Science.gov

Sample records for biology division progress

  1. Biology Division progress report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.; Cook, J.S.

    1993-10-01

    This Progress Report summarizes the research endeavors of the Biology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1993. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the Division`s major organizational units. Lists of information to convey the entire scope of the Division`s activities are compiled at the end of the report.

  2. Biology Division progress report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This Progress Report summarizes the research endeavors of the Biology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1993, through September 30, 1995. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the Division`s major organizational units. Lists of information to convey the entire scope of the Division`s activities are compiled at the end of the report. Attention is focused on the following research activities: molecular, cellular, and cancer biology; mammalian genetics and development; genome mapping program; and educational activities.

  3. Biology Division. Progress report, August 1, 1982-September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The Biology Division is the component of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory that investigates the potential adverse health effects of energy-related substances. The body of this report provides summaries of the aims, scope and progress of the research of groups of investigators in the Division during the period of August 1, 1982, through September 30, 1983. At the end of each summary is a list of publications covering the same period (published or accepted for publication). For convenience, the summaries are assembled under Sections in accordance with the current organizational structure of the Biology Division; each Section begins with an overview. It will be apparent, however, that currents run throughout the Division and that the various programs support and interact with each other.

  4. Biology Division progress report, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The body of this report provides summaries of the aims, scope and progress of the research by groups of investigators in the Division during the period of October 1, 1984, through September 30, 1985. At the end of each summary is a list of publications covering the same period. For convenience, the summaries are assembled under Sections in accordance with the current organizational structure of the Biology Division; each Section begins with an overview. It will be apparent, however, tha crosscurrents run throughout the Division and that the various programs support and interact with each other. In addition, this report includes information on the Division's educational activities, Advisory Committee, seminar program, and international interactions, as well as extramural activities of staff members, abstracts for technical meetings, and funding and personnel levels.

  5. Biology Division progress report, June 1, 1980-July 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    Highlights of progress for the period June 1980 through July 1982 are summarized. Discussions of projects are presented under the following headings: molecular and cellular sciences; cellular and comparative mutagenesis; mammalian genetics and teratology; toxicology; and carcinogenesis. In addition this report includes an outline of educational activities. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual technical reports for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (RJC)

  6. Biology Division progress report, October 1, 1978-May 31, 1980. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the four sections into which this progress report has been divided. The report also contains sections related to interdivision activities and educational activities. (ERB)

  7. Biology and Medicine Division: Annual report 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    The Biology and Medicine Division continues to make important contributions in scientific areas in which it has a long-established leadership role. For 50 years the Division has pioneered in the application of radioisotopes and charged particles to biology and medicine. There is a growing emphasis on cellular and molecular applications in the work of all the Division's research groups. The powerful tools of genetic engineering, the use of recombinant products, the analytical application of DNA probes, and the use of restriction fragment length polymorphic DNA are described and proposed for increasing use in the future.

  8. Biology and Medicine Division annual report, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-04-01

    This book briefly describes the activities of the Biology and Medicine Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. During the past year the Donner Pavilion program on the treatment of arteriovenous malformations in the brain has chalked up very significant successes. The disease control rate has been high and objective measures of success using cerebral angiography have been established. The new high resolution positron emitting tomographic imager has been demonstrated to operate successfully. In the Radiation Biophysics program, the availability of higher mass ions up to uranium has allowed us cell and tissue studies in a radiation domain that is entirely new. Using uranium beams, investigators have already made new and exciting findings that are described in the body of the report.

  9. Physics division. Progress report, January 1, 1995--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, M.; Bacon, D.S.; Aine, C.J.; Bartsch, R.R.

    1997-10-01

    This issue of the Physics Division Progress Report describes progress and achievements in Physics Division research during the period January 1, 1995-December 31, 1996. The report covers the five main areas of experimental research and development in which Physics Division serves the needs of Los Alamos National Laboratory and the nation in applied and basic sciences: (1) biophysics, (2) hydrodynamic physics, (3) neutron science and technology, (4) plasma physics, and (5) subatomic physics. Included in this report are a message from the Division Director, the Physics Division mission statement, an organizational chart, descriptions of the research areas of the five groups in the Division, selected research highlights, project descriptions, the Division staffing and funding levels for FY95-FY97, and a list of publications and presentations.

  10. Physics Division progress report, January 1, 1984-September 30, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, W.E.

    1987-10-01

    This report provides brief accounts of significant progress in development activities and research results achieved by Physics Division personnel during the period January 1, 1984, through September 31, 1986. These efforts are representative of the three main areas of experimental research and development in which the Physics Division serves Los Alamos National Laboratory's and the Nation's needs in defense and basic sciences: (1) defense physics, including the development of diagnostic methods for weapons tests, weapon-related high-energy-density physics, and programs supporting the Strategic Defense Initiative; (2) laser physics and applications, especially to high-density plasmas; and (3) fundamental research in nuclear and particle physics, condensed-matter physics, and biophysics. Throughout the report, emphasis is placed on the design, construction, and application of a variety of advanced, often unique, instruments and instrument systems that maintain the Division's position at the leading edge of research and development in the specific fields germane to its mission. A sampling of experimental systems of particular interest would include the relativistic electron-beam accelerator and its applications to high-energy-density plasmas; pulsed-power facilities; directed energy weapon devices such as free-electron lasers and neutral-particle-beam accelerators; high-intensity ultraviolet and x-ray beam lines at the National Synchrotron Light Source (at Brookhaven National Laboratory); the Aurora KrF ultraviolet laser system for projected use as an inertial fusion driver; antiproton physics facility at CERN; and several beam developments at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility for studying nuclear, condensed-matter, and biological physics, highlighted by progress in establishing the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center.

  11. Life Sciences Division progress report for CYs 1997-1998 [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Reinhold C.

    1999-06-01

    This is the first formal progress report issued by the ORNL Life Sciences Division. It covers the period from February 1997 through December 1998, which has been critical in the formation of our new division. The legacy of 50 years of excellence in biological research at ORNL has been an important driver for everyone in the division to do their part so that this new research division can realize the potential it has to make seminal contributions to the life sciences for years to come. This reporting period is characterized by intense assessment and planning efforts. They included thorough scrutiny of our strengths and weaknesses, analyses of our situation with respect to comparative research organizations, and identification of major thrust areas leading to core research efforts that take advantage of our special facilities and expertise. Our goal is to develop significant research and development (R&D) programs in selected important areas to which we can make significant contributions by combining our distinctive expertise and resources in the biological sciences with those in the physical, engineering, and computational sciences. Significant facilities in mouse genomics, mass spectrometry, neutron science, bioanalytical technologies, and high performance computing are critical to the success of our programs. Research and development efforts in the division are organized in six sections. These cluster into two broad areas of R&D: systems biology and technology applications. The systems biology part of the division encompasses our core biological research programs. It includes the Mammalian Genetics and Development Section, the Biochemistry and Biophysics Section, and the Computational Biosciences Section. The technology applications part of the division encompasses the Assessment Technology Section, the Environmental Technology Section, and the Toxicology and Risk Analysis Section. These sections are the stewards of the division's core competencies. The common

  12. Cell Division and Evolution of Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivier, Nicolas; Arcenegui-Siemens, Xavier; Schliecker, Gudrun

    A tissue is a geometrical, space-filling, random cellular network; it remains in this steady state while individual cells divide. Cell division (fragmentation) is a local, elementary topological transformation which establishes statistical equilibrium of the structure. Statistical equilibrium is characterized by observable relations (Lewis, Aboav) between cell shapes, sizes and those of their neighbours, obtained through maximum entropy and topological correlation extending to nearest neighbours only, i.e. maximal randomness. For a two-dimensional tissue (epithelium), the distribution of cell shapes and that of mother and daughter cells can be obtained from elementary geometrical and physical arguments, except for an exponential factor favouring division of larger cells, and exponential and combinatorial factors encouraging a most symmetric division. The resulting distributions are very narrow, and stationarity severely restricts the range of an adjustable structural parameter

  13. Progress in space biology.

    PubMed

    Imshenetskii, A A

    1979-01-01

    Over the past two decades there has arisen a new branch of biology--space biology. This short review is devoted to a discussion of its achievements. It considers the results of research in the area of gravitation biology, and an account is made of studies in those areas of radiobiology which have relevance to the study of the cosmos. There is a brief summary of the results of the search for the upper and lower limits of the biosphere, and information is presented regarding the measures employed to maintain planetary quarantine. A great deal of attention has been given to the search for extraterrestrial life, one of the most important of problems. The results obtained with the aid of the American Viking probes on Mars are given special attention. The review presents experimental data based both upon data obtained in experiments on biological specimens during space flights of satellites and space vehicles, and also upon the results of laboratory research.

  14. Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period October 1, 1991--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Berven, B.A.

    1993-09-01

    This is a progress report from the Health and Safety Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information is presented in the following sections: Assessment Technology, Biological and Radiation Physics, Chemical Physics, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis, Risk Analysis, Center for Risk Management, Associate Laboratories for Excellence in Radiation Technology (ALERT), and Contributions to National and Lead Laboratory Programs and Assignments--Environmental Restoration.

  15. Energy Division progress report, fiscal years 1994--1995

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, C.I.

    1996-06-01

    At ORNL, the Energy Division`s mission is to provide innovative solutions to energy and related issues of national and global importance through interdisciplinary research and development. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this progress report for FY 1994 and FY 1995. The Division`s expenditures in FY 1995 totaled 44.9 million. Sixty percent of the divisions work was supported by the US DOE. Other significant sponsors include the US DOT, the US DOD, other federal agencies, and some private organizations. The Division`s programmatic activities cover three main areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) transportation systems, and (3) energy use and delivery technologies. Analysis and assessment activities involve energy and resource analysis, preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, and impact statements, research on emergency preparedness, analysis of energy and environmental needs in developing countries, and transportation analysis. Transportation systems research seeks to improve the quality of both civilian and military transportation efforts. Energy use and delivery technologies focus on building equipment, building envelopes, (walls, roofs, attics, and materials), improvement of energy efficiency in buildings, and electric power systems.

  16. Environmental Research Division technical progress report, January 1984-December 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-05-01

    Technical progress in the various research and assessment activities of Argonne National Laboratory's Environmental Research Division is reported for the period 1984 to 1985. Textual, graphic, and tabular information is used to briefly summarize (in separate chapters) the work of the Division's Atmospheric Physics, Environmental Effects Research, Environmental Impacts, Fundamental Molecular Physics and Chemistry, and Waste Management Programs. Information on professional qualifications, awards, and outstanding professional activities of staff members, as well as lists of publications, oral presentations, special events organized, and participants in educational programs, are provided in appendices at the end of each chapter.

  17. Biology and Medicine Division annual report, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-04-01

    Modern biology is characterized by rapid change. The development of new tools and the results derived from their application to various biological systems require significant shifts in our concepts and the strategies that are adopted to analyze and elucidate mechanisms. In parallel with exciting new scientific developments our organizational structure and programmatic emphases have altered. These changes and developments have enabled the life sciences at LBL to be better positioned to create and respond to new opportunities. The work summarized in this annual report reflects a vital multifaceted research program that is in the vanguard of the areas represented. We are committed to justifying the confidence expressed by LBL through the new mission statement and reorganizational changes designed to give greater prominence to the life sciences.

  18. Proper division plane orientation and mitotic progression together allow normal growth of maize

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Anding; Sylvester, Anne

    2017-01-01

    How growth, microtubule dynamics, and cell-cycle progression are coordinated is one of the unsolved mysteries of cell biology. A maize mutant, tangled1, with known defects in growth and proper division plane orientation, and a recently characterized cell-cycle delay identified by time-lapse imaging, was used to clarify the relationship between growth, cell cycle, and proper division plane orientation. The tangled1 mutant was fully rescued by introduction of cortical division site localized TANGLED1-YFP. A CYCLIN1B destruction box was fused to TANGLED1-YFP to generate a line that mostly rescued the division plane defect but still showed cell-cycle delays when expressed in the tangled1 mutant. Although an intermediate growth phenotype between wild-type and the tangled1 mutant was expected, these partially rescued plants grew as well as wild-type siblings, indicating that mitotic progression delays alone do not alter overall growth. These data indicate that division plane orientation, together with proper cell-cycle progression, is critical for plant growth. PMID:28202734

  19. Experimental Facilities Division progress report 1996--97

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the activities of the Experimental Facilities Division (XFD) in support of the users of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), primarily focusing on the past year of operations. In September 1996, the APS began operations as a national user facility serving the US community of x-ray researchers from private industry, academic institutions, and other research organizations. The start of operations was about three months ahead of the baseline date established in 1988. This report is divided into the following sections: (1) overview; (2) user operations; (3) user administration and technical support; (4) R and D in support of view operations; (5) collaborative research; and (6) long-term strategic plans for XFD.

  20. Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period April 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S.V.

    1992-03-01

    This is a brief progress report from the Health and Safety Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information is presented in the following sections: Assessment Technology including Measurement Applications and Development, Pollutant Assessments, Measurement Systems Research, Dosimetry Applications Research, Metabolism and Dosimetry Research and Nuclear Medicine. Biological and Radiation Physics including Atomic, Molecular, and High Voltage Physics, Physics of Solids and Macromolecules, Liquid and Submicron Physics, Analytic Dosimetry and Surface Physics and Health Effects. Chemical Physics including Molecular Physics, Photophysics and Advanced Monitoring Development. Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis including Human Genome and Toxicology, Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication, Environmental Regulations and Remediation and Information Management Technology. Risk Analysis including Hazardous Waste.

  1. Chemical Technology Division progress report, January 1, 1993--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This progress report presents a summary of the missions and activities of the various sections and administrative groups in this Division for this period. Specific projects in areas such as energy research, waste and environmental programs, and radiochemical processing are highlighted, and special programmatic activities conducted by the Division are identified and described. The administrative summary portion features information about publications and presentations of Chemical Technology Division staff, as well as a listing of patents awarded to Division personnel during this period.

  2. Geospatial Technology Applications and Infrastructure in the Biological Resources Division

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    D'Erchia, Frank; Getter, James; D'Erchia, Terry D.; Root, Ralph; Stitt, Susan; White, Barbara

    1998-01-01

    Executive Summary -- Automated spatial processing technology such as geographic information systems (GIS), telemetry, and satellite-based remote sensing are some of the more recent developments in the long history of geographic inquiry. For millennia, humankind has endeavored to map the Earth's surface and identify spatial relationships. But the precision with which we can locate geographic features has increased exponentially with satellite positioning systems. Remote sensing, GIS, thematic mapping, telemetry, and satellite positioning systems such as the Global Positioning System (GPS) are tools that greatly enhance the quality and rapidity of analysis of biological resources. These technologies allow researchers, planners, and managers to more quickly and accurately determine appropriate strategies and actions. Researchers and managers can view information from new and varying perspectives using GIS and remote sensing, and GPS receivers allow the researcher or manager to identify the exact location of interest. These geospatial technologies support the mission of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Biological Resources Division (BRD) and the Strategic Science Plan (BRD 1996) by providing a cost-effective and efficient method for collection, analysis, and display of information. The BRD mission is 'to work with others to provide the scientific understanding and technologies needed to support the sound management and conservation of our Nation's biological resources.' A major responsibility of the BRD is to develop and employ advanced technologies needed to synthesize, analyze, and disseminate biological and ecological information. As the Strategic Science Plan (BRD 1996) states, 'fulfilling this mission depends on effectively balancing the immediate need for information to guide management of biological resources with the need for technical assistance and long-range, strategic information to understand and predict emerging patterns and trends in ecological systems

  3. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Sincovec, R.F.

    1995-07-01

    This report provides a record of the research activities of the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division for the period January 1, 1993, through December 31, 1994. This report is the final archival record of the EPM Division. On October 1, 1994, ORELA was transferred to Physics Division and on January 1, 1995, the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division and the Computer Applications Division reorganized to form the Computer Science and Mathematics Division and the Computational Physics and Engineering Division. Earlier reports in this series are identified on the previous pages, along with the progress reports describing ORNL`s research in the mathematical sciences prior to 1984 when those activities moved into the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division.

  4. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1982. Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 2090. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 12 of the 14 sections of the Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report. The other 2 sections deal with educational activities. The programs discussed deal with advanced fuel energy, toxic substances, environmental impacts of various energy technologies, biomass, low-level radioactive waste management, the global carbon cycle, and aquatic and terrestrial ecology. (KRM)

  5. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual technical report, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, M.W.

    1982-06-01

    This report summarizes research during 1981 in the Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory. Studies in Low Level Radiation include comparison of lifetime effects in mice of low level neutron and gamma irradiation, delineation of the responses of dogs to continuous low level gamma irradiation, elucidation of mechanisms of radiation damage and repair in mammalian cells, and study of the genetic effects of high LET radiations. Carcinogenesis research addresses mechanisms of tumor initiation and promotion in rat liver, chemical carcinogenesis in cultured mammalian cells, and molecular and genetic mechanisms of chemical and ultraviolet mutagenesis in bacteria. Research in Toxicology uses a variety of cellular, whole animal, and chronobiological end points, chemical separations, and statistical models to evaluate the hazards and mechanisms of actions of metals, coal gasification by products, and other energy-related pollutants. Human Protein Index studies develop two-dimensional electrophoresis systems for diagnosis and detection of cancer and other disease. Biophysics research includes fundamental structural and biophysical investigations of immunoglobulins and key biological molecules using NMR, crystallographic, and x-ray and neutron small-angle scattering techniques. The final sections cover support facilities, educational activities, seminars, staff talks, staff, and funding agencies.

  6. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual technical report 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, M.W.

    1983-05-01

    This report summarizes research during 1982 in the Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory. Studies in Carcinogenesis address mechanisms of chemical and radiation carcinogenesis including the processes of tumor initiation and promotion. The studies employ rat liver and mouse skin models as well as human rodent cell culture systems. The use of liposomes for metal mobilization is also explored. Low Level Radiation studies include delineation of the hematopoietic and other responses of dogs to continuous low level gamma irradiation, comparison of lifetime effects in mice of low level neutron and gamma irradiation, and study of the genetic effects of high LET radiation. Molecular Biology research develops two-dimensional electrophoresis systems for diagnosis and detection of cancer and other diseases. Fundamental structural and biophysical investigations of immunoglobulins and other key proteins are included, as are studies of cell growth, and of molecular and cellular effects of solar uv light. Research in Toxicology uses cellular, physiological, whole animal, and chronobiological end points and chemical separations to elucidate mechanisms and evaluate hazards of coal conversion by-products, actinides, and toxic metals. The final sections cover support facilities, educational activities, seminars, staff talks, staff, and funding agencies.

  7. Cell division cycle 45 promotes papillary thyroid cancer progression via regulating cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Shi, Run; Zhao, Sha; Li, Xiaona; Lu, Shan; Bu, Hemei; Ma, Xianghua

    2017-05-01

    Cell division cycle 45 was reported to be overexpressed in some cancer-derived cell lines and was predicted to be a candidate oncogene in cervical cancer. However, the clinical and biological significance of cell division cycle 45 in papillary thyroid cancer has never been investigated. We determined the expression level and clinical significance of cell division cycle 45 using The Cancer Genome Atlas, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry. A great upregulation of cell division cycle 45 was observed in papillary thyroid cancer tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues. Furthermore, overexpression of cell division cycle 45 positively correlates with more advanced clinical characteristics. Silence of cell division cycle 45 suppressed proliferation of papillary thyroid cancer cells via G1-phase arrest and inducing apoptosis. The oncogenic activity of cell division cycle 45 was also confirmed in vivo. In conclusion, cell division cycle 45 may serve as a novel biomarker and a potential therapeutic target for papillary thyroid cancer.

  8. Environmental Research Division technical progress report: January 1986--October 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    Technical process in the various research activities of Argonne National Laboratory's Environmental Research Division is reported for the period 1986-1987. Textual, graphic, and tabular information is used to briefly summarize (in separate chapters) the work of the Division's Atmospheric Physics, Environmental Effects Research, Fundamental Molecular Physics and Chemistry, and Organic Geochemistry and Environmental Instrumentation Programs. Information on professional qualifications, awards, and outstanding professional activities of staff members, as well as lists of publications, oral presentations, special events organized, and participants in educational programs, are provided in appendices at the end of each chapter. Individual projects under each division are processed separately for the data bases.

  9. Solid State Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W.

    1997-12-01

    This report covers research progress in the Solid State Division from April 1, 1995, through March 31, 1997. During this period, the division conducted a broad, interdisciplinary materials research program in support of Department of Energy science and technology missions. The report includes brief summaries of research activities in condensed matter theory, neutron scattering, synthesis and characterization of materials, ion beam and laser processing, and the structure of solids and surfaces. An addendum includes listings of division publications and professional activities.

  10. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hook, R. I.; Hildebrand, S. G.; Gehrs, C. W.; Sharples, F. E.; Shriner, D. S.; Stow, S. H.; Cushman, J. H.; Kanciruk, P.

    1993-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1992, which which extended from October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. This report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Section activities are described in the Earth and Atmospheric sciences, ecosystem studies, Environmental analysis, environmental biotechnology, and division operations.

  11. Solid State Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W.

    1991-03-01

    This report covers research progress in the Solid State Division from April 1, 1989, to September 30, 1990. During this period, division research programs were significantly enhanced by the restart of the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and by new initiatives in processing and characterization of materials.

  12. Physics division. Progress report for period ending September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, S.J.

    1997-04-01

    This report covers the research and development activities of the Physics Division for the 1995 and 1996 fiscal years, beginning October 1, 1994, and ending September 30, 1996. The activities of the Division continue to be concentrated in the areas of experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. In addition, there are smaller programs in plasma diagnostics and data compilation and evaluation. During the period of this report, there has been considerable success in bringing the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) into routine operation. The budgets of the nuclear physics portion of the Division have increased each year in nearly all areas, and several new members have been added to the Division research and development staff. On August 30, 1996, the HRIBF successfully accelerated its first radioactive ion beams, {sup 69}As and {sup 70}As. Prior to this, the heart of the facility, the RIB injector system, was completed, including installation of a remote handling system for the target/ion source assembly. Target and ion source development is likely to be the technical key to success of the HRIBF. We have expanded our efforts in those development areas. Of special note is the development of highly permeable composite targets which have now been shown to allow release of difficult-to-produce radioactive ions such as {sup 17,18}F. A summary of the HRIBF work is provided in Chapter 1, along with supporting activities of the Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research.

  13. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, A.B.

    1989-03-01

    This report covers the research and development activities of the Physics Division for the 1988 fiscal year, beginning October 1, 1987, and ending September 30, 1988. The activities of this Division are concentrated in the areas of experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. Operation of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility as a national user facility continues to represent the single largest activity within the Division. This year saw the completion of the acceleration tube upgrade of the 25-MV tandem electrostatic accelerator and the achievement of record terminal potentials, operation for an experiment with 25 million volts on terminal, and successful tests with beam at 25.5 MV. The experimental nuclear physics program continues to be dominated by research utilizing heavy ions. These activities, while continuing to center largely on the Holifield Facility, have seen significant growth in the use of facilities that provide intermediate energies and especially ultrarelativistic beams. The UNISOR program, since its inception, has been intimately associated with the Division and, most particularly, with the Holifield Facility. In addition to the Holifield Facility, the Division operates two smaller facilities, the EN Tandem and the ECR Ion Source Facility, as ''User Resources.'' The efforts in theoretical physics, covering both nuclear and atomic physics, are presented. In addition to research with multicharged heavy ions from the ECR source, the effort on atomic physics in support of the controlled fusion program includes a plasma diagnostics development program. The concentration of this program on optical and laser technology is marked by the change in designation to the Laser and Electro-Optics Lab. A small, continuing effort in elementary particle physics, carried out in collaboration with the University of Tennessee, is reported.

  14. Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division progress report for the period January 1, 1993--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Poutsma, M.L.

    1995-06-01

    This report provides brief summaries of progress in the Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division (CASD) during 1993 and 1994. The first four chapters, which cover the research mission, are organized to mirror the major organizational units of the division and indicate the scope of the research portfolio. These divisions are the Analytical Spectroscopy Section, Nuclear and Radiochemistry Section, Organic Chemistry Section, and Physical and Materials Chemistry Section. The fifth and sixth chapters summarize the support activities within CASD that are critical for research progress. Finally, the appendices indicate the productivity and recognition of the staff in terms of various forms of external publications, professional activities, and awards.

  15. Health and Safety Research Division: Progress report, October 1, 1985-March 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, P.J.

    1987-09-01

    This report summarizes the progress in our programs for the period October 1, 1985, through March 31, 1987. The division's presentations and publications represented important contributions on the forefronts of many fields. Eleven invention disclosures were filed, two patent applications submitted, and one patent issued. The company's transfers new technologies to the private sector more efficiently than in the past. The division's responsibilities to DOE under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) program includes inclusion recommendations for 3100 properties. The nuclear medicine program developed new radiopharmaceuticals and radionuclide generators through clinical trials with some of our medical cooperatives. Two major collaborative indoor air quality studies and a large epidemiological study of drinking water quality and human health were completed. ORNL's first scanning tunneling microscope (STM) has achieved single atom resolution and has produced some of the world's best images of single atoms on the surface of a silicon crystal. The Biological and Radiation Physics Section, designed and constructed a soft x-ray spectrometer which has exhibited a measuring efficiency that is 10,000 times higher than other equipment. 1164 refs.

  16. [PROGRESS IN BIOLOGICAL TISSUE ENGINEERING SCAFFOLD MATERIALS].

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaojuan; Xi, Tingfei; Zheng, Yufeng

    2014-06-01

    To analyze the progress in biological tissue engineering scaffold materials and the clinical application, as well as product development status. Based on extensive investigation in the status of research and application of biological tissue engineering scaffold materials, a comprehensive analysis was made. Meanwhile, a detailed analysis of research and product development was presented. Considerable progress has been achieved in research, products transformation, clinical application, and supervision of biological scaffold for tissue engineering. New directions, new technology, and new products are constantly emerging. With the continuous progress of science and technology and continuous improvement of life sciences theory, the new direction and new focus still need to be continuously adjusted in order to meet the clinical needs. From the aspect of industrial transformation feasibility, acellular scaffolds and extracellular matrix are the most promising new growth of both research and product development in this field.

  17. Health, Safety, and Environment Division: Annual progress report 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, M.A.

    1988-04-01

    The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environment protection. These activities are designed to protect the worker, the public, and the environment. Many disciplines are required to meet the responsibilities, including radiation protection, industrial hygiene, safety, occupational medicine, environmental science, epidemiology, and waste management. New and challenging health and safety problems arise occasionally from the diverse research and development work of the Laboratory. Research programs in HSE Division often stem from these applied needs. These programs continue but are also extended, as needed to study specific problems for the Department of Energy and to help develop better occupational health and safety practices.

  18. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, A.B.

    1988-03-01

    The activities of this Division are concentrated in the areas of experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. A major activity within the Division is operation of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility as a national user facility. Highlights for this year, which include a record number of beam hours provided for research, are summarized. The experimental nuclear physics program continues to be dominated by research utilizing heavy ions. These activities, while continuing to center largely on the Holifield Facility, have seen growth in the use of facilities that provide intermediate energies (GANIL) and ultrarelativistic beams (CERN). The UNISOR program, since its inception, has been intimately associated with the Division and, most particularly, with the Holifield Facility. The experimental nuclear structure research of this consortium is included. In addition to the Holifield Facility, the Division also operates two smaller facilities, the EN Tandem and the ECR Ion Source Facility, as /open quotes/User Resources/close quotes/. The tandem continues a long history of supporting research in accelerator-based atomic physics. During this past year, new beam lines have been added to the ECR ion source to create user opportunities for atomic physics experiments with this unique device. These two facilities and the experimental programs in atomic physics are discussed. The efforts in theoretical physics, covering both nuclear and atomic physics, are presented. Also included is the theory effort in support of the UNISOR structure program. In addition to research with multicharged heavy ions from the ECR source, the effort on atomic physics in support of the controlled fusion program includes a plasma diagnostics development program and operation of an atomic physics data center. The nuclear physics program also operates a compilation and evaluation effort; this work is also described.

  19. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, A.B.

    1991-03-01

    The activities of this Division continue to be concentrated in the areas of experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. The Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility and its operation as a national user facility continued as the single largest activity within the Division. The experimental nuclear physics program continues to emphasize heavy ion studies, with much of the activity centered at the Holifield Facility. The work with heavy ions at ultrarelativistic energies continues at the CERN SPS. Studies at the Brookhaven AGS, particularly in preparation of future experiments at RHIC, have seen an increased emphasis. A major consortium has been formed to propose the design and construction of a dimuon detector as the basis for one the principal experiments for RHIC. Also included are results from the increasing effort in particle physics, including participation in the L* proposal for the SSC. The UNISOR program, since its inception, has been associated intimately with the Division and, most particularly, with the Holifield Facility. A major area of experimental research for the Division is atomic physics. This activity comprises two groups: one on accelerator-based atomic physics, centered primarily at the EN-tandem and the Holifield Facility, but extending this year to an experiment at ultrarelativistic energies at the CERN SPS; and one on atomic physics in support of fusion energy, based primarily at the ECR ion source facility. Included in this section is also a description of a new effort in multicharged ion-surface interactions, and details of a planned upgrade of the ECR source.

  20. Regulation of cell division in higher plants. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, T.W.

    1992-07-01

    Cell division is arguably the most fundamental of all developmental processes. In higher plants, mitotic activity is largely confined to foci of patterned cell divisions called meristems. From these perpetually embryonic tissues arise the plant`s essential organs of light capture, support, protection and reproduction. Once an adequate understanding of plant cell mitotic regulation is attained, unprecedented opportunities will ensue for analyzing and genetically controlling diverse aspects of development, including plant architecture, leaf shape, plant height, and root depth. The mitotic cycle in a variety of model eukaryotic systems in under the control of a regulatory network of striking evolutionary conservation. Homologues of the yeast cdc2 gene, its catalytic product, p34, and the cyclin regulatory subunits of the MPF complex have emerged as ubiquitous mitotic regulators. We have cloned cdc2-like and cyclin genes from pea. As in other eukaryotic model systems, p34 of Pisum sativum is a subunit of a high molecular weight complex which binds the fission yeast p13 protein and displays histone H1 kinase activity in vitro. Our primary objective in this study is to gain baseline information about the regulation of this higher plant cell division control complex in non-dividing, differentiated cells as well as in synchronous and asynchronous mitotic cells. We are investigating cdc2 and cyclin expression at the levels of protein abundance, protein phosphorylation and quaternary associations.

  1. Advanced Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, A.K.; Cerbone, R.J.; Sastre, C.

    1980-06-01

    The Advanced Reactor Safety Research Programs quarterly progress report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: HTGR Safety Evaluation, SSC Code Development, LMFBR Safety Experiments, and Fast Reactor Safety Code Validation.

  2. Advanced Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, April 1-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, A.J.

    1980-01-01

    The Advanced Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Progress Report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: HTGR safety evaluation, SSC Code Development, LMFBR Safety Experiments, and Fast Reactor Safety Code Validation.

  3. The molecular biology capstone assessment: a concept assessment for upper-division molecular biology students.

    PubMed

    Couch, Brian A; Wood, William B; Knight, Jennifer K

    2015-03-02

    Measuring students' conceptual understandings has become increasingly important to biology faculty members involved in evaluating and improving departmental programs. We developed the Molecular Biology Capstone Assessment (MBCA) to gauge comprehension of fundamental concepts in molecular and cell biology and the ability to apply these concepts in novel scenarios. Targeted at graduating students, the MBCA consists of 18 multiple-true/false (T/F) questions. Each question consists of a narrative stem followed by four T/F statements, which allows a more detailed assessment of student understanding than the traditional multiple-choice format. Questions were iteratively developed with extensive faculty and student feedback, including validation through faculty reviews and response validation through student interviews. The final assessment was taken online by 504 students in upper-division courses at seven institutions. Data from this administration indicate that the MBCA has acceptable levels of internal reliability (α=0.80) and test-retest stability (r=0.93). Students achieved a wide range of scores with a 67% overall average. Performance results suggest that students have an incomplete understanding of many molecular biology concepts and continue to hold incorrect conceptions previously documented among introductory-level students. By pinpointing areas of conceptual difficulty, the MBCA can provide faculty members with guidance for improving undergraduate biology programs.

  4. The Molecular Biology Capstone Assessment: A Concept Assessment for Upper-Division Molecular Biology Students

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Brian A.; Wood, William B.; Knight, Jennifer K.

    2015-01-01

    Measuring students’ conceptual understandings has become increasingly important to biology faculty members involved in evaluating and improving departmental programs. We developed the Molecular Biology Capstone Assessment (MBCA) to gauge comprehension of fundamental concepts in molecular and cell biology and the ability to apply these concepts in novel scenarios. Targeted at graduating students, the MBCA consists of 18 multiple-true/false (T/F) questions. Each question consists of a narrative stem followed by four T/F statements, which allows a more detailed assessment of student understanding than the traditional multiple-choice format. Questions were iteratively developed with extensive faculty and student feedback, including validation through faculty reviews and response validation through student interviews. The final assessment was taken online by 504 students in upper-division courses at seven institutions. Data from this administration indicate that the MBCA has acceptable levels of internal reliability (α = 0.80) and test–retest stability (r = 0.93). Students achieved a wide range of scores with a 67% overall average. Performance results suggest that students have an incomplete understanding of many molecular biology concepts and continue to hold incorrect conceptions previously documented among introductory-level students. By pinpointing areas of conceptual difficulty, the MBCA can provide faculty members with guidance for improving undergraduate biology programs. PMID:25713098

  5. Cell biological regulation of division fate in vertebrate neuroepithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Willardsen, Minde I; Link, Brian A

    2011-08-01

    The developing nervous system derives from neuroepithelial progenitor cells that divide to generate all of the mature neuronal types. For the proper complement of cell types to form, the progenitors must produce postmitotic cells, yet also replenish the progenitor pool. Progenitor divisions can be classified into three general types: symmetric proliferative (producing two progenitors), asymmetric neurogenic (producing one progenitor and one postmitotic cell), and symmetric neurogenic (producing two postmitotic cells). The appropriate ratios for these modes of cell division require intrinsic polarity, which is one of the characteristics that define neuroepithelial progenitor cells. The type of division an individual progenitor undergoes can be influenced by cellular features, or behaviors, which are heterogeneous within the population of progenitors. Here we review three key cellular parameters, asymmetric inheritance, cell cycle kinetics, and interkinetic nuclear migration, and the possible mechanisms for how these features influence progenitor fates.

  6. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to provide an archival record of the activities of the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division during the period September 1, 1989 through March 31, 1991. Earlier reports in this series are identified on the previous pages, along with the progress reports describing ORNL's research on the mathematical sciences prior to 1984 when those activities moved into the division. As in previous reports, our research is described through abstracts of journal articles, technical reports, and presentations. Summary lists of publications and presentations, staff additions and departures, scientific and professional activities of division staff, and technical conferences organized and sponsored by the division are included as appendices. The report is organized following the division of our research among four sections and information centers. These research areas are: Mathematical Sciences; Nuclear Data Measurement and Evaluations; Intelligent Systems; Nuclear Analysis and Shielding; and Engineering Physics Information Center.

  7. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, A.B.

    1986-04-01

    This report covers the research and development activities of the Physics Division for the 1985 fiscal year. The research activities were centered on experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. The experimental nuclear physics program is dominated by heavy ion research. A major part of this effort is the responsibility for operating the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility as a national user facility. A major new activity described is the preparation for participation in an ultrarelativistic heavy ion experiment to be performed at CERN in 1986. The experimental atomic physics program has two components: the accelerator-based studies of basic collisional phenomena and the studies in support of the controlled fusion program. Also associated with the fusion-related studies are a plasma diagnostics program and the operation of an atomic physics data center. Theory efforts associated with the UNISOR program are described, as well as smaller programs in applications and high-energy physics. (LEW)

  8. Physics Division annual progress report, January 1-December 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Trela, W.J.

    1984-12-01

    The Physics Division is organized into three major research areas: Weapons Physics, Inertial Fusion Physics, and Basic Research. In Weapons Physics, new strategic defensive research initiatives were developed in response to President Reagan's speech in May 1983. Significant advances have been made in high-speed diagnostics including electro-optic technique, fiber-optic systems, and imaging. In Inertial Fusion, the 40-kJ Antares CO/sub 2/ laser facility was completed, and the 1- by 1- by 2-m-long large-aperture module amplifier (LAM) was constructed and operated. In Basic Research, our main emphasis was on development of the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility as a world-class pulsed neutron research facility

  9. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, A.B.

    1985-01-01

    The research activities of the Division are centered primarily in three areas: experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. The largest of these efforts, experimental nuclear physics, is dominated by the heavy ion research program. A major responsibility under this program is the operation of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility as a national user facility. During the period of this report, the facility has begun routine operation for the experimental program. The experimental atomic physics program has two components: the accelerator-based studies of basic collisional phenomena and the studies in support of the controlled fusion program. Also associated with the fusion-related studies are a plasma diagnostics program and the operation of an atomic physics data center. The theoretical physics program, both nuclear and atomic, is covered. This program has benefited this year from the success of the VAX-AP computer system and from the increase in manpower provided by the ORNL/University of Tennessee Distinguished Scientist Program. Smaller programs in applications and high-energy physics are summarized. During the period of this report, we continued to explore possible future extensions of the Holifield Facility. We retain a strong interest in a relativistic heavy-ion collider in the 10 x 10 GeV/nuclear energy range. The ideas for such a facility, described in last year's report, have been modified to utilize the HHIRF 25 MV tandem accelerator as the first stage. Finally, the report concludes with some general information on publications, Division activities, and personnel changes.

  10. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Shultz, W.D.

    1986-05-01

    Progress reports are presented for the four major sections of the division: analytical spectroscopy, radioactive materials laboratories, inorganic chemistry, and organic chemistry. A brief discussion of the division's role in the Laboratory's Environmental Restoration and Facilities Upgrade is given. Information about quality assurance and safety programs is presented, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited.

  11. Instrumentation and Controls Division progress report for the period July 1, 1988 to June 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Klobe, L.E.

    1990-12-01

    The format of this Instrumentation and Controls Division progress report is a major departure from previous reports. This report has been published in two volumes instead of one, and the description of individual activities have been shortened considerably to make it easier document to scan and to read. Volume 1 of this report presents brief descriptions of a few highly significant programmatic and technological efforts representative of Instrumentation and Controls Division activities over the past two years. This volume contains information concerning the publications, presentations, and other professional activities and achievements of I C Division staff members.

  12. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units is a section devoted to lists of information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts environmental research and analyses associated with both energy technology development and the interactions between people and the environment. The division engages in basic and applied research for a diverse list of sponsors. While the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the primary sponsor ESD staff also perform research for other federal agencies, state agencies, and private industry. The division works collaboratively with federal agencies, universities, and private organizations in achieving its research objectives and hosts a large number of visiting investigators from these organizations. Given the diverse interdisciplinary specialization of its staff, ESD provides technical expertise on complex environmental problems and renders technical leadership for major environmental issues of national and local concern. This progress report highlights many of ESD`s accomplishment in these and other areas in FY 1991.

  13. Physics Division progress report for period ending June 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    Progress is reported in detail in the following areas: Holifield Heavy-Ion Research Facility, nuclear physics, the UNISOR program, neutron physics, theoretical physics, the Nuclear Data Project, atomic and plasma physics, and high energy physics. Publications are listed. Separate abstracts were prepared for 34 papers. (WHK)

  14. Physics Division progress report, January 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hollen, G.Y.; Schappert, G.T.

    1994-07-01

    This report discusses its following topics: Recent Weapons-Physics Experiments on the Pegasus II Pulsed Power Facility; Operation of a Large-Scale Plasma Source Ion Implantation Experiment; Production of Charm and Beauty Mesons at Fermilab Sudbury Neutrino Observatory; P-Division`s Essential Role in the Redirected Inertial Confinement Fusion Program; Trident Target Physics Program; Comparative Studies of Brain Activation with Magnetocephalography and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Cellular Communication, Interaction of G-Proteins, and Single-Photon Detection; Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of Oxygen-doped La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4+{delta}} Thermoacoustic Engines; A Shipborne Raman Water-Vapor Lidar for the Central Pacific Experiment; Angara-5 Pinch Temperature Verification with Time-resolved Spectroscopy; Russian Collaborations on Megagauss Magnetic Fields and Pulsed-Power Applications; Studies of Energy Coupling from Underground Explosions; Trapping and Cooling Large Numbers of Antiprotons: A First Step Toward the Measurement of Gravity on Antimatter; and Nuclear-Energy Production Without a Long-Term High-Level Waste Stream.

