Science.gov

Sample records for bioluminescence based reporter

  1. Fluorescent and Bioluminescent Reporter Myxoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Rostad, Christina A.; Currier, Michael C.; Moore, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    The advent of virus reverse genetics has enabled the incorporation of genetically encoded reporter proteins into replication-competent viruses. These reporters include fluorescent proteins which have intrinsic chromophores that absorb light and re-emit it at lower wavelengths, and bioluminescent proteins which are luciferase enzymes that react with substrates to produce visible light. The incorporation of these reporters into replication-competent viruses has revolutionized our understanding of molecular virology and aspects of viral tropism and transmission. Reporter viruses have also enabled the development of high-throughput assays to screen antiviral compounds and antibodies and to perform neutralization assays. However, there remain technical challenges with the design of replication-competent reporter viruses, and each reporter has unique advantages and disadvantages for specific applications. This review describes currently available reporters, design strategies for incorporating reporters into replication-competent paramyxoviruses and orthomyxoviruses, and the variety of applications for which these tools can be utilized both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27527209

  2. Detection of bacteria with bioluminescent reporter bacteriophage.

    PubMed

    Klumpp, Jochen; Loessner, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that exclusively infect bacteria. They are ideally suited for the development of highly specific diagnostic assay systems. Bioluminescent reporter bacteriophages are designed and constructed by integration of a luciferase gene in the virus genome. Relying on the host specificity of the phage, the system enables rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of bacterial pathogens. A bioluminescent reporter phage assay is superior to any other molecular detection method, because gene expression and light emission are dependent on an active metabolism of the bacterial cell, and only viable cells will yield a signal. In this chapter we introduce the concept of creating reporter phages, discuss their advantages and disadvantages, and illustrate the advances made in developing such systems for different Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens. The application of bioluminescent reporter phages for the detection of foodborne pathogens is emphasized.

  3. Amplitude Metrics for Cellular Circadian Bioluminescence Reporters

    PubMed Central

    St. John, Peter C.; Taylor, Stephanie R.; Abel, John H.; Doyle, Francis J.

    2014-01-01

    Bioluminescence rhythms from cellular reporters have become the most common method used to quantify oscillations in circadian gene expression. These experimental systems can reveal phase and amplitude change resulting from circadian disturbances, and can be used in conjunction with mathematical models to lend further insight into the mechanistic basis of clock amplitude regulation. However, bioluminescence experiments track the mean output from thousands of noisy, uncoupled oscillators, obscuring the direct effect of a given stimulus on the genetic regulatory network. In many cases, it is unclear whether changes in amplitude are due to individual changes in gene expression level or to a change in coherence of the population. Although such systems can be modeled using explicit stochastic simulations, these models are computationally cumbersome and limit analytical insight into the mechanisms of amplitude change. We therefore develop theoretical and computational tools to approximate the mean expression level in large populations of noninteracting oscillators, and further define computationally efficient amplitude response calculations to describe phase-dependent amplitude change. At the single-cell level, a mechanistic nonlinear ordinary differential equation model is used to calculate the transient response of each cell to a perturbation, whereas population-level dynamics are captured by coupling this detailed model to a phase density function. Our analysis reveals that amplitude changes mediated at either the individual-cell or the population level can be distinguished in tissue-level bioluminescence data without the need for single-cell measurements. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method by modeling experimental bioluminescence profiles of light-sensitive fibroblasts, reconciling the conclusions of two seemingly contradictory studies. This modeling framework allows a direct comparison between in vitro bioluminescence experiments and in silico ordinary

  4. Amplitude metrics for cellular circadian bioluminescence reporters.

    PubMed

    St John, Peter C; Taylor, Stephanie R; Abel, John H; Doyle, Francis J

    2014-12-02

    Bioluminescence rhythms from cellular reporters have become the most common method used to quantify oscillations in circadian gene expression. These experimental systems can reveal phase and amplitude change resulting from circadian disturbances, and can be used in conjunction with mathematical models to lend further insight into the mechanistic basis of clock amplitude regulation. However, bioluminescence experiments track the mean output from thousands of noisy, uncoupled oscillators, obscuring the direct effect of a given stimulus on the genetic regulatory network. In many cases, it is unclear whether changes in amplitude are due to individual changes in gene expression level or to a change in coherence of the population. Although such systems can be modeled using explicit stochastic simulations, these models are computationally cumbersome and limit analytical insight into the mechanisms of amplitude change. We therefore develop theoretical and computational tools to approximate the mean expression level in large populations of noninteracting oscillators, and further define computationally efficient amplitude response calculations to describe phase-dependent amplitude change. At the single-cell level, a mechanistic nonlinear ordinary differential equation model is used to calculate the transient response of each cell to a perturbation, whereas population-level dynamics are captured by coupling this detailed model to a phase density function. Our analysis reveals that amplitude changes mediated at either the individual-cell or the population level can be distinguished in tissue-level bioluminescence data without the need for single-cell measurements. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method by modeling experimental bioluminescence profiles of light-sensitive fibroblasts, reconciling the conclusions of two seemingly contradictory studies. This modeling framework allows a direct comparison between in vitro bioluminescence experiments and in silico ordinary

  5. Assessment of shikonin for potential estrogenic activity by dual-luciferase reporter based bioluminescent measurements in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Li, Ping-Ping

    2011-02-01

    Shikonin, an active component of Lithospermum erythrorhizon Sieb. et Zucc., shows multiple pharmacological properties. However, the estrogenic activity of shikonin is remaining unclear. We assessed the potential estrogenic activity of shikonin with dual-luciferase reporter assay and bioluminescent measurements, by using transient cotransfection with estrogen dependent plasmid pERE-TK-Luc and internal control plasmid pRL-TK in MCF-7 cells. Estrogenic activity of shikonin, even at high concentration did not alter significantly compared to negative control (p > 0.05) and were significantly lower than those with E2 (p < 0.01). Concluding, shikonin demonstrates no estrogenic activity in vitro.

  6. Bioluminescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, M. Gail

    1993-01-01

    Describes bioluminescence and the chemistry of how it occurs. Presents information for conducting the following classroom activities: (1) firefly mimic; (2) modeling deep-sea fish; (3) sea fireflies; and (4) the chemistry of light. (PR)

  7. Construction of a bioluminescent reporter strain to detect polychlorinated biphenyls

    SciTech Connect

    Layton, A.C.; Muccini, M.; Ghosh, M.M.; Sayler, G.S.

    1998-12-01

    A bioluminescent reporter strain, Ralstonia eutropha ENV307 (pUTK60), was constructed for the detection of polychlorinated biphenyls by inserting the biphenyl promoter upstream of the bioluminescence genes. In the presence of a nonionic surfactant, which enhances the solubility of chlorinated biphenyls, bioluminescence was induced three- to fourfold over background by biphenyl, monochlorinated biphenyls, and Aroclor 1242. The minimum detection limits for these compounds ranged from 0.15 mg/liter for 4-chlorobiphenyl to 1.5 mg/liter for Aroclor 1242.

  8. A novel reconstruction algorithm for bioluminescent tomography based on Bayesian compressive sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yaqi; Feng, Jinchao; Jia, Kebin; Sun, Zhonghua; Wei, Huijun

    2016-03-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) is becoming a promising tool because it can resolve the biodistribution of bioluminescent reporters associated with cellular and subcellular function through several millimeters with to centimeters of tissues in vivo. However, BLT reconstruction is an ill-posed problem. By incorporating sparse a priori information about bioluminescent source, enhanced image quality is obtained for sparsity based reconstruction algorithm. Therefore, sparsity based BLT reconstruction algorithm has a great potential. Here, we proposed a novel reconstruction method based on Bayesian compressive sensing and investigated its feasibility and effectiveness with a heterogeneous phantom. The results demonstrate the potential and merits of the proposed algorithm.

  9. Application of ATP-based bioluminescence for bioaerosol quantification: effect of sampling method.

    PubMed

    Han, Taewon; Wren, Melody; DuBois, Kelsey; Therkorn, Jennifer; Mainelis, Gediminas

    2015-12-01

    An adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-based bioluminescence has potential to offer a quick and affordable method for quantifying bioaerosol samples. Here we report on our investigation into how different bioaerosol aerosolization parameters and sampling methods affect bioluminescence output per bacterium, and implications of that effect for bioaerosol research. Bacillus atrophaeus and Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria were aerosolized by using a Collison nebulizer (BGI Inc., Waltham, MA) with a glass or polycarbonate jar and then collected for 15 and 60 min with: (1) Button Aerosol Sampler (SKC Inc., Eighty Four, PA) with polycarbonate, PTFE, and cellulose nitrate filters, (2) BioSampler (SKC Inc.) with 5 and 20 mL of collection liquid, and (3) our newly developed Electrostatic Precipitator with Superhydrophobic Surface (EPSS). For all aerosolization and sampling parameters we compared the ATP bioluminescence output per bacterium relative to that before aerosolization and sampling. In addition, we also determined the ATP reagent storage and preparation conditions that that do not affect the bioluminescence signal intensity. Our results show that aerosolization by a Collison nebulizer with a polycarbonate jar yields higher bioluminescence output per bacterium compared to the glass jar. Interestingly enough, the bioluminescence output by P. fluorescens increased substantially after its aerosolization compared to the fresh liquid suspension. For both test microorganisms, the bioluminescence intensity per bacterium after sampling was significantly lower than that before sampling suggesting negative effect of sampling stress on bioluminescence output. The decrease in bioluminescence intensity was more pronounces for longer sampling times and significantly and substantially depended on the sampling method. Among the investigated method, the EPSS was the least injurious for both microorganisms and sampling times. While the ATP-based bioluminescence offers a quick bioaerosol

  10. Application of ATP-based bioluminescence for bioaerosol quantification: effect of sampling method

    PubMed Central

    Han, Taewon; Wren, Melody; DuBois, Kelsey; Therkorn, Jennifer; Mainelis, Gediminas

    2015-01-01

    An adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-based bioluminescence has potential to offer a quick and affordable method for quantifying bioaerosol samples. Here we report on our investigation into how different bioaerosol aerosolization parameters and sampling methods affect bioluminescence output per bacterium, and implications of that effect for bioaerosol research. Bacillus atrophaeus and Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria were aerosolized by using a Collison nebulizer (BGI Inc., Waltham, MA) with a glass or polycarbonate jar and then collected for 15 and 60 min with: (1) Button Aerosol Sampler (SKC Inc., Eighty Four, PA) with polycarbonate, PTFE, and cellulose nitrate filters, (2) BioSampler (SKC Inc.) with 5 and 20 mL of collection liquid, and (3) our newly developed Electrostatic Precipitator with Superhydrophobic Surface (EPSS). For all aerosolization and sampling parameters we compared the ATP bioluminescence output per bacterium relative to that before aerosolization and sampling. In addition, we also determined the ATP reagent storage and preparation conditions that that do not affect the bioluminescence signal intensity. Our results show that aerosolization by a Collison nebulizer with a polycarbonate jar yields higher bioluminescence output per bacterium compared to the glass jar. Interestingly enough, the bioluminescence output by P. fluorescens increased substantially after its aerosolization compared to the fresh liquid suspension. For both test microorganisms, the bioluminescence intensity per bacterium after sampling was significantly lower than that before sampling suggesting negative effect of sampling stress on bioluminescence output. The decrease in bioluminescence intensity was more pronounces for longer sampling times and significantly and substantially depended on the sampling method. Among the investigated method, the EPSS was the least injurious for both microorganisms and sampling times. While the ATP-based bioluminescence offers a quick bioaerosol

  11. Smartphone-based low light detection for bioluminescence application

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Huisung; Jung, Youngkee; Doh, Iyll-Joon; Lozano-Mahecha, Roxana Andrea; Applegate, Bruce; Bae, Euiwon

    2017-01-01

    We report a smartphone-based device and associated imaging-processing algorithm to maximize the sensitivity of standard smartphone cameras, that can detect the presence of single-digit pW of radiant flux intensity. The proposed hardware and software, called bioluminescent-based analyte quantitation by smartphone (BAQS), provides an opportunity for onsite analysis and quantitation of luminescent signals from biological and non-biological sensing elements which emit photons in response to an analyte. A simple cradle that houses the smartphone, sample tube, and collection lens supports the measuring platform, while noise reduction by ensemble averaging simultaneously lowers the background and enhances the signal from emitted photons. Five different types of smartphones, both Android and iOS devices, were tested, and the top two candidates were used to evaluate luminescence from the bioluminescent reporter Pseudomonas fluorescens M3A. The best results were achieved by OnePlus One (android), which was able to detect luminescence from ~106 CFU/mL of the bio-reporter, which corresponds to ~107 photons/s with 180 seconds of integration time. PMID:28067287

  12. Smartphone-based low light detection for bioluminescence application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Huisung; Jung, Youngkee; Doh, Iyll-Joon; Lozano-Mahecha, Roxana Andrea; Applegate, Bruce; Bae, Euiwon

    2017-01-01

    We report a smartphone-based device and associated imaging-processing algorithm to maximize the sensitivity of standard smartphone cameras, that can detect the presence of single-digit pW of radiant flux intensity. The proposed hardware and software, called bioluminescent-based analyte quantitation by smartphone (BAQS), provides an opportunity for onsite analysis and quantitation of luminescent signals from biological and non-biological sensing elements which emit photons in response to an analyte. A simple cradle that houses the smartphone, sample tube, and collection lens supports the measuring platform, while noise reduction by ensemble averaging simultaneously lowers the background and enhances the signal from emitted photons. Five different types of smartphones, both Android and iOS devices, were tested, and the top two candidates were used to evaluate luminescence from the bioluminescent reporter Pseudomonas fluorescens M3A. The best results were achieved by OnePlus One (android), which was able to detect luminescence from ~106 CFU/mL of the bio-reporter, which corresponds to ~107 photons/s with 180 seconds of integration time.

