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Sample records for biology laboratory hog

  1. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 141-C Large Animal Barn and Biology Laboratory (Hog Barn), Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-027

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Carlson

    2006-05-24

    The 141-C waste site is a former large animal barn and biology laboratory within the 100-F Area experimental animal farm. Strontium-90, arsenic, and multiple polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were detected within residual demolition debris at concentrations exceeding cleanup criteria. The site has been remediated by removing approximately 900 bank cubic meters of soil and debris within the former building footprint to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  2. [Biological characteristics of an Hog1 MAPK homologous gene FoHog1 knock-out mutant of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense].

    PubMed

    Mao, Chao; Chen, Pingya; Dai, Qingdong; Yang, Laying; Huang, Junsheng

    2014-11-04

    This study was aimed to obtain a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) gene namely FoHog1 from Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense and to verify its function. We amplified FoHog1 gene by PCR and RT-PCR methods and analyzed it through bioinformatics method. PEG-mediated protoplast transformation was used to create the deletion mutants of FoHog1 gene. We analyzed different biological characteristics between knock-out strain and wild-type strain. FoHog1 gene encoding a putative protein of 357 amino acids and its genetic relationship with different Fusarium' s protein. Compared with the wild-type strain, FoHog1 deletion mutants have loose hyphae colony, less spores production, lower dry weight of hyphae and more sensitive to temperature, pH and osmotic stress. FoHog1 deletion mutants also have reduced colonization ability compared with the wild-type strain. FoHog1 gene participated in mycelial growth, sporulation, catabolism of sodium acetate and ammonium chloride, osmotic stress response and pathogenic process with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense Race 4.

  3. Hog Cholera

    PubMed Central

    Boulanger, P.; Appel, M.; Bannister, G. L.; Ruckerbauer, Gerda M.; Mori, K.; Gray, D. P.

    1965-01-01

    The complement-fixation test was investigated as a means of detecting hog cholera virus in spleen from experimentally infected swine. Various methods of extracting the tissue for production of antigen are described and emphasis is placed on the necessity of using the modified direct complement-fixation test to obtain reactions. The tissue should be obtained from animals showing advanced clinical manifestations of the disease. Preferably, the tissue should be maintained frozen or at least well refrigerated. The results indicate that tissue from dead animals or from breeding sows should be avoided. The 77 per cent positive reactions obtained suggest the test could be of diagnostic value provided two or three samples are obtained from the same herd. PMID:14318539

  4. Hog Cholera

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, A.; Greig, A. S.; Appel, M.; Girard, A.; Bannister, G. L.; Boulanger, P.

    1965-01-01

    The fluorescent-antibody technique was employed for detection of hog cholera virus in tissue cultures inoculated with spleens of infected animals. As controls, cultures were also inoculated with material from normal swine and from those infected with other agents. In the first series 71 of 73 infected spleens, or 97 per cent, were detected. There were no false positive reactions among the controls. Results obtained with the second series of pigs showed that spleens collected during advanced stages of the disease were more satisfactory specimens than those collected earlier during the high temperature phase of infection. Findings with the third series of older swine indicated that their spleens were less satisfactory as a source of virus than those from young pigs. Tissues from freshly killed animals provided better specimen material than those from animals which had died. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2. PMID:4221990

  5. Biological Laboratory, Ann Arbor, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moffett, James W.

    1963-01-01

    This laboratory located about 40 miles west of Detroit, near the intersection of highways I-94 and US-23, can be reached by bus, railroad, or via commercial airlines to Detroit Willow Run or Metropolitan airports. Field biological stations are located in Wisconsin at Ashland; in Ohio at Sandusky; and in Michigan at Ludington, Marquette, Millersburg, and Northville.

  6. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE BIOLOGICAL CHARACTERS AND PATHOGENESIS OF BACILLUS X (STERNBERG), BACILLUS ICTEROIDES (SANARELLI), AND THE HOG-CHOLERA BACILLUS (SALMON AND SMITH)

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Walter; Carroll, James

    1900-01-01

    1. Bacillus X (Sternberg) belongs to the colon group. 2. Bacillus icteroides (Sanarelli) is a member of the hog-cholera group. 3. The various channels of infection, the duration of the disease and the gross and microscopical lesions in mice, guinea-pigs and rabbits are the same for Bacillus icteroides and the hog-cholera bacillus. 4. The clinical symptoms and the lesions observed in dogs inoculated intravenously with Bacillus icteroides, are reproduced in these animals by infection with the hog-cholera bacillus. 5. Bacillus icteroides when fed to the domestic pig causes fatal infection, accompanied by diphtheritic, necrotic and ulcerative lesions in the digestive tract, such as are seen in hogs when infected with the hog-cholera bacillus. 6. This disease may be acquired by exposing swine in pens already infected with Bacillus icteroides, or by feeding them with the viscera of infected pigs. 7. Guinea-pigs may be immunized with sterilized cultures ofBacillus icteroides from a fatal dose of the hog-cholera bacillus and vice versa. 8. Rabbits may be rendered immune by gradually increasing doses of a living culture of Bacillus icteroides of weak virulence from a fatal dose of a virulent culture of the hog-cholera bacillus 9. The sera of animals immunized with Bacillus icteroides and with the hog-cholera bacillus, respectively, show a marked reciprocal agglutinative reaction. 10. While the blood of yellow fever practically does not exercise an agglutinative reaction upon Bacillus icteroides, the blood of hog-cholera agglutinates this bacillus in a much more marked degree, thus pointing, we think, to the closer etiological relationship of this bacillus to hog-cholera than to yellow fever. PMID:19866945

  7. An Evaluation of the Amylase and Haemolytic Tests for the Diagnosis of Hog Cholera

    PubMed Central

    Gray, D. P.; Bannister, G. L.; Boulanger, Paul

    1962-01-01

    The amylase and haemolytic tests recommended for the diagnosis of hog cholera were used on normal swine, hog cholera-infected swine, hog cholera-immune swine and swine with some other virus diseases. The results obtained show that these tests do not appear to be sufficiently reliable for specific laboratory diagnosis. PMID:17649373

  8. 9 CFR 311.3 - Hog cholera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... kidneys and the lymph nodes which resemble lesions of hog cholera, they shall be regarded as those of hog... kidneys and lymph nodes of carcasses of hogs which appeared normal on ante-mortem inspection, further..., characteristic lesions of hog cholera are found in some organ or tissue in addition to those in the kidneys or...

  9. 9 CFR 311.3 - Hog cholera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... kidneys and the lymph nodes which resemble lesions of hog cholera, they shall be regarded as those of hog... kidneys and lymph nodes of carcasses of hogs which appeared normal on ante-mortem inspection, further..., characteristic lesions of hog cholera are found in some organ or tissue in addition to those in the kidneys or...

  10. 9 CFR 311.3 - Hog cholera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... kidneys and the lymph nodes which resemble lesions of hog cholera, they shall be regarded as those of hog... kidneys and lymph nodes of carcasses of hogs which appeared normal on ante-mortem inspection, further..., characteristic lesions of hog cholera are found in some organ or tissue in addition to those in the kidneys or...

  11. 9 CFR 311.3 - Hog cholera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... kidneys and the lymph nodes which resemble lesions of hog cholera, they shall be regarded as those of hog... kidneys and lymph nodes of carcasses of hogs which appeared normal on ante-mortem inspection, further..., characteristic lesions of hog cholera are found in some organ or tissue in addition to those in the kidneys or...

  12. 9 CFR 311.3 - Hog cholera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... kidneys and the lymph nodes which resemble lesions of hog cholera, they shall be regarded as those of hog... kidneys and lymph nodes of carcasses of hogs which appeared normal on ante-mortem inspection, further..., characteristic lesions of hog cholera are found in some organ or tissue in addition to those in the kidneys or...

  13. Hog Cholera II

    PubMed Central

    Ruckerbauer, Gerda M.; Appel, M.; Gray, D. P.; Bannister, G. L.; Boulanger, P.

    1965-01-01

    The specificity in the agar diffusion precipitation test of the reaction between the antigen of hog cholera virus diffusing from infected tissues and its homologous antibody was verified. Alternate freezing and thawing of infected tissues was found to give optimum release of the antigen from fresh tissue frozen for 18 hours. A study of the effect of the size and age of pigs upon the diffusion of the antigen from tissues showed that tissues from pigs of less than 250 lbs. gave good results provided the tissues were from animals showing gross clinical manifestations. Specimens from infected breeding sows and dead animals usually did not give a reaction. ImagesFig. 1. PMID:14290949

  14. From pigsties to hog heaven?

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, D A

    2001-01-01

    In the continuing transformation of U.S. agriculture, North Carolina finds itself on the front edge of change. Between 1989 and 1998, the number of hogs in the state's pork industry quintupled---and so has the amount of hog waste that must be disposed of. Now the state has engaged private and public resources in a rapid search for better ways for handling hog waste. A technology review panel has approved the first round of proposals for a number of novel technologies to be developed through funds from a government-industry agreement. A second batch of proposals is expected to be approved by late summer. PMID:11485887

  15. Integrating Introductory Biology and General Chemistry Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godrick, Elizabeth; Hartman, Standish

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a science laboratory integrating biology and chemistry courses that includes four modules: (1) the fundamental process of reactions; (2) a semester-long project on the chemical assay of ascorbic acid; (3) human metabolism of Vitamin C; and (4) an open-ended project on the manipulation of macromolecules. (YDS)

  16. 2. DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL SYSTEM FOR CANTILEVERED HOG RUN; BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL SYSTEM FOR CANTILEVERED HOG RUN; BUILDING 168 (1960 HOG KILL) IS BENEATH HOG RUN - Rath Packing Company, Cantilevered Hog Run, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  17. Investigating Coccolithophorid Biology in the Sedimentary Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClelland, H. L. O.; Barbarin, N.; Beaufort, L.; Hermoso, M.; Rickaby, R. E. M.

    2014-12-01

    Coccolithophores are the ocean's dominant calcifying phytoplankton; they play an important, but poorly understood, role in long-term biogeochemical climatic feedbacks. Calcite producing marine organisms are likely to calcify less in a future world where higher carbon dioxide concentrations will lead to ocean acidification (OA), but coccolithophores may be the exception. In coccolithophores calcification occurs in an intracellular vesicle, where the site of calcite precipitation is buffered from the external environment and is subject to a uniquely high degree of biological control. Culture manipulation experiments mimicking the effects of OA in the laboratory have yielded empirical evidence for phenotypic plasticity, competition and evolutionary adaptation in asexual populations. However, the extent to which these results are representative of natural populations, and of the response over timescales of greater than a few hundred generations, is unclear. Here we describe a new sediment-based proxy for the PIC:POC (particulate inorganic to particulate organic carbon ratio) of coccolithophore biomass, which is equivalent to the fractional energy contribution to calcification at constant pH, and a biologically meaningful measure of the organism's tendency to calcify. Employing the geological record as a laboratory, we apply this proxy to sedimentary material from the southern Pacific Ocean to investigate the integrated response of real ancient coccolithophore populations to environmental change over many thousands of years. Our results provide a new perspective on phenotypic change in real populations of coccolithophorid algae over long timescales.

  18. Laboratory biological safety cabinet (BSC) explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Dahhan, Wedad H.; Al-Zuhairi, Ali Jasim; Hussein, Falah H.; Rodda, Kabrena E.; Yousif, Emad

    2016-12-01

    Scientists at universities across Iraq are actively working to report actual incidents and accidents occurring in their laboratories in order to raise awareness and encourage openness, leading to widespread adoption of robust Chemical Safety and Security (CSS) practices. This manuscript is the first in a series of five case studies describing laboratory incidents and accidents in Iraqi university laboratories in order to share lessons learned and minimize the possibility of similar incidents in the future. In this study, we describe a serious event that resulted in a postgraduate student sustaining serious injuries when the biological safety cabinet (BSC) she was using exploded. Of particular note, the paper highlights how a combination of failures and deficiencies at many levels within an organization and its technical community (rather than a single piece of faulty equipment or the careless behavior of one person) can lead to a dangerous, potentially life-threatening incident. By openly sharing what happened along with the lessons learned from the accident, we hope to minimize the possibility of another researcher being injured in a similar incident in the future.

  19. Osmostress-Induced Cell Volume Loss Delays Yeast Hog1 Signaling by Limiting Diffusion Processes and by Hog1-Specific Effects

    PubMed Central

    Babazadeh, Roja; Adiels, Caroline Beck; Smedh, Maria; Petelenz-Kurdziel, Elzbieta; Goksör, Mattias; Hohmann, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Signal transmission progresses via a series of transient protein-protein interactions and protein movements, which require diffusion within a cell packed with different molecules. Yeast Hog1, the effector protein kinase of the High Osmolarity Glycerol pathway, translocates transiently from the cytosol to the nucleus during adaptation to high external osmolarity. We followed the dynamics of osmostress-induced cell volume loss and Hog1 nuclear accumulation upon exposure of cells to different NaCl concentrations. While Hog1 nuclear accumulation peaked within five minutes following mild osmotic shock it was delayed up to six-fold under severe stress. The timing of Hog1 nuclear accumulation correlated with the degree of cell volume loss and the cells capacity to recover. Also the nuclear translocation of Msn2, the transcription factor of the general stress response pathway, is delayed upon severe osmotic stress suggesting a general phenomenon. We show by direct measurements that the general diffusion rate of Hog1 in the cytoplasm as well as its rate of nuclear transport are dramatically reduced following severe volume reduction. However, neither Hog1 phosphorylation nor Msn2 nuclear translocation were as much delayed as Hog1 nuclear translocation. Our data provide direct evidence that signaling slows down during cell volume compression, probably as a consequence of molecular crowding. Hence one purpose of osmotic adaptation is to restore optimal diffusion rates for biochemical and cell biological processes. In addition, there may be mechanisms slowing down especially Hog1 nuclear translocation under severe stress in order to prioritize Hog1 cytosolic targets. PMID:24278344

  20. INNOVATIONS IN EQUIPMENT AND TECHNIQUES FOR THE BIOLOGY TEACHING LABORATORY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BARTHELEMY, RICHARD E.; AND OTHERS

    LABORATORY TECHNIQUES AND EQUIPMENT APPROPRIATE FOR TEACHING BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE CURRICULUM STUDY BIOLOGY ARE EMPHASIZED. MAJOR CATEGORIES INCLUDE (1) LABORATORY FACILITIES, (2) EQUIPMENT AND TECHNIQUES FOR CULTURE OF MICRO-ORGANISMS, (3) LABORATORY ANIMALS AND THEIR HOUSING, (4) TECHNIQUES FOR STUDYING PLANT GROWTH, (5) TECHNIQUES FOR STUDYING…

  1. INNOVATIONS IN EQUIPMENT AND TECHNIQUES FOR THE BIOLOGY TEACHING LABORATORY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BARTHELEMY, RICHARD E.; AND OTHERS

    LABORATORY TECHNIQUES AND EQUIPMENT APPROPRIATE FOR TEACHING BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE CURRICULUM STUDY BIOLOGY ARE EMPHASIZED. MAJOR CATEGORIES INCLUDE (1) LABORATORY FACILITIES, (2) EQUIPMENT AND TECHNIQUES FOR CULTURE OF MICRO-ORGANISMS, (3) LABORATORY ANIMALS AND THEIR HOUSING, (4) TECHNIQUES FOR STUDYING PLANT GROWTH, (5) TECHNIQUES FOR STUDYING…

  2. Radiation and Its Use in Biology: A Laboratory Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, William V.

    This booklet contains a six-week series of laboratory investigations that may be used individually or in combination to complement other biology course materials or as an independent laboratory course in radiation biology. Contents include twelve activities dealing with radiation biology, five additional activities suitable for individual work,…

  3. Environmental injustice and the Mississippi hog industry.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sacoby M; Howell, Frank; Wing, Steve; Sobsey, Mark

    2002-01-01

    The recent growth and restructuring of the swine industry in the state of Mississippi has raised various environmental and socioeconomic concerns. We spatially examined the location and attributes of 67 industrial hog operations to determine if African American and low-income communities have a high prevalence of industrial hog operations located near their neighborhoods at the census block group level. We used spatial data and cross-classification analysis to compare the prevalence of industrial hog operations in neighborhoods that are primarily African American and low income with the prevalence in neighborhoods that are African American and affluent. We also used logistic regression to evaluate the relationship between the environmental justice variables and the location of the industrial hog operations. The block group characterization showed a high prevalence of hog operations in the four highest quintiles compared with the lowest quintile for percentage African American and percentage poverty. At increasing levels of percentage African Americans and percentage of persons in poverty, there are 2.4-3.6 times more operations compared with the referent group; additionally, scale adjustment to only the hog counties reduces this to 1.8-3.1 more operations compared with the referent group. The inequitable distribution of hog-confined agricultural feeding operations in these communities may have adverse environmental impacts associated with industrial hog production, such as increased health risks and quality of life degradation, as have occurred in other areas having similar facilities. PMID:11929728

  4. Tensions in the Biology Laboratory: What Are They?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Aik-Ling

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify tensions in teacher-student interaction in a high school biology laboratory. Using micro-analytic analysis of classroom talk, the interaction between the students and a teacher working in the biology laboratory session on "Reproduction in Plants" is studied. The two tensions highlighted here are…

  5. Biotechniques Laboratory: An Enabling Course in the Biological Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Trapani, Giovanna; Clarke, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Practical skills and competencies are critical to student engagement and effective learning in laboratory courses. This article describes the design of a yearlong, stand-alone laboratory course--the Biotechniques Laboratory--a common core course in the second year of all our degree programs in the biological sciences. It is an enabling,…

  6. Biotechniques Laboratory: An Enabling Course in the Biological Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Trapani, Giovanna; Clarke, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Practical skills and competencies are critical to student engagement and effective learning in laboratory courses. This article describes the design of a yearlong, stand-alone laboratory course--the Biotechniques Laboratory--a common core course in the second year of all our degree programs in the biological sciences. It is an enabling,…

  7. The Illusion of the Instructional Biology Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ralph, Charles L.

    1996-01-01

    Argues that the changing informational content of biology, tightening cost constraints, improving electronic media, increasing pressures from advocates of animal rights, and the growing evidence of the effectiveness of electronic modes of instruction are undermining the traditional belief that all students in biology should have the benefit of…

  8. The Illusion of the Instructional Biology Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ralph, Charles L.

    1996-01-01

    Argues that the changing informational content of biology, tightening cost constraints, improving electronic media, increasing pressures from advocates of animal rights, and the growing evidence of the effectiveness of electronic modes of instruction are undermining the traditional belief that all students in biology should have the benefit of…

  9. pGLO Mutagenesis: A Laboratory Procedure in Molecular Biology for Biology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassiri, Eby A.

    2011-01-01

    A five-session laboratory project was designed to familiarize or increase the laboratory proficiency of biology students and others with techniques and instruments commonly used in molecular biology research laboratories and industries. In this project, the EZ-Tn5 transposon is used to generate and screen a large number of cells transformed with…

  10. pGLO Mutagenesis: A Laboratory Procedure in Molecular Biology for Biology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassiri, Eby A.

    2011-01-01

    A five-session laboratory project was designed to familiarize or increase the laboratory proficiency of biology students and others with techniques and instruments commonly used in molecular biology research laboratories and industries. In this project, the EZ-Tn5 transposon is used to generate and screen a large number of cells transformed with…

  11. Analog Computer Laboratory with Biological Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strebel, Donald E.

    1979-01-01

    The use of biological examples in teaching applications of the analog computer is discussed and several examples from mathematical ecology, enzyme kinetics, and tracer dynamics are described. (Author/GA)

  12. Analog Computer Laboratory with Biological Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strebel, Donald E.

    1979-01-01

    The use of biological examples in teaching applications of the analog computer is discussed and several examples from mathematical ecology, enzyme kinetics, and tracer dynamics are described. (Author/GA)

  13. Classical Swine Fever in Wild Hog: Report of its Prevalence in Northeast India.

    PubMed

    Barman, N N; Bora, D P; Khatoon, E; Mandal, S; Rakshit, A; Rajbongshi, G; Depner, K; Chakraborty, A; Kumar, S

    2016-10-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the causative agent of a highly contagious disease, hog cholera in pigs. The disease is endemic in many parts of the world and vaccination is the only way to protect the animals from CSFV infection. Wild hogs belong to the species Sus Scrofa Cristatus under the family Suidae are quite susceptible to CSFV infection. The epidemiological role concerning classical swine fever (CSF) in India is largely unknown. We report here the three isolated cases of CSF in wild hogs from three National parks, namely Kaziranga National Park, Manas National Park and Jaldapara National Park, from north-east part of India. The post-mortem and histopathological findings were clearly indicative for CSFV infection. The presence of CSFV genome was demonstrated in several organs and tissues collected from hogs died due to viral infection. In addition, CSF-specific antibodies were detected in two wild hogs as well as in eighteen feral pigs from the same locations. The phylogenetic analysis of the partial E2 protein gene and 5' untranslated region of CSFV isolates from the wild hog showed identities with genotype 2.2 of the Indian isolates. Occurrence of CSF in wild hogs may pose a potent threat in the epidemiology of the virus in Northeast part of India. To the best of our knowledge, the report presented in the manuscript is the first comprehensive report on CSF in wild hogs form Northeast India. The findings reported would help us to understand the epidemiology and biology of CSFV in wild animals. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  14. PHACT: Parallel HOG and Correlation Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Waqas; Birch, Philip; Young, Rupert; Chatwin, Chris

    2014-03-01

    Histogram of Oriented Gradients (HOG) based methods for the detection of humans have become one of the most reliable methods of detecting pedestrians with a single passive imaging camera. However, they are not 100 percent reliable. This paper presents an improved tracker for the monitoring of pedestrians within images. The Parallel HOG and Correlation Tracking (PHACT) algorithm utilises self learning to overcome the drifting problem. A detection algorithm that utilises HOG features runs in parallel to an adaptive and stateful correlator. The combination of both acting in a cascade provides a much more robust tracker than the two components separately could produce.

  15. Investigating Evolutionary Biology in the Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McComas, William F., Ed.

    This document presents a collection of useful laboratory-based activities for teaching about evolution. Some of the activities in this monograph are previously unpublished exercises, some are new versions of well-known labs, a few make useful classroom demonstrations, and several require somewhat sophisticated equipment. As a group, the activities…

  16. Laboratory Experiences in Marine Biology, Student Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raimist, Roger J.

    This manual contains instructions for laboratory exercises using marine organisms. For each exercise a problem is defined, materials are listed, possible ways to solve the problem are suggested, questions are asked to guide the student in interpreting data, and further reading is suggested. The exercises deal with the measurement of oxygen…

  17. Graphic Biology Laboratory Modules for the Blind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Austin E.

    The goal of this project was to devise new methods of producing tactile facsimiles of microscopic images for the blind and visually impaired biology students at the secondary and college level. The numerous raised-line images that were produced were assembled along with brailled and large print student instructions, audio cassette tapes describing…

  18. Some Experiments with Biological Applications for the Elementary Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kammer, D. W.; Williams, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Summarizes physics laboratory experiments with applications in the biological sciences. Includes the following topics: mechanics of the human arm, fluid flow in tubes, physics of learning, the electrocardiograph, nerve impulse conduction, and corrective lenses for eye defects. (Author/MLH)

  19. Some Experiments with Biological Applications for the Elementary Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kammer, D. W.; Williams, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Summarizes physics laboratory experiments with applications in the biological sciences. Includes the following topics: mechanics of the human arm, fluid flow in tubes, physics of learning, the electrocardiograph, nerve impulse conduction, and corrective lenses for eye defects. (Author/MLH)

  20. Environmental injustice in North Carolina's hog industry.

    PubMed Central

    Wing, S; Cole, D; Grant, G

    2000-01-01

    Rapid growth and the concentration of hog production in North Carolina have raised concerns of a disproportionate impact of pollution and offensive odors on poor and nonwhite communities. We analyzed the location and characteristics of 2,514 intensive hog operations in relation to racial, economic, and water source characteristics of census block groups, neighborhoods with an average of approximately 500 households each. We used Poisson regression to evaluate the extent to which relationships between environmental justice variables and the number of hog operations persisted after consideration of population density. There are 18.9 times as many hog operations in the highest quintile of poverty as compared to the lowest; however, adjustment for population density reduces the excess to 7.2. Hog operations are approximately 5 times as common in the highest three quintiles of the percentage nonwhite population as compared to the lowest, adjusted for population density. The excess of hog operations is greatest in areas with both high poverty and high percentage nonwhites. Operations run by corporate integrators are more concentrated in poor and nonwhite areas than are operations run by independent growers. Most hog operations, which use waste pits that can contaminate groundwater, are located in areas with high dependence on well water for drinking. Disproportionate impacts of intensive hog production on people of color and on the poor may impede improvements in economic and environmental conditions that are needed to address public health in areas which have high disease rates and low access to medical care as compared to other areas of the state. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:10706528

  1. Chemistry and Biology Laboratories. Design--Construction--Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schramm, Werner

    Guidelines for planning, building, and equipping the biological and chemical laboratory are revealed, along with construction methods for the modernization or building of new academic or industrial type laboratories. Building equipment, services, utilities, and materials data are given with rules concerning the dimensions and services of…

  2. Chemistry and Biology Laboratories. Design--Construction--Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schramm, Werner

    Guidelines for planning, building, and equipping the biological and chemical laboratory are revealed, along with construction methods for the modernization or building of new academic or industrial type laboratories. Building equipment, services, utilities, and materials data are given with rules concerning the dimensions and services of…

  3. Assessing Practical Laboratory Skills in Undergraduate Molecular Biology Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Lynne; Koenders, Annette; Gynnild, Vidar

    2012-01-01

    This study explored a new strategy of assessing laboratory skills in a molecular biology course to improve: student effort in preparation for and participation in laboratory work; valid evaluation of learning outcomes; and students' employment prospects through provision of evidence of their skills. Previously, assessment was based on written…

  4. Assessing Practical Laboratory Skills in Undergraduate Molecular Biology Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Lynne; Koenders, Annette; Gynnild, Vidar

    2012-01-01

    This study explored a new strategy of assessing laboratory skills in a molecular biology course to improve: student effort in preparation for and participation in laboratory work; valid evaluation of learning outcomes; and students' employment prospects through provision of evidence of their skills. Previously, assessment was based on written…

  5. Classical swine fever in the pygmy hog.

    PubMed

    Barman, N N; Bora, D P; Tiwari, A K; Kataria, R S; Desai, G S; Deka, P J

    2012-12-01

    The pygmy hog is a rare, small and highly endangered mammal belonging to the Suidae family, and it is presently found only in the Assam state of India. While investigating the cause of death of pygmy hogs housed at a conservation centre for captive breeding and research at Basistha, Assam, it was confirmed that they were susceptible to and died as a result of contracting classical swine fever (CSF), caused by CSF virus (CSFV), which is a highly infectious endemic disease of domestic pigs in India. The post-mortem findings and serum CSFV-specific antibody titres, along with the isolation of CSFV from two pygmy hogs, and further confirmation by CSFV genomic E2 and 5' untranslated region (UTR) gene amplification in PCR (polymerase chain reaction), clearly established the cause of death of the pygmy hogs. Further, on phylogenetic analysis, the pygmy hog CSFV 5' UTR sequences were grouped in the genotype 1.1 cluster of Indian CSFVs, and hence the strains causing infection were closely related to CSFV isolates circulating in domestic pigs. Therefore, the occurrence of CSF in this endangered species may pose a potent threat to their existence unless properly controlled, and thus it needs urgent attention. To the authors' knowledge this is the first report on CSF in pygmy hogs.

  6. Biology Student Teachers' Ideas about Purpose of Laboratory Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dikmenli, Musa

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate biology student teachers' ideas about the purpose of laboratory work in teaching biology. Data has been collected from 82 participating students using an open-ended questionnaire and analyzed using content analysis techniques. The results show that almost all of the student teachers considered laboratory…

  7. An Integrated Biology-Chemistry Freshman Laboratory Project in Biotechnology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schendel, Marilyn Shimizu

    1999-01-01

    Describes a freshman biology laboratory project that uses the polymerase chain reaction to introduce students to the interrelationship between biology and chemistry. Students must develop their own experimental protocol, perform calculations introduced in freshman classes, and evaluate group dynamics. (Author/WRM)

  8. Biology Student Teachers' Ideas about Purpose of Laboratory Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dikmenli, Musa

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate biology student teachers' ideas about the purpose of laboratory work in teaching biology. Data has been collected from 82 participating students using an open-ended questionnaire and analyzed using content analysis techniques. The results show that almost all of the student teachers considered laboratory…

  9. From Cookbook to Collaborative: Transforming a University Biology Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herron, Sherry S.

    2009-01-01

    As described in "How People Learn," "Developing Biological Literacy," and by the Commission on Undergraduate Education in the Biological Sciences during the 1960s and early 1970s, laboratories should promote guided-inquiries or investigations, and not simply consist of cookbook or verification activities. However, the only word that could describe…

  10. An Integrated Biology-Chemistry Freshman Laboratory Project in Biotechnology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schendel, Marilyn Shimizu

    1999-01-01

    Describes a freshman biology laboratory project that uses the polymerase chain reaction to introduce students to the interrelationship between biology and chemistry. Students must develop their own experimental protocol, perform calculations introduced in freshman classes, and evaluate group dynamics. (Author/WRM)

  11. Genetics and molecular biology in laboratory medicine, 1963-2013.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, John B

    2013-01-01

    The past 50 years have seen many changes in laboratory medicine, either as causes or consequences of increases in productivity and expansion of the range of information which can be provided. The drivers and facilitators of change in relation to clinical applications of molecular biology included the need for diagnostic tools for genetic diseases and technical advances such as PCR and sequencing. However, molecular biology techniques have proved to have far wider applications, from detection of infectious agents to molecular characterization of tumors. Journals such as Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine play an important role in communication of these advances to the laboratory medicine community and in publishing evaluations of their practical value.

  12. Establishing a national biological laboratory safety and security monitoring program.

    PubMed

    Blaine, James W

    2012-12-01

    The growing concern over the potential use of biological agents as weapons and the continuing work of the Biological Weapons Convention has promoted an interest in establishing national biological laboratory biosafety and biosecurity monitoring programs. The challenges and issues that should be considered by governments, or organizations, embarking on the creation of a biological laboratory biosafety and biosecurity monitoring program are discussed in this article. The discussion focuses on the following questions: Is there critical infrastructure support available? What should be the program focus? Who should be monitored? Who should do the monitoring? How extensive should the monitoring be? What standards and requirements should be used? What are the consequences if a laboratory does not meet the requirements or is not willing to comply? Would the program achieve the results intended? What are the program costs? The success of a monitoring program can depend on how the government, or organization, responds to these questions.

  13. Design, Synthesis, and Characterization of a Highly Effective Hog1 Inhibitor: A Powerful Tool for Analyzing MAP Kinase Signaling in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Migdal, Iwona; Andersson, Terese; Gebbia, Marinella; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Hohmann, Stefan; Wysocki, Robert; Tamás, Markus J.; Grøtli, Morten

    2011-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae High-Osmolarity Glycerol (HOG) pathway is a conserved mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal transduction system that often serves as a model to analyze systems level properties of MAPK signaling. Hog1, the MAPK of the HOG-pathway, can be activated by various environmental cues and it controls transcription, translation, transport, and cell cycle adaptations in response to stress conditions. A powerful means to study signaling in living cells is to use kinase inhibitors; however, no inhibitor targeting wild-type Hog1 exists to date. Herein, we describe the design, synthesis, and biological application of small molecule inhibitors that are cell-permeable, fast-acting, and highly efficient against wild-type Hog1. These compounds are potent inhibitors of Hog1 kinase activity both in vitro and in vivo. Next, we use these novel inhibitors to pinpoint the time of Hog1 action during recovery from G1 checkpoint arrest, providing further evidence for a specific role of Hog1 in regulating cell cycle resumption during arsenite stress. Hence, we describe a novel tool for chemical genetic analysis of MAPK signaling and provide novel insights into Hog1 action. PMID:21655328

  14. A qualitative characterization of an introductory college nonmajors biology laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cherin Ann

    The nature of an undergraduate, nonmajors biology laboratory was investigated in this study. Student participants were enrolled in a general education biology laboratory course at the University of Northern Iowa. The researcher's purpose was to gain a characterization of the instructional format and laboratory activities experienced by students. Interpretation of student and instructor responses enabled an insider's view of the biology laboratory. The laboratory period was consistently described by both students and instructors as having three parts, Beginning, Middle, and End, with the End being of special importance for conceptual development. The instructional format of the three instructors differed within the three portions of the laboratory period, ranging from an inquiry-oriented, partial learning cycle to a fairly expository model labeled inform/verify/practice. There was striking similarity in intrasectional student and teacher descriptions of instructional format. Additionally, students experiencing the alternate instructor provided the same characterizations of instructional format as those provided by the instructor's usual students. There were no discernible patterns of instructional format based on sex or reasoning level. In addition to the central role of instructional format, three areas of importance emerged: the social aspects of learning, the collaborative and cooperative nature of laboratory work and learning, and the role of self-efficacy. Theory developed from and grounded in the data showed six factors important in the introductory college biology laboratory: collaborative and cooperative learning, student-student and teacher-student interactions, attitude and self-efficacy, learning process and learning style, effective instructional format, and science content. These factors were found to be similar to factors identified in the literature as important in K-12 science education. These factors were set in the context of schooling and learning

  15. 9 CFR 319.144 - Whole hog sausage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Whole hog sausage. 319.144 Section 319... CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Sausage Generally: Fresh Sausage § 319.144 Whole hog sausage. “Whole Hog Sausage” is sausage prepared with fresh and/or frozen meat from swine in...

  16. 3. LOOKING TOWARD EAST INSIDE HOG RUN; STEEL STRUCTURAL MEMBERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. LOOKING TOWARD EAST INSIDE HOG RUN; STEEL STRUCTURAL MEMBERS ABOVE WINDOWS SUPPORTED IMMENSE SCALDING TANK INSTALLED DURING 1960-61 RENOVATION OF RATH'S HOG OPERATIONS - Rath Packing Company, Cantilevered Hog Run, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  17. Structural biology facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s high flux beam reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Korszun, Z.R.; Saxena, A.M.; Schneider, D.K.

    1994-12-31

    The techniques for determining the structure of biological molecules and larger biological assemblies depend on the extent of order in the particular system. At the High Flux Beam Reactor at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Biology Department operates three beam lines dedicated to biological structure studies. These beam lines span the resolution range from approximately 700{Angstrom} to approximately 1.5{Angstrom} and are designed to perform structural studies on a wide range of biological systems. Beam line H3A is dedicated to single crystal diffraction studies of macromolecules, while beam line H3B is designed to study diffraction from partially ordered systems such as biological membranes. Beam line H9B is located on the cold source and is designed for small angle scattering experiments on oligomeric biological systems.

  18. Modeling Radial Holoblastic Cleavage: A Laboratory Activity for Developmental Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Linda K.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a laboratory activity designed for an undergraduate developmental biology course. Uses Play-Doh (plastic modeling clay) to build a multicellular embryo in order to provide a 3-D demonstration of cleavage. Includes notes for the instructor and student directions. (YDS)

  19. A Practical Polymerase Chain Reaction Laboratory for Introductory Biology Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowlus, R. David; Grether, Susan C.

    1996-01-01

    Presents a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) laboratory exercise that can be performed by introductory biology students in 1 45- to 55-minute class period. Includes a general description of the polymerase chain reaction, materials needed, procedure, and details of interest to teachers. (JRH)

  20. Characterizing High School Students' Written Explanations in Biology Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peker, Deniz; Wallace, Carolyn S.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative interpretive research study was to examine high school students' written scientific explanations during biology laboratory investigations. Specifically, we characterized the types of epistemologies and forms of reasoning involved in students' scientific explanations and students' perceptions of scientific…

  1. Critical components required to improve deployable laboratory biological hazards identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeyer, Debra M.

    2004-08-01

    An ever-expanding global military mission necessitates quick and accurate identification of biological hazards, whether naturally occurring or man-made. Coupled with an ever-present threat of biological attack, an expanded U.S. presence in worn-torn locations like Southwest Asia presents unique public health challenges. We must heed modern day "lessons learned" from Operation Desert Shield and the Soviet Afghanistan Campaign and guard against rapid incapacitation of troop strength from endemic disease and biological attack. To minimize readiness impacts, field hygiene is enforced, and research on better medical countermeasures such as antibiotics and vaccines continues. However, there are no preventions or remedies for all military-relevant infectious diseases or biological agents. A deployable, streamlined, self-contained diagnostic and public health surveillance laboratory capability with a reach-back communication is critical to meeting global readiness challenges. Current deployable laboratory packages comprise primarily diagnostic or environmental sample testing capabilities. Discussion will focus on critical components needed to improve existing laboratory assets, and to facilitate deployment of small, specialized packages far forward. The ideal laboratory model described will become an essential tool for the Combatant or Incident Commander to maintain force projection in the expeditionary environment.

  2. Modeling Radial Holoblastic Cleavage: A Laboratory Activity for Developmental Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Linda K.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a laboratory activity designed for an undergraduate developmental biology course. Uses Play-Doh (plastic modeling clay) to build a multicellular embryo in order to provide a 3-D demonstration of cleavage. Includes notes for the instructor and student directions. (YDS)

  3. A Practical Polymerase Chain Reaction Laboratory for Introductory Biology Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowlus, R. David; Grether, Susan C.

    1996-01-01

    Presents a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) laboratory exercise that can be performed by introductory biology students in 1 45- to 55-minute class period. Includes a general description of the polymerase chain reaction, materials needed, procedure, and details of interest to teachers. (JRH)

  4. Biological and Physical Space Research Laboratory 2002 Science Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A. (Editor); Robinson, M. B. (Editor); Murphy, K. L. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    With the International Space Station Program approaching core complete, our NASA Headquarters sponsor, the new Code U Enterprise, Biological and Physical Research, is shifting its research emphasis from purely fundamental microgravity and biological sciences to strategic research aimed at enabling human missions beyond Earth orbit. Although we anticipate supporting microgravity research on the ISS for some time to come, our laboratory has been vigorously engaged in developing these new strategic research areas.This Technical Memorandum documents the internal science research at our laboratory as presented in a review to Dr. Ann Whitaker, MSFC Science Director, in July 2002. These presentations have been revised and updated as appropriate for this report. It provides a snapshot of the internal science capability of our laboratory as an aid to other NASA organizations and the external scientific community.

  5. Biological and Physical Space Research Laboratory 2002 Science Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A. (Editor); Robinson, M. B. (Editor); Murphy, K. L. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    With the International Space Station Program approaching core complete, our NASA Headquarters sponsor, the new Code U Enterprise, Biological and Physical Research, is shifting its research emphasis from purely fundamental microgravity and biological sciences to strategic research aimed at enabling human missions beyond Earth orbit. Although we anticipate supporting microgravity research on the ISS for some time to come, our laboratory has been vigorously engaged in developing these new strategic research areas.This Technical Memorandum documents the internal science research at our laboratory as presented in a review to Dr. Ann Whitaker, MSFC Science Director, in July 2002. These presentations have been revised and updated as appropriate for this report. It provides a snapshot of the internal science capability of our laboratory as an aid to other NASA organizations and the external scientific community.

  6. Professor Created On-line Biology Laboratory Course

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Arthur W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper will share the creation, implementation, and modification of an online college level general biology laboratory course offered for non-science majors as a part of a General Education Curriculum. The ability of professors to develop quality online laboratories will address a growing need in Higher Education as more institutions combine course sections and look for suitable alternative course delivery formats due to declining departmental budgets requiring reductions in staffing, equipment, and supplies. Also, there is an equal or greater need for more professors to develop the ability to create online laboratory experiences because many of the currently available online laboratory course packages from publishers do not always adequately parallel on-campus laboratory courses, or are not as aligned with the companion lecture sections. From a variety of scientific simulation and animation web sites, professors can easily identify material that closely fit the specific needs of their courses, instructional environment, and students that they serve. All too often, on-campus laboratory courses in the sciences provide what are termed confirmation experiences that do NOT allow students to experience science as would be carried out by scientists. Creatively developed online laboratory experiences can often provide the type of authentic investigative experiences that are not possible on-campus due to the time constraints of a typical two-hour, once-per-week-meeting laboratory course. In addition, online laboratory courses can address issues related to the need for students to more easily complete missing laboratory assignments, and to have opportunities to extend introductory exercises into more advanced undertakings where a greater sense of scientific discovery can be experienced. Professors are strongly encourages to begin creating online laboratory exercises for their courses, and to consider issues regarding assessment, copyrights, and Intellectual Property

  7. Hog-ringer speeds seed trap construction

    Treesearch

    D.O. Hall

    1964-01-01

    An upholsterer's hog-ringer, with Hill's No. 1 pig rings, increased production of one-foot-square wire seed traps by 25 percent. A design modification allowed two bottom sections to be cut from a 36-inch roll of wire.

  8. Removal design report for the 108-F Biological Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    Most of the 100-F facilities were deactivated with the reactor and have since been demolished. Of the dozen or so reactor-related structures, only the 105-F Reactor Building and the 108-F Biology Laboratory remain standing today. The 108-F Biology Laboratory was intended to be used as a facility for the mixing and addition of chemicals used in the treatment of the reactor cooling water. Shortly after F Reactor began operation, it was determined that the facility was not needed for this purpose. In 1949, the building was converted for use as a biological laboratory. In 1962, the lab was expanded by adding a three-story annex to the original four-story structure. The resulting lab had a floor area of approximately 2,883 m{sup 2} (main building and annex) that operated until 1973. The building contained 47 laboratories, a number of small offices, a conference room, administrative section, lunch and locker rooms, and a heavily shielded, high-energy exposure cell. The purpose of this removal design report is to establish the methods of decontamination and decommissioning and the supporting functions associated with facility removal and disposal.

  9. Enhancing Scientific Literacy in the Undergraduate Cell Biology Laboratory Classroom.

    PubMed

    Woodham, Hadiya; Marbach-Ad, Gili; Downey, Gretchen; Tomei, Erika; Thompson, Katerina

    2016-12-01

    This paper describes the implementation of the Scientific Literacy in Cell Biology (SLCB) curriculum in an undergraduate biology laboratory course. The SLCB curriculum incorporated the reading and discussion of primary literature into hands-on and collaborative practical experiences. It was implemented in five stages over an 11-week period, during which students were also introduced to the theory and practice of common cell biology techniques. We report on the effectiveness of the course, as measured by pre- and post-course survey data probing students' content knowledge and their level of familiarity, confidence, and experience with different skills pertaining to analyzing (reading, interpreting, and discussing) primary literature. In the spring 2015 semester, 287 (72%) of the 396 students who were enrolled in the laboratory completed both the pre- and post-course survey. The average score on the content questions of the post-course survey was significantly higher (p < 0.0001) than the average score on the pre-course survey. Students reported that they gained greater familiarity, experience, and confidence in the skills that were measured. Our findings may aid in reforming higher-education science laboratory courses to better promote writing, reading, data processing, and presentation skills. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education.

  10. Enhancing Scientific Literacy in the Undergraduate Cell Biology Laboratory Classroom†

    PubMed Central

    Woodham, Hadiya; Marbach-Ad, Gili; Downey, Gretchen; Tomei, Erika; Thompson, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of the Scientific Literacy in Cell Biology (SLCB) curriculum in an undergraduate biology laboratory course. The SLCB curriculum incorporated the reading and discussion of primary literature into hands-on and collaborative practical experiences. It was implemented in five stages over an 11-week period, during which students were also introduced to the theory and practice of common cell biology techniques. We report on the effectiveness of the course, as measured by pre- and post-course survey data probing students’ content knowledge and their level of familiarity, confidence, and experience with different skills pertaining to analyzing (reading, interpreting, and discussing) primary literature. In the spring 2015 semester, 287 (72%) of the 396 students who were enrolled in the laboratory completed both the pre- and post-course survey. The average score on the content questions of the post-course survey was significantly higher (p < 0.0001) than the average score on the pre-course survey. Students reported that they gained greater familiarity, experience, and confidence in the skills that were measured. Our findings may aid in reforming higher-education science laboratory courses to better promote writing, reading, data processing, and presentation skills. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education PMID:28101274

  11. Space Station Freedom: a unique laboratory for gravitational biology research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. W.; Cowing, K. L.

    1993-01-01

    The advent of Space Station Freedom (SSF) will provide a permanent laboratory in space with unparalleled opportunities to perform biological research. As with any spacecraft there will also be limitations. It is our intent to describe this space laboratory and present a picture of how scientists will conduct research in this unique environment we call space. SSF is an international venture which will continue to serve as a model for other peaceful international efforts. It is hoped that as the human race moves out from this planet back to the moon and then on to Mars that SSF can serve as a successful example of how things can and should be done.

  12. Space Station Freedom: a unique laboratory for gravitational biology research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. W.; Cowing, K. L.

    1993-01-01

    The advent of Space Station Freedom (SSF) will provide a permanent laboratory in space with unparalleled opportunities to perform biological research. As with any spacecraft there will also be limitations. It is our intent to describe this space laboratory and present a picture of how scientists will conduct research in this unique environment we call space. SSF is an international venture which will continue to serve as a model for other peaceful international efforts. It is hoped that as the human race moves out from this planet back to the moon and then on to Mars that SSF can serve as a successful example of how things can and should be done.

  13. [Cooperations between biology laboratories of the establishments of healthcare].

    PubMed

    Burnat, Pascal; Payen, Catherine; Mérens, Audrey; Ceppa, Franck; Renard, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    In France, the cooperations between biological laboratories of the healthcare establishments increased after those realized in the private laboratories. The biologists are confronted with various hypotheses of organization. They are often complex because they may preserve the quality of the care and their continuity while realizing financial economies. These economies are mostly based on the global reduction in the staff and in the equipments by mutualising the biological tests with varying degrees. We describe the various elements to be taken into account (staff, activities, budget, quality, transport, materials) and propose many scenarios of cooperations, from a unique central shape to the transfer of very specialized tests, with their advantages and their inconveniences. The management of human aspects in these cooperations is determining to facilitate their success as well as a reliable preliminary inventory of fixtures.

  14. Teaching PCR Through Inquiry in an Undergraduate Biology Laboratory Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorighi, K. M.; Betancourt, J.; Sapp, J.; Quan, T. K.; Lee, J.

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of an inquiry-based laboratory unit on the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). This unit was designed and taught for the undergraduate Eukaryotic Genetics Laboratory class (Bio105L) at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Our activity utilizes an authentic molecular biology research question to teach the underlying molecular mechanisms and experimental technique of PCR, as well as fundamental scientific process skills such as planning experiments, making predictions and interpreting data. In particular, the activity prompts students to use PCR to determine which gene has been deleted in a region of the Drosophila genome. During this activity, students also gained technical experience in common molecular biology techniques, learned about additional applications of PCR and used a hands-on approach to model each step of PCR.

  15. Clinical laboratories, the select agent program, and biological surety (biosurety).

    PubMed

    Pastel, Ross H; Demmin, Gretchen; Severson, Grant; Torres-Cruz, Rafael; Trevino, Jorge; Kelly, John; Arrison, Jay; Christman, Joy

    2006-06-01

    The threat of bioterrorism has led to increased concerns over the availability of biological select agents and toxins (BSAT). Congress has implemented several public laws that have led to the development of federal regulations by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the US Department of Agriculture. The CDC regulation 42 CFR 73 has a direct impact on all clinical laboratories that may at some time identify BSAT in a clinical specimen. The Department of Defense has imposed a more stringent layer of regulation called biological surety (biosurety) on top of the requirements of 42 CFR 73 for military laboratories that possess BSAT. However,42 CFR 73 falls into the framework of biosurety. Both sets of regulations have four pillars (safety, physical security, agent account-ability, and personnel reliability) that are built on a foundation of training and covered by a roof of management (operations and plans).

  16. A Guided-Inquiry pH Laboratory Exercise for Introductory Biological Science Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snodgrass, Meagan A.; Lux, Nicholas; Metz, Anneke M.

    2011-01-01

    There is a continuing need for engaging inquiry-based laboratory experiences for advanced high school and undergraduate biology courses. The authors describe a guided-inquiry exercise investigating the pH-dependence of lactase enzyme that uses an inexpensive, wide-range buffering system, lactase dietary supplement, over-the-counter glucose test…

  17. A Guided-Inquiry pH Laboratory Exercise for Introductory Biological Science Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snodgrass, Meagan A.; Lux, Nicholas; Metz, Anneke M.

    2011-01-01

    There is a continuing need for engaging inquiry-based laboratory experiences for advanced high school and undergraduate biology courses. The authors describe a guided-inquiry exercise investigating the pH-dependence of lactase enzyme that uses an inexpensive, wide-range buffering system, lactase dietary supplement, over-the-counter glucose test…

  18. Large-size space laboratory for biological orbit experiments.

    PubMed

    Kondyurin, A

    2001-01-01

    The study of space factors on living systems has great interest and long-term experiments during orbital flight will be important tool for increasing our knowledge. Realization of such experiments is limited by constraints of modern space stations. A new technology of large-size space laboratory for biological experiments has been developed on the basis of polymerization techniques. Using this technique there are no limits of form and size of laboratory for a space station that will permit long term experiments on Earth orbit with plants and animals in sufficient volume for creation of closed self-regulating ecological systems. The technology is based on experiments of the behavior of polymer materials in simulated free space conditions during the reaction of polymerization. The influences of space vacuum, sharp temperature changes and space plasma generated by galactic rays and Sun irradiation on chemical reaction were evaluated in their impact on liquid organic materials in laboratory conditions. The results of our study shows, that the chemical reaction is sensitive to such space factors. But we believe that the technology of polymerization could be used for the creation of space biological laboratories in Earth orbit in the near future.

  19. An Integration of Chemistry, Biology, and Physics: The Interdisciplinary Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hecke, Gerald R.; Karukstis, Kerry K.; Haskell, Richard C.; McFadden, Catherine S.; Sheldon Wettack, F.

    2002-07-01

    As a new venture to integrate research and education, a pilot section of a first-year laboratory sequence known as the Interdisciplinary Laboratory (ID Lab) was introduced on the Harvey Mudd campus during the 1999 2000 academic year and continues to be offered. The ID Lab attempts to bridge laboratory experiences from biology, chemistry, and physics for the first-year student. Taught by a team of faculty from these disciplines, the course seeks both to illustrate commonality of investigative methods and laboratory techniques in these sciences and to introduce discipline-specific principles. Experiments with a chemistry component include the Molecular Weight of Macromolecules, the Synthesis and Characterization of Liquid Crystals, A Structure Activity Investigation of Photosynthetic Electron Transport, a Genetic Map of a Bacterial Plasmid, and The Carbonate Content of Biological Hard Tissue. This article provides some details of the experiments conducted, information on the philosophy and mechanics of the course, and a discussion of student reaction to this innovative and novel course.

  20. Efficient eye detection using HOG-PCA descriptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savakis, Andreas; Sharma, Riti; Kumar, Mrityunjay

    2014-03-01

    Eye detection is becoming increasingly important for mobile interfaces and human computer interaction. In this paper, we present an efficient eye detector based on HOG-PCA features obtained by performing Principal Component Analysis (PCA) on Histogram of Oriented Gradients (HOG). The Histogram of Oriented Gradients is a dense descriptor computed on overlapping blocks along a grid of cells over regions of interest. The HOG-PCA offers an efficient feature for eye detection by applying PCA on the HOG vectors extracted from image patches corresponding to a sliding window. The HOG-PCA descriptor significantly reduces feature dimensionality compared to the dimensionality of the original HOG feature or the eye image region. Additionally, we introduce the HOG-RP descriptor by utilizing Random Projections as an alternative to PCA for reducing the dimensionality of HOG features. We develop robust eye detectors by utilizing HOG-PCA and HOG-RP features of image patches to train a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier. Testing is performed on eye images extracted from the FERET and BioID databases.