  15. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending June 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Brogden, I.

    1984-09-01

    This progress report covers the research and development activities of the Metals and Ceramics Division from January 1, 1983, through June 30, 1984. The format of the report follows the organizational structure of the division. Short summaries of technical work in progress in the various experimental groups are presented in six parts. Chapter 1 deals with the research and development activities of the Engineering Materials Section, Chapter 2 with the Processing Science and Technology Section, Chapter 3 with the Materials Science Section, Chapter 4 with Project Activities, Chapter 5 with Specialized Research Facilities and Equipment, and Chapter 6 with Miscellaneous Activities.

  16. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units is a section devoted to lists of information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts environmental research and analyses associated with both energy technology development and the interactions between people and the environment. The division engages in basic and applied research for a diverse list of sponsors. While the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the primary sponsor ESD staff also perform research for other federal agencies, state agencies, and private industry. The division works collaboratively with federal agencies, universities, and private organizations in achieving its research objectives and hosts a large number of visiting investigators from these organizations. Given the diverse interdisciplinary specialization of its staff, ESD provides technical expertise on complex environmental problems and renders technical leadership for major environmental issues of national and local concern. This progress report highlights many of ESD's accomplishment in these and other areas in FY 1991.

  17. Conceptual Barriers to Progress Within Evolutionary Biology

    PubMed Central

    Laland, Kevin N.; Odling-Smee, John; Feldman, Marcus W.; Kendal, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    In spite of its success, Neo-Darwinism is faced with major conceptual barriers to further progress, deriving directly from its metaphysical foundations. Most importantly, neo-Darwinism fails to recognize a fundamental cause of evolutionary change, “niche construction”. This failure restricts the generality of evolutionary theory, and introduces inaccuracies. It also hinders the integration of evolutionary biology with neighbouring disciplines, including ecosystem ecology, developmental biology, and the human sciences. Ecology is forced to become a divided discipline, developmental biology is stubbornly difficult to reconcile with evolutionary theory, and the majority of biologists and social scientists are still unhappy with evolutionary accounts of human behaviour. The incorporation of niche construction as both a cause and a product of evolution removes these disciplinary boundaries while greatly generalizing the explanatory power of evolutionary theory. PMID:21572912

  18. Solid State Division progress report, September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-01

    Progress made during the 19 months from March 1, 1980, through September 30, 1981, is reported in the following areas: theoretical solid state physics (surfaces, electronic and magnetic properties, particle-solid interactions, and laser annealing); surface and near-surface properties of solids (plasma materials interactions, ion-solid interactions, pulsed laser annealing, and semiconductor physics and photovoltaic conversion); defects in solids (radiation effects, fracture, and defects and impurities in insulating crystals); transport properties of solids (fast-ion conductors, superconductivity, and physical properties of insulating materials); neutron scattering (small-angle scattering, lattice dynamics, and magnetic properties); crystal growth and characterization (nuclear waste forms, ferroelectric mateirals, high-temperature materials, and special materials); and isotope research materials. Publications and papers are listed. (WHK)

  19. Engineering Physics Division progress report period ending May 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-07-01

    Progress is described in the following areas: nuclear cross sections and related quantities; methods for generating and validating multigroup cross-section libraries; methods for reactor and shield analysis; methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis; integral experiments and nuclear analyses (integral experiments supporting fusion reactor designs, nuclear analyses supporting fusion reactor designs, high-energy particle transport calculations, integral experiments supporting gas-cooled fast breeder reactor designs, nuclear analyses supporting gas-cooled reactor designs, nuclear analyses supporting utilization of light-water reactors, and integral experiment analyses supporting surveillance dosimetry improvement program); energy economics modeling and analysis; safety and reliability assessments for nuclear power reactors; and information analysis and distribution. Publications and papers presented are listed. (WHK)

  20. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1993, which extended from October 1, 1992, through September 30, 1993. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units are sections highlighting ESD Scientific, Technical, and Administrative Achievement awards and listing information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. An organizational chart of staff and long-term guests who were in ESD and the end of FY 1993 is located in the final section of the report.

  1. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1994, which extended from October 1, 1993, through September 30, 1994. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units are sections highlighting ESD Scientific, Technical, and Administrative Achievement awards and listing information necessary to covey the scope of the work in the division. An organizational chart of staff and long-term guests who wee in ESD at the end of FY 1994 is located in the final section of the report.

  2. Health and Safety Research Division progress report, October 1, 1988--March 31, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) continues to maintain an outstanding program of basic and applied research displaying a high level of creativity and achievement as documented by awards, publications, professional service, and successful completion of variety of projects. Our focus is on human health and the scientific basis for measurement and assessment of health-related impacts of energy technologies. It is our custom to publish a division progress report every 18 months that summarizes our programmatic progress and other measures of achievement over the reporting period. Since it is not feasible to summarize in detail all of our work over the period covered by this report (October 1, 1988, to March 30, 1990), we intend this document to point the way to the expensive open literature that documents our findings. During the reporting period the Division continued to maintain strong programs in its traditional areas of R D, but also achieved noteworthy progress in other areas. Much of the Division's work on site characterization, development of new field instruments, compilation of data bases, and methodology development fits into this initiative. Other new work in tunneling microscopy in support of DOE's Human Genome Program and the comprehensive R D work related to surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy have attained new and exciting results. These examples of our progress and numerous other activities are highlighted in this report.

  3. Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's biomedical and environmental research programs. Progress report, January-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, L.M.; Stafford, C.G.; Bolen, S.K.

    1981-09-01

    Highlights of research progress accomplished in the Life Sciences Division during the year ending December 1980 are summarized. Reports from the following groups are included: Toxicology, Biophysics, Genetics; Environmental Pathology, Organic Chemistry, and Environmental Sciences. Individual abstracts have been prepared for 46 items for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (RJC)

  4. Water Reactor Safety Research Division quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, A.J.

    1980-06-01

    The Water Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: LWR Thermal Hydraulic Development, Advanced Code Evaluation, TRAC Code Assessment, and Stress Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubing.

  5. Water Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, April 1-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Abuaf, N.; Levine, M.M.; Saha, P.; van Rooyen, D.

    1980-08-01

    The Water Reactor Safety Research Programs quarterly report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: LWR Thermal Hydraulic Development, Advanced Code Evlauation, TRAC Code Assessment, and Stress Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubing.

  6. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, J.N.

    1992-04-01

    The Energy Division is one of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge Laboratory. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY 1991. The division`s total expenditures in FY 1991 were $39.1 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 124 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The Energy Division`s programmatic activities focus on three major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities cover energy and resource analysis, the preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, analysis of emergency preparedness for natural and technological disasters, analysis of the energy and environmental needs of developing countries, technology transfer, and analysis of civilian transportation. Energy conservation technologies include electric power systems, building equipment (thermally activated heat pumps, advanced refrigeration systems, novel cycles), building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and technical issues for improving energy efficiency in existing buildings. Military transportation systems concentrate on research for sponsors within the US military on improving the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination.

  7. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a large and diversified organization. As such, it serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside of ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: (1) Analytical Research, Development, and Implementation. The division maintains a program to conceptualize, investigate, develop, assess, improve, and implement advanced technology for chemical and physicochemical measurements. Emphasis is on problems and needs identified with ORNL and Department of Energy (DOE) programs; however, attention is also given to advancing the analytical sciences themselves. (2) Programmatic Research, Development, and Utilization. The division carries out a wide variety of chemical work that typically involves analytical research and/or development plus the utilization of analytical capabilities to expedite programmatic interests. (3) Technical Support. The division performs chemical and physicochemical analyses of virtually all types. The Analytical Chemistry Division is organized into four major sections, each of which may carry out any of the three types of work mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 4 of this report highlight progress within the four sections during the period January 1 to December 31, 1988. A brief discussion of the division's role in an especially important environmental program is given in Chapter 5. Information about quality assurance, safety, and training programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8.

  8. Intrinsic noise and division cycle effects on an abstract biological oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatakis, Michail; Mantzaris, Nikos V.

    2010-09-01

    Oscillatory dynamics are common in biological pathways, emerging from the coupling of positive and negative feedback loops. Due to the small numbers of molecules typically contained in cellular volumes, stochastic effects may play an important role in system behavior. Thus, for moderate noise strengths, stochasticity has been shown to enhance signal-to-noise ratios or even induce oscillations in a class of phenomena referred to as "stochastic resonance" and "coherence resonance," respectively. Furthermore, the biological oscillators are subject to influences from the division cycle of the cell. In this paper we consider a biologically relevant oscillator and investigate the effect of intrinsic noise as well as division cycle which encompasses the processes of growth, DNA duplication, and cell division. We first construct a minimal reaction network which can oscillate in the presence of large or negligible timescale separation. We then derive corresponding deterministic and stochastic models and compare their dynamical behaviors with respect to (i) the extent of the parameter space where each model can exhibit oscillatory behavior and (ii) the oscillation characteristics, namely, the amplitude and the period. We further incorporate division cycle effects on both models and investigate the effect of growth rate on system behavior. Our results show that in the presence but not in the absence of large timescale separation, coherence resonance effects result in extending the oscillatory region and lowering the period for the stochastic model. When the division cycle is taken into account, the oscillatory region of the deterministic model is shown to extend or shrink for moderate or high growth rates, respectively. Further, under the influence of the division cycle, the stochastic model can oscillate for parameter sets for which the deterministic model does not. The division cycle is also found to be able to resonate with the oscillator, thereby enhancing oscillation

  9. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Counce, D.M.; Wolff, P.P.

    1993-04-01

    Energy Division`s mission is to provide innovative solutions to energy and related Issues of national and global importance through interdisciplinary research and development. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY 1992. Energy Division`s total expenditures in FY 1992 were $42.8 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, the US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 116.5 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The division`s programmatic activities cover three main areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities involve energy and resource analysis, preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, technology transfer, analysis of energy and environmental needs in developing countries, and civilian transportation analysis. Energy conservation technologies focus on electric power systems, building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and methods to improve energy efficiency in existing buildings. Military transportation systems conduct research for sponsors within the US military to improve the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination. Much of Energy Division`s research is valuable to other organizations as well as to sponsors. This information is disseminated by the staff`s involvement in professional and trade organizations and workshops; joint research with universities and private-sector firms; collaboration with state and local governments; presentation of work at conferences; and publication of research results in journals, reports, and conference proceedings.

  10. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, P.P.

    1994-07-01

    One of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Energy Division`s mission is to provide innovative solutions to energy and related issues of national and global importance through interdisciplinary research and development. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY1993. Energy Division is committed to (1) understanding the mechanisms by which societies make choices in energy use; (2) improving society`s understanding of the environmental, social, and economic implications of technological change; (3) developing and transferring energy-efficient technologies; (4) improving transportation policy and planning; (5) enhancing basic knowledge in the social sciences as related to energy and associated issues. Energy Division`s expenditures in FY1993 totaled $42 million. The work was supported by the US DOE, DOD, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 126.5 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and computer sciences and data systems. The division`s programmatic activities cover three main areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy use and delivery technologies, and (3) transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities involve energy and resource analysis, preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on emergency preparedness, transportation analysis, and analysis of energy and environmental needs in developing countries. Energy use and delivery technologies focus on electric power systems, building equipment, building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and methods to improve energy efficiency in existing buildings. Transportation systems research is conducted both to improve the quality of civilian transportation and for sponsors within the US military to improve the efficiency of deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination.

  11. Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) FY 2001 Progress Report Environment, Safety, and Health (ESH) Division

    SciTech Connect

    L.G. Hoffman; K. Alvar; T. Buhl; E. Foltyn; W. Hansen; B. Erdal; P. Fresquez; D. Lee; B. Reinert

    2002-05-01

    This progress report presents the results of 11 projects funded ($500K) in FY01 by the Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) Committee of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division (ESH). Five projects fit into the Health Physics discipline, 5 projects are environmental science and one is industrial hygiene/safety. As a result of their TDEA-funded projects, investigators have published sixteen papers in professional journals, proceedings, or Los Alamos reports and presented their work at professional meetings. Supplement funds and in-kind contributions, such as staff time, instrument use, and workspace, were also provided to TDEA-funded projects by organizations external to ESH Divisions.

  12. Chemical Technology Division progress report, July 1, 1991--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Genung, R.K.; Hightower, J.R.; Bell, J.T.

    1993-05-01

    This progress report reviews the mission of the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) and presents a summary of organizational structure, programmatic sponsors, and funding levels for the period July 1, 1991, through December 31, 1992. The report also summarizes the missions and activities of organizations within Chem Tech for the reporting period. Specific projects performed within Chem Tech`s energy research programs, waste and environmental programs, and radiochemical processing programs are highlighted. Special programmatic activities conducted by the division are identified and described. Other information regarding publications, patents, awards, and conferences organized by Chem Tech staff is also included.

  13. Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) FY 1999 Progress Report, Environment, Safety, and Health (ESH) Division

    SciTech Connect

    Larry G. Hoffman

    2000-12-01

    This progress report presents the results of 10 projects funded ($500K) in FY99 by the Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) Committee of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division. Five are new projects for this year; seven projects have been completed in their third and final TDEA-funded year. As a result of their TDEA-funded projects, investigators have published thirty-four papers in professional journals, proceedings, or Los Alamos reports and presented their work at professional meetings. Supplemental funds and in-kind contributions, such as staff time, instrument use, and work space, were also provided to TDEA-funded projects by organizations external to ESH Division.

  14. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual research summary, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, S.H.

    1984-08-01

    This research summary contains brief descriptions of research in the following areas: (1) mechanisms of hepatocarcinogenesis; (2) role of metals in cocarcinogenesis and the use of liposomes for metal mobilization; (3) control of mutagenesis and cell differentiation in cultured cells by tumor promoters; (4) radiation effects in mammalian cells; (5) radiation carcinogenesis and radioprotectors; (6) life shortening, tumor induction, and tissue dose for fission-neutron and gamma-ray irradiations; (7) mammalian genetics and biostatistics; (8) radiation toxicity studies; (9) hematopoiesis in chronic toxicity; (10) molecular biology studies; (11) chemical toxicology; (12) carcinogen identification and metabolism; (13) metal metabolism and toxicity; and (14) neurobehavioral chronobiology. (ACR)

  15. Progress in nemertean biology: development and phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Turbeville, J M

    2002-07-01

    This paper reviews progress in developmental biology and phylogeny of the Nemertea, a common but poorly studied spiralian taxon of considerable ecological and evolutionary significance. Analyses of reproductive biology (including calcium dynamics during fertilization and oocyte maturation), larval morphology and development and developmental genetics have significantly extended our knowledge of spiralian developmental biology. Developmental genetics studies have in addition provided characters useful for reconstructing metazoan phylogeny. Reinvestigation of the cell lineage of Cerebratulus lacteus using fluorescent tracers revealed that endomesoderm forms from the 4d cell as in other spiralians and that ectomesoderm is derived from the 3a and 3b cells as in annelids, echiurans and molluscs. Studies examining blastomere specification show that cell fates are established precociously in direct developers and later in indirect developers. Morphological characters used to estimate the phylogenetic position of nemerteans are critically re-evaluated, and cladistic analyses of morphology reveal that conflicting hypotheses of nemertean relationships result because of different provisional homology statements. Analyses that include disputed homology statements (1, gliointerstitial cell system 2, coelomic circulatory system) suggest that nemerteans form the sister taxon to the coelomate spiralian taxa rather than the sister taxon to Platyhelminthes. Analyses of small subunit rRNA (18S rDNA) sequences alone or in combination with morphological characters support the inclusion of the nemerteans in a spiralian coelomate clade nested within a more inclusive lophotrochozoan clade. Ongoing evaluation of nemertean relationships with mitochondrial gene rearrangements and other molecular characters is discussed.

  16. Recent progress in mode-division multiplexed passive optical networks with low modal crosstalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juhao; Ren, Fang; Hu, Tao; Li, Zhengbin; He, Yongqi; Chen, Zhangyuan; Mo, Qi; Li, Guifang

    2017-02-01

    Recently, mode-division multiplexing (MDM) has been investigated in transmission systems and optical access networks for capacity enhancement. In this paper, recent progress in MDM optical passive networks (PONs) enabled by low-modal crosstalk few-mode fibers (FMFs) and optical components is reviewed. All-fiber mode multiplexer/demultiplexers (MUX/DeMUX) composed of mode-selective couplers (MSCs) are introduced to simultaneously multiplex or demultiplex multiple modes. Few-mode circulators (FMCs) are employed to realize bidirectional MDM-PON transmission. Direct detection without complex multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) digital signal processing (DSP) is applied. Moreover, multidimensional PONs by cascading MDM optical distribution network (ODN) with conventional time-division multiplexing (TDM) and wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) ODNs are proposed and experimentally demonstrated.

  17. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Selden, R.H.

    1991-06-01

    The Energy Division is one of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The goals and accomplishments of the Energy Division are described in this annual progress report for FY 1990. The Energy Division is a multidisciplinary research organization committed to (1) increasing the knowledge and understanding of how societies make choices in energy use; (2) improving society's understanding of the environmental, social, and economic implications of technological change; (3) developing and transferring energy efficient technologies; and (4) developing improved transportation planning and policy. Disciplines of the 129 staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The Energy Division's programmatic activities focus on three major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities cover energy and resource analysis, the preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, analysis of emergency preparedness for natural and technological disasters, analysis of the energy and environmental needs of developing countries, technology transfer, and analysis of civilian transportation. Energy conservation technologies include building equipment (thermally activated heat pumps, chemical heat pumps, refrigeration systems, novel cycles), building enveloped (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), retrofits for existing buildings, and electric power systems. Military transportation systems concentrate on research for sponsors within the US military on improving the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination. 48 refs., 34 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. Biology and Medicine Division annual report, 1981-1982. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 61 research reports in the 1981-1982 annual report for the Biology and Medicine Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Programs reviewed include research medicine, Donner Pavilion, environmental physiology, radiation biophysics and structural biophysics. (KRM)

  19. Instructor Feedback in Upper-Division Biology Courses: Moving from Spelling and Syntax to Scientific Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szymanski, Erika Amethyst

    2014-01-01

    In this study, I present an analysis of instructor comments on assignments written for upper-division courses in the biological sciences as a window into current practices around teaching science writing to major students. My results demonstrate that, while the overwhelming majority of instructors respond primarily to lower order issues of grammar…

  20. Instrumentation and Controls Division Progress report, July 1, 1992--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, D.W.

    1995-06-01

    The Instrumentation and Controls (I&C) Division serves a national laboratory, and as such has an expansive domain: science, industry, and national defense. The core mission is to support the scientific apparatus of the Laboratory and all of the systems that protect the safety and health of people and the environment. Progress is reported for the five sections: photonics and measurements systems, electronic systems, signal processing, controls and systems integration, and technical support.

  1. Health and Safety Research Division progress report, July 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This report summarizes progress made for the period July 1984 through September 1985. Sections describe research in health studies, dosimetry and biophysical transport, biological and radiation physics, chemical physics, and risk analysis. (ACR)

  2. Evolutionary Cell Biology of Division Mode in the Bacterial Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobia- Chlamydiae Superphylum

    PubMed Central

    Rivas-Marín, Elena; Canosa, Inés; Devos, Damien P.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria from the Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Chlamydiae (PVC) superphylum are exceptions to the otherwise dominant mode of division by binary fission, which is based on the interaction between the FtsZ protein and the peptidoglycan (PG) biosynthesis machinery. Some PVC bacteria are deprived of the FtsZ protein and were also thought to lack PG. How these bacteria divide is still one of the major mysteries of microbiology. The presence of PG has recently been revealed in Planctomycetes and Chlamydiae, and proteins related to PG synthesis have been shown to be implicated in the division process in Chlamydiae, providing important insights into PVC mechanisms of division. Here, we review the historical lack of observation of PG in PVC bacteria, its recent detection in two phyla and its involvement in chlamydial cell division. Based on the detection of PG-related proteins in PVC proteomes, we consider the possible evolution of the diverse division mechanisms in these bacteria. We conclude by summarizing what is known and what remains to be understood about the evolutionary cell biology of PVC division modes. PMID:28018303

  3. Evolutionary Cell Biology of Division Mode in the Bacterial Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobia- Chlamydiae Superphylum.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Marín, Elena; Canosa, Inés; Devos, Damien P

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria from the Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Chlamydiae (PVC) superphylum are exceptions to the otherwise dominant mode of division by binary fission, which is based on the interaction between the FtsZ protein and the peptidoglycan (PG) biosynthesis machinery. Some PVC bacteria are deprived of the FtsZ protein and were also thought to lack PG. How these bacteria divide is still one of the major mysteries of microbiology. The presence of PG has recently been revealed in Planctomycetes and Chlamydiae, and proteins related to PG synthesis have been shown to be implicated in the division process in Chlamydiae, providing important insights into PVC mechanisms of division. Here, we review the historical lack of observation of PG in PVC bacteria, its recent detection in two phyla and its involvement in chlamydial cell division. Based on the detection of PG-related proteins in PVC proteomes, we consider the possible evolution of the diverse division mechanisms in these bacteria. We conclude by summarizing what is known and what remains to be understood about the evolutionary cell biology of PVC division modes.

  4. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, J.N.

    1992-04-01

    The Energy Division is one of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge Laboratory. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY 1991. The division's total expenditures in FY 1991 were $39.1 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 124 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The Energy Division's programmatic activities focus on three major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities cover energy and resource analysis, the preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, analysis of emergency preparedness for natural and technological disasters, analysis of the energy and environmental needs of developing countries, technology transfer, and analysis of civilian transportation. Energy conservation technologies include electric power systems, building equipment (thermally activated heat pumps, advanced refrigeration systems, novel cycles), building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and technical issues for improving energy efficiency in existing buildings. Military transportation systems concentrate on research for sponsors within the US military on improving the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination.

  5. Solid State Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W.

    1994-08-01

    This report covers research progress in the Solid State Division from April 1, 1992, to September 30, 1993. During this period, the division conducted a broad, interdisciplinary materials research program with emphasis on theoretical solid state physics, neutron scattering, synthesis and characterization of materials, ion beam and laser processing, and the structure of solids and surfaces. This research effort was enhanced by new capabilities in atomic-scale materials characterization, new emphasis on the synthesis and processing of materials, and increased partnering with industry and universities. The theoretical effort included a broad range of analytical studies, as well as a new emphasis on numerical simulation stimulated by advances in high-performance computing and by strong interest in related division experimental programs. Superconductivity research continued to advance on a broad front from fundamental mechanisms of high-temperature superconductivity to the development of new materials and processing techniques. The Neutron Scattering Program was characterized by a strong scientific user program and growing diversity represented by new initiatives in complex fluids and residual stress. The national emphasis on materials synthesis and processing was mirrored in division research programs in thin-film processing, surface modification, and crystal growth. Research on advanced processing techniques such as laser ablation, ion implantation, and plasma processing was complemented by strong programs in the characterization of materials and surfaces including ultrahigh resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, atomic-resolution chemical analysis, synchrotron x-ray research, and scanning tunneling microscopy.

  6. Fusion Energy Division progress report, 1 January 1990--31 December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

    1994-03-01

    The Fusion Program of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a major part of the national fusion program, encompasses nearly all areas of magnetic fusion research. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an economical and environmentally attractive energy source for the future. The program involves staff from ORNL, Martin Marietta Energy systems, Inc., private industry, the academic community, and other fusion laboratories, in the US and abroad. Achievements resulting from this collaboration are documented in this report, which is issued as the progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division; it also contains information from components for the Fusion Program that are external to the division (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program include the following: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts; engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling; development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments; assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects; development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas; development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas; development and testing of materials for fusion devices; and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas (about 15% of the Division`s activities). Highlights from program activities during 1990 and 1991 are presented.

  7. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1988: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    The goals and accomplishments of the Energy Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory are described in this annual progress report for Fiscal Year (FY) 1988. The Energy Division is a multidisciplinary research organization committed to (1) increasing the knowledge and understanding of the way society makes choices in energy use and energy-using technologies, (2) improving society's understanding of the environmental implications of changes in energy technology, and (3) improving and developing new energy-efficient technologies. The Energy Division's programmatic activities focus on four major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) transportation and decision systems research, (3) technology research and development for improving the efficiency of energy and end-use technologies, and (4) electric power systems. The Division's total expenditures in FY 1988 were $44.3 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 139 staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics.

  8. [Progress in synthetic biology of "973 Funding Program" in China].

    PubMed

    Chen, Guoqiang; Wang, Ying

    2015-06-01

    This paper reviews progresses made in China from 2011 in areas of "Synthetic Biology" supported by State Basic Research 973 Program. Till the end of 2014, 9 "synthetic biology" projects have been initiated with emphasis on "microbial manufactures" with the 973 Funding Program. Combined with the very recent launch of one project on "mammalian cell synthetic biology" and another on "plant synthetic biology", Chinese "synthetic biology" research reflects its focus on "manufactures" while not giving up efforts on "synthetic biology" of complex systems.

  9. Analytical Chemistry Division. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, W. S.

    1982-04-01

    The functions of the Analytical Chemistry Division fall into three general categories: (1) analytical research, development, and implementation; (2) programmatic research, development and utilization; (3) technical support. The Division is organized into five major sections each of which may carry out any type of work falling into the thre categories mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 5 of this report highlight progress within the five sections which are: analytical methodology; mass and emission spectrometry; analytical technical support; bio/organic analysis section; and nuclear and radiochemical analysis. A short summary introduces each chapter to indicate work scope. Information about quality assurance and safety programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Chapter 7 covers supplementary activities. Chapter 8 is on presentation of research results (publications, articles reviewed or referred for periodicals). Approximately 56 articles, 31 proceedings publications and 33 reports have been published, and 119 oral presentations given during this reporting period.

  10. Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) FY 1998 Progress Report Environment, Safety, and Health (ESH) Division

    SciTech Connect

    Larry G. Hoffman; Kenneth Alvar; Thomas Buhl; Bruce Erdal; Philip Fresquez; Elizabeth Foltyn; Wayne Hansen; Bruce Reinert

    1999-06-01

    This progress report presents the results of 10 projects funded ($504K) in FY98 by the Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) Committee of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division. Nine projects are new for this year; two projects were completed in their third and final TDEA-funded year. As a result of their TDEA-funded projects, investigators have published 19 papers in professional journals, proceedings, or Los Alamos reports and presented their work at professional meetings. Supplemental funds and in-kind contributions, such as staff time, instrument use, and work space were also provided to the TDEA-funded projects by organizations external to ESH Division. Products generated from the projects funded in FY98 included a new extremity dosimeter that replaced the previously used finger-ring dosimeters, a light and easy-to-use detector to measure energy deposited by neutron interactions, and a device that will allow workers to determine the severity of a hazard.

  11. Chemical Technology Division: Progress report, January 1, 1987--June 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development efforts conducted in the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) during the period January 1, 1987, to June 30, 1988. The following major areas are covered: waste management and environmental programs, radiochemical and reactor engineering programs, basic science and technology, Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs, and administrative resources and facilities. The Administrative Summary, an appendix, presents a comprehensive listing of publications, oral presentations, awards and recognitions, and patents of Chem Tech staff members during this period. A staffing level and financial summary and lists of seminars and Chem Tech consultants for the period are also included.

  12. Chemical Technology Division progress report, October 1, 1989--June 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This progress report reviews the mission of the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) and presents a summary of organizational structure, programmatic sponsors, and funding levels for the period October 1, 1988, through June 30, 1991. The report also summarizes the missions and activities of organizations within Chem Tech for the reporting period. Specific projects performed within Chem Tech`s energy research programs, waste and environmental programs, and radiochemical processing programs are highlighted. Other information regarding publications, patents, awards, and conferences organized by Chem Tech staff is also included.

  13. Chemical Technology Division progress report, October 1, 1989--June 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This progress report reviews the mission of the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) and presents a summary of organizational structure, programmatic sponsors, and funding levels for the period October 1, 1988, through June 30, 1991. The report also summarizes the missions and activities of organizations within Chem Tech for the reporting period. Specific projects performed within Chem Tech's energy research programs, waste and environmental programs, and radiochemical processing programs are highlighted. Other information regarding publications, patents, awards, and conferences organized by Chem Tech staff is also included.

  14. Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division. Progress report, October 1980-September 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, R.R.

    1982-05-01

    This report describes major progress in the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory during FY 1981. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, medical radioisotopes research, element migration and fixation, nuclear waste isolation research, inorganic and structural chemistry, isotope separation, analysis and applications, the newly established Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Center, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, pion charge exchange, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research.

  15. The Molecular Biology Capstone Assessment: A Concept Assessment for Upper-Division Molecular Biology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couch, Brian A.; Wood, William B.; Knight, Jennifer K.

    2015-01-01

    Measuring students' conceptual understandings has become increasingly important to biology faculty members involved in evaluating and improving departmental programs. We developed the Molecular Biology Capstone Assessment (MBCA) to gauge comprehension of fundamental concepts in molecular and cell biology and the ability to apply these concepts in…

  16. The Molecular Biology Capstone Assessment: A Concept Assessment for Upper-Division Molecular Biology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couch, Brian A.; Wood, William B.; Knight, Jennifer K.

    2015-01-01

    Measuring students' conceptual understandings has become increasingly important to biology faculty members involved in evaluating and improving departmental programs. We developed the Molecular Biology Capstone Assessment (MBCA) to gauge comprehension of fundamental concepts in molecular and cell biology and the ability to apply these concepts in…

  17. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a large and diversified organization. As such, it serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside of ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: Analytical Research, Development and Implementation; Programmatic Research, Development, and Utilization; and Technical Support. The Analytical Chemistry Division is organized into four major sections, each which may carry out any of the three types of work mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 4 of this report highlight progress within the four sections during the period January 1 to December 31, 1989. A brief discussion of the division's role in an especially important environmental program is given in Chapter 5. Information about quality assurance, safety, and training programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8. Approximately 69 articles, 41 proceedings, and 31 reports were published, and 151 oral presentations were given during this reporting period. Some 308,981 determinations were performed.

  18. Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period April 1, 1987--September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S.V.

    1989-03-01

    The mission of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) is to provide a sound scientific basis for the measurement and assessment of human health impacts of radiological and chemical substances. Our approach to fulfilling this mission is to conduct a broad program of experimental, theoretical, and field research based on a strong foundation of fundamental physical studies that blend into well-established programs in life sciences. Topics include biomedical screening techniques, biological and chemical sensors, risk assessment, health hazards, dosimetry, nuclear medicine, environmental pollution monitoring, electron-molecule interactions, interphase physics, surface physics, data base management, environmental mutagens, carcinogens, and tetratogens.

  19. Health and Safety Research Division. Progress report, October 1, 1979-March 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    Research progress for the period October 1, 1979 through March 31, 1981 is reported. Research conducted by the Office of Integrated Assessments and Policy Analysis, Health Studies Section, Technology Assessments Section, Biological and Radiation Physics Section, and Chemical Physics Section is summarized. (ACR)

  20. Health and Safety Research Division progress report, April 1, 1981-September 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-02-01

    Research progress for the reporting period is briefly summarized for the following sections: (1) health studies, (2) technology assessments, (3) biological and radiation physics, (4) chemical physics, (5) Office of Risk Analysis, and (6) health and environmental risk and analysis. (ACR)

  1. ATP-binding cassette G-subfamily transporter 2 regulates cell cycle progression and asymmetric division in mouse cardiac side population progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Sereti, Konstantina-Ioanna; Oikonomopoulos, Angelos; Unno, Kazumasa; Cao, Xin; Qiu, Yiling; Liao, Ronglih

    2013-01-04

    After cardiac injury, cardiac progenitor cells are acutely reduced and are replenished in part by regulated self-renewal and proliferation, which occurs through symmetric and asymmetric cellular division. Understanding the molecular cues controlling progenitor cell self-renewal and lineage commitment is critical for harnessing these cells for therapeutic regeneration. We previously have found that the cell surface ATP-binding cassette G-subfamily transporter 2 (Abcg2) influences the proliferation of cardiac side population (CSP) progenitor cells, but through unclear mechanisms. To determine the role of Abcg2 on cell cycle progression and mode of division in mouse CSP cells. Herein, using CSP cells isolated from wild-type and Abcg2 knockout mice, we found that Abcg2 regulates G1-S cell cycle transition by fluorescence ubiquitination cell cycle indicators, cell cycle-focused gene expression arrays, and confocal live-cell fluorescent microscopy. Moreover, we found that modulation of cell cycle results in transition from symmetric to asymmetric cellular division in CSP cells lacking Abcg2. Abcg2 modulates CSP cell cycle progression and asymmetric cell division, establishing a mechanistic link between this surface transporter and cardiac progenitor cell function. Greater understanding of progenitor cell biology and, in particular, the regulation of resident progenitor cell homeostasis is vital for guiding the future development of cell-based therapies for cardiac regeneration.

  2. Division of Biological and Medical Research research summary 1984-1985

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, S.H.

    1985-08-01

    The Division of Biological and Medical Research at Argonne National Laboratory conducts multidisciplinary research aimed at defining the biological and medical hazards to man from energy technologies and new energy options. These technically oriented studies have a strong base in fundamental research in a variety of scientific disciplines, including molecular and cellular biology, biophysics, genetics, radiobiology, pharmacology, biochemistry, chemistry, environmental toxicology, and epidemiology. This research summary is organized into six parts. The first five parts reflect the Divisional structure and contain the scientific program chapters, which summarize the activities of the individual groups during the calendar year 1984 and the first half of 1985. To provide better continuity and perspective, previous work is sometimes briefly described. Although the summaries are short, efforts have been made to indicate the range of research activities for each group.

  3. CDC-25.2, a C. elegans ortholog of cdc25, is essential for the progression of intestinal divisions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Uk; Son, Miseol; Kim, Jiyoung; Shim, Yhong-Hee; Kawasaki, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal divisions in Caenorhabditis elegans take place in 3 stages: (1) cell divisions during embryogenesis, (2) binucleations at the L1 stage, and (3) endoreduplications at the end of each larval stage. Here, we report that CDC-25.2, a C. elegans ortholog of Cdc25, is required for these specialized division cycles between the 16E cell stage and the onset of endoreduplication. Results of our genetic analyses suggest that CDC-25.2 regulates intestinal cell divisions and binucleations by counteracting WEE-1.3 and by activating the CDK-1/CYB-1 complex. CDC-25.2 activity is then repressed by LIN-23 E3 ubiquitin ligase before the onset of intestinal endoreduplication, and this repression is maintained by LIN-35, the C. elegans ortholog of Retinoblastoma (Rb). These findings indicate that timely regulation of CDC-25.2 activity is essential for the progression of specialized division cycles and development of the C. elegans intestine.

  4. Instrumentation and Controls Division progress report for the period July 1, 1988 to June 30, 1990. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Klobe, L.E.

    1990-12-01

    The format of this Instrumentation and Controls Division progress report is a major departure from previous reports. This report has been published in two volumes instead of one, and the description of individual activities have been shortened considerably to make it easier document to scan and to read. Volume 1 of this report presents brief descriptions of a few highly significant programmatic and technological efforts representative of Instrumentation and Controls Division activities over the past two years. This volume contains information concerning the publications, presentations, and other professional activities and achievements of I&C Division staff members.

  5. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts research on the environmental aspects of existing and emerging energy systems and applies this information to ensure that technology development and energy use are consistent with national environmental health and safety goals. Offering an interdisciplinary resource of staff and facilities to address complex environmental problems, the division is currently providing technical leadership for major environmental issues of national concern: (1) acidic deposition and related environmental effects, (2) effects of increasing concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2} and the resulting climatic changes to ecosystems and natural and physical resources, (3) hazardous chemical and radioactive waste disposal and remediation research and development, and (4) development of commercial biomass energy production systems. This progress report outlines ESD's accomplishments in these and other areas in FY 1990. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases in the following areas: ecosystem studies; environmental analyses; environmental toxicology; geosciences; technical and administrative support; biofuels feedstock development program; carbon dioxide information analysis and research program; and environmental waste program.

  6. Fusion Energy Division: Annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

    1988-11-01

    The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a major part of the national fusion program, carries out research in nearly all areas of magnetic fusion. Collaboration among staff from ORNL, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., private industry, the academic community, and other fusion laboratories, in the United States and abroad, is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source. This report documents the program's achievements during 1987. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, it also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are external to the division (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program include the following: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, and development and testing of materials for fusion devices. Highlights from program activities are included in this report. 126 figs., 15 tabs.

  7. Chemical Technology Division progress report for the period April 1, 1985 to December 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development efforts conducted in the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) during the period April 1, 1985, through December 31, 1986. The following major areas are covered in the discussion: nuclear and chemical waste management, environmental control technology, basic science and technology, biotechnology research, transuranium-element processing, Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs, radioactive materials production, computer/engineering applications, fission energy, environmental cleanup projects, and various other work activities. As an appendix, the Administrative Summary presents a comprehensive compilation of publications, oral presentations, awards and recognitions, and patents of Chem Tech staff members during this report period. An organization chart, a staffing level and financial summary, and lists of seminars and Chem Tech consultants for the period are also included to provide additional information. 78 figs., 40 tabs.

  8. Phased cell division, specific division rates and other biological observations of Dinophysis populations in sub-surface layers off the south coast of Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Hazel; Velo-Suarez, Lourdes; Reguera, Beatriz; Raine, Robin

    2014-03-01

    The proportions of viable cells of Dinophysis spp. that were paired (dividing) and recently divided during a cell cycle were measured on populations of D. acuta and D. acuminata observed off the south coast of Ireland in July 2007 and July 2009. Both species exhibited phased cell division in 2009 with maximum frequency of division (fmax) 2 h after sunrise. Different patterns of division (timing of fmax) were shown by D. acuta in 2007, when the population aggregated in a thin layer was transported by a coastal jet flow. High resolution (decimetre-scale) profiles within the thin layer showed large differences in the vertical distribution of biological properties (feeding status, mortality). Values of the specific growth rate μ were compared to estimates derived in similar fashion from observations on Dinophysis populations elsewhere. Different patterns exhibited by the same species in different regions may be attributed to adaptations to latitudinal differences (length of photoperiod). The question of whether phased cell division always occurs in Dinophysis populations, and the incorporation of the potential specific division rate into models of Dinophysis growth are discussed. Comprehensive field data sets demonstrate the impact of the results on the coherence of Dinophysis populations during their transport along the Irish coast in jet-like flows towards sites of intensive shellfish culture.

  9. Instrumentation and Controls Division progress report, July 1, 1990--June 30, 1992. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This report contains the following information from the Instrumentation and Controls Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory: supplementary activities; seminars; publications and presentations; scientific and professional activities, achievements, and awards; and division organization charts.

  10. Instrumentation and Controls Division progress report, July 1, 1990--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This report contains the following information from the Instrumentation and Controls Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory: supplementary activities; seminars; publications and presentations; scientific and professional activities, achievements, and awards; and division organization charts.

  11. 10. Freiburger Symposium 2011 der SCG-Division Industrielle Chemie Technology Progress, Success Key for our Production Sites.

    PubMed

    Naef, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    This short paper presents the abstracts of the different presentations during 10. Freiburger Symposium 2011 der SCG-Division Industrielle Chemie: Technology Progress, Success key for our production sites held Thursday and Friday, September 29 and 30, 2011 at the Ecole d'ingénieurs et d'architectes de Fribourg (Switzerland).