  13. Smartphone-based low light detection for bioluminescence application.

    PubMed

    Kim, Huisung; Jung, Youngkee; Doh, Iyll-Joon; Lozano-Mahecha, Roxana Andrea; Applegate, Bruce; Bae, Euiwon

    2017-01-09

    We report a smartphone-based device and associated imaging-processing algorithm to maximize the sensitivity of standard smartphone cameras, that can detect the presence of single-digit pW of radiant flux intensity. The proposed hardware and software, called bioluminescent-based analyte quantitation by smartphone (BAQS), provides an opportunity for onsite analysis and quantitation of luminescent signals from biological and non-biological sensing elements which emit photons in response to an analyte. A simple cradle that houses the smartphone, sample tube, and collection lens supports the measuring platform, while noise reduction by ensemble averaging simultaneously lowers the background and enhances the signal from emitted photons. Five different types of smartphones, both Android and iOS devices, were tested, and the top two candidates were used to evaluate luminescence from the bioluminescent reporter Pseudomonas fluorescens M3A. The best results were achieved by OnePlus One (android), which was able to detect luminescence from ~10(6) CFU/mL of the bio-reporter, which corresponds to ~10(7) photons/s with 180 seconds of integration time.

  14. Rapid, sensitive bioluminescent reporter technology for napthalene exposure and biodegradation

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.M.H.; DiGrazia, P.M.; Applegate, B.; Burlage, R.; Sanseverino, J.; Dunbar, P.; Sayler, G.S. ); Larimer, F. )

    1990-08-17

    A bioluminescent reporter plasmid for naphthalene catabolism (pUTK21) was developed by transposon (Tn4431) insertion of the lux gene cassette from Vibrio fischeri into a naphthalene catabolic plasmid in Pseudomonas fluorescens. The insertion site of the lux transposon was the nahG gene encoding for salicylate hydroxylase. Luciferase-mediated light production from P. fluorescens strains harboring this plasmid was induced on exposure to naphthalene or the regulatory inducer metabolite, salicylate. In continuous culture, light induction was rapid and was highly responsive to dynamic changes in naphthalene exposure. Strains harboring pUTK21 were responsive to aromatic hydrocarbon contamination in Manufactured Gas Plant soils and produced sufficient light to serve as biosensors of naphthalene exposure and reporters of napthalene biodegradative activity. The robust and sensitive nature of the bioluminescent reporter technology suggests that new sensing methods can be developed for on-line process monitoring and control in complex environmental matrices.

  15. Optical biosensor for environmental on-line monitoring of naphthalene and salicylate bioavailability with an immobilized bioluminescent catabolic reporter bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Heitzer, A; Malachowsky, K; Thonnard, J E; Bienkowski, P R; White, D C; Sayler, G S

    1994-01-01

    An optical whole-cell biosensor based on a genetically engineered bioluminescent catabolic reporter bacterium was developed for continuous on-line monitoring of naphthalene and salicylate bioavailability and microbial catabolic activity potential in waste streams. The bioluminescent reporter bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44, carries a transcriptional nahG-luxCDABE fusion for naphthalene and salicylate catabolism. Exposure to either compound resulted in inducible bioluminescence. The reporter culture was immobilized onto the surface of an optical light guide by using strontium alginate. This biosensor probe was then inserted into a measurement cell which simultaneously received the waste stream solution and a maintenance medium. Exposure under defined conditions to both naphthalene and salicylate resulted in a rapid increase in bioluminescence. The magnitude of the response and the response time were concentration dependent. Good reproducibility of the response was observed during repetitive perturbations with either naphthalene or salicylate. Exposure to other compounds, such as glucose and complex nutrient medium or toluene, resulted in either minor bioluminescence increases after significantly longer response times compared with naphthalene or no response, respectively. The environmental utility of the biosensor was tested by using real pollutant mixtures. A specific bioluminescence response was obtained after exposure to either an aqueous solution saturated with JP-4 jet fuel or an aqueous leachate from a manufactured-gas plant soil, since naphthalene was present in both pollutant mixtures. PMID:8017932

  16. Optical biosensor for environmental on-line monitoring of naphthalene and salicylate bioavailability with an immobilized bioluminescent catabolic reporter bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Heitzer, A.; Malachowsky, K.; Thonnard, J.E.

    1994-05-01

    An optical whole-cell biosensor based on a genetically engineered bioluminescent catabolic reporter bacterium was developed for continuous on-line monitoring of naphthalene and salicylate bioavailability and microbial catabolic activity potential in waste streams. The bioluminescent reporter bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44, carries a transcriptional nahG-luxCDABE fusion for naphthalene and salicylate catabolism. Exposure to either compound resulted in inducible bioluminescence. The reporter culture was immobilized onto the surface of an optical guide by using strontium alginate. The biosensor probe was then inserted into a measurement cell which simultaneously received the waste stream solution and a maintenance medium. Exposure under defined conditions to both naphthalene and salicylate resulted in a rapid increase in bioluminescence. The magnitude of the response and the response time were concentration dependent. Good reproducibility of the response was observed during repetitive perturbations with either napthalene or salicylate. Exposure to other compounds, such as glucose and complex nutrient medium or toluene, resulted in either minor bioluminescence increases after significantly longer response times compared with naphthalene or no response, respectively. The environmental utility of the biosensor was tested by using real pollutant mixtures. A specific bioluminescence response was obtained after exposure to either an aqueous solution saturated with JP-4 fuel or an aqueous leachate from a manufactured-gas plant soil, since napthalene was present in both pollutant mixtures. 43 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Isolation and development of bioluminescent reporter phages for bacterial dysentery.

    PubMed

    Schofield, D A; Wray, D J; Molineux, I J

    2015-02-01

    Shigellosis is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, most notably amongst children. Moreover, there is a global increase in the occurrence of multidrug-resistant isolates, including the epidemic and pandemic Shigella dysenteriae type 1 strain. We developed a bioluminescent reporter phage assay to facilitate detection and simultaneously determine antibiotic susceptibility. A Shigella flexneri phage (Shfl25875) was isolated from environmental wastewater and characterized by DNA sequencing. Shfl25875 is T4-like, harbors a 169,062-bp genome, and grows on most (28/29) S. flexneri strains and all 12 S. dysenteriae type 1 strains tested. The genes encoding bacterial luciferase were integrated into the Shfl25875 genome to create a "light-tagged" phage capable of transducing a bioluminescent phenotype to infected cells. Shfl25875::luxAB rapidly detects cultured isolates with high sensitivity. Specificity experiments indicate that the reporter does not respond to Shigella boydii, non-type 1 S. dysenteriae strains, and most non-Shigella Enterobacteriaceae. Shfl25875::luxAB generates ampicillin and ciprofloxacin susceptibility profiles that are similar to the standard Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) growth microdilution method, but in a significantly shorter time. In addition, the reporter phage detects Shigella in mock-infected stool. This new reporter phage shows promise as a tool for the detection of cultured isolates or complex clinical samples.

  18. In vivo bioluminescence and reflectance imaging of multiple organs in bioluminescence reporter mice by bundled-fiber-coupled microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Yoriko; Sakurai, Takashi; Koida, Kowa; Tei, Hajime; Hida, Akiko; Nakao, Kazuki; Natsume, Mistuo; Numano, Rika

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is used in biomedical research to monitor biological processes within living organisms. Recently, fiber bundles with high transmittance and density have been developed to detect low light with high resolution. Therefore, we have developed a bundled-fiber-coupled microscope with a highly sensitive cooled-CCD camera that enables the BLI of organs within the mouse body. This is the first report of in vivo BLI of the brain and multiple organs in luciferase-reporter mice using bundled-fiber optics. With reflectance imaging, the structures of blood vessels and organs can be seen clearly with light illumination, and it allowed identification of the structural details of bioluminescence images. This technique can also be applied to clinical diagnostics in a low invasive manner. PMID:27231601

  19. In vivo bioluminescence and reflectance imaging of multiple organs in bioluminescence reporter mice by bundled-fiber-coupled microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ando, Yoriko; Sakurai, Takashi; Koida, Kowa; Tei, Hajime; Hida, Akiko; Nakao, Kazuki; Natsume, Mistuo; Numano, Rika

    2016-03-01

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is used in biomedical research to monitor biological processes within living organisms. Recently, fiber bundles with high transmittance and density have been developed to detect low light with high resolution. Therefore, we have developed a bundled-fiber-coupled microscope with a highly sensitive cooled-CCD camera that enables the BLI of organs within the mouse body. This is the first report of in vivo BLI of the brain and multiple organs in luciferase-reporter mice using bundled-fiber optics. With reflectance imaging, the structures of blood vessels and organs can be seen clearly with light illumination, and it allowed identification of the structural details of bioluminescence images. This technique can also be applied to clinical diagnostics in a low invasive manner.

  20. Reporter cell activity within hydrogel constructs quantified from oxygen-independent bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, Dennis; Roeffaers, Maarten; Kerckhofs, Greet; Hofkens, Johan; Van de Putte, Tom; Schrooten, Jan; Van Oosterwyck, Hans

    2014-09-01

    By providing a three-dimensional (3D) support to cells, hydrogels offer a more relevant in vivo tissue-like environment as compared to two-dimensional cell cultures. Hydrogels can be applied as screening platforms to investigate in 3D the role of biochemical and biophysical cues on cell behaviour using bioluminescent reporter cells. Gradients in oxygen concentration that result from the interplay between molecular transport and cell metabolism can however cause substantial variability in the observed bioluminescent reporter cell activity. To assess the influence of these oxygen gradients on the emitted bioluminescence for various hydrogel geometries, a combined experimental and modelling approach was implemented. We show that the applied model is able to predict oxygen gradient independent bioluminescent intensities which correlate better to the experimentally determined viable cell numbers, as compared to the experimentally measured bioluminescent intensities. By analysis of the bioluminescence reaction dynamics we obtained a quantitative description of cellular oxygen metabolism within the hydrogel, which was validated by direct measurements of oxygen concentration within the hydrogel. Bioluminescence peak intensities can therefore be used as a quantitative measurement of reporter cell activity within a hydrogel, but an unambiguous interpretation of these intensities requires a compensation for the influence of cell-induced oxygen gradients on the luciferase activity.

  1. Discovery of Bacterial Fatty Acid Synthase Type II Inhibitors Using a Novel Cellular Bioluminescent Reporter Assay

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Joselynn; Bowlin, Nicholas O.; Mills, Debra M.; Saenkham, Panatda; Kwasny, Steven M.; Opperman, Timothy J.; Williams, John D.; Rock, Charles O.; Bowlin, Terry L.

    2015-01-01

    Novel, cellular, gain-of-signal, bioluminescent reporter assays for fatty acid synthesis type II (FASII) inhibitors were constructed in an efflux-deficient strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and based on the discovery that FASII genes in P. aeruginosa are coordinately upregulated in response to pathway disruption. A screen of 115,000 compounds identified a series of sulfonamidobenzamide (SABA) analogs, which generated strong luminescent signals in two FASII reporter strains but not in four control reporter strains designed to respond to inhibitors of pathways other than FASII. The SABA analogs selectively inhibited lipid biosynthesis in P. aeruginosa and exhibited minimal cytotoxicity to mammalian cells (50% cytotoxic concentration [CC50] ≥ 80 μM). The most potent SABA analogs had MICs of 0.5 to 7.0 μM (0.2 to 3.0 μg/ml) against an efflux-deficient Escherichia coli (ΔtolC) strain but had no detectable MIC against efflux-proficient E. coli or against P. aeruginosa (efflux deficient or proficient). Genetic, molecular genetic, and biochemical studies revealed that SABA analogs target the enzyme (AccC) catalyzing the biotin carboxylase half-reaction of the acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) carboxylase step in the initiation phase of FASII in E. coli and P. aeruginosa. These results validate the capability and the sensitivity of this novel bioluminescent reporter screen to identify inhibitors of E. coli and P. aeruginosa FASII. PMID:26169404

  2. Bioluminescent reporter bacterium for toxicity monitoring in biological wastewater treatment systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, C.J.; Lajoie, C.A.; Layton, A.C.; Sayler, G.S.

