems biology is a new science of the 21st century, which resembles traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in many aspects such as study method and design. Adoption of systems biology approach would do much help for exploring the scientific connotation of TCM syndrome and the modernization of Chinese herbal medicine. Its technological platforms, such as genomics, proteomics and metabonomics, provide powerful tools for the study of the essence of TCM syndrome and the function of herbal compound recipe. Compared with other molecular biological methods, such as genomics and proteomics, metabonomics method is more direct and more concise, especially for providing an effective method for the study of TCM therapy in preventing and treating kidney diseases.

  7. 40 CFR 63.945 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) The test shall be conducted in accordance with the procedures specified in Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60... criteria of Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A, except the instrument response factor criteria in... shall be calibrated before use on each day of its use by the procedures specified in Method 21 of 40...

  8. 40 CFR 60.725 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Surface Coating: Surface Coating of Plastic Parts for Business Machines § 60.725 Test methods and... of each coating as received. (2) For Method 24, the sample must be at least a 1-liter sample in a 1-liter container. (b) Other methods may be used to determine the VOC content of each coating if...

  9. 40 CFR 60.725 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Surface Coating: Surface Coating of Plastic Parts for Business Machines § 60.725 Test methods and... of each coating as received. (2) For Method 24, the sample must be at least a 1-liter sample in a 1-liter container. (b) Other methods may be used to determine the VOC content of each coating if...

  10. 40 CFR 75.22 - Reference test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... volumetric flow. (3) Methods 3, 3A, or 3B are the reference methods for the determination of the dry... are produced in accordance with method 205 in Appendix M of 40 CFR Part 51; (ii) The sampling point... emissions from stationary gas turbines for testing under appendix E to this part. (7) ASTM...

  11. 40 CFR 60.547 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... sampling times or smaller volumes, when necessitated by process variables or other factors, may be approved... of any test by Method 25. For Method 25, the sampling time for each of three runs shall be at least 1 hour. Method 1 shall be used to select the sampling site, and the sampling point shall be the...

  12. 40 CFR 60.547 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... sampling times or smaller volumes, when necessitated by process variables or other factors, may be approved... of any test by Method 25. For Method 25, the sampling time for each of three runs shall be at least 1 hour. Method 1 shall be used to select the sampling site, and the sampling point shall be the...

  13. 40 CFR 63.945 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) The test shall be conducted in accordance with the procedures specified in Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60... criteria of Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A, except the instrument response factor criteria in section 3.1.2(a) of Method 21 shall be for the average composition of the organic constituents in...

  14. 40 CFR 63.945 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) The test shall be conducted in accordance with the procedures specified in Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60... criteria of Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A, except the instrument response factor criteria in section 3.1.2(a) of Method 21 shall be for the average composition of the organic constituents in...

  15. 40 CFR 63.1046 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) National Emission Standards for Oil-Water Separators and Organic-Water Separators § 63.1046 Test methods... Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A. Each potential leak interface (i.e., a location where organic... instrument shall meet the performance criteria of Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A, except...

  16. 40 CFR 63.1046 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) National Emission Standards for Oil-Water Separators and Organic-Water Separators § 63.1046 Test methods... Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A. Each potential leak interface (i.e., a location where organic... instrument shall meet the performance criteria of Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A, except...

  17. Methods for collection and analysis of aquatic biological and microbiological samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greeson, Phillip E., (Edited By); Ehlke, T.A.; Irwin, G.A.; Lium, B.W.; Slack, K.V.

    1977-01-01

    Chapter A4 contains methods used by the U.S. Geological Survey to collect, preserve, and analyze waters to determine their biological and microbiological properties. Part 1 discusses biological sampling and sampling statistics. The statistical procedures are accompanied by examples. Part 2 consists of detailed descriptions of more than 45 individual methods, including those for bacteria, phytoplankton, zooplankton, seston, periphyton, macrophytes, benthic invertebrates, fish and other vertebrates, cellular contents, productivity, and bioassays. Each method is summarized, and the application, interferences, apparatus, reagents, collection, analysis, calculations, reporting of results, precision and references are given. Part 3 consists of a glossary. Part 4 is a list of taxonomic references.

  18. Test method to measure resistance towards fragmentation by studded tires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viman, L.

