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Sample records for biology ccr national

  1. Milligram Production and Biological Activity Characterization of the Human Chemokine Receptor CCR3

    PubMed Central

    Li, Renmin; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Lao, Jun; Huang, Fang

    2013-01-01

    Human chemokine receptor CCR3 (hCCR3) belongs to the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) superfamily of membrane proteins and plays major roles in allergic diseases and angiogenesis. In order to study the structural and functional mechanism of hCCR3, it is essential to produce pure protein with biological functions on a milligram scale. Here we report the expression of hCCR3 gene in a tetracycline-inducible stable mammalian cell line. A cell clone with high hCCR3 expression was selected from 46 stably transfected cell clones and from this cell line pure hCCR3 on a milligram scale was obtained after two-step purification. Circular dichroism spectrum with a characteristic shape and magnitude for α-helix indicated proper folding of hCCR3 after purification. The biological activity of purified hCCR3 was verified by its high binding affinity with its endogenous ligands CCL11 and CCL24, with KD in the range of 10−8 M to 10−6 M. PMID:23755240

  2. CEPPAD, CAMMICE, and RAPID (CCR) Data from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Comprehensive Energetic Particle and Pitch Angle Distribution (CEPPAD) Experiment, the Charge and Mass Magnetospheric Ion Composition Experiment (CAMMICE), and the experiment for Research with Adaptive Particle Imaging Detectors (RAPID) refer to specific instruments mounted on the Polar satellite launched by NASA in February of 1996 and the Cluster II spacecraft launched in 2000 under the auspices of the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC), Germany. All three instruments are participating in the International Solar Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP), to which the Global Geospace Science Program (GGSP) is the U.S. contribution. The CCR Science Team is composed of members of three instrument teams on the ISTP satellites POLAR and CLUSTER. DOE's Los Alamos National Laboratory is part of that team, and the CCR website is maintained at LANL. CCR Summary Data Plots are available from the LANL website through either the specialized browser or as digitized data from an anonymous FTP. ISTP data of various kinds can be obtained from NASA at http://pwg.gsfc.nasa.gov/istp/

  3. Synthesis and biological evaluation of spirocyclic antagonists of CCR2 (chemokine CC receptor subtype 2).

    PubMed

    Strunz, Ann Kathrin; Zweemer, Annelien J M; Weiss, Christina; Schepmann, Dirk; Junker, Anna; Heitman, Laura H; Koch, Michael; Wünsch, Bernhard

    2015-07-15

    Activation of chemokine CC receptors subtype 2 (CCR2) plays an important role in chronic inflammatory processes such as atherosclerosis, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. A diverse set of spirocyclic butanamides 4 (N-benzyl-4-(3,4-dihydrospiro[[2]benzopyran-1,4'-piperidin]-1'-yl)butanamides) was prepared by different combination of spirocyclic piperidines 8 (3,4-dihydrospiro[[2]benzopyran-1,4'-piperidines]) and γ-halobutanamides 11. A key step in the synthesis of spirocyclic piperidines 8 was an Oxa-Pictet-Spengler reaction of β-phenylethanols 5 with piperidone acetal 6. The substituted γ-hydroxybutanamides 11c-e were prepared by hydroxyethylation of methyl acetates 13 with ethylene sulfate giving the γ-lactones 14c and 14e. Aminolysis of the γ-lactones 14c and 14e with benzylamines provided the γ-hydroxybutanamides 15c-e, which were converted into the bromides 11c-e by an Appel reaction using polymer-bound PPh3. In radioligand binding assays the spirocyclic butanamides 4 did not displace the iodinated radioligand (125)I-CCL2 from the human CCR2. However, in the Ca(2+)-flux assay using human CCR2 strong antagonistic activity of butanamides 4 was detected. Analysis of the IC50-values led to clear relationships between the structure and the inhibition of the Ca(2+)-flux. 4g (4-(3,4-dihydrospiro[[2]benzopyran-1,4'-piperidin]-1'-yl)-N-[3,5-bis(trifluoromethylbenzyl)]-2-(4-fluorophenyl)butanamide) and 4o (N-[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]-2-cyclopropyl-4-(3,4-dihydrospiro[[2]benzopyran-1,4'-piperidin]-1'-yl)butanamide) represent the most potent CCR2 antagonists with IC50-values of 89 and 17nM, respectively. Micromolar activities were found in the β-arrestin recruitment assay with murine CCR2, but the structure-activity-relationships detected in the Ca(2+)-flux assay were confirmed. PMID:25766632

  4. Blood pressure regulation by CCR genes.

    PubMed

    Mettimano, Marco; Specchia, Maria Lucia; La Torre, Giuseppe; Bruno, Antonio; Ricciardi, Gualtiero; Savi, Luigi; Romano-Spica, Vincenzo

    2006-10-01

    New genetic evidence strongly supports a role for the immune system in the pathogenesis of essential hypertension (EH) through chemokines and their receptors (CCR) involvement. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible relation between CCR2 and CCR5 alleles and blood pressure (BP) levels in hypertensive subjects. In all, 118 essential hypertensive outpatients (male 90, female 28; stage I and II; age 27-54 years; not previously treated with antihypertensive drugs) were selected for the study. All of the subjects underwent office BP measurement. Subsequently, 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) was performed with a Spacelabs 90207 monitor during a regular working day. CCR264I and CCR5Delta32 polymorphisms were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), following the standard molecular biology protocols. Allelic frequencies were the following: CCR5Delta32= 0.097, CCR264I=0.101. Logistic regression analysis showed an association between the CCR5Delta32 allele and the following: 24-h systolic BP (SBP >140 mmHg; p = 0.027), values over the 50th percentile of 24-h SBP (p = 0.032), and the values over the 50th percentile of nighttime SBP (p = 0.039). Office BP showed an association with the Delta32 allele in a range over the 75th percentile of SBP (p = 0.087) and the 75th percentile of DBP (p = 0.085). No significant association was observed for CCR264I and BP levels or between physiological nocturnal BP decline and genotype. The observed results not only support the role of the immune system in the development and maintenance of hypertension, but they also indicate an influence of CCR5Delta32 polymorphism on the establishment of BP levels. PMID:17060059

  5. Analytical and biological considerations in the measurement of cell-associated CCR5 and CXCR4 mRNA and protein.

    PubMed

    Campbell, D E; Lai, J P; Tustin, N B; Riedel, E; Tustin, R; Taylor, J; Murray, J; Douglas, S D

    2010-07-01

    The accurate measurement of T cell-associated CC chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) and CXC chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) expression, including expression of CCR5 and CXCR4 mRNA as an immune measure of immunologic response to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and newer agents, including entry inhibitors, is essential. Previous studies have reported alterations in lymphocyte cell membrane CCR5 expression that were related to blood collection and cell separation media. Clinical trials often require the transport of specimens to central laboratories for evaluation, resulting in significant time delays between specimen procurement and analysis. This study shows that CCR5 expression on naïve and memory T cells is influenced by blood collection media and specimen age. Peripheral blood collected in Streck Vacutainer tubes containing a cell stabilizer and fixative was found to improve detection of CCR5 expression compared to specimens collected in K2 EDTA anticoagulant. The selection of flow cytometry gating strategies for the identification of naïve and memory T-helper cells can also significantly influence the sensitivity of detection of CCR5 expression. Procedural methods are described that allow for the optimal measurement of naïve and memory T-helper cell CCR5 and CXCR4 expression as well as the quantitation of CCR5 and CXCR4 mRNA.

  6. MCP-1, CCR2 and CCR5 polymorphisms in Tunisian patients with atopic asthma.

    PubMed

    Dhaouadi, Tarak; Sfar, Imen; Aounallah-Skhiri, Hajer; Jendoubi-Ayed, Saloua; Bouacha, Hend; Ben Abdallah, Taieb; Gorgi, Yousr

    2013-03-01

    Chemokines and their receptors play an important role in the late inflammatory stage of asthma. In this study, we aimed to investigate polymorphisms of MCP-1 (CCL2), CCR2 and CCR5 which can affect qualitatively and/or quantitatively their production and thus influence both susceptibility and severity of asthma and its clinical and biological features.MCP-1 (A/G -2518), CCR2 (+/64I), CCR5 (G/A -59029) and CCR5 (∆32) polymorphisms were evaluated by PCR in 107 Tunisian patients with asthma and 169 healthy controls.No significant association was found between the four investigated polymorphisms and asthma. Nevertheless the haplotype MCP1*AG/CCR2*+/+ was significantly l ess frequent in patients (20.5%) compared to controls (32.5%) (p=0.03; OR=0.54; 95% CI: 0.29-0.98). Whereas no difference was observed in CCR2/CCR5 haplotypes between patients and controls. Analysis of polymorphisms with clinical and biological features showed that the concomitant presence of MCP-1*G/CCR2*64I alleles was less frequent in severe forms (4.34%) compared to moderate disease (12%) but the difference was not significant (p=0.27). No association was observed between the four polymorphisms and the presence of atopic rhinitis or atopic conjunctivitis and an elevated rate of serum IgE over 200 IU/ml.Additional effects of MCP-1 and its receptor CCR2 polymorphisms seem to be involved in disease susceptibility to asthma in Tunisian patients; nevertheless they could be protective against its severe forms.

  7. The Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk Variant CCR6DNP Regulates CCR6 via PARP-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Cunin, Pierre; Wu, Di; Diogo, Dorothée; Yang, Yu; Okada, Yukinori; Plenge, Robert M; Nigrovic, Peter A

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the implications of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for disease biology requires both identification of causal variants and definition of how these variants alter gene function. The non-coding triallelic dinucleotide polymorphism CCR6DNP is associated with risk for rheumatoid arthritis, and is considered likely causal because allelic variation correlates with expression of the chemokine receptor CCR6. Using transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) gene editing, we confirmed that CCR6DNP regulates CCR6. To identify the associated transcription factor, we applied a novel assay, Flanking Restriction Enhanced Pulldown (FREP), to identify specific association of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) with CCR6DNP consistent with the established allelic risk hierarchy. Correspondingly, manipulation of PARP-1 expression or activity impaired CCR6 expression in several lineages. These findings show that CCR6DNP is a causal variant through which PARP-1 regulates CCR6, and introduce a highly efficient approach to interrogate non-coding genetic polymorphisms associated with human disease. PMID:27626929

  8. The Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk Variant CCR6DNP Regulates CCR6 via PARP-1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Cunin, Pierre; Wu, Di; Diogo, Dorothée; Yang, Yu; Okada, Yukinori; Plenge, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the implications of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for disease biology requires both identification of causal variants and definition of how these variants alter gene function. The non-coding triallelic dinucleotide polymorphism CCR6DNP is associated with risk for rheumatoid arthritis, and is considered likely causal because allelic variation correlates with expression of the chemokine receptor CCR6. Using transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) gene editing, we confirmed that CCR6DNP regulates CCR6. To identify the associated transcription factor, we applied a novel assay, Flanking Restriction Enhanced Pulldown (FREP), to identify specific association of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) with CCR6DNP consistent with the established allelic risk hierarchy. Correspondingly, manipulation of PARP-1 expression or activity impaired CCR6 expression in several lineages. These findings show that CCR6DNP is a causal variant through which PARP-1 regulates CCR6, and introduce a highly efficient approach to interrogate non-coding genetic polymorphisms associated with human disease. PMID:27626929

  9. Identification of human CCR8 as a CCL18 receptor.

    PubMed

    Islam, Sabina A; Ling, Morris F; Leung, John; Shreffler, Wayne G; Luster, Andrew D

    2013-09-23

    The CC chemokine ligand 18 (CCL18) is one of the most highly expressed chemokines in human chronic inflammatory diseases. An appreciation of the role of CCL18 in these diseases has been hampered by the lack of an identified chemokine receptor. We report that the human chemokine receptor CCR8 is a CCL18 receptor. CCL18 induced chemotaxis and calcium flux of human CCR8-transfected cells. CCL18 bound with high affinity to CCR8 and induced its internalization. Human CCL1, the known endogenous CCR8 ligand, and CCL18 competed for binding to CCR8-transfected cells. Further, CCL1 and CCL18 induced heterologous cross-desensitization of CCR8-transfected cells and human Th2 cells. CCL18 induced chemotaxis and calcium flux of human activated highly polarized Th2 cells through CCR8. Wild-type but not Ccr8-deficient activated mouse Th2 cells migrated in response to CCL18. CCL18 and CCR8 were coexpressed in esophageal biopsy tissue from individuals with active eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and were present at markedly higher levels compared with esophageal tissue isolated from EoE patients whose disease was in remission or in normal controls. Identifying CCR8 as a chemokine receptor for CCL18 will help clarify the biological role of this highly expressed chemokine in human disease.

  10. BIONET: national computer resource for molecular biology.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D H; Brutlag, D; Friedland, P; Kedes, L H

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes briefly the BIONET National Computer Resource for Molecular Biology. This presentation is intended as information for scientists in molecular biology and related disciplines who require access to computational methods for sequence analysis. We describe the goals, and the service and research opportunities offered to the community by BIONET, the relationship of BIONET to other national and regional resources, our recent efforts toward distribution of the resource to BIONET Satellites, and procedures for investigators to gain access to the Resource. PMID:3945548

  11. Characterization of the "CCR5" Chemokine Receptor Gene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, John C.

    2004-01-01

    The life cycle of retroviruses is an essential topic of modern cell biology instruction. Furthermore, the process of HIV viral entry into the cell is a question of great interest in basic and clinical biology. This paper describes how students can easily recover their own DNA, amplify a portion of the "CCR5" chemokine receptor gene, characterize…

  12. The National Biological Information Infrastructure: Coming of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Gladys; Frame, Mike; Sepic, Ron; Zolly, Lisa

    2000-01-01

    Coordinated by the U.S. Geological Survey, the National Biological Information Infrastructure (NBII) is a Web-based system that provides increased access to data and information on the nation's biological resources. This article-an individual case study-addresses the structure of the NBII related to thematic, infrastructure and place-based…

  13. MicroRNAs expression profile in CCR6+ regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yan; Chen, Chao; Zhou, Ya; Tao, Yijin; Guo, Mengmeng; Qin, Nalin

    2014-01-01

    Backgroud. CCR6+ CD4+ regulatory T cells (CCR6+ Tregs), a distinct Tregs subset, played an important role in various immune diseases. Recent evidence showed that microRNAs (miRNAs) are vital regulators in the function of immune cells. However, the potential role of miRNAs in the function of CCR6+ Tregs remains largely unknown. In this study, we detected the expression profile of miRNAs in CCR6+ Tregs. Materials and Methods. The expression profile of miRNAs as well as genes in CCR6+ Tregs or CCR6- Tregs from Balb/c mice were detected by microarray. The signaling pathways were analyzed using the Keggs pathway library. Results. We found that there were 58 miRNAs significantly upregulated and 62 downregulated up to 2 fold in CCR6+ Tregs compared with CCR6- Tregs. Moreover, 1,391 genes were observed with 3 fold change and 20 signaling pathways were enriched using the Keggs pathway library. Conclusion. The present data showed CCR6+ Tregs expressed specific miRNAs pattern, which provides insight into the role of miRNAs in the biological function of distinct Tregs subsets. PMID:25279261

  14. CCR7 regulates B16 murine melanoma cell tumorigenesis in skin.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lei; Lee, Vivian C; Cha, Emily; Zhang, Hong; Hwang, Sam T

    2008-10-01

    Tumor cell-associated chemokine receptors play distinct roles in cancer biology, including enhancement of lymph node (LN) metastasis. To determine if CCR7 influences tumor formation in skin, we inoculated B16 cells transduced with CCR7 and luciferase (CCR7-luc-B16) or with retroviral vector and luciferase (pLNCX2-luc-B16) into ear skin and footpads of wild-type (WT) mice. In contrast to pLNCX2-luc-B16 cells, 97% of CCR7-luc-B16 cell-inoculated mice formed skin tumors as well as cervical LN metastases by Day 21 following ear inoculation. CCR7-expressing and control B16 cells, however, formed tumors of similar size and with high-efficiency in SCID-beige mice. Cells from both lines accumulated in the skin of WT mice in similar numbers until Day 7. By Day 11, however, control cells decreased tenfold, whereas CCR7-luc-B16 cells formed small tumor nodules. Tumor cells were infrequently detected in draining cervical LNs up to 11 days after injection of both cell lines, but stable nodal metastases were only observed after CCR7-luc-B16 ear tumors had been established (Day 21). ELISPOT assays revealed that IFN--producing cells in draining LNs from CCR7-luc-B16-injected ears were reduced through Day 7. After footpad injection, tumor formation by CCR7-expressing B16 cells was enhanced only with small, initial tumor cell inocula. With larger inocula, tumor formation was equivalent, but the numbers of tumor-infiltrating leukocytes were reduced by approximately sixfold in CCR7-B16 tumors compared with pLNCX2-B16 tumors of equal size. IFN- and CXCL10 were reduced 35- and sixfold, respectively, in CCR7-B16 cell tumors (vs. control tumors). Thus, CCR7 expression enhances tumorigenesis in addition to facilitating LN metastasis. PMID:18519742

  15. CCR4 versus CCR10 in human cutaneous TH lymphocyte trafficking.

    PubMed

    Soler, Dulce; Humphreys, Tricia L; Spinola, Stanley M; Campbell, James J

    2003-03-01

    The chemokine receptors (CCRs) CCR4 and CCR10, and the cutaneous lymphocyte antigen (CLA), have each been proposed as critical mediators of skin-specific TH lymphocyte homing in mice and humans. CLA initiates skin homing by mediating E-selectin-dependent tethering and rolling within cutaneous venules, but the specific roles of CCR4 and CCR10 are unclear. We have generated an antihuman CCR10 monoclonal antibody (mAb; 1B5) to illuminate the individual contributions of these molecules. This mAb allows us to compare CCR10, CCR4, and CLA expression within human TH populations. The mAb 1B5 recognizes functional CCR10 expression, as chemotactic responsiveness to cutaneous T-cell-attracting chemokine (CTACK)/CCL27 (a CCR10 ligand) parallels the staining of TH subsets. We find CCR10 expressed by only a minority (approximately 30%) of blood-borne, skin-homing (CLA+/CCR4+) TH cells. However, essentially all members of the relatively small "effector" (CLA+/CCR4+/CD27-/CCR7-) skin-homing TH population express CCR10. Most skin-infiltrating lymphocytes in allergic delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and bacterial chancroid skin lesions express both CCR4 and CLA, but only about 10% express CCR10. This suggests for the 2 models of TH skin homing studied here that CCR10+ TH cells have no advantage over other CLA+/CCR4+ TH cells in homing to cutaneous sites. We conclude that the skin-homing TH compartment is itself divided into distinct subpopulations, the smaller of which expresses both CCR4 and CCR10, and the larger of which expresses only CCR4. Thus, CCR10 is unlikely to be necessary for cutaneous homing of TH cells in the models studied here. CCR10 may instead play a role in the movement of specialized "effector" cutaneous TH cells to and/or within epidermal microenvironments.

  16. Commentary: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Educators Launch National Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Cheryl; Bell, Ellis; Johnson, Margaret; Mattos, Carla; Sears, Duane; White, Harold B.

    2010-01-01

    The American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) has launched an National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded 5 year project to support biochemistry and molecular biology educators learning what and how students learn. As a part of this initiative, hundreds of life scientists will plan and develop a rich central resource for…

  17. Elucidating a Key Anti-HIV-1 and Cancer-Associated Axis: The Structure of CCL5 (Rantes) in Complex with CCR5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamamis, Phanourios; Floudas, Christodoulos A.

    2014-06-01

    CCL5 (RANTES) is an inflammatory chemokine which binds to chemokine receptor CCR5 and induces signaling. The CCL5:CCR5 associated chemotactic signaling is of critical biological importance and is a potential HIV-1 therapeutic axis. Several studies provided growing evidence for the expression of CCL5 and CCR5 in non-hematological malignancies. Therefore, the delineation of the CCL5:CCR5 complex structure can pave the way for novel CCR5-targeted drugs. We employed a computational protocol which is primarily based on free energy calculations and molecular dynamics simulations, and report, what is to our knowledge, the first computationally derived CCL5:CCR5 complex structure which is in excellent agreement with experimental findings and clarifies the functional role of CCL5 and CCR5 residues which are associated with binding and signaling. A wealth of polar and non-polar interactions contributes to the tight CCL5:CCR5 binding. The structure of an HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop in complex with CCR5 has recently been derived through a similar computational protocol. A comparison between the CCL5 : CCR5 and the HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop : CCR5 complex structures depicts that both the chemokine and the virus primarily interact with the same CCR5 residues. The present work provides insights into the blocking mechanism of HIV-1 by CCL5.

  18. Structural biology research at the National Synchroton Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    The world`s foremost facility for scientific research using x-rays and ultraviolet and infrared radiation is operated by the national synchrotron Light Source Department. This year alone, a total of 2200 guest researchers performed experiments at the world`s largest source of synchrotron light. Researchers are trying to define the three- dimensional structures of biological macromolecules to create a map of life, a guide for exploring the biological and chemical interactions of the vast variety of molecules found in living organisms. Studies in structural biology may lead to new insights into how biological systems are formed and nourished, how they survive and grow, how they are damaged and die. This document discusses some the the structural biological research done at the National Synchrotron Light Source.

  19. Information technology developments within the national biological information infrastructure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cotter, G.; Frame, M.T.

    2000-01-01

    Looking out an office window or exploring a community park, one can easily see the tremendous challenges that biological information presents the computer science community. Biological information varies in format and content depending whether or not it is information pertaining to a particular species (i.e. Brown Tree Snake), or a specific ecosystem, which often includes multiple species, land use characteristics, and geospatially referenced information. The complexity and uniqueness of each individual species or ecosystem do not easily lend themselves to today's computer science tools and applications. To address the challenges that the biological enterprise presents the National Biological Information Infrastructure (NBII) (http://www.nbii.gov) was established in 1993. The NBII is designed to address these issues on a National scale within the United States, and through international partnerships abroad. This paper discusses current computer science efforts within the National Biological Information Infrastructure Program and future computer science research endeavors that are needed to address the ever-growing issues related to our Nation's biological concerns.

  20. The Simbios National Center: Systems Biology in Motion

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Jeanette P.; Delp, Scott L.; Sherman, Michael A.; Taylor, Charles A.; Pande, Vijay S.; Altman, Russ B.

    2010-01-01

    Physics-based simulation is needed to understand the function of biological structures and can be applied across a wide range of scales, from molecules to organisms. Simbios (the National Center for Physics-Based Simulation of Biological Structures, http://www.simbios.stanford.edu/) is one of seven NIH-supported National Centers for Biomedical Computation. This article provides an overview of the mission and achievements of Simbios, and describes its place within systems biology. Understanding the interactions between various parts of a biological system and integrating this information to understand how biological systems function is the goal of systems biology. Many important biological systems comprise complex structural systems whose components interact through the exchange of physical forces, and whose movement and function is dictated by those forces. In particular, systems that are made of multiple identifiable components that move relative to one another in a constrained manner are multibody systems. Simbios’ focus is creating methods for their simulation. Simbios is also investigating the biomechanical forces that govern fluid flow through deformable vessels, a central problem in cardiovascular dynamics. In this application, the system is governed by the interplay of classical forces, but the motion is distributed smoothly through the materials and fluids, requiring the use of continuum methods. In addition to the research aims, Simbios is working to disseminate information, software and other resources relevant to biological systems in motion. PMID:20107615

  1. The National Biological Information Infrastructure: Coming of age

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cotter, G.; Frame, M.; Sepic, R.; Zolly, L.

    2000-01-01

    Coordinated by the US Geological Survey, the National Biological Information Infrastructure (NBII) is a Web-based system that provides increased access to data and information on the nation's biological resources. The NBII can be viewed from a variety of perspectives. This article - an individual case study and not a broad survey with extensive references to the literature - addresses the structure of the NBII related to thematic sections, infrastructure sections and place-based sections, and other topics such as the Integrated Taxonomic Information System (one of our more innovative tools) and the development of our controlled vocabulary.

  2. Status and trends of the nation's biological resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mac, Michael J.; Opler, Paul A.; Puckett Haecker, Catherine E.; Doran, Peter D.

    1998-01-01

    This report is a comprehensive summary of the status and trends of our nation’s biological resources. The report describes the major processes and factors affecting biological resources, and it treats regional status and trends. Authors of the chapters and boxes in this two-volume report were drawn from federal and state agencies, universities, and private organizations, reflecting the U.S. Geological Survey’s national partnership approach to providing comprehensive, reliable information about our biological resources. Following scientific tradition, each chapter and box was peer-reviewed by anonymous scientific reviewers.

  3. HIV-1 co-receptor CCR5 and CCR2 mutations among Greeks.

    PubMed

    Papa, A; Papadimitriou, E; Adwan, G; Clewley, J P; Malissiovas, N; Ntoutsos, I; Alexiou, S; Antoniadis, A

    2000-05-01

    The frequency of CCR5 and CCR2 alleles in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and HIV-negative populations of Northern Greece was investigated. The frequency of the CCR5Delta32 allele among the HIV-negative subjects was 0.052, while it was approximately two-fold lower among the seropositives, suggesting that the heterozygous genotype confers a partial resistance to the HIV infection. No significant difference in CCR2 allele frequency between the two groups was observed.

  4. Genetic diversity and prevalence of CCR2-CCR5 gene polymorphisms in the Omani population

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mahruqi, Samira H.; Zadjali, Fahad; Beja-Pereira, Albano; Koh, Crystal Y.; Balkhair, Abdullah; Al-Jabri, Ali A.

    2014-01-01

    Polymorphisms in the regulatory region of the CCR5 gene affect protein expression and modulate the progress of HIV-1 disease. Because of this prominent role, variations in this gene have been under differential pressure and their frequencies vary among human populations. The CCR2V64I mutation is tightly linked to certain polymorphisms in the CCR5 gene. The current Omani population is genetically diverse, a reflection of their history as traders who ruled extensive regions around the Indian Ocean. In this study, we examined the CCR2-CCR5 haplotypes in Omanis and compared the patterns of genetic diversity with those of other populations. Blood samples were collected from 115 Omani adults and genomic DNA was screened to identify the polymorphic sites in the CCR5 gene and the CCR2V64I mutation. Four minor alleles were common: CCR5-2554T and CCR5-2086G showed frequencies of 49% and 46%, respectively, whereas CCR5-2459A and CCR5-2135C both had a frequency of 36%. These alleles showed moderate levels of heterozygosity, indicating that they were under balancing selection. However, the well-known allele CCR5Δ32 was relatively rare. Eleven haplotypes were identified, four of which were common: HHC (46%), HHE (20%), HHA (14%) and HHF*2 (12%). PMID:24688285

  5. CCR1+/CCR5+ Mononuclear Phagocytes Accumulate in the Central Nervous System of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Trebst, Corinna; Lykke Sørensen, Torben; Kivisäkk, Pia; Cathcart, Martha K.; Hesselgesser, Joseph; Horuk, Richard; Sellebjerg, Finn; Lassmann, Hans; Ransohoff, Richard M.

    2001-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes (monocytes, macrophages, and microglia) are considered central to multiple sclerosis (MS) pathogenesis. Molecular cues that mediate mononuclear phagocyte accumulation and activation in the central nervous system (CNS) of MS patients may include chemokines RANTES/CCL5 and macrophage inflammatory protein-1α/CCL3. We analyzed expression of CCR1 and CCR5, the monocyte receptors for these chemokines, on circulating and cerebrospinal fluid CD14+ cells, and in MS brain lesions. Approximately 70% of cerebrospinal fluid monocytes were CCR1+/CCR5+, regardless of the presence of CNS pathology, compared to less than 20% of circulating monocytes. In active MS lesions CCR1+/CCR5+ monocytes were found in perivascular cell cuffs and at the demyelinating edges of evolving lesions. Mononuclear phagocytes in early demyelinating stages comprised CCR1+/CCR5+ hematogenous monocytes and CCR1−/CCR5− resident microglial cells. In later stages, phagocytic macrophages were uniformly CCR1−/CCR5+. Cultured in vitro, adherent monocytes/macrophages up-regulated CCR5 and down-regulated CCR1 expression, compared to freshly-isolated monocytes. Taken together, these findings suggest that monocytes competent to enter the CNS compartment derive from a minority CCR1+/CCR5+ population in the circulating pool. In the presence of ligand, these cells will be retained in the CNS. During further activation in lesions, infiltrating monocytes down-regulate CCR1 but not CCR5, whereas microglia up-regulate CCR5. PMID:11696431

  6. The frequency of CCR5 promoter polymorphisms and CCR5 Δ 32 mutation in Iranian populations.

    PubMed

    Zare-Bidaki, Mohammad; Karimi-Googheri, Masoud; Hassanshahi, Gholamhossein; Zainodini, Nahid; Arababadi, Mohammad Kazemi

    2015-04-01

    Evidence showed that chemokines serve as pro-migratory factors for immune cells. CCL3, CCL4 and CCL5, as the main CC chemokines subfamily members, activate immune cells through binding to CC chemokine receptor 5 or CCR5. Macrophages, NK cells and T lymphocytes express CCR5 and thus, affected CCR5 expression or functions could be associated with altered immune responses. Deletion of 32 base pairs (Δ 32) in the exon 1 of the CCR5 gene, which is known as CCR5 Δ 32 mutation causes down regulation and malfunction of the molecule. Furthermore, it has been evidenced that three polymorphisms in the promoter region of CCR5 modulate its expression. Altered CCR5 expression in microbial infection and immune related diseases have been reported by several researchers but the role of CCR5 promoter polymorphisms and CCR5 Δ 32 mutation in Iranian patients suffering from these diseases are controversial. Due to the fact that Iranian people have different genetic backgrounds compared to other ethnics, hence, CCR5 promoter polymorphisms and CCR5 32 mutation association with the diseases may be different in Iranian patients. Therefore, this review addresses the most recent information regarding the prevalence as well as association of the mutation and polymorphisms in Iranian patients with microbial infection and immune related diseases as along with normal population.

  7. CCR+: Metadata Based Extended Personal Health Record Data Model Interoperable with the ASTM CCR Standard

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yu Rang; Yoon, Young Jo; Jang, Tae Hun; Seo, Hwa Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Extension of the standard model while retaining compliance with it is a challenging issue because there is currently no method for semantically or syntactically verifying an extended data model. A metadata-based extended model, named CCR+, was designed and implemented to achieve interoperability between standard and extended models. Methods Furthermore, a multilayered validation method was devised to validate the standard and extended models. The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Community Care Record (CCR) standard was selected to evaluate the CCR+ model; two CCR and one CCR+ XML files were evaluated. Results In total, 188 metadata were extracted from the ASTM CCR standard; these metadata are semantically interconnected and registered in the metadata registry. An extended-data-model-specific validation file was generated from these metadata. This file can be used in a smartphone application (Health Avatar CCR+) as a part of a multilayered validation. The new CCR+ model was successfully evaluated via a patient-centric exchange scenario involving multiple hospitals, with the results supporting both syntactic and semantic interoperability between the standard CCR and extended, CCR+, model. Conclusions A feasible method for delivering an extended model that complies with the standard model is presented herein. There is a great need to extend static standard models such as the ASTM CCR in various domains: the methods presented here represent an important reference for achieving interoperability between standard and extended models. PMID:24627817

  8. CCR2, CCR5, and CXCL12 variation and HIV/AIDS in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Mehlotra, Rajeev K; Hall, Noemi B; Bruse, Shannon E; John, Bangan; Blood Zikursh, Melinda J; Stein, Catherine M; Siba, Peter M; Zimmerman, Peter A

    2015-12-01

    Polymorphisms in chemokine receptors, serving as HIV co-receptors, and their ligands are among the well-known host genetic factors associated with susceptibility to HIV infection and/or disease progression. Papua New Guinea (PNG) has one of the highest adult HIV prevalences in the Asia-Pacific region. However, information regarding the distribution of polymorphisms in chemokine receptor (CCR5, CCR2) and chemokine (CXCL12) genes in PNG is very limited. In this study, we genotyped a total of nine CCR2-CCR5 polymorphisms, including CCR2 190G >A, CCR5 -2459G >A and Δ32, and CXCL12 801G >A in PNG (n=258), North America (n=184), and five countries in West Africa (n=178). Using this data, we determined previously characterized CCR5 haplotypes. In addition, based on the previously reported associations of CCR2 190, CCR5 -2459, CCR5 open reading frame, and CXCL12 801 genotypes with HIV acquisition and/or disease progression, we calculated composite full risk scores, considering both protective as well as susceptibility effects of the CXCL12 801 AA genotype. We observed a very high frequency of the CCR5 -2459A allele (0.98) in the PNG population, which together with the absence of Δ32 resulted in a very high frequency of the HHE haplotype (0.92). These frequencies were significantly higher than in any other population (all P-values<0.001). Regardless of whether we considered the CXCL12 801 AA genotype protective or susceptible, the risk scores were significantly higher in the PNG population compared with any other population (all P-values<0.001). The results of this study provide new insights regarding CCR5 variation in the PNG population, and suggest that the collective variation in CCR2, CCR5, and CXCL12 may increase the risk of HIV/AIDS in a large majority of Papua New Guineans.

  9. Effects of chemokine receptor signalling on cognition-like, emotion-like and sociability behaviours of CCR6 and CCR7 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Jaehne, E J; Baune, B T

    2014-03-15

    Inflammation is regarded as an important mechanism of neuropsychiatric disorders. Chemokines, which are a part of the immune system, have effects on various aspects of brain function, but little is known about their effects on behaviour. We have compared the cognition-like behaviour (learning and spatial memory) of CCR6(-/-) and CCR7(-/-) mice with wild type (WT) C57BL/6 mice, in the Barnes maze, as well as a range of other behaviours, including exploratory, anxiety and depression-like behaviour, using a battery of tests. Levels of cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 were also measured. In the Barnes maze, CCR7(-/-) mice were shown to take longer to learn the location of the escape box on the 1st of 4 days of training. In the behavioural battery, CCR6(-/-) mice showed higher locomotor activity and lower anxiety in the open field test, and a lack of preference for social novelty in a sociability test. CCR7(-/-) mice behaved much like WT mice, although showed higher anxiety in Elevated Zero Maze. While baseline saccharin preference in a 2-bottle choice test, a test for anhedonia depression-like behaviour, was equal in all strains at baseline, weekly tests showed that both CCR6(-/-) and CCR7(-/-) mice developed a decreased preference for saccharin compared to WT over time. There were no differences between strains in any of the cytokines measured. These results suggest that chemokine receptors may play a role in cognition and learning behaviour, as well as anxiety and other behaviours, although the biological mechanisms are still unclear.

  10. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Biological Specimen Repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMonigal, Kathleen A.; Pietrzyk, Robert a.; Johnson, Mary Anne

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Biological Specimen Repository (Repository) is a storage bank that is used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. Samples from the International Space Station (ISS), including blood and urine, will be collected, processed and archived during the preflight, inflight and postflight phases of ISS missions. This investigation has been developed to archive biosamples for use as a resource for future space flight related research. The International Space Station (ISS) provides a platform to investigate the effects of microgravity on human physiology prior to lunar and exploration class missions. The storage of crewmember samples from many different ISS flights in a single repository will be a valuable resource with which researchers can study space flight related changes and investigate physiological markers. The development of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Biological Specimen Repository will allow for the collection, processing, storage, maintenance, and ethical distribution of biosamples to meet goals of scientific and programmatic relevance to the space program. Archiving of the biosamples will provide future research opportunities including investigating patterns of physiological changes, analysis of components unknown at this time or analyses performed by new methodologies.

  11. CCR3 is a target for age-related macular degeneration diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Atsunobu; Baffi, Judit Z; Kleinman, Mark E; Cho, Won Gil; Nozaki, Miho; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Kaneko, Hiroki; Albuquerque, Romulo J C; Dridi, Sami; Saito, Kuniharu; Raisler, Brian J; Budd, Steven J; Geisen, Pete; Munitz, Ariel; Ambati, Balamurali K; Green, Martha G; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Wright, John D; Humbles, Alison A; Gerard, Craig J; Ogura, Yuichiro; Pan, Yuzhen; Smith, Justine R; Grisanti, Salvatore; Hartnett, M Elizabeth; Rothenberg, Marc E; Ambati, Jayakrishna

    2009-07-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness worldwide, is as prevalent as cancer in industrialized nations. Most blindness in AMD results from invasion of the retina by choroidal neovascularisation (CNV). Here we show that the eosinophil/mast cell chemokine receptor CCR3 is specifically expressed in choroidal neovascular endothelial cells in humans with AMD, and that despite the expression of its ligands eotaxin-1, -2 and -3, neither eosinophils nor mast cells are present in human CNV. Genetic or pharmacological targeting of CCR3 or eotaxins inhibited injury-induced CNV in mice. CNV suppression by CCR3 blockade was due to direct inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation, and was uncoupled from inflammation because it occurred in mice lacking eosinophils or mast cells, and was independent of macrophage and neutrophil recruitment. CCR3 blockade was more effective at reducing CNV than vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) neutralization, which is in clinical use at present, and, unlike VEGF-A blockade, is not toxic to the mouse retina. In vivo imaging with CCR3-targeting quantum dots located spontaneous CNV invisible to standard fluorescein angiography in mice before retinal invasion. CCR3 targeting might reduce vision loss due to AMD through early detection and therapeutic angioinhibition.

  12. A national facility for biological cryo-electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Saibil, Helen R.; Grünewald, Kay; Stuart, David I.

    2015-01-01

    This review provides a brief update on the use of cryo-electron microscopy for integrated structural biology, along with an overview of the plans for the UK national facility for electron microscopy being built at the Diamond synchrotron. Three-dimensional electron microscopy is an enormously powerful tool for structural biologists. It is now able to provide an understanding of the molecular machinery of cells, disease processes and the actions of pathogenic organisms from atomic detail through to the cellular context. However, cutting-edge research in this field requires very substantial resources for equipment, infrastructure and expertise. Here, a brief overview is provided of the plans for a UK national three-dimensional electron-microscopy facility for integrated structural biology to enable internationally leading research on the machinery of life. State-of-the-art equipment operated with expert support will be provided, optimized for both atomic-level single-particle analysis of purified macromolecules and complexes and for tomography of cell sections. The access to and organization of the facility will be modelled on the highly successful macromolecular crystallography (MX) synchrotron beamlines, and will be embedded at the Diamond Light Source, facilitating the development of user-friendly workflows providing near-real-time experimental feedback.

  13. A national comparison of biochemistry and molecular biology capstone experiences.

    PubMed

    Aguanno, Ann; Mertz, Pamela; Martin, Debra; Bell, Ellis

    2015-01-01

    Recognizing the increasingly integrative nature of the molecular life sciences, the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) recommends that Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (BMB) programs develop curricula based on concepts, content, topics, and expected student outcomes, rather than courses. To that end, ASBMB conducted a series of regional workshops to build a BMB Concept Inventory containing validated assessment tools, based on foundational and discipline-specific knowledge and essential skills, for the community to use. A culminating activity, which integrates the educational experience, is often part of undergraduate molecular life science programs. These "capstone" experiences are commonly defined as an attempt to measure student ability to synthesize and integrate acquired knowledge. However, the format, implementation, and approach to outcome assessment of these experiences are quite varied across the nation. Here we report the results of a nation-wide survey on BMB capstone experiences and discuss this in the context of published reports about capstones and the findings of the workshops driving the development of the BMB Concept Inventory. Both the survey results and the published reports reveal that, although capstone practices do vary, certain formats for the experience are used more frequently and similarities in learning objectives were identified. The use of rubrics to measure student learning is also regularly reported, but details about these assessment instruments are sparse in the literature and were not a focus of our survey. Finally, we outline commonalities in the current practice of capstones and suggest the next steps needed to elucidate best practices.

  14. CCR7 signaling inhibits T cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Ekkehard; Oberbarnscheidt, Martin; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia; Förster, Reinhold; Kunzendorf, Ulrich; Krautwald, Stefan

    2007-11-15

    CCR7 and its ligands, CCL19 and CCL21, are responsible for directing the migration of T cells and dendritic cells into lymph nodes, where these cells play an important role in the initiation of the immune response. Recently, we have shown that systemic application of CCL19-IgG is able to inhibit the colocalization of T cells and dendritic cells within secondary lymphoid organs, resulting in pronounced immunosuppression with reduced allograft rejection after organ transplantation. In this study, we demonstrate that the application of sustained high concentrations of either soluble or immobilized CCL19 and CCL21 elicits an inhibitory program in T cells. We show that these ligands specifically interfere with cell proliferation and IL-2 secretion of CCR7(+) cells. This could be demonstrated for human and murine T cells and was valid for both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. In contrast, CCL19 had no inhibitory effect on T cells from CCR7 knockout mice, but CCR7(-/-) T cells showed a proliferative response upon TCR-stimulation similar to that of CCL19-treated wild-type cells. Furthermore, the inhibition of proliferation is associated with delayed degradation of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p27(Kip1) and the down-regulation of CDK1. This shows that CCR7 signaling is linked to cell cycle control and that sustained engagement of CCR7, either by high concentrations of soluble ligands or by high density of immobilized ligands, is capable of inducing cell cycle arrest in TCR-stimulated cells. Thus, CCR7, a chemokine receptor that has been demonstrated to play an essential role during activation of the immune response, is also competent to directly inhibit T cell proliferation. PMID:17982037

  15. CCR5 blockage by maraviroc induces cytotoxic and apoptotic effects in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pervaiz, Asim; Ansari, Shariq; Berger, Martin R; Adwan, Hassan

    2015-05-01

    Alterations in the expression of C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5 or CD195) have been correlated with disease progression in different cancers. Recently, a few investigations have reported the blockage of this receptor by an antagonist (maraviroc) and its antineoplastic effects on tumor cell growth. However, little is known about the mechanistic reasons behind these antineoplastic effects of CCR5 blockage by maraviroc. In this study, we blocked the CCR5 receptor by maraviroc in SW480 and SW620 colorectal cancer cells to study the resulting changes in biological properties and related pathways. This blockage induced significantly reduced proliferation and a profound arrest in G1 phase of the cell cycle. Concomitantly, maraviroc caused significant signs of apoptosis at morphological level. Significant modulation of multiple apoptosis-relevant genes was also noticed at mRNA levels. In addition, we found remarkable increases in cleaved caspases at protein level. These modulations led us to propose a signaling pathway for the observed apoptotic effects. In conclusion, blocking the CCR5 by maraviroc induces significant cytotoxic and apoptotic effects in colorectal cancer cells. Thus, maraviroc can be considered a model compound, which may foster the development of further CCR5 antagonists to be used for the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  16. [Progress on Hypoxic-ischemic Brain Damage Associated with CCR2 and CCL2].

    PubMed

    Luo, Yu-jia; Li, Ru-bo; Ma, Shi-yu; Lü, Meng-yan

    2016-02-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD) is referred to a common type of cerebral damage, which is caused by injury, leading to shallow bleeding in the cortex with intact cerebral pia mater. In recent years, studies show that a various kinds of immune cells and immune cellular factors are involved in the occurrence of HIBD. CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) is a representative of CC chemokine receptor, and is widely distributed in cerebral neuron, astrocyte, and microglial cells, and is the main chemo-tactic factor receptor in brain tissue. CC chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) is a kind of basophilic protein and the ligand of CCR2, and plays an important role in inflammation. In order to provide evidence for correlational studies in HIBD, this review will introduce the biological characteristics of CCR2 and CCL2, and illustrate the relationship between the immunoreactivity and HIBD. PMID:27295859

  17. Folding of newly translated membrane protein CCR5 is assisted by the chaperonin GroEL-GroES

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Haixia; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Li, Jiqiang; Ren, Hao; Huang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro folding of newly translated human CC chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5), which belongs to the physiologically important family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), has been studied in a cell-free system supplemented with the surfactant Brij-35. The freshly synthesized CCR5 can spontaneously fold into its biologically active state but only slowly and inefficiently. However, on addition of the GroEL-GroES molecular chaperone system, the folding of the nascent CCR5 was significantly enhanced, as was the structural stability and functional expression of the soluble form of CCR5. The chaperonin GroEL was partially effective on its own, but for maximum efficiency both the GroEL and its GroES lid were necessary. These results are direct evidence for chaperone-assisted membrane protein folding and therefore demonstrate that GroEL-GroES may be implicated in the folding of membrane proteins. PMID:26585937

  18. Folding of newly translated membrane protein CCR5 is assisted by the chaperonin GroEL-GroES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Haixia; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Li, Jiqiang; Ren, Hao; Huang, Fang

    2015-11-01

    The in vitro folding of newly translated human CC chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5), which belongs to the physiologically important family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), has been studied in a cell-free system supplemented with the surfactant Brij-35. The freshly synthesized CCR5 can spontaneously fold into its biologically active state but only slowly and inefficiently. However, on addition of the GroEL-GroES molecular chaperone system, the folding of the nascent CCR5 was significantly enhanced, as was the structural stability and functional expression of the soluble form of CCR5. The chaperonin GroEL was partially effective on its own, but for maximum efficiency both the GroEL and its GroES lid were necessary. These results are direct evidence for chaperone-assisted membrane protein folding and therefore demonstrate that GroEL-GroES may be implicated in the folding of membrane proteins.

  19. Folding of newly translated membrane protein CCR5 is assisted by the chaperonin GroEL-GroES.

    PubMed

    Chi, Haixia; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Li, Jiqiang; Ren, Hao; Huang, Fang

    2015-11-20

    The in vitro folding of newly translated human CC chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5), which belongs to the physiologically important family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), has been studied in a cell-free system supplemented with the surfactant Brij-35. The freshly synthesized CCR5 can spontaneously fold into its biologically active state but only slowly and inefficiently. However, on addition of the GroEL-GroES molecular chaperone system, the folding of the nascent CCR5 was significantly enhanced, as was the structural stability and functional expression of the soluble form of CCR5. The chaperonin GroEL was partially effective on its own, but for maximum efficiency both the GroEL and its GroES lid were necessary. These results are direct evidence for chaperone-assisted membrane protein folding and therefore demonstrate that GroEL-GroES may be implicated in the folding of membrane proteins.

  20. Lymphocyte adhesion to CCR5 ligands is reduced by anti-CCR5 gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Marusich, Elena; Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Chekmasova, Alena A; Strayer, David S

    2011-09-15

    Immune-mediated damage to the central nervous system (CNS) is an important contributor to many CNS diseases, including epilepsy. Chemokines play a role in leukocyte recruitment to, and migration across, the blood-brain barrier (BBB) during many such processes. We previously investigated the role of the chemokine receptor CCR5 in a rat model of epilepsy based on intraperitoneal kainic acid (KA) administration. Before KA injection, rats were given intramarrow inoculations of SV(RNAiR5-RevM10.AU1), which carries an interfering RNA (RNAi) that targets CCR5. Decreased CCR5 expression in blood cells after vector administration reduced expression of CCR5 ligands MIP-1α and RANTES in the microvasculature, and strongly protected from BBB leakage, CNS loss and inflammation and facilitated CNS repair. We show here that rSV40-mediated downregulation of CCR5 in lymphocytes decreased cellular adhesion to surfaces carrying CCR5 ligands. These data suggest that reducing CCR5 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) might alter their adhesion to the microvasculature and their participation in inflammatory processes. PMID:21741662

  1. A national facility for biological cryo-electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Saibil, Helen R.; Grünewald, Kay; Stuart, David I.

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional electron microscopy is an enormously powerful tool for structural biologists. It is now able to provide an understanding of the molecular machinery of cells, disease processes and the actions of pathogenic organisms from atomic detail through to the cellular context. However, cutting-edge research in this field requires very substantial resources for equipment, infrastructure and expertise. Here, a brief overview is provided of the plans for a UK national three-dimensional electron-microscopy facility for integrated structural biology to enable internationally leading research on the machinery of life. State-of-the-art equipment operated with expert support will be provided, optimized for both atomic-level single-particle analysis of purified macromolecules and complexes and for tomography of cell sections. The access to and organization of the facility will be modelled on the highly successful macromolecular crystallography (MX) synchrotron beamlines, and will be embedded at the Diamond Light Source, facilitating the development of user-friendly workflows providing near-real-time experimental feedback. PMID:25615867

  2. A national facility for biological cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Saibil, Helen R; Grünewald, Kay; Stuart, David I

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional electron microscopy is an enormously powerful tool for structural biologists. It is now able to provide an understanding of the molecular machinery of cells, disease processes and the actions of pathogenic organisms from atomic detail through to the cellular context. However, cutting-edge research in this field requires very substantial resources for equipment, infrastructure and expertise. Here, a brief overview is provided of the plans for a UK national three-dimensional electron-microscopy facility for integrated structural biology to enable internationally leading research on the machinery of life. State-of-the-art equipment operated with expert support will be provided, optimized for both atomic-level single-particle analysis of purified macromolecules and complexes and for tomography of cell sections. The access to and organization of the facility will be modelled on the highly successful macromolecular crystallography (MX) synchrotron beamlines, and will be embedded at the Diamond Light Source, facilitating the development of user-friendly workflows providing near-real-time experimental feedback. PMID:25615867

  3. Building on the Ccr4-Not architecture.

    PubMed

    Villanyi, Zoltan; Collart, Martine A

    2016-10-01

    In a recent issue of Nature Communications Ukleja and co-workers reported a cryo-EM 3D reconstruction of the Ccr4-Not complex from Schizosaccharomyces pombe with an immunolocalization of the different subunits. The newly gained architectural knowledge provides cues to apprehend the functional diversity of this major eukaryotic regulator. Indeed, in the cytoplasm alone, Ccr4-Not regulates translational repression, decapping and deadenylation, and the Not module additionally plays a positive role in translation. The spatial distribution of the subunits within the structure is compatible with a model proposing that the Ccr4-Not complex interacts with the 5' and 3' ends of target mRNAs, allowing different functional modules of the complex to act at different stages of the translation process, possibly within a circular constellation of the mRNA. This work opens new avenues, and reveals important gaps in our understanding regarding structure and mode of function of the Ccr4-Not complex that need to be addressed in the future. PMID:27545501

  4. CCR9/CCL25 expression in non-small cell lung cancer correlates with aggressive disease and mediates key steps of metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pranav; Sharma, Praveen K.; Mir, Hina; Singh, Rajesh; Singh, Nalinaksha; Kloecker, Goetz H.; Lillard, James W.; Singh, Shailesh

    2014-01-01

    Poor clinical outcome of lung cancer (LuCa) is primarily due to lack of knowledge about specific molecules involved in its progression and metastasis. In this study, we for the first time show the clinical and biological significance of CC chemokine receptor-9 (CCR9) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Expression of CCR9 and CCL25, the only natural ligand of CCR9, was significantly higher (p < 0.0001) in NSCLC tissues and serum respectively, compared to their respective controls. Interestingly, expression of both CCR9 and CCL25 was significantly higher in adenocarcinomas (ACs) compared to squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) (p = 0.04, and p < 0.0001). Similar to tissues, AC and SCC cell lines were positive for CCR9 expression. Despite of marginal difference in CCR9 expression, AC cells showed higher migratory and invasive potential in response to CCL25, compared to SCC cells. This differential biological response of AC cells was primarily due to differential expression of matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases under the influence of CCL25. Our results suggest CCR9 as a potential target for developing new treatment modality for NSCLC. Additionally, differential serum CCL25 level in ACs and SCCs, two NSCLC subtypes, suggest its potential as a non-invasive diagnostic/prognostic biomarker. PMID:25296976

  5. CCR9/CCL25 expression in non-small cell lung cancer correlates with aggressive disease and mediates key steps of metastasis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pranav; Sharma, Praveen K; Mir, Hina; Singh, Rajesh; Singh, Nalinaksha; Kloecker, Goetz H; Lillard, James W; Singh, Shailesh

    2014-10-30

    Poor clinical outcome of lung cancer (LuCa) is primarily due to lack of knowledge about specific molecules involved in its progression and metastasis. In this study, we for the first time show the clinical and biological significance of CC chemokine receptor-9 (CCR9) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Expression of CCR9 and CCL25, the only natural ligand of CCR9, was significantly higher (p<0.0001) in NSCLC tissues and serum respectively, compared to their respective controls. Interestingly, expression of both CCR9 and CCL25 was significantly higher in adenocarcinomas (ACs) compared to squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) (p = 0.04, and p< 0.0001). Similar to tissues, AC and SCC cell lines were positive for CCR9 expression. Despite of marginal difference in CCR9 expression, AC cells showed higher migratory and invasive potential in response to CCL25, compared to SCC cells. This differential biological response of AC cells was primarily due to differential expression of matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases under the influence of CCL25. Our results suggest CCR9 as a potential target for developing new treatment modality for NSCLC. Additionally, differential serum CCL25 level in ACs and SCCs, two NSCLC subtypes, suggest its potential as a non-invasive diagnostic/prognostic biomarker.

  6. Allelic distribution of CCR5 and CCR2 genes in an Italian population sample.

    PubMed

    Romano-Spica, V; Ianni, A; Arzani, D; Cattarini, L; Majore, S; Dean, M

    2000-01-20

    Genetic polymorphisms of CCR5 and CCR2 human chemokine receptors have been associated with resistance during HIV-1 infection and disease progression. The protective effect of mutant alleles at these loci has important implications in AIDS pathogenesis. Chemokine receptors have a role in viral entry into target cells as well as in immune response modulation. In the present report, we studied the frequency of CCR5delta32 and CCR264I allelic variants among a representative sample of the Italian population. Observed allelic frequencies were 0.0454 and 0.0655, respectively. In both cases, genotype distribution was in equilibrium as predicted by the Hardy-Weinberg equation. Taken as a whole, about 21% of the population sample was found to be heterozygous for one or another of those two mutated alleles. Distribution of CCR5delta32 and CCR264I allelic variants within a population can be considered as a measure of genetic susceptibility to HIV infection and disease progression. PMID:10659048

  7. A National Comparison of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Capstone Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguanno, Ann; Mertz, Pamela; Martin, Debra; Bell, Ellis

    2015-01-01

    Recognizing the increasingly integrative nature of the molecular life sciences, the "American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology" (ASBMB) recommends that Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (BMB) programs develop curricula based on concepts, content, topics, and expected student outcomes, rather than courses. To that end,…

  8. [Expressions of MIP-1alpha, MCP-1 and their receptors CCR-1, CCR-2 in chronic myeloid leukemia cells].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Liang; Shen, Ti; Hui, Yu-Rong; Gu, Xi-Chun; Li, Rong-Sheng

    2006-06-01

    This study was aimed to explore the expression of MIP-1alpha, MCP-1 and their receptors CCR-1, CCR-2 in bcr/abl fusion gene positive CML cells, and to study the effects of P210(bcr/abl) fusion protein tyrosine kinase on expression of MIP-1alpha, MCP-1 and their receptors CCR-1, CCR-2 mRNAs in chronic myeloid leukemia cells. The expression levels of MIP-1alpha, MCP-1 and their receptors CCR-1, CCR-2 mRNA were detected by semi-quantitative RT-PCR in bcr/abl negative cells, bcr/abl positive cells, and P210(bcr/abl)-Rb-C-Box positive cells. The results showed that MIP-1alpha and CCR-1 mRNAs were expressed in bcr/abl negative cells, but not in positive cells. Both MCP-1 and CCR-2 mRNA cannot be detected in both bcr/abl positive and negative cells. After inhibiting P210(bcr/abl) tyrosine kinase activity by Rb-C-Box, expressions of MIP-1alpha and CCR-1 mRNAs were restored to normal (similar to P210(bcr/abl) negative cells). It is concluded that P210(bcr/abl) fusion protein inhibits the expression of MIP-1alpha and CCR-1 in chronic myeloid leukemia cells, but does not inhibit MCP-1 and CCR-2 mRNA expressions in these leukemia cells.

  9. [Expressions of MIP-1alpha, MCP-1 and their receptors CCR-1, CCR-2 in chronic myeloid leukemia cells].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Liang; Shen, Ti; Hui, Yu-Rong; Gu, Xi-Chun; Li, Rong-Sheng

    2006-06-01

    This study was aimed to explore the expression of MIP-1alpha, MCP-1 and their receptors CCR-1, CCR-2 in bcr/abl fusion gene positive CML cells, and to study the effects of P210(bcr/abl) fusion protein tyrosine kinase on expression of MIP-1alpha, MCP-1 and their receptors CCR-1, CCR-2 mRNAs in chronic myeloid leukemia cells. The expression levels of MIP-1alpha, MCP-1 and their receptors CCR-1, CCR-2 mRNA were detected by semi-quantitative RT-PCR in bcr/abl negative cells, bcr/abl positive cells, and P210(bcr/abl)-Rb-C-Box positive cells. The results showed that MIP-1alpha and CCR-1 mRNAs were expressed in bcr/abl negative cells, but not in positive cells. Both MCP-1 and CCR-2 mRNA cannot be detected in both bcr/abl positive and negative cells. After inhibiting P210(bcr/abl) tyrosine kinase activity by Rb-C-Box, expressions of MIP-1alpha and CCR-1 mRNAs were restored to normal (similar to P210(bcr/abl) negative cells). It is concluded that P210(bcr/abl) fusion protein inhibits the expression of MIP-1alpha and CCR-1 in chronic myeloid leukemia cells, but does not inhibit MCP-1 and CCR-2 mRNA expressions in these leukemia cells. PMID:16800914

  10. Diphtheria-toxin based anti-human CCR4 immunotoxin for targeting human CCR4(+) cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaohui; Wei, Min; Zhang, Huiping; Chen, Hongyuan; Germana, Sharon; Huang, Christene A; Madsen, Joren C; Sachs, David H; Wang, Zhirui

    2015-08-01

    CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4) has attracted much attention as a promising therapeutic drug target for CCR4(+) tumor cells and Tregs. CCR4 is expressed on some tumor cells such as T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), adult peripheral T cell lymphoma (PTCL) and cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL). CCR4 is also expressed on majority of Tregs, mainly effector Tregs. In this study we have successfully developed three versions of diphtheria-toxin based anti-human CCR4 immunotoxins (monovalent, bivalent and single-chain fold-back diabody). Binding analysis by flow cytometry showed that all three versions of the anti-human CCR4 immunotoxins bound to the human CCR4(+) tumor cell line as well as CCR4(+) human PBMC. The bivalent isoform bound stronger than its monovalent counterpart and the single-chain foldback diabody isoform was the strongest among the three versions. In vitro efficacy analysis demonstrated that the bivalent isoform was 20 fold more potent in inhibiting cellular proliferation and protein synthesis in human CCR4(+) tumor cells compared to the monovalent anti-human CCR4 immunotoxin. The single-chain fold-back diabody isoform was 10 fold more potent than its bivalent counterpart and 200 fold more potent than its monovalent counterpart. The in vivo efficacy was assessed using a human CCR4(+) tumor-bearing mouse model. The immunotoxin significantly prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing NOD/SCID IL-2 receptor γ(-/-) (NSG) mice injected with human CCR4(+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells compared with the control group. This novel anti-human CCR4 immunotoxin is a promising drug candidate for targeting human CCR4(+) tumor cells and Tregs in vivo. PMID:25958791

  11. Beyond the known functions of the CCR4-NOT complex in gene expression regulatory mechanisms: New structural insights to unravel CCR4-NOT mRNA processing machinery.

    PubMed

    Ukleja, Marta; Valpuesta, José María; Dziembowski, Andrzej; Cuellar, Jorge

    2016-10-01

    Large protein assemblies are usually the effectors of major cellular processes. The intricate cell homeostasis network is divided into numerous interconnected pathways, each controlled by a set of protein machines. One of these master regulators is the CCR4-NOT complex, which ultimately controls protein expression levels. This multisubunit complex assembles around a scaffold platform, which enables a wide variety of well-studied functions from mRNA synthesis to transcript decay, as well as other tasks still being identified. Solving the structure of the entire CCR4-NOT complex will help to define the distribution of its functions. The recently published three-dimensional reconstruction of the complex, in combination with the known crystal structures of some of the components, has begun to address this. Methodological improvements in structural biology, especially in cryoelectron microscopy, encourage further structural and protein-protein interaction studies, which will advance our comprehension of the gene expression machinery.

  12. Cutting edge: CCR7+ and CCR7- memory T cells do not differ in immediate effector cell function.

    PubMed

    Unsoeld, Heike; Krautwald, Stefan; Voehringer, David; Kunzendorf, Ulrich; Pircher, Hanspeter

    2002-07-15

    It has been proposed that expression of the chemokine receptor CCR7 represents a defining factor for nonpolarized central (CCR7(+)) and polarized effector memory (CCR7(-)) T cells. In this study, we have tested this hypothesis using in vivo-activated T cells from P14 and SMARTA TCR-transgenic (tg) mice specific for MHC class I- and II-restricted epitopes of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) glycoprotein. CCR7 cell surface expression on TCR-tg cells was monitored with a CC chemokine ligand 19-Ig fusion protein. CC chemokine ligand 19-Ig staining separated TCR-tg cells activated by LCMV infection into CCR7(-) and CCR7(+) effector/memory T cell populations. Nonetheless, both T cell populations isolated from spleen and liver produced identical amounts of IFN-gamma after short-term Ag stimulation. Furthermore, CCR7(+) and CCR7(-) CD8 TCR-tg cells from LCMV-infected mice exhibited similar lytic activity against LCMV peptide-coated target cells. These results question the proposed concept of differential effector cell function of CCR7(+) and CCR7(-) memory T cells. PMID:12097363

  13. Information science and technology developments within the National Biological Information Infrastructure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frame, M.T.; Cotter, G.; Zolly, L.; Little, J.

    2002-01-01

    Whether your vantage point is that of an office window or a national park, your view undoubtedly encompasses a rich diversity of life forms, all carefully studied or managed by some scientist, resource manager, or planner. A few simple calculations - the number of species, their interrelationships, and the many researchers studying them - and you can easily see the tremendous challenges that the resulting biological data presents to the information and computer science communities. Biological information varies in format and content: it may pertain to a particular species or an entire ecosystem; it can contain land use characteristics, and geospatially referenced information. The complexity and uniqueness of each individual species or ecosystem do not easily lend themselves to today's computer science tools and applications. To address the challenges that the biological enterprise presents, the National Biological Information Infrastructure (NBII) (http://www.nbii.gov) was established in 1993 on the recommendation of the National Research Council (National Research Council 1993). The NBII is designed to address these issues on a national scale, and through international partnerships. This paper discusses current information and computer science efforts within the National Biological Information Infrastructure Program, and future computer science research endeavors that are needed to address the ever-growing issues related to our nation's biological concerns. ?? 2003 by The Haworth Press, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Biological Consequences of Nuclear War: Initiating National Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwell, Mark A.; Freeman, Ann C.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the second volume of the environmental consequences of nuclear war (ENUWAR) study of the Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment (SCOPE) which involves the potential consequences for the Earth's biological systems. Discusses case studies in areas where the indirect effects of nuclear war would be the greatest danger. (CW)

  15. Chemokine receptor CCR5 polymorphisms and Chagas' disease cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Calzada, J E; Nieto, A; Beraún, Y; Martín, J

    2001-09-01

    In this study we investigated the possible role of two CCR5 gene polymorphisms, CCR5Delta32 deletion and CCR5 59029 A-->G promoter point mutation, in determining the susceptibility to Trypanosoma cruzi infection as well as in the development of chagasic heart disease. These CCR5 polymorphisms were assessed in 85 seropositive (asymptomatic, n=53; cardiomyopathic, n=32) and 87 seronegative individuals. The extremely low frequency (0.009) of the CCR5Delta32 allele in our population did not allow us to analyse its possible influence on T. cruzi infection. We found no differences in the distribution of CCR5 59029 promoter genotype or phenotype frequencies between total chagasic patients and controls. However, we observed that the CCR5 59029-A/G genotype was significantly increased in asymptomatic with respect to cardiomyopathic patients (P=0.02; OR=0.33, 95% CI 0.10-0.94). In addition, the presence of the CCR5 59029-G allele was also increased in asymptomatics when compared with cardiomyopathics (P=0.02; OR=0.35, 95% CI 0.12-0.96). Our data suggest that the CCR5 59029 promoter polymorphism may be involved in a differential susceptibility to chagasic cardiomyopathy.

  16. Field Trip to Kazdagi National Park: Views of Prospective Biology Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çetin, Gülcan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the views of the prospective biology teachers about the field trip to Kazdagi National Park. Participants were 12 prospective Biology teachers studying in Necatibey Faculty of Education in Balikesir University, Turkey. A semi-structured interview form was used as a data collection instrument. Data were…

  17. A Comparative Docking Study of Anibamine as the First Natural Product CCR5 Antagonist in CCR5 Homology Models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guo; Haney, Kendra M.; Kellogg, Glen E.; Zhang, Yan

    2009-01-01

    Anibamine, a novel pyridine quaternary alkaloid recently isolated from Aniba sp., has been found to effectively bind to the chemokine receptor CCR5 with an IC50 at 1 μM in competition with 125I-gp120, an HIV viral envelope protein binding to CCR5 with high affinity. Since CCR5, a G-protein-coupled receptor, is an essential co-receptor for the human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) entry to host cells, a CCR5 antagonist that inhibits the cellular entry of HIV-1 provides a new therapy choice for the treatment of HIV. Anibamine provides a novel structural skeleton that is remarkably different from all lead compounds previously identified as CCR5 antagonists. Here, we report comparative docking studies of anibamine with several other known CCR5 antagonists in two CCR5 homology models built based on the crystal structures of bovine rhodopsin and human β2-adrenergic receptor. The binding pocket of anibamine has some common features shared with other high affinity CCR5 antagonists, suggesting that they may bind in similar binding sites and/or modes. At the same time, several unique binding features of anibamine were identified and it will likely prove beneficial in future molecular design of novel CCR5 antagonists based on the anibamine scaffold. PMID:19166361

  18. Structural biology facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s high flux beam reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Korszun, Z.R.; Saxena, A.M.; Schneider, D.K.

    1994-12-31

    The techniques for determining the structure of biological molecules and larger biological assemblies depend on the extent of order in the particular system. At the High Flux Beam Reactor at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Biology Department operates three beam lines dedicated to biological structure studies. These beam lines span the resolution range from approximately 700{Angstrom} to approximately 1.5{Angstrom} and are designed to perform structural studies on a wide range of biological systems. Beam line H3A is dedicated to single crystal diffraction studies of macromolecules, while beam line H3B is designed to study diffraction from partially ordered systems such as biological membranes. Beam line H9B is located on the cold source and is designed for small angle scattering experiments on oligomeric biological systems.

  19. Attenuation of rodent neuropathic pain by an orally active peptide, RAP-103, which potently blocks CCR2- and CCR5-mediated monocyte chemotaxis and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Padi, Satyanarayana S V; Shi, Xiang Q; Zhao, Yuan Q; Ruff, Michael R; Baichoo, Noel; Pert, Candace B; Zhang, Ji

    2012-01-01

    Chemokine signaling is important in neuropathic pain, with microglial cells expressing CCR2 playing a well-established key role. DAPTA, a HIV gp120-derived CCR5 entry inhibitor, has been shown to inhibit CCR5-mediated monocyte migration and to attenuate neuroinflammation. We report here that as a stabilized analog of DAPTA, the short peptide RAP-103 exhibits potent antagonism for both CCR2 (half maximal inhibitory concentration [IC50] 4.2 pM) and CCR5 (IC50 0.18 pM) in monocyte chemotaxis. Oral administration of RAP-103 (0.05-1 mg/kg) for 7 days fully prevents mechanical allodynia and inhibits the development of thermal hyperalgesia after partial ligation of the sciatic nerve in rats. Administered from days 8 to 12, RAP-103 (0.2-1 mg/kg) reverses already established hypersensitivity. RAP-103 relieves behavioral hypersensitivity, probably through either or both CCR2 and CCR5 blockade, because by using genetically deficient animals, we demonstrated that in addition to CCR2, CCR5 is also required for the development of neuropathic pain. Moreover, RAP-103 is able to reduce spinal microglial activation and monocyte infiltration, and to inhibit inflammatory responses evoked by peripheral nerve injury that cause chronic pain. Our findings suggest that targeting CCR2/CCR5 should provide greater efficacy than targeting CCR2 or CCR5 alone, and that dual CCR2/CCR5 antagonist RAP-103 has the potential for broad clinical use in neuropathic pain treatment.

  20. Natural anti-CCR5 antibodies in HIV-infection and -exposure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Natural antibodies constitute a first-line of defence against pathogens; they may also play other roles in immune regulation and homeostasis, through their ability to bind host antigens, surface molecules and receptors. Natural anti-CCR5 antibodies can be decisive in preventing HIV infection in mucosal tissues and offer prompt and effective protection just at major sites of virus entry. Among natural anti-CCR5 antibodies, IgG and IgA to the ECL1 domain have been shown to block HIV effectively and durably without causing harm to the host. Their biological properties and their uncommon generation in subsets of HIV-infected and HIV-exposed individuals (so called ESN) will be introduced and discussed, with the aim at exploiting their potential in therapy and prevention. PMID:21284903

  1. Downregulation of CCR1 inhibits human hepatocellular carcinoma cell invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Xiaofeng; Fan Jia; E-mail: jiafan99@yahoo.com; Wang Xiaoying; Zhou Jian; Qiu Shuangjian; Yu Yao; Liu Yinkun; Tang Zhaoyou

    2007-04-20

    CC chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1) has an important role in the recruitment of leukocytes to the site of inflammation. The migration and metastasis of tumor cells shares many similarities with leukocyte trafficking, which is mainly regulated by chemokine receptor-ligand interactions. CCR1 is highly expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and tissues with unknown functions. In this study, we silenced CCR1 expression in the human HCC cell line HCCLM3 using artificial microRNA (miRNA)-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) and examined the invasiveness and proliferation of CCR1-silenced HCCLM3 cells and the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. The miRNA-mediated knockdown expression of CCR1 significantly inhibited the invasive ability of HCCLM3 cells, but had only a minor effect on the cellular proliferation rate. Moreover, CCR1 knockdown significantly reduced the secretion of MMP-2. Together, these findings indicate that CCR1 has an important role in HCCLM3 invasion and that CCR1 might be a new target of HCC treatment.

  2. A Simplified Technique for Evaluating Human "CCR5" Genetic Polymorphism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falteisek, Lukáš; Cerný, Jan; Janštová, Vanda

    2013-01-01

    To involve students in thinking about the problem of AIDS (which is important in the view of nondecreasing infection rates), we established a practical lab using a simplified adaptation of Thomas's (2004) method to determine the polymorphism of HIV co-receptor CCR5 from students' own epithelial cells. CCR5 is a receptor involved in…

  3. Risk assessment related to veterinary biologicals: specific issues in developing nations.

    PubMed

    Ward, D E

    1995-12-01

    The author reviews both technical and socio-economic issues in developing nations, in relation to veterinary biologicals. Health risk assessment is a specific process to estimate the likelihood that animals, humans or ecological systems will be affected adversely by a chemical or physical agent, or biological product, under a specific set of conditions. Some technical issues (quality assurance, good manufacturing practice, education of end-users, field monitoring) apply equally well in developed, industrialised and in developing, pre-industrialised nations. Many regions have documented unique diseases (trypanosomosis, tick diseases, theileriosis) or high disease prevalence which may influence risk assessment results. This emphasises the need for scientifically-valid risk assessment methodologies in developing nations. Developing nations also have various socio-economic concerns, which may not be based on scientific fact but, nonetheless, affect trade in, and use of, veterinary biologicals. These non-scientific but perceived problems and issues are briefly discussed, and possible solutions are presented. The way in which countries deal with such perceived problems and issues in a context of internationally harmonised norms for risk assessment impinges on livestock farmers in developing nations. Finally, the author presents possible ways to correct the potentially widening cost gap between conventional, proven veterinary biologicals and newly-developed products. The results of risk assessment of veterinary biologicals influence risk management in both developed and less-developed nations. It is important to agree upon scientifically-based risk management guidelines which may be applied in all countries. The effect of the agreements of the Uruguay Round of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade on trade in veterinary biologicals in developing nations is reviewed.

  4. Coincident expression of the chemokine receptors CCR6 and CCR7 by pathologic Langerhans cells in Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Mark D; Pinkus, Jack L; Fournier, Marcia V; Alexander, Sarah W; Tam, Carmen; Loda, Massimo; Sallan, Stephen E; Nichols, Kim E; Carpentieri, David F; Pinkus, Geraldine S; Rollins, Barrett J

    2003-04-01

    It has been suggested that a switch in chemokine receptor expression underlies Langerhans cell migration from skin to lymphoid tissue. Activated cells are thought to down-regulate CCR6, whose ligand macrophage inflammatory protein-3 alpha (MIP-3 alpha)/CCL20 is expressed in skin, and up-regulate CCR7, whose ligands are in lymphoid tissues. In Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), pathologic Langerhans cells (LCs) accumulate in several tissues, including skin, bone, and lymphoid organs. We have examined 24 LCH cases and find that pathologic LCs expressed CCR6 and CCR7 coincidentally in all cases. Furthermore, MIP-3 alpha/CCL20 is expressed by keratinocytes in involved skin and by macrophages and osteoblasts in involved bone. Expression of CCR6 by pathologic LCs may contribute to their accumulation in nonlymphoid organs such as skin and bone, whereas CCR7 expression may direct them to lymphoid tissue. Histiocytes in Rosai-Dorfman disease and hemophagocytic syndrome also coexpressed CCR6 and CCR7, suggesting that this may be a general attribute of abnormal histiocytes.

  5. Chemokine CCL28 induces apoptosis of decidual stromal cells via binding CCR3/CCR10 in human spontaneous abortion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chan; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Tang, Chuan-Ling; Wang, Song-Cun; Piao, Hai-Lan; Tao, Yu; Zhu, Rui; Du, Mei-Rong; Li, Da-Jin

    2013-10-01

    Spontaneous abortion is the most common complication of pregnancy. Immune activation and the subsequent inflammation-induced tissue injury are often observed at the maternal-fetal interface as the final pathological assault in recurrent spontaneous abortion. However, the precise mechanisms responsible for spontaneous abortion involving inflammation are not fully understood. Chemokine CCL28 and its receptors CCR3 and CCR10 are important regulators in inflammatory process. Here, we examined the expression of CCL28 and its receptors in decidual stromal cells (DSCs) by immunochemistry and flow cytometry (FCM), and compared their expression level in DSCs from normal pregnancy versus spontaneous abortion, and their relationship to inflammatory cytokines production by DSCs. We further analyzed regulation of the pro-inflammatory cytokines on CCL28 expression in DSCs by real-time polymerase chain reaction, In-cell Western and FCM. The effects of CCL28-CCR3/CCR10 interaction on DSC apoptosis was investigated by Annexin V staining and FCM analysis or DAPI staining and nuclear morphology. Higher levels of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-17A and tumor necrosis factor-α, and increased CCR3/CCR10 expression were observed in DSCs from spontaneous abortion compared with normal pregnancy. Treatment with inflammatory cytokines differently affected CCL28 and CCR3/CCR10 expression in DSCs. Human recombinant CCL28 promoted DSC apoptosis, which was eliminated by pretreatment with neutralizing antibodies against CCR3/CCR10 and CCL28. However, CCL28 did not affect DSC growth. These results suggest that the inflammation-promoted up-regulation of CCL28 and its receptors interaction in DSCs is involved in human spontaneous abortion via inducing DSC apoptosis.

  6. Chemokine receptor CCR2 involvement in skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Warren, Gordon L; Hulderman, Tracy; Mishra, Dawn; Gao, Xin; Millecchia, Lyndell; O'Farrell, Laura; Kuziel, William A; Simeonova, Petia P

    2005-03-01

    Chemokines, signaling through the CCR2 receptor, are highly expressed in injured skeletal muscle. Their target specificity depends on the cellular expression of the specific receptors. Here we demonstrate that, in freeze-injured muscle, CCR2 co-localized with Mac-3, a marker of activated macrophages as well as with myogenin, a marker of activated muscle precursor cells. The degeneration/regeneration process in skeletal muscle of CCR2-/- and wild-type mice was not significantly different at day 3. However in contrast to the regenerated muscle of the wild-type mice, the muscle from CCR2-/- mice was characterized by impaired regeneration, inflammation, and fibrotic response at day 14, increased fat infiltration, fibrosis, and calcification at day 21, and impaired strength recovery until at least 28 days post-injury. Consistently, the increased expression of Mac-1 and TNF-alpha was prolonged in the injured muscle of CCR2-/- mice. The expression pattern of the myogenic factors MyoD and myogenin was similar for both types of mice, while NCAM, which is associated with the initiation of fusion of muscle precursor cells, was more increased in the injured muscle of CCR2-/- mice. In conclusion, the study delineates that signaling through CCR2 is involved in muscle precursor cell activities necessary for complete and rapid regeneration of injured skeletal muscle. PMID:15601671

  7. Efficient Use of a Crude Drug/Herb Library Reveals Ephedra Herb As a Specific Antagonist for TH2-Specific Chemokine Receptors CCR3, CCR4, and CCR8.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Kazuhiko; Koizumi, Keiichi; Fujita, Mitsugu; Morikawa, Toshio; Jo, Michiko; Shibahara, Naotoshi; Saiki, Ikuo; Yoshie, Osamu; Nakayama, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptors CCR3 and CCR4 are preferentially expressed by TH2 cells, mast cells, and/or eosinophils, all of which are involved in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. Therefore, CCR3 and CCR4 have long been highlighted as potent therapeutic targets for allergic diseases. Japanese traditional herbal medicine Kampo consists of multiple crude drugs/herbs, which further consist of numerous chemical substances. Recent studies have demonstrated that such chemical substances appear to promising sources in the development of novel therapeutic agents. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that Kampo-related crude drugs/herbs would contain chemical substances that inhibit the cell migration mediated by CCR3 and/or CCR4. To test this hypothesis, we screened 80 crude drugs/herbs to identify candidate substances using chemotaxis assay. Among those tested, Ephedra Herb inhibited the chemotaxis mediated by both CCR3 and CCR4, Cornus Fruit inhibited that mediated by CCR3, and Rhubarb inhibited that mediated by CCR4. Furthermore, Ephedra Herb specifically inhibited the chemotaxis mediated by not only CCR3 and CCR4 but CCR8, all of which are selectively expressed by TH2 cells. This result led us to speculate that ephedrine, a major component of Ephedra Herb, would play a central role in the inhibitory effects on the chemotaxis mediated by CCR3, CCR4, and CCR8. However, ephedrine exhibited little effects on the chemotaxis. Therefore, we fractionated Ephedra Herb into four subfractions and examined the inhibitory effects of each subfraction. As the results, ethyl acetate-insoluble fraction exhibited the inhibitory effects on chemotaxis and calcium mobilization mediated by CCR3 and CCR4 most significantly. In contrast, chloroform-soluble fraction exhibited a weak inhibitory effect on the chemotaxis mediated by CCR8. Furthermore, maoto, one of the Kampo formulations containing Ephedra Herb, exhibited the inhibitory effects on the chemotaxis mediated by CCR3, CCR4, and CCR8

  8. Efficient Use of a Crude Drug/Herb Library Reveals Ephedra Herb As a Specific Antagonist for TH2-Specific Chemokine Receptors CCR3, CCR4, and CCR8

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Kazuhiko; Koizumi, Keiichi; Fujita, Mitsugu; Morikawa, Toshio; Jo, Michiko; Shibahara, Naotoshi; Saiki, Ikuo; Yoshie, Osamu; Nakayama, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptors CCR3 and CCR4 are preferentially expressed by TH2 cells, mast cells, and/or eosinophils, all of which are involved in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. Therefore, CCR3 and CCR4 have long been highlighted as potent therapeutic targets for allergic diseases. Japanese traditional herbal medicine Kampo consists of multiple crude drugs/herbs, which further consist of numerous chemical substances. Recent studies have demonstrated that such chemical substances appear to promising sources in the development of novel therapeutic agents. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that Kampo-related crude drugs/herbs would contain chemical substances that inhibit the cell migration mediated by CCR3 and/or CCR4. To test this hypothesis, we screened 80 crude drugs/herbs to identify candidate substances using chemotaxis assay. Among those tested, Ephedra Herb inhibited the chemotaxis mediated by both CCR3 and CCR4, Cornus Fruit inhibited that mediated by CCR3, and Rhubarb inhibited that mediated by CCR4. Furthermore, Ephedra Herb specifically inhibited the chemotaxis mediated by not only CCR3 and CCR4 but CCR8, all of which are selectively expressed by TH2 cells. This result led us to speculate that ephedrine, a major component of Ephedra Herb, would play a central role in the inhibitory effects on the chemotaxis mediated by CCR3, CCR4, and CCR8. However, ephedrine exhibited little effects on the chemotaxis. Therefore, we fractionated Ephedra Herb into four subfractions and examined the inhibitory effects of each subfraction. As the results, ethyl acetate-insoluble fraction exhibited the inhibitory effects on chemotaxis and calcium mobilization mediated by CCR3 and CCR4 most significantly. In contrast, chloroform-soluble fraction exhibited a weak inhibitory effect on the chemotaxis mediated by CCR8. Furthermore, maoto, one of the Kampo formulations containing Ephedra Herb, exhibited the inhibitory effects on the chemotaxis mediated by CCR3, CCR4, and CCR8

  9. Cloning and expression analysis of cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR) genes in sorghum

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Feifei; Wang, Lihua; Zhan, Qiuwen; Wu, Peijin; Du, Junli; Yang, Xiaocui; Liu, Yanlong

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR) is the first enzyme in the monolignol-specific branch of the lignin biosynthetic pathway. In this research, three sorghum CCR genes including SbCCR1, SbCCR2-1 and SbCCR2-2 were cloned and characterized. Analyses of the structure and phylogeny of the three CCR genes showed evolutionary conservation of the functional domains and divergence of function. Transient expression assays in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves demonstrated that the three CCR proteins were localized in the cytoplasm. The expression analysis showed that the three CCR genes were induced by drought. But in 48 h, the expression levels of SbCCR1 and SbCCR2-2 did not differ between CK and the drought treatment; while the expression level of SbCCR2-1 in the drought treatment was higher than in CK. The expression of the SbCCR1 and SbCCR2-1 genes was not induced by sorghum aphid [Melanaphis sacchari (Zehntner)] attack, but SbCCR2-2 was significantly induced by sorghum aphid attack. It is suggested that SbCCR2-2 is involved in the process of pest defense. Absolute quantitative real-time PCR revealed that the three CCR genes were mainly expressed in lignin deposition organs. The gene copy number of SbCCR1 was significantly higher than those of SbCCR2-1 and SbCCR2-2 in the tested tissues, especially in stem. The results provide new insight into the functions of the three CCR genes in sorghum. PMID:27231650

  10. Cloning and expression analysis of cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR) genes in sorghum.

    PubMed

    Li, Jieqin; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Lihua; Zhan, Qiuwen; Wu, Peijin; Du, Junli; Yang, Xiaocui; Liu, Yanlong

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR) is the first enzyme in the monolignol-specific branch of the lignin biosynthetic pathway. In this research, three sorghum CCR genes including SbCCR1, SbCCR2-1 and SbCCR2-2 were cloned and characterized. Analyses of the structure and phylogeny of the three CCR genes showed evolutionary conservation of the functional domains and divergence of function. Transient expression assays in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves demonstrated that the three CCR proteins were localized in the cytoplasm. The expression analysis showed that the three CCR genes were induced by drought. But in 48 h, the expression levels of SbCCR1 and SbCCR2-2 did not differ between CK and the drought treatment; while the expression level of SbCCR2-1 in the drought treatment was higher than in CK. The expression of the SbCCR1 and SbCCR2-1 genes was not induced by sorghum aphid [Melanaphis sacchari (Zehntner)] attack, but SbCCR2-2 was significantly induced by sorghum aphid attack. It is suggested that SbCCR2-2 is involved in the process of pest defense. Absolute quantitative real-time PCR revealed that the three CCR genes were mainly expressed in lignin deposition organs. The gene copy number of SbCCR1 was significantly higher than those of SbCCR2-1 and SbCCR2-2 in the tested tissues, especially in stem. The results provide new insight into the functions of the three CCR genes in sorghum. PMID:27231650

  11. Biological assessment for the effluent reduction program, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, S.P.

    1996-08-01

    This report describes the biological assessment for the effluent recution program proposed to occur within the boundaries of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Potential effects on wetland plants and on threatened and endangered species are discussed, along with a detailed description of the individual outfalls resulting from the effluent reduction program.

  12. The Changing Face of Biology 101 with Regard to the Nation's Science Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeth, Michael E.; Adadan, Emine; Firat, Gul; Kutay, Huban

    This study examines how the Biology 101 curriculum at The Ohio State University, a non-major's course, was changing with regard to recommendations expressed in the National Science Education Standards (NSES) and Benchmarks for Science Literacy. The Bio 101 course was observed to compare the content topics identified in the syllabus with topics…

  13. Binding of fusion protein FLSC IgG1 to CCR5 is enhanced by CCR5 antagonist Maraviroc.

    PubMed

    Latinovic, Olga; Schneider, Kate; Szmacinski, Henryk; Lakowicz, Joseph R; Heredia, Alonso; Redfield, Robert R

    2014-12-01

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor is crucial for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, acting as the principal coreceptor for HIV-1 entry and transmission and is thus an attractive target for antiviral therapy. Studies have suggested that CCR5 surface density and its conformational changes subsequent to virion engagement are rate limiting for entry, and consequently, infection. Not all CCR5 antibodies inhibit HIV-1 infection, suggesting a need for more potent reagents. Here we evaluated full length single chain (FLSC) IgG1, a novel IgG-CD4-gp120(BAL) fusion protein with several characteristics that make it an attractive candidate for treatment of HIV-1 infections, including bivalency and a potentially increased serum half-life over FLSC, the parental molecule. FLSC IgG1 binds two domains on CCR5, the N-terminus and the second extracellular loop, lowering the levels of available CCR5 viral attachment sites. Furthermore, FLSC IgG1 synergizes with Maraviroc (MVC), the only licensed CCR5 antagonist. In this study, we used both microscopy and functional assays to address the mechanistic aspects of the interactions of FLSC IgG1 and MVC in the context of CCR5 conformational changes and viral infection. We used a novel stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), based on high resolution localization of photoswitchable dyes to visualize direct contacts between FLSC IgG1 and CCR5. We compared viral entry inhibition by FLSC IgG1 with that of other CCR5 blockers and showed FLSC IgG1 to be the most potent. We also showed that lower CCR5 surface densities in HIV-1 infected primary cells result in lower FLSC IgG1 EC50 values. In addition, CCR5 binding by FLSC IgG1, but not CCR5 Ab 2D7, was significantly increased when cells were treated with MVC, suggesting MVC allosterically increases exposure of the FLSC IgG1 binding site. These data have implications for future antiviral therapy development.

  14. CCR2 inhibition sequesters multiple subsets of leukocytes in the bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Naoki; Xu, Baohui; Dalman, Jackson; Deng, Hongping; Aoyama, Kohji; Dalman, Ronald L

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine receptor CCR2 mediates monocyte mobilization from the bone marrow (BM) and subsequent migration into target tissues. The degree to which CCR2 is differentially expressed in leukocyte subsets, and the contribution of CCR2 to these leukocyte mobilization from the BM are poorly understood. Using red fluorescence protein CCR2 reporter mice, we found heterogeneity in CCR2 expression among leukocyte subsets in varying tissues. CCR2 was highly expressed by inflammatory monocytes, dendritic cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells and NK cells in all tissues. Unexpectedly, more than 60% of neutrophils expressed CCR2, albeit at low levels. CCR2 expression in T cells, B cells and NK T cells was greatest in the BM compared to other tissues. Genetic CCR2 deficiency markedly sequestered all leukocyte subsets in the BM, with reciprocal reduction noted in the peripheral blood and spleen. CCR2 inhibition via treatment with CCR2 signaling inhibitor propagermanium produced similar effects. Propagermanium also mitigated lipopolysaccharide-induced BM leukocyte egress. Consistent with its functional significance, CCR2 antibody staining revealed surface CCR2 expression within a subset of BM neutrophils. These results demonstrate the central role CCR2 plays in mediating leukocyte mobilization from the BM, and suggest a role for CCR2 inhibition in managing monocytes/macrophages-mediated chronic inflammatory conditions.

  15. Plasmodium yoelii 17XL infection up-regulates RANTES, CCR1, CCR3 and CCR5 expression, and induces ultrastructural changes in the cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Sarfo, Bismark Y; Armah, Henry B; Irune, Ikovwaiza; Adjei, Andrew A; Olver, Christine S; Singh, Shailesh; Lillard, James W; Stiles, Jonathan K

    2005-01-01

    Background Malaria afflicts 300–500 million people causing over 1 million deaths globally per year. The immunopathogenesis of malaria is mediated partly by co mplex cellular and immunomodulator interactions involving co-regulators such as cytokines and adhesion molecules. However, the role of chemokines and their receptors in malaria immunopathology remains unclear. RANTES (Regulated on Activation Normal T-Cell Expressed and Secreted) is a chemokine involved in the generation of inflammatory infiltrates. Recent studies indicate that the degradation of cell-cell junctions, blood-brain barrier dysfunction, recruitment of leukocytes and Plasmodium-infected erythrocytes into and occlusion of microvessels relevant to malaria pathogenesis are associated with RANTES expression. Additionally, activated lymphocytes, platelets and endothelial cells release large quantities of RANTES, thus suggesting a unique role for RANTES in the generation and maintenance of the malaria-induced inflammatory response. The hypothesis of this study is that RANTES and its corresponding receptors (CCR1, CCR3 and CCR5) modulate malaria immunopathogenesis. A murine malaria model was utilized to evaluate the role of this chemokine and its receptors in malaria. Methods The alterations in immunomodulator gene expression in brains of Plasmodium yoelii 17XL-infected mice was analysed using cDNA microarray screening, followed by a temporal comparison of mRNA and protein expression of RANTES and its corresponding receptors by qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. Plasma RANTES levels was determined by ELISA and ultrastructural studies of brain sections from infected and uninfected mice was conducted. Results RANTES (p < 0.002), CCR1 (p < 0.036), CCR3 (p < 0.033), and CCR5 (p < 0.026) mRNA were significantly upregulated at peak parasitaemia and remained high thereafter in the experimental mouse model. RANTES protein in the brain of infected mice was upregulated (p < 0.034) compared with

  16. Neutron Imaging at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory: Application to Biological Research

    SciTech Connect

    Bilheux, Hassina Z; Cekanova, Maria; Bilheux, Jean-Christophe; Bailey, William Barton; Keener, Wylie S; Davis, Larry E; Herwig, Kenneth W

    2014-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Neutron Sciences Directorate (NScD) has recently installed a neutron imaging beamline at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) cold guide hall. The CG-1D beamline supports a broad range of user research spanning from engineering to material research, energy storage, additive manufacturing, vehicle technologies, archaeology, biology, and plant physiology. The beamline performance (spatial resolution, field of view, etc.) and its utilization for biological research are presented. The NScD is also considering a proposal to build the VENUS imaging beamline (beam port 10) at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Unlike CG-1D which provides cold neutrons, VENUS will offer a broad range of neutron wavelengths, from epithermal to cold, and enhanced contrast mechanisms. This new capability will also enable the imaging of thicker biological samples than is currently available at CG-1D. A brief overview of the VENUS capability for biological research is discussed.

  17. Association of the CCR5 gene with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hinks, A; Martin, P; Flynn, E; Eyre, S; Packham, J; Barton, A; Worthington, J; Thomson, W

    2010-10-01

    The CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) has been shown to be important in the recruitment of T-helper cells to the synovium, where they accumulate, drive the inflammatory process and the consequent synovitis and joint destruction. A 32 base-pair insertion/deletion variant (CCR5Δ32) within the gene leads to a frame shift and a nonfunctional receptor. CCR5Δ32 has been investigated for its association with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), with conflicting results. The aim of this study was to investigate whether CCR5Δ32 is associated with JIA in an UK population. CCR5Δ32 was genotyped in JIA cases (n=1054) and healthy controls (n=3129) and genotype and allele frequencies were compared. A meta-analysis of our study combined with previously published studies was performed. CCR5Δ32 was significantly associated with protection from developing JIA, in this UK data set (P(trend)=0.006, odds ratio (OR) 0.79 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.66-0.94). The meta-analysis of all published case-control association studies confirmed the protective association with JIA (P=0.001 OR 0.82 95% CI: 0.73-0.93). CCR5Δ32 is a functional variant determining the number of receptors on the surface of T cells, and it is hypothesized that the level of CCR5 expression could influence the migration of proinflammatory T cells into the synovium and thus susceptibility to JIA. PMID:20463745

  18. Association of the CCR5 gene with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hinks, A; Martin, P; Flynn, E; Eyre, S; Packham, J; Barton, A; Worthington, J; Thomson, W

    2010-01-01

    The CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) has been shown to be important in the recruitment of T-helper cells to the synovium, where they accumulate, drive the inflammatory process and the consequent synovitis and joint destruction. A 32 base-pair insertion/deletion variant (CCR5Δ32) within the gene leads to a frame shift and a nonfunctional receptor. CCR5Δ32 has been investigated for its association with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), with conflicting results. The aim of this study was to investigate whether CCR5Δ32 is associated with JIA in an UK population. CCR5Δ32 was genotyped in JIA cases (n=1054) and healthy controls (n=3129) and genotype and allele frequencies were compared. A meta-analysis of our study combined with previously published studies was performed. CCR5Δ32 was significantly associated with protection from developing JIA, in this UK data set (Ptrend=0.006, odds ratio (OR) 0.79 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.66–0.94). The meta-analysis of all published case–control association studies confirmed the protective association with JIA (P=0.001 OR 0.82 95% CI: 0.73–0.93). CCR5Δ32 is a functional variant determining the number of receptors on the surface of T cells, and it is hypothesized that the level of CCR5 expression could influence the migration of proinflammatory T cells into the synovium and thus susceptibility to JIA. PMID:20463745

  19. The Case for Selection at CCR5-Δ32

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The C-C chemokine receptor 5, 32 base-pair deletion (CCR5-Δ32) allele confers strong resistance to infection by the AIDS virus HIV. Previous studies have suggested that CCR5-Δ32 arose within the past 1,000 y and rose to its present high frequency (5%–14%) in Europe as a result of strong positive selection, perhaps by such selective agents as the bubonic plague or smallpox during the Middle Ages. This hypothesis was based on several lines of evidence, including the absence of the allele outside of Europe and long-range linkage disequilibrium at the locus. We reevaluated this evidence with the benefit of much denser genetic maps and extensive control data. We find that the pattern of genetic variation at CCR5-Δ32 does not stand out as exceptional relative to other loci across the genome. Moreover using newer genetic maps, we estimated that the CCR5-Δ32 allele is likely to have arisen more than 5,000 y ago. While such results can not rule out the possibility that some selection may have occurred at C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5), they imply that the pattern of genetic variation seen atCCR5-Δ32 is consistent with neutral evolution. More broadly, the results have general implications for the design of future studies to detect the signs of positive selection in the human genome. PMID:16248677

  20. [Targeted modification of CCR5 gene in rabbits by TALEN].

    PubMed

    Tang, Chengcheng; Zhang, Quanjun; Li, Xiaoping; Fan, Nana; Yang, Yi; Quan, Longquan; Lai, Liangxue

    2014-04-01

    The lack of suitable animal model for HIV-1 infection has become a bottleneck for the development of AIDS vaccines and drugs. Wild-type rabbits can be infected by HIV-1 persistently and HIV-1 can be efficiently replicated resulting in syncytia in rabbit cell line co-expressing human CD4 and CCR5.Therefore, a rabbit highly expressing human CD4 and CCR5 may be an ideal animal model for AIDS disease study. In the present report, by using the efficient gene targeting technology, transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN), we explored the feasibility of generating a HIV-1 model by knocking in human CD4 and CCR5 into rabbit genome. First we constructed two TALEN vectors targeting rabbit CCR5 gene and a vector with homologous arms. TALEN mRNAs and donor DNA were then co-injected into fertilized oocytes. After 3?5 days, 24 embryos were collected and used to conduct mutation analysis with PCR and sequencing. All the 24 embryos were detected with CCR5 knockouts and 5 were human CD4 and CCR5 knockins. Our results laid a foundation for establishing a new animal model for the study of AIDS.

  1. [Targeted modification of CCR5 gene in rabbits by TALEN].

    PubMed

    Tang, Chengcheng; Zhang, Quanjun; Li, Xiaoping; Fan, Nana; Yang, Yi; Quan, Longquan; Lai, Liangxue

    2014-04-01

    The lack of suitable animal model for HIV-1 infection has become a bottleneck for the development of AIDS vaccines and drugs. Wild-type rabbits can be infected by HIV-1 persistently and HIV-1 can be efficiently replicated resulting in syncytia in rabbit cell line co-expressing human CD4 and CCR5.Therefore, a rabbit highly expressing human CD4 and CCR5 may be an ideal animal model for AIDS disease study. In the present report, by using the efficient gene targeting technology, transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN), we explored the feasibility of generating a HIV-1 model by knocking in human CD4 and CCR5 into rabbit genome. First we constructed two TALEN vectors targeting rabbit CCR5 gene and a vector with homologous arms. TALEN mRNAs and donor DNA were then co-injected into fertilized oocytes. After 3?5 days, 24 embryos were collected and used to conduct mutation analysis with PCR and sequencing. All the 24 embryos were detected with CCR5 knockouts and 5 were human CD4 and CCR5 knockins. Our results laid a foundation for establishing a new animal model for the study of AIDS. PMID:24846981

  2. Short Communication: HIV-1 Variants That Use Mouse CCR5 Reveal Critical Interactions of gp120's V3 Crown with CCR5 Extracellular Loop 1.

    PubMed

    Platt, Emily J; Durnin, James P; Kabat, David

    2015-10-01

    The CCR5 coreceptor amino terminus and extracellular (ECL) loops 1 and 2 have been implicated in HIV-1 infections, with species differences in these regions inhibiting zoonoses. Interactions of gp120 with CD4 and CCR5 reduce constraints on metastable envelope subunit gp41, enabling gp41 conformational changes needed for infection. We previously selected HIV-1JRCSF variants that efficiently use CCR5(Δ18) with a deleted amino terminus or CCR5(HHMH) with ECL2 from an NIH/Swiss mouse. Unexpectedly, the adaptive gp120 mutations were nearly identical, suggesting that they function by weakening gp120's grip on gp41 and/or by increasing interactions with ECL1. To analyze this and further wean HIV-1 from human CCR5, we selected variants using CCR5(HMMH) with murine ECL1 and 2 sequences. HIV-1JRCSF mutations adaptive for CCR5(Δ18) and CCR5(HHMH) were generally maladaptive for CCR5(HMMH), whereas the converse was true for CCR5(HMMH) adaptations. The HIV-1JRCSF variant adapted to CCR5(HMMH) also weakly used intact NIH/Swiss mouse CCR5. Our results strongly suggest that HIV-1JRCSF makes functionally critical contacts with human ECL1 and that adaptation to murine ECL1 requires multiple mutations in the crown of gp120's V3 loop. PMID:26114311

  3. Short Communication: HIV-1 Variants That Use Mouse CCR5 Reveal Critical Interactions of gp120's V3 Crown with CCR5 Extracellular Loop 1.

    PubMed

    Platt, Emily J; Durnin, James P; Kabat, David

    2015-10-01

    The CCR5 coreceptor amino terminus and extracellular (ECL) loops 1 and 2 have been implicated in HIV-1 infections, with species differences in these regions inhibiting zoonoses. Interactions of gp120 with CD4 and CCR5 reduce constraints on metastable envelope subunit gp41, enabling gp41 conformational changes needed for infection. We previously selected HIV-1JRCSF variants that efficiently use CCR5(Δ18) with a deleted amino terminus or CCR5(HHMH) with ECL2 from an NIH/Swiss mouse. Unexpectedly, the adaptive gp120 mutations were nearly identical, suggesting that they function by weakening gp120's grip on gp41 and/or by increasing interactions with ECL1. To analyze this and further wean HIV-1 from human CCR5, we selected variants using CCR5(HMMH) with murine ECL1 and 2 sequences. HIV-1JRCSF mutations adaptive for CCR5(Δ18) and CCR5(HHMH) were generally maladaptive for CCR5(HMMH), whereas the converse was true for CCR5(HMMH) adaptations. The HIV-1JRCSF variant adapted to CCR5(HMMH) also weakly used intact NIH/Swiss mouse CCR5. Our results strongly suggest that HIV-1JRCSF makes functionally critical contacts with human ECL1 and that adaptation to murine ECL1 requires multiple mutations in the crown of gp120's V3 loop.

  4. National health and medical services response to incidents of chemical and biological terrorism.

    PubMed

    Tucker, J B

    1997-08-01

    In response to the growing threat of terrorism with chemical and biological weapons, the US government has developed a national concept of operations for emergency health and medical services response. This capability was developed and tested for the first time during the Atlanta Olympic Games in the summer of 1996. In the event of a chemical or biological terrorist incident that exceeded local and state-level response capabilities, federal agencies would provide specialized teams and equipment to help manage the consequences of the attack and treat, decontaminate, and evacuate casualties. The US Congress has also established a Domestic Preparedness Program that provides for enhanced training of local first-responders and the formation of metropolitan medical strike teams in major cities around the country. While these national response capabilities are promising, their implementation to date has been problematic and their ultimate effectiveness is uncertain. PMID:9244313

  5. The National Biological Information Infrastructure as an E-Government tool

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sepic, R.; Kase, K.

    2002-01-01

    Coordinated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the National Biological Information Infrastructure (NBII) is a Web-based system that provides access to data and information on the nation's biological resources. Although it was begun in 1993, predating any formal E-Government initiative, the NBII typifies the E-Government concepts outlined in the President's Management Agenda, as well as in the proposed E-Government Act of 2002. This article-an individual case study and not a broad survey with extensive references to the literature-explores the structure and operation of the NBII in relation to several emerging trends in E-Government: end-user focus, defined and scalable milestones, public-private partnerships, alliances with stakeholders, and interagency cooperation. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Editing CCR5: a novel approach to HIV gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Cornu, Tatjana I; Mussolino, Claudio; Bloom, Kristie; Cathomen, Toni

    2015-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a life-threatening disorder caused by infection of individuals with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Entry of HIV-1 into target cells depends on the presence of two surface proteins on the cell membrane: CD4, which serves as the main receptor, and either CCR5 or CXCR4 as a co-receptor. A limited number of people harbor a genomic 32-bp deletion in the CCR5 gene (CCR5∆32), leading to expression of a truncated gene product that provides resistance to HIV-1 infection in individuals homozygous for this mutation. Moreover, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation with CCR5∆32 donor cells seems to confer HIV-1 resistance to the recipient as well. However, since Δ32 donors are scarce and allogeneic HSC transplantation is not exempt from risks, the development of gene editing tools to knockout CCR5 in the genome of autologous cells is highly warranted. Targeted gene editing can be accomplished with designer nucleases, which essentially are engineered restriction enzymes that can be designed to cleave DNA at specific sites. During repair of these breaks, the cellular repair pathway often introduces small mutations at the break site, which makes it possible to disrupt the ability of the targeted locus to express a functional protein, in this case CCR5. Here, we review the current promise and limitations of CCR5 gene editing with engineered nucleases, including factors affecting the efficiency of gene disruption and potential off-target effects. PMID:25757618

  7. Biology as an integrated component of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meador, Michael R.; Gurtz, Martin E.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey?s (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program is designed to integrate chemical, physical, and biological data to assess the status of and trends in the Nation?s water quality at local, regional, and national levels. The Program consists of 60 study units (major river basins and large parts of aquifers) located throughout the Nation (fig. 1). Data are collected at stream, river, and ground-water sites that represent the Nation?s mix of major natural and human factors that influence water quality. Biological data are collected from streams and rivers, and include (1) fish and other aquatic organisms whose tissues are analyzed for a wide array of chemical contaminants; (2) characterizations of algal, benthic invertebrate, and fish communities; and (3) characterizations of vegetation growing in streams and along streambanks. These biological data are collected in conjunction with physical (streamflow, characterizations of instream, bank, and flood-plain habitats) and chemical data.

  8. German National Proficiency Scales in Biology: Internal Structure, Relations to General Cognitive Abilities and Verbal Skills

    PubMed Central

    KÖLLER, OLAF

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT National and international large‐scale assessments (LSA) have a major impact on educational systems, which raises fundamental questions about the validity of the measures regarding their internal structure and their relations to relevant covariates. Given its importance, research on the validity of instruments specifically developed for LSA is still sparse, especially in science and its subdomains biology, chemistry, and physics. However, policy decisions for the improvement of educational quality based on LSA can only be helpful if valid information on students’ achievement levels is provided. In the present study, the nature of the measurement instruments based on the German Educational Standards in Biology is examined. On the basis of data from 3,165 students in Grade 10, we present dimensional analyses and report the relationship between different subdimensions of biology literacy and cognitive covariates such as general cognitive abilities and verbal skills. A theory‐driven two‐dimensional model fitted the data best. Content knowledge and scientific inquiry, two subdimensions of biology literacy, are highly correlated and show differential correlational patterns to the covariates. We argue that the underlying structure of biology should be incorporated into curricula, teacher training and future assessments.

  9. CCR5 deficiency accelerates lipopolysaccharide-induced astrogliosis, amyloid-beta deposit and impaired memory function.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Chul Ju; Park, Mi Hee; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Kim, Ju Hwan; Yun, Na Young; Oh, Sang Yeon; Song, Ju Kyung; Seo, Hyun Ok; Kim, Yun-Bae; Hwang, Dae Yeon; Oh, Ki-Wan; Han, Sang-Bae; Hong, Jin Tae

    2016-03-15

    Chemokine receptors are implicated in inflammation and immune responses. Neuro-inflammation is associated with activation of astrocyte and amyloid-beta (Aβ) generations that lead to pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). Previous our study showed that deficiency of CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) results in activation of astrocytes and Aβ deposit, and thus memory dysfunction through increase of CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) expression. CCR5 knockout mice were used as an animal model with memory dysfunction. For the purpose LPS was injected i.p. daily (0.25 mg/kg/day). The memory dysfunctions were much higher in LPS-injected CCR5 knockout mice compared to CCR5 wild type mice as well as non-injected CCR5 knockout mice. Associated with severe memory dysfuction in LPS injected CCR5 knockout mice, LPS injection significant increase expression of inflammatory proteins, astrocyte activation, expressions of β-secretase as well as Aβ deposition in the brain of CCR5 knockout mice as compared with that of CCR5 wild type mice. In CCR5 knockout mice, CCR2 expressions were high and co-localized with GFAP which was significantly elevated by LPS. Expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) which ligands of CCR2 also increased by LPS injection, and increment of MCP-1 expression is much higher in CCR5 knockout mice. BV-2 cells treated with CCR5 antagonist, D-ala-peptide T-amide (DAPTA) and cultured astrocytes isolated from CCR5 knockout mice treated with LPS (1 μg/ml) and CCR2 antagonist, decreased the NF-ĸB activation and Aβ level. These findings suggest that the deficiency of CCR5 enhances response of LPS, which accelerates to neuro-inflammation and memory impairment.

  10. In vitro immunological effects of blocking CCR5 on T cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jing; Ren, Han-Yun; Shi, Yong-Jin; Liu, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Blockade of CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) by maraviroc may induce immunological changes independent of its antiviral effects and may have immunoregulation properties. This study was designed to determine the effects of blocking CCR5 on human activated T cells in vitro and investigate the potential immunological mechanisms. Human CD3+ T cells were purified from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and then activated by cytokines. We tested the surface expressions and relative messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of CCR2, CCR5, CCR6, CCR7, and CXCR3, chemotaxis toward their cognate ligands, internalization of chemokine receptors, and production of cytokines. In conclusion, blocking CCR5 by maraviroc not only can block CCR5 and CCR2 internalization processes induced by CCL5 and CCL2, but also inhibit T cell chemotactic activities toward their cognate ligands, respectively. Moreover, blocking CCR5 with maraviroc at high doses tends to decrease the production of TNF-α and IFN-γ. In addition, there might be a form of cross talk between CCR5 and CCR2, and this may offer a novel immunological effect for blockade of CCR5.

  11. CCR5 knockout suppresses experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Gu, Sun Mi; Park, Mi Hee; Yun, Hyung Mun; Han, Sang Bae; Oh, Ki Wan; Son, Dong Ju; Yun, Jae Suk; Hong, Jin Tae

    2016-03-29

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease in which myelin in the spinal cord is damaged. C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is implicated in immune cell migration and cytokine release in central nervous system (CNS). We investigated whether CCR5 plays a role in MS progression using a murine model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), in CCR5 deficient (CCR5-/-) mice. CCR5-/- and CCR5+/+ (wild-type) mice were immunized with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein 35-55 (MOG35-55) followed by pertussis toxin, after which EAE paralysis was scored for 28 days. We found that clinical scoring and EAE neuropathology were lower in CCR5-/- mice than CCR5+/+ mice. Immune cells (CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, B cell, NK cell and macrophages) infiltration and astrocytes/microglial activation were attenuated in CCR5-/- mice. Moreover, levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-γ and MCP-1 cytokine levels were decreased in CCR5-/- mice spinal cord. Myelin basic protein (MBP) and CNPase were increased while NG2 and O4 were decreased in CCR5-/- mice, indicating that demyelination was suppressed by CCR5 gene deletion. These findings suggest that CCR5 is likely participating in demyelination in the spinal cord the MS development, and that it could serve as an effective therapeutic target for the treatment of MS.

  12. NO gas loss from biologically crusted soils in Canyonlands National Park, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barger, N.N.; Belnap, J.; Ojima, D.S.; Mosier, A.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we examined N gas loss as nitric oxide (NO) from N-fixing biologically crusted soils in Canyonlands National Park, Utah. We hypothesized that NO gas loss would increase with increasing N fixation potential of the biologically crusted soil. NO fluxes were measured from biologically crusted soils with three levels of N fixation potential (Scytonema-Nostoc-Collema spp. (dark)>Scytonema-Nostoc-Microcoleus spp. (medium)>Microcoleus spp. (light)) from soil cores and field chambers. In both cores and field chambers there was a significant effect of crust type on NO fluxes, but this was highly dependent on season. NO fluxes from field chambers increased with increasing N fixation potential of the biologically crusted soils (dark>medium>light) in the summer months, with no differences in the spring and autumn. Soil chlorophyllasis Type a content (an index of N fixation potential), percent N, and temperature explained 40% of the variability in NO fluxes from our field sites. Estimates of annual NO loss from dark and light crusts was 0.04-0.16 and 0.02-0.11-N/ha/year. Overall, NO gas loss accounts for approximately 3-7% of the N inputs via N fixation in dark and light biologically crusted soils. Land use practices have drastically altered biological soil crusts communities over the past century. Livestock grazing and intensive recreational use of public lands has resulted in a large scale conversion of dark cyanolichen crusts to light cyanobacterial crusts. As a result, changes in biologically crusted soils in arid and semi-arid regions of the western US may subsequently impact regional NO loss. ?? Springer 2005.

  13. CCR5 is a receptor for Staphylococcus aureus leukotoxin ED

    PubMed Central

    III, Francis Alonzo; Kozhaya, Lina; Rawlings, Stephen A.; Reyes-Robles, Tamara; DuMont, Ashley L.; Myszka, David G.; Landau, Nathaniel; Unutmaz, Derya; Torres, Victor J.

    2012-01-01

    Pore-forming toxins are critical virulence factors for many bacterial pathogens and are central to Staphylococcus aureus-mediated killing of host cells. S. aureus encodes pore-forming bi-component leukotoxins that are toxic toward neutrophils, but also specifically target other immune cells. Despite decades since the first description of Staphylococcal leukocidal activity, the host factors responsible for the selectivity of leukotoxins toward different immune cells remain unknown. Here we identified the HIV co-receptor, CCR5, as a cellular determinant required for cytotoxic targeting of subsets of myeloid cells and T lymphocytes by the S. aureus leukotoxin ED (LukED). We further demonstrate that LukED-dependent cell killing is blocked by CCR5 receptor antagonists, including the HIV drug maraviroc. Remarkably, CCR5-deficient mice are largely resistant to lethal S. aureus infection, highlighting the importance of CCR5 targeting in S. aureus pathogenesis. Thus, depletion of CCR5+ leukocytes by LukED suggests a novel S. aureus immune evasion mechanism that can be therapeutically targeted. PMID:23235831

  14. Simbios: an NIH national center for physics-based simulation of biological structures.

    PubMed

    Delp, Scott L; Ku, Joy P; Pande, Vijay S; Sherman, Michael A; Altman, Russ B

    2012-01-01

    Physics-based simulation provides a powerful framework for understanding biological form and function. Simulations can be used by biologists to study macromolecular assemblies and by clinicians to design treatments for diseases. Simulations help biomedical researchers understand the physical constraints on biological systems as they engineer novel drugs, synthetic tissues, medical devices, and surgical interventions. Although individual biomedical investigators make outstanding contributions to physics-based simulation, the field has been fragmented. Applications are typically limited to a single physical scale, and individual investigators usually must create their own software. These conditions created a major barrier to advancing simulation capabilities. In 2004, we established a National Center for Physics-Based Simulation of Biological Structures (Simbios) to help integrate the field and accelerate biomedical research. In 6 years, Simbios has become a vibrant national center, with collaborators in 16 states and eight countries. Simbios focuses on problems at both the molecular scale and the organismal level, with a long-term goal of uniting these in accurate multiscale simulations.

  15. Specificity for a CCR5 Inhibitor Is Conferred by a Single Amino Acid Residue: ROLE OF ILE198.

    PubMed

    Lau, Gloria; Labrecque, Jean; Metz, Markus; Vaz, Roy; Fricker, Simon P

    2015-04-24

    The chemokine receptors CCR5 and CCR2b share 89% amino acid homology. CCR5 is a co-receptor for HIV and CCR5 antagonists have been investigated as inhibitors of HIV infection. We describe the use of two CCR5 antagonists, Schering-C (SCH-C), which is specific for CCR5, and TAK-779, a dual inhibitor of CCR5 and CCR2b, to probe the CCR5 inhibitor binding site using CCR5/CCR2b chimeric receptors. Compound inhibition in the different chimeras was assessed by inhibition of chemokine-induced calcium flux. SCH-C inhibited RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted) (CCL5)-mediated calcium flux on CCR5 with an IC50 of 22.8 nM but was inactive against monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (CCL2)-mediated calcium flux on CCR2b. However, SCH-C inhibited CCL2-induced calcium flux against a CCR5/CCR2b chimera consisting of transmembrane domains IV-VI of CCR5 with an IC50 of 55 nM. A sequence comparison of CCR5 and CCR2b identified a divergent amino acid sequence located at the junction of transmembrane domain V and second extracellular loop. Transfer of the CCR5 sequence KNFQTLKIV into CCR2b conferred SCH-C inhibition (IC50 of 122 nM) into the predominantly CCR2b chimera. Furthermore, a single substitution, R206I, conferred partial but significant inhibition (IC50 of 1023 nM) by SCH-C. These results show that a limited amino acid sequence is responsible for SCH-C specificity to CCR5, and we propose a model showing the interaction with CCR5 Ile(198).

  16. CCR5 deficiency increased susceptibility to lipopolysaccharide-induced acute renal injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hun; Park, Mi Hee; Hwang, Chul Ju; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Yoon, Hae Suk; Yoon, Do Young; Hong, Jin Tae

    2016-05-01

    C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) regulates leukocyte chemotaxis and activation, and its deficiency exacerbates development of nephritis. Therefore, we investigated the role of CCR5 during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute kidney injury. CCR5-deficient (CCR5-/-) and wild-type (CCR5+/+) mice, both aged about 10 months, had acute renal injury induced by intraperitoneal injection of LPS (10 mg/kg). Compared with CCR5+/+ mice, CCR5-/- mice showed increased mortality and renal injury, including elevated creatinine and blood urea nitrogen levels, following LPS challenge. Compared to CCR5+/+ mice, CCR5-/- mice also exhibited greater increases in the serum concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-1β following LPS challenge. Furthermore, infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils, expression of intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, and the number of apoptotic cells were more greatly increased by LPS treatment in CCR5-/- mice than in CCR5+/+ mice. The concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β were also significantly increased in the kidney of CCR5-/- mice after LPS challenge. Moreover, primary kidney cells from CCR5-/- mice showed greater increases in TNF-α production and p38 MAP kinase activation following treatment with LPS compared with that observed in the cells from CCR5+/+ mice. LPS-induced TNF-α production and apoptosis in the primary kidney cells from CCR5-/- mice were inhibited by treatment with p38 MAP kinase inhibitor. These results suggest that CCR5 deficiency increased the production of TNF-α following LPS treatment through increased activation of the p38 pathway in the kidney, resulting in renal apoptosis and leukocyte infiltration and led to exacerbation of LPS-induced acute kidney injury.

  17. The CCL5/CCR5 axis promotes metastasis in basal breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Velázquez, Marco; Pestell, Richard G.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we have shown that the CCL5/CCR5 axis is active in patients affected by an aggressive basal subtype of breast cancer. Using preclinical models, we have demonstrated that CCR5 promotes breast cancer invasiveness and metastatic potential, while CCR5 inhibition abrogates them. Thus, CCR5 antagonists may constitute an alternative therapeutic approach for patients affected by metastatic basal breast cancer. PMID:23734321

  18. CCR2 chemokine receptor signaling mediates pain in experimental osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Rachel E.; Tran, Phuong B.; Das, Rosalina; Ghoreishi-Haack, Nayereh; Ren, Dongjun; Miller, Richard J.; Malfait, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is one of the leading causes of chronic pain, but almost nothing is known about the mechanisms and molecules that mediate osteoarthritis-associated joint pain. Consequently, treatment options remain inadequate and joint replacement is often inevitable. Here, we use a surgical mouse model that captures the long-term progression of knee osteoarthritis to longitudinally assess pain-related behaviors and concomitant changes in the innervating dorsal root ganglia (DRG). We demonstrate that monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 (CCL2) and its high-affinity receptor, chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2 (CCR2), are central to the development of pain associated with knee osteoarthritis. After destabilization of the medial meniscus, mice developed early-onset secondary mechanical allodynia that was maintained for 16 wk. MCP-1 and CCR2 mRNA, protein, and signaling activity were temporarily up-regulated in the innervating DRG at 8 wk after surgery. This result correlated with the presentation of movement-provoked pain behaviors, which were maintained up to 16 wk. Mice that lack Ccr2 also developed mechanical allodynia, but this started to resolve from 8 wk onwards. Despite severe allodynia and structural knee joint damage equal to wild-type mice, Ccr2-null mice did not develop movement-provoked pain behaviors at 8 wk. In wild-type mice, macrophages infiltrated the DRG by 8 wk and this was maintained through 16 wk after surgery. In contrast, macrophage infiltration was not observed in Ccr2-null mice. These observations suggest a key role for the MCP-1/CCR2 pathway in establishing osteoarthritis pain. PMID:23185004

  19. C-terminal clipping of chemokine CCL1/I-309 enhances CCR8-mediated intracellular calcium release and anti-apoptotic activity.

    PubMed

    Denis, Catherine; Deiteren, Kathleen; Mortier, Anneleen; Tounsi, Amel; Fransen, Erik; Proost, Paul; Renauld, Jean-Christophe; Lambeir, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Carboxypeptidase M (CPM) targets the basic amino acids arginine and lysine present at the C-terminus of peptides or proteins. CPM is thought to be involved in inflammatory processes. This is corroborated by CPM-mediated trimming and modulation of inflammatory factors, and expression of the protease in inflammatory environments. Since the function of CPM in and beyond inflammation remains mainly undefined, the identification of natural substrates can aid in discovering the (patho)physiological role of CPM. CCL1/I-309, with its three C-terminal basic amino acids, forms a potential natural substrate for CPM. CCL1 plays a role not only in inflammation but also in apoptosis, angiogenesis and tumor biology. Enzymatic processing differently impacts the biological activity of chemokines thereby contributing to the complex regulation of the chemokine system. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether (i) CCL1/I-309 is prone to trimming by CPM, and (ii) the biological activity of CCL1 is altered after C-terminal proteolytic processing. CCL1 was identified as a novel substrate for CPM in vitro using mass spectrometry. C-terminal clipping of CCL1 augmented intracellular calcium release mediated by CCR8 but reduced the binding of CCL1 to CCR8. In line with the higher intracellular calcium release, a pronounced increase of the anti-apoptotic activity of CCL1 was observed in the BW5147 cellular model. CCR8 signaling, CCR8 binding and anti-apoptotic activity were unaffected when CPM was exposed to the carboxypeptidase inhibitor DL-2-mercaptomethyl-3-guanidino-ethylthiopropanoic acid. The results of this study suggest that CPM is a likely candidate for the regulation of biological processes relying on the CCL1-CCR8 system. PMID:22479563

  20. Prevalence of CCR5-Δ32 and CCR2-V64I polymorphisms in a mixed population from northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Fernandes, H; Santos, A C C; Motta, F J N; Canalle, R; Yoshioka, F K N; Burbano, R R; Rey, J A; da Silva, B B; Pinto, G R

    2015-10-02

    Chemokines are low-molecular weight proteins that play a key role in inflammatory processes. Genomic variations in chemokine receptors are associated with the susceptibility to various diseases. Polymorphisms in chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5)-Δ32 and CCR2-V64I are related to human immunodeficiency virus infection resistance, which has led to genetic association studies for several other diseases. Given the heterogeneous distribution of these polymorphisms in different global populations and within Brazilian populations, we analyzed the prevalence of CCR5-Δ32 and CCR2-V64I polymorphisms in a mixed population from northeastern Brazil. The study included 223 individuals from the general population of the city of Parnaíba, Piauí, who had a mean age of 73 years. Of these individuals, 37.2% were men and 62.8% were women. Polymorphisms were analyzed using DNA extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes by using polymerase chain reaction alone (CCR5-Δ32) or accompanied by restriction endonuclease digestion (CCR2-V64I). In both cases, the genotypes were determined using 8% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver nitrate staining. The population conformed to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for both the loci studied. No individuals were homozygous for allele-Δ32, which was present in 1.8% of the population, whereas allele-64I was present in 13.9% of the participants studied; 74.9% were homozygous for the wild-type allele, while 22.4 and 2.7% were heterozygous and homozygous for the mutant allele, respectively. Additional studies are needed to investigate the relationship between these polymorphisms and disease etiopathogenesis in reference populations.

  1. Prevalence of CCR5-Δ32 and CCR2-V64I polymorphisms in a mixed population from northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Fernandes, H; Santos, A C C; Motta, F J N; Canalle, R; Yoshioka, F K N; Burbano, R R; Rey, J A; da Silva, B B; Pinto, G R

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are low-molecular weight proteins that play a key role in inflammatory processes. Genomic variations in chemokine receptors are associated with the susceptibility to various diseases. Polymorphisms in chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5)-Δ32 and CCR2-V64I are related to human immunodeficiency virus infection resistance, which has led to genetic association studies for several other diseases. Given the heterogeneous distribution of these polymorphisms in different global populations and within Brazilian populations, we analyzed the prevalence of CCR5-Δ32 and CCR2-V64I polymorphisms in a mixed population from northeastern Brazil. The study included 223 individuals from the general population of the city of Parnaíba, Piauí, who had a mean age of 73 years. Of these individuals, 37.2% were men and 62.8% were women. Polymorphisms were analyzed using DNA extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes by using polymerase chain reaction alone (CCR5-Δ32) or accompanied by restriction endonuclease digestion (CCR2-V64I). In both cases, the genotypes were determined using 8% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver nitrate staining. The population conformed to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for both the loci studied. No individuals were homozygous for allele-Δ32, which was present in 1.8% of the population, whereas allele-64I was present in 13.9% of the participants studied; 74.9% were homozygous for the wild-type allele, while 22.4 and 2.7% were heterozygous and homozygous for the mutant allele, respectively. Additional studies are needed to investigate the relationship between these polymorphisms and disease etiopathogenesis in reference populations. PMID:26436495

  2. Influence of CCR5 and CCR2 Genetic Variants in the Resistance/Susceptibility to HIV in Serodiscordant Couples from Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Wildeman; Aguilar-Jiménez, Wbeimar; Pineda-Trujillo, Nicolás; Rojas, Winston; Estrada, Hernando

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The main genetic factor related to HIV-1 resistance is the CCR5-Δ32 mutation; however, the homozygous genotype is uncommon. The CCR5-Δ32 mutation along with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CCR5 promoter and the CCR2-V64I mutation have been included in seven human haplogroups (HH) previously associated with resistance/susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and different rates of AIDS progression. Here, we determined the association of the CCR5 promoter SNPs, the CCR5-Δ32 mutation, CCR2-V64I SNP, and HH frequencies with resistance/susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in a cohort of HIV-1-serodiscordant couples from Colombia. Seventy HIV-1-exposed, but seronegative (HESN) individuals, 57 seropositives (SP), and 112 healthy controls (HC) were included. The CCR5-Δ32 mutation and CCR2-V64I SNP were identified by PCR, and the CCR5 promoter SNPs were evaluated by sequencing. None of the individuals exhibited a homozygous Δ32 genotype; the CCR2-I allele was more frequent in HESN (34%) than HC (23%) (p=0.039, OR=1.672). The frequency of the 29G allele was higher in SP than HC (p=0.003, OR=3). HHF2 showed a higher frequency in HC (19%) than SP (9%) (p=0.027), while HHG1 was more frequent in SP (11.1%) than in HC (4.2%) (p=0.019). The AGACCAC-CCR2-I-CCR5 wild-type haplotype showed a higher frequency in SP (14.2%) than in HC (3.7%) (p=0.001). In conclusion, the CCR5-Δ32 allele is not responsible for HIV-1 resistance in this HESN group; however, the CCR2-I allele could be protective, while the 29G allele might increase the likelihood of acquiring HIV-1 infection. HHG1 and the AGACCAC-CCR2-I-CCR5 wild-type haplotype might promote HIV-1 infection while HHF2 might be related to resistance. However, additional studies are required to evaluate the implications of these findings. PMID:24098976

  3. The impact of the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity on natural products research.

    PubMed

    Cragg, Gordon M; Katz, Flora; Newman, David J; Rosenthal, Joshua

    2012-12-01

    The discovery and development of novel, biologically active agents from natural sources, whether they be drugs, agrochemicals or other bioactive entities, involve a high level of interdisciplinary as well as international collaboration. Such collaboration, particularly at the international level, requires the careful negotiation of collaborative agreements protecting the rights of all parties, with special attention being paid to the rights of host (source) country governments, communities and scientific organizations. While many biodiversity-rich source countries currently might not have the necessary resources for in-country drug discovery and advanced development, they provide valuable opportunities for collaboration in this endeavor with research organizations from more high-income nations. This chapter discusses the experiences of the US National Cancer Institute and the US government-sponsored International Cooperative Biodiversity Groups program in the establishment of international agreements in the context of the Convention of Biological Diversity's objectives of promoting fair and equitable collaboration with multiple parties in many countries, and includes some specific lessons of value in developing such collaborations.

  4. A model of federal interagency cooperation: the National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research.

    PubMed

    Gilman, James K; Wright, Mary; Clifford Lane, H; Schoomaker, Eric B

    2014-01-01

    The terrorist attacks of September 11 and the anthrax mailings a month later prompted a sweeping response by the federal government to improve the preparedness of the US to meet the potential threat posed by a terrorist using a biological agent. This response transcended traditional interagency boundaries, creating new opportunities while producing unique fiscal and leadership challenges. The National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research has made significant progress over the past 12 years because of its ability to adapt to the need for interagency cooperation and overcome many of these challenges. As construction of the National Interagency Biodefense Campus at Fort Detrick nears completion, the US has the capability to pursue a unique whole-of-government approach to the development of medical measures to counter the threat of bioterrorism. In addition to the high-level support of many in the federal government, the key success factors for this effort have been (1) a critical mass of leaders with the right leadership characteristics, (2) development of a compelling vision and accompanying narrative understood and articulated by all partnering organizations, and (3) recognition of the need for a partnership office to do the important communication and collaboration work in the organization to synchronize the information available to all the partners. The major barrier to interagency cooperative efforts of this kind is the inability to comingle funds from different appropriations.

  5. A Model of Federal Interagency Cooperation: The National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Mary; Clifford Lane, H.; Schoomaker, Eric B.

    2014-01-01

    The terrorist attacks of September 11 and the anthrax mailings a month later prompted a sweeping response by the federal government to improve the preparedness of the US to meet the potential threat posed by a terrorist using a biological agent. This response transcended traditional interagency boundaries, creating new opportunities while producing unique fiscal and leadership challenges. The National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research has made significant progress over the past 12 years because of its ability to adapt to the need for interagency cooperation and overcome many of these challenges. As construction of the National Interagency Biodefense Campus at Fort Detrick nears completion, the US has the capability to pursue a unique whole-of-government approach to the development of medical measures to counter the threat of bioterrorism. In addition to the high-level support of many in the federal government, the key success factors for this effort have been (1) a critical mass of leaders with the right leadership characteristics, (2) development of a compelling vision and accompanying narrative understood and articulated by all partnering organizations, and (3) recognition of the need for a partnership office to do the important communication and collaboration work in the organization to synchronize the information available to all the partners. The major barrier to interagency cooperative efforts of this kind is the inability to comingle funds from different appropriations. PMID:24819736

  6. First annual report on the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Loar, J. M.; Adams, S. M.; Blaylock, B. G.; Boston, H. L.; Frank, M. L.; Garten, C. T.; Houston, M. A.; Kimmel, B. L.; Ryon, M. G.; Smith, J. G.; Southworth, G. R.; Stewart, A. J.; Walton, B. T.; Berry, J. B.; Talmage, S. S.; Amano, H.; Jimenez, B. D.; Kitchings, J. T.; Meyers-Schoene, L.; Mohrbacher, D. A.; Olsen, C. R.

    1992-08-01

    As a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC); selected tributaries of WOC, including Fifth Creek, First Creek, Melton Branch, and Northwest Tributary; and the Clinch River. BMAP consists of seven major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs on-site and the aquatic environs off-site. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring; (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota; (3) biological indicator studies; (4) instream ecological monitoring; (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment; (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake (WOL); and (7) contaminant transport, distribution, and fate in the WOC embayment-Clinch River-Watts Bar Reservoir system. This document, the first of a series of annual reports presenting the results of BMAP, describes studies that were conducted from March through December 1986.

  7. A model of federal interagency cooperation: the National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research.

    PubMed

    Gilman, James K; Wright, Mary; Clifford Lane, H; Schoomaker, Eric B

    2014-01-01

    The terrorist attacks of September 11 and the anthrax mailings a month later prompted a sweeping response by the federal government to improve the preparedness of the US to meet the potential threat posed by a terrorist using a biological agent. This response transcended traditional interagency boundaries, creating new opportunities while producing unique fiscal and leadership challenges. The National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research has made significant progress over the past 12 years because of its ability to adapt to the need for interagency cooperation and overcome many of these challenges. As construction of the National Interagency Biodefense Campus at Fort Detrick nears completion, the US has the capability to pursue a unique whole-of-government approach to the development of medical measures to counter the threat of bioterrorism. In addition to the high-level support of many in the federal government, the key success factors for this effort have been (1) a critical mass of leaders with the right leadership characteristics, (2) development of a compelling vision and accompanying narrative understood and articulated by all partnering organizations, and (3) recognition of the need for a partnership office to do the important communication and collaboration work in the organization to synchronize the information available to all the partners. The major barrier to interagency cooperative efforts of this kind is the inability to comingle funds from different appropriations. PMID:24819736

  8. Nation-Based Occurrence and Endogenous Biological Reduction of Mycotoxins in Medicinal Herbs and Spices.

    PubMed

    Do, Kee Hun; An, Tae Jin; Oh, Sang-Keun; Moon, Yuseok

    2015-10-01

    Medicinal herbs have been increasingly used for therapeutic purposes against a diverse range of human diseases worldwide. Moreover, the health benefits of spices have been extensively recognized in recent studies. However, inevitable contaminants, including mycotoxins, in medicinal herbs and spices can cause serious problems for humans in spite of their health benefits. Along with the different nation-based occurrences of mycotoxins, the ultimate exposure and toxicities can be diversely influenced by the endogenous food components in different commodities of the medicinal herbs and spices. The phytochemicals in these food stuffs can influence mold growth, mycotoxin production and biological action of the mycotoxins in exposed crops, as well as in animal and human bodies. The present review focuses on the occurrence of mycotoxins in medicinal herbs and spices and the biological interaction between mold, mycotoxin and herbal components. These networks will provide insights into the methods of mycotoxin reduction and toxicological risk assessment of mycotoxin-contaminated medicinal food components in the environment and biological organisms. PMID:26473926

  9. Review of the algal biology program within the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts

    DOE PAGES

    Unkefer, Clifford Jay; Sayre, Richard Thomas; Magnuson, Jon K.; Anderson, Daniel B.; Baxter, Ivan; Blaby, Ian K.; Brown, Judith K.; Carleton, Michael; Cattolico, Rose Ann; Dale, Taraka T.; et al

    2016-06-21

    In 2010,when the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts (NAABB) consortium began, little was known about the molecular basis of algal biomass or oil production. Very few algal genome sequences were available and efforts to identify the best-producing wild species through bioprospecting approaches had largely stalled after the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program. This lack of knowledge included how reduced carbon was partitioned into storage products like triglycerides or starch and the role played by metabolite remodeling in the accumulation of energy-dense storage products. Furthermore, genetic transformation and metabolic engineering approaches to improve algal biomass and oilmore » yields were in their infancy. Genome sequencing and transcriptional profiling were becoming less expensive, however; and the tools to annotate gene expression profiles under various growth and engineered conditions were just starting to be developed for algae. It was in this context that an integrated algal biology program was introduced in the NAABB to address the greatest constraints limiting algal biomass yield. Our review describes the NAABB algal biology program, including hypotheses, research objectives, and strategies to move algal biology research into the twenty-first century and to realize the greatest potential of algae biomass systems to produce biofuels.« less

  10. Nation-Based Occurrence and Endogenous Biological Reduction of Mycotoxins in Medicinal Herbs and Spices.

    PubMed

    Do, Kee Hun; An, Tae Jin; Oh, Sang-Keun; Moon, Yuseok

    2015-10-14

    Medicinal herbs have been increasingly used for therapeutic purposes against a diverse range of human diseases worldwide. Moreover, the health benefits of spices have been extensively recognized in recent studies. However, inevitable contaminants, including mycotoxins, in medicinal herbs and spices can cause serious problems for humans in spite of their health benefits. Along with the different nation-based occurrences of mycotoxins, the ultimate exposure and toxicities can be diversely influenced by the endogenous food components in different commodities of the medicinal herbs and spices. The phytochemicals in these food stuffs can influence mold growth, mycotoxin production and biological action of the mycotoxins in exposed crops, as well as in animal and human bodies. The present review focuses on the occurrence of mycotoxins in medicinal herbs and spices and the biological interaction between mold, mycotoxin and herbal components. These networks will provide insights into the methods of mycotoxin reduction and toxicological risk assessment of mycotoxin-contaminated medicinal food components in the environment and biological organisms.

  11. Nation-Based Occurrence and Endogenous Biological Reduction of Mycotoxins in Medicinal Herbs and Spices

    PubMed Central

    Do, Kee Hun; An, Tae Jin; Oh, Sang-Keun; Moon, Yuseok

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal herbs have been increasingly used for therapeutic purposes against a diverse range of human diseases worldwide. Moreover, the health benefits of spices have been extensively recognized in recent studies. However, inevitable contaminants, including mycotoxins, in medicinal herbs and spices can cause serious problems for humans in spite of their health benefits. Along with the different nation-based occurrences of mycotoxins, the ultimate exposure and toxicities can be diversely influenced by the endogenous food components in different commodities of the medicinal herbs and spices. The phytochemicals in these food stuffs can influence mold growth, mycotoxin production and biological action of the mycotoxins in exposed crops, as well as in animal and human bodies. The present review focuses on the occurrence of mycotoxins in medicinal herbs and spices and the biological interaction between mold, mycotoxin and herbal components. These networks will provide insights into the methods of mycotoxin reduction and toxicological risk assessment of mycotoxin-contaminated medicinal food components in the environment and biological organisms. PMID:26473926

  12. Estrogen regulates CCR gene expression and function in T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Mo, RuRan; Chen, Jun; Grolleau-Julius, Annabelle; Murphy, Hedwig S; Richardson, Bruce C; Yung, Raymond L

    2005-05-15

    Estrogen has been implicated in the observed female bias in autoimmune diseases. However, the mechanisms behind this gender dimorphism are poorly defined. We have previously reported that in vivo T cell trafficking is gender- and estrogen-dependent. Chemokine receptors are critical determinants of T cell homing and immune response. In this study, we show that the female gender is associated with increased CD4(+) T cell CCR1-CCR5 gene and protein expression in mice. The increased CCR expression correlates with enhanced in vitro chemotaxis response to MIP-1beta (CCL4). In vivo treatment of young oophorectomized and postmenopausal female mice with 17beta-estradiol also increased CD4(+) T cell CCR expression. Finally, 17beta-estradiol enhances tyrosine phosphorylation in T cells stimulated with MIP-1alpha in a time-dependent manner. Our results indicate an important role of estrogen in determining T cell chemokine response that may help explain the increased susceptibility and severity of autoimmune diseases in females. PMID:15879095

  13. An anti-CCR5 monoclonal antibody and small molecule CCR5 antagonists synergize by inhibiting different stages of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 entry

    SciTech Connect

    Safarian, Diana; Carnec, Xavier; Tsamis, Fotini; Kajumo, Francis; Dragic, Tatjana . E-mail: tdragic@aecom.yu.edu

    2006-09-01

    HIV-1 coreceptors are attractive targets for novel antivirals. Here, inhibition of entry by two classes of CCR5 antagonists was investigated. We confirmed previous findings that HIV-1 isolates vary greatly in their sensitivity to small molecule inhibitors of CCR5-mediated entry, SCH-C and TAK-779. In contrast, an anti-CCR5 monoclonal antibody (PA14) similarly inhibited entry of diverse viral isolates. Sensitivity to small molecules was V3 loop-dependent and inversely proportional to the level of gp120 binding to CCR5. Moreover, combinations of the MAb and small molecules were highly synergistic in blocking HIV-1 entry, suggesting different mechanisms of action. This was confirmed by time course of inhibition experiments wherein the PA14 MAb and small molecules were shown to inhibit temporally distinct stages of CCR5 usage. We propose that small molecules inhibit V3 binding to the second extracellular loop of CCR5, whereas PA14 preferentially inhibits subsequent events such as CCR5 recruitment into the fusion complex or conformational changes in the gp120-CCR5 complex that trigger fusion. Importantly, our findings suggest that combinations of CCR5 inhibitors with different mechanisms of action will be central to controlling HIV-1 infection and slowing the emergence of resistant strains.

  14. Impact of CCR7 on priming and distribution of antiviral effector and memory CTL.

    PubMed

    Junt, Tobias; Scandella, Elke; Förster, Reinhold; Krebs, Philippe; Krautwald, Stefan; Lipp, Martin; Hengartner, Hans; Ludewig, Burkhard

    2004-12-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR7 is a key factor in the coordinate migration of T cells and dendritic cells (DC) into and their localization within secondary lymphoid organs. In this study we investigated the impact of CCR7 on CD8(+) T cell responses by infecting CCR7(-/-) mice with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). We found that the absence of CCR7 affects the magnitude of an antiviral CTL response during the acute phase, with reduced numbers of virus-specific CTL in all lymphoid and nonlymphoid organs tested. On the single cell level, CCR7-deficient CTL gained full effector function, such that antiviral protection in CCR7-deficient mice was complete, but delayed. Similarly, adoptive transfer experiments using DC from CCR7-deficient or competent mice for the priming of CCR7-positive or CCR7-negative CD8(+) T cells, respectively, revealed that ectopic positioning of DC and CTL outside organized T cell zones results in reduced priming efficacy. In the memory phase, CCR7-deficient mice maintained a stable LCMV-specific CTL population, predominantly in nonlymphoid organs, and rapidly mounted protective CTL responses against a challenge infection with a vaccinia virus recombinant for the gp33 epitope of LCMV. Taken together, the CCR7-dependent organization of the T cell zone does not appear to be a prerequisite for antiviral effector CTL differentiation and the sustenance of antiviral memory responses in lymphoid or peripheral tissues. PMID:15557160

  15. The role and modulation of CCR6+ Th17 cell populations in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Paulissen, Sandra M J; van Hamburg, Jan Piet; Dankers, Wendy; Lubberts, Erik

    2015-07-01

    The IL-17A producing T-helper-17 (Th17) cell population plays a major role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis and has gained wide interest as treatment target. IL-17A expressing Th cells are characterized by the expression of the chemokine receptor CCR6 and the transcription factor RORC. In RA, CCR6+ Th cells were identified in peripheral blood, synovial fluid and inflamed synovial tissue. CCR6+ Th cells might drive the progression of an early inflammation towards a persistent arthritis. The CCR6+ Th cell population is heterogeneous and several subpopulations can be distinguished, including Th17, Th22, Th17.1 (also called non-classic Th1 cells), and unclassified or intermediate populations. Interestingly, some of these populations produce low levels of IL-17A but are still very pathogenic. Furthermore, the CCR6+ Th cells phenotype is unstable and plasticity exists between CCR6+ Th cells and T-regulatory (Treg) cells and within the CCR6+ Th cell subpopulations. In this review, characteristics of the different CCR6+ Th cell populations, their plasticity, and their potential impact on rheumatoid arthritis are discussed. Moreover, current approaches to target CCR6+ Th cells and future directions of research to find specific CCR6+ Th cell targets in the treatment of patients with RA and other CCR6+ Th cell mediated autoimmune diseases are highlighted.

  16. Highly specific blockade of CCR5 inhibits leukocyte trafficking and reduces mucosal inflammation in murine colitis

    PubMed Central

    Mencarelli, Andrea; Cipriani, Sabrina; Francisci, Daniela; Santucci, Luca; Baldelli, Franco; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Targeted disruption of leukocyte trafficking to the gut represents a promising approach for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). CCR5, the shared receptor for MIP1α and β and RANTES, is expressed by multiple leukocytes. Here, we aimed to determine the role of CCR5 in mediating leukocyte trafficking in models of colitis, and evaluate the therapeutic potential of maraviroc, an orally active CCR5 antagonist used in the treatment of CCR5-tropic HIV. Acute and chronic colitis were induced by administration of DSS or TNBS to wild-type and CCR5−/− mice or adoptive transfer of splenic naïve CD4+ T-cells from wild type or CCR5−/− mice into RAG-1−/−. CCR5 gene ablation reduced the mucosal recruitment and activation of CCR5-bearing CD4+ and CD11b+ leukocytes, resulting in profound attenuation of signs and symptoms of inflammation in the TNBS and transfer models of colitis. In the DSS/TNBS colitis and in the transfer model, maraviroc attenuated development of intestinal inflammation by selectively reducing the recruitment of CCR5 bearing leukocytes. In summary, CCR5 regulates recruitment of blood leukocytes into the colon indicating that targeting CCR5 may offer therapeutic options in IBDs. PMID:27492684

  17. Highly specific blockade of CCR5 inhibits leukocyte trafficking and reduces mucosal inflammation in murine colitis.

    PubMed

    Mencarelli, Andrea; Cipriani, Sabrina; Francisci, Daniela; Santucci, Luca; Baldelli, Franco; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2016-08-05

    Targeted disruption of leukocyte trafficking to the gut represents a promising approach for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). CCR5, the shared receptor for MIP1α and β and RANTES, is expressed by multiple leukocytes. Here, we aimed to determine the role of CCR5 in mediating leukocyte trafficking in models of colitis, and evaluate the therapeutic potential of maraviroc, an orally active CCR5 antagonist used in the treatment of CCR5-tropic HIV. Acute and chronic colitis were induced by administration of DSS or TNBS to wild-type and CCR5(-/-) mice or adoptive transfer of splenic naïve CD4(+) T-cells from wild type or CCR5(-/-) mice into RAG-1(-/-). CCR5 gene ablation reduced the mucosal recruitment and activation of CCR5-bearing CD4(+) and CD11b(+) leukocytes, resulting in profound attenuation of signs and symptoms of inflammation in the TNBS and transfer models of colitis. In the DSS/TNBS colitis and in the transfer model, maraviroc attenuated development of intestinal inflammation by selectively reducing the recruitment of CCR5 bearing leukocytes. In summary, CCR5 regulates recruitment of blood leukocytes into the colon indicating that targeting CCR5 may offer therapeutic options in IBDs.

  18. YTHDF2 destabilizes m(6)A-containing RNA through direct recruitment of the CCR4-NOT deadenylase complex.

    PubMed

    Du, Hao; Zhao, Ya; He, Jinqiu; Zhang, Yao; Xi, Hairui; Liu, Mofang; Ma, Jinbiao; Wu, Ligang

    2016-01-01

    Methylation at the N6 position of adenosine (m(6)A) is the most abundant RNA modification within protein-coding and long noncoding RNAs in eukaryotes and is a reversible process with important biological functions. YT521-B homology domain family (YTHDF) proteins are the readers of m(6)A, the binding of which results in the alteration of the translation efficiency and stability of m(6)A-containing RNAs. However, the mechanism by which YTHDF proteins cause the degradation of m(6)A-containing RNAs is poorly understood. Here we report that m(6)A-containing RNAs exhibit accelerated deadenylation that is mediated by the CCR4-NOT deadenylase complex. We further show that YTHDF2 recruits the CCR4-NOT complex through a direct interaction between the YTHDF2 N-terminal region and the SH domain of the CNOT1 subunit, and that this recruitment is essential for the deadenylation of m(6)A-containing RNAs by CAF1 and CCR4. Therefore, we have uncovered the mechanism of YTHDF2-mediated degradation of m(6)A-containing RNAs in mammalian cells. PMID:27558897

  19. Decreased HIV Type 1 Transcription in CCR5-Δ32 Heterozygotes During Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Charlene; Abdel-Mohsen, Mohamed; Strain, Matthew C.; Lada, Steven M.; Yukl, Steven; Cockerham, Leslie R.; Pilcher, Christopher D.; Hecht, Frederick M.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Liegler, Teri; Richman, Douglas D.; Deeks, Steven G.; Pillai, Satish K.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals who are heterozygous for the CCR5-Δ32 mutation provide a natural model to examine the effects of reduced CCR5 expression on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) persistence. We evaluated the HIV reservoir in 18 CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes and 54 CCR5 wild-type individuals during suppressive antiretroviral therapy. Cell-associated HIV RNA levels (P = .035), RNA to DNA transcriptional ratios (P = .013), and frequency of detectable HIV 2–long terminal repeat circular DNA (P = .013) were significantly lower in CD4+ T cells from CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes. Cell-associated HIV RNA was significantly correlated with CCR5 surface expression on CD4+ T cells (r2 = 0.136; P = .002). Our findings suggest that curative strategies should further explore manipulation of CCR5. PMID:24935955

  20. Decreased HIV type 1 transcription in CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes during suppressive antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Charlene; Abdel-Mohsen, Mohamed; Strain, Matthew C; Lada, Steven M; Yukl, Steven; Cockerham, Leslie R; Pilcher, Christopher D; Hecht, Frederick M; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Liegler, Teri; Richman, Douglas D; Deeks, Steven G; Pillai, Satish K

    2014-12-01

    Individuals who are heterozygous for the CCR5-Δ32 mutation provide a natural model to examine the effects of reduced CCR5 expression on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) persistence. We evaluated the HIV reservoir in 18 CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes and 54 CCR5 wild-type individuals during suppressive antiretroviral therapy. Cell-associated HIV RNA levels (P=.035), RNA to DNA transcriptional ratios (P=.013), and frequency of detectable HIV 2-long terminal repeat circular DNA (P=.013) were significantly lower in CD4+ T cells from CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes. Cell-associated HIV RNA was significantly correlated with CCR5 surface expression on CD4+ T cells (r2=0.136; P=.002). Our findings suggest that curative strategies should further explore manipulation of CCR5.

  1. Retinal Inhibition of CCR3 Induces Retinal Cell Death in a Murine Model of Choroidal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haibo; Han, Xiaokun; Gambhir, Deeksha; Becker, Silke; Kunz, Eric; Liu, Angelina Jingtong; Hartnett, M. Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of chemokine C-C motif receptor 3 (CCR3) signaling has been considered as treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, CCR3 is expressed in neural retina from aged human donor eyes. Therefore, broad CCR3 inhibition may be harmful to the retina. We assessed the effects of CCR3 inhibition on retina and choroidal endothelial cells (CECs) that develop into choroidal neovascularization (CNV). In adult murine eyes, CCR3 colocalized with glutamine-synthetase labeled Műller cells. In a murine laser-induced CNV model, CCR3 immunolocalized not only to lectin-stained cells in CNV lesions but also to the retina. Compared to non-lasered controls, CCR3 mRNA was significantly increased in laser-treated retina. An intravitreal injection of a CCR3 inhibitor (CCR3i) significantly reduced CNV compared to DMSO or PBS controls. Both CCR3i and a neutralizing antibody to CCR3 increased TUNEL+ retinal cells overlying CNV, compared to controls. There was no difference in cleaved caspase-3 in laser-induced CNV lesions or in overlying retina between CCR3i- or control-treated eyes. Following CCR3i, apoptotic inducible factor (AIF) was significantly increased and anti-apoptotic factor BCL2 decreased in the retina; there were no differences in retinal vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In cultured human Műller cells exposed to eotaxin (CCL11) and VEGF, CCR3i significantly increased TUNEL+ cells and AIF but decreased BCL2 and brain derived neurotrophic factor, without affecting caspase-3 activity or VEGF. CCR3i significantly decreased AIF in RPE/choroids and immunostaining of phosphorylated VEGF receptor 2 (p-VEGFR2) in CNV with a trend toward reduced VEGF. In cultured CECs treated with CCL11 and/or VEGF, CCR3i decreased p-VEGFR2 and increased BCL2 without increasing TUNEL+ cells and AIF. These findings suggest that inhibition of retinal CCR3 causes retinal cell death and that targeted inhibition of CCR3 in CECs may be a safer if CCR3 inhibition

  2. Epigenetic mechanisms, T-cell activation, and CCR5 genetics interact to regulate T-cell expression of CCR5, the major HIV-1 coreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Gornalusse, German G.; Mummidi, Srinivas; Gaitan, Alvaro A.; Jimenez, Fabio; Ramsuran, Veron; Picton, Anabela; Rogers, Kristen; Manoharan, Muthu Saravanan; Avadhanam, Nymisha; Murthy, Krishna K.; Martinez, Hernan; Molano Murillo, Angela; Chykarenko, Zoya A.; Hutt, Richard; Daskalakis, Demetre; Shostakovich-Koretskaya, Ludmila; Abdool Karim, Salim; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Deeks, Steven G.; Hecht, Frederick; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Clark, Robert A.; Okulicz, Jason; Valentine, Fred T.; Martinson, Neil; Tiemessen, Caroline Tanya; Ndung’u, Thumbi; Hunt, Peter W.; He, Weijing; Ahuja, Sunil K.

    2015-01-01

    T-cell expression levels of CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) are a critical determinant of HIV/AIDS susceptibility, and manifest wide variations (i) between T-cell subsets and among individuals and (ii) in T-cell activation-induced increases in expression levels. We demonstrate that a unifying mechanism for this variation is differences in constitutive and T-cell activation-induced DNA methylation status of CCR5 cis-regulatory regions (cis-regions). Commencing at an evolutionarily conserved CpG (CpG −41), CCR5 cis-regions manifest lower vs. higher methylation in T cells with higher vs. lower CCR5 levels (memory vs. naïve T cells) and in memory T cells with higher vs. lower CCR5 levels. HIV-related and in vitro induced T-cell activation is associated with demethylation of these cis-regions. CCR5 haplotypes associated with increased vs. decreased gene/surface expression levels and HIV/AIDS susceptibility magnify vs. dampen T-cell activation-associated demethylation. Methylation status of CCR5 intron 2 explains a larger proportion of the variation in CCR5 levels than genotype or T-cell activation. The ancestral, protective CCR5-HHA haplotype bears a polymorphism at CpG −41 that is (i) specific to southern Africa, (ii) abrogates binding of the transcription factor CREB1 to this cis-region, and (iii) exhibits a trend for overrepresentation in persons with reduced susceptibility to HIV and disease progression. Genotypes lacking the CCR5-Δ32 mutation but with hypermethylated cis-regions have CCR5 levels similar to genotypes heterozygous for CCR5-Δ32. In HIV-infected individuals, CCR5 cis-regions remain demethylated, despite restoration of CD4+ counts (≥800 cells per mm3) with antiretroviral therapy. Thus, methylation content of CCR5 cis-regions is a central epigenetic determinant of T-cell CCR5 levels, and possibly HIV-related outcomes. PMID:26307764

  3. Epigenetic mechanisms, T-cell activation, and CCR5 genetics interact to regulate T-cell expression of CCR5, the major HIV-1 coreceptor.

    PubMed

    Gornalusse, German G; Mummidi, Srinivas; Gaitan, Alvaro A; Jimenez, Fabio; Ramsuran, Veron; Picton, Anabela; Rogers, Kristen; Manoharan, Muthu Saravanan; Avadhanam, Nymisha; Murthy, Krishna K; Martinez, Hernan; Molano Murillo, Angela; Chykarenko, Zoya A; Hutt, Richard; Daskalakis, Demetre; Shostakovich-Koretskaya, Ludmila; Abdool Karim, Salim; Martin, Jeffrey N; Deeks, Steven G; Hecht, Frederick; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Clark, Robert A; Okulicz, Jason; Valentine, Fred T; Martinson, Neil; Tiemessen, Caroline Tanya; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Hunt, Peter W; He, Weijing; Ahuja, Sunil K

    2015-08-25

    T-cell expression levels of CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) are a critical determinant of HIV/AIDS susceptibility, and manifest wide variations (i) between T-cell subsets and among individuals and (ii) in T-cell activation-induced increases in expression levels. We demonstrate that a unifying mechanism for this variation is differences in constitutive and T-cell activation-induced DNA methylation status of CCR5 cis-regulatory regions (cis-regions). Commencing at an evolutionarily conserved CpG (CpG -41), CCR5 cis-regions manifest lower vs. higher methylation in T cells with higher vs. lower CCR5 levels (memory vs. naïve T cells) and in memory T cells with higher vs. lower CCR5 levels. HIV-related and in vitro induced T-cell activation is associated with demethylation of these cis-regions. CCR5 haplotypes associated with increased vs. decreased gene/surface expression levels and HIV/AIDS susceptibility magnify vs. dampen T-cell activation-associated demethylation. Methylation status of CCR5 intron 2 explains a larger proportion of the variation in CCR5 levels than genotype or T-cell activation. The ancestral, protective CCR5-HHA haplotype bears a polymorphism at CpG -41 that is (i) specific to southern Africa, (ii) abrogates binding of the transcription factor CREB1 to this cis-region, and (iii) exhibits a trend for overrepresentation in persons with reduced susceptibility to HIV and disease progression. Genotypes lacking the CCR5-Δ32 mutation but with hypermethylated cis-regions have CCR5 levels similar to genotypes heterozygous for CCR5-Δ32. In HIV-infected individuals, CCR5 cis-regions remain demethylated, despite restoration of CD4+ counts (≥800 cells per mm(3)) with antiretroviral therapy. Thus, methylation content of CCR5 cis-regions is a central epigenetic determinant of T-cell CCR5 levels, and possibly HIV-related outcomes.

  4. A role for CCR5(+)CD4 T cells in cutaneous psoriasis and for CD103(+) CCR4(+) CD8 Teff cells in the associated systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sgambelluri, Francesco; Diani, Marco; Altomare, Andrea; Frigerio, Elena; Drago, Lorenzo; Granucci, Francesca; Banfi, Giuseppe; Altomare, Gianfranco; Reali, Eva

    2016-06-01

    Recent results have identified critical components of the T cell response involved in the initiation and amplification phases of psoriasis. However the link between T cell responses arising in the skin and the systemic inflammation associated with severe psoriasis is largely unknown. We hypothesized that specific subsets of memory T cells recirculating from the skin could play a role. We therefore dissected the circulating memory T cell compartment in patients by analyzing the TCM, TEM and Teff phenotype, the pattern of CCR4 and CCR5 chemokine receptor expression and the expression of the tissue homing molecule CD103. For each subset we calculated the correlation with the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) and with the extent of systemic inflammation measured as serum level of the prototypic short pentraxin, C reactive protein (CRP). Validation was performed by comparison with gene expression data in psoriatic plaques. We found that circulating CD103(+)CCR4(+)CCR5(+) and CCR4(+)CCR6(-) CD8(+) Teff cells, were highly correlated with CRP levels as well as with the validated index PASI, reflecting a link between skin involvement and systemic inflammation in patients with severe psoriasis. In addition we observed a contraction of circulating CCR5(+) T cells in psoriasis patients, with a highly significant inverse correlation between CCR5(+)CD4 T cells and the PASI score. Increased expression of CCR5 and CCL5 genes in psoriatic skin lesions was consistent with an accumulation of CCR5(+) cells in psoriatic plaques indicating a role for CCR5/CCL5 axis in disease pathogenesis.

  5. A role for CCR5(+)CD4 T cells in cutaneous psoriasis and for CD103(+) CCR4(+) CD8 Teff cells in the associated systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sgambelluri, Francesco; Diani, Marco; Altomare, Andrea; Frigerio, Elena; Drago, Lorenzo; Granucci, Francesca; Banfi, Giuseppe; Altomare, Gianfranco; Reali, Eva

    2016-06-01

    Recent results have identified critical components of the T cell response involved in the initiation and amplification phases of psoriasis. However the link between T cell responses arising in the skin and the systemic inflammation associated with severe psoriasis is largely unknown. We hypothesized that specific subsets of memory T cells recirculating from the skin could play a role. We therefore dissected the circulating memory T cell compartment in patients by analyzing the TCM, TEM and Teff phenotype, the pattern of CCR4 and CCR5 chemokine receptor expression and the expression of the tissue homing molecule CD103. For each subset we calculated the correlation with the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) and with the extent of systemic inflammation measured as serum level of the prototypic short pentraxin, C reactive protein (CRP). Validation was performed by comparison with gene expression data in psoriatic plaques. We found that circulating CD103(+)CCR4(+)CCR5(+) and CCR4(+)CCR6(-) CD8(+) Teff cells, were highly correlated with CRP levels as well as with the validated index PASI, reflecting a link between skin involvement and systemic inflammation in patients with severe psoriasis. In addition we observed a contraction of circulating CCR5(+) T cells in psoriasis patients, with a highly significant inverse correlation between CCR5(+)CD4 T cells and the PASI score. Increased expression of CCR5 and CCL5 genes in psoriatic skin lesions was consistent with an accumulation of CCR5(+) cells in psoriatic plaques indicating a role for CCR5/CCL5 axis in disease pathogenesis. PMID:27068801

  6. Transition-ready technologies and expertise from the Chemical and Biological National Security Program at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Folta, P A; McBride, M T

    2006-02-22

    HSARPA has initiated a new Bioinformatics and Assay Development solicitation, BIAD2 (BAA 06-01), to address a number of technology gaps and requirements for biodetection (www.hsarpabaa.com). This solicitation will leverage the vast research and development capabilities of the private sector and academia in order to meet the needs of HSARPA and Homeland Security. In order to meet these requirements, this solicitation will: (1) Develop and validate actionable assays for the public and private sector; (2) Develop and validate new assays and novel assay methodologies to enhance existing detection systems and enable future detection platforms; (3) Develop next generation assays which are robust against novel, emerging and engineered threats; (4) Develop novel assays that detect low levels of ribonucleic acid (RNA)-based viral threats in complex backgrounds; (5) Develop novel assays to characterize the viability, degree of virulence or toxicity, and countermeasure resistance of a biological agent; and (6) Develop new bioinformatics tools to support assay development and assay validation The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Bioassays and Signature Program (BSP) develops nationally-validated detection and identification assays to cover the full range of biological threat agents, starting from human, animal, and plant pathogens on the Select Agent list. The assays that have been co-developed by the CDC and the BSP are used internationally and represent the gold standard for molecular detection of select agent pathogens for the public health community. They are also used in the DHS environmental monitoring operations such as BioWatch and DHS National Security Special Events support. These reagents have been used to process and analyze more than 5 million samples and have delivered exceptional performance for the end users, with zero false positives since their deployment. Currently, highly-multiplexed nucleic acid assays that represent the ''next-generation'' in

  7. Cloning, stem cells, and the current national debate: incorporating ethics into a large introductory biology course.

    PubMed

    Fink, Rachel D

    2002-01-01

    Discussing the ethical issues involved in topics such as cloning and stem cell research in a large introductory biology course is often difficult. Teachers may be wary of presenting material biased by personal beliefs, and students often feel inhibited speaking about moral issues in a large group. Yet, to ignore what is happening "out there" beyond the textbooks and lab work is to do a disservice to students. This essay describes a semester-long project in which upperclass students presented some of the most complex and controversial ideas imaginable to introductory students by staging a mock debate and acting as members of the then newly appointed President's Council on Bioethics. Because the upperclass students were presenting the ideas of real people who play an important role in shaping national policy, no student's personal beliefs were put on the line, and many ideas were articulated. The introductory audience could accept or reject what they were hearing and learn information important for making up their own minds on these issues. This project is presented as an example of how current events can be used to put basic cell biology into context and of how exciting it can be when students teach students.

  8. Cloning, Stem Cells, and the Current National Debate: Incorporating Ethics into a Large Introductory Biology Course

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Discussing the ethical issues involved in topics such as cloning and stem cell research in a large introductory biology course is often difficult. Teachers may be wary of presenting material biased by personal beliefs, and students often feel inhibited speaking about moral issues in a large group. Yet, to ignore what is happening “out there” beyond the textbooks and lab work is to do a disservice to students. This essay describes a semester-long project in which upperclass students presented some of the most complex and controversial ideas imaginable to introductory students by staging a mock debate and acting as members of the then newly appointed President's Council on Bioethics. Because the upperclass students were presenting the ideas of real people who play an important role in shaping national policy, no student's personal beliefs were put on the line, and many ideas were articulated. The introductory audience could accept or reject what they were hearing and learn information important for making up their own minds on these issues. This project is presented as an example of how current events can be used to put basic cell biology into context and of how exciting it can be when students teach students. PMID:12669102

  9. Biological soil crusts of sand dunes in Cape Cod National Seashore, Massachusetts, USA.

    PubMed

    Smith, S M; Abed, R M M; Gercia-Pichel, F

    2004-08-01

    Biological soil crusts cover hundreds of hectares of sand dunes at the northern tip of Cape Cod National Seashore (Massachusetts, USA). Although the presence of crusts in this habitat has long been recognized, neither the organisms nor their ecological roles have been described. In this study, we report on the microbial community composition of crusts from this region and describe several of their physical and chemical attributes that bear on their environmental role. Microscopic and molecular analyses revealed that eukaryotic green algae belonging to the genera Klebsormidium or Geminella formed the bulk of the material sampled. Phylogenetic reconstruction of partial 16S rDNA sequences obtained from denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprints also revealed the presence of bacterial populations related to the subclass of the Proteobacteria, the newly described phylum Geothrix/ Holophaga/ Acidobacterium, the Cytophaga/ Flavobacterium/ Bacteroides group, and spirochetes. The presence of these crusts had significant effects on the hydric properties and nutrient status of the natural substrate. Although biological soil crusts are known to occur in dune environments around the world, this study enhances our knowledge of their geographic distribution and suggests a potential ecological role for crust communities in this landscape.

  10. Biological investigations of the Sandia National Laboratories Sol se Mete Aerial Cable Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.M.

    1994-10-01

    This report provides results of a comprehensive biological field survey performed on the Sandia National Laboratories Aerial Cable Facility, at the east end of Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB), Bernalillo County, New Mexico. This survey was conducted late September through October, 1991. ACF occupies a 440-acre tract of land withdrawn by the US Forest Service (USFS) for use by KAFB, and in turn placed under operational control of SNL by the Department of Energy (DOE). All land used by SNL for ACF is part of a 15,851-acre tract of land withdrawn by the US Forest Service. In addition, a number of different organizations use the 15,851-acre area. The project area used by SNL encompasses portions of approximately six sections (3,840 acres) of US Forest Service land located within the foothills of the west side of the Manzano Mountains (East Mesa). The biological study area is used by the KAFB, the US Department of Interior, and SNL. This area includes: (1) Sol se Mete Springs and Canyon, (2) East Anchor Access Road, (3) East Anchor Site, (4) Rocket Sled Track, (5) North Arena, (6) East Instrumentation Site and Access Road, (7) West Anchor Access Road, (8) West Anchor Site, (9) South Arena, (10) Winch Sites, (11) West Instrumentation Sites, (12) Explosive Assembly Building, (13) Control Building, (14) Lurance Canyon Road and vicinity. Although portions of approximately 960 acres of withdrawn US Forest Service land have been altered, only 700 acres have been disturbed by activities associated with ACF; approximately 2,880 acres consist of natural habitat. Absence of grazing by livestock and possibly native ungulates, and relative lack of human disturbance have allowed this area to remain in a more natural vegetative state relative to the condition of private range lands throughout New Mexico. This report evaluates threatened and endangered species found on ACF, as well as a comprehensive assessment of biological habitats.

  11. Biological nitrogen fixation in acidic high-temperature geothermal springs in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Trinity L; Lange, Rachel K; Boyd, Eric S; Peters, John W

    2011-08-01

    The near ubiquitous distribution of nifH genes in sediments sampled from 14 high-temperature (48.0-89.0°C) and acidic (pH 1.90-5.02) geothermal springs in Yellowstone National Park suggested a role for the biological reduction of dinitrogen (N(2)) to ammonia (NH(3)) (e.g. nitrogen fixation or diazotrophy) in these environments. nifH genes from these environments formed three unique phylotypes that were distantly related to acidiphilic, mesophilic diazotrophs. Acetylene reduction assays and (15) N(2) tracer studies in microcosms containing sediments sampled from acidic and high-temperature environments where nifH genes were detected confirmed the potential for biological N(2) reduction in these environments. Rates of acetylene reduction by sediment-associated populations were positively correlated with the concentration of NH(4)(+), suggesting a potential relationship between NH(4)(+) consumption and N(2) fixation activity. Amendment of microcosms with NH(4)(+) resulted in increased lag times in acetylene reduction assays. Manipulation of incubation temperature and pH in acetylene reduction assays indicated that diazotrophic populations are specifically adapted to local conditions. Incubation of sediments in the presence of a N(2) headspace yielded a highly enriched culture containing a single nifH phylotype. This phylotype was detected in all 14 geothermal spring sediments examined and its abundance ranged from ≈ 780 to ≈ 6800 copies (g dry weight sediment)(-1), suggesting that this organism may contribute N to the ecosystems. Collectively, these results for the first time demonstrate thermoacidiphilic N(2) fixation in the natural environment and extend the upper temperature for biological N(2) fixation in terrestrial systems.

  12. Molecular Gymnastics: Mechanisms of HIV-1 Resistance to CCR5 Antagonists and Impact on Virus Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Roche, Michael; Borm, Katharina; Flynn, Jacqueline K; Lewin, Sharon R; Churchill, Melissa J; Gorry, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) enters host cells through the binding of its envelope glycoproteins (Env) to the host cell receptor CD4 and then subsequent binding to a chemokine coreceptor, either CCR5 or CXCR4. CCR5 antagonists are a relatively recent class addition to the armamentarium of anti-HIV-1 drugs. These compounds act by binding to a hydrophobic pocket formed by the transmembrane helices of CCR5 and altering the conformation of the extracellular domains, such that they are no longer recognized by Env. Maraviroc is the first drug within this class to be licenced for use in HIV-1 therapy regimens. HIV resistance to CCR5 antagonists occurs either through outgrowth of pre-existing CXCR4-using viruses, or through acquisition of the ability of CCR5-using HIV-1 to use the antagonist bound form of CCR5. In the latter scenario, the mechanism underlying resistance is through complex alterations in the way that resistant Envs engage CCR5. These significant changes are unlikely to occur without consequence to the viral entry phenotype and may also open up new avenues to target CCR5 antagonist resistant viruses. This review discusses the mechanism of action of CCR5 antagonists, how HIV resistance to CCR5 antagonists occurs, and the subsequent effects on Env function. PMID:26324043

  13. Distinct CCR7 glycosylation pattern shapes receptor signaling and endocytosis to modulate chemotactic responses.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Mark A; Kindinger, Ilona; Laufer, Julia M; Späte, Anne-Katrin; Bucher, Delia; Vanes, Sarah L; Krueger, Wolfgang A; Wittmann, Valentin; Legler, Daniel F

    2016-06-01

    The homeostatic chemokines CCL19 and CCL21 and their common cognate chemokine receptor CCR7 orchestrate immune cell trafficking by eliciting distinct signaling pathways. Here, we demonstrate that human CCR7 is N-glycosylated on 2 specific residues in the N terminus and the third extracellular loop. Conceptually, CCR7 glycosylation adds steric hindrance to the receptor N terminus and extracellular loop 3, acting as a "swinging door" to regulate receptor sensitivity and cell migration. We found that freshly isolated human B cells, as well as expanded T cells, but not naïve T cells, express highly sialylated CCR7. Moreover, we identified that human dendritic cells imprint T cell migration toward CCR7 ligands by secreting enzymes that deglycosylate CCR7, thereby boosting CCR7 signaling on T cells, permitting enhanced T cell locomotion, while simultaneously decreasing receptor endocytosis. In addition, dendritic cells proteolytically convert immobilized CCL21 to a soluble form that is more potent in triggering chemotactic movement and does not desensitize the receptor. Furthermore, we demonstrate that soluble CCL21 functionally resembles neither the CCL19 nor the CCL21 phenotype but acts as a chemokine with unique features. Thus, we advance the concept of dendritic cell-dependent generation of micromilieus and lymph node conditioning by demonstrating a novel layer of CCR7 regulation through CCR7 sialylation. In summary, we demonstrate that leukocyte subsets express distinct patterns of CCR7 sialylation that contribute to receptor signaling and fine-tuning chemotactic responses. PMID:26819318

  14. Two distinct CCR5 domains can mediate coreceptor usage by human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Doranz, B J; Lu, Z H; Rucker, J; Zhang, T Y; Sharron, M; Cen, Y H; Wang, Z X; Guo, H H; Du, J G; Accavitti, M A; Doms, R W; Peiper, S C

    1997-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 is the major fusion coreceptor for macrophage-tropic strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). To define the structures of CCR5 that can support envelope (Env)-mediated membrane fusion, we analyzed the activity of homologs, chimeras, and mutants of human CCR5 in a sensitive gene reporter cell-cell fusion assay. Simian, but not murine, homologs of CCR5 were fully active as HIV-1 fusion coreceptors. Chimeras between CCR5 and divergent chemokine receptors demonstrated the existence of two distinct regions of CCR5 that could be utilized for Env-mediated fusion, the amino-terminal domain and the extracellular loops. Dual-tropic Env proteins were particularly sensitive to alterations in the CCR5 amino-terminal domain, suggesting that this domain may play a pivotal role in the evolution of coreceptor usage in vivo. We identified individual residues in both functional regions, Asp-11, Lys-197, and Asp-276, that contribute to coreceptor function. Deletion of a highly conserved cytoplasmic motif rendered CCR5 incapable of signaling but did not abrogate its ability to function as a coreceptor, implying the independence of fusion and G-protein-mediated chemokine receptor signaling. Finally, we developed a novel monoclonal antibody to CCR5 to assist in future studies of CCR5 expression. PMID:9261347

  15. Molecular Gymnastics: Mechanisms of HIV-1 Resistance to CCR5 Antagonists and Impact on Virus Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Roche, Michael; Borm, Katharina; Flynn, Jacqueline K; Lewin, Sharon R; Churchill, Melissa J; Gorry, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) enters host cells through the binding of its envelope glycoproteins (Env) to the host cell receptor CD4 and then subsequent binding to a chemokine coreceptor, either CCR5 or CXCR4. CCR5 antagonists are a relatively recent class addition to the armamentarium of anti-HIV-1 drugs. These compounds act by binding to a hydrophobic pocket formed by the transmembrane helices of CCR5 and altering the conformation of the extracellular domains, such that they are no longer recognized by Env. Maraviroc is the first drug within this class to be licenced for use in HIV-1 therapy regimens. HIV resistance to CCR5 antagonists occurs either through outgrowth of pre-existing CXCR4-using viruses, or through acquisition of the ability of CCR5-using HIV-1 to use the antagonist bound form of CCR5. In the latter scenario, the mechanism underlying resistance is through complex alterations in the way that resistant Envs engage CCR5. These significant changes are unlikely to occur without consequence to the viral entry phenotype and may also open up new avenues to target CCR5 antagonist resistant viruses. This review discusses the mechanism of action of CCR5 antagonists, how HIV resistance to CCR5 antagonists occurs, and the subsequent effects on Env function.

  16. CCR2 and CCR5 genes polymorphisms in women with cervical lesions from Pernambuco, Northeast Region of Brazil: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Santos, Erinaldo Ubirajara Damasceno dos; Lima, Géssica Dayane Cordeiro de; Oliveira, Micheline de Lucena; Heráclio, Sandra de Andrade; Silva, Hildson Dornelas Angelo da; Crovella, Sergio; Maia, Maria de Mascena Diniz; Souza, Paulo Roberto Eleutério de

    2016-03-01

    Polymorphisms in chemokine receptors play an important role in the progression of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) to cervical cancer (CC). Our study examined the association of CCR2-64I (rs1799864) andCCR5-Δ32 (rs333) polymorphisms with susceptibility to develop cervical lesion (CIN and CC) in a Brazilian population. The genotyping of 139 women with cervical lesions and 151 women without cervical lesions for the CCR2-64I and CCR5-Δ32 polymorphisms were performed using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The individuals carrying heterozygous or homozygous genotypes (GA+AA) for CCR2-64I polymorphisms seem to be at lower risk for cervical lesion [odds ratio (OR) = 0.37, p = 0.0008)]. The same was observed for the A allele (OR = 0.39, p = 0.0002), while no association was detected (p > 0.05) with CCR5-Δ32 polymorphism. Regarding the human papillomavirus (HPV) type, patients carrying the CCR2-64Ipolymorphism were protected against infection by HPV type 16 (OR = 0.35, p = 0.0184). In summary, our study showed a protective effect ofCCR2-64I rs1799864 polymorphism against the development of cervical lesions (CIN and CC) and in the susceptibility of HPV 16 infection.

  17. CCR2 and CCR5 genes polymorphisms in women with cervical lesions from Pernambuco, Northeast Region of Brazil: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Erinaldo Ubirajara Damasceno; de Lima, Géssica Dayane Cordeiro; Oliveira, Micheline de Lucena; Heráclio, Sandra de Andrade; da Silva, Hildson Dornelas Angelo; Crovella, Sergio; Maia, Maria de Mascena Diniz; de Souza/, Paulo Roberto Eleutério

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphisms in chemokine receptors play an important role in the progression of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) to cervical cancer (CC). Our study examined the association of CCR2-64I (rs1799864) andCCR5-Δ32 (rs333) polymorphisms with susceptibility to develop cervical lesion (CIN and CC) in a Brazilian population. The genotyping of 139 women with cervical lesions and 151 women without cervical lesions for the CCR2-64I and CCR5-Δ32 polymorphisms were performed using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The individuals carrying heterozygous or homozygous genotypes (GA+AA) for CCR2-64I polymorphisms seem to be at lower risk for cervical lesion [odds ratio (OR) = 0.37, p = 0.0008)]. The same was observed for the A allele (OR = 0.39, p = 0.0002), while no association was detected (p > 0.05) with CCR5-Δ32 polymorphism. Regarding the human papillomavirus (HPV) type, patients carrying the CCR2-64Ipolymorphism were protected against infection by HPV type 16 (OR = 0.35, p = 0.0184). In summary, our study showed a protective effect ofCCR2-64I rs1799864 polymorphism against the development of cervical lesions (CIN and CC) and in the susceptibility of HPV 16 infection. PMID:26982176

  18. Y-12 National Security Complex Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program 2007 Calendar Yeare Report

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, M.J.; Greeley, M. S. Jr.; Morris, G. W.; Roy, W. K.; Ryan, M. G.; Smith, J. G.; Southworth, G. R.

    2008-07-01

    The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) which became effective May 1, 2006, continued a requirement for a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP). The BMAP was originally developed in 1985 to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Complex protected the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek: EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Loar et al. 1989). The objectives of the current BMAP are similar, specifically to assess stream ecological conditions relative to regulatory limits and criteria, to assess ecological impacts as well as recovery in response to Y-12 operations, and to investigate the causes of continuing impacts. The BMAP consists of three tasks that reflect complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Complex discharges on the biotic integrity of EFPC. These tasks include: (1) bioaccumulation monitoring, (2) benthic macroinvertebrate community monitoring, and (3) fish community monitoring. As required by the NPDES permit, the BMAP benthic macroinvertebrate community monitoring task includes studies to annually evaluate the receiving stream's biological integrity in comparison to TN Water Quality Criteria. BMAP monitoring is currently being conducted at five primary EFPC sites, although sites may be excluded or added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) appropriate habitat distribution, and (5) access. The primary sampling sites include upper EFPC at kilometers (EFKs) 24.4 and 23.4 [upstream and downstream of Lake Reality (LR) respectively]; EFK 18.7 (also EFK 18.2 and 19), located off

  19. A Novel Role for the Receptor of the Complement Cleavage Fragment C5a, C5aR1, in CCR5-Mediated Entry of HIV into Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Fernandez, Maria E; Aliberti, Julio; Groeneweg, Sander; Köhl, Jörg; Chougnet, Claire A

    2016-04-01

    The complement system is an ancient pattern recognition system that becomes activated during all stages of HIV infection. Previous studies have shown that C5a can enhance the infection of monocyte-derived macrophages and T cells indirectly through the production of interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and the attraction of dendritic cells. C5a exerts its multiple biologic functions mainly through activation of C5a receptor 1 (C5aR1). Here, we assessed the role of C5aR1 as an enhancer of CCR5-mediated HIV infection. We determined CCR5 and C5aR1 heterodimer formation in myeloid cells and the impact of C5aR1 blockade on HIV entry and genomic integration. C5aR1/CCR5 heterodimer formation was identified by immunoprecipitation and western blotting. THP-1 cells and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) were infected by R5 laboratory strains or HIV pseudotyped for the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) envelope. Levels of integrated HIV were measured by quantitative PCR after targeting of C5aR1 by a C5aR antagonist, neutralizing C5aR1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) or hC5a. C5aR1 was also silenced by specific siRNA prior to viral entry. We found that C5aR1 forms heterodimers with the HIV coreceptor CCR5 in myeloid cells. Targeting C5aR1 significantly decreased integration by R5 viruses but not by VSV-pseudotyped viruses, suggesting that C5aR1 is critical for viral entry. The level of inhibition achieved with C5aR1-blocking reagents was comparable to that of CCR5 antagonists. Mechanistically, C5aR1 targeting decreased CCR5 expression. MDM from CCR5Δ32 homozygous subjects expressed levels of C5aR1 similar to CCR5 WT individuals, suggesting that mere C5aR1 expression is not sufficient for HIV infection. HIV appeared to preferentially enter THP-1 cells expressing high levels of both C5aR1 and CCR5. Targeted reduction of C5aR1 expression in such cells reduced HIV infection by ~50%. Our data thus suggest that C5aR1 acts as an enhancer of CCR5-mediated HIV entry into

  20. CCR5 Disruption in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Using CRISPR/Cas9 Provides Selective Resistance of Immune Cells to CCR5-tropic HIV-1 Virus.

    PubMed

    Kang, HyunJun; Minder, Petra; Park, Mi Ae; Mesquitta, Walatta-Tseyon; Torbett, Bruce E; Slukvin, Igor I

    2015-12-15

    The chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 5 (CCR5) serves as an HIV-1 co-receptor and is essential for cell infection with CCR5-tropic viruses. Loss of functional receptor protects against HIV infection. Here, we report the successful targeting of CCR5 in GFP-marked human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) using CRISPR/Cas9 with single and dual guide RNAs (gRNAs). Following CRISPER/Cas9-mediated gene editing using a single gRNA, 12.5% of cell colonies demonstrated CCR5 editing, of which 22.2% showed biallelic editing as determined by a Surveyor nuclease assay and direct sequencing. The use of dual gRNAs significantly increased the efficacy of CCR5 editing to 27% with a biallelic gene alteration frequency of 41%. To ensure the homogeneity of gene editing within cells, we used single cell sorting to establish clonal iPSC lines. Single cell-derived iPSC lines with homozygous CCR5 mutations displayed the typical characteristics of pluripotent stem cells and differentiated efficiently into hematopoietic cells, including macrophages. Although macrophages from both wild-type and CCR5-edited iPSCs supported CXCR4-tropic virus replication, macrophages from CCR5-edited iPSCs were uniquely resistant to CCR5-tropic virus challenge. This study demonstrates the feasibility of applying iPSC technology for the study of the role of CCR5 in HIV infection in vitro, and generation of HIV-resistant cells for potential therapeutic applications.

  1. Evolution of coreceptor utilization to escape CCR5 antagonist therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Gao, Xiang; Martin, John; Rosa, Bruce; Chen, Zheng; Mitreva, Makedonka; Henrich, Timothy; Kuritzkes, Daniel; Ratner, Lee

    2016-01-01

    The HIV-1 envelope interacts with coreceptors CCR5 and CXCR4 in a dynamic, multi-step process, its molecular details not clearly delineated. Use of CCR5 antagonists results in tropism shift and therapeutic failure. Here we describe a novel approach using full-length patient-derived gp160 quasispecies libraries cloned into HIV-1 molecular clones, their separation based on phenotypic tropism in vitro, and deep sequencing of the resultant variants for structure-function analyses. Analysis of functionally validated envelope sequences from patients who failed CCR5 antagonist therapy revealed determinants strongly associated with coreceptor specificity, especially at the gp120-gp41 and gp41-gp41 interaction surfaces that invite future research on the roles of subunit interaction and envelope trimer stability in coreceptor usage. This study identifies important structure-function relationships in HIV-1 envelope, and demonstrates proof of concept for a new integrated analysis method that facilitates laboratory discovery of resistant mutants to aid in development of other therapeutic agents. PMID:27128349

  2. The architecture of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe CCR4-NOT complex.

    PubMed

    Ukleja, Marta; Cuellar, Jorge; Siwaszek, Aleksandra; Kasprzak, Joanna M; Czarnocki-Cieciura, Mariusz; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Dziembowski, Andrzej; Valpuesta, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    CCR4-NOT is a large protein complex present both in cytoplasm and the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Although it is involved in a variety of distinct processes related to expression of genetic information such as poly(A) tail shortening, transcription regulation, nuclear export and protein degradation, there is only fragmentary information available on some of its nine subunits. Here we show a comprehensive structural characterization of the native CCR4-NOT complex from Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Our cryo-EM 3D reconstruction of the complex, combined with techniques such as immunomicroscopy, RNA-nanogold labelling, docking of the available high-resolution structures and models of different subunits and domains, allow us to propose its full molecular architecture. We locate all functionally defined domains endowed with deadenylating and ubiquitinating activities, the nucleus-specific RNA-interacting subunit Mmi1, as well as surfaces responsible for protein-protein interactions. This information provides insight into cooperation of the different CCR4-NOT complex functions.

  3. The architecture of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe CCR4-NOT complex

    PubMed Central

    Ukleja, Marta; Cuellar, Jorge; Siwaszek, Aleksandra; Kasprzak, Joanna M.; Czarnocki-Cieciura, Mariusz; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Dziembowski, Andrzej; M. Valpuesta, Jose

    2016-01-01

    CCR4-NOT is a large protein complex present both in cytoplasm and the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Although it is involved in a variety of distinct processes related to expression of genetic information such as poly(A) tail shortening, transcription regulation, nuclear export and protein degradation, there is only fragmentary information available on some of its nine subunits. Here we show a comprehensive structural characterization of the native CCR4-NOT complex from Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Our cryo-EM 3D reconstruction of the complex, combined with techniques such as immunomicroscopy, RNA-nanogold labelling, docking of the available high-resolution structures and models of different subunits and domains, allow us to propose its full molecular architecture. We locate all functionally defined domains endowed with deadenylating and ubiquitinating activities, the nucleus-specific RNA-interacting subunit Mmi1, as well as surfaces responsible for protein–protein interactions. This information provides insight into cooperation of the different CCR4-NOT complex functions. PMID:26804377

  4. Upregulation of chemokine receptor CCR10 is essential for glioma proliferation, invasion and patient survival

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lingchao; Liu, Xing; Zhang, Hai-Yan; Du, Wenzong; Qin, Zhiyong; Yao, Yu; Mao, Ying; Zhou, Liangfu

    2014-01-01

    Human gliomas are characterized by their invasion of normal brain structures irrespective of their grade of malignancy. Tumor cell invasion share many similarities with leukocyte trafficking, which is critically regulated by chemokines and their receptors. Here we report that the chemokine receptor CCR10 is highly expressed in human glioblastoma compared with control brain tissue. In vitro, signaling through CCL27-CCR10 mediates activation of p-Akt, and subsequently induces proliferation and invasive responses. Cell proliferation and invasion promoted by CCL27 were blocked by inhibition of p-Akt or CCR10. In vivo, down-regulation of CCR10 significantly impairs growth of glioma. Clinically, High CCR10 expression in GBM correlated with p-Akt, shorter overall survival and progression-free survival (P < 0.05). Together, these findings suggest that elevated CCR10 is a critical molecular event associated with gliomagenesis. PMID:25149529

  5. Y-12 National Security Complex Biological Monitoring And Abatement Program 2008 Calendar Year Report

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, M. J.; Greeley Jr., M. S.; Mathews, T. J.; Morris, G. W.; Roy, W. K.; Ryon, M. G.; Smith, J. G.; Southworth, G. R.

    2009-07-01

    The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) which became effective May 1, 2006, continued a requirement for a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP). The BMAP was originally developed in 1985 to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Complex protected the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek: EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Loar et al. 1989). The objectives of the current BMAP are similar, specifically to assess stream ecological conditions relative to regulatory limits and criteria, to assess ecological impacts as well as recovery in response to Y-12 operations, and to investigate the causes of continuing impacts. The BMAP consists of three tasks that reflect complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Complex discharges on the biotic integrity of EFPC. These tasks include: (1) bioaccumulation monitoring, (2) benthic macroinvertebrate community monitoring, and (3) fish community monitoring. As required by the NPDES permit, the BMAP benthic macroinvertebrate community monitoring task includes studies to annually evaluate the receiving stream's biological integrity in comparison to TN Water Quality Criteria. BMAP monitoring is currently being conducted at five primary EFPC sites, although sites may be excluded or added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) appropriate habitat distribution, and (5) access. The primary sampling sites include upper EFPC at kilometers (EFKs) 24.4 and 23.4 [upstream and downstream of Lake Reality (LR) respectively]; EFK 18.7 (also EFK 18.2 and 19), located off

  6. Allosteric Model of Maraviroc Binding to CC Chemokine Receptor 5 (CCR5)*

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Perez, Javier; Rueda, Patricia; Alcami, Jose; Rognan, Didier; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Lagane, Bernard; Kellenberger, Esther

    2011-01-01

    Maraviroc is a nonpeptidic small molecule human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) entry inhibitor that has just entered the therapeutic arsenal for the treatment of patients. We recently demonstrated that maraviroc binding to the HIV-1 coreceptor, CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5), prevents it from binding the chemokine CCL3 and the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 by an allosteric mechanism. However, incomplete knowledge of ligand-binding sites and the lack of CCR5 crystal structures have hampered an in-depth molecular understanding of how the inhibitor works. Here, we addressed these issues by combining site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) with homology modeling and docking. Six crystal structures of G-protein-coupled receptors were compared for their suitability for CCR5 modeling. All CCR5 models had equally good geometry, but that built from the recently reported dimeric structure of the other HIV-1 coreceptor CXCR4 bound to the peptide CVX15 (Protein Data Bank code 3OE0) best agreed with the SDM data and discriminated CCR5 from non-CCR5 binders in a virtual screening approach. SDM and automated docking predicted that maraviroc inserts deeply in CCR5 transmembrane cavity where it can occupy three different binding sites, whereas CCL3 and gp120 lie on distinct yet overlapped regions of the CCR5 extracellular loop 2. Data suggesting that the transmembrane cavity remains accessible for maraviroc in CCL3-bound and gp120-bound CCR5 help explain our previous observation that the inhibitor enhances dissociation of preformed ligand-CCR5 complexes. Finally, we identified residues in the predicted CCR5 dimer interface that are mandatory for gp120 binding, suggesting that receptor dimerization might represent a target for new CCR5 entry inhibitors. PMID:21775441

  7. Induction of Murine Mucosal CCR5-Reactive Antibodies as an Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Barassi, C.; Soprana, E.; Pastori, C.; Longhi, R.; Buratti, E.; Lillo, F.; Marenzi, C.; Lazzarin, A.; Siccardi, A. G.; Lopalco, L.

    2005-01-01

    The genital mucosa is the main site of initial human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) contact with its host. In spite of repeated sexual exposure, some individuals remain seronegative, and a small fraction of them produce immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA autoantibodies directed against CCR5, which is probably the cause of the CCR5-minus phenotype observed in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of these subjects. These antibodies recognize the 89-to-102 extracellular loop of CCR5 in its native conformation. The aim of this study was to induce infection-preventing mucosal anti-CCR5 autoantibodies in individuals at high risk of HIV infection. Thus, we generated chimeric immunogens containing the relevant CCR5 peptide in the context of the capsid protein of Flock House virus, a presentation system in which it is possible to engineer conformationally constrained peptide in a highly immunogenic form. Administered in mice via the systemic or mucosal route, the immunogens elicited anti-CCR5 IgG and IgA (in sera and vaginal fluids). Analogous to exposed seronegative individuals, mice producing anti-CCR5 autoantibodies express significantly reduced levels of CCR5 on the surfaces of CD4+ cells from peripheral blood and vaginal washes. In vitro studies have shown that murine IgG and IgA (i) specifically bind human and mouse CD4+ lymphocytes and the CCR5-transfected U87 cell line, (ii) down-regulate CCR5 expression of CD4+ cells from both humans and untreated mice, (iii) inhibit Mip-1β chemotaxis of CD4+ CCR5+ lymphocytes, and (iv) neutralize HIV R5 strains. These data suggest that immune strategies aimed at generating anti-CCR5 antibodies at the level of the genital mucosa might be feasible and represent a strategy to induce mucosal HIV-protective immunity. PMID:15890924

  8. Relationship between the chemokine receptor CCR5 and microglia in neurological disorders: consequences of targeting CCR5 on neuroinflammation, neuronal death and regeneration in a model of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Strayer, David S

    2013-09-01

    Chemokines may play a role in leukocyte migration across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) during neuroinflammation and other neuropathological processes, such as epilepsy. The CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a member of CC-chemokine receptor family that binds several chemokines, including CCL3 (macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha, MIP-1alpha), CCL4 (macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta, MIP-1beta) and CCL5 (RANTES). The current review examines the relationship between CCR5 and the microglia in different neurological disorders and models of CNS injury. CCR5 expression is upregulated in different neurological diseases, where it is often immunolocalized in microglial cells. A multistep cascade couples CCR5 activation by chemokines to Ca(2+) increases in human microglia. Because changes in [Ca(2+)] (i) affect chemotaxis, secretion, and gene expression, pharmacologic modulation of this pathway may alter inflammatory and degenerative processes in the CNS. Consequently, targeting CCR5 by using CCR5 antagonists may attenuate critical aspects of neuroinflammation in different models of neurological disorders. To illustrate the interaction between CCR5 and microglia in the CNS, we used a model of excitotoxicity, and demonstrate the intimate involvement of CCR5 in neuron injury and inflammation attendant to kainic acid (KA)-induced neurotoxicity. CCR5 participates in neuronal injury caused by the excitotoxin, KA, brings inflammatory cells to the sites of KA-induced CNS injury, defines the extent of tissue loss after KA exposure and limits reparative responses. We used a SV40-derived vector carrying an interfering RNA (RNAi) that targets CCR5. Delivered directly to the bone marrow, this vector decreased CCR5 expression in circulating cells. Animals so treated showed greatly reduced expression of CCR5 and its ligands (MIP-1alpha and RANTES) in the CNS, including in the brain vasculature, decreased BBB leakage, demonstrated greater KA-stimulated neurogenesis and increased

  9. Antifibrotic Effects of the Dual CCR2/CCR5 Antagonist Cenicriviroc in Animal Models of Liver and Kidney Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Eric; Moyle, Graeme; Reshef, Ran; Richman, Lee P.; Thompson, Melanie; Hong, Feng; Chou, Hsin-l; Hashiguchi, Taishi; Plato, Craig; Poulin, Dominic; Richards, Toni; Yoneyama, Hiroyuki; Jenkins, Helen; Wolfgang, Grushenka; Friedman, Scott L.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Interactions between C-C chemokine receptor types 2 (CCR2) and 5 (CCR5) and their ligands, including CCL2 and CCL5, mediate fibrogenesis by promoting monocyte/macrophage recruitment and tissue infiltration, as well as hepatic stellate cell activation. Cenicriviroc (CVC) is an oral, dual CCR2/CCR5 antagonist with nanomolar potency against both receptors. CVC’s anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic effects were evaluated in a range of preclinical models of inflammation and fibrosis. Methods Monocyte/macrophage recruitment was assessed in vivo in a mouse model of thioglycollate-induced peritonitis. CCL2-induced chemotaxis was evaluated ex vivo on mouse monocytes. CVC’s antifibrotic effects were evaluated in a thioacetamide-induced rat model of liver fibrosis and mouse models of diet-induced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and renal fibrosis. Study assessments included body and liver/kidney weight, liver function test, liver/kidney morphology and collagen deposition, fibrogenic gene and protein expression, and pharmacokinetic analyses. Results CVC significantly reduced monocyte/macrophage recruitment in vivo at doses ≥20 mg/kg/day (p < 0.05). At these doses, CVC showed antifibrotic effects, with significant reductions in collagen deposition (p < 0.05), and collagen type 1 protein and mRNA expression across the three animal models of fibrosis. In the NASH model, CVC significantly reduced the non-alcoholic fatty liver disease activity score (p < 0.05 vs. controls). CVC treatment had no notable effect on body or liver/kidney weight. Conclusions CVC displayed potent anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic activity in a range of animal fibrosis models, supporting human testing for fibrotic diseases. Further experimental studies are needed to clarify the underlying mechanisms of CVC’s antifibrotic effects. A Phase 2b study in adults with NASH and liver fibrosis is fully enrolled (CENTAUR Study 652-2-203; NCT02217475). PMID:27347680

  10. Association of two functional polymorphisms in the CCR5 gene with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Prahalad, S; Bohnsack, J F; Jorde, L B; Whiting, A; Clifford, B; Dunn, D; Weiss, R; Moroldo, M; Thompson, S D; Glass, D N; Bamshad, M J

    2006-09-01

    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) is mediated by Th1-immune responses. In children with JRA, synovial T cells express high levels of the Th1-chemokine receptor CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5), which has been implicated in susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis. To test the hypothesis that genetic variation in CCR5 is associated with susceptibility to JRA, we analyzed patterns of variation in the 5'cis-regulatory region of CCR5 in 124 multiplex families from a JRA-affected sibpair registry. After sequencing the upstream region of CCR5, variants were tested for association with JRA by transmission disequilibrium testing. A single nucleotide polymorphism, C-1835T, was significantly undertransmitted to children with early-onset JRA (P<0.01). C-1835T was genotyped in 424 additional simplex and multiplex families. CCR5-1835T allele was undertransmitted in the cohort of all probands with JRA (P<0.02), as well as in those with early-onset (P<0.01) or pauciarticular JRA (P<0.05). Another variant, a 32-bp deletion in the open reading frame of CCR5 (CCR5-Delta32) was also tested in approximately 700 simplex and multiplex families. CCR5-Delta32 was also significantly undertransmitted to probands with early-onset JRA (P<0.05). Both variants are in regions under natural selection, and result in functional consequences. Our results suggest these CCR5 variants are protective against early-onset JRA.

  11. CCR5-CCL Axis in PDL during Orthodontic Biophysical Force Application.

    PubMed

    Lee, S Y; Yoo, H I; Kim, S H

    2015-12-01

    Tooth movement by application of orthodontic biophysical force primarily reflects the role of soluble molecules released from the periodontal ligament (PDL). Thus far, many factors have been reported to be involved in orthodontic tooth movement (OTM), but key molecules that orchestrate responses of periodontal tissues to biophysical force are still enigmatic. In this in vivo study, in which the upper first molars in rats were moved, differential display-polymerase chain reaction revealed that CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) level was differentially increased during OTM. Strong immunoreactivity for CCR5 was found in the PDL undergoing force application. Moreover, the in vitro compression or tension force application to primary cultured human PDL cells increased the expression of CCR5 and CCR5 ligands. In vitro tension force on human PDL cells did not induce RANKL, an osteoclastogenesis-inducing factor, but did induce the upregulation of IL12, an osteoclast inhibitory factor, and osteoblast differentiation factors, including Runx2, which was attenuated under tension by CCR5 gene silencing whereas augmented with CCR5 ligands. In contrast, in vitro compression force did not induce the expression of osteoprotegerin, a decoy receptor for RANKL and Runx2, but did induce the upregulation of RANKL, which was attenuated under compression by CCR5 gene silencing. These results suggest that the CCR5-CCR5 ligands axis in PDL cells may play a crucial role in the remodeling of periodontal tissues and can be a therapeutic target for achieving efficient OTM.

  12. Dengue virus requires the CC-chemokine receptor CCR5 for replication and infection development.

    PubMed

    Marques, Rafael E; Guabiraba, Rodrigo; Del Sarto, Juliana L; Rocha, Rebeca F; Queiroz, Ana Luiza; Cisalpino, Daniel; Marques, Pedro E; Pacca, Carolina C; Fagundes, Caio T; Menezes, Gustavo B; Nogueira, Maurício L; Souza, Danielle G; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2015-08-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease that affects millions of people worldwide yearly. Currently, there is no vaccine or specific treatment available. Further investigation on dengue pathogenesis is required to better understand the disease and to identify potential therapeutic targets. The chemokine system has been implicated in dengue pathogenesis, although the specific role of chemokines and their receptors remains elusive. Here we describe the role of the CC-chemokine receptor CCR5 in Dengue virus (DENV-2) infection. In vitro experiments showed that CCR5 is a host factor required for DENV-2 replication in human and mouse macrophages. DENV-2 infection induces the expression of CCR5 ligands. Incubation with an antagonist prevents CCR5 activation and reduces DENV-2 positive-stranded (+) RNA inside macrophages. Using an immunocompetent mouse model of DENV-2 infection we found that CCR5(-/-) mice were resistant to lethal infection, presenting at least 100-fold reduction of viral load in target organs and significant reduction in disease severity. This phenotype was reproduced in wild-type mice treated with CCR5-blocking compounds. Therefore, CCR5 is a host factor required for DENV-2 replication and disease development. Targeting CCR5 might represent a therapeutic strategy for dengue fever. These data bring new insights on the association between viral infections and the chemokine receptor CCR5.

  13. ERK1-Based Pathway as a New Selective Mechanism To Modulate CCR5 with Natural Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Venuti, Assunta; Pastori, Claudia; Siracusano, Gabriel; Riva, Agostino; Sciortino, Maria Teresa; Lopalco, Lucia

    2015-10-01

    Natural human Abs, recognizing an epitope within the first extramembrane loop of CCR5 (the main HIV coreceptor), induce a long-lasting internalization (48 h) of the protein, whereas all known CCR5 modulating molecules show a short-term kinetics (60-90 min). Despite extensive studies on the regulation of CCR5 signaling cascades, which are the effect of concomitant CCR5 internalization by exogenous stimuli such as Abs, downstream signaling continues to be poorly understood. In this article, we report a hitherto unrecognized mechanism of CCR5 modulation mediated by G protein-dependent ERK1 activity. We further demonstrate that ERK1 is localized mainly in the cytoplasmic compartment and that it interacts directly with the CCR5 protein, thus provoking possible CCR5 degradation with a subsequent de novo synthesis, and that re-expression of CCR5 on the cell membrane required several days. In contrast, the RANTES treatment induces a recovery of the receptor on the cell membrane in short-term kinetics without the involvement of de novo protein synthesis. The said new pathway could be relevant not only to better understand the molecular basis of all pathologic conditions in which CCR5 is involved but also to generate new tools to block viral infections, such as the use of recombinant Abs.

  14. Chemokine receptor Ccr1 drives neutrophil-mediated kidney immunopathology and mortality in invasive candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Lionakis, Michail S; Fischer, Brett G; Lim, Jean K; Swamydas, Muthulekha; Wan, Wuzhou; Richard Lee, Chyi-Chia; Cohen, Jeffrey I; Scheinberg, Phillip; Gao, Ji-Liang; Murphy, Philip M

    2012-01-01

    Invasive candidiasis is the 4(th) leading cause of nosocomial bloodstream infection in the US with mortality that exceeds 40% despite administration of antifungal therapy; neutropenia is a major risk factor for poor outcome after invasive candidiasis. In a fatal mouse model of invasive candidiasis that mimics human bloodstream-derived invasive candidiasis, the most highly infected organ is the kidney and neutrophils are the major cellular mediators of host defense; however, factors regulating neutrophil recruitment have not been previously defined. Here we show that mice lacking chemokine receptor Ccr1, which is widely expressed on leukocytes, had selectively impaired accumulation of neutrophils in the kidney limited to the late phase of the time course of the model; surprisingly, this was associated with improved renal function and survival without affecting tissue fungal burden. Consistent with this, neutrophils from wild-type mice in blood and kidney switched from Ccr1(lo) to Ccr1(high) at late time-points post-infection, when Ccr1 ligands were produced at high levels in the kidney and were chemotactic for kidney neutrophils ex vivo. Further, when a 1∶1 mixture of Ccr1(+/+) and Ccr1(-/-) donor neutrophils was adoptively transferred intravenously into Candida-infected Ccr1(+/+) recipient mice, neutrophil trafficking into the kidney was significantly skewed toward Ccr1(+/+) cells. Thus, neutrophil Ccr1 amplifies late renal immunopathology and increases mortality in invasive candidiasis by mediating excessive recruitment of neutrophils from the blood to the target organ.

  15. Association of two functional polymorphisms in the CCR5 gene with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Prahalad, Sampath; Bohnsack, John F.; Jorde, Lynn B.; Whiting, April; Clifford, Bronte; Dunn, Diane; Weiss, Robert; Moroldo, Marta; Thompson, Susan D.; Glass, David N.; Bamshad, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) is mediated by Th1-immune responses. In children with JRA, synovial T-cells express high levels of the Th1-chemokine receptor CCR5, which has been implicated in susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis. To test the hypothesis that genetic variation in CCR5 is associated with susceptibility to JRA, we analyzed patterns of variation in the 5'cis-regulatory region of CCR5 in 124 multiplex families from a JRA affected-sibpair registry. After sequencing the upstream region of CCR5, variants were tested for association with JRA by transmission disequilibrium testing. A single nucleotide polymorphism, C-1835T, was significantly under-transmitted to children with early-onset JRA (p<0.01). C-1835T was genotyped in 424 additional simplex and multiplex families. CCR5-1835T allele was under-transmitted in the cohort of all probands with JRA (p<0.02), as well as in those with early-onset (p<0.01) or pauciarticular JRA (p<0.05). Another variant, a 32-bp deletion in the open reading frame of CCR5, (CCR5-Δ32), was also tested in ~700 simplex and multiplex families. CCR5-Δ32 was also significantly under-transmitted to probands with early-onset JRA (p<0.05). Both variants are in regions under natural selection, and result in functional consequences. Our results suggest these CCR5 variants are protective against early-onset JRA. PMID:16775617

  16. Biological diversity, ecological health and condition of aquatic assemblages at national wildlife refuges in southern indiana, USA.

    PubMed

    Simon, Thomas P; Morris, Charles C; Robb, Joseph R; McCoy, William

    2015-01-01

    The National Wildlife Refuge system is a vital resource for the protection and conservation of biodiversity and biological integrity in the United States. Surveys were conducted to determine the spatial and temporal patterns of fish, macroinvertebrate, and crayfish populations in two watersheds that encompass three refuges in southern Indiana. The Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge had the highest number of aquatic species with 355 macroinvertebrate taxa, six crayfish species, and 82 fish species, while the Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge had 163 macroinvertebrate taxa, seven crayfish species, and 37 fish species. The Muscatatuck National Wildlife Refuge had the lowest diversity of macroinvertebrates with 96 taxa and six crayfish species, while possessing the second highest fish species richness with 51 species. Habitat quality was highest in the Muscatatuck River drainage with increased amounts of forested habitats compared to the Patoka River drainage. Biological integrity of the three refuges ranked the Patoka NWR as the lowest biological integrity (mean IBI reach scores = 35 IBI points), while Big Oaks had the highest biological integrity (mean IBI reach score = 41 IBI points). The Muscatatuck NWR had a mean IBI reach score of 31 during June, which seasonally increased to a mean of 40 IBI points during summer. Watershed IBI scores and habitat condition were highest in the Big Oaks NWR.

  17. Towards national mapping of aquatic condition (II): Predicting the probable biological condition of USA streams and rivers

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA’s National River and Stream Assessment (NRSA) uses spatially balanced sampling to estimate the proportion of streams within the conterminous US (CONUS) that deviate from least-disturbed biological condition (BC). These assessments do not infer BC at un-sampled st...

  18. Biological Diversity, Ecological Health and Condition of Aquatic Assemblages at National Wildlife Refuges in Southern Indiana, USA

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Charles C.; Robb, Joseph R.; McCoy, William

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The National Wildlife Refuge system is a vital resource for the protection and conservation of biodiversity and biological integrity in the United States. Surveys were conducted to determine the spatial and temporal patterns of fish, macroinvertebrate, and crayfish populations in two watersheds that encompass three refuges in southern Indiana. The Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge had the highest number of aquatic species with 355 macroinvertebrate taxa, six crayfish species, and 82 fish species, while the Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge had 163 macroinvertebrate taxa, seven crayfish species, and 37 fish species. The Muscatatuck National Wildlife Refuge had the lowest diversity of macroinvertebrates with 96 taxa and six crayfish species, while possessing the second highest fish species richness with 51 species. Habitat quality was highest in the Muscatatuck River drainage with increased amounts of forested habitats compared to the Patoka River drainage. Biological integrity of the three refuges ranked the Patoka NWR as the lowest biological integrity (mean IBI reach scores = 35 IBI points), while Big Oaks had the highest biological integrity (mean IBI reach score = 41 IBI points). The Muscatatuck NWR had a mean IBI reach score of 31 during June, which seasonally increased to a mean of 40 IBI points during summer. Watershed IBI scores and habitat condition were highest in the Big Oaks NWR. PMID:25632261

  19. Treatment of chronically Trypanosoma cruzi-infected mice with a CCR1/CCR5 antagonist (Met-RANTES) results in amelioration of cardiac tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Gabriela A; Silvério, Jaline C; Marino, Ana Paula M P; Roffê, Ester; Vieira, Valeska; Kroll-Palhares, Karina; Carvalho, Cristiano E; Silva, Andréa Alice; Teixeira, Mauro M; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2009-02-01

    The comprehension of the molecular mechanisms leading to Trypanosoma cruzi-elicited heart dysfunction might contribute to design novel therapeutic strategies aiming to ameliorate chronic Chagas disease cardiomyopathy. In C3H/He mice infected with the low virulence T. cruzi Colombian strain, the persistent cardiac inflammation composed mainly of CCR5(+) T lymphocytes parallels the expression of CC-chemokines in a pro-inflammatory IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha milieu. The chronic myocarditis is accompanied by increased frequency of peripheral CCR5(+)LFA-1(+) T lymphocytes. The treatment of chronically T. cruzi-infected mice with Met-RANTES, a selective CCR1/CCR5 antagonist, led to a 20-30% decrease in CD4(+) cell numbers as well as IL-10, IL-13 and TNF-alpha expression. Further, Met-RANTES administration impaired the re-compartmentalization of the activated CD4(+)CCR5(+) lymphocytes. Importantly, Met-RANTES treatment resulted in significant reduction in parasite load and fibronectin deposition in the heart tissue. Moreover, Met-RANTES treatment significantly protected T. cruzi-infected mice against connexin 43 loss in heart tissue and CK-MB level enhancement, markers of heart dysfunction. Thus, our results corroborate that therapeutic strategies based on the modulation of CCR1/CCR5-mediated cell migration and/or effector function may contribute to cardiac tissue damage limitation during chronic Chagas disease.

  20. International and national expert group evaluations: biological/health effects of radiofrequency fields.

    PubMed

    Vijayalaxmi; Scarfi, Maria R

    2014-09-01

    The escalated use of various wireless communication devices, which emit non-ionizing radiofrequency (RF) fields, have raised concerns among the general public regarding the potential adverse effects on human health. During the last six decades, researchers have used different parameters to investigate the effects of in vitro and in vivo exposures of animals and humans or their cells to RF fields. Data reported in peer-reviewed scientific publications were contradictory: some indicated effects while others did not. International organizations have considered all of these data as well as the observations reported in human epidemiological investigations to set-up the guidelines or standards (based on the quality of published studies and the "weight of scientific evidence" approach) for RF exposures in occupationally exposed individuals and the general public. Scientists with relevant expertise in various countries have also considered the published data to provide the required scientific information for policy-makers to develop and disseminate authoritative health information to the general public regarding RF exposures. This paper is a compilation of the conclusions, on the biological effects of RF exposures, from various national and international expert groups, based on their analyses. In general, the expert groups suggested a reduction in exposure levels, precautionary approach, and further research. PMID:25211777

  1. Biological and Environmental Research Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, FY 1992--1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report is the 1992--1994 Program Director`s Overview Report for Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Program, and as such it addresses KP-funded work at ORNL conducted during FY 1991 and in progress during FY 1992; it also serves as a planning document for the remainder of FY 1992 through FY 1994. Non-BER funded work at ORNL relevant to the mission of OHER is also discussed. The second section of the report describes ORNL facilities and resources used by the BER program. The third section addresses research management practices at ORNL. The fourth, fifth, and sixth sections address BER-funded research in progress, program accomplishments and research highlights, and program orientation for the remainder of FY 1992 through FY 1994, respectively. Work for non-BER sponsors is described in the seventh section, followed by a discussion of significant near and long-term issues facing BER work at ORNL in the eighth section. The last section provides a statistical summary of BER research at ORNL. Appendices supplement the above topics with additional detail.

  2. Biological and Environmental Research Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, FY 1992--1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report is the 1992--1994 Program Director's Overview Report for Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Program, and as such it addresses KP-funded work at ORNL conducted during FY 1991 and in progress during FY 1992; it also serves as a planning document for the remainder of FY 1992 through FY 1994. Non-BER funded work at ORNL relevant to the mission of OHER is also discussed. The second section of the report describes ORNL facilities and resources used by the BER program. The third section addresses research management practices at ORNL. The fourth, fifth, and sixth sections address BER-funded research in progress, program accomplishments and research highlights, and program orientation for the remainder of FY 1992 through FY 1994, respectively. Work for non-BER sponsors is described in the seventh section, followed by a discussion of significant near and long-term issues facing BER work at ORNL in the eighth section. The last section provides a statistical summary of BER research at ORNL. Appendices supplement the above topics with additional detail.

  3. International and National Expert Group Evaluations: Biological/Health Effects of Radiofrequency Fields

    PubMed Central

    Vijayalaxmi; Scarfi, Maria R.

    2014-01-01

    The escalated use of various wireless communication devices, which emit non-ionizing radiofrequency (RF) fields, have raised concerns among the general public regarding the potential adverse effects on human health. During the last six decades, researchers have used different parameters to investigate the effects of in vitro and in vivo exposures of animals and humans or their cells to RF fields. Data reported in peer-reviewed scientific publications were contradictory: some indicated effects while others did not. International organizations have considered all of these data as well as the observations reported in human epidemiological investigations to set-up the guidelines or standards (based on the quality of published studies and the “weight of scientific evidence” approach) for RF exposures in occupationally exposed individuals and the general public. Scientists with relevant expertise in various countries have also considered the published data to provide the required scientific information for policy-makers to develop and disseminate authoritative health information to the general public regarding RF exposures. This paper is a compilation of the conclusions, on the biological effects of RF exposures, from various national and international expert groups, based on their analyses. In general, the expert groups suggested a reduction in exposure levels, precautionary approach, and further research. PMID:25211777

  4. CCR4 frameshift mutation identifies a distinct group of adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Noriaki; Miyoshi, Hiroaki; Kato, Takeharu; Sakata-Yanagimoto, Mamiko; Niino, Daisuke; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Moriuchi, Yukiyoshi; Miyahara, Masaharu; Kurita, Daisuke; Sasaki, Yuya; Shimono, Joji; Kawamoto, Keisuke; Utsunomiya, Atae; Imaizumi, Yoshitaka; Seto, Masao; Ohshima, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    Adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is an intractable T cell neoplasm caused by human T cell leukaemia virus type 1. Next-generation sequencing-based comprehensive mutation studies have revealed recurrent somatic CCR4 mutations in ATLL, although clinicopathological findings associated with CCR4 mutations remain to be delineated. In the current study, 184 cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma, including 113 cases of ATLL, were subjected to CCR4 mutation analysis. This sequence analysis identified mutations in 27% (30/113) of cases of ATLL and 9% (4/44) of cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma not otherwise specified. Identified mutations included nonsense (NS) and frameshift (FS) mutations. No significant differences in clinicopathological findings were observed between ATLL cases stratified by presence of CCR4 mutation. All ATLL cases with CCR4 mutations exhibited cell-surface CCR4 positivity. Semi-quantitative CCR4 protein analysis of immunohistochemical sections revealed higher CCR4 expression in cases with NS mutations of CCR4 than in cases with wild-type (WT) CCR4. Furthermore, among ATLL cases, FS mutation was significantly associated with a poor prognosis, compared with NS mutation and WT CCR4. These results suggest that CCR4 mutation is an important determinant of the clinical course in ATLL cases, and that NS and FS mutations of CCR4 behave differently with respect to ATLL pathophysiology.

  5. CCR4 frameshift mutation identifies a distinct group of adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Noriaki; Miyoshi, Hiroaki; Kato, Takeharu; Sakata-Yanagimoto, Mamiko; Niino, Daisuke; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Moriuchi, Yukiyoshi; Miyahara, Masaharu; Kurita, Daisuke; Sasaki, Yuya; Shimono, Joji; Kawamoto, Keisuke; Utsunomiya, Atae; Imaizumi, Yoshitaka; Seto, Masao; Ohshima, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    Adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is an intractable T cell neoplasm caused by human T cell leukaemia virus type 1. Next-generation sequencing-based comprehensive mutation studies have revealed recurrent somatic CCR4 mutations in ATLL, although clinicopathological findings associated with CCR4 mutations remain to be delineated. In the current study, 184 cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma, including 113 cases of ATLL, were subjected to CCR4 mutation analysis. This sequence analysis identified mutations in 27% (30/113) of cases of ATLL and 9% (4/44) of cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma not otherwise specified. Identified mutations included nonsense (NS) and frameshift (FS) mutations. No significant differences in clinicopathological findings were observed between ATLL cases stratified by presence of CCR4 mutation. All ATLL cases with CCR4 mutations exhibited cell-surface CCR4 positivity. Semi-quantitative CCR4 protein analysis of immunohistochemical sections revealed higher CCR4 expression in cases with NS mutations of CCR4 than in cases with wild-type (WT) CCR4. Furthermore, among ATLL cases, FS mutation was significantly associated with a poor prognosis, compared with NS mutation and WT CCR4. These results suggest that CCR4 mutation is an important determinant of the clinical course in ATLL cases, and that NS and FS mutations of CCR4 behave differently with respect to ATLL pathophysiology. PMID:26847489

  6. Introducing Bioinformatics into the Biology Curriculum: Exploring the National Center for Biotechnology Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Thomas M.; Emmeluth, Donald S.

    2002-01-01

    Explains the potential of computer technology in science education and argues for integrating bioinformatics into the biology curriculum. Describes three modules designed to introduce students to technological advancements in biology. Aims to develop a better understanding of molecular biology among students. (YDS)

  7. Naive Treg-like CCR7(+) mononuclear cells indicate unfavorable prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jie-Yi; Duan, Meng; Sun, Qi-Man; Yang, Liuxiao; Wang, Zhi-Chao; Mynbaev, Ospan A; He, Yi-Feng; Wang, Ling-Yan; Zhou, Jian; Tang, Qi-Qun; Cao, Ya; Fan, Jia; Wang, Xiao-Ying; Gao, Qiang

    2016-07-01

    Chemokine receptor-like 1 (CCRL1) has the potential in creating a low level of CCL19 and CCL21 to hinder CCR7(+) cell tracking to tumor tissue. Previously, we found a tumor suppressive role of CCRL1 by impairing CCR7-related chemotaxis of tumor cells in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we reported a contribution of CCR7(+) mononuclear cells in the tumor microenvironment to the progression of disease. Immunohistochemistry was used to investigate the distribution and clinical significance of CCR7(+) cells in a cohort of 240 HCC patients. Furthermore, the phenotype, composition, and functional status of CCR7(+) cells were determined by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, and in vitro co-culture assays. We found that CCR7(+) mononuclear cells were dispersed around tumor tissue and negatively related to tumoral expression of CCRL1 (P < 0.001, r = 0.391). High density of CCR7(+) mononuclear cells positively correlated with the absence of tumor capsule, vascular invasion, and poor differentiation (P < 0.05). Survival analyses revealed that increased number of CCR7(+) mononuclear cells was significantly associated with worse survival and increased recurrence. We found that CCR7(+) mononuclear cells featured a naive Treg-like phenotype (CD45RA(+)CD25(+)FOXP3(+)) and possessed tumor-promoting potential by producing TGF-β1. Moreover, CCR7(+) cells were also composed of several immunocytes, a third of which were CD8(+) T cells. CCR7(+) Treg-like cells facilitate tumor growth and indicate unfavorable prognosis in HCC patients, but fortunately, their tracking to tumor tissue is under the control of CCRL1. PMID:26813566

  8. CCR5 small interfering RNA ameliorated joint inflammation in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hongmei; Yang, Pingting; Fang, Fang; Ding, Shuang; Xiao, Weiguo

    2014-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease. C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is found in inflamed synovium of RA patients and is necessary for formation of RA. We aimed to check whether delivery of CCR5-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) via electroporation suppresses local inflammation in arthritis rats. Vectors encoding siRNA that target CCR5 or negative control siRNA were constructed for gene silencing and the silencing effects of suppressing CCR5 expression in synovium examined by western blot. The vector with strongest effect was delivered into the knee joint of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats by the in vivo electroporation method 7, 10, 13, and 16 days after immunization with Complete Freund's adjuvant. During an observation of 28 days, behavior, paw swelling, arthritis and histopathologic scoring were estimated. The expression level of CCR5 in synovium was evaluated by western blot and real-time PCR. Anti-CCR5 D1 siRNA was effectively inhibited CCR5 expression in vitro. Moreover, delivery of the siRNA into inflammatory joint also suppressed the expression of CCR5 in vivo and markedly suppressed paw swelling and inflammation. Local electroporation of anti-CCR5 siRNA into the left inflamed joints could achieve the silencing of CCR5 gene and alleviate local inflammation just in the knee joint injected with siRNA other than the opposite joint. Inhibition of CCR5 expression may provide a potential for treatment of RA.

  9. IMOS National Reference Stations: a continental-wide physical, chemical and biological coastal observing system.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Tim P; Morello, Elisabetta B; Evans, Karen; Richardson, Anthony J; Rochester, Wayne; Steinberg, Craig R; Roughan, Moninya; Thompson, Peter; Middleton, John F; Feng, Ming; Sherrington, Robert; Brando, Vittorio; Tilbrook, Bronte; Ridgway, Ken; Allen, Simon; Doherty, Peter; Hill, Katherine; Moltmann, Tim C

    2014-01-01

    Sustained observations allow for the tracking of change in oceanography and ecosystems, however, these are rare, particularly for the Southern Hemisphere. To address this in part, the Australian Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS) implemented a network of nine National Reference Stations (NRS). The network builds on one long-term location, where monthly water sampling has been sustained since the 1940s and two others that commenced in the 1950s. In-situ continuously moored sensors and an enhanced monthly water sampling regime now collect more than 50 data streams. Building on sampling for temperature, salinity and nutrients, the network now observes dissolved oxygen, carbon, turbidity, currents, chlorophyll a and both phytoplankton and zooplankton. Additional parameters for studies of ocean acidification and bio-optics are collected at a sub-set of sites and all data is made freely and publically available. Our preliminary results demonstrate increased utility to observe extreme events, such as marine heat waves and coastal flooding; rare events, such as plankton blooms; and have, for the first time, allowed for consistent continental scale sampling and analysis of coastal zooplankton and phytoplankton communities. Independent water sampling allows for cross validation of the deployed sensors for quality control of data that now continuously tracks daily, seasonal and annual variation. The NRS will provide multi-decadal time series, against which more spatially replicated short-term studies can be referenced, models and remote sensing products validated, and improvements made to our understanding of how large-scale, long-term change and variability in the global ocean are affecting Australia's coastal seas and ecosystems. The NRS network provides an example of how a continental scaled observing systems can be developed to collect observations that integrate across physics, chemistry and biology.

  10. Biological Communities and Geomorphology of Patch Reefs in Biscayne National Park, Florida, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuffner, Ilsa B.; Brock, John C.; Grober-Dunsmore, Rikki; Hickey, T. Don; Bonito, Victor; Bracone, Jeremy E.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2008-01-01

    Coral reef ecosystem management benefits from continual, quantitative assessment of the resources being managed, plus assessment of factors that affect distribution patterns of organisms in the ecosystem. In this study, we investigated the relationships among physical, benthic, and fish variables in effort to help explain the distribution patterns of ecologically and economically important species on twelve patch reefs within Biscayne National Park (BNP), Florida, U.S.A. We visited 196 randomly-located sampling stations across twelve shallow (< 10m) patch reefs, using SCUBA to conduct our surveys. We measured physical variables (e.g., substratum type), estimated the percent cover of benthic community members (e.g., coral, algae), and counted and estimated mean size for each fish species observed. We also used high-density bathymetric data collected remotely via airborne laser surveying (Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL)) to calculate rugosity (bumpiness) of the reef habitat. Here we present our findings visually by graphing our quantitative community and physical structure data simultaneously in a GIS map format. You will see that biological organisms arrange themselves on each patch reef in a non-random manner. For example, many species of fish prefer to locate themselves in areas of the reef where the rugosity index is high. Rugose parts of the reef provide them with good hiding places from predators. These maps (and the data used to create them) are permanent records of the status of reef resources found on these twelve patch reefs in BNP as of September, 2003. The survey data found in the shapefile located on this CD product includes benthic percent cover data for algae, coral, encrusting invertebrates, and substratum type, in addition to gorgonian abundance and volume, total fish abundance and species richness, and specific counts for Acanthurids (surgeonfish), Scarids (parrotfish), Lutjanids (snappers), Haemulids (grunts), Serranids

  11. IMOS National Reference Stations: A Continental-Wide Physical, Chemical and Biological Coastal Observing System

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Tim P.; Morello, Elisabetta B.; Evans, Karen; Richardson, Anthony J.; Rochester, Wayne; Steinberg, Craig R.; Roughan, Moninya; Thompson, Peter; Middleton, John F.; Feng, Ming; Sherrington, Robert; Brando, Vittorio; Tilbrook, Bronte; Ridgway, Ken; Allen, Simon; Doherty, Peter; Hill, Katherine; Moltmann, Tim C.

    2014-01-01

    Sustained observations allow for the tracking of change in oceanography and ecosystems, however, these are rare, particularly for the Southern Hemisphere. To address this in part, the Australian Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS) implemented a network of nine National Reference Stations (NRS). The network builds on one long-term location, where monthly water sampling has been sustained since the 1940s and two others that commenced in the 1950s. In-situ continuously moored sensors and an enhanced monthly water sampling regime now collect more than 50 data streams. Building on sampling for temperature, salinity and nutrients, the network now observes dissolved oxygen, carbon, turbidity, currents, chlorophyll a and both phytoplankton and zooplankton. Additional parameters for studies of ocean acidification and bio-optics are collected at a sub-set of sites and all data is made freely and publically available. Our preliminary results demonstrate increased utility to observe extreme events, such as marine heat waves and coastal flooding; rare events, such as plankton blooms; and have, for the first time, allowed for consistent continental scale sampling and analysis of coastal zooplankton and phytoplankton communities. Independent water sampling allows for cross validation of the deployed sensors for quality control of data that now continuously tracks daily, seasonal and annual variation. The NRS will provide multi-decadal time series, against which more spatially replicated short-term studies can be referenced, models and remote sensing products validated, and improvements made to our understanding of how large-scale, long-term change and variability in the global ocean are affecting Australia's coastal seas and ecosystems. The NRS network provides an example of how a continental scaled observing systems can be developed to collect observations that integrate across physics, chemistry and biology. PMID:25517905

  12. Norepinephrine Inhibits Macrophage Migration by Decreasing CCR2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Xiu, Fangming; Stanojcic, Mile; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2013-01-01

    Increased incidences of infectious and septic complications during post-burn courses represent the main contributor to burn injury mortality. Sustained increases in catecholamine levels, especially norepinephrine (NE), contribute to immune disturbances in severely burned patients. The precise mechanisms underlying NE-mediated immunoregulation are not fully understood. Here we hypothesize that persistently elevated NE levels are associated with immunodysfunctions. We examined the effects of NE on the phenotype and functions of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs). Whole mouse bone marrow cells were treated in vitro with 40 ng/mL of M-CSF and with 1 x 10-6 M or 1 x 10-8 M of NE or without NE for 7 days; cells were collected and stained with antibodies for CD11b, F4/80, MHC II and the inflammatory CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2). We found 1 x 10-6 M of NE inhibited MHC II and CCR2 expression on CD11b+/F4/80+ BMM cells. It also inhibited BMM proliferation by inhibiting CSF-1R expression. On the contrary, 1 x 10-8 M of NE slightly increased both MHC II and CCR2 expression on CD11b+/F4/80+ BMM cells but inhibited CD11b+/F4/80+ BMM proliferation. MCP-1 based migration assay showed that the migration of 1 x 10-6 M of NE-treated BMM toward MCP-1 was significantly decreased compared to BMM without NE treatment. Both 1 x 10-8 M and 1 x 10-6 M of NE enhanced TNF-α production and phagocytosis of FITC-Dextran. Intracellular staining of transcriptional factor MafB showed that 1 x 10-6 M of NE treatment enhanced its expression, whereas 1 x 10-8 M of NE decreased expression. Stimulation with LPS in the last 24-hours of BMM culture further decreased CCR2 and MHC II expression of these BMM, suggesting the synergistic effect of LPS and NE on macrophage. Our results demonstrate that NE regulates macrophage differentiation, proliferation and function, and may play a critical role in the dysfunctional immune response post-burn. PMID:23844252

  13. Elucidation of the CCR1- and CCR5-binding modes of MIP-1α by application of an NMR spectra reconstruction method to the transferred cross-saturation experiments.

    PubMed

    Yoshiura, Chie; Ueda, Takumi; Kofuku, Yutaka; Matsumoto, Masahiko; Okude, Junya; Kondo, Keita; Shiraishi, Yutaro; Shimada, Ichio

    2015-12-01

    C-C chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1) and CCR5 are involved in various inflammation and immune responses, and regulate the progression of the autoimmune diseases differently. However, the number of residues identified at the binding interface was not sufficient to clarify the differences in the CCR1- and CCR5-binding modes to MIP-1α, because the NMR measurement time for CCR1 and CCR5 samples was limited to 24 h, due to their low stability. Here we applied a recently developed NMR spectra reconstruction method, Conservation of experimental data in ANAlysis of FOuRier, to the amide-directed transferred cross-saturation experiments of chemokine receptors, CCR1 and CCR5, embedded in lipid bilayers of the reconstituted high density lipoprotein, and MIP-1α. Our experiments revealed that the residues on the N-loop and β-sheets of MIP-1α are close to both CCR1 and CCR5, and those in the C-terminal helix region are close to CCR5. These results suggest that the genetic influence of the single nucleotide polymorphisms of MIP-1α that accompany substitution of residues in the C-terminal helix region, E57 and V63, would provide clues toward elucidating how the CCR5-MIP-1α interaction affects the progress of autoimmune diseases.

  14. CCR4 in human allergen-induced late responses in the skin and lung.

    PubMed

    Nouri-Aria, Kayhan T; Wilson, Duncan; Francis, James N; Jopling, Louise A; Jacobson, Mikila R; Hodge, Martin R; Andrew, David P; Till, Stephen J; Varga, Eva-Maria; Williams, Timothy J; Pease, James E; Lloyd, Clare M; Sabroe, Ian; Durham, Stephen R

    2002-07-01

    We studied the regulation of CCR4 expression in peripheral blood and in human models of cutaneous and pulmonary allergen challenge. CCR4 expression was detectable on freshly isolated CD4+ lymphocytes and in CD4+ and CD8+ T cell lines derived from blood of atopic donors. Numbers of CCR4+ cells were up-regulated in T cell lines expanded in the presence of IL-4. CCR4 mRNA was absent at baseline in normal subjects in lung and skin, but present at baseline in the lung of some atopics. Baseline expression of CCR4 mRNA and protein was higher in lung vs. skin, but allergen-induced increases in CCR4 mRNA+ cells were observed in both organs. CCR4 protein+ cells were present at higher levels after allergen challenge in atopics compared to normal subjects. CCR4 may be important in the recruitment of T lymphocytes at sites of allergic inflammation, in a non-organ-specific manner.

  15. Unexpected Regulatory Role of CCR9 in Regulatory T Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Evans-Marin, Heather L.; Cao, Anthony T.; Yao, Suxia; Chen, Feidi; He, Chong; Liu, Han; Wu, Wei; Gonzalez, Maria G.; Dann, Sara M.; Cong, Yingzi

    2015-01-01

    T cells reactive to microbiota regulate the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). As T cell trafficking to intestines is regulated through interactions between highly specific chemokine-chemokine receptors, efforts have been made to develop intestine-specific immunosuppression based on blocking these key processes. CCR9, a gut-trophic chemokine receptor expressed by lymphocytes and dendritic cells, has been implicated in the regulation of IBD through mediating recruitment of T cells to inflamed sites. However, the role of CCR9 in inducing and sustaining inflammation in the context of IBD is poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrate that CCR9 deficiency in effector T cells and Tregs does not affect the development of colitis in a microbiota antigen-specific, T cell-mediated model. However, Treg cells express higher levels of CCR9 compared to those in effector T cells. Interestingly, CCR9 inhibits Treg cell development, in that CCR9-/- mice demonstrate a high level of Foxp3+ Tregs, and ligation of CCR9 by its ligand CCL25 inhibits Treg cell differentiation in vitro. Collectively, our data indicate that in addition to acting as a gut-homing molecule, CCR9 signaling shapes immune responses by inhibiting Treg cell development. PMID:26230654

  16. Chemokine receptor CCR5 antagonist maraviroc: medicinal chemistry and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guoyan G; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao

    2014-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes acquired immumodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), one of the worst global pandemic. The virus infects human CD4 T cells and macrophages, and causes CD4 depletion. HIV enters target cells through the binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein to CD4 and the chemokine coreceptor, CXCR4 or CCR5. In particular, the CCR5-utilizing viruses predominate in the blood during the disease course. CCR5 is expressed on the surface of various immune cells including macrophages, monocytes, microglia, dendric cells, and active memory CD4 T cells. In the human population, the CCR5 genomic mutation, CCR5Δ32, is associated with relative resistance to HIV. These findings paved the way for the discovery and development of CCR5 inhibitors to block HIV transmission and replication. Maraviroc, discovered as a CCR5 antagonist, is the only CCR5 inhibitor that has been approved by both US FDA and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for treating HIV/AIDS patients. In this review, we summarize the medicinal chemistry and clinical studies of Maraviroc.

  17. CCR9 Is a Key Regulator of Early Phases of Allergic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    López-Pacheco, C.; Soldevila, G.; Du Pont, G.; Hernández-Pando, R.

    2016-01-01

    Airway inflammation is the most common hallmark of allergic asthma. Chemokine receptors involved in leukocyte recruitment are closely related to the pathology in asthma. CCR9 has been described as a homeostatic and inflammatory chemokine receptor, but its role and that of its ligand CCL25 during lung inflammation remain unknown. To investigate the role of CCR9 as a modulator of airway inflammation, we established an OVA-induced allergic inflammation model in CCR9-deficient mice. Here, we report the expression of CCR9 and CCL25 as early as 6 hours post-OVA challenge in eosinophils and T-lymphocytes. Moreover, in challenged CCR9-deficient mice, cell recruitment was impaired at peribronchial and perivenular levels. OVA-administration in CCR9-deficient mice leads to a less inflammatory cell recruitment, which modifies the expression of IL-10, CCL11, and CCL25 at 24 hours after OVA challenge. In contrast, the secretion of IL-4 and IL-5 was not affected in CCR9-deficient mice compared to WT mice. These results demonstrate for the first time that CCR9 and CCL25 expressions are induced in the early stages of airway inflammation and they have an important role modulating eosinophils and lymphocytes recruitment at the first stages of inflammatory process, suggesting that they might be a potential target to regulate inflammation in asthma. PMID:27795621

  18. CCR4 is critically involved in effective antitumor immunity in mice bearing intradermal B16 melanoma.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Kazuhiko; Itoh, Tatsuki; Koyama, Atsushi; Imamura, Reira; Kawai, Shiori; Nishiwaki, Keiji; Oiso, Naoki; Kawada, Akira; Yoshie, Osamu; Nakayama, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    CCR4 is a major chemokine receptor expressed by Treg cells and Th17 cells. While Treg cells are known to suppress antitumor immunity, Th17 cells have recently been shown to enhance the induction of antitumor cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Here, CCR4-deficient mice displayed enhanced tumor growth upon intradermal inoculation of B16-F10 melanoma cells. In CCR4-deficient mice, while IFN-γ+CD8+ effector T cells were decreased in tumor sites, IFN-γ+CD8+ T cells and Th17 cells were decreased in regional lymph nodes. In wild-type mice, CD4+IL-17A+ cells, which were identified as CCR4+CD44+ memory Th17, were found to be clustered around dendritic cells expressing MDC/CCL22, a ligand for CCR4, in regional lymph nodes. Compound 22, a CCR4 antagonist, also enhanced tumor growth and decreased Th17 cells in regional lymph nodes in tumor-bearing mice treated with Dacarbazine. In contrast, CCR6 deficiency did not affect the tumor growth and the numbers of Th17 cells in regional lymph nodes. These findings indicate that CCR4 is critically involved in regional lymph node DC-Th17 cell interactions that are necessary for Th17 cell-mediated induction of antitumor CD8+ effector T cells in mice bearing B16 melanoma. PMID:27132989

  19. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Tennessee's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  20. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. New Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on New Mexico's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  1. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on California's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  2. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Minnesota's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  3. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. Alaska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Alaska's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  4. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Georgia's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  5. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on South Carolina's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  6. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. Arkansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Arkansas' college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  7. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. North Dakota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on North Dakota's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  8. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Florida's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  9. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. West Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on West Virginia's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  10. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. Kentucky

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Kentucky's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  11. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Alabama's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  12. Chemokine Receptor CCR5 Antagonist Maraviroc: Medicinal Chemistry and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guoyan G.; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao

    2015-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes acquired immumodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), one of the worst global pandemic. The virus infects human CD4 T cells and macrophages, and causes CD4 depletion. HIV enters target cells through the binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein to CD4 and the chemokine coreceptor, CXCR4 or CCR5. In particular, the CCR5-utilizing viruses predominate in the blood during the disease course. CCR5 is expressed on the surface of various immune cells including macrophages, monocytes, microglia, dendric cells, and active memory CD4 T cells. In the human population, the CCR5 genomic mutation, CCR5Δ32, is associated with relative resistance to HIV. These findings paved the way for the discovery and development of CCR5 inhibitors to block HIV transmission and replication. Maraviroc, discovered as a CCR5 antagonist, is the only CCR5 inhibitor that has been approved by both US FDA and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for treating HIV/AIDS patients. In this review, we summarize the medicinal chemistry and clinical studies of Maraviroc. PMID:25159165

  13. CCR7 Deficiency Exacerbates Injury in Acute Nephritis Due to Aberrant Localization of Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Eller, Kathrin; Weber, Tobias; Pruenster, Monika; Wolf, Anna M.; Mayer, Gert

    2010-01-01

    The homing of dendritic cells and T cells to secondary lymphoid organs requires chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) expression on these cells. T cells mediate the pathogenesis of experimental accelerated nephrotoxic serum nephritis (NTS), including its suppression by regulatory T cells (Tregs), but the contribution of CCR7 to this disease is unknown. Here, we compared the development of NTS in CCR7-knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. Compared with WT mice, CCR7KO mice developed more severe disease with significantly more inflammatory cells infiltrating the kidney. These cells included FoxP3+ Tregs, which were virtually absent from WT kidneys. The adoptive transfer of WT Tregs into CCR7KO mice at the time of immunization protected the recipients from disease; these cells homed to secondary lymphoid organs but not to kidneys. Conversely, adoptive transfer of CCR7KO Tregs into WT mice did not inhibit development of NTS. These data suggest that NTS can develop without CCR7 expression, but Treg-mediated disease suppression, which seems to occur in secondary lymphoid organs, requires CCR7. PMID:19917782

  14. CCR5 susceptibility to ligand-mediated down-modulation differs between human T lymphocytes and myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Fox, James M; Kasprowicz, Richard; Hartley, Oliver; Signoret, Nathalie

    2015-07-01

    CCR5 is a chemokine receptor expressed on leukocytes and a coreceptor used by HIV-1 to enter CD4(+) T lymphocytes and macrophages. Stimulation of CCR5 by chemokines triggers internalization of chemokine-bound CCR5 molecules in a process called down-modulation, which contributes to the anti-HIV activity of chemokines. Recent studies have shown that CCR5 conformational heterogeneity influences chemokine-CCR5 interactions and HIV-1 entry in transfected cells or activated CD4(+) T lymphocytes. However, the effect of CCR5 conformations on other cell types and on the process of down-modulation remains unclear. We used mAbs, some already shown to detect distinct CCR5 conformations, to compare the behavior of CCR5 on in vitro generated human T cell blasts, monocytes and MDMs and CHO-CCR5 transfectants. All human cells express distinct antigenic forms of CCR5 not detected on CHO-CCR5 cells. The recognizable populations of CCR5 receptors exhibit different patterns of down-modulation on T lymphocytes compared with myeloid cells. On T cell blasts, CCR5 is recognized by all antibodies and undergoes rapid chemokine-mediated internalization, whereas on monocytes and MDMs, a pool of CCR5 molecules is recognized by a subset of antibodies and is not removed from the cell surface. We demonstrate that this cell surface-retained form of CCR5 responds to prolonged treatment with more-potent chemokine analogs and acts as an HIV-1 coreceptor. Our findings indicate that the regulation of CCR5 is highly specific to cell type and provide a potential explanation for the observation that native chemokines are less-effective HIV-entry inhibitors on macrophages compared with T lymphocytes.

  15. Analysis of CCR5 and SDF-1 genetic variants and HIV infection in Indian population.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A; Padh, Harish

    2015-08-01

    HIV-1 infection and progression exhibits interindividual variation. The polymorphism in the chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4, the principal coreceptors for HIV-1 and their ligands like SDF-1 have a profound effect in altering the HIV-1 disease progression rate. A single nucleotide polymorphism designated SDF1-3'UTR-801G-A has been associated with resistance to HIV-1 infection or delayed progression to AIDS. In this study, the SDF1-3'A polymorphism, CCR5∆32 polymorphism and CCR5 promoter polymorphism at positions 58934 G/T, 59029 G/A, 59353 T/C, 59356 C/T, 59402 A/G and 59653 C/T were analysed in Indian population. The polymorphisms in HIV-1 patients and healthy individuals were evaluated by conventional PCR, RFLP-PCR and direct sequencing techniques. The CCR5∆32 mutant allele was found to be almost absent in Indian population. The analysis of the CCR5-59356C/T polymorphism revealed a trend towards an association of the C allele with an increased risk of HIV-1 infection. The frequency of allele CCR5-59356C was higher in HIV-1 patients (100%) as compared to healthy control subjects (89%, P = 0.003). The correlation of SDF1-3'A and CCR5 promoter CCR5-58934G/T, CCR5-59029G/A, CCR5-59353T/C, CCR5-59402 A/G and CCR5-59653C/T polymorphisms and protection to HIV-1 infection and progression to AIDS was found to be nonsignificant. Nine haplotypes with more than 1% frequency were detected but were not significant in their protective role against HIV. Comparative analysis with global populations showed a noteworthy difference in CCR5 and SDF-1 polymorphisms' frequency distribution, indicating the ethnic variability of Indians. Although susceptibility to infections cannot be completely dependent on one or few genetic variants, it is important to remember that SDF-1 and CCR5 variants have been correlated globally with HIV-1 infection and disease progression. In the light of that, higher frequency of SDF-1 variants in the Indian population is noteworthy.

  16. Constitutive expression of CCR7 directs effector CD8 T cells into the splenic white pulp and impairs functional activity.

    PubMed

    Unsoeld, Heike; Voehringer, David; Krautwald, Stefan; Pircher, Hanspeter

    2004-09-01

    Antigenic stimulation down-regulates CCR7 on effector T cells. To analyze the importance of CCR7 down-regulation, transgenic (tg) mice constitutively expressing CCR7 were generated. CD8 T cells with defined Ag specificity were obtained by breeding CCR7-tg mice with P14 TCR-tg mice specific for lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Transgenic CCR7 expression did not impair proliferation of P14.CCR7 T cells induced by lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection, but prevented CCR7 down-regulation. Compared with wild-type P14 effector cells, P14.CCR7 effector cells, expressing the CCR7 transgene, were increased in the spleen, but decreased in blood and peripheral tissues. Moreover, P14.CCR7 effector cells localized almost exclusively in the splenic white pulp, whereas P14 effector cells were excluded from splenic white pulp cords and were found preferentially in the red pulp. Functional experiments further revealed that P14.CCR7 effector cells were impaired in rapid viral clearance and in inducing Ag-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. Thus, the present study demonstrates that down-regulation of CCR7 during CD8 T cell activation is important to release effector cells from the white pulp of the spleen, and highlights the importance of effector cell localization in providing rapid immunity. PMID:15322160

  17. Amino- and Carboxyl-Terminal CCR5 Mutations in Brazilian HIV-1-Infected Women and Homology Model of p.L55Q CCR5 Mutant.

    PubMed

    Costa, Giselle Calasans de Souza; Nunes, Marcio Roberto T; Jesus, Jaqueline Goes; Novaes, Thiago; Cardoso, Jedson Ferreira; Sousa Júnior, Edivaldo Costa; Santos, Edson de Souza; Galvão-Castro, Bernardo; Zanette, Dalila Luciola; Gonçalves, Marilda de Souza; Alcantara, Luiz Carlos Junior

    2015-07-01

    Genetic factors from an HIV-1 host can affect the rate of progression to AIDS and HIV infection. To investigate the frequency of mutations in the CCR5 gene, HIV-1 samples from infected women and uninfected individuals were selected for sequencing of the CCR5 gene regions encoding the N- and C-terminal protein domains. Physicochemical CCR5 modeling and potential protein domain analysis were performed in order to evaluate the impact of the mutations found in the properties and structure of CCR5. The p.L55Q mutation in the N-terminal protein domain was observed only in uninfected individuals, with an allelic frequency of 1.8%. Physicochemical analysis revealed that the p.L55Q mutation magnified the flexibility and accessibility profiles and the modeling of CCR5 structures showed resulting in a small deviation to the right, as well as a hydrophobic to hydrophilic property alteration. The p.L55Q mutation also resulted in a slight modification of the electrostatic load of this region. Additionally, three novel silent mutations were found at the C-terminal coding region among HIV-1-infected women. The results suggest that the p.L55Q mutation might alter CCR5 conformation. Further studies should be conducted to verify the role of this mutation in HIV-1 susceptibility.

  18. CXCR3/CCR5 pathways in metastatic melanoma patients treated with adoptive therapy and interleukin-2

    PubMed Central

    Bedognetti, D; Spivey, T L; Zhao, Y; Uccellini, L; Tomei, S; Dudley, M E; Ascierto, M L; De Giorgi, V; Liu, Q; Delogu, L G; Sommariva, M; Sertoli, M R; Simon, R; Wang, E; Rosenberg, S A; Marincola, F M

    2013-01-01

    Background: Adoptive therapy with tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) induces durable complete responses (CR) in ∼20% of patients with metastatic melanoma. The recruitment of T cells through CXCR3/CCR5 chemokine ligands is critical for immune-mediated rejection. We postulated that polymorphisms and/or expression of CXCR3/CCR5 in TILs and the expression of their ligands in tumour influence the migration of TILs to tumours and tumour regression. Methods: Tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes from 142 metastatic melanoma patients enrolled in adoptive therapy trials were genotyped for CXCR3 rs2280964 and CCR5-Δ32 deletion, which encodes a protein not expressed on the cell surface. Expression of CXCR3/CCR5 in TILs and CXCR3/CCR5 and ligand genes in 113 available parental tumours was also assessed. Tumour-infiltrating lymphocyte data were validated by flow cytometry (N=50). Results: The full gene expression/polymorphism model, which includes CXCR3 and CCR5 expression data, CCR5-Δ32 polymorphism data and their interaction, was significantly associated with both CR and overall response (OR; P=0.0009, and P=0.007, respectively). More in detail, the predicted underexpression of both CXCR3 and CCR5 according to gene expression and polymorphism data (protein prediction model, PPM) was associated with response to therapy (odds ratio=6.16 and 2.32, for CR and OR, respectively). Flow cytometric analysis confirmed the PPM. Coordinate upregulation of CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, and CCL5 in pretreatment tumour biopsies was associated with OR. Conclusion: Coordinate overexpression of CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, and CCL5 in pretreatment tumours was associated with responsiveness to treatment. Conversely, CCR5-Δ32 polymorphism and CXCR3/CCR5 underexpression influence downregulation of the corresponding receptors in TILs and were associated with likelihood and degree of response. PMID:24129241

  19. Multistep continuous-flow synthesis in medicinal chemistry: discovery and preliminary structure-activity relationships of CCR8 ligands.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Trine P; Mirsharghi, Sahar; Rummel, Pia C; Thiele, Stefanie; Rosenkilde, Mette M; Ritzén, Andreas; Ulven, Trond

    2013-07-01

    A three-step continuous-flow synthesis system and its application to the assembly of a new series of chemokine receptor ligands directly from commercial building blocks is reported. No scavenger columns or solvent switches are necessary to recover the desired test compounds, which were obtained in overall yields of 49-94%. The system is modular and flexible, and the individual steps of the sequence can be interchanged with similar outcome, extending the scope of the chemistry. Biological evaluation confirmed activity on the chemokine CCR8 receptor and provided initial structure-activity-relationship (SAR) information for this new ligand series, with the most potent member displaying full agonist activity with single-digit nanomolar potency. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first published example of efficient use of multistep flow synthesis combined with biological testing and SAR studies in medicinal chemistry.

  20. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect

    Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Allison, L.J.; Blaylock, B.G.; Boston, H.L.; Huston, M.A.; Kimmel, B.L.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.; Walton, B.T.; Kitchings, J.T.; Olsen, C.R.

    1991-09-01

    On April 1, 1986, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) (EPA 1986). As specified in Part 3: Special Conditions (Item H) of the permit, a plan for biological monitoring of the Clinch River, White Oak Creek (WOC), Northwest Tributary (NWT) of WOC, Melton Branch (MB), Fifth Creek, and First Creek shall be submitted for approval to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) within 90 days of the effective date of the permit. The plan, which is referred to in Part 3 (H) of the permit as the Biological Monitoring Plan and Abatement Program (BMPAP), describes characterization monitoring studies to be conducted for the duration of the permit (5 years). In order to be consistent with the terminology used for the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Programs for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plan and the Oak Ridge K-25 Plant, BMPAP will subsequently be referred to as the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP). The proposed BMAP outlined in this document is based on preliminary discussions held on December 9, 1985, between staff of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (ORNL and Central Management), the US Department of Energy (DOE), EPA, and TDHE. 232 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Selected aquatic biological investigations in the Great Salt Lake basins, 1875-1998, National Water-Quality Assessment Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Giddings, Elise M.P.; Stephens, Doyle W.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes previous investigations of aquatic biological communities, habitat, and contaminants in streams and selected large lakes within the Great Salt Lake Basins study unit as part of the U.S. Geological Survey?s National Water-Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA). The Great Salt Lake Basins study unit is one of 59 such units designed to characterize water quality through the examination of chemical, physical, and biological factors in surface and ground waters across the country. The data will be used to aid in the planning, collection, and analysis of biological information for the NAWQA study unit and to aid other researchers concerned with water quality of the study unit. A total of 234 investigations conducted during 1875-1998 are summarized in this report. The studies are grouped into three major subjects: (1) aquatic communities and habitat, (2) contamination of streambed sediments and biological tissues, and (3) lakes. The location and a general description of each study is listed. The majority of the studies focus on fish and macroinvertebrate communities. Studies of algal communities, aquatic habitat, riparian wetlands, and contamination of streambed sediment or biological tissues are less common. Areas close to the major population centers of Salt Lake City, Provo, and Logan, Utah, are generally well studied, but more rural areas and much of the Bear River Basin are lacking in detailed information, except for fish populations..

  2. CD8 T Cells Enter the Splenic T Cell Zones Independently of CCR7, but the Subsequent Expansion and Trafficking Patterns of Effector T Cells after Infection Are Dysregulated in the Absence of CCR7 Migratory Cues.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Naveen; Benechet, Alexandre P; Lefrançois, Leo; Khanna, Kamal M

    2015-12-01

    CCR7 is an important chemokine receptor that regulates T cell trafficking and compartmentalization within secondary lymphoid organs. However, the T cell-intrinsic role of CCR7 during infection in the spleen is not well understood. This study was designed to understand how CCR7-dependent localization and migration of CD8(+) T cells in different compartments of the spleen affected the primary and recall responses after infection. To this end, we used adoptive transfer of naive Ag-specific CD8 T cells (OT-I) that either lacked CCR7 or constitutively expressed CCR7 (CD2-CCR7) in mice that were subsequently infected i.v. with Listeria monocytogenes. We show that naive CCR7(-/-)CD8(+) T cells failed to enter the T cell zone, whereas CD2-CCR7 OT-I cells were exclusively confined to the T cell zones of the spleen. Surprisingly, however, CCR7(-/-) OT-I cells entered the T cell zones after infection, but the entry and egress migratory pattern of these cells was dysregulated and very distinct compared with wild-type OT-I cells. Moreover, CCR7-deficient OT-I cells failed to expand robustly when compared with wild-type OT-I cells and were preferentially skewed toward a short-lived effector cell differentiation pattern. Interestingly, CCR7(-/-), CD2-CCR7, and wild-type OT-I memory cells responded equally well to rechallenge infection. These results highlight a novel role of CCR7 in regulating effector CD8 T cell migration in the spleen and demonstrate differential requirement of CCR7 for primary and secondary CD8 T cell responses to infection.

  3. Cooperating mechanisms of CXCR5 and CCR7 in development and organization of secondary lymphoid organs.

    PubMed

    Ohl, Lars; Henning, Golo; Krautwald, Stefan; Lipp, Martin; Hardtke, Svenja; Bernhardt, Gunter; Pabst, Oliver; Förster, Reinhold

    2003-05-01

    Homeostatic chemokines participate in the development of secondary lymphoid organs and later on in the functional organization of these tissues. The development of lymph nodes (LNs) and Peyer's patches depends on the recruitment of CD3- CD4+ interleukin (IL)-7R alpha hi cells to sites of future organ development. CD3- CD4+ IL-7R alpha hi cells express the chemokine receptor CXCR5 and might be attracted by its ligand CXCL13, which is secreted by mesenchymal cells. Mesenchymal cells also secrete CCL19, a ligand for CCR7, yet it is not clear whether CCR7 and CCL19 are important for secondary lymphoid organ development. Analyzing CXCR5-/- CCR7-/- double deficient mice we now show that these mice lack all examined peripheral LNs suggesting a profound role for both receptors in secondary lymphoid organ development. We demonstrate that CD3- CD4+ IL-7R alpha hi cells express CXCR5 as well as CCR7 indicating that both receptors cooperate during an early step of secondary lymphoid organ development. Furthermore, CXCR5-/- CCR7-/- mice display a severely disturbed architecture of mesenteric LN and spleen. Due to an impaired migration of B cells into the white pulp, CXCR5-/- CCR7-/- mice fail to develop B cell follicles but show small clusters of unorganized lymphocytes in the spleen. These data demonstrate a cooperative function of CXCR5 and CCR7 in lymphoid organ organogenesis and organization. PMID:12732661

  4. Interaction of small molecule inhibitors of HIV-1 entry with CCR5

    SciTech Connect

    Seibert, Christoph . E-mail: seiberc@mail.rockefeller.edu; Ying Weiwen; Gavrilov, Svetlana; Tsamis, Fotini; Kuhmann, Shawn E.; Palani, Anandan; Tagat, Jayaram R.; Clader, John W.; McCombie, Stuart W.; Baroudy, Bahige M.; Smith, Steven O.; Dragic, Tatjana; Moore, John P.; Sakmar, Thomas P.

    2006-05-25

    The CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is the major coreceptor for macrophage-tropic (R5) HIV-1 strains. Several small molecule inhibitors of CCR5 that block chemokine binding and HIV-1 entry are being evaluated as drug candidates. Here we define how CCR5 antagonists TAK-779, AD101 (SCH-350581) and SCH-C (SCH-351125), which inhibit HIV-1 entry, interact with CCR5. Using a mutagenesis approach in combination with a viral entry assay to provide a direct functional read out, we tested predictions based on a homology model of CCR5 and analyzed the functions of more than 30 amino acid residues. We find that a key set of aromatic and aliphatic residues serves as a hydrophobic core for the ligand binding pocket, while E283 is critical for high affinity interaction, most likely by acting as the counterion for a positively charged nitrogen atom common to all three inhibitors. These results provide a structural basis for understanding how specific antagonists interact with CCR5, and may be useful for the rational design of new, improved CCR5 ligands.

  5. The chemokine receptor CCR7 promotes mammary tumorigenesis through amplification of stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Boyle, S T; Ingman, W V; Poltavets, V; Faulkner, J W; Whitfield, R J; McColl, S R; Kochetkova, M

    2016-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR7 is widely implicated in breast cancer pathobiology. Although recent reports correlated high CCR7 levels with more advanced tumor grade and poor prognosis, limited in vivo data are available regarding its specific function in mammary gland neoplasia and the underlying mechanisms involved. To address these questions we generated a bigenic mouse model of breast cancer combined with CCR7 deletion, which revealed that CCR7 ablation results in a considerable delay in tumor onset as well as significantly reduced tumor burden. Importantly, CCR7 was found to exert its function by regulating mammary cancer stem-like cells in both murine and human tumors. In vivo experiments showed that loss of CCR7 activity either through deletion or pharmacological antagonism significantly decreased functional pools of stem-like cells in mouse primary mammary tumors, providing a mechanistic explanation for the tumor-promoting role of this chemokine receptor. These data characterize the oncogenic properties of CCR7 in mammary epithelial neoplasia and point to a new route for therapeutic intervention to target evasive cancer stem cells.

  6. HEK293T Cells Are Heterozygous for CCR5 Delta 32 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Chunxia; Jia, Xiaopeng; Lu, Lingling; Ma, Ping; Wei, Min

    2016-01-01

    C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a receptor for chemokines and a co-receptor for HIV-1 entry into the target CD4+ cells. CCR5 delta 32 deletion is a loss-of-function mutation, resistant to HIV-1 infection. We tried to induce the CCR5 delta 32 mutation harnessing the genome editing technique, CRISPR-Cas9 (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats, CRISPR and CRISPR associated protein 9, Cas9) in the commonly used cell line human embryonic kidney HEK 293T cells. Surprisingly, we found that HEK293T cells are heterozygous for CCR5 delta 32 mutation, in contrast to the wild type CCR5 cells, human acute T cell leukemia cell line Jurkat and human breast adenocarcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231 cells. This finding indicates that at least one human cell line is heterozygous for the CCR5 delta 32 mutation. We also found that in PCR amplification, wild type CCR5 DNA and mutant delta 32 DNA can form mismatched heteroduplex and move slowly in gel electrophoresis. PMID:27042825

  7. HEK293T Cells Are Heterozygous for CCR5 Delta 32 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Chunxia; Jia, Xiaopeng; Lu, Lingling; Ma, Ping; Wei, Min

    2016-01-01

    C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a receptor for chemokines and a co-receptor for HIV-1 entry into the target CD4+ cells. CCR5 delta 32 deletion is a loss-of-function mutation, resistant to HIV-1 infection. We tried to induce the CCR5 delta 32 mutation harnessing the genome editing technique, CRISPR-Cas9 (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats, CRISPR and CRISPR associated protein 9, Cas9) in the commonly used cell line human embryonic kidney HEK 293T cells. Surprisingly, we found that HEK293T cells are heterozygous for CCR5 delta 32 mutation, in contrast to the wild type CCR5 cells, human acute T cell leukemia cell line Jurkat and human breast adenocarcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231 cells. This finding indicates that at least one human cell line is heterozygous for the CCR5 delta 32 mutation. We also found that in PCR amplification, wild type CCR5 DNA and mutant delta 32 DNA can form mismatched heteroduplex and move slowly in gel electrophoresis.

  8. Critical roles of chemokine receptor CCR5 in regulating glioblastoma proliferation and invasion.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lanfu; Wang, Yuan; Xue, Yafei; Lv, Wenhai; Zhang, Yufu; He, Shiming

    2015-11-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most prevalent malignant primary brain tumor in adults and exhibits a spectrum of aberrantly aggressive phenotype. Tumor cell proliferation and invasion are critically regulated by chemokines and their receptors. Recent studies have shown that the chemokine CCL5 and its receptor CCR5 play important roles in tumor invasion and metastasis. Nonetheless, the roles of the CCR5 in GBM still remain unclear. The present study provides the evidence that the chemokine receptor CCR5 is highly expressed and associated with poor prognosis in human GBM. Mechanistically, CCL5-CCR5 mediates activation of Akt, and subsequently induces proliferation and invasive responses in U87 and U251 cells. Moreover, down-regulation of CCR5 significantly inhibited the growth of glioma in U87 tumor xenograft mouse model. Finally, high CCR5 expression in GBM is correlated with increased p-Akt expression in patient samples. Together, these findings suggest that the CCR5 is a critical molecular event associated with gliomagenesis.

  9. Control of Both Myeloid Cell Infiltration and Angiogenesis by CCR1 Promotes Liver Cancer Metastasis Development in Mice12

    PubMed Central

    Rodero, Mathieu Paul; Auvynet, Constance; Poupel, Lucie; Combadière, Behazine; Combadière, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Expression of the CC chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1) by tumor cells has been associated with protumoral activity; however, its role in nontumoral cells during tumor development remains elusive. Here, we investigated the role of CCR1 deletion on stromal and hematopoietic cells in a liver metastasis tumor model. Metastasis development was strongly impaired in CCR1-deficient mice compared to control mice and was associated with reduced liver monocyte infiltration. To decipher the role of myeloid cells, sublethally irradiated mice were reconstituted with CCR1-deficient bone marrow (BM) and showed better survival rates than the control reconstituted mice. These results point toward the involvement of CCR1 myeloid cell infiltration in the promotion of tumor burden. In addition, survival rates were extended in CCR1-deficient mice receiving either control or CCR1-deficient BM, indicating that host CCR1 expression on nonhematopoietic cells also supports tumor growth. Finally, we found defective tumor-induced neoangiogenesis (in vitro and in vivo) in CCR1-deficient mice. Overall, our results indicate that CCR1 expression by both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells favors tumor aggressiveness. We propose CCR1 as a potential therapeutical target for liver metastasis therapy. PMID:23730212

  10. An intracellular allosteric site for a specific class of antagonists of the CC chemokine G protein-coupled receptors CCR4 and CCR5.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Glen; Jones, Carolyn; Wreggett, Keith A

    2008-03-01

    A novel mechanism for antagonism of the human chemokine receptors CCR4 and CCR5 has been discovered with a series of small-molecule compounds that seems to interact with an allosteric, intracellular site on the receptor. The existence of this site is supported by a series of observations: 1) intracellular access of these antagonists is required for their activity; 2) specific, saturable binding of a radiolabeled antagonist requires the presence of CCR4; and 3) through engineering receptor chimeras by reciprocal transfer of C-terminal domains between CCR4 and CCR5, compound binding and the selective structure-activity relationships for antagonism of these receptors seem to be associated with the integrity of that intracellular region. Published antagonists from other chemical series do not seem to bind to the novel site, and their interaction with either CCR4 or CCR5 is not affected by alteration of the C-terminal domain. The precise location of the proposed binding site remains to be determined, but the known close association of the C-terminal domain, including helix 8, as a proposed intracellular region that interacts with transduction proteins (e.g., G proteins and beta-arrestin) suggests that this could be a generic allosteric site for chemokine receptors and perhaps more broadly for class A G protein-coupled receptors. The existence of such a site that can be targeted for drug discovery has implications for screening assays for receptor antagonists, which would need, therefore, to consider compound properties for access to this intracellular site.

  11. The enzyme activities of Caf1 and Ccr4 are both required for deadenylation by the human Ccr4–Not nuclease module

    PubMed Central

    Maryati, Maryati; Airhihen, Blessing; Winkler, G. Sebastiaan

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the shortening and removal of the poly(A) tail (deadenylation) of cytoplasmic mRNA is a key event in regulated mRNA degradation. A major enzyme involved in deadenylation is the Ccr4–Not deadenylase complex, which can be recruited to its target mRNA by RNA-binding proteins or the miRNA repression complex. In addition to six non-catalytic components, the complex contains two enzymatic subunits with ribonuclease activity: Ccr4 and Caf1 (Pop2). In vertebrates, each deadenylase subunit is encoded by two paralogues: Caf1, which can interact with the anti-proliferative protein BTG2, is encoded by CNOT7 and CNOT8, whereas Ccr4 is encoded by the highly similar genes CNOT6 and CNOT6L. Currently, it is unclear whether the catalytic subunits work co-operatively or whether the nuclease components have unique roles in deadenylation. We therefore developed a method to express and purify a minimal human BTG2–Caf1–Ccr4 nuclease sub-complex from bacterial cells. By using chemical inhibition and well-characterized inactivating amino acid substitutions, we demonstrate that the enzyme activities of Caf1 and Ccr4 are both required for deadenylation in vitro. These results indicate that Caf1 and Ccr4 cooperate in mRNA deadenylation and suggest that the enzyme activities of Caf1 and Ccr4 are regulated via allosteric interactions within the nuclease module. PMID:25944446

  12. YTHDF2 destabilizes m6A-containing RNA through direct recruitment of the CCR4–NOT deadenylase complex

    PubMed Central

    Du, Hao; Zhao, Ya; He, Jinqiu; Zhang, Yao; Xi, Hairui; Liu, Mofang; Ma, Jinbiao; Wu, Ligang

    2016-01-01

    Methylation at the N6 position of adenosine (m6A) is the most abundant RNA modification within protein-coding and long noncoding RNAs in eukaryotes and is a reversible process with important biological functions. YT521-B homology domain family (YTHDF) proteins are the readers of m6A, the binding of which results in the alteration of the translation efficiency and stability of m6A-containing RNAs. However, the mechanism by which YTHDF proteins cause the degradation of m6A-containing RNAs is poorly understood. Here we report that m6A-containing RNAs exhibit accelerated deadenylation that is mediated by the CCR4–NOT deadenylase complex. We further show that YTHDF2 recruits the CCR4–NOT complex through a direct interaction between the YTHDF2 N-terminal region and the SH domain of the CNOT1 subunit, and that this recruitment is essential for the deadenylation of m6A-containing RNAs by CAF1 and CCR4. Therefore, we have uncovered the mechanism of YTHDF2-mediated degradation of m6A-containing RNAs in mammalian cells. PMID:27558897

  13. ACCOUNTING FOR BIOLOGICAL AND ANTHROPOGENIC FACTORS IN NATIONAL LAND-BASED CARBON BUDGETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Efforts to quantify net greenhouse gas emissions at the national scale, as required by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, must include both industrial emissions and the net flux associated with the land base. In this study, data on current land use, rates ...

  14. CCR5 Deletion Protects Against Inflammation-Associated Mortality in Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Muntinghe, Friso L.H.; Verduijn, Marion; Zuurman, Mike W.; Grootendorst, Diana C.; Carrero, Juan Jesus; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Luttropp, Karin; Nordfors, Louise; Lindholm, Bengt; Brandenburg, Vincent; Schalling, Martin; Stenvinkel, Peter; Boeschoten, Elisabeth W.; Krediet, Raymond T.; Navis, Gerjan; Dekker, Friedo W.

    2009-01-01

    The CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a receptor for various proinflammatory chemokines, and a deletion variant of the CCR5 gene (CCR5Δ32) leads to deficiency of the receptor. We hypothesized that CCR5Δ32 modulates inflammation-driven mortality in patients with ESRD. We studied the interaction between CCR5 genotype and levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in 603 incident dialysis patients from the multicenter, prospective NEtherlands COoperative Study on the Adequacy of Dialysis (NECOSAD) cohort. CCR5 genotype and hsCRP levels were both available for 413 patients. During 5 yr of follow-up, 170 patients died; 87 from cardiovascular causes. Compared with the reference group of patients who had the wild-type CCR5 genotype and hsCRP ≤ 10 mg/L (n = 225), those carrying the deletion allele with hsCRP ≤ 10 mg/L (n = 55) had similar mortality, and those carrying the wild-type genotype with hsCRP > 10 mg/L (n = 108) had an increased risk for mortality (HR: 1.82; 95% CI: 1.29 to 2.58). However, those carrying the deletion allele with hsCRP > 10 mg/L (n = 25) had a mortality rate similar to the reference group; this seemingly protective effect of the CCR5 deletion was even more pronounced for cardiovascular mortality. We replicated these findings in an independent Swedish cohort of 302 ESRD patients. In conclusion, the CCR5Δ32 polymorphism attenuates the adverse effects of inflammation on overall and cardiovascular mortality in ESRD. PMID:19389855

  15. The CCR4-NOT complex mediates deadenylation and degradation of stem cell mRNAs and promotes planarian stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Solana, Jordi; Gamberi, Chiara; Mihaylova, Yuliana; Grosswendt, Stefanie; Chen, Chen; Lasko, Paul; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Aboobaker, A Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are of fundamental importance to form robust genetic networks, but their roles in stem cell pluripotency remain poorly understood. Here, we use freshwater planarians as a model system to investigate this and uncover a role for CCR4-NOT mediated deadenylation of mRNAs in stem cell differentiation. Planarian adult stem cells, the so-called neoblasts, drive the almost unlimited regenerative capabilities of planarians and allow their ongoing homeostatic tissue turnover. While many genes have been demonstrated to be required for these processes, currently almost no mechanistic insight is available into their regulation. We show that knockdown of planarian Not1, the CCR4-NOT deadenylating complex scaffolding subunit, abrogates regeneration and normal homeostasis. This abrogation is primarily due to severe impairment of their differentiation potential. We describe a stem cell specific increase in the mRNA levels of key neoblast genes after Smed-not1 knock down, consistent with a role of the CCR4-NOT complex in degradation of neoblast mRNAs upon the onset of differentiation. We also observe a stem cell specific increase in the frequency of longer poly(A) tails in these same mRNAs, showing that stem cells after Smed-not1 knock down fail to differentiate as they accumulate populations of transcripts with longer poly(A) tails. As other transcripts are unaffected our data hint at a targeted regulation of these key stem cell mRNAs by post-transcriptional regulators such as RNA-binding proteins or microRNAs. Together, our results show that the CCR4-NOT complex is crucial for stem cell differentiation and controls stem cell-specific degradation of mRNAs, thus providing clear mechanistic insight into this aspect of neoblast biology.

  16. The CCR4-NOT Complex Mediates Deadenylation and Degradation of Stem Cell mRNAs and Promotes Planarian Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Solana, Jordi; Gamberi, Chiara; Mihaylova, Yuliana; Grosswendt, Stefanie; Chen, Chen; Lasko, Paul; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Aboobaker, A. Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are of fundamental importance to form robust genetic networks, but their roles in stem cell pluripotency remain poorly understood. Here, we use freshwater planarians as a model system to investigate this and uncover a role for CCR4-NOT mediated deadenylation of mRNAs in stem cell differentiation. Planarian adult stem cells, the so-called neoblasts, drive the almost unlimited regenerative capabilities of planarians and allow their ongoing homeostatic tissue turnover. While many genes have been demonstrated to be required for these processes, currently almost no mechanistic insight is available into their regulation. We show that knockdown of planarian Not1, the CCR4-NOT deadenylating complex scaffolding subunit, abrogates regeneration and normal homeostasis. This abrogation is primarily due to severe impairment of their differentiation potential. We describe a stem cell specific increase in the mRNA levels of key neoblast genes after Smed-not1 knock down, consistent with a role of the CCR4-NOT complex in degradation of neoblast mRNAs upon the onset of differentiation. We also observe a stem cell specific increase in the frequency of longer poly(A) tails in these same mRNAs, showing that stem cells after Smed-not1 knock down fail to differentiate as they accumulate populations of transcripts with longer poly(A) tails. As other transcripts are unaffected our data hint at a targeted regulation of these key stem cell mRNAs by post-transcriptional regulators such as RNA-binding proteins or microRNAs. Together, our results show that the CCR4-NOT complex is crucial for stem cell differentiation and controls stem cell-specific degradation of mRNAs, thus providing clear mechanistic insight into this aspect of neoblast biology. PMID:24367277

  17. Discovery of potent, orally bioavailable small-molecule inhibitors of the human CCR2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Julien; Coesemans, Erwin; Boeckx, Staf; Buntinx, Mieke; Hermans, Bart; Van Wauwe, Jean P; Gilissen, Ron A H J; De Groot, Alex H J; Corens, David; Van Lommen, Guy

    2008-04-01

    We recently reported the discovery of a series of 2-thioimidazoles as CCR2 antagonists. The most potent molecules of this series, the 4,5-diesters, were rapidly hydrolyzed to the inactive acids and were found to be metabolically unstable. Herein we describe the synthesis of a number of analogues with heterocyclic bioisosteric replacements of the ester group(s). Small 5-membered heterocyclic substituents at the 4-position gave highly potent CCR2 antagonists. Hydrolysis of the 5-ester is diminished, thus imparting these compounds with sufficient stability and systemic exposure after oral administration to warrant further study of the in vivo pharmacology of these functional CCR2 inhibitors.

  18. Bipiperidinyl carboxylic acid amides as potent, selective, and functionally active CCR4 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Cyrille F; Bazin, Marc; Philippe, Laurence; Zhang, Jiansu; Tylaska, Laurie; Miret, Juan; Bauer, Paul H

    2007-09-01

    A cell-based assay for the chemokine G-protein-coupled receptor CCR4 was developed, and used to screen a small-molecule compound collection in a multiplex format. A series of bipiperidinyl carboxylic acid amides amenable to parallel chemistry were derived that were potent and selective antagonists of CCR4. One prototype compound was shown to be active in a functional model of chemotaxis, making it a useful chemical tool to explore the role of CCR4 in asthma, allergy, diabetes, and cancer.

  19. Biological monitoring and abatement program plan for Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kszos, L.A.; Anderson, G.E.; Gregory, S.M.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Schilling, E.M.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Phipps, T.L.

    1997-06-01

    The overall purpose of this plan is to evaluate the receiving streams` biological communities for the duration of the permit and meet the objectives for the ORNL BMAP as outlined in the NPDES permit (Appendix). The ORNL BMAP will focus on those streams in the WOC watershed that (1) receive NPDES discharges and (2) have been identified as ecologically impacted. In response to the newly issued NPDES permit, the tasks that are included in this BMAP plan include monitoring biological communities (fish and benthic invertebrates), monitoring mercury contamination in fish and water, monitoring polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contamination in fish, and evaluating temperature loading from ORNL outfalls. The ORNL BMAP will evaluate the effects of sediment and oil and grease, as well as the chlorine control strategy through the use of biological community data. Monitoring will be conducted at sites in WOC, First Creek, Fifth Creek, Melton Branch, and WOL.

  20. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Biological and Physical Research Enterprise Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    As the 21st century begins, NASA's new Vision and Mission focuses the Agency's Enterprises toward exploration and discovery.The Biological and Physical Research Enterprise has a unique and enabling role in support of the Agency's Vision and Mission. Our strategic research seeks innovations and solutions to enable the extension of life into deep space safely and productively. Our fundamental research, as well as our research partnerships with industry and other agencies, allow new knowledge and tech- nologies to bring improvements to life on Earth. Our interdisciplinary research in the unique laboratory of microgravity addresses opportunities and challenges on our home planet as well as in space environments. The Enterprise maintains a key role in encouraging and engaging the next generation of explorers from primary school through the grad- uate level via our direct student participation in space research.The Biological and Physical Research Enterprise encompasses three themes. The biological sciences research theme investigates ways to support a safe human presence in space. This theme addresses the definition and control of physiological and psychological risks from the space environment, including radiation,reduced gravity, and isolation. The biological sciences research theme is also responsible for the develop- ment of human support systems technology as well as fundamental biological research spanning topics from genomics to ecologies. The physical sciences research theme supports research that takes advantage of the space environment to expand our understanding of the fundamental laws of nature. This theme also supports applied physical sciences research to improve safety and performance of humans in space. The research partnerships and flight support theme establishes policies and allocates space resources to encourage and develop entrepreneurial partners access to space research.Working together across research disciplines, the Biological and Physical

  1. Gene Cloning and Characterization of the Geobacillus thermoleovorans CCR11 Carboxylesterase CaesCCR11, a New Member of Family XV.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Luna, Graciela; Sánchez-Otero, María Guadalupe; Quintana-Castro, Rodolfo; Matus-Toledo, Rodrigo Eloir; Oliart-Ros, Rosa María

    2016-01-01

    A gene encoding a carboxylesterase produced by Geobacillus thermoleovoras CCR11 was cloned in the pET-3b cloning vector, sequenced and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). Gene sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame of 750 bp that encodes a polypeptide of 250 amino acid residues (27.3 kDa) named CaesCCR11. The enzyme showed its maximum activity at 50 °C and pH 5-8, with preference for C4 substrates, confirming its esterase nature. It displayed good resistance to temperature, pH, and the presence of organic solvents and detergents, that makes this enzyme biotechnologically applicable in the industries such as fine and oleo-chemicals, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, organic synthesis, biodiesel production, detergents, and food industries. A 3D model of CaesCCR11 was predicted using the Bacillus sp. monoacyl glycerol lipase bMGL H-257 structure as template (PBD code 3RM3, 99 % residue identity with CaesCCR11). Based on its canonical α/β hydrolase fold composed of 7 β-strands and 6 α-helices, the α/β architecture of the cap domain, the GLSTG pentapeptide, and the formation of distinctive salt bridges, we are proposing CaesCCR11 as a new member of family XV of lipolytic enzymes.

  2. CCR5Δ32 Genotypes in a German HIV-1 Seroconverter Cohort and Report of HIV-1 Infection in a CCR5Δ32 Homozygous Individual

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Djin-Ye; Jessen, Heiko; Kücherer, Claudia; Neumann, Konrad; Oh, Nari; Poggensee, Gabriele; Bartmeyer, Barbara; Jessen, Arne; Pruss, Axel

    2008-01-01

    Background Homozygosity (Δ32/Δ32) for the 32 bp deletion in the chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) gene is associated with strong resistance against HIV infection. Heterozygosity is associated with protection of HIV-1 disease progression. Methodology/Principal Findings We genotyped a population of 737 HIV-positive adults and 463 healthy controls for the CCR5Δ32 deletion and found heterozygous frequencies of 16.2% (HIV-negative) and 17.5% (HIV-positive) among Caucasian individuals. Analysis of CCR5Δ32 influence on disease progression showed notably lower viral setpoints and a longer time to a CD4 count of <200 µl−1 in seroconverters heterozygous for the deletion. Furthermore, we identified one HIV-positive man homozygous for the Δ32 deletion. Conclusions/Significance The protective effect of CCR5 Δ32 heterozygosity is confimed in a large cohort of German seroconverters. The HIV-infected CCR5 Δ32 homozygous individual, however, displays extremely rapid disease progression. This is the 12th case of HIV-infection in this genotype described worldwide. PMID:18648518

  3. CORAL REEF BIOLOGICAL CRITERIA: USING THE CLEAN WATER ACT TO PROTECT A NATIONAL TREASURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coral reefs are declining at unprecedented rates worldwide due to multiple interactive stressors including climate change and land-based sources of pollution. The Clean Water Act (CWA) can be a powerful legal instrument for protecting water resources, including the biological inh...

  4. Cloning, Stem Cells, and the Current National Debate: Incorporating Ethics into a Large Introductory Biology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Rachel D.

    2002-01-01

    Discussing the ethical issues involved in topics such as cloning and stem cell research in a large introductory biology course is often difficult. Teachers may be wary of presenting material biased by personal beliefs, and students often feel inhibited speaking about moral issues in a large group. Yet, to ignore what is happening "out there"…

  5. Regional and national significance of biological nitrogen fixation by crops in the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Questions/Methods Biological nitrogen fixation by crops (C-BNF) represents one of the largest anthropogenic inputs of reactive nitrogen (N) to land surfaces around the world. In the United States (US), existing estimates of C-BNF are uncertain because of incomplete o...

  6. Establishment of a novel CCR5 and CXCR4 expressing CD4+ cell line which is highly sensitive to HIV and suitable for high-throughput evaluation of CCR5 and CXCR4 antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Princen, Katrien; Hatse, Sigrid; Vermeire, Kurt; De Clercq, Erik; Schols, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    Background CCR5 and CXCR4 are the two main coreceptors essential for HIV entry. Therefore, these chemokine receptors have become important targets in the search for anti-HIV agents. Here, we describe the establishment of a novel CD4+ cell line, U87.CD4.CCR5.CXCR4, stably expressing both CCR5 and CXCR4 at the cell surface. Results In these cells, intracellular calcium signalling through both receptors can be measured in a single experiment upon the sequential addition of CXCR4- and CCR5-directed chemokines. The U87.CD4.CCR5.CXCR4 cell line reliably supported HIV-1 infection of diverse laboratory-adapted strains and primary isolates with varying coreceptor usage (R5, X4 and R5/X4) and allows to investigate the antiviral efficacy of combined CCR5 and CXCR4 blockade. The antiviral effects recorded in these cells with the CCR5 antagonist SCH-C and the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 were similar to those noted in the single CCR5- or CXCR4-transfected U87.CD4 cells. Furthermore, the combination of both inhibitors blocked the infection of all evaluated HIV-1 strains and isolates. Conclusions Thus, the U87.CD4.CCR5.CXCR4 cell line should be useful in the evaluation of CCR5 and CXCR4 antagonists with therapeutic potential and combinations thereof. PMID:15169555

  7. Structure of the CCR5 Chemokine Receptor-HIV Entry Inhibitor Maraviroc Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Qiuxiang; Zhu, Ya; Li, Jian; Chen, Zhuxi; Han, Gye Won; Kufareva, Irina; Li, Tingting; Ma, Limin; Fenalti, Gustavo; Li, Jing; Zhang, Wenru; Xie, Xin; Yang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Hualiang; Cherezov, Vadim; Liu, Hong; Stevens, Raymond C.; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Beili

    2013-10-21

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor acts as a co-receptor for HIV-1 viral entry. Here we report the 2.7 angstrom–resolution crystal structure of human CCR5 bound to the marketed HIV drug maraviroc. The structure reveals a ligand-binding site that is distinct from the proposed major recognition sites for chemokines and the viral glycoprotein gp120, providing insights into the mechanism of allosteric inhibition of chemokine signaling and viral entry. A comparison between CCR5 and CXCR4 crystal structures, along with models of co-receptor–gp120-V3 complexes, suggests that different charge distributions and steric hindrances caused by residue substitutions may be major determinants of HIV-1 co-receptor selectivity. These high-resolution insights into CCR5 can enable structure-based drug discovery for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  8. Development of maraviroc, a CCR5 antagonist for treatment of HIV, using a novel tropism assay.

    PubMed

    van der Ryst, Elna; Heera, Jayvant; Demarest, James; Knirsch, Charles

    2015-06-01

    Assays to identify infectious organisms are critical for diagnosis and enabling the development of therapeutic agents. The demonstration that individuals with a 32-bp deletion within the CCR5 locus were resistant to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, while those heterozygous for the mutation progressed more slowly, led to the discovery of maraviroc (MVC), a CCR5 antagonist. As MVC is only active against CCR5-tropic strains of HIV, it was critical to develop a diagnostic assay to identify appropriate patients. Trofile™, a novel phenotypic tropism assay, was used to identify patients with CCR5-tropic virus for the MVC development program. Results of these clinical studies demonstrated that the assay correctly identified patients likely to respond to MVC. Over time, the performance characteristics of the phenotypic assay were enhanced, necessitating retesting of study samples. Genotypic tropism tests that have the potential to allow for local use and more rapid turnaround times are also being developed.

  9. CCR5 Expression Levels in HIV-Uninfected Women Receiving Hormonal Contraception.

    PubMed

    Sciaranghella, Gaia; Wang, Cuiwei; Hu, Haihong; Anastos, Kathryn; Merhi, Zaher; Nowicki, Marek; Stanczyk, Frank Z; Greenblatt, Ruth M; Cohen, Mardge; Golub, Elizabeth T; Watts, D Heather; Alter, Galit; Young, Mary A; Tsibris, Athe M N

    2015-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infectivity increases as receptor/coreceptor expression levels increase. We determined peripheral CD4, CCR5, and CXCR4 expression levels in HIV-uninfected women who used depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA; n = 32), the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device (LNG-IUD; n = 27), oral contraceptive pills (n = 32), or no hormonal contraception (n = 33). The use of LNG-IUD increased the proportion of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells that expressed CCR5; increases in the magnitude of T-cell subset CCR5 expression were observed with DMPA and LNG-IUD use (P < .01 for all comparisons). LNG-IUD and, to a lesser extent, DMPA use were associated with increased peripheral T-cell CCR5 expression.

  10. CCR5 blockade for neuroinflammatory diseases--beyond control of HIV.

    PubMed

    Martin-Blondel, Guillaume; Brassat, David; Bauer, Jan; Lassmann, Hans; Liblau, Roland S

    2016-02-01

    Chemokine receptors have been implicated in a wide range of CNS inflammatory diseases and have important roles in the recruitment and positioning of immune cells within tissues. Among them, the chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 5 (CCR5) can be targeted by maraviroc, a readily available and well-tolerated drug that was developed for the treatment of HIV. Correlative evidence implicates the CCR5-chemokine axis in multiple sclerosis, Rasmussen encephalitis, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, and infectious diseases, such as cerebral malaria and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. On the basis of this evidence, we postulate in this Review that CCR5 antagonists, such as maraviroc, offer neuroprotective benefits in settings in which CCR5 promotes deleterious neuroinflammation, particularly in diseases in which CD8(+) T cells seem to play a pivotal role.

  11. Quantifying CD4/CCR5 Usage Efficiency of HIV-1 Env Using the Affinofile System.

    PubMed

    Webb, Nicholas E; Lee, Benhur

    2016-01-01

    Entry of HIV-1 into target cells involves the interaction of the HIV envelope (Env) with both a primary receptor (CD4) and a coreceptor (CXCR4 or CCR5). The relative efficiency with which a particular Env uses these receptors is a major component of cellular tropism in the context of entry and is related to a variety of pathological Env phenotypes (Chikere et al. Virology 435:81-91, 2013). The protocols outlined in this chapter describe the use of the Affinofile system, a 293-based dual-inducible cell line that expresses up to 25 distinct combinations of CD4 and CCR5, as well as the associated Viral Entry Receptor Sensitivity Assay (VERSA) metrics used to summarize the CD4/CCR5-dependent infectivity results. This system allows for high-resolution profiling of CD4 and CCR5 usage efficiency in the context of unique viral phenotypes.

  12. Biological Assessment of the Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory on Federally Listed Threatened and Endangered Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Leslie A.

    2006-09-19

    This biological assessment considers the effects of continuing to operate Los Alamos National Laboratory on Federally listed threatened or endangered species, based on current and future operations identified in the 2006 Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory (SWEIS; DOE In Prep.). We reviewed 40 projects analyzed in the SWEIS as well as two aspects on ongoing operations to determine if these actions had the potential to affect Federally listed species. Eighteen projects that had not already received U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) consultation and concurrence, as well as the two aspects of ongoing operations, ecological risk from legacy contaminants and the Outfall Reduction Project, were determined to have the potential to affect threatened or endangered species. Cumulative impacts were also analyzed.

  13. Novel Type XII Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec Harboring a New Cassette Chromosome Recombinase, CcrC2

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhaowei; Li, Fan; Liu, Dongliang

    2015-01-01

    Excision and integration of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) are mediated by cassette chromosome recombinases (Ccr), which play a crucial role in the worldwide spread of methicillin resistance in staphylococci. We report a novel ccr gene, ccrC2, in the SCCmec of a Staphylococcus aureus isolate, BA01611, which showed 62.6% to 69.4% sequence identities to all published ccrC1 sequences. A further survey found that the ccrC2 gene was mainly located among coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) and could be found in staphylococcal isolates from China, the United States, France, and Germany. The ccr gene complex harboring the ccrC2 gene was designated a type 9 complex, and the SCCmec of BA01611 was considered a novel type and was designated type XII (9C2). This novel SCCmec element in BA01611 was flanked by a pseudo-SCC element (ΨSCCBA01611) carrying a truncated ccrA1 gene. Both individual SCC elements and a composite SCC were excised from the chromosome based on detection of extrachromosomal circular intermediates. We advocate inclusion of the ccrC2 gene and type 9 ccr gene complex during revision of the SCCmec typing method. PMID:26416872

  14. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Replication by a Dual CCR5/CXCR4 Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Princen, Katrien; Hatse, Sigrid; Vermeire, Kurt; Aquaro, Stefano; De Clercq, Erik; Gerlach, Lars-Ole; Rosenkilde, Mette; Schwartz, Thue W.; Skerlj, Renato; Bridger, Gary; Schols, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    Here we report that the N-pyridinylmethyl cyclam analog AMD3451 has antiviral activity against a wide variety of R5, R5/X4, and X4 strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] ranging from 1.2 to 26.5 μM) in various T-cell lines, CCR5- or CXCR4-transfected cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and monocytes/macrophages. AMD3451 also inhibited R5, R5/X4, and X4 HIV-1 primary clinical isolates in PBMCs (IC50, 1.8 to 7.3 μM). A PCR-based viral entry assay revealed that AMD3451 blocks R5 and X4 HIV-1 infection at the virus entry stage. AMD3451 dose-dependently inhibited the intracellular Ca2+ signaling induced by the CXCR4 ligand CXCL12 in T-lymphocytic cells and in CXCR4-transfected cells, as well as the Ca2+ flux induced by the CCR5 ligands CCL5, CCL3, and CCL4 in CCR5-transfected cells. The compound did not interfere with chemokine-induced Ca2+ signaling through CCR1, CCR2, CCR3, CCR4, CCR6, CCR9, or CXCR3 and did not induce intracellular Ca2+ signaling by itself at concentrations up to 400 μM. In freshly isolated monocytes, AMD3451 inhibited the Ca2+ flux induced by CXCL12 and CCL4 but not that induced by CCL2, CCL3, CCL5, and CCL7. The CXCL12- and CCL3-induced chemotaxis was also dose-dependently inhibited by AMD3451. Furthermore, AMD3451 inhibited CXCL12- and CCL3L1-induced endocytosis in CXCR4- and CCR5-transfected cells. AMD3451, in contrast to the specific CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100, did not inhibit but enhanced the binding of several anti-CXCR4 monoclonal antibodies (such as clone 12G5) at the cell surface, pointing to a different interaction with CXCR4. AMD3451 is the first low-molecular-weight anti-HIV agent with selective HIV coreceptor, CCR5 and CXCR4, interaction. PMID:15542651

  15. Critical roles of chemokine receptor CCR10 in regulating memory IgA responses in intestines.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shaomin; Yang, KangKang; Yang, Jie; Li, Ming; Xiong, Na

    2011-11-01

    Chemokine receptor CCR10 is expressed by all intestinal IgA-producing plasma cells and is suggested to play an important role in positioning these cells in the lamina propria for proper IgA production to maintain intestinal homeostasis and protect against infection. However, interfering with CCR10 or its ligand did not impair intestinal IgA production under homeostatic conditions or during infection, and the in vivo function of CCR10 in the intestinal IgA response remains unknown. We found that an enhanced generation of IgA(+) cells in isolated lymphoid follicles of intestines offset defective intestinal migration of IgA(+) cells in CCR10-KO mice, resulting in the apparently normal IgA production under homeostatic conditions and in primary response to pathogen infection. However, the compensatorily generated IgA(+) cells in CCR10-KO mice carried fewer hypermutations in their Ig heavy chain alleles than those of WT mice, indicating that their IgA repertoires are qualitatively different, which might impact the intestinal homeostasis of microflora. In addition, CCR10-deficient long-lived IgA-producing plasma cells and IgA(+) memory B cells generated against the pathogen infection could not be maintained properly in intestines. Consequently, IgA memory responses to the pathogen reinfection were severely impaired in CCR10-KO mice. These findings elucidate critical roles of CCR10 in regulating the intestinal IgA response and memory maintenance and could help in design of vaccines against intestinal and possibly other mucosal pathogens.

  16. VEGF-Production by CCR2-Dependent Macrophages Contributes to Laser-Induced Choroidal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Torsten A.; Alex, Anne F.; Engel, Daniel R.; Kurts, Christian; Eter, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most prevalent cause of blindness in the elderly, and its exsudative subtype critically depends on local production of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF). Mononuclear phagocytes, such as macrophages and microglia cells, can produce VEGF. Their precursors, for example monocytes, can be recruited to sites of inflammation by the chemokine receptor CCR2, and this has been proposed to be important in AMD. To investigate the role of macrophages and CCR2 in AMD, we studied intracellular VEGF content in a laser-induced murine model of choroidal neovascularisation. To this end, we established a technique to quantify the VEGF content in cell subsets from the laser-treated retina and choroid separately. 3 days after laser, macrophage numbers and their VEGF content were substantially elevated in the choroid. Macrophage accumulation was CCR2-dependent, indicating recruitment from the circulation. In the retina, microglia cells were the main VEGF+ phagocyte type. A greater proportion of microglia cells contained VEGF after laser, and this was CCR2-independent. On day 6, VEGF-expressing macrophage numbers had already declined, whereas numbers of VEGF+ microglia cells remained increased. Other sources of VEGF detectable by flow cytometry included in dendritic cells and endothelial cells in both retina and choroid, and Müller cells/astrocytes in the retina. However, their VEGF content was not increased after laser. When we analyzed flatmounts of laser-treated eyes, CCR2-deficient mice showed reduced neovascular areas after 2 weeks, but this difference was not evident 3 weeks after laser. In summary, CCR2-dependent influx of macrophages causes a transient VEGF increase in the choroid. However, macrophages augmented choroidal neovascularization only initially, presumably because VEGF production by CCR2-independent eye cells prevailed at later time points. These findings identify macrophages as a relevant source of VEGF in laser

  17. Frequency of CCR5Δ32 allele in healthy Bosniak population.

    PubMed

    Adler, Grażyna; Valjevac, Amina; Skonieczna-Żydecka, Karolina; Mackic-Djurovic, Mirela; Parczewski, Miłosz; Urbańska, Anna; Salkic, Nermin Nusret

    2014-08-28

    Recent evidence has demonstrated the role of CCR5Δ32 in a variety of human diseases: from infectious and inflammatory diseases to cancer. Several studies have confirmed that genetic variants in chemokine receptor CCR5 gene are correlated with susceptibility and resistance to HIV infection. A 32-nucleotide deletion within the CCR5 reading frame is associated with decreased susceptibility to HIV acquisition and a slower progression to AIDS. Mean frequency of CCR5Δ32 allele in Europe is approximately 10%. The highest allele frequency is observed among Nordic populations (about 12%) and lower in the regions of Southeast Mediterranean (about 5%). Although the frequency of CCR5Δ32 was determined in numerous European populations, there is a lack of studies on this variant in the Bosnia and Hercegovina population. Therefore, the aim of our study was to assess the frequency of CCR5Δ32 allele in the cohort of Bosniaks and compare the results with European reports. CCR5Δ32 was detected by sequence-specific PCR in a sample of 100 healthy subjects from Bosnia and Herzegovina (DNA collected 2011-2013). Mean age of the cohort being 58.8 (± 10.7) years, with 82% of women. We identified 17 heterozygotes and one mutant homozygote in study group, with mean ∆32 allele frequency of 9.5%. CCR5∆32 allele frequency among Bosniaks is comparable to that found in Caucasian populations and follows the pattern of the north-southern gradient observed for Europe. Further studies on larger cohorts with adequate female-to-male ratio are necessary.

  18. Frequency of CCR5Δ32 allele in healthy Bosniak population

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Grażyna; Valjevac, Amina; Skonieczna-Żydecka, Karolina; Mackic-Djurovic, Mirela; Parczewski, Miłosz; Urbańska, Anna; Salkic, Nermin N

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence has demonstrated the role of CCR5Δ32 in a variety of human diseases: from infectious and inflammatory diseases to cancer. Several studies have confirmed that genetic variants in chemokine receptor CCR5 gene are correlated with susceptibility and resistance to HIV infection. A 32-nucleotide deletion within the CCR5 reading frame is associated with decreased susceptibility to HIV acquisition and a slower progression to AIDS. Mean frequency of CCR5Δ32 allele in Europe is approximately 10%. The highest allele frequency is observed among Nordic populations (about 12%) and the lowest in the regions of Southeast Mediterranean (about 5%). Although the frequency of CCR5Δ32 was determined in numerous European populations, there is a lack of studies on this variant in the Bosnia and Herzegovina population. Therefore, the aim of our study was to assess the frequency of CCR5Δ32 allele in the cohort of Bosniaks and compare the results with European reports. CCR5Δ32 was detected by sequence-specific PCR in a sample of 100 healthy Bosniaks (DNA collected 2011-2013). Mean age of the cohort being 58.8 (±10.7) years, with 82% of women. We identified 17 heterozygotes and one mutant homozygote in study group, with mean ∆32 allele frequency of 9.5%. CCR5∆32 allele frequency among Bosniaks is comparable to that found in Caucasian populations and follows the pattern of the north-southern gradient observed for Europe. Further studies on larger cohorts with adequate female-to-male ratio are necessary. PMID:25172974

  19. CCR1-mediated accumulation of myeloid cells in the liver microenvironment promoting mouse colon cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Hideyo; Fujishita, Teruaki; Kurimoto, Kazuki; Miyachi, Hitoshi; Kitano, Satsuki; Inamoto, Susumu; Itatani, Yoshiro; Saitou, Mitinori; Maekawa, Taira; Taketo, M Mark

    2014-12-01

    To understand colon cancer metastasis, we earlier analyzed a mouse model that developed liver metastasis of cancer cells disseminated from the spleen. We suggested that CCR1(+) bone marrow (BM)-derived cells are recruited to the microenvironment of disseminated colon cancer cells, and produce metalloproteinases MMP9 and MMP2, helping metastatic colonization. In the present study, we have examined these myeloid cells expressing CCR1 and/or MMPs in detail. To this end, we have established bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based transgenic mouse lines in which membrane-targeted Venus fluorescent protein (mVenus) was expressed under the control of Ccr1 gene promoter. Then, myeloid cells obtained from the BM and liver metastatic foci were analyzed by the combination of flow cytometry and cytology/immunohistochemistry, in situ RNA hybridization, or quantitative RT-PCR. We have found four distinct types of myeloid cells recruited to the metastatic foci; neutrophils, eosinophils, monocytes and fibrocytes. These cell types exhibited distinct expression patterns for CCR1, MMP2 and MMP9. Namely, neutrophils found in the early phase of cancer cell dissemination expressed CCR1 exclusively and MMP9 preferentially, whereas fibrocytes accumulated in later phase expressed MMP2 exclusively. Either genetic inactivation of Ccr1 or antibody-mediated neutrophil depletion reduced subsequent recruitment of fibrocytes. The recruitment of CCR1(+) neutrophils in early phase of colon cancer dissemination appears to cause that of fibrocytes in late phase. These results implicate the key role of CCR1 in colon cancer metastasis in this mouse model, and explain why both MMP9 and MMP2 are essential as genetically demonstrated previously. The results also suggest relevant mechanisms in humans.

  20. CCR5 Antagonism by Maraviroc Reduces the Potential for Gastric Cancer Cell Dissemination.

    PubMed

    Mencarelli, Andrea; Graziosi, Luigina; Renga, Barbara; Cipriani, Sabrina; D'Amore, Claudio; Francisci, Daniela; Bruno, Angela; Baldelli, Franco; Donini, Annibale; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2013-12-01

    The chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 5 (CCR5) that belongs to the family of G protein-coupled receptors is exploited by macrophage tropic (R5) human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to enter cells. Maraviroc, a small molecule CCR antagonist, is used as a part of combination antiretroviral therapy to treat persons infected by R5 HIV-1. CCR5 is expressed in various cancers, and its level of expression is a negative predictor of patients' survival in gastric cancers. Here, we report MKN45, MKN74, and KATOIII cells, three human gastric cancer cell lines with different stages of differentiation, which express CCR5 as detected by flow cytometry and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and its ligand RANTES. In vitro experiments demonstrate that CCR5 antagonism reduces gastric cancer cell migration induced by macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α), MIP-1β, and RANTES and adhesion to the ex-planted murine peritoneum. Administration of maraviroc from days 3 to 10 after MKN45 cell inoculation to severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice effectively reduced the extent of peritoneal disease and increased survival. Maraviroc treatment also reduced the tumor burden in a xenograft model. Gene expression and RT-PCR analyses revealed that CCR5 antagonism in vivo modulates the expression of genes known for their role in cancer growth including interleukin-10 receptor B; hepatocyte growth factor receptor (MET); the homolog of the atypical cadherin gene, FAT1; Nm23-H1; and lymphotoxin β receptor. In summary, we have shown that CCR5 is mechanistically involved in dissemination of gastric cancer cells, suggesting that small molecule inhibitors of CCR5 might be exploited for their anticancer potential. PMID:24466382

  1. CCR5 Antagonism by Maraviroc Reduces the Potential for Gastric Cancer Cell Dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Mencarelli, Andrea; Graziosi, Luigina; Renga, Barbara; Cipriani, Sabrina; D'Amore, Claudio; Francisci, Daniela; Bruno, Angela; Baldelli, Franco; Donini, Annibale; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    The chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 5 (CCR5) that belongs to the family of G protein-coupled receptors is exploited by macrophage tropic (R5) human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to enter cells. Maraviroc, a small molecule CCR antagonist, is used as a part of combination antiretroviral therapy to treat persons infected by R5 HIV-1. CCR5 is expressed in various cancers, and its level of expression is a negative predictor of patients' survival in gastric cancers. Here, we report MKN45, MKN74, and KATOIII cells, three human gastric cancer cell lines with different stages of differentiation, which express CCR5 as detected by flow cytometry and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and its ligand RANTES. In vitro experiments demonstrate that CCR5 antagonism reduces gastric cancer cell migration induced by macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α), MIP-1β, and RANTES and adhesion to the ex-planted murine peritoneum. Administration of maraviroc from days 3 to 10 after MKN45 cell inoculation to severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice effectively reduced the extent of peritoneal disease and increased survival. Maraviroc treatment also reduced the tumor burden in a xenograft model. Gene expression and RT-PCR analyses revealed that CCR5 antagonism in vivo modulates the expression of genes known for their role in cancer growth including interleukin-10 receptor B; hepatocyte growth factor receptor (MET); the homolog of the atypical cadherin gene, FAT1; Nm23-H1; and lymphotoxin β receptor. In summary, we have shown that CCR5 is mechanistically involved in dissemination of gastric cancer cells, suggesting that small molecule inhibitors of CCR5 might be exploited for their anticancer potential. PMID:24466382

  2. Genetic evidence supports a role for the yeast CCR4-NOT complex in transcriptional elongation.

    PubMed Central

    Denis, C L; Chiang, Y C; Cui, Y; Chen, J

    2001-01-01

    The CCR4-NOT complex is involved in the regulation of gene expression both positively and negatively. The repressive effects of the complex appear to result in part from restricting TBP access to noncanonical TATAA binding sites presumably through interaction with multiple TAF proteins. We provide here genetic evidence that the CCR4-NOT complex also plays a role in transcriptional elongation. First, defects in CCR4-NOT components as well as overexpression of the NOT4 gene elicited 6-azauracil (6AU) and mycophenolic acid sensitivities, hallmarks of transcriptional elongation defects. A number of other transcription initiation factors known to interact with the CCR4-NOT complex did not elicit these phenotypes nor did defects in factors that reduced mRNA degradation and hence the recycling of NTPs. Second, deletion of ccr4 resulted in severe synthetic effects with mutations or deletions in the known elongation factors RPB2, TFIIS, and SPT16. Third, the ccr4 deletion displayed allele-specific interactions with rpb1 alleles that are thought to be important in the control of elongation. Finally, we found that a ccr4 deletion as well as overexpression of the NOT1 gene specifically suppressed the cold-sensitive phenotype associated with the spt5-242 allele. The only other known suppressors of this spt5-242 allele are factors involved in slowing transcriptional elongation. These genetic results are consistent with the model that the CCR4-NOT complex, in addition to its known effects on initiation, plays a role in aiding the elongation process. PMID:11404327

  3. 2012 National Survey of Science and Mathematics Education: Status of High School Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Kiira M.

    2013-01-01

    The 2012 National Survey of Science and Mathematics Education was designed to provide up-to-date information and to identify trends in the areas of teacher background and experience, curriculum and instruction, and the availability and use of instructional resources. A total of 7,752 science and mathematics teachers in schools across the United…

  4. 2012 National Survey of Science and Mathematics Education: Compendium of Tables for High School Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horizon Research, Inc., 2013

    2013-01-01

    The 2012 National Survey of Science and Mathematics Education was designed to provide up-to-date information and to identify trends in the areas of teacher background and experience, curriculum and instruction, and the availability and use of instructional resources. This compendium, one of a series, details the results of a survey of high school…

  5. German National Proficiency Scales in Biology: Internal Structure, Relations to General Cognitive Abilities and Verbal Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kampa, Nele; Köller, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    National and international large-scale assessments (LSA) have a major impact on educational systems, which raises fundamental questions about the validity of the measures regarding their internal structure and their relations to relevant covariates. Given its importance, research on the validity of instruments specifically developed for LSA is…

  6. Upregulation of expression of the chemokine receptor CCR5 by hydrogen peroxide in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Lehoux, Geneviève; Le Gouill, Christian; Stankova, Jana; Rola-Pleszczynski, Marek

    2003-02-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that an oxidative stress can serve as a signal to regulate the expression of CCR5. When human monocytes were exposed to graded concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), CCR5 mRNA levels increased maximally at 4 h of exposure to 200 microM of H(2)O(2) and decreased by 24 h of treatment. Pretreatment of monocytes with the NF-kappaB inhibitor BAY 11-8072 blocked the H(2)O(2)-induced augmentation of CCR5 mRNA expression, suggesting a role for this transcription factor in the regulation of CCR5 expression. CCR5 protein expression on the plasma membrane was also increased by treatment with H(2)O(2,) as assessed by flow cytometry. This was accompanied by enhanced responsiveness of H(2)O(2)-pretreated monocytes to the CCR5 ligand MIP-1beta in terms of chemotaxis and c-fos gene activation. Our results suggest that oxidative stress may indeed modulate the expression of chemokine receptors and thus contribute to regulation of the inflammatory process.

  7. Upregulation of expression of the chemokine receptor CCR5 by hydrogen peroxide in human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Lehoux, Geneviève; Le Gouill, Christian; Stankova, Jana; Rola-Pleszczynski, Marek

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that an oxidative stress can serve as a signal to regulate the expression of CCR5. When human monocytes were exposed to graded concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), CCR5 mRNA levels increased maximally at 4 h of exposure to 200 microM of H(2)O(2) and decreased by 24 h of treatment. Pretreatment of monocytes with the NF-kappaB inhibitor BAY 11-8072 blocked the H(2)O(2)-induced augmentation of CCR5 mRNA expression, suggesting a role for this transcription factor in the regulation of CCR5 expression. CCR5 protein expression on the plasma membrane was also increased by treatment with H(2)O(2,) as assessed by flow cytometry. This was accompanied by enhanced responsiveness of H(2)O(2)-pretreated monocytes to the CCR5 ligand MIP-1beta in terms of chemotaxis and c-fos gene activation. Our results suggest that oxidative stress may indeed modulate the expression of chemokine receptors and thus contribute to regulation of the inflammatory process. PMID:12745546

  8. The chemokine (CCL2-CCR2) signaling axis mediates perineural invasion

    PubMed Central

    He, Shizhi; He, Shuangba; Chen, Chun-Hao; Deborde, Sylvie; Bakst, Richard L.; Chernichenko, Natalya; McNamara, William F.; Lee, Sei Young; Barajas, Fernando; Yu, Zhenkun; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat A.; Wong, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Perineural invasion (PNI) is a form of cancer progression where cancer cells invade along nerves. This behavior is associated with poor clinical outcomes; therefore, it is critical to identify novel ligand-receptor interactions between nerves and cancer cells that support the process of PNI. A proteomic profiler chemokine array was used to screen for nerve-derived factors secreted from tissue explants of dorsal root ganglion (DRG), and CCL2 was identified as a lead candidate. Prostate cancer cell line expression of CCR2, the receptor to CCL2, correlated closely with MAPK and Akt pathway activity and cell migration towards CCL2 and DRG. In vitro nerve and cancer co-culture invasion assays of PNI demonstrated that cancer cell CCR2 expression facilitates PNI. PNI is significantly diminished in co-culture assays when using DRG harvested from CCL2−/− knockout mice as compared with control CCL2+/+ mice, indicating that CCR2 is required for PNI in this murine model of PNI. Furthermore, 20/21 (95%) of patient specimens of prostate adenocarcinoma with PNI exhibited CCR2 expression by immunohistochemistry, while just 3/13 (23%) lacking PNI expressed CCR2. In summary, nerve-released CCL2 supports prostate cancer migration and PNI though CCR2-mediated signaling. PMID:25312961

  9. CCR5 Targeted Cell Therapy for HIV and Prevention of Viral Escape.

    PubMed

    Hütter, Gero; Bodor, Josef; Ledger, Scott; Boyd, Maureen; Millington, Michelle; Tsie, Marlene; Symonds, Geoff

    2015-07-27

    Allogeneic transplantation with CCR5-delta 32 (CCR5-d32) homozygous stem cells in an HIV infected individual in 2008, led to a sustained virus control and probably eradication of HIV. Since then there has been a high degree of interest to translate this approach to a wider population. There are two cellular ways to do this. The first one is to use a CCR5 negative cell source e.g., hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) to copy the initial finding. However, a recent case of a second allogeneic transplantation with CCR5-d32 homozygous stem cells suffered from viral escape of CXCR4 quasi-species. The second way is to knock down CCR5 expression by gene therapy. Currently, there are five promising techniques, three of which are presently being tested clinically. These techniques include zinc finger nucleases (ZFN), clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 nuclease (CRISPR/Cas9), transcription activator-like effectors nuclease (TALEN), short hairpin RNA (shRNA), and a ribozyme. While there are multiple gene therapy strategies being tested, in this review we reflect on our current knowledge of inhibition of CCR5 specifically and whether this approach allows for consequent viral escape.

  10. Targeting the CCL2-CCR2 signaling axis in cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Su Yin; Yuzhalin, Arseniy E.; Gordon-Weeks, Alex N.; Muschel, Ruth J.

    2016-01-01

    The CCL2-CCR2 signaling axis has generated increasing interest in recent years due to its association with the progression of cancer. Although first described as a chemotactic molecule with physiological roles in regulating inflammation, recent studies have revealed a pro-tumorigenic function for CCL2 in favoring cancer development and subsequent metastasis. CCL2 binds the cognate receptor CCR2, and together this signaling pair has been shown to have multiple pro-tumorigenic roles, from mediating tumor growth and angiogenesis to recruiting and usurping host stromal cells to support tumor progression. The importance of CCL2-CCR2 signaling has been further championed by the establishment of clinical trials targeting this signaling pair in solid and metastatic cancers. Here we review the roles of CCL2-CCR2 signaling in the development and progression of cancer metastasis. We further evaluate the outcome of several clinical trials targeting either CCL2 or CCR2, and discuss the prospects and challenges of manipulating CCL2-CCR2 interaction as a potential approach for combating metastatic disease. PMID:26885690

  11. CCR5 Targeted Cell Therapy for HIV and Prevention of Viral Escape

    PubMed Central

    Hütter, Gero; Bodor, Josef; Ledger, Scott; Boyd, Maureen; Millington, Michelle; Tsie, Marlene; Symonds, Geoff

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic transplantation with CCR5-delta 32 (CCR5-d32) homozygous stem cells in an HIV infected individual in 2008, led to a sustained virus control and probably eradication of HIV. Since then there has been a high degree of interest to translate this approach to a wider population. There are two cellular ways to do this. The first one is to use a CCR5 negative cell source e.g., hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) to copy the initial finding. However, a recent case of a second allogeneic transplantation with CCR5-d32 homozygous stem cells suffered from viral escape of CXCR4 quasi-species. The second way is to knock down CCR5 expression by gene therapy. Currently, there are five promising techniques, three of which are presently being tested clinically. These techniques include zinc finger nucleases (ZFN), clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 nuclease (CRISPR/Cas9), transcription activator-like effectors nuclease (TALEN), short hairpin RNA (shRNA), and a ribozyme. While there are multiple gene therapy strategies being tested, in this review we reflect on our current knowledge of inhibition of CCR5 specifically and whether this approach allows for consequent viral escape. PMID:26225991

  12. Roles of RUNX1 and PU.1 in CCR3 Transcription.

    PubMed

    Kong, Su-Kang; Kim, Byung Soo; Hwang, Sae Mi; Lee, Hyune Hwan; Chung, Il Yup

    2016-06-01

    CCR3 is a chemokine receptor that mediates the accumulation of allergic inflammatory cells, including eosinophils and Th2 cells, at inflamed sites. The regulatory sequence of the CCR3 gene, contains two Runt-related transcription factor (RUNX) 1 sites and two PU.1 sites, in addition to a functional GATA site for transactivation of the CCR3 gene. In the present study, we examined the effects of the cis-acting elements of RUNX1 and PU.1 on transcription of the gene in EoL-1 eosinophilic cells and Jurkat T cells, both of which expressed functional surface CCR3 and these two transcription factors. Introduction of RUNX1 siRNA or PU.1 siRNA resulted in a modest decrease in CCR3 reporter activity in both cell types, compared with transfection of GATA-1 siRNA. Cotransfection of the two siRNAs led to inhibition in an additive manner. EMSA analysis showed that RUNX1, in particular, bound to its binding motifs. Mutagenesis analysis revealed that all point mutants lacking RUNX1- and PU.1-binding sites exhibited reduced reporter activities. These results suggest that RUNX1 and PU.1 participate in transcriptional regulation of the CCR3 gene.

  13. AtCCR4a and AtCCR4b are Involved in Determining the Poly(A) Length of Granule-bound starch synthase 1 Transcript and Modulating Sucrose and Starch Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuya; Arae, Toshihiro; Green, Pamela J; Yamaguchi, Junji; Chiba, Yukako

    2015-05-01

    Removing the poly(A) tail is the first and rate-limiting step of mRNA degradation and apparently an effective step not only for modulating mRNA stability but also for translation of many eukaryotic transcripts. Carbon catabolite repressor 4 (CCR4) has been identified as a major cytoplasmic deadenylase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Arabidopsis thaliana homologs of the yeast CCR4, AtCCR4a and AtCCR4b, were identified by sequence-based analysis; however, their role and physiological significance in plants remain to be elucidated. In this study, we revealed that AtCCR4a and AtCCR4b are localized to cytoplasmic mRNA processing bodies, which are specific granules consisting of many enzymes involved in mRNA turnover. Double mutants of AtCCR4a and AtCCR4b exhibited tolerance to sucrose application but not to glucose. The levels of sucrose in the seedlings of the atccr4a/4b double mutants were reduced, whereas no difference was observed in glucose levels. Further, amylose levels were slightly but significantly increased in the atccr4a/4b double mutants. Consistent with this observation, we found that the transcript encoding granule-bound starch synthase 1 (GBSS1), which is responsible for amylose synthesis, is accumulated to a higher level in the atccr4a/4b double mutant plants than in the control plants. Moreover, we revealed that GBSS1 has a longer poly(A) tail in the double mutant than in the control plant, suggesting that AtCCR4a and AtCCR4b can influence the poly(A) length of transcripts related to starch metabolism. Our results collectively suggested that AtCCR4a and AtCCR4b are involved in sucrose and starch metabolism in A. thaliana.

  14. The chemokine SLC is expressed in T cell areas of lymph nodes and mucosal lymphoid tissues and attracts activated T cells via CCR7.

    PubMed

    Willimann, K; Legler, D F; Loetscher, M; Roos, R S; Delgado, M B; Clark-Lewis, I; Baggiolini, M; Moser, B

    1998-06-01

    Secondary lymphoid-tissue chemokine, SLC, also known as exodus-2 and 6Ckine, is a novel CC chemokine with selectivity for T lymphocytes and preferential expression in lymphoid tissues. We have studied its production, receptor usage and biological activities. High levels of SLC mRNA were detected in lymph nodes, the gastrointestinal tract and several gland tissues, but no expression was found by Northern blot analysis in freshly isolated or stimulated blood monocytes and lymphocytes, or neutrophils and eosinophils. In situ hybridization revealed constitutive expression of SLC in the T cell areas and the marginal zone of follicles in lymph nodes and the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue, but not in B cell areas or sinuses. Comparison with immunocytochemical staining showed similarity between the in situ expression of SLC and the distribution of interdigitating dendritic cells but not with sinus-lining dendritic cells, macrophages or T lymphocytes. SLC induced chemotaxis of T lymphocytes and its activity increased considerably when the cells were conditioned with IL-2 or phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Under optimal conditions SLC had unusually high efficacy and induced the migration of up to 50 % of input T lymphocytes. SLC also induced Ca2+ mobilization in these cells. Similar responses were obtained with EBI1 ligand chemokine (ELC), and sequential stimulation with both chemokines led to cross-desensitization, suggesting that SLC acts via the ELC receptor, CCR7. This was confirmed using murine pre-B cells stably transfected with CCR7 which bound SLC with high affinity and showed chemotaxis and Ca2+ mobilization in response to both SLC and ELC. In T lymphocytes PHA and IL-2, which enhanced chemotactic responsiveness, also markedly enhanced CCR7 expression. In contrast to all known chemokine receptors, up-regulation of CCR7 by IL-2 was transient. A maximum was reached in 2-3 days and expression returned to initial levels within 8-10 days. The present study shows that SLC is

  15. Stromal CCR6 drives tumor growth in a murine transplantable colon cancer through recruitment of tumor-promoting macrophages.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Bisweswar; Shapiro, Mia; Samur, Mehmet K; Pai, Christine; Frank, Natasha Y; Yoon, Charles; Prabhala, Rao H; Munshi, Nikhil C; Gold, Jason S

    2016-08-01

    Interactions between the inflammatory chemokine CCL20 and its receptor CCR6 have been implicated in promoting colon cancer; however, the mechanisms behind this effect are poorly understood. We have previously demonstrated that deficiency of CCR6 is associated with decreased tumor macrophage accumulation in a model of sporadic intestinal tumorigenesis. In this study, we aimed to determine the role of stromal CCR6 expression in a murine syngeneic transplantable colon cancer model. We show that deficiency of host CCR6 is associated with decreased growth of syngeneic CCR6-expressing colon cancers. Colon cancers adoptively transplanted into CCR6-deficient mice have decreased tumor-associated macrophages without alterations in the number of monocytes in blood or bone marrow. CCL20, the unique ligand for CCR6, promotes migration of monocytes in vitro and promotes accumulation of macrophages in vivo. Depletion of tumor-associated macrophages decreases the growth of tumors in the transplantable tumor model. Macrophages infiltrating the colon cancers in this model secrete the inflammatory mediators CCL2, IL-1α, IL-6 and TNFα. Ccl2, Il1α and Il6 are consequently downregulated in tumors from CCR6-deficient mice. CCL2, IL-1α and IL-6 also promote proliferation of colon cancer cells, linking the decreased macrophage migration into tumors mediated by CCL20-CCR6 interactions to the delay in tumor growth in CCR6-deficient hosts. The relevance of these findings in human colon cancer is demonstrated through correlation of CCR6 expression with that of the macrophage marker CD163 as well as that of CCL2, IL1α and TNFα. Our findings support the exploration of targeting the CCL20-CCR6 pathway for the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:27622061

  16. A geothermal-linked biological oasis in Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming.

    PubMed

    Lovalvo, D; Clingenpeel, S R; McGinnis, S; Macur, R E; Varley, J D; Inskeep, W P; Glime, J; Nealson, K; McDermott, T R

    2010-09-01

    Hundreds of active and dormant geothermal vents have been located on the floor of Yellowstone Lake, although characterization of the associated biology (macro or micro) has been extremely limited. Herein, we describe an aquatic moss (Fontinalis) colony closely associated with vent emissions that considerably exceeded known temperature maxima for this plant. Vent waters were supersaturated with CO(2), likely accommodating a CO(2) compensation point that would be expected to be quite elevated under these conditions. The moss was colonized by metazoa, including the crustaceans Hyalella and Gammarus, a segmented worm in the Lumbriculidae family, and a flatworm specimen tentatively identified as Polycelis. The presence of these invertebrates suggest a highly localized food chain that derives from the presence of geothermal inputs and thus is analogous to the deep marine vents that support significant biodiversity.

  17. [Morphology of some tricostrongilinae (Strongylida) from the National Helminth Collection, Institute of Biology, UNAM, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Falcón-Ordaz, Jorge; García-Prieto, Luis

    2004-06-01

    The present study analyses the taxonomic status of eleven species of trichostrongylins that parasitize rodents and lagomorphs deposited in the Colección Nacional de Helmintos, Instituto de Biología. UNAM. Mexico. This analysis is based on the morphology of the synlophe, characteristic that had not been studied for most of these nematode species and at present, it has a very important taxonomic value. As a result of this study, the identity of five species is ratified (Trichostrongylus calcaratus, Obeliscoides cuniculi, Carolinensis huehuetlana. Stilestrongylus peromysci and Nippostrongylus brasiliensis), the transference suggested previously for two more (Vexillata convoluta and Vexillata vexillata) is confirmed, Trichostrongylus chiapensis is synonymized with Boehmiella willsoni, and finally Lamothiella romerolagi is re-determined as Teporingonema cerropeladoensis and Stilestrongylus atlatilpinensis as Stilestrongylus hidalguensis.

  18. IL-33 enhances proliferation and invasiveness of decidual stromal cells by up-regulation of CCL2/CCR2 via NF-κB and ERK1/2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wen-Ting; Li, Ming-Qing; Liu, Wei; Jin, Li-Ping; Li, Da-Jin; Zhu, Xiao-Yong

    2014-04-01

    Interleukin (IL)-33, a newly described member of the IL-1 family, has been reported to facilitate primary tumor progression and metastatic dissemination. However, its biological function on decidual stromal cells (DSCs) remains unclear. In this study, we tested the hypothesis whether IL-33 promotes proliferation and invasion of DSCs, and the possible mechanism. IL-33 and its orphan receptor ST2 was found to be co-expressed by DSCs in human first-trimester pregnancy. Addition of IL-33, enhanced the proliferation and invasion of DSCs in a dosage-dependent manner, concomitantly with increasing expression of proliferation relative gene (PCNA, survivin) and invasion relative gene (titin, MMP2). Blocking IL-33/ST2 signaling by soluble sST2 apparently abolished the stimulatory effect on the proliferation, invasiveness and related gene expression in DSCs. We also demonstrated that chemokines CCL2/CCR2 was significantly increased with IL-33 administration. Moreover, inhibition of CCL2/CCR2 activation using CCL2 neutralizing antibody or CCR2 blocker prevented IL-33-stimulated proliferation and invasiveness capacity of DSCs. Increasing phosphorylation of nuclear factor NF-κB p65 and extracellular signal-regulated kinases ERK1/2 after treatment with IL-33 was confirmed by western blotting. And the IL-33-induced CCL2/CCR2 expression was abrogated by treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor BAY 11-7082 or ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126. Finally, we showed that decreased IL-33/ST2 expression was observed in DSCs from spontaneous abortion compared with normal pregnancy at both gene and protein levels. This study provides evidence for the molecular mechanism of IL-33 in promoting proliferation and invasiveness of DSCs by up-regulation of CCL2/CCR2 via NF-κB and ERK1/2 signal pathways and thus contributes insight to the potential of IL-33 involved in successful pregnancy via inducing DSCs mitosis and invasion. PMID:24344240

  19. IL-33 enhances proliferation and invasiveness of decidual stromal cells by up-regulation of CCL2/CCR2 via NF-κB and ERK1/2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wen-Ting; Li, Ming-Qing; Liu, Wei; Jin, Li-Ping; Li, Da-Jin; Zhu, Xiao-Yong

    2014-04-01

    Interleukin (IL)-33, a newly described member of the IL-1 family, has been reported to facilitate primary tumor progression and metastatic dissemination. However, its biological function on decidual stromal cells (DSCs) remains unclear. In this study, we tested the hypothesis whether IL-33 promotes proliferation and invasion of DSCs, and the possible mechanism. IL-33 and its orphan receptor ST2 was found to be co-expressed by DSCs in human first-trimester pregnancy. Addition of IL-33, enhanced the proliferation and invasion of DSCs in a dosage-dependent manner, concomitantly with increasing expression of proliferation relative gene (PCNA, survivin) and invasion relative gene (titin, MMP2). Blocking IL-33/ST2 signaling by soluble sST2 apparently abolished the stimulatory effect on the proliferation, invasiveness and related gene expression in DSCs. We also demonstrated that chemokines CCL2/CCR2 was significantly increased with IL-33 administration. Moreover, inhibition of CCL2/CCR2 activation using CCL2 neutralizing antibody or CCR2 blocker prevented IL-33-stimulated proliferation and invasiveness capacity of DSCs. Increasing phosphorylation of nuclear factor NF-κB p65 and extracellular signal-regulated kinases ERK1/2 after treatment with IL-33 was confirmed by western blotting. And the IL-33-induced CCL2/CCR2 expression was abrogated by treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor BAY 11-7082 or ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126. Finally, we showed that decreased IL-33/ST2 expression was observed in DSCs from spontaneous abortion compared with normal pregnancy at both gene and protein levels. This study provides evidence for the molecular mechanism of IL-33 in promoting proliferation and invasiveness of DSCs by up-regulation of CCL2/CCR2 via NF-κB and ERK1/2 signal pathways and thus contributes insight to the potential of IL-33 involved in successful pregnancy via inducing DSCs mitosis and invasion.

  20. Cytokine-induced killer cells interact with tumor lysate-pulsed dendritic cells via CCR5 signaling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong Kyung; Kim, Yong Guk; Kim, Ji Sung; Park, Eun Jae; Kim, Boyeong; Park, Ki Hwan; Kang, Jong Soon; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Youngsoo; Han, Sang-Bae

    2016-08-10

    The antitumor activity of cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells can be increased by co-culturing them with tumor lysate-pulsed dendritic cells (tDCs); this phenomenon has been studied mainly at the population level. Using time-lapse imaging, we examined how CIK cells gather information from tDCs at the single-cell level. tDCs highly expressed CCL5, which bound CCR5 expressed on CIK cells. tDCs strongly induced migration of Ccr5(+/+) CIK cells, but not that of Ccr5(-/-) CIK cells or Ccr5(+/+) CIK cells treated with the CCR5 antagonist Maraviroc. Individual tDCs contacted Ccr5(+/+) CIK cells more frequently and lengthily than with Ccr5(-/-) CIK cells. Consequently, tDCs increased the antitumor activity of Ccr5(+/+) CIK cells in vitro and in vivo, but did not increase that of Ccr5(-/-) CIK cells. Taken together, our data provide insight into the mechanism of CIK cell activation by tDCs at the single-cell level.

  1. CCR1 blockade reduces tumor burden and osteolysis in vivo in a mouse model of myeloma bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Oyajobi, Babatunde O.; Gupta, Anjana; McCluskey, Brandon; Miao, Shichang; Powers, Jay P.; Seitz, Lisa C.; Wang, Yu; Zeng, Yibin; Zhang, Penglie; Schall, Thomas J.; Jaen, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    The chemokine CCL3/MIP-1α is a risk factor in the outcome of multiple myeloma (MM), particularly in the development of osteolytic bone disease. This chemokine, highly overexpressed by MM cells, can signal mainly through 2 receptors, CCR1 and CCR5, only 1 of which (CCR1) is responsive to CCL3 in human and mouse osteoclast precursors. CCR1 activation leads to the formation of osteolytic lesions and facilitates tumor growth. Here we show that formation of mature osteoclasts is blocked by the highly potent and selective CCR1 antagonist CCX721, an analog of the clinical compound CCX354. We also show that doses of CCX721 selected to completely inhibit CCR1 produce a profound decrease in tumor burden and osteolytic damage in the murine 5TGM1 model of MM bone disease. Similar effects were observed when the antagonist was used prophylactically or therapeutically, with comparable efficacy to that of zoledronic acid. 5TGM1 cells were shown to express minimal levels of CCR1 while secreting high levels of CCL3, suggesting that the therapeutic effects of CCX721 result from CCR1 inhibition on non-MM cells, most likely osteoclasts and osteoclast precursors. These results provide a strong rationale for further development of CCR1 antagonists for the treatment of MM and associated osteolytic bone disease. PMID:22618707

  2. CCR7 is required for the in vivo function of CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Martin A.; Meingassner, Josef G.; Lipp, Martin; Moore, Henrietta D.; Rot, Antal

    2007-01-01

    CCR7-mediated migration of naive T cells into the secondary lymphoid organs is a prerequisite for their encounter with mature dendritic cells, the productive presentation of cognate antigen, and consequent T cell proliferation and effector differentiation. Therefore, CCR7 was suggested to play an important role in the initiation of adaptive immune responses. In this study, we show that primary immunity can also develop in the absence of CCR7. Moreover, CCR7-deficient knockout (KO) mice display augmented immune responses. Our data cumulatively suggest that enhanced immunity in CCR7 KO mice is caused by the defective lymph node (LN) positioning of FoxP3+ CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells (T reg cells) and the consequent impediment of their function. The FoxP3+ T reg cells express CCR7 and, after their adoptive transfer, migrate into the LNs of wild-type mice. Here, they proliferate in situ upon antigen stimulation and inhibit the generation of antigen-specific T cells. Conversely, transferred CCR7-deficient T reg cells fail to migrate into the LNs and suppress antigen-induced T cell responses. The transfer of combinations of naive and T reg cells from wild-type and CCR7 KO mice into syngeneic severe combined immunodeficient mice directly demonstrates that CCR7-deficient T reg cells are less effective than their wild-type counterparts in preventing the development of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:17371928

  3. Distribution of the CCR5delta32 allele (gene variant CCR5) in Rondônia, Western Amazonian region, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Farias, Josileide Duarte; Santos, Marlene Guimarães; de França, Andonai Krauze; Delani, Daniel; Tada, Mauro Shugiro; Casseb, Almeida Andrade; Simões, Aguinaldo Luiz; Engracia, Vera

    2012-01-01

    Since around 1723, on the occasion of its initial colonization by Europeans, Rondonia has received successive waves of immigrants. This has been further swelled by individuals from northeastern Brazil, who began entering at the beginning of the twentieth century. The ethnic composition varies across the state according to the various sites of settlement of each wave of immigrants. We analyzed the frequency of the CCR5Δ32 allele of the CCR5 chemokine receptor, which is considered a Caucasian marker, in five sample sets from the population. Four were collected in Porto Velho, the state capital and the site of several waves of migration. Of these, two, from the Hospital de Base were comprised of HB Mothers and HB Newborns presenting allele frequencies of 3.5% and 3.1%, respectively, a third from the peri-urban neighborhoods of Candelária/Bate-Estaca (1.8%), whereas a fourth, from the Research Center on Tropical Medicine/CEPEM (0.6%), was composed of malaria patients under treament. The fifth sample (3.4%) came from the inland Quilombola village of Pedras Negras. Two homozygous individuals (CCR5Δ32/CCR5Δ32) were detected among the HB Mother samples. The frequency of this allele was heterogeneous and higher where the European inflow was more pronounced. The presence of the allele in Pedras Negras revealed European miscegenation in a community largely comprising Quilombolas. PMID:22481870

  4. Cooperating Mechanisms of CXCR5 and CCR7 in Development and Organization of Secondary Lymphoid Organs

    PubMed Central

    Ohl, Lars; Henning, Golo; Krautwald, Stefan; Lipp, Martin; Hardtke, Svenja; Bernhardt, Günter; Pabst, Oliver; Förster, Reinhold

    2003-01-01

    Homeostatic chemokines participate in the development of secondary lymphoid organs and later on in the functional organization of these tissues. The development of lymph nodes (LNs) and Peyer's patches depends on the recruitment of CD3− CD4+ interleukin (IL)-7Rαhi cells to sites of future organ development. CD3− CD4+ IL-7Rαhi cells express the chemokine receptor CXCR5 and might be attracted by its ligand CXCL13, which is secreted by mesenchymal cells. Mesenchymal cells also secrete CCL19, a ligand for CCR7, yet it is not clear whether CCR7 and CCL19 are important for secondary lymphoid organ development. Analyzing CXCR5−/− CCR7−/− double deficient mice we now show that these mice lack all examined peripheral LNs suggesting a profound role for both receptors in secondary lymphoid organ development. We demonstrate that CD3− CD4+ IL-7Rαhi cells express CXCR5 as well as CCR7 indicating that both receptors cooperate during an early step of secondary lymphoid organ development. Furthermore, CXCR5−/− CCR7−/− mice display a severely disturbed architecture of mesenteric LN and spleen. Due to an impaired migration of B cells into the white pulp, CXCR5−/− CCR7−/− mice fail to develop B cell follicles but show small clusters of unorganized lymphocytes in the spleen. These data demonstrate a cooperative function of CXCR5 and CCR7 in lymphoid organ organogenesis and organization. PMID:12732661

  5. Disruption of CCL20-CCR6 interaction inhibits metastasis of advanced cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Mitsugu; Abe, Fumito; Nara, Miho; Watanabe, Atsushi; Takahashi, Naoto; Miyagaki, Tomomitsu; Sugaya, Makoto; Tagawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that upregulation of a chemokine receptor CCR6 and its ligand CCL20 led to metastasis of advanced cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) cells, suggesting the involvement of CCL20-CCR6 interaction in initiating CTCL cell metastasis. In this study, we determined whether this interaction is functional in metastatic CTCL cells. We first demonstrated increased STAT3 expression during the progression of primary CTCL. STAT3 was spontaneously activated and mediated the transcription of CCL20 in CTCL cell lines. Next, to determine whether the transient knockdown of STAT3, CCL20, or CCR6 or treatment with neutralizing antibody against CCL20 (neutralizing CCL20 antibody) could reduce the migration ability of CTCL cells, we conducted an in vitro migration assay. All treatments reduced the nutrition-dependent migration activity of CTCL cells. Notably, treatment with neutralizing CCL20 antibody reduced the migration ability of the cells without decreasing the expression of CCL20 and CCR6. This demonstrated that the CCL20-CCR6 interaction is actually functional in metastatic CTCL cells. Finally, to examine the in vivo effect of neutralizing CCL20 antibody, we used NOD/Shi-scid IL-2γnul mice inoculated with CTCL cells. These mice were expected to die due to metastasis of CTCL cells into multiple organs. However, administration of neutralizing CCL20 antibody significantly prolonged the survival of the xenografted mice. These findings suggested that automatic activation of the STAT3/CCL20/CCR6 cascade was involved in CTCL lymphomagenesis and that disruption of CCL20-CCR6 interaction could be a key therapeutic strategy against advanced CTCL. PMID:26789110

  6. Biologic surveys for the Sandia National Laboratories, Coyote Canyon Test Complex, Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.M.; Knight, P.J.

    1994-05-25

    This report provides results of a comprehensive biologic survey performed in Coyote Canyon Test Complex (CCTC), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Bernalillo County, New Mexico, which was conducted during the spring and summer of 1992 and 1993. CCTC is sited on land owned by the Department of Energy (DOE) and Kirtland Air Force Base and managed by SNL. The survey covered 3,760 acres of land, most of which is rarely disturbed by CCTC operations. Absence of grazing by livestock and possibly native ungulates, and relative to the general condition of private range lands throughout New Mexico, and relative to other grazing lands in central New Mexico. Widely dispersed, low intensity use by SNL as well as prohibition of grazing has probably contributed to abundance of special status species such as grama grass cactus within the CCTC area. This report evaluates threatened and endangered species found in the area, as well as comprehensive assessment of biologic habitats. Included are analyses of potential impacts and mitigative measures designed to reduce or eliminate potential impacts. Included is a summary of CCTC program and testing activities.

  7. CCR2 Deficiency Promotes Exacerbated Chronic Erosive Neutrophil-Dominated Chikungunya Virus Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Poo, Yee Suan; Nakaya, Helder; Gardner, Joy; Larcher, Thibaut; Schroder, Wayne A.; Le, Thuy T.; Major, Lee D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a member of a globally distributed group of arthritogenic alphaviruses that cause weeks to months of debilitating polyarthritis/arthralgia, which is often poorly managed with current treatments. Arthritic disease is usually characterized by high levels of the chemokine CCL2 and a prodigious monocyte/macrophage infiltrate. Several inhibitors of CCL2 and its receptor CCR2 are in development and may find application for treatment of certain inflammatory conditions, including autoimmune and viral arthritides. Here we used CCR2−/− mice to determine the effect of CCR2 deficiency on CHIKV infection and arthritis. Although there were no significant changes in viral load or RNA persistence and only marginal changes in antiviral immunity, arthritic disease was substantially increased and prolonged in CCR2−/− mice compared to wild-type mice. The monocyte/macrophage infiltrate was replaced in CCR2−/− mice by a severe neutrophil (followed by an eosinophil) infiltrate and was associated with changes in the expression levels of multiple inflammatory mediators (including CXCL1, CXCL2, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor [G-CSF], interleukin-1β [IL-1β], and IL-10). The loss of anti-inflammatory macrophages and their activities (e.g., efferocytosis) was also implicated in exacerbated inflammation. Clear evidence of cartilage damage was also seen in CHIKV-infected CCR2−/− mice, a feature not normally associated with alphaviral arthritides. Although recruitment of CCR2+ monocytes/macrophages can contribute to inflammation, it also appears to be critical for preventing excessive pathology and resolving inflammation following alphavirus infection. Caution might thus be warranted when considering therapeutic targeting of CCR2/CCL2 for the treatment of alphaviral arthritides. IMPORTANCE Here we describe the first analysis of viral arthritis in mice deficient for the chemokine receptor CCR2. CCR2 is thought to be central to the

  8. Functional inhibition of chemokine receptor CCR2 by dicer-substrate-siRNA prevents pain development

    PubMed Central

    Midavaine, Élora; Dansereau, Marc-André; Tétreault, Pascal; Longpré, Jean-Michel; Jacobi, Ashley M; Rose, Scott D; Behlke, Mark A; Beaudet, Nicolas; Sarret, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests that the C-C chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2, or monocyte chemoattractant protein 1) acts as a neuromodulator in the central nervous system through its binding to the C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2). Notably, it is well established that the CCL2/CCR2 axis plays a key role in neuron-glia communication as well as in spinal nociceptive transmission. Gene silencing through RNA interference has recently emerged as a promising avenue in research and drug development, including therapeutic management of chronic pain. In the present study, we used 27-mer Dicer-substrate small interfering RNA (DsiRNA) targeting CCR2 and assessed their ability to reverse the nociceptive behaviors induced by spinal CCL2 injection or following intraplantar injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant. Results To this end, we first developed high-potency DsiRNAs designed to target different sequences distributed across the rat CCR2 (rCCR2) messenger RNA. For optimization, methyl groups were added to the two most potent DsiRNA candidates (Evader and M7 2′-O-methyl modified duplexes) in order to improve in vivo duplex stability and to reduce potential immunostimulatory activity. Our results demonstrated that all modified candidates formulated with the cell-penetrating peptide reagent Transductin showed strong RNAi activity following intrathecal delivery, exhibiting >50% rCCR2 knockdown in lumbar dorsal root ganglia. Accordingly, we found that these DsiRNA duplexes were able to reduce spinal microglia activation and were effective at blocking CCL2-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. Along with similar reductions of rCCR2 messenger RNA, both sequences and methylation patterns were similarly effective in inhibiting the CCL2 nociceptive action for the whole seven days testing period, compared to mismatch DsiRNA. DsiRNAs against CCR2 also reversed the hypernociceptive responses observed in the complete Freund’s adjuvant-induced inflammatory chronic pain model

  9. Biological aging and social characteristics: gerontology, the Baltimore city hospitals, and the National Institutes of Health.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyung Wook

    2013-01-01

    The intramural gerontological research program in the National Institutes of Health underwent a substantial growth after its creation within the precincts of the Baltimore City Hospitals in 1940. This paper analyzes its development and the associated problems of its early years. Gerontologists aimed at improving the social and economic life of the elderly through scientific research. With this aim in mind, they conducted various investigations using the indigent aged patients of the Baltimore City Hospitals. Yet the scientists of aging, who hoped to eliminate negative social factors that might bias their research and heighten the confusion between pathology and aging per se, eventually stopped using these patients in the hospital as human subjects. Instead they sought educated affluent subjects in order to eliminate the impact of poverty. By doing so, however, they introduced a new source of social bias to their work, especially within the novel project begun in 1958, the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. This article thus examines the context of the development of gerontologists' research by analyzing their agenda, institutional environment, and research subjects in the 1940s and the 1950s.

  10. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection by synthetic peptides derived CCR5 fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Masaki; Baranyi, Lajos; Okada, Noriko; Okada, Hidechika; E-mail: hiokada@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp

    2007-02-23

    HIV-1 infection requires interaction of viral envelope protein gp160 with CD4 and a chemokine receptor, CCR5 or CXCR4 as entry coreceptor. We designed HIV-inhibitory peptides targeted to CCR5 using a novel computer program (ANTIS), which searched all possible sense-antisense amino acid pairs between proteins. Seven AHBs were found in CCR5 receptor. All AHB peptides were synthesized and tested for their ability to prevent HIV-1 infection to human T cells. A peptide fragment (LC5) which is a part of the CCR5 receptor corresponding to the loop between the fifth and sixth transmembrane regions (amino acids 222-240) proved to inhibit HIV-1{sub IIIB} infection of MT-4 cells. Interaction of these antisense peptides could be involved in sustaining HIV-1 infectivity. LC5 effectively indicated dose-dependent manner, and the suppression was enhanced additively by T20 peptide, which inhibits infection in vitro by disrupting the gp41 conformational changes necessary for membrane fusion. Thus, these results indicate that CCR5-derived AHB peptides could provide a useful tool to define the mechanism(s) of HIV infection, and may provide insight which will contribute to the development of an anti-HIV-1 reagent.

  11. The functions of DNA methylation by CcrM in Caulobacter crescentus: a global approach.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Diego; Kozdon, Jennifer B; McAdams, Harley H; Shapiro, Lucy; Collier, Justine

    2014-04-01

    DNA methylation is involved in a diversity of processes in bacteria, including maintenance of genome integrity and regulation of gene expression. Here, using Caulobacter crescentus as a model, we exploit genome-wide experimental methods to uncover the functions of CcrM, a DNA methyltransferase conserved in most Alphaproteobacteria. Using single molecule sequencing, we provide evidence that most CcrM target motifs (GANTC) switch from a fully methylated to a hemi-methylated state when they are replicated, and back to a fully methylated state at the onset of cell division. We show that DNA methylation by CcrM is not required for the control of the initiation of chromosome replication or for DNA mismatch repair. By contrast, our transcriptome analysis shows that >10% of the genes are misexpressed in cells lacking or constitutively over-expressing CcrM. Strikingly, GANTC methylation is needed for the efficient transcription of dozens of genes that are essential for cell cycle progression, in particular for DNA metabolism and cell division. Many of them are controlled by promoters methylated by CcrM and co-regulated by other global cell cycle regulators, demonstrating an extensive cross talk between DNA methylation and the complex regulatory network that controls the cell cycle of C. crescentus and, presumably, of many other Alphaproteobacteria.

  12. Fully Human Antagonistic Antibodies against CCR4 Potently Inhibit Cell Signaling and Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Géraudie, Solène; Scheffler, Ulrike; Griep, Remko A.; Reiersen, Herald; Duncan, Alexander R.; Kiprijanov, Sergej M.

    2014-01-01

    Background CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4) represents a potentially important target for cancer immunotherapy due to its expression on tumor infiltrating immune cells including regulatory T cells (Tregs) and on tumor cells in several cancer types and its role in metastasis. Methodology Using phage display, human antibody library, affinity maturation and a cell-based antibody selection strategy, the antibody variants against human CCR4 were generated. These antibodies effectively competed with ligand binding, were able to block ligand-induced signaling and cell migration, and demonstrated efficient killing of CCR4-positive tumor cells via ADCC and phagocytosis. In a mouse model of human T-cell lymphoma, significant survival benefit was demonstrated for animals treated with the newly selected anti-CCR4 antibodies. Significance For the first time, successful generation of anti- G-protein coupled chemokine receptor (GPCR) antibodies using human non-immune library and phage display on GPCR-expressing cells was demonstrated. The generated anti-CCR4 antibodies possess a dual mode of action (inhibition of ligand-induced signaling and antibody-directed tumor cell killing). The data demonstrate that the anti-tumor activity in vivo is mediated, at least in part, through Fc-receptor dependent effector mechanisms, such as ADCC and phagocytosis. Anti-CC chemokine receptor 4 antibodies inhibiting receptor signaling have potential as immunomodulatory antibodies for cancer. PMID:25080123

  13. CCR4 promotes medullary entry and thymocyte–dendritic cell interactions required for central tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zicheng; Lancaster, Jessica N.; Sasiponganan, Chayanit

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmunity results from a breakdown in central or peripheral tolerance. To establish central tolerance, developing T cells must enter the thymic medulla, where they scan antigen-presenting cells (APCs) displaying a diverse array of autoantigens. If a thymocyte is activated by a self-antigen, the cell undergoes either deletion or diversion into the regulatory T cell (T reg) lineage, thus maintaining self-tolerance. Mechanisms promoting thymocyte medullary entry and interactions with APCs are incompletely understood. CCR4 is poised to contribute to central tolerance due to its expression by post-positive selection thymocytes, and expression of its ligands by medullary thymic dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we use two-photon time-lapse microscopy to demonstrate that CCR4 promotes medullary entry of the earliest post-positive selection thymocytes, as well as efficient interactions between medullary thymocytes and DCs. In keeping with the contribution of thymic DCs to central tolerance, CCR4 is involved in regulating negative selection of polyclonal and T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic thymocytes. In the absence of CCR4, autoreactive T cells accumulate in secondary lymphoid organs and autoimmunity ensues. These studies reveal a previously unappreciated role for CCR4 in the establishment of central tolerance. PMID:26417005

  14. Breast cancer lung metastasis requires expression of chemokine receptor CCR4 and regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Olkhanud, Purevdorj B; Baatar, Dolgor; Bodogai, Monica; Hakim, Fran; Gress, Ronald; Anderson, Robin L; Deng, Jie; Xu, Mai; Briest, Susanne; Biragyn, Arya

    2009-07-15

    Cancer metastasis is a leading cause of cancer morbidity and mortality. More needs to be learned about mechanisms that control this process. In particular, the role of chemokine receptors in metastasis remains controversial. Here, using a highly metastatic breast cancer (4T1) model, we show that lung metastasis is a feature of only a proportion of the tumor cells that express CCR4. Moreover, the primary tumor growing in mammary pads activates remotely the expression of TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 in the lungs. These chemokines acting through CCR4 attract both tumor and immune cells. However, CCR4-mediated chemotaxis was not sufficient to produce metastasis, as tumor cells in the lung were efficiently eliminated by natural killer (NK) cells. Lung metastasis required CCR4(+) regulatory T cells (Treg), which directly killed NK cells using beta-galactoside-binding protein. Thus, strategies that abrogate any part of this process should improve the outcome through activation of effector cells and prevention of tumor cell migration. We confirm this prediction by killing CCR4(+) cells through delivery of TARC-fused toxins or depleting Tregs and preventing lung metastasis. PMID:19567680

  15. Colorectal carcinoma metastases: Detection with In-111-labeled monoclonal antibody CCR 086

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Nabi, H.H.; Levine, G.; Lamki, L.M.; Murray, J.L.; Tauxe, W.N.; Shah, A.N.; Patt, Y.Z.; Doerr, R.J.; Klein, H.A.; Gona, J. )

    1990-07-01

    A phase I/II clinical trial with indium-111-labeled antimucin murine monoclonal antibody (MoAb) CCR 086 was conducted. Seventeen patients with histologically proved colorectal carcinoma and known metastatic disease underwent external scintigraphy after administration of 5.5 mCi (203.5 MBq) of In-111 CCR 086 at doses of 5 and 20 mg. Of 25 known lesions, 17 were detected (sensitivity, 68%). The smallest detected lesion in the lung was 1 cm and in the liver was 1.5 cm. The serum half-life of In-111-labeled CCR 086 MoAb was approximately 64 hours. The formation of human antimouse antibody (HAMA) was detected in the serum of four of five patients who received 20 mg of MoAb. No HAMAs were detected in four patients receiving 5 mg of MoAb. No side effects were encountered. Because of effective detection of liver and lung metastases with lower doses (5-20 mg) of CCR 086 conjugated with In-111, further investigations are warranted to assess clinical and therapeutic potentials of CCR 086 in the management of colorectal cancer.

  16. CCR5 deficiency predisposes to fatal outcome in influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Falcon, A; Cuevas, M T; Rodriguez-Frandsen, A; Reyes, N; Pozo, F; Moreno, S; Ledesma, J; Martínez-Alarcón, J; Nieto, A; Casas, I

    2015-08-01

    Influenza epidemics affect all age groups, although children, the elderly and those with underlying medical conditions are the most severely affected. Whereas co-morbidities are present in 50% of fatal cases, 25-50% of deaths are in apparently healthy individuals. This suggests underlying genetic determinants that govern infection severity. Although some viral factors that contribute to influenza disease are known, the role of host genetic factors remains undetermined. Data for small cohorts of influenza-infected patients are contradictory regarding the potential role of chemokine receptor 5 deficiency (CCR5-Δ32 mutation, a 32 bp deletion in the CCR5 gene) in the outcome of influenza virus infection. We tested 171 respiratory samples from influenza patients (2009 pandemic) for CCR5-Δ32 and evaluated its correlation with patient mortality. CCR5-Δ32 patients (17.4%) showed a higher mortality rate than WT individuals (4.7%; P = 0.021), which indicates that CCR5-Δ32 patients are at higher risk than the normal population of a fatal outcome in influenza infection.

  17. HIPK family kinases bind and regulate the function of the CCR4-NOT complex

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Gil, Alfonso; Ritter, Olesja; Hornung, Juliane; Stekman, Hilda; Krüger, Marcus; Braun, Thomas; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Kracht, Michael; Schmitz, M. Lienhard

    2016-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase HIPK2 functions as a regulator of developmental processes and as a signal integrator of a wide variety of stress signals, such as DNA damage, hypoxia, and reactive oxygen intermediates. Because the kinase is generated in a constitutively active form, its expression levels are restricted by a variety of different mechanisms. Here we identify the CCR4-NOT complex as a new regulator of HIPK2 abundance. Down-regulation or knockout of the CCR4-NOT complex member CNOT2 leads to reduced HIPK2 protein levels without affecting the expression level of HIPK1 or HIPK3. A fraction of all HIPK family members associates with the CCR4-NOT components CNOT2 and CNOT3. HIPKs also phosphorylate the CCR4-NOT complex, a feature that is shared with their yeast progenitor kinase, YAK1. Functional assays reveal that HIPK2 and HIPK1 restrict CNOT2-dependent mRNA decay. HIPKs are well known regulators of transcription, but the mutual regulation between CCR4-NOT and HIPKs extends the regulatory potential of these kinases by enabling posttranscriptional gene regulation. PMID:27122605

  18. Chemokine/chemokine receptor pair CCL20/CCR6 in human colorectal malignancy: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Frick, Vilma Oliveira; Rubie, Claudia; Keilholz, Ulrich; Ghadjar, Pirus

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines belong to a superfamily of small, cytokine-like proteins, which induce multiple physiological functions, particularly cytoskeletal rearrangement and compartment-specific migration through their interaction with G-protein-coupled receptors. Chemokines and their receptors have been widely acknowledged as essential and selective mediators in leukocyte migration in inflammatory response. It is now established that the chemokine/chemokine receptor system is also used by cancer cells to direct lymphatic and haematogenous spreading and additionally has an impact on the site of metastatic growth of different tumours. In recent years an increasing number of studies have drawn attention to CC-chemokine cysteine motif chemokine ligand 20 (CCL20) and its physiological sole receptor CCR6 to play a role in the onset, development and metastatic spread of various gastrointestinal cancer entities. Among various cancer types CCR6 was also demonstrated to be significantly overexpressed in colorectal cancer (CRC) and stimulation by its physiological ligand CCL20 has been reported to promote CRC cell proliferation and migration in vitro. Further, the CCL20/CCR6 system apparently plays a role in the organ-selective liver metastasis of CRC. Here we review the literature on expression patterns of CCL20 and CCR6 and their physiological interactions as well as the currently presumed role of CCL20 and CCR6 in the formation of CRC and the development of liver metastasis, providing a potential basis for novel treatment strategies. PMID:26811629

  19. Distinct Contributions of Neutrophils and CCR2+ Monocytes to Pulmonary Clearance of Different Klebsiella pneumoniae Strains.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Huizhong; Carter, Rebecca A; Leiner, Ingrid M; Tang, Yi-Wei; Chen, Liang; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Pamer, Eric G

    2015-09-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common respiratory pathogen, with some strains having developed broad resistance to clinically available antibiotics. Humans can become infected with many different K. pneumoniae strains that vary in genetic background, antibiotic susceptibility, capsule composition, and mucoid phenotype. Genome comparisons have revealed differences between K. pneumoniae strains, but the impact of genomic variability on immune-mediated clearance of pneumonia remains unclear. Experimental studies of pneumonia in mice have used the rodent-adapted 43816 strain of K. pneumoniae and demonstrated that neutrophils are essential for optimal host defense. It remains unclear, however, whether CCR2(+) monocytes contribute to K. pneumoniae clearance from the lung. We selectively depleted neutrophils, CCR2(+) monocytes, or both from immunocompetent mice and determined susceptibility to infection by the 43816 strain and 4 newly isolated clinical K. pneumoniae strains. The clinical K. pneumoniae strains, including one carbapenem-resistant ST258 strain, are less virulent than 43816. Optimal clearance of each of the 5 strains required either neutrophils or CCR2(+) monocytes. Selective neutrophil depletion markedly worsened infection with K. pneumoniae strain 43816 and three clinical isolates but did not increase susceptibility of mice to infection with the carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae ST258 strain. Depletion of CCR2(+) monocytes delayed recovery from infection with each of the 5 K. pneumoniae strains, revealing a contribution of these cells to bacterial clearance from the lung. Our findings demonstrate strain-dependent variation in the contributions of neutrophils and CCR2(+) monocytes to clearance of K. pneumoniae pulmonary infection.

  20. CCL3L1 gene-containing segmental duplications and polymorphisms in CCR5 affect risk of systemic lupus erythaematosus

    PubMed Central

    Mamtani, M; Rovin, B; Brey, R; Camargo, J F; Kulkarni, H; Herrera, M; Correa, P; Holliday, S; Anaya, J-M; Ahuja, S K

    2013-01-01

    Objectives There is an enrichment of immune response genes that are subject to copy number variations (CNVs). However, there is limited understanding of their impact on susceptibility to human diseases. CC chemokine ligand 3 like-1 (CCL3L1) is a potent ligand for the HIV coreceptor, CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5), and we have demonstrated previously an association between CCL3L1- gene containing segmental duplications and polymorphisms in CCR5 and HIV/AIDS susceptibility. Here, we determined the association between these genetic variations and risk of developing systemic lupus erythaematosus (SLE), differential recruitment of CD3+ and CD68+ leukocytes to the kidney, clinical severity of SLE reflected by autoantibody titres and the risk of renal complications in SLE. Methods We genotyped 1084 subjects (469 cases of SLE and 615 matched controls with no autoimmune disease) from three geographically distinct cohorts for variations in CCL3L1 and CCR5. Results Deviation from the average copy number of CCL3L1 found in European populations increased the risk of SLE and modified the SLE-influencing effects of CCR5 haplotypes. The CCR5 human haplogroup (HH)E and CCR5-Δ32-bearing HHG*2 haplotypes were associated with an increased risk of developing SLE. An individual’s CCL3L1–CCR5 genotype strongly predicted the overall risk of SLE, high autoantibody titres, and lupus nephritis as well as the differential recruitment of leukocytes in subjects with lupus nephritis. The CCR5 HHE/HHG*2 genotype was associated with the maximal risk of developing SLE. Conclusion CCR5 haplotypes HHE and HHG*2 strongly influence the risk of SLE. The copy number of CCL3L1 influences risk of SLE and modifies the SLE-influencing effects associated with CCR5 genotypes. These findings implicate a key role of the CCL3L1–CCR5 axis in the pathogenesis of SLE. PMID:17971457

  1. Identifying bias in CCR1 antagonists using radiolabelled binding, receptor internalization, β-arrestin translocation and chemotaxis assays

    PubMed Central

    Gilchrist, A; Gauntner, T D; Fazzini, A; Alley, K M; Pyen, D S; Ahn, J; Ha, S J; Willett, A; Sansom, S E; Yarfi, J L; Bachovchin, K A; Mazzoni, M R; Merritt, J R

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Investigators have suggested that the chemokine receptor CCR1 plays a role in multiple myeloma. Studies using antisense and neutralizing antibodies to CCR1 showed that down-regulation of the receptor altered disease progression in a mouse model. More recently, experiments utilizing scid mice injected with human myeloma cells demonstrated that the CCR1 antagonist BX471 reduced osteolytic lesions, while the CCR1 antagonist MLN-3897 prevented myeloma cell adhesion to osteoclasts. However, information is limited regarding the pharmacology of CCR1 antagonists in myeloma cells. Experimental Approach We compared several well-studied CCR1 antagonists including AZD4818, BX471, CCX354, CP-481715, MLN-3897 and PS899877 for their ability to inhibit binding of [125I]-CCL3 in vitro using membranes prepared from RPMI 8226 cells, a human multiple myeloma cell line that endogenously expresses CCR1. In addition, antagonists were assessed for their ability to modulate CCL3-mediated internalization of CCR1 and CCL3-mediated cell migration using RPMI 8226 cells. As many GPCRs signal through β–arrestin-dependent pathways that are separate and distinct from those driven by G-proteins, we also evaluated the compounds for their ability to alter β-arrestin translocation. Key Results There were clear differences between the CCR1 antagonists in their ability to inhibit CCL3 binding to myeloma cells, as well as in their ability to inhibit G–protein-dependent and -independent functional responses. Conclusions and Implications Our studies demonstrate that tissue phenotype seems to be relevant with regards to CCR1. Moreover, it appears that for CCR1 antagonists, inhibition of β-arrestin translocation is not necessarily linked to chemotaxis or receptor internalization. PMID:24990525

  2. Dual targeting of CCR2 and CX3CR1 in an arterial injury model of vascular inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The chemokine receptors CCR2 and CX3CR1 are important in the development of coronary artery disease. The purpose of this study is to analyze the effect of a novel CCR2 inhibitor in conjunction with CX3CR1 deletion on vascular inflammation. Methods The novel CCR2 antagonist MRL-677 was characterized using an in vivo model of monocyte migration. To determine the relative roles of CCR2 and CX3CR1 in vascular remodeling, normal or CX3CR1 deficient mice were treated with MRL-677. After 14 days, the level of intimal hyperplasia in the artery was visualized by paraffin sectioning and histology of the hind limbs. Results MRL-677 is a CCR2 antagonist that is effective in blocking macrophage trafficking in a peritoneal thioglycollate model. Intimal hyperplasia resulting from vascular injury was also assessed in mice. Based on the whole-blood potency of MRL-677, sufficient drug levels were maintained for the entire 14 day experimental period to afford good coverage of mCCR2 with MRL-677. Blocking CCR2 with MRL-677 resulted in a 56% decrease in the vascular injury response (n = 9, p < 0.05) in normal animals. Mice in which both CCR2 and CX3CR1 pathways were targeted (CX3CR1 KO mice given MRL-677) had an 88% decrease in the injury response (n = 6, p = 0.009). Conclusion In this study we have shown that blocking CCR2 with a low molecular weight antagonist ameliorates the inflammatory response to vascular injury. The protective effect of CCR2 blockade is increased in the presence of CX3CR1 deficiency suggesting that CX3CR1 and CCR2 have non-redundant functions in the progression of vascular inflammation. PMID:20836883

  3. Biological community structure on patch reefs in Biscayne National Park, FL, USA.

    PubMed

    Kuffner, Ilsa B; Grober-Dunsmore, Rikki; Brock, John C; Hickey, T Don

    2010-05-01

    Coral reef ecosystem management benefits from continual quantitative assessment of the resources being managed, plus assessment of factors that affect distribution patterns of organisms in the ecosystem. In this study, we investigate the relationships among physical, benthic, and fish variables in an effort to help explain the distribution patterns of organisms on patch reefs within Biscayne National Park, FL, USA. We visited a total of 196 randomly selected sampling stations on 12 shallow (<10 m) patch reefs and measured physical variables (e.g., substratum rugosity, substratum type) and benthic and fish community variables. We also incorporated data on substratum rugosity collected remotely via airborne laser surveying (Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar-EAARL). Across all stations, only weak relationships were found between physical, benthic cover, and fish assemblage variables. Much of the variance was attributable to a "reef effect," meaning that community structure and organism abundances were more variable at stations among reefs than within reefs. However, when the reef effect was accounted for and removed statistically, patterns were detected. Within reefs, juvenile scarids were most abundant at stations with high coverage of the fleshy macroalgae Dictyota spp., and the calcified alga Halimeda tuna was most abundant at stations with low EAARL rugosity. Explanations for the overwhelming importance of "reef" in explaining variance in our dataset could include the stochastic arrangement of organisms on patch reefs related to variable larval recruitment in space and time and/or strong historical effects due to patchy disturbances (e.g., hurricanes, fishing), as well as legacy effects of prior residents ("priority" effects). PMID:19399634

  4. Biological community structure on patch reefs in Biscayne National Park, FL, USA.

    PubMed

    Kuffner, Ilsa B; Grober-Dunsmore, Rikki; Brock, John C; Hickey, T Don

    2010-05-01

    Coral reef ecosystem management benefits from continual quantitative assessment of the resources being managed, plus assessment of factors that affect distribution patterns of organisms in the ecosystem. In this study, we investigate the relationships among physical, benthic, and fish variables in an effort to help explain the distribution patterns of organisms on patch reefs within Biscayne National Park, FL, USA. We visited a total of 196 randomly selected sampling stations on 12 shallow (<10 m) patch reefs and measured physical variables (e.g., substratum rugosity, substratum type) and benthic and fish community variables. We also incorporated data on substratum rugosity collected remotely via airborne laser surveying (Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar-EAARL). Across all stations, only weak relationships were found between physical, benthic cover, and fish assemblage variables. Much of the variance was attributable to a "reef effect," meaning that community structure and organism abundances were more variable at stations among reefs than within reefs. However, when the reef effect was accounted for and removed statistically, patterns were detected. Within reefs, juvenile scarids were most abundant at stations with high coverage of the fleshy macroalgae Dictyota spp., and the calcified alga Halimeda tuna was most abundant at stations with low EAARL rugosity. Explanations for the overwhelming importance of "reef" in explaining variance in our dataset could include the stochastic arrangement of organisms on patch reefs related to variable larval recruitment in space and time and/or strong historical effects due to patchy disturbances (e.g., hurricanes, fishing), as well as legacy effects of prior residents ("priority" effects).

  5. Biological community structure on patch reefs in Biscayne National Park, FL, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuffner, Ilsa B.; Grober-Dunsmore, Rikki; Brock, John C.; Hickey, T. Don

    2010-01-01

    Coral reef ecosystem management benefits from continual quantitative assessment of the resources being managed, plus assessment of factors that affect distribution patterns of organisms in the ecosystem. In this study, we investigate the relationships among physical, benthic, and fish variables in an effort to help explain the distribution patterns of organisms on patch reefs within Biscayne National Park, FL, USA. We visited a total of 196 randomly selected sampling stations on 12 shallow (<10 m) patch reefs and measured physical variables (e.g., substratum rugosity, substratum type) and benthic and fish community variables. We also incorporated data on substratum rugosity collected remotely via airborne laser surveying (Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar—EAARL). Across all stations, only weak relationships were found between physical, benthic cover, and fish assemblage variables. Much of the variance was attributable to a “reef effect,” meaning that community structure and organism abundances were more variable at stations among reefs than within reefs. However, when the reef effect was accounted for and removed statistically, patterns were detected. Within reefs, juvenile scarids were most abundant at stations with high coverage of the fleshy macroalgae Dictyota spp., and the calcified alga Halimeda tuna was most abundant at stations with low EAARL rugosity. Explanations for the overwhelming importance of “reef” in explaining variance in our dataset could include the stochastic arrangement of organisms on patch reefs related to variable larval recruitment in space and time and/or strong historical effects due to patchy disturbances (e.g., hurricanes, fishing), as well as legacy effects of prior residents (“priority” effects).

  6. CCR5 antibodies HGS004 and HGS101 preferentially inhibit drug-bound CCR5 infection and restore drug sensitivity of Maraviroc-resistant HIV-1 in primary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Latinovic, Olga; Reitz, Marvin; Le, Nhut M.; Foulke, James S.; Faetkenheuer, Gerd; Lehmann, Clara; Redfield, Robert R.; Heredia, Alonso

    2011-03-01

    R5 HIV-1 strains resistant to the CCR5 antagonist Maraviroc (MVC) can use drug-bound CCR5. We demonstrate that MVC-resistant HIV-1 exhibits delayed kinetics of coreceptor engagement and fusion during drug-bound versus free CCR5 infection of cell lines. Antibodies directed against the second extracellular loop (ECL2) of CCR5 had greater antiviral activity against MVC-bound compared to MVC-free CCR5 infection. However, in PBMCs, only ECL2 CCR5 antibodies HGS004 and HGS101, but not 2D7, inhibited infection by MVC resistant HIV-1 more potently with MVC-bound than with free CCR5. In addition, HGS004 and HGS101, but not 2D7, restored the antiviral activity of MVC against resistant virus in PBMCs. In flow cytometric studies, CCR5 binding by the HGS mAbs, but not by 2D7, was increased when PBMCs were treated with MVC, suggesting MVC increases exposure of the relevant epitope. Thus, HGS004 and HGS101 have antiviral mechanisms distinct from 2D7 and could help overcome MVC resistance.

  7. HIV-1 adaptation to low levels of CCR5 results in V3 and V2 loop changes that increase envelope pathogenicity, CCR5 affinity and decrease susceptibility to Maraviroc.

    PubMed

    Garg, Himanshu; Lee, Raphael T C; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Joshi, Anjali

    2016-06-01

    Variability in CCR5 levels in the human population is suggested to affect virus evolution, fitness and the course of HIV disease. We previously demonstrated that cell surface CCR5 levels directly affect HIV Envelope mediated bystander apoptosis. In this study, we attempted to understand HIV evolution in the presence of low levels of CCR5, mimicking the limiting CCR5 levels inherent to the host. HIV-1 adaptation in a T cell line expressing low levels of CCR5 resulted in two specific mutations; N302Y and E172K. The N302Y mutation led to accelerated virus replication, increase in Maraviroc IC50 and an increase in Envelope mediated bystander apoptosis in low CCR5 expressing cells. Analysis of subtype B sequences showed that N302Y is over-represented in CXCR4 tropic viruses in comparison to CCR5 tropic isolates. Considering the variability in CCR5 levels between individuals, our findings have implications for virus evolution, MVC susceptibility as well as HIV pathogenesis.

  8. Reproductive biology, stem cells biotechnology and regenerative medicine: a 1-day national symposium held at Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Akyash, Fatemeh; Tahajjodi, Somayyeh Sadat; Sadeghian-Nodoushan, Fatemeh; Aflatoonian, Abbas; Abdoli, Ali-Mohammad; Nikukar, Habib; Aflatoonian, Behrouz

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarizes the proceedings of a 1 day national symposium entitled “Reproductive biology, stem cells biotechnology and regenerative medicine” held at Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran on 3rd March 2016. Here, we collected the papers that presented and discussed at this meeting by specialists that currently researched about the overlaps of the fields of reproductive biology and stem cells and their applications in regenerative medicine.

  9. Chemokine receptor CCR7 required for T lymphocyte exit from peripheral tissues.

    PubMed

    Debes, Gudrun F; Arnold, Carrie N; Young, Alan J; Krautwald, Stefan; Lipp, Martin; Hay, John B; Butcher, Eugene C

    2005-09-01

    Lymphocytes travel throughout the body to carry out immune surveillance and participate in inflammatory reactions. Their path takes them from blood through tissues into lymph and back to blood. Molecules that control lymphocyte recruitment into extralymphoid tissues are well characterized, but exit is assumed to be random. Here, we showed that lymphocyte emigration from the skin was regulated and was sensitive to pertussis toxin. CD4(+) lymphocytes emigrated more efficiently than CD8(+) or B lymphocytes. T lymphocytes in the afferent lymph expressed functional chemokine receptor CCR7, and CCR7 was required for T lymphocyte exit from the skin. The regulated expression of CCR7 by tissue T lymphocytes may control their exit, acting with recruitment mechanisms to regulate lymphocyte transit and accumulation during immune surveillance and inflammation. PMID:16116468

  10. Anti-infective peptide IDR-1002 augments monocyte chemotaxis towards CCR5 chemokines.

    PubMed

    Madera, Laurence; Hancock, Robert E W

    2015-08-28

    Innate defense regulator (IDR) peptides are a class of immunomodulators which enhance and modulate host innate immune responses against microbial pathogens. While IDR-mediated protection against a range of bacterial pathogens is dependent on enhanced monocyte recruitment to the site of infection, the mechanisms through which they increase monocyte trafficking remain unclear. In this study, anti-infective peptide IDR-1002 was shown to enhance monocyte chemotaxis towards chemokines CCL3 and CCL5. This enhancement correlated with the selective upregulation of CCR5 surface expression by peptide-treated monocytes. It was found that IDR-1002 enhancement of monocyte chemotaxis was fully dependent on CCR5 function. Furthermore, IDR-1002 enhanced chemokine-induced monocyte p38 MAPK phosphorylation in a CCR5-dependent fashion. Overall, these results indicate that peptide IDR-1002 can selectively influence monocyte recruitment by host chemokines through the regulation of chemokine receptors. PMID:26168734

  11. Probing the structural and topological requirements for CCR2 antagonism: holographic QSAR for indolopiperidine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Srikanth, K; Nair, Pramod C; Sobhia, M Elizabeth

    2008-02-15

    CCR2 is the major family of chemokine receptors which involve in the pathophysiology of the acute or chronic inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, asthma, obesity, and type-2 diabetes. Herein, we report the results of HQSAR model, developed for CCR2 antagonistic activity of indolopiperidine derivatives. The best HQSAR model with r(2)=0.916, q(2)=0.562 with atom count=4-7 was used to predict the activity of the test set molecules. The predicted values are in good agreement with experimental results and show the potential of the model for untested compounds. Analysis of molecular fragments throws light on essential structural and topological features of indolopiperidine derivatives for antagonist activity. The analysis shows that the presence of tertiary hydrogen bond acceptor groups is important for CCR2 antagonism. Fragments containing benzene ring substituted with one or more chlorine atoms show the positive effect of electron withdrawing group for favorable activity. PMID:18226895

  12. Exploring a model of human chemokine receptor CCR2 in presence of TAK779: A membrane based molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balupuri, Anand; Sobhia, M. Elizabeth

    2014-04-01

    Chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and a crucial target for various inflammation-driven diseases. In the present study, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations were performed on a CCR2 homology model. This work includes the comparative MD simulations of uncomplexed and ‘antagonist-complexed’ CCR2 models. These simulations yield insights into the binding mechanism of antagonist TAK779 and improve the understanding of various structural changes induced by the ligand in the CCR2 protein. Here, one 20 ns MD simulation was carried out on the uncomplexed CCR2 model in lipid bilayer to explore the effects of lipid membrane on the protein. Another 20 ns MD simulation was performed under the similar conditions on the docked CCR2-TAK779 complex. An alteration in the position and orientation of the ligand in binding site was observed after the simulation. Examination of protein-ligand complex suggested that TAK779 produced a greater structural change on the TM-III, TM-IV, TM-V and TM-VI than TM-I, TM-II and TM-VII. Interaction networks involving the conserved residues of uncomplexed and ‘antagonist-complexed’ CCR2 models were also examined. The major difference was observed to be the role of conserved residues of the DRY motif of TM-III and the NPxxY motif of TM-VII of CCR2.

  13. Characterization of developmental and stress mediated expression of cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR) in kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR) is an important enzyme for lignin biosynthesis as it catalyzes the first specific committed step in monolignol biosynthesis. We have cloned a full length coding sequence of CCR from kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.), which contains a 1,020-bp open reading frame (ORF), enco...

  14. Multiple Active States and Oligomerization of CCR5 Revealed by Functional Properties of Monoclonal AntibodiesV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Blanpain, Cédric; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Cihak, Josef; Wittamer, Valérie; Le Poul, Emmanuel; Issafras, Hassan; Stangassinger, Manfred; Vassart, Gilbert; Marullo, Stefano; Schloō̈ndorff, Detlef; Parmentier, Marc; Mack, Matthias

    2002-01-01

    CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is the principal coreceptor for macrophage-tropic strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). We have generated a set of anti-CCR5 monoclonal antibodies and characterized them in terms of epitope recognition, competition with chemokine binding, receptor activation and trafficking, and coreceptor activity. MC-4, MC-5, and MC-7 mapped to the amino-terminal domain, MC-1 to the second extracellular loop, and MC-6 to a conformational epitope covering multiple extracellular domains. MC-1 and MC-6 inhibited regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), macrophage inflammatory polypeptide-1β, and Env binding, whereas MC-5 inhibited macrophage inflammatory polypeptide-1β and Env but not RANTES binding. MC-6 induced signaling in different functional assays, suggesting that this monoclonal antibody stabilizes an active conformation of CCR5. Flow cytometry and real-time confocal microscopy showed that MC-1 promoted strong CCR5 endocytosis. MC-1 but not its monovalent isoforms induced an increase in the transfer of energy between CCR5 molecules. Also, its monovalent isoforms bound efficiently, but did not internalize the receptor. In contrast, MC-4 did not prevent RANTES binding or subsequent signaling, but inhibited its ability to promote CCR5 internalization. These results suggest the existence of multiple active conformations of CCR5 and indicate that CCR5 oligomers are involved in an internalization process that is distinct from that induced by the receptor's agonists. PMID:11854425

  15. In silico identified CCR4 antagonists target regulatory T cells and exert adjuvant activity in vaccination.

    PubMed

    Bayry, Jagadeesh; Tchilian, Elma Z; Davies, Matthew N; Forbes, Emily K; Draper, Simon J; Kaveri, Srini V; Hill, Adrian V S; Kazatchkine, Michel D; Beverley, Peter C L; Flower, Darren R; Tough, David F

    2008-07-22

    Adjuvants are substances that enhance immune responses and thus improve the efficacy of vaccination. Few adjuvants are available for use in humans, and the one that is most commonly used (alum) often induces suboptimal immunity for protection against many pathogens. There is thus an obvious need to develop new and improved adjuvants. We have therefore taken an approach to adjuvant discovery that uses in silico modeling and structure-based drug-design. As proof-of-principle we chose to target the interaction of the chemokines CCL22 and CCL17 with their receptor CCR4. CCR4 was posited as an adjuvant target based on its expression on CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs), which negatively regulate immune responses induced by dendritic cells (DC), whereas CCL17 and CCL22 are chemotactic agents produced by DC, which are crucial in promoting contact between DC and CCR4(+) T cells. Molecules identified by virtual screening and molecular docking as CCR4 antagonists were able to block CCL22- and CCL17-mediated recruitment of human Tregs and Th2 cells. Furthermore, CCR4 antagonists enhanced DC-mediated human CD4(+) T cell proliferation in an in vitro immune response model and amplified cellular and humoral immune responses in vivo in experimental models when injected in combination with either Modified Vaccinia Ankara expressing Ag85A from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MVA85A) or recombinant hepatitis B virus surface antigen (rHBsAg) vaccines. The significant adjuvant activity observed provides good evidence supporting our hypothesis that CCR4 is a viable target for rational adjuvant design. PMID:18621704

  16. A Role for the Chemokine Receptor CCR6 in Mammalian Sperm Motility and Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Caballero-Campo, Pedro; Buffone, Mariano G.; Benencia, Fabian; Conejo-García, José R.; Rinaudo, Paolo F.; Gerton, George L.

    2013-01-01

    Although recent evidence indicates that several chemokines and defensins, well-known as inflammatory mediators, are expressed in the male and female reproductive tracts, the location and functional significance of chemokine networks in sperm physiology and sperm reproductive tract interactions are poorly understood. To address this deficiency in our knowledge, we examined the expression and function in sperm of CCR6, a receptor common to several chemoattractant peptides, and screened several reproductive tract fluids for the presence of specific ligands. CCR6 protein is present in mouse and human sperm and mainly localized in the sperm tail with other minor patterns in sperm from mice (neck and acrosomal region) and men (neck and midpiece regions). As expected from the protein immunoblotting and immunofluorescence results, mouse Ccr6 mRNA is expressed in the testis. Furthermore, the Defb29 mRNA encoding the CCR6 ligand, β-defensin DEFB29, is expressed at high levels in the epididymis. As determined by protein chip analysis, several chemokines (including some that act through CCR6, such as CCL20/MIP-3α (formerly Macrophage Inflammatory Protein 3α) and protein hormones were present in human follicular fluid, endometrial secretions, and seminal plasma. In functional chemotaxis assays, capacitated human sperm exhibited a directional movement towards CCL20, and displayed modifications in motility parameters. Our data indicate that chemokine ligand/receptor interactions in the male and female genital tracts promote sperm motility and chemotaxis under non-inflammatory conditions. Therefore, some of the physiological reactions mediated by CCR6 ligands in male reproduction extend beyond a pro-inflammatory response and might find application in clinical reproduction and/or contraception. PMID:23765988

  17. Differential evolution of a CXCR4-using HIV-1 strain in CCR5wt/wt and CCR5∆32/∆32 hosts revealed by longitudinal deep sequencing and phylogenetic reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Le, Anh Q.; Taylor, Jeremy; Dong, Winnie; McCloskey, Rosemary; Woods, Conan; Danroth, Ryan; Hayashi, Kanna; Milloy, M.-J.; Poon, Art F. Y.; Brumme, Zabrina L.

    2015-01-01

    Rare individuals homozygous for a naturally-occurring 32 base pair deletion in the CCR5 gene (CCR5∆32/∆32) are resistant to infection by CCR5-using (“R5”) HIV-1 strains but remain susceptible to less common CXCR4-using (“X4”) strains. The evolutionary dynamics of X4 infections however, remain incompletely understood. We identified two individuals, one CCR5wt/wt and one CCR5∆32/∆32, within the Vancouver Injection Drug Users Study who were infected with a genetically similar X4 HIV-1 strain. While early-stage plasma viral loads were comparable in the two individuals (~4.5–5 log10 HIV-1 RNA copies/ml), CD4 counts in the CCR5wt/wt individual reached a nadir of <20 CD4 cells/mm3 within 17 months but remained >250 cells/mm3 in the CCR5∆32/∆32 individual. Ancestral phylogenetic reconstructions using longitudinal envelope-V3 deep sequences suggested that both individuals were infected by a single transmitted/founder (T/F) X4 virus that differed at only one V3 site (codon 24). While substantial within-host HIV-1 V3 diversification was observed in plasma and PBMC in both individuals, the CCR5wt/wt individual’s HIV-1 population gradually reverted from 100% X4 to ~60% R5 over ~4 years whereas the CCR5∆32/∆32 individual’s remained consistently X4. Our observations illuminate early dynamics of X4 HIV-1 infections and underscore the influence of CCR5 genotype on HIV-1 V3 evolution. PMID:26631642

  18. Impact of CCL2 and Its Receptor CCR2 Gene Polymorphism in North Indian Population: A Comparative Study in Different Ethnic Groups Worldwide.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vibha; Srivastava, Neena; Srivastava, Priyanka; Mittal, Rama Devi

    2013-07-01

    Chemokine are small, inducible pro-inflammatory cytokines involved in many biological processes, such as migration of leukocytes, atherosclerosis, angiogenesis, tumor growth, and metastasis. Chemokine are also known to influence tumor cell's activity. Specifically, tumor cells express chemokine receptors in a non random manner suggesting a role of chemokine in metastatic destination of tumor cells. The present study was conducted to determine distribution of (Chemokine receptor 2) CCR2 V64I, Chemokine ligand 2 CCL2 I/D, and CCL2 2518 A>G gene polymorphisms in North Indian population and compare with different populations globally. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based analysis was conducted in 200 normal healthy individuals of similar ethnicity. Allelic frequencies in wild type (GG) of CCR2 V64I G>A were 63 % G; CCL2 I/D 42 % II; CCL2 2518 A>G 40.5 % A. The minor variant allele frequency in our population was as follows: 19.5 % for CCR2 V64I, 35.5 % for CCL2 I/D, 35.3 % for CCL2 2518 A>G. We further compared frequency distribution for these genes with various published studies in different ethnicity. Our results suggested that frequency in chemokine genes exhibit distinctive pattern in India that could be attributed to ethnicity variation. This could assist in high-risk screening of human exposed to environmental carcinogens and cancer predisposition in different ethnic groups. Thus, they signify an impact of ethnicity and provide a basis for future epidemiological and clinical studies.

  19. Common promoter deletion is associated with 3.9-fold differential transcription of ovine CCR5 and reduced proviral level of ovine progressive pneumonia virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CCR5 is a chemokine receptor that regulates immune cell recruitment in inflammation and serves as a coreceptor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). A human CCR5 coding deletion (termed delta-32) results in strong resistance to HIV infection, and polymorphisms in CCR5 regulatory regions have been ...

  20. Bioengineering in the Millennium, National Institute of Health Symposium, Bioengineering: Building the Future of Biology and Medicine.

    PubMed

    Ranu, H S

    1998-01-01

    This symposium identified the major challenges in biomedical research that will benefit from bioengineering applications. Attention was focused on the important role that bioengineers will play in future advances in biomedical research. There was considerable discussion about how to integrate bioengineering with biological research in meeting the challenges of the twenty-first century. Symposium presenters showcased the accomplishments of NIH-funded bioengineering researches and increased the visibility of bioengineering to NIH leaders, staff and members of the intramural and extramural research community. Recommendations were also made for future NIH-funded research projects. Attention was also placed on how basic bioengineering research can lead to commercialization of new health care technology and therefore maintain the Nation's leadership in this important area. New products, from biotechnology and novel devices for diagnosis and treatment, are marketed through interactions between universities, medical centers, small start-up firms, and larger, more established companies. In the United States the gross revenue of the bioengineering private sector industry involved in the manufacture of health care products already exceeds $40 billion. More than 750 persons attended this bioengineering symposium. Over 110 scientific posters and exhibits relating to biology and medicine were presented. They provided a forum for showcasing NIH-funded bioengineering projects and fostered future collaboration among academic investigators, industry and members of the small business community. The role of bioengineering in the 21st century has already been highlighted by the author as far as research, education and space age technologies are concerned. The contributions of Pugwash bioengineer, Maciej Natecz, a member of the Polish Academy of Sciences, was recognized by the Conference Planning Committee. He was honoured for his work in nuclear disarmament.

  1. Silencing of CCR7 inhibits the growth, invasion and migration of prostate cancer cells induced by VEGFC

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Bao-Jin; Du, Cong-Lin; Fu, Yun-Feng; Zhang, Ya-Nan; Wang, Ru Wen

    2015-01-01

    Early in prostate cancer development, tumor cells express vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGF-C), a secreted molecule that is important in angiogenesis progression. CC-chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7), another protein involved in angiogenesis, is strongly expressed in most human cancers, where it activated promotes tumor growth as well as favoring tumor cell invasion and migration. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of down-regulating CCR7 expression on the growth of human prostate cancer cells stimulated by VEGFC. The CCR7-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) plasmid vector was constructed and then transfected into prostate cancer cells. The expression of CCR7 mRNA and protein was detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. Cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle distribution and cell migration were assessed following knockdown of CCR7 by RNA interference (RNAi). Western blot analysis was used to identify differentially expressed angiogenesis- and cell cycle-associated proteins in cells with silenced CCR7. The expression levels of CCR7 in prostate cancer cells transfected with siRNA were decreased, leading to a significant inhibition of prostate cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion induced by VEGFC. Western blot analysis revealed that silencing of CCR7 may inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 protein expression. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that RNAi can effectively silence CCR7 gene expression and inhibit the growth of prostate cancer cells, which indicates that there is a potential of targeting CCR7 as a novel gene therapy approach for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:26722441

  2. Neutralizing antibody and anti-retroviral drug sensitivities of HIV-1 isolates resistant to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Pugach, Pavel; Ketas, Thomas J.; Michael, Elizabeth; Moore, John P.

    2008-08-01

    The small molecule CCR5 inhibitors are a new class of drugs for treating infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). They act by binding to the CCR5 co-receptor and preventing its use during HIV-1-cell fusion. Escape mutants can be raised against CCR5 inhibitors in vitro and will arise when these drugs are used clinically. Here, we have assessed the responses of CCR5 inhibitor-resistant viruses to other anti-retroviral drugs that act by different mechanisms, and their sensitivities to neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The rationale for the latter study is that the resistance pathway for CCR5 inhibitors involves changes in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), which are also targets for NAbs. The escape mutants CC101.19 and D1/85.16 were selected for resistance to AD101 and vicriviroc (VVC), respectively, from the primary R5 HIV-1 isolate CC1/85. Each escape mutant was cross-resistant to other small molecule CCR5 inhibitors (aplaviroc, maraviroc, VVC, AD101 and CMPD 167), but sensitive to protein ligands of CCR5: the modified chemokine PSC-RANTES and the humanized MAb PRO-140. The resistant viruses also retained wild-type sensitivity to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) zidovudine, the non-nucleoside RTI nevirapine, the protease inhibitor atazanavir and other attachment and fusion inhibitors that act independently of CCR5 (BMS-806, PRO-542 and enfuvirtide). Of note is that the escape mutants were more sensitive than the parental CC1/85 isolate to a subset of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and to some sera from HIV-1-infected people, implying that sequence changes in Env that confer resistance to CCR5 inhibitors can increase the accessibility of some NAb epitopes. The need to preserve NAb resistance may therefore be a constraint upon how escape from CCR5 inhibitors occurs in vivo.

  3. A Vaccine against CCR5 Protects a Subset of Macaques upon Intravaginal Challenge with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVmac251

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Zoe; Jayashankar, Kartika; Peabody, Julianne; Montefiori, David; LaBranche, Celia C.; Keele, Brandon F.; Jensen, Kara; Abel, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    As an alternative to targeting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), we have developed vaccines targeting CCR5, a self-protein critically involved in HIV replication and pathogenesis. By displaying peptides derived from CCR5 at high density on the surface of virus-like particles, we can efficiently induce high-titer IgG antibodies against this self-molecule. Here, we investigated whether prophylactic immunization of rhesus macaques with a particle-based vaccine targeting two regions of macaque CCR5 could prevent or suppress vaginal infection with highly virulent SIVmac251. Twelve macaques were vaccinated with a bacteriophage Qß-based vaccine targeting macaque CCR5 (Qß.CCR5). Six control animals were immunized with the Qß platform alone. All animals immunized with Qß.CCR5 developed high-titer anti-CCR5 antibody responses. Macaques were vaginally challenged with a high dose of SIVmac251. The mean peak viral RNA levels in the vaccinated groups were 30-fold lower than in the control group (106.8 versus 108.3 copies/ml plasma). Three of the 12 vaccinated macaques dramatically suppressed simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) replication: peak viral loads were low (103 to 104 RNA copies/ml), and SIV RNA became undetectable from 6 weeks onward. No viral RNA or DNA could be detected in colon and lymph node biopsy specimens collected 13 months after challenge. In vivo depletion of CD8+ cells failed to induce a viral rebound. However, once anti-CCR5 antibody responses had waned, the 3 animals became infected after intravaginal and/or intravenous rechallenge. In conclusion, vaccination against CCR5 was associated with dramatic suppression of virus replication in a subset (25%) of macaques. These data support further research of vaccination against CCR5 to combat HIV infection. PMID:24307581

  4. Chemical and Biological National Security Program (CBNP) Annual Report FY2002 Overview Local Integration of NARAC With Cities (LINC)

    SciTech Connect

    Ermak, D L; Nasstrom, J S; Tull, J E; Baskett, R L; Pobanz, B; Mosley-Rovi, R

    2002-11-18

    The objective of the Local Integration of NARAC With Cities (LINC) project is to demonstrate the capability for providing local government agencies with advanced, CBNP-developed operational atmospheric plume prediction capabilities that can be seamlessly integrated with appropriate federal agency support for homeland security. LINC's approach is to integrate Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) tools and services with local emergency management and response centers. In the event of an airborne chemical or biological agent release in an urban area, large portions of the city and even the surrounding suburbs may be affected by the airborne plume, depending on the type of agent, size of release, dissemination mechanism and ambient meteorological conditions. The goal of LINC is to provide real-time predictions that would be used by emergency managers and responders (fire, police, hazmat, etc.) to map the extent and effects of hazardous airborne material. Prompt predictions are provided to guide first responders in determining protective actions to be taken (use of personal protective equipment, evacuation, sheltering in place, etc.), safe locations for incident command posts, and critical facilities that may be at risk (hospitals, schools, etc.). LINC also provides response teams from multiple jurisdictions (local, state, and federal) with tools to effectively share information regarding the areas and populations at risk. The ultimate goal of LINC is a seamless and coordinated nationwide system that integrates NARAC prediction and situation awareness resources with the appropriate local, state and federal agencies for homeland security applications ranging from planning to emergency response to consequence assessment and attribution.

  5. CCR2 and CCR5 receptor-binding properties of herpesvirus-8 vMIP-II based on sequence analysis and its solution structure.

    PubMed

    Shao, W; Fernandez, E; Sachpatzidis, A; Wilken, J; Thompson, D A; Schweitzer, B I; Lolis, E

    2001-05-01

    Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) is the infectious agent responsible for Kaposi's sarcoma and encodes a protein, macrophage inflammatory protein-II (vMIP-II), which shows sequence similarity to the human CC chemokines. vMIP-II has broad receptor specificity that crosses chemokine receptor subfamilies, and inhibits HIV-1 viral entry mediated by numerous chemokine receptors. In this study, the solution structure of chemically synthesized vMIP-II was determined by nuclear magnetic resonance. The protein is a monomer and possesses the chemokine fold consisting of a flexible N-terminus, three antiparallel beta strands, and a C-terminal alpha helix. Except for the N-terminal residues (residues 1-13) and the last two C-terminal residues (residues 73-74), the structure of vMIP-II is well-defined, exhibiting average rmsd of 0.35 and 0.90 A for the backbone heavy atoms and all heavy atoms of residues 14-72, respectively. Taking into account the sequence differences between the various CC chemokines and comparing their three-dimensional structures allows us to implicate residues that influence the quaternary structure and receptor binding and activation of these proteins in solution. The analysis of the sequence and three-dimensional structure of vMIP-II indicates the presence of epitopes involved in binding two receptors CCR2 and CCR5. We propose that vMIP-II was initially specific for CCR5 and acquired receptor-binding properties to CCR2 and other chemokine receptors.

  6. CCR2 and CCR5 receptor-binding properties of herpesvirus-8 vMIP-II based on sequence analysis and its solution structure.

    PubMed

    Shao, W; Fernandez, E; Sachpatzidis, A; Wilken, J; Thompson, D A; Schweitzer, B I; Lolis, E

    2001-05-01

    Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) is the infectious agent responsible for Kaposi's sarcoma and encodes a protein, macrophage inflammatory protein-II (vMIP-II), which shows sequence similarity to the human CC chemokines. vMIP-II has broad receptor specificity that crosses chemokine receptor subfamilies, and inhibits HIV-1 viral entry mediated by numerous chemokine receptors. In this study, the solution structure of chemically synthesized vMIP-II was determined by nuclear magnetic resonance. The protein is a monomer and possesses the chemokine fold consisting of a flexible N-terminus, three antiparallel beta strands, and a C-terminal alpha helix. Except for the N-terminal residues (residues 1-13) and the last two C-terminal residues (residues 73-74), the structure of vMIP-II is well-defined, exhibiting average rmsd of 0.35 and 0.90 A for the backbone heavy atoms and all heavy atoms of residues 14-72, respectively. Taking into account the sequence differences between the various CC chemokines and comparing their three-dimensional structures allows us to implicate residues that influence the quaternary structure and receptor binding and activation of these proteins in solution. The analysis of the sequence and three-dimensional structure of vMIP-II indicates the presence of epitopes involved in binding two receptors CCR2 and CCR5. We propose that vMIP-II was initially specific for CCR5 and acquired receptor-binding properties to CCR2 and other chemokine receptors. PMID:11358512

  7. Spatial heterogeneity of eukaryotic microbial communities in an unstudied geothermal diatomaceous biological soil crust: Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA.

    PubMed

    Meadow, James F; Zabinski, Catherine A

    2012-10-01

    Knowledge of microbial communities and their inherent heterogeneity has dramatically increased with the widespread use of high-throughput sequencing technologies, and we are learning more about the ecological processes that structure microbial communities across a wide range of environments, as well as the relative scales of importance for describing bacterial communities in natural systems. Little work has been carried out to assess fine-scale eukaryotic microbial heterogeneity in soils. Here, we present findings from a bar-coded 18S rRNA survey of the eukaryotic microbial communities in a previously unstudied geothermal diatomaceous biological soil crust in Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA, in which we explicitly compare microbial community heterogeneity at the particle scale within soil cores. Multivariate analysis of community composition showed that while subsamples from within the same soil core clustered together, community dissimilarity between particles in the same core was high. This study describes a novel soil microbial environment and also adds to our growing understanding of microbial heterogeneity and the scales relevant to the study of soil microbial communities.

  8. Ccr4-Not Regulates RNA Polymerase I Transcription and Couples Nutrient Signaling to the Control of Ribosomal RNA Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Laribee, R. Nicholas; Hosni-Ahmed, Amira; Workman, Jason J.; Chen, Hongfeng

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA synthesis is controlled by nutrient signaling through the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway. mTORC1 regulates ribosomal RNA expression by affecting RNA Polymerase I (Pol I)-dependent transcription of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) but the mechanisms involved remain obscure. This study provides evidence that the Ccr4-Not complex, which regulates RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) transcription, also functions downstream of mTORC1 to control Pol I activity. Ccr4-Not localizes to the rDNA and physically associates with the Pol I holoenzyme while Ccr4-Not disruption perturbs rDNA binding of multiple Pol I transcriptional regulators including core factor, the high mobility group protein Hmo1, and the SSU processome. Under nutrient rich conditions, Ccr4-Not suppresses Pol I initiation by regulating interactions with the essential transcription factor Rrn3. Additionally, Ccr4-Not disruption prevents reduced Pol I transcription when mTORC1 is inhibited suggesting Ccr4-Not bridges mTORC1 signaling with Pol I regulation. Analysis of the non-essential Pol I subunits demonstrated that the A34.5 subunit promotes, while the A12.2 and A14 subunits repress, Ccr4-Not interactions with Pol I. Furthermore, ccr4Δ is synthetically sick when paired with rpa12Δ and the double mutant has enhanced sensitivity to transcription elongation inhibition suggesting that Ccr4-Not functions to promote Pol I elongation. Intriguingly, while low concentrations of mTORC1 inhibitors completely inhibit growth of ccr4Δ, a ccr4Δ rpa12Δ rescues this growth defect suggesting that the sensitivity of Ccr4-Not mutants to mTORC1 inhibition is at least partially due to Pol I deregulation. Collectively, these data demonstrate a novel role for Ccr4-Not in Pol I transcriptional regulation that is required for bridging mTORC1 signaling to ribosomal RNA synthesis. PMID:25815716

  9. CCR4-Not Complex Subunit Not2 Plays Critical Roles in Vegetative Growth, Conidiation and Virulence in Watermelon Fusarium Wilt Pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yi; Cao, Zhongye; Huang, Lihong; Liu, Shixia; Shen, Zhihui; Wang, Yuyan; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Huijuan; Li, Dayong; Song, Fengming

    2016-01-01

    CCR4-Not complex is a multifunctional regulator that plays important roles in multiple cellular processes in eukaryotes. In the present study, the biological function of FonNot2, a core subunit of the CCR4-Not complex, was explored in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum (Fon), the causal agent of watermelon wilt disease. FonNot2 was expressed at higher levels in conidia and germinating conidia and during infection in Fon-inoculated watermelon roots than in mycelia. Targeted disruption of FonNot2 resulted in retarded vegetative growth, reduced conidia production, abnormal conidial morphology, and reduced virulence on watermelon. Scanning electron microscopy observation of infection behaviors and qRT-PCR analysis of in planta fungal growth revealed that the ΔFonNot2 mutant was defective in the ability to penetrate watermelon roots and showed reduced fungal biomass in root and stem of the inoculated plants. Phenotypic and biochemical analyses indicated that the ΔFonNot2 mutant displayed hypersensitivity to cell wall perturbing agents (e.g., Congo Red and Calcofluor White) and oxidative stress (e.g., H2O2 and paraquat), decreased fusaric acid content, and reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production during spore germination. Our data demonstrate that FonNot2 plays critical roles in regulating vegetable growth, conidiogenesis and conidia morphology, and virulence on watermelon via modulating cell wall integrity, oxidative stress response, ROS production and FA biosynthesis through the regulation of transcription of genes involved in multiple pathways.

  10. The FgNot3 Subunit of the Ccr4-Not Complex Regulates Vegetative Growth, Sporulation, and Virulence in Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Bui, Duc-Cuong; Son, Hokyoung; Shin, Ji Young; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Kim, Hun; Choi, Gyung Ja; Lee, Yin-Won

    2016-01-01

    The Ccr4-Not complex is evolutionarily conserved and important for multiple cellular functions in eukaryotic cells. In this study, the biological roles of the FgNot3 subunit of this complex were investigated in the plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum. Deletion of FgNOT3 resulted in retarded vegetative growth, retarded spore germination, swollen hyphae, and hyper-branching. The ΔFgnot3 mutants also showed impaired sexual and asexual sporulation, decreased virulence, and reduced expression of genes related to conidiogenesis. Fgnot3 deletion mutants were sensitive to thermal stress, whereas NOT3 orthologs in other model eukaryotes are known to be required for cell wall integrity. We found that FgNot3 functions as a negative regulator of the production of secondary metabolites, including trichothecenes and zearalenone. Further functional characterization of other components of the Not module of the Ccr4-Not complex demonstrated that the module is conserved. Each subunit primarily functions within the context of a complex and might have distinct roles outside of the complex in F. graminearum. This is the first study to functionally characterize the Not module in filamentous fungi and provides novel insights into signal transduction pathways in fungal development.

  11. The FgNot3 Subunit of the Ccr4-Not Complex Regulates Vegetative Growth, Sporulation, and Virulence in Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Duc-Cuong; Son, Hokyoung; Shin, Ji Young; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Kim, Hun; Choi, Gyung Ja; Lee, Yin-Won

    2016-01-01

    The Ccr4-Not complex is evolutionarily conserved and important for multiple cellular functions in eukaryotic cells. In this study, the biological roles of the FgNot3 subunit of this complex were investigated in the plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum. Deletion of FgNOT3 resulted in retarded vegetative growth, retarded spore germination, swollen hyphae, and hyper-branching. The ΔFgnot3 mutants also showed impaired sexual and asexual sporulation, decreased virulence, and reduced expression of genes related to conidiogenesis. Fgnot3 deletion mutants were sensitive to thermal stress, whereas NOT3 orthologs in other model eukaryotes are known to be required for cell wall integrity. We found that FgNot3 functions as a negative regulator of the production of secondary metabolites, including trichothecenes and zearalenone. Further functional characterization of other components of the Not module of the Ccr4-Not complex demonstrated that the module is conserved. Each subunit primarily functions within the context of a complex and might have distinct roles outside of the complex in F. graminearum. This is the first study to functionally characterize the Not module in filamentous fungi and provides novel insights into signal transduction pathways in fungal development. PMID:26799401

  12. CCR4-Not Complex Subunit Not2 Plays Critical Roles in Vegetative Growth, Conidiation and Virulence in Watermelon Fusarium Wilt Pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yi; Cao, Zhongye; Huang, Lihong; Liu, Shixia; Shen, Zhihui; Wang, Yuyan; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Huijuan; Li, Dayong; Song, Fengming

    2016-01-01

    CCR4-Not complex is a multifunctional regulator that plays important roles in multiple cellular processes in eukaryotes. In the present study, the biological function of FonNot2, a core subunit of the CCR4-Not complex, was explored in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum (Fon), the causal agent of watermelon wilt disease. FonNot2 was expressed at higher levels in conidia and germinating conidia and during infection in Fon-inoculated watermelon roots than in mycelia. Targeted disruption of FonNot2 resulted in retarded vegetative growth, reduced conidia production, abnormal conidial morphology, and reduced virulence on watermelon. Scanning electron microscopy observation of infection behaviors and qRT-PCR analysis of in planta fungal growth revealed that the ΔFonNot2 mutant was defective in the ability to penetrate watermelon roots and showed reduced fungal biomass in root and stem of the inoculated plants. Phenotypic and biochemical analyses indicated that the ΔFonNot2 mutant displayed hypersensitivity to cell wall perturbing agents (e.g., Congo Red and Calcofluor White) and oxidative stress (e.g., H2O2 and paraquat), decreased fusaric acid content, and reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production during spore germination. Our data demonstrate that FonNot2 plays critical roles in regulating vegetable growth, conidiogenesis and conidia morphology, and virulence on watermelon via modulating cell wall integrity, oxidative stress response, ROS production and FA biosynthesis through the regulation of transcription of genes involved in multiple pathways. PMID:27695445

  13. Ablation of type I hypersensitivity in experimental allergic conjunctivitis by eotaxin-1/CCR3 blockade

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Takao; Ohbayashi, Masaharu; Kuo, Chuan Hui; Komatsu, Naoki; Yakura, Keiko; Tominaga, Takeshi; Inoue, Yoshitsugu; Higashi, Hidemitsu; Murata, Meguru; Takeda, Shuzo; Fukushima, Atsuki; Liu, Fu-Tong; Rothenberg, Marc E.; Ono, Santa Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    The immune response is regulated, in part, by effector cells whose activation requires multiple signals. For example, T cells require signals emanating from the T cell antigen receptor and co-stimulatory molecules for full activation. Here, we present evidence indicating that IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions in vivo also require cognate signals to activate mast cells. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions in the conjunctiva are ablated in mice deficient in eotaxin-1, despite normal numbers of tissue mast cells and levels of IgE. To further define the co-stimulatory signals mediated by chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3), an eotaxin-1 receptor, effects of CCR3 blockade were tested with an allergic conjunctivitis model and in ex vivo isolated connective tissue-type mast cells. Our results show that CCR3 blockade significantly suppresses allergen-mediated hypersensitivity reactions as well as IgE-mediated mast cell degranulation. We propose that a co-stimulatory axis by CCR3, mainly stimulated by eotaxin-1, is pivotal in mast cell-mediated hypersensitivity reactions. PMID:19147836

  14. Antitumor effects of a monoclonal antibody to human CCR9 in leukemia cell xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Chamorro, Sonia; Vela, Maria; Franco-Villanueva, Ana; Carramolino, Laura; Gutiérrez, Julio; Gómez, Lucio; Lozano, María; Salvador, Beatriz; García-Gallo, Mónica; Martínez-A, Carlos; Kremer, Leonor

    2014-01-01

    Tumor expression of certain chemokine receptors is associated with resistance to apoptosis, migration, invasiveness and metastasis. Because CCR9 chemokine receptor expression is very restricted in healthy tissue, whereas it is present in tumors of distinct origins including leukemias, melanomas, prostate and ovary carcinomas, it can be considered a suitable candidate for target-directed therapy. Here, we report the generation and characterization of 91R, a mouse anti-human CCR9 IgG2b monoclonal antibody that recognizes an epitope within the CCR9 N-terminal domain. This antibody inhibits the growth of subcutaneous xenografts from human acute T lymphoblastic leukemia MOLT-4 cells in immunodeficient Rag2−/− mice. Tumor size in 91R-treated mice was reduced by 85% compared with isotype-matched antibody-treated controls. Tumor reduction in 91R-treated mice was concomitant with an increase in the apoptotic cell fraction and tumor necrotic areas, as well as a decrease in the fraction of proliferating cells and in tumor vascularization. In the presence of complement or murine natural killer cells, 91R promoted in vitro lysis of MOLT-4 leukemia cells, indicating that this antibody might eliminate tumor cells via complement- and cell-dependent cytotoxicity. The results show the potential of the 91R monoclonal antibody as a therapeutic agent for treatment of CCR9-expressing tumors. PMID:24870448

  15. 77 FR 55833 - Announcement of Public Meeting on the Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) Rule Retrospective Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... community water system is required by Federal regulations (63 FR 44512, August 19, 1998) to provide to its... and Request for Public Comment on Potential Approaches to Electronic Delivery of the CCR AGENCY..., 2012, to listen to stakeholder comments on potential approaches for providing Consumer...

  16. Interfering with CCL5/CCR5 at the Tumor-Stroma Interface.

    PubMed

    Bronte, Vincenzo; Bria, Emilio

    2016-04-11

    In this issue of Cancer Cell, Halama et al. (2016) further advance chemokine interference as a therapeutic option for cancer by demonstrating the effect of CCR5 blockade in reshaping macrophage polarization toward an anti-tumor functional state in patient-derived tumor models and liver metastases of colorectal cancer patients.

  17. Intravitreal TSG-6 suppresses laser-induced choroidal neovascularization by inhibiting CCR2+ monocyte recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Jin Kim, Sang; Ju Lee, Hyun; Yun, Ji-Hyun; Hwa Ko, Jung; Choi, Da Ye; Youn Oh, Joo

    2015-01-01

    Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is the hallmark of wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD), one of the leading causes of blindness in the elderly. Although the pathogenesis of CNV is not clear, a number of studies show that ocular-infiltrating macrophages and inflammation play a critical role in the development of CNV. TNFα-stimulated gene/protein (TSG)-6 is a multifunctional endogenous protein that has anti-inflammatory activities partly by regulating macrophage activation. Therefore, we here investigated the therapeutic potential of TSG-6 in a rat model of CNV induced by laser photocoagulation. Time course analysis showed that the expression of VEGF and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the choroid was up-regulated early after laser injury, and gradually decreased to baseline over 14 days. An intravitreal injection of TSG-6 suppressed the expression of VEGF and pro-inflammatory cytokines including CCL2, and reduced the size of CNV. Also, the number of Iba+ and CCR2+ cells including infiltrating macrophages was markedly lower in the CNV lesion of TSG-6-treated eyes. Further analysis identified CCR2+ CD11b+ CD11c+ cells and CCR2+ CD11b-CD11c+ cells as the cell populations that were increased by laser injury and reduced by TSG-6 treatment. Together, the results demonstrate that TSG-6 inhibits inflammation and CCR2+ monocyte recruitment into the choroid, and suppresses the development of CNV. PMID:26149224

  18. Association analysis of a CCR5 variant with ewe lifetime production in 3 breeds of sheep.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A deletion in the promoter region of CCR5 associates with a 50% reduction in proviral concentration (log10 env copies/microgram DNA) of ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) in blood. Nearly half of all flocks in the U.S. have at least one sheep infected with OPPV. Because OPP provirus concentr...

  19. Investigation of Inhibition Mechanism of Chemokine Receptor CCR5 by Micro-second Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Salmas, Ramin Ekhteiari; Yurtsever, Mine; Durdagi, Serdar

    2015-08-24

    Chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) belongs to G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and plays an important role in treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection since HIV uses CCR5 protein as a co-receptor. Recently, the crystal structure of CCR5-bound complex with an approved anti-retroviral drug (maroviroc) was resolved. During the crystallization procedure, amino acid residues (i.e., Cys224, Arg225, Asn226 and Glu227) at the third intra-cellular loop were replaced by the rubredoxin for stability reasons. In the current study, we aimed to understand the impact of the incorporated rubredoxin on the conformations of TM domains of the target protein. For this reason, rubredoxin was deleted from the crystal structure and the missing amino acids were engineered. The resultant structure was subjected to long (μs) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to shed light into the inhibitory mechanism. The derived model structure displayed a significant deviation in the cytoplasmic domain of TM5 and IC3 in the absence of rubredoxin. The principal component analyses (PCA) and MD trajectory analyses revealed important structural and dynamical differences at apo and holo forms of the CCR5.

  20. Association analysis of a CCR5 variant with ewe lifetime production.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A deletion in the promoter region of CCR5 associates with a 50% reduction in proviral concentration (log10 env copies/microgram DNA) of ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) in sheep blood. Because OPP provirus blood concentrations correlate with the degree of histological lesions in affected ti...

  1. CCR7 and IRF4-dependent dendritic cells regulate lymphatic collecting vessel permeability

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Stoyan; Scallan, Joshua P.; Kim, Ki-Wook; Werth, Kathrin; Johnson, Michael W.; Saunders, Brian T.; Wang, Peter L.; Kuan, Emma L.; Straub, Adam C.; Ouhachi, Melissa; Weinstein, Erica G.; Williams, Jesse W.; Briseño, Carlos; Colonna, Marco; Isakson, Brant E.; Gautier, Emmanuel L.; Förster, Reinhold; Davis, Michael J.; Zinselmeyer, Bernd H.

    2016-01-01

    Lymphatic collecting vessels direct lymph into and from lymph nodes (LNs) and can become hyperpermeable as the result of a previous infection. Enhanced permeability has been implicated in compromised immunity due to reduced flow of lymph and immune cells to LNs, which are the primary site of antigen presentation to T cells. Presently, very little is known about the molecular signals that affect lymphatic collecting vessel permeability. Here, we have shown that lymphatic collecting vessel permeability is controlled by CCR7 and that the chronic hyperpermeability of collecting vessels observed in Ccr7–/– mice is followed by vessel fibrosis. Reexpression of CCR7 in DCs, however, was sufficient to reverse the development of such fibrosis. IFN regulatory factor 4–positive (IRF4+) DCs constitutively interacted with collecting lymphatics, and selective ablation of this DC subset in Cd11c-Cre Irf4fl/fl mice also rendered lymphatic collecting vessels hyperpermeable and fibrotic. Together, our data reveal that CCR7 plays multifaceted roles in regulating collecting vessel permeability and fibrosis, with one of the key players being IRF4-dependent DCs. PMID:26999610

  2. Investigation of Inhibition Mechanism of Chemokine Receptor CCR5 by Micro-second Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Salmas, Ramin Ekhteiari; Yurtsever, Mine; Durdagi, Serdar

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) belongs to G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and plays an important role in treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection since HIV uses CCR5 protein as a co-receptor. Recently, the crystal structure of CCR5-bound complex with an approved anti-retroviral drug (maroviroc) was resolved. During the crystallization procedure, amino acid residues (i.e., Cys224, Arg225, Asn226 and Glu227) at the third intra-cellular loop were replaced by the rubredoxin for stability reasons. In the current study, we aimed to understand the impact of the incorporated rubredoxin on the conformations of TM domains of the target protein. For this reason, rubredoxin was deleted from the crystal structure and the missing amino acids were engineered. The resultant structure was subjected to long (μs) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to shed light into the inhibitory mechanism. The derived model structure displayed a significant deviation in the cytoplasmic domain of TM5 and IC3 in the absence of rubredoxin. The principal component analyses (PCA) and MD trajectory analyses revealed important structural and dynamical differences at apo and holo forms of the CCR5. PMID:26299310

  3. QSAR studies on CCR2 antagonists with chiral sensitive hologram descriptors.

    PubMed

    Nair, Pramod C; Srikanth, K; Sobhia, M Elizabeth

    2008-02-15

    Chemokines are small molecular weight water-soluble proteins playing a key role in immunomodulation and host-defense mechanisms. CCR2 receptor is targeted for diseases like arthritis, multiple sclerosis, vascular disease, obesity, and type 2 diabetes. Reported, herein are the QSAR studies performed on a diverse set of enantiopure analogues reported as CCR2 antagonists by hologram analysis. The best model highlights the importance of chirality feature in comparison with the other models developed without the chirality. The validated model showed high internal and external predictive power. The robustness of the model was achieved with good statistical r(2) of 0.945 and cross-validated r(cv)(2) of 0.837. The challenging test predictivity of the model was confirmed with r(pred)(2) of 0.807. The fragment fingerprints help in understanding essential pharmacophoric features for CCR2 antagonism and provide basis for SAR of the molecules. The 2D contribution maps with fragment information will be useful for the design of novel CCR2 antagonists having improved efficacy.

  4. 77 FR 57566 - Announcement of Public Meeting on the Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) Rule Retrospective Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-18

    ...) 250-8793. Correction In the Federal Register of September 11, 2012, in FR Doc. FRL-9726- 8; on page... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Announcement of Public Meeting on the Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) Rule Retrospective...

  5. Jak3 Is Involved in Dendritic Cell Maturation and CCR7-Dependent Migration

    PubMed Central

    Rivas-Caicedo, Ana; Soldevila, Gloria; Fortoul, Teresa I.; Castell-Rodríguez, Andrés; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo; García-Zepeda, Eduardo A.

    2009-01-01

    Background CCR7-mediated signalling is important for dendritic cell maturation and homing to the lymph nodes. We have previously demonstrated that Jak3 participates in the signalling pathway of CCR7 in T lymphocytes. Methodology and Principal Findings Here, we used Jak3−/− mice to analyze the role of Jak3 in CCR7-mediated dendritic cells migration and function. First, we found no differences in the generation of DCs from Jak3−/− bone marrow progenitors, when compared to wild type cells. However, phenotypic analysis of the bone marrow derived DCs obtained from Jak3−/− mice showed reduced expression of co-stimulatory molecules compared to wild type (Jak3+/+). In addition, when we analyzed the migration of Jak3−/− and Jak3+/+ mature DCs in response to CCL19 and CCL21 chemokines, we found that the absence of Jak3 results in impaired chemotactic responses both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, lymphocyte proliferation and contact hypersensitivity experiments showed that DC-mediated T lymphocyte activation is reduced in the absence of Jak3. Conclusion/Significance Altogether, our data provide strong evidence that Jak3 is important for DC maturation, migration and function, through a CCR7-mediated signalling pathway. PMID:19759904

  6. Absence of Association between CCR5 rs333 Polymorphism and Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Carlos Eduardo Coral; Perim, Aparecida de Lourdes; Ozawa, Patricia Midori Murobushi; Freire Vitiello, Glauco Akelinghton; Losi Guembarovski, Roberta; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a malignant disorder that originates from one single hematopoietic precursor committed to B- or T-cell lineage. Ordinarily, these cells express CCR5 chemokine receptor, which directs the immune response to a cellular pattern and is involved in cancer pathobiology. The genetic rs333 polymorphism of CCR5 (Δ32), results in a diminished receptor expression, thus leading to impaired cell trafficking. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of CCR5 chemokine receptor rs333 polymorphism in the pathogenesis of ALL. The genotype distribution was studied in 79 patients and compared with 80 control subjects, in a childhood population of Southern Brazil. Genotyping was performed using DNA samples amplified by polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP). The homozygous (Δ32/Δ32) deletion was not observed in any subject involved in the study. Heterozygous genotype was not associated with ALL risk (OR 0.7%; 95% CI 0.21–2.32; P > 0.05), nor recurrence status of ALL (OR 0.86; 95% CI 0.13–5.48; P > 0.05). This work demonstrated, for the first time, no significant differences in the frequency of the CCR5/Δ32 genotype between ALL and control groups, indicating no effect of this genetic variant on the ALL susceptibility and recurrence risk. PMID:24822066

  7. Autocrine MCP-1/CCR2 signaling stimulates proliferation and migration of renal carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Küper, Christoph; Beck, Franz-Xaver; Neuhofer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    The chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 [MCP-1; also known as chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2] is an important mediator of monocyte recruitment during inflammatory processes. Pathologically high expression levels of MCP-1 by tumor cells have been observed in a variety of cancer types. In the majority of cases, high MCP-1 expression is associated with a poor prognosis, as infiltration of the tumor with inflammatory monocytes promotes tumor progression and metastasis. MCP-1 is also expressed in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). In the present study, the function and the regulation of MCP-1 was investigated in two RCC cell lines, CaKi-1 and 786-O. In both cell lines, expression of MCP-1 was significantly enhanced compared with non-cancerous control cells. As expected, secretion of MCP-1 into the medium facilitated the recruitment of peripheral blood monocytes via the chemokine (C-C motif) receptor type 2 (CCR2). As expression of CCR2 was also detected in 786-O and CaKi-1 cells, the effect of autocrine MCP-1/CCR2 signaling was evaluated in these cells. In proliferation assays, administration of an MCP-1 neutralizing antibody or of a CCR2 antagonist to CaKi-1 and 786-O cells significantly decreased cell growth; supplementation of the growth medium with recombinant human MCP-1 had no additional effect on proliferation. The migration ability of RCC cells was impaired by MCP-1 neutralization or pharmacological CCR2 inhibition, while it was stimulated by the addition of recombinant human MCP-1, compared with untreated control cells. Finally, substantial differences in the regulation of MCP-1 expression were observed between RCC cell lines. In CaKi-1 cells, expression of MCP-1 appears to be largely mediated by the transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells 5, while in 786-O cells, deletion of the tumor suppressor gene Von-Hippel-Lindau appeared to be responsible for MCP-1 upregulation, as suggested by previous studies. Taken together, the results of the

  8. Autocrine MCP-1/CCR2 signaling stimulates proliferation and migration of renal carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Küper, Christoph; Beck, Franz-Xaver; Neuhofer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    The chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 [MCP-1; also known as chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2] is an important mediator of monocyte recruitment during inflammatory processes. Pathologically high expression levels of MCP-1 by tumor cells have been observed in a variety of cancer types. In the majority of cases, high MCP-1 expression is associated with a poor prognosis, as infiltration of the tumor with inflammatory monocytes promotes tumor progression and metastasis. MCP-1 is also expressed in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). In the present study, the function and the regulation of MCP-1 was investigated in two RCC cell lines, CaKi-1 and 786-O. In both cell lines, expression of MCP-1 was significantly enhanced compared with non-cancerous control cells. As expected, secretion of MCP-1 into the medium facilitated the recruitment of peripheral blood monocytes via the chemokine (C-C motif) receptor type 2 (CCR2). As expression of CCR2 was also detected in 786-O and CaKi-1 cells, the effect of autocrine MCP-1/CCR2 signaling was evaluated in these cells. In proliferation assays, administration of an MCP-1 neutralizing antibody or of a CCR2 antagonist to CaKi-1 and 786-O cells significantly decreased cell growth; supplementation of the growth medium with recombinant human MCP-1 had no additional effect on proliferation. The migration ability of RCC cells was impaired by MCP-1 neutralization or pharmacological CCR2 inhibition, while it was stimulated by the addition of recombinant human MCP-1, compared with untreated control cells. Finally, substantial differences in the regulation of MCP-1 expression were observed between RCC cell lines. In CaKi-1 cells, expression of MCP-1 appears to be largely mediated by the transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells 5, while in 786-O cells, deletion of the tumor suppressor gene Von-Hippel-Lindau appeared to be responsible for MCP-1 upregulation, as suggested by previous studies. Taken together, the results of the

  9. Dating the origin of the CCR5-Delta32 AIDS-resistance allele by the coalescence of haplotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, J C; Reich, D E; Goldstein, D B; Shin, H D; Smith, M W; Carrington, M; Winkler, C; Huttley, G A; Allikmets, R; Schriml, L; Gerrard, B; Malasky, M; Ramos, M D; Morlot, S; Tzetis, M; Oddoux, C; di Giovine, F S; Nasioulas, G; Chandler, D; Aseev, M; Hanson, M; Kalaydjieva, L; Glavac, D; Gasparini, P; Kanavakis, E; Claustres, M; Kambouris, M; Ostrer, H; Duff, G; Baranov, V; Sibul, H; Metspalu, A; Goldman, D; Martin, N; Duffy, D; Schmidtke, J; Estivill, X; O'Brien, S J; Dean, M

    1998-01-01

    The CCR5-Delta32 deletion obliterates the CCR5 chemokine and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 coreceptor on lymphoid cells, leading to strong resistance against HIV-1 infection and AIDS. A genotype survey of 4,166 individuals revealed a cline of CCR5-Delta32 allele frequencies of 0%-14% across Eurasia, whereas the variant is absent among native African, American Indian, and East Asian ethnic groups. Haplotype analysis of 192 Caucasian chromosomes revealed strong linkage disequilibrium between CCR5 and two microsatellite loci. By use of coalescence theory to interpret modern haplotype genealogy, we estimate the origin of the CCR5-Delta32-containing ancestral haplotype to be approximately 700 years ago, with an estimated range of 275-1,875 years. The geographic cline of CCR5-Delta32 frequencies and its recent emergence are consistent with a historic strong selective event (e.g. , an epidemic of a pathogen that, like HIV-1, utilizes CCR5), driving its frequency upward in ancestral Caucasian populations. PMID:9585595

  10. The C-C chemokine receptor 6 (CCR6) is crucial for Th2-driven allergic conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Chung, So-Hyang; Chang, Sun Young; Lee, Hyun Jung; Choi, Seong Hyun

    2015-12-01

    Allergic conjunctivitis from an allergen-driven Th2 response is characterized by conjunctival eosinophilic infiltration. Although CCL20-CCR6 axis has been reported to play a proinflammatory role in several murine models of autoimmune diseases including allergic diseases, their underlying mechanism needs to be investigated. We here examined whether CCL20-CCR6 axis could play a role in the development of allergic conjunctival inflammation using murine experimental allergic conjunctivitis (EAC) model induced by ovalbumin (OVA) allergen. Mice were challenged with consecutive 10days of OVA via conjunctival sac after systemic challenge with OVA and cholera toxin in alum. Several indicators for allergy were comparatively evaluated in wild-type and CCR6 KO EAC mice. Wild-type mice challenged with OVA via conjunctival sac following systemic challenge with OVA in alum had severe allergic conjunctivitis. The absence of CCR6 suppressed IgE secretion and allergic conjunctival inflammation. Reduced allergic inflammation was ascribable to reduced cytokine responses from Th-2 type in draining lymph node although Th17, regulatory T cells and dendritic cell subsets are not affected by the absence of CCR6. In addition, neutralization of CCR6 ligand, CCL20 could repress allergic conjunctival inflammation. Our findings suggested that CCR6 might be crucial for optimal development of Th2 immune responses and further allergic conjunctival inflammation in EAC model.

  11. Lack of Correlation Between the CCR5-Δ32 Mutation and Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Iranian Patients.

    PubMed

    Khorramdelazad, Hossein; Mortazavi, Yousef; Momeni, Mohammad; Arababadi, Mohammad Kazemi; Khandany, Behjat Kalantary; Moogooei, Mozhgan; Hassanshahi, Gholamhossein

    2015-03-01

    Chemokines and their receptors are crucially important in the pathogenesis of acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML). The CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a specific chemokine receptor for CC chemokine ligand 3 (CCL3), CCL4 and CCL5 which all play key roles in identifying cancer properties and localization of leukemia cells. It has been demonstrated that the known mutation in CCR5 gene (CCR5-Δ32) leads to mal-expression of the receptor and affect its function. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of CCR5-Δ32 mutation within Iranian AML patients. In this study, blood samples were obtained from 60 AML patients and 300 healthy controls. The CCR5-Δ32 mutation was evaluated using Gap-PCR technique. Our results showed that CCR5-Δ32 mutation was not found in the patients, while three out of the controls had hetrozygotic form of this mutation. The rest of studied samples had the wild form of the gene. According to these findings, it can probably be concluded that the CCR5-Δ32 is not associated with susceptibility to AML in Iranian patients.

  12. CCR5 Blockade Suppresses Melanoma Development Through Inhibition of IL-6-Stat3 Pathway via Upregulation of SOCS3.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qiu; Jiang, Jun; Liu, Jian

    2015-12-01

    In order to understand how tumor cells can escape immune surveillance mechanisms and thus develop antitumor therapies, it is critically important to investigate the mechanisms by which the immune system interacts with the tumor microenvironment. In our current study, we found that chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) neutralization resulted in reduced melanoma tumor size, decreased percentage of CD11b+ Gr-1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), and increased proportion of cluster of differentiation (CD)3+ T cells in tumor tissues. Suppressive activity of MDSCs on CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cell proliferation is significantly inhibited by anti-CCR5 antibody. CCR5 blockade also suppresses interleukin (IL)-6 induction, which in turn deactivates signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) in tumors. Furthermore, the suppressed B16 tumor growth induced by CCR5 blockade is abolished with additional administration of recombinant IL-6. CCR5 blockade also induces suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) upregulations, and anti-CCR5 antibody fails to suppress expression of phospho-Stat3 (p-Stat3), matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9), and IL-6 in cells transfected with SOCS3 short-interfering RNA (SiRNA). All these data suggest that CCR5 blockade suppresses melanoma development through inhibition of IL-6-Stat3 pathway via upregulation of SOCS3.

  13. Cell-specific RNA aptamer against human CCR5 specifically targets HIV-1 susceptible cells and inhibits HIV-1 infectivity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiehua; Satheesan, Sangeetha; Li, Haitang; Weinberg, Marc S; Morris, Kevin V; Burnett, John C; Rossi, John J

    2015-03-19

    The C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is a receptor expressed by T cells and macrophages that serves as a coreceptor for macrophage-tropic HIV-1. Loss of CCR5 is associated with resistance to HIV-1. Here, we combine the live-cell-based SELEX with high-throughput sequencing technology to generate CCR5 RNA aptamers capable of specifically targeting HIV-1 susceptible cells (as small interfering RNA [siRNA] delivery agent) and inhibiting HIV-1 infectivity (as antiviral agent) via block of the CCR5 required for HIV-1 to enter cells. One of the best candidates, G-3, efficiently bound and was internalized into human CCR5-expressing cells. The G-3 specifically neutralized R5 virus infection in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and in vivo generated human CD4(+) T cells with a nanomolar inhibitory concentration 50%. G-3 was also capable of transferring functional siRNAs to CCR5-expressing cells. Collectively, the cell-specific, internalizing, CCR5-targeted aptamers and aptamer-siRNA conjugates offer promise for overcoming some of the current challenges of drug resistance in HIV-1 by providing cell-type- or tissue-specific delivery of various therapeutic moieties.

  14. CCR4 Controls the Suppressive Effects of Regulatory T Cells on Early and Late Events during Severe Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Molinaro, Raphael; Pecli, Cyntia; Guilherme, Rafael F.; Alves-Filho, José Carlos; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Canetti, Claudio; Kunkel, Steven L.; Bozza, Marcelo T.; Benjamim, Claudia F.

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a deadly disease characterized by an overwhelming release of inflammatory mediators and the activation of different types of cells. This altered state of cell activation, termed leukocyte reprogramming, contributes to patient outcome. However, the understanding of the process underlying sepsis and the role of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in sepsis remains to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of CCR4, the CCL17/CCL22 chemokine receptor, in the innate and acquired immune responses during severe sepsis and the role of Tregs in effecting the outcome. In contrast with wild-type (WT) mice subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) sepsis, CCR4-deficient (CCR4-/-) septic mice presented an increased survival rate, significant neutrophil migration toward the infection site, a low bacterial count in the peritoneum, and reduced lung inflammation and serum cytokine levels. Thus, a better early host response may favor an adequate long-term response. Consequently, the CCR4-/- septic mice were not susceptible to secondary fungal infection, in contrast with the WT septic mice. Furthermore, Tregs cells from the CCR4-/- septic mice showed reduced suppressive effects on neutrophil migration (both in vivo and in vitro), lymphocyte proliferation and ROS production from activated neutrophils, in contrast with what was observed for Tregs from the WT septic mice. These data show that CCR4 is involved in immunosuppression after severe sepsis and suggest that CCR4+ Tregs negatively modulate the short and long-term immune responses. PMID:26197455

  15. SLC/CCR7 stimulates the proliferation of BMDCs by the pNF-kappaB p65 pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuang; Li, Rilun; Qin, Jie; Zhong, Cuiping; Liang, Chunmin

    2010-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR7 is highly expressed in dendritic cells (DCs), T cells, and other immune effector cells. One of the high-affinity ligand that can bind to CCR7 is the secondary lymphoid tissue chemokine (SLC). The SLC/CCR7 axis plays an important role in the immune system by inducing the chemotaxis and migration of immune effector cells. In this study, we examined the effect of SLC at different concentrations (0, 50, 100, 200, 300, and 400 ng/mL) on the proliferation of bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs). ELC (CCL19), another high-affinity ligand for CCR7, was used as the control at the same time. We found that SLC directly stimulated the proliferation of BMDCs and enhanced the antigen-presenting function and CCR7 expression. Western blot analysis showed that pNF-kappaBp65 was involved in this mechanism. We also found that the NF-kappaB inhibitor PDTC could specifically block the proliferation and CCR7 expression of BMDCs induced by SLC or ELC (200 ng/mL). The results suggested that there were cross-talk signals between the chemotaxis and proliferation of BMDCs involving the SLC/CCR7 axis.

  16. RNAi-Mediated CCR5 Knockdown Provides HIV-1 Resistance to Memory T Cells in Humanized BLT Mice.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Saki; Ringpis, Gene-Errol; Marsden, Matthew D; Cortado, Ruth V; Wilhalme, Holly M; Elashoff, David; Zack, Jerome A; Chen, Irvin S Y; An, Dong Sung

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) modified with a lentiviral vector bearing a potent nontoxic short hairpin RNA (sh1005) directed to the HIV coreceptor CCR5 is capable of continuously producing CCR5 downregulated CD4+ T lymphocytes. Here, we characterized HIV-1 resistance of the sh1005-modified CD4+ T lymphocytes in vivo in humanized bone marrow/liver/thymus (hu BLT) mice. The sh1005-modified CD4+ T lymphocytes were positively selected in CCR5-tropic HIV-1-challenged mice. The sh1005-modified memory CD4+ T lymphocytes (the primary target of CCR5-tropic HIV-1) expressing sh1005 were maintained in lymphoid tissues in CCR5-tropic HIV-1-challenged mice. Frequencies of HIV-1 p24 expressing cells were significantly reduced in the sh1005-modified splenocytes by ex vivo cell stimulation confirming that CCR5 downregulated sh1005 modified cells are protected from viral infection. These results demonstrate that stable CCR5 downregulation through genetic modification of human HSPC by lentivirally delivered sh1005 is highly effective in providing HIV-1 resistance. Our results provide in vivo evidence in a relevant small animal model that sh1005 is a potent early-step anti-HIV reagent that has potential as a novel anti-HIV-1 HSPC gene therapeutic reagent for human applications. PMID:25689223

  17. Cell-specific RNA aptamer against human CCR5 specifically targets HIV-1 susceptible and inhibits HIV-1 infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiehua; Satheesan, Sangeetha; Li, Haitang; Weinberg, Marc S.; Morris, Kevin V.; Burnett, John; Rossi, John

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is a receptor expressed by T-cells and macrophages that serves as a co-receptor for macrophage-tropic HIV-1. Loss of CCR5 is associated with resistance to HIV-1. Here we combine the live cell-based SELEX with high throughput sequencing technology to generate CCR5 RNA aptamers capable of specifically targeting HIV-1 susceptible cells (as siRNA delivery agent) and inhibiting HIV-1 infectivity (as antiviral agent) via block of the CCR5 required for HIV-1 to enter cells. One of the best candidates, G-3, efficiently bound and was internalized into human CCR5 expressing cells. The G-3 specifically neutralized R5 virus infection in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and in vivo generated human CD4+ T cells with a nanomolar IC50. G-3 was also capable of transferring functional siRNAs to CCR5 expressing cells. Collectively, the cell-specific, internalizing, CCR5-targeted aptamers and aptamer-siRNA conjugates offer promise for overcoming some of the current challenges of drug resistance in HIV-1 by providing cell-type- or tissue-specific delivery of various therapeutic moieties. PMID:25754473

  18. CCR5-Δ32 Heterozygosity, HIV-1 Reservoir Size, and Lymphocyte Activation in Individuals Receiving Long-term Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Timothy J; Hanhauser, Emily; Harrison, Linda J; Palmer, Christine D; Romero-Tejeda, Marisol; Jost, Stephanie; Bosch, Ronald J; Kuritzkes, Daniel R

    2016-03-01

    We conducted a case-controlled study of the associations of CCR5-Δ32 heterozygosity with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reservoir size, lymphocyte activation, and CCR5 expression in 114 CCR5(Δ32/WT) and 177 wild-type CCR5 AIDS Clinical Trials Group participants receiving suppressive antiretroviral therapy. Overall, no significant differences were found between groups for any of these parameters. However, higher levels of CCR5 expression correlated with lower amounts of cell-associated HIV-1 RNA. The relationship between CCR5-Δ32 heterozygosity, CCR5 expression, and markers of HIV-1 persistence is likely to be complex and may be influenced by factors such as the duration of ART.

  19. Prognostic value of a CCR5 defective allele in pediatric HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Romiti, M. L.; Colognesi, C.; Cancrini, C.; Mas, A.; Berrino, M.; Salvatori, F.; Orlandi, P.; Jansson, M.; Palomba, E.; Plebani, A.; Bertran, J. M.; Hernandez, M.; de Martino, M.; Amoroso, A.; Tovo, P. A.; Rossi, P.; Espanol, T.; Scarlatti, G.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A deletion of 32 base pairs in the CCR5 gene (delta32 CCR5) has been linked to resistance to HIV-1 infection in exposed adults and to the delay of disease progression in infected adults. MATERIALS AND METHODS: To determine the role of delta32 CCR5 in disease progression of HIV-1 infected children born to seropositive mothers, we studied a polymerase chain reaction in 301 HIV-1 infected, 262 HIV-1 exposed-uninfected and 47 HIV-1 unexposed-uninfected children of Spanish and Italian origin. Infected children were further divided into two groups according to their rate of HIV-1 disease progression: rapid progressors who developed severe clinical and/or immunological conditions within the second year of life, and delayed progressors with any other evolution of disease. Among the latter were the long-term, non-progressors (LTNP) who presented with mild or no symptoms of HIV-1 infection above 8 years of age. Viral phenotype was studied for 45 delayed progressors. RESULTS: No correlation was found between delta32 CCR5 and mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1. However, the frequency of the deletion was substantially higher in LTNP, compared with delayed (p = 0.019) and rapid progressors (p = 0.0003). In children carrying the delta32 CCRS mutation, the presence of MT-2 tropic virus isolate was associated with a severe immune suppression (p = 0.028); whereas, the presence of MT-2 negative viruses correlated with LTNP (p = 0.010). CONCLUSIONS: Given the rapidity and simplicity of the assay, the delta32 CCR5 mutation may be a useful predictive marker to identify children with delayed disease progression who, consequently, may not require immediate antiretroviral treatment. PMID:10803406

  20. Macrophages recruited via CCR2 produce insulin-like growth factor-1 to repair acute skeletal muscle injury

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Haiyan; Huang, Danping; Saederup, Noah; Charo, Israel F.; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Zhou, Lan

    2011-01-01

    CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) is essential to acute skeletal muscle injury repair. We studied the subpopulation of inflammatory cells recruited via CCR2 signaling and their cellular functions with respect to muscle regeneration. Mobilization of monocytes/macrophages (MOs/MPs), but not lymphocytes or neutrophils, was impaired from bone marrow to blood and from blood to injured muscle in Ccr2−/− mice. While the Ly-6C+ but not the Ly-6C− subset of MOs/MPs was significantly reduced in blood, both subsets were drastically reduced in injured muscle of Ccr2−/− mice. Expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I) was markedly up-regulated in injured muscle of wild-type but not Ccr2−/− mice. IGF-I was strongly expressed by macrophages within injured muscle, more prominently by the Ly-6C− subset. A single injection of IGF-I, but not PBS, into injured muscle to replace IGF-I remarkably improved muscle regeneration in Ccr2−/− mice. CCR2 was not detected in myogenic cells or capillary endothelial cells in injured muscle to suggest its direct involvement in muscle regeneration or angiogenesis. We conclude that CCR2 is essential to acute skeletal muscle injury repair primarily by recruiting Ly-6C+ MOs/MPs. Within injured muscle, these cells conduct phagocytosis, contribute to accumulation of intramuscular Ly-6C− macrophages, and produce a high level of IGF-I to promote muscle regeneration.—Lu, H., Huang, D., Saederupm, N., Charo, I. F., Ransohoff, R. M., Zhou, L. Macrophages recruited via CCR2 produce insulin-like growth factor-1 to repair acute skeletal muscle injury. PMID:20889618

  1. CCR7 as a predictive biomarker associated with computed tomography for the diagnosis of lymph node metastasis in bladder carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, JINBO; CUI, YU; LIU, LONGFEI; LI, CHAO; TANG, YUNHUA; ZHOU, XU; QI, LIN; ZU, XIONGBING

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the expression levels of CC-chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) combined with computed tomography (CT) was associated with lymph node metastasis in bladder transitional cell carcinoma (BTCC). For this purpose, 115 cases of BTCC were analyzed at the Department of Urology of Xiangya Hospital, Central South University (Changsha, China). Preoperative CT scans of abdomen and pelvis, immunohistochemistry of CCR7 expression in the tumor specimens and pathological findings for lymph node metastasis were assessed. In addition, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of CCR7 and CT for the diagnosis of lymph node metastasis in BTCC were evaluated separately and jointly. The expression levels of CCR7 were observed to be significantly higher in BTCC than in normal controls (P<0.01). Multivariate analysis indicated that the overexpression of CCR7 was an independent predictor for lymph node metastasis in BTCC (P<0.05). The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of CCR7 combined with CT scan for the diagnosis of lymph node metastasis in BTCC were 92.3, 83.6 and 70.0%, respectively. By contrast, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of CCR7 alone were 88.1, 69.9 and 76.5%, respectively, while the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of CT alone were 52.4, 79.5 and 69.6%, respectively. The results of the present study indicated that CCR7 is an independent predictor of lymph node metastasis in BTCC. Therefore, the use of CCR7 combined with CT may improve the accuracy of the diagnosis of lymph node metastasis in BTCC. PMID:26870276

  2. [Topical issues of biological safety under current conditions. Part 3. Scientific provision for the national regulation of the biological safety framework in its broad interpretation].

    PubMed

    Onishchenko, G G; Smolensky, V Yu; Ezhlova, E B; Demina, Yu V; Toporkov, V P; Toporkov, A V; Lyapin, M N; Kutyrev, V V

    2014-01-01

    Consequent of investigation concerned with biological safety (BS) framework development in its broad interpretation, reflected in the Russian Federation State Acts, identified have been conceptual entity parameters of the up-to-date broad interpretation of BS, which have formed a part of the developed by the authors system for surveillance (prophylaxis, localization, indication, identification, and diagnostics) and control (prophylaxis, localization, and response/elimination) over the emergency situations of biological (sanitary-epidemiological) character. The System functionality is activated through supplying the content with information data which are concerned with monitoring and control of specific internal and external threats in the sphere of BS provision fixed in the Supplement 2 of the International Health Regulations (IHR, 2005), and with the previously characterized nomenclature of hazardous biological factors. The system is designed as a network-based research-and-practice tool for evaluation of the situation in the sphere of BS provision, as well as assessment of efficacy of management decision making as regards BS control and proper State policy implementation. Most of the system elements either directly or indirectly relate to the scope of activities conducted by Federal Service for Surveillance in the Sphere of Consumers Rights Protection and Human Welfare, being substantial argument for allocating coordination functions in the sphere of BS provision to this government agency and consistent with its function as the State Coordinator on IHR (2005). The data collected serve as materials to Draft Federal Law "Concerning biological safety provision of the population". PMID:25971137

  3. [Topical issues of biological safety under current conditions. Part 3. Scientific provision for the national regulation of the biological safety framework in its broad interpretation].

    PubMed

    Onishchenko, G G; Smolensky, V Yu; Ezhlova, E B; Demina, Yu V; Toporkov, V P; Toporkov, A V; Lyapin, M N; Kutyrev, V V

    2014-01-01

    Consequent of investigation concerned with biological safety (BS) framework development in its broad interpretation, reflected in the Russian Federation State Acts, identified have been conceptual entity parameters of the up-to-date broad interpretation of BS, which have formed a part of the developed by the authors system for surveillance (prophylaxis, localization, indication, identification, and diagnostics) and control (prophylaxis, localization, and response/elimination) over the emergency situations of biological (sanitary-epidemiological) character. The System functionality is activated through supplying the content with information data which are concerned with monitoring and control of specific internal and external threats in the sphere of BS provision fixed in the Supplement 2 of the International Health Regulations (IHR, 2005), and with the previously characterized nomenclature of hazardous biological factors. The system is designed as a network-based research-and-practice tool for evaluation of the situation in the sphere of BS provision, as well as assessment of efficacy of management decision making as regards BS control and proper State policy implementation. Most of the system elements either directly or indirectly relate to the scope of activities conducted by Federal Service for Surveillance in the Sphere of Consumers Rights Protection and Human Welfare, being substantial argument for allocating coordination functions in the sphere of BS provision to this government agency and consistent with its function as the State Coordinator on IHR (2005). The data collected serve as materials to Draft Federal Law "Concerning biological safety provision of the population".

  4. CCL2-CCR2 axis promotes metastasis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma by activating ERK1/2-MMP2/9 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Changqing; Xia, Weixiong; Jiang, Chen; Zeng, Tingting; Ye, Yanfang; Ke, Liangru; Yu, Yahui; Liang, Hu; Guan, Xin-Yuan; Guo, Xiang; Xiang, Yanqun

    2016-01-01

    Distant metastasis remains the major failure of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In this study, the roles of chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2), and its receptor chemokine C-C motif receptor type 2 (CCR2) on NPC metastasis were investigated. Serum CCL2 and CCL2/CCR2 expression level were remarkably increased in NPC patients compared to non-tumor patients by ELISA and IHC analyses. High expressions of CCL2/CCR2 were significantly associated with NPC metastasis and poor overall survival (OS). High expression of CCR2 is an independent adverse prognostic factor of OS and distant metastasis free survival (DMFS). Overexpressions of CCL2 and CCR2 were detected in high-metastatic NPC cell lines. Upregulating CCL2 and CCR2 respectively in low-metastatic NPC cell lines could promote cell migration and invasion, and exogenous CCL2 enhanced the motility in CCR2-overexpressing cells. On the other hand, downregulating CCL2 and CCR2 respectively in high-metastatic NPC cell lines by shRNA could decrease cell migration and invasion. However, exogenous CCL2 could not rescue the weaken ability of motility of CCR2-silencing cells. In nude mouse model, distant metastasis was significantly facilitated in either CCL2-overexpressing or CCR2-overexpressing groups, which was more obvious in CCR2-overexpressing group. Also, distant metastasis was considerably inhibited in either CCL2-silencing or CCR2-silencing groups. Dual overexpression of CCL2/CCR2 could activate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) signaling pathway, which sequentially induced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 2 and 9 upregulations in the downstream. In conclusion, CCL2-CCR2 axis could promote NPC metastasis by activating ERK1/2-MMP2/9 pathway. This study helps to develop novel therapeutic targets for distant metastasis in NPC. PMID:26701209

  5. Cenicriviroc, a Novel CCR5 (R5) and CCR2 Antagonist, Shows In Vitro Activity against R5 Tropic HIV-2 Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Visseaux, Benoit; Charpentier, Charlotte; Collin, Gilles; Bertine, Mélanie; Peytavin, Gilles; Damond, Florence; Matheron, Sophie; Lefebvre, Eric; Brun-Vézinet, Françoise; Descamps, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Background Maraviroc activity against HIV-2, a virus naturally resistant to different HIV-1 antiretroviral drugs, has been recently demonstrated. The aim of this study was to assess HIV-2 susceptibility to cenicriviroc, a novel, once-daily, dual CCR5 and CCR2 antagonist that has completed Phase 2b development in HIV-1 infection. Methods Cenicriviroc phenotypic activity has been tested using a PBMC phenotypic susceptibility assay against four R5-, one X4- and one dual-tropic HIV-2 clinical primary isolates. All isolates were obtained by co-cultivation of PHA-activated PBMC from distinct HIV-2-infected CCR5-antagonist-naïve patients included in the French HIV-2 cohort and were previously tested for maraviroc susceptibility using the same protocol. HIV-2 tropism was determined by phenotypic assay using Ghost(3) cell lines. Results Regarding the 4 R5 HIV-2 clinical isolates tested, effective concentration 50% EC50 for cenicriviroc were 0.03, 0.33, 0.45 and 0.98 nM, similar to those observed with maraviroc: 1.13, 0.58, 0.48 and 0.68 nM, respectively. Maximum percentages of inhibition (MPI) of cenicriviroc were 94, 94, 93 and 98%, similar to those observed with maraviroc (93, 90, 82, 100%, respectively). The dual- and X4-tropic HIV-2 strains were resistant to cenicriviroc with EC50 >1000 nM and MPI at 33% and 4%, respectively. Conclusions In this first study assessing HIV-2 susceptibility to cenicriviroc, we observed an in vitro activity against HIV-2 R5-tropic strains similar to that observed with maraviroc. Thus, cenicriviroc may offer a once-daily treatment opportunity in the limited therapeutic arsenal for HIV-2. Clinical studies are warranted. PMID:26247470

  6. Fourth report on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect

    Loar, J.M.

    1994-04-01

    In response to a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC) and selected tributaries. BMAP currently consists of six major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs on-site and the aquatic environs off-site. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota, (3) biological indicator studies, (4) instream ecological monitoring, (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment, and (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake. The ecological characterization of the WOC watershed will provide baseline data that can be used to document the ecological effects of the water pollution control program and the remedial action program. The long-term nature of BMAP ensures that the effectiveness of remedial measures will be properly evaluated.

  7. Second report on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect

    Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Bailey, R.D.; Blaylock, B.G.; Boston, H.L.; Cox, D.K.; Huston, M.A.; Kimmel, B.L.; Loar, J.M.; Olsen, C.R.; Ryon, M.G.; Shugart, L.R.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.; Walton, B.T.; Talmage, S.S.; Murphy, J.B.; Valentine, C.K.; Appellanis, S.M.; Jimenez, B.D.; Huq, M.V.; Meyers-Schone, L.J.; Mohrbacher, D.A.; Olsen, C.R.; Stout, J.G.

    1992-12-01

    As a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC); selected tributaries of WOC, including Fifth Creek, First Creek, Melton Branch, and Northwest Tributary; and the Clinch River. BMAP consists of seven major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs on-site and the aquatic environs off-site. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring; (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota; (3) biological indicator studies; (4) instream ecological monitoring; (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment; (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake (WOL); and (7) contaminant transport, distribution, and fate in the WOC embayment-Clinch River-Watts Bar Reservoir system. This document, the second of a series of annual reports, described the results of BMAP studies conducted in 1987.

  8. CCR9 antagonism: potential in the treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wendt, Emily; Keshav, Satish

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), mainly comprising Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), is a chronic condition that primarily affects the intestine and is characterized by leukocytic infiltration. Blocking the migration of leukocytes from the circulation is therefore a reasonable therapeutic goal. Recent clinical trials using this approach have shown promise, with the monoclonal antibody to α4β7 integrin, vedolizumab, and previously with the monoclonal antibody to the α4 subunit, natalizumab. Directly targeting the subset of α4β7 expressing cells that co-express CC chemokine receptor 9 (CCR9), using the orally administered antagonist, CCX282-B, also known as vercirnon, has also been evaluated in Phase II and III trials that have produced mixed results. Although CCX282-B showed efficacy in inducing response in active CD in early studies, this was not confirmed in a Phase III study. CCX282-B was also more effective than placebo in maintaining remission, and this result has yet to be confirmed in Phase III. The efficacy of blocking CCR9 in UC, where vedolizumab was effective, has not been tested. The prospect of targeting CCR9 in IBD remains attractive. Much of the local accumulation of inflammatory cells in the intestine arises from migration rather than local proliferation and genetic and pharmacological targeting of CCR9 or its ligand in preclinical models that mimic UC and CD ameliorate inflammation in some cases. Furthermore, binding of chemokine ligands to receptor is a critical step in activating integrin binding, so there is a potential for synergistic action between integrin and chemokine antagonists. CCR9 is expressed on a smaller proportion of circulating cells than α4β7 integrin, which may offer greater specificity of effect, particularly in long term use. Furthermore, while α4β7 is widely expressed on T and B cell subsets, CCR9 is mainly expressed on effector memory Th1 cells. Indications for the use of intestine-specific integrin

  9. Down-regulation of the chemokine receptor CCR5 by activation of chemotactic formyl peptide receptor in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Shen, W; Li, B; Wetzel, M A; Rogers, T J; Henderson, E E; Su, S B; Gong, W; Le, Y; Sargeant, R; Dimitrov, D S; Oppenheim, J J; Wang, J M

    2000-10-15

    Interactions between cell surface receptors are important regulatory elements in the complex host responses to infections. In this study, it is shown that a classic chemotactic factor, the bacterial chemotactic peptide N-formyl-methionyl-leucylphenyl-alanine (fMLF), rapidly induced a protein-kinase-C-mediated serine phosphorylation and down-regulation of the chemokine receptor CCR5, which serves as a major human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 coreceptor. The fMLF binding to its receptor, formyl peptide receptor (FPR), resulted in significant attenuation of cell responses to CCR5 ligands and in inhibition of HIV-1-envelope-glycoprotein-mediated fusion and infection of cells expressing CD4, CCR5, and FPR. The finding that the expression and function of CCR5 can be regulated by peptides that use an unrelated receptor may provide a novel approach to the design of anti-inflamatory and antiretroviral agents. (Blood. 2000;96:2887-2894)

  10. CCR5 receptor antagonists block metastasis to bone of v-Src-oncogene-transformed metastatic prostate cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Sicoli, Daniela; Jiao, Xuanmao; Ju, Xiaoming; Velasco-Velazquez, Marco; Ertel, Adam; Addya, Sankar; Li, Zhiping; Ando, Sebastiano; Fatatis, Alessandro; Paudyal, Bishnuhari; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Thakur, Mathew L.; Lisanti, Michael P; Pestell, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Src family kinases (SFKs) integrate signal transduction for multiple receptors, regulating cellular proliferation invasion and metastasis in human cancer. Although Src is rarely mutated in human prostate cancer, SFK activity is increased in the majority of human prostate cancers. In order to determine the molecular mechanisms governing prostate cancer bone metastasis, FVB murine prostate epithelium was transduced with oncogenic v-Src. The prostate cancer cell lines metastasized in FVB mice to brain and bone. Gene expression profiling of the tumors identified activation of a CCR5 signaling module when the prostate epithelial cells (PEC) lines were grown in vivo vs. tissue cultures. The whole body, bone and brain metastatic prostate cancer burden was reduced by oral CCR5 antagonist. Clinical trials of CCR5 inhibitors may warrant consideration in patients with CCR5 activation in their tumors. PMID:25452256

  11. CCR2 elimination in mice results in larger and stronger tibial bones but bone loss is not attenuated following ovariectomy or muscle denervation.

    PubMed

    Mader, Tara L; Novotny, Susan A; Lin, Angela S; Guldberg, Robert E; Lowe, Dawn A; Warren, Gordon L

    2014-11-01

    Bone loss due to age and disuse contributes to osteoporosis and increases fracture risk. It has been hypothesized that such bone loss can be attenuated by modulation of the C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) and/or its ligands. The objectives of this study were to examine the effects of genetic elimination of CCR2 on cortical and trabecular bones in the mouse tibia and how bone loss was impacted following disuse and estrogen loss. Female CCR2 knockout (CCR2(-/-)) and wildtype mice underwent ovariectomy (OVX) or denervation of musculature adjacent to the tibia (DEN) to induce bone loss. Cortical and trabecular structural properties as well as mechanical properties (i.e., strength) of tibial bones were measured. Compared to wildtype mice, CCR2(-/-) mice had tibiae that were up to 9% larger and stronger; these differences could be explained mainly by the 17% greater body mass (P < 0.001) of CCR2(-/-) mice. The majority of the tibia's structural and functional responses to OVX and DEN were similar regardless of the lack or presence of CCR2, indicating that CCR2 is not protective against bone loss per se. These findings indicate that while CCR2(-/-) mice do have larger and stronger bones than do wildtype mice, there is minimal evidence that CCR2 elimination provides protection against bone loss during disuse and estrogen loss.

  12. Long-lasting CCR5 internalization by antibodies in a subset of long-term nonprogressors: a possible protective effect against disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Pastori, Claudia; Weiser, Barbara; Barassi, Claudia; Uberti-Foppa, Caterina; Ghezzi, Silvia; Longhi, Renato; Calori, Giliola; Burger, Harold; Kemal, Kimdar; Poli, Guido; Lazzarin, Adriano; Lopalco, Lucia

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to HIV-1 does not necessarily result in infection and progression toward disease, thus suggesting that the control of viral infection may be achieved. Antibodies to CCR5 have been detected in HIV-exposed but uninfected subjects (ESNs); thus, these antibodies could be involved in HIV protection. To assess whether anti-CCR5 antibodies may also contribute to slow HIV disease progression, we searched for anti-CCR5 antibodies in 497 subjects, including 85 long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs), 70 progressors, 135 HIV+ patients treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), and 207 seronegative donors. We found anti-CCR5 antibodies in a fraction of the LTNPs(23.5%) but not in the other populations studied (P < .001). These antibodies recognized a conformational epitope within the first extramembrane loop of CCR5, and they induced a stable and long-lasting downregulation of CCR5 on the surface of T lymphocytes, which inhibited HIV entry. In addition, CD4+ lymphocytes from LTNPs having anti-CCR5 antibodies are resistance to R5 strains of HIV-1. Follow-up studies showed that the loss of anti-CCR5 antibodies occurred in some subjects, and this loss was significantly associated with a progression toward disease, whereas subjects who retained anti-CCR5 Abs maintained their LTNP status. Induction of anti-CCR5 Abs could be relevant to vaccine design and therapeutics. PMID:16522810

  13. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; preparation procedure for aquatic biological material determined for trace metals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, Gerald L.

    1996-01-01

    A method for the chemical preparation of tissue samples that are subsequently analyzed for 22 trace metals is described. The tissue-preparation procedure was tested with three National Institute of Standards and Technology biological standard reference materials and two National Water Quality Laboratory homogenized biological materials. A low-temperature (85 degrees Celsius) nitric acid digestion followed by the careful addition of hydrogen peroxide (30-percent solution) is used to decompose the biological material. The solutions are evaporated to incipient dryness, reconstituted with 5 percent nitric acid, and filtered. After filtration the solutions were diluted to a known volume and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), and cold vapor-atomic absorption spectrophotometry (CV-AAS). Many of the metals were determined by both ICP-MS and ICP-AES. This report does not provide a detailed description of the instrumental procedures and conditions used with the three types of instrumentation for the quantitation of trace metals determined in this study. Statistical data regarding recovery, accuracy, and precision for individual trace metals determined in the biological material tested are summarized.

  14. CCR5 Knockout Prevents Neuronal Injury and Behavioral Impairment Induced in a Transgenic Mouse Model by a CXCR4-using HIV-1 Glycoprotein 1201

    PubMed Central

    Maung, Ricky; Hoefer, Melanie M.; Sanchez, Ana B.; Sejbuk, Natalia E.; Medders, Kathryn E.; Desai, Maya K.; Catalan, Irene C.; Dowling, Cari C.; de Rozieres, Cyrus M.; Garden, Gwenn A.; Russo, Rossella; Roberts, Amanda J.; Williams, Roy; Kaul, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system has been implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 associated dementia. Here we show that genetic ablation of CCR5 prevents microglial activation and neuronal damage in a transgenic model of HIV-associated brain injury induced by a CXCR4-utilizing viral envelope gp120. The CCR5 knockout (KO) also rescues spatial learning and memory in gp120-transgenic (tg) mice. However, the CCR5KO does not abrogate astrocytosis, indicating it can occur independently from neuronal injury and behavioral impairment. To further characterize the neuroprotective effect of CCR5-deficiency we performed a genome –wide gene expression analysis of brains from HIVgp120tg mice expressing or lacking CCR5 and non-transgenic controls. Comparison with a human brain microarray study reveals that brains of HIVgp120tg mice and HIV patients with neurocognitive impairment share numerous differentially regulated genes. Furthermore, brains of CCR5 wild-type (WT) and CCR5KO gp120tg mice express markers of an innate immune response. One of the most significantly up-regulated factors is the acute phase protein lipocalin-2 (LCN2). Using cerebrocortical cell cultures, we find that LCN2 is neurotoxic in a CCR5-dependent fashion while inhibition of CCR5 alone is not sufficient to abrogate neurotoxicity of a CXCR4-utilizing gp120. However, the combination of pharmacological CCR5 blockade and LCN2 protects neurons from toxicity of a CXCR4-utilizing gp120 thus recapitulating the finding in CCR5-deficient gp120tg mouse brain. Altogether, our study provides evidence for an indirect pathological role of CCR5 and a novel protective effect of LCN2 in combination with inhibition of CCR5 in HIV-associated brain injury. PMID:25031461

  15. The Ccr4 Protein from Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Contains a Leucine-Rich Repeat Region Which Is Required for Its Control of Adh2 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Malvar, T.; Biron, R. W.; Kaback, D. B.; Denis, C. L.

    1992-01-01

    The CCR4 gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for the transcription of the glucose-repressible alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH2). Mutations in CCR4 also suppress the transcription at the ADH2 and his4-912delta loci caused by defects in the SPT10 (CRE1) and SPT6 (CRE2) genes. The CCR4 gene was mapped to the left arm of chromosome I and cloned by complementation of function using previously isolated segments of chromosome I. DNA sequence analysis of the cloned gene defined CCR4 as a 2511 bp open reading frame that would encode a polypeptide of 837 amino acids. The CCR4 mRNA was found to be 2.8 kb in size and Western analysis identified CCR4 as a 95,000 D protein. Disruption of the CCR4 gene resulted in reduced levels of ADH2 expression under both glucose and ethanol growth conditions and in temperature sensitive growth on nonfermentative medium, phenotypes essentially indistinguishable from previously identified mutations in CCR4. The amino terminus of the CCR4 protein was found to be rich in glutamine residues similar to a number of genes which are required for transcription. More importantly, CCR4 showed similarity to a diverse set of proteins sharing a leucine-rich tandem repeat motif, the presence of which has been implicated in mediating protein-protein interactions. Deletions of several of the five leucine-rich repeats in CCR4 were shown to produce nonfunctional proteins indicating the importance of the repeats to CCR4 activity. This leucine-rich repeat region may mediate the contact CCR4 makes with another factor. PMID:1459446

  16. mRNA transfection of a novel TAL effector nuclease (TALEN) facilitates efficient knockout of HIV co-receptor CCR5.

    PubMed

    Mock, Ulrike; Machowicz, Rafał; Hauber, Ilona; Horn, Stefan; Abramowski, Pierre; Berdien, Belinda; Hauber, Joachim; Fehse, Boris

    2015-06-23

    Homozygosity for a natural deletion variant of the HIV-coreceptor molecule CCR5, CCR5Δ32, confers resistance toward HIV infection. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation from a CCR5Δ32-homozygous donor has resulted in the first cure from HIV ('Berlin patient'). Based thereon, genetic disruption of CCR5 using designer nucleases was proposed as a promising HIV gene-therapy approach. Here we introduce a novel TAL-effector nuclease, CCR5-Uco-TALEN that can be efficiently delivered into T cells by mRNA electroporation, a gentle and truly transient gene-transfer technique. CCR5-Uco-TALEN mediated high-rate CCR5 knockout (>90% in PM1 and >50% in primary T cells) combined with low off-target activity, as assessed by flow cytometry, next-generation sequencing and a newly devised, very convenient gene-editing frequency digital-PCR (GEF-dPCR). GEF-dPCR facilitates simultaneous detection of wild-type and gene-edited alleles with remarkable sensitivity and accuracy as shown for the CCR5 on-target and CCR2 off-target loci. CCR5-edited cells were protected from infection with HIV-derived lentiviral vectors, but also with the wild-type CCR5-tropic HIV-1BaL strain. Long-term exposure to HIV-1BaL resulted in almost complete suppression of viral replication and selection of CCR5-gene edited T cells. In conclusion, we have developed a novel TALEN for the targeted, high-efficiency knockout of CCR5 and a useful dPCR-based gene-editing detection method.

  17. CCR5 knockout prevents neuronal injury and behavioral impairment induced in a transgenic mouse model by a CXCR4-using HIV-1 glycoprotein 120.

    PubMed

    Maung, Ricky; Hoefer, Melanie M; Sanchez, Ana B; Sejbuk, Natalia E; Medders, Kathryn E; Desai, Maya K; Catalan, Irene C; Dowling, Cari C; de Rozieres, Cyrus M; Garden, Gwenn A; Russo, Rossella; Roberts, Amanda J; Williams, Roy; Kaul, Marcus

    2014-08-15

    The innate immune system has been implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases, including HIV-1-associated dementia. In this study, we show that genetic ablation of CCR5 prevents microglial activation and neuronal damage in a transgenic model of HIV-associated brain injury induced by a CXCR4-using viral envelope gp120. The CCR5 knockout (KO) also rescues spatial learning and memory in gp120-transgenic mice. However, the CCR5KO does not abrogate astrocytosis, indicating it can occur independently from neuronal injury and behavioral impairment. To characterize further the neuroprotective effect of CCR5 deficiency we performed a genome-wide gene expression analysis of brains from HIVgp120tg mice expressing or lacking CCR5 and nontransgenic controls. A comparison with a human brain microarray study reveals that brains of HIVgp120tg mice and HIV patients with neurocognitive impairment share numerous differentially regulated genes. Furthermore, brains of CCR5 wild-type and CCR5KO gp120tg mice express markers of an innate immune response. One of the most significantly upregulated factors is the acute phase protein lipocalin-2 (LCN2). Using cerebrocortical cell cultures, we find that LCN2 is neurotoxic in a CCR5-dependent fashion, whereas inhibition of CCR5 alone is not sufficient to abrogate neurotoxicity of a CXCR4-using gp120. However, the combination of pharmacologic CCR5 blockade and LCN2 protects neurons from toxicity of a CXCR4-using gp120, thus recapitulating the finding in CCR5-deficient gp120tg mouse brain. Our study provides evidence for an indirect pathologic role of CCR5 and a novel protective effect of LCN2 in combination with inhibition of CCR5 in HIV-associated brain injury.

  18. Efficient modification of CCR5 in primary human hematopoietic cells using a megaTAL nuclease and AAV donor template

    PubMed Central

    Sather, Blythe D.; Romano Ibarra, Guillermo S.; Sommer, Karen; Curinga, Gabrielle; Hale, Malika; Khan, Iram F.; Singh, Swati; Song, Yumei; Gwiazda, Kamila; Sahni, Jaya; Jarjour, Jordan; Astrakhan, Alexander; Wagner, Thor A.; Scharenberg, Andrew M.; Rawlings, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic mutations or engineered nucleases that disrupt the HIV co-receptor CCR5 block HIV infection of CD4+ T cells. These findings have motivated the engineering of CCR5-specific nucleases for application as HIV therapies. The efficacy of this approach relies on efficient biallelic disruption of CCR5, and the ability to efficiently target sequences that confer HIV resistance to the CCR5 locus has the potential to further improve clinical outcomes. We used RNA-based nuclease expression paired with adeno-associated virus (AAV) – mediated delivery of a CCR5-targeting donor template to achieve highly efficient targeted recombination in primary human T cells. This method consistently achieved 8 to 60% rates of homology-directed recombination into the CCR5 locus in T cells, with over 80% of cells modified with an MND-GFP expression cassette exhibiting biallelic modification. MND-GFP – modified T cells maintained a diverse repertoire and engrafted in immune-deficient mice as efficiently as unmodified cells. Using this method, we integrated sequences coding chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) into the CCR5 locus, and the resulting targeted CAR T cells exhibited antitumor or anti-HIV activity. Alternatively, we introduced the C46 HIV fusion inhibitor, generating T cell populations with high rates of biallelic CCR5 disruption paired with potential protection from HIV with CXCR4 co-receptor tropism. Finally, this protocol was applied to adult human mobilized CD34+ cells, resulting in 15 to 20% homologous gene targeting. Our results demonstrate that high-efficiency targeted integration is feasible in primary human hematopoietic cells and highlight the potential of gene editing to engineer T cell products with myriad functional properties. PMID:26424571

  19. CCR2 deficiency leads to increased eosinophils, alternative macrophage activation, and type 2 cytokine expression in adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Bolus, W. Reid; Gutierrez, Dario A.; Kennedy, Arion J.; Anderson-Baucum, Emily K.; Hasty, Alyssa H.

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) inflammation during obesity is mediated by immune cells and closely correlates with systemic insulin resistance. In lean AT, eosinophils are present in low but significant numbers and capable of promoting alternative macrophage activation in an IL-4/IL-13-dependent manner. In WT mice, obesity causes the proportion of AT eosinophils to decline, concomitant with inflammation and classical activation of AT macrophages. In this study, we show that CCR2 deficiency leads to increased eosinophil accumulation in AT. Furthermore, in contrast to WT mice, the increase in eosinophils in CCR2−/− AT is sustained and even amplified during obesity. Interestingly, a significant portion of eosinophils is found in CLSs in AT of obese CCR2−/− mice, which is the first time eosinophils have been shown to localize to these inflammatory hot spots. CCR2−/− bone marrow precursors displayed increased expression of various key eosinophil genes during in vitro differentiation to eosinophils, suggesting a potentially altered eosinophil phenotype in the absence of CCR2. In addition, the proportion of eosinophils in AT positively correlated with local expression of Il5, a potent eosinophil stimulator. The increase in eosinophils in CCR2−/− mice was detected in all white fat pads analyzed and in the peritoneal cavity but not in bone marrow, blood, spleen, or liver. In AT of CCR2−/− mice, an increased eosinophil number positively correlated with M2-like macrophages, expression of the Treg marker Foxp3, and type 2 cytokines, Il4, Il5, and Il13. This is the first study to link CCR2 function with regulation of AT eosinophil accumulation. PMID:25934927

  20. Efficient modification of CCR5 in primary human hematopoietic cells using a megaTAL nuclease and AAV donor template.

    PubMed

    Sather, Blythe D; Romano Ibarra, Guillermo S; Sommer, Karen; Curinga, Gabrielle; Hale, Malika; Khan, Iram F; Singh, Swati; Song, Yumei; Gwiazda, Kamila; Sahni, Jaya; Jarjour, Jordan; Astrakhan, Alexander; Wagner, Thor A; Scharenberg, Andrew M; Rawlings, David J

    2015-09-30

    Genetic mutations or engineered nucleases that disrupt the HIV co-receptor CCR5 block HIV infection of CD4(+) T cells. These findings have motivated the engineering of CCR5-specific nucleases for application as HIV therapies. The efficacy of this approach relies on efficient biallelic disruption of CCR5, and the ability to efficiently target sequences that confer HIV resistance to the CCR5 locus has the potential to further improve clinical outcomes. We used RNA-based nuclease expression paired with adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated delivery of a CCR5-targeting donor template to achieve highly efficient targeted recombination in primary human T cells. This method consistently achieved 8 to 60% rates of homology-directed recombination into the CCR5 locus in T cells, with over 80% of cells modified with an MND-GFP expression cassette exhibiting biallelic modification. MND-GFP-modified T cells maintained a diverse repertoire and engrafted in immune-deficient mice as efficiently as unmodified cells. Using this method, we integrated sequences coding chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) into the CCR5 locus, and the resulting targeted CAR T cells exhibited antitumor or anti-HIV activity. Alternatively, we introduced the C46 HIV fusion inhibitor, generating T cell populations with high rates of biallelic CCR5 disruption paired with potential protection from HIV with CXCR4 co-receptor tropism. Finally, this protocol was applied to adult human mobilized CD34(+) cells, resulting in 15 to 20% homologous gene targeting. Our results demonstrate that high-efficiency targeted integration is feasible in primary human hematopoietic cells and highlight the potential of gene editing to engineer T cell products with myriad functional properties.

  1. Novel CCR3 Antagonists Are Effective Mono- and Combination Inhibitors of Choroidal Neovascular Growth and Vascular Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Nori; Ju, Meihua; Izumi-Nagai, Kanako; Robbie, Scott J.; Bainbridge, James W.; Gale, David C.; Pierre, Esaie; Krauss, Achim H.P.; Adamson, Peter; Shima, David T.; Ng, Yin-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is a defining feature of wet age-related macular degeneration. We examined the functional role of CCR3 in the development of CNV in mice and primates. CCR3 was associated with spontaneous CNV lesions in the newly described JR5558 mice, whereas CCR3 ligands localized to CNV-associated macrophages and the retinal pigment epithelium/choroid complex. Intravitreal injection of neutralizing antibodies against vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, CCR3, CC chemokine ligand 11/eotaxin-1, and CC chemokine ligand 24/eotaxin-2 all reduced CNV area and lesion number in these mice. Systemic administration of the CCR3 antagonists GW766994X and GW782415X reduced spontaneous CNV in JR5558 mice and laser-induced CNV in mouse and primate models in a dose-dependent fashion. Combination treatment with antivascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 antibody and GW766994X yielded additive reductions in CNV area and hyperpermeability in mice. Interestingly, topical GW766994X and intravitreal anti-CCR3 antibody yielded strong systemic effects, reducing CNV in the untreated, contralateral eye. Contrarily, ocular administration of GW782415X in primates failed to substantially elevate plasma drug levels or to reduce the development of grade IV CNV lesions. These findings suggest that CCR3 signaling may be an attractive therapeutic target for CNV, utilizing a pathway that is at least partly distinct from that of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor. The findings also demonstrate that systemic exposure to CCR3 antagonists may be crucial for CNV-targeted activity. PMID:26188133

  2. Enhancement of anti-STLV-1/HTLV-1 immune responses through multimodal effects of anti-CCR4 antibody.

    PubMed

    Sugata, Kenji; Yasunaga, Jun-Ichirou; Miura, Michi; Akari, Hirofumi; Utsunomiya, Atae; Nosaka, Kisato; Watanabe, Yuko; Suzushima, Hitoshi; Koh, Ki-Ryang; Nakagawa, Masanori; Kohara, Michinori; Matsuoka, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) causes adult T-cell leukemia and inflammatory diseases. Because anti-HTLV-1 immune responses are critical for suppressing infected cells, enhancing cellular immunity is beneficial for the treatment of HTLV-1-associated diseases. Using simian T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (STLV-1) infected Japanese macaques, we analyzed the immune responses to viral antigens and the dynamics of virus-infected cells. The chemokine receptor CCR4 is expressed on STLV-1 infected cells, and administration of humanized monoclonal antibody to CCR4, mogamulizumab, dramatically decreased the number of STLV-1-infected cells in vivo. Concurrently, mogamulizumab treatment enhanced STLV-1 specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses by simultaneously targeting CCR4(+) effector regulatory T (Treg) cells and infected cells. Mogamulizumab promoted the phagocytosis of CCR4(+) infected cells by macrophages, which likely enhanced antigen presentation. Vaccination with recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV) expressing viral antigens suppressed the proviral load and the number of Tax-expressing cells. Enhanced T-cell responses were also observed in some ATL patients who were treated with mogamulizumab. This study shows that mogamulizumab works not only by killing CCR4(+) infected cells directly, but also by enhancing T cell responses by increasing the phagocytosis of infected cells by antigen-presenting cells and suppressing CCR4(+) effector Treg cells. PMID:27250643

  3. CCR4 and CAF1 deadenylases have an intrinsic activity to remove the post-poly(A) sequence.

    PubMed

    Niinuma, Sho; Fukaya, Takashi; Tomari, Yukihide

    2016-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) recruit the CCR4-NOT complex, which contains two deadenylases, CCR4 and CAF1, to promote shortening of the poly(A) tail. Although both CCR4 and CAF1 generally have a strong preference for poly(A) RNA substrates, it has been reported from yeast to humans that they can also remove non-A residues in vitro to various degrees. However, it remains unknown how CCR4 and CAF1 remove non-A sequences. Herein we show that Drosophila miRNAs can promote the removal of 3'-terminal non-A residues in an exonucleolytic manner, but only if an upstream poly(A) sequence exists. This non-A removing reaction is directly catalyzed by both CCR4 and CAF1 and depends on the balance between the length of the internal poly(A) sequence and that of the downstream non-A sequence. These results suggest that the CCR4-NOT complex has an intrinsic activity to remove the 3'-terminal non-A modifications downstream from the poly(A) tail. PMID:27484313

  4. Enhanced tumor trafficking of GD2 chimeric antigen receptor T cells by expression of the chemokine receptor CCR2b.

    PubMed

    Craddock, John A; Lu, An; Bear, Adham; Pule, Martin; Brenner, Malcolm K; Rooney, Cliona M; Foster, Aaron E

    2010-10-01

    For adoptive T-cell therapy to be effective against solid tumors, tumor-specific T cells must be able to migrate to the tumor site. One requirement for efficient migration is that the effector cells express chemokine receptors that match the chemokines produced either by tumor or tumor-associated cells. In this study, we investigated whether the tumor trafficking of activated T cells (ATCs) bearing a chimeric antigen receptor specific for the tumor antigen GD2 (GD2-CAR) could be enhanced by forced coexpression of the chemokine receptor CCR2b, as this receptor directs migration toward CCL2, a chemokine produced by many tumors, including neuroblastoma. Neuroblastoma cell lines (SK-N-SH and SK-N-AS) and primary tumor cells isolated from 6 patients all secreted high levels of CCL2, but GD2-CAR transduced ATCs lacked expression of CCR2 (<5%) and migrated poorly to recombinant CCL2 or tumor supernatants. After retroviral transduction, however, ATCs expressed high levels of CCR2b (>60%) and migrated well in vitro. We expressed firefly luciferase in CCR2b-expressing ATCs and observed improved homing (>10-fold) to CCL2-secreting neuroblastoma compared with CCR2-negative ATCs. As a result, ATCs co-modified with both CCR2b and GD2-CAR had greater antitumor activity in vivo.

  5. Enhancement of anti-STLV-1/HTLV-1 immune responses through multimodal effects of anti-CCR4 antibody

    PubMed Central

    Sugata, Kenji; Yasunaga, Jun-ichirou; Miura, Michi; Akari, Hirofumi; Utsunomiya, Atae; Nosaka, Kisato; Watanabe, Yuko; Suzushima, Hitoshi; Koh, Ki-Ryang; Nakagawa, Masanori; Kohara, Michinori; Matsuoka, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) causes adult T-cell leukemia and inflammatory diseases. Because anti-HTLV-1 immune responses are critical for suppressing infected cells, enhancing cellular immunity is beneficial for the treatment of HTLV-1-associated diseases. Using simian T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (STLV-1) infected Japanese macaques, we analyzed the immune responses to viral antigens and the dynamics of virus-infected cells. The chemokine receptor CCR4 is expressed on STLV-1 infected cells, and administration of humanized monoclonal antibody to CCR4, mogamulizumab, dramatically decreased the number of STLV-1-infected cells in vivo. Concurrently, mogamulizumab treatment enhanced STLV-1 specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses by simultaneously targeting CCR4+ effector regulatory T (Treg) cells and infected cells. Mogamulizumab promoted the phagocytosis of CCR4+ infected cells by macrophages, which likely enhanced antigen presentation. Vaccination with recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV) expressing viral antigens suppressed the proviral load and the number of Tax-expressing cells. Enhanced T-cell responses were also observed in some ATL patients who were treated with mogamulizumab. This study shows that mogamulizumab works not only by killing CCR4+ infected cells directly, but also by enhancing T cell responses by increasing the phagocytosis of infected cells by antigen-presenting cells and suppressing CCR4+ effector Treg cells. PMID:27250643

  6. Cloning of two chemokine receptor homologs (CXC-R4 and CC-R7) in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Daniels, G D; Zou, J; Charlemagne, J; Partula, S; Cunningham, C; Secombes, C J

    1999-05-01

    Two rainbow trout chemokine receptors have been sequenced, with homology to CXC-R4 and CC-R7 molecules. The CXC-R4 sequence consisted of 1681 nucleotides, which translated into a mature protein of 357 amino acids, with 80.7% similarity to human CXC-R4. The CC-R7 sequence consisted of 2287 nucleotides, which translated into a 368-amino acid mature protein with 64.5% similarity to human CC-R7. Both sequences contained seven hydrophobic regions, representing the seven transmembrane domains (TM) typical of G-protein-coupled receptors. Extracellular cysteines, transmembrane prolines, and the DRY motif immediately following TM3 were conserved. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed a tight clustering of trout CXC-R4 with CXC-R3-5 genes. Trout CC-R7 clustered with CC-R6-7 and CXC-R1-2. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated a wide tissue distribution of CXC-R4 and CC-R7 message in trout, being present in head-kidney leukocytes, blood, gill, brain, spleen, and liver. PMID:10331499

  7. Maraviroc decreases CCL8-mediated migration of CCR5(+) regulatory T cells and reduces metastatic tumor growth in the lungs.

    PubMed

    Halvorsen, E C; Hamilton, M J; Young, A; Wadsworth, B J; LePard, N E; Lee, H N; Firmino, N; Collier, J L; Bennewith, K L

    2016-06-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a crucial physiological role in the regulation of immune homeostasis, although recent data suggest Tregs can contribute to primary tumor growth by suppressing antitumor immune responses. Tregs may also influence the development of tumor metastases, although there is a paucity of information regarding the phenotype and function of Tregs in metastatic target organs. Herein, we demonstrate that orthotopically implanted metastatic mammary tumors induce significant Treg accumulation in the lungs, which is a site of mammary tumor metastasis. Tregs in the primary tumor and metastatic lungs express high levels of C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) relative to Tregs in the mammary fat pad and lungs of tumor-free mice, and Tregs in the metastatic lungs are enriched for CCR5 expression in comparison to other immune cell populations. We also identify that C-C chemokine ligand 8 (CCL8), an endogenous ligand of CCR5, is produced by F4/80(+) macrophages in the lungs of mice with metastatic primary tumors. Migration of Tregs toward CCL8 ex vivo is reduced in the presence of the CCR5 inhibitor Maraviroc. Importantly, treatment of mice with Maraviroc (MVC) reduces the level of CCR5(+) Tregs and metastatic tumor burden in the lungs. This work provides evidence of a CCL8/CCR5 signaling axis driving Treg recruitment to the lungs of mice bearing metastatic primary tumors, representing a potential therapeutic target to decrease Treg accumulation and metastatic tumor growth.

  8. Is the CCR5-59029-G/G genotype a protective factor for cardiomyopathy in Chagas disease?

    PubMed

    Fernández-Mestre, M T; Montagnani, S; Layrisse, Z

    2004-07-01

    Investigated were two CCR5 gene polymorphisms, the CCR5 Delta 32 deletion and the pCCR5 59029 A-->G promoter point mutation, in 107 ethnically mixed Venezuelan patients serologically positive for Trypanosoma cruzi (34 asymptomatic, 38 arrhythmic, 35 cardiomyopathic). No difference in the distribution of CCR5 Delta 32 among asymptomatic and symptomatic patients was found. We have observed an increase of the 59029-G phenotype among asymptomatic compared with symptomatic chagasic patients (68% vs. 58%), in agreement with previously reported data (57% vs. 31%). This frequency difference, although not statistically significant, is more marked when the 59029-G allele is present in homozygous form. However, a similar distribution of the G/G genotype is present among asymptomatic patients and patients with heart failure. Because it has been reported that the 59029G/G genotype associates with lower CCR5 expression, 37% of our T. cruzi-infected patients with heart failure are genetically predisposed to express low levels of CCR5 on the surface of CD8(+) T cells, contrary to what would be expected if an inflammatory response is required for severe cardiac damage. If confirmed, the possible protection that might be conferred by the G/G genotype may be due to the existence of other genes in linkage disequilibria.

  9. CCR5 plays a critical role in the development of myocarditis and host protection in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Machado, Fabiana S; Koyama, Natalia S; Carregaro, Vanessa; Ferreira, Beatriz R; Milanezi, Cristiane M; Teixeira, Mauro M; Rossi, Marcos A; Silva, João S

    2005-02-15

    The pathogenesis of myocarditis during Trypanosoma cruzi infection is poorly understood. We investigated the role played by chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) in the influx of T cells to the cardiac tissue of T. cruzi-infected mice. mRNA and protein for the CCR5 ligands CCL3, CCL4, and CCL5 were detected in the hearts of infected mice in association with CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. There was a high level of CCR5 expression on CD8+ T cells in the hearts of infected mice. Moreover, CCR5 expression on CD8+ T cells was positively modulated by T. cruzi infection. CCR5-deficient mice infected with T. cruzi experienced a dramatically inhibited migration of T cells to the heart and were also more susceptible to infection. These results suggest that CCR5 and its ligands play a central role in the control of T cell influx in T. cruzi-infected mice. Knowledge of the mechanisms that trigger and control the migration of cells to the heart in patients with Chagas disease may help in the design of drugs that prevent myocarditis and protect against the development of severe disease.

  10. Physical Exercise Reduces the Expression of RANTES and Its CCR5 Receptor in the Adipose Tissue of Obese Humans

    PubMed Central

    Baturcam, Engin; Tiss, Ali; Khadir, Abdelkrim; Al-Ghimlas, Fahad; Al-Khairi, Irina; Cherian, Preethi; Elkum, Naser; John, Jeena; Kavalakatt, Sina; Lehe, Cynthia; Warsame, Samia; Behbehani, Kazem; Dermime, Said

    2014-01-01

    RANTES and its CCR5 receptor trigger inflammation and its progression to insulin resistance in obese. In the present study, we investigated for the first time the effect of physical exercise on the expression of RANTES and CCR5 in obese humans. Fifty-seven adult nondiabetic subjects (17 lean and 40 obese) were enrolled in a 3-month supervised physical exercise. RANTES and CCR5 expressions were measured in PBMCs and subcutaneous adipose tissue before and after exercise. Circulating plasma levels of RANTES were also investigated. There was a significant increase in RANTES and CCR5 expression in the subcutaneous adipose tissue of obese compared to lean. In PBMCs, however, while the levels of RANTES mRNA and protein were comparable between both groups, CCR5 mRNA was downregulated in obese subjects (P < 0.05). Physical exercise significantly reduced the expression of both RANTES and CCR5 (P < 0.05) in the adipose tissue of obese individuals with a concomitant decrease in the levels of the inflammatory markers TNF-α, IL-6, and P-JNK. Circulating RANTES correlated negatively with anti-inflammatory IL-1ra (P = 0.001) and positively with proinflammatory IP-10 and TBARS levels (P < 0.05). Therefore, physical exercise may provide an effective approach for combating the deleterious effects associated with obesity through RANTES signaling in the adipose tissue. PMID:24895488

  11. Efficient Clinical Scale Gene Modification via Zinc Finger Nuclease–Targeted Disruption of the HIV Co-receptor CCR5

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Dawn A.; Brennan, Andrea L.; Jiang, Shuguang; Binder-Scholl, Gwendolyn K.; Lee, Gary; Plesa, Gabriela; Zheng, Zhaohui; Cotte, Julio; Carpenito, Carmine; Wood, Travis; Spratt, S. Kaye; Ando, Dale; Gregory, Philip; Holmes, Michael C.; Perez, Elena. E.; Riley, James L.; Carroll, Richard G.; June, Carl H.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Since HIV requires CD4 and a co-receptor, most commonly C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5), for cellular entry, targeting CCR5 expression is an attractive approach for therapy of HIV infection. Treatment of CD4+ T cells with zinc-finger protein nucleases (ZFNs) specifically disrupting chemokine receptor CCR5 coding sequences induces resistance to HIV infection in vitro and in vivo. A chimeric Ad5/F35 adenoviral vector encoding CCR5-ZFNs permitted efficient delivery and transient expression following anti-CD3/anti-CD28 costimulation of T lymphocytes. We present data showing CD3/CD28 costimulation substantially improved transduction efficiency over reported methods for Ad5/F35 transduction of T lymphocytes. Modifications to the laboratory scale process, incorporating clinically compatible reagents and methods, resulted in a robust ex vivo manufacturing process capable of generating >1010 CCR5 gene-edited CD4+ T cells from healthy and HIV+ donors. CD4+ T-cell phenotype, cytokine production, and repertoire were comparable between ZFN-modified and control cells. Following consultation with regulatory authorities, we conducted in vivo toxicity studies that showed no detectable ZFN-specific toxicity or T-cell transformation. Based on these findings, we initiated a clinical trial testing the safety and feasibility of CCR5 gene-edited CD4+ T-cell transfer in study subjects with HIV-1 infection. PMID:23360514

  12. Enhanced Tumor Trafficking of GD2 Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells by Expression of the Chemokine Receptor CCR2b

    PubMed Central

    Craddock, John A; Lu, An; Bear, Adham; Pule, Martin; Brenner, Malcolm K; Rooney, Cliona M; Foster, Aaron E

    2010-01-01

    For adoptive T cell therapy to be effective against solid tumors, tumor-specific T cells must be able to migrate to the tumor site. One requirement for efficient migration is that the effector cells express chemokine receptors that match the chemokines produced either by tumor or tumor-associated cells. In this study, we investigated whether the tumor trafficking of activated T cells (ATCs) bearing a chimeric antigen receptor specific for the tumor antigen GD2 (GD2-CAR) could be enhanced by forced co-expression of the chemokine receptor CCR2b, since this receptor directs migration towards CCL2, a chemokine produced by many tumors, including neuroblastoma. Neuroblastoma cell lines (SK-N-SH and SK-N-AS) and primary tumor cells isolated from six patients all secreted high levels of CCL2, but GD2-CAR transduced ATCs lacked expression of CCR2 (<5%) and migrated poorly to recombinant CCL2 or tumor supernatants. Following retroviral transduction, however, ATCs expressed high levels of CCR2b (>60%) and migrated well in vitro. We expressed firefly luciferase in CCR2b-expressing ATCs and observed improved homing (>10-fold) to CCL2-secreting neuroblastoma compared to CCR2 negative ATCs. As a result, ATCs co-modified with both CCR2b and GD2-CAR had greater anti-tumor activity in vivo. PMID:20842059

  13. CCR5/CD4/CXCR4 oligomerization prevents HIV-1 gp120IIIB binding to the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Muñoz, Laura; Barroso, Rubén; Dyrhaug, Sunniva Y.; Navarro, Gemma; Lucas, Pilar; Soriano, Silvia F.; Vega, Beatriz; Costas, Coloma; Muñoz-Fernández, M. Ángeles; Santiago, César; Frade, José Miguel Rodríguez; Franco, Rafael; Mellado, Mario

    2014-01-01

    CCR5 and CXCR4, the respective cell surface coreceptors of R5 and X4 HIV-1 strains, both form heterodimers with CD4, the principal HIV-1 receptor. Using several resonance energy transfer techniques, we determined that CD4, CXCR4, and CCR5 formed heterotrimers, and that CCR5 coexpression altered the conformation of both CXCR4/CXCR4 homodimers and CD4/CXCR4 heterodimers. As a result, binding of the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120IIIB to the CD4/CXCR4/CCR5 heterooligomer was negligible, and the gp120-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements necessary for HIV-1 entry were prevented. CCR5 reduced HIV-1 envelope-induced CD4/CXCR4-mediated cell-cell fusion. In nucleofected Jurkat CD4 cells and primary human CD4+ T cells, CCR5 expression led to a reduction in X4 HIV-1 infectivity. These findings can help to understand why X4 HIV-1 strains infection affect T-cell types differently during AIDS development and indicate that receptor oligomerization might be a target for previously unidentified therapeutic approaches for AIDS intervention. PMID:24778234

  14. A Novel MEK-ERK-AMPK Signaling Axis Controls Chemokine Receptor CCR7-dependent Survival in Human Mature Dendritic Cells*

    PubMed Central

    López-Cotarelo, Pilar; Escribano-Díaz, Cristina; González-Bethencourt, Ivan Luis; Gómez-Moreira, Carolina; Deguiz, María Laura; Torres-Bacete, Jesús; Gómez-Cabañas, Laura; Fernández-Barrera, Jaime; Delgado-Martín, Cristina; Mellado, Mario; Regueiro, José Ramón; Miranda-Carús, María Eugenia; Rodríguez-Fernández, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine receptor CCR7 directs mature dendritic cells (mDCs) to secondary lymph nodes where these cells regulate the activation of T cells. CCR7 also promotes survival in mDCs, which is believed to take place largely through Akt-dependent signaling mechanisms. We have analyzed the involvement of the AMP-dependent kinase (AMPK) in the control of CCR7-dependent survival. A pro-apoptotic role for AMPK is suggested by the finding that pharmacological activators induce apoptosis, whereas knocking down of AMPK with siRNA extends mDC survival. Pharmacological activation of AMPK also induces apoptosis of mDCs in the lymph nodes. Stimulation of CCR7 leads to inhibition of AMPK, through phosphorylation of Ser-485, which was mediated by Gi/Gβγ, but not by Akt or S6K, two kinases that control the phosphorylation of AMPK on Ser-485 in other settings. Using selective pharmacological inhibitors, we show that CCR7-induced phosphorylation of AMPK on Ser-485 is mediated by MEK and ERK. Coimmunoprecipitation analysis and proximity ligation assays indicate that AMPK associates with ERK, but not with MEK. These results suggest that in addition to Akt-dependent signaling mechanisms, CCR7 can also promote survival of mDCs through a novel MEK1/2-ERK1/2-AMPK signaling axis. The data also suggest that AMPK may be a potential target to modulate mDC lifespan and the immune response. PMID:25425646

  15. Efficient clinical scale gene modification via zinc finger nuclease-targeted disruption of the HIV co-receptor CCR5.

    PubMed

    Maier, Dawn A; Brennan, Andrea L; Jiang, Shuguang; Binder-Scholl, Gwendolyn K; Lee, Gary; Plesa, Gabriela; Zheng, Zhaohui; Cotte, Julio; Carpenito, Carmine; Wood, Travis; Spratt, S Kaye; Ando, Dale; Gregory, Philip; Holmes, Michael C; Perez, Elena E; Riley, James L; Carroll, Richard G; June, Carl H; Levine, Bruce L

    2013-03-01

    Since HIV requires CD4 and a co-receptor, most commonly C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5), for cellular entry, targeting CCR5 expression is an attractive approach for therapy of HIV infection. Treatment of CD4(+) T cells with zinc-finger protein nucleases (ZFNs) specifically disrupting chemokine receptor CCR5 coding sequences induces resistance to HIV infection in vitro and in vivo. A chimeric Ad5/F35 adenoviral vector encoding CCR5-ZFNs permitted efficient delivery and transient expression following anti-CD3/anti-CD28 costimulation of T lymphocytes. We present data showing CD3/CD28 costimulation substantially improved transduction efficiency over reported methods for Ad5/F35 transduction of T lymphocytes. Modifications to the laboratory scale process, incorporating clinically compatible reagents and methods, resulted in a robust ex vivo manufacturing process capable of generating >10(10) CCR5 gene-edited CD4+ T cells from healthy and HIV+ donors. CD4+ T-cell phenotype, cytokine production, and repertoire were comparable between ZFN-modified and control cells. Following consultation with regulatory authorities, we conducted in vivo toxicity studies that showed no detectable ZFN-specific toxicity or T-cell transformation. Based on these findings, we initiated a clinical trial testing the safety and feasibility of CCR5 gene-edited CD4+ T-cell transfer in study subjects with HIV-1 infection.

  16. Antagonistic effects of extracts from Artemisia rupetris L. and Leontopodium leontopodioides to CC chemokine receptor 2b (CCR2b).

    PubMed

    Yu, Qin-Wei; Hu, Jie; Wang, Hao; Chen, Xin; Zhao, Fang; Gao, Peng; Yang, Qiu-Bin; Sun, Dan-Dan; Zhang, Lu-Yong; Yan, Ming

    2016-05-01

    The present study was designed to establish a suitable assay to explore CCR2b receptor antagonists from the natural products of Artemisia rupetris and Leontopodium leontopodioides. An aequorin assay was developed as a cell-based assay suitable for 384-well microplate and used for screening CCR2b receptor antagonists from natural products. Through establishing suitable conditions, the assay was shown to be suitable for screening of CCR2b receptor antagonists. Seven compounds were identified in preliminary screening. Five of them showed evident dose-response relationship in secondary screening. The structure-activity relationship study suggested that 7-position hydroxyl group of flavonoids was necessary, a polar group should be introduced on the 3-position, and the substituents on 2-position benzene ring of flavonoids have little influence on the potentency of the inhibition activity on CCR2b receptor. The ortho-position dihydroxyl structure in quinic acid compounds may be important. In conclusion, Compounds HR-1, 5, 7, and AR-20, 35 showed activity as antagonist of CCR2b receptor, which shed lights on the development of novel drugs as CCR2b receptor antagonists for preventing inflammation related diseases. PMID:27478099

  17. Preferential recruitment of Th17 cells to cervical cancer via CCR6-CCL20 pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qing; Lou, Xiang-ming; He, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies suggest that Th17 cells accumulate within tumor tissues and correlate with recurrence of cervical cancer patients. However, the source of the increased tumor-infiltrating Th17 cells remains poorly understood. We investigated the prevalence, phenotype and trafficking property of Th17 cells in patients with cervical cancer. Our results showed that Th17 cells highly aggregated within tumor tissues in an activated phenotype with markedly increased expression of CCR6. Correspondingly, level of CCL20 in the tumor tissues was significantly higher than that in non-tumor and normal control tissues, and strongly positively associated with Th17 cells. Further, in vitro migration assay showed CCL20 had effective chemotaxis to circulating Th17 cells. In conclusion, Th17 cells are recruited into tumor tissues preferentially through CCR6-CCL20 pathway, which can serve as a novel therapeutic target for cervical cancer. PMID:25768730

  18. Relative concordance of human immunodeficiency virus oligomeric and monomeric envelope in CCR5 coreceptor usage

    SciTech Connect

    Teeravechyan, Samaporn; Suphaphiphat, Pirada; Essex, Max; Lee, Tun-Hou

    2008-01-20

    A major difference between binding and fusion assays commonly used to study the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope is the use of monomeric envelope for the former assay and oligomeric envelope for the latter. Due to discrepancies in their readouts for some mutants, envelope regions involved in CCR5 coreceptor usage were systematically studied to determine whether the discordance is due to inherent differences between the two assays or whether it genuinely reflects functional differences at each entry step. By adding the binding inhibitor TAK-779 to delay coreceptor binding kinetics in the fusion assay, the readouts were found comparable between the assays for the mutants analysed in this study. Our finding indicates that monomeric binding reflects oligomeric envelope-CCR5 interaction, thus discordant results between binding and fusion assays do not necessarily indicate differences in coreceptor usage by oligomeric envelope and monomeric gp120.

  19. Design and Cold Mode Experiment of Dual Bubbling Fluidized Bed Reactors for Multiple CCR Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, F.; Li, Z. S.; Cai, N. S.

    The dual fluidized bed reactors are the key technology to fulfill the multiple CCR (calcination/carbonation reactions) cycles for CO2 capture from the flue gases. Firstly, the dual bubbling fluidized bed reactors were selected in this work based on analyzing different types of dual fluidized bed reactors. Secondly, the design method of dual fluidized bed reactors for CO2 capture with CCR concept was proposed. Thirdly, with the designed results, a cold mode of the dual bubbling fluidized bed reactors was built. The long-term stable operation and the continuous solid circulation between two reactors could be achieved successfully. The experimental results indicated that the solid circulation rate was increased with an increase of bed height, diameter of solid injection nozzle, and diameter of holes on the solid injection nozzle.

  20. Senescent dermal fibroblasts enhance stem cell migration through CCL2/CCR2 axis.

    PubMed

    Ohgo, Shiro; Hasegawa, Seiji; Hasebe, Yuichi; Mizutani, Hiroshi; Nakata, Satoru; Akamatsu, Hirohiko

    2015-07-01

    During aging, increases in the number of senescent cells are seen in various tissues. On the other hand, stem cells play crucial roles in tissue repair and homeostasis. Therefore, it is likely that stem cells give rise to new cells that replace senescent cells. However, how stem cells contribute to homeostasis in the dermis has not been elucidated. Here, we investigated the effects of factors secreted from senescent fibroblasts on stem cells. We found that senescent human dermal fibroblast (HDF) conditioned medium (CM) significantly enhanced stem cell migration compared with young HDF CM. The senescent HDF CM strongly secreted chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2). Furthermore, CCL2 was found to enhance stem cell migration, and the inhibition of CCR2, a receptor for CCL2, reduced stem cell migration. These results suggest that senescent fibroblasts recruit stem cells by secreting various factors and that the CCL2/CCR2 axis is one of the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon.

  1. Targeting chemokine receptors in disease – a case study of CCR4

    PubMed Central

    Solari, Roberto; Pease, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Since their early 1990s, the chemokine receptor family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has been the source of much pharmacological endeavour. Best known for their key roles in recruiting leukocytes to sites of infection and inflammation, the receptors present themselves as plausible drug targets for therapeutic intervention. In this article, we will focus our attention upon CC Chemokine Receptor Four (CCR4) which has been implicated in diseases as diverse as allergic asthma and lymphoma. We will review the discovery of the receptors and their ligands, their perceived roles in disease and the successful targeting of CCR4 by both small molecule antagonists and monoclonal antibodies. We will also discuss future directions and strategies for drug discovery in this field. PMID:25981299

  2. Accelerated and enhanced effect of CCR5-transduced bone marrow neural stem cells on autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jingxian; Yan, Yaping; Ma, Cun-Gen; Kang, Tingguo; Zhang, Nan; Gran, Bruno; Xu, Hui; Li, Ke; Ciric, Bogoljub; Zangaladze, Andro; Curtis, Mark; Rostami, Abdolmohamad; Zhang, Guang-Xian

    2013-01-01

    The suppressive effect of neural stem cells (NSCs) on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), has been reported. However, the migration of NSCs to inflammatory sites was relatively slow as was the onset of rather limited clinical benefit. Lack of, or low expression of particular chemokine receptors on NSCs could be an important factor underlying the slow migration of NSCs. To enhance the therapeutic effect of NSCs, in the present study we transduced bone marrow (BM)-derived NSCs with CCR5, a receptor for CCL3, CCL4, and CCL5, chemokines that are abundantly produced in CNS-inflamed foci of MS/EAE. After i.v. injection, CCR5-NSCs rapidly reached EAE foci in larger numbers, and more effectively suppressed CNS inflammatory infiltration, myelin damage, and clinical EAE than GFP-NSCs used as controls. CCR5-NSC-treated mice also exhibited augmented remyelination and neuron/oligodendrocyte repopulation compared to PBS- or GFP-NSC-treated mice. We inferred that the critical mechanism underlying enhanced effect of CCR5-transduced NSCs on EAE is the early migration of chemokine receptor-transduced NSCs into the inflamed foci. Such migration at an earlier stage of inflammation enables NSCs to exert more effective immunomodulation, to reduce the extent of early myelin/neuron damage by creating a less hostile environment for remyelinating cells, and possibly to participate in the remyelination/neural re-population process. These features of BM-derived transduced NSCs, combined with their easy availability (the subject’s own BM) and autologous properties, may lay the groundwork for an innovative approach to rapid and highly effective MS therapy. PMID:22526024

  3. $200,000 Grants Awarded to CCR Researchers for HIV/AIDS Studies | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer Earlier this year, the Office of AIDS Research (OAR) awarded two, two-year grants of $200,000 each to Anu Puri, Ph.D., and Robert Blumenthal, Ph.D., both of the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) Nanobiology Program, and to Eric Freed, Ph.D., of the HIV Drug Resistance Program, for their research on potential new treatments for HIV.

  4. CCR5 genotype and resistance to vertical transmission of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Philpott, S; Burger, H; Charbonneau, T; Grimson, R; Vermund, S H; Visosky, A; Nachman, S; Kovacs, A; Tropper, P; Frey, H; Weiser, B

    1999-07-01

    A human gene has been identified that affects susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. The gene codes for CCR5, the coreceptor for macrophage-tropic strains of HIV-1. Individuals who are homozygous for a deleted, mutant form of the gene, delta32, display a high degree of natural resistance to sexual and parenteral transmission of HIV-1. To investigate whether delta32 plays a role in vertical transmission, we determined the CCR5 genotype of 552 children born to infected mothers in the United States and correlated the genotypes with HIV-1 infection status. Of these children, 13% were white, 30% Latino, and 56% African American, reflecting the ethnic makeup of infected women in the United States. The delta32 gene frequency varied among these groups, ranging from 0.08 in whites to 0.02 in both Latinos and African Americans. Approximately 27% of the children in each ethnic group were infected. Four children were identified as delta32 homozygotes, two uninfected whites (3.77%) and two uninfected Latinos (1.68%). None of the infected children displayed the delta32 homozygous genotype. Among Latinos and whites, the number of uninfected children who carried the homozygous delta32 mutation was significantly greater than that predicted by the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (p < .001 for Latinos, p = .044 for whites). This association was noted in Latino and white children whose mothers were either treated or untreated with zidovudine. These data document the occurrence of the homozygous delta32 genotype among children of HIV-1-infected mothers and suggest that this mutant genotype may confer protection from mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1. They also suggest that sexual, parenteral, and vertical transmission all involve processes that use CCR5 as a coreceptor for primary HIV-1 infection. Therefore, blocking the CCR5 receptor may provide an additional strategy to prevent HIV-1 vertical transmission.

  5. A CCR2 macrophage endocytic pathway mediates extravascular fibrin clearance in vivo.

    PubMed

    Motley, Michael P; Madsen, Daniel H; Jürgensen, Henrik J; Spencer, David E; Szabo, Roman; Holmbeck, Kenn; Flick, Matthew J; Lawrence, Daniel A; Castellino, Francis J; Weigert, Roberto; Bugge, Thomas H

    2016-03-01

    Extravascular fibrin deposition accompanies many human diseases and causes chronic inflammation and organ damage, unless removed in a timely manner. Here, we used intravital microscopy to investigate how fibrin is removed from extravascular space. Fibrin placed into the dermis of mice underwent cellular endocytosis and lysosomal targeting, revealing a novel intracellular pathway for extravascular fibrin degradation. A C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2)-positive macrophage subpopulation constituted the majority of fibrin-uptaking cells. Consequently, cellular fibrin uptake was diminished by elimination of CCR2-expressing cells. The CCR2-positive macrophage subtype was different from collagen-internalizing M2-like macrophages. Cellular fibrin uptake was strictly dependent on plasminogen and plasminogen activator. Surprisingly, however, fibrin endocytosis was unimpeded by the absence of the fibrin(ogen) receptors, αMβ2 and ICAM-1, the myeloid cell integrin-binding site on fibrin or the endocytic collagen receptor, the mannose receptor. The study identifies a novel fibrin endocytic pathway engaged in extravascular fibrin clearance and shows that interstitial fibrin and collagen are cleared by different subsets of macrophages employing distinct molecular pathways. PMID:26647393

  6. CCL5 activation of CCR5 regulates cell metabolism to enhance proliferation of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Darrin; Rahbar, Ramtin; Fish, Eleanor N

    2016-06-01

    In earlier studies, we showed that CCL5 enhances proliferation and survival of MCF-7 breast cancer cells in an mTOR-dependent manner and we provided evidence that, for T cells, CCL5 activation of CCR5 results in increased glycolysis and enhanced ATP production. Increases in metabolic activity of cancer cells, specifically increased glycolytic activity and increased expression of glucose transporters, are associated with tumour progression. In this report, we provide evidence that CCL5 enhances the proliferation of human breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, MCF-7) and mouse mammary tumour cells (MMTV-PyMT), mediated by CCR5 activation. Concomitant with enhanced proliferation we show that CCL5 increases cell surface expression of the glucose transporter GLUT1, and increases glucose uptake and ATP production by these cells. Blocking CCL5-inducible glucose uptake abrogates the enhanced proliferation induced by CCL5. We provide evidence that increased glucose uptake is associated with enhanced glycolysis, as measured by extracellular acidification. Moreover, CCL5 enhances the invasive capacity of these breast cancer cells. Using metabolomics, we demonstrate that the metabolic signature of CCL5-treated primary mouse mammary tumour cells reflects increased anabolic metabolism. The implications are that CCL5-CCR5 interactions in the tumour microenvironment regulate metabolic events, specifically glycolysis, to promote tumour proliferation and invasion.

  7. A CCR2 macrophage endocytic pathway mediates extravascular fibrin clearance in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Motley, Michael P.; Madsen, Daniel H.; Jürgensen, Henrik J.; Spencer, David E.; Szabo, Roman; Holmbeck, Kenn; Flick, Matthew J.; Lawrence, Daniel A.; Castellino, Francis J.; Weigert, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Extravascular fibrin deposition accompanies many human diseases and causes chronic inflammation and organ damage, unless removed in a timely manner. Here, we used intravital microscopy to investigate how fibrin is removed from extravascular space. Fibrin placed into the dermis of mice underwent cellular endocytosis and lysosomal targeting, revealing a novel intracellular pathway for extravascular fibrin degradation. A C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2)-positive macrophage subpopulation constituted the majority of fibrin-uptaking cells. Consequently, cellular fibrin uptake was diminished by elimination of CCR2-expressing cells. The CCR2-positive macrophage subtype was different from collagen-internalizing M2-like macrophages. Cellular fibrin uptake was strictly dependent on plasminogen and plasminogen activator. Surprisingly, however, fibrin endocytosis was unimpeded by the absence of the fibrin(ogen) receptors, αMβ2 and ICAM-1, the myeloid cell integrin-binding site on fibrin or the endocytic collagen receptor, the mannose receptor. The study identifies a novel fibrin endocytic pathway engaged in extravascular fibrin clearance and shows that interstitial fibrin and collagen are cleared by different subsets of macrophages employing distinct molecular pathways. PMID:26647393

  8. CCL5 activation of CCR5 regulates cell metabolism to enhance proliferation of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Darrin; Rahbar, Ramtin; Fish, Eleanor N.

    2016-01-01

    In earlier studies, we showed that CCL5 enhances proliferation and survival of MCF-7 breast cancer cells in an mTOR-dependent manner and we provided evidence that, for T cells, CCL5 activation of CCR5 results in increased glycolysis and enhanced ATP production. Increases in metabolic activity of cancer cells, specifically increased glycolytic activity and increased expression of glucose transporters, are associated with tumour progression. In this report, we provide evidence that CCL5 enhances the proliferation of human breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, MCF-7) and mouse mammary tumour cells (MMTV-PyMT), mediated by CCR5 activation. Concomitant with enhanced proliferation we show that CCL5 increases cell surface expression of the glucose transporter GLUT1, and increases glucose uptake and ATP production by these cells. Blocking CCL5-inducible glucose uptake abrogates the enhanced proliferation induced by CCL5. We provide evidence that increased glucose uptake is associated with enhanced glycolysis, as measured by extracellular acidification. Moreover, CCL5 enhances the invasive capacity of these breast cancer cells. Using metabolomics, we demonstrate that the metabolic signature of CCL5-treated primary mouse mammary tumour cells reflects increased anabolic metabolism. The implications are that CCL5–CCR5 interactions in the tumour microenvironment regulate metabolic events, specifically glycolysis, to promote tumour proliferation and invasion. PMID:27335323

  9. Distribution of CCR5delta32, CCR2-64I and SDF1-3'A and plasma levels of SDF-1 in HIV-1 seronegative North Indians.

    PubMed

    Verma, Romsha; Gupta, Radha Ballabh; Singh, Kalpana; Bhasin, Rama; Anand Shukla, Abhay; Chauhan, Shyam S; Luthra, Kalpana

    2007-03-01

    Host genetic factors play an important role in susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and progression to AIDS. Mutations in genes encoding chemokine receptors and their ligands, viz., CCR5delta32, CCR2-64I and SDF1-3'A are implicated to have protective effects against HIV-1 infection and/or disease progression. The distribution of these gene polymorphisms and their role in the course of the disease varies between individuals of different racial, ethnic and risk groups. We have examined the allelic frequencies of CCR5delta32, CCR2-64I and SDF1-3'A in 500 healthy North Indians tested seronegative for HIV-1, by PCR-RFLP. The plasma levels of stromal derived factor (SDF-1) protein were estimated in 75 individuals using ELISA kit. Frequencies of CCR5delta32, CCR2-64I and SDF1-3'A alleles in 500 individuals were 1.5%, 9.1% and 20.4%, respectively. The SDF1-3'A homozygosity was confirmed by PCR product cloning and sequencing. The relative hazard values calculated on the basis of the three locus genotype of each individual revealed high relative hazard values (>0.9). The plasma levels of SDF-1 ranged from 1.77 to 3.42 ng/ml and were comparable between the three genotypes of SDF-1. This is the first study to assess the plasma level of SDF-1 protein in Asian Indians. Low frequency of the protective allele CCR5delta32 observed in this study suggests high vulnerability of North Indians to HIV-1 infection. The precise role of SDF1-3'A in HIV-1 infection needs to be elucidated.

  10. Components of the CCR4-NOT complex function as nuclear hormone receptor coactivators via association with the NRC-interacting Factor NIF-1.

    PubMed

    Garapaty, Shivani; Mahajan, Muktar A; Samuels, Herbert H

    2008-03-14

    CCR4-NOT is an evolutionarily conserved, multicomponent complex known to be involved in transcription as well as mRNA degradation. Various subunits (e.g. CNOT1 and CNOT7/CAF1) have been reported to be involved in influencing nuclear hormone receptor activities. Here, we show that CCR4/CNOT6 and RCD1/CNOT9, members of the CCR4-NOT complex, potentiate nuclear receptor activity. RCD1 interacts in vivo and in vitro with NIF-1 (NRC-interacting factor), a previously characterized nuclear receptor cotransducer that activates nuclear receptors via its interaction with NRC. As with NIF-1, RCD1 and CCR4 do not directly associate with nuclear receptors; however, they enhance ligand-dependent transcriptional activation by nuclear hormone receptors. CCR4 mediates its effect through the ligand binding domain of nuclear receptors and small interference RNA-mediated silencing of endogenous CCR4 results in a marked decrease in nuclear receptor activation. Furthermore, knockdown of CCR4 results in an attenuated stimulation of RARalpha target genes (e.g. Sox9 and HoxA1) as shown by quantitative PCR assays. The silencing of endogenous NIF-1 also resulted in a comparable decrease in the RAR-mediated induction of both Sox9 and HoxA1. Furthermore, CCR4 associates in vivo with NIF-1. In addition, the CCR4-enhanced transcriptional activation by nuclear receptors is dependent on NIF-1. The small interference RNA-mediated knockdown of NIF-1 blocks the ligand-dependent potentiating effect of CCR4. Our results suggest that CCR4 plays a role in the regulation of certain endogenous RARalpha target genes and that RCD1 and CCR4 might mediate their function through their interaction with NIF-1.

  11. Similarity transformed coupled cluster response (ST-CCR) theory--a time-dependent similarity transformed equation-of-motion coupled cluster (STEOM-CC) approach.

    PubMed

    Landau, Arie

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a new method for calculating spectroscopic properties in the framework of response theory utilizing a sequence of similarity transformations (STs). The STs are preformed using the coupled cluster (CC) and Fock-space coupled cluster operators. The linear and quadratic response functions of the new similarity transformed CC response (ST-CCR) method are derived. The poles of the linear response yield excitation-energy (EE) expressions identical to the ones in the similarity transformed equation-of-motion coupled cluster (STEOM-CC) approach. ST-CCR and STEOM-CC complement each other, in analogy to the complementarity of CC response (CCR) and equation-of-motion coupled cluster (EOM-CC). ST-CCR/STEOM-CC and CCR/EOM-CC yield size-extensive and size-intensive EEs, respectively. Other electronic-properties, e.g., transition dipole strengths, are also size-extensive within ST-CCR, in contrast to STEOM-CC. Moreover, analysis suggests that in comparison with CCR, the ST-CCR expressions may be confined to a smaller subspace, however, the precise scope of the truncation can only be determined numerically. In addition, reformulation of the time-independent STEOM-CC using the same parameterization as in ST-CCR, as well as an efficient truncation scheme, is presented. The shown convergence of the time-dependent and time-independent expressions displays the completeness of the presented formalism.

  12. Large-scale expression and purification of the major HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5 and characterization of its interaction with RANTES.

    PubMed

    Nisius, Lydia; Rogowski, Marco; Vangelista, Luca; Grzesiek, Stephan

    2008-10-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor CCR5 is a human chemokine receptor involved in the activation and migration of leukocytes. CCR5 is also the major HIV-1 coreceptor that, together with human CD4 and the viral glycoprotein gp120, promotes virus entry into host cells. Thus inhibition of the CCR5-gp120 interaction presents a promising route to prevent HIV infections. Atomic structural details of the interaction between CCR5 and its cognate chemokines or gp120 are presently unknown due to the general difficulties of membrane protein structure determination. Here, we report the high-yield expression of human CCR5 in baculovirus-infected Sf9 insect cells. Highly purified (>90%) CCR5 is obtained in detergent-solubilized form at yields of about 1mg/l cell culture. The conformational integrity of recombinant CCR5 after purification is shown by immunoprecipitation with the conformation-dependent monoclonal antibody 2D7, CD and NMR spectroscopy. The detergent micelles contain CCR5 in monomeric and dimeric forms, which can be separated by size exclusion chromatography and characterized individually. Further functional characterization by isothermal titration calorimetry indicates that the recombinant receptor interacts with its cognate chemokine RANTES. This interaction is strongly suppressed when sulfation of CCR5 is inhibited in the insect cells.

  13. Viremic Control and Viral Coreceptor Usage in Two HIV-1-Infected Persons Homozygous for CCR5 Δ32

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, Timothy J.; Hanhauser, Emily; Hu, Zixin; Stellbrink, Hans-Jürgen; Noah, Christian; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Deeks, Steven G.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Pereyra, Florencia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine viral and immune factors involved in transmission and control of HIV-1 infection in persons without functional CCR5 Design Understanding transmission and control of HIV-1 in persons homozygous for CCR5Δ32 is important given efforts to develop HIV-1 curative therapies aimed at modifying or disrupting CCR5 expression. Methods We identified two HIV-infected CCR5Δ32/Δ32 individuals among a cohort of patients with spontaneous control of HIV-1 infection without antiretroviral therapy and determined co-receptor usage of the infecting viruses. We assessed genetic evolution of full-length HIV-1 envelope sequences by single-genome analysis from one participant and his sexual partner, and explored HIV-1 immune responses and HIV-1 mutations following virologic escape and disease progression. Results Both participants experienced viremia of less than 4,000 RNA copies/ml with preserved CD4+ T cell counts off ART for at least 3.3 and 4.6 years after diagnosis, respectively. One participant had phenotypic evidence of X4 virus, had no known favorable HLA alleles, and appeared to be infected by minority X4 virus from a pool that predominately used CCR5 for entry. The second participant had virus that was unable to use CXCR4 for entry in phenotypic assay but was able to engage alternative viral coreceptors (e.g. CXCR6) in vitro. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that individuals may be infected by minority X4 viruses from a population that predominately uses CCR5 for entry, and that viruses may bypass traditional HIV-1 coreceptors (CCR5 and CXCR4) completely by engaging alternative coreceptors to establish and propagate HIV-1 infection. PMID:25730507

  14. Importance of the CCR5-CCL5 axis for mucosal Trypanosoma cruzi protection and B cell activation.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Nicole L; Eickhoff, Christopher S; Zhang, Xiuli; Giddings, Olivia K; Lane, Thomas E; Hoft, Daniel F

    2011-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is an intracellular parasite and the causative agent of Chagas disease. Previous work has shown that the chemokine receptor CCR5 plays a role in systemic T. cruzi protection. We evaluated the importance of CCR5 and CCL5 for mucosal protection against natural oral and conjunctival T. cruzi challenges. T. cruzi-immune CCR5(-/-) and wild-type C57BL/6 mice were generated by repeated infectious challenges with T. cruzi. CCR5(-/-) and wild-type mice developed equivalent levels of cellular, humoral, and protective mucosal responses. However, CCR5(-/-)-immune mice produced increased levels of CCL5 in protected gastric tissues, suggesting compensatory signaling through additional receptors. Neutralization of CCL5 in CCR5(-/-)-immune mice resulted in decreased mucosal inflammatory responses, reduced T. cruzi-specific Ab-secreting cells, and significantly less mucosal T. cruzi protection, confirming an important role for CCL5 in optimal immune control of T. cruzi replication at the point of initial mucosal invasion. To investigate further the mechanism responsible for mucosal protection mediated by CCL5-CCR5 signaling, we evaluated the effects of CCL5 on B cells. CCL5 enhanced proliferation and IgM secretion in highly purified B cells triggered by suboptimal doses of LPS. In addition, neutralization of endogenous CCL5 inhibited B cell proliferation and IgM secretion during stimulation of highly purified B cells, indicating that B cell production of CCL5 has important autocrine effects. These findings demonstrate direct effects of CCL5 on B cells, with significant implications for the development of mucosal adjuvants, and further suggest that CCL5 may be important as a general B cell coactivator.

  15. The Not4 E3 Ligase and CCR4 Deadenylase Play Distinct Roles in Protein Quality Control

    PubMed Central

    Halter, David; Collart, Martine A.; Panasenko, Olesya O.

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells control their proteome by regulating protein production and protein clearance. Protein production is determined to a large extent by mRNA levels, whereas protein degradation depends mostly upon the proteasome. Dysfunction of the proteasome leads to the accumulation of non-functional proteins that can aggregate, be toxic for the cell, and, in extreme cases, lead to cell death. mRNA levels are controlled by their rates of synthesis and degradation. Recent evidence indicates that these rates have oppositely co-evolved to ensure appropriate mRNA levels. This opposite co-evolution has been correlated with the mutations in the Ccr4-Not complex. Consistently, the deadenylation enzymes responsible for the rate-limiting step in eukaryotic mRNA degradation, Caf1 and Ccr4, are subunits of the Ccr4-Not complex. Another subunit of this complex is a RING E3 ligase, Not4. It is essential for cellular protein solubility and has been proposed to be involved in co-translational quality control. An open question has been whether this role of Not4 resides strictly in the regulation of the deadenylation module of the Ccr4-Not complex. However, Not4 is important for proper assembly of the proteasome, and the Ccr4-Not complex may have multiple functional modules that participate in protein quality control in different ways. In this work we studied how the functions of the Caf1/Ccr4 and Not4 modules are connected. We concluded that Not4 plays a role in protein quality control independently of the Ccr4 deadenylase, and that it is involved in clearance of aberrant proteins at least in part via the proteasome. PMID:24465968

  16. Preliminary Authorization Basis Document For the Proposed Biological Safety Level 3 (BSL-3) Facility (B368) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Altenbach, T; Nguyen, S

    2005-01-04

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Integrated Safety Management (ISM) System Description (LLNL 2002) and the Task Plan for the Preparation of Authorization Basis Documentation for the proposed Biosafety Level 3 Laboratory at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (DOE 2002a) require a PABD be prepared for the proposed BSL-3 Facility. NNSA-OAK approval is required prior to its construction. This Preliminary Authorization Basis Documentation (PABD) formalizes and documents the hazard evaluation and its results for the Biosafety level 3 (BSL-3) facility. The PABD for the proposed BSL-3 facility provides the following information: (1) BSL-3 facility's site description; (2) general description of the BSL-3 facility and its operations; (3) identification of facility hazards; (4) generic hazard analysis; (5) identification of controls important to safety; and (6) safety management programs. The PABD characterizes the level of intrinsic potential hazard associated with a facility and provides the basis for its hazard classification. The hazard classification determines the level of safety documentation required and the level of review and approval for the safety analysis. The hazards of primary concern associated with the BSL-3 facility are biological. The hazard classification is determined by comparing facility inventories of biological materials and activities with the BSL-3 threshold established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for BSL-3 facilities.

  17. A system to evaluate the scientific quality of biological and restoration objectives using National Wildlife Refuge Comprehensive Conservation Plans as a case study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroeder, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    It is widely accepted that plans for restoration projects should contain specific, measurable, and science-based objectives to guide restoration efforts. The United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is in the process of developing Comprehensive Conservation Plans (CCPs) for more than 500 units in the National Wildlife Refuge System (NWRS). These plans contain objectives for biological and ecosystem restoration efforts on the refuges. Based on USFWS policy, a system was developed to evaluate the scientific quality of such objectives based on three critical factors: (1) Is the objective specific, measurable, achievable, results-oriented, and time-fixed? (2) What is the extent of the rationale that explains the assumptions, logic, and reasoning for the objective? (3) How well was available science used in the development of the objective? The evaluation system scores each factor on a scale of 1 (poor) to 4 (excellent) according to detailed criteria. The biological and restoration objectives from CCPs published as of September 2004 (60 total) were evaluated. The overall average score for all biological and restoration objectives was 1.73. Average scores for each factor were: Factor 1-1.97; Factor 2-1.86; Factor 3-1.38. The overall scores increased from 1997 to 2004. Future restoration efforts may benefit by using this evaluation system during the process of plan development, to ensure that biological and restoration objectives are of the highest scientific quality possible prior to the implementation of restoration plans, and to allow for improved monitoring and adaptive management.

  18. The preferred traits of mates in a cross-national study of heterosexual and homosexual men and women: an examination of biological and cultural influences.

    PubMed

    Lippa, Richard A

    2007-04-01

    BBC Internet survey participants (119,733 men and 98,462 women) chose from a list of 23 traits those they considered first, second, and third most important in a relationship partner. Across all participants, the traits ranked most important were: intelligence, humor, honesty, kindness, overall good looks, face attractiveness, values, communication skills, and dependability. On average, men ranked good looks and facial attractiveness more important than women did (d = 0.55 and 0.36, respectively), whereas women ranked honesty, humor, kindness, and dependability more important than men did (ds = 0.23, 0.22, 0.18, and 0.15). Sexual orientation differences were smaller than sex differences in trait rankings, but some were meaningful; for example, heterosexual more than homosexual participants assigned importance to religion, fondness for children, and parenting abilities. Multidimensional scaling analyses showed that trait preference profiles clustered by participant sex, not by sexual orientation, and by sex more than by nationality. Sex-by-nation ANOVAs of individuals' trait rankings showed that sex differences in rankings of attractiveness, but not of character traits, were extremely consistent across 53 nations and that nation main effects and sex-by-nation interactions were stronger for character traits than for physical attractiveness. United Nations indices of gender equality correlated, across nations, with men's and women's rankings of character traits but not with their rankings of physical attractiveness. These results suggest that cultural factors had a relatively greater impact on men's and women's rankings of character traits, whereas biological factors had a relatively greater impact on men's and women's rankings of physical attractiveness.

  19. DNA methylation by CcrM activates the transcription of two genes required for the division of Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Diego; Collier, Justine

    2013-04-01

    DNA methylation regulates many processes, including gene expression, by superimposing secondary information on DNA sequences. The conserved CcrM enzyme, which methylates adenines in GANTC sequences, is essential to the viability of several Alphaproteobacteria. In this study, we find that Caulobacter crescentus cells lacking the CcrM enzyme accumulate low levels of the two conserved FtsZ and MipZ proteins, leading to a severe defect in cell division. This defect can be compensated by the expression of the ftsZ gene from an inducible promoter or by spontaneous suppressor mutations that promote FtsZ accumulation. We show that CcrM promotes the transcription of the ftsZ and mipZ genes and that the ftsZ and mipZ promoter regions contain a conserved CGACTC motif that is critical to their activities and to their regulation by CcrM. In addition, our results suggest that the ftsZ promoter has the lowest activity when the CGACTC motif is non-methylated, an intermediate activity when it is hemi-methylated and the highest activity when it is fully methylated. The regulation of ftsZ expression by DNA methylation may explain why CcrM is essential in a subset of Alphaproteobacteria.

  20. Influence of the CCR-5/MIP-1 α axis in the pathogenesis of Rocio virus encephalitis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Chávez, Juliana H; França, Rafael F O; Oliveira, Carlo J F; de Aquino, Maria T P; Farias, Kleber J S; Machado, Paula R L; de Oliveira, Thelma F M; Yokosawa, Jonny; Soares, Edson G; da Silva, João S; da Fonseca, Benedito A L; Figueiredo, Luiz T M

    2013-11-01

    Rocio virus (ROCV) caused an outbreak of human encephalitis during the 1970s in Brazil and its immunopathogenesis remains poorly understood. CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a chemokine receptor that binds to macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-1 α). Both molecules are associated with inflammatory cells migration during infections. In this study, we demonstrated the importance of the CCR5 and MIP-1 α, in the outcome of viral encephalitis of ROCV-infected mice. CCR5 and MIP-1 α knockout mice survived longer than wild-type (WT) ROCV-infected animals. In addition, knockout mice had reduced inflammation in the brain. Assessment of brain viral load showed mice virus detection five days post-infection in wild-type and CCR5-/- mice, while MIP-1 α-/- mice had lower viral loads seven days post-infection. Knockout mice required a higher lethal dose than wild-type mice as well. The CCR5/MIP-1 α axis may contribute to migration of infected cells to the brain and consequently affect the pathogenesis during ROCV infection.

  1. Evolution of the CCR5 Delta32 mutation based on haplotype variation in Jewish and Northern European population samples.

    PubMed

    Klitz, W; Brautbar, C; Schito, A M; Barcellos, L F; Oksenberg, J R

    2001-05-01

    The chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) serves as a fusion cofactor for macrophage-tropic strains of HIV-1. In addition, CCR5 has been shown to mediate the entry of poxviruses into target cells. Individuals homozygous for the Delta32 deletion-mutation have no surface expression of CCR5 and are highly protected against HIV-1 infection. To gain insights into the evolution of the mutation in modern populations, the relatively high frequency of the Delta32-ccr5 allele in some European and Jewish populations is explored here by examining haplotypes of 3p21.3 constructed of five polymorphic marker loci surrounding CCR5. By sampling Ashkenazi, non-Ashkenazi and non-Jewish populations, we utilize the natural experiment that occurred as a consequence of the Jewish Diaspora, and demonstrate that a single mutation was responsible for all copies of Delta32. This mutation must have moved from Northern European populations to the Ashkenazi Jews where evidence suggests that Delta32 carriers of both groups were favored by repeated occurrence of epidemic small pox beginning in the 8th century AD.

  2. Different Regulations of ROM2 and LRG1 Expression by Ccr4, Pop2, and Dhh1 in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cell Wall Integrity Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xia; Ohmori, Tetsuro; Irie, Kaoru; Kimura, Yuichi; Suda, Yasuyuki; Mizuno, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ccr4, a component of the Ccr4-Not cytoplasmic deadenylase complex, is known to be required for the cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, it is not fully understood how Ccr4 and other components of the Ccr4-Not complex regulate the CWI pathway. Previously, we showed that Ccr4 functions in the CWI pathway together with Khd1 RNA binding protein. Ccr4 and Khd1 modulate a signal from Rho1 small GTPase in the CWI pathway by regulating the expression of ROM2 mRNA and LRG1 mRNA, encoding a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) and a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for Rho1, respectively. Here we examined the possible involvement of the POP2 gene encoding a subunit of the Ccr4-Not complex and the DHH1 gene encoding a DEAD box RNA helicase that associates with the Ccr4-Not complex in the regulation of ROM2 and LRG1 expression. Neither ROM2 mRNA level nor Rom2 function was impaired by pop2Δ or dhh1Δ mutation. The LRG1 mRNA level was increased in pop2Δ and dhh1Δ mutants, as well as the ccr4Δ mutant, and the growth defects caused by pop2Δ and dhh1Δ mutations were suppressed by lrg1Δ mutation. Our results suggest that LRG1 expression is regulated by Ccr4 together with Pop2 and Dhh1 and that ROM2 expression is regulated by Khd1 and Ccr4, but not by Pop2 and Dhh1. Thus, Rho1 activity in the CWI pathway is precisely controlled by modulation of the mRNA levels for Rho1-GEF Rom2 and Rho1-GAP Lrg1. IMPORTANCE We find here that Ccr4, Pop2, and Dhh1 modulate the levels of mRNAs for specific Rho1 regulators, Rom2 and Lrg1. In budding yeast, Rho1 activity is tightly regulated both temporally and spatially. It is anticipated that Ccr4, Pop2, and Dhh1 may contribute to the precise spatiotemporal control of Rho1 activity by regulating expression of its regulators temporally and spatially. Our finding on the roles of the components of the Ccr4-Not complex in yeast would give important information for understanding the

  3. Biological restoration of major transportation facilities domestic demonstration and application project (DDAP): technology development at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, James L., Jr.; Melton, Brad; Finley, Patrick; Brockman, John; Peyton, Chad E.; Tucker, Mark David; Einfeld, Wayne; Griffith, Richard O.; Brown, Gary Stephen; Lucero, Daniel A.; Betty, Rita G.; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Knowlton, Robert G.; Ho, Pauline

    2006-06-01

    The Bio-Restoration of Major Transportation Facilities Domestic Demonstration and Application Program (DDAP) is a designed to accelerate the restoration of transportation nodes following an attack with a biological warfare agent. This report documents the technology development work done at SNL for this DDAP, which include development of the BROOM tool, an investigation of surface sample collection efficiency, and a flow cytometry study of chlorine dioxide effects on Bacillus anthracis spore viability.

  4. Intratumoral expression of CCR3 in breast cancer is associated with improved relapse-free survival in luminal-like disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hai-Yan; Ding, Ke-Feng; Yu, Ke-Da

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The association chemokine receptor CCR3 with breast cancer subtypes and relapse-free survival is unknown. Results The overall expression (either intratumoral or peritumoral) of CCR3 was not associated with tumor size, lymph node status, age, and subtype. When we confined the analysis in samples without peritumoral stromal CCR3 expression, intratumoral expression of CCR3 was associated with breast cancer subtype (P=0.04). Tumors with high expression of CCR3 were more likely to be luminal-like rather than TNBC or HER2-enriched cancers. Moreover, high mRNA expression of CCR3 was related with improved relapse-free survival in luminal-A/B (P<0.001). The subsequent sensitivity analysis using the systemically untreated patients confirmed that higher mRNA expression of CCR3 was a robust prognostic factor for luminal-A (P=0.0025) and luminal-B (P=0.088), but not for HER2-enriched (P=0.21) and TNBC (P=0.86). In the independent cohort, the positive association between increased expression of CCR3 and improved distant relapse-free survival was also observed. Methods We determined the expression level of CCR3 in 150 cases with breast cancer by using immunohistochemistry (IHC) assay, for both intratumoral and peritumoral stroma, and investigated the effect of CCR3 expression on relapse-free survival according to subtype using cases from publicly available datasets, in the whole group (N=3557) and in the patients without adjuvant systemic treatment (N=1005), respectively. Moreover, the survival outcomes were validated in another independent cohort including 508 breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Conclusions Our data indicate that intratumoral expression of CCR3 in breast cancer is associated with improved relapse-free survival in patients with luminal-like disease. PMID:27086913

  5. Biological inventory of anchialine pools in the Pu'uhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park and Pu'ukoholā Heiau National Historical Site, Hawaii Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tango, Lori K.; Foote, David; Magnacca, Karl N.; Foltz, Sarah J.; Cutler, Kerry

    2012-01-01

    Inventories for major groups of invertebrates were completed at anchialine pool complexes in Pu‘uhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park (PUHO) and Pu‘ukoholā Heiau National Historic Site (PUHE) on the island of Hawai‘i. Nine pools within two pool complexes were surveyed at PUHO, along with one extensive pool at the terminus of Makeāhua Gulch at PUHE. At both parks, inventories documented previously unreported diversity, with pool complexes at PUHO exhibiting greater species richness for most taxa than the pool at PUHE. Inventories at PUHO recorded five species of molluscs, four species of crustaceans (including the candidate endangered shrimp Metabetaeus lohena), two species of Orthoptera, four species of Odonata (including the candidate endangered damselfly Megalagrion xanthomelas), fourteen species of Diptera, nine taxa of plankton, and thirteen species of ants; inventories at the PUHE pool produced only one species of mollusc, two species of crustacean, at least one species of Orthoptera, four species of Odonata, thirty species of Diptera, five taxa of plankton, and four species of ants. Further survey work may be necessary to document the full diversity of pool fauna, especially in species-rich groups like the Diptera. Inventory data will be used to generate a network wide database of species presence and distribution, and will aid in developing management plans for anchialine pool resources.

  6. De-novo Collateral Formation Following Acute Myocardial Infarction: Dependence on CCR2+ Bone Marrow Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Faber, James E

    2015-01-01

    Wide variation exists in the extent (number and diameter) of native pre-existing collaterals in tissues of different strains of mice, with supportive indirect evidence recently appearing for humans. This variation is a major determinant of the wide variation in severity of tissue injury in occlusive vascular disease. Whether such genetic-dependent variation also exists in the heart is unknown because no model exists for study of mouse coronary collaterals. Also owing to methodological limitations, it is not known if ischemia can induce new coronary collaterals to form (“neo-collaterals”) versus remodeling of pre-existing ones. The present study sought to develop a model to study coronary collaterals in mice, determine whether neo-collateral formation occurs, and investigate the responsible mechanisms. Four strains with known rank-ordered differences in collateral extent in brain and skeletal muscle were studied: C57BLKS>C57BL/6>A/J>BALB/c. Unexpectedly, these and 5 additional strains lacked native coronary collaterals. However after ligation, neo-collaterals formed rapidly within 1-to-2 days, reaching their maximum extent in ≤ 7 days. Rank-order for neo-collateral formation differed from the above: C57BL/6>BALB/c>C57BLKS>A/J. Collateral network conductance, infarct volume−1, and contractile function followed this same rank-order. Neo-collateral formation and collateral conductance were reduced and infarct volume increased in MCP1−/− and CCR2−/− mice. Bone-marrow transplant rescued collateral formation in CCR2−/− mice. Involvement of fractalkine→CX3CR1 signaling and endothelial cell proliferation were also identified. This study introduces a model for investigating the coronary collateral circulation in mice, demonstrates that neocollaterals form rapidly after coronary occlusion, and finds that MCP→CCR2-mediated recruitment of myeloid cells is required for this process. PMID:26254180

  7. The Ccr4‐Not complex is a key regulator of eukaryotic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The Ccr4‐Not complex is a multisubunit complex present in all eukaryotes that contributes to regulate gene expression at all steps, from production of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) in the nucleus to their degradation in the cytoplasm. In the nucleus it influences the post‐translational modifications of the chromatin template that has to be remodeled for transcription, it is present at sites of transcription and associates with transcription factors as well as with the elongating polymerase, it interacts with the factors that prepare the new transcript for export to the cytoplasm and finally is important for nuclear quality control and influences mRNA export. In the cytoplasm it is present in polysomes where mRNAs are translated and in RNA granules where mRNAs will be redirected upon inhibition of translation. It influences mRNA translatability, and is needed during translation, on one hand for co‐translational protein interactions and on the other hand to preserve translation that stalls. It is one of the relevant players during co‐translational quality control. It also interacts with factors that will repress translation or induce mRNA decapping when recruited to the translating template. Finally, Ccr4‐Not carries deadenylating enzymes and is a key player in mRNA decay, generic mRNA decay that follows normal translation termination, co‐translational mRNA decay of transcripts on which the ribosomes stall durably or which carry a non‐sense mutation and finally mRNA decay that is induced by external signaling for a change in genetic programming. Ccr4‐Not is a master regulator of eukaryotic gene expression. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:438–454. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1332 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26821858

  8. Third report on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect

    Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Bailey, R.D.

    1994-03-01

    As a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1985, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC); selected tributaries of WOC, including Fifth Creek, First Creek, Melton Branch, and Northwest Tributary; and the Clinch River. The BMAP currently consists of six major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs at ORNL. These are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota, (3) biological indicator studies, (4) instream ecological monitoring, (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment, and (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake (WOL). The investigation of contaminant transport, distribution, and fate in the WOC embayment-Clinch River-Watts Bar Reservoir system was originally a task of the BMAP but, in 1988, was incorporated into the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation for the Clinch River, a separate study to assess offsite contamination from all three Department of Energy facilities in Oak Ridge.

  9. Modulation of ccrAB Expression and SCCmec Excision by an Inverted Repeat Element and SarS in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shijie; Ma, Ronghua; Liu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a notorious human pathogen that can cause a broad spectrum of infections. MRSA strains are resistant to almost the entire family of β-lactam antibiotics due to the acquisition of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec). The chromosome cassette recombinases A and B, encoded by ccrAB genes located on SCCmec, play a key role in the excision of SCCmec. Studies have shown that ccrAB genes are expressed in only a minority of cells, suggesting the involvement of a subtle regulatory mechanism in ccrAB expression which has not been uncovered. Here, we found that an inverted repeat (IR) element, existing extensively and conservatively within the ccrAB promoter of different SCCmec types, played a repressive role in ccrAB expression and SCCmec excision in MRSA strain N315. Replacement of the IR sequence led to a significant increase in ccrAB expression and curing of SCCmec from strain N315 cells. In addition, we identified the transcriptional regulator SarS using DNA-affinity chromatography and further demonstrated that SarS can bind to the IR sequence and upregulate ccrAB expression and SCCmec excision. These findings reveal a molecular mechanism regulating ccrAB expression and SCCmec excision and may provide mechanic insights into the lateral transfer of SCCmec and spread of antibiotic resistance in S. aureus. PMID:26248371

  10. AMPK-Activated Protein Kinase Suppresses Ccr2 Expression by Inhibiting the NF-κB Pathway in RAW264.7 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kumase, Fumiaki; Takeuchi, Kimio; Morizane, Yuki; Suzuki, Jun; Matsumoto, Hidetaka; Kataoka, Keiko; Al-Moujahed, Ahmad; Maidana, Daniel E.; Miller, Joan W.; Vavvas, Demetrios G.

    2016-01-01

    C-C chemokine receptor 2 (Ccr2) is a key pro-inflammatory marker of classic (M1) macrophage activation. Although Ccr2 is known to be expressed both constitutively and inductively, the full regulatory mechanism of its expression remains unclear. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is not only a master regulator of energy homeostasis but also a central regulator of inflammation. In this study, we sought to assess AMPK’s role in regulating RAW264.7 macrophage Ccr2 protein levels in resting (M0) or LPS-induced M1 states. In both M0 and M1 RAW264.7 macrophages, knockdown of the AMPKα1 subunit by siRNA led to increased Ccr2 levels whereas pharmacologic (A769662) activation of AMPK, attenuated LPS-induced increases in Ccr2 expression in an AMPK dependent fashion. The increases in Ccr2 levels by AMPK downregulation were partially reversed by NF-κB inhibition whereas TNF-a inhibition had minimal effects. Our results indicate that AMPK is a negative regulator of Ccr2 expression in RAW264.7 macrophages, and that the mechanism of action of AMPK inhibition of Ccr2 is mediated, in part, through the NF-κB pathway. PMID:26799633

  11. CCR7 Receptor Expression in Mono-MAC-1 Cells: Modulation by Liver X Receptor α Activation and Prostaglandin E2

    PubMed Central

    Tanné, Bérengère; Bernier, Stéphane; Dumais, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration via chemokine receptor CCR7 expression is an essential function of the immune system. We previously showed that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), an important immunomodulatory molecule, increases CCR7 expression and function in monocytes. Here, we explore the role of the liver X receptor α (LXRα) activation on CCR7 expression in Mono-Mac-1 (MM-1) cells in the presence of PGE2. To do this, MM-1 cells were stimulated with the LXRα synthetic agonist T0901317 in the presence or absence of PGE2. CCR7 mRNA transcription was measured using quantitative RT-PCR and protein expression was examined using flow cytometry. CCR7 function was analyzed using migration assays in response to CCL19/CCL21, which are natural ligands for CCR7. Our results show that agonist-mediated activation of LXRα in the presence of PGE2 increases CCR7 mRNA transcription and MM-1 cell migratory capacity in response to CCL19/21. In addition, our results demonstrate that engagement of the E-prostanoids 2 and 4 (EP2/EP4) receptors present on MM-1 cells is responsible for the observed increase in CCR7 mRNA expression and function during LXRα activation. Examination of monocyte migration in response to lipid derivatives such as PGE2 and oxysterols that are produced at sites of chronic inflammation would contribute to understanding the excessive monocyte migration that characterizes atherosclerosis. PMID:26770865

  12. Blockade of CCR2 reduces macrophage influx and development of chronic renal damage in murine renovascular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Sonu; Warner, Gina M; Hartono, Stella P; Boyilla, Rajendra; Knudsen, Bruce E; Zubair, Adeel S; Lien, Karen; Nath, Karl A; Textor, Stephen C; Lerman, Lilach O; Grande, Joseph P

    2016-03-01

    Renovascular hypertension (RVH) is a common cause of both cardiovascular and renal morbidity and mortality. In renal artery stenosis (RAS), atrophy in the stenotic kidney is associated with an influx of macrophages and other mononuclear cells. We tested the hypothesis that chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) inhibition would reduce chronic renal injury by reducing macrophage influx in the stenotic kidney of mice with RAS. We employed a well-established murine model of RVH to define the relationship between macrophage infiltration and development of renal atrophy in the stenotic kidney. To determine the role of chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2)/CCR2 signaling in the development of renal atrophy, mice were treated with the CCR2 inhibitor RS-102895 at the time of RAS surgery and followed for 4 wk. Renal tubular epithelial cells expressed CCL2 by 3 days following surgery, a time at which no significant light microscopic alterations, including interstitial inflammation, were identified. Macrophage influx increased with time following surgery. At 4 wk, the development of severe renal atrophy was accompanied by an influx of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)+ and CD206+ macrophages that coexpressed F4/80, with a modest increase in macrophages coexpressing arginase 1 and F4/80. The CCR2 inhibitor RS-102895 attenuated renal atrophy and significantly reduced the number of dual-stained F4/80+ iNOS+ and F4/80+ CD206+ but not F4/80+ arginase 1+ macrophages. CCR2 inhibition reduces iNOS+ and CD206+ macrophage accumulation that coexpress F4/80 and renal atrophy in experimental renal artery stenosis. CCR2 blockade may provide a novel therapeutic approach to humans with RVH. PMID:26661648

  13. The chemokine receptor CCR1 is constitutively active, which leads to G protein-independent, β-arrestin-mediated internalization.

    PubMed

    Gilliland, C Taylor; Salanga, Catherina L; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Trejo, JoAnn; Handel, Tracy M

    2013-11-01

    Activation of G protein-coupled receptors by their associated ligands has been extensively studied, and increasing structural information about the molecular mechanisms underlying ligand-dependent receptor activation is beginning to emerge with the recent expansion in GPCR crystal structures. However, some GPCRs are also able to adopt active conformations in the absence of agonist binding that result in the initiation of signal transduction and receptor down-modulation. In this report, we show that the CC-type chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1) exhibits significant constitutive activity leading to a variety of cellular responses. CCR1 expression is sufficient to induce inhibition of cAMP formation, increased F-actin content, and basal migration of human and murine leukocytes. The constitutive activity leads to basal phosphorylation of the receptor, recruitment of β-arrestin-2, and subsequent receptor internalization. CCR1 concurrently engages Gαi and β-arrestin-2 in a multiprotein complex, which may be accommodated by homo-oligomerization or receptor clustering. The data suggest the presence of two functional states for CCR1; whereas receptor coupled to Gαi functions as a canonical GPCR, albeit with high constitutive activity, the CCR1·β-arrestin-2 complex is required for G protein-independent constitutive receptor internalization. The pertussis toxin-insensitive uptake of chemokine by the receptor suggests that the CCR1·β-arrestin-2 complex may be related to a potential scavenging function of the receptor, which may be important for maintenance of chemokine gradients and receptor responsiveness in complex fields of chemokines during inflammation.

  14. Blockade of CCR2 reduces macrophage influx and development of chronic renal damage in murine renovascular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Sonu; Warner, Gina M; Hartono, Stella P; Boyilla, Rajendra; Knudsen, Bruce E; Zubair, Adeel S; Lien, Karen; Nath, Karl A; Textor, Stephen C; Lerman, Lilach O; Grande, Joseph P

    2016-03-01

    Renovascular hypertension (RVH) is a common cause of both cardiovascular and renal morbidity and mortality. In renal artery stenosis (RAS), atrophy in the stenotic kidney is associated with an influx of macrophages and other mononuclear cells. We tested the hypothesis that chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) inhibition would reduce chronic renal injury by reducing macrophage influx in the stenotic kidney of mice with RAS. We employed a well-established murine model of RVH to define the relationship between macrophage infiltration and development of renal atrophy in the stenotic kidney. To determine the role of chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2)/CCR2 signaling in the development of renal atrophy, mice were treated with the CCR2 inhibitor RS-102895 at the time of RAS surgery and followed for 4 wk. Renal tubular epithelial cells expressed CCL2 by 3 days following surgery, a time at which no significant light microscopic alterations, including interstitial inflammation, were identified. Macrophage influx increased with time following surgery. At 4 wk, the development of severe renal atrophy was accompanied by an influx of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)+ and CD206+ macrophages that coexpressed F4/80, with a modest increase in macrophages coexpressing arginase 1 and F4/80. The CCR2 inhibitor RS-102895 attenuated renal atrophy and significantly reduced the number of dual-stained F4/80+ iNOS+ and F4/80+ CD206+ but not F4/80+ arginase 1+ macrophages. CCR2 inhibition reduces iNOS+ and CD206+ macrophage accumulation that coexpress F4/80 and renal atrophy in experimental renal artery stenosis. CCR2 blockade may provide a novel therapeutic approach to humans with RVH.

  15. Brookhaven National Laboratory

    MedlinePlus

    ... Materials Science National Synchrotron Light Source II Sustainable Energy Technologies Environment, Biology, Nuclear Science & Nonproliferation Biology Environmental and Climate Sciences Department ...

  16. Frequency of the CCR5-delta32 allele in Brazilian populations: A systematic literature review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Silva-Carvalho, Wlisses Henrique Veloso; de Moura, Ronald Rodrigues; Coelho, Antonio Victor Campos; Crovella, Sergio; Guimarães, Rafael Lima

    2016-09-01

    The CCR5 is a chemokine receptor widely expressed by several immune cells that are engaged in inflammatory responses. Some populations have individuals exhibiting a 32bp deletion in the CCR5 gene (CCR5-delta32) that produces a truncated non-functional protein not expressed on the cell surface. This polymorphism, known to be associated with susceptibility to infectious and inflammatory diseases, such as osteomyelitis, pre-eclampsia, systemic lupus erythematous, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and HIV/AIDS, is more commonly found in European populations with average frequency of 10%. However, it is also possible to observe a significant frequency in other world populations, such as the Brazilian one. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of CCR5-delta32 genetic association studies in Brazilian populations throughout the country to estimate the frequency of this polymorphism. We also compared CCR5-delta32 frequencies across Brazilian regions. The systematic literature reviewed studies involving delta32 allele in Brazilian populations published from 1995 to 2015. Among the reviewed literature, 25 studies including 30 Brazilian populations distributed between the North, Northeast, South and Southeast regions were included in our meta-analysis. We observed an overall allelic frequency of 4% (95%-CI, 0.03-0.05), that was considered moderate and, notably, higher than some European populations, such as Cyprus (2.8%), Italy (3%) and Greece (2.4%). Regarding the regional frequency comparisons between North-Northeast (N-NE) and South-Southeast (S-SE) regions, we observed an allelic frequency of 3% (95%-CI, 0.02-0.04) and 4% (95%-CI, 0.03-0.05), respectively. The populations from S-SE regions had a slightly higher CCR5-delta32 frequency than N-NE regions (OR=1.41, p=0.002). Although there are several studies about the CCR5-delta32 polymorphism and its effect on the immune response of some infectious diseases, this report is the first meta

  17. Combined 3D-QSAR modeling and molecular docking study on azacycles CCR5 antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yongjun; Shu, Mao; Lin, Yong; Wang, Yuanqiang; Wang, Rui; Hu, Yong; Lin, Zhihua

    2013-08-01

    The beta chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is an attractive target for pharmaceutical industry in the HIV-1, inflammation and cancer therapeutic areas. In this study, we have developed quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) models for a series of 41 azacycles CCR5 antagonists using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA), and Topomer CoMFA methods. The cross-validated coefficient q2 values of 3D-QASR (CoMFA, CoMSIA, and Topomer CoMFA) methods were 0.630, 0.758, and 0.852, respectively, the non-cross-validated R2 values were 0.979, 0.978, and 0.990, respectively. Docking studies were also employed to determine the most probable binding mode. 3D contour maps and docking results suggested that bulky groups and electron-withdrawing groups on the core part would decrease antiviral activity. Furthermore, docking results indicated that H-bonds and π bonds were favorable for antiviral activities. Finally, a set of novel derivatives with predicted activities were designed.

  18. The CCR4-NOT Complex Is Implicated in the Viability of Aneuploid Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Tange, Yoshie; Kurabayashi, Atsushi; Goto, Bunshiro; Hoe, Kwang-Lae; Kim, Dong-Uk; Park, Han-Oh; Hayles, Jacqueline; Chikashige, Yuji; Tsutumi, Chihiro; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Yamao, Fumiaki; Nurse, Paul; Niwa, Osami

    2012-01-01

    To identify the genes required to sustain aneuploid viability, we screened a deletion library of non-essential genes in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, in which most types of aneuploidy are eventually lethal to the cell. Aneuploids remain viable for a period of time and can form colonies by reducing the extent of the aneuploidy. We hypothesized that a reduction in colony formation efficiency could be used to screen for gene deletions that compromise aneuploid viability. Deletion mutants were used to measure the effects on the viability of spores derived from triploid meiosis and from a chromosome instability mutant. We found that the CCR4-NOT complex, an evolutionarily conserved general regulator of mRNA turnover, and other related factors, including poly(A)-specific nuclease for mRNA decay, are involved in aneuploid viability. Defective mutations in CCR4-NOT complex components in the distantly related yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae also affected the viability of spores produced from triploid cells, suggesting that this complex has a conserved role in aneuploids. In addition, our findings suggest that the genes required for homologous recombination repair are important for aneuploid viability. PMID:22737087

  19. Mechanistic Models Predict Efficacy of CCR5-Deficient Stem Cell Transplants in HIV Patient Populations.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, I; Gabhann, F Mac

    2016-02-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) effectively suppresses viral load in HIV-infected individuals, but it is not a cure. Bone marrow transplants using HIV-resistant stem cells have renewed hope that cure is achievable but key questions remain e.g., what percentage of stem cells must be HIV-resistant to achieve cure?. As few patients have undergone transplants, we built a mechanistic model of HIV/AIDS to approach this problem. The model includes major players of infection, reproduces the complete course of the disease, and simulates crucial components of clinical treatments, such as cART, irradiation, host recovery, gene augmentation, and donor chimerism. Using clinical data from 172 cART-naïve HIV-infected individuals, we created virtual populations to predict performance of CCR5-deficient stem-cell therapies and explore interpatient variability. We validated our model against a published clinical study of CCR5-modified T-cell therapy. Our model predicted that donor chimerism must exceed 75% to achieve 90% probability of cure across patient populations.

  20. Human NK Cell Subsets Redistribution in Pathological Conditions: A Role for CCR7 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Pesce, Silvia; Moretta, Lorenzo; Moretta, Alessandro; Marcenaro, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Innate and adaptive immunity has evolved complex molecular mechanisms regulating immune cell migration to facilitate the dynamic cellular interactions required for its function involving the chemokines and their receptors. One important chemokine receptor in the immune system is represented by CCR7. Together with its ligands CCL19 and CCL21, this chemokine receptor controls different arrays of migratory events, both in innate and adaptive immunity, including homing of CD56bright NK cells, T cells, and DCs to lymphoid compartments, where T cell priming occurs. Only recently, a key role for CCR7 in promoting CD56dim NK cell migration toward lymphoid tissues has been described. Remarkably, this event can influence the shaping and polarization of adaptive T cell responses. In this review, we describe recent progress in understanding the mechanisms and the site where CD56dim KIR+ NK cells can acquire the capability to migrate toward lymph nodes. The emerging significance of this event in clinical transplantation is also discussed. PMID:27774094

  1. Mechanistic Models Predict Efficacy of CCR5-Deficient Stem Cell Transplants in HIV Patient Populations.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, I; Gabhann, F Mac

    2016-02-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) effectively suppresses viral load in HIV-infected individuals, but it is not a cure. Bone marrow transplants using HIV-resistant stem cells have renewed hope that cure is achievable but key questions remain e.g., what percentage of stem cells must be HIV-resistant to achieve cure?. As few patients have undergone transplants, we built a mechanistic model of HIV/AIDS to approach this problem. The model includes major players of infection, reproduces the complete course of the disease, and simulates crucial components of clinical treatments, such as cART, irradiation, host recovery, gene augmentation, and donor chimerism. Using clinical data from 172 cART-naïve HIV-infected individuals, we created virtual populations to predict performance of CCR5-deficient stem-cell therapies and explore interpatient variability. We validated our model against a published clinical study of CCR5-modified T-cell therapy. Our model predicted that donor chimerism must exceed 75% to achieve 90% probability of cure across patient populations. PMID:26933519

  2. The chemokine receptors ACKR2 and CCR2 reciprocally regulate lymphatic vessel density

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kit M; Danuser, Renzo; Stein, Jens V; Graham, Delyth; Nibbs, Robert JB; Graham, Gerard J

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages regulate lymphatic vasculature development; however, the molecular mechanisms regulating their recruitment to developing, and adult, lymphatic vascular sites are not known. Here, we report that resting mice deficient for the inflammatory chemokine-scavenging receptor, ACKR2, display increased lymphatic vessel density in a range of tissues under resting and regenerating conditions. This appears not to alter dendritic cell migration to draining lymph nodes but is associated with enhanced fluid drainage from peripheral tissues and thus with a hypotensive phenotype. Examination of embryonic skin revealed that this lymphatic vessel density phenotype is developmentally established. Further studies indicated that macrophages and the inflammatory CC-chemokine CCL2, which is scavenged by ACKR2, are associated with this phenotype. Accordingly, mice deficient for the CCL2 signalling receptor, CCR2, displayed a reciprocal phenotype of reduced lymphatic vessel density. Further examination revealed that proximity of pro-lymphangiogenic macrophages to developing lymphatic vessel surfaces is increased in ACKR2-deficient mice and reduced in CCR2-deficient mice. Therefore, these receptors regulate vessel density by reciprocally modulating pro-lymphangiogenic macrophage recruitment, and proximity, to developing, resting and regenerating lymphatic vessels. PMID:25271254

  3. An Imbalance between Frequency of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Regulatory T Cells and CCR4+ and CCR9+ Circulating Helper T Cells Is Associated with Active Perennial Allergic Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Galicia-Carreón, J.; Santacruz, C.; Ayala-Balboa, J.; Robles-Contreras, A.; Perez-Tapia, S. M.; Garfias, Y.; Hong, E.; Jiménez-Martínez, M. C.

    2013-01-01

    Allergic conjunctivitis (AC) is one of the most common eye disorders in ophthalmology. In mice models, it has been suggested that control of allergic conjunctivitis is a delicate balance between Tregs and inflammatory migrating effector cells. Our aim was to evaluate the frequency of Tregs and the frequency of homing receptors expressing cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with perennial allergic conjunctivitis (PAC). The analyses of phenotypic markers on CD4+ T cells and both soluble or intracellular cytokines were performed by flow cytometry. CD4+CD25+ cells were 15 times more frequent in PBMC from patients than HC; the vast majority of these CD4+CD25+ cells were FOXP3−, and most of CD4+ T cells were CCR4+ and CCR9+ cells. Upon allergen-stimulation, no significant changes were observed in frequency of Treg; however, an increased frequency of CD4+CCR4+CCR9+ cells, CD4+CD103+ cells and CD4+CD108+ cells with increased IL-5, IL-6, and IL-8 production was observed. These findings suggest an immune dysregulation in PAC, characterized by diminished frequency of Tregs and increased frequency of circulating activated CD4+ T cells; upon allergen-stimulation, these cells were expressing cell-surface molecules related to mucosa homing and were able to trigger an inflammatory microenvironment. PMID:24368924

  4. The National Lung Matrix Trial: translating the biology of stratification in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, G.; Crack, L. R.; Popat, S.; Swanton, C.; Hollingsworth, S. J.; Buller, R.; Walker, I.; Carr, T. H.; Wherton, D.; Billingham, L. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The management of NSCLC has been transformed by stratified medicine. The National Lung Matrix Trial (NLMT) is a UK-wide study exploring the activity of rationally selected biomarker/targeted therapy combinations. Patients and methods The Cancer Research UK (CRUK) Stratified Medicine Programme 2 is undertaking the large volume national molecular pre-screening which integrates with the NLMT. At study initiation, there are eight drugs being used to target 18 molecular cohorts. The aim is to determine whether there is sufficient signal of activity in any drug–biomarker combination to warrant further investigation. A Bayesian adaptive design that gives a more realistic approach to decision making and flexibility to make conclusions without fixing the sample size was chosen. The screening platform is an adaptable 28-gene Nextera next-generation sequencing platform designed by Illumina, covering the range of molecular abnormalities being targeted. The adaptive design allows new biomarker–drug combination cohorts to be incorporated by substantial amendment. The pre-clinical justification for each biomarker–drug combination has been rigorously assessed creating molecular exclusion rules and a trumping strategy in patients harbouring concomitant actionable genetic abnormalities. Discrete routes of pathway activation or inactivation determined by cancer genome aberrations are treated as separate cohorts. Key translational analyses include the deep genomic analysis of pre- and post-treatment biopsies, the establishment of patient-derived xenograft models and longitudinal ctDNA collection, in order to define predictive biomarkers, mechanisms of resistance and early markers of response and relapse. Conclusion The SMP2 platform will provide large scale genetic screening to inform entry into the NLMT, a trial explicitly aimed at discovering novel actionable cohorts in NSCLC. Clinical Trial ISRCTN 38344105. PMID:26410619

  5. IL-4/CCL22/CCR4 Axis Controls Regulatory T-Cell Migration That Suppresses Inflammatory Bone Loss in Murine Experimental Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Araujo-Pires, Ana Claudia; Vieira, Andreia Espindola; Francisconi, Carolina Favaro; Biguetti, Claudia Cristina; Glowacki, Andrew; Yoshizawa, Sayuri; Campanelli, Ana Paula; Trombone, Ana Paula Favaro; Sfeir, Charles S.; Little, Steven R.; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bone resorption is a hallmark of periodontitis, and Tregs and Th2 cells are independently associated with disease progression attenuation. In this study, we employed an infection-triggered inflammatory osteolysis model to investigate the mechanisms underlying Treg and Th2 cell migration and the impact on disease outcome. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans–infected C57Bl/6 (wild-type [WT]) mice develop an intense inflammatory reaction and alveolar bone resorption, and Treg and Th2 cell migration is temporally associated with disease progression attenuation. Tregs extracted from the lesions preferentially express CCR4 and CCR8, whereas Th2 cells express CCR3, CCR4, and CCR8. The absence of CCR5 and CCR8 did not significantly impact the migration of Tregs and Th2 cells or affect the disease outcome. CCR4KO mice presented a minor reduction in Th2 cells in parallel with major impairment of Treg migration, which was associated with increased inflammatory bone loss and higher proinflammatory and osteoclastogenic cytokine levels. The blockade of the CCR4 ligand CCL22 in WT mice resulted in an increased inflammatory bone loss phenotype similar to that in the CCR4KO strain. Adoptive transfer of CCR4+ Tregs to the CCR4KO strain revert the increased disease phenotype to WT mice–like levels; also, the in situ production of CCL22 in the lesions is mandatory for Tregs migration and the consequent bone loss arrest. The local release of exogenous CCL22 provided by poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles promotes migration of Tregs and disease arrest in the absence of endogenous CCL22 in the IL-4KO strain, characterized by the lack of endogenous CCL22 production, defective migration of Tregs, and exacerbated bone loss. In summary, our results show that the IL-4/CCL22/CCR4 axis is involved in the migration of Tregs to osteolytic lesion sites, and attenuates development of lesions by inhibiting inflammatory migration and the production of

  6. Habitat Utilization and Feeding Biology of Himalayan Grey Langur (Semnopithecus entellus ajex) in Machiara National Park, Azad Jammu and Kashmir, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Minhas, Riaz Aziz; Ahmed, Khawaja Basharat; Awan, Muhammad Siddique; Dar, Naeem Iftikhar

    2010-04-01

    Habitat utilization and feeding biology of Himalayan Grey Langur (Semnopithecus entellus ajex) were studied from April, 2006 to April, 2007 in Machiara National Park, Azad Jammu and Kashmir, Pakistan. The results showed that in the winter season the most preferred habitat of the langurs was the moist temperate coniferous forests interspersed with deciduous trees, while in the summer season they preferred to migrate into the subalpine scrub forests at higher altitudes. Langurs were folivorous in feeding habit, recorded as consuming more than 49 plant species (27 in summer and 22 in winter) in the study area. The mature leaves (36.12%) were preferred over the young leaves (27.27%) while other food components comprised of fruits (17.00%), roots (9.45%), barks (6.69%), flowers (2.19%) and stems (1.28%) of various plant species.

  7. Mercury bioaccumulation studies in the National Water-Quality Assessment Program--biological data from New York and South Carolina, 2005-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beaulieu, Karen M.; Button, Daniel T.; Eikenberry, Barbara C. Scudder; Riva-Murray, Karen; Chasar, Lia C.; Bradley, Paul M.; Burns, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program conducted a multidisciplinary study from 2005–09 to investigate the bioaccumulation of mercury in streams from two contrasting environmental settings. Study areas were located in the central Adirondack Mountains region of New York and the Inner Coastal Plain of South Carolina. Fish, macroinvertebrates, periphyton (attached algae and associated material), detritus, and terrestrial leaf litter were collected. Fish were analyzed for total mercury; macroinvertebrates, periphyton, and terrestrial leaf litter were analyzed for total mercury and methylmercury; and select samples of fish, macroinvertebrates, periphyton, detritus, and terrestrial leaf litter were analyzed for stable isotopes of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N). This report presents methodology and data on total mercury, methylmercury, stable isotopes, and other ecologically relevant measurements in biological tissues.

  8. A Review and Synthesis of the Scientific Information Related to the Biology and Management of Species of Special Concern at Cape Hatteras National Seashore, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohen, Jonathan B.; Erwin, R. Michael; French, John B.; Marion, Jeffrey L.; Meyers, J. Michael

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's Patuxent Wildlife Research Center (PWRC) conducted a study for the National Park Service (NPS) Southeast Region, Atlanta, GA, and Cape Hatteras National Seashore (CAHA) in North Carolina to review, evaluate, and summarize the available scientific information for selected species of concern at CAHA (piping plovers, sea turtles, seabeach amaranth, American oystercatchers, and colonial waterbirds). This work consisted of reviewing the scientific literature and evaluating the results of studies that examined critical life history stages of each species, and focused on the scientific findings reported that are relevant to the management of these species and their habitats at CAHA. The chapters that follow provide the results of that review separately for each species and present scientifically based options for resource management at CAHA. Although no new original research or experimental work was conducted, this synthesis of the existing information was peer reviewed by over 15 experts with familiarity with these species. This report does not establish NPS management protocols but does highlight scientific information on the biology of these species to be considered by NPS managers who make resource management decisions at CAHA. To ensure that the best available information is considered when assessing each species of interest at CAHA, this review included published research as well as practical experience of scientists and wildlife managers who were consulted in 2005. PWRC scientists evaluated the literature, consulted wildlife managers, and produced an initial draft that was sent to experts for scientific review. Revisions based on those comments were incorporated into the document. The final draft of the document was reviewed by NPS personnel to ensure that the description of the recent status and management of these species at CAHA was accurately represented and that the report was consistent with our work agreement. The following

  9. Heterologous desensitization of T cell functions by CCR5 and CXCR4 ligands: inhibition of cellular signaling, adhesion and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Iris; Cahalon, Liora; Hershkoviz, Rami; Lahat, Adi; Franitza, Suzanne; Lider, Ofer

    2003-01-01

    T cells migrate into inflamed sites through the extracellular matrix (ECM) in response to chemotactic areas and are then simultaneously or sequentially exposed to multiple chemotactic ligands. We examined the responses of human peripheral blood T cells, present in an ECM-like context, to combinatorial signaling transduced by SDF-1alpha (CXCL12), and two CCR5 ligands, RANTES (CCL5) and MIP-1beta (CCL4). Separately, these chemokines, at G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-stimulating concentrations, induced T cell adhesion to fibronectin (FN) and T cell chemotaxis. However, the pro-adhesive and pro-migratory capacities of SDF-1alpha and RANTES or MIP-1beta were mutually suppressed by the simultaneous or sequential exposure of the cells to these CCR5 or CXCR4 ligands. This cross-talk did not involve the internalization of the SDF-1alpha receptor, CXCR4, but rather, a decrease in phosphorylation of ERK and Pyk-2, as well as inhibition of Ca(2+) mobilization. Strikingly, early CXCR4 signaling of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, detected by SDF-1alpha-induced AKT phosphorylation, was insensitive to RANTES-CCR5 signals. Accordingly, early chemotaxis to SDF-1alpha was not susceptible to CCR5 occupancy, whereas late stages of T cell chemotaxis were markedly down-regulated. This is an example of a specialized functional desensitization of heterologous chemokine receptors that induces GPCR interference with T cell adhesion to ECM ligands and chemotaxis within chemokine-rich extravascular contexts. PMID:12502723

  10. Effects of sequence changes in the HIV-1 gp41 fusion peptide on CCR5 inhibitor resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Anastassopoulou, Cleo G.; Ketas, Thomas J.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Johan Klasse, Per; Moore, John P.

    2012-07-05

    A rare pathway of HIV-1 resistance to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors such as Vicriviroc (VCV) involves changes solely in the gp41 fusion peptide (FP). Here, we show that the G516V change is critical to VCV resistance in PBMC and TZM-bl cells, although it must be accompanied by either M518V or F519I to have a substantial impact. Modeling VCV inhibition data from the two cell types indicated that G516V allows both double mutants to use VCV-CCR5 complexes for entry. The model further identified F519I as an independent determinant of preference for the unoccupied, high-VCV affinity form of CCR5. From inhibitor-free reversion cultures, we also identified a substitution in the inner domain of gp120, T244A, which appears to counter the resistance phenotype created by the FP substitutions. Examining the interplay of these changes will enhance our understanding of Env complex interactions that influence both HIV-1 entry and resistance to CCR5 inhibitors.

  11. CCR4+T cell recruitment to the skin in mycosis fungoides: potential contributions by thymic stromal lymphopoietin and interleukin-16.

    PubMed

    Tuzova, Marina; Richmond, Jillian; Wolpowitz, Deon; Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara; Chaney, Keri; Kupper, Thomas; Cruikshank, William

    2015-02-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is characterized by skin accumulation of CCR4+CCR7- effector memory T cells; however the mechanism for their recruitment is not clearly identified. Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin (TSLP) is a keratinocyte-derived cytokine that triggers Th2 immunity and is associated with T cell recruitment to the skin in atopic dermatitis. Interleukin-16 (IL-16) is a chemoattractant and growth factor for CD4+T cells. We hypothesized that TSLP and IL-16 could contribute to recruitment of malignant T cells in MF. We found elevated TSLP and IL-16 in very early stage patients' plasma and skin biopsies, prior to elevation in CCL22. Both TSLP and IL-16 induced migratory responses of CCR4+TSLPR+CD4+CCR7-CD31+cells, characteristic of malignant T cells in the skin. Co-stimulation also resulted in significant proliferative responses. We conclude that TSLP and IL-16, expressed at early stages of disease, function to recruit malignant T cells to the skin and contribute to their enhanced proliferation.

  12. Tissue-Specific Induction of CCR6 and Nrp1 During Early CD4+ T Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Pezoldt, Joern; Huehn, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Upon differentiation, T cells acquire tissue-specific homing properties allowing efficient targeting of effector T cells into distinct inflamed organs. Priming of T cells within skin-draining, peripheral lymph nodes (pLNs) leads to the expression of E- and P-selectin ligands, which facilitate migration into inflamed skin, whereas activation within gut-draining, mesenteric LNs (mLNs) results in induction of chemokine receptor CCR9 and integrin α4β7, both required for migration of effector T cells into mucosal tissues. In addition to the local tissue microenvironment, both organ-specific dendritic cells and LN-resident stromal cells are critical factors to shape T cell migration properties. Here, we identify two additional homing-related molecules, CCR6 and Neuropilin-1 (Nrp1), upregulated in T cells early during differentiation solely in pLNs, but not mLNs. Surprisingly, intestinal inflammation resulted in an ameliorated induction of CCR6 and Nrp1 in pLNs, suggesting that a local inflammation within the gut can systemically alter T cell differentiation. Finally, transplantation of mLNs to a skin-draining environment revealed that LN stromal cells also contribute to efficient CCR6 induction in pLNs. Collectively, these findings identify further aspects of early T cell differentiation within skin-draining pLNs, which could be utilized to further develop tailored and highly specialized vaccination strategies. PMID:27766171

  13. A Linear Epitope in the N-Terminal Domain of CCR5 and Its Interaction with Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Chain, Benny; Arnold, Jack; Akthar, Samia; Brandt, Michael; Davis, David; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Lapp, Thabo; Ji, Changhua; Sankuratri, Surya; Zhang, Yanjing; Govada, Lata; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Chayen, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    The CCR5 receptor plays a role in several key physiological and pathological processes and is an important therapeutic target. Inhibition of the CCR5 axis by passive or active immunisation offers one very selective strategy for intervention. In this study we define a new linear epitope within the extracellular domain of CCR5 recognised by two independently produced monoclonal antibodies. A short peptide encoding the linear epitope can induce antibodies which recognise the intact receptor when administered colinear with a tetanus toxoid helper T cell epitope. The monoclonal antibody RoAb 13 is shown to bind to both cells and peptide with moderate to high affinity (6x10^8 and 1.2x107 M-1 respectively), and binding to the peptide is enhanced by sulfation of tyrosines at positions 10 and 14. RoAb13, which has previously been shown to block HIV infection, also blocks migration of monocytes in response to CCR5 binding chemokines and to inflammatory macrophage conditioned medium. A Fab fragment of RoAb13 has been crystallised and a structure of the antibody is reported to 2.1 angstrom resolution. PMID:26030924

  14. Biological vulnerabilities of National Park Service Class I areas to atmospheric pollutants: Environmental Sciences Division publication No. 2646

    SciTech Connect

    Esserlieu, M.K.; Olson, R.J.

    1986-10-01

    The National Park Service (NPS) is responsible for managing 322 parks and other lands; 48 of the parks are designated as ''Class I'' areas under the requirements for prevention of significant deterioration (PSD) of the Clean Air Act. This designation is intended to protect the parks from sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) and suspended particulates. Nonetheless, long-range transport of these and other pollutants, particularly ozone (O/sub 3/) and acidic deposition, potentially threatens the health and structure of ecosystems of these 48 Class I parks. This analysis quantifies and ranks their sensitivities to air pollutants; it also estimates relative risk to aid determination of priorities for monitoring and for more detailed analyses. Vulnerability was assessed by determining from literature sources the sensitivity of the dominant vascular plant species to SO/sub 2/ and O/sub 3/ and the sensitivity of lichens to SO/sub 2/. The additional sensitivity factor of surface water alkalinity was included to indicate potential vulnerability to acidic deposition. When these factors were compared with ambient air quality, the risks for potential impacts to these Class I parks were estimated.

  15. Aquatic biology of the Redwood Creek and Mill Creek drainage basins, Redwood National Park, Humboldt and Del Norte counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iwatsubo, Rick T.; Averett, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    A 2-year study of the aquatic biota in the Redwood Creek and Mill Creek drainage basins of Redwood National Park indicated that the aquatic productivity is low. Densities of coliform bacteria were low except in Prairie Creek, a tributary to Redwood Creek, where a State park, county fish hatchery, grazing land, lumber mill, and scattered residential areas are potential sources of fecal coliform bacteria. Benthic invertebrate data indicated a diverse fauna which varied considerably between streams and among stream sections. Noteworthy findings include: (1) benthic invertebrates rapidly recolonized the streambed following a major storm, and (2) man-caused disruption or sedimentation of the streambed during low flow can result in drastic reductions of the benthic invertebrate community. Seven species of fish representing species typically found in northern California coastal streams were captured during the study. Nonparametric statistical tests indicate that condition factors of steelhead trout were significantly larger at sampling stations with more insolation, regardless of drainage basin land-use history. Periphyton and phytoplankton communities were diverse, variable in numbers, and dominated by diatoms. Seston concentrations were extremely variable between stations and at each station sampled. The seston is influenced seasonally by aquatic productivity at each station and amount of allochthonous material from the terrestrial ecosystem. Time-series analysis of some seston data indicated larger and sharper peak concentrations being flushed from the logged drainage basin than from the control drainage basin. (USGS)

  16. Biological consequences of the coaster brook trout restoration stocking program in Lake Superior tributaries with Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leonard, Jill B.K.; Stott, Wendylee; Loope, Delora M.; Kusnierz, Paul C.; Sreenivasan, Ashwin

    2013-01-01

    The coaster Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalis is a Lake Superior ecotype representing intraspecific variation that has been impacted by habitat loss and overfishing. Hatchery strains of Brook Trout derived from populations in Lake Superior were stocked into streams within Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore, Michigan, as part of an effort to rehabilitate adfluvial coaster Brook Trout. Wild and hatchery Brook Trout from three streams (Mosquito River, Hurricane River, and Sevenmile Creek) were examined for movement behavior, size, physiology, and reproductive success. Behavior and size of the stocked fish were similar to those of wild fish, and less than 15% of the stocked, tagged Brook Trout emigrated from the river into which they were stocked. There was little evidence of successful reproduction by stocked Brook Trout. Similar to the results of other studies, our findings suggest that the stocking of nonlocal Brook Trout strains where a local population already exists results in limited natural reproduction and should be avoided, particularly if the mechanisms governing the ecotype of interest are poorly understood.

  17. Genetic Susceptibility to Cardiac and Digestive Clinical Forms of Chronic Chagas Disease: Involvement of the CCR5 59029 A/G Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Amanda Priscila; Bernardo, Cássia Rubia; Camargo, Ana Vitória da Silveira; Ronchi, Luiz Sérgio; Borim, Aldenis Albaneze; Brandão de Mattos, Cinara Cássia; de Campos Júnior, Eumildo; Castiglioni, Lílian; Netinho, João Gomes; Cavasini, Carlos Eugênio; Bestetti, Reinaldo Bulgarelli; de Mattos, Luiz Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of chronic Chagas disease include the cardiac form of the disease and the digestive form. Not all the factors that act in the variable clinical course of this disease are known. This study investigated whether the CCR5Δ32 (rs333) and CCR5 59029 A/G (promoter region—rs1799987) polymorphisms of the CCR5 gene are associated with different clinical forms of chronic Chagas disease and with the severity of left ventricular systolic dysfunction in patients with chronic Chagas heart disease (CCHD). The antibodies anti-T. cruzi were identified by ELISA. PCR and PCR-RFLP were used to identify the CCR5Δ32 and CCR5 59029 A/G polymorphisms. The chi-square test was used to compare variables between groups. There was a higher frequency of the AA genotype in patients with CCHD compared with patients with the digestive form of the disease and the control group. The results also showed a high frequency of the AG genotype in patients with the digestive form of the disease compared to the other groups. The results of this study show that the CCR5Δ32 polymorphism does not seem to influence the different clinical manifestations of Chagas disease but there is involvement of the CCR5 59029 A/G polymorphism in susceptibility to the different forms of chronic Chagas disease. Besides, these polymorphisms do not influence left ventricular systolic dysfunction in patients with CCHD. PMID:26599761

  18. Dual function of Ccr5 during Langat virus encephalitis - Reduction of neutrophil-mediated CNS inflammation and increase in T cell-mediated viral clearance

    PubMed Central

    Michlmayr, Daniela; Bardina, Susana V.; Rodriguez, Carlos A.; Pletnev, Alexander G.; Lim, Jean K.

    2016-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is a vector-transmitted flavivirus that causes potentially fatal neurological infection. There are thousands of cases reported annually, and despite the availability of an effective vaccine, the incidence of TBEV is increasing worldwide. Importantly, up to thirty percent of affected individuals will develop long-term neurologic sequelae. We investigated the role of chemokine receptor Ccr5 in a mouse model of TBEV infection using the naturally attenuated tick-borne flavivirus, Langat virus (LGTV). Ccr5-deficient mice presented with an increase in viral replication within the CNS and decreased survival during LGTV encephalitis when compared to wild type (WT) controls. This enhanced susceptibility was due to the temporal lag in lymphocyte migration into the CNS. Adoptive transfer of WT T cells, but not Ccr5-deficient T cells, was able to significantly improve survival outcome in LGTV-infected Ccr5-deficient mice. Concomitantly, a significant increase in neutrophil migration into the CNS in LGTV-infected Ccr5−/− mice was documented at the late stage of infection. Antibody-mediated depletion of neutrophils in Ccr5−/− mice resulted in a significant improvement in mortality, a decrease in viral load, and a decrease in overall tissue damage in the CNS when compared to isotype control-treated mice. Ccr5 is crucial in not only directing T cells towards the LGTV-infected brain, but also in suppressing neutrophil-mediated inflammation within the CNS. PMID:27183602

  19. Bone marrow-derived macrophages distinct from tissue-resident macrophages play a pivotal role in Concanavalin A-induced murine liver injury via CCR9 axis

    PubMed Central

    Amiya, Takeru; Nakamoto, Nobuhiro; Chu, Po-sung; Teratani, Toshiaki; Nakajima, Hideaki; Fukuchi, Yumi; Taniki, Nobuhito; Yamaguchi, Akihiro; Shiba, Shunsuke; Miyake, Rei; Katayama, Tadashi; Ebinuma, Hirotoshi; Kanai, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    The fundamental mechanism how heterogeneous hepatic macrophage (Mφ) subsets fulfill diverse functions in health and disease has not been elucidated. We recently reported that CCR9+ inflammatory Mφs play a critical role in the course of acute liver injury. To clarify the origin and differentiation of CCR9+Mφs, we used a unique partial bone marrow (BM) chimera model with liver shielding for maintaining hepatic resident Mφs. First, irradiated mice developed less liver injury with less Mφs accumulation by Concanavalin A (Con A) regardless of liver shielding. In mice receiving further BM transplantation, CD11blowF4/80high hepatic-resident Mφs were not replaced by transplanted donors under steady state, while under inflammatory state by Con A, CCR9+Mφs were firmly replaced by donors, indicating that CCR9+Mφs originate from BM, but not from hepatic-resident cells. Regarding the mechanism of differentiation and proliferation, EdU+CCR9+Mφs with a proliferative potential were detected specifically in the inflamed liver, and in vitro study revealed that BM-derived CD11b+ cells co-cultured with hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) or stimulated with retinoic acids could acquire CCR9 with antigen-presenting ability. Collectively, our study demonstrates that inflammatory Mφs originate from BM and became locally differentiated and proliferated by interaction with HSCs via CCR9 axis during acute liver injury. PMID:27725760

  20. Role of CCR5 and its ligands in the control of vascular inflammation and leukocyte recruitment required for acute excitotoxic seizure induction and neural damage.

    PubMed

    Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Chekmasova, Alena; Marusich, Elena; Agrawal, Lokesh; Strayer, David S

    2011-02-01

    Chemokines may play a role in leukocyte migration across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) during neuroinflammation and other neuropathological processes, such as epilepsy. We investigated the role of the chemokine receptor CCR5 in seizures. We used a rat model based on intraperitoneal kainic acid (KA) administration. Four months before KA injection, adult rats were given femoral intramarrow inoculations of SV (RNAiR5-RevM10.AU1), which carries an interfering RNA (RNAi) against CCR5, plus a marker epitope (AU1), or its monofunctional RNAi-carrying homologue, SV(RNAiR5). This treatment lowered expression of CCR5 in circulating cells. In control rats, seizures induced elevated expression of CCR5 ligands MIP-1α and RANTES in the microvasculature, increased BBB leakage and CCR5(+) cells, as well as neuronal loss, inflammation, and gliosis in the hippocampi. Animals given either the bifunctional or the monofunctional vector were largely protected from KA-induced seizures, neuroinflammation, BBB damage, and neuron loss. Brain CCR5 mRNA was reduced. Rats receiving RNAiR5-bearing vectors showed far greater repair responses: increased neuronal proliferation, and decreased production of MIP-1α and RANTES. Controls received unrelated SV(BUGT) vectors. Decrease in CCR5 in circulating cells strongly protected from excitotoxin-induced seizures, BBB leakage, CNS injury, and inflammation, and facilitated neurogenic repair. PMID:20940264

  1. Dual Function of Ccr5 during Langat Virus Encephalitis: Reduction in Neutrophil-Mediated Central Nervous System Inflammation and Increase in T Cell-Mediated Viral Clearance.

    PubMed

    Michlmayr, Daniela; Bardina, Susana V; Rodriguez, Carlos A; Pletnev, Alexander G; Lim, Jean K

    2016-06-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is a vector-transmitted flavivirus that causes potentially fatal neurologic infection. There are thousands of cases reported annually, and despite the availability of an effective vaccine, the incidence of TBEV is increasing worldwide. Importantly, up to 30% of affected individuals develop long-term neurologic sequelae. We investigated the role of chemokine receptor Ccr5 in a mouse model of TBEV infection using the naturally attenuated tick-borne flavivirus Langat virus (LGTV). Ccr5-deficient mice presented with an increase in viral replication within the CNS and decreased survival during LGTV encephalitis compared with wild-type controls. This enhanced susceptibility was due to the temporal lag in lymphocyte migration into the CNS. Adoptive transfer of wild-type T cells, but not Ccr5-deficient T cells, significantly improved survival outcome in LGTV-infected Ccr5-deficient mice. Concomitantly, a significant increase in neutrophil migration into the CNS in LGTV-infected Ccr5(-/-) mice was documented at the late stage of infection. Ab-mediated depletion of neutrophils in Ccr5(-/-) mice resulted in a significant improvement in mortality, a decrease in viral load, and a decrease in overall tissue damage in the CNS compared with isotype control-treated mice. Ccr5 is crucial in directing T cells toward the LGTV-infected brain, as well as in suppressing neutrophil-mediated inflammation within the CNS.

  2. Genetic Susceptibility to Cardiac and Digestive Clinical Forms of Chronic Chagas Disease: Involvement of the CCR5 59029 A/G Polymorphism.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Amanda Priscila; Bernardo, Cássia Rubia; Camargo, Ana Vitória da Silveira; Ronchi, Luiz Sérgio; Borim, Aldenis Albaneze; de Mattos, Cinara Cássia Brandão; de Campos Júnior, Eumildo; Castiglioni, Lílian; Netinho, João Gomes; Cavasini, Carlos Eugênio; Bestetti, Reinaldo Bulgarelli; de Mattos, Luiz Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of chronic Chagas disease include the cardiac form of the disease and the digestive form. Not all the factors that act in the variable clinical course of this disease are known. This study investigated whether the CCR5Δ32 (rs333) and CCR5 59029 A/G (promoter region--rs1799987) polymorphisms of the CCR5 gene are associated with different clinical forms of chronic Chagas disease and with the severity of left ventricular systolic dysfunction in patients with chronic Chagas heart disease (CCHD). The antibodies anti-T. cruzi were identified by ELISA. PCR and PCR-RFLP were used to identify the CCR5Δ32 and CCR5 59029 A/G polymorphisms. The chi-square test was used to compare variables between groups. There was a higher frequency of the AA genotype in patients with CCHD compared with patients with the digestive form of the disease and the control group. The results also showed a high frequency of the AG genotype in patients with the digestive form of the disease compared to the other groups. The results of this study show that the CCR5Δ32 polymorphism does not seem to influence the different clinical manifestations of Chagas disease but there is involvement of the CCR5 59029 A/G polymorphism in susceptibility to the different forms of chronic Chagas disease. Besides, these polymorphisms do not influence left ventricular systolic dysfunction in patients with CCHD.

  3. CCL2 shapes macrophage polarization by GM-CSF and M-CSF: identification of CCL2/CCR2-dependent gene expression profile.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Filardi, Elena; Nieto, Concha; Domínguez-Soto, Angeles; Barroso, Rubén; Sánchez-Mateos, Paloma; Puig-Kroger, Amaya; López-Bravo, María; Joven, Jorge; Ardavín, Carlos; Rodríguez-Fernández, José L; Sánchez-Torres, Carmen; Mellado, Mario; Corbí, Angel L

    2014-04-15

    The CCL2 chemokine mediates monocyte egress from bone marrow and recruitment into inflamed tissues through interaction with the CCR2 chemokine receptor, and its expression is upregulated by proinflammatory cytokines. Analysis of the gene expression profile in GM-CSF- and M-CSF-polarized macrophages revealed that a high CCL2 expression characterizes macrophages generated under the influence of M-CSF, whereas CCR2 is expressed only by GM-CSF-polarized macrophages. Analysis of the factors responsible for this differential expression identified activin A as a critical factor controlling the expression of the CCL2/CCR2 pair in macrophages, as activin A increased CCR2 expression but inhibited the acquisition of CCL2 expression by M-CSF-polarized macrophages. CCL2 and CCR2 were found to determine the extent of macrophage polarization because CCL2 enhances the LPS-induced production of IL-10, whereas CCL2 blockade leads to enhanced expression of M1 polarization-associated genes and cytokines, and diminished expression of M2-associated markers in human macrophages. Along the same line, Ccr2-deficient bone marrow-derived murine macrophages displayed an M1-skewed polarization profile at the transcriptomic level and exhibited a significantly higher expression of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6) in response to LPS. Therefore, the CCL2-CCR2 axis regulates macrophage polarization by influencing the expression of functionally relevant and polarization-associated genes and downmodulating proinflammatory cytokine production.

  4. Simvastatin Inhibits IL-5-Induced Chemotaxis and CCR3 Expression of HL-60-Derived and Human Primary Eosinophils

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chia-Hsiang; Tsai, Wan-Chun; Lee, Ta-Jen; Huang, Chi-Che; Chang, Po-Hung; Su Pang, Jong-Hwei

    2016-01-01

    IL-5-induced chemotaxis of eosinophils is an important feature of allergic airway inflammatory diseases. Simvastatin, a lipid lowering agent, has been shown to exhibit anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic effects. Our aim was to investigate the effect of simvastatin on IL-5-induced eosinophil chemotaxis and its regulatory mechanisms. Eosinophils were derived by treating HL-60 clone 15 (HC15) cells with butyric acid (BA) in an alkaline condition or through direct isolation from human peripheral blood. The expressions of CC chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3) and interleukin (IL)-5 receptors (IL5Rα and β) were analyzed using RT/real-time PCR. The granular proteins were stained using fast green. Eotaxin-induced chemotaxis was measured using a transwell migration assay. CCR3 protein expression was revealed by immunocytochemistry. An animal model of allergic rhinitis was established by challenging Sprague–Dawley® rats repeatedly with ovalbumin. Butyric acid significantly increased the expression of IL5Rα and IL5Rβ, CCR3 and granular proteins in HC15 cells, indicating the maturation of eosinophils (BA-E cells). IL-5 further enhanced the CCR3 expression at both the mRNA and protein levels and the eotaxin-induced chemotaxis of BA-E cells. Simvastatin inhibited the effects of IL-5 on BA-E cells, but not in the presence of mevalonate. Similar results were also exhibited in human primary eosinophils. In vivo animal studies further confirmed that oral simvastatin could significantly suppress the infiltration of eosinophils into turbinate tissues of allergic rats. Therefore, simvastatin was demonstrated to inhibit IL-5-induced CCR3 expression and chemotaxis of eosinophils mediated via the mevalonate pathway. We confirmed that simvastatin also reduced eosinophilic infiltration in allergic rhinitis. PMID:27275740

  5. Functional Mimetics of the HIV-1 CCR5 Co-Receptor Displayed on the Surface of Magnetic Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmina, Alona; Vaknin, Karin; Gdalevsky, Garik; Vyazmensky, Maria; Marks, Robert S.; Taube, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine G protein coupled receptors, principally CCR5 or CXCR4, function as co-receptors for HIV-1 entry into CD4+ T cells. Initial binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 subunit to the host CD4 receptor induces a cascade of structural conformational changes that lead to the formation of a high-affinity co-receptor-binding site on gp120. Interaction between gp120 and the co-receptor leads to the exposure of epitopes on the viral gp41 that mediates fusion between viral and cell membranes. Soluble CD4 (sCD4) mimetics can act as an activation-based inhibitor of HIV-1 entry in vitro, as it induces similar structural changes in gp120, leading to increased virus infectivity in the short term but to virus Env inactivation in the long term. Despite promising clinical implications, sCD4 displays low efficiency in vivo, and in multiple HIV strains, it does not inhibit viral infection. This has been attributed to the slow kinetics of the sCD4-induced HIV Env inactivation and to the failure to obtain sufficient sCD4 mimetic levels in the serum. Here we present uniquely structured CCR5 co-receptor mimetics. We hypothesized that such mimetics will enhance sCD4-induced HIV Env inactivation and inhibition of HIV entry. Co-receptor mimetics were derived from CCR5 gp120-binding epitopes and functionalized with a palmitoyl group, which mediated their display on the surface of lipid-coated magnetic beads. CCR5-peptidoliposome mimetics bound to soluble gp120 and inhibited HIV-1 infectivity in a sCD4-dependent manner. We concluded that CCR5-peptidoliposomes increase the efficiency of sCD4 to inhibit HIV infection by acting as bait for sCD4-primed virus, catalyzing the premature discharge of its fusion potential. PMID:26629902

  6. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1-induced CCR2B receptor desensitization mediated by the G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2

    PubMed Central

    Aragay, A. M.; Mellado, M.; Frade, J. M. R.; Martin, A. M.; Jimenez-Sainz, M. C.; Martinez-A, C.; Mayor, F.

    1998-01-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) is a member of the chemokine cytokine family, whose physiological function is mediated by binding to the CCR2 and CCR4 receptors, which are members of the G protein-coupled receptor family. MCP-1 plays a critical role in both activation and migration of leukocytes. Rapid chemokine receptor desensitization is very likely essential for accurate chemotaxis. In this report, we show that MCP-1 binding to the CCR2 receptor in Mono Mac 1 cells promotes the rapid desensitization of MCP-1-induced calcium flux responses. This desensitization correlates with the Ser/Thr phosphorylation of the receptor and with the transient translocation of the G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2, also called β-adrenergic kinase 1 or βARK1) to the membrane. We also demonstrate that GRK2 and the uncoupling protein β-arrestin associate with the receptor, forming a macromolecular complex shortly after MCP-1 binding. Calcium flux responses to MCP-1 in HEK293 cells expressing the CCR2B receptor were also markedly reduced upon cotransfection with GRK2 or the homologous kinase GRK3. Nevertheless, expression of the GRK2 dominant-negative mutant βARK-K220R did not affect the initial calcium response, but favored receptor response to a subsequent challenge by agonists. The modulation of the CCR2B receptor by GRK2 suggests an important role for this kinase in the regulation of monocyte and lymphocyte response to chemokines. PMID:9501202

  7. Progesterone Levels Associate with a Novel Population of CCR5+CD38+ CD4 T Cells Resident in the Genital Mucosa with Lymphoid Trafficking Potential.

    PubMed

    Swaims-Kohlmeier, Alison; Haaland, Richard E; Haddad, Lisa B; Sheth, Anandi N; Evans-Strickfaden, Tammy; Lupo, L Davis; Cordes, Sarah; Aguirre, Alfredo J; Lupoli, Kathryn A; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Ofotukun, Igho; Hart, Clyde E; Kohlmeier, Jacob E

    2016-07-01

    The female genital tract (FGT) provides a means of entry to pathogens, including HIV, yet immune cell populations at this barrier between host and environment are not well defined. We initiated a study of healthy women to characterize resident T cell populations in the lower FGT from lavage and patient-matched peripheral blood to investigate potential mechanisms of HIV sexual transmission. Surprisingly, we observed FGT CD4 T cell populations were primarily CCR7(hi), consistent with a central memory or recirculating memory T cell phenotype. In addition, roughly half of these CCR7(hi) CD4 T cells expressed CD69, consistent with resident memory T cells, whereas the remaining CCR7(hi) CD4 T cells lacked CD69 expression, consistent with recirculating memory CD4 T cells that traffic between peripheral tissues and lymphoid sites. HIV susceptibility markers CCR5 and CD38 were increased on FGT CCR7(hi) CD4 T cells compared with blood, yet migration to the lymphoid homing chemokines CCL19 and CCL21 was maintained. Infection with GFP-HIV showed that FGT CCR7(hi) memory CD4 T cells are susceptible HIV targets, and productive infection of CCR7(hi) memory T cells did not alter chemotaxis to CCL19 and CCL21. Variations of resident CCR7(hi) FGT CD4 T cell populations were detected during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle, and longitudinal analysis showed the frequency of this population positively correlated to progesterone levels. These data provide evidence women may acquire HIV through local infection of migratory CCR7(hi) CD4 T cells, and progesterone levels predict opportunities for HIV to access these novel target cells.

  8. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection of primary CD4+ T-cells by gene editing of CCR5 using adenovirus-delivered CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Li, Chang; Guan, Xinmeng; Du, Tao; Jin, Wei; Wu, Biao; Liu, Yalan; Wang, Ping; Hu, Bodan; Griffin, George E; Shattock, Robin J; Hu, Qinxue

    2015-08-01

    CCR5 serves as an essential coreceptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) entry, and individuals with a CCR5(Δ32) variant appear to be healthy, making CCR5 an attractive target for control of HIV-1 infection. The CRISPR/Cas9, which functions as a naturally existing adaptive immune system in prokaryotes, has been recently harnessed as a novel nuclease system for genome editing in mammalian cells. Although CRISPR/Cas9 can be readily delivered into cell lines, due to the large size of the Cas9 protein, efficient delivery of CCR5-targeting CRISPR/Cas9 components into primary cells, including CD4(+) T-cells, the primary target for HIV-1 infection in vivo, remains a challenge. In the current study, following design of a panel of top-ranked single-guided RNAs (sgRNAs) targeting the ORF of CCR5, we demonstrate that CRISPR/Cas9 can efficiently mediate the editing of the CCR5 locus in cell lines, resulting in the knockout of CCR5 expression on the cell surface. Next-generation sequencing revealed that various mutations were introduced around the predicted cleavage site of CCR5. For each of the three most effective sgRNAs that we analysed, no significant off-target effects were detected at the 15 top-scoring potential sites. More importantly, by constructing chimeric Ad5F35 adenoviruses carrying CRISPR/Cas9 components, we efficiently transduced primary CD4(+) T-lymphocytes and disrupted CCR5 expression, and the positively transduced cells were conferred with HIV-1 resistance. To our knowledge, this is the first study establishing HIV-1 resistance in primary CD4(+) T-cells utilizing adenovirus-delivered CRISPR/Cas9.

  9. Anti-CCR7 therapy exerts a potent anti-tumor activity in a xenograft model of human mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The chemokine receptor CCR7 mediates lymphoid dissemination of many cancers, including lymphomas and epithelial carcinomas, thus representing an attractive therapeutic target. Previous results have highlighted the potential of the anti-CCR7 monoclonal antibodies to inhibit migration in transwell assays. The present study aimed to evaluate the in vivo therapeutic efficacy of an anti-CCR7 antibody in a xenografted human mantle cell lymphoma model. Methods NOD/SCID mice were either subcutaneously or intravenously inoculated with Granta-519 cells, a human cell line derived from a leukemic mantle cell lymphoma. The anti-CCR7 mAb treatment (3 × 200 μg) was started on day 2 or 7 to target lymphoma cells in either a peri-implantation or a post-implantation stage, respectively. Results The anti-CCR7 therapy significantly delayed the tumor appearance and also reduced the volumes of tumors in the subcutaneous model. Moreover, an increased number of apoptotic tumor cells was detected in mice treated with the anti-CCR7 mAb compared to the untreated animals. In addition, significantly reduced number of Granta-519 cells migrated from subcutaneous tumors to distant lymphoid organs, such as bone marrow and spleen in the anti-CCR7 treated mice. In the intravenous models, the anti-CCR7 mAb drastically increased survival of the mice. Accordingly, dissemination and infiltration of tumor cells in lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs, including lungs and central nervous system, was almost abrogated. Conclusions The anti-CCR7 mAb exerts a potent anti-tumor activity and might represent an interesting therapeutic alternative to conventional therapies. PMID:24305507

  10. Progesterone Levels Associate with a Novel Population of CCR5+CD38+ CD4 T Cells Resident in the Genital Mucosa with Lymphoid Trafficking Potential.

    PubMed

    Swaims-Kohlmeier, Alison; Haaland, Richard E; Haddad, Lisa B; Sheth, Anandi N; Evans-Strickfaden, Tammy; Lupo, L Davis; Cordes, Sarah; Aguirre, Alfredo J; Lupoli, Kathryn A; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Ofotukun, Igho; Hart, Clyde E; Kohlmeier, Jacob E

    2016-07-01

    The female genital tract (FGT) provides a means of entry to pathogens, including HIV, yet immune cell populations at this barrier between host and environment are not well defined. We initiated a study of healthy women to characterize resident T cell populations in the lower FGT from lavage and patient-matched peripheral blood to investigate potential mechanisms of HIV sexual transmission. Surprisingly, we observed FGT CD4 T cell populations were primarily CCR7(hi), consistent with a central memory or recirculating memory T cell phenotype. In addition, roughly half of these CCR7(hi) CD4 T cells expressed CD69, consistent with resident memory T cells, whereas the remaining CCR7(hi) CD4 T cells lacked CD69 expression, consistent with recirculating memory CD4 T cells that traffic between peripheral tissues and lymphoid sites. HIV susceptibility markers CCR5 and CD38 were increased on FGT CCR7(hi) CD4 T cells compared with blood, yet migration to the lymphoid homing chemokines CCL19 and CCL21 was maintained. Infection with GFP-HIV showed that FGT CCR7(hi) memory CD4 T cells are susceptible HIV targets, and productive infection of CCR7(hi) memory T cells did not alter chemotaxis to CCL19 and CCL21. Variations of resident CCR7(hi) FGT CD4 T cell populations were detected during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle, and longitudinal analysis showed the frequency of this population positively correlated to progesterone levels. These data provide evidence women may acquire HIV through local infection of migratory CCR7(hi) CD4 T cells, and progesterone levels predict opportunities for HIV to access these novel target cells. PMID:27233960

  11. Artificial neural network modelling of biological oxygen demand in rivers at the national level with input selection based on Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Šiljić, Aleksandra; Antanasijević, Davor; Perić-Grujić, Aleksandra; Ristić, Mirjana; Pocajt, Viktor

    2015-03-01

    Biological oxygen demand (BOD) is the most significant water quality parameter and indicates water pollution with respect to the present biodegradable organic matter content. European countries are therefore obliged to report annual BOD values to Eurostat; however, BOD data at the national level is only available for 28 of 35 listed European countries for the period prior to 2008, among which 46% of data is missing. This paper describes the development of an artificial neural network model for the forecasting of annual BOD values at the national level, using widely available sustainability and economical/industrial parameters as inputs. The initial general regression neural network (GRNN) model was trained, validated and tested utilizing 20 inputs. The number of inputs was reduced to 15 using the Monte Carlo simulation technique as the input selection method. The best results were achieved with the GRNN model utilizing 25% less inputs than the initial model and a comparison with a multiple linear regression model trained and tested using the same input variables using multiple statistical performance indicators confirmed the advantage of the GRNN model. Sensitivity analysis has shown that inputs with the greatest effect on the GRNN model were (in descending order) precipitation, rural population with access to improved water sources, treatment capacity of wastewater treatment plants (urban) and treatment of municipal waste, with the last two having an equal effect. Finally, it was concluded that the developed GRNN model can be useful as a tool to support the decision-making process on sustainable development at a regional, national and international level.

  12. The mouse CCR2 gene is regulated by two promoters that are responsive to plasma cholesterol and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yiming; Green, Simone R.; Ho, Jessica; Li, Andrew; Almazan, Felizidad; Quehenberger, Oswald . E-mail: oquehenberger@ucsd.edu

    2005-06-24

    We have previously shown that the expression of monocyte CCR2, the receptor for monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, is induced by plasma cholesterol. The present study examines the mechanisms that regulate monocyte CCR2 expression in hypercholesterolemia using a mouse model. Our data demonstrate that in the mouse, CCR2 expression in circulating monocytes is controlled by two promoters P1 and P2. The two distinct transcripts, which encode the same protein, are produced by alternative splicing in the 5'-untranslated region. Both promoters are constitutively active, but only P2 is stimulated by cholesterol. However, both promoters are repressed by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}.

  13. CCR7-dependent trafficking of RORγ+ ILCs creates a unique microenvironment within mucosal draining lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Mackley, Emma C.; Houston, Stephanie; Marriott, Clare L.; Halford, Emily E.; Lucas, Beth; Cerovic, Vuk; Filbey, Kara J.; Maizels, Rick M.; Hepworth, Matthew R.; Sonnenberg, Gregory F.; Milling, Simon; Withers, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Presentation of peptide:MHCII by RORγ-expressing group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s), which are enriched within gut tissue, is required for control of CD4 T-cell responses to commensal bacteria. It is not known whether ILC populations migrate from their mucosal and peripheral sites to local draining secondary lymphoid tissues. Here we demonstrate that ILC3s reside within the interfollicular areas of mucosal draining lymph nodes, forming a distinct microenvironment not observed in peripheral lymph nodes. By photoconverting intestinal cells in Kaede mice we reveal constitutive trafficking of ILCs from the intestine to the draining mesenteric lymph nodes, which specifically for the LTi-like ILC3s was CCR7-dependent. Thus, ILC populations traffic to draining lymph nodes using different mechanisms. PMID:25575242

  14. Studies of acute and chronic radiation injury at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 1970-1992: The JANUS Program Survival and Pathology Data

    SciTech Connect

    Grahn, D.; Wright, B.J.; Carnes, B.A.; Williamson, F.S.; Fox, C.

    1995-02-01

    A research reactor for exclusive use in experimental radiobiology was designed and built at Argonne National Laboratory in the 1960`s. It was located in a special addition to Building 202, which housed the Division of Biological and Medical Research. Its location assured easy access for all users to the animal facilities, and it was also near the existing gamma-irradiation facilities. The water-cooled, heterogeneous 200-kW(th) reactor, named JANUS, became the focal point for a range of radiobiological studies gathered under the rubic of {open_quotes}the JANUS program{close_quotes}. The program ran from about 1969 to 1992 and included research at all levels of biological organization, from subcellular to organism. More than a dozen moderate- to large-scale studies with the B6CF{sub 1} mouse were carried out; these focused on the late effects of whole-body exposure to gamma rays or fission neutrons, in matching exposure regimes. In broad terms, these studies collected data on survival and on the pathology observed at death. A deliberate effort was made to establish the cause of death. This archieve describes these late-effects studies and their general findings. The database includes exposure parameters, time of death, and the gross pathology and histopathology in codified form. A series of appendices describes all pathology procedures and codes, treatment or irradiation codes, and the manner in which the data can be accessed in the ORACLE database management system. A series of tables also presents summaries of the individual experiments in terms of radiation quality, sample sizes at entry, mean survival times by sex, and number of gross pathology and histopathology records.

  15. The chemokine CCL5 induces CCR1-mediated hyperalgesia in mice inoculated with NCTC 2472 tumoral cells.

    PubMed

    Pevida, M; Lastra, A; Meana, Á; Hidalgo, A; Baamonde, A; Menéndez, Luis

    2014-02-14

    Although the expression of the chemokine receptor CCR1 has been demonstrated in several structures related to nociception, supporting the nociceptive role of chemokines able to activate it, the involvement of CCR1 in neoplastic pain has not been previously assessed. We have assayed the effects of a CCR1 antagonist, J113863, in two murine models of neoplastic hyperalgesia based on the intratibial injection of either NCTC 2472 fibrosarcoma cells, able to induce osteolytic bone injury, or B16-F10 melanoma cells, associated to mixed osteolytic/osteoblastic bone pathological features. The systemic administration of J113863 inhibited thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia but not mechanical allodynia in mice inoculated with NCTC 2472 cells. Moreover, in these mice, thermal hyperalgesia was counteracted following the peritumoral (10-30μg) but not spinal (3-5μg) administration of J113863. In contrast, hyperalgesia and allodynia measured in mice inoculated with B16-F10 cells remained unaffected after the administration of J113863. The inoculation of tumoral cells did not modify the levels of CCL3 at tumor or spinal cord. In contrast, although the concentration of CCL5 remained unmodified in mice inoculated with B16-F10 cells, increased levels of this chemokine were measured in tumor-bearing limbs, but not the spinal cord, of mice inoculated with NCTC 2472 cells. Increased levels of CCL5 were also found following the incubation of NCTC 2472, but not B16-F10, cells in the corresponding culture medium. The intraplantar injection of CCL5 (0.5ng) to naïve mice evoked thermal hyperalgesia prevented by the coadministration of J113863 or the CCR5 antagonist, d-Ala-peptide T-amide (DAPTA), demonstrating that CCL5 can induce thermal hyperalgesia in mice through the activation of CCR1 or CCR5. However, contrasting with the inhibitory effect evoked by J113863, the systemic administration of DAPTA did not prevent tumoral hyperalgesia. Finally, the peritumoral administration of an anti

  16. Pollen analysis of Holocene sediments from the Poço das Antas National Biological Reserve, Silva Jardim, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Luciane G; Barth, Ortrud M; Araujo, Dorothy S Dde

    2008-09-01

    The Poço das Antas National Biological Reserve is located in Rio de Janeiro State, southeast Brazil. This paper presents information on past environmental characteristics of the area through pollen analysis. Two sedimentary columns were collected and five samples were selected for radiocarbon dating. The following ages of the columns from bottom to top were detected: column 1 - 1.20-1.16 m: 6080 +/-40 years BP, 0.775-0.735 m: 4090 +/-40 years BP, 0.385-0.345 m: 1880 +/-80 years BP; column 2 - 1.22-1.18 m: 3520 +/-40 years BP, 0.23-0.19 m: 1810 +/-40 years BP. Three samples from column 1 and two samples from column 2 were selected for pollen analysis: 1.20 m, 0.77 m and 0.37 m of column 1 and 1.22 m and 0.21 m of column 2. Chemical treatment followed standard methodology. The palynological analysis shows that around 6080 years BP the study area was dominated by a rain forest and from around 4090 years BP the vegetation changed to a fragmented forest, restricted to low hills and surrounded by an open area of grassland and pioneer plants, swamps and peat areas. The pollen assemblage of the samples 3520, 1880 and 1810 years BP suggest the permanence of this kind of vegetation between 4000 years BP and the actual.

  17. Biologic Monitoring of Exposure to Environmental Chemicals throughout the Life Stages: Requirements and Issues for Consideration for the National Children’s Study

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Dana B.; Wang, Richard Y.; Needham, Larry L.

    2005-01-01

    Biomonitoring of exposure is a useful tool for assessing environmental exposures. The matrices available for analyses include blood, urine, breast milk, adipose tissue, and saliva, among others. The sampling can be staged to represent the particular time period of concern: preconceptionally from both parents, from a pregnant woman during each of the three trimesters, during and immediately after childbirth, from the mother postnatally, and from the child as it develops to 21 years of age. The appropriate sample for biomonitoring will depend upon matrix availability, the time period of concern for a particular exposure or health effect, and the different classes of environmental chemicals to be monitored. This article describes the matrices available for biomonitoring during the life stages being evaluated in the National Children’s Study; the best biologic matrices for exposure assessment for each individual chemical class, including consideration of alternative matrices; the analytical methods used for analysis, including quality control procedures and less costly alternatives; the costs of analysis; optimal storage conditions; and chemical and matrix stability during long-term storage. PMID:16079083

  18. Environmental and Biological Data of the Nutrient Enrichment Effects on Stream Ecosystems Project of the National Water Quality Assessment Program, 2003-04

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brightbill, Robin A.; Munn, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    In 2000, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency began the process of developing regional nutrient criteria for streams and rivers. In response to concerns about nutrients by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and others, the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment Program began studying the effects of nutrient enrichment on agricultural stream ecosystems to aid in the understanding of how nutrients affect the biota in agricultural streams. Streams within five study areas were sampled either in 2003 or 2004. These five study areas were located within six NAWQA study units: the combined Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin (ACFB) and Georgia-Florida Coastal Plain Drainages (GAFL), Central Columbia Plateau?Yakima River Basin (CCYK), Central Nebraska Basins (CNBR), Potomac River?Delmarva Peninsula (PODL), and the White-Miami River Basin (WHMI). Data collected included nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorous) and other chemical parameters, biological samples (chlorophyll, algal assemblages, invertebrate assemblages, and some fish assemblages), stream habitat, and riparian and basin information. This report describes and presents the data collected from these study areas.

  19. HIV-1 entry inhibition by small-molecule CCR5 antagonists: A combined molecular modeling and mutant study using a high-throughput assay

    SciTech Connect

    Labrecque, Jean; Metz, Markus; Lau, Gloria; Darkes, Marilyn C.; Wong, Rebecca S.Y.; Bogucki, David; Carpenter, Bryon; Chen Gang; Li Tongshuang; Nan, Susan; Schols, Dominique; Bridger, Gary J.; Fricker, Simon P.; Skerlj, Renato T.

    2011-05-10

    Based on the attrition rate of CCR5 small molecule antagonists in the clinic the discovery and development of next generation antagonists with an improved pharmacology and safety profile is necessary. Herein, we describe a combined molecular modeling, CCR5-mediated cell fusion, and receptor site-directed mutagenesis approach to study the molecular interactions of six structurally diverse compounds (aplaviroc, maraviroc, vicriviroc, TAK-779, SCH-C and a benzyloxycarbonyl-aminopiperidin-1-yl-butane derivative) with CCR5, a coreceptor for CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains. This is the first study using an antifusogenic assay, a model of the interaction of the gp120 envelope protein with CCR5. This assay avoids the use of radioactivity and HIV infection assays, and can be used in a high throughput mode. The assay was validated by comparison with other established CCR5 assays. Given the hydrophobic nature of the binding pocket several binding models are suggested which could prove useful in the rational drug design of new lead compounds.

  20. CD8+CD45RA+CCR7+FOXP3+ T cells with immunosuppressive properties: a novel subset of inducible human regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masakatsu; Jagger, Ann L.; Konya, Christine; Shimojima, Yasuhiro; Pryshchep, Sergey; Goronzy, Jörg J.; Weyand, Cornelia M.

    2012-01-01

    CD8 T cells stimulated with a suboptimal dose of anti-CD3 antibodies (100 pg/ml) in the presence of IL-15 retain a naïve phenotype with expression of CD45RA, CD28, CD27 and CCR7 but acquire new functions and differentiate into immunosuppressive T cells. CD8+CCR7+ Tregs express FOXP3 and prevent CD4 T cells from responding to T-cell receptor stimulation and entering the cell cycle. Naïve CD4 T cells are more susceptible to inhibition than memory cells. The suppressive activity of CD8+CCR7+ Tregs is not mediated by IL-10, TGF-β, CTLA-4, CCL4 or adenosine and relies on interference with very early steps of the TCR signaling cascade. Specifically, CD8+CCR7+ Tregs prevent TCR-induced phosphorylation of ZAP70 and dampen the rise of intracellular calcium in CD4 T cells. The inducibility of CD8+CCR7+ Tregs is correlated to the age of the individual with peripheral blood lymphocytes of donors older than 60 years yielding low numbers of FOXP3low CD8 Treg cells. Loss of CD8+CCR7+ Tregs in the elderly host may be of relevance in the aging immune system as immunosenescence is associated with a state of chronic smoldering inflammation. PMID:22821963

  1. Metadata Activities in Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Inigo, Gil San; HUTCHISON, VIVIAN; Frame, Mike; Palanisamy, Giri

    2010-01-01

    The National Biological Information Infrastructure program has advanced the biological sciences ability to standardize, share, integrate and synthesize data by making the metadata program a core of its activities. Through strategic partnerships, a series of crosswalks for the main biological metadata specifications have enabled data providers and international clearinghouses to aggregate and disseminate tens of thousands of metadata sets describing petabytes of data records. New efforts at the National Biological Information Infrastructure are focusing on better metadata creation and curation tools, semantic mediation for data discovery and other curious initiatives.

  2. Cervical cancer cell-derived interleukin-6 impairs CCR7-dependent migration of MMP-9-expressing dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Pahne-Zeppenfeld, Jennifer; Schröer, Nadine; Walch-Rückheim, Barbara; Oldak, Monika; Gorter, Arko; Hegde, Subramanya; Smola, Sigrun

    2014-05-01

    Cervical carcinogenesis is a consequence of persistent infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs). Recent studies indicate that HPV-transformed cells actively instruct their microenvironment to promote carcinogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that cervical cancer cells activate monocytes to produce their own CCL2 for further monocyte recruitment and reprogram their function during differentiation and maturation to dendritic cells (DCs). Our data show that cervical cancer cells suppress the induction of the chemokine receptor CCR7 in phenotypically mature DCs and impair their migration toward a lymph node homing chemokine, required to initiate adaptive immune responses. We confirmed the presence of CD83(+)CCR7(low) DCs in cancer biopsies. The second factor essential for DC migration, matrix-metalloproteinase MMP-9, which also has vasculogenic and protumorigenic properties, is not suppressed but upregulated in immature as well as mature DCs. We identified interleukin-6 (IL-6) as a crucial cervical cancer cell-derived mediator and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-jB) as the central signaling pathway targeted in DCs. Anti-IL-6 antibodies reverted not only NF-jB inhibition and restored CCR7-dependent migration but also blocked MMP-9 induction. This is the first report demonstrating the dissociation of CCR7 and MMP-9 expression in phenotypically mature CD83(+) DCs by cancer cells. Our results show that cervical cancer cells actively shape the local microenvironment. They induce the accumulation of myeloid cells and skew their function from immune activation to local production of protumorigenic MMP-9. Neutralizing anti-IL-6 antibodies can counteract this functional dysbalance and should therefore be considered for adjuvant cervical cancer therapy.

  3. Analgesic effects evoked by a CCR2 antagonist or an anti-CCL2 antibody in inflamed mice.

    PubMed

    Llorián-Salvador, María; Pevida, Marta; González-Rodríguez, Sara; Lastra, Ana; Fernández-García, María-Teresa; Hidalgo, Agustín; Baamonde, Ana; Menéndez, Luis

    2016-06-01

    Chemokine CCL2, also known as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), is a molecule that in addition to its well-established role in chemotaxis can also act as nociceptor sensitizer. The upregulation of this chemokine in inflamed tissues could suggest its involvement in inflammatory hypernociception. Thus, we have measured CCL2 levels in mice with acute or chronic inflammation due to the intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of carrageenan or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), respectively, and we have studied whether inflammatory hyperalgesia or allodynia could be attenuated by blocking CCR2 receptors or neutralizing CCL2 with an anti-CCL2 antibody. A remarkable increase in CCL2 concentration was detected by ELISA in paw homogenates coming from carrageenan- or CFA-inflamed mice, being its expression mainly localized in macrophages, as shown by immunohistochemical assays. The s.c. (0.3-3 mg/kg) or i.pl. (0.3-3 μg) administration of the CCR2 antagonist, RS 504393, dose dependently inhibited thermal hyperalgesia measured in acutely or chronically inflamed mice, whereas s.c. administration of this drug did not reduce inflammatory mechanical allodynia. Furthermore, the inhibition of inflammatory hyperalgesia after the administration of an anti-CCL2 antibody (0.1-1 μg; i.pl.) suggests that CCL2 could be the endogenous chemokine responsible for CCR2-mediated hyperalgesic effects. Besides, the acute administration of the highest antihyperalgesic dose of RS 504393 assayed did not reduce paw tumefaction or modify the presence of inflammatory cells. These results indicate that the blockade of the CCL2/CCR2 system can counteract inflammatory hyperalgesia, being this antinociceptive effect unrelated to a decrease in the inflammatory reaction. PMID:26820818

  4. Analgesic effects evoked by a CCR2 antagonist or an anti-CCL2 antibody in inflamed mice.

    PubMed

    Llorián-Salvador, María; Pevida, Marta; González-Rodríguez, Sara; Lastra, Ana; Fernández-García, María-Teresa; Hidalgo, Agustín; Baamonde, Ana; Menéndez, Luis

    2016-06-01

    Chemokine CCL2, also known as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), is a molecule that in addition to its well-established role in chemotaxis can also act as nociceptor sensitizer. The upregulation of this chemokine in inflamed tissues could suggest its involvement in inflammatory hypernociception. Thus, we have measured CCL2 levels in mice with acute or chronic inflammation due to the intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of carrageenan or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), respectively, and we have studied whether inflammatory hyperalgesia or allodynia could be attenuated by blocking CCR2 receptors or neutralizing CCL2 with an anti-CCL2 antibody. A remarkable increase in CCL2 concentration was detected by ELISA in paw homogenates coming from carrageenan- or CFA-inflamed mice, being its expression mainly localized in macrophages, as shown by immunohistochemical assays. The s.c. (0.3-3 mg/kg) or i.pl. (0.3-3 μg) administration of the CCR2 antagonist, RS 504393, dose dependently inhibited thermal hyperalgesia measured in acutely or chronically inflamed mice, whereas s.c. administration of this drug did not reduce inflammatory mechanical allodynia. Furthermore, the inhibition of inflammatory hyperalgesia after the administration of an anti-CCL2 antibody (0.1-1 μg; i.pl.) suggests that CCL2 could be the endogenous chemokine responsible for CCR2-mediated hyperalgesic effects. Besides, the acute administration of the highest antihyperalgesic dose of RS 504393 assayed did not reduce paw tumefaction or modify the presence of inflammatory cells. These results indicate that the blockade of the CCL2/CCR2 system can counteract inflammatory hyperalgesia, being this antinociceptive effect unrelated to a decrease in the inflammatory reaction.

  5. Expanded numbers of circulating myeloid dendritic cells in patent human filarial infection reflect lower CCR1 expression.

    PubMed

    Semnani, Roshanak Tolouei; Mahapatra, Lily; Dembele, Benoit; Konate, Siaka; Metenou, Simon; Dolo, Housseini; Coulibaly, Michel E; Soumaoro, Lamine; Coulibaly, Siaka Y; Sanogo, Dramane; Seriba Doumbia, Salif; Diallo, Abdallah A; Traoré, Sekou F; Klion, Amy; Nutman, Thomas B; Mahanty, Siddhartha

    2010-11-15

    APC dysfunction has been postulated to mediate some of the parasite-specific T cell unresponsiveness seen in patent filarial infection. We have shown that live microfilariae of Brugia malayi induce caspase-dependent apoptosis in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro. This study addresses whether apoptosis observed in vitro extends to patent filarial infections in humans and is reflected in the number of circulating myeloid DCs (mDCs; CD11c(-)CD123(lo)) in peripheral blood of infected microfilaremic individuals. Utilizing flow cytometry to identify DC subpopulations (mDCs and plasmacytoid DCs [pDCs]) based on expression of CD11c and CD123, we found a significant increase in numbers of circulating mDCs (CD11c(+)CD123(lo)) in filaria-infected individuals compared with uninfected controls from the same filaria-endemic region of Mali. Total numbers of pDCs, monocytes, and lymphocytes did not differ between the two groups. To investigate potential causes of differences in mDC numbers between the two groups, we assessed chemokine receptor expression on mDCs. Our data indicate that filaria-infected individuals had a lower percentage of circulating CCR1(+) mDCs and a higher percentage of circulating CCR5(+) mDCs and pDCs. Finally, live microfilariae of B. malayi were able to downregulate cell-surface expression of CCR1 on monocyte-derived DCs and diminish their calcium flux in response to stimulation by a CCR1 ligand. These findings suggest that microfilaria are capable of altering mDC migration through downregulation of expression of some chemokine receptors and their signaling functions. These observations have major implications for regulation of immune responses to these long-lived parasites. PMID:20956349

  6. Tumor infiltration by chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7)+ T-lymphocytes is a favorable prognostic factor in metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Correale, Pierpaolo; Rotundo, Maria Saveria; Botta, Cirino; Del Vecchio, Maria Teresa; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro

    2012-01-01

    The immune interactions occurring within the tumor microenvironment have a critical role in determining the outcome of colorectal cancer patients. We carried-out an immunohistochemical analysis of tumor infiltrating T-lymphocytes expressing chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) in a series of colorectal cancer patients enrolled in a prospective clinical trial. We demonstrated that a high tumor infiltration score of this lymphocyte subset is predictive of longer progression free survival and overall survival. PMID:22754775

  7. Current Trends in Biology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wivagg, Daniel E.; Moore, Randy

    1987-01-01

    This newsletter reports on the status of biology education in the United States. It states that biology has entered its "golden age" because of the emergence of biotechnology, ecology, agricultural productivity, and human biology as major societal issues. This report discusses the status of the informal national curriculum of biology, involving…

  8. Multi-Functional Regulation of 4E-BP Gene Expression by the Ccr4-Not Complex