    1999-01-01

    Toxic shock due to certain chemical loads in biological wastewater treatment systems can result in death of microorganisms and loss of floc structure. To overcome the limitations of existing approaches to toxicity monitoring, genes encoding enzymes for light production were inserted to a bacterium (Shk 1) isolated from activated sludge. The Shk 1 bioreporter indicated a toxic response to concentrations of cadmium, 2,4-dinitrophenol, and hydroquinone by reductions in initial levels of bioluminescence on exposure to the toxicant. The decrease in bioluminescence was more severe with increasing toxicant concentration. Bioluminescence did not decrease in response to ethanol concentrations up to 1,000 mg/L or to pH conditions between 6.1 and 7.9. A continuous toxicity monitoring system using this bioreporter was developed for influent wastewater and tested with hydroquinone. The reporter exhibited a rapid and proportional decrease in bioluminescence in response to increasing hydroquinone concentrations.

  3. Ratiometric bioluminescence indicators for monitoring cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate in live cells based on luciferase-fragment complementation.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Masaki; Nagaoka, Yasutaka; Yamada, Toshimichi; Takakura, Hideo; Ozawa, Takeaki

    2010-11-15

    Bioluminescent indicators for cyclic 3',5'-monophosphate AMP (cAMP) are powerful tools for noninvasive detection with high sensitivity. However, the absolute photon counts are affected substantially by adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) and d-luciferin concentrations, limiting temporal analysis in live cells. This report describes a genetically encoded bioluminescent indicator for detecting intracellular cAMP based on complementation of split fragments of two-color luciferase mutants originated from click beetles. A cAMP binding domain of protein kinase A was connected with an engineered carboxy-terminal fragment of luciferase, of which ends were connected with amino-terminal fragments of green luciferase and red luciferase. We demonstrated that the ratio of green to red bioluminescence intensities was less influenced by the changes of ATP and d-luciferin concentrations. We also showed an applicability of the bioluminescent indicator for time-course and quantitative assessments of intracellular cAMP in living cells and mice. The bioluminescent indicator will enable quantitative analysis and imaging of spatiotemporal dynamics of cAMP in opaque and autofluorescent living subjects.

  4. Posttranslationally caused bioluminescence burst of the Escherichia coli luciferase reporter strain.

    PubMed

    Ideguchi, Yamato; Oshikoshi, Yuta; Ryo, Masashi; Motoki, Shogo; Kuwano, Takashi; Tezuka, Takafumi; Aoki, Setsuyuki

    2016-01-01

    We continuously monitored bioluminescence from a wild-type reporter strain of Escherichia coli (lacp::luc+/WT), which carries the promoter of the lac operon (lacp) fused with the firefly luciferase gene (luc+). This strain showed a bioluminescence burst when shifted into the stationary growth phase. Bioluminescence profiles of other wild-type reporter strains (rpsPp::luc+ and argAp::luc+) and gene-deletion reporter strains (lacp::luc+/crp- and lacp::luc+/lacI-) indicate that transcriptional regulation is not responsible for generation of the burst. Consistently, changes in the luciferase protein levels did not recapitulate the profile of the burst. On the other hand, dissolved oxygen levels increased over the period across the burst, suggesting that the burst is, at least partially, caused by an increase in intracellular oxygen levels. We discuss limits of the firefly luciferase when used as a reporter for gene expression and its potential utility for monitoring metabolic changes in cells.

  5. Kinetic study of trichloroethylene and toluene degradation by a bioluminescent reporter bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, C.J.; Sanseverino, J.; Bienkowski, P.R.; Sayler, G.S.

    1995-12-31

    A constructed bioluminescent reporter bacterium, Pseudomonas putida B2, is very briefly described in this paper. The bacterium degrades toluene and trichloroethylene (TCE), and produces light in the presence of toluene. The light response is an indication of cellular viability and expression of the genes encoding toluene and TCE degrading enzymes.

  6. Construction of a novel bioluminescent reporter system for investigating Shiga toxin expression of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takeshi; Ohta, Yuko; Tsutsuki, Hiroyasu; Noda, Masatoshi

    2011-06-01

    A novel chromosome-plasmid hybrid bioluminescent reporter system (C-P reporter system) utilizing Photorhabdus luminescens luxCDABE genes has been constructed to monitor the expression of Shiga toxin 1 (Stx1) and Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2) in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) in real time. The luxCDABE genes of P. luminescens have been cloned and divided into a luxCDAB cassette and a luxE gene. A promoter-less luxE gene introduced downstream from stx1 and from stx2 on EHEC chromosomes in single copies, and other luxCDAB genes were expressed on a multicopy number expression plasmid into the same cells. These Stx1- and Stx2-bioluminescent reporter strains expressed bioluminescence into bacteria cells when the expression of the promoter-less luxE gene was expressed in response to the promoter activity of stx1 and stx2, respectively. The expression levels of bioluminescence were identical to the production levels of Stx1 and Stx2 in the Stx1- and Stx2-bioluminescent reporter strains, and these strains produced both Stxs at the same respective levels as those of the parent EHEC strains. Using these reporter strains, we examined the profiles of Stx1 and Stx2 expression in EHEC. We found that production of both Stx1 and Stx2 in EHEC was enhanced upon contact with intestinal epithelial cells and within macrophages. However, the expression profiles between Stx1 and Stx2 in EHEC were different from each other under these conditions. Thus, these results suggested that this C-P reporter system is useful for determining the gene expression profile of bacteria.

  7. An improved bioluminescence-based signaling assay for odor sensing with a yeast expressing a chimeric olfactory receptor.

    PubMed

    Fukutani, Yosuke; Ishii, Jun; Noguchi, Keiichi; Kondo, Akihiko; Yohda, Masafumi

    2012-12-01

    The goal of this work was to improve the bioluminescence-based signaling assay system to create a practical application of a biomimetic odor sensor using an engineered yeast-expressing olfactory receptors (ORs). Using the yeast endogenous pheromone receptor (Ste2p) as a model GPCR, we determined the suitable promoters for the firefly luciferase (luc) reporter and GPCR genes. Additionally, we deleted some genes to further improve the sensitivity of the luc reporter assay. By replacing the endogenous yeast G-protein α-subunit (Gpa1p) with the olfactory-specific Gα(olf), the optimized yeast strain successfully transduced signal through both OR and yeast Ste2p. Our results will assist the development of a bioluminescence-based odor-sensing system using OR-expressing yeast.

  8. Construction of mobilizable mini-Tn7 vectors for bioluminescent detection of gram-negative bacteria and single-copy promoter lux reporter analysis.

    PubMed

    Damron, F Heath; McKenney, Elizabeth S; Barbier, Mariette; Liechti, George W; Schweizer, Herbert P; Goldberg, Joanna B

    2013-07-01

    We describe the construction of mini-Tn7-based broad-host-range vectors encoding lux genes as bioluminescent reporters. These constructs can be mobilized into the desired host(s) by conjugation for chromosomal mini-Tn7-lux integration and are useful for localization of bacteria during infections or for characterizing regulation of promoters of interest in Gram-negative bacteria.

  9. Rapid identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of Yersinia pestis using bioluminescent reporter phage.

    PubMed

    Schofield, David A; Molineux, Ian J; Westwater, Caroline

    2012-08-01

    The rapid identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of Yersinia pestis is paramount for a positive prognosis. We previously engineered a Y. pestis-specific 'bioluminescent' reporter phage for the identification of Y. pestis. In this study, we generated an improved reporter phage and evaluated the ability of this phage to provide direct and rapid susceptibility testing. Compared to the first generation reporter, the second generation reporter exhibited a 100-fold increase in signal strength, leading to a 10-fold increase in assay sensitivity. Y. pestis antimicrobial testing in the presence of the reporter elicited bioluminescent signals that were drug concentration-dependent, and produced susceptibility profiles that mirrored the standard CLSI method. The phage-generated susceptibility profiles, however, were obtained within hours in contrast to days with the conventional method.

  10. Temperature-modulated bioluminescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ge; Shen, Haiou; Cong, Wenxiang; Zhao, Shan; Wei, Guo Wei

    2006-08-01

    It was recently reported that bioluminescent spectra can be significantly affected by temperature, which we recognize as a major opportunity to overcome the inherent illposedness of bioluminescence tomography (BLT). In this paper, we propose temperature-modulated bioluminescence tomography (TBT) to utilize the temperature dependence of bioluminescence for superior BLT performance. Specifically, we employ a focused ultrasound array to heat small volumes of interest (VOI) one at a time, and induce a detectable change in the optical signal on the body surface of a mouse. Based on this type of information, the BLT reconstruction can be stabilized and improved. Our numerical experiments clearly demonstrate the merits of our TBT with either noise-free or noisy datasets. Also, this idea is applicable in 2D bioluminescence imaging and computational optical biopsy (COB). We believe that our approach and technology represents a major step forward in the field of BLT, and has an important and immediate applicability in bioluminescence imaging of small animals in general.

  11. Development of a novel, bioluminescence-based, fungal bioassay for toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Weitz, Hedda J; Campbell, Colin D; Killham, Ken

    2002-07-01

    Naturally bioluminescent fungi, Armillaria mellea and Mycena citricolor, were used to develop a novel, bioluminescence-based bioassay for toxicity testing. Bioassays were carried out to assess the toxicity of 3,5-dichlorophenol (3,5-DCP), pentachlorophenol (PCP), copper and zinc. The results suggested that 60 min was a suitable exposure time for the bioassay. Light reduction was observed in response to 3,5-DCP, PCP and Cu for both A. mellea and M. citricolor, but to Zn only for A. mellea. Armillaria mellea was significantly less sensitive to 3,5-DCP and PCP than M. citricolor. The EC50 values for A. mellea and M. citricolor were similar to EC50 values for 3,5-DCP, PCP and Cu (but not Zn) of bioluminescence-based bacterial biosensors. They were also similar to EC50 values for Cu and Zn of a bioluminescence-based yeast biosensor. The results highlighted the importance of using both prokaryotic and eukaryotic biosensors. The novel bioassay provides a rapid and sensitive method to assess bioavailability of pollutants as well as a method to determine their toxicity to filamentous fungi. It also expands the range of organisms that can be used for bioluminescence-based toxicity testing by complementing existing biosensors.

  12. Monitoring cell-autonomous circadian clock rhythms of gene expression using luciferase bioluminescence reporters.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Chidambaram; Khan, Sanjoy K; Kathale, Nimish D; Xu, Haiyan; Liu, Andrew C

    2012-09-27

    In mammals, many aspects of behavior and physiology such as sleep-wake cycles and liver metabolism are regulated by endogenous circadian clocks (reviewed). The circadian time-keeping system is a hierarchical multi-oscillator network, with the central clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) synchronizing and coordinating extra-SCN and peripheral clocks elsewhere. Individual cells are the functional units for generation and maintenance of circadian rhythms, and these oscillators of different tissue types in the organism share a remarkably similar biochemical negative feedback mechanism. However, due to interactions at the neuronal network level in the SCN and through rhythmic, systemic cues at the organismal level, circadian rhythms at the organismal level are not necessarily cell-autonomous. Compared to traditional studies of locomotor activity in vivo and SCN explants ex vivo, cell-based in vitro assays allow for discovery of cell-autonomous circadian defects. Strategically, cell-based models are more experimentally tractable for phenotypic characterization and rapid discovery of basic clock mechanisms. Because circadian rhythms are dynamic, longitudinal measurements with high temporal resolution are needed to assess clock function. In recent years, real-time bioluminescence recording using firefly luciferase as a reporter has become a common technique for studying circadian rhythms in mammals, as it allows for examination of the persistence and dynamics of molecular rhythms. To monitor cell-autonomous circadian rhythms of gene expression, luciferase reporters can be introduced into cells via transient transfection or stable transduction. Here we describe a stable transduction protocol using lentivirus-mediated gene delivery. The lentiviral vector system is superior to traditional methods such as transient transfection and germline transmission because of its efficiency and versatility: it permits efficient delivery and stable integration into the host

  13. Exploiting NanoLuc luciferase for smartphone-based bioluminescence cell biosensor for (anti)-inflammatory activity and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Cevenini, Luca; Calabretta, Maria Maddalena; Lopreside, Antonia; Tarantino, Giuseppe; Tassoni, Annalisa; Ferri, Maura; Roda, Aldo; Michelini, Elisa

    2016-12-01

    The availability of smartphones with high-performance digital image sensors and processing power has completely reshaped the landscape of point-of-need analysis. Thanks to the high maturity level of reporter gene technology and the availability of several bioluminescent proteins with improved features, we were able to develop a bioluminescence smartphone-based biosensing platform exploiting the highly sensitive NanoLuc luciferase as reporter. A 3D-printed smartphone-integrated cell biosensor based on genetically engineered Hek293T cells was developed. Quantitative assessment of (anti)-inflammatory activity and toxicity of liquid samples was performed with a simple and rapid add-and-measure procedure. White grape pomace extracts, known to contain several bioactive compounds, were analyzed, confirming the suitability of the smartphone biosensing platform for analysis of untreated complex biological matrices. Such approach could meet the needs of small medium enterprises lacking fully equipped laboratories for first-level safety tests and rapid screening of new bioactive products. Graphical abstract Smartphone-based bioluminescence cell biosensor.