    1995-01-01

    In the Nordic countries most cars are equipped with studded tires during the winter. The studs increase the wear on the road surfaces and a special test method has been developed to measure the aggregates' resistance towards fragmentation by studded tires. The method has proven to correlate very well with the actual wear on the road surfaces. The Nordic countries Sweden, Norway and Finland have agreed to propose this method as a European Standard test method. One reason is to be able to set requirements on aggregates to be used in countries where studded tires are allowed. A cross-testing project regarding this Nordic abrasion test for studded tires was set up in order to determine the repeatability and the reproducibility of the methods to become European Standard.

  19. A Method to Identify and Analyze Biological Programs through Automated Reasoning

    PubMed Central

    Kugler, Hillel; Smith, Austin; Martello, Graziano; Emmott, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Predictive biology is elusive because rigorous, data-constrained, mechanistic models of complex biological systems are difficult to derive and validate. Current approaches tend to construct and examine static interaction network models, which are descriptively rich but often lack explanatory and predictive power, or dynamic models that can be simulated to reproduce known behavior. However, in such approaches implicit assumptions are introduced as typically only one mechanism is considered, and exhaustively investigating all scenarios is impractical using simulation. To address these limitations, we present a methodology based on automated formal reasoning, which permits the synthesis and analysis of the complete set of logical models consistent with experimental observations. We test hypotheses against all candidate models, and remove the need for simulation by characterizing and simultaneously analyzing all mechanistic explanations of observed behavior. Our methodology transforms knowledge of complex biological processes from sets of possible interactions and experimental observations to precise, predictive biological programs governing cell function. PMID:27668090

  20. A Method to Identify and Analyze Biological Programs through Automated Reasoning

    PubMed Central

    Kugler, Hillel; Smith, Austin; Martello, Graziano; Emmott, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Predictive biology is elusive because rigorous, data-constrained, mechanistic models of complex biological systems are difficult to derive and validate. Current approaches tend to construct and examine static interaction network models, which are descriptively rich but often lack explanatory and predictive power, or dynamic models that can be simulated to reproduce known behavior. However, in such approaches implicit assumptions are introduced as typically only one mechanism is considered, and exhaustively investigating all scenarios is impractical using simulation. To address these limitations, we present a methodology based on automated formal reasoning, which permits the synthesis and analysis of the complete set of logical models consistent with experimental observations. We test hypotheses against all candidate models, and remove the need for simulation by characterizing and simultaneously analyzing all mechanistic explanations of observed behavior. Our methodology transforms knowledge of complex biological processes from sets of possible interactions and experimental observations to precise, predictive biological programs governing cell function.

  1. Accelerated Test Method for Corrosion Protective Coatings Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falker, John; Zeitlin, Nancy; Calle, Luz

    2015-01-01

    This project seeks to develop a new accelerated corrosion test method that predicts the long-term corrosion protection performance of spaceport structure coatings as accurately and reliably as current long-term atmospheric exposure tests. This new accelerated test method will shorten the time needed to evaluate the corrosion protection performance of coatings for NASA's critical ground support structures. Lifetime prediction for spaceport structure coatings has a 5-year qualification cycle using atmospheric exposure. Current accelerated corrosion tests often provide false positives and negatives for coating performance, do not correlate to atmospheric corrosion exposure results, and do not correlate with atmospheric exposure timescales for lifetime prediction.

  2. [Method of Entirely Parallel Differential Evolution for Model Adaptation in Systems Biology].

    PubMed

    Kozlov, K N; Samsonov, A M; Samsonova, M G

    2015-01-01

    We developed a method of entirely parallel differential evolution for identification of unknown parameters of mathematical models by minimization of the objective function that describes the discrepancy of the model solution and the experimental data. The method is implemented in the free and open source software available on the Internet. The method demonstrated a good performance comparable to the top three methods from CEC-2014 and was successfully applied to several biological problems.

  3. Cancer biology, toxicology and alternative methods development go hand-in-hand.

    PubMed

    Kohonen, Pekka; Ceder, Rebecca; Smit, Ines; Hongisto, Vesa; Myatt, Glenn; Hardy, Barry; Spjuth, Ola; Grafström, Roland

    2014-07-01

    Toxicological research faces the challenge of integrating knowledge from diverse fields and novel technological developments generally in the biological and medical sciences. We discuss herein the fact that the multiple facets of cancer research, including discovery related to mechanisms, treatment and diagnosis, overlap many up and coming interest areas in toxicology, including the need for improved methods and analysis tools. Common to both disciplines, in vitro and in silico methods serve as alternative investigation routes to animal studies. Knowledge on cancer development helps in understanding the relevance of chemical toxicity studies in cell models, and many bioinformatics-based cancer biomarker discovery tools are also applicable to computational toxicology. Robotics-aided, cell-based, high-throughput screening, microscale immunostaining techniques and gene expression profiling analyses are common tools in cancer research, and when sequentially combined, form a tiered approach to structured safety evaluation of thousands of environmental agents, novel chemicals or engineered nanomaterials. Comprehensive tumour data collections in databases have been translated into clinically useful data, and this concept serves as template for computer-driven evaluation of toxicity data into meaningful results. Future 'cancer research-inspired knowledge management' of toxicological data will aid the translation of basic discovery results and chemicals- and materials-testing data to information relevant to human health and environmental safety.

  4. Fire test method for graphite fiber reinforced plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, K. J.

    1980-01-01

    A potential problem in the use of graphite fiber reinforced resin matrix composites is the dispersal of graphite fibers during accidental fires. Airborne, electrically conductive fibers originating from the burning composites could enter and cause shorting in electrical equipment located in surrounding areas. A test method for assessing the burning characteristics of graphite fiber reinforced composites and the effectiveness of the composites in retaining the graphite fibers has been developed. The method utilizes a modified Ohio State University Rate of Heat Release apparatus. The equipment and the testing procedure are described. The application of the test method to the assessment of composite materials is illustrated for two resin matrix/graphite composite systems.

  5. Residual flexibility test method for verification of constrained structural models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Admire, John R.; Tinker, Michael L.; Ivey, Edward W.

    1992-01-01

    A method is presented for deriving constrained modes and frequencies from a model correlated to a set of free-free test modes and a set of measured residual flexibilities. The method involves a simple modification of the MacNeal and Rubin component mode representation to allow verification of a constrained structural model. Results for two spaceflight structures show quick convergence of constrained modes using an easily measurable set of free-free modes plus the residual flexibility matrix or its boundary partition. This paper further validates the residual flexibility approach as an alternative test/analysis method when fixed-base testing proves impractical.

  6. BSAC standardized disc susceptibility testing method (version 11).

    PubMed

    Howe, R A; Andrews, J M

    2012-12-01

    This article highlights key amendments incorporated into version 11 of the BSAC standardized disc susceptibility testing method, available as Supplementary data at JAC Online (http://jac.oxfordjournals.org/) and on the BSAC web site (http://bsac.org.uk/susceptibility/guidelines-standardized-disc-susceptibility-testing-method/). The basic disc susceptibility testing method remains unchanged, but there have been a number of alterations to the interpretive criteria for certain organism/drug combinations due to continuing harmonization with the EUCAST MIC breakpoints and constant efforts to improve the reliability and clinical applicability of the guidance.

  7. Fire test method for graphite fiber reinforced plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, K. J.

    1980-01-01

    A potential problem in the use of graphite fiber reinforced resin matrix composites is the dispersal of graphite fibers during accidential fires. Airborne, electrically conductive fibers originating from the burning composites could enter and cause shorting in electrical equipment located in surrounding areas. A test method for assessing the burning characteristics of graphite fiber reinforced composites and the effectiveness of the composites in retaining the graphite fibers has been developed. The method utilizes a modified rate of heat release apparatus. The equipment and the testing procedure are described. The application of the test method to the assessment of composite materials is illustrated for two resin matrix/graphite composite systems.

  8. Glossary (for Measuring and Monitoring Biological Diversity: Standard Methods for Fungi)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Approximately 300 technical terms and 250 diagrammatic sketches and illustrations are provided for the Smithsonian Institution methods book, ‘Measuring and Monitoring Biological Diversity: Standard Methods for Fungi.’ Technical terms focus on traditional morphotaxonomy, ecology, and pathology. Als...

  9. Stereological methods in cell biology: where are we--where are we going?

    PubMed

    Weibel, E R

    1981-09-01

    The current state of the art in morphometric cell biology is reviewed by looking at the developmental state of stereological methods, and at the approaches used to arrive at quantitative structure-function correlation. Stereological methods have reached a fairly advanced level of sophistication since mathematical stereology has been developed as a branch of geometric probability theory. The application of these methods in cell biology lags behind, both quantitatively and qualitatively. Among the strategies used in exploiting stereological methods in cell biology the physiological approach (where a change is induced experimentally and its effect on the cells is followed by biochemical and morphometric methods) ranks highest and is still valid. More analytical approaches, such as combining stereology and biochemistry in cell fraction studies, are fraught with difficulties. In considering future developments of stereological methods, the emphasis will have to be 1) on developing procedures for eliminating biases such as section thickness or resolution effects, and 2) on increasing the efficiency of the methods by better sampling rules and improved instrumentation. The future trends in morphometric cell biology might best be served by exploiting the potentials of histochemistry and stereology by combining them with a view to 1) establishing procedures for cell-specific sampling and 2) developing methods towards "molecular morphometry" on the basis of immunocytochemical labeling.

  10. Biological and analytical variations of 16 parameters related to coagulation screening tests and the activity of coagulation factors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Shou, Weiling; Wu, Wei; Guo, Ye; Zhang, Yujuan; Huang, Chunmei; Cui, Wei

    2015-04-01

    To accurately estimate longitudinal changes in individuals, it is important to take into consideration the biological variability of the measurement. The few studies available on the biological variations of coagulation parameters are mostly outdated. We confirmed the published results using modern, fully automated methods. Furthermore, we added data for additional coagulation parameters. At 8:00 am, 12:00 pm, and 4:00 pm on days 1, 3, and 5, venous blood was collected from 31 healthy volunteers. A total of 16 parameters related to coagulation screening tests as well as the activity of coagulation factors were analyzed; these included prothrombin time, fibrinogen (Fbg), activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, international normalized ratio, prothrombin time activity, activated partial thromboplastin time ratio, fibrin(-ogen) degradation products, as well as the activity of factor II, factor V, factor VII, factor VIII, factor IX, and factor X. All intraindividual coefficients of variation (CVI) values for the parameters of the screening tests (except Fbg) were less than 5%. Conversely, the CVI values for the activity of coagulation factors were all greater than 5%. In addition, we calculated the reference change value to determine whether a significant difference exists between two test results from the same individual.

  11. Ergometer error and biological variation in power output in a performance test with three cycle ergometers.

    PubMed

    Paton, C D; Hopkins, W G

    2006-06-01

    When physical performance is monitored with an ergometer, random error arising from the ergometer combines with biological variation from the subject to limit the precision of estimation of performance changes. We report here the contributions of ergometer error and biological variation to the error of measurement in a performance test with two popular cycle ergometers (air-braked Kingcycle, mobile SRM crankset) and a relatively new inexpensive mobile ergometer (PowerTap hub). Eleven well-trained male cyclists performed a familiarization trial followed by three 5-min time trials within 2 wk on a racing cycle fitted with the SRM and PowerTap and mounted on the Kingcycle. Mean power output in each trial was recorded with all ergometers simultaneously. A novel analysis using mixed modelling of log-transformed mean power provided estimates of the standard error of measurement as a coefficient of variation and its components arising from the ergometer and the cyclists. The usual errors of measurement were: Kingcycle 2.2 %, PowerTap 1.5 %, and SRM 1.6 % (90 % confidence limits +/- 1.3). The components of these errors arising purely from the ergometers and the cyclists were: Kingcycle 1.8 %, PowerTap 0.9 %, SRM 1.1 %, and cyclists 1.2 % (+/- 1.5). Thus, ergometer errors and biological variation made substantial contributions to the usual error of measurement. Use of the best ergometers and of test protocols that reduce biological variation would improve monitoring of the small changes that matter to elite athletes.

  12. Membrane materials for storing biological samples intended for comparative nanotoxicological testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metelkin, A.; Kuznetsov, D.; Kolesnikov, E.; Chuprunov, K.; Kondakov, S.; Osipov, A.; Samsonova, J.

    2015-11-01

    The study is aimed at identifying the samples of most promising membrane materials for storing dry specimens of biological fluids (Dried Blood Spots, DBS technology). Existing sampling systems using cellulose fiber filter paper have a number of drawbacks such as uneven distribution of the sample spot, dependence of the spot spreading area on the individual biosample properties, incomplete washing-off of the sample due to partially inconvertible sorption of blood components on cellulose fibers, etc. Samples of membrane materials based on cellulose, polymers and glass fiber with applied biosamples were studied using methods of scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy and surface-wetting measurement. It was discovered that cellulose-based membrane materials sorb components of biological fluids inside their structure, while membranes based on glass fiber display almost no interaction with the samples and biological fluid components dry to films in the membrane pores between the structural fibers. This characteristic, together with the fact that membrane materials based on glass fiber possess sufficient strength, high wetting properties and good storage capacity, attests them as promising material for dry samples of biological fluids storage systems.

  13. [Data on the identification of staphylococci of hospital origin. Report 2. Method of biological typing of S. epidermis].

    PubMed

    Akatov, A K; Khatenever, M L

    1976-02-01

    In accordance with the principles of numerical taxonomy the authors elaborated a new method of biological typing of S. epidermidis strains of hospital origin based on the use of 5 tests (gelatinase, hemolysis, lecithinase, phosphatase, lysozyme). The suggested scheme includes 5 biotypes. In typing 690 S. epidermidis strains it was revealed that 47.5% belonged to biotype 1,14.4% - to type 2,11.2% - to type 3,7.7% - to type 4,14.5% - to type 5, and 4.7% were nontyping strains. The suggested scheme permitted better differentiation of the cultures under study than methods of biological typing suggested earlier by foreign authors. The new scheme requires wide approbation. PMID:773061

  14. Evaluation of Gene Association Methods for Coexpression Network Construction and Biological Knowledge Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Sapna; Nie, Jeff; Chen, Huann-Sheng; Ma, Hao; Stewart, Ron; Li, Xiang; Lu, Meng-Zhu; Taylor, William M.; Wei, Hairong

    2012-01-01

    Background Constructing coexpression networks and performing network analysis using large-scale gene expression data sets is an effective way to uncover new biological knowledge; however, the methods used for gene association in constructing these coexpression networks have not been thoroughly evaluated. Since different methods lead to structurally different coexpression networks and provide different information, selecting the optimal gene association method is critical. Methods and Results In this study, we compared eight gene association methods – Spearman rank correlation, Weighted Rank Correlation, Kendall, Hoeffding's D measure, Theil-Sen, Rank Theil-Sen, Distance Covariance, and Pearson – and focused on their true knowledge discovery rates in associating pathway genes and construction coordination networks of regulatory genes. We also examined the behaviors of different methods to microarray data with different properties, and whether the biological processes affect the efficiency of different methods. Conclusions We found that the Spearman, Hoeffding and Kendall methods are effective in identifying coexpressed pathway genes, whereas the Theil-sen, Rank Theil-Sen, Spearman, and Weighted Rank methods perform well in identifying coordinated transcription factors that control the same biological processes and traits. Surprisingly, the widely used Pearson method is generally less efficient, and so is the Distance Covariance method that can find gene pairs of multiple relationships. Some analyses we did clearly show Pearson and Distance Covariance methods have distinct behaviors as compared to all other six methods. The efficiencies of different methods vary with the data properties to some degree and are largely contingent upon the biological processes, which necessitates the pre-analysis to identify the best performing method for gene association and coexpression network construction. PMID:23226279

  15. Linking experimental results, biological networks and sequence analysis methods using Ontologies and Generalised Data Structures.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Jacob; Rawlings, Chris; Verrier, Paul; Mitchell, Rowan; Skusa, Andre; Ruegg, Alexander; Philippi, Stephan

    2005-01-01

    The structure of a closely integrated data warehouse is described that is designed to link different types and varying numbers of biological networks, sequence analysis methods and experimental results such as those coming from microarrays. The data schema is inspired by a combination of graph based methods and generalised data structures and makes use of ontologies and meta-data. The core idea is to consider and store biological networks as graphs, and to use generalised data structures (GDS) for the storage of further relevant information. This is possible because many biological networks can be stored as graphs: protein interactions, signal transduction networks, metabolic pathways, gene regulatory networks etc. Nodes in biological graphs represent entities such as promoters, proteins, genes and transcripts whereas the edges of such graphs specify how the nodes are related. The semantics of the nodes and edges are defined using ontologies of node and relation types. Besides generic attributes that most biological entities possess (name, attribute description), further information is stored using generalised data structures. By directly linking to underlying sequences (exons, introns, promoters, amino acid sequences) in a systematic way, close interoperability to sequence analysis methods can be achieved. This approach allows us to store, query and update a wide variety of biological information in a way that is semantically compact without requiring changes at the database schema level when new kinds of biological information is added. We describe how this datawarehouse is being implemented by extending the text-mining framework ONDEX to link, support and complement different bioinformatics applications and research activities such as microarray analysis, sequence analysis and modelling/simulation of biological systems. The system is developed under the GPL license and can be downloaded from http://sourceforge.net/projects/ondex/

  16. [Methods for sampling, collecting, preserving and carrying materials for parasitic tests (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Penna, R

    1977-01-01

    A review is made of the methods of sampling, collecting, preserving and carrying materials to search directly (by microscopical, cultural or biological tests) the most common human parasites: protozoa, helminths and arthropods, with some references of indirect, specific (immunological) and aspecific (hematological, biochemical, immunochemical) procedures to search signs of parasitoses. The aim of this paper is to propose a standardization of these procedures for protozoa, helminth and arthropod infections. PMID:356770

  17. Biological properties of carbon powders synthesized using chemical vapour deposition and detonation methods.

    PubMed

    Batory, M; Batory, D; Grabarczyk, J; Kaczorowski, W; Kupcewicz, B; Mitura, K; Nasti, T H; Yusuf, N; Niedzielski, P

    2012-12-01

    Carbon powders can be synthesized using variety of CVD and detonation methods. Several interesting properties of carbon powder particles make them a very attractive material examined in many laboratories all over the world. However there is a lack of information discussing investigation of carbon powders directed to its application in pharmaceutical-cosmetic industry and medicine. Earlier investigation results proved that diamond powders present properties fighting free radicals. Presented work discusses the influence of carbon powder particles manufactured using MW/RF PACVD, RF PACVD and detonation methods onto hydro-lipid skin coat. Before the biological examinations physicochemical properties of carbon powders were determined. Grain size, shape and chemical composition of carbon powders were determined using the scanning electron microscopy. Surface functional groups were characterized by IR Fourier-transform spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Structure and phase composition were investigated by means of the Raman spectroscopy. Results of allergy tests performed on laboratory mice proved that carbon powder particles synthesized using different methods do not cause allergy. In the following stage, the group of 20 patients applied the formula including carbon powder on their face skin. The influence of carbon powder onto hydro-lipid skin coat was determined by measurement of such parameters as: pH reaction, skin temperature, lipid fotometry and level of hydration. Additionally, macro pictures of places where the cream had been applied were registered. As the result of the investigation it was found that powders synthesized using various methods present different physicochemical properties which may individually affect the face skin parameters. The noticeable improvement of hydro-lipid skin coat kilter was observed. PMID:23447955

  18. Inquiry-based laboratory investigations and student performance on standardized tests in biological science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patke, Usha

    Achievement data from the 3rd International Mathematics and Sciences Study and Program for International Student Assessment in science have indicated that Black students from economically disadvantaged families underachieve at alarming rates in comparison to White and economically advantaged peer groups. The study site was a predominately Black, urban school district experiencing underachievement. The purpose of this correlational study was to examine the relationship between students' use of inquiry-based laboratory investigations and their performance on the Biology End of Course Test, as well as to examine the relationship while partialling out the effects of student gender. Constructivist theory formed the theoretical foundation of the study. Students' perceived levels of experience with inquiry-based laboratory investigations were measured using the Laboratory Program Variable Inventory (LPVI) survey. LPVI scores of 256 students were correlated with test scores and were examined by student gender. The Pearson correlation coefficient revealed a small direct correlation between students' experience in inquiry-based laboratory investigation classes and standardized test scores on the Biology EOCT. A partial correlational analysis indicated that the correlation remained after controlling for gender. This study may prompt a change from teacher-centered to student-centered pedagogy at the local site in order to increase academic achievement for all students. The results of this study may also influence administrators and policy makers to initiate local, state, or nationwide curricular development. A change in curriculum may promote social change as students become more competent, and more able, to succeed in life beyond secondary school.

  19. Assessment of a multi-assay biological diagnostic test for mood disorders in a Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Yamamori, Hidenaga; Ishima, Tamaki; Yasuda, Yuka; Fujimoto, Michiko; Kudo, Noriko; Ohi, Kazutaka; Hashimoto, Kenji; Takeda, Masatoshi; Hashimoto, Ryota

    2016-01-26

    The current diagnostic tests for mood disorders, including major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD), have limitations. Inflammatory markers, growth factors, and oxidative stress markers are involved in the pathophysiology of mood disorders. A multi-assay biological diagnostic test combining these biomarkers might improve diagnostic efficiency. The plasma levels of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (sTNFR2), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and myeloperoxidase were measured in 40 MDD patients, 40 BD patients and 40 controls in a Japanese population. We also investigated the plasma levels of these markers in 40 patients with schizophrenia to determine the utility of these markers in differential diagnosis. The plasma levels of sTNFR2 were significantly higher in BD and schizophrenia patients than in controls. The plasma levels of EGF and myeloperoxidase were significantly higher in patients with BD than in controls. The correct classification rate obtained from discriminant analysis with sTNFR2 and EGF between controls and mood disorders was 69.2%, with a sensitivity and specificity of 62.5% and 82.5%, respectively. The correct classification rate obtained from discriminant analysis with sTNFR2 and EGF between controls and BD was 85.0%, with a sensitivity and specificity of 77.6% and 92.5%, respectively. Our results suggest that sTNFR2 and EGF could be biological markers of BD. Further studies are needed to determine the utility of these markers in diagnostic tests for mood disorders. PMID:26687272

  20. An Alternative Method Of Specifying Shock Test Criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferebee, R. C.; Clayton, J.; Alldredge, D.; Irvine, T.

    2008-01-01

    Shock testing of aerospace vehicle hardware has presented many challenges over the years due to the high magnitude and short duration of the specifications. Recently, component structural failures have occurred during testing that have not manifested themselves on over 200 Space Shuttle solid rocket booster (SRB) flights (two boosters per flight). It is suspected that the method of specifying shock test criteria may be leaving important information out of the test process. The traditional test criteria specification, the shock response spectrum, can be duplicated by any number of waveforms that may not resemble the actual flight test recorded time history. One method of overcoming this limitation is described herein, which may prove useful for qualifying hardware for the upcoming Constellation Program.

  1. 16 CFR 1610.3 - Summary of test method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... provides methods of testing the flammability of textiles from or intended to be used for apparel... surface, and held in a special apparatus at an angle of 45°. A standardized flame shall be applied to...

  2. 16 CFR 1610.3 - Summary of test method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... provides methods of testing the flammability of textiles from or intended to be used for apparel... surface, and held in a special apparatus at an angle of 45°. A standardized flame shall be applied to...

  3. 16 CFR 1610.3 - Summary of test method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... provides methods of testing the flammability of textiles from or intended to be used for apparel... surface, and held in a special apparatus at an angle of 45°. A standardized flame shall be applied to...

  4. 16 CFR 1610.3 - Summary of test method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... provides methods of testing the flammability of textiles from or intended to be used for apparel... surface, and held in a special apparatus at an angle of 45°. A standardized flame shall be applied to...

  5. 40 CFR 61.137 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Emissions from Coke By-Product Recovery Plants § 61.137 Test methods and procedures. (a) Each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart shall comply with the requirements in § 61.245 of 40...

  6. 40 CFR 61.137 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Emissions from Coke By-Product Recovery Plants § 61.137 Test methods and procedures. (a) Each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart shall comply with the requirements in § 61.245 of 40...

  7. 40 CFR 61.137 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Emissions from Coke By-Product Recovery Plants § 61.137 Test methods and procedures. (a) Each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart shall comply with the requirements in § 61.245 of 40...

  8. 40 CFR 61.137 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Emissions from Coke By-Product Recovery Plants § 61.137 Test methods and procedures. (a) Each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart shall comply with the requirements in § 61.245 of 40...

  9. 40 CFR 61.137 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Emissions from Coke By-Product Recovery Plants § 61.137 Test methods and procedures. (a) Each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart shall comply with the requirements in § 61.245 of 40...

  10. Youden test application in robustness assays during method validation.

    PubMed

    Karageorgou, Eftichia; Samanidou, Victoria

    2014-08-01

    Analytical method validation is a vital step following method development for ensuring reliable and accurate method performance. Among examined figures of merit, robustness/ruggedness study allows us to test performance characteristics of the analytical process when operating conditions are altered either deliberately or not. This study yields useful information, being a fundamental part of method validation. Since many experiments are required, this step is high demanding in time and consumables. In order to avoid the difficult task of performing too many experiments the Youden test which makes use of fractional factorial designs and has been proved to be a very effective approach. The main advantage of Youden test is the fact that it keeps the required time and effort to a minimum, since only a limited number of determinations have to be made, using combinations of the chosen investigated factors. Typical applications of this robustness test found in literature covering a wide variety of sample matrices are briefly discussed in this review.

  11. Comparison of bulk sediment and sediment elutriate toxicity testing methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elutriate bioassays are among numerous methods that exist for assessing the potential toxicity of sediments in aquatic systems. In this study, interlaboratory results were compared from 96-hour Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas static-renewal acute toxicity tests conduct...

  12. 8. VIEW OF RADIOGRAPHY EQUIPMENT, TEST METHODS INCLUDED RADIOGRAPHY AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF RADIOGRAPHY EQUIPMENT, TEST METHODS INCLUDED RADIOGRAPHY AND BETA BACKSCATTERING. (7/13/56) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  13. Comparison of HEPA filter test methods in corrosive environments

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, L.P.; Fernandez, S.J.; Motes, B.G.

    1980-01-01

    The in-plant testing of process off-gas high efficiency particular air (HEPA) filters is an important quality control activity of the ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) policy at nuclear facilities. Imprecise and irreproducible data were recorded during DOP testing at the Atmospheric Protection System (APS) of the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The tests at the APS are performed in an environment that has high humidity, high temperatures and has NO/sub x/ present. An evaluation of three HEPA filter test methods in corrosive environments was conducted: the dioctyl phthalate (DOP) method (US Standard Method ANSI N-101.1-1979) the sodium chloride method (British Standard 3928:1969), and the soda-fluorescein or uranine method (French Standard AFNOR STD NFX 44-011). The effects of high humidity, temperature, and oxides of nitrogen (NO/sub x/) on each method was examined. The effects of each variable and any interaction between variables on the test methods were examined. Recommendations for changes in the standard methods to reduce erratic on-line results are presented.

  14. 40 CFR 63.344 - Performance test requirements and test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... testing may be used to demonstrate compliance with this subpart if: (i) The test methods and procedures... electroplating tanks and chromium anodizing tanks if the following conditions are met: (i) If a colorimetric... method (i.e., 1.0 microgram per liter of sample for AAGF and 0.5 microgram per liter of sample for...

  15. Overview of multi-input frequency domain modal testing methods with an emphasis on sine testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rost, Robert W.; Brown, David L.

    1988-01-01

    An overview of the current state of the art multiple-input, multiple-output modal testing technology is discussed. A very brief review of the current time domain methods is given. A detailed review of frequency and spatial domain methods is presented with an emphasis on sine testing.

  16. A study of short test and charge retention test methods for nickel-cadmium spacecraft cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    Methods for testing nickel-cadmium cells for internal shorts and charge retention were studied. Included were (a) open circuit voltage decay after a brief charge, (b) open circuit voltage recovery after shorting, and (c) open circuit voltage decay and capacity loss after a full charge. The investigation included consideration of the effects of prior history, of conditioning cells prior to testing, and of various test method variables on the results of the tests. Sensitivity of the tests was calibrated in terms of equivalent external resistance. The results were correlated. It was shown that a large number of variables may affect the results of these tests. It is concluded that the voltage decay after a brief charge and the voltage recovery methods are more sensitive than the charged stand method, and can detect an internal short equivalent to a resistance of about (10,000/C)ohms where "C' is the numerical value of the capacity of the cell in ampere hours.

  17. Nondestructive spot test method for magnesium and magnesium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, M. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A method for spot test identification of magnesium and various magnesium alloys commonly used in aerospace applications is described. The spot test identification involves color codes obtained when several drops of 3 M hydrochloric acid are placed on the surface to be tested. After approximately thirty seconds, two drops of this reacted acid is transferred to each of two depressions in a spot plate for additions of other chemicals with subsequent color changes indicating magnesium or its alloy.

  18. Impetus of composite mechanics on test methods for fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1978-01-01

    The impetus of composite mechanics on composite test methods and/or on interpreting test results is described by using examples from composite micromechanics, composite macromechanics and laminate theory. The specific examples included contributions such as criteria for selecting resin matrices for improved composite strength, the 10 deg off-axis tensile test, criteria for configuring hybrids and superhybrids for improved impact resistance and the reduced bending rigidities concept for buckling and vibration analyses.

  19. Primer Stepper Motor Nomenclature, Definition, Performance and Recommended Test Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starin, Scott; Shea, Cutter

    2014-01-01

    There has been an unfortunate lack of standardization of the terms and components of stepper motor performance, requirements definition, application of torque margin and implementation of test methods. This paper will address these inconsistencies and discuss in detail the implications of performance parameters, affects of load inertia, control electronics, operational resonances and recommended test methods. Additionally, this paper will recommend parameters for defining and specifying stepper motor actuators. A useful description of terms as well as consolidated equations and recommended requirements is included.

  20. 40 CFR 60.547 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Manufacturing Industry § 60.547 Test methods and procedures. (a) The test methods in appendix A to this part... of the duct or at a point no closer to the walls than 1.0 meter (3.3 feet). The minimum sample volume shall be 0.003 dry standard cubic meter (dscm) (0.11 dry standard cubic feet (dscf)) except that...