  1. Use of Veterinary Records To Teach Laboratory Thinking Skills in Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolverton, Christopher J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a laboratory protocol using clinical veterinary data that teaches the cognitive, analytical, communication, and interpersonal skills necessary for students in a biology core laboratory course. (WRM)

  2. Use of Veterinary Records To Teach Laboratory Thinking Skills in Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolverton, Christopher J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a laboratory protocol using clinical veterinary data that teaches the cognitive, analytical, communication, and interpersonal skills necessary for students in a biology core laboratory course. (WRM)

  3. The lunar environment as a fractional-gravity biological laboratory.

    PubMed

    Garshnek, V

    1994-07-01

    A quarter of a century ago men stepped upon the lunar surface and established the possibility of human expansion beyond Earth. When humans return to the moon to occupy it with greater permanency, an applied lunar biological laboratory would provide a means of conducting experiments on the long-term effects of fractional gravity in animals and plants and provide necessary data to enhance the health, safety and well-being of lunar workers and inhabitants. In-depth studies can go beyond zero-g observations, on-orbit centrifuge studies, and ground-based research providing important insight into continuous 1/6-g effects on biological systems. Studies concentrating on development, gravity sensing, and adaptation/readaptation would provide preliminary data on whether long-term fractional gravity is detrimental or compromising to fundamental biological function. Food production research in 1/6-g would provide important information for on site application to improve the yield and quality of food (animal and plant) produced in the unique lunar environment. The purpose of this paper is to discuss some examples of the major gravitational biology areas that could be studied on the moon and applied to lunar population needs utilizing lunar biological facilities and continuous fractional gravity.

  4. The lunar environment as a fractional-gravity biological laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garshnek, V.

    A quarter of a century ago men stepped upon the lunar surface and established the possibility of human expansion beyond Earth. When humans return to the moon to occupy it with greater permanency, an applied lunar biological laboratory would provide a means of conducting experiments on the long-term effects of fractional gravity in animals and plants and provide necessary data to enhance the health, safety and well-being of lunar workers and inhabitants. In-depth studies can go beyond zero-g observations, on-orbit centrifuge studies, and ground-based research providing important insight into continuous 1/6- g effects on biological systems. Studies concentrating on development, gravity sensing, and adaptation/readaptation would provide preliminary data on whether long-term fractional gravity is detrimental or compromising to fundamental biological function. Food production research in 1/6- g would provide important information for on site application to improve the yield and quality of food (animal and plant) produced in the unique lunar environment. The purpose of this paper is to discuss some examples of the major gravitational biology areas that could be studied on the moon and applied to lunar population needs utilizing lunar biological facilities and continuous fractional gravity.

  5. Hog farm in California uses anaerobic digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, D.

    1995-12-31

    This article describes a system of covered lagoons which help address the waste management problems of hog farmers as well as producing methane used to power generators. Four advantages of anaerobic digestion are described along with the system: energy production from methane; fertilizer for fields; economic development in rural areas; and improved water quality through reduction of nonpoint source pollution. Address for full report is given.

  6. Online Pre-laboratory Modules Enhance Introductory Biology Students’ Preparedness and Performance in the Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Peteroy-Kelly, Marcy

    2010-01-01

    Introductory biology students are typically overwhelmed in the laboratory. Many of the students are unsure of how to prepare for each session. Two online pre-laboratory modules were developed to introduce the students to the concepts required for laboratory. The students studied the information in the modules and took an online quiz prior to each lab session. Of the 49 students who reviewed the first module and took the online quiz, the average quiz grade was 83.7% ± 12.8. A control group that did not review the online module had an average quiz grade of 53.6% ± 17.5. Of the 20 students who reviewed the second module and took the online quiz, the average quiz grade was 76% ± 15.0. The average quiz grade of the control group was 47.2% ± 16.5. The students were required to prepare laboratory reports for each session. Students who were required to review the modules received slightly higher grades on their laboratory reports compared to the control group. The students and faculty took a survey to determine their perceived impact of the modules on laboratory preparedness and performance. Both the faculty and students agreed that students are typically underprepared for lab (100% and 62%, respectively). Eighty-five percent of the students and all faculty felt that the modules did help them with preparation for the lab. Eighty-eight percent of the students and 76% of the faculty reported that the modules helped them to prepare their laboratory reports. These data clearly indicate that the pre-laboratory modules do enhance student preparedness and performance in the laboratory. PMID:23914280

  7. Web Camera Use in Developing Biology, Molecular Biology and Biochemistry Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogren, Paul J.; Deibel, Michael; Kelly, Ian; Mulnix, Amy B.; Peck, Charlie

    2004-01-01

    The use of a network-ready color camera is described which is primarily marketed as a security device and is used for experiments in developmental biology, genetics and biochemistry laboratories and in special student research projects. Acquiring and analyzing project and archiving images is very important in microscopy, electrophoresis and…

  8. Web Camera Use in Developing Biology, Molecular Biology and Biochemistry Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogren, Paul J.; Deibel, Michael; Kelly, Ian; Mulnix, Amy B.; Peck, Charlie

    2004-01-01

    The use of a network-ready color camera is described which is primarily marketed as a security device and is used for experiments in developmental biology, genetics and biochemistry laboratories and in special student research projects. Acquiring and analyzing project and archiving images is very important in microscopy, electrophoresis and…

  9. Hematologic and Biochemical Biologic Variation in Laboratory Cats

    PubMed Central

    Trumel, Catherine; Monzali, Céline; Geffré, Anne; Concordet, Didier V; Hourqueig, Louise; Braun, Jean-Pierre D; Bourgès-Abella, Nathalie H

    2016-01-01

    The biologic variation associated with a clinical pathology result is important to consider before reference intervals (RI) are used. Most available RI are population-based RI, in which the analytical variability, interindividual variability, and intraindividual variability are confounded. In addition, when the intraindividual variability is considerably less than the interindividual variability, a population-based RI is insufficiently sensitive to detect changes in a subject over time. Here we determined the biologic variation and reference change value (RCV) of hematologic and biochemical variables in laboratory cats. Blood specimens from 14 (7 females and 7 males) overnight-fasted laboratory cats sampled 7 times (days 1, 2, 7, 14, 31, 42, and 100) were analyzed regarding hematology and biochemistry variables. For each variable, analytical, intraindividual, and interindividual coefficients of variation were estimated prior to calculation of the index of individuality and the RCV. RBC variables (count, Hgb, Hct, MCV, MCH, MCHC, and RBC distribution width) and 5 biochemical analytes (cholesterol, creatinine, triglycerides, ALP, and calcium) exhibited marked individuality, therefore indicating that subject-based reference intervals or RCV would be preferable when monitoring these variables in laboratory cats. Population-based RI were shown to be adequate for glucose and sodium, and both types of population and individual RI were similarly efficient for albumin, total protein, urea, ALT, AST, creatine kinase, chloride, carbon dioxide, iron, magnesium, inorganic phosphate, and potassium and reticulocyte, WBC, neutrophil, lymphocyte, monocyte, eosinophil, and platelet counts. The RCV determined in the present study provide a valuable tool for monitoring hematologic and biochemical variables in healthy laboratory cats. PMID:27657703

  10. BION - A Unique Space Biological Laboratory: Reviews and Outlooks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakova, A. E.; Abrashkin, V. I.; Kozlov, V. D.; Nikanorov, V. M.

    2002-01-01

    unique fundamental and applied researches in field of space biology. facilities when launch date, life time, orbital parameters, operation of the onboard equipment are subject to the benefit of the scientific research. of space system optimization prior to flight tests including ground and airplane tests with research hardware and animals involved. new relevant research hardware was also manufactured. influence of space flight on Earth organisms; combined influence of weightlessness and increased radiation on an organism; implementation of artificial gravity as a preventive aid; possibilities of fertilization and fetal growth under space flight conditions. amphibia, tortoises, laboratory rats, monkeys and others were used in space as biological objects. In total, they constituted 37 appellations. of the system. At present Bion S/C is a space facility, which meets scientific requirements and provides full scale of services to Customers.

  11. Elucidating GPR Response to Biological Activity: Field and Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoflias, G. P.; Schillig, P. C.; McGlashan, M. A.; Roberts, J. A.; Devlin, J. F.

    2010-12-01

    Recent studies of the geophysical signatures of biological processes in earth environments have resulted in the emergent field of “biogeophysics”. The ability to monitor remotely and to quantify active biological processes in the subsurface can have transformative implications to a wide range of investigations, including the bioremediation of contaminated sites. Previous studies have demonstrated that ground-penetrating radar (GPR) can be used to detect the products of microbial activity in the subsurface, such as changes in bulk electrical conductivity, mineral dissolution and precipitation, and the formation of biogenic gas. We present field and laboratory experiments that offer insights to the response of GPR signals to microbial activity. In the field, time-lapse borehole radar tomography was used to monitor biodegradation of a hydrocarbon plume over a period of two years. A dense grid of fourteen borehole pairs monitoring the bioactive region showed radar wave velocity changes of +/-4% and signal attenuation changes of +/-25%. These GPR observations correlated spatially and temporally to independent measurements of groundwater velocity and geochemical variations that occurred in response to microbial activity. The greatest relative changes in radar wave velocity of propagation and attenuation were observed in the region of enhanced bacterial stimulation where biomass growth was the greatest. Radar wave velocity and attenuation decreased during periods of enhanced biostimulation. Two laboratory experiments were conducted to further assess radar response to biomass growth. The first experiment monitored GPR wave transmission through a water-saturated quartz-sand reactor during the course of enhanced biostimulation. Radar wave velocity initially decreased as a result of bacterial activity and subsequently increased rapidly as biogenic gas formed in the pore space. Radar signal attenuation increased during the course of the experiment as a result of an

  12. Characterizing High School Students' Written Explanations in Biology Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peker, Deniz; Wallace, Carolyn S.

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this qualitative interpretive research study was to examine high school students' written scientific explanations during biology laboratory investigations. Specifically, we characterized the types of epistemologies and forms of reasoning involved in students' scientific explanations and students' perceptions of scientific explanations. Sixteen students from a rural high school in the Southeastern United States were the participants of this research study. The data consisted of students' laboratory reports and individual interviews. The results indicated that students' explanations were primarily based on first-hand knowledge gained in the science laboratories and mostly representing procedural recounts. Most students did not give explanations based on a theory or a principle and did not use deductive reasoning in their explanations. The students had difficulties explaining phenomena that involved intricate cause-effect relationships. Students perceived scientific explanation as the final step of a scientific inquiry and as an account of what happened in the inquiry process, and held a constructivist-empiricist view of scientific explanations. Our results imply the need for more explicit guidance to help students construct better scientific explanations and explicit teaching of the explanatory genre with particular focus on theoretical and causal explanations.

  13. 2. Viaduct deck, Omaha livestock market offices to left, hog ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Viaduct deck, Omaha livestock market offices to left, hog sheds to right. View to east. - South Omaha Union Stock Yards, "O" Street Viaduct, "O" Street Spanning Hog Pens; South Omaha Terminal Railway Company Tracks & Union Pacific Railroad Tracks, Omaha, Douglas County, NE

  14. People on the Farm: Corn and Hog Farming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC. Office of Governmental and Public Affairs.

    This booklet provides information on corn and hog farming on a small farm through a profile of a farm family. According to the profile, John and Mary Miller and their three children are a comfortable family operating a corn and hog farm in Iowa. John, the principal farmer, uses a variety of skills in management, veterinary science, soil science,…

  15. 1. GENERAL SETTING; LOOKING WEST INTO RAILROAD CORRIDOR; HOG RUN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL SETTING; LOOKING WEST INTO RAILROAD CORRIDOR; HOG RUN AND BUILDING 149 ARE AT LEFT; BUILDING 92 IS PARTIALLY HIDDEN BEHIND PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE AT CENTER; BUILDING 181 IS AT RIGHT - Rath Packing Company, Cantilevered Hog Run, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  16. 9 CFR 311.24 - Hogs affected with tapeworm cysts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hogs affected with tapeworm cysts. 311.24 Section 311.24 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... affected with tapeworm cysts. Carcasses of hogs affected with tapeworm cysts (Cysticercus cellulosae) may...

  17. 9 CFR 311.24 - Hogs affected with tapeworm cysts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hogs affected with tapeworm cysts. 311.24 Section 311.24 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... affected with tapeworm cysts. Carcasses of hogs affected with tapeworm cysts (Cysticercus cellulosae) may...

  18. 9 CFR 311.24 - Hogs affected with tapeworm cysts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hogs affected with tapeworm cysts. 311.24 Section 311.24 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... affected with tapeworm cysts. Carcasses of hogs affected with tapeworm cysts (Cysticercus cellulosae) may...

  19. 9 CFR 311.24 - Hogs affected with tapeworm cysts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hogs affected with tapeworm cysts. 311.24 Section 311.24 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... affected with tapeworm cysts. Carcasses of hogs affected with tapeworm cysts (Cysticercus cellulosae) may...

  20. 9 CFR 311.24 - Hogs affected with tapeworm cysts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hogs affected with tapeworm cysts. 311.24 Section 311.24 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... affected with tapeworm cysts. Carcasses of hogs affected with tapeworm cysts (Cysticercus cellulosae) may...

  1. Electrophoretic gel image analysis software for the molecular biology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Redman, T; Jacobs, T

    1991-06-01

    We present GelReader 1.0, a microcomputer program designed to make precision, digital analysis of one-dimensional electrophoretic gels accessible to the molecular biology laboratory of modest means. Images of electrophoretic gels are digitized via a desktop flatbed scanner from instant photographs, autoradiograms or chromogenically stained blotting media. GelReader is then invoked to locate lanes and bands and generate a report of molecular weights of unknowns, based on specified sets of standards. Frequently used standards can be stored in the program. Lanes and bands can be added or removed, based upon users' subjective preferences. A unique lane histogram feature facilitates precise manual addition of bands missed by the software. Image enhancement features include palette manipulation, histogram equalization, shadowing and magnification. The user interface strikes a balance between program autonomy and user intervention, in recognition of the variability in electrophoretic gel quality and users' analytical needs.

  2. Exploring Metagenomics in the Laboratory of an Introductory Biology Course†

    PubMed Central

    Gibbens, Brian B.; Scott, Cheryl L.; Hoff, Courtney D.; Schottel, Janet L.

    2015-01-01

    Four laboratory modules were designed for introductory biology students to explore the field of metagenomics. Students collected microbes from environmental samples, extracted the DNA, and amplified 16S rRNA gene sequences using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Students designed functional metagenomics screens to determine and compare antibiotic resistance profiles among the samples. Bioinformatics tools were used to generate and interpret phylogenetic trees and identify homologous genes. A pretest and posttest were used to assess learning gains, and the results indicated that these modules increased student performance by an average of 22%. Here we describe ways to engage students in metagenomics-related research and provide readers with ideas for how they can start developing metagenomics exercises for their own classrooms. PMID:25949755

  3. Laboratory study of biological retention for urban stormwater management.

    PubMed

    Davis, A P; Shokouhian, M; Sharma, H; Minami, C

    2001-01-01

    Urban stormwater runoff contains a broad range of pollutants that are transported to natural water systems. A practice known as biological retention (bioretention) has been suggested to manage stormwater runoff from small, developed areas. Bioretention facilities consist of porous soil, a topping layer of hardwood mulch, and a variety of different plant species. A detailed study of the characteristics and performance of bioretention systems for the removal of several heavy metals (copper, lead, and zinc) and nutrients (phosphorus, total Kjeldahl nitrogen [TKN], ammonium, and nitrate) from a synthetic urban stormwater runoff was completed using batch and column adsorption studies along with pilot-scale laboratory systems. The roles of the soil, mulch, and plants in the removal of heavy metals and nutrients were evaluated to estimate the treatment capacity of laboratory bioretention systems. Reductions in concentrations of all metals were excellent (> 90%) with specific metal removals of 15 to 145 mg/m2 per event. Moderate reductions of TKN, ammonium, and phosphorus levels were found (60 to 80%). Little nitrate was removed, and nitrate production was noted in several cases. The importance of the mulch layer in metal removal was identified. Overall results support the use of bioretention as a stormwater best management practice and indicate the need for further research and development.

  4. A model for Bioinformatics training: the marine biological laboratory.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Grant; Miller, Holly; Goddard, Anthony; Norton, Cathy

    2010-11-01

    Many areas of science such as biology, medicine and oceanography are becoming increasingly data-rich and most programs that train scientists do not address informatics techniques or technologies that are necessary for managing and analysing large amounts of data. Educational resources for scientists in informatics are scarce, yet scientists need the skills and knowledge to work with informaticians and manage graduate students and post-docs in informatics projects. The Marine Biological Laboratory houses a world-renowned library and is involved in a number of informatics projects in the sciences. The MBL has been home to the National Library of Medicine's BioMedical Informatics Course for nearly two decades and is committed to educating scientists and other scholars in informatics. In an innovative, immersive learning experience, G.Y., a biologist and post-doc at Arizona State University, visited the Science Informatics Group at the MBL to learn first hand how informatics is done and how informatics teams work. Hands-on work with developers, systems administrators, librarians and other scientists provided an invaluable education in informatics and is a model for future science informatics training.

  5. pGLO mutagenesis: a laboratory procedure in molecular biology for biology students.

    PubMed

    Bassiri, Eby A

    2011-01-01

    A five-session laboratory project was designed to familiarize or increase the laboratory proficiency of biology students and others with techniques and instruments commonly used in molecular biology research laboratories and industries. In this project, the EZ-Tn5 transposon is used to generate and screen a large number of cells transformed with mutagenized pGLO plasmid. EZ-Tn5 carries the kanamycin resistance (Kan(R)) gene, and the pGLO plasmid carries the β-lactamase gene for ampicillin resistance (Amp(R)), the gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the arabinose operon repressor (araC). Insertion of the Tn5 transposon into pGLO occurs randomly, and any gene into which it inserts is knocked out. By screening cells transformed with mutagenized pGLO with kanamycin, ampicillin, arabinose and/or for GFP expression in different combinations, pGLO plasmids with mutations in different genes are identified. The locations of these insertions are then mapped approximately by restriction fragment analysis and precisely by sequence analysis of the pGLO plasmid.

  6. Laboratory techniques in plant molecular biology taught with UniformMu insertion alleles of maize

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An undergraduate course - Laboratory Techniques in Plant Molecular Biology - was organized around our research application of UniformMu insertion alleles to investigate mitochondrial functions in plant reproduction. The course objectives were to develop students’ laboratory, record keeping, bioinfor...

  7. [Psychoactive substances in biological samples--toxicological laboratory data].

    PubMed

    Gomółka, Ewa; Wilimowska, Jolanta; Piekoszewski, Wojciech; Groszek, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    The subject of the research was the analysis of frequency and type of psychoactive substances used, basing on the determinations the blood and/or urine samples, performed in the toxicological laboratory of the Department of Clinical and Industrial Toxicology Jagiellonian University in Kraków in the period from December 2001 to November 2003. From 17,649 performed determinations--45.5% were positive. 50% of the positive determinations were psychoactive substances. The most often psychoactive substance determined was ethyl alcohol (52.86%), next benzodiazepines (17.41%), amphetamines (10.54%), opiates (8.05%), THC (6.87%), barbiturates (3.74%), and occasionally atropine and cocaine. There was observed a variety of mixed, simultaneously taking psychoactive substances, especially ethyl alcohol, opiates, amphetamine derivatives and cannabinoids. The analysis of the occurrence of psychoactive substances in biological samples from patients treated in different hospital departments, others hospitals and ordered by private persons also was performed. In the last two years 369 private patients ordered psychoactive substances determinations and 78 of them were positive.

  8. Dry hog fuel to improve effiency, cut emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Schwieger, B.

    1980-02-01

    Various dryers in wood-fired powerplants are described and it is stated that when moisture levels of hog fuel rise above 55%, boilers cannot produce enough heat to sustain combustion. Methods to avoid this problem are suggested and include the burning of a low-moisture fuel in conjunction with the hog fuel and the installation of a dryer to remove some moisture from the fuel before it enter the furnace. It is generally agreed that flue-gas dryers should be considered in the design of hog-fuel-fired steam sytems whenever fuel moisture exceeds about 50%.

  9. A robust HOG-based descriptor for pattern recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Escobar, Julia; Kober, Vitaly

    2016-09-01

    The Histogram of Oriented Gradients (HOG) is a popular feature descriptor used in computer vision and image processing. The technique counts occurrences of gradient orientation in localized portions of an image. The descriptor is sensible to the presence in images of noise, nonuniform illumination, and low contrast. In this work, we propose a robust HOG-based descriptor using the local energy model and phase congruency approach. Computer simulation results are presented for recognition of objects in images affected by additive noise, nonuniform illumination, and geometric distortions using the proposed and conventional HOG descriptors.

  10. Two putative MAP kinase genes, ZrHOG1 and ZrHOG2, cloned from the salt-tolerant yeast Zygosaccharomyces rouxii are functionally homologous to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HOG1 gene.

    PubMed

    Iwaki, T; Tamai, Y; Watanabe, Y

    1999-01-01

    The salt-tolerant yeast Zygosaccharomyces rouxii can adjust its osmotic balance when responding to osmotic shock by accumulating glycerol as the compatible osmolyte. However, the mechanism of glycerol production in Z. rouxii cells and its genetic regulation remain to be elucidated. Two putative mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase genes, ZrHOG1 and ZrHOG2, were cloned from Z. rouxii by their homology with HOG1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The deduced amino acid sequences of ZrHog1p and ZrHog2p indicated close homology to that of Hog1p and contained a TGY motif for phosphorylation by MAP kinase kinase. When ZrHOG1 or ZrHOG2 was expressed in an S. cerevisiae hog1delta null mutant, the salt tolerance and osmotic tolerance characteristics of wild-type S. cerevisiae were restored. In addition, the aberrant cell morphology and low glycerol content of the hog1delta null mutant were corrected, indicating that ZrHog1p and ZrHog2p have functions similar to Hog1p. While the transcription of the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (GPD1) of the ZrHOG1-harbouring S. cerevisiae mutant was similar to that of wild-type S. cerevisiae, the ZrHOG2-harbouring strain showed prolonged GPD1 transcription. Both Zrhog1delta and Zrhog2delta Z. rouxii null mutants showed a decrease in salt tolerance compared to the wild-type strain. The present study suggested the presence of a high-osmolarity glycerol response (HOG) pathway in Z. rouxii similar to that elucidated in S. cerevisiae. Two putative MAP kinase genes in Z. rouxii appeared to be significant in either osmotic regulation or ion homeostasis.

  11. Outbreak of invasive listeriosis associated with the consumption of hog head cheese--Louisiana, 2010.

    PubMed

    2011-04-08

    During January-June 2010, a total of 14 cases of laboratory-confirmed invasive listeriosis were reported to the Louisiana Office of Public Health (OPH). Isolates of Listeria monocytogenes from the blood samples of eight patients were identified as serotype 1/2a and had pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern combinations that were indistinguishable from one another. The detection of this cluster prompted an investigation in coordination with CDC, the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry (LDAF), and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS). In-depth epidemiologic and environmental investigations of the cluster were initiated on July 26, including food history interviews of four patients. Three patients reported eating hog head cheese (a meat jelly made from swine heads and feet); the product was purchased at two grocery stores in Louisiana. A traceback investigation determined that a single brand of hog head cheese was common between the two grocery stores. L. monocytogenes serotype 1/2a was cultured from one of three product samples and from two of 16 environmental samples collected by LDAF at the processing establishment; the product and one of the two environmental samples yielded isolates with PFGE pattern combinations that were indistinguishable from the patient isolates. On August 14, LDAF coordinated a voluntary recall of approximately 500,000 pounds of hog head cheese and sausage because of possible contamination with L. monocytogenes. This is the first published report of an invasive listeriosis outbreak associated with hog head cheese, which is a ready-to-eat (RTE) meat. USDA-FSIS has a "zero tolerance" policy for L. monocytogenes contamination of RTE food products, requesting recall of such products at any detectable level of L. monocytogenes contamination. LDAF imposes and enforces equivalent requirements in state-inspected establishments.

  12. Risk factors at slaughter associated with presence of Salmonella on hog carcasses in Canada.

    PubMed

    Letellier, Ann; Beauchamp, Guy; Guévremont, Evelyne; D'Allaire, Sylvie; Hurnik, Dan; Quessy, Sylvain

    2009-11-01

    Despite the application of hazard analysis and critical control point systems at slaughter and during processing, Salmonella contamination is still a significant biological hazard associated with pork products. A better understanding of risk factors in slaughterhouses and of contamination sources is therefore critical to improve control of this bacterium in the abattoirs. The objectives of this study were to identify the risk factors at slaughter that are associated with the presence of Salmonella on hog carcasses and to assess possible sources of contamination. A questionnaire on potential risk factors was developed. Over 7,400 hogs originating from 312 randomly selected production lots were tested. The lots were from 10 different abattoirs located in five different Canadian provinces. At slaughter, blood was collected for serological analysis, and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and carcass swabs were collected for Salmonella analysis. Furthermore, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was conducted to establish the genetic profiles of selected isolates from carcasses and MLN and to compare these profiles with those recovered from the slaughter environment. Multivariate regression analysis results indicated that the cleanliness of the hogs and the status of the scald water were factors significantly associated with the Salmonella status of the carcasses at the end of the slaughter process. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis showed that most isolates from carcasses were similar to those from animals (MLN) or the preevisceration environment.

  13. 22. William E. Barrett, Photographer, August 1975. CHIPPER OR 'HOG' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. William E. Barrett, Photographer, August 1975. CHIPPER OR 'HOG' FOR REDUCING SCRAPS TO WOOD CHIPS. HOUSING PARTIALLY REMOVED. - Meadow River Lumber Company, Highway 60, Rainelle, Greenbrier County, WV

  14. The Semipermeability of Biological Membranes: An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frimer, Aryeh A.

    1985-01-01

    The semipermeability of biological membranes is simply and directly illustrated in an experiment which uses ovolecithin liposomes as convenient models for biological membranes. Background information and procedures used are provided. (JN)

  15. The Semipermeability of Biological Membranes: An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frimer, Aryeh A.

    1985-01-01

    The semipermeability of biological membranes is simply and directly illustrated in an experiment which uses ovolecithin liposomes as convenient models for biological membranes. Background information and procedures used are provided. (JN)

  16. [Historic Development of Clinical Biology Laboratories in Luxembourg].

    PubMed

    Wennig R; Humbel R-L

    2014-01-01

    After a short overview on the development of diagnostic tools in clinical biology at an international level from Antiquity towards today, a history of the clinical biology including public and private institutions in Luxembourg will be outlined.

  17. Integrating Mathematics into the Introductory Biology Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, James D.; Carpenter, Jenna P.

    2008-01-01

    Louisiana Tech University has an integrated science curriculum for its mathematics, chemistry, physics, computer science, biology-research track and secondary mathematics and science education majors. The curriculum focuses on the calculus sequence and introductory labs in biology, physics, and chemistry. In the introductory biology laboratory…

  18. Integrating Mathematics into the Introductory Biology Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, James D.; Carpenter, Jenna P.

    2008-01-01

    Louisiana Tech University has an integrated science curriculum for its mathematics, chemistry, physics, computer science, biology-research track and secondary mathematics and science education majors. The curriculum focuses on the calculus sequence and introductory labs in biology, physics, and chemistry. In the introductory biology laboratory…

  19. 1. GENERAL VIEW OF HOG KILLING ROOM ON LEVEL 4; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW OF HOG KILLING ROOM ON LEVEL 4; LOOKING NORTHWEST; A PORTION OF THE SCALDING TANK IS VISIBLE AT EXTREME RIGHT, CENTER; CONCRETE PYLONS AT LOWER RIGHT SUPPORTED BY SCRAPING MACHINE; FINAL SCRAPING WAS DONE BY WORKERS STANDING ON ELEVATED PLATFORMS AT LEFT; BATHTUB-SHAPED CART NEAR CENTER OF PHOTO WAS USED TO TRANSPORT OFFAL TO RENDERING AREAS - Rath Packing Company, Hog Killing Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  20. Wildlife of southern forests habitat & management (Chapter 16): Wild Hogs

    Treesearch

    James G. Dickson; John J. Mayer; John D. Dickson

    2003-01-01

    Wild hogs or swine are medium to large-sized, stout-bodied, and proportionately short-legged hoofed mammals with thick skin covered with sparse to dense coats of coarse bristles. These animals have elongated heads and snouts ending in a disc-like pad through which the external nares open. The only other species in the southern United States that resembles the wild hog...

  1. 5. GENERAL VIEW OF HOG DRESSING AREA ON LEVEL 4; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. GENERAL VIEW OF HOG DRESSING AREA ON LEVEL 4; LOOKING WEST; WORKERS STOOD ON RAISED PLATFORMS TO EVISCERATE AND WASH CARCASSES; EXPANDED STEEL GRATING PROVIDED NON-SLIP WORKING SURFACE; STAINLESS-STEEL BAFFLES BETWEEN PLATFORMS HELPED TO CONTAIN STEAM AND WATER SPRAY; METAL TROUGHS BELOW PLATFORMS AND CONCRETE GUTTERS IN FLOOR HELPED CHANNEL WASTE WATER TO DRAINS - Rath Packing Company, Hog Dressing Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  2. INTERIOR OF HOG BARN SHOWING MILKING STANCHIONS AND DIAGONAL SHEATHING, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF HOG BARN SHOWING MILKING STANCHIONS AND DIAGONAL SHEATHING, LOOKING EAST. (In the 1940s the hog barn was converted to a calf barn to service the growing dairy. After a fire on the property took the Engle’s main barn in 1954, the building was converted into a milking parlor.) - Engle Farm, Barn, 89 South Ebey Road, Coupeville, Island County, WA

  3. PCA-HOG symmetrical feature based diseased cell detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Min-jie

    2016-04-01

    A histogram of oriented gradient (HOG) feature is applied to the field of diseased cell detection, which can detect diseased cells in high resolution tissue images rapidly, accurately and efficiently. Firstly, motivated by symmetrical cellular forms, a new HOG symmetrical feature based on the traditional HOG feature is proposed to meet the condition of cell detection. Secondly, considering the high feature dimension of traditional HOG feature leads to plenty of memory resources and long runtime in practical applications, a classical dimension reduction method called principal component analysis (PCA) is used to reduce the dimension of high-dimensional HOG descriptor. Because of that, computational speed is increased greatly, and the accuracy of detection can be controlled in a proper range at the same time. Thirdly, support vector machine (SVM) classifier is trained with PCA-HOG symmetrical features proposed above. At last, practical tissue images is detected and analyzed by SVM classifier. In order to verify the effectiveness of this new algorithm, it is practically applied to conduct diseased cell detection which takes 200 pieces of H&E (hematoxylin & eosin) high resolution staining histopathological images collected from 20 breast cancer patients as a sample. The experiment shows that the average processing rate can be 25 frames per second and the detection accuracy can be 92.1%.

  4. Conceptual Change in the Undergraduate Biology Teaching Laboratory: A "Type Specimen" Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Dorothy A.; Eichinger, David C.

    This paper introduces the biology laboratory as a learning project. Biology laboratories provide unique learning opportunities to students as traditional achievement outcome measures, and play an important role in the development of process skills, manual skills, and attitudes. However, there is insufficient data on undergraduate students majoring…

  5. The Next Generation of Synthetic Biology Chassis: Moving Synthetic Biology from the Laboratory to the Field.

    PubMed

    Adams, Bryn L

    2016-12-16

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) has played a pivotal role in the development of genetics and molecular biology as scientific fields. It is therefore not surprising that synthetic biology (SB) was built upon E. coli and continues to dominate the field. However, scientific capabilities have advanced from simple gene mutations to the insertion of rationally designed, complex synthetic circuits and creation of entirely synthetic genomes. The point is rapidly approaching where E. coli is no longer an adequate host for the increasingly sophisticated genetic designs of SB. It is time to develop the next generation of SB chassis; robust organisms that can provide the advanced physiology novel synthetic circuits will require to move SB from the laboratory into fieldable technologies. This can be accomplished by developing chassis-specific genetic toolkits that are as extensive as those for E. coli. However, the holy grail of SB would be the development of a universal toolkit that can be ported into any chassis. This viewpoint article underscores the need for new bacterial chassis, as well as discusses some of the important considerations in their selection. It also highlights a few examples of robust, tractable bacterial species that can meet the demands of tomorrow's state-of-the-art in SB. Significant advances have been made in the first 15 years since this field has emerged. However, the advances over the next 15 years will occur not in laboratory organisms, but in fieldable species where the potential of SB can be fully realized in game changing technology.

  6. THE NATURE AND EXTENT OF LABORATORY INSTRUCTION IN SELECTED MODERN HIGH SCHOOL BIOLOGY CLASSES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BARNES, LEHMAN WILDER, JR.

    ANALYZED WAS THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE DEGREE TO WHICH LABORATORY ACTIVITIES CONFORMED TO LABORATORY ACTIVITIES RECOMMENDED BY BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES CURRICULUM STUDY (BSCS) AND THREE SPECIFIC VARIABLES WHICH WERE (1) AVAILABLE LABORATORY FACILITIES, (2) ACCEPTANCE OF BSCS OBJECTIVES, AND (3) CLASS GAIN IN THE UNDERSTANDING OF SCIENCE. DATA WERE…

  7. Implementation of a project-based molecular biology laboratory emphasizing protein structure-function relationships in a large introductory biology laboratory course.

    PubMed

    Treacy, Daniel J; Sankaran, Saumya M; Gordon-Messer, Susannah; Saly, Danielle; Miller, Rebecca; Isaac, Stefan R; Kosinski-Collins, Melissa S

    2011-01-01

    In introductory laboratory courses, many universities are turning from traditional laboratories with predictable outcomes to inquiry-inspired, project-based laboratory curricula. In these labs, students are allowed to design at least some portion of their own experiment and interpret new, undiscovered data. We have redesigned the introductory biology laboratory course at Brandeis University into a semester-long project-based laboratory that emphasizes concepts and contains an element of scientific inquiry. In this laboratory, students perform a site-directed mutagenesis experiment on the gene encoding human γD crystallin, a human eye lens protein implicated in cataracts, and assess the stability of their newly created protein with respect to wild-type crystallin. This laboratory utilizes basic techniques in molecular biology to emphasize the importance of connections between DNA and protein. This project lab has helped engage students in their own learning, has improved students' skills in critical thinking and analysis, and has promoted interest in basic research in biology.

  8. Biology of Triatoma sherlocki (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) Under Laboratory Conditions: Biological Cycle and Resistance to Starvation.

    PubMed

    Lima-Neiva, Vanessa; Gonçalves, Teresa C M; Bastos, Leonardo S; Gumiel, Marcia; Correia, Nathália C; Silva, Catia C; Almeida, Carlos E; Costa, Jane

    2017-07-01

    Triatoma sherlocki Papa, Jurberg, Carcavallo, Cerqueira & Barata was described in 2002, based on specimens caught in the wild in the municipality of Gentio do Ouro, Bahia, Brazil. In 2009, nymphs and adults were detected inside homes and sylvatic specimens were positive for Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas). No information on the bionomics of T. sherlocki exists, although such data are considered essential to estimate its vector and colonization potential in domestic environments. Herein, the biological cycle of T. sherlocki was studied based on 123 eggs, with nymphs and adults fed on Mus musculus (Linnaeus). Nymphal development time phases, number of meals consumed, and stage-specific mortality rates were analyzed. Survival time under starvation conditions was measured between ecdysis and death among 50 nymphs (first to fifth instar) and 50 male and female adults. The median development time from egg to adult was 621.0 (CI: 489-656) d. The number of meals consumed ranged from 1 to 20 for nymphs of the first to fifth instar. The fifth instar showed the greatest resistance to starvation, with a mean of 156.5 d. The high number of meals consumed by T. sherlocki favored infection with and transmission of T. cruzi. The full development of this species under laboratory conditions with a low mortality rate indicates that this vector presents biological characteristics that may contribute to its adaptation to artificial human ecotopes. Its high resistance to starvation emphasizes the importance of entomological surveillance for this species. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. The mitogen-activated protein kinase homolog HOG1 gene controls glycerol accumulation in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    San José, C; Monge, R A; Pérez-Díaz, R; Pla, J; Nombela, C

    1996-01-01

    The Candida albicans HOG1 gene (HOG1CA) was cloned by functional complementation of the osmosensitive phenotype associated with Saccharomyces cerevisiae hog1 delta mutants. HOG1CA codes for a 377-amino-acid protein, 78% identical to S. cerevisiae Hog1p. A C. albicans hog1 null mutant was found to be sensitive to osmotic stress and failed to accumulate glycerol on high-osmolarity media. PMID:8824643

  10. Serosurvey of leptospirosis in feral hogs (Sus scrofa) in Florida.

    PubMed

    Chatfield, Jenifer; Milleson, Michael; Stoddard, Robyn; Bui, Duy M; Galloway, Renee

    2013-06-01

    Leptospira is a global pathogen of emerging public health importance in both developing and industrialized nations and can infect almost all mammalian species, including humans. As suburbanization and the popularity of outdoor recreational activities increases, so do human-wildlife and companion animal-wildlife interfaces. Florida offers a tropical climate favorable for outdoor activities and a semirural landscape that sustains an abundant feral hog population. Because no survey ofleptospirosis in feral hogs (Sus scrofa) in Florida has been published to our knowledge, we sought to establish preliminary seroprevalence ofleptospirosis exposure in feral hogs in Florida. Blood samples were collected opportunistically from 158 male and 166 female feral hogs taken at managed hunts and by permitted trappers in the northern, central, and southern regions of Florida. Samples were then analyzed using the microscopic agglutination test (MAT) for antibody titers to 20 Leptospira serovars representing 17 serogroups. A titer of > 1:100 was considered positive; 33% (107/324 total samples) were positive to at least one serovar, and 46% of those were positive to multiple serovars. Antibodies to L. interrogans serovar Bratislava strain Jez Bratislava (serogroup Australis) was the most common, with 18% (58/324) testing positive for antibodies. These initial data indicate that there is a significant possibility of feral hogs having a larger role in the complex etiology of leptospirosis in Florida than historically estimated and that further investigation is warranted.

  11. IHR (2005) Compliance: Laboratory Capacities and Biological Risks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    compile guidance for infection prevention and control measures.11 This guidance includes transmission -based precautions for diseases such as...for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); protocols published by laboratory credentialing organizations; and protocols published by professional...International Development and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ) who participated in the Maputo consensus process also developed detailed

  12. What High School Students Learn during Internships in Biology Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Wolff-Michael; van Eijck, Michiel; Hsu, Pei-Ling; Marshall, Anne; Mazumder, Asit

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on the results of the authors' research and development work that was designed to study the impact of internships in scientific laboratories on high school students. The authors sketch how the internships affected cognitive outcomes, experiences and attitudes, and the career aspirations of the high school students. The…

  13. Introduction to Biological Research: A Laboratory Course in Microbiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley, Aimee M.; Cardozo, David Lopes

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the authors describe their development of an introductory laboratory course in microbiology that is geared towards students in grades 8-10. The course was developed as part of the Mentoring for Science Program at Harvard Medical School, an outreach program created by the Minority Faculty Development Program, directed towards…

  14. Introduction to Biological Research: A Laboratory Course in Microbiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley, Aimee M.; Cardozo, David Lopes

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the authors describe their development of an introductory laboratory course in microbiology that is geared towards students in grades 8-10. The course was developed as part of the Mentoring for Science Program at Harvard Medical School, an outreach program created by the Minority Faculty Development Program, directed towards…

  15. Optimiziing the laboratory monitoring of biological wastewater-purification systems

    SciTech Connect

    S.V. Gerasimov

    2009-05-15

    Optimization of the laboratory monitoring of biochemical wastewater-treatment systems at coke plants is considered, for the example of OAO Koks. By adopting a methodological approach to determine the necessary data from chemical analysis, it is possible to reduce the time, labor, and materials required for monitoring, without impairing the purification process or compromising the plant's environmental policies.

  16. Oversight of High-Containment Biological Laboratories: Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-27

    conducted at BSL-1. Those that may cause disease in healthy humans, but for which immunization or antibiotic treatment is available, should be conducted at...western equine encephalitis, and yellow fever. Some of the pathogens that cause these diseases have been considered as biological weapons.104

  17. Oversight of High-Containment Biological Laboratories: Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-04

    at BSL-1. Those that may cause disease in healthy humans, but for which immunization or antibiotic treatment is available, should be conducted at BSL... equine encephalitis, and yellow fever. Some of the pathogens that cause these diseases have been considered as biological weapons.104 Expanding the number

  18. Biology Laboratory Construction Kit with Intelligent Tutor. Final Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Nils S.; And Others

    This project developed a new kind of computer simulation and explored its impact on teaching and learning in introductory biology. The aims of the project were to: (1) develop a flexible simulation environment that would permit students to design, build, and test realistic simulations; (2) support student experimentation with intelligent tutoring…

  19. Exposure to hazardous substances in a standard molecular biology laboratory environment: evaluation of exposures in IARC laboratories.

    PubMed

    Chapot, Brigitte; Secretan, Béatrice; Robert, Annie; Hainaut, Pierre

    2009-07-01

    Working in a molecular biology laboratory environment implies regular exposure to a wide range of hazardous substances. Several recent studies have shown that laboratory workers may have an elevated risk of certain cancers. Data on the nature and frequency of exposures in such settings are scanty. The frequency of use of 163 agents by staff working in molecular biology laboratories was evaluated over a period of 4 years by self-administered questionnaire. Of the agents listed, ethanol was used by the largest proportion of staff (70%), followed by ethidium bromide (55%). Individual patterns of use showed three patterns, namely (i) frequent use of a narrow range of products, (ii) occasional use of a wide range of products, and (iii) frequent and occasional use of an intermediate range of products. Among known or suspected carcinogens (International Agency for Research on Cancer Group 1 and 2A, respectively), those most frequently used included formaldehyde (17%), oncogenic viruses (4%), and acrylamide (32%). The type of exposure encountered in research laboratories is extremely diverse. Few carcinogenic agents are used frequently but many laboratory workers may be exposed occasionally to known human carcinogens. In addition, many of the chemicals handled by staff represent a health hazard. The results enabled the staff physician to develop an individual approach to medical surveillance and to draw a personal history of occupational exposures for laboratory staff.

  20. Determination of Rate Constants for Ouabain Inhibition of Adenosine Triphosphatase: An Undergraduate Biological Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sall, Eri; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate biological chemistry laboratory experiment which provides students with an example of pseudo-first-order kinetics with the cardiac glycoside inhibition of mammalism sodium and potassium transport. (SL)

  1. Demonstrations of Extraterrestrial Life Detection Techniques in the High School Biology Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltinski, Ronald

    1969-01-01

    Discusses the experimental procedures and equipment for exobiology projects at the high school level. An interdisciplinary approach involving electronic equipment and micro-biological laboratory techniques is used. Photographs and diagrams of equipment are included. Bibliography. (LC)

  2. Determination of Rate Constants for Ouabain Inhibition of Adenosine Triphosphatase: An Undergraduate Biological Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sall, Eri; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate biological chemistry laboratory experiment which provides students with an example of pseudo-first-order kinetics with the cardiac glycoside inhibition of mammalism sodium and potassium transport. (SL)

  3. Demonstrations of Extraterrestrial Life Detection Techniques in the High School Biology Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltinski, Ronald

    1969-01-01

    Discusses the experimental procedures and equipment for exobiology projects at the high school level. An interdisciplinary approach involving electronic equipment and micro-biological laboratory techniques is used. Photographs and diagrams of equipment are included. Bibliography. (LC)

  4. Practicing Real Science in the Laboratory: A Project-Based Approach to Teaching Molecular Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wimmers, Larry E.

    2001-01-01

    Describes a molecular biology laboratory in which students study the role of the enzyme polygalacturonase in the softening of tomatoes during ripening by developing their own hypotheses and designing their own experiments. (MM)

  5. Human Impairment from Living near Confined Animal (Hog) Feeding Operations

    PubMed Central

    Kilburn, Kaye H.

    2012-01-01

    Problem. To determine whether neighbors around manure lagoons and massive hog confinement buildings who complained of offensive odors and symptoms had impaired brain and lung functions. Method. We compared near hog manure neighbors of lagoons to people living beyond 3 kilometers in Ohio and to unexposed people controls in a nearby state for neurophysiological, cognitive, recall and memory functions, and pulmonary performance. Results. The 25 exposed subjects averaged 4.3 neurobehavioral abnormalities, significantly different from 2.5 for local controls and 2.3 for Tennessee controls. Exposed subjects mean forced vital capacity and expiratory volume in 1 sec were reduced significantly compared to local and regional controls. Conclusions. Near neighbors of hog enclosures and manure lagoon gases had impaired neurobehavioral functions and pulmonary functions and these effects extended to nearby people thought to be controls. Hydrogen sulfide must be abated because people living near lagoons cannot avoid rotten egg gas. PMID:22496706

  6. Inter-relationship among laboratory process skills in biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamir, Pinchas; Amir, Ruth

    Inquiry oriented practical matriculation tests of 3650 12th grade biology students in Israel were analyzed to find out the interrelationships among 21 process skills. Using correlations and varimax factor analysis, seven factors were obtained. These factors are listed according to the relative percentage of the total variance accounted for from highest to lowest: handling quantitative relationships, explaining and assessing data, conceptualizing and planning investigations, summarizing results, interpreting and concluding, selecting form of presenting findings, designing experiments.The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are briefly discussed. Theoretically, the associations as well as the dissociations identified provide important clues regarding the organization of process skills related knowledge in cognitive structure. From a practical perspective the findings offer guidance for teacher educators as well as biology teachers on more effective ways for developing science process skills.

  7. Observations of DNA transfer within an operational Forensic Biology Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Duncan; Abarno, Damien; Rowe, Emily; Rask-Nielsen, Lauren

    2016-07-01

    Advances in technology to both generate and interpret DNA profiles has seen the expansion of the ability to provide opinions about results obtained from very low levels of starting biological material. The response in court has been to question the mode by which the DNA came to be on an item, rather than questioning its presence. This brings into play a number of real-world aspects such as transfer of biological material, persistence of biological material on items, shedding ability of individuals, just to name a few. There have been a number of studies that investigate different aspects relating the mode of DNA deposition and transfer, mostly under tightly controlled conditions. We add to this knowledge pool by investigating the extent to which individuals at Forensic Science SA (FSSA) deposit their DNA on objects throughout the floor of the building where DNA examinations take place. We find that the results obtained in our minimally controlled study allow us to comment on a number of published concepts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 9 CFR 309.5 - Swine; disposal because of hog cholera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Swine; disposal because of hog cholera... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION ANTE-MORTEM INSPECTION § 309.5 Swine; disposal because of hog cholera. (a) All swine found by an inspector to be affected with hog cholera shall be identified as U.S. Condemned and...

  9. 9 CFR 309.5 - Swine; disposal because of hog cholera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Swine; disposal because of hog cholera... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION ANTE-MORTEM INSPECTION § 309.5 Swine; disposal because of hog cholera. (a) All swine found by an inspector to be affected with hog cholera shall be identified as U.S. Condemned and...

  10. 9 CFR 309.5 - Swine; disposal because of hog cholera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Swine; disposal because of hog cholera... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION ANTE-MORTEM INSPECTION § 309.5 Swine; disposal because of hog cholera. (a) All swine found by an inspector to be affected with hog cholera shall be identified as U.S. Condemned and...

  11. 9 CFR 309.5 - Swine; disposal because of hog cholera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Swine; disposal because of hog cholera... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION ANTE-MORTEM INSPECTION § 309.5 Swine; disposal because of hog cholera. (a) All swine found by an inspector to be affected with hog cholera shall be identified as U.S. Condemned and...

  12. 9 CFR 311.22 - Hogs affected with urticaria, tinea tonsurans, demodex follicurlorum, or erythema.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hogs affected with urticaria, tinea... OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.22 Hogs affected with urticaria, tinea tonsurans, demodex follicurlorum, or erythema. Carcasses of hogs affected with urticaria (nettle rash), tinea tonsurans,...

  13. 9 CFR 309.5 - Swine; disposal because of hog cholera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Swine; disposal because of hog cholera... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION ANTE-MORTEM INSPECTION § 309.5 Swine; disposal because of hog cholera. (a) All swine found by an inspector to be affected with hog cholera shall be identified as U.S. Condemned...

  14. Environmental Inequity: An Analysis of Large-Scale Hog Operations in 17 States, 1982-1997

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stretesky, Paul B.; Johnston, Janis E.; Arney, Jeremy

    2003-01-01

    This study extends ideas of environmental equity to large-scale hog operations. We investigate counties in 17 hog producing states to determine whether large-scale hog operations are more likely to be sited and expanded in areas that have a disproportionate number of Black, Hispanic, and/or economically disadvantaged residents. The data for this…

  15. Basic Laboratory Techniques for Students of Biology and Small Animal Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoen, Jerome; Berman, Paul

    This document provides descriptions of lessons, activities, and laboratory experiments to be used in a course on basic laboratory techniques for students in biology and small animal care. These learning experiences are designed to be completed during one class period daily for approximately 70 days per semester. (It is assumed that this would…

  16. Basic Laboratory Techniques for Students of Biology and Small Animal Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoen, Jerome; Berman, Paul

    This document provides descriptions of lessons, activities, and laboratory experiments to be used in a course on basic laboratory techniques for students in biology and small animal care. These learning experiences are designed to be completed during one class period daily for approximately 70 days per semester. (It is assumed that this would…

  17. Laboratory Experiences in Marine Biology for Upper Elementary and Secondary School Grades, Teachers Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raimist, Roger J.

    Designed to assist the teacher who wishes to use marine organisms for biological laboratory investigations, this manual includes general information on maintaining marine aquaria and collecting marine organisms as well as five tested laboratory exercises. The exercises deal with the measurement of oxygen consumption (giving techniques for…

  18. Multiweek Cell Culture Project for Use in Upper-Level Biology Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marion, Rebecca E.; Gardner, Grant E.; Parks, Lisa D.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a laboratory protocol for a multiweek project piloted in a new upper-level biology laboratory (BIO 426) using cell culture techniques. Human embryonic kidney-293 cells were used, and several culture media and supplements were identified for students to design their own experiments. Treatments included amino acids, EGF,…

  19. Redefining Authentic Research Experiences in Introductory Biology Laboratories and Barriers to Their Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spell, Rachelle M.; Guinan, Judith A.; Miller, Kristen R.; Beck, Christopher W.

    2014-01-01

    Incorporating authentic research experiences in introductory biology laboratory classes would greatly expand the number of students exposed to the excitement of discovery and the rigor of the scientific process. However, the essential components of an authentic research experience and the barriers to their implementation in laboratory classes are…

  20. Multiweek Cell Culture Project for Use in Upper-Level Biology Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marion, Rebecca E.; Gardner, Grant E.; Parks, Lisa D.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a laboratory protocol for a multiweek project piloted in a new upper-level biology laboratory (BIO 426) using cell culture techniques. Human embryonic kidney-293 cells were used, and several culture media and supplements were identified for students to design their own experiments. Treatments included amino acids, EGF,…

  1. Redefining Authentic Research Experiences in Introductory Biology Laboratories and Barriers to Their Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spell, Rachelle M.; Guinan, Judith A.; Miller, Kristen R.; Beck, Christopher W.

    2014-01-01

    Incorporating authentic research experiences in introductory biology laboratory classes would greatly expand the number of students exposed to the excitement of discovery and the rigor of the scientific process. However, the essential components of an authentic research experience and the barriers to their implementation in laboratory classes are…

  2. Responses of Florida panthers to recreational deer and hog hunting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Janis, Michael W.; Clark, Joseph D.

    2002-01-01

    Big Cypress National Preserve constitutes approximately one-third of the range of the endangered Florida panther (Puma concolor coryi). Because recreational hunting is allowed in Big Cypress National Preserve, we examined 8 response variables (activity rates, movement rates, predation success, home-range size, home-range shifts, proximity to off-road vehicle trails, use of areas with concentrated human activity, and habitat selection) to evaluate how Florida panthers respond to human activity associated with deer and hog hunting. Data consisted of panther radiolocations collected since 1981 by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the National Park Service, which we augmented with radiolocations and activity monitoring from 1994 to 1998. A split-plot (treatment and control) study design with repeated measures of the variables for each panther taken before, during, and after the hunting season was used. We did not detect responses to hunting for variables most directly related to panther energy intake or expenditure (i.e., activity rates, movement rates, predation success of females; P>0.10). However, panthers reduced their use of Bear Island (P=0.021), an area of concentrated human activity, and were found farther from off-road vehicle trails (P≤0.001) during the hunting season, which was indicative of a reaction to human disturbance. Whereas the reaction to human activity on off-road vehicle trails probably has minor biological implications and may be linked to prey behavior, the decreased use of Bear Island is most likely a direct reaction to human activity and resulted in increased use of adjacent private lands. Future habitat loss on those private lands could exacerbate the negative consequences of this response by panthers.

  3. [Biological aspects of Blatella germanica (Dictyoptera: Blattellidae) in laboratory conditions].