  14. Development of an engineered bioluminescent reporter phage for detection of bacterial blight of crucifers.

    PubMed

    Schofield, David A; Bull, Carolee T; Rubio, Isael; Wechter, W Patrick; Westwater, Caroline; Molineux, Ian J

    2012-05-01

    Bacterial blight, caused by the phytopathogen Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis, is an emerging disease afflicting important members of the Brassicaceae family. The disease is often misdiagnosed as pepper spot, a much less severe disease caused by the related pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola. We have developed a phage-based diagnostic that can both identify and detect the causative agent of bacterial blight and differentiate the two pathogens. A recombinant "light"-tagged reporter phage was generated by integrating bacterial luxAB genes encoding luciferase into the genome of P. cannabina pv. alisalensis phage PBSPCA1. The PBSPCA1::luxAB reporter phage is viable and stable and retains properties similar to those of the wild-type phage. PBSPCA1::luxAB rapidly and sensitively detects P. cannabina pv. alisalensis by conferring a bioluminescent signal response to cultured cells. Detection is dependent on cell viability. Other bacterial pathogens of Brassica species such as P. syringae pv. maculicola, Pseudomonas marginalis, Pectobacterium carotovorum, Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, and X. campestris pv. raphani either do not produce a response or produce significantly attenuated signals with the reporter phage. Importantly, the reporter phage detects P. cannabina pv. alisalensis on diseased plant specimens, indicating its potential for disease diagnosis.

  15. PCR-based detection of bioluminescent microbial populations in Tyrrhenian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentile, Gabriela; De Luca, Massimo; Denaro, Renata; La Cono, Violetta; Smedile, Francesco; Scarfì, Simona; De Domenico, Emilio; De Domenico, Maria; Yakimov, Michail M.

    2009-05-01

    The present study is focused on the development of a cultivation-independent molecular approach for specific detection of bioluminescent bacteria within microbial communities by direct amplification of luxA gene from environmental DNA. A new set of primers, specifically targeting free-living bioluminescent bacteria, was designed on the base of l uxA sequences available from the public database. Meso- and bathypelagic seawater samples were collected from two stations in Tyrrhenian Sea at the depths of 500 and 2750 m. The same seawater samples also were used to isolate bioluminescent bacteria that were further subjected to luxA and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. PCR products obtained by amplification with designed primers were cloned, and the phylogenetic affiliation of 40 clones was determined. All of them were clustered into three groups, only distantly related to the Photobacterium phosphoreum and Photobacterium kishitanii clades. The half of all clones formed a tight monophyletic clade, while the rest of clones were organized in "compartment"-specific, meso- and bathypelagic ecotypes. No matches with luxA gene sequences of four bioluminescent strains, isolated from the same seawater samples, were observed. These findings indicate that the PCR-based approach developed in present manuscript, allowed us to detect the novel, "yet to be cultivated" lineages of bioluminescent bacteria, which are likely specific for distinct warm bathypelagic realms of Mediterranean Sea.

  16. Quick preparation of nanoluciferase-based tracers for novel bioluminescent receptor-binding assays of protein hormones: Using erythropoietin as a model.

    PubMed

    Song, Ge; Wu, Qing-Ping; Xu, Ting; Liu, Ya-Li; Xu, Zeng-Guang; Zhang, Shi-Fu; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2015-12-01

    Nanoluciferase (NanoLuc) is a newly developed small luciferase reporter with the so far brightest bioluminescence. In recent studies, we developed NanoLuc as an ultrasensitive probe for novel bioluminescent receptor-binding assays of some protein/peptide hormones. In the present study, we proposed a simple method for quick preparation of the NanoLuc-based protein tracers using erythropoietin (Epo) as a model. Epo is a glycosylated cytokine that promotes erythropoiesis by binding and activating the cell membrane receptor EpoR. For quick preparation of a bioluminescent Epo tracer, an Epo-Luc fusion protein carrying a NanoLuc-6 × His-tag at the C-terminus was secretorily overexpressed in transiently transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 T cells. The Epo-Luc fusion protein retained high-binding affinities with EpoR either overexpressed in HEK293T cells or endogenously expressed in mouse erythroleukemia cells, representing a novel ultrasensitive bioluminescent tracer for non-radioactive receptor-binding assays. Sufficient Epo-Luc tracer for thousands of assays could be quickly obtained within 2 days through simple transient transfection. Thus, our present work provided a simple method for quick preparation of novel NanoLuc-based bioluminescent tracers for Epo and some other protein hormones to facilitate their ligand-receptor interaction studies.

  17. Specific and quantitative assessment of naphthalene and salicylate bioavailability by using a bioluminescent catabolic reporter bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Heitzer, A.; Thonnard, J.E.; Sayler, G.S.; Webb, O.F. )

    1992-06-01

    A bioassay was developed and standardized for the rapid, specific, and quantitative assessment of naphthalene and salicylate bioavailability by use of bioluminescence monitoring of catabolic gene expression. The bioluminescent reporter strain Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44, which carries a transcriptional nahG-luxCDABE fusion for naphthalene and salicylate catabolism, was used. The physiological state of the reporter cultures as well as the intrinsic regulatory properties of the naphthalene degradation operon must be taken into account to obtain a high specificity at low target substrate concentrations. Experiments have shown that the use of exponentially growing reporter cultures has advantages over the use of carbon-starved, resting cultures. In aqueous solutions for both substrates, naphthalene and salicylate, linear relationships between initial substrate concentration and bioluminescence response were found over concentration ranges of 1 to 2 orders of magnitude. Naphthalene could be detected at a concentration of 45 ppb. Studies conducted under defined conditions with extracts and slurries of experimentally contaminated sterile soils and identical uncontaminated soil controls demonstrated that this method can be used for specific and quantitative estimations of target pollutant presence and bioavailability in soil extracts and for specific and qualitative estimations of napthalene in soil slurries.

  18. Specific and Quantitative Assessment of Naphthalene and Salicylate Bioavailability by Using a Bioluminescent Catabolic Reporter Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Heitzer, Armin; Webb, Oren F.; Thonnard, Janeen E.; Sayler, Gary S.

    1992-01-01

    A bioassay was developed and standardized for the rapid, specific, and quantitative assessment of naphthalene and salicylate bioavailability by use of bioluminescence monitoring of catabolic gene expression. The bioluminescent reporter strain Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44, which carries a transcriptional nahG-luxCDABE fusion for naphthalene and salicylate catabolism, was used. The physiological state of the reporter cultures as well as the intrinsic regulatory properties of the naphthalene degradation operon must be taken into account to obtain a high specificity at low target substrate concentrations. Experiments have shown that the use of exponentially growing reporter cultures has advantages over the use of carbon-starved, resting cultures. In aqueous solutions for both substrates, naphthalene and salicylate, linear relationships between initial substrate concentration and bioluminescence response were found over concentration ranges of 1 to 2 orders of magnitude. Naphthalene could be detected at a concentration of 45 ppb. Studies conducted under defined conditions with extracts and slurries of experimentally contaminated sterile soils and identical uncontaminated soil controls demonstrated that this method can be used for specific and quantitative estimations of target pollutant presence and bioavailability in soil extracts and for specific and qualitative estimations of napthalene in soil slurries. PMID:16348717

  19. Iterative method for bioluminescence tomography based on the radiative transport equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2006-08-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) is a new molecular imaging modality, which helps study cancer and other diseases, develop drugs, and so on. This technology localizes and quantifies a bioluminescent source inside a living transgenic mouse, and is very useful in many biomedical applications. In this paper, we propose a novel algorithm based on the radiative transport equation to reconstruct the bioluminescence source distribution from data measured on the external surface of a mouse. Our approach transforms the transport equation into an integral equation of the second kind, and establishes a linear system to link the measured photon fluence rate with the unknown light source variables. A regularization measure is taken to overcome the ill-posedness of the inverse problem. Then, an iterative optimization technique with a simple constrain is employed to compute the desirable solution. The physical phantom experiments have been performed to demonstrate the feasibility of the reconstruction method, and evaluate its performance in terms of source location and power estimation.

  20. Mechanosensitivity of a Rapid Bioluminescence Reporter System Assessed by Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tesson, Benoit; Latz, Michael I.

    2015-01-01

    Cells are sophisticated integrators of mechanical stimuli that lead to physiological, biochemical, and genetic responses. The bioluminescence of dinoflagellates, alveolate protists that use light emission for predator defense, serves as a rapid noninvasive whole-cell reporter of mechanosensitivity. In this study, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to explore the relationship between cell mechanical properties and mechanosensitivity in live cells of the dinoflagellate Pyrocystis lunula. Cell stiffness was 0.56 MPa, consistent with cells possessing a cell wall. Cell response depended on both the magnitude and velocity of the applied force. At the maximum stimulation velocity of 390 μm s−1, the threshold response occurred at a force of 7.2 μN, resulting in a contact time of 6.1 ms and indentation of 2.1 μm. Cells did not respond to a low stimulation velocity of 20 μm s−1, indicating a velocity dependent response that, based on stress relaxation experiments, was explained by the cell viscoelastic properties. This study demonstrates the use of AFM to study mechanosensitivity in a cell system that responds at fast timescales, and provides insights into how viscoelastic properties affect mechanosensitivity. It also provides a comparison with previous studies using hydrodynamic stimulation, showing the discrepancy in cell response between direct compressive forces using AFM and those within flow fields based on average flow properties. PMID:25809248

  1. An enhanced chimeric firefly luciferase-inspired enzyme for ATP detection and bioluminescence reporter and imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Branchini, Bruce R; Southworth, Tara L; Fontaine, Danielle M; Kohrt, Dawn; Talukder, Munya; Michelini, Elisa; Cevenini, Luca; Roda, Aldo; Grossel, Martha J

    2015-09-01

    Firefly luciferases, which emit visible light in a highly specific ATP-dependent process, have been adapted for a variety of applications, including gene reporter assays, whole-cell biosensor measurements, and in vivo imaging. We previously reported the approximately 2-fold enhanced activity and 1.4-fold greater bioluminescence quantum yield properties of a chimeric enzyme that contains the N-domain of Photinus pyralis luciferase joined to the C-domain of Luciola italica luciferase. Subsequently, we identified 5 amino acid changes based on L. italica that are the main determinants of the improved bioluminescence properties. Further engineering to enhance thermal and pH stability produced a novel luciferase called PLG2. We present here a systematic comparison of the spectral and physical properties of the new protein with P. pyralis luciferase and demonstrate the potential of PLG2 for use in assays based on the detection of femtomole levels of ATP. In addition, we compared the performance of a mammalian codon-optimized version of the cDNA for PLG2 with the luc2 gene in HEK293T cells. Using an optimized low-cost assay system, PLG2 activity can be monitored in mammalian cell lysates and living cells with 4.4-fold and approximately 3.0-fold greater sensitivity, respectively. PLG2 could be an improved alternative to Promega's luc2 for reporter and imaging applications.

  2. Three-dimensional multi bioluminescent sources reconstruction based on adaptive finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xibo; Tian, Jie; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Xing; Xue, Zhenwen; Dong, Di; Han, Dong

    2011-03-01

    Among many optical molecular imaging modalities, bioluminescence imaging (BLI) has more and more wide application in tumor detection and evaluation of pharmacodynamics, toxicity, pharmacokinetics because of its noninvasive molecular and cellular level detection ability, high sensitivity and low cost in comparison with other imaging technologies. However, BLI can not present the accurate location and intensity of the inner bioluminescence sources such as in the bone, liver or lung etc. Bioluminescent tomography (BLT) shows its advantage in determining the bioluminescence source distribution inside a small animal or phantom. Considering the deficiency of two-dimensional imaging modality, we developed three-dimensional tomography to reconstruct the information of the bioluminescence source distribution in transgenic mOC-Luc mice bone with the boundary measured data. In this paper, to study the osteocalcin (OC) accumulation in transgenic mOC-Luc mice bone, a BLT reconstruction method based on multilevel adaptive finite element (FEM) algorithm was used for localizing and quantifying multi bioluminescence sources. Optical and anatomical information of the tissues are incorporated as a priori knowledge in this method, which can reduce the ill-posedness of BLT. The data was acquired by the dual modality BLT and Micro CT prototype system that was developed by us. Through temperature control and absolute intensity calibration, a relative accurate intensity can be calculated. The location of the OC accumulation was reconstructed, which was coherent with the principle of bone differentiation. This result also was testified by ex vivo experiment in the black 96-plate well using the BLI system and the chemiluminescence apparatus.

