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Sample records for biologically active binuclear

  1. Binuclear biologically active Co(II) complexes with octazamacrocycle and aliphatic dicarboxylates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanasković, S. B.; Vučković, G.; Antonijević-Nikolić, M.; Stanojković, T.; Gojgić-Cvijović, G.

    2012-12-01

    Four new cationic Co(II) complexes with N,N',N'',N'''-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl)-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane (tpmc) and dianion of one the aliphatic dicarboxylic acids: butanedioic acid (succinic) acid = succH2, pentanedioic (glutaric) acid = gluH2, hexanedioic acid (adipic) acid = adipH2 or decanedioic acid (sebacic) acid = sebH2 of general formula [Co2(L)(tpmc)](ClO4)2ṡxY, L2- = succ, x = 1, Y = H2O; L = glu, x = 1, Y = H2O; L = adip, x = 1.5, Y = H2O; L = seb, x = 1, Y = CH3CN were isolated. The composition and charge are proposed based on elemental analyses (C, H, N) and electrical conductivity measurements. UV-Vis and FTIR spectral data and magnetic moments were in accordance with high-spin Co(II) state. It is proposed that in all complexes Co(II) is hexa-coordinated out of cyclam ring and that both carboxylic groups from dicarboxylate bridge participate in coordination. Oxygens from one group are most likely bonded to the same Co(II) ion thus forming a four-membered ring. The in vitro antibacterial/antiproliferative activities of the complexes were in some cases enhanced compared with the simple Co(II) salt and free ligands, tested as controls.

  2. O2 activation by binuclear Cu sites: Noncoupled versus exchange coupled reaction mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Solomon, Edward I.

    2004-09-01

    Binuclear Cu proteins play vital roles in O2 binding and activation in biology and can be classified into coupled and noncoupled binuclear sites based on the magnetic interaction between the two Cu centers. Coupled binuclear Cu proteins include hemocyanin, tyrosinase, and catechol oxidase. These proteins have two Cu centers strongly magnetically coupled through direct bridging ligands that provide a mechanism for the 2-electron reduction of O2 to a µ-2:2 side-on peroxide bridged species. This side-on bridged peroxo-CuII2 species is activated for electrophilic attack on the phenolic ring of substrates. Noncoupled binuclear Cu proteins include peptidylglycine -hydroxylating monooxygenase and dopamine -monooxygenase. These proteins have binuclear Cu active sites that are distant, that exhibit no exchange interaction, and that activate O2 at a single Cu center to generate a reactive CuII/O2 species for H-atom abstraction from the C-H bond of substrates. O2 intermediates in the coupled binuclear Cu enzymes can be trapped and studied spectroscopically. Possible intermediates in noncoupled binuclear Cu proteins can be defined through correlation to mononuclear CuII/O2 model complexes. The different intermediates in these two classes of binuclear Cu proteins exhibit different reactivities that correlate with their different electronic structures and exchange coupling interactions between the binuclear Cu centers. These studies provide insight into the role of exchange coupling between the Cu centers in their reaction mechanisms.

  3. Synthesis, spectroscopic and biological activities studies of acyclic and macrocyclic mono and binuclear metal complexes containing a hard-soft Schiff base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Hussein, Azza A. A.; Linert, Wolfgang

    Mono- and bi-nuclear acyclic and macrocyclic complexes with hard-soft Schiff base, H2L, ligand derived from the reaction of 4,6-diacetylresorcinol and thiocabohydrazide, in the molar ratio 1:2 have been prepared. The H2L ligand reacts with Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Mn(II) and UO2(VI) nitrates, VO(IV) sulfate and Ru(III) chloride to get acyclic binuclear complexes except for VO(IV) and Ru(III) which gave acyclic mono-nuclear complexes. Reaction of the acyclic mono-nuclear VO(IV) and Ru(III) complexes with 4,6-diacetylresorcinol afforded the corresponding macrocyclic mono-nuclear VO(IV) and Ru(IIII) complexes. Template reactions of the 4,6-diacetylresorcinol and thiocarbohydrazide with either VO(IV) or Ru(III) salts afforded the macrocyclic binuclear VO(IV) and Ru(III) complexes. The Schiff base, H2L, ligand acts as dibasic with two NSO-tridentate sites and can coordinate with two metal ions to form binuclear complexes after the deprotonation of the hydrogen atoms of the phenolic groups in all the complexes, except in the case of the acyclic mononuclear Ru(III) and VO(IV) complexes, where the Schiff base behaves as neutral tetradentate chelate with N2S2 donor atoms. The ligands and the metal complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-vis 1H-NMR, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and ESR, as well as the measurements of conductivity and magnetic moments at room temperature. Electronic spectra and magnetic moments of the complexes indicate the geometries of the metal centers are either tetrahedral, square planar or octahedral. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were calculated using Coats-Redfern equation, for the different thermal decomposition steps of the complexes. The ligands and the metal complexes were screened for their antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus as Gram-positive bacteria, and Pseudomonas fluorescens as Gram-negative bacteria in addition to Fusarium oxysporum fungus. Most of the complexes exhibit mild

  4. Manganese enzymes with binuclear active sites

    SciTech Connect

    Dismukes, G.C.

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this article is twofold. First, to review the recent literature dealing with the mechanisms of catalysis by binuclear manganese enzymes. Second, to summarize and illustrate the general principles of catalysis which distinguish binuclear metalloenzymes from monometallic centers. This review covers primarily the published literature from 1991 up to May 1996. A summary of the major structurally characterized dimanganese enzymes is given. These perform various reaction types including several redox reactions, (de)hydrations, isomerizations, (de)phosphorylation, and phosphoryl transfer. 114 refs.

  5. Anticancer activity assessment of two novel binuclear platinum (II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Shahsavani, Mohammad Bagher; Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Aseman, Marzieh Dadkhah; Nabavizadeh, S Masoud; Rashidi, Mehdi; Asadi, Zahra; Erfani, Nasrollah; Ghasemi, Atiyeh; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Niazi, Ali; Bahaoddini, Aminollah; Yousefi, Reza

    2016-08-01

    In the current study, two binuclear Pt (II) complexes, containing cis, cis-[Me2Pt (μ-NN) (μ-dppm) PtMe2] (1), and cis,cis-[Me2Pt(μ-NN)(μ dppm) Pt((CH2)4)] (2) in which NN=phthalazine and dppm=bis (diphenylphosphino) methane were evaluated for their anticancer activities and DNA/purine nucleotide binding properties. These Pt (II) complexes, with the non-classical structures, demonstrated a significant anticancer activity against Jurkat and MCF-7 cancer cell lines. The results of ethidium bromide/acridine orange staining and Caspase-III activity suggest that these complexes were capable to stimulate an apoptotic mechanism of cell death in the cancer cells. Using different biophysical techniques and docking simulation analysis, we indicated that these complexes were also capable to interact efficiently with DNA via a non-intercalative mechanism. According to our results, substitution of cyclopentane (in complex 2) with two methyl groups (in complex 1) results in significant improvement of the complex ability to interact with DNA and subsequently to induce the anticancer activity. Overall, these binuclear Pt (II) complexes are promising group of the non-classical potential anticancer agents which can be considered as molecular templates in designing of highly efficient platinum anticancer drugs.

  6. Peroxide Activation for Electrophilic Reactivity by the Binuclear Non-heme Iron Enzyme AurF

    DOE PAGES

    Park, Kiyoung; Li, Ning; Kwak, Yeonju; ...

    2017-05-01

    Binuclear non-heme iron enzymes activate O2 for diverse chemistries that include oxygenation of organic substrates and hydrogen atom abstraction. This process often involves the formation of peroxo-bridged biferric intermediates, only some of which can perform electrophilic reactions. To elucidate the geometric and electronic structural requirements to activate peroxo reactivity, the active peroxo intermediate in 4-aminobenzoate N-oxygenase (AurF) has been characterized spectroscopically and computationally. A magnetic circular dichroism study of reduced AurF shows that its electronic and geometric structures are poised to react rapidly with O2. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopic definition of the peroxo intermediate formed in this reaction shows thatmore » the active intermediate has a protonated peroxo bridge. Density functional theory computations on the structure established here show that the protonation activates peroxide for electrophilic/single-electron-transfer reactivity. As a result, this activation of peroxide by protonation is likely also relevant to the reactive peroxo intermediates in other binuclear non-heme iron enzymes.« less

  7. Nuclease activity and interaction studies of unsymmetrical binuclear Ni(II) complexes with CT-DNA and BSA.

    PubMed

    Poornima, S; Gunasekaran, K; Kandaswamy, M

    2015-10-07

    New unsymmetrical binuclear nickel(II) complexes [Ni2L(1-5)] (ClO4)2 (1-5) were synthesized by using [NiL] [(3-((9E)-(2-((E)-(3-formyl-2-olato-5-methylbenzylideneamino)methyl) phenylimino)methyl)-3-formyl-5-methyl-2-olato)nickel(II)] with various diamines like 1,2-diaminoethane (L(1)), 1,3-diaminopropane (L(2)), 1,4-diaminobutane (L(3)), 1,2-diaminobenzene (L(4)) and 1,8-diaminonaphthalene (L(5)) and characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopic methods. The molecular structure of binuclear nickel(II) complex 1 is determined by a single crystal X-ray diffraction method. Cyclic voltammograms of binuclear Ni(II) complexes exhibit two quasi-reversible reduction waves in the cathodic region and two oxidation waves in the anodic region. DNA binding, protein binding and DNA cleavage studies were investigated. The interactions of complexes (1-5) with calf thymus DNA were studied by spectroscopic techniques, including absorption and fluorescence methods. The binding affinities of complexes (1-5) with CT-DNA and nuclease activities are in the following order: 5> 4>3 >2>1 . Binuclear Ni(II) complex 1 cleaved the plasmid DNA by a hydrolytic pathway. The hydrolytic cleavage of DNA by the complexes is supported by evidence from free radical quenching and T4 ligase ligation. Binuclear Ni(II) complexes (1-5) displayed significant protein (bovine serum albumin) interactions. The experimental results showed that the interaction between binuclear Ni(II) complexes and BSA was mainly a static quenching process.

  8. Biological evaluation of a novel water soluble sulphur bridged binuclear copper(II) thiosemicarbazone complex.

    PubMed

    Senthil Raja, Duraisamy; Bhuvanesh, Nattamai S P; Natarajan, Karuppannan

    2011-09-01

    The reaction of 2-oxo-1,2-dihydroquinoline-3-carbaldehyde 4(N,N)-dimethylthiosemicarbazone (HL) with copper(II) nitrate in methanol yielded water soluble [{Cu(L)(CH(3)OH)}(2)](NO(3))(2) · H(2)O. Structural analysis revealed that the complex consists of centrosymmetric binuclear entities containing square-pyramidal copper(II) ions bridged through the sulfur atoms. The spectroscopic experimental evidences strongly suggested that the ligand and complex could interact with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) through intercalation. A gel electrophoresis assay demonstrated the ability of the complex to cleave the pBR322 plasmid DNA. The complex also exhibited a strong binding to bovine serum albumin (BSA) over the ligand. Investigations of antioxidative properties showed that the complex has strong radical scavenging properties. Further, the cytotoxic effect of the complex was examined on HeLa, Hep G2, and HEp-2, which showed that the complex exhibited substantial cytotoxic specificity on HeLa over the other two. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Electrochemical, catalytic and antimicrobial activity of N-functionalized tetraazamacrocyclic binuclear nickel(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabu, R.; Vijayaraj, A.; Suresh, R.; Shenbhagaraman, R.; Kaviyarasan, V.; Narayanan, V.

    2011-02-01

    The five binuclear nickel(II) complexes have been synthesized by the Schiff base condensation of 1,8-[bis(3-formyl-2-hydroxy-5-methyl)benzyl]-l,4,8,11-tetraazacyclo-tetradecane (PC) with appropriate aliphatic diamines and nickel(II) perchlorate. All the five complexes were characterized by elemental and spectral analysis. The electronic spectra of the complexes show three d-d transition in the range of 550-1055 nm due to 3A 2g → 3T 2g(F), 3A 2g → 3T 1g(F) and 3A 2g → 3T 1g(P). These spin allowed electronic transitions are characteristic of an octahedral Ni 2+ center. Electrochemical studies of the complexes show two irreversible one electron reduction waves at cathodic region. The reduction potential of the complexes shifts towards anodically upon increasing the chain length of the macrocyclic ring. All the nickel(II) complexes show two irreversible one electron oxidation waves at anodic region. The oxidation potential of the complexes shift towards anodically upon increasing the chain length of the macrocyclic ring. The catalytic activities of the complexes were observed to be increase with increase the macrocyclic ring size. The observed rate constant values for the catalytic hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenyl phosphate are in the range of 5.85 × 10 -3 to 9.14 × 10 -3 min -1. All the complexes were screened for antimicrobial activity.

  10. Synthesis, characterization and biological studies of homo and hetero-binuclear 13-membered pentaaza bis (macrocyclic) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafar, Hina; Kareem, Abdul; Sherwani, Asif; Mohammad, Owais; Khan, Tahir Ali

    2015-01-01

    A new series of homo and hetero binuclear 13-membered pentaaza bis (macrocyclic) complexes, [MM‧LX4], [M = Cu(II), M‧ = Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Sn(II); L = ligand and X = Cl or NO3] have been synthesized by the template reaction of dichloro/dinitrato diphenyl sulphone 1,3,6,9,12-tetra hydro pentaazacyclo pantane copper (II) complexes with formaldehyde, triethylenetetraamine, and respective metal salts in 1:2:1:1 molar ratio. The complexes have been characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance measurements, ESI-mass, 1H, 13C and 119Sn NMR, IR, electronic and EPR spectral studies. The results of elemental analyses, ESI-mass and conductivity measurements confirmed the stoichiometry of the complexes while the characteristic absorption bands and resonance peaks in IR and NMR spectra confirmed the formation of macrocyclic frameworks of the complexes. These studies showed octahedral geometry around the metal ion. The thermal stability of copper complexes was also studied by TGA and DTA analyses. Some complexes of this series were also studied for their in vitro anticancer activity against cancer cells lines: Hep3B, MCF7, and HeLa. The recorded IC50 values for the tested complexes show moderate to good cytotoxicity against these cancer cell lines.

  11. Mn(II) Oxidation by the Multicopper Oxidase Complex Mnx: A Binuclear Activation Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Soldatova, Alexandra V; Tao, Lizhi; Romano, Christine A; Stich, Troy A; Casey, William H; Britt, R David; Tebo, Bradley M; Spiro, Thomas G

    2017-08-23

    The bacterial protein complex Mnx contains a multicopper oxidase (MCO) MnxG that, unusually, catalyzes the two-electron oxidation of Mn(II) to MnO2 biomineral, via a Mn(III) intermediate. Although Mn(III)/Mn(II) and Mn(IV)/Mn(III) reduction potentials are expected to be high, we find a low reduction potential, 0.38 V (vs Normal Hydrogen Electrode, pH 7.8), for the MnxG type 1 Cu(2+), the electron acceptor. Indeed the type 1 Cu(2+) is not reduced by Mn(II) in the absence of molecular oxygen, indicating that substrate oxidation requires an activation step. We have investigated the enzyme mechanism via electronic absorption spectroscopy, using chemometric analysis to separate enzyme-catalyzed MnO2 formation from MnO2 nanoparticle aging. The nanoparticle aging time course is characteristic of nucleation and particle growth; rates for these processes followed expected dependencies on Mn(II) concentration and temperature, but exhibited different pH optima. The enzymatic time course is sigmoidal, signaling an activation step, prior to turnover. The Mn(II) concentration and pH dependence of a preceding lag phase indicates weak Mn(II) binding. The activation step is enabled by a pKa > 8.6 deprotonation, which is assigned to Mn(II)-bound H2O; it induces a conformation change (consistent with a high activation energy, 106 kJ/mol) that increases Mn(II) affinity. Mnx activation is proposed to decrease the Mn(III/II) reduction potential below that of type 1 Cu(II/I) by formation of a hydroxide-bridged binuclear complex, Mn(II)(μ-OH)Mn(II), at the substrate site. Turnover is found to depend cooperatively on two Mn(II) and is enabled by a pKa 7.6 double deprotonation. It is proposed that turnover produces a Mn(III)(μ-OH)2Mn(III) intermediate that proceeds to the enzyme product, likely Mn(IV)(μ-O)2Mn(IV) or an oligomer, which subsequently nucleates MnO2 nanoparticles. We conclude that Mnx exploits manganese polynuclear chemistry in order to facilitate an otherwise difficult

  12. Binuclear Phthalocyanines with Aromatic Bridges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    successful. (Scheme 2) Synthesis of Binuclear Phthalocyanines Covalently Bridged by Anthracene The coupling reaction of aromatic halides using elemental...available (16), it Is not active enough to undergo the desired cross coupling reaction . Less electropositive arylzinc derivatives can tolerate various electro...philic functional groups such as nitriles and esters (17). These organo- metallic reagents readily undergo cross coupling reaction with aryl halides

  13. Determination of the catalytic activity of binuclear metallohydrolases using isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Pedroso, Marcelo M; Ely, Fernanda; Lonhienne, Thierry; Gahan, Lawrence R; Ollis, David L; Guddat, Luke W; Schenk, Gerhard

    2014-03-01

    Binuclear metallohydrolases are a large and diverse family of enzymes that are involved in numerous metabolic functions. An increasing number of members find applications as drug targets or in processes such as bioremediation. It is thus essential to have an assay available that allows the rapid and reliable determination of relevant catalytic parameters (k cat, K m, and k cat/K m). Continuous spectroscopic assays are frequently only possible by using synthetic (i.e., nonbiological) substrates that possess a suitable chromophoric marker (e.g., nitrophenol). Isothermal titration calorimetry, in contrast, affords a rapid assay independent of the chromophoric properties of the substrate-the heat associated with the hydrolytic reaction can be directly related to catalytic properties. Here, we demonstrate the efficiency of the method on several selected examples of this family of enzymes and show that, in general, the catalytic parameters obtained by isothermal titration calorimetry are in good agreement with those obtained from spectroscopic assays.

  14. Structural, spectral and biological studies of binuclear tetradentate metal complexes of N 3O Schiff base ligand synthesized from 4,6-diacetylresorcinol and diethylenetriamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emara, Adel A. A.

    2010-09-01

    The binuclear Schiff base, H 2L, ligand was synthesized by reaction of 4,6-diacetylresorcinol with diethylenetriamine in the molar ratio 1:2. The coordination behavior of the H 2L towards Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Zn(II), Fe(III), Cr(III), VO(IV) and UO 2(VI) ions has been investigated. The elemental analyses, magnetic moments, thermal studies and IR, electronic, 1H NMR, ESR and mass spectra were used to characterize the isolated ligand and its metal complexes. The ligand acts as dibasic with two N 3O-tetradentate sites and can coordinate with two metal ions to form binuclear complexes. The bonding sites are the nitrogen atoms of the azomethine and amine groups and the oxygen atoms of the phenolic groups. The metal complexes exhibit either square planar, tetrahedral, square pyramid or octahedral structures. The Schiff base ligand and its metal complexes were tested against four pathogenic bacteria ( Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes) as Gram-positive bacteria, and ( Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas phaseolicola) as Gram-negative bacteria and two pathogenic fungi ( Fusarium oxysporum and Aspergillus fumigatus) to assess their antimicrobial properties. Most of the complexes exhibit mild antibacterial and antifungal activities against these organisms.

  15. Mono- and binuclear copper(I) complexes of thionucleotide analogues and their catalytic activity on the synthesis of dihydrofurans.

    PubMed

    Charalampou, D C; Kourkoumelis, N; Karanestora, S; Hadjiarapoglou, L P; Dokorou, V; Skoulika, S; Owczarzak, A; Kubicki, M; Hadjikakou, S K

    2014-08-18

    The reaction of copper(I) halides with 2-thiouracil (TUC), 6-methyl-2-thiouacil (MTUC), and 4-methyl-2-mercaptopyrimidine (MPMTH) in the presence of triphenylphosphine (tpp) in a 1:1:2 molar ratio results in a mixed-ligand copper(I) complex with the formulas [Cu2(tpp)4(TUC)Cl] (1), [Cu2(tpp)4(MTUC)Cl] (2), [Cu(tpp)2(MPMTH)Cl]·(1)/2CH3OH (3), [Cu(tpp)2(MTUC)Br] (4), and [Cu(tpp)2(MTUC)I]·(1)/2CH3CN (5). The complexes have been characterized by FT-IR, (1)H NMR, and UV-vis spectroscopic techniques and single-crystal X-ray crystallography. Complexes 1 and 2 are binuclear copper(I) complexes. Two phosphorus atoms from tpp ligands are coordinated to the copper(I) ions, forming two units that are linked to each other by a deprotonated TUC or MTUC chelating ligand through a sulfur bridge. A linear Cu-S-Cu moiety is formed. The tetrahedral geometry around the metal centers is completed by the nitrogen-donor atom from the TUC or MTUC ligand for the one unit, while for the other one, it is completed by the chloride anion. Two phosphorus atoms from two tpp ligands, one sulfur atom from MPMTH or MTUC ligand, and one halide anion (Cl, Br, and I) form a tetrahedron around the copper ion in 3-5 and two polymorphic forms of 4 (4a and 4b). In all of the complexes, either mono- or binuclear intramolecular O-H···X hydrogen bonds enhance the stability of the structures. On the other hand, in almost all cases of mononuclear complexes (with the exception of a symmetry-independent molecule in 4a), intermolecular NH···O hydrogen-bonding interactions lead to dimerization. Complexes 1-5 were studied for their catalytic activity for the intermolecular cycloaddition of iodonium ylides toward dihydrofuran formation by HPLC, (1)H NMR, and LC-HRMS spectroscopic techniques. The results show that the geometry and halogen and ligand types have a strong effect on the catalytic properties of the complexes. The highest yield of dihydrofurans was obtained when "linear" complexes 1 and 2 were

  16. Electrochemical, catalytic and antimicrobial activities of N-functionalized cyclam based unsymmetrical dicompartmental binuclear nickel(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreedaran, S.; Bharathi, K. Shanmuga; Rahiman, A. Kalilur; Suresh, R.; Jegadeesh, R.; Raaman, N.; Narayanan, V.

    2009-11-01

    Five binuclear nickel(II) complexes have been prepared by simple Schiff base condensation of the compound 1,8-[bis(3-formyl-2-hydroxy-5-bromo)benzyl]-l,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane (L) with appropriate aliphatic or aromatic diamine, nickel(II) perchlorate and triethylamine. All the complexes were characterized by elemental and spectral analysis. Positive ion FAB mass spectra show the presence of dinickel core in the complexes. The electronic spectra of the complexes show red shift in the d-d transition. Electrochemical studies of the complexes show two irreversible one electron reduction processes in the range of 0 to -1.4 V. The reduction potential of the complexes shifts towards anodically upon increasing chain length of the macrocyclic ring. All the nickel(II) complexes show two irreversible one electron oxidation waves in the range 0.4-1.6 V. The observed rate constant values for catalysis of the hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenyl phosphate are in the range of 1.36 × 10 -2-9.14 × 10 -2 min -1. The rate constant values for the complexes containing aliphatic diimines are found to be higher than the complexes containing aromatic diimines. Spectral, electrochemical and catalytic studies of the complexes were compared on the basis of increasing chain length of the imine compartment. All the complexes show higher antimicrobial activity than the ligand and metal salt.

  17. Structural, spectral, pH-metric and biological studies on mercury (II), cadmium (II) and binuclear zinc (II) complexes of NS donor thiosemicarbazide ligand.

    PubMed

    El-Gammal, Ola A; Abu El-Reash, Gaber M; El-Gamil, Mohammed M

    2014-04-05

    Hg(II), Cd(II) and binuclear Zn(II) complexes derived from the tetradentate N(1)-ethyl-N(2)-(pyridine-2-yl) hydrazine-1, 2-bis (carbothioamide) ligand (H2PET) have been prepared and characterized by conventional techniques. The isolated complexes acquired the formulas, [Hg(HPET)(H2O)2Cl]⋅H2O, [Cd(HPET)Cl] and [Zn2(HPET)(PET)(OAc)]⋅H2O, respectively. IR data revealed that the ligand behaves as monobasic tridentate through (CN)py, (C-S) and new (NC)azomethine(∗) groups in both Hg(II) and Cd(II) complexes. In the binuclear Zn(II) complex, the behavior of ligand contains two types, where H2PET acts as dibasic tetradentate via (CN)py, both deprotonated (C-SH) and the new (NC)azomethine(∗) towards two Zn atoms and also it acts as monobasic tridentate via (CS), deprotonated (C-SH) and (CN)py towards the same Zn atoms. An octahedral geometry for Hg(II) complex and tetrahedral geometry for both Cd(II) and Zn(II) complexes were proposed. The bond lengths, bond angles, HOMO, LUMO and dipole moment have been calculated by DFT using materials studio program to confirm the geometry of ligand and its metal complexes. The association constant of the ligand and the stability constants of its complexes as well as the thermodynamic parameters were calculated by pH metric measurements at 298, 308 and 318K in 50% dioxane-water mixture, respectively. Also, the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for the different thermal degradation steps of the complexes were determined by Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger methods. Moreover, the anti-oxidant (using ABTS and DPPH methods), anti-hemolytic, and cytotoxic activities of the compounds have been tested. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Crystal structure, DNA interaction and thermal analysis data of two new antimicrobial active binuclear cadmium and mercury complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musavi, S. A.; Montazerozohori, M.; Masoudiasl, A.; Naghiha, R.; Joohari, S.; Assoud, A.

    2017-10-01

    Two new binuclear Schiff base complexes with the general formula [CdLBr(μ-Br)]2 (1) and [Hg2L(μ-I)2I2] (2) were prepared by the reaction of 2,2-dimethyl-N,N'- bis-(3-phenyl-allylidene)-propane-1,3-diamine (L), CdBr2 and HgI2. The crystal structure of two complexes was determined by X-ray crystallography. The common structures for four-coordinated compounds are square planar or the tetrahedral geometries, which is evaluated by the Houser angular index (τ4). In [CdLBr(μ-Br)]2 (1), each cadmium center is five-coordinated by two iminic nitrogen atoms from Schiff base ligand, two μ2-bridging bromide anions and one terminal coordinating bromide anion. The metal center in this centrosymmetric dimer has a distorted square-pyramidal geometry. [Hg2L(μ-I)2I2] (2) consists of two four-coordinated mercury centers with different coordination spheres (HgN2I2 for Hg1 and HgI4 for Hg2). The TG/DTG diagrams showed that both complexes were completely decomposed under a nitrogen atmosphere. Furthermore, antibacterial activities of compounds have been screened against various bacteria and fungi by Disk diffusion method. Mercury complex inhibited the growth of the microorganisms more efficient than cadmium complex. DNA cleavage potential of compounds was evaluated by agarose gel electrophoresis method. Finally, nano-structure cadmium complex was sono-chemically synthesized and applied as precursor for preparation of cadmium oxide nanoparticles.

  19. Mechanistic Insight from Calorimetric Measurements of the Assembly of the Binuclear Metal Active Site of Glycerophosphodiesterase (GpdQ) from Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Pedroso, Marcelo M; Ely, Fernanda; Carpenter, Margaret C; Mitić, Nataša; Gahan, Lawrence R; Ollis, David L; Wilcox, Dean E; Schenk, Gerhard

    2017-07-05

    Glycerophosphodiesterase (GpdQ) from Enterobacter aerogenes is a binuclear metallohydrolase with a high affinity for metal ions at its α site but a lower affinity at its β site in the absence of a substrate. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) has been used to quantify the Co(II) and Mn(II) binding affinities and thermodynamics of the two sites in wild-type GpdQ and two mutants, both in the absence and in the presence of phosphate. Metal ions bind to the six-coordinate α site in an entropically driven process with loss of a proton, while binding at the β site is not detected by ITC. Phosphate enhances the metal affinity of the α site by increasing the binding entropy and the metal affinity of the β site by enthalpic (Co) or entropic (Mn) contributions, but no additional loss of protons. Mutations of first- and second-coordination sphere residues at the β site increase the metal affinity of both sites by enhancing the binding enthalpy. In particular, loss of the hydrogen bond from second-sphere Ser127 to the metal-coordinating Asn80 has a significant effect on the metal binding thermodynamics that result in a resting binuclear active site with high catalytic activity. While structural and spectroscopic data with excess metal ions have indicated a bridging hydroxide in the binuclear GpdQ site, analysis of ITC data here reveals the loss of a single proton in the assembly of this site, indicating that the metal-bound hydroxide nucleophile is formed in the resting inactive mononuclear form, which becomes catalytically competent upon binding the second metal ion.

  20. Mechanism of O2 activation and substrate hydroxylation in noncoupled binuclear copper monooxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Cowley, Ryan E.; Tian, Li; Solomon, Edward I.

    2016-01-01

    Peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM) and dopamine β-monooxygenase (DβM) are copper-dependent enzymes that are vital for neurotransmitter regulation and hormone biosynthesis. These enzymes feature a unique active site consisting of two spatially separated (by 11 Å in PHM) and magnetically noncoupled copper centers that enables 1e– activation of O2 for hydrogen atom abstraction (HAA) of substrate C–H bonds and subsequent hydroxylation. Although the structures of the resting enzymes are known, details of the hydroxylation mechanism and timing of long-range electron transfer (ET) are not clear. This study presents density-functional calculations of the full reaction coordinate, which demonstrate: (i) the importance of the end-on coordination of superoxide to Cu for HAA along the triplet spin surface; (ii) substrate radical rebound to a CuII hydroperoxide favors the proximal, nonprotonated oxygen; and (iii) long-range ET can only occur at a late step with a large driving force, which serves to inhibit deleterious Fenton chemistry. The large inner-sphere reorganization energy at the ET site is used as a control mechanism to arrest premature ET and dictate the correct timing of ET. PMID:27790986

  1. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, electrochemistry and biological evaluation of some binuclear transition metal complexes of bicompartmental ONO donor ligands containing benzo[b]thiophene moiety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahendra Raj, K.; Vivekanand, B.; Nagesh, G. Y.; Mruthyunjayaswamy, B. H. M.

    2014-02-01

    A series of new binucleating Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes of bicompartmental ligands with ONO donor were synthesized. The ligands were obtained by the condensation of 3-chloro-6-substituted benzo[b]thiophene-2-carbohydrazides and 4,6-diacetylresorcinol. The synthesized ligands and their complexes were characterized by elemental analysis and various spectroscopic techniques. Elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR, ESI-mass, UV-Visible, TG-DTA, magnetic measurements, molar conductance and powder-XRD data has been used to elucidate their structures. The bonding sites are the oxygen atom of amide carbonyl, azomethine nitrogen and phenolic oxygen for ligands 1 and 2. The binuclear nature of the complexes was confirmed by ESR spectral data. TG-DTA studies for some complexes showed the presence of coordinated water molecules and the final product is the metal oxide. All the complexes were investigated for their electrochemical activity, only the Cu(II) complexes showed the redox property. Cu(II) complexes were square planar, whereas Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes were octahedral. Powder-XRD pattern have been studied in order to test the degree of crystallinity of the complexes and unit cell calculations were made. In order to evaluate the effect of antimicrobial activity of metal ions upon chelation, both the ligands and their metal complexes were screened for their antibacterial and antifungal activities by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) method. The results showed that the metal complexes were found to be more active than free ligands. The DNA cleaving capacities of all the complexes were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis method against supercoiled plasmid DNA. Among the compounds tested for antioxidant capacity, ligand 1 displayed excellent activity than its metal complexes.

  2. A series of binuclear lanthanide(III) complexes: Crystallography, antimicrobial activity and thermochemistry properties studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying-Ying; Ren, Ning; Xu, Su-Ling; Zhang, Jian-Jun; Zhang, Da-Hai

    2015-02-01

    A series of novel lanthanide complexes with the general formula [Ln(3,4-DClBA)3phen]2 (Ln = Ho(1), Nd(2), Sm(3), Dy(4), Eu(5), Tb(6), Yb(7) and Er(8), 3,4-DClBA = 3,4-dichlorobenzoate, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) were prepared at room temperature and characterized. The crystal structures of complexes 1-8 have been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. These complexes are isomorphous and lanthanide ions are all eight-coordinated to oxygen atoms and nitrogen atoms with distorted square-antiprism geometry. The thermal decomposition mechanism and TG-FTIR spectra of gaseous products of thermal decomposition processes for complexes 1-8 were acquired through TG/DSC-FTIR system. The heat capacities of complexes 1-8 were measured using DSC technology and fitted to a polynomial equation by the least-squares method. Complexes 3-6 display characteristic lanthanide emission bands in the visible region. Meanwhile, these complexes exhibit in good antimicrobial activity against Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureu.

  3. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and antimicrobial activity of binuclear metal complexes of a new asymmetrical Schiff base ligand: DNA binding affinity of copper(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Shebl, Magdy

    2014-01-03

    The 1:1 condensation of o-acetoacetylphenol and 1,2-diaminopropane under condition of high dilution gives the mono-condensed Schiff base, (E)-3-(1-aminopropan-2-ylimino)-1-(2-hydroxyphenyl)butan-1-one. The mono-condensed Schiff base has been used for further condensation with isatin to obtain the new asymmetrical dicompartmental Schiff base ligand, (E)-3-(2-((E)-4-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-4-oxobutan-2-ylideneamino) propylimino)indolin-2-one (H3L) with a N2O3 donor set. Reactions of the ligand with metal salts give a series of new binuclear complexes. The ligand and its metal complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, IR, (1)H and (13)C NMR, electronic, ESR and mass spectra, conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements as well as thermal analyses. The analytical and spectroscopic tools showed that the complexes can be formulated as: [(HL)(VO)2(SO4)(H2O)]·4H2O, [(HL)Fe2Cl4(H2O)3]·EtOH, [(HL)Fe2(ox)Cl2(H2O)3]·2H2O, [(L)M2(OAc)(H2O)m]·nH2O; M=Co, Ni or Cu, m=4, 0 and n=2, 3, [(HL)Cu2Cl]Cl·6H2O and [(L)(UO2)2(OAc)(H2O)3]·6H2O. The metal complexes exhibited octahedral geometrical arrangements except copper complexes that exhibited tetrahedral geometries and uranyl complex in which the metal ion is octa-coordinated. The Schiff base and its metal complexes were evaluated for antimicrobial activity against Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus), Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) and fungi (Candida albicans and Aspergillus flavus). The ligand and some of its complexes were found to be biologically active. The DNA-binding properties of the copper complexes (6 and 7) have been investigated by electronic absorption, fluorescence and viscosity measurements. The results obtained indicate that these complexes bind to DNA via an intercalation binding mode with an intrinsic binding constant, Kb of 1.34×10(4) and 2.5×10(4) M(-1), respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Synthesis, characterization, biological evaluation and docking studies of macrocyclic binuclear manganese(II) complexes containing 3,5-dinitrobenzoyl pendant arms.

    PubMed

    Arthi, P; Shobana, S; Srinivasan, P; Mitu, L; Kalilur Rahiman, A

    2015-05-15

    A series of bis(phenoxo) bridged binuclear manganese(II) complexes of the type [Mn2L(1-3)](ClO4)2 (1-3) containing 3,5-dinitrobenzoyl pendant-arms have been synthesized by cyclocondensation of 2,6-diformyl-4-R-phenols (where R=CH3, C(CH3)3 or Br) with 2,2'-3,5-dinitrobenzoyliminodi(ethylamine) trihydrochloride in the presence of manganese(II) perchlorate. The IR spectra of complexes indicate the presence of uncoordinated perchlorate anions. The UV-Vis spectra of complexes suggest the distorted octahedral geometry around manganese(II) nuclei. The EPR spectra of Mn(II) complexes show a broad signal with g value 2.03-2.04, which is characteristic for octahedral high spin Mn(2+) complex. The observed room temperature magnetic moment values of the Mn(II) complexes (5.60-5.62B.M.) are less than the normal value (5.92B.M.), indicating weak antiferromagnetic coupling interaction between the two metal ions. Electrochemical studies of the complexes show two distinct quasi-reversible one electron transfer processes in the cathodic (E(1)pc=-0.73 to -0.76V, E(2)pc=-1.30 to -1.36V), and anodic (E(1)pa=1.02-1.11V, E(2)pa=1.32-1.79V) potential regions. Antibacterial efficacy of complexes have been screened against four Gram (-ve) and two Gram (+ve) bacterial strains. The DNA interaction studies suggest that these complexes bind with CT-DNA by intercalation, giving the binding affinity in the order 1>2>3. All the complexes display significant cleavage activity against circular plasmid pBR322 DNA. Docking simulation was performed to insert complexes into the crystal structure of EGFR tyrosine kinase and B-DNA at active site to determine the probable binding mode.

  5. Synthesis, characterization, biological evaluation and docking studies of macrocyclic binuclear manganese(II) complexes containing 3,5-dinitrobenzoyl pendant arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthi, P.; Shobana, S.; Srinivasan, P.; Mitu, L.; Kalilur Rahiman, A.

    2015-05-01

    A series of bis(phenoxo) bridged binuclear manganese(II) complexes of the type [Mn2L1-3](ClO4)2 (1-3) containing 3,5-dinitrobenzoyl pendant-arms have been synthesized by cyclocondensation of 2,6-diformyl-4-R-phenols (where R = sbnd CH3, sbnd C(CH3)3 or sbnd Br) with 2,2‧-3,5-dinitrobenzoyliminodi(ethylamine) trihydrochloride in the presence of manganese(II) perchlorate. The IR spectra of complexes indicate the presence of uncoordinated perchlorate anions. The UV-Vis spectra of complexes suggest the distorted octahedral geometry around manganese(II) nuclei. The EPR spectra of Mn(II) complexes show a broad signal with g value 2.03-2.04, which is characteristic for octahedral high spin Mn2+ complex. The observed room temperature magnetic moment values of the Mn(II) complexes (5.60-5.62 B.M.) are less than the normal value (5.92 B.M.), indicating weak antiferromagnetic coupling interaction between the two metal ions. Electrochemical studies of the complexes show two distinct quasi-reversible one electron transfer processes in the cathodic (E1pc = -0.73 to -0.76 V, E2pc = -1.30 to -1.36 V), and anodic (E1pa = 1.02-1.11 V, E2pa = 1.32-1.79 V) potential regions. Antibacterial efficacy of complexes have been screened against four Gram (-ve) and two Gram (+ve) bacterial strains. The DNA interaction studies suggest that these complexes bind with CT-DNA by intercalation, giving the binding affinity in the order 1 > 2 > 3. All the complexes display significant cleavage activity against circular plasmid pBR322 DNA. Docking simulation was performed to insert complexes into the crystal structure of EGFR tyrosine kinase and B-DNA at active site to determine the probable binding mode.

  6. Binuclear cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II) and palladium(II) complexes of a new Schiff-base as ligand: synthesis, structural characterization, and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Geeta, B; Shravankumar, K; Reddy, P Muralidhar; Ravikrishna, E; Sarangapani, M; Reddy, K Krishna; Ravinder, V

    2010-11-01

    A binucleating new Schiff-base ligand with a phenylene spacer, afforded by the condensation of glycyl-glycine and o-phthalaldehyde has been served as an octadentate N₄O₄ ligand in designing some binuclear complexes of cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), and palladium(II). The binding manner of the ligand to the metal and the composition and geometry of the metal complexes were examined by elemental analysis, conductivity measurements, magnetic moments, IR, ¹H, ¹³C NMR, ESR and electronic spectroscopies, and TGA measurements. There are two different coordination/chelation environments present around two metal centers of each binuclear complex. The composition of the complexes in the coordination sphere was found to be [M₂(L)(H(2)O)₄] (where M=Co(II) and Ni(II)) and [M₂(L)] (where M=Cu(II) and Pd(II)). In the case of Cu(II) complexes, ESR spectra provided further information to confirm the binuclear structure and the presence of magnetic interactions. All the above metal complexes have shown moderate to good antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  7. A binuclear complex constituted by diethyldithiocarbamate and copper(I) functions as a proteasome activity inhibitor in pancreatic cancer cultures and xenografts.

    PubMed

    Han, Jinbin; Liu, Luming; Yue, Xiaoqiang; Chang, Jinjia; Shi, Weidong; Hua, Yongqiang

    2013-12-15

    It is a therapeutic strategy for cancers including pancreatic to inhibit proteasome activity. Disulfiram (DSF) may bind copper (Cu) to form a DSF-Cu complex. DSF-Cu is capable of inducing apoptosis in cancer cells by inhibiting proteasome activity. DSF is rapidly converted to diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) within bodies. Copper(II) absorbed by bodies is reduced to copper(I) when it enters cells. We found that DDTC and copper(I) could form a binuclear complex which might be entitled DDTC-Cu(I), and it had been synthesized by us in the laboratory. This study is to investigate the anticancer potential of this complex on pancreatic cancer and the possible mechanism. Pancreatic cancer cell lines, SW1990, PANC-1 and BXPC-3 were used for in vitro assays. Female athymic nude mice grown SW1990 xenografts were used as animal models. Cell counting kit-8 (cck-8) assay and flow cytometry were used for analyzing apoptosis in cells. A 20S proteasome assay kit was used in proteasome activity analysis. Western blot (WB) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays were used in tumor sample analysis. The results suggest that DDTC-Cu(I) inhibit pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and proteasome activity in vitro and in vivo. Accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins, and increased p27 as well as decreased NF-κB expression were detected in tumor tissues of DDTC-Cu(I)-treated group. Our data indicates that DDTC-Cu(I) is an effective proteasome activity inhibitor with the potential to be explored as a drug for pancreatic cancer. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The influence of oxo-bridged binuclear gold(III) complexes on Na/K-ATPase activity: a joint experimental and theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Bondžić, Aleksandra M; Čolović, Mirjana B; Janjić, Goran V; Zarić, Božidarka; Petrović, Sandra; Krstić, Danijela Z; Marzo, Tiziano; Messori, Luigi; Vasić, Vesna M

    2017-08-01

    The in vitro effects of oxo-bridged binuclear gold(III) complexes, i.e., [(bipy2Me)2Au2(μ-O)2][PF6]2 (Auoxo6), Au2[(bipydmb-H)2(μ-O)][PF6] (Au2bipyC) and [Au2(phen(2Me))2(μ-O)2](PF6)2 (Au2phen) on Na/K-ATPase, purified from the porcine cerebral cortex, were investigated. All three studied gold complexes inhibited the enzyme activity in a concentration-dependent manner achieving IC50 values in the low micromolar range. Kinetic analysis suggested an uncompetitive mode of inhibition for Auoxo6 and Au2bipyC, and a mixed type one for Au2phen. Docking studies indicated that the inhibitory actions of all tested complexes are related to E2-P enzyme conformation binding to ion channel and intracellular part between N and P sub-domain. In addition, Au2phen was able to inhibit the enzyme by interacting with its extracellular part as well. Toxic effects of the gold(III) complexes were evaluated in vitro by following lactate dehydrogenase activity in rat brain synaptosomes and incidence of micronuclei and cytokinesis-block proliferation index in cultivated human lymphocytes. All investigated complexes turned out to induce cytogenetic damage consisting of a significant decrease in cell proliferation and an increase in micronuclei in a dose-dependent manner. On the other hand, lactate dehydrogenase activity, an indicator of membrane integrity/viability, was not affected by Auoxo6 and Au2bipyC, while Au2phen slightly modified its activity.

  9. Metadata Activities in Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Inigo, Gil San; HUTCHISON, VIVIAN; Frame, Mike; Palanisamy, Giri

    2010-01-01

    The National Biological Information Infrastructure program has advanced the biological sciences ability to standardize, share, integrate and synthesize data by making the metadata program a core of its activities. Through strategic partnerships, a series of crosswalks for the main biological metadata specifications have enabled data providers and international clearinghouses to aggregate and disseminate tens of thousands of metadata sets describing petabytes of data records. New efforts at the National Biological Information Infrastructure are focusing on better metadata creation and curation tools, semantic mediation for data discovery and other curious initiatives.

  10. Crystal Structure of Phosphatidylglycerophosphatase (PGPase), a Putative Membrane-Bound Lipid Phosphatase, Reveals a Novel Binuclear Metal Binding Site and Two Proton Wires

    SciTech Connect

    Kumaran,D.; Bonnano, J.; Burley, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphatidylglycerophosphatase (PGPase), an enzyme involved in lipid metabolism, catalyzes formation of phosphatidylglycerol from phosphatidylglycerophosphate. Phosphatidylglycerol is a multifunctional phospholipid, found in the biological membranes of many organisms. Here, we report the crystal structure of Listeria monocytogenes PGPase at 1.8 Angstroms resolution. PGPase, an all-helical molecule, forms a homotetramer. Each protomer contains an independent active site with two metal ions, Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+}, forming a hetero-binuclear center located in a hydrophilic cavity near the surface of the molecule. The binuclear center, conserved ligands, metal-bound water molecules, and an Asp-His dyad form the active site. The catalytic mechanism of this enzyme is likely to proceed via binuclear metal activated nucleophilic water. The binuclear metal-binding active-site environment of this structure should provide insights into substrate binding and metal-dependent catalysis. A long channel with inter-linked linear water chains, termed 'proton wires', is observed at the tetramer interface. Comparison of similar water chain structures in photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs), Cytochrome f, gramicidin, and bacteriorhodopsin, suggests that PGPase may conduct protons via proton wires.

  11. Synthesis, spectroscopic studies, molecular modeling and antimicrobial activity of binuclear Co(II) and Cu(II) complexes of 4,6-diacetylresorcinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebl, Magdy; Khalil, Saied M. E.; Taha, A.; Mahdi, M. A. N.

    2013-09-01

    Reactions of 4,6-diacetylresorcinol with different cobalt(II) and copper(II) salts viz., OAc-, Cl-, NO3- and SO42-, yielded a new series of binuclear metal complexes. Reactions of the ligand with these metal ions in the presence of a secondary ligand (L‧) [O,O-donor; acetylacetone, N,O-donor; 8-hydroxyquinoline or N,N-donor; 1,10-phenanthroline and N,N,N‧,N‧-tetramethylethylenediamine] in 1:2:2 (L:M:L‧) molar ratio yielded mixed-ligand complexes with different molar ratios. The metal complexes were characterized by elemental and thermal analyses, IR, electronic, ESR and mass spectra as well as conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The analytical and spectroscopic data suggested that the H2L ligand behaves as a neutral, monobasic or dibasic tetradentate ligand, depending on the type of the anion and secondary ligand used, through the two phenolic and two carbonyl groups. Electronic spectra, magnetic and conductivity measurements showed that all complexes are octahedral with non-electrolytic nature. The profile of ESR spectra of copper(II) complexes suggested the octahedral geometry and the spin Hamiltonian parameters of the complexes were calculated and discussed. Molecular orbital calculations were performed for metal complexes using Hyperchem 7.52 program on the bases of PM3 level and the results correlated with the experimental data. The free ligand and some of its metal complexes showed antimicrobial activity towards some of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeast (Candida albicans) and fungus (Aspergillus fumigatus).

  12. Synthesis, spectroscopic studies, molecular modeling and antimicrobial activity of binuclear Co(II) and Cu(II) complexes of 4,6-diacetylresorcinol.

    PubMed

    Shebl, Magdy; Khalil, Saied M E; Taha, A; Mahdi, M A N

    2013-09-01

    Reactions of 4,6-diacetylresorcinol with different cobalt(II) and copper(II) salts viz., OAc(-), Cl(-), NO3(-) and SO4(2-), yielded a new series of binuclear metal complexes. Reactions of the ligand with these metal ions in the presence of a secondary ligand (L') [O,O-donor; acetylacetone, N,O-donor; 8-hydroxyquinoline or N,N-donor; 1,10-phenanthroline and N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine] in 1:2:2 (L:M:L') molar ratio yielded mixed-ligand complexes with different molar ratios. The metal complexes were characterized by elemental and thermal analyses, IR, electronic, ESR and mass spectra as well as conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The analytical and spectroscopic data suggested that the H2L ligand behaves as a neutral, monobasic or dibasic tetradentate ligand, depending on the type of the anion and secondary ligand used, through the two phenolic and two carbonyl groups. Electronic spectra, magnetic and conductivity measurements showed that all complexes are octahedral with non-electrolytic nature. The profile of ESR spectra of copper(II) complexes suggested the octahedral geometry and the spin Hamiltonian parameters of the complexes were calculated and discussed. Molecular orbital calculations were performed for metal complexes using Hyperchem 7.52 program on the bases of PM3 level and the results correlated with the experimental data. The free ligand and some of its metal complexes showed antimicrobial activity towards some of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeast (Candida albicans) and fungus (Aspergillus fumigatus).

  13. A binuclear complex constituted by diethyldithiocarbamate and copper(I) functions as a proteasome activity inhibitor in pancreatic cancer cultures and xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jinbin; Yue, Xiaoqiang; Chang, Jinjia; Shi, Weidong; Hua, Yongqiang

    2013-12-15

    It is a therapeutic strategy for cancers including pancreatic to inhibit proteasome activity. Disulfiram (DSF) may bind copper (Cu) to form a DSF–Cu complex. DSF–Cu is capable of inducing apoptosis in cancer cells by inhibiting proteasome activity. DSF is rapidly converted to diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) within bodies. Copper(II) absorbed by bodies is reduced to copper(I) when it enters cells. We found that DDTC and copper(I) could form a binuclear complex which might be entitled DDTC–Cu(I), and it had been synthesized by us in the laboratory. This study is to investigate the anticancer potential of this complex on pancreatic cancer and the possible mechanism. Pancreatic cancer cell lines, SW1990, PANC-1 and BXPC-3 were used for in vitro assays. Female athymic nude mice grown SW1990 xenografts were used as animal models. Cell counting kit-8 (cck-8) assay and flow cytometry were used for analyzing apoptosis in cells. A 20S proteasome assay kit was used in proteasome activity analysis. Western blot (WB) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays were used in tumor sample analysis. The results suggest that DDTC–Cu(I) inhibit pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and proteasome activity in vitro and in vivo. Accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins, and increased p27 as well as decreased NF-κB expression were detected in tumor tissues of DDTC–Cu(I)-treated group. Our data indicates that DDTC–Cu(I) is an effective proteasome activity inhibitor with the potential to be explored as a drug for pancreatic cancer. - Highlights: • A new structure of DDTC–Cu(I) was reported for the first time. • DDTC–Cu(I) dissolved directly in water was for in vitro and in vivo uses. • DDTC–Cu(I) demonstrated significant anticancer effect in vitro and in vivo. • DDTC–Cu(I) is capable of inhibiting proteasome activity in vitro and in vivo.

  14. Antitumor activity of phenylene bridged binuclear bis(imino-quinolyl)palladium(II) and platinum(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Motswainyana, William M; Onani, Martin O; Madiehe, Abram M; Saibu, Morounke

    2014-04-01

    Antitumor effects of a known bis(imino-quinolyl)palladium(II) complex 1 and its newly synthesized platinum(II) analogue 2 were evaluated against human breast (MCF-7) and human colon (HT-29) cancer cell lines. The complexes gave cytotoxicity profiles that were better than the reference drug cisplatin. The highest cytotoxic activities were pronounced in complex 2 across the two examined cancer cell lines. Both compounds represent potential active drugs based on bimetallic complexes.

  15. Spectroscopic Definition of the Ferroxidase Site in M Ferritin: Comparison of Binuclear Substrate vs. Cofactor Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Jennifer K.; Liu, Xiaofeng S.; Tosha, Takehiko; Theil, Elizabeth C.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2008-01-01

    Maxi ferritins, 24 subunit protein nanocages, are essential in humans, plants, bacteria, and other animals for the concentration and storage of iron as hydrated ferric oxide, while minimizing free radical generation or use by pathogens. Formation of the precursors to these ferric oxides is catalyzed at a non-heme biferrous substrate site, which has some parallels with the cofactor sites in other biferrous enzymes. A combination of circular dichroism (CD), magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), and variable-temperature, variable-field MCD (VTVH MCD) has been used to probe Fe(II) binding to the substrate active site in frog M ferritin. These data determined that the active site within each subunit consists of two inequivalent five-coordinate (5C) ferrous centers that are weakly anti-ferromagnetically coupled, consistent with a μ-1,3 carboxylate bridge. The active site ligand set is unusual and likely includes a terminal water bound to each Fe(II) center. The Fe(II) ions bind to the active sites in a concerted manner, and cooperativity among the sites in each subunit is observed, potentially providing a mechanism for the control of ferritin iron loading. Differences in geometric and electronic structure – including a weak ligand field, availability of two water ligands at the biferrous substrate site, and the single carboxylate bridge in ferritin – coincide with the divergent reaction pathways observed between this substrate site and the previously studied cofactor active sites. PMID:18576633

  16. Spectroscopic definition of the ferroxidase site in M ferritin: comparison of binuclear substrate vs cofactor active sites.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Jennifer K; Liu, Xiaofeng S; Tosha, Takehiko; Theil, Elizabeth C; Solomon, Edward I

    2008-07-23

    Maxi ferritins, 24 subunit protein nanocages, are essential in humans, plants, bacteria, and other animals for the concentration and storage of iron as hydrated ferric oxide, while minimizing free radical generation or use by pathogens. Formation of the precursors to these ferric oxides is catalyzed at a nonheme biferrous substrate site, which has some parallels with the cofactor sites in other biferrous enzymes. A combination of circular dichroism (CD), magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), and variable-temperature, variable-field MCD (VTVH MCD) has been used to probe Fe(II) binding to the substrate active site in frog M ferritin. These data determined that the active site within each subunit consists of two inequivalent five-coordinate (5C) ferrous centers that are weakly antiferromagnetically coupled, consistent with a mu-1,3 carboxylate bridge. The active site ligand set is unusual and likely includes a terminal water bound to each Fe(II) center. The Fe(II) ions bind to the active sites in a concerted manner, and cooperativity among the sites in each subunit is observed, potentially providing a mechanism for the control of ferritin iron loading. Differences in geometric and electronic structure--including a weak ligand field, availability of two water ligands at the biferrous substrate site, and the single carboxylate bridge in ferritin--coincide with the divergent reaction pathways observed between this substrate site and the previously studied cofactor active sites.

  17. Protonation of the binuclear active site in cytochrome c oxidase decreases the reduction potential of CuB.

    PubMed

    Blomberg, Margareta R A; Siegbahn, Per E M

    2015-10-01

    One of the remaining mysteries regarding the respiratory enzyme cytochrome c oxidase is how proton pumping can occur in all reduction steps in spite of the low reduction potentials observed in equilibrium titration experiments for two of the active site cofactors, CuB(II) and Fea3(III). It has been speculated that, at least the copper cofactor can acquire two different states, one metastable activated state occurring during enzyme turnover, and one relaxed state with lower energy, reached only when the supply of electrons stops. The activated state should have a transiently increased CuB(II) reduction potential, allowing proton pumping. The relaxed state should have a lower reduction potential, as measured in the titration experiments. However, the structures of these two states are not known. Quantum mechanical calculations show that the proton coupled reduction potential for CuB is inherently high in the active site as it appears after reaction with oxygen, which explains the observed proton pumping. It is suggested here that, when the flow of electrons ceases, a relaxed resting state is formed by the uptake of one extra proton, on top of the charge compensating protons delivered in each reduction step. The extra proton in the active site decreases the proton coupled reduction potential for CuB by almost half a volt, leading to agreement with titration experiments. Furthermore, the structure for the resting state with an extra proton is found to have a hydroxo-bridge between CuB(II) and Fea3(III), yielding a magnetic coupling that can explain the experimentally observed EPR silence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. [Biological activity of Spirulina].

    PubMed

    Blinkova, L P; Gorobets, O B; Baturo, A P

    2001-01-01

    In this review information of Spirulina platensis (SP), a blue-green alga (photosynthesizing cyanobacterium) having diverse biological activity is presented. Due to high content of highly valuable proteins, indispensable amino acids, vitamins, beta-carotene and other pigments, mineral substances, indispensable fatty acids and polysaccharides, PS has been found suitable for use as bioactive additive. SP produces an immunostimulating effect by enhancing the resistance of humans, mammals, chickens and fish to infections, the capacity of influencing hemopoiesis, stimulating the production of antibodies and cytokines. Under the influence of SP macrophages, T and B cells are activated. SP sulfolipids have proved to be effective against HIV. Preparations obtained from SP biomass have also been found active against herpesvirus, cytomegalovirus, influenza virus, etc. SP extracts are capable in inhibiting cancerogenesis. SP preparations are regarded as functional products contributing to the preservation of the resident intestinal microflora, especially lactic acid bacilli and bifidobacteria, and to a decrease in the level of Candida albicans. The biological activity of SP with respect to microorganisms holds good promise for using these microalgae as components of culture media.

  19. Paramagnetic resonance and visible spectroscopic properties of binuclear Cu-Cu and Cu-Zn imidazolate-bridged complexes: effective model for active site of superoxide dismutase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, R. N.; Kumar, Subodh; Pandeya, K. B.

    2000-12-01

    Syntheses of the imidazolate-bridged heterometallic binuclear copper-zinc complex [(glyala)Cu-im-Zn(glyala)]Na,where H 2glyala=glycylalanine, and im=imidazolate ion, has been achieved. X-band e.p.r and visible absorption spectra of the complex [(glyala)Cu-im-Zn(glyala)]Na at different pH values in frozen solution (50% aqueous DMSO, 77K) show that the imidazolate-bridged complex is stable in the pH range 7.15-10.50.

  20. Active Biological Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Daniel A.; Geissler, Phillip L.

    2009-05-01

    Cells make use of dynamic internal structures to control shape and create movement. By consuming energy to assemble into highly organized systems of interacting parts, these structures can generate force and resist compression, as well as adaptively change in response to their environment. Recent progress in reconstituting cytoskeletal structures in vitro has provided an opportunity to characterize the mechanics and dynamics of filament networks formed from purified proteins. Results indicate that a complex interplay between length scales and timescales underlies the mechanical responses of these systems and that energy consumption, as manifested in molecular motor activity and cytoskeletal filament growth, can drive transitions between distinct material states. This review discusses the basic characteristics of these active biological materials that set them apart from conventional materials and that create a rich array of unique behaviors.

  1. A purple acid phosphatase from sweet potato contains an antiferromagnetically coupled binuclear Fe-Mn center.

    PubMed

    Schenk, G; Boutchard, C L; Carrington, L E; Noble, C J; Moubaraki, B; Murray, K S; de Jersey, J; Hanson, G R; Hamilton, S

    2001-06-01

    A purple acid phosphatase from sweet potato is the first reported example of a protein containing an enzymatically active binuclear Fe-Mn center. Multifield saturation magnetization data over a temperature range of 2 to 200 K indicates that this center is strongly antiferromagnetically coupled. Metal ion analysis shows an excess of iron over manganese. Low temperature EPR spectra reveal only resonances characteristic of high spin Fe(III) centers (Fe(III)-apo and Fe(III)-Zn(II)) and adventitious Cu(II) centers. There were no resonances from either Mn(II) or binuclear Fe-Mn centers. Together with a comparison of spectral properties and sequence homologies between known purple acid phosphatases, the enzymatic and spectroscopic data strongly indicate the presence of catalytic Fe(III)-Mn(II) centers in the active site of the sweet potato enzyme. Because of the strong antiferromagnetism it is likely that the metal ions in the sweet potato enzyme are linked via a mu-oxo bridge, in contrast to other known purple acid phosphatases in which a mu-hydroxo bridge is present. Differences in metal ion composition and bridging may affect substrate specificities leading to the biological function of different purple acid phosphatases.

  2. Binuclear metallohydrolases: complex mechanistic strategies for a simple chemical reaction.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Gerhard; Mitić, Nataša; Gahan, Lawrence R; Ollis, David L; McGeary, Ross P; Guddat, Luke W

    2012-09-18

    Binuclear metallohydrolases are a large family of enzymes that require two closely spaced transition metal ions to carry out a plethora of hydrolytic reactions. Representatives include purple acid phosphatases (PAPs), enzymes that play a role in bone metabolism and are the only member of this family with a heterovalent binuclear center in the active form (Fe(3+)-M(2+), M = Fe, Zn, Mn). Other members of this family are urease, which contains a di-Ni(2+) center and catalyzes the breakdown of urea, arginase, which contains a di-Mn(2+) center and catalyzes the final step in the urea cycle, and the metallo-β-lactamases, which contain a di-Zn(2+) center and are virulence factors contributing to the spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens. Binuclear metallohydrolases catalyze numerous vital reactions and are potential targets of drugs against a wide variety of human disorders including osteoporosis, various cancers, antibiotic resistance, and erectile dysfunctions. These enzymes also tend to catalyze more than one reaction. An example is an organophosphate (OP)-degrading enzyme from Enterobacter aerogenes (GpdQ). Although GpdQ is part of a pathway that is used by bacteria to degrade glycerolphosphoesters, it hydrolyzes a variety of other phosphodiesters and displays low levels of activity against phosphomono- and triesters. Such a promiscuous nature may have assisted the apparent recent evolution of some binuclear metallohydrolases to deal with situations created by human intervention such as OP pesticides in the environment. OP pesticides were first used approximately 70 years ago, and therefore the enzymes that bacteria use to degrade them must have evolved very quickly on the evolutionary time scale. The promiscuous nature of enzymes such as GpdQ makes them ideal candidates for the application of directed evolution to produce new enzymes that can be used in bioremediation and against chemical warfare. In this Account, we review the mechanisms employed by binuclear

  3. Binuclear copper(II), cobalt(II) and nickel(II) complexes of N1-ethyl-N2-(pyridin-2-yl) hydrazine-1,2-bis(carbothioamide): structural, spectral, pH-metric and biological studies.

    PubMed

    El-Gammal, O A; Abu El-Reash, G M; El-Gamil, M M

    2012-10-01

    Binuclear Cu(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) complexes derived from N(1)-ethyl-N(2)-(pyridin-2-yl) hydrazine-1,2-bis(carbothioamide) (H(2)PET) have been prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, spectral (IR, UV-vis, EI mass, ESR and (1)HNMR) and magnetic measurements. The isolated complexes assigned the general formula, [M(HPET)(H(2)O)(n)Cl](2)·xH(2)O where M=Cu(II), Co(II) and Ni(II), n=2, 1, 0 and x=0, 0.5 and 0, respectively. IR data revealed that the ligand behaves as monobasic tridentate through (CN)(py), (C-S) and new azomethine, (NC)(∗) groups in the Co(II) complex but in Cu(II) complex, the ligand coordinate via both (CS) groups, one of them in thiol form as well as the new azomethine group. In Ni(II) complex, H(2)PET acts as NSNS monobasic tetradente via (CN)(py), (C-S), (CS) and the new azomethine, (NC)(∗) groups. An octahedral geometry is proposed for all complexes. pH- metric titration was carried out in 50% dioxane-water mixture at 298, 308 and 318 °K, respectively and the dissociation constant of the ligand as well as the stability constants of its complexes were evaluated. Also the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for the different thermal decomposition steps of the complexes were determined by Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger methods. Moreover, the anti-oxidant, anti-hemolytic, and cytotoxic activities of the compounds have been tested.

  4. Preparation and spectroscopic characterization of a coupled binuclear center in cobalt(II)-substituted hemocyanin.

    PubMed

    Bubacco, L; Magliozzo, R S; Beltramini, M; Salvato, B; Peisach, J

    1992-09-29

    A binuclear cobalt derivative of arthropod hemocyanin (Hc) has been prepared by the reaction of apo-Hc with Co(II) in the presence of thiocyanate. The crude product of the reaction contains specifically and adventitiously bound metal, the latter being removable by EDTA treatment. The specifically bound Co(II) constitutes a binuclear metal center that exhibits optical and CD spectra typical in their absorption maxima and extinction coefficients of Co(II) complexes with near-tetrahedral geometry. The EPR spectrum of the binuclear Co(II) derivative contains a resonance at g approximately 13, which is characteristic of integer spin systems and indicates coupled metal ions; the excess Co(II) bound to crude products exhibits an EPR signal at g approximately 4. The time course of derivative formation was followed by EPR, optical and atomic absorption techniques, and by fluorimetry. The intensity of the optical absorption in the visible region due to Co(II) increases with increasing stoichiometry of specifically bound metal [up to 2 Co(II) per protein monomer], but the intensity of the Co(II) EPR signal increases only during the formation of a mononuclear derivative. As the reaction proceeds over approximately 100 h to the formation of the binuclear derivative, the EPR signal intensity decreases to 10% of the value expected for 2 mol of EPR-active Co(II)/mol of protein. The binuclear cobalt derivative cannot be reconstituted to native Hc with Cu(I), indicating the stable loading of Co(II) in the active site. EPR and optical spectroscopic evidence is presented showing that the binuclear derivative does not bind oxygen.

  5. Click conjugation of a binuclear terbium(III) complex for real-time detection of tyrosine phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Akiba, Hiroki; Sumaoka, Jun; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Komiyama, Makoto

    2015-04-07

    Phosphorylation of proteins is closely associated with various diseases, and, therefore, its detection is vitally important in molecular biology and drug discovery. Previously, we developed a binuclear Tb(III) complex, which emits notable luminescence only in the presence of phosphotyrosine. In this study, we conjugated a newly synthesized binuclear Tb(III) complex to substrate peptides by using click chemistry. Using these conjugates, we were able to detect tyrosine phosphorylation in real time. These conjugates were superior to nonconjugated Tb(III) complexes for the detection of tyrosine phosphorylation, especially when the substrate peptides used were positively charged. Luminescence intensity upon phosphorylation was enhanced 10-fold, making the luminescence intensity of this system one of the largest among lanthanide luminescence-based systems. We also determined Michaelis-Menten parameters for the phosphorylation of various kinase/peptide combinations and quantitatively analyzed the effects of mutations in the peptide substrates. Furthermore, we successfully monitored the inhibition of enzymatic phosphorylation by inhibitors in real time. Advantageously, this system detects only the phosphorylation of tyrosine (phosphorylated serine and threonine are virtually silent) and is applicable to versatile peptide substrates. Our study thus demonstrates the applicability of this system for the analysis of kinase activity, which could lead to drug discovery.

  6. Solar Energy Project, Activities: Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tullock, Bruce, Ed.; And Others

    This guide contains lesson plans and outlines of science activities which present concepts of solar energy in the context of biology experiments. Each unit presents an introduction; objectives; skills and knowledge needed; materials; methods; questions; recommendations for further work; and a teacher information sheet. The teacher information…

  7. Biological activity of ionene polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.

    1973-01-01

    Ionene polymers are polyammonium salts with positive nitrogens in the backbone, resulting from the polycondensation of diamines with dihalides or from the polycondensation of halo amines. The mechanism of formation of ionene polymers of different structures and their biological activity is reviewed. The antimicrobial and antifungal properties are compared with low molecular weight ammonium salts. Ionenes were found to combine with DNA by means of ionic bonds to yield similar complexes to those obtained with polyamines (spermine and spermidine). They also combine with nerve cell receptors and exercise a more powerful and longer duration ganglionic blocking action than their monomeric analogs. The antiheparin activity of ionenes and the thromboresistance of elastomeric ionene heparin coatings is described. The enhanced biological activity of ionenes as compared with low molecular weight compounds is attributed to a cooperative effect of a large number of positive charges on the polymeric chains.

  8. Biological activity of ionene polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.

    1973-01-01

    Ionene polymers are polyammonium salts with positive nitrogens in the backbone, resulting from the polycondensation of diamines with dihalides or from the polycondensation of halo amines. The mechanism of formation of ionene polymers of different structures and their biological activity is reviewed. The antimicrobial and antifungal properties are compared with low molecular weight ammonium salts. Ionenes were found to combine with DNA by means of ionic bonds to yield similar complexes to those obtained with polyamines (spermine and spermidine). They also combine with nerve cell receptors and exercise a more powerful and longer duration ganglionic blocking action than their monomeric analogs. The antiheparin activity of ionenes and the thromboresistance of elastomeric ionene heparin coatings is described. The enhanced biological activity of ionenes as compared with low molecular weight compounds is attributed to a cooperative effect of a large number of positive charges on the polymeric chains.

  9. Diverse biological activities of dandelion.

    PubMed

    González-Castejón, Marta; Visioli, Francesco; Rodriguez-Casado, Arantxa

    2012-09-01

    Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale Weber) is a member of the Asteraceae (Compositae) family, native to Europe but widely distributed in the warmer temperate zones of the Northern Hemisphere. Dandelion and its parts are habitually consumed as plant foods in several areas of the world, where they are also employed in phytotherapy. Indeed, dandelion contains a wide array of phytochemicals whose biological activities are actively being explored in various areas of human health. In particular, emerging evidence suggests that dandelion and its constituents have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities that result in diverse biological effects. The present review provides a comprehensive analysis of the constituents of dandelion, an assessment of the pharmacological properties of dandelion, and a description of relevant studies that support the use of dandelion as a medicinal plant.

  10. Comparative study on the anticancer activities and binding properties of a hetero metal binuclear complex [Co(dipic)2Ni(OH2)5]·2H2O (dipic=dipicolinate) with two carrier proteins.

    PubMed

    Shahraki, Somaye; Shiri, Fereshteh; Majd, Mostafa Heidari; Razmara, Zohreh

    2017-10-25

    Recognizing of binding mechanisms between drugs and carrier proteins is basic for us to understand the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of them. In this research, the anticancer activities of a binuclear complex [Co(dipic)2Ni(OH2)5]·2H2O (dipic=dipicolinate) against MDA-MB-231 cell lines were studied. Results of MTT assay and flow cytometry analysis revealed that above complex can induce the cytotoxicity and the apoptosis in breast cancer cell lines. So, this complex was selected to investigate its binding to human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine β-lactoglobulin (βLG) by spectroscopic methods (UV-visible, fluorescence and FT-IR) along with molecular docking technique. The fluorescence data showed Co-Ni complex quench the fluorescence of both proteins by a static quenching mechanism and HSA has stronger binding affinity toward Co-Ni complex than βLG. The binding constant (Kb), number of binding sites (n) and thermodynamic parameters were calculated and showed that the Co-Ni complex binds to protein (HSA and βLG) through hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces with one binding site. The results of UV-visible measurements indicated that the binding of above complex to HSA and βLG may induce conformational and micro-environmental changes of studied proteins. Protein-ligand docking analysis confirmed that the Co-Ni complex binds to residues located in the subdomain IIA of HSA and site II of βLG. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Voltammetric determination of ruthenium in the form of complexes with biologically active ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Medyantseva, E.P.; Budnikov, G.K.; Balakaeva, T.A.