    PubMed

    Aguilera, L; Marquetti, M C; Fuentes, O; Navarro, A

    1996-01-01

    In a study of Blatella germanica (L) 1767 (Dictyoptera: Blattellidae) carried out in laboratory conditions, 6 nymphal stages were found in a period of 114.71 days, at 29 +/- 1 degrees C and 80-90% of relative humidity. Times of appearence and eclosion of every ovipositted ootheca, as well as the offspring average of each one, were determined. Females ovipositted up to 5 oothecas during their life. The maximum average of eggs found per ootheca was 29.22. The average longevity of males was lower that that of females (77.23 and 98.40 days, respectively) (t = 2.21; p < 0.05).

  4. A Curriculum Skills Matrix for Development and Assessment of Undergraduate Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Laboratory Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Benjamin; Rohlman, Christopher; Benore-Parsons, Marilee

    2004-01-01

    We have designed a skills matrix to be used for developing and assessing undergraduate biochemistry and molecular biology laboratory curricula. We prepared the skills matrix for the Project Kaleidoscope Summer Institute workshop in Snowbird, Utah (July 2001) to help current and developing undergraduate biochemistry and molecular biology program…

  5. Student Perceptions of the Cell Biology Laboratory Learning Environment in Four Undergraduate Science Courses in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Juan, Joaquin; Pérez-Cañaveras, Rosa M.; Segovia, Yolanda; Girela, Jose Luis; Martínez-Ruiz, Noemi; Romero-Rameta, Alejandro; Gómez-Torres, Maria José; Vizcaya-Moreno, M. Flores

    2016-01-01

    Cell biology is an academic discipline that organises and coordinates the learning of the structure, function and molecular composition of cells in some undergraduate biomedical programs. Besides course content and teaching methodologies, the laboratory environment is considered a key element in the teaching of and learning of cell biology. The…

  6. A Curriculum Skills Matrix for Development and Assessment of Undergraduate Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Laboratory Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Benjamin; Rohlman, Christopher; Benore-Parsons, Marilee

    2004-01-01

    We have designed a skills matrix to be used for developing and assessing undergraduate biochemistry and molecular biology laboratory curricula. We prepared the skills matrix for the Project Kaleidoscope Summer Institute workshop in Snowbird, Utah (July 2001) to help current and developing undergraduate biochemistry and molecular biology program…

  7. Individualizing Instruction in Large Undergraduate Biology Laboratories. II. Computers and Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norberg, Ann Marie

    1975-01-01

    Describes the following uses of computers in college biology laboratories: (1) to organize and analyze research data and (2) to simulate biological systems. Also being developed are computer simulations to systematically prepare students for independent investigations. (See also SE 515 092.) (LS)

  8. Student Perceptions of the Cell Biology Laboratory Learning Environment in Four Undergraduate Science Courses in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Juan, Joaquin; Pérez-Cañaveras, Rosa M.; Segovia, Yolanda; Girela, Jose Luis; Martínez-Ruiz, Noemi; Romero-Rameta, Alejandro; Gómez-Torres, Maria José; Vizcaya-Moreno, M. Flores

    2016-01-01

    Cell biology is an academic discipline that organises and coordinates the learning of the structure, function and molecular composition of cells in some undergraduate biomedical programs. Besides course content and teaching methodologies, the laboratory environment is considered a key element in the teaching of and learning of cell biology. The…

  9. Restructuring Laboratory Worksheets for Junior High School Biology Students in the Heterogeneous Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witenoff, Shalamit; Lazarowitz, Reuven

    1993-01-01

    Presents samples of educational material adapted for laboratory use on the subject of the pH scale, dilution skills, and their relevance to biology. The experiments were developed for use in both ninth-grade heterogeneous and tracked classes in biology. Students were assessed for academic achievement in relation to their operational reasoning…

  10. Introducing Mammalian Cell Culture and Cell Viability Techniques in the Undergraduate Biology Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Bowey-Dellinger, Kristen; Dixon, Luke; Ackerman, Kristin; Vigueira, Cynthia; Suh, Yewseok K; Lyda, Todd; Sapp, Kelli; Grider, Michael; Crater, Dinene; Russell, Travis; Elias, Michael; Coffield, V McNeil; Segarra, Verónica A

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate students learn about mammalian cell culture applications in introductory biology courses. However, laboratory modules are rarely designed to provide hands-on experience with mammalian cells or teach cell culture techniques, such as trypsinization and cell counting. Students are more likely to learn about cell culture using bacteria or yeast, as they are typically easier to grow, culture, and manipulate given the equipment, tools, and environment of most undergraduate biology laboratories. In contrast, the utilization of mammalian cells requires a dedicated biological safety cabinet and rigorous antiseptic techniques. For this reason, we have devised a laboratory module and method herein that familiarizes students with common cell culture procedures, without the use of a sterile hood or large cell culture facility. Students design and perform a time-efficient inquiry-based cell viability experiment using HeLa cells and tools that are readily available in an undergraduate biology laboratory. Students will become familiar with common techniques such as trypsinizing cells, cell counting with a hemocytometer, performing serial dilutions, and determining cell viability using trypan blue dye. Additionally, students will work with graphing software to analyze their data and think critically about the mechanism of death on a cellular level. Two different adaptations of this inquiry-based lab are presented-one for non-biology majors and one for biology majors. Overall, these laboratories aim to expose students to mammalian cell culture and basic techniques and help them to conceptualize their application in scientific research.

  11. Introducing Mammalian Cell Culture and Cell Viability Techniques in the Undergraduate Biology Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Bowey-Dellinger, Kristen; Dixon, Luke; Ackerman, Kristin; Vigueira, Cynthia; Suh, Yewseok K.; Lyda, Todd; Sapp, Kelli; Grider, Michael; Crater, Dinene; Russell, Travis; Elias, Michael; Coffield, V. McNeil; Segarra, Verónica A.

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate students learn about mammalian cell culture applications in introductory biology courses. However, laboratory modules are rarely designed to provide hands-on experience with mammalian cells or teach cell culture techniques, such as trypsinization and cell counting. Students are more likely to learn about cell culture using bacteria or yeast, as they are typically easier to grow, culture, and manipulate given the equipment, tools, and environment of most undergraduate biology laboratories. In contrast, the utilization of mammalian cells requires a dedicated biological safety cabinet and rigorous antiseptic techniques. For this reason, we have devised a laboratory module and method herein that familiarizes students with common cell culture procedures, without the use of a sterile hood or large cell culture facility. Students design and perform a time-efficient inquiry-based cell viability experiment using HeLa cells and tools that are readily available in an undergraduate biology laboratory. Students will become familiar with common techniques such as trypsinizing cells, cell counting with a hemocytometer, performing serial dilutions, and determining cell viability using trypan blue dye. Additionally, students will work with graphing software to analyze their data and think critically about the mechanism of death on a cellular level. Two different adaptations of this inquiry-based lab are presented—one for non-biology majors and one for biology majors. Overall, these laboratories aim to expose students to mammalian cell culture and basic techniques and help them to conceptualize their application in scientific research. PMID:28861134

  12. 7. CONVEYOR DISCHARGE IN HOG HAIR PROCESSING AREA, NORTHWEST CORNER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. CONVEYOR DISCHARGE IN HOG HAIR PROCESSING AREA, NORTHWEST CORNER OF LEVEL 2; HAIR WAS TRANSPORTED BY CONVEYOR FROM BUILDING 40, THEN WASHED, DRIED AND BALED IN BUILDING 148 - Rath Packing Company, Grease Interceptor Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  13. ADVANCED HETEROGENEOUS REBURN FUEL FROM COAL AND HOG MANURE

    SciTech Connect

    Melanie D. Jensen; Ronald C. Timpe; Jason D. Laumb

    2003-09-01

    This study was performed to investigate whether the nitrogen content inherent in hog manure and alkali used as a catalyst during processing could be combined with coal to produce a reburn fuel that would result in advanced reburning NO{sub x} control without the addition of either alkali or ammonia/urea. Fresh hog manure was processed in a cold-charge, 1-gal, batch autoclave system at 275 C under a reducing atmosphere in the presence of an alkali catalyst. Instead of the expected organic liquid, the resulting product was a waxy solid material. The waxy nature of the material made size reduction and feeding difficult as the material agglomerated and tended to melt, plugging the feeder. The material was eventually broken up and sized manually and a water-cooled feeder was designed and fabricated. Two reburn tests were performed in a pilot-scale combustor. The first test evaluated a reburn fuel mixture comprising lignite and air-dried, raw hog manure. The second test evaluated a reburn fuel mixture made of lignite and the processed hog manure. Neither reburn fuel reduced NO{sub x} levels in the combustor flue gas. Increased slagging and ash deposition were observed during both reburn tests. The material-handling and ash-fouling issues encountered during this study indicate that the use of waste-based reburn fuels could pose practical difficulties in implementation on a larger scale.

  14. The status of electronic laboratory notebooks for chemistry and biology.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Keith T

    2006-05-01

    Documenting an experiment in a way that ensures that the record can act as evidence to support a patent claim or to demonstrate compliance with the US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) predicate rules, puts demands on an electronic laboratory notebook (ELN) that are not trivial. The 1996 General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) allowed notebook records that were generated outside of the US to be used to claim precedence in US patent claims. This agreement spurred interest in the development of ELNs in Europe. The pharmaceutical research process became dependent on computer systems during the latter part of the 1990s, and this also led to a wider interest in ELNs. More recently, the FDA began to encourage submissions in an all-electronic form, leading to great interest in the use of ELNs in development and manufacturing. As a result of these influences, the pharmaceutical industry is now actively pursuing ELN evaluations and implementations. This article describes some of the early efforts and the recent drivers for ELN adoption. The state of the ELN market in 2005 is also described.

  15. Biological and photochemical degradation of cytostatic drugs under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Franquet-Griell, Helena; Medina, Andrés; Sans, Carme; Lacorte, Silvia

    2017-02-05

    Cytostatic drugs, used in chemotherapy, have emerged as new environmental contaminants due to their recurrent presence in surface waters and genotoxic effects. Yet, their degradability and environmental fate is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the degradation kinetics of 16 cytostatic drugs, prioritized according to their usage and occurrence in hospital and wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) effluents, through the following laboratory scale processes: hydrolysis, aerobic biodegradation, UV-C photolysis, UV-C/H2O2 and simulated solar radiation. Some drugs were unstable in milli-Q water (vincristine, vinblastine, daunorubicin, doxorubicin and irinotecan); others were photodegraded under UV-C light (melphalan and etoposide) but some others were found to be recalcitrant to biodegradation and/or UV-C, making necessary the use of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) such as UV-C/H2O2 for complete elimination (cytarabine, ifosfamide and cyclophosphamide). Finally, radiation in a solar box was used to simulate the fate of cytostatic drugs in surface waters under natural radiation and complete removal was not observed for any drug. The degradation process was monitored using liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry and pseudo-first order kinetic degradation constants were calculated. This study provides new data on the degradability of cytostatic compounds in water, thus contributing to the existing knowledge on their fate and risk in the environment.

  16. Generation of data on within-subject biological variation in laboratory medicine: An update.

    PubMed

    Braga, Federica; Panteghini, Mauro

    2016-10-01

    In recent decades, the study of biological variation of laboratory analytes has received increased attention. The reasons for this interest are related to the potential practical applications of such knowledge. Biological variation data allow the derivation of important parameters for the interpretation and use of laboratory tests, such as the index of individuality for the evaluation of the utility of population reference intervals for the test interpretation, the estimate of significant change in a timed series of results of an individual, the number of specimens required to obtain an accurate estimate of the homeostatic set point of the analyte and analytical performance specifications that assays should fulfill for their application in the clinical setting. It is, therefore, essential to experimentally derive biological variation information in an accurate and reliable way. Currently, a dated guideline for the biological variation data production and a more recent checklist to assist in the correct preparation of publications related to biological variation studies are available. Here, we update and integrate, with examples, the available guideline for biological variation data production to help researchers to comply with the recommendations of the checklist for drafting manuscripts on biological variation. Particularly, we focus on the distribution of the data, an essential aspect to be considered for the derivation of biological variation data. Indeed, the difficulty in deriving reliable estimates of biological variation for those analytes, the measured concentrations of which are not normally distributed, is more and more evident.

  17. Leaf LIMS: A Flexible Laboratory Information Management System with a Synthetic Biology Focus.

    PubMed

    Craig, Thomas; Holland, Richard; D'Amore, Rosalinda; Johnson, James R; McCue, Hannah V; West, Anthony; Zulkower, Valentin; Tekotte, Hille; Cai, Yizhi; Swan, Daniel; Davey, Robert P; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Hall, Anthony; Caddick, Mark

    2017-09-13

    This paper presents Leaf LIMS, a flexible laboratory information management system (LIMS) designed to address the complexity of synthetic biology workflows. At the project's inception there was a lack of a LIMS designed specifically to address synthetic biology processes, with most systems focused on either next generation sequencing or biobanks and clinical sample handling. Leaf LIMS implements integrated project, item, and laboratory stock tracking, offering complete sample and construct genealogy, materials and lot tracking, and modular assay data capture. Hence, it enables highly configurable task-based workflows and supports data capture from project inception to completion. As such, in addition to it supporting synthetic biology it is ideal for many laboratory environments with multiple projects and users. The system is deployed as a web application through Docker and is provided under a permissive MIT license. It is freely available for download at https://leaflims.github.io .

  18. Culturally relevant inquiry-based laboratory module implementations in upper-division genetics and cell biology teaching laboratories.

    PubMed

    Siritunga, Dimuth; Montero-Rojas, María; Carrero, Katherine; Toro, Gladys; Vélez, Ana; Carrero-Martínez, Franklin A

    2011-01-01

    Today, more minority students are entering undergraduate programs than ever before, but they earn only 6% of all science or engineering PhDs awarded in the United States. Many studies suggest that hands-on research activities enhance students' interest in pursuing a research career. In this paper, we present a model for the implementation of laboratory research in the undergraduate teaching laboratory using a culturally relevant approach to engage students. Laboratory modules were implemented in upper-division genetics and cell biology courses using cassava as the central theme. Students were asked to bring cassava samples from their respective towns, which allowed them to compare their field-collected samples against known lineages from agricultural stations at the end of the implementation. Assessment of content and learning perceptions revealed that our novel approach allowed students to learn while engaged in characterizing Puerto Rican cassava. In two semesters, based on the percentage of students who answered correctly in the premodule assessment for content knowledge, there was an overall improvement of 66% and 55% at the end in the genetics course and 24% and 15% in the cell biology course. Our proposed pedagogical model enhances students' professional competitiveness by providing students with valuable research skills as they work on a problem to which they can relate.

  19. Culturally Relevant Inquiry-Based Laboratory Module Implementations in Upper-Division Genetics and Cell Biology Teaching Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Siritunga, Dimuth; Montero-Rojas, María; Carrero, Katherine; Toro, Gladys; Vélez, Ana; Carrero-Martínez, Franklin A.

    2011-01-01

    Today, more minority students are entering undergraduate programs than ever before, but they earn only 6% of all science or engineering PhDs awarded in the United States. Many studies suggest that hands-on research activities enhance students’ interest in pursuing a research career. In this paper, we present a model for the implementation of laboratory research in the undergraduate teaching laboratory using a culturally relevant approach to engage students. Laboratory modules were implemented in upper-division genetics and cell biology courses using cassava as the central theme. Students were asked to bring cassava samples from their respective towns, which allowed them to compare their field-collected samples against known lineages from agricultural stations at the end of the implementation. Assessment of content and learning perceptions revealed that our novel approach allowed students to learn while engaged in characterizing Puerto Rican cassava. In two semesters, based on the percentage of students who answered correctly in the premodule assessment for content knowledge, there was an overall improvement of 66% and 55% at the end in the genetics course and 24% and 15% in the cell biology course. Our proposed pedagogical model enhances students’ professional competitiveness by providing students with valuable research skills as they work on a problem to which they can relate. PMID:21885825

  20. Practicing biology: Undergraduate laboratory research, persistence in science, and the impact of self-efficacy beliefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkes, Elizabeth

    As undergraduate laboratory research internships become more popular and universities devote considerable resources towards promoting them, it is important to clarify what students specifically gain through involvement in these experiences and it is important to understand their impact on the science pipeline. By examining recent findings describing the primary benefits of undergraduate research participation, along with self-efficacy theory, this study aims to provide more explanatory power to the anecdotal and descriptive accounts regarding the relationship between undergraduate research experiences and interest in continuing in science. Furthermore, this study characterizes practices that foster students' confidence in doing scientific work with detailed description and analysis of the interactions of researchers in a laboratory. Phase 1 of the study, a survey of undergraduate biology majors (n=71) at a major research university, investigates the relationships among participation in biology laboratory research internships, biology laboratory self-efficacy strength, and interest in persisting in science. Phase 2 of the study, a two-year investigation of a university biology research laboratory, investigates how scientific communities of practice develop self-efficacy beliefs. The findings suggest that participation in lab internships results in increased interest in continuing in life science/biology graduate school and careers. They also suggest that a significant proportion of that interest is related to the students' biology laboratory self-efficacy. The findings of this study point to two primary ways that undergraduate research participation might work to raise self-efficacy strength. First, university research laboratory communities can provide students with a variety of resources that scaffold them into biology laboratory mastery experiences. Second, university research laboratory communities can provide students with coping and mastery Discourse models

  1. Connecting biology and organic chemistry introductory laboratory courses through a collaborative research project.

    PubMed

    Boltax, Ariana L; Armanious, Stephanie; Kosinski-Collins, Melissa S; Pontrello, Jason K

    2015-01-01

    Modern research often requires collaboration of experts in fields, such as math, chemistry, biology, physics, and computer science to develop unique solutions to common problems. Traditional introductory undergraduate laboratory curricula in the sciences often do not emphasize connections possible between the various disciplines. We designed an interdisciplinary, medically relevant, project intended to help students see connections between chemistry and biology. Second term organic chemistry laboratory students designed and synthesized potential polymer inhibitors or inducers of polyglutamine protein aggregation. The use of novel target compounds added the uncertainty of scientific research to the project. Biology laboratory students then tested the novel potential pharmaceuticals in Huntington's disease model assays, using in vitro polyglutamine peptide aggregation and in vivo lethality studies in Drosophila. Students read articles from the primary literature describing the system from both chemical and biological perspectives. Assessment revealed that students emerged from both courses with a deeper understanding of the interdisciplinary nature of biology and chemistry and a heightened interest in basic research. The design of this collaborative project for introductory biology and organic chemistry labs demonstrated how the local interests and expertise at a university can be drawn from to create an effective way to integrate these introductory courses. Rather than simply presenting a series of experiments to be replicated, we hope that our efforts will inspire other scientists to think about how some aspect of authentic work can be brought into their own courses, and we also welcome additional collaborations to extend the scope of the scientific exploration.

  2. Assessing landowners' attitudes toward wild hogs and support for control options.

    PubMed

    Caplenor, Carlotta A; Poudyal, Neelam C; Muller, Lisa I; Yoest, Chuck

    2017-10-01

    Wild hogs (Sus scrofa) are an invasive species with destructive habits, particularly rooting and wallowing, which can directly impact agricultural crops, pasture land, and water quality. Considering wild hogs are widely dispersed across the landscape, they are extremely difficult to control. Disagreements can arise among different stakeholders over whether and how their populations should be managed. The purpose of this article was to examine Tennessee, United States landowners' attitudes toward wild hogs, to compare acceptability of control methods, and to evaluate factors significantly influencing public support for regulations to control wild hogs. Logistic regression was employed to analyze data collected from a statewide survey of rural landowners in the fall of 2015. Landowners had overwhelmingly negative attitudes towards wild hogs, and were concerned about their impact on the natural environment and rural economy. Although landowners showed support for controlling wild hogs, levels of acceptability for management options varied. Respondents favored active management and supported education and incentive-based control programs to control wild hogs. Cognitive concepts such as social and personal norms and awareness of consequences, as well as demographic characteristics, significantly predicted landowners' support for state regulations to control wild hogs in Tennessee. Findings increase our understanding of the human dimensions of wild hog management and that of other similarly invasive animals, and may guide resource managers in designing effective and socially acceptable management strategies to control wild hog populations in Tennessee and elsewhere. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Center for Regenerative Biology and Medicine at Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    biology. While this capacity is limited only to the very distal tips of digits in mammals, adult teolost fish and urodele amphibians have championed...tips of digits in mammals, adult teleost fish and urodele amphibians have championed regeneration of entire appendages. The key feature of appendage

  4. A comparison of student reactions to biology instruction by interactive videodisc or conventional laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, William H.

    This study was designed to learn if students perceived an interactive computer/videodisc learning system to represent a viable alternative to (or extension of) the conventional laboratory for learning biology skills and concepts normally taught under classroom laboratory conditions. Data were collected by questionnaire for introductory biology classes at a large midwestern university where students were randomly assigned to two interactive videodisc/computer lessons titled Respiration and Climate and Life or traditional laboratory investigation with the same titles and concepts. The interactive videodisc system consisted of a TRS-80 Model III microcomputer interfaced to a Pioneer laser-disc player and a color TV monitor. Students indicated an overall level satisfaction with this strategy very similar to that of conventional laboratory instruction. Students frequently remarked that videodisc instruction gave them more experimental and procedural options and more efficient use of instructional time than did the conventional laboratory mode. These two results are consistent with past CAI research. Students also had a strong perception that the images on the videodisc were not real and this factor was perceived as having both advantages and disadvantages. Students found the two approaches to be equivalent to conventional laboratory instruction in the areas of general interest, understanding of basic principles, help on examinations, and attitude toward science. The student-opinion data in this study do not suggest that interactive videodisc technology serve as a substitute to the wet laboratory experience, but that this medium may enrich the spectrum of educational experiences usually not possible in typical classroom settings.

  5. An experimental test of an extended discretion approach for high school biology laboratory investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, William H.; Cavana, Gordon R.; Lowery, Lawrence F.

    Discretion-the exercise of independent judgment-was observed to be lacking in most commercially available laboratory investigations for high school biology. An Extended Discretion (ED) laboratory approach was developed and tested experimentally against the BSCS Green Version laboratory program, using ten classes of 10th-grade biology in a suburban California high school. Five teachers were each assigned one experimental and one control group. The primary differences between the two approaches were that the BSCS was more prescriptive and directive than the ED approach and the ED approach increased discretionary demands upon the student over the school year. A treatment verification procedure showed statistically significant differences between the two approaches. The hypothesis under test was that when high school biology students are taught laboratory concepts under comparatively high discretionary demands, they would perform as well as or better than a similar group of students taught with BSCS Green Version investigations. A second hypothesis was that teachers would prefer to use the ED approach over the BSCS approach for their future classes. A t analysis between experimental and control groups for each teacher was employed. There were significant differences in favor of the ED group on laboratory report scores for three teachers and no differences for two teachers. There were significant differences in favor of the ED group on laboratory concepts quiz scores for three teachers, no differences for one teacher, and significant differences in favor of the BSCS group for only one teacher. A t analysis of teacher evaluation of the two approaches showed a significant teacher preference overall for the ED approach. Both experimental hypotheses were accepted. The ED approach was observed to be difficult for students at first, but it was found to be a workable and productive means of teaching laboratory concepts in biology which also required extensive use of individual

  6. Merging of Research and Teaching in Developmental Biology: Adaptation of Current Scientific Research Papers for Use in Undergraduate Laboratory Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, H. H.; and others

    1970-01-01

    Describes two laboratory exercises adopted from current research papers for use in an undergraduate developmental biology course. Gives methods, summary of student results, and student comments. Lists lecture topics, text and reprint assignments, and laboratory exercises for course. (EB)

  7. Integrating Internet Assignments into a Biochemistry/Molecular Biology Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaspar, Roger L.

    2002-01-01

    A main challenge in educating undergraduate students is to introduce them to the Internet and to teach them how to effectively use it in research. To this end, an Internet assignment was developed that introduces students to websites related to biomedical research at the beginning of a biochemistry/molecular biology laboratory course. The basic…

  8. Infusing Bioinformatics and Research-Like Experience into a Molecular Biology Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nogaj, Luiza A.

    2014-01-01

    A nine-week laboratory project designed for a sophomore level molecular biology course is described. Small groups of students (3-4 per group) choose a tumor suppressor gene (TSG) or an oncogene for this project. Each group researches the role of their TSG/oncogene from primary literature articles and uses bioinformatics engines to find the gene…

  9. Cloning Yeast Actin cDNA Leads to an Investigative Approach for the Molecular Biology Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Michael W.; Tuan, Alice; Jonasson, Erin

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of molecular tools in multiple disciplines has elevated the importance of undergraduate laboratory courses that train students in molecular biology techniques. Although it would also be desirable to provide students with opportunities to apply these techniques in an investigative manner, this is generally not possible in the…

  10. A Statistical Analysis of Student Questions in a Cell Biology Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeling, Elena L.; Polacek, Kelly M.; Ingram, Ella L.

    2009-01-01

    Asking questions is an essential component of the practice of science, but question-asking skills are often underemphasized in science education. In this study, we examined questions written by students as they prepared for laboratory exercises in a senior-level cell biology class. Our goals were to discover 1) what types of questions students…

  11. Connecting Biology and Organic Chemistry Introductory Laboratory Courses through a Collaborative Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boltax, Ariana L.; Armanious, Stephanie; Kosinski-Collins, Melissa S.; Pontrello, Jason K.

    2015-01-01

    Modern research often requires collaboration of experts in fields, such as math, chemistry, biology, physics, and computer science to develop unique solutions to common problems. Traditional introductory undergraduate laboratory curricula in the sciences often do not emphasize connections possible between the various disciplines. We designed an…

  12. Cloning Yeast Actin cDNA Leads to an Investigative Approach for the Molecular Biology Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Michael W.; Tuan, Alice; Jonasson, Erin

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of molecular tools in multiple disciplines has elevated the importance of undergraduate laboratory courses that train students in molecular biology techniques. Although it would also be desirable to provide students with opportunities to apply these techniques in an investigative manner, this is generally not possible in the…

  13. An Open-Ended Investigative Microbial Ecology Laboratory for Introductory Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones-Held, Susan; Paoletti, Robert; Glick, David; Held, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    In this article we describe a multi-week investigative laboratory in microbial ecology/diversity and nitrogen cycling that we have used in our introductory biology course. This module encourages active student involvement in experimental design, using the scientific literature and quantitative analysis of large data sets. Students analyze soil…

  14. What are undergraduates doing at biological field stations and marine laboratories?

    Treesearch

    Janet Hodder

    2009-01-01

    Biological field stations and marine laboratories (FSMLs) serve as places to study the natural environment in a variety of ways, from the level of the molecule to the globe. Undergraduate opportunities at FSMLs reflect the diversity of study options -- formal courses, research and service internships, and field-trip experiences -- and students are responding to those...

  15. Connecting Biology and Organic Chemistry Introductory Laboratory Courses through a Collaborative Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boltax, Ariana L.; Armanious, Stephanie; Kosinski-Collins, Melissa S.; Pontrello, Jason K.

    2015-01-01

    Modern research often requires collaboration of experts in fields, such as math, chemistry, biology, physics, and computer science to develop unique solutions to common problems. Traditional introductory undergraduate laboratory curricula in the sciences often do not emphasize connections possible between the various disciplines. We designed an…

  16. Inquiry-based Investigation in Biology Laboratories: Does Neem Provide Bioprotection against Bean Beetles?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Amy R.; Sale, Amanda Lovelace; Srivatsan, Malathi; Beck, Christopher W.; Blumer, Lawrence S.; Grippo, Anne A.

    2013-01-01

    We developed an inquiry-based biology laboratory exercise in which undergraduate students designed experiments addressing whether material from the neem tree ("Azadirachta indica") altered bean beetle ("Callosobruchus maculatus") movements and oviposition. Students were introduced to the bean beetle life cycle, experimental…

  17. Integrating Internet Assignments into a Biochemistry/Molecular Biology Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaspar, Roger L.

    2002-01-01

    A main challenge in educating undergraduate students is to introduce them to the Internet and to teach them how to effectively use it in research. To this end, an Internet assignment was developed that introduces students to websites related to biomedical research at the beginning of a biochemistry/molecular biology laboratory course. The basic…

  18. Biological assessment for the effluent reduction program, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, S.P.

    1996-08-01

    This report describes the biological assessment for the effluent recution program proposed to occur within the boundaries of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Potential effects on wetland plants and on threatened and endangered species are discussed, along with a detailed description of the individual outfalls resulting from the effluent reduction program.

  19. An Inquiry-Infused Introductory Biology Laboratory That Integrates Mendel's Pea Phenotypes with Molecular Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kudish, Philip; Schlag, Erin; Kaplinsky, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a multi-week laboratory in which college-level introductory biology students investigate Mendel's stem length phenotype in peas. Students collect, analyze and interpret convergent evidence from molecular and physiological techniques. In weeks 1 and 2, students treat control and experimental plants with Gibberellic Acid (GA) to…

  20. Glucose Transport in Cultured Animal Cells: An Exercise for the Undergraduate Cell Biology Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledbetter, Mary Lee S.; Lippert, Malcolm J.

    2002-01-01

    Membrane transport is a fundamental concept that undergraduate students of cell biology understand better with laboratory experience. Formal teaching exercises commonly used to illustrate this concept are unbiological, qualitative, or intricate and time consuming to prepare. We have developed an exercise that uses uptake of radiolabeled nutrient…

  1. Literacy Strategies Build Connections between Introductory Biology Laboratories and Lecture Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon, Lisa L.; Pegg, Jerine

    2012-01-01

    Content area literacy strategies, which support students in developing literacy skills and better understanding disciplinary concepts, are a promising approach to teaching science at the college level. In this study, we examined the effects of incorporating literacy strategies with laboratory sections in a General Biology course. In particular, we…

  2. Problem-Solving Inquiry-Oriented Biology Tasks Integrating Practical Laboratory and Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedler, Yael; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents results of a study that examines the development and use of computer simulations for high school science instruction and for integrated laboratory and computerized tests that are part of the biology matriculation examination in Israel. Eleven implications for teaching are presented. (MDH)

  3. A Statistical Analysis of Student Questions in a Cell Biology Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeling, Elena L.; Polacek, Kelly M.; Ingram, Ella L.

    2009-01-01

    Asking questions is an essential component of the practice of science, but question-asking skills are often underemphasized in science education. In this study, we examined questions written by students as they prepared for laboratory exercises in a senior-level cell biology class. Our goals were to discover 1) what types of questions students…

  4. Semester-Long Inquiry-Based Molecular Biology Laboratory: Transcriptional Regulation in Yeast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oelkers, Peter M.

    2017-01-01

    A single semester molecular biology laboratory has been developed in which students design and execute a project examining transcriptional regulation in "Saccharomyces cerevisiae." Three weeks of planning are allocated to developing a hypothesis through literature searches and use of bioinformatics. Common experimental plans address a…

  5. Glucose Transport in Cultured Animal Cells: An Exercise for the Undergraduate Cell Biology Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledbetter, Mary Lee S.; Lippert, Malcolm J.

    2002-01-01

    Membrane transport is a fundamental concept that undergraduate students of cell biology understand better with laboratory experience. Formal teaching exercises commonly used to illustrate this concept are unbiological, qualitative, or intricate and time consuming to prepare. We have developed an exercise that uses uptake of radiolabeled nutrient…

  6. Redefining Authentic Research Experiences in Introductory Biology Laboratories and Barriers to Their Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Spell, Rachelle M.; Guinan, Judith A.; Miller, Kristen R.; Beck, Christopher W.

    2014-01-01

    Incorporating authentic research experiences in introductory biology laboratory classes would greatly expand the number of students exposed to the excitement of discovery and the rigor of the scientific process. However, the essential components of an authentic research experience and the barriers to their implementation in laboratory classes are poorly defined. To guide future reform efforts in this area, we conducted a national survey of biology faculty members to determine 1) their definitions of authentic research experiences in laboratory classes, 2) the extent of authentic research experiences currently experienced in their laboratory classes, and 3) the barriers that prevent incorporation of authentic research experiences into these classes. Strikingly, the definitions of authentic research experiences differ among faculty members and tend to emphasize either the scientific process or the discovery of previously unknown data. The low level of authentic research experiences in introductory biology labs suggests that more development and support is needed to increase undergraduate exposure to research experiences. Faculty members did not cite several barriers commonly assumed to impair pedagogical reform; however, their responses suggest that expanded support for development of research experiences in laboratory classes could address the most common barrier. PMID:24591509

  7. Redefining authentic research experiences in introductory biology laboratories and barriers to their implementation.

    PubMed

    Spell, Rachelle M; Guinan, Judith A; Miller, Kristen R; Beck, Christopher W

    2014-01-01

    Incorporating authentic research experiences in introductory biology laboratory classes would greatly expand the number of students exposed to the excitement of discovery and the rigor of the scientific process. However, the essential components of an authentic research experience and the barriers to their implementation in laboratory classes are poorly defined. To guide future reform efforts in this area, we conducted a national survey of biology faculty members to determine 1) their definitions of authentic research experiences in laboratory classes, 2) the extent of authentic research experiences currently experienced in their laboratory classes, and 3) the barriers that prevent incorporation of authentic research experiences into these classes. Strikingly, the definitions of authentic research experiences differ among faculty members and tend to emphasize either the scientific process or the discovery of previously unknown data. The low level of authentic research experiences in introductory biology labs suggests that more development and support is needed to increase undergraduate exposure to research experiences. Faculty members did not cite several barriers commonly assumed to impair pedagogical reform; however, their responses suggest that expanded support for development of research experiences in laboratory classes could address the most common barrier.

  8. Exposure to hog barn dust alters airway epithelial ciliary beating.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, T A; Sisson, J H; Von Essen, S G; Poole, J A; Romberger, D J

    2008-06-01

    Swine confinement workers are at increased risk of airway diseases, including mucus membrane irritation syndrome, chronic rhinosinusitis and chronic bronchitis. Dust extracts from swine confinement facilities stimulate the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in bronchial epithelial cells, including interleukin (IL)-8. As IL-8 is capable of blocking beta-agonist-stimulated increases in cilia beating, which impacts on mucociliary clearance, it was hypothesised that hog barn-dust exposure might alter cilia responses to stimulation. To test this hypothesis, ciliated bovine bronchial epithelial cell cultures were exposed to hog barn-dust extract (HDE) and ciliary beat frequency (CBF) was assayed. An elevation in baseline CBF was observed. This effect appeared to be independent of endotoxin but dependent upon nitric oxide. HDE also stimulated nitric oxide production in bronchial epithelial cells; however, stimulation of cilia beating by a beta-agonist did not occur in cells pre-exposed to HDE. These data demonstrate that hog barn dust can alter normal stimulation of cilia, suggesting a mechanism for the abrogation of stimulated increases in mucociliary clearance in response to inhaled dust exposure.

  9. Wet Lab Accelerator: A Web-Based Application Democratizing Laboratory Automation for Synthetic Biology.

    PubMed

    Bates, Maxwell; Berliner, Aaron J; Lachoff, Joe; Jaschke, Paul R; Groban, Eli S

    2017-01-20

    Wet Lab Accelerator (WLA) is a cloud-based tool that allows a scientist to conduct biology via robotic control without the need for any programming knowledge. A drag and drop interface provides a convenient and user-friendly method of generating biological protocols. Graphically developed protocols are turned into programmatic instruction lists required to conduct experiments at the cloud laboratory Transcriptic. Prior to the development of WLA, biologists were required to write in a programming language called "Autoprotocol" in order to work with Transcriptic. WLA relies on a new abstraction layer we call "Omniprotocol" to convert the graphical experimental description into lower level Autoprotocol language, which then directs robots at Transcriptic. While WLA has only been tested at Transcriptic, the conversion of graphically laid out experimental steps into Autoprotocol is generic, allowing extension of WLA into other cloud laboratories in the future. WLA hopes to democratize biology by bringing automation to general biologists.

  10. Biotechnology by Design: An Introductory Level, Project-Based, Synthetic Biology Laboratory Program for Undergraduate Students†

    PubMed Central

    Beach, Dale L.; Alvarez, Consuelo J.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology offers an ideal opportunity to promote undergraduate laboratory courses with research-style projects, immersing students in an inquiry-based program that enhances the experience of the scientific process. We designed a semester-long, project-based laboratory curriculum using synthetic biology principles to develop a novel sensory device. Students develop subject matter knowledge of molecular genetics and practical skills relevant to molecular biology, recombinant DNA techniques, and information literacy. During the spring semesters of 2014 and 2015, the Synthetic Biology Laboratory Project was delivered to sophomore genetics courses. Using a cloning strategy based on standardized BioBrick genetic “parts,” students construct a “reporter plasmid” expressing a reporter gene (GFP) controlled by a hybrid promoter regulated by the lac-repressor protein (lacI). In combination with a “sensor plasmid,” the production of the reporter phenotype is inhibited in the presence of a target environmental agent, arabinose. When arabinose is absent, constitutive GFP expression makes cells glow green. But the presence of arabinose activates a second promoter (pBAD) to produce a lac-repressor protein that will inhibit GFP production. Student learning was assessed relative to five learning objectives, using a student survey administered at the beginning (pre-survey) and end (post-survey) of the course, and an additional 15 open-ended questions from five graded Progress Report assignments collected throughout the course. Students demonstrated significant learning gains (p < 0.05) for all learning outcomes. Ninety percent of students indicated that the Synthetic Biology Laboratory Project enhanced their understanding of molecular genetics. The laboratory project is highly adaptable for both introductory and advanced courses. PMID:26753032

  11. Biotechnology by Design: An Introductory Level, Project-Based, Synthetic Biology Laboratory Program for Undergraduate Students.

    PubMed

    Beach, Dale L; Alvarez, Consuelo J

    2015-12-01

    Synthetic biology offers an ideal opportunity to promote undergraduate laboratory courses with research-style projects, immersing students in an inquiry-based program that enhances the experience of the scientific process. We designed a semester-long, project-based laboratory curriculum using synthetic biology principles to develop a novel sensory device. Students develop subject matter knowledge of molecular genetics and practical skills relevant to molecular biology, recombinant DNA techniques, and information literacy. During the spring semesters of 2014 and 2015, the Synthetic Biology Laboratory Project was delivered to sophomore genetics courses. Using a cloning strategy based on standardized BioBrick genetic "parts," students construct a "reporter plasmid" expressing a reporter gene (GFP) controlled by a hybrid promoter regulated by the lac-repressor protein (lacI). In combination with a "sensor plasmid," the production of the reporter phenotype is inhibited in the presence of a target environmental agent, arabinose. When arabinose is absent, constitutive GFP expression makes cells glow green. But the presence of arabinose activates a second promoter (pBAD) to produce a lac-repressor protein that will inhibit GFP production. Student learning was assessed relative to five learning objectives, using a student survey administered at the beginning (pre-survey) and end (post-survey) of the course, and an additional 15 open-ended questions from five graded Progress Report assignments collected throughout the course. Students demonstrated significant learning gains (p < 0.05) for all learning outcomes. Ninety percent of students indicated that the Synthetic Biology Laboratory Project enhanced their understanding of molecular genetics. The laboratory project is highly adaptable for both introductory and advanced courses.

  12. Feral Hogs Management at Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge: Analysis of Current Management Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, Arie; Hinkle, C. Ross; Epstein, Marc

    2002-01-01

    This ST1 Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes a two-month project on feral hog management in Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge (MINWR). For this project, feral hogs were marked and recaptured, with the help of local trappers, to estimate population size and habitat preferences. Habitat covers included vegetation cover and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) data for MINWR. In addition, an analysis was done of hunting records compiled by the Refuge and hog-car accidents compiled by KSC Security.

  13. Biological Risks and Laboratory-Acquired Infections: A Reality That Cannot be Ignored in Health Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Ana Cláudia; García Díez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Advances and research in biotechnology have applications over a wide range of areas, such as microbiology, medicine, the food industry, agriculture, genetically modified organisms, and nanotechnology, among others. However, research with pathogenic agents, such as virus, parasites, fungi, rickettsia, bacterial microorganisms, or genetic modified organisms, has generated concern because of their potential biological risk – not only for people, but also for the environment due to their unpredictable behavior. In addition, concern for biosafety is associated with the emergence of new diseases or re-emergence of diseases that were already under control. Biotechnology laboratories require biosafety measures designed to protect their staff, the population, and the environment, which may be exposed to hazardous organisms and materials. Laboratory staff training and education is essential, not only to acquire a good understanding about the direct handling of hazardous biological agents but also knowledge of the epidemiology, pathogenicity, and human susceptibility to the biological materials used in research. Biological risk can be reduced and controlled by the correct application of internationally recognized procedures such as proper microbiological techniques, proper containment apparatus, adequate facilities, protective barriers, and special training and education of laboratory workers. To avoid occupational infections, knowledge about standardized microbiological procedures and techniques and the use of containment devices, facilities, and protective barriers is necessary. Training and education about the epidemiology, pathogenicity, and biohazards of the microorganisms involved may prevent or decrease the risk. In this way, the scientific community may benefit from the lessons learned in the past to anticipate future problems. PMID:25973418

  14. Biological Risks and Laboratory-Acquired Infections: A Reality That Cannot be Ignored in Health Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Ana Cláudia; García Díez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Advances and research in biotechnology have applications over a wide range of areas, such as microbiology, medicine, the food industry, agriculture, genetically modified organisms, and nanotechnology, among others. However, research with pathogenic agents, such as virus, parasites, fungi, rickettsia, bacterial microorganisms, or genetic modified organisms, has generated concern because of their potential biological risk - not only for people, but also for the environment due to their unpredictable behavior. In addition, concern for biosafety is associated with the emergence of new diseases or re-emergence of diseases that were already under control. Biotechnology laboratories require biosafety measures designed to protect their staff, the population, and the environment, which may be exposed to hazardous organisms and materials. Laboratory staff training and education is essential, not only to acquire a good understanding about the direct handling of hazardous biological agents but also knowledge of the epidemiology, pathogenicity, and human susceptibility to the biological materials used in research. Biological risk can be reduced and controlled by the correct application of internationally recognized procedures such as proper microbiological techniques, proper containment apparatus, adequate facilities, protective barriers, and special training and education of laboratory workers. To avoid occupational infections, knowledge about standardized microbiological procedures and techniques and the use of containment devices, facilities, and protective barriers is necessary. Training and education about the epidemiology, pathogenicity, and biohazards of the microorganisms involved may prevent or decrease the risk. In this way, the scientific community may benefit from the lessons learned in the past to anticipate future problems.

  15. Neutron Imaging at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory: Application to Biological Research

    SciTech Connect

    Bilheux, Hassina Z; Cekanova, Maria; Bilheux, Jean-Christophe; Bailey, William Barton; Keener, Wylie S; Davis, Larry E; Herwig, Kenneth W

    2014-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Neutron Sciences Directorate (NScD) has recently installed a neutron imaging beamline at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) cold guide hall. The CG-1D beamline supports a broad range of user research spanning from engineering to material research, energy storage, additive manufacturing, vehicle technologies, archaeology, biology, and plant physiology. The beamline performance (spatial resolution, field of view, etc.) and its utilization for biological research are presented. The NScD is also considering a proposal to build the VENUS imaging beamline (beam port 10) at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Unlike CG-1D which provides cold neutrons, VENUS will offer a broad range of neutron wavelengths, from epithermal to cold, and enhanced contrast mechanisms. This new capability will also enable the imaging of thicker biological samples than is currently available at CG-1D. A brief overview of the VENUS capability for biological research is discussed.

  16. Multiweek cell culture project for use in upper-level biology laboratories.

    PubMed

    Marion, Rebecca E; Gardner, Grant E; Parks, Lisa D

    2012-06-01

    This article describes a laboratory protocol for a multiweek project piloted in a new upper-level biology laboratory (BIO 426) using cell culture techniques. Human embryonic kidney-293 cells were used, and several culture media and supplements were identified for students to design their own experiments. Treatments included amino acids, EGF, caffeine, epinephrine, heavy metals, and FBS. Students researched primary literature to determine their experimental variables, made their own solutions, and treated their cells over a period of 2 wk. Before this, a sterile technique laboratory was developed to teach students how to work with the cells and minimize contamination. Students designed their experiments, mixed their solutions, seeded their cells, and treated them with their control and experimental media. Students had the choice of manipulating a number of variables, including incubation times, exposure to treatment media, and temperature. At the end of the experiment, students observed the effects of their treatment, harvested and dyed their cells, counted relative cell numbers in control and treatment flasks, and determined the ratio of living to dead cells using a hemocytometer. At the conclusion of the experiment, students presented their findings in a poster presentation. This laboratory can be expanded or adapted to include additional cell lines and treatments. The ability to design and implement their own experiments has been shown to increase student engagement in the biology-related laboratory activities as well as develop the critical thinking skills needed for independent research.

  17. Participation in introductory biology laboratories: An integrated assessment based on surveys, behavioral observations, and qualitative interviews

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Connie Adelle

    Scope and method of study. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of gender, major, and prior knowledge of and attitude toward biology on participation in introductory biology laboratories. Subjects for this study were 3,527 students enrolled in college-level introductory biology courses. During the study, three introductory courses were replaced with one mixed-majors course. The new course adopted a different pedagological approach from the previous courses in that an inquiry-based approach was used in lectures and laboratories. All subjects completed a survey that measured content knowledge using the NABT/NSTA High School Biology Examination Version 1990 and attitude using Russell and Hollander's Biology Attitude Scale. I used and discuss the merits of using ethological methods and data collection software, EthoScribeTM (Tima Scientific) to collect behavioral data from 145 students. I also evaluated participation using qualitative interviews of 30 students. I analyzed content knowledge and attitude data using ANOVA and Pearson correlation, and behavioral data using Contingency Table Analysis. I analyzed interviews following methods outlined by Rubin and Rubin. Findings. Course style and gender were the most useful variables in distinguishing differences among groups of students with regard to attitude, content knowledge, and participation in laboratories. Attitude toward biology and achievement measured by the surveys were found to be positively correlated; however, gender, major, class standing, course style and interactions between these variables also had effects on these variables. I found a positive association among attitude, achievement and participation in hands-on activities in laboratories. Differences in participation also were associated group type. In a traditional introductory biology course, females in single-gender groups, gender-equal, or groups in which females were the majority spent more time performing hands-on science

  18. Accomplishments of the Trustees and laboratory staff of the Biological Stain Commission, 2002-2013.

    PubMed

    Dapson, R W

    2014-08-01

    During the 12 years from 2002 to 2013, the Trustees and laboratory personnel of the Biological Stain Commission (BSC) can claim many accomplishments. These accomplishments are itemized under 11 categories: continuous publication of the official journal, Biotechnic & Histochemistry; production of four special issues of Biotechnic & Histochemistry devoted to specific dyes or stains; standardization of staining and dye purity; mechanisms of staining and prediction of dye behavior; publication of books or book chapters; effects of fixation and processing on staining; cancer research; immunohistochemistry; BSC Laboratory activities; miscellaneous publications; and administrative accomplishments.

  19. [Experience of the development special medical technical laboratory for studies of effects caused by potent electromagnetic radiation in biologic objects].

    PubMed

    Gorodetsky, B N; Kalyada, T V; Petrov, S V

    2015-01-01

    This article covers topics of creating special medical technical laboratory for medial and biologic studies concerning influence of potent high-frequency elecromagnetic radiation on various biologic objects. The authors gave example of such laboratory, described its construction features, purpose and main characteristics of the included devices.

  20. Background study of absorbed dose in biological experiments at the Modane Underground Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampe, Nathanael; Marin, Pierre; Castor, Jean; Warot, Guillaume; Incerti, S.; Maigne, Lydia; Sarramia, David; Breton, Vincent

    2016-09-01

    Aiming to explore how biological systems respond to ultra-low background environ-ments, we report here our background studies for biological experiments in the Modane Under-ground Laboratory. We find that the minimum radioactive background for biology experiments is limited by the potassium content of the biological sample itself, coming from its nutritive me-dium, which we find in our experimental set-up to be 26 nGy hr-1. Compared to our reference radiation environment in Clermont-Ferrand, biological experiments can be conducted in the Modane laboratory with a radiation background 8.2 times lower than the reference above-ground level. As the radiation background may be further reduced by using different nutritive media, we also provide measurements of the potassium concentration by gamma spectroscopy of yeast extract (63.3±1.2 mg g-1) and tryptone (2.5±0.2 mg g-1) in order to guide media selection in future experiments.

  1. Developing information fluency in introductory biology students in the context of an investigative laboratory.

    PubMed

    Lindquester, Gary J; Burks, Romi L; Jaslow, Carolyn R

    2005-01-01

    Students of biology must learn the scientific method for generating information in the field. Concurrently, they should learn how information is reported and accessed. We developed a progressive set of exercises for the undergraduate introductory biology laboratory that combine these objectives. Pre- and postassessments of approximately 100 students suggest that increases occurred, some statistically significant, in the number of students using various library-related resources, in the numbers and confidence level of students using various technologies, and in the numbers and confidence levels of students involved in various activities related to the scientific method. Following this course, students should be better prepared for more advanced and independent study.

  2. Developing Information Fluency in Introductory Biology Students in the Context of an Investigative Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Students of biology must learn the scientific method for generating information in the field. Concurrently, they should learn how information is reported and accessed. We developed a progressive set of exercises for the undergraduate introductory biology laboratory that combine these objectives. Pre- and postassessments of approximately 100 students suggest that increases occurred, some statistically significant, in the number of students using various library-related resources, in the numbers and confidence level of students using various technologies, and in the numbers and confidence levels of students involved in various activities related to the scientific method. Following this course, students should be better prepared for more advanced and independent study. PMID:15746979

  3. Recommendations for accreditation of laboratories in molecular biology of hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Flandrin-Gresta, Pascale; Cornillet, Pascale; Hayette, Sandrine; Gachard, Nathalie; Tondeur, Sylvie; Mauté, Carole; Cayuela, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Over recent years, the development of molecular biology techniques has improved the hematological diseases diagnostic and follow-up. Consequently, these techniques are largely used in the biological screening of these diseases; therefore the Hemato-oncology molecular diagnostics laboratories must be actively involved in the accreditation process according the ISO 15189 standard. The French group of molecular biologists (GBMHM) provides requirements for the implementation of quality assurance for the medical molecular laboratories. This guideline states the recommendations for the pre-analytical, analytical (methods validation procedures, quality controls, reagents), and post-analytical conditions. In addition, herein we state a strategy for the internal quality control management. These recommendations will be regularly updated.

  4. Protein crystallization screens developed at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology.

    PubMed

    Gorrec, Fabrice

    2016-05-01

    In order to solve increasingly challenging protein structures with crystallography, crystallization reagents and screen formulations are regularly investigated. Here, we briefly describe 96-condition screens developed at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology: the LMB sparse matrix screen, Pi incomplete factorial screens, the MORPHEUS grid screens and the ANGSTROM optimization screen. In this short review, we also discuss the difficulties and advantages associated with the development of protein crystallization screens.

  5. Status of Biology Laboratory and Practical Activities in Some Selected Secondary and Preparatory Schools of Borena Zone, South Ethiopia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daba, Tolessa Muleta; Anbassa, Baressa; Oda, Bula Kere; Degefa, Itefa

    2016-01-01

    Science laboratory is a very important resource input for teaching science. Learning science is enhanced and the understanding level is improved when students are engaged in science laboratory for practical experiments. The current study aimed to assess the status of Biology laboratory and practical activities in some selected secondary and…

  6. XperimentR: painless annotation of a biological experiment for the laboratory scientist.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Chris D; Barton, Geraint R; Woodbridge, Mark; Butcher, Sarah A

    2013-01-16

    Today's biological experiments often involve the collaboration of multidisciplinary researchers utilising several high throughput 'omics platforms. There is a requirement for the details of the experiment to be adequately described using standardised ontologies to enable data preservation, the analysis of the data and to facilitate the export of the data to public repositories. However there are a bewildering number of ontologies, controlled vocabularies, and minimum standards available for use to describe experiments. There is a need for user-friendly software tools to aid laboratory scientists in capturing the experimental information. A web application called XperimentR has been developed for use by laboratory scientists, consisting of a browser-based interface and server-side components which provide an intuitive platform for capturing and sharing experimental metadata. Information recorded includes details about the biological samples, procedures, protocols, and experimental technologies, all of which can be easily annotated using the appropriate ontologies. Files and raw data can be imported and associated with the biological samples via the interface, from either users' computers, or commonly used open-source data repositories. Experiments can be shared with other users, and experiments can be exported in the standard ISA-Tab format for deposition in public databases. XperimentR is freely available and can be installed natively or by using a provided pre-configured Virtual Machine. A guest system is also available for trial purposes. We present a web based software application to aid the laboratory scientist to capture, describe and share details about their experiments.