  3. Novel Bioluminescent Activatable Reporter for Src Tyrosine Kinase Activity in Living Mice

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Weibing; Li, Dezhi; Chen, Liang; Xia, Hongwei; Tang, Qiulin; Chen, Baoqin; Gong, Qiyong; Gao, Fabao; Bi, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the Src kinase is implicated in the development of a variety of human malignancies. However, it is almost impossible to monitor Src activity in an in vivo setting with current biochemical techniques. To facilitate the noninvasive investigation of the activity of Src kinase both in vitro and in vivo, we developed a genetically engineered, activatable bioluminescent reporter using split-luciferase complementation. The bioluminescence of this reporter can be used as a surrogate for Src activity in real time. This hybrid luciferase reporter was constructed by sandwiching a Src-dependent conformationally responsive unit (SH2 domain-Srcpep) between the split luciferase fragments. The complementation bioluminescence of this reporter was dependent on the Src activity status. In our study, Src kinase activity in cultured cells and tumor xenografts was monitored quantitatively and dynamically in response to clinical small-molecular kinase inhibitors, dasatinib and saracatinib. This system was also applied for high-throughput screening of Src inhibitors against a kinase inhibitor library in living cells. These results provide unique insights into drug development and pharmacokinetics/phoarmocodynamics of therapeutic drugs targeting Src signaling pathway enabling the optimization of drug administration schedules for maximum benefit. Using both Firefly and Renilla luciferase imaging, we have successfully monitored Src tyrosine kinase activity and Akt serine/threonine kinase activity concurrently in one tumor xenograft. This dual luciferase reporter imaging system will be helpful in exploring the complex signaling networks in vivo. The strategies reported here can also be extended to study and image other important kinases and the cross-talks among them. PMID:26941850

  4. Luminol-based bioluminescence imaging of mouse mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Alshetaiwi, Hamad S; Balivada, Sivasai; Shrestha, Tej B; Pyle, Marla; Basel, Matthew T; Bossmann, Stefan H; Troyer, Deryl L

    2013-10-05

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are the most abundant circulating blood leukocytes. They are part of the innate immune system and provide a first line of defense by migrating toward areas of inflammation in response to chemical signals released from the site. Some solid tumors, such as breast cancer, also cause recruitment and activation of PMNs and release of myeloperoxidase. In this study, we demonstrate that administration of luminol to mice that have been transplanted with 4T1 mammary tumor cells permits the detection of myeloperoxidase activity, and consequently, the location of the tumor. Luminol allowed detection of activated PMNs only two days after cancer cell transplantation, even though tumors were not yet palpable. In conclusion, luminol-bioluminescence imaging (BLI) can provide a pathway towards detection of solid tumors at an early stage in preclinical tumor models.

  5. Bioengineered bioluminescent magnetotactic bacteria as a powerful tool for chip-based whole-cell biosensors.

    PubMed

    Roda, Aldo; Cevenini, Luca; Borg, Sarah; Michelini, Elisa; Calabretta, Maria Maddalena; Schüler, Dirk

    2013-12-21

    This paper describes the generation of genetically engineered bioluminescent magnetotactic bacteria (BL-MTB) and their integration into a microfluidic analytical device to create a portable toxicity detection system. Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense strain MSR-1 was bioengineered to constitutively express a red-emitting click beetle luciferase whose bioluminescent signal is directly proportional to bacterial viability. The magnetic properties of these bacteria have been exploited as "natural actuators" to transfer the cells in the chip from the reaction to the detection area, optimizing the chip's analytical performance. A robust and cost-effective biosensor for the evaluation of sample toxicity, named MAGNETOX, based on lens-free contact imaging detection, has been developed. A microfluidic chip has been fabricated using multilayered black and transparent polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) in which BL-MTB are incubated for 30 min with the sample, then moved by microfluidics, trapped, and concentrated in detection chambers by an array of neodymium-iron-boron magnets. The chip is placed in contact with a cooled CCD via a fiber optic taper to perform quantitative bioluminescence imaging after addition of luciferin substrate. A model toxic compound (dimethyl sulfoxide, DMSO) and a bile acid (taurochenodeoxycholic acid, TCDCA) were used to investigate the analytical performance of the MAGNETOX. Incubation with DMSO and TCDCA drastically reduces the bioluminescent signal in a dose-related manner. The generation of bacteria that are both magnetic and bioluminescent combines the advantages of easy 2D cell handling with ultra sensitive detection, offering undoubted potential to develop cell-based biosensors integrated into microfluidic chips.

  6. 'Bioluminescent' reporter phage for the detection of Category A bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Schofield, David A; Molineux, Ian J; Westwater, Caroline

    2011-07-08

    Yersinia pestis and Bacillus anthracis are Category A bacterial pathogens that are the causative agents of the plague and anthrax, respectively. Although the natural occurrence of both diseases' is now relatively rare, the possibility of terrorist groups using these pathogens as a bioweapon is real. Because of the disease's inherent communicability, rapid clinical course, and high mortality rate, it is critical that an outbreak be detected quickly. Therefore methodologies that provide rapid detection and diagnosis are essential to ensure immediate implementation of public health measures and activation of crisis management. Recombinant reporter phage may provide a rapid and specific approach for the detection of Y. pestis and B. anthracis. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention currently use the classical phage lysis assays for the confirmed identification of these bacterial pathogens. These assays take advantage of naturally occurring phage which are specific and lytic for their bacterial hosts. After overnight growth of the cultivated bacterium in the presence of the specific phage, the formation of plaques (bacterial lysis) provides a positive identification of the bacterial target. Although these assays are robust, they suffer from three shortcomings: 1) they are laboratory based; 2) they require bacterial isolation and cultivation from the suspected sample, and 3) they take 24-36 h to complete. To address these issues, recombinant "light-tagged" reporter phage were genetically engineered by integrating the Vibrio harveyi luxAB genes into the genome of Y. pestis and B. anthracis specific phage. The resulting luxAB reporter phage were able to detect their specific target by rapidly (within minutes) and sensitively conferring a bioluminescent phenotype to recipient cells. Importantly, detection was obtained either with cultivated recipient cells or with mock-infected clinical specimens. For demonstration purposes, here we describe the method for the phage

  7. A bioluminescence reporter mouse that monitors expression of constitutively active β-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Kommagani, Ramakrishna; Peavey, Mary C.; Hai, Lan; Lonard, David M.; Lydon, John P.

    2017-01-01

    This short technical report describes the generation and characterization of a bioluminescence reporter mouse that is engineered to detect and longitudinally monitor the expression of doxycycline-induced constitutively active β-catenin. The new responder transgenic mouse contains the TetO-ΔN89β-CatTMILA transgene, which consists of the tet-operator followed by a bicistronic sequence encoding a stabilized form of active β-catenin (ΔN89β-catenin), an internal ribosome entry site, and the firefly luciferase gene. To confirm that the transgene operates as designed, TetO-ΔN89β-CatTMILA transgenic mouse lines were crossed with an effector mouse that harbors the mouse mammary tumor virus-reverse tetracycline transactivator (MMTV-rtTA) transgene (termed MTB hereon), which primarily targets rtTA expression to the mammary epithelium. Following doxycycline administration, the resultant MTB/CatTMILA bigenic reporter exhibited precocious lobuloalveologenesis, ductal hyperplasia, and mammary adenocarcinomas, which were visualized and monitored by in vivo bioluminescence detection. Therefore, we predict that the TetO-ΔN89β-CatTMILA transgenic responder mouse—when crossed with the appropriate effector transgenic—will have wide-applicability to non-invasively monitor the influence of constitutively active β-catenin expression on cell-fate specification, proliferation, differentiation, and neoplastic transformation in a broad spectrum of target tissues. PMID:28253313

  8. Rapid identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of Yersinia pestis using bioluminescent reporter phage

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, David A.; Molineux, Ian J.; Westwater, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    The rapid identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of Yersinia pestis is paramount for a positive prognosis. We previously engineered a Y. pestis-specific ‘bioluminescent’ reporter phage for the identification of Y. pestis. In this study, we generated an improved reporter phage and evaluated the ability of this phage to provide direct and rapid susceptibility testing. Compared to the first generation reporter, the second generation reporter exhibited a 100-fold increase in signal strength, leading to a 10-fold increase in assay sensitivity. Y. pestis antimicrobial testing in the presence of the reporter elicited bioluminescent signals that were drug concentration-dependent, and produced susceptibility profiles that mirrored the standard CLSI method. The phage-generated susceptibility profiles, however, were obtained within hours in contrast to days with the conventional method. PMID:22579583

  9. Bacillus anthracis diagnostic detection and rapid antibiotic susceptibility determination using 'bioluminescent' reporter phage.

    PubMed

    Schofield, David A; Sharp, Natasha J; Vandamm, Joshua; Molineux, Ian J; Spreng, Krista A; Rajanna, Chythanya; Westwater, Caroline; Stewart, George C

    2013-11-01

    Genetically modified phages have the potential to detect pathogenic bacteria from clinical, environmental, or food-related sources. Herein we assess an engineered 'bioluminescent' reporter phage (Wß::luxAB) as a clinical diagnostic tool for Bacillus anthracis, the etiological agent of anthrax. Wß::luxAB is able to rapidly (within minutes) detect a panel of B. anthracis strains by transducing a bioluminescent phenotype. The reporter phage displays species specificity by its inability, or significantly reduced ability, to detect members of the closely related Bacillus cereus group and other common bacterial pathogens. Using spiked clinical specimens, Wß::luxAB detects B. anthracis within 5 h at clinically relevant concentrations, and provides antibiotic susceptibility information that mirrors the CLSI method, except that data are obtained at least 5-fold faster. Although anthrax is a treatable disease, a positive patient prognosis is dependent on timely diagnosis and appropriate therapy. Wß::luxAB rapidly detects B. anthracis and determines antibiotic efficacy, properties that will help patient outcome.

  10. Performance of PCR-based and Bioluminescent assays for mycoplasma detection.

    PubMed

    Falagan-Lotsch, Priscila; Lopes, Talíria Silva; Ferreira, Nívea; Balthazar, Nathália; Monteiro, Antônio M; Borojevic, Radovan; Granjeiro, José Mauro

    2015-11-01

    Contaminated eukaryotic cell cultures are frequently responsible for unreliable results. Regulatory entities request that cell cultures must be mycoplasma-free. Mycoplasma contamination remains a significant problem for cell cultures and may have an impact on biological analysis since they affect many cell parameters. The gold standard microbiological assay for mycoplasma detection involves laborious and time-consuming protocols. PCR-based and Bioluminescent assays have been considered for routine cell culture screening in research laboratories since they are fast, easy and sensitive. Thus, the aim of this work is to compare the performance of two popular commercial assays, PCR-based and Bioluminescent assays, by assessing the level of mycoplasma contamination in cell cultures from Rio de Janeiro Cell Bank (RJCB) and also from customers' laboratories. The results obtained by both performed assays were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. In addition, we evaluated the limit of detection of the PCR kit under our laboratory conditions and the storage effects on mycoplasma detection in frozen cell culture supernatants. The performance of both assays for mycoplasma detection was not significantly different and they showed very good agreement. The Bioluminescent assay for mycoplasma detection was slightly more dependable than PCR-based due to the lack of inconclusive results produced by the first technique, especially considering the ability to detect mycoplasma contamination in frozen cell culture supernatants. However, cell lines should be precultured for four days or more without antibiotics to obtain safe results. On the other hand, a false negative result was obtained by using this biochemical approach. The implementation of fast and reliable mycoplasma testing methods is an important technical and regulatory issue and PCR-based and Bioluminescent assays may be good candidates. However, validation studies are needed.

  11. Hybrid light transport model based bioluminescence tomography reconstruction for early gastric cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xueli; Liang, Jimin; Hu, Hao; Qu, Xiaochao; Yang, Defu; Chen, Duofang; Zhu, Shouping; Tian, Jie

    2012-03-01

    Gastric cancer is the second cause of cancer-related death in the world, and it remains difficult to cure because it has been in late-stage once that is found. Early gastric cancer detection becomes an effective approach to decrease the gastric cancer mortality. Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has been applied to detect early liver cancer and prostate cancer metastasis. However, the gastric cancer commonly originates from the gastric mucosa and grows outwards. The bioluminescent light will pass through a non-scattering region constructed by gastric pouch when it transports in tissues. Thus, the current BLT reconstruction algorithms based on the approximation model of radiative transfer equation are not optimal to handle this problem. To address the gastric cancer specific problem, this paper presents a novel reconstruction algorithm that uses a hybrid light transport model to describe the bioluminescent light propagation in tissues. The radiosity theory integrated with the diffusion equation to form the hybrid light transport model is utilized to describe light propagation in the non-scattering region. After the finite element discretization, the hybrid light transport model is converted into a minimization problem which fuses an l1 norm based regularization term to reveal the sparsity of bioluminescent source distribution. The performance of the reconstruction algorithm is first demonstrated with a digital mouse based simulation with the reconstruction error less than 1mm. An in situ gastric cancer-bearing nude mouse based experiment is then conducted. The primary result reveals the ability of the novel BLT reconstruction algorithm in early gastric cancer detection.