    1992-02-10

    The interest in the analytical chemistry of ruthenium and its compounds has recently been increasing. Ruthenium compounds can be used an antitumor agents and in the treatment of tuberculosis and fungal infections. It has been suggested that there is a specific relationship between the reduction potentials of the compounds and their biological activity. Of greatest interest among the biologically active compounds are the compounds with nitrogen-containing heterocycles. In order to obtain information on the degree of oxidation of the central atom in the complexes and to select the optimum conditions for the determination of the mono- and bi-nuclear complexes of ruthenium compounds with biologically active ligands such as imidazole (Im), histidine (His), benzimidazole (BIm) and its methyl derivative [1,2(CH{sub 3}){sub 2} - BIm], benzohyroxamic acid (Bha), and 1-phenyl-2-methylamino-1-propanol or ephedrine (Eph) in the present work, the authors studied their electrochemical behavior at dropping mercury (dme) and a platinum electrodes. 6 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  12. Molybdenum: biological activity and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mendel, Ralf R

    2005-11-07

    Molybdenum and tungsten are available to all organisms, with molybdenum having the far greater abundance and availability. Molybdenum occurs in a wide range of metalloenzymes in bacteria, fungi, algae, plants and animals, while tungsten was found to be essential only for a limited range of bacteria. In order to gain biological activity, molybdenum has to be complexed by a pterin compound, thus forming a molybdenum cofactor. In this article I will review the way that molybdenum takes from uptake into the cell, via formation of the molybdenum cofactor and its storage, to the final modification of molybdenum cofactor and its insertion into apo-metalloenzymes.

  13. Molecular characteristics versus biological activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Applegate, Vernon C.; Smith, Manning A.; Willeford, Bennett R.

    1967-01-01

    The molecular characteristics of mononitrophenols containing halogens not only play a key role in their biological activity but provide a novel example of selective toxicity among vertebrate animals. It has been reported that efforts to control the parasitic sea lamprey in the Great Lakes are directed at present to the applications of a selective toxicant to streams inhabited by lamprey larvae. Since 1961, the larvicide that has been used almost exclusively in the control program has been 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM). However, this is only one of about 15 closely related compounds, all halogen-containing mononitrophenols, that display a selectively toxic action upon lampreys. Although not all of the halogenated mononitrophenols are selectively toxic to lampreys (in fact, fewer than half of those tested), no other group of related compounds has displayed any useful larvicidal activity except for the substituted nitrosalicylanilides.

  14. A case of gastric adenocarcinoma with conspicuous binuclear cytologic features.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hideaki; Furuya, Chiemi; Yamanouchi, Tsuyoshi; Ikemoto, Kenzo; Katoh, Tomoe; Onoda, Masahiko; Kondo, Tomoko; Oga, Atsunori

    2013-01-01

    Binuclear cells have been occasionally observed in nonneoplastic and carcinoma cells. However, in clinical cases, few reports have analyzed and discussed the origins and features, including the proliferative capacity, of binuclear cells. We describe the case of a 75-year-old man with gastric cancer with microscopically prominent binuclear cells in the resected tissue and ascitic fluid. Image cytometry and chromosomal analysis were performed on cells isolated from the ascitic fluid. The DNA histogram pattern showed aneuploidy and the fluorescence in situ hybridization pattern of centromeres 7 and 11 was similar to that of most other mononuclear cancer cells. Furthermore, the binuclear cells showed low proliferative capability based on 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation. Our results demonstrated that the binuclear cells were derived from mononuclear aneuploid cells through incomplete cell division, and, in this case, may have impaired proliferative capacity.

  15. Biological activation of carbon filters.

    PubMed

    Seredyńska-Sobecka, Bozena; Tomaszewska, Maria; Janus, Magdalena; Morawski, Antoni W

    2006-01-01

    To prepare biological activated carbon (BAC), raw surface water was circulated through granular activated carbon (GAC) beds. Biological activity of carbon filters was initiated after about 6 months of filter operation and was confirmed by two methods: measurement of the amount of biomass attached to the carbon and by the fluorescein diacetate (FDA) test. The effect of carbon pre-washing on WG-12 carbon properties was also studied. For this purpose, the nitrogen adsorption isotherms at 77K and Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectra analyses were performed. Moreover, iodine number, decolorizing power and adsorption properties of carbon in relation to phenol were studied. Analysis of the results revealed that after WG-12 carbon pre-washing its BET surface increased a little, the pH value of the carbon water extract decreased from 11.0 to 9.4, decolorizing power remained at the same level, and the iodine number and phenol adsorption rate increased. In preliminary studies of the ozonation-biofiltration process, a model phenol solution with concentration of approximately 10mg/l was applied. During the ozonation process a dose of 1.64 mg O(3)/mg TOC (total organic carbon) was employed and the contact time was 5 min. Four empty bed contact times (EBCTs) in the range of 2.4-24.0 min were used in the biofiltration experiment. The effectiveness of purification was measured by the following parameters: chemical oxygen demand (COD(Mn)), TOC, phenol concentration and UV(254)-absorbance. The parameters were found to decrease with EBCT.

  16. In vitro effects of binuclear (η (6)-p-cymene)ruthenium(II) complex containing bridging bis(nicotinate)-polyethylene glycol ester ligand on differentiation pathways of murine Th lymphocytes activated by T cell mitogen.

    PubMed

    Momcilovic, Miljana; Eichhorn, Thomas; Blazevski, Jana; Schmidt, Harry; Kaluđerović, Goran N; Stosic-Grujicic, Stanislava

    2015-04-01

    T cell differentiation into distinct T helper (Th) subpopulations is crucial in governing acquired immune responses as well as some inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. This study investigated potential of the novel neutral binuclear ruthenium(II) complexes 1-8 with general formula [{RuCl2(η(6)-p-cym)}2μ-(N(∩)N)] (N(∩)N = bis(nicotinate)- and bis(iso-nicotinate)-polyethylene glycol esters; (3-py)COO(CH2CH2O) n CO(3-py) and (4-py)COO(CH2CH2O) n CO(4-py); n = 1-4), as well as [RuCl2(η(6)-p-cym)(nic)] (R1, nic = nicotinate) and [RuCl2(η(6)-p-cym)(inic)] (R2, inic = isonicotinate) as an immunomodulatory agents capable to direct Th cell differentiation. From all investigated complexes, [{RuCl2(η(6)-p-cym)}2μ-{(3-py)COO(CH2CH2O)4CO(3-py)}] (4) was selected for further study because it did not affect splenocyte viability (in concentration up to 50 μM), but significantly reduced secretion of representative Th1 cytokine, IFN-γ induced by T cell mitogen. Besides IFN-γ, 4 inhibited dose dependently expression and production of representative Th17 cytokine, IL-17, in these cells. Otherwise, the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 was upregulated. Also, 4 significantly increased CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) Treg cell frequency in the activated splenocytes. Moreover, ConA-induced expression of Th1 transcription factors, T-bet and STAT1, as well as of Th17-related protein STAT3 was attenuated upon exposure to 4, while the expression of Th2-related transcription factor GATA3 remained stable. In conclusion, ruthenium(II) complex 4 modulates immune system cell functions in vitro by inhibiting T cell differentiation towards pathogenic Th1/Th17 phenotype and inducing a regulatory phenotype characterized by IL-10 and IL-4 production, which may provide novel therapeutic opportunities for immune-inflammatory and/or autoimmune disorders.

  17. Ion-exchanged binuclear Ca2OX clusters, X = 1-4, as active sites of selective oxidation over MOR and FAU zeolites.

    PubMed

    Larin, A V; Zhidomirov, G M; Trubnikov, D N; Vercauteren, D P

    2010-01-30

    A new series of calcium oxide clusters Ca(2)O(X) (X = 1-4) at cationic positions of mordenite (MOR) and faujasite (FAU) is studied via the isolated cluster approach. Active oxide framework fragments are represented via 8-membered window (8R) in MOR, and two 6R and 4R windows (6R+4R) possessing one common Si-O-Si moiety in FAU. Structural similarities between the Ca(2)O(X)(8R) and Ca(2)O(X)(6R+4R) moieties are considered up to X = 4. High oxidation possibilities of the Ca(2)O(2)(nR) and Ca(2)O(3)(nR) systems are demonstrated relative to CO, whose oxidation over the Ca-exchanged zeolite forms is well studied experimentally. Relevance of the oxide cluster models with respect to trapping and desorption of singlet dioxygen is discussed. Copyright 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Iridium Cyclooctene Complex That Forms a Hyperpolarization Transfer Catalyst before Converting to a Binuclear C–H Bond Activation Product Responsible for Hydrogen Isotope Exchange

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    [IrCl(COE)2]2 (1) reacts with pyridine (py) and H2 to form crystallographically characterized IrCl(H)2(COE)(py)2 (2). 2 undergoes py loss to form 16-electron IrCl(H)2(COE)(py) (3), with equivalent hydride ligands. When this reaction is studied with parahydrogen, 1 efficiently achieves hyperpolarization of free py (and nicotinamide, nicotine, 5-aminopyrimidine, and 3,5-lutudine) via signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) and hence reflects a simple and readily available precatayst for this process. 2 reacts further over 48 h at 298 K to form crystallographically characterized (Cl)(H)(py)(μ-Cl)(μ-H)(κ-μ-NC5H4)Ir(H)(py)2 (4). This dimer is active in the hydrogen isotope exchange process that is used in radiopharmaceutical preparations. Furthermore, while [Ir(H)2(COE)(py)3]PF6 (6) forms upon the addition of AgPF6 to 2, its stability precludes its efficient involvement in SABRE. PMID:27934314

  19. Strigolactones: structures and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, Koichi; Xie, Xiaonan; Yoneyama, Kaori; Takeuchi, Yasutomo

    2009-05-01

    Strigolactones released from plant roots induce seed germination of root parasitic weeds, witchweeds (Striga spp.) and broomrapes (Orobanche spp.), and hyphal branching of symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. In addition to these functions in the rhizosphere, strigolactones have recently been shown to be a novel class of plant hormones regulating shoot outgrowth. The natural strigolactones identified so far have the common C-D ring moiety, which is thought to be the essential structure for exhibiting biological activity. The introduction of substitutions on the A-B ring moiety of 5-deoxystrigol, the basic strigolactone, affords various strigolactones, e.g. hydroxylation on C-4, C-5 and C-9 leads to orobanchol, strigol and sorgomol respectively. Then, acetylation and probably other derivatisations of these hydroxy-strigolactones would occur. Although the C-2'-(R) stereochemistry was thought to be an important structural feature for potent germination stimulation activity, 2'-epi-strigolactones were found in root exudates of tobacco, rice, pea and other plant species, indicating that at least some plants produce both epimers.

  20. Biological Activity of Masked Endotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Harald; Gornicec, Jan; Neuper, Theresa; Parigiani, Maria Alejandra; Wallner, Michael; Duschl, Albert; Horejs-Hoeck, Jutta

    2017-01-01

    Low endotoxin recovery (LER) is a recently discovered phenomenon describing the inability of limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL)-based assays to detect lipopolysaccharide (LPS) because of a “masking effect” caused by chelators or detergents commonly used in buffer formulations for medical products and recombinant proteins. This study investigates the masking capacities of different buffer formulations and whether masked endotoxin is biologically active. We show that both naturally occurring endotoxin as well as control standard endotoxin can be affected by LER. Furthermore, whereas masked endotoxin cannot be detected in Factor C based assays, it is still detectable in a cell-based TLR4-NF-κB-luciferase reporter gene assay. Moreover, in primary human monocytes, masked LPS induces the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and surface activation markers even at very low concentrations. We therefore conclude that masked LPS is a potent trigger of immune responses, which emphasizes the potential danger of masked LPS, as it may pose a health threat in pharmaceutical products or compromise experimental results. PMID:28317862

  1. Synthesis, spectral characterization, molecular modeling and antimicrobial activity studies on 2-aminopyridine-cyclodiphosph(V)azane derivative and its homo-binuclear zinc(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaghaz, Abdel-Nasser M. A.

    2014-06-01

    Complexes of zinc(II) of general composition [Zn2(L)X2(H2O)4]nH2O have been synthesized [L = 1,3-dipyridyl-2,4-dioxo-2‧,4‧-bis(2-iminopyridine)cyclodi-phosph(V)azane and X = NO3-; n = 2, OAc-; n = 1, SO42-; n = 2 and Cl-; n = 2]. The elemental analysis, molar conductance measurements, mass, IR, UV, NMR (1H and 31P), TGA, DTA, SEM and XRD spectral studies of the compounds led to the conclusion that the cyclodiphosph(V)azane ligand (H2L) acts as a bidentate manner per zinc ion. The cyclodiphosph(V)azane ligand forms hexa-coordinated complexes having octahedral geometry for Zn(II) complexes. The elemental analyses and mass spectral data have justified the [Zn2(L)X2(H2O)4]nH2O composition of complexes. Infrared spectra of the zinc complexes indicate deprotonation and coordination of the imine NH. It also confirms that nitrogen atoms of the pyridine group contribute to the complexation. The X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) was performed of [Zn2L(SO4)2(H2O)4]2H2O complex. The XRD patterns indicate crystalline nature for the [Zn2L(SO4)2(H2O)4]2H2O complex. The measured low molar conductance values in dimethylformamide indicate that the complexes are non-electrolyte nature. The surface morphology (SEM) of the cyclodiphosph(V)azane ligand and the [Zn2L(NO3)2(H2O)4]2H2O complex were studied by SEM. The thermal studies suggested that the complexes are more stable as compared to ligand. In molecular modeling the geometries of cyclodiphosph(V)azane ligand H2L and its zinc(II) complexes were fully optimized with respect to the energy using the 6-31G basis set. The cyclodiphosph(V)azane ligand and the zinc(II) complexes have been measured in vitro to judge their antibacterial (Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus) and antifungal (Aspergillus niger and Pencillium chrysogenum) activities.

  2. Concepts for Biologically Active Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kastin, Abba J.; Pan, Weihong

    2012-01-01

    Here we review a unique aspect of CNS research on biologically active peptides that started against a background of prevalent dogmas but ended by exerting considerable influence on the field. During the course of refuting some doctrines, we introduced several concepts that were unconventional and paradigm-shifting at the time. We showed that (1) hypothalamic peptides can act ‘up’ on the brain as well as ‘down’ on the pituitary, (2) peripheral peptides can affect the brain, (3) peptides can cross the blood-brain barrier, (4) the actions of peptides can persist longer than their half-lives in blood, (5) perinatal administration of peptides can exert actions persisting into adulthood, (6) a single peptide can have more than one action, (7) dose-response relationships of peptides need not be linear, (8) the brain produces antiopiate as well as opiate peptides, (9) there is a selective high affinity endogenous peptide ligand for the mu-opiate receptor, (10) a peptide’s name does not restrict its effects, and (11) astrocytes assume an active role in response to metabolic disturbance and hyperleptinemia. The evolving questions in our laboratories reflect the diligent effort of the neuropeptide community to identify the roles of peptides in the CNS. The next decade is expected to see greater progress in the following areas: (a) interactions of peptides with other molecules in the CNS; (b) peptide involvement in cell-cell interactions; and (c) peptides in neuropsychiatric, autoimmune, and neurodegenerative diseases. The development of peptidomics and gene silencing approaches will expedite the formation of many new concepts in a new era. PMID:20726835

  3. Biological spectra analysis: Linking biological activity profiles to molecular structure

    PubMed Central

    Fliri, Anton F.; Loging, William T.; Thadeio, Peter F.; Volkmann, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    Establishing quantitative relationships between molecular structure and broad biological effects has been a longstanding challenge in science. Currently, no method exists for forecasting broad biological activity profiles of medicinal agents even within narrow boundaries of structurally similar molecules. Starting from the premise that biological activity results from the capacity of small organic molecules to modulate the activity of the proteome, we set out to investigate whether descriptor sets could be developed for measuring and quantifying this molecular property. Using a 1,567-compound database, we show that percent inhibition values, determined at single high drug concentration in a battery of in vitro assays representing a cross section of the proteome, provide precise molecular property descriptors that identify the structure of molecules. When broad biological activity of molecules is represented in spectra form, organic molecules can be sorted by quantifying differences between biological spectra. Unlike traditional structure–activity relationship methods, sorting of molecules by using biospectra comparisons does not require knowledge of a molecule's putative drug targets. To illustrate this finding, we selected as starting point the biological activity spectra of clotrimazole and tioconazole because their putative target, lanosterol demethylase (CYP51), was not included in the bioassay array. Spectra similarity obtained through profile similarity measurements and hierarchical clustering provided an unbiased means for establishing quantitative relationships between chemical structures and biological activity spectra. This methodology, which we have termed biological spectra analysis, provides the capability not only of sorting molecules on the basis of biospectra similarity but also of predicting simultaneous interactions of new molecules with multiple proteins. PMID:15625110

  4. Structural, magnetic, electrochemical, catalytic, DNA binding and cleavage studies of new macrocyclic binuclear copper(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Anbu, S; Kandaswamy, M; Suthakaran, P; Murugan, V; Varghese, Babu

    2009-03-01

    The macrocyclic symmetrical and a series of unsymmetrical binuclear copper(II) complexes have been synthesized by using mononuclear complex [CuL] [3,3'-((1E,7E)-3,6-dioxa-2,7-diazaocta-1,7-diene-1,8-diyl)bis(3-formyl-5-methyl-2-diolato)copper(II)]. Another compartment of the [CuL] have been condensed with various diamines like 1,2-bis(aminooxy)ethane (L(1)), 1,2-diamino ethane(L(2a)), 1,3-diamino propane(L(2b)), 1,4-diamino butane(L(2c)), 1,2-diamino benzene(L(2d)), 1,8-diamino naphthalene(L(2e)) and characterized by elemental, spectroscopic, and X-ray crystallographic methods. The influence of the coordination geometry and the ring size of the binucleating ligands on the electronic, redox, magnetic, catecholase activity, DNA binding and cleavage properties have been studied. The molecular structures of the symmetrical binuclear complex [Cu(2)L(1)(H(2)O)(2)](ClO(4))(2) (1) and unsymmetrical binuclear complex [Cu(2)L(2b)(ClO(4))(H(2)O)]ClO(4) (2b) were determined by X-ray crystallography. Both of them were discrete binuclear species in which each Cu(II) ions are in distorted square pyramid. The Cu...Cu distances vary from 3.0308 (2b) to 3.0361 A (1). Electrochemical studies evidenced that two quasi-reversible one electron-transfer reduction waves (E(pc)(1)) -0.91 to -1.01 V, (E(pc)(2)) -1.26 to -1.55 V) for binuclear complexes are obtained in the cathodic region. Cryomagnetic investigation of the binuclear complexes reveals a weak antiferromagnetic spin exchange interaction between the Cu(II) ions within the complexes (-2J=104.4-127.5 cm(-1)). The initial rate (V(in)) for the oxidation of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol to o-quinone by the binuclear Cu(II)complexes are in the range 3.6 x 10(-5) to 7.3 x 10(-5)Ms(-1). The binuclear Cu(II) complexes are avid binders to calf thymus DNA. The complexes display significant oxidative cleavage of circular plasmid pBR322 DNA in the presence of mercaptoethanol using the singlet oxygen as a reactive species. The aromatic diamine

  5. A review exploring biological activities of hydrazones

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Garima; Marella, Akranth; Shaquiquzzaman, Mohammad; Akhtar, Mymoona; Ali, Mohammad Rahmat; Alam, Mohammad Mumtaz

    2014-01-01

    The development of novel compounds, hydrazones has shown that they possess a wide variety of biological activities viz. antimicrobial, anticonvulsant, antidepressant, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antiplatelet, antimalarial, anticancer, antifungal, antitubercular, antiviral, cardio protective etc., Hydrazones/azomethines/imines possess-NHN = CH- and constitute an important class of compounds for new drug development. A number of researchers have synthesized and evaluated the biological activities of hydrazones. This review aims at highlighting the diverse biological activities of hydrazones. PMID:24741273

  6. Biologically active proteins from natural product extracts.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, B R

    2001-10-01

    The term "biologically active proteins" is almost redundant. All proteins produced by living creatures are, by their very nature, biologically active to some extent in their homologous species. In this review, a subset of these proteins will be discussed that are biologically active in heterologous systems. The isolation and characterization of novel proteins from natural product extracts including those derived from microorganisms, plants, insects, terrestrial vertebrates, and marine organisms will be reviewed and grouped into several distinct classes based on their biological activity and their structure.

  7. Recently reported biological activities of pyrazole compounds.

    PubMed

    Faria, Jéssica Venância; Vegi, Percilene Fazolin; Miguita, Ana Gabriella Carvalho; Dos Santos, Maurício Silva; Boechat, Nubia; Bernardino, Alice Maria Rolim

    2017-09-23

    The pyrazole nucleus is an aromatic azole heterocycle with two adjacent nitrogen atoms. Pyrazole derivatives have exhibited a broad spectrum of biological activities, and approved pyrazole-containing drugs include celecoxib, antipyrine, phenylbutazone, rimonabant, and dipyrone. Many research groups have synthesized and evaluated pyrazoles against several biological agents. This review examines recent publications relating the structures of pyrazoles with their corresponding biological activities. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Spectroscopic and biological studies of new binuclear metal complexes of a tridentate ONS hydrazone ligand derived from 4-amino-6-methyl-3-thioxo-3,4-dihydro-1,2,4-triazin-5(2H)-one and 4,6-diacetylresorcinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adly, Omima M. I.; Emara, Adel A. A.

    2014-11-01

    The binuclear hydrazone, H2L, ligand derived from 4-amino-6-methyl-3-thioxo-3,4-dihydro-1,2,4-triazin-5(2H)-one and 4,6-diacetylresorcinol, in the molar ratio 2:1, and its copper(II), nickel(II), cobalt(II), zinc(II), cadmium(II), cerium(III), iron(III), oxovanadium(IV) and dioxouranium(VI) complexes have been synthesized. Structures of the ligand and its metal complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, spectral (infrared, electronic, mass, 1H NMR and ESR) data, magnetic susceptibility, molar conductivity measurements and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The ligand acts as dibasic with two ONS tridentate sites. The bonding sites are the azomethine nitrogen, phenolate oxygen and sulfur atoms. The metal complexes exhibit different geometrical arrangements such as square planer, tetrahedral and octahedral. The Coats-Redfern equation was used to calculate the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for the different thermal decomposition steps of some complexes. The ligand and its metal complexes showed antimicrobial activity towards Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis), Gram-negative bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli), yeast (Candida albicans) and fungus (Aspergillus fumigatus). Structural parameters of the ligand and its metal complexes were theoretically computed on the basis of semiempirical PM3 level, and the results were correlated with their experimental data.

  9. The applications of binuclear metallohydrolases in medicine: recent advances in the design and development of novel drug leads for purple acid phosphatases, metallo-β-lactamases and arginases.

    PubMed

    McGeary, Ross P; Schenk, Gerhard; Guddat, Luke W

    2014-04-09

    Binuclear metallohydrolases are a family of proteins that can be targeted for drug discovery. The common feature of these enzymes is the presence of two closely spaced metal ions (i.e. less than 4 Å apart) that capture a water molecule that is used as a nucleophile in highly specific hydrolytic reactions. In this mini-review we describe what is known about the biological and catalytic activity, three-dimensional structure and inhibition for three prominent drug targets in this family of enzymes, (i) purple acid phosphatases, (ii) metallo-β-lactamases and (iii) arginases. These enzymes are targets for the development of chemotherapeutics to treat a range of disorders including osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease and erectile dysfunctions, but also to stem the spread of antibiotic resistance, a major threat to global health care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Highly efficient binuclear ruthenium catalyst for water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Sander, Anett C; Maji, Somnath; Francàs, Laia; Böhnisch, Torben; Dechert, Sebastian; Llobet, Antoni; Meyer, Franc

    2015-05-22

    Water splitting is one of the key steps in the conversion of sunlight into a usable renewable energy carrier such as dihydrogen or more complex chemical fuels. Developing rugged and highly efficient catalysts for the oxidative part of water splitting, the water oxidation reaction generating dioxygen, is a major challenge in the field. Herein, we introduce a new, and rationally designed, pyrazolate-based diruthenium complex with the highest activity in water oxidation catalysis for binuclear systems reported to date. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction showed favorable preorganization of the metal ions, well suited for binding two water molecules at a distance adequate for OO bond formation; redox titrations as well as spectroelectrochemistry allowed characterization of the system in several oxidation states. Low oxidation potentials reflect the trianionic character of the elaborate compartmental pyrazolate ligand furnished with peripheral carboxylate groups. Water oxidation has been mediated both by a chemical oxidant (Ce(IV) )-by means of manometry and a Clark electrode for monitoring the dioxygen production-and electrochemically with impressive activities.

  11. [Biological activity of probiotic microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Novik, G I; Samartsev, A A; Astapovich, N I; Kavrus, M A; Mikhaliuk, A N

    2006-01-01

    Adaptation of bifidobacteria and lactic acid bacteria to nutrient media with increased concentrations of bile (1%) and protein substrates of animal origin allowed the variants resistant to bile and displaying a high production of proteolytic enzymes (active within the pH range of 2.5-9.0) to be selected. Administration of the preparations involving the selected bifidobacteria and lactic acid bacteria assisted in the normalization of the intestinal microflora and activation of protein metabolism in the organism of animals. Specifically, it increased the total protein level in blood serum and redistributed protein fractions, increasing the content of globulins and decreasing albumin concentration.

  12. Biological activity of liposomal vanillin.

    PubMed

    Castan, Leniher; Del Toro, Grisel; Fernández, Adolfo A; González, Manuel; Ortíz, Emilia; Lobo, Daliana

    2013-06-01

    This article presents a study of vanillin encapsulation inside multilamellar liposomes, with emphasis on the evaluation of antioxidant activity, the hemolytic effect, and the antisickling properties of these products. Egg phosphatidylcholine-cholesterol and egg phosphatidylcholine-cholesterol-1-O-decylglycerol liposomes were prepared by mechanical dispersion, all with vanillin included. Vesicles were characterized by determination of encapsulation efficiency and vanillin retention capacity. Antioxidant activity was determined by the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method. The hemolytic effect of liposomes was also evaluated by spectrophotometry, as well as the antisickling activity by the Huck test using optical microscopy. Results showed that the lipid composition of liposomes did not significantly affect the encapsulation efficiency. Stable vesicles were obtained with a high retention percentage of vanillin. Liposomes exhibited a high capture of the DPPH radical compared to free vanillin and 1-O-decylglycerol (C10) in solution. Vesicles caused no significant hemolisys in normal erythrocytes, nor in those coming from patients with sickle cell anemia. Vanillin encapsulated in liposomes retained its antisickling activity, with a greater effect for C10-containing vesicles. Our results show that vanillin encapsulation in liposomes is a way to enhance the pharmacologic properties of this molecule using a suitable vehicle.

  13. Elsholtzia: phytochemistry and biological activities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Plants of the genus Elsholtzia (Lamiaceae) have a long history of medicinal use in folk. The phytochemical investigations revealed the presence of flavonoids, phenylpropanoids, terpenoids, and other compounds. Abundant volatile components are also identified. Pure compounds, volatile constituents and crude extracts from the genus exhibited a wide spectrum of in vitro and in vivo pharmacological activities. The aims of this review hopefully provide comprehensive information on the distribution, phytochemistry, volatile components, and pharmacological research of Elsholtzia for exploring the potential and advance researches. PMID:23216850

  14. Marine Pyridoacridine Alkaloids: Biosynthesis and Biological Activities.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Sabrin R M; Mohamed, Gamal A

    2016-01-01

    Pyridoacridines are a class of strictly marine-derived alkaloids that constitute one of the largest chemical families of marine alkaloids. During the last few years, both natural pyridoacridines and their analogues have constituted excellent targets for synthetic works. They have been the subject of intense study due to their significant biological activities; cytotoxic, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, insecticidal, anti-HIV, and anti-parasitic activities. In the present review, 95 pyridoacridine alkaloids isolated from marine organisms are discussed in term of their occurrence, biosynthesis, biological activities, and structural assignment.

  15. Marine Biology Activities. Ocean Related Curriculum Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauls, John

    The ocean affects all of our lives. Therefore, awareness of and information about the interconnections between humans and oceans are prerequisites to making sound decisions for the future. Project ORCA (Ocean Related Curriculum Activities) has developed interdisciplinary curriculum materials designed to meet the needs of students and teachers…

  16. Biological activity of acetylated phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Fragopoulou, Elizabeth; Nomikos, Tzortzis; Karantonis, Haralabos C; Apostolakis, Constantinos; Pliakis, Emmanuel; Samiotaki, Martina; Panayotou, George; Antonopoulou, Smaragdi

    2007-01-10

    In recent years an effort has been made to isolate and identify biologically active compounds that are included in the Mediterranean diet. The existence of naturally occurring acetylated phenolics, as well as studies with synthetic ones, provide evidence that acetyl groups could be correlated with their biological activity. Platelet activating factor (PAF) is implicated in atherosclerosis, whereas its inhibitors seem to play a protective role against cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to examine the biological activity of resveratrol and tyrosol and their acetylated derivatives as inhibitors of PAF-induced washed rabbit platelet aggregation. Acetylation of resveratrol and tyrosol was performed, and separation was achieved by HPLC. Acetylated derivatives were identified by negative mass spectrometry. The data showed that tyrosol and its monoacetylated derivatives act as PAF inhibitors, whereas diacetylated derivatives induce platelet aggregation. Resveratrol and its mono- and triacetylated derivatives exert similar inhibitory activity, whereas the diacetylated ones are more potent inhibitors. In conclusion, acetylated phenolics exert the same or even higher antithrombotic activity compared to the biological activity of the initial one.

  17. [Biologically active metabolites of the marine actinobacteria].

    PubMed

    Sobolevskaia, M P; Kuznetsova, T A

    2010-01-01

    This review systematically data on the chemical structure and biological activity of metabolites of obligate and facultative marine actinobacteria, published from 2000 to 2007. We discuss some structural features of the five groups of metabolites related to macrolides and compounds containing lactone, quinone and diketopiperazine residues, cyclic peptides, alkaloids, and compounds of mixed biosynthesis. Survey shows a large chemical diversity of metabolites actinobacteria isolated from marine environment. It is shown that, along with metabolites, identical to previously isolated from terrestrial actinobacteria, marine actinobacteria synthesize unknown compounds not found in other natural sources, including micro organisms. Perhaps the biosynthesis of new chemotypes bioactive compounds in marine actinobacteria is one manifestation of chemical adaptation of microorganisms to environmental conditions at sea. Review stresses the importance of the chemical study of metabolites of marine actinobacteria. These studies are aimed at obtaining new data on marine microorganisms producers of biologically active compounds and chemical structure and biological activity of new low-molecular bioregulators of natural origin.

  18. Perylenequinones: Isolation, Synthesis, and Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mulrooey, Carol A.; O'Brien, Erin M.; Morgan, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    The perylenequinones are a novel class of natural products characterized by pentacyclic conjugated chromophore giving rise to photoactivity. Potentially useful light-activated biological activity, targeting protein kinase C (PKC), has been identified for several of the natural products. Recently discovered new members of this class of compound, as well as several related phenanthroperylenequinones, are reviewed. Natural product modifications that improve biological profiles, and avenues for the total synthesis of analogs, which are not available from the natural product series, are outlined. An overview of structure/function relationships is provided. PMID:24039544

  19. The plasminogen activator system: biology and regulation.

    PubMed

    Irigoyen, J P; Muñoz-Cánoves, P; Montero, L; Koziczak, M; Nagamine, Y

    1999-10-01

    The regulation of plasminogen activation involves genes for two plasminogen activators (tissue type and urokinase type), two specific inhibitors (type 1 and type 2), and a membrane-anchored urokinase-type plasminogen-activator-specific receptor. This system plays an important role in various biological processes involving extracellular proteolysis. Recent studies have revealed that the system, through interplay with integrins and the extracellular matrix protein vitronectin, is also involved in the regulation of cell migration and proliferation in a manner independent of proteolytic activity. The genes are expressed in many different cell types and their expression is under the control of diverse extracellular signals. Gene expression reflects the levels of the corresponding mRNA, which should be the net result of synthesis and degradation. Thus, modulation of mRNA stability is an important factor in overall regulation. This review summarizes current understanding of the biology and regulation of genes involved in plasminogen activation at different levels.

  20. Can binuclear atoms solve the cold fusion puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Cerofolini, G.F. ); Para, A.F. )

    1993-01-01

    The internal and external inconsistencies of cold fusion phenomena are discussed. It is shown that most of these inconsistencies can be removed by assuming the formation of binuclear atoms that have the ability to trap thermal neutrons from the natural background in a localized state. 29 refs., 3 figs.

  1. The biological activity of silicon carbide whiskers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, N.F.

    1989-01-01

    Size characteristics of SiC whiskers are similar to asbestos and contain potentially carcinogenic long thin fibers. Size distribution suggests that it is highly respirable, with majority of particles having diameters <3.0 [mu]m. Cytotoxic activity of SiC whiskers in cultured cells is [ge] than that of crocidolite asbestos. Inhalation exposures are needed to further delineate the biological activity; while SiC whiskers were as or more cytotoxic than crocidolite, JM Code 100 also displays such activity but results in no increased risk of lung cancer, pulmonary fibrosis or mesothelioma. PRD-166, a coarse continuous glass filament, displays little in vitro biological activity. It is recommended that SiC whiskers be treated as asbestos, and to continue investigating the potential health effects of SiC whiskers, in particular conducting animal experiments with acute and chronic inhalation exposures. 17 refs., 11 tabs., 18 figs.

  2. [Biologically Active Peptides of King Crab Hepatopancreas].

    PubMed

    Bogdanov, V V; Berezin, B B; Il'ina, A P; Yamskova, V P; Yamskov, I A

    2015-01-01

    Substances of a peptide nature isolated from the hepatopancreas of the king crab Paralithodes camtschaticus exhibited physicochemical properties and membranotropic and specific activities similar to those of membranotropic homeostatic tissue-specific bioregulators previously found in different mammalian and plant tissues. Their biological effect on vertebrate tissues was demonstrated on a model of roller organotypic cultivation of Pleurodeles waltl newt liver tissue.

  3. Amaryllidaceae alkaloids: Absolute configuration and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Cimmino, Alessio; Masi, Marco; Evidente, Marco; Superchi, Stefano; Evidente, Antonio

    2017-09-01

    Plants belonging to the Amaryllidaceae family are well known for their ornamental and medicinal use. Plant members of this group are distributed through both tropical and subtropical regions of the world and are dominant in Andean South America, the Mediterranean basin, and southern Africa. Amaryllidaceae plants have been demonstrated to be a good source of alkaloids with a large spectrum of biological activities, the latter being strictly related to the absolute stereochemistry of the alkaloid scaffold. Among them, great importance for practical applications in medicine has galanthamine, which has already spawned an Alzheimer's prescription drug as a potent and selective inhibitor of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase. Furthermore, lycorine as well as its related isocarbostyryl analogs narciclasine and pancratistatine have shown a strong anticancer activity in vitro against different solid tumors with malignant prognosis. This review addresses the assignment of the absolute configuration of several Amaryllidaceae alkaloids and its relationship with their biological activities. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Loranthus micranthus Linn.: Biological Activities and Phytochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Zorofchian Moghadamtousi, Soheil; Hajrezaei, Maryam; Abdul Kadir, Habsah

    2013-01-01

    Loranthus micranthus Linn. is a medicinal plant from the Loranthaceae family commonly known as an eastern Nigeria species of the African mistletoe and is widely used in folkloric medicine to cure various ailments and diseases. It is semiparasitic plant because of growing on various host trees and shrubs and absorbing mineral nutrition and water from respective host. Hence, the phytochemicals and biological activities of L. micranthus demonstrated strong host and harvesting period dependency. The leaves have been proved to possess immunomodulatory, antidiabetic, antimicrobial, antihypertensive, antioxidant, antidiarrhoeal, and hypolipidemic activities. This review summarizes the information and findings concerning the current knowledge on the biological activities, pharmacological properties, toxicity, and chemical constituents of Loranthus micranthus. PMID:24109490

  5. Glycosides from Marine Sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae): Structures, Taxonomical Distribution, Biological Activities and Biological Roles

    PubMed Central

    Kalinin, Vladimir I.; Ivanchina, Natalia V.; Krasokhin, Vladimir B.; Makarieva, Tatyana N.; Stonik, Valentin A.

    2012-01-01

    Literature data about glycosides from sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae) are reviewed. Structural diversity, biological activities, taxonomic distribution and biological functions of these natural products are discussed. PMID:23015769

  6. Glycosides from marine sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae): structures, taxonomical distribution, biological activities and biological roles.

    PubMed

    Kalinin, Vladimir I; Ivanchina, Natalia V; Krasokhin, Vladimir B; Makarieva, Tatyana N; Stonik, Valentin A

    2012-08-01

    Literature data about glycosides from sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae) are reviewed. Structural diversity, biological activities, taxonomic distribution and biological functions of these natural products are discussed.

  7. Estrogenic flavonoids: structural requirements for biological activity.

    PubMed

    Miksicek, R J

    1995-01-01

    A systematic survey of polycyclic phenols has been performed to identify members of this chemical group with estrogenic activity. Twelve compounds were found to be able to stimulate the transcriptional activity of the human estrogen receptor expressed in cultured cells by transient transfection. These natural estrogens belong to several distinct, but chemically related classes including chalcones, flavanones, flavones, flavonols, and isoflavones. Selected examples of estrogenic flavonoids were further analyzed to determine their biological potencies and their relative affinities for binding to the estrogen receptor. These data are interpreted with respect to the molecular structure of polycyclic phenols required for hormonal activity as nonsteroidal estrogens.

  8. Isoflavones: estrogenic activity, biological effect and bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Daniela Cristina; Piazza, Cateno; Melilli, Barbara; Drago, Filippo; Salomone, Salvatore

    2013-03-01

    Isoflavones are phytoestrogens with potent estrogenic activity; genistein, daidzein and glycitein are the most active isoflavones found in soy beans. Phytoestrogens have similarity in structure with the human female hormone 17-β-estradiol, which can bind to both alpha and beta estrogen receptors, and mimic the action of estrogens on target organs, thereby exerting many health benefits when used in some hormone-dependent diseases. Numerous clinical studies claim benefits of genistein and daidzein in chemoprevention of breast and prostate cancer, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis as well as in relieving postmenopausal symptoms. The ability of isoflavones to prevent cancer and other chronic diseases largely depends on pharmacokinetic properties of these compounds, in particular absorption and distribution to the target tissue. The chemical form in which isoflavones occur is important because it influences their bioavailability and, therefore, their biological activity. Glucose-conjugated isoflavones are highly polar, water-soluble compounds. They are hardly absorbed by the intestinal epithelium and have weaker biological activities than the corresponding aglycone. Different microbial families of colon can transform glycosylated isoflavones into aglycones. Clinical studies show important differences between the aglycone and conjugated forms of genistein and daidzein. The evaluation of isoflavone metabolism and bioavailability is crucial to understanding their biological effects. Lipid-based formulations such as drug incorporation into oils, emulsions and self-microemulsifying formulations have been introduced to increase bioavailability. Complexation with cyclodextrin also represent a valid method to improve the physicochemical characteristics of these substances in order to be absorbed and distributed to target tissues. We review and discuss pharmacokinetic issues that critically influence the biological activity of isoflavones.

  9. Biological activities of selected basidiomycetes from Yemen.

    PubMed

    Al-Fatimi, M; Schröder, G; Kreisel, H; Lindequist, U

    2013-03-01

    In a previous paper we demonstrated the results of biological screening of Yemeni basidiomycetes. The present study was aimed to investigate the antimicrobial and the antioxidant activity of further basidiomycetes collected in Yemen. Dichloromethane, methanol and aqueous extracts of the fruiting bodies of 25 species were screened in vitro for their antibacterial activities against three Gram-positive bacteria (Staphyloccocus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus flavus) and two Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa), against six human fungal pathogens (Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Aspergillus fumigatus, Mucor sp., Microsporum gypseum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes) and against one non human pathogenic fungus (Candida maltosa). The results indicated that 75 extracts exhibited activity against one or more of the bacteria. The methanol extracts of Agaricus cf. bernardii, Agrocybe pediades, Chlorophyllum molybdites, Coriolopsis polyzona, Ganoderma xylonoides, Pycnoporus sanguineus, Trametes lactinea and Trametes cingulata showed activity against all tested bacteria. The highest antibacterial activity was exhibited by methanol extracts from Chlorophyllum molybdites, Ganoderma xylonoides and Trametes cingulata and Agaricus cf. bernardii, Agrocybe pediades, Coriolopsis polyzona, Pycnoporus sanguineus and Trametes lactinea. The methanol extracts of Chlorophyllum molybdites, Ganoderma xylonoides and Pycnoporus sanguineus showed considerable antifungal activities against the tested fungal strains. Strong antioxidative effects employing the DPPH assay were exhibited by methanol extracts from Chlorophyllum molybdites, Ganoderma xylonoides, Hexagonia velutina, Pycnoporus sanguineus, Trametes lactinea and Trametes cingulata. Our previous and presented studies about 48 basidiomycetes collected in Yemen provide evidence that basidiomycetes from the Arabic region so far should attract more attention as potential source for new biologically active

  10. Biologically active compounds from Aphyllophorales (polypore) fungi.

    PubMed

    Zjawiony, Jordan K

    2004-02-01

    This review describes biologically active natural products isolated from Aphyllophorales, many of which are known as polypores. Polypores are a large group of terrestrial fungi of the phylum Basdiomycota (basidiomycetes), and they along with certain Ascomycota are a major source of pharmacologically active substances. There are about 25 000 species of basidiomycetes, of which about 500 are members of the Aphyllophorales, a polyphyletic group that contains the polypores. Many of these fungi have circumboreal distributions in North America, Europe, and Asia and broad distributions on all inhabited continents and Africa; only a small number of the most common species with the most obvious fruiting bodies (basidiocarps) have been evaluated for biological activity. An estimated 75% of polypore fungi that have been tested show strong antimicrobial activity, and these may constitute a good source for developing new antibiotics. Numerous compounds from these fungi also display antiviral, cytotoxic, and/or antineoplastic activities. Additional important components of this vast arsenal of compounds are polysaccharides derived from the fungal cell walls. These compounds have attracted significant attention in recent years because of their immunomodulatory activities, resulting in antitumor effects. These high molecular weight compounds, often called biological response modifiers (BRM), or immunopotentiators, prevent carcinogenesis, show direct anticancer effects, and prevent tumor metastasis. Some of the protein-bound polysaccharides from polypores and other basidiomycetes have found their way to the market in Japan as anticancer drugs. Finally, numerous compounds with cardiovascular, phytotoxic, immunomodulatory, analgesic, antidiabetic, antioxidant, insecticidal, and nematocidal activities, isolated from polypores, are also presented. In fact many of the fungi mentioned in this paper have long been used in herbal medicine, including polypores such as Ganoderma lucidum

  11. A comparative DFT study of oxygen reduction reaction on mononuclear and binuclear cobalt and iron phthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Li, Mengke; Yu, Zongxue; Ke, Qiang

    2016-12-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyzed by mononuclear and planar binuclear cobalt (CoPc) and iron phthalocyanine (FePc) catalysts is investigated in detail by density functional theory (DFT) methods. The calculation results indicate that the ORR activity of Fe-based Pcs is much higher than that of Co-based Pcs, which is due to the fact that the former could catalyze 4e- ORRs, while the latter could catalyze only 2e- ORRs from O2 to H2O2. The original high activities of Fe-based Pcs could be attributed to their high energy level of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO), which could lead to the stronger adsorption energy between catalysts and ORR species. Nevertheless, the HOMO of Co-based Pcs is the ring orbital, not the 3 d Co orbital, thereby inhibiting the electron transfer from metal to adsorbates. Furthermore, compared with mononuclear FePc, the planar binuclear FePc has more stable structure in acidic medium and more suitable adsorption energy of ORR species, making it a promising non-precious electrocatalyst for ORR.

  12. Monitoring Biological Activity at Geothermal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Pryfogle

    2005-09-01

    The economic impact of microbial growth in geothermal power plants has been estimated to be as high as $500,000 annually for a 100 MWe plant. Many methods are available to monitor biological activity at these facilities; however, very few plants have any on-line monitoring program in place. Metal coupon, selective culturing (MPN), total organic carbon (TOC), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), respirometry, phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA), and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) characterizations have been conducted using water samples collected from geothermal plants located in California and Utah. In addition, the on-line performance of a commercial electrochemical monitor, the BIoGEORGE?, has been evaluated during extended deployments at geothermal facilities. This report provides a review of these techniques, presents data on their application from laboratory and field studies, and discusses their value in characterizing and monitoring biological activities at geothermal power plants.

  13. Perspectives on Biologically Active Camptothecin Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying-Qian; Li, Wen-Qun; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Qian, Keduo; Yang, Liu; Zhu, Gao-Xiang; Wu, Xiao-Bing; Chen, An-Liang; Zhang, Shao-Yong; Song, Zi-Long; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2015-01-01

    Camptothecins (CPTs) are cytotoxic natural alkaloids that specifically target DNA topoisomerase I. Research on CPTs has undergone a significant evolution from the initial discovery of CPT in the late 1960s through the study of synthetic small molecule derivatives to investigation of macromolecular constructs and formulations. Over the past years, intensive medicinal chemistry efforts have generated numerous CPT derivatives. Three derivatives, topotecan, irinotecan, and belotecan, are currently prescribed as anticancer drugs, and several related compounds are now in clinical trials. Interest in other biological effects, besides anticancer activity, of CPTs is also growing exponentially, as indicated by the large number of publications on the subject during the last decades. Therefore, the main focus of the present review is to provide an ample but condensed overview on various biological activities of CPT derivatives, in addition to continued up-to-date coverage of anticancer effects. PMID:25808858

  14. Synthesis, spectroscopic, coordination and biological activities of some organometallic complexes derived from thio-Schiff base ligands

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Hussein, Azza A.; Linert, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Two series of mono- and binuclear complexes cyclic or acyclic thio-ferocine Schiff base ligands, derived from the condensation of 2-aminobenzenthiol (L) with monoacetyl ferrocene in the molar ratio 1:1 or in the molar ratio 1:2 for diacetyl ferocine have been prepared. The condensation reactions yield the corresponding Schiff Base ligands, HLa-Maf and H2Lb-Daf. The chelation of the ligands to metal ions occurs through the sulfur of the thiol group as well as the nitrogen atoms of the azomethine group of the ligands. HLa-Maf acts as monobasic bidentate or dibasic tetradentate, while H2Lb-Daf behaves as twice negatively cargend tetradentate ligand. The structures of these ligands were elucidated by elemental analysis, infrared, ultraviolet–visible spectra, as well as 1H NMR spectra. Reactions of the Schiff bases ligands with ruthenium(III), oxovanadium(IV) and dioxouranium(VI) afforded the corresponding transition metal complexes. The properties of the newly prepared complexes were analyse by elemental analyses, infrared, electronic spectra, 1H NMR as well as the magnetic susceptibility and conductivity measurement. The metal complexes exhibits different geometrical arrangements such as octahedral and square pyramidal coordination. Schiff base ligands and their metal complexes were tested against two pathogenic bacteria as Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as one kind of fungi to study their biological activity. All the complexes exhibit antibacterial and antifungal activities against these organisms. PMID:24070648

  15. Synthesis, spectroscopic, coordination and biological activities of some organometallic complexes derived from thio-Schiff base ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Hussein, Azza A.; Linert, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Two series of mono- and binuclear complexes cyclic or acyclic thio-ferocine Schiff base ligands, derived from the condensation of 2-aminobenzenthiol (L) with monoacetyl ferrocene in the molar ratio 1:1 or in the molar ratio 1:2 for diacetyl ferocine have been prepared. The condensation reactions yield the corresponding Schiff Base ligands, HLa-Maf and H2Lb-Daf. The chelation of the ligands to metal ions occurs through the sulfur of the thiol group as well as the nitrogen atoms of the azomethine group of the ligands. HLa-Maf acts as monobasic bidentate or dibasic tetradentate, while H2Lb-Daf behaves as twice negatively cargend tetradentate ligand. The structures of these ligands were elucidated by elemental analysis, infrared, ultraviolet-visible spectra, as well as 1H NMR spectra. Reactions of the Schiff bases ligands with ruthenium(III), oxovanadium(IV) and dioxouranium(VI) afforded the corresponding transition metal complexes. The properties of the newly prepared complexes were analyse by elemental analyses, infrared, electronic spectra, 1H NMR as well as the magnetic susceptibility and conductivity measurement. The metal complexes exhibits different geometrical arrangements such as octahedral and square pyramidal coordination. Schiff base ligands and their metal complexes were tested against two pathogenic bacteria as Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as one kind of fungi to study their biological activity. All the complexes exhibit antibacterial and antifungal activities against these organisms.

  16. Generation and Biological Activities of Oxidized Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Oskolkova, Olga V.; Birukov, Konstantin G.; Levonen, Anna-Liisa; Binder, Christoph J.; Stöckl, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Glycerophospholipids represent a common class of lipids critically important for integrity of cellular membranes. Oxidation of esterified unsaturated fatty acids dramatically changes biological activities of phospholipids. Apart from impairment of their structural function, oxidation makes oxidized phospholipids (OxPLs) markers of “modified-self” type that are recognized by soluble and cell-associated receptors of innate immunity, including scavenger receptors, natural (germ line-encoded) antibodies, and C-reactive protein, thus directing removal of senescent and apoptotic cells or oxidized lipoproteins. In addition, OxPLs acquire novel biological activities not characteristic of their unoxidized precursors, including the ability to regulate innate and adaptive immune responses. Effects of OxPLs described in vitro and in vivo suggest their potential relevance in different pathologies, including atherosclerosis, acute inflammation, lung injury, and many other conditions. This review summarizes current knowledge on the mechanisms of formation, structures, and biological activities of OxPLs. Furthermore, potential applications of OxPLs as disease biomarkers, as well as experimental therapies targeting OxPLs, are described, providing a broad overview of an emerging class of lipid mediators. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 12, 1009–1059. PMID:19686040

  17. Biologic Activity of Porphyromonas endodontalis complex lipids

    PubMed Central

    Mirucki, Christopher S.; Abedi, Mehran; Jiang, Jin; Zhu, Qiang; Wang, Yu-Hsiung; Safavi, Kamran E.; Clark, Robert B.; Nichols, Frank C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Periapical infections secondary to pulpal necrosis are associated with bacterial contamination of the pulp. Porphyromonas endodontalis, a Gram-negative organism, is considered to be a pulpal pathogen. P. gingivalis is phylogenetically related to P. endodontalis and synthesizes several classes of novel complex lipids that possess biological activity, including the capacity to promote osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activation. The purpose of this study was to extract and characterize constituent lipids of P. endodontalis, and evaluate their capacity to promote pro-inflammatory secretory responses in the macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7, as well as their capacity to promote osteoclastogenesis and inhibit osteoblast activity. Methods Constituent lipids of both organisms were fractionated by HPLC and were structurally characterized using electrospray-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) or ESI-MS/MS. The virulence potential of P. endodontalis lipids was then compared with known biologically active lipids isolated from P. gingivalis. Results P. endodontalis total lipids were shown to promote TNF-α secretion from RAW 264.7 cells and the serine lipid fraction appeared to account for the majority of this effect. P. endodontalis lipid preparations also increased osteoclast formation from RAW 264.7 cells but osteoblast differentiation in culture was inhibited and appeared to be dependent on TLR2 expression. Conclusions These effects underscore the importance of P. endodontalis lipids in promoting inflammatory and bone cell activation processes that could lead to periapical pathology. PMID:25146013

  18. Structural characterization by EXAFS spectroscopy of the binuclear iron center in protein A of methane monooxygenase from methylococcus capsulatus (bath)

    SciTech Connect

    Ericson, A.; Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O.; Green, J.; Dalton, H.; Bentsen, J.G.; Beer, R.H.; Lippard, S.J.

    1988-03-30

    Soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) activates dioxygen for incorporation into a remarkable variety of substrates including methane, which is required for bacterial growth (eq 1). MMO is a three component CH/sub 4/ + NADH + H/sup +/ + O/sub 2/ /sup MMO/ ..-->.. CH/sub 3/OH + NAD/sup +/ + H/sub 2/O (1) enzyme. Protein A (M/sub r/ 210,000), believed to be the oxygenase component, contains two iron atoms. Protein B (M/sub r/ 15,700) serves a regulatory function and lacks prosthetic groups, while protein C, the reductase component of the enzyme, is an iron-sulfur flavoprotein (M/sub r/ 42,000) responsible for electron transfer from NADH to protein A. Recently, a binuclear iron center was postulated to occur in protein A based on the finding that one-electron reduction gives rise to electron spin resonance (ESR) signals (g 1.95, 1.88, 1.78) very similar to those observed for the binuclear mixed-valence Fe/sub 2/(III,II) centers in semimet hemerythrin (Hr) and purple acid phosphatase (PAP). In conjunction with model studies, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy has proven to be a powerful method for identifying bridged binuclear iron centers in Hr, ribonucleotide reductase (RR), and PAP. Here the authors report iron K-edge EXAFS results on semireduced protein A of MMO which support the occurrence of a binuclear iron center (Fe-Fe distance, 3.41 A), with no short ..mu..-oxo bridge.

  19. XAFS Study of the Ferro- and Antiferromagnetic Binuclear Copper(II) Complexes of Azomethine Based Tridentate Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasenko, Valery G.

    2007-02-02

    Binuclear copper complexes are known to be models for metalloenzymes containing copper active sites, and some of them are of considerable interest due to their magnetic and charge transfer properties. The reactions of the complex formation of bibasic tridentate heterocyclic imines with copper acetate leads to two types of chelates with mono deprotonated ligands and with totally deprotonated ligands. Cu K-edge EXAFS has been applied to determine the local structure around the metal center in copper(II) azomethine complexes with five tridentate ligands: 1-(salycilideneimino)- or 1-(2-tosylaminobenzilideneimino)-2-amino(oxo, thio)benzimidazoles. It has been found that some of the chelates studied are bridged binuclear copper complexes, and others are mononuclear complexes. The copper-copper interatomic distances in the bridged binuclear copper complexes were found to be 2.85-3.01 A. Variable temperature magnetic susceptibility data indicate the presence of both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interactions within the dimer, the former is dominating at low temperatures and the latter at high temperatures.

  20. Binuclear Phthalocyanines as Model Electrocatalysts for the Reduction of Oxygen.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    H. Melnik, A. Nevin, .W. Liu, A.B.P. Lever* and C.C. Leznoff N00014- 84-G-0201 S. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMZNT... synthesis of the thermally more stable, soluble, binuclear and trinuclear phthalocyanines has generated considerable interest [1-31. Until this project was...observation of the very large parent ion. Our synthesis led to metal-free multinuclear phthalocyanines. To date, metal insertion has been carried out

  1. Thioetherification of chloroheteroarenes: a binuclear catalyst promotes wide scope and high functional-group tolerance.

    PubMed

    Platon, Mélanie; Wijaya, Novi; Rampazzi, Vincent; Cui, Luchao; Rousselin, Yoann; Saeys, Mark; Hierso, Jean-Cyrille

    2014-09-22

    A constrained binuclear palladium catalyst system affords selective thioetherification of a wide range of functionalized arenethiols with chloroheteroaromatic partners with the highest turnover numbers (TONs) reported to date and tolerates a large variety of reactive functions. The scope of this system includes the coupling of thiophenols with six- and five-membered 2-chloroheteroarenes (i.e., functionalized pyridine, pyrazine, quinoline, pyrimidine, furane, and thiazole) and 3-bromoheteroarenes (i.e., pyridine and furane). Electron-rich congested thiophenols and fluorinated thiophenols are also suitable partners. The coupling of unprotected amino-2-chloropyridines with thiophenol and the successful employment of synthetically valuable chlorothiophenols are described with the same catalyst system. DFT studies attribute the high performance of this binuclear palladium catalyst to the decreased stability of thiolate-containing resting states. Palladium loading was as low as 0.2 mol %, which is important for industrial application and is a step forward in solving catalyst activation/deactivation problems. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Structural diversity in binuclear complexes of alkaline earth metal ions with 4,6-diacetylresorcinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebl, Magdy; Khalil, Saied M. E.; Taha, A.; Mahdi, M. A. N.

    2012-11-01

    A new series of binuclear and mixed-ligand complexes with the general formula: [M 2(LO)yClz]; where M = Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II); H2L = 4,6-diacetylresorcinol, the secondary ligand L' = acetylacetone (acac), 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) or 2,2'-bipyridyl (Bipy), n = 0-2, m = 1, 2, x = 0, 1, 2, 4, y = 0, 2, 4, 5 and z = 0-2; have been synthesized. They have been characterized by the analytical and spectral methods (IR, 1H NMR and mass) as well as TGA and molar conductivity measurements. The spectroscopic and conductance data suggested that the H2L ligand behaves as a neutral, monobasic or dibasic tetradentate ligand, depending on the basicity of the secondary ligand, through the two phenolic and two carbonyl groups. Binuclear octahedral geometry has been assigned to all of the prepared complexes in various molar ratios 2:2; 2:2:2; 1:2:1 and 1:2:4 (L:M:L'). Molecular orbital calculations were performed for the ligands and their complexes using Hyperchem 7.52 program on the bases of PM3 level and the results were correlated with the experimental data. The ligand and some of its alkaline metal(II) complexes showed antibacterial activity towards some of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeast (Candida albicans) and fungus (Aspergillus fumigatus).

  3. Nonclassical biological activities of quinolone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Abeer; Daneshtalab, Mohsen

    2012-01-01

    Quinolones are considered as a big family of multi-faceted drugs; their chemical synthesis is flexible and can be easily adapted to prepare new congeners with rationally devised structures. This is shown by the description of many thousands of derivatives in the literature. Scientists could accurately describe their QSAR, which is essential for effective drug design. This also gave them the chance to discover new and unprecedented activities, which makes quinolones an endless source of hope and enables further development of new clinically useful drugs. Quinolones are among the most common frameworks present in the bioactive molecules that have dominated the market for more than four decades. Since 1962, 4(1H)-quinolone-3-carboxylic acid derivatives are widely used as antibacterial agents. Quinolones have a broad and potent spectrum of activity and are also used as second-line drugs to treat tuberculosis (TB). Recently, quinolones have been reported to display "nonclassical" biological activities, such as antitumor, anti-HIV-1 integrase, anti-HCV-NS3 helicase and -NS5B-polymerase activities. The present review focuses on the structural modifications responsible for the transformation of an antibacterial into an anticancer agent and/or an antiviral agent. Indeed, quinolones' antimicrobial action is distinguishable among antibacterial agents, because they target different type II topoisomerase enzymes. Many derivatives of this family show high activity against bacterial topoisomerases and eukaryotic topoisomerases, and are also toxic to cultured mammalian cells and in vivo tumor models. Moreover, quinolones have shown antiviral activity against HIV and HCV viruses. In this context the quinolones family of drugs seem to link three different biological activities (antibacterial, anticancer, and the antiviral profiles) and the review will also provide an insight into the different mechanisms responsible for these activities among different species.

  4. ElaC encodes a novel binuclear zinc phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Andreas; Schilling, Oliver; Niecke, Manfred; Bettmer, Jorg; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram

    2002-08-09

    carboxylate group, and 1.5 oxygen atoms. This corresponds to the coordination found in other metallo-beta-lactamase domain proteins. Phosphodiesterase activity is strongly dependent on the presence of zinc. These results identify the currently unassigned gene product ElaC to be a novel binuclear zinc phosphodiesterase.

  5. Biological Activities of Polyphenols from Grapes

    PubMed Central

    Xia, En-Qin; Deng, Gui-Fang; Guo, Ya-Jun; Li, Hua-Bin

    2010-01-01

    The dietary consumption of grape and its products is associated with a lower incidence of degenerative diseases such as cardiovascular disease and certain types of cancers. Most recent interest has focused on the bioactive phenolic compounds in grape. Anthocyanins, flavanols, flavonols and resveratrol are the most important grape polyphenols because they possess many biological activities, such as antioxidant, cardioprotective, anticancer, anti-inflammation, antiaging and antimicrobial properties. This review summarizes current knowledge on the bioactivities of grape phenolics. The extraction, isolation and identification methods of polyphenols from grape as well as their bioavailability and potential toxicity also are included. PMID:20386657

  6. Milk inhibits the biological activity of ricin.

    PubMed

    Rasooly, Reuven; He, Xiaohua; Friedman, Mendel

    2012-08-10

    Ricin is a highly toxic protein produced by the castor plant Ricinus communis. The toxin is relatively easy to isolate and can be used as a biological weapon. There is great interest in identifying effective inhibitors for ricin. In this study, we demonstrated by three independent assays that a component of reconstituted powdered milk has a high binding affinity to ricin. We discovered that milk can competitively bind to and reduce the amount of toxin available to asialofetuin type II, which is used as a model to study the binding of ricin to galactose cell-surface receptors. Milk also removes ricin bound to the microtiter plate. In parallel experiments, we demonstrated by activity assay and by immuno-PCR that milk can bind competitively to 1 ng/ml ricin, reducing the amount of toxin uptake by the cells, and thus inhibit the biological activity of ricin. The inhibitory effect of milk on ricin activity in Vero cells was at the same level as by anti-ricin antibodies. We also found that (a) milk did not inhibit ricin at concentrations of 10 or 100 ng/ml; (b) autoclaving 10 and 100 ng/ml ricin in DMEM at 121 °C for 30 min completely abolished activity; and (c) milk did not affect the activity of another ribosome inactivating protein, Shiga toxin type 2 (Stx2), produced by pathogenic Escherichia coli O157:H7. Unlike ricin, which is internalized into the cells via a galactose-binding site, Stx2 is internalized through the cell surface receptor glycolipid globotriasylceramides Gb3 and Gb4. These observations suggest that ricin toxicity may possibly be reduced at room temperature by a widely consumed natural liquid food.

  7. SORPTION ON WASTEWATER SOLIDS: ELIMINATION OF BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption was found to be greatly affected by the biological activity in wastewater solids. wo experimental techniques, cyanide treatment and pasteurization, were developed for eliminating the biological activity during isotherm measurements. oth methods are effective; however, pa...

  8. SORPTION ON WASTEWATER SOLIDS: ELIMINATION OF BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption was found to be greatly affected by the biological activity in wastewater solids. wo experimental techniques, cyanide treatment and pasteurization, were developed for eliminating the biological activity during isotherm measurements. oth methods are effective; however, pa...

  9. Using synthetic biology to increase nitrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Xin; Liu, Qi; Liu, Xiao-Meng; Shi, Hao-Wen; Chen, San-Feng

    2016-02-20

    Nitrogen fixation has been established in protokaryotic model Escherichia coli by transferring a minimal nif gene cluster composed of 9 genes (nifB, nifH, nifD, nifK, nifE, nifN, nifX, hesA and nifV) from Paenibacillus sp. WLY78. However, the nitrogenase activity in the recombinant E. coli 78-7 is only 10 % of that observed in wild-type Paenibacillus. Thus, it is necessary to increase nitrogenase activity through synthetic biology. In order to increase nitrogenase activity in heterologous host, a total of 28 selected genes from Paenibacillus sp. WLY78 and Klebsiella oxytoca were placed under the control of Paenibacillus nif promoter in two different vectors and then they are separately or combinationally transferred to the recombinant E. coli 78-7. Our results demonstrate that Paenibacillus suf operon (Fe-S cluster assembly) and the potential electron transport genes pfoAB, fldA and fer can increase nitrogenase activity. Also, K. oxytoca nifSU (Fe-S cluster assembly) and nifFJ (electron transport specific for nitrogenase) can increase nitrogenase activity. Especially, the combined assembly of the potential Paenibacillus electron transporter genes (pfoABfldA) with K. oxytoca nifSU recovers 50.1 % of wild-type (Paenibacillus) activity. However, K. oxytoca nifWZM and nifQ can not increase activity. The combined assembly of the potential Paenibacillus electron transporter genes (pfoABfldA) with K. oxytoca nifSU recovers 50.1 % of wild-type (Paenibacillus) activity in the recombinant E. coli 78-7. Our results will provide valuable insights for the enhancement of nitrogenase activity in heterogeneous host and will provide guidance for engineering cereal plants with minimal nif genes.

  10. Biologically active neutrophil chemokine pattern in tonsillitis

    PubMed Central

    RUDACK, C; JÖRG, S; SACHSE, F

    2004-01-01

    To gain an insight into the mechanisms of chronic and acute inflammation, the production of neutrophil chemokines in different types of tonsillitis – hyperplastic tonsillitis (HT), recurrent tonsillitis (RT) and peritonsillar abscesses (PA) – was investigated. The chemokines interleukin-8 (IL-8), growth-related oncogene-α (GRO-α), epithelial cell-derived neutrophil attractant-78 (ENA-78) and granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 (GCP-2) were detected and shown to have different biological activities. With respect to the biological properties of CXC chemokines, the biological activity of the chemokines was identified using a three-step high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique, a bioassay involving measurement of neutrophil chemotaxis in a single Boyden chamber in tissue of HT, RT and PA. Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), the chemokine concentrations were determined in the different tonsillitis entities. The chemokine pattern was dominated in PA by IL-8 and GRO-α and in RT by GRO-α. Hyperplastic tonsils of patients without a history of infection generated about five times lower IL-8 than PA. A protein concentration of GCP-2 was induced in PA and RT, whereas ENA-78 remained the same in all entities. In conclusion, it would appear that IL-8 was up-regulated in acute inflammation, whereas GRO-α dominated in chronic inflammation. ENA-78 seems not to play a pivotal role in inflammatory processes in tonsils. GCP-2 may serve as a substitute chemokine in certain inflammatory conditions as its quantity of mRNA and protein was higher in RT and PA than in HT. PMID:15008987

  11. Biologically Active Secondary Metabolites from the Fungi.

    PubMed

    Bills, Gerald F; Gloer, James B

    2016-11-01

    Many Fungi have a well-developed secondary metabolism. The diversity of fungal species and the diversification of biosynthetic gene clusters underscores a nearly limitless potential for metabolic variation and an untapped resource for drug discovery and synthetic biology. Much of the ecological success of the filamentous fungi in colonizing the planet is owed to their ability to deploy their secondary metabolites in concert with their penetrative and absorptive mode of life. Fungal secondary metabolites exhibit biological activities that have been developed into life-saving medicines and agrochemicals. Toxic metabolites, known as mycotoxins, contaminate human and livestock food and indoor environments. Secondary metabolites are determinants of fungal diseases of humans, animals, and plants. Secondary metabolites exhibit a staggering variation in chemical structures and biological activities, yet their biosynthetic pathways share a number of key characteristics. The genes encoding cooperative steps of a biosynthetic pathway tend to be located contiguously on the chromosome in coregulated gene clusters. Advances in genome sequencing, computational tools, and analytical chemistry are enabling the rapid connection of gene clusters with their metabolic products. At least three fungal drug precursors, penicillin K and V, mycophenolic acid, and pleuromutilin, have been produced by synthetic reconstruction and expression of respective gene clusters in heterologous hosts. This review summarizes general aspects of fungal secondary metabolism and recent developments in our understanding of how and why fungi make secondary metabolites, how these molecules are produced, and how their biosynthetic genes are distributed across the Fungi. The breadth of fungal secondary metabolite diversity is highlighted by recent information on the biosynthesis of important fungus-derived metabolites that have contributed to human health and agriculture and that have negatively impacted crops

  12. Potential biological activity of acacia honey.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Aliyu; Odunola, Oyeronke A; Ibrahim, Mohammed A; Sallau, Abdullahi B; Erukainure, Ochuko L; Aimola, Idown A; Malami, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in functional foods-based research have increasingly become an area of major interest because it affects human health and activities. Functional foods are classes of foods with health promoting and disease preventing properties in addition to multiple nutritional values and of such type is honey. Acacia honey is a type of honey produced by bees (Apis mellifera) fed on Acacia flowers, hence the name. This review focuses on the potential biological activities of Acacia honey which includes quality, antioxidant, immuno-modulatory, antiproliferative and neurological properties at in vitro and in vivo levels. Based on our review, Acacia honey used from various researches is of high purity, contains some bioactive compounds ranging from vitamins, phenolics, flavonoids and fatty acids. It's highly nutritional with strong antioxidant and immuno-modulatory potentials which may therefore be considered a potential candidate for both cancer prevention and treatment. Neurologically, it may be considered as a viable therapeutic agent in the management of Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Biologically Active Metabolites Synthesized by Microalgae

    PubMed Central

    de Morais, Michele Greque; Vaz, Bruna da Silva; de Morais, Etiele Greque; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae are microorganisms that have different morphological, physiological, and genetic traits that confer the ability to produce different biologically active metabolites. Microalgal biotechnology has become a subject of study for various fields, due to the varied bioproducts that can be obtained from these microorganisms. When microalgal cultivation processes are better understood, microalgae can become an environmentally friendly and economically viable source of compounds of interest, because production can be optimized in a controlled culture. The bioactive compounds derived from microalgae have anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and antioxidant activities, among others. Furthermore, these microorganisms have the ability to promote health and reduce the risk of the development of degenerative diseases. In this context, the aim of this review is to discuss bioactive metabolites produced by microalgae for possible applications in the life sciences. PMID:26339647

  14. New lignans and their biological activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia; Chen, Jiejun; Liang, Zizhen; Zhao, Changqi

    2014-01-01

    Lignans, which are widely distributed in higher plants, represent a vast and rather diverse group of phenylpropane derivatives. They have attracted considerable attention due to their pharmacological activities. Some of the lignans have been developed approved therapeutics, and others are considered as lead structures for new drugs. This article is based on our previous review of lignans discovered in the period 2000-2004, and it provides a comprehensive compilation of the 354 new naturally occurring lignans obtained from 61 plant families between 2005 and 2011. We classified five main types according to their structural features, and provided the details of their sources, some typical structures, and diverse biological activities. A tabular compilation of the novel lignans by species is presented at the end. A total of 144 references were considered for this review. Copyright © 2014 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  15. Spectroscopic study of biologically active glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szumera, M.; Wacławska, I.; Mozgawa, W.; Sitarz, M.

    2005-06-01

    It is known that the chemical activity phenomenon is characteristic for some inorganic glasses and they are able to participate in biological processes of living organisms (plants, animals and human bodies). An example here is the selective removal of silicate-phosphate glass components under the influence of biological solutions, which has been applied in designing glasses acting as ecological fertilizers of controlled release rate of the nutrients for plants. The structure of model silicate-phosphate glasses containing the different amounts of the glass network formers, i.e. Ca 2+ and Mg 2+, as a binding components were studied. These elements besides other are indispensable of the normal growth of plants. In order to establish the function and position occupied by the particular components in the glass structure, the glasses were examined by FTIR spectroscopy (with spectra decomposition) and XRD methods. It has been found that the increasing amount of MgO in the structure of silicate-phosphate glasses causes the formation of domains the structure of which changes systematically from a structure of the cristobalite type to a structure corresponding to forsterite type. Whilst the increasing content of CaO in the structure of silicate-phosphate glasses causes the formation of domains the structure of which changes from a structure typical for cristobalite through one similar to the structure of calcium orthophosphate, to a structure corresponding to calcium silicates. The changing character of domains structure is the reason of different chemical activity of glasses.

  16. Carbon nanomaterials: Biologically active fullerene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Bogdanović, Gordana; Djordjević, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery, fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and graphene attract significant attention of researches in various scientific fields including biomedicine. Nano-scale size and a possibility for diverse surface modifications allow carbon nanoallotropes to become an indispensable nanostructured material in nanotechnologies, including nanomedicine. Manipulation of surface chemistry has created diverse populations of water-soluble derivatives of fullerenes, which exhibit different behaviors. Both non-derivatized and derivatized fullerenes show various biological activities. Cellular processes that underline their toxicity are oxidative, genotoxic, and cytotoxic responses.The antioxidant/cytoprotective properties of fullerenes and derivatives have been considered in the prevention of organ oxidative damage and treatment. The same unique physiochemical properties of nanomaterials may also be associated with potential health hazards. Non-biodegradability and toxicity of carbon nanoparticles still remain a great concern in the area of biomedical application. In this review, we report on basic physical and chemical properties of carbon nano-clusters--fullerenes, nanotubes, and grapheme--their specificities, activities, and potential application in biological systems. Special emphasis is given to our most important results obtained in vitro and in vivo using polyhydroxylated fullerene derivative C₆₀(OH)₂₄.

  17. THE BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITIES OF HYPERICUM PERFORATUM L.

    PubMed Central

    Okmen, Gulten; Balpınar, Neslihan

    2017-01-01

    Background: Mastitis reduces milk yield and alters milk composition. Antibiotics are widely used in the treatment of the disease. However, this widespread use of antibiotics causes both antibiotic residues in milks and antibiotic resistance developed in bacteria. Today’s researches are focused on discovering and using new antibiotics against bacteria. Objective: The aim of this work was to discover the antibacterial effects of Hypericum perforatum L. extracts against mastitis pathogens, and its other biological activities. Material and Methods: Kirby-Bauer assay was applied to the extracts. The other antibacterial activity was MIC for plant extracts. The non-enzymatic antioxidant activity was found using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl-hydrate (DPPH). Results: The extract was showed maximum inhibition zone against two bacteria (Coagulase-negative Staphylococci-33 and 37; CNS 33 and 37), and the zone was 17 mm. A bacterium (CNS - 22) showed the lowest sensitivity to 812.5 μg/mL concentration. In addition, the extract was tried against the stable DPPH for antioxidant activity. As a result, the extract showed a strength antioxidant activity. Trolox equivalent is 0.83 mM. Conclusion: The extract of Hypericum perforatum have antibacterial, antioxidant and antimutagenic potentials. PMID:28480399

  18. Dimethylphosphinate bridged binuclear Rh(i) catalysts for the alkoxycarbonylation of aromatic C-H bonds.

    PubMed

    Iturmendi, Amaia; Sanz Miguel, Pablo J; Popoola, Saheed A; Al-Saadi, Abdulaziz A; Iglesias, Manuel; Oro, Luis A

    2016-11-14

    A variety of binuclear rhodium(i) complexes featuring two bridging dimethylphosphinate ligands ((CH3)2PO2(-)) have been prepared and tested in the alkoxycarbonylation of aromatic C-H bonds. The complex [Rh(μ-κO,O'-(CH3)2PO2)(cod)]2 has been prepared by a reaction of [Rh(μ-MeO)(cod)]2 with 2 equivalents of dimethylphosphinic acid. Binuclear complexes [Rh(μ-κO,O'-(CH3)2PO2)(CO)L]2 (L = PPh3, P(OMe)Ph2 and P(OPh)3) were obtained by carbonylation of the related mononuclear complexes [Rh(κO-(CH3)2PO2)(cod)(L)], which were prepared in situ by the reaction of [Rh(μ-κO,O'-(CH3)2PO2)(cod)]2 with 2 equivalents of L. Conversely, if L = IPr, the reaction of [Rh(μ-κO,O'-(CH3)2PO2)(CO)L]2 with carbon monoxide affords the mononuclear complex [Rh(κO-(CH3)2PO2)(CO)2IPr]. The subsequent reaction with trimethylamine N-oxide gives the corresponding binuclear complex [Rh(μ-κO,O'-(CH3)2PO2)(CO)(IPr)]2 by abstraction of one of the carbonyl ligands. Complexes [Rh(μ-κO,O'-(CH3)2PO2)(cod)]2 and [Rh(κO-(CH3)2PO2)(cod)(L)] (L = IPr, PPh3, P(OMe)Ph2, P(OPh)3) are active precatalysts in the alkoxycarbonylation of C-H bonds, with the ligand system playing a key role in the catalytic activity. The complexes that feature more labile Rh-L bonds give rise to better catalysts, probably due to the more straightforward substitution of L by a second carbonyl ligand, since a more electrophilic carbonyl carbon atom is more susceptible toward aryl migration. In fact, complexes [Rh(μ-κO,O'-(CH3)2PO2)(CO)2]2 and [Rh(μ-Cl)(CO)2]2, generated in situ from [Rh(μ-κO,O'-(CH3)2PO2)(cod)]2 and [Rh(μ-Cl)(cod)2]2, respectively, are the most active catalysts tested in this work.

  19. Biological activity of some conjugated gibberellins.

    PubMed

    Sembdner, G; Borgmann, E; Schneider, G; Liebisch, H W; Miersch, O; Adam, G; Lischewski, M; Schrefber, K

    1976-01-01

    The biological activity of several gibberellin (GA) conjugates was studied and compared with that of the corresponding free GAs. The following conjugates were included: O(3)-β-D-glucopyranosides of GA1, GA3 and GA4; O(13)-β-D-glucopyranosides of GA1, GA3 and GA5; O(13)-β-D-glucopyranosyl-GA5-β-D-glucopyranosyl ester; GA3-β-D-glucopyranosyl ester and GA3-α-D-glucopyranosyl ester; N-GA3-oyl-glycine, its methyl ester, N-GA3-oyl-glycylglycine, and N-GA3-oyl-proline. All compounds were synthesized chemically but some of them are known to occur as endogenous plant products, or to be formed in plants upon application of a free GA. Activity was determined in the dwarf pea, dwarf corn, dwarf rice, and lettuce hypocotyl bioassays. The GA conjugates were found to posses different relative activities depending on the chemical structure, the bioassay system, and the site of application (shoot or roots). It is concluded that the activity of GA conjugates as measured in different bioassays is based upon the ability of plant enzymes and possibly of certain microorganisms to hydrolyze glucosidic, glucosyl ester, and amide-like linkages.

  20. Biological Activity of Dolichandrone serrulata Flowers and Their Active Components.

    PubMed

    Phanthong, Phanida; Phumal, Noppawan; Chancharunee, Sirirat; Mangmool, Supachoke; Anantachoke, Natthinee; Bunyapraphatsara, Nuntavan

    2015-08-01

    Dolichandrone serrulata (DC.) Seem flowers are widely used as vegetables in northern and eastern Thailand. Biological studies of the methanolic extract of these flowers have shown promising antioxidant activity. Biological-guided separation of D. serrulata flowers yielded six compounds, identified as hallerone, protocatechuic acid, rengyolone, cleroindicin B, ixoside, and isomaltose. This is the first report on hallerone, protocatechuic acid, rengyolone, cleroindicin B, and isomaltose in D. serrulata. Protocatechuic acid was the most potent scavenger of 2,2-diphenyl-l-picrylhydrazyl and hydroxyl radicals with IC50 values of 25.6 +/- 0.6 and 29.6 +/- 0.4 microM, respectively. Hallerone and rengyolone showed moderate scavenging action on superoxide radicals and inhibited H202 induced reactive oxygen species production in HEK-293 cell. In addition, the other isolated compounds showed weak activity.

  1. Biologically active and antimicrobial peptides from plants.

    PubMed

    Salas, Carlos E; Badillo-Corona, Jesus A; Ramírez-Sotelo, Guadalupe; Oliver-Salvador, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive peptides are part of an innate response elicited by most living forms. In plants, they are produced ubiquitously in roots, seeds, flowers, stems, and leaves, highlighting their physiological importance. While most of the bioactive peptides produced in plants possess microbicide properties, there is evidence that they are also involved in cellular signaling. Structurally, there is an overall similarity when comparing them with those derived from animal or insect sources. The biological action of bioactive peptides initiates with the binding to the target membrane followed in most cases by membrane permeabilization and rupture. Here we present an overview of what is currently known about bioactive peptides from plants, focusing on their antimicrobial activity and their role in the plant signaling network and offering perspectives on their potential application.

  2. Biologically Active and Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Carlos E.; Badillo-Corona, Jesus A.; Ramírez-Sotelo, Guadalupe; Oliver-Salvador, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive peptides are part of an innate response elicited by most living forms. In plants, they are produced ubiquitously in roots, seeds, flowers, stems, and leaves, highlighting their physiological importance. While most of the bioactive peptides produced in plants possess microbicide properties, there is evidence that they are also involved in cellular signaling. Structurally, there is an overall similarity when comparing them with those derived from animal or insect sources. The biological action of bioactive peptides initiates with the binding to the target membrane followed in most cases by membrane permeabilization and rupture. Here we present an overview of what is currently known about bioactive peptides from plants, focusing on their antimicrobial activity and their role in the plant signaling network and offering perspectives on their potential application. PMID:25815307

  3. Biotransformations and biological activities of hop flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Karabin, Marcel; Hudcova, Tereza; Jelinek, Lukas; Dostalek, Pavel

    2015-11-01

    Female hop cones are used extensively in the brewing industry, but there is now increasing interest in possible uses of hops for non-brewing purposes, especially in the pharmaceutical industry. Among pharmaceutically important compounds from hops are flavonoids, having proven anticarcinogenic, antioxidant, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and estrogenic effects. In this review we aim to present current knowledge on the biotransformation of flavonoids from hop cones with respect to products, catalysis and conversion. A list of microbial enzymatic reactions associated with gastrointestinal microbiota is presented. A comparative analysis of the biological activities of hop flavonoids and their biotransformation products is described, indicating where further research has potential for applications in the pharmaceutical industry.

  4. [Nonequilibrium state of electrochemically activated water and its biological activity].

    PubMed

    Petrushanko, I Iu; Lobyshev, V I

    2001-01-01

    Changes in the physicochemical parameters (pH, redox potential and electroconductivity) of catholyte and anolyte produced by membrane electrolysis of distilled water and dilute (c < 10(-3) M) sodium chloride solutions were studied. The relaxation of these parameters after electrolysis and the influence of catholyte and anolyte on the growth of roots of Tradescantia viridis grafts, the development of duckweed, and the motive activity of infusoria Spirostomum ambiguum were investigated. It was found that the anolyte of distilled water stimulated development of these biological objects. The direction of shift of physicochemical parameters of catholyte and anolyte from equilibrium values and the type of their biological activity (stimulation or inhibition) depend on salt concentration in initial solution. Barbotage of initial distilled water with argon or nitrogen leads to a greater decrease in the redox potential of catholyte during electrolysis. The physicochemical parameters relax to equilibrium values, and the biological activity of catholite and anolyte decreases with time and practically disappears by the end of the day. It was found that the oxidation of reducing agent by atmospheric oxygen is not the sole cause of the relaxation of catalyte redox potential. The increase in the ionic strength of catholite and anolyte by the addition of concentrated sodium chloride after electrolysis decreases the rate of redox potential relaxation several times. The redox potential can be maintained for long periods by freezing.

  5. Threading of Binuclear Ruthenium Complex Through DNA Bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paramanathan, Thayaparan; Westerlund, Fredrik; McCauley, Micah; Lincoln, Per; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark

    2009-03-01

    Due to steric constraints the dumb-bell shaped binuclear ruthenium complex can only intercalate DNA by threading, which requires local melting of the DNA to occur. By mechanically manipulating a single DNA molecule held with optical tweezers, we lower the barrier to threading compared to bulk experiments. Stretching single DNA molecules with different drug concentrations and holding a constant force allows the binding to reach equilibrium. We can obtain the equilibrium fractional ligand binding and length of DNA at saturation. Fitting these results yields quantitative measurements of the binding thermodynamics and kinetics. In addition, we obtain the minimum binding site size, which may be determined by either electrostatic repulsion or steric constraints.

  6. Nonexercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT): environment and biology.

    PubMed

    Levine, James A

    2004-05-01

    Nonexercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) is the energy expended for everything that is not sleeping, eating, or sports-like exercise. It includes the energy expended walking to work, typing, performing yard work, undertaking agricultural tasks, and fidgeting. NEAT can be measured by one of two approaches. The first is to measure or estimate total NEAT. Here, total daily energy expenditure is measured, and from it "basal metabolic rate-plus-thermic effect of food" is subtracted. The second is the factoral approach, whereby the components of NEAT are quantified, and total NEAT is calculated by summing these components. The amount of NEAT that humans perform represents the product of the amount and types of physical activities and the thermogenic cost of each activity. The factors that impact a human's NEAT are readily divisible into environmental factors, such as occupation or dwelling within a "concrete jungle," and biological factors such as weight, gender, and body composition. The combined impact of these factors explains the substantial variance in human NEAT. The variability in NEAT might be viewed as random, but human and animal data contradict this. It appears that changes in NEAT subtly accompany experimentally induced changes in energy balance and are important in the physiology of weight change. Inadequate modulation of NEAT plus a sedentary lifestyle may thus be important in obesity. It then becomes intriguing to dissect mechanistic studies that delineate how NEAT is regulated into neural, peripheral, and humoral factors. A scheme is described in this review in which NEAT corresponds to a carefully regulated "tank" of physical activity that is crucial for weight control.

  7. Sulfation and biological activities of konjac glucomannan.

    PubMed

    Bo, Surina; Muschin, Tegshi; Kanamoto, Taisei; Nakashima, Hideki; Yoshida, Takashi

    2013-05-15

    The sulfation of konjac glucomannan and its anti-HIV and blood anticoagulant activities were investigated. Konjac glucomannan is a polysaccharide occurring naturally in konjac plant tubers and has high molecular weights. Solubility in water is very low, and the aqueous solutions at low concentrations have high viscosity. Before sulfation, hydrolysis by diluted sulfuric acid was carried out to decrease the molecular weights of M¯n=19.2 × 10(4)-0.2 × 10(4). Sulfation with piperidine-N-sulfonic acid or SO3-pyridine complex gave sulfated konjac glucomannans with molecular weights of M¯n=1.0 × 10(4)-0.4 × 10(4) and degrees of sulfation (DS) of 1.3-1.4. It was found that the sulfated konjac glucomannans had potent anti-HIV activity at a 50% effective concentration, (EC50) of 1.2-1.3 μg/ml, which was almost as high as that of an AIDS drug, ddC, whose EC50=3.2 μg/ml, and moderate blood anticoagulant activity, AA=0.8-22.7 units/mg, compared to those of standard sulfated polysaccharides, curdlan (10 units/mg) and dextran (22.7 units/mg) sulfates. Structural analysis of sulfated konjac glucomannans with negatively charged sulfated groups was performed by high resolution NMR, and the interaction between poly-l-lysine with positively charged amino groups as a model compound of proteins and peptides was measured by surface plasmon resonance measurement, suggesting that the sulfated konjac glucomannans had a high binding stability on immobilized poly-l-lysine. The binding of sulfated konjac glucomannan was concentration-dependent, and the biological activity of the sulfated konjac glucomannans may be due to electrostatic interaction between the sulfate and amino groups. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Reduction of carbon dioxide to oxalate by a binuclear copper complex.

    PubMed

    Pokharel, Uttam R; Fronczek, Frank R; Maverick, Andrew W

    2014-12-19

    Reduction of carbon dioxide to products such as oxalate (C2O4(2-)) is an active area of research, as the process converts an environmental pollutant into more useful organic compounds. However, carbon dioxide reduction remains a major challenge. Here we demonstrate a three-step reaction sequence in which a copper complex converts carbon dioxide to oxalate under mild conditions. The copper(II) complex is reduced to copper(I) in solution, either electrochemically or using sodium ascorbate. The reduced complex selectively reacts with carbon dioxide from air and fixes it into oxalate, with the oxalate ion bridging between two copper atoms. The bound oxalate ion is released as oxalic acid on treatment with mineral acids, regenerating the original copper(II) complex. This completes the process for conversion of carbon dioxide into oxalate using a binuclear copper complex and a mild reducing agent.

  9. Monascus secondary metabolites: production and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Patakova, Petra

    2013-02-01

    The genus Monascus, comprising nine species, can reproduce either vegetatively with filaments and conidia or sexually by the formation of ascospores. The most well-known species of genus Monascus, namely, M. purpureus, M. ruber and M. pilosus, are often used for rice fermentation to produce red yeast rice, a special product used either for food coloring or as a food supplement with positive effects on human health. The colored appearance (red, orange or yellow) of Monascus-fermented substrates is produced by a mixture of oligoketide pigments that are synthesized by a combination of polyketide and fatty acid synthases. The major pigments consist of pairs of yellow (ankaflavin and monascin), orange (rubropunctatin and monascorubrin) and red (rubropunctamine and monascorubramine) compounds; however, more than 20 other colored products have recently been isolated from fermented rice or culture media. In addition to pigments, a group of monacolin substances and the mycotoxin citrinin can be produced by Monascus. Various non-specific biological activities (antimicrobial, antitumor, immunomodulative and others) of these pigmented compounds are, at least partly, ascribed to their reaction with amino group-containing compounds, i.e. amino acids, proteins or nucleic acids. Monacolins, in the form of β-hydroxy acids, inhibit hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis in animals and humans.

  10. Biologically active peptides: prospects for drug development.

    PubMed

    Hughes, J

    1980-08-11

    Biologically active peptides aree typified by their unbiquity of distribution, their high receptor affinity and an almost infinite diversity of structure. For these reasons, considerable effort is now being expended to elucidate the possible role of peptides in brain function. This effort has been stimulated by the discovery of a number of new endogenous peptides, such as the enkephalins, endorphins, vasoactive intestinal peptide and neurotensin. At present, there is no clearly defined role for these peptides, although they may form an important basis for the chemical coding of various brain functions, including pain, mood and memory. At present, the potential for drug development of peptide agonists remains in fairly circumscribed areas such as analgesia, pituitary hormone control, and gastrointestinal motor and secretory control. Peptide antagonists may provide a vast field for future development, although only one area, that of antifertility drugs based on LHRH antagonists, shows any promise of immediate success. Industrial research approaches to new peptide agonists and antagonists mainly rely at present on rational drug design through structural analogies. Other fruitful approaches to be considered are the screening of natural microbial and plant products and the possible application of genetic engineering techniques.

  11. Structure/function correlations among coupled binuclear copper proteins through spectroscopic and reactivity studies of NspF

    PubMed Central

    Ginsbach, Jake W.; Kieber-Emmons, Matthew T.; Nomoto, Ryohei; Noguchi, Akio; Ohnishi, Yasuo; Solomon, Edward I.

    2012-01-01

    The terminal step of 4-hydroxy-3-nitrosobenzamide biosynthesis in Streptomyces murayamaensis is performed by NspF, a mono-oxygenase that converts o-aminophenols to the corresponding nitroso product (hydroxyanilinase activity). Previous biochemical characterization of the resting form of NspF suggested that this enzyme belonged to the coupled binuclear copper enzyme (CBC) family. Another member of this enzyme family, tyrosinase, is able to mono-oxygenate monophenols (monophenolase activity) but not o-aminophenols. To gain insight into the unique reactivity of NspF, we have generated and characterized the oxy form of its active site. The observation of spectral features identical to those of oxy-tyrosinase indicates that oxy-NspF contains a Cu2O2 core where peroxide is coordinated in a μ-η2∶ η2 mode, confirming that NspF is a CBC enzyme. This oxy form is found to react with monophenols, indicating that, like tyrosinase, NspF also possesses monophenolase activity. A comparison of the two electrophilic mechanisms for the monophenolase and hydroxyanilinase activity indicates a large geometric change between their respective transition states. The potential for specific interactions between the protein pocket and the substrate in each transition state is discussed within the context of the differential reactivity of this family of enzymes with equivalent μ-η2∶η2 peroxy bridged coupled binuclear copper active sites. PMID:22711806

  12. Interesting biological activities from plants traditionally used by Native Australians.

    PubMed

    Pennacchio, Marcello; Kemp, Annabeth S; Taylor, Rory P; Wickens, Kristen M; Kienow, Lucie

    2005-01-15

    Four plants routinely used for medicinal purposes by Native Australians were screened for various biological activities. Methanol extracts of Eremophila maculata, Acacia auriculoformis and Acacia bivenosa exhibited antibiotic effects, while Eremophila alternifolia yielded an extract that induced significant changes to the heart activity of spontaneously hypertensive rats. We report on these biological activities.

  13. Substrate-promoted formation of a catalytically competent binuclear center and regulation of reactivity in a glycerophosphodiesterase from Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Hadler, Kieran S; Tanifum, Eric A; Yip, Sylvia Hsu-Chen; Mitić, Natasa; Guddat, Luke W; Jackson, Colin J; Gahan, Lawrence R; Nguyen, Kelly; Carr, Paul D; Ollis, David L; Hengge, Alvan C; Larrabee, James A; Schenk, Gerhard

    2008-10-29

    The glycerophosphodiesterase (GpdQ) from Enterobacter aerogenes is a promiscuous binuclear metallohydrolase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of mono-, di-, and triester substrates, including some organophosphate pesticides and products of the degradation of nerve agents. GpdQ has attracted recent attention as a promising enzymatic bioremediator. Here, we have investigated the catalytic mechanism of this versatile enzyme using a range of techniques. An improved crystal structure (1.9 A resolution) illustrates the presence of (i) an extended hydrogen bond network in the active site, and (ii) two possible nucleophiles, i.e., water/hydroxide ligands, coordinated to one or both metal ions. While it is at present not possible to unambiguously distinguish between these two possibilities, a reaction mechanism is proposed whereby the terminally bound H2O/OH(-) acts as the nucleophile, activated via hydrogen bonding by the bridging water molecule. Furthermore, the presence of substrate promotes the formation of a catalytically competent binuclear center by significantly enhancing the binding affinity of one of the metal ions in the active site. Asn80 appears to display coordination flexibility that may modulate enzyme activity. Kinetic data suggest that the rate-limiting step occurs after hydrolysis, i.e., the release of the phosphate moiety and the concomitant dissociation of one of the metal ions and/or associated conformational changes. Thus, it is proposed that GpdQ employs an intricate regulatory mechanism for catalysis, where coordination flexibility in one of the two metal binding sites is essential for optimal activity.

  14. Substitution of silver for copper in the binuclear Mo/Cu center of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from Oligotropha carboxidovorans.

    PubMed

    Wilcoxen, Jarett; Snider, Samantha; Hille, Russ

    2011-08-24

    Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from Oligotropha carboxidovorans catalyzes the aerobic oxidation of carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide, providing the organism both a carbon source and energy for growth. The active site of the native enzyme is a unique binuclear molybdenum- and copper-containing center. Here we show that silver can be substituted for copper in the active site to yield a functional enzyme. The characteristic hyperfine coupling of the I = ½ nucleus of Ag is evident in the EPR signal of the binuclear active site observed upon reduction with CO, indicating both the incorporation of silver into the active site and, remarkably, retention of the catalytic activity. The silver-substituted enzyme is reduced by CO with an observed limiting rate constant of 8.1 s(-1), which can be compared with the value of 51 s(-1) for the wild-type enzyme. Steady-state kinetics for the Ag-substituted enzyme yielded k(cat) = 8.2 s(-1) and K(m) = 2.95 μM at pH 7.2.

  15. Office of Biological Informatics and Outreach geospatial technology activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1998-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Office of Biological Informatics and Outreach (OBIO) in Reston, Virginia, and its Center for Biological Informatics (CBI) in Denver, Colorado, provide leadership in the development and use of geospatial technologies to advance the Nation's biological science activities.

  16. Lung biological activity of American attapulgite

    SciTech Connect

    Begin, R.; Masse, S.; Rola-Pleszczynski, M.; Geoffroy, M.; Martel, M.; Desmarais, Y.; Sebastien, P.

    1987-04-01

    Attapulgite is a fibrous mineral industrially consumed at the rate of over a million tons per year but the biological activity of the material is not fully known. To evaluate the in vivo toxicity of the fibrous materials, they exposed the tracheal lobe of 16 sheep to a single exposure of either 100 ml saline, 100 mg UICC asbestos fibers in 100 ml saline, 100 mg short asbestos fibers in 100 ml saline, or 100 mg attapulgite in 100 ml saline. The animals were studied by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) at Days 2, 12, 24, 40, and 60 and by autopsy at Day 60. In the saline-exposed sheep, BAL and lung histology did not change. In the UICC asbestos-exposed animals, they reproduced the BAL changes previously reported. In the short asbestos-exposed sheep, there were no significant BAL changes. In the attapulgite sheep, they found significant and sustained increases in total BAL cells, macrophages, neutrophils, fibronectin, lactate dehydrogenase, ..beta..-glucuronidase, but BAL cellularity returned to control levels by Day 60 whereas in the UICC asbestos-exposed sheep, it remained significantly above control. Lung histology demonstrated the characteristic peribronchiolar fibrosing alveolitis in the UICC asbestos-exposed sheep, whereas macrophagic alveolitis with minimal airway distortion was seen in the short asbestos-exposed sheep, whereas macrophagic alveolitis with minimal airway distortion was seen in the short asbestos-exposed sheep and in all of the attapulgite-exposed sheep but three which had typical peribronchiolar alveolitis quite similar to that observed in UICC-exposed sheep, but of lower intensity.

  17. The ice nucleation activity of biological aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grothe, H.; Pummer, B.; Bauer, H.; Bernardi, J.

    2012-04-01

    Primary Biological Aerosol Particles (PBAPs), including bacteria, spores and pollen may be important for several atmospheric processes. Particularly, the ice nucleation caused by PBAPs is a topic of growing interest, since their impact on ice cloud formation and thus on radiative forcing, an important parameter in global climate is not yet fully understood. In laboratory model studies we investigated the ice nucleation activity of selected PBAPs. We studied the immersion mode freezing using water-oil emulsion, which we observed by optical microscopy. We particularly focused on pollen. We show that pollen of different species strongly differ in their ice nucleation behavior. The average freezing temperatures in laboratory experiments range from 240 K to 255 K. As the most efficient nuclei (silver birch, Scots pine and common juniper pollen) have a distribution area up to the Northern timberline, their ice nucleation activity might be a cryoprotective mechanism. For comparison the ice nucleation activity of Snomax, fungal spores, and mushrooms will be discussed as well. In the past, pollen have been rejected as important atmospheric IN, as they are not as abundant in the atmosphere as bacteria or mineral dust and are too heavy to reach higher altitudes. However, in our experiments (Pummer et al. 2011) it turned out that water, which had been in contact with pollen and then been separated from the bodies, nucleates as good as the pollen grains themselves. So the ice nuclei have to be easily-suspendable macromolecules (100-300 kDa) located on the pollen. Once extracted, they can be distributed further through the atmosphere than the heavy pollen grains and so augment the impact of pollen on ice cloud formation even in the upper troposphere. It is widely known, that material from the pollen, like allergens and sugars, can indeed leave the pollen body and be distributed independently. The most probable mechanism is the pollen grain bursting by rain, which releases

  18. The Infusion of Environmental Activities into a Secondary Biology Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Helen M.

    1976-01-01

    Reviewed are "adventure-type" environmental education activities incorporated into a secondary level biology course. Student wilderness experiences included 24 weekend activities of hiking, bird watching, camping, and cross-country skiing. (SL)

  19. Multifunctional and biologically active matrices from multicomponent polymeric solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiick, Kristi L. (Inventor); Yamaguchi, Nori (Inventor); Rabolt, John (Inventor); Casper, Cheryl (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A functionalized electrospun matrix for the controlled-release of biologically active agents, such as growth factors, is presented. The functionalized matrix comprises a matrix polymer, a compatibilizing polymer and a biomolecule or other small functioning molecule. In certain aspects the electrospun polymer fibers comprise at least one biologically active molecule functionalized with low molecular weight heparin.

  20. Spectral characterization, thermal and biological activity studies of Schiff base complexes derived from 4,4‧-Methylenedianiline, ethanol amine and benzil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emam, Sanaa Moustafa

    2017-04-01

    Some new metal(II) complexes of asymmetric Schiff base ligand were prepared by template technique. The shaped complexes are in binuclear structures and were explained through elemental analysis, molar conductivity, various spectroscopic methods (IR, U.V-Vis, XRD, ESR), thermal (TG) and magnetic moment measurements. The IR spectra were done demonstrating that the Schiff base ligand acts as neutral tetradentate moiety in all metal complexes. The electronic absorption spectra represented octahedral geometry for all complexes, while, the ESR spectra for Cu(II) complex showed axially symmetric g-tensor parameter with g׀׀ > g⊥ > 2.0023 indicating to 2B1g ground state with (dx2-y2)1 configuration. The nature of the solid residue created from TG estimations was affirmed utilizing IR and XRD spectra. The biological activity of the prepared complexes was studied against Land Snails. Additionally, the in vitro antitumor activity of the synthesized complexes with Hepatocellular Carcinoma cell (Hep-G2) was examined. It was observed that Zn(II) complex (5), exhibits a high inhibition of growth of the cell line with IC50 of 7.09 μg/mL.

  1. Nuclearity and cooperativity effects in binuclear catalysts and cocatalysts for olefin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongbo; Marks, Tobin J

    2006-10-17

    A series of bimetallic organo-group 4 "constrained geometry" catalysts and binuclear bisborane and bisborate cocatalysts have been synthesized to probe catalyst center-catalyst center cooperativity effects on olefin enchainment in homogenous olefin polymerization and copolymerization processes. Significant nuclearity effects are found versus mononuclear controls, and the effect can be correlated with metal-metal approach distances and ion pairing effects. Novel polymer structures can be obtained by using such binuclear catalyst/cocatalyst systems.

  2. Milk inhibits the biological activity of ricin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ricin is a highly toxic protein produced by the castor plant Ricinus communis. The toxin is relatively easy to isolate and can be used as a biological weapon. There is great interest in identifying effective inhibitors for ricin. In this study, we demonstrated by three independent assays that compon...

  3. Biological effects related to geomagnetic activity and possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Krylov, Viacheslav V

    2017-06-21

    This review presents contemporary data on the biological effects of geomagnetic activity. Correlations between geomagnetic indices and biological parameters and experimental studies that used simulated geomagnetic storms to detect possible responses of organisms to these events in nature are discussed. Possible mechanisms by which geomagnetic activity influences organisms are also considered. Special attention is paid to the idea that geomagnetic activity is perceived by organisms as a disruption of diurnal geomagnetic variation. This variation, in turn, is viewed by way of a secondary zeitgeber for biological circadian rhythms. Additionally, we discuss the utility of cryptochrome as a biological detector of geomagnetic storms. The possible involvement of melatonin and protein coding by the CG8198 gene in the biological effects of geomagnetic activity are discussed. Perspectives for studying mechanisms by which geomagnetic storms affect organisms are suggested. Bioelectromagnetics. 2017;9999:1-14. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Biology Research Activities: Teacher's Edition (with Answers).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Barbara

    This book is part of the series "Explorations in Science" which contains enrichment activities for the general science curriculum. Each book in the series contains innovative and traditional projects for both the bright and average, the self-motivated, and those who find activity motivating. Each activity is self-contained and provides everything…

  5. Biology Research Activities: Teacher's Edition (with Answers).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Barbara

    This book is part of the series "Explorations in Science" which contains enrichment activities for the general science curriculum. Each book in the series contains innovative and traditional projects for both the bright and average, the self-motivated, and those who find activity motivating. Each activity is self-contained and provides everything…

  6. Strong DNA deformation required for extremely slow DNA threading intercalation by a binuclear ruthenium complex

    PubMed Central

    Almaqwashi, Ali A.; Paramanathan, Thayaparan; Lincoln, Per; Rouzina, Ioulia; Westerlund, Fredrik; Williams, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    DNA intercalation by threading is expected to yield high affinity and slow dissociation, properties desirable for DNA-targeted therapeutics. To measure these properties, we utilize single molecule DNA stretching to quantify both the binding affinity and the force-dependent threading intercalation kinetics of the binuclear ruthenium complex Δ,Δ-[μ‐bidppz‐(phen)4Ru2]4+ (Δ,Δ-P). We measure the DNA elongation at a range of constant stretching forces using optical tweezers, allowing direct characterization of the intercalation kinetics as well as the amount intercalated at equilibrium. Higher forces exponentially facilitate the intercalative binding, leading to a profound decrease in the binding site size that results in one ligand intercalated at almost every DNA base stack. The zero force Δ,Δ-P intercalation Kd is 44 nM, 25-fold stronger than the analogous mono-nuclear ligand (Δ-P). The force-dependent kinetics analysis reveals a mechanism that requires DNA elongation of 0.33 nm for association, relaxation to an equilibrium elongation of 0.19 nm, and an additional elongation of 0.14 nm from the equilibrium state for dissociation. In cells, a molecule with binding properties similar to Δ,Δ-P may rapidly bind DNA destabilized by enzymes during replication or transcription, but upon enzyme dissociation it is predicted to remain intercalated for several hours, thereby interfering with essential biological processes. PMID:25245944

  7. Characterization of Metastable Intermediates Formed in the Reaction Between a Mn(II) Complex and Dioxygen, Including a Crystallographic Structure of a Binuclear Mn(III)-Peroxo Species

    PubMed Central

    Coggins, Michael K.; Sun, Xianru; Kwak, Yeonju; Solomon, Edward I.; Rybak-Akimova, Elena; Kovacs, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Transition-metal peroxos have been implicated as key intermediates in a variety of critical biological processes involving O2. Due to their highly reactive nature, very few metal-peroxos have been characterized. The dioxygen chemistry of manganese remains largely unexplored despite the proposed involvement of a binuclear Mn-peroxo, either as a precursor to O2, or derived from O2, in both photosynthetic H2O oxidation and DNA biosynthesis, arguably two of the most fundamental processes of life. Neither of these biological intermediates has been observed. Herein we describe the dioxygen chemistry of coordinatively unsaturated [MnII(SMe2N4(6-MeDPEN))] +(1), and the characterization of intermediates formed en route to a binuclear mono-oxo bridged Mn(III) product {[MnIII(SMe2N4(6-MeDPEN)]2-(μ-O)}2+ (2), the oxo atom of which is derived from 18O2. At low-temperatures, a dioxygen intermediate, [Mn(SMe2N4(6-MeDPEN))(O2)]+ (4), is observed (by stopped-flow) to rapidly and irreversibly form in this reaction (k1(−10 °C)= 3780±180M−1s−1, ΔH1‡ = 26.4±1.7 kJ mol−1, ΔS1‡ = − 75.6±6.8 J mol−1K−1), and then convert more slowly (k2(−10 °C)= 417±3.2 M−1s−1, ΔH2‡ = 47.1±1.4 kJ mol−1, ΔS2‡ = − 15.0±5.7 J mol−1K−1) to a species 3 with isotopically sensitive stretches at νo-o (Δ18O) = 819(47) cm−1, kO–O= 3.02 mdyn/Å, and νMn-O(Δ18O) = 611(25) cm−1 consistent with a peroxo. Intermediate 3 releases approximately 0.5 equiv of H2O2 per Mn ion upon protonation, and the rate of conversion of 4 to 3 is dependent on [Mn(II)] concentration, consistent with the formation of a binuclear Mn-peroxo. This was verified by X-ray crystallography, where the peroxo of {[MnIII(SMe2N4(6-Me-DPEN)]2(trans–μ–1,2–O2)}2+ (3) is shown to be bridging between two Mn(III) ions in an end-on trans-μ-1,2-fashion. This represents the first characterized example of a binuclear Mn(III)-peroxo, and a rare case in which more than one intermediate is observed

  8. Binuclear complexes of bis-chelating ligands based on [1,4]dioxocino[6,5-b:7,8-b']dipyridine moieties.

    PubMed

    Casalino, Marcello; De Felice, Vincenzo; Fraldi, Natascia; Panunzi, Achille; Ruffo, Francesco

    2009-07-06

    Ligands based on a [1,4]dioxocino[6,5-b:7,8-b']dipyridine (doxpy) core were prepared and characterized. They all present two equal chelating moieties each one including one N, O, or S donor in addition to a pyridinic nitrogen. These ligands displayed high selectivity for the formation of binuclear complexes. At least one d(8) ion (Pd(II) or Pt(II)) complex was prepared for each type of ligand. The stereochemical behavior of the ligands is discussed on the basis of NMR spectra. Stable atropoisomers were obtained in the case of N-oxides or in case chiral centers were introduced in the ethereal bridge. As for the complexes, stable enantiomers appear to be in principle attainable for all the new compounds. A test on the cooperative ability of two Pd(II) centers has been grounded on the microstructure of the styrene/CO copolymer catalytically produced by a binuclear pyridine-imino complex. In fact, comparison with the microstructure of the copolymers produced by related single-site mono- and (open-chain) binuclear catalysts reveals significant difference, thus giving indication of possible synergic metal activity.

  9. Ficus carica L. (Moraceae): Phytochemistry, Traditional Uses and Biological Activities

    PubMed Central

    Mawa, Shukranul; Husain, Khairana; Jantan, Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the botanical features of Ficus carica L. (Moraceae), its wide variety of chemical constituents, its use in traditional medicine as remedies for many health problems, and its biological activities. The plant has been used traditionally to treat various ailments such as gastric problems, inflammation, and cancer. Phytochemical studies on the leaves and fruits of the plant have shown that they are rich in phenolics, organic acids, and volatile compounds. However, there is little information on the phytochemicals present in the stem and root. Reports on the biological activities of the plant are mainly on its crude extracts which have been proven to possess many biological activities. Some of the most interesting therapeutic effects include anticancer, hepatoprotective, hypoglycemic, hypolipidemic, and antimicrobial activities. Thus, studies related to identification of the bioactive compounds and correlating them to their biological activities are very useful for further research to explore the potential of F. carica as a source of therapeutic agents. PMID:24159359

  10. Biological Activity of Recently Discovered Halogenated Marine Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Gribble, Gordon W.

    2015-01-01

    This review presents the biological activity—antibacterial, antifungal, anti-parasitic, antiviral, antitumor, antiinflammatory, antioxidant, and enzymatic activity—of halogenated marine natural products discovered in the past five years. Newly discovered examples that do not report biological activity are not included. PMID:26133553

  11. Sensitive bioassay for detection of biologically active ricin in food

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The potential use of ricin as an agent of biological warfare highlights the need to develop fast and effective methods to detect biologically active ricin. The current “gold standard” for ricin detection is an in vivo mouse bioassay; however, this method is not practical to test on a large number of...

  12. Biological activities of Croton palanostigma Klotzsch

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Eduardo Ferreira; Rosario, Diele Magno; Silva Veiga, Andreza Socorro; Brasil, Davi Do Socorro Barros; Silveira, Fernando Tobias; Dolabela, Maria Fâni

    2015-01-01

    Background: Different species of Croton are used in traditional Amazonian medicine. Among the popular uses are treatment of bacterial diseases, poorly healing wounds and fevers. Objective: This study evaluated the antileishmanial, antiplasmodial and antimicrobial activities of the extracts and diterpenes of Croton palanostigma Klotzsch (Euphorbiaceae). Materials and Methods: Leaves and bark were extracted with dichloromethane and methanol. The bark dichloromethane extract (BDE) was chromatographed on a column, obtaining cordatin and aparisthman. The extracts and diterpenes were assayed thought agar disk diffusion method and their bactericidal or fungicidal effects were evaluated by minimum bactericidal or fungicidal concentration. The antiplasmodial activity was evaluated after 24 and 72 h of exposition. The antileishmanial activity was performed on promastigotes forms of Leishmania amazonensis. Results: The bark methanol extract (BME) and cordatin were not active against any microbial strains tested; BDE and leaves methanol extract (LME) were positive for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and aparisthman was positive for Candida albicans. In the determination of the minimum bactericidal concentration, neither of them were active in the highest concentration tested. The extracts and diterpenes were inactive in Plasmodium falciparum, except the LME in 72 h. Any extract was shown to be active in promastigote forms of L. amazonensis. Conclusion: These results indicate that the BDE and LME did not inhibit the bacterial growth, then they probably had bacteriostatic effect. LME presented activity in P. falciparum. PMID:26246738

  13. Biological activities of Croton palanostigma Klotzsch

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Eduardo Ferreira; Rosario, Diele Magno; Silva Veiga, Andreza Socorro; Barros Brasil, Davi Do Socorro; Silveira, Fernando Tobias; Dolabela, Maria Fâni

    2016-01-01

    Background: Different species of Croton are used in traditional Amazonian medicine. Among the popular uses are treatment of bacterial diseases, poorly healing wounds and fevers. Objective: This study evaluated the antileishmanial, antiplasmodial and antimicrobial activities of the extracts and diterpenes of Croton palanostigma Klotzsch (Euphorbiaceae). Materials and Methods: Leaves and bark were extracted with dichloromethane and methanol. The bark dichloromethane extract (BDE) was chromatographed on a column, obtaining cordatin and aparisthman. The extracts and diterpenes were assayed thought agar disk diffusion method and their bactericidal or fungicidal effects were evaluated by minimum bactericidal or fungicidal concentration. The antiplasmodial activity was evaluated after 24 and 72 h of exposition. The antileishmanial activity was performed on promastigotes forms of Leishmania amazonensis. Results: The bark methanol extract (BME) and cordatin were not active against any microbial strains tested; BDE and leaves methanol extract (LME) were positive for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and aparisthman was positive for Candida albicans. In the determination of the minimum bactericidal concentration, neither of them were active in the highest concentration tested. The extracts and diterpenes were inactive in Plasmodium falciparum, except the LME in 72 h. Any extract was shown to be active in promastigote forms of L. amazonensis. Conclusion: These results indicate that the BDE and LME did not inhibit the bacterial growth, then they probably had bacteriostatic effect. LME presented activity in P. falciparum. PMID:27041867

  14. Methods of increasing secretion of polypeptides having biological activity

    SciTech Connect

    Merino, Sandra

    2015-04-14

    The present invention relates to methods for producing a secreted polypeptide having biological activity, comprising: (a) transforming a fungal host cell with a fusion protein construct encoding a fusion protein, which comprises: (i) a first polynucleotide encoding a signal peptide; (ii) a second polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of an endoglucanase or a portion thereof; and (iii) a third polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of a polypeptide having biological activity; wherein the signal peptide and at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase increases secretion of the polypeptide having biological activity compared to the absence of at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase; (b) cultivating the transformed fungal host cell under conditions suitable for production of the fusion protein; and (c) recovering the fusion protein, a component thereof, or a combination thereof, having biological activity, from the cultivation medium.

  15. Methods of increasing secretion of polypeptides having biological activity

    DOEpatents

    Merino, Sandra

    2013-10-01

    The present invention relates to methods for producing a secreted polypeptide having biological activity, comprising: (a) transforming a fungal host cell with a fusion protein construct encoding a fusion protein, which comprises: (i) a first polynucleotide encoding a signal peptide; (ii) a second polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of an endoglucanase or a portion thereof; and (iii) a third polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of a polypeptide having biological activity; wherein the signal peptide and at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase increases secretion of the polypeptide having biological activity compared to the absence of at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase; (b) cultivating the transformed fungal host cell under conditions suitable for production of the fusion protein; and (c) recovering the fusion protein, a component thereof, or a combination thereof, having biological activity, from the cultivation medium.

  16. Methods of increasing secretion of polypeptides having biological activity

    DOEpatents

    Merino, Sandra

    2014-10-28

    The present invention relates to methods for producing a secreted polypeptide having biological activity, comprising: (a) transforming a fungal host cell with a fusion protein construct encoding a fusion protein, which comprises: (i) a first polynucleotide encoding a signal peptide; (ii) a second polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of an endoglucanase or a portion thereof; and (iii) a third polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of a polypeptide having biological activity; wherein the signal peptide and at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase increases secretion of the polypeptide having biological activity compared to the absence of at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase; (b) cultivating the transformed fungal host cell under conditions suitable for production of the fusion protein; and (c) recovering the fusion protein, a component thereof, or a combination thereof, having biological activity, from the cultivation medium.

  17. Methods of increasing secretion of polypeptides having biological activity

    DOEpatents

    Merino, Sandra

    2014-05-27

    The present invention relates to methods for producing a secreted polypeptide having biological activity, comprising: (a) transforming a fungal host cell with a fusion protein construct encoding a fusion protein, which comprises: (i) a first polynucleotide encoding a signal peptide; (ii) a second polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of an endoglucanase or a portion thereof; and (iii) a third polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of a polypeptide having biological activity; wherein the signal peptide and at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase increases secretion of the polypeptide having biological activity compared to the absence of at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase; (b) cultivating the transformed fungal host cell under conditions suitable for production of the fusion protein; and (c) recovering the fusion protein, a component thereof, or a combination thereof, having biological activity, from the cultivation medium.

  18. Multifunctional and biologically active matrices from multicomponent polymeric solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiick, Kristi L. (Inventor); Yamaguchi, Nori (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a biologically active functionalized electrospun matrix to permit immobilization and long-term delivery of biologically active agents. In particular the invention relates to a functionalized polymer matrix comprising a matrix polymer, a compatibilizing polymer and a biomolecule or other small functioning molecule. In certain aspects the electrospun polymer fibers comprise at least one biologically active molecule functionalized with low molecular weight heparin. Examples of active molecules that may be used with the multicomponent polymer of the invention include, for example, a drug, a biopolymer, for example a growth factor, a protein, a peptide, a nucleotide, a polysaccharide, a biological macromolecule or the like. The invention is further directed to the formation of functionalized crosslinked matrices, such as hydrogels, that include at least one functionalized compatibilizing polymer capable of assembly.

  19. Integrating Biological Activity and Exposure in the US EPA's ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    presentation at the IUTOX meeting in Mexico on Oct. 3, 2016. on Integrating Biological Activity and Exposure in the US EPA's Toxcast Program. presentation at the IUTOX meeting in Mexico on Oct. 3, 2016.

  20. Physical activity and biological maturation: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Bacil, Eliane Denise Araújo; Mazzardo, Oldemar; Rech, Cassiano Ricardo; Legnani, Rosimeide Francisco dos Santos; de Campos, Wagner

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the association between physical activity (PA) and biological maturation in children and adolescents. DATA SOURCE: We performed a systematic review in April 2013 in the electronic databases of PubMed/MEDLINE, SportDiscus, Web of Science and LILACS without time restrictions. A total of 628 potentially relevant articles were identified and 10 met the inclusion criteria for this review: cross-sectional or longitudinal studies, published in Portuguese, English or Spanish, with schoolchildren aged 9-15 years old of both genders. DATA SYNTHESIS: Despite the heterogeneity of the studies, there was an inverse association between PA and biological maturation. PA decreases with increased biological and chronological age in both genders. Boys tend to be more physically active than girls; however, when controlling for biological age, the gender differences disappear. The association between PA and timing of maturation varies between the genders. Variation in the timing of biological maturation affects the tracking of PA in early adolescent girls. This review suggests that mediators (BMI, depression, low self-esteem, and concerns about body weight) can explain the association between PA and biological maturation. CONCLUSIONS: There is an association between PA and biological maturation. PA decreases with increasing biological age with no differences between genders. As for the timing of biological maturation, this association varies between genders. PMID:25583624

  1. Activated Sludge. Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boe, Owen K.; Klopping, Paul H.

    This student manual contains the textual material for a seven-lesson unit on activated sludge. Topic areas addressed in the lessons include: (1) activated sludge concepts and components (including aeration tanks, aeration systems, clarifiers, and sludge pumping systems); (2) activated sludge variations and modes; (3) biological nature of activated…

  2. Biologically active secondary metabolites from Asphodelus microcarpus.

    PubMed

    Ghoneim, Mohammed M; Ma, Guoyi; El-Hela, Atef A; Mohammad, Abd-Elsalam I; Kottob, Saeid; El-Ghaly, Sayed; Cutler, Stephen J; Ross, Samir A

    2013-08-01

    Bioassay guided fractionation of the ethanolic extract of Asphodelus microcarpus Salzm.et Vivi (Asphodelaceae) resulted in the isolation of one new metabolite, 1,6-dimethoxy-3-methyl-2-naphthoic acid (1) as well as nine known compounds: asphodelin (2), chrysophanol (3), 8-methoxychrysophanol (4), emodin (5), 2-acetyl-1,8-dimethoxy-3-methylnaphthalene (6), 10-(chrysophanol-7'-yl)-10-hydroxychrysophanol-9-anthrone (7), aloesaponol-III-8-methyl ether (8), ramosin (9) and aestivin (10). The compounds were identified by 1D and 2D NMR and HRESIMS. Compounds 3, 6 and 10 were isolated for the first time from this species. Compounds 3 and 4 showed moderate to weak antileishmanial activity with IC50 values of 14.3 and 35.1 microg/mL, respectively. Compound 4 exhibited moderate antifungal activity against Cryptococcus neoformans with an IC50 value of 15.0 microg/mL, while compounds 5, 7 and 10 showed good to potent activity against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with IC50 values of 6.6, 9.4 microg/mL and 1.4 microg/mL respectively. Compounds 5, 8 and 9 displayed good activity against S. aureus with IC50 values of 3.2, 7.3 and 8.5 microg/mL, respectively. Compounds 7 and 9 exhibited a potent cytotoxic activity against leukemia LH60 and K562 cell lines. Compound 10 showed potent antimalarial activities against both chloroquine-sensitive and chloroquine-resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum with IC50 values in the range of 0.8-0.7 microg/mL without showing any cytotoxicity to mammalian cells.

  3. Synthesis and biological activity of radiolabeled phytosterols

    SciTech Connect

    De Palma, A.

    1984-01-01

    /sup 3/H and /sup 14/C-labeled phytosterols were synthesized for the purpose of elucidating insect sterol side-chain dealkylating mechanisms. Sitosterol, stigmasterol, and the 29-fluoro derivatives of these compounds, which are highly toxic, were labeled with /sup 3/H at C-29 in order to study the fate of the two-carbon dealkylation product in vivo and in vitro. The first rapid, reliable in vitro dealkylation bioassay was developed using doubly-labeled (29-/sup 3/H)-(24-/sup 14/C) fucosterol epoxides as the substrates, incubated with midgut preparations from Manduca sexta, the tobacco hornworm. Since C-28 and C-29 are lost in the dealkylation process, the extent of dealkylation is expressed as the change in the isotopic ratio when the system is partitioned between an organic solvent and water after incubation. As predicted, the /sup 3/H//sup 14/C ratio decreases in the organic layer as a function of time, due to loss of /sup 3/H into the aqueous phase as acetate or a biological equivalent. This ratio likewise increases in the aqueous phase for the same reason. The (29-/sup 3/H) phytosterols alone are reliable substrates for the first rapid in vivo bioassay of phytosterol dealkylation.

  4. Transport and biological activities of bile acids.

    PubMed

    Zwicker, Brittnee L; Agellon, Luis B

    2013-07-01

    Bile acids have emerged as important biological molecules that support the solubilization of various lipids and lipid-soluble compounds in the gut, and the regulation of gene expression and cellular function. Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver and eventually released into the small intestine. The majority of bile acids are recovered in the distal end of the small intestine and then returned to the liver for reuse. The components of the mechanism responsible for the recycling of bile acids within the enterohepatic circulation have been identified whereas the mechanism for intracellular transport is less understood. Recently, the ileal lipid binding protein (ILBP; human gene symbol FABP6) was shown to be needed for the efficient transport of bile acids from the apical side to the basolateral side of enterocytes in the distal intestine. This review presents an overview of the transport of bile acids between the liver and the gut as well as within hepatocytes and enterocytes. A variety of pathologies is associated with the malfunction of the bile acid transport system.

  5. Biologically active phenols from Saussurea medusa.

    PubMed

    Fan, Cheng-Qi; Yue, Jian-Min

    2003-03-06

    Sixteen phenolic compounds were isolated from the polar fraction of Saussurea medusa and were structurally elucidated by chemical evidences and spectral methods. These compounds include two new lignan glucosides, namely medusasides A (1) and B (2), and fourteen known phenolic compounds (3-16). One major compound, apigenin 7-O-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranoside] (6) showed remarkable activity to attenuate the scopolamine induced memory deficit of mice. Compound 6 and another major one, quercetin (8) also exhibited moderate cell protecting activities against hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) induced PC12 cell damage.

  6. Biologically active steroidal glycosides from Tribulus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Bedir, E; Khan, I A; Walker, L A

    2002-07-01

    The steroidal saponin constituents obtained from Tribulus terrestris were tested for their antimicrobial and cytotoxic effects. The spirostanol-based steroidal saponins 1-3 exhibited remarkable activity against fungal organisms (Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans) and cancer cell lines [human malignant melanoma (SK-MEL), human oral epidermoid carcinoma (KB), human breast ductal carcinoma (BT-549), and human ovary carcinoma (SK-OV-3)], while none of the compounds possessing the furostanol framework 4-7 showed activity. The most active spirostanol glycoside, compound 3 exhibited a broad range of anticancer activity against cell lines, SK-MEL, KB, BT-549 and SK-OV-3 at IC50s of 6.0, 7.0, 6.0 and 8.2 micrograms/ml, respectively, while compounds 1 and 2 showed selective cytotoxicity against SK-MEL at 6.7 and 9.1 micrograms/ml, respectively. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) in antifungal bioassay for compounds 1-3 varied from 1.5 to 6.2 micrograms/ml, which prompted to conclude certain structural features are required for these bioactivities.

  7. Building biologically active nucleic acid nanocomplexes.

    PubMed

    Smith, C I Edvard; Lundin, Karin E; Simonson, Oscar E; Moreno, Pedro M D; Svahn, Mathias G; Wenska, Malgorzata; Strömberg, Roger

    2008-01-01

    The Bioplex technology allows the hybridization of functional entities to various forms of nucleic acids by the use of synthetic nucleic acid analogs. Such supramolecular assemblies can be made in a predetermined fashion and can confer new properties. The Zorro technology is based on a novel construct generated to simultaneously bind to both DNA strands. Such compounds may have gene silencing activity.

  8. Relationship between insulin A chain regions and insulin biological activities

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shi-Zhen; Huang, Yi-Ding; Jie, Xin-Feng; Feng, You-Min; Niu, Jing-Yi

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To study the relationship between insulin A chain regions and insulin biological activities, we designed a series of insulin analogues with changes at A21, A12-18 of C-terminal helical region and A8-10 located in the region of A6-A11 intra-chain disulphide bond. METHODS: Insulin A-chain analogues were prepared by stepwise Fmoc solid-phase manual synthesis and then combined with natural B-chain of porcine insulin to yield corresponding insulin analogues. Their biological activities were tested by receptor binding, mouse convulsion and immunological assay. RESULTS: [A21Ala]Ins retains 70.3% receptor binding capacity and 60% in vivo biological activity. [DesA13-14, A21Ala]Ins and [DesA12-13-14-15, A21Ala] Ins still have definite biological activity, 7.9% and 4.0% receptor binding, and 6.2% and 3.3% in vivo biological activity respectively. [A15Asn, A17Pro, A21Ala]Ins maintains 10.4% receptor binding and 10% in vivo biological activity. [A8His, A9Arg, A10Pro, A21Ala]Ins, [A8His, A9Lys, A10Pro, A21Ala]Ins and [A8His, A9Lys, A10Arg, A21Ala]Ins have 51.9%, 44.3% and 32.1% receptor binding respectively, 50%, 40% and 30% in vivo biological activity respectively, and 28.8%, 29.6% and 15.4% immunological activity respectively. CONCLUSION: A21Asn can be replaced by simple amino acid residues. The A chains with gradually damaged structur al integrity in A12-18 helical region and the demolition of the A12-18 helical region by the substitution of Pro and Asn for A17Glu and A15Gln respectively ca n combine with the B chain and the combination products show definite biological activity, the helical structure of A12-18 is essential for biological activities of insulin. A8-10 is not much concerned with biological activities, but is much more important antigenically in binding to its antibodies, these results may help us design a new type of insulin analogue molecule. PMID:11819600

  9. Isoxanthohumol--Biologically active hop flavonoid.

    PubMed

    Żołnierczyk, Anna Katarzyna; Mączka, Wanda Krystyna; Grabarczyk, Małgorzata; Wińska, Katarzyna; Woźniak, Edyta; Anioł, Mirosław

    2015-06-01

    Isoxanthohumol (IXN), apart from xanthohumol (XN) and 8-prenylnaringenin (8PN), is one of the most important prenylflavonoids found in hops. Another natural source of this compound is a shrub Sophora flavescens, used in traditional Chinese medicine. Main dietary source of IXN is beer, and the compound is produced from XN during wort boiling. In the human body, the compound is O-demethylated to 8PN, the strongest known phytoestrogen. This process takes place in the liver and in the intestine, where it is mediated by local microflora. It has been reported in some studies that even though beer contains small amounts of hops and its preparations, these compounds may affect the functioning of the human body. IXN exhibits an antiproliferative activity against human cell lines typical for breast cancer (MCF-7), ovarian cancer (A-2780), prostate cancer (DU145 and PC-3), and colon cancer (HT-29 and SW620) cells. It strongly inhibits the activation of the following carcinogens: 2-amino-3-methylimidazol-[4,5-f]quinoline and aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) via human cytochrome P450 (CYP1A2). It also inhibits the production of prostate specific antigen (PSA). IXN significantly reduces the expression of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in the case of invasive breast cancer MDA-MB-231. It interferes with JAK/STAT signaling pathway and inhibits the expression of pro1inflammatory genes in the monoblastic leukemia cell line (MonoMac6). It activates apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). In addition, IXN shows an antiviral activity towards herpes viruses (HSV1 and HSV2) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV).

  10. Biological activities of yarrow species (Achillea spp.).

    PubMed

    Nemeth, E; Bernath, J

    2008-01-01

    The genus Achillea consists of about 140 perennial herbs native to the Northern hemisphere. Traditional indications of their use include digestive problems, liver and gall-bladder conditions, menstrual irregularities, cramps, fever, wound healing. The Commission E approves its internal use for loss of appetite and dyspeptic ailments (gastric catarrh, spastic discomfort), externally it is used in form of sitz bath or as a compress against skin inflammation, slow healing wounds, bacterial or fungal infections. In the last decades, pharmacological studies became intensive, although human clinical investigations are still rare. Recent findings have confirmed several traditional uses. The largest number of data accumulated for antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. There are positive results on the analgesic, anti-ulcer, choleretic, hepatoprotective and wound healing activities. First results on other interesting therapeutical areas - antihypertensive, antidiabetic, antitumor, antispermatogenic activities -need confirmation. Yarrow can be used also as an insect repellent. Contact dermatitis as adverse effect may be connected to sesquiterpenes. The diversity and complexity of the effective compounds of yarrow species explains the broad spectrum of their activity. According to the literature the pharmacological effects are mainly due to the essential oil, proazulenes and other sesquiterpene lactones, dicaffeoylquinic acids and flavonoids. Synergistic actions of these and other compounds are also supposed. Achillea species have different chemical and therapeutical values. Despite of numerous data, correct evaluation of the results is difficult because of missing generally accepted taxonomical nomenclature. The used chemical-analytical methods and bio-assays are utmost diverse, making the comparison complicated. Further research on the activity is needed using exactly defined plant material, standardized methods and chemical analysis.

  11. Physical aspects of biological activity and cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorný, Jiří

    2012-03-01

    Mitochondria are organelles at the boundary between chemical-genetic and physical processes in living cells. Mitochondria supply energy and provide conditions for physical mechanisms. Protons transferred across the inner mitochondrial membrane diffuse into cytosol and form a zone of a strong static electric field changing water into quasi-elastic medium that loses viscosity damping properties. Mitochondria and microtubules form a unique cooperating system in the cell. Microtubules are electrical polar structures that make possible non-linear transformation of random excitations into coherent oscillations and generation of coherent electrodynamic field. Mitochondria supply energy, may condition non-linear properties and low damping of oscillations. Electrodynamic activity might have essential significance for material transport, organization, intra- and inter-cellular interactions, and information transfer. Physical processes in cancer cell are disturbed due to suppression of oxidative metabolism in mitochodria (Warburg effect). Water ordering level in the cell is decreased, excitation of microtubule electric polar oscilations diminished, damping increased, and non-linear energy transformation shifted towards the linear region. Power and coherence of the generated electrodynamic field are reduced. Electromagnetic activity of healthy and cancer cells may display essential differences. Local invasion and metastastatic growth may strongly depend on disturbed electrodynamic activity. Nanotechnological measurements may disclose yet unknown properties and parameters of electrodynamic oscillations and other physical processes in healthy and cancer cells.

  12. Rhodiola plants: Chemistry and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Hsiu-Mei; Chen, Hsin-Chun; Wu, Chin-Sheng; Wu, Po-Yuan; Wen, Kuo-Ching

    2015-09-01

    Rhodiola is a genus of medicinal plants that originated in Asia and Europe and are used traditionally as adaptogens, antidepressants, and anti-inflammatory remedies. Rhodiola plants are rich in polyphenols, and salidroside and tyrosol are the primary bioactive marker compounds in the standardized extracts of Rhodiola rosea. This review article summarizes the bioactivities, including adaptogenic, antifatigue, antidepressant, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antinoception, and anticancer activities, and the modulation of immune function of Rhodiola plants and its two constituents, as well as their potential to prevent cardiovascular, neuronal, liver, and skin disorders. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Modification of biological surface activity of particles

    PubMed Central

    Schnitzer, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The hemolytic activity of fibrous asbestos varieties and of fibrous or granular silica dust can be markedly reduced by adsorption of polymers. Polyanions exert a specific action on asbestos, particularly chrysotile, whereas silica is inactivated by nonionic polymers. A high degree of reduction of the lytic action by comparatively small amounts of the antagonistic polymers can be demonstrated after short exposure to concentrations of 0.1–0.4 mg/ml of appropriate polymers. Inactivation is based on stable adsorption. Repeated washings of inactivated mineral sediments or exposure to elevated temperatures (80–120°C) produced no essential loss of the reduction of lytic potency. In one example, inactivation of chrysotile by sodium alginate, depolymerization by ascorbic acid was also ineffective. PMID:4377873

  14. Biologically active extracts with kidney affections applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascu (Neagu), Mihaela; Pascu, Daniela-Elena; Cozea, Andreea; Bunaciu, Andrei A.; Miron, Alexandra Raluca; Nechifor, Cristina Aurelia

    2015-12-01

    This paper is aimed to select plant materials rich in bioflavonoid compounds, made from herbs known for their application performances in the prevention and therapy of renal diseases, namely kidney stones and urinary infections (renal lithiasis, nephritis, urethritis, cystitis, etc.). This paper presents a comparative study of the medicinal plant extracts composition belonging to Ericaceae-Cranberry (fruit and leaves) - Vaccinium vitis-idaea L. and Bilberry (fruit) - Vaccinium myrtillus L. Concentrated extracts obtained from medicinal plants used in this work were analyzed from structural, morphological and compositional points of view using different techniques: chromatographic methods (HPLC), scanning electronic microscopy, infrared, and UV spectrophotometry, also by using kinetic model. Liquid chromatography was able to identify the specific compounds of the Ericaceae family, present in all three extracts, arbutosid, as well as specific components of each species, mostly from the class of polyphenols. The identification and quantitative determination of the active ingredients from these extracts can give information related to their therapeutic effects.

  15. Biological activities of terthiophenes and polyynes from the Asteraceae.

    PubMed

    Hudson, J B; Graham, E A; Rossi, R; Carpita, A; Neri, D; Towers, G H

    1993-10-01

    We evaluated a number of terthiophenes and polyynes, from the Asteraceae, for biological activities against microorganisms, viruses, and tumor cells, with and without the aid of UVA (long wavelength ultraviolet) radiation. The terthiophenes, which represented the basic alpha-terthienyl nucleus with simple side chains, showed impressive UVA-dependent activities, some of which were superior to alpha-terthienyl itself. In contrast, the polyynes had no significant biological activity, with or without UVA. We believe that these terthiophenes would be worthwhile evaluating in animal models of infectious diseases.

  16. A general reaction mechanism for carbapenem hydrolysis by mononuclear and binuclear metallo-β-lactamases.

    PubMed

    Lisa, María-Natalia; Palacios, Antonela R; Aitha, Mahesh; González, Mariano M; Moreno, Diego M; Crowder, Michael W; Bonomo, Robert A; Spencer, James; Tierney, David L; Llarrull, Leticia I; Vila, Alejandro J

    2017-09-14

    Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae threaten human health, since carbapenems are last resort drugs for infections by such organisms. Metallo-β-lactamases (MβLs) are the main mechanism of resistance against carbapenems. Clinically approved inhibitors of MBLs are currently unavailable as design has been limited by the incomplete knowledge of their mechanism. Here, we report a biochemical and biophysical study of carbapenem hydrolysis by the B1 enzymes NDM-1 and BcII in the bi-Zn(II) form, the mono-Zn(II) B2 Sfh-I and the mono-Zn(II) B3 GOB-18. These MβLs hydrolyse carbapenems via a similar mechanism, with accumulation of the same anionic intermediates. We characterize the Michaelis complex formed by mono-Zn(II) enzymes, and we identify all intermediate species, enabling us to propose a chemical mechanism for mono and binuclear MβLs. This common mechanism open avenues for rationally designed inhibitors of all MβLs, notwithstanding the profound differences between these enzymes' active site structure, β-lactam specificity and metal content.Carbapenem-resistant bacteria pose a major health threat by expressing metallo-β-lactamases (MβLs), enzymes able to hydrolyse these life-saving drugs. Here the authors use biophysical and computational methods and show that different MβLs share the same reaction mechanism, suggesting new strategies for drug design.

  17. Pyrolyzed binuclear-cobalt-phthalocyanine as electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Baitao; Wang, Mian; Zhou, Xiuxiu; Wang, Xiujun; Liu, Bingchuan; Li, Baikun

    2015-10-01

    A novel platinum (Pt)-free cathodic materials binuclear-cobalt-phthalocyanine (Bi-CoPc) pyrolyzed at different temperatures (300-1000 °C) were examined as the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts, and compared with unpyrolyzed Bi-CoPc/C and Pt cathode in single chamber microbial fuel cells (SCMFCs). The results showed that the pyrolysis process increased the nitrogen abundance on Bi-CoPc and changed the nitrogen types. The Bi-CoPc pyrolyzed at 800 °C contained a significant amount of pyrrolic-N, and exhibited a high electrochemical catalytic activity. The power density and current density increased with temperature: Bi-CoPc/C-800 > Bi-CoPc/C-1000 > Bi-CoPc/C-600 > Bi-CoPc/C-300 > Bi-CoPc/C. The SCMFC with Bi-CoPc/C-800 cathode had a maximum power density of 604 mW m(-2). The low cost Bi-CoPc compounds developed in this study showed a potential in air-breathing MFC systems, with the proper pyrolysis temperature being chosen. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Liposomal Packaging Generates Wnt Protein with In Vivo Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ludan; Kim, Jae-Beom; ten Berge, Derk; Ponnusamy, Karthik; Carre, A. Lyonel; Dudek, Henryk; Zachlederova, Marie; McElhaney, Michael; Brunton, Shirley; Gunzner, Janet; Callow, Marinella; Polakis, Paul; Costa, Mike; Zhang, Xiaoyan M.; Helms, Jill A.; Nusse, Roel

    2008-01-01

    Wnt signals exercise strong cell-biological and regenerative effects of considerable therapeutic value. There are, however, no specific Wnt agonists and no method for in vivo delivery of purified Wnt proteins. Wnts contain lipid adducts that are required for activity and we exploited this lipophilicity by packaging purified Wnt3a protein into lipid vesicles. Rather than being encapsulated, Wnts are tethered to the liposomal surface, where they enhance and sustain Wnt signaling in vitro. Molecules that effectively antagonize soluble Wnt3a protein but are ineffective against the Wnt3a signal presented by a cell in a paracrine or autocrine manner are also unable to block liposomal Wnt3a activity, suggesting that liposomal packaging mimics the biological state of active Wnts. When delivered subcutaneously, Wnt3a liposomes induce hair follicle neogenesis, demonstrating their robust biological activity in a regenerative context. PMID:18698373

  19. Models Role within Active Learning in Biology. A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pop-Pacurar, Irina; Tirla, Felicia-Doina

    2009-01-01

    In order to integrate ideas and information creatively, to motivate students and activate their thinking, we have used in Biology classes a series of active methods, among which the methods of critical thinking, which had very good results. Still, in the case of some intuitive, abstract, more difficult topics, such as the cell structure,…

  20. Should soil testing services measure soil biological activity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Health of agricultural soils depends largely on conservation management to promote soil organic C accumulation. Total soil organic C changes slowly, but active fractions are more dynamic. A key indicator of healthy soil is potential biological activity, which could be measured rapidly with soil te...

  1. Azaglycomimetics: Natural Occurrence, Biological Activity, and Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Naoki

    A large number of alkaloids mimicking the structures of monosaccharides or oligosaccharides have been isolated from plants and microorganisms. The sugar mimicking alkaloids with a nitrogen in the ring are called azasugars or iminosugars. Naturally occurring azasugars are classified into five structural classes: polyhydroxylated piperidines, pyrrolidines, indolizidines, pyrrolizidines, and nortropanes. They are easily soluble in water because of their polyhydroxylated structures and inhibit glycosidases because of a structural resemblance to the sugar moiety of the natural substrate. Glycosidases are involved in a wide range of anabolic and catabolic processes, such as digestion, lysosomal catabolism of glycoconjugates, biosynthesis of glycoproteins, and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) quality control and ER-associated degradation of glycoproteins. Hence, modifying or blocking these processes in vivo by inhibitors is of great interest from a therapeutic point of view. Azasugars are an important class of glycosidase inhibitors and are arousing great interest for instance as antidiabetics, antiobesity drugs, antivirals, and therapeutic agents for some genetic disorders. This review describes the recent studies on isolation, characterization, glycosidase inhibitory activity, and therapeutic application of azaglycomimetics.

  2. Manufacturing of peptides exhibiting biological activity.

    PubMed

    Zambrowicz, Aleksandra; Timmer, Monika; Polanowski, Antoni; Lubec, Gert; Trziszka, Tadeusz

    2013-02-01

    Numerous studies have shown that food proteins may be a source of bioactive peptides. Those peptides are encrypted in the protein sequence. They stay inactive within the parental protein until release by proteolytic enzymes (Mine and Kovacs-Nolan in Worlds Poult Sci J 62(1):87-95, 2006; Hartman and Miesel in Curr Opin Biotechnol 18:163-169, 2007). Once released the bioactive peptides exhibit several biofunctionalities and may serve therapeutic roles in body systems. Opioid peptides, peptides lowering high blood pressure, inhibiting platelet aggregation as well as being carriers of metal ions and peptides with immunostimulatory, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities have been described (Hartman and Miesel in Curr Opin Biotechnol 18:163-169, 2007). The biofunctional abilities of the peptides have therefore aroused a lot of scientific, technological and consumer interest with respect to the role of dietary proteins in controlling and influencing health (Möller et al. in Eur J Nutr 47(4):171-182, 2008). Biopeptides may find wide application in food production, the cosmetics industry as well as in the prevention and treatment of various medical conditions. They are manufactured by chemical and biotechnological methods (Marx in Chem Eng News 83(11):17-24. 2005; Hancock and Sahl in Nat Biotechnol 24(12):1551-1557, 2006). Depending on specific needs (food or pharmaceutical industry) different degrees of peptide purifications are required. This paper discusses the practicability of manufacturing bioactive peptides, especially from food proteins.

  3. Phytochemistry and biological activities of Phlomis species.

    PubMed

    Limem-Ben Amor, Ilef; Boubaker, Jihed; Ben Sgaier, Mohamed; Skandrani, Ines; Bhouri, Wissem; Neffati, Aicha; Kilani, Soumaya; Bouhlel, Ines; Ghedira, Kamel; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2009-09-07

    The genus Phlomis L. belongs to the Lamiaceae family and encompasses 100 species native to Turkey, North Africa, Europe and Asia. It is a popular herbal tea enjoyed for its taste and aroma. Phlomis species are used to treat various conditions such as diabetes, gastric ulcer, hemorrhoids, inflammation, and wounds. This review aims to summarize recent research on the phytochemistry and pharmacological properties of the genus Phlomis, with particular emphasis on its ethnobotanical uses. The essential oil of Phomis is composed of four chemotypes dominated by monoterpenes (alpha-pinene, limonene and linalool), sesquiterpenes (germacrene D and beta-caryophyllene), aliphalic compounds (9,12,15-octadecatrienoic acid methyl ester), fatty acids (hexadecanoic acid) and other components (trans-phytol, 9,12,15-octadecatrien-1-ol). Flavonoids, iridoids and phenylethyl alcohol constitute the main compounds isolated from Phlomis extracts. The pharmacological activities of some Phlomis species have been investigated. They are described according to antidiabetic, antinociceptive, antiulcerogenic, protection of the vascular system, anti-inflammatory, antiallergic, anticancer, antimicrobial and antioxidant properties.

  4. BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF GREEN TEA EXTRACTS.

    PubMed

    Lursmanashvili, L; Gulua, L; Turmanidze, T; Enukidze, M; Machavariani, M; Sanikidze, T

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine effects of green tea extracts on the Jurkat cells incubated under oxidative stress conditions. The research was conducted on leukemic human mature T cells (Jurkat cells). For the modelling of oxidative stress 30% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) (Sigma) (10 μl, 25 μl 50 μl and 100 μl) was added to Jurkat cell suspension with subsequent incubation for 4, 6, 8 and 24 h. Control group was represented by intact Jurkat cells. The assessment of cells proliferation activity (viability) was performed by MTT test. The viability of Jurkat cells incubated for 24 hours under acquit oxidative stress conditions dose-depenently, monotonically decreased (irreversibly at 100 μM of H2O2 and reaches the 30% of intact Jurkat cells viability level at 50 μM of H2O2). Low doses of H2O2 (10 μl, 25 μl H2O2) revealed cytotoxicity only within short term (8 hours) of the incubation, afterward the viability of Jurkat cells monotonically increased and after 24 hours it reached 43% and 56% of control level, respectively. Vitamins C and E revealed cytotoxic effect on intact Jurkat cells, while the C+V vitamins complex induced 2-fold stimulation of Jurkat cells viability. Under a moderate oxidative stress condition (25 μl of H2O2) the complex of C + E vitamins revealed cytoprotective effect on Jurkat cells which may be related to ability of vitamin C to induce regeneration and to transform E vitamin tocopheroxyl free radicals into tocopherol. Green tea had no effect, green tea catechins revealed stimulatory effect, while green tea pectin - weak cytotoxic effect on intact Jurkat cells. Green tea and especially extracted catechins (but not pectin) revealed stimulatory effect on the viability of the Jurkat cells incubated under an oxidative stress condition. Our study results confirm the opinion that the natural compounds (green tea extracts) are harmless for normal cellular metabolism. Their differential effects on the "diseased", incubated under an

  5. Investigating biological activity spectrum for novel quinoline analogues.

    PubMed

    Musiol, Robert; Jampilek, Josef; Kralova, Katarina; Richardson, Des R; Kalinowski, Danuta; Podeszwa, Barbara; Finster, Jacek; Niedbala, Halina; Palka, Anna; Polanski, Jaroslaw

    2007-02-01

    The lack of the wide spectrum of biological data is an important obstacle preventing the efficient molecular design. Quinoline derivatives are known to exhibit a variety of biological effects. In the current publication, we tested a series of novel quinoline analogues for their photosynthesis-inhibiting activity (the inhibition of photosynthetic electron transport in spinach chloroplasts (Spinacia oleracea L.) and the reduction of chlorophyll content in Chlorella vulgaris Beij.). Moreover, antiproliferative activity was measured using SK-N-MC neuroepithelioma cell line. We described the structure-activity relationships (SAR) between the chemical structure and biological effects of the synthesized compounds. We also measured the lipophilicity of the novel compounds by means of the RP-HPLC and illustrate the relationships between the RP-HPLC retention parameter logK (the logarithm of capacity factor K) and logP data calculated by available programs.

  6. Novel fungal transcriptional activators, Cmr1p of Colletotrichum lagenarium and pig1p of Magnaporthe grisea, contain Cys2His2 zinc finger and Zn(II)2Cys6 binuclear cluster DNA-binding motifs and regulate transcription of melanin biosynthesis genes in a developmentally specific manner.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, G; Kenmochi, Y; Takano, Y; Sweigard, J; Farrall, L; Furusawa, I; Horino, O; Kubo, Y

    2000-12-01

    Colletotrichum lagenarium and Magnaporthe grisea are plant pathogenic fungi that produce melanin during the appressorial differentiation stage of conidial germination and during the late stationary phase of mycelial growth. Here, we report the identification of genes for two unique transcription factors, CMR1 (Colletotrichum melanin regulation) and PIG1 (pigment of Magnaporthe), that are involved in melanin biosynthesis. Both Cmr1p and Pig1p contain two distinct DNA-binding motifs, a Cys2His2 zinc finger motif and a Zn(II)2Cys6 binuclear cluster motif. The presence of both these motifs in a single transcriptional regulatory protein is unique among known eukaryotic transcription factors. Deletion of CMR1 in C. lagenarium caused a defect in mycelial melanization, but not in appressorial melanization. Also, cmr1Delta mutants do not express the melanin biosynthetic structural genes SCD1 and THR1 during mycelial melanization, although the expression of these two genes was not affected during appressorial melanization.

  7. Sensitive bioassay for detection of biologically active ricin in food.

    PubMed

    Rasooly, Reuven; He, Xiaohua

    2012-05-01

    The potential use of ricin as an agent of biological warfare highlights the need to develop fast and effective methods to detect biologically active ricin. The current "gold standard" for ricin detection is an in vivo mouse bioassay; however, this method is not practical to test on a large number of samples and raises ethical concerns with regard to the use of experimental animals. In this work, we generated adenoviral vectors that express the green fluorescent protein gene and used the relative fluorescence units intensity inhibition by transduced cells for quantitative measurement of biologically active ricin. The detection limit of the assay was 200 pg/ml, which is over 500,000 times greater than the adult human lethal oral dose. The inhibition of fluorescence intensity between ricin treatment and control was higher in 72-h posttransduction Vero cells than 24-h human embryonic kidney cells. Therefore, to detect biologically active ricin in food matrices that might influence the assay, we used 72-h posttransduction Vero cells. This simple assay could be used for large-scale screening to detect biologically active ricin in food without added substrates or use of cell fixation methods.

  8. Functional toxicology: a new approach to detect biologically active xenobiotics.

    PubMed Central

    McLachlan, J A

    1993-01-01

    The pervasiveness of chemicals in the environment with estrogenic activity and other biological functions recommends the development of new approaches to monitor and study them. Chemicals can be screened for activity in vitro using a panel of human or animal cells that have been transfected with a specific receptor and reporter gene; for example, the estrogen receptor. By using a variety of different receptors, the screening of xenobiotics for biological functions can be broad. Chemicals could then be classified by their function in vitro which, in some cases, may be a useful guide for toxicological studies. Images Figure 1. PMID:8119246

  9. [Biological activity of Penicillium sp. 10-51 exometabolites].

    PubMed

    Savchuk, Ia I; Zaĭchenko, A M; Tsyganenko, E S

    2012-01-01

    Silica gel column chromatography (silica gel "L" II kind of activity 100/160 mkm) of the chloroform extract from the cultural filtrate of Penicillium sp. 10-51 gave two fractions (chloroform and chloroform-acetone, 5:1) having biological activity. Recrystallization yielded two compounds. On the basis of physico-chemical and spectral data these compounds were identified as curvularin and hydroxycurvularin, which have a large spectrum of biological action as to bacteria, yeast, blue-green algae and phytopathogenic micromycetes.

  10. Biological Activity of Aminophosphonic Acids and Their Short Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejczak, Barbara; Kafarski, Pawel

    The biological activity and natural occurrence of the aminophosphonic acids were described half a century ago. Since then the chemistry and biology of this class of compounds have developed into the separate field of phosphorus chemistry. Today it is well acknowledged that these compounds possess a wide variety of promising, and in some cases commercially useful, physiological activities. Thus, they have found applications ranging from agrochemical (with the herbicides glyphosate and bialaphos being the most prominent examples) to medicinal (with the potent antihypertensive fosinopril and antiosteoporetic bisphosphonates being examples).

  11. Calculation of the exchange coupling constants of copper binuclear systems based on spin-flip constricted variational density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Zhekova, Hristina R; Seth, Michael; Ziegler, Tom

    2011-11-14

    We have recently developed a methodology for the calculation of exchange coupling constants J in weakly interacting polynuclear metal clusters. The method is based on unrestricted and restricted second order spin-flip constricted variational density functional theory (SF-CV(2)-DFT) and is here applied to eight binuclear copper systems. Comparison of the SF-CV(2)-DFT results with experiment and with results obtained from other DFT and wave function based methods has been made. Restricted SF-CV(2)-DFT with the BH&HLYP functional yields consistently J values in excellent agreement with experiment. The results acquired from this scheme are comparable in quality to those obtained by accurate multi-reference wave function methodologies such as difference dedicated configuration interaction and the complete active space with second-order perturbation theory. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  12. [Decolorization of reactive blue P-3R with microsphere-supported binuclear Manganese complex as a novel heterogeneous CWPO catalyst].

    PubMed

    Song, Min; Zhang, Lin-Ping; Zhong, Yi; Xu, Hong; Mao, Zhi-Ping

    2015-03-01

    Binuclear manganese complex (MnL), with high catalytic activity, was encapsulated into ethyl cellulose microspheres via a microencapsulation technique. The characterization of the catalyst through ICP, UV-VIS, SEM and TEM revealed that MnL was well distributed within the ethyl cellulose matrix. The results of UV-VIS confirmed the structural integrity of MnL after the encapsulation process. The MnL loaded microspheres exhibited an excellent catalytic property in the oxidative decolorization of Reactive Blue P-3R, which was used to simulate the dyestuff wastewater. The dye solution was completely decolorized under the catalyzing action of these microspheres. What's more, these MnL loaded microspheres could be reused for at least 4 times and the decolorization degree of Reactive Blue P-3R was maintained above 70%. The results demonstrated the potential application of the microsphere-supported MnL as a novel heterogeneous CWPO catalyst for the decolorization of wastewater containing dyestuff.

  13. Synthesis, Spectral and Antibacterial Studies of Binuclear Titanium(IV) / Zirconium(IV) Complexes of Piperazine Dithiosemicarbazones

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, O. P.; Sengupta, S. K.; Mishra, M. K.; Tripathi, C. M.

    2003-01-01

    The reactions of mono(cyclopentadienyl)titanium(IV) trichloride and bis(cyclopentadienyl)titanium(IV)/ zirconium(IV) dichloride with a new class of dithiosemicarbazone, derived by condensing piperazine dithiosemicarbazide with benzaldehyde (L1H2), 2-chlorobenzaldehyde (L2H2), 4-nitrobenzaldehyde (L3H2) or salicylaldehyde (L4H4) have been studied and different types of binuclear products, viz. [{CpTiCl2}2L], [{Cp2MCl}2L], ((L=L1, L2 or L3), [{CpTiCI}2L4] and [{Cp2M}2L4] (M=Yi or Zr), have been isolated. Tentative structures are proposed for these complexes based upon elemental analyses, electrical conductance, magnetic moment and spectral (electronic, IR, 1H and 13C NMR) data. Attempts have been made to establish a correlation between antibacterial activity and the structures of the products. PMID:18365041

  14. Different mechanisms at different temperatures for the ring-opening polymerization of lactide catalyzed by binuclear magnesium and zinc alkoxides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yangyang; Cui, Yaqin; Xiong, Jiao; Dai, Zhongran; Tang, Ning; Wu, Jincai

    2015-10-07

    Two binuclear magnesium and zinc alkoxides supported by a bis-salalen type dinucleating heptadentate Schiff base ligand were synthesized and fully characterized. The two complexes are efficient initiators for the ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of L-lactide, affording polymers with narrow polydispersities and desirable molecular weights. Interestingly, the mechanisms for the ROP of lactide are different at different temperatures. At a high temperature of 130 °C, a coordination-insertion mechanism is reasonable for the bulk melt polymerization of lactide. At a low temperature, the alkoxide cannot initiate the ROP reaction; however, upon the addition of external benzyl alcohol into the system, the ROP of lactide can smoothly proceed via an "activated monomer" mechanism. In addition, these complexes display slight stereo-selectivity for the ring-opening polymerization of rac-lactide, affording partially isotactic polylactide in toluene with a Pm value of 0.59.

  15. Formation of Binuclear Zigzag Hexapentaene Titanium Complexes via a Titanacumulene [Ti=C=C=CH2 ] Intermediate.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Tim; Gelert, Tina; Lasar, Christian; Schmidtmann, Marc; Klüner, Thorsten; Beckhaus, Rüdiger

    2017-09-25

    The reaction of bis(η(5) :η(1) -pentafulvene)titanium complexes with an allylidenephosphorylide Ph3 P=C(H)- C(H)=CH2 leads to binuclear zigzag hexapentaene titanium complexes (Ti2a, Ti2b). The formation of the central C6 H4 unit can be described as a spontaneous double C-H bond activation process, leading to an R3 P=C=C=CH2 intermediate, as a synthon for a titanabutatriene fragment [(Cp(R) )2 Ti=C=C=CH2 ] (R: 2-adamantyl, CH(p-tol)2 ). In a subsequent dimerization Ti2a and Ti2b are formed, proofed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and NMR measurements. The reaction sequence is confirmed by DFT calculations. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Teaching systems biology: an active-learning approach.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anuj

    2005-01-01

    With genomics well established in modern molecular biology, recent studies have sought to further the discipline by integrating complementary methodologies into a holistic depiction of the molecular mechanisms underpinning cell function. This genomic subdiscipline, loosely termed "systems biology," presents the biology educator with both opportunities and obstacles: The benefit of exposing students to this cutting-edge scientific methodology is manifest, yet how does one convey the breadth and advantage of systems biology while still engaging the student? Here, I describe an active-learning approach to the presentation of systems biology. In graduate classes at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, I divided students into small groups and asked each group to interpret a sample data set (e.g., microarray data, two-hybrid data, homology-search results) describing a hypothetical signaling pathway. Mimicking realistic experimental results, each data set revealed a portion of this pathway; however, students were only able to reconstruct the full pathway by integrating all data sets, thereby exemplifying the utility in a systems biology approach. Student response to this cooperative exercise was extremely positive. In total, this approach provides an effective introduction to systems biology appropriate for students at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.

  17. Binding of molybdate to uteroferrin. Hyperfine interactions of the binuclear center with /sup 95/Mo, /sup 1/H, and /sup 2/H

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, K.; McCracken, J.; Peisach, J.; Aisen, P.

    1988-04-25

    Uteroferrin, an acid phosphatase with a spin-coupled and redox-active binuclear iron center, is paramagnetic in its pink, enzymatically active, mixed-valence (S = 1/2) state. Phosphate, a product and inhibitor of the enzymatic activity of uteroferrin, converts the pink, EPR-active form of the protein to a purple, EPR-silent species. In contrast, molybdate, a tetrahedral oxyanion analog of phosphate, transforms the EPR spectrum of uteroferrin from a rhombic to an axial form. With both electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) and electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopies, we observe a hyperfine interaction of (95Mo)molybdate with the S = 1/2, Fe(II)-Fe(III) center of the protein. A pair of 95Mo resonances centered at the 95Mo Larmor frequency at the applied magnetic field and separated by a hyperfine coupling constant of 1.2 MHz is evident. Therefore, a single monomeric species of molybdate is close to, and likely a ligand of, the binuclear cluster. 1H ENDOR studies on uteroferrin reveal at least six sets of lines mirrored about the 1H Larmor frequency. Two pairs of these lines become reduced in intensity when the protein is exchanged against D2O. Moreover, ESEEM and 2H ENDOR spectra display resonances at the 2H Larmor frequency. Therefore, the metal-binding region of the protein is accessible to solvent. Additional deuterium lines observable by ESEEM spectroscopy provide evidence for a population of strongly coupled, readily exchangeable protons associated with the binuclear center. The measured hyperfine coupling constants for these deuterons are orientation-dependent with splittings of nearly 4 MHz at g3 = 1.59 and less than 1 MHz at g1 = 1.94. In the presence of molybdate, ESEEM spectra of D2O-exchanged samples reveal a resonance at the 2H Larmor frequency, with no evidence of spectral components due to strongly coupled deuterons.

  18. Gemini ester quat surfactants and their biological activity.

    PubMed

    Łuczyński, Jacek; Frąckowiak, Renata; Włoch, Aleksandra; Kleszczyńska, Halina; Witek, Stanisław

    2013-03-01

    Cationic gemini surfactants are an important class of surface-active compounds that exhibit much higher surface activity than their monomeric counterparts. This type of compound architecture lends itself to the compound being easily adsorbed at interfaces and interacting with the cellular membranes of microorganisms. Conventional cationic surfactants have high chemical stability but poor chemical and biological degradability. One of the main approaches to the design of readily biodegradable and environmentally friendly surfactants involves inserting a bond with limited stability into the surfactant molecule to give a cleavable surfactant. The best-known example of such a compound is the family of ester quats, which are cationic surfactants with a labile ester bond inserted into the molecule. As part of this study, a series of gemini ester quat surfactants were synthesized and assayed for their biological activity. Their hemolytic activity and changes in the fluidity and packing order of the lipid polar heads were used as the measures of their biological activity. A clear correlation between the hemolytic activity of the tested compounds and their alkyl chain length was established. It was found that the compounds with a long hydrocarbon chain showed higher activity. Moreover, the compounds with greater spacing between their alkyl chains were more active. This proves that they incorporate more easily into the lipid bilayer of the erythrocyte membrane and affect its properties to a greater extent. A better understanding of the process of cell lysis by surfactants and of their biological activity may assist in developing surfactants with enhanced selectivity and in widening their range of application.

  19. Modeling Radial Holoblastic Cleavage: A Laboratory Activity for Developmental Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Linda K.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a laboratory activity designed for an undergraduate developmental biology course. Uses Play-Doh (plastic modeling clay) to build a multicellular embryo in order to provide a 3-D demonstration of cleavage. Includes notes for the instructor and student directions. (YDS)

  20. Students' Learning Activities While Studying Biological Process Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kragten, Marco; Admiraal, Wilfried; Rijlaarsdam, Gert

    2015-01-01

    Process diagrams describe how a system functions (e.g. photosynthesis) and are an important type of representation in Biology education. In the present study, we examined students' learning activities while studying process diagrams, related to their resulting comprehension of these diagrams. Each student completed three learning tasks. Verbal…

  1. Aspartate and glutamate mimetic structures in biologically active compounds.

    PubMed

    Stefanic, Peter; Dolenc, Marija Sollner

    2004-04-01

    Glutamate and aspartate are frequently recognized as key structural elements for the biological activity of natural peptides and synthetic compounds. The acidic side-chain functionality of both the amino acids provides the basis for the ionic interaction and subsequent molecular recognition by specific receptor sites that results in the regulation of physiological or pathophysiological processes in the organism. In the development of new biologically active compounds that possess the ability to modulate these processes, compounds offering the same type of interactions are being designed. Thus, using a peptidomimetic design approach, glutamate and aspartate mimetics are incorporated into the structure of final biologically active compounds. This review covers different bioisosteric replacements of carboxylic acid alone, as well as mimetics of the whole amino acid structure. Amino acid analogs presented include those with different distances between anionic moieties, and analogs with additional functional groups that result in conformational restriction or alternative interaction sites. The article also provides an overview of different cyclic structures, including various cycloalkane, bicyclic and heterocyclic analogs, that lead to conformational restriction. Higher di- and tripeptide mimetics in which carboxylic acid functionality is incorporated into larger molecules are also reviewed. In addition to the mimetic structures presented, emphasis in this article is placed on their steric and electronic properties. These mimetics constitute a useful pool of fragments in the design of new biologically active compounds, particularly in the field of RGD mimetics and excitatory amino acid agonists and antagonists.

  2. BIOLOGICALLY ENHANCED OXYGEN TRANSFER IN THE ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESS (JOURNAL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biologically enhanced oxgyen transfer has been a hypothesis to explain observed oxygen transfer rates in activated sludge systems that were well above that predicted from aerator clean-water testing. The enhanced oxygen transfer rates were based on tests using BOD bottle oxygen ...

  3. Biologically active substances produced by antarctic cryptoendolithic fungi.

    PubMed

    Ocampo-Friedmann, R; Friedmann, E I

    1993-01-01

    Researchers report results of laboratory studies of over 200 microbial strains of fungi, algae, cyanobacteria, and heterotrophic bacteria collected in the Ross Desert region of Antarctica. All of the 35 fungal strains produced substances that inhibited the growth of cyanobacteria and algae. The inhibitory effect of the biologically active substance was evident in crushed cell extract but less in spent broth.

  4. Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy activities for biology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    An instructional aid for teachers is presented that will allow biology students the opportunity to learn about renewable energy sources. Some of the school activities include using leaves as collectors of solar energy, solar energy stored in wood, and a fuel value test for green and dry woods. A study of organic wastes as a source of fuel is included. (BCS)

  5. Modeling Radial Holoblastic Cleavage: A Laboratory Activity for Developmental Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Linda K.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a laboratory activity designed for an undergraduate developmental biology course. Uses Play-Doh (plastic modeling clay) to build a multicellular embryo in order to provide a 3-D demonstration of cleavage. Includes notes for the instructor and student directions. (YDS)

  6. Students' Learning Activities While Studying Biological Process Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kragten, Marco; Admiraal, Wilfried; Rijlaarsdam, Gert

    2015-01-01

    Process diagrams describe how a system functions (e.g. photosynthesis) and are an important type of representation in Biology education. In the present study, we examined students' learning activities while studying process diagrams, related to their resulting comprehension of these diagrams. Each student completed three learning tasks. Verbal…

  7. On the biological activity of drug molecules: Busulfan and nabumetone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Igor; Kovač, Branka

    2010-10-01

    The electronic structures of drug molecules busulfan (BSU) and nabumetone (NAB) have been investigated by HeI and HeII UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), quantum chemical calculations and virtual docking studies. Their biological activities are discussed in the framework of their electronic and molecular structures, reactivity and drug-enzyme binding.

  8. Crystal Structure of Human Arginase l Complexed with Thiosemicarbazide Reveals an Unusual Thiocarbonly u-Sulfide Ligand in the Binuclear Manganese Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Di Costanzo,L.; Pique, M.; Christianson, D.

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structure of the human arginase I-thiosemicarbazide complex reveals an unusual thiocarbonyl {mu}-sulfide ligand in the binuclear manganese cluster. The CS moiety of thiosemicarbazide bridges Mn2+A and Mn2+B with coordination distances of 2.6 and 2.4 Angstroms, respectively. Otherwise, the binding of thiosemicarbazide to human arginase I does not cause any significant structural changes in the active site. The crystal structure of the unliganded enzyme reveals a hydrogen-bonded water molecule that could support proton transfer between a {mu}-water molecule and H141 to regenerate the nucleophilic {mu}-hydroxide ion in the final step of catalysis.

  9. Stereochemical Assignment of Strigolactone Analogues Confirms Their Selective Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Artuso, Emma; Ghibaudi, Elena; Lace, Beatrice; Marabello, Domenica; Vinciguerra, Daniele; Lombardi, Chiara; Koltai, Hinanit; Kapulnik, Yoram; Novero, Mara; Occhiato, Ernesto G; Scarpi, Dina; Parisotto, Stefano; Deagostino, Annamaria; Venturello, Paolo; Mayzlish-Gati, Einav; Bier, Ariel; Prandi, Cristina

    2015-11-25

    Strigolactones (SLs) are new plant hormones with various developmental functions. They are also soil signaling chemicals that are required for establishing beneficial mycorrhizal plant/fungus symbiosis. In addition, SLs play an essential role in inducing seed germination in root-parasitic weeds, which are one of the seven most serious biological threats to food security. There are around 20 natural SLs that are produced by plants in very low quantities. Therefore, most of the knowledge on SL signal transduction and associated molecular events is based on the application of synthetic analogues. Stereochemistry plays a crucial role in the structure-activity relationship of SLs, as compounds with an unnatural D-ring configuration may induce biological effects that are unrelated to SLs. We have synthesized a series of strigolactone analogues, whose absolute configuration has been elucidated and related with their biological activity, thus confirming the high specificity of the response. Analogues bearing the R-configured butenolide moiety showed enhanced biological activity, which highlights the importance of this stereochemical motif.

  10. Controlled release of biologically active silver from nanosilver surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingyu; Sonshine, David A; Shervani, Saira; Hurt, Robert H

    2010-11-23

    Major pathways in the antibacterial activity and eukaryotic toxicity of nanosilver involve the silver cation and its soluble complexes, which are well established thiol toxicants. Through these pathways, nanosilver behaves in analogy to a drug delivery system, in which the particle contains a concentrated inventory of an active species, the ion, which is transported to and released near biological target sites. Although the importance of silver ion in the biological response to nanosilver is widely recognized, the drug delivery paradigm has not been well developed for this system, and there is significant potential to improve nanosilver technologies through controlled release formulations. This article applies elements of the drug delivery paradigm to nanosilver dissolution and presents a systematic study of chemical concepts for controlled release. After presenting thermodynamic calculations of silver species partitioning in biological media, the rates of oxidative silver dissolution are measured for nanoparticles and macroscopic foils and used to derive unified area-based release kinetics. A variety of competing chemical approaches are demonstrated for controlling the ion release rate over 4 orders of magnitude. Release can be systematically slowed by thiol and citrate ligand binding, formation of sulfidic coatings, or the scavenging of peroxy-intermediates. Release can be accelerated by preoxidation or particle size reduction, while polymer coatings with complexation sites alter the release profile by storing and releasing inventories of surface-bound silver. Finally, the ability to tune biological activity is demonstrated through a bacterial inhibition zone assay carried out on selected formulations of controlled release nanosilver.

  11. [Dihydroquercetin--a new antioxidant and biologically active food additive].

    PubMed

    Tiukavkina, N A; Rulenko, I A; Kolesnik, Iu A

    1997-01-01

    Information about types of vegetative raw material for flavonoid dihydroquercetin manufacture are given. Data of a wide spectrum of biological activity of dihydroquercetin are systematized. Two directions of use dihydroquercetin in food industry: as antioxidant and as biologically active supplement for creation different types of parapharmaceutical production is shown. Dihydroquercetin in the capacity of antioxidant may be compared or exceeds many synthetic and natural antioxidants and, in particular, known bioflavonoids (quercetin). High antioxidant activity of dihydroquercetin is combined with absence embryotoxicity, teratogenicity, allergenicity and mutability. Dihydroquercetin used as efficient antioxidant with regard to vegetable oils, animal fat, milk powder, fat contain pastry. Parapharmaceutical production with dihydroquercetin is intended for prophylactic of "oxidative stress" diseases (cardiovascular, bronchopulmonary, etc.). Practical application of new types of products containing dihydroquercetin was described. Dihydroquercetin is an available commercial food additive, producing domestic industry.

  12. 1,3,4-oxadiazole: a biologically active scaffold.

    PubMed

    Khalilullah, H; Ahsan, M J; Hedaitullah, Md; Khan, S; Ahmed, B

    2012-07-01

    There has been considerable interest in the development of novel compounds with anticonvulsant, antidepressant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antiallergic, antipsychotic, antimicrobial, antimycobecterial, antitumour, antiviral and antitubercular activities. 1,3,4-oxadiazoles constitute an important class of compounds for new drug development. Therefore, many researchers have synthesized these compounds as target structures and evaluated their biological activities. These observations led to the development of new 1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives. This review article describes the various biological activities associated with 1,3,4-oxadiazole ring system and is useful in guiding the researchers across the world working on this moiety and consequently have been instrumental in the advancement of 1,3,4-oxadiazole chemistry.

  13. Biological activities of phenolic compounds present in virgin olive oil.

    PubMed

    Cicerale, Sara; Lucas, Lisa; Keast, Russell

    2010-02-02

    The Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower incidence of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative diseases and certain types of cancer. The apparent health benefits have been partially ascribed to the dietary consumption of virgin olive oil by Mediterranean populations. Much research has focused on the biologically active phenolic compounds naturally present in virgin olive oils to aid in explaining reduced mortality and morbidity experienced by people consuming a traditional Mediterranean diet. Studies (human, animal, in vivo and in vitro) have demonstrated that olive oil phenolic compounds have positive effects on certain physiological parameters, such as plasma lipoproteins, oxidative damage, inflammatory markers, platelet and cellular function, antimicrobial activity and bone health. This paper summarizes current knowledge on the bioavailability and biological activities of olive oil phenolic compounds.

  14. Similar Biological Activities of Two Isostructural Ruthenium and Osmium Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Maksimoska,J.; Williams, D.; Atilla-Gokcumen, G.; Smalley, K.; Carroll, P.; Webster, R.; Filippakopoulos, P.; Knapp, S.; Herlyn, M.; Meggers, E.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we probe and verify the concept of designing unreactive bioactive metal complexes, in which the metal possesses a purely structural function, by investigating the consequences of replacing ruthenium in a bioactive half-sandwich kinase inhibitor scaffold by its heavier congener osmium. The two isostructural complexes are compared with respect to their anticancer properties in 1205?Lu melanoma cells, activation of the Wnt signaling pathway, IC50 values against the protein kinases GSK-3? and Pim-1, and binding modes to the protein kinase Pim-1 by protein crystallography. It was found that the two congeners display almost indistinguishable biological activities, which can be explained by their nearly identical three-dimensional structures and their identical mode of action as protein kinase inhibitors. This is a unique example in which the replacement of a metal in an anticancer scaffold by its heavier homologue does not alter its biological activity.

  15. Protein stability and enzyme activity at extreme biological temperatures.

    PubMed

    Feller, Georges

    2010-08-18

    Psychrophilic microorganisms thrive in permanently cold environments, even at subzero temperatures. To maintain metabolic rates compatible with sustained life, they have improved the dynamics of their protein structures, thereby enabling appropriate molecular motions required for biological activity at low temperatures. As a consequence of this structural flexibility, psychrophilic proteins are unstable and heat-labile. In the upper range of biological temperatures, thermophiles and hyperthermophiles grow at temperatures > 100 °C and synthesize ultra-stable proteins. However, thermophilic enzymes are nearly inactive at room temperature as a result of their compactness and rigidity. At the molecular level, both types of extremophilic proteins have adapted the same structural factors, but in opposite directions, to address either activity at low temperatures or stability in hot environments. A model based on folding funnels is proposed accounting for the stability-activity relationships in extremophilic proteins.

  16. Biological Ice Nucleation Activity in Cloud Water (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delort, A.

    2013-12-01

    Ice nucleation active (INA) biological particles, in particular microorganisms, were studied in cloud water. Twelve cloud samples were collected over a period of 16 months from the puy de Dôme summit (1465 m, France) using sterile cloud droplet impactors. The samples were characterized through biological (cultures, cell counts) and physico-chemical measurements (pH, ion concentrations, carbon content...), and biological ice nuclei were investigated by droplet-freezing assays from -3°C to -13°C. The concentration of total INA particles within this temperature range typically varied from ~1 to ~100 per mL of cloud water; the concentrations of biological IN were several orders of magnitude higher than the values previously reported for precipitations. At -12°C, at least 76% of the IN were biological in origin, i.e. they were inactivated by heating at 95°C, and at temperatures above -8°C only biological material could induce ice. By culture, 44 Pseudomonas-like strains of bacteria were isolated from cloud water samples; 16% of them were found INA at the temperature of -8°C and they were identified as Pseudomonas syringae, Xanthomonas sp. and Pseudoxanthomonas sp.. Two strains induced freezing at as warm as -2°C, positioning them among the most active ice nucleators described so far. We estimated that, in average, 0.18% and more than 1%.of the bacterial cells present in clouds (~104 mL-1) are INA at the temperatures of -8°C and -12°C, respectively.

  17. Structure-activity relationships of αs-casein peptides with multifunctional biological activities.

    PubMed

    Sistla, Srinivas

    2013-12-01

    Multifunctional bioactive peptides have a wider role in modulating physiological functions and possess multiple biological activities. Peptides from bovine milk with sequences QKALNEINQF [p10] and TKKTKLTEEEKNRL [p14] from α-S2 casein f (79-88) and α-S2 casein f (148-161) were identified to be having multifunctional biological activities and were synthesized. These synthesized peptides show various biological activities like angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition, prolyl endopeptidase inhibition, antioxidant, and antimicrobial activities. The mode of antimicrobial mechanism was studied and p10 shows depolarization of cell membrane, whereas p14 was found to display DNA-binding activity. Structural studies envisaged backbone flexibility, for differences in their mode of action. Peptide structure function studies were correlated to understand their multifunctional biological activity.

  18. Humic substances biological activity at the plant-soil interface

    PubMed Central

    Trevisan, Sara; Francioso, Ornella; Nardi, Serenella

    2010-01-01

    Humic substances (HS) represent the organic material mainly widespread in nature. HS have positive effects on plant physiology by improving soil structure and fertility and by influencing nutrient uptake and root architecture. The biochemical and molecular mechanisms underlying these events are only partially known. HS have been shown to contain auxin and an “auxin-like” activity of humic substances has been proposed, but support to this hypothesis is fragmentary. In this review article, we are giving an overview of available data concerning molecular structures and biological activities of humic substances, with special emphasis on their hormone-like activities. PMID:20495384

  19. Synthesis and Biological Activities of Oxadiazole Derivatives: A Review.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Ankur; Jain, Shweta; Jain, Priyanka; Jain, Prachi; Tiwari, Nidhi; Jain, Roshni; Jain, Rashi; Jain, Abhishek K; Agrawal, Ram K

    2016-01-01

    Recently, there has been wide interest in compounds containing the oxadiazole scaffold because of their unique chemical structure and their broad spectrum of biological properties. This review provides readers with an overview of the main synthetic methodologies for oxadiazoles and of their broad spectrum of pharmacological activities such as, anti-microbial, anti-fungal activity, antiviral, anti-tubercular, anti-inflammatory, anti-convulsant, anti-angiogenic, anti-proliferative, analgesic, anti-oedema and in alzheimer activity, which were reported over the past years.

  20. Models to support active sensing of biological aerosol clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Andrea M.; Kalter, Jeffrey M.; Corson, Elizabeth C.; Chaudhry, Zahra; Boggs, Nathan T.; Brown, David M.; Thomas, Michael E.; Carter, Christopher C.

    2013-05-01

    Elastic backscatter LIght Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) is a promising approach for stand-off detection of biological aerosol clouds. Comprehensive models that explain the scattering behavior from the aerosol cloud are needed to understand and predict the scattering signatures of biological aerosols under varying atmospheric conditions and against different aerosol backgrounds. Elastic signatures are dependent on many parameters of the aerosol cloud, with two major components being the size distribution and refractive index of the aerosols. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) has been in a unique position to measure the size distributions of released biological simulant clouds using a wide assortment of aerosol characterization systems that are available on the commercial market. In conjunction with the size distribution measurements, JHU/APL has also been making a dedicated effort to properly measure the refractive indices of the released materials using a thin-film absorption technique and laboratory characterization of the released materials. Intimate knowledge of the size distributions and refractive indices of the biological aerosols provides JHU/APL with powerful tools to build elastic scattering models, with the purpose of understanding, and ultimately, predicting the active signatures of biological clouds.

  1. Biological activity and photostability of biflorin micellar nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Santana, Edson R B; Ferreira-Neto, João P; Yara, Ricardo; Sena, Kêsia X F R; Fontes, Adriana; Lima, Cláudia S A

    2015-05-13

    Capraria biflora L. is a shrub from the Scrophulariaceae family which produces in its roots a compound named biflorin, an o-naphthoquinone that shows activity against Gram-positive bacteria and fungi and also presents antitumor and antimetastatic activities. However, biflorin is hydrophobic and photosensitive. These properties make its application difficult. In this work we prepared biflorin micellar nanostructures looking for a more effective vehiculation and better preservation of the biological activity. Biflorin was obtained, purified and characterized by UV-Vis, infrared (IR) and 1H- and 13C-NMR. Micellar nanostructures of biflorin were then assembled with Tween 80®, Tween 20® and saline (0.9%) and characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The results showed that the micellar nanostructures were stable and presented an average size of 8.3 nm. Biflorin micellar nanostructures' photodegradation was evaluated in comparison with biflorin in ethanol. Results showed that the biflorin in micellar nanostructures was better protected from light than biflorin dissolved in ethanol, and also indicated that biflorin in micelles were efficient against Gram-positive bacteria and yeast species. In conclusion, the results showed that the micellar nanostructures could ensure the maintenance of the biological activity of biflorin, conferring photoprotection. Moreover, biflorin vehiculation in aqueous media was improved, favoring its applicability in biological systems.

  2. Postulates on electromagnetic activity in biological systems and cancer.

    PubMed

    Pokorný, Jiří; Pokorný, Jan; Kobilková, Jitka

    2013-12-01

    A framework of postulates is formulated to define the existence, nature, and function of a coherent state far from thermodynamic equilibrium in biological systems as an essential condition for the existence of life. This state is excited and sustained by energy supply. Mitochondria producing small packets of energy in the form of adenosine and guanosine triphosphate and strong static electric field around them form boundary elements between biochemical-genetic and physical processes. The transformation mechanism of chemical energy into useful work for biological needs and the excitation of the coherent state far from thermodynamic equilibrium are fundamental problems. The exceptional electrical polarity of biological objects and long-range interactions suggest a basic role of the endogenous electromagnetic field generated by living cells. The formulated postulates encompass generation, properties and function of the electromagnetic field connected with biological activity and its pathological deviations. Excited longitudinal polar oscillations in microtubules in eukaryotic cells generate the endogenous electromagnetic field. The metabolic activity of mitochondria connected with water ordering forms conditions for excitation. The electrodynamic field plays an important role in the establishment of coherence, directional transport, organization of morphological structures, interactions, information transfer, and brain activity. An overview of experimental results and physical models supporting the postulates is included. The existence of the endogenous biological electromagnetic field, its generation by microtubules and supporting effects produced by mitochondria have a reasonable experimental foundation. Cancer transformation is a pathological reduction of the coherent energy state far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Malignancy, i.e. local invasion and metastasis, is a direct consequence of mitochondrial dysfunction, disturbed microtubule polar oscillations and the

  3. Biological activities of xanthatin from Xanthium strumarium leaves.

    PubMed

    Nibret, Endalkachew; Youns, Mahamoud; Krauth-Siegel, R Luise; Wink, Michael

    2011-12-01

    The objective of the present work was to evaluate the biological activities of the major bioactive compound, xanthatin, and other compounds from Xanthium strumarium (Asteraceae) leaves. Inhibition of bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei brucei and leukaemia HL-60 cell proliferation was assessed using resazurin as a vital stain. Xanthatin was found to be the major and most active compound against T. b. brucei with an IC(50) value of 2.63 µg/mL and a selectivity index of 20. The possible mode of action of xanthatin was further evaluated. Xanthatin showed antiinflammatory activity by inhibiting both PGE(2) synthesis (24% inhibition) and 5-lipoxygenase activity (92% inhibition) at concentrations of 100 µg/mL and 97 µg/mL, respectively. Xanthatin exhibited weak irreversible inhibition of parasite specific trypanothione reductase. Unlike xanthatin, diminazene aceturate and ethidium bromide showed strong DNA intercalation with IC(50) values of 26.04 µg/mL and 44.70 µg/mL, respectively. Substantial induction of caspase 3/7 activity in MIA PaCa-2 cells was observed after 6 h of treatment with 100 µg/mL of xanthatin. All these data taken together suggest that xanthatin exerts its biological activity by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting both PGE(2) synthesis and 5-lipoxygenase activity thereby avoiding unwanted inflammation commonly observed in diseases such as trypanosomiasis.

  4. EXAFS studies of binuclear iron complexes as models for hemerythrin and related proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Hedman, B.; Co, M.S.; Armstrong, W.H.; Hodgson, K.O.; Lippard, S.J.

    1986-09-24

    There is increasing interest in oxo-bridged polyiron centers in biology. Binuclear units of this kind occur in hemerythrin, the marine invertebrate oxygen carrier, in ribonucleotide reductase, and in purple acid phosphatases. The reversible binding of dioxygen in hemerythrin has been postulated to occur where the bridging carboxylate groups are contributed from glutamate and aspartate residues of the protein. Following the synthesis of realistic model compounds for both oxidized and reduced forms of the hemerythrin iron core, as well as analogues of the former in which either the oxo bridge was protonated or the bridging carboxylate ligands were replaced by diphenylphosphate groups, they have been working to establish their relevance to the chemical and physical properties of the proteins. Previously, they showed close similarities between the molecular geometry, magnetic exchange interactions, and optical spectroscopic and vibrational properties of azidomethemerythrin and the model compounds (Fe/sub 2/O(O/sub 2/CCH/sub 3/)/sub 2/(HB(pz)/sub 3/)/sub 2/) and (Fe/sub 2/O-(O/sub 2/CCH/sub 3/)/sub 2/(TACN)/sub 2/)/sup 2 +/, where HB(pz)/sub 3//sup -/ = hydrotris(1-pyrazolyl)borate and TACN = 1,4,7-triazacyclononane. They now report the results of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies of these two complexes as well as the derivatives (Fe/sub 2/O)O/sub 2/P(OC/sub 6/H/sub 5/)/sub 2/)/sub 2/(HB(pz)/sub 3/)/sub 2/) and (Fe/sub 2/(OH)(O/sub 2/CCH/sub 3/)/sub 2/(HB(pz)/sub 3/)/sub 2/)/sup +/. This work addresses in well-defined model systems how sensitive EXAFS spectroscopy is to the important question of modulations in the iron-to-bridging oxygen and nonbonded, e.g. Fe...Fe or Fe...P, distances. Such geometric information is necessary to understand the oxygen binding reaction of hemerythrin as well as the structural biology of ribonucleotide reductase and purple acid phosphatase.

  5. Milk kefir: composition, microbial cultures, biological activities, and related products

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Maria R.; Blandón, Lina Marcela; Vandenberghe, Luciana P. S.; Rodrigues, Cristine; Castro, Guillermo R.; Thomaz-Soccol, Vanete; Soccol, Carlos R.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a strong focus on beneficial foods with probiotic microorganisms and functional organic substances. In this context, there is an increasing interest in the commercial use of kefir, since it can be marketed as a natural beverage that has health promoting bacteria. There are numerous commercially available kefir based-products. Kefir may act as a matrix in the effective delivery of probiotic microorganisms in different types of products. Also, the presence of kefir’s exopolysaccharides, known as kefiran, which has biological activity, certainly adds value to products. Kefiran can also be used separately in other food products and as a coating film for various food and pharmaceutical products. This article aims to update the information about kefir and its microbiological composition, biological activity of the kefir’s microflora and the importance of kefiran as a beneficial health substance. PMID:26579086

  6. Milk kefir: composition, microbial cultures, biological activities, and related products.

    PubMed

    Prado, Maria R; Blandón, Lina Marcela; Vandenberghe, Luciana P S; Rodrigues, Cristine; Castro, Guillermo R; Thomaz-Soccol, Vanete; Soccol, Carlos R

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a strong focus on beneficial foods with probiotic microorganisms and functional organic substances. In this context, there is an increasing interest in the commercial use of kefir, since it can be marketed as a natural beverage that has health promoting bacteria. There are numerous commercially available kefir based-products. Kefir may act as a matrix in the effective delivery of probiotic microorganisms in different types of products. Also, the presence of kefir's exopolysaccharides, known as kefiran, which has biological activity, certainly adds value to products. Kefiran can also be used separately in other food products and as a coating film for various food and pharmaceutical products. This article aims to update the information about kefir and its microbiological composition, biological activity of the kefir's microflora and the importance of kefiran as a beneficial health substance.

  7. Removal of Biologically Active Organic Contaminants using Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor); Banks, Michael A. (Inventor); Banks, Eric B. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Biomedical devices that are to come into contact with living tissue, such as prosthetic and other implants for the human body and the containers used to store and transport them, are together cleaned of non-living, but biologically active organic materials, including endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharides, and assembled into a hermetically sealed package without recontamination. This is achieved by cleaning both the device and package components together in an apparatus, which includes a hermetically sealed chamber, in which they are contacted with atomic oxygen which biocleans them, by oxidizing the biologically active organic materials. The apparatus also includes means for manipulating the device and container and hermetically sealing the cleaned device into the cleaned container to form the package. A calibrated witness coupon visually indicates whether or not the device and container have received enough exposure to the atomic oxygen to have removed the organic materials from their surfaces. Gamma radiation is then used to sterilize the device in the sealed container.

  8. Biological activities and medicinal properties of Gokhru (Pedalium murex L.)

    PubMed Central

    Rajashekar, V; Rao, E Upender; P, Srinivas

    2012-01-01

    Bada Gokhru (Pedalium murex L.) is perhaps the most useful traditional medicinal plant in India. Each part of the neem tree has some medicinal property and is thus commercially exploitable. During the last five decades, apart from the chemistry of the Pedalium murex compounds, considerable progress has been achieved regarding the biological activity and medicinal applications of this plant. It is now considered as a valuable source of unique natural products for development of medicines against various diseases and also for the development of industrial products. This review gives a bird's eye view mainly on the biological activities of some of this compounds isolated, pharmacological actions of the extracts, clinical studies and plausible medicinal applications of gokharu along with their safety evaluation. PMID:23569975

  9. Marine sponge lectins: actual status on properties and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Gomes Filho, Sandro Mascena; Cardoso, Juscélio Donizete; Anaya, Katya; Silva do Nascimento, Edilza; de Lacerda, José Thalles Jucelino Gomes; Mioso, Roberto; Santi Gadelha, Tatiane; de Almeida Gadelha, Carlos Alberto

    2014-12-26

    Marine sponges are primitive metazoans that produce a wide variety of molecules that protect them against predators. In studies that search for bioactive molecules, these marine invertebrates stand out as promising sources of new biologically-active molecules, many of which are still unknown or little studied; thus being an unexplored biotechnological resource of high added value. Among these molecules, lectins are proteins that reversibly bind to carbohydrates without modifying them. In this review, various structural features and biological activities of lectins derived from marine sponges so far described in the scientific literature are discussed. From the results found in the literature, it could be concluded that lectins derived from marine sponges are structurally diverse proteins with great potential for application in the production of biopharmaceuticals, especially as antibacterial and antitumor agents.

  10. Studies on the biological activity of porcine proinsulin

    PubMed Central

    Lazarus, Norman R.; Penhos, Juan C.; Tanese, Tomio; Michaels, Leslie; Gutman, Raul; Recant, Lillian

    1970-01-01

    The biological activity of purified porcine proinsulin was investigated in rats. In vivo studies revealed that proinsulin produced a hypoglycemic response similar to insulin but of lesser magnitude. Hypophysectomized and adrenalectomized animals proved to be more sensitive to proinsulin than normal. In vitro studies with rat hemidiaphragm were consistent with the in vivo findings. No competition with insulin action could be demonstrated. Experiments were carried out to determine whether proinsulin is converted to intermediate forms or insulin as a requisite to its biological activity. Labeled proinsulin injected in vivo or incubated in vitro remained intact by a variety of techniques (Sephadex column chromatography and polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis). An inhibitory action of Kunitz pancreatic trypsin inhibitor on proinsulin action in vitro was confirmed. No clarification of this effect could be ascertained. Images PMID:5416410

  11. Studies on the biological activity of porcine proinsulin.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, N R; Penhos, J C; Tanese, T; Michaels, L; Gutman, R; Recant, L

    1970-03-01

    The biological activity of purified porcine proinsulin was investigated in rats. In vivo studies revealed that proinsulin produced a hypoglycemic response similar to insulin but of lesser magnitude. Hypophysectomized and adrenalectomized animals proved to be more sensitive to proinsulin than normal. In vitro studies with rat hemidiaphragm were consistent with the in vivo findings. No competition with insulin action could be demonstrated. Experiments were carried out to determine whether proinsulin is converted to intermediate forms or insulin as a requisite to its biological activity. Labeled proinsulin injected in vivo or incubated in vitro remained intact by a variety of techniques (Sephadex column chromatography and polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis). An inhibitory action of Kunitz pancreatic trypsin inhibitor on proinsulin action in vitro was confirmed. No clarification of this effect could be ascertained.

  12. Removal of Biologically Active Organic Contaminants using Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor); Banks, Michael A. (Inventor); Banks, Eric B. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Biomedical devices that are to come into contact with living tissue, such as prosthetic and other implants for the human body and the containers used to store and transport them, are together cleaned of non-living, but biologically active organic materials, including endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharides, and assembled into a hermetically sealed package without recontamination. This is achieved by cleaning both the device and package components together in an apparatus, which includes a hermetically sealed chamber, in which they are contacted with atomic oxygen which biocleans them, by oxidizing the biologically active organic materials. The apparatus also includes means for manipulating the device and container and hermetically sealing the cleaned device into the cleaned container to form the package. A calibrated witness coupon visually indicates whether or not the device and container have received enough exposure to the atomic oxygen to have removed the organic materials from their surfaces. Gamma radiation is then used to sterilize the device in the sealed container.

  13. Polymer application for separation/filtration of biological active compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tylkowski, B.; Tsibranska, I.

    2017-06-01

    Membrane technology is an important part of the engineer's toolbox. This is especially true for industries that process food and other products with their primary source from nature. This review is focused on ongoing development work using membrane technologies for concentration and separation of biologically active compounds, such as polyphenols and flavonoids. We provide the readers not only with the last results achieve in this field but also, we deliver detailed information about the membrane types and polymers used for their preparation.

  14. Current status of pyrazole and its biological activities

    PubMed Central

    Naim, Mohd Javed; Alam, Ozair; Nawaz, Farah; Alam, Md. Jahangir; Alam, Perwaiz

    2016-01-01

    Pyrazole are potent medicinal scaffolds and exhibit a full spectrum of biological activities. This review throws light on the detailed synthetic approaches which have been applied for the synthesis of pyrazole. This has been followed by an in depth analysis of the pyrazole with respect to their medical significance. This follow-up may help the medicinal chemists to generate new leads possessing pyrazole nucleus with high efficacy. PMID:26957862

  15. Influencing upon Mammalian Radioresistance with Biologically Active Drug Respistim Plus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    RTO-MP-HFM-181 3 - 1 Influencing upon Mammalian Radioresistance with Biologically Active Drug Respistim Plus Leut . Iv. Kindekov MD Vl...Vasilieva Assoc. Prof. M. Aljakov MD PhD, Coll. Assoc. Prof. Pl. Petrunov MD, PhD ivankindekov@gmail.com ABSTRACT Radiobiology is a medical...success. Protection of the hematopoietic and immune systems is a critical area for restoring organism after irradiation. Some radioprotective

  16. Current status of pyrazole and its biological activities.

    PubMed

    Naim, Mohd Javed; Alam, Ozair; Nawaz, Farah; Alam, Md Jahangir; Alam, Perwaiz

    2016-01-01

    Pyrazole are potent medicinal scaffolds and exhibit a full spectrum of biological activities. This review throws light on the detailed synthetic approaches which have been applied for the synthesis of pyrazole. This has been followed by an in depth analysis of the pyrazole with respect to their medical significance. This follow-up may help the medicinal chemists to generate new leads possessing pyrazole nucleus with high efficacy.

  17. [New selen-organic biologically active nutrition supplement as a palliative for protection against chemical exposure].

    PubMed

    Sanotskiĭ, I V

    2009-01-01

    The article covers data on new biologically active nutrition supplement containing 3 generation selenium compound. The data include biologic effects, pharmacokinetics and usage recommendation for the supplement.

  18. Preparation, characterization and biological activity of C8-substituted cytokinins.

    PubMed

    Zahajská, Lenka; Nisler, Jaroslav; Voller, Jiří; Gucký, Tomáš; Pospíšil, Tomáš; Spíchal, Lukáš; Strnad, Miroslav

    2017-03-01

    Naturally occurring cytokinins are adenine-based plant hormones. Although, the effect of various substituents at positions N1, C2, N3, N(6), N7, or N9 on the biological activity of cytokinins has been studied, the C8-substituted compounds have received little attention. Here, we report the synthesis and in vitro biological testing of thirty-one cytokinin derivatives substituted at the C8 position of the adenine skeleton and twenty-seven compounds which served as their N9-tetrahydropyranyl protected precursors. The cytokinin activity of all the compounds was determined in classical cytokinin biotests (wheat leaf senescence, Amaranthus and tobacco callus assays). With some exceptions, the compounds with a N9-tetrahydropyranyl group were generally less active than their de-protected analogs. The latter were further tested for their ability to activate the Arabidopsis cytokinin receptors AHK3 and CRE1/AHK4 in bacterial receptor activation assays. Using this approach, we identified derivatives bearing short aliphatic chains and retaining high cytokinin activity. Such compounds are suitable candidates for fluorescence labeling or as protein-affinity ligands. We further found that some C8-substituted cytokinins exhibited no or lower cytotoxicity toward tobacco cells when compared to their parent compound. Therefore, we also present and discuss the cytotoxicity of all the compounds against three normal human cell lines.

  19. Myricetin: A Dietary Molecule with Diverse Biological Activities.

    PubMed

    Semwal, Deepak Kumar; Semwal, Ruchi Badoni; Combrinck, Sandra; Viljoen, Alvaro

    2016-02-16

    Myricetin is a common plant-derived flavonoid and is well recognised for its nutraceuticals value. It is one of the key ingredients of various foods and beverages. The compound exhibits a wide range of activities that include strong anti-oxidant, anticancer, antidiabetic and anti-inflammatory activities. It displays several activities that are related to the central nervous system and numerous studies have suggested that the compound may be beneficial to protect against diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. The use of myricetin as a preserving agent to extend the shelf life of foods containing oils and fats is attributed to the compound's ability to protect lipids against oxidation. A detailed search of existing literature revealed that there is currently no comprehensive review available on this important molecule. Hence, the present work includes the history, synthesis, pharmaceutical applications and toxicity studies of myricetin. This report also highlights structure-activity relationships and mechanisms of action for various biological activities.

  20. The biological and toxicological activity of gases and vapors.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Michael H; Sánchez-Moreno, Ricardo; Gil-Lostes, Javier; Acree, William E; Cometto-Muñiz, J Enrique; Cain, William S

    2010-03-01

    A large amount of data on the biological and toxicological activity of gases and vapors has been collected from the literature. Processes include sensory irritation thresholds, the Alarie mouse test, inhalation anesthesia, etc. It is shown that a single equation using only five descriptors (properties of the gases and vapors) plus a set of indicator variables for the given processes can correlate 643 biological and non-lethal toxicological activities of 'non-reactive' compounds with a standard deviation of 0.36 log unit. The equation is scaled to sensory irritation thresholds obtained by the procedure of Cometto-Muñiz, and Cain provides a general equation for the prediction of sensory irritation thresholds in man. It is suggested that differences in biological/toxicological activity arise primarily from transport from the gas phase to a receptor phase or area, except for odor detection thresholds where interaction with a receptor(s) is important. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Biologically active and biomimetic dual gelatin scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, P; Pedraz, J L; Orive, G

    2017-05-01

    We have designed, developed and optimized Genipin cross-linked 3D gelatin scaffolds that were biologically active and biomimetic, show a dual activity both for growth factor and cell delivery. Type B gelatin powder was dissolved in DI water. 100mg of genipin was dissolved in 10ml of DI water. Three genipin concentrations were prepared: 0.1%, 0.2% and 0.3% (w/v). Solutions were mixed at 40°C and under stirring and then left crosslinking for 72h. Scaffolds were obtained by punching 8 mm-cylinders into ethanol 70% solution for 10min and then freeze-drying. Scaffolds were biologically, biomechanically and morphologically evaluated. Cell adhesion and morphology of D1-Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and L-929 fibroblast was studied. Vascular endothelial grwoth factor (VEGF) and Sonic hedgehog (SHH) were used as model proteins. Swelling ratio increased and younǵs module decreased along with the concentration of genipin. All scaffolds were biocompatible according to the toxicity test. MSC and L-929 cell adhesion improved in 0.2% of genipin, obtaining better results with MSCs. VEGF and SHH were released from the gels. This preliminary study suggest that the biologically active and dual gelatin scaffolds may be used for tissue engineering approaches like bone regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Ethnobotany, chemistry, and biological activities of the genus Tithonia (Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Chagas-Paula, Daniela A; Oliveira, Rejane B; Rocha, Bruno A; Da Costa, Fernando B

    2012-02-01

    The genus Tithonia is an important source of diverse natural products, particularly sesquiterpene lactones, diterpenes, and flavonoids. The collected information in this review attempts to summarize the recent developments in the ethnobotany, biological activities, and secondary metabolite chemistry of this genus. More than 100 structures of natural products from Tithonia are reported in this review. The species that has been most investigated in this genus is T. diversifolia, from which ca. 150 compounds were isolated. Biological studies are described to evaluate the anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antimalarial, antiviral, antidiabetic, antidiarrhoeal, antimicrobial, antispasmodic, vasorelaxant, cancer-chemopreventive, cytotoxic, toxicological, bioinsecticide, and repellent activities. A few of these studies have been carried out with isolated compounds from Tithonia species, but the majority has been conducted with different extracts. The relationship between the biological activity and the toxicity of compounds isolated from the plants of this genus as well as T. diversifolia extracts still remains unclear, and mechanisms of action remain to be determined. Copyright © 2012 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  3. Expression of biologically active murine interleukin-18 in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Feizollahzadeh, Sadegh; Khanahmad, Hossein; Rahimmanesh, Ilnaz; Ganjalikhani-Hakemi, Mazdak; Andalib, Alireza; Sanei, Mohammad Hossein; Rezaei, Abbas

    2016-11-01

    The food-grade bacterium Lactococcus lactis is increasingly used for heterologous protein expression in therapeutic and industrial applications. The ability of L. lactis to secrete biologically active cytokines may be used for the generation of therapeutic cytokines. Interleukin (IL)-18 enhances the immune response, especially on mucosal surfaces, emphasizing its therapeutic potential. However, it is produced as an inactive precursor and has to be enzymatically cleaved for maturation. We genetically manipulated L. lactis to secrete murine IL-18. The mature murine IL-18 gene was inserted downstream of a nisin promoter in pNZ8149 plasmid and the construct was used to transform L. lactis NZ3900. The transformants were selected on Elliker agar and confirmed by restriction enzyme digestion and sequencing. The expression and secretion of IL-18 protein was verified by SDS-PAGE, western blotting and ELISA. The biological activity of recombinant IL-18 was determined by its ability to induce interferon (IFN)-γ production in L. lactis co-cultured with murine splenic T cells. The amounts of IL-18 in bacterial lysates and supernatants were 3-4 μg mL(-1) and 0.6-0.7 ng mL(-1), respectively. The successfully generated L. lactis strain that expressed biologically active murine IL-18 can be used to evaluate the possible therapeutic effects of IL-18 on mucosal surfaces.

  4. Integrity and Biological Activity of DNA after UV Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, Delina Y.; Monier, Jean-Michel; Dupraz, Sébastien; Freissinet, Caroline; Simonet, Pascal; Vogel, Timothy M.

    2010-04-01

    The field of astrobiology lacks a universal marker with which to indicate the presence of life. This study supports the proposal to use nucleic acids, specifically DNA, as a signature of life (biosignature). In addition to its specificity to living organisms, DNA is a functional molecule that can confer new activities and characteristics to other organisms, following the molecular biology dogma, that is, DNA is transcribed to RNA, which is translated into proteins. Previous criticisms of the use of DNA as a biosignature have asserted that DNA molecules would be destroyed by UV radiation in space. To address this concern, DNA in plasmid form was deposited onto different surfaces and exposed to UVC radiation. The surviving DNA was quantified via the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Results demonstrate increased survivability of DNA attached to surfaces versus non-adsorbed DNA. The DNA was also tested for biological activity via transformation into the bacterium Acinetobacter sp. and assaying for antibiotic resistance conferred by genes encoded by the plasmid. The success of these methods to detect DNA and its gene products after UV exposure (254 nm, 3.5 J/m2s) not only supports the use of the DNA molecule as a biosignature on mineral surfaces but also demonstrates that the DNA retained biological activity.

  5. Functional diversification of the RING finger and other binuclear treble clef domains in prokaryotes and the early evolution of the ubiquitin system.

    PubMed

    Burroughs, A Maxwell; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Aravind, L

    2011-07-01

    Recent studies point to a diverse assemblage of prokaryotic cognates of the eukaryotic ubiquitin (Ub) system. These systems span an entire spectrum, ranging from those catalyzing cofactor and amino acid biosynthesis, with only adenylating E1-like enzymes and ubiquitin-like proteins (Ubls), to those that are closer to eukaryotic systems by virtue of possessing E2 enzymes. Until recently E3 enzymes were unknown in such prokaryotic systems. Using contextual information from comparative genomics, we uncover a diverse group of RING finger E3s in prokaryotes that are likely to function with E1s, E2s, JAB domain peptidases and Ubls. These E1s, E2s and RING fingers suggest that features hitherto believed to be unique to eukaryotic versions of these proteins emerged progressively in such prokaryotic systems. These include the specific configuration of residues associated with oxyanion-hole formation in E2s and the C-terminal UFD in the E1 enzyme, which presents the E2 to its active site. Our study suggests for the first time that YukD-like Ubls might be conjugated by some of these systems in a manner similar to eukaryotic Ubls. We also show that prokaryotic RING fingers possess considerable functional diversity and that not all of them are involved in Ub-related functions. In eukaryotes, other than RING fingers, a number of distinct binuclear (chelating two Zn atoms) and mononuclear (chelating one zinc atom) treble clef domains are involved in Ub-related functions. Through detailed structural analysis we delineated the higher order relationships and interaction modes of binuclear treble clef domains. This indicated that the FYVE domain acquired the binuclear state independently of the other binuclear forms and that different treble clef domains have convergently acquired Ub-related functions independently of the RING finger. Among these, we uncover evidence for notable prokaryotic radiations of the ZF-UBP, B-box, AN1 and LIM clades of treble clef domains and present

  6. Isolation of biologically active nanomaterial (inclusion bodies) from bacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In recent years bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs) were recognised as highly pure deposits of active proteins inside bacterial cells. Such active nanoparticles are very interesting for further downstream protein isolation, as well as for many other applications in nanomedicine, cosmetic, chemical and pharmaceutical industry. To prepare large quantities of a high quality product, the whole bioprocess has to be optimised. This includes not only the cultivation of the bacterial culture, but also the isolation step itself, which can be of critical importance for the production process. To determine the most appropriate method for the isolation of biologically active nanoparticles, three methods for bacterial cell disruption were analyzed. Results In this study, enzymatic lysis and two mechanical methods, high-pressure homogenization and sonication, were compared. During enzymatic lysis the enzyme lysozyme was found to attach to the surface of IBs, and it could not be removed by simple washing. As this represents an additional impurity in the engineered nanoparticles, we concluded that enzymatic lysis is not the most suitable method for IBs isolation. During sonication proteins are released (lost) from the surface of IBs and thus the surface of IBs appears more porous when compared to the other two methods. We also found that the acoustic output power needed to isolate the IBs from bacterial cells actually damages proteins structures, thereby causing a reduction in biological activity. High-pressure homogenization also caused some damage to IBs, however the protein loss from the IBs was negligible. Furthermore, homogenization had no side-effects on protein biological activity. Conclusions The study shows that among the three methods tested, homogenization is the most appropriate method for the isolation of active nanoparticles from bacterial cells. PMID:20831775

  7. Target identification for biologically active small molecules using chemical biology approaches.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heesu; Lee, Jae Wook

    2016-09-01

    The identification and validation of the targets of biologically active molecules is an important step in the field of chemical biology. While recent advances in proteomic and genomic technology have accelerated this identification process, the discovery of small molecule targets remains the most challenging step. A general method for the identification of these small molecule targets has not yet been established. To overcome the difficulty in target identification, new technology derived from the fields of genomics, proteomics, and bioinformatics has been developed. To date, pull-down methods using small molecules immobilized on a solid support followed by mass spectrometry have been the most successful approach. Here, we discuss current procedures for target identification. We also review the most recent target identification approaches and present several examples that illustrate advanced target identification technology.

  8. Purification and characterization of biologically active peptides from spider venoms.

    PubMed

    Vassilevski, Alexander A; Kozlov, Sergey A; Egorov, Tsezi A; Grishin, Eugene V

    2010-01-01

    Spider venoms represent invaluable sources of biologically active compounds suitable for use in life science research and also having a significant potential for biotechnology and therapeutic applications. The methods reported herewith are based on our long experience of spider venom fractionation and peptides purification. We routinely screen new peptides for antimicrobial and insecticidal activities and our detailed protocols are also reported here. So far these have been tested on species of Central Asian and European spiders from the families Agelenidae, Eresidae, Gnaphosidae, Lycosidae, Miturgidae, Oxyopidae, Philodromidae, Pisauridae, Segestriidae, Theridiidae, Thomisidae, and Zodariidae. The reported protocols should be easily adaptable for use with other arthropod species.

  9. Biological Activities of Phenolic Compounds of Extra Virgin Olive Oil.

    PubMed

    Servili, Maurizio; Sordini, Beatrice; Esposto, Sonia; Urbani, Stefania; Veneziani, Gianluca; Di Maio, Ilona; Selvaggini, Roberto; Taticchi, Agnese

    2013-12-20

    Over the last few decades, multiple biological properties, providing antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, chemopreventive and anti-cancer benefits, as well as the characteristic pungent and bitter taste, have been attributed to Extra Virgin Olive Oil (EVOO) phenols. In particular, growing efforts have been devoted to the study of the antioxidants of EVOO, due to their importance from health, biological and sensory points of view. Hydrophilic and lipophilic phenols represent the main antioxidants of EVOO, and they include a large variety of compounds. Among them, the most concentrated phenols are lignans and secoiridoids, with the latter found exclusively in the Oleaceae family, of which the drupe is the only edible fruit. In recent years, therefore, we have tackled the study of the main properties of phenols, including the relationships between their biological activity and the related chemical structure. This review, in fact, focuses on the phenolic compounds of EVOO, and, in particular, on their biological properties, sensory aspects and antioxidant capacity, with a particular emphasis on the extension of the product shelf-life.

  10. Biological Activities of Phenolic Compounds of Extra Virgin Olive Oil

    PubMed Central

    Servili, Maurizio; Sordini, Beatrice; Esposto, Sonia; Urbani, Stefania; Veneziani, Gianluca; Maio, Ilona Di; Selvaggini, Roberto; Taticchi, Agnese

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few decades, multiple biological properties, providing antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, chemopreventive and anti-cancer benefits, as well as the characteristic pungent and bitter taste, have been attributed to Extra Virgin Olive Oil (EVOO) phenols. In particular, growing efforts have been devoted to the study of the antioxidants of EVOO, due to their importance from health, biological and sensory points of view. Hydrophilic and lipophilic phenols represent the main antioxidants of EVOO, and they include a large variety of compounds. Among them, the most concentrated phenols are lignans and secoiridoids, with the latter found exclusively in the Oleaceae family, of which the drupe is the only edible fruit. In recent years, therefore, we have tackled the study of the main properties of phenols, including the relationships between their biological activity and the related chemical structure. This review, in fact, focuses on the phenolic compounds of EVOO, and, in particular, on their biological properties, sensory aspects and antioxidant capacity, with a particular emphasis on the extension of the product shelf-life. PMID:26784660

  11. Chitosan oligosaccharide: Biological activities and potential therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Muanprasat, Chatchai; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj

    2017-02-01

    Chitosan oligosaccharide (COS) is an oligomer of β-(1➔4)-linked d-glucosamine. COS can be prepared from the deacetylation and hydrolysis of chitin, which is commonly found in the exoskeletons of arthropods and insects and the cell walls of fungi. COS is water soluble, non-cytotoxic, readily absorbed through the intestine and mainly excreted in the urine. Of particular importance, COS and its derivatives have been demonstrated to possess several biological activities including anti-inflammation, immunostimulation, anti-tumor, anti-obesity, anti-hypertension, anti-Alzheimer's disease, tissue regeneration promotion, drug and DNA delivery enhancement, anti-microbial, anti-oxidation and calcium-absorption enhancement. The mechanisms of actions of COS have been found to involve the modulation of several important pathways including the suppression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). This review summarizes the current knowledge of the preparation methods, pharmacokinetic profiles, biological activities, potential therapeutic applications and safety profiles of COS and its derivatives. In addition, future research directions are discussed.

  12. On the mechanism of biological activation by tritium.

    PubMed

    Rozhko, T V; Badun, G A; Razzhivina, I A; Guseynov, O A; Guseynova, V E; Kudryasheva, N S

    2016-06-01

    The mechanism of biological activation by beta-emitting radionuclide tritium was studied. Luminous marine bacteria were used as a bioassay to monitor the biological effect of tritium with luminescence intensity as the physiological parameter tested. Two different types of tritium sources were used: HTO molecules distributed regularly in the surrounding aqueous medium, and a solid source with tritium atoms fixed on its surface (tritium-labeled films, 0.11, 0.28, 0.91, and 2.36 MBq/cm(2)). When using the tritium-labeled films, tritium penetration into the cells was prevented. The both types of tritium sources revealed similar changes in the bacterial luminescence kinetics: a delay period followed by bioluminescence activation. No monotonic dependences of bioluminescence activation efficiency on specific radioactivities of the films were found. A 15-day exposure to tritiated water (100 MBq/L) did not reveal mutations in bacterial DNA. The results obtained give preference to a "non-genomic" mechanism of bioluminescence activation by tritium. An activation of the intracellular bioluminescence process develops without penetration of tritium atoms into the cells and can be caused by intensification of trans-membrane cellular processes stimulated by ionization and radiolysis of aqueous media. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Distribution and biological activities of the flavonoid luteolin.

    PubMed

    López-Lázaro, Miguel

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that flavonoids may play an important role in the decreased risk of chronic diseases associated with a diet rich in plant-derived foods. Flavonoids are also common constituents of plants used in traditional medicine to treat a wide range of diseases. The purpose of this article is to summarize the distribution and biological activities of one of the most common flavonoids: luteolin. This flavonoid and its glycosides are widely distributed in the plant kingdom; they are present in many plant families and have been identified in Bryophyta, Pteridophyta, Pinophyta and Magnoliophyta. Dietary sources of luteolin include, for instance, carrots, peppers, celery, olive oil, peppermint, thyme, rosemary and oregano. Preclinical studies have shown that this flavone possesses a variety of pharmacological activities, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and anticancer activities. The ability of luteolin to inhibit angiogenesis, to induce apoptosis, to prevent carcinogenesis in animal models, to reduce tumor growth in vivo and to sensitize tumor cells to the cytotoxic effects of some anticancer drugs suggests that this flavonoid has cancer chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic potential. Modulation of ROS levels, inhibition of topoisomerases I and II, reduction of NF-kappaB and AP-1 activity, stabilization of p53, and inhibition of PI3K, STAT3, IGF1R and HER2 are possible mechanisms involved in the biological activities of luteolin.

  14. The Chemistry and Biological Activities of Mimosine: A Review.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Binh Cao Quan; Tawata, Shinkichi

    2016-08-01

    Mimosine [β-[N-(3-hydroxy-4-oxypyridyl)]-α-aminopropionic acid] is a non-protein amino acid found in the members of Mimosoideae family. There are a considerable number of reports available on the chemistry, methods for estimation, biosynthesis, regulation, and degradation of this secondary metabolite. On the other hand, over the past years of active research, mimosine has been found to have various biological activities such as anti-cancer, antiinflammation, anti-fibrosis, anti-influenza, anti-virus, herbicidal and insecticidal activities, and others. Mimosine is a leading compound of interest for use in the development of RAC/CDC42-activated kinase 1 (PAK1)-specific inhibitors for the treatment of various diseases/disorders, because PAK1 is not essential for the growth of normal cells. Interestingly, the new roles of mimosine in malignant glioma treatment, regenerative dentistry, and phytoremediation are being emerged. These identified properties indicate an exciting future for this amino acid. The present review is focused on the chemistry and recognized biological activities of mimosine in an attempt to draw a link between these two characteristics. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Chemistry, biological activity, and uses of formamidine pesticides.

    PubMed Central

    Hollingworth, R M

    1976-01-01

    The formamidines, a relatively new group of acaricide-insecticides, are novel both in their range of biological activities and in their mode of action, which is presently unknown. This paper is a review of the historical development, properties, structures, uses, and chemistry of this group of pesticides, with particular emphasis on chlordimeform (Galecron or Fundal), N'-4-chloro-o-tolyl-N,N-dimethylformamidine, and amitraz, 1,3=di-(2,4-dimethylphenylimino)-2-methyl-2-azapropane. Their biological activity and uses are defined by their toxicity to spider mites, ticks, and certain insects, and they are particularly effective against juvenile and resistant forms of these organisms. A significant, but poorly understood feature of their field effectiveness is their breadth of toxic action which includes direct lethality, excitant-repellant behavioral effects, and chemosterilization. They are generally of low hazard for nontarget species with the significant exception of predaceous mites. Several aspects of the chemistry of these compounds are considered, including structure--activity relations, synthetic pathways, isomerism and configuration, and their chemical and environmental stability. A significant feature of the metabolism and toxicity of these agents is the possible activation of chlordimeform by N-demethylation in vivo. Strong evidence for this has been presented with the cattle tick, but recent results discussed here suggest that in other species, i.e., mice, German cockroaches or black cutworm eggs, N-demethylation is neither a strong activation nor a detoxication reaction. PMID:789070

  16. Controlled Release of Biologically Active Silver from Nanosilver Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingyu; Sonshine, David A.; Shervani, Saira; Hurt, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    Major pathways in the antibacterial activity and eukaryotic toxicity of nano-silver involve the silver cation and its soluble complexes, which are well established thiol toxicants. Through these pathways, nano-silver behaves in analogy to a drug delivery system, in which the particle contains a concentrated inventory of an active species, the ion, which is transported to and released near biological target sites. Although the importance of silver ion in the biological response to nano-silver is widely recognized, the drug delivery paradigm has not been well developed for this system, and there is significant potential to improve nano-silver technologies through controlled release formulations. This article applies elements of the drug delivery paradigm to nano-silver dissolution and presents a systematic study of chemical concepts for controlled release. After presenting thermodynamic calculations of silver species partitioning in biological media, the rates of oxidative silver dissolution are measured for nanoparticles and macroscopic foils and used to derive unified area-based release kinetics. A variety of competing chemical approaches are demonstrated for controlling the ion release rate over four orders of magnitude. Release can be systematically slowed by thiol and citrate ligand binding, formation of sulfidic coatings, or the scavenging of peroxy-intermediates. Release can be accelerated by pre-oxidation or particle size reduction, while polymer coatings with complexation sites alter the release profile by storing and release inventories of surface-bound silver. Finally, the ability to tune biological activity is demonstrated through bacterial inhibition zone assay carried out on selected formulations of controlled release nano-silver. PMID:20968290

  17. Structure activity relationships: their function in biological prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, T.W.

    1982-01-01

    Quantitative structure activity relationships provide a means of ranking or predicting biological effects based on chemical structure. For each compound used to formulate a structure activity model two kinds of quantitative information are required: (1) biological activity and (2) molecular properties. Molecular properties are of three types: (1) molecular shape, (2) physiochemical parameters, and (3) abstract quantitations of molecular structure. Currently the two best descriptors are the hydrophobic parameter, log 1-octanol/water partition coefficient (log P), and the /sup 1/X/sup v/(one-chi-v) molecular connectivity index. Biological responses can be divided into three main categories: (1) non-specific effects due to membrane perturbation, (2) non-specific effects due to interaction with functional groups of proteins, and (3) specific effects due to interaction with receptors. Twenty-six synthetic fossil fuel-related nitrogen-containing aromatic compounds were examined to determine the quantitative correlation between log P and /sup 1/X/sup v/ and population growth impairment of Tetrahymena pyriformis. Nitro-containing compounds are the most active, followed by amino-containing compounds and azaarenes. Within each analog series activity increases with alkyl substitution and ring addition. The planar model log BR = 0.5564 log P + 0.3000 /sup 1/X/sup v/ -2.0138 was determined using mono-nitrogen substituted compounds. Attempts to extrapolate this model to dinitrogen-containing molecules were, for the most part, unsuccessful because of a change in mode of action from membrane perturbation to uncoupling of oxidative phosphoralation.

  18. Isoleukotrienes are biologically active free radical products of lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Harrison, K A; Murphy, R C

    1995-07-21

    The free radical oxidation of arachidonic acid esterified to glycerophospholipids is known to generate complex metabolites, termed isoprostanes, that share structural features of prostaglandins derived from prostaglandin H2 synthase. Furthermore, certain isoprostanes have been found to exert biological activity through endogenous receptors on cell surfaces. Using mass spectrometry and ancillary techniques, the free radical oxidation of 1-hexadecanoyl-2-arachidonoyl-glycerophosphocholine was studied in the search for products of arachidonic acid isomeric to the leukotrienes that are derived from 5-lipoxygenase-catalyzed metabolism of arachidonic acid. Several conjugated triene metabolites were chromatographically separated from known 5-lipoxygenase products and structures characterized as 5,12-dihydroxy-6,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic acid esterified to the glycerophosphocholine backbone. We have termed these products as B4-isoleukotrienes. Following saponification some, but not all, B4-isoleukotrienes were found to exert biological activity in elevating intracellular calcium in Indo-1-loaded human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. This activity could be blocked by a leukotriene B4 receptor antagonist. An EC50 of approximately 30 nM was determined for one unique B4-isoleukotriene with a relative retention index of 2.54. We have shown that free radical processes can lead to the formation of biologically active isoleukotrienes in glycerophosphocholine liposomes, and we propose that B4-isoleukotrienes may also be formed in membrane glycerophospholipids as a result of lipid peroxidation during tissue injury. Such B4-isoleukotrienes could then mediate events of tissue damage through activation of leukotriene B4 receptors on target cells.

  19. [Influence of biological activated carbon dosage on landfill leachate treatment].

    PubMed

    Cui, Yan-Rui; Guo, Yan; Wu, Qing

    2014-08-01

    Effects of biological activated carbon (BAC) dosage on COD removal in landfill leachate treatment were compared. The COD removal efficiency of reactors with 0, 100 and 300 g activated carbon dosage per litre activated sludge was 12.9%, 19.6% and 27.7%, respectively. The results indicated that BAC improved the refractory organic matter removal efficiency and there was a positive correlation between COD removal efficiency and BAC dosage. The output of carbon dioxide after 8h of aeration in reactors was 109, 193 and 306 mg corresponding to the activated carbon dosages mentioned above, which indicated the amount of biodegradation and BAC dosage also had a positive correlation. The combination of adsorption and bioregeneration of BAC resulted in the positive correlation betweem organic matter removal efficiency and BAC dosage, and bioregeneration was the root cause for the microbial decomposition of refractory organics.

  20. Biologically active traditional medicinal herbs from Balochistan, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Mudassir A; Crow, Sidney A

    2005-01-04

    The biological activities of the following four important medicinal plants of Balochistan, Pakistan were checked; Grewia erythraea Schwein f. (Tiliaceae), Hymenocrater sessilifolius Fisch. and C.A. Mey (Lamiaceae), Vincetoxicum stocksii Ali and Khatoon (Asclepiadaceae) and Zygophyllum fabago L. (Zygophyllaceae). The methanolic extracts were fractionated into hexane, ethyl acetate, chloroform, butanol and water. The antifungal and antibacterial activities of these plants were determined against 12 fungal and 12 bacterial strains by agar well diffusion and disk diffusion assays. The extract of Zygophyllum fabago was found to be highly effective against Candida albicans and Escherichia coli. The extract of Vincetoxicum stocksii was also found to be significantly active against Candida albicans, Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus cereus. Extracts of Hymenocrater sessilifolius and Grewia erythraea showed good activity only against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  1. Biological activities of water-soluble fullerene derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, S.; Mashino, T.

    2009-04-01

    Three types of water-soluble fullerene derivatives were synthesized and their biological activities were investigated. C60-dimalonic acid, an anionic fullerene derivative, showed antioxidant activity such as quenching of superoxide and relief from growth inhibition of E. coli by paraquat. C60-bis(7V,7V-dimethylpyrrolidinium iodide), a cationic fullerene derivative, has antibacterial activity and antiproliferative effect on cancer cell lines. The mechanism is suggested to be respiratory chain inhibition by reactive oxygen species produced by the cationic fullerene derivative. Proline-type fullerene derivatives showed strong inhibition activities on HIV-reverse transcriptase. The IC50 values were remarkably lower than nevirapine, a clinically used anti-HIV drug. Fullerene derivatives have a big potential for a new type of lead compound to be used as medicine.

  2. Physical activity and cancer prevention: etiologic evidence and biological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Friedenreich, Christine M; Orenstein, Marla R

    2002-11-01

    Scientific evidence is accumulating on physical activity as a means for the primary prevention of cancer. Nearly 170 observational epidemiologic studies of physical activity and cancer risk at a number of specific cancer sites have been conducted. The evidence for decreased risk with increased physical activity is classified as convincing for breast and colon cancers, probable for prostate cancer, possible for lung and endometrial cancers and insufficient for cancers at all other sites. Despite the large number of studies conducted on physical activity and cancer, most have been hampered by incomplete assessment of physical activity and a lack of full examination of effect modification and confounding. Several plausible hypothesized biological mechanisms exist for the association between physical activity and cancer, including changes in endogenous sexual and metabolic hormone levels and growth factors, decreased obesity and central adiposity and possibly changes in immune function. Weight control may play a particularly important role because links between excess weight and increased cancer risk have been established for several sites, and central adiposity has been particularly implicated in promoting metabolic conditions amenable to carcinogenesis. Based on existing evidence, some public health organizations have issued physical activity guidelines for cancer prevention, generally recommending at least 30 min of moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity on > or =5 d/wk. Although most research has focused on the efficacy of physical activity in cancer prevention, evidence is increasing that exercise also influences other aspects of the cancer experience, including cancer detection, coping, rehabilitation and survival after diagnosis.

  3. Intermittent hypoxia stimulates formation of binuclear neurons in brain cortex- a role of cell fusion in neuroprotection?

    PubMed

    Paltsyn, Alexander A; Manukhina, Eugenia B; Goryacheva, Anna V; Downey, H Fred; Dubrovin, Ivan P; Komissarova, Svetlana V; Kubatiev, Aslan A

    2014-05-01

    Oligodendrocyte fusion with neurons in the brain cortex is a part of normal ontogenesis and is a possible means of neuroregeneration. Following such fusion, the oligodendrocyte nucleus undergoes neuron-specific reprogramming, resulting in the formation of binuclear neurons, which doubles the functional capability of the neuron. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the formation of binuclear neurons is involved in long-term adaptation of the brain to intermittent hypobaric hypoxia, which is known to be neuroprotective. Rats were adapted to hypoxia in an altitude chamber at a simulated altitude of 4000 m above sea level for 14 days (30 min increasing to 4 h, daily). One micrometer sections of the left motor cortex were analyzed by light microscopy. Phases of the fusion and reprogramming process were recorded, and the number of binuclear neurons was counted for all section areas containing pyramidal neurons of layers III-V. For the control group subjected to sham hypoxia, the density of binuclear neurons was 4.49 ± 0.32 mm(2). In the hypoxia-adapted group, this density increased to 5.71 ± 0.39 mm(2) (P < 0.04). In a subgroup of rats exposed to only one hypoxia session, the number of binuclear neurons did not differ from the number observed in the control group. We suggest that the increased content of binuclear neurons may serve as a structural basis for the neuroprotective effects of the adaptation to hypoxia.

  4. Natural products as a resource for biologically active compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Hanke, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate various sources of biologically active natural products in an effort to identify the active pesticidal compounds involved. The study is divided into several parts. Chapter 1 contains a discussion of several new compounds from plant and animal sources. Chapter 2 introduces a new NMR technique. In section 2.1 a new technique for better utilizing the lanthanide relaxation agent Gd(fod)/sub 3/ is presented which allows the predictable removal of resonances without line broadening. Section 2.2 discusses a variation of this technique for use in an aqueous solvent by applying this technique towards identifying the binding sites of metals of biological interest. Section 2.3 presents an unambiguous /sup 13/C NMR assignment of melibiose. Chapter 3 deals with work relating to the molting hormone of most arthropods, 20-hydroxyecdysone. Section 3.1 discusses the use of two-dimensional NMR (2D NMR) to assign the /sup 1/H NMR spectrum of this biologically important compound. Section 3.2 presents a new application for Droplet countercurrent chromatography (DCCC). Chapter 4 presents a basic improvement to the commercial DCCC instrument that is currently being applied to future commercial instruments. Chapter 5 discusses a curious observation of the effects that two previously known compounds, nagilactone C and (-)-epicatechin, have on lettuce and rice and suggest a possible new role for the ubiquitous flavanol (-)-epicatechin in plants.

  5. Towards biologically active self-assemblies: model nucleotide chimeras.

    PubMed

    Vebert-Nardin, Corinne

    2011-01-01

    With this article, we wish to give an overview of our main research activities assessing the potential of a suitable polymer modification of DNA fragments to self-assemble biologically active nanostructures. Specifically, the grafting of a hydrophobic polymer segment on DNA fragments results in amphiphilic nucleotide-based macromolecules, which, owing to both chemical and physical incompatibility, organize in self-assembled structures either on surfaces or in aqueous solution. Through the combination of the existing know-how in polymer chemistry with modern analytical techniques, we are currently focusing on establishing the mechanism of self-assembly of the polymer-modified nucleotide sequences in solution and on surfaces prior to the assessment of their hybridization capacity once involved in the ensemble. With the evaluation of the potential of the functional nanostructures to undergo biological-like adhesion through hybridization one can eventually foresee that the optimal functionality of these bio-inspired systems could be fine-tuned for biological applications such as drug delivery, gene therapy, tissue engineering and the design of either biomedical devices or biosensors.

  6. Mutant p53: Multiple Mechanisms Define Biologic Activity in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Michael Paul; Zhang, Yun; Lozano, Guillermina

    2015-01-01

    The functional importance of p53 as a tumor suppressor gene is evident through its pervasiveness in cancer biology. The p53 gene is the most commonly altered gene in human cancer; however, not all genetic alterations are biologically equivalent. The majority of alterations involve p53 missense mutations that result in the production of mutant p53 proteins. Such mutant p53 proteins lack normal p53 function and may concomitantly gain novel functions, often with deleterious effects. Here, we review characterized mechanisms of mutant p53 gain of function in various model systems. In addition, we review mutant p53 addiction as emerging evidence suggests that tumors may depend on sustained mutant p53 activity for continued growth. We also discuss the role of p53 in stromal elements and their contribution to tumor initiation and progression. Lastly, current genetic mouse models of mutant p53 in various organ systems are reviewed and their limitations discussed.

  7. Inhibitors of Angiogenesis in Cancer Therapy - Synthesis and Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Gensicka, Monika; Głowacka, Agnieszka; Dzierzbicka, Krystyna; Cholewinski, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is the process of formation of new capillaries from preexisting blood vessels. Angiogenesis is involved in normal physiological processes, and plays an important role in tumor invasion and development of metastases. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a key role in angiogenesis. VEGF is a mitogen for vascular endothelial cells and stimulates their proliferation. By inhibiting the biological activity of VEGF, and then signal cascades with neutralizing VEGF antibodies and signal inhibitors, may negatively regulate the growth and metastasis. Anti-angiogenesis therapy is less toxic than chemotherapy. Angiogenesis is a multistep and multifactorial process, and therefore, can be blocked at different levels. In this review article, the authors present the synthesis of novel inhibitors of angiogenesis, together with the results of biological tests in vitro, and in some cases, state trials.

  8. Mutant p53: Multiple Mechanisms Define Biologic Activity in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Michael Paul; Zhang, Yun; Lozano, Guillermina

    2015-01-01

    The functional importance of p53 as a tumor suppressor gene is evident through its pervasiveness in cancer biology. The p53 gene is the most commonly altered gene in human cancer; however, not all genetic alterations are biologically equivalent. The majority of alterations involve p53 missense mutations that result in the production of mutant p53 proteins. Such mutant p53 proteins lack normal p53 function and may concomitantly gain novel functions, often with deleterious effects. Here, we review characterized mechanisms of mutant p53 gain of function in various model systems. In addition, we review mutant p53 addiction as emerging evidence suggests that tumors may depend on sustained mutant p53 activity for continued growth. We also discuss the role of p53 in stromal elements and their contribution to tumor initiation and progression. Lastly, current genetic mouse models of mutant p53 in various organ systems are reviewed and their limitations discussed. PMID:26618142

  9. Ion exchange defines the biological activity of titanate nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Rónavári, Andrea; Kovács, Dávid; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Kónya, Zoltán; Kiricsi, Mónika; Pfeiffer, Ilona

    2016-05-01

    One-dimensional titanate nanotubes (TiONTs) were subjected to systematic ion exchange to determine the impact of these modifications on biological activities. Ion exchanged TiONTs (with Ag, Mg, Bi, Sb, Ca, K, Sr, Fe, and Cu ions) were successfully synthesized and the presence of the substituted ions was verified by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). A complex screening was carried out to reveal differences in toxicity to human cells, as well as in antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral activities between the various modified nanotubes. Our results demonstrated that Ag ion exchanged TiONTs exerted potent antibacterial and antifungal effects against all examined microbial species but were ineffective on viruses. Surprisingly, the antibacterial activity of Cu/TiONTs was restricted to Micrococcus luteus. Most ion exchanged TiONTs did not show antimicrobial activity against the tested bacterial and fungal species. Incorporation of various ions into nanotube architectures lead to mild, moderate, or even to a massive loss of human cell viability; therefore, this type of biological effect exerted by TiONTs can be greatly modulated by ion exchange. These findings further emphasize the contribution of ion exchange in determining not only the physical and chemical characteristics but also the bioactivity of TiONT against different types of living cells. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Application of activation techniques to biological analysis. [813 references

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, H.J.M.

    1981-12-01

    Applications of activation analysis in the biological sciences are reviewed for the period of 1970 to 1979. The stages and characteristics of activation analysis are described, and its advantages and disadvantages enumerated. Most applications involve activation by thermal neutrons followed by either radiochemical or instrumental determination. Relatively little use has been made of activation by fast neutrons, photons, or charged particles. In vivo analyses are included, but those based on prompt gamma or x-ray emission are not. Major applications include studies of reference materials, and the elemental analysis of plants, marine biota, animal and human tissues, diets, and excreta. Relatively little use of it has been made in biochemistry, microbiology, and entomology, but it has become important in toxicology and environmental science. The elements most often determined are Ag, As, Au, Br, Ca, Cd, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Hg, I, K, Mn, Mo, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, and Zn, while few or no determinations of B, Be, Bi, Ga, Gd, Ge, H, In, Ir, Li, Nd, Os, Pd, Pr, Pt, Re, Rh, Ru, Te, Tl, or Y have been made in biological materials.

  11. [Histidine triad protein superfamily--biological function and enzymatic activity].

    PubMed

    Krakowiak, Agnieszka; Fryc, Izabela

    2012-01-01

    The HIT superfamily consists of proteins that share the histidine triad motif, His-X-His-X-His-X-X (where X is a hydrophobic amino acid), which constitutes enzymatic catalytic center. These enzymes act as nucleotidylyl hydrolase or transferase, and the mutation of the second histidine in the triad abolishes their activity. HIT proteins were found ubiquitous in all organisms and they were classified into 5 branches, which are represented by human proteins: HINT1, FHIT, Aprataxin, GALT and DCPS. Because HINT1 orthologs, which belong to the evolutionally oldest family branch, were found from prokaryotes to eukaryotes, it is clear that HIT motif was conserved during the evolution what means that the enzymatic activity is necessary for functions of these proteins. However, in few cases, e.g. HINT1 and FHIT, the connection between the biological function and the enzymatic activity is still obscure. In this review, the relations between biology and activity for 7 HIT proteins, which were found in human, are highlighted.

  12. Biologically Active Metabolites Produced by the Basidiomycete Quambalaria cyanescens

    PubMed Central

    Stodůlková, Eva; Císařová, Ivana; Kolařík, Miroslav; Chudíčková, Milada; Novák, Petr; Man, Petr; Kuzma, Marek; Pavlů, Barbora; Černý, Jan; Flieger, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Four strains of the fungus Quambalaria cyanescens (Basidiomycota: Microstromatales), were used for the determination of secondary metabolites production and their antimicrobial and biological activities. A new naphthoquinone named quambalarine A, (S)-(+)-3-(5-ethyl-tetrahydrofuran-2-yliden)-5,7,8-trihydroxy-2-oxo-1,4-naphthoquinone (1), together with two known naphthoquinones, 3-hexanoyl-2,5,7,8-tetrahydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (named here as quambalarine B, 2) and mompain, 2,5,7,8-tetrahydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (3) were isolated. Their structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction crystallography, NMR and MS spectrometry. Quambalarine A (1) had a broad antifungal and antibacterial activity and is able inhibit growth of human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus and fungi co-occurring with Q. cyanescens in bark beetle galleries including insect pathogenic species Beauveria bassiana. Quambalarine B (2) was active against several fungi and mompain mainly against bacteria. The biological activity against human-derived cell lines was selective towards mitochondria (2 and 3); after long-term incubation with 2, mitochondria were undetectable using a mitochondrial probe. A similar effect on mitochondria was observed also for environmental competitors of Q. cyanescens from the genus Geosmithia. PMID:25723150

  13. Preparation and characterization of new biologically active polyurethane foams.

    PubMed

    Savelyev, Yuri; Veselov, Vitali; Markovskaya, Ludmila; Savelyeva, Olga; Akhranovich, Elena; Galatenko, Natalya; Robota, Ludmila; Travinskaya, Tamara

    2014-12-01

    Biologically active polyurethane foams are the fast-developed alternative to many applications of biomedical materials. Due to the polyurethane structure features and foam technology it is possible to incorporate into their structure the biologically active compounds of target purpose via structural-chemical modification of macromolecule. A series of new biologically active polyurethane foams (PUFs) was synthesized with polyethers (MM 2500-5000), polyesters MM (500-2200), 2,4(2,6) toluene diisocyanate, water as a foaming agent, catalysts, foam stabilizers and functional compounds. Different functional compounds: 1,4-di-N-oxy-2,3-bis-(oxymethyl)-quinoxaline (DOMQ), partial sodium salt of poly(acrylic acid) and 2,6-dimethyl-N,N-diethyl aminoacetatanilide hydrochloride were incorporated into the polymer structure/composition due to the chemical and/or physical bonding. Structural peculiarities of PUFs were studied by FTIR spectroscopy and X-ray scattering. Self-adhesion properties of PUFs were estimated by measuring of tensile strength at break of adhesive junction. The optical microscopy method was performed for the PUF morphology studies. Toxicological estimation of the PUFs was carried out in vitro and in vivo. The antibacterial action towards the Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli ATC 25922, E. coli ATC 2150, Klebsiella pneumoniae 6447, Staphylococcus aureus 180, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 8180, Proteus mirabilis F 403, P. mirabilis 6054, and Proteus vulgaris 8718) was studied by the disc method on the solid nutrient. Physic-chemical properties of the PUFs (density, tensile strength and elongation at break, water absorption and vapor permeability) showed that all studied PUFs are within the operational requirements for such materials and represent fine-cellular foams. Spectral studies confirmed the incorporation of DOMQ into the PUF's macrochain. PUFs are characterized by microheterogeneous structure. They are antibacterially active, non

  14. Soil biological activity at European scale - two calculation concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Janine; Rühlmann, Jörg

    2014-05-01

    The CATCH-C project aims to identify and improve the farm-compatibility of Soil Management Practices including to promote productivity, climate change mitigation and soil quality. The focus of this work concentrates on turnover conditions for soil organic matter (SOM). SOM is fundamental for the maintenance of quality and functions of soils while SOM storage is attributed a great importance in terms of climate change mitigation. The turnover conditions depend on soil biological activity characterized by climate and soil properties. To assess the turnover conditions two model concepts are applied: (I) Biological active time (BAT) regression approach derived from CANDY model (Franko & Oelschlägel 1995) expresses the variation of air temperature, precipitation and soil texture as a timescale and an indicator of biological activity for soil organic matter (SOM) turnover. (II) Re_clim parameter within the Introductory Carbon Balance Model (Andrén & Kätterer 1997) states the soil temperature and soil water to estimate soil biological activity. The modelling includes two strategies to cover the European scale and conditions. BAT was calculated on a 20x20 km grid basis. The European data sets of precipitation and air temperature (time period 1901-2000, monthly resolution), (Mitchell et al. 2004) were used to derive long-term averages. As we focus on agricultural areas we included CORINE data (2006) to extract arable land. The resulting BATs under co-consideration of the main soil textures (clay, silt, sand and loam) were investigated per environmental zone (ENZs, Metzger et al. 2005) that represents similar conditions for precipitation, temperature and relief to identify BAT ranges and hence turnover conditions for each ENZ. Re_clim was quantified by climatic time series of more than 250 weather stations across Europe presented by Klein Tank et al. (2002). Daily temperature, precipitation and potential evapotranspiration (maximal thermal extent) were used to calculate

  15. Hydrolysis of the RNA model substrate catalyzed by a binuclear Zr(IV)-substituted Keggin polyoxometalate.

    PubMed

    Luong, Thi Kim Nga; Absillis, Gregory; Shestakova, Pavletta; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N

    2015-09-21

    The reactivity and solution behaviour of the binuclear Zr(IV)-substituted Keggin polyoxometalate (Et2NH2)8[{α-PW11O39Zr(μ-OH)(H2O)}2]·7H2O (ZrK 2 : 2) towards phosphoester bond hydrolysis of the RNA model substrate 2-hydroxypropyl-4-nitrophenyl phosphate (HPNP) was investigated at different reaction conditions (pD, temperature, concentration, and ionic strength). The hydrolysis of the phosphoester bond of HPNP, followed by means of (1)H NMR spectroscopy, proceeded with an observed rate constant, kobs = 11.5(±0.42) × 10(-5) s(-1) at pD 6.4 and 50 °C, representing a 530-fold rate enhancement in comparison with the spontaneous hydrolysis of HPNP. (1)H and (31)P NMR spectra indicate that at these reaction conditions the only products of hydrolysis are p-nitrophenol and the corresponding cyclic phosphate ester. The pD dependence of kobs exhibits a bell-shaped profile, with the fastest rate observed at pD 6.4. The formation constant (Kf = 455 M(-1)) and catalytic rate constant (kc = 42 × 10(-5) s(-1)) for the HPNP-ZrK 2 : 2 complex, activation energy (Ea) of 63.35 ± 1.82 kJ mol(-1), enthalpy of activation (ΔH(‡)) of 60.60 ± 2.09 kJ mol(-1), entropy of activation (ΔS(‡)) of -133.70 ± 6.13 J mol(-1) K(-1), and Gibbs activation energy (ΔG(‡)) of 102.05 ± 0.13 kJ mol(-1) at 37 °C were calculated from kinetic experiments. Binding between ZrK 2 : 2 and the P-O bond of HPNP was evidenced by the change in the (31)P chemical shift and signal line-broadening of the (31)P atom in HPNP upon addition of ZrK 2 : 2. Based on (31)P NMR experiments and isotope effect studies, a mechanism for HPNP hydrolysis in the presence of ZrK 2 : 2 was proposed.

  16. Protonic sidedness of the binuclear iron-copper centre in cytochrome oxidase.

    PubMed

    Wikström, M

    1988-04-11

    The oxidised (ferric-cupric) binuclear centre of cytochrome oxidase is converted into two other states, presumably ferrylcupric (F) and ferric-peroxy-cupric (P), by energy-dependent reversed electron transfer from the centre (and water) to cytochrome c [(1981) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 78, 4051-4054; (1987) Chem. Scr. 27B, 53-58]. This sequence of events represents a partial reversal of the O2 reduction catalysed by the centre. Here it is shown that the strong pH-dependence of these reactions is exerted specifically from the matrix (M) side of the inner mitochondrial membrane. This proves unequivocally that the binuclear centre generates protonmotive force by means of its vectorial accessibility for electrons and protons.

  17. Phenoxy-bridged binuclear Zn(II) complex holding salen ligand: Synthesis and structural characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azam, Mohammad; Al-Resayes, Saud I.

    2016-03-01

    A novel binuclear phenoxo-bridged zinc complex obtained from the interaction of ligand, 2,2-(1E,1E)-(2,2-dimethylpropane-1,3-diyl)bis(azanylylidene) bis(methanylylidene)diphenol with zinc chloride is reported. The synthesized and isolated zinc complex has been characterized by FT-IR, 1H- and 13C- NMR, ESI-MS, TGA/DTA and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. The phenoxo-bridge in this binuclear Zn(II) complex is due to the phenolic oxygen of the salen liagnd. The complex crystallizes in monoclinic P-1 space group, and different geometry has been assigned for both zinc ions in the complex.

  18. Biological and therapeutic activities, and anticancer properties of curcumin

    PubMed Central

    PERRONE, DONATELLA; ARDITO, FATIMA; GIANNATEMPO, GIOVANNI; DIOGUARDI, MARIO; TROIANO, GIUSEPPE; LO RUSSO, LUCIO; DE LILLO, ALFREDO; LAINO, LUIGI; LO MUZIO, LORENZO

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is a polyphenol derived from the Curcuma longa plant. Curcumin has been used extensively in Ayurvedic medicine, as it is nontoxic and exhibits a variety of therapeutic properties, including antioxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antiseptic activities. Recently, certain studies have indicated that curcumin may exert anticancer effects in a variety of biological pathways involved in mutagenesis, apoptosis, tumorigenesis, cell cycle regulation and metastasis. The present study reviewed previous studies in the literature, which support the therapeutic activity of curcumin in cancer. In addition, the present study elucidated a number of the challenges concerning the use of curcumin as an adjuvant chemotherapeutic agent. All the studies reviewed herein suggest that curcumin is able to exert anti-inflammatory, antiplatelet, antioxidative, hepatoprotective and antitumor activities, particularly against cancers of the liver, skin, pancreas, prostate, ovary, lung and head neck, as well as having a positive effect in the treatment of arthritis. PMID:26640527

  19. CANTHARELLUS CIBARIUS - CULINARY-MEDICINAL MUSHROOM CONTENT AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY.

    PubMed

    Muszyńska, Bozena; Kała, Katarzyna; Firlej, Anna; Sułkowska-Ziaja, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    One of the most frequently harvested mushrooms in Polish forests is Yellow chanterelle (chanterelle) - Cantharellus cibarius Fr. from the Cantharellaceae family. Chanterelle is an ectomycorrhizal mushroom occurring in Poland. Chanterelle lives in symbiosis with pine, spruce, oak and hombeam. In cookery, chanterelle is appreciated because of the aroma, taste, firmness and crunchiness of its fruiting bodies. Wild edible mushrooms are widely consumed in Asia, Western Europe and Central America. Chanterelle contains a great number of carbohydrates and proteins and a low amount of fat. Actual review presents the main groups of physiologically active primary and secondary metabolites in the fruiting bodies of chanterelle such as indole and phenolic compounds, carbohydrates, fatty acids, proteins, free amino acids, sterols, carotenoids, enzymes, vitamins and elements with biological activity. The presence of these compounds and elements conditions the nutrient and therapeutic activity of chanterelle, e.g., immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiviral, antimicrobial and antigenotoxic properties.

  20. Investigating biological activity spectrum for novel styrylquinazoline analogues.

    PubMed

    Jampilek, Josef; Musiol, Robert; Finster, Jacek; Pesko, Matus; Carroll, James; Kralova, Katarina; Vejsova, Marcela; O'Mahony, Jim; Coffey, Aidan; Dohnal, Jiri; Polanski, Jaroslaw

    2009-10-23

    In this study, series of ring-substituted 2-styrylquinazolin-4(3H)-one and 4-chloro-2-styrylquinazoline derivatives were prepared. The syntheses of the discussed compounds are presented. The compounds were analyzed by RP-HPLC to determine lipophilicity. They were tested for their inhibitory activity on photosynthetic electron transport (PET) in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) chloroplasts. Primary in vitro screening of the synthesized compounds was also performed against four mycobacterial strains and against eight fungal strains. Several compounds showed biological activity comparable with or higher than that of the standard isoniazid. It was found that the electronic properties of the R substituent, and not the total lipophilicity of the compound, were decisive for the photosynthesis-inhibiting activity of tested compounds.

  1. Hydrodynamic collective effects of active proteins in biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyano, Yuki; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2016-08-01

    Lipid bilayers forming biological membranes are known to behave as viscous two-dimensional fluids on submicrometer scales; usually they contain a large number of active protein inclusions. Recently, it was shown [A. S. Mikhailov and R. Kapral, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 112, E3639 (2015), 10.1073/pnas.1506825112] that such active proteins should induce nonthermal fluctuating lipid flows leading to diffusion enhancement and chemotaxislike drift for passive inclusions in biomembranes. Here, a detailed analytical and numerical investigation of such effects is performed. The attention is focused on the situations when proteins are concentrated within lipid rafts. We demonstrate that passive particles tend to become attracted by active rafts and are accumulated inside them.

  2. Biological Activity Predictions and Hydrogen Bonding Analysis in Quinolines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Palvi; Kamni

    The paper has been designed to make a comprehensive review of a particular series of organic molecular assembly in the form of compendium. An overview of general description of fifteen quinoline derivatives has been given. The biological activity spectra of quinoline derivatives have been correlated on structure activity relationships base which provides the different Pa (possibility of activity) and Pi (possibility of inactivity) values. Expositions of the role of intermolecular interactions in the identified derivatives have been discussed with the standard distance and angle cut-off criteria criteria as proposed by Desiraju and Steiner (1999) in an International monogram on crystallography. Distance-angle scatter plots for intermolecular interactions are presented for a better understanding of the packing interactions which exist in quinoline derivatives.

  3. Biological activities of aqueous extract from Cinnamomum porrectum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farah, H. Siti; Nazlina, I.; Yaacob, W. A.

    2013-11-01

    A study was carried out to evaluate biological activities of an extract obtained from Cinnamomum porrectum under reflux using water. Aqueous extract of Cinnamomum porrectum was tested for antibacterial activity against six Gram-positive and eight Gram-negative bacteria as well as MRSA. The results confirmed that the aqueous extract of Cinnamomum porrectum was bactericidal. Cytotoxic tests on Vero cell culture revealed that Cinnamomum porrectum was non-toxic which IC50 value higher than 0.02 mg/mL. Antiviral activity was tested based on the above IC50 values together with the measured EC50 values to obtain Therapeutic Index. The result showed that Cinnamomum porrectum has the ability to inhibit viral replication of HSV-1 in Vero cells.

  4. Pereskia aculeata Muller (Cactaceae) Leaves: Chemical Composition and Biological Activities

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Lucèia Fàtima; Caputo, Lucia; Inchausti De Barros, Ingrid Bergman; Fratianni, Florinda; Nazzaro, Filomena; De Feo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this work were to study the chemical composition of the essential oil from the leaves of Pereskia aculeata and to evaluate some biological activities of three leaf extracts. The phenolic content, antioxidant activity, and in vitro antimicrobial and antifungal activities were determined. The methanol extract showed antioxidant activity (EC50 7.09 mg/mL) and high polyphenols content (15.04 ± 0.31 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g). The petroleum ether extract exhibited potent antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, whereas the chloroform extract showed inhibitory activity against Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus. The petroleum ether and methanol extracts were more effective in inhibiting the growth of Aspergillus versicolor. The possible cytotoxicity of extracts on neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cancer cell line and the influence on adenylate cyclase (ADCY) expression was also studied. P. aculeata chloroform extract showed antiproliferative activity with an IC50 value of 262.83 µg/mL. Treatments of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells with 100 µg/mL of methanol extract significantly reduced ADCY1 expression. PMID:27598154

  5. Students' Learning Activities While Studying Biological Process Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kragten, Marco; Admiraal, Wilfried; Rijlaarsdam, Gert

    2015-08-01

    Process diagrams describe how a system functions (e.g. photosynthesis) and are an important type of representation in Biology education. In the present study, we examined students' learning activities while studying process diagrams, related to their resulting comprehension of these diagrams. Each student completed three learning tasks. Verbal data and eye-tracking data were collected as indications of students' learning activities. For the verbal data, we applied a fine-grained coding scheme to optimally describe students' learning activities. For the eye-tracking data, we used fixation time and transitions between areas of interest in the process diagrams as indices of learning activities. Various learning activities while studying process diagrams were found that distinguished between more and less successful students. Results showed that between-student variance in comprehension score was highly predicted by meaning making of the process arrows (80%) and fixation time in the main area (65%). Students employed successful learning activities consistently across learning tasks. Furthermore, compared to unsuccessful students, successful students used a more coherent approach of interrelated learning activities for comprehending process diagrams.

  6. Pereskia aculeata Muller (Cactaceae) Leaves: Chemical Composition and Biological Activities.

    PubMed

    Souza, Lucèia Fàtima; Caputo, Lucia; Inchausti De Barros, Ingrid Bergman; Fratianni, Florinda; Nazzaro, Filomena; De Feo, Vincenzo

    2016-09-03

    The aims of this work were to study the chemical composition of the essential oil from the leaves of Pereskia aculeata and to evaluate some biological activities of three leaf extracts. The phenolic content, antioxidant activity, and in vitro antimicrobial and antifungal activities were determined. The methanol extract showed antioxidant activity (EC50 7.09 mg/mL) and high polyphenols content (15.04 ± 0.31 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g). The petroleum ether extract exhibited potent antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, whereas the chloroform extract showed inhibitory activity against Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus. The petroleum ether and methanol extracts were more effective in inhibiting the growth of Aspergillus versicolor. The possible cytotoxicity of extracts on neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cancer cell line and the influence on adenylate cyclase (ADCY) expression was also studied. P. aculeata chloroform extract showed antiproliferative activity with an IC50 value of 262.83 µg/mL. Treatments of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells with 100 µg/mL of methanol extract significantly reduced ADCY1 expression.

  7. Preparation of biologically active recombinant human progastrin(1-80).

    PubMed

    McQueen, Kim; Kovac, Suzana; Ho, Po-Ki; Rorison, Kristy; Pannequin, Julie; Neumann, Greg; Shulkes, Arthur; Baldwin, Graham S

    2002-10-01

    The bacterial expression of human progastrin(6-80) has been reported previously [Baldwin, G.S. et al. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276: 7791-7796]. The aims of the present study were to prepare full-length recombinant human progastrin(1-80) and to compare its biological activity with that of progastrin(6-80) in vitro, to determine whether or not the N-terminal five amino acids contributed to activity. A fusion protein of glutathione-S-transferase and human progastrin(1-80) was expressed in Escherichia coli, collected on glutathione-agarose beads, and cleaved with enterokinase. Progastrin(1-80) was purified by reversed-phase and anion exchange HPLC and characterized by radioimmunoassay, amino acid sequencing, and mass spectrometry. No differences were detected in the extent of stimulation by progastrin(1-80) and progastrin(6-80) in proliferation and migration assays with the mouse gastric cell line IMGE-5. We conclude that residues 1-5 of progastrin(1-80) are not essential for biological activity.

  8. Gynura procumbens: An Overview of the Biological Activities

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hui-Li; Chan, Kok-Gan; Pusparajah, Priyia; Lee, Learn-Han; Goh, Bey-Hing

    2016-01-01

    Gynura procumbens (Lour.) Merr. (Family Asteraceae) is a medicinal plant commonly found in tropical Asia countries such as China, Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Vietnam. Traditionally, it is widely used in many different countries for the treatment of a wide variety of health ailments such as kidney discomfort, rheumatism, diabetes mellitus, constipation, and hypertension. Based on the traditional uses of G. procumbens, it seems to possess high therapeutic potential for treatment of various diseases making it a target for pharmacological studies aiming to validate and provide scientific evidence for the traditional claims of its efficacy. Although there has been considerable progress in the research on G. procumbens, to date there is no review paper gathering the reported biological activities of G. procumbens. Hence, this review aims to provide an overview of the biological activities of G. procumbens based on reported in vitro and in vivo studies. In brief, G. procumbens has been reported to exhibit antihypertensive, cardioprotective, antihyperglycemic, fertility enhancement, anticancer, antimicrobial, antioxidant, organ protective, and antiinflammatory activity. The commercial applications of G. procumbens have also been summarized in this paper based on existing patents. The data compiled illustrate that G. procumbens is a potential natural source of compounds with various pharmacological actions which can be utilized for the development of novel therapeutic agents. PMID:27014066

  9. Toxin bioportides: exploring toxin biological activity and multifunctionality.

    PubMed

    Kerkis, Irina; de Brandão Prieto da Silva, Alvaro Rossan; Pompeia, Celine; Tytgat, Jan; de Sá Junior, Paulo L

    2017-02-01

    Toxins have been shown to have many biological functions and to constitute a rich source of drugs and biotechnological tools. We focus on toxins that not only have a specific activity, but also contain residues responsible for transmembrane penetration, which can be considered bioportides-a class of cell-penetrating peptides that are also intrinsically bioactive. Bioportides are potential tools in pharmacology and biotechnology as they help deliver substances and nanoparticles to intracellular targets. Bioportides characterized so far are peptides derived from human proteins, such as cytochrome c (CYCS), calcitonin receptor (camptide), and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (nosangiotide). However, toxins are usually disregarded as potential bioportides. In this review, we discuss the inclusion of some toxins and molecules derived thereof as a new class of bioportides based on structure activity relationship, minimization, and biological activity studies. The comparative analysis of the amino acid residue composition of toxin-derived bioportides and their short molecular variants is an innovative analytical strategy which allows us to understand natural toxin multifunctionality in vivo and plan novel pharmacological and biotechnological products. Furthermore, we discuss how many bioportide toxins have a rigid structure with amphiphilic properties important for both cell penetration and bioactivity.

  10. Propolis volatile compounds: chemical diversity and biological activity: a review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Propolis is a sticky material collected by bees from plants, and used in the hive as building material and defensive substance. It has been popular as a remedy in Europe since ancient times. Nowadays, propolis use in over-the-counter preparations, “bio”-cosmetics and functional foods, etc., increases. Volatile compounds are found in low concentrations in propolis, but their aroma and significant biological activity make them important for propolis characterisation. Propolis is a plant-derived product: its chemical composition depends on the local flora at the site of collection, thus it offers a significant chemical diversity. The role of propolis volatiles in identification of its plant origin is discussed. The available data about chemical composition of propolis volatiles from different geographic regions are reviewed, demonstrating significant chemical variability. The contribution of volatiles and their constituents to the biological activities of propolis is considered. Future perspectives in research on propolis volatiles are outlined, especially in studying activities other than antimicrobial. PMID:24812573

  11. Isolation of biologically-active exosomes from human plasma.

    PubMed

    Muller, Laurent; Hong, Chang-Sook; Stolz, Donna B; Watkins, Simon C; Whiteside, Theresa L

    2014-09-01

    Effects of exosomes present in human plasma on immune cells have not been examined in detail. Immunological studies with plasma-derived exosomes require their isolation by procedures involving ultracentrifugation. These procedures were largely developed using supernatants of cultured cells. To test biologic activities of plasma-derived exosomes, methods are necessary that ensure adequate recovery of exosome fractions free of contaminating larger vesicles, cell fragments and protein/nucleic acid aggregates. Here, an optimized method for exosome isolation from human plasma/serum specimens of normal controls (NC) or cancer patients and its advantages and pitfalls are described. To remove undesirable plasma-contaminating components, ultrafiltration of differentially-centrifuged plasma/serum followed by size-exclusion chromatography prior to ultracentrifugation facilitated the removal of contaminants. Plasma or serum was equally acceptable as a source of exosomes based on the recovered protein levels (in μg protein/mL plasma) and TEM image quality. Centrifugation on sucrose density gradients led to large exosome losses. Fresh plasma was the best source of morphologically-intact exosomes, while the use of frozen/thawed plasma decreased exosome purity but not their biologic activity. Treatments of frozen plasma with DNAse, RNAse or hyaluronidase did not improve exosome purity and are not recommended. Cancer patients' plasma consistently yielded more isolated exosomes than did NCs' plasma. Cancer patients' exosomes also mediated higher immune suppression as evidenced by decreased CD69 expression on responder CD4+ T effector cells. Thus, the described procedure yields biologically-active, morphologically-intact exosomes that have reasonably good purity without large protein losses and can be used for immunological, biomarker and other studies.

  12. Water-soluble magnetic nanoparticles with biologically active stabilizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zablotskaya, Alla; Segal, Izolda; Lukevics, Edmunds; Maiorov, Mikhail; Zablotsky, Dmitry; Blums, Elmars; Shestakova, Irina; Domracheva, Ilona

    2009-05-01

    We present the results of the interaction of iron oxide nanoparticles with some biologically active surfactants, namely, oleic acid and cytotoxic alkanolamine derivatives. Physico-chemical properties, as magnetization, magnetite concentration and particle diameter, of the prepared magnetic samples were studied. The nanoparticle size of 11 nm for toluene magnetic fluid determined by TEM is in good agreement with the data obtained by the method of magnetogranulometry. In vitro cytotoxic effect of water-soluble nanoparticles with different iron oxide:oleic acid molar ratio were revealed against human fibrosarcoma and mouse hepatoma cells. In vivo results using a sarcoma mouse model showed observable antitumor action.

  13. Local or distributed activation? The view from biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimers, Mark

    2011-06-01

    There is considerable disagreement among connectionist modellers over whether to represent distinct properties by distinct nodes of a network or whether properties should be represented by patterns of activity across all nodes. This paper draws on the literature of neuroscience to say that a more subtle way of describing how different brain regions contribute to a behaviour, in terms of individual learning and in terms of degrees of importance, may render the current debate moot: both sides of the 'localist' versus 'distributed' debate emphasise different aspects of biology.

  14. Synthesis and biological activity of novel deoxycholic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Popadyuk, Irina I; Markov, Andrey V; Salomatina, Oksana V; Logashenko, Evgeniya B; Shernyukov, Andrey V; Zenkova, Marina A; Salakhutdinov, Nariman F

    2015-08-01

    We report the synthesis and biological activity of new semi-synthetic derivatives of naturally occurring deoxycholic acid (DCA) bearing 2-cyano-3-oxo-1-ene, 3-oxo-1(2)-ene or 3-oxo-4(5)-ene moieties in ring A and 12-oxo or 12-oxo-9(11)-ene moieties in ring C. Bioassays using murine macrophage-like cells and tumour cells show that the presence of the 9(11)-double bond associated with the increased polarity of ring A or with isoxazole ring joined to ring A, improves the ability of the compounds to inhibit cancer cell growth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Biological activity of bleached kraft pulp mill effluents before and after activated sludge and ozone treatments.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Alessandra Cunha; Mounteer, Ann H; Stoppa, Teynha Valverde; Aquino, Davi Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Eucalyptus bleached kraft pulp production, an important sector of the Brazilian national economy, is responsible for generating large volume, high pollutant load effluents, containing a considerable fraction of recalcitrant organic matter. The objectives of this study were to quantify the biological activity of the effluent from a eucalyptus bleached kraft pulp mill, characterize the nature of compounds responsible for biological activity and assess the effect of ozone treatment on its removal. Primary and secondary effluents were collected bimonthly over the course of one year at a Brazilian bleached eucalypt kraft pulp mill and their pollutant loads (biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC), adsorbable organic halogen (AOX), lignin, extractives) and biological activity (acute and chronic toxicity and estrogenic activity) quantified. The effluent studied did not present acute toxicity to Daphnia, but presented the chronic toxicity effects of algal growth inhibition and reduced survival and reproduction in Ceriodaphnia, as well as estrogenic activity. Chronic toxicity and estrogenic activity were reduced but not eliminated during activated sludge biological treatment. The toxicity identification evaluation revealed that lipophilic organic compounds (such as residual lignin, extractives and their byproducts) were responsible for the toxicity and estrogenic activity. Ozone treatment (50 mg/L O(3)) of the secondary effluent eliminated the chronic toxicity and significantly reduced estrogen activity.

  16. Experimental and theoretical studies of hydrolysis of nerve agent sarin by binuclear zinc biomimetic catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Nan; Zhong, Jin-Yi; Chen, Shi-Lu; Liu, Jing-Quan; Min, Qi; Shi, Rui-Xue

    2015-08-01

    A complex (ZnL1) of 2,2-(2-hydroxy-5-methyl-1,3-phenylene)bis(methylene)bis ((pyridin-2-ylmethyl)azanediyl)diethanol (this ligand is named by L1) functionalized with two Zn(II) centers, has been previously suggested to be a structural model for binuclear zinc phosphotriesterases (PTEs) and proven to be an effective catalyst for the hydrolysis of bis(2,4-dinitrophenyl)phosphate (BDNPP). In this paper, ZnL1 was further found to have a high catalytic activity for the hydrolysis of isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate (sarin, GB) with kcat/Km = 0.051 s-1 M-1 at 303 K, examined by on-site NMR analysis. The subsequent density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that a terminal alkoxide (Ot) bound by Zn may work as a general base to activate a water molecule and then a hydroxide derived from the latter performs the initial nucleophilic attack on the phosphor in GB. Inspired by this mechanism, a new biomimetic catalyst was designed and synthesized by replacing the two pyridines of ZnL1 by hydroxyls, i.e. a complex of two Zn(II) with 2,6-bis((bis(2-hydroxyethyl)amino)methyl)-4-methylphenol (the ligand is named by L2). This replacement was expected to increase the Ot basicity, thereby facilitating the nucleophilic attack and the overall hydrolysis of GB. It was shown that ZnL2 had a very high catalytic efficiency for the hydrolysis of GB, with kcat/Km = 0.11 s-1 M-1 at 303 K and about 90% conversion in 30 min. The following DFT calculations proposed a detailed reaction mechanism of ZnL2 and gave an energy barrier (5.8 kcal M-1) very close to the experimental activation energy (5.6 kcal M-1). In this study, a mechanism-inspired design strategy has been demonstrated to be successful in developing biomimetic catalyst.

  17. Cells with dendritic cell morphology and immunophenotype, binuclear morphology, and immunosuppressive function in dendritic cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Dong, Rong; Moulding, Dale; Himoudi, Nourredine; Adams, Stuart; Bouma, Gerben; Eddaoudi, Ayad; Basu, B Piku; Derniame, Sophie; Chana, Prabhjoat; Duncan, Andrew; Anderson, John

    2011-01-01

    Culturing of human peripheral blood CD14 positive monocytes is a method for generation of dendritic cells (DCs) for experimental purposes or for use in clinical grade vaccines. When culturing human DCs in this manner for clinical vaccine production, we noticed that 5-10% of cells within the bulk culture were binuclear or multiple nuclear, but had typical dendritic cell morphology and immunophenotype. We refer to the cells as binuclear cells in dendritic cell cultures (BNiDCs). By using single cell PCR analysis of mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms we demonstrated that approximately 20-25% of cells in DC culture undergo a fusion event. Flow sorted BNiDC express low HLA-DR and IL-12p70, but high levels of IL-10. In mixed lymphocyte reactions, purified BNiDC suppressed lymphocyte proliferation. Blockade of dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP) decreased the number of binuclear cells in DC cultures. BNiDC represent a potentially tolerogenic population within DC preparations for clinical use.

  18. Spectroscopic, and thermal studies of some new binuclear transition metal(II) complexes with hydrazone ligands containing acetoacetanilide and isoxazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhimin; Wu, Yiqun; Gu, Donghong; Gan, Fuxi

    2007-11-01

    A new chelating ligand, 2-(2-(5- tert-butylisoxazol-3-yl)hydrazono)- N-(2,4-dimethylphenyl)-3-oxobutanamide (HL), and its four binuclear transition metal complexes, M 2(L) 2 (μ-OCH 3) 2 [M = Ni(II), Co(II), Cu(II), Zn(II)], were synthesized using the procedure of diazotization, coupling and metallization. Their structures were postulated based on elemental analysis, 1H NMR, MALDI-MS, FT-IR spectra and UV-vis electronic absorption spectra. Smooth films of these complexes on K9 glass substrates were prepared using the spin-coating method and their absorption properties were evaluated. The thermal properties of the metal(II) complexes were investigated by thermogravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Different thermodynamic and kinetic parameters namely activation energy ( E*), enthalpy of activation (Δ H*), entropy of activation (Δ S*) and free energy change of activation (Δ G*) are calculated using Coats-Redfern (CR) equation.

  19. A Conceptual Framework for Organizing Active Learning Experiences in Biology Instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Joel; Belland, Brian R.

    2012-08-01

    Introductory biology courses form a cornerstone of undergraduate instruction. However, the predominantly used lecture approach fails to produce higher-order biology learning. Research shows that active learning strategies can increase student learning, yet few biology instructors use all identified active learning strategies. In this paper, we present a framework to design biology instruction that incorporates all active learning strategies. We review active learning research in undergraduate biology courses, present a framework for organizing active learning strategies, and provide clear implications and future research for designing instruction in introductory undergraduate biology courses.

  20. Elucidating GPR Response to Biological Activity: Field and Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoflias, G. P.; Schillig, P. C.; McGlashan, M. A.; Roberts, J. A.; Devlin, J. F.

    2010-12-01

    Recent studies of the geophysical signatures of biological processes in earth environments have resulted in the emergent field of “biogeophysics”. The ability to monitor remotely and to quantify active biological processes in the subsurface can have transformative implications to a wide range of investigations, including the bioremediation of contaminated sites. Previous studies have demonstrated that ground-penetrating radar (GPR) can be used to detect the products of microbial activity in the subsurface, such as changes in bulk electrical conductivity, mineral dissolution and precipitation, and the formation of biogenic gas. We present field and laboratory experiments that offer insights to the response of GPR signals to microbial activity. In the field, time-lapse borehole radar tomography was used to monitor biodegradation of a hydrocarbon plume over a period of two years. A dense grid of fourteen borehole pairs monitoring the bioactive region showed radar wave velocity changes of +/-4% and signal attenuation changes of +/-25%. These GPR observations correlated spatially and temporally to independent measurements of groundwater velocity and geochemical variations that occurred in response to microbial activity. The greatest relative changes in radar wave velocity of propagation and attenuation were observed in the region of enhanced bacterial stimulation where biomass growth was the greatest. Radar wave velocity and attenuation decreased during periods of enhanced biostimulation. Two laboratory experiments were conducted to further assess radar response to biomass growth. The first experiment monitored GPR wave transmission through a water-saturated quartz-sand reactor during the course of enhanced biostimulation. Radar wave velocity initially decreased as a result of bacterial activity and subsequently increased rapidly as biogenic gas formed in the pore space. Radar signal attenuation increased during the course of the experiment as a result of an

  1. Parsley: a review of ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Farzaei, Mohammad Hosein; Abbasabadi, Zahra; Ardekani, Mohammad Reza Shams; Rahimi, Roja; Farzaei, Fatemeh

    2013-12-01

    To summarize comprehensive information concerning ethnomedicinal uses, phytochemistry, and pharmacological activities of parsley. Databases including PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar, and Web of Science were searched for studies focusing on the ethnomedicinal use, phytochemical compounds and biological and pharmacological activities of parsley. Data were collected from 1966 to 2013. The search terms were: "Parsley" or "Petroselinum crispum" or "Petroselinum hortence". Parsley has been used as carminative, gastro tonic, diuretic, antiseptic of urinary tract, anti-urolithiasis, anti-dote and anti-inflammatory and for the treatment of amenorrhea, dysmenorrhea, gastrointestinal disorder, hypertension, cardiac disease, urinary disease, otitis, sniffle, diabetes and also various dermal disease in traditional and folklore medicines. Phenolic compounds and flavonoids particularly apigenin, apiin and 6"-Acetylapiin; essential oil mainly myristicin and apiol; and also coumarins are the active compounds identified in Petroselinum crispum. Wide range of pharmacological activity including antioxidant, hepatoprotective, brain protective, anti-diabetic, analgesic, spasmolytic, immunosuppressant, anti-platelet, gastroprotective, cytoprotective, laxative, estrogenic, diuretic, hypotensive, antibacterial and antifungal activities have been exhibited for this plant in modern medicine. It is expectant that this study resulted in improvement the tendencies toward Petroselinum crispum as a useful and important medicinal plant with wide range of proven medicinal activity.

  2. Isolation and biological activity of compounds from Garcinia preussii.

    PubMed

    Biloa Messi, Bernadette; Ho, Raimana; Meli Lannang, Alain; Cressend, Delphine; Perron, Karl; Nkengfack, Augustin Ephrem; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Hostettmann, Kurt; Cuendet, Muriel

    2014-06-01

    Plants of the genus Garcinia (Clusiaceae) are traditionally used to relieve stomachaches, toothaches, and as a chew stick. In order to determine which compounds were responsible for these activities, a phytochemical investigation of the fruits and leaves of Garcinia preussii Engl. was pursued. Plants were extracted by solvents of various polarities. Compounds isolation was then carried out using chromatography methods (medium- and high-pressure liquid chromatography, open column and thin-layer chromatography). The isolated compounds were identified and characterized by using 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopies. The antioxidant activity was evaluated using DPPH(•), ABTS(•-), ALP, and ORAC assays. The antimicrobial activity was assayed against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Enterococcus faecalis by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value. The cytotoxic activity of most of the isolated compounds was evaluated on a small panel of human cancer cell lines (DU145, HeLa, HT-29, and A431) using the XTT method. The phytochemical investigation of G. preussii led to the isolation of eight known compounds, six benzophenones and two flavonoids. These compounds were tested for their biological activities. 1, 2, 3, 4, 7 and 8 demonstrated a high free radical scavenging activity with ER50 ranging from 0.1 to 0.7. The antimicrobial activity was shown only against Gram-positive bacteria for 1, 4, and 5. A moderate cytotoxic activity with IC50 ranging from 7 to 50 µM was observed, except for 6 which was not active. These results appear to support some of the properties reported for Garcinia species.

  3. Biological activity of lactoferrin-functionalized biomimetic hydroxyapatite nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Nocerino, Nunzia; Fulgione, Andrea; Iannaccone, Marco; Tomasetta, Laura; Ianniello, Flora; Martora, Francesca; Lelli, Marco; Roveri, Norberto; Capuano, Federico; Capparelli, Rosanna

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of bacterial strains resistant to antibiotics is a general public health problem. Progress in developing new molecules with antimicrobial properties has been made. In this study, we evaluated the biological activity of a hybrid nanocomposite composed of synthetic biomimetic hydroxyapatite surface-functionalized by lactoferrin (LF-HA). We evaluated the antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties of LF-HA and found that the composite was active against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and that it modulated proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses and enhanced antioxidant properties as compared with LF alone. These results indicate the possibility of using LF-HA as an antimicrobial system and biomimetic hydroxyapatite as a candidate for innovative biomedical applications. PMID:24623976

  4. Biological activity of lactoferrin-functionalized biomimetic hydroxyapatite nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Nocerino, Nunzia; Fulgione, Andrea; Iannaccone, Marco; Tomasetta, Laura; Ianniello, Flora; Martora, Francesca; Lelli, Marco; Roveri, Norberto; Capuano, Federico; Capparelli, Rosanna

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of bacterial strains resistant to antibiotics is a general public health problem. Progress in developing new molecules with antimicrobial properties has been made. In this study, we evaluated the biological activity of a hybrid nanocomposite composed of synthetic biomimetic hydroxyapatite surface-functionalized by lactoferrin (LF-HA). We evaluated the antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties of LF-HA and found that the composite was active against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and that it modulated proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses and enhanced antioxidant properties as compared with LF alone. These results indicate the possibility of using LF-HA as an antimicrobial system and biomimetic hydroxyapatite as a candidate for innovative biomedical applications.

  5. Borrelidin B: isolation, biological activity, and implications for nitrile biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Christopher J; Bray, Walter M; Loganzo, Frank; Lam, My-Hanh; Szal, Teresa; Villalobos, Anabella; Koehn, Frank E; Linington, Roger G

    2014-11-26

    Borrelidin (1) is a nitrile-containing bacterially derived polyketide that is a potent inhibitor of bacterial and eukaryotic threonyl-tRNA synthetases. We now report the discovery of borrelidin B (2), a tetrahydro-borrelidin derivative containing an aminomethyl group in place of the nitrile functionality in borrelidin. The discovery of this new metabolite has implications for both the biosynthesis of the nitrile group and the bioactivity of the borrelidin compound class. Screening in the SToPS assay for tRNA synthetase inhibition revealed that the nitrile moiety is essential for activity, while profiling using our in-house image-based cytological profiling assay demonstrated that 2 retains biological activity by causing a mitotic stall, even in the absence of the nitrile motif.

  6. Rethinking biological activation of methane and conversion to liquid fuels.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Chad A; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2014-05-01

    If methane, the main component of natural gas, can be efficiently converted to liquid fuels, world reserves of methane could satisfy the demand for transportation fuels in addition to use in other sectors. However, the direct activation of strong C-H bonds in methane and conversion to desired products remains a difficult technological challenge. This perspective reveals an opportunity to rethink the logic of biological methane activation and conversion to liquid fuels. We formulate a vision for a new foundation for methane bioconversion and suggest paths to develop technologies for the production of liquid transportation fuels from methane at high carbon yield and high energy efficiency and with low CO2 emissions. These technologies could support natural gas bioconversion facilities with a low capital cost and at small scales, which in turn could monetize the use of natural gas resources that are frequently flared, vented or emitted.

  7. Synthesis, characterization and biological activity of Rhein-cyclodextrin conjugate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Manshuo; Lv, Pin; Liao, Rongqiang; Zhao, Yulin; Yang, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Cyclodextrin conjugate complexation is a useful method to enhance the solubility and absorption of poorly soluble drugs. A series of new Rhein-β-cyclodextrin conjugates (Rh-CD conjugates) have been synthesized and examined. Rhein is covalently linked with the β-CD by amido linkage in a 1:1 molar ratio. The conjugates were characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR, HRMS, powder X-ray diffraction (powder XRD) as well as thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results reveal that incorporation of β-CD could improve the aqueous solubility of Rhein and the cytotoxicity against hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cell line as well as antibacterial activity against three organisms. The improved biological activity and the satisfactory water solubility of the conjugates will be potentially useful for developing novel drug-cyclodextrin conjugates, such as herbal medicine.

  8. Biological Activity and Electronic Structure of the Aflatoxins

    PubMed Central

    Heathcote, J. G.; Hibbert, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    In theoretical studies of aromatic hydrocarbons, Pullman and Pullman (1969) used the molecular orbital method to correlate electronic structure with biological activity. They suggested that the interaction between carcinogens and their molecular receptors must occur through the K region of the carcinogenic molecule and involve a strong chemical binding of the type of an addition reaction. In the present work the electronic structures of aflatoxins B1, G1, 4-20 dehydro B1 and of versicolorin A have been determined by the simple Hückel molecular orbital method using a computer, in order to see whether the correlation between electronic structure and biological activity is applicable to these compounds also. Calculations show that the 2-3 pi-bond, which has the highest bond order of the aflatoxin molecules, should be the most susceptible to electrophilic attack and is the most probable location of the K region. This is in agreement with the experimental observation of Dutton and Heathcote (1968) that aflatoxins B1 and G1 hydrate rapidly in dilute acid to the hydroxyaflatoxins B2a and G2a with an apparent total loss of carcinogenicity. The calculations also show that aflatoxins B1 G1 and M1 have no suitable site for an L region and this probably accounts for their highly carcinogenic nature. PMID:4850776

  9. Chemical Variability and Biological Activities of Eucalyptus spp. Essential Oils.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Luiz Claudio Almeida; Filomeno, Claudinei Andrade; Teixeira, Robson Ricardo

    2016-12-07

    Many plant species produce mixtures of odorous and volatile compounds known as essential oils (EOs). These mixtures play important roles in Nature and have been utilized by mankind for different purposes, such as pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, aromatherapy, and food flavorants. There are more than 3000 EOs reported in the literature, with approximately 300 in commercial use, including the EOs from Eucalyptus species. Most EOs from Eucalyptus species are rich in monoterpenes and many have found applications in pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, food flavorants, and perfumes. Such applications are related to their diverse biological and organoleptic properties. In this study, we review the latest information concerning the chemical composition and biological activities of EOs from different species of Eucalyptus. Among the 900 species and subspecies of the Eucalyptus genus, we examined 68 species. The studies associated with these species were conducted in 27 countries. We have focused on the antimicrobial, acaricidal, insecticidal and herbicidal activities, hoping that such information will contribute to the development of research in this field. It is also intended that the information described in this study can be useful in the rationalization of the use of Eucalyptus EOs as components for pharmaceutical and agrochemical applications as well as food preservatives and flavorants.

  10. A biologically active peptide mimetic of N-acetylgalactosamine/galactose

    PubMed Central

    Eggink, Laura L; Hoober, J Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Background Glycosylated proteins and lipids are important regulatory factors whose functions can be altered by addition or removal of sugars to the glycan structure. The glycans are recognized by sugar-binding lectins that serve as receptors on the surface of many cells and facilitate initiation of an intracellular signal that changes the properties of the cells. We identified a peptide that mimics the ligand of an N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-specific lectin and asked whether the peptide would express specific biological activity. Findings A 12-mer phage display library was screened with a GalNAc-specific lectin to identify an amino acid sequence that binds to the lectin. Phage particles that were eluted from the lectin with free GalNAc were considered to have been bound to a GalNAc-binding site. Peptides were synthesized with the selected sequence as a quadravalent structure to facilitate receptor crosslinking. Treatment of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells for 24 h with the peptide stimulated secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8) but not of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, or tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). The secretion of IL-21 was stimulated as strongly with the peptide as with interferon-γ. Conclusion The data indicate that the quadravalent peptide has biological activity with a degree of specificity. These effects occurred at concentrations in the nanomolar range, in contrast to free sugars that generally bind to proteins in the micro- to millimolar range. PMID:19284521

  11. Fruit cuticular waxes as a source of biologically active triterpenoids.

    PubMed

    Szakiel, Anna; Pączkowski, Cezary; Pensec, Flora; Bertsch, Christophe

    2012-06-01

    The health benefits associated with a diet rich in fruit and vegetables include reduction of the risk of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer, that are becoming prevalent in the aging human population. Triterpenoids, polycyclic compounds derived from the linear hydrocarbon squalene, are widely distributed in edible and medicinal plants and are an integral part of the human diet. As an important group of phytochemicals that exert numerous biological effects and display various pharmacological activities, triterpenoids are being evaluated for use in new functional foods, drugs, cosmetics and healthcare products. Screening plant material in the search for triterpenoid-rich plant tissues has identified fruit peel and especially fruit cuticular waxes as promising and highly available sources. The chemical composition, abundance and biological activities of triterpenoids occurring in cuticular waxes of some economically important fruits, like apple, grape berry, olive, tomato and others, are described in this review. The need for environmentally valuable and potentially profitable technologies for the recovery, recycling and upgrading of residues from fruit processing is also discussed.

  12. Phage Display of a Biologically Active Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Kasman, Laura M.; Lukowiak, Andrew A.; Garczynski, Stephen F.; McNall, Rebecca J.; Youngman, Phil; Adang, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Activated forms of Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal toxins have consistently been found to form insoluble and inactive precipitates when they are expressed in Escherichia coli. Genetic engineering of these proteins to improve their effectiveness as biological pesticides would be greatly facilitated by the ability to express them in E. coli, since the molecular biology tools available for Bacillus are limited. To this end, we show that activated B. thuringiensis toxin (Cry1Ac) can be expressed in E. coli as a translational fusion with the minor phage coat protein of filamentous phage. Phage particles displaying this fusion protein were viable, infectious, and as lethal as pure toxin on a molar basis when the phage particles were fed to insects susceptible to native Cry1Ac. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blot analysis showed the fusion protein to be antigenically equivalent to native toxin, and micropanning with anti-Cry1Ac antibody was positive for the toxin-expressing phage. Phage display of B. thuringiensis toxins has many advantages over previous expression systems for these proteins and should make it possible to construct large libraries of toxin variants for screening or biopanning. PMID:9687463

  13. Synthesis, characterization and biological activities of curcumin nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Arunraj, T R; Sanoj Rejinold, N; Mangalathillam, Sabitha; Saroj, Soumya; Biswas, Raja; Jayakumar, R

    2014-02-01

    Curcumin is one of the most versatile compounds obtained from Curcuma longa. The major obstacle in the therapeutic use of curcumin is its aqueous solubility. To enhance its aqueous solubility and biological activities, we prepared curcumin nanospheres (CNSs) by wet milling-solvent evaporation technique without any surfactants. In this study, we have focused on the synthesis, characterization and biological effects of CNSs. DLS and SEM analyses showed 50-80 nm spherical shaped CNSs with a zeta potential of -31.65 mV. FTIR revealed that there were no structural changes to CNSs. Antibacterial and antifungal studies proved that CNSs were much more effective than curcumin against Escherichia coil, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. Antioxidant activity of CNSs showed promising result for therapeutic applications. The in vitro anti-inflammatory studies proved that CNSs possessed enhanced anti-inflammatory effect against protein denaturation. Cytotoxicity and uptake of CNSs showed more toxicity on cancer cells (T47D, MG63, A375) sparing normal HDF and IEC cell lines. Skin permeation studies showed CNSs retained at different layers of pig skin. These results give clear evidence for their use against microbial and fungal skin infections as well as cancer treatment.

  14. Inhalable DNase I microparticles engineered with biologically active excipients.

    PubMed

    Osman, Rihab; Al Jamal, Khuloud T; Kan, Pei-Lee; Awad, Gehanne; Mortada, Nahed; El-Shamy, Abd-Elhameed; Alpar, Oya

    2013-12-01

    Highly viscous mucus poses a big challenge for the delivery of particulates carrying therapeutics to patients with cystic fibrosis. In this study, surface modifying DNase I loaded particles using different excipients to achieve better lung deposition, higher enzyme stability or better biological activity had been exploited. For the purpose, controlled release microparticles (MP) were prepared by co-spray drying DNase I with the polymer poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) and the biocompatible lipid surfactant 1,2-dipalmitoyl-Sn-phosphatidyl choline (DPPC) using various hydrophilic excipients. The effect of the included modifiers on the particle morphology, size, zeta potential as well as enzyme encapsulation efficiency, biological activity and release had been evaluated. Powder aerosolisation performance and particle phagocytosis by murine macrophages were also investigated. The results showed that more than 80% of enzyme activity was recovered after MP preparation and that selected surface modifiers greatly increased the enzyme encapsulation efficiency. The particle morphology was greatly modified altering in turn the powders inhalation indices where dextran, ovalbumin and chitosan hydrochloride increased considerably the respirable fraction compared to the normal hydrophilic carriers lactose and PVP. Despite of the improved aerosolisation caused by chitosan hydrochloride, yet retardation of chitosan coated particles in artificial mucus samples discouraged its application. On the other hand, dextran and polyanions enhanced DNase I effect in reducing cystic fibrosis mucus viscosity. DPPC proved good ability to reduce particles phagocytic uptake even in the presence of the selected adjuvants. The prepared MP systems were biocompatible with lung epithelial cells. To conclude, controlled release DNase I loaded PLGA-MP with high inhalation indices and enhanced mucolytic activity on CF sputum could be obtained by surface modifying the particles with PGA or dextran.

  15. Myricetin: A Dietary Molecule with Diverse Biological Activities

    PubMed Central

    Semwal, Deepak Kumar; Semwal, Ruchi Badoni; Combrinck, Sandra; Viljoen, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    Myricetin is a common plant-derived flavonoid and is well recognised for its nutraceuticals value. It is one of the key ingredients of various foods and beverages. The compound exhibits a wide range of activities that include strong anti-oxidant, anticancer, antidiabetic and anti-inflammatory activities. It displays several activities that are related to the central nervous system and numerous studies have suggested that the compound may be beneficial to protect against diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. The use of myricetin as a preserving agent to extend the shelf life of foods containing oils and fats is attributed to the compound’s ability to protect lipids against oxidation. A detailed search of existing literature revealed that there is currently no comprehensive review available on this important molecule. Hence, the present work includes the history, synthesis, pharmaceutical applications and toxicity studies of myricetin. This report also highlights structure-activity relationships and mechanisms of action for various biological activities. PMID:26891321

  16. Fluorescent and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy studies on the antioxidation and DNA binding properties of binuclear Tb(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongchun; Jiang, Xinhui; Yang, Zhengyin; Zheng, Xudong; Liu, Jianning; Zhou, Tianlin

    2010-09-01

    Tb(III) complexes were prepared from Tb(NO(3))(3)·6H(2)O and four Schiff-base ligands derived from 8-hydroxyquinoline-2-carboxaldehyde with aroylhydrazines. X-ray crystal and other structural analyses indicate that Tb(III) and every ligand can form a binuclear Tb(III) complex with 1:1 metal-to-ligand stoichiometry and nine-coordination at the Tb(III) center. Viscosity titration experiments and fluorescent and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy results indicate that all the Tb(III) complexes can bind to Calf thymus DNA through intercalation with the binding constants at the order of magnitude of 10(6)-10(7) M(-1), and they may be used as potential anticancer drugs, but complexes containing active phenolic hydroxy groups may have stronger antitumor activities. Antioxidation results indicate that all the Tb(III) complexes have strong abilities of scavenging hydroxyl radicals and superoxide radicals, but complexes containing active phenolic hydroxy groups show stronger scavenging effects on hydroxyl radicals and complexes containing N-heteroaromatic substituent show stronger scavenging effects on superoxide radicals. However, Tb(III) emission with these systems is not observed, for these ligands rather are quenchers and unable to sensitize this metal ion.

  17. Ribosome-independent biosynthesis of biologically active peptides: Application of synthetic biology to generate structural diversity.

    PubMed

    Giessen, Tobias W; Marahiel, Mohamed A

    2012-07-16

    Peptide natural products continue to play an important role in modern medicine as last-resort treatments of many life-threatening diseases, as they display many interesting biological activities ranging from antibiotic to antineoplastic. A large fraction of these microbial natural products is assembled by ribosome-independent mechanisms. Progress in sequencing technology and the mechanistic understanding of secondary metabolite pathways has led to the discovery of many formerly cryptic natural products and a molecular understanding of their assembly. Those advances enable us to apply protein and metabolic engineering approaches towards the manipulation of biosynthetic pathways. In this review we discuss the application potential of both templated and non-templated pathways as well as chemoenzymatic strategies for the structural diversification and tailoring of peptide natural products. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Biological activities of novel gyrase inhibitors of the aminocoumarin class.

    PubMed

    Anderle, Christine; Stieger, Martin; Burrell, Matthew; Reinelt, Stefan; Maxwell, Anthony; Page, Malcolm; Heide, Lutz

    2008-06-01

    Thirty-one aminocoumarin antibiotics derived from mutasynthesis experiments were investigated for their biological activities. Their inhibitory activities toward Escherichia coli DNA gyrase were determined in two different in vitro assays: an ATPase assay and a DNA supercoiling assay. The assays gave a similar rank order of the activities of the compounds tested, although the absolute 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)s) obtained in each assay were different. To confirm that the compounds also acted as gyrase inhibitors in vivo, reporter gene assays were carried out with E. coli by using gyrA and sulA promoter fusions with the luxCDABE operon. A strong induction of both promoters was observed for those compounds that showed gyrase inhibitory activity in the biochemical assays. Compounds carrying analogs of the prenylated benzoyl moiety (ring A) of clorobiocin that were structurally very different showed high levels of activity both in the biochemical assay and in the reporter gene assay, indicating that the structure of this moiety can be varied considerably without a loss of affinity for bacterial gyrase. The experimentally determined IC(50)s were compared to the binding energies calculated in silico, which indicated that a shift of the pyrrole carboxylic acid moiety from the O-3'' to the O-2'' position of the deoxysugar moiety has a significant impact on the binding mode of the compounds. The aminocoumarin compounds were also investigated for their MICs against different bacterial pathogens. Several compounds showed high levels of activity against staphylococci, including a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain. However, they showed only poor activities against gram-negative strains.

  19. Investigating biological activity spectrum for novel quinoline analogues 2: hydroxyquinolinecarboxamides with photosynthesis-inhibiting activity.

    PubMed

    Musiol, Robert; Tabak, Dominik; Niedbala, Halina; Podeszwa, Barbara; Jampilek, Josef; Kralova, Katarina; Dohnal, Jiri; Finster, Jacek; Mencel, Agnieszka; Polanski, Jaroslaw

    2008-04-15

    Two series of amides based on quinoline scaffold were designed and synthesized in search of photosynthesis inhibitors. The compounds were tested for their photosynthesis-inhibiting activity against Spinacia oleracea L. and Chlorella vulgaris Beij. The compounds lipophilicity was determined by the RP-HPLC method. Several compounds showed biological activity similar or even higher than that of the standard (DCMU). The structure-activity relationships are discussed.

  20. Biological activity of soil contaminated with cobalt, tin, and molybdenum.

    PubMed

    Zaborowska, Magdalena; Kucharski, Jan; Wyszkowska, Jadwiga

    2016-07-01

    In this age of intensive industrialization and urbanization, mankind's highest concern should be to analyze the effect of all metals accumulating in the environment, both those considered toxic and trace elements. With this aim in mind, a unique study was conducted to determine the potentially negative impact of Sn(2+), Co(2+), and Mo(5+) in optimal and increased doses on soil biological properties. These metals were applied in the form of aqueous solutions of Sn(2+) (SnCl2 (.)2H2O), Co(2+) (CoCl2 · 6H2O), and Mo(5+) (MoCl5), each in the doses of 0, 25, 50, 100, 200, 400, and 800 mg kg(-1) soil DM. The activity of dehydrogenases, urease, acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, arylsulfatase, and catalase and the counts of twelve microorganism groups were determined on the 25th and 50th day of experiment duration. Moreover, to present the studied problem comprehensively, changes in the biochemical activity and yield of spring barley were shown using soil and plant resistance indices-RS. The study shows that Sn(2+), Co(2+), and Mo(5+) disturb the state of soil homeostasis. Co(2+) and Mo(5+) proved the greatest soil biological activity inhibitors. The residence of these metals in soil, particularly Co(2+), also generated a drastic decrease in the value of spring barley resistance. Only Sn(2+) did not disrupt its yielding. The studied enzymes can be arranged as follows for their sensitivity to Sn(2+), Co(2+), Mo(5+): Deh > Ure > Aryl > Pal > Pac > Cat. Dehydrogenases and urease may be reliable soil health indicators.

  1. Biological Activity and Phytochemical Study of Scutellaria platystegia

    PubMed Central

    Madani mousavi, Seyedeh Neda; Delazar, Abbas; Nazemiyeh, Hossein; Khodaie, Laleh

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine biological activity and phytochemical study of Scutellaria platystegia (family Labiatae). Methanolic (MeOH) extract of aerial parts of S. platystegia and SPE fractions of methanolic extract (specially 20% and 40% methanolic fractions), growing in East-Azarbaijan province of Iran were found to have radical scavenging activity by DPPH (2, 2-diphenyl -1- pycryl hydrazyl) assay. Dichloromethane (DCM) extract of this plant exhibited animalarial activity by cell free method providing IC50 at 1.1876 mg/mL. Crude extracts did not exhibit any toxicity assessed by brine shrimp lethality assay. Phytochemical study of methanolic extract by using reverse phase HPLC method and NMR instrument for isolation and identification of pure compounds respectively, yielded 2-(4- hydroxy phenyl) ethyl-O-β-D- glucopyranoside from 10% and apigenin 7-O-glucoside, verbascoside and martynoside from 40% SPE fraction. Occurance of verbascoside and martynoside as biochemical markers appeared to be widespread in this genus. Antioxidant and antimalarial activity of MeOH and DCM extracts, respectively, as well as no general toxicity of them could provide a basis for further in-vitro and in-vivo studies and clinical trials to develop new therapeutical alternatives. PMID:25561927

  2. Biological Activities of the Essential Oil from Erigeron floribundus.

    PubMed

    Petrelli, Riccardo; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Sorci, Leonardo; Maggi, Filippo; Ranjbarian, Farahnaz; Biapa Nya, Prosper C; Petrelli, Dezemona; Vitali, Luca A; Lupidi, Giulio; Quassinti, Luana; Bramucci, Massimo; Hofer, Anders; Cappellacci, Loredana

    2016-08-13

    Erigeron floribundus (Asteraceae) is an herbaceous plant widely used in Cameroonian traditional medicine to treat various diseases of microbial and non-microbial origin. In the present study, we evaluated the in vitro biological activities displayed by the essential oil obtained from the aerial parts of E. floribundus, namely the antioxidant, antimicrobial and antiproliferative activities. Moreover, we investigated the inhibitory effects of E. floribundus essential oil on nicotinate mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NadD), a promising new target for developing novel antibiotics, and Trypanosoma brucei, the protozoan parasite responsible for Human African trypanosomiasis. The essential oil composition was dominated by spathulenol (12.2%), caryophyllene oxide (12.4%) and limonene (8.8%). The E. floribundus oil showed a good activity against Staphylococcus aureus (inhibition zone diameter, IZD of 14 mm, minimum inhibitory concentration, MIC of 512 µg/mL). Interestingly, it inhibited the NadD enzyme from S. aureus (IC50 of 98 µg/mL), with no effects on mammalian orthologue enzymes. In addition, T. brucei proliferation was inhibited with IC50 values of 33.5 µg/mL with the essential oil and 5.6 µg/mL with the active component limonene. The essential oil exhibited strong cytotoxicity on HCT 116 colon carcinoma cells with an IC50 value of 14.89 µg/mL, and remarkable ferric reducing antioxidant power (tocopherol-equivalent antioxidant capacity, TEAC = 411.9 μmol·TE/g).

  3. Biological and Nonbiological Antioxidant Activity of Some Essential Oils.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rosés, Renato; Risco, Ester; Vila, Roser; Peñalver, Pedro; Cañigueral, Salvador

    2016-06-15

    Fifteen essential oils, four essential oil fractions, and three pure compounds (thymol, carvacrol, and eugenol), characterized by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, were investigated for biological and nonbiological antioxidant activity. Clove oil and eugenol showed strong DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) free-radical scavenging activity (IC50 = 13.2 μg/mL and 11.7 μg/mL, respectively) and powerfully inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human neutrophils stimulated by PMA (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate) (IC50 = 7.5 μg/mL and 1.6 μg/mL) or H2O2 (IC50 = 22.6 μg/mL and 27.1 μg/mL). Nutmeg, ginger, and palmarosa oils were also highly active on this test. Essential oils from clove and ginger, as well as eugenol, carvacrol, and bornyl acetate inhibited NO (nitric oxide) production (IC50 < 50.0 μg/mL). The oils of clove, red thyme, and Spanish oregano, together with eugenol, thymol, and carvacrol showed the highest myeloperoxidase inhibitory activity. Isomers carvacrol and thymol displayed a disparate behavior in some tests. All in all, clove oil and eugenol offered the best antioxidant profile.

  4. Chemistry and Biological Activities of Flavonoids: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shashank; Pandey, Abhay K.

    2013-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in the research on flavonoids from plant sources because of their versatile health benefits reported in various epidemiological studies. Since flavonoids are directly associated with human dietary ingredients and health, there is need to evaluate structure and function relationship. The bioavailability, metabolism, and biological activity of flavonoids depend upon the configuration, total number of hydroxyl groups, and substitution of functional groups about their nuclear structure. Fruits and vegetables are the main dietary sources of flavonoids for humans, along with tea and wine. Most recent researches have focused on the health aspects of flavonoids for humans. Many flavonoids are shown to have antioxidative activity, free radical scavenging capacity, coronary heart disease prevention, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer activities, while some flavonoids exhibit potential antiviral activities. In plant systems, flavonoids help in combating oxidative stress and act as growth regulators. For pharmaceutical purposes cost-effective bulk production of different types of flavonoids has been made possible with the help of microbial biotechnology. This review highlights the structural features of flavonoids, their beneficial roles in human health, and significance in plants as well as their microbial production. PMID:24470791

  5. Chemistry and biological activities of flavonoids: an overview.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shashank; Pandey, Abhay K

    2013-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in the research on flavonoids from plant sources because of their versatile health benefits reported in various epidemiological studies. Since flavonoids are directly associated with human dietary ingredients and health, there is need to evaluate structure and function relationship. The bioavailability, metabolism, and biological activity of flavonoids depend upon the configuration, total number of hydroxyl groups, and substitution of functional groups about their nuclear structure. Fruits and vegetables are the main dietary sources of flavonoids for humans, along with tea and wine. Most recent researches have focused on the health aspects of flavonoids for humans. Many flavonoids are shown to have antioxidative activity, free radical scavenging capacity, coronary heart disease prevention, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer activities, while some flavonoids exhibit potential antiviral activities. In plant systems, flavonoids help in combating oxidative stress and act as growth regulators. For pharmaceutical purposes cost-effective bulk production of different types of flavonoids has been made possible with the help of microbial biotechnology. This review highlights the structural features of flavonoids, their beneficial roles in human health, and significance in plants as well as their microbial production.

  6. Catalytically and biologically active silver nanoparticles synthesized using essential oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilas, Vidya; Philip, Daizy; Mathew, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    There are numerous reports on phytosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and various phytochemicals are involved in the reduction and stabilization. Pure explicit phytosynthetic protocol for catalytically and biologically active silver nanoparticles is of importance as it is an environmentally benign green method. This paper reports the use of essential oil of Myristica fragrans enriched in terpenes and phenyl propenes in the reduction and stabilization. FTIR spectra of the essential oil and the synthesized biogenic silver nanoparticles are in accordance with the GC-MS spectral analysis reports. Nanosilver is initially characterized by an intense SPR band around 420 nm, followed by XRD and TEM analysis revealing the formation of 12-26 nm sized, highly pure, crystalline silver nanoparticles. Excellent catalytic and bioactive potential of the silver nanoparticles is due to the surface modification. The chemocatalytic potential of nanosilver is exhibited by the rapid reduction of the organic pollutant, para nitro phenol and by the degradation of the thiazine dye, methylene blue. Significant antibacterial activity of the silver colloid against Gram positive, Staphylococcus aureus (inhibition zone - 12 mm) and Gram negative, Escherichia coli (inhibition zone - 14 mm) is demonstrated by Agar-well diffusion method. Strong antioxidant activity of the biogenic silver nanoparticles is depicted through NO scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, reducing power, DPPH and total antioxidant activity assays.

  7. Biological Activities of Oleanolic Acid Derivatives from Calendula officinalis Seeds.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Ahmed; Ashour, Ahmed; Mira, Amira; Kishikawa, Asuka; Nakagawa, Toshinori; Zhu, Qinchang; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2016-05-01

    Phytochemical examination of butanol fraction of Calendula officinalis seeds led to the isolation of two compounds identified as 28-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-oleanolic acid 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl (1→3)-β-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid (CS1) and oleanolic acid 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl (1→3)-β-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid (CS2). Biological evaluation was carried out for these two compounds such as melanin biosynthesis inhibitory, hyaluronic acid production activities, anti obesity using lipase inhibition and adipocyte differentiation as well as evaluation of the protective effect against hydrogen peroxide induced neurotoxicity in neuro-2A cells. The results showed that, compound CS2 has a melanin biosynthesis stimulatory activity; however, compound CS1 has a potent stimulatory effect for the production of hyaluronic acid on normal human dermal fibroblast from adult (NHDF-Ad). Both compounds did not show any inhibitory effect on both lipase and adipocyte differentiation. Compound CS2 could protect neuro-2A cells and increased cell viability against H2 O2 . These activities (melanin biosynthesis stimulatory and protective effect against H2 O2 of CS2 and hyaluronic acid productive activities of these triterpene derivatives) have been reported for the first time. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Biological activity of bee propolis in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Mahmoud Lotfy

    2006-01-01

    Propolis is a natural product derived from plant resins collected by honeybees. It is used by bees as glue, a general-purpose sealer, and as draught-extruder for beehives. Propolis has been used in folk medicine for centuries. It is known that propolis possesses anti-microbial, antioxidative, anti-ulcer and anti-tumor activities. Therefore, propolis has attracted much attention in recent years as a useful or potential substance used in medicine and cosmetics products. Furthermore, it is now extensively used in foods and beverages with the claim that it can maintain or improve human health. The chemical composition of propolis is quite complicated. More than 300 compounds such as polyphenols, phenolic aldehydes, sequiterpene quinines, coumarins, amino acids, steroids and inorganic compounds have been identified in propolis samples. The contents depend on the collecting location, time and plant source. Consequently, biological activities of propolis gathered from different phytogeographical areas and time periods vary greatly. In this review, the activity of bee propolis will be presented with special emphasis on the antitumor activity.

  9. Soil degradation effect on biological activity in Mediterranean calcareous soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca-Pérez, L.; Alcover-Sáez, S.; Mormeneo, S.; Boluda, R.

    2009-04-01

    Soil degradation processes include erosion, organic matter decline, compaction, salinization, landslides, contamination, sealing and biodiversity decline. In the Mediterranean region the climatological and lithological conditions, together with relief on the landscape and anthropological activity are responsible for increasing desertification process. It is therefore considered to be extreme importance to be able to measure soil degradation quantitatively. We studied soil characteristics, microbiological and biochemical parameters in different calcareous soil sequences from Valencia Community (Easter Spain), in an attempt to assess the suitability of the parameters measured to reflect the state of soil degradation and the possibility of using the parameters to assess microbiological decline and soil quality. For this purpose, forest, scrubland and agricultural soil in three soil sequences were sampled in different areas. Several sensors of the soil biochemistry and microbiology related with total organic carbon, microbial biomass carbon, soil respiration, microorganism number and enzyme activities were determined. The results show that, except microorganism number, these parameters are good indicators of a soil biological activity and soil quality. The best enzymatic activities to use like indicators were phosphatases, esterases, amino-peptidases. Thus, the enzymes test can be used as indicators of soil degradation when this degradation is related with organic matter losses. There was a statistically significant difference in cumulative O2 uptake and extracellular enzymes among the soils with different degree of degradation. We would like to thank Spanish government-MICINN for funding and support (MICINN, project CGL2006-09776).

  10. Catalytically and biologically active silver nanoparticles synthesized using essential oil.

    PubMed

    Vilas, Vidya; Philip, Daizy; Mathew, Joseph

    2014-11-11

    There are numerous reports on phytosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and various phytochemicals are involved in the reduction and stabilization. Pure explicit phytosynthetic protocol for catalytically and biologically active silver nanoparticles is of importance as it is an environmentally benign green method. This paper reports the use of essential oil of Myristica fragrans enriched in terpenes and phenyl propenes in the reduction and stabilization. FTIR spectra of the essential oil and the synthesized biogenic silver nanoparticles are in accordance with the GC-MS spectral analysis reports. Nanosilver is initially characterized by an intense SPR band around 420 nm, followed by XRD and TEM analysis revealing the formation of 12-26 nm sized, highly pure, crystalline silver nanoparticles. Excellent catalytic and bioactive potential of the silver nanoparticles is due to the surface modification. The chemocatalytic potential of nanosilver is exhibited by the rapid reduction of the organic pollutant, para nitro phenol and by the degradation of the thiazine dye, methylene blue. Significant antibacterial activity of the silver colloid against Gram positive, Staphylococcus aureus (inhibition zone--12 mm) and Gram negative, Escherichia coli (inhibition zone--14 mm) is demonstrated by Agar-well diffusion method. Strong antioxidant activity of the biogenic silver nanoparticles is depicted through NO scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, reducing power, DPPH and total antioxidant activity assays. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Biologically active metal-independent superoxide dismutase mimics

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.B.; Samuni, A.; Krishna, M.C.; DeGraff, W.G.; Ahn, M.S.; Samuni, U.; Russo, A. )

    1990-03-20

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is an enzyme that detoxifies superoxide (O2.-), a potentially toxic oxygen-derived species. Attempts to increase intracellular concentrations of SOD by direct application are complicated because SOD, being a relatively large molecule, does not readily cross cell membranes. We have identified a set of stable nitroxides that possess SOD-like activity, have the advantage of being low molecular weight, membrane permeable, and metal independent, and at pH 7.0 have reaction rate constants with O2.- ranging from 1.1 x 10(3) to 1.3 x 10(6) M-1 s-1. These SOD mimics protect mammalian cells from damage induced by hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, although they exhibit no catalase-like activity. In addition, the nitroxide SOD mimics rapidly oxidize DNA-FeII and thus may interrupt the Fenton reaction and prevent formation of deleterious OH radicals and/or higher oxidation states of metal ions. Whether by SOD-like activity and/or interception of an electron from redox-active metal ions they protect cells from oxidative stress and may have use in basic and applied biological studies.

  12. Residual matrix from different separation techniques impacts exosome biological activity

    PubMed Central

    Paolini, Lucia; Zendrini, Andrea; Noto, Giuseppe Di; Busatto, Sara; Lottini, Elisabetta; Radeghieri, Annalisa; Dossi, Alessandra; Caneschi, Andrea; Ricotta, Doris; Bergese, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are gaining a prominent role in research due to their intriguing biology and several therapeutic opportunities. However, their accurate purification from body fluids and detailed physicochemical characterization remain open issues. We isolated exosomes from serum of patients with Multiple Myeloma by four of the most popular purification methods and assessed the presence of residual contaminants in the preparations through an ad hoc combination of biochemical and biophysical techniques - including Western Blot, colloidal nanoplasmonics, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning helium ion microscopy (HIM). The preparations obtained by iodixanol and sucrose gradients were highly pure. To the contrary, those achieved with limited processing (serial centrifugation or one step precipitation kit) resulted contaminated by a residual matrix, embedding the exosomes. The contaminated preparations showed lower ability to induce NfkB nuclear translocation in endothelial cells with respect to the pure ones, probably because the matrix prevents the interaction and fusion of the exosomes with the cell membrane. These findings suggest that exosome preparation purity must be carefully assessed since it may interfere with exosome biological activity. Contaminants can be reliably probed only by an integrated characterization approach aimed at both the molecular and the colloidal length scales. PMID:27009329

  13. Diastereoselective Synthesis of Biologically Active Cyclopenta[b]indoles.

    PubMed

    Santos, Marilia S; Fernandes, Daniara C; Rodrigues, Manoel T; Regiani, Thais; Andricopulo, Adriano D; Ruiz, Ana Lúcia T G; Vendramini-Costa, Débora B; de Carvalho, João E; Eberlin, Marcos N; Coelho, Fernando

    2016-08-05

    The cyclopenta[b]indole motif is present in several natural and synthetic biologically active compounds, being directly responsible for the biological effects some of them present. We described herein a three step sequence for the synthesis of cyclopenta[b]indoles with a great structural diversity. The method is based on an oxidative Michael addition of suitable indoles on the double bond of Morita-Baylis-Hillman adducts mediated by a hypervalent iodine reagent (IBX) to form β-ketoesters, which were chemoselectively reduced with NaBH4 in THF to give the corresponding β-hydroxy-esters. The diastereoisomeric mixture was then treated with a catalytic amount of triflic acid (20 mol %) to give cyclopenta[b]indoles with overall yields ranging from 8 to 73% (for 2 steps). The acid-catalyzed cyclization step gave the required heterocycles, via an intramolecular Friedel-Crafts reaction, with high diastereoselectivity, where only the trans product was observed. A mechanistic study monitored by ESI-(+)-MS was also conducted to collect evidence about the mechanism of this reaction. The new molecules herein synthesized were also evaluated against a panel of human cancer cells demonstrating a promising antitumoral profile.

  14. Magnetic, electronic and electrochemical studies of mono and binuclear Cu(II) complexes using novel macrocyclic ligands.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nidhi; Gupta, Rachna; Chandra, Sulekh; Bawa, S S

    2005-04-01

    A series of new mono and binuclear copper (II) complexes [Cul]X(2)and [Cu(2)lX(2)] where 1 = L(1), L(2) and L(3) are the macrocyclic ligands. In mononuclear complexes the geometry of Cu(II) ion is distorted squareplanar and in binuclear complexes the geometry of Cu(II) is tetragonal. The synthesized complexes were characterized by spectroscopic (IR,UV-vis and ESR) techniques. Electrochemical studies of the complexes reveals that all the mononuclear Cu(II) complexes show a single quasireversible one-electron transfer reduction wave (E(pc) = -0.76 to -0.84V) and the binuclear complexes show two quasireversible one electron transfer reduction waves (E(pc)(1) = -0.86 to -1.01V, E(pc)(2) = -1.11 to -1.43V) in cathodic region. The ESR spectra of mononuclear complexes show four lines with nuclear hyperfine splittings with the observed g(11) values in the ranges 2.20-2.28, g( perpendicular) = 2.01-2.06 and A(11) = 125-273. The binuclear complexes show a broad ESR spectra with g = 2.10-2.11. The room temperature magnetic moment values for the mononuclear complexes are in the range [mu(eff) = 1.70-1.72BM] and for the binuclear complexes the range is [mu(eff) = 1.46-1.59BM].

  15. Production and biological activities of yellow pigments from Monascus fungi.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gong; Wu, Zhenqiang

    2016-08-01

    Monascus yellow pigments (MYPs), are azaphilone compounds and one of the three main components of total Monascus pigments (MPs). Thirty-five hydrophilic or hydrophobic MYPs have been identified, with the majority being hydrophobic. Apart from screening special Monascus strains, some advanced approaches, such as extractive and high-cell-density fermentations, have been applied for developing or producing new MYPs, especially extracellular hydrophilic MYPs. The outstanding performance of MYPs in terms of resistance to photodegradation, as well as tolerance for temperature and pH, give natural MYPs reasonable prospects, compared with the orange and red MPs, for practical use in the present and future. Meanwhile, MYPs have shown promising potential for applications in the food and pharmaceutical industries based on their described bioactivities. This review briefly summarizes the reports to date on chemical structures, biological activities, biosynthetic pathways, production technologies, and physicochemical performances of MYPs. The existing problems for MYPs are discussed and research prospects proposed.

  16. Synthesis and biological activity of homoarginine-containing opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Izdebski, Jan; Kunce, Danuta; Schiller, Peter W; Chung, Nga N; Gers, Tomasz; Zelman, Monika; Grabek, Monika

    2007-01-01

    Two tris-alkoxycarbonyl homoarginine derivatives, Boc-Har{omega,omega'-[Z(2Br)]2}-OH and Boc-Har{omega,omega'-[Z(2Cl)]2}-OH, were prepared by guanidinylation of Boc-Lys-OH, and used for the synthesis of neo-endorphins and dynorphins. The results were compared with that obtained in the synthesis in which Boc-Lys(Fmoc)-OH was incorporated into the peptide chain, and after removing Fmoc protection, the resulting peptide-resin was guanidinylated with N,N'-[Z(2Br)]2- or N,N'-[Z(2Cl)]2-S-methylisourea. The peptides were tested in the guinea-pig ileum (GPI) and mouse vas deferens (MVD) assays. The results indicated that replacement of Arg by Har may be a good avenue for the design of biologically active peptides with increased resistance to degradation by trypsin-like enzymes.

  17. [The release of biologically active compounds from peat peloids].

    PubMed

    Babaskin, D V

    2011-01-01

    This work had the objective to study kinetics of the release of flavonoides from peat peloid compositions containing extracts of medicinal herbs in model systems.The key parameters of the process are defined. The rate of liberation of flavonoides is shown to depend on their initial concentration in the compositions being used. The influence of the flavonoide composition of the tested extracts and dimethylsulfoxide on the release of biologically active compounds contained in the starting material in the model environment is estimated. The possibility of the layer-by-layer deposition of the compositions and peat peloids in order to increase the efficacy of flavonoide release from the starting composition and to ensure more rational utilization of the extracts of medicinal plants is demonstrated.

  18. Neutron activation analysis of biological materials by the monostandard method.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, T; Shinogi, M

    1979-12-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis by the monostandard method has been applied to the analyses of biological NBS standard reference materials; 1571 Orchard Leaves and 1577 Bovine Liver. Aluminum foils containing 0.100% gold or 2.00% cobalt were used as the monostandards. The gamma-ray spectral data were recorded on punched paper tape and were analyzed by a computer assisted data processing. The following 25 elements were determined: Al, Ca, Cl Cu, Mg, Mn, V (by short period irradiation), As, Ba, Br, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hg, K, La, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm and Zn (by long period irradiation). The results were compared with the certified values by NBS and the reported values in literatures to prove the reliability and accuracy of the monostandard method.

  19. Molecular Requirements for the Biological Activity of Ethylene 1

    PubMed Central

    Burg, Stanley P.; Burg, Ellen A.

    1967-01-01

    The molecular requirements for ethylene action were investigated using the pea straight growth test. Biological activity requires an unsaturated bond adjacent to a terminal carbon atom, is inversely related to molecular size, and is decreased by substitutions which lower the electron density in the unsaturated position. Evidence is presented that ethylene binds to a metal containing receptor site. CO2 is a competitive inhibitor of ethylene action, and prevents high concentrations of auxin (which stimulate ethylene formation) from retarding the elongation of etiolated pea stem sections. It is suggested that CO2 delays fruit ripening by displacing the ripening hormone, ethylene, from its receptor site. Binding of ethylene to the receptor site is also impeded when the O2 concentration is lowered, and this may explain why fruit ripening is delayed at low O2 tensions. PMID:16656478

  20. Biological activity of oxidized and reduced iodinated bombesins

    SciTech Connect

    Vigna, S.R.; Giraud, A.S.; Reeve, J.R. Jr.; Walsh, J.H.

    1988-07-01

    A method is reported for preparing oxidized and reduced iodinated Tyr4-bombesin. Iodogen was used to iodinate Tyr4-bombesin and the reaction products were separated by reverse-phase HPLC. The peak of oxidized label was then reduced by incubation with 725 mM dithiothreitol at 80 degrees C (pH 8.0) for one hour and the reaction products separated by HPLC as before. The reduced but not oxidized peaks of /sup 125/I-Tyr4-bombesin stimulated amylase release from rat pancreatic acini in vitro. We conclude that oxidation of bombesin producing C-terminal methionine sulfoxide destroys the biological activity of the peptide and that this form of oxidation can be reversed.

  1. Structure and Biological Activity of Pathogen-like Synthetic Nanomedicines

    PubMed Central

    Lőrincz, Orsolya; Tőke, Enikő R.; Somogyi, Eszter; Horkay, Ferenc; Chandran, Preethi; Douglas, Jack F.; Szebeni, János; Lisziewicz, Julianna

    2011-01-01

    Here we characterize the structure, stability and intracellular mode-of-action of DermaVir nanomedicine that is under clinical development for the treatment of HIV/AIDS. This nanomedicine is comprised of pathogen-like pDNA/PEIm nanoparticles (NPs) having the structure and function resembling spherical viruses that naturally evolved to deliver nucleic acids to the cells. Atomic force microscopy demonstrated spherical 100–200nm NPs with a smooth polymer surface protecting the pDNA in the core. Optical-absorption determined both the NP structural stability and biological activity relevant to their ability to escape from the endosome and release the pDNA at the nucleus. Salt, pH and temperature influence the nanomedicine shelf-life and intracellular stability. This approach facilitates the development of diverse polyplex nanomedicines where the delivered pDNA-expressed antigens induce immune responses to kill infected cells. PMID:21839051

  2. Fungal phytotoxins with potential herbicidal activity: chemical and biological characterization.

    PubMed

    Cimmino, Alessio; Masi, Marco; Evidente, Marco; Superchi, Stefano; Evidente, Antonio

    2015-12-19

    Covering: 2007 to 2015 Fungal phytotoxins are secondary metabolites playing an important role in the induction of disease symptoms interfering with host plant physiological processes. Although fungal pathogens represent a heavy constraint for agrarian production and for forest and environmental heritage, they can also represent an ecofriendly alternative to manage weeds. Indeed, the phytotoxins produced by weed pathogenic fungi are an efficient tool to design natural, safe bioherbicides. Their use could avoid that of synthetic pesticides causing resistance in the host plants and the long term impact of residues in agricultural products with a risk to human and animal health. The isolation and structural and biological characterization of phytotoxins produced by pathogenic fungi for weeds, including parasitic plants, are described. Structure activity relationships and mode of action studies for some phytotoxins are also reported to elucidate the herbicide potential of these promising fungal metabolites.

  3. Macrophage activation syndrome in the era of biologic therapy.

    PubMed

    Grom, Alexei A; Horne, AnnaCarin; De Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2016-05-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) refers to acute overwhelming inflammation caused by a 'cytokine storm'. Although increasingly recognized as a life-threatening complication of various rheumatic diseases, clinically, MAS is strikingly similar to primary and secondary forms of haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). Not surprisingly, many rheumatologists prefer the term secondary HLH rather than MAS to describe this condition, and efforts to change the nomenclature are in progress. The pathophysiology of MAS remains elusive, but observations in animal models, as well as data on the effects of new anticytokine therapies on rates and clinical presentations of MAS in patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA), provide clues to the understanding of this perplexing clinical phenomenon. In this Review, we explore the latest available evidence and discuss potential diagnostic challenges in the era of increasing use of biologic therapies.

  4. Phase diagram for assembly of biologically-active peptide amphiphiles.

    PubMed

    Tsonchev, Stefan; Niece, Krista L; Schatz, George C; Ratner, Mark A; Stupp, Samuel I

    2008-01-17

    We construct a phase diagram for self-assembling biologically active peptide amphiphiles. The structure and stability of the assemblies are studied as a function of pH and salinity of the solution. The general features of the phase diagram are predicted based on theoretical modeling of the self-assembly process, as well as experimental data, and further experiments are performed to verify and ascertain the boundary locations of the diagram. Depending on solution conditions, the amphiphiles can form cylindrical or spherical micelles, intermediate structures between these, or may not assemble at all. We also demonstrate that changing conditions may result in phase transitions among these structures. This type of phase diagram could be useful in the design of certain supramolecular nanostructures by providing information on the necessary conditions to form them.

  5. Comparison between geochemical and biological estimates of subsurface microbial activities.

    PubMed

    Phelps, T J; Murphy, E M; Pfiffner, S M; White, D C

    1994-01-01

    Geochemical and biological estimates of in situ microbial activities were compared from the aerobic and microaerophilic sediments of the Atlantic Coastal Plain. Radioisotope time-course experiments suggested oxidation rates greater than millimolar quantities per year for acetate and glucose. Geochemical analyses assessing oxygen consumption, soluble organic carbon utilization, sulfate reduction, and carbon dioxide production suggested organic oxidation rates of nano- to micromolar quantities per year. Radiotracer timecourse experiments appeared to overestimate rates of organic carbon oxidation, sulfate reduction, and biomass production by a factor of 10(3)-10(6) greater than estimates calculated from groundwater analyses. Based on the geochemical evidence, in situ microbial metabolism was estimated to be in the nano- to micromolar range per year, and the average doubling time for the microbial community was estimated to be centuries.

  6. Relationships between the stereochemistry and biological activity of fungal phytotoxins.

    PubMed

    Evidente, Antonio; Andolfi, Anna; Cimmino, Alessio

    2011-10-01

    Toxins produced by phytopathogenic fungi assume great importance because of their involvement in several plant diseases. Although such pathogens are known to have seriously damaged crops, forest, and environmental resources, they represent a very important tool to develop new environmentally friendly herbicides and fungicides. This review deals with the relationships between the biological activity of some phytotoxins produced by pathogenic fungi for major forest plants and for damaging weeds and their stereochemistry. In particular, the methods used to determine their relative and/or absolute configuration will be illustrated. These include the application of Mosher's and Murata's methods, X-ray diffractometric analysis, circular dichroism, and the use of computational methods to determine the theoretical optical rotatory power as well as the CD spectrum. The importance of determining the absolute configuration to achieve the total synthesis of some phytotoxins, interesting for their potential practical application, is also discussed.

  7. The active site of melanopsin: the biological clock photoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Sekharan, Sivakumar; Wei, Jennifer N; Batista, Victor S

    2012-12-05

    The nonvisual ocular photoreceptor melanopsin, found in the neurons of vertebrate inner retina, absorbs blue light and triggers the "biological clock" of mammals by activating the suprachiasmatic nuclei (a small region of the brain that regulates the circadian rhythms of neuronal and hormonal activities over 24 h cycles). The structure of melanopsin, however, has yet to be established. Here, we propose for the first time a structural model of the active site of mouse melanopsin. The homology model is based on the crystal structure of squid rhodopsin (λ(max) = 490 nm) and shows a maximal absorbance (λ(max) = 447 nm) consistent with the observed absorption of the photoreceptor. The 43 nm spectral shift is due to an increased bond-length alternation of the protonated Schiff base of 11-cis-retinal chromophore, induced by N87Q mutation and water-mediated H-bonding interactions with the Schiff base linkage. These findings, analogous to spectral changes observed in the G89Q bovine rhodopsin mutant, suggest that single site mutations can convert photopigments into visual light sensors or nonvisual sensory photoreceptors.

  8. Differential Biological Activities of Swine Interferon-α Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Zanotti, Cinzia; Razzuoli, Elisabetta; Crooke, Helen; Soule, Olubukola; Pezzoni, Giulia; Ferraris, Monica; Ferrari, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) play a crucial role in the host's immune response and other homeostatic control actions. Three IFN types and several IFN families within the types allow for a plethora of regulatory actions. The number of distinct IFN molecules is highest among type I IFNs and, in particular, within the IFN-α family. In pigs, there are 17 IFN-α subtypes with different antiviral activities and different expression profiles; however, no data are available about biological properties other than the antiviral effector activities. Therefore, 16 porcine IFN-α genes were cloned, expressed in mammalian Chinese hamster ovary cells, and characterized for antiviral, anti-inflammatory, and MHC-modulating activities at a pre-established level of 10 IU/mL. Antiviral activity: IFN-α2, -α5, -α9, and -α10 showed the highest level of activity in a pseudorabies virus yield reduction assay. On the contrary, little, if any, activity was shown by IFN-α3, -α7, -α13, -α4, and -α15. Anti-inflammatory activity: With the exception of IFNs-α2, -α7, -α9, and -α11, all IFN-α subtypes had significant anti-inflammatory control activity in an interleukin-8 (IL-8) yield reduction assay. Gene expression analyses showed that some IFN-α subtypes can significantly downregulate the expression of IL-8, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), IL-6, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), βD1, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-kB) genes, while maintaining or upregulating the expression of βD4. Immunomodulation: A significant upregulation of class I and/or class II MHC was induced by all the IFNs under study, with the exception of IFNs-α11, -α15, and -α16, which instead significantly downregulated class I MHC. Our results indicate that gene duplications in the porcine IFN-α family underlie diverse effector and regulatory activities, being therefore instrumental in host survival and environmental adaptation. This role of IFN-α could be founded on fine-tuning and regulation of pro- and anti

  9. Dynamic properties of biologically active synthetic heparin-like hexasaccharides.

    PubMed

    Angulo, Jesús; Hricovíni, Milos; Gairi, Margarida; Guerrini, Marco; de Paz, José Luis; Ojeda, Rafael; Martín-Lomas, Manuel; Nieto, Pedro M

    2005-10-01

    A complete study of the dynamics of two synthetic heparin-like hexasaccharides, D-GlcNHSO3-6-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-L-IdoA-2-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-D-GlcNHSO3-6-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-L-IdoA-2-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-D-GlcNHSO3-6-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-L-IdoA-2-SO4-alpha-1-->iPr (1) and -->4)-L-IdoA-2-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-D-GlcNHAc-6-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-L-IdoA-alpha-(1-->4)-D-GlcNHSO3-alpha-(1-->4)-L-IdoA-2-SO4-alpha-1-->iPr (2), has been performed using 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation parameters, T1, T2, and heteronuclear nuclear Overhauser effect (NOEs). Compound 1 is constituted from sequences corresponding to the major polysaccharide heparin region, while compound 2 contains a sequence never found in natural heparin. They differ from each other only in sulphation patterns, and are capable of stimulating fibroblast growth factors (FGFs)-1 induced mitogenesis. Both oligosaccharides exhibit a remarkable anisotropic overall motion in solution as revealed by their anisotropic ratios (tau /tau||), 4.0 and 3.0 respectively. This is a characteristic behaviour of natural glycosaminoglycans (GAG) which has also been observed for the antithrombin (AT) binding pentasaccharide D-GlcNHSO3-6-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-D-GlcA-beta-(1-->4)-D-GlcNHSO3-(3,6-SO4)-alpha-(1-->4)-L-IdoA-2-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-D-GlcNHSO3-6-SO4-alpha-1-->Me (3) (Hricovíni, M., Guerrini, M., Torri, G., Piani, S., and Ungarelli, F. (1995) Conformational analysis of heparin epoxide in aqueous solution. An NMR relaxation study. Carbohydr. Res., 277, 11-23). The motional properties observed for 1 and 2 provide additional support to the suitability of these compounds as heparin models in agreement with previous structural (de Paz, J.L., Angulo, J., Lassaletta, J.M., Nieto, P.M., Redondo-Horcajo, M., Lozano, R.M., Jiménez-Gallego, G., and Martín-Lomas, M. (2001) The activation of fibroblast growth factors by heparin: synthesis, structure and biological activity of heparin-like oligosaccharides. Chembiochem, 2, 673-685; Ojeda, R

  10. Phytochemical Analysis and Biological Activities of Cola nitida Bark

    PubMed Central

    Dah-Nouvlessounon, Durand; Adoukonou-Sagbadja, Hubert; Diarrassouba, Nafan; Sina, Haziz; Adjanohoun, Adolphe; Inoussa, Mariam; Akakpo, Donald; Gbenou, Joachim D.; Kotchoni, Simeon O.; Dicko, Mamoudou H.; Baba-Moussa, Lamine

    2015-01-01

    Kola nut is chewed in many West African cultures and is used ceremonially. The aim of this study is to investigate some biological effects of Cola nitida's bark after phytochemical screening. The bark was collected, dried, and then powdered for the phytochemical screening and extractions. Ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts of C. nitida were used in this study. The antibacterial activity was tested on ten reference strains and 28 meat isolated Staphylococcus strains by disc diffusion method. The antifungal activity of three fungal strains was determined on the Potato-Dextrose Agar medium mixed with the appropriate extract. The antioxidant activity was determined by DPPH and ABTS methods. Our data revealed the presence of various potent phytochemicals. For the reference and meat isolated strains, the inhibitory diameter zone was from 17.5 ± 0.7 mm (C. albicans) to 9.5 ± 0.7 mm (P. vulgaris). The MIC ranged from 0.312 mg/mL to 5.000 mg/mL and the MBC from 0.625 mg/mL to >20 mg/mL. The highest antifungal activity was observed with F. verticillioides and the lowest one with P. citrinum. The two extracts have an excellent reducing free radical activity. The killing effect of A. salina larvae was perceptible at 1.04 mg/mL. The purified extracts of Cola nitida's bark can be used to hold meat products and also like phytomedicine. PMID:25767723

  11. Phytochemical Analysis and Biological Activities of Cola nitida Bark.

    PubMed

    Dah-Nouvlessounon, Durand; Adoukonou-Sagbadja, Hubert; Diarrassouba, Nafan; Sina, Haziz; Adjanohoun, Adolphe; Inoussa, Mariam; Akakpo, Donald; Gbenou, Joachim D; Kotchoni, Simeon O; Dicko, Mamoudou H; Baba-Moussa, Lamine

    2015-01-01

    Kola nut is chewed in many West African cultures and is used ceremonially. The aim of this study is to investigate some biological effects of Cola nitida's bark after phytochemical screening. The bark was collected, dried, and then powdered for the phytochemical screening and extractions. Ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts of C. nitida were used in this study. The antibacterial activity was tested on ten reference strains and 28 meat isolated Staphylococcus strains by disc diffusion method. The antifungal activity of three fungal strains was determined on the Potato-Dextrose Agar medium mixed with the appropriate extract. The antioxidant activity was determined by DPPH and ABTS methods. Our data revealed the presence of various potent phytochemicals. For the reference and meat isolated strains, the inhibitory diameter zone was from 17.5 ± 0.7 mm (C. albicans) to 9.5 ± 0.7 mm (P. vulgaris). The MIC ranged from 0.312 mg/mL to 5.000 mg/mL and the MBC from 0.625 mg/mL to >20 mg/mL. The highest antifungal activity was observed with F. verticillioides and the lowest one with P. citrinum. The two extracts have an excellent reducing free radical activity. The killing effect of A. salina larvae was perceptible at 1.04 mg/mL. The purified extracts of Cola nitida's bark can be used to hold meat products and also like phytomedicine.

  12. [Biologically active substances of cornelian cherry fruits (Cornus mas L.)].

    PubMed

    Perova, I B; Zhogova, A A; Poliakova, A V; Éller, K I; Ramenskaia, G V; Samylina, I A

    2014-01-01

    10 samples of fresh-frozen cornelian cherry fruits (Cornus mas L.), collected in the Tambov and the Caucasus regions, were investigated for the total amount and composition of the main biologically active substances (BAS): anthocyanins (AC), proanthocyanidins (OPC), dihydroxycinnamic acids (DHCA), iridoids, organic acids, mono- and disaccharides and antiradical activity in the DPPH-test in vitro. Total phenolics content determined by Folin-Ciocalteu method, was 150-400 mg/100 g fresh fruit weight. The OPC content, estimated by Bate-Smith method, varied from 20-25 mg/100 g of unripe cornelian cherries to 80-430 mg/100 g of mature cornelian cherries. Total AC amount evaluated by pH-differential spectrophotometry was minimal in unripe fruits (11,2 mg/100 g), and maximal in mature fruits (92,2 mg/100 g). Profile of individual AC was determined by HPLC with UV/Vis and ESI-TOF-MS detections. 3-galactosides of cyanidin (19,0-80,3%) and pelargonidin (15,1-75,6%) were found as main anthocyanins. An original methodology for iridoid determination based on HPLC with UV and ESI-TOF-MS detection was developed. The main iridoids were identified as loganic acid, loganin, sweroside and cornuside. Total iridoids content was 130-400 mg/100 g, and loganic acid was predominant in all samples (87,6-94,8%). Only minor amount of the DHCA derivatives (<10 mg/100 g) were found. The malic acid was predominant among organic acids, the total content of which varied from 0,4 to 2,8%. Relatively high amount of ascorbic acid (35-60 mg/100 g) was found. The carbohydrates profile of cornielian cherries was represented by fructose (2,2-3,8%) and glucose (2,5-7,0%). 70% water-ethanol extracts of Cornus mas fruits have showed pronounced antiradical activity in DPPH-test (470,5-932,0 mg TE/100 g). The data on specific minor BAS can be used in the standardization and evaluation of potential biological activity of extracts and dietary supplements based on the cornelian cherry fruits.

  13. Phytochemicals from Mangifera pajang Kosterm and their biological activities.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Sadikah; Sukari, Mohd Aspollah; Ismail, Nurussaadah; Ismail, Intan Safinar; Abdul, Ahmad Bustamam; Abu Bakar, Mohd Fadzelly; Kifli, Nurolaini; Ee, Gwendoline C L

    2015-03-26

    Mangifera pajang Kosterm is a plant species from the mango family (Anacardiaceae). The fruits are edible and have been reported to have high antioxidant content. However, the detailed phytochemical studies of the plant have not been reported previously. This study investigates the phytochemicals and biological activities of different parts of Mangifera pajang. The plant samples were extracted with solvents of different polarity to obtain the crude extracts. The isolated compounds were characterized using spectroscopic methods. The extracts and isolated compounds were subjected to cytotoxicity tests using human breast cancer (MCF-7), human cervical cancer (HeLa) and human colon cancer (HT-29) cells. The free radical scavenging activity test was conducted using the DPPH assay. Antimicrobial activity tests were carried out by using the disc diffusion method. Phytochemical investigation on the kernel, stem bark and leaves of Mangifera pajang led to the isolation of methyl gallate (1), mixture of benzaldehyde (2) and benzyl alcohol (3), mangiferonic acid (4), 3β-hydroxy-cycloart-24-ene-26-oic acid (5), 3β,23-dihydroxy-cycloart-24-ene-26-oic acid (6), lupeol(7) lupenone(8), β-sitosterol(9), stigmasterol(10), trans-sobrerol(11) and quercitrin (12). Crude ethyl acetate and methanol extracts from the kernel indicated strong cytotoxic activity towards MCF-7 and HeLa cells with IC50 values of less than 10 μg/mL, while petroleum ether, chloroform and ethyl acetate extracts of the stem bark showed strong to moderate activity against MCF-7, HeLa and HT-29 cancer cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 5 to 30 μg/mL. As for the antimicrobial assays, only the ethyl acetate and methanol extracts from the kernel displayed some inhibition against the microbes in the antibacterial assays. The kernel extracts showed highest free radical scavenging activity with IC50 values of less than 10 μg/mL, while the ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of leaves displayed only weak

  14. Teaching Systems Biology: An Active-Learning Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Anuj

    2005-01-01

    With genomics well established in modern molecular biology, recent studies have sought to further the discipline by integrating complementary methodologies into a holistic depiction of the molecular mechanisms underpinning cell function. This genomic subdiscipline, loosely termed "systems biology," presents the biology educator with both…

  15. Teaching Systems Biology: An Active-Learning Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Anuj

    2005-01-01

    With genomics well established in modern molecular biology, recent studies have sought to further the discipline by integrating complementary methodologies into a holistic depiction of the molecular mechanisms underpinning cell function. This genomic subdiscipline, loosely termed "systems biology," presents the biology educator with both…

  16. Advances in structural modifications and biological activities of berberine: an active compound in traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Huang, Z-J; Zeng, Y; Lan, P; Sun, P-H; Chen, W-M

    2011-11-01

    Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid isolated from Chinese herbs such as Coptidis Rhizome. This paper is a systematic review of the structural modifications of berberine for different biological activities such as antitumor, antimicrobial, anti-Alzheimer's disease, antihyperglycemic, anti-inflammatory and antimalaria. The current review would provide some useful information for further studies on structural modification of berberine for discovering new drug leads.

  17. A Conceptual Framework for Organizing Active Learning Experiences in Biology Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Joel; Belland, Brian R.

    2012-01-01

    Introductory biology courses form a cornerstone of undergraduate instruction. However, the predominantly used lecture approach fails to produce higher-order biology learning. Research shows that active learning strategies can increase student learning, yet few biology instructors use all identified active learning strategies. In this paper, we…

  18. A Conceptual Framework for Organizing Active Learning Experiences in Biology Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Joel; Belland, Brian R.

    2012-01-01

    Introductory biology courses form a cornerstone of undergraduate instruction. However, the predominantly used lecture approach fails to produce higher-order biology learning. Research shows that active learning strategies can increase student learning, yet few biology instructors use all identified active learning strategies. In this paper, we…

  19. On the mechanism and biology of cytochrome oxidase inhibition by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Fernando; Boveris, Alberto; Cadenas, Enrique

    2004-11-30

    The detailed molecular mechanism for the reversible inhibition of mitochondrial respiration by NO has puzzled investigators: The rate constants for the binding of NO and O2 to the reduced binuclear center CuB/a3 of cytochrome oxidase (COX) are similar, and NO is able to dissociate slowly from this center whereas O2 is kinetically trapped, which altogether seems to favor the complex of COX with O2 over the complex of COX with NO. Paradoxically, the inhibition of COX by NO is observed at high ratios of O2 to NO (in the 40-500 range) and is very fast (seconds or faster). In this work, we used simple mathematical models to investigate this paradox and other important biological questions concerning the inhibition of COX by NO. The results showed that all known features of the inhibition of COX by NO can be accounted for by a direct competition between NO and O2 for the reduced binuclear center CuB/a3 of COX. Besides conciliating apparently contradictory data, this work provided an explanation for the so-called excess capacity of COX by showing that the COX activity found in tissues actually is optimized to avoid an excessive inhibition of mitochondrial respiration by NO, allowing a moderate, but not excessive, overlap between the roles of NO in COX inhibition and in cellular signaling. In pathological situations such as COX-deficiency diseases and chronic inflammation, an excessive inhibition of the mitochondrial respiration is predicted.

  20. On the mechanism and biology of cytochrome oxidase inhibition by nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Fernando; Boveris, Alberto; Cadenas, Enrique

    2004-01-01

    The detailed molecular mechanism for the reversible inhibition of mitochondrial respiration by NO has puzzled investigators: The rate constants for the binding of NO and O2 to the reduced binuclear center CuB/a3 of cytochrome oxidase (COX) are similar, and NO is able to dissociate slowly from this center whereas O2 is kinetically trapped, which altogether seems to favor the complex of COX with O2 over the complex of COX with NO. Paradoxically, the inhibition of COX by NO is observed at high ratios of O2 to NO (in the 40–500 range) and is very fast (seconds or faster). In this work, we used simple mathematical models to investigate this paradox and other important biological questions concerning the inhibition of COX by NO. The results showed that all known features of the inhibition of COX by NO can be accounted for by a direct competition between NO and O2 for the reduced binuclear center CuB/a3 of COX. Besides conciliating apparently contradictory data, this work provided an explanation for the so-called excess capacity of COX by showing that the COX activity found in tissues actually is optimized to avoid an excessive inhibition of mitochondrial respiration by NO, allowing a moderate, but not excessive, overlap between the roles of NO in COX inhibition and in cellular signaling. In pathological situations such as COX-deficiency diseases and chronic inflammation, an excessive inhibition of the mitochondrial respiration is predicted. PMID:15546991

  1. Synthesis, structural features, and methyl methacrylate polymerisation of binuclear zinc(II) complexes with tetradentate pyrazolyl ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunghoon; Kim, Dongil; Lee, Ha-Jin; Lee, Hyosun

    2014-04-01

    The reaction of ZnCl2 with ancillary ligands, including 1,4-bis-(N,N-di-(1H-pyrazolyl-1-methyl)amine)benzene (L1) and 4,4‧-bis-(N,N-di(1H-pyrazolyl-1-methyl)phenyl)methane (L2), in ethanol yields Zn(II) chloride complexes, i.e., 1,4-bis-(N,N-di-(1H-pyrazolyl-1-methyl)amine)benzene(dichloro)Zn(II) [L1Zn2Cl4] and 4,4‧-bis-(N,N-di-(1H-pyrazolyl-1-methyl)phenyl)methane(dichloro)Zn(II) [L2Zn2Cl4]. The X-ray crystal structures of Zn(II) complexes revealed that they are binuclear, and each zinc atom has a distorted tetrahedral geometry which involves a nitrogen atom from two pyrazole groups and two chloro ligands. The catalytic activity of [L1Zn2Cl4] and [L2Zn2Cl4] for the polymerisation of methyl methacrylate (MMA) in the presence of modified methylaluminoxane (MMAO) increased by twofold compared to the corresponding monomeric Zn(II) complex, N,N-bis(1H-pyrazolyl-1-methyl)aniline(dichloro)Zn(II) [LZnCl2], at 60 °C.

  2. Isoflavones, their Glycosides and Glycoconjugates. Synthesis and Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Szeja, Wiesław; Grynkiewicz, Grzegorz; Rusin, Aleksandra

    2017-01-01

    Glycosylation of small biologically active molecules, either of natural or synthetic origin, has a profound impact on their solubility, stability, and bioactivity, making glycoconjugates attractive compounds as therapeutic agents or nutraceuticals. A large proportion of secondary metabolites, including flavonoids, occur in plants as glycosides, which adds to the molecular diversity that is much valued in medicinal chemistry studies. The subsequent growing market demand for glycosidic natural products has fueled the development of various chemical and biotechnological methods of glycosides preparation. The review gives an extensive overview of the processes of the synthesis of isoflavones and discusses recently developed major routes towards isoflavone-sugar formation processes. Special attention is given to the derivatives of genistein, the main isoflavone recognized as a useful lead in several therapeutic categories, with particular focus on anticancer drug design. The utility of chemical glycosylations as well as glycoconjugates preparation is discussed in some theoretical as well as practical aspects. Since novel approaches to chemical glycosylations and glycoconjugations are abundant and many of them proved suitable for derivatization of polyphenols a new body of evidence has emerged, indicating that sugar moiety can play a much more significant role, when attached to a pharmacophore, then being a mere “solubilizer”. In many cases, it has been demonstrated that semisynthetic glycoconjugates are much more potent cytostatic and cytotoxic agents than reference isoflavones. Moreover, the newly designed glycosides or glycoside mimics can act through different mechanisms than the parent active molecule. PMID:28553156

  3. Chemical constituents and biological activities of two Iranian Cystoseira species.

    PubMed

    Yegdaneh, Afsaneh; Ghannadi, Alireza; Dayani, Ladan

    2016-07-01

    The marine environment represents approximately half of the global biodiversity and could provide unlimited biological resources for the production of therapeutic drugs. Marine seaweeds comprise few thousands of species representing a considerable part of the littoral biomass. Extracts of the Cystoseira indica and Cystoseira merica were subjected to phytochemical and cytotoxicity evaluation. The amount of total phenol was determined with Folin-Ciocalteu reagent. Cytotoxicity was characterized by IC50 of human cancer cell lines including MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma), HeLa (cervical carcinoma), and HT-29 (human colon adenocarcinoma) using Sulforhodamin assay. Antioxidant activities were evaluated using 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method. The analysis revealed that tannins, saponins, sterols and triterpenes were the most abundant constituents in these Cystoseira species while cyanogenic and cardiac glycosides were the least ones. C. indica had the higher content of total phenolics and also showed higher antioxidant activity. Cytotoxic results showed that both species inhibited cell growth effectively, especially against MCF-7 cell line. The present findings suggest potential pharmacological applications of selected seaweeds but require further investigation and identification of their bioactive principles.

  4. On Some Passive and Active Motion in Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misbah, Chaouqi

    This contribution focuses on two main questions inspired by biology: (i) passive motion under flow, like advection of red blood cells in the circulatory system, and (ii) active motion generated by actin polymerization, as encountered in cells of the immune system and some micro-organisms (e.g. some bacteria and viruses). The first part is dedicated to the dynamics and rheology of vesicles (a simple model for red blood cells) under flow. Some results obtained on red blood cells are also presented and compared to vesicles. Vesicles and red blood cells under flow exhibit several interesting dynamics: tank-treading, tumbling, vacillating-breathing, and so on. These dynamics have a direct impact on rheology, as will be discussed both from the theoretical and experimental point of views. The second part addresses active motion. Some Bacteria (like Listeria) are known to transfect cells thanks to the polymerization on their surface of an actin gel. Monomeric actin proteins are recruited from the transfected cell when the bacteria gets in contact with the cell surface. It has been found that the bacteria propulsion into the cell occurs in the absence of molecular motors. Biomimetic experiments on beads and droplets have revealed that motion is a consequence of a spontaneous symmetry breaking that is accompanied with force generation. A simple basic model taking into account growth of actin and elasticity is sufficient to capture the essence of symmetry breaking and force generation, as will be presented in this contribution.

  5. Biological activities of thionated thyrotropin-releasing hormone analogs.

    PubMed

    Lankiewicz, L; Bowers, C Y; Reynolds, G A; Labroo, V; Cohen, L A; Vonhof, S; Sirén, A L; Spatola, A F

    1992-04-15

    Analogs of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (Glp-His-Pro-NH2, TRH) have been prepared which contain thioamide moieties in the pyroglutamic acid ring, the carboxyamide proline terminus, and in both positions (dithio). These compounds have been tested for TSH-releasing activities (in vitro and in vivo), and for binding to TRH receptors in rat pituitary and cortex. The monothionated analogs showed no significant differences in TSH-releasing potency from TRH either in vitro or in vivo. However, with two thioamide replacements the potency decreases about 50%. Significantly, in terms of receptor selectivity, thionation has resulted in differentiation between brain receptors (pituitary and cortex). The Pro psi[CSNH2] and dithio analogs were more selective (higher affinity to pituitary receptors) than the parent hormone, while the analog containing a thioamide replacement in the pyroglutamyl ring had lower affinity and was not selective. These results suggest that the subtle exchange of sulphur for oxygen can have an important impact on both receptor selectivity and affinity within a biologically active peptide.

  6. Chemical constituents and biological activities of two Iranian Cystoseira species

    PubMed Central

    Yegdaneh, Afsaneh; Ghannadi, Alireza; Dayani, Ladan

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment represents approximately half of the global biodiversity and could provide unlimited biological resources for the production of therapeutic drugs. Marine seaweeds comprise few thousands of species representing a considerable part of the littoral biomass. Extracts of the Cystoseira indica and Cystoseira merica were subjected to phytochemical and cytotoxicity evaluation. The amount of total phenol was determined with Folin-Ciocalteu reagent. Cytotoxicity was characterized by IC50 of human cancer cell lines including MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma), HeLa (cervical carcinoma), and HT-29 (human colon adenocarcinoma) using Sulforhodamin assay. Antioxidant activities were evaluated using 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method. The analysis revealed that tannins, saponins, sterols and triterpenes were the most abundant constituents in these Cystoseira species while cyanogenic and cardiac glycosides were the least ones. C. indica had the higher content of total phenolics and also showed higher antioxidant activity. Cytotoxic results showed that both species inhibited cell growth effectively, especially against MCF-7 cell line. The present findings suggest potential pharmacological applications of selected seaweeds but require further investigation and identification of their bioactive principles. PMID:27651811

  7. Prescribed active learning increases performance in introductory biology.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Scott; O'Connor, Eileen; Parks, John W; Cunningham, Matthew; Hurley, David; Haak, David; Dirks, Clarissa; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2007-01-01

    We tested five course designs that varied in the structure of daily and weekly active-learning exercises in an attempt to lower the traditionally high failure rate in a gateway course for biology majors. Students were given daily multiple-choice questions and answered with electronic response devices (clickers) or cards. Card responses were ungraded; clicker responses were graded for right/wrong answers or participation. Weekly practice exams were done as an individual or as part of a study group. Compared with previous versions of the same course taught by the same instructor, students in the new course designs performed better: There were significantly lower failure rates, higher total exam points, and higher scores on an identical midterm. Attendance was higher in the clicker versus cards section; attendance and course grade were positively correlated. Students did better on clicker questions if they were graded for right/wrong answers versus participation, although this improvement did not translate into increased scores on exams. In this course, achievement increases when students get regular practice via prescribed (graded) active-learning exercises.

  8. Soil biological activity as affected by tillage intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajda, A.; Przewłoka, B.

    2012-02-01

    The effect of tillage intensity on changes of microbiological activity and content of particulate organic matter in soil under winter wheat duirng 3 years was studied. Microbial response related to the tillage-induced changes in soil determined on the content of biomass C and N, the rate of CO2 evolution, B/F ratio, the activity of dehydrogenases, acid and alkaline phosphatases, soil C/N ratio and microbial biomass C/N ratio confirmed the high sensitivity of soil microbial populations to the tillage system applied. After three year studies, the direct sowing system enhanced the increase of labile fraction of organic matter content in soil. There were no significant changes in the labile fraction quantity observed in soil under conventional tillage. Similar response related to the tillage intensity was observed in particulate organic matter quantities expressed as a percentage of total organic matter in soil. A high correlation coefficients calculated between contents of soil microbial biomass C and N, particulate organic matter and potentially mineralizable N, and the obtained yields of winter wheat grown on experimental fields indicated on a high importance of biological quality of status of soil for agricultural crop production.

  9. A new assay system for guinea pig interferon biological activity.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Toshiko; Jeevan, Amminikutty; Ohishi, Kazue; Nojima, Yasuhiro; Umemori, Kiyoko; Yamamoto, Saburo; McMurray, David N

    2002-07-01

    We have developed an assay system for guinea pig interferon (IFN) based on reduction of viral cytopathic effect (CPE) in various cell lines. CPE inhibition was detected optimally in the guinea pig fibroblast cell line 104C1 infected with encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV). The amount of biologically active guinea pig IFN was quantified by estimating viable cell numbers colorimetrically by means of a tetrazolium compound, 2-(4-iodophenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-(2,4-disulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium monosodium salt (WST-1) and 1-methoxy-5-methylphenazinium methylsulfate (PMS). WST-1 color developed until stopped by the addition of sulfuric acid. This had no effect on the colorimetric assay, and the color was stable for at least 24 h. The acid also inactivated the EMCV and, thus, eliminated the viral hazard. Inhibition of CPE activity was highly correlated with the concentration of culture supernatants from BCG-vaccinated guinea pig splenocytes stimulated in vitro with tuberculin or an immunostimulatory oligoDNA. This assay detected guinea pig IFN and human IFN-alpha, but not IFN-gamma from human, mouse, rat, pig, or dog. This assay system has proved useful for the titration of guinea pig IFN, being easy to perform, free from viral hazard, relatively species specific, highly reproducible, and inexpensive.

  10. Prescribed Active Learning Increases Performance in Introductory Biology

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Eileen; Parks, John W.; Cunningham, Matthew; Hurley, David; Haak, David; Dirks, Clarissa; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2007-01-01

    We tested five course designs that varied in the structure of daily and weekly active-learning exercises in an attempt to lower the traditionally high failure rate in a gateway course for biology majors. Students were given daily multiple-choice questions and answered with electronic response devices (clickers) or cards. Card responses were ungraded; clicker responses were graded for right/wrong answers or participation. Weekly practice exams were done as an individual or as part of a study group. Compared with previous versions of the same course taught by the same instructor, students in the new course designs performed better: There were significantly lower failure rates, higher total exam points, and higher scores on an identical midterm. Attendance was higher in the clicker versus cards section; attendance and course grade were positively correlated. Students did better on clicker questions if they were graded for right/wrong answers versus participation, although this improvement did not translate into increased scores on exams. In this course, achievement increases when students get regular practice via prescribed (graded) active-learning exercises. PMID:17548875

  11. Oat Phytochrome Is Biologically Active in Transgenic Tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Boylan, M. T.; Quail, P. H.

    1989-08-01

    To determine the functional homology between phytochromes from evolutionarily divergent species, we used the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter to express a monocot (oat) phytochrome cDNA in a dicot plant (tomato). Immunoblot analysis shows that more than 50% of the transgenic tomato plants synthesize the full-length oat phytochrome polypeptide. Moreover, leaves of light-grown transgenic plants contain appreciably less oat phytochrome than leaves from dark-adapted plants, and etiolated R1 transgenic seedlings have higher levels of spectrally active phytochrome than wild-type tomato seedlings in direct proportion to the level of immunochemically detectable oat polypeptide present. These data suggest that the heterologous oat polypeptide carries a functional chromophore, allowing reversible photoconversion between the two forms of the molecule, and that the far-red absorbing form (Pfr) is recognized and selectively degraded by the Pfr-specific degradative machinery in the dicot cell. The overexpression of oat phytochrome has pleiotropic, phenotypic consequences at all major phases of the life cycle. Adult transgenic tomato plants expressing high levels of the oat protein tend to be dwarfed, with dark green foliage and fruits. R1 transgenic seedlings have short hypocotyls with elevated anthocyanin contents. We conclude that a monocot phytochrome can be synthesized and correctly processed to a biologically active form in a dicot cell, and that the transduction pathway components that interact with the photoreceptor are evolutionarily conserved.

  12. Chemistry, biogenesis, and biological activities of Cinnamomum zeylanicum.

    PubMed

    Jayaprakasha, G K; Rao, L Jagan Mohan

    2011-07-01

    The genus Cinnamomum comprises of several hundreds of species, which are distributed in Asia and Australia. Cinnamomum zeylanicum, the source of cinnamon bark and leaf oils, is an indigenous tree of Sri Lanka, although most oil now comes from cultivated areas. C. zeylanicum is an important spice and aromatic crop having wide applications in flavoring, perfumery, beverages, and medicines. Volatile oils from different parts of cinnamon such as leaves, bark, fruits, root bark, flowers, and buds have been isolated by hydro distillation/steam distillation and supercritical fluid extraction. The chemical compositions of the volatile oils have been identified by GC and GC-MS. More than 80 compounds were identified from different parts of cinnamon. The leaf oil has a major component called eugenol. Cinnamaldehyde and camphor have been reported to be the major components of volatile oils from stem bark and root bark, respectively. Trans-cinnamyl acetate was found to be the major compound in fruits, flowers, and fruit stalks. These volatile oils were found to exhibit antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antidiabetic activities. C. zeylanicum bark and fruits were found to contain proanthocyandins with doubly linked bis-flavan-3-ol units in the molecule. The present review provides a coherent presentation of scattered literature on the chemistry, biogenesis, and biological activities of cinnamon.

  13. KNApSAcK Metabolite Activity Database for retrieving the relationships between metabolites and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yukiko; Afendi, Farit Mochamad; Parvin, Aziza Kawsar; Ono, Naoaki; Tanaka, Ken; Hirai Morita, Aki; Sato, Tetsuo; Sugiura, Tadao; Altaf-Ul-Amin, Md; Kanaya, Shigehiko

    2014-01-01

    Databases (DBs) are required by various omics fields because the volume of molecular biology data is increasing rapidly. In this study, we provide instructions for users and describe the current status of our metabolite activity DB. To facilitate a comprehensive understanding of the interactions between the metabolites of organisms and the chemical-level contribution of metabolites to human health, we constructed a metabolite activity DB known as the KNApSAcK Metabolite Activity DB. It comprises 9,584 triplet relationships (metabolite-biological activity-target species), including 2,356 metabolites, 140 activity categories, 2,963 specific descriptions of biological activities and 778 target species. Approximately 46% of the activities described in the DB are related to chemical ecology, most of which are attributed to antimicrobial agents and plant growth regulators. The majority of the metabolites with antimicrobial activities are flavonoids and phenylpropanoids. The metabolites with plant growth regulatory effects include plant hormones. Over half of the DB contents are related to human health care and medicine. The five largest groups are toxins, anticancer agents, nervous system agents, cardiovascular agents and non-therapeutic agents, such as flavors and fragrances. The KNApSAcK Metabolite Activity DB is integrated within the KNApSAcK Family DBs to facilitate further systematized research in various omics fields, especially metabolomics, nutrigenomics and foodomics. The KNApSAcK Metabolite Activity DB could also be utilized for developing novel drugs and materials, as well as for identifying viable drug resources and other useful compounds.

  14. Actinobacteria from Arid and Desert Habitats: Diversity and Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Mohammadipanah, Fatemeh; Wink, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The lack of new antibiotics in the pharmaceutical pipeline guides more and more researchers to leave the classical isolation procedures and to look in special niches and ecosystems. Bioprospecting of extremophilic Actinobacteria through mining untapped strains and avoiding resiolation of known biomolecules is among the most promising strategies for this purpose. With this approach, members of acidtolerant, alkalitolerant, psychrotolerant, thermotolerant, halotolerant and xerotolerant Actinobacteria have been obtained from respective habitats. Among these, little survey exists on the diversity of Actinobacteria in arid areas, which are often adapted to relatively high temperatures, salt concentrations, and radiation. Therefore, arid and desert habitats are special ecosystems which can be recruited for the isolation of uncommon Actinobacteria with new metabolic capability. At the time of this writing, members of Streptomyces, Micromonospora, Saccharothrix, Streptosporangium, Cellulomonas, Amycolatopsis, Geodermatophilus, Lechevalieria, Nocardia, and Actinomadura are reported from arid habitats. However, metagenomic data present dominant members of the communities in desiccating condition of areas with limited water availability that are not yet isolated. Furthermore, significant diverse types of polyketide synthase (PKS) and non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) genes are detected in xerophilic and xerotolerant Actinobacteria and some bioactive compounds are reported from them. Rather than pharmaceutically active metabolites, molecules with protection activity against drying such as Ectoin and Hydroxyectoin with potential application in industry and agriculture have also been identified from xerophilic Actinobacteria. In addition, numerous biologically active small molecules are expected to be discovered from arid adapted Actinobacteria in the future. In the current survey, the diversity and biotechnological potential of Actinobacteria obtained from arid ecosystems

  15. [Studies on acetylspiramycin. II. Biological activities of spiramycin components].

    PubMed

    Kondo, A; Sato, K; Shuto, K; Yamashita, K; Ichikawa, S; Takahashi, K; Kita, K; Nishiie, Y; Sano, H; Yamaguchi, K

    1990-09-01

    Acetylspiramycin (ASPM) was fractionated using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The peak fractions were named F1 to F7 successively in order of increasing retention times (Rt), i.e., increasing hydrophobicity, and studied for 1) antibacterial activities (MIC), 2) antibacterial potency against Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633, 3) therapeutic effect on mice infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae III, Staphylococcus aureus Smith, 4) acute toxicity by i.p. administration to mice (LD50) and 5) cytotoxicities to fibroblasts derived from Chinese-hamster lung (CHL), cow pulmonary artery endothelial cells (CPAE) and rat hepatic cells. The results obtained are summarized below. 1. Components F1 and 4'-acetylspiramycin F2 had significantly different biological activities from those of other components: F1 showed the lowest antibacterial potency of 492 micrograms (potency)/mg, F2 showed the highest antibacterial potency of 2,040 micrograms (potency)/mg and correspondingly the lowest LD50 value of 692 mg/kg (the highest toxicity). The therapeutic effect of F2 on infections in mice was found to be the second smallest and was superior only to that of F1. The LD50 value of F1 was 1,200 mg/kg and similar to that of ASPM. 2. Antibacterial potencies of F3, F4, F5 and F6 were 1,165, 1,266, 1,374 and 1,530 micrograms (potency)/mg, respectively; fraction with the higher antibacterial activities corresponded to the longer retention times, i.e., the greater hydrophobicities. The most hydrophobic component, F7, 3-propionyl-3",4"-diacetylspiramycin, however, showed a low antibacterial potency of 1,085 micrograms (potency)/mg, next to the lowest one, F1, a fact which was in contradiction to with the sequential relation between hydrophobicities and potencies from F3 to F6.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Polyphosphate Kinase from Activated Sludge Performing Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal†

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Katherine D.; Dojka, Michael A.; Pace, Norman R.; Jenkins, David; Keasling, Jay D.

    2002-01-01

    A novel polyphosphate kinase (PPK) was retrieved from an uncultivated organism in activated sludge carrying out enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR). Acetate-fed laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactors were used to maintain sludge with a high phosphorus content (approximately 11% of the biomass). PCR-based clone libraries of small subunit rRNA genes and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were used to verify that the sludge was enriched in Rhodocyclus-like β-Proteobacteria known to be associated with sludges carrying out EBPR. These organisms comprised approximately 80% of total bacteria in the sludge, as assessed by FISH. Degenerate PCR primers were designed to retrieve fragments of putative ppk genes from a pure culture of Rhodocyclus tenuis and from organisms in the sludge. Four novel ppk homologs were found in the sludge, and two of these (types I and II) shared a high degree of amino acid similarity with R. tenuis PPK (86 and 87% similarity, respectively). Dot blot analysis of total RNA extracted from sludge demonstrated that the Type I ppk mRNA was present, indicating that this gene is expressed during EBPR. Inverse PCR was used to obtain the full Type I sequence from sludge DNA, and a full-length PPK was cloned, overexpressed, and purified to near homogeneity. The purified PPK has a specific activity comparable to that of other PPKs, has a requirement for Mg2+, and does not appear to operate in reverse. PPK activity was found mainly in the particulate fraction of lysed sludge microorganisms. PMID:12324346

  17. Actinobacteria from Arid and Desert Habitats: Diversity and Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadipanah, Fatemeh; Wink, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The lack of new antibiotics in the pharmaceutical pipeline guides more and more researchers to leave the classical isolation procedures and to look in special niches and ecosystems. Bioprospecting of extremophilic Actinobacteria through mining untapped strains and avoiding resiolation of known biomolecules is among the most promising strategies for this purpose. With this approach, members of acidtolerant, alkalitolerant, psychrotolerant, thermotolerant, halotolerant and xerotolerant Actinobacteria have been obtained from respective habitats. Among these, little survey exists on the diversity of Actinobacteria in arid areas, which are often adapted to relatively high temperatures, salt concentrations, and radiation. Therefore, arid and desert habitats are special ecosystems which can be recruited for the isolation of uncommon Actinobacteria with new metabolic capability. At the time of this writing, members of Streptomyces, Micromonospora, Saccharothrix, Streptosporangium, Cellulomonas, Amycolatopsis, Geodermatophilus, Lechevalieria, Nocardia, and Actinomadura are reported from arid habitats. However, metagenomic data present dominant members of the communities in desiccating condition of areas with limited water availability that are not yet isolated. Furthermore, significant diverse types of polyketide synthase (PKS) and non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) genes are detected in xerophilic and xerotolerant Actinobacteria and some bioactive compounds are reported from them. Rather than pharmaceutically active metabolites, molecules with protection activity against drying such as Ectoin and Hydroxyectoin with potential application in industry and agriculture have also been identified from xerophilic Actinobacteria. In addition, numerous biologically active small molecules are expected to be discovered from arid adapted Actinobacteria in the future. In the current survey, the diversity and biotechnological potential of Actinobacteria obtained from arid ecosystems

  18. Theoretical studies of the spin states of macrocyclic aza-amido binuclear copper (II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Pravat K.; Sinha, Bhabadyuti; Manoharan, P. T.; Ramasesha, S.

    1992-04-01

    The spin and charge excitation gaps and charge and spin density distributions have been studied in macrocyclic binuclear aza-amido copper (II) complexes employing a model Hamiltonian. The spin gaps depend on the σ-orbital occupancies, and for small gaps, the exchange integral between the σ orbitals of the bridging oxygen atoms, KOO, which is sensitive to geometry, determines the low-lying spin excitations. The singlet—singlet gaps also depend upon the σ-orbital occupancy but are weakly dependent upon KOO.

  19. Redox and Acid-Base Properties of Binuclear 4-Terphenyldithiophenolate Complexes of Nickel.

    PubMed

    Koch, Felix; Berkefeld, Andreas; Schubert, Hartmut; Grauer, Claudius

    2016-10-04

    This work reports on the redox and acid-base properties of binuclear complexes of nickel from 1,4-terphenyldithiophenol ligands. The results provide insight into the cooperative electronic interaction between a dinickel core and its ligand. Donor/acceptor contributions flexibly adjust to stabilize different redox states at the metals, which is relevant for redox reactions like proton reduction. Proton transfer to the [S2 Ni2 ] core and Ni-H bond formation are kinetically favored over the thermodynamically favored yet unproductive proton transfer to ligand.

  20. Leukaemomycin, an antibiotic with antitumor activity. I. Screening, fermentation, and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Fleck, W; Strauss, D

    1975-01-01

    A Streptomyces strain belonging to S. griseus (Krainski) Waksman et Henrici 1948 sensu Hütter (1967) was found to produce an antibiotic designated as leukaemomycin. The red-pigment antibiotic, having antimicrobial and antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo, was isolated from C-, N-, and Fe-containing cultures of the strains IMET JA 3933, IMET JA 5570, IMET JA 10086, and IMET JA 10431. Leukaemomycin has indicator properties and is produced by the classic procedures of submerged fermentation. The crude base of leukaemomycin consists of 4 main components, designated as leukaemomycin A, B, C, and D. The biological activity of the main components leukaemomycin B and C was compared. The biological activity and the physicochemical properties of leukaemomycin C are identical with known properties of the anthracycline antibiotic daunorubicin.

  1. Proximity and cooperativity effects in binuclear d(0) olefin polymerization catalysis. theoretical analysis of structure and reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Motta, Alessandro; Fragalà, Ignazio L; Marks, Tobin J

    2009-03-25

    This contribution focuses on the distinctive center-to-center cooperative catalytic properties exhibited by bimetallic "constrained geometry catalysts" (CGCs), and analyzes metal-metal proximity effects on ethylene polymerization processes mediated by (mu-CH(2)-3,3'){(eta(5)-indenyl)[1-H(2)Si((t)BuN)](ZrMe(2))}(2) (Zr(2))-derived catalysts using density functional theory. Precatalyst geometries are first discussed, and then ion-pair formation/heterolytic dissociation processes involving the binuclear bis(borane) cocatalyst 1,4-(C(6)F(5))(2)BC(6)F(4)B(C(6)F(5))(2) (BN(2)), are analyzed and compared with those in the parent mononuclear analogue. It is found that, on proceeding from the mononuclear to binuclear catalyst system, ion-pair dissociation energies increase due to the stronger catalyst center-counterdianion interactions. Moreover, in the binuclear case, the interaction energies are markedly sensitive to geometrical matching between the binuclear bis(borane) and the precatalyst Zr-methyl positions. Binuclear catalytic effects between the metal centers are then explored, with the specific contribution from the proximity of the second metal center. Possible agostic interactions of alpha-alkenes pi-coordinated to one Zr center with the second Zr center of the binuclear catalyst are scrutinized for the case of 1-octene. It is argued that these agostic interactions are at least partly responsible for the unusual enchainment properties of the bimetallic catalysts. In particular, the greater polyethylene product branch densities found experimentally for the bimetallic catalysts can be correlated with an intramolecular reinsertion process, assisted by agostic interactions. Moreover, these same agostic interactions involving a chain growing at one metal site with the second metal site of the binuclear catalyst modify the environment to increase propagation/termination rate ratios, in turn favoring increased product molecular weight (M(n)). These effects are observed

  2. Magnetism and electronic structure of triplet binuclear niobium complexes in inorganic glasses, organic ligand environment, and polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhimov, R. R.; Arrington, S. A.; Jackson, E. M.; Hwang, J. S.; Prokof'ev, A. I.; Alexandrov, I. A.; Aleksandrov, A. I.

    2005-05-01

    We investigated paramagnetic properties of binuclear niobium complexes Nb-O-Nb with two nonequivalent Nb4+ ions in lithium-niobium phosphate glasses (LNPG), in the environment of catechol/ortho-quinone ligands and in polyethylene. Experimental electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum analysis revealed nonequivalent distribution of the charge and electron spin density between two Nb atoms. Mechanochemical interaction of LNPG with an organic donor-acceptor mixture catechol/ortho-quinone followed by organic solvent extraction leads to the formation of a new binuclear complex with catechol/ortho-quinone ligands. This complex can be further incorporated into polyethylene matrix to form the complex with properties close to the complex in LNPG.

  3. Biological activities caused by far-infrared radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoué, Shojiro; Kabaya, Morihiro

    1989-09-01

    Contrary to previous presumption, accumulated evidence indicates that far-infrared rays are biologically active. A small ceramic disk that emist far-infrared rays (4 16 μm) has commonly been applied to a local spot or a whole part of the body for exposure. Pioneering attempts to experimentally analyze an effect of acute and chronic radiation of far-infrared rays on living organisms have detected a growth-promoting effect in growing rats, a sleep-modulatory effect in freely behaving rats and an insomiac patient, and a blood circulation-enhancing effect in human skin. Question-paires to 542 users of far-infrared radiator disks embedded in bedelothes revealed that the majority of the users subjectively evaluated an improvement of their health. These effects on living organisms appear to be non-specifically triggered by an exposure to far-infrared rays, which eventually induce an increase in temperature of the body tissues or, more basically, an elevated motility of body fluids due to decrease in size of water clusters.

  4. Plant polyphenols: chemical properties, biological activities, and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Quideau, Stéphane; Deffieux, Denis; Douat-Casassus, Céline; Pouységu, Laurent

    2011-01-17

    Eating five servings of fruits and vegetables per day! This is what is highly recommended and heavily advertised nowadays to the general public to stay fit and healthy! Drinking green tea on a regular basis, eating chocolate from time to time, as well as savoring a couple of glasses of red wine per day have been claimed to increase life expectancy even further! Why? The answer is in fact still under scientific scrutiny, but a particular class of compounds naturally occurring in fruits and vegetables is considered to be crucial for the expression of such human health benefits: the polyphenols! What are these plant products really? What are their physicochemical properties? How do they express their biological activity? Are they really valuable for disease prevention? Can they be used to develop new pharmaceutical drugs? What recent progress has been made toward their preparation by organic synthesis? This Review gives answers from a chemical perspective, summarizes the state of the art, and highlights the most significant advances in the field of polyphenol research. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Biological aerosol detection with combined passive-active infrared measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ifarraguerri, Agustin I.; Vanderbeek, Richard G.; Ben-David, Avishai

    2004-12-01

    A data collection experiment was performed in November of 2003 to measure aerosol signatures using multiple sensors, all operating in the long-wave infrared. The purpose of this data collection experiment was to determine whether combining passive hyperspectral and LIDAR measurements can substantially improve biological aerosol detection performance. Controlled releases of dry aerosols, including road dust, egg albumin and two strains of Bacillus Subtilis var. Niger (BG) spores were performed using the ECBC/ARTEMIS open-path aerosol test chamber located in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Grounds, MD. The chamber provides a ~ 20' path without optical windows. Ground truth devices included 3 aerodynamic particle sizers, an optical particle size spectrometer, 6 nephelometers and a high-volume particle sampler. Two sensors were used to make measurements during the test: the AIRIS long-wave infrared imaging spectrometer and the FAL CO2 LIDAR. The AIRIS and FAL data sets were analyzed for detection performance relative to the ground truth. In this paper we present experimental results from the individual sensors as well as results from passive-active sensor fusion. The sensor performance is presented in the form of receiver operating characteristic curves.

  6. Expression of biologically active rat apolipoprotein AIV in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Maiorano, Nick; Shen, Ling; Pearson, Kevin; Tajima, Daisuke; Zhang, Dian Ming; Woods, Stephen C; Seeley, Randy J; Davidson, W Sean; Tso, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    Rat apolipoprotein AIV (apo AIV) is a 43-kDa intestinal apolipoprotein that is important in lipid metabolism and the suppression of food intake. In this study, a full-length rat apo AIV was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified in a bioactive form. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and mass spectrometric analysis revealed that the isolated recombinant protein has a molecular mass of approximately 43 kDa, similar to that of natural rat apo AIV. Immunoblot analysis and N-terminal amino acid sequencing confirmed the identity of the recombinant apo AIV protein as natural rat apo AIV. The recombinant protein was functional in lipoprotein binding assays. Biological activity was assessed behaviorally in that the recombinant protein suppressed food intake of fasted rats comparably to natural rat apo AIV. Neither native nor recombinant apo AIV elicited a conditioned taste aversion (CTA) at doses that suppress feeding. These results indicate that the recombinant apo AIV is structurally and functionally indistinguishable from rat natural apo AIV, making this overexpression and purification scheme a powerful tool for future structure and function studies.

  7. Biological Activities of Three Essential Oils of the Lamiaceae Family.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Gema

    2017-08-23

    Herbs and spices have been used since ancient times to improve the sensory characteristics of food, to act as preservatives and for their nutritional and healthy properties. Herbs and spices are generally recognized as safe (GRAS) and are excellent substitutes for chemical additives. Essential oils are mixtures of volatile compounds obtained, mainly by steam distillation, from medicinal and aromatic plants. They are an alternative to synthetic additives for the food industry, and they have gained attention as potential sources for natural food preservatives due to the growing interest in the development of safe, effective, natural food preservation. Lamiaceae is one of the most important families in the production of essential oils with antioxidants and antimicrobial properties. Aromatic plants are rich in essential oils and are mainly found in the Mediterranean region, where the production of such oils is a profitable source of ecological and economic development. The use of essential oils with antimicrobial and antioxidant properties to increase the shelf life of food is a promising technology, and the essential oils of the Lamiaceae family, such as rosemary, thyme, and sage, have been extensively studied with respect to their use as food preservatives. Regarding the new applications of essential oils, this review gives an overview of the current knowledge and recent trends in the use of these oils from aromatic plants as antimicrobials and antioxidants in foods, as well as their biological activities, future potential, and challenges.

  8. Evaluation of biological activity of quantum dots in a microsystem.

    PubMed

    Grabowska-Jadach, Ilona; Haczyk, Maja; Drozd, Marcin; Fischer, Agnieszka; Pietrzak, Mariusz; Malinowska, Elżbieta; Brzózka, Zbigniew

    2016-02-01

    The presented work aimed at systematic investigation of biological activity of CdSex S1- x /ZnS and CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs), whose surface was modified with different ligands. For these studies, we used a microfluidic system combined with fluorescence microscopy techniques, which enabled analysis of cells' morphology, viability, and QDs uptake. PDMS and glass-based microfluidic system enabled the precise control of the cell environment, allowed to examine five replications of each tested QDs concentrations (statistically significant number), monitor multiple cellular events, and avoid manual preparation of QDs dilutions. We investigated the influence of the core composition and the type of surface modifiers on QDs toxicity. We also determined whether the examined nanoparticles penetrate into the cells. For all tested nanoparticles, the decrease of cells' viability was observed when increasing nanoparticles concentration. The decrease of live cells' number in microchambers and the accumulation of the nanoparticles around cultured cells were observed. The effect of hydrocarbon chain length of surface modifiers and QDs core composition on the cell viability was confirmed in our tests.

  9. Pyridylphosphinate metal complexes: synthesis, structural characterisation and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Cross, Jasmine M; Gallagher, Natalie; Gill, Jason H; Jain, Mohit; McNeillis, Archibald W; Rockley, Kimberly L; Tscherny, Fiona H; Wirszycz, Natasha J; Yufit, Dmitry S; Walton, James W

    2016-08-09

    For the first time, a series of 25 pseudo-octahedral pyridylphosphinate metal complexes (Ru, Os, Rh, Ir) has been synthesised and assessed in biological systems. Each metal complex incorporates a pyridylphosphinate ligand, a monodentate halide and a capping η(6)-bound aromatic ligand. Solid- and solution-state analyses of two complexes reveal a structural preference for one of a possible two diastereomers. The metal chlorides hydrolyse rapidly in D2O to form a 1 : 1 equilibrium ratio between the aqua and chloride adducts. The pKa of the aqua adduct depends upon the pyridyl substituent and the metal but has little dependence upon the phosphinate R' group. Toxicity was measured in vitro against non-small cell lung carcinoma H460 cells, with the most potent complexes reporting IC50 values around 50 μM. Binding studies with selected amino acids and nucleobases provide a rationale for the variation in toxicity observed within the series. Finally, an investigation into the ability of the chelating amino acid l-His to displace the phosphinate O-metal bond shows the potential for phosphinate complexes to act as prodrugs that can be activated in the intracellular environment.

  10. Chelating ability and biological activity of hesperetin Schiff base.

    PubMed

    Lodyga-Chruscinska, Elzbieta; Symonowicz, Marzena; Sykula, Anna; Bujacz, Anna; Garribba, Eugenio; Rowinska-Zyrek, Magdalena; Oldziej, Stanislaw; Klewicka, Elzbieta; Janicka, Magdalena; Krolewska, Karolina; Cieslak, Marcin; Brodowska, Katarzyna; Chruscinski, Longin

    2015-02-01

    Hydrazone hesperetin Schiff base (HHSB) - N-[(±)-[5,7-dihydroxy-2-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxy-phenyl)chroman-4-ylidene]amino]benzamide has been synthesized and its crystal structure was determined. This compound was used for the formation of Cu(II) complexes in solid state and in solution which were characterized using different spectroscopic methods. The analyses of potentiometric titration curves revealed that monomeric and dimeric complexes of Cu(II) are formed above pH7. The ESI-MS (electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry) spectra confirmed their formation. The EPR and UV-visible spectra evidenced the involvement of oxygen and nitrogen atoms in Cu(II) coordination. Hydrazone hesperetin Schiff base can show keto-enol tautomerism and coordinate Cu(II) in the keto (O(-), N, Oket) and in the enolate form (O(-), N, O(-)enol). The semi-empirical molecular orbital method PM6 and DFT (density functional theory) calculations have revealed that the more stable form of the dimeric complex is that one in which the ligand is present in the enol form. The CuHHSB complex has shown high efficiency in the cleavage of plasmid DNA in aqueous solution, indicating its potential as chemical nuclease. Studies on DNA interactions, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities have been undertaken to gain more information on the biological significance of HHSB and copper(II)-HHSB chelate species.

  11. Persistence of biologically active compounds in aquatic systems: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boelter, A.M.; Fernandez, J.D.; Meyer, J.S.; Sanchez, D.A.; Bergman, H.L.

    1986-11-01

    Waters collected from two study sites were tested for persistence of biologically active compounds as the waters percolated through experimental media. At the first site, the Paraho Lysimeter in Anvil Points, Colorado, two leachate samples (early and late flow in Spring 1983) were collected from each of four piles of processed oil shale overlain by different thicknesses of soil. Although water quality differed among samples, six of eight lysimeter leachates tested were acutely toxic to an aquatic invertebrate, Daphnia magna, and five were acutely toxic to fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Water collected from a modified in situ (MIS) retort was percolated through columns containing three different types of soil. Raw leachate from the MIS spent shale was acutely toxic to an aquatic invertebrate, Ceriodaphnia dubia. The toxicity of samples from nine pore volumes of retort water percolating through a column containing a sandy soil increased with successive pore volumes, but leachate toxicity never equaled the toxicity of the retort water. In contrast, the first pore volumes of retort water or reconstituted water leached through a sandy loam soil were more toxic than the retort water; however, the second pore volumes of leachates were not toxic. First pore volume leachates of retort water percolating through a sandy clay loam soil were much less toxic than the retort water; second pore volume leachates were not toxic.

  12. Sustainable production of biologically active molecules of marine based origin.

    PubMed

    Murray, Patrick M; Moane, Siobhan; Collins, Catherine; Beletskaya, Tanya; Thomas, Olivier P; Duarte, Alysson W F; Nobre, Fernando S; Owoyemi, Ifeloju O; Pagnocca, Fernando C; Sette, L D; McHugh, Edward; Causse, Eric; Pérez-López, Paula; Feijoo, Gumersindo; Moreira, Ma T; Rubiolo, Juan; Leirós, Marta; Botana, Luis M; Pinteus, Susete; Alves, Celso; Horta, André; Pedrosa, Rui; Jeffryes, Clayton; Agathos, Spiros N; Allewaert, Celine; Verween, Annick; Vyverman, Wim; Laptev, Ivan; Sineoky, Sergei; Bisio, Angela; Manconi, Renata; Ledda, Fabio; Marchi, Mario; Pronzato, Roberto; Walsh, Daniel J

    2013-09-25

    The marine environment offers both economic and scientific potential which are relatively untapped from a biotechnological point of view. These environments whilst harsh are ironically fragile and dependent on a harmonious life form balance. Exploitation of natural resources by exhaustive wild harvesting has obvious negative environmental consequences. From a European industry perspective marine organisms are a largely underutilised resource. This is not due to lack of interest but due to a lack of choice the industry faces for cost competitive, sustainable and environmentally conscientious product alternatives. Knowledge of the biotechnological potential of marine organisms together with the development of sustainable systems for their cultivation, processing and utilisation are essential. In 2010, the European Commission recognised this need and funded a collaborative RTD/SME project under the Framework 7-Knowledge Based Bio-Economy (KBBE) Theme 2 Programme 'Sustainable culture of marine microorganisms, algae and/or invertebrates for high value added products'. The scope of that project entitled 'Sustainable Production of Biologically Active Molecules of Marine Based Origin' (BAMMBO) is outlined. Although the Union is a global leader in many technologies, it faces increasing competition from traditional rivals and emerging economies alike and must therefore improve its innovation performance. For this reason innovation is placed at the heart of a European Horizon 2020 Strategy wherein the challenge is to connect economic performance to eco performance. This article provides a synopsis of the research activities of the BAMMBO project as they fit within the wider scope of sustainable environmentally conscientious marine resource exploitation for high-value biomolecules. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Polyphenols from Bee Pollen: Structure, Absorption, Metabolism and Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Rzepecka-Stojko, Anna; Stojko, Jerzy; Kurek-Górecka, Anna; Górecki, Michał; Kabała-Dzik, Agata; Kubina, Robert; Moździerz, Aleksandra; Buszman, Ewa

    2015-12-04

    Bee pollen constitutes a natural source of antioxidants such as phenolic acids and flavonoids, which are responsible for its biological activity. Research has indicated the correlation between dietary polyphenols and cardioprotective, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, anticancerogenic, immunostimulating, antianaemic effects, as well as their beneficial influence on osseous tissue. The beneficial effects of bee pollen on health result from the presence of phenolic acids and flavonoids which possess anti-inflammatory properties, phytosterol and linolenic acid which play an anticancerogenic role, and polysaccharides which stimulate immunological activity. Polyphenols are absorbed in the alimentary tract, metabolised by CYP450 enzymes, and excreted with urine and faeces. Flavonoids and phenolic acids are characterised by high antioxidative potential, which is closely related to their chemical structure. The high antioxidant potential of phenolic acids is due to the presence and location of hydroxyl groups, a carboxyl group in the immediate vicinity of ortho-diphenolic substituents, and the ethylene group between the phenyl ring and the carboxyl group. As regards flavonoids, essential structural elements are hydroxyl groups at the C5 and C7 positions in the A ring, and at the C3' and C4' positions in the B ring, and a hydroxyl group at the C3 position in the C ring. Furthermore, both, the double bond between C2 and C3, and a ketone group at the C4 position in the C ring enhance the antioxidative potential of these compounds. Polyphenols have an ideal chemical structure for scavenging free radicals and for creating chelates with metal ions, which makes them effective antioxidants in vivo.

  14. Cloning, expression and biological activity of equine interleukin (IL)-5.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, F M; Vandergrifft, E; Bailey, S R; Sepulveda, M F; Goode, N T; Horohov, D W

    2003-09-15

    The cytokine, interleukin (IL)-5 stimulates eosinophil differentiation, activation and survival and can prime these cells, increasing the response to other mediators. In view of its many effects on eosinophils, IL-5 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of allergic disease in man. Here we report the cloning of equine IL-5 and expression of the recombinant protein by transfection of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The cloned cDNA sequence consisted of 405 nucleotides and encoded a protein of 135 amino acids. There is >85% identity with feline, bovine, ovine, canine, and human IL-5 sequences at the nucleotide and protein level. Supernatants containing equine IL-5 were also examined for biological activity. CHO supernatant containing equine recombinant (eqr) IL-5, like the human ortholog (hrIL-5), induced concentration dependent equine eosinophil adherence to autologous serum-coated plastic (9.7+/-1.5% with a 1:100 dilution of eqrIL-5 and 9.1+/-1.6% adherence with 1 nM hrIL-5; n = 4). The eqr protein also caused concentration dependent superoxide production (11.9+/-2.4 nmol (reduced cytochrome (cyt) C)/10(6) cells at a 1:50 dilution, n = 4). In contrast, hrIL-5 only caused significant superoxide production when diluted in conditioned CHO medium, an effect that was inhibited by the anti-human mAb, TRFK5 (4.4+/-0.3 versus 0.3+/-0.4 nmol/10(6) cells for 0.5 nM hrIL-5 in the presence of the isotype matched IgG1 control (10 microM) and TRFK5 (10 microM), respectively). TRFK5 also significantly inhibited hrIL-5 induced adherence at concentrations of 0.3 microg/ml and above but had no significant inhibitory effect on either superoxide or adherence caused by eqrIL-5. These results demonstrate that equine IL-5 expressed by CHO cells stimulates equine eosinophils, suggesting that this cytokine could play a role in eosinophil recruitment and activation in equine allergic disease. The anti-human and murine moAb TRFK5 does not appear to recognise the equine protein.

  15. Arginine mimetic structures in biologically active antagonists and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Masic, Lucija Peterlin

    2006-01-01

    Peptidomimetics have found wide application as bioavailable, biostable, and potent mimetics of naturally occurring biologically active peptides. L-Arginine is a guanidino group-containing basic amino acid, which is positively charged at neutral pH and is involved in many important physiological and pathophysiological processes. Many enzymes display a preference for the arginine residue that is found in many natural substrates and in synthetic inhibitors of many trypsin-like serine proteases, e.g. thrombin, factor Xa, factor VIIa, trypsin, and in integrin receptor antagonists, used to treat many blood-coagulation disorders. Nitric oxide (NO), which is produced by oxidation of L-arginine in an NADPH- and O(2)-dependent process catalyzed by isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), exhibits diverse roles in both normal and pathological physiologies and has been postulated to be a contributor to the etiology of various diseases. Development of NOS inhibitors as well as analogs and mimetics of the natural substrate L-arginine, is desirable for potential therapeutic use and for a better understanding of their conformation when bound in the arginine binding site. The guanidino residue of arginine in many substrates, inhibitors, and antagonists forms strong ionic interactions with the carboxylate of an aspartic acid moiety, which provides specificity for the basic amino acid residue in the active side. However, a highly basic guanidino moiety incorporated in enzyme inhibitors or receptor antagonists is often associated with low selectivity and poor bioavailability after peroral application. Thus, significant effort is focused on the design and preparation of arginine mimetics that can confer selective inhibition for specific trypsin-like serine proteases and NOS inhibitors as well as integrin receptor antagonists and possess reduced basicity for enhanced oral bioavailability. This review will describe the survey of arginine mimetics designed to mimic the function of the

  16. Selective Anion Binding by a Cofacial Binuclear Zinc Complex of a Schiff-Base Pyrrole Macrocycle

    PubMed Central

    Devoille, Aline M. J.; Richardson, Patricia; Bill, Nathan; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Love, Jason B.

    2011-01-01

    The synthesis of the new cofacial binuclear zinc complex [Zn2(L)] of a Schiff-base pyrrole macrocycle is reported. It was discovered that the binuclear microenvironment between the two metals of [Zn2(L)] is suited for the encapsulation of anions, leading to the formation of [K(THF)6][Zn2(μ-Cl)(L)].2THF and [Bun4N][Zn2(μ-OH)(L)] which were characterized by X-ray crystallography. Unusually obtuse Zn-X-Zn angles (X=Cl: 150.54(9)° and OH: 157.4(3)°) illustrate the weak character of these interactions and the importance of the cleft pre-organization to stabilize the host. In the absence of added anion, aggregation of [Zn2(L)] was inferred and investigated by successive dilutions and by the addition of coordinating solvents to [Zn2(L)] solutions using NMR spectroscopy as well as isothermal microcalorimetry (ITC). On anion addition, evidence for de-aggregation of [Zn2(L)], combined with the formation of the 1:1 host-guest complex, was observed by NMR spectroscopy and ITC titrations. Furthermore, [Zn2(L)] binds to Cl− selectively in THF as deduced from the ITC analyses, while other halides induce only de-aggregation. These conclusions were reinforced by DFT calculations, which indicated that the binding energies of OH− and Cl− were significantly greater than for the other halides. PMID:21391550

  17. Synergy and destructive interferences between local magnetic anisotropies in binuclear complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Guihéry, Nathalie; Ruamps, Renaud; Maurice, Rémi

    2015-12-31

    Magnetic anisotropy is responsible for the single molecule magnet behavior of transition metal complexes. This behavior is characterized by a slow relaxation of the magnetization for low enough temperatures, and thus for a possible blocking of the magnetization. This bistable behavior can lead to possible technological applications in the domain of data storage or quantum computing. Therefore, the understanding of the microscopic origin of magnetic anisotropy has received a considerable interest during the last two decades. The presentation focuses on the determination of the anisotropy parameters of both mono-nuclear and bi-nuclear types of complexes and on the control and optimization of the anisotropic properties. The validity of the model Hamiltonians commonly used to characterize such complexes has been questioned and it is shown that neither the standard multispin Hamiltonian nor the giant spin Hamiltonian are appropriate for weakly coupled ions. Alternative models have been proposed and used to properly extract the relevant parameters. Rationalizations of the magnitude and nature of both local anisotropies of single ions and the molecular anisotropy of polynuclear complexes are provided. The synergy and interference effects between local magnetic anisotropies are studied in a series of binuclear complexes.

  18. Activities for Students: Biology as a Source for Algebra Equations--The Heart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horak, Virginia M.

    2005-01-01

    The high school course that integrated first year algebra with an introductory environmental biology/anatomy and physiology course, in order to solve algebra problems is discussed. Lessons and activities for the course were taken by identifying the areas where mathematics and biology content intervenes may help students understand biology concepts…

  19. Investigating the Use of Inquiry & Web-Based Activities with Inclusive Biology Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodzin, Alec M.; Waller, Patricia L.; Edwards, Lana; Darlene Kale, Santoro

    2007-01-01

    A Web-integrated biology program is used to explore how to best assist inclusive high school students to learn biology with inquiry-based activities. Classroom adaptations and instructional strategies teachers may use to assist in promoting biology learning with inclusive learners are discussed.

  20. Microbial Survey of a Full-Scale, Biologically Active Filter for Treatment of Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    DeBry, Ronald W.; Lytle, Darren A.

    2012-01-01

    The microbial community of a full-scale, biologically active drinking water filter was surveyed using molecular techniques. Nitrosomonas, Nitrospira, Sphingomonadales, and Rhizobiales dominated the clone libraries. The results elucidate the microbial ecology of biological filters and demonstrate that biological treatment of drinking water should be considered a viable alternative to physicochemical methods. PMID:22752177

  1. Investigating the Use of Inquiry & Web-Based Activities with Inclusive Biology Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodzin, Alec M.; Waller, Patricia L.; Edwards, Lana; Darlene Kale, Santoro

    2007-01-01

    A Web-integrated biology program is used to explore how to best assist inclusive high school students to learn biology with inquiry-based activities. Classroom adaptations and instructional strategies teachers may use to assist in promoting biology learning with inclusive learners are discussed.

  2. Microbial survey of a full-scale, biologically active filter for treatment of drinking water.

    PubMed

    White, Colin P; Debry, Ronald W; Lytle, Darren A

    2012-09-01

    The microbial community of a full-scale, biologically active drinking water filter was surveyed using molecular techniques. Nitrosomonas, Nitrospira, Sphingomonadales, and Rhizobiales dominated the clone libraries. The results elucidate the microbial ecology of biological filters and demonstrate that biological treatment of drinking water should be considered a viable alternative to physicochemical methods.

  3. Activities for Students: Biology as a Source for Algebra Equations--The Heart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horak, Virginia M.

    2005-01-01

    The high school course that integrated first year algebra with an introductory environmental biology/anatomy and physiology course, in order to solve algebra problems is discussed. Lessons and activities for the course were taken by identifying the areas where mathematics and biology content intervenes may help students understand biology concepts…

  4. Crystal structure of an arginase-like protein from Trypanosoma brucei that evolved without a binuclear manganese cluster.

    PubMed

    Hai, Yang; Kerkhoven, Eduard J; Barrett, Michael P; Christianson, David W

    2015-01-20

    The X-ray crystal structure of an arginase-like protein from the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei, designated TbARG, is reported at 1.80 and 2.38 Å resolution in its reduced and oxidized forms, respectively. The oxidized form of TbARG is a disulfide-linked hexamer that retains the overall architecture of a dimer of trimers in the reduced form. Intriguingly, TbARG does not contain metal ions in its putative active site, and amino acid sequence comparisons indicate that all but one of the residues required for coordination to the catalytically obligatory binuclear manganese cluster in other arginases are substituted here with residues incapable of metal ion coordination. Therefore, the structure of TbARG is the first of a member of the arginase/deacetylase superfamily that is not a metalloprotein. Although we show that metal binding activity is easily reconstituted in TbARG by site-directed mutagenesis and confirmed in X-ray crystal structures, it is curious that this protein and its parasitic orthologues evolved away from metal binding function. Knockout of the TbARG gene from the genome demonstrated that its function is not essential to cultured bloodstream-form T. brucei, and metabolomics analysis confirmed that the enzyme has no role in the conversion of l-arginine to l-ornithine in these cells. While the molecular function of TbARG remains enigmatic, the fact that the T. brucei genome encodes only this protein and not a functional arginase indicates that the parasite must import l-ornithine from its host to provide a source of substrate for ornithine decarboxylase in the polyamine biosynthetic pathway, an active target for the development of antiparasitic drugs.

  5. Biological activity, design, synthesis and structure activity relationship of some novel derivatives of curcumin containing sulfonamides.

    PubMed

    Lal, Jaggi; Gupta, Sushil K; Thavaselvam, D; Agarwal, Dau D

    2013-06-01

    Five series of curcumin derivatives with sulfonamides 3a-3e, 4a-4e, 5a-5e, 6a-6e and 7a-7e have been synthesized and evaluated for in vitro antibacterial activity against selected medically important gram-(+) and gram-(-) bacterial species viz. Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Salmonella typhi, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, and antifungal activity against few pathogenic fungal species viz. Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Trichoderma viride and Curvularia lunata. The cytotoxicity has been determined by measuring IC50 values against human cell lines HeLa, Hep G-2, QG-56 and HCT-116. Among the compounds screened, 3a-3e showed the most potent biological activity against tested bacteria and fungi. Compounds 3a-3e displayed higher cytotoxicity than curcumin. The curcumin derivatives were also evaluated for in vivo anti-inflammatory activity. In contrast, the compounds 6a-6e and 7a-7e showed dramatically decrease in biological activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Design and Magnetic Properties of a Mononuclear Co(II) Single Molecule Magnet and Its Antiferromagnetically Coupled Binuclear Derivative.

    PubMed

    El-Khatib, Fatima; Cahier, Benjamin; Shao, Feng; López-Jordà, Maurici; Guillot, Régis; Rivière, Eric; Hafez, Hala; Saad, Zeinab; Girerd, Jean-Jacques; Guihéry, Nathalie; Mallah, Talal

    2017-04-17

    The preparations of related mononuclear and binuclear Co(II) complexes with a quasi-identical local C3v symmetry using a cryptand organic ligand are reported. The mononuclear complex behaves as a single molecule magnet (SMM). A relatively weak antiferromagnetic exchange coupling (J) of the same order of magnitude as the local magnetic anisotropy (D) is determined experimentally and theoretically for the binuclear complex. The weak magnitude of the antiferromagnetic exchange coupling, analyzed using a combination of broken-symmetry density functional theory and wave function based calculations, is ascribed to the weak overlap between the singly occupied orbitals because of the local C3v symmetry of the Co(II) ions; the organic ligand was found to contribute to the exchange coupling as the azido bridge that directly links the Co(II) ions. Calculation of the energy and wave functions of the spin states for the binuclear complex, in the general case, allows analysis of the effect of the |J/D| ratio on the magnetic behavior of the binuclear complex and prediction of the optimum range of values for the complex to behave as two weakly interacting SMMs.

  7. A novel binuclear palladacycle complex inhibits melanoma growth in vitro and in vivo through apoptosis and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Aliwaini, Saeb; Swarts, Andrew J; Blanckenberg, Angelique; Mapolie, Selwyn; Prince, Sharon

    2013-12-15

    Malignant melanoma is an aggressive skin cancer and it is reported to be the most treatment-resistant human cancer. Here we describe the anti-tumour activity of a novel binuclear palladacycle complex (AJ-5) in vertical growth phase (ME1402) and metastatic (WM1158) melanoma cell lines. We show that compared to normal control cell lines, AJ-5 is more effective in inhibiting the proliferation of ME1402 and WM1158 melanoma cells with IC50 values of 0.19 and 0.20μM, respectively. Flow cytometry analyses showed that AJ-5 induced apoptosis (sub-G1 peak) which was confirmed by Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide double-staining, nuclear fragmentation and an increase in the levels of PARP cleavage. Furthermore, AJ-5 was shown to induce both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways as measured by PUMA, Bax and active caspases. Interestingly, AJ-5 treatment also simultaneously induced the formation of autophagosomes and led to an increase in the autophagy markers LC3II and Beclin1. Inhibition of autophagy reduced AJ-5 cytotoxicity suggesting that AJ-5 induced autophagy was a cell death and not cell survival mechanism. Moreover we show that AJ-5 induces the ATM-CHK2 DNA damage pathway and that its anti-tumour function is mediated by the p38 and ERK1/2 signalling pathways. Importantly, AJ-5 treatment efficiently reduced tumour growth in melanoma bearing mice and induced high levels of autophagy and apoptosis markers. Together these findings suggest that AJ-5 may be an effective chemotherapeutic drug in the treatment of melanoma, a highly aggressive and intractable cancer.

  8. Systems Biology Graphical Notation: Activity Flow language Level 1 Version 1.2.

    PubMed

    Mi, Huaiyu; Schreiber, Falk; Moodie, Stuart; Czauderna, Tobias; Demir, Emek; Haw, Robin; Luna, Augustin; Le Novère, Nicolas; Sorokin, Anatoly; Villéger, Alice

    2015-09-04

    The Systems Biological Graphical Notation (SBGN) is an international community effort for standardized graphical representations of biological pathways and networks. The goal of SBGN is to provide unambiguous pathway and network maps for readers with different scientific backgrounds as well as to support efficient and accurate exchange of biological knowledge between different research communities, industry, and other players in systems biology. Three SBGN languages, Process Description (PD), Entity Relationship (ER) and Activity Flow (AF), allow for the representation of different aspects of biological and biochemical systems at different levels of detail. The SBGN Activity Flow language represents the influences of activities among various entities within a network. Unlike SBGN PD and ER that focus on the entities and their relationships with others, SBGN AF puts the emphasis on the functions (or activities) performed by the entities, and their effects to the functions of the same or other entities. The nodes (elements) describe the biological activities of the entities, such as protein kinase activity, binding activity or receptor activity, which can be easily mapped to Gene Ontology molecular function terms. The edges (connections) provide descriptions of relationships (or influences) between the activities, e.g., positive influence and negative influence. Among all three languages of SBGN, AF is the closest to signaling pathways in biological literature and textbooks, but its well-defined semantics offer a superior precision in expressing biological knowledge.

  9. Electron paramagnetic resonance and quantum-mechanical analysis of binuclear niobium clusters in lithium-niobium phosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhimov, R. R.; Turney, V. J.; Jones, D. E.; Dobryakov, S. N.; Borisov, Yu. A.; Prokof'ev, A. I.; Aleksandrov, A. I.

    2003-04-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of Nb4+ ions in Li2O-Nb2O5-P2O5 glasses with different composition of oxide components have been investigated. The EPR spectrum shape analysis of Nb4+ (electron configuration 4d1, electron spin S=1/2) reveals the formation of triplet niobium binuclear complex (total electron spin S=1) in glasses. The amount of Nb4+ ions in glasses reversibly changes with temperature and is explained via the mechanism of electron hopping between niobium ions in clusters. The dependence of the amount of Nb4+ ions upon Li2O content has a maximal character, which implies that small amounts of Li+ ions stabilize the Nb4+ pairs, but cause their disproportionation at higher concentrations of Li+ ions in the glass. Quantum mechanical analysis of electronic and spin states of binuclear niobium clusters has been performed on model binuclear complexes, (HO)3Nb-O-Nb(OH)3, [(HO)3Nb-O-Nb(OH)3]Li+, and [(HO)3Nb-O-Nb(OH)3](Li+)2 that exhibit the reversible disproportionation reaction Nb4+-O-Nb4+⇔Nb3+-O-Nb5+. Triplet states of these complexes (total electron spin S=1) have lower energies than singlet states (S=0), and Li+ ions stabilize the binuclear niobium complex. We have found that electron spin densities on niobium ions change depending upon the shift of the bridging oxygen atom. Application of this theoretical modeling to the analysis of the experimental EPR spectrum in Li2O-Nb2O5-P2O5 glass concludes noncentrosymmetric structure of binuclear niobium complex with ˜0.1 Å offset of the bridging oxygen atom towards one Nb atom.

  10. Collapse of the EPR fine structure of a one-dimensional array of weakly interacting binuclear units: A dimensional quantum phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, Rafael; Abud, Julián E.; Sartoris, Rosana P.; Santana, Ricardo C.

    2011-09-01

    Binuclear (also called dimeric) compounds with pairs of antiferromagnetically coupled spins ½, S1 and S2 (Hex = -J0 S1.S2, with J0<0 for antiferromagnets), have been around for ˜60 years, providing roots to the field of molecular magnetism. In addition, as reported in recent years, weak interactions between binuclear units in a crystalline network give rise to interesting systems of interacting bosons having an energy gap, which are important in the study of quantum phenomena in many body systems coupled by stochastic distributions of interactions. Binuclear compounds have gained new relevance in the last decade with the observation of Bose-Einstein condensation. In this work, we use electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to study the role of weak inter-binuclear exchange couplings J’ (|J’| ≪|J0|) in the spectra, elementary excitations, and spin dynamics of a one-dimensional (1-D) array of antiferromagnetic (AFM) binuclear units in the hybrid (organic-inorganic) CuII compound [Cu(CH3COO)(phen)(H2O)]2·(NO3)2·4H2O. In this material, the acetate (CH3COO)- anion supports the intra-binuclear exchange coupling J0, and the stacking of the (phen) = 1,10-phenanthroline rings of neighbor units supports the inter-binuclear interactions J', giving rise to well-isolated chains. This has advantages over other binuclear compounds studied previously because magnetically equal units are arranged in a 1-D spatial arrangement along the direction of their symmetry axis, simplifying the analysis of the data and allowing a simpler treatment. In addition, single crystals of good quality allow detailed EPR experiments.EPR spectra were collected at ˜33.8 and ˜9.4-9.8 GHz in oriented single crystals at room temperature and in powder samples at temperatures (T) between 10 and 300 K. By varying the energy levels of the binuclear units with the magnetic field orientation, or changing the population of the excited triplet state with temperature and, consequently, the effective

  11. A glimpse on biological activities of tellurium compounds.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Rodrigo L O R; Gouvea, Iuri E; Juliano, Luiz

    2009-09-01

    Tellurium is a rare element which has been regarded as a toxic, non-essential trace element and its biological role is not clearly established to date. Besides of that, the biological effects of elemental tellurium and some of its inorganic and organic derivatives have been studied, leading to a set of interesting and promising applications. As an example, it can be highlighted the uses of alkali-metal tellurites and tellurates in microbiology, the antioxidant effects of organotellurides and diorganoditellurides and the immunomodulatory effects of the non-toxic inorganic tellurane, named AS-101, and the plethora of its uses. Inasmuch, the nascent applications of organic telluranes (organotelluranes) as protease inhibitors and its applications in disease models are the most recent contribution to the scenario of the biological effects and applications of tellurium and its compounds discussed in this manuscript.

  12. Three Activities To Assist Biology Teachers in Presenting Conceptually Difficult Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Neil; Tulip, David

    1997-01-01

    Outlines three activities for different areas of biology that can serve as motivators for students or as demonstrations. Each activity is easy to organize and uses available materials. Topics include evolution, anaerobic respiration, and heat loss. (DDR)

  13. Three Activities To Assist Biology Teachers in Presenting Conceptually Difficult Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Neil; Tulip, David

    1997-01-01

    Outlines three activities for different areas of biology that can serve as motivators for students or as demonstrations. Each activity is easy to organize and uses available materials. Topics include evolution, anaerobic respiration, and heat loss. (DDR)

  14. DNA hydrolytic cleavage by the diiron(III) complex Fe(2)(DTPB)(mu-O)(mu-Ac)Cl(BF(4))(2): comparison with other binuclear transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changlin; Yu, Siwang; Li, Dongfeng; Liao, Zhanru; Sun, Xiaohui; Xu, Huibi

    2002-02-25

    The binuclear structure of Fe(2)(DTPB)(mu-O)(mu-Ac)Cl(BF(4))(2) (DTPB = 1,1,4,7,7-penta (2'-benzimidazol-2-ylmethyl)-triazaheptane, Ac = acetate) was characterized by UV-visible absorption and infrared spectra and NMR and ESR. The binding interaction of DNA with the diiron complex was examined spectroscopically. Supercoiled and linear DNA hydrolytic cleavage by the diiron complex is supported by the evidence from anaerobic reactions, free radical quenching, high performance liquid chromatography experiments, and enzymatic manipulation such as T4 ligase ligation, 5'-(32)P end-labeling, and footprinting analysis. The estimation of rate for the supercoiled DNA double strand cleavage shows one of the largest known rate enhancement factors, approximately 10(10) against DNA. Moreover, the DNA hydrolysis chemistry needs no coreactant such as hydrogen peroxide. The poor sequence-specific DNA cleavage indicated by the restriction analysis of the pBR322 DNA linearized by the diiron complex might be due to the diiron complex bound to DNA by a coordination of its two ferric ions to the DNA phosphate oxygens, as suggested by spectral characterizations. The hydrolysis chemistry for a variety of binuclear metal complexes including Fe(2)(DTPB)(mu-O)(mu-Ac)Cl(BF(4))(2) is compared. It is established that the dominant factors for the DNA hydrolysis activities of the binuclear metal complexes are the mu-oxo bridge, labile and anionic ligands, and open coordination site(s). Concerning the hydrolytic mechanisms, the diiron complex Fe(2)(DTPB)(mu-O)(mu-Ac)Cl(BF(4))(2) might share many points in common with the native purple acid phosphatases.

  15. Using Active Learning to Teach Concepts and Methods in Quantitative Biology.

    PubMed

    Waldrop, Lindsay D; Adolph, Stephen C; Diniz Behn, Cecilia G; Braley, Emily; Drew, Joshua A; Full, Robert J; Gross, Louis J; Jungck, John A; Kohler, Brynja; Prairie, Jennifer C; Shtylla, Blerta; Miller, Laura A

    2015-11-01

    This article provides a summary of the ideas discussed at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology society-wide symposium on Leading Students and Faculty to Quantitative Biology through Active Learning. It also includes a brief review of the recent advancements in incorporating active learning approaches into quantitative biology classrooms. We begin with an overview of recent literature that shows that active learning can improve students' outcomes in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Education disciplines. We then discuss how this approach can be particularly useful when teaching topics in quantitative biology. Next, we describe some of the recent initiatives to develop hands-on activities in quantitative biology at both the graduate and the undergraduate levels. Throughout the article we provide resources for educators who wish to integrate active learning and technology into their classrooms.

  16. [Biological activity of electrochemically activated solutions obtained in a diaphragm electrolyser].

    PubMed

    Miroshnikov, A I; Konovalov, V F; Serikov, I S

    2006-01-01

    The biological activity of the catholyte and anolyte of bidistilled water in experiments with the germination of wheat grains in the period from March to May has been studied. The activity of solutions, which was characterized by the grain germination index, was high at the beginning of the period, then it gradually decreased and was equal to zero at the middle of the period; at the end of the period it gradually increased almost to initial values. It has been established that the effectiveness of bidistilled water anolyte was as a rule higher than that of catholyte throughout the observation period. At the beginning and end, the stimulating effect of anolyte was 5-5.5 times greater than that of catholyte. The seasonal changes in the biological activity of M 9 medium catholyte were compared with those of bidistilled water anolyte and catholyte. The stimulating effect of M 9 catholyte was estimated by changes in the growth of E. coli cells. The stimulating effect, which was estimated from an increase in the optical density of cell suspension in the initial period at a cultivation temperature of 20 degrees C was 55-60% relative to control (untreated medium). Then it decreased almost to zero in the middle of the period to increase again approximately to the initial values. The assumption has been made that the physicochemical causes of the influence of catholyte and anolyte of bidistilled water on wheat grains and of the culture medium catholyte on E. coli cells are of different nature.

  17. Potential biological activities and bioavailability of alfrutamide and caffedymine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Alfrutamide and caffedymine are clovamide-type phenolic amides whose analogues are found in numerous plants including garlic and cocoa. However, potential health effects of the amides are largely unknown. For last ten years, several amides have been synthesized and their potential biological activi...

  18. Binuclear ruthenium(III) bis(thiosemicarbazone) complexes: synthesis, spectral, electrochemical studies and catalytic oxidation of alcohol.

    PubMed

    Mohamed Subarkhan, M; Ramesh, R

    2015-03-05

    A new series of binuclear ruthenium(III) thiosemicarbazone complexes of general formula [(EPh3)2(X)2Ru-L-Ru(X)2(EPh3)2] (where E=P or As; X=Cl or Br; L=NS chelating bis(thiosemicarbazone ligands) has been synthesized and characterized by analytical and spectral (FT-IR, UV-Vis and EPR). IR spectra show that the thiosemicarbazones behave as monoanionic bidentate ligands coordinating through the azomethine nitrogen and thiolate sulphur. The electronic spectra of the complexes indicate that the presence of d-d and intense LMCT transitions in the visible region. The complexes are paramagnetic (low spin d(5)) in nature and all the complexes show rhombic distortion around the ruthenium ion with three different 'g' values (gx≠gy≠gz) at 77K. All the complexes are redox active and exhibit an irreversible metal centered redox processes (Ru(III)-Ru(III)/Ru(IV)-Ru(IV); Ru(III)-Ru(III)/Ru(II)-Ru(II)) within the potential range of 0.38-0.86V and -0.39 to -0.66 V respectively, versus Ag/AgCl. Further, the catalytic efficiency of one of the complexes [Ru2Cl2(AsPh3)4(L1)] (4) has been investigated in the case of oxidation of primary and secondary alcohols into their corresponding aldehydes and ketones in the presence of N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide(NMO) as co-oxidant. The formation of high valent Ru(V)O species is proposed as catalytic intermediate for the catalytic cycle.

  19. A binuclear Fe(III)Dy(III) single molecule magnet. Quantum effects and models.

    PubMed

    Ferbinteanu, Marilena; Kajiwara, Takashi; Choi, Kwang-Yong; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Nakamoto, Akio; Kojima, Norimichi; Cimpoesu, Fanica; Fujimura, Yuichi; Takaishi, Shinya; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2006-07-19

    The binuclear [FeIII(bpca)(mu-bpca)Dy(NO3)4], having Single Molecule Magnet (SMM) properties, belonging to a series of isostructural FeIIILnIII complexes (Ln = Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho) and closely related FeIILnIII chain structures, was characterized in concise experimental and theoretical respects. The low temperature magnetization data showed hysteresis and tunneling. The anomalous temperature dependence of Mössbauer spectra is related to the onset of magnetic order, consistent with the magnetization relaxation time scale resulting from AC susceptibility measurements. The advanced ab initio calculations (CASSCF and spin-orbit) revealed the interplay of ligand field, spin-orbit, and exchange effects and probed the effective Ising nature of the lowest states, involved in the SMM and tunneling effects.

  20. Flexible cofacial binuclear metal complexes derived from alpha,alpha-bis(salicylimino)-m-xylene.

    PubMed

    Maverick, Andrew W; Laxman, Ravi K; Hawkins, Mark A; Martone, Daniel P; Fronczek, Frank R

    2005-01-07

    The tetradentate Schiff-base ligand SIXH2 (alpha,alpha-bis(salicylimino)-m-xylene), prepared from salicylaldehyde and m-xylylenediamine, forms cofacial binuclear complexes with Pd and Cu. Of the two isomers possible (trans-syn and trans-anti) for M2(SIX)2, these complexes crystallize exclusively as the trans-anti isomer. In ansolvous Pd2(SIX)2, the metal-containing planes are approximately parallel, with PdPd 4.416(1) A. Pd2(SIX)2 also forms a crystalline solvate, in which the molecules adopt a more open conformation with longer metal-metal distances (5.109(1) and 5.112(1) A). The M...M distance is significantly longer in Cu2(SIX)2 (6.653(1) A), because of conformational changes in the m-xylylene moieties and substantial tetrahedral distortion about Cu.

  1. Alkoxy bridged binuclear rhenium (I) complexes as a potential sensor for β-amyloid aggregation.

    PubMed

    Sathish, Veerasamy; Babu, Eththilu; Ramdass, Arumugam; Lu, Zong-Zhan; Velayudham, Murugesan; Thanasekaran, Pounraj; Lu, Kuang-Lieh; Rajagopal, Seenivasan

    2014-12-01

    Alkoxy bridged binuclear rhenium(I) complexes are used as a probe for the selective and sensitive detection of aggregation of β-amyloid fibrils that are consorted with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The strong binding of the complexes is affirmed by the fluorescence enhancement and calculated binding constant value in the order of 10(5)M(-1) is obtained from the Scatchard plots. The binding of β-amyloid can be attributed to π-π stacking interaction of naphthalene moiety present in rhenium(I) complexes, and it is supported by docking studies. The selectivity is quite high towards other proteins and the formation of fibrils can be observed in the range of 30-40 nm through the AFM and TEM techniques. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Synthesis of four binuclear copper(II) complexes: Structure, anticancer properties and anticancer mechanism.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jinxu; Liang, Shichu; Gou, Yi; Zhang, Zhenlei; Zhou, Zuping; Yang, Feng; Liang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Copper (Cu) compounds are a promising candidate for next generation metal anticancer drugs and have been extensively studied. Therefore, four binuclear copper(II) compounds derived from Schiff base thiosemicarbazones (L1-L4), namely [CuCl(L1)]2 (C1), [CuNO3(L2)]2 (C2), [Cu(NCS) (L3)]2 (C3) and [Cu(CH3COO) (L4)]2 (C4) were synthesized and characterized. Four of these compounds showed very high cytotoxicity to cancer cell lines in vitro. These Cu(II) compounds strongly promoted the apoptosis of BEL-7404 cells. The formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), change in mitochondrial membrane potential and western blot analysis revealed that Cu compounds could induce cancer cell apoptosis through the intrinsic ROS-mediated mitochondrial pathway accompanied by the regulation of Bcl-2 family proteins.

  3. Phthalides: Distribution in Nature, Chemical Reactivity, Synthesis, and Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    León, Alejandra; Del-Ángel, Mayela; Ávila, José Luis; Delgado, Guillermo

    2017-01-01

    oxidation, reduction, addition, elimination, and cycloaddition reactions, and treatments with Lewis acids of (Z)-ligustilide have afforded linear dimers. Some intramolecular condensations and differentiated cyclizations of the dimeric phthalides have been carried out, providing evidences for the particular chemical reactivity of these compounds.Several structural modifications of phthalides have been carried out subjecting them to microbial transformations by different species of bacteria, fungi and algae, and these included resolutions of racemic mixtures and oxidations, among others.The [π4s + π2s] and [π2s + π2s] cycloadditions of (Z)-ligustilide for the synthesis of dimeric phthalides have been reported, and different approaches involving cyclizations, Alder-Rickert reactions, Sharpless asymmetric hydroxylations, or Grignard additions have been used for the synthesis of monomeric phthalides. The use of phthalides as building blocks for divergent oriented synthesis has been proven.Many of the naturally occurring phthalides display different biological activities including antibacterial, antifungal, insecticidal, cytotoxic, and anti-inflammatory effects, among many others, with a considerable recent research on the topic. In the case of compounds isolated from the Apiaceae, the bioactivities correlate with the traditional medicinal uses of the natural sources. Some monomeric phthalides have shown their ability to attenuate certain neurological diseases, including stroke, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.The present contribution covers the distribution of phthalides in nature and the findings in the structural diversity, chemical reactivity, biotransformations, syntheses, and bioactivity of natural and semisynthetic phthalides.

  4. π-π Stacking and ferromagnetic coupling mechanism on a binuclear Cu(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Chi, Yan-Hui; Yu, Li; Shi, Jing-Min; Zhang, Yi-Quan; Hu, Tai-Qiu; Zhang, Gui-Qiu; Shi, Wei; Cheng, Peng

    2011-02-21

    The ferromagnetic couplings were observed in an unpublished crystal that consists of binuclear copper(II) complexes, namely, [Cu(2)(μ(1,3)-SCN)(2)(PhenOH)(OCH(3))(2)(HOCH(3))(2)] (PhenOH = 2-hydroxy-1,10-phenanthroline), and in the binuclear complex Cu(ii) ion assumes a distorted octahedral geometry and thiocyanate anion functions as a μ(1,3)-SCN(-) equatorial-axial (EA) bridging ligand. The analysis for the crystal structure indicates that there are three types of magnetic coupling pathways, in which two pathways involve π-π stacking between the adjacent complexes and the third one is the μ(1,3)-SCN(-) bridged pathway. The fitting for the data of the variable-temperature magnetic susceptibilities shows that there is a ferromagnetic coupling between adjacent Cu(II) ions with J = 50.02 cm(-1). Theoretical calculations reveal that the two types of π-π stacking resulted in ferromagnetic couplings with J = 4.16 cm(-1) and J = 2.75 cm(-1), respectively, and the bridged thiocyanate anions pathway led to a weaker ferromagnetic interaction with J = 0.88 cm(-1). The theoretical calculations also indicate that the ferromagnetic coupling sign from the two types of π-π stacking does not accord with McConnell I spin-polarization mechanism. The analysis for the Wiberg bond indexes that originate from the π-π stacking atoms indicates that the Wiberg bond indexes are relevant to the associated magnetic coupling magnitude and the Wiberg bond index is one of the key factors that dominates the associated magnetic coupling magnitude.

  5. Physicochemical and porosity characteristics of thermally regenerated activated carbon polluted with biological activated carbon process.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lihua; Liu, Wenjun; Jiang, Renfu; Wang, Zhansheng

    2014-11-01

    The characteristics of thermally regenerated activated carbon (AC) polluted with biological activated carbon (BAC) process were investigated. The results showed that the true micropore and sub-micropore volume, pH value, bulk density, and hardness of regenerated AC decreased compared to the virgin AC, but the total pore volume increased. XPS analysis displayed that the ash contents of Al, Si, and Ca in the regenerated AC respectively increased by 3.83%, 2.62% and 1.8%. FTIR spectrum showed that the surface functional groups of virgin and regenerated AC did not change significantly. Pore size distributions indicated that the AC regeneration process resulted in the decrease of micropore and macropore (D>10 μm) volume and the increase of mesopore and macropore (0.1 μmbiological waste (spent AC) from BAC process.

  6. An alternative mechanistic concept for homogeneous selective ethylene oligomerization of chromium-based catalysts: binuclear metallacycles as a reason for 1-octene selectivity?

    PubMed

    Peitz, Stephan; Aluri, Bhaskar R; Peulecke, Normen; Müller, Bernd H; Wöhl, Anina; Müller, Wolfgang; Al-Hazmi, Mohammed H; Mosa, Fuad M; Rosenthal, Uwe

    2010-07-12

    An alternative concept for the selective catalytic formation of 1-octene from ethylene via dimeric catalytic centers is proposed. The selectivity of the tetramerization systems depends on the capability of ligands to form binuclear complexes that subsequently build up and couple two separate metallacyclopentanes to form 1-octene selectively. Comparison of existing catalytic processes, the ability of the bis(diarylphosphino)amine (PNP) ligand to bridge two metal centers, and the experimental background support the proposed binuclear mechanism for ethylene tetramerization.

  7. Mango ginger (Curcuma amada Roxb.)--a promising spice for phytochemicals and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Policegoudra, R S; Aradhya, S M; Singh, L

    2011-09-01

    Mango ginger (Curcuma amada Roxb.) is a unique spice having morphological resemblance with ginger but imparts a raw mango flavour. The main use of mango ginger rhizome is in the manufacture of pickles and culinary preparations. Ayurveda and Unani medicinal systems have given much importance to mango ginger as an appetizer, alexteric, antipyretic, aphrodisiac, diuretic, emollient, expectorant and laxative and to cure biliousness, itching, skin diseases, bronchitis, asthma, hiccough and inflammation due to injuries. The biological activities of mango ginger include antioxidant activity, antibacterial activity, antifungal activity, anti-inflammatory activity, platelet aggregation inhibitory activity, cytotoxicity, antiallergic activity, hypotriglyceridemic activity, brine-shrimp lethal activity, enterokinase inhibitory activity, CNS depressant and analgesic activity. The major chemical components include starch, phenolic acids, volatile oils, curcuminoids and terpenoids like difurocumenonol, amadannulen and amadaldehyde. This article brings to light the major active components present in C. amada along with their biological activities that may be important from the pharmacological point of view.

  8. Biologically Active Chorionic Gonadotropin: Synthesis by the Human Fetus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGregor, W. G.; Kuhn, R. W.; Jaffe, R. B.

    1983-04-01

    The kidney, and to a slight extent the liver, of human fetuses were found to synthesize and secrete the α subunit common to glycoprotein hormones. Fetal lung and muscle did not synthesize this protein. Since fetal kidney and liver were previously found to synthesize β chorionic gonadotropin, their ability to synthesize bioactive chorionic gonadotropin was also determined. The newly synthesized hormone bound to mouse Leydig cells and elicited a biological response: namely, the synthesis of testosterone. These results suggest that the human fetus may participate in metabolic homeostasis during its development.

  9. Potential roles of chemical degradation in the biological activities of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Julia; Sanidad, Katherine Z; Sukamtoh, Elvira; Zhang, Guodong

    2017-03-22

    Substantial pre-clinical and human studies have shown that curcumin, a dietary compound from turmeric, has a variety of health-promoting biological activities. A better understanding of the biochemical mechanisms for the health-promoting effects of curcumin could facilitate the development of effective strategies for disease prevention. Recent studies have shown that in aqueous buffer, curcumin rapidly degrades and leads to formation of various degradation products. In this review, we summarized and discussed the biological activities of chemical degradation products of curcumin, including alkaline hydrolysis products (such as ferulic acid, vanillin, ferulaldehyde, and feruloyl methane), and autoxidation products (such as bicyclopentadione). Though many of these degradation products are biologically active, they are substantially less-active compared to curcumin, supporting that chemical degradation has a limited contribution to the biological activities of curcumin.

  10. Biologically active constituents of a polyphenol extract from Geranium sanguineum L. with anti-influenza activity.

    PubMed

    Pantev, Assen; Ivancheva, Stefka; Staneva, Lidija; Serkedjieva, Julia

    2006-01-01

    From the aerial roots of the medicinal plant Geranium sanguineum L. a polyphenol-rich extract with strong anti-influenza activity has been isolated. To investigate its active fractions, the extract was partitioned by solvents with increasing polarity. The n-BuOH fraction contained the majority of the in vitro antiviral activity; the EtOAc fraction was the most effective one in vivo. A bioassay-directed fractionation of the n-BuOH and EtOAc fractions was performed to obtain information about the nature of the chemical components of the plant extract, responsible for the antiviral effect. The individual constituents were identified by spectroscopic methods and comparison with authentic samples and by HPLC. The cell-toxic and virus-inhibitory effects of the fractions and some individual polyphenol compounds, found in Geranium sanguineum L., were studied using the replication of representative influenza viruses in cell cultures. This study showed that the presence of a variety of biologically active compounds as well as the possible synergistic interactions between them seem to be decisive for the overall antiviral effect.

  11. Active Metamaterial Based Terahertz Polarimeter for Spectroscopic Detection of Chemical and Biological Hazards

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    Active Metamaterial Based Terahertz Polarimeter for Spectroscopic Detection of Chemical and Biological Hazards by Grace D. Metcalfe ...for Spectroscopic Detection of Chemical and Biological Hazards Grace D. Metcalfe and Michael Wraback Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate, ARL...GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Grace D. Metcalfe , Michael Wraback, Richard D. Averitt, and Xin Zhang 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  12. Low Budget Biology 3: A Collection of Low Cost Labs and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wartski, Bert; Wartski, Lynn Marie

    This document contains biology labs, demonstrations, and activities that use low budget materials. The goal is to get students involved in the learning process by experiencing biology. Each lab has a teacher preparation section which outlines the purpose of the lab, some basic information, a list of materials , and how to prepare the different…

  13. An Introduction to Biological Modeling Using Coin Flips to Predict the Outcome of a Diffusion Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butcher, Greg Q.; Rodriguez, Juan; Chirhart, Scott; Messina, Troy C.

    2016-01-01

    In order to increase students' awareness for and comfort with mathematical modeling of biological processes, and increase their understanding of diffusion, the following lab was developed for use in 100-level, majors/non-majors biology and neuroscience courses. The activity begins with generation of a data set that uses coin-flips to replicate…

  14. Effects of Biology Teachers' Professional Knowledge and Cognitive Activation on Students' Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Förtsch, Christian; Werner, Sonja; von Kotzebue, Lena; Neuhaus, Birgit J.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of teachers' biology-specific dimensions of professional knowledge--pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) and content knowledge (CK)--and cognitively activating biology instruction, as a feature of instructional quality, on students' learning. The sample comprised 39 German secondary school teachers whose lessons on…

  15. Effects of Biology Teachers' Professional Knowledge and Cognitive Activation on Students' Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Förtsch, Christian; Werner, Sonja; von Kotzebue, Lena; Neuhaus, Birgit J.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of teachers' biology-specific dimensions of professional knowledge--pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) and content knowledge (CK)--and cognitively activating biology instruction, as a feature of instructional quality, on students' learning. The sample comprised 39 German secondary school teachers whose lessons on…

  16. Low Budget Biology 3: A Collection of Low Cost Labs and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wartski, Bert; Wartski, Lynn Marie

    This document contains biology labs, demonstrations, and activities that use low budget materials. The goal is to get students involved in the learning process by experiencing biology. Each lab has a teacher preparation section which outlines the purpose of the lab, some basic information, a list of materials , and how to prepare the different…

  17. Unusual saccharin-N,O (carbonyl) coordination in mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes: Synthesis, X-ray crystallography and biological activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtaruddin, Nur Shuhada Mohd; Yusof, Enis Nadia Md; Ravoof, Thahira B. S. A.; Tiekink, Edward R. T.; Veerakumarasivam, Abhi; Tahir, Mohamed Ibrahim Mohamed

    2017-07-01

    Three tridentate Schiff bases containing N and S donor atoms were synthesized via the condensation reaction between S-2-methylbenzyldithiocarbazate with 2-acetyl-4-methylpyridine (S2APH); 4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazide with 2-acetylpyridine (MT2APH) and 4-ethyl-3-thiosemicarbazide with 2-acetylpyridine (ET2APH). Three new, binuclear and mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes with the general formula, [Cu(sac)(L)]2 (sac = saccharinate anion; L = anion of the Schiff base) were then synthesized, and subsequently characterized by IR and UV/Vis spectroscopy as well as by molar conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The Schiff bases were also spectroscopically characterized using NMR and MS to further confirm their structures. The spectroscopic data indicated that the Schiff bases behaved as a tridentate NNS donor ligands coordinating via the pyridyl-nitrogen, azomethine-nitrogen and thiolate-sulphur atoms. Magnetic data indicated a square pyramidal environment for the complexes and the conductivity values showed that the complexes were essentially non-electrolytes in DMSO. The X-ray crystallographic analysis of one complex, [Cu(sac)(S2AP)]2 showed that the Cu(II) atom was coordinated to the thiolate-S, azomethine-N and pyridyl-N donors of the S2AP Schiff base and to the saccharinate-N from one anion, as well as to the carbonyl-O atom from a symmetry related saccharinate anion yielding a centrosymmetric binuclear complex with a penta-coordinate, square pyramidal geometry. All the copper(II) saccharinate complexes were found to display strong cytotoxic activity against the MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines.

  18. Synthesis and Biological Activity Evaluation of Novel Heterocyclic Pleuromutilin Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Yi, Yunpeng; Fu, Yunxing; Dong, Pengcheng; Qin, Wenwen; Liu, Yu; Liang, Jiangping; Shang, Ruofeng

    2017-06-15

    A series of pleuromutilin derivatives were synthesized by two synthetic procedures under mild reaction conditions and characterized by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), Infrared Spectroscopy (IR), and High Resolution Mass Spectrometer (HRMS). Most of the derivatives with heterocyclic groups at the C-14 side of pleuromutilin exhibited excellent in vitro antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE), and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) in vitro antibacterial activity. The synthesized derivatives which contained pyrimidine rings, 3a, 3b, and 3f, displayed modest antibacterial activities. Compound 3a, the most active antibacterial agent, displayed rapid bactericidal activity and affected bacterial growth in the same manner as that of tiamulin fumarate. Moreover, molecular docking studies of 3a and lefamulin provided similar information about the interactions between the compounds and 50S ribosomal subunit. The results of the study show that pyrimidine rings should be considered in the drug design of pleuromutilin derivatives.

  19. Some biologically active oxovanadium(IV) complexes of triazole derived Schiff bases: their synthesis, characterization and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Chohan, Zahid H; Sumrra, Sajjad H

    2010-10-01

    A series of biologically active oxovanadium(IV) complexes of triazole derived Schiff bases L(1)-L(5) have been synthesized and characterized by their physical, analytical, and spectral data. The synthesized ligands potentially act as bidentate, in which the oxygen of furfural and nitrogen of azomethine coordinate with the oxovanadium atom to give a stoichiometry of vanadyl complexes 1:2 (M:L) in a square-pyramidal geometry. In vitro antibacterial and antifungal activities on different species of pathogenic bacteria (E. coli, S. flexneri, P. aeruginosa, S. typhi, S. aureus, and B. subtilis) and fungi (T. longifusus, C. albicans, A. flavus, M. canis, F. solani, and C. glabrata) have been studied. All compounds showed moderate to significant antibacterial activity against one or more bacterial strains and good antifungal activity against most of the fungal strains. The brine shrimp bioassay was also carried out to check the cytotoxicity of coordinated and uncoordinated synthesized compounds.

  20. Activated Biological Filters (ABF Towers). Instructor's Guide. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooley, John F.

    This instructor's manual contains materials needed to teach a two-lesson unit on activated bio-filters (ABF). These materials include: (1) an overview of the two lessons; (2) lesson plans; (3) lecture outlines (keyed to a set of slides designed for use with the lessons); (4) overhead transparency masters; (5) worksheets for each lesson (with…

  1. Activated Biological Filters (ABF Towers). Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooley, John F.

    This student manual contains textual material for a two-lesson unit on activated bio-filters (ABF). The first lesson (the sewage treatment plant) examines those process units that are unique to the ABF system. The lesson includes a review of the structural components of the ABF system and their functions and a discussion of several operational…

  2. Capturing Biological Activity in Natural Product Fragments by Chemical Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Erika A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Natural products have had an immense influence on science and have directly led to the introduction of many drugs. Organic chemistry, and its unique ability to tailor natural products through synthesis, provides an extraordinary approach to unlock the full potential of natural products. In this Review, an approach based on natural product derived fragments is presented that can successfully address some of the current challenges in drug discovery. These fragments often display significantly reduced molecular weights, reduced structural complexity, a reduced number of synthetic steps, while retaining or even improving key biological parameters such as potency or selectivity. Examples from various stages of the drug development process up to the clinic are presented. In addition, this process can be leveraged by recent developments such as genome mining, antibody–drug conjugates, and computational approaches. All these concepts have the potential to identify the next generation of drug candidates inspired by natural products. PMID:26833854

  3. Capturing Biological Activity in Natural Product Fragments by Chemical Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Crane, Erika A; Gademann, Karl

    2016-03-14

    Natural products have had an immense influence on science and have directly led to the introduction of many drugs. Organic chemistry, and its unique ability to tailor natural products through synthesis, provides an extraordinary approach to unlock the full potential of natural products. In this Review, an approach based on natural product derived fragments is presented that can successfully address some of the current challenges in drug discovery. These fragments often display significantly reduced molecular weights, reduced structural complexity, a reduced number of synthetic steps, while retaining or even improving key biological parameters such as potency or selectivity. Examples from various stages of the drug development process up to the clinic are presented. In addition, this process can be leveraged by recent developments such as genome mining, antibody-drug conjugates, and computational approaches. All these concepts have the potential to identify the next generation of drug candidates inspired by natural products.

  4. IMAGING BRAIN ACTIVATION: SIMPLE PICTURES OF COMPLEX BIOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Dienel, Gerald A.; Cruz, Nancy F.

    2009-01-01

    Elucidation of biochemical, physiological, and cellular contributions to metabolic images of brain is important for interpretation of images of brain activation and disease. Discordant brain images obtained with [14C]deoxyglucose (DG) and [1- or 6-14C]glucose were previously ascribed to increased glycolysis and rapid [14C]lactate release from tissue, but direct proof of [14C]lactate release from activated brain structures is lacking. Analysis of factors contributing to images of focal metabolic activity evoked by monotonic acoustic stimulation of conscious rats reveals that labeled metabolites of [1- or 6-14C]glucose are quickly released from activated cells due to decarboxylation reactions, spreading via gap junctions, and efflux via lactate transporters. Label release from activated tissue accounts for most of the additional [14C]glucose consumed during activation compared to rest. Metabolism of [3,4-14C]glucose generates about four times more [14C]lactate compared to 14CO2 in extracellular fluid suggesting that most lactate is not locally oxidized. In brain slices, direct assays of lactate uptake from extracellular fluid demonstrate that astrocytes have faster influx and higher transport capacity than neurons. Also, lactate transfer from a single astrocyte to other gap junction-coupled astrocytes exceeds astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttling. Astrocytes and neurons have excess capacities for glycolysis, and oxidative metabolism in both cell types rises during sensory stimulation. The energetics of brain activation is quite complex and the proportion of glucose consumed by astrocytes and neurons, lactate generation by either cell type, and the contributions of both cell types to brain images during brain activation are likely to vary with the stimulus paradigm and activated pathways. PMID:19076439

  5. Biological Activities of 2-Mercaptobenzothiazole Derivatives: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Mohammed Afzal; Suresh, Bhojraj

    2012-01-01

    2-Mercaptobenzothiazoles are an important class of bioactive and industrially important organic compounds. These compounds are reported for their antimicrobial and antifungal activities, and are subsequently highlighted as a potent mechanism-based inhibitor of several enzymes like acyl coenzyme A cholesterol acyltransferase, monoamine oxidase, heat shock protein 90, cathepsin D, and c-Jun N-terminal kinases. These derivatives are also known to possess antitubercular, anti-inflammatory, antitumor, amoebic, antiparkinsonian, anthelmintic, antihypertensive, antihyperlipidemic, antiulcer, chemoprotective, and selective CCR3 receptor antagonist activity. This present review article focuses on the pharmacological profile of 2-mercaptobenzothiazoles with their potential activities. PMID:23264933

  6. Analytical development of a binuclear oxo-manganese complex bio-inspired on oxidase enzyme for doping control analysis of acetazolamide.

    PubMed

    Machini, Wesley B S; Teixeira, Marcos F S

    2016-05-15

    A bio-inspired electrochemical sensor using a binuclear oxo-manganese complex was evaluated and applied in the detection of a substance associated with doping in sports: acetazolamide (ACTZ). Investigation was made of the influence of different experimental variables on the electrocatalytic oxidation of ACTZ by the bio-inspired sensor, such as pH and interfering species. The bio-inspired sensor showed the best response in the range from 5.00×10(-9) to 7.00×10(-8) mol L(-1) ACTZ, with a linear range from 5.00×10(-9) to 2.50×10(-8) mol L(-1) and a detection limit of 4.76×10(-9) mol L(-1). The sensor exhibited characteristics similar to the Michaelis-Menten model of an enzymatic electrode, due to the use of a multinucleated complex of manganese with μ-oxo units, which was able to mimic the properties of enzymes with manganese as a cofactor in their composition, such as Mn-containing oxidase. The determination of ACTZ with the bio-inspired sensor was evaluated using three different synthetic biological fluids (plasma, saliva, and urine), demonstrating its viability for use with real samples. The analysis of ACTZ in real urine samples using the bio-inspired sensor, simulating the method adopted by the World Anti-Doping Agency, which revealed viable, suggesting a new and promising platform to be used in these analysis.

  7. The chemical structures, plant origins, ethnobotany and biological activities of homoisoflavanones.

    PubMed

    du Toit, Karen; Drewes, Siegfried E; Bodenstein, Johannes

    2010-03-01

    This work reviews the four basic structural types of homoisoflavanones. The relationships between the various structures of homoisoflavanones and their plant origins, ethnobotany and biological activities are put into perspective.

  8. Bioactive components and functional properties of biologically activated cereal grains: A bibliographic review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arashdeep; Sharma, Savita

    2017-09-22

    Whole grains provide energy, nutrients, fibers, and bioactive compounds that may synergistically contribute to their protective effects. A wide range of these compounds is affected by germination. While some compounds, such as β-glucans are degraded, others, like antioxidants and total phenolics are increased by means of biological activation of grains. The water and oil absorption capacity as well as emulsion and foaming capacity of biologically activated grains are also improved. Application of biological activation of grains is of emerging interest, which may significantly enhance the nutritional, functional, and bioactive content of grains, as well as improve palatability of grain foods in a natural way. Therefore, biological activation of cereals can be a way to produce food grains enriched with health-promoting compounds and enhanced functional attributes.

  9. Isolation, biological activity, synthesis, and medicinal chemistry of the pederin/mycalamide family of natural products.

    PubMed

    Mosey, R Adam; Floreancig, Paul E

    2012-09-01

    This review highlights the broad range of science that has arisen from the isolation of pederin, the mycalamides, theopederins, and onnamides, and psymberin. Specific topics include structure determination, biological activity, synthesis, and analog preparation and analysis.

  10. Biological activities and potential health benefit effects of polysaccharides isolated from Lycium barbarum L.

    PubMed

    Jin, Mingliang; Huang, Qingsheng; Zhao, Ke; Shang, Peng

    2013-03-01

    Recently, isolation and investigation of novel ingredients with biological activities and health benefit effects from natural resources have attracted a great deal of attention. The fruit of Lycium barbarum L., a well-known Chinese herbal medicine as well as valuable nourishing tonic, has been used historically as antipyretic, anti-inflammation and anti-senile agent for thousands of years. Modern pharmacological experiments have proved that polysaccharide is one of the major ingredients responsible for those biological activities in L. barbarum. It has been demonstrated that L. barbarum polysaccharides had various important biological activities, such as antioxidant, immunomodulation, antitumor, neuroprotection, radioprotection, anti-diabetes, hepatoprotection, anti-osteoporosis and antifatigue. The purpose of the present review is to summarize previous and current references regarding biological activities as well as potential health benefits of L. barbarum polysaccharides.

  11. Activity-dependent dendritic release of BDNF and biological consequences

    PubMed Central

    Kuczewski, Nicola; Porcher, Christophe; Lessmann, Volkmar; Medina, Igor; Gaiarsa, Jean-Luc

    2009-01-01

    Network construction and reorganization is modulated by the level and pattern of synaptic activity generated in the nervous system. During the past decades, neurotrophins, and in particular brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), have emerged as attractive candidates for linking synaptic activity and brain plasticity. Thus, neurotrophin expression and secretion are under the control of activity-dependent mechanisms and, besides their classical role in supporting neuronal survival neurotrophins, modulate nearly all key steps of network construction from neuronal migration to experience-dependent refinement of local connections. In this paper, we provide an overview of recent findings showing that BDNF can serve as a target-derived messenger for activity-dependent synaptic plasticity and development at the single cell level. PMID:19156544

  12. Biological Studies in Childhood Schizophrenia: Plasma and RBC Cholinesterase Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Alexander R.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    A comparison of plasma (pseudo) cholinesterase and erythrocyte (true) cholinesterase activity in 16 male childhood schizophrenic patients and 16 male nonpsychotic hospitalized controls revealed no significant differences between the two groups. (Author)

  13. Synthesis and Biological Activities of Camphor Hydrazone and Imine Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Emerson T.; da Silva Araújo, Adriele; Moraes, Adriana M.; de Souza, Leidiane A.; Silva Lourenço, Maria Cristina; de Souza, Marcus V. N.; Wardell, James L.; Wardell, Solange M. S. V.

    2015-01-01

    Both sonochemical and classical methodologies have been employed to convert camphor, 1,7,7-trimethylbicyclo[2.2.1]heptan-2-one, C9H16C=O, into a number of derivatives including hydrazones, C9H16C=N-NHAr 3, imines, C9H16C=N-R 7, and the key intermediate nitroimine, C9H16C=N-NO2 6. Reactions of nitroamine 6 with nucleophiles by classical methods provided the desired compounds in a range of yields. In evaluations of activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, compound 7j exhibited the best activity (minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) = 3.12 µg/mL), comparable to that of the antitubercular drug ethambutol. The other derivatives displayed modest antimycobacterial activities at 25–50 µg/mL. In in vitro tests against cancer cell lines, none of the synthesized camphor compounds exhibited cytotoxic activities. PMID:28117313

  14. Biological activity of camel milk casein following enzymatic digestion.

    PubMed

    Salami, Maryam; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar; Moosavi-Movahedi, Faezeh; Ehsani, Mohammad Reza; Yousefi, Reza; Farhadi, Mohammad; Niasari-Naslaji, Amir; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Chobert, Jean-Marc; Haertlé, Thomas

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of enzymatic hydrolysis with digestive enzymes of camel whole casein and beta-casein (β-CN) on their antioxidant and Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory properties. Peptides in each hydrolysate were fractionated with ultra-filtration membranes. The antioxidant activity was determined using a Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) scale. After enzymatic hydrolysis, both antioxidant and ACE-inhibitory activities of camel whole casein and camel β-CN were enhanced. Camel whole casein and β-CN showed significant ACE-inhibitory activities after hydrolysis with pepsin alone and after pepsinolysis followed by trypsinolysis and chymotrypsinolysis. Camel β-CN showed high antioxidant activity after hydrolysis with chymotrypsin. The results of this study suggest that when camel milk is consumed and digested, the produced peptides start to act as natural antioxidants and ACE-inhibitors.

  15. Biological Studies in Childhood Schizophrenia: Plasma and RBC Cholinesterase Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Alexander R.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    A comparison of plasma (pseudo) cholinesterase and erythrocyte (true) cholinesterase activity in 16 male childhood schizophrenic patients and 16 male nonpsychotic hospitalized controls revealed no significant differences between the two groups. (Author)

  16. CHARACTERIZATION ADN BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF SECONDARY METABOLITES FROM ARMILLARIA TABESCENS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ethyl acetate extracts from liquid cultures of Armillaria tabescens showed good antimicrobial activity against Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium intracellulare. Chemical analyses of extract constituents led to the isolation and identification of two new co...

  17. Synthesis and biological activity of nifuroxazide and analogs. II.

    PubMed

    Tavares, L C; Chisté, J J; Santos, M G; Penna, T C

    1999-09-01

    Nifuroxazyde and six analogs were synthesized by varying the substitute from the para-position of the benzenic ring and the heteroatom of the heterocyclic ring. The MIC of seven resultant compounds was determined by serial dilutions, testing the ATCC 25923 strain of Staphylococcus aureus. A significant increase in the anti-microbial activity of thyophenic analogs, as compared with furanic and pyrrholic analogs, was observed. In addition, unlike the cyano and hydroxyl groups, the acetyl group promoted anti-microbial activity.

  18. Assessing the biological activity of the glucan phosphatase laforin

    PubMed Central

    Romá-Mateo, Carlos; Raththagala, Madushi; Gentry, Mathew S.; Sanz, Pascual

    2017-01-01

    Summary Glucan phosphatases are a recently discovered family of enzymes that dephosphorylate either starch or glycogen and are essential for proper starch metabolism in plants and glycogen metabolism in humans. Mutations in the gene encoding the only human glucan phosphatase, laforin, result in the fatal, neurodegenerative, epilepsy known as Lafora disease. Here, we describe phosphatase assays to assess both generic laforin phosphatase activity and laforin’s unique glycogen phosphatase activity. PMID:27514803

  19. New analogues of acyclovir--synthesis and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Stankova, Ivanka; Schichkov, Stoyan; Kostova, Kalina; Galabov, Angel

    2010-01-01

    New acyclovir esters with peptidomimetics were synthesized and evaluated in vitro for their antiviral activity against the replication of Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and type 2 (HSV-2). The influence of peptidomimetics containing oxazole and thiazolyl-thiazole moieties on the antiviral activity is also reported. The esters were synthesized using the coupling reagents N-ethyl-N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N,N-dimethyl-4-aminopyridine (DMAP) as a catalyst.

  20. Spectroscopic definition of the biferrous and biferric sites of de novo designed 4-helix bundle DFsc peptides: Implications for O2 reactivity of binuclear non-heme iron enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Caleb B.; Calhoun, Jennifer R.; Bobyr, Elena; Wei, Pin-pin; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.; DeGrado, William F.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2009-01-01

    DFsc is a single chain de novo designed 4-helix bundle peptide that mimics the core protein fold and primary ligand set of various binuclear non-heme iron enzymes. DFsc and the E11D, Y51L and Y18F single amino acid variants have been studied using a combination of near-IR circular dichroism (CD), magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), variable temperature variable field MCD (VTVH MCD) and x-ray absorption (XAS) spectroscopies. The biferrous sites are all weakly antiferromagnetically coupled with μ-1,3 carboxylate bridges and one 4-coordinate and one 5-coordinate Fe, very similar to the active site of Class I ribonucleotide reductase (R2) providing open coordination positions on both irons for dioxygen to bridge. From perturbations of the MCD and VTVH MCD the iron proximal to Y51 can be assigned as the 4-coordinate center and XAS results show that Y51 is not bound to this iron in the reduced state. The two open coordination positions on one iron in the biferrous state would become occupied by dioxygen and Y51 along the O2 reaction coordinate. Subsequent binding of Y51 functions as an internal spectral probe of the O2 reaction and as a proton source that would promote loss of H2O2. Coordination by a ligand that functions as a proton source could be a structural mechanism used by natural binuclear iron enzymes to drive their reactions past peroxo biferric level intermediates. PMID:19090676

  1. Synthesis and biological activity of alkynoic acids derivatives against mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Vilchèze, Catherine; Leung, Lawrence W.; Bittman, Robert; Jacobs, William R.

    2015-01-01

    2-alkynoic acids have bactericidal activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis but their activity fall sharply as the length of the carbon chain increased. In this study, derivatives of 2- alkynoic acids were synthesized and tested against fast- and slow-growing mycobacteria. Their activity was first evaluated in M. smegmatis against their parental 2-alkynoic acids, as well as isoniazid, a first-line antituberculosis drug. The introduction of additional unsaturation or heteroatoms into the carbon chain enhanced the antimycobacterial activity of longer chain alkynoic acids (more than 19 carbons long). In contrast, although the modification of the carboxylic group did not improve the antimycobacterial activity, it significantly reduced the toxicity of the compounds against eukaryotic cells. Importantly, 4-(alkylthio)but-2-ynoic acids, had better bactericidal activity than the parental 2-alkynoic acids and on a par with isoniazid against the slow-grower Mycobacterium bovis BCG. These compounds had also low toxicity against eukaryotic cells, suggesting that they could be potential therapeutic agents against other types of topical mycobacterial infections causing skin diseases including Mycobacterium abscessus, Mycobacterium ulcerans, and Mycobacterium leprae. Moreover, they provide a possible scaffold for future drug development. PMID:26256431

  2. Biological Activities of Aerial Parts Extracts of Euphorbia characias

    PubMed Central

    Pisano, Maria Barbara; Cosentino, Sofia; Viale, Silvia; Spanò, Delia; Corona, Angela; Esposito, Francesca; Tramontano, Enzo; Montoro, Paola; Tuberoso, Carlo Ignazio Giovanni; Medda, Rosaria; Pintus, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate antioxidant, antimicrobial, anti-HIV, and cholinesterase inhibitory activities of aqueous and alcoholic extracts from leaves, stems, and flowers of Euphorbia characias. The extracts showed a high antioxidant activity and were a good source of total polyphenols and flavonoids. Ethanolic extracts from leaves and flowers displayed the highest inhibitory activity against acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase, showing potential properties against Alzheimer's disease. Antimicrobial assay showed that leaves and flowers extracts were active against all Gram-positive bacteria tested. The ethanolic leaves extract appeared to have the strongest antibacterial activity against Bacillus cereus with MIC value of 312.5 μg/mL followed by Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus that also exhibited good sensitivity with MIC values of 1250 μg/mL. Moreover, all the extracts possessed anti-HIV activity. The ethanolic flower extract was the most potent inhibitor of HIV-1 RT DNA polymerase RNA-dependent and Ribonuclease H with IC50 values of 0.26 and 0.33 μg/mL, respectively. The LC-DAD metabolic profile showed that ethanolic leaves extract contains high levels of quercetin derivatives. This study suggests that Euphorbia characias extracts represent a good source of natural bioactive compounds which could be useful for pharmaceutical application as well as in food system for the prevention of the growth of food-borne bacteria and to extend the shelf-life of processed foods. PMID:27314007

  3. Synthesis, characterization and biological activities of Cu(II), Co(II), Mn(II), Fe(II), and UO2(VI) complexes with a new Schiff Base hydrazone: O-hydroxyacetophenone-7-chloro-4-quinoline hydrazone.

    PubMed

    Al-Shaalan, Nora H

    2011-10-13

    The Schiff base hydrazone ligand HL was prepared by the condensation reaction of 7-chloro-4-quinoline with o-hydroxyacetophenone. The ligand behaves either as monobasic bidentate or dibasic tridentate and contain ONN coordination sites. This was accounted for be the presence in the ligand of a phenolic azomethine and imine groups. It reacts with Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Mn(II), UO(2) (VI) and Fe(II) to form either mono- or binuclear complexes. The ligand and its metal complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, IR, NMR, Mass, and UV-Visible spectra. The magnetic moments and electrical conductance of the complexes were also determined. The Co(II), Ni(II) and UO(2) (VI) complexes are mononuclear and coordinated to NO sites of two ligand molecules. The Cu(II) complex has a square-planar geometry distorted towards tetrahedral, the Ni(II) complex is octahedral while the UO(2) (VI) complex has its favoured heptacoordination. The Co(II), Mn(II) complexes and also other Ni(II) and Fe(III) complexes, which were obtained in the presence of Li(OH) as deprotonating agent, are binuclear and coordinated via the NNNO sites of two ligand molecules. All the binuclear complexes have octahedral geometries and their magnetic moments are quite low compared to the calculated value for two metal ions complexes and thus antiferromagnetic interactions between the two adjacent metal ions. The ligand HL and metal complexes were tested against a strain of Gram +ve bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus), Gram -ve bacteria (Escherichia coli), and fungi (Candida albicans). The tested compounds exhibited high antibacterial activities.

  4. Terpenes from the soft corals of the genus Sarcophyton: chemistry and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Liang, Lin-Fu; Guo, Yue-Wei

    2013-12-01

    This review covers structural diversity and biological activities of terpenes from soft corals of the genus of Sarcophyton, reported from 1995 to July, 2011. During this period, besides undefined species, 16 species of the genus Sarcophyton, from different geographical areas, had been chemically examined. Two hundred and five terpenes had been isolated from this genus, including eleven sesquiterpenes, 165 diterpenes, 29 biscembranoids, some of which had novel skeletons. They exhibited various biological features, such as antifeedant, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and antifouling activities.

  5. Effect of cooking and cold storage on biologically active antibiotic residues in meat.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, J. J.; Campbell, N.; Conaghan, T.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to see if cooking or cold storage would destroy or decrease the level of biologically active antibiotic in tissues from animals given therapeutic doses of antibiotic on three occasions prior to slaughter. The effects of cooking and cold storage on the biological activity of the residues of ampicillin, chloramphenicol, oxytetracycline, streptomycin and sulphadimidine were varied; in some instances the effects were minimal, in others nil. PMID:7310129

  6. Natural occurring 2-(2-phenylethyl) chromones, structure elucidation and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Sabrin R M; Mohamed, Gamal A

    2015-01-01

    2-(2-Phenylethyl) chromone (PEC), an uncommon class of chromones, possesses a phenylethyl substituent at the C2 position. They have been isolated from a few plant species. They have promising biological activities such as neuro-protective, cytotoxic, acetylcholinesterase inhibitory, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory. This review focuses on the naturally occurring PEC derivatives, their sources, physical and spectral data, as well as biological activities.

  7. Low Budget Biology. A Collection of Low Cost Labs and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wartski, Bert; Wartski, Lynn Marie

    This document contains a collection of low cost labs and activities. The activities are organized into the following units: Chemistry; Microbiology; DNA to Chromosomes; Genetics; Evolution; Classification, Protist, and Fungus; Plant; Invertebrate; Human Biology; and Ecology and Miscellaneous. Some of the activities within these units include: (1)…

  8. Research and Teaching: Instructor Use of Group Active Learning in an Introductory Biology Sequence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auerbach, Anna Jo; Schussler, Elisabeth E.

    2016-01-01

    Active learning (or learner-centered) pedagogies have been shown to enhance student learning in introductory biology courses. Student collaboration has also been shown to enhance student learning and may be a critical part of effective active learning practices. This study focused on documenting the use of individual active learning and group…

  9. Research and Teaching: Instructor Use of Group Active Learning in an Introductory Biology Sequence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auerbach, Anna Jo; Schussler, Elisabeth E.

    2016-01-01

    Active learning (or learner-centered) pedagogies have been shown to enhance student learning in introductory biology courses. Student collaboration has also been shown to enhance student learning and may be a critical part of effective active learning practices. This study focused on documenting the use of individual active learning and group…

  10. Using Active Learning in a Studio Classroom to Teach Molecular Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nogaj, Luiza A.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the conversion of a lecture-based molecular biology course into an active learning environment in a studio classroom. Specific assignments and activities are provided as examples. The goal of these activities is to involve students in collaborative learning, teach them how to participate in the learning process, and give…

  11. Low Budget Biology. A Collection of Low Cost Labs and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wartski, Bert; Wartski, Lynn Marie

    This document contains a collection of low cost labs and activities. The activities are organized into the following units: Chemistry; Microbiology; DNA to Chromosomes; Genetics; Evolution; Classification, Protist, and Fungus; Plant; Invertebrate; Human Biology; and Ecology and Miscellaneous. Some of the activities within these units include: (1)…

  12. Using Active Learning in a Studio Classroom to Teach Molecular Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nogaj, Luiza A.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the conversion of a lecture-based molecular biology course into an active learning environment in a studio classroom. Specific assignments and activities are provided as examples. The goal of these activities is to involve students in collaborative learning, teach them how to participate in the learning process, and give…

  13. Biological activities and chemical composition of lichens from Serbia

    PubMed Central

    Kosanic, Marijana; Rankovic, Branislav; Stanojkovic, Tatjana; Vasiljevic, Perica; Manojlovic, Nedeljko

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate chemical composition of acetone extracts of the lichens Parmelia arseneana and Acarospora fuscata and in vitro antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activities of these extracts and gyrophoric acid isolated from A. fuscata. The HPLC-UV method was used for the identification of secondary metabolites. Stictic acid, norstictic acid, gyrophoric acid, usnic acid, atranorin and chloroatranorin were identified in the A. fuscata. In P. arseneana, we detected stictic acid, norstictic acid, usnic acid and atranorin, while gyrophoric acid was not identified. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by measuring the scavenging capacity of tested samples on DPPH and superoxide anion radicals, reducing the power of samples and determination of total phenolic compounds in extracts. As a result of the study, gyrophoric acid was found to have the largest DPPH radical scavenging activity with an IC50 value of 105.75 µg/ml. Moreover, the tested samples had an effective superoxide anion radical scavenging and reducing power. The total content of phenol in extracts was determined as pyrocatechol equivalent. The antimicrobial activity was estimated by determination of the minimal inhibitory concentration by the broth microdilution method. The most active was also gyrophoric acid, with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 0.019 to 1.25 mg/ml. Anticancer activity was tested against LS174 (human colon carcinoma cell line), A549 (human lung carcinoma cell line), Fem-x (malignant melanoma cell line), and a chronic myelogeneous leukaemia K562 cell line using the MTT method. Extract of P. arseneana expressed the strongest anticancer activity against all cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 11.61 to 47.06 µg/ml. PMID:26417336

  14. Biologic therapy improves psoriasis by decreasing the activity of monocytes and neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Keiichi; Umezawa, Yoshinori; Yamagiwa, Akisa; Saeki, Hidehisa; Kondo, Makoto; Gabazza, Esteban C; Nakagawa, Hidemi; Mizutani, Hitoshi

    2014-08-01

    Therapy with monoclonal antibodies to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and the interleukin (IL)-12/23 p40 subunit has significantly improved the clinical outcome of patients with psoriasis. These antibodies inhibit the effects of the target cytokines and thus the major concern during their use is the induction of excessive immunosuppression. Recent studies evaluating the long-term efficacy and safety of biologic therapy in psoriasis have shown no significant appearance of serious adverse effects including infections and malignancies. However, the immunological consequence and the mechanism by which the blockade of a single cytokine by biologics can successfully control the activity of psoriasis remain unclear. In the current study, we investigated the effect of biologic therapy on cytokine production of various lymphocytes and on the activity of monocytes and neutrophils in psoriatic patients. Neutrophils, monocytes and T cells were purified from heparinized peripheral venous blood by Ficoll density gradient centrifugation, and γ-interferon, TNF-α and IL-17 production from lymphocytes was measured by flow cytometer. The activation maker of neutrophils and the activated subsets of monocytes were also analyzed. Biologic therapy induced no significant changes in the cytokine production by lymphocytes from the skin and gut-homing T cells. However, neutrophil activity and the ratio of activated monocyte population increased in severely psoriatic patients were normalized in psoriatic patients receiving biologic therapy. The present study showed that biologic therapy ameliorates clinical symptoms and controls the immune response in patients with psoriasis.

  15. Spectroscopic study of molecular structure, antioxidant activity and biological effects of metal hydroxyflavonol complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonowicz, Mariola; Regulska, Ewa

    2017-02-01

    Flavonols with varied hydroxyl substitution can act as strong antioxidants. Thanks to their ability to chelate metals as well as to donate hydrogen atoms they have capacity to scavenge free radicals. Their metal complexes are often more active in comparison with free ligands. They exhibit interesting biological properties, e.g. anticancer, antiphlogistic and antibacterial. The relationship between molecular structure and their biological properties was intensively studied using spectroscopic methods (UV-Vis, IR, Raman, NMR, ESI-MS). The aim of this paper is review on spectroscopic analyses of molecular structure and biological activity of hydroxyflavonol metal complexes.

  16. Smart interactive electronic system for monitoring the electromagnetic activities of biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, Sorin G.; Shahinpoor, Mohsen

    2001-08-01

    A novel electronic device capable of sensing and monitoring the myoelectric, polarization wave and electromagnetic activities of the biological systems and in particular the human body is presented. It is known that all the physical and chemical processes within biological systems are associated with polarization, depolarization waves from the brain, neural signals and myoelectric processes that manifest themselves in ionic and dipole motion. The technology developed in our laboratory is based on certain charge motion sensitive electronics. The electronic system developed is capable of sensing the electromagnetic activities of biological systems. The information obtained is then processed by specialized software in order to interpret it from physical and chemical point of view.

  17. The chemistry and biological activity of heterocycle-fused quinolinone derivatives: A review.

    PubMed

    Shiro, Tomoya; Fukaya, Takayuki; Tobe, Masanori

    2015-06-05

    Among all heterocycles, the heterocycle-fused quinolinone scaffold is one of the privileged structures in drug discovery as heterocycle-fused quinolinone derivatives exhibit various biological activities allowing them to act as anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antidiabetic, and antipsychotic agents. This wide spectrum of biological activity has attracted a great deal of attention in the field of medicinal chemistry. In this review, we provide a comprehensive description of the biological and pharmacological properties of various heterocycle-fused quinolinone scaffolds and discuss the synthetic methods of some of their derivatives.

  18. Biological activity of alkaloids from Solanum dulcamara L.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Padma; Sharma, Bindu; Bakshi, Nidhi

    2009-01-01

    Alkaloids are well known for their antimicrobial activity. Though all natural alkaloids come from plants, not all plants produce alkaloids. Plants of the Solanaceae family are known for their high alkaloid content. Alkaloids are found in all plant parts like roots, stems, leaves, flowers, fruits and seeds. In the present study, those plant parts of Solanum dulcamara were selected which have been reported to produce a high content of a specific alkaloid: solanine (from unripe fruits), solasodine (from flowers) and beta-solamarine (from roots). These alkaloids were extracted from various parts of S. dulcamara by well-established methods and were screened for their antibacterial activity. Human pathogenic bacteria, viz., Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, were selected for the study. All three alkaloids inhibited the growth of E. coli and S. aureus. However, no significant activity was observed against E. aerogenes. Minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration were also evaluated.

  19. Phytochemical components and biological activities of Silene arenarioides Desf.

    PubMed

    Golea, Lynda; Benkhaled, Mohammed; Lavaud, Catherine; Long, Christophe; Haba, Hamada

    2017-02-24

    In this study, six known compounds 1-6 were isolated from the aerial parts of Silene arenarioides Desf. using different chromatographic methods. The structures of these compounds were identified as maltol glycoside (1), soyacerebroside I (2), chrysin (3), apigenin (4), quercetin (5) and stigmasterol glucoside (6). The compounds (1) and (2) are reported for the first time from this genus. The isolated compounds were determined using NMR techniques ((1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, COSY, HSQC and HMBC) and mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS). The antibacterial and antioxidant activities of extracts and of compound (1) have been evaluated. The antioxidant activity was performed by DPPH radical scavenging method, which showed that methanol extract possesses a good antioxidant activity with value of IC50 = 8.064 ± 0.005 μg/mL.

  20. Papaya seed represents a rich source of biologically active isothiocyanate.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Yoshimoto, Motoko; Murata, Yoshiyuki; Shimoishi, Yasuaki; Asai, Yumi; Park, Eun Young; Sato, Kenji; Nakamura, Yasushi

    2007-05-30

    In the present study, papaya (Carica papaya) seed and edible pulp were carefully separated and then the contents of benzyl isothiocyanate and the corresponding glucosinolate (benzyl glucosinolate, glucotropaeolin) quantified in each part. The papaya seed with myrosinase inactivation contained >1 mmol of benzyl glucosinolate in 100 g of fresh seed. This content is equivalent to that of Karami daikon (the hottest Japanese white radish) or that of cress. The papaya seed extract also showed a very high activity of myrosinase and, without myrosinase inactivation, produced 460 micromol of benzyl isothiocyanate in 100 g of seed. In contrast, papaya pulp contained an undetectable amount of benzyl glucosinolate and showed no significant myrosinase activity. The n-hexane extract of the papaya seed homogenate was highly effective in inhibiting superoxide generation and apoptosis induction in HL-60 cells, the activities of which are comparable to those of authentic benzyl isothiocyanate.

  1. Investigation of some biologic activities of Swertia longifolia Boiss

    PubMed Central

    Hajimehdipoor, H.; Esmaeili, S.; Shekarchi, M.; Emrarian, T.; Naghibi, F.

    2013-01-01

    Swertia species are widespread in Eastern and Southern Asian countries and used in traditional medicine as anti-pyretic, analgesic, gastro and liver tonic. Among different species, only Swertia longifolia grows in Iran. In this investigation, antioxidant, cytotoxic and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activities of S. longifolia have been studied. Aerial parts and roots of the plant were collected, dried and extracted with methanol 80% (total extract). Different extracts of the plant were obtained using hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, methanol, methanol:water (1:1) and water, respectively. Cytotoxic activity was determined by MTT assay on MDBK, HepG2, MCF7, HT29 and A549 cell lines. Antioxidant activity was measured by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) free radicals and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory (AChEI) effect was evaluated based on Ellman’s method in 96-well microplates.The results showed no cytotoxicity of the plant extracts on MDBK, HepG2, MCF7, HT29 and A549 cell lines up to 100 μg/ml. All samples showed radical scavenging activity but methanol extract of aerial parts and ethyl acetate extract of the roots showed the highest effects.Total extract of the roots showed higher AChEI activity than the aerial parts. Among different extracts, chloroform and ethyl acetate extracts of the roots and chloroform and methanol:water extracts of the aerial parts were more potent in AChEI assay. It is concluded that aerial parts and roots of the plant are rich in antioxidant agents with no cytotoxicity on selected cell lines up to 100 μg/ml. Moreover, since antioxidant and AChEI activity of compounds play an important role in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disorder, this plant might be a potential candidate for isolation of antioxidant and AChEI compounds which could be used as supportive treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:24082894

  2. Phytochemical and biological activities of Bituminaria bituminosa L. (Fabaceae).

    PubMed

    Azzouzi, Salima; Zaabat, Nabila; Medjroubi, Kamel; Akkal, Salah; Benlabed, Kadour; Smati, Farida; Dijoux-Franca, Marie-Geneviève

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the phytochemical composition, the antioxidant and antibacterial activities of Bituminaria bituminosa L. (Fabaceae) (B. bituminosa). The aerial parts of B. bituminosa yielded two compounds. The structures of these compounds were determinated using UV, (1)H-NMR and (13)C-NMR experiments and comparison of their spectroscopic properties with literature data. The antibacterial activity of the extracts (CH2Cl2, ethyl acetate and n-BuOH) was determinated using disk diffusion method against standard and clinical strains. Antioxidant potential of n-BuOH extract was evaluated through two methods: DPPH and cupric ion reducing antioxidant capacity assay. The n-BuOH extract from B. bituminosa yielded the isolation of isoflavone and flavone. The extracts CH2Cl2, ethyl acetate and n-BuOH demonstrated significant antibacterial activities. CH2Cl2 extract showed the maximum antibacterial activity with high concentration of 2 mg/mL against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213, Klebsiella pneumonia and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 (20.45 mm, 16.41 mm and 15.74 mm inhibition zone, respectively). The value IC50 was 0.26 μg/mL for n-BuOH extract using DPPH method. Whereas the E% value was 0.10 L/mg every centimeter for cupric ion reducing antioxidant capacity assay. The phytochemical study of B. bituminosa revealed the presence of isoflavone (daidzin) and flavone (isoorientin) and identified for the first time in this specie. The antibacterial activity of the plant B. bituminosa is certainly related to its chemical content. The n-BuOH extract showed a significant antioxidant activity. Copyright © 2014 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Detection and Investigation of Soil Biological Activity against Meloidogyne incognita

    PubMed Central

    Bent, E.; Loffredo, A.; McKenry, M. V.; Becker, J. O.; Borneman, J.

    2008-01-01

    Greenhouse experiments with two susceptible hosts of Meloidogyne incognita, a dwarf tomato and wheat, led to the identification of a soil in which the root-knot nematode population was reduced 5- to 16-fold compared to identical but pasteurized soil two months after infestation with 280 M. incognita J2/100 cm3 soil. This suppressive soil was subjected to various temperature, fumigation and dilution treatments, planted with tomato, and infested with 1,000 eggs of M. incognita/100 cm3 soil. Eight weeks after nematode infestation, distinct differences in nematode population densities were observed among the soil treatments, suggesting the suppressiveness had a biological nature. A fungal rRNA gene analysis (OFRG) performed on M. incognita egg masses collected at the end of the greenhouse experiments identified 11 fungal phylotypes, several of which exhibited associations with one or more of the nematode population density measurements (egg masses, eggs or J2). The phylotype containing rRNA genes with high sequence identity to Pochonia chlamydosporia exhibited the strongest negative associations. The negative correlation between the densities of the P. chlamydosporia genes and the nematodes was corroborated by an analysis using a P. chlamydosporia-selective qPCR assay. PMID:19259527

  4. Biological activity of Leu-enkephalin containing hydrophobic moieties.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, R E; Reig, F; Valencia, G; Herrero, J F; Garcia Anton, J

    1986-01-01

    A series of enkephalin analogues (Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Leu-C-NH-R;R=C6,C8,C10,C12 and C14; C=CH2 groups) with increasing hydrophobic character have been tested behaviourally in the analgesic hot plate and tail flick tests. The analogues were administered intraperitoneally and were found to possess anti-nociceptive activity. The results indicate that apparently there is not a direct relationship between increasing hydrophobicity and activity of the enkephalin-alkyl-amide analogues. The enkephalin analogues were found to behave in the same way as the enkephalins in producing tolerance.

  5. Biological activity of Paecilomyces genus against Toxocara canis eggs.

    PubMed

    Basualdo, J A; Ciarmela, M L; Sarmiento, P L; Minvielle, M C

    2000-10-01

    Saprophytic soil fungi can exert ovicidal and ovistatic effects on helminths with differing degrees of efficiency. The representatives of such fungi from temperate regions, Paecilomyces lilacinus (Thom) Samson and P. marquandii (Masse) Hughes, exhibit recognized ovicidal activity on some nematodes. We evaluated the action in vitro of P. lilacinus and P. marquandii on the zoonotic canine roundworm eggs of Toxocara canis. Eggs exposed and unexposed to fungal samples were observed by both light and scanning electron microscopy on days 4, 7 and 14 post-inoculation. Ovicidal activity of P. lilacinus on T. canis eggs was considered to be high and that of P. marquandii to be intermediate.

  6. The biological activity of a novel pyrethroid: metofluthrin.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Masayo; Ishiwatari, Takao

    2012-01-01

    Metofluthrin (commercial name: SumiOne(®), Eminence(®)) is a novel pyrethroid insecticide developed by Sumitomo Chemical Co., Ltd. Metofluthrin has extremely high insecticidal activity to various pest insects, especially to mosquitoes. In addition, Metofluthrin has relatively high volatility and low mammalian toxicity. Metofluthrin is therefore suitable for use not only in conventional mosquito control formulations such as coils and liquid vaporizers, but also in a variety of novel devices that do not require heating, such as fan vaporizers and paper and resin emanators. Here we describe the insecticidal activity of Metofluthrin mainly against mosquitoes in various formulations in both laboratory and field trials.

  7. Activated Sludge. Instructor's Guide. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boe, Owen K.

    This instructor's guide contains the materials needed to teach a seven-lesson unit on activated sludge. These materials include an overview of the unit, lesson plans, lecture outlines (keyed to slides designed for use with the lessons), student worksheets for each of the seven lessons (with answers), and two copies of a final quiz (with and…

  8. Marine Biology Field Trip Sites. Ocean Related Curriculum Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauls, John

    The ocean affects all of our lives. Therefore, awareness of and information about the interconnections between humans and oceans are prerequisites to making sound decisions for the future. Project ORCA (Ocean Related Curriculum Activities) has developed interdisciplinary curriculum materials designed to meet the needs of students and teachers…

  9. Biological activity of Schinus molle on Triatoma infestans.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, A A; Werdin González, J O; Sánchez Chopa, C

    2006-07-01

    Hexanic extracts from leaves and fruits of Schinus molle were tested for repellent and insecticidal properties against first instar nymphs and eggs of Triatoma infestans, the vector of Chagas' disease. Leaf and fruit extracts were highly repellent for first nymphs. Fruit extracts had also ovicidal activity.

  10. Biological activities of extracts from cultivated Granadilla Passiflora alata.

    PubMed

    Vasic, Sava M; Stefanovic, Olgica D; Licina, Braho Z; Radojevic, Ivana D; Comic, Ljiljana R

    2012-01-01

    Research conducted in this study showed the influence of ethanol, acetone and ethyl acetate extracts of the outgrowth of cultivated Passiflora alata on microorganisms, as well as the antioxidant activity and the concentrations of total phenols, flavonoids and tannins. In vitro antimicrobial activities of extracts were studied on 27 species of microorganisms, of which 17 species of bacteria and 10 species of fungi. The strongest antimicrobial activity was detected on G+ bacteria while the activities on other species were moderate. Ethyl acetate extract showed the strongest effect. The concentrations of total phenols were examined by using Folin-Ciocalteu reagent and the obtained values ranged from 14.04 to 34.22 mg GA/g. By using aluminium chloride method, the concentrations of flavonoids were obtained and the values ranged from 33.19 to 62.30 mg RU/g. In determining the amount of tannins we used the method with buthanol-HCl reagent and the obtained value was 5.1 % of dry matter. The efficiency of antioxidation, which we identified through the reduction of DPPH, was in the range from 808.69 to 1107.79 µg/ml for a particular IC50, and AAI values were between 0.07 and 0.10. The best parameters were shown by ethanol extract. All data were statistically analyzed. Overall, extracts showed potential for further investigation and use.

  11. Programming biological operating systems: genome design, assembly and activation.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Daniel G

    2014-05-01

    The DNA technologies developed over the past 20 years for reading and writing the genetic code converged when the first synthetic cell was created 4 years ago. An outcome of this work has been an extraordinary set of tools for synthesizing, assembling, engineering and transplanting whole bacterial genomes. Technical progress, options and applications for bacterial genome design, assembly and activation are discussed.

  12. Acyclic glycosidopyrroles analogues of ganciclovir: synthesis and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Diana, P; Barraja, P; Almerico, A M; Dattolo, G; Mingoia, F; Loi, A G; Congeddu, E; Musiu, C; Putzolu, M; La Colla, P

    1997-05-01

    Acyclic glycosidopyrroles of type 3 were synthetized in good overall yields, according to the Scheme. When evaluated for antiviral activity against DNA and RNA viruses, only compound in which R1 = R2 = Ph, R3 = NH2 was found to inhibit the HIV-1 replication at concentrations that were not cytotoxic for MT-4 cells.

  13. Synthesis and biological activity of salinomycin conjugates with floxuridine.

    PubMed

    Huczyński, Adam; Antoszczak, Michał; Kleczewska, Natalia; Lewandowska, Marta; Maj, Ewa; Stefańska, Joanna; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Janczak, Jan; Celewicz, Lech

    2015-03-26

    As part of our program to develop anticancer agents, we have synthesized new compounds, which are conjugates between well-known anticancer drug, floxuridine and salinomycin which is able to selectivity kill cancer stem cells. The conjugates were obtained in two ways i.e. by copper(I) catalysed click Huisgen cycloaddition reaction performed between 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxy-5-fluorouridine and salinomycin propargyl amide, and by the ester synthesis starting from salinomycin and floxuridine under mild condition. The compounds obtained were characterized by spectroscopic methods and evaluated for their in vitro cytotoxicity against seven human cancer cell lines as well as antibacterial activity against clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE). The conjugate obtained by esterification reaction showed a significantly higher antiproliferative activity against the drug-resistant cancer cells and lower toxicity than those of salinomycin and floxuridine towards normal cells, as well as standard anticancer drugs, such as cisplatin and doxorubicin. The conjugate compound revealed also moderate activity against MRSA and MRSE bacterial strains. Very high activity of floxuridine and 5-fluorouracil against MRSA and MRSE has been also observed.

  14. Biological activities of extracts from cultivated Granadilla Passiflora alata

    PubMed Central

    Vasic, Sava M.; Stefanovic, Olgica D.; Licina, Braho Z.; Radojevic, Ivana D.; Comic, Ljiljana R.

    2012-01-01

    Research conducted in this study showed the influence of ethanol, acetone and ethyl acetate extracts of the outgrowth of cultivated Passiflora alata on microorganisms, as well as the antioxidant activity and the concentrations of total phenols, flavonoids and tannins. In vitro antimicrobial activities of extracts were studied on 27 species of microorganisms, of which 17 species of bacteria and 10 species of fungi. The strongest antimicrobial activity was detected on G+ bacteria while the activities on other species were moderate. Ethyl acetate extract showed the strongest effect. The concentrations of total phenols were examined by using Folin-Ciocalteu reagent and the obtained values ranged from 14.04 to 34.22 mg GA/g. By using aluminium chloride method, the concentrations of flavonoids were obtained and the values ranged from 33.19 to 62.30 mg RU/g. In determining the amount of tannins we used the method with buthanol-HCl reagent and the obtained value was 5.1 % of dry matter. The efficiency of antioxidation, which we identified through the reduction of DPPH, was in the range from 808.69 to 1107.79 µg/ml for a particular IC50, and AAI values were between 0.07 and 0.10. The best parameters were shown by ethanol extract. All data were statistically analyzed. Overall, extracts showed potential for further investigation and use. PMID:27385958

  15. Phenolic compounds and biological activity of Kitaibelia vitifolia.

    PubMed

    Mašković, Pavle; Solujić, Slavica; Mihailović, Vladimir; Mladenović, Milan; Cvijović, Milica; Mladenović, Jelena; Aćamović-Đoković, Gordana; Kurćubić, Vladimir

    2011-12-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the antioxidant activity and efficacy of the ethanolic extract of the endemic plant species Kitaibelia vitifolia in inhibiting the growth of selected fungi and bacteria. Antimicrobial activity was tested using the broth dilution procedure for determination of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). MICs were determined for eight selected indicator strains. The highest susceptibility to K. vitifolia ethanolic extract among the bacteria tested was exhibited by Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, and Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 13883 (MIC=15.62 μg/mL), followed by Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Proteus mirabilis ATCC 14153 (MIC=31.25 μg/mL), and Proteus vulgaris ATCC 13315 (MIC=62.50 μg/mL). Of the fungi, Candida albicans ATCC 10231 (MIC=15.62 μg/mL) showed the highest susceptibility, and Aspergillus niger ATCC 16404 (MIC=31.25 μg/mL) had the lowest. Results showed that K. vitifolia extract possesses antioxidant activity, with total antioxidant capacity of 75.45±0.68 μg of ascorbic acid/g and 50% inhibition concentration values of 47.45±0.55 μg/mL for 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging activity, 35.35±0.68 μg/mL for inhibitory activity against lipid peroxidation, 95.25±0.52 μg/mL for hydroxyl radical scavenging activity, and 31.50±0.35 μg/mL for metal chelating activity. Total phenolics, flavonoids, condensed tannins, and gallotannins were 85.25±0.69 mg of gallic acid (GA)/g, 45.32±0.55 mg of rutin/g, 54.25±0.75 mg of GA/g, and 41.74±0.55 mg of GA/g, respectively. The phenolic composition of K. vitifolia extract was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Rosmarinic acid was found to be the dominant phenolic compound of the extract.

  16. Ergosteroids. II: Biologically active metabolites and synthetic derivatives of dehydroepiandrosterone.

    PubMed

    Lardy, H; Kneer, N; Wei, Y; Partridge, B; Marwah, P

    1998-03-01

    An improved procedure for the synthesis of 3 beta-hydroxyandrost-5-ene-7,17-dione, a natural metabolite of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is described. The synthesis and magnetic resonance spectra of several other related steroids are presented. Feeding dehydroepiandrosterone to rats induces enhanced formation of several liver enzymes among which are mitochondrial sn-glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) and cytosolic malic enzyme. The induction of these two enzymes, that complete a thermogenic system in rat liver, was used as an assay to search for derivatives of DHEA that might be more active than the parent steroid. Activity is retained in steroids that are reduced to the corresponding 17 beta-hydroxy derivative, or hydroxylated at 7 alpha or 7 beta, and is considerably enhanced when the 17-hydroxy or 17-carbonyl steroid is converted to the 7-oxo derivative. Several derivatives of DHEA did not induce the thermogenic enzymes whereas the corresponding 7-oxo compounds did. Both short and long chain acyl esters of DHEA and of 7-oxo-DHEA are active inducers of the liver enzymes when fed to rats. 7-Oxo-DHEA-3-sulfate is as active as 7-oxo-DHEA or its 3-acetyl ester, whereas DHEA-3-sulfate is much less active than DHEA. Among many steroids tested, those possessing a carbonyl group at position 3, a methyl group at 7, a hydroxyl group at positions 1, 2, 4, 11, or 19, or a saturated B ring, with or without a 4-5 double bond, were inactive.

  17. Biologically Inspired Photocatalytically Active Membranes for Water Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsinger, Nichola M.

    There is an alarming increase of a variety of new chemicals that are now being discharged into the wastewater system causing increased concern for public health and safety because many are not removed by typical wastewater treatment practices. Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) is a heterogeneous photocatalytic material that rapidly and completely mineralizing organics without harmful byproducts. TiO2 is synthesized by various methods, which lack the necessary control of crystal size, phase, and morphological features that yield optimized semiconductor materials. Mineralizing organisms demonstrate how nature can produce elegant structures at room temperature through controlled organic-mineral interactions. Here, we utilize biologically-inspired scaffolds to template the nucleation and growth of inorganic materials such as TiO2, which aid in controlling the size and phase of these particles and ultimately, their properties. Nanosized rutile and anatase particles were synthesized under solution conditions at relatively low temperatures and mild pH conditions. The effects of reaction conditions on phase and grain size were investigated and discussed from coordination chemistry and coarsening mechanisms. Photocatalytic characterization of TiO2 phase mixtures was performed to investigate their synergistic effect. The suspension conditions of these catalytic nanomaterials were modulated to optimize the degradation rate of organic analytes. Through the addition of an organic scaffold during the synthesis reaction, a mechanically robust (elastic) composite material containing TiO2 nanoparticles was produced. This composite was subsequently heat-treated to produce a porous, high surface area TiO2 nanoparticulate membrane. Processing conditions were investigated to characterize the growth and phase transformation of TiO2, which ultimately impacts photocatalytic performance. These bulk porous TiO2 structures can be fabricated and tailored to act as stand-alone photocatalytic membranes

  18. Biologic activity of cyclic and caged phosphates: a review.

    PubMed

    Lorke, Dietrich E; Stegmeier-Petroianu, Anka; Petroianu, Georg A

    2017-01-01

    The recognition in the early 1960s by Morifusa Eto that tri-o-cresyl phosphate (TOCP) is hydroxylated by the cytochrome P450 system to an intermediate that spontaneously cyclizes to a neurotoxic phosphate (saligenin phosphate ester) ignited the interest in this group of compounds. Only the ortho isomer can cyclize and clinically cause Organo Phosphate Induced Delayed Neurotoxicity (OPIDN); the meta and para isomers of tri-cresyl phosphate are not neuropathic because they are unable to form stable cyclic saligenin phosphate esters. This review identifies the diverse biological effects associated with various cyclic and caged phosphates and phosphonates and their possible use. Cyclic compounds that inhibit acetylcholine esterase (AChE), such as salithion, can be employed as pesticides. Others are neurotoxic, most probably because of inhibition of neuropathy target esterase (NTE). Cyclic phosphates that inhibit lipases, the cyclipostins, possibly represent promising therapeutic avenues for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or microbial infections; those compounds inhibiting β-lactamase may prevent bacterial resistance against β-lactam antibiotics. Naturally occurring cyclic phosphates, such as cyclic AMP, cyclic phosphatidic acid and the ryanodine receptor modulator cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose, play an important physiological role in signal transduction. Moreover, some cyclic phosphates are GABA-antagonists, while others are an essential component of Molybdenum-containing enzymes. Some cyclic phosphates (cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide) are clinically used in tumor therapy, while the coupling of therapeutic agents with other cyclic phosphates (HepDirect® Technology) allows drugs to be targeted to specific organs. Possible clinical applications of these compounds are considered. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Systematic Perturbations of Binuclear Non-heme Iron Sites: Structure and Dioxygen Reactivity of de Novo Due Ferri Proteins.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Rae Ana; Betzu, Justine; Butch, Susan E; Reig, Amanda J; DeGrado, William F; Solomon, Edward I

    2015-08-04

    DFsc (single-chain due ferri) proteins allow for modeling binuclear non-heme iron enzymes with a similar fold. Three 4A → 4G variants of DFsc were studied to investigate the effects of (1) increasing the size of the substrate/solvent access channel (G4DFsc), (2) including an additional His residue in the first coordination sphere along with three additional helix-stabilizing mutations [3His-G4DFsc(Mut3)], and (3) the three helix-stabilizing mutations alone [G4DFsc(Mut3)] on the biferrous structures and their O2 reactivities. Near-infrared circular dichroism and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy show that the 4A → 4G mutations increase coordination of the diiron site from 4-coordinate/5-coordinate to 5-coordinate/5-coordinate, likely reflecting increased solvent accessibility. While the three helix-stabilizing mutations [G4DFsc(Mut3)] do not affect the coordination number, addition of the third active site His residue [3His-G4DFsc(Mut3)] results in a 5-coordinate/6-coordinate site. Although all 4A→ 4G variants have significantly slower pseudo-first-order rates when reacting with excess O2 than DFsc (∼2 s(-1)), G4DFsc and 3His-G4DFsc(Mut3) have rates (∼0.02 and ∼0.04 s(-1)) faster than that of G4DFsc(Mut3) (∼0.002 s(-1)). These trends in the rate of O2 reactivity correlate with exchange coupling between the Fe(II) sites and suggest that the two-electron reduction of O2 occurs through end-on binding at one Fe(II) rather than through a peroxy-bridged intermediate. UV-vis absorption and MCD spectroscopies indicate that an Fe(III)Fe(III)-OH species first forms in all three variants but converts into an Fe(III)-μ-OH-Fe(III) species only in the 2-His forms, a process inhibited by the additional active site His ligand that coordinatively saturates one of the iron centers in 3His-G4DFsc(Mut3).

  20. Systematic Perturbations of Binuclear Non-heme Iron Sites: Structure and Dioxygen Reactivity of de Novo Due Ferri Proteins

    DOE PAGES

    Snyder, Rae Ana; Betzu, Justine; Butch, Susan E.; ...

    2015-07-08

    We report that DFsc (single-chain due ferri) proteins allow for modeling binuclear non-heme iron enzymes with a similar fold. Three 4A → 4G variants of DFsc were studied to investigate the effects of (1) increasing the size of the substrate/solvent access channel (G4DFsc), (2) including an additional His residue in the first coordination sphere along with three additional helix-stabilizing mutations [3His-G4DFsc(Mut3)], and (3) the three helix-stabilizing mutations alone [G4DFsc-(Mut3)] on the biferrous structures and their O2 reactivities. Near-infrared circular dichroism and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy show that the 4A → 4G mutations increase coordination of the diiron site frommore » 4-coordinate/5-coordinate to 5-coordinate/5-coordinate, likely reflecting increased solvent accessibility. While the three helix-stabilizing mutations [G4DFsc(Mut3)] do not affect the coordination number, addition of the third active site His residue [3His-G4DFsc(Mut3)] results in a 5-coordinate/6-coordinate site. Although all 4A → 4G variants have significantly slower pseudo-first-order rates when reacting with excess O2 than DFsc (~2 s₋1), G4DFsc and 3His-G4DFsc(Mut3) have rates (~0.02 and ~0.04 s₋1) faster than that of G4DFsc(Mut3) (~0.002 s₋1). These trends in the rate of O2 reactivity correlate with exchange coupling between the Fe(II) sites and suggest that the two-electron reduction of O2 occurs through end-on binding at one Fe(II) rather than through a peroxy-bridged intermediate. Finally, UV–vis absorption and MCD spectroscopies indicate that an Fe(III)Fe(III)-OH species first forms in all three variants but converts into an Fe(III)-μ-OH-Fe(III) species only in the 2-His forms, a process inhibited by the additional active site His ligand that coordinatively saturates one of the iron centers in 3His-G4DFsc(Mut3).« less