  12. Recent progress in exobiology and planetary biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jukes, T. H.

    1981-01-01

    Recent work in the fields of exobiology, the study of the possible characteristics of extraterrestrial life, and planetary biology, the study of life forms as a function of planetary conditions, is reviewed. Searches conducted for life on Mars by the Viking Landers and on Titan by Voyager 1 are considered, and the origin of life on earth is considered in relation to the question of the inorganic trace elements in living systems that are required for life. The question of the origin of terrestrial life from spores carried through the interstellar medium is examined, and the unlikelihood of the survival of such spores except within meteorites or dust particles is pointed out. Studies of organic molecules present in the interstellar medium are indicated as evidence that the conditions necessary for the formation of life can exist in various locations throughout the universe. Investigations of the molecular evolution of life on earth and of life under extreme conditions of heat, cold, drought and ultraviolet radiation, and of the organic compounds found in meteorites and comets are also discussed. The importance of a mechanism of heredity, such as terrestrial DNA, to the evolution of terrestrial and possible extraterrestrial life is pointed out.

  13. AICD: Advanced Industrial Concepts Division Biological and Chemical Technologies Research Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, G.; Bair, K.; Ross, J.

    1994-03-01

    The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1993 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program of the Advanced Industrial Concepts Division (AICD). This AICD program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). The annual summary report for 1993 (ASR 93) contains the following: A program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives), program structure and organization, selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1993, detailed descriptions of individual projects, and a listing of program output including a bibliography of published work, patents, and awards arising from work supported by BCTR.

  14. AICD -- Advanced Industrial Concepts Division Biological and Chemical Technologies Research Program. 1993 Annual summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, G.; Bair, K.; Ross, J.

    1994-03-01

    The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1993 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program of the Advanced Industrial Concepts Division (AICD). This AICD program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). The annual summary report for 1993 (ASR 93) contains the following: A program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives), program structure and organization, selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1993, detailed descriptions of individual projects, a listing of program output, including a bibliography of published work, patents, and awards arising from work supported by BCTR.

  15. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, W.S.

    1983-05-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Dvision of Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: (1) analytical research, development, and implementation; (2) programmatic research, development, and utilization; and (3) technical support. The Division is organized into five major sections, each of which may carry out any type of work falling in the three categories mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 5 of this report highlight progress within the five sections (analytical methodology, mass and emission spectrometry, radioactive materials, bio/organic analysis, and general and environmental analysis) during the period January 1, 1982 to December 31, 1982. A short summary introduces each chapter to indicate work scope. Information about quality assurance and safety programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8. Approximately 61 articles, 32 proceedings publications and 37 reports have been published, and 107 oral presentations were given during this reporting period.

  16. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

    1991-07-01

    The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) carries out research in most areas of magnetic confinement fusion. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US fusion program and the international fusion community. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, this report also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are carried out by other ORNL organizations (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program and discussed in this report include the following: Experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, development and testing of materials for fusion devices, and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas. Highlights from program activities are included in this report.

  17. Development of biological movement recognition by interaction between active basis model and fuzzy optical flow division.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Bardia; Loo, Chu Kiong

    2014-01-01

    Following the study on computational neuroscience through functional magnetic resonance imaging claimed that human action recognition in the brain of mammalian pursues two separated streams, that is, dorsal and ventral streams. It follows up by two pathways in the bioinspired model, which are specialized for motion and form information analysis (Giese and Poggio 2003). Active basis model is used to form information which is different from orientations and scales of Gabor wavelets to form a dictionary regarding object recognition (human). Also biologically movement optic-flow patterns utilized. As motion information guides share sketch algorithm in form pathway for adjustment plus it helps to prevent wrong recognition. A synergetic neural network is utilized to generate prototype templates, representing general characteristic form of every class. Having predefined templates, classifying performs based on multitemplate matching. As every human action has one action prototype, there are some overlapping and consistency among these templates. Using fuzzy optical flow division scoring can prevent motivation for misrecognition. We successfully apply proposed model on the human action video obtained from KTH human action database. Proposed approach follows the interaction between dorsal and ventral processing streams in the original model of the biological movement recognition. The attained results indicate promising outcome and improvement in robustness using proposed approach.

  18. Development of Biological Movement Recognition by Interaction between Active Basis Model and Fuzzy Optical Flow Division

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Chu Kiong

    2014-01-01

    Following the study on computational neuroscience through functional magnetic resonance imaging claimed that human action recognition in the brain of mammalian pursues two separated streams, that is, dorsal and ventral streams. It follows up by two pathways in the bioinspired model, which are specialized for motion and form information analysis (Giese and Poggio 2003). Active basis model is used to form information which is different from orientations and scales of Gabor wavelets to form a dictionary regarding object recognition (human). Also biologically movement optic-flow patterns utilized. As motion information guides share sketch algorithm in form pathway for adjustment plus it helps to prevent wrong recognition. A synergetic neural network is utilized to generate prototype templates, representing general characteristic form of every class. Having predefined templates, classifying performs based on multitemplate matching. As every human action has one action prototype, there are some overlapping and consistency among these templates. Using fuzzy optical flow division scoring can prevent motivation for misrecognition. We successfully apply proposed model on the human action video obtained from KTH human action database. Proposed approach follows the interaction between dorsal and ventral processing streams in the original model of the biological movement recognition. The attained results indicate promising outcome and improvement in robustness using proposed approach. PMID:24883361

  19. Biological Sciences Curriculum Study Newsletter Number 56, Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, George M., Ed.

    This newsletter presents a progress report for the 1973-74 year for the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS). The program for the Educable Mentally Handicapped is reviewed and a new series of Animal Behavior films is described. Other articles in the newsletter include information on the Human Sciences Program with emphasis on the…

  20. Progress in nucleic acid research and molecular biology

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, W.E. . Biology Div.); Moldave, K. )

    1989-01-01

    This book contain the proceedings on progress in nucleic acid research and molecular biology. Topics covered include: polynucleotide-protein cross-links induced by ultraviolet light and their use for structural investigation of nucleoproteins; left-handed Z-DNA and genetic recombination, and structure and function of signal recognition particle RNA.

  1. [Progress in determination of histamine levels in biological samples].

    PubMed

    Wu, Juan-li; Wang, Zhao-pin; Bao, Ai-min

    2012-11-01

    Neuronal histamine is crucially involved in a number of physiological functions as well as in neuropsychiatric diseases. Determination of histamine in biological samples is thus of importance in the clinical studies. The aim of this review is to summarize the progress or effort made in this field, with focus on the high-performance liquid chromatography.

  2. Instrumentation and Controls Division biennial progress report, September 1, 1978-September 1, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Sadowski, G.S.

    1981-06-01

    Brief summaries of research work are presented in the following section: overview of the ORNL Instrumentation and Controls Division activities; new developments and methods; reactor instrumentation and controls; measurement and control engineering; electronic engineering; maintenance; studies; services; and development; and division achievements.

  3. Metals and Ceramics Division Materials Science Program. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    McHargue, C.J.

    1983-05-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Materials Sciences Program in the Metals and Ceramics Division. These activities constitute about one-fourth of the research and development conducted by the division. The major elements of the Materials Sciences Program can be grouped under the areas of (1) structural characterization, (2) high-temperature alloy studies, (3) structural ceramics, and (4) radiation effects.

  4. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, D.F.; Bradley, R.A.; Weir, J.R. Jr.

    1994-07-01

    This report provides an overview of activities and accomplishsments of the division from October 1992 through December 1993; the division is organized to provide technical support, mainly in the area of high-temperature materials, for technologies being developed by DOE. Activities span the range from basic research to industrial interactions (cooperative research and technology transfer). Sections 1-5 describe the different functional groups (engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, ceramics, nuclear fuel materials). Sect. 6 provides an alternative view of the division in terms of the major programs, most of which cross group lines. Sect. 7 summarizes external interactions including cooperative R and D programs and technology transfer functions. Finally, Sect. 8 briefly describes the division`s involvement in educational activities. Several organizational changes were effected during this period.

  5. CDC-25.2, a C. elegans ortholog of cdc25, is essential for the progression of intestinal divisions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong-Uk; Son, Miseol; Kim, Jiyoung; Shim, Yhong-Hee; Kawasaki, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intestinal divisions in Caenorhabditis elegans take place in 3 stages: (1) cell divisions during embryogenesis, (2) binucleations at the L1 stage, and (3) endoreduplications at the end of each larval stage. Here, we report that CDC-25.2, a C. elegans ortholog of Cdc25, is required for these specialized division cycles between the 16E cell stage and the onset of endoreduplication. Results of our genetic analyses suggest that CDC-25.2 regulates intestinal cell divisions and binucleations by counteracting WEE-1.3 and by activating the CDK-1/CYB-1 complex. CDC-25.2 activity is then repressed by LIN-23 E3 ubiquitin ligase before the onset of intestinal endoreduplication, and this repression is maintained by LIN-35, the C. elegans ortholog of Retinoblastoma (Rb). These findings indicate that timely regulation of CDC-25.2 activity is essential for the progression of specialized division cycles and development of the C. elegans intestine. PMID:27104746

  6. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    1992-01-01

    The following sentences highlight some of the technical activities carried out during 1991. They illustrate the diversity of programs and technical work performed within the Analytical Chemistry Division. Our neutron activation analysis laboratory at HFIR was placed into operation during 1991. We have combined inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) with a preparation procedure developed at the Argonne National Laboratory to measure ultra-trace levels of U, Pu, Np, and Am in body fluids, primarily urine. Much progress has been made over the last year in the interfacing of an rf-powered glow discharge source to a double-focusing mass spectrometer. Preliminary experiments using electrospray ionization combined with ion trap mass spectrometry show much promise for the analysis of metals in solution. A secondary ion microprobe has been constructed that permits determination of the distribution of organic compounds less than a monolayer thick on samples as large as 1 cm diameter. Fourier transform mass spectrometry has been demonstrated to be a highly effective tool for the detailed characterization of biopolymers, especially normal and modified oligonucleotides. Much has been accomplished in understanding the fundamentals of quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry. Work with ITMS instrumentation has led to the development of rapid methods for the detection of trace organics in environmental and physiological samples. A new type of time-of-flight mass spectrometer was designed for use with our positron ionization experiments. Fundamental research on chromatography at high concentrations and on gas-solid adsorption has continued. The preparation of a monograph on the chemistry of environmental tobacco smoke was completed this year.

  7. [Research progress of mammalian synthetic biology in biomedical field].

    PubMed

    Yang, Linfeng; Yin, Jianli; Wang, Meiyan; Ye, Haifeng

    2017-03-25

    Although still in its infant stage, synthetic biology has achieved remarkable development and progress during the past decade. Synthetic biology applies engineering principles to design and construct gene circuits uploaded into living cells or organisms to perform novel or improved functions, and it has been widely used in many fields. In this review, we describe the recent advances of mammalian synthetic biology for the treatment of diseases. We introduce common tools and design principles of synthetic gene circuits, and then we demonstrate open-loop gene circuits induced by different trigger molecules used in disease diagnosis and close-loop gene circuits used for biomedical applications. Finally, we discuss the perspectives and potential challenges of synthetic biology for clinical applications.

  8. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    This eighth annual report of the Division covers work done during FY 1981 (October 1, 1980, through September 30, 1981). As with these documents in the past, the format follows approximately the organizational structure of the Energy Division. Chapters 2 through 6 summarize the activities of the sections of the Division: Environmental Impact Section, headed by H.E. Zittel; Regional and Urban Studies Section, R.M. Davis; Economic Analysis Section, R.B. Shelton; Data and Analysis Section, A.S. Loebl; and Efficiency and Renewables Research Section, J.W. Michel. In addition, work on a variety of projects which cut across section lines is reported in Chapter 7, Integrated Programs. These activities are under the supervision of T.J. Wilbanks, Associate Director for the Division. Separate abstracts are included for individual projects.

  9. Metals and Ceramics Division Materials Science Program. Annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    McHargue, C.J.

    1984-11-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Materials Sciences Program in the Metals and Ceramics Division for the period January 1, 1983, to June 30, 1984. These activities constitute about one-fourth of the research and development conducted by the division. The emphasis of the program can be described as the scientific design of materials. The efforts are directed toward three classes of materials: high-temperature metallic alloys based on intermetallic compounds, structural ceramics, and radiation-resistant alloys.

  10. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, D.F.; Weir, J.R. Jr.

    1993-04-01

    This report provides a brief overview of the activities and accomplishments of the division, whose purpose is to provide technical support, primarily in the area of high-temperature materials, for the various technologies being developed by US DOE. Activities range from basic research to industrial research and technology transfer. The division (and the report) is divided into the following: Engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, ceramics, nuclear fuel materials, program activities, collaborative research facilities and technology transfer, and educational programs.

  11. Solid State Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M.

    1985-03-01

    During the reporting period, relatively minor changes have occurred in the research areas of interest to the Division. Nearly all the research of the Division can be classified broadly as mission-oriented basic research. Topics covered include: theoretical solid state physics; surface and near-surface properties of solids; defects in solids; transport properties of solids; neutron scattering; and preparation and characterization of research materials. (GHT)

  12. Metacognition in Upper-Division Biology Students: Awareness Does Not Always Lead to Control

    PubMed Central

    Dye, Kathryn Morris; Stanton, Julie Dangremond

    2017-01-01

    Students with awareness and control of their own thinking can learn more and perform better than students who are not metacognitive. Metacognitive regulation is how you control your thinking in order to learn. It includes the skill of evaluation, which is the ability to appraise your approaches to learning and then modify future plans based on those appraisals. We asked when, why, and how upper-division biology students evaluated their approaches to learning. We used self-evaluation assignments to identify students with potentially high metacognition and conducted semistructured interviews to collect rich qualitative data from them. Through content analysis, we found that students evaluated their approaches to learning when their courses presented novel challenges. Most students evaluated in response to an unsatisfactory grade. While evaluating study strategies, many students considered performance and learning simultaneously. We gained insights on the barriers students face when they try to change their approaches to learning based on their evaluations. A few students continued to use ineffective study strategies even though they were aware of the ineffectiveness of those strategies. A desire to avoid feeling uncomfortable was the primary reason they avoided strategies that they knew were more effective. We examined the behavioral change literature to help interpret these findings. PMID:28495935

  13. The Genus Neolitsea of Lauraceae: A Phytochemical and Biological Progress.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuan; Gao, Xiao-Li; Su, Guo-Zhu; Yu, Xue-Long; Tu, Peng-Fei; Chai, Xing-Yun

    2015-10-01

    As one of the biggest genera in Lauraceae, Neolitsea owns a great application potential in industrial and traditional medical fields. Modern phytochemical and biological investigations revealed its structural diversity and diverse activities. This review summarizes the most recent progress on this regards, hopefully to provide a reference for full use and development of the Neolitsea resource. Copyright © 2015 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  14. Instrumentation and Controls Division progress report for the period July 1, 1986 to June 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Klobe, L.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Instrumentation and Controls (IandC) Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) performs basic and applied instrumentation and controls research, development and design engineering, specialized instrument design and fabrication, and maintenance services for instruments, electronics, and computers. The IandC Division is one of the largest RandD organizations of its type among government laboratories, and it exists as the result of an organizational strategy to integrate ORNL's instrumentation and controls-related disciplines into one dedicated functional organization to increase the Laboratory's expertise and capabilities in these rapidly expanding, innovative areas of technology. The Division participates in the programs and projects of ORNL by applying its expertise and capabilities in concert with other divisions to perform basic research and mission-oriented technology development. Many of the Division's RandD tasks that are a part of a larger ORNL program are of sufficient scope that the IandC effort constitutes a separate program element with direct funding and management responsibility within the Division. The activities of IandC include performance of an RandD task in IandC facilities, the participation of from one of many IandC engineers and scientists in a multidisciplinary team working in a specific research area or development project, design and fabrication of a special instrument or instrumentation system, or a few hours of maintenance service. In its support and maintenance work, the role of the IandC Division is to provide a level of expertise appropriate to complete a job successfully at minimum overall cost and time schedule---a role which involves IandC in almost all ORNL activities.

  15. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This report provides a brief overview of the activities and accomplishments of the Metals and Ceramics (M C) Division during fiscal year (FY) 1991. The division is organized to provide technical support, primarily in the area of high-temperature materials, for the various technologies being developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Activities span the range from basic research (through applied research and engineering development) to industrial interactions (through cooperative research and a strong technology transfer program). The division is organized in functional groups that encompass nearly all of the disciplines needed to develop and to apply materials in high-temperature applications. Sections I through 5 describe the different functional groups; Sect. 6 provides an alternative view of the division in terms of the major programs, most of which cross group lines; and Sect. 7 summarizes external interactions including cooperative research and development programs, educational activities, and technology transfer functions. Appendices describe the organizational structure, note personnel changes, present honors and awards received by division members, and contain listings of publications completed and presentations made at technical meetings.

  16. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    This report describes work done by staff of the Energy Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during FY 1986. The work of the Division is quite diversified, but it can be divided into four research themes: (1) technology for improving the productivity of energy use; (2) technology for electric power systems; (3) analysis and assessment of energy and environmental issues, policies, and technologies; and (4) data systems research and development (R and D). The research is supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), numerous other federal agencies, and some private organizations. 190 refs., 60 figs., 23 tabs.

  17. Environmental Sciences Division. Annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1980. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Auerbach, S.I.; Reichle, D.E.

    1981-03-01

    Research conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division for the Fiscal Year 1980 included studies carried out in the following Division programs and sections: (1) Advanced Fossil Energy Program, (2) Nuclear Program, (3) Environmental Impact Program, (4) Ecosystem Studies Program, (5) Low-Level Waste Research and Development Program, (6) National Low-Level Waste Program, (7) Aquatic Ecology Section, (8) Environmental Resources Section, (9) Earth Sciences Section, and (10) Terrestrial Ecology Section. In addition, Educational Activities and the dedication of the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park are reported. Separate abstracts were prepared for the 10 sections of this report.

  18. Roles of VRK1 as a new player in the control of biological processes required for cell division.

    PubMed

    Valbuena, Alberto; Sanz-García, Marta; López-Sánchez, Inmaculada; Vega, Francisco M; Lazo, Pedro A

    2011-08-01

    Cell division, in addition to an accurate transmission of genetic information to daughter cells, also requires the temporal and spatial coordination of several biological processes without which cell division would not be feasible. These processes include the temporal coordination of DNA replication and chromosome segregation, regulation of nuclear envelope disassembly and assembly, chromatin condensation and Golgi fragmentation for its redistribution into daughter cells, among others. However, little is known regarding regulatory proteins and signalling pathways that might participate in the coordination of all these different biological functions. Such regulatory players should directly have a role in the processes leading to cell division. VRK1 (Vaccinia-related kinase 1) is an early response gene required for cyclin D1 expression, regulates p53 by a specific Thr18 phosphorylation, controls chromatin condensation by histone phosphorylation, nuclear envelope assembly by phosphorylation of BANF1, and participates in signalling required for Golgi fragmentation late in the G2 phase. We propose that VRK1, a Ser-Thr kinase, might be a candidate to play an important coordinator role in these cell division processes as part of a novel signalling pathway.

  19. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending August 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    This paper contains abstracts on research performed at the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The areas covered are: mathematical science; nuclear-data measurement and evaluation; intelligent systems; nuclear analysis and shielding; and Engineering Physics Information Center. (LSP)

  20. Solid State Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W.

    1992-09-01

    During this period, the division conducted a broad, interdisciplinary materials research program with emphasis on theoretical solid state physics, superconductivity, neutron scattering, synthesis and characterization of materials, ion beam and laser processing, and the structure of solids and surfaces. The High Flux Isotope Reactor was returned to full operation.

  1. Solid State Division: Progress report for period ending September 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M.

    1988-03-01

    This paper contains a collection of articles on research done at the Solid State Division of ORNL. General topics covered are: theoretical solid state physics; neutron scattering; physical properties of superconductors and ceramics; synthesis and characterization of solids; ion beam and laser processing; and surface and defect studies. (LSP)

  2. Proteomic analysis of mitochondria: biological and clinical progresses in cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Jing; Li, Bin; He, Qing-Yu

    2017-10-01

    Mitochondria play important roles in regulating multiple biological processes and signalling pathways in eukaryotic cells, and mitochondrial dysfunction may result in a wide range of serious diseases, including cancer. With improvements in the identification of mitochondrial proteins, mitochondrial proteomics has made great achievements. In particular, this approach has been widely used to compare tumour cells at different stages of malignancy. Therefore, there is an urgent need to identify and characterize the function of mitochondrial proteins in cancer progression and to determine the involved mechanisms. Areas covered: We provide an overview of recent progress related to mitochondrial proteomics in cancer and the application of comparative mitochondrial proteomics in various biological processes, including apoptosis, necroptosis, autophagy and metastasis, as well as clinical progress in cancer. Proteomics-related reports were found using PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Expert commentary: Understanding both post-translational modification and post-translational processing is important in the comprehensive characterization of protein function. The application of comparative mitochondrial proteomics to investigate clinical samples and cancer cells will contribute to our understanding of the molecular interplay of mitochondrial proteins in the development of cancer. This approach will mine more biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis and improve therapeutic outcomes among cancer patients.

  3. Scientific progress specific to biology: an epistemological overview.

    PubMed

    Durrive, Barthélemy

    2012-09-01

    Progresses in leading edge life sciences are undeniable, but there is more to it: from an epistemological perspective, they rest on a paradox vitalizing the very project of biology. Making our understanding of organic functioning all the more objective, life sciences yet exploit a paradigm which structurally rules out any opportunity to explain why biological phenomena are explainable the way we claim they are. As such a blind spot is constitutive of the disciplinary boundaries that condition and permit objective modelling, evolutions in scientists' mode of thought (i.e. paradigm shifts) may require at crucial points some interaction with epistemologists or historians of sciences. The model case of ontophylogenesis thus shows not only how such cooperation can be useful (both in normal science and in transitional contexts), but mostly why it plays a role in helping biology to get out of its intrinsic paradox. The most innovative feature of ontophylogenesis would thus be the following: to give account for the mode of intelligibility it chose by explaining it - in a truly Darwinian manner -in the core of the theory. Though this epistemic move definitely confirms biology to be an autonomous science as long as it faces its constitutive paradox, the methodological detour such realization implied would go through occasional interplay with "exclusively reflexive approaches" - that is to say, humanities.

  4. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    This report covers work done during FY 1983 by the staff of the Energy Division and its subcontractors and by colleagues in other Oak Ridge National Laboratory divisions working on Energy Division projects. The work can be divided into four areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) models and data systems, (3) research to improve the efficiency of energy use and to improve electric power transmission and distribution, and (4) research utilization. Support came principally from the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the US Department of Defense, but also from a number of other agencies and organizations. Analysis and assessment included work on (a) environmental issues, including those deriving from the preparation of environmental impact statements; (b) energy and resource analysis; and (c) emergency preparedness. The models and data systems area involved research on evaluating and developing energy, environment, and engineering simulation models and on devising large data management systems, evaluating user data requirements, and compiling data bases. Research on improving the efficiency of energy use was focused primarily on the buildings and electricity sectors. A major effort on heat pump technology, which includes both heat-activated and electrically driven systems, continues. An important aspect of all the work was research utilization. Since the Energy Division is doing applied research, results are, by definition, intended to solve problems or answer questions of DOE and other sponsors. However, there are other users, and research utilization activities include technology transfer, commercialization efforts, outreach to state and regional organizations, and, of course, information dissemination.

  5. Engineering Physics Division progress report for period ending November 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    Separate abstracts are included for sections concerning measurement of nuclear cross sections and related quantities; nuclear cross-section evaluations and theory; nuclear cross-section processing, testing, and sensitivity analysis; engineering physics division integral experiments and their analyses; development of methods for shield and reactor analysis; analyses for specific systems or applications; energy model validation; systems reliability and operations research; and information analysis and distribution.

  6. Chemistry-nuclear chemistry division. Progress report, October 1979-September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, R.R.

    1981-05-01

    This report presents the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, element migration and fixation, inorganic chemistry, isotope separation and analysis, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, muonic x rays, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research.

  7. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, R.C.

    1993-05-01

    In this report, our research is described through abstracts of journal articles, technical reports, and presentations organized into sections following the five major operating units in the division: Mathematical Sciences, Intelligent Systems, Nuclear Data and Measurement Analysis, Nuclear Analysis and Shielding, and the Engineering Physics Information Centers. Each section begins with an introduction highlighting honors, awards, and significant research accomplishments in that unit during the reporting period.

  8. Metal finishing and vacuum processes groups, Materials Fabrication Division progress report, March-May 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Dini, J.W.; Romo, J.G.; Jones, L.M.

    1984-07-11

    Progress is reported in fabrication and coating activities being conducted for the weapons program, nuclear test program, nuclear design program, magnetic fusion program, and miscellaneous applications. (DLC)

  9. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Shults, W.D.; Lyon, W.S.

    1980-05-01

    The progress is reported in the following sections: analytical methodology, mass and emission spectrometry, technical support, bio-organic analysis, nuclear and radiochemical analysis, and quality assurance. (DLC)

  10. Regulation of cell division cycle progression by bcl-2 expression: a potential mechanism for inhibition of programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Expression of the bcl-2 gene has been shown to effectively confer resistance to programmed cell death under a variety of circumstances. However, despite a wealth of literature describing this phenomenon, very little is known about the mechanism of resistance. In the experiments described here, we show that bcl-2 gene expression can result in an inhibition of cell division cycle progression. These findings are based upon the analysis of cell cycle distribution, cell cycle kinetics, and relative phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein, using primary tissues in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro, as well as continuous cell lines. The effects of bcl-2 expression on cell cycle progression appear to be focused at the G1 to S phase transition, which is a critical control point in the decision between continued cell cycle progression or the induction programmed cell death. In all systems tested, bcl-2 expression resulted in a substantial 30-60% increase in the length of G1 phase; such an increase is very substantial in the context of other regulators of cell cycle progression. Based upon our findings, and the related findings of others, we propose a mechanism by which bcl-2 expression might exert its well known inhibition of programmed cell death by regulating the kinetics of cell cycle progression at a critical control point. PMID:8642331

  11. Issues and progress in transforming a middle-division classical mechanics/math methods course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Steven J.; Pepper, Rachel E.; Marino, Alysia D.

    2012-02-01

    The physics department at the University of Colorado, Boulder has recently begun the transformation of its Classical Mechanics/Math Methods course, a middle-division course taken primarily by sophomore physics majors. We discuss the process of course transformation, including holding faculty meetings to create consensus learning goals and a conceptual diagnostic, and adopting, adapting and creating course materials and structures. We also report preliminary observations of student learning gains, student attitudes towards the transformation, and common student difficulties with the course material. We also discuss ongoing plans for the course transformation.

  12. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Shults, W.D.

    1993-04-01

    This report is divided into: Analytical spectroscopy (optical spectroscopy, organic mass spectrometry, inorganic mass spectrometry, secondary ion mass spectrometry), inorganic and radiochemistry (transuranium and activation analysis, low-level radiochemical analysis, inorganic analysis, radioactive materials analysis, special projects), organic chemistry (organic spectroscopy, separations and synthesis, special projects, organic analysis, ORNL/UT research program), operations (quality assurance/quality control, environmental protection, safety, analytical improvement, training, radiation control), education programs, supplementary activities, and presentation of research results. Tables are included for articles reviewed or refereed for periodicals, analytical service work, division manpower and financial summary, and organization chart; a glossary is also included.

  13. Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending April 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Poutsma, M.L.; Ferris, L.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

    1993-08-01

    The Chemistry Division conducts basic and applied chemical research on projects important to DOE`s missions in sciences, energy technologies, advanced materials, and waste management/environmental restoration; it also conducts complementary research for other sponsors. The research are arranged according to: coal chemistry, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures, geochemistry, chemistry of advanced inorganic materials, structure and dynamics of advanced polymeric materials, chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds, chemical and structural principles in solvent extraction, surface science related to heterogeneous catalysis, photolytic transformations of hazardous organics, DNA sequencing and mapping, and special topics.

  14. CONTINUUM MODELING OF BIOLOGICAL TISSUE GROWTH BY CELL DIVISION, AND ALTERATION OF INTRACELLULAR OSMOLYTES AND EXTRACELLULAR FIXED CHARGE DENSITY

    PubMed Central

    Ateshian, Gerard A.; Costa, Kevin D.; Azeloglu, Evren U.; Morrison, Barclay; Hung, Clark T.

    2009-01-01

    A framework is formulated within the theory of mixtures for continuum modeling of biological tissue growth that explicitly addresses cell division, using a homogenized representation of cells and their extracellular matrix (ECM). The model relies on the description of the cell as containing a solution of water and osmolytes, and having a porous solid matrix. The division of a cell into two nearly identical daughter cells is modeled as the doubling of the cell solid matrix and osmolyte content, producing an increase in water uptake via osmotic effects. This framework is also generalized to account for the growth of ECM-bound molecular species that impart a fixed charge density (FCD) to the tissue, such as proteoglycans. This FCD similarly induces osmotic effects, resulting in extracellular water uptake and osmotic pressurization of the ECM interstitial fluid, with concomitant swelling of its solid matrix. Applications of this growth model are illustrated in several examples. PMID:19831471

  15. Progress in defining the biological causes of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Pickard, Benjamin

    2011-07-28

    Schizophrenia is a common mental illness resulting from a complex interplay of genetic and environmental risk factors. Establishing its primary molecular and cellular aetiopathologies has proved difficult. However, this is a vital step towards the rational development of useful disease biomarkers and new therapeutic strategies. The advent and large-scale application of genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic technologies are generating data sets required to achieve this goal. This discovery phase, typified by its objective and hypothesis-free approach, is described in the first part of the review. The accumulating biological information, when viewed as a whole, reveals a number of biological process and subcellular locations that contribute to schizophrenia causation. The data also show that each technique targets different aspects of central nervous system function in the disease state. In the second part of the review, key schizophrenia candidate genes are discussed more fully. Two higher-order processes - adult neurogenesis and inflammation - that appear to have pathological relevance are also described in detail. Finally, three areas where progress would have a large impact on schizophrenia biology are discussed: deducing the causes of schizophrenia in the individual, explaining the phenomenon of cross-disorder risk factors, and distinguishing causative disease factors from those that are reactive or compensatory.

  16. Advances in materials science, Metals and Ceramics Division. Triannual progress report, October 1979-January 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-31

    Progress is summarized concerning magnetic fusion energy materials, laser fusion energy, aluminium-air battery and vehicle, geothermal research, oil-shale research, nuclear waste management, office of basic energy sciences research, and materials research notes. (FS)

  17. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending June 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This progress report is divided into: engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, program activities, and collaborative research facilities. Very little hard data is presented. The appendices include listings of seminars, publications, and conference papers. (DLC)

  18. Instrumentation and Controls Division progress report, September 1, 1980-July 1, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Klobe, L.E.E.

    1982-12-01

    Activities are reported by the Reactor Systems Section, Research Instrument Section, and the Measurement and Controls Engineering Section. Reactor system activities include dynamic analysis, survillanc and diagnostic methods, design and evaluation, detectors, facilities support, process instrumentation development, and special assignments. Activities in the Research Instrument Section include the Navy-ORNL RADIAC development program, advanced ..gamma.. and x ray detector systems, neutron detection and subcriticality measurements, circuit development, position-sensitive detectors, stand-alone computers, environmental monitoring-detectors and systems, plant security, engineering support for fusion energy division, engineering support for accelerator physics, and communications: radio, closed-circuit tv, and computer. Activities in the Measurement and Controls Engineering Section include the AVLIS program; gas centrifuge enrichment technology support; Advanced Instrumentation for Reflood Studies (AIDRS) program; instrumentation development support for fuel reprocessing; in-core experiments and reactor systems; energy, conservation, and electric power systems; computer systems; measurements research; and fossil energy studies Publications are listed. (WHK)

  19. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    This report provides an archival record of the activities of the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division during the period June 30, 1985 through September 30, 1987. Work in Mathematical Sciences continues to include applied mathematics research, statistics research, and computer science. Nuclear-data measurements and evaluations continue for fusion reactors, fission reactors, and other nuclear systems. Also discussed are long-standing studies of fission-reactor shields through experiments and related analysis, of accelerator shielding, and of fusion-reactor neutronics. Work in Machine Intelligence continues to feature the development of an autonomous robot. The last descriptive part of this report reflects the work in our Engineering Physics Information Center, which again concentrates primarily upon radiation-shielding methods and related data.

  20. Fusion energy division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    The ORNL Program encompasses most aspects of magnetic fusion research including research on two magnetic confinement programs (tokamaks and ELMO bumpy tori); the development of the essential technologies for plasma heating, fueling, superconducting magnets, and materials; the development of diagnostics; the development of atomic physics and radiation effect data bases; the assessment of the environmental impact of magnetic fusion; the physics and engineering of present-generation devices; and the design of future devices. The integration of all of these activities into one program is a major factor in the success of each activity. An excellent example of this integration is the extremely successful application of neutral injection heating systems developed at ORNL to tokamaks both in the Fusion Energy Division and at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The goal of the ORNL Fusion Program is to maintain this balance between plasma confinement, technology, and engineering activities.

  1. [Progress in molecular biology study of DNA computer].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Zhou; Zhao, Jian; He, Lin

    2003-09-01

    DNA (deoxyribonucleotide acids) computer is an emerging new study area that basically combines molecular biology study of DNA molecules and computational study on how to employ these specific molecules to calculate. In 1994 Adleman described his pioneering research on DNA computing in Science. This is the first experimental report on DNA computer study. In 2001 Benenson et al published a paper in Nature regarding a programmable and autonomous DNA computing device. Because of its Turing-like functions, the device is regarded as another milestone progress for DNA computer study. The main features of DNA computer are massively parallel computing ability and potential enormous data storage capacity. Comparing with conventional electronic computers, DNA molecules provide conceptually a revolution in computing, and more and more implications have been found in various disciplines. DNA computer studies have brought great progress not only in its own computing mechanisms, but also in DNA manipulation technologies especially nano-technology. This article presents the basic principles of DNA computer, its applications, its important relationship with genomic research and our comments on all above issues.

  2. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report period ending December 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

    1987-10-01

    This annual report on fusion energy discusses the progress on work in the following main topics: toroidal confinement experiments; atomic physics and plasma diagnostics development; plasma theory and computing; plasma-materials interactions; plasma technology; superconducting magnet development; fusion engineering design center; materials research and development; and neutron transport. (LSP)

  3. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, W.S.

    1985-04-01

    Progress reports are presented for the following sections: analytical methodology; mass and emission spectroscopy; radioactive materials analysis; bio/organic analysis; and general and environmental analysis; quality assurance, safety, and tabulation analyses. In addition a list of publications and oral presentations and supplemental activities are included.

  4. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, W.S.

    1984-05-01

    Progress and activities are reported in: analytical methodology, mass and emission spectrometry, radioactive materials analysis, bio/organic analysis, general and environmental analysis, and quality assurance and safety. Supplementary activities are also discussed, and a bibliography of publications is also included. (DLC)

  5. Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending January 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-05-01

    Progress is reported in the following fields: coal chemistry, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures, geochemistry, high-temperature chemistry and thermodynamics of structural materials, chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds, separations chemistry, elecrochemistry, catalysis, chemical physics, theoretical chemistry, nuclear waste chemistry, chemistry of hazardous chemicals, and thermal energy storage.

  6. Learning Cell Biology as a Team: A Project-Based Approach to Upper-Division Cell Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Robin; Boggs, James

    2002-01-01

    To help students develop successful strategies for learning how to learn and communicate complex information in cell biology, we developed a quarter-long cell biology class based on team projects. Each team researches a particular human disease and presents information about the cellular structure or process affected by the disease, the cellular…

  7. Learning Cell Biology as a Team: A Project-Based Approach to Upper-Division Cell Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Robin; Boggs, James

    2002-01-01

    To help students develop successful strategies for learning how to learn and communicate complex information in cell biology, we developed a quarter-long cell biology class based on team projects. Each team researches a particular human disease and presents information about the cellular structure or process affected by the disease, the cellular…

  8. Occupational health and environment research 1983: Health, Safety, and Environment Division. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Voelz, G.L.

    1985-05-01

    The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environmental protection. These activities are designed to protect the workers, the public, and the environment. Evaluation of respiratory protective equipment included the XM-30 and M17A1 military masks, use of MAG-1 spectacles in respirators, and eight self-contained units. The latter units were used in an evaluation of test procedures used for Bureau of Mines approval of breathing apparatuses. Analyses of air samples from field studies of a modified in situ oil shale retorting facility were performed for total cyclohexane extractables and selected polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. Aerosols generation and characterization of effluents from oil shale processing were continued as part of an inhalation toxicology study. Additional data on plutonium excretion in urine are presented and point up problems in using the Langham equation to predict plutonium deposition in the body from long-term excretion data. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1983 showed the highest estimated radiation dose from Laboratory operations to be about 26% of the natural background radiation dose. Several studies on radionuclides and their transport in the Los Alamos environment are described. The chemical quality of surface and ground water near the geothermal hot dry rock facility is described. Short- and long-term consequences to man from releases of radionuclides into the environment can be simulated by the BIOTRAN computer model, which is discussed brirfly.

  9. Fusion Energy Division progress report, January 1, 1992--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.; Shannon, T.E.

    1995-09-01

    The report covers all elements of the ORNL Fusion Program, including those implemented outside the division. Non-fusion work within FED, much of which is based on the application of fusion technologies and techniques, is also discussed. The ORNL Fusion Program includes research and development in most areas of magnetic fusion research. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US and international fusion efforts. The research discussed in this report includes: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts; engineering and physics of existing and planned devices; development and testing of plasma diagnostic tools and techniques; assembly and distribution of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects; development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas; and development and testing of materials for fusion devices. The activities involving the use of fusion technologies and expertise for non-fusion applications ranged from semiconductor manufacturing to environmental management.

  10. Chemical Engineering Division Fuel Cycle Programs. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Steindler, M.J.; Bates, J.K.; Cannon, T.F.

    1982-05-01

    Methods of measuring rates of leaching from simulated waste glasses using neutron activation analysis and radiotracers have been developed. Laboratory-scale impact tests of solid alternative waste forms are being performed to obtain a size analysis of the fragments. Logging techniques are being developed to measure the relative amount of residual oil in a depleted oil reservoir by injecting gamma-active solution into it. Work to test the behavior of radionuclides leached from proposed nuclear-waste repositories using laboratory-analog experiments is in progress. High potassium levels in crushed granite from a Northern Illinois drill hole are probably derived by the leaching of potassium feldspar. Testing and development of equipment for the destructive analysis of full-length irradiated fuel rods from the LWBR are in progress. 19 figures, 13 tables.

  11. Occupational health, waste management, and environmental research program of the Health Division 1981. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Voelz, G.L.

    1983-09-01

    The primary responsibility of the Health Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide effective programs in health, safety, waste processing, and environmental protection for the Laboratory. During 1981, evaluations of respiratory protective equipment included 3 special DOE contractor supplied-air suits or hoods and 10 commercial supplied-air devices. Preliminary results of chemical permeation tests of different protective garment materials are reported. Industrial hygiene field studies of oil shale work were conducted at the Geokinetics true in situ facility and the Rio Blanco modified in situ facility. An occupational medical survey of workers at the Geokinetics, Inc., facility was completed. Research on the generation and characterization of aerosols was continued for inhalation studies of man-made mineral fibers and oil shale aerosols. The distribution of /sup 241/Am in a whole body was determined by tissue analyses. Preliminary results of mortality in workers formerly employed at the Rocky Flats plant were reported. A simplified method for the analysis of plutonium in urine has been developed. Instrumentation development resulted in a portable computer system for field data analysis and a small, computerized, wristwatch-style radiation dosimeter. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1981 showed the highest estimated radiation dose due to Laboratory operations is about 4% of the dose due to the natural radioactivity here. A study was completed on alternative strategies for long-term management of Los Alamos transuranic wastes. A successful 10-day test burn of pentachlorophenol-contaminated wastes was conducted in the Controlled Air Incinerator. Decontamination factors for five fission products in the off-gas handling system of the incinerator were measured.

  12. Solid-State Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M.

    1983-09-01

    Progress and activities are reported on: theoretical solid-state physics (surfaces; electronic, vibrational, and magnetic properties; particle-solid interactions; laser annealing), surface and near-surface properties of solids (surface, plasma-material interactions, ion implantation and ion-beam mixing, pulsed-laser and thermal processing), defects in solids (radiation effects, fracture, impurities and defects, semiconductor physics and photovoltaic conversion), transport properties of solids (fast-ion conductors, superconductivity, mass and charge transport in materials), neutron scattering (small-angle scattering, lattice dynamics, magnetic properties, structure and instrumentation), and preparation and characterization of research materials (growth and preparative methods, nuclear waste forms, special materials). (DLC)

  13. Learning cell biology as a team: a project-based approach to upper-division cell biology.

    PubMed

    Wright, Robin; Boggs, James

    2002-01-01

    To help students develop successful strategies for learning how to learn and communicate complex information in cell biology, we developed a quarter-long cell biology class based on team projects. Each team researches a particular human disease and presents information about the cellular structure or process affected by the disease, the cellular and molecular biology of the disease, and recent research focused on understanding the cellular mechanisms of the disease process. To support effective teamwork and to help students develop collaboration skills useful for their future careers, we provide training in working in small groups. A final poster presentation, held in a public forum, summarizes what students have learned throughout the quarter. Although student satisfaction with the course is similar to that of standard lecture-based classes, a project-based class offers unique benefits to both the student and the instructor.

  14. Learning Cell Biology as a Team: A Project-Based Approach to Upper-Division Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Robin; Boggs, James

    2002-01-01

    To help students develop successful strategies for learning how to learn and communicate complex information in cell biology, we developed a quarter-long cell biology class based on team projects. Each team researches a particular human disease and presents information about the cellular structure or process affected by the disease, the cellular and molecular biology of the disease, and recent research focused on understanding the cellular mechanisms of the disease process. To support effective teamwork and to help students develop collaboration skills useful for their future careers, we provide training in working in small groups. A final poster presentation, held in a public forum, summarizes what students have learned throughout the quarter. Although student satisfaction with the course is similar to that of standard lecture-based classes, a project-based class offers unique benefits to both the student and the instructor. PMID:12669105

  15. Chemical Engineering Division fuel cycle programs. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Steindler, M.J.; Ader, M.; Barletta, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    Fuel cycle work included hydraulic performance and extraction efficiency of eight-stage centrifugal contactors, flowsheet for the Aralex process, Ru and Zr extraction in a miniature centrifugal contactor, study of Zr aging in the organic phase and its effect on Zr extraction and hydraulic testing of the 9-cm-ID contactor. Work for predicting accident consequences in LWR fuel processing covered the relation between energy input (to subdivide a solid) and the modes of particle size frequency distribution. In the pyrochemical and dry processing program corrosion-testing materials for containment vessels and equipment for studying carbide reactions in bismuth is under way. Analytical studies have been made of salt-transport processes; efforts to spin tungsten crucibles 13 cm dia continue, and other information on tungsten fabrication is being assembled; the process steps of the chloride volatility process have been demonstrated and the thoria powder product used to produce oxide pellets; solubility of UO/sub 2/, PuO/sub 2/, and fission products in molten alkali nitrates is being investigated; work was continued on reprocessing actinide oxides by extracting the actinides into ammonium chloroaluminate from bismuth; the preparation of thorium-uranium carbide from the oxide is being studied as a means of improving the oxide reactivity; studies are in progress on producing uranium metal and decontaminated ThO/sub 2/ by the reaction of (Th,U)O/sub 2/ solid solution in molten salts containing ThCl/sub 4/ and thorium metal chips. In the molten tin process, no basic thermodynamic or kinetic factors have been found that may limit process development.

  16. IFLA General Conference, 1985. Division on Special Libraries. Section on Biological and Medical Science Libraries. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on biological and medical science libraries which were presented at the 1985 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "The International Programs of the National Library of Medicine" (Lois Ann Colaianni, United States); (2) "Information Needs for International Health. A CDC (Centers for Disease…

  17. IFLA General Conference, 1985. Division on Special Libraries. Section on Biological and Medical Science Libraries. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on biological and medical science libraries which were presented at the 1985 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "The International Programs of the National Library of Medicine" (Lois Ann Colaianni, United States); (2) "Information Needs for International Health. A CDC (Centers for Disease…

  18. Factors Influencing Academic Performance of Students Enrolled in a Lower Division Cell Biology Core Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soto, Julio G.; Anand, Sulekha

    2009-01-01

    Students' performance in two semesters of our Cell Biology course was examined for this study. Teaching strategies, behaviors, and pre-course variables were analyzed with respect to students' performance. Pre-semester and post-semester surveys were administered to ascertain students' perceptions about class difficulty, amount of study and effort…

  19. IFLA General Conference, 1986. Special Libraries Division. Section: Biological and Medical Sciences Libraries. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Four papers on biological and medical sciences libraries were presented at the 1986 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference. "Activities and Services of Medical Libraries in Japan--Past, Present, and Future" (Kazuo Urata and Toshinobu Suga, Japan) discusses the inauguration of the Japan Medical Library…

  20. EFFECTS OF POLLUTANTS ON BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS. CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Authors, Various

    1980-10-01

    Planning a rational energy future requires anticipating the environmental consequences of various technologies. This is difficult to do with precision as the effects of pollutants are often determined by interactions between and among complex physical (abiotic) and biological (biotic) systems. A given pollutant may affect human beings through direct exposure or indirectly through inducing changes to biological systems which humans need to utilize. The concentration of a toxin in the food chain or the destruction of organisms necessary for the maintenance of high quality water are examples of indirect effects. Pollutants can be transformed and/or degraded as they establish residence in various components of an ecosystem. Anticipation and amelioration of pollutant effects involves the integration of a vast range of data. This data includes: (1) physical and chemical characterization cf the pollutant as it enters the environment; (2) determining effects on the various components (biotic and abiotic) within the context of the functioning ecosystem of interest; (3) transformation in movements and/or degradation of the pollutant within that ecosystem and within specific organisms and physical components; and (4) determining a detailed biochemical and biological picture of the interactions of pollutants with particular organisms and/or their cellular components judged salient for various processes. The major programs described below are designed to answer parts of the above fundamental questions relevant to pollutants generated by energy related technologies. Their emphasis is on anticipating consequences to the biological components of various ecosystems. The work ranges from studies involving parts of a single cell (the membranes) to studies involving the whole ecosystem (in the pelagic zone of a lake). The programs take advantage of expertise and technical abilities present at LBL. Two small exploratory projects which were of brief duration and not related to

  1. Essential Biological Processes of an Emerging Pathogen: DNA Replication, Transcription, and Cell Division in Acinetobacter spp.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Andrew; Brzoska, Anthony J.; Turner, Kylie M.; Withers, Ryan; Harry, Elizabeth J.; Lewis, Peter J.; Dixon, Nicholas E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Within the last 15 years, members of the bacterial genus Acinetobacter have risen from relative obscurity to be among the most important sources of hospital-acquired infections. The driving force for this has been the remarkable ability of these organisms to acquire antibiotic resistance determinants, with some strains now showing resistance to every antibiotic in clinical use. There is an urgent need for new antibacterial compounds to combat the threat imposed by Acinetobacter spp. and other intractable bacterial pathogens. The essential processes of chromosomal DNA replication, transcription, and cell division are attractive targets for the rational design of antimicrobial drugs. The goal of this review is to examine the wealth of genome sequence and gene knockout data now available for Acinetobacter spp., highlighting those aspects of essential systems that are most suitable as drug targets. Acinetobacter spp. show several key differences from other pathogenic gammaproteobacteria, particularly in global stress response pathways. The involvement of these pathways in short- and long-term antibiotic survival suggests that Acinetobacter spp. cope with antibiotic-induced stress differently from other microorganisms. PMID:20508250

  2. Culturally relevant inquiry-based laboratory module implementations in upper-division genetics and cell biology teaching laboratories.

    PubMed

    Siritunga, Dimuth; Montero-Rojas, María; Carrero, Katherine; Toro, Gladys; Vélez, Ana; Carrero-Martínez, Franklin A

    2011-01-01

    Today, more minority students are entering undergraduate programs than ever before, but they earn only 6% of all science or engineering PhDs awarded in the United States. Many studies suggest that hands-on research activities enhance students' interest in pursuing a research career. In this paper, we present a model for the implementation of laboratory research in the undergraduate teaching laboratory using a culturally relevant approach to engage students. Laboratory modules were implemented in upper-division genetics and cell biology courses using cassava as the central theme. Students were asked to bring cassava samples from their respective towns, which allowed them to compare their field-collected samples against known lineages from agricultural stations at the end of the implementation. Assessment of content and learning perceptions revealed that our novel approach allowed students to learn while engaged in characterizing Puerto Rican cassava. In two semesters, based on the percentage of students who answered correctly in the premodule assessment for content knowledge, there was an overall improvement of 66% and 55% at the end in the genetics course and 24% and 15% in the cell biology course. Our proposed pedagogical model enhances students' professional competitiveness by providing students with valuable research skills as they work on a problem to which they can relate.

  3. Culturally Relevant Inquiry-Based Laboratory Module Implementations in Upper-Division Genetics and Cell Biology Teaching Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Siritunga, Dimuth; Montero-Rojas, María; Carrero, Katherine; Toro, Gladys; Vélez, Ana; Carrero-Martínez, Franklin A.

    2011-01-01

    Today, more minority students are entering undergraduate programs than ever before, but they earn only 6% of all science or engineering PhDs awarded in the United States. Many studies suggest that hands-on research activities enhance students’ interest in pursuing a research career. In this paper, we present a model for the implementation of laboratory research in the undergraduate teaching laboratory using a culturally relevant approach to engage students. Laboratory modules were implemented in upper-division genetics and cell biology courses using cassava as the central theme. Students were asked to bring cassava samples from their respective towns, which allowed them to compare their field-collected samples against known lineages from agricultural stations at the end of the implementation. Assessment of content and learning perceptions revealed that our novel approach allowed students to learn while engaged in characterizing Puerto Rican cassava. In two semesters, based on the percentage of students who answered correctly in the premodule assessment for content knowledge, there was an overall improvement of 66% and 55% at the end in the genetics course and 24% and 15% in the cell biology course. Our proposed pedagogical model enhances students’ professional competitiveness by providing students with valuable research skills as they work on a problem to which they can relate. PMID:21885825

  4. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities. Semi-annual progress report, July 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J.; Bajt, D.; Rezmer, R.; Wagner, R.

    1996-10-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period July 1, 1995 - December 31, 1995. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  5. Annual report and summaries of FY 1983 activities supported by the Division of Biological Energy Research

    SciTech Connect

    Rabson, R.

    1983-10-01

    Summaries of research performed in FY 1983 are presented. Representative research areas include: (1) progress was made in modifying the Agrobacterium tumefaciens Ti plasmid as a vector in the transfer of DNA in higher plants. The plasmid was disarmed by genetically altering that information which is responsible for unwanted tumor formation in recipient plants. In addition it was demonstrated that antibiotic resistance as a representative genetic character may be transferred by the Ti plasmid to a recipient plant culture; (2) by using appropriately constituted genetic lines of maize it has been possible by following male sterility restorer function to measure for the first time the frequency and character of genetic transposition events in a higher organism; (3) the gene coding for susceptibility to the herbicide atrazine in higher plants has been identified, cloned, and sequenced. A mutant gene which is responsible for resistance to the herbicide has likewise been studied. The difference between the two is one nucleotide in the DNA sequence; and (4) amino acid sequences of a number of proteins of the smallest functional photosynthetic particle, known as the reaction center, of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas capsulata have been determined by cloning and sequencing the corresponding DNA. This information has led to new insights concerning the structural and functional nature of the proteins in photosynthesis.

  6. Instrumentation and Controls Division Progress Report for the Period of July 1, 1994 to December 31, 1997: Publications, Presentations, Activities, and Awards

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, D.W.

    1998-04-01

    This report contains a record of publishing and other activities in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Instrumentation and Controls (I&C) Division for the period of July 1, 1994, to December31, 1997. It is a companion volume to Working Together on New Horizons: Instrumentation and Controls Division Progress Report for the Period of July 1, 1994, to December 31, 1997 (OR.NLA4-6530). Working Together on New Horizons contains illustrated summaries of some of the projects under way in I&C Division. Both books can be obtained by contacting C. R. Brittain (brittain@ornl. gov), P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6005. l&C Division Mission and Vision I&C Division develops and maintains techniques, instruments, and systems that lead to a better understanding of nature and harnessing of natural phenomena for the benefit of humankind. We have dedicated ourselves to accelerating the advancement of science and the transfer of those advancements into products and processes that benefit U.S. industry and enhance the security of our citizens.

  7. Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's biomedical and environmental research programs. Progress report, January-December 1981. [Leading abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, L.M.; Stafford, C.G.

    1982-10-01

    This report summarizes research and development activities of the Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's Biomedical and Environmental Research program for the calendar year 1981. Individual reports describing the current status of projects have been entered individually into the data base.

  8. Understanding Essential Tremor: Progress on the Biological Front

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Elan D.

    2014-01-01

    For many years, little was written about the underlying biology of ET, despite its high prevalence. Discussions of disease mechanisms were dominated by a focus on tremor physiology. The traditional model of ET, the olivary model, was proposed in the 1970s. The model suffers from several critical problems and its relevance to ET has been questioned. Recent mechanistic research has focused on the cerebellum. Clinical and neuroimaging studies strongly implicate the importance of this brain region in ET. Recent mechanistic research has been grounded more in tissue-based changes (i.e., postmortem studies of the brain). These studies have collectively and systematically identified a sizable number of changes in the ET cerebellum, and have led to a new model of ET, referred to as the cerebellar degenerative model. Hence, there is a renewed interest in the science behind the biology of ET. How the new understanding of ET will translate into treatment changes is an open question. PMID:24740806

  9. Current databases on biological variation: pros, cons and progress.

    PubMed

    Ricós, C; Alvarez, V; Cava, F; García-Lario, J V; Hernández, A; Jiménez, C V; Minchinela, J; Perich, C; Simón, M

    1999-11-01

    A database with reliable information to derive definitive analytical quality specifications for a large number of clinical laboratory tests was prepared in this work. This was achieved by comparing and correlating descriptive data and relevant observations with the biological variation information, an approach that had not been used in the previous efforts of this type. The material compiled in the database was obtained from published articles referenced in BIOS, CURRENT CONTENTS, EMBASE and MEDLINE using "biological variation & laboratory medicine" as key words, as well as books and doctoral theses provided by their authors. The database covers 316 quantities and reviews 191 articles, fewer than 10 of which had to be rejected. The within- and between-subject coefficients of variation and the subsequent desirable quality specifications for precision, bias and total error for all the quantities accepted are presented. Sex-related stratification of results was justified for only four quantities and, in these cases, quality specifications were derived from the group with lower within-subject variation. For certain quantities, biological variation in pathological states was higher than in the healthy state. In these cases, quality specifications were derived only from the healthy population (most stringent). Several quantities (particularly hormones) have been treated in very few articles and the results found are highly discrepant. Therefore, professionals in laboratory medicine should be strongly encouraged to study the quantities for which results are discrepant, the 90 quantities described in only one paper and the numerous quantities that have not been the subject of study.

  10. Recent progress in studies on Merkel cell biology.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Tamiko; Nawa, Tokio

    2002-03-01

    Merkel cells ubiquitously distribute in the skin of vertebrates, from cyclostomes to mammals. It is well known that mammalian Merkel cells coupled with axon terminals of type I sensory nerve fibers form slowly adapting mechanoreceptors, Merkel endings, within the epidermis. However, there are still many unresolved problems in the biology of Merkel cells. We reviewed recently acquired knowledge about the histochemical nature of Merkel cell granules, the morphological heterogeneity of Merkel cells and the roles of neurotrophins and their receptors for the development and survival of the cells. We discuss the functional significance of Merkel cell granules and the heterogeneity of Merkel cell populations.

  11. Progress in nucleic acid research and molecular biology

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, W.E.; Moldave, K.

    1988-01-01

    Complementary Use of Chemical Modification and Site-Directed Mutagenesis to Probe Structure-Activity Relationships in Enzymes. Mechanisms of the Antiviral Action of Inteferons. Modulation of Cellular Genes by Oncogenes. DNA Damage Produced by Ionizing Radiation in Mammalian Cells: Identities, Mechanisms of Formation, and Reparability. Human Ferritin Gene Expression. Molecular Biology of the Insulin Receptor. Cap-Binding Proteins of Eukaryotic Messenger RNA: Functions in Initiation and Control of Translation. Physical Monitoring of Meiotic and Mitotic Recombination in Yeast. Early Signals Underlying the Induction of the c-fos and c-myc Genes in Quiescent Fibroblasts: Studies with Bombesin and Other Growth Factors. Each chapter includes references.

  12. Enzymology and molecular biology of cell wall biosynthesis. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, P.M.

    1993-03-20

    In order to be able to explore the control of cell wall polysaccharide synthesis at the molecular level, which inter alia might eventually lead to means for useful modification of plant biomass polysaccharide production, the immediate goals of this project are to identify polypeptides responsible for wall polysaccharide synthase activities and to obtain clones of the genes that encode them. We are concentrating on plasma membraneassociated (1,3)-{beta}-glucan synthase (glucan synthase-II or GS-II) and Golgi-associated (1,4)-{beta}-glucan synthase (glucan synthase-I or GS-I), of growing pea stem tissue. Our progress has been much more rapid with respect to GS-II than regarding GS-I.

  13. Meaningful crosstalk between biologists and physical scientists is essential for modern biology to progress.

    PubMed

    Dev, Sukhendu B

    2009-01-01

    The advances in biological sciences have been phenomenal since the structure of DNA was decoded, especially if one considers the input from physical sciences, not only in terms of analytical tools, but also understanding and solving some of the key problems in biology. In this article, I trace briefly the history of this transition, from physical sciences to biology, and argue that progress in modern biology can be accelerated if there is far more meaningful crosstalk between the biologists and the physical scientists, simply because biology has become far more complex and interdisciplinary, and the need for such crosstalk cannot be overemphasized. Without a concerted effort in this area progress will be hindered, and the two camps will continue to work on their own, using their own specialized language, thus making communication highly ineffective. I support my argument giving a vast array of examples and also quoting leading authorities.

  14. [RESEARCH PROGRESS OF CONTROLLED RELEASING DELIVERY OF BIOLOGICAL FACTORS FOR CARTILAGE REPAIR].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jialei; Xiang, Zhou

    2015-08-01

    To summarize the recent progress of the controlled releasing delivery of biological factors for cartilage repair. The recently published literature at home and abroad on the controlled releasing delivery of biological factors for cartilage repair was reviewed and summarized. Various biological factors have been applied for repairing cartilage. For better cartilage repair effects, controlled releasing delivery of biological factors can be applied by means of combining biological factors with degradable biomaterials, or by micro- and nano-particles. Meanwhile, multiple biologic delivery and temporally controlled delivery are also inevitable choices. Although lots of unsolved problems exist, the controlled releasing delivery of biological factors has been a research focus for cartilage repair because of the controllability and delicacy.

  15. Progress in Small Molecule and Biologic Therapeutics Targeting Ghrelin Signaling.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Kayleigh R; Darling, Joseph E; Hougland, James L

    2016-01-01

    Ghrelin is a circulating peptide hormone involved in regulation of a wide array of physiological processes. As an endogenous ligand for growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR1a), ghrelin is responsible for signaling involved in energy homeostasis, including appetite stimulation, glucose metabolism, insulin signaling, and adiposity. Ghrelin has also been implicated in modulation of several neurological processes. Dysregulation of ghrelin signaling is implicated in diseases related to these pathways, including obesity, type II diabetes, and regulation of appetite and body weight in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome. Multiple steps in the ghrelin signaling pathway are available for targeting in the development of therapeutics for these diseases. Agonists and antagonists of GHS-R1a have been widely studied and have shown varying levels of effectiveness within ghrelin-related physiological pathways. Agents targeting ghrelin directly, either through depletion of ghrelin levels in circulation or inhibitors of ghrelin O-acyltransferase whose action is required for ghrelin to become biologically active, are receiving increasing attention as potential therapeutic options. We discuss the approaches utilized to target ghrelin signaling and highlight the current challenges toward developing small-molecule agents as potential therapeutics for ghrelin-related diseases.

  16. Molecular and biologic markers of progression in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance to multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Mailankody, Sham; Mena, Esther; Yuan, Constance M; Balakumaran, Arun; Kuehl, W Michael; Landgren, Ola

    2010-12-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant plasma cell dyscrasia localized in the bone marrow. Recent studies have shown that MM is preceded in virtually all cases by a premalignant state called monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). This review focuses on non-IgM MGUS and its progression to MM. Although certain clinical markers of MGUS progression have been identified, it currently is not possible to accurately determine individual risk of progression. This review focuses on the various biologic and molecular markers that could be used to determine the risk of MM progression. A better understanding of the pathogenesis will allow us to define the biological high-risk precursor disease and, ultimately, to develop early intervention strategies designed to delay and prevent full-blown MM.

  17. Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July-December 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-06-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July-December 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications.

  18. Quarterly Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: April-June 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-04-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during th eperiod April-June 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications.

  19. [Progress in molecular biology of a semi-mangrove, Millettia pinnata].

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianzi; Zhang, Wanke; Huang, Rongfeng; Zheng, Yizhi

    2015-04-01

    Millettia pinnata L. is a leguminous tree with great potential in biodiesel applications and also a typical semi-mangrove. In this review, we presented several aspects about the recent research progress in molecular biology of M. pinnata. We descrived several types of molecular markers used to assess the genetic diversity and phylogeny of this species, genome and transcriptome analyses based on high-throughput sequencing platform accomplished for this species, and several gene and genomic sequences of this species isolated for further research. Finally, based on the current research progress, we proposed some orientations for future molecular biology research on M. pinnata.

  20. [Progress of environmental monitoring and biological containment system on genetically engineered microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Li, Qin; Wu, Yijun

    2008-03-01

    With the development of biological technology, many genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs) for special purposes have been constructed and developed, but their practical applications in the field are still limited because GEMs may cause new environmental contaminations. To minimize the potential risks, the organisms released to environment need to be monitored and restricted for their distribution. In the laboratory conditions, the GEMs can be wiped off when required using some new biological technologies. The recent progress of research on the monitoring methods and active biological containment system for GEMs were reviewed in this paper.

  1. Quarterly Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: January-March 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-03-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period January-March 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within nine major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Biotechnology, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies.

  2. Development and applications of photosensitive device systems to studies of biological and organic materials. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The purpose was to develop and improve appropriate experimental techniques to the point where they could be applied to specific classes of biological problems. Progress is reported in the following areas: (1) area detectors; (2) x-ray diffraction studies of membranes; (3) electron transfer in loosely coupled systems; (4) bioluminescence and fluorescence; and (5) sonoluminescence. (ACR)

  3. Reconstructing the Temporal Progression of Biological Data using Cluster Spanning Trees.

    PubMed

    Eshleman, Ryan; Singh, Rahul

    2017-02-09

    Identifying the temporal progression of a set of biological samples is crucial for comprehending the dynamics of the underlying molecular interactions. It is often also a basic step in data denoising and synchronization. Finally, identifying the progression order is crucial for problems like cell lineage identification, disease progression, tumor classification, and epidemiology and thus impacts the spectrum of disciplines spanning basic biology, drug discovery, and public health. Current methods that attempt solving this problem face difficulty when it is necessary to factor-in complex relationships within the data such as grouping, partial ordering or bifurcating or multifurcating progressions. We propose the notion of Cluster Spanning Trees (CST) that can model both linear as well as the aforementioned complex progression relationships in temporally evolving data. Through a number of experimental investigations involving synthetic data sets as well as datasets from the cell cycle, cellular differentiation, phenotypic screening, and genetic variation, we show that the proposed CST approach outperforms existing methods in reconstructing the temporal progression of the data.

  4. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July--September 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1998-07-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July--September 1997. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within nine major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Biotechnology, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information.

  5. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: January--March 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division (CTD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period January--March 1997. Created in March 1997 when the CTD Chemical Development and Energy Research sections were combined, the Chemical and Energy Research Section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within seven major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Solution Thermodynamics, and Biotechnology Research. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described in the report, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information.

  6. Annual progress report, July 1, 1979-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Research progress is reported for the year 1979-1980. The report is divided into sections dealing individually with the divisions of Biomolecular and Cellular Science, Environmental Biology, and Nuclear Medicine. The sections have been individually entered into EDB. (ACR)

  7. An Examination of the Influence of Institutional Context on Academic Progress Rates at Division I Institutions: A Multilevel Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Jacqueline Elaine

    2012-01-01

    The growing attention given to intercollegiate athletics in recent years amid ongoing controversies highlights the importance of closely examining the implementation and impact of sports policy on college campuses. In an attempt to improve the academic performance and retention of student-athletes, the Academic Progress Rate (APR) was implemented…

  8. The Impact of the Academic Progress Rating on the Retention and Recruiting Strategies of NCAA Division I Football Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Joshua

    2010-01-01

    In 2004, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) adopted legislation that it hoped would help increase the graduation rates of student athletes. The Academic Progress Rating (APR), was designed to hold each individual athletic program accountable for keeping student athletes eligible and at the institution until the student athlete…

  9. A Longitudinal Study of Academic Progress Rate as a Result of Team and Institutional Variables at NCAA Division I Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Jimmie Edwin

    2014-01-01

    This study explained Academic Progress Rate (APR) levels and differences in APR (DAPR) with team and institutional variables. Team variables included team gender, sport profile, and squad size. Institutional variables included individual variables aggregated to the institutional level. The data analyzed in this study was derived from the National…

  10. The Impact of the Academic Progress Rating on the Retention and Recruiting Strategies of NCAA Division I Football Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Joshua

    2010-01-01

    In 2004, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) adopted legislation that it hoped would help increase the graduation rates of student athletes. The Academic Progress Rating (APR), was designed to hold each individual athletic program accountable for keeping student athletes eligible and at the institution until the student athlete…

  11. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: October-December 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-02-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period October--December 1997. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within six major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information. Activities conducted within the area of Hot Cell Operations included efforts to optimize the processing conditions for Enhanced Sludge Washing of Hanford tank sludge, the testing of candidate absorbers and ion exchangers under continuous-flow conditions using actual supernatant from the Melton Valley Storage Tanks, and attempts to develop a cesium-specific spherical inorganic sorbent for the treatment of acidic high-salt waste solutions. Within the area of Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, the problem of solids formation in process solutions from caustic treatment of Hanford sludge was addressed and experimental collaborative efforts with Russian scientists to determine the solidification conditions of yttrium barium, and copper oxides from their melts were completed.

  12. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical Development Section of the Chemical Technology Division: October--December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1997-06-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical Development Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period October-December 1996. The report describes ten tasks conducted in four major areas of research and development within the section. The first major research area -- Chemical Processes for Waste Management -- includes the following tasks: Comprehensive Supernate Treatment, Partitioning of Sludge Components by Caustic Leaching, Hot Demonstration of Proposed Commercial Nuclide Removal Technology, Development and Testing of Inorganic Sorbents, and Sludge Treatment Studies. Within the second research area -- Reactor Fuel Chemistry -- the distribution of iodine in containment during an AP600 design-basis accident was evaluated using models in the TRENDS code. Within the third research area -- Thermodynamics -- efforts continued in the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of energy-Related Materials task. The fourth major research area -- Processes for Waste Management -- includes work on these tasks: Ion-Exchange Process for Heavy Metals Removal, Search for Technetium in Natural Metallurgical Residues, and Waste Form Development and Testing of a Glass- and Cement-Based Dedicated Hot-Cell Facility.

  13. IFLA General Conference, 1987. Division of Special Libraries. Biological and Medical Science Libraries Section. Social Science Libraries Section. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Six of the nine papers in this collection focus on biological and medical science libraries; the remaining three are concerned with social science libraries. The papers on biological and medical science libraries appear first in this list: (1) "Standards for Medical and Health Care Libraries: Canada" (Jan Greenwood, Canada); (2) "Standards for…

  14. Barrett's Esophagus Translational Research Network (BETRNet) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The goal of BETRNet is to reduce the incidence, morbidity, and mortality of esophageal adenocarcinoma by answering key questions related to the progression of the disease, especially in the premalignant stage. In partnership with NCI’s Division of Cancer Biology, multidisciplinary translational research centers collaborate to better understand the biology of Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma to improve risk stratification and develop prevention strategies. | Multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional collaboration to enhance understanding of Barrett's esophagus and to prevent esophageal adenocarcinoma.

  15. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical Development Section of the Chemical Technology Division: April--June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1996-11-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical Development Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period April--June 1996. The report describes 12 tasks conducted in 4 major areas of research and development within the section. The first major research area--Chemical Processes for Waste Management--includes the following tasks: Comprehensive Supernate Treatment, Partitioning of Sludge Components by Caustic Leaching, Studies on Treatment of Dissolved MVST Sludge Using TRUEX Process, ACT*DE*CON{sup SM} Test Program, Hot Demonstration of Proposed Commercial Nuclide Removal Technology, Sludge Treatment Studies, and Development and Testing of Inorganic Sorbents. Within the second research area--Reactor Fuel Chemistry--a new scope of work for the Technical Assistance in Review of Advanced Reactors task has been established to include assessments of iodine behavior nd pH control in operating nuclear reactor containments as well as in advanced reactor systems. This task is on hold, awaiting finalization of the revised proposal and receipt of the necessary information from Westinghouse to permit the start of the study. Within the third research area--Thermodynamics--the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Energy-Related Materials task has used a differential thermal analysis (DTA)/thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to study the phase transitions of phase-pure YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} (123). The fourth major research area--Processes for Waste Management--includes work on these tasks: Ion Exchange Process for Heavy Metals Removal, Hot Cell Cross-Flow Filtration Studies of Gunite Tank Sludges, and Chemical Conversion of Nitrate Directly to Nitrogen Gas: A Feasibility Study.

  16. Quarterly Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July-September 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    2001-04-16

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July-September 1999. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within ten major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Physical Properties Research, Biochemical Engineering, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structures and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information. Activities conducted within the area of the Cell Operations involved the testing of two continuously stirred tank reactors in series to evaluate the Savannah River-developed process of small-tank tetraphenylborate precipitation to remove cesium, strontium and transuranics from supernatant. Within the area of Process Chemistry, various topics related to solids formation in process solutions from caustic treatment of Hanford sludge were addressed. Saltcake dissolution efforts continued, including the development of a predictive algorithm. New initiatives for the section included modeling activities centered on detection of hydrogen in {sup 233}U storage wells and wax formation in petroleum mixtures, as well as support for the Spallation Neutron Source (investigation of transmutation products formed during operation). Other activities involved in situ grouting and evaluation of options for use (i.e., as castable shapes) of depleted uranium. In a continuation of activities of the preceding

  17. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: January-March 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-11-01

    This reports summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period January--March 1999. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within eight major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information. Activities conducted within the area of Hot Cell Operations included column loading of cesium from Melton Valley Storage Tank supematants using an engineered form of crystalline silicotitanate. A second task was to design and construct a continuously stirred tank reactor system to test the Savannah River-developed process of small-tank tetraphenylborate precipitation to remove cesium, strontium, and transuranics from supematant. Within the area of Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, the problem of solids formation in process solutions from caustic treatment of Hanford sludge was addressed, including issues such as pipeline plugging and viscosity measurements. Investigation of solution conditions required to dissolve Hanford saltcake was also continued. MSRE Remediation Studies focused on recovery of {sup 233}U and its transformation into a stable oxide and radiolysis experiments to permit remediation of MSRE fuel salt. In the area of Chemistry Research, activities included studies relative to molecular imprinting for

  18. Research by ESS Division for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations: Progress report, January-June 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Vaniman, D.

    1987-10-01

    Petrographic research for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations focused on xenolithic variability in the Topopah Spring Member and on variations of clinoptilolite composition at Yucca Mountain. Zeolite and smectite occurrences were considered in terms of their relation to a disturbed zone beneath the potential repository, and mineral stability experiments have produced a new clinoptilolite structure as a result of prolonged heating at low temperature. Limitations were defined on the abundance of erionite and of sulfur. X-ray diffraction studies lead to improved analytical methods. Progress was made in the comparative study of mineralogy in sand ramps and in faults. Geological modeling considered the differences of the diffusion of nonsorbing tracers in vertically and in horizontally fractured rock. Modeling also treated the diffusion of a nonsorbing tracer in devitrified and in zeolitized rock. The results of these experiments in all cases show relatively symmetrical two-dimensional diffusion patterns. Preliminary calculations compare the dispersion/diffusion of nonsorbing Tc with the dispersion/diffusion/sorption of U. 27 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Regular college preparatory students' perceptions of the student teams achievement divisions approach in an academic college preparatory biology class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Aarti P.

    Cooperative learning allows individuals with varying abilities to work alongside their peers. Students are placed into achievement levels based on placement test scores. The Regular College Preparatory (RCP) level is a score of 59% or lower and Academic College Preparatory (ACP) level is a score of 60-92% on the placement test. The purpose of this study was to obtain 9th grade RCP students' perceptions of the student teams achievement divisions (STAD) approach which allows each member of a team to have a defined role in group work. The research questions addressed 9 th grade RCP students' perceptions of integrated STAD teams. Qualitative data from 6 RCP participants were collected from interviews and observations. Data were analyzed using typological analysis by creating codes and categories. Findings indicated that RCP students retained more content and enhanced their skills in communication, critical thinking, and problem solving. Teachers need to serve as guides to monitor motivation and enhance peer interaction. School administrators are advised to provide professional development opportunities allowing educators to learn how to incorporate cooperation for optimal student learning communication, negotiation, and problem solving.

  20. [Research progress on biology and ecology of Harmonia axyridis Pallas (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)].

    PubMed

    Wang, Su; Zhang, Run-Zhi; Zhang, Fan

    2007-09-01

    Harmonia axyridis Pallas (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) with its native in Asia is one of the most important predatory ladybird beetles, and used worldwide as a biological control agent. This paper summarized the recent decades research progress at home and abroad on its life history, reproductive strategies, and predatory and cannibalism behaviors, and analysed the prospects of its utilization. Based on the review of its artificial reproduction, insecticide interaction, and impact as an invasive species, some useful measures were suggested to prevent the beetle from its potential risk to ecological banlance.

  1. Progress and Application of CRISPR/Cas Technology in Biological and Biomedical Investigation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiachen; Zhou, Yangzhong; Liu, Jiaqi; Chen, Jia; Chen, Weisheng; Zhao, Sen; Wu, Zhihong; Wu, Nan

    2017-10-01

    Based on the tremendous progress of the understanding on the CRISPR-Cas systems, the application CRISPR/Cas technology has been extended into increasing scenarios in biological and biomedical investigation. The potency of gene editing has been greatly improved by the rapid development of engineered Cas9 variants and modified CRISPR platforms. As advanced sequencing technology identified vast causative genetic basis for human diseases, CRISPR toolkits are now able to mediate precise genetic disruption or correction in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we have discussed the recent development of the CRISPR/Cas gene-editing technology and the extensive applications of the CRISPR platforms in biological and biomedical investigation, including disease modeling in animal and human cell line, development of gene therapy, as well as high-throughput genetic screening. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 3061-3071, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Building Capacity in Understanding Foundational Biology Concepts: A K-12 Learning Progression in Genetics Informed by Research on Children's Thinking and Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmesky, Rowhea

    2013-06-01

    This article describes the substance, structure, and rationale of a learning progression in genetics spanning kindergarten through twelfth grade (K-12). The learning progression is designed to build a foundation towards understanding protein structure and activity and should be viewed as one possible pathway to understanding concepts of genetics and ultimately protein expression, based on the existing research. The kindergarten through fifth grade segment reflects findings that show children have a rich knowledge base and sophisticated cognitive abilities, and therefore, is designed so that elementary-aged children can learn content in deep and abstract manners, as well as apply scientific explanations appropriate to their knowledge level. The article also details the LP segment facilitating secondary students' understanding by outlining the overlapping conceptual frames which guide student learning from cell structures and functions to cell splitting (both cell division and gamete formation) to genetics as trait transmission, culminating in genetics as protein expression. The learning progression product avoids the use of technical language, which has been identified as a prominent source of student misconceptions in learning cellular biology, and explicit connections between cellular and macroscopic phenomena are encouraged.

  3. | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  4. | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  5. Investigative cases and student outcomes in an upper-division cell and molecular biology laboratory course at a minority-serving institution.

    PubMed

    Knight, Jonathan D; Fulop, Rebecca M; Márquez-Magaña, Leticia; Tanner, Kimberly D

    2008-01-01

    Active-learning strategies are increasingly being integrated into college-level science courses to make material more accessible to all students and to improve learning outcomes. One active-learning pedagogy, case-based learning (CBL), was developed as a way to both enhance engagement in the material and to accommodate diverse learning styles. Yet, adoption of CBL approaches in undergraduate biology courses has been piecemeal, in part because of the perceived investment of time required. Furthermore, few CBL lesson plans have been developed specifically for upper-division laboratory courses. Here, we describe four cases that we developed and implemented for a senior cell and molecular biology laboratory course at San Francisco State University, a minority-serving institution. To evaluate the effectiveness of these modules, we used both written and verbal assessments to gauge learning outcomes and attitudinal responses of students over two semesters. Students responded positively to the new approach and seemed to meet the learning goals for the course. Most said they would take a course using CBL again. These case modules are readily adaptable to a variety of classroom settings.

  6. Recent Progress on Systems and Synthetic Biology Approaches to Engineer Fungi As Microbial Cell Factories.

    PubMed

    Amores, Gerardo Ruiz; Guazzaroni, María-Eugenia; Arruda, Letícia Magalhães; Silva-Rocha, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    Filamentous fungi are remarkable organisms naturally specialized in deconstructing plant biomass and this feature has a tremendous potential for biofuel production from renewable sources. The past decades have been marked by a remarkable progress in the genetic engineering of fungi to generate industry-compatible strains needed for some biotech applications. In this sense, progress in this field has been marked by the utilization of high-throughput techniques to gain deep understanding of the molecular machinery controlling the physiology of these organisms, starting thus the Systems Biology era of fungi. Additionally, genetic engineering has been extensively applied to modify wellcharacterized promoters in order to construct new expression systems with enhanced performance under the conditions of interest. In this review, we discuss some aspects related to significant progress in the understating and engineering of fungi for biotechnological applications, with special focus on the construction of synthetic promoters and circuits in organisms relevant for industry. Different engineering approaches are shown, and their potential and limitations for the construction of complex synthetic circuits in these organisms are examined. Finally, we discuss the impact of engineered promoter architecture in the single-cell behavior of the system, an often-neglected relationship with a tremendous impact in the final performance of the process of interest. We expect to provide here some new directions to drive future research directed to the construction of high-performance, engineered fungal strains working as microbial cell factories.

  7. Recent Progress on Systems and Synthetic Biology Approaches to Engineer Fungi As Microbial Cell Factories

    PubMed Central

    Amores, Gerardo Ruiz; Guazzaroni, María-Eugenia; Arruda, Letícia Magalhães; Silva-Rocha, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are remarkable organisms naturally specialized in deconstructing plant biomass and this feature has a tremendous potential for biofuel production from renewable sources. The past decades have been marked by a remarkable progress in the genetic engineering of fungi to generate industry-compatible strains needed for some biotech applications. In this sense, progress in this field has been marked by the utilization of high-throughput techniques to gain deep understanding of the molecular machinery controlling the physiology of these organisms, starting thus the Systems Biology era of fungi. Additionally, genetic engineering has been extensively applied to modify wellcharacterized promoters in order to construct new expression systems with enhanced performance under the conditions of interest. In this review, we discuss some aspects related to significant progress in the understating and engineering of fungi for biotechnological applications, with special focus on the construction of synthetic promoters and circuits in organisms relevant for industry. Different engineering approaches are shown, and their potential and limitations for the construction of complex synthetic circuits in these organisms are examined. Finally, we discuss the impact of engineered promoter architecture in the single-cell behavior of the system, an often-neglected relationship with a tremendous impact in the final performance of the process of interest. We expect to provide here some new directions to drive future research directed to the construction of high-performance, engineered fungal strains working as microbial cell factories. PMID:27226765

  8. Biology and mechano-response of tendon cells: progress overview and perspectives†

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hui B.; Schaniel, Christoph; Leong, Daniel J.; Wang, James H-C.

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we summarize the group discussions on Cell Biology & Mechanics from the 2014 ORS/ISMMS New Frontiers in Tendon Research Conference. The major discussion topics included: 1) the biology of tendon stem/progenitor cells (TSPCs) and the potential of stem cell-based tendon therapy using TSPCs and other types of stem cells, namely, embryonic and/or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), 2) the biological concept and potential impact of cellular senescence on tendon aging, tendon injury repair and the development of degenerative disease, and 3) the effects of tendon cells’ mechano-response on tendon cell fate and metabolism. For each topic, a brief overview is presented which summarizes the major points discussed by the group participants. The focus of the discussions ranged from current research progress, challenges and opportunities, to future directions on these topics. In the preparation of this manuscript, authors consulted relevant references as a part of their efforts to present an accurate view on the topics discussed. PMID:25728946

  9. Using chemical biology to assess and modulate mitochondria: progress and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    Our understanding of the role of mitochondria in biomedical sciences has expanded considerably over the past decade. In addition to their well-known metabolic roles, mitochondrial are also central to signalling for various processes through the generation of signals such as ROS and metabolites that affect cellular homeostasis, as well as other processes such as cell death and inflammation. Thus, mitochondrial function and dysfunction are central to the health and fate of the cell. Consequently, there is considerable interest in better understanding and assessing the many roles of mitochondria. Furthermore, there is also a growing realization that mitochondrial are a promising drug target in a wide range of pathologies. The application of interdisciplinary approaches at the interface between chemistry and biology are opening up new opportunities to understand mitochondrial function and in assessing the role of the organelle in biology. This work and the experience thus gained are leading to the development of new classes of therapies. Here, we overview the progress that has been made to date on exploring the chemical biology of the organelle and then focus on future challenges and opportunities that face this rapidly developing field. PMID:28382206

  10. Progress in the Biological Understanding and Management of Breast Cancer-Associated Central Nervous System Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    Metastasis to the central nervous system (CNS) is a devastating neurological complication of systemic cancer. Brain metastases from breast cancer have been documented to occur in approximately 10%–16% of cases over the natural course of the disease with leptomeningeal metastases occurring in approximately 2%–5% of cases of breast cancer. CNS metastases among women with breast cancer tend to occur among those who are younger, have larger tumors, and have a more aggressive histological subtype such as the triple negative and HER2-positive subtypes. Treatment of CNS metastases involves various combinations of whole brain radiation therapy, surgery, stereotactic radiosurgery, and chemotherapy. We will discuss the progress made in the treatment and prevention of breast cancer-associated CNS metastases and will delve into the biological underpinnings of CNS metastases including evaluating the role of breast tumor subtype on the incidence, natural history, prognostic outcome, and impact of therapeutic efficacy. PMID:23740934

  11. Studies of acute and chronic radiation injury at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 1970-1992: The JANUS Program Survival and Pathology Data

    SciTech Connect

    Grahn, D.; Wright, B.J.; Carnes, B.A.; Williamson, F.S.; Fox, C.

    1995-02-01

    A research reactor for exclusive use in experimental radiobiology was designed and built at Argonne National Laboratory in the 1960`s. It was located in a special addition to Building 202, which housed the Division of Biological and Medical Research. Its location assured easy access for all users to the animal facilities, and it was also near the existing gamma-irradiation facilities. The water-cooled, heterogeneous 200-kW(th) reactor, named JANUS, became the focal point for a range of radiobiological studies gathered under the rubic of {open_quotes}the JANUS program{close_quotes}. The program ran from about 1969 to 1992 and included research at all levels of biological organization, from subcellular to organism. More than a dozen moderate- to large-scale studies with the B6CF{sub 1} mouse were carried out; these focused on the late effects of whole-body exposure to gamma rays or fission neutrons, in matching exposure regimes. In broad terms, these studies collected data on survival and on the pathology observed at death. A deliberate effort was made to establish the cause of death. This archieve describes these late-effects studies and their general findings. The database includes exposure parameters, time of death, and the gross pathology and histopathology in codified form. A series of appendices describes all pathology procedures and codes, treatment or irradiation codes, and the manner in which the data can be accessed in the ORACLE database management system. A series of tables also presents summaries of the individual experiments in terms of radiation quality, sample sizes at entry, mean survival times by sex, and number of gross pathology and histopathology records.

  12. Molecular Biology and Genetic Mechanisms in the Progression of the Malignant Skin Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Pejkova, Sofija; Dzokic, Gjorgje; Tudzarova-Gjorgova, Smilja; Panov, Sasho

    2016-11-01

    Malignant skin melanoma is a tumor deriving from transformed skin melanocytes as a result of complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. This melanoma has a potential to metastasize early and very often it is resistant to the existing modalities of the systemic therapy. As in any other neoplasms, certain types of melanoma may skip certain stages of progression. The progression from one stage to another is accompanied by specific biological changes. Several key changes in the melanoma tumorogenesis influence the regulation of the cell proliferation and vitality, including the RAS-RAF-ERK, PI3K-AKT, and p16INK4/CDK4/RB pathways. A key role in the dissreguarity of the RAS-RAF-ERK (MAPK) pathway in the malignant melanoma development have been demonstrated by many studies. To date, the molecular genetic alterations during melanoma development have been partially known. In the pathogenesis of the malignant melanoma, there are mutations of various genes such as NRAS, BRAF, and PTEN and mutations and deletions of CDKN2A. In the past years, great advance has been made in the insights of the molecular aspects of the melanoma pathogenesis. However, this field yet poses a challenge to discover new details about the melanoma molecular characteristics. The research results are focused towards the improvement of the melanoma patients prognosis by introducing personalized targeted therapy.

  13. Division i: Fundamental Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Dennis D.; Klioner, Sergei A.; Vondrák, Jan; Evans, Dafydd Wyn; Hohenkerk, Catherine Y.; Hosokawa, Mizuhiko; Huang, Cheng-Li; Kaplan, George H.; Knežević, Zoran; Manchester, Richard N.; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Petit, Gérard; Schuh, Harald; Soffel, Michael H.; Zacharias, Norbert

    2012-04-01

    The goal of the division is to address the scientific issues that were developed at the 2009 IAU General Assembly in Rio de Janeiro. These are:•Astronomical constants-Gaussian gravitational constant, Astronomical Unit, GMSun, geodesic precession-nutation•Astronomical software•Solar System Ephemerides-Pulsar research-Comparison of dynamical reference frames•Future Optical Reference Frame•Future Radio Reference Frame•Exoplanets-Detection-Dynamics•Predictions of Earth orientation•Units of measurements for astronomical quantities in relativistic context•Astronomical units in the relativistic framework•Time-dependent ecliptic in the GCRS•Asteroid masses•Review of space missions•Detection of gravitational waves•VLBI on the Moon•Real time electronic access to UT1-UTCIn pursuit of these goals Division I members have made significant scientific and organizational progress, and are organizing a Joint Discussion on Space-Time Reference Systems for Future Research at the 2012 IAU General Assembly. The details of Division activities and references are provided in the individual Commission and Working Group reports in this volume. A comprehensive list of references related to the work of the Division is available at the IAU Division I website at http://maia.usno.navy.mil/iaudiv1/.

  14. How to integrate biological research into society and exclude errors in biomedical publications? Progress in theoretical and systems biology releases pressure on experimental research.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Vadim

    2014-01-01

    This brief opinion proposes measures to increase efficiency and exclude errors in biomedical research under the existing dynamic situation. Rapid changes in biology began with the description of the three dimensional structure of DNA 60 years ago; today biology has progressed by interacting with computer science and nanoscience together with the introduction of robotic stations for the acquisition of large-scale arrays of data. These changes have had an increasing influence on the entire research and scientific community. Future advance demands short-term measures to ensure error-proof and efficient development. They can include the fast publishing of negative results, publishing detailed methodical papers and excluding a strict connection between career progression and publication activity, especially for younger researchers. Further development of theoretical and systems biology together with the use of multiple experimental methods for biological experiments could also be helpful in the context of years and decades. With regards to the links between science and society, it is reasonable to compare both these systems, to find and describe specific features for biology and to integrate it into the existing stream of social life and financial fluxes. It will increase the level of scientific research and have mutual positive effects for both biology and society. Several examples are given for further discussion.

  15. Biological Sciences Division 1991 Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    species and strains of synbiotic and free-living algae . These profiles will be with special regard to mono-and di-saccharides, amine sugars , amino...steroidal glysoconjugates were constructed by attaching sugars to various cholic acid derivatives using a glycosylation method developed in our...This enzyme has been used as a catalyst in regioselective acylation of polyhydroxylated compounds including sugars and nucleosides, enantioselective

  16. Artificial gametes: a systematic review of biological progress towards clinical application.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Saskia; Dancet, Eline A F; van Pelt, Ans M M; Hamer, Geert; Repping, Sjoerd

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in the formation of artificial gametes, i.e. gametes generated by manipulation of their progenitors or of somatic cells, has led to scientific and societal discussion about their use in medically assisted reproduction (MAR). Artificial gametes could potentially help infertile men and women but also post-menopausal women and gay couples conceive genetically related children. This systematic review aimed to provide insight in the progress of biological research towards clinical application of artificial gametes. The electronic database 'Medline/Pubmed' was systematically searched with medical subject heading (MesH) terms, and reference lists of eligible studies were hand searched. Studies in English between January 1970 and December 2013 were selected based on meeting a priori defined starting- and end-points of gamete development, including gamete formation, fertilization and the birth of offspring. For each biologically plausible method to form artificial gametes, data were extracted on the potential to generate artificial gametes that might be used to achieve fertilization and to result in the birth of offspring in animals and humans. The systematic search yielded 2424 articles, and 70 studies were included after screening. In animals, artificial sperm and artificial oocytes generated from germline stem cells (GSCs), embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have resulted in the birth of viable offspring. Also in animals, artificial sperm and artificial oocytes have been generated from somatic cells directly, i.e. without documentation of intermediate stages of stem- or germ cell development or (epi)genetic status. Finally, although the subsequent embryos showed hampered development, haploidization by transplantation of a somatic cell nucleus into an enucleated donor oocyte has led to fertilized artificial oocytes. In humans, artificial sperm has been generated from ESCs and iPSCs. Artificial human oocytes have been

  17. Minichromosome maintenance 7 protein is a reliable biological marker for human cervical progressive disease

    PubMed Central

    Lobato, Soraya; Tafuri, Alexandre; Fernandes, Paula Ávila; Caliari, Marcelo Vidigal; Silva, Marcos Xavier; Xavier, Marcelo Antônio Pascoal

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study focused on comparing the expression levels of p16, Ki-67, and minichromosome maintenance 7 (MCM7) protein in normal and affected cervical epithelium to ascertain the biological significance of these markers in detecting progressive cervical disease. Methods A quantitative and based on-scanning-microscopy analysis of the three markers expression was performed in normal and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) I, II, and III tissues. p16 area as well as p16, Ki-67, and MCM7 positive cells or nuclei were evaluated according to their distribution and extent through the cervical epithelium. Results A clear p16 over-expression was observed in all the dysplastic epithelium tissue samples. The quantitative analysis of p16 area as well as the number of p16 positive cells was able to better discriminate the CIN lesions grades than the usual semi-quantitative analysis. The average Ki-67 labeling indexes for the normal epithelium, CIN I, CIN II, and CIN III groups were 19.8%, 27.3%, 32.8%, and 37.1%, respectively, whereas the mean MCM7 labeling indexes for the correspondent grades were 27.0%, 30.4%, 50.5%, and 67.2%. The Ki-67 and MCM7 labeling indexes were closely correlated with the CIN histological grade, with higher labeling indexe values obtained from the more severe lesions (p<0.05), being the MCM7 labeling indexes the highest values in all the CIN categories (p<0.05). Conclusion We observed a good correlation among the p16, Ki-67, and MCM7 data. In addition, MCM7 demonstrated to be a more efficient and sensitive marker to assess disease progression in the uterine cervix. PMID:22355461

  18. Understanding Microbial Divisions of Labor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheren; Claessen, Dennis; Rozen, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Divisions of labor are ubiquitous in nature and can be found at nearly every level of biological organization, from the individuals of a shared society to the cells of a single multicellular organism. Many different types of microbes have also evolved a division of labor among its colony members. Here we review several examples of microbial divisions of labor, including cases from both multicellular and unicellular microbes. We first discuss evolutionary arguments, derived from kin selection, that allow divisions of labor to be maintained in the face of non-cooperative cheater cells. Next we examine the widespread natural variation within species in their expression of divisions of labor and compare this to the idea of optimal caste ratios in social insects. We highlight gaps in our understanding of microbial caste ratios and argue for a shift in emphasis from understanding the maintenance of divisions of labor, generally, to instead focusing on its specific ecological benefits for microbial genotypes and colonies. Thus, in addition to the canonical divisions of labor between, e.g., reproductive and vegetative tasks, we may also anticipate divisions of labor to evolve to reduce the costly production of secondary metabolites or secreted enzymes, ideas we consider in the context of streptomycetes. The study of microbial divisions of labor offers opportunities for new experimental and molecular insights across both well-studied and novel model systems. PMID:28066387

  19. [Progress in down-stream processing of biologically produced 1,3-propanediol].

    PubMed

    Wu, Ruchun; Xu, Yunzhen; Liu, Dehua

    2011-03-01

    1,3-propanediol is an important raw material in chemical industry. Microbial conversion of glycerol or glucose into 1,3-propanediol has been given much attention due to its renewable resource, mild reaction conditions, and other advantages. It is a challenge to efficiently separate 1,3-propanediol from a mixture of multiple components, such as 1,3-propanediol, 2,3-butanediol, water, residual glycerol, ethanol, macromolecules and salts, for the reason that 1,3-propanediol, glycerol and 2,3-butanediol are all very hydrophilic and have intense polarity. The conventional evaporation and distillation techniques used in the purification of 1,3-propanediol suffer from the problem of high energy consumption and low recovery. It makes the recovery of 1,3-propanediol from a fermentation broth become a bottleneck in industrial production. The down-stream processing of biologically produced 1,3-propanediol mainly includes the removal of protein, salts, water and other impurities. This paper analyze the research progress of these separation technologies and point out the developing direction worth further investigation.

  20. New-onset vitiligo and progression of pre-existing vitiligo during treatment with biological agents in chronic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Méry-Bossard, L; Bagny, K; Chaby, G; Khemis, A; Maccari, F; Marotte, H; Perrot, J L; Reguiai, Z; Sigal, M L; Avenel-Audran, M; Boyé, T; Grasland, A; Gillard, J; Jullien, D; Toussirot, E

    2017-01-01

    The development of vitiligo during treatment with biological agents is an unusual event and only a few isolated cases have been reported. To describe the clinical characteristics and evolution of patients developing new-onset vitiligo following initiation of a biological agent for chronic inflammatory disease; and also to report the clinical course of pre-existing vitiligo under biological therapy. This nationwide multicentre, retrospective study, carried out between July 2013 and January 2015, describes the characteristics of a large series of 18 patients (psoriasis N = 8, inflammatory rheumatic diseases N = 8, ulcerative colitis N = 1, uveitis N = 1) who developed new-onset vitiligo while receiving a biological agent. TNFα inhibitors were the most common biological agent involved (13/18) while anti-IL-12/23 and anti-IL-17 agents or abatacept were less common (4/18 and 1/18 respectively). Mean duration of biological agent exposure before vitiligo onset was 13.9 ± 16.5 months. Outcome was favourable for most patients (15/17) while maintaining the biological agent. Data were also collected for 18 patients (psoriasis N = 5, inflammatory rheumatic diseases N = 10, inflammatory bowel diseases N = 2, SAPHO N = 1) who had pre-existing vitiligo when treatment with a biological agent started (TNFα inhibitors N = 15, ustekinumab N = 1, rituximab N = 1, tocilizumab N = 1). Vitiligo progressed in seven patients and was stable or improved in eight cases. Vitiligo may thus emerge and/or progress during treatment with various biological agents, mainly TNFα inhibitors and could be a new paradoxical skin reaction. De novo vitiligo displays a favourable outcome when maintaining the biological agent, whereas the prognosis seems worse in cases of pre-existing vitiligo. © 2016 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  1. B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia: recent progress in biology, diagnosis, and therapy.

    PubMed

    Montserrat, E; Bosch, F; Rozman, C

    1997-01-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a highly common form of leukemia characterized by the accumulation of long-lived, functionally inactive, mature appearing neoplastic B lymphocytes. In addition, immune disturbances such as hypogammaglobulinemia and autoimmune phenomena (particularly, autoimmune hemolytic anemia) are frequently found in CLL patients [1-2]. The etiology of CLL is unknown. In contrast with other leukemias, there is no relationship between CLL and exposure to radiation or other cytotoxic agents. A genetic basis is highly likely since there are differences in the incidence of CLL in different countries (e.g., CLL accounts for 30%-40% of all the leukemias in Western countries as compared to 5%-10% in Asian countries) and the risk of contracting CLL is higher among persons with first-degree relatives with the disease [3]. Because the incidence of CLL increases with age and the longer life expectancy of the general population, the age of patients at diagnosis is increasing. The median age at diagnosis is now about 70 years, with only one-third of the patients being less than 60 years of age. In the majority of the series, males predominate over females in a proportion of 1.5/1. The prognosis of patients with CLL is variable. However, clinical stages and other prognostic factors allow the individual risk of each patient to be assessed very accurately, which is useful for making treatment decisions. In the past two decades, significant progress has been made in CLL [4-10]. This review summarizes recent advances in the biology, diagnosis, and therapy of CLL.

  2. Structures Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center Structures Division is an international leader and pioneer in developing new structural analysis, life prediction, and failure analysis related to rotating machinery and more specifically to hot section components in air-breathing aircraft engines and spacecraft propulsion systems. The research consists of both deterministic and probabilistic methodology. Studies include, but are not limited to, high-cycle and low-cycle fatigue as well as material creep. Studies of structural failure are at both the micro- and macrolevels. Nondestructive evaluation methods related to structural reliability are developed, applied, and evaluated. Materials from which structural components are made, studied, and tested are monolithics and metal-matrix, polymer-matrix, and ceramic-matrix composites. Aeroelastic models are developed and used to determine the cyclic loading and life of fan and turbine blades. Life models are developed and tested for bearings, seals, and other mechanical components, such as magnetic suspensions. Results of these studies are published in NASA technical papers and reference publication as well as in technical society journal articles. The results of the work of the Structures Division and the bibliography of its publications for calendar year 1995 are presented.

  3. Asymmetric Segregation of the Double-Stranded RNA Binding Protein Staufen2 during Mammalian Neural Stem Cell Divisions Promotes Lineage Progression

    PubMed Central

    Kusek, Gretchen; Campbell, Melissa; Doyle, Frank; Tenenbaum, Scott A.; Kiebler, Michael; Temple, Sally

    2012-01-01

    Summary Asymmetric cell divisions are a fundamental feature of neural development, and misregulation can lead to brain abnormalities or tumor formation. During an asymmetric cell division, molecular determinants are segregated preferentially into one daughter cell to specify its fate. An important goal is to identify the asymmetric determinants in neural progenitor cells, which could be tumor suppressors or inducers of specific neural fates. Here we show that the double-stranded RNA-binding protein Stau2 is distributed asymmetrically during progenitor divisions in the developing mouse cortex, preferentially segregating into the Tbr2+ neuroblast daughter, taking with it a sub-set of RNAs. Knockdown of Stau2 stimulates differentiation and over-expression produces periventricular neuronal masses, demonstrating its functional importance for normal cortical development. We immunoprecipitated Stau2 to examine its cargo mRNAs, and found enrichment for known asymmetric and basal cell determinants, such as Trim32, and identified novel candidates, including a subset involved in primary cilium function. PMID:22902295

  4. Chloroplast division checkpoint in eukaryotic algae

    PubMed Central

    Sumiya, Nobuko; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Era, Atsuko; Miyagishima, Shin-ya

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts evolved from a cyanobacterial endosymbiont. It is believed that the synchronization of endosymbiotic and host cell division, as is commonly seen in existing algae, was a critical step in establishing the permanent organelle. Algal cells typically contain one or only a small number of chloroplasts that divide once per host cell cycle. This division is based partly on the S-phase–specific expression of nucleus-encoded proteins that constitute the chloroplast-division machinery. In this study, using the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae, we show that cell-cycle progression is arrested at the prophase when chloroplast division is blocked before the formation of the chloroplast-division machinery by the overexpression of Filamenting temperature-sensitive (Fts) Z2-1 (Fts72-1), but the cell cycle progresses when chloroplast division is blocked during division-site constriction by the overexpression of either FtsZ2-1 or a dominant-negative form of dynamin-related protein 5B (DRP5B). In the cells arrested in the prophase, the increase in the cyclin B level and the migration of cyclin-dependent kinase B (CDKB) were blocked. These results suggest that chloroplast division restricts host cell-cycle progression so that the cell cycle progresses to the metaphase only when chloroplast division has commenced. Thus, chloroplast division and host cell-cycle progression are synchronized by an interactive restriction that takes place between the nucleus and the chloroplast. In addition, we observed a similar pattern of cell-cycle arrest upon the blockage of chloroplast division in the glaucophyte alga Cyanophora paradoxa, raising the possibility that the chloroplast division checkpoint contributed to the establishment of the permanent organelle. PMID:27837024

  5. Empirical Validation of a Modern Genetics Progression Web for College Biology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Amber; Romine, William L.

    2017-01-01

    Research in learning progressions (LPs) has been essential towards building understanding of how students' ideas change over time. There has been little work, however, into how ideas between separate but related constructs within a multi-faceted LP relate. The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on the idea of "progression webs" to…

  6. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1993--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1994-05-01

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a blend of physics, chemistry and biology and epitomizes the multidisciplinary approach towards understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. To an increasing extent, the focus of attention is on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights from the past year are briefly described.

  7. Status and progress in large-scale assessment of biological diversity in the United States

    Treesearch

    S. R. Shifley; C. H. Flather; W. B. Smith; K. H. Riitters; C. H. Sieg

    2010-01-01

    Conservation of biological diversity is one of seven criteria used to evaluate forest sustainability in the United States. The status of biological diversity is characterized by nine indicators that report area, protected status, and fragmentation of forest habitats; number and conservation status of forest-associated species; range and abundance of forest species to...

  8. Characterization of dependencies between growth and division in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Mayhew, Michael B; Iversen, Edwin S; Hartemink, Alexander J

    2017-02-01

    Cell growth and division are processes vital to the proliferation and development of life. Coordination between these two processes has been recognized for decades in a variety of organisms. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this coordination or 'size control' appears as an inverse correlation between cell size and the rate of cell-cycle progression, routinely observed in G1 prior to cell division commitment. Beyond this point, cells are presumed to complete S/G2/M at similar rates and in a size-independent manner. As such, studies of dependence between growth and division have focused on G1 Moreover, in unicellular organisms, coordination between growth and division has commonly been analysed within the cycle of a single cell without accounting for correlations in growth and division characteristics between cycles of related cells. In a comprehensive analysis of three published time-lapse microscopy datasets, we analyse both intra- and inter-cycle dependencies between growth and division, revisiting assumptions about the coordination between these two processes. Interestingly, we find evidence (i) that S/G2/M durations are systematically longer in daughters than in mothers, (ii) of dependencies between S/G2/M and size at budding that echo the classical G1 dependencies, and (iii) in contrast with recent bacterial studies, of negative dependencies between size at birth and size accumulated during the cell cycle. In addition, we develop a novel hierarchical model to uncover inter-cycle dependencies, and we find evidence for such dependencies in cells growing in sugar-poor environments. Our analysis highlights the need for experimentalists and modellers to account for new sources of cell-to-cell variation in growth and division, and our model provides a formal statistical framework for the continued study of dependencies between biological processes.

  9. Characterization of dependencies between growth and division in budding yeast

    DOE PAGES

    Mayhew, Michael B.; Iversen, Edwin S.; Hartemink, Alexander J.

    2017-02-01

    Cell growth and division are processes vital to the proliferation and development of life. Coordination between these two processes has been recognized for decades in a variety of organisms. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this coordination or ‘size control’ appears as an inverse correlation between cell size and the rate of cell-cycle progression, routinely observed in G1 prior to cell division commitment. Beyond this point, cells are presumed to complete S/G2/M at similar rates and in a size-independent manner. As such, studies of dependence between growth and division have focused on G1. Moreover, in unicellular organisms, coordination between growthmore » and division has commonly been analyzed within the cycle of a single cell without accounting for correlations in growth and division characteristics between cycles of related cells. In a comprehensive analysis of three published time-lapse microscopy datasets, we analyze both intra- and inter-cycle dependencies between growth and division, revisiting assumptions about the coordination between these two processes. Interestingly, we find evidence (1) that S/G2/M durations are systematically longer in daughters than in mothers, (2) of dependencies between S/G2/M and size at budding that echo the classical G1 dependencies, and, (3) in contrast with recent bacterial studies, of negative dependencies between size at birth and size accumulated during the cell cycle. In addition, we develop a novel hierarchical model to uncover inter-cycle dependencies, and we find evidence for such dependencies in cells growing in sugar-poor environments. Our analysis highlights the need for experimentalists and modelers to account for new sources of cell-to-cell variation in growth and division, and our model provides a formal statistical framework for the continued study of dependencies between biological processes.« less

  10. 2012 Gordon Research Conference on Cellular and Molecular Fungal Biology, Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, Judith

    2012-06-22

    The Gordon Research Conference on Cellular and Molecular Fungal Biology was held at Holderness School, Holderness New Hampshire, June 17 - 22, 2012. The 2012 Gordon Conference on Cellular and Molecular Fungal Biology (CMFB) will present the latest, cutting-edge research on the exciting and growing field of molecular and cellular aspects of fungal biology. Topics will range from yeast to filamentous fungi, from model systems to economically important organisms, and from saprophytes and commensals to pathogens of plants and animals. The CMFB conference will feature a wide range of topics including systems biology, cell biology and morphogenesis, organismal interactions, genome organisation and regulation, pathogenesis, energy metabolism, biomass production and population genomics. The Conference was well-attended with 136 participants. Gordon Research Conferences does not permit publication of meeting proceedings.

  11. newsletter | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  12. Home | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Our Research The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into cancer. |

  13. Long Divisions

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-08

    The shadow of Saturn on the rings, which stretched across all of the rings earlier in Cassini's mission (see PIA08362), now barely makes it past the Cassini division. The changing length of the shadow marks the passing of the seasons on Saturn. As the planet nears its northern-hemisphere solstice in May 2017, the shadow will get even shorter. At solstice, the shadow's edge will be about 28,000 miles (45,000 kilometers) from the planet's surface, barely making it past the middle of the B ring. The moon Mimas is a few pixels wide, near the lower left in this image. This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 35 degrees above the ring plane. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on May 21, 2016. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 2.0 million miles (3.2 million kilometers) from Saturn. Image scale is 120 miles (190 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20494

  14. Recent progress in development of synthetic biology platforms and metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Woo, Han Min; Park, Jin-Byung

    2014-06-20

    The paradigm of synthetic biology has been evolving, along with relevant engineering, to achieve designed bio-systems. Synthetic biology has reached the point where it is possible to develop microbial strains to produce desired chemicals. Recent advances in this field have promoted metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum as an amino-acid producer for use in intelligent microbial-cell factories. Here, we review recent advances that address C. glutamicum as a potential model organism for synthetic biology, and evaluate their industrial applications. Finally, we highlight the perspective of developing C. glutamicum as a step toward advanced microbial-cell factories that could produce valuable chemicals from renewable resources.

  15. Revisiting the cell biology of the acyl-ACP:phosphate transacylase PlsX suggests that the phospholipid synthesis and cell division machineries are not coupled in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Sastre, Diego Emiliano; Bisson-Filho, Alexandre; de Mendoza, Diego; Gueiros-Filho, Frederico J

    2016-05-01

    PlsX is a central enzyme of phospholipid synthesis in bacteria, converting acyl-ACP to acyl-phosphate on the pathway to phosphatidic acid formation. PlsX has received attention because it plays a key role in the coordination of fatty acid and phospholipid synthesis. Recently, PlsX was also suggested to coordinate membrane synthesis with cell division in Bacillus subtilis. Here, we have re-investigated the cell biology of PlsX and determined that the enzyme is uniformly distributed on the membrane of most cells, but occasionally appears as membrane foci as well. Foci and homogenous patterns seem freely interconvertible but the prevalence of the uniform staining suggests that PlsX does not need to localize to specific sites to function correctly. We also investigated the relationship between PlsX and the divisome. In contrast to previous observations, PlsX's foci showed no obvious periodicity of localization and did not colocalize with the divisome. Furthermore, depletion of PlsX did not affect cell division if phospholipid synthesis is maintained by an alternative enzyme. These results suggest that coordination between division and membrane synthesis may not require physical or functional interactions between the divisome and phospholipid synthesis enzymes.

  16. Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division, 1991 Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Willard S., Ed.

    This report documents research and development performed under the sponsorship of the Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division of the Office of Naval Research in fiscal year 1991. It provides abstracts (title, principal investigator, project code, objective, approach, progress, and related reports) of projects of three program divisions (cognitive…

  17. Recent Progress of Propolis for Its Biological and Chemical Compositions and Its Botanical Origin

    PubMed Central

    Toreti, Viviane Cristina; Sato, Helia Harumi; Pastore, Glaucia Maria; Park, Yong Kun

    2013-01-01

    Propolis is the generic name given to the product obtained from resinous substances, which is gummy and balsamic and which is collected by bees from flowers, buds, and exudates of plants. It is a popular folk medicine possessing a broad spectrum of biological activities. These biological properties are related to its chemical composition and more specifically to the phenolic compounds that vary in their structure and concentration depending on the region of production, availability of sources to collect plant resins, genetic variability of the queen bee, the technique used for production, and the season in which propolis is produced. Many scientific articles are published every year in different international journal, and several groups of researchers have focused their attention on the chemical compounds and biological activity of propolis. This paper presents a review on the publications on propolis and patents of applications and biological constituents of propolis. PMID:23737843

  18. Biological processes in the water column of the south Atlantic bight: Zooplankton responses: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Paffenhoefer, G.A.

    1987-12-16

    The studies on which we report in the following segments represent interdisciplinary efforts to understand interactions of physical, chemical and biological processes on the southeastern continental shelf of the USA. The Georgia Bight Experiment was designed to determine the physical forces responsible for upwelling on the northeastern Florida and Georgia shelf during summer, trajectories and fate of those upwellings, and major chemical and biological processes therein. 5 refs.

  19. Instrumentation and Controls Division Progress Report for the Period July 1, 1994, to December 31, 1997: Working Together on New Horizons

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, D.W.

    1998-04-01

    The ORNL I&C Division was created to support DOE-funded research. We have since broadened our mission to include other sponsors as the need for our services has grown. This report summarizes some of the work we have been conducting on behalf of DOE, other federal agencies, and the private sector during the past three and a half years. Because we take on nearly 750 individual projects every year, much of our work cannot be reported in detail. We hope that these summaries are of interest and demonstrate that our work, rooted in DOE scientific and technological programs, can also benefit the nation, its industry, and its citizens in direct and tangible ways.

  20. Progression into the First Meiotic Division Is Sensitive to Histone H2a-H2b Dimer Concentration in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, K.; Simon, L.; Norris, D.

    1997-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains two genes for histone H2A and two for histone H2B located in two divergently transcribed gene pairs: HTA1-HTB1 and HTA2-HTB2. Diploid strains lacking HTA1-HTB1 (hta1-htb1Δ/hta1-htb1Δ, HTA2-HTB2/HTA2-HTB2) grow vegetatively, but will not sporulate. This sporulation phenotype results from a partial depletion of H2A-H2B dimers. Since the expression patterns of HTA1-HTB1 and HTA2-HTB2 are similar in mitosis and meiosis, the sporulation pathway is therefore more sensitive than the mitotic cycle to depletion of H2A-H2B dimers. After completing premeiotic DNA replication, commitment to meiotic recombination, and chiasma resolution, the hta1-htb1Δ/hta1-htb1Δ, HTA2-HTB2/HTA2-HTB2 mutant arrests before the first meiotic division. The arrest is not due to any obvious disruptions in spindle pole bodies or microtubules. The meiotic block is not bypassed in backgrounds homozygous for spo13, rad50Δ, or rad9Δ mutations, but is bypassed in the presence of hydroxyurea, a drug known to inhibit DNA chain elongation. We hypothesize that the deposition of H2A-H2B dimers in the mutant is unable to keep pace with the replication fork, thereby leading to a disruption in chromosome structure that interferes with the meiotic divisions. PMID:9055075

  1. Contrasting breast cancer molecular subtypes across serial tumor progression stages: biological and prognostic implications.

    PubMed

    Kimbung, Siker; Kovács, Anikó; Danielsson, Anna; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Lövgren, Kristina; Frostvik Stolt, Marianne; Tobin, Nicholas P; Lindström, Linda; Bergh, Jonas; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Fernö, Mårten; Hatschek, Thomas; Hedenfalk, Ingrid

    2015-10-20

    The relevance of the intrinsic subtypes for clinical management of metastatic breast cancer is not comprehensively established. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence and prognostic significance of drifts in tumor molecular subtypes during breast cancer progression. A well-annotated cohort of 304 women with advanced breast cancer was studied. Tissue microarrays of primary tumors and synchronous lymph node metastases were constructed. Conventional biomarkers were centrally assessed and molecular subtypes were assigned following the 2013 St Gallen guidelines. Fine-needle aspirates of asynchronous metastases were transcriptionally profiled and subtyped using PAM50. Discordant expression of individual biomarkers and molecular subtypes was observed during tumor progression. Primary luminal-like tumors were relatively unstable, frequently adopting a more aggressive subtype in the metastases. Notably, loss of ER expression and a luminal to non-luminal subtype conversion was associated with an inferior post-recurrence survival. In addition, ER and molecular subtype assessed at all tumor progression stages were independent prognostic factors for post-recurrence breast cancer mortality in multivariable analyses. Our results demonstrate that drifts in tumor molecular subtypes may occur during tumor progression, conferring adverse consequences on outcome following breast cancer relapse.

  2. Contrasting breast cancer molecular subtypes across serial tumor progression stages: biological and prognostic implications

    PubMed Central

    Kimbung, Siker; Kovács, Anikó; Danielsson, Anna; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Lövgren, Kristina; Stolt, Marianne Frostvik; Tobin, Nicholas P.; Lindström, Linda; Bergh, Jonas; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Fernö, Mårten; Hatschek, Thomas; Hedenfalk, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    The relevance of the intrinsic subtypes for clinical management of metastatic breast cancer is not comprehensively established. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence and prognostic significance of drifts in tumor molecular subtypes during breast cancer progression. A well-annotated cohort of 304 women with advanced breast cancer was studied. Tissue microarrays of primary tumors and synchronous lymph node metastases were constructed. Conventional biomarkers were centrally assessed and molecular subtypes were assigned following the 2013 St Gallen guidelines. Fine-needle aspirates of asynchronous metastases were transcriptionally profiled and subtyped using PAM50. Discordant expression of individual biomarkers and molecular subtypes was observed during tumor progression. Primary luminal-like tumors were relatively unstable, frequently adopting a more aggressive subtype in the metastases. Notably, loss of ER expression and a luminal to non-luminal subtype conversion was associated with an inferior post-recurrence survival. In addition, ER and molecular subtype assessed at all tumor progression stages were independent prognostic factors for post-recurrence breast cancer mortality in multivariable analyses. Our results demonstrate that drifts in tumor molecular subtypes may occur during tumor progression, conferring adverse consequences on outcome following breast cancer relapse. PMID:26375671

  3. An Unprecedented Revolution in Medicinal Chemistry Driven by the Progress of Biological Science.

    PubMed

    Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2017-01-01

    The eternal or ultimate goal of medicinal chemistry is to find most effective ways to treat various diseases and extend human beings' life as long as possible. Human being is a biological entity. To realize such an ultimate goal, the inputs or breakthroughs from the advances in biological science are no doubt most important that may even drive medicinal science into a revolution. In this review article, we are to address this from several different angles. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Novel CXCR3/CXCR7-Directed Biological Antagonist for Inhibition of Breast Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    100 ng/ml of pertussis toxin (List Biological Laboratories), 100 ng/ml of CXCL12 + 6 µM of U73122 ( Sigma ). Cells were treated with inhibitors one...Academy of Sciences 1028, 4693. Borner, M. M., Myers, C. E., Sartor, O., Sei , Y., Toko, T., Trepel, J. B., and Schneider, E. (1995). Drug-induced

  5. Quarterly Progress Report on the Biological Monitoring Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.M.; Ashwood, T.L.; Cicerone, D.S.; Greeley, M.S. Jr.; Hill, W.R.; Kszos, L.A.

    1996-12-30

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program ( BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Lear et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities.

  6. Recent progress in a classical biological control program for olive fruit fly in California

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae (Diptera: Tephritidae), causes severe damage to olive production worldwide. Control of olive fruit fly typically relies on pesticides, and under such conditions the impact of natural enemies is relatively low. About 15 years ago, the USDA-ARS European Biologic...

  7. The search for life's origins: Progress and future directions in planetary biology and chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The current state is reviewed of the study of chemical evolution and planetary biology and the probable future is discussed of the field, at least for the near term. To this end, the report lists the goals and objectives of future research and makes detailed, comprehensive recommendations for accomplishing them, emphasizing those issues that were inadequately discussed in earlier Space Studies Board reports.

  8. Biological Control of Old World climbing fern, Lygodium microphyllum - Recent progress with the brown lygodium moth

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Old World climbing fern, Lygodium microphyllum is one of the most serious invasive weeds impacting natural areas in southern and central Florida. Management of this weed using traditional methods has proved difficult and expensive, and has prompted efforts to develop biological control options for t...

  9. Progress report on the geology and ground-water hydrology of part of the Oahe Unit, James River Division, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waring, Gerald A.; Bush, W.H.

    1950-01-01

    The Oahe Unit, in the James River basin in eastern South Dakota, extends for about 100 miles north and south and is 20 to 80 miles wide, having the river as its east border. The Oahe irrigation project is planned to supply water to 750,000 to 1,500,000 acres of the most suitable land within the area. The studies that have been undertaken in the Oahe area by the Ground Water Division of the U. S. Geological Survey form a part of the investigations which are being carried on by several bureaus of the Department of the Interior and other government agencies for the conservation, control and utilization of the water resources of the Missouri River Basin. The field studies on which the present report is based were made during May 1947 through November 1948 and cover about 1,890 square miles in the southern part of the Oahe area. Data were collected on the character of the surficial geological deposits, and on the occurrence, movement, quantity, and quality of the groundwater supplies. The report describes the several water-bearing formations and presents nine typical logs of deep artesian wells. The records of fluctuation of the water table in 168 wells in or near the Oahe area are listed. Tabulated inventory of 3,257 wells and springs includes information on the observation wells and on all other wells that were noted within the area examined.

  10. Biology, Therapy and Implications of Tumor Exosomes in the Progression of Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Isola, Allison L.; Eddy, Kevinn; Chen, Suzie

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States, and about 6% of the estimated cancer diagnoses this year will be melanoma cases. Melanomas are derived from transformation of the pigment producing cells of the skin, melanocytes. Early stage melanoma is usually curable by surgical resection, but late stage or subsequent secondary metastatic tumors are treated with some success with chemotherapies, radiation and/or immunotherapies. Most cancer patients die from metastatic disease, which is especially the case in melanoma. A better understanding of tumor metastasis will provide insights and guide rational therapeutic designs. Recently, the importance of melanoma-derived exosomes in the progression of that cancer has become more apparent, namely, their role in various stages of metastasis, including the induction of migration, invasion, primary niche manipulation, immune modulation and pre-metastatic niche formation. This review focuses on the critical roles that melanoma exosomes play in the progression of this deadly disease. PMID:27941674

  11. The molecular biology of medullary thyroid carcinoma: A model for cancer development and progression

    SciTech Connect

    Nelkin, B.D.; de Bustros, A.C.; Mabry, M.; Baylin, S.B. )

    1989-06-02

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is an important human cancer for the study of molecular abnormalities that underlie initiation of neoplasia and subsequent cellular changes during tumor progression. Thus tumor can occur in different inherited forms, each mediated by autosomal dominant genetic events. Germline abnormalities on chromosome 10 are linked to at least one type of genetic MTC, multiple endocrine neoplasia type II. These studies of chromosome 10 in DNA from MTC tumors failed to detect frequent loss of polymorphic DNA markers, suggesting that the genetic mechanisms involved in MTC development may be different from those for other inherited cancers such as retinoblastoma. During tumor progression of MTC, abnormalities develop in expression of the mature phenotype of the endocrine cell from which the tumor arises. In cell culture, chemical modulation or gene insertion can lead to partial correction of these defects in differentiation capacity by activating cellular signaling processes. These studies offer opportunities to dissect the molecular events that regulate endocrine cell differentiation, to determine the precise abnormalities that may underlie the initiation and tumor progression events in MTC and related cancers, and, thereby, to identify new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  12. Biological and Clinicopathological Significance of Cripto-1 Expression in the Progression of Human ESCC

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudian, Reihaneh Alsadat; Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza; Forghanifard, Mohammad Mahdi; Moghbeli, Meysam; Moghbeli, Faezeh; Chamani, Jamshidkhan; Gholamin, Mehran

    2017-01-01

    Background: Human Cripto-1, a member of the EGF-CFC family, is involved in embryonic development, embryonic stem cell maintenance, and tumor progression. It also participates in multiple cell signaling pathways including Wnt, Notch, and TGF-β. Remarkably, it is expressed in cancer stem cell (CSC) compartments, boosting tumor cell migration, invasion, and angiogenesis. Although Cripto-1 is overexpressed in a variety of human malignant tumors, its expression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) remains unclear. Our aim in this study was to evaluate the possible oncogenic role of Cripto-1 in ESCC progression and elucidate its association with clinicopathological parameters in patients. Methods: In this study, Cripto-1 expression in 50 ESCC tissue samples was analyzed and compared to corresponding margin-normal esophageal tissues using quantitative real-time PCR. Results: Cripto-1 was overexpressed in nearly 40% of ESCC samples compared with normal tissue samples. Significant correlations were observed between Cripto-1 expression and tumor differentiation grade, progression stage, and location (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Our results indicate that overexpression of Cripto-1 is involved in the development of ESCC. Further assessment will be necessary to determine the role of Cripto-1 cross talk in ESCC tumorigenesis. PMID:28367468

  13. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1991--November 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.J.

    1992-05-01

    The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent.

  14. [Research progress and trend analysis of biology and chemistry of Taxus medicinal resources].

    PubMed

    Hao, Da-Cheng; Xiao, Pei-Gen; Peng, Yong; Liu, Ming; Huo, Li

    2012-07-01

    Taxus is the source plant of anti-cancer drug paclitaxel and its biosynthetic precursor, analogs and derivatives, which has been studying for decades. There are many endemic Taxus species in China, which have been studied in the field of multiple disciplines. Based on the recent studies of the researchers, this review comments on the study of Taxus biology and chemistry. The bibliometric method is used to quantify the global scientific production of Taxus-related research, and identify patterns and tendencies of Taxus-related articles. Gaps are present in knowledge about the genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and bioinformatics of Taxus and their endophytic fungi. Systems biology and various omics technologies will play an increasingly important role in the coming decades.

  15. [Progress of biological air filter (BAF) development in manned spacecraft cabin].

    PubMed

    Tang, Yong-kang; Guo, Shuang-sheng; Ai, Wei-dang

    2005-06-01

    The contaminants originating from human metabolism, material off-gassing and waste processing, may influence human health and the growth and development of higher plants when they accumulate at some degree in the spacecraft cabin. So the contaminants concentrations must be controlled below the spacecraft maximum allowable concentration (SMAC). For the long manned space missions and planetary habitation, biological technique is available for the removal of the contaminants. The biological air filter, BAF, is a system that degrades the contaminants into carbon dioxide, water and salts. It holds many advantages such as small weight and volume, low power consumption, easy maintenance and good working performance under the condition of microgravity. Its wide application will be seen in the space field in near future.

  16. Recent Progress in the Development of Metabolome Databases for Plant Systems Biology

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Atsushi; Kusano, Miyako

    2013-01-01

    Metabolomics has grown greatly as a functional genomics tool, and has become an invaluable diagnostic tool for biochemical phenotyping of biological systems. Over the past decades, a number of databases involving information related to mass spectra, compound names and structures, statistical/mathematical models and metabolic pathways, and metabolite profile data have been developed. Such databases complement each other and support efficient growth in this area, although the data resources remain scattered across the World Wide Web. Here, we review available metabolome databases and summarize the present status of development of related tools, particularly focusing on the plant metabolome. Data sharing discussed here will pave way for the robust interpretation of metabolomic data and advances in plant systems biology. PMID:23577015

  17. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1992--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1993-05-01

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a multidisciplenary blend of physics, chemistry and biology aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. The focus is increased on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights of the program from the past year are described. A mathematical model describing the production of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA as a function radiation quality has been completed. For the first time Monte Carlo techniques have been used to obtain directly the spatial distribution of DNA moieties altered by radiation. This information was obtained by including the transport codes a realistic description of the electronic structure of DNA. We have investigated structure activity relationships for the potential oncogenicity of a new generation of bioreductive drugs that function as hypoxic cytotoxins. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inverse dose rate effect, whereby medium LET radiations actually produce an c effect when the dose is protracted, is now at a point where the basic mechanisms are reasonably understood and the complex interplay between dose, dose rate and radiation quality which is necessary for the effect to be present can now be predicted at least in vitro. In terms of early radiobiological damage, a quantitative link has been established between basic energy deposition and locally multiply damaged sites, the radiochemical precursor of DNA double strand breaks; specifically, the spatial and energy deposition requirements necessary to form LMDs have been evaluated. For the first time, a mechanically understood ``biological fingerprint`` of high-LET radiation has been established. Specifically measurement of the ratio of inter-to intra-chromosomal aberrations produces a unique signature from alpha-particles or neutrons.

  18. Biological processes in the water column of the South Atlantic Bight: Phytoplankton response. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Verity, P.G.; Yoder, J.A.

    1992-03-10

    This study addressed shelf-wide processes and nearshore (coastal boundary zone) processes occurring in the southeastern. Coastal boundary zone (CBZ) US continental shelf dynamics involve studies of circulation and of biological and chemical transformations. Continental shelf processes affect the removal of material from the coastal boundary zone into areas where the material no longer interacts with or influences concentrations in the CBZ. The two arbitrarily separate components are, in fact, unified. The CBZ typically extends about 300 km along-shore and about 20 km offshore from its center off Savannah, Georgia, where most runoff occurs. The rates of biological and chemical transformations are controlled by proximity to the bottom and the amounts of fine suspended organic matter originating from rivers and salt marshes. Once material is removed from this zone, either by a long-shelf or cross-shelf advection to regions where the materials are no longer in contact with the bottom, the suite of factors governing the rates of chemical and biological transformations changes. The determination of contrasting rates in these two environments was one of the central focuses of the South Atlantic Bight program.

  19. Both physical exercise and progressive muscle relaxation reduce the facing-the-viewer bias in biological motion perception.

    PubMed

    Heenan, Adam; Troje, Nikolaus F

    2014-01-01

    Biological motion stimuli, such as orthographically projected stick figure walkers, are ambiguous about their orientation in depth. The projection of a stick figure walker oriented towards the viewer, therefore, is the same as its projection when oriented away. Even though such figures are depth-ambiguous, however, observers tend to interpret them as facing towards them more often than facing away. Some have speculated that this facing-the-viewer bias may exist for sociobiological reasons: Mistaking another human as retreating when they are actually approaching could have more severe consequences than the opposite error. Implied in this hypothesis is that the facing-towards percept of biological motion stimuli is potentially more threatening. Measures of anxiety and the facing-the-viewer bias should therefore be related, as researchers have consistently found that anxious individuals display an attentional bias towards more threatening stimuli. The goal of this study was to assess whether physical exercise (Experiment 1) or an anxiety induction/reduction task (Experiment 2) would significantly affect facing-the-viewer biases. We hypothesized that both physical exercise and progressive muscle relaxation would decrease facing-the-viewer biases for full stick figure walkers, but not for bottom- or top-half-only human stimuli, as these carry less sociobiological relevance. On the other hand, we expected that the anxiety induction task (Experiment 2) would increase facing-the-viewer biases for full stick figure walkers only. In both experiments, participants completed anxiety questionnaires, exercised on a treadmill (Experiment 1) or performed an anxiety induction/reduction task (Experiment 2), and then immediately completed a perceptual task that allowed us to assess their facing-the-viewer bias. As hypothesized, we found that physical exercise and progressive muscle relaxation reduced facing-the-viewer biases for full stick figure walkers only. Our results provide

  20. Division Planes Alternate in Spherical Cells of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Begg, K. J.; Donachie, W. D.

    1998-01-01

    In the spherical cells of Escherichia coli rodA mutants, division is initiated at a single point, from which a furrow extends progressively around the cell. Using “giant” rodA ftsA cells, we confirmed that each new division furrow is initiated at the midpoint of the previous division plane and runs perpendicular to it. PMID:9573213

  1. EFFECTS OF RADIATIONS ON CELL DIVISION AND CHROMOSOMES IN ANIMALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CELL DIVISION, RADIATION EFFECTS, MORPHOLOGY(BIOLOGY), CHROMOSOMES, JAPAN, INVERTEBRATES, RADIOPROTECTIVE AGENTS, MAMMALS, HUMANS, MICE, EMBRYOS, SENSITIVITY, DROSOPHILA, REPRODUCTION(PHYSIOLOGY), PARAMECIUM .

  2. Sequential chemical-biological processes for the treatment of industrial wastewaters: review of recent progresses and critical assessment.

    PubMed

    Guieysse, Benoit; Norvill, Zane N

    2014-02-28

    When direct wastewater biological treatment is unfeasible, a cost- and resource-efficient alternative to direct chemical treatment consists of combining biological treatment with a chemical pre-treatment aiming to convert the hazardous pollutants into more biodegradable compounds. Whereas the principles and advantages of sequential treatment have been demonstrated for a broad range of pollutants and process configurations, recent progresses (2011-present) in the field provide the basis for refining assessment of feasibility, costs, and environmental impacts. This paper thus reviews recent real wastewater demonstrations at pilot and full scale as well as new process configurations. It also discusses new insights on the potential impacts of microbial community dynamics on process feasibility, design and operation. Finally, it sheds light on a critical issue that has not yet been properly addressed in the field: integration requires complex and tailored optimization and, of paramount importance to full-scale application, is sensitive to uncertainty and variability in the inputs used for process design and operation. Future research is therefore critically needed to improve process control and better assess the real potential of sequential chemical-biological processes for industrial wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Progress and problems in the biology, diagnostics, and therapeutics of prion diseases

    PubMed Central

    Aguzzi, Adriano; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Miele, Gino

    2004-01-01

    The term “prion” was introduced by Stanley Prusiner in 1982 to describe the atypical infectious agent that causes transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, a group of infectious neurodegenerative diseases that include scrapie in sheep, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, chronic wasting disease in cervids, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle. Over the past twenty years, the word “prion” has been taken to signify various subtly different concepts. In this article, we refer to the prion as the transmissible principle underlying prion diseases, without necessarily implying any specific biochemical or structural identity. When Prusiner started his seminal work, the study of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies was undertaken by only a handful of scientists. Since that time, the “mad cow” crisis has put prion diseases on the agenda of both politicians and the media. Significant progress has been made in prion disease research, and many aspects of prion pathogenesis are now understood. And yet the diagnostic procedures available for prion diseases are not nearly as sensitive as they ought to be, and no therapeutic intervention has been shown to reliably affect the course of the diseases. This article reviews recent progress in the areas of pathogenesis of, diagnostics of, and therapy for prion diseases and highlights some conspicuous problems that remain to be addressed in each of these fields. PMID:15254579

  4. Panacea in progress: CRISPR and the future of its biological research introduction.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Michael; Zhou, Xiaohui

    2017-08-01

    The elucidation of the CRISPR (clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats) adaptive immune system endogenous to most microbial life has culminated in progress in a diversity of scientific disciplines. The concurrently promising and eccentric nature of its theoretically plausible applications has wrought enthusiasm in the research community globally, potentiating advancements in human and animal health, ecological stability, and economic wellbeing, that would hitherto be considered the unattainable fancies of a futurist. It may be supposed that the tomes of science fiction are the true books of prophecy. Here, we narrate the scientific dialogue regarding CRISPR/Cas biotechnologies, from the happenstantial initial observation of the locus to the litany of intriguing contemporary endeavors. We discuss the mechanistic underpinnings in detail, and the corpulent body of literature on CRISPR-based biotech is digested into a germane and informative review. CRISPR applications such as microbiome engineering in order to enhance the human immune system beyond the fortitude of the wild type, bacterial genome editing in industrial and medical aspects, conquering antibiotic resistance, the development of novel antimicrobial techniques, the harvesting of solventogenic microbes, the development of antifungal therapies, and investigation of the genetic properties of fungi, are here represented, and the authors posit unconventional, and at times gainfully tangential, thoughts and concepts in order to encourage a reflective disposition towards this sophisticated device of nature: a panacea in progress, such that the most impassive and technical writing still carries the ring of poetry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Development and applications of photosensitive device systems to biological studies. Three year progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The major developments of the project have been in the area of low light level detection. Although the instrumentation is designed for biological applications, the parallel interests of astronomers serve as a good source for information and interchange of experience and ideas. Also, it is increasingly evident that the instrumentation developed is applicable to other areas where low light level detection capability is essential. Two such areas are sonoluminescence and thermoluminescence. The research has been primarily directed to the two areas of x-ray diffraction and bioluminescence, with emphasis in the area of x-ray detection. Interest in x-ray image intensification techniques for biological and medical applications is long standing, and more and more utilized each year. During the past three years the demonstrated advantages of our system over fast scan TV systems and multiwire chambers has become recognized. This is particularly true for use as the synchrotron x-ray sources. Although in recent years less effort has been spent in bioluminescence studies, results have been numerous, both in instrumentation development and experimental results. Bioluminescence is not only of interest in itself, but is a powerful tool for non-destructive study of other biological processes. Bioluminescence has also become increasingly of interest because of its relation to communication with, and detection of, submarines. Instrumentation for in situ observations is under active consideration. The techniques for data acquisition and retrieval in the two areas are closely related, so that much of the development in one area is transferable to the other. (ERB)

  6. [Current progress in research on the nanomaterials for biological macromolecules recognition].

    PubMed

    He, Liu; Li, Jin; Song, Dandan; Cao, Yiping; Qian, Zhiyong

    2013-04-01

    The combination of nanotechnology and molecular imprinting technique, including their application research in biomedical domain, provides a new solution to the problem of the substitutes for antibodies, enzymes, and other native biological structures as well as cell bracket materials. Nanocavity biomaterials with recognition specificity imprinted by using proteins as templates have numerous applications in biotechnology, medicine and so on. This review presents the aspects of molecular imprinting nanostructure involved in the biomacromolecules imprinting, and it explores the precent developments and achievements of nanomaterials for molecular imprinting technology.

  7. Current progress in the biology of members of the Sporothrix schenckii complex following the genomic era.

    PubMed

    Mora-Montes, Héctor M; Dantas, Alessandra da Silva; Trujillo-Esquivel, Elías; de Souza Baptista, Andrea R; Lopes-Bezerra, Leila M

    2015-09-01

    Sporotrichosis has been attributed for more than a century to one single etiological agent, Sporothrix schencki. Only eight years ago, it was described that, in fact, the disease is caused by several pathogenic cryptic species. The present review will focus on recent advances to understand the biology and virulence of epidemiologically relevant pathogenic species of the S. schenckii complex. The main subjects covered are the new clinical and epidemiological aspects including diagnostic and therapeutic challenges, the development of molecular tools, the genome database and the perspectives for study of virulence of emerging Sporothrix species.

  8. Quarterly Progress Report - Biological Monitoring Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.M.; Christensen, S.W.; Greeley, M.S.jr; Hill, W.R.; McCarthy, J.F.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.

    2000-04-18

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Loar et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities. Monitoring is currently being conducted at five primary EFPC sites, although sites may be excluded or added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) concentration of mercury in the adjacent floodplain, (5) appropriate habitat distribution, and

  9. Quarterly Progress Report - Biological Monitoring Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.M.; Christensen, S.W.; Greeley, M.S. jr; Hill, W.R.; McCarthy, J.F.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.

    2000-07-18

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Loar et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities. Monitoring is currently being conducted at five primary EFPC sites, although sites may be excluded or added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) concentration of mercury in the adjacent floodplain, (5) appropriate habitat distribution, and

  10. Quarterly Progress Report - Biological Monitoring Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.M.; Christensen, S.W.; Greeley, M.S.jr; Hill, W.R.; McCarthy, J.F.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.

    2000-10-18

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Loar et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities. Monitoring is currently being conducted at five primary EFPC sites, although sites may be excluded or added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) concentration of mercury in the adjacent floodplain, (5) appropriate habitat distribution, and

  11. [Recent progress in the theoretical studies of structure, function, and reaction of biological molecules].

    PubMed

    Hirao, Hajime; Morokuma, Keiji

    2011-01-01

    Essential biomolecular functions often involve electron-related events such as chemical reactions and photoluminescence phenomena. Theoretical description of such electronic processes requires the use of quantum mechanics (QM), but the number of atoms that can be handled with QM is usually smaller than the number of atoms present in a single protein. A reasonable strategy is therefore to give priority to a few tens or hundreds of atoms in the system and deal with them quantum mechanically. Lower-priority atoms influence the event occurring in the higher-priority area; therefore, their effect should also be taken into account. Under these circumstances, a reasonable approach is to apply two or more different theoretical methods to differently prioritized subsystems. QM can be combined, for example, with less accurate yet much less demanding molecular mechanics (MM). Our own N-layered integrated molecular orbital and molecular mechanics (ONIOM) method allows for such hybrid calculations, and our group has been applying it to a wide range of biology-related problems. In this paper, we briefly explain the theoretical background and the procedure for the theoretical investigation of biological systems. Subsequently, we provide an overview of some of our recent studies of metalloenzymes and photobiology-related problems.

  12. Reflection Imaging X-Ray Laser Microscope (RIXRALM) and its biological applications. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Suckewer, S.

    1998-07-01

    The main stimulus for the development of the proposed microscope (RIXRALM) is the possibility to view the surface and near surface structure of biological materials, such as cell membranes at much higher resolution than an optical (confocal) microscope. Although the prediction resolution of RIXRALM was lower than a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), the possibility to obtain images of cells (membranes) in a more natural, hydrated state and, in many cases, without staining, made the idea of a reflection X-ray microscope very attractive. The specimen can be in an H{sub 2}O saturated He atmosphere at atmospheric pressure. As the image can be obtained quickly (nsec exposure, occurring within seconds of insertion into such an environment), the cell surface can be seen in a state which is very close to its natural condition. Besides, the short exposure time eliminates the effect of motional blurring on the images. Their X-ray reflection microscope fit well in the very large gap in the size of biological objects studied in light microscopy (sub-micron size) and electron microscope (down to a few nanometers size).

  13. Climate change and alpine stream biology: progress, challenges, and opportunities for the future.

    PubMed

    Hotaling, Scott; Finn, Debra S; Joseph Giersch, J; Weisrock, David W; Jacobsen, Dean

    2017-01-20

    In alpine regions worldwide, climate change is dramatically altering ecosystems and affecting biodiversity in many ways. For streams, receding alpine glaciers and snowfields, paired with altered precipitation regimes, are driving shifts in hydrology, species distributions, basal resources, and threatening the very existence of some habitats and biota. Alpine streams harbour substantial species and genetic diversity due to significant habitat insularity and environmental heterogeneity. Climate change is expected to affect alpine stream biodiversity across many levels of biological resolution from micro- to macroscopic organisms and genes to communities. Herein, we describe the current state of alpine stream biology from an organism-focused perspective. We begin by reviewing seven standard and emerging approaches that combine to form the current state of the discipline. We follow with a call for increased synthesis across existing approaches to improve understanding of how these imperiled ecosystems are responding to rapid environmental change. We then take a forward-looking viewpoint on how alpine stream biologists can make better use of existing data sets through temporal comparisons, integrate remote sensing and geographic information system (GIS) technologies, and apply genomic tools to refine knowledge of underlying evolutionary processes. We conclude with comments about the future of biodiversity conservation in alpine streams to confront the daunting challenge of mitigating the effects of rapid environmental change in these sentinel ecosystems.

  14. Molecular biology of coal bio-desulfurization. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.D.; Gallagher, J.R.

    1992-04-30

    Genes cloned from Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8 can transfer the DBT desulfurization phenotype to a different species (R. Fascians). The product was identified as 2-phenylphenol by gas chromatography. This result parallels the results we have previously reported for the activity of these genes in a DBT-negative mutant of IGTS8. Thus, the evidence is strong that we have identified and cloned the entire set of genes that are responsible for this very specific desulfurization reaction. Sequencing of these genes has commenced. A genomic library was constructed from the bacterium, Besulfovibrio desulfuricans. Screening has not yet identified a clone that carries the desulfurization genes from that organism. Two open reading frames, doxH and doxJ, in the C18 DBT degradation pathway were mutated and are now believed to be dispensable to that pathway. Finally, progress was made toward beginning to sequence the DBT dixoygenase genes from strain A15.

  15. Yucca Mountain Biological Resources Monitoring Program; Progress report, October 1992--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1994-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of (as amended in 1987) to study and characterize the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. During site characterization, the DOE will conduct a variety of geotechnical, geochemical, geological, and hydrological studies to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential repository. To ensure that site characterization activities do not adversely affect the environment at Yucca Mountain, a program has been implemented to monitor and mitigate potential impacts and ensure activities comply with applicable environmental regulations. This report describes the activities and accomplishments of EG&G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG&G/EM) from October 1992 through December 1993 for six program areas within the Terrestrial Ecosystem component of the environmental program for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP): Site Characterization Effects, Desert Tortoises (Gopherus agassizii), Habitat Reclamation, Monitoring and Mitigation, Radiological Monitoring, and Biological Support.

  16. Enhancing biological production of ammonia from atmospheric nitrogen and soil nitrate. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.M.; Valentine, R.C.; Phillips, D.A.; Rains, D.W.; Huffaker, R.C.

    1980-12-01

    This report focuses on the genetic engineering of improved strains of root nodule bacteria--Rhizobium japonicum--which form effective nitrogen fixing associations with soybeans. Methodology is presented for the molecular cloning of nitrogen fixing (nif) genes of soybean Rhizobium and the hydrogen uptake (Hup) system in R. japonicum. The latter includes strategies for genetic engineering of Hup genes to enhance energy efficiency of symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Also described are the function of osmotic tolerance (osm) plasmids and stages of genetic engineering to protect the bacteria against drought and salinity stresses. Strains of Rhizobium leguminosorium were examined to determine how their plasmid content affects symbiosis and host plant function. Other studies include the enhancement of biological nitrogen fixation in rice paddies, conservation of fixed nitrogen, and integrative physiology of nitrogen assimilation in higher plants. Extensive references and future research plans are included.

  17. Quarterly Progress Report - Biological Monitoring Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S. M.; Christensen, S. W.; Greeley, M.S. jr; McCracken, M.K.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth G. R.; Stewart, A. J.

    2001-01-19

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (formerly the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant). As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Complex protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Loar et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Complex on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Complex discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities. Monitoring is currently being conducted at five primary EFPC sites, although sites may be excluded or added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) concentration of mercury in the

  18. Second generation biological signal processor. Final progress report, February 15, 1993--February 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The Biological Information Signal Processor (BISP) is a VLSI ASIC implementation of the dynamic programming methods favored for direct sequence-to-sequence comparison in order to discover local as well as global similarities. These methods, based on the local algorithm of Smith and Waterman provide the most mathematically robust solution to the problem of sequence alignment (determination of the optimal character-to-character registration between the two sequence, including relative insertions and deletions, indels). BISP provides a complete implementation of the standard Smith and Waterman algorithm in a systolic array that allows full parameterization and several novel extensions to the algorithm. BISP operates at supercomputer speeds from a VME board on a Sun workstation. Each VME array provides a complete systolic pipeline for comparison and multiple arrays can be combined linearly in order to increase the pipeline length. Overall performance is a function of the IO speed of the pipelined disk-resident data and the length of the array.

  19. TMPRSS2-ERG Fusion Gene Expression in Prostate Tumor Cells and Its Clinical and Biological Significance in Prostate Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    St. John, Jason; Powell, Katelyn; Conley-LaComb, M. Katie; Chinni, Sreenivasa R.

    2012-01-01

    TMPRSS2-Ets gene fusions were identified in prostate cancers where the promoter of transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2) fused with coding sequence of the erythroblastosis virus E26 (Ets) gene family members. TMPRSS2 is an androgen responsive transmembrane serine protease. Ets family members are oncogenic transcription factors that contain a highly conserved Ets DNA binding domain and an N-terminal regulatory domain. Fusion of these gene results in androgen dependent transcription of Ets factor in prostate tumor cells. The ERG is the most common fusion partner with TMPRSS2 promoter in prostate cancer patients. The high prevalence of these gene fusions, in particular TMPRSS2-ERG, makes them attractive as potential diagnostic and prognostic indicators, as well as making them a potential target for tailored therapies. This review focuses on the clinical and biological significance of TMPRSS2-ERG fusions and their role in PC development and progression. PMID:23264855

  20. Progress and challenges in using human stem cells for biological and therapeutics discovery: neuropsychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Panchision, David M.

    2016-01-01

    In facing the daunting challenge of using human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (hESCs, hiPSCs) to study complex neural circuit disorders such as schizophrenia (SCZ), mood and anxiety disorders and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), a 2012 National Institute of Mental Health workshop produced a set of recommendations to advance basic research and engage industry in cell-based studies of neuropsychiatric disorders. This review describes progress in meeting these recommendations, including the development of novel tools, strides in recapitulating relevant cell and tissue types, insights into the genetic basis of these disorders that permit integration of risk-associated gene regulatory networks with cell/circuit phenotypes, and promising findings of patient-control differences using cell-based assays. However, numerous challenges are still being addressed, requiring further technological development, approaches to resolve disease heterogeneity and collaborative structures for investigators of different disciplines. Additionally, since data obtained so far is on small sample sizes, replication in larger sample sets is needed. A number of individual success stories point to a path forward in developing assays to translate discovery science to therapeutics development. PMID:26840228

  1. Molecular Profiling Reveals Biologically Discrete Subsets and Pathways of Progression in Diffuse Glioma.

    PubMed

    Ceccarelli, Michele; Barthel, Floris P; Malta, Tathiane M; Sabedot, Thais S; Salama, Sofie R; Murray, Bradley A; Morozova, Olena; Newton, Yulia; Radenbaugh, Amie; Pagnotta, Stefano M; Anjum, Samreen; Wang, Jiguang; Manyam, Ganiraju; Zoppoli, Pietro; Ling, Shiyun; Rao, Arjun A; Grifford, Mia; Cherniack, Andrew D; Zhang, Hailei; Poisson, Laila; Carlotti, Carlos Gilberto; Tirapelli, Daniela Pretti da Cunha; Rao, Arvind; Mikkelsen, Tom; Lau, Ching C; Yung, W K Alfred; Rabadan, Raul; Huse, Jason; Brat, Daniel J; Lehman, Norman L; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Zheng, Siyuan; Hess, Kenneth; Rao, Ganesh; Meyerson, Matthew; Beroukhim, Rameen; Cooper, Lee; Akbani, Rehan; Wrensch, Margaret; Haussler, David; Aldape, Kenneth D; Laird, Peter W; Gutmann, David H; Noushmehr, Houtan; Iavarone, Antonio; Verhaak, Roel G W

    2016-01-28

    Therapy development for adult diffuse glioma is hindered by incomplete knowledge of somatic glioma driving alterations and suboptimal disease classification. We defined the complete set of genes associated with 1,122 diffuse grade II-III-IV gliomas from The Cancer Genome Atlas and used molecular profiles to improve disease classification, identify molecular correlations, and provide insights into the progression from low- to high-grade disease. Whole-genome sequencing data analysis determined that ATRX but not TERT promoter mutations are associated with increased telomere length. Recent advances in glioma classification based on IDH mutation and 1p/19q co-deletion status were recapitulated through analysis of DNA methylation profiles, which identified clinically relevant molecular subsets. A subtype of IDH mutant glioma was associated with DNA demethylation and poor outcome; a group of IDH-wild-type diffuse glioma showed molecular similarity to pilocytic astrocytoma and relatively favorable survival. Understanding of cohesive disease groups may aid improved clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Biology of chronic graft-vs-host disease: Immune mechanisms and progress in biomarker discovery

    PubMed Central

    Presland, Richard B

    2016-01-01

    Chronic graft-vs-host disease (cGVHD) is the leading cause of long-term morbidity and mortality following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It presents as a chronic inflammatory and sclerotic autoimmune-like condition that most frequently affects the skin, oral mucosa, liver, eyes and gastrointestinal tract. Both clinical and animal studies have shown that multiple T cell subsets including Th1, Th2, Th17, T follicular helper cells and regulatory T-cells play some role in cGVHD development and progression; B cells also play an important role in the disease including the production of antibodies to HY and nuclear antigens that can cause serious tissue damage. An array of cytokines and chemokines produced by different types of immune cells also mediate tissue inflammation and damage of cGVHD target tissues such as the skin and oral cavity. Many of these same immune regulators have been studied as candidate cGVHD biomarkers. Recent studies suggest that some of these biomarkers may be useful for determining disease prognosis and planning long-term clinical follow-up of cGVHD patients. PMID:28058210

  3. Yucca Mountain Biological Resources Monitoring Program. Progress report, January 1994--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987) to study and characterize the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential geological repository for high-level nuclear waste. During site characterization, the DOE will conduct a variety of geotechnical, geochemical, geological, and hydrological studies to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential repository. To ensure that site characterization activities do not adversely affect the environment at Yucca Mountain, a program has been implemented to monitor and mitigate potential impacts and ensure activities comply with applicable environmental regulations. This report describes the activities and accomplishments of EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG and G/EM) from January 1994 through December 1994 for six program areas within the Terrestrial Ecosystem component of the environmental program for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP): Site Characterization Effects, Desert Tortoises (Gopherus agassizii), Habitat Reclamation, Monitoring and Mitigation, Radiological Monitoring, and Biological Support.

  4. Advances in Wilms Tumor Treatment and Biology: Progress Through International Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Dome, Jeffrey S; Graf, Norbert; Geller, James I; Fernandez, Conrad V; Mullen, Elizabeth A; Spreafico, Filippo; Van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy

    2015-09-20

    Clinical trials in Wilms tumor (WT) have resulted in overall survival rates of greater than 90%. This achievement is especially remarkable because improvements in disease-specific survival have occurred concurrently with a reduction of therapy for large patient subgroups. However, the outcomes for certain patient subgroups, including those with unfavorable histologic and molecular features, bilateral disease, and recurrent disease, remain well below the benchmark survival rate of 90%. Therapy for WT has been advanced in part by an increasingly complex risk-stratification system based on patient age; tumor stage, histology, and volume; response to chemotherapy; and loss of heterozygosity at chromosomes 1p and 16q. A consequence of this system has been the apportionment of patients into such small subgroups that only collaboration between large international WT study groups will support clinical trials that are sufficiently powered to answer challenging questions that move the field forward. This article gives an overview of the Children's Oncology Group and International Society of Pediatric Oncology approaches to WT and focuses on four subgroups (stage IV, initially inoperable, bilateral, and relapsed WT) for which international collaboration is pressing. In addition, biologic insights resulting from collaborative laboratory research are discussed. A coordinated expansion of international collaboration in both clinical trials and laboratory science will provide real opportunity to improve the treatment and outcomes for children with renal tumors on a global level. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  5. The role of North Atlantic Ocean circulation and biological sequestration on atmospheric CO2 uptake during the last deglaciation (CL Division Outstanding ECS Award Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muschitiello, Francesco; D'Andrea, William J.; Dokken, Trond M.; Schmittner, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the impact of ocean circulation on the global atmospheric CO2 budget is of paramount importance for anticipating the consequences of projected future changes in Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). In particular, the efficiency of the oceanic biological pump can impact atmospheric CO2 through changes in vertical carbon export mediated by variations in the nutrient inventory of the North Atlantic basin. However, the causal relationship between North Atlantic Ocean circulation, biological carbon sequestration, and atmospheric CO2 is poorly understood. Here we present new high-resolution planktic-benthic 14C data and biomarker records from an exceptionally well-dated marine core from the Nordic Seas spanning the last deglaciation ( 15,000-10,000 years BP). The records document for the first time large and rapid atmospheric CO2 drawdowns and increase in plankton stocks during major North Atlantic cooling events. Using transient climate simulations from a fully coupled climate-biosphere model, we show that minor perturbations of the North Atlantic biological pump resulting from surface freshening and AMOC weakening can have a major impact on the global atmospheric CO2 budget. Furthermore, our data help clarifying the timing and magnitude of the deglacial CO2 signal recorded in Antarctic ice cores. We conclude that the global CO2 budget is more sensitive to perturbations in North Atlantic circulation than previously thought, which has significance in the future debate of the AMOC response to anthropogenic warming.

  6. Pattern formation on membranes and its role in bacterial cell division.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, Simon; Schwille, Petra

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial cell division is arguably one of the most central processes in biology. Despite the identification of many important molecular players, surprisingly little is yet known about the underlying physicochemical mechanisms. However, self-organized protein patterns play key roles during division of Escherichia coli, where division is initiated by the directed localization of FtsZ to the cell middle by an inhibitor gradient arising from pole-to-pole oscillations of MinCDE proteins. In vitro reconstitution studies have established that both the Min system and FtsZ with its membrane adaptor FtsA form dynamic energy-dependent patterns on membranes. Furthermore, recent in vivo and in vitro approaches have shown that Min patterns display rich dynamics in diverse geometries and respond to the progress of cytokinesis.

  7. Pathogenesis and molecular biology of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, the JC virus-induced demyelinating disease of the human brain.

    PubMed Central

    Major, E O; Amemiya, K; Tornatore, C S; Houff, S A; Berger, J R

    1992-01-01

    Studies of the pathogenesis and molecular biology of JC virus infection over the last two decades have significantly changed our understanding of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, which can be described as a subacute viral infection of neuroglial cells that probably follows reactivation of latent infection rather than being the consequence of prolonged JC virus replication in the brain. There is now sufficient evidence to suggest that JC virus latency occurs in kidney and B cells. However, JC virus isolates from brain or kidney differ in the regulatory regions of their viral genomes which are controlled by host cell factors for viral gene expression and replication. DNA sequences of noncoding regions of the viral genome display a certain heterogeneity among isolates from brain and kidney. These data suggest that an archetypal strain of JC virus exists whose sequence is altered during replication in different cell types. The JC virus regulatory region likely plays a significant role in establishing viral latency and must be acted upon for reactivation of the virus. A developing hypothesis is that reactivation takes place from latently infected B lymphocytes that are activated as a result of immune suppression. JC virus enters the brain in the activated B cell. Evidence for this mechanism is the detection of JC virus DNA in peripheral blood lymphocytes and infected B cells in the brains of patients with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Once virus enters the brain, astrocytes as well as oligodendrocytes support JC virus multiplication. Therefore, JC virus infection of neuroglial cells may impair other neuroglial functions besides the production and maintenance of myelin. Consequently our increased understanding of the pathogenesis of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy suggests new ways to intervene in JC virus infection with immunomodulation therapies. Perhaps along with trials of nucleoside analogs or interferon administration, this fatal

  8. [Progress in spectral characteristics of biological soil crust of arid or semiarid region].

    PubMed

    Fang, Shi-bo; Liu, Hua-jie; Zhang, Xin-shi; Dong, Ming; Liu, Jian-dong

    2008-08-01

    The Biological Soil Crusts (BSC) (also known as organic or microphytic crust) can be formed by different combinations of microphytic communities including mosses, lichens, liverworts, algae, fungi, cyanobacteria (= blue-green algae or Cyanophyta), as well as bacteria. Large areas of sand fields in arid and semi-arid regions are covered by BSC. Remote sensing distinction should be made between physical and biogenical crust formations. It was reviewed the advances of domestic and overseas studies of BSC spectral characteristics, as well as spectral reflectance measurement in situ of our workgruop. When the BSC is wet, it turns green, a notable change in the reflectance curve occurs. The wet BSC's spectral reflectance curve is similar to those of the higher plants and therefore may lead to misinterpretation of the vegetation dynamics and to overestimation of ecosystem productivity. This spectral feature produces a much higher NDVI value for the wet moss BSC than for the dry moss BSC (0.65 vs. 0.30 units, respectively), a higher NDVI value for the wet algae BSC than for the dry algae BSC (0.30 vs. 0.15 units, respectively). The "maximum value composite" (MVC) technique is used to eliminate the effect of clouds and haze from vegetation maps. Misinterpretation of the vegetation dynamics could be more severe due to the MVC technique used to compose the global vegetation maps in the study of vegetation dynamics. But relatively limited research has been conducted to investigate the spectral characteristics of BSC change with different moisture conditions and under different seasons. More research works could be considered in spectral characteristics of BSC. The researches would be useful for detecing and mapping BSC, from remote sensing imagery. It also is to the advantage to employ Vegetation Index wisely.

  9. Detailing the Division

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-10-11

    NASA Cassini spacecraft looks between Saturn A and B rings to spy structure in the Cassini Division. The Cassini Division, occupying the middle and left of the image, contains five dim bands of ring material, but not all of the division is shown here.

  10. Fundamentals of quality assessment of molecular amplification methods in clinical diagnostics. International Federation of Clinical Chemistry Scientific Division Committee on Molecular Biology Techniques.

    PubMed

    Neumaier, M; Braun, A; Wagener, C

    1998-01-01

    The increasing interest in molecular biology diagnostics is a result of the tremendous gain of scientific knowledge in genetics, made possible especially since the introduction of amplification techniques. High expectations have been placed on genetic testing, and the number of laboratories now using the relevant technology is rapidly increasing--resulting in an obvious need for standardization and definition of laboratory organization. This communication is an effort towards that end. We address aspects that should be considered when structuring a new molecular diagnostic laboratory, and we discuss individual preanalytical and analytical procedures, from sampling to evaluation of assay results. In addition, different means of controlling contamination are discussed. Because the methodology is in constant change, no general standards can be defined. Accordingly, this publication is intended to serve as a recommendation for good laboratory practice and internal quality control and as a guide to troubleshooting, primarily in amplification techniques.

  11. Development and application of photosensitive device systems to studies of biological and organic materials. Third year progress report, January 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Gruner, S.M.; Reynolds, G.T.

    1992-05-15

    This report describes progress as of the third year of a 3-year DoE grant for 1/1/92 to 12/31/92. Because this is the last year of a 3- year grant cycle, this report will summarize progress over the entire 3-year period. The overall goals of the grant are to develop novel instrumentation and techniques for the performance of biological and materials research, and especially for the development of x-ray detectors suitable for use at storage ring sources. Research progress has been excellent and the overall goals, as well as most of the specific goals have been successfully met.

  12. Progress at LAMPF: Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. Progress report, July-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Allred, J.C.

    1981-03-01

    Progress at LAMPF is the semiannual progress report of the MP Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The report also includes brief reports on research done at LAMPF by researchers from other institutions and Los Alamos divisions.

  13. Progress at LAMPF: Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. Progress report, January-June 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Allred, J.C.

    1981-09-01

    Progress at LAMPF is the semiannual progress report of the MP Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The report includes brief reports on research done at LAMPF by researchers from other institutions and Los Alamos divisions.

  14. Universal rules for division plane selection in plants.

    PubMed

    Müller, Sabine

    2012-04-01

    Coordinated cell divisions and cell expansion are the key processes that command growth in all organisms. The orientation of cell divisions and the direction of cell expansion are critical for normal development. Symmetric divisions contribute to proliferation and growth, while asymmetric divisions initiate pattern formation and differentiation. In plants these processes are of particular importance since their cells are encased in cellulosic walls that determine their shape and lock their position within tissues and organs. Several recent studies have analyzed the relationship between cell shape and patterns of symmetric cell division in diverse organisms and employed biophysical and mathematical considerations to develop computer simulations that have allowed accurate prediction of cell division patterns. From these studies, a picture emerges that diverse biological systems follow simple universal rules of geometry to select their division planes and that the microtubule cytoskeleton takes a major part in sensing the geometric information and translates this information into a specific division outcome. In plant cells, the division plane is selected before mitosis, and spatial information of the division plane is preserved throughout division by the presence of reference molecules at a distinct region of the plasma membrane, the cortical division zone. The recruitment of these division zone markers occurs multiple times by several mechanisms, suggesting that the cortical division zone is a highly dynamic region.

  15. Asymmetric stem cell division: lessons from Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pao-Shu; Egger, Boris; Brand, Andrea H

    2008-06-01

    Asymmetric cell division is an important and conserved strategy in the generation of cellular diversity during animal development. Many of our insights into the underlying mechanisms of asymmetric cell division have been gained from Drosophila, including the establishment of polarity, orientation of mitotic spindles and segregation of cell fate determinants. Recent studies are also beginning to reveal the connection between the misregulation of asymmetric cell division and cancer. What we are learning from Drosophila as a model system has implication both for stem cell biology and also cancer research.

  16. Division Chief Meeting, April, 1929

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1929-01-01

    Caption: 'LMAL division chiefs confer with the engineer-in-charge in April 1929. Left to right: E.A. Myers, Personnel Division; Edward R. Sharp, Property and Clerical Division; Thomas Carroll, Flight Test Division; Henry J.E. Reid, engineer in chief; Carlton Kemper, Power Plants Division; Elton Miller, aerodynamics division.'

  17. Effects of Moderate and Subsequent Progressive Weight Loss on Metabolic Function and Adipose Tissue Biology in Humans with Obesity.

    PubMed

    Magkos, Faidon; Fraterrigo, Gemma; Yoshino, Jun; Luecking, Courtney; Kirbach, Kyleigh; Kelly, Shannon C; de Las Fuentes, Lisa; He, Songbing; Okunade, Adewole L; Patterson, Bruce W; Klein, Samuel

    2016-04-12

    Although 5%-10% weight loss is routinely recommended for people with obesity, the precise effects of 5% and further weight loss on metabolic health are unclear. We conducted a randomized controlled trial that evaluated the effects of 5.1% ± 0.9% (n = 19), 10.8% ± 1.3% (n = 9), and 16.4% ± 2.1% (n = 9) weight loss and weight maintenance (n = 14) on metabolic outcomes. 5% weight loss improved adipose tissue, liver and muscle insulin sensitivity, and β cell function, without a concomitant change in systemic or subcutaneous adipose tissue markers of inflammation. Additional weight loss further improved β cell function and insulin sensitivity in muscle and caused stepwise changes in adipose tissue mass, intrahepatic triglyceride content, and adipose tissue expression of genes involved in cholesterol flux, lipid synthesis, extracellular matrix remodeling, and oxidative stress. These results demonstrate that moderate 5% weight loss improves metabolic function in multiple organs simultaneously, and progressive weight loss causes dose-dependent alterations in key adipose tissue biological pathways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Accelerator Technology Division progress report, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Schriber, S.O.; Hardekopf, R.A.; Heighway, E.A.

    1993-07-01

    This report briefly discusses the following topics: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; Defense Free-Electron Lasers; AXY Programs; A Next Generation High-Power Neutron-Scattering Facility; JAERI OMEGA Project and Intense Neutron Sources for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Supercollider; The High-Power Microwave (HPM) Program; Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) Power Systems Highlights; Industrial Partnering; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Accelerator Theory and Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

  19. Accelerator Technology Division progress report, FY 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Schriber, S.O.; Hardekopf, R.A.; Heighway, E.A.

    1993-12-31

    This report discusses the following topics: A Next-Generation Spallation-Neutron Source; Accelerator Performance Demonstration Facility; APEX Free-Electron Laser Project; The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) Program; Intense Neutron Source for Materials Testing; Linac Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Radio-Frequency Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operation.

  20. Physics division annual report 2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, K., ed.

    2001-10-04

    impacts the structure of nuclei and extended the exquisite sensitivity of the Atom-Trap-Trace-Analysis technique to new species and applications. All of this progress was built on advances in nuclear theory, which the Division pursues at the quark, hadron, and nuclear collective degrees of freedom levels. These are just a few of the highlights in the Division's research program. The results reflect the talents and dedication of the Physics Division staff and the visitors, guests and students who bring so much to the research.

  1. Chemical Sciences Division: Annual report 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The Chemical Sciences Division (CSD) is one of twelve research Divisions of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, a Department of Energy National Laboratory. The CSD is composed of individual groups and research programs that are organized into five scientific areas: Chemical Physics, Inorganic/Organometallic Chemistry, Actinide Chemistry, Atomic Physics, and Physical Chemistry. This report describes progress by the CSD for 1992. Also included are remarks by the Division Director, a description of work for others (United States Office of Naval Research), and appendices of the Division personnel and an index of investigators. Research reports are grouped as Fundamental Interactions (Photochemical and Radiation Sciences, Chemical Physics, Atomic Physics) or Processes and Techniques (Chemical Energy, Heavy-Element Chemistry, and Chemical Engineering Sciences).

  2. Division: The Sleeping Dragon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Of the four mathematical operators, division seems to not sit easily for many learners. Division is often described as "the odd one out". Pupils develop coping strategies that enable them to "get away with it". So, problems, misunderstandings, and misconceptions go unresolved perhaps for a lifetime. Why is this? Is it a case of "out of sight out…

  3. Division: The Sleeping Dragon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Of the four mathematical operators, division seems to not sit easily for many learners. Division is often described as "the odd one out". Pupils develop coping strategies that enable them to "get away with it". So, problems, misunderstandings, and misconceptions go unresolved perhaps for a lifetime. Why is this? Is it a case of "out of sight out…

  4. Trial NCT02095145 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  5. Trial NCT02326805 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  6. Clinical Trials Node | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  7. 2013 News Articles | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  8. Trial NCT02063698 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  9. 2015 News Articles | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  10. 2016 News Articles | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  11. 2014 News Articles | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  12. Trial NCT01169259 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  13. Trial NCT01849250 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  14. Trial NCT00917735 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  15. Trial NCT02134925 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  16. Clinical Trials | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  17. Active Grants | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  18. Trial NCT01968798 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  19. Administrative Resource Center | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  20. Trial NCT01238172 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  1. Trial NCT01391689 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  2. Trial NCT02581137 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  3. Trial NCT01594502 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  4. Trial NCT01728571 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  5. Trial NCT01793233 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  6. Trial NCT01661764 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  7. Trial NCT01141231 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  8. Shizuko Sei, MD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  9. Staff Directory | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  10. Early Detection Staff | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  11. Trial NCT00392561 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  12. Sarah Temkin, MD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  13. Trial NCT01781468 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  14. Trial NCT01503632 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  15. Trial NCT02112188 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  16. Trial NCT00690924 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  17. Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division, 1988 Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Willard S., Ed.

    The research and development efforts performed by principal investigators under sponsorship of the Office of Naval Research Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division during 1988 are documented. The title, name and affiliation of the principal investigator, project code, contract number, current end date, technical objective, approach, and progress of…

  18. Trial NCT02568566 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  19. Trial NCT02780401 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  20. Trial NCT02382419 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  1. Trial NCT02155777 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  2. Trial NCT02636582 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  3. Trial NCT01550783 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  4. Trial NCT01935960 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  5. Biometry Staff | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  6. Trial NCT02169284 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  7. Trial NCT02237183 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  8. Trial NCT02772003 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  9. Trial NCT02123849 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  10. Trial NCT02169271 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  11. Trial NCT02521285 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  12. Trial NCT02348203 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  13. Trial NCT02028221 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  14. Trial NCT01556243 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  15. Trial NCT01824836 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  16. Trial NCT01382082 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  17. Trial NCT02116530 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  18. Trial NCT01793233 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  19. Trial NCT01346267 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  20. Trial NCT02237183 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  1. Trial NCT02169284 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  2. Trial NCT02123849 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  3. Trial NCT02348203 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  4. Trial NCT02169271 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  5. Trial NCT00153816 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  6. Trial NCT02314156 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  7. Meetings and Events | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  8. Mark Sherman, MD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  9. Trial NCT02002533 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  10. Howard Parnes, MD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  11. Trial NCT01141231 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  12. Trial NCT01503632 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  13. Trial NCT02112188 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  14. Meetings and Events | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  15. 2017 News Articles | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  16. Trial NCT01824836 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  17. Trial NCT02052908 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  18. Trial NCT00983580 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  19. Trial NCT01606124 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  20. Trial NCT01950403 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  1. Trial NCT00641147 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  2. Trial NCT02273362 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  3. Trial NCT02365480 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  4. 2017 News Articles | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  5. clinical_trial | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  6. major_program | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  7. Trial NCT02052908 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  8. Clinical Trials Node | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  9. News Archives | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  10. Howard Parnes, MD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  11. Leslie Ford, MD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  12. Eva Szabo, MD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  13. Mark Sherman, MD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  14. Funded Grants | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  15. Cancer Biomarkers Staff | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  16. Trial NCT02743364 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  17. Nutritional Science Staff | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  18. Biology Division Habrobracon Experiment P-1079

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Dosimetric analyses accumulated during the five-year period of the biosatellite program are summarized. These data are from a unique source placed in a unique optical bench, the biosatellite. Thus the multitudinous array of dosimeters was mandatory to give confidence in the experiment.

  19. Biological and medical research with accelerated heavy ions at the Bevalac, 1977-1980. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Pirruccello, M.C.; Tobias, C.A.

    1980-11-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 46 papers presented in this progress report. This report is a major review of studies with accelerated heavy ions carried out by the Biology and Medicine Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory from 1977 to 1980. (KRM)

  20. Division Iv: Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbally, Christopher; D'Antona, Francesca; Spite, Monique; Asplund, Martin; Charbonnel, Corinne; Docobo, Jose Angel; Gray, Richard O.; Piskunov, Nikolai E.

    2012-04-01

    This Division IV was started on a trial basis at the General Assembly in The Hague 1994 and was formally accepted at the Kyoto General Assembly in 1997. Its broad coverage of ``Stars'' is reflected in its relatively large number of Commissions and so of members (1266 in late 2011). Its kindred Division V, ``Variable Stars'', has the same history of its beginning. The thinking at the time was to achieve some kind of balance between the number of members in each of the 12 Divisions. Amid the current discussion of reorganizing the number of Divisions into a more compact form it seems advisable to make this numerical balance less of an issue than the rationalization of the scientific coverage of each Division, so providing more effective interaction within a particular field of astronomy. After all, every star is variable to a certain degree and such variability is becoming an ever more powerful tool to understand the characteristics of every kind of normal and peculiar star. So we may expect, after hearing the reactions of members, that in the restructuring a single Division will result from the current Divisions IV and V.

  1. Studies of acute and chronic radiation injury at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 1953-1970: Description of individual studies, data files, codes, and summaries of significant findings

    SciTech Connect

    Grahn, D.; Fox, C.; Wright, B.J.; Carnes, B.A.

    1994-05-01

    Between 1953 and 1970, studies on the long-term effects of external x-ray and {gamma} irradiation on inbred and hybrid mouse stocks were carried out at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory. The results of these studies, plus the mating, litter, and pre-experimental stock records, were routinely coded on IBM cards for statistical analysis and record maintenance. Also retained were the survival data from studies performed in the period 1943-1953 at the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. The card-image data files have been corrected where necessary and refiled on hard disks for long-term storage and ease of accessibility. In this report, the individual studies and data files are described, and pertinent factors regarding caging, husbandry, radiation procedures, choice of animals, and other logistical details are summarized. Some of the findings are also presented. Descriptions of the different mouse stocks and hybrids are included in an appendix; more than three dozen stocks were involved in these studies. Two other appendices detail the data files in their original card-image format and the numerical codes used to describe the animal`s exit from an experiment and, for some studies, any associated pathologic findings. Tabular summaries of sample sizes, dose levels, and other variables are also given to assist investigators in their selection of data for analysis. The archive is open to any investigator with legitimate interests and a willingness to collaborate and acknowledge the source of the data and to recognize appropriate conditions or caveats.

  2. Oriented divisions, fate decisions

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Scott E.; Fuchs, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    During development, the establishment of proper tissue architecture depends upon the coordinated control of cell divisions not only in space and time, but also direction. Execution of an oriented cell division requires establishment of an axis of polarity and alignment of the mitotic spindle along this axis. Frequently, the cleavage plane also segregates fate determinants, either unequally or equally between daughter cells, the outcome of which is either an asymmetric or symmetric division, respectively. The last few years have witnessed tremendous growth in understanding both the extrinsic and intrinsic cues that position the mitotic spindle, the varied mechanisms in which the spindle orientation machinery is controlled in diverse organisms and organ systems, and the manner in which the division axis influences the signaling pathways that direct cell fate choices. PMID:24021274

  3. Chemical Engineering Division Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical Engineering Education, 1978

    1978-01-01

    The 1978 ASEE Chemical Engineering Division Lecturer was Theodore Vermeulen of the University of California at Berkeley. Other chemical engineers who received awards or special recognition at a recent ASEE annual conference are mentioned. (BB)

  4. Reconsidering Division Cavalry Squadrons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-05-25

    battalions because they were “the central core of the reconnaissance team,” other cavalry champions, like Major General Robert Wagner , countered that they...29 Starry, Mounted Combat, 221; Robert Wagner , “Division Cavalry: The Broken Saber,” Armor (September-October 1989): 39; Thomas Tait...Cavalry Squadron of 2025.” Armor (January-March 2015): 67-71. Wagner , Robert. “Division Cavalry: The Broken Saber.” Armor (September-October 1989

  5. Structures and Acoustics Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquaviva, Cynthia S.

    2001-01-01

    The Structures and Acoustics Division of the NASA Glenn Research Center is an international leader in rotating structures, mechanical components, fatigue and fracture, and structural aeroacoustics. Included in this report are disciplines related to life prediction and reliability, nondestructive evaluation, and mechanical drive systems. Reported is a synopsis of the work and accomplishments completed by the Division during the 1997, 1998, and 1999 calendar years. A bibliography containing 93 citations is provided.

  6. Structures and Acoustics Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquaviva, Cynthia S.

    1999-01-01

    The Structures and Acoustics Division of NASA Glenn Research Center is an international leader in rotating structures, mechanical components, fatigue and fracture, and structural aeroacoustics. Included are disciplines related to life prediction and reliability, nondestructive evaluation, and mechanical drive systems. Reported are a synopsis of the work and accomplishments reported by the Division during the 1996 calendar year. A bibliography containing 42 citations is provided.

  7. Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY 1986, October 1985-September 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Heiken, J.H.

    1987-06-01

    This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1986 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. The report includes articles on radiochemical diagnostics and weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production and separation; chemical biology and nuclear medicine; element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced concepts and technology; and atmospheric chemistry.

  8. [Division of regulatory cellular systems (Lvov)].

    PubMed

    Kusen', S I

    1995-01-01

    Two departments of the A. V. Palladin Institute of Biochemistry of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine were founded in 1969 in Lviv. These were: the Department of Biochemistry of Cell Differentiation headed by Professor S. I. Kusen and Department of Regulation of Cellular Synthesis of Low Molecular Weight Compounds headed by Professor G. M. Shavlovsky. The Lviv Division of the A. V. Palladin Institute of Biochemistry of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine with Professor S. I. Kusen as its chief, was founded in 1974 on the basis of these departments and the Laboratory of Modelling of Regulatory Cellular Systems headed by Professor M. P. Derkach. The above mentioned laboratory which was not the structural unit obtained the status of Structural Laboratory of Cellular Biophysics in 1982 and was headed by O. A. Goida, Candidate of biological sciences. From 1983 the Laboratory of Correcting Therapy of Malignant Tumors and Hemoblastoses at the Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (Chief--S. V. Ivasivka, Candidate of medical sciences) was included in the structure of the Division. That Laboratory was soon transformed into the Department of Carbohydrate Metabolism Regulation headed by Professor I. D. Holovatsky. In 1988 this Department was renamed into the Department of Glycoprotein Biochemistry and headed by M. D. Lutsik, Doctor of biological sciences. In 1982 one more Laboratory of Biochemical Genetics was founded at the Department of Regulation of Cellular Synthesis of Low Molecular Weight Compounds, in 1988 it was transformed into the Department of Biochemical Genetics (Chief--Professor A. A. Sibirny). In 1989 the Laboratory of Anion Transport was taken from A. V. Palladin Institute of Biochemistry, Academy of Sciences of Ukraine to Lviv Division of this Institute. This laboratory was headed by Professor M. M. Veliky. One more reorganization in the Division structure took place in 1994. The Department of

  9. Radiation physics, biophysics and radiation biology. Progress report for October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, H.H.; Hall, E.J.

    1980-07-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 31 of the 32 papers presented in this progress report. The other paper is represented by an abstract only and deals with field shaping and recalibration of x-ray facilities.

  10. Asymmetric cell divisions: a view from plant development.

    PubMed

    Abrash, Emily B; Bergmann, Dominique C

    2009-06-01

    All complex multicellular organisms must solve the problem of generating diverse and appropriately patterned cell types. Asymmetric division, in which a single mother cell gives rise to daughters with distinct identities, is instrumental in the generation of cellular diversity and higher-level patterns. In animal systems, there exists considerable evidence for conserved mechanisms of polarization and asymmetric division. Here, we consider asymmetric cell divisions in plants, highlighting the unique aspects of plant cell biology and organismal development that constrain the process, but also emphasizing conceptual and mechanistic similarities with animal asymmetric divisions.

  11. Quantitative biological surface science: challenges and recent advances.

    PubMed

    Höök, Fredrik; Kasemo, Bengt; Grunze, Michael; Zauscher, Stefan

    2008-12-23

    Biological surface science is a broad, interdisciplinary subfield of surface science, where properties and processes at biological and synthetic surfaces and interfaces are investigated, and where biofunctional surfaces are fabricated. The need to study and to understand biological surfaces and interfaces in liquid environments provides sizable challenges as well as fascinating opportunities. Here, we report on recent progress in biological surface science that was described within the program assembled by the Biomaterial Interface Division of the Science and Technology of Materials, Interfaces and Processes (www.avs.org) during their 55th International Symposium and Exhibition held in Boston, October 19-24, 2008. The selected examples show that the rapid progress in nanoscience and nanotechnology, hand-in-hand with theory and simulation, provides increasingly sophisticated methods and tools to unravel the mechanisms and details of complex processes at biological surfaces and in-depth understanding of biomolecular surface interactions.

  12. Teaching Cell Division to Secondary School Students: An Investigation of Difficulties Experienced by Turkish Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oztap, Haydar; Ozay, Esra; Oztap, Fulya

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the difficulties biology teachers face when teaching cell division in the secondary schools of the central part of the Erzurum province in Turkey. During this research, a questionnaire was distributed to a total of 36 secondary school biology teachers. Findings of the study indicate biology teachers perceive cell division as…

  13. Teaching Cell Division to Secondary School Students: An Investigation of Difficulties Experienced by Turkish Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oztap, Haydar; Ozay, Esra; Oztap, Fulya

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the difficulties biology teachers face when teaching cell division in the secondary schools of the central part of the Erzurum province in Turkey. During this research, a questionnaire was distributed to a total of 36 secondary school biology teachers. Findings of the study indicate biology teachers perceive cell division as…

  14. Determination of symmetric and asymmetric division planes in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Carolyn G; Humphries, John A; Smith, Laurie G

    2011-01-01

    The cellular organization of plant tissues is determined by patterns of cell division and growth coupled with cellular differentiation. Cells proliferate mainly via symmetric division, whereas asymmetric divisions are associated with initiation of new developmental patterns and cell types. Division planes in both symmetrically and asymmetrically dividing cells are established through the action of a cortical preprophase band (PPB) of cytoskeletal filaments, which is disassembled upon transition to metaphase, leaving behind a cortical division site (CDS) to which the cytokinetic phragmoplast is later guided to position the cell plate. Recent progress has been made in understanding PPB formation and function as well as the nature and function of the CDS. In asymmetrically dividing cells, division plane establishment is governed by cell polarity. Recent work is beginning to shed light on polarization mechanisms in asymmetrically dividing cells, with receptor-like proteins and potential downstream effectors emerging as important players in this process.

  15. Cell Division Induces and Switches Coherent Angular Motion within Bounded Cellular Collectives.

    PubMed

    Siedlik, Michael J; Manivannan, Sriram; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G; Nelson, Celeste M

    2017-06-06

    Collective cell migration underlies many biological processes, including embryonic development, wound healing, and cancer progression. In the embryo, cells have been observed to move collectively in vortices using a mode of collective migration known as coherent angular motion (CAM). To determine how CAM arises within a population and changes over time, here, we study the motion of mammary epithelial cells within engineered monolayers, in which the cells move collectively about a central axis in the tissue. Using quantitative image analysis, we find that CAM is significantly reduced when mitosis is suppressed. Particle-based simulations recreate the observed trends, suggesting that cell divisions drive the robust emergence of CAM and facilitate switches in the direction of collective rotation. Our simulations predict that the location of a dividing cell, rather than the orientation of the division axis, facilitates the onset of this motion. These predictions agree with experimental observations, thereby providing, to our knowledge, new insight into how cell divisions influence CAM within a tissue. Overall, these findings highlight the dynamic nature of CAM and suggest that regulating cell division is crucial for tuning emergent collective migratory behaviors, such as vortical motions observed in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Plastid Division: Evolution, Mechanism and Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Maple, Jodi; Møller, Simon Geir

    2007-01-01

    Background The continuity of chloroplasts is maintained by division of pre-existing chloroplasts. Chloroplasts originated as bacterial endosymbionts; however, the majority of bacterial division factors are absent from chloroplasts and the eukaryotic host has added several new components. For example, the ftsZ gene has been duplicated and modified, and the Min system has retained MinE and MinD but lost MinC, acquiring at least one new component ARC3. Further, the mechanism has evolved to include two members of the dynamin protein family, ARC5 and FZL, and plastid-dividing (PD) rings were most probably added by the eukaryotic host. Scope Deciphering how the division of plastids is coordinated and controlled by nuclear-encoded factors is key to our understanding of this important biological process. Through a number of molecular-genetic and biochemical approaches, it is evident that FtsZ initiates plastid division where the coordinated action of MinD and MinE ensures correct FtsZ (Z)-ring placement. Although the classical FtsZ antagonist MinC does not exist in plants, ARC3 may fulfil this role. Together with other prokaryotic-derived proteins such as ARC6 and GC1 and key eukaryotic-derived proteins such as ARC5 and FZL, these proteins make up a sophisticated division machinery. The regulation of plastid division in a cellular context is largely unknown; however, recent microarray data shed light on this. Here the current understanding of the mechanism of chloroplast division in higher plants is reviewed with an emphasis on how recent findings are beginning to shape our understanding of the function and evolution of the components. Conclusions Extrapolation from the mechanism of bacterial cell division provides valuable clues as to how the chloroplast division process is achieved in plant cells. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that the highly regulated mechanism of plastid division within the host cell has led to the evolution of features unique to the

  17. Division II: Sun and Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, David F.; Melrose, Donald B.; Benz, Arnold O.; Bogdan, Thomas J.; Bougeret, Jean-Louis; Klimchuk, James A.; Martinez Pillet, Valentin

    2007-03-01

    Division II of the IAU provides a forum for astronomers studying a wide range of phenomena related to the structure, radiation and activity of the Sun, and its interaction with the Earth and the rest of the solar system. Division II encompasses three Commissions, 10, 12 and 49, and four working groups. During the last triennia the activities of the division involved some reorganization of the division and its working groups, developing new procedures for election of division and commission officers, promoting annual meetings from within the division and evaluating all the proposed meetings, evaluating the division's representatives for the IAU to international scientific organizations, and participating in general IAU business.

  18. Contacts in the Office of Pesticide Programs, Biopesticides and Pollution Prevention Division

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Contact the Biopesticides and Pollution Prevention Division (BPPD) about regulatory activities associated with biologically-based pesticides, implementation of integrated pest management and the Pesticide Environmental Stewardship Program.

  19. Development and application of photosensitive device systems to studies of biological and organic materials. Progress report, January 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Gruner, S.M.; Reynolds, G.T.

    1993-09-14

    This progress report summarizes results, as of August, 1993, for DOE grant DE-FG-02-76ER60522 during the fiscal period 1/1/93 to 12/31/93, which is the first year of a 3-year grant cycle. The overall goals of the grant are to develop advanced x-ray detector technologies, especially as applicable for biological and materials research at the national laboratories, and to train graduate and post-doctoral students on the use of these technologies via the performance of original biological and materials research. As summarized below, there has been good progress toward achieving the research goals of the original 3-year proposal; in consequence, the research plan and the total budget for the rest of 1993 and beyond is still well described by the original proposal. Accomplishments since the last progress report include: (A) A 1k x 1k fiber optically coupled CCD detector was assembled, tested at CHESS and is slated for extended user trials this Fall. A 2k x 2k CCD detector is being assembled for permanent installation at CHESS. (B) X-ray detector phosphors, calibration techniques, and system software have been developed. (C) The design of a Pixel Array Detector, a collaborative project with the Advanced Photon Source, has been initiated. (D) The properties of biomembrane lipids under extremes of pressure have been investigated. High pressure instrumentation and techniques have been developed. (E) The physics of mesophase formation in biomembrane lipid, surfactant, and polymeric systems have been studied. This includes study of the interaction of membrane proteins with elastically strained lipid bilayers. (G) Work has been initiated on the use of thermal diffuse scatter from proteins as a probe of protein dynamics. (H) Studies on luminescent phenomena have been reported. Since the last progress report (dated 15 May 1992), this work has resulted in 10 published papers, 7 abstracts, 1 Ph.D. thesis and 1 technical report.

  20. Early changes in serum type II collagen biomarkers predict radiographic progression at one year in inflammatory arthritis patients after biologic therapy.

    PubMed

    Mullan, Ronan H; Matthews, Clare; Bresnihan, Barry; FitzGerald, Oliver; King, Lindsay; Poole, A Robin; Fearon, Ursula; Veale, Douglas J

    2007-09-01

    To investigate whether short-term changes in serum biomarkers of type II collagen degradation (C2C) and types I and II collagen degradation (C1,2C), as well as the biomarker for the synthesis of type II procollagen (CPII) can predict radiographic progression at 1 year following initiation of biologic therapy in patients with inflammatory arthritis. Serum levels of biomarkers were measured at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after initiation of biologic therapy. A composite score reflecting changes from baseline in all 3 biomarkers (DeltaCOL) was calculated. Associations with clinical responses according to the 28-joint count Disease Activity Score and with radiographic progression according to the modified Sharp/van der Heijde score (SHS) were assessed. The 1-year increase in the SHS correlated with the 1-month change in C2C results (r = 0.311, P = 0.028) and the DeltaCOL score (r = 0.342, P = 0.015). Radiographic progression was predicted by increases in serum C2C at 1 month (P = 0.031). The DeltaCOL score was significantly associated with 1-year radiographic progression after 1 (P = 0.022), 3 (P = 0.015), 6 (P = 0.048), and 9 (P = 0.019) months of therapy. Clinical remission was predicted by 1-month decreases in serum levels of C2C (P = 0.008) and C1,2C (P = 0.036). By regression analysis, 1-month changes in C2C, C1,2C, and CPII levels were independently associated with, and correctly predicted radiographic outcome in, 88% of the patients. Short-term changes in serum levels of collagen biomarkers following initiation of biologic therapy may better predict long-term clinical and radiographic outcomes. These collagen biomarkers may therefore be valuable new early indicators of short-term biologic treatment efficacy in clinical trials and in individual patients with inflammatory erosive arthritis.

  1. Multiple sclerosis: integration of modeling with biology, clinical and imaging measures to provide better monitoring of disease progression and prediction of outcome.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Shikha Jain

    2016-12-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a major cause of neurological disability in adults and has an annual cost of approximately $28 billion in the United States. MS is a very complex disorder as demyelination can happen in a variety of locations throughout the brain; therefore, this disease is never the same in two patients making it very hard to predict disease progression. A modeling approach which combines clinical, biological and imaging measures to help treat and fight this disorder is needed. In this paper, I will outline MS as a very heterogeneous disorder, review some potential solutions from the literature, demonstrate the need for a biomarker and will discuss how computational modeling combined with biological, clinical and imaging data can help link disparate observations and decipher complex mechanisms whose solutions are not amenable to simple reductionism.

  2. Multiple sclerosis: integration of modeling with biology, clinical and imaging measures to provide better monitoring of disease progression and prediction of outcome

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Shikha Jain

    2016-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a major cause of neurological disability in adults and has an annual cost of approximately $28 billion in the United States. MS is a very complex disorder as demyelination can happen in a variety of locations throughout the brain; therefore, this disease is never the same in two patients making it very hard to predict disease progression. A modeling approach which combines clinical, biological and imaging measures to help treat and fight this disorder is needed. In this paper, I will outline MS as a very heterogeneous disorder, review some potential solutions from the literature, demonstrate the need for a biomarker and will discuss how computational modeling combined with biological, clinical and imaging data can help link disparate observations and decipher complex mechanisms whose solutions are not amenable to simple reductionism. PMID:28197176

  3. Informing a Learning Progression in Genetics: Which Should Be Taught First, Mendelian Inheritance or the Central Dogma of Molecular Biology?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Ravit Golan; Castro-Faix, Moraima; Choi, Jinnie

    2016-01-01

    The Framework for Science Education and the Next Generation Science Standards in the USA emphasize learning progressions (LPs) that support conceptual coherence and the gradual building of knowledge over time. In the domain of genetics there are two independently developed alternative LPs. In essence, the difference between the two progressions…

  4. Informing a Learning Progression in Genetics: Which Should Be Taught First, Mendelian Inheritance or the Central Dogma of Molecular Biology?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Ravit Golan; Castro-Faix, Moraima; Choi, Jinnie

    2016-01-01

    The Framework for Science Education and the Next Generation Science Standards in the USA emphasize learning progressions (LPs) that support conceptual coherence and the gradual building of knowledge over time. In the domain of genetics there are two independently developed alternative LPs. In essence, the difference between the two progressions…

  5. Division Vi: Interstellar Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millar, Tom; Chu, You-Hua; Dyson, John; Breitschwerdt, Dieter; Burton, Mike; Cabrit, Sylvie; Caselli, Paola; de Gouveia Dal Pino, Elisabete; Ferland, Gary; Juvela, Mika; Koo, Bon-Chul; Kwok, Sun; Lizano, Susana; Rozyczka, Michal; Tóth, Viktor; Tsuboi, Masato; Yang, Ji

    2010-05-01

    The business meeting of Division VI was held on Monday 10 October 2009. Apologies had been received in advance from D Breitschwerdt, P Caselli, G Ferland, M Juvela, S Lizano, M Rozyczka, V Tóth, M Tsuboi, J Yang and B-C Koo.

  6. Order Division Automated System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kniemeyer, Justin M.; And Others

    This publication was prepared by the Order Division Automation Project staff to fulfill the Library of Congress' requirement to document all automation efforts. The report was originally intended for internal use only and not for distribution outside the Library. It is now felt that the library community at-large may have an interest in the…

  7. Solid State Division

    SciTech Connect

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M.

    1989-08-01

    This report contains brief discussions on work done in the Solid State Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The topics covered are: Theoretical Solid State Physics; Neutron scattering; Physical properties of materials; The synthesis and characterization of materials; Ion beam and laser processing; and Structure of solids and surfaces. (LSP)

  8. Cell division in Corynebacterineae

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Catriona; Bramkamp, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial cells must coordinate a number of events during the cell cycle. Spatio-temporal regulation of bacterial cytokinesis is indispensable for the production of viable, genetically identical offspring. In many rod-shaped bacteria, precise midcell assembly of the division machinery relies on inhibitory systems such as Min and Noc. In rod-shaped Actinobacteria, for example Corynebacterium glutamicum and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the divisome assembles in the proximity of the midcell region, however more spatial flexibility is observed compared to Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. Actinobacteria represent a group of bacteria that spatially regulate cytokinesis in the absence of recognizable Min and Noc homologs. The key cell division steps in E. coli and B. subtilis have been subject to intensive study and are well-understood. In comparison, only a minimal set of positive and negative regulators of cytokinesis are known in Actinobacteria. Nonetheless, the timing of cytokinesis and the placement of the division septum is coordinated with growth as well as initiation of chromosome replication and segregation. We summarize here the current knowledge on cytokinesis and division site selection in the Actinobacteria suborder Corynebacterineae. PMID:24782835

  9. 76 FR 8357 - Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy; Office of Science... News from the Biological Systems Science and Climate and Environmental Sciences Divisions Discussions on the Climate and Environmental Sciences Division Committee of Visitors Response and the...

  10. Smad4 is dispensable for normal pancreas development yet critical in progression and tumor biology of pancreas cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bardeesy, Nabeel; Cheng, Kuang-hung; Berger, Justin H.; Chu, Gerald C.; Pahler, Jessica; Olson, Peter; Hezel, Aram F.; Horner, James; Lauwers, Gregory Y.; Hanahan, Douglas; DePinho, Ronald A.

    2006-01-01

    SMAD4 is inactivated in the majority of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC) with concurrent mutational inactivation of the INK4A/ARF tumor suppressor locus and activation of the KRAS oncogene. Here, using genetically engineered mice, we determined the impact of SMAD4 deficiency on the development of the pancreas and on the initiation and/or progression of PDAC—alone or in combination with PDAC-relevant mutations. Selective SMAD4 deletion in the pancreatic epithelium had no discernable impact on pancreatic development or physiology. However, when combined with the activated KRASG12D allele, SMAD4 deficiency enabled rapid progression of KRASG12D-initiated neoplasms. While KRASG12D alone elicited premalignant pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) that progressed slowly to carcinoma, the combination of KRASG12D and SMAD4 deficiency resulted in the rapid development of tumors resembling intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasia (IPMN), a precursor to PDAC in humans. SMAD4 deficiency also accelerated PDAC development of KRASG12D INK4A/ARF heterozygous mice and altered the tumor phenotype; while tumors with intact SMAD4 frequently exhibited epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), PDAC null for SMAD4 retained a differentiated histopathology with increased expression of epithelial markers. SMAD4 status in PDAC cell lines was associated with differential responses to transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in vitro with a subset of SMAD4 wild-type lines showing prominent TGF-β-induced proliferation and migration. These results provide genetic confirmation that SMAD4 is a PDAC tumor suppressor, functioning to block the progression of KRASG12D-initiated neoplasms, whereas in a subset of advanced tumors, intact SMAD4 facilitates EMT and TGF-β-dependent growth. PMID:17114584

  11. Painless Division with Doc Spitler's Magic Division Estimator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitler, Gail

    1981-01-01

    An approach to teaching pupils the long division algorithm that relies heavily on a consistent and logical approach to estimation is reviewed. Once learned, the division estimator can be used to support the standard repeated subtraction algorithm. (MP)

  12. IFLA General Conference, 1990. Division of Special Libraries: Section of Administrative Libraries; Section of Social Science Libraries; Section of Science and Technology Libraries; Section of Biological and Medical Sciences Libraries; Section of Art Libraries. Booklet 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    The 23 papers in this collection were presented at 5 sections of the Division of Special Libraries: (1) "Principles of Government Librarianship" (Hans H. van der Neut); (2) "Strategic Planning as an Instrument of Improving Library Quality" (Maurice B. Line); (3) "Library Staff Development Consultancy: A Means to Achieve a…

  13. IFLA General Conference, 1991. Division of Special Libraries Services: Section of Social Science Libraries; Section of Geography and Map Libraries; Section of Biological and Medical Sciences Libraries; Section of Art Libraries. Booklet 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, The Hague (Netherlands).

    The 10 papers in this booklet were presented at meetings of 4 sections within the Division of Special Libraries: (1) "Information Ensurance of a Scientist" (V. Matveyev, USSR); (2) "Linguistic Barriers and Machine Translation" (Stanley Kalkus, USA); (3) "Maps for Planning" (V. I. Zhukov and L. G. Rudenko, USSR); (4)…

  14. IFLA General Conference, 1990. Division of Special Libraries: Section of Administrative Libraries; Section of Social Science Libraries; Section of Science and Technology Libraries; Section of Biological and Medical Sciences Libraries; Section of Art Libraries. Booklet 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    The 23 papers in this collection were presented at 5 sections of the Division of Special Libraries: (1) "Principles of Government Librarianship" (Hans H. van der Neut); (2) "Strategic Planning as an Instrument of Improving Library Quality" (Maurice B. Line); (3) "Library Staff Development Consultancy: A Means to Achieve a…

  15. IFLA General Conference, 1991. Division of Special Libraries Services: Section of Social Science Libraries; Section of Geography and Map Libraries; Section of Biological and Medical Sciences Libraries; Section of Art Libraries. Booklet 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, The Hague (Netherlands).

    The 10 papers in this booklet were presented at meetings of 4 sections within the Division of Special Libraries: (1) "Information Ensurance of a Scientist" (V. Matveyev, USSR); (2) "Linguistic Barriers and Machine Translation" (Stanley Kalkus, USA); (3) "Maps for Planning" (V. I. Zhukov and L. G. Rudenko, USSR); (4)…

  16. Synthetic biology

    PubMed Central

    Bower, Adam G; McClintock, Maria K

    2010-01-01

    The field of synthetic biology has made rapid progress in a number of areas including method development, novel applications and community building. In seeking to make biology “engineerable,” synthetic biology is increasing the accessibility of biological research to researchers of all experience levels and backgrounds. One of the underlying strengths of synthetic biology is that it may establish the framework for a rigorous bottom-up approach to studying biology starting at the DNA level. Building upon the existing framework established largely by the Registry of Standard Biological Parts, careful consideration of future goals may lead to integrated multi- scale approaches to biology. Here we describe some of the current challenges that need to be addressed or considered in detail to continue the development of synthetic biology. Specifically, discussion on the areas of elucidating biological principles, computational methods and experimental construction methodologies are presented. PMID:21326830

  17. Yields of biologically significant damage produced in mammalian DNA by irradiation associated with radon decay. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, J.F.

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this project was to characterize the difference between damage to DNA caused by alpha particles and by low LET radiation. Estimation of the risk posed by exposure to high LET radiation (such as that from radon) relies at present on epidemiological data, and is therefore largely empirical. This empiricism is evident from the concepts of quality factor or RBE that find use for describing the biological effects of high LET radiation. The author argues that some effort should be made to address the mechanisms of DNA damage by high and low LET forms of radiation, and how these mechanisms might relate to the biological endpoints. This report summarizes the results of the author`s investigations and the current understanding of these mechanisms.

  18. Driving Discovery | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Progress against cancer depends on many types of research—including basic, translational, and clinical—across different research areas, from the biology of cancer cells to studies of large populations. Regardless of the research type or area, supporting the best science and the best scientists is of paramount importance to NCI. Learn more about driving progress against cancer. |

  19. Regulation of nucleic acid and protein synthesis: a background study related to the biological effects of radiation. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Zamecnik, P.

    1984-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following areas in defining the varied roles of diadenosine 5', 5'''-P/sup 1/, P/sup 4/-tetraphosphate (Ap/sub 4/A) in metabolic events within the living cell: (1) Ap/sub 4/A association with a subunit of DNA polymerase ..cap alpha..; (2) studies on the unusual ordered structure of Ap/sub 4/A and of related bisnucleoside oligophosphates; (3) the utilization of technetium labeled Ap/sub 4/A as a radionuclide diagnostic reagent; and (4) the role of Ap/sub 4/A in the blood clotting mechanism. (ACR)

  20. 2016 T Division Lightning Talks

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, Marilyn Leann; Adams, Luke Clyde; Ferre, Gregoire Robing; Grantcharov, Vesselin; Iaroshenko, Oleksandr; Krishnapriyan, Aditi; Kurtakoti, Prajvala Kishore; Le Thien, Minh Quan; Lim, Jonathan Ng; Low, Thaddeus Song En; Lystrom, Levi Aaron; Ma, Xiaoyu; Nguyen, Hong T.; Pogue, Sabine Silvia; Orandle, Zoe Ann; Reisner, Andrew Ray; Revard, Benjamin Charles; Roy, Julien; Sandor, Csanad; Slavkova, Kalina Polet; Weichman, Kathleen Joy; Wu, Fei; Yang, Yang

    2016-11-29

    These are the slides for all of the 2016 T Division lightning talks. There are 350 pages worth of slides from different presentations, all of which cover different topics within the theoretical division at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  1. Podcast: The Electronic Crimes Division

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Sept 26, 2016. Chris Lukas, the Special Agent in Charge of the Electronic Crimes Division within the OIG's Office of Investigations talks about computer forensics, cybercrime in the EPA and his division's role in criminal investigations.

  2. [Basal cell carcinoma of the skin--biological behaviour of the tumor and a review of the most important molecular predictors of disease progression in pathological practice].

    PubMed

    Bartos, V; Adamicová, K; Kullová, M; Péc, M

    2011-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma of the skin is currently the most frequent malignancy in human population. Basal cell carcinoma represents a heterogeneous group of tumors with a variable clinical and morphological picture. Based on its biological behaviour, we generally differentiate between indolent (superficial and nodular) and aggressive type (infiltrative, micronodular, and metatypical) of basal cell carcinoma. Because of the different biological characteristics of these tumors, it is questionable whether they are a part of a continuous spectrum of carcinogenesis, starting with indolent and ending with aggressive forms, or they represent separate developmental lines. In the current clinical practice, there is an increasing demand for identification of tumors that are prognostically more adverse and their impact on the overall health status of patients is more serious. Recent advances in pathology and molecular medicine allow identification of various biomarkers from tumor tissue that are significantly involved in the mechanisms of malignant cell transformation. Detection of these biomarkers is of great importance in predicting further clinical behaviour of the cancer. The authors of the paper present basic information about biological behaviour of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma and provide an overview of the most important biomarkers that influence the clinical outcome and disease progression and are detectable through a routine biopsy tissue examination. It is now necessary to search for novel histological and molecular parameters that, in the future, could have a prognostic value in diagnostic and therapeutic process of this disorder.

  3. On nonepistemic values in conservation biology.

    PubMed

    Baumgaertner, Bert; Holthuijzen, Wieteke

    2017-02-01

    Conservation biology is a uniquely interdisciplinary science with strong roots in ecology, but it also embraces a value-laden and mission-oriented framework. This combination of science and values causes conservation biology to be at the center of critique regarding the discipline's scientific credibility-especially the division between the realms of theory and practice. We identify this dichotomy between seemingly objective (fact-based) and subjective (value-laden) practices as the measure-value dichotomy, whereby measure refers to methods and analyses used in conservation biology (i.e., measuring biodiversity) and value refers to nonepistemic values. We reviewed and evaluated several landmark articles central to the foundation of conservation biology and concepts of biodiversity with respect to their attempts to separate measures and values. We argue that the measure-value dichotomy is false and that conservation biology can make progress in ways unavailable to other disciplines because its practitioners are tasked with engaging in both the realm of theory and the realm of practice. The entanglement of measures and values is by no means a weakness of conservation biology. Because central concepts such as biodiversity contain both factual and evaluative aspects, conservation biologists can make theoretical progress by examining, reviewing, and forming the values that are an integral part of those concepts. We suggest that values should be included and analyzed with respect to the methods, results, and conclusions of scientific work in conservation biology.

  4. Towards a bottom-up reconstitution of bacterial cell division.

    PubMed

    Martos, Ariadna; Jiménez, Mercedes; Rivas, Germán; Schwille, Petra

    2012-12-01

    The components of the bacterial division machinery assemble to form a dynamic ring at mid-cell that drives cytokinesis. The nature of most division proteins and their assembly pathway is known. Our knowledge about the biochemical activities and protein interactions of some key division elements, including those responsible for correct ring positioning, has progressed considerably during the past decade. These developments, together with new imaging and membrane reconstitution technologies, have triggered the 'bottom-up' synthetic approach aiming at reconstructing bacterial division in the test tube, which is required to support conclusions derived from cellular and molecular analysis. Here, we describe recent advances in reconstituting Escherichia coli minimal systems able to reproduce essential functions, such as the initial steps of division (proto-ring assembly) and one of the main positioning mechanisms (Min oscillating system), and discuss future perspectives and experimental challenges.

  5. Energy Systems Divisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applewhite, John

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the JSC Energy Systems Divisions work in propulsion. Specific work in LO2/CH4 propulsion, cryogenic propulsion, low thrust propulsion for Free Flyer, robotic and Extra Vehicular Activities, and work on the Morpheus terrestrial free flyer test bed is reviewed. The back-up slides contain a chart with comparisons of LO2/LCH4 with other propellants, and reviewing the advantages especially for spacecraft propulsion.

  6. Biological processes in the water column of the South Atlantic Bight: Phytoplankton response: A three-year progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Verity, P.G.; Yoder, J.A.

    1987-12-01

    This project report consists of published and unpublished manuscripts which describe research studies initiated and completed during the past three years. Results of these and additional efforts, presently being prepared for submission to refereed journals, were presented at various scientific meetings. SPREX was an interdisciplinary study of the spring removal period when low salinity nearshore waters advect offshore in the region between Savannah and Cape Fear. Our objectives were to determine the fate of the relatively high concentrations of phytoplankton biomass within low salinity nearshore waters and to determine the effect of wind events on phytoplankton dynamics within the nearshore zone. All field studies are complete, and a workshop was held in March 1986 to provide a forum for all investigators to discuss and interpret the results. Several related studies on plankton dynamics in coastal and shelf waters are in progress. A new component, research on the abundance, distribution, and impact of protozoan grazers, was added to this project in 1986 to 1987. Data collection in the nearshore program (BIOTRANS) is nearing completion. Synthesis and analysis of data are in progress. Research on shelf processes includes two components: interdisciplinary shipboard efforts (FLEX) and studies of CZCS satellite imagery of chlorophyll distributions. 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Molecular Biology, Epidemiology, and Pathogenesis of Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy, the JC Virus-Induced Demyelinating Disease of the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Ferenczy, Michael W.; Marshall, Leslie J.; Nelson, Christian D. S.; Atwood, Walter J.; Nath, Avindra; Khalili, Kamel

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a debilitating and frequently fatal central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating disease caused by JC virus (JCV), for which there is currently no effective treatment. Lytic infection of oligodendrocytes in the brain leads to their eventual destruction and progressive demyelination, resulting in multiple foci of lesions in the white matter of the brain. Before the mid-1980s, PML was a relatively rare disease, reported to occur primarily in those with underlying neoplastic conditions affecting immune function and, more rarely, in allograft recipients receiving immunosuppressive drugs. However, with the onset of the AIDS pandemic, the incidence of PML has increased dramatically. Approximately 3 to 5% of HIV-infected individuals will develop PML, which is classified as an AIDS-defining illness. In addition, the recent advent of humanized monoclonal antibody therapy for the treatment of autoimmune inflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and Crohn's disease has also led to an increased risk of PML as a side effect of immunotherapy. Thus, the study of JCV and the elucidation of the underlying causes of PML are important and active areas of research that may lead to new insights into immune function and host antiviral defense, as well as to potential new therapies. PMID:22763635

  8. Recent progress on our understanding of the biological effects of mercury in fish and wildlife in the Canadian Arctic.

    PubMed

    Scheuhammer, Anton; Braune, Birgit; Chan, Hing Man; Frouin, Héloïse; Krey, Anke; Letcher, Robert; Loseto, Lisa; Noël, Marie; Ostertag, Sonja; Ross, Peter; Wayland, Mark

    2015-03-15

    This review summarizes our current state of knowledge regarding the potential biological effects of mercury (Hg) exposure on fish and wildlife in the Canadian Arctic. Although Hg in most freshwater fish from northern Canada was not sufficiently elevated to be of concern, a few lakes in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut contained fish of certain species (e.g. northern pike, Arctic char) whose muscle Hg concentrations exceeded an estimated threshold range (0.5-1.0 μg g(-1) wet weight) within which adverse biological effects begin to occur. Marine fish species generally had substantially lower Hg concentrations than freshwater fish; but the Greenland shark, a long-lived predatory species, had mean muscle Hg concentrations exceeding the threshold range for possible effects on health or reproduction. An examination of recent egg Hg concentrations for marine birds from the Canadian Arctic indicated that mean Hg concentration in ivory gulls from Seymour Island fell within the threshold range associated with adverse effects on reproduction in birds. Mercury concentrations in brain tissue of beluga whales and polar bears were generally lower than levels associated with neurotoxicity in mammals, but were sometimes high enough to cause subtle neurochemical changes that can precede overt neurotoxicity. Harbour seals from western Hudson Bay had elevated mean liver Hg concentrations along with comparatively high muscle Hg concentrations indicating potential health effects from methylmercury (MeHg) exposure on this subpopulation. Because current information is generally insufficient to determine with confidence whether Hg exposure is impacting the health of specific fish or wildlife populations in the Canadian Arctic, biological effects studies should comprise a major focus of future Hg research in the Canadian Arctic. Additionally, studies on cellular interactions between Hg and selenium (Se) are required to better account for potential protective effects of Se on Hg

  9. Physics division annual report 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, J.; Physics

    2007-03-12

    This report highlights the research performed in 2005 in the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research, nuclear theory, medium energy nuclear research and accelerator research and development. The mission of Nuclear Physics is to understand the origin, evolution and structure of baryonic matter in the universe--the matter that makes up stars, planets and human life itself. The Division's research focuses on innovative new ways to address this mission and 2005 was a year of great progress. One of the most exciting developments is the initiation of the Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade, CARIBU. By combining a Cf-252 fission source, the gas catcher technology developed for rare isotope beams, a high-resolution isobar separator, and charge breeding ECR technology, CARIBU will make hundreds of new neutron-rich isotope beams available for research. The cover illustration shows the anticipated intensities of low-energy beams that become available for low-energy experiments and for injection into ATLAS for reacceleration. CARIBU will be completed in early 2009 and provide us with considerable experience in many of the technologies developed for a future high intensity exotic beam facility. Notable results in research at ATLAS include a measurement of the isomeric states in {sup 252}No that helps pin down the single particle structure expected for superheavy elements, and a new low-background measurement of {sup 16}N beta-decay to determine the {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction rate that is so important in astrophysical environments. Precise mass measurements shed new light on the unitarity of the quark weak-mixing matrix in the search for physics beyond the standard model. ATLAS operated for 4686 hours of research in FY2005 while achieving 95% efficiency of beam delivery for experiments. In Medium-Energy Physics, radium isotopes were

  10. Division Quilts: A Measurement Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Sarah S.; Lupton, Tina M.; Richardson, Kerri

    2015-01-01

    As teachers seek activities to assist students in understanding division as more than just the algorithm, they find many examples of division as fair sharing. However, teachers have few activities to engage students in a quotative (measurement) model of division. Efraim Fischbein and his colleagues (1985) defined two types of whole-number…

  11. Division Quilts: A Measurement Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Sarah S.; Lupton, Tina M.; Richardson, Kerri

    2015-01-01

    As teachers seek activities to assist students in understanding division as more than just the algorithm, they find many examples of division as fair sharing. However, teachers have few activities to engage students in a quotative (measurement) model of division. Efraim Fischbein and his colleagues (1985) defined two types of whole-number…

  12. Biorepositories | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Carefully collected and controlled high-quality human biospecimens, annotated with clinical data and properly consented for investigational use, are available through the Division of Cancer Prevention Biorepositories listed in the charts below. Biorepositories Managed by the Division of Cancer Prevention Biorepositories Supported by the Division of Cancer Prevention Related Biorepositories | Information about accessing biospecimens collected from DCP-supported clinical trials and projects.

  13. Chemical and Biological Approaches for Adapting Proteostasis to Ameliorate Protein Misfolding and Aggregation Diseases–Progress and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Lindquist, Susan L.; Kelly, Jeffery W.

    2011-01-01

    Maintaining the proteome to preserve the health of an organism in the face of developmental changes, environmental insults, infectious diseases, and rigors of aging is a formidable task. The challenge is magnified by the inheritance of mutations that render individual proteins subject to misfolding and/or aggregation. Maintenance of the proteome requires the orchestration of protein synthesis, folding, degradation, and trafficking by highly conserved/deeply integrated cellular networks. In humans, no less than 2000 genes are involved. Stress sensors detect the misfolding and aggregation of proteins in specific organelles and respond by activating stress-responsive signaling pathways. These culminate in transcriptional and posttranscriptional programs that up-regulate the homeostatic mechanisms unique to that organelle. Proteostasis is also strongly influenced by the general properties of protein folding that are intrinsic to every proteome. These include the kinetics and thermodynamics of the folding, misfolding, and aggregation of individual proteins. We examine a growing body of evidence establishing that when cellular proteostasis goes awry, it can be reestablished by deliberate chemical and biological interventions. We start with approaches that employ chemicals or biological agents to enhance the general capacity of the proteostasis network. We then introduce chemical approaches to prevent the misfolding or aggregation of specific proteins through direct binding interactions. We finish with evidence that synergy is achieved with the combination of mechanistically distinct approaches to reestablish organismal proteostasis. PMID:21900404

  14. Chemical and biological approaches for adapting proteostasis to ameliorate protein misfolding and aggregation diseases: progress and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, Susan L; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2011-12-01

    Maintaining the proteome to preserve the health of an organism in the face of developmental changes, environmental insults, infectious diseases, and rigors of aging is a formidable task. The challenge is magnified by the inheritance of mutations that render individual proteins subject to misfolding and/or aggregation. Maintenance of the proteome requires the orchestration of protein synthesis, folding, degradation, and trafficking by highly conserved/deeply integrated cellular networks. In humans, no less than 2000 genes are involved. Stress sensors detect the misfolding and aggregation of proteins in specific organelles and respond by activating stress-responsive signaling pathways. These culminate in transcriptional and posttranscriptional programs that up-regulate the homeostatic mechanisms unique to that organelle. Proteostasis is also strongly influenced by the general properties of protein folding that are intrinsic to every proteome. These include the kinetics and thermodynamics of the folding, misfolding, and aggregation of individual proteins. We examine a growing body of evidence establishing that when cellular proteostasis goes awry, it can be reestablished by deliberate chemical and biological interventions. We start with approaches that employ chemicals or biological agents to enhance the general capacity of the proteostasis network. We then introduce chemical approaches to prevent the misfolding or aggregation of specific proteins through direct binding interactions. We finish with evidence that synergy is achieved with the combination of mechanistically distinct approaches to reestablish organismal proteostasis.

  15. Evaluation of Novel Targeted Therapies in Aggressive Biology Sarcoma Patients after progression from US FDA approved Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Subbiah, Vivek; Hess, Kenneth R.; Khawaja, Muhammad Rizwan; Wagner, Michael J.; Tang, Chad; Naing, Aung; Fu, Siqing; Janku, Filip; Piha-Paul, Sarina; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M.; Herzog, Cynthia E.; Ludwig, Joseph A.; Patel, Shreyaskumar; Ravi, Vinod; Benjamin, Robert S.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Hong, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Prognosis of patients with advanced sarcoma after progression from FDA approved therapies remains grim. In this study, clinical outcomes of 100 patients with advanced sarcoma who received treatment on novel targeted therapy trials were evaluated. Outcomes of interest included best response, clinical benefit rate, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Median patient age was 48 years (range 14–80). Patients had received a median of 2 prior lines of systemic treatment. Phase I treatments were anti-VEGF–based (n = 45), mTOR inhibitor–based (n = 15), and anti-VEGF + mTOR inhibitor–based (n = 17) or involved other targets (n = 23). Best responses included partial response (n = 4) and stable disease (n = 57). Clinical benefit rate was 36% (95% confidence interval 27–46%). Median OS was 9.6 months (95% Confidence Interval 8.1–14.2); median PFS was 3.5 months (95% Confidence Interval 2.4–4.7). RMH prognostic score of 2 or 3 was associated with lower median OS (log-rank p-value < 0.0001) and PFS (log-rank p-value 0.0081). Receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy as part of phase I trial was also associated with shorter median OS (log-rank p-value 0.039). Patients with advanced sarcoma treated on phase I clinical trials had a clinical benefit rate of 36% and RMH score predicted survival. PMID:27748430

  16. Mitochondrial inheritance is mediated by microtubules in mammalian cell division.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Elizabeth; Mandato, Craig

    2013-11-01

    The mitochondrial network fragments and becomes uniformly dispersed within the cytoplasm when mammalian cells enter mitosis. Such morphology and distribution of mitochondria was previously thought to facilitate the stochastic inheritance of mitochondria by daughter cells. In contrast, we recently reported that mitochondria in dividing mammalian cells are inherited by an ordered mechanism of inheritance mediated by microtubules. We showed that mitochondria are progressively enriched at the cell equator and depleted at the poles throughout division. Furthermore, the mitochondrial distribution during division is dependent on microtubules, indicating an ordered inheritance strategy. The microtubule-mediated positioning of mitochondria in dividing mammalian cells may have functional consequences for cell division and/or mitochondrial inheritance.

  17. Activities of the Solid State Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, P. H.; Hinton, L. W.

    1994-08-01

    This report covers research progress in the Solid State Division from April 1, 1992, to September 30, 1993. During this period, the division conducted a broad, interdisciplinary materials research program with emphasis on theoretical solid state physics, neutron scattering, synthesis and characterization of materials, ion beam and laser processing, and the structure of solids and surfaces. This research effort was enhanced by new capabilities in atomic-scale materials characterization, new emphasis on the synthesis and processing of materials, and increased partnering with industry and universities. The theoretical effort included a broad range of analytical studies, as well as a new emphasis on numerical simulation stimulated by advances in high-performance computing and by strong interest in related division experimental programs. Superconductivity research continued to advance on a broad front from fundamental mechanisms of high-temperature superconductivity to the development of new materials and processing techniques. The Neutron Scattering Program was characterized by a strong scientific user program and growing diversity represented by new initiatives in complex fluids and residual stress. The national emphasis on materials synthesis and processing was mirrored in division research programs in thin-film processing, surface modification, and crystal growth. Research on advanced processing techniques such as laser ablation, ion implantation, and plasma processing was complemented by strong programs in the characterization of materials and surfaces including ultrahigh resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, atomic-resolution chemical analysis, synchrotron x-ray research, and scanning tunneling microscopy.

  18. Rapid radiation in bacteria leads to a division of labour

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wook; Levy, Stuart B.; Foster, Kevin R.

    2016-01-01

    The division of labour is a central feature of the most sophisticated biological systems, including genomes, multicellular organisms and societies, which took millions of years to evolve. Here we show that a well-organized and robust division of labour can evolve in a matter of days. Mutants emerge within bacterial colonies and work with the parent strain to gain new territory. The two strains self-organize in space: one provides a wetting polymer at the colony edge, whereas the other sits behind and pushes them both along. The emergence of the interaction is repeatable, bidirectional and only requires a single mutation to alter production of the intracellular messenger, cyclic-di-GMP. Our work demonstrates the power of the division of labour to rapidly solve biological problems without the need for long-term evolution or derived sociality. We predict that the division of labour will evolve frequently in microbial populations, where rapid genetic diversification is common. PMID:26852925

  19. The biology of extracellular vesicles with focus on platelet microparticles and their role in cancer development and progression.

    PubMed

    Żmigrodzka, M; Guzera, M; Miśkiewicz, A; Jagielski, D; Winnicka, A

    2016-11-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are a heterogeneous group of structures which can be classified into smaller in size and relatively homogenous exosomes (EXSMs)-spherical fragments of lipid bilayers from inner cell compartments-and bigger in size ectosomes (ECSMs)-a direct consequence of cell-membrane blebbing. EVs can be found in body fluids of healthy individuals. Their number increases in cancer and other pathological conditions. EVs can originate from various cell types, including leukocytes, erythrocytes, thrombocytes, and neoplastic cells. Platelet microparticles (PMPs) are the most abundant population of EVs in blood. It is well documented that PMPs, being a crucial element of EVs signaling, are involved in tumor growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis and may participate in the development of multidrug resistance by tumor cells. The aim of this review is to present the role of PMPs in carcinogenesis. The biology and functions of PMPs with a particular emphasis on the most recent scientific reports on EV properties are also characterized.

  20. Recent progress of task-specific ionic liquids in chiral resolution and extraction of biological samples and metal ions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Datong; Cai, Pengfei; Zhao, Xiaoyong; Kong, Yong; Pan, Yuanjiang

    2017-09-06

    Ionic liquids have been functionalized for modern applications. The functional ionic liquids are also called task-specific ionic liquids. Various task-specific ionic liquids with certain groups have been constructed and exploited widely in the field of separation. To take advantage of their properties in separation science, task-specific ionic liquids are generally used in techniques such as liquid-liquid extraction, solid-phase extraction, gas chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, and capillary electrophoresis. This review mainly covers original research papers published in the last five years, and we will focus on task-specific ionic liquids as the chiral selectors in chiral resolution and as extractant or sensor for biological samples and metal ion purification. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Molecular biology and genetics of the acetate-utilizing methanogenic bacteria. Progress report, [July 1, 1988--June 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Gunsalus, R.P.

    1991-12-31

    Acetate conversion to methane and C0{sub 2} by the methanogenic archaebacteria is a primary rate limiting step in anaerobic biodegradative processes in nature. However, the genetic study of these organisms has not been experimentally tractable due to the inability to grow and plate the organisms as single cells, and to extract high molecular weight DNA and RNA without shearing. The acetate-utilizing species, Methanosarcina thermolphila TM-1, is being used for the proposed genetic and molecular studies because, unlike previously described acetotrophic methanosarcina that have a thick heteropolysaccharide cell wall, this species can be cultured in a unicellular form that has a protein cell wall lacking the heteropolysaccharide layer. These cells can be gently disrupted to obtain protoplasts or lysed to yield intact genomic DNA and RNA. Experiments are in progress to develop a gene transfer system in this bacterial species. Methods are being developed and refined for the efficient plating of M. thermophila on defined media, for chemical mutagenesis, and for the isolation of mutants defective in acetate utilization. Chromosomal DNA libraries have been constructed from M. thermophila and are being used to clone genes involved in the acetate utilization pathway (e.g. carbon monoxide dehydrogenase). Once cloned, analysis of the molecular mechanisms responsible for their regulatory control will be performed. These studies should aid our understanding of the pathway for acetate utilization in M. thermophila and serve as a model for elucidating regulatory mechanisms in the acetotrophic methanogens.

  2. Concise Review: Progress and Challenges in Using Human Stem Cells for Biological and Therapeutics Discovery: Neuropsychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Panchision, David M

    2016-03-01

    In facing the daunting challenge of using human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells to study complex neural circuit disorders such as schizophrenia, mood and anxiety disorders, and autism spectrum disorders, a 2012 National Institute of Mental Health workshop produced a set of recommendations to advance basic research and engage industry in cell-based studies of neuropsychiatric disorders. This review describes progress in meeting these recommendations, including the development of novel tools, strides in recapitulating relevant cell and tissue types, insights into the genetic basis of these disorders that permit integration of risk-associated gene regulatory networks with cell/circuit phenotypes, and promising findings of patient-control differences using cell-based assays. However, numerous challenges are still being addressed, requiring further technological development, approaches to resolve disease heterogeneity, and collaborative structures for investigators of different disciplines. Additionally, since data obtained so far is on small sample sizes, replication in larger sample sets is needed. A number of individual success stories point to a path forward in developing assays to translate discovery science to therapeutics development. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  3. Polarity in plant asymmetric cell division: Division orientation and cell fate differentiation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wanchen; Dong, Juan

    2016-11-01

    Asymmetric cell division (ACD) is universally required for the development of multicellular organisms. Unlike animal cells, plant cells have a rigid cellulosic extracellular matrix, the cell wall, which provides physical support and forms communication routes. This fundamental difference leads to some unique mechanisms in plants for generating asymmetries during cell division. However, plants also utilize intrinsically polarized proteins to regulate asymmetric signaling and cell division, a strategy similar to the differentiation mechanism found in animals. Current progress suggests that common regulatory modes, i.e. protein spontaneous clustering and cytoskeleton reorganization, underlie protein polarization in both animal and plant cells. Despite these commonalities, it is important to note that intrinsic mechanisms in plants are heavily influenced by extrinsic cues. To control physical asymmetry in cell division, although our understanding is fragmentary thus far, plants might have evolved novel polarization strategies to orientate cell division plane. Recent studies also suggest that the phytohormone auxin, one of the most pivotal small molecules in plant development, regulates ACD in plants. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Polarity in plant asymmetric cell division: Division orientation and cell fate differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Wanchen; Dong, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division (ACD) is universally required for the development of multicellular organisms. Unlike animal cells, plant cells have a rigid cellulosic extracellular matrix, the cell wall, which provides physical support and forms communication routes. This fundamental difference leads to some unique mechanisms in plants for generating asymmetries during cell division. However, plants also utilize intrinsically polarized proteins to regulate asymmetric signaling and cell division, a strategy similar to the differentiation mechanism found in animals. Current progress suggests that common regulatory modes, i.e. protein spontaneous clustering and cytoskeleton reorganization, underlie protein polarization in both animal and plant cells. Despite these commonalities, it is important to note that intrinsic mechanisms in plants are heavily influenced by extrinsic cues. To control physical asymmetry in cell division, although our understanding is fragmentary thus far, plants might have evolved novel polarization strategies to orientate cell division plane. Recent studies also suggest that the phytohormone auxin, one of the most pivotal small molecules in plant development, regulates ACD in plants. PMID:27475487

  5. The Spanish Blue Division

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-18

    the German North Army Group. WORD COUNT=5933 20 ENDNOTES 1 Torres, Francisco. La Divisi6n Azul50 AFos Despu6s. Madrid: Editorial Fuerza Nueva , 1991,31...osDespu6s. Madrid: Editorial Fuerza Nueva , 1991,47. ’ Kleinfield, Gerald R. and Tambs, Lewis A. La Divisi6n espatjola de Hitler. Madrid: Editorial San Martin...1983, 25. ’ Torres, Francisco. La Divisi6n Azu150AiosDespu6s. Madrid: Editorial Fuerza Nueva , 1991,53 6 The Division was popularly known as the Blue

  6. Artificial cell division.

    PubMed

    Mange, Daniel; Stauffer, André; Petraglio, Enrico; Tempesti, Gianluca

    2004-01-01

    After a survey of the theory and some realizations of self-replicating machines, this paper presents a novel self-replicating loop endowed with universal construction and computation properties. Based on the hardware implementation of the so-called Tom Thumb algorithm, the design of this loop leads to a new kind of cellular automaton made of a processing and a control units. The self-replication of the Swiss flag serves as an artificial cell division example of the loop which, according to autopoietic evaluation criteria, corresponds to a cell showing the phenomenology of a living system.

  7. Bacterial cell division: the mechanism and its precison.

    PubMed

    Harry, Elizabeth; Monahan, Leigh; Thompson, Lyndal

    2006-01-01

    The recent development of cell biology techniques for bacteria to allow visualization of fundamental processes in time and space, and their use in synchronous populations of cells, has resulted in a dramatic increase in our understanding of cell division and its regulation in these tiny cells. The first stage of cell division is the formation of a Z ring, composed of a polymerized tubulin-like protein, FtsZ, at the division site precisely at midcell. Several membrane-associated division proteins are then recruited to this ring to form a complex, the divisome, which causes invagination of the cell envelope layers to form a division septum. The Z ring marks the future division site, and the timing of assembly and positioning of this structure are important in determining where and when division will take place in the cell. Z ring assembly is controlled by many factors including negative regulatory mechanisms such as Min and nucleoid occlusion that influence Z ring positioning and FtsZ accessory proteins that bind to FtsZ directly and modulate its polymerization behavior. The replication status of the cell also influences the positioning of the Z ring, which may allow the tight coordination between DNA replication and cell division required to produce two identical newborn cells.

  8. Division plane determination during plant somatic cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, Daniel

    2009-12-01

    Division plane determination in plant cells involves the transformation of the cortical microtubular array into a preprophase band (PPB) with the nucleus anchored at the center. This likely occurs through polarity cues controlling proteins affecting cytoskeletal dynamics. Crosstalk with cell cycle machinery should assure that this happens in concert with cell cycle progression. Before PPB breakdown, targeted deposition of factors at the position of the PPB translates this position into a signal which remains present throughout cytokinesis and directs the centrifugal growing cell plate to the correct cortical position. Anchoring and maturation of the cell plate ultimately divides the two daughter cells. This review aims to provide an up-to-date overview of the mechanisms and molecular players in division plane determination in plant somatic cytokinesis.

  9. Physics Division annual report 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, J.

    2006-04-06

    This report highlights the research performed in 2004 in the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research, nuclear theory, medium energy nuclear research and accelerator research and development. The intellectual challenges of this research represent some of the most fundamental challenges in modern science, shaping our understanding of both tiny objects at the center of the atom and some of the largest structures in the universe. A great strength of these efforts is the critical interplay of theory and experiment. Notable results in research at ATLAS include a measurement of the charge radius of He-6 in an atom trap and its explanation in ab-initio calculations of nuclear structure. Precise mass measurements on critical waiting point nuclei in the rapid-proton-capture process set the time scale for this important path in nucleosynthesis. An abrupt fall-off was identified in the subbarrier fusion of several heavy-ion systems. ATLAS operated for 5559 hours of research in FY2004 while achieving 96% efficiency of beam delivery for experiments. In Medium Energy Physics, substantial progress was made on a long-term experiment to search for the violation of time-reversal invariance using trapped Ra atoms. New results from HERMES reveal the influence of quark angular momentum. Experiments at JLAB search for evidence of color transparency in rho-meson production and study the EMC effect in helium isotopes. New theoretical results include a Poincare covariant description of baryons as composites of confined quarks and non-point-like diquarks. Green's function Monte Carlo techniques give accurate descriptions of the excited states of light nuclei and these techniques been extended to scattering states for astrophysics studies. A theoretical description of the phenomena of proton radioactivity has been extended to triaxial nuclei. Argonne continues to

  10. Control of biologically active degradation zones by vertical heterogeneity: Applications in fractured media. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Colwell, F.S.; Smith, R.; McKinley, J.P.; Fredrickson, J.K.; Onstott, T.C.; Reysenbach, A.L.

    1998-06-01

    'The objective of this research is to determine the relationship between biologically active contaminant degradation zones in a fractured, subsurface medium and vertical geological heterogeneities. The research is being performed on samples collected from the Test Area North (TAN) site at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) where a dissolved trichloroethylene (TCE) plume is migrating in the basalts and interbed sediments of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) aquifer. Results are leading to an enhanced understanding of the constraints placed on the activities and distribution of TCE-degrading organisms by the geochemical and hydrological environment. This understanding allows better decisions to be made regarding the use of remedial technologies such as natural attenuation and in-situ bioremediation at geologically complex waste sites. Through this research, investigations conducted by the DOE Subsurface Science Program at TAN have been extended in order to develop a mechanistic understanding of the coupled geomicrobial and hydrogeochemical processes that are necessary to predict field-scale intrinsic degradation rates of TCE. The research objective is being accomplished by characterizing paired cores and water samples from boreholes located in differing geochemical and flow environments within the plume. Analysis of these samples will allow the determination of the spatial correlation between microbial degradation and preferred flow paths for the contaminant and required electron donors and acceptors. A combination of traditional microbiological methods (e.g., enrichments) and molecular tools are being used to characterize the indigenous microbial communities. This report summarizes work conducted after 1.5 years of a three year project.'

  11. Control of biologically active degradation zones by vertical heterogeneity: Applications in fractured media. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Colwell, F.S.; Smith, R.W.; McKinley, J.; Fredrickson, J.; Onstott, T.C.; Reysenbach, A.L.

    1997-11-01

    'The objective of this research is to determine the relationship between of biologically active contaminant degradation zones in a fractured, subsurface medium and vertical geological heterogeneities. The research is being performed on samples collected from the Test Area North (TAN) site at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) where a dissolved trichloroethylene (TCE) plume is migrating in the basalts and interbed sediments of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) aquifer. Research results are leading to an enhanced understanding of the constraints that the geochemical and hydrological environment place on the activities and distribution of TCE-degrading organisms in this fractured subsurface medium. Enhanced understanding allows better decisions to be made regarding the use of remedial technologies such as natural attenuation and in situ bioremediation at geologically complex waste sites. Through this research, investigations conducted by the Subsurface Science Program (SSP) at TAN are being extended in order to develop a mechanistic understanding of the coupled geomicrobial and hydrogeochemical processes that are necessary to predict the field-scale intrinsic degradation rates of TCE. The research objective is being accomplished by characterizing paired cores and water samples from boreholes located in differing geochemical and flow environments within the plume. Analysis of these samples will allow the determination of the spatial correlation and microbial characterization. The results presented in this report consist primarily of TAN-33 data as many of those analyses have been completed. Nearly all of the TAN-37 data has yet to be acquired. It should be noted that most of the cores were collected from zones that consist of relatively competent, massive basalt. This was because the authors were doubtful about the quality of samples obtained from rubble zones due to potential alteration by the drilling fluids. Thus, microbiological

  12. Deconstructing Calculation Methods, Part 4: Division

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Ian

    2008-01-01

    In the final article of a series of four, the author deconstructs the primary national strategy's approach to written division. The approach to division is divided into five stages: (1) mental division using partition; (2) short division of TU / U; (3) "expanded" method for HTU / U; (4) short division of HTU / U; and (5) long division.…

  13. Accelerator Technology Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-04-01

    In fiscal year (FY) 1991, the Accelerator Technology (AT) division continued fulfilling its mission to pursue accelerator science and technology and to develop new accelerator concepts for application to research, defense, energy, industry, and other areas of national interest. This report discusses the following programs: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; APLE Free-Electron Laser Program; Accelerator Transmutation of Waste; JAERI, OMEGA Project, and Intense Neutron Source for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Super Collider; The High-Power Microwave Program; (Phi) Factory Collaboration; Neutral Particle Beam Power System Highlights; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

  14. Physics division annual report 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, K., ed.; Physics

    2000-12-06

    This report summarizes the research performed in the past year in the Argonne Physics Division. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national heavy-ion user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research with beams of heavy ions, accelerator research and development especially in superconducting radio frequency technology, nuclear theory and medium energy nuclear physics. The Division took significant strides forward in its science and its initiatives for the future in the past year. Major progress was made in developing the concept and the technology for the future advanced facility of beams of short-lived nuclei, the Rare Isotope Accelerator. The scientific program capitalized on important instrumentation initiatives with key advances in nuclear science. In 1999, the nuclear science community adopted the Argonne concept for a multi-beam superconducting linear accelerator driver as the design of choice for the next major facility in the field a Rare Isotope Accelerator (WA) as recommended by the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee's 1996 Long Range Plan. Argonne has made significant R&D progress on almost all aspects of the design concept including the fast gas catcher (to allow fast fragmentation beams to be stopped and reaccelerated) that in large part defined the RIA concept the superconducting rf technology for the driver accelerator, the multiple-charge-state concept (to permit the facility to meet the design intensity goals with existing ion-source technology), and designs and tests of high-power target concepts to effectively deal with the full beam power of the driver linac. An NSAC subcommittee recommended the Argonne concept and set as tie design goal Uranium beams of 100-kwatt power at 400 MeV/u. Argonne demonstrated that this goal can be met with an innovative, but technically in-hand, design. The heavy-ion research program focused on GammaSphere, the premier facility for nuclear structure gamma-ray studies. One example of the

  15. Fundamental quantitative analysis of microbial activity in aquifer bioreclamation; and Modeling the transport of biologically and chemically reactive solutes in a two-dimensional, heterogeneous intermediate scale system. Semi-annual progress report, August 1991--March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Rittmann, B.E.; Valocchi, A.J.; Baveye, P.

    1992-12-31

    This report is the semi-annual progress report for the second half of the third year. The project has four primary areas: (1) biodegradation of poorly soluble organic contaminants; (2) dual-limitation kinetics of electron donors and acceptors; (3) two-dimensional modeling of biofilm reactions in nonhomogeneous porous media; and (4) biologically induced clogging in porous media. For each area, this report presents a brief summary of the previous progress, as well as reporting this period`s progress. In addition plans for future work are included.

  16. Signaling networks during development: the case of asymmetric cell division in the Drosophila nervous system.

    PubMed

    Carmena, Ana

    2008-09-01

    Remarkable progress in genetics and molecular biology has made possible the sequencing of the genomes from numerous species. In the post-genomic era, technical developments in the fields of proteomics and bioinformatics are poised to further catapult our understanding of protein structure, function and organization into complex signaling networks. One of the greatest challenges in the field now is to unravel the functional signaling networks and their spatio-temporal regulation in living cells. Here, the need for such in vivo system-wide level approach is illustrated in relation to the mechanisms that underlie the biological process of asymmetric cell division. Genomic, post-genomic and live imaging techniques are reviewed in light of the huge impact they are having on this field for the discovering of new proteins and for the in vivo analysis of asymmetric cell division. The proteins, signals and the emerging networking of functional connections that is arising between them during this process in the Drosophila nervous system will be also discussed.

  17. Effects of Polyhydroxybutyrate Production on Cell Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Kathleen; Rahman, Asif; Hadi, Masood Z.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biological engineering can be utilized to aide the advancement of improved long-term space flight. The potential to use synthetic biology as a platform to biomanufacture desired equipment on demand using the three dimensional (3D) printer on the International Space Station (ISS) gives long-term NASA missions the flexibility to produce materials as needed on site. Polyhydroxybutyrates (PHBs) are biodegradable, have properties similar to plastics, and can be produced in Escherichia coli using genetic engineering. Using PHBs during space flight could assist mission success by providing a valuable source of biomaterials that can have many potential applications, particularly through 3D printing. It is well documented that during PHB production E. coli cells can become significantly elongated. The elongation of cells reduces the ability of the cells to divide and thus to produce PHB. I aim to better understand cell division during PHB production, through the design, building, and testing of synthetic biological circuits, and identify how to potentially increase yields of PHB with FtsZ overexpression, the gene responsible for cell division. Ultimately, an increase in the yield will allow more products to be created using the 3D printer on the ISS and beyond, thus aiding astronauts in their missions.

  18. What do we really know about the signalling role of plumage colour in blue tits? A case study of impediments to progress in evolutionary biology.

    PubMed

    Parker, Timothy H

    2013-08-01

    effects or a likelihood of bias. Last, researchers studying blue tit plumage have often developed ad hoc explanations for deviations of results from their predictions. Revising hypotheses in light of data is appropriate, but these revised hypotheses were rarely tested with new data. The only highly robust conclusion supported by meta-analysis is that male blue tits have plumage that reflects more light in the ultraviolet and yellow wavelengths than the plumage of females. Various other effects, including condition-dependence of plumage colour expression and a tendency for females to adjust the sex ratio of their offspring in response to male colour, remain uncertain. These obstacles to progress in the blue tit plumage literature are likely common in evolutionary biology, and so I recommend changes to incentive structures which may improve progress towards scientific understanding in this discipline.

  19. About the Alliance | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Objectives The major objective of the Alliance is to discover and develop molecular markers for early detection of cancer by conducting innovative, translational research in the field of complex carbohydrates. An important key to biomarker discovery is to understand the biological mechanisms by which changes in glycosylation promote cancer progression. Taking this biologically-informed approach, Alliance investigators focus their efforts on specific classes of glycan markers that are likely to play important roles in oncogenesis. |

  20. Ecological Research Division, Marine Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    This report presents program summaries of the various projects sponsored during 1979 by the Marine Research Program of the Ecological Research Division. Program areas include the effects of petroleum hydrocarbons on the marine environment; a study of the baseline ecology of a proposed OTEC site near Puerto Rico; the environmental impact of offshore geothermal energy development; the movement of radionuclides through the marine environment; the environmental aspects of power plant cooling systems; and studies of the physical and biological oceangraphy of the continental shelves bordering the United States.