  12. Development of a rapid optic bacteria detecting system based on ATP bioluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun Tao; Luo, JinPing; Liu, XiaoHong; Cai, XinXia

    2014-12-01

    A rapid optic bacteria detecting system based on the principle of Adenosine triphosphate(ATP) bioluminescence was presented in this paper. This system consisted of bioluminescence-based biosensor and the high-sensitivity optic meter. A photon counting photomultiplier tube (PMT) module was used to improve the detection sensitivity, and a NIOS II/f processor based on a Field Programmable Gate Array(FPGA) was used to control the system. In this work, Micrococcus luteus were chosen as the test sample. Several Micrococcus luteus suspension with different concentration was tested by both T2011 and plate counting method. By comparing the two group results, an calibration curve was obtained from the bioluminescence intensity for Micrococcus luteus in the range of 2.3×102 ~ 2.3×106 CFU/mL with a good correlation coefficient of 0.960. An impacting Air microorganism sampler was used to capture Airborne Bacteria, and 8 samples were collected in different place. The TBC results of 8 samples by T2011 were between 10 ~ 2×103 cfu/mL, consistent with that of plate counting method, which indicated that 8 samples were between 10 ~ 3×103 cfu/mL. For total airborne bacteria count was small, correlation coefficient was poor. Also no significant difference was found between T2011 and plate counting method by statistical analyses.

  13. Homogeneous assay for biotin based on Aequorea victoria bioluminescence resonance energy transfer system.

    PubMed

    Gorokhovatsky, Andrey Yu; Rudenko, Natalia V; Marchenkov, Victor V; Skosyrev, Vitaly S; Arzhanov, Maxim A; Burkhardt, Nils; Zakharov, Mikhail V; Semisotnov, Gennady V; Vinokurov, Leonid M; Alakhov, Yuli B

    2003-02-01

    Here we describe a homogeneous assay for biotin based on bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) between aequorin and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The fusions of aequorin with streptavidin (SAV) and EGFP with biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) were purified after expression of the corresponding genes in Escherichia coli cells. Association of SAV-aequorin and BCCP-EGFP fusions was followed by BRET between aequorin (donor) and EGFP (acceptor), resulting in significantly increasing 510 nm and decreasing 470 nm bioluminescence intensity. It was shown that free biotin inhibited BRET due to its competition with BCCP-EGFP for binding to SAV-aequorin. These properties were exploited to demonstrate competitive homogeneous BRET assay for biotin.

  14. [Quantitative specific detection of Staphylococcus aureus based on recombinant lysostaphin and ATP bioluminescence].

    PubMed

    Li, Yuyuan; Mi, Zhiqiang; An, Xiaoping; Zhou, Yusen; Tong, Yigang

    2014-08-01

    Quantitative specific detection of Staphylococcus aureus is based on recombinant lysostaphin and ATP bioluminescence. To produce recombinant lysostaphin, the lysostaphin gene was chemically synthesized and inserted it into prokaryotic expression vector pQE30, and the resulting expression plasmid pQE30-Lys was transformed into E. coli M15 for expressing lysostaphin with IPTG induction. The recombinant protein was purified by Ni(2+)-NTA affinity chromatography. Staphylococcus aureus was detected by the recombinant lysostaphin with ATP bioluminescence, and plate count method. The results of the two methods were compared. The recombinant lysostaphin was successfully expressed, and a method of quantitative specific detection of S. aureus has been established, which showed a significant linear correlation with the colony counting. The detection method developed has good perspective to quantify S. aureus.

  15. In vivo bioluminescence tomography based on multi-view projection and 3D surface reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuang; Wang, Kun; Leng, Chengcai; Deng, Kexin; Hu, Yifang; Tian, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) is a powerful optical molecular imaging modality, which enables non-invasive realtime in vivo imaging as well as 3D quantitative analysis in preclinical studies. In order to solve the inverse problem and reconstruct inner light sources accurately, the prior structural information is commonly necessary and obtained from computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. This strategy requires expensive hybrid imaging system, complicated operation protocol and possible involvement of ionizing radiation. The overall robustness highly depends on the fusion accuracy between the optical and structural information. In this study we present a pure optical bioluminescence tomographic system (POBTS) and a novel BLT method based on multi-view projection acquisition and 3D surface reconstruction. The POBTS acquired a sparse set of white light surface images and bioluminescent images of a mouse. Then the white light images were applied to an approximate surface model to generate a high quality textured 3D surface reconstruction of the mouse. After that we integrated multi-view luminescent images based on the previous reconstruction, and applied an algorithm to calibrate and quantify the surface luminescent flux in 3D.Finally, the internal bioluminescence source reconstruction was achieved with this prior information. A BALB/C mouse with breast tumor of 4T1-fLuc cells mouse model were used to evaluate the performance of the new system and technique. Compared with the conventional hybrid optical-CT approach using the same inverse reconstruction method, the reconstruction accuracy of this technique was improved. The distance error between the actual and reconstructed internal source was decreased by 0.184 mm.

  16. Study of effectiveness of bioluminescent reporter phage assay on Y. pseudotuberculosis strains.

    PubMed

    Mitiashvili, M R

    2013-05-01

    The method describes the phage-mediated transduction of a bioluminescent phenotype to cultivated Y. pseudotuberculosis cells which are subsequently measured using a microplate luminometer. Reporter phage assay is rapid detection technique and its efficiency is not affected by presence of contaminating bacteria, no sample preparation is needed and it has the ability to test multiple samples simultaneously in a 96-well microtiter plate format. Experiments were performed to develop the rapid detection technique for Y. pseudotuberculosis strains and study the ability of a reporter Yersinia phage to confer a bioluminescent signal to Y. pseudotuberculosis strains under different environmental conditions (media, temperature, bacterial number) for detection. Further, to determine if the Yersinia phage can detect Y. pseudotuberculosis in presence of other bacterial species. The results revealed that the developed reporter phage assay is not effective against wide range of Y. pseudotuberculosis. Y. pseudotuberculosis could be rapidly detected within 30 minutes at 28°C. The reporter phage assay could detect luminescence within 45 minutes when the bacterial cells were at the minimal concentration 105 cells/mL. The optimal detectable concentrations were 106-107 cells/mL at 28 and 37°C. The reporter phage assay could detect Y. pseudotuberculosis within 30 minutes in presence of other enteric bacteria without selective enrichment. It should be noted that the Yersinia reporter phage is specific to Yersinia pestis strains and it can be used to detect Y. pseudotuberculosis when samples exclude the existence of Y. pestis strains. In the presented study this aspect was foreseen.

  17. Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET)-Based Synthetic Sensor Platform for Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jongchan; Hong, Jason; Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma P

    2017-04-03

    Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) is a technique that analyzes protein-protein interactions (PPIs). The unique feature of BRET delineates that the resonance energy is generated by the resonance energy donor, Renilla luciferase by the oxidative decarboxylation of coelenterazine substrate. BRET is superior to FRET where issues such as autofluorescence, photobleaching, and light scattering can occur. Recently, BRET has been applied to design synthetic biosensors for monitoring autophagy in vivo and in vitro. Here, we report the methods for constructing a biosensor of human HsLC3a as a probe for autophagy biogenesis and the optimization of the intramolecular BRET assay that allows for high-throughput screening of chemical modulators of autophagy. User-friendly working interface with the BRET-based synthetic sensor of HsLC3a makes drug discovery easy and amenable for high-throughput. The BRET protocol described here could be easily applicable to generate other biosensors for monitoring PPIs by measurement of intermolecular BRET. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  18. Disposable bioluminescence-based biosensor for detection of bacterial count in food.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jinping; Liu, Xiaohong; Tian, Qing; Yue, Weiwei; Zeng, Jing; Chen, Guangquan; Cai, Xinxia

    2009-11-01

    A biosensor for rapid detection of bacterial count based on adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence has been developed. The biosensor is composed of a key sensitive element and a photomultiplier tube used as a detector element. The disposable sensitive element consists of a sampler, a cartridge where intracellular ATP is chemically extracted from bacteria, and a microtube where the extracted ATP reacts with the luciferin-luciferase reagent to produce bioluminescence. The bioluminescence signal is transformed into relevant electrical signal by the detector and further measured with a homemade luminometer. Parameters affecting the amount of the extracted ATP, including the types of ATP extractants, the concentrations of ATP extractant, and the relevant neutralizing reagent, were optimized. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the biosensor showed a linear response to standard bacteria in a concentration range from 10(3) to 10(8) colony-forming units (CFU) per milliliter with a correlation coefficient of 0.925 (n=22) within 5min. Moreover, the bacterial count of real food samples obtained by the biosensor correlated well with those by the conventional plate count method. The proposed biosensor, with characteristics of low cost, easy operation, and fast response, provides potential application to rapid evaluation of bacterial contamination in the food industry, environment monitoring, and other fields.

  19. Flow injection analysis with bioluminescence-based fiber-optic biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Loic J.; Gautier, Sabine; Coulet, Pierre R.

    1991-09-01

    Fiber optic biosensors based on the firefly and the bacterial bioluminescence reactions have been constructed and incorporated in a specially designed flow-cell for the sensitive determination of ATP and NADH, respectively. The bioluminescence enzymes were immobilized on preactivated polyamide membranes which were placed in close contact with the surface on one end of a glass-fiber bundle, the other end being connected to the photomultiplier tube of a luminometer. When using the continuous-flow device with the firefly luciferase or the bacterial system immobilized separately on different membranes, the detection limit for ATP and NADH were 0.25 and 2 pmol, respectively. The versatility of the fiber optic probe has been improved by co-immobilizing the bacterial bioluminescent system and the firefly luciferase on the same support enabling the use of a single sensor for the selective, specific, and alternate determination of these two analytes. Compatible reaction conditions preserving the activity of each co-immobilized enzyme without impairing its stability were found. The selection of the appropriate reaction medium was done using a four port valve. Alternate quantification of ATP and NADH could then be performed in the linear ranges 0.25 pmol - 3 nmol and 5 pmol - 1 nmol, respectively with a RSD of 4.0 - 4.5%.

  20. Evaluation of the ecotoxicity of pollutants with bioluminescent microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Piñas, Francisca; Rodea-Palomares, Ismael; Leganés, Francisco; González-Pleiter, Miguel; Angeles Muñoz-Martín, M

    2014-01-01

    This chapter deals with the use of bioluminescent microorganisms in environmental monitoring, particularly in the assessment of the ecotoxicity of pollutants. Toxicity bioassays based on bioluminescent microorganisms are an interesting complement to classical toxicity assays, providing easiness of use, rapid response, mass production, and cost effectiveness. A description of the characteristics and main environmental applications in ecotoxicity testing of naturally bioluminescent microorganisms, covering bacteria and eukaryotes such as fungi and dinoglagellates, is reported in this chapter. The main features and applications of a wide variety of recombinant bioluminescent microorganisms, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic, are also summarized and critically considered. Quantitative structure-activity relationship models and hormesis are two important concepts in ecotoxicology; bioluminescent microorganisms have played a pivotal role in their development. As pollutants usually occur in complex mixtures in the environment, the use of both natural and recombinant bioluminescent microorganisms to assess mixture toxicity has been discussed. The main information has been summarized in tables, allowing quick consultation of the variety of luminescent organisms, bioluminescence gene systems, commercially available bioluminescent tests, environmental applications, and relevant references.

  1. A measurement-based analytical approach to the bioluminescence tomography problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkol, Hakan; Demirkiran, Aytac; Kipergil, Esra-Aytac; Uluc, Nasire; Unlu, Mehmet B.

    2014-03-01

    This work presents an analytical approach for the solution of the tissue diffusion equation based on the bound- ary measurements. We consider a bioluminescent point source in both homogeneous and heterogeneous circular turbid media. The point source is described by the Dirac delta function. Analytical expressions for the strength and position of the point source are obtained introducing boundary measurements and then applying appropriate boundary conditions. In addition, numerical simulations are performed for the position of the source. Calculations show that that the analytical results are in a good accordance with the numerical results.

  2. Online monitoring of water toxicity by use of bioluminescent reporter bacterial biochips.

    PubMed

    Elad, Tal; Almog, Ronen; Yagur-Kroll, Sharon; Levkov, Klimentiy; Melamed, Sahar; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi; Belkin, Shimshon

    2011-10-01

    We describe a flow-through biosensor for online continuous water toxicity monitoring. At the heart of the device are disposable modular biochips incorporating agar-immobilized bioluminescent recombinant reporter bacteria, the responses of which are probed by single-photon avalanche diode detectors. To demonstrate the biosensor capabilities, we equipped it with biochips harboring both inducible and constitutive reporter strains and exposed it to a continuous water flow for up to 10 days. During these periods we challenged the biosensor with 2-h pulses of water spiked with model compounds representing different classes of potential water pollutants, as well as with a sample of industrial wastewater. The biosensor reporter panel detected all simulated contamination events within 0.5-2.5 h, and its response was indicative of the nature of the contaminating chemicals. We believe that a biosensor of the proposed design can be integrated into future water safety and security networks, as part of an early warning system against accidental or intentional water pollution by toxic chemicals.

  3. Circadian rhythms identified in Caenorhabditis elegans by in vivo long-term monitoring of a bioluminescent reporter.

    PubMed

    Goya, María Eugenia; Romanowski, Andrés; Caldart, Carlos S; Bénard, Claire Y; Golombek, Diego A

    2016-11-29

    Circadian rhythms are based on endogenous clocks that allow organisms to adjust their physiology and behavior by entrainment to the solar day and, in turn, to select the optimal times for most biological variables. Diverse model systems-including mice, flies, fungi, plants, and bacteria-have provided important insights into the mechanisms of circadian rhythmicity. However, the general principles that govern the circadian clock of Caenorhabditis elegans have remained largely elusive. Here we report robust molecular circadian rhythms in C elegans recorded with a bioluminescence assay in vivo and demonstrate the main features of the circadian system of the nematode. By constructing a luciferase-based reporter coupled to the promoter of the suppressor of activated let-60 Ras (sur-5) gene, we show in both population and single-nematode assays that C elegans expresses ∼24-h rhythms that can be entrained by light/dark and temperature cycles. We provide evidence that these rhythms are temperature-compensated and can be re-entrained after phase changes of the synchronizing agents. In addition, we demonstrate that light and temperature sensing requires the photoreceptors LITE and GUR-3, and the cyclic nucleotide-gated channel subunit TAX-2. Our results shed light on C elegans circadian biology and demonstrate evolutionarily conserved features in the circadian system of the nematode.

  4. In Vivo Functional Brain Imaging Approach Based on Bioluminescent Calcium Indicator GFP-aequorin.

    PubMed

    Lark, Arianna R; Kitamoto, Toshihiro; Martin, Jean-René

    2016-01-08

    Functional in vivo imaging has become a powerful approach to study the function and physiology of brain cells and structures of interest. Recently a new method of Ca(2+)-imaging using the bioluminescent reporter GFP-aequorin (GA) has been developed. This new technique relies on the fusion of the GFP and aequorin genes, producing a molecule capable of binding calcium and - with the addition of its cofactor coelenterazine - emitting bright light that can be monitored through a photon collector. Transgenic lines carrying the GFP-aequorin gene have been generated for both mice and Drosophila. In Drosophila, the GFP-aequorin gene has been placed under the control of the GAL4/UAS binary expression system allowing for targeted expression and imaging within the brain. This method has subsequently been shown to be capable of detecting both inward Ca(2+)-transients and Ca(2+)-released from inner stores. Most importantly it allows for a greater duration in continuous recording, imaging at greater depths within the brain, and recording at high temporal resolutions (up to 8.3 msec). Here we present the basic method for using bioluminescent imaging to record and analyze Ca(2+)-activity within the mushroom bodies, a structure central to learning and memory in the fly brain.

  5. Bioluminescence patterns among North American Armillaria species.

    PubMed

    Mihail, Jeanne D

    2015-06-01

    Bioluminescence is widely recognized among white-spored species of Basidiomycota. Most reports of fungal bioluminescence are based upon visual light perception. When instruments such as photomultipliers have been used to measure fungal luminescence, more taxa have been discovered to produce light, albeit at a range of magnitudes. The present studies were undertaken to determine the prevalence of bioluminescence among North American Armillaria species. Consistent, constitutive bioluminescence was detected for the first time for mycelia of Armillaria calvescens, Armillaria cepistipes, Armillaria gemina, Armillaria nabsnona, and Armillaria sinapina and confirmed for mycelia of Armillaria gallica, Armillaria mellea, Armillaria ostoyae, and Armillaria tabescens. Emission spectra of mycelia representing all species had maximum intensity in the range 515-525 nm confirming that emitted light was the result of bioluminescence rather than chemiluminescence. Time series analysis of 1000 consecutive luminescence measurements revealed a highly significant departure from random variation. Mycelial luminescence of eight species exhibited significant, stable shifts in magnitude in response to a series of mechanical disturbance treatments, providing one mechanism for generating observed luminescence variation.

  6. Sequential bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based ratiometric protease assays with fusion proteins of firefly luciferase and red fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Branchini, Bruce R; Rosenberg, Justin C; Ablamsky, Danielle M; Taylor, Kelsey P; Southworth, Tara L; Linder, Samantha J

    2011-07-15

    We report here the preparation of ratiometric luminescent probes that contain two well-separated emission peaks produced by a sequential bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. The probes are single soluble fusion proteins consisting of a thermostable firefly luciferase variant that catalyze yellow-green (560nm maximum) bioluminescence and a red fluorescent protein covalently labeled with a near-infrared fluorescent dye. The two proteins are connected by a decapeptide containing a protease recognition site specific for factor Xa, thrombin, or caspase 3. The rates of protease cleavage of the fusion protein substrates were monitored by recording emission spectra and plotting the change in peak ratios over time. Detection limits of 0.41nM for caspase 3, 1.0nM for thrombin, and 58nM for factor Xa were realized with a scanning fluorometer. Our results demonstrate for the first time that an efficient sequential BRET-FRET energy transfer process based on firefly luciferase bioluminescence can be employed to assay physiologically important protease activities.

  7. L1/2 regularization based numerical method for effective reconstruction of bioluminescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xueli; Yang, Defu; Zhang, Qitan; Liang, Jimin

    2014-05-01

    Even though bioluminescence tomography (BLT) exhibits significant potential and wide applications in macroscopic imaging of small animals in vivo, the inverse reconstruction is still a tough problem that has plagued researchers in a related area. The ill-posedness of inverse reconstruction arises from insufficient measurements and modeling errors, so that the inverse reconstruction cannot be solved directly. In this study, an l1/2 regularization based numerical method was developed for effective reconstruction of BLT. In the method, the inverse reconstruction of BLT was constrained into an l1/2 regularization problem, and then the weighted interior-point algorithm (WIPA) was applied to solve the problem through transforming it into obtaining the solution of a series of l1 regularizers. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method were demonstrated with numerical simulations on a digital mouse. Stability verification experiments further illustrated the robustness of the proposed method for different levels of Gaussian noise.

  8. Basic and Applied Aspects of Color Tuning of Bioluminescence Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmiya, Yoshihiro

    2005-09-01

    V. Viviani et al. [Biochemistry 38 (1999) 8271] were the first to succeed in cloning the red-emitting enzyme from the South American railroad worm, which is the only bioluminescent organism known to emit a red-colored light. The application of red bioluminescence has been our goal because the transmittance of longer-wavelength light is superior to that of the other colors for visualization of biological functions in living cells. Now, different color luciferases, which emit with wavelength maxima ranging from 400 to 630 nm, are available and are being used. For example, based on different color luciferases, Nakajima et al. developed a tricolor reporter in vitro assay system based on these different color luciferases in which the expression of three genes can be monitored simultaneously. On the other hand, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) is a natural phenomenon caused by the intermolecular interaction between a bioluminescent protein and a fluorophore on a second protein, resulting in the light from the bioluminescence reaction having the spectrum of the fluorophore. Otsuji et al. [Anal. Biochem. 329 (2004) 230] showed that the change in the efficiency of energy transfer in intramolecular BRET can quantify cellular functions in living cells. In this review, I introduce the basic mechanisms of color tuning in bioluminescent systems and new applications based on color tuning in the life sciences.

  9. Destabilized bioluminescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Michael S.; Rakesh, Gupta; Gary, Sayler S.

    2007-07-31

    Purified nucleic acids, vectors and cells containing a gene cassette encoding at least one modified bioluminescent protein, wherein the modification includes the addition of a peptide sequence. The duration of bioluminescence emitted by the modified bioluminescent protein is shorter than the duration of bioluminescence emitted by an unmodified form of the bioluminescent protein.

  10. Cell-based galactosemia diagnosis system based on a galactose assay using a bioluminescent Escherichia coli array.

    PubMed

    Woo, Min-Ah; Kim, Moon Il; Cho, Daeyeon; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2013-11-19

    A new cell-based galactose assay system, which is comprised of two bioluminescent Escherichia coli strains immobilized within an agarose gel arrayed on a well plate, has been developed. For this purpose, a galT knockout strain [galT(-) cell] of E. coli was genetically constructed so that cell growth is not promoted by galactose but rather by glucose present in a sample. Another E. coli W strain (normal cell), which grows normally in the presence of either glucose or galactose, was employed. A luminescent reporter gene, which produces luminescence as cells grow, was inserted into both of the E. coli strains, so that cell growth could be monitored in a facile manner. The two strains were separately grown for 4 h on gel arrays to which test samples were individually supplied. The relative luminescence unit (RLU) values caused by cell growth were determined for each array, one of which is resulted by glucose only and the other of which is resulted by both glucose and galactose present in the sample. By employing this protocol, galactose concentrations present in the test sample are reflected in the differences between the RLU values for each array. The practical utility of the new assay system was demonstrated by its use in determining galactose levels in clinical blood spot specimens coming from newborn babies. Because it can be employed to diagnosis of galactosemia in newborn babies in a more rapid, convenient, and cost-effective manner, this cell-based solid-phase galactose assay system should become a powerful alternative to conventional methods, which require labor-intensive and time-consuming procedures and/or complicated and expensive equipment.

  11. Hybrid radiosity-SP3 equation based bioluminescence tomography reconstruction for turbid medium with low- and non-scattering regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xueli; Zhang, Qitan; Yang, Defu; Liang, Jimin

    2014-01-01

    To provide an ideal solution for a specific problem of gastric cancer detection in which low-scattering regions simultaneously existed with both the non- and high-scattering regions, a novel hybrid radiosity-SP3 equation based reconstruction algorithm for bioluminescence tomography was proposed in this paper. In the algorithm, the third-order simplified spherical harmonics approximation (SP3) was combined with the radiosity equation to describe the bioluminescent light propagation in tissues, which provided acceptable accuracy for the turbid medium with both low- and non-scattering regions. The performance of the algorithm was evaluated with digital mouse based simulations and a gastric cancer-bearing mouse based in situ experiment. Primary results demonstrated the feasibility and superiority of the proposed algorithm for the turbid medium with low- and non-scattering regions.

  12. Buffer enhanced bioluminescence resonance energy transfer sensor based on Gaussia luciferase for in vitro detection of protease.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengyun; Yu, Junping; Zhang, Zhiping; Cui, Zongqiang; Wang, Dianbing; Wei, Hongping; Zhang, Xian-En

    2012-04-29

    Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) has gained favors in recent years as a detection technology for protease activity due to its extreme reliability, high sensitivity and low intrinsic backgrounds. Because of the sensitivity of the donors, substrates and the acceptors, it is expected that BRET systems are sensitive to buffer environments. However, no systematic study has been reported on how buffer components would affect the BRET ratio, and thus affect the determination of protease activity based on BRET. We present here that several environmental factors, including buffer agents, pH and divalent metal ions, influenced BRET ratio significantly, when humanized Gaussia luciferase (hGluc) was utilized as the donor and enhanced yellow fluorescence protein (EYFP) as the acceptor. Based on these findings, an enhancing solution was optimized to improve the performance of the BRET sensor for analysis of enterokinase activity in vitro, resulting in 10-fold and 7-fold improvement of the sensitivity and the detection limit, respectively. We anticipate the system will be applicable for improving performance of other in vitro BRET protease sensors, especially when the optimal conditions for protease activity would severely affect the BRET signal.

  13. Bioluminescence imaging in live cells and animals.

    PubMed

    Tung, Jack K; Berglund, Ken; Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Hochgeschwender, Ute; Gross, Robert E

    2016-04-01

    The use of bioluminescent reporters in neuroscience research continues to grow at a rapid pace as their applications and unique advantages over conventional fluorescent reporters become more appreciated. Here, we describe practical methods and principles for detecting and imaging bioluminescence from live cells and animals. We systematically tested various components of our conventional fluorescence microscope to optimize it for long-term bioluminescence imaging. High-resolution bioluminescence images from live neurons were obtained with our microscope setup, which could be continuously captured for several hours with no signs of phototoxicity. Bioluminescence from the mouse brain was also imaged noninvasively through the intact skull with a conventional luminescence imager. These methods demonstrate how bioluminescence can be routinely detected and measured from live cells and animals in a cost-effective way with common reagents and equipment.

  14. A lower limit of detection for atrazine was obtained using bioluminescent reporter bacteria via a lower incubation temperature.

    PubMed

    Jia, Kun; Eltzov, Evgeni; Toury, Timothée; Marks, Robert S; Ionescu, Rodica E

    2012-10-01

    The present article reports on the influence of various atrazine concentrations to the response of genetically modified Escherichia coli TV1061 bacterial cells while modulating the experimental conditions. Interesting increases of bioluminescence signals are recorded for E. coli TV1061 bacteria in the presence of 10 μg/mL atrazine concentration named "high-toxicity bacteria alert" when compared with 1 μg/mL -10 fg/mL atrazine termed "low-toxicity bacteria alert". Detecting the effect of atrazine via its effect on bioluminescence of bacteria has been carried out by two consecutive measurements (fresh and overnight modes) at different concentrations of analyte. We have shown that a more precise discrimination at lower-toxicity concentrations can be obtained through overnight incubation of bacteria with the analyte at 4 °C. In addition, centrifugation of bacterial cells and analyte dilutions has been performed in order to ensure a better interaction between the insoluble atrazine pesticide and the bacterial cells.

  15. Molecular probes and bioluminescent reporters in ecological optimization of biodegradation. (FY 91 aasert). Annual report, 1 June 1993-31 May 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Sayler, G.S.

    1994-05-31

    The goal of the research supported by this grant is to determine the role that biosurfactants and synthetic surfactants play in enhancing the bioavailability of sorbed or immiscible-phase aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs.) in particulate media. Increased bioavailability is assessed in terms of increased PAH-degrader population densities (nah gene frequencies) and their activities including the rate and/or extent of biodegradation and degradative gene expression as measured by bioluminescence response and mRNA levels. To achieve the proposed goal, bacterial strains containing specific degradative genes and bioluminescent reporter systems are being used to monitor the effectiveness of surfactants for enhancing the biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbon contaminants in environmental simulations. These genetic marker systems allow for the quantitation of degradative gene frequency and activity. Construction of an improved bioluminescent reporter strain for PAH degradation is currently underway. This approach involves incorporation of a transposon containing the lower naphthalene pathway promoter fused to the lux genes (nah-lux) into the bacterial chromosome resulting in a stable gene fusion present as a single copy per cell.

  16. Firefly Luciferase-Based Sequential Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET)-Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) Protease Assays.

    PubMed

    Branchini, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    We describe here the preparation of ratiometric luminescent probes that contain two well-separated emission peaks produced by a sequential bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. The probes are single soluble fusion proteins consisting of a thermostable firefly luciferase variant that catalyzes yellow-green (560 nm maximum) bioluminescence and a red fluorescent protein covalently labeled with a near-Infrared fluorescent dye. The two proteins are connected by a decapeptide containing a protease recognition site specific for factor Xa, thrombin, or caspase 3. The rates of protease cleavage of the fusion protein substrates were monitored by recording emission spectra and plotting the change in peak ratios over time. Detection limits of 0.41 nM for caspase 3, 1.0 nM for thrombin, and 58 nM for factor Xa were realized with a scanning fluorometer. This method successfully employs an efficient sequential BRET-FRET energy transfer process based on firefly luciferase bioluminescence to assay physiologically important protease activities and should be generally applicable to the measurement of any endoprotease lacking accessible cysteine residues.

  17. L{sub 1/2} regularization based numerical method for effective reconstruction of bioluminescence tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xueli E-mail: jimleung@mail.xidian.edu.cn; Yang, Defu; Zhang, Qitan; Liang, Jimin E-mail: jimleung@mail.xidian.edu.cn

    2014-05-14

    Even though bioluminescence tomography (BLT) exhibits significant potential and wide applications in macroscopic imaging of small animals in vivo, the inverse reconstruction is still a tough problem that has plagued researchers in a related area. The ill-posedness of inverse reconstruction arises from insufficient measurements and modeling errors, so that the inverse reconstruction cannot be solved directly. In this study, an l{sub 1/2} regularization based numerical method was developed for effective reconstruction of BLT. In the method, the inverse reconstruction of BLT was constrained into an l{sub 1/2} regularization problem, and then the weighted interior-point algorithm (WIPA) was applied to solve the problem through transforming it into obtaining the solution of a series of l{sub 1} regularizers. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method were demonstrated with numerical simulations on a digital mouse. Stability verification experiments further illustrated the robustness of the proposed method for different levels of Gaussian noise.

  18. The uses and abuses of rapid bioluminescence-based ATP assays.

    PubMed

    Shama, G; Malik, D J

    2013-03-01

    Bioluminescence-based ATP testing of solid surfaces has become well established in the food processing industry as part of general hazard analysis and critical control points (HACCP) measures. The rise in healthcare associated infections (HAIs) at the turn of the century focussed attention on the environment as a potential reservoir of the agents responsible for such infections. In response to the need for objective methods of assessing the efficiency of cleaning in healthcare establishments and for rapid methods for detecting the presence of the pathogens responsible for HAIs, it was proposed that ATP testing of environmental surfaces be introduced. We examine the basis behind the assumptions inherent in these proposals. Intracellular ATP levels are shown to vary between microbial taxa and according to environmental conditions. Good correlations between microbial numbers and ATP levels have been obtained under certain specific conditions, but never within healthcare settings. Notwithstanding, ATP testing may still have a role in providing reassurance that cleaning regimes are being carried out satisfactorily. However, ATP results should not be interpreted as surrogate indicators for the presence of microbial pathogens.

  19. Bioluminescence based biosensors for quantitative detection of enterococcal peptide–pheromone activity reveal inter-strain telesensing in vivo during polymicrobial systemic infection

    PubMed Central

    La Rosa, Sabina Leanti; Solheim, Margrete; Diep, Dzung B.; Nes, Ingolf F.; Brede, Dag Anders

    2015-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a significant threat in the nosocomial setting due to the emergence of isolates that are multi-antibiotic resistant, refractory to the available therapies and equipped with a variety of pathogenicity determinants. This bacterium uses quorum-sensing systems to regulate its physiological processes, including the expression of virulence traits, to adapt and proliferate within a host. Here, we describe the construction and application of two bioluminescence-based reporter systems for the direct detection of the quorum-sensing regulated expression of (i) the gelatinase biosynthesis-activating pheromone (GBAP) and (ii) the cytolysin small subunit (CylLS) in natural samples. The two E. faecalis reporters conditionally expressed bioluminescence in the presence of GBAP and CylLS both in the supernatants of liquid cultures and in an agar-overlay assay in as little as three hours, with a high level of sensitivity. Biosensors employed to investigate the interaction between the fsr and cyl systems revealed that fsr impeded CylLS activity by 75%. Furthermore, we identified a clinical E. faecalis isolate that acted as a biological cheater, producing cytolysin only upon sensing CylLS-producers in its environment. This isolate enhanced its virulence during polymicrobial systemic infection of Galleria mellonella. PMID:25661457

  20. An efficient reconstruction method for bioluminescence tomography based on two-step iterative shrinkage approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Jia, Kebin; Tian, Jie; Han, Dong; Liu, Xueyan; Wu, Ping; Feng, Jinchao; Yang, Xin

    2012-03-01

    Among many molecular imaging modalities, Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) is an important optical molecular imaging modality. Due to its unique advantages in specificity, sensitivity, cost-effectiveness and low background noise, BLT is widely studied for live small animal imaging. Since only the photon distribution over the surface is measurable and the photo propagation with biological tissue is highly diffusive, BLT is often an ill-posed problem and may bear multiple solutions and aberrant reconstruction in the presence of measurement noise and optical parameter mismatches. For many BLT practical applications, such as early detection of tumors, the volumes of the light sources are very small compared with the whole body. Therefore, the L1-norm sparsity regularization has been used to take advantage of the sparsity prior knowledge and alleviate the ill-posedness of the problem. Iterative shrinkage (IST) algorithm is an important research achievement in a field of compressed sensing and widely applied in sparse signal reconstruction. However, the convergence rate of IST algorithm depends heavily on the linear operator. When the problem is ill-posed, it becomes very slow. In this paper, we present a sparsity regularization reconstruction method for BLT based on the two-step iterated shrinkage approach. By employing Two-step strategy of iterative reweighted shrinkage (IRS) to improve IST, the proposed method shows faster convergence rate and better adaptability for BLT. The simulation experiments with mouse atlas were conducted to evaluate the performance of proposed method. By contrast, the proposed method can obtain the stable and comparable reconstruction solution with less number of iterations.

  1. Development of a novel genetically modified bioluminescent-bacteria-based assay for detection of fluoroquinolones in animal-derived foods.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guyue; Dong, Xiaobing; Wang, Yulian; Peng, Dapeng; Wang, Xu; Hao, Haihong; Xie, Shuyu; Qu, Wei; Liu, Zhenli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2014-12-01

    Fluoroquinolones (FQNs) are broad-spectrum antibacterial agents widely used in animal husbandry and aquaculture. The residues and antimicrobial resistance of such antibiotics are a major public health concern. To realize multianalyte detection of FQN residues, a genetically modified bacterium, Escherichia coli pK12 harboring plasmid pRecAlux3, was constructed in this study to develop a bioluminescent-bacteria-based assay for the detection of FQNs in animal-derived foods. This assay was based on the principle of induction of an SOS response by FQNs via inducing the recA-promoter-fused luciferase reporter gene existing on the plasmid pRecAlux3. E. coli pK12 was able to recognize 11 FQNs: difloxacin, enrofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, sarafloxacin, norfloxacin, danofloxacin, ofloxacin, pefloxacin, lomefloxacin, marbofloxacin, and orbifloxacin. This method could be applied to 11 edible tissues, including milk, fish muscle, and the muscles, livers, and kidneys of cattle, chickens, and pigs, with a very simple and rapid sample extraction procedure using only phosphate-buffered saline. The limits of detection of the FQNs were between 12.5 and 100 μg kg(-1), all of which were lower than the maximum residue limits. Most of the recoveries of the FQNs were in the range from 60 to 120 %, and the interassay coefficients of variation were less than 30 %. This method, confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography, is reliable and can be used as both a screening test and a semiquantitative assay, when the identity of a single type of FQN is known.

  2. Bioluminescent Cell-Based NAD(P)/NAD(P)H Assays for Rapid Dinucleotide Measurement and Inhibitor Screening

    PubMed Central

    Leippe, Donna; Sobol, Mary; Vidugiris, Gediminas; Zhou, Wenhui; Meisenheimer, Poncho; Gautam, Prson; Wennerberg, Krister; Cali, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The central role of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides in cellular energy metabolism and signaling makes them important nodes that link the metabolic state of cells with energy homeostasis and gene regulation. In this study, we describe the implementation of cell-based bioluminescence assays for rapid and sensitive measurement of those important redox cofactors. We show that the sensitivity of the assays (limit of detection ∼0.5 nM) enables the selective detection of total amounts of nonphosphorylated or phosphorylated dinucleotides directly in cell lysates. The total amount of NAD+NADH or NADP+NADPH levels can be detected in as low as 300 or 600 cells/well, respectively. The signal remains linear up to 5,000 cells/well with the maximum signal-to-background ratios ranging from 100 to 200 for NAD+NADH and from 50 to 100 for NADP+NADPH detection. The assays are robust (Z′ value >0.7) and the inhibitor response curves generated using a known NAD biosynthetic pathway inhibitor FK866 correlate well with the reported data. More importantly, by multiplexing the dinucleotide detection assays with a fluorescent nonmetabolic cell viability assay, we show that dinucleotide levels can be decreased dramatically (>80%) by FK866 treatment before changes in cell viability are detected. The utility of the assays to identify modulators of intracellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide levels was further confirmed using an oncology active compound library, where novel dinucleotide regulating compounds were identified. For example, the histone deacetylase inhibitor entinostat was a potent inhibitor of cellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides, whereas the selective estrogen receptor modulator raloxifene unexpectedly caused a twofold increase in cellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide levels. PMID:25506801

  3. Development of bacteriophage-based bioluminescent bioreporters for monitoring of microbial pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozen, Aysu; Montgomery, Kacey; Jegier, Pat; Patterson, Stacey; Daumer, Kathleen A.; Ripp, Steven A.; Garland, Jay L.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2004-03-01

    Microorganisms pose numerous problems when present in human occupied enclosed environments. Primary among these are health related hazards, manifested as infectious diseases related to contaminated drinking water, food, or air circulation systems or non-infectious allergy related complications associated with microbial metabolites (sick building syndrome). As a means towards rapid detection of microbial pathogens, we are attempting to harness the specificity of bacterial phage for their host with a modified quorum sensing amplification signal to produce quantifiable bioluminescent (lux) detection on a silicon microluminometer. The bacteriophage itself is metabolically inactive, only achieving replicative capabilities upon infection of its specific host bacterium. Bacteriophage bioluminescent bioreporters contain a genomically inserted luxI component. During an infection event, the phage genes and accompanying luxI construct are taken up by the host bacterium and transcribed, resulting in luxI expression and subsequent activation of a homoserine lactone inducible bioluminescent bioreporter. We constructed a vector carrying the luxI gene under the control of a strong E. coli promoter and cloned it into E. coli. We have shown that it can induce luminescence up to 14,000 counts per second when combined with the bioreporter strain. In their final embodiment, these sensors will be fully independent microelectronic monitors for microbial contamination, requiring only exposure of the biochip to the sample, with on-chip signal processing downloaded directly to the local area network of the environmental control system.

  4. High-throughput viability assay using an autonomously bioluminescent cell line with a bacterial Lux reporter.

    PubMed

    Class, Bradley; Thorne, Natasha; Aguisanda, Francis; Southall, Noel; McKew, John C; Zheng, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Cell viability assays are extensively used to determine cell health, evaluate growth conditions, and assess compound cytotoxicity. