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Sample records for biological testing

  1. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: BIOLOGICAL TOXICITY TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Engineering Bulletin is intended to provide site managers with information on ecological assessment and biological toxicity testing, applicability of biological toxicity testing, planning effective biological toxicity assessments, descriptions of test methods, limitations, c...

  2. Testing multiple biological mediators simultaneously.

    PubMed

    Boca, Simina M; Sinha, Rashmi; Cross, Amanda J; Moore, Steven C; Sampson, Joshua N

    2014-01-15

    Modern biomedical and epidemiological studies often measure hundreds or thousands of biomarkers, such as gene expression or metabolite levels. Although there is an extensive statistical literature on adjusting for 'multiple comparisons' when testing whether these biomarkers are directly associated with a disease, testing whether they are biological mediators between a known risk factor and a disease requires a more complex null hypothesis, thus offering additional methodological challenges. We propose a permutation approach that tests multiple putative mediators and controls the family wise error rate. We demonstrate that, unlike when testing direct associations, replacing the Bonferroni correction with a permutation approach that focuses on the maximum of the test statistics can significantly improve the power to detect mediators even when all biomarkers are independent. Through simulations, we show the power of our method is 2-5× larger than the power achieved by Bonferroni correction. Finally, we apply our permutation test to a case-control study of dietary risk factors and colorectal adenoma to show that, of 149 test metabolites, docosahexaenoate is a possible mediator between fish consumption and decreased colorectal adenoma risk. R-package included in online Supplementary Material.

  3. Automatic interpretation of biological tests.

    PubMed

    Boufriche-Boufaïda, Z

    1998-03-01

    In this article, an approach for an Automatic Interpretation of Biological Tests (AIBT) is described. The developed system is much needed in Preventive Medicine Centers (PMCs). It is designed as a self-sufficient system that could be easily used by trained nurses during the routine visit. The results that the system provides are not only useful to provide the PMC physicians with a preliminary diagnosis, but also allows them more time to focus on the serious cases, making the clinical visit more qualitative. On the other hand, because the use of such a system has been planned for many years, its possibilities for future extensions must be seriously considered. The methodology adopted can be interpreted as a combination of the advantages of two main approaches adopted in current diagnostic systems: the production system approach and the object-oriented system approach. From the rules, the ability of these approaches to capture the deductive processes of the expert in domains where causal mechanisms are often understood are retained. The object-oriented approach guides the elicitation and the engineering of knowledge in such a way that abstractions, categorizations and classifications are encouraged whilst individual instances of objects of any type are recognized as separate, independent entities.

  4. Apparatus for automated testing of biological specimens

    DOEpatents

    Layne, Scott P.; Beugelsdijk, Tony J.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus for performing automated testing of infections biological specimens is disclosed. The apparatus comprise a process controller for translating user commands into test instrument suite commands, and a test instrument suite comprising a means to treat the specimen to manifest an observable result, and a detector for measuring the observable result to generate specimen test results.

  5. Biomonitoring test procedures and biological criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Kszos, L.A.; Lipschultz, M.J.; Foster, W.E.

    1997-10-01

    The Water Environment Federation recently issued a special publication, Biomonitoring in the Water Environment. In this paper, the authors highlight the contents of the chapter 3, Biomonitoring Test Procedures, identify current trends in test procedures and introduce the concept of biological criteria (biocriteria). The book chapter (and this paper) focuses on freshwater and marine chronic and acute toxicity tests used in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits program to identify effluents and receiving waters containing toxic materials in acutely or chronically toxic concentrations. The two major categories of toxicity tests include acute tests and chronic tests. The USEPA chronic tests required in NPDEs permits have been shortened to 7 days by focusing on the most sensitive life-cycle stages; these tests are often referred to as short-term chronic tests. The type of test(s) required depend on NPDES permit requirements, objectives of the test, available resources, requirements of the test organisms, and effluent characteristics such as variability in flow or toxicity. The permit writer will determine the requirements for toxicity test(s) by considering such factors as dilution, effluent variability, and exposure variability. Whether the required test is acute or chronic, the objective of the test is to estimate the safe or no effect concentration which is defined as the concentration which will permit normal propagation of fish and other aquatic life in the receiving waters. In this paper, the authors review the types of toxicity tests, the commonly used test organisms, and the uses of toxicity test data. In addition, they briefly describe research on new methods and the use of biological criteria.

  6. Unit testing, model validation, and biological simulation

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Mark D.; Ghayoomie, S. Vahid; Larson, Stephen D.; Gerkin, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    The growth of the software industry has gone hand in hand with the development of tools and cultural practices for ensuring the reliability of complex pieces of software. These tools and practices are now acknowledged to be essential to the management of modern software. As computational models and methods have become increasingly common in the biological sciences, it is important to examine how these practices can accelerate biological software development and improve research quality. In this article, we give a focused case study of our experience with the practices of unit testing and test-driven development in OpenWorm, an open-science project aimed at modeling Caenorhabditis elegans. We identify and discuss the challenges of incorporating test-driven development into a heterogeneous, data-driven project, as well as the role of model validation tests, a category of tests unique to software which expresses scientific models. PMID:27635225

  7. Prospective Tests on Biological Models of Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The biological effects of acupuncture include the regulation of a variety of neurohumoral factors and growth control factors. In science, models or hypotheses with confirmed predictions are considered more convincing than models solely based on retrospective explanations. Literature review showed that two biological models of acupuncture have been prospectively tested with independently confirmed predictions: The neurophysiology model on the long-term effects of acupuncture emphasizes the trophic and anti-inflammatory effects of acupuncture. Its prediction on the peripheral effect of endorphin in acupuncture has been confirmed. The growth control model encompasses the neurophysiology model and suggests that a macroscopic growth control system originates from a network of organizers in embryogenesis. The activity of the growth control system is important in the formation, maintenance and regulation of all the physiological systems. Several phenomena of acupuncture such as the distribution of auricular acupuncture points, the long-term effects of acupuncture and the effect of multimodal non-specific stimulation at acupuncture points are consistent with the growth control model. The following predictions of the growth control model have been independently confirmed by research results in both acupuncture and conventional biomedical sciences: (i) Acupuncture has extensive growth control effects. (ii) Singular point and separatrix exist in morphogenesis. (iii) Organizers have high electric conductance, high current density and high density of gap junctions. (iv) A high density of gap junctions is distributed as separatrices or boundaries at body surface after early embryogenesis. (v) Many acupuncture points are located at transition points or boundaries between different body domains or muscles, coinciding with the connective tissue planes. (vi) Some morphogens and organizers continue to function after embryogenesis. Current acupuncture research suggests a convergence

  8. Raise Test Scores: Integrate Biology and Calculus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukens, Jeffrey D.; Feinstein, Sheryl

    This paper presents the results of research that compared the academic achievement of high school students enrolled in an integrated Advanced Placement Biology/Advanced Placement Calculus course with students enrolled in traditional Advanced Placement Biology and Advanced Placement Calculus courses. Study subjects included high school students…

  9. Statistics and Hypothesis Testing in Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maret, Timothy J.; Ziemba, Robert E.

    1997-01-01

    Suggests that early in their education students be taught to use basic statistical tests as rigorous methods of comparing experimental results with scientific hypotheses. Stresses that students learn how to use statistical tests in hypothesis-testing by applying them in actual hypothesis-testing situations. To illustrate, uses questions such as…

  10. Multidimensional Computerized Adaptive Testing for Indonesia Junior High School Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Bor-Chen; Daud, Muslem; Yang, Chih-Wei

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a curriculum-based multidimensional computerized adaptive test that was developed for Indonesia junior high school Biology. In adherence to the Indonesian curriculum of different Biology dimensions, 300 items was constructed, and then tested to 2238 students. A multidimensional random coefficients multinomial logit model was…

  11. Multidimensional Computerized Adaptive Testing for Indonesia Junior High School Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Bor-Chen; Daud, Muslem; Yang, Chih-Wei

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a curriculum-based multidimensional computerized adaptive test that was developed for Indonesia junior high school Biology. In adherence to the Indonesian curriculum of different Biology dimensions, 300 items was constructed, and then tested to 2238 students. A multidimensional random coefficients multinomial logit model was…

  12. Comparison of agriculture biology and general biology testing outcomes in Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despain, Deric Walter

    Agriculture education can take scientific topics to higher levels, emphasize scientific concepts, involve hands-on learning, and develop interrelationships with the other sciences, thus making the living and non-living world around them relevant for students. Prior to 1996, agriculture education was not considered adequate to prepare Utah high school students to meet state biology requirements. The appropriateness of making that equalizing decision in 1996 was not tested until this 2014 study, comparing student test scores on the state biology test for general biology and agriculture biology students. The 2008-2012 data were collected from the Utah Department of Education Data and Statistics, utilizing a descriptive comparative post-test only analysis. As seen in this study, not only did B/AS students tend to score lower than their General Biology counterparts, in multiple cases this difference was significant (p ≤ .05). This contrary finding challenges the theoretical foundation of this study. As a result of this study three implications were made; (a) the Utah CRT-Biology test is not a reliable gauge of academic achievement in agriculture biology, (b) agriculture students in the sample population have not been taught with rigorous biology standards, and (c) biology standards taught in agricultural biology classes are not aligned with content tested by the biology portion of the Utah CRT-Biology test standards. The results of this study indicate to stakeholders that there is a gap occurring within the B/AS education, and the need to reevaluate the biology curriculum delivery to its population may possibly be in need of immediate action.

  13. Drug Development Against Viral Diseases (Biological Testing)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-01

    any. sip of infection or disese (11. Also, laboratory work with CCHF has beeni limited because accidental infections which have had serious or even fata...were unldrgoir. i,,¢rois. No leb’ons were found in submaxillary or sublingual salivary gland, kidney , heart, eye, lacrimal gland, thyroid, trachea, or...examined including kidney , lung, liver and brain. e. Active chemotherapeutic agents in the vaccinia tail lesion model. Most drugs tested in thit model gave

  14. Using synthetic biology to make cells tomorrow's test tubes.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Hernan G; Brewster, Robert C; Phillips, Rob

    2016-04-18

    The main tenet of physical biology is that biological phenomena can be subject to the same quantitative and predictive understanding that physics has afforded in the context of inanimate matter. However, the inherent complexity of many of these biological processes often leads to the derivation of complex theoretical descriptions containing a plethora of unknown parameters. Such complex descriptions pose a conceptual challenge to the establishment of a solid basis for predictive biology. In this article, we present various exciting examples of how synthetic biology can be used to simplify biological systems and distill these phenomena down to their essential features as a means to enable their theoretical description. Here, synthetic biology goes beyond previous efforts to engineer nature and becomes a tool to bend nature to understand it. We discuss various recent and classic experiments featuring applications of this synthetic approach to the elucidation of problems ranging from bacteriophage infection, to transcriptional regulation in bacteria and in developing embryos, to evolution. In all of these examples, synthetic biology provides the opportunity to turn cells into the equivalent of a test tube, where biological phenomena can be reconstituted and our theoretical understanding put to test with the same ease that these same phenomena can be studied in the in vitro setting.

  15. UNDERSTANDINGS OF BSCS BIOLOGY STUDENTS AS DETERMINED BY INSTRUCTIONAL TESTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ROBINSON, JAMES T.

    EIGHT INSTRUCTIONAL TESTS SPANNED THE CURRICULUM OF ONE YEAR OF BIOLOGY STUDY. THE FIRST CONCERNED THE NATURE OF SCIENCE INCLUDED 4 AREAS OF EMPHASIS--THE NATURE AND FUNCTION OF HYPOTHESIS, THE IDEA OF CONTROLS IN EXPERIMENTS, INTERPRETATION OF GRAPHED DATA, AND THE NATURE OF DATA. THE SECOND TEST WAS DESIGNED TO SHOW AN UNDERSTANDING OF…

  16. UNDERSTANDINGS OF BSCS BIOLOGY STUDENTS AS DETERMINED BY INSTRUCTIONAL TESTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ROBINSON, JAMES T.

    EIGHT INSTRUCTIONAL TESTS SPANNED THE CURRICULUM OF ONE YEAR OF BIOLOGY STUDY. THE FIRST CONCERNED THE NATURE OF SCIENCE INCLUDED 4 AREAS OF EMPHASIS--THE NATURE AND FUNCTION OF HYPOTHESIS, THE IDEA OF CONTROLS IN EXPERIMENTS, INTERPRETATION OF GRAPHED DATA, AND THE NATURE OF DATA. THE SECOND TEST WAS DESIGNED TO SHOW AN UNDERSTANDING OF…

  17. Current challenges and opportunities in nonclinical safety testing of biologics.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Sven; Baumann, Andreas; de Haan, Lolke; Hinton, Heather J; Moggs, Jonathan; Theil, Frank-Peter; Wakefield, Ian; Singer, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    Nonclinical safety testing of new biotherapeutic entities represents its own challenges and opportunities in drug development. Hot topics in this field have been discussed recently at the 2nd Annual BioSafe European General Membership Meeting. In this feature article, discussions on the challenges surrounding the use of PEGylated therapeutic proteins, selection of cynomolgus monkey as preclinical species, unexpected pharmacokinetics of biologics and the safety implications thereof are summarized. In addition, new developments in immunosafety testing of biologics, the use of transgenic mouse models and PK and safety implications of multispecific targeting approaches are discussed. Overall, the increasing complexity of new biologic modalities and formats warrants tailor-made nonclinical development strategies and experimental testing.

  18. Cosmic heavy ion tracks in mesoscopic biological test objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Facius, R.

    1994-01-01

    Since more than 20 years ago, when the National Academy of Sciences and the National Research Council of the U.S.A. released their report on 'HZE particle effects in manned spaced flight', it has been emphasized how difficult - if not even impossible - it is to assess their radiobiological impact on man from conventional studies where biological test organisms are stochastically exposed to 'large' fluences of heavy ions. An alternative, competing approach had been realized in the BIOSTACK experiments, where the effects of single cosmic as well as accelerator - heavy ions on individual biological test organisms could be investigated. Although presented from the beginning as the preferable approach for terrestrial investigations with accelerator heavy ions too ('The BIOSTACK as an approach to high LET radiation research'), only recently this insight is gaining more widespread recognition. In space flight experiments, additional constraints imposed by the infrastructure of the vehicle or satellite further impede such investigations. Restrictions concern the physical detector systems needed for the registration of the cosmic heavy ions' trajectories as well as the biological systems eligible as test organisms. Such optimized procedures and techniques were developed for the investigations on chromosome aberrations induced by cosmic heavy ions in cells of the stem meristem of lettuce seeds (Lactuca sativa) and for the investigation of the radiobiological response of Wolffia arriza, which is the smallest flowering (water) plant. The biological effects were studied by the coworkers of the Russian Institute of Biomedical Problems (IBMP) which in cooperation with the European Space Agency ESA organized the exposure in the Biosatellites of the Cosmos series. Since biological investigations and physical measurements of particle tracks had to be performed in laboratories widely separated, the preferred fixed contact between biological test objects and the particle detectors

  19. Pulse Duplicator Hydrodynamic Testing of Bioengineered Biological Heart Valves.

    PubMed

    Buse, Eric E; Hilbert, Stephen L; Hopkins, Richard A; Converse, Gabriel L

    2016-12-01

    There are many heart valve replacements currently available on the market; however, these devices are not ideal for pediatric patients with congenital heart valve defects. Decellularized valve substitutes offer potential for improved clinical outcomes and require pre-clinical testing guidelines and testing systems suitable for non-crosslinked, biological heart valves. The objective of this study was to assess the hydrodynamic performance of intact, bioengineered pulmonary valves using a custom pulse duplicator capable of testing intact biological valved conduits. The mechanical behavior of valve associated sinus and arterial tissue was also evaluated under biaxial loading. Cryopreserved, decellularized, extracellular matrix (ECM) conditioned and glutaraldehyde fixed valves showed reduced pressure gradients and increased effective orifice area for decellularized and ECM conditioned valves. ECM conditioning resulted in increased elastic modulus but decreased stretch in circumferential and longitudinal directions under biaxial loading. Overall, decellularization and ECM conditioning did not compromise the scaffolds, which exhibited satisfactory bench top performance.

  20. A new biological test of water toxicity-yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae conductometric test.

    PubMed

    Dolezalova, Jaroslava; Rumlova, Lubomira

    2014-11-01

    This new biological test of water toxicity is based on monitoring of specific conductivity changes of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae suspension as a result of yeast fermentation activity inhibition in toxic conditions. The test was verified on ten substances with various mechanisms of toxic effect and the results were compared with two standard toxicity tests based on Daphnia magna mobility inhibition (EN ISO 6341) and Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence inhibition (EN ISO 11348-2) and with the results of the S. cerevisiae lethal test (Rumlova and Dolezalova, 2012). The new biological test - S. cerevisiae conductometric test - is an express method developed primarily for field conditions. It is applicable in case of need of immediate information about water toxicity. Fast completion is an advantage of this test (time necessary for test completion is about 60min), the test is simple and the test organism - dried instant yeast - belongs among its biggest advantages because of its long-term storage life and broad availability.

  1. Testing of Synthetic Biological Membranes for Forward Osmosis Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parodi, Jurek; Mangado, Jaione Romero; Stefanson, Ofir; Flynn, Michael; Mancinelli, Rocco; Kawashima, Brian; Trieu, Serena; Brozell, Adrian; Rosenberg, Kevan

    2016-01-01

    Commercially available forward osmosis membranes have been extensively tested for human space flight wastewater treatment. Despite the improvements achieved in the last decades, there is still a challenge to produce reliable membranes with anti-fouling properties, chemical resistance, and high flux and selectivity. Synthetic biological membranes that mimic the ones present in nature, which underwent millions of years of evolution, represent a potential solution for further development and progress in membrane technology. Biomimetic forward osmosis membranes based on a polymeric support filter and coated with surfactant multilayers have been engineered to investigate how different manufacturing processes impact the performance and structure of the membrane. However, initial results of the first generation prototype membranes tests reveal a high scatter in the data, due to the current testing apparatus set up. The testing apparatus has been upgraded to improve data collection, reduce errors, and to allow higher control of the testing process.

  2. Biological testing of a digested sewage sludge and derived composts.

    PubMed

    Moreira, R; Sousa, J P; Canhoto, C

    2008-11-01

    Aiming to evaluate a possible loss of soil habitat function after amendment with organic wastes, a digested sewage sludge and derived composts produced with green residues, where biologically tested in the laboratory using soil animals (Eisenia andrei and Folsomia candida) and plants (Brassica rapa and Avena sativa). Each waste was tested mimicking a field application of 6ton/ha or 12ton/ha. Avoidance tests did not reveal any impact of sludge and composts to soil biota. Germination and growth tests showed that application of composts were beneficial for both plants. Composts did not affect earthworm's mass increase or reproduction, but the highest sludge amendment revealed negative effects on both parameters. Only the amendment of composts at the highest dose originated an impairment of springtails reproductive output. We suggest that bioassays using different test species may be an additional tool to evaluate effects of amendment of organic wastes in soil. Biological tests are sensitive to pollutants at low concentrations and to interactions undetected by routine chemical analysis.

  3. Wave basin model tests of technical-biological bank protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenmann, J.

    2012-04-01

    Sloped embankments of inland waterways are usually protected from erosion and other negative im-pacts of ship-induced hydraulic loads by technical revetments consisting of riprap. Concerning the dimensioning of such bank protection there are several design rules available, e.g. the "Principles for the Design of Bank and Bottom Protection for Inland Waterways" or the Code of Practice "Use of Standard Construction Methods for Bank and Bottom Protection on Waterways" issued by the BAW (Federal Waterways Engineering and Research Institute). Since the European Water Framework Directive has been put into action special emphasis was put on natural banks. Therefore the application of technical-biological bank protection is favoured. Currently design principles for technical-biological bank protection on inland waterways are missing. The existing experiences mainly refer to flowing waters with no or low ship-induced hydraulic loads on the banks. Since 2004 the Federal Waterways Engineering and Research Institute has been tracking the re-search and development project "Alternative Technical-Biological Bank Protection on Inland Water-ways" in company with the Federal Institute of Hydrology. The investigation to date includes the ex-amination of waterway sections where technical- biological bank protection is applied locally. For the development of design rules for technical-biological bank protection investigations shall be carried out in a next step, considering the mechanics and resilience of technical-biological bank protection with special attention to ship-induced hydraulic loads. The presentation gives a short introduction into hydraulic loads at inland waterways and their bank protection. More in detail model tests of a willow brush mattress as a technical-biological bank protec-tion in a wave basin are explained. Within the scope of these tests the brush mattresses were ex-posed to wave impacts to determine their resilience towards hydraulic loads. Since the

  4. Cosmic heavy ion tracks in mesoscopic biological test objects

    SciTech Connect

    Facius, R.

    1994-12-31

    Since more than 20 years ago, when the National Academy of Sciences and the National Research Council of the U.S.A. released their report on `HZE particle effects in manned spaced flight`, it has been emphasized how difficult - if not even impossible - it is to assess their radiobiological impact on man from conventional studies where biological test organisms are stochastically exposed to `large` fluences of heavy ions. An alternative, competing approach had been realized in the BIOSTACK experiments, where the effects of single cosmic as well as accelerator - heavy ions on individual biological test organisms could be investigated. Although presented from the beginning as the preferable approach for terrestrial investigations with accelerator heavy ions too (`The BIOSTACK as an approach to high LET radiation research`), only recently this insight is gaining more widespread recognition. In space flight experiments, additional constraints imposed by the infrastructure of the vehicle or satellite further impede such investigations. Restrictions concern the physical detector systems needed for the registration of the cosmic heavy ions` trajectories as well as the biological systems eligible as test organisms. Such optimized procedures and techniques were developed for the investigations on chromosome aberrations induced by cosmic heavy ions in cells of the stem meristem of lettuce seeds (Lactuca sativa) and for the investigation of the radiobiological response of Wolffia arriza, which is the smallest flowering (water) plant. The biological effects were studied by the coworkers of the Russian Institute of Biomedical Problems (IBMP) which in cooperation with the European Space Agency ESA organized the exposure in the Biosatellites of the Cosmos series.

  5. Nondestructive mechanical characterization of developing biological tissues using inflation testing.

    PubMed

    Oomen, P J A; van Kelle, M A J; Oomens, C W J; Bouten, C V C; Loerakker, S

    2017-10-01

    One of the hallmarks of biological soft tissues is their capacity to grow and remodel in response to changes in their environment. Although it is well-accepted that these processes occur at least partly to maintain a mechanical homeostasis, it remains unclear which mechanical constituent(s) determine(s) mechanical homeostasis. In the current study a nondestructive mechanical test and a two-step inverse analysis method were developed and validated to nondestructively estimate the mechanical properties of biological tissue during tissue culture. Nondestructive mechanical testing was achieved by performing an inflation test on tissues that were cultured inside a bioreactor, while the tissue displacement and thickness were nondestructively measured using ultrasound. The material parameters were estimated by an inverse finite element scheme, which was preceded by an analytical estimation step to rapidly obtain an initial estimate that already approximated the final solution. The efficiency and accuracy of the two-step inverse method was demonstrated on virtual experiments of several material types with known parameters. PDMS samples were used to demonstrate the method's feasibility, where it was shown that the proposed method yielded similar results to tensile testing. Finally, the method was applied to estimate the material properties of tissue-engineered constructs. Via this method, the evolution of mechanical properties during tissue growth and remodeling can now be monitored in a well-controlled system. The outcomes can be used to determine various mechanical constituents and to assess their contribution to mechanical homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Biological Aerosol Test Method and Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Decon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    time they were used for viral TCID50 assay(s). The Spearman – Karber formula (Appendix C, C-3) was used to determine the concentration of viable virus...300 mL 50% glutaraldehyde, 2700 mL H2O. E-3 Virus quantification Spearman – Karber formula L = log10 TCID50 titer = X0 - (d/2) + d *∑ri/ni...AFRL-RX-TY-TR-2010-0070 BIOLOGICAL AEROSOL TEST METHOD AND PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE) DECON Steven H. Hinrichs, Michael B

  7. A drop tower for controlled impact testing of biological tissues.

    PubMed

    Burgin, Leanne V; Aspden, Richard M

    2007-05-01

    Impact damage, in particular to tissues such as articular cartilage, is a recognised source of morbidity. To understand better the clinical outcomes, it is important to know the mechanics of the damage sustained and the biological response of cells to rapidly applied forces and subsequent tissue disruption. An instrumented drop tower has been designed to enable controlled impact loads to be applied to small samples of biological materials. Impact severity can be controlled by using impactors of different masses and various drop heights. Force and deceleration at impact are recorded at 50,000 samples s(-1) by a force transducer under the sample and an accelerometer on the impactor. Repeatability was tested on rubber washers and coefficients of variation were found to be better than 8% for dynamic stiffness, 3.4% for stress and 4.3% for strain. Initial tests on isolated biopsies of articular cartilage showed that at an initial strain rate of 916 s(-1), the peak dynamic modulus of human femoral head cartilage was 59 MPa, and for a bovine biopsy the initial strain rate and corresponding peak dynamic modulus were 3380 s(-1) and 130 MPa, respectively. The equipment described is capable of applying an impact load to small biopsies of tissue with a defined energy and velocity and measuring deformation and load at high rates of loading.

  8. Toxicity testing and instream biological monitoring in evaluating municipal effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Krier, K.; Pontasch, K.

    1995-12-31

    Twelve streams receiving municipal wastewater treatment plant effluents were evaluated in riffle areas above and below the outfall using the Environmental Protection Agency`s Rapid Bioassessment Protocols (RBPs) for benthic macroinvertebrates. Eight of the sites evaluated using RBP 1 exhibited stream health in the downstream riffles equaling or exceeding the upstream riffles. RBP 1 results suggested possible impacts at the remaining four sites, and these sites were more intensely evaluated using RBPs 2 and 3, acute effluent toxicity tests with Daphnia magna, and quantification of periphytic chlorophyll a and ash free dry weight (AFDW). Results from RBP 2 indicated three of the four sites evaluated have similar taxonomic richness above and below the outfall, while one site is heavily impacted by organic pollutants. Toxicity tests with 100% effluent resulted in no mortality with any of the four effluents tested. Relative to the respective upstream sites, chlorophyll a was significantly increased at one downstream site and significantly reduced at another. AFDW was similar above and below the outfalls in all streams. These results suggest that laboratory toxicity tests may not always be adequate predictors of instream biological effects.

  9. An exact law can test biological theories of mortality.

    PubMed

    Azbel, Mark Ya

    2002-07-01

    Wild animals rarely grow old, and die due to extrinsic hazards. So, natural selection favors genes with good early effects even when they lead to senescence and death at later ages. This implies the Medawar accumulation of late-acting deleterious effects and Williams-Kirkwood life-history trade-off: mortality of a generation strongly depends on its early age life history. Human and protected animal populations live in evolutionary unprecedented conditions, and survive to old age. Quantitative analysis of their mortality establishes that in such conditions a dominant fraction of mortality yields an exact law. In contrast to mortality, the law is biologically non-specific (i.e. independent of genotypes, phenotypes, life history, old age diseases, and all other relevant factors, describing the population and its environment from conception to the age of death). It is universal for species as remote as humans and flies and may lead to the formulation of a biologically non-specific thermodynamic mechanism of mortality. The law predicts that mortality may be significantly decreased and reversed to its value at a much younger age. The reversal is consistent with demographic data. For instance, Swedish females, born in 1916, at 48 years restored the mortality rate they had at 20; Japanese females, born in 1927, at 28 restored the life expectancy they had 8 years earlier. The law quantitatively tests mortality theories and establishes their limitations.

  10. Membrane characteristics for biological blast overpressure testing using blast simulators.

    PubMed

    Alphonse, Vanessa D; Siva Sai Sujith Sajja, Venkata; Kemper, Andrew R; Rizel, Dave V; Duma, Stefan M; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2014-01-01

    Blast simulators often use passive-rupture membranes to generate shock waves similar to free-field blasts. The purpose of this study was to compare rupture patterns and pressure traces of three distinct membrane materials for biological and biomechanical blast studies. An Advanced Blast Simulator (ABS) located at the Center for Injury Biomechanics at Virginia Tech was used to test membrane characteristics. Acetate, Mylar, and aluminum sheets with different thicknesses were used to obtain pressures between 70–210 kPa. Static pressure was measured inside the tube at the test section using piezoelectric pressure sensors. Peak overpressure, positive duration, and positive impulse were calculated for each test. Rupture patterns and characteristic pressure traces were unique to each membrane type and thickness. Shock wave speed ranged between 1.2-1.8 Mach for static overpressures of 70–210 kPa. Acetate membranes fragmented sending pieces down the tube, but produced ideal (Friedlander) pressure traces. Mylar membranes bulged without fragmenting, but produced less-than-ideal pressure traces. Aluminum membranes did not fragment and produced ideal pressure traces. However, the cost of manufacturing and characterizing aluminum membranes should be considered during membrane selection. This study illustrates the advantages and disadvantages of using Mylar, acetate, and aluminum for passive rupture membranes for blast simulators.

  11. Tests of Level A Suits - Protection Against Chemical and Biological Warfare Agents and Simulants: Executive Summary

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-01

    Tests of Level A Suits – Protection Against Chemical and Biological Warfare Agents and Simulants: Executive Summary Richard B. Belmonte...AND SUBTITLE Test Results of Level A Suits – Protection Against Chemical and Biological Warfare Agents and Simulants: Executive Summary 5. FUNDING...words) Twelve Level A protective suits were tested for GB and HD permeation swatch testing using modified procedures of TOP

  12. Dormancy and Recovery Testing for Biological Wastewater Processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummerick, Mary F.; Coutts, Janelle L.; Lunn, Griffin M.; Spencer, LaShelle; Khodadad, Christina L.; Birmele, Michele N.; Frances, Someliz; Wheeler, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Resource recovery and recycling waste streams to usable water via biological water processors is a plausible component of an integrated water purification system. Biological processing as a pretreatment can reduce the load of organic carbon and nitrogen compounds entering physiochemical systems downstream. Aerated hollow fiber membrane bioreactors, have been proposed and studied for a number of years as an approach for treating wastewater streams for space exploration.

  13. Optomechanical tests of hydrated biological tissues subjected to laser shaping

    SciTech Connect

    Omel'chenko, A I; Sobol', E N

    2008-03-31

    The mechanical properties of a matrix are studied upon changing the size and shape of biological tissues during dehydration caused by weak laser-induced heating. The cartilage deformation, dehydration dynamics, and hydraulic conductivity are measured upon laser heating. The hydrated state and the shape of samples of separated fascias and cartilaginous tissues were controlled by using computer-aided processing of tissue images in polarised light. (laser biology)

  14. Testing the Capacity of the National Biological Dose Response Plan (NBDRP) EX40801

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    Testing the capacity of the National Biological Dose Response Plan (NBDRP) EX40801 Ruth Wilkins, James McNamee, Hillary...2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Testing the capacity of the National Biological Dose Response Plan (NBDRP) EX40801 5a...Report July 2009 Page 2 of 11 Testing the capacity of the NBDRP

  15. Vestigial Biological Structures: A Classroom-Applicable Test of Creationist Hypotheses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senter, Phil; Ambrocio, Zenis; Andrade, Julia B.; Foust, Katanya K.; Gaston, Jasmine E.; Lewis, Ryshonda P.; Liniewski, Rachel M.; Ragin, Bobby A.; Robinson, Khanna L.; Stanley, Shane G.

    2015-01-01

    Lists of vestigial biological structures in biology textbooks are so short that some young-Earth creationist authors claim that scientists have lost confidence in the existence of vestigial structures and can no longer identify any verifiable ones. We tested these hypotheses with a method that is easily adapted to biology classes. We used online…

  16. Vestigial Biological Structures: A Classroom-Applicable Test of Creationist Hypotheses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senter, Phil; Ambrocio, Zenis; Andrade, Julia B.; Foust, Katanya K.; Gaston, Jasmine E.; Lewis, Ryshonda P.; Liniewski, Rachel M.; Ragin, Bobby A.; Robinson, Khanna L.; Stanley, Shane G.

    2015-01-01

    Lists of vestigial biological structures in biology textbooks are so short that some young-Earth creationist authors claim that scientists have lost confidence in the existence of vestigial structures and can no longer identify any verifiable ones. We tested these hypotheses with a method that is easily adapted to biology classes. We used online…

  17. Video and HTML: Testing Online Tutorial Formats with Biology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Cindy L.; Friehs, Curt G.

    2013-01-01

    This study compared two common types of online information literacy tutorials: a streaming media tutorial using animation and narration and a text-based tutorial with static images. Nine sections of an undergraduate biology lab class (234 students total) were instructed by a librarian on how to use the BIOSIS Previews database. Three sections…

  18. Video and HTML: Testing Online Tutorial Formats with Biology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Cindy L.; Friehs, Curt G.

    2013-01-01

    This study compared two common types of online information literacy tutorials: a streaming media tutorial using animation and narration and a text-based tutorial with static images. Nine sections of an undergraduate biology lab class (234 students total) were instructed by a librarian on how to use the BIOSIS Previews database. Three sections…

  19. Should soil testing services measure soil biological activity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Health of agricultural soils depends largely on conservation management to promote soil organic C accumulation. Total soil organic C changes slowly, but active fractions are more dynamic. A key indicator of healthy soil is potential biological activity, which could be measured rapidly with soil te...

  20. AN EVALUATIVE STUDY OF TEACHER CONSTRUCTED TEST ITEMS FOR BSCS BIOLOGY. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HETTICK, VERGIL; TURNER, GEORGE C.

    THIS STUDY PROVIDES A PORTFOLIO OF SEVERAL THOUSAND FIELD-TESTED MULTIPLE CHOICE TEST ITEMS COORDINATED WITH THE CHAPTERS OF THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES CURRICULUM STUDY (BSCS) YELLOW VERSION TEXTBOOK. THE ITEMS WERE DEVELOPED BY A TEAM OF HIGH SCHOOL BIOLOGY TEACHERS AND WERE EVALUATED UNDER CLASSROOM CONDITIONS WITH GRADE 10 STUDENTS. A…

  1. Testing systems for biologic markers of genotoxic exposure and effect

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1986-11-19

    Societal interest in genotoxicity stems from two concerns: the fear of carcinogenesis secondary to somatic mutation; and the fear of birth defects and decreasing genetic fitness secondary to heritable mutation. There is a pressing need to identify agents that can cause these effects, to understand the underlying dose-response relationships, to identify exposed populations, and to estimate both the magnitude of exposure and the risk of adverse health effects in such populations. Biologic markers refer either to evidence in surrogate organisms, or to the expressions of exposure and effect in human populations. 21 refs.

  2. Biologically Relevant Exposure Science for 21st Century Toxicity Testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    High visibility efforts in toxicity testing and computational toxicology including the recent NRC report, Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: a Vision and Strategy (NRC, 2007), raise important research questions and opportunities for the field of exposure science. The authors ...

  3. Biologically Relevant Exposure Science for 21st Century Toxicity Testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    High visibility efforts in toxicity testing and computational toxicology including the recent NRC report, Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: a Vision and Strategy (NRC, 2007), raise important research questions and opportunities for the field of exposure science. The authors ...

  4. LASER BIOLOGY: Optomechanical tests of hydrated biological tissues subjected to laser shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omel'chenko, A. I.; Sobol', E. N.

    2008-03-01

    The mechanical properties of a matrix are studied upon changing the size and shape of biological tissues during dehydration caused by weak laser-induced heating. The cartilage deformation, dehydration dynamics, and hydraulic conductivity are measured upon laser heating. The hydrated state and the shape of samples of separated fascias and cartilaginous tissues were controlled by using computer-aided processing of tissue images in polarised light.

  5. Reaction times to weak test lights. [psychophysics biological model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wandell, B. A.; Ahumada, P.; Welsh, D.

    1984-01-01

    Maloney and Wandell (1984) describe a model of the response of a single visual channel to weak test lights. The initial channel response is a linearly filtered version of the stimulus. The filter output is randomly sampled over time. Each time a sample occurs there is some probability increasing with the magnitude of the sampled response - that a discrete detection event is generated. Maloney and Wandell derive the statistics of the detection events. In this paper a test is conducted of the hypothesis that the reaction time responses to the presence of a weak test light are initiated at the first detection event. This makes it possible to extend the application of the model to lights that are slightly above threshold, but still within the linear operating range of the visual system. A parameter-free prediction of the model proposed by Maloney and Wandell for lights detected by this statistic is tested. The data are in agreement with the prediction.

  6. Tests of Level B Suits - Protection Against Chemical and Biological Warfare Agents and Simulants: Executive Summary

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-04-01

    Tests of Level B Suits – Protection Against Chemical and Biological Warfare Agents and Simulants: Executive Summary Robert S. Lindsay April...Final; Jan 98 – Jun 98 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Tests of Level B Suits – Protection Against Chemical and Biological Warfare Agents and Simulants...Occupational Safety and Health Level B∗ suit designs were tested to assess their capability to protect in a chemical warfare agent

  7. [Fish silage prepared from fish species of shrimp by-catch. II. Biological test in broilers].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, T; Montilla, J J; Bello, R A

    1990-12-01

    The purpose of this study was the nutritional evaluation of proteins in fish silage. A biological test was conducted in chicks (broilers) to evaluate two levels of inclusion of fish silage (2.5% and 5%, respectively) in diets normally used for feeding them. Chicks were evaluated in weight gain, food consumption, and feeding conversion index. Finally, flavor and acceptability tests of meat from broilers fed the experimental diet were conducted. Results of the biological assay indicated that the best biological response was that of the animals fed the 5% fish silage diet. Sensory tests revealed that the meat of chicks fed the experimental diets had favorable acceptance by the consumers.

  8. Biological Gender Differences in Students' Errors on Mathematics Achievement Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Christie; Root, Melissa M.; Koriakin, Taylor; Choi, Dowon; Luria, Sarah R.; Bray, Melissa A.; Sassu, Kari; Maykel, Cheryl; O'Rourke, Patricia; Courville, Troy

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated developmental gender differences in mathematics achievement, using the child and adolescent portion (ages 6-19 years) of the Kaufman Test of Educational Achievement-Third Edition (KTEA-3). Participants were divided into two age categories: 6 to 11 and 12 to 19. Error categories within the Math Concepts & Applications…

  9. Biological Gender Differences in Students' Errors on Mathematics Achievement Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Christie; Root, Melissa M.; Koriakin, Taylor; Choi, Dowon; Luria, Sarah R.; Bray, Melissa A.; Sassu, Kari; Maykel, Cheryl; O'Rourke, Patricia; Courville, Troy

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated developmental gender differences in mathematics achievement, using the child and adolescent portion (ages 6-19 years) of the Kaufman Test of Educational Achievement-Third Edition (KTEA-3). Participants were divided into two age categories: 6 to 11 and 12 to 19. Error categories within the Math Concepts & Applications…

  10. A Knowledge Base for Teaching Biology Situated in the Context of Genetic Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Zande, Paul; Waarlo, Arend Jan; Brekelmans, Mieke; Akkerman, Sanne F.; Vermunt, Jan D.

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of genomics will impact the daily practice of biology teachers who teach genetics in secondary education. This study reports on the first results of a research project aimed at enhancing biology teacher knowledge for teaching genetics in the context of genetic testing. The increasing body of scientific knowledge…

  11. Expertise for Teaching Biology Situated in the Context of Genetic Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Zande, Paul; Akkerman, Sanne F.; Brekelmans, Mieke; Waarlo, Arend Jan; Vermunt, Jan D.

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary genomics research will impact the daily practice of biology teachers who want to teach up-to-date genetics in secondary education. This article reports on a research project aimed at enhancing biology teachers' expertise for teaching genetics situated in the context of genetic testing. The increasing body of scientific knowledge…

  12. Expertise for Teaching Biology Situated in the Context of Genetic Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Zande, Paul; Akkerman, Sanne F.; Brekelmans, Mieke; Waarlo, Arend Jan; Vermunt, Jan D.

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary genomics research will impact the daily practice of biology teachers who want to teach up-to-date genetics in secondary education. This article reports on a research project aimed at enhancing biology teachers' expertise for teaching genetics situated in the context of genetic testing. The increasing body of scientific knowledge…

  13. A Knowledge Base for Teaching Biology Situated in the Context of Genetic Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Zande, Paul; Waarlo, Arend Jan; Brekelmans, Mieke; Akkerman, Sanne F.; Vermunt, Jan D.

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of genomics will impact the daily practice of biology teachers who teach genetics in secondary education. This study reports on the first results of a research project aimed at enhancing biology teacher knowledge for teaching genetics in the context of genetic testing. The increasing body of scientific knowledge…

  14. 77 FR 30887 - Amendments to Sterility Test Requirements for Biological Products; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is correcting a final rule that appeared in the Federal Register of May 3, 2012. (77 FR 26162). The final rule provides manufacturers of biological products greater flexibility, as appropriate, and encourages use of the most appropriate and state-of-the-art test methods for assuring the safety of biological products. The rule was published with an......

  15. Australian Biology Test Item Bank, Years 11 and 12. Volume II: Year 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Sewell, Jeffrey J., Ed.

    This document consists of test items which are applicable to biology courses throughout Australia (irrespective of course materials used); assess key concepts within course statement (for both core and optional studies); assess a wide range of cognitive processes; and are relevant to current biological concepts. These items are arranged under…

  16. Australian Biology Test Item Bank, Years 11 and 12. Volume I: Year 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Sewell, Jeffrey J., Ed.

    This document consists of test items which are applicable to biology courses throughout Australia (irrespective of course materials used); assess key concepts within course statement (for both core and optional studies); assess a wide range of cognitive processes; and are relevant to current biological concepts. These items are arranged under…

  17. Cosmo Cassette: A Microfluidic Microgravity Microbial System For Synthetic Biology Unit Tests and Satellite Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berliner, Aaron J.

    2013-01-01

    Although methods in the design-build-test life cycle of the synthetic biology field have grown rapidly, the expansion has been non-uniform. The design and build stages in development have seen innovations in the form of biological CAD and more efficient means for building DNA, RNA, and other biological constructs. The testing phase of the cycle remains in need of innovation. Presented will be both a theoretical abstraction of biological measurement and a practical demonstration of a microfluidics-based platform for characterizing synthetic biological phenomena. Such a platform demonstrates a design of additive manufacturing (3D printing) for construction of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) to be used in experiments carried out in space. First, the biocompatibility of the polypropylene chassis will be demonstrated. The novel MFCs will be cheaper, and faster to make and iterate through designs. The novel design will contain a manifold switchingdistribution system and an integrated in-chip set of reagent reservoirs fabricated via 3D printing. The automated nature of the 3D printing yields itself to higher resolution switching valves and leads to smaller sized payloads, lower cost, reduced power and a standardized platform for synthetic biology unit tests on Earth and in space. It will be demonstrated that the application of unit testing in synthetic biology will lead to the automatic construction and validation of desired constructs. Unit testing methodologies offer benefits of preemptive problem identification, change of facility, simplicity of integration, ease of documentation, and separation of interface from implementation, and automated design.

  18. 40 CFR 230.61 - Chemical, biological, and physical evaluation and testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... FILL MATERIAL Evaluation and Testing § 230.61 Chemical, biological, and physical evaluation and testing... materials. This section provides some guidance in determining which test and/or evaluation procedures are... effects. The principal concerns of discharge of dredged or fill material that contain contaminants are...

  19. Modeling the Drug Discovery Process: The Isolation and Biological Testing of Eugenol from Clove Oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, William H.; Smiley, Patricia M.

    2002-01-01

    This experiment describes the isolation and biological testing of eugenol and neutral compounds from commercially available clove oil. By coupling the chemical separation of the components of clove oil (an experiment described in many introductory organic laboratory textbooks) with a simple antibiotic test, the students "discover" the biologically active compound in clove oil. This experiment models one of the primary methods used in the discovery of new pharmaceutical agents.

  20. A PCR detection method for testing Mycoplasma contamination of veterinary vaccines and biological products.

    PubMed

    Ingebritson, A L; Gibbs, C P; Tong, C; Srinivas, G B

    2015-02-01

    A rapid test method was developed for detecting mycoplasma contamination in veterinary biological products. The method reduces testing time by 2 weeks and shows comparable sensitivity to the current agar-based detection model. The primary goals for the development of the test were to reduce the testing time, incorporate a method that was easily adaptable across the veterinary biologics industry and reduce the subjective interpretation of results. We found that biological enrichment is necessary to maintain sensitivity of the detection method when compared to the standard culture-based test and that periodic sampling of enrichment cultures is essential to detect a wide variety of mycoplasma species that may be present as contaminants. The PCR detection method is comparable to the agar-based model and can reduce the overall testing time by up to 14 days.

  1. Dormancy and Recovery Testing for Biological Wastewater Processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummerick, Mary E.; Coutts, Janelle L.; Lunn, Griffin M.; Spencer, LaShelle; Khodadad, Christina L.; Frances, Someliz; Wheller, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Bioreactors, such as aerated membrane type bioreactors have been proposed and studied for a number of years as an alternate approach for treating wastewater streams for space exploration. Several challenges remain before these types of bioreactors can be used in space settings, including transporting the bioreactors with their microbial communities to space, whether that be the International Space Station or beyond, or procedures for safing the systems and placing them into dormant state for later start-up. Little information is available on such operations as it is not common practice for terrestrial systems. This study explored several dormancy processes for established bioreactors to determine optimal storage and recovery conditions. Procedures focused on complete isolation of the microbial communities from an operational standpoint and observing the effects of: 1) storage temperature, and 2) storage with or without the reactor bulk fluid. The first consideration was tested from a microbial integrity and power consumption standpoint; both room temperature (25 C) and cold (4 C) storage conditions were studied. The second consideration was explored; again, for microbial integrity as well as plausible real-world scenarios of how terrestrially established bioreactors would be transported to microgravity and stored for periods of time between operations. Biofilms were stored without the reactor bulk fluid to simulate transport of established biofilms into microgravity, while biofilms stored with the reactor bulk fluid simulated the most simplistic storage condition to implement operations for extended periods of nonuse. Dormancy condition did not have an influence on recovery in initial studies with immature biofilms (48 days old), however, a lengthy recovery time was required (20+ days). Bioreactors with fully established biofilms (13 months) were able to recover from a 7-month dormancy period to steady state operation within 4 days (approximately 1 residence cycle

  2. Dormancy and Recovery Testing for Biological Wastewater Processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummerick, Mary E.; Coutts, Janelle L.; Lunn, Griffin M.; Spencer, LaShelle; Khodadad, Christina L.; Birmele, Michele N.; Frances, Someliz; Wheeler, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Bioreactors, such as the aerated hollow fiber membrane type, have been proposed and studied for a number of years as an alternate approach for treating wastewater streams for space exploration. Several challenges remain to be resolved before these types of bioreactors can be used in space settings, including transporting the bioreactors with intact and active biofilms, whether that be to the International Space Station or beyond, or procedures for safing the systems and placing them into a dormant state for later start-up. Little information is available on such operations as it is not common practice for terrestrial systems. This study explored several dormancy processes for established bioreactors to determine optimal storage and recovery conditions. Procedures focused on complete isolation of the microbial communities from an operational standpoint and observing the effects of: 1) storage temperature, and 2) storage with or without the reactor bulk fluid. The first consideration was tested from a microbial integrity and power consumption standpoint; both ambient temperature (25 C) and cold (4 C) storage conditions were studied. The second consideration was explored; again, for microbial integrity as well as plausible real-world scenarios of how terrestrially established bioreactors would be transported to microgravity and stored for periods of time between operations. Biofilms were stored without the reactor bulk fluid to simulate transport of established biofilms into microgravity, while biofilms stored with the reactor bulk fluid simulated the most simplistic storage condition to implement operations for extended periods of nonuse. Dormancy condition did not have an influence on recovery in initial studies with immature biofilms (48 days old), however a lengthy recovery time was required (20+ days). Bioreactors with fully established biofilms (13 months) were able to recover from a 7-month dormancy period to steady state operation within 4 days (approx. 1

  3. Using biological data to test climate change refugia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, T. L.; Maher, S. P.

    2015-12-01

    The concept of refugia has been discussed from theoretical and paleontological perspectives to address how populations persisted during periods of unfavorable climate. Recently, several studies have applied the idea to contemporary landscapes to identify locations that are buffered from climate change effects so as to favor greater persistence of valued resources relative to other areas. Refugia are now being discussed among natural resource agencies as a potential adaptation option in the face of anthropogenic climate change. Using downscaled climate data, we identified hypothetical refugial meadows in the Sierra Nevada and then tested them using survey and genetic data from Belding's ground squirrel (Urocitellus beldingi) populations. We predicted that refugial meadows would show higher genetic diversity, higher rates of occupancy and lower rates of extirpation over time. At each step of the research, we worked with managers to ensure the largest impact. Although no panacea, identifying climate change refugia could be an important strategy for prioritizing habitats for management intervention in order to conserve populations. This research was supported by the California LCC, the Northeast Climate Science Center, and NSF.

  4. Test Operations Procedure (TOP) 10-2-022A Chemical Vapor and Aerosol System-Level Testing of Chemical/Biological Protective Suits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-16

    Level Testing of Chemical/ Biological Protective Suits 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHORS 5d...designing and conducting tests estimating penetration of chemical agent vapor and aerosol simulant through chemical/ biological (CB) protective suit... Biological ; CB; Defense Testing 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 188 19a

  5. Routine biological tests in self-poisoning patients: results from an observational prospective multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Reydel, Thomas; Callahan, Jean-Christophe; Verley, Laurent; Teiten, Christelle; Andreotti, Christophe; Claessens, Yann Erick; Missud, David; L'Her, Erwan; Le Roux, Gael; Lerolle, Nicolas

    2016-08-01

    Routine biological tests are frequently ordered in self-poisoning patients, but their clinical relevance is poorly studied. This is a prospective multicentric observational study conducted in the emergency departments and intensive care units of 5 university and nonuniversity French hospitals. Adult self-poisoning patients without severely altered vital status on admission were prospectively included. Routine biological test (serum electrolytes and creatinine, liver enzymes, bilirubin, blood cell count, prothrombin time) ordering and results were analyzed. A total of 1027 patients were enrolled (age, 40.2 ± 14 years; women, 61.5%); no patient died during the hospital stay. Benzodiazepine was suspected in more than 70% of cases; 65% (range, 48%-80%) of patients had at least 1 routine biological test performed. At least 1 abnormal test was registered in 23% of these patients. Three factors were associated with abnormal test results: age older than 40 years, male sex, and poisoning with a drug known to alter routine tests (ie, acetaminophen, NSAIDs, metformine, lithium). Depending on these factors, abnormal results ranged from 14% to 48%. Unexpected severe life-threatening conditions were recorded in 6 patients. Only 3 patients were referred to the intensive care unit solely because of abnormal test results. Routine biological tests are commonly prescribed in nonsevere self-poisoning patients. Abnormal results are frequent but their relevance at bedside remains limited. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Testing with Feedback Yields Potent, but Piecewise, Learning of History and Biology Facts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan, Steven C.; Gopal, Arpita; Rickard, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    Does correctly answering a test question about a multiterm fact enhance memory for the entire fact? We explored that issue in 4 experiments. Subjects first studied Advanced Placement History or Biology facts. Half of those facts were then restudied, whereas the remainder were tested using "5 W" (i.e., "who, what, when, where",…

  7. Using Open-Book Tests to Strengthen the Study Skills of Community-College Biology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Gregory

    2006-01-01

    The author observed that students enrolled in first-year college biology courses often had weak study skills. This longitudinal study examined the use of open-book tests to encourage reading and to assess the improvement of college students' study skills. There was a statistically significant improvement from the initial test to the final test…

  8. Using Open-Book Tests to Strengthen the Study Skills of Community-College Biology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Gregory

    2006-01-01

    The author observed that students enrolled in first-year college biology courses often had weak study skills. This longitudinal study examined the use of open-book tests to encourage reading and to assess the improvement of college students' study skills. There was a statistically significant improvement from the initial test to the final test…

  9. A Computer-Aided Self-Testing System for Biological Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leiblum, M. D.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes the production of a computer-aided, self-testing system for university students enrolled in a first-year course in biological psychology. Project aspects described include selection, acquisition and description of software; question banks and test structures; modes of use (computer or printed version); evaluation; and future plans. (11…

  10. Testing with Feedback Yields Potent, but Piecewise, Learning of History and Biology Facts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan, Steven C.; Gopal, Arpita; Rickard, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    Does correctly answering a test question about a multiterm fact enhance memory for the entire fact? We explored that issue in 4 experiments. Subjects first studied Advanced Placement History or Biology facts. Half of those facts were then restudied, whereas the remainder were tested using "5 W" (i.e., "who, what, when, where",…

  11. A Computer-Aided Self-Testing System for Biological Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leiblum, M. D.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes the production of a computer-aided, self-testing system for university students enrolled in a first-year course in biological psychology. Project aspects described include selection, acquisition and description of software; question banks and test structures; modes of use (computer or printed version); evaluation; and future plans. (11…

  12. Effects of Scoring by Section and Independent Scorers' Patterns on Scorer Reliability in Biology Essay Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebuoh, Casmir N.; Ezeudu, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of scoring by section, use of independent scorers and conventional patterns on scorer reliability in Biology essay tests. It was revealed from literature review that conventional pattern of scoring all items at a time in essay tests had been criticized for not being reliable. The study was true experimental study…

  13. A Knowledge Base for Teaching Biology Situated in the Context of Genetic Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Zande, Paul; Waarlo, Arend Jan; Brekelmans, Mieke; Akkerman, Sanne F.; Vermunt, Jan D.

    2011-10-01

    Recent developments in the field of genomics will impact the daily practice of biology teachers who teach genetics in secondary education. This study reports on the first results of a research project aimed at enhancing biology teacher knowledge for teaching genetics in the context of genetic testing. The increasing body of scientific knowledge concerning genetic testing and the related consequences for decision-making indicate the societal relevance of such a situated learning approach. What content knowledge do biology teachers need for teaching genetics in the personal health context of genetic testing? This study describes the required content knowledge by exploring the educational practice and clinical genetic practices. Nine experienced teachers and 12 respondents representing the clinical genetic practices (clients, medical professionals, and medical ethicists) were interviewed about the biological concepts and ethical, legal, and social aspects (ELSA) of testing they considered relevant to empowering students as future health care clients. The ELSA suggested by the respondents were complemented by suggestions found in the literature on genetic counselling. The findings revealed that the required teacher knowledge consists of multiple layers that are embedded in specific genetic test situations: on the one hand, the knowledge of concepts represented by the curricular framework and some additional concepts (e.g. multifactorial and polygenic disorder) and, on the other hand, more knowledge of ELSA and generic characteristics of genetic test practice (uncertainty, complexity, probability, and morality). Suggestions regarding how to translate these characteristics, concepts, and ELSA into context-based genetics education are discussed.

  14. Establishing construct validity of the Biology I Subject Area Testing program in Mississippi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippoff, Christy Michelle Hollis

    Science education has undergone many revisions since it was permanently embedded in the country's educational curriculum at the end of the 19th century. Some of these revisions occurred as a direct result of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). This legislation placed more accountability on schools than ever before by requiring that all students pass a series of standardized tests (USDE, 2010). High schools in Mississippi require four areas of standardized testing: English II, Algebra I, U.S. History, and Biology I (Wroten, 2008). The focus of this study is the Biology I Subject Area Test. In an effort to determine the validity of that test, this study explores the importance of the Mississippi Biology I content standards according to the importance ratings and frequency of use ratings by science professionals in Mississippi. The science professionals surveyed for this study were high school science teachers, college science professors and scientists in their professional settings. The science professionals' importance ratings were compared to the importance ratings placed on the content strands by the Mississippi Biology I Subject Area Test. To further determine the test's validity, it is also compared to the National Science Education Standards.

  15. An investigation on impacts of scheduling configurations on Mississippi biology subject area testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchette, Frances Lenora

    The purpose of this mixed modal study was to compare the results of Biology Subject Area mean scores of students on a 4 x 4 block schedule, A/B block schedule, and traditional year-long schedule for 1A to 5A size schools. This study also reviewed the data to determine if minority or gender issues might influence the test results. Interviews with administrators and teachers were conducted about the type of schedule configuration they use and the influence that the schedule has on student academic performance on the Biology Subject Area Test. Additionally, this research further explored whether schedule configurations allow sufficient time for students to construct knowledge. This study is important to schools, teachers, and administrators because it can assist them in considering the impacts that different types of class schedules have on student performance and if ethnic or gender issues are influencing testing results. This study used the causal-comparative method for the quantitative portion of the study and constant comparative method for the qualitative portion to explore the relationship of school schedules on student academic achievement on the Mississippi Biology Subject Area Test. The aggregate means of selected student scores indicate that the Mississippi Biology Subject Area Test as a measure of student performance reveals no significant difference on student achievement for the three school schedule configurations. The data were adjusted for initial differences of gender, minority, and school size on the three schedule configurations. The results suggest that schools may employ various schedule configurations and expect student performance on the Mississippi Biology Subject Area Test to be unaffected. However, many areas of concern were identified in the interviews that might impact on school learning environments. These concerns relate to effective classroom management, the active involvement of students in learning, the adequacy of teacher education

  16. Bioinformatics for the synthetic biology of natural products: integrating across the Design–Build–Test cycle

    PubMed Central

    Currin, Andrew; Jervis, Adrian J.; Rattray, Nicholas J. W.; Swainston, Neil; Yan, Cunyu; Breitling, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Covering: 2000 to 2016 Progress in synthetic biology is enabled by powerful bioinformatics tools allowing the integration of the design, build and test stages of the biological engineering cycle. In this review we illustrate how this integration can be achieved, with a particular focus on natural products discovery and production. Bioinformatics tools for the DESIGN and BUILD stages include tools for the selection, synthesis, assembly and optimization of parts (enzymes and regulatory elements), devices (pathways) and systems (chassis). TEST tools include those for screening, identification and quantification of metabolites for rapid prototyping. The main advantages and limitations of these tools as well as their interoperability capabilities are highlighted. PMID:27185383

  17. Gender Differences in Caribbean Students' Performance on a Test of Errors in Biological Labelling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soyibo, Kola

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the performance of 11th-grade students from Barbados, Belize, Jamaica, St. Lucia, St. Vincent, and Trinidad (n=1216) on an Errors in Biological Labeling Test (EBLT). Concludes that performance was low in six categories of errors, and that girls performed significantly better on each category of error than did boys. Contains 15…

  18. Sound and Faulty Arguments Generated by Preservice Biology Teachers When Testing Hypotheses Involving Unobservable Entities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Anton E.

    2002-01-01

    Investigates the responses of a sample of preservice biology teachers enrolled in a teaching methods course to a casual question about why water rose in a jar inverted over a burning candle placed in a pan of water by formulating and testing six hypotheses. (Contains 43 references.) (Author/YDS)

  19. Causal attributions of obese men and women in genetic testing: implications of genetic/biological attributions.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, Anja; Dierk, Jan-Michael; Conradt, Matthias; Schlumberger, Pia; Hinney, Anke; Hebebrand, Johannes; Rief, Winfried

    2009-09-01

    The present study sought to investigate genetic/biological attributions of obesity, their associations with a predisposition to obesity and their crossectional and longitudinal implications for weight regulation in obese individuals presenting for genetic testing and counselling. A total of 421 obese men and women underwent psychological and anthropometric assessment and a mutation screen of the melanocortin-4 receptor gene. At study entry, women revealed more genetic/biological attributions than men on the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire adapted to obesity (86.2% versus 59.7%). Genetic/biological attributions of obesity were associated in both sexes with a family history of obesity, assessed through Stunkard's Figure Rating Scale. In both sexes, genetic/biological attributions were unrelated to weight regulation beliefs and behaviour (i.e. self-efficacy, controllability beliefs, restrained eating and physical activity), assessed through standardised questionnaires or interview at baseline and at six-month follow-up. In addition, causal attributions and weight regulation beliefs and behaviour were not predictive of body mass index at six-month follow-up. Overall, the results indicate that causal attributions of obesity to genetic/biological factors in obese individuals presenting for genetic screening and counselling are crossectionally and longitudinally unrelated to weight regulation and longer-term weight outcome. Those who attribute their obesity to genetic/biological factors likely have a familial obesity risk.

  20. [Contribution of biological tests in the evaluation of professional asthma (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Biot, N; Grosclaude, M; Meyer, J L; Perrin-Fayolle, M

    1980-01-01

    The eventual difficulties of diagnosing professional asthma sometimes need the help of methods of complementary diagnosis. The histamine-release test and that of basophils granules liberation are studied in this work, concerning 12 substances with a suspected allergenic action (saw-dust, textile fibres, chemicals, products of plant origin). The histamine-release and granules liberation tests were performed according to the techniques described respectively by Lichtenstein and Benveniste. Both examinations were positive in a concording manner in 8 cases out of 12, but this positivity was difficult to interprete for etiopathogenic reasons. The study of the curve of histamine-release in relation with the dose of allergen used in the test nevertheless enables to differentiate two types of answers, one related to an allergic mechanism, the other to an irritative one. These observations led to the deduction that a positive granules liberation test could be due to a non allergic mechanism. Negativity in both tests does not allow the rejection of the part played by these substances into the genesis of respiratory signs. Indeed these tests only investigate one part of the mechanisms which can be involved: direct stimulation of vagal irritant receptors and the plain pharmacological reactions escape from this type of biological investigations. The biological tests studied in this work can be used in a complementary fashion in the etiological survey of professional asthma but they cannot replace the realistic tests, more reliable because they react whatever the etiopathogenic mechanism involved.

  1. Offer of rapid testing and alternative biological samples as practical tools to implement HIV screening programs.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Maria Rita; Soldini, Laura; Di Perri, Giovanni; Tiberi, Simon; Lazzarin, Adriano; Lillo, Flavia B

    2009-10-01

    Implementation of HIV testing has the objective to increase screening, identify and counsel persons with infection, link them to clinical services and reduce transmission. Rapid tests and/or alternative biological samples (like oral fluid) give the option for a better general consent in approaching screening, immediate referral of HIV positives to medical treatment and partner notification. We tested the performance characteristics of an oral fluid-based rapid HIV test (Rapidtest HIV lateral flow-Healthchem diag. LLC) in comparison with routinely utilized methods in a selected population of known positive (N = 121) or negative (N = 754) subjects. The sensitivity of the rapid test was 99.1% (one false negative sample) and the specificity 98.8%. Five negatives showed a faint reactivity, 3 of these were reactive also in the reference test, one with a p24 only reaction in Western blot. If these 3 samples were excluded from the analysis the specificity increases to 99.2%. Results from our study confirm that, although a continuous improvement of the test performance is still needed to minimize false negative and positive results, rapid test and alternative biological samples may contribute to HIV prevention strategies by reaching a larger population particularly when and where regular screening procedures are difficult to obtain.

  2. Legal, workplace, and treatment drug testing with alternate biological matrices on a global scale.

    PubMed

    Cone, E J

    2001-09-15

    Global trends in drug trafficking and drug usage patterns indicate a continuing pattern of escalation throughout the world. Over the last two decades, urinalysis has evolved into a highly accurate means for determining whether individuals have been exposed to illicit drugs of abuse. Advances have also been made in the use of alternate biological matrices such as hair, oral fluids and sweat for drug testing. Often, these new matrices demonstrate some distinct advantages over urinalysis, e.g. less invasive procedures, different time course of drug detection. They may even indicate impairment. National and local laws of each country provide the underpinnings of drug-testing programs, but most countries have not addressed use of these alternate matrices. Currently, only a few countries have statutes that specifically mention use of alternate biological matrices, e.g. United States (Florida state law), Germany, Ireland, Poland and the Czech Republic. Conversely, few countries have prohibited collection of alternate biological specimens or drug test devices that utilize such specimens. In addition, guidelines for implementing drug testing programs have been slow to emerge and most deal primarily with workplace drug testing programs, e.g. United States. Currently, scientific technology utilized in drug testing is advancing rapidly, but there is a clear need for parallel development of guidelines governing the use of alternate matrices for drug testing. This article provides an overview of global drug trafficking patterns and drug use, and results from a survey of legal statutes in 20 countries covering use of alternate matrices for drug testing. In addition, elements needed for the development of guidelines for alternate matrices testing for drugs of abuse are discussed, and specific examples of use of alternate matrices in treatment monitoring are provided.

  3. Biology, host specificity tests, and risk assessment of the sawfly Heteroperreyia hubrichi, a potential biological control agent of Schinus terebinthifolius in Hawaii

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Abstract. Heteroperreyia hubrichi Malaise (Hymenoptera: Pergidae), a foliage feeding sawfly of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi (Sapindales: Anacardiaceae), was studied to assess its suitability as a classical biological control agent of this invasive weed in Hawaii. Nochoice host-specificity tests we...

  4. Evaluation of Immunoassays and General Biological Indicator Tests for Field Screening of Bacillus anthracis and Ricin

    PubMed Central

    Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Ozanich, Richard M.; Arce, Jennifer S.; Engelmann, Heather E.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Hofstad, Beth A.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Jarman, Kristin; Melville, Angela M.; Victry, Kristin D.

    2017-01-01

    There is little published data on the performance of biological indicator tests and immunoassays that could be used by first responders to determine if a suspicious powder contains a potential biothreat agent. We evaluated a range of biological indicator tests, including 3 protein tests, 2 ATP tests, 1 DNA test, and 1 FTIR spectroscopy instrument for their ability to screen suspicious powders for Bacillus anthracis (B. anthracis) spores and ricin. We also evaluated 12 immunoassays (mostly lateral flow immunoassays) for their ability to screen for B. anthracis and ricin. We used a cost-effective, statistically based test plan that allows instruments to be evaluated at performance levels ranging from 0.85 to 0.95 lower confidence bound of the probability of detection at confidence levels of 80% to 95%. We also assessed interference with 22 common suspicious powders encountered in the field. The detection reproducibility for the biological indicators was evaluated at 108 B. anthracis spores and 62.5 μg ricin, and the immunoassay detection reproducibility was evaluated at 107 spores/mL (B. anthracis) and 0.1 μg/mL (ricin). Seven out of 12 immunoassays met our most stringent criteria for B. anthracis detection, while 9 out of 12 met our most stringent test criteria for ricin detection. Most of the immunoassays also detected ricin in 3 different crude castor seed preparations. Our testing results varied across products and sample preparations, indicating the importance of reviewing performance data for specific instruments and sample types of interest for the application in order to make informed decisions regarding the selection of biodetection equipment for field use. PMID:28192054

  5. Science Teacher Efficacy and Outcome Expectancy as Predictors of Students' End-of-Instruction (EOI) Biology I Test Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angle, Julie; Moseley, Christine

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare teacher efficacy beliefs of secondary Biology I teachers whose students' mean scores on the statewide End-of-Instruction (EOI) Biology I test met or exceeded the state academic proficiency level (Proficient Group) to teacher efficacy beliefs of secondary Biology I teachers whose students' mean scores on the…

  6. SO-CALLED BIOLOGICAL TESTS FOR ADRENALIN IN BLOOD, WITH SOME OBSERVATIONS ON ARTERIAL HYPERTONUS

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, G. N.

    1911-01-01

    1. The combination of a biological test object on which adrenalin causes contraction of smooth muscle (perfused blood-vessels or the uterus in certain conditions) with a biological test object on which it produces inhibition of contraction of smooth muscle (intestine) greatly diminishes the chance of error in testing blood (or other body liquids) for adrenalin. A control experiment with adrenalin solutions should, in general, accompany each observation on the blood. 2. When properly chosen biological tests are employed, no evidence is obtained of the presence of adrenalin in detectable amount in normal blood taken from the general circulation. 3. In a case of nephritis with albuminuria and persistently high arterial pressure, the pressure was diminished by forced breathing. The washing out of carbon dioxide seemed to be a factor in this diminution as well as the mechanical interference with the circulation. In this case, the administration of large doses of sodium bicarbonate was associated with a marked diminution in the blood pressure. 4. In another case with persistently high blood pressure, the drawing off of cerebrospinal fluid caused a distinct diminution in the arterial pressure, presumably by lowering the intracranial pressure. No pressor substance was detected in the cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:19867483

  7. Development and testing of hyperbaric atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence microscopy for biological applications.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, D P; McNally, H A; Dean, J B

    2012-05-01

    A commercially available atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscope were installed and tested inside a custom-designed hyperbaric chamber to provide the capability to study the effects of hyperbaric gases on biological preparations, including cellular mechanism of oxidative stress. In this report, we list details of installing and testing atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy inside a hyperbaric chamber. The pressure vessel was designed to accommodate a variety of imaging equipment and ensures full functionality at ambient and hyperbaric conditions (≤85 psi). Electrical, gas and fluid lines were installed to enable remote operation of instrumentation under hyperbaric conditions, and to maintain viable biological samples with gas-equilibrated superfusate and/or drugs. Systems were installed for vibration isolation and temperature regulation to maintain atomic force microscopy performance during compression and decompression. Results of atomic force microscopy testing demonstrate sub-nanometre resolution at hyperbaric pressure in dry scans and fluid scans, in both contact mode and tapping mode. Noise levels were less when measurements were taken under hyperbaric pressure with air, helium (He) and nitrogen (N(2) ). Atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy measurements were made on a variety of living cell cultures exposed to hyperbaric gases (He, N(2) , O(2) , air). In summary, atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy were installed and tested for use at hyperbaric pressures and enables the study of cellular and molecular effects of hyperbaric gases and pressure per se in biological preparations. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2012 Royal Microscopical Society.

  8. Expertise for Teaching Biology Situated in the Context of Genetic Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van der Zande, Paul; Akkerman, Sanne F.; Brekelmans, Mieke; Waarlo, Arend Jan; Vermunt, Jan D.

    2012-07-01

    Contemporary genomics research will impact the daily practice of biology teachers who want to teach up-to-date genetics in secondary education. This article reports on a research project aimed at enhancing biology teachers' expertise for teaching genetics situated in the context of genetic testing. The increasing body of scientific knowledge concerning genetic testing and the related consequences for decision-making indicate the societal relevance of an educational approach based on situated learning. What expertise do biology teachers need for teaching genetics in the personal health context of genetic testing? This article describes the required expertise by exploring the educational practice. Nine experienced teachers were interviewed about the pedagogical content, moral and interpersonal expertise areas concerning how to teach genetics in the personal health context of genetic testing, and the lessons of five of them were observed. The findings showed that the required teacher expertise encompasses specific pedagogical content expertise, interpersonal expertise and a preference for teacher roles and teaching approaches for the moral aspects of teaching in this context. A need for further development of teaching and learning activities for (reflection on) moral reasoning came to the fore. Suggestions regarding how to apply this expertise into context-based genetics education are discussed.

  9. Support for the revocation of general safety test regulations in biologics license applications.

    PubMed

    Evans, Dana M; Thorn, Jennifer M; Arch-Douglas, Katherine; Sperry, Justin B; Thompson, Bruce; Davis, Heather L; McCluskie, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    The United States Food and Drug Administration recently removed the requirement for a General Safety Test (GST) for biologics in the Code of Federal Regulations (21 CFR 610.11). The GST, as well as abnormal toxicity (European Pharmacopeia) and innocuity tests (World Health Organization), were designed to test for extraneous toxic contaminants on each product lot intended for human use. Tests require one-week observations for general health and weight following injection of specified volumes of product batches into guinea pigs and mice. At the volumes specified, dose-related toxicity may result when the product is pharmacologically active in rodents. With vaccines, required doses may be > 3 logs higher than intended human dose on a weight-adjusted basis and if an immune modulatory adjuvant is included, systemic immune hyperactivation may cause toxicity. Herein, using the CpG/alum adjuvant combination we evaluated the different test protocols and showed their unsuitability for this adjuvant combination.

  10. Mycoplasma testing of cell substrates and biologics: Review of alternative non-microbiological techniques.

    PubMed

    Volokhov, Dmitriy V; Graham, Laurie J; Brorson, Kurt A; Chizhikov, Vladimir E

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasmas, particularly species of the genera Mycoplasma and Acholeplasma, are known to be occasional microbial contaminants of cell cultures that produce biologics. This presents a serious concern regarding the risk of mycoplasma contamination for research laboratories and commercial facilities developing and manufacturing cell-derived biological and biopharmaceutical products for therapeutic use. Potential undetected contamination of these products or process intermediates with mycoplasmas represents a potential safety risk for patients and a business risk for producers of biopharmaceuticals. To minimize these risks, monitoring for adventitious agents, such as viruses and mycoplasmas, is performed during the manufacture of biologics produced in cell culture substrates. The "gold standard" microbiological assay, currently recommended by the USP, EP, JP and the US FDA, for the mycoplasma testing of biologics, involves the culture of viable mycoplasmas in broth, agar plates and indicator cells. Although the procedure enables highly efficient mycoplasma detection in cell substrates and cell-derived products, the overall testing strategy is time consuming (a minimum of 28 days) and requires skilled interpretation of the results. The long time period required for these conventional assays does not permit their use for products with short shelf-lives or for timely 'go/no-go' decisions during routine in-process testing. PCR methodology has existed for decades, however PCR based and other alternative methods for mycoplasma detection have only recently been considered for application to biologics manufacture. The application of alternative nucleic acid-based, enzyme-based and/or recombinant cell-culture methods, particularly in combination with efficient sample preparation procedures, could provide advantages over conventional microbiological methods in terms of analytical throughput, simplicity, and turnaround time. However, a challenge to the application of alternative

  11. Phosphorus recycling potential assessment by a biological test applied to wastewater sludge.

    PubMed

    Braak, Etienne; Auby, Sarah; Piveteau, Simon; Guilayn, Felipe; Daumer, Marie-Line

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) recycling as mineral fertilizer from wastewater activated sludge (WAS) depends on the amount that can be dissolved and separated from the organic matter before the final crystallization step. The aim of the biological phosphorus dissolution potential (BPDP) test developed here was to assess the maximum amount of P that could be biologically released from WAS prior that the liquid phase enters the recovery process. It was first developed for sludge combining enhanced biological phosphorus removal and iron chloride. Because carbohydrates are known to induce acidification during the first stage of anaerobic digestion, sucrose was used as a co-substrate. Best results were obtained after 24-48 h, without inoculum, with a sugar/sludge ratio of 0.5 gCOD/gVS and under strict anaerobic conditions. Up to 75% of the total phosphorus in sludge from a wastewater treatment plant combining enhanced biological phosphorus removal and iron chloride phosphorus removal could be dissolved. Finally, the test was applied to assess BPDP from different sludge using alum compounds for P removal. No dissolution was observed when alum polychloride was used and less than 20% when alum sulphate was used. In all the cases, comparison to chemical acidification showed that the biological process was a major contributor to P dissolution. The possibility to crystallize struvite was discussed from the composition of the liquids obtained. The BPDP will be used not only to assess the potential for phosphorus recycling from sludge, but also to study the influence of the co-substrates available for anaerobic digestion of sludge.

  12. Sound and faulty arguments generated by preservice biology teachers when testing hypotheses involving unobservable entities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Anton E.

    2002-03-01

    A sample of preservice biology teachers (biology majors) enrolled in a teaching methods course formulated and attempted to test six hypotheses to answer a causal question about why water rose in a jar inverted over a burning candle placed in a pan of water. The students submitted a lab report in which arguments and evidence for testing each hypothesis were presented in an if/then/therefore hypothetico-predictive form. Analysis of written arguments revealed considerable success when students were able to manipulate observable hypothesized causes. However, when the hypothesized causes were unobservable, such that they could be only indirectly tested, performance dropped, as shown by use of three types of faulty arguments: (a) arguments that had missing or confused elements, (b) arguments whose predictions did not follow from hypotheses and planned tests, and (c) arguments that failed to consider alternative hypotheses. Science is an enterprise in which unobservable theoretical entities and processes (e.g., atoms, genes, osmosis, and photosynthesis) are often used to explain observable phenomena. Consequently, if it is assumed that effective teaching requires prior understanding, then it follows that these future teachers have yet to develop adequate hypothesis-testing skills and sufficient awareness of the nature of science to teach science in the inquiry mode advocated by reform guidelines.

  13. Insects as test systems for assessing the potential role of microgravity in biological development and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernós, I.; Carratalá, M.; González-Jurado, J.; Valverde, J. R.; Calleja, M.; Domingo, A.; Vinós, J.; Cervera, M.; Marco, R.

    Gravity and radiation are undoubtedly the two major environmental factors altered in space. Gravity is a weak force, which creates a permanent potential field acting on the mass of biological systems and their cellular components, strongly reduced in space flights. Developmental systems, particularly at very early stages, provide the larger cellular compartments known, where the effects of alterations in the size of the gravity vector on living organisms can be more effectively tested. The insects, one of the more highly evolved classes of animals in which early development occurs in a syncytial embryo, are systems particularly well suited to test these effects and the specific developmental mechanisms affected. Furthermore, they share some basic features such as small size, short life cycles, relatively high radio-resistance, etc. and show a diversity of developmental strategies and tempos advantageous in experiments of this type in space. Drosophila melanogaster, the current biological paradigm to study development, with so much genetic and evolutionary background available, is clearly the reference organism for these studies. The current evidence on the effects of the physical parameters altered in space flights on insect development indicate a surprising correlation between effects seen on the fast developing and relatively small Drosophila embryo and the more slowly developing and large Carausius morosus system. In relation to the issue of the importance of developmental and environmental constraints in biological evolution, still the missing link in current evolutionary thinking, insects and space facilities for long-term experiments could provide useful experimental settings where to critically assess how development and evolution may be interconnected. Finally, it has to be pointed out that since there are experimental data indicating a possible synergism between microgravity and space radiation, possible effects of space radiation should be taken into

  14. Insects as test systems for assessing the potential role of microgravity in biological development and evolution.

    PubMed

    Vernós, I; Carratalá, M; González-Jurado, J; Valverde, J R; Calleja, M; Domingo, A; Vinós, J; Cervera, M; Marco, R

    1989-01-01

    Gravity and radiation are undoubtedly the two major environmental factors altered in space. Gravity is a weak force, which creates a permanent potential field acting on the mass of biological systems and their cellular components, strongly reduced in space flights. Developmental systems, particularly at very early stages, provide the larger cellular compartments known, where the effects of alterations in the size of the gravity vector on living organisms can be more effectively tested. The insects, one of the more highly evolved classes of animals in which early development occurs in a syncytial embryo, are systems particularly well suited to test these effects and the specific developmental mechanisms affected. Furthermore, they share some basic features such as small size, short life cycles, relatively high radio-resistance, etc. and show a diversity of developmental strategies and tempos advantageous in experiments of this type in space. Drosophila melanogaster, the current biological paradigm to study development, with so much genetic and evolutionary background available, is clearly the reference organism for these studies. The current evidence on the effects of the physical parameters altered in space flights on insect development indicate a surprising correlation between effects seen on the fast developing and relatively small Drosophila embryo and the more slowly developing and large Carausius morosus system. In relation to the issue of the importance of developmental and environmental constraints in biological evolution, still the missing link in current evolutionary thinking, insects and space facilities for long-term experiments could provide useful experimental settings where to critically assess how development and evolution may be interconnected. Finally, it has to be pointed out that since there are experimental data indicating a possible synergism between microgravity and space radiation, possible effects of space radiation should be taken into

  15. DAISY: a new software tool to test global identifiability of biological and physiological systems.

    PubMed

    Bellu, Giuseppina; Saccomani, Maria Pia; Audoly, Stefania; D'Angiò, Leontina

    2007-10-01

    A priori global identifiability is a structural property of biological and physiological models. It is considered a prerequisite for well-posed estimation, since it concerns the possibility of recovering uniquely the unknown model parameters from measured input-output data, under ideal conditions (noise-free observations and error-free model structure). Of course, determining if the parameters can be uniquely recovered from observed data is essential before investing resources, time and effort in performing actual biomedical experiments. Many interesting biological models are nonlinear but identifiability analysis for nonlinear system turns out to be a difficult mathematical problem. Different methods have been proposed in the literature to test identifiability of nonlinear models but, to the best of our knowledge, so far no software tools have been proposed for automatically checking identifiability of nonlinear models. In this paper, we describe a software tool implementing a differential algebra algorithm to perform parameter identifiability analysis for (linear and) nonlinear dynamic models described by polynomial or rational equations. Our goal is to provide the biological investigator a completely automatized software, requiring minimum prior knowledge of mathematical modelling and no in-depth understanding of the mathematical tools. The DAISY (Differential Algebra for Identifiability of SYstems) software will potentially be useful in biological modelling studies, especially in physiology and clinical medicine, where research experiments are particularly expensive and/or difficult to perform. Practical examples of use of the software tool DAISY are presented. DAISY is available at the web site http://www.dei.unipd.it/~pia/.

  16. Testing for phylogenetic signal in biological traits: the ubiquity of cross-product statistics.

    PubMed

    Pavoine, Sandrine; Ricotta, Carlo

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate rates of evolution, to establish tests of correlation between two traits, or to investigate to what degree the phylogeny of a species assemblage is predictive of a trait value so-called tests for phylogenetic signal are used. Being based on different approaches, these tests are generally thought to possess quite different statistical performances. In this article, we show that the Blomberg et al. K and K*, the Abouheif index, the Moran's I, and the Mantel correlation are all based on a cross-product statistic, and are thus all related to each other when they are associated to a permutation test of phylogenetic signal. What changes is only the way phylogenetic and trait similarities (or dissimilarities) among the tips of a phylogeny are computed. The definitions of the phylogenetic and trait-based (dis)similarities among tips thus determines the performance of the tests. We shortly discuss the biological and statistical consequences (in terms of power and type I error of the tests) of the observed relatedness among the statistics that allow tests for phylogenetic signal. Blomberg et al. K* statistic appears as one on the most efficient approaches to test for phylogenetic signal. When branch lengths are not available or not accurate, Abouheif's Cmean statistic is a powerful alternative to K*.

  17. Biological variability of the sweat chloride in diagnostic sweat tests: A retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, F; Lebecque, P; De Boeck, K; Leal, T

    2017-01-01

    The sweat test is the current gold standard for the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF). CF is unlikely when sweat chloride (Clsw) is lower than 30mmol/L, Clsw>60 is suggestive of CF, with intermediate values between 30 and 60mmol/L. To correctly interpret a sweat chloride value, the biological variability of the sweat chloride has to be known. Sweat tests performed in two centers using the classic Gibson and Cooke method were retrospectively reviewed (n=5904). Within test variability of Clsw was measured by comparing results from right and left arm collected on the same day. Between test variability was calculated from subjects with sweat tests performed on more than one occasion. Within test variability of Clsw calculated in 1022 subjects was low with differences between -3.2 (p5) and +3.6mmol/L (p95). Results from left and right arm were classified differently in only 3 subjects. Between test variability of Clsw in 197 subjects was larger, with differences between -18.2mmol/L (p5) and +14.1mmol/L (p95) between repeat tests. Changes in diagnostic conclusion were seen in 55/197 subjects, the most frequent being changing from indeterminate to 'CF unlikely' range (48/102). Variability of sweat chloride is substantial, with frequent changes in diagnostic conclusion, especially in the intermediate range. Copyright © 2016 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Detecting Change in Biological Rhythms: A Multivariate Permutation Test Approach to Fourier-Transformed Data

    PubMed Central

    Blackford, Jennifer Urbano; Salomon, Ronald M.; Waller, Niels G.

    2009-01-01

    Treatment-related changes in neurobiological rhythms are of increasing interest to psychologists, psychiatrists, and biological rhythms researchers. New methods for analyzing change in rhythms are needed, as most common methods disregard the rich complexity of biological processes. Large time series data sets reflect the intricacies of underlying neurobiological processes, but can be difficult to analyze. We propose the use of Fourier methods with multivariate permutation test (MPT) methods for analyzing change in rhythms from time series data. To validate the use of MPT for Fourier-transformed data, we performed Monte Carlo simulations and compared statistical power and family-wise error for MPT to Bonferroni-corrected and uncorrected methods. Results show that MPT provides greater statistical power than Bonferroni-corrected tests, while appropriately controlling family-wise error. We applied this method to human, pre-and post-treatment, serially-sampled neurotransmitter data to confirm the utility of this method using real data. Together, Fourier with MPT methods provides a statistically powerful approach for detecting change in biological rhythms from time series data. PMID:19212840

  19. Computational systems biology and dose-response modeling in relation to new directions in toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Bhattacharya, Sudin; Andersen, Melvin E; Conolly, Rory B

    2010-02-01

    The new paradigm envisioned for toxicity testing in the 21st century advocates shifting from the current animal-based testing process to a combination of in vitro cell-based studies, high-throughput techniques, and in silico modeling. A strategic component of the vision is the adoption of the systems biology approach to acquire, analyze, and interpret toxicity pathway data. As key toxicity pathways are identified and their wiring details elucidated using traditional and high-throughput techniques, there is a pressing need to understand their qualitative and quantitative behaviors in response to perturbation by both physiological signals and exogenous stressors. The complexity of these molecular networks makes the task of understanding cellular responses merely by human intuition challenging, if not impossible. This process can be aided by mathematical modeling and computer simulation of the networks and their dynamic behaviors. A number of theoretical frameworks were developed in the last century for understanding dynamical systems in science and engineering disciplines. These frameworks, which include metabolic control analysis, biochemical systems theory, nonlinear dynamics, and control theory, can greatly facilitate the process of organizing, analyzing, and understanding toxicity pathways. Such analysis will require a comprehensive examination of the dynamic properties of "network motifs"--the basic building blocks of molecular circuits. Network motifs like feedback and feedforward loops appear repeatedly in various molecular circuits across cell types and enable vital cellular functions like homeostasis, all-or-none response, memory, and biological rhythm. These functional motifs and associated qualitative and quantitative properties are the predominant source of nonlinearities observed in cellular dose response data. Complex response behaviors can arise from toxicity pathways built upon combinations of network motifs. While the field of computational cell

  20. Methods for using 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking in biaxial mechanical testing of biological tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Yap, Choon Hwai; Park, Dae Woo; Dutta, Debaditya; Simon, Marc; Kim, Kang

    2015-04-01

    Being multilayered and anisotropic, biological tissues such as cardiac and arterial walls are structurally complex, making the full assessment and understanding of their mechanical behavior challenging. Current standard mechanical testing uses surface markers to track tissue deformations and does not provide deformation data below the surface. In the study described here, we found that combining mechanical testing with 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking could overcome this limitation. Rat myocardium was tested with a biaxial tester and was concurrently scanned with high-frequency ultrasound in three dimensions. The strain energy function was computed from stresses and strains using an iterative non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Because the strain energy function consists of terms for the base matrix and for embedded fibers, spatially varying fiber orientation was also computed by curve fitting. Using finite-element simulations, we first validated the accuracy of the non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Next, we compared experimentally measured rat myocardium strain energy function values with those in the literature and found a matching order of magnitude. Finally, we retained samples after the experiments for fiber orientation quantification using histology and found that the results satisfactorily matched those computed in the experiments. We conclude that 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking can be a useful addition to traditional mechanical testing of biological tissues and may provide the benefit of enabling fiber orientation computation.

  1. Review: production, characterization, and testing of banked mammalian cell substrates used to produce biological products.

    PubMed

    Schiff, Leonard J

    2005-01-01

    A critical component in controlling the production of biological products derived from human and animal cell lines is the characterization and testing of banked cell substrates. The objective is to confirm the identity, purity, and suitability of these cells for manufacturing use. Quality concerns for biological products derived from cell lines originate from the presence of cellular and adventitious contaminants. Well-characterized cell banks not only permit a consistent source of production cells throughout the life of a product but also decrease the likelihood of contamination by other cell lines and adventitious agents. An important part of qualifying a cell line is choosing the appropriate testing for the presence of adventitious contaminants. The qualification of cell banks includes tests for cell identity and endogenous and adventitious microbial contaminants (bacteria, fungi, mycoplasmas, and viruses). For cells producing recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid-derived products, analysis of the expression construct at the nucleic acid level (genetic stability) is also a primary concern. The strategy for designing a safety-testing program for banked cells should be based on sound scientific principles and current regulatory guidance.

  2. METHODS FOR USING 3-D ULTRASOUND SPECKLE TRACKING IN BIAXIAL MECHANICAL TESTING OF BIOLOGICAL TISSUE SAMPLES

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Choon Hwai; Park, Dae Woo; Dutta, Debaditya; Simon, Marc; Kim, Kang

    2014-01-01

    Being multilayered and anisotropic, biological tissues such as cardiac and arterial walls are structurally complex, making full assessment and understanding of their mechanical behavior challenging. Current standard mechanical testing uses surface markers to track tissue deformations and does not provide deformation data below the surface. In the study described here, we found that combining mechanical testing with 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking could overcome this limitation. Rat myocardium was tested with a biaxial tester and was concurrently scanned with high-frequency ultrasound in three dimensions. The strain energy function was computed from stresses and strains using an iterative non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Because the strain energy function consists of terms for the base matrix and for embedded fibers, spatially varying fiber orientation was also computed by curve fitting. Using finite-element simulations, we first validated the accuracy of the non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Next, we compared experimentally measured rat myocardium strain energy function values with those in the literature and found a matching order of magnitude. Finally, we retained samples after the experiments for fiber orientation quantification using histology and found that the results satisfactorily matched those computed in the experiments. We conclude that 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking can be a useful addition to traditional mechanical testing of biological tissues and may provide the benefit of enabling fiber orientation computation. PMID:25616585

  3. HRI catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process materials: chemical analysis and biological testing

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, C.W.; Later, D.W.

    1985-12-01

    This report presents data from the chemical analysis and biological testing of coal liquefaction materials obtained from the Hydrocarbon Research, Incorporated (HRI) catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process. Materials from both an experimental run and a 25-day demonstration run were analyzed. Chemical methods of analysis included adsorption column chromatography, high-resolution gas chromatography, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, low-voltage probe-inlet mass spectrometry, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The biological activity was evaluated using the standard microbial mutagenicity assay and an initiation/promotion assay for mouse-skin tumorigenicity. Where applicable, the results obtained from the analyses of the CTSL materials have been compared to those obtained from the integrated and nonintegrated two-stage coal liquefaction processes. 18 refs., 26 figs., 22 tabs.

  4. The conversion rate of tuberculosis screening tests during biological therapies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cuomo, Giovanna; D'Abrsca, Virginia; Iacono, Daniela; Pantano, Ilenia

    2017-02-01

    Screening for active tuberculosis (TB) and latent TB infection (LTBI) is mandatory to the initiation of biological therapy in patients with rheumatic diseases. To determine the prevalence of LTBI in patients with rheumatoid arthritis before treatment with biological therapy (anti-TNF, abatacept, and tocilizumab) and the rate of TB conversion during treatment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, we evaluated the file of 275 patients with RA treated with biological agents. We considered patients with negative baseline TB screening (tuberculin skin test (TST); quantiferon TB gold in tube (QFT-GIT); chest x-ray) and with rescreening for a TB assay every year. Twenty-six patients (10.6%) resulted positive to TB screening at baseline. Two hundred and forty-nine patients (mean age 55.3 ± 11.9; median 55.8 years, range 16-81.9; 210 female) with TB screening negative at baseline were enrolled. One hundred and sixty-eight (67.5%) patients were treated with anti-TNF, 37 (14.9%) patients with abatacept, and 44 (17.7%) patients with tocilizumab. After a period of 12-120 months (median 24), 34 (13.6%) patients displayed conversion of at least one screening assay. Out of the 34 patients with conversion, 6 (16.2%) were treated with abatacept, 7 (15.9%) with tocilizumab, and 21 (12.5%) with anti-TNF. During the follow-up period, no patients developed active TB. Our study shows that a proportion of patients (13.6%) converts at least one TB screening assay during biological therapy. This study underscores the American College of Rheumatology advice for annual screening in some or all biologically treated patients.

  5. An experimental test of an extended discretion approach for high school biology laboratory investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, William H.; Cavana, Gordon R.; Lowery, Lawrence F.

    Discretion-the exercise of independent judgment-was observed to be lacking in most commercially available laboratory investigations for high school biology. An Extended Discretion (ED) laboratory approach was developed and tested experimentally against the BSCS Green Version laboratory program, using ten classes of 10th-grade biology in a suburban California high school. Five teachers were each assigned one experimental and one control group. The primary differences between the two approaches were that the BSCS was more prescriptive and directive than the ED approach and the ED approach increased discretionary demands upon the student over the school year. A treatment verification procedure showed statistically significant differences between the two approaches. The hypothesis under test was that when high school biology students are taught laboratory concepts under comparatively high discretionary demands, they would perform as well as or better than a similar group of students taught with BSCS Green Version investigations. A second hypothesis was that teachers would prefer to use the ED approach over the BSCS approach for their future classes. A t analysis between experimental and control groups for each teacher was employed. There were significant differences in favor of the ED group on laboratory report scores for three teachers and no differences for two teachers. There were significant differences in favor of the ED group on laboratory concepts quiz scores for three teachers, no differences for one teacher, and significant differences in favor of the BSCS group for only one teacher. A t analysis of teacher evaluation of the two approaches showed a significant teacher preference overall for the ED approach. Both experimental hypotheses were accepted. The ED approach was observed to be difficult for students at first, but it was found to be a workable and productive means of teaching laboratory concepts in biology which also required extensive use of individual

  6. [Plasma antioxidant activity--a test for impaired biological functions of endoecology, exotrophy, and inflammation reactions].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N; Krylin, V V; Dmitriev, V A; Iashin, Ia I

    2010-07-01

    The authors discuss the diagnostic value of a test for total serum antioxidant activity determined by an electrochemistry method on a liquid chromatograph (without a column), by using an amperometric detector, as well as the composition of the endogenously synthesized hydrophilic and hydrophobic acceptors of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Uric acid is a major hydrophilic acceptor of ROS; monoenic oleic fatty acid acts as its major lipophilic acceptor. The constant determined by the authors for of 03 oleic acid oxidation during automatic titration in the organic medium is an order of magnitude higher than that for alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene and linoleic fatty acid; its concentration is also an order of magnitude higher. In oxidative stress, the adrenal steroid hormone dehydroepiandrosterone initiates oleic acid synthesis via expression of palmitoyl elongase and steatoryl desaturase. In early steps of phylogenesis in primates, spontaneous mutation resulted in ascorbic acid synthesis gene knockout; phylogenetically, further other mutation knocked out the gene encoding the synthesis of uricase and the conversion of uric acid to alantoin. In primates, uric acid became not only a catabolite of purine bases in vivo, but also the major endogenous hydrophilic acceptor of ROS. This philogenetic order makes it clear why the epithelium in the proximal nephron tubule entirely reabsorbs uric acid (a catabolite?) from primary urine and then secretes it again to urine depending on the impairment of biological functions of endoecology (the intercellular medium being contaminated with biological rubbish), the activation of a biological inflammatory reaction, the cellular production of ROS, and the reduction in serum total antioxidant activity. With each biological reaction, there was an increase in the blood content of uric acid as a hydrophilic acceptor of ROS, by actively lowering its secretion into urine. Uric acid is a diagnostic test of inflammation, or rather compensatory

  7. Inquiry-based laboratory investigations and student performance on standardized tests in biological science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patke, Usha

    Achievement data from the 3rd International Mathematics and Sciences Study and Program for International Student Assessment in science have indicated that Black students from economically disadvantaged families underachieve at alarming rates in comparison to White and economically advantaged peer groups. The study site was a predominately Black, urban school district experiencing underachievement. The purpose of this correlational study was to examine the relationship between students' use of inquiry-based laboratory investigations and their performance on the Biology End of Course Test, as well as to examine the relationship while partialling out the effects of student gender. Constructivist theory formed the theoretical foundation of the study. Students' perceived levels of experience with inquiry-based laboratory investigations were measured using the Laboratory Program Variable Inventory (LPVI) survey. LPVI scores of 256 students were correlated with test scores and were examined by student gender. The Pearson correlation coefficient revealed a small direct correlation between students' experience in inquiry-based laboratory investigation classes and standardized test scores on the Biology EOCT. A partial correlational analysis indicated that the correlation remained after controlling for gender. This study may prompt a change from teacher-centered to student-centered pedagogy at the local site in order to increase academic achievement for all students. The results of this study may also influence administrators and policy makers to initiate local, state, or nationwide curricular development. A change in curriculum may promote social change as students become more competent, and more able, to succeed in life beyond secondary school.

  8. Testing the nematophagous biological control strain Paecilomyces lilacinus 251 for paecilotoxin production.

    PubMed

    Khan, Alamgir; Williams, Keith; Nevalainen, Helena

    2003-10-10

    Paecilomyces lilacinus is a nematophagous fungus currently developed as a biological control agent. In order to evaluate potential toxin production, culture extract and concentrated culture supernatant of P. lilacinus strain 251 were tested against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis was carried out to compare the chromatograms of P. lilacinus strain 251 with the chromatogram of known paecilotoxin. It was found that the 251 strain of P. lilacinus did not produce detectable levels of paecilotoxin or other toxins with antimicrobial activity.

  9. Collaborative testing improves performance but not content retention in a large-enrollment introductory biology class.

    PubMed

    Leight, Hayley; Saunders, Cheston; Calkins, Robin; Withers, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Collaborative testing has been shown to improve performance but not always content retention. In this study, we investigated whether collaborative testing could improve both performance and content retention in a large, introductory biology course. Students were semirandomly divided into two groups based on their performances on exam 1. Each group contained equal numbers of students scoring in each grade category ("A"-"F") on exam 1. All students completed each of the four exams of the semester as individuals. For exam 2, one group took the exam a second time in small groups immediately following the individually administered test. The other group followed this same format for exam 3. Individual and group exam scores were compared to determine differences in performance. All but exam 1 contained a subset of cumulative questions from the previous exam. Performances on the cumulative questions for exams 3 and 4 were compared for the two groups to determine whether there were significant differences in content retention. Even though group test scores were significantly higher than individual test scores, students who participated in collaborative testing performed no differently on cumulative questions than students who took the previous exam as individuals.

  10. Collaborative Testing Improves Performance but Not Content Retention in a Large-Enrollment Introductory Biology Class

    PubMed Central

    Leight, Hayley; Saunders, Cheston; Calkins, Robin; Withers, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Collaborative testing has been shown to improve performance but not always content retention. In this study, we investigated whether collaborative testing could improve both performance and content retention in a large, introductory biology course. Students were semirandomly divided into two groups based on their performances on exam 1. Each group contained equal numbers of students scoring in each grade category (“A”–“F”) on exam 1. All students completed each of the four exams of the semester as individuals. For exam 2, one group took the exam a second time in small groups immediately following the individually administered test. The other group followed this same format for exam 3. Individual and group exam scores were compared to determine differences in performance. All but exam 1 contained a subset of cumulative questions from the previous exam. Performances on the cumulative questions for exams 3 and 4 were compared for the two groups to determine whether there were significant differences in content retention. Even though group test scores were significantly higher than individual test scores, students who participated in collaborative testing performed no differently on cumulative questions than students who took the previous exam as individuals. PMID:23222835

  11. Fetal sex chromosome testing by maternal plasma DNA sequencing: clinical laboratory experience and biology.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Diana W; Parsa, Saba; Bhatt, Sucheta; Halks-Miller, Meredith; Kurtzman, Kathryn; Sehnert, Amy J; Swanson, Amy

    2015-02-01

    To describe the clinical experience with noninvasive prenatal testing for fetal sex chromosomes using sequencing of maternal plasma cell-free DNA in a commercial laboratory. A noninvasive prenatal testing laboratory data set was examined for samples in which fetal sex chromosomes were reported. Available clinical outcomes were reviewed. Of 18,161 samples with sex chromosome results, no sex chromosome aneuploidy was detected in 98.9% and the fetal sex was reported as XY (9,236) or XX (8,721). In 4 of 32 cases in which the fetal sex was reportedly discordant between noninvasive prenatal testing and karyotype or ultrasonogram, a potential biological reason for the discordance exists, including two cases of documented co-twin demise, one case of a maternal kidney transplant from a male donor, and one case of fetal ambiguous genitalia. In the remaining 204 samples (1.1%), one of four sex chromosome aneuploidies (monosomy X, XXX, XXY, or XYY) was detected. The frequency of false positive results for sex chromosome aneuploidies is a minimum of 0.26% and a maximum of 1.05%. All but one of the discordant sex chromosome aneuploidy results involved the X chromosome. In two putative false-positive XXX cases, maternal XXX was confirmed by karyotype. For the false-positive cases, mean maternal age was significantly higher in monosomy X (P<.001) and lower in XXX (P=.008). Noninvasive prenatal testing results for sex chromosome aneuploidy can be confounded by maternal or fetal biological phenomena. When a discordant noninvasive prenatal testing result is encountered, resolution requires additional maternal history, detailed fetal ultrasonography, and determination of fetal and possibly maternal karyotypes.

  12. Chemical analysis and biological testing of materials from the EDS coal liquefaction process: a status report

    SciTech Connect

    Later, D.W.; Pelroy, R.A.; Wilson, B.W.

    1984-05-01

    Representative process materials were obtained from the EDS pilot plant for chemical and biological analyses. These materials were characterized for biological activity and chemical composition using a microbial mutagenicity assay and chromatographic and mass spectrometric analytical techniques. The two highest boiling distillation cuts, as well as process solvent (PS) obtained from the bottoms recycle mode operation, were tested for initiation of mouse skin tumorigenicity. All three materials were active; the crude 800/sup 0 +/F cut was substantially more potent than the crude bottoms recycle PS or 750 to 800/sup 0/F distillate cut. Results from chemical analyses showed the EDS materials, in general, to be more highly alkylated and have higher hydroaromatic content than analogous SRC II process materials (no in-line process hydrogenation) used for comparison. In the microbial mutagenicity assays the N-PAC fractions showed greater activity than did the aliphatic hydrocarbon, hydroxy-PAH, or PAH fractions, although mutagenicity was detected in certain PAH fractions by a modified version of the standard microbial mutagenicity assay. Mutagenic activities for the EDS materials were lower, overall, than those for the corresponding materials from the SRC II process. The EDS materials produced under different operational modes had distinguishable differences in both their chemical constituency and biological activity. The primary differences between the EDS materials studied here and their SRC II counterparts used for comparison are most likely attributable to the incorporation of catalytic hydrogenation in the EDS process. 27 references, 28 figures, 27 tables.

  13. Electrophoresis tests on STS-3 and ground control experiments - A basis for future biological sample selections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D. R.; Lewis, M. L.

    1982-01-01

    Static zone electrophoresis is an electrokinetic method of separating macromolecules and small particles. However, its application for the isolation of biological cells and concentrated protein solutions is limited by sedimentation and convection. Microgravity eliminates or reduces sedimentation, floatation, and density-driven convection arising from either Joule heating or concentration differences. The advantages of such an environment were first demonstrated in space during the Apollo 14 and 16 missions. In 1975 the Electrophoresis Technology Experiment (MA-011) was conducted during the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project flight. In 1979 a project was initiated to repeat the separations of human kidney cells. One of the major objectives of the Electrophoresis Equipment Verification Tests (EEVT) on STS-3 was to repeat and thereby validate the first successful electrophoretic separation of human kidney cells. Attention is given to the EEVT apparatus, the preflight electrophoresis, and inflight operational results.

  14. Molecular and biological diagnostic tests for monitoring benzimidazole resistance in human soil-transmitted helminths.

    PubMed

    Diawara, Aïssatou; Schwenkenbecher, Jan M; Kaplan, Ray M; Prichard, Roger K

    2013-06-01

    In endemic countries with soil-transmitted helminths mass drug administration with albendazole or mebendazole are being implemented as a control strategy. However, it is well known in veterinary helminths that the use of the same benzimidazole drugs can place selection on the β-tubulin gene, leading to resistance. Given the concern that resistance could arise in human soil-transmitted helminths, there is an urgent need to develop accurate diagnostic tools for monitoring resistance. In this study, we developed molecular assays to detect putative resistance genetic changes in Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and hookworms, and we optimized an egg hatch assay for the canine hookworm Ancylostoma caninum and applied it to Necator americanus. Both assays were tested on field samples. The molecular assays demonstrated their reproducibility and capacity to detect the presence of worms carrying putative resistance-associated genetic changes. However, further investigations are needed to validate our molecular and biological tests on additional field isolates.

  15. Design, Fabrication and Characterization of a Pure Uniaxial Microloading System for Biologic Testing

    PubMed Central

    King, Jonathan D.; York, Spencer L.; Saunders, Marnie M.

    2016-01-01

    The field of mechanobiology is aimed at understanding the role the mechanical environment plays in directing cell and tissue development, function and disease. The empirical aspect of the field requires the development of accurate, reproducible and reliable loading platforms that can apply microprecision mechanical load. In this study we designed, fabricated and characterized a pure uniaxial loading platform capable of testing small synthetic and organic specimens along a horizontal axis. The major motivation for platform development was in stimulating bone cells seeded on elastomeric substrates and soft tissue loading. The biological uses required the development of culturing fixtures and environmental chamber. The device utilizes commercial microactuators, load cells and a rail/carriage block system. Following fabrication, acceptable performance was verified by suture tensile testing. PMID:26904918

  16. Covariance Association Test (CVAT) Identifies Genetic Markers Associated with Schizophrenia in Functionally Associated Biological Processes.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Palle Duun; Demontis, Ditte; Cuyabano, Beatriz Castro Dias; Børglum, Anders D; Sørensen, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Schizophrenia is a psychiatric disorder with large personal and social costs, and understanding the genetic etiology is important. Such knowledge can be obtained by testing the association between a disease phenotype and individual genetic markers; however, such single-marker methods have limited power to detect genetic markers with small effects. Instead, aggregating genetic markers based on biological information might increase the power to identify sets of genetic markers of etiological significance. Several set test methods have been proposed: Here we propose a new set test derived from genomic best linear unbiased prediction (GBLUP), the covariance association test (CVAT). We compared the performance of CVAT to other commonly used set tests. The comparison was conducted using a simulated study population having the same genetic parameters as for schizophrenia. We found that CVAT was among the top performers. When extending CVAT to utilize a mixture of SNP effects, we found an increase in power to detect the causal sets. Applying the methods to a Danish schizophrenia case-control data set, we found genomic evidence for association of schizophrenia with vitamin A metabolism and immunological responses, which previously have been implicated with schizophrenia based on experimental and observational studies. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  17. Pre-release efficacy test of the prospective biological control agent Arytinnis hakani on the invasive weed Genista monspessulana

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In weed biological control, conducting a pre-release efficacy test can help ascertain if prospective biological control agents will be capable of controlling the target plant. Currently, the phloem-feeding psyllid, Arytinnis hakani, is being evaluated as a prospective agent for the exotic invasive w...

  18. A new approach to mechanical testing and modeling of biological tissues, with application to blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Brossollet, L J; Vito, R P

    1996-11-01

    The collection and processing of data from mechanical tests of biological tissues usually follow classical principles appropriate for studying engineering materials. However, difficulties specific to biological tissues have generally kept such methods from producing quantitative results for statistically-oriented studies. This paper demonstrates a different approach linking testing and data reduction with modern statistical tools. Experimental design theory is used to minimize the detrimental effects of collinearity on the stability of the parameters in constitutive equations. The numerical effects of time-dependent biasing factors such as viscoelasticity are reduced by randomizing the order of collection of data points. Some of the parameters of the model are allowed to vary from specimen to specimen while the others are computed once from a database of designed experiments on several specimens. Finally, a new self-modeling algorithm based on principal component analysis is used to generate uncorrelated parameters for a model that is linear in its specimen-dependent parameters. The method, associated with a recently published complementary energy formulation for vascular mechanics, is illustrated with biaxial canine saphenous vein data. Results show that three specimen-dependent linear parameters are enough to characterize the experimental data and that they can be repeatedly estimated from different data sets. Independently collected biaxial inflation data can also be predicted reasonably well with this model.

  19. In silico model-based inference: a contemporary approach for hypothesis testing in network biology

    PubMed Central

    Klinke, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Inductive inference plays a central role in the study of biological systems where one aims to increase their understanding of the system by reasoning backwards from uncertain observations to identify causal relationships among components of the system. These causal relationships are postulated from prior knowledge as a hypothesis or simply a model. Experiments are designed to test the model. Inferential statistics are used to establish a level of confidence in how well our postulated model explains the acquired data. This iterative process, commonly referred to as the scientific method, either improves our confidence in a model or suggests that we revisit our prior knowledge to develop a new model. Advances in technology impact how we use prior knowledge and data to formulate models of biological networks and how we observe cellular behavior. However, the approach for model-based inference has remained largely unchanged since Fisher, Neyman and Pearson developed the ideas in the early 1900’s that gave rise to what is now known as classical statistical hypothesis (model) testing. Here, I will summarize conventional methods for model-based inference and suggest a contemporary approach to aid in our quest to discover how cells dynamically interpret and transmit information for therapeutic aims that integrates ideas drawn from high performance computing, Bayesian statistics, and chemical kinetics. PMID:25139179

  20. Gene expression-based biological test for major depressive disorder: an advanced study

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shin-ya; Numata, Shusuke; Iga, Jun-ichi; Kinoshita, Makoto; Umehara, Hidehiro; Ishii, Kazuo; Ohmori, Tetsuro

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Recently, we could distinguished patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) from nonpsychiatric controls with high accuracy using a panel of five gene expression markers (ARHGAP24, HDAC5, PDGFC, PRNP, and SLC6A4) in leukocyte. In the present study, we examined whether this biological test is able to discriminate patients with MDD from those without MDD, including those with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Patients and methods We measured messenger ribonucleic acid expression levels of the aforementioned five genes in peripheral leukocytes in 17 patients with schizophrenia and 36 patients with bipolar disorder using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and we combined these expression data with our previous expression data of 25 patients with MDD and 25 controls. Subsequently, a linear discriminant function was developed for use in discriminating between patients with MDD and without MDD. Results This expression panel was able to segregate patients with MDD from those without MDD with a sensitivity and specificity of 64% and 67.9%, respectively. Conclusion Further research to identify MDD-specific markers is needed to improve the performance of this biological test. PMID:28260899

  1. In silico model-based inference: a contemporary approach for hypothesis testing in network biology.

    PubMed

    Klinke, David J

    2014-01-01

    Inductive inference plays a central role in the study of biological systems where one aims to increase their understanding of the system by reasoning backwards from uncertain observations to identify causal relationships among components of the system. These causal relationships are postulated from prior knowledge as a hypothesis or simply a model. Experiments are designed to test the model. Inferential statistics are used to establish a level of confidence in how well our postulated model explains the acquired data. This iterative process, commonly referred to as the scientific method, either improves our confidence in a model or suggests that we revisit our prior knowledge to develop a new model. Advances in technology impact how we use prior knowledge and data to formulate models of biological networks and how we observe cellular behavior. However, the approach for model-based inference has remained largely unchanged since Fisher, Neyman and Pearson developed the ideas in the early 1900s that gave rise to what is now known as classical statistical hypothesis (model) testing. Here, I will summarize conventional methods for model-based inference and suggest a contemporary approach to aid in our quest to discover how cells dynamically interpret and transmit information for therapeutic aims that integrates ideas drawn from high performance computing, Bayesian statistics, and chemical kinetics.

  2. Chaste: A test-driven approach to software development for biological modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitt-Francis, Joe; Pathmanathan, Pras; Bernabeu, Miguel O.; Bordas, Rafel; Cooper, Jonathan; Fletcher, Alexander G.; Mirams, Gary R.; Murray, Philip; Osborne, James M.; Walter, Alex; Chapman, S. Jon; Garny, Alan; van Leeuwen, Ingeborg M. M.; Maini, Philip K.; Rodríguez, Blanca; Waters, Sarah L.; Whiteley, Jonathan P.; Byrne, Helen M.; Gavaghan, David J.

    2009-12-01

    Chaste ('Cancer, heart and soft-tissue environment') is a software library and a set of test suites for computational simulations in the domain of biology. Current functionality has arisen from modelling in the fields of cancer, cardiac physiology and soft-tissue mechanics. It is released under the LGPL 2.1 licence. Chaste has been developed using agile programming methods. The project began in 2005 when it was reasoned that the modelling of a variety of physiological phenomena required both a generic mathematical modelling framework, and a generic computational/simulation framework. The Chaste project evolved from the Integrative Biology (IB) e-Science Project, an inter-institutional project aimed at developing a suitable IT infrastructure to support physiome-level computational modelling, with a primary focus on cardiac and cancer modelling. Program summaryProgram title: Chaste Catalogue identifier: AEFD_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEFD_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: LGPL 2.1 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 5 407 321 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 42 004 554 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Operating system: Unix Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: Yes. Parallelized using MPI. RAM:<90 Megabytes for two of the scenarios described in Section 6 of the manuscript (Monodomain re-entry on a slab or Cylindrical crypt simulation). Up to 16 Gigabytes (distributed across processors) for full resolution bidomain cardiac simulation. Classification: 3. External routines: Boost, CodeSynthesis XSD, CxxTest, HDF5, METIS, MPI, PETSc, Triangle, Xerces Nature of problem: Chaste may be used for solving coupled ODE and PDE systems arising from modelling biological systems. Use of Chaste in two application areas are described in this paper: cardiac electrophysiology and

  3. Revocation of General Safety Test Regulations That Are Duplicative of Requirements in Biologics License Applications. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-07-02

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the biologics regulations by removing the general safety test (GST) requirements for biological products. FDA is finalizing this action because the existing codified GST regulations are duplicative of requirements that are also specified in biologics license applications (BLAs), or are no longer necessary or appropriate to help ensure the safety, purity, and potency of licensed biological products. FDA is taking this action as part of its retrospective review of its regulations to promote improvement and innovation, in response to the Executive order.

  4. [Prediction of Post-operative Lymph Node Metastasis with a Molecular Biological Test in Head and Neck Cancer].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Katsumasa; Nakajima, Kyoko; Shino, Masato; Toyoda, Minoru; Takayasu, Yukihiro; Chikamatsu, Kazuaki

    2015-02-01

    We assessed herein the post-operative lymph node metastasis in head and neck cancer, using the One-step nucleotide amplification (OSNA) method targeting matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP-7). Compared with the pathological test, the molecular biological test revealed more lymph node metastasis, resulting in poor prognosis. Six cases, of which the number of lymph node metastasis was the same between pathological and molecular biological test, survived. On the other hand, three of four cases, in which number of lymph node metastasis in the molecular biological test were larger than the pathological test, died from metastasis. We concluded that the pathological test underestimated metastasis, and OSNA with MMP-7 was useful for the prediction of post-operative lymph node metastasis.

  5. Using polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in regulatory testing of biological products.

    PubMed

    Coe Clough, Nancy E; Hauer, Paul J

    2005-01-01

    Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies are often used in regulatory testing of biologicals (vaccines and related products). One of the most common applications for antibody-based immunoassays is as a batch release test. Batch release tests, whether they measure serological responses to vaccination or they quantify individual antigens by in vitro methods, must provide an acceptable estimate of potency of an individual batch of vaccine. Thus, due consideration must be given to the type of antibody used or quantified in such assays. Differences in specificity and avidity may affect the utility of an assay as an indicator of potency; case examples are given to illustrate these concepts. Concerns associated with antigen quantification assays (e.g., reagent denaturation upon binding to solid substrates, and interference from nontarget antigens or additives in a complex vaccine) are also discussed. International efforts to harmonize test methods in recent years have increased the importance of establishing standardized antibodies. Sources of such antibodies and issues associated with the ongoing availability of antibody supplies are described.

  6. Biology-inspired Microphysiological System Approaches to Solve the Prediction Dilemma of Substance Testing

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Uwe; Andersson, Tommy B.; Bahinski, Anthony; Beilmann, Mario; Beken, Sonja; Cassee, Flemming R.; Cirit, Murat; Daneshian, Mardas; Fitzpatrick, Susan; Frey, Olivier; Gaertner, Claudia; Giese, Christoph; Griffith, Linda; Hartung, Thomas; Heringa, Minne B.; Hoeng, Julia; de Jong, Wim H.; Kojima, Hajime; Kuehnl, Jochen; Luch, Andreas; Maschmeyer, Ilka; Sakharov, Dmitry; Sips, Adrienne J. A. M.; Steger-Hartmann, Thomas; Tagle, Danilo A.; Tonevitsky, Alexander; Tralau, Tewes; Tsyb, Sergej; van de Stolpe, Anja; Vandebriel, Rob; Vulto, Paul; Wang, Jufeng; Wiest, Joachim; Rodenburg, Marleen; Roth, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Summary The recent advent of microphysiological systems – microfluidic biomimetic devices that aspire to emulate the biology of human tissues, organs and circulation in vitro – is envisaged to enable a global paradigm shift in drug development. An extraordinary US governmental initiative and various dedicated research programs in Europe and Asia have led recently to the first cutting-edge achievements of human single-organ and multi-organ engineering based on microphysiological systems. The expectation is that test systems established on this basis would model various disease stages, and predict toxicity, immunogenicity, ADME profiles and treatment efficacy prior to clinical testing. Consequently, this technology could significantly affect the way drug substances are developed in the future. Furthermore, microphysiological system-based assays may revolutionize our current global programs of prioritization of hazard characterization for any new substances to be used, for example, in agriculture, food, ecosystems or cosmetics, thus, replacing laboratory animal models used currently. Thirty-five experts from academia, industry and regulatory bodies present here the results of an intensive workshop (held in June 2015, Berlin, Germany). They review the status quo of microphysiological systems available today against industry needs, and assess the broad variety of approaches with fit-for-purpose potential in the drug development cycle. Feasible technical solutions to reach the next levels of human biology in vitro are proposed. Furthermore, key organ-on-a-chip case studies, as well as various national and international programs are highlighted. Finally, a roadmap into the future is outlined, to allow for more predictive and regulatory-accepted substance testing on a global scale. PMID:27180100

  7. Biology-inspired microphysiological system approaches to solve the prediction dilemma of substance testing.

    PubMed

    Marx, Uwe; Andersson, Tommy B; Bahinski, Anthony; Beilmann, Mario; Beken, Sonja; Cassee, Flemming R; Cirit, Murat; Daneshian, Mardas; Fitzpatrick, Susan; Frey, Olivier; Gaertner, Claudia; Giese, Christoph; Griffith, Linda; Hartung, Thomas; Heringa, Minne B; Hoeng, Julia; de Jong, Wim H; Kojima, Hajime; Kuehnl, Jochen; Leist, Marcel; Luch, Andreas; Maschmeyer, Ilka; Sakharov, Dmitry; Sips, Adrienne J A M; Steger-Hartmann, Thomas; Tagle, Danilo A; Tonevitsky, Alexander; Tralau, Tewes; Tsyb, Sergej; van de Stolpe, Anja; Vandebriel, Rob; Vulto, Paul; Wang, Jufeng; Wiest, Joachim; Rodenburg, Marleen; Roth, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    The recent advent of microphysiological systems - microfluidic biomimetic devices that aspire to emulate the biology of human tissues, organs and circulation in vitro - is envisaged to enable a global paradigm shift in drug development. An extraordinary US governmental initiative and various dedicated research programs in Europe and Asia have led recently to the first cutting-edge achievements of human single-organ and multi-organ engineering based on microphysiological systems. The expectation is that test systems established on this basis would model various disease stages, and predict toxicity, immunogenicity, ADME profiles and treatment efficacy prior to clinical testing. Consequently, this technology could significantly affect the way drug substances are developed in the future. Furthermore, microphysiological system-based assays may revolutionize our current global programs of prioritization of hazard characterization for any new substances to be used, for example, in agriculture, food, ecosystems or cosmetics, thus, replacing laboratory animal models used currently. Thirty-six experts from academia, industry and regulatory bodies present here the results of an intensive workshop (held in June 2015, Berlin, Germany). They review the status quo of microphysiological systems available today against industry needs, and assess the broad variety of approaches with fit-for-purpose potential in the drug development cycle. Feasible technical solutions to reach the next levels of human biology in vitro are proposed. Furthermore, key organ-on-a-chip case studies, as well as various national and international programs are highlighted. Finally, a roadmap into the future is outlined, to allow for more predictive and regulatory-accepted substance testing on a global scale.

  8. The Closed Equilibrated Biological Aquatic System: A 12 months Test of an Artificial Aquatic Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blüm, V.; Andriske, M.; Ludwig, Ch.; Paaßen, U.; Voeste, D.

    1999-01-01

    The ``Closed Equilibrated Biological Aquatic System'' (C.E.B.A.S.) is finally disposed for long-term multi-generation experiments with aquatic organisms in a space station. Therefore a minimum operation time of three month is required. It is verified in three versions of laboratory prototypes. The third one passed successfully a 12 months mid-term test in 1995/96 thus demonstrating its high biological stability. The third version of the C.E.B.A.S. consists of a 100 l animal tank, two plant cultivators with a volume of 15 l each with independent illuminations, a 3.0 l semibiological ``mechanical'' filter, a 3.0 l bacteria filter, a heating/cooling device and a dummy filter unit. The live-bearing teleost Xiphophorus helleri is the vertebrate and the pulmonate water snail Biomphalaria glabrata the invertebrate experimental animal in the system. The rootless higher water plant Ceratophyllum demersum is the producer organism. Ammonia oxidizing bacteria and other microorganisms settle in the filters. A simple data acquisition is combined with temperature and plant illumination control. Besides of the space aspects the C.E.B.A.S. proved to be an extremely suitable tool to investigate the organism and subcomponent interactions in a well defined terrestrial aquatic closed ecosystem by providing physical, chemical and biological data which allow an approach to a comprehensive system analysis. Moreover the C.E.B.A.S. is the base for the development of innovative combined animal-plant aquaculture systems for human nutrition on earth which could be implemented into bioregenerative life support systems with a higher degree of complexity suitable for lunar or planetary bases.

  9. The closed equilibrated biological aquatic system: a 12 months test of an artificial aquatic ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Blum, V; Andriske, M; Ludwig, C h; Paassen, U; Voeste, D

    1999-01-01

    The Closed Equilibrated Biological Aquatic System" (C.E.B.A.S.) is finally disposed for long-term multi-generation experiments with aquatic organisms in a space station. Therefore a minimum operation time of three months is required. It is verified in three versions of laboratory prototypes. The third one passed successfully a 12 months mid-term test in 1995/96 thus demonstrating its high biological stability. The third version of the C.E.B.A.S. consists of a 100 l animal tank, two plant cultivators with a volume of 15 l each with independent illuminations, a 3.0 l semibiological "mechanical" filter, a 3.0 l bacteria filter, a heating/cooling device and a dummy filter unit. The live-bearing teleost Xiphophorus helleri is the vertebrate and the pulmonate water snail Biomphalana glabrata the invertebrate experimental animal in the system. The rootless higher water plant Ceratophyllum demersum is the producer organism. Ammonia oxidizing bacteria and other microorganisms settle in the filters. A sample data acquisition is combined with temperature and plant illumination control. Besides of the space aspects the C.E.B.A.S. proved to be an extremely suitable tool to investigate the organism and subcomponent interactions in a well defined terrestrial aquatic closed ecosystem by providing physical, chemical and biological data which allow an approach to a comprehensive system analysis. Moreover the C.E.B.A.S. is the base for the development of innovative combined animal-plant aquaculture systems for human nutrition on earth which could be implemented into bioregenerative life support systems with a higher degree of complexity suitable for lunar or planetary bases.

  10. A test of biological trait analysis with nematodes and an anthropogenic stressor.

    PubMed

    Mitwally, Hanan M; Fleeger, John W

    2016-03-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are fundamentally altered by nutrient enrichment, and effective monitoring tools are needed to detect biological responses especially in the early stages of eutrophication. We tested the utility of biological trait analysis (BTA) to quantify the temporal responses of nematodes inhabiting salt marsh creeks that were experimentally enriched with nutrients for 6 years. Feeding, body shape, and tail shape traits were characterized on >6000 nematodes from annual samples from enriched and non-enriched sites. Here, we ask if trait combinations are more effective than single traits in detecting the magnitude and rate of change. We also sought to identify combinations of traits that best distinguish natural from nutrient-induced variation. BTA revealed that feeding, body shape, and all traits combined equally detected the response to nutrient enrichment. Compared to single traits however, BTAs were more sensitive to temporal trends and better distinguished natural variation from the response to nutrient enrichment. Tail shape traits (that might respond to altered sediment texture or geochemistry) were not affected by enrichment, and feeding traits yielded the greatest difference between enriched and reference communities indicating that changes in food resources drove responses. Feeding traits provided the highest quality information content in our study, and the use of feeding traits alone may adequately identify anthropogenic effects in many studies. However, we caution that body shape, tail shape, and feeding traits were strongly interrelated at our study site, and a diversity of trait groups may increase the information content of BTAs in more diverse habitats.

  11. Porcine ear skin as a biological substrate for in vitro testing of sunscreen performance.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Myriam; Korn, Verena; Imanidis, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the use of skin from porcine ears as a biological substrate for in vitro testing of sunscreens in order to overcome the shortcomings of the presently used polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) plates that generally fail to yield a satisfactory correlation between sun protection factors (SPF) in vitro and in vivo. Trypsin-separated stratum corneum and heat-separated epidermis provided UV-transparent substrates that were laid on quartz or on PMMA plates. These were used to determine surface roughness by chromatic confocal imaging and to measure SPF in vitro of 2 sunscreens by diffuse transmission spectroscopy. The recovered skin layers showed a lower roughness than full-thickness skin but yielded SPF in vitro values that more accurately reflected the SPF determined in vivo by a validated procedure than PMMA plates, although the latter had in part roughness values identical to those of intact skin. Combination of skin tissue with a high roughness PMMA plate also provided accurate SPF in vitro. Besides roughness, the improved affinity of the sunscreen to the skin substrate compared to PMMA plates may explain the better in vitro prediction of SPF achieved with the use of a biological substrate. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. The use of crab-shell chitin for biological denitrification: batch and column tests.

    PubMed

    Robinson-Lora, Mary Ann; Brennan, Rachel A

    2009-01-01

    Crab-shell chitin (SC-20) was evaluated for its ability to enhance biological denitrification in bench-scale tests. In the presence of SC-20, highly reducing conditions were generated, supporting both denitrification and sulfate reduction of aerated water. Rapid degradation of protein in SC-20 was observed to cause an initial high release of ammonium and carbon, while a slower, continuous release of calcium carbonate from the crab shell maintained the pH near 9 throughout the tests. In batch tests, denitrification rates of 2.4+/-0.2 mg N/L-d were obtained. Columns receiving a continuous nitrate load of 24.5 mg N/L-d sustained complete denitrification for an average of 149 d (250 pore volumes). The denitrification rates and longevity of SC-20 chitin are comparable to, or better than, those previously reported for other polymeric substrates. This, in addition to its particle size, non-swelling nature, and ease of delivery in slurry form make SC-20 an attractive electron donor source for groundwater bio-denitrification.

  13. [The investigation of nickel dissolution from nitinol under different extraction conditions in biological tests].

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiantao; He, Xueying; Li, Jian; Tang, Juli; Huang, Yongfu

    2013-03-01

    The dissolution of nickel from nitinol alloy under different extraction conditions was investigated when biological tests of nitinol medical devices were carried out. It discussed the equivalence of these extraction conditions and found the best extraction conditions. In the experiment, two brands of nitinol were chosen and extracted under different extraction conditions according to GB/T 16886-12. Plasma emission spectrometer was used to analyse the concentration of nickel in extract liquid. The results show that there is no equivalence among these extraction conditions for nitinol materials. And it is suggested that (37 +/- 1) degree C, (72 +/- 2) h could be used as normal extraction condition and (70 +/- 2) degrees C, (24 +/- 2) h as accelerated extraction condition.

  14. Novel Biological Approaches for Testing the Contributions of Single DSBs and DSB Clusters to the Biological Effects of High LET Radiation.

    PubMed

    Mladenova, Veronika; Mladenov, Emil; Iliakis, George

    2016-01-01

    The adverse biological effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are commonly attributed to the generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). IR-induced DSBs are generated by clusters of ionizations, bear damaged terminal nucleotides, and frequently comprise base damages and single-strand breaks in the vicinity generating a unique DNA damage-clustering effect that increases DSB "complexity." The number of ionizations in clusters of different radiation modalities increases with increasing linear energy transfer (LET), and is thought to determine the long-known LET-dependence of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Multiple ionizations may also lead to the formation of DSB clusters, comprising two or more DSBs that destabilize chromatin further and compromise overall processing. DSB complexity and DSB-cluster formation are increasingly considered in the development of mathematical models of radiation action, which are then "tested" by fitting available experimental data. Despite a plethora of such mathematical models the ultimate goal, i.e., the "a priori" prediction of the radiation effect, has not yet been achieved. The difficulty partly arises from unsurmountable difficulties in testing the fundamental assumptions of such mathematical models in defined biological model systems capable of providing conclusive answers. Recently, revolutionary advances in methods allowing the generation of enzymatic DSBs at random or in well-defined locations in the genome, generate unique testing opportunities for several key assumptions frequently fed into mathematical modeling - including the role of DSB clusters in the overall effect. Here, we review the problematic of DSB-cluster formation in radiation action and present novel biological technologies that promise to revolutionize the way we address the biological consequences of such lesions. We describe new ways of exploiting the I-SceI endonuclease to generate DSB-clusters at random locations in the genome and describe the

  15. In vitro testing of biological control agents on A1 and A2 isolates of Phytophthora ramorum

    Treesearch

    Marianne Elliott; Simon Shamoun

    2008-01-01

    Biological control products were tested in vitro with six isolates of Phytophthora ramorum. These isolates were geographically diverse and were selected based on their pathogenicity to detached Rhododendron leaves. In addition to five commercially available biocontrol products, nine species of Trichoderma were tested. The in vitro...

  16. The Athlete Biological Passport: How to Personalize Anti-Doping Testing across an Athlete's Career?

    PubMed

    Robinson, Neil; Sottas, Pierre-Edouard; Schumacher, Yorck Olaf

    2017-01-01

    For decades, drug testing has been the main instrument at the disposal of anti-doping authorities. The availability in the 1980s of substances identical to those produced by the human body, including the "big 3" (erythropoietin, testosterone, and growth hormone), necessitated a new paradigm in anti-doping. The athlete biological passport (ABP) is a new paradigm, complementary to traditional drug testing, based on the personalized monitoring of doping biomarkers. Athletes who abuse doping substances do so to trigger physiological changes that provide performance enhancement. The ABP aims to detect these changes through its 3 hematological, steroidal, and endocrine modules. Any deviation of a biomarker from what is expected in a healthy physiological condition can be attributable to doping or a medical condition, which, interestingly, is also the criterion used to define a banned substance. Recent advances in proteomics and metabolomics offer immense opportunities to enhance the ABP. The ABP shares multiple aspects with the present customization of health care and personalized medicine. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Testing surrogacy assumptions: can threatened and endangered plants be grouped by biological similarity and abundances?

    PubMed

    Che-Castaldo, Judy P; Neel, Maile C

    2012-01-01

    There is renewed interest in implementing surrogate species approaches in conservation planning due to the large number of species in need of management but limited resources and data. One type of surrogate approach involves selection of one or a few species to represent a larger group of species requiring similar management actions, so that protection and persistence of the selected species would result in conservation of the group of species. However, among the criticisms of surrogate approaches is the need to test underlying assumptions, which remain rarely examined. In this study, we tested one of the fundamental assumptions underlying use of surrogate species in recovery planning: that there exist groups of threatened and endangered species that are sufficiently similar to warrant similar management or recovery criteria. Using a comprehensive database of all plant species listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act and tree-based random forest analysis, we found no evidence of species groups based on a set of distributional and biological traits or by abundances and patterns of decline. Our results suggested that application of surrogate approaches for endangered species recovery would be unjustified. Thus, conservation planning focused on individual species and their patterns of decline will likely be required to recover listed species.

  18. Future Food Production System Development Pulling from Space Biology Crop Growth Testing in Veggie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massa, G. D.; Romeyn, M. W.; Fritsche, R. F.

    2017-01-01

    lessons, as we learn about growing at different scales and move toward developing systems that require less launch mass. Veggie will be used as a test bed for novel food production technologies. Veggie is a relatively simple precursor food production system but the knowledge gained from space biology validation tests in Veggie will have far reaching repercussions on future exploration food production.

  19. Epistemological Predictors of "Self Efficacy on Learning Biology" and "Test Anxiety Related to Evaluation of Learning on Biology" for Pre-service Elementary Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köksal, Mustafa Serdar

    2011-11-01

    The degree to which pre-service teachers learn biology is related to both motivational factors of self-regulation and factors regarding epistemological beliefs. At the same time, self-regulation and epistemological beliefs are also associated with one another. Based on this relationship, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between components of epistemological beliefs and self-refulation (self-efficacy and test-anxiety) on learning biology. The study was conducted with 411 pre-service elementary and pre-service elementary science teachers by using a predictive research approach. Collected data was analyzed by the multiple linear regression technique. The results showed that only the belief about "existence of one truth" was a significant predictor of test anxiety while there was no epistemological predictor of self-efficacy. Conclusions and implications of the study will be discussed.

  20. Novel Biological Approaches for Testing the Contributions of Single DSBs and DSB Clusters to the Biological Effects of High LET Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Mladenova, Veronika; Mladenov, Emil; Iliakis, George

    2016-01-01

    The adverse biological effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are commonly attributed to the generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). IR-induced DSBs are generated by clusters of ionizations, bear damaged terminal nucleotides, and frequently comprise base damages and single-strand breaks in the vicinity generating a unique DNA damage-clustering effect that increases DSB “complexity.” The number of ionizations in clusters of different radiation modalities increases with increasing linear energy transfer (LET), and is thought to determine the long-known LET-dependence of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Multiple ionizations may also lead to the formation of DSB clusters, comprising two or more DSBs that destabilize chromatin further and compromise overall processing. DSB complexity and DSB-cluster formation are increasingly considered in the development of mathematical models of radiation action, which are then “tested” by fitting available experimental data. Despite a plethora of such mathematical models the ultimate goal, i.e., the “a priori” prediction of the radiation effect, has not yet been achieved. The difficulty partly arises from unsurmountable difficulties in testing the fundamental assumptions of such mathematical models in defined biological model systems capable of providing conclusive answers. Recently, revolutionary advances in methods allowing the generation of enzymatic DSBs at random or in well-defined locations in the genome, generate unique testing opportunities for several key assumptions frequently fed into mathematical modeling – including the role of DSB clusters in the overall effect. Here, we review the problematic of DSB-cluster formation in radiation action and present novel biological technologies that promise to revolutionize the way we address the biological consequences of such lesions. We describe new ways of exploiting the I-SceI endonuclease to generate DSB-clusters at random locations in the genome and

  1. Dosimetric and biological results from the Bacillus subtilis Biostack experiment with the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project.

    PubMed

    Facius, R; Bucker, H; Horneck, G; Reitz, G; Schafer, M

    1979-01-01

    The evaluation of the Bacillus subtilis experiment has been completed. The biological and the physical results for this part of the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) Biostack experiment are given. This comprises dosimetric data for the cosmic radiation at that orbit as well as biological findings from two types of plastic detectors. Further, the frequency distributions of the physical quantities atomic number, energy and energy loss of the heavy ions within the sample of spores hit are presented. The biological hazard presented by cosmic HZE-particles has been much underestimated.

  2. Test Results of Level A Suits to Challenge by Chemical and Biological Warfare Agents and Simulants: Summary Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-01

    Agent Permeation of GB and HD Through 25-Mil Chemical Protective Glove 30 3.3 System Test (Aerosol Simulant) 3.3.1 System Test (Aerosol Simulant... Chemical Protective Glove GB Permeation 176 Appendix Q: Commander Brigade F91 Table Q - 3: Commander Brigade F91: System Test (Vapor Simulant) Results No...capability to protect in a chemical agent or biological agent environment. Each

  3. Hearing Tests on Mobile Devices: Evaluation of the Reference Sound Level by Means of Biological Calibration

    PubMed Central

    Kipiński, Lech; Grysiński, Tomasz; Kręcicki, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Background Hearing tests carried out in home setting by means of mobile devices require previous calibration of the reference sound level. Mobile devices with bundled headphones create a possibility of applying the predefined level for a particular model as an alternative to calibrating each device separately. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the reference sound level for sets composed of a mobile device and bundled headphones. Methods Reference sound levels for Android-based mobile devices were determined using an open access mobile phone app by means of biological calibration, that is, in relation to the normal-hearing threshold. The examinations were conducted in 2 groups: an uncontrolled and a controlled one. In the uncontrolled group, the fully automated self-measurements were carried out in home conditions by 18- to 35-year-old subjects, without prior hearing problems, recruited online. Calibration was conducted as a preliminary step in preparation for further examination. In the controlled group, audiologist-assisted examinations were performed in a sound booth, on normal-hearing subjects verified through pure-tone audiometry, recruited offline from among the workers and patients of the clinic. In both the groups, the reference sound levels were determined on a subject’s mobile device using the Bekesy audiometry. The reference sound levels were compared between the groups. Intramodel and intermodel analyses were carried out as well. Results In the uncontrolled group, 8988 calibrations were conducted on 8620 different devices representing 2040 models. In the controlled group, 158 calibrations (test and retest) were conducted on 79 devices representing 50 models. Result analysis was performed for 10 most frequently used models in both the groups. The difference in reference sound levels between uncontrolled and controlled groups was 1.50 dB (SD 4.42). The mean SD of the reference sound level determined for devices within the same model

  4. Hearing Tests on Mobile Devices: Evaluation of the Reference Sound Level by Means of Biological Calibration.

    PubMed

    Masalski, Marcin; Kipiński, Lech; Grysiński, Tomasz; Kręcicki, Tomasz

    2016-05-30

    Hearing tests carried out in home setting by means of mobile devices require previous calibration of the reference sound level. Mobile devices with bundled headphones create a possibility of applying the predefined level for a particular model as an alternative to calibrating each device separately. The objective of this study was to determine the reference sound level for sets composed of a mobile device and bundled headphones. Reference sound levels for Android-based mobile devices were determined using an open access mobile phone app by means of biological calibration, that is, in relation to the normal-hearing threshold. The examinations were conducted in 2 groups: an uncontrolled and a controlled one. In the uncontrolled group, the fully automated self-measurements were carried out in home conditions by 18- to 35-year-old subjects, without prior hearing problems, recruited online. Calibration was conducted as a preliminary step in preparation for further examination. In the controlled group, audiologist-assisted examinations were performed in a sound booth, on normal-hearing subjects verified through pure-tone audiometry, recruited offline from among the workers and patients of the clinic. In both the groups, the reference sound levels were determined on a subject's mobile device using the Bekesy audiometry. The reference sound levels were compared between the groups. Intramodel and intermodel analyses were carried out as well. In the uncontrolled group, 8988 calibrations were conducted on 8620 different devices representing 2040 models. In the controlled group, 158 calibrations (test and retest) were conducted on 79 devices representing 50 models. Result analysis was performed for 10 most frequently used models in both the groups. The difference in reference sound levels between uncontrolled and controlled groups was 1.50 dB (SD 4.42). The mean SD of the reference sound level determined for devices within the same model was 4.03 dB (95% CI 3

  5. Evaluation of growth based rapid microbiological methods for sterility testing of vaccines and other biological products.

    PubMed

    Parveen, Seema; Kaur, Simleen; David, Selwyn A Wilson; Kenney, James L; McCormick, William M; Gupta, Rajesh K

    2011-10-19

    Most biological products, including vaccines, administered by the parenteral route are required to be tested for sterility at the final container and also at various stages during manufacture. The sterility testing method described in the Code of Federal Regulations (21 CFR 610.12) and the United States Pharmacopoeia (USP, Chapter <71>) is based on the observation of turbidity in liquid culture media due to growth of potential contaminants. We evaluated rapid microbiological methods (RMM) based on detection of growth 1) by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence technology (Rapid Milliflex(®) Detection System [RMDS]), and 2) by CO(2) monitoring technologies (BacT/Alert and the BACTEC systems), as alternate sterility methods. Microorganisms representing Gram negative, Gram positive, aerobic, anaerobic, spore forming, slow growing bacteria, yeast, and fungi were prepared in aliquots of Fluid A or a biological matrix (including inactivated influenza vaccines) to contain approximately 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 colony forming units (CFU) in an inoculum of 10 ml. These preparations were inoculated to the specific media required for the various methods: 1) fluid thioglycollate medium (FTM) and tryptic soy broth (TSB) of the compendial sterility method (both membrane filtration and direct inoculation); 2) tryptic soy agar (TSA), Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) and Schaedler blood agar (SBA) of the RMDS; 3) iAST and iNST media of the BacT/Alert system and 4) Standard 10 Aerobic/F and Standard Anaerobic/F media of the BACTEC system. RMDS was significantly more sensitive in detecting various microorganisms at 0.1CFU than the compendial methods (p<0.05), whereas the compendial membrane filtration method was significantly more sensitive than the BACTEC and BacT/Alert methods (p<0.05). RMDS detected all microorganisms significantly faster than the compendial method (p<0.05). BacT/Alert and BACTEC methods detected most microorganisms significantly faster than the compendial method

  6. Examples of testing global identifiability of biological and biomedical models with the DAISY software.

    PubMed

    Saccomani, Maria Pia; Audoly, Stefania; Bellu, Giuseppina; D'Angiò, Leontina

    2010-04-01

    DAISY (Differential Algebra for Identifiability of SYstems) is a recently developed computer algebra software tool which can be used to automatically check global identifiability of (linear and) nonlinear dynamic models described by differential equations involving polynomial or rational functions. Global identifiability is a fundamental prerequisite for model identification which is important not only for biological or medical systems but also for many physical and engineering systems derived from first principles. Lack of identifiability implies that the parameter estimation techniques may not fail but any obtained numerical estimates will be meaningless. The software does not require understanding of the underlying mathematical principles and can be used by researchers in applied fields with a minimum of mathematical background. We illustrate the DAISY software by checking the a priori global identifiability of two benchmark nonlinear models taken from the literature. The analysis of these two examples includes comparison with other methods and demonstrates how identifiability analysis is simplified by this tool. Thus we illustrate the identifiability analysis of other two examples, by including discussion of some specific aspects related to the role of observability and knowledge of initial conditions in testing identifiability and to the computational complexity of the software. The main focus of this paper is not on the description of the mathematical background of the algorithm, which has been presented elsewhere, but on illustrating its use and on some of its more interesting features. DAISY is available on the web site http://www.dei.unipd.it/ approximately pia/.

  7. Biological impact assessment of nanomaterial used in nanomedicine. introduction to the NanoTEST project.

    PubMed

    Juillerat-Jeanneret, Lucienne; Dusinska, Maria; Fjellsbø, Lise Marie; Collins, Andrew R; Handy, Richard D; Riediker, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Therapeutic nanoparticles (NPs) are used in nanomedicine as drug carriers or imaging agents, providing increased selectivity/specificity for diseased tissues. The first NPs in nanomedicine were developed for increasing the efficacy of known drugs displaying dose-limiting toxicity and poor bioavailability and for enhancing disease detection. Nanotechnologies have gained much interest owing to their huge potential for applications in industry and medicine. It is necessary to ensure and control the biocompatibility of the components of therapeutic NPs to guarantee that intrinsic toxicity does not overtake the benefits. In addition to monitoring their toxicity in vitro, in vivo and in silico, it is also necessary to understand their distribution in the human body, their biodegradation and excretion routes and dispersion in the environment. Therefore, a deep understanding of their interactions with living tissues and of their possible effects in the human (and animal) body is required for the safe use of nanoparticulate formulations. Obtaining this information was the main aim of the NanoTEST project, and the goals of the reports collected together in this special issue are to summarise the observations and results obtained by the participating research teams and to provide methodological tools for evaluating the biological impact of NPs.

  8. Advances in design and testing of limited angle optical diffraction tomographysystem for biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuś, A.; Makowski, P.; Kujawińska, M.

    2016-03-01

    Optical diffraction tomography has been steadily proving its potential to study one of the hot topics in modern cell biology -- 3D dynamic changes in cells' morphology represented with refractive index values. In this technique digital holography is combined with tomographic reconstruction and thus it is necessary to provide projections acquired at different viewing directions. Usually the Mach-Zehnder interferometer configuration is used and while the object beam performs scanning, the reference beam is in most cases stationary. This approach either limits possible scanning strategies or requires additional mechanical movement to be introduced in the reference beam. On the other hand, spiral or grid scanning is possible in alternative common-path or Michelson configurations. However, in this case there is no guarantee that a specimen is sparse enough for the object to interfere with an object-free part of the beam. In this paper we present a modified version of Mach-Zehnder interferometer-based tomographic microscope, in which both object and reference beam are subject to scanning using one scanning device only thus making any scanning scenario possible. This concept is realized with a custom-built optical system in the reference beam and is appropriate for mechanical as well as optical scanning. Usually, the tomographic reconstruction setups and algorithms are verified using a microsphere phantom, which is not enough to test the influence of the distribution of the projections. In this work we propose a more complex calibration object created using two-photon polymerization.

  9. Biological activities of dihydrodiols derived from two polycyclic hydrocarbons in rodent test systems.

    PubMed Central

    Chouroulinkov, I.; Gentil, A.; Tierney, B.; Grover, P. L.; Sims, P.

    1979-01-01

    Comparisons have been made between (a) the initiation of tumours in mouse skin, (b) the induction of hyperplasia and the suppression of sebaceous glands in mouse skin and (c) the induction of s.c. tumours in rats, by either benzo[a]pyrene or 7-methylbenz[a]anthracene and their related K-region and non-K-region dihydrodiols. Whilst the 3,4-dihydrodiol derived from 7-methylbenz[a]anthracene is more active than the hydrocarbon in initiating tumours in mouse skin (subsequently promoted by a phorbol ester) the 7,8-dihydrodiol of benzo[a]pyrene is very much less active than benzo[a]pyrene itself in the induction of hyperplasia or the suppression of sebaceous glands in mouse skin or in the induction of s.c. sarcomas in rats. Since much other evidence suggests that the 3,4-dihydrodiol of 7-methylbenz[a]anthracene and the 7,8-dihydrodiol of benzo[a]pyrene are the dihydrodiols involved, via the related vicinal diol-epoxides, in the metabolic activation of these hydrocarbons, mouse skin initiation-promotion experiments may be more useful for the identification of such diols than the other two in vivo tests for biological activity used here. PMID:444395

  10. Space experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space (CellRad)": Hardware and biological system tests.

    PubMed

    Hellweg, Christine E; Dilruba, Shahana; Adrian, Astrid; Feles, Sebastian; Schmitz, Claudia; Berger, Thomas; Przybyla, Bartos; Briganti, Luca; Franz, Markus; Segerer, Jürgen; Spitta, Luis F; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Konda, Bikash; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Panitz, Corinna; Reitz, Günther

    2015-11-01

    One factor contributing to the high uncertainty in radiation risk assessment for long-term space missions is the insufficient knowledge about possible interactions of radiation with other spaceflight environmental factors. Such factors, e.g. microgravity, have to be considered as possibly additive or even synergistic factors in cancerogenesis. Regarding the effects of microgravity on signal transduction, it cannot be excluded that microgravity alters the cellular response to cosmic radiation, which comprises a complex network of signaling pathways. The purpose of the experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space" (CellRad, formerly CERASP) is to study the effects of combined exposure to microgravity, radiation and general space flight conditions on mammalian cells, in particular Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK) cells that are stably transfected with different plasmids allowing monitoring of proliferation and the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) pathway by means of fluorescent proteins. The cells will be seeded on ground in multiwell plate units (MPUs), transported to the ISS, and irradiated by an artificial radiation source after an adaptation period at 0 × g and 1 × g. After different incubation periods, the cells will be fixed by pumping a formaldehyde solution into the MPUs. Ground control samples will be treated in the same way. For implementation of CellRad in the Biolab on the International Space Station (ISS), tests of the hardware and the biological systems were performed. The sequence of different steps in MPU fabrication (cutting, drilling, cleaning, growth surface coating, and sterilization) was optimized in order to reach full biocompatibility. Different coatings of the foil used as growth surface revealed that coating with 0.1 mg/ml poly-D-lysine supports cell attachment better than collagen type I. The tests of prototype hardware (Science Model) proved its full functionality for automated medium change, irradiation and fixation of cells. Exposure of

  11. Space experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space (CELLRAD)": Hardware and biological system tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, Christine E.; Dilruba, Shahana; Adrian, Astrid; Feles, Sebastian; Schmitz, Claudia; Berger, Thomas; Przybyla, Bartos; Briganti, Luca; Franz, Markus; Segerer, Jürgen; Spitta, Luis F.; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Konda, Bikash; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Panitz, Corinna; Reitz, Günther

    2015-11-01

    One factor contributing to the high uncertainty in radiation risk assessment for long-term space missions is the insufficient knowledge about possible interactions of radiation with other spaceflight environmental factors. Such factors, e.g. microgravity, have to be considered as possibly additive or even synergistic factors in cancerogenesis. Regarding the effects of microgravity on signal transduction, it cannot be excluded that microgravity alters the cellular response to cosmic radiation, which comprises a complex network of signaling pathways. The purpose of the experiment ;Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space; (CELLRAD, formerly CERASP) is to study the effects of combined exposure to microgravity, radiation and general space flight conditions on mammalian cells, in particular Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK) cells that are stably transfected with different plasmids allowing monitoring of proliferation and the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) pathway by means of fluorescent proteins. The cells will be seeded on ground in multiwell plate units (MPUs), transported to the ISS, and irradiated by an artificial radiation source after an adaptation period at 0 × g and 1 × g. After different incubation periods, the cells will be fixed by pumping a formaldehyde solution into the MPUs. Ground control samples will be treated in the same way. For implementation of CELLRAD in the Biolab on the International Space Station (ISS), tests of the hardware and the biological systems were performed. The sequence of different steps in MPU fabrication (cutting, drilling, cleaning, growth surface coating, and sterilization) was optimized in order to reach full biocompatibility. Different coatings of the foil used as growth surface revealed that coating with 0.1 mg/ml poly-D-lysine supports cell attachment better than collagen type I. The tests of prototype hardware (Science Model) proved its full functionality for automated medium change, irradiation and fixation of cells. Exposure of

  12. A Test of the Relationship between Reading Ability & Standardized Biology Assessment Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Denise A.

    2014-01-01

    Little empirical evidence suggested that independent reading abilities of students enrolled in biology predicted their performance on the Biology I Graduation End-of-Course Assessment (ECA). An archival study was conducted at one Indiana urban public high school in Indianapolis, Indiana, by examining existing educational assessment data to test…

  13. A Test of the Relationship between Reading Ability & Standardized Biology Assessment Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Denise A.

    2014-01-01

    Little empirical evidence suggested that independent reading abilities of students enrolled in biology predicted their performance on the Biology I Graduation End-of-Course Assessment (ECA). An archival study was conducted at one Indiana urban public high school in Indianapolis, Indiana, by examining existing educational assessment data to test…

  14. Selected Biology Behavioral Objectives and Test Items for Grades 4-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leithwood, Kenneth A.

    This booklet, compiled by the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, lists behavioral objectives for biology in grades 4-6. The major areas of biology objectives presented are relations among plants, animals, and the environment; identifying and classifying plants and animals; and structures and functions of plants and animals. Each major…

  15. Inferring local competition intensity from patch size distributions: a test using biological soil crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowker, Matthew A.; Maestre, Fernando T.

    2012-01-01

    Dryland vegetation is inherently patchy. This patchiness goes on to impact ecology, hydrology, and biogeochemistry. Recently, researchers have proposed that dryland vegetation patch sizes follow a power law which is due to local plant facilitation. It is unknown what patch size distribution prevails when competition predominates over facilitation, or if such a pattern could be used to detect competition. We investigated this question in an alternative vegetation type, mosses and lichens of biological soil crusts, which exhibit a smaller scale patch-interpatch configuration. This micro-vegetation is characterized by competition for space. We proposed that multiplicative effects of genetics, environment and competition should result in a log-normal patch size distribution. When testing the prevalence of log-normal versus power law patch size distributions, we found that the log-normal was the better distribution in 53% of cases and a reasonable fit in 83%. In contrast, the power law was better in 39% of cases, and in 8% of instances both distributions fit equally well. We further hypothesized that the log-normal distribution parameters would be predictably influenced by competition strength. There was qualitative agreement between one of the distribution's parameters (μ) and a novel intransitive (lacking a 'best' competitor) competition index, suggesting that as intransitivity increases, patch sizes decrease. The correlation of μ with other competition indicators based on spatial segregation of species (the C-score) depended on aridity. In less arid sites, μ was negatively correlated with the C-score (suggesting smaller patches under stronger competition), while positive correlations (suggesting larger patches under stronger competition) were observed at more arid sites. We propose that this is due to an increasing prevalence of competition transitivity as aridity increases. These findings broaden the emerging theory surrounding dryland patch size distributions

  16. Science Library of Test Items. Volume Seventeen. A Collection of Multiple Choice Test Items Relating Mainly to Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New South Wales Dept. of Education, Sydney (Australia).

    As one in a series of test item collections developed by the Assessment and Evaluation Unit of the Directorate of Studies, items are made available to teachers for the construction of unit tests or term examinations or as a basis for class discussion. Each collection was reviewed for content validity and reliability. The test items meet syllabus…

  17. Comparative study of biological activity of insulins of lower vertebrates in the novel adenylyl cyclase test-system.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, L; Shpakov, A; Rusakov, Yu; Plesneva, S; Bondareva, V; Pertseva, M

    2003-11-15

    The biological activity of insulins of lower vertebrates (teleosts-Oncorhynchus gorbuscha, Scorpaena porcus, chondrosteans-Acipenser guldenstaedti and cyclostomates-Lamperta fluviatilis) was studied and compared with that of standard pig insulin. The determination of biological activity was made using the novel adenylyl cyclase (AC) test-system based on the adenylyl cyclase signaling mechanism (ACSM) of insulin action discovered earlier by the authors. The biological activity of insulins was estimated as EC(50), i.e. concentration leading to half-maximal activating effect of the hormone (10(-11)-10(-7) M), in vitro, on adenylyl cyclase in two types of the target tissues: in membrane fractions of the muscles of rat and mollusc Anodonta cygnea. In rat, the efficiency of insulins was found to decrease in the following order: pig insulin>scorpaena insulin>gorbuscha insulin>sturgeon insulin>lamprey insulin. In the mollusc, the order was different: sturgeon insulin>scorpaena insulin>pig insulin>gorbuscha insulin. Lamprey insulin at the same concentrations did not apparently reach the maximal adenylyl cyclase activating effect. The suggestion was made that differences in the biological activity of insulins depend on the hormone structure and a number of indexes characteristic of the adenylyl cyclase test-system in the vertebrate and invertebrate tissues. The proposed adenylyl cyclase test-system is highly sensitive to insulin at physiological concentrations, has good reproduction and is easy to apply.

  18. Critical tests for determination of microbiological quality and biological activity in commercial vermicompost samples of different origins.

    PubMed

    Grantina-Ievina, Lelde; Andersone, Una; Berkolde-Pīre, Dace; Nikolajeva, Vizma; Ievinsh, Gederts

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the present paper was to show that differences in biological activity among commercially produced vermicompost samples can be found by using a relatively simple test system consisting of microorganism tests on six microbiological media and soilless seedling growth tests with four vegetable crop species. Significant differences in biological properties among analyzed samples were evident both at the level of microbial load as well as plant growth-affecting activity. These differences were mostly manufacturer- and feedstock-associated, but also resulted from storage conditions of vermicompost samples. A mature vermicompost sample that was produced from sewage sludge still contained considerable number of Escherichia coli. Samples from all producers contained several potentially pathogenic fungal species such as Aspergillus fumigatus, Pseudallescheria boidii, Pseudallescheria fimeti, Pseudallescheria minutispora, Scedosporium apiospermum, Scedosporium prolificans, Scopulariopsis brevicaulis, Stachybotrys chartarum, Geotrichum spp., Aphanoascus terreus, and Doratomyces columnaris. In addition, samples from all producers contained plant growth-promoting fungi from the genera Trichoderma and Mortierella. The described system can be useful both for functional studies aiming at understanding of factors affecting quality characteristics of vermicompost preparations and for routine testing of microbiological quality and biological activity of organic waste-derived composts and vermicomposts.

  19. Testing biological effects of hand-washing grey water for reuse in irrigation on an urban farm: a case study.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Zain; Sim, Yei Lin; Lin, Yang Jian; Lai, Ka Man

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of reusing hand-washing grey water contaminated with antibacterial hand-washing liquid for irrigation purposes in an urban farm is explored in this case study. Experiments are carried out to investigate if the quality of this grey water allows for its reuse in agriculture as per the guidelines established by the World Health Organization (WHO). However, there is no guideline to test the biological effect of grey water prior to agricultural use. It is plausible that the antibacterial property of the grey water can harm the soil microbial system and plants when applied to land, even if all other water quality parameters satisfy the WHO limit. We use algae (Chlorella vulgaris) and indigenous soil bacteria as initial plant and soil bacteria indicators, respectively, to test the potential inhibition of the water on plants and soil bacteria. Results show that the chemical oxygen demand (COD) of the grey water is 10% higher than the WHO permissible level, while all other water quality parameters are within the limits after four days of our experimental period. An inhibitory effect is observed in all of the biological tests. However, the inhibitory effect on algae and soil bacteria is not observed after the four-day period. The case study demonstrates a new approach for testing the biological effect of grey water, which can be used in conjunction with the WHO guideline, and provides data for this urban farm to set up a future water treatment system for grey-water reuse in irrigation.

  20. Measuring the Outcome of At-Risk Students on Biology Standardized Tests When Using Different Instructional Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Dana

    Over the last two decades, online education has become a popular concept in universities as well as K-12 education. This generation of students has grown up using technology and has shown interest in incorporating technology into their learning. The idea of using technology in the classroom to enhance student learning and create higher achievement has become necessary for administrators, teachers, and policymakers. Although online education is a popular topic, there has been minimal research on the effectiveness of online and blended learning strategies compared to the student learning in a traditional K-12 classroom setting. The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in standardized test scores from the Biology End of Course exam when at-risk students completed the course using three different educational models: online format, blended learning, and traditional face-to-face learning. Data was collected from over 1,000 students over a five year time period. Correlation analyzed data from standardized tests scores of eighth grade students was used to define students as "at-risk" for failing high school courses. The results indicated a high correlation between eighth grade standardized test scores and Biology End of Course exam scores. These students were deemed "at-risk" for failing high school courses. Standardized test scores were measured for the at-risk students when those students completed Biology in the different models of learning. Results indicated significant differences existed among the learning models. Students had the highest test scores when completing Biology in the traditional face-to-face model. Further evaluation of subgroup populations indicated statistical differences in learning models for African-American populations, female students, and for male students.

  1. The effects of co-teaching on student test performance and attitudes towards science in high school biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Virginia Scott

    Reform efforts in response to the inclusion of students with disabilities into general education classrooms have become necessary to shift students' placements into the science classroom. An investigation into the effects of co-teaching in high school biology classrooms was conducted to explore the impact of two models of co-teaching on biology students' achievement and their attitudes towards science. Quantitative data were collected using a diagnostic exam, student chapter test scores, and the Scientific Attitude Inventory II (SAI II) (Moore & Foy, 1997). Additionally, qualitative data were collected from student and teacher interviews, as well as reflections recorded by the general education participating teacher. The study occurred at a predominantly African-American high school in an Alabama city school with approximately 700 students. The population for the study was composed of 62 high school biology students, with 18 of those students placed inclusively in the biology classroom as a result of No Child Left Behind legislation. The participating teachers consisted of one general education biology teacher and one highly qualified, science special education teacher. Twelve students, along with the special education participating teacher, were interviewed and provided qualitative data after completion of the study. The general education teacher provided teacher reflection responses to contribute qualitatively on the impact of co-teaching in high school biology. Quantitative data analysis was performed using descriptive statistics, ANOVA, and paired samples t tests analyses. ANOVA results revealed that there were no changes in student test scores of achievement due to the models of instruction implemented. The implementation of no co-teaching, station teaching, and the one-teaching, one-drifting co-teaching models of instruction did not result in significant changes in students' achievement. Furthermore, paired samples t tests revealed no change in students

  2. Determination of ichthiomycin concentration by biological test with Cyprinus carpio L.

    PubMed

    Gameyska, Y; Popov, K; Ognianov, I; Tishinova, R; Rachev, R

    1993-01-01

    We have found out that one-year-old carps are extremely sensitive to ichthiomycin in concentrations between 25-125 micrograms/dm3. This fact permitted the use of biological methods for determination of ichthiomycin concentrations in cultural medium of Streptomyces levoris 1107 or crude preparations of the antibiotic.

  3. Membrane materials for storing biological samples intended for comparative nanotoxicological testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metelkin, A.; Kuznetsov, D.; Kolesnikov, E.; Chuprunov, K.; Kondakov, S.; Osipov, A.; Samsonova, J.

    2015-11-01

    The study is aimed at identifying the samples of most promising membrane materials for storing dry specimens of biological fluids (Dried Blood Spots, DBS technology). Existing sampling systems using cellulose fiber filter paper have a number of drawbacks such as uneven distribution of the sample spot, dependence of the spot spreading area on the individual biosample properties, incomplete washing-off of the sample due to partially inconvertible sorption of blood components on cellulose fibers, etc. Samples of membrane materials based on cellulose, polymers and glass fiber with applied biosamples were studied using methods of scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy and surface-wetting measurement. It was discovered that cellulose-based membrane materials sorb components of biological fluids inside their structure, while membranes based on glass fiber display almost no interaction with the samples and biological fluid components dry to films in the membrane pores between the structural fibers. This characteristic, together with the fact that membrane materials based on glass fiber possess sufficient strength, high wetting properties and good storage capacity, attests them as promising material for dry samples of biological fluids storage systems.

  4. The Relationship of Programmed Instruction to Test and Discussion Performance among Beginning College Biology Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Gary Eugene

    The objective of this research was to contrast the effects of two instructional techniques (programmed vs. conventional) used in beginning college biology courses. The experimental technique involved the use of programmed textbook units within the typical course syllabus. Ninety students were involved in the study. Four programmed texts were used.…

  5. Testing Effect and Complex Comprehension in a Large Introductory Undergraduate Biology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagliarulo, Christopher L.

    2011-01-01

    Traditional undergraduate biology courses are content intensive, requiring students to understand and remember large amounts of information in short periods of time. Yet most students maintain little of the material encountered during their education. Poor knowledge retention is a main cause of academic failure and high undergraduate attrition…

  6. Testing Effect and Complex Comprehension in a Large Introductory Undergraduate Biology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagliarulo, Christopher L.

    2011-01-01

    Traditional undergraduate biology courses are content intensive, requiring students to understand and remember large amounts of information in short periods of time. Yet most students maintain little of the material encountered during their education. Poor knowledge retention is a main cause of academic failure and high undergraduate attrition…

  7. The performances of the chi-square test and complexity measures for signal recognition in biological sequences.

    PubMed

    Pirhaji, Leila; Kargar, Mehdi; Sheari, Armita; Poormohammadi, Hadi; Sadeghi, Mehdi; Pezeshk, Hamid; Eslahchi, Changiz

    2008-03-21

    With large amounts of experimental data, modern molecular biology needs appropriate methods to deal with biological sequences. In this work, we apply a statistical method (Pearson's chi-square test) to recognize the signals appear in the whole genome of the Escherichia coli. To show the effectiveness of the method, we compare the Pearson's chi-square test with linguistic complexity on the complete genome of E. coli. The results suggest that Pearson's chi-square test is an efficient method for distinguishing genes (coding regions) form pseudogenes (noncoding regions). On the other hand, the performance of the linguistic complexity is much lower than the chi-square test method. We also use the Pearson's chi-square test method to determine which parts of the Open Reading Frame (ORF) have significant effect on discriminating genes form pseudogenes. Moreover, different complexity measures and Pearson's chi-square test applied on the genes with high value of Pearson's chi-square statistic. We also compute the measures on homologous of these genes. The results illustrate that there is a region near the start codon with high value of chi-square statistic and low complexity that is conserve between homologous genes.

  8. Cosmic radiation exposure of biological test systems during the EXPOSE-E mission.

    PubMed

    Berger, Thomas; Hajek, Michael; Bilski, Pawel; Körner, Christine; Vanhavere, Filip; Reitz, Günther

    2012-05-01

    In the frame of the EXPOSE-E mission on the Columbus external payload facility EuTEF on board the International Space Station, passive thermoluminescence dosimeters were applied to measure the radiation exposure of biological samples. The detectors were located either as stacks next to biological specimens to determine the depth dose distribution or beneath the sample carriers to determine the dose levels for maximum shielding. The maximum mission dose measured in the upper layer of the depth dose part of the experiment amounted to 238±10 mGy, which relates to an average dose rate of 408±16 μGy/d. In these stacks of about 8 mm height, the dose decreased by 5-12% with depth. The maximum dose measured beneath the sample carriers was 215±16 mGy, which amounts to an average dose rate of 368±27 μGy/d. These values are close to those assessed for the interior of the Columbus module and demonstrate the high shielding of the biological experiments within the EXPOSE-E facility. Besides the shielding by the EXPOSE-E hardware itself, additional shielding was experienced by the external structures adjacent to EXPOSE-E, such as EuTEF and Columbus. This led to a dose gradient over the entire exposure area, from 215±16 mGy for the lowest to 121±6 mGy for maximum shielding. Hence, the doses perceived by the biological samples inside EXPOSE-E varied by 70% (from lowest to highest dose). As a consequence of the high shielding, the biological samples were predominantly exposed to galactic cosmic heavy ions, while electrons and a significant fraction of protons of the radiation belts and solar wind did not reach the samples.

  9. Cosmic Radiation Exposure of Biological Test Systems During the EXPOSE-E Mission

    PubMed Central

    Hajek, Michael; Bilski, Pawel; Körner, Christine; Vanhavere, Filip; Reitz, Günther

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In the frame of the EXPOSE-E mission on the Columbus external payload facility EuTEF on board the International Space Station, passive thermoluminescence dosimeters were applied to measure the radiation exposure of biological samples. The detectors were located either as stacks next to biological specimens to determine the depth dose distribution or beneath the sample carriers to determine the dose levels for maximum shielding. The maximum mission dose measured in the upper layer of the depth dose part of the experiment amounted to 238±10 mGy, which relates to an average dose rate of 408±16 μGy/d. In these stacks of about 8 mm height, the dose decreased by 5–12% with depth. The maximum dose measured beneath the sample carriers was 215±16 mGy, which amounts to an average dose rate of 368±27 μGy/d. These values are close to those assessed for the interior of the Columbus module and demonstrate the high shielding of the biological experiments within the EXPOSE-E facility. Besides the shielding by the EXPOSE-E hardware itself, additional shielding was experienced by the external structures adjacent to EXPOSE-E, such as EuTEF and Columbus. This led to a dose gradient over the entire exposure area, from 215±16 mGy for the lowest to 121±6 mGy for maximum shielding. Hence, the doses perceived by the biological samples inside EXPOSE-E varied by 70% (from lowest to highest dose). As a consequence of the high shielding, the biological samples were predominantly exposed to galactic cosmic heavy ions, while electrons and a significant fraction of protons of the radiation belts and solar wind did not reach the samples. Key Words: Space radiation—Dosimetry—Passive radiation detectors—Thermoluminescence—EXPOSE-E. Astrobiology 12, 387–392. PMID:22680685

  10. Characteristics of Twenty-Nine Aerosol Samplers Tested at U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (2000-2006)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    and biological particles in the size range of 0.5 - 13 urn. None of the samplers were tested with all particle sizes . A comparative ranking...dependent on particle aerodynamic size and wind speed. Inlets intended for use either in calm air or indoors can be characterized in an aerosol...on particle size , density, charge, composition, and biofactors. There has been ambiguity in the use of these efficiency terms in the literature. In

  11. [Predictive values of the usual biologic tests for the detection of human immunodeficiency virus infection. Consequences for screening].

    PubMed

    Grémy, F; Salmi, L R

    1995-02-01

    This paper tries to review what is scientifically known about the predictive values of biological tests of HIV infection. The epidemiological situation for that infection is characterized by two facts: the very high values of sensitivity and specificity which are close to unity; the prevalence of seropositivity which is on average--at least in western countries--, very low (except for some small specific groups). Under those conditions, Negative Predictive Values are always very close to unity, and the percentage of false negative tests is extremely low. Things are quite different for Positive Predictive Value, which varies very rapidly with very small shifts or uncertainties about specificity and prevalence. In the case when prevalence is very low (general population screening) and at the same time specificity is not excellent (that means < 0.99 or even < 0.995), Positive Predictive Value is very poor and the proportion of false positive tests rather important. Indeed the analysis of scientific literature, using the method of "best synthesis evidence", reveals numerous discrepancies as to the value of specificity among different tests. Figures vary a lot from one study to another. It is not obvious which screening strategies are concerned by the results, which finally entail a strong statistical uncertainty. Finally, the figures published in the literature are given by high standard laboratories. One may fear the tests realized in routine laboratories are less reliable. As a conclusion, let us say that despite their very good quality, the biological tests, when used separately, should not be trusted without strong previous criticism when applied to samples of the general population. Any biological screening should be preceded by a clinical examination, including a precise inquiry, in order to detect people at risk, that means with a high prior probability. Clinical dialogue has moreover another great interest: it allows health consulting and education, and calls

  12. Test Results of Air-Permeable Charcoal Impregnated Suits to Challenge by Chemical and Biological Warfare Agents and Simulants. Executive Summary and Summary Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-05-01

    proteCt in a "CW ( chemical warfare ) and BW (biological warfare )" agents environment. Swatches of material from each suit design were tested for...factors were determined for each suit. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES HD Swatch testing Permeation testing 63 GB Chemical protective suits... Testing Procedures This testing was conducted to measure the permeation of chemical agents GB

  13. Developing Achievement Test: A Research for Assessment of 5th Grade Biology Subject

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sener, Nilay; Tas, Erol

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to prepare a multiple-choice achievement test with high reliability and validity for the "Let's Solve the Puzzle of Our Body" unit. For this purpose, a multiple choice achievement test consisting of 46 items was applied to 178 fifth grade students in total. As a result of the test and material analysis…

  14. Cold Regions Environmental Test of Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Decontamination Equipment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    6502, Engine, Cold-starting and Warmup Tests. (2) Decontaminant mixing/filling. Evaluate ease of filling and mixing decontaminants at low temperatures...2. TOP 2-2-650, Engine Cold-Starting and Warmup Tests, 18 July 1980. 3. TOP 8-4-015, Cold Regions Logistics, Supportability Testing of Chemical

  15. 76 FR 36019 - Amendments to Sterility Test Requirements for Biological Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ... as incubation conditions (time and temperature) to be used during testing, suitable test organisms...) and incubation conditions (time and temperature) to be used during testing, with exceptions provided... temperature) and visual examination requirements currently prescribed in Sec. 610.12. Because we propose to...

  16. Mortality follow-up of veterans who participated in military chemical and biological warfare agent testing between 1962 and 1972.

    PubMed

    Kang, Han K; Bullman, Tim

    2009-01-01

    Between 1962 and 1972, several thousand U.S. Navy personnel participated in Project SHAD (Shipboard Hazard and Defense). These tests potentially exposed participants to either active chemical or biological warfare agents or their simulants. This study examined mortality risk associated with participating in SHAD tests by comparing the cause-specific mortality of 4927 SHAD veterans to that of 10,927 other Navy veterans. Compared to other Navy veterans, SHAD veterans had an increased risk of overall mortality, which was due primarily to heart disease deaths.

  17. A versatile system for biological and soil chemical tests on a planetary landing craft. I - Scientific objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radmer, R. J.; Kok, B.; Martin, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    We describe an approach for the remote detection and characterization of life in planetary soil samples. A mass spectrometer is used as the central sensor to monitor changes in the gas phase in eleven test cells filled with soil. Many biological assays, ranging from general 'in situ' assays to specific metabolic processes (such as photosynthesis, respiration, denitrification, etc.) can be performed by appropriate additions to the test cell via attached preloaded injector capsules. The system is also compatible with a number of chemical assays such as the analysis of atmospheric composition (both chemical and isotopic), the status of soil water, and the determination of compounds of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur in the soil.

  18. A versatile system for biological and soil chemical tests on a planetary landing craft. I - Scientific objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radmer, R. J.; Kok, B.; Martin, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    We describe an approach for the remote detection and characterization of life in planetary soil samples. A mass spectrometer is used as the central sensor to monitor changes in the gas phase in eleven test cells filled with soil. Many biological assays, ranging from general 'in situ' assays to specific metabolic processes (such as photosynthesis, respiration, denitrification, etc.) can be performed by appropriate additions to the test cell via attached preloaded injector capsules. The system is also compatible with a number of chemical assays such as the analysis of atmospheric composition (both chemical and isotopic), the status of soil water, and the determination of compounds of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur in the soil.

  19. The Silicon Trypanosome: a test case of iterative model extension in systems biology

    PubMed Central

    Achcar, Fiona; Fadda, Abeer; Haanstra, Jurgen R.; Kerkhoven, Eduard J.; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Leroux, Alejandro E.; Papamarkou, Theodore; Rojas, Federico; Bakker, Barbara M.; Barrett, Michael P.; Clayton, Christine; Girolami, Mark; Luise Krauth-Siegel, R.; Matthews, Keith R.; Breitling, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    The African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, is a unicellular parasite causing African Trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness in humans and nagana in animals). Due to some of its unique properties, it has emerged as a popular model organism in systems biology. A predictive quantitative model of glycolysis in the bloodstream form of the parasite has been constructed and updated several times. The Silicon Trypanosome (SilicoTryp) is a project that brings together modellers and experimentalists to improve and extend this core model with new pathways and additional levels of regulation. These new extensions and analyses use computational methods that explicitly take different levels of uncertainty into account. During this project, numerous tools and techniques have been developed for this purpose, which can now be used for a wide range of different studies in systems biology. PMID:24797926

  20. The silicon trypanosome: a test case of iterative model extension in systems biology.

    PubMed

    Achcar, Fiona; Fadda, Abeer; Haanstra, Jurgen R; Kerkhoven, Eduard J; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Leroux, Alejandro E; Papamarkou, Theodore; Rojas, Federico; Bakker, Barbara M; Barrett, Michael P; Clayton, Christine; Girolami, Mark; Krauth-Siegel, R Luise; Matthews, Keith R; Breitling, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    The African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, is a unicellular parasite causing African Trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness in humans and nagana in animals). Due to some of its unique properties, it has emerged as a popular model organism in systems biology. A predictive quantitative model of glycolysis in the bloodstream form of the parasite has been constructed and updated several times. The Silicon Trypanosome is a project that brings together modellers and experimentalists to improve and extend this core model with new pathways and additional levels of regulation. These new extensions and analyses use computational methods that explicitly take different levels of uncertainty into account. During this project, numerous tools and techniques have been developed for this purpose, which can now be used for a wide range of different studies in systems biology.

  1. Critique of Test Methodologies for Biological Agent Detection and Identification Systems for Military and First Responders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis (BT). This is of critical importance as these are very common in the soil and the BT is common used to kill...Assays, generic DNA , and Luminescence) have demonstrated significant performance differences when evaluated with common environmental samples...study, salt, sugars, detergents, talc, phosphates, cross-reacting organisms ( Bacillus spp), non-toxic material of biological origin (cereal), as

  2. Testing biological liquid samples using modified m-line spectroscopy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augusciuk, Elzbieta; Rybiński, Grzegorz

    2005-09-01

    Non-chemical method of detection of sugar concentration in biological (animal and plant source) liquids has been investigated. Simplified set was build to show the easy way of carrying out the survey and to make easy to gather multiple measurements for error detecting and statistics. Method is suggested as easy and cheap alternative for chemical methods of measuring sugar concentration, but needing a lot effort to be made precise.

  3. Protozoan parasites in group-living primates: testing the biological island hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Colin A; Bowman, Dwight D; Ghai, Ria R; Gogarten, Jan F; Goldberg, Tony L; Rothman, Jessica M; Twinomugisha, Dennis; Walsh, Chesley

    2012-06-01

    A series of articles by W.J. Freeland published in the 1970s proposed that social organization and behavioral processes were heavily influenced by parasitic infections, which led to a number of intriguing hypotheses concerning how natural selection might act on social factors because of the benefits of avoiding parasite infections. For example, Freeland [1979] showed that all individuals within a given group harbored identical gastrointestinal protozoan faunas, which led him to postulate that social groups were akin to "biological islands" and suggest how this isolation could select specific types of ranging and dispersal patterns. Here, we reexamine the biological island hypothesis by quantifying the protozoan faunas of the same primate species examined by Freeland in the same location; our results do not support this hypothesis. In contrast, we quantified two general changes in protozoan parasite community of primates in the study area of Kibale National Park, Uganda, over the nearly 35 years between sample collections: (1) the colobines found free of parasites in the early 1970s are now infected with numerous intestinal protozoan parasites and (2) groups are no longer biological islands in terms of their protozoan parasites. Whatever the ultimate explanation for these changes, our findings have implications for studies proposing selective forces shaping primate behavior and social organization. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Instrument for controlling the application of mechanical loads to biological and bicompatible test subjects

    DOEpatents

    Lintilhac, Phillip M.; Vesecky, Thompson B.

    1995-01-01

    Apparatus and methods are disclosed facilitating the application of forces and measurement of dimensions of a test subject. In one arrangement the test subject is coupled to a forcing frame and controlled forces applied thereto. Force applied to the test subject is measured and controlled. A dimensional characteristic of the test subject, such as growth, is measured by a linear variable differential transformer. The growth measurement data can be used to control the force applied. The transducer module receives force and dimensional data from the forcing frame. The transducer module is a separate, microprocessor-based unit that communicates the test data to a controller unit that controls the application of force to the test subject and receives the test data from the transducer module for force control, storage, and/or communication to the user.

  5. Instrument for controlling the application of mechanical loads to biological and bicompatible test subjects

    DOEpatents

    Lintilhac, P.M.; Vesecky, T.B.

    1995-09-19

    An apparatus and methods are disclosed facilitating the application of forces and measurement of dimensions of a test subject. In one arrangement the test subject is coupled to a forcing frame and controlled forces applied thereto. Force applied to the test subject is measured and controlled. A dimensional characteristic of the test subject, such as growth, is measured by a linear variable differential transformer. The growth measurement data can be used to control the force applied. The transducer module receives force and dimensional data from the forcing frame. The transducer module is a separate, microprocessor-based unit that communicates the test data to a controller unit that controls the application of force to the test subject and receives the test data from the transducer module for force control, storage, and/or communication to the user. 8 figs.

  6. Concurrent use of REM latency, dexamethasone suppression, clonidine, and apomorphine tests as biological markers of endogenous depression: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ansseau, M; Scheyvaerts, M; Doumont, A; Poirrier, R; Legros, J J; Franck, G

    1984-07-01

    In a sample of 12 major depressive inpatients, endogenous subtype (8 primary and 4 secondary) defined by Research Diagnostic Criteria, we compared the sensitivity of four potential biological markers: latency of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep (recorded during at least 4 consecutive nights), dexamethasone suppression, and the clonidine and apomorphine tests. Shortened REM latency (less than 50 minutes during at least 1 night) identified 67% of depressives (87% of primary and 25% of secondary); nonsuppression after dexamethasone identified 50% of depressives (62% of primary and 25% of secondary); blunted growth hormone (GH) response after clonidine identified 75% of depressives (100% of primary and 25% of secondary); and blunted GH response after apomorphine identified 42% of depressives (62% of primary and 0% of secondary). Ninety-two percent of patients were correctly identified by at least one biological marker (100% of primary and 75% of secondary depressives). Of 67% of patients positive on at least two biological markers, all were primary depressives (100%). These four biological markers do not necessarily identify the same population, suggesting that their concurrent use may yield the highest level of diagnostic sensitivity.

  7. 'Battling my biology': psychological effects of genetic testing for risk of weight gain.

    PubMed

    Meisel, S F; Wardle, J

    2014-04-01

    The availability of genetic tests for multifactorial conditions such as obesity raises concerns that higher-risk results could lead to fatalistic reactions or lower-risk results to complacency. No study has investigated the effects of genetic test feedback for the risk of obesity in non-clinical samples. The present study explored psychological and behavioral reactions to genetic test feedback for a weight related gene (FTO) in a volunteer sample (n = 18) using semi-structured interviews. Respondents perceived the gene test result as scientifically objective; removing some of the emotion attached to the issue of weight control. Those who were struggling with weight control reported relief of self-blame. There was no evidence for either complacency or fatalism; all respondents emphasized the importance of lifestyle choices in long-term weight management, although they recognized the role of both genes and environment. Regardless of the test result, respondents evaluated the testing positively and found it motivating and informative. Genetic test feedback for risk of weight gain may offer psychological benefits beyond its objectively limited clinical utility. As the role of genetic counselors is likely to expand, awareness of reasons for genetic testing for common, complex conditions and reactions to the test result is important.

  8. Biological-mechanical waste treatment tests at a landfill in East Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Wotte, J.; Brummack, J.; Paar, S.; Gemende, B.

    1996-11-01

    The paper begins by describing the present situation in East Germany with regard to sanitary landfills, that is, there is very limited space for new landfills. The paper discusses the new German waste act amendments, special waste management problems in East Germany, and the combination biological and mechanical waste treatment (BMT) method proposed to help solve these problems. In general terms the BMT method would use a combination of composting, fermentation, separation, mixing, and crushing processes to minimize the waste to be disposed of and to render it harmless to further degradation which leads to emission of methane and contaminated leachates from the landfills.

  9. Biological testing of sediment for the Olympia Harbor Navigation Improvement Project, 1988: Geoduck, amphipod, and echinoderm bioassays

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, J.A.; Word, J.Q.; Antrim, L.D.

    1989-05-01

    The Olympia Harbor Navigation Improvement Project requires the dredging of approximately 330,000 cubic yards (cy) of sediment from the harbor entrance channel and 205,185 cy from the turning basin. Puget Sound Dredged Disposal Analysis (PSDDA) partial characterization studies were used to plan a full sediment characterization in which chemical analyses and biological testing of sediments evaluated the suitability of the dredged material for unconfined, open-water disposal. The US Army Corps of Engineers (COE), Seattle District, contracted with NOAA/NMFS, Environmental Conservation Division, to perform the chemical analysis and Microtox bioassay tests, and with the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) in Sequim to perform flow-through solid-phase bioassays utilizing juvenile (8 to 10 mm) geoduck clams, Panopea generosa, and static solid phase bioassays using the phoxocephalid amphipod, Rhepoxynius abronius, developing embryos and gametes of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, and the larvae of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. When the results of the biological tests were evaluated under PSDDA guidelines, it was found that all the tested sediment treatments from Olympia Harbor are suitable for unconfined open-water disposal. 14 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Biological alternatives to chemical identification for the ecotoxicological assessment of industrial effluents: The RTG-2 in vitro cytotoxicity test

    SciTech Connect

    Castano, A. . Centro de Sanidad Ambiental); Vega, M.; Blazquez, T.; Tarazona, J.V. )

    1994-10-01

    Ecotoxicology is concerned with the effects of chemicals on biological systems. Identifying components of complex aqueous effluents poses special problems, and can be useless if there is a lack of information on the biological effects of the identified chemicals. Toxicity-based (bioassay-directed) sample fractionation can be very useful, but the small amount of fractioned material is a constraint that can be solved by using in vitro tests. The RTG-2 in vitro cytotoxicity test has been used to assess (a) the efficacy of a treatment plant in the aeronautics industry and (b) the exposure of fish and molluscs cultured in Esteiro Bay to the effluent of a fish-processing factory. Ecotoxicological assessments could be done without identifying the responsible chemicals. The RTG-2 test was used in combination with concentration/fractionation procedures. It proved that the toxicity of the liquid wastes from the aeronautics industry was eliminated by the treatment, and that molluscs and fish reared in Esteiro Bay had accumulated toxic chemicals dumped by the fish-processing factory. A combination of the RTG-2 cytotoxicity test and HPLC proved to give useful information even for chemicals not identified by GC-MS.

  11. Experimental Work in Biology: Book 1, Food Tests; Book 2, Enzymes; Book 3, Soil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackean, D. G.

    Laboratory experiments are presented in these first three manuals of a six-volume series for use at the 12- to 16-year-old, or British CSE, level. On the subject of food tests, 17 exercises are prepared in connection with Biuret reactions, starch and emulsion tests, Millon's and Benedict's reagents, reagent sensitivity, and calorific values and…

  12. Experimental Work in Biology: Book 1, Food Tests; Book 2, Enzymes; Book 3, Soil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackean, D. G.

    Laboratory experiments are presented in these first three manuals of a six-volume series for use at the 12- to 16-year-old, or British CSE, level. On the subject of food tests, 17 exercises are prepared in connection with Biuret reactions, starch and emulsion tests, Millon's and Benedict's reagents, reagent sensitivity, and calorific values and…

  13. Alignment between High School Biology Curriculum Standard and the Standardised Tests of Four Provinces in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Qun; Liu, Enshan

    2012-01-01

    With the development and implementation of new curriculum standards, the field tests of education reform in senior high schools began in 2004 in four pilot provinces in mainland China. After five years of the reform, it is necessary to know how and to what extent the curriculum standard guides test classroom instruction. The present study was…

  14. Alignment between High School Biology Curriculum Standard and the Standardised Tests of Four Provinces in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Qun; Liu, Enshan

    2012-01-01

    With the development and implementation of new curriculum standards, the field tests of education reform in senior high schools began in 2004 in four pilot provinces in mainland China. After five years of the reform, it is necessary to know how and to what extent the curriculum standard guides test classroom instruction. The present study was…

  15. Euglena gracilis as a supplementary test organism for detecting biologically active compounds.

    PubMed

    Macor, M; Beno, J; Grones, J; Siekel, P; Novotný, J

    1996-01-01

    The mutagenic activity of more than 120 antimicrobial agents and protective components was investigated. Only Kathon showed a consistent increase in revertant counts in the Ames test on Salmonella typhimurium. The hereditary bleaching test on Euglena gracilis used for detecting extranuclear mutations, showed positive results for Kathon, triethanolamine and diamine silver tetraborate.

  16. 40 CFR 230.61 - Chemical, biological, and physical evaluation and testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... effect until the revised testing guidelines are published as final regulations. (a) No single test or approach can be applied in all cases to evaluate the effects of proposed discharges of dredged or fill... effects. The principal concerns of discharge of dredged or fill material that contain contaminants are the...

  17. 40 CFR 230.61 - Chemical, biological, and physical evaluation and testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... effect until the revised testing guidelines are published as final regulations. (a) No single test or approach can be applied in all cases to evaluate the effects of proposed discharges of dredged or fill... effects. The principal concerns of discharge of dredged or fill material that contain contaminants are the...

  18. Planar biaxial testing of soft biological tissue using rakes: A critical analysis of protocol and fitting process.

    PubMed

    Fehervary, Heleen; Smoljkić, Marija; Vander Sloten, Jos; Famaey, Nele

    2016-08-01

    Mechanical characterization of soft biological tissue is becoming more and more prevalent. Despite the growing use of planar biaxial testing for soft tissue characterization, testing conditions and subsequent data analysis have not been standardized and vary widely. This also influences the quality of the result of the parameter fitting. Moreover, the testing conditions and data analysis are often not or incompletely reported, which impedes the proper comparison of parameters obtained from different studies. With a focus on planar biaxial tests using rakes, this paper investigates varying testing conditions and varying data analysis methods and their effect on the quality of the parameter fitting results. By means of a series of finite element simulations, aspects such as number of rakes, rakes׳ width, loading protocol, constitutive model, material stiffness and anisotropy are evaluated based on the degree of homogeneity of the stress field, and on the correlation between the experimentally obtained stress and the stress derived from the constitutive model. When calculating the aforementioned stresses, different definitions of the section width and deformation gradient are used in literature, each of which are looked into. Apart from this degree of homogeneity and correlation, also the effect on the quality of the parameter fitting result is evaluated. The results show that inhomogeneities can be reduced to a minimum for wise choices of testing conditions and analysis methods, but never completely eliminated. Therefore, a new parameter optimization procedure is proposed that corrects for the inhomogeneities in the stress field and induces significant improvements to the fitting results. Recommendations are made for best practice in rake-based planar biaxial testing of soft biological tissues and subsequent parameter fitting, and guidelines are formulated for reporting thereof in publications.

  19. Proposed biological testing methods for the United States incineration-at-sea research program

    SciTech Connect

    Strobel, C.J.; Gentile, J.H.; Schimmel, S.C.; Carr, R.S.; Williams, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    As part of the United States Environmental Protection Agency's Incineration-at-Sea research program, a suite of toxicity tests has been selected for assessing the toxicity of incinerator emissions generated during the combustion of chlorinated wastes. The test organisms for the five short-term chronic tests are the inland silverside, Menidia beryllina, the myside Mysidopsis bahia, the red macroalga Champia parvula, the polychaete Dinophilus gyrociliatus, and gametes from the sea urchin Arbacia punctulata. The durations of individual tests range from 2 hours to 7 days. The endpoints include survival, growth and reproductive effects. The results have demonstrated that the proposed methodologies can be used to test the toxicity of gaseous emissions, and that there appears to be no significant toxicity associated with the combustion products of a carrier fuel oil.

  20. Effect of chemical and biological surfactants on activated sludge of MBR system: microscopic analysis and foam test.

    PubMed

    Capodici, Marco; Di Bella, Gaetano; Nicosia, Salvatore; Torregrossa, Michele

    2015-02-01

    A bench-scale MBR unit was operated, under stressing condition, with the aim of stimulating the onset of foaming in the activated sludge. Possible synergies between synthetic surfactants in the wastewater and biological surfactants (Extra-Cellular Polymeric Substances, EPSs) were investigated by changing C/N ratio. The growth of filamentous bacteria was also discussed. The MBR unit provided satisfactory overall carbon removal overall efficiencies: in particular, synthetic surfactants were removed with efficiency higher than 90% and 95% for non-ionic and ionic surfactants, respectively. Lab investigation suggested also the importance to reduce synthetic surfactants presence entering into mixed liquor: otherwise, their presence can significantly worsen the natural foaming caused by biological surfactants (EPSs) produced by bacteria. Finally, a new analytic method based on "ink test" has been proposed as a useful tool to achieve a valuation of EPSs bound fraction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Single and multiple streamer DBD micro-discharges for testing inactivation of biologically contaminated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prukner, Vaclav; Dolezalova, Eva; Simek, Milan

    2014-10-01

    Highly reactive environment produced by atmospheric-pressure, non-equilibrium plasmas generated by surface dielectric barrier discharges (SDBDs) may be used for inactivation of biologically contaminated surfaces. We investigated decontamination efficiency of reactive environment produced by single/multiple surface streamer micro-discharge driven by amplitude-modulated AC power in coplanar electrode geometry on biologically contaminated surface by Escherichia coli. The discharges were fed by synthetic air with water vapor admixtures at atmospheric pressure, time of treatment was set from 10 second to 10 minutes, diameters of used SDBD electrodes (single and multiple streamer) and homogeneously contaminated disc samples were equal (25 mm), the distance between the electrode and contaminated surface was 2 mm. Both a conventional cultivation and fluorescent method LIVE/DEAD Bacterial Viability kit were applied to estimate counts of bacteria after the plasma treatment. Inactivation was effective and bacteria partly lost ability to grow and became injured and viable/active but non-cultivable (VBNC/ABNC). Work was supported by the MEYS under Project LD13010, VES13 COST CZ (COST Action MP 1101).

  2. A test of Ockham's razor: implications of conjugated linoleic acid in bone biology.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Bruce A; Li, Yong; Lippman, Hugh E; Reinwald, Susan; Seifert, Mark F

    2004-06-01

    The philosopher William of Ockham is recognized for the maxim that an assumption introduced to explain a phenomenon must not be multiplied beyond necessity, or that the simplest explanation is probably the correct explanation. The general truth is that conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) are nutrients. However, the demonstration that these isomers of octadecadienoic acid protect against cancers in rodents stimulated curiosity that directed significant resources to characterize the biological functions of these fatty acids in cell and animal models. The benefits to human subjects given supplements of CLA were at best modest. The disappointing results in humans should be taken as an opportunity to critically evaluate all findings of CLA use and to consolidate the common actions of this nutrient so that future investigations focus on specific isomers and the most reasonable mechanisms. As such, the principal and consistently reported benefits of CLA have been in improving cancer outcomes, reducing body fat in growing animals, and modulating cell functions. Recognizing where related actions of CLA converge in specific disease conditions and physiologic states is how research efforts should be directed to minimize the pursuit of superfluous theories. Here, we briefly review the current biological effects of CLA and attempt to integrate their potential effect on the physiology and health of the skeletal system. Thus, the purpose of this review is to advance the science of CLA and to identify areas of research in which these nutrients affect bone metabolism and skeletal health.

  3. The relationship between agricultural intensification and biological control: experimental tests across Europe.

    PubMed

    Thies, Carsten; Haenke, Sebastian; Scherber, Christoph; Bengtsson, Janne; Bommarco, Riccardo; Clement, Lars W; Ceryngier, Piotr; Dennis, Christopher; Emmerson, Mark; Gagic, Vesna; Hawro, Violetta; Liira, Jaan; Weisser, Wolfgang W; Winqvist, Camilla; Tscharntke, Teja

    2011-09-01

    Agricultural intensification can affect biodiversity and related ecosystem services such as biological control, but large-scale experimental evidence is missing. We examined aphid pest populations in cereal fields under experimentally reduced densities of (1) ground-dwelling predators (-G), (2) vegetation-dwelling predators and parasitoids (-V), (3) a combination of (1) and (2) (-G-V), compared with open-fields (control), in contrasting landscapes with low vs. high levels of agricultural intensification (AI), and in five European regions. Aphid populations were 28%, 97%, and 199% higher in -G, -V, and -G-V treatments, respectively, compared to the open fields, indicating synergistic effects of both natural-enemy groups. Enhanced parasitoid: host and predator: prey ratios were related to reduced aphid population density and population growth. The relative importance of parasitoids and vegetation-dwelling predators greatly differed among European regions, and agricultural intensification affected biological control and aphid density only in some regions. This shows a changing role of species group identity in diverse enemy communities and a need to consider region-specific landscape management.

  4. Radiotoxicity of gadolinium-148 and radium-223 in mouse testes: relative biological effectiveness of alpha-particle emitters in vivo.

    PubMed

    Howell, R W; Goddu, S M; Narra, V R; Fisher, D R; Schenter, R E; Rao, D V

    1997-03-01

    The biological effects of radionuclides that emit alpha particles are of considerable interest in view of their potential for therapy and their presence in the environment. The present work is a continuation of our ongoing effort to study the radiotoxicity of alpha-particle emitters in vivo using the survival of murine testicular sperm heads as the biological end point. Specifically, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of very low-energy alpha particles (3.2 MeV) emitted by 148Gd is investigated and determined to be 7.4 +/- 2.4 when compared to the effects of acute external 120 kVp X rays. This datum, in conjunction with our earlier results for 210Po and 212Pb in equilibrium with its daughters, is used to revise and extend the range of validity of our previous RBE-energy relationship for alpha particles emitted by tissue-incorporated radionuclides. The new empirical relationship is given by RBE alpha = 9.14 - 0.510 E alpha where 3 < E alpha < 9 MeV. The validity of this empirical relationship is tested by determining the RBE of the prolific alpha-particle emitter 223Ra (in equilibrium with its daughters) experimentally in the same biological model and comparing the value obtained experimentally with the predicted value. The resulting RBE values are 5.4 +/- 0.9 and 5.6, respectively. This close agreement strongly supports the adequacy of the empirical RBE-E alpha relationship to predict the biological effects of alpha-particle emitters in vivo.

  5. Radiotoxicity of Gadolinium-148 and Radium-223 in Mouse Testes: Relative Biological Effectiveness of Alpha-Particle Emitters In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Roger W.; Goddu, S. Murty; Narra, Venkat R.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Schenter, Robert E.; Rao, Dandamudi V.

    2012-01-01

    The biological effects of radionuclides that emit α particles are of considerable interest in view of their potential for therapy and their presence in the environment. The present work is a continuation of our ongoing effort to study the radiotoxicity of α-particle emitters in vivo using the survival of murine testicular sperm heads as the biological end point. Specifically, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of very low-energy α particles (3.2 MeV) emitted by 148Gd is investigated and determined to be 7.4 ± 2.4 when compared to the effects of acute external 120 kVp X rays. This datum, in conjunction with our earlier results for 210Po and 212Pb in equilibrium with its daughters, is used to revise and extend the range of validity of our previous RBE–energy relationship for α particles emitted by tissue-incorporated radionuclides. The new empirical relationship is given by RBEα = 9.14 − 0.510 Eα, where 3 < Eα < 9 MeV. The validity of this empirical relationship is tested by determining the RBE of the prolific α-particle emitter 223Ra (in equilibrium with its daughters) experimentally in the same biological model and comparing the value obtained experimentally with the predicted value. The resulting RBE values are 5.4 ± 0.9 and 5.6, respectively. This close agreement strongly supports the adequacy of the empirical RBE-Eα relationship to predict the biological effects of α-particle emitters in Vivo. PMID:9052681

  6. Dispersed oil toxicity tests with biological species indigenous to the Gulf of Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fucik, K.W.; Carr, K.A.; Balcom, B.J.

    1994-08-01

    Static and flowthrough aquatic acute toxicity testing protocols were utilized on eggs and larvae of seven commercially important invertebrates and fishes from the Gulf of Mexico. Test organisms were exposed to Central and Western Gulf oils, dispersed oil, and Corexit 9527. Species included brown shrimp (Penaeus aztecus), white shrimp (Penaeus setiferus), blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica), red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus), inland silverside (Menidia berylina), and spot (Leiosomus xanthurus). Atlantic menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus) was also tested because gulf menhaden were not available. Mysids (Mysidopsis bahia) were evaluated as part of a chronic toxicity assessment.

  7. [Ethylene oxide sterilization. II. Influence of test devices on the performance of biological monitors and its evaluation].

    PubMed

    Pinto, T de J; Saito, T

    1992-12-01

    In view of the importance of the assurance of the sterility of medical devices, with a large incidence of tubular forms, a study of biological monitors was undertaken, using paper as a carrier, the dimension of the test specimens being the variable considered. After the sterilization process in an industrial cycle, followed by the recovery of the surviving spores through inoculation of the carriers into thioglycolate broth, soybean-casein broth and this last with the addition of bromothymol blue. No differences were found between the growth promoting capacity of these 3 media. The effectiveness of sterilization was dependent on the dimension of the test specimens. The periodic determination of residual gas content on the test specimens, as well as the monitoring of the industrial environment demonstrate the need and importance of the legislation in force.

  8. A method for biological testing of containment systems for viral agents.

    PubMed

    Bolton, N E; Lincoln, T A; Otten, J A; Porter, W E

    1976-07-01

    A technique utilizing coliphage as the test material has been developed and employed to evaluate the effectiveness of a containment system for zonal centrifugation of hepatits viruses. An Andersen Viable Particle Sampler which had been loaded with plates containing a base layer of agar nutrient with an overlay of E. coli- agar suspension was used to sample the test air. The containment system, which includes a HEPA filter, was challenged with an aerosolized suspension of coliphage.

  9. Investigation and field testing of anaerobic biological treatment of pharmaceutical wastewaters

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-30

    A study has been conducted that investigated and demonstrated the anaerobic biological treatment of wastewaters generated by the pharmaceuticals industry. This report presents the results of the multi-phase program and the conclusions and recommendations which have been derived from an analysis of the experimental data. The program was initiated in October 1985 and was conducted over a period of 26 months, at which point the experimental portions of the study were completed in December 1987. These can be divided to essentially three major tasks: screening assays to assess anaerobic treatability; bench-scale treatability investigations of the Merck Stonewall Plant wastewaters; and, pilot scale demonstration of anaerobic treatment. Each major element is discussed separately, addressing the design of the program (facilities), the experimental procedures, and finally the results of each task. The final section discusses the application of the technology to the pharmaceutical industry and the economic components associated with it. 2 refs., 54 figs., 35 tabs.

  10. Biological and analytical variations of 16 parameters related to coagulation screening tests and the activity of coagulation factors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Shou, Weiling; Wu, Wei; Guo, Ye; Zhang, Yujuan; Huang, Chunmei; Cui, Wei

    2015-04-01

    To accurately estimate longitudinal changes in individuals, it is important to take into consideration the biological variability of the measurement. The few studies available on the biological variations of coagulation parameters are mostly outdated. We confirmed the published results using modern, fully automated methods. Furthermore, we added data for additional coagulation parameters. At 8:00 am, 12:00 pm, and 4:00 pm on days 1, 3, and 5, venous blood was collected from 31 healthy volunteers. A total of 16 parameters related to coagulation screening tests as well as the activity of coagulation factors were analyzed; these included prothrombin time, fibrinogen (Fbg), activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, international normalized ratio, prothrombin time activity, activated partial thromboplastin time ratio, fibrin(-ogen) degradation products, as well as the activity of factor II, factor V, factor VII, factor VIII, factor IX, and factor X. All intraindividual coefficients of variation (CVI) values for the parameters of the screening tests (except Fbg) were less than 5%. Conversely, the CVI values for the activity of coagulation factors were all greater than 5%. In addition, we calculated the reference change value to determine whether a significant difference exists between two test results from the same individual.

  11. Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from the John F. Baldwin Ship Channel: Phase 3 -- biological testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, N.P.; Karle, L.M.; Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; White, P.J.; Gruendell, B.D.; Word, J.Q.

    1993-10-01

    The John F. Baldwin Ship Channel is a 28-mile-long portion of the San Francisco Bay to Stockton Ship Channel, the primary shipping lane through San Francisco Bay and Delta. The San Francisco District of the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is responsible for construction of the John F. Baldwin Ship Channel, which is authorized to be deepened to a project depth of {minus}45 ft relative to mean lower low water (MLLW). Approximately 8.5 million cubic yards (mcy) of sediment will be removed from the channel to reach this project depth. The USACE requested Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to conduct testing for ocean disposal under the guidelines in Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal-Testing Manual (EPA/USACE 1991). This testing manual contains a tiered evaluation approach developed specifically for ocean disposal of dredged material at a selected site. In this study, John F. Baldwin Ship Channel sediments were evaluated under the Tier III (biological) testing guidance, which is considered to be highly stringent and protective of the environment. The Tier III guidance for ocean disposal testing requires tests of water column effects, (following dredged material disposal), deposited sediment toxicity, and bioaccumulation of contaminants from deposited sediment (dredged material).

  12. Surfzone Bubbles: Model Development, Testing and Extension to Sedimentary/Chemical/Biological Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    inundation", Ocean Modelling, 43-44, 36-51. Shi, F., Kirby, J . T., Ma, G., Holman , R. A. and Chickadel, C. C., 2012b, "Field testing model predictions...Shi, F., Kirby, J . T., Ma, G., Holman , R. A. and Chickadel, C. C., 2012b, "Field testing model predictions of foam coverage and bubble content...outflows and their effects on the delivery and resuspension of sediments in the near field. REFERENCES Blenkinsopp, C. E. and Chaplin, J . R., 2007

  13. Development and testing of new biologically-based polymers as advanced biocompatible contact lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2000-06-01

    Nature has evolved complex and elegant materials well suited to fulfill a myriad of functions. Lubricants, structural scaffolds and protective sheaths can all be found in nature, and these provide a rich source of inspiration for the rational design of materials for biomedical applications. Many biological materials are based in some fashion on hydrogels, the crosslinked polymers that absorb and hold water. Biological hydrogels contribute to processes as diverse as mineral nucleation during bone growth and protection and hydration of the cell surface. The carbohydrate layer that coats all living cells, often referred to as the glycocalyx, has hydrogel-like properties that keep cell surfaces well hydrated, segregated from neighboring cells, and resistant to non-specific protein deposition. With the molecular details of cell surface carbohydrates now in hand, adaptation of these structural motifs to synthetic materials is an appealing strategy for improving biocompatibility. The goal of this collaborative project between Prof. Bertozzi's research group, the Center for Advanced Materials at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Sunsoft Corporation was the design, synthesis and characterization of novel hydrogel polymers for improved soft contact lens materials. Our efforts were motivated by the urgent need for improved materials that allow extended wear, and essential feature for those whose occupation requires the use of contact lenses rather than traditional spectacles. Our strategy was to transplant the chemical features of cell surface molecules into contact lens materials so that they more closely resemble the tissue in which they reside. Specifically, we integrated carbohydrate molecules similar to those found on cell surfaces, and sulfoxide materials inspired by the properties of the carbohydrates, into hydrogels composed of biocompatible and manufacturable substrates. The new materials were characterized with respect to surface and bulk hydrophilicity, and

  14. 40 CFR 230.61 - Chemical, biological, and physical evaluation and testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... potential effects on the water column and on communities of aquatic organisms. (1) Evaluation of chemical... in § 230.60, that the likelihood of contamination by contaminants is acceptably low, unless the... be obtained from bioassays in lieu of chemical tests. (2) Water column effects. (i)...

  15. Stress test of a biological early warning system with zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Amorim, João; Fernandes, Miguel; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Oliva Teles, Luis

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a novel methodology to stress test the diagnostic capability of a video tracking system with zebrafish (Danio rerio), against two pre-established disturbances. Eight different treatments were tested varying the presence or absence of a toxicant (NaOCl) and two disturbances: the passing of a shadow (mimicking a predator) and entrapment of the fish. The concentration tested corresponded to a sublethal (1 % 24 h-LC50) and short term exposure (2 h). A total of 56 organisms were tested resulting in 112 diagnoses (before and after the contamination). A statistical model of diagnosis was developed using Self-organizing Map (SOM) and Correspondence Analysis (CA). Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, false positive and false negative values were calculated to evaluate the diagnostic performance. The disturbances did not negatively affect the capability of the model. In the presence of at least one of these variables, the diagnostic performance was similar or even superior to the baseline results without disturbances. Furthermore, the system produced a large number of correct diagnoses, at an ecologically relevant concentration of exposure, in a non-invasive way.

  16. 77 FR 26162 - Amendments to Sterility Test Requirements for Biological Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 600, 610, and 680 Amendments to Sterility Test... apply to Whole Blood, Cryoprecipitated Antihemophilic Factor (AHF), Platelets, Red Blood Cells, Plasma, Source Plasma, Smallpox Vaccine, Reagent Red Blood Cells, Anti-Human Globulin, or Blood Grouping Reagents...

  17. Testing sediment biological effects with the freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca: the gap between laboratory and nature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feiyue; Goulet, Richard R; Chapman, Peter M

    2004-12-01

    The freshwater amphipod, Hyalella azteca, is widely used in laboratory sediment toxicity and bioaccumulation tests. However, its responses in the laboratory are probably very different from those in the field. A review of the literature indicates that in its natural habitat this species complex is primarily epibenthic, derives little nutrition from the sediments, and responds primarily to contaminants in the overlying water column (including water and food), not sediment or porewater. In laboratory sediment toxicity tests H. azteca is deprived of natural food sources such as algal communities on or above the sediments, and is subjected to constant light without any cover except that afforded by burial into the sediments. Under these constraining laboratory conditions, H. azteca has been reported to respond to sediment or porewater contamination. In nature, contamination of overlying water from sediment is less likely than in the laboratory because of the large, generally non-static sink of natural surface water. H. azteca does not appear to be the most appropriate test species for direct assessments of the bioavailability and toxicity of sediment contaminants, though it is probably appropriate for testing the toxicity of surface waters. Toxic and non-toxic responses will be highly conservative, though the latter are probably the most persuasive given the exposure constraints. Thus H. azteca is probably a suitable surrogate species for determining sediments that are likely not toxic to field populations; however, it is not suitable for determining sediments that are likely toxic to field populations.

  18. [Determination of tumor biological parameters in breast cancer: round robin testing for quality assurance].

    PubMed

    Liessem, S; Winkens, W; Jonigk, D; Wasielewski, R V; Fisseler-Eckhoff, A; Rüschoff, J; Kreipe, H-H

    2014-02-01

    Round robin testing for quality assurance in the determination of the breast cancer biomarkers estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and epithelial growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) have been carried out in Germany for 13 years. As the first quality assurance trial worldwide tissue microarrays with 20 different breast cancer specimens were used. As a further innovation the challenges were split into a test part representing routine cases and a training part enriched with difficult borderline cases in order to uncover latent weaknesses in the participating laboratories. Certificates are issued based exclusively on the test part. Similar to NordiQC and UKNequas stained slides are assessed externally and the quality of staining and evaluation are considered separately. Since 2010 an additional internet-based trial without assessment of the staining quality is offered for ER and PR. Since the introduction of the round robin trials the numbers of participants (n = 200-250) and the success rates have steadily increased. The breast cancer quality assurance trial ranks first with regard to the number of participants in Germany. It could be demonstrated that regular participation in the round robin test leads to an improvement of staining results of ER, PR and HER2 and hence appears to be mandatory for maintaining quality standards. The use of fully automated immunohistochemical staining procedures has steadily increased and these are now used by approximately 50 % of participants.

  19. 77 FR 22282 - Draft Guidelines on Biologics Quality Monitoring: Testing for the Detection of Mycoplasma...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ... master seed/cell testing in veterinary vaccines regulated by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection... products through the master seeds, the master cell seed (stock), starting materials of animal origin, and... seed, master cell seed, and ingredients of animal origin. The draft guideline establishes stages of...

  20. Some biological aspects of Mysidopsis juniae (Crustacea:Mysidacea) and its use in chronic toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Badaro-Pedroso, C. Nipper, M.G.

    1995-12-31

    As part of the joint effort to develop marine toxicity tests with organisms abundant at the Brazilian coast, some aspects for the laboratory culture of M. juniae and its sensitivity to single chemicals were studied. Organisms fed a mixture of brine shrimp (Artemia sp.) nauplii and the microalgae Isochrysis galbana reached sexual maturity 10 days before animals fed brine shrimp nauplii only. Under best conditions, sexual maturity was reached on the 9th--11th day and newborn mysids hatched on the 16th--18th day, Short-term chronic toxicity tests were initiated with 7-day old mysids and exposure time was 11 days, with growth (length and dry weight) as test endpoints. Experiments were undertaken with zinc, copper, and ammonia. Zinc did not affect the organisms at concentrations between 0.018 and 0.1 mg/L, which were one order of magnitude lower than the average 96-h; LC50 value. The NOEC and LOEC values were the same for length and weight in some tests with copper and ammonia (Cu: 0.006 and 0.015 mg/L; NH{sub 3}: 0.32 and 0.87 mg/L, respectively), but revealed length as a more sensitive endpoint than weight in others (length NOEC and LOEC: 0.23 and 0.53 mgNH{sub 3}/L; weight: 0.53 and 0.99 mgNH{sub 3}/L, respectively). The authors speculate that this could be caused by time-dependent variations in the lipid content of the organisms. Length would be a steadier and more reliable endpoint for chronic toxicity tests with M. juniae. The results show that the method has potential applications for the evaluation and monitoring of contaminated marine systems along the Brazilian coast.

  1. Testing Foundations of Biological Scaling Theory Using Automated Measurements of Vascular Networks.

    PubMed

    Newberry, Mitchell G; Ennis, Daniel B; Savage, Van M

    2015-08-01

    Scientists have long sought to understand how vascular networks supply blood and oxygen to cells throughout the body. Recent work focuses on principles that constrain how vessel size changes through branching generations from the aorta to capillaries and uses scaling exponents to quantify these changes. Prominent scaling theories predict that combinations of these exponents explain how metabolic, growth, and other biological rates vary with body size. Nevertheless, direct measurements of individual vessel segments have been limited because existing techniques for measuring vasculature are invasive, time consuming, and technically difficult. We developed software that extracts the length, radius, and connectivity of in vivo vessels from contrast-enhanced 3D Magnetic Resonance Angiography. Using data from 20 human subjects, we calculated scaling exponents by four methods-two derived from local properties of branching junctions and two from whole-network properties. Although these methods are often used interchangeably in the literature, we do not find general agreement between these methods, particularly for vessel lengths. Measurements for length of vessels also diverge from theoretical values, but those for radius show stronger agreement. Our results demonstrate that vascular network models cannot ignore certain complexities of real vascular systems and indicate the need to discover new principles regarding vessel lengths.

  2. Biological process design and pilot testing for a carbon oxidation, nitrification, and denitrification system

    SciTech Connect

    Givens, S.W.; Brown, E.V. ); Gelman, S.R. ); Grady, C.P.L. Jr. ); Skedsvold, D.A. )

    1991-05-01

    In response to a new NPDES permit incorporating Organic Chemical, Plastic, and Synthetic Fiber (OCPSF) effluent limits for BOD (carbonaceous and nitrogenous), TSS, and priority pollutants, a treatability study was conducted to establish design criteria for a new process wastewater treatment plant for DSM Chemicals North America, Inc. The permit also requires partial removal of total nitrogen. Based on the discharge criteria, a two-stage biological process configuration was selected. The configuration consisted of an anoxic followed by an aerobic reactor with mixed liquor recirculation. To establish design criteria, a two-phase study was conducted. The first phase involved determining wastewater characteristics and kinetic and stoichiometric coefficients. These values were used as input to Simulation of Single-Sludge Processes (SSSP), a computer model that was used to evaluate potential process configurations. In the second phase, a pilot-scale system was operated to verify performance. With a volume distribution of 40% anoxic and 60% aerobic and recirculation ratio of 2, BOD, COD, and total nitrogen removal efficiencies of 99, 88, and 80% were obtained, respectively. Approximately 84% of the biodegradable COD was removed through denitrification.

  3. The Acid Test for Biological Science: STAP Cells, Trust, and Replication.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Cheryl

    2016-02-01

    In January 2014, a letter and original research article were published in Nature describing a process whereby somatic mouse cells could be converted into stem cells by subjecting them to stress. These "stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency" (STAP) cells were shown to be capable of contributing to all cell types of a developing embryo, and extra-embryonic tissues. The lead author of the publications, Haruko Obokata, became an overnight celebrity in Japan, where she was dubbed the new face of Japanese science. However, in the weeks that followed publication of the research, issues arose. Other laboratories and researchers (including authors on the original papers) found that they were unable to replicate Obokata et al.'s work. Closer scrutiny of the papers by the scientific community also suggested that there was manipulation of images that had been published, and Obokata was accused of misconduct. Those who should have been supervising her work (also her co-authors on the publications) were also heavily criticised. The STAP cell saga of 2014 is used as an example to highlight the importance of trust and replication in twenty-first century biological science. The role of trust in the scientific community is highlighted, and the effects on interactions between science and the public examined. Similarly, this essay aims to highlight the importance of replication, and how this is understood by researchers, the media, and the public. The expected behaviour of scientists in the twenty-first century is now more closely scrutinised.

  4. 1994 Baseline biological studies for the Device Assembly Facility at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, Y.E.; Woodward, B.D.; Hunter, R.B.; Greger, P.D.; Saethre, M.B.

    1995-02-01

    This report describes environmental work performed at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) in 1994 by the Basic Environmental Monitoring and Compliance Program (BECAMP). The DAF is located near the Mojave-Great Basin desert transition zone 27 km north of Mercury. The area immediately around the DAF building complex is a gentle slope cut by 1 to 3 m deep arroyos, and occupied by transitional vegetation. In 1994, construction activities were largely limited to work inside the perimeter fence. The DAF was still in a preoperational mode in 1994, and no nuclear materials were present. The DAF facilities were being occupied so there was water in the sewage settling pond, and the roads and lights were in use. Sampling activities in 1994 represent the first year in the proposed monitoring scheme. The proposed biological monitoring plan gives detailed experimental protocols. Plant, lizard, tortoise, small mammal, and bird surveys were performed in 1994. The authors briefly outline procedures employed in 1994. Studies performed on each taxon are reviewed separately then summarized in a concluding section.

  5. Dissolution testing and potentiometric determination of famciclovir in pure, dosage forms and biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Rezk, Mohamed S; El Nashar, Rasha M

    2013-02-01

    The performance characteristics of two new plastic membrane ion selective electrodes (ISEs) used for the determination of famciclovir (Fcv) based on the ion associate of Fcv with phosphotungstic acid (PTA) or phosphomolybdic acid (PMA) are described. Different experimental conditions as type of plasticizer to be incorporated in the membrane, life span, effect of soaking, pH, temperature, and interferences were studied. Both electrodes showed similar performance under these conditions, exhibiting Nernstian slopes of S (Fcv-PTA)=58.60±0.84 mV/decade and S (Fcv-PMA)=58.77±0.68 mV/decade within a usable concentration range of 10⁻⁵-10⁻² [Fcv/M] at 298/K. Famciclovir was assayed potentiometrically in its pure solution, pharmaceutical preparations and biological fluids (urine and plasma) using proposed electrodes under batch and flow injection analysis (FIA) conditions with a recovery % ranging between 96.76% and 102.83% having RSD of 0.66%-1.81%. The electrodes were also successfully applied in the determination of the dissolution profile of Fcv tablets and the results came in agreement with the validated results of the HPLC method obtained from the quality control unit of the company producing the tablets.

  6. The most informative spacing test effectively discovers biologically relevant outliers or multiple modes in expression

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Gang; Edmonson, Michael; Liu, Zhifa; Gruber, Tanja; Zhang, Jinghui; Pounds, Stan

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Several outlier and subgroup identification statistics (OASIS) have been proposed to discover transcriptomic features with outliers or multiple modes in expression that are indicative of distinct biological processes or subgroups. Here, we borrow ideas from the OASIS methods in the bioinformatics and statistics literature to develop the ‘most informative spacing test’ (MIST) for unsupervised detection of such transcriptomic features. In an example application involving 14 cases of pediatric acute megakaryoblastic leukemia, MIST more robustly identified features that perfectly discriminate subjects according to gender or the presence of a prognostically relevant fusion-gene than did seven other OASIS methods in the analysis of RNA-seq exon expression, RNA-seq exon junction expression and micorarray exon expression data. MIST was also effective at identifying features related to gender or molecular subtype in an example application involving 157 adult cases of acute myeloid leukemia. Availability: MIST will be freely available in the OASIS R package at http://www.stjuderesearch.org/site/depts/biostats Contact: stanley.pounds@stjude.org Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24458951

  7. Engineering aspects of the experiment and results of animal tests. [Apollo 17 Biological Cosmic Ray Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Look, B. C.; Tremor, J. W.; Barrows, W. F.; Zabower, H. R.; Suri, K.; Park, E. G., Jr.; Durso, J. A.; Leon, H. A.; Haymaker, W.; Lindberg, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    A closed passive system independent of support from the spacecraft or its crew was developed to house five pocket mice for their flight on Apollo XVII. The reaction of potassium superoxide with carbon dioxide and water vapor to produce oxygen provided a habitable atmosphere within the experiment package. The performance of the system and the ability of the mice to survive the key preflight tests gave reasonable assurance that the mice would also withstand the Apollo flight.-

  8. ``Test kit'' for detection of biologically important anions: A salicylidene-hydrazine based Schiff base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalapati, Sasanka; Alam, Md Akhtarul; Jana, Sankar; Karmakar, Saswati; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2013-02-01

    Test paper coated with Schiff base [(N,N/-bis(5-nitro-salicylidene)hydrazine] receptor 1 (host) can selectively detect fluoride and acetate ions (guest) by developing yellow color which can be detected by naked-eye both in aqueous-acetonitrile solution and in solid supported test kit. UV-vis spectral analysis shows that the absorption peaks at 288 and 345 nm of receptor 1 gradually decrease its initial intensity and new red shifted absorption bands at 397 nm and 455 nm gradually appear upon addition of increasing amount of F- and AcO- ions over several tested anions such as HPO4-, Cl, Br, I, NO3-, NO2-, HSO4-, HSO3-, and ClO4- in aqueous-acetonitrile solvent. The colorimetric test results and UV-vis spectral analysis are in well agreement with 1H NMR titration results in d6-DMSO solvent. The receptor 1 forms 1:2 stable complexes with F- and AcO- ions. However, similar kind of observation obtained from UV-vis titrations in presence of AcOH corresponds to 1:1 complexation ratio indicating the formation of H-bonding interaction between the receptor and anions (F- and AcO- ions). So, the observed 1:2 complexation ratio can only be explained on the basis of deprotonation (˜1 eqv.) and H-bonding (˜1 eqv.) interactions [1]. The ratiometric analysis of host-guest complexes corroborates well with the proposed theoretical model optimization at Density Functional Theory (DFT) level.

  9. Engineering aspects of the experiment and results of animal tests. [Apollo 17 Biological Cosmic Ray Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Look, B. C.; Tremor, J. W.; Barrows, W. F.; Zabower, H. R.; Suri, K.; Park, E. G., Jr.; Durso, J. A.; Leon, H. A.; Haymaker, W.; Lindberg, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    A closed passive system independent of support from the spacecraft or its crew was developed to house five pocket mice for their flight on Apollo XVII. The reaction of potassium superoxide with carbon dioxide and water vapor to produce oxygen provided a habitable atmosphere within the experiment package. The performance of the system and the ability of the mice to survive the key preflight tests gave reasonable assurance that the mice would also withstand the Apollo flight.-

  10. "Test kit" for detection of biologically important anions: a salicylidene-hydrazine based Schiff base.

    PubMed

    Dalapati, Sasanka; Alam, Md Akhtarul; Jana, Sankar; Karmakar, Saswati; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2013-02-01

    Test paper coated with Schiff base [(N,N(/)-bis(5-nitro-salicylidene)hydrazine] receptor 1 (host) can selectively detect fluoride and acetate ions (guest) by developing yellow color which can be detected by naked-eye both in aqueous-acetonitrile solution and in solid supported test kit. UV-vis spectral analysis shows that the absorption peaks at 288 and 345 nm of receptor 1 gradually decrease its initial intensity and new red shifted absorption bands at 397 nm and 455 nm gradually appear upon addition of increasing amount of F(-) and AcO(-) ions over several tested anions such as H(2)PO(4)(-), Cl(-), Br(-), I(-), NO(3)(-), NO(2)(-), HSO(4)(-), HSO(3)(-), and ClO(4)(-) in aqueous-acetonitrile solvent. The colorimetric test results and UV-vis spectral analysis are in well agreement with (1)H NMR titration results in d(6)-DMSO solvent. The receptor 1 forms 1:2 stable complexes with F(-) and AcO(-) ions. However, similar kind of observation obtained from UV-vis titrations in presence of AcOH corresponds to 1:1 complexation ratio indicating the formation of H-bonding interaction between the receptor and anions (F(-) and AcO(-) ions). So, the observed 1:2 complexation ratio can only be explained on the basis of deprotonation (∼1 eqv.) and H-bonding (∼1 eqv.) interactions [1]. The ratiometric analysis of host-guest complexes corroborates well with the proposed theoretical model optimization at Density Functional Theory (DFT) level.

  11. Evaluation of some biological tests as parameters for microbial activities in soils. II. Field investigations.

    PubMed

    Abd-El-Malek, Y; Monib, M; Rizk, S G; Shehata, S M

    1976-01-01

    Investigations were designed to study the effect of certain factors on the microbial activities in soil. The parameters, used as an index of the microbial activities, were total bacterial counts, dehydrogenase activity, oxidation of organic carbon, and CO2 evolved/7 days. Bahteem Farm clay soil was examined for determining the effects of depth, type of fertilization, and crop rotation on the microbial activities. It appears that the microbial activities, as indicated by the tested parameters, were more pronounced in the surface 15 cm-layer than in the subsurface layer (15-30 cm). Results of all the parameters tested showed markedly higher increases with farmyard manure than with nitrogenous fertilizer and in the control, without significant differences between the latter two. Moreover, the time of sampling had no effect on the results obtained for all parameters. Different types of rotations did not exert significant variation in total bacterial counts, though more than one crop per year increased the organic carbon content of soil and mostly the dehydrogenase activity, whereas the evolution of CO2 tended to decrease. At Gabal el-Asfar Farm, the effect of irrigation with sewage effluent, for long periods, on the microbial activities of sandy soil was investigated. Sewage water stimulated the total bacteria, raised the dehydrogenase activity, the organic carbon, and the production of CO2. In North El Tahreer and Mariut Sectors, the effect of both the type and age of cultivation on the microbial activities in the calcareous soils were examined. Cultivation raised the figures of all the tested parameters progressively with time of cultivation. It was also noticed that crops exerted more beneficial effects on microbial activities than orchards, and the dehydrogenase test was the most reliable parameter to reveal this fact.

  12. Assessing the predictive validity of psychomotor tests as measures of biological age in mice.

    PubMed

    Ingram, D K; Reynolds, M A

    1986-01-01

    Two experiments assessed the predictive validity of a psychomotor test battery in male C57BL/6J mice. First, performance was recorded for 66 mice in rotorod, tightrope, grip strength, exploratory activity, and runwheel activity tasks at 24 mo of age. Except in the rotorod task, performance was positively and significantly correlated to lifespan, i.e. better performance indicated longer lifespan. Body weight and body temperature were also significantly correlated with lifespan, while water consumption was negatively related. Using the five behavioral scores in a multiple regression analysis, about 40% of the variance in lifespan was explainable. When measures of body weight, body temperature, and water consumption were added to the regression equation, about 54% of the variance in lifespan could be explained. As revealed by factor analysis, a high degree of interrelationship existed among variables. In a second experiment, 54 mice were tested in the psychomotor battery every 8 weeks from 24 mo. Scores in the tightrope and both locomotor activity tasks revealed age-related declines, whether considering all individuals or only those surviving to 28 mo. Significant correlations between first and subsequent scores indicated stability of individual differences for tightrope and exploratory activity at most ages and for runwheel activity at 26 mo but not later. Rotorod and grip strength scores were not stable and suggested confounding by learning. Significant correlations with lifespan were obtained at some ages for all tests. In contrast to the first experiment, however, there were no significant correlations between lifespan and scores at 24-mo for any test and little correlation among scores.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Determining Biology Student Teachers' Cognitive Structure on the Concept of "Diffusion" through the Free Word-Association Test and the Drawing-Writing Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurt, Hakan; Ekici, Gülay; Aktas, Murat; Aksu, Özlem

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to investigate student biology teachers' cognitive structures related to "diffusion" through the free word-association test and the drawing-writing technique. As the research design of the study, the qualitative research method was applied. The data were collected from 44 student biology teachers. The free…

  14. Commercialization of genetic testing services: the FDA, market forces, and biological tarot cards.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, M J; Blatt, R J R

    1997-03-01

    Many women fear being diagnosed with breast cancer, and rightfully so. Despite the capabilities of modern medicine, the cumulative lifetime risk of getting the disease has risen to one in eight and, despite decades of research, no cures exist. In this Article, the authors explore the commercialization of so-called breast cancer gene tests, based upon genetic alterations linked to the disease. Although the authors fully address this specific technology, they use what constitutes the seminal case of predictive genetic testing to analyze the adequacy of the existing regulatory framework. The authors conclude that the present regulatory system is inadequate and places a dangerous amount of reliance on primary care physicians. Their conclusion is grounded in the observation that most primary care physicians lack sufficient knowledge about this evolving investigative technology--which is highly subject to misinterpretation, and, though potentially helpful to some "high risk" patients, offers questionable clinical value for the general public. The authors set forth numerous proposals to promote both the quality and clinical value of predictive genetic testing so that it conforms to public health standards and can be properly integrated as a reliable component of medical care in specific situations.

  15. System development and early biological tests in NASA's biomass production chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Mackowiak, C. L.; Dreschel, T. W.; Sager, J. C.; Prince, R. P.; Knott, W. M.; Hinkle, C. R.; Strayer, R. F.

    1990-01-01

    The Biomass Production Chamber at Kennedy Space Center was constructed to conduct large scale plant growth studies for NASA's CELSS program. Over the past four years, physical systems and computer control software have been continually upgraded and the degree of atmospheric leakage from the chamber has decreased from about 40 to 5 percent of the total volume per day. Early tests conducted with a limited degree of closure showed that total crop (wheat) growth from the best trays was within 80 percent of reported optimal yields for similar light levels. Yields from subsequent tests under more tightly closed conditions have not been as good--up to only 65 percent of optimal yields. Yields appear to have decreased with increasing closure, yet potential problems exist in cultural techniques and further studies are warranted. With the ability to tightly seal the chamber, quantitative data were gathered on CO2 and water exchange rates. Results showed that stand photosynthesis and transpiration reached a peak near 25 days after planting, soon after full vegetative ground cover was established. In the final phase of testing when atmospheric closure was the highest, ethylene gas levels in the chamber rose from about 10 to nearly 120 ppb. Evidence suggests that the ethylene originated from the wheat plants themselves and may have caused an epinastic rolling of the leaves, but no apparent detrimental effects on whole plant function.

  16. Successful lichen translocation on disturbed gypsum areas: A test with adhesives to promote the recovery of biological soil crusts

    PubMed Central

    Ballesteros, M.; Ayerbe, J.; Casares, M.; Cañadas, E. M.; Lorite, J.

    2017-01-01

    The loss of biological soil crusts represents a challenge for the restoration of disturbed environments, specifically in particular substrates hosting unique lichen communities. However, the recovery of lichen species affected by mining is rarely addressed in restoration projects. Here, we evaluate the translocation of Diploschistes diacapsis, a representative species of gypsum lichen communities affected by quarrying. We tested how a selection of adhesives could improve thallus attachment to the substrate and affect lichen vitality (as CO2 exchange and fluorescence) in rainfall-simulation and field experiments. Treatments included: white glue, water, hydroseeding stabiliser, gum arabic, synthetic resin, and a control with no adhesive. Attachment differed only in the field, where white glue and water performed best. Adhesives altered CO2 exchange and fluorescence yield. Notably, wet spoils allowed thalli to bind to the substrate after drying, revealing as the most suitable option for translocation. The satisfactory results applying water on gypsum spoils are encouraging to test this methodology with other lichen species. Implementing these measures in restoration projects would be relatively easy and cost-effective. It would help not only to recover lichen species in the disturbed areas but also to take advantage of an extremely valuable biological material that otherwise would be lost. PMID:28367957

  17. Biologic surveys for the Sandia National Laboratories, Coyote Canyon Test Complex, Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.M.; Knight, P.J.

    1994-05-25

    This report provides results of a comprehensive biologic survey performed in Coyote Canyon Test Complex (CCTC), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Bernalillo County, New Mexico, which was conducted during the spring and summer of 1992 and 1993. CCTC is sited on land owned by the Department of Energy (DOE) and Kirtland Air Force Base and managed by SNL. The survey covered 3,760 acres of land, most of which is rarely disturbed by CCTC operations. Absence of grazing by livestock and possibly native ungulates, and relative to the general condition of private range lands throughout New Mexico, and relative to other grazing lands in central New Mexico. Widely dispersed, low intensity use by SNL as well as prohibition of grazing has probably contributed to abundance of special status species such as grama grass cactus within the CCTC area. This report evaluates threatened and endangered species found in the area, as well as comprehensive assessment of biologic habitats. Included are analyses of potential impacts and mitigative measures designed to reduce or eliminate potential impacts. Included is a summary of CCTC program and testing activities.

  18. [Value of the sleep EEG as a biological marker of depressive states. Comparison with 3 neuroendocrine tests].

    PubMed

    Ansseau, M; Scheyvaerts, M; Doumont, A; Poirrier, R; Demonceau, G; Legros, J J; Franck, G

    1985-04-01

    In a sample of 12 endogenous depressive inpatients (8 primary and 4 secondary depressives), we compared the diagnostic usefulness of REM latency (recorded during at least 4 consecutive nights) with 3 neuroendocrine tests: dexamethasone suppression test and GH response after clonidine (a alpha-adrenergic agonist) and apomorphine (a dopaminergic agonist) challenges. Shortened REM latency (less than 50 min during at least 1 night) was present in 67% of depressives. However, REM latency presented a clear night to night intra-patient variability that makes it necessary to record at least 3 consecutive nights for the best sensitivity. Non-suppression after dexamethasone was present in 50% of depressives, blunted GH response after clonidine, in 75% and blunted response after apomorphine, in 42%. A total of 92% of patients exhibited at least one abnormal biological parameter (100% of primary and 75% of secondary depressives); 67% of patients exhibited at least two disturbed parameters and these patients constituted the whole primary depressive group (100%). These results show that these 4 potential biological markers of depression are not necessarily distributed in the same population. This suggests the potential usefulness of their concurrent use for improved accuracy of diagnosis.

  19. Successful lichen translocation on disturbed gypsum areas: A test with adhesives to promote the recovery of biological soil crusts.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, M; Ayerbe, J; Casares, M; Cañadas, E M; Lorite, J

    2017-04-03

    The loss of biological soil crusts represents a challenge for the restoration of disturbed environments, specifically in particular substrates hosting unique lichen communities. However, the recovery of lichen species affected by mining is rarely addressed in restoration projects. Here, we evaluate the translocation of Diploschistes diacapsis, a representative species of gypsum lichen communities affected by quarrying. We tested how a selection of adhesives could improve thallus attachment to the substrate and affect lichen vitality (as CO2 exchange and fluorescence) in rainfall-simulation and field experiments. Treatments included: white glue, water, hydroseeding stabiliser, gum arabic, synthetic resin, and a control with no adhesive. Attachment differed only in the field, where white glue and water performed best. Adhesives altered CO2 exchange and fluorescence yield. Notably, wet spoils allowed thalli to bind to the substrate after drying, revealing as the most suitable option for translocation. The satisfactory results applying water on gypsum spoils are encouraging to test this methodology with other lichen species. Implementing these measures in restoration projects would be relatively easy and cost-effective. It would help not only to recover lichen species in the disturbed areas but also to take advantage of an extremely valuable biological material that otherwise would be lost.

  20. Successful lichen translocation on disturbed gypsum areas: A test with adhesives to promote the recovery of biological soil crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros, M.; Ayerbe, J.; Casares, M.; Cañadas, E. M.; Lorite, J.

    2017-04-01

    The loss of biological soil crusts represents a challenge for the restoration of disturbed environments, specifically in particular substrates hosting unique lichen communities. However, the recovery of lichen species affected by mining is rarely addressed in restoration projects. Here, we evaluate the translocation of Diploschistes diacapsis, a representative species of gypsum lichen communities affected by quarrying. We tested how a selection of adhesives could improve thallus attachment to the substrate and affect lichen vitality (as CO2 exchange and fluorescence) in rainfall-simulation and field experiments. Treatments included: white glue, water, hydroseeding stabiliser, gum arabic, synthetic resin, and a control with no adhesive. Attachment differed only in the field, where white glue and water performed best. Adhesives altered CO2 exchange and fluorescence yield. Notably, wet spoils allowed thalli to bind to the substrate after drying, revealing as the most suitable option for translocation. The satisfactory results applying water on gypsum spoils are encouraging to test this methodology with other lichen species. Implementing these measures in restoration projects would be relatively easy and cost-effective. It would help not only to recover lichen species in the disturbed areas but also to take advantage of an extremely valuable biological material that otherwise would be lost.

  1. Field testing of biological spectral weighting functions for induction of UV-absorbing compounds in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Flint, Stephan D; Searles, Peter S; Caldwell, Martyn M

    2004-05-01

    Action spectra are typically used as biological spectral weighting functions (BSWF) in biological research on the stratospheric ozone depletion issue. Despite their critical role in determining the amount of UV supplied in experiments, there has been only limited testing of different functions under realistic field conditions. Here, we calculate effective radiation according to five published BSWF and evaluate the appropriateness of these BSWF in representing the induction of UV-absorbing compounds. Experiments were carried out in the field using both ultraviolet-B radiation (280-320 nm) supplementation and selective filtering of solar UV radiation. For the four species tested, BSWF that extend into the ultraviolet-A radiation (320-400 nm) (UV-A) with moderate effectiveness best represented the observed results. When compared with the commonly used generalized plant response, these BSWF suggest that simulations of ozone depletion will require more radiation than in the past experiments. However, they imply lower radiation supplements than a new plant growth BSWF that has a greater emphasis on UV-A wavelengths.

  2. Trait-Based Representation of Biological Nitrification: Model Development, Testing, and Predicted Community Composition

    PubMed Central

    Bouskill, Nicholas J.; Tang, Jinyun; Riley, William J.; Brodie, Eoin L.

    2012-01-01

    Trait-based microbial models show clear promise as tools to represent the diversity and activity of microorganisms across ecosystem gradients. These models parameterize specific traits that determine the relative fitness of an “organism” in a given environment, and represent the complexity of biological systems across temporal and spatial scales. In this study we introduce a microbial community trait-based modeling framework (MicroTrait) focused on nitrification (MicroTrait-N) that represents the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) using traits related to enzyme kinetics and physiological properties. We used this model to predict nitrifier diversity, ammonia (NH3) oxidation rates, and nitrous oxide (N2O) production across pH, temperature, and substrate gradients. Predicted nitrifier diversity was predominantly determined by temperature and substrate availability, the latter was strongly influenced by pH. The model predicted that transient N2O production rates are maximized by a decoupling of the AOB and NOB communities, resulting in an accumulation and detoxification of nitrite to N2O by AOB. However, cumulative N2O production (over 6 month simulations) is maximized in a system where the relationship between AOB and NOB is maintained. When the reactions uncouple, the AOB become unstable and biomass declines rapidly, resulting in decreased NH3 oxidation and N2O production. We evaluated this model against site level chemical datasets from the interior of Alaska and accurately simulated NH3 oxidation rates and the relative ratio of AOA:AOB biomass. The predicted community structure and activity indicate (a) parameterization of a small number of traits may be sufficient to broadly characterize nitrifying community structure and (b) changing decadal trends in climate and edaphic conditions could impact nitrification rates in ways that are not captured by extant biogeochemical models. PMID

  3. Testing the effectiveness of problem-based learning with learning-disabled students in biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrera, Claudia Patrizia

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of problem-based learning (PBL) with learning-disabled (LD) students. Twenty-four students (12 dyads) classified as LD and attending a school for the learning-disabled participated in the study. Students engaged in either a computer-based environment involving BioWorld, a hospital simulation designed to teach biology students problem-solving skills, or a paper-and-pencil version based on the computer program. A hybrid model of learning was adopted whereby students were provided with direct instruction on the digestive system prior to participating in a problem-solving activity. Students worked in dyads and solved three problems involving the digestive system in either a computerized or a paper-and-pencil condition. The experimenter acted as a coach to assist students throughout the problem-solving process. A follow-up study was conducted, one month later, to measure the long-term learning gains. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used to analyze three types of data: process data, outcome data, and follow-up data. Results from the process data showed that all students engaged in effective collaboration and became more systematic in their problem solving over time. Findings from the outcome and follow-up data showed that students in both treatment conditions, made both learning and motivational gains and that these benefits were still evident one month later. Overall, results demonstrated that the computer facilitated students' problem solving and scientific reasoning skills. Some differences were noted in students' collaboration and the amount of assistance required from the coach in both conditions. Thus, PBL is an effective learning approach with LD students in science, regardless of the type of learning environment. These results have implications for teaching science to LD students, as well as for future designs of educational software for this population.

  4. Host range testing and biology of Abia sericea (Cimbicidae), a candidate for biological control of invasive teasels (Dipsacus spp.) in North America

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Invasive teasels (Dipsacus spp., Dipsacaceae) are widespread in the USA, being present in 43 states and listed as noxious in five. The cimbicid sawfly Abia sericea (L.) is under evaluation as a potential agent for biological control of teasels. The host range, biology, and life history of this ins...

  5. Thresholded Two-Phase Test Sample Representation for Outlier Rejection in Biological Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiang; Wu, Ning

    2013-01-01

    The two-phase test sample representation (TPTSR) was proposed as a useful classifier for face recognition. However, the TPTSR method is not able to reject the impostor, so it should be modified for real-world applications. This paper introduces a thresholded TPTSR (T-TPTSR) method for complex object recognition with outliers, and two criteria for assessing the performance of outlier rejection and member classification are defined. The performance of the T-TPTSR method is compared with the modified global representation, PCA and LDA methods, respectively. The results show that the T-TPTSR method achieves the best performance among them according to the two criteria. PMID:23554837

  6. Study of the genotoxicity of organic extracts from wastewater-irrigated vegetables using in vitro and in vivo biological tests.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hongxia; Cao, Yanhua; Liu, Yingli; Liu, Nan; Guan, Weijun

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore genotoxicity due to organic pollutants in wastewater-irrigated vegetables using biological and chemical analyses. Chinese cabbages from wastewater-irrigated farmland were taken as the research object. For the in vitro test, DNA damage was characterized in rat hepatocytes exposed to organic extracts from the cabbages using the comet assay. For the in vivo tests, mice were exposed to organic extracts from the cabbages. DNA damage was assessed in mouse peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs), and chromosome damage was assessed in bone marrow cells using the comet assay and micronucleus test, respectively. For the chemical analysis, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to analyze the organic compounds in the organic vegetable extracts. The in vitro test results showed that the comet tail lengths of the DNA in rat hepatocytes were significantly increased in the group dosed with 0.36 g/ml (P < 0.05), and the comet tailing rates of the hepatocytes were significantly increased in the groups dosed with 0.24 and 0.36 g/ml (P < 0.05). The in vivo test results indicated that the comet tail lengths of the DNA in mouse PBLs were increased in the low- and high-dose groups and that the comet tailing rate of the PBLs was increased in the high-dose group (P < 0.05). The chemical analysis results showed that the total organic content in the organic vegetable extracts from the wastewater-irrigated area (1.355 mg/kg) was significantly higher than the content in the cabbage samples from the clean-water-irrigated area (0.089 mg/kg). This finding indicated that wastewater irrigation can cause organic pollution with genetic toxicity in vegetables. This study also showed that in vivo and in vitro biological tests can reflect the joint toxicity of organic pollutants, and the test results were in accordance with the chemical analysis of the organic pollutant compositions.

  7. Photodegradation of fluorene in aqueous solution: Identification and biological activity testing of degradation products.

    PubMed

    Kinani, Said; Souissi, Yasmine; Kinani, Aziz; Vujović, Svetlana; Aït-Aïssa, Sélim; Bouchonnet, Stéphane

    2016-04-15

    Degradation of fluorene under UV-vis irradiation in water was investigated and structural elucidation of the main photoproducts was achieved using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Twenty-six photoproducts were structurally identified, mainly on the basis of electron ionization mass spectra interpretation. The main generated transformation products are hydroxy derivatives. Some secondary photoproducts including fluorenone, hydroxy fluorenone, 2-biphenyl carboxylic acid, biphenylene, methanol fluorene congeners and hydroxy fluorene dimers were also observed. A photodegradation pathway was suggested on the basis of the chemical structures of photoproducts. Fluorene as well as its main photoproducts for which chemical standards were commercially available were tested for their ability to elicit cytotoxic, estrogenic and dioxin-like activity by using in vitro cell-based bioassays. None of the tested compounds was cytotoxic at concentrations up to 100 μM. However, 2-hydroxyfluorene and 3-hydroxyfluorene exerted significant estrogenic and dioxin-like activity on a concentration range of 3-30 μM, while fluorene and 9-hydroxyfluorene were weakly or not active, respectively, in our assays. This supports the view that photodegradation processes can generate by-products of higher toxicological concern than the parent compound and strengthens the need to further identify transformation products in the aquatic environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Biological induced corrosion of materials II: New test methods and experiences from mir station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klintworth, R.; Reher, H. J.; Viktorov, A. N.; Bohle, D.

    1999-09-01

    During previous long-term manned missions, more than 100 species of microorganisms have been identified on surfaces of materials (bacteria and fungi). Among them were potentially pathogenic ones (saprophytes) which are capable of active growth on artificial substrates, as well as technophilic bacteria and fungi causing damages (destruction and degradation) to various materials (metals and polymers), resulting in failures and disruptions in the functioning of equipment and hardware. Aboard a space vehicle some microclimatic parameters are optimal for microorganism growth: the atmospheric fluid condensate with its specific composition, chemical and/or antropogenic contaminants (human metobolic products, etc.) all are stimulating factors for the development of bacteria and mould fungi on materials of the interior and equipment of an orbital station during its operational phase(s). Especially Russian long-term missions (SALJUT, MIR) have demonstrated that uncontrolled interactions of microorganisms with materials will ultimately lead to the appearence of technological and medical risks, significantly influencing safety and reliability characteristics of individual as well as whole systems and/ or subsystems. For a first conclusion, it could be summarized, that countermeasures and anti-strategies focussing on Microbial Contamination Management (MCM) for the International Space Station (ISS, next long-term manned mission) at least require a new materials test approach. Our respective concept includes a combined age-ing/biocorrosion test sequence. It is represented here, as well as current status of MCM program, e.g. continuous monitoring (microbiological analyses), long-term disinfection, frequent cleaning methods, mathematical modeling of ISS, etc.

  9. Relationships among sediment chemistry, toxicity testing, and biology: What can large-scale monitoring teach us?

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, J.K.; Macauley, J.M.; Engle, V.D.; Malaeb, Z.

    1995-12-31

    The Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program for Estuarine Resources has collected sediments from over 1,000 varying locations in the estuaries of the United States. At each of these sites, sediments are analyzed for bulk chemistry, tested for toxicity to Ampelisca abdita, and enumerated regarding benthic community structure and abundance. In addition, tissue residues have been examined for selected fish and shellfish species and toxicity testing has been completed at selected sites for alternative species. The statistical and ecological relationships among these indicators have been examined with regard to how they can used to identify the overall ecological condition of a site, an estuary, or populations of estuaries. Comparisons of these relationships among different regions of the country show major differences in the modes of exposure and response being prevalent in the Southeast and Gulf Coasts as compared to the Mid-Atlantic and West Coasts. While the extent of sediment contamination in the Southeast and Gulf estuaries appears to be similar to that of the Mid-Atlantic and California Coasts, the degree of contamination at contaminated sites is much greater in Mid-Atlantic estuaries. An examination of the primary contaminants suggests that the primary sources of contamination in the Mid-Atlantic are industrial and urban while the Southeast and Gulf estuaries are dominated by agricultural contaminants.

  10. Designing and testing a classroom curriculum to teach preschoolers about the biology of physical activity: The respiration system as an underlying biological causal mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, Tracy S.

    The present study examined young children's understanding of respiration and oxygen as a source of vital energy underlying physical activity. Specifically, the purpose of the study was to explore whether a coherent biological theory, characterized by an understanding that bodily parts (heart and lungs) and processes (oxygen in respiration) as part of a biological system, can be taught as a foundational concept to reason about physical activity. The effects of a biology-based intervention curriculum designed to teach preschool children about bodily functions as a part of the respiratory system, the role of oxygen as a vital substance and how physical activity acts an energy source were examined. Participants were recruited from three private preschool classrooms (two treatment; 1 control) in Southern California and included a total of 48 four-year-old children (30 treatment; 18 control). Findings from this study suggested that young children could be taught relevant biological concepts about the role of oxygen in respiratory processes. Children who received biology-based intervention curriculum made significant gains in their understanding of the biology of respiration, identification of physical and sedentary activities. In addition these children demonstrated that coherence of conceptual knowledge was correlated with improved accuracy at activity identification and reasoning about the inner workings of the body contributing to endurance. Findings from this study provided evidence to support the benefits of providing age appropriate but complex coherent biological instruction to children in early childhood settings.

  11. Diagnosis of Tetanus Immunization Status: Multicenter Assessment of a Rapid Biological Test

    PubMed Central

    Colombet, Isabelle; Saguez, Colette; Sanson-Le Pors, Marie-José; Coudert, Benoît; Chatellier, Gilles; Espinoza, Pierre

    2005-01-01

    Diagnosis of tetanus immunization status by medical interview of patients with wounds is poor. Many protected patients receive unnecessary vaccine or immunoglobulin, and unprotected patients may receive nothing. The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of the Tetanos Quick Stick (TQS) rapid finger prick stick test in the emergency department for determining immunization status. We designed a prospective multicenter study for blinded comparison of TQS with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Adults referred for open wounds in 37 French hospital emergency departments had the TQS after receiving standard care (emergency-TQS). TQS was also performed in the hospital laboratory on total blood (blood/lab-TQS) and serum (serum/lab-TQS). ELISA was performed with the same blood sample at a central laboratory. We assessed concordance between emergency-TQS and blood/lab-TQS by the kappa test and the diagnostic accuracy (likelihood ratios) of medical interview, emergency-TQS, and lab-TQS. ELISA was positive in 94.6% of the 988 patients included. Concordance between blood/emergency-TQS and blood/lab-TQS results was moderate (κ = 0.6), with a high proportion of inconclusive blood/emergency-TQS tests (9.8%). Likelihood ratios for immunization were 3.0 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.8 to 5.1), 36.6 (95% CI, 5.3 to 255.3), 89.1 (95% CI, 5.6 to 1,405.0), and 92.7 (95% CI, 5.9 to 1,462.0) for medical interview, blood/emergency-TQS, blood/lab-TQS, and serum/lab-TQS, respectively. The sensitivity of the blood/emergency-TQS was 76.7%, and the specificity was 98% by reference to the ELISA. TQS use in the emergency room could make tetanus prevention more accurate if its technical feasibility were improved, and our assessment will be supplemented by a cost effectiveness study. PMID:16148171

  12. Assessing potential effects of incinerating organic wastes at sea: Development and field testing of the Marine Incineration Biological Assessment Sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Werme, C.; Boehm, P.; Cooke, M.; Oberacker, D.; Jackson, M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the development and field-testing of the Marine Incineration Biological Assessment Sampler (MIBAS), used to assess potential effects of incinerating hazardous wastes at sea. In 1985, the U.S. EPA developed a strategy for the research necessary for measuring environmental and public health effects of incinerating hazardous wastes at sea. One area of the strategy addressed developing a way to sample incinerator emissions and introduce them into seawater for use as test media in toxicity tests. Responding to the strategy, EPA developed the MIBAS system, a system that samples incineration flue gas, cools the emissions, and collects them in seawater-filled impingers. Particulate matter and both semi-volatile and nonvolatile organic species are collected by the train. The system uses no materials that could in themselves prove toxic to marine organisms. A recent modification of the train permits collecting emissions in the first impinger without bubbling, mimicking the situation in nature, where emissions would settle onto the ocean surface. MIBAS tests have included spike recovery, using a gas-phase spiking system to spike compounds into the emissions and then measuring them in the components of the MIBAS train.

  13. Biocompatible and bioactive nanostructured glass coatings synthesized by pulsed laser deposition: In vitro biological tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, A. C.; Sima, F.; Duta, L.; Popescu, C.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Capitanu, D.; Mustata, R.; Sima, L. E.; Petrescu, S. M.; Janackovic, D.

    2009-03-01

    We report on the synthesis by pulsed laser deposition with a KrF* excimer laser source ( λ = 248 nm, τ = 25 ns) of bioglass thin films of 6P57 and 6P61 types. Physiology, viability, and proliferation of human osteoblast cells were determined by quantitative in vitro tests performed by flow cytometry on primary osteoblasts cultured on pulsed laser deposited bioglasses. Both types of glass films proved to be appropriate mediums for cell survival and proliferation. In a parallel investigation, cell morphology and adhesion to the surface was studied by fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Strong bonds between the materials and cells were found in both cases, as osteoblast pseudopodes penetrated deep into the material. According to our observations, the 6P57 glass films were superior with respect to viability and proliferation performances.

  14. Biological induced corrosion of materials II: new test methods and experiences from MIR station.

    PubMed

    Klintworth, R; Reher, H J; Viktorov, A N; Bohle, D

    1999-01-01

    During previous long-term manned missions, more than 100 species of microorganisms have been identified on surfaces of materials (bacteria and fungi). Among them were potentially pathogenic ones (saprophytes) which are capable of active growth on artificial substrates, as well as technophilic bacteria and fungi causing damages (destruction and degradation) to various materials (metals and polymers), resulting in failures and disruptions in the functioning of equipment and hardware. Aboard a space vehicle some microclimatic parameters are optimal for microorganism growth: the atmospheric fluid condensate with its specific composition, chemical and/or anthropogenic contaminants (human metabolic products, etc.) all are stimulating factors for the development of bacteria and mould fungi on materials of the interior and equipment of an orbital station during its operational phase(s). Especially Russian long-term missions (SALYUT, MIR) [correction of SALJUT] have demonstrated that uncontrolled interactions of microorganisms with materials will ultimately lead to the appearance of technological and medical risks, significantly influencing safety and reliability characteristics of individual as well as whole systems and/or subsystems. For a first conclusion, it could be summarized, that countermeasures and anti-strategies focusing on Microbial Contamination Management (MCM) for the International Space Station (ISS, next long-term manned mission) at least require a new materials test approach. Our respective concept includes a combined aging/biocorrosion test sequence. It is represented here, as well as current status of MCM program, e.g. continuous monitoring (microbiological analyses), long-term disinfection, frequent cleaning methods, mathematical modeling of ISS, etc.

  15. Herpes murine model as a biological assay to test dialyzable leukocyte extracts activity.

    PubMed

    Salinas-Jazmín, Nohemí; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Becerril-García, Miguel Angel; Limón-Flores, Alberto Yairh; Vázquez-Leyva, Said; Medina-Rivero, Emilio; Pavón, Lenin; Velasco-Velázquez, Marco Antonio; Pérez-Tapia, Sonia Mayra

    2015-01-01

    Human dialyzable leukocyte extracts (DLEs) are heterogeneous mixtures of low-molecular-weight peptides that are released on disruption of peripheral blood leukocytes from healthy donors. DLEs improve clinical responses in infections, allergies, cancer, and immunodeficiencies. Transferon is a human DLE that has been registered as a hemoderivate by Mexican health authorities and commercialized nationally. To develop an animal model that could be used routinely as a quality control assay for Transferon, we standardized and validated a murine model of cutaneous HSV-1 infection. Using this model, we evaluated the activity of 27 Transferon batches. All batches improved the survival of HSV-1-infected mice, wherein average survival rose from 20.9% in control mice to 59.6% in Transferon-treated mice. The activity of Transferon correlated with increased serum levels of IFN-γ and reduced IL-6 and TNF-α concentrations. Our results demonstrate that (i) this mouse model of cutaneous herpes can be used to examine the activity of DLEs, such as Transferon; (ii) the assay can be used as a routine test for batch release; (iii) Transferon is produced with high homogeneity between batches; (iv) Transferon does not have direct virucidal, cytoprotective, or antireplicative effects; and (v) the protective effect of Transferon in vivo correlates with changes in serum cytokines.

  16. Herpes Murine Model as a Biological Assay to Test Dialyzable Leukocyte Extracts Activity

    PubMed Central

    Salinas-Jazmín, Nohemí; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Becerril-García, Miguel Angel; Limón-Flores, Alberto Yairh; Vázquez-Leyva, Said; Pavón, Lenin; Velasco-Velázquez, Marco Antonio; Pérez-Tapia, Sonia Mayra

    2015-01-01

    Human dialyzable leukocyte extracts (DLEs) are heterogeneous mixtures of low-molecular-weight peptides that are released on disruption of peripheral blood leukocytes from healthy donors. DLEs improve clinical responses in infections, allergies, cancer, and immunodeficiencies. Transferon is a human DLE that has been registered as a hemoderivate by Mexican health authorities and commercialized nationally. To develop an animal model that could be used routinely as a quality control assay for Transferon, we standardized and validated a murine model of cutaneous HSV-1 infection. Using this model, we evaluated the activity of 27 Transferon batches. All batches improved the survival of HSV-1-infected mice, wherein average survival rose from 20.9% in control mice to 59.6% in Transferon-treated mice. The activity of Transferon correlated with increased serum levels of IFN-γ and reduced IL-6 and TNF-α concentrations. Our results demonstrate that (i) this mouse model of cutaneous herpes can be used to examine the activity of DLEs, such as Transferon; (ii) the assay can be used as a routine test for batch release; (iii) Transferon is produced with high homogeneity between batches; (iv) Transferon does not have direct virucidal, cytoprotective, or antireplicative effects; and (v) the protective effect of Transferon in vivo correlates with changes in serum cytokines. PMID:25984538

  17. Biologic overview for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, E.; O`Farrell, T.P.; Rhoads, W.A.

    1982-01-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations project study area includes five major vegetation associations characteristic of the transition between the northern extent of the Mojave Desert and the southern extent of the Great Basin Desert. A total of 32 species of reptiles, 66 species of birds, and 46 species of mammals are known to occur within these associations elsewhere on the Nevada Test Site. Ten species of plants, and the mule deer, wild horse, feral burro, and desert tortoise were defined as possible sensitive species because they are protected by federal and state regulations, or are being considered for such protection. The major agricultural resources of southern Nye County included 737,000 acres of public grazing land managed by the Bureau of Land Management, and 9500 acres of irrigated crop land located in the Beatty/Oasis valleys, the Amargosa Valley, and Ash Meadows. Range lands are of poor quality. Alfalfa and cotton are the major crops along with small amounts of grains, Sudan grass, turf, fruits, and melons. The largest impacts to known ecosystems are expected to result from: extensive disturbances associated with construction of roads, seismic lines, drilling pads, and surface facilities; storage and leaching of mined spoils; disposal of water; off-road vehicle travel; and, over several hundred years, elevated soil temperatures. Significant impacts to off-site areas such as Ash Meadows are anticipated if new residential developments are built there to accommodate an increased work force. Several species of concern and their essential habitats are located at Ash Meadows. Available literature contained sufficient baseline information to assess potential impacts of the proposed project on an area-wide basis. It was inadequate to support analysis of potential impacts on specific locations selected for site characterization studies, mining an exploratory shaft, or the siting and operation of a repository.

  18. Field scale testing of a hyperfiltration unit for removal of creosote and pentachlorophenol from ground water: Chemical and biological assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Middaugh, D.P.; Thomas, R.L.; Lantz, S.E.; Heard, C.S.; Mueller, J.G.

    1994-01-01

    Chemical analyses and biological response data were used to assess the efficacy of a field-scale hyperfiltration unit in the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other organic compounds from creosote- and pentachlorophenol (PCP)-contaminated ground water recovered from the former American Creosote Works in Escambia County, Pensacola, Florida. The hyperfiltration unit consisted of 4 modules containing porous stainless steel tubes which were coated with a formed-in-place zirconium hydrous oxide-polyacrylic acid (ZOPA) membrane. A 5-fold concentration of the feedwater (80% volume reduction) with up to 97% removal of high molecular weight PAHs was achieved during pre-demonstration and field-demonstration runs of the hyperfiltration unit. Toxicological and teratogenic data for embryonic inland silversides, Menidia beryllina, indicated that 100, 10 and 1% solutions of the ground water sample used in the pre-demonstration run caused statistically significant (p < or - 0.05) biological responses when compared to controls. Permeates from both runs, diluted to 1%, met the pre-condition of non-toxic responses in 48h tests with Ceriodaphnia dubia. Meeting this requirement allowed for discharge of diluted permeate into the county's sanitary sewerage collector system.

  19. The testing of several biological and chemical coupled treatments for Cibacron Red FN-R azo dye removal.

    PubMed

    García-Montaño, Julia; Domènech, Xavier; García-Hortal, José A; Torrades, Francesc; Peral, José

    2008-06-15

    Several biological and chemical coupled treatments for Cibacron Red FN-R reactive azo dye degradation have been evaluated. Initially, a two-stage anaerobic-aerobic biotreatment has been assessed for different dye concentrations (250, 1250 and 3135 mg l(-1)). 92-97% decolourisation was attained during the anaerobic digestion operating in batch mode. However, no dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal neither biogas production was observed during the process, indicating that no methanogenesis occurred. Additionally, according to Biotox and Zahn-Wellens assays, the anaerobically generated colourless solutions (presumably containing the resulting aromatic amines from azo bond cleavage) were found to be more toxic than the initial dye as well as aerobically non-biodegradable, thus impeding the anaerobic-aerobic biological treatment. In a second part, the use of an advanced oxidation process (AOP) like photo-Fenton or ozonation as a chemical post-treatments of the anaerobic process has been considered for the complete dye by-products mineralisation. The best results were obtained by means of ozonation at pH 10.5, achieving a global 83% mineralisation and giving place to a final harmless effluent. On the contrary, the tested photo-Fenton conditions were not efficient enough to complete oxidation.

  20. A mathematical model for the interpretation of nuclear bomb test derived 14C incorporation in biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Samuel; Frisén, Jonas; Spalding, Kirsty L.

    2010-04-01

    Human tissues continually replace dying cells with newborn cells. However, the rate of renewal varies by orders of magnitudes between blood cells, which are renewed every day and neurons, for which renewal is non-existent or limited to specific regions of the brain. Between those extreme are many tissues that turnover on a time scale of years, although no direct measurements have been done. We present here a mathematical method to estimate cell turnover in slowly renewing biological systems. Age distribution of DNA can be estimated from the integration of radiocarbon derived from nuclear bomb-testing during the cold war (1955-1963). For slowly renewing tissues, this method provides a better estimate of the average age of the tissue than direct estimates from the bomb-curve. Moreover, death, birth and turnover rates can be estimated. We highlight this method with data from human fat cells.

  1. Environmental Technology Verification: Supplement to Test/QA Plan for Biological and Aerosol Testing of General Ventilation Air Cleaners; Bioaerosol Inactivation Efficiency by HVAC In-Duct Ultraviolet Light Air Cleaners

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Air Pollution Control Technology Verification Center has selected general ventilation air cleaners as a technology area. The Generic Verification Protocol for Biological and Aerosol Testing of General Ventilation Air Cleaners is on the Environmental Technology Verification we...

  2. Study of FibroTest and hyaluronic acid biological variation in healthy volunteers and comparison of serum hyaluronic acid biological variation between chronic liver diseases of different etiology and fibrotic stage using confidence intervals.

    PubMed

    Istaces, Nicolas; Gulbis, Béatrice

    2015-07-01

    Personalized ranges of liver fibrosis serum biomarkers such as FibroTest or hyaluronic acid could be used for early detection of fibrotic changes in patients with progressive chronic liver disease. Our aim was to generate reliable biological variation estimates for these two biomarkers with confidence intervals for within-subject biological variation and reference change value. Nine fasting healthy volunteers and 66 chronic liver disease patients were included. Biological variation estimates were calculated for FibroTest in healthy volunteers, and for hyaluronic acid in healthy volunteers and chronic liver disease patients stratified by etiology and liver fibrosis stage. In healthy volunteers, within-subject biological coefficient of variation (with 95% confidence intervals) and index of individuality were 20% (16%-28%) and 0.6 for FibroTest and 34% (27%-47%) and 0.79 for hyaluronic acid, respectively. Overall hyaluronic acid within-subject biological coefficient of variation was similar among non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and chronic hepatitis C with 41% (34%-52%) and 45% (39%-55%), respectively, in contrast to chronic hepatitis B with 170% (140%-215%). Hyaluronic acid within-subject biological coefficients of variation were similar between F0-F1, F2 and F3 liver fibrosis stages in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease with 34% (25%-49%), 41% (31%-59%) and 34% (23%-62%), respectively, and in chronic hepatitis C with 34% (27%-47%), 33% (26%-45%) and 38% (27%-65%), respectively. However, corresponding hyaluronic acid indexes of individuality were lower in the higher fibrosis stages. Non-overlapping confidence intervals of biological variation estimates allowed us to detect significant differences regarding hyaluronic acid biological variation between chronic liver disease subgroups. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A linear laser scanner to measure cross-sectional shape and area of biological specimens during mechanical testing.

    PubMed

    Vergari, Claudio; Pourcelot, Philippe; Holden, Laurène; Ravary-Plumioën, Bérangère; Laugier, Pascal; Mitton, David; Crevier-Denoix, Nathalie

    2010-10-01

    Measure of the cross-sectional area (CSA) of biological specimens is a primary concern for many biomechanical tests. Different procedures are presented in literature but besides the fact that noncontact techniques are required during mechanical testing, most of these procedures lack accuracy or speed. Moreover, they often require a precise positioning of the specimen, which is not always feasible, and do not enable the measure of the same section during tension. The objective of this study was to design a noncontact, fast, and accurate device capable of acquiring CSA of specimens mounted on a testing machine. A system based on the horizontal linear displacement of two charge-coupled device reflectance laser devices next to the specimen, one for each side, was chosen. The whole measuring block is mounted on a vertical linear guide to allow following the measured zone during sample tension (or compression). The device was validated by measuring the CSA of metallic rods machined with geometrical shapes (circular, hexagonal, semicircular, and triangular) as well as an equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) in static condition. We also performed measurements during mechanical testing of three SDFTs, obtaining the CSA variations until tendon rupture. The system was revealed to be very fast with acquisition times in the order of 0.1 s and interacquisition time of about 1.5 s. Measurements of the geometrical shapes yielded mean errors lower than 1.4% (n=20 for each shape) while the tendon CSA at rest was 90.29 ± 1.69 mm(2) (n=20). As for the tendons that underwent tension, a mean of 60 measures were performed for each test, which lasted about 2 min until rupture (at 20 mm/min), finding CSA variations linear with stress (R(2)>0.85). The proposed device was revealed to be accurate and repeatable. It is easy to assemble and operate and capable of moving to follow a defined zone on the specimen during testing. The system does not need precise centering of the sample

  4. DNA Fingerprinting To Improve Data Collection Efficiency and Yield in a Host-Specificity Test of a Weed Biological Control Candidate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An open-field test was conducted in southern France to assess the host-specificity of Ceratapion basicorne, a candidate for biological control of yellow starthistle (Centaurea solstitialis; YST). Test plants were infested by naturally occurring populations of C. basicorne but were also exposed to s...

  5. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Describes laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom activities/materials, including chi-square tests on a microcomputer, an integrated biology game, microscope slides of leaf stomata, culturing soil nematodes, technique for watering locust egg-laying tubes, hazards of biological chemicals (such as benzene, benzidene, calchicine,…

  6. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Describes laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom activities/materials, including chi-square tests on a microcomputer, an integrated biology game, microscope slides of leaf stomata, culturing soil nematodes, technique for watering locust egg-laying tubes, hazards of biological chemicals (such as benzene, benzidene, calchicine,…

  7. Thermal Design, Test and Analysis of PharmaSat, a Small Class D Spacecraft with a Biological Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaz-Aguado, Millan F.; VanOutryve, Cassandra; Ghassemiah, Shakib; Beasley, Christopher; Schooley, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Small spacecraft have been increasing in popularity because of their low cost, short turnaround and relative efficiency. In the past, small spacecraft have been primarily used for technology demonstrations, but advances in technology have made the miniaturization of space science possible [1,2]. PharmaSat is a low cost, small three cube size spacecraft, with a biological experiment on board, built at NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Ames Research Center. The thermal design of small spacecraft presents challenges as their smaller surface areas translate into power and thermal constraints. The spacecraft is thermally designed to run colder in the Low Earth Orbit space environment, and heated to reach the temperatures required by the science payload. The limited power supply obtained from the solar panels on small surfaces creates a constraint in the power used to heat the payload to required temperatures. The pressurized payload is isolated with low thermally conductance paths from the large ambient temperature changes. The thermal design consists of different optical properties of section surfaces, Multi Layer Insulation (MLI), low thermal conductance materials, flexible heaters and thermal spreaders. The payload temperature is controlled with temperature sensors and flexible heaters. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) and testing were used to aid the thermal design of the spacecraft. Various tests were conducted to verify the thermal design. An infrared imager was used on the electronic boards to find large heat sources and eliminate any possible temperature runaways. The spacecraft was tested in a thermal vacuum chamber to optimize the thermal and power analysis and qualify the thermal design of the spacecraft for the mission.

  8. Thermal Design, Test and Analysis of PharmaSat, a Small Class D Spacecraft with a Biological Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaz-Aguado, Millan F.; VanOutryve, Cassandra; Ghassemiah, Shakib; Beasley, Christopher; Schooley, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Small spacecraft have been increasing in popularity because of their low cost, short turnaround and relative efficiency. In the past, small spacecraft have been primarily used for technology demonstrations, but advances in technology have made the miniaturization of space science possible [1,2]. PharmaSat is a low cost, small three cube size spacecraft, with a biological experiment on board, built at NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Ames Research Center. The thermal design of small spacecraft presents challenges as their smaller surface areas translate into power and thermal constraints. The spacecraft is thermally designed to run colder in the Low Earth Orbit space environment, and heated to reach the temperatures required by the science payload. The limited power supply obtained from the solar panels on small surfaces creates a constraint in the power used to heat the payload to required temperatures. The pressurized payload is isolated with low thermally conductance paths from the large ambient temperature changes. The thermal design consists of different optical properties of section surfaces, Multi Layer Insulation (MLI), low thermal conductance materials, flexible heaters and thermal spreaders. The payload temperature is controlled with temperature sensors and flexible heaters. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) and testing were used to aid the thermal design of the spacecraft. Various tests were conducted to verify the thermal design. An infrared imager was used on the electronic boards to find large heat sources and eliminate any possible temperature runaways. The spacecraft was tested in a thermal vacuum chamber to optimize the thermal and power analysis and qualify the thermal design of the spacecraft for the mission.

  9. Bottle Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CSTA Journal, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Provides hands-on biology activities using plastic bottles that allow students to become engaged in asking questions, creating experiments, testing hypotheses, and generating answers. Activities explore terrestrial and aquatic systems. (MKR)

  10. Bottle Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CSTA Journal, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Provides hands-on biology activities using plastic bottles that allow students to become engaged in asking questions, creating experiments, testing hypotheses, and generating answers. Activities explore terrestrial and aquatic systems. (MKR)

  11. Using aquatic macroinvertebrate species traits to build test batteries for sediment toxicity assessment: accounting for the diversity of potential biological responses to toxicants.

    PubMed

    Ducrot, Virginie; Usseglio-Polatera, Philippe; Péry, T Alexandre R R; Mouthon, Jacques; Lafont, Michel; Roger, Marie-Claude; Garric, Jeanne; Férard, Jean-François

    2005-09-01

    An original species-selection method for the building of test batteries is presented. This method is based on the statistical analysis of the biological and ecological trait patterns of species. It has been applied to build a macroinvertebrate test battery for the assessment of sediment toxicity, which efficiently describes the diversity of benthic macroinvertebrate biological responses to toxicants in a large European lowland river. First, 109 potential representatives of benthic communities of European lowland rivers were selected from a list of 479 taxa, considering 11 biological traits accounting for the main routes of exposure to a sediment-bound toxicant and eight ecological traits providing an adequate description of habitat characteristics used by the taxa. Second, their biological and ecological trait patterns were compared using coinertia analysis. This comparison allowed the clustering of taxa into groups of organisms that exhibited similar life-history characteristics, physiological and behavioral features, and similar habitat use. Groups exhibited various sizes (7-35 taxa), taxonomic compositions, and biological and ecological features. Main differences among group characteristics concerned morphology, substrate preferendum and habitat utilization, nutritional features, maximal size, and life-history strategy. Third, the best representatives of the mean biological and ecological characteristics of each group were included in the test battery. The final selection was composed of Chironomus riparius (Insecta: Diptera), Branchiura sowerbyi (Oligochaeta: Tubificidae), Lumbriculus variegatus (Oligochaeta: Lumbriculidae), Valvata piscinalis (Gastropoda: Valvatidae), and Sericostoma personatum (Trichoptera: Sericostomatidae). This approach permitted the biological and ecological variety of the battery to be maximized. Because biological and ecological traits of taxa determine species sensitivity, such maximization should permit the battery to better account

  12. Physics Characterization of TLD-600 and TLD-700 and Acceptance Testing of New XRAD 160 Biological X-Ray Irradiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yanan

    2: Acceptance testing of new X-RAD 160 Biological X-Ray Irradiator. Purpose: An X-RAD 160 Biological X-Ray Irradiator was recently installed at Duke University to serve as a key device for cellular radiobiology research. The purpose of this study is to perform acceptance testing on the new irradiator for operator radiation safety and irradiation specifications. Methods: The acceptance testing included tests of the following components: (1) Leakage radiation survey, (2) Half-value layer (beam quality), (3) Uniformity, (4) KVp accuracy, (5) Exposure at varying mA (linearity of mA), (6) Exposure at varying kVp, (7) Inverse square measurements, (8) Field size measurement, (9) Exposure constancy. The irradiation parameters for each components of first round of acceptance testing performed on September 21, 2012 were: Leakage radiation survey (none, 160 kVp, 18 mA, 200s), Beam quality (40cm, 50-140 kVp in 10 kVp incensement, 1 mA, 10s, none), Uniformity (40cm, 160 kVp, 18 mA, 15s, F1), KVp accuracy (40cm, 50-150 kVp in 10 kVp incensement, 10 mA, 15s, none), Linearity of mA (40cm, 160 kVp, 2-18 mA, 15s, none), Inverse square measurements (20-63cm, 160 kVp, 1mA, 30s, none), Field size measurement (40cm, 160 kVp, 10 mA, 15s, none), Exposure constancy (40cm, 160 kVp, 18 mA, 20s, none). The irradiation parameters for each components for each components of second round of acceptance testing performed on November 18, 2012 were: Beam quality (40cm, 35-150 kVp, 1 mA, 10s, F1), KVp accuracy (40cm, 35-150 kVp, 1 mA, 10s, F1), Variation of kVp (40cm, 160 kVp, 18 mA, 30s, F1), Linearity of mA (40cm, 160 kVp, 1-18 mA, 30s, F1), Uniformity (40cm, 160 kVp, 18 mA, 30s, F1), Inverse square measurements (20-63cm, 160 kVp, 18 mA, 30s, F1). Results: The first round of acceptance testing performed on September 21, 2012 failed due to the fact that the measured exposure along the X-axis was significantly non-uniform; the exposure greatly decreases going in the left direction, which is a clear

  13. Field demonstration of biological dentrification of polluted groundwater and pilot scale field testing and biological dentrification with widely varied hydraulic loading rates

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, N.E.; Silverstein, J.; Veydovec, B.; de Mendonca, M.M.; Sydney, R.

    1991-12-15

    Based on the previous research, a field demonstration of the biological denitrification process followed by slow sand filtration was initiated. It was the objective of the project to demonstrate the operation of the plant under conditions which are typical of a small community water supply operation, i.e., significant periods of unattended operation, natural variations of water temperatures and influent nitrate concentrations, and seasonal variations in water demand producing variations in hydraulic loading to the denitrification tower. After slow sand filtration the performance of the plant was expected to produce a high-quality water meeting the Safe Drinking Water Act standards for nitrate, turbidity, and coliform bacterial concentrations.

  14. Assessing Students' Abilities in Processes of Scientific Inquiry in Biology Using a Paper-and-Pencil Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowak, Kathrin Helena; Nehring, Andreas; Tiemann, Rüdiger; Upmeier zu Belzen, Annette

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe, categorise and analyse students' (aged 14-16) processes of scientific inquiry in biology and chemistry education. Therefore, a theoretical structure for scientific inquiry for both biology and chemistry, the VerE model, was developed. This model consists of nine epistemological acts, which combine processes of…

  15. Assessing Students' Abilities in Processes of Scientific Inquiry in Biology Using a Paper-and-Pencil Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowak, Kathrin Helena; Nehring, Andreas; Tiemann, Rüdiger; Upmeier zu Belzen, Annette

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe, categorise and analyse students' (aged 14-16) processes of scientific inquiry in biology and chemistry education. Therefore, a theoretical structure for scientific inquiry for both biology and chemistry, the VerE model, was developed. This model consists of nine epistemological acts, which combine processes of…

  16. Factors in seventh grade academics associated with performance levels on the tenth grade biology end of course test in selected middle and high schools in northwest Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Jennifer Henry

    This study attempted to identify factors in seventh grade academics that are associated with overall success in tenth grade biology. The study addressed the following research questions: Are there significant differences in performance levels in seventh grade Criterion Referenced Competency Test (CRCT) scores in science, math, reading, and language arts associated with performance categories in tenth grade biology End of Course Test (EOCT) and the following demographic variables : gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, disability category, and English language proficiency level? Is there a relationship among the categorical variables on the tenth grade biology EOCT and the same five demographic variables? Retrospective causal comparative research was used on a representative sample from the middle schools in three North Georgia counties who took the four CRCTs in the 2006-2007 school year, and took the biology EOCT in the 2009-2010 school year. Chi square was used to determine the relationships of the various demographic variables on three biology EOCT performance categories. Twoway ANOVA determined relationships between the seventh grade CRCT scores of students in the various demographic groups and their performance levels on the biology EOCT. Students' performance levels on the biology EOCT matched their performance levels on the seventh grade CRCTs consistently. Females performed better than males on all seventh grade CRCTs. Black and Hispanic students did worse than White and Asian/Asian Indian students on the math CRCT. Students living in poverty did worse on reading and language arts CRCTs than students who were better off. Special education students did worse on science, reading, and language arts CRCTs than students not receiving special education services. English language learners did worse than native English speakers on all seventh grade CRCTs. These findings suggest that remedial measures may be taken in the seventh grade that could impact

  17. Development and Application of a Two-Tier Diagnostic Test Measuring College Biology Students' Understanding of Diffusion and Osmosis after a Course of Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odom, Arthur Louis; Barrow, Lloyd H.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a diagnostic test for measuring college biology students' understanding of diffusion. Three general steps were used: (1) defining the content boundaries; (2) collecting information on students' misconceptions; and (3) instrument development. The split half reliability was 0.74, difficulty indices ranged from 0.23 to 0.95, and the…

  18. Development and Application of a Two-Tier Diagnostic Test Measuring College Biology Students' Understanding of Diffusion and Osmosis after a Course of Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odom, Arthur Louis; Barrow, Lloyd H.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a diagnostic test for measuring college biology students' understanding of diffusion. Three general steps were used: (1) defining the content boundaries; (2) collecting information on students' misconceptions; and (3) instrument development. The split half reliability was 0.74, difficulty indices ranged from 0.23 to 0.95, and the…

  19. Open-field host specificity test of Gratiana boliviana (Coleoptera:Chrysomelidae), a biological control agent of Tropical Soda Apple (Solanaceae) in the United States

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An open-field experiment was conducted to asses the suitability of the South American leaf feeding beetle Gratiana boliviana Spaeth for biological control of Solanum viarum Dunal in the USA. An open-field test with eggplant, Solanum melongena L., was conducted on the campus of the University of Buen...

  20. Cognitive Process Analysis of Test Questions in a Computer-Managed College Biology Course Based on a Learning Style Assessment with Emphasis on Analytic-Spatial Skill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melear, Claudia T.

    The objective of this study was to provide data related to learning styles and to learning environments, to identify appropriate experiences for the non-major biology student. Investigated was whether congruence existed between a measured amount of cognitive process or analytical skill and the resultant answer on a test question which required…

  1. Biological testing and chemical analysis of process materials from an integrated two stage coal liquefaction: a status report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B.W.; Buhl, P.; Moroni, E.C.

    1983-07-01

    Samples for chemical characterization and biological testing were obtained from ITSL runs 3LCF7, 3LCF8 and 3LCF9. Chemical analysis of these materials showed that SCT products were composed of fewer compounds than analogous materials from Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) processes. Major components in the SCT materials were three-, four-, five- and six-ring neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Methyl(C/sub 1/) and C/sub 2/ homologs of these compounds were present in relatively low concentrations, compared to their non-alkylated homologs. Organic nitrogen was primarily in the form of tertiary polycyclic aromatic nitrogen heterocycles and carbazoles. Little or no amino PAH (APAH) or cyano PAH were detected in samples taken during normal PDU operations, however, mutagenic APAH were produced during off-normal operation. Microbial mutagenicity appeared to be due mainly to the presence of APAH which were probably formed in the LC finer due to failure of the catalyst to promote deamination following carbon-nitrogen bond scission of nitrogen-containing hydroaromatics. This failure was observed for the off-normal runs where it was likely that the catalyst had been deactivated. Carcinogenic activity of ITSL materials as assessed by (tumors per animal) in the initiation/promotion mouse skin painting assay was slightly reduced for materials produced with good catalyst under normal operation compared to those collected during recycle of the LC Finer feed. Initiation activity of the latter samples did not appear to be significantly different from that of other coal derived materials with comparable boiling ranges. The observed initiation activity was not unexpected, considering analytical data which showed the presence of four-, five- and six-ring PAH in ITSL materials.

  2. 139 Clinically Applicable and Biologically Validated MRI Radiomic Test Method Predicts Glioblastoma Genomic Landscape and Survival.

    PubMed

    Zinn, Pascal O; Singh, Sanjay K; Kotrotsou, Aikaterini; Zandi, Faramak; Thomas, Ginu; Hatami, Masumeh; Luedi, Markus M; Elakkad, Ahmed; Hassan, Islam; Gumin, Joy; Sulman, Erik P; Lang, Frederick F; Colen, Rivka R

    2016-08-01

    Imaging is the modality of choice for noninvasive characterization of biological tissue and organ systems; imaging serves as early diagnostic tool for most disease processes and is rapidly evolving, thus transforming the way we diagnose and follow patients over time. A vast number of cancer imaging characteristics have been correlated to underlying genomics; however, none have established causality. Therefore, our objectives were to test if there is a causal relationship between imaging and genomic information; and to develop a clinically relevant radiomic pipeline for glioblastoma molecular characterization. Functional validation was performed using a prototypic in vivo RNA-interference-based orthotopic xenograft mouse model. The automated pipeline collects 4800 MRI-derived texture features per tumor. Using univariate feature selection and boosted tree predictive modeling, a patient-specific genomic probability map was derived and patient survival predicted (The Cancer Genome Atlas/MD Anderson data sets). Data demonstrated a significant xenograft to human association (area under the curve [AUC] 84%, P < .001). Further, epidermal growth factor receptor amplification (AUC 86%, P < .0001), O-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase methylation/expression (AUC 92%, P = .001), glioblastoma molecular subgroups (AUC 88%, P = .001), and survival in 2 independent data sets (AUC 90%, P < .001) was predicted. Our results for the first time illustrate a causal relationship between imaging features and genomic tumor composition. We present a directly clinically applicable analytical imaging method termed Radiome Sequencing to allow for automated image analysis, prediction of key genomic events, and survival. This method is scalable and applicable to any type of medical imaging. Further, it allows for human-mouse matched coclinical trials, in-depth end point analysis, and upfront noninvasive high-resolution radiomics-based diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive biomarker development.

  3. Biological-Warfare Agent Decontamination Efficacy Testing: Large-Scale Chamber mVHP (Trademark) Decontamination System Evaluation for Biological Contamination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    37 4. CHALLENGES AND LESSONS LEARNED ........................................................ 37 LITERATURE CITED...LOE) at Tyndall AFB. The LOE formal report indicated that mVHP has potential applicability for thorough decon of sensitive equipment primarily in rear...future testing is adjusting the coupon size such that the true ORD inoculation and ORD comparison can be directly made. 38 LITERATURE CITED 1. Jahnke, M

  4. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site, Site 300, Biological Review, January 1, 2009 through December 31, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, Lisa E.; Woollett, Jim S.

    2014-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s (LLNL’s) Environmental Restoration Department (ERD) is required to conduct an ecological review at least every five years to ensure that biological and contaminant conditions in areas undergoing remediation have not changed such that existing conditions pose an ecological hazard (Dibley et al. 2009a). This biological review is being prepared by the Natural Resources Team within LLNL’s Environmental Functional Area (EFA) to support the 2013 five-year ecological review.

  5. Development and application of a two-tier diagnostic test measuring college biology students' understanding of diffusion and osmosis after a course of instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odom, Arthur Louis; Barrow, Lloyd H.

    This study involved the development and application of a two-tier diagnostic test measuring college biology students' understanding of diffusion and osmosis after a course of instruction. The development procedure had three general steps: defining the content boundaries of the test, collecting information on students' misconceptions, and instrument development. Misconception data were collected from interviews and multiple-choice questions with free response answers. The data were used to develop 12 two-tier multiple choice items in which the first tier examined content knowledge and the second examined understanding of that knowledge. The conceptual knowledge examined was the particulate and random nature of matter, concentration and tonicity, the influence of life forces on diffusion and osmosis, membranes, kinetic energy of matter, the process of diffusion, and the process of osmosis. The diagnostic instrument was administered to 240 students (123 non-biology majors and 117 biology majors) enrolled in a college freshman biology laboratory course. The students had completed a unit on diffusion and osmosis. The content taught was carefully defined by propositional knowledge statements, and was the same content that defined the content boundaries of the test. The split-half reliability was .74. Difficulty indices ranged from 0.23 to 0.95, and discrimination indices ranged from 0.21 to 0.65. Each item was analyzed to determine student understanding of, and identify misconceptions about, diffusion and osmosis.Received: 18 June 1993; Revised: 16 February 1994;

  6. Current status and recommendations for the future of research, teaching, and testing in the biological sciences of radiation oncology: report of the American Society for Radiation Oncology Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force, executive summary.

    PubMed

    Wallner, Paul E; Anscher, Mitchell S; Barker, Christopher A; Bassetti, Michael; Bristow, Robert G; Cha, Yong I; Dicker, Adam P; Formenti, Silvia C; Graves, Edward E; Hahn, Stephen M; Hei, Tom K; Kimmelman, Alec C; Kirsch, David G; Kozak, Kevin R; Lawrence, Theodore S; Marples, Brian; McBride, William H; Mikkelsen, Ross B; Park, Catherine C; Weidhaas, Joanne B; Zietman, Anthony L; Steinberg, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In early 2011, a dialogue was initiated within the Board of Directors (BOD) of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) regarding the future of the basic sciences of the specialty, primarily focused on the current state and potential future direction of basic research within radiation oncology. After consideration of the complexity of the issues involved and the precise nature of the undertaking, in August 2011, the BOD empanelled a Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force (TF). The TF was charged with developing an accurate snapshot of the current state of basic (preclinical) research in radiation oncology from the perspective of relevance to the modern clinical practice of radiation oncology as well as the education of our trainees and attending physicians in the biological sciences. The TF was further charged with making suggestions as to critical areas of biological basic research investigation that might be most likely to maintain and build further the scientific foundation and vitality of radiation oncology as an independent and vibrant medical specialty. It was not within the scope of service of the TF to consider the quality of ongoing research efforts within the broader radiation oncology space, to presume to consider their future potential, or to discourage in any way the investigators committed to areas of interest other than those targeted. The TF charge specifically precluded consideration of research issues related to technology, physics, or clinical investigations. This document represents an Executive Summary of the Task Force report.

  7. Current Status and Recommendations for the Future of Research, Teaching, and Testing in the Biological Sciences of Radiation Oncology: Report of the American Society for Radiation Oncology Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force, Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, Paul E.; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Barker, Christopher A.; Bassetti, Michael; Bristow, Robert G.; Dicker, Adam P.; Formenti, Silvia C.; Graves, Edward E.; Hahn, Stephen M.; Hei, Tom K.; Kimmelman, Alec C.; Kirsch, David G.; Kozak, Kevin R.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Marples, Brian; and others

    2014-01-01

    In early 2011, a dialogue was initiated within the Board of Directors (BOD) of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) regarding the future of the basic sciences of the specialty, primarily focused on the current state and potential future direction of basic research within radiation oncology. After consideration of the complexity of the issues involved and the precise nature of the undertaking, in August 2011, the BOD empanelled a Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force (TF). The TF was charged with developing an accurate snapshot of the current state of basic (preclinical) research in radiation oncology from the perspective of relevance to the modern clinical practice of radiation oncology as well as the education of our trainees and attending physicians in the biological sciences. The TF was further charged with making suggestions as to critical areas of biological basic research investigation that might be most likely to maintain and build further the scientific foundation and vitality of radiation oncology as an independent and vibrant medical specialty. It was not within the scope of service of the TF to consider the quality of ongoing research efforts within the broader radiation oncology space, to presume to consider their future potential, or to discourage in any way the investigators committed to areas of interest other than those targeted. The TF charge specifically precluded consideration of research issues related to technology, physics, or clinical investigations. This document represents an Executive Summary of the Task Force report.

  8. Fractionally distilled SRC-I, SRC-II, EDS, H-Coal and ITSL direct coal liquefaction process materials: a comparative summary of chemical analysis and biological testing

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, C.W.; Later, D.W.; Dauble, D.D.; Wilson, B.W.

    1985-07-01

    This document reports and compares the results compiled from chemical analyses and biological testing of coal liquefaction process materials which were fractionally distilled, after production, into various comparable boiling-point range cuts. Comparative analyses were performed on solvent refined coal (SRC)-I, SRC-II, H-Coal, EDS an integrated two-stage liquefaction (ITSL) distillate materials. Mutagenicity and carcinogenicity assays were conducted in conjunction with chromatographic and mass spectrometric analyses to provide detailed, comparative, chemical and biological assessments. Where possible, results obtained from the distillate cuts are compared to those from coal liquefaction materials with limited boiling ranges. Work reported here was conducted by investigators in the Biology and Chemistry Department at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Richland, WA. 38 refs., 16 figs., 27 tabs.

  9. Decommissioning samples from the Ft. Lewis, WA, solvent refined coal pilot plant: chemical analysis and biological testing

    SciTech Connect

    Weimer, W.C.; Wright, C.W.

    1985-10-01

    This report presents the results from chemical analyses and limited biological assays of three sets of samples from the Ft. Lewis, WA solvent refined coal (SRC) pilot plant. The samples were collected during the process of decommissioning this facility. Chemical composition was determined for chemical class fractions of the samples by using high-resolution gas chromatography (GC), high-resolution GC/mass spectrometry (MS) and high-resolution MS. Biological activity was measuring using both the histidine reversion microbial mutagenicity assay with Salmonella typhimurium, TA98 and an initiation/promotion mouse-skin tumorigenicity assay. 19 refs., 7 figs., 27 tabs.

  10. Testing Models: A Key Aspect to Promote Teaching Activities Related to Models and Modelling in Biology Lessons?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krell, Moritz; Krüger, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated biology teachers' (N = 148) understanding of models and modelling (MoMo), their model-related teaching activities and relations between the two. A framework which distinguishes five aspects of MoMo in science ("nature of models," "multiple models," "purpose of models," "testing…

  11. Testing Models: A Key Aspect to Promote Teaching Activities Related to Models and Modelling in Biology Lessons?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krell, Moritz; Krüger, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated biology teachers' (N = 148) understanding of models and modelling (MoMo), their model-related teaching activities and relations between the two. A framework which distinguishes five aspects of MoMo in science ("nature of models," "multiple models," "purpose of models," "testing…

  12. The Androgen Receptor and Its Use in Biological Assays: Looking Toward Effect-Based Testing and Its Applications

    PubMed Central

    Cadwallader, Amy B.; Lim, Carol S.; Rollins, Douglas E.; Botrè, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Steroid abuse is a growing problem among amateur and professional athletes. Because of an inundation of newly and illegally synthesized steroids with minor structural modifications and other designer steroid receptor modulators, there is a need to develop new methods of detection which do not require prior knowledge of the abused steroid structure. The number of designer steroids currently being abused is unknown because detection methods in general are only identifying substances with a known structure. The detection of doping is moving away from merely checking for exposure to prohibited substance toward detecting an effect of prohibited substances, as biological assays can do. Cell-based biological assays are the next generation of assays which should be utilized by antidoping laboratories; they can detect androgenic anabolic steroid and other human androgen receptor (hAR) ligand presence without knowledge of their structure and assess the relative biological activity of these compounds. This review summarizes the hAR and its action and discusses its relevance to sports doping and its use in biological assays. PMID:22080898

  13. Test and Evaluation of Field-Deployable Infectious Disease Diagnostic Assays in Support of the Joint Biological Agent Identification and Diagnosis System (JBAIDS): Malaria (Plasmodium/JBAIDS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-31

    Disease Diagnostic Assays in Support of the Joint Biological Agent Identification and Diagnosis System 5b. GRANT NUMBER (JBAIDS): Malaria ( Plasmodium ...as plasmid control DNA. The assay was 100% (5/5) sensitive and 100% (13/13) specific in testing with a diverse panel of human malaria Plasmodium ...Assay • • .11. • • ..Tl£"’Tl _,_ • • .. _ .,,_ Tll • • • 15. SUBJECT TERMS Malaria , Plasmodium , Probe, TaqMan 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a

  14. Otoconia as test masses in biological accelerometers: what can we learn about their formation from evolutionary studies and from work in microgravity?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.; Donovan, K. M.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reviews previous findings and introduces new material about otolith end organs that help us to understand their functioning and development. In particular, we consider the end organs as biological accelerometers. The otoconia are dealt with as test masses whose substructure and evolutionary trend toward calcite may prove significant in understanding formation requirements. Space-flight helps illuminate the influence of gravity, while right-left asymmetry is suggested by study of certain rat strains.

  15. Concepts and Tests for the Remote-Controlled Dismantling of the Biological Shield and Form work of the KNK Reactor - 13425

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, Sylvia; Graf, Anja; Petrick, Holger; Rothschmitt, Stefan; Klute, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    The compact sodium-cooled nuclear reactor facility Karlsruhe (KNK), a prototype Fast Breeder, is currently in an advanced stage of dismantling. Complete dismantling is based on 10 partial licensing steps. In the frame of the 9. decommissioning permit, which is currently ongoing, the dismantling of the biological shield is foreseen. The biological shield consists of heavy reinforced concrete with built-in steel fitments, such as form-work of the reactor tank, pipe sleeves, ventilation channels, and measuring devices. Due to the activation of the inner part of the biological shield, dismantling has to be done remote-controlled. During a comprehensive basic design phase a practical dismantling strategy was developed. Necessary equipment and tools were defined. Preliminary tests revealed that hot wire plasma cutting is the most favorable cutting technology due to the geometrical boundary conditions, the varying distance between cutter and material, and the heavy concrete behind the steel form-work. The cutting devices will be operated remotely via a carrier system with an industrial manipulator. The carrier system has expandable claws to adjust to the varying diameter of the reactor shaft during dismantling progress. For design approval of this prototype development, interaction between manipulator and hot wire plasma cutting was tested in a real configuration. For the demolition of the concrete structure, an excavator with appropriate tools, such as a hydraulic hammer, was selected. Other mechanical cutting devices, such as a grinder or rope saw, were eliminated because of concrete containing steel spheres added to increase the shielding factor of the heavy concrete. Dismantling of the biological shield will be done in a ring-wise manner due to static reasons. During the demolition process, the excavator is positioned on its tripod in three concrete recesses made prior to the dismantling of the separate concrete rings. The excavator and the manipulator carrier system

  16. Nitrous oxide emissions during biological soil disinfestation with different organic matter and plastic mulch films in laboratory-scale tests.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Morihiro; Kayano, Eisuke; Fujiwara, Taku; Nagare, Hideaki; Akao, Satoshi

    2015-10-23

    Nitrous oxide (N2O), which is a greenhouse gas, may be more emitted as an intermediate product of denitrification during biological soil disinfestation. The biological soil disinfestation is a method to suppress soil-borne pathogens under reductive soil conditions produced by the application of organic matter and water irrigation with plastic film. The objective of the study was to determine the effects of different organic matter and mulch films on N2O emissions during biological soil disinfestation. Grey lowland soil amended with cattle compost plus rice bran (0.2%), rice husk (0.2%) or dent corn (0.1%, 0.2% and 0.4%) was incubated at 100% water-holding capacity with or without plastic films made of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and triple-layer polyolefin (3PO) for 72 h at 50°C. Permeation of the two films was also measured at 25°C and 50°C. Results showed that incorporation of organic matter increased N2O emissions compared with no organic matter addition at 50°C. Incorporation of rice bran and dent corn with easily decomposable C and low C:N ratios increased N2O emissions for the first 12 h, but thereafter, available C supply from these amendments suppressed N2O emissions. Permeability of mulch films increased at a higher temperature and was larger for PVC than for 3PO. Our study indicated that rice husk should not be used for soil disinfestation and that application rates of organic matter must be determined based on their decomposability. Moreover, mulch film covering would not suppress N2O emission in biological soil disinfestation because of high temperature.

  17. A Test of Biological and Behavioral Explanations for Gender Differences in Telomere Length: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    NEEDHAM, BELINDA L.; DIEZ ROUX, ANA V.; BIRD, CHLOE E.; BRADLEY, RYAN; FITZPATRICK, ANNETTE L.; JACOBS, DAVID R.; OUYANG, PAMELA; SEEMAN, TERESA E.; THURSTON, REBECCA C.; VAIDYA, DHANANJAY; WANG, STEVEN

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine biological and behavioral explanations for gender differences in leukocyte telomere length (LTL), a biomarker of cell aging that has been hypothesized to contribute to women’s greater longevity. Data are from a subsample (n = 851) of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, a population-based study of women and men aged 45 to 84. Mediation models were used to examine study hypotheses. We found that women had longer LTL than men, but the gender difference was smaller at older ages. Gender differences in smoking and processed meat consumption partially mediated gender differences in telomere length, whereas gender differences in estradiol, total testosterone, oxidative stress, and body mass index did not. Neither behavioral nor biological factors explained why the gender difference in LTL was smaller at older ages. Longitudinal studies are needed to assess gender differences in the rate of change in LTL over time; to identify the biological, behavioral, and psychosocial factors that contribute to these differences throughout the life course; and to determine whether gender differences in LTL explain the gender gap in longevity. PMID:25343364

  18. A test of biological and behavioral explanations for gender differences in telomere length: the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Needham, Belinda L; Diez Roux, Ana V; Bird, Chloe E; Bradley, Ryan; Fitzpatrick, Annette L; Jacobs, David R; Ouyang, Pamela; Seeman, Teresa E; Thurston, Rebecca C; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Wang, Steven

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine biological and behavioral explanations for gender differences in leukocyte telomere length (LTL), a biomarker of cell aging that has been hypothesized to contribute to women's greater longevity. Data are from a subsample (n = 851) of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, a population-based study of women and men aged 45 to 84. Mediation models were used to examine study hypotheses. We found that women had longer LTL than men, but the gender difference was smaller at older ages. Gender differences in smoking and processed meat consumption partially mediated gender differences in telomere length, whereas gender differences in estradiol, total testosterone, oxidative stress, and body mass index did not. Neither behavioral nor biological factors explained why the gender difference in LTL was smaller at older ages. Longitudinal studies are needed to assess gender differences in the rate of change in LTL over time; to identify the biological, behavioral, and psychosocial factors that contribute to these differences throughout the life course; and to determine whether gender differences in LTL explain the gender gap in longevity.

  19. Design of a new monitoring network and first testing of new biological assessment methods according to water framework directive.

    PubMed

    Sommerhäuser, Mario; Scharner, Christoph; Schimmer, Hannes; Schindler, Anna; Plantikow, Kerstin; Vietoris, Friederike

    2007-09-01

    In most European member states, more or less completely new monitoring networks and assessment methods had to be developed as basic technical tools for the implementation of the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD). In the river basin of the Stever, the largest tributary to the river Lippe (River Rhine, Northrhine-Westphalia, Germany), a WFD-monitoring network was developed, and new German biological methods for rivers, developed for the purposes of the WFD, have been applied. Like most rivers in the German lowland areas, nearly all the river courses of the Stever system are altered by hydro-morphological degradation (straightening, bank fixation, lack of canopy etc.). In 2005 and 2006, the biological quality components of macroinvertebrates, fish and macrophytes were investigated and evaluated for the assessment of the ecological status of about 50 surface water bodies within the whole Stever system. Basic physical and chemical parameters, as well as priority substances, have been analysed in the same period. In this contribution, the design of the new monitoring network, the core principles of the German biological methods, and the most important results of the pilot monitoring will be presented. As main impacts with severe effects on the faunal and floral communities, the many migration barriers and the bad quality of the river morphology could be stated. Organic pollution is no more a severe problem in the Stever. The pilot project was successfully conducted in close collaboration with the water authorities (District Government Münster) and the water association Lippeverband.

  20. Two-stage coal liquefaction process materials from the Wilsonville Facility operated in the nonintegrated and integrated modes: chemical analyses and biological testing

    SciTech Connect

    Later, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    This document reports the results from chemical analyses and biological testing of process materials sampled during operation of the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility (Wilsonville, Alabama) in both the noncoupled or nonintegrated (NTSL Run 241) and coupled or integrated (ITSL Run 242) two-stage liquefaction operating modes. Mutagenicity and carcinogenicity assays were conducted in conjunction with chromatographic and mass spectrometric analyses to provide detailed, comparative chemical and biological assessments of several NTSL and ITSL process materials. In general, the NTSL process materials were biologically more active and chemically more refractory than analogous ITSL process materials. To provide perspective, the NTSL and ITSL results are compared with those from similar testing and analyses of other direct coal liquefaction materials from the solvent refined coal (SRC) I, SRC II and EDS processes. Comparisons are also made between two-stage coal liquefaction materials from the Wilsonville pilot plant and the C.E. Lummus PDU-ITSL Facility in an effort to assess scale-up effects in these two similar processes. 36 references, 26 figures, 37 tables.

  1. Testing for HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability (Biologics) HIV Home Test Kits Testing for HIV Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  2. Corynebacterium glutamicum Chassis C1*: Building and Testing a Novel Platform Host for Synthetic Biology and Industrial Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Baumgart, Meike; Unthan, Simon; Kloß, Ramona; Radek, Andreas; Polen, Tino; Tenhaef, Niklas; Müller, Moritz Fabian; Küberl, Andreas; Siebert, Daniel; Brühl, Natalie; Marin, Kay; Hans, Stephan; Krämer, Reinhard; Bott, Michael; Kalinowski, Jörn; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Seibold, Gerd; Frunzke, Julia; Rückert, Christian; Wendisch, Volker F; Noack, Stephan

    2017-08-30

    Targeted top-down strategies for genome reduction are considered to have a high potential for providing robust basic strains for synthetic biology and industrial biotechnology. Recently, we created a library of 26 genome-reduced strains of Corynebacterium glutamicum carrying broad deletions in single gene clusters and showing wild-type-like biological fitness. Here, we proceeded with combinatorial deletions of these irrelevant gene clusters in two parallel orders, and the resulting library of 28 strains was characterized under various environmental conditions. The final chassis strain C1* carries a genome reduction of 13.4% (412 deleted genes) and shows wild-type-like growth behavior in defined medium with d-glucose as carbon and energy source. Moreover, C1* proves to be robust against several stresses (including oxygen limitation) and shows long-term growth stability under defined and complex medium conditions. In addition to providing a novel prokaryotic chassis strain, our results comprise a large strain library and a revised genome annotation list, which will be valuable sources for future systemic studies of C. glutamicum.

  3. The use of mathematical modeling and pilot plant testing to develop a new biological phosphorus and nitrogen removal process

    SciTech Connect

    Nolasco, D.A.; Daigger, G.T.; Stafford, D.R.; Kaupp, D.M.; Stephenson, J.P.

    1998-09-01

    A mechanistic mathematical model for carbon oxidation, nitrogen removal, and enhanced biological phosphorus removal was used to develop the Step Bio-P process, a new biological phosphorus and nitrogen removal process with a step-feed configuration. A 9,000-L pilot plant with diurnally varying influent process loading rates was operated to verify the model results and to optimize the Step Bio-P process for application at the lethbridge, Alberta, Canada, wastewater treatment plant. The pilot plant was operated for 10 months. An automatic on-line data acquisition system with multiple sampling and metering points for dissolved oxygen, mixed liquor suspended solids, ammonia-nitrogen, nitrate-nitrogen, ortho-phosphate, and flow rates was used. A sampling program to obtain off-line data was carried out to verify the information from the on-line system and monitor additional parameters. The on-line and off-line data were used to recalibrate the model, which was used as an experimental design and process optimization tool.

  4. Factors associated with HIV testing among male injecting drug users: findings from a cross-sectional behavioural and biological survey in Manipur and Nagaland, India.

    PubMed

    Ganju, Deepika; Ramesh, Sowmya; Saggurti, Niranjan

    2016-06-21

    Although targeted interventions in India require all high-risk groups, including injecting drug users (IDUs), to test for HIV every 6 months, testing uptake among IDUs remains far from universal. Our study estimates the proportion of IDUs who have taken an HIV test and identifies the factors associated with HIV testing uptake in Nagaland and Manipur, two high HIV prevalence states in India where the epidemic is driven by injecting drug use. Data are drawn from the cross-sectional Integrated Behavioural and Biological Assessment (2009) of 1650 male IDUs from two districts each of Manipur and Nagaland. Participants were recruited using respondent-driven sampling (RDS). Descriptive data were analysed using RDSAT 7.1. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was undertaken using STATA 11 to examine the association between HIV testing and socio-demographic, behavioural and programme exposure variables. One third of IDUs reported prior HIV testing, of whom 8 % had tested HIV-positive. Among those without prior testing, 6.2 % tested HIV-positive in the current survey. IDUs aged 25-34 years (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.41; 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.03-1.93), married (Adjusted OR = 1.56; 95 % CI = 1.15-2.12), had a paid sexual partner (Adjusted OR = 1.64; 95 % CI = 1.24-2.18), injected drugs for more than 36 months (Adjusted OR = 1.38; 95 % CI = 1.06-1.81), injected frequently (Adjusted OR = 1.49; 95 % CI = 1.12-1.98) and had high-risk perception (Adjusted OR = 1.68; 95 % CI = 1.32-2.14) were more likely than others to test for HIV. Compared to those with no programme exposure, IDUs who received counselling, or counselling and needle/syringe services, were more likely to test for HIV. HIV testing uptake among IDUs is low in Manipur and Nagaland, and a critical group of HIV-positive IDUs who have never tested for HIV are being missed by current programmes. This study identifies key sub

  5. [Possibilities of testing the biological acceptability of composite filling materials, with special reference to the microscopic test for pulp vitality. Review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Nyárasdy, I

    1990-08-01

    The main problem of microscopically observing the living pulpa consists in that it lies embedded into hard tissue. The haemodynamics of the pulpa may be defined by studying the physical parameters by examining the characteristics of blood flow and by the factors determining them. By comparison with other tissues little work is dealing with regulating the blood flow. The vital microscopic model of the rat incisor pulpa was first employed by Gängler to testing dental filling materials. The results thereof well complete the findings of standardized tests. On basis of the foregoing the sublining in case of clinical employment of composite filling materials is unconditionally suggested.

  6. Chemical analysis and biological testing of a polar fraction of ambient air, diesel engine, and gasoline engine particulate extracts.

    PubMed

    Strandell, M; Zakrisson, S; Alsberg, T; Westerholm, R; Winquist, L; Rannug, U

    1994-10-01

    Extracts of gasoline and diesel vehicle exhaust and ambient air particles were fractionated into five fractions according to polarity on a silica gel column. Two medium polar fractions showing high genotoxic activity in the Ames test were further subfractionated, using normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Chemical analyses were performed by means of gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry and flame ionization and detection. The crude extracts, fractions, and subfractions were assayed with the Ames test, with and without S9, and the most abundant compounds in the subfractions are reported.

  7. Chemical analysis and biological testing of a polar fraction of ambient air, diesel engine, and gasoline engine particulate extracts.

    PubMed Central

    Strandell, M; Zakrisson, S; Alsberg, T; Westerholm, R; Winquist, L; Rannug, U

    1994-01-01

    Extracts of gasoline and diesel vehicle exhaust and ambient air particles were fractionated into five fractions according to polarity on a silica gel column. Two medium polar fractions showing high genotoxic activity in the Ames test were further subfractionated, using normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Chemical analyses were performed by means of gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry and flame ionization and detection. The crude extracts, fractions, and subfractions were assayed with the Ames test, with and without S9, and the most abundant compounds in the subfractions are reported. PMID:7529708

  8. Evaluation of three force-position hybrid control methods for a robot-based biological joint-testing system.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Hong-Jung; Hu, Chih-Chung; Lu, Tung-Wu; Lu, Hsuan-Lun; Kuo, Mei-Ying; Kuo, Chien-Chung; Hsu, Horng-Chaung

    2016-06-07

    Robot-based joint-testing systems (RJTS) can be used to perform unconstrained laxity tests, measuring the stiffness of a degree of freedom (DOF) of the joint at a fixed flexion angle while allowing the other DOFs unconstrained movement. Previous studies using the force-position hybrid (FPH) control method proposed by Fujie et al. (J Biomech Eng 115(3):211-7, 1993) focused on anterior/posterior tests. Its convergence and applicability on other clinically relevant DOFs such as valgus/varus have not been demonstrated. The current s1tudy aimed to develop a 6-DOF RJTS using an industrial robot, to propose two new force-position hybrid control methods, and to evaluate the performance of the methods and FPH in controlling the RJTS for anterior/posterior and valgus/varus laxity tests of the knee joint. An RJTS was developed using an industrial 6-DOF robot with a 6-component load-cell attached at the effector. The performances of FPH and two new control methods, namely force-position alternate control (FPA) and force-position hybrid control with force-moment control (FPHFM), for unconstrained anterior/posterior and valgus/varus laxity tests were evaluated and compared with traditional constrained tests (CT) in terms of the number of control iterations, total time and the constraining forces and moments. As opposed to CT, the other three control methods successfully reduced the constraining forces and moments for both anterior/posterior and valgus/varus tests, FPHFM being the best followed in order by FPA and FPH. FPHFM had root-mean-squared constraining forces and moments of less than 2.2 N and 0.09 Nm, respectively at 0° flexion, and 2.3 N and 0.14 Nm at 30° flexion. The corresponding values for FPH were 8.5 N and 0.33 Nm, and 11.5 N and 0.45 Nm, respectively. Given the same control parameters including the compliance matrix, FPHFM and FPA reduced the constraining loads of FPH at the expense of additional control iterations, and thus increased total time, FPA

  9. The Application of Pattern Recognition to Screening Prospective Anti-Cancer Drugs: Adenocarcinoma 775 Biological Activity Test.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A novel application of pattern recognition to the screening of potential anti-cancer drugs is presented. Structural features of 200 drugs previously tested by the National Cancer Institute for activity in the solid tumor adenocarcinoma 755 screening test are input to a master program of pattern recognition methods. The programs were 93.5% accurate in discriminating drugs with positive anti-neoplastic activity versus those with no anti-cancer activity. Extensions to a more rational approach to ’ drug design ’ are also discussed. (Author)

  10. Influence of aeration cycles on mechanical characteristics of elastomeric diffusers in biological intermittent processes: Accelerated tests in real environment.

    PubMed

    Eusebi, Anna Laura; Bellezze, Tiziano; Chiappini, Gianluca; Sasso, Marco; Battistoni, Paolo

    2017-06-15

    The paper deals with the evaluation of the effect of on/off switching of diffuser membranes, in the intermittent aeration process of the urban wastewater treatments. Accelerated tests were done using two types of commercial EPDM diffusers, which were submitted to several consecutive cycles up to the simulation of more than 8 years of real working conditions. The effect of this switching on the mechanical characteristics of the membranes was evaluated in terms of pressure increment of the air operating at different flow rates (2, 3.5 and 6 m(3)/h/diff): during accelerated tests, such increment ranged from 2% to 18%. The intermittent phases emphasized the loss both of the original mechanical proprieties of the diffusers and of the initial pore shapes. The main cause of pressure increment was attributed to the fouling of the internal channels of the pores. Further analyses performed by scanning electron microscopy and by mechanical tests on EPDM membrane, using a traditional tensile test and a non destructive optical method, from which the Young's Modulus was obtained, supported previous conclusions. Any changes in terms of oxygen transfer parameters (KLa and SOTE%) were specifically founded by causing to the repeated on/off switching. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Biological Science: An Ecological Approach. BSCS Green Version. Teacher's Resource Book and Test Item Bank. Sixth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biological Sciences Curriculum Study, Colorado Springs.

    This book consists of four sections: (1) "Supplemental Materials"; (2) "Supplemental Investigations"; (3) "Test Item Bank"; and (4) "Blackline Masters." The first section provides additional background material related to selected chapters and investigations in the student book. Included are a periodic table of the elements, genetics problems and…

  12. Testing the museum versus cradle tropical biological diversity hypothesis: phylogeny, diversification, and ancestral biogeographic range evolution of the ants.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Corrie S; Bell, Charles D

    2013-08-01

    Ants are one of the most ecologically and numerically dominant group of terrestrial organisms with most species diversity currently found in tropical climates. Several explanations for the disparity of biological diversity in the tropics compared to temperate regions have been proposed including that the tropics may act as a "museum" where older lineages persist through evolutionary time or as a "cradle" where new species continue to be generated. We infer the molecular phylogenetic relationships of 295 ant specimens including members of all 21 extant subfamilies to explore the evolutionary diversification and biogeography of the ants. By constraining the topology and age of the root node while using 45 fossils as minimum constraints, we converge on an age of 139-158 Mya for the modern ants. Further diversification analyses identified 10 periods with a significant change in the tempo of diversification of the ants, although these shifts did not appear to correspond to ancestral biogeographic range shifts. Likelihood-based historical biogeographic reconstructions suggest that the Neotropics were important in early ant diversification (e.g., Cretaceous). This finding coupled with the extremely high-current species diversity suggests that the Neotropics have acted as both a museum and cradle for ant diversity. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution © 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  13. Biological studies in the impact zone of the Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility in Frenchman Flat, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, R.B.; Saethre, M.B.; Medica, P.A.; Greger, P.D.; Romney, E.M.

    1991-01-01

    Desert shrubs and rodents were monitored downwind of the Department of Energy Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility (LGF), which is situated on a dry lake bed (playa). Plants were censused in 1981 and 1986 through 1990; rodent survival was measured from 1986 through 1990. During that time there were no apparent effects of the spill tests on animals or plants off the edge of the playa, which extends more than 2.5 kilometers from the facility. Plant populations increased in volume from 1981 through 1986, then declined precipitously during drought in 1989 and 1990. Rodent populations also declined during the drought. Some effects of spilled hydrogen fluoride gas were seen on plants growing on manmade mounds on the playa surface. Animal and bird species seen in the vicinity of the LGF are also reported. 11 refs., 10 figs., 16 tabs.

  14. The Effects of Individual Versus Cooperative Testing in a Flipped Classroom on the Academic Achievement, Motivation Toward Science, and Study Time for 9th Grade Biology Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCall, Megan O'Neill

    This study examined the effects of cooperative testing versus traditional or individual testing and the impacts on academic achievement, motivation toward science, and study time for 9th grade biology students. Research questions centered on weekly quizzes given in a flipped classroom format for a period of 13 weeks. The study used a mixed methods research design, which combined quantitative and qualitative data collection techniques. The study examined 66 students enrolled in three sections of a 9 th grade biology course at a private K-12 school. Students were randomly assigned to groups of three or four students. Weekly quizzes on regularly assigned curriculum material were provided from the flipped classroom videos. Six quizzes were randomly selected for each class to be in the cooperative testing format and six quizzes were randomly selected to be given individually or traditional-style testing format. Week 7 was reserved for administration of the mid-study questionnaire and no quiz was administered. Quantitative data collected included student grades on the 12 weekly quizzes. Qualitative data were also collected from pre-study, mid-study, and post-study questionnaires as well as semi-structured individual interviews and one focus group. Cooperative testing groups scored higher on the quizzes than when students took quizzes as individuals for five of the nine quizzes analyzed. Students did not score significantly higher than the best scorer in groups taking quizzes individually. For one quiz, the best scorer did better than the cooperative groups. Overall, cooperatively tested groups in some cases scored higher than the average of groups taking the quizzes individually, but the impact was not consistent across all quiz weeks. Difficulty level of the material, contextual factors, and ceiling effects are among potential explanations of the inconsistent outcomes. Across the study, motivation toward science stayed the same or increased depending on the aspect of

  15. Host-range testing of Eucryptorrhynchus brandti (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a candidate for biological control of tree-of-heaven, Ailanthus altissima.

    PubMed

    Herrick, N J; McAvoy, T J; Snyder, A L; Salom, S M; Kok, L T

    2012-02-01

    Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) Swingle, tree-of-heaven, is an invasive species native to Asia. It first was introduced into the United States in the 1700 s and now is distributed throughout much of North America. Mechanical and chemical controls are current suppression tactics, however, implementation is costly. A weevil, Eucryptorrhynchus brandti (Harold), was identified in China and imported for quarantine testing in 2004 as a potential biological control agent. Host specificity tests on adult feeding, larval development, and oviposition of this weevil were conducted from 2007 to 2011 on A. altissima and 29 nontarget species. Eucryptorrhynchus brandti adults fed significantly more on A. altissima foliage when compared with all test species. Range of means for feeding on A. altissima was 32.5-106.5 mm(2)/adult/d. In no-choice tests, Simarouba glauca DC, Leitneria floridana Chapm., and Citrus limon (L.) Burm. F., had feeding rates of only 10, 49, and 10%, respectively, compared with the level of feeding on A. altissima. The mean range of adult feeding by E. brandti on all other test species was <7% of feeding on A. altissima (0.0-3.3 ± 5.0 mm(2)/adult/d). In the no-choice larval inoculation tests, larval development only occurred in two of 10 L. floridana seedlings compared with seven of 10 A. altissima seedlings. In the no-choice oviposition tests, oviposition and subsequent larval development did not occur in L. floridiana, whereas all seven A. altissima seedlings supported oviposition and subsequent larval development. The weevil did not appear to be a threat to L. floridana or any other nontarget species tested. Therefore, we conclude that Eucryptorrhynchus brandti is highly host specific to A. altissima.

  16. Amphibian embryos as a biological test for environmental pollutants in leachates, industrial effluents, surface and ground water

    SciTech Connect

    Herkovits, J.; Perez-Coll, C.S.; Herkovits, F.D.; Tarlato, M.

    1995-12-31

    Test of early life stages are very sensitive to toxic effects and moreover a good predictive correlation between embryo-larval survival and independent ecological parameters such as species richness and diversity have been established. The main purpose of this preliminary study is to report that Bufo arenarum embryos are very sensitive to contaminants from a variety of sources such as leachates, industrial effluents, surface and ground water. The toxicity of 30 samples (five from each category plus controls of surface and ground water from reference places) was evaluated during a 14 day renewal toxicity test at 20 C, conducted with 10 embryos (by triplicate) from stage 23--25 onwards using six concentrations (V/V) of each sample of Holtfreter`s solution. For industrial effluents and leachates the results range from a concentration of 0.6% resulting in 24hs LC100 up to a sample which exert 20% of lethality after 14 days of treatment. The survival of controls and in samples from reference places was over 90% for 7 days and over 80% for 14 days. The results with Bufo arenarum embryos confirm that a 7 day Short-term Chronic Toxicity Test is appropriate for toxicity screening of industrial effluents (as it was established by EPA for whole effluent toxicity test for aquatic life protection performed with other species) as well as for leachates. On the other hand, for freshwater (surface and ground), it is convenient to extend the exposure period until 14 days in order to record situations of low, but significant levels of toxicity, which could be of particular value for surface as well as ground water quality criteria.

  17. The design and characterization of a testing platform for quantitative evaluation of tread performance on multiple biological substrates.

    PubMed

    Sliker, Levin J; Rentschler, Mark E

    2012-09-01

    In this study, an experimental platform is developed to quantitatively measure the performance of robotic wheel treads in a dynamic environment. The platform imposes a dynamic driving condition for a single robot wheel, where the wheel is rotated on a translating substrate, thereby inducing slip. The normal force of the wheel can be adjusted mechanically, while the rotational velocity of the wheel and the translational velocity of the substrate can be controlled using an open-loop control system. Wheel slip and translational speed can be varied autonomously while wheel traction force is measured using a load cell. The testing platform is characterized by testing one micropatterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) tread on three substrates (dry synthetic tissue, hydrated synthetic tissue, and excised porcine small bowel tissue), at three normal forces (0.10, 0.20, and 0.30 N), 13 slip ratios (-0.30 to 0.30 in increments of 0.05), and three translational speeds (2, 3, and 6 mm/s). Additionally, two wheels (micropatterned and smooth PDMS) are tested on beef liver at the same three normal forces and translational speeds for a tread comparison. An analysis of variance revealed that the platform can detect statistically significant differences between means when observing normal forces, translational speeds, slip ratios, treads, and substrates. The variance due to within (platform error, P = 1) and between trials (human error, P = 0.152) is minimal when compared to the normal force (P = 0.036), translational speed ( P = 0.059), slip ratio (P = 0), tread (P = 0.004), and substrate variances ( P = 0). In conclusion, this precision testing platform can be used to determine wheel tread performance differences on the three substrates and for each of the studied parameters. Future use of the platform could lead to an optimized micropattern-based mobility system, under given operating conditions, for implementation on a robotic capsule endoscope.

  18. Evaluation of an Inexpensive Field Test for Ruling Out the Presence of Biological Threat Agents in Suspicious Powders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    coffee creamer, flour, Dipel, and yeast . However, one of the hoax powders that does not contain protein, baking soda , also had a positive reading...powders, as well as for most of the hoax powders alone. However, one of the hoax powders ( baking soda ) consistently produced false positives. Also, a...thus a false positive). This false positive could possibly be due to the baking soda interfering with the colorimetric chemistry of the test strips

  19. Tested Studies for Laboratory Teaching. Proceedings of the Workshop/Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) (13th, Laramie, Wyoming, June 11-15, 1991). Volume 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Corey A., Ed.

    The focus of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) is to improve the undergraduate biology laboratory experience by promoting the development and dissemination of interesting, innovative, and reliable laboratory exercises. This proceedings volume contains 10 papers: "Testing Issues of Foraging and Flocking Behavior" (C. C.…

  20. Tested Studies for Laboratory Teaching. Proceedings of the Workshop/Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) (13th, Laramie, Wyoming, June 11-15, 1991). Volume 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Corey A., Ed.

    The focus of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) is to improve the undergraduate biology laboratory experience by promoting the development and dissemination of interesting, innovative, and reliable laboratory exercises. This proceedings volume contains 10 papers: "Testing Issues of Foraging and Flocking Behavior" (C. C.…

  1. A Novel Malaria Pf/Pv Ab Rapid Diagnostic Test Using a Differential Diagnostic Marker Identified by Network Biology.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Jin; Lee, Jihoo; Lee, Hyun Jae; Jo, Hyun-Young; Sinniah, Mangalam; Kim, Hak-Yong; Chong, Chom-Kyu; Song, Hyun-Ok

    2016-01-01

    Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) can detect anti-malaria antibodies in human blood. As they can detect parasite infection at the low parasite density, they are useful in endemic areas where light infection and/or re-infection of parasites are common. Thus, malaria antibody tests can be used for screening bloods in blood banks to prevent transfusion-transmitted malaria (TTM), an emerging problem in malaria endemic areas. However, only a few malaria antibody tests are available in the microwell-based assay format and these are not suitable for field application. A novel malaria antibody (Ab)-based RDT using a differential diagnostic marker for falciparum and vivax malaria was developed as a suitable high-throughput assay that is sensitive and practical for blood screening. The marker, merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1) was discovered by generation of a Plasmodium-specific network and the hierarchical organization of modularity in the network. Clinical evaluation revealed that the novel Malaria Pf/Pv Ab RDT shows improved sensitivity (98%) and specificity (99.7%) compared with the performance of a commercial kit, SD BioLine Malaria P.f/P.v (95.1% sensitivity and 99.1% specificity). The novel Malaria Pf/Pv Ab RDT has potential for use as a cost-effective blood-screening tool for malaria and in turn, reduces TTM risk in endemic areas.

  2. A Novel Malaria Pf/Pv Ab Rapid Diagnostic Test Using a Differential Diagnostic Marker Identified by Network Biology

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung Jin; Lee, Jihoo; Lee, Hyun Jae; Jo, Hyun-Young; Sinniah, Mangalam; Kim, Hak-Yong; Chong, Chom-Kyu; Song, Hyun-Ok

    2016-01-01

    Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) can detect anti-malaria antibodies in human blood. As they can detect parasite infection at the low parasite density, they are useful in endemic areas where light infection and/or re-infection of parasites are common. Thus, malaria antibody tests can be used for screening bloods in blood banks to prevent transfusion-transmitted malaria (TTM), an emerging problem in malaria endemic areas. However, only a few malaria antibody tests are available in the microwell-based assay format and these are not suitable for field application. A novel malaria antibody (Ab)-based RDT using a differential diagnostic marker for falciparum and vivax malaria was developed as a suitable high-throughput assay that is sensitive and practical for blood screening. The marker, merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1) was discovered by generation of a Plasmodium-specific network and the hierarchical organization of modularity in the network. Clinical evaluation revealed that the novel Malaria Pf/Pv Ab RDT shows improved sensitivity (98%) and specificity (99.7%) compared with the performance of a commercial kit, SD BioLine Malaria P.f/P.v (95.1% sensitivity and 99.1% specificity). The novel Malaria Pf/Pv Ab RDT has potential for use as a cost-effective blood-screening tool for malaria and in turn, reduces TTM risk in endemic areas. PMID:27313496

  3. Collaborative study for the establishment of the Ph. Eur. Hepatitis E virus RNA for NAT testing biological reference preparation batch 1.

    PubMed

    Baylis, S A; Terao, E; Blümel, J; Hanschmann, K-M O

    2017-01-01

    A new European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) biological reference preparation (BRP) had to be established further to the decision to include nucleic acid testing (NAT) for the detection of hepatitis E virus (HEV) RNA in the monograph Human plasma (pooled and treated for virus inactivation) (1646). To this purpose, an international collaborative study was launched in the framework of the Biological Standardisation Programme (BSP) of the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines & HealthCare (EDQM) and the Commission of the European Union (EU). The study was run in conjunction with the establishment of the 1(st) World Health Organization (WHO) international reference panel (IRP) for hepatitis E virus RNA genotypes (8578/13). Twenty-three laboratories used in-house developed and commercially available assays to calibrate a lyophilised candidate BRP prepared from a HEV 3f strain positive human plasma against the 1(st) WHO International Standard (IS) for HEV RNA (6329/10). Results from quantitative and qualitative assays were in good agreement and were combined to calculate an assigned potency. Real-time stability studies indicated that the candidate BRP is very stable at lower temperatures and is thus suitable for long-term use. Based on these results, in February 2016, the Ph. Eur. Commission adopted the candidate material as the hepatitis E virus RNA for NAT testing BRP batch 1, with an assigned unitage of 2.1 × 10(4) IU/vial (4.32 log10 IU/vial).

  4. 2011 lAAF World Championships in Daegu: blood tests for all athletes in the framework of the Athlete Biological Passport.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Neil; Dollé, Gabriel; Garnier, Pierre-Yves; Saugy, Martial

    2012-07-01

    The 2011 International Association of Athletics Federation (IAAF) World Championships took place in Daegu, Korea. For the first time, all athletes were blood tested prior to the competition in order to give a clear signal to the world athletic community of the wish to enter into the era of the Athlete Biological Passport and fight against doping in their sport. The hematological parameters were measured on site. Thus, a mobile-accredited laboratory for blood testing was created in Daegu. Two serum tubes were collected for clinical chemistry and hormonal analyses in order to build the bases of the endocrine and the androgen (steroid) modules of the Athlete Biological Passport in blood. This paper describes some of the main challenges the project faced with regard to the large number of athletes, competing in different disciplines, and the logistic problems that had to be solved for smart implementation of one of the most complex operations organized in the last decade in the fight against doping.

  5. HPV status of oropharyngeal cancer by combination HPV DNA/p16 testing: biological relevance of discordant results.

    PubMed

    Hong, Angela; Jones, Deanna; Chatfield, Mark; Lee, C Soon; Zhang, Mei; Clark, Jonathan; Elliott, Michael; Harnett, Gerald; Milross, Christopher; Rose, Barbara

    2013-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes up to 70 % of oropharyngeal cancers (OSCC). HPV positive OSCC has a more favorable outcome, thus HPV status is being used to guide treatment and predict outcome. Combination HPV DNA/p16(ink4) (p16) testing is commonly used for HPV status, but there are no standardized methods, scoring or interpretative criteria. The significance of discordant (HPV DNA positive/p16 negative and HPV DNA negative/p16 positive) cancers is controversial. In this study, 647 OSCCs from 10 Australian centers were tested for HPV DNA/p16 expression. Our aims are to determine p16 distribution by HPV DNA status to inform decisions on p16 scoring and to assess clinical significance of discordant cancers. HPV DNA was identified using a multiplex tandem HPV E6 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and p16 expression by semiquantitative immunohistochemistry. p16 distribution was essentially bimodal (42 % of cancers had ≥ 70 % positive staining, 52 % <5 % positive, 6 % between 5 and 70 %). Cancers with 5 to <50 % staining had similar characteristics to the p16 negative group, and cancers with 50 to <70 % staining were consistent with the ≥ 70 % group. Using a p16 cut-point of 50 %, there were 25 % HPV DNA positive/p16 negative cancers and 1 % HPV DNA negative/p16 positive cancers. HPV DNA positive/p16 negative cancers had outcomes similar to HPV DNA negative/p16 negative cancers. 50 % is a reasonable cut-point for p16; HPV DNA positive/p16 negative OSCCs may be treated as HPV negative for clinical purposes; HPV DNA/p16 testing may add no prognostic information over p16 alone.

  6. A roadmap for hazard monitoring and risk assessment of marine biotoxins on the basis of chemical and biological test systems.

    PubMed

    Daneshian, Mardas; Botana, Luis M; Dechraoui Bottein, Marie-Yasmine; Buckland, Gemma; Campàs, Mònica; Dennison, Ngaire; Dickey, Robert W; Diogène, Jorge; Fessard, Valérie; Hartung, Thomas; Humpage, Andrew; Leist, Marcel; Molgó, Jordi; Quilliam, Michael A; Rovida, Costanza; Suarez-Isla, Benjamin A; Tubaro, Aurelia; Wagner, Kristina; Zoller, Otmar; Dietrich, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Aquatic food accounts for over 40% of global animal food products, and the potential contamination with toxins of algal origin--marine biotoxins--poses a health threat for consumers. The gold standards to assess toxins in aquatic food have traditionally been in vivo methods, i.e., the mouse as well as the rat bioassay. Besides ethical concerns, there is also a need for more reliable test methods because of low inter-species comparability, high intra-species variability, the high number of false positive and negative results as well as questionable extrapolation of quantitative risk to humans. For this reason, a transatlantic group of experts in the field of marine biotoxins was convened from academia and regulatory safety authorities to discuss future approaches to marine biotoxin testing. In this report they provide a background on the toxin classes, on their chemical characterization, the epidemiology, on risk assessment and management, as well as on their assumed mode of action. Most importantly, physiological functional assays such as in vitro bioassays and also analytical techniques, e.g., liquid chromatography coupled mass spectrometry (LC-MS), as substitutes for the rodent bioassay are reviewed. This forms the basis for recommendations on methodologies for hazard monitoring and risk assessment, establishment of causality of intoxications in human cases, a roadmap for research and development of human-relevant functional assays, as well as new approaches for a consumer directed safety concept.

  7. Integration of an optical CMOS sensor with a microfluidic channel allows a sensitive readout for biological assays in point-of-care tests.

    PubMed

    Van Dorst, Bieke; Brivio, Monica; Van Der Sar, Elfried; Blom, Marko; Reuvekamp, Simon; Tanzi, Simone; Groenhuis, Roelf; Adojutelegan, Adewole; Lous, Erik-Jan; Frederix, Filip; Stuyver, Lieven J

    2016-04-15

    In this manuscript, a microfluidic detection module, which allows a sensitive readout of biological assays in point-of-care (POC) tests, is presented. The proposed detection module consists of a microfluidic flow cell with an integrated Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS)-based single photon counting optical sensor. Due to the integrated sensor-based readout, the detection module could be implemented as the core technology in stand-alone POC tests, for use in mobile or rural settings. The performance of the detection module was demonstrated in three assays: a peptide, a protein and an antibody detection assay. The antibody detection assay with readout in the detection module proved to be 7-fold more sensitive that the traditional colorimetric plate-based ELISA. The protein and peptide assay showed a lower limit of detection (LLOD) of 200 fM and 460 fM respectively. Results demonstrate that the sensitivity of the immunoassays is comparable with lab-based immunoassays and at least equal or better than current mainstream POC devices. This sensitive readout holds the potential to develop POC tests, which are able to detect low concentrations of biomarkers. This will broaden the diagnostic capabilities at the clinician's office and at patient's home, where currently only the less sensitive lateral flow and dipstick POC tests are implemented.

  8. The 1993 baseline biological studies and proposed monitoring plan for the Device Assembly Facility at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, B.D.; Hunter, R.B.; Greger, P.D.; Saethre, M.B.

    1995-02-01

    This report contains baseline data and recommendations for future monitoring of plants and animals near the new Device Assembly Facility (DAF) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The facility is a large structure designed for safely assembling nuclear weapons. Baseline data was collected in 1993, prior to the scheduled beginning of DAF operations in early 1995. Studies were not performed prior to construction and part of the task of monitoring operational effects will be to distinguish those effects from the extensive disturbance effects resulting from construction. Baseline information on species abundances and distributions was collected on ephemeral and perennial plants, mammals, reptiles, and birds in the desert ecosystems within three kilometers (km) of the DAF. Particular attention was paid to effects of selected disturbances, such as the paved road, sewage pond, and the flood-control dike, associated with the facility. Radiological monitoring of areas surrounding the DAF is not included in this report.

  9. Thermal Performance of Biological Substance Systems in Vitro Under Static and Dynamic Conditions at the Cryogenic Test Laboratory, NASA Kennedy Space Center, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augustynowicz, S. D.; Fesmire, James E.; Steinrock, T. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A unique research program, including a comprehensive study of thermal performance at cryogenic vacuum insulation systems, was performed at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. The main goal was to develop a new soft vacuum system (from 1 torr to 10 torr) that provides an intermediate level of performance (k-value below 4.8 mW/m-K). Liquid nitrogen boil-off methods were used to test conventional materials, novel materials, and certain combinations. The test articles included combinations of aluminum foil, fiberglass paper, polyester fabric, silica aerogel composite blanket, fumed silica, silica aerogel powder, and syntactic foam. A new LCI system was developed at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory. This system performs exceptionally well at soft vacuum levels and nearly as good as an MLI at high vacuum levels. Apparent thermal conductivities for the LCI range from 2 mW/m-K at soft vacuum to 0.1 mW/m-K at high vacuum. Several cryostats were designed, constructed, and calibrated by the Cryogenics Test Laboratory at KSC NASA as part of this research program. The cryostat test apparatus is a liquid nitrogen boil-off calorimeter system for direct measurement of the apparent thermal conductivity at a fixed vacuum level between 5 x 10(exp -5) and 760 torr. The apparatus is also used for transient measurements of temperature profiles. The development of efficient, robust cryogenic insulation systems has been a targeted area of research for a number of years. Improved methods of characterization, testing, and evaluation of complex biological substance systems for cryosurgery and cryobiology are the focus of this paper.

  10. Testing of conductivity/calcium and rubidium/strontium ratios as indicators of the chemical stability of a river: comparison with a biological indicator.

    PubMed

    Nirel, P M V; Lazzarotto, J

    2005-01-01

    It is customary to detect pollution in a water flow by monitoring the increase of sensitive elements concentrations (NH4+, PO4(3-), NO3-...). However, concentrations are dependent on the flow rate and these compounds are not conservative, implying a concentration decrease downstream leading to false negative diagnosis of pollution impact. The use of elemental ratios of conservative compounds should diminish these pitfalls. We then thought of the chi/Ca (conductivity/calcium) and Rb/Sr (rubidium/strontium) ratios as water chemical stability indicators to clearly identify and discriminate point from diffuse pollutions. This hypothesis has been tested on 12 brooks located in the basin of Lake Geneva, during 2 hydrological years. The results were compared to the observed land use of the watershed and a biological indicator: the Pollution Sensitivity Index (PSI). The PSI is calculated from diatom taxonomy and evaluates biological quality with a grade ranging from 0 to 20 (bad to excellent). The main results of the research can be summarized as follows. The pollution signal is observable far downstream of the pollution site. Both chi/Ca and Rb/Sr ratios are water quality indicators expressing the stability of water chemistry. They can both be used to detect diffuse and point pollution impact. These indicators provide complementary information: chi/Ca variations increase in case of point pollution; Rb/Sr variations increase when diffuse pollutions occur. The results obtained with the indicators chi/Ca and Rb/Sr agree with biological indicator and observation of the land use. chi/Ca and Rb/Sr ratios represent important tools to identify and discriminate point source pollution from diffuse pollution.

  11. Biological Experiment and Clinical Tests on Mammotropic Action Of Muyingle — A New Type of Healthfood Prepared from Marine Organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ba-fan; Hao, Lin-hua; Liu, Xiang-dong

    1996-12-01

    Muyingle is a new type of health food prepared from marine organisms. The mammotropic action of Muyingle was investigated by studying its effect on mammary glands and pituitary glands of lactating mice and the survival rate of suckling mice. The results showed that the mammotropic action of Muyingle was very effective. The survival rates of suckling mice were 92.90% for the treated group and 0 for the control group ( p<0.01). The weights of mammary gland were 163 ± 51.1mg/10g (weight of mouse) for the treated group and 98.5 ± 18.4 mg/10 g for the control group ( p<0.01). Histological examinations suggested that mammary glands from the treated group were at the secreting stages, while those from the control group were at the resting stages. Clinical tests also demonstrated that Muyingle was highly effective in promoting lactation and improving the quality of the puerpera's milk. The efficiency was up to 86.7%.

  12. Does morality have a biological basis? An empirical test of the factors governing moral sentiments relating to incest.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Debra; Tooby, John; Cosmides, Leda

    2003-04-22

    Kin-recognition systems have been hypothesized to exist in humans, and adaptively to regulate altruism and incest avoidance among close genetic kin. This latter function allows the architecture of the kin recognition system to be mapped by quantitatively matching individual variation in opposition to incest to individual variation in developmental parameters, such as family structure and co-residence patterns. Methodological difficulties that appear when subjects are asked to disclose incestuous inclinations can be circumvented by measuring their opposition to incest in third parties, i.e. morality. This method allows a direct test of Westermarck's original hypothesis that childhood co-residence with an opposite-sex individual predicts the strength of moral sentiments regarding third-party sibling incest. Results support Westermarck's hypothesis and the model of kin recognition that it implies. Co-residence duration objectively predicts genetic relatedness, making it a reliable cue to kinship. Co-residence duration predicts the strength of opposition to incest, even after controlling for relatedness and even when co-residing individuals are genetically unrelated. This undercuts kin-recognition models requiring matching to self (through, for example, major histocompatibility complex or phenotypic markers). Subjects' beliefs about relatedness had no effect after controlling for co-residence, indicating that systems regulating kin-relevant behaviours are non-conscious, and calibrated by co-residence, not belief.

  13. Does morality have a biological basis? An empirical test of the factors governing moral sentiments relating to incest.

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Debra; Tooby, John; Cosmides, Leda

    2003-01-01

    Kin-recognition systems have been hypothesized to exist in humans, and adaptively to regulate altruism and incest avoidance among close genetic kin. This latter function allows the architecture of the kin recognition system to be mapped by quantitatively matching individual variation in opposition to incest to individual variation in developmental parameters, such as family structure and co-residence patterns. Methodological difficulties that appear when subjects are asked to disclose incestuous inclinations can be circumvented by measuring their opposition to incest in third parties, i.e. morality. This method allows a direct test of Westermarck's original hypothesis that childhood co-residence with an opposite-sex individual predicts the strength of moral sentiments regarding third-party sibling incest. Results support Westermarck's hypothesis and the model of kin recognition that it implies. Co-residence duration objectively predicts genetic relatedness, making it a reliable cue to kinship. Co-residence duration predicts the strength of opposition to incest, even after controlling for relatedness and even when co-residing individuals are genetically unrelated. This undercuts kin-recognition models requiring matching to self (through, for example, major histocompatibility complex or phenotypic markers). Subjects' beliefs about relatedness had no effect after controlling for co-residence, indicating that systems regulating kin-relevant behaviours are non-conscious, and calibrated by co-residence, not belief. PMID:12737660

  14. Effects of Activated Carbon on PCB Bioaccumulation and Biological Responses of Chironomus riparius in Full Life Cycle Test.

    PubMed

    Nybom, Inna; Abel, Sebastian; Waissi, Greta; Väänänen, Kristiina; Mäenpää, Kimmo; Leppänen, Matti T; Kukkonen, Jussi V K; Akkanen, Jarkko

    2016-05-17

    The nonbiting midge Chironomus riparius was used to study the remediation potential and secondary effects of activated carbon (AC, ø 63-200 μm) in PCB contaminated sediments. AC amendments efficiently reduced PCB bioavailability determined by Chironomus riparius bioaccumulation tests and passive samplers. PCBs were shown to transfer from larvae to adults. Lower PCB concentrations were observed in adult midges emerging from AC amended compared to unamended sediments. Increased reproduction, survival, larval growth and gut wall microvilli length were observed with low AC dose (0.5% sediment dw) compared to unamended sediment, indicating an improved success of larvae in the sediment with low organic carbon content. On the other hand, higher AC doses (2.5% sediment dw) caused adverse effects on emergence and larval development. In addition, morphological changes in the gut wall microvilli layer were observed. This study showed that the secondary effects of AC amendments are dependent on the dose and the sediment characteristics. Metamorphic species, such as C. riparius, may act as a vector for organic pollutants from aquatic to terrestrial ecosystems and according to this study the AC amendments may reduce this transport.

  15. Action of silver nanoparticles towards biological systems: cytotoxicity evaluation using hen's egg test and inhibition of Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Freire, Priscila L L; Stamford, Thayza C M; Albuquerque, Allan J R; Sampaio, Fabio C; Cavalcante, Horacinna M M; Macedo, Rui O; Galembeck, André; Flores, Miguel A P; Rosenblatt, Aronita

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the cytotoxicity and bactericidal properties of four silver nanoparticle (AgNP) colloids and their ability to inhibit Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation on dental enamel. The cytotoxicity of AgNPs was evaluated based on signs of vascular change on the chorioallantoic membrane using the hen's egg test (HET-CAM). Bactericidal properties and inhibition of S. mutans biofilm formation were determined using a parallel-flow cell system and a dichromatic fluorescent stain. The percentage of viable cells was calculated from regression data generated from a viability standard. AgNP colloids proved to be non-irritating, as they were unable to promote vasoconstriction, haemorrhage or coagulation. AgNP colloids inhibited S. mutans biofilm formation on dental enamel, and cell viability measured by fluorescence was 0% for samples S1, S2, S3 and S4 and 36.5% for the positive control (diluted 30% silver diamine fluoride). AgNPs are new products with a low production cost because they have a lower concentration of silver, with low toxicity and an effective bactericidal effect against a cariogenic oral bacterium. Moreover, they do not promote colour change in dental enamel, which is an aesthetic advantage compared with traditional silver products.

  16. Design and biological testing of peptidic dimerization inhibitors of human Hsp90 that target the C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Bopp, Bertan; Ciglia, Emanuele; Ouald-Chaib, Anissa; Groth, Georg; Gohlke, Holger; Jose, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    Small molecules targeting the dimerization interface of the C-terminal domain of Hsp90, a validated target for cancer treatment, have yet to be identified. Three peptides were designed with the aim to inhibit the dimerization of Hsp90. Computational and biophysical methods examined the α-helical structure for the three peptides. Based on the Autodisplay technology, a novel flow cytometer dimerization assay was developed to test inhibition of Hsp90 dimerization. Microscale thermophoresis was used to determine the K(D) of the peptides towards the C-terminal domain of Hsp90. MD simulations and CD spectroscopy indicated an α-helical structure for two of the three peptides. By flow cytometer analysis, IC(50) values of 2.08 μM for peptide H2 and 8.96 μM for peptide H3 were determined. Dimer formation of the C-terminal dimerization domain was analyzed by microscale thermophoresis, and a K(D) of 1.29 nM was determined. Furthermore, microscale thermophoresis studies demonstrated a high affinity binding of H2 and H3 to the C-terminal domain, with a K(D) of 1.02 μM and 1.46 μM, respectively. These results revealed the first peptidic inhibitors of Hsp90 dimerization targeting the C-terminal domain. Furthermore, it has been shown that these peptides bind to the C-terminal domain with a low micromolar affinity. These results can be used to design and screen for small molecules that inhibit the dimerization of the C-terminal domain of Hsp90, which could open a new route for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Optical high-resolution analysis of rotational movement: testing circular spatial filter velocimetry (CSFV) with rotating biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeper, M.; Schmidt, R.; Kostbade, R.; Damaschke, N.; Gimsa, J.

    2016-07-01

    Circular spatial filtering velocimetry (CSFV) was tested during the microscopic registration of the individual rotations of baker’s yeast cells. Their frequency-dependent rotation (electrorotation; ER) was induced in rotating electric fields, which were generated in a glass chip chamber with four electrodes (600 μm tip-to-tip distance). The electrodes were driven with sinusoidal quadrature signals of 5 or 8 V PP with frequencies up to 3 MHz. The observed cell rotation was of the order of 1-100 s per revolution. At each measuring frequency, the independent rotations of up to 20 cells were simultaneously recorded with a high-speed camera. CSFV was software-implemented using circular spatial filters with harmonic gratings. ER was proportional to the phase shift between the values of the spatial filtering signal of consecutive frames. ER spectra obtained by CSFV from the rotation velocities at different ER-field frequencies agreed well with manual measurements and theoretical spectra. Oscillations in the rotation velocity of a single cell in the elliptically polarized field near an electrode, which were resolved by CSFV, could not be visually discerned. ER step responses after field-on were recorded at 2500 frames per second. Analysis proved the high temporal resolution of CSFV and revealed a largely linear torque-friction relation during the acceleration phase of ER. Future applications of CSFV will allow for the simple and cheap automated high-resolution analysis of rotational movements where mechanical detection has too low a resolution or is not possible, e.g. in polluted environments or for gas and fluid vortices, microscopic objects, etc.

  18. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma: morphoproteomics and personalized tumor graft testing further define the biology of PAX3-FKHR(FOXO1) subtype and provide targeted therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Robert E.; Buryanek, Jamie; Katz, Amanda M.; Paz, Keren; Wolff, Johannes E.

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) represents a block in differentiation of malignant myoblasts. Genomic events implicated in the pathogenesis of ARMS involve PAX3-FKHR (FOXO1) or PAX7-FKHR (FOXO1) translocation with corresponding fusion transcripts and fusion proteins. Commonalities in ARMS include uncontrollable proliferation and failure to differentiate. The genomic-molecular correlates contributing to the etiopathogenesis of ARMS incorporate PAX3-FKHR (FOXO1) fusion protein stimulation of the IGF-1R, c-Met and GSK3-β pathways. With sequential morphoproteomic profiling on such a case in conjunction with personalized tumor graft testing, we provide an expanded definition of the biology of PAX3-FKHR (FOXO1) ARMS that integrates genomics, proteomics and pharmacogenomics. Moreover, therapies that target the genomic and molecular biology and lead to tumoral regression and/or tumoral growth inhibition in a xenograft model of ARMS are identified. Significance This case study could serve as a model for clinical trials using relatively low toxicity agents in both initial and maintenance therapies to induce remission and reduce the risk of recurrent disease in PAX3-FKHR (FOXO1) subtype of ARMS. PMID:27323832

  19. [The phylogenetic theory of pathology. The arterial hypertension--a test of metabolic disorder. The biological basis of damage of target organs (a lecture)].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N

    2013-05-01

    The increase of blood tension is a diagnostic test of disorders of homeostasis, trophology, endoecology and adaptation in paracrine regulated coenosis of cells. This conditions results in disorder of microcirculation in the distal section of arterial race and in compensatory increase of blood tension in its proximal section. The increase of blood tension disturbs the function of paracrine coenosis of cells which have one's own system of hemo- and hydrodynamics such as brain with system of spinal liquor and kidneys with local pool of primary urine. They counteract the rise of blood tension and activate local, humoral system of renin-angiotensin-II increasing peripheral resistance to blood flow. At that, the compensatory blood tension becomes even higher. The aldosterone and natriuretic peptides are functional synergists. So, they preserve and excrete ions of Na+ and support the stability of unified pool of intercellular medium ("Inner Ocean" of organism) where all cells live. The parameters of this pool are limited most strictly in vivo. If at the level of nephron the conditions are formed that can alter the parameters of unified pool of intercellular medium the vasomotor center rises blood tension from the level of organism "forcing" nephrons to re-establish the parameters of this pool and normalize the biological functions and biological reactions. The blood pressure increase under pathology of kidneys is caused because of pathological compensation at the level of organism mediated by vegetal nervous system and dictated by necessity to preserve the parameters of inner medium of organism.

  20. Assessing the cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of secondary metabolites produced by several fungal biological control agents with the Ames assay and the VITOTOX(®) test.

    PubMed

    Kouvelis, Vassili N; Wang, Chengshu; Skrobek, Anke; Pappas, Katherine M; Typas, Milton A; Butt, Tariq M

    2011-05-18

    The potential genotoxic effects of several pure secondary metabolites produced by fungi used as biological control agents (BCAs) were studied with the Ames Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity assay and the Vitotox test, with and without metabolic activation. A complete set of Salmonella tester strains was used to avoid false negative results. To detect possible mutagenic and/or cytotoxic effects of fungal secondary metabolites due to synergistic action, crude extracts and fungal cell extracts of the BCAs were also examined. Although the sensitivity of the methods varied depending on the metabolite used, clearly no genotoxicity was observed in all cases. The results of the two assays are discussed in the light of being used in a complementary fashion for a convincing risk-assessment evaluation of fungal BCAs and their secondary metabolites.

  1. Structure-based design, synthesis and biological testing of etoposide analog epipodophyllotoxin-N-mustard hybrid compounds designed to covalently bind to topoisomerase II and DNA

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Arun A.; Wu, Xing; Patel, Daywin; Yalowich, Jack C.; Hasinoff, Brian B.

    2014-01-01

    Drugs that target DNA topoisomerase II isoforms and alkylate DNA represent two mechanistically distinct and clinically important classes of anticancer drugs. Guided by molecular modeling and docking a series of etoposide analog epipodophyllotoxin-N-mustard hybrid compounds were designed, synthesized and biologically characterized. These hybrids were designed to alkylate nucleophilic protein residues on topoisomerase II and thus produce inactive covalent adducts and to also alkylate DNA. The most potent hybrid had a mean GI50 in the NCI-60 cell screen 17-fold lower than etoposide. Using a variety of in vitro and cell-based assays all of the hybrids tested were shown to target topoisomerase II. A COMPARE analysis indicated that the hybrids had NCI 60-cell growth inhibition profiles matching both etoposide and the N-mustard compounds from which they were derived. These results supported the conclusion that the hybrids displayed characteristics that were consistent with having targeted both topoisomerase II and DNA. PMID:25282653

  2. The "plantar test" apparatus (Ugo Basile Biological Apparatus), a controlled infrared noxious radiant heat stimulus for precise withdrawal latency measurement in the rat, as a tool for humans?

    PubMed

    Montagne-Clavel, J; Oliveras, J L

    1996-01-01

    In the present study, we precisely and automatically measured the withdrawal latency to noxious radiant heat application in unrestrained male rats and in human subjects of both sexes, by means of the "plantar test" apparatus (Ugo Basile Biological Apparatus). The infrared light stimulus of this tool was applied underneath the hindpaws of rats and the middle fingers of human subjects. With one right and one left stimulation every 10 min, we observed a decrease in latency over a 40-min testing period in rats; the latency reached a mean value of 5.08 +/- 0.25 sec after 40 min with a 36-W stimulus, which corresponded to 46.5 degrees C. In pilot experiments, also performed on rats, we showed that the opiate morphine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) produced remarkable increases of the withdrawal latency only in "naive" animals (i.e., ones that had never experienced the plantar test stimulus) and not in animals "habituated" to it. Among humans, we noted gender differences, such as less sensitivity to the infrared noxious radiant heat for women, particularly during the menstrual period. A difference from rats was that there was no significant latency modification along the 40-min testing period for either women or men, with a mean latency of 5.61 +/- 0.18 sec (47.5 degrees C) for the women and 4.39 +/- 0.10 sec (45.5 degrees C) for the men. These data confirm the reliability of the plantar test in rats, and demonstrate the possible use of an infrared source in human subjects as a noxious heat stimulus; the withdrawal reaction to this stimulus is emphasized as a good index of nociception in humans.

  3. A step towards removing plasma volume variance from the Athlete's Biological Passport: The use of biomarkers to describe vascular volumes from a simple blood test.

    PubMed

    Lobigs, Louisa M; Sottas, Pierre-Edouard; Bourdon, Pitre C; Nikolovski, Zoran; El-Gingo, Mohamed; Varamenti, Evdokia; Peeling, Peter; Dawson, Brian; Schumacher, Yorck O

    2017-05-26

    The haematological module of the Athlete's Biological Passport (ABP) has significantly impacted the prevalence of blood manipulations in elite sports. However, the ABP relies on a number of concentration-based markers of erythropoiesis, such as haemoglobin concentration ([Hb]), which are influenced by shifts in plasma volume (PV). Fluctuations in PV contribute to the majority of biological variance associated with volumetric ABP markers. Our laboratory recently identified a panel of common chemistry markers (from a simple blood test) capable of describing ca 67% of PV variance, presenting an applicable method to account for volume shifts within anti-doping practices. Here, this novel PV marker was included into the ABP adaptive model. Over a six-month period (one test per month), 33 healthy, active males provided blood samples and performed the CO-rebreathing method to record PV (control). In the final month participants performed a single maximal exercise effort to promote a PV shift (mean PV decrease -17%, 95% CI -9.75 to -18.13%). Applying the ABP adaptive model, individualized reference limits for [Hb] and the OFF-score were created, with and without the PV correction. With the PV correction, an average of 66% of [Hb] within-subject variance is explained, narrowing the predicted reference limits, and reducing the number of atypical ABP findings post-exercise. Despite an increase in sensitivity there was no observed loss of specificity with the addition of the PV correction. The novel PV marker presented here has the potential to improve the ABP's rate of correct doping detection by removing the confounding effects of PV variance. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. All biology is computational biology.

    PubMed

    Markowetz, Florian

    2017-03-01

    Here, I argue that computational thinking and techniques are so central to the quest of understanding life that today all biology is computational biology. Computational biology brings order into our understanding of life, it makes biological concepts rigorous and testable, and it provides a reference map that holds together individual insights. The next modern synthesis in biology will be driven by mathematical, statistical, and computational methods being absorbed into mainstream biological training, turning biology into a quantitative science.

  5. All biology is computational biology

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Here, I argue that computational thinking and techniques are so central to the quest of understanding life that today all biology is computational biology. Computational biology brings order into our understanding of life, it makes biological concepts rigorous and testable, and it provides a reference map that holds together individual insights. The next modern synthesis in biology will be driven by mathematical, statistical, and computational methods being absorbed into mainstream biological training, turning biology into a quantitative science. PMID:28278152

  6. Solubility properties in polymers and biological media. 7. An analysis of toxicant properties that influence inhibition of bioluminescence in photobacterium phosphoreum (the Microtox test)

    SciTech Connect

    Kamlet, M.J.; Doherty, R.M.; Veith, G.D.; Taft, R.W.; Abraham, M.H.

    1986-07-01

    Inhibition of bioluminescence in Photobacterium phosphoreum (the Microtox test) has been proposed as a cost-effective prescreening procedure to eliminate the relatively more innocuous chemicals from testing programs for toxicities of organic chemicals to fish. The biological response, as a function of toxicant properties, is given by log EC/sub 50/ (in ..mu..molL) = 7.61 - 4.11 anti V100 - 1.54 ..pi..* + 3.94..beta.. - 1.51..cap alpha../sub m/ n = 38, r = 0.987, SD = 0.28 where anti V is the solute molar volume and ..pi..*, ..beta.., and ..cap alpha../sub m/ are the solvatochromic parameters that measure dipolaritypolarizability, hydrogen-bond acceptor basicity, and hydrogen-bond donor acidity of the solute (toxicant). The above equation applies to compounds that act by a nonreactive toxicity mechanism, and it is suggested that for certain compounds, which are outliers relative to the above equation, reactive toxicity properties mask the effects of the nonreactive mechanism. The above equation is compared with a correlation of log EC/sub 50/ with octanolwater partition coefficients. 25 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  7. [Viral safety of biologicals: evaluation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) nucleic acid amplification test (NAT) assay and development of concentration method of HCV for sensitive detection by NAT].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Eriko; Yamaguchi, Teruhide

    2010-02-01

    The most important issue for the safety of biological products and blood products derived from human sources is how to prevent transmission of infectious agents. The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major public health problem due to its high prevalence. HCV is mainly transmitted by exposure to blood and highly infectious during the early window period with extremely low viral loads. Therefore it is important to develop more sensitive detection methods for HCV. In the case of blood products, both serological test and nucleic acid amplification test (NAT) are required to detect HCV. Since NAT is highly sensitive, establishment of a new standard is required for validation of NAT assay. NAT guideline and establishment of the standard for HCV RNA and HCV genotype panel is introduced in this review. On the other hand, to enhance the sensitivity of virus detection by NAT, a novel viral concentration method using polyethyleneimine (PEI)-conjugated magnetic beads (PEI beads) was developed. PEI beads concentration method is applicable to a wide range of viruses including HCV. Studies using the national standard for HCV RNA, HCV genotype panel and seroconversion panel, suggest that virus concentration method using PEI-beads is useful for improvement of the sensitivity of HCV detection by NAT and applicable to donor screening for HCV.

  8. Human procollagen type I surface-modified PHB-based non-woven textile scaffolds for cell growth: preparation and short-term biological tests.

    PubMed

    Kawalec, Michał; Sitkowska, Anna; Sobota, Michał; Sieroń, Aleksander L; Komar, Patrycja; Kurcok, Piotr

    2014-10-30

    3D fine porous structures obtained by electrospinning a poly[(R,S)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (aPHB)/ poly[(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB) (85/15 w/w) blend were successfully modified with human procollagen type I by simple immersion of the polyester scaffold in an aqueous solution of the protein. Effective modification of the scaffold with human procollagen I was confirmed by an immunodetection test, which revealed the presence of the procollagen type I as an outer layer even on inner structures of the porous matrixes. Biological tests of 3D fabrics made of the PHB blend provide support for the adhesion and proliferation of human fibroblasts, while their modification with procollagen type I increased the biocompatibility of the final scaffolds significantly, as shown by the notable increase in the number of attached cells during the early hours of their incubation. Based on these findings, human procollagen type I surface-modified aPHB/PHB scaffolds should be considered a promising material in regenerative medicine.

  9. Using biological and physico-chemical test methods to assess the role of concrete mixture design in resistance to microbially induced corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, Mitchell Wayne

    Concrete is the most widely used material for construction of wastewater collection, storage, and treatment infrastructure. The chemical and physical characteristics of hydrated portland cement make it susceptible to degradation under highly acidic conditions. As a result, some concrete wastewater infrastructure may be susceptible to a multi-stage degradation process known as microbially induced corrosion, or MIC. MIC begins with the production of aqueous hydrogen sulfide (H2S(aq)) by anaerobic sulfate reducing bacteria present below the waterline. H2S(aq) partitions to the gas phase where it is oxidized to sulfuric acid by the aerobic sulfur oxidizing bacteria Thiobacillus that resides on concrete surfaces above the waterline. Sulfuric acid then attacks the cement paste portion of the concrete matrix through decalcification of calcium hydroxide and calcium silica hydrate coupled with the formation of expansive corrosion products. The attack proceeds inward resulting in reduced service life and potential failure of the concrete structure. There are several challenges associated with assessing a concrete's susceptibility to MIC. First, no standard laboratory tests exist to assess concrete resistance to MIC. Straightforward reproduction of MIC in the laboratory is complicated by the use of microorganisms and hydrogen sulfide gas. Physico-chemical tests simulating MIC by immersing concrete specimens in sulfuric acid offer a convenient alternative, but do not accurately capture the damage mechanisms associated with biological corrosion. Comparison of results between research studies is difficult due to discrepancies that can arise in experimental methods even if current ASTM standards are followed. This thesis presents two experimental methods to evaluate concrete resistance to MIC: one biological and one physico-chemical. Efforts are made to address the critical aspects of each testing method currently absent in the literature. The first method presented is a new test

  10. Thinking Like a Wolf, a Sheep, or a Firefly: Learning Biology through Constructing and Testing Computational Theories--An Embodied Modeling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilensky, Uri; Reisman, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    Biological phenomena can be investigated at multiple levels, from the molecular to the cellular to the organismic to the ecological. In typical biology instruction, these levels have been segregated. Yet, it is by examining the connections between such levels that many phenomena in biology, and complex systems in general, are best explained. We…

  11. Thinking Like a Wolf, a Sheep, or a Firefly: Learning Biology through Constructing and Testing Computational Theories--An Embodied Modeling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilensky, Uri; Reisman, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    Biological phenomena can be investigated at multiple levels, from the molecular to the cellular to the organismic to the ecological. In typical biology instruction, these levels have been segregated. Yet, it is by examining the connections between such levels that many phenomena in biology, and complex systems in general, are best explained. We…

  12. Synthetic biological networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, Eric; Süel, Gürol M.

    2013-09-01

    Despite their obvious relationship and overlap, the field of physics is blessed with many insightful laws, while such laws are sadly absent in biology. Here we aim to discuss how the rise of a more recent field known as synthetic biology may allow us to more directly test hypotheses regarding the possible design principles of natural biological networks and systems. In particular, this review focuses on synthetic gene regulatory networks engineered to perform specific functions or exhibit particular dynamic behaviors. Advances in synthetic biology may set the stage to uncover the relationship of potential biological principles to those developed in physics.

  13. Comparative biology of test species

    SciTech Connect

    Calabrese, E.J.

    1988-04-01

    This paper assesses the capacity of animal models to predict human response to carcinogenic agents with consideration for the heterogeneity of humans. It is widely accepted that human susceptibility to toxic substances, including carcinogens, is highly variable. Conventional rodent models are usually highly inbred and valued for their ability to display characteristic homogeneity. Current practice assumes that the homogeneity of response to toxic agents, including carcinogens, in the rodent model will be representative of humans. The issue then becomes, To which of the broad spectrum of human responses are specific animal models likely to be related. This paper examines the extent of human heterogeneity over a broad range of biochemical characteristics (e.g., aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity, epoxide hydrase activity, ..beta..-glucuronidase activity, debrisoquine hydroxylation, DNA-adduct formation) with emphasis on those biochemical characteristics that affect responses to carcinogens. Examples are presented to compare the heterogeneity of selected animal models for these biochemical characteristics as they relate to the spectrum of human responses noted above. The paper presents a theoretical perspective for determining to which part of the human population response spectrum common animal models are most likely to be extrapolated.

  14. Comparative biology of test species.

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, E J

    1988-01-01

    This paper assesses the capacity of animal models to predict human response to carcinogenic agents with consideration for the heterogeneity of humans. It is widely accepted that human susceptibility to toxic substances, including carcinogens, is highly variable. Conventional rodent models are usually highly inbred and valued for their ability to display characteristic homogeneity. Current practice assumes that the homogeneity of response to toxic agents, including carcinogens, in the rodent model will be representative of humans. The issue then becomes, To which of the broad spectrum of human responses are specific animal models likely to be related? This paper examines the extent of human heterogeneity over a broad range of biochemical characteristics (e.g., aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity, epoxide hydrase activity, beta-glucuronidase activity, debrisoquine hydroxylation, DNA-adduct formation) with emphasis on those biochemical characteristics that affect responses to carcinogens. Examples are presented to compare the heterogeneity of selected animal models for these biochemical characteristics as they relate to the spectrum of human responses noted above. The paper presents a theoretical perspective for determining to which part of the human population response spectrum common animal models are most likely to be extrapolated. PMID:3289908

  15. The biological and ethical basis of the use of human embryonic stem cells for in vitro test systems or cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Leist, Marcel; Bremer, Susanne; Brundin, Patrik; Hescheler, Juergen; Kirkeby, Agnete; Krause, Karl-Heinz; Poerzgen, Peter; Puceat, Michel; Schmidt, Mathias; Schrattenholz, Andre; Zak, Naomi B; Hentze, Hannes

    2008-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) are now routinely cultured in many laboratories, and differentiation protocols are available to generate a large variety of cell types. In an ongoing ethical debate opinions of different groups are based on varying sets of religious, historical, cultural and scientific arguments as well as on widely differing levels of general information. We here give an overview of the biological background for non-specialists, and address all is- sues of the current stem cell debate that are of concern in different cultures and states. Thirty-five chapters address embryo definition, potential killing and the beginning of human life, in addition to matters of human dignity, patenting, commercialisation, and potential alternatives for the future, such as induced pluripotent (reprogrammed) stem cells. All arguments are compiled in a synopsis, and compromise solutions, e.g. for the definition of the beginning of personhood and for assigning dignity to embryos, are suggested. Until recently, the major application of hESC was thought to be transplantation of cells derived from hESC for therapeutic use. We discuss here that the most likely immediate uses will rather be in vitro test systems and disease models. Major and minor pharmaceutical companies have entered this field, and the European Union is sponsoring academic research into hESC-based innovative test systems. This development is supported by new testing strategies in Europe and the USA focussing on human cell-based in vitro systems for safety evaluations, and shifting the focus of toxicology away from classical animal experiments towards a more mechanistic understanding.

  16. A comparison between selected 4 x 4 block schedule schools and seven-period traditional schools as measured by the public schools in North Carolina End of Course tests in algebra and biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, George Humphries, III

    A Comparison Between Selected 4 x 4 Block Schedule Schools and Seven-Period Traditional Schools as Measured by the Public Schools in North Carolina End-of-Course Tests in Algebra and Biology (Under the direction of Ernest McNeill.) The purpose of this study was to compare test scores of students on the 4x4 block schedule and students on the seven-period traditional schedule using the End-of-Course testing program scores in the North Carolina ABC accountability model to determine if significant differences exist. The tested areas this researcher examined were Algebra I and Biology in an urban school system. The population in the study was extracted from data files of four schools in the Cumberland County School System, Fayetteville, North Carolina. They were Terry Sanford Senior High School and Seventy First Senior High School, which are on the traditional seven-period day schedule, as well as South View Senior High School and Jack Britt Senior High School, which are on the 4x4 block schedule. The scores on the End-of-Course Tests in Algebra I and Biology over the period of 2001-2002 and 2002-2003 were compared. The conclusion of the study indicated that there was a significant difference in student achievement for all students, minority, non-minority, female, and male in Algebra I on the 4 x 4 schedule versus all students, minority, non-minority, female, and male in Algebra I on the traditional schedule. There was a significant difference in student achievement for minority students in Biology on the 4 x 4 schedule versus minority students in Biology on the traditional schedule. There was no significant difference in student achievement for all students, non-minority, female, and male students in Biology on the 4 x 4 versus all students, non-minority, female, and male in Biology on the traditional schedule.

  17. Comparison of the effects block and traditional schedules have on the number of students who are proficient on the Biology End-of-Course Test in forty public high schools in the state of North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonner, Tonia Anita

    This study examined the difference between the number of overall students, African-American students, and students with disabilities on a semester 4 x 4 block schedule who were proficient on the North Carolina Biology End-of-Course Test and the number of the same group of students on a traditional 45-50 minute yearlong schedule who were proficient on the NC Biology End-of-Course Test in the state of North Carolina during the 2009--2010 school year. A causal-comparative design was used and three null hypotheses were tested using chi-square analysis. Archival data was used. The results showed that there was a significant association between the number of the overall students and African-American students who were proficient on the NC Biology EOC Test when taught biology on a 4 x 4 semester block versus a traditional schedule. However, no statistically significant relationship existed between the number of students with disabilities who were educated on 4 x 4 semester block schedule and those students with disabilities who were educated on a six or seven period traditional schedule in biology. Suggestions for further research are included.

  18. Designing synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Agapakis, Christina M

    2014-03-21

    Synthetic biology is frequently defined as the application of engineering design principles to biology. Such principles are intended to streamline the practice of biological engineering, to shorten the time required to design, build, and test synthetic gene networks. This streamlining of iterative design cycles can facilitate the future construction of biological systems for a range of applications in the production of fuels, foods, materials, and medicines. The promise of these potential applications as well as the emphasis on design has prompted critical reflection on synthetic biology from design theorists and practicing designers from many fields, who can bring valuable perspectives to the discipline. While interdisciplinary connections between biologists and engineers have built synthetic biology via the science and the technology of biology, interdisciplinary collaboration with artists, designers, and social theorists can provide insight on the connections between technology and society. Such collaborations can open up new avenues and new principles for research and design, as well as shed new light on the challenging context-dependence-both biological and social-that face living technologies at many scales. This review is inspired by the session titled "Design and Synthetic Biology: Connecting People and Technology" at Synthetic Biology 6.0 and covers a range of literature on design practice in synthetic biology and beyond. Critical engagement with how design is used to shape the discipline opens up new possibilities for how we might design the future of synthetic biology.

  19. A bioreactor test system to mimic the biological and mechanical environment of oral soft tissues and to evaluate substitutes for connective tissue grafts.

    PubMed

    Mathes, Stephanie H; Wohlwend, Lorenz; Uebersax, Lorenz; von Mentlen, Roger; Thoma, Daniel S; Jung, Ronald E; Görlach, Christoph; Graf-Hausner, Ursula

    2010-12-15

    Gingival cells of the oral connective tissue are exposed to complex mechanical forces during mastication, speech, tooth movement and orthodontic treatments. Especially during wound healing following surgical procedures, internal and external forces may occur, creating pressure upon the newly formed tissue. This clinical situation has to be considered when developing biomaterials to augment soft tissue in the oral cavity. In order to pre-evaluate a collagen sponge intended to serve as a substitute for autogenous connective tissue grafts (CTGs), a dynamic bioreactor system was developed. Pressure and shear forces can be applied in this bioreactor in addition to a constant medium perfusion to cell-material constructs. Three-dimensional volume changes and stiffness of the matrices were analyzed. In addition, cell responses such as cell vitality and extracellular matrix (ECM) production were investigated. The number of metabolic active cells constantly increased under fully dynamic culture conditions. The sponges remained elastic even after mechanical forces were applied for 14 days. Analysis of collagen type I and fibronectin revealed a statistically significant accumulation of these ECM molecules (P < 0.05-0.001) when compared to static cultures. An increased expression of tenascin-c, indicating tissue remodeling processes, was observed under dynamic conditions only. The results indicate that the tested in vitro cell culture system was able to mimic both the biological and mechanical environments of the clinical situation in a healing wound. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Multilevel correlations in the biological phosphorus removal process: From bacterial enrichment to conductivity-based metabolic batch tests and polyphosphatase assays.

    PubMed

    Weissbrodt, David G; Maillard, Julien; Brovelli, Alessandro; Chabrelie, Alexandre; May, Jonathan; Holliger, Christof

    2014-12-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) from wastewater relies on the preferential selection of active polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAO) in the underlying bacterial community continuum. Efficient management of the bacterial resource requires understanding of population dynamics as well as availability of bioanalytical methods for rapid and regular assessment of relative abundances of active PAOs and their glycogen-accumulating competitors (GAO). A systems approach was adopted here toward the investigation of multilevel correlations from the EBPR bioprocess to the bacterial community, metabolic, and enzymatic levels. Two anaerobic-aerobic sequencing-batch reactors were operated to enrich activated sludge in PAOs and GAOs affiliating with "Candidati Accumulibacter and Competibacter phosphates", respectively. Bacterial selection was optimized by dynamic control of the organic loading rate and the anaerobic contact time. The distinct core bacteriomes mainly comprised populations related to the classes Betaproteobacteria, Cytophagia, and Chloroflexi in the PAO enrichment and of Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Sphingobacteria in the GAO enrichment. An anaerobic metabolic batch test based on electrical conductivity evolution and a polyphosphatase enzymatic assay were developed for rapid and low-cost assessment of the active PAO fraction and dephosphatation potential of activated sludge. Linear correlations were obtained between the PAO fraction, biomass specific rate of conductivity increase under anaerobic conditions, and polyphosphate-hydrolyzing activity of PAO/GAO mixtures. The correlations between PAO/GAO ratios, metabolic activities, and conductivity profiles were confirmed by simulations with a mathematical model developed in the aqueous geochemistry software PHREEQC. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. geneCommittee: a web-based tool for extensively testing the discriminatory power of biologically relevant gene sets in microarray data classification.

    PubMed

    Reboiro-Jato, Miguel; Arrais, Joel P; Oliveira, José Luis; Fdez-Riverola, Florentino

    2014-01-30

    The diagnosis and prognosis of several diseases can be shortened through the use of different large-scale genome experiments. In this context, microarrays can generate expression data for a huge set of genes. However, to obtain solid statistical evidence from the resulting data, it is necessary to train and to validate many classification techniques in order to find the best discriminative method. This is a time-consuming process that normally depends on intricate statistical tools. geneCommittee is a web-based interactive tool for routinely evaluating the discriminative classification power of custom hypothesis in the form of biologically relevant gene sets. While the user can work with different gene set collections and several microarray data files to configure specific classification experiments, the tool is able to run several tests in parallel. Provided with a straightforward and intuitive interface, geneCommittee is able to render valuable information for diagnostic analyses and clinical management decisions based on systematically evaluating custom hypothesis over different data sets using complementary classifiers, a key aspect in clinical research. geneCommittee allows the enrichment of microarrays raw data with gene functional annotations, producing integrated datasets that simplify the construction of better discriminative hypothesis, and allows the creation of a set of complementary classifiers. The trained committees can then be used for clinical research and diagnosis. Full documentation including common use cases and guided analysis workflows is freely available at http://sing.ei.uvigo.es/GC/.

  2. Host Range Testing of Diaphorencyrtus aligarhensis (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) for Use in Classical Biological Control of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae) in California.

    PubMed

    Bistline-East, Allison; Pandey, Raju; Kececi, Mehmet; Hoddle, Mark S

    2015-06-01

    Host range tests for Diaphorencyrtus aligarhensis (Shafee, Alam, & Agarwal) (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), an endoparasitoid of Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae), sourced from Punjab Pakistan, were conducted in quarantine at the University of California, Riverside, CA. Seven nontarget psyllid species representing four psyllid families were exposed to mated D. aligarhensis females in four different treatment types: 1) short sequential no-choice treatments, 2) prolonged sequential no-choice treatments, 3) prolonged no-choice static treatments, and 4) choice treatments. Selection of nontarget psyllid species was based on phylogenetic proximity to D. citri, likelihood of being encountered by D. aligarhensis in the prospective release areas in California, and psyllid species in biological control of invasive weeds. D. aligarhensis exhibited high host affinity to D. citri, and only parasitized one nontarget species, the pestiferous potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Sulc), at low levels (<14%). Based on the results of this study, we conclude that D. aligarhensis has a narrow host range and exhibits a high level of host specificity, as it shows a significant attack preference for the target pest, D. citri. Results presented here suggest D. aligarhensis poses minimal risk to nontarget psyllid species in California.

  3. Screening biological stains with qPCR versus lateral flow immunochromatographic test strips: a quantitative comparison using analytical figures of merit.

    PubMed

    Oechsle, Crystal Simson; Haddad, Sandra; Sgueglia, Joanne B; Grgicak, Catherine M

    2014-01-01

    Biological fluid identification is an important facet of evidence examination in forensic laboratories worldwide. While identifying bodily fluids may provide insight into which downstream DNA methods to employ, these screening techniques consume a vital portion of the available evidence, are usually qualitative, and rely on visual interpretation. In contrast, qPCR yields information regarding the amount and proportion of amplifiable genetic material. In this study, dilution series of either semen or male saliva were prepared in either buffer or female blood. The samples were subjected to both lateral flow immunochromatographic test strips and qPCR analysis. Analytical figures of merit-including sensitivity, minimum distinguishable signal (MDS) and limit of detection (LOD)-were calculated and compared between methods. By applying the theory of the propagation of random errors, LODs were determined to be 0.05 μL of saliva for the RSID™ Saliva cards, 0.03 μL of saliva for Quantifiler(®) Duo, and 0.001 μL of semen for Quantifiler(®) Duo. In conclusion, quantitative PCR was deemed a viable and effective screening method for subsequent DNA profiling due to its stability in different matrices, sensitivity, and low limits of detection.

  4. Structure-based design, synthesis and biological testing of etoposide analog epipodophyllotoxin-N-mustard hybrid compounds designed to covalently bind to topoisomerase II and DNA.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Arun A; Wu, Xing; Patel, Daywin; Yalowich, Jack C; Hasinoff, Brian B

    2014-11-01

    Drugs that target DNA topoisomerase II isoforms and alkylate DNA represent two mechanistically distinct and clinically important classes of anticancer drugs. Guided by molecular modeling and docking a series of etoposide analog epipodophyllotoxin-N-mustard hybrid compounds were designed, synthesized and biologically characterized. These hybrids were designed to alkylate nucleophilic protein residues on topoisomerase II and thus produce inactive covalent adducts and to also alkylate DNA. The most potent hybrid had a mean GI(50) in the NCI-60 cell screen 17-fold lower than etoposide. Using a variety of in vitro and cell-based assays all of the hybrids tested were shown to target topoisomerase II. A COMPARE analysis indicated that the hybrids had NCI 60-cell growth inhibition profiles matching both etoposide and the N-mustard compounds from which they were derived. These results supported the conclusion that the hybrids displayed characteristics that were consistent with having targeted both topoisomerase II and DNA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Synthetic biology

    PubMed Central

    Bower, Adam G; McClintock, Maria K

    2010-01-01

    The field of synthetic biology has made rapid progress in a number of areas including method development, novel applications and community building. In seeking to make biology “engineerable,” synthetic biology is increasing the accessibility of biological research to researchers of all experience levels and backgrounds. One of the underlying strengths of synthetic biology is that it may establish the framework for a rigorous bottom-up approach to studying biology starting at the DNA level. Building upon the existing framework established largely by the Registry of Standard Biological Parts, careful consideration of future goals may lead to integrated multi- scale approaches to biology. Here we describe some of the current challenges that need to be addressed or considered in detail to continue the development of synthetic biology. Specifically, discussion on the areas of elucidating biological principles, computational methods and experimental construction methodologies are presented. PMID:21326830

  6. Collaborative study for establishment of a European Pharmacopoei Biological Reference Preparation (BRP) for B19 virus DNA testing of plasma pools by nucleic acid amplification technique.

    PubMed

    Nübling, C M; Daas, A; Buchheit, K H

    2004-01-01

    The goal of the collaborative study was to calibrate the B19 DNA content of a candidate Biological Reference Preparation (BRP) that is intended to be used for the validation of the analytical procedure, as threshold control and/or as quantitative reference material in the Nucleic Acid Amplification Technique (NAT) test of plasma pools for detection of B19 contamination. The candidate BRP was calibrated against the 1st International Standard for B19 DNA NAT assays. According to the European Pharmacopoeia monograph Human anti-D immunoglobulin, the threshold control needs to have a titre of 10( 4) IU/ml of B19 virus DNA. The lyophilised candidate BRP was prepared from 0.5 ml aliquots of a plasma pool spiked with B19 virus. The B19 virus originated from a "B19 virus window phase" blood donation (anti-B19 negative, B19-DNA high titre positive) and was diluted in a plasma pool tested negative by both serological and NAT assays for Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 to obtain a B19-DNA concentration level in the range of 10( 6) copies/ml. The residual water content of the lyophilised candidate BRP was determined as 0.98 +/- 0.65% (mean +/- relative standard deviation). Sixteen laboratories (Official Medicine Control Laboratories, manufacturers of plasma derivatives, NAT test laboratories and NAT kit manufacturers) from nine countries participated. Participants were requested to test the candidate BRP and the International Standard (99/800) in four independent test runs on different days using their in-house qualitative and/or quantitative NAT methods. Sixteen laboratories reported results. Thirteen laboratories reported results from qualitative assays and 5 laboratories reported results from quantitative assays. Two laboratories reported results from both types of assay. For the qualitative assays a weighted combined potency of 5.64 log( 10) IU/ml with 95 per cent confidence limits of +/- 0.17 log( 10) which corresponds to 67 to 150

  7. Comparison of the Effects Block and Traditional Schedules Have on the Number of Students Who Are Proficient on the Biology End-of-Course Test in Forty Public High Schools in the State of North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonner, Tonia Anita

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the difference between the number of overall students, African-American students, and students with disabilities on a semester 4 x 4 block schedule who were proficient on the North Carolina Biology End-of-Course Test and the number of the same group of students on a traditional 45-50 minute yearlong schedule who were proficient…

  8. Monitoring human impacts on sandy shore ecosystems: a test of ghost crabs (Ocypode spp.) as biological indicators on an urban beach.

    PubMed

    Lucrezi, Serena; Schlacher, Thomas A; Walker, Simon

    2009-05-01

    Sandy beaches comprise one of the most important coastal resources worldwide, providing habitats to threatened vertebrates, supporting underappreciated invertebrate biodiversity, and delivering crucial ecosystem services and economic benefits to mankind. Monitoring of the natural resource condition of sandy beaches and assessments of the ecological impacts of human disturbance are, however, rare on sandy shores. Because a crucial step in developing beach monitoring is to identify and test biological indicators, we evaluated the utility of using population densities of ghost crabs (genus Ocypode) to measure how beach biota respond to human pressures. Densities of crabs--estimated via burrow counts--were quantified at two sites exposed to high and low levels of human disturbance on an urban beach in eastern Australia. Human disturbance consisted of pedestrian trampling and shoreline armouring which led to the loss of dune habitat. Overall, crab numbers were halved in disturbed areas, but contrasts between impact and control sites were not necessarily consistent over time and varied between different levels of the shore: stronger and more consistent effect sizes were recorded on the upper shore than further seawards. In addition to lowering crab densities, human disturbance also caused shifts in intertidal distributions, with a greater proportion of individuals occurring lower on the shore in the impacted beach sections. The number of visible burrow openings also changed in response to weather conditions (temperature and wind). We demonstrate that spatial contrasts of burrow counts are broadly useful to indicate the existence of a human-induced disturbance effect on urban beaches; we also highlight a number of critical, hitherto unknown, issues in the application of this monitoring technique; these encompass three broad dimensions: (1) a need for standardised protocols; (2) unresolved causal links between observed patterns and putative pressures; and (3) uncertainties

  9. Biological Filters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klemetson, S. L.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the 1978 literature review of wastewater treatment. The review is concerned with biological filters, and it covers: (1) trickling filters; (2) rotating biological contractors; and (3) miscellaneous reactors. A list of 14 references is also presented. (HM)

  10. Biological Filters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klemetson, S. L.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the 1978 literature review of wastewater treatment. The review is concerned with biological filters, and it covers: (1) trickling filters; (2) rotating biological contractors; and (3) miscellaneous reactors. A list of 14 references is also presented. (HM)

  11. Open-field host specificity test of Gratiana boliviana (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a biological control agent of tropical soda apple (Solanaceae) in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Gandolfo, D.; McKay, F.; Medal, J.C.; Cuda, J.P.

    2007-03-15

    An open-field experiment was conducted to assess the suitability of the South American leaf feeding beetle Gratiana boliviana Spaeth for biological control of Solanum viarum Dunal in the USA. An open-field test with eggplant, Solanum melongena L., was conducted on the campus of the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina, and a S. viarum control plot was established 40 km from the campus. One hundred adult beetles were released in each plot at the beginning of the experiment during the vegetative stage of the plants, and forty additional beetles were released in the S. melongena plot at the flowering stage. All the plants in each plot were checked twice a week and the number of adults, immatures, and eggs recorded. Results showed almost a complete rejection of eggplant by G. boliviana. No noticeable feeding damage was ever recorded on eggplant. The experiment was ended when the eggplants started to senesce or were severely damaged by whiteflies and spider mites. The results of this open-field experiment corroborate previous quarantine/laboratory host-specificity tests indicating that a host range expansion of G. boliviana to include eggplant is highly unlikely. Gratiana boliviana was approved for field release in May 2003 in the USA. To date, no non-target effects have been observed either on eggplant or native species of Solanum. (author) [Spanish] Una prueba de campo fue conducida para evaluar la especificidad del escarabajo suramericano defoliador Gratiana boliviana Spaeth para control biologico de Solanum viarum Dunal en los Estados Unidos. La prueba con berenjena se realizo en el campo experimental de la Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina, y una parcela control con S. viarum fue establecida a 40 km. Cien escarabajos adultos fueron liberados en cada parcela al inicio del experimento durante la fase vegetativa, y cuarenta escarabajos adicionales fueron liberados en la parcela de berenjena durante la floracion. Todas las plantas en cada parcela fueron

  12. Biological properties

    Treesearch

    Rebecca E. Ibach

    2005-01-01

    There are numerous biological degradations that wood is exposed to in various environments. Biological damage occurs when a log, sawn product, or final product is not stored, handled, or designed properly. Biological organisms, such as bacteria, mold, stain, decay fungi, insects, and marine borers, depend heavily on temperature and moisture conditions to grow. A higher...

  13. Fluorescent biological aerosol particles measured with the Waveband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor WIBS-4: laboratory tests combined with a one year field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toprak, E.; Schnaiter, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper bioaerosol measurements conducted with the Waveband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor mark 4 (WIBS-4) are presented. The measurements comprise aerosol chamber characterization experiments and a one-year ambient measurement period at a semi-rural site in South Western Germany. This study aims to investigate the sensitivity of WIBS-4 to biological and non-biological aerosols and detection of biological particles in the ambient aerosol. Several types of biological and non-biological aerosol samples, including fungal spores, bacteria, mineral dust, ammonium sulphate, combustion soot, and fluorescent polystyrene spheres, were analyzed by WIBS-4 in the laboratory. The results confirm the sensitivity of the ultraviolet light-induced fluorescence (UV-LIF) method to biological fluorophores and show the good discrimination capabilities of the two excitation wavelengths/detection wavebands method applied in WIBS-4. However, a weak cross-sensitivity to non-biological fluorescent interferers remains and is discussed in this paper. All the laboratory studies have been undertaken in order to prepare WIBS-4 for ambient aerosol measurements. According to the one-year ambient aerosol study, number concentration of fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAP) show strong seasonal and diurnal variability. The highest number concentration of FBAP was measured during the summer term and decreased towards the winter period when colder and drier conditions prevail. Diurnal FBAP concentrations start to increase after sunset and reach maximum values during the late night and early morning hours. On the other hand, the total aerosol number concentration was almost always higher during daytime than during nighttime and a sharp decrease after sunset was observed. There was no correlation observed between the FBAP concentration and the meteorological parameters temperature, precipitation, wind direction and wind speed. However, a clear correlation was identified between the FBAP

  14. [Biological weapons].

    PubMed

    Kerwat, K; Becker, S; Wulf, H; Densow, D

    2010-08-01

    Biological weapons are weapons of mass destruction that use pathogens (bacteria, viruses) or the toxins produced by them to target living organisms or to contaminate non-living substances. In the past, biological warfare has been repeatedly used. Anthrax, plague and smallpox are regarded as the most dangerous biological weapons by various institutions. Nowadays it seems quite unlikely that biological warfare will be employed in any military campaigns. However, the possibility remains that biological weapons may be used in acts of bioterrorism. In addition all diseases caused by biological weapons may also occur naturally or as a result of a laboratory accident. Risk assessment with regard to biological danger often proves to be difficult. In this context, an early identification of a potentially dangerous situation through experts is essential to limit the degree of damage. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart * New York.

  15. Collaborative study for the establishment of a European Phamacopoeia Biological reference preparation for Bordetella pertussis mouse antiserum for serological potency testing of acellular pertussis vaccines.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Bertrand; Bornstein, Nicole; Andre, Murielle; Marmonier, Denis; Pares, Monique; Vanhooren, Gerard; Rautmann, Guy; Behr-Gross, Marie-Emmanuelle; Dobbelaer, Roland; Fuchs, Florence

    2003-03-01

    A collaborative study was organised by the European Directorate For the Quality of Medicines (EDQM) to assess the suitability of a candidate mouse antiserum as a European Pharmacopoeia Biological reference preparation (BRP) for acellular pertussis vaccine potency testing. The candidate antiserum was obtained by immunising mice with a five-component acellular pertussis vaccine: pertussis toxin (PT), filamentous haemagglutinin (FHA), pertactin (PRN) and Fimbrial 2/Fimbrial 3 (Fim 2&3). The study has been divided into two separate phases. Phase I was a pre-qualification study including three laboratories. This phase was aimed at pre-qualifying the candidate BRP (cBRP) and at documenting the impact of differences in the antibody detection methodology enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) procedures on results of pertussis antisera calibration versus the currently used standard US standard pertussis antiserum (mouse) Lot 1 (SPAM-1) (United States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) reference serum) and the cBRP. As no significant difference between the antibody titres determined by using the different ELISA methodologies was found, a large-scale study enrolling 13 laboratories (Phase II) was carried out, each participant performing its in-house methodology. Its aim was to calibrate the cBRP (in terms of the SPAM-1 reference) and to demonstrate its equivalence or superiority to internal references. The study showed that there was no difference in positive sera titres expressed relative to their corresponding internal reference (homologous situation) or the proposed standard (heterologous situation) reference. The cBRP can, therefore, reliably act as replacement for the in-house reference preparations. Further analysis of the outcome of this study enabled to assign to the cBRP a potency of 39, 138, 34 and 56 ELISA unit per millilitre, respectively, to its anti-PT, anti-FHA, anti-PRN and anti-Fim 2&3 antibody contents. The cBRP has been adopted by the European

  16. Workshop Introduction: Systems Biology and Biological Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    As we consider the future of toxicity testing, the importance of applying biological models to this problem is clear. Modeling efforts exist along a continuum with respect to the level of organization (e.g. cell, tissue, organism) linked to the resolution of the model. Generally,...

  17. Workshop Introduction: Systems Biology and Biological Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    As we consider the future of toxicity testing, the importance of applying biological models to this problem is clear. Modeling efforts exist along a continuum with respect to the level of organization (e.g. cell, tissue, organism) linked to the resolution of the model. Generally,...

  18. Fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAPs) measured with the Waveband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor WIBS-4: laboratory tests combined with a one year field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toprak, E.; Schnaiter, M.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper bioaerosol measurements conducted with the Waveband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor mark 4 (WIBS-4) are presented. The measurements comprise aerosol chamber characterization experiments and a one-year ambient measurement period at a semi-rural site in South Western Germany. This study aims to investigate the sensitivity of WIBS-4 to biological and non-biological aerosols, performance of WIBS-4 for discrimination of several types of aerosols, and the detection and identification of biological particles in the ambient aerosol. Several types of biological and non-biological aerosol samples including spores, bacteria, pollen, mineral dust, ammonium sulphate, combustion soot, and fluorescent polystyrene spheres were analysed by WIBS-4 in the laboratory. The results confirm the sensitivity of the Ultra Violet Light Induced Fluorescence (UV-LIF) method to biological fluorophores and show the good discrimination capabilities of the two wavelengths excitation/two wavebands detection method applied in WIBS-4. However, a weak cross-sensitivity to non-biological fluorescent interferers remains and is discussed in this paper. All the laboratory studies have been undertaken in order to prepare WIBS-4 for ambient aerosol measurements. According to the one year ambient aerosol study, number concentration of fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAP) show strong seasonal and diurnal variability. The highest number concentration of FBAP was measured during the summer term and it decreases towards the winter period when colder and drier conditions are prevailing. Diurnal FBAP concentrations start to increase after sunset and reach maximum values during the late night and early morning hours. On the other hand the total aerosol number concentration was always higher during day time than during night time and a sharp decrease after sunset was observed. There was no correlation observed between the FBAP concentration and the meteorological parameters temperature

  19. Biological indeterminacy.

    PubMed

    Greenspan, Ralph J

    2012-09-01

    Reductionist explanations in biology generally assume that biological mechanisms are highly deterministic and basically similar between individuals. A contrasting view has emerged recently that takes into account the degeneracy of biological processes--the ability to arrive at a given endpoint by a variety of available paths, even within the same individual. This perspective casts significant doubt on the prospects for the ability to predict behavior accurately based on brain imaging or genotyping, and on the ability of neuroscience to stipulate ethics.

  20. Laboratory host range testing of Neomusotima conspurcatalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) - a potential biological control agent of the invasive weed, Old World climbing fern, Lygodium microphyllum (Lygodiaceae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Old World climbing fern, Lygodium microphyllum, is a serious invasive weed in south Florida. Development of biological control is vital for sustainable management of L. microphyllum. Neomusotima conspurcatalis was discovered in Hong Kong in 1997 and was subsequently found causing feeding damage on L...

  1. Complete Host Testing with a Potential Biological Control Agent on Common Reed in View of Submitting a Petition for Field Release in Winter 2014/15

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    sampled for endophagous herbivores of P. australis. In a first step, eight moth species and one chloropid fly were prioritized for further...development of biological control this means that herbivores are required that are able to reduce the invasiveness of the introduced European type, without

  2. Laboratory and open-field tests on Abia sericea (L.) (Hymenoptera: Cimbicidae) - a candidate for biological control of teasels (Dipsacus spp.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Invasive teasels (Dipsacus spp.) are widespread in the USA (43 states) and listed as noxious in five states. The cimbicid sawfly Abia sericea (Linné, 1758) is under evaluation as a potential agent for biological control of teasels. Abia sericea lays its eggs under the epidermis of the leaves of Di...

  3. "What if We Were in a Test Tube?" Students' Gendered Meaning Making during a Biology Lesson about the Basic Facts of the Human Genitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orlander, Auli Arvola

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores what happens in the encounters between presentations of "basic facts" about the human genitals and 15-year-old students during a biology lesson in a Swedish secondary school. In this paper, meaning making was approached as relational, context-dependent and continually transacted. For this reason the analysis was…

  4. Is synthetic biology mechanical biology?

    PubMed

    Holm, Sune

    2015-12-01

    A widespread and influential characterization of synthetic biology emphasizes that synthetic biology is the application of engineering principles to living systems. Furthermore, there is a strong tendency to express the engineering approach to organisms in terms of what seems to be an ontological claim: organisms are machines. In the paper I investigate the ontological and heuristic significance of the machine analogy in synthetic biology. I argue that the use of the machine analogy and the aim of producing rationally designed organisms does not necessarily imply a commitment to mechanical biology. The ideal of applying engineering principles to biology is best understood as expressing recognition of the machine-unlikeness of natural organisms and the limits of human cognition. The paper suggests an interpretation of the identification of organisms with machines in synthetic biology according to which it expresses a strategy for representing, understanding, and constructing living systems that are more machine-like than natural organisms.

  5. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents procedures, exercises, demonstrations, and information on a variety of biology topics including labeling systems, biological indicators of stream pollution, growth of lichens, reproductive capacity of bulbous buttercups, a straw balance to measure transpiration, interaction of fungi, osmosis, and nitrogen fixation and crop production. (DC)

  6. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents procedures, exercises, demonstrations, and information on a variety of biology topics including labeling systems, biological indicators of stream pollution, growth of lichens, reproductive capacity of bulbous buttercups, a straw balance to measure transpiration, interaction of fungi, osmosis, and nitrogen fixation and crop production. (DC)

  7. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Describes laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom activities/materials, including use of dwarf cichlids (fishes) in secondary school biology, teaching edge effects on stomatal diffusion, computer program on effects of selection on gene frequencies, biological oxidation/reduction reactions, short cuts with Drosophila, computer program…

  8. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Describes laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom activities/materials, including use of dwarf cichlids (fishes) in secondary school biology, teaching edge effects on stomatal diffusion, computer program on effects of selection on gene frequencies, biological oxidation/reduction reactions, short cuts with Drosophila, computer program…

  9. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Presents experiments, demonstrations, activities and ideas relating to various fields of biology to be used in biology courses in secondary schools. Among those experiments presented are demonstrating the early stages of ferns and mosses and simple culture methods for fern prothalli. (HM)

  10. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Presents experiments, demonstrations, activities and ideas relating to various fields of biology to be used in biology courses in secondary schools. Among those experiments presented are demonstrating the early stages of ferns and mosses and simple culture methods for fern prothalli. (HM)

  11. Comparison of a commercial interferon-gamma release assay and tuberculin skin test for the detection of latent tuberculosis infection in Hong Kong arthritis patients who are candidates for biologic agents.

    PubMed

    So, H; Yuen, C Sw; Yip, R Ml

    2017-06-01

    It is universally agreed that screening for latent tuberculosis infection prior to biologic therapy is necessary, especially in endemic areas such as Hong Kong. There are still, however, controversies regarding how best to accomplish this task. The tuberculin skin test has been the routine screening tool for latent tuberculosis infection in Hong Kong for the past decade although accuracy is far from perfect, especially in patients who have been vaccinated with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin, who are immunocompromised, or who have atypical mycobacterium infection. The new interferon-gamma release assays have been shown to improve specificity and probably sensitivity. This study aimed to evaluate agreement between the interferon-gamma release assay and the tuberculin skin test in the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection in patients with arthritic diseases scheduled to receive biologic agents. We reviewed 38 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, or spondyloarthritis at a local hospital in Hong Kong from August 2013 to April 2014. They were all considered candidates for biologic agents. The patients underwent both the interferon-gamma release assay (ASACIR.TB; A.TB) and the tuberculin skin test simultaneously. Concurrent medications were documented. Patients who tested positive for either test (ie A.TB+ or TST+) were prescribed treatment for latent tuberculosis if they were to be given biologic agents. All patients were followed up regularly for 1 year and the development of active tuberculosis infection was evaluated. Based on an induration of 10 mm in diameter as the cut-off value, 13 (34.2%) of 38 patients had a positive tuberculin skin test. Of the 38 patients, 11 (28.9%) also had a positive interferon-gamma release assay. The agreement between interferon-gamma release assay and tuberculin skin test was 73.7% (kappa=0.39). Six patients were TST+/A.TB- and four were TST-/A.TB+. When positive tuberculin skin test was defined as an induration of 5

  12. Acid test of joint technical and biological measures in slope stabilisation - Impact analysis of the heavy rainstorm event in August 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, F.; Böll, A.

    2009-04-01

    The persisting and heavy rainstorms from 20th to 22nd August in 2005 resulted in loss of human lives and tremendous damage on infrastructure all over Switzerland. Many of the measures taken hitherto to protect against such natural hazards were stressed to their limits or even beyond due to water saturation of the soils and extreme discharges of the torrents. This particular configuration offered the possibility to investigate the reliability of technical and biological measures taken within the scope of slope stabilisation, torrent and gully control. In the context of a joint project the ancient sliding area "Schwandrübi" in Dallenwil (Switzerland) providing joint technical and biological measures was chosen to address aspects concerning the reliability of technical supporting structures, the development of biological measures in the course of time and their performance under the extreme impact as well as the effects of biological measures on the stability of slopes. During 1981 and 1982 joint technical and biological measures had been taken on a large scale with minor follow-ups shortly after to stabilise the "Schwandrübi". The underlying strategy was based on several pilot surveys as thorough soil analysis, e.g. grain size distribution and determination of the angle of internal friction (Φ') related to the porosity (n) and the dry unit weight (γ), respectively. Basically, the spatial arrangement of the gabions was in accordance with the theoretical guidelines. However, based on the angle of internal friction (Φ') determined on the loose moraine soil material, it was not possible to meet the soil mechanical criterion of inclination between the constructions in all cases. Regardless of the extreme impact during the rainstorm (~100-year event), no serious damage occurred neither on the roughly 25-year old gabions nor on the torrent control structures. The recalculated peak discharge in the outlet channel was ~60 m3s-1 superimposed by high bed load

  13. Biological Oceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyhrman, Sonya

    2004-10-01

    The ocean is arguably the largest habitat on the planet, and it houses an astounding array of life, from microbes to whales. As a testament to this diversity and its importance, the discipline of biological oceanography spans studies of all levels of biological organization, from that of single genes, to organisms, to their population dynamics. Biological oceanography also includes studies on how organisms interact with, and contribute to, essential global processes. Students of biological oceanography are often as comfortable looking at satellite images as they are electron micrographs. This diversity of perspective begins the textbook Biological Oceanography, with cover graphics including a Coastal Zone Color Scanner image representing chlorophyll concentration, an electron micrograph of a dinoflagellate, and a photograph of a copepod. These images instantly capture the reader's attention and illustrate some of the different scales on which budding oceanographers are required to think. Having taught a core graduate course in biological oceanography for many years, Charlie Miller has used his lecture notes as the genesis for this book. The text covers the subject of biological oceanography in a manner that is targeted to introductory graduate students, but it would also be appropriate for advanced undergraduates.

  14. BIOLOGICAL WARFARE

    PubMed Central

    Beeston, John

    1953-01-01

    The use of biological agents as controlled weapons of war is practical although uncertain. Three types of agents are feasible, including pathogenic organisms and biological pests, toxins, and synthetic hormones regulating plant growth. These agents may be chosen for selective effects varying from prolonged incipient illness to death of plants, man and domestic animals. For specific preventive and control measures required to combat these situations, there must be careful and detailed planning. The nucleus of such a program is available within the existing framework of public health activities. Additional research and expansion of established activities in time of attack are necessary parts of biological warfare defense. PMID:13059641

  15. Building biological foundries for next-generation synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Chao, Ran; Yuan, YongBo; Zhao, HuiMin

    2015-07-01

    Synthetic biology is an interdisciplinary field that takes top-down approaches to understand and engineer biological systems through design-build-test cycles. A number of advances in this relatively young field have greatly accelerated such engineering cycles. Specifically, various innovative tools were developed for in silico biosystems design, DNA de novo synthesis and assembly, construct verification, as well as metabolite analysis, which have laid a solid foundation for building biological foundries for rapid prototyping of improved or novel biosystems. This review summarizes the state-of-the-art technologies for synthetic biology and discusses the challenges to establish such biological foundries.

  16. Biological Agents

    MedlinePlus

    ... is required. Biological Agents Menu Overview In Focus: Ebola Frederick A. Murphy/CDC OSHA's Ebola webpage provides ... OSHA offers, visit OSHA's Workers' page. In Focus: Ebola Frederick A. Murphy/CDC OSHA's Ebola webpage provides ...

  17. Biology Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Twelve new experiments in biology are described by teachers for use in classrooms. Broad areas covered include enzyme action, growth regulation, microscopy, respiration, germination, plant succession, leaf structure and blood structure. Explanations are detailed. (PS)

  18. Biology Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Ten ideas that have been tried out by the authors in schools are presented for biology teachers. The areas covered include genetics, dispersal of seeds, habituation in earthworms, respiration, sensory neurons, fats and oils. A reading list is provided. (PS)

  19. Biological monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, M.H.; Dillon, H.K.

    1986-02-01

    Biological monitoring is defined as the measurement and assessment of workplace agents or their metabolites in tissues, secreta, excreta, expired air, or any combination of these to evaluate exposure and health risk compared to an appropriate reference. Biological monitoring offers several advantages: it takes into account individual variability in biological activity resulting from a chemical insult. It takes into account the effects of personal physical activity and individual life styles. It is a valuable adjunct to ambient monitoring and health surveillance. The importance of chemical speciation in the toxicity of pollutants is discussed. Basic protocols for lead, aluminum, cadmium, mercury, selenium, and nickel are presented. Basic criteria for biological monitoring methods are presented. 11 references, 1 table.

  20. Biology Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Ten ideas that have been tried out by the authors in schools are presented for biology teachers. The areas covered include genetics, dispersal of seeds, habituation in earthworms, respiration, sensory neurons, fats and oils. A reading list is provided. (PS)

  1. Biology Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Some helpful ideas are proposed for use by biology teachers. Topics included are Food Webs,'' Key to Identification of Families,'' Viruses,'' Sieve Tube,'' Woodlice,'' Ecology of Oak Leaf Roller Moth,'' and Model Making.'' (PS)

  2. Biology Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Twelve new experiments in biology are described by teachers for use in classrooms. Broad areas covered include enzyme action, growth regulation, microscopy, respiration, germination, plant succession, leaf structure and blood structure. Explanations are detailed. (PS)

  3. Biology Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Some helpful ideas are proposed for use by biology teachers. Topics included are Food Webs,'' Key to Identification of Families,'' Viruses,'' Sieve Tube,'' Woodlice,'' Ecology of Oak Leaf Roller Moth,'' and Model Making.'' (PS)

  4. Stereo-specific glucose consumption may be used to distinguish between chemical and biological reactivity on Mars: a preliminary test on Earth.

    PubMed

    Sun, Henry J; Saccomanno, Vienna; Hedlund, Brian; McKay, Christopher P

    2009-06-01

    Two alternative hypotheses explain the degradation of organics in the Viking Labeled Release experiment on Mars. Either martian soil contains live indigenous microorganisms or it is sterile but chemically reactive. These two possibilities could be distinguished by the use of pure preparations of glucose isomers. In the laboratory, selected eukaryotes, bacteria, and archaea consumed only D-glucose, not L-glucose, while permanganate oxidized both isomers. On Mars, selective consumption of either D- or L-glucose would constitute evidence for biological activity.

  5. Adverse Outcome Pathways and Systems Biology as Conceptual Approaches to Support Development of 21st Century Test Methods and Extrapolation Tools

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proposed paradigm for “Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century” supports the development of mechanistically-based, high-throughput in vitro assays as a potential cost effective and scientifically-sound alternative to some whole animal hazard testing. To accomplish this long-term...

  6. Adverse Outcome Pathways and Systems Biology as Conceptual Approaches to Support Development of 21st Century Test Methods and Extrapolation Tools

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proposed paradigm for “Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century” supports the development of mechanistically-based, high-throughput in vitro assays as a potential cost effective and scientifically-sound alternative to some whole animal hazard testing. To accomplish this long-term...

  7. Assessment of Biology Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Ros; Gott, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Makes a case for the assessment of investigations against the Concept of Evidence in written tests as a potentially more reliable and valid way of assessing the ideas used in all types of biology investigations, thus reducing the distorting effect of assessment on the curriculum. (Author/SOE)

  8. Biological Oceanography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    Within the framework of global biogeochemical cycles and ocean productivity, there are two areas that will be of particular interest to biological oceanography in the 1990s. The first is the mapping in space time of the biomass and productivity of phytoplankton in the world ocean. The second area is the coupling of biological and physical processes as it affects the distribution and growth rate of phytoplankton biomass. Certainly other areas will be of interest to biological oceanographers, but these two areas are amenable to observations from satellites. Temporal and spatial variability is a regular feature of marine ecosystems. The temporal and spatial variability of phytoplankton biomass and productivity which is ubiquitous at all time and space scales in the ocean must be characterized. Remote sensing from satellites addresses these problems with global observations of mesocale (2 to 20 days, 10 to 200 km) features over a long period of time.

  9. Biological preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Bunker, Bruce C.; Huber, Dale L.

    2008-09-09

    A biological preconcentrator comprises a stimulus-responsive active film on a stimulus-producing microfabricated platform. The active film can comprise a thermally switchable polymer film that can be used to selectively absorb and desorb proteins from a protein mixture. The biological microfabricated platform can comprise a thin membrane suspended on a substrate with an integral resistive heater and/or thermoelectric cooler for thermal switching of the active polymer film disposed on the membrane. The active polymer film can comprise hydrogel-like polymers, such as poly(ethylene oxide) or poly(n-isopropylacrylamide), that are tethered to the membrane. The biological preconcentrator can be fabricated with semiconductor materials and technologies.

  10. (Biological dosimetry)

    SciTech Connect

    Sega, G.A.

    1990-11-06

    The traveler participated in an International Symposium on Trends in Biological Dosimetry and presented an invited paper entitled, Adducts in sperm protamine and DNA vs mutation frequency.'' The purpose of the Symposium was to examine the applicability of new methods to study quantitatively the effects of xenobiotic agents (radiation and chemicals) on molecular, cellular and organ systems, with special emphasis on human biological dosimetry. The general areas covered at the meeting included studies on parent compounds and metabolites; protein adducts; DNA adducts; gene mutations; cytogenetic end-points and reproductive methods.

  11. Testing, Testing, Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coatney, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    Teacher-librarians and teachers said that testing is driving everything that they do. One elementary teacher said that her entire grade level had not been to the library all year because they did not have time because the testing is all consuming and dictating all they do in the classroom. The teacher-librarian at that school added there was…

  12. Biological Races in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    Races may exist in humans in a cultural sense, but biological concepts of race are needed to access their reality in a non-species-specific manner and to see if cultural categories correspond to biological categories within humans. Modern biological concepts of race can be implemented objectively with molecular genetic data through hypothesis-testing. Genetic data sets are used to see if biological races exist in humans and in our closest evolutionary relative, the chimpanzee. Using the two most commonly used biological concepts of race, chimpanzees are indeed subdivided into races but humans are not. Adaptive traits, such as skin color, have frequently been used to define races in humans, but such adaptive traits reflect the underlying environmental factor to which they are adaptive and not overall genetic differentiation, and different adaptive traits define discordant groups. There are no objective criteria for choosing one adaptive trait over another to define race. As a consequence, adaptive traits do not define races in humans. Much of the recent scientific literature on human evolution portrays human populations as separate branches on an evolutionary tree. A tree-like structure among humans has been falsified whenever tested, so this practice is scientifically indefensible. It is also socially irresponsible as these pictorial representations of human evolution have more impact on the general public than nuanced phrases in the text of a scientific paper. Humans have much genetic diversity, but the vast majority of this diversity reflects individual uniqueness and not race. PMID:23684745

  13. Sverdrup's Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, J.

    2002-12-01

    Sverdrup's contribution to Biological Oceanography were more than merely substantial, they were of fundamental importance. His plan for the training of graduate students at Scripps did not recognize the traditional division of the basic disciplines into separate categories of physics, chemistry, biology and geology. He insisted that Oceanography was a multi-disciplinary subject and that all entering students should study all four subjects. Today this is not very unusual but it was in the early 50s when I took those courses. We biologists carried away from those courses an appreciation of the importance of both spatial and temporal scale. It was of clear relevance to problems of oceanic population and community biology. But there was still more to his biology. He is responsible for a very simple, but very elegant model of the regulation of oceanic primary productivity. The elements of this model are found today in the ten or so highly derivative models. He also published a map predicting global ocean productivity based on the ideas in the model plus some wonderfully intuitive thinking. This map does not differ strongly from those glorious false color ones being published today.

  14. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Outlines a variety of laboratory procedures, techniques, and materials including construction of a survey frame for field biology, a simple tidal system, isolation and applications of plant protoplasts, tropisms, teaching lung structure, and a key to statistical methods for biologists. (DS)

  15. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Describes laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom activities/materials, including water relation exercise on auxin-treated artichoke tuber tissue; aerobic respiration in yeast; an improved potometer; use of mobiles in biological classification, and experiments on powdery mildews and banana polyphenol oxidase. Includes reading lists…

  16. Scaffolded biology.

    PubMed

    Minelli, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    Descriptions and interpretations of the natural world are dominated by dichotomies such as organism vs. environment, nature vs. nurture, genetic vs. epigenetic, but in the last couple of decades strong dissatisfaction with those partitions has been repeatedly voiced and a number of alternative perspectives have been suggested, from perspectives such as Dawkins' extended phenotype, Turner's extended organism, Oyama's Developmental Systems Theory and Odling-Smee's niche construction theory. Last in time is the description of biological phenomena in terms of hybrids between an organism (scaffolded system) and a living or non-living scaffold, forming unit systems to study processes such as reproduction and development. As scaffold, eventually, we can define any resource used by the biological system, especially in development and reproduction, without incorporating it as happens in the case of resources fueling metabolism. Addressing biological systems as functionally scaffolded systems may help pointing to functional relationships that can impart temporal marking to the developmental process and thus explain its irreversibility; revisiting the boundary between development and metabolism and also regeneration phenomena, by suggesting a conceptual framework within which to investigate phenomena of regular hypermorphic regeneration such as characteristic of deer antlers; fixing a periodization of development in terms of the times at which a scaffolding relationship begins or is terminated; and promoting plant galls to legitimate study objects of developmental biology.

  17. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Organized by topic is a reading list for A- and S-level biology. Described are experiments for measuring rate of water uptake in a shoot; questions to aid students in designing experiments; rise of overhead projection to demonstrate osmosis and blood cell counting; and microbial manufacture of vinegar. (CS)

  18. Biology Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Describes nine biology experiments, including osmosis, genetics; oxygen content of blood, enzymes in bean seedlings, preparation of bird skins, vascularization in bean seedlings, a game called "sequences" (applied to review situations), crossword puzzle for human respiration, and physiology of the woodlouse. (CS)

  19. Biology Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Describes nine biology experiments, including osmosis, genetics; oxygen content of blood, enzymes in bean seedlings, preparation of bird skins, vascularization in bean seedlings, a game called "sequences" (applied to review situations), crossword puzzle for human respiration, and physiology of the woodlouse. (CS)

  20. Bottle Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jager, Peter

    1993-01-01

    Describes activities which utilize plastic drink bottles and are designed to foster the development of a wide range of biological and ecological concepts. Includes instructions for making a model compost column and presents a model that illustrates open versus closed ecosystems. (DDR)

  1. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Presents information on the teaching of nutrition (including new information relating to many current O-level syllabi) and part 16 of a reading list for A- and S-level biology. Also includes a note on using earthworms as a source of material for teaching meiosis. (JN)

  2. Cancer Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominiecki, Mary E.

    2004-01-01

    University of Colorado's Virtual Student Fellowship available at and developed by Bakemeier, Richard F. This website is designed to give students applying for a fellowship an overview of basic topics in biology and how they are used by cancer researchers to develop new treatments.

  3. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Describes equipment, activities, and experiments useful in biology and environmental education instruction, including, among others, sampling in ecology using an overhead projector, the slide finder as an aid to microscopy, teaching kidney function, and teaching wildlife conservation-sand dune systems. (SK)

  4. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Outlines a variety of laboratory procedures, techniques, and materials including construction of a survey frame for field biology, a simple tidal system, isolation and applications of plant protoplasts, tropisms, teaching lung structure, and a key to statistical methods for biologists. (DS)

  5. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Presents information on the teaching of nutrition (including new information relating to many current O-level syllabi) and part 16 of a reading list for A- and S-level biology. Also includes a note on using earthworms as a source of material for teaching meiosis. (JN)

  6. Biology Excursions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldock, R. N.

    1973-01-01

    Provides many useful suggestions and cautions for planning and executing a biology field excursion. Specific procedures are outlined for investigating land communities and coastal areas, and a number of follow-up laboratory activities are described. The appendix provides an extensive bibliography with useful comments on the literature. (JR)

  7. Marine Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewees, Christopher M.; Hooper, Jon K.

    1976-01-01

    A variety of informational material for a course in marine biology or oceanology at the secondary level is presented. Among the topics discussed are: food webs and pyramids, planktonic blooms, marine life, plankton nets, food chains, phytoplankton, zooplankton, larval plankton and filter feeders. (BT)

  8. Marine Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewees, Christopher M.; Hooper, Jon K.

    1976-01-01

    A variety of informational material for a course in marine biology or oceanology at the secondary level is presented. Among the topics discussed are: food webs and pyramids, planktonic blooms, marine life, plankton nets, food chains, phytoplankton, zooplankton, larval plankton and filter feeders. (BT)

  9. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Describes laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom activities/materials, including water relation exercise on auxin-treated artichoke tuber tissue; aerobic respiration in yeast; an improved potometer; use of mobiles in biological classification, and experiments on powdery mildews and banana polyphenol oxidase. Includes reading lists…

  10. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Organized by topic is a reading list for A- and S-level biology. Described are experiments for measuring rate of water uptake in a shoot; questions to aid students in designing experiments; rise of overhead projection to demonstrate osmosis and blood cell counting; and microbial manufacture of vinegar. (CS)

  11. Biologic Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    ADAMS, KATHERINE T.

    2009-01-01

    The threat of new disease pandemics has spurred the development of biologic vaccines, which promise tremendous improvements in global and local health. Several lend themselves to the prevention or treatment of chronic diseases. But the uncertainties of whom to vaccinate raise the question of whether the health care system can make these promising products viable. PMID:22478749

  12. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Describes equipment, activities, and experiments useful in biology and environmental education instruction, including, among others, sampling in ecology using an overhead projector, the slide finder as an aid to microscopy, teaching kidney function, and teaching wildlife conservation-sand dune systems. (SK)

  13. Cancer Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominiecki, Mary E.

    2004-01-01

    University of Colorado's Virtual Student Fellowship available at and developed by Bakemeier, Richard F. This website is designed to give students applying for a fellowship an overview of basic topics in biology and how they are used by cancer researchers to develop new treatments.

  14. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Presents content information and/or laboratory procedures and experiments on different biology topics including small-scale cultivation of watercress and its use in water-culture experiments, microbiology of the phylloplane, use of mouthbrooders in science class, and the gene. (DC)

  15. Bottle Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jager, Peter

    1993-01-01

    Describes activities which utilize plastic drink bottles and are designed to foster the development of a wide range of biological and ecological concepts. Includes instructions for making a model compost column and presents a model that illustrates open versus closed ecosystems. (DDR)

  16. (Biological dosimetry)

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, R.J.

    1990-12-17

    The traveler attended the 1st International Conference on Biological Dosimetry in Madrid, Spain. This conference was organized to provide information to a general audience of biologists, physicists, radiotherapists, industrial hygiene personnel and individuals from related fields on the current ability of cytogenetic analysis to provide estimates of radiation dose in cases of occupational or environmental exposure. There is a growing interest in Spain in biological dosimetry because of the increased use of radiation sources for medical and occupational uses, and with this the anticipated and actual increase in numbers of overexposure. The traveler delivered the introductory lecture on Biological Dosimetry: Mechanistic Concepts'' that was intended to provide a framework by which the more applied lectures could be interpreted in a mechanistic way. A second component of the trip was to provide advice with regard to several recent cases of overexposure that had been or were being assessed by the Radiopathology and Radiotherapy Department of the Hospital General Gregorio Maranon'' in Madrid. The traveler had provided information on several of these, and had analyzed cells from some exposed or purportedly exposed individuals. The members of the biological dosimetry group were referred to individuals at REACTS at Oak Ridge Associated Universities for advice on follow-up treatment.

  17. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Presents content information and/or laboratory procedures and experiments on different biology topics including small-scale cultivation of watercress and its use in water-culture experiments, microbiology of the phylloplane, use of mouthbrooders in science class, and the gene. (DC)

  18. Ovarian reserve test: an impartial means to resolve the mismatch between chronological and biological age in the assessment of female reproductive chances.

    PubMed

    Gizzo, Salvatore; Andrisani, Alessandra; Esposito, Federica; Oliva, Alessandra; Zicchina, Cecilia; Capuzzo, Denise; Gangemi, Michele; Nardelli, Giovanni Battista

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays, the ovarian reserve (OR) is considered more important than chronological age to estimate female reproductive capability. We conducted a retrospective, observational, and cohort study in order to detect the best predictor marker of OR, ovarian response, chances to obtain high-quality embryos, and pregnancy after in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle in elderly women. For all eligible patients (aged between 40 and 50 and admitted to their first IVF cycle for primary infertility), we investigated the biochemical parameters and ultrasound aspects of ovaries and how they affected IVF outcomes. Age, basal follicle-stimulating hormone, basal luteinizing hormone, and basal-17β-estradiol are better related to the dose of gonadotropin used during a controlled ovarian stimulation cycle. Basal anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), antral follicular count (AFC), and maximum serum level of 17β-estradiol before pickup resulted the best predictors of chances to retrieve at least 6 oocytes (at least 3 in metaphase II) and to have at least 1 to 3 embryos. The basal AMH, AFC and maximum serum level of 17β-estradiol before pickup continue to show higher correlation to pregnancy rate. The maximum endometrial thickness at pickup resulted important to predict the pregnancy rate and the chances to detect ongoing pregnancy. It seems mandatory to well define the ovarian biological age rather than the chronological one in women older than 40 years of age in order to give the best counseling and to choose the most appropriate IVF protocols.

  19. ``What if we were in a test tube?'' Students' gendered meaning making during a biology lesson about the basic facts of the human genitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlander, Auli Arvola

    2014-06-01

    This paper explores what happens in the encounters between presentations of "basic facts" about the human genitals and 15-year-old students during a biology lesson in a Swedish secondary school. In this paper, meaning making was approached as relational, context-dependent and continually transacted. For this reason the analysis was conducted through a series of close readings of situations where students interacted with each other and the teacher in opening up gaps about alternative ways of discussing gender. Drawing on Foucault's theories about the inclusion and exclusion of knowledge and the subsequent work of Butler and other feminist researchers, the paper illuminates what gendered relations remain tacit in the conversation. It then illustrates possible ways in which these tacit gendered meanings could be made overt and discussed with the students when making meaning about the human genitals. The paper also shows how the ways in which human genitals are transacted in the science classroom have importance for what kind of learning is made available to the students.

  20. Ancestral state reconstructions require biological evidence to test evolutionary hypotheses: A case study examining the evolution of reproductive mode in squamate reptiles.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Oliver W; Blackburn, Daniel G; Brandley, Matthew C; Van Dyke, James U; Whittington, Camilla M; Thompson, Michael B

    2015-09-01

    To understand evolutionary transformations it is necessary to identify the character states of extinct ancestors. Ancestral character state reconstruction is inherently difficult because it requires an accurate phylogeny, character state data, and a statistical model of transition rates and is fundamentally constrained by missing data such as extinct taxa. We argue that model based ancestral character state reconstruction should be used to generate hypotheses but should not be considered an analytical endpoint. Using the evolution of viviparity and reversals to oviparity in squamates as a case study, we show how anatomical, physiological, and ecological data can be used to evaluate hypotheses about evolutionary transitions. The evolution of squamate viviparity requires changes to the timing of reproductive events and the successive loss of features responsible for building an eggshell. A reversal to oviparity requires that those lost traits re-evolve. We argue that the re-evolution of oviparity is inherently more difficult than the reverse. We outline how the inviability of intermediate phenotypes might present physiological barriers to reversals from viviparity to oviparity. Finally, we show that ecological data supports an oviparous ancestral state for squamates and multiple transitions to viviparity. In summary, we conclude that the first squamates were oviparous, that frequent transitions to viviparity have occurred, and that reversals to oviparity in viviparous lineages either have not occurred or are exceedingly rare. As this evidence supports conclusions that differ from previous ancestral state reconstructions, our paper highlights the importance of incorporating biological evidence to evaluate model-generated hypotheses.

  1. [Methylglyoxal--a test for impaired biological functions of exotrophy and endoecology, low glucose level in the cytosol and gluconeogenesis from fatty acids (a lecture)].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N; Dmitriev, L F; Krylin, V A; Dmitriev, V A

    2010-03-01

    In philogenesis, due to the failure to store a great deal of carbohydrates in vivo as glycogen, all animal species began synthesizing from glucose palminitic fatty acid and depositing it as triglycerides. During biological dysfunction of exotrophy (long starvation, early postnatality, hibernation), cells also accomplish a reverse synthesis of glucose from fatty acids under aerobic conditions. Under physiological conditions, acetyl-CoA that is converted to malate and pyruvate in the glyoxalate cycle is a substrate of glyconeogenesis. Under pathological conditions of hypoxia and deficiency of macroerges, gluconeogenesis occurs without ATP consumption through the methylglyoxal pathway when used as a substrate of ketone bodies via the pathway: butyric acid (butyrate) --> beta-hydroxybutyrate --> acetoacetate --> acetone --> acetol --> methylglyoxal --> S-D-lactol-glutathione --> D-lactate --> pyruvate --> D-lactate. Under physiological conditions, this gluconeogenesis pathway does not function. We believe that with low glucose levels in the cell cytosole (glycopenia), under pathological conditions of hypoxia and due to failure to mitochondria to oxidize fatty acids, gene expression and gluconeogenesis occur through the methylglyoxal pathway. At the same time, the cytosol, intercellular environment, and plasma shows the elevated levels of methylglyoxal and D-lactate that it is converted to by the action of glyoxalases I and II. Under pathological conditions, glycopenia develops in starvation, diabetes, and metabolic acidosis, neoplasms, renal failure, and possibly, metabolic syndrome. The chemical interaction of methylglyoxal with the amino acid residues of lysine and arginine results in the denaturation of circulating and structurized proteins via carbonylation--glycosylation.

  2. The study of mechanisms of biological activity of copper oxide nanoparticle CuO in the test for seedling roots of Triticum vulgare.

    PubMed

    Korotkova, Anastasia Mickhailovna; Lebedev, Svyatoslav Valeryevich; Gavrish, Irina Aleksandrovna

    2017-03-06

    The rapid development of nanotechnology raises questions assessment of their impact on living objects. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of nanoparticle (NP) CuO at concentrations ranging from 0.8 to 63.5 g/l in the test on wheat seedlings Triticum vulgare during 1-72 h. In the viability test (WST-test), cells were isolated from the roots of seedlings T. vulgare, 12 h not observed increase reductase activity after 24 h decreased rate of not more than 19% compared with the control. The number of dead cells in seedlings of T. vulgaris after exposure with CuO nanoparticles to the test with Evans blue increased by 5-15% compared to control. We observed that a significant increase in copper revenues leaves 4.5-8.9 times more in relation to the control and the roots-in 5-9.7 times. During the determined amount of active oxygen species, a significant proportional increase in the total pool of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in roots increased to 27.6% after exposure to NP CuO compared with the control. It is shown that in the introduction in medium, the NP CuO in the doses ranging from 3.2 to 63.5 g/l leads to DNA fragmentation and increases the fragments less than 3000 bp on 51.4-62.8%. The totality of our results influences nanoforms of copper oxide on the amount of ROS, and the viability of the genomic component of the cells shows different mechanisms of damage in the activation of a metabolic reaction, to determine the concentration of nano-CuO.

  3. Implementation of a minimal set of biological tests to assess the ecotoxic effects of effluents from land-based marine fish farms.

    PubMed

    Carballeira, C; De Orte, M R; Viana, I G; Carballeira, A

    2012-04-01

    Environmental monitoring plans (EMP) that include chemical analysis of water, a battery of bioassays and the study of local hydrodynamic conditions are required for land-based marine aquaculture. In this study, the following standardized toxicity tests were performed to assess the toxicity of effluents from eight land-base marine fish farms (LBMFFs) located on the northwest coast of Spain: bacterial bioluminescence (with Vibrio fischeri at 15 and 30 min), microalgal growth (with Phaeodactyllum tricornutum and Isochrysis galbana) and sea urchin larval development (with Paracentrotus lividus and Arbacia lixula). These bioassays were evaluated for inclusion in routine fish farm monitoring. Effective concentrations (EC(5), EC(10), EC(20), EC(50)) for each bioassay were calculated from dose-response curves, obtained by fitting the bioassay results to the best parametric model. Moreover, a graphical method of integrating the results from the battery of bioassays and classifying the toxicity was proposed, and the potential ecotoxic effects probe (PEEP) index was calculated. The bacterial bioluminiscence test at 30min, growth of I. galbana and larval development of A. lixula were found to be the most sensitive and useful tests. Graphical integration of these test results enabled definition of the ecotoxicological profiles of the different farms. The PEEP index, considering EC(20), efficiently reflected the toxic loading potential of LBMFF effluents. In conclusion, a battery of bioassays with species from different low trophic levels is recommended as a rapid and cost-effective methodology for assessing LBMFF discharges. The graphical integration method and the PEEP index are proposed for consideration in EMPs for such farms.

  4. Tested Studies for Laboratory Teaching. Proceedings of the Workshop/Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) (7th, Las Vegas, Nevada, June 3-7, 1985; 8th, Ithaca, New York, June 16-20, 1986). Volume 7/8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Corey A., Ed.; Hauta, P. Lynn, Ed.

    The focus of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) is to improve the undergraduate biology laboratory experience by promoting the development and dissemination of interesting, innovative, and reliable laboratory exercises. This proceeding volume contains 12 papers: "Experimental Design and Testing: Hatching and Development in…

  5. Tested Studies for Laboratory Teaching. Proceedings of the Workshop/Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) (7th, Las Vegas, Nevada, June 3-7, 1985; 8th, Ithaca, New York, June 16-20, 1986). Volume 7/8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Corey A., Ed.; Hauta, P. Lynn, Ed.

    The focus of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) is to improve the undergraduate biology laboratory experience by promoting the development and dissemination of interesting, innovative, and reliable laboratory exercises. This proceeding volume contains 12 papers: "Experimental Design and Testing: Hatching and Development in…

  6. Research in drug development against viral diseases of military importance (biological testing). Volume 2. Final report, 15 November 1985-31 January 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, W.M.; Arnett, G.; Brazier, A.D.; Hollingshead, M.G.; Kirsi, J.J.

    1991-03-01

    The purpose of this program is to evaluate the efficacy of candidate antiviral compounds against a spectrum of viruses of military importance. This program involves (a) primary testing of chemical compounds and natural products for antiviral efficacy in vitro using standard CPE-inhibition assays, (b) primary testing of compounds for antiviral efficacy in vivo in animal model systems, and (c) secondary evaluation of the active candidate antiviral compounds. The target viruses for in vitro testing are Vaccinia Virus (VV), Adenovirus (AD2), Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV), Punta Toro Virus (PT), Sandfly fever Virus (SF), Yellow Fever Virus (YF), Venezuelan Equine Encephalomyelitis Virus (VE), Japanese Encephalitis Virus, Pichinde Virus (PIC), Hantaan Virus (HTN), and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). The in vivo systems are Pichinde Virus infection of hamsters, Venezuelan Equine Encephalomyelitis Virus, Japanese Encephalitis Virus and Vaccinia virus infections of mice. Approximately 10,000 compounds have been received for in vitro evaluation and over 66,000 assays have been performed on this contract. Compounds have been identified in nearly all virus systems that have confirmed antiviral activity equal or exceeding that of the various positive control compounds (ribavirin, selenazofurin, carbocyclic-3-aza-adenosine, adenosine dialdehyde, Ara-A, ddC and AZT). Many of these compounds represent potent and selective new antiviral agents.

  7. Research in drug development against viral diseases of military importance (biological testing). Volume 1. Final report, 15 November 1985-31 January 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, W.M.; Arnett, G.; Brazier, A.D.; Hollingshead, M.G.; Kirsi, J.J.

    1991-03-01

    The purpose of this program is to evaluate the efficacy of candidate antiviral compounds against a spectrum of viruses of military importance. This program involves (a) primary testing of chemical compounds and natural products for antiviral efficacy in vitro using standard CPE-inhibition assays, (b) primary testing of compounds for antiviral efficacy in vivo in animal model systems, and (c) secondary evaluation of the active candidate antiviral compounds. The target viruses for in vitro testing are Vaccinia Virus (VV), Adenovirus (AD2), Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV), Punta Toro Virus (PT), Sandfly Fever Virus (SF), Yellow Fever Virus (YF), Venezuelan Equine Encephalomyelitis Virus (VE), Japanese Encephalitis Virus and Vaccinia Virus infections of mice. Approximately 10,000 compounds have been received for in vitro evaluation and over 66,000 assays have been performed on this contract. Compounds have been identified in nearly all virus systems that have confirmed antiviral activity equal or exceeding that of the various positive control compounds (Ribavirin, Selenazofurin, Carbocyclic-3-deaza-adenosine, Adenosine dialdehyde, Ara-A, ddC and AZT). Many of these compounds represent potent and selective new antiviral agents.

  8. Thiomaleimide Functionalization for Selective Biological Fluorescence Detection of Peroxynitrite as Tested in HeLa and RAW 264.7 Cells.

    PubMed

    Yudhistira, Tesla; Mulay, Sandip V; Lee, Kyung Jin; Kim, Youngsam; Park, Hee-Sung; Churchill, David G

    2017-08-04

    The role of fluorescent molecules in diagnosis, treatment as well as in biomedical research has great current medicinal significance and is the focus of concentrated effort across the scientific research spectrum. Related research continues to reveal new practical sensing systems that bear enhanced features for interfacing of substituted molecules with biological systems. As part of an effort to better understand chalcogenide systems, a new dithiomaleimide BODIPY (BDP-NGM) probe has been designed, synthesized and characterized. The fluorescence of BDP-NGM was quenched by the incorporation of [3,4-bis(phenylthio)] on the maleimide-4-phenyl moiety which is, in turn, placed at the meso-position of the BODIPY system. The probe shows a turn-on fluorescence response upon reaction with ONOO(-) ; mass spectral evidence reveals peaks in agreement with products involving oxidation of the sulfur groups to sulfone groups. An about 18.0-fold emission intensity enhancement was found. By comparison, the emission signal from another ROS/RNS, superoxide, gave a modest turn on signal (≈5.0-fold). The reaction is complete within 10 min, judging from the monitoring of the turn-on fluorescence process; the detection limit was found to be 0.4 μm. BDP-NGM can be used for the detection of ONOO(-) under both acidic and basic conditions. Live cell imaging showed that the current probe can be used for the selective detection of ONOO(-) in living systems. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Crusts: biological

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, Jayne; Elias, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Biological soil crusts, a community of cyanobacteria, lichens, mosses, and fungi, are an essential part of dryland ecosystems. They are critical in the stabilization of soils, protecting them from wind and water erosion. Similarly, these soil surface communities also stabilized soils on early Earth, allowing vascular plants to establish. They contribute nitrogen and carbon to otherwise relatively infertile dryland soils, and have a strong influence on hydrologic cycles. Their presence can also influence vascular plant establishment and nutrition.

  10. Foldit Biology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-31

    and widely used talking points in the biology curriculum: Hemoglobin, Lysozyme and Lactase . Hemoglobin is our first example and is currently used to...its ability to succinctly capture into one package all of the important aspects of a protein interacting with other molecules. Lactase is the...third example, in which we introduce interactive gameplay to show how enzymes work. Like the Lysozyme example, the Lactase example is a multi-state

  11. Marine biology

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman, H.V.; Webber, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses both taxonomic and ecological topics on marine biology. Full coverage of marine organisms of all five kingdoms is provided, along with interesting and thorough discussion of all major marine habitats. Organization into six major parts allows flexibility. It also provides insight into important topics such as disposal of nuclear waste at sea, the idea that life began on the ocean floor, and how whales, krill, and people interact. A full-color photo chapter reviews questions, and exercises. The contents are: an overview marine biology: fundamental concepts/investigating life in the ocean; the physical ocean, the ocean floor, the nature of water, the nature and motion of ocean water; general ecology, conditions for life in the sea, biological productivity and energy transfer; marine organisms; monera, protista, mycota and metaphyta; the smaller marine animals, the large animals marine habitats, the intertidal zone/benthos of the continental shelf, the photic zone, the deep ocean, the ocean under stress, marine pollution, appendix a: the metric system and conversion factors/ appendix b: prefixes and suffixes/ appendix c: taxonomic classification of common marine organisms, and glossary, and index.

  12. The stability of biological standards

    PubMed Central

    Jerne, N. K.; Perry, W. L. M.

    1956-01-01

    The authors emphasize the importance of stability in biological standards and discuss the steps taken to ensure the stability of International Standards and the theoretical basis of the various stability tests used. PMID:13329844

  13. Cross-Institute Evaluations of Inhibitor-Resistant PCR Reagents for Direct Testing of Aerosol and Blood Samples Containing Biological Warfare Agent DNA

    PubMed Central

    Minogue, Timothy D.; Rachwal, Phillip A.; Trombley Hall, Adrienne; Koehler, Jeffery W.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid pathogen detection is crucial for the timely introduction of therapeutics. Two groups (one in the United Kingdom and one in the United States) independently evaluated inhibitor-resistant PCR reagents for the direct testing of substrates. In the United Kingdom, a multiplexed Bacillus anthracis (target) and Bacillus subtilis (internal-control) PCR was used to evaluate 4 reagents against 5 PCR inhibitors and down-selected the TaqMan Fast Virus 1-Step master mix (Life Technologies Inc.). In the United States, four real-time PCR assays (targeting B. anthracis, Brucella melitensis, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus [VEEV], and Orthopoxvirus spp.) were used to evaluate 5 reagents (plus the Fast Virus master mix) against buffer, blood, and soil samples and down-selected the KAPA Blood Direct master mix (KAPA Biosystems Inc.) with added Platinum Taq (Life Technologies). The down-selected reagents underwent further testing. In the United Kingdom experiments, both reagents were tested against seven contrived aerosol collector samples containing B. anthracis Ames DNA and B. subtilis spores from a commercial formulation (BioBall). In PCR assays with reaction mixtures containing 40% crude sample, an airfield-collected sample induced inhibition of the B. subtilis PCR with the KAPA reagent and complete failure of both PCRs with the Fast Virus reagent. However, both reagents allowed successful PCR for all other samples—which inhibited PCRs with a non-inhibitor-resistant reagent. In the United States, a cross-assay limit-of-detection (LoD) study in blood was conducted. The KAPA Blood Direct reagent allowed the detection of agent DNA (by four PCRs) at higher concentrations of blood in the reaction mixture (2.5%) than the Fast Virus reagent (0.5%), although LoDs differed between assays and reagent combinations. Across both groups, the KAPA Blood Direct reagent was determined to be the optimal reagent for inhibition relief in PCR. PMID:24334660

  14. Cross-institute evaluations of inhibitor-resistant PCR reagents for direct testing of aerosol and blood samples containing biological warfare agent DNA.

    PubMed

    Minogue, Timothy D; Rachwal, Phillip A; Trombley Hall, Adrienne; Koehler, Jeffery W; Weller, Simon A

    2014-02-01

    Rapid pathogen detection is crucial for the timely introduction of therapeutics. Two groups (one in the United Kingdom and one in the United States) independently evaluated inhibitor-resistant PCR reagents for the direct testing of substrates. In the United Kingdom, a multiplexed Bacillus anthracis (target) and Bacillus subtilis (internal-control) PCR was used to evaluate 4 reagents against 5 PCR inhibitors and down-selected the TaqMan Fast Virus 1-Step master mix (Life Technologies Inc.). In the United States, four real-time PCR assays (targeting B. anthracis, Brucella melitensis, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus [VEEV], and Orthopoxvirus spp.) were used to evaluate 5 reagents (plus the Fast Virus master mix) against buffer, blood, and soil samples and down-selected the KAPA Blood Direct master mix (KAPA Biosystems Inc.) with added Platinum Taq (Life Technologies). The down-selected reagents underwent further testing. In the United Kingdom experiments, both reagents were tested against seven contrived aerosol collector samples containing B. anthracis Ames DNA and B. subtilis spores from a commercial formulation (BioBall). In PCR assays with reaction mixtures containing 40% crude sample, an airfield-collected sample induced inhibition of the B. subtilis PCR with the KAPA reagent and complete failure of both PCRs with the Fast Virus reagent. However, both reagents allowed successful PCR for all other samples-which inhibited PCRs with a non-inhibitor-resistant reagent. In the United States, a cross-assay limit-of-detection (LoD) study in blood was conducted. The KAPA Blood Direct reagent allowed the detection of agent DNA (by four PCRs) at higher concentrations of blood in the reaction mixture (2.5%) than the Fast Virus reagent (0.5%), although LoDs differed between assays and reagent combinations. Across both groups, the KAPA Blood Direct reagent was determined to be the optimal reagent for inhibition relief in PCR.

  15. [Biologics and mycobacterial diseases].

    PubMed

    Tsuyuguchi, Kazunari; Matsumoto, Tomoshige

    2013-03-01

    Various biologics such as TNF-alpha inhibitor or IL-6 inhibitor are now widely used for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Many reports suggested that one of the major issues is high risk of developing tuberculosis (TB) associated with using these agents, which is especially important in Japan where tuberculosis still remains endemic. Another concern is the risk of development of nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) diseases and we have only scanty information about it. The purpose of this symposium is to elucidate the role of biologics in the development of mycobacterial diseases and to establish the strategy to control them. First, Dr. Tohma showed the epidemiologic data of TB risks associated with using biologics calculated from the clinical database on National Database of Rheumatic Diseases by iR-net in Japan. He estimated TB risks in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients to be about four times higher compared with general populations and to become even higher by using biologics. He also pointed out a low rate of implementation of QuantiFERON test (QFT) as screening test for TB infection. Next, Dr. Tokuda discussed the issue of NTM disease associated with using biologics. He suggested the airway disease in RA patients might play some role in the development of NTM disease, which may conversely lead to overdiagnosis of NTM disease in RA patients. He suggested that NTM disease should not be uniformly considered a contraindication to treatment with biologics, considering from the results of recent multicenter study showing relatively favorable outcome of NTM patients receiving biologics. Patients with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) should receive LTBI treatment before starting biologics. Dr. Kato, a chairperson of the Prevention Committee of the Japanese Society for Tuberculosis, proposed a new LTBI guideline including active implementation of LTBI treatment, introducing interferon gamma release assay, and appropriate selection of persons at high risk for

  16. A novel chordoma xenograft allows in vivo drug testing and reveals the importance of NF-κB signaling in chordoma biology.

    PubMed

    Trucco, Matteo M; Awad, Ola; Wilky, Breelyn A; Goldstein, Seth D; Huang, Ruili; Walker, Robert L; Shah, Preeti; Katuri, Varalakshmi; Gul, Naheed; Zhu, Yuelin J; McCarthy, Edward F; Paz-Priel, Ido; Meltzer, Paul S; Austin, Christopher P; Xia, Menghang; Loeb, David M

    2013-01-01

    Chordoma is a rare primary bone malignancy that arises in the skull base, spine and sacrum and originates from remnants of the notochord. These tumors are typically resistant to conventional chemotherapy, and to date there are no FDA-approved agents to treat chordoma. The lack of in vivo models of chordoma has impeded the development of new therapies for this tumor. Primary tumor from a sacral chordoma was xenografted into NOD/SCID/IL-2R γ-null mice. The xenograft is serially transplantable and was characterized by both gene expression analysis and whole genome SNP genotyping. The NIH Chemical Genomics Center performed high-throughput screening of 2,816 compounds using two established chordoma cell lines, U-CH1 and U-CH2B. The screen yielded several compounds that showed activity and two, sunitinib and bortezomib, were tested in the xenograft. Both agents slowed the growth of the xenograft tumor. Sensitivity to an inhibitor of IκB, as well as inhibition of an NF-κB gene expression signature demonstrated the importance of NF-κB signaling for chordoma growth. This serially transplantable chordoma xenograft is thus a practical model to study chordomas and perform in vivo preclinical drug testing.

  17. Prospective Testing and Redesign of a Temporal Biomarker Based Risk Model for Patients With Septic Shock: Implications for Septic Shock Biology

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Hector R.; Cvijanovich, Natalie Z.; Anas, Nick; Allen, Geoffrey L.; Thomas, Neal J.; Bigham, Michael T.; Weiss, Scott L.; Fitzgerald, Julie; Checchia, Paul A.; Meyer, Keith; Quasney, Michael; Hall, Mark; Gedeit, Rainer; Freishtat, Robert J.; Nowak, Jeffrey; Raj, Shekhar S.; Gertz, Shira; Howard, Kelli; Harmon, Kelli; Lahni, Patrick; Frank, Erin; Hart, Kimberly W.; Lindsell, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    The temporal version of the pediatric sepsis biomarker risk model (tPERSEVERE) estimates the risk of a complicated course in children with septic shock based on biomarker changes from days 1 to 3 of septic shock. We validated tPERSEVERE performance in a prospective cohort, with an a priori plan to redesign tPERSEVERE if it did not perform well. Biomarkers were measured in the validation cohort (n = 168) and study subjects were classified according to tPERSEVERE. To redesign tPERSEVERE, the validation cohort and the original derivation cohort (n = 299) were combined and randomly allocated to training (n = 374) and test (n = 93) sets. tPERSEVERE was redesigned using the training set and CART methodology. tPERSEVERE performed poorly in the validation cohort, with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.67 (95% CI: 0.58–0.75). Failure analysis revealed potential confounders related to clinical characteristics. The redesigned tPERSEVERE model had an AUC of 0.83 (0.79–0.87) and a sensitivity of 93% (68–97) for estimating the risk of a complicated course. Similar performance was seen in the test set. The classification tree segregated patients into two broad endotypes of septic shock characterized by either excessive inflammation or immune suppression. PMID:26844289

  18. Assessment of rates of recanting and hair testing as a biological measure of drug use in a general population sample of young people.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Michelle; Sullivan, John; Ring, Susan M; Macleod, John; Hickman, Matthew

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the extent of and factors associated with denial of previously reported cannabis and other illicit drug use, and assess the potential of hair testing for measuring substance use in general population samples. Birth cohort study. United Kingdom, 1991-present. A total of 3643 participants who provided hair and self-report measures of cannabis and other illicit drug use in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) at age 18 years. Denial of ever use of cannabis and other illicit drugs at age 18 following previously reported use. Positive hair drug tests for cannabis and other illicit drugs, and expected numbers of false positives and false negatives based on expected sensitivity and specificity. Cannabis and other illicit drug use was reported by 1223 and 393 individuals, respectively, before age 18 years. Of these 176 (14.4%) and 99 (25.2%), respectively, denied use at age 18. Denial of cannabis use decreased with the reporting of other substances and antisocial behaviour. Cannabis and other illicit drug use at age 18 was reported by 547 (22.5%) and 203 (8.4%) individuals, respectively. Of these, 111 (20.3%) and 13 (6.4%) were hair-positive for cannabis and other illicit drugs, respectively. Based on hair testing for cannabis use we expect 0 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0-169] false positives and 394 (95% CI = 323-449) false negatives compared to observed 362 potential false positives and 436 potential false negatives based on self-report. In hair-positive individuals, reporting the use of other substances and antisocial behaviour decreased the odds of a negative self-report. Hair analysis provides an unreliable marker of substance use in general population samples. People who report more frequent substance use before age 18 are less likely to later deny previous substance use at age 18 than people who report occasional use. © 2016 The Authors. Addiction published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society for the Study

  19. Assessment of rates of recanting and hair testing as a biological measure of drug use in a general population sample of young people

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, John; Ring, Susan M.; Macleod, John; Hickman, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims We investigate the extent of and factors associated with denial of previously reported cannabis and other illicit drug use, and assess the potential of hair testing for measuring substance use in general population samples. Design Birth cohort study. Setting United Kingdom, 1991–present. Participants A total of 3643 participants who provided hair and self‐report measures of cannabis and other illicit drug use in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) at age 18 years. Measurements Denial of ever use of cannabis and other illicit drugs at age 18 following previously reported use. Positive hair drug tests for cannabis and other illicit drugs, and expected numbers of false positives and false negatives based on expected sensitivity and specificity. Findings Cannabis and other illicit drug use was reported by 1223 and 393 individuals, respectively, before age 18 years. Of these 176 (14.4%) and 99 (25.2%), respectively, denied use at age 18. Denial of cannabis use decreased with the reporting of other substances and antisocial behaviour. Cannabis and other illicit drug use at age 18 was reported by 547 (22.5%) and 203 (8.4%) individuals, respectively. Of these, 111 (20.3%) and 13 (6.4%) were hair‐positive for cannabis and other illicit drugs, respectively. Based on hair testing for cannabis use we expect 0 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0–169] false positives and 394 (95% CI = 323–449) false negatives compared to observed 362 potential false positives and 436 potential false negatives based on self‐report. In hair‐positive individuals, reporting the use of other substances and antisocial behaviour decreased the odds of a negative self‐report. Conclusions Hair analysis provides an unreliable marker of substance use in general population samples. People who report more frequent substance use before age 18 are less likely to later deny previous substance use at age 18 than people who report occasional use. PMID

  20. Biological effects of high-LET particles on corn-seed embryos in the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project--Biostack III experiment.

    PubMed

    Peterson, D D; Benton, E V; Tran, M; Yang, T; Freeling, M; Craise, L; Tobias, C A

    1977-01-01

    High-LET particle hits in embryos of Zea mays corn seeds, flown as part of Biostack III in the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project, were determined via plastic nuclear track detectors. Based on etched particle-track measurements, 41 embryos were hit in seed layer 1 which contained 80 seeds, and 49 hits occurred in layer 2 which contained 79 seeds. The mean LET value and range of atomic numbers of recorded hits is, respectively, 210 +/- 57 keV micrometers -1 and 9 < or approximately Z < or approximately 26. Detailed analysis of one particular seed showing marked growth anomalies revealed two hits in the central region of the embryo. These two hits had LET values in the region of 100-150 keV micrometers-1, and Z > or approximately 20.

  1. The computational design of test compounds with potentially specific biological activity: Histamine-H2 agonists derived from 5-HT/H2 antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topiol, Sid; Sabio, Michael

    1991-06-01

    The previously proposed models for the recognition and activation of 5-HT and histamine-H2 receptors, which were employed to explain the antagonist activity of LSD at both of these receptors, as well as the selective antagonism for H2 receptors by SKF-10856 and 9,10-dihydro-LSD, are used herein to design a compound to test the H2-receptor model. The design strategy attempts to construct a compound with potentially selective H2 agonism. The design scheme maintains features which were previously used to explain selective recognition of SKF-10856 and 9,10-dihydro-LSD as well as reintroduces the chemical features proposed to be responsible for H2 activation. The existence of the H2 recognition and activation features in the proposed compound is verified, in a previously proposed model, by computational studies of the molecular electrostatic potentials and shifts in the tautomeric preference.

  2. Biological materials by design.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhao; Dimas, Leon; Adler, David; Bratzel, Graham; Buehler, Markus J

    2014-02-19

    In this topical review we discuss recent advances in the use of physical insight into the way biological materials function, to design novel engineered materials 'from scratch', or from the level of fundamental building blocks upwards and by using computational multiscale methods that link chemistry to material function. We present studies that connect advances in multiscale hierarchical material structuring with material synthesis and testing, review case studies of wood and other biological materials, and illustrate how engineered fiber composites and bulk materials are designed, modeled, and then synthesized and tested experimentally. The integration of experiment and simulation in multiscale design opens new avenues to explore the physics of materials from a fundamental perspective, and using complementary strengths from models and empirical techniques. Recent developments in this field illustrate a new paradigm by which complex material functionality is achieved through hierarchical structuring in spite of simple material constituents.

  3. [Cell biology and cosmetology].

    PubMed

    Traniello, S; Cavalletti, T

    1991-01-01

    Cellular biology can become the natural support of research in the field of cosmetics because it is able to provide alternative experimental models which can partially replace the massive use of laboratory animals. Cultures of human skin cells could be used in tests investigating irritation of the skin. We have developed an "in vitro" experimental model that allows to evaluate the damage caused by the free radicals to the fibroblasts in culture and to test the protective action of the lipoaminoacids. Experimenting on human cell cultures presents the advantage of eliminating the extrapolation between the different species, of allowing a determination of the biological action of a substance and of evaluating its dose/response effect. This does not mean that "in vitro" experimenting could completely replace experimenting on living animals, but the "in vitro" model can be introduced in the realisation of preliminary screenings.

  4. Multiplexed Engineering in Biology.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Jameson K; Church, George M

    2016-03-01

    Biotechnology is the manufacturing technology of the future. However, engineering biology is complex, and many possible genetic designs must be evaluated to find cells that produce high levels of a desired drug or chemical. Recent advances have enabled the design and construction of billions of genetic variants per day, but evaluation capacity remains limited to thousands of variants per day. Here we evaluate biological engineering through the lens of the design–build–test cycle framework and highlight the role that multiplexing has had in transforming the design and build steps. We describe a multiplexed solution to the ‘test’ step that is enabled by new research. Achieving a multiplexed test step will permit a fully multiplexed engineering cycle and boost the throughput of biobased product development by up to a millionfold.

  5. Accuracy of self-report, biological tests, collateral reports and clinician ratings in identifying substance use disorders among adults with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Desmarais, Sarah L; Van Dorn, Richard A; Sellers, Brian G; Young, M Scott; Swartz, Marvin S

    2013-09-01

    Identifying substance use disorders among adults with schizophrenia presents unique challenges but is critical to research and practice. This study examined: (a) the accuracy of assessments completed using various approaches in identifying substance use disorders, (b) their ability to discriminate between disorders of abuse and dependence, and (c) the benefits of using multiple indicators to identify substance use disorders. Data are from the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness study. The sample comprised 1,460 community-based adults with schizophrenia, 15.8% (n = 230) of whom were positive for a current (past month) drug or alcohol use disorder using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders (SCID). Clinician ratings, self-report, collateral reports, and results of hair and urine tests were compared to SCID diagnoses. Congruence with SCID diagnoses was good across approaches and evidence for superiority of one approach over another was limited. No approach discriminated between abuse and dependence. There was limited benefit of using multiple indicators. Findings suggest that the decision regarding the "best" approach for identifying substance use disorders among adults with schizophrenia may be made through consideration of practical issues and assessment purpose, rather than selection of the approach that yields the most accurate diagnostic assessment. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. Accuracy of Self-Report, Biological Tests, Collateral Reports and Clinician Ratings in Identifying Substance Use Disorders among Adults with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Desmarais, Sarah L.; Van Dorn, Richard A.; Sellers, Brian G.; Young, M. Scott; Swartz, Marvin S.

    2013-01-01

    Identifying substance use disorders among adults with schizophrenia presents unique challenges, but is critical to research and practice. This study examined: a) the accuracy of assessments completed using various approaches in identifying substance use disorders; b) their ability to discriminate between disorders of abuse and dependence; and c) the benefits of using multiple indicators to identify substance use disorders. Data are from the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness study. The sample comprised 1,460 community-based adults with schizophrenia, 15.8% (n = 230) of whom were positive for a current (past month) drug or alcohol use disorder using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders (SCID). Clinician ratings, self-report, collateral reports, and results of hair and urine tests were compared to SCID diagnoses. Congruence with SCID diagnoses was good across approaches and evidence for superiority of one approach over another was limited. No approach discriminated between abuse and dependence. There was limited benefit of using multiple indicators. Findings suggest that the decision regarding the ‘best’ approach for identifying substance use disorders among adults with schizophrenia may be made through consideration of practical issues and assessment purpose, rather than selection of the approach that yields the most accurate diagnostic assessment. PMID:23276310

  7. OPERATION SANDSTONE. Scientific Director’s Report of Atomic Weapon Tests at Eniwetok, 1948. Annex 12. Parts 1 and 2. Biological and Animal Container Studies (Service Test Number 7)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1948-01-01

    ANIMAL CONTAINER STUDIES (SERVICE TEST NO. j) Preliminary Report MIXED RADIATION EXPERIMENTS WITH MAIZE CAUTION ^vVS? Thi.« docunirnt contains...rfg COPIES. SMf.^ ^ MIXED RADIATION EXPERIMENTS WITH MAIZE L. F. RANDOLPH Department of Botany Cornell University Ithaca, New York COMTENTS...the dent com hybrid L 289/1 205» and with a stock of tetraploid dent corn to determine the relative sensitivity of diplold and tetraploid corn to

  8. [Biological markers of alcoholism].

    PubMed

    Marcos Martín, M; Pastor Encinas, I; Laso Guzmán, F J

    2005-09-01

    Diagnosis of alcoholism is very important, given its high prevalence and possibility of influencing the disease course. For this reason, the so-called biological markers of alcoholism are useful. These are analytic parameters that alter in the presence of excessive alcohol consumption. The two most relevant markers are the gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase and carbohydrate deficient transferrin. With this clinical comment, we aim to contribute to the knowledge of these tests and promote its use in the clinical practice.

  9. Reference gene selection for quantitative gene expression studies during biological invasions: A test on multiple genes and tissues in a model ascidian Ciona savignyi.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuena; Gao, Yangchun; Jiang, Bei; Zhou, Zunchun; Zhan, Aibin

    2016-01-15

    As invasive species have successfully colonized a wide range of dramatically different local environments, they offer a good opportunity to study interactions between species and rapidly changing environments. Gene expression represents one of the primary and crucial mechanisms for rapid adaptation to local environments. Here, we aim to select reference genes for quantitative gene expression analysis based on quantitative Real-Time PCR (qRT-PCR) for a model invasive ascidian, Ciona savignyi. We analyzed the stability of ten candidate reference genes in three tissues (siphon, pharynx and intestine) under two key environmental stresses (temperature and salinity) in the marine realm based on three programs (geNorm, NormFinder and delta Ct method). Our results demonstrated only minor difference for stability rankings among the three methods. The use of different single reference gene might influence the data interpretation, while multiple reference genes could minimize possible errors. Therefore, reference gene combinations were recommended for different tissues - the optimal reference gene combination for siphon was RPS15 and RPL17 under temperature stress, and RPL17, UBQ and TubA under salinity treatment; for pharynx, TubB, TubA and RPL17 were the most stable genes under temperature stress, while TubB, TubA and UBQ were the best under salinity stress; for intestine, UBQ, RPS15 and RPL17 were the most reliable reference genes under both treatments. Our results suggest that the necessity of selection and test of reference genes for different tissues under varying environmental stresses. The results obtained here are expected to reveal mechanisms of gene expression-mediated invasion success using C. savignyi as a model species.

  10. The Relationships Between Epistemic Beliefs in Biology and Approaches to Learning Biology Among Biology-Major University Students in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Chun; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between students' epistemic beliefs in biology and their approaches to learning biology. To this end, two instruments, the epistemic beliefs in biology and the approaches to learning biology surveys, were developed and administered to 520 university biology students, respectively. By and large, it was found that the students reflected "mixed" motives in biology learning, while those who had more sophisticated epistemic beliefs tended to employ deep strategies. In addition, the results of paired t tests revealed that the female students were more likely to possess beliefs about biological knowledge residing in external authorities, to believe in a right answer, and to utilize rote learning as a learning strategy. Moreover, compared to juniors and seniors, freshmen and sophomores tended to hold less mature views on all factors of epistemic beliefs regarding biology. Another comparison indicated that theoretical biology students (e.g. students majoring in the Department of Biology) tended to have more mature beliefs in learning biology and more advanced strategies for biology learning than those students studying applied biology (e.g. in the Department of Biotechnology). Stepwise regression analysis, in general, indicated that students who valued the role of experiments and justify epistemic assumptions and knowledge claims based on evidence were more oriented towards having mixed motives and utilizing deep strategies to learn biology. In contrast, students who believed in the certainty of biological knowledge were more likely to adopt rote learning strategies and to aim to qualify in biology.

  11. Shrinkage estimation of effect sizes as an alternative to hypothesis testing followed by estimation in high-dimensional biology: applications to differential gene expression.

    PubMed

    Montazeri, Zahra; Yanofsky, Corey M; Bickel, David R

    2010-01-01

    Research on analyzing microarray data has focused on the problem of identifying differentially expressed genes to the neglect of the problem of how to integrate evidence that a gene is differentially expressed with information on the extent of its differential expression. Consequently, researchers currently prioritize genes for further study either on the basis of volcano plots or, more commonly, according to simple estimates of the fold change after filtering the genes with an arbitrary statistical significance threshold. While the subjective and informal nature of the former practice precludes quantification of its reliability, the latter practice is equivalent to using a hard-threshold estimator of the expression ratio that is not known to perform well in terms of mean-squared error, the sum of estimator variance and squared estimator bias. On the basis of two distinct simulation studies and data from different microarray studies, we systematically compared the performance of several estimators representing both current practice and shrinkage. We find that the threshold-based estimators usually perform worse than the maximum-likelihood estimator (MLE) and they often perform far worse as quantified by estimated mean-squared risk. By contrast, the shrinkage estimators tend to perform as well as or better than the MLE and never much worse than the MLE, as expected from what is known about shrinkage. However, a Bayesian measure of performance based on the prior information that few genes are differentially expressed indicates that hard-threshold estimators perform about as well as the local false discovery rate (FDR), the best of the shrinkage estimators studied. Based on the ability of the latter to leverage information across genes, we conclude that the use of the local-FDR estimator of the fold change instead of informal or threshold-based combinations of statistical tests and non-shrinkage estimators can be expected to substantially improve the reliability of

  12. Nanoindentation of biological composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, M.

    2009-08-01

    This investigation studied the effect of storage conditions on the mechanical properties as measured by nanoindentation of mineralised tissue samples. The three storage solutions were Hanks balanced salt solution, phosphate buffered saline and deionised water and all had a significant effect on the surface properties, namely hardness and modulus of enamel, dentin and bone tested. The effect was significant with a greater than 70% reduction in surface mechanical properties after 8 days immersion in the solutions. This study highlights the importance of testing biological tissues immediately after extraction, and the possible structural and chemistry changes that may occur by artificially storing the tissues.

  13. Biological monitoring of radiation exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horneck, G.

    1998-11-01

    Complementary to physical dosimetry, biological dosimetry systems have been developed and applied which weight the different components of environmental radiation according to their biological efficacy. They generally give a record of the accumulated exposure of individuals with high sensitivity and specificity for the toxic agent under consideration. Basically three different types of biological detecting/monitoring systems are available: (i) intrinsic biological dosimeters that record the individual radiation exposure (humans, plants, animals) in measurable units. For monitoring ionizing radiation exposure, in situ biomarkers for genetic (e.g. chromosomal aberrations in human lymphocytes, germ line minisatellite mutation rates) or metabolic changes in serum, plasma and blood (e.g. serum lipids, lipoproteins, lipid peroxides, melatonin, antibody titer) have been used. (ii) Extrinsic biological dosimeters/indicators that record the accumulated dose in biological model systems. Their application includes long-term monitoring of changes in environmental UV radiation and its biological implications as well as dosimetry of personal UV exposure. (iii) Biological detectors/biosensors for genotoxic substances and agents such as bacterial assays (e.g. Ames test, SOS-type test) that are highly sensitive to genotoxins with high specificity. They may be applicable for different aspects in environmental monitoring including the International Space Station.

  14. Biological membranes

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Biological membranes allow life as we know it to exist. They form cells and enable separation between the inside and outside of an organism, controlling by means of their selective permeability which substances enter and leave. By allowing gradients of ions to be created across them, membranes also enable living organisms to generate energy. In addition, they control the flow of messages between cells by sending, receiving and processing information in the form of chemical and electrical signals. This essay summarizes the structure and function of membranes and the proteins within them, and describes their role in trafficking and transport, and their involvement in health and disease. Techniques for studying membranes are also discussed. PMID:26504250

  15. Creating biological nanomaterials using synthetic biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, MaryJoe K.; Ruder, Warren C.

    2014-02-01

    Synthetic biology is a new discipline that combines science and engineering approaches to precisely control biological networks. These signaling networks are especially important in fields such as biomedicine and biochemical engineering. Additionally, biological networks can also be critical to the production of naturally occurring biological nanomaterials, and as a result, synthetic biology holds tremendous potential in creating new materials. This review introduces the field of synthetic biology, discusses how biological systems naturally produce materials, and then presents examples and strategies for incorporating synthetic biology approaches in the development of new materials. In particular, strategies for using synthetic biology to produce both organic and inorganic nanomaterials are discussed. Ultimately, synthetic biology holds the potential to dramatically impact biological materials science with significant potential applications in medical systems.

  16. Creating biological nanomaterials using synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Rice, MaryJoe K; Ruder, Warren C

    2014-02-01

    Synthetic biology is a new discipline that combines science and engineering approaches to precisely control biological networks. These signaling networks are especially important in fields such as biomedicine and biochemical engineering. Additionally, biological networks can also be critical to the production of naturally occurring biological nanomaterials, and as a result, synthetic biology holds tremendous potential in creating new materials. This review introduces the field of synthetic biology, discusses how biological systems naturally produce materials, and then presents examples and strategies for incorporating synthetic biology approaches in the development of new materials. In particular, strategies for using synthetic biology to produce both organic and inorganic nanomaterials are discussed. Ultimately, synthetic biology holds the potential to dramatically impact biological materials science with significant potential applications in medical systems.

  17. Cultivating the Physical Biology Mindset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Rob

    2014-03-01

    Biological experiments now regularly result in data that emphasize functional relationships between key parameters such as level of gene expression and number of transcription factors or motor velocity and applied force. This trend towards quantitative dissection of biological problems has been acknowledged explicitly in learned reports such as ``Bio2010'' and the recent NAS report ``A New Biology for the 21st Century.'' These reports repeatedly emphasize the need for a new biology characterized by what one might call ``biological numeracy'' and for overhauling biological education in a way that is consistent with this kind of biological research. In this talk, I will describe my own experience in introducing courses aimed at introducing physical biology both in the lecture hall and in the laboratory. One of the most interesting aspects of the physics-biology interface is the question of what constitutes understanding and here, I will describe my views on the role of polarizing predictions as a test of such understanding with special emphasis on examples from signaling and regulation.

  18. Bayes in biological anthropology.

    PubMed

    Konigsberg, Lyle W; Frankenberg, Susan R

    2013-12-01

    In this article, we both contend and illustrate that biological anthropologists, particularly in the Americas, often think like Bayesians but act like frequentists when it comes to analyzing a wide variety of data. In other words, while our research goals and perspectives are rooted in probabilistic thinking and rest on prior knowledge, we often proceed to use statistical hypothesis tests and confidence interval methods unrelated (or tenuously related) to the research questions of interest. We advocate for applying Bayesian analyses to a number of different bioanthropological questions, especially since many of the programming and computational challenges to doing so have been overcome in the past two decades. To facilitate such applications, this article explains Bayesian principles and concepts, and provides concrete examples of Bayesian computer simulations and statistics that address questions relevant to biological anthropology, focusing particularly on bioarchaeology and forensic anthropology. It also simultaneously reviews the use of Bayesian methods and inference within the discipline to date. This article is intended to act as primer to Bayesian methods and inference in biological anthropology, explaining the relationships of various methods to likelihoods or probabilities and to classical statistical models. Our contention is not that traditional frequentist statistics should be rejected outright, but that there are many situations where biological anthropology is better served by taking a Bayesian approach. To this end it is hoped that the examples provided in this article will assist researchers in choosing from among the broad array of statistical methods currently available. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The Viking biology results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Harold P.

    1989-01-01

    A brief review of the purposes and the results from the Viking Biology experiments is presented, in the expectation that the lessons learned from this mission will be useful in planning future approaches to the biological exploration of Mars. Since so little was then known about potential micro-environments on Mars, three different experiments were included in the Viking mission, each one based on different assumptions about what Martian organisms might be like. In addition to the Viking Biology Instrument (VBI), important corollary information was obtained from the Viking lander imaging system and from the molecular analysis experiments that were conducted using the gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GCMS) instrument. No biological objects were noted by the lander imaging instrument. The GCMS did not detect any organic compounds. A description of the tests conducted by the Gas Exchange Experiment, the Labeled Release experiment, and the Pyrolytic Release experiment is given. Results are discussed. Taken as a whole, the Viking data yielded no unequivocal evidence for a Martian biota at either landing site. The results also revealed the presence of one or more reactive oxidants in the surface material and these need to be further characterized, as does the range of micro-environments, before embarking upon future searches for extant life on Mars.

  20. Structural Biology Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Science Education > Structural Biology Fact Sheet Structural Biology Fact Sheet Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area What is structural biology? Structural biology is a field of science focused ...

  1. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Describes laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom materials, including "diet poker" (nutrition game); an experiment on enzyme characteristics; demonstrations of yeast anaerobic respiration and color preference in Calliphora larvae; method to extract eugenol from clove oil to show antibiotic properties; and Benedict's test.…

  2. Buffer Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Kelly

    2000-01-01

    Presents a science experiment in which students test the buffering capacity of household products such as shampoo, hand lotion, fizzies candy, and cola. Lists the standards addressed in this experiment and gives an example of a student lab write-up. (YDS)

  3. Buffer Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Kelly

    2000-01-01

    Presents a science experiment in which students test the buffering capacity of household products such as shampoo, hand lotion, fizzies candy, and cola. Lists the standards addressed in this experiment and gives an example of a student lab write-up. (YDS)

  4. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Describes laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom materials, including "diet poker" (nutrition game); an experiment on enzyme characteristics; demonstrations of yeast anaerobic respiration and color preference in Calliphora larvae; method to extract eugenol from clove oil to show antibiotic properties; and Benedict's test.…

  5. Simulating Biological and Non-Biological Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruzzo, Angela; Gesierich, Benno; Wohlschlager, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the brain processes biological and non-biological movements in distinct neural circuits. Biological motion, in contrast to non-biological motion, refers to active movements of living beings. Aim of our experiment was to investigate the mechanisms underlying mental simulation of these two movement types. Subjects had to…

  6. Simulating Biological and Non-Biological Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruzzo, Angela; Gesierich, Benno; Wohlschlager, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the brain processes biological and non-biological movements in distinct neural circuits. Biological motion, in contrast to non-biological motion, refers to active movements of living beings. Aim of our experiment was to investigate the mechanisms underlying mental simulation of these two movement types. Subjects had to…

  7. Tested Studies for Laboratory Teaching. Proceedings of the Workshop/Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) (16th, Atlanta, Georgia, June 7-11, 1994). Volume 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Corey A., Ed.

    The focus of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) is to improve the undergraduate biology laboratory experience by promoting the development and dissemination of interesting, innovative, and reliable laboratory exercises. This proceedings volume contains 17 papers on the topics of cell and molecular biology, genetics, and…

  8. Tested Studies for Laboratory Teaching. Proceedings of the Workshop/Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) (16th, Atlanta, Georgia, June 7-11, 1994). Volume 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Corey A., Ed.

    The focus of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) is to improve the undergraduate biology laboratory experience by promoting the development and dissemination of interesting, innovative, and reliable laboratory exercises. This proceedings volume contains 17 papers on the topics of cell and molecular biology, genetics, and…

  9. Quantitative biology: where modern biology meets physical sciences

    PubMed Central

    Shekhar, Shashank; Zhu, Lian; Mazutis, Linas; Sgro, Allyson E.; Fai, Thomas G.; Podolski, Marija

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative methods and approaches have been playing an increasingly important role in cell biology in recent years. They involve making accurate measurements to test a predefined hypothesis in order to compare experimental data with predictions generated by theoretical models, an approach that has benefited physicists for decades. Building quantitative models in experimental biology not only has led to discoveries of counterintuitive phenomena but has also opened up novel research directions. To make the biological sciences more quantitative, we believe a two-pronged approach needs to be taken. First, graduate training needs to be revamped to ensure biology students are adequately trained in physical and mathematical sciences and vice versa. Second, students of both the biological and the physical sciences need to be provided adequate opportunities for hands-on engagement with the methods and approaches necessary to be able to work at the intersection of the biological and physical sciences. We present the annual Physiology Course organized at the Marine Biological Laboratory (Woods Hole, MA) as a case study for a hands-on training program that gives young scientists the opportunity not only to acquire the tools of quantitative biology but also to develop the necessary thought processes that will enable them to bridge the gap between these disciplines. PMID:25368426

  10. Biological Clocks. Testing Our Internal Timing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, M. Gail

    1991-01-01

    Presented are seven investigations that examine circadian rhythms. Topics include attention span, body temperature, rhythms found in rodents and spiders, and possible genetic determination of circadian rhythms. Background information on plants and animals is given. (KR)

  11. Biological Clocks. Testing Our Internal Timing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, M. Gail

    1991-01-01

    Presented are seven investigations that examine circadian rhythms. Topics include attention span, body temperature, rhythms found in rodents and spiders, and possible genetic determination of circadian rhythms. Background information on plants and animals is given. (KR)

  12. Evaluation of the usefulness of interferon-gamma release assays and the tuberculin skin test for the detection of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections in Korean rheumatic patients who are candidates for biologic agents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hoon; Won, Soyoung; Choi, Chan-Bum; Sung, Yoon-Kyoung; Song, Gwan Gyu; Bae, Sang-Cheol

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of active tuberculosis (TB) in patients who received both an interferon-gamma release assay (the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube test [QFT-GIT]) and tuberculin skin test (TST) in comparison with those who received QFT-GIT or TST alone for the detection of latent TB infection (LTBI). In total, 842 patients who received QFT-GIT or TST and used biologic agents between January 2007 and December 2012 were recruited to determine the usefulness of LTBI screening tests. The incidence of active TB was calculated relative to the LTBI screening method as the number of events per 100 000 person-years exposure. TB occurred in two of the patients who complied with an LTBI prophylaxis strategy. The TB incidence in the group that received both QFT-GIT and TST was 151.05 (95% confidence interval [CI] 150.11-151.98)/100 000 person-years, and the incidence was 169.78 (95% CI 168.73-170.84)/100 000 person-years in the group that received only TST. TB occurred even in some patients who received LTBI prophylaxis in compliance with national guidelines. The incidence of TB in patients who received either the QFT-GIT plus TST prophylaxis strategy or the TST prophylaxis strategy alone was higher than the annual incidence of the general population of the Republic of Korea. It is not possible to conclude which of the LTBI prophylaxis strategies is superior. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Toward verified biological models.

    PubMed

    Sadot, Avital; Fisher, Jasmin; Barak, Dan; Admanit, Yishai; Stern, Michael J; Hubbard, E Jane Albert; Harel, David

    2008-01-01

    The last several decades have witnessed a vast accumulation of biological data and data analysis. Many of these data sets represent only a small fraction of the system's behavior, making the visualization of full system behavior difficult. A more complete understanding of a biological system is gained when different types of data (and/or conclusions drawn from the data) are integrated into a larger-scale representation or model of the system. Ideally, this type of model is consistent with all available data about the system, and it is then used to generate additional hypotheses to be tested. Computer-based methods intended to formulate models that integrate various events and to test the consistency of these models with respect to the laboratory-based observations on which they are based are potentially very useful. In addition, in contrast to informal models, the consistency of such formal computer-based models with laboratory data can be tested rigorously by methods of formal verification. We combined two formal modeling approaches in computer science that were originally developed for non-biological system design. One is the inter-object approach using the language of live sequence charts (LSCs) with the Play-Engine tool, and the other is the intra-object approach using the language of statecharts and Rhapsody as the tool. Integration is carried out using InterPlay, a simulation engine coordinator. Using these tools, we constructed a combined model comprising three modules. One module represents the early lineage of the somatic gonad of C. elegans in LSCs, while a second more detailed module in statecharts represents an interaction between two cells within this lineage that determine their developmental outcome. Using the advantages of the tools, we created a third module representing a set of key experimental data using LSCs. We tested the combined statechart-LSC model by showing that the simulations were consistent with the set of experimental LSCs. This small

  14. The effect of a county's public high school summer remediation program on student gains on end-of-course standard of learning tests in Algebra I, Biology, Chemistry, Geometry and World History and Geography II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiken, Brenda L.

    The Commonwealth of Virginia requires high school students to receive a passing grade in core courses and a passing score on End-of-Course Standards of Learning (EOC SOL) tests to receive verified credits that lead to a Virginia high school diploma. These tests are believed to accurately reflect what students should know and be able to do in order to experience success in their endeavors beyond high school. For some students remediation is required to experience success on EOC SOL tests. This study sought to determine the effect of a County's public high school summer remediation program on student gains on EOC SOL tests in Algebra I, Biology, Chemistry, Geometry, and World History and Geography II. Specifically, the purpose of the study sought to determine the following: (a) If significant gains were made by students who attended the summer remediation program; (b) If significant gains were made by students who did not attend the summer remediation program; (c) If there were differences in gain scores of students who attended and those who did not attend the summer remediation program; and (d) If there were differences in gain scores among students who attended the summer remediation program related to school site, gender, ethnicity, learning ability group, socioeconomic status, and level of English proficiency. The results of the study indicate that students who attended and those who did not attend the summer remediation program made significant gains. However, the gains for students who attended the summer remediation program were significantly greater than the gains made by students who did not attend. The study also found that there were no significant differences in gain scores among students who attended the summer remediation program related to gender, ethnicity, learning ability group, socioeconomic status, and level of English proficiency. There were significant differences in Algebra I gain scores related to school site. Recommendations for

  15. The athlete biological passport.

    PubMed

    Sottas, Pierre-Edouard; Robinson, Neil; Rabin, Olivier; Saugy, Martial

    2011-07-01

    In elite sports, the growing availability of doping substances identical to those naturally produced by the human body seriously limits the ability of drug-testing regimes to ensure fairness and protection of health. The Athlete Biological Passport (ABP), the new paradigm in testing based on the personalized monitoring of biomarkers of doping, offers the enormous advantage of being independent of this endless pharmaceutical race. Doping triggers physiological changes that provide physiological enhancements. In the same way that disease-related biomarkers are invaluable tools that assist physicians in the diagnosis of pathology, specifically selected biomarkers can be used to detect doping. The ABP is a new testing paradigm with immense potential value in the current climate of rapid advancement in biomarker discovery. In addition to its original aim of providing proof of a doping offense, the ABP can also serve as a platform for a Rule of Sport, with the presentation before competition of the ABP to objectively demonstrate that the athlete will participate in a healthy physiological condition that is unaltered by performance-enhancing drugs. Finally, the decision-support system used today for the biological monitoring of world top-level athletes can also be advantageously transferred to other areas of clinical practice to reach the goal of personalized medicine.

  16. Quantitative biology: where modern biology meets physical sciences.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, Shashank; Zhu, Lian; Mazutis, Linas; Sgro, Allyson E; Fai, Thomas G; Podolski, Marija

    2014-11-05

    Quantitative methods and approaches have been playing an increasingly important role in cell biology in recent years. They involve making accurate measurements to test a predefined hypothesis in order to compare experimental data with predictions generated by theoretical models, an approach that has benefited physicists for decades. Building quantitative models in experimental biology not only has led to discoveries of counterintuitive phenomena but has also opened up novel research directions. To make the biological sciences more quantitative, we believe a two-pronged approach needs to be taken. First, graduate training needs to be revamped to ensure biology students are adequately trained in physical and mathematical sciences and vice versa. Second, students of both the biological and the physical sciences need to be provided adequate opportunities for hands-on engagement with the methods and approaches necessary to be able to work at the intersection of the biological and physical sciences. We present the annual Physiology Course organized at the Marine Biological Laboratory (Woods Hole, MA) as a case study for a hands-on training program that gives young scientists the opportunity not only to acquire the tools of quantitative biology but also to develop the necessary thought processes that will enable them to bridge the gap between these disciplines. © 2014 Shekhar, Zhu, Mazutis, Sgro, Fai, and Podolski. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  17. Biological Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-09

    The BioPA provides turbine designers with a set of tools that can be used to assess biological risks of turbines during the design phase, before expensive construction begins. The toolset can also be used to assess existing installations under a variety of operating conditions, supplementing data obtained through expensive field testing. The BioPA uses computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of a turbine design to quantify the exposure of passing fish to a set of known injury mechanisms. By appropriate sampling of the fluid domain, the BioPA assigns exposure probabilities to each mechanism. The exposure probabilities are combined with dose-response data from laboratory stress studies of fish to produce a set of biological BioPA Scores. These metrics provide an objective measure that can be used to compare competing turbines or to refine a new design. The BioPA process can be performed during the turbine design phase and is considerably less expensive than prototype-scale field testing.

  18. Biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Pohanka, Miroslav; Kuca, Kamil

    2010-01-01

    Biological warfare agents are a group of pathogens and toxins of biological origin that can be potentially misused for military or criminal purposes. The present review attempts to summarize necessary knowledge about biological warfare agents. The historical aspects, examples of applications of these agents such as anthrax letters, biological weapons impact, a summary of biological warfare agents and epidemiology of infections are described. The last section tries to estimate future trends in research on biological warfare agents.

  19. Tested Studies for Laboratory Teaching. Proceedings. Workshop/Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) (11th, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada, June 12-16, 1989). Volume 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Corey A., Ed.

    The focus of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) is to improve the undergraduate biology laboratory experience by promoting the development and dissemination of interesting, innovative, and reliable laboratory exercises. This proceedings volume contains 10 papers: "Investigating Fungi Which Cause Rot and Decay" (J. A Johnson);…

  20. Tested Studies for Laboratory Teaching. Proceedings of the Workshop/Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) (15th, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, June 8-12, 1993). Volume 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Corey A., Ed.

    The focus of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) is to improve the undergraduate biology laboratory experience by promoting the development and dissemination of interesting, innovative, and reliable laboratory exercises. This proceedings volume contains 18 papers: "Human DNA Fingerprinting by Polymerase Chain Reaction" (M. V.…