  7. Apoptosis: A Four-Week Laboratory Investigation for Advanced Molecular and Cellular Biology Students

    PubMed Central

    DiBartolomeis, Susan M.; Moné, James P.

    2003-01-01

    Over the past decade, apoptosis has emerged as an important field of study central to ongoing research in many diverse fields, from developmental biology to cancer research. Apoptosis proceeds by a highly coordinated series of events that includes enzyme activation, DNA fragmentation, and alterations in plasma membrane permeability. The detection of each of these phenotypic changes is accessible to advanced undergraduate cell and molecular biology students. We describe a 4-week laboratory sequence that integrates cell culture, fluorescence microscopy, DNA isolation and analysis, and western blotting (immunoblotting) to follow apoptosis in cultured human cells. Students working in teams chemically induce apoptosis, and harvest, process, and analyze cells, using their data to determine the order of events during apoptosis. We, as instructors, expose the students to an environment closely simulating what they would encounter in an active cell or molecular biology research laboratory by having students coordinate and perform multiple tasks simultaneously and by having them experience experimental design using current literature, data interpretation, and analysis to answer a single question. Students are assessed by examination of laboratory notebooks for completeness of experimental protocols and analysis of results and for completion of an assignment that includes questions pertaining to data interpretation and apoptosis. PMID:14673493

  8. Apoptosis: a four-week laboratory investigation for advanced molecular and cellular biology students.

    PubMed

    DiBartolomeis, Susan M; Moné, James P

    2003-01-01

    Over the past decade, apoptosis has emerged as an important field of study central to ongoing research in many diverse fields, from developmental biology to cancer research. Apoptosis proceeds by a highly coordinated series of events that includes enzyme activation, DNA fragmentation, and alterations in plasma membrane permeability. The detection of each of these phenotypic changes is accessible to advanced undergraduate cell and molecular biology students. We describe a 4-week laboratory sequence that integrates cell culture, fluorescence microscopy, DNA isolation and analysis, and western blotting (immunoblotting) to follow apoptosis in cultured human cells. Students working in teams chemically induce apoptosis, and harvest, process, and analyze cells, using their data to determine the order of events during apoptosis. We, as instructors, expose the students to an environment closely simulating what they would encounter in an active cell or molecular biology research laboratory by having students coordinate and perform multiple tasks simultaneously and by having them experience experimental design using current literature, data interpretation, and analysis to answer a single question. Students are assessed by examination of laboratory notebooks for completeness of experimental protocols and analysis of results and for completion of an assignment that includes questions pertaining to data interpretation and apoptosis.

  9. [RESAOLAB: West African network of laboratories to enhance the quality of clinical biology].

    PubMed

    Delorme, L; Machuron, J L; Sow, I; Diagne, R; Sakandé, J; Nikiéma, A; Bougoudogo, F; Keita, A; Longuet, C

    2015-02-01

    The Fondation Mérieux, in partnership with the Ministries of Health of Burkina Faso, Mali and Senegal, implemented for four years a project to reinforce the laboratory sector in the three participating countries: the RESAOLAB project (West African Network of Biomedical Analysis Laboratories).The objective of RESAOLAB project, in partnership with the WHO Office for West Africa and the West African Health Organization, was to strengthen the systems of biomedical laboratories to improve diagnostic services, access, monitoring and management of infectious diseases. Following the successful results achieved under the RESAOLAB project and due to the demand of the neighbour countries ministries, the RESAOLAB project is now extended to four other countries of the West African region: Benin, Guinea-Conakry, Niger and Togo. The RESAOLAB project has become the RESAOLAB programme, its purpose is to strengthen the quality of the medical biology services thanks to a regional and transversal approach.

  10. Inquiry-based laboratory investigations and student performance on standardized tests in biological science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patke, Usha

    Achievement data from the 3rd International Mathematics and Sciences Study and Program for International Student Assessment in science have indicated that Black students from economically disadvantaged families underachieve at alarming rates in comparison to White and economically advantaged peer groups. The study site was a predominately Black, urban school district experiencing underachievement. The purpose of this correlational study was to examine the relationship between students' use of inquiry-based laboratory investigations and their performance on the Biology End of Course Test, as well as to examine the relationship while partialling out the effects of student gender. Constructivist theory formed the theoretical foundation of the study. Students' perceived levels of experience with inquiry-based laboratory investigations were measured using the Laboratory Program Variable Inventory (LPVI) survey. LPVI scores of 256 students were correlated with test scores and were examined by student gender. The Pearson correlation coefficient revealed a small direct correlation between students' experience in inquiry-based laboratory investigation classes and standardized test scores on the Biology EOCT. A partial correlational analysis indicated that the correlation remained after controlling for gender. This study may prompt a change from teacher-centered to student-centered pedagogy at the local site in order to increase academic achievement for all students. The results of this study may also influence administrators and policy makers to initiate local, state, or nationwide curricular development. A change in curriculum may promote social change as students become more competent, and more able, to succeed in life beyond secondary school.

  11. Integrated payload resource requirements for NASA's Gravitational Biology Research Laboratory on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Lauren E.; Sarver, George L., Dr.; Jahns, Gary, Dr.

    2000-01-01

    The primary mission of International Space Station (ISS) is to provide a shirt-sleeve working environment within an orbiting laboratory to support a wide variety of research conducted in the micro-gravity (μ-gravity) environment of space. The laboratory being developed by the Space Station Biological Research Project (SSBRP) at the Ames Research Center (ARC) will support NASA's Gravitational Biology and Ecology (GB&E) Research Program on the influence and affects of gravity on living systems. It will support research from the building blocks of biology (cells and tissues) through complete, fully grown systems (plants, rodents, aquatics and insects) and through all phases of growth as well as multiple generations. The results will provide an in-depth understanding of the role of gravity in living systems. It should provide the information necessary to support long-term manned missions for exploration of the solar system. In addition, it is expected to provide valuable insight into how Earth-bound biological systems work. .

  12. Role of CgHOG1 in Stress Responses and Glycerol Overproduction of Candida glycerinogenes.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hao; Zhuge, Bin; Zong, Hong; Lu, Xinyao; Fang, Huiying; Zhuge, Jian

    2016-12-01

    Candida glycerinogenes, the glycerol producer with excellent multi-stress tolerances, is considered to be a potential biotechnological host used in the production of glycerol and its derivatives under extreme fermentation conditions. In this study, to evaluate the multiple roles of mitogen-activated protein kinase CgHOG1, we constructed a gene disruption system in the diploid C. glycerinogenes to obtain CgHOG1 null mutant. Pseudohyphae generation of the CgHOG1 mutant under non-inducing condition indicated a repressor role in morphological transitions. Disruption of CgHOG1 resulted in increased sensitivities to osmotic, acetic acid, and oxidative stress but not involved in thermotolerance. In the CgHOG1 mutant, NaCl shock failed to stimulate the accumulation of intracellular glycerol and was fatal. In addition, the CgHOG1 mutant displayed a significant prolonged growth lag phase in YPD medium with no decrease in glycerol production, whereas the mutant cannot grow under hyperosmotic condition with no detectable glycerol in broth. These results suggested that CgHOG1 plays important roles in morphogenesis and multi-stress tolerance. The growth and glycerol overproduction under osmotic stress are heavily dependent on CgHOG1 kinase.

  13. Renal structural flexibility in response to environmental water stress in feral hogs.

    PubMed

    Zervanos, S M; Naveh, S

    1988-09-01

    Several morphological characteristics of the kidney were studied to determine the degree of acclimatization that may occur in three groups of feral hogs raised under different environmental conditions. Two groups of hogs were living in the wild, while another was raised in captivity for three generations and was directly descended from one of the wild-living groups. The two groups of wild hogs were living under two different types of water stress conditions. One group experienced periodic drought, and the other ate a high salt diet. The captive hogs were given food and water ad libitum. The captive-raised hogs had significantly lower relative medullary thickness (RMT) and relative medullary area (RMA) values (RMT of 2.35; RMA of 0.35) than either group of hogs living in the wild (RMT of 2.70 and 2.69; RMA of 0.41 and 0.44). Since the feral hogs living in the wild were exposed to a higher degree of water stress than the captive-raised hogs, it was concluded that the differences in observed kidney structure were due to acclimatization.

  14. 9 CFR 311.22 - Hogs affected with urticaria, tinea tonsurans, demodex follicurlorum, or erythema.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... folliculorum, or erythema may be passed for human food after detaching and condemning the affected skin, if the... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hogs affected with urticaria, tinea... OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.22 Hogs affected with urticaria, tinea tonsurans,...

  15. 9 CFR 311.22 - Hogs affected with urticaria, tinea tonsurans, demodex follicurlorum, or erythema.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... folliculorum, or erythema may be passed for human food after detaching and condemning the affected skin, if the... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hogs affected with urticaria, tinea... OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.22 Hogs affected with urticaria, tinea tonsurans,...

  16. 9 CFR 311.30 - Livestock suffocated and hogs scalded alive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Livestock suffocated and hogs scalded alive. 311.30 Section 311.30 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... PARTS § 311.30 Livestock suffocated and hogs scalded alive. All livestock which have been suffocated...

  17. Gastrointestinal helminths of wild hogs and their potential livestock and public health significance in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Okoro, C K; Wilson, B S; Lorenzo-Morales, J; Robinson, R D

    2016-03-01

    An investigation into the potential for transmission of gastrointestinal helminths from wild hogs to livestock and humans was prompted by concerns of recreational wild-hog hunting in the Caribbean region and the recent practice, by livestock farmers in Jamaica, of co-rearing wild and domesticated swine. Thirty-one wild hogs from the Hellshire Hills, a dry limestone forest in southern Jamaica, were necropsied during the period June 2004 to August 2006. Thirteen of the captured animals were male and 18 female. Four species of adult helminths were recovered from the gastrointestinal tracts of the wild hogs: Hyostrongylus rubidus (77%), Globocephalus urosubulatus (48%), Oesophagostomum dentatum (42%) and Macroacanthorhynchus hirudinaceus (77%). Two (6.2%), ten (32.2%) and 18 (58.0%) hogs harboured one, two and three species of helminths, respectively. Mean infection intensities varied from 8.1 for M. hirudinaceus, to 115.5 for O. dentatum. There was no association between any of the recovered helminths and sex of the host; however, a multivariate analysis indicated a positive association between the prevalence of G. urosubulatus and host age (odds ratio (OR) = 6.517). Domesticated hogs co-reared with wild hogs are potentially at risk of infection with all four helminths, while wild-hog hunters and pig farmers may be exposed to M. hirudinaceus.

  18. Real-time pedestrian detection based on GMM and HOG cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Moonyong; Jeong, Kiseon; Yoon, Sook; Park, Dong Sun

    2013-12-01

    Most of the human detection methods are using HOG (Histogram of Oriented Gradients). In the case of fixed camera environment, it is possible to make background model using GMM (Gaussian mixture model) and easily extract motions using background subtraction. However, it is difficult to recognize pedestrians among extracted motions. In this paper, we propose an efficient coarse-to-fine pedestrian detection framework which combines motion detection and HOG cascade to make a faster pedestrian detector. Firstly, motion detection is used as the coarse detection in order to reduce the area of interest to be covered by the pedestrian detector. Then HOG cascade which detects pedestrians is executed only on the blobs or ROIs selected from the coarse detection. The experimental results on PET2009 768X576 dataset show that proposed method of which processing speed is 11.46 fps is 7.5 times faster than HOG and 2.2 times faster than HOG cascade.

  19. Production costs and animal welfare for four stylized hog production systems.

    PubMed

    Seibert, Lacey; Norwood, F Bailey

    2011-01-01

    Nonhuman animal welfare is arguably the most contentious issue facing the hog industry. Animal advocacy groups influence the regulation of hog farms and induce some consumers to demand more humane pork products. Hog producers are understandably reluctant to improve animal well being unless the premium they extract exceeds the corresponding increase in cost. To better understand the relationship between animal welfare and production costs under different farm systems, this study investigates 4 stylized hog production systems. The results show that increasing animal welfare for all hogs in the United States will increase retail pork prices by a maximum of 2% for a small welfare increase and 5% for a large welfare increase. The cost of banning gestation crates measured by this study is lower than the consumer willingness-to-pay from other studies.

  20. Combining ontologies and workflows to design formal protocols for biological laboratories

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Laboratory protocols in life sciences tend to be written in natural language, with negative consequences on repeatability, distribution and automation of scientific experiments. Formalization of knowledge is becoming popular in science. In the case of laboratory protocols two levels of formalization are needed: one for the entities and individuals operations involved in protocols and another one for the procedures, which can be manually or automatically executed. This study aims to combine ontologies and workflows for protocol formalization. Results A laboratory domain specific ontology and the COW (Combining Ontologies with Workflows) software tool were developed to formalize workflows built on ontologies. A method was specifically set up to support the design of structured protocols for biological laboratory experiments. The workflows were enhanced with ontological concepts taken from the developed domain specific ontology. The experimental protocols represented as workflows are saved in two linked files using two standard interchange languages (i.e. XPDL for workflows and OWL for ontologies). A distribution package of COW including installation procedure, ontology and workflow examples, is freely available from http://www.bmr-genomics.it/farm/cow. Conclusions Using COW, a laboratory protocol may be directly defined by wet-lab scientists without writing code, which will keep the resulting protocol's specifications clear and easy to read and maintain. PMID:20416048

  1. 7 CFR 1230.113 - Collection and remittance of assessments for the sale of feeder pigs and market hogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Collection and remittance of assessments for the sale of feeder pigs and market hogs. 1230.113 Section 1230.113 Agriculture Regulations of the Department... pigs and market hogs. Pursuant to the provisions of § 1230.71, purchasers of feeder pigs or market hogs...

  2. 7 CFR 1230.113 - Collection and remittance of assessments for the sale of feeder pigs and market hogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Collection and remittance of assessments for the sale of feeder pigs and market hogs. 1230.113 Section 1230.113 Agriculture Regulations of the Department... pigs and market hogs. Pursuant to the provisions of § 1230.71, purchasers of feeder pigs or market hogs...

  3. 7 CFR 1230.113 - Collection and remittance of assessments for the sale of feeder pigs and market hogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Collection and remittance of assessments for the sale of feeder pigs and market hogs. 1230.113 Section 1230.113 Agriculture Regulations of the Department... pigs and market hogs. Pursuant to the provisions of § 1230.71, purchasers of feeder pigs or market hogs...

  4. A comparison of a biological sciences curriculum study (BSCS) laboratory and a traditional laboratory on student achievement at two private liberal arts colleges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Donald A.; McCurdy, Donald W.

    The purpose of this experiment was to compare an inquiry-oriented Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS) style laboratory approach with a more directive traditional approach on student outcomes in the cognitive and affective domains of learning at two private, midwestern liberal-arts colleges. The BSCS approach emphasized basic and integrated science processes, concept development through extensive questioning, and increased student discretion, while the traditional approach contained highly structured, more prescriptive, teacher-oriented activities. Intact laboratory sections of students enrolled in introductory general biology at two private liberal-arts colleges were randomly selected into two treatment groups. Pretest and posttest measures were taken on three dependent variables: (1) biological content achievement, measured with a researcher-generated Test on Biology Laboratory Concepts, (2) reasoning ability, measured with the Group Assessment of Logical Thinking, and (3) attitude toward biology, measured with the Biology Student Behavior Inventory. Analysis of covariance indicated the experimental group (n = 60) using the BSCS-style laboratory approach scored significantly higher than the comparison group (n = 59) in levels of performance on biology content achievement, F(1, 114) = 4.07, p < 0.05. There were no significant differences between the two groups in performance levels on attitude toward biology or on reasoning ability. However, both groups experienced a 15-percent increase in the number of formal thinkers as indicated by pretest-posttest gain scores on the reasoning ability test. These results lend support to the hypothesis that a BSCS-style laboratory approach fosters desired learner outcomes at the postsecondary level. In addition, these findings support the notion that the science laboratory may be used as a primary vehicle to promote formal reasoning skills.

  5. Student and instructor perceptions of the use of inquiry practices in a Biology Survey Laboratory course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayer, Lisbeth Ann

    The level of inquiry in science education has been the subject of a great deal of research by organizations such as The National Resource Council, The National Science Teachers Association, and The National Science Resources Center. Although inquiry has been promulgated as best practice, most colleges have not included inquiry science instruction in their coursework. The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of the level of inquiry, which students and instructors in a Biology Survey Laboratory I course consider the most supportive of student learning at a small, rural, Midwestern university. A survey instrument developed using the Inquiry Level Rubric designed by Buck et al., (2008) and the Likert Scale (1932) was used to collect data from 192 Biology Survey Laboratory I course students and their two instructors. The instrument consisted of 36 five-point Likert scale items followed by four demographic questions. A total of 190 (99.0%) students' surveys contained usable information for statistical analyses. Semi-structured instructor interviews were completed after the survey. Descriptive statistics including means and standard deviations were analyzed to determine the perceptions of students and their instructors regarding the best level of inquiry to learn biology. Inferential statistical analysis with independent t tests were utilized to determine if there were statistically significant differences between education majors and non-education majors, underrepresented groups and students typically represented in the science fields, and students with high versus low inquiry experience K--12. Qualitative phenomenological data were collected and analyzed from instructor interviews. Descriptive analyses revealed that students perceived that they would learn best with Open or Authentic inquiry levels, while instructors' perceptions leaned towards Open or Guided inquiry levels in the Biology Survey Laboratory I course (Buck et al., 2008). Inferential data

  6. Integrating responsible conduct of research education into undergraduate biochemistry and molecular biology laboratory curricula.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Tamara L

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a requirement for directed responsible conduct in research (RCR) education has become a priority in the United States and elsewhere. In the US, both the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation require RCR education for all students who are financially supported by federal awards. The guidelines produced by these agencies offer useful templates for the introduction of RCR materials into courses worldwide. Many academic programs already offer courses or workshops in RCR for their graduate students and for undergraduate science majors and/or researchers. Introducing RCR into undergraduate biochemistry and molecular biology laboratory curricula is another, highly practical way that students can be exposed to these important topics. In fact, a strong argument can be made for integrating RCR into laboratory courses because these classes often introduce students to a scientific environment like that they might encounter in their careers after graduation. This article focuses on general strategies for incorporating explicit RCR education into biochemistry and molecular biology laboratory coursework using the topics suggested by NIH as a starting point.

  7. Tested Studies for Laboratory Teaching. Proceedings of the Workshop/Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) (16th, Atlanta, Georgia, June 7-11, 1994). Volume 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Corey A., Ed.

    The focus of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) is to improve the undergraduate biology laboratory experience by promoting the development and dissemination of interesting, innovative, and reliable laboratory exercises. This proceedings volume contains 17 papers on the topics of cell and molecular biology, genetics, and…

  8. Tested Studies for Laboratory Teaching. Proceedings of the Workshop/Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) (16th, Atlanta, Georgia, June 7-11, 1994). Volume 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Corey A., Ed.

    The focus of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) is to improve the undergraduate biology laboratory experience by promoting the development and dissemination of interesting, innovative, and reliable laboratory exercises. This proceedings volume contains 17 papers on the topics of cell and molecular biology, genetics, and…

  9. The use of passerine bird species in laboratory research: implications of basic biology for husbandry and welfare.

    PubMed

    Bateson, Melissa; Feenders, Gesa

    2010-01-01

    Passerine birds are important models in fundamental biological research, with as many as 300,000 individuals used in laboratory experiments worldwide annually. However, because the use of passerines is rare compared with that of more conventional laboratory animals, there is often a lack of information about the basic biology and husbandry requirements of these species. We aim to address this deficit by providing an overview of the most salient aspects of passerine biology and their implications for laboratory husbandry and welfare. We start by describing the characteristics that make these birds useful and interesting research subjects. Specifically, we highlight features (e.g., birdsong) of passerine biology that differentiate these birds from more common laboratory animals. Next, we consider the implications of passerine biology for husbandry in the laboratory. Many of the aspects of passerine biology that make these species valuable to scientists are also likely to be affected by environmental variables; a good knowledge of these variables is necessary in order to choose appropriate laboratory conditions for passerines. We outline how the developmental history of the birds and choices of caging, feeding, and environmental regimes might influence their physiology and behavior and thus affect both the welfare of the birds and the quality of the resulting data. We stress the importance of a sound understanding of the biology of any species to ensure good welfare and good science.

  10. Signaling of chloroquine-induced stress in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires the Hog1 and Slt2 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Baranwal, Shivani; Azad, Gajendra Kumar; Singh, Vikash; Tomar, Raghuvir S

    2014-09-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) has been under clinical use for several decades, and yet little is known about CQ sensing and signaling mechanisms or about their impact on various biological pathways. We employed the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism to study the pathways targeted by CQ. Our screening with yeast mutants revealed that it targets histone proteins and histone deacetylases (HDACs). Here, we also describe the novel role of mitogen-activated protein kinases Hog1 and Slt2, which aid in survival in the presence of CQ. Cells deficient in Hog1 or Slt2 are found to be CQ hypersensitive, and both proteins were phosphorylated in response to CQ exposure. CQ-activated Hog1p is translocated to the nucleus and facilitates the expression of GPD1 (glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), which is required for the synthesis of glycerol (one of the major osmolytes). Moreover, cells treated with CQ exhibited an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and the effects were rescued by addition of reduced glutathione to the medium. The deletion of SOD1, the superoxide dismutase in yeast, resulted in hypersensitivity to CQ. We have also observed P38 as well as P42/44 phosphorylation in HEK293T human cells upon exposure to CQ, indicating that the kinds of responses generated in yeast and human cells are similar. In summary, our findings define the multiple biological pathways targeted by CQ that might be useful for understanding the toxicity modulated by this pharmacologically important molecule.

  11. The Biological Stain Commission's Quality Control Laboratory operations and improved traceability of certified stains.

    PubMed

    Fagan, C L

    2012-01-01

    The Biological Stain Commission (BSC) is a quality control laboratory that certifies biological dyes for staining cells and tissues. Originally, a single lot of a certified dye was sold to histologists. Today, companies frequently change their lot numbers as part of regulatory efforts. When a certified dye undergoes a lot number change, the BSC must re-certify this dye to verify that it is identical to the one certified earlier. The BSC has improved how these lot changes are monitored using a redesigned BSC certification label. Certification labels always have been issued by the BSC and are attached to every bottle of "BSC certified dye" that is sold. The new BSC certification label has added security features and currently bears both the BSC certification number and the manufacturer batch lot number. The result is improved security and traceability of certified dyes.

  12. Cell physiology at the Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory: a brief look back and forward

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory (MDIBL) has played important roles in the development of modern physiological concepts and tools, particularly in the fields of kidney and epithelial cell physiology. Over the last decade, MDIBL has undergone remarkable growth and evolution. This article will briefly review MDIBL's past and outline its future directions. It is hoped that this overview will renew and stimulate interest in MDIBL and, in particular, will encourage an even wider community of physiologists to participate in its ongoing growth and development. PMID:21068363

  13. Cocaine Use among the College Age Group: Biological and Psychological Effects--Clinical and Laboratory Research Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholi, Armand M., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Knowledge about cocaine's effect on the human mind and body is limited and not clearly documented. This article discusses various biological and psychological effects of the drug based on clinical and laboratory studies of man. (Author/DF)

  14. Using biocatalysis to integrate organic chemistry into a molecular biology laboratory course.

    PubMed

    Beers, Mande; Archer, Crystal; Feske, Brent D; Mateer, Scott C

    2012-01-01

    Current cutting-edge biomedical investigation requires that the researcher have an operational understanding of several diverse disciplines. Biocatalysis is a field of science that operates at the crossroads of organic chemistry, biochemistry, microbiology, and molecular biology, and provides an excellent model for interdisciplinary research. We have developed an inquiry-based module that uses the mutagenesis of the yeast reductase, YDL124w, to study the bioorganic synthesis of the taxol side-chain, a pharmacologically important molecule. Using related structures, students identify regions they think will affect enzyme stereoselective, design and generate site-specific mutants, and then characterize the effect of these changes on enzyme activity. This laboratory activity gives our students experience, working in a scientific discipline outside of biology and exposes them to techniques and equipment they do not normally work with in a molecular biology course. These inter-disciplinary experiences not only show the relevance of other sciences to biology, but also give our students the ability to communicate more effectively with scientists outside their discipline.

  15. Dissection of the HOG pathway activated by hydrogen peroxide in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Mi; Kim, Eunjung; An, Jieun; Lee, Yeji; Choi, Eunyong; Choi, Wonja; Moon, Eunpyo; Kim, Wankee

    2017-02-01

    Cells usually cope with oxidative stress by activating signal transduction pathways. In the budding yeast Sacchromyces cerevisiae, the high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway has long been implicated in transducing the oxidative stress-induced signal, but the underlying mechanisms are not well defined. Based on phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) Hog1, we reveal that the signal from hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) flows through Ssk1, the response regulator of the two-component system of the HOG pathway. Downstream signal transduction into the HOG MAPK cascade requires the MAP kinase kinase kinase (MAP3K) Ssk2 but not its paralog Ssk22 or another MAP3K Ste11 of the pathway, culminating in Hog1 phosphorylation via the MAP2K Pbs2. When overexpressed, Ssk2 is also activated in an Ssk1-independent manner. Unlike in mammals, H2 O2 does not cause endoplasmic reticulum stress, which can activate Hog1 through the conventional unfolded protein response. Hog1 activated by H2 O2 is retained in the cytoplasm, but is still able to activate the cAMP- or stress-responsive elements by unknown mechanisms.

  16. Prevention of losses for hog farmers in China: insurance, on-farm biosecurity practices, and vaccination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue-hua; Li, Chu-Shiu; Liu, Chwen-Chi; Chen, Kevin Z

    2013-10-01

    Using agricultural household survey data and claim records from insurers in China, this paper analyzes hog producers' choice of the ways to prevent possible losses and identifies the relationships among biosecurity practices, vaccination, and hog insurance. By combining one probit and two structural equations, we adopt three-stage estimations by a mixed-process model to obtain results. The findings indicate that biosecurity practices provide the basic infrastructure for operating pig farms and complement both the usage of quality vaccines and the uptake of hog insurance. In addition, there is a strong substitution relationship between the quality of vaccine and the demand for hog insurance. Hog farmers that implement better biosecurity practices are more likely to seek high-quality vaccines or buy into hog insurance schemes, but not both. For those households with hog insurance, better biosecurity status, better management practices, and higher-quality vaccines significantly help to reduce loss ratios. However, we also find a moral hazard effect in that higher premium expenditures by the insured households might induce larger loss ratios.

  17. Impact of Biology Laboratory Courses on Students' Science Performance and Views about Laboratory Courses in General: Innovative Measurements and Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Silvia Wen-Yu; Lai, Yung-Chih; Yu, Hon-Tsen Alex; Lin, Yu-Teh Kirk

    2012-01-01

    Despite the fact that some educational researchers believe that laboratory courses promote outcomes in cognitive and affective domains in science learning, others have argued that laboratory courses are costly in relation to their value. Moreover, effective measurement of student learning in the laboratory is an area requiring further…

  18. Impact of Biology Laboratory Courses on Students' Science Performance and Views about Laboratory Courses in General: Innovative Measurements and Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Silvia Wen-Yu; Lai, Yung-Chih; Yu, Hon-Tsen Alex; Lin, Yu-Teh Kirk

    2012-01-01

    Despite the fact that some educational researchers believe that laboratory courses promote outcomes in cognitive and affective domains in science learning, others have argued that laboratory courses are costly in relation to their value. Moreover, effective measurement of student learning in the laboratory is an area requiring further…

  19. Developmental biology of Argas neghmei Kohls & Hoogstraal (Acari: Argasidae) under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    González-Acuña, Daniel; Vargas, Pamela; Ardiles, Karen; Parra, Luis; Guglielmone, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    In order to describe the developmental biology of the tick Argas neghmei Kohls & Hoogstraal under laboratory conditions, 40 females and 40 males were collected from chicken coops located in Calama (II Region, Chile). They were fed on chickens and maintained under two laboratory conditions: one group at 30 +/- 5 degrees C and 35 +/- 5 % RH and another at 27 +/- 5 degrees C and 80 +/- 5 % RH, both at 12: 12 h L:D photoperiod. The ticks were observed daily to determine larval feeding periods, preoviposition, oviposition, egg incubation as well as the frequency of egg laying, number of eggs laid, and percentage of larval hatching. Females did not lay eggs at 80 +/- 5% RH, and data on the biology of this tick was obtained only at 35 +/- 5% RH. The life cycle of A. neghmei lasted an average of 269 days. Feeding period of each nymphal stage as well as of adult females between oviposition events lasted less than a day. Females laid on average 1.8 egg batches and egg-laying period lasted on average 14 days, during which about 96 eggs were laid per female.

  20. How to Generate Understanding of the Scientific Process in Introductory Biology: A Student-Designed Laboratory Exercise on Yeast Fermentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Linda T.; Bell, Rebekah P.

    2004-01-01

    Heavy faculty teaching loads and limited funds biology teachers designed certain objectives in order to increase the understandability of the subject matter of the laboratory exercises they write. In relation to these objectives an old "cookbook" laboratory exercise on yeast fermentation is introduced which involve students asking questions,…

  1. How to Generate Understanding of the Scientific Process in Introductory Biology: A Student-Designed Laboratory Exercise on Yeast Fermentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Linda T.; Bell, Rebekah P.

    2004-01-01

    Heavy faculty teaching loads and limited funds biology teachers designed certain objectives in order to increase the understandability of the subject matter of the laboratory exercises they write. In relation to these objectives an old "cookbook" laboratory exercise on yeast fermentation is introduced which involve students asking questions,…

  2. Fast pedestrian detection based on multiple instance hierarchical HOG matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guang; Meng, Long; Lin, Xinggang

    2013-12-01

    Many pedestrian detection research works focused on the improvement of detection performance, without considering the detection speed, making the detection algorithms not applicable for real-world requirement for real-time processing. To explore this problem, we first propose a pre-processing method Hierarchical HOG Matrices to replace the traditional integral histogram of gradients, which stores more data in the pre-processing phase to reduce computation time. A matrix-based detection computation structure is also proposed, which organize the massive data computations in the scanning detection process into matrix operations to optimize the overall speed. We then add multiple instance learning into the fast pedestrian detection algorithm to further enhance its accuracy. Experiments demonstrate that the proposed fast and robust pedestrian detection algorithm based on the multiple instance feature achieves an accuracy comparable to the latest algorithms, with the best speed among the algorithms with an accuracy of the same level.

  3. The Purification and Concentration of Hog Cholera Virus*

    PubMed Central

    Cunliffe, H. R.; Rebers, P. A.

    1968-01-01

    Partial purification of hog cholera virus (HCV) using a simple batch-type chromatographic procedure with magnetic ferric oxide (MFO) is described. Infectious HCV was adsorbed from isotonic solutions to MFO and was eluted under conditions of low ionic strength and high pH. Aqueous solutions of 0.01 M sodium cyanide or 0.0003 M ammonium hydroxide effectively dissociated MFO-HCV complexes. The data indicate that 50 to 100% of the original HCV infectivity was recovered concomitant with a 90 to 95% reduction of extraneous organic nitrogen. MFO-purified HCV was concentrated by density gradient type centrifugations in buffered solutions of cesium chloride and sucrose. Prolonged isodensity centrifugations of concentrated MFO-purified HCV indicated a buoyant density of 1.14 to 1.15 gm/ml for the strain of virus used. PMID:15846899

  4. Hog cholera virus: molecular composition of virions from a pestivirus.

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, H J; Stark, R; Weiland, E; Rümenapf, T; Meyers, G

    1991-01-01

    Virions from hog cholera virus (HCV), a member of the genus Pestivirus, were analyzed by using specific antibodies. The nucleocapsid protein was found to be a 14-kDa molecule (HCV p14). An equivalent protein could also be demonstrated for virions from another pestivirus, bovine viral diarrhea virus. The HCV envelope is composed of three glycoproteins, HCV gp44/48, gp33, and gp55. All three exist in the form of disulfide-linked dimers in virus-infected cells and in virions; HCV gp44/48 and gp55 each form homodimers, whereas gp55 is also found dimerized with gp33. Such complex covalent interactions between structural glycoproteins have not been described so far for any RNA virus. Images PMID:1870198

  5. Implementation of a Project-Based Molecular Biology Laboratory Emphasizing Protein Structure-Function Relationships in a Large Introductory Biology Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treacy, Daniel J.; Sankaran, Saumya M.; Gordon-Messer, Susannah; Saly, Danielle; Miller, Rebecca; Isaac, R. Stefan; Kosinski-Collins, Melissa S.

    2011-01-01

    In introductory laboratory courses, many universities are turning from traditional laboratories with predictable outcomes to inquiry-inspired, project-based laboratory curricula. In these labs, students are allowed to design at least some portion of their own experiment and interpret new, undiscovered data. We have redesigned the introductory…

  6. Implementation of a Project-Based Molecular Biology Laboratory Emphasizing Protein Structure-Function Relationships in a Large Introductory Biology Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treacy, Daniel J.; Sankaran, Saumya M.; Gordon-Messer, Susannah; Saly, Danielle; Miller, Rebecca; Isaac, R. Stefan; Kosinski-Collins, Melissa S.

    2011-01-01

    In introductory laboratory courses, many universities are turning from traditional laboratories with predictable outcomes to inquiry-inspired, project-based laboratory curricula. In these labs, students are allowed to design at least some portion of their own experiment and interpret new, undiscovered data. We have redesigned the introductory…

  7. Using Phylogenetic Analysis to Detect Market Substitution of Atlantic Salmon for Pacific Salmon: An Introductory Biology Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cline, Erica; Gogarten, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    We describe a laboratory exercise developed for the cell and molecular biology quarter of a year-long majors' undergraduate introductory biology sequence. In an analysis of salmon samples collected by students in their local stores and restaurants, DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis were used to detect market substitution of Atlantic salmon…

  8. Using Phylogenetic Analysis to Detect Market Substitution of Atlantic Salmon for Pacific Salmon: An Introductory Biology Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cline, Erica; Gogarten, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    We describe a laboratory exercise developed for the cell and molecular biology quarter of a year-long majors' undergraduate introductory biology sequence. In an analysis of salmon samples collected by students in their local stores and restaurants, DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis were used to detect market substitution of Atlantic salmon…

  9. 3D nanoscale imaging of biological samples with laboratory-based soft X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehlinger, Aurélie; Blechschmidt, Anne; Grötzsch, Daniel; Jung, Robert; Kanngießer, Birgit; Seim, Christian; Stiel, Holger

    2015-09-01

    In microscopy, where the theoretical resolution limit depends on the wavelength of the probing light, radiation in the soft X-ray regime can be used to analyze samples that cannot be resolved with visible light microscopes. In the case of soft X-ray microscopy in the water-window, the energy range of the radiation lies between the absorption edges of carbon (at 284 eV, 4.36 nm) and oxygen (543 eV, 2.34 nm). As a result, carbon-based structures, such as biological samples, posses a strong absorption, whereas e.g. water is more transparent to this radiation. Microscopy in the water-window, therefore, allows the structural investigation of aqueous samples with resolutions of a few tens of nanometers and a penetration depth of up to 10μm. The development of highly brilliant laser-produced plasma-sources has enabled the transfer of Xray microscopy, that was formerly bound to synchrotron sources, to the laboratory, which opens the access of this method to a broader scientific community. The Laboratory Transmission X-ray Microscope at the Berlin Laboratory for innovative X-ray technologies (BLiX) runs with a laser produced nitrogen plasma that emits radiation in the soft X-ray regime. The mentioned high penetration depth can be exploited to analyze biological samples in their natural state and with several projection angles. The obtained tomogram is the key to a more precise and global analysis of samples originating from various fields of life science.

  10. Laboratory variability does not preclude identification of biological functions impacted by hydroxyurea.

    PubMed

    Müller, Arne; Boitier, Eric; Hu, Ting; Carr, Gregory J; Le Fèvre, Anne-Céline; Marchandeau, Jean-Pierre; Flor, Manoli; Jefferson, Felicia; Aardema, Marilyn J; Thybaud, Véronique

    2005-12-01

    The multi-lab International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) project on the application of genomics to risk assessment offered the unique opportunity to investigate the influence of variability within and between laboratories on identifying biologically relevant gene expression changes. We assessed the gene expression profiles of mouse lymphoma L5178Y cells treated with hydroxyurea (HU) in three independent studies from two different laboratories, Sanofi Aventis and Procter and Gamble. Cells were dosed for 4 hr and harvested immediately at the end of the treatment or after a 20-hr recovery period. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were evaluated by standard assays. Statistical analysis of these data revealed that, while gene expression responses to HU treatment were markedly different at 4 hr vs. 24 hr, there was otherwise a consistent pattern of dose-response across the three studies. Therefore, the studies were merged and each time point was evaluated separately. At 4 hr, we identified 173 (P < 0.0001) dose-responsive genes with a common trend in all three studies. These were mainly associated with the cell cycle, DNA repair and DNA metabolism, and in particular, the intra-S and G2/M phase checkpoints. At 24 hr, we identified 434 dose-responsive genes common across studies. These genes were involved in lymphocyte-specific activities and the activation of apoptosis via the caspase cascade. Our results show that despite inter-laboratory variability, combining the three studies in a single statistical analysis identifies more significantly-modulated genes than in any of the individual studies, due to improved statistical sensitivity. The genes identified in our study provide information that is relevant to HU biology.

  11. A statistical analysis of student questions in a cell biology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Keeling, Elena L; Polacek, Kelly M; Ingram, Ella L

    2009-01-01

    Asking questions is an essential component of the practice of science, but question-asking skills are often underemphasized in science education. In this study, we examined questions written by students as they prepared for laboratory exercises in a senior-level cell biology class. Our goals were to discover 1) what types of questions students asked about laboratory activities, 2) whether the types or quality of questions changed over time, and 3) whether the quality of questions or degree of improvement was related to academic performance. We found a majority of questions were about laboratory outcomes or seeking additional descriptive information about organisms or processes to be studied. Few questions earned the highest possible ranking, which required demonstration of extended thought, integration of information, and/or hypotheses and future experiments, although a majority of students asked such a question at least once. We found no correlation between types of student questions or improvement in questions and final grades. Only a small improvement in overall question quality was seen despite considerable practice at writing questions about science. Our results suggest that improving students' ability to generate higher-order questions may require specific pedagogical intervention.

  12. Effects of the herbicide glyphosate on biological attributes of Alpaida veniliae (Araneae, Araneidae), in laboratory.

    PubMed

    Benamú, M A; Schneider, M I; Sánchez, N E

    2010-02-01

    In the past decades there has been increasing interest in the study of arthropod predators as effective potential natural enemies to be used in the biological control of agricultural pests. In Argentina, transgenic soybean crops (Round-up Ready, RR) are inhabit by many spider species, some of them in high abundance, being indicative of an import potential for pest predation. This crop is associated with the use of glyphosate, a broad-spectrum herbicide, with low environmental impact, even though since the 80's, several negative effects have been deeply documented on mammals, fishes, amphibians, snails, earthworms, insects, etc. Nowadays, the effects on arthropod physiology, behavior and life history traits as end-points in ecotoxicological evaluations are being recognized. In transgenic soybean crops of Buenos Aires province (Argentina), Alpaida veniliae (Araneae, Araneidae) is one of the most abundant orb web weaver spiders. The purpose of this study was to address the effects of glyphosate on some biological attributes of A. veniliae, in laboratory. Results of this study showed no lethal direct effects of Glifoglex on this spider, but it is the first report in literature about sublethal effects of this herbicide on a spider's biological attributes. Negative effects on prey consumption, web building, fecundity, fertility and developmental time of progeny were observed. Although sublethal effects have received less attention than direct lethal effects, they are relevant from an ecological point of view, since the reduction of the arthropod performance may create risks to arthropod biodiversity conservation in agroecosystems.

  13. Semester-long inquiry-based molecular biology laboratory: Transcriptional regulation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Oelkers, Peter M

    2017-03-04

    A single semester molecular biology laboratory has been developed in which students design and execute a project examining transcriptional regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Three weeks of planning are allocated to developing a hypothesis through literature searches and use of bioinformatics. Common experimental plans address a cell process and how three genes that encode for proteins involved in that process are transcriptionally regulated in response to changing environmental conditions. Planning includes designing oligonucleotides to amplify the putative promoters of the three genes of interest. After the PCR, each product is cloned proximal to β-galactosidase in a yeast reporter plasmid. Techniques used include agarose electrophoresis, extraction of DNA from agarose, plasmid purification from bacteria, restriction digestion, ligation, and bacterial transformation. This promoter/reporter plasmid is then transformed into yeast. Transformed yeast are cultured in conditions prescribed in the experimental design, lysed and β-galactosidase activity is measured. The course provides an independent research experience in a group setting. Notebooks are maintained on-line with regular feedback. Projects culminate with the presentation of a poster worth 60% of the grade. Over the last three years, about 65% of students met expectations for experimental design, data acquisition, and analysis. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(2):145-151, 2017. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  14. Field and Laboratory GPR Monitoring of Biological Activity in Saturated Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoflias, Georgios; Schillig, Peter; McGlashan, Michael; Roberts, Jennifer; Devlin, J. F.

    2010-05-01

    Recent studies of the geophysical signatures of biological processes in earth environments have resulted in the emergent field of "biogeophysics". The ability to monitor remotely and to quantify active biological processes in the subsurface can have transformative implications to a wide range of investigations, including the bioremediation of contaminated sites. Previous studies have demonstrated that ground-penetrating radar (GPR) can be used to detect the products of microbial activity in the subsurface, such as changes in bulk electrical conductivity, mineral dissolution and precipitation, and the formation of biogenic gas. We present a field study and a laboratory experiment that offer insights to the response of GPR signals to microbial activity. In the field, time-lapse borehole radar tomography was used to monitor biodegradation of a hydrocarbon plume over a period of two years. A dense grid of fourteen borehole pairs monitoring the bioactive region showed radar wave velocity changes of +/-4% and signal attenuation changes of +/-25%. These GPR observations correlated spatially and temporally to independent measurements of groundwater velocity and geochemical variations that occurred in response to microbial activity. The greatest relative changes in radar wave velocity of propagation and attenuation were observed in the region of enhanced bacterial stimulation where biomass growth was the greatest. Radar wave velocity and attenuation decreased during periods of enhanced biostimulation. Three competing mechanisms are postulated to cause the changes observed in the radar data: 1) biogenic gas production, 2) mineral dissolution, and 3) biomass growth. However, due to the inherent complexity and uncertainties associated with field experimentation, the relative effect of each mechanism on the GPR signal could not be confirmed. To overcome the limitations of field observations in assessing the response of GPR signals to biomass formation, a 90-day laboratory

  15. The Zygosaccharomyces rouxii strain CBS732 contains only one copy of the HOG1 and the SOD2 genes.

    PubMed

    Kinclová, O; Potier, S; Sychrová, H

    2001-06-15

    The osmotolerant yeast Zygosaccharomyces rouxii CBS732 contains only one copy of the ZrHOG1 and ZrSOD2-22 genes. Both genes were cloned and sequenced (Acc. Nos. AJ132606 and AJ252273, respectively) and their sequences were compared to homologous pairs of genes from Z. rouxii ATCC42981 (genes Z-HOG1, Z-HOG2, Z-SOD2, Z-SOD22). The CBS732 ZrHog1p is shorter than its ATCC42981 counterparts (380 aa residues vs. 407 and 420 aa, respectively) and is more similar to ATCC42981 Z-Hog2p than to Z-Hog1p. Also its promoter region corresponds to that one of Z-HOG2. The CBS732 ZrHOG1 promoter region is recognised by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the gene product (MAP kinase ZrHog1p) presence fully complements the osmosensitivity of a S. cerevisiae hog1 mutant strain. The CBS ZrSOD2-22 gene is highly similar to ATCC42981 Z-SOD2 but it contains also a segment of 15 aa residues specific for Z-SOD22. Z. rouxii ZrSod2-22 Na(+)/H(+) antiporter expressed in S. cerevisiae shows better activity toward toxic Na(+) and Li(+) cations than does S. cerevisiae's own Nha1 antiporter, and is efficient in improving the halotolerance of some S. cerevisiae wild types.

  16. Study of the Ubiquitous Hog Farm System Using Wireless Sensor Networks for Environmental Monitoring and Facilities Control

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jeonghwan; Yoe, Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Many hog farmers are now suffering from high pig mortality rates due to various wasting diseases and increased breeding costs, etc. It is therefore necessary for hog farms to implement systematic and scientific pig production technology to increase productivity and produce high quality pork in order to solve these problems. In this study, we describe such a technology by suggesting a ubiquitous hog farm system which applies WSN (Wireless Sensor Network) technology to the pig industry. We suggest that a WSN and CCTV (Closed-circuit television) should be installed on hog farms to collect environmental and image information which shall then help producers not only in monitoring the hog farm via the Web from outside the farm, but also facilitate the control of hog farm facilities in remote locations. In addition, facilities can be automatically controlled based on breeding environment parameters which are already set up and a SMS notice service to notify of deviations shall provide users with convenience. Hog farmers may increase production and improve pork quality through this ubiquitous hog farm system and prepare a database with information collected from environmental factors and the hog farm control devices, which is expected to provide information needed to design and implement suitable control strategies for hog farm operation. PMID:22163497

  17. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Hog1 Mediates Adaptation to G1 Checkpoint Arrest during Arsenite and Hyperosmotic Stress▿

    PubMed Central

    Migdal, Iwona; Ilina, Yulia; Tamás, Markus J.; Wysocki, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Cells slow down cell cycle progression in order to adapt to unfavorable stress conditions. Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) responds to osmotic stress by triggering G1 and G2 checkpoint delays that are dependent on the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) Hog1. The high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway is also activated by arsenite, and the hog1Δ mutant is highly sensitive to arsenite, partly due to increased arsenite influx into hog1Δ cells. Yeast cell cycle regulation in response to arsenite and the role of Hog1 in this process have not yet been analyzed. Here, we found that long-term exposure to arsenite led to transient G1 and G2 delays in wild-type cells, whereas cells that lack the HOG1 gene or are defective in Hog1 kinase activity displayed persistent G1 cell cycle arrest. Elevated levels of intracellular arsenite and “cross talk” between the HOG and pheromone response pathways, observed in arsenite-treated hog1Δ cells, prolonged the G1 delay but did not cause a persistent G1 arrest. In contrast, deletion of the SIC1 gene encoding a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor fully suppressed the observed block of G1 exit in hog1Δ cells. Moreover, the Sic1 protein was stabilized in arsenite-treated hog1Δ cells. Interestingly, Sic1-dependent persistent G1 arrest was also observed in hog1Δ cells during hyperosmotic stress. Taken together, our data point to an important role of the Hog1 kinase in adaptation to stress-induced G1 cell cycle arrest. PMID:18552285

  18. Fetal sex chromosome testing by maternal plasma DNA sequencing: clinical laboratory experience and biology.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Diana W; Parsa, Saba; Bhatt, Sucheta; Halks-Miller, Meredith; Kurtzman, Kathryn; Sehnert, Amy J; Swanson, Amy

    2015-02-01

    To describe the clinical experience with noninvasive prenatal testing for fetal sex chromosomes using sequencing of maternal plasma cell-free DNA in a commercial laboratory. A noninvasive prenatal testing laboratory data set was examined for samples in which fetal sex chromosomes were reported. Available clinical outcomes were reviewed. Of 18,161 samples with sex chromosome results, no sex chromosome aneuploidy was detected in 98.9% and the fetal sex was reported as XY (9,236) or XX (8,721). In 4 of 32 cases in which the fetal sex was reportedly discordant between noninvasive prenatal testing and karyotype or ultrasonogram, a potential biological reason for the discordance exists, including two cases of documented co-twin demise, one case of a maternal kidney transplant from a male donor, and one case of fetal ambiguous genitalia. In the remaining 204 samples (1.1%), one of four sex chromosome aneuploidies (monosomy X, XXX, XXY, or XYY) was detected. The frequency of false positive results for sex chromosome aneuploidies is a minimum of 0.26% and a maximum of 1.05%. All but one of the discordant sex chromosome aneuploidy results involved the X chromosome. In two putative false-positive XXX cases, maternal XXX was confirmed by karyotype. For the false-positive cases, mean maternal age was significantly higher in monosomy X (P<.001) and lower in XXX (P=.008). Noninvasive prenatal testing results for sex chromosome aneuploidy can be confounded by maternal or fetal biological phenomena. When a discordant noninvasive prenatal testing result is encountered, resolution requires additional maternal history, detailed fetal ultrasonography, and determination of fetal and possibly maternal karyotypes.

  19. [Comparative biology and feeding behavior of Rhodnius neglectus and Rhodnius robustus (Triatominae) under laboratory conditions].

    PubMed

    Barreto-Santana, Daniella; Starling, Jacqueline; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo; Cuba, César Augusto Cuba

    2011-01-01

    The vector competence of triatomine insects is determined by studying their biology and feeding behavior under field and/or laboratory conditions. Factors including the number of bites, the amount of blood ingested and defecation time have implications for trypanosome transmission. The biological and behavioral parameters of Rhodnius neglectus and R. robustus were compared under experimental conditions to estimate differences in the potential transmission of trypanosomes. The insects were observed daily to determine the period of nymphal development, mortality, detection of food source, number of bites, time of blood meal intake, amount of blood ingested, time elapsed between the end of the meal and the first defecation and the frequency of defecation. Although the nymphal development of R. neglectus (156.4 ± 25.05d) was lower than that of R. robustus (204.7 ± 13.22d), the mortality between species was similar (63.8 and 65% respectively).R. robustus and R. neglectus quickly located the food source, especially in the first instar (2.5 and 1.6 min, respectively). Although the time of blood meal intake was similar between the species, R. robustus ingested a larger amount of blood on average at all stages and exhibited higher values for the fifth instar. Nymphs of R. neglectus bit more frequently, and they defecated faster and more often than those of R. robustus. Under laboratory conditions, R. neglectus has a greater potential for transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi and T. rangeli than does R. robustus, an attribute that should be further evaluated in experimental infections.

  20. Tested Studies for Laboratory Teaching. Proceedings of the Workshop/Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) (13th, Laramie, Wyoming, June 11-15, 1991). Volume 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Corey A., Ed.

    The focus of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) is to improve the undergraduate biology laboratory experience by promoting the development and dissemination of interesting, innovative, and reliable laboratory exercises. This proceedings volume contains 10 papers: "Testing Issues of Foraging and Flocking Behavior" (C. C.…

  1. Tested Studies for Laboratory Teaching. Proceedings. Workshop/Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) (11th, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada, June 12-16, 1989). Volume 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Corey A., Ed.

    The focus of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) is to improve the undergraduate biology laboratory experience by promoting the development and dissemination of interesting, innovative, and reliable laboratory exercises. This proceedings volume contains 10 papers: "Investigating Fungi Which Cause Rot and Decay" (J. A Johnson);…

  2. Tested Studies for Laboratory Teaching. Proceedings of the Workshop/Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) (15th, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, June 8-12, 1993). Volume 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Corey A., Ed.

    The focus of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) is to improve the undergraduate biology laboratory experience by promoting the development and dissemination of interesting, innovative, and reliable laboratory exercises. This proceedings volume contains 18 papers: "Human DNA Fingerprinting by Polymerase Chain Reaction" (M. V.…

  3. Tested Studies for Laboratory Teaching. Proceedings of the Workshop/Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) (14th, Las Vegas, Nevada, June 2-6, 1992). Volume 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Corey A., Ed.

    The focus of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) is to improve undergraduate biology laboratory experiences by promoting the development and dissemination of interesting, innovative, and reliable laboratory exercises. This proceedings volume contains 11 papers: "A Practical Guide to the Use of Cellular Slime Molds for…

  4. Tested Studies for Laboratory Teaching. Proceedings. Workshop/Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) (11th, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada, June 12-16, 1989). Volume 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Corey A., Ed.

    The focus of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) is to improve the undergraduate biology laboratory experience by promoting the development and dissemination of interesting, innovative, and reliable laboratory exercises. This proceedings volume contains 10 papers: "Investigating Fungi Which Cause Rot and Decay" (J. A Johnson);…

  5. Tested Studies for Laboratory Teaching. Proceedings of the Workshop/Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) (5th, Clemson, South Carolina, June 13-17, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Corey A., Ed.; And Others

    The focus of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) is to improve the undergraduate biology laboratory experience by promoting the development and dissemination of interesting, innovative, and reliable laboratory exercises. This proceedings volume contains eight papers: "Bacterial Transformation" (M. J. Ernest & N. J. Rosenbaum);…

  6. Tested Studies for Laboratory Teaching. Proceedings of the Workshop/Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) (5th, Clemson, South Carolina, June 13-17, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Corey A., Ed.; And Others

    The focus of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) is to improve the undergraduate biology laboratory experience by promoting the development and dissemination of interesting, innovative, and reliable laboratory exercises. This proceedings volume contains eight papers: "Bacterial Transformation" (M. J. Ernest & N. J. Rosenbaum);…

  7. Tested Studies for Laboratory Teaching. Proceedings of the Workshop/Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) (13th, Laramie, Wyoming, June 11-15, 1991). Volume 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Corey A., Ed.

    The focus of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) is to improve the undergraduate biology laboratory experience by promoting the development and dissemination of interesting, innovative, and reliable laboratory exercises. This proceedings volume contains 10 papers: "Testing Issues of Foraging and Flocking Behavior" (C. C.…

  8. Tested Studies for Laboratory Teaching. Proceedings of the Workshop/Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) (15th, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, June 8-12, 1993). Volume 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Corey A., Ed.

    The focus of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) is to improve the undergraduate biology laboratory experience by promoting the development and dissemination of interesting, innovative, and reliable laboratory exercises. This proceedings volume contains 18 papers: "Human DNA Fingerprinting by Polymerase Chain Reaction" (M. V.…

  9. Tested Studies for Laboratory Teaching. Proceedings of the Workshop/Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) (12th, Springfield, Missouri, June 4-8, 1990). Volume 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Corey A., Ed.

    The focus of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) is to improve the undergraduate biology laboratory experience by promoting the development and dissemination of interesting, innovative, and reliable laboratory exercises. This proceedings volume includes 13 papers: "Non-Radioactive DNA Hybridization Experiments for the…

  10. Tested Studies for Laboratory Teaching. Proceedings of the Workshop/Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) (12th, Springfield, Missouri, June 4-8, 1990). Volume 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Corey A., Ed.

    The focus of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) is to improve the undergraduate biology laboratory experience by promoting the development and dissemination of interesting, innovative, and reliable laboratory exercises. This proceedings volume includes 13 papers: "Non-Radioactive DNA Hybridization Experiments for the…

  11. Tested Studies for Laboratory Teaching. Proceedings of the Workshop/Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) (14th, Las Vegas, Nevada, June 2-6, 1992). Volume 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Corey A., Ed.

    The focus of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) is to improve undergraduate biology laboratory experiences by promoting the development and dissemination of interesting, innovative, and reliable laboratory exercises. This proceedings volume contains 11 papers: "A Practical Guide to the Use of Cellular Slime Molds for…

  12. A Hybrid Vehicle Detection Method Based on Viola-Jones and HOG + SVM from UAV Images.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yongzheng; Yu, Guizhen; Wang, Yunpeng; Wu, Xinkai; Ma, Yalong

    2016-08-19

    A new hybrid vehicle detection scheme which integrates the Viola-Jones (V-J) and linear SVM classifier with HOG feature (HOG + SVM) methods is proposed for vehicle detection from low-altitude unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) images. As both V-J and HOG + SVM are sensitive to on-road vehicles' in-plane rotation, the proposed scheme first adopts a roadway orientation adjustment method, which rotates each UAV image to align the roads with the horizontal direction so the original V-J or HOG + SVM method can be directly applied to achieve fast detection and high accuracy. To address the issue of descending detection speed for V-J and HOG + SVM, the proposed scheme further develops an adaptive switching strategy which sophistically integrates V-J and HOG + SVM methods based on their different descending trends of detection speed to improve detection efficiency. A comprehensive evaluation shows that the switching strategy, combined with the road orientation adjustment method, can significantly improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the vehicle detection from UAV images. The results also show that the proposed vehicle detection method is competitive compared with other existing vehicle detection methods. Furthermore, since the proposed vehicle detection method can be performed on videos captured from moving UAV platforms without the need of image registration or additional road database, it has great potentials of field applications. Future research will be focusing on expanding the current method for detecting other transportation modes such as buses, trucks, motors, bicycles, and pedestrians.

  13. A Hybrid Vehicle Detection Method Based on Viola-Jones and HOG + SVM from UAV Images

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yongzheng; Yu, Guizhen; Wang, Yunpeng; Wu, Xinkai; Ma, Yalong

    2016-01-01

    A new hybrid vehicle detection scheme which integrates the Viola-Jones (V-J) and linear SVM classifier with HOG feature (HOG + SVM) methods is proposed for vehicle detection from low-altitude unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) images. As both V-J and HOG + SVM are sensitive to on-road vehicles’ in-plane rotation, the proposed scheme first adopts a roadway orientation adjustment method, which rotates each UAV image to align the roads with the horizontal direction so the original V-J or HOG + SVM method can be directly applied to achieve fast detection and high accuracy. To address the issue of descending detection speed for V-J and HOG + SVM, the proposed scheme further develops an adaptive switching strategy which sophistically integrates V-J and HOG + SVM methods based on their different descending trends of detection speed to improve detection efficiency. A comprehensive evaluation shows that the switching strategy, combined with the road orientation adjustment method, can significantly improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the vehicle detection from UAV images. The results also show that the proposed vehicle detection method is competitive compared with other existing vehicle detection methods. Furthermore, since the proposed vehicle detection method can be performed on videos captured from moving UAV platforms without the need of image registration or additional road database, it has great potentials of field applications. Future research will be focusing on expanding the current method for detecting other transportation modes such as buses, trucks, motors, bicycles, and pedestrians. PMID:27548179

  14. Hog1 Targets Whi5 and Msa1 Transcription Factors To Downregulate Cyclin Expression upon Stress

    PubMed Central

    González-Novo, Alberto; Jiménez, Javier; Clotet, Josep; Nadal-Ribelles, Mariona; Cavero, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    Yeast cells have developed complex mechanisms to cope with extracellular insults. An increase in external osmolarity leads to activation of the stress-activated protein kinase Hog1, which is the main regulator of adaptive responses, such as gene expression and cell cycle progression, that are essential for cellular survival. Upon osmostress, the G1-to-S transition is regulated by Hog1 through stabilization of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor Sic1 and the downregulation of G1 cyclin expression by an unclear mechanism. Here, we show that Hog1 interacts with and phosphorylates components of the core cell cycle transcriptional machinery such as Whi5 and the coregulator Msa1. Phosphorylation of these two transcriptional regulators by Hog1 is essential for inhibition of G1 cyclin expression, for control of cell morphogenesis, and for maximal cell survival upon stress. The control of both Whi5 and Msa1 by Hog1 also revealed the necessity for proper coordination of budding and DNA replication. Thus, Hog1 regulates G1 cyclin transcription upon osmostress to ensure coherent passage through Start. PMID:25733686

  15. Laboratory and field evaluation of a biological monitoring system using Corbicula fluminea and Mulinia lateralis

    SciTech Connect

    Waller, W.T.; Allen, H.J.; Schwalm, F.U.; Acevedo, M.F.; Ammann, L.P.; Dickson, K.L.; Kennedy, J.H.; Morgan, E.L.

    1995-12-31

    Laboratory and field experiments have been performed to evaluate a non-invasive biomonitoring system using the Asiatic clam Corbicula fluminea and Mulinia lateralis. C. fluminea was exposed to simulated episodic toxicity events in the laboratory using copper, diazinon, and regulated flow rates. Group behavior during these simulated events was compared to behavior during unstressed periods to develop a statistical model and an alarm criteria. Bayou Chico, Pensacola Bay, FL, was the site for field experiments in which M. lateralis was placed in situ to evaluate the performance of the biomonitoring system. The biomonitoring system consists of proximity sensors which detect an aluminum foil target attached to the valve of an organism. Valve movements of the clams are then digitally recorded using a personal computer. Data collected from remote sites are telemetered to the lab using short wave radio. In its final form, the authors envision an in situ biological monitoring system using bivalves deployed in aquatic systems in conjunction with automated monitoring systems like those found at USGS gauging stations. A tool such as this could be used as a warning system to increase the probability of detecting toxic events as they occur.

  16. Inferring microbial interactions in thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digestion of hog waste

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Grace Tzun-Wen; Liu, An-Chi; Weng, Chieh-Yin; Chou, Chu-Yang

    2017-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AnD) is a microbiological process that converts organic waste materials into biogas. Because of its high methane content, biogas is a combustible energy source and serves as an important environmental technology commonly used in the management of animal waste generated on large animal farms. Much work has been done on hardware design and process engineering for the generation of biogas. However, little is known about the complexity of the microbiology in this process. In particular, how microbes interact in the digester and eventually breakdown and convert organic matter into biogas is still regarded as a “black box.” We used 16S rRNA sequencing as a tool to study the microbial community in laboratory hog waste digesters under tightly controlled conditions, and systematically unraveled the distinct interaction networks of two microbial communities from mesophilic (MAnD) and thermophilic anaerobic digestion (TAnD). Under thermophilic conditions, the well-known association between hydrogen-producing bacteria, e.g., Ruminococcaceae and Prevotellaceae, and hydrotrophic methanogens, Methanomicrobiaceae, was reverse engineered by their interactive topological niches. The inferred interaction network provides a sketch enabling the determination of microbial interactive relationships that conventional strategy of finding differential taxa was hard to achieve. This research is still in its infancy, but it can help to depict the dynamics of microbial ecosystems and to lay the groundwork for understanding how microorganisms cohabit in the anaerobic digester. PMID:28732056

  17. Class III Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Acute Leukemia – Biological Functions and Modern Laboratory Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Berenstein, Rimma

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a complex disease caused by deregulation of multiple signaling pathways. Mutations in class III receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) have been implicated in alteration of cell signals concerning the growth and differentiation of leukemic cells. Point mutations, insertions, or deletions of RTKs as well as chromosomal translocations induce constitutive activation of the receptor, leading to uncontrolled proliferation of undifferentiated myeloid blasts. Aberrations can occur in all domains of RTKs causing either the ligand-independent activation or mimicking the activated conformation. The World Health Organization recommended including RTK mutations in the AML classification since their detection in routine laboratory diagnostics is a major factor for prognostic stratification of patients. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)–based methods are well-validated for the detection of fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) mutations and can easily be applied for other RTKs. However, when methodological limitations are reached, accessory techniques can be applied. For a higher resolution and more quantitative approach compared to agarose gel electrophoresis, PCR fragments can be separated by capillary electrophoresis. Furthermore, high-resolution melting and denaturing high-pressure liquid chromatography are reliable presequencing screening methods that reduce the sample amount for Sanger sequencing. Because traditional DNA sequencing is time-consuming, next-generation sequencing (NGS) is an innovative modern possibility to analyze a high amount of samples simultaneously in a short period of time. At present, standardized procedures for NGS are not established, but when this barrier is resolved, it will provide a new platform for rapid and reliable laboratory diagnostic of RTK mutations in patients with AML. In this article, the biological and physiological role of RTK mutations in AML as well as possible laboratory methods for their detection will be

  18. Biology of Cerotoma arcuatus (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and field validation of a laboratory model for temperature requirements.

    PubMed

    Nava, Dori Edson; Parra, José Roberto Postali

    2003-06-01

    Cerotoma arcuatus Olivier is a polyphagous pest of legumes [soybean, Glycine max (L.); dry beans, Phaseolus vulgaris (L.); and cowpeas, Vigna unguiculata (L.)], all of which are considered important protein sources for humans and domestic animals. Studies on the biology and temperature requirements of C. arcuatus were made under laboratory and field (cage) conditions. In the laboratory, insects were reared on soybean plants in incubators held at 18, 20, 22, 25, 28, 30, or 32 degrees C, 70 +/- 10% RH, and a photoperiod of 14:10 (L:D) h. A degree-days (DD) model developed based on the incubator data were validated in the field based on air and soil temperatures. The duration of the egg, larva-to-adult, and egg-to-adult period was inversely correlated with the temperature within the range of 18-32 degrees C, with the highest viability found from 20 to 30 degrees C. The temperature threshold for development and the thermal constant for the egg phase and the larva-to-adult periods were 13.6 degrees C and 106.7 DD, 8.3 degrees C and 399.4 DD, and 10.7 degrees C and 489.0 DD, respectively. The DD model for the egg-to-adult period, calculated using constant temperatures in the laboratory, was found to be valid for populations of C. arcuatus in the field, based on the fluctuating air and soil temperatures, although air temperatures provided more precise predictions. These data provide support for the rational control of this pest through population predictions based on their temperature requirements.

  19. Laboratory study of biological response of juvenile salmon subjected to turbulent shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Zhiqun; Richmond, Marshall C.; Mueller, Robert P.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2005-07-21

    The objective of this study is to establish correlation metrics between Sensor Fish measurements and live fish injuries through well-controlled laboratory studies, and relate the findings of field studies and computational fluid dynamics modeling to the Sensor Fish measurements in the turbine environment. We exposed juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawythscha) and Sensor Fish devices to a laboratory-generated turbulent shear environment to determine whether observed biological responses could be linked to hydraulic conditions. Since its field trials in 1999, the Sensor Fish device has been an important tool to characterize the exposure conditions that fish experience during turbine, spillway, and other hydraulic environments. The live fish and Sensor Fish were introduced into the top portion of a submerged, 6.35-cm diameter water jet at velocities ranging from 12.2 to 19.8 m-s-1, with a control group released at 3 m.s-1. Injuries typical of simulated turbine-exposures include eye damage, opercle damage, bruising, loss of equilibrium, lethargy, and mortality. Digital video images were captured by two high-speed, high-resolution cameras. Advanced motion analysis was performed to obtain three-dimensional trajectories of Sensor Fish and juvenile salmon, from which time series of the velocity, acceleration, jerk, fish body bending, and force magnitudes were calculated. The motion is then correlated with live fish injury and mortality data and related kinematic/dynamic parameters. This study provides improved understanding of the location and dynamics of conditions deleterious to fish passage, and linkage between laboratory, field studies, and computational fluid dynamics simulations.

  20. First annual report on the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Loar, J. M.; Adams, S. M.; Blaylock, B. G.; Boston, H. L.; Frank, M. L.; Garten, C. T.; Houston, M. A.; Kimmel, B. L.; Ryon, M. G.; Smith, J. G.; Southworth, G. R.; Stewart, A. J.; Walton, B. T.; Berry, J. B.; Talmage, S. S.; Amano, H.; Jimenez, B. D.; Kitchings, J. T.; Meyers-Schoene, L.; Mohrbacher, D. A.; Olsen, C. R.

    1992-08-01

    As a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC); selected tributaries of WOC, including Fifth Creek, First Creek, Melton Branch, and Northwest Tributary; and the Clinch River. BMAP consists of seven major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs on-site and the aquatic environs off-site. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring; (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota; (3) biological indicator studies; (4) instream ecological monitoring; (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment; (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake (WOL); and (7) contaminant transport, distribution, and fate in the WOC embayment-Clinch River-Watts Bar Reservoir system. This document, the first of a series of annual reports presenting the results of BMAP, describes studies that were conducted from March through December 1986.

  1. Using a Module-based Laboratory To Incorporate Inquiry into a Large Cell Biology Course

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Because cell biology has rapidly increased in breadth and depth, instructors are challenged not only to provide undergraduate science students with a strong, up-to-date foundation of knowledge, but also to engage them in the scientific process. To these ends, revision of the Cell Biology Lab course at the University of Wisconsin–La Crosse was undertaken to allow student involvement in experimental design, emphasize data collection and analysis, make connections to the “big picture,” and increase student interest in the field. Multiweek laboratory modules were developed as a method to establish an inquiry-based learning environment. Each module utilizes relevant techniques to investigate one or more questions within the context of a fictional story, and there is a progression during the semester from more instructor-guided to more open-ended student investigation. An assessment tool was developed to evaluate student attitudes regarding their lab experience. Analysis of five semesters of data strongly supports the module format as a successful model for inquiry education by increasing student interest and improving attitude toward learning. In addition, student performance on inquiry-based assignments improved over the course of each semester, suggesting an improvement in inquiry-related skills. PMID:16220145

  2. Cloning yeast actin cDNA leads to an investigative approach for the molecular biology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Black, Michael W; Tuan, Alice; Jonasson, Erin

    2008-05-01

    The emergence of molecular tools in multiple disciplines has elevated the importance of undergraduate laboratory courses that train students in molecular biology techniques. Although it would also be desirable to provide students with opportunities to apply these techniques in an investigative manner, this is generally not possible in the classroom because of the preparation, expense, and logistics involved in independent student projects. The authors have designed a 10-week lab series that mimics the research environment by tying separate fundamental lab techniques to a common goal: to build a plasmid with yeast actin cDNA cloned in a particular orientation. In the process of completing this goal, a problem arises in that students are unable to obtain the target plasmid and instead only recover the gene cloned in the opposite orientation. To address this problem, students identify four plausible hypotheses and work in teams to address them by designing and executing experiments. This project reinforces the utility and flexibility of techniques covered earlier in the class and serves to develop their skills in experimental design and analysis. As the project is focused on one problem, the diversity of experimental approaches is limited and may be prepared in advance with little additional expense in reagents or technical support. Copyright © 2008 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Biological investigations of the Sandia National Laboratories Sol se Mete Aerial Cable Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.M.

    1994-10-01

    This report provides results of a comprehensive biological field survey performed on the Sandia National Laboratories Aerial Cable Facility, at the east end of Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB), Bernalillo County, New Mexico. This survey was conducted late September through October, 1991. ACF occupies a 440-acre tract of land withdrawn by the US Forest Service (USFS) for use by KAFB, and in turn placed under operational control of SNL by the Department of Energy (DOE). All land used by SNL for ACF is part of a 15,851-acre tract of land withdrawn by the US Forest Service. In addition, a number of different organizations use the 15,851-acre area. The project area used by SNL encompasses portions of approximately six sections (3,840 acres) of US Forest Service land located within the foothills of the west side of the Manzano Mountains (East Mesa). The biological study area is used by the KAFB, the US Department of Interior, and SNL. This area includes: (1) Sol se Mete Springs and Canyon, (2) East Anchor Access Road, (3) East Anchor Site, (4) Rocket Sled Track, (5) North Arena, (6) East Instrumentation Site and Access Road, (7) West Anchor Access Road, (8) West Anchor Site, (9) South Arena, (10) Winch Sites, (11) West Instrumentation Sites, (12) Explosive Assembly Building, (13) Control Building, (14) Lurance Canyon Road and vicinity. Although portions of approximately 960 acres of withdrawn US Forest Service land have been altered, only 700 acres have been disturbed by activities associated with ACF; approximately 2,880 acres consist of natural habitat. Absence of grazing by livestock and possibly native ungulates, and relative lack of human disturbance have allowed this area to remain in a more natural vegetative state relative to the condition of private range lands throughout New Mexico. This report evaluates threatened and endangered species found on ACF, as well as a comprehensive assessment of biological habitats.

  4. Horse Manure and Other Fun Projects. Field Studies and Laboratory Experiences in Environmental Biology - A Book of Experimental Ideas for Secondary School Biology Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Robert T., Ed.; Clark, Barbara G., Ed.

    This guide contains a collection of laboratory and field inquiries designed to promote ecological awareness, sensitivity, and understanding. The activities compiled by 28 teachers are for use in teaching biology at the secondary level. They are presented in a "recipe" form to make it possible for teachers without prior experience or training to…

  5. Assessing hog lagoon waste contamination in the Cape Fear Watershed using Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Arfken, Ann M; Song, Bongkeun; Mallin, Michael A

    2015-09-01

    Hog lagoons can be major sources of waste and nutrient contamination to watersheds adjacent to pig farms. Fecal source tracking methods targeting Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA genes in pig fecal matter may underestimate or fail to detect hog lagoon contamination in riverine environments. In order to detect hog lagoon wastewater contamination in the Cape Fear Watershed, where a large number of hog farms are present, we conducted pyrosequencing analyses of Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA genes in hog lagoon waste and identified new hog lagoon-specific marker sequences. Additional pyrosequencing analyses of Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA genes were conducted with surface water samples collected at 4 sites during 5 months in the Cape Fear Watershed. Using an operational taxonomic unit (OTU) identity cutoff value of 97 %, these newly identified hog lagoon markers were found in 3 of the river samples, while only 1 sample contained the pig fecal marker. In the sample containing the pig fecal marker, there was a relatively high percentage (14.1 %) of the hog lagoon markers and a low pig fecal marker relative abundance of 0.4 % in the Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA gene sequences. This suggests that hog lagoon contamination must be somewhat significant in order for pig fecal markers to be detected, and low levels of hog lagoon contamination cannot be detected targeting only pig-specific fecal markers. Thus, new hog lagoon markers have a better detection capacity for lagoon waste contamination, and in conjunction with a pig fecal marker, provide a more comprehensive and accurate detection of hog lagoon waste contamination in susceptible watersheds.

  6. Arabic sign language recognition based on HOG descriptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Jmaa, Ahmed; Mahdi, Walid; Ben Jemaa, Yousra; Ben Hamadou, Abdelmajid

    2017-02-01

    We present in this paper a new approach for Arabic sign language (ArSL) alphabet recognition using hand gesture analysis. This analysis consists in extracting a histogram of oriented gradient (HOG) features from a hand image and then using them to generate an SVM Models. Which will be used to recognize the ArSL alphabet in real-time from hand gesture using a Microsoft Kinect camera. Our approach involves three steps: (i) Hand detection and localization using a Microsoft Kinect camera, (ii) hand segmentation and (iii) feature extraction using Arabic alphabet recognition. One each input image first obtained by using a depth sensor, we apply our method based on hand anatomy to segment hand and eliminate all the errors pixels. This approach is invariant to scale, to rotation and to translation of the hand. Some experimental results show the effectiveness of our new approach. Experiment revealed that the proposed ArSL system is able to recognize the ArSL with an accuracy of 90.12%.

  7. Assessment and evaluation of science process skills in secondary school biology laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujawinski, Daniel Bernard

    Awareness of the importance of process skills in science education has increased, but practical methods of assessing student performance of these skills has received minimal attention. The purpose of this dissertation is to examine how student science process skills may be accurately and reliably measured and evaluated. A set of laboratory activities that emphasized process skills was developed by 12 science educators from the western New York area who were participants in a summer institute sponsored by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. These innovative laboratory activities were designed to be used in existing secondary school biology courses by students of different ages and ability levels. Student performance in the four general process categories of planning, performing, reasoning, and communicating was broken down into twenty specific, individual science process skills deemed important to science education. Nine teacher developers used these twelve activities, entirely and/or partially with their high school biology students during the 1995-1996 school year. Two types of assessment instruments were developed and field-tested for the purpose of evaluating student self evaluation and performance of the twenty individual science process skills. The first was an inventory that asked for the students' self-evaluation of their abilities to perform each of the twenty process skills based on the current year's laboratory experiences. The second was a set of three performance tasks which assessed the twenty skills and were to be completed by the students in a laboratory setting under supervision of their classroom teacher and the researcher. During May and early June, 1996, the student self-evaluation inventory and the three performance tasks were administered to 94 students of teachers in 6 schools who developed and used the activities (HH95, experimental group) and to 126 students of teachers in 9 schools that did not use the activities (HH96, control group). All

  8. Characterization of the Hog1 MAPK pathway in the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Zhi-Kang; Sun, Huan-Huan; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2017-01-11

    High-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway required for yeast osmoregulation relies upon the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) Hog1 cascade that comprise the MAPKKKs Ssk2/Ssk22 and Ste11 converging on the MAPKK Pbs2. Here we show a Hog1 cascade with the unique MAPKKK Ssk2 acting in Beauveria bassiana. Hypersensitivity to high osmolarity and high resistance to fludioxonil fungicide appeared in Δssk2, Δpbs2 and Δhog1 mutants whereas the two hallmark phenotypes were reversed in Δste11. Increased sensitivity to heat shock and decreased sensitivity to cell wall perturbation also occurred in the three mutants but not in Δste11 although antioxidant phenotypes were different in all deletion mutants. Intriguingly, signals of Hog1 phosphorylation induced by osmotic, oxidative and thermal cues were present in Δste11 but absent in Δssk2 and Δpbs2. Moreover, vegetative growth on minimal media with different carbon/nitrogen sources was much more suppressed in Δste11 and Δssk2 than in Δpbs2 and Δhog1 although all mutants suffered similar, but severe, conidiation defects on a standard medium. Normal host infection was abolished in Δste11 while virulence was differentially attenuated in other mutants. Our findings exclude Ste11 from the Hog1 cascade that regulates multiple stress responses and environmental adaptation of B. bassiana and perhaps other filamentous fungi. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Faecal steroid metabolites for non-invasive assessment of reproduction in common warthogs (Phacochoerus africanus), red river hogs (Potamochoerus porcus) and babirusa (Babyrousa babyrussa).

    PubMed

    Berger, Eva M; Leus, Kristin; Vercammen, Paul; Schwarzenberger, Franz

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to analyse faecal steroid metabolites in African and South East Asian pig species kept in European zoos. Species studied were the warthog (Phacochoerus africanus), the red river hog (Potamochoerus porcus) and the babirusa (Babyrousa babyrussa). Faecal samples were collected 1-3 times per week from non-pregnant and pregnant captive female warthogs (n = 9), red river hogs (n = 7) and babirusas (n = 5). Enzyme-immunoassays for faecal progesterone, androgen, and oestrogen metabolites, were tested for their ability to determine follicular and luteal phases. In all three species, oestrous cycles could be monitored with 20alpha-OH- and 20-oxo-pregnane assays. In contrast, oestrogens and androgens were not useful in characterising follicular activity during the oestrous cycle in any species. Faecal 20alpha-OH- and 20-oxo-pregnane values were significantly correlated. Faecal pregnane concentrations revealed species-specific differences. Luteal phase values of 20alpha-OH-pregnanes were considerably higher than 20-oxo-pregnanes; 20alpha-OH-pregnanes were in the range of 3-10 microg/g in warthogs and red river hogs, whereas concentrations were 30-200 microg/g faeces in the babirusa. Regular oestrus cycles had a length of about 35 days in all three species studied. Results indicated a seasonal influence on the occurrence of reproductive cycles in the warthog with anoestrous periods in the European summer. The red river hog was found to be a seasonal and poly oestrous breeder; oestrus cycles started by January and continued until summer. In contrast, the babirusa showed non-seasonal ovarian cyclicity. In pregnant red river hogs, progesterone metabolites were comparable to luteal phase values of the oestrous cycle during the first 3 months of gestation, but did further increase during the last month of pregnancy. Oestrogens and 17-oxo-androstanes were significantly elevated during the second half of gestation. In summary, the reproductive biology

  10. Construction, implementation, and evaluation of an undergraduate biology laboratory teaching model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarrant, Todd M.

    This dissertation documents a time series study in which an undergraduate non-majors biology laboratory was revised, leading to the development of a new teaching model. The course model was developed at a large Midwestern university enrolling about 827 students in 32 sections per semester and using graduate teaching assistants as primary instructors. The majority of the students consisted of freshman and sophomores, with the remainder being juniors and seniors. This dissertation explains the rationale leading to the development and implementation of this educational model using graduate teaching assistants as the primary course instructors and embedded course assessment as evidence of its success. The major components of this model include six major items including: learning community, course design, GTA professional development, course delivery, assessment, and the filter. The major aspects of this model include clear links between instruction, GTA professional development, embedded assessment (student and GTA), course revision, student perceptions, and performance. The model includes the following components: Formal and informal discourse in the learning community, teaching assistant professional development, the use of multiple assessment tools, a filter to guide course evaluation, and redirection and delivery of course content based on embedded formal course assessment. Teaching assistants receive both initial and ongoing professional development throughout the semester in effective instructional pedagogy from an instructor of record. Results for three years of operation show a significant increase in student biology content knowledge and the use of scientific process/critical thinking skills with mean improvement in student performance of 25.5% and 18.9% respectively. Mean attendance for ISB 208L is 95% for the six semesters of this study showing students regularly attend the laboratory classes and remain in the course with a completion rate of 93

  11. Robotic nanolitre protein crystallisation at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology.

    PubMed

    Stock, Daniela; Perisic, Olga; Löwe, Jan

    2005-07-01

    We have set up high-throughput robotic systems to screen and optimise crystallisation conditions of biological macromolecules with the aim to make difficult structural biology projects easier. The initial screening involves two robots. A Tecan Genesis liquid handler is used to transfer commercially available crystallisation reagents from 15 ml test tubes into the reservoirs of 96-well crystallisation plates. This step is fully automated and includes a carousel for intermediate plate storage, a Beckman plate sealer and a robotic arm, which transfers plates in between steps. For adding the sample, we use a second robot, a 17-tip Cartesian Technologies PixSys 4200 SynQuad liquid handler, which uses a syringe/solenoid valve combination to dispense small quantities of liquid (typically 100 nl) without touching the surface of the plate. Sixteen of the tips are used to transfer the reservoir solution to the crystallisation wells, while the 17th tip is used to dispense the protein. The screening of our standard set of 1440 conditions takes about 3 h and requires 300 microl of protein solution. Once crystallisation conditions have been found, they are optimised using a second Tecan Genesis liquid handler, which is programmed to pipette gradients from four different corner solutions into a wide range of crystallisation plate formats. For 96-well plates, the Cartesian robot can be used to add the sample. The methods described are now used almost exclusively for obtaining diffraction quality crystals in our laboratory with a throughput of several thousand plates per year. Our set-up has been copied in many institutions worldwide.

  12. Biology of the Mealybug, Phenacoccus solenopsis on Cotton in the Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Vennila, S; Deshmukh, AJ; Pinjarkar, D; Agarwal, M; Ramamurthy, W; Joshi, S; Kranthi, KR; Bambawale, OM

    2010-01-01

    Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsley (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) has been the current topic of research for insect taxonomists and applied entomologists in India due to its invasiveness, rapid spread, morphological and biological variations and the need for establishing an effective control strategy. The biology of the mealybug P. solenopsis was studied on cotton under laboratory conditions between August and October of 2009 with mean temperature and relative humidity of 23.3–30.2°C and 40.5–92.5% RH, respectively, in central India. Neonate crawlers that emerged from a field population were collected and constituted the study population. The developmental period from immature crawler to adult stage was greater for males (18.7 ± 0.9 days) compared to females (13.2 ± 1.8 days), probably due to the additional molt to the pupal stage in males. Survival of second instars was lower (45.5%) than first and third instars (71.4%). Females showed dynamic patterns of fecundity with the number of crawlers produced per female ranging between 128 and 812, with a mean of 344 ± 82. The reproductive period lasted 30.2 ± 8.2 days. Parthenogenesis with ovoviviparity (96.5%) was dominant over the oviparous (3.5%) mode of reproduction. Adult females lived 42.4 ± 5.7 days. Males accounted for less than 5% of the population, and lived 1.5 ± 0.1 days. The life history parameters of P. solenopsis adult females are discussed relative to the appearance of symptoms on the cotton crop, and the importance of making management interventions during the effective reproductive period of the insect. PMID:20874596

  13. Low-gravity Orbiting Research Laboratory Environment Potential Impact on Space Biology Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jules, Kenol

    2006-01-01

    One of the major objectives of any orbital space research platform is to provide a quiescent low gravity, preferably a zero gravity environment, to perform fundamental as well as applied research. However, small disturbances exist onboard any low earth orbital research platform. The impact of these disturbances must be taken into account by space research scientists during their research planning, design and data analysis in order to avoid confounding factors in their science results. The reduced gravity environment of an orbiting research platform in low earth orbit is a complex phenomenon. Many factors, among others, such as experiment operations, equipment operation, life support systems and crew activity (if it is a crewed platform), aerodynamic drag, gravity gradient, rotational effects as well as the vehicle structural resonance frequencies (structural modes) contribute to form the overall reduced gravity environment in which space research is performed. The contribution of these small disturbances or accelerations is precisely why the environment is NOT a zero gravity environment, but a reduced acceleration environment. This paper does not discuss other factors such as radiation, electromagnetic interference, thermal and pressure gradient changes, acoustic and CO2 build-up to name a few that affect the space research environment as well, but it focuses solely on the magnitude of the acceleration level found on orbiting research laboratory used by research scientists to conduct space research. For ease of analysis this paper divides the frequency spectrum relevant to most of the space research disciplines into three regimes: a) quasi-steady, b) vibratory and c) transient. The International Space Station is used as an example to illustrate the point. The paper discusses the impact of these three regimes on space biology research and results from space flown experiments are used to illustrate the potential negative impact of these disturbances (accelerations

  14. Low-gravity Orbiting Research Laboratory Environment Potential Impact on Space Biology Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jules, Kenol

    2006-01-01

    One of the major objectives of any orbital space research platform is to provide a quiescent low gravity, preferably a zero gravity environment, to perform fundamental as well as applied research. However, small disturbances exist onboard any low earth orbital research platform. The impact of these disturbances must be taken into account by space research scientists during their research planning, design and data analysis in order to avoid confounding factors in their science results. The reduced gravity environment of an orbiting research platform in low earth orbit is a complex phenomenon. Many factors, among others, such as experiment operations, equipment operation, life support systems and crew activity (if it is a crewed platform), aerodynamic drag, gravity gradient, rotational effects as well as the vehicle structural resonance frequencies (structural modes) contribute to form the overall reduced gravity environment in which space research is performed. The contribution of these small disturbances or accelerations is precisely why the environment is NOT a zero gravity environment, but a reduced acceleration environment. This paper does not discuss other factors such as radiation, electromagnetic interference, thermal and pressure gradient changes, acoustic and CO2 build-up to name a few that affect the space research environment as well, but it focuses solely on the magnitude of the acceleration level found on orbiting research laboratory used by research scientists to conduct space research. For ease of analysis this paper divides the frequency spectrum relevant to most of the space research disciplines into three regimes: a) quasi-steady, b) vibratory and c) transient. The International Space Station is used as an example to illustrate the point. The paper discusses the impact of these three regimes on space biology research and results from space flown experiments are used to illustrate the potential negative impact of these disturbances (accelerations

  15. Teaching Statistics in Biology: Using Inquiry-based Learning to Strengthen Understanding of Statistical Analysis in Biology Laboratory Courses

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    There is an increasing need for students in the biological sciences to build a strong foundation in quantitative approaches to data analyses. Although most science, engineering, and math field majors are required to take at least one statistics course, statistical analysis is poorly integrated into undergraduate biology course work, particularly at the lower-division level. Elements of statistics were incorporated into an introductory biology course, including a review of statistics concepts and opportunity for students to perform statistical analysis in a biological context. Learning gains were measured with an 11-item statistics learning survey instrument developed for the course. Students showed a statistically significant 25% (p < 0.005) increase in statistics knowledge after completing introductory biology. Students improved their scores on the survey after completing introductory biology, even if they had previously completed an introductory statistics course (9%, improvement p < 0.005). Students retested 1 yr after completing introductory biology showed no loss of their statistics knowledge as measured by this instrument, suggesting that the use of statistics in biology course work may aid long-term retention of statistics knowledge. No statistically significant differences in learning were detected between male and female students in the study. PMID:18765754

  16. Teaching statistics in biology: using inquiry-based learning to strengthen understanding of statistical analysis in biology laboratory courses.

    PubMed

    Metz, Anneke M

    2008-01-01

    There is an increasing need for students in the biological sciences to build a strong foundation in quantitative approaches to data analyses. Although most science, engineering, and math field majors are required to take at least one statistics course, statistical analysis is poorly integrated into undergraduate biology course work, particularly at the lower-division level. Elements of statistics were incorporated into an introductory biology course, including a review of statistics concepts and opportunity for students to perform statistical analysis in a biological context. Learning gains were measured with an 11-item statistics learning survey instrument developed for the course. Students showed a statistically significant 25% (p < 0.005) increase in statistics knowledge after completing introductory biology. Students improved their scores on the survey after completing introductory biology, even if they had previously completed an introductory statistics course (9%, improvement p < 0.005). Students retested 1 yr after completing introductory biology showed no loss of their statistics knowledge as measured by this instrument, suggesting that the use of statistics in biology course work may aid long-term retention of statistics knowledge. No statistically significant differences in learning were detected between male and female students in the study.

  17. Teaching Statistics in Biology: Using Inquiry-Based Learning to Strengthen Understanding of Statistical Analysis in Biology Laboratory Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Anneke M.

    2008-01-01

    There is an increasing need for students in the biological sciences to build a strong foundation in quantitative approaches to data analyses. Although most science, engineering, and math field majors are required to take at least one statistics course, statistical analysis is poorly integrated into undergraduate biology course work, particularly…

  18. The Protein Information Management System (PiMS): a generic tool for any structural biology research laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Chris; Pajon, Anne; Griffiths, Susanne L.; Daniel, Ed; Savitsky, Marc; Lin, Bill; Diprose, Jonathan M.; Wilter da Silva, Alan; Pilicheva, Katya; Troshin, Peter; van Niekerk, Johannes; Isaacs, Neil; Naismith, James; Nave, Colin; Blake, Richard; Wilson, Keith S.; Stuart, David I.; Henrick, Kim; Esnouf, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    The techniques used in protein production and structural biology have been developing rapidly, but techniques for recording the laboratory information produced have not kept pace. One approach is the development of laboratory information-management systems (LIMS), which typically use a relational database schema to model and store results from a laboratory workflow. The underlying philosophy and implementation of the Protein Information Management System (PiMS), a LIMS development specifically targeted at the flexible and unpredictable workflows of protein-production research laboratories of all scales, is described. PiMS is a web-based Java application that uses either Postgres or Oracle as the underlying relational database-management system. PiMS is available under a free licence to all academic laboratories either for local installation or for use as a managed service. PMID:21460443

  19. The Protein Information Management System (PiMS): a generic tool for any structural biology research laboratory.

    PubMed

    Morris, Chris; Pajon, Anne; Griffiths, Susanne L; Daniel, Ed; Savitsky, Marc; Lin, Bill; Diprose, Jonathan M; da Silva, Alan Wilter; Pilicheva, Katya; Troshin, Peter; van Niekerk, Johannes; Isaacs, Neil; Naismith, James; Nave, Colin; Blake, Richard; Wilson, Keith S; Stuart, David I; Henrick, Kim; Esnouf, Robert M

    2011-04-01

    The techniques used in protein production and structural biology have been developing rapidly, but techniques for recording the laboratory information produced have not kept pace. One approach is the development of laboratory information-management systems (LIMS), which typically use a relational database schema to model and store results from a laboratory workflow. The underlying philosophy and implementation of the Protein Information Management System (PiMS), a LIMS development specifically targeted at the flexible and unpredictable workflows of protein-production research laboratories of all scales, is described. PiMS is a web-based Java application that uses either Postgres or Oracle as the underlying relational database-management system. PiMS is available under a free licence to all academic laboratories either for local installation or for use as a managed service.

  20. Complementary function of mitogen-activated protein kinase Hog1 from Trichosporonoides megachiliensis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under hyper-osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Junjiro; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Tanaka, Yosuke; Koyama, Yoshiyuki; Ogihara, Jun; Kato, Jun; Shima, Jun; Kasumi, Takafumi

    2013-02-01

    A (TmHog1) gene encoding a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) homologous to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hog1 (ScHog1) involved in hyper-osmotic stress signaling was isolated from Trichosporonoides megachiliensis SN-124A, an erythritol-producing yeast. Although TmHog1, like other Hog1 homologs, encoded a kinase catalytic domain containing TGY motif, it was 50-60 amino acid residues shorter than the ScHog1. A TmHog1 transgene rescued the osmotic sensitivity and glycerol production defect of S. cerevisiae hog1Δ, a highly osmo-sensitive strain that does not produce glycerol, a compatible solute, during osmotic stress. Functional analyses of chimeric Hog1 proteins constructed from ScHog1 and TmHog1 sequences indicated that the C-terminal region of TmHog1 is more effective for glycerol biosynthesis than ScHog1 under osmotic stress. Copyright © 2012 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Conceptual design of a biological specimen holding facility. [Life Science Laboratory for Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, J. K.; Yakut, M. M.

    1976-01-01

    An all-important first step in the development of the Spacelab Life Science Laboratory is the design of the Biological Specimen Holding Facility (BSHF) which will provide accommodation for living specimens for life science research in orbit. As a useful tool in the understanding of physiological and biomedical changes produced in the weightless environment, the BSHF will enable biomedical researchers to conduct in-orbit investigations utilizing techniques that may be impossible to perform on human subjects. The results of a comprehensive study for defining the BSHF, description of its experiment support capabilities, and the planning required for its development are presented. Conceptual designs of the facility, its subsystems and interfaces with the Orbiter and Spacelab are included. Environmental control, life support and data management systems are provided. Interface and support equipment required for specimen transfer, surgical research, and food, water and waste storage is defined. New and optimized concepts are presented for waste collection, feces and urine separation and sampling, environmental control, feeding and watering, lighting, data management and other support subsystems.

  2. Biological and Environmental Research Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, FY 1992--1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report is the 1992--1994 Program Director's Overview Report for Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Program, and as such it addresses KP-funded work at ORNL conducted during FY 1991 and in progress during FY 1992; it also serves as a planning document for the remainder of FY 1992 through FY 1994. Non-BER funded work at ORNL relevant to the mission of OHER is also discussed. The second section of the report describes ORNL facilities and resources used by the BER program. The third section addresses research management practices at ORNL. The fourth, fifth, and sixth sections address BER-funded research in progress, program accomplishments and research highlights, and program orientation for the remainder of FY 1992 through FY 1994, respectively. Work for non-BER sponsors is described in the seventh section, followed by a discussion of significant near and long-term issues facing BER work at ORNL in the eighth section. The last section provides a statistical summary of BER research at ORNL. Appendices supplement the above topics with additional detail.

  3. Laboratory Study on Biological Control of Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) by Entomopathogenic Indigenous Fungi (Beauveria bassiana).

    PubMed

    Abdigoudarzi, M; Esmaeilnia, K; Shariat, N

    2009-01-01

    Chemical control method using different acaricides as spray, dipping solution or pour-on is routinely used for controlling ticks. Biological control agents are favorable due to their safety for animals and environment. Entomopathogenic fungi such as Beauveria bassiana are well known for controlling ticks. In this study, two Iranian indigenous strains of B. bassiana (B. bassiana 5197 and B. bassiana Evin) were selected and grown on specific media. The pathogenic effects of these strains were evaluated on adult stages of two Iranian Ixodidae members (H. anatolicum anatolicum Koch 1844, and H. marginatum Koch 1844) by dipping method. Two Iranian strains of Beauveria bassiana (Beauveria bassiana 5197 and Beauveria bassiana Evin) were selected and were grown successfully on specific media. The pathogenic effects of these strains were evaluated on adult stages of Iranian Ixodidae members such as, Hyalomma anatolicum anatolicum and H. marginatum by dipping method (these ticks were grown up at laboratory conditions during 2002 up to 2003 and still it is continued) . There was no effect of strain 5197 on mortality or fecundity rates for ticks. There was acute phase sign of paralysis in test group after dipping ticks in suspension made from Evin strain of B. bassiana. In addition, the test groups were totally died after four months, but the control groups survived for six months. High concentration of fungal spores is needed for inducing fungal infection. Additional study using different strains and fungi on Iranian ticks is proposed.

  4. Laboratory Study on Biological Control of Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) by Entomopathogenic Indigenous Fungi (Beauveria bassiana)

    PubMed Central

    Abdigoudarzi, M; Esmaeilnia, K; Shariat, N

    2009-01-01

    Background: Chemical control method using different acaricides as spray, dipping solution or pour-on is routinely used for controlling ticks. Biological control agents are favorable due to their safety for animals and environment. Entomopathogenic fungi such as Beauveria bassiana are well known for controlling ticks. In this study, two Iranian indigenous strains of B. bassiana (B. bassiana 5197 and B. bassiana Evin) were selected and grown on specific media. The pathogenic effects of these strains were evaluated on adult stages of two Iranian Ixodidae members (H. anatolicum anatolicum Koch 1844, and H. marginatum Koch 1844) by dipping method. Methods: Two Iranian strains of Beauveria bassiana (Beauveria bassiana 5197 and Beauveria bassiana Evin) were selected and were grown successfully on specific media. The pathogenic effects of these strains were evaluated on adult stages of Iranian Ixodidae members such as, Hyalomma anatolicum anatolicum and H. marginatum by dipping method (these ticks were grown up at laboratory conditions during 2002 up to 2003 and still it is continued) . Results: There was no effect of strain 5197 on mortality or fecundity rates for ticks. There was acute phase sign of paralysis in test group after dipping ticks in suspension made from Evin strain of B. bassiana. In addition, the test groups were totally died after four months, but the control groups survived for six months. Conclusion: High concentration of fungal spores is needed for inducing fungal infection. Additional study using different strains and fungi on Iranian ticks is proposed. PMID:22808380

  5. Conceptual design of a biological specimen holding facility. [Life Science Laboratory for Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, J. K.; Yakut, M. M.

    1976-01-01

    An all-important first step in the development of the Spacelab Life Science Laboratory is the design of the Biological Specimen Holding Facility (BSHF) which will provide accommodation for living specimens for life science research in orbit. As a useful tool in the understanding of physiological and biomedical changes produced in the weightless environment, the BSHF will enable biomedical researchers to conduct in-orbit investigations utilizing techniques that may be impossible to perform on human subjects. The results of a comprehensive study for defining the BSHF, description of its experiment support capabilities, and the planning required for its development are presented. Conceptual designs of the facility, its subsystems and interfaces with the Orbiter and Spacelab are included. Environmental control, life support and data management systems are provided. Interface and support equipment required for specimen transfer, surgical research, and food, water and waste storage is defined. New and optimized concepts are presented for waste collection, feces and urine separation and sampling, environmental control, feeding and watering, lighting, data management and other support subsystems.

  6. Investigation of biological, chemical and physical processes on and in planetary surfaces by laboratory simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, D. W. G.; Benoit, P. H.; McKeever, S. W. S.; Banerjee, D.; Kral, T.; Stites, W.; Roe, L.; Jansma, P.; Mattioli, G.

    2002-08-01

    The recently established Arkansas-Oklahoma Center for Space and Planetary Science has been given a large planetary simulation chamber by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California. When completely refurbished, the chamber will be dubbed Andromeda and it will enable conditions in space, on asteroids, on comet nuclei, and on Mars, to be reproduced on the meter-scale and surface and subsurface processes monitored using a range of analytical instruments. The following projects are currently planned for the facility. (1) Examination of the role of surface and subsurface processes on small bodies in the formation of meteorites. (2) Development of in situ sediment dating instrumentation for Mars. (3) Studies of the survivability of methanogenic microorganisms under conditions resembling the subsurface of Mars to test the feasibility of such species surviving on Mars and identify the characteristics of the species most likely to be present on Mars. (4) The nature of the biochemical "fingerprints" likely to have been left by live organisms on Mars from a study of degradation products of biologically related molecules. (5) Testing local resource utilization in spacecraft design. (6) Characterization of surface effects on reflectivity spectra for comparison with the data from spacecraft-borne instruments on Mars orbiters.

  7. An integrated pathway system modeling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae HOG pathway: a Petri net based approach.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Namrata; Choudhury, Olivia; Chakrabarty, Ankush; De, Rajat K

    2013-02-01

    Biochemical networks comprise many diverse components and interactions between them. It has intracellular signaling, metabolic and gene regulatory pathways which are highly integrated and whose responses are elicited by extracellular actions. Previous modeling techniques mostly consider each pathway independently without focusing on the interrelation of these which actually functions as a single system. In this paper, we propose an approach of modeling an integrated pathway using an event-driven modeling tool, i.e., Petri nets (PNs). PNs have the ability to simulate the dynamics of the system with high levels of accuracy. The integrated set of signaling, regulatory and metabolic reactions involved in Saccharomyces cerevisiae's HOG pathway has been collected from the literature. The kinetic parameter values have been used for transition firings. The dynamics of the system has been simulated and the concentrations of major biological species over time have been observed. The phenotypic characteristics of the integrated system have been investigated under two conditions, viz., under the absence and presence of osmotic pressure. The results have been validated favorably with the existing experimental results. We have also compared our study with the study of idFBA (Lee et al., PLoS Comput Biol 4:e1000-e1086, 2008) and pointed out the differences between both studies. We have simulated and monitored concentrations of multiple biological entities over time and also incorporated feedback inhibition by Ptp2 which has not been included in the idFBA study. We have concluded that our study is the first to the best of our knowledge to model signaling, metabolic and regulatory events in an integrated form through PN model framework. This study is useful in computational simulation of system dynamics for integrated pathways as there are growing evidences that the malfunctioning of the interplay among these pathways is associated with disease.

  8. Ethical and methodological standards for laboratory and medical biological rhythm research.

    PubMed

    Portaluppi, Francesco; Touitou, Yvan; Smolensky, Michael H

    2008-11-01

    The main objectives of this article are to update the ethical standards for the conduct of human and animal biological rhythm research and recommend essential elements for quality chronobiological research information, which should be especially useful for new investigators of the rhythms of life. A secondary objective is to provide for those with an interest in the results of chronobiology investigations, but who might be unfamiliar with the field, an introduction to the basic methods and standards of biological rhythm research and time series data analysis. The journal and its editors endorse compliance of all investigators to the principles of the Declaration of Helsinki of the World Medical Association, which relate to the conduct of ethical research on human beings, and the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research of the National Research Council, which relate to the conduct of ethical research on laboratory and other animals. The editors and the readers of the journal expect the authors of submitted manuscripts to have adhered to the ethical standards dictated by local, national, and international laws and regulations in the conduct of investigations and to be unbiased and accurate in reporting never-before-published research findings. Authors of scientific papers are required to disclose all potential conflicts of interest, particularly when the research is funded in part or in full by the medical and pharmaceutical industry, when the authors are stock-holders of the company that manufactures or markets the products under study, or when the authors are a recent or current paid consultant to the involved company. It is the responsibility of the authors of submitted manuscripts to clearly present sufficient detail about the synchronizer schedule of the studied subjects (i.e., the sleep-wake schedule, ambient light-dark cycle, intensity and spectrum of ambient light exposure, seasons when the research was

  9. Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing, and Hearing Signing Undergraduates’ Attitudes toward Science in Inquiry-Based Biology Laboratory Classes

    PubMed Central

    Gormally, Cara

    2017-01-01

    For science learning to be successful, students must develop attitudes toward support future engagement with challenging social issues related to science. This is especially important for increasing participation of students from underrepresented populations. This study investigated how participation in inquiry-based biology laboratory classes affected students’ attitudes toward science, focusing on deaf, hard-of-hearing, and hearing signing students in bilingual learning environments (i.e., taught in American Sign Language and English). Analysis of reflection assignments and interviews revealed that the majority of students developed positive attitudes toward science and scientific attitudes after participating in inquiry-based biology laboratory classes. Attitudinal growth appears to be driven by student value of laboratory activities, repeated direct engagement with scientific inquiry, and peer collaboration. Students perceived that hands-on experimentation involving peer collaboration and a positive, welcoming learning environment were key features of inquiry-based laboratories, affording attitudinal growth. Students who did not perceive biology as useful for their majors, careers, or lives did not develop positive attitudes. Students highlighted the importance of the climate of the learning environment for encouraging student contribution and noted both the benefits and pitfalls of teamwork. Informed by students’ characterizations of their learning experiences, recommendations are made for inquiry-based learning in college biology. PMID:28188279

  10. Cooperative and Active Learning in Undergraduate Biological Laboratories at FIU--Implications to TA Teaching and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penwell, Rebecca A.; Elsawa, Sherine F.; Pitzer, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    There were several changes in the laboratory teaching program in the Biological Sciences at Florida International University (FIU) between 1993-1994. The underlying goal was the improvement of the amount of material learned and retained by the student, but these changes showed little positive improvement. It was deemed necessary for FIU to…

  11. Characterization of Pathogenic Human MSH2 Missense Mutations Using Yeast as a Model System: A Laboratory Course in Molecular Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gammie, Alison E.; Erdeniz, Naz

    2004-01-01

    This work describes the project for an advanced undergraduate laboratory course in cell and molecular biology. One objective of the course is to teach students a variety of cellular and molecular techniques while conducting original research. A second objective is to provide instruction in science writing and data presentation by requiring…

  12. Practice Makes Pretty Good: Assessment of Primary Literature Reading Abilities across Multiple Large-Enrollment Biology Laboratory Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Brian K.; Kadandale, Pavan; He, Wenliang; Murata, Paige M. N.; Latif, Yama; Warschauer, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Primary literature is essential for scientific communication and is commonly utilized in undergraduate biology education. Despite this, there is often little time spent "training" our students how to critically analyze a paper. To address this, we introduced a primary literature module in multiple upper-division laboratory courses. In…

  13. Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing, and Hearing Signing Undergraduates' Attitudes toward Science in Inquiry-Based Biology Laboratory Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gormally, Cara

    2017-01-01

    For science learning to be successful, students must develop attitudes toward support future engagement with challenging social issues related to science. This is especially important for increasing participation of students from underrepresented populations. This study investigated how participation in inquiry-based biology laboratory classes…

  14. Development of a Semester-Long, Inquiry-Based Laboratory Course in Upper-Level Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murthy, Pushpalatha P. N.; Thompson, Martin; Hungwe, Kedmon

    2014-01-01

    A semester-long laboratory course was designed and implemented to familiarize students with modern biochemistry and molecular biology techniques. The designed format involved active student participation, evaluation of data, and critical thinking, and guided students to become independent researchers. The first part of the course focused on…

  15. Characterization of Pathogenic Human MSH2 Missense Mutations Using Yeast as a Model System: A Laboratory Course in Molecular Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gammie, Alison E.; Erdeniz, Naz

    2004-01-01

    This work describes the project for an advanced undergraduate laboratory course in cell and molecular biology. One objective of the course is to teach students a variety of cellular and molecular techniques while conducting original research. A second objective is to provide instruction in science writing and data presentation by requiring…

  16. Terrestrial Slugs as a Model Organism for Inquiry-Based Experimentation in a Majors General Biology Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Brenda J.; Blair, Amy C.

    2013-01-01

    Many biology educators at the undergraduate level are revamping their laboratory curricula to incorporate inquiry-based research experiences so that students can directly participate in the process of science and improve their scientific reasoning skills. Slugs are an ideal organism for use in such a student-directed, hypothesis-driven experience.…

  17. Development of a Semester-Long, Inquiry-Based Laboratory Course in Upper-Level Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murthy, Pushpalatha P. N.; Thompson, Martin; Hungwe, Kedmon

    2014-01-01

    A semester-long laboratory course was designed and implemented to familiarize students with modern biochemistry and molecular biology techniques. The designed format involved active student participation, evaluation of data, and critical thinking, and guided students to become independent researchers. The first part of the course focused on…

  18. Terrestrial Slugs as a Model Organism for Inquiry-Based Experimentation in a Majors General Biology Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Brenda J.; Blair, Amy C.

    2013-01-01

    Many biology educators at the undergraduate level are revamping their laboratory curricula to incorporate inquiry-based research experiences so that students can directly participate in the process of science and improve their scientific reasoning skills. Slugs are an ideal organism for use in such a student-directed, hypothesis-driven experience.…

  19. From genes to proteins to behavior: a laboratory project that enhances student understanding in cell and molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Benjamin D; Silveira, Linda A

    2009-01-01

    In the laboratory, students can actively explore concepts and experience the nature of scientific research. We have devised a 5-wk laboratory project in our introductory college biology course whose aim was to improve understanding in five major concepts that are central to basic cellular, molecular biology, and genetics while teaching molecular biology techniques. The project was focused on the production of adenine in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and investigated the nature of mutant red colonies of this yeast. Students created red mutants from a wild-type strain, amplified the two genes capable of giving rise to the red phenotype, and then analyzed the nucleotide sequences. A quiz assessing student understanding in the five areas was given at the start and the end of the course. Analysis of the quiz showed significant improvement in each of the areas. These areas were taught in the laboratory and the classroom; therefore, students were surveyed to determine whether the laboratory played a role in their improved understanding of the five areas. Student survey data demonstrated that the laboratory did have an important role in their learning of the concepts. This project simulated steps in a research project and could be adapted for an advanced course in genetics.

  20. Pheromone-Induced Morphogenesis Improves Osmoadaptation Capacity by Activating the HOG MAPK Pathway**

    PubMed Central

    Baltanás, Rodrigo; Bush, Alan; Couto, Alicia; Durrieu, Lucía; Hohmann, Stefan; Colman-Lerner, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Environmental and internal conditions expose cells to a multiplicity of stimuli whose consequences are difficult to predict. Here, we investigate the response to mating pheromone of yeast cells adapted to high osmolarity. Events downstream of pheromone binding involve two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades: the pheromone response (PR) and the cell-wall integrity response (CWI). Although these MAPK pathways share components with each and a third MAPK pathway, the high osmolarity response (HOG), they are normally only activated by distinct stimuli, a phenomenon called insulation. We found that in cells adapted to high osmolarity, PR activated the HOG pathway in a pheromone- and osmolarity- dependent manner. Activation of HOG by the PR was not due to loss of insulation, but rather a response to a reduction in internal osmolarity, which resulted from an increase in glycerol release caused by the PR. By analyzing single-cell time courses, we found that stimulation of HOG occurred in discrete bursts that coincided with the “shmooing” morphogenetic process. Activation required the polarisome, the cell wall integrity MAPK Slt2, and the aquaglyceroporin Fps1. HOG activation resulted in high glycerol turnover that improved adaptability to rapid changes in osmolarity. Our work shows how a differentiation signal can recruit a second, unrelated sensory pathway to enable responses to yeast to multiple stimuli. PMID:23612707

  1. VARIATIONS IN THE PLASMA CHOLESTEROL AND CHOLESTEROL ESTER CONTENT IN HOG CHOLERA

    PubMed Central

    Shope, Richard E.

    1930-01-01

    1. The plasma cholesterol and cholesterol ester content of swine, experimentally infected with hog cholera, exhibit a regular succession of changes. During the period of incubation of the disease, for 3 or more days following inoculation with hog cholera virus, hypocholesterolemia prevails. This is followed by a period of hypercholesterolemia which is coincident with the onset of the clinical manifestations of the disease. The hypercholesterolemia after persisting for from 4 to 7 days, gives way to a second period of hypocholesterolemia more marked and more prolonged than that observed immediately after inoculation. In the experiments of the present work this second period lasted 8 and 11 days in the 2 animals surviving long enough for the study of it and was followed by a second period of hypercholesterolemia. In the one animal surviving this period for 8 days a third period of irregular and fluctuating hypocholesterolemia set in. 2. A comparison with the results in other acute infections indicates that hog cholera is unique in showing alternating periods of hypocholesterolemia and hypercholesterolemia. 3. A normal hog inoculated with Bacillus suisepticus rapidly developed the typical marked hypocholesterolemia whereas an animal infected with hog cholera and then inoculated with B. suisepticus failed to show the decrease in plasma cholesterol content. PMID:19869682

  2. Hog barn dust extract increases macromolecular efflux from the hamster cheek pouch.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, Israel; Von Essen, Susanna G

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether short-term exposure to an aqueous extract of hog barn dust increases macromolecular efflux from the intact hamster cheek pouch and, if so, to begin to determine the mechanism(s) underlying this response. By using intravital microscopy, we found that suffusion of hog barn dust extract onto the intact hamster cheek pouch for 60 min elicited a significant, concentration-dependent leaky site formation and increase in clearance of FITC-labeled dextran (molecular mass, 70 kDa). This response was significantly attenuated by suffusion of catalase (60 U/ml), but not by heat-inactivated catalase, and by pretreatment with dexamethasone (10 mg/kg iv) (P < 0.05). Catalase had no significant effects on adenosine-induced increase in macromolecular efflux from the cheek pouch. Suffusion of hog barn dust extract had no significant effects on arteriolar diameter in the cheek pouch. Taken together, these data indicate that hog barn dust extract increases macromolecular efflux from the in situ hamster cheek pouch, in part, through local elaboration of reactive oxygen species that are inactivated by catalase. This response is specific and attenuated by corticosteroids. We suggest that plasma exudation plays an important role in the genesis of upper airway dysfunction evoked by short-term exposure to hog barn dust.

  3. Through Microgravity and Towards the Stars: Microgravity and Strategic Research at Marshall's Biological and Physical Space Research Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, Peter A.

    2003-01-01

    The Microgravity and Strategic research at Marshall s Biological and Physical Space Research Laboratory will be reviewed. The environment in orbit provides a unique opportunity to study Materials Science and Biotechnology in the absence of sedimentation and convection. There are a number of peer-selected investigations that have been selected to fly on the Space Station that have been conceived and are led by Marshall s Biological and Physical Research Laboratory s scientists. In addition to Microgravity research the Station will enable research in "Strategic" Research Areas that focus on enabling humans to live, work, and explore the solar system safely. New research in Radiation Protection, Strategic Molecular Biology, and In-Space Fabrication will be introduced.

  4. Through Microgravity and Towards the Stars: Microgravity and Strategic Research at Marshall's Biological and Physical Space Research Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, Peter A.

    2003-01-01

    The Microgravity and Strategic research at Marshall s Biological and Physical Space Research Laboratory will be reviewed. The environment in orbit provides a unique opportunity to study Materials Science and Biotechnology in the absence of sedimentation and convection. There are a number of peer-selected investigations that have been selected to fly on the Space Station that have been conceived and are led by Marshall s Biological and Physical Research Laboratory s scientists. In addition to Microgravity research the Station will enable research in "Strategic" Research Areas that focus on enabling humans to live, work, and explore the solar system safely. New research in Radiation Protection, Strategic Molecular Biology, and In-Space Fabrication will be introduced.

  5. Effectiveness of biological geotextiles in reducing runoff and soil loss under different environmental conditions using laboratory and field plot data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smets, T.

    2009-04-01

    Preliminary investigations suggest biological geotextiles could be an effective and inexpensive soil conservation method, with enormous global potential. Biological geotextiles are a possible temporary alternative for vegetation cover and can offer immediate soil protection. However, limited data are available on the erosion-reducing effects of biological geotextiles. Therefore, the objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of selected types of biological geotextile in reducing runoff and soil loss under controlled laboratory conditions and under field conditions reflecting different environments (i.e. continental, temperate and tropical). In laboratory experiments, interrill runoff, interrill erosion and concentrated flow erosion were simulated using various rainfall intensities, flow shear stresses and slope gradients. Field plot data on the effects of biological geotextiles on sheet and rill erosion were collected in several countries under natural rainfall (U.K., Hungary, Lithuania, South Africa, Brazil, China and Thailand). The laboratory experiments indicate that all tested biological geotextiles were effective in reducing interrill runoff (on average 59% of the value for bare soil) and interrill erosion rates (on average 16% of the value for bare soil). Since simulated concentrated flow discharge sometimes flowed below the geotextiles, the effectiveness in reducing concentrated flow erosion was significantly less (on average 59% of the value for bare soil). On field plots, where both interrill and rill erosion occur, all tested geotextiles reduced runoff depth by a mean of 54% of the control value for bare soil and in some cases, runoff depth increased compared to bare soil surfaces, which can be attributed to the impermeable and hydrophobic characteristics of some biological geotextiles. In the field, soil loss rates due to interrill and rill erosion were reduced by a mean of 21% of the value of bare soil by biological geotextiles. This study

  6. Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing, and Hearing Signing Undergraduates' Attitudes toward Science in Inquiry-Based Biology Laboratory Classes.

    PubMed

    Gormally, Cara

    2017-01-01

    For science learning to be successful, students must develop attitudes toward support future engagement with challenging social issues related to science. This is especially important for increasing participation of students from underrepresented populations. This study investigated how participation in inquiry-based biology laboratory classes affected students' attitudes toward science, focusing on deaf, hard-of-hearing, and hearing signing students in bilingual learning environments (i.e., taught in American Sign Language and English). Analysis of reflection assignments and interviews revealed that the majority of students developed positive attitudes toward science and scientific attitudes after participating in inquiry-based biology laboratory classes. Attitudinal growth appears to be driven by student value of laboratory activities, repeated direct engagement with scientific inquiry, and peer collaboration. Students perceived that hands-on experimentation involving peer collaboration and a positive, welcoming learning environment were key features of inquiry-based laboratories, affording attitudinal growth. Students who did not perceive biology as useful for their majors, careers, or lives did not develop positive attitudes. Students highlighted the importance of the climate of the learning environment for encouraging student contribution and noted both the benefits and pitfalls of teamwork. Informed by students' characterizations of their learning experiences, recommendations are made for inquiry-based learning in college biology. © 2017 C. Gormally. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2017 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  7. Comparative economic analysis of recombinant porcine somatotropin (pST) for the hog-pork industry.

    PubMed

    Halbrendt, C K; Sterling, L G

    1991-05-01

    A multisector model was formulated to simulate the effects of recombinant porcine somatotropin (pST) on the U.S. hog-pork industry. A producer sector submodel was specified for nine hog-producing states, and a retail-wholesale sector was specified on a national level. Four pST adoption scenarios were tested; these differed in the extent of feed cost reduction (15 vs 25%) with or without premium pricing ($3 per animal). Simulation results show that, in general, national producer and retail prices will fall and pork consumption and production will increase due to pST use during the 5 yr of adoption. Responses to pST in terms of percentage of sows farrowing among states differed; states that produce more pork responded less than states that produce less. Downward price adjustments occurred and began stabilizing in the 4th yr; hog farmers will need to use pST to remain competitive.

  8. The "swinish multitude": controversies over hogs in antebellum New York City.

    PubMed

    McNeur, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    In the first half of the nineteenth century, New Yorkers fought passionately over the presence of hogs on their streets and in their city. New York’s filthy streets had cultivated an informal economy and a fertile environment for roaming creatures. The battles—both physical and legal—reveal a city rife with class tensions. After decades of arguments, riots, and petitions, cholera and the fear of other public health crises ultimately spelled the end for New York’s hogs. New York struggled during this period to improve municipal services while adapting to a changing economy and rapid population growth. The fights between those for and against hogs shaped New York City’s landscape and resulted in new rules for using public space a new place for nature in the city.

  9. Regulated nucleo/cytoplasmic exchange of HOG1 MAPK requires the importin beta homologs NMD5 and XPO1.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrigno, P; Posas, F; Koepp, D; Saito, H; Silver, P A

    1998-01-01

    MAP kinase signaling modules serve to transduce extracellular signals to the nucleus of eukaryotic cells, but little is known about how signals cross the nuclear envelope. Exposure of yeast cells to increases in extracellular osmolarity activates the HOG1 MAP kinase cascade, which is composed of three tiers of protein kinases, namely the SSK2, SSK22 and STE11 MAPKKKs, the PBS2 MAPKK, and the HOG1 MAPK. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions of these kinases, we found that HOG1, PBS2 and STE11 localize to the cytoplasm of unstressed cells. Following osmotic stress, HOG1, but neither PBS2 nor STE11, translocates into the nucleus. HOG1 translocation occurs very rapidly, is transient, and correlates with the phosphorylation and activation of the MAP kinase by its MAPKK. HOG1 phosphorylation is necessary and sufficient for nuclear translocation, because a catalytically inactive kinase when phosphorylated is translocated to the nucleus as efficiently as the wild-type. Nuclear import of the MAPK under stress conditions requires the activity of the small GTP binding protein Ran-GSP1, but not the NLS-binding importin alpha/beta heterodimer. Rather, HOG1 import requires the activity of a gene, NMD5, that encodes a novel importin beta homolog. Similarly, export of dephosphorylated HOG1 from the nucleus requires the activity of the NES receptor XPO1/CRM1. Our findings define the requirements for the regulated nuclear transport of a stress-activated MAP kinase. PMID:9755161

  10. The MAPK Hog1p Modulates Fps1p-dependent Arsenite Uptake and Tolerance in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Thorsen, Michael; Di, Yujun; Tängemo, Carolina; Morillas, Montserrat; Ahmadpour, Doryaneh; Van der Does, Charlotte; Wagner, Annemarie; Johansson, Erik; Boman, Johan; Posas, Francesc; Wysocki, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Arsenic is widely distributed in nature and all organisms possess regulatory mechanisms to evade toxicity and acquire tolerance. Yet, little is known about arsenic sensing and signaling mechanisms or about their impact on tolerance and detoxification systems. Here, we describe a novel role of the S. cerevisiae mitogen-activated protein kinase Hog1p in protecting cells during exposure to arsenite and the related metalloid antimonite. Cells impaired in Hog1p function are metalloid hypersensitive, whereas cells with elevated Hog1p activity display improved tolerance. Hog1p is phosphorylated in response to arsenite and this phosphorylation requires Ssk1p and Pbs2p. Arsenite-activated Hog1p remains primarily cytoplasmic and does not mediate a major transcriptional response. Instead, hog1Δ sensitivity is accompanied by elevated cellular arsenic levels and we demonstrate that increased arsenite influx is dependent on the aquaglyceroporin Fps1p. Fps1p is phosphorylated on threonine 231 in vivo and this phosphorylation critically affects Fps1p activity. Moreover, Hog1p is shown to affect Fps1p phosphorylation. Our data are the first to demonstrate Hog1p activation by metalloids and provides a mechanism by which this kinase contributes to tolerance acquisition. Understanding how arsenite/antimonite uptake and toxicity is modulated may prove of value for their use in medical therapy. PMID:16885417

  11. 7 CFR 1230.113 - Collection and remittance of assessments for the sale of feeder pigs and market hogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Collection and remittance of assessments for the sale of feeder pigs and market hogs. 1230.113 Section 1230.113 Agriculture Regulations of the Department... pigs and market hogs. Pursuant to the provisions of § 1230.71, purchasers of feeder pigs or market...

  12. 7 CFR 1230.113 - Collection and remittance of assessments for the sale of feeder pigs and market hogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Collection and remittance of assessments for the sale of feeder pigs and market hogs. 1230.113 Section 1230.113 Agriculture Regulations of the Department... pigs and market hogs. Pursuant to the provisions of § 1230.71, purchasers of feeder pigs or market...

  13. MDI Biological Laboratory Arsenic Summit: Approaches to Limiting Human Exposure to Arsenic.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Bruce A; Caldwell, Kathleen; Congdon, Clare Bates; Disney, Jane; Donahue, Maria; Ferguson, Elizabeth; Flemings, Elsie; Golden, Meredith; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Highman, Jay; James, Karen; Kim, Carol; Lantz, R Clark; Marvinney, Robert G; Mayer, Greg; Miller, David; Navas-Acien, Ana; Nordstrom, D Kirk; Postema, Sonia; Rardin, Laurie; Rosen, Barry; SenGupta, Arup; Shaw, Joseph; Stanton, Elizabeth; Susca, Paul

    2015-09-01

    This report is the outcome of the meeting "Environmental and Human Health Consequences of Arsenic" held at the MDI Biological Laboratory in Salisbury Cove, Maine, August 13-15, 2014. Human exposure to arsenic represents a significant health problem worldwide that requires immediate attention according to the World Health Organization (WHO). One billion people are exposed to arsenic in food, and more than 200 million people ingest arsenic via drinking water at concentrations greater than international standards. Although the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has set a limit of 10 μg/L in public water supplies and the WHO has recommended an upper limit of 10 μg/L, recent studies indicate that these limits are not protective enough. In addition, there are currently few standards for arsenic in food. Those who participated in the Summit support citizens, scientists, policymakers, industry, and educators at the local, state, national, and international levels to (1) establish science-based evidence for setting standards at the local, state, national, and global levels for arsenic in water and food; (2) work with government agencies to set regulations for arsenic in water and food, to establish and strengthen non-regulatory programs, and to strengthen collaboration among government agencies, NGOs, academia, the private sector, industry, and others; (3) develop novel and cost-effective technologies for identification and reduction of exposure to arsenic in water; (4) develop novel and cost-effective approaches to reduce arsenic exposure in juice, rice, and other relevant foods; and (5) develop an Arsenic Education Plan to guide the development of science curricula as well as community outreach and education programs that serve to inform students and consumers about arsenic exposure and engage them in well water testing and development of remediation strategies.

  14. MDI Biological Laboratory Arsenic Summit: Approaches to Limiting Human Exposure to Arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    This report is the outcome of the meeting: “Environmental and Human Health Consequences of Arsenic”, held at the MDI Biological Laboratory in Salisbury Cove, Maine, August 13–15, 2014. Human exposure to arsenic represents a significant health problem worldwide that requires immediate attention according to the World Health Organization (WHO). One billion people are exposed to arsenic in food and more than 200 million people ingest arsenic via drinking water at concentrations greater than international standards. Although the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has set a limit of 10 micrograms per liter (10 μg/L) in public water supplies and the WHO has recommended an upper limit of 10 μg/L, recent studies indicate that these limits are not protective enough. In addition, there are currently few standards for arsenic in food. Those who participated in the Summit support citizens, scientists, policymakers, industry and educators at the local, state, national and international levels to: (1) Establish science-based evidence for setting standards at the local, state, national, and global levels for arsenic in water and food; (2) Work with government agencies to set regulations for arsenic in water and food, to establish and strengthen non-regulatory programs, and to strengthen collaboration among government agencies, NGOs, academia, the private sector, industry and others; (3) Develop novel and cost-effective technologies for identification and reduction of exposure to arsenic in water; (4) Develop novel and cost-effective approaches to reduce arsenic exposure in juice, rice, and other relevant foods, and (5) Develop an Arsenic Education Plan to guide the development of science curricula as well as community outreach and education programs that serve to inform students and consumers about arsenic exposure and engage them in well water testing and development of remediation strategies. PMID:26231509

  15. Substitution of oil by hogged fuel in a kraft process lime sludge kiln

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, I.G.

    1984-02-01

    Hogged fuel, typically at 55% moisture content, was combusted in a wet-cell burner and the flue gases applied to a lime sludge kiln. Up to 78% oil substitution was achieved, consistent with satisfactory lime quality and availability. Specific energy consumption was high because heat transfer was less efficient. Computer simulation techniques were used to develop parameter profiles throughout the kiln and to predict optimal performance. Optimized kiln conversion was shown to be economically advantageous if hogged fuel is available for $7.00 per cubic meter or less, assuming an oil price of $30/bbl ($0.189/l).

  16. Additional Material from and Notes on the Hog Hollow Site, Grant County, Wisconsin,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    k R-AS? 31 DDI TIONL NTERIL FRON ND NOTES ON THE HNO HOLLOW 1E/1I SITE GRANT COUNTY WISC SI (U) WISCONSIN STATEI HISTORICAL SOCIETY NADISON...NOTES ON THE HOG HOLLOW SITE, GRANT COUNTY, WISCONSIN by David C. Lowe Preface by William Green to Prepared for the Rock Island District, Corps of...Request No. NCRPD-4983 Contract/Purchase Order No. DACW25-86-M-0301 1986 APR 3 0 1986 ABSTRACT: Prehistoric artifacts collected from the Hog Hollow site

  17. Dicentric chromosome aberration analysis using giemsa and centromere specific fluorescence in-situ hybridization for biological dosimetry: An inter- and intra-laboratory comparison in Indian laboratories.

    PubMed

    Bhavani, M; Tamizh Selvan, G; Kaur, Harpreet; Adhikari, J S; Vijayalakshmi, J; Venkatachalam, P; Chaudhury, N K

    2014-09-01

    To facilitate efficient handling of large samples, an attempt towards networking of laboratories in India for biological dosimetry was carried out. Human peripheral blood samples were exposed to (60)Co γ-radiation for ten different doses (0-5Gy) at a dose rate of 0.7 and 2Gy/min. The chromosomal aberrations (CA) were scored in Giemsa-stained and fluorescence in-situ hybridization with centromere-specific probes. No significant difference (p>0.05) was observed in the CA yield for given doses except 4 and 5Gy, between the laboratories, among the scorers and also staining methods adapted suggest the reliability and validates the inter-lab comparisons exercise for triage applications.

  18. Implementing the Science Assessment Standards: Developing and validating a set of laboratory assessment tasks in high school biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Gouranga Chandra

    Very often a number of factors, especially time, space and money, deter many science educators from using inquiry-based, hands-on, laboratory practical tasks as alternative assessment instruments in science. A shortage of valid inquiry-based laboratory tasks for high school biology has been cited. Driven by this need, this study addressed the following three research questions: (1) How can laboratory-based performance tasks be designed and developed that are doable by students for whom they are designed/written? (2) Do student responses to the laboratory-based performance tasks validly represent at least some of the intended process skills that new biology learning goals want students to acquire? (3) Are the laboratory-based performance tasks psychometrically consistent as individual tasks and as a set? To answer these questions, three tasks were used from the six biology tasks initially designed and developed by an iterative process of trial testing. Analyses of data from 224 students showed that performance-based laboratory tasks that are doable by all students require careful and iterative process of development. Although the students demonstrated more skill in performing than planning and reasoning, their performances at the item level were very poor for some items. Possible reasons for the poor performances have been discussed and suggestions on how to remediate the deficiencies have been made. Empirical evidences for validity and reliability of the instrument have been presented both from the classical and the modern validity criteria point of view. Limitations of the study have been identified. Finally implications of the study and directions for further research have been discussed.

  19. Improving the life science (biology) laboratory education experience: From an instructor-centered to a learner-centered educational environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Marcella Liffick

    The component parts of the educational experience in a freshman biology laboratory course could be improved if the knowledge, skills, and personality of the students could be integrated with the instructor's. Lack of integration of instruction with learning often results in students unwilling or unable to learn content and to transfer it to future courses. This research examined the component parts of instruction and learning for a freshman biology laboratory class and provided an alternative approach to the traditional experience in this lab. Outcome assessment revealed that students experiencing a learner-centered lab responded differently to instruction than students in the traditional lab did and expressed more of a learning orientation and awareness. Not all methods used were successful but course evaluations demonstrated an increased awareness of the learning process among students in the learner-centered lab. The alternative group indicated differences specifically directed toward learning, more often than the traditional group did.

  20. Middle/high school students in the research laboratory: A summer internship program emphasizing the interdisciplinary nature of biology.

    PubMed

    McMiller, Tracee; Lee, Tameshia; Saroop, Ria; Green, Tyra; Johnson, Casonya M

    2006-03-01

    We describe an eight-week summer Young Scientist in Training (YSIT) internship program involving middle and high school students. This program exposed students to current basic research in molecular genetics, while introducing or reinforcing principles of the scientific method and demonstrating the uses of mathematics and chemistry in biology. For the laboratory-based program, selected students from Baltimore City Schools working in groups of three were teamed with undergraduate research assistants at Morgan State University. Teams were assigned a project that was indirectly related to our laboratory research on the characterization of gene expression in Caenorhabditis elegans. At the end of the program, teams prepared posters detailing their accomplishments, and presented their findings to parents and faculty members during a mini-symposium. The posters were also submitted to the respective schools and the interns were offered a presentation of their research at local high school science fairs. Copyright © 2006 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. The Protein Information Management System (PiMS): a generic tool for any structural biology research laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Chris; Pajon, Anne; Griffiths, Susanne L.; Daniel, Ed; Savitsky, Marc; Lin, Bill; Diprose, Jonathan M.; Wilter da Silva, Alan; Pilicheva, Katya; Troshin, Peter; Niekerk, Johannes van; Isaacs, Neil; Naismith, James; Nave, Colin; Blake, Richard; Wilson, Keith S.; Stuart, David I.; Henrick, Kim; Esnouf, Robert M.

    2011-04-01

    The Protein Information Management System (PiMS) is described together with a discussion of how its features make it well suited to laboratories of all sizes. The techniques used in protein production and structural biology have been developing rapidly, but techniques for recording the laboratory information produced have not kept pace. One approach is the development of laboratory information-management systems (LIMS), which typically use a relational database schema to model and store results from a laboratory workflow. The underlying philosophy and implementation of the Protein Information Management System (PiMS), a LIMS development specifically targeted at the flexible and unpredictable workflows of protein-production research laboratories of all scales, is described. PiMS is a web-based Java application that uses either Postgres or Oracle as the underlying relational database-management system. PiMS is available under a free licence to all academic laboratories either for local installation or for use as a managed service.

  2. LONG-TERM PRESERVATION OF BIOLOGICALS FOR THE FORENSIC LABORATORY AND THEIR AREAS OF APPLICATION.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The requirement for a wide range of controls in a forensic laboratory testing blood stains, blood crusts, saliva, semen, and whole blood or serum...controls and their implementation in a forensic laboratory are presented. The importance of nomenclature in the field of forensic immunohematology is reviewed for workers in this field. (Author)

  3. A Molecular Genetics Laboratory Course Applying Bioinformatics and Cell Biology in the Context of Original Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brame, Cynthia J.; Pruitt, Wendy M.; Robinson, Lucy C.

    2008-01-01

    Research based laboratory courses have been shown to stimulate student interest in science and to improve scientific skills. We describe here a project developed for a semester-long research-based laboratory course that accompanies a genetics lecture course. The project was designed to allow students to become familiar with the use of…

  4. A Molecular Genetics Laboratory Course Applying Bioinformatics and Cell Biology in the Context of Original Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brame, Cynthia J.; Pruitt, Wendy M.; Robinson, Lucy C.

    2008-01-01

    Research based laboratory courses have been shown to stimulate student interest in science and to improve scientific skills. We describe here a project developed for a semester-long research-based laboratory course that accompanies a genetics lecture course. The project was designed to allow students to become familiar with the use of…

  5. Development of a Laboratory Course in Nonmajors General Biology for Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickle, James E.; Aune, Patricia M.

    2008-01-01

    For distance-education students, the requirement for a laboratory course can present a significant hurdle to completing degree requirements. To better serve these nontraditional students, the authors developed a distance version of the laboratory course to provide a hands-on experience similar to that of on-campus students. In order to make the…

  6. Synthesis and Biological Testing of Penicillins: An Investigative Approach to the Undergraduate Teaching Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Ragnhild D.; Truhlar, Laura M.; Yksel, Deniz; Walt, David R.; Williams, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    The development and implementation of a research-based organic chemistry laboratory experiment is presented. The experiment was designed to simulate a scientific research environment, involve students in critical thinking, and develop the student's ability to analyze and present research-based data. In this experiment, a laboratory class…

  7. Synthesis and Biological Testing of Penicillins: An Investigative Approach to the Undergraduate Teaching Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Ragnhild D.; Truhlar, Laura M.; Yksel, Deniz; Walt, David R.; Williams, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    The development and implementation of a research-based organic chemistry laboratory experiment is presented. The experiment was designed to simulate a scientific research environment, involve students in critical thinking, and develop the student's ability to analyze and present research-based data. In this experiment, a laboratory class…

  8. Environmental monitoring and assessment program (EMAP) laboratory methods manual estuaries. Volume 1. Biological and physical analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Strobel, C.J.; Klemm, D.J.; Lobring, L.B.; Eichelberger, J.W.; Alford-Stevens, A.

    1995-08-01

    This document is intended to document analytical methods for use by laboratories conducting analyses for the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program-Estuaries. This document is volume I of a two-part series. The second volume of the EMAP-Estuaries Laboratory Methods Manual presents methods for the chemical analyses of sediments and tissue.

  9. Comparing biology majors from large lecture classes with TA-facilitated laboratories to those from small lecture classes with faculty-facilitated laboratories.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Barbara E; Koster, Karen L; Redinius, Patrick L

    2005-06-01

    The teaching faculty for this course sought to address their own concerns about the quality of student learning in an impersonal large lecture biology class for majors, the difficulties in getting to know each student by name, and difficulties in soliciting answers and reactions from the students during the lecture. Questions addressed by this study were, Do active-learning activities in a small and personal lecture setting enhance student learning more than active-learning activities in large impersonal lectures? and Are students more satisfied with an educational experience in a small and personal lecture setting? Based on faculty perceptions of how they best relate to their students, the prediction was that the students in the experimental group with small lecture classes and increased direct contact with the teaching faculty would learn physiological principles better than the students in the control group in the large impersonal lecture portion of the course. One of the laboratory sections of this large enrollment biology course was randomly selected to be taught with separate small lectures by the teaching faculty. In addition, the teaching faculty participated in the laboratory with these students during their experiments correlated with the lecture material. The students in both groups were compared by pre- and posttests of physiological principles, final course grades, and class satisfaction surveys.

  10. Zebrafish development and genetics: introducing undergraduates to developmental biology and genetics in a large introductory laboratory class.

    PubMed

    D'Costa, Allison; Shepherd, Iain T

    2009-06-01

    We have taken advantage of the strengths of the zebrafish model system to introduce developmental biology and genetics to undergraduates in their second semester of the Introductory Biology course at Emory. We designed a 6-week laboratory module based on research being undertaken by faculty in the department, and incorporated experiments that used current research methods including bioinformatics. Students undertook a range of experiments including direct observation of live wild-type zebrafish at different stages of embryogenesis, whole-mount in situ hybridization of mutant and wild-type embryos, vital dye staining of mutant and wild-type embryos, and pharmacological treatments to perturb normal development. These laboratories engaged the students by providing a hands-on, research-centered experience, while also enhancing their written (worksheets and laboratory reports) and oral (group presentation) communication skills. We describe the proceedings of each lab and the logistics of preparing and running these labs for 400-500 students (120 students taking lab each day), and provide a preliminary assessment of the success of the laboratories data based on student evaluations.

  11. Biological Warfare Agents, Toxins, Vectors and Pests as Biological Terrorism Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-01

    cholera virus) 5. Classical swine fever virus (Hog cholera virus) 6. Newcastle disease virus 7. Rinderpest virus 8. Pest des petits ruminants virus...BIOLOGICAL WARFARE AGENTS, TOXINS, VECTORS AND PESTS AS BIOLOGICAL TERRORISM AGENTS Slavko Bokan MOD of the Republic of Croatia... pests that include the invertebrates such as insects and arthropods with potential terrorism and military use are presented. INTRODUCTION Many

  12. [Life cycle of Gongylonema mucronatum Seurat, 1916, parasite of the African hedge-hog (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Quentin, J C; Seguignes, M

    1979-01-01

    The Gongylonematid Nematode parasite of the Tunisian hedge-hog has been identified as Gongylonema mucronatum Seurat, 1916. The infective larva has been obtained from Locusta migratoria as intermediate host. The larval characters of this Gongylonema link it to the species G. pulchrum.

  13. Health effects from breathing air near CAFOs for feeder cattle or hogs.

    PubMed

    Von Essen, Susanna G; Auvermann, Brent W

    2005-01-01

    There is concern that livestock operations for fattening cattle and raising hogs known as concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) release substances into the air that have negative effects on the health of persons living nearby. These substances include dust containing endotoxin and other microbial products as well as ammonia, hydrogen sulfide and a variety of volatile organic compounds. Odors from these farms are considered offensive by some neighbors. A variety of medical complaints are reported to be more common in those people who live near CAFOs for raising hogs than in people without this exposure. Respiratory health effects, including symptoms of pulmonary disease and lung function test result abnormalities, have been described in workers employed in CAFOs where hogs are raised. Health effects after inhalation exposure of neighbors to substances released into the ambient air from these farms is less well characterized. It must be noted that CAFO workers may differ from neighbors in terms of their exposures and general health status. The presence of dust and other substances from cattle feedlots also causes some neighbors to voice concerns about the impact on their health but this exposure has been studied less extensively than exposure to substances released from CAFOs where hogs are raised. Further research needs to be done to look for measurable health effects attributable to living near all CAFOs in order to better understand the impact of these farms.

  14. 78 FR 45057 - Safety Zone; Alpena Area HOG Rally Fireworks, Alpena, Michigan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Alpena Area HOG Rally Fireworks, Alpena... spectators and vessels from the potential hazards associated with fireworks displays. DATES: This rule is... Guard's ability to protect the public from the potential hazards associated with maritime...

  15. PREVALENCE OF YERSINIA ENTEROCOLITICA IN MARKET WEIGHT HOGS IN THE UNITED STATES

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pigs are the major animal reservoir for Y. enterocolitica strains, which are potentially pathogenic for humans. The goals of this study were (1) to estimate the individual animal and on-farm prevalences of Y. enterocolitica in hogs based on tonsil samples collected during National Animal Health Mon...

  16. Hog Island Bank Protection - Lock and Dam 16 and Huron Chute Closing Dam Modification - Pool 18

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    siteG. iTne site is located at Lock and Dam (L/D) 16 between Rock Island County, Illinois, and Muscatine County, Iowa. The site, referred to as Hog Isla ...to fulfill its ,Waic uroe ifno. see Section 2 and Information gathered fo? IA alterative). VIES OD J * ~ ~ ~ b. The activity does not eppear to (1

  17. Host immune responses against hog cholera virus in pigs treated with an ionized alkali mineral complex.

    PubMed

    Park, Bong-Kyun; Lyoo, Kwang-Soo; Park, Yong-Ho; Koh, Jong-Ho; Seo, KyungSuk

    2002-12-01

    To determine the immune responses in pigs to hog cholera virus after treatment with an ionized alkali mineral complex (IAMC), 40 healthy pigs (28-32 days old) from a commercial swine farm were purchased and housed into 4 groups (n=10 each). All pigs were vaccinated intramuscularly (1 ml) with an attenuated live hog cholera virus (HCV, LOM strain) at 28-32 days old and challenged with a virulent hog cholera virus at 8 weeks after vaccination. Each group was treated with PowerFeel sprayed diet as 0.05% (w/w) in a final concentration (T-1, n=10), a diet mixed with SuperFeed as 3% (w/w) in a final concentration (T-2, n=10), or a diluted PowerFeel solution (1:500, v/v) as drinking water (T-3, n=10), respectively. A group (n=10) served as a non-treated control. Proportions of expressing CD2+ and CD8+ cells increased significantly (p<, 0.05) at 8-week post-application. Mean antibody titers of each group against HCV gradually increased to higher levels after vaccination and with challenge of the virulent virus. In conclusion, the IAMC-treated diets can be helpful for the improvement of growth in pigs with proper vaccination program, while the IAMC-treated diets have no effects on the clinical protection against hog cholera.

  18. Relative effects of human and feral hog disturbance on a wet forest in Hawaii

    Treesearch

    C. John Ralph; Bruce D. Maxwell

    1984-01-01

    The effects of 20 months of intensive disturbance by humans, as well as the presence of feral hogs Sus scrofa, was measured on vegetation. Both forms of disturbance have been thought severely to affect Hawaiian rain forests by reduction of plant cover and allowing the proliferation of exotic plants. Despite much human use throughout the stud), area,...

  19. SEASONAL EMISSIONS OF AMMONIA AND METHANE FROM A HOG WASTE LAGOON WITH BIOACTIVE COVER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the use of plane-integrated (PI) open-path Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (OP-FTIR) to measure the flux of ammonia and methane from a hog waste lagoon before and after the installation of a bioactive cover. A computed tomography algorithm using a smoo...

  20. Immobilization of collared peccaries (Tayassu tajacu) and feral hogs (Sus scrofa) with Telazol and xylazine.

    PubMed

    Gabor, T M; Hellgren, E C; Silvy, N J

    1997-01-01

    A 1:1 mg mixture of Telazol and xylazine hydrochloride (100 mg of Telazol and 100 mg of xylazine per ml) was used to immobilize wild collared peccaries (Tayassu tajacu) and feral hogs (Sus scrofa); mean (+/-SD) intramuscular dosage rate was 4.73 +/- 0.86 mg/kg and 4.35 +/- 0.68 mg/kg for peccaries (n = 107) and hogs (n = 49), respectively. Mean (+/-SD) induction time (time from injection until complete immobilization) was 4.6 +/- 2.5 minutes for collared peccaries and 4.4 +/- 1.9 for hogs. Peccaries became conscious at 64 +/- 29 minutes and first stood at 92 +/- 33 minutes after initial injection. Hogs became conscious at 54 +/- 26 minutes and first stood at 78 +/- 38 minutes after initial injection. A 1:1 mg mixture of Telazol and xylazine provided an effective and safe method to immobilize both species and provided adequate analgesia and anesthesia for short surgical procedures.

  1. Human gait recognition by pyramid of HOG feature on silhouette images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guang; Yin, Yafeng; Park, Jeanrok; Man, Hong

    2013-03-01

    As a uncommon biometric modality, human gait recognition has a great advantage of identify people at a distance without high resolution images. It has attracted much attention in recent years, especially in the fields of computer vision and remote sensing. In this paper, we propose a human gait recognition framework that consists of a reliable background subtraction method followed by the pyramid of Histogram of Gradient (pHOG) feature extraction on the silhouette image, and a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) based classifier. Through background subtraction, the silhouette of human gait in each frame is extracted and normalized from the raw video sequence. After removing the shadow and noise in each region of interest (ROI), pHOG feature is computed on the silhouettes images. Then the pHOG features of each gait class will be used to train a corresponding HMM. In the test stage, pHOG feature will be extracted from each test sequence and used to calculate the posterior probability toward each trained HMM model. Experimental results on the CASIA Gait Dataset B1 demonstrate that with our proposed method can achieve very competitive recognition rate.

  2. SEASONAL EMISSIONS OF AMMONIA AND METHANE FROM A HOG WASTE LAGOON WITH BIOACTIVE COVER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the use of plane-integrated (PI) open-path Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (OP-FTIR) to measure the flux of ammonia and methane from a hog waste lagoon before and after the installation of a bioactive cover. A computed tomography algorithm using a smoo...

  3. Susceptibility of a minipig kidney cell line (MPK) to hog cholera virus.

    PubMed

    Buonavoglia, C; Falcone, E; Pestalozza, S; Iovane, G; Rivero, V B

    1988-07-01

    A comparitive study on the different susceptibility of MPK cells (Minipig Kidney cell line) and PK15 cells (Pig Kidney cell line) to the Hog Cholera Virus (HCV) was conducted. Higher HCV titres (3 log10) were reached on MPK cells compared with PK15 cells.

  4. Characterization and pathogenicity for pigs of a hog cholera virus strain isolated from wild boars.

    PubMed

    Leforban, Y; Cariolet, R

    1992-01-01

    One hog cholera virus strain isolated from an outbreak of the disease in a wild boar breeding herd in Brittany (France) in 1990 has been characterized with a panel of monoclonal antibodies to hog cholera virus and ruminant pestiviruses: the strain was found to be indistinguishable from that of other domestic pig isolates. The pathogenicity of the strain to domestic pigs was evaluated by infecting intranasally, intramuscularly and by contact 17 specific pathogen-free 6-week- and 12-week-old pigs. Sixteen of the 17 pigs showed symptoms of hog cholera. The virus was detected in the blood of the 16 pigs during all phases of hyperthermia which persisted up to death or the terminal phase, ie between 16 and 29 days post-infection. One animal recovered after presenting a mild form of the disease. This pig was the only one which raised antibodies to the virus. Typical hog cholera lesions were observed in 2 pigs only; the other animal showed very few pathological changes. No relationship between intensity or duration of the disease and pathological changes could be established.

  5. 9 CFR 310.11 - Cleaning of hog carcasses before incising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cleaning of hog carcasses before incising. 310.11 Section 310.11 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS...

  6. 9 CFR 310.11 - Cleaning of hog carcasses before incising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cleaning of hog carcasses before incising. 310.11 Section 310.11 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS...

  7. 9 CFR 310.11 - Cleaning of hog carcasses before incising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cleaning of hog carcasses before incising. 310.11 Section 310.11 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS...

  8. 9 CFR 310.11 - Cleaning of hog carcasses before incising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cleaning of hog carcasses before incising. 310.11 Section 310.11 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS...

  9. Using a Module-Based Laboratory to Incorporate Inquiry into a Large Cell Biology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, David R.; Miskowski, Jennifer A.

    2005-01-01

    Because cell biology has rapidly increased in breadth and depth, instructors are challenged not only to provide undergraduate science students with a strong, up-to-date foundation of knowledge, but also to engage them in the scientific process. To these ends, revision of the Cell Biology Lab course at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse was…

  10. Space Resources for Teachers: Biology, Including Suggestions for Classroom Activities and Laboratory Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Tom E.; And Others

    This compilation of resource units concerns the latest developments in space biology. Some of the topics included are oxygen consumption, temperature, radiation, rhythms, weightlessness, acceleration and vibration stress, toxicity, and sensory and perceptual problems. Many of the topics are interdisciplinary and relate biology, physiology,…

  11. Using a Module-Based Laboratory to Incorporate Inquiry into a Large Cell Biology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, David R.; Miskowski, Jennifer A.

    2005-01-01

    Because cell biology has rapidly increased in breadth and depth, instructors are challenged not only to provide undergraduate science students with a strong, up-to-date foundation of knowledge, but also to engage them in the scientific process. To these ends, revision of the Cell Biology Lab course at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse was…

  12. Cell migration analysis: A low-cost laboratory experiment for cell and developmental biology courses using keratocytes from fish scales.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Daniel; Aparicio, Gonzalo; Sotelo-Silveira, Jose R

    2017-06-19

    Cell and developmental processes are complex, and profoundly dependent on spatial relationships that change over time. Innovative educational or teaching strategies are always needed to foster deep comprehension of these processes and their dynamic features. However, laboratory exercises in cell and developmental biology at the undergraduate level do not often take into account the time dimension. In this article, we provide a laboratory exercise focused in cell migration, aiming to stimulate thinking in time and space dimensions through a simplification of more complex processes occurring in cell or developmental biology. The use of open-source tools for the analysis, as well as the whole package of raw results (available at http://github.com/danielprieto/keratocyte) make it suitable for its implementation in courses with very diverse budgets. Aiming to facilitate the student's transition from science-students to science-practitioners we propose an exercise of scientific thinking, and an evaluation method. This in turn is communicated here to facilitate the finding of common caveats and weaknesses in the process of producing simple scientific communications describing the results achieved. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2017. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  13. Delayed Turnover of Unphosphorylated Ssk1 during Carbon Stress Activates the Yeast Hog1 Map Kinase Pathway.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Milene Carmes; Mayinger, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Hog1 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway coordinates the adaptation to osmotic stress and was recently reported to respond to acute changes in glucose levels. Similarly as in osmotic stress, glucose starvation leads to a transient accumulation of Hog1 in the nucleus. However, the kinetics and the mechanism of Hog1 activation are different for these stress conditions. During osmotic shock the activation of Hog1 can be transduced by either the Sho1 or the Sln1/Ypd1/Ssk1 branch. During glucose starvation the phosphorylation of Hog1 is slower and is completely dependent on Ssk1, but independent of Sho1. To characterize the mechanism of activation of Hog1 during carbon stress, we examined the turnover of Ssk1 protein levels upon glucose starvation in the presence of cycloheximide and monitored protein levels by western blotting. Our data demonstrate that unphosphorylated Ssk1 was quickly degraded during exponential growth and after osmotic stress but remained remarkably stable during glucose limitation. We conclude that glucose starvation induces a delay in the turnover of unphosphorylated Ssk1, which is sufficient to activate the Hog1 MAPK pathway. Although unphosphorylated Ssk1 is known to be degraded by the proteasome, its stabilization is apparently not due to changes in cellular localization or decrease in ubiquitination levels during glucose limitation.

  14. Rewiring yeast osmostress signalling through the MAPK network reveals essential and non-essential roles of Hog1 in osmoadaptation

    PubMed Central

    Babazadeh, Roja; Furukawa, Takako; Hohmann, Stefan; Furukawa, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) have a number of targets which they regulate at transcriptional and post-translational levels to mediate specific responses. The yeast Hog1 MAPK is essential for cell survival under hyperosmotic conditions and it plays multiple roles in gene expression, metabolic regulation, signal fidelity and cell cycle regulation. Here we describe essential and non-essential roles of Hog1 using engineered yeast cells in which osmoadaptation was reconstituted in a Hog1-independent manner. We rewired Hog1-dependent osmotic stress-induced gene expression under the control of Fus3/Kss1 MAPKs, which are activated upon osmostress via crosstalk in hog1Δ cells. This approach revealed that osmotic up-regulation of only two Hog1-dependent glycerol biosynthesis genes, GPD1 and GPP2, is sufficient for successful osmoadaptation. Moreover, some of the previously described Hog1-dependent mechanisms appeared to be dispensable for osmoadaptation in the engineered cells. These results suggest that the number of essential MAPK functions may be significantly smaller than anticipated and that knockout approaches may lead to over-interpretation of phenotypic data. PMID:24732094

  15. PiHOG1, a stress regulator MAP kinase from the root endophyte fungus Piriformospora indica, confers salinity stress tolerance in rice plants

    PubMed Central

    Jogawat, Abhimanyu; Vadassery, Jyothilakshmi; Verma, Nidhi; Oelmüller, Ralf; Dua, Meenakshi; Nevo, Eviatar; Johri, Atul Kumar

    2016-01-01

    In this study, yeast HOG1 homologue from the root endophyte Piriformospora indica (PiHOG1) was isolated and functionally characterized. Functional expression of PiHOG1 in S. cerevisiae ∆hog1 mutant restored osmotolerance under high osmotic stress. Knockdown (KD) transformants of PiHOG1 generated by RNA interference in P. indica showed that genes for the HOG pathway, osmoresponse and salinity tolerance were less stimulated in KD-PiHOG1 compared to the wild-type under salinity stress. Furthermore, KD lines are impaired in the colonization of rice roots under salinity stress of 200 mM NaCl, and the biomass of the host plants, their shoot and root lengths, root number, photosynthetic pigment and proline contents were reduced as compared to rice plants colonized by WT P. indica. Therefore, PiHOG1 is critical for root colonisation, salinity tolerance and the performance of the host plant under salinity stress. Moreover, downregulation of PiHOG1 resulted not only in reduced and delayed phosphorylation of the remaining PiHOG1 protein in colonized salinity-stressed rice roots, but also in the downregulation of the upstream MAP kinase genes PiPBS2 and PiSSK2 involved in salinity tolerance signalling in the fungus. Our data demonstrate that PiHOG1 is not only involved in the salinity response of P. indica, but also helping host plant to overcome salinity stress. PMID:27849025

  16. Recommendation for the review of biological reference intervals in medical laboratories.

    PubMed

    Henny, Joseph; Vassault, Anne; Boursier, Guilaine; Vukasovic, Ines; Mesko Brguljan, Pika; Lohmander, Maria; Ghita, Irina; Andreu, Francisco A Bernabeu; Kroupis, Christos; Sprongl, Ludek; Thelen, Marc H M; Vanstapel, Florent J L A; Vodnik, Tatjana; Huisman, Willem; Vaubourdolle, Michel

    2016-12-01

    This document is based on the original recommendation of the Expert Panel on the Theory of Reference Values of the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC), updated guidelines were recently published under the auspices of the IFCC and the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). This document summarizes proposals for recommendations on: (i) The terminology, which is often confusing, noticeably concerning the terms of reference limits and decision limits. (ii) The method for the determination of reference limits according to the original procedure and the conditions, which should be used. (iii) A simple procedure allowing the medical laboratories to fulfill the requirements of the regulation and standards. The updated document proposes to verify that published reference limits are applicable to the laboratory involved. Finally, the strengths and limits of the revised recommendations (especially the selection of the reference population, the maintenance of the analytical quality, the choice of the statistical method used…) will be briefly discussed.

  17. Are Your Cells Pregnant? Relating Biology Laboratory Exercises to Everyday Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, Simon J.; Banner, Lisa R.

    2001-01-01

    Presents a laboratory exercise that allows students to investigate the principles of hormone release from endocrine cells, which is highly relevant to students' everyday lives. (Contains 17 references.) (ASK)

  18. Prepare, Do, Review: A skills-based approach for laboratory practical classes in biochemistry and molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Peter; Ludwig, Martha; Castelli, Joane; Kirkwood, Paul; Attwood, Paul

    2016-05-06

    A new laboratory practical system is described which is comprised of a number of laboratory practical modules, each based around a particular technique or set of techniques, related to the theory part of the course but not designed to be dependent on it. Each module comprises an online recorded pre-lab lecture, the laboratory practical itself and a post-lab session in which students make oral presentations on different aspects of the practical. Each part of the module is assessed with the aim of providing rapid feedback to staff and students. Each laboratory practical is the responsibility of a single staff member and through this "ownership," continual review and updating is promoted. Examples of changes made by staff to modules as a result of student feedback are detailed. A survey of students who had experienced both the old-style laboratory course and the new one provided evidence of increased satisfaction with the new program. The assessment of acquired shills in the new program showed that it was much more effective than the old course. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44:276-287, 2016.

  19. Involvement of the mitogen activated protein kinase Hog1p in the response of Candida albicans to iron availability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Iron is an essential nutrient for almost all organisms, and generating iron limiting conditions for pathogens is one of the host defense strategies against microbial infections. Excess of iron can be toxic; therefore, iron uptake is tightly controlled. The high affinity iron uptake system of the opportunistic pathogenic yeast Candida albicans has been shown to be essential for virulence. Several transcription factors and regulators of iron uptake genes were identified, but the knowledge of signaling pathways is still limited. Gene expression profiling of the Δhog1 deletion mutant indicated an involvement of the mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase Hog1p. However, the function of Hog1p in the response of C. albicans to iron availability was not studied in detail. Thus, we analyzed phenotypic and molecular responses of C. albicans to different iron concentrations particularly with respect to the activity of the Hog1p MAP kinase module. Results We observed flocculation of yeast cells, when the iron ion concentration was equal to or higher than 5 μM. This phenotype was dependent on the MAP kinase Hog1p and the corresponding MAP kinase kinase Pbs2p. Moreover, high extracellular iron ion concentrations led to hyper-phosphorylation of Hog1p. We determined lower amounts of multicopper ferroxidase (MCFO) proteins and lower ferric reductase activity, when the iron ion concentration in the medium was increased. This effect was also observed for the Δhog1 mutant. However, the amounts of MCFO proteins and the cell surface ferric reductase activity were increased in the Δhog1 in comparison to wild type cells. This effect was independent of iron availability in growth media. Conclusions In C. albicans, the MAP kinase Hog1p is part of the network regulating the response of the organism to iron availability. Hog1p was transiently phosphorylated under high iron concentrations and was essential for a flocculent phenotype. Furthermore, deletion of HOG1 led to

  20. The Hog1 MAP Kinase Promotes the Recovery from Cell Cycle Arrest Induced by Hydrogen Peroxide in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Correia, Inês; Alonso-Monge, Rebeca; Pla, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cell cycle progression in response to environmental conditions is controlled via specific checkpoints. Signal transduction pathways mediated by MAPKs play a crucial role in sensing stress. For example, the canonical MAPKs Mkc1 (of the cell wall integrity pathway), and Hog1 (of the HOG pathway), are activated upon oxidative stress. In this work, we have analyzed the effect of oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide on cell cycle progression in Candida albicans. Hydrogen peroxide was shown to induce a transient arrest at the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Specifically, a G1 arrest was observed, although phosphorylation of Mkc1 and Hog1 MAPKs can take place at all stages of the cell cycle. Interestingly, hog1 (but not mkc1) mutants required a longer time compared to wild type cells to resume growth after hydrogen peroxide challenge. Using GFP-labeled cells and mixed cultures of wild type and hog1 cells we were able to show that hog1 mutants progress faster through the cell cycle under standard growth conditions in the absence of stress (YPD at 37°C). Consequently, hog1 mutants exhibited a smaller cell size. The altered cell cycle progression correlates with altered expression of the G1 cyclins Cln3 and Pcl2 in hog1 cells compared to the wild type strain. In addition, Hgc1 (a hypha-specific G1 cyclin) as well as Cln3 displayed a different kinetics of expression in the presence of hydrogen peroxide in hog1 mutants. Collectively, these results indicate that Hog1 regulates the expression of G1 cyclins not only in response to oxidative stress, but also under standard growth conditions. Hydrogen peroxide treated cells did not show fluctuations in the mRNA levels for SOL1, which are observed in untreated cells during cell cycle progression. In addition, treatment with hydrogen peroxide prevented degradation of Sol1, an effect which was enhanced in hog1 mutants. Therefore, in C. albicans, the MAPK Hog1 mediates cell cycle progression in response to oxidative

  1. The Hog1 MAP Kinase Promotes the Recovery from Cell Cycle Arrest Induced by Hydrogen Peroxide in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Inês; Alonso-Monge, Rebeca; Pla, Jesús

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic cell cycle progression in response to environmental conditions is controlled via specific checkpoints. Signal transduction pathways mediated by MAPKs play a crucial role in sensing stress. For example, the canonical MAPKs Mkc1 (of the cell wall integrity pathway), and Hog1 (of the HOG pathway), are activated upon oxidative stress. In this work, we have analyzed the effect of oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide on cell cycle progression in Candida albicans. Hydrogen peroxide was shown to induce a transient arrest at the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Specifically, a G1 arrest was observed, although phosphorylation of Mkc1 and Hog1 MAPKs can take place at all stages of the cell cycle. Interestingly, hog1 (but not mkc1) mutants required a longer time compared to wild type cells to resume growth after hydrogen peroxide challenge. Using GFP-labeled cells and mixed cultures of wild type and hog1 cells we were able to show that hog1 mutants progress faster through the cell cycle under standard growth conditions in the absence of stress (YPD at 37°C). Consequently, hog1 mutants exhibited a smaller cell size. The altered cell cycle progression correlates with altered expression of the G1 cyclins Cln3 and Pcl2 in hog1 cells compared to the wild type strain. In addition, Hgc1 (a hypha-specific G1 cyclin) as well as Cln3 displayed a different kinetics of expression in the presence of hydrogen peroxide in hog1 mutants. Collectively, these results indicate that Hog1 regulates the expression of G1 cyclins not only in response to oxidative stress, but also under standard growth conditions. Hydrogen peroxide treated cells did not show fluctuations in the mRNA levels for SOL1, which are observed in untreated cells during cell cycle progression. In addition, treatment with hydrogen peroxide prevented degradation of Sol1, an effect which was enhanced in hog1 mutants. Therefore, in C. albicans, the MAPK Hog1 mediates cell cycle progression in response to oxidative

  2. Field Studies and Laboratory Bearing of Arzama densa Walker, A Biological Control Agent against Waterhyacinth.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    WLK.. A BIOLOGICAL CONTROL AGENT AGAINST WATERHYACINTH PART I: INTRODUCTION 1. Waterhyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms, is a perennial... crassipes Solms) in the Nile System, Egypt," Aquatic Bot. 1:243-252. Bock, J. H. 1966. "An Ecological Study of Eichhornia crassipes with Special...biological organisms combined with other types of control methods. 2 141 REFERENCES Batanouny, K. H. and El-Fiky, A. M. 1975. "The Waterhyacinth ( Eichhornia

  3. The development and assessment of constructivist-based curriculum changes in a university general biology laboratory course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herron, Sherry Shelton

    1999-11-01

    This study describes the processes involved in transforming the curriculum of the second semester general biology laboratory course for science majors, BSC 111L, at the University of Southern Mississippi from one based on the behaviorist model of teaching and learning to one based on the constructivist model. The study encompasses pilot and research phases. During the pilot phase conducted fall semester of 1997, the researcher presented to graduate teaching assistants an overview of the need for curriculum reform and some of the theoretical underpinnings for the movement. The researcher worked with all of the general biology teaching assistants to determine factors they considered supportive of the effort, identified specific goals and exercises, and developed a mission statement. The researcher then worked with two of the teaching assistants to write the new curriculum materials and pilot them in a designated laboratory section each week. During the research phase, the researcher facilitated the use of constructivist teaching methods and interviewed the teaching assistants during weekly group meetings. The researcher videotaped and observed the laboratories at various times throughout spring semester of 1998. Student responses to survey questions about the laboratories were collected during the observation sessions. Data derived from self-assessments on teaching beliefs completed by the teaching assistants, interview transcripts, videotaped laboratory sessions, and student surveys were used to assess the effectiveness of the new curriculum and the intervention program. It was observed that despite being given the same instructions, curriculum, and materials, each teaching assistant conducted his laboratory section in a unique way and rarely conducted the complete laboratory in the intended manner. It was also observed that one TA in particular needed more training in interpersonal skill development and content than was provided during the weekly intervention

  4. Testing sediment biological effects with the freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca: the gap between laboratory and nature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feiyue; Goulet, Richard R; Chapman, Peter M

    2004-12-01

    The freshwater amphipod, Hyalella azteca, is widely used in laboratory sediment toxicity and bioaccumulation tests. However, its responses in the laboratory are probably very different from those in the field. A review of the literature indicates that in its natural habitat this species complex is primarily epibenthic, derives little nutrition from the sediments, and responds primarily to contaminants in the overlying water column (including water and food), not sediment or porewater. In laboratory sediment toxicity tests H. azteca is deprived of natural food sources such as algal communities on or above the sediments, and is subjected to constant light without any cover except that afforded by burial into the sediments. Under these constraining laboratory conditions, H. azteca has been reported to respond to sediment or porewater contamination. In nature, contamination of overlying water from sediment is less likely than in the laboratory because of the large, generally non-static sink of natural surface water. H. azteca does not appear to be the most appropriate test species for direct assessments of the bioavailability and toxicity of sediment contaminants, though it is probably appropriate for testing the toxicity of surface waters. Toxic and non-toxic responses will be highly conservative, though the latter are probably the most persuasive given the exposure constraints. Thus H. azteca is probably a suitable surrogate species for determining sediments that are likely not toxic to field populations; however, it is not suitable for determining sediments that are likely toxic to field populations.

  5. Manipulatives-Based Laboratory for Majors Biology – a Hands-On Approach to Understanding Respiration and Photosynthesis †

    PubMed Central

    Boomer, Sarah M.; Latham, Kristin L.

    2011-01-01

    The first course in our year-long introductory series for Biology majors encompasses four learning units: biological molecules and cells, metabolism, genetics, and evolution. Of these, the metabolism unit, which includes respiration and photosynthesis, has shown the lowest student exam scores, least interest, and lowest laboratory ratings. Consequently, we hypothesized that modeling metabolic processes in the laboratory would improve student content learning during this course unit. Specifically, we developed manipulatives-based laboratory exercises that combined paper cutouts, movable blocks, and large diagrams of the cell. In particular, our novel use of connecting LEGO blocks allowed students to move model electrons and phosphates between molecules and within defined spaces of the cell. We assessed student learning using both formal (content indicators and attitude surveys) and informal (the identification of misconceptions or discussions with students) approaches. On the metabolism unit content exam, student performance improved by 46% over pretest scores and by the end of the course, the majority of students rated metabolism as their most-improved (43%) and favorite (33%) subject as compared with other unit topics. The majority of students rated manipulatives-based labs as very helpful, as compared to non-manipulatives-based labs. In this report, we will demonstrate that students made learning gains across all content areas, but most notably in the unit that covered respiration and photosynthesis. PMID:23653756

  6. Effects of nickel on biological methane generation from a laboratory poultry waste digester

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C.M.; Shih, J.C.H.; Spears, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    Nickel added in concentrations as low as 10..mu..M significantly increased biogas production in a laboratory poultry waste digester utilizing excreta from laying hens as the organic energy source. It was shown that the initial rate of biogas production increased as early as 4 h after the addition of nickel to the laboratory cultures. Analysis of the excreta for nickel content prior to addition of exogenous NiCl/sub 2/ showed appreciable amounts of nickel present. The data indicate that nickel naturally present in layer excreta is suboptimal or unavailable to the bacteria for biogas production purposes.

  7. Mammalian skin cell biology: at the interface between laboratory and clinic.

    PubMed

    Watt, Fiona M

    2014-11-21

    Mammalian skin research represents the convergence of three complementary disciplines: cell biology, mouse genetics, and dermatology. The skin provides a paradigm for current research in cell adhesion, inflammation, and tissue stem cells. Here, I discuss recent insights into the cell biology of skin. Single-cell analysis has revealed that human epidermal stem cells are heterogeneous and differentiate in response to multiple extrinsic signals. Live-cell imaging, optogenetics, and cell ablation experiments show skin cells to be remarkably dynamic. High-throughput, genome-wide approaches have yielded unprecedented insights into the circuitry that controls epidermal stem cell fate. Last, integrative biological analysis of human skin disorders has revealed unexpected functions for elements of the skin that were previously considered purely structural. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Biological monitoring and abatement program plan for Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kszos, L.A.; Anderson, G.E.; Gregory, S.M.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Schilling, E.M.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Phipps, T.L.

    1997-06-01

    The overall purpose of this plan is to evaluate the receiving streams` biological communities for the duration of the permit and meet the objectives for the ORNL BMAP as outlined in the NPDES permit (Appendix). The ORNL BMAP will focus on those streams in the WOC watershed that (1) receive NPDES discharges and (2) have been identified as ecologically impacted. In response to the newly issued NPDES permit, the tasks that are included in this BMAP plan include monitoring biological communities (fish and benthic invertebrates), monitoring mercury contamination in fish and water, monitoring polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contamination in fish, and evaluating temperature loading from ORNL outfalls. The ORNL BMAP will evaluate the effects of sediment and oil and grease, as well as the chlorine control strategy through the use of biological community data. Monitoring will be conducted at sites in WOC, First Creek, Fifth Creek, Melton Branch, and WOL.

  9. Integrating Biology into the General Chemistry Laboratory: Fluorometric Analysis of Chlorophyll "a"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wesolowski, Meredith C.

    2014-01-01

    A laboratory experiment that introduces fluorometry of chlorophyll "a" at the general chemistry level is described. The use of thin-layer chromatography to isolate chlorophyll "a" from spirulina and leaf matter enables quantification of small amounts of chlorophyll "a" via fluorometry. Student results were reasonably…

  10. A Linked Series of Laboratory Exercises in Molecular Biology Utilizing Bioinformatics and GFP

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medin, Carey L.; Nolin, Katie L.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular biologists commonly use bioinformatics to map and analyze DNA and protein sequences and to align different DNA and protein sequences for comparison. Additionally, biologists can create and view 3D models of protein structures to further understand intramolecular interactions. The primary goal of this 10-week laboratory was to introduce…

  11. Bats, Barnacles, and Bread Mold: An "Organism Day" Laboratory for General Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loehr, Karen A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a laboratory exercise in which students select and identify an organism, study it as it interacts within its environment, collect further information through library research, and bring the organism (alive, preserved, or photographed) to lab for a five-minute presentation. (JN)

  12. Introducing Human Population Biology through an Easy Laboratory Exercise on Mitochondrial DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardinas, Antonio F.; Dopico, Eduardo; Roca, Agustin; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva; Lopez, Belen

    2010-01-01

    This article describes an easy and cheap laboratory exercise for students to discover their own mitochondrial haplogroup. Students use buccal swabs to obtain mucosa cells as noninvasive tissue samples, extract DNA, and with a simple polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis they can obtain DNA fragments of…

  13. Biotechnology for Non-biology Majors: An Activity Using a Commercial Biotechnology Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wray, Francis P.; Fox, Mary C.; Huether, Carl A.; Schurdak, Eric R.

    2001-01-01

    Presents an inexpensive activity to stimulate student interest in biotechnology that was developed in partnership with a biotechnology company. Focuses on the use of DNA by a commercial laboratory; describing the analysis procedure; important uses of DNA technology in modern society; and ethical, social, and legal issues related to biotechnology.…

  14. How-To-Do-It: Recombinant DNA Technology in the High School Biology Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Describes a basic biotechnology investigation that includes restriction and ligation of plasmid DNA, transformation of bacteria and cloning of these bacterial cells. Discusses laboratory procedures and another activity in the identification of unknown plasmids by studying agarose gel electrophoresis photographs. (CW)

  15. Bats, Barnacles, and Bread Mold: An "Organism Day" Laboratory for General Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loehr, Karen A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a laboratory exercise in which students select and identify an organism, study it as it interacts within its environment, collect further information through library research, and bring the organism (alive, preserved, or photographed) to lab for a five-minute presentation. (JN)

  16. A Linked Series of Laboratory Exercises in Molecular Biology Utilizing Bioinformatics and GFP

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medin, Carey L.; Nolin, Katie L.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular biologists commonly use bioinformatics to map and analyze DNA and protein sequences and to align different DNA and protein sequences for comparison. Additionally, biologists can create and view 3D models of protein structures to further understand intramolecular interactions. The primary goal of this 10-week laboratory was to introduce…

  17. Introducing Human Population Biology through an Easy Laboratory Exercise on Mitochondrial DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardinas, Antonio F.; Dopico, Eduardo; Roca, Agustin; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva; Lopez, Belen

    2010-01-01

    This article describes an easy and cheap laboratory exercise for students to discover their own mitochondrial haplogroup. Students use buccal swabs to obtain mucosa cells as noninvasive tissue samples, extract DNA, and with a simple polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis they can obtain DNA fragments of…

  18. How-To-Do-It: Recombinant DNA Technology in the High School Biology Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Describes a basic biotechnology investigation that includes restriction and ligation of plasmid DNA, transformation of bacteria and cloning of these bacterial cells. Discusses laboratory procedures and another activity in the identification of unknown plasmids by studying agarose gel electrophoresis photographs. (CW)

  19. Integrating Biology into the General Chemistry Laboratory: Fluorometric Analysis of Chlorophyll "a"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wesolowski, Meredith C.

    2014-01-01

    A laboratory experiment that introduces fluorometry of chlorophyll "a" at the general chemistry level is described. The use of thin-layer chromatography to isolate chlorophyll "a" from spirulina and leaf matter enables quantification of small amounts of chlorophyll "a" via fluorometry. Student results were reasonably…

  20. Biological Assessment of the Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory on Federally Listed Threatened and Endangered Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Leslie A.

    2006-09-19

    This biological assessment considers the effects of continuing to operate Los Alamos National Laboratory on Federally listed threatened or endangered species, based on current and future operations identified in the 2006 Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory (SWEIS; DOE In Prep.). We reviewed 40 projects analyzed in the SWEIS as well as two aspects on ongoing operations to determine if these actions had the potential to affect Federally listed species. Eighteen projects that had not already received U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) consultation and concurrence, as well as the two aspects of ongoing operations, ecological risk from legacy contaminants and the Outfall Reduction Project, were determined to have the potential to affect threatened or endangered species. Cumulative impacts were also analyzed.

  1. Modeling the Endogenous Sunlight Inactivation Rates of Laboratory Strain and Wastewater E. coli and Enterococci Using Biological Weighting Functions.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Andrea I; Nelson, Kara L

    2016-11-15

    Models that predict sunlight inactivation rates of bacteria are valuable tools for predicting the fate of pathogens in recreational waters and designing natural wastewater treatment systems to meet disinfection goals. We developed biological weighting function (BWF)-based numerical models to estimate the endogenous sunlight inactivation rates of E. coli and enterococci. BWF-based models allow the prediction of inactivation rates under a range of environmental conditions that shift the magnitude or spectral distribution of sunlight irradiance (e.g., different times, latitudes, water absorbances, depth). Separate models were developed for laboratory strain bacteria cultured in the laboratory and indigenous organisms concentrated directly from wastewater. Wastewater bacteria were found to be 5-7 times less susceptible to full-spectrum simulated sunlight than the laboratory bacteria, highlighting the importance of conducting experiments with bacteria sourced directly from wastewater. The inactivation rate models fit experimental data well and were successful in predicting the inactivation rates of wastewater E. coli and enterococci measured in clear marine water by researchers from a different laboratory. Additional research is recommended to develop strategies to account for the effects of elevated water pH on predicted inactivation rates.

  2. Boron contents and isotopic compositions of hog manure, selected fertilizers, and water in Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Komor, S.C.

    1997-01-01

    Boron-isotope (δ11B) values may be useful as surrogate tracers of contaminants and indicators of water mixing in agricultural settings. This paper characterizes the B contents and isotopic compositions of hog manure and selected fertilizers, and presents δ11B data for ground and surface water from two agricultural areas. Boron concentrations in dry hog manure averaged 61 mg/kg and in commercial fertilizers ranged from below detection limits in some brands of ammonium nitrate and urea to 382 mg/kg in magnesium sulfate. Values of δ11B of untreated hog manure ranged from 7.2 to 11.2o/oo and of N fertilizers were −2.0 to 0.7o/oo. In 22 groundwater samples from a sand-plain aquifer in east-central Minnesota, B concentrations averaged 0.04 mg/L and δ11B values ranged from 2.3 to 41.5o/oo. Groundwater beneath a hog feedlot and a cultivated field where hog manure was applied had B-isotope compositions consistent with the water containing hog-manure leachate. In a 775-km2 watershed with silty-loam soils in southcentral Minnesota: 18 samples of subsurface drainage from corn (Zea mays L.) and soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) fields had average B concentrations of 0.06 mg/L and δ11B values of 5.3 to 15.1o/oo; 27 stream samples had average B concentrations of 0.05 mg/L and δ11B values of 1.0 to 19.0o/oo; and eight groundwater samples had average B concentrations of 0.09 mg/L and δ11B values of −0.3 to 23.0o/oo. Values of δ11B and B concentrations, when plotted against one another, define a curved mixing trend that suggests subsurface drainage and stream water contain mixtures of B from shallow and deep groundwater.

  3. Molecular cloning and evolutionary analysis of the HOG-signaling pathway genes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae rice wine isolates.

    PubMed

    Li, Yudong; Chen, Wei; Shi, Yugang; Liang, Xinle

    2013-04-01

    The high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) signaling pathway is crucial for yeast to cope with high osmolarity. Here, we showed that Saccharomyces cerevisiae rice wine isolates exhibited higher tolerance to osmotic stress, which was associated with the evolution of HOG pathway genes. Phylogenetic analysis of HOG genes revealed that Chinese rice wine strains were closely related to sake strains, indicating a common origin of rice wine strains. The DNA sequence diversity analysis showed that higher levels of polymorphism tended to accumulate on the osmosensor genes (MSB2 and SLN1), suggesting that most changes in a signaling transduction pathway were concentrated in the receptors. Moreover, the rapid evolution of osmosensors (Sln1/Msb2) and transcription factor (Msn4) might experience positive selection. Our results imply that the evolution of HOG pathway genes in S. cerevisiae rice wine strains is associated with their adaptation to high osmotic environments.

  4. Apoptosis: A Four-Week Laboratory Investigation for Advanced Molecular and Cellular Biology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiBartolomeis, Susan M.; Mone, James P.

    2003-01-01

    Over the past decade, apoptosis has emerged as an important field of study central to ongoing research in many diverse fields, from developmental biology to cancer research. Apoptosis proceeds by a highly coordinated series of events that includes enzyme activation, DNA fragmentation, and alterations in plasma membrane permeability. The detection…

  5. Degradative Enzymes from the Pharmacy or Health Food Store: Interesting Examples for Introductory Biology Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deutch, Charles E.

    2007-01-01

    Degradative enzymes in over-the-counter products from pharmacies and health food stores provide good examples of biological catalysis. These include [beta]-galactosidase in Lactaid[TM], [alpha]-galactosidase in Beano[R], [alpha]-amylase and proteases in digestive aids, and proteases in contact lens cleaners. These enzymes can be studied…

  6. Modeling Biological Membranes with Circuit Boards and Measuring Electrical Signals in Axons: Student Laboratory Exercises

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Martha M.; Martin, Jonathan M.; Atwood, Harold L.; Cooper, Robin L.

    2011-01-01

    This is a demonstration of how electrical models can be used to characterize biological membranes. This exercise also introduces biophysical terminology used in electrophysiology. The same equipment is used in the membrane model as on live preparations. Some properties of an isolated nerve cord are investigated: nerve action potentials, recruitment of neurons, and responsiveness of the nerve cord to environmental factors. PMID:21304461

  7. An Investigative Alternative to Single-Species Dissection in the Introductory Biology Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlin, Joel L.

    2010-01-01

    Dissections of single species (e.g., fetal pig) are a common student learning activity in introductory biology courses. Such dissections demonstrate location of anatomical parts and provide dissection practice but provide less opportunity for student critical thinking, numeracy and demonstration of the scientific method. A comparative anatomy lab…

  8. Using Biocatalysis to Integrate Organic Chemistry into a Molecular Biology Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beers, Mande; Archer, Crystal; Feske, Brent D.; Mateer, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    Current cutting-edge biomedical investigation requires that the researcher have an operational understanding of several diverse disciplines. Biocatalysis is a field of science that operates at the crossroads of organic chemistry, biochemistry, microbiology, and molecular biology, and provides an excellent model for interdisciplinary research. We…

  9. Degradative Enzymes from the Pharmacy or Health Food Store: Interesting Examples for Introductory Biology Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deutch, Charles E.

    2007-01-01

    Degradative enzymes in over-the-counter products from pharmacies and health food stores provide good examples of biological catalysis. These include [beta]-galactosidase in Lactaid[TM], [alpha]-galactosidase in Beano[R], [alpha]-amylase and proteases in digestive aids, and proteases in contact lens cleaners. These enzymes can be studied…

  10. Using Osteoclast Differentiation as a Model for Gene Discovery in an Undergraduate Cell Biology Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnbaum, Mark J.; Picco, Jenna; Clements, Meghan; Witwicka, Hanna; Yang, Meiheng; Hoey, Margaret T.; Odgren, Paul R.

    2010-01-01

    A key goal of molecular/cell biology/biotechnology is to identify essential genes in virtually every physiological process to uncover basic mechanisms of cell function and to establish potential targets of drug therapy combating human disease. This article describes a semester-long, project-oriented molecular/cellular/biotechnology laboratory…

  11. Apoptosis: A Four-Week Laboratory Investigation for Advanced Molecular and Cellular Biology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiBartolomeis, Susan M.; Mone, James P.

    2003-01-01

    Over the past decade, apoptosis has emerged as an important field of study central to ongoing research in many diverse fields, from developmental biology to cancer research. Apoptosis proceeds by a highly coordinated series of events that includes enzyme activation, DNA fragmentation, and alterations in plasma membrane permeability. The detection…

  12. Using Osteoclast Differentiation as a Model for Gene Discovery in an Undergraduate Cell Biology Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnbaum, Mark J.; Picco, Jenna; Clements, Meghan; Witwicka, Hanna; Yang, Meiheng; Hoey, Margaret T.; Odgren, Paul R.

    2010-01-01

    A key goal of molecular/cell biology/biotechnology is to identify essential genes in virtually every physiological process to uncover basic mechanisms of cell function and to establish potential targets of drug therapy combating human disease. This article describes a semester-long, project-oriented molecular/cellular/biotechnology laboratory…

  13. Using Biocatalysis to Integrate Organic Chemistry into a Molecular Biology Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beers, Mande; Archer, Crystal; Feske, Brent D.; Mateer, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    Current cutting-edge biomedical investigation requires that the researcher have an operational understanding of several diverse disciplines. Biocatalysis is a field of science that operates at the crossroads of organic chemistry, biochemistry, microbiology, and molecular biology, and provides an excellent model for interdisciplinary research. We…

  14. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect

    Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Allison, L.J.; Blaylock, B.G.; Boston, H.L.; Huston, M.A.; Kimmel, B.L.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.; Walton, B.T.; Kitchings, J.T.; Olsen, C.R.

    1991-09-01

    On April 1, 1986, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) (EPA 1986). As specified in Part 3: Special Conditions (Item H) of the permit, a plan for biological monitoring of the Clinch River, White Oak Creek (WOC), Northwest Tributary (NWT) of WOC, Melton Branch (MB), Fifth Creek, and First Creek shall be submitted for approval to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) within 90 days of the effective date of the permit. The plan, which is referred to in Part 3 (H) of the permit as the Biological Monitoring Plan and Abatement Program (BMPAP), describes characterization monitoring studies to be conducted for the duration of the permit (5 years). In order to be consistent with the terminology used for the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Programs for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plan and the Oak Ridge K-25 Plant, BMPAP will subsequently be referred to as the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP). The proposed BMAP outlined in this document is based on preliminary discussions held on December 9, 1985, between staff of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (ORNL and Central Management), the US Department of Energy (DOE), EPA, and TDHE. 232 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Comparative analysis of salt-tolerant gene HOG1 in a Zygosaccharomyces rouxii mutant strain and its parent strain.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yonghua; Wang, Cong; Wang, Meng; Cao, Xiaohong; Hou, Lihua

    2013-08-30

    A higher-salt-tolerant mutant strain Zygosaccharomyces rouxii 3-2 (strain S3-2) that could be used for improving the flavour of high-salt liquid state soy sauce was previously constructed from parent strain Z. rouxii (strain S) by genome shuffling. However, whether the mutations in this strain affect HOG1 encoding MAPK Hog1p and improve intracellular glycerol production remains to be elucidated. Although two mutations in the ORF and one in the promoter of the HOG1 gene sequence of strain S3-2 occurred compared with that of strain S, there was no significant difference in secondary and tertiary structures between S3-2Hog1p and SHog1p. It was found that the expression level of S3-2HOG1 was higher than that of SHOG1 in YPDN medium with high salt concentration. Furthermore, overexpression of S3-2HOG1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae W303-1A could improve the salt tolerance and osmotolerance of engineered yeast compared with that of SHOG1. Enhancement of the transcription level of HOG1 induced by mutation in the promoter region may be one of the main reasons for the improved salt tolerance of strain S3-2 compared with that of strain S. Considering food security, the conservation of S3-2HOG1 would be beneficial for application of strain S3-2 in the fermentation of soy sauce. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Construction of an Efficient Mutant Strain of Trichosporonoides oedocephalis with HOG1 Gene Deletion for Production of Erythritol.

    PubMed

    Li, Liangzhi; Yang, Tianyi; Guo, Weiqiang; Ju, Xin; Hu, Cuiying; Tang, Bingyu; Fu, Jiaolong; Gu, Jingsheng; Zhang, Haiyang

    2016-04-28

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase HOG1 (high-osmolarity glycerol response pathway) plays a crucial role in the response of yeast to hyperosmotic shock. Trichosporonoides oedocephalis produces large amounts of polyols (,e.g., erythritol and glycerol) in a culture medium. However, the effects of HOG1 gene knockout and environmental stress on the production of these polyols have not yet been studied. In this study, a To-HOG1 null mutation was constructed in T. oedocephalis using the loxP-Kan-loxP/Cre system as replacement of the targeted genes, and the resultant mutants showed much smaller colonies than the wild-type controls. Interestingly, compared with the wild-type strains, the results of shake-flask culture showed that To-HOG1 null mutation increased erythritol production by 1.44-fold while decreasing glycerol production by 71.23%. In addition, this study investigated the effects of citric acid stress on the T. oedocephalis HOG1 null mutants and the wild-type strain. When the supplementation of citric acid in the fermentation medium was controlled at 0.3% (w/v), the concentration of erythritol produced from the wild-type and To-HOG1 knockout mutant strains improved by 18.21% and 21.65%, respectively.

  17. Tertiary amines related to brompheniramine: preferred conformations for N-oxygenation by the hog liver flavin-containing monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Cashman, J R; Celestial, J R; Leach, A; Newdoll, J; Park, S B

    1993-08-01

    The metabolism of racemic, (D)- and (L)-brompheniramine, a widely used antihistamine, was studied with microsomes and with highly purified flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) from hog liver. In addition, a number of other similar tertiary amines were evaluated as substrates for FMO activity from hog liver and the kinetic constants obtained were compared with brompheniramine. Although some N-demethylation was observed, the major metabolite of brompheniramine and the other tertiary amines examined in hog liver microsomes was the metabolite containing an aliphatic nitrogen N-oxide. Brompheniramine was extensively N-oxygenated by the highly purified FMO from hog liver. N-Oxygenation of brompheniramine in both microsomes and with highly purified FMO from hog liver was enantioselective. The Km for N-oxygenation of (D)-brompheniramine was markedly lower than the Km for (L)-brompheniramine. (E)- and (Z)-zimeldine are less conformationally flexible model compounds of brompheniramine, and these compounds were also examined and were found to be stereoselectively N-oxygenated by the highly purified FMO from hog liver. The similarities and differences in Km and Vmax values were evaluated in terms of possible conformations of the substrates determined by SYBYL molecular mechanics calculations. Distance map data indicated that FMO preferentially accommodated selected conformations of tertiary amines. Thus, (D)-brompheniramine and (Z)-zimeldine presumably have the aliphatic tertiary amine nitrogen atom and aromatic ring center at a defined distance and geometry and were more efficiently N-oxygenated than their respective isomers.

  18. Pedestrian detection system based on HOG and a modified version of CSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosmo, Daniel L.; Salles, Evandro O. T.; Ciarelli, Patrick M.

    2015-02-01

    This paper describes a complete pedestrian detection system based on sliding windows. Two feature vector extraction techniques are used: HOG (Histogram of Oriented Gradient) and CSS (Color Self Similarities), and to classify windows we use linear SVM (Support Vector Machines). Besides these techniques, we use mean shift and hierarchical clustering, to fuse multiple overlapping detections. The results we obtain on the dataset INRIA Person shows that the proposed system, using only HOG descriptors, achieves better results over similar systems, with a log average miss rate equal to 43%, against 46%, due to the cutting of final detections to better adapt them to the modified annotations. The addition of the modified CSS increases the efficiency of the system, leading to a log average miss rate equal to 39%.

  19. Hydrologic conditions related to the Hog Canyon Riparian Restoration Project, dinosaur national monument. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, L.; Wagner, J.

    1992-10-01

    In September, 1990, an interdisciplinary team of hydrologists, botanists, soil scientists, and park resource managers met to develop a plan for evaluating riparian conditions and management opportunities for Hog Canyon. At this meeting a set of study objectives was developed to help focus information needs. This report focuses on analysis of hydrologic data collected during the first year of the study. Specifically, the authors discuss seasonal surface and ground water hydrologic conditions, stream channel and ground water relationships, soil moisture conditions, and other aspects of Hog Canyon hydrology relevant to the management objectives. A set of preliminary management/restoration alternatives are also presented as a starting point for continued discussions by the evaluation team.

  20. Impact of odor from industrial hog operations on daily living activities.

    PubMed

    Tajik, M; Muhammad, N; Lowman, A; Thu, K; Wing, S; Grant, G

    2008-01-01

    Intensive industrial animal production systems worldwide require confinement of large numbers of animals in small spaces and concentration of enormous quantities of waste. Industrial hog operations, in particular, have raised public concerns about their adverse impact on public health and sustainable development. Using a community-based participatory research approach and qualitative interviews, we explored people's perception of the impact of odor from these industries on daily living activities as they relate to the beneficial use of property and enjoyment of life. Our research indicates that hog odor limits several leisure time activities and social interactions which could have adverse public health consequences. The results of this study can assist the communities and other stakeholders in public policy development that addresses these concerns.

  1. Field immobilization of Molina's hog-nosed skunk (Conepatus chinga) using ketamine and xylazine.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Diego F; Vidal, Estela Luengos; Casanave, Emma B; Lucherini, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    We injected 27 adult Molina's hog-nosed skunks (Conepatus chinga) intramuscularly by hand with ketamine hydrochloride (KH) and xylazine hydrochloride (XH) in the Pampas grassland of Argentina. Skunks were immobilized with a mean (±SD) dosage of 24.9±6.5 mg/kg KH and 1.9±0.6 mg/kg XH. The mean effective dosages of KH (27.6 mg/kg) and XH (1.7 mg/kg) were higher and lower, respectively, than those reported in skunks previously. Mean induction and recovery time were 5.3±1.9 min and 47.7±18.5 min, respectively. Hypothermia was the only problem detected in field immobilization and occurred in winter but did not appear to be associated with to drug doses. We conclude that KH/XH is a safe immobilizing drug combination for Molina's hog-nosed skunk.

  2. Sub-critical water hydrolysis of hog hair for amino acid production.

    PubMed

    Esteban, M B; García, A J; Ramos, P; Márquez, M C

    2010-04-01

    A recycling method using sub-critical water hydrolysis to convert hog hair from slaughterhouses into amino acids was developed. The influence of the reaction parameters such as temperature, time of reaction and initial substrate concentration were investigated in a batch reactor. The quality and quantity of amino acids in hydrolysates were determined and 17 kinds of amino acids were obtained. Under the tested conditions, the highest amino acid yield (325 mg/g protein) was reached at an initial substrate concentration of 10 g/l, a temperature of 250 degrees C and a reaction time of 60 min. A large amount of low-molecular weight amino acids, such alanine and glycine, was observed at these operating conditions. Sub-critical water hydrolysis was confirmed as an effective and practical process to recover amino acids from hog hair waste.

  3. Laboratory experiments on snail predation by Sargochromis codringtoni, a candidate for biological control of the snails that transmit schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Chimbari, M J; Madsen, H; Ndamba, J

    1997-01-01

    The potential efficacy of Sargochromis codringtoni, a species of cichlid fish, in the biological control of snails carrying the Schistosoma spp. infecting man has long been recognized. A laboratory study to produce much-needed data on the malacophagous characteristics of this fish was conducted, to see if field studies on its possible role as a biological agent for snail control in Zimbabwe were likely to be worthwhile. The fish can consume large numbers of snails within a short period: a single fish, provided with trout pellets as an alternative food, not only chose to eat the snails but also consumed > 800 within 3 weeks. Addition of macrophytes to the aquaria used appeared to offer the snails no protection from predation. For fish measuring 15-18 cm in length, there was no size preference among snails measuring up to 12 mm in shell height nor was any species preference observed in experiments involving Bulinus globosus, B. tropicus and Melanoides tuberculata. The fish crushed B. globosus which were > 3.0 mm in shell height in their pharynges but swallowed smaller snails of this species whole. Before field trials are conducted, further laboratory studies, in which field conditions are simulated, should be carried out.

  4. Learning from Inquiry-Based Laboratories in Nonmajor Biology: An Interpretive Study of the Relationships among Inquiry Experience, Epistemologies, and Conceptual Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Carolyn S.; Tsoi, Mai Yin; Calkin, Jamie; Darley, Marshall

    2003-01-01

    The use of inquiry-based laboratory in college science classes is on the rise. This study investigated how five nonmajor biology students learned from an inquiry-based laboratory experience. Using interpretive data analysis, the five students' conceptual ecologies, learning beliefs, and science epistemologies were explored. Findings indicated that…

  5. Implementation of a Cascaded Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG)-Based Pedestrian Detector

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Implementation of a Cascaded Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG)-Based Pedestrian Detector by Christopher Reale, Prudhvi Gurram , Shuowen...Pedestrian Detector Christopher Reale, Prudhvi Gurram , Shuowen Hu, and Alex Chan Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate, ARL...NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Christopher Reale, Prudhvi Gurram , Shuowen Hu, and Alex Chan 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER

  6. Introducing human population biology through an easy laboratory exercise on mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Pardiñas, Antonio F; Dopico, Eduardo; Roca, Agustín; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva; Lopez, Belen

    2010-03-01

    This article describes an easy and cheap laboratory exercise for students to discover their own mitochondrial haplogroup. Students use buccal swabs to obtain mucosa cells as noninvasive tissue samples, extract DNA, and with a simple polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis they can obtain DNA fragments of different sizes that can be visualized in agarose gels. The analysis of these fragments can reveal the mitochondrial haplogroup of each student. The results of the exercise can be used to provide additional insights into the genetic variation of human populations.

  7. Effect of trisodium phosphate on slip and textural properties of hog and sheep natural sausage casings.

    PubMed

    Houben, J H; Bakker, W A M; Keizer, G

    2005-02-01

    The defective gliding of certain natural casings during the stuffing of sausages is an important problem in the meat processing industry. The gliding behaviour of (defective) hog and sheep casings was assessed with a newly developed instrument, and by a technologist during the stuffing of sausages. Casings were treated with 0.01 M trisodium phosphate; control casings were untreated. Cooked and smoked sausages were made in hog casings treated or untreated with phosphate and subjected to compression tests. In all cases the treatment with phosphate clearly facilitated the gliding of the casings over the test pipes, as compared to the control casings. The instrument to measure the casing gliding properties did not provide reliable information about the actual stuffing of sausages. The phosphate-treated casings had a lower shear force than the control casings after being used as skins for cooked and smoked sausages. If confirmed, the finding that mild phosphate treatment can diminish the force required to shear a casing will be of interest to the sausage industry because the toughness of certain hog casings is considered a problem.

  8. Laboratory and field experimental evaluation of host plant specificity of Aceria solstitialis, a prospective biological control agent of yellow starthistle.

    PubMed

    Stoeva, Atanaska; Harizanova, Vili; de Lillo, Enrico; Cristofaro, Massimo; Smith, Lincoln

    2012-01-01

    Centaurea solstitialis (yellow starthistle, Asteraceae) is an invasive annual weed in the western USA that is native to the Mediterranean Region and is a target for classical biological control. Aceria solstitialis is an eriophyid mite that has been found exclusively in association with Ce. solstitialis in Italy, Greece, Turkey and Bulgaria. The mite feeds on leaf tissue and damages bolting plants, causing stunting, witch's broom and incomplete flower development. Field experiments and laboratory no-choice and two-way choice experiments were conducted to assess host plant specificity of the mite in Bulgaria. Mites showed the highest degree of host specificity in the field and lowest in the no-choice experiments. In the field, highest densities of mites occurred on Ce. solstitialis and Ce. cyanus (bachelor's button), and either no mites or trace numbers occurred on the other test plants: Ce. diffusa (diffuse knapweed), Carthamus tinctorius (safflower) and Cynara scolymus (artichoke). In no-choice experiments, mites persisted for 60 days on Ce. diffusa, Ce. cyanus, Ce. solstitialis, Ca. tinctorius and Cy. scolymus, whereas in two-way choice experiments mites persisted on 25% of Cy. scolymus plants for 60 days and did not persist on Ca. tinctorius beyond 40 days. The eight other species of plants that were tested in the laboratory were less suitable for the mite. These results suggest that although A. solstitialis can persist on some nontarget plants for as long as 60 days in the laboratory, it appears to be much more specific under natural conditions, and warrants further evaluation as a prospective biological control agent.

  9. Instructional Experiences of Graduate Assistants Implementing Explicit and Reflective Introductory Biology Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uludag Bautista, Nazan; Schussler, Elisabeth E.; Rybczynski, Stephen M.

    2014-05-01

    Science education reform documents identify nature of science (NOS) as a critical component of scientific literacy and call for universities, colleges, and K-12 schools to explicitly integrate NOS learning into science curricula. In response to these calls, this study investigated the classroom practices of nine graduate assistants (GAs) who taught expository and inquiry laboratories that implemented an explicit and reflective (ER) pedagogy to teach NOS. The purpose of this qualitative study was to better understand the experiences that enabled or inhibited GA implementation of an ER strategy in a college setting. The findings revealed that achieving quality implementation in this setting was very difficult. Factors such as GAs' ability to foster meaningful classroom discussions, laboratory logistics (e.g. lack of time and supplies), and the value undergraduates and GAs saw in learning about NOS were identified by GAs and observed by the researchers as barriers to the technique maximizing its potential. Thus, for meaningful infusion of NOS into science curricula, pedagogical support for GAs to manage meaningful classroom discussions in support of NOS or other complex topics is recommended for an ER approach to NOS learning to be successful in college settings.

  10. Biology of Amblyomma aureolatum (Pallas, 1772) (Acari: Ixodidae) on some laboratory hosts in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Sobreira Rodrigues, Daniel; Avila de Carvalho, Henrique; Almeida Fernandes, André; Freitas, Carolina Maria Viana; Cerqueira Leite, Romário; de Oliveira, Paulo Roberto

    2002-09-01

    The ixodid Amblyomma aureolatum is suspected to play a role in the epidemiology of wild life-cycle hemoparasites, which frequently infect dogs in rural and hunting areas in Brazil. Little is known about its bionomics. The objective of the present study was to evaluate some bionomic aspects of A. aureolatum ticks in Brazil. One engorged female, collected from a dog (Canis familiaris) in São Sebastião das Aguas Claras, State of Minas Gerais, was used to establish a colony in the laboratory. Subsequently its parasitic stage progeny were fed on domestic dogs and laboratory animals. The free-living stages were incubated at 27 degrees C +/- 2 degrees C and minimum 70% relative humidity in a BOD incubator. The egg incubation period ranged from 31 to 34 days; the parasitic period of larvae ranged from 4 to 6 days and ecdysis to nymphs occurred from day 19 up to day 22. The parasitic period of nymphs ranged from 5 to 8 days and the period of ecdysis to adults from 31 to 33 days. The parasitic period of adults ranged from 11 to 15 days, the pre-oviposition period from 6 to 12 days, and the oviposition period from 9 to 38 days. The total duration of the life cycle ranged from 116 to 168 days.

  11. Laboratory x-ray micro-computed tomography: a user guideline for biological samples

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Laboratory x-ray micro–computed tomography (micro-CT) is a fast-growing method in scientific research applications that allows for non-destructive imaging of morphological structures. This paper provides an easily operated “how to” guide for new potential users and describes the various steps required for successful planning of research projects that involve micro-CT. Background information on micro-CT is provided, followed by relevant setup, scanning, reconstructing, and visualization methods and considerations. Throughout the guide, a Jackson's chameleon specimen, which was scanned at different settings, is used as an interactive example. The ultimate aim of this paper is make new users familiar with the concepts and applications of micro-CT in an attempt to promote its use in future scientific studies. PMID:28419369

  12. Interpreting EChO's future data: biological laboratory extimates under M star's planetary surface conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erculiani, Marco S.; Claudi, Riccardo U.; Giro, Enrico; Galletta, Giuseppe; D'Alessandro, Maurizio; Farisato, Giancarlo; Lessio, Luigi; Micela, Giuseppina; Billi, Daniela

    2014-08-01

    The EChO Exoplanet Atmosphere Characterization mission will have in the midst of its main targets, planets that orbit M stars in their or very close to their habitable zone. In this framework at the Astronomical Observatory of Padova (INAF) we are going to perform experiments that will give us an idea about the possible modification of the atmosphere by photosynthetic biota present on the planet surface. In the framework of the project "Atmosphere In a Test Tube", planetary environmental conditions are being performed. The bacteria that are being studied are Acaryochloris marina, Chroococcidiopsis sp., Cyanidium Caldarium and Halomicronema hongdechloris and tests are being performed with LISA ambient simulator in the laboratory of the Padova Astronomical Observatory.

  13. Laboratory soft-x-ray microscope for cryotomography of biological specimens.

    PubMed

    Bertilson, Michael; von Hofsten, Olov; Vogt, Ulrich; Holmberg, Anders; Christakou, Athanasia E; Hertz, Hans M

    2011-07-15

    Soft-x-ray cryotomography allows quantitative and high-resolution three-dimensional imaging of intact unstained cells. To date, the method relies on synchrotron-radiation sources, which limits accessibility for researchers. Here we present a laboratory water-window microscope for cryotomography. It is based on a λ=2.48 nm liquid-jet laser-plasma source, a normal-incidence multilayer condenser, a 30 nm zone-plate objective, and a cryotilt sample holder. We demonstrate high-resolution imaging, as well as quantitative tomographic imaging, of frozen intact cells. The reconstructed tomogram of the intracellular local absorption coefficient shows details down to ∼100 nm. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  14. Laboratory model ecosystem evaluation of the chemical and biological behavior of radiolabeled micropollutants.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, R L

    1976-01-01

    A standardized laboratory model ecosystem has been used to evaluate the comparative behavior of radiolabeled micropollutants including organochlorine, organophosphorus, carbamate, and hormone-mimic insecticides; herbicides; important industrial organic compounds including phthalate esters and PCB's; and specific pollutants such as TCBD and hexachlorobenzene. The compounds have been studies for ecological effects over a terrestrial-aquatic interface and through several food chains, especially with regard to the development of quantitative information on ecological magnification and biodegradability index. The pathways of chemical degradation in the various organisms have been evaluated and the ecological effects of degradation products investigated. Illustrations are given of the use of the model ecosystem technology for screening new candidate pesticides for effects on environmental quality; for evaluating the hazards of environmental pollution by industrial waste effluents; and for fundamental studies of the principles fo biodegradability of organic chemicals in a variety of organisms.

  15. Fatigue in Primary Sjögren's Syndrome: Clinical, Laboratory, Psychometric, and Biologic Associations.

    PubMed

    Karageorgas, Theofanis; Fragioudaki, Sofia; Nezos, Adrianos; Karaiskos, Dimitrios; Moutsopoulos, Haralampos M; Mavragani, Clio P

    2016-01-01

    To identify independent contributors of fatigue in primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS) patients, taking into account clinical, laboratory, and psychological features, and to explore the potential role of interferon (IFN)-induced gene indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO-1), anti-21-hydroxylase (anti-21[OH]) antibodies, and soluble BAFF. Detailed clinical and laboratory characteristics were recorded for 106 primary SS patients. The Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue, Zung Depression Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Eysenck Personality Questionnaire Scale, and Athens Insomnia Scale were adopted to assess fatigue, depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbances, respectively. Peripheral whole blood expression levels of IDO-1, as well as type I and II IFN-induced genes were calculated using quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Serum anti-21(OH) antibodies and soluble BAFF levels were determined by a radioimmunoassay and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Univariate and multivariate models were performed to identify determinants of fatigue. Fatigue was detected in 32 of 106 (30.2%) primary SS patients. In univariate analysis, fatigue was associated with arthralgias/myalgias, fibromyalgia hydroxychloroquine therapy, both state and trait anxiety scores, depression, and neuroticism, as well as impaired sleep patterns. Multivariate analysis revealed neuroticism (odds ratio [OR] 6.9, [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.7-28.0]), depression (OR 3.0 [95% CI 0.8-11.0]), and fibromyalgia (OR 5.5 [95% CI 1.1-27.7]) as independent fatigue contributors. Soluble BAFF levels, anti-21(OH) autoantibodies, and IDO-1 messenger RNA expression did not significantly differ between fatigued and nonfatigued primary SS patients. Depression, neuroticism, and fibromyalgia play a major role in primary SS-associated fatigue and should be addressed in clinical practice, with active collaboration between rheumatologists and mental health

  16. The conserved dual phosphorylation sites of the Candida albicans Hog1 protein are crucial for white-opaque switching, mating, and pheromone-stimulated cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Han; Liang, Shen-Huan; Deng, Fu-Sheng; Lin, Ching-Hsuan

    2016-08-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic human pathogen capable of causing life-threatening infections in immunocompromised patients. C. albicans has a unique morphological transition between white and opaque phases. These two cells differ in virulence, mating capability, biofilm formation, and host-cell interaction. Previous studies revealed that deletion of the SSK2, PBS2, or HOG1 gene resulted in 100% opaque cell formation and suppressed the mating response. Thr-174 and Tyr-176 of the Hog1 protein are important phosphoacceptors and can be activated in response to stimuli. In this study, we first demonstrated the importance of two conserved phosphorylation sites in white-opaque switching, mating, and pheromone-stimulated cell adhesion. Six Hog1 point-mutated strains were generated, including nonphosphorylated strains (Hog1(T174A), Hog1(Y176F), and Hog1(T174A,Y176F)) and negatively charged phosphorylated strains (Hog1(T174D), Hog1(Y176D), and Hog1(T174D,Y176D)). Point mutation on Thr-174, Tyr-176 or in combination with the Hog1 protein in C. albicans MTL homozygous strains stimulated opaque cell formation at a frequency of 100%. Furthermore, mating projections of point-mutated strains were significantly shorter and their mating efficiencies and pheromone-stimulated cell adhesive numbers were lower than those of the wild-type. By investigating the effects of Hog1 phosphorylation in ssk1Δ and sln1Δ, we also demonstrate that the phosphorylation intensity of Hog1p is directly involved in the white-opaque switching. Taken together, the results of our study demonstrate that dual phosphorylation sites of C. albicans are crucial for white-opaque transition, sexual mating, and pheromone-induced cell adhesion.

  17. A path or a new road in laboratory diagnostics? Biological mass spectrometry: facts and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Elek, Gábor; Lapis, Károly

    2006-01-01

    Proteins in tissues and biofluids and their many attributes define the proteome. Proteome can be directly correlated to known diseases and histological regions allowing the diagnosis and monitoring of disease progression as well predicting the patient's response to specific treatments. Proteomics performs large-scale, high-throughput characterization of the human proteome, among others by biological mass spectrometry. Proteinchip technology coupled with bioinformatics is able to screen any protein source for putative disease biomarkers from a small sample volume (microliter range) by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS). This article discusses on a basic level both the technology and reliability of these methods.

  18. Contributions of academic laboratories to the discovery and development of chemical biology tools.

    PubMed

    Huryn, Donna M; Resnick, Lynn O; Wipf, Peter

    2013-09-26

    The academic setting provides an environment that may foster success in the discovery of certain types of small molecule tools while proving less suitable in others. For example, small molecule probes for poorly understood systems, those that exploit a specific resident expertise, and those whose commercial return is not apparent are ideally suited to be pursued in a university setting. In this review, we highlight five projects that emanated from academic research groups and generated valuable tool compounds that have been used to interrogate biological phenomena: reactive oxygen species (ROS) sensors, GPR30 agonists and antagonists, selective CB2 agonists, Hsp70 modulators, and β-amyloid PET imaging agents. By taking advantage of the unique expertise resident in university settings and the ability to pursue novel projects that may have great scientific value but with limited or no immediate commercial value, probes from academic research groups continue to provide useful tools and generate a long-term resource for biomedical researchers.

  19. Environmental Assessment for moving the Pacific Northwest Laboratory radon generators from Life Sciences Laboratory II, Richland North Area, to Life Sciences Laboratory I, 300 Area, and their continued use in physical and biological research

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, I.C.

    1993-09-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) radon generators are a core resource of the overall U. S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Radon Research Program and are administratively controlled within the ``Radon Hazards in Homes`` project. This project primarily focuses on radon exposures of animals and addresses the major biologic effects and factors influencing risks of indoor radon exposures. For example, the ``Mechanisms of Radon Injury`` and ``In vivo/In vitro Radon-Induced Cellular Damage`` projects specifically address the cytogenetic and DNA damage produced by radon exposure as part of a larger effort to understand radon carcinogenesis. Several other ongoing PNL projects, namely: ``Biological Effectiveness of Radon Alpha Particles: A Microbeam Study of Dose Rate Effects,`` ``Laser Measurements of Pb-210,`` ``Radon Transport Modeling in Soils,`` ``Oncogenes in Radiation Carcinogenesis,`` ``Mutation of DNA Targets,`` ``Dosimetry of Radon Progeny,`` and ``Aerosol Technology Development`` also use the radon exposure facilities in the conduct of their work. While most, but not all, studies in the PNL Radon Research Program are funded through DOE`s Office of Health and Environmental Research, PNL also has ongoing collaborative radon studies with investigators worldwide; many of these use the radon exposure facilities. The purpose of the proposed action is to provide for relocation of the radon generators to a DOE-owned facility and to continue to provide a controlled source of radon-222 for continued use in physical and biological research.

  20. Practice makes pretty good: assessment of primary literature reading abilities across multiple large-enrollment biology laboratory courses.

    PubMed

    Sato, Brian K; Kadandale, Pavan; He, Wenliang; Murata, Paige M N; Latif, Yama; Warschauer, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Primary literature is essential for scientific communication and is commonly utilized in undergraduate biology education. Despite this, there is often little time spent training our students how to critically analyze a paper. To address this, we introduced a primary literature module in multiple upper-division laboratory courses. In this module, instructors conduct classroom discussions that dissect a paper as researchers do. While previous work has identified classroom interventions that improve primary literature comprehension within a single course, our goal was to determine whether including a scientific paper module in our classes could produce long-term benefits. On the basis of performance in an assessment exam, we found that our module resulted in longitudinal gains, including increased comprehension and critical-thinking abilities in subsequent lab courses. These learning gains were specific to courses utilizing our module, as no longitudinal gains were seen in students who had taken other upper-division labs that lacked extensive primary literature discussion. In addition, we assessed whether performance on our assessment correlated with a variety of factors, including grade point average, course performance, research background, and self-reported confidence in understanding of the article. Furthermore, all of the study conclusions are independent of biology disciplines, as we observe similar trends within each course. © 2014 B. K. Sato et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2014 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  1. The REPAIR Project: Examining the Biological Impacts of Sub-Background Radiation Exposure within SNOLAB, a Deep Underground Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Thome, Christopher; Tharmalingam, Sujeenthar; Pirkkanen, Jake; Zarnke, Andrew; Laframboise, Taylor; Boreham, Douglas R

    2017-07-19

    Considerable attention has been given to understanding the biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure at levels slightly above background. However, relatively few studies have been performed to examine the inverse, where natural background radiation is removed. The limited available data suggest that organisms exposed to sub-background radiation environments undergo reduced growth and an impaired capacity to repair genetic damage. Shielding from background radiation is inherently difficult due to high-energy cosmic radiation. SNOLAB, located in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, is a unique facility for examining the effects of sub-background radiation exposure. Originally constructed for astroparticle physics research, the laboratory is located within an active nickel mine at a depth of over 2,000 m. The rock overburden provides shielding equivalent to 6,000 m of water, thereby almost completely eliminating cosmic radiation. Additional features of the facility help to reduce radiological contamination from the surrounding rock. We are currently establishing a biological research program within SNOLAB: Researching the Effects of the Presence and Absence of Ionizing Radiation (REPAIR project). We hypothesize that natural background radiation is essential for life and maintains genomic stability, and that prolonged exposure to sub-background radiation environments will be detrimental to biological systems. Using a combination of whole organism and cell culture model systems, the effects of exposure to a sub-background environment will be examined on growth and development, as well as markers of genomic damage, DNA repair capacity and oxidative stress. The results of this research will provide further insight into the biological effects of low-dose radiation exposure as well as elucidate some of the processes that may drive evolution and selection in living systems. This Radiation Research focus issue contains reviews and original articles, which relate to the

  2. An evolutionarily stable strategy and the critical point of hog futures trading entities based on replicator dynamic theory: 2006-2015 data for China's 22 provinces.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jinbo; Deng, Lingfei; Wang, Gangyi

    2017-01-01

    Although frequent fluctuations in domestic hog prices seriously affect the stability and robustness of the hog supply chain, hog futures (an effective hedging instrument) have not been listed in China. To better understand hog futures market hedging, it is important to study the steady state of intersubjective bidding. This paper uses evolutionary game theory to construct a game model between hedgers and speculators in the hog futures market, and replicator dynamic equations are then used to obtain the steady state between the two trading entities. The results show that the steady state is one in which hedgers adopt a "buy" strategy and speculators adopt a "do not speculate" strategy, but this type of extreme steady state is not easily realized. Thus, to explore the rational proportion of hedgers and speculators in the evolutionary stabilization strategy, bidding processes were simulated using weekly average hog prices from 2006 to 2015, such that the conditions under which hedgers and speculators achieve a steady state could be analyzed. This task was performed to achieve the stability critical point, and we show that only when the value of λ is satisfied and the conditions of hog futures price changes and futures price are satisfied can hedgers and speculators achieve a rational proportion and a stable hog futures market. This market can thus provide a valuable reference for the development of the Chinese hog futures market and the formulation and guidance of relevant departmental policies.

  3. An evolutionarily stable strategy and the critical point of hog futures trading entities based on replicator dynamic theory: 2006–2015 data for China’s 22 provinces

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jinbo; Deng, Lingfei

    2017-01-01

    Although frequent fluctuations in domestic hog prices seriously affect the stability and robustness of the hog supply chain, hog futures (an effective hedging instrument) have not been listed in China. To better understand hog futures market hedging, it is important to study the steady state of intersubjective bidding. This paper uses evolutionary game theory to construct a game model between hedgers and speculators in the hog futures market, and replicator dynamic equations are then used to obtain the steady state between the two trading entities. The results show that the steady state is one in which hedgers adopt a “buy” strategy and speculators adopt a “do not speculate” strategy, but this type of extreme steady state is not easily realized. Thus, to explore the rational proportion of hedgers and speculators in the evolutionary stabilization strategy, bidding processes were simulated using weekly average hog prices from 2006 to 2015, such that the conditions under which hedgers and speculators achieve a steady state could be analyzed. This task was performed to achieve the stability critical point, and we show that only when the value of λ is satisfied and the conditions of hog futures price changes and futures price are satisfied can hedgers and speculators achieve a rational proportion and a stable hog futures market. This market can thus provide a valuable reference for the development of the Chinese hog futures market and the formulation and guidance of relevant departmental policies. PMID:28241024

  4. Reconstruction of the High-Osmolarity Glycerol (HOG) Signaling Pathway from the Halophilic Fungus Wallemia ichthyophaga in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Konte, Tilen; Terpitz, Ulrich; Plemenitaš, Ana

    2016-01-01

    The basidiomycetous fungus Wallemia ichthyophaga grows between 1.7 and 5.1 M NaCl and is the most halophilic eukaryote described to date. Like other fungi, W. ichthyophaga detects changes in environmental salinity mainly by the evolutionarily conserved high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) signaling pathway. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the HOG pathway has been extensively studied in connection to osmotic regulation, with a valuable knock-out strain collection established. In the present study, we reconstructed the architecture of the HOG pathway of W. ichthyophaga in suitable S. cerevisiae knock-out strains, through heterologous expression of the W. ichthyophaga HOG pathway proteins. Compared to S. cerevisiae, where the Pbs2 (ScPbs2) kinase of the HOG pathway is activated via the SHO1 and SLN1 branches, the interactions between the W. ichthyophaga Pbs2 (WiPbs2) kinase and the W. ichthyophaga SHO1 branch orthologs are not conserved: as well as evidence of poor interactions between the WiSho1 Src-homology 3 (SH3) domain and the WiPbs2 proline-rich motif, the absence of a considerable part of the osmosensing apparatus in the genome of W. ichthyophaga suggests that the SHO1 branch components are not involved in HOG signaling in this halophilic fungus. In contrast, the conserved activation of WiPbs2 by the S. cerevisiae ScSsk2/ScSsk22 kinase and the sensitivity of W. ichthyophaga cells to fludioxonil, emphasize the significance of two-component (SLN1-like) signaling via Group III histidine kinase. Combined with protein modeling data, our study reveals conserved and non-conserved protein interactions in the HOG signaling pathway of W. ichthyophaga and therefore significantly improves the knowledge of hyperosmotic signal processing in this halophilic fungus. PMID:27379041

  5. Laboratory and field methods for stable isotope analysis in human biology.

    PubMed

    Reitsema, Laurie J

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis (SIA; carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen) of human tissues offers a means for assessing diet among living humans. Stable isotope ratios of broad categories of food and drink food vary systematically, and stable isotope ratios in consumer tissues represent a composite of the isotopic ratios of food and drink consumed during an individual's life. Isotopic evidence for diet is independent of errors in informant recall, and accrues during time periods when researchers are absent. Beyond diet reconstruction, tissue stable isotope ratios are sensitive to excursions from homeostasis, such as starvation and rapid growth. Because of their relationship to diet, geographic location, hydration, and nutritional status, stable isotope signatures in human tissues offer a window into human biocultural adaptations, past and present. This article describes methods for SIA that may be usefully applied in studies of living humans, with emphasis placed on carbon and nitrogen. Some of the ecological, physiological, and evolutionary applications of stable isotope data among living humans are discussed. By incorporating SIA in research, human biologists facilitate a productive dialog with bioarchaeologists, who routinely use stable isotope evidence, mingling different perspectives on human biology and behavior.

  6. Superhydrophobicity of the gecko toe pad: biological optimization versus laboratory maximization.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alyssa Y; Subarajan, Shairani; Jain, Dharamdeep; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2016-08-06

    While many gecko-inspired hierarchically structured surfaces perform as well as or better than the natural adhesive system, these designs often fail to function across a variety of contexts. For example, the gecko can adhere to rough, wet and dirty surfaces; however, most synthetic mimics cannot maintain function when faced with a similar situation. The solution to this problem lies in a more thorough investigation of the natural system. Here, we review the adhesive system of the gecko toe pad, as well as the far less-well-studied anti-adhesive system that results from the chemistry and structure of the toe pad (superhydrophobicity). This paradoxical relationship serves as motivation to study functional optimization at the system level. As an example, we experimentally investigate the role of surface lipids in adhesion and anti-adhesion, and find a clear performance trade-off related to shear adhesion in air on a hydrophilic surface. This represents the first direct investigation of the role of surface lipids in gecko adhesion and anti-adhesion, and supports the argument that a system-level approach is necessary to elucidate optimization in biological systems. Without such an approach, bioinspired designs will be limited in functionality and context, especially compared to the natural systems they mimic.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bioinspired hierarchically structured surfaces for green science'.

  7. [Biology of Triatoma vitticeps (Stal, 1859) under laboratory conditions (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae). II. Resistance to fasting].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, T C; Victório, V M; Jurberg, J; Cunha, V

    1989-01-01

    Following the study on the biology of Triatoma vitticeps (Gonçalves et al., 1988) observations have been made on its resistance to starvation. Of the 286 eggs obtained only 201 hatched and reached the intended stage for observation. The others did not eclode, neither reached the ecdisis nor died, without explanation. The nymphs were kept, separately, in Borrel flasks and properly listed. The blood-meal was performed in mice, although the insects were kept without feeding as soon as moulted. The starvation was evaluated in two ways: the time-lapse in days between the last meal/death and between moult/death. The starvation was directly related with the developmental stage. In relation to the parameters last meal/death and moult/death, both sexes were less resistant than 3rd and 2nd stage, respectively. The experiment have been carried out for 15 months and by this time the average minimum and maximum temperatures and the humidity were 25 +/- 2 degrees C - 28 +/- 2 degrees C and 81 +/- 3% UR, respectively. The material spent belongs to the triatomine colony of the Oswaldo Cruz Institute Department of Entomology.

  8. Toward the laboratory identification of [O,N,S,S] isomers: Implications for biological NO chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayari, Tarek; Jaidane, Nejm-Eddine; Al Mogren, Muneerah Mogren; Francisco, Joseph S.; Hochlaf, Majdi

    2016-06-01

    Benchmark ab initio calculations are performed to investigate the stable isomers of [O,N,S,S]. These computations are carried out using coupled cluster (RCCSD(T)) and explicitly correlated coupled cluster methods (RCCSD(T)-F12). In addition to the already known cis isomer of SSNO, nine other stable forms are predicted. The most stable isomer is cis-OSNS. Nine structures are chain bent-bent with relatively large dipole moments which make them detectable, as cis-SSNO, by infrared, far-infrared, and microwave spectroscopies. We found also a C2v isomer (NS2O). Since these species are strongly suggested to play an important role as intermediates during the bioactive reaction products of the NO/H2S interaction, the rotational and vibrational spectroscopic parameters are presented to help aid the in vivo identification and assignment of these spectra. Results from this work show that [O,N,S,S] may play key roles during nitric oxide transport and deliver in biological media, as well as, provide an explanation for the weak characteristic of disulfide bridges within proteins.

  9. Perceptual Drawing as a Learning Tool in a College Biology Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landin, Jennifer

    2011-12-01

    The use of drawing in the classroom has a contentious history in the U.S. education system. While most instructors and students agree that the activity helps students focus and observe more details, there is a lack of empirical data to support these positions. This study examines the use of three treatments (writing a description, drawing a perceptual image, or drawing a perceptual image after participating in a short instructional lesson on perceptual drawing) each week over the course of a semester. The students in the "Drawing with Instruction" group exhibit a small but significantly higher level of content knowledge by the end of the semester. When comparing Attitude Toward Biology and Observational Skills among the three groups, inconclusive results restrict making any conclusions. Student perceptions of the task are positive, although not as strong as indicated by other studies. A student behavior observed during the first study led to another question regarding student cognitive processes, and demonstrated cognitive change in student-rendered drawings. The data from the second study indicate that hemispheric dominance or visual/verbal learning do not impact learning from perceptual drawing activities. However, conservatism and need for closure are inversely proportional to the change seen in student drawings over the course of a lesson. Further research is needed to verify these conclusions, as the second study has a small number of participants.

  10. Biological effects of 60-Hz electric fields on small and large laboratory animals

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    Rats and mice were exposed to 60-Hz electric fields up to 330 kV/m for durations as long as four months. No significant effects were found in the following major areas: metabolic status and growth; organ and tissue morphology; brain morphology; cardiovascular function; serum chemistry; reproduction; prenatal growth and development; teratology; bone growth; peripheral nerve function; humoral and cell-mediated immunity; susceptibility to viral infection; cell and membrane function; illness/malaise; and cytogenetics. Statistically significant effects of electric field exposures were observed in the following areas: bone fracture repair; neonatal development; neuromuscular function; endocrinology; hematology; neurochemistry; urine volume and chemistry; sympathetic nervous system; behavior. It is likely that many of the effects observed are secondary to chronic stimulation of the animal by the field. Our research efforts have shifted to an in-depth investigation of nervous system functions, with emphasis in behavior, neurochemistry, neurophysiology, and dosimetry. Current and future research in these areas will focus on: relationship of effects to field strength and duration of exposure; recovery from observed effects; fundamental understanding of observed effects; fundamental understanding of interaction of field with animal (dosimetry); and biological significance of observed effects. (ERB)

  11. A Brief History of the Study of Fish Osmoregulation: The Central Role of the Mt. Desert Island Biological Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Evans, David H.

    2010-01-01

    The Mt. Desert Island Biological Laboratory (MDIBL) has played a central role in the study of fish osmoregulation for the past 80 years. In particular, scientists at the MDIBL have made significant discoveries in the basic pattern of fish osmoregulation, the function of aglomerular kidneys and proximal tubular secretion, the roles of NaCl cotransporters in intestinal uptake and gill and rectal gland secretion, the role of the shark rectal gland in osmoregulation, the mechanisms of salt secretion by the teleost fish gill epithelium, and the evolution of the ionic uptake mechanisms in fish gills. This short review presents the history of these discoveries and their relationships to the study of epithelial transport in general. PMID:21423356

  12. Biological effects of gamma-irradiation on laboratory and field isolates of Eimeria tenella (Protozoa; Coccidia).

    PubMed

    Gilbert, J M; Fuller, A L; Scott, T C; McDougald, L R

    1998-06-01

    Sporulated oocysts of a field strain (FS-111) and a laboratory strain (WIS) of Eimeria tenella were exposed to 0, 50, 100, 150, or 200 Gy of gamma-radiation from a 60Co source. Irradiated oocysts of WIS and FS-111 were not significantly more fragile after irradiation as shown by the release of sporocysts after 5-105 s of vortex agitation with glass beads. Excystation was normal in both strains after treatment of the sporocysts with trypsin and sodium taurodeoxycholate, even in groups exposed to 200 Gy of radiation. Sporozoite release from irradiated sporocysts was more rapid than that from unirradiated sporocysts, primarily because of a shorter lag phase during the first 30 min. Irradiated sporozoites were slower to parasitize cultured chick kidney cells than were control sporozoites (4 h postinoculation), but after 24 h there was no significant difference (P < 0.05) between irradiated and control groups except for the WIS treated with 200 Gy. After 48 h, developing schizonts were reduced by 77-94% on exposure to 50-200 Gy. Strain FS-111 did not develop as well as WIS in vitro, but the effect of irradiation was similar. When irradiated oocysts of WIS or FS-111 were inoculated into chickens the prepatent period was unaffected, but fewer oocysts were produced, lesion scores were lower, and the weight gain was less strongly affected in proportion to the doses of radiation. These results suggest that the effects of radiation damage were largely confined to the mechanism of nuclear and cellular reproduction rather than other physiological processes.

  13. A CMOS active pixel sensor system for laboratory- based x-ray diffraction studies of biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohndiek, Sarah E.; Cook, Emily J.; Arvanitis, Costas D.; Olivo, Alessandro; Royle, Gary J.; Clark, Andy T.; Prydderch, Mark L.; Turchetta, Renato; Speller, Robert D.

    2008-02-01

    X-ray diffraction studies give material-specific information about biological tissue. Ideally, a large area, low noise, wide dynamic range digital x-ray detector is required for laboratory-based x-ray diffraction studies. The goal of this work is to introduce a novel imaging technology, the CMOS active pixel sensor (APS) that has the potential to fulfil all these requirements, and demonstrate its feasibility for coherent scatter imaging. A prototype CMOS APS has been included in an x-ray diffraction demonstration system. An industrial x-ray source with appropriate beam filtration is used to perform angle dispersive x-ray diffraction (ADXRD). Optimization of the experimental set-up is detailed including collimator options and detector operating parameters. Scatter signatures are measured for 11 different materials, covering three medical applications: breast cancer diagnosis, kidney stone identification and bone mineral density calculations. Scatter signatures are also recorded for three mixed samples of known composition. Results are verified using two independent models for predicting the APS scatter signature: (1) a linear systems model of the APS and (2) a linear superposition integral combining known monochromatic scatter signatures with the input polychromatic spectrum used in this case. Cross validation of experimental, modelled and literature results proves that APS are able to record biologically relevant scatter signatures. Coherent scatter signatures are sensitive to multiple materials present in a sample and provide a means to quantify composition. In the future, production of a bespoke APS imager for x-ray diffraction studies could enable simultaneous collection of the transmitted beam and scattered radiation in a laboratory-based coherent scatter system, making clinical transfer of the technique attainable.

  14. The Biology and some Population Parameters of the Grasshopper, Ronderosia bergi, Under Laboratory Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mariottini, Yanina; de Wysiecki, Maria Laura; Lange, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Some biological and population parameters of Ronderosia bergi (Stål) (Orthoptera: Acrididae: Melanoplinae) were estimated by monitoring five cohorts of the first generation (F1) of individuals born in captivity from grasshoppers collected in the South of Misiones province, northeastern Argentina, and held under controlled conditions (30° C, 14:10 L:D, 40% RH). The mean embryonic development time was 40.6 ± 1.7 days. Five nymphal instars were recorded. Total duration of nymphal development was 30.8 ± 0.54 days. The mean lifespan of cohorts was 22.6 ± 0.7 weeks. The number of egg-pods per female was 7.6 ± 1.44, and the amount of eggs per egg-pod was 16.45 ± 0.85. Mean fecundity was 125 ± 5.83 eggs per female with an oviposition rate of 1.55 ± 0.57 eggs/female/day. Survivorship curves showed that mortality was concentrated in the final weeks of adulthood, and the life expectancy curve decreased accordingly. The population parameters estimated gave the following values: the net rate of reproduction (R0) was 46.75 ± 11.2, generation time (T) was 18.87 ± 1.67 weeks, duplication time (D) was 3.31 ± 0.34, the intrinsic rate of population growth (rm) was 0.21 ± 0.021 and the finite rate of population increase (λ) was 1.24 ± 0.026. The reproductive values (Vx) indicated that the largest contribution of females to the subsequent generation was between weeks 15 and 25. PMID:20673116

  15. Biology of Triatoma carcavalloi Jurberg, Rocha & Lent, 1998 under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Cardozo-de-Almeida, Margareth; Neves, Simone Caldas Teves; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo de; Lima, Nathanielly Rocha Casado de; Oliveira, Maria Luiza Ribeiro de; Santos-Mallet, Jacenir Reis dos; Gonçalves, Teresa Cristina Monte

    2014-01-01

    Triatoma carcavalloi is a wild species that is found in sympatry with Triatoma rubrovaria and Triatoma circummaculata, which are vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi currently found in rural areas of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Fertility was assessed and to determine the incubation period, the eggs were observed until hatching. The first meal was offered to 1st stage nymphs. The intermolt period was also determined. The number of blood meals was quantified at each nymphal stage and the resistance to fasting as the period between ecdysis and death. Mortality was assessed and longevity was determined by recording the time that elapsed from molting to the adult stage and until death. The developmental cycle was assessed by recording the length in days of each stage from molting to adult hood. The average incubation period was 22.7 days. The average first meal occurred 3.1 days after hatching. The 5th stage nymph to adult intermolting period was the longest at 193.4 days. The average number of feedings during nymphal development was 13.4. The resistance to fasting assay indicated that the 3rd, 4th and 5th stage nymphs presented higher resistance than did adults. The highest mortality rate was observed in the 3rd stage nymphs (22.2%). The average length of adult survival was 25.6 weeks, and the average total life cycle lasted 503.4 days. This study is the first report on the biology of T. carcavalloi that fed on mice. The presented findings expand the bionomic knowledge of these species.

  16. A Simple and Low-Cost Monitoring System to Investigate Environmental Conditions in a Biological Research Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Gurdita, Akshay; Vovko, Heather; Ungrin, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Basic equipment such as incubation and refrigeration systems plays a critical role in nearly all aspects of the traditional biological research laboratory. Their proper functioning is therefore essential to ensure reliable and repeatable experimental results. Despite this fact, in many academic laboratories little attention is paid to validating and monitoring their function, primarily due to the cost and/or technical complexity of available commercial solutions. We have therefore developed a simple and low-cost monitoring system that combines a "Raspberry Pi" single-board computer with USB-connected sensor interfaces to track and log parameters such as temperature and pressure, and send email alert messages as appropriate. The system is controlled by open-source software, and we have also generated scripts to automate software setup so that no background in programming is required to install and use it. We have applied it to investigate the behaviour of our own equipment, and present here the results along with the details of the monitoring system used to obtain them.

  17. Characterization of pathogenic human MSH2 missense mutations using yeast as a model system: a laboratory course in molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Gammie, Alison E; Erdeniz, Naz

    2004-01-01

    This work describes the project for an advanced undergraduate laboratory course in cell and molecular biology. One objective of the course is to teach students a variety of cellular and molecular techniques while conducting original research. A second objective is to provide instruction in science writing and data presentation by requiring comprehensive laboratory reports modeled on the primary literature. The project for the course focuses on a gene, MSH2, implicated in the most common form of inherited colorectal cancer. Msh2 is important for maintaining the fidelity of genetic material where it functions as an important component of the DNA mismatch repair machinery. The goal of the project has two parts. The first part is to create mapped missense mutation listed in the human databases in the cognate yeast MSH2 gene and to assay for defects in DNA mismatch repair. The second part of the course is directed towards understanding in what way are the variant proteins defective for mismatch repair. Protein levels are analyzed to determine if the missense alleles display decreased expression. Furthermore, the students establish whether the Msh2p variants are properly localized to the nucleus using indirect immunofluorescence and whether the altered proteins have lost their ability to interact with other subunits of the MMR complex by creating recombinant DNA molecules and employing the yeast 2-hybrid assay.

  18. Surveying on the biologic behaviors of Hemiscorpius lepturus Peters 1861, scorpion in laboratory (Khuzestan, Iran) (Scorpions: Hemiscorpiidae).

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Rouhullah; Khamehchian, Tahereh; Miranzadeh, Mohammad Bagher

    2007-09-15

    This descriptive research was conducted so as to find and distinguish the sex of H. lepturus based on 107 dead specimens in the 70% ethyl alcohol and exact decision on their species using a criterion considering all morphological parameters and by the use of stereo microscope. Their biologic behaviors, 50 H. lepturus specimens which were fed and kept alive in capped bottles were studies while their way of shedding and number of newly-born young were also investigated under laboratory conditions in the process. The research revealed that in 107 H. lepturus specimens, 27 specimens (23%) were male and 80 ones (77%) were female. The results gained from 50 scorpions kept in the laboratory showed that only 10 cases (20%) had shed. Duration of emergence varies in each young from 10-20 min and delivery lasts approximately for 4-6 h. The average number of the young born was 24.3 in each delivery. It was concluded that the time of delivery and shedding in H lepturus is definitely fixed during the year and the number ofpectine denticles and length of the tail can be used to differentiate male and female H. lepturus.

  19. A Simple and Low-Cost Monitoring System to Investigate Environmental Conditions in a Biological Research Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Gurdita, Akshay; Vovko, Heather; Ungrin, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Basic equipment such as incubation and refrigeration systems plays a critical role in nearly all aspects of the traditional biological research laboratory. Their proper functioning is therefore essential to ensure reliable and repeatable experimental results. Despite this fact, in many academic laboratories little attention is paid to validating and monitoring their function, primarily due to the cost and/or technical complexity of available commercial solutions. We have therefore developed a simple and low-cost monitoring system that combines a “Raspberry Pi” single-board computer with USB-connected sensor interfaces to track and log parameters such as temperature and pressure, and send email alert messages as appropriate. The system is controlled by open-source software, and we have also generated scripts to automate software setup so that no background in programming is required to install and use it. We have applied it to investigate the behaviour of our own equipment, and present here the results along with the details of the monitoring system used to obtain them. PMID:26771659

  20. Characterization of Pathogenic Human MSH2 Missense Mutations Using Yeast as a Model System: A Laboratory Course in Molecular Biology

    PubMed Central

    Gammie, Alison E.; Erdeniz, Naz

    2004-01-01

    This work describes the project for an advanced undergraduate laboratory course in cell and molecular biology. One objective of the course is to teach students a variety of cellular and molecular techniques while conducting original research. A second objective is to provide instruction in science writing and data presentation by requiring comprehensive laboratory reports modeled on the primary literature. The project for the course focuses on a gene, MSH2, implicated in the most common form of inherited colorectal cancer. Msh2 is important for maintaining the fidelity of genetic material where it functions as an important component of the DNA mismatch repair machinery. The goal of the project has two parts. The first part is to create mapped missense mutation listed in the human databases in the cognate yeast MSH2 gene and to assay for defects in DNA mismatch repair. The second part of the course is directed towards understanding in what way are the variant proteins defective for mismatch repair. Protein levels are analyzed to determine if the missense alleles display decreased expression. Furthermore, the students establish whether the Msh2p variants are properly localized to the nucleus using indirect immunofluorescence and whether the altered proteins have lost their ability to interact with other subunits of the MMR complex by creating recombinant DNA molecules and employing the yeast 2-hybrid assay. PMID:22039344

  1. Screening biological methods for laboratory scale stabilization of fine fraction from landfill mining.

    PubMed

    Mönkäre, Tiina J; Palmroth, Marja R T; Rintala, Jukka A

    2017-02-01

    Increasing interest for the landfill mining and the amount of fine fraction (FF) in landfills (40-70% (w/w) of landfill content) mean that sustainable treatment and utilization methods for FF are needed. For this study FF (<20mm) was mined from a municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill operated from 1967 to 1989. FF, which resembles soil, was stabilized in laboratory scale reactors in two phases: first, anaerobically for 101days and second, for 72days using four different methods: anaerobic with the addition of moisture (water) or inoculum (sewage sludge) and aerobic with continuous water washing, with, or without, bulking material. The aim was to evaluate the effect on the stability of mined FF, which has been rarely reported, and to study the quality and quantity of gas and leachate produced during the stabilization experiment. The study showed that aerobic treatment reduced respiration activity (final values 0.9-1.1mgO2/gTS) and residual methane potential (1.1LCH4/kgTS) better than anaerobic methods (1.8-2.3mg O2/g TS and 1.3-2.4L CH4/kg TS, respectively). Bulking material mixed in FF in one aerobic reactor had no effect on the stability of FF. The benefit of anaerobic treatment was the production of methane, which could be utilized as energy. Even though the inoculum addition increased methane production from FF about 30%, but the methane production was still relatively low (in total 1.5-1.7L CH4/kg TS). Continuous water washing was essential to remove leachable organic matter and soluble nutrients from FF, while increasing the volume of leachate collected. In the aerobic treatment, nitrogen was oxidized into nitrite and nitrate and then washed out in the leachate. Both anaerobic and aerobic methods could be used for FF stabilization. The use of FF, in landscaping for example, is possible because its nutrient content (4gN/kg TS and 1g P/kg TS) can increase the nutrient content of soil, but this may have limitations due to the possible presence of heavy metal and

  2. Biologic surveys for the Sandia National Laboratories, Coyote Canyon Test Complex, Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.M.; Knight, P.J.

    1994-05-25

    This report provides results of a comprehensive biologic survey performed in Coyote Canyon Test Complex (CCTC), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Bernalillo County, New Mexico, which was conducted during the spring and summer of 1992 and 1993. CCTC is sited on land owned by the Department of Energy (DOE) and Kirtland Air Force Base and managed by SNL. The survey covered 3,760 acres of land, most of which is rarely disturbed by CCTC operations. Absence of grazing by livestock and possibly native ungulates, and relative to the general condition of private range lands throughout New Mexico, and relative to other grazing lands in central New Mexico. Widely dispersed, low intensity use by SNL as well as prohibition of grazing has probably contributed to abundance of special status species such as grama grass cactus within the CCTC area. This report evaluates threatened and endangered species found in the area, as well as comprehensive assessment of biologic habitats. Included are analyses of potential impacts and mitigative measures designed to reduce or eliminate potential impacts. Included is a summary of CCTC program and testing activities.

  3. Practice Makes Pretty Good: Assessment of Primary Literature Reading Abilities across Multiple Large-Enrollment Biology Laboratory Courses

    PubMed Central

    Kadandale, Pavan; He, Wenliang; Murata, Paige M. N.; Latif, Yama; Warschauer, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Primary literature is essential for scientific communication and is commonly utilized in undergraduate biology education. Despite this, there is often little time spent training our students how to critically analyze a paper. To address this, we introduced a primary literature module in multiple upper-division laboratory courses. In this module, instructors conduct classroom discussions that dissect a paper as researchers do. While previous work has identified classroom interventions that improve primary literature comprehension within a single course, our goal was to determine whether including a scientific paper module in our classes could produce long-term benefits. On the basis of performance in an assessment exam, we found that our module resulted in longitudinal gains, including increased comprehension and critical-thinking abilities in subsequent lab courses. These learning gains were specific to courses utilizing our module, as no longitudinal gains were seen in students who had taken other upper-division labs that lacked extensive primary literature discussion. In addition, we assessed whether performance on our assessment correlated with a variety of factors, including grade point average, course performance, research background, and self-reported confidence in understanding of the article. Furthermore, all of the study conclusions are independent of biology disciplines, as we observe similar trends within each course. PMID:25452490

  4. Using Zebrafish to Implement a Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experience to Study Teratogenesis in Two Biology Laboratory Courses.

    PubMed

    Sarmah, Swapnalee; Chism, Grady W; Vaughan, Martin A; Muralidharan, Pooja; Marrs, Jim A; Marrs, Kathleen A

    2016-08-01

    A course-based undergraduate research experience (CURE) spanning three semesters was introduced into freshman and sophomore biology classes, with the hypothesis that participation in a CURE affects skills in research, communication, and collaboration, which may help students persist in science. Student research projects were centered on the hypothesis that nicotine and caffeine exposure during early development affects gastrulation and heart development in zebrafish. First, freshmen generated original data showing distinct effects of embryonic nicotine and caffeine exposure on zebrafish heart development and function. Next, Cell Biology laboratory students continued the CURE studies and identified novel teratogenic effects of nicotine and caffeine during gastrulation. Finally, new freshmen continued the CURE research, examining additional toxicant effects on development. Students designed new protocols, made measurements, presented results, and generated high-quality preliminary data that were studied in successive semesters. By implementing this project, the CURE extended faculty research and provided a scalable model to address national goals to involve more undergraduates in authentic scientific research. In addition, student survey results support the hypothesis that CUREs provide significant gains in student ability to (1) design experiments, (2) analyze data, and (3) make scientific presentations, translating into high student satisfaction and enhanced learning.

  5. SensorDB: a virtual laboratory for the integration, visualization and analysis of varied biological sensor data.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Ali; Jimenez-Berni, Jose; Deery, David M; Palmer, Doug; Holland, Edward; Rozas-Larraondo, Pablo; Chapman, Scott C; Georgakopoulos, Dimitrios; Furbank, Robert T

    2015-01-01

    To our knowledge, there is no software or database solution that supports large volumes of biological time series sensor data efficiently and enables data visualization and analysis in real time. Existing solutions for managing data typically use unstructured file systems or relational databases. These systems are not designed to provide instantaneous response to user queries. Furthermore, they do not support rapid data analysis and visualization to enable interactive experiments. In large scale experiments, this behaviour slows research discovery, discourages the widespread sharing and reuse of data that could otherwise inform critical decisions in a timely manner and encourage effective collaboration between groups. In this paper we present SensorDB, a web based virtual laboratory that can manage large volumes of biological time series sensor data while supporting rapid data queries and real-time user interaction. SensorDB is sensor agnostic and uses web-based, state-of-the-art cloud and storage technologies to efficiently gather, analyse and visualize data. Collaboration and data sharing between different agencies and groups is thereby facilitated. SensorDB is available online at http://sensordb.csiro.au.

  6. Metabolic respiration induces AMPK- and Ire1p-dependent activation of the p38-Type HOG MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Hema; Cullen, Paul J

    2014-10-01

    Evolutionarily conserved mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways regulate the response to stress as well as cell differentiation. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, growth in non-preferred carbon sources (like galactose) induces differentiation to the filamentous cell type through an extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK)-type MAPK pathway. The filamentous growth MAPK pathway shares components with a p38-type High Osmolarity Glycerol response (HOG) pathway, which regulates the response to changes in osmolarity. To determine the extent of functional overlap between the MAPK pathways, comparative RNA sequencing was performed, which uncovered an unexpected role for the HOG pathway in regulating the response to growth in galactose. The HOG pathway was induced during growth in galactose, which required the nutrient regulatory AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK) Snf1p, an intact respiratory chain, and a functional tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. The unfolded protein response (UPR) kinase Ire1p was also required for HOG pathway activation in this context. Thus, the filamentous growth and HOG pathways are both active during growth in galactose. The two pathways redundantly promoted growth in galactose, but paradoxically, they also inhibited each other's activities. Such cross-modulation was critical to optimize the differentiation response. The human fungal pathogen Candida albicans showed a similar regulatory circuit. Thus, an evolutionarily conserved regulatory axis links metabolic respiration and AMPK to Ire1p, which regulates a differentiation response involving the modulated activity of ERK and p38 MAPK pathways.

  7. The sensitivity of new laboratory-based heterogeneous freezing schemes for dust and biological particles to time and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermeier, D.; Ervens, B.; Hartmann, S.; Wex, H.; Stratmann, F.

    2012-12-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation has been recently described by means of the Soccer ball model that takes into account multiple nucleation sites on individual particles [Niedermeier et al., 2011]. In order to study sensitivities of the implied contact angle distributions, a modified version of the Soccer ball model is implemented into a parcel model that describes in detail heterogeneous ice formation and ice /liquid water partitioning [Ervens and Feingold, 2012]. Soccer ball model parameters (number of surface sites, mean and width of the contact angle distribution) are determined from immersion freezing measurements of mineral dust particles and bacteria performed with the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator [LACIS, Hartmann et al., 2011]. While biological particles (e.g., bacteria) are much less frequent in the atmosphere, they can induce droplet freezing already at about -5°C as opposed to dust that shows efficient freezing only at lower temperatures (below -15°C). We will identify updraft regimes, temperature and IN concentration ranges where dust or biological particles, respectively, might dominate the number concentration of frozen droplets in mixed phase clouds. Additional model studies will focus on the importance of time versus temperature dependence and explore the usefulness of alternative descriptions of the freezing behavior that can be derived based on the respective laboratory studies using LACIS. These descriptions include the choice of a single contact angle as opposed to contact angle distributions or time-independent expressions. These results reveal that under selected conditions, it might be a satisfactory approximation to assume singular freezing behavior. Our sensitivity studies will help to refine time-independent freezing parameterizations using laboratory data and help bridging the current divergence between deterministic approaches [e.g., Hoose and Möhler, 2012] and physically-based approaches (classical nucleation theory) that

  8. The HOG MAP kinase pathway is required for the induction of methylglyoxal-responsive genes and determines methylglyoxal resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Jaime; Rodríguez-Vargas, Sonia; Prieto, Jose A

    2005-04-01

    A sudden overaccumulation of methylglyoxal (MG) induces, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the expression of MG-protective genes, including GPD1, GLO1 and GRE3. The response is partially dependent on the transcriptional factors Msn2p/Msn4p, but unrelated with the general stress response mechanism. Here, we show that the high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG)-pathway controls the genetic response to MG and determines the yeast growth capacity upon MG exposure. Strains lacking the MAPK Hog1p, the upstream component Ssk1p or the HOG-dependent nuclear factor Msn1p, showed a reduction in the mRNA accumulation of MG-responsive genes after MG addition. Moreover, hyperactivation of Hog1p by deletion of protein phosphatase PTP2 enhanced the response, while blocking the pathway by deletion of the MAPKK PBS2 had a negative effect. In addition, the activity of Hog1p affected the basal level of GPD1 mRNA under non-inducing conditions. These effects had a great influence on MG resistance, as hog1Delta and other HOG-pathway mutants with impaired MG-specific expression displayed MG sensitivity, whereas those with enhanced expression exhibited MG resistance as compared with the wild-type. However, MG does not trigger the overphosphorylation of Hog1p or its nuclear import in the parental strain. Moreover, dual phosphorylation of Hog1p appears to be dispensable in the triggering of the transcriptional response, although a phosphorylable form of Hog1p is fundamental for the transcriptional activity. Overall, our results suggest that the basal activity of the HOG-pathway serves to amplify the expression of MG-responsive genes under non-inducing and inducing conditions, ensuring cell protection against this toxic glycolytic by-product.

  9. CREB is activated by UVC through a p38/HOG-1-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Iordanov, M; Bender, K; Ade, T; Schmid, W; Sachsenmaier, C; Engel, K; Gaestel, M; Rahmsdorf, H J; Herrlich, P

    1997-01-01

    Changes in environmental conditions such as the addition of growth factors or irradiation of cells in culture first affect immediate response genes. We have shown previously that short wavelength UV irradiation (UVC) elicits massive activation of several growth factor receptor-dependent pathways. At the level of the immediate response gene c-fos, these pathways activate the transcription factor complex serum response factor (SRF)-p62TCF which mediates part of the UV-induced transcriptional response. These studies have, however, suggested that more that one pathway is required for full UV responsiveness of c-fos. Using appropriate promoter mutations and dominant-negative cAMP response element (CRE)-binding protein (CREB), we now find that UVC-induced transcriptional activation depends also on the CRE at position -60 of the c-fos promoter and on the functionality of a CREB. Upon UV irradiation, CREB and ATF-1 are phosphorylated at serines 133 and 63, respectively, preceded by and dependent on activation of p38/RK/HOG-1 and of a p38/RK/HOG-1-dependent p108 CREB kinase. Although p90RSK1 and MAPKAP kinase 2 are also activated by UV, p90RSK1 does not, at least not decisively, participate in this signalling pathway to CREB and ATF-1 as it is not p38/RK/HOG-1 dependent, and CREB is a poor substrate for MAPKAP kinase 2 in vitro. On the basis of resistance to the growth factor receptor inhibitor suramin and of several types of cross-refractoriness experiments, the UVC-induced CREB/ATF-1 phosphorylation represents an as yet unrecognized route of UVC-induced signal transduction, independent of suramin-inhibitable growth factor receptors and different from the Erk 1,2-p62TCF pathway. PMID:9118940

  10. Virtually the Same: A Comparison of STEM Students' Content Knowledge, Course Performance, and Motivation to Learn in Virtual and Face-to-Face Introductory Biology Laboratories. Research and Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reece, Amber J.; Butler, Malcolm B.

    2017-01-01

    Biology I is a required course for many science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors and is often their first college-level laboratory experience. The replacement of the traditional face-to-face laboratory experience with virtual laboratories could influence students' content knowledge, motivation to learn biology, and overall…

  11. Virtually the Same: A Comparison of STEM Students' Content Knowledge, Course Performance, and Motivation to Learn in Virtual and Face-to-Face Introductory Biology Laboratories. Research and Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reece, Amber J.; Butler, Malcolm B.

    2017-01-01

    Biology I is a required course for many science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors and is often their first college-level laboratory experience. The replacement of the traditional face-to-face laboratory experience with virtual laboratories could influence students' content knowledge, motivation to learn biology, and overall…

  12. A second envelope glycoprotein mediates neutralization of a pestivirus, hog cholera virus.

    PubMed Central

    Weiland, E; Ahl, R; Stark, R; Weiland, F; Thiel, H J

    1992-01-01

    Several monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) raised against hog cholera virus (HCV) reacted with the HCV structural glycoprotein gp44/48 and neutralized the virus. The presence of HCV gp44/48 on the viral surface was directly demonstrated by immunogold electron microscopy. Eight anti-HCV gp44/48 MAbs were tested by immunoperoxidase assay against a panel of pestivirus strains. Each MAb showed a distinct pattern of reactivity with HCV strains. It is suggested that the MAbs are well suited for epidemiological investigations of HCV outbreaks. Images PMID:1583727

  13. The mitogen-activated protein kinase gene, VdHog1, regulates osmotic stress response, microsclerotia formation and virulence in Verticillium dahliae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yonglin; Tian, Longyan; Xiong, Dianguang; Klosterman, Steven J; Xiao, Shuxiao; Tian, Chengming

    2016-03-01

    The fungus Verticillium dahliae has gained worldwide notoriety as a destructive plant pathogen, causing vascular wilt diseases on diverse plant species. V. dahliae produces melanized resting bodies, known as microsclerotia, which can survive for 15 years in the soil, and are thus critically important in its disease cycle. However, the molecular mechanisms that underpin microsclerotia formation, survival, and germination remain poorly understood. In this study, we observed that deletion of VdHog1 (ΔVdHog1), encoding a homolog of a high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) response mitogen-activated protein kinase, displayed decreased numbers of melanized microsclerotia in culture, heightened sensitivity to hyperosmotic stress, and increased resistance to the fungicide fludioxonil. Through RNA-Seq analysis, we identified 221 genes differentially expressed in the ΔVdHog1 strain. Interestingly, the expression levels of genes involved in melanin biosynthesis, as well as the hydrophobin gene VDH1, involved in the early stage of microsclerotia formation, were significantly decreased in the ΔVdHog1 strains relative to the wild-type expression levels. The ΔVdHog1 strains exhibited decreased virulence relative to the wild type strain on smoke tree seedlings. These results indicate that VdHog1 regulates hyperosmotic stress responses in V. dahliae, and establishes the Hog1-mediated pathway as a target to further probe the up- and downstream processes that regulate asexual development in this fungus.

  14. Assessment of swine worker exposures to dust and endotoxin during hog load-out and power washing.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Patrick; Peters, Thomas; Donham, Kelley; Taylor, Craig; Altmaier, Ralph; Kelly, Kevin

    2012-08-01

    Field measurements of personal and area dust and endotoxin concentrations were obtained while agricultural workers performed two work tasks that have been previously unreported: hog load-out and swine building power washing. Hog load-out involves moving hogs from their pens in finishing buildings into a truck for transport to a meat processor. High pressure power washing is conducted for sanitation purposes after a building has been emptied of hogs to remove surface and floor debris. This debris consists of feed, feces, and hog dander as dust or an encrusted form. The hog load-out process necessarily increases pig activity which is known to increase airborne dust concentrations. An unintended consequence of power washing is that the material covering surfaces is forcibly ejected into the atmosphere, creating the potential for a highly concentrated aerosol exposure to workers. The load-out process resulted in a median personal inhalable mass concentration of 7.14 mg m(-) (3) and median endotoxin concentration of 12 150 endotoxin units (EU) m(-) (3). When converted to an 8-h time-weighted average for a 'total' sampler, one of the 19 samples exceeded a regulatory limit of 15 mg m(-) (3). An impinger was used to sample power washing endotoxin concentrations, which resulted in a median personal concentration of 40 350 EU m(-) (3). These concentrations were among the highest found in the literature for any occupation. With the lack of engineering controls present to reduce airborne contaminant concentrations in swine buildings, either respirator use or a reduction in exposure time is recommended while performing these tasks.

  15. An Open Source Based High Content Screening Method for Cell Biology Laboratories Investigating Cell Spreading and Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Pietro, Maurianne A.; Schwab, Martin E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Adhesion dependent mechanisms are increasingly recognized to be important for a wide range of biological processes, diseases and therapeutics. This has led to a rising demand of pharmaceutical modulators. However, most currently available adhesion assays are time consuming and/or lack sensitivity and reproducibility or depend on specialized and expensive equipment often only available at screening facilities. Thus, rapid and economical high-content screening approaches are urgently needed. Results We established a fully open source high-content screening method for identifying modulators of adhesion. We successfully used this method to detect small molecules that are able to influence cell adhesion and cell spreading of Swiss-3T3 fibroblasts in general and/or specifically counteract Nogo-A-Δ20-induced inhibition of adhesion and cell spreading. The tricyclic anti-depressant clomipramine hydrochloride was shown to not only inhibit Nogo-A-Δ20-induced cell spreading inhibition in 3T3 fibroblasts but also to promote growth and counteract neurite outgrowth inhibition in highly purified primary neurons isolated from rat cerebellum. Conclusions We have developed and validated a high content screening approach that can be used in any ordinarily equipped cell biology laboratory employing exclusively freely available open-source software in order to find novel modulators of adhesion and cell spreading. The versatility and adjustability of the whole screening method will enable not only centers specialized in high-throughput screens but most importantly also labs not routinely employing screens in their daily work routine to investigate the effects of a wide range of different compounds or siRNAs on adhesion and adhesion-modulating molecules. PMID:24205161

  16. Finisher hog production in the Southeastern United States: Ancillary measurements derived from the National Air Emissions Monitoring Study (NAEMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robarge, W. P.; Lee, S.; Walker, J. T.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements of emissions of gases and fine particulate matter from swine animal feeding operations (AFOs) in the southeastern US have typically been confined to relatively short periods (days to several weeks) and have generally focused on waste lagoons. Access to swine animal housing units and other ancillary information has been limited. The National Air Emissions Monitoring Study (NAEMS) provided a unique opportunity to characterize emissions from swine housing units for an extended period of time (~ 2 years), and allowed access to ancillary measurements regarding nutrient flows (feed amounts and composition), manure dynamics, animal inventories, water usage and farm management. Presented here is a summary of the observations made for a NAEMS finisher site (NC3B) selected as being representative of swine production in the southeastern US. Finisher hogs are raised in rotations (~ 140 days) with a target market weight of 123 kg/hog. Among the population during a rotation (700-800 hogs/barn) the actual growth rate varies with a series of “grade-outs” of market-weight hogs starting ~ 110 days from initial load-in. Derivation of the standing live-weight in the barns during a rotation therefore requires use of a growth model and summation over several different “populations” of hogs within a single barn. Up to 5 different feed formulations are fed during a rotation with %N content ranging from (3.4 to 2.2% N; total feed consumed 181,000 kg/barn). Across 4 complete rotations, N consumed was ~50 g N per hog/day. Of this amount, we estimate ~ 60% is excreted as fecal matter and urine. The TAN (NH3 + NH4+) content of the shallow pits is consistently higher (1880 ±390 mg TAN/L) than that found in the anaerobic lagoon (800 ±70 mg TAN/L), except immediately after recharge following pit-pull (pH of the two liquids was similar). The presence of a recalcitrant layer of sludge in the shallow pits (liquid height = 20 cm; sludge depth = 5-10 cm; TAN = 2500 mg N/L; total

  17. Effect of Season, Transport Length, Deck Location, and Lairage Length on Pork Quality and Blood Cortisol Concentrations of Market Hogs

    PubMed Central

    Newman, David; Young, Jennifer; Carr, Chad; Ryan, Matt; Berg, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Simple Summary Transport of hogs is a routine practice in the swine industry. Loading pigs onto the trailer, transporting them to the plant, and having them wait in an unfamiliar pen at the plant prior to slaughter are all stressful to the pigs. Seasonal changes in temperatures can also affect the amount of stress a hog is subjected to during transport to market. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the effect of transportation and lairage conditions on stress, evaluated by measuring serum cortisol concentrations, and the effect on pork quality. Abstract The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of seasonal environment, transport conditions, and time in lairage on pork quality and serum cortisol concentrations. Market hogs were slaughtered during winter (n = 535), spring (n = 645), summer (n = 644), and fall (n = 488). Within season, hogs were randomly assigned to treatments in a 2 × 2 × 2 factorial arrangement, with 2 deck locations (top vs. bottom) and 2 transport and lairage durations (3 h vs. 6 h). Blood samples were collected at exsanguination for analysis of cortisol concentration. Loins were collected at 24 h postmortem for pork quality assessment. Season and deck did not have a main effect on cortisol concentrations or pork quality. Hogs transported 6 h had increased cortisol concentrations (103.0 vs. 95.5 ng/mL; P < 0.001) and decreased L* (52.49 vs. 52.69; P = 0.09), b* (6.28 vs. 6.36; P = 0.03), and hue angle (20.70 vs. 20.95; P = 0.03) compared to hogs transported 3 h. Hogs subjected to 6 h of lairage had increased 24-h pH (5.69 vs. 5.66; P = 0.005), a* (16.64 vs. 16.48; P < 0.0001), b* (6.42 vs. 6.22; P < 0.0001), saturation (17.85 vs. 17.64; P < 0.0001), and hue angle (21.01 vs. 20.65; P = 0.002) and decreased L* (52.49 vs. 52.69; P = 0.07) when compared to hogs subjected to 3 h of lairage. PMID:26479004

  18. Biology Laboratory Safety Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Christine L.

    The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommends that schools prepare or adapt a biosafety manual, and that instructors develop a list of safety procedures applicable to their own lab and distribute it to each student. In this way, safety issues will be brought to each student's attention. This document is an example of such a manual. It contains…

  19. Tested Studies for Laboratory Teaching. Proceedings of the Workshop/Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) (7th, Las Vegas, Nevada, June 3-7, 1985; 8th, Ithaca, New York, June 16-20, 1986). Volume 7/8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Corey A., Ed.; Hauta, P. Lynn, Ed.

    The focus of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) is to improve the undergraduate biology laboratory experience by promoting the development and dissemination of interesting, innovative, and reliable laboratory exercises. This proceeding volume contains 12 papers: "Experimental Design and Testing: Hatching and Development in…

  20. Tested Studies for Laboratory Teaching. Proceedings of the Workshop/Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) (7th, Las Vegas, Nevada, June 3-7, 1985; 8th, Ithaca, New York, June 16-20, 1986). Volume 7/8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Corey A., Ed.; Hauta, P. Lynn, Ed.

    The focus of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) is to improve the undergraduate biology laboratory experience by promoting the development and dissemination of interesting, innovative, and reliable laboratory exercises. This proceeding volume contains 12 papers: "Experimental Design and Testing: Hatching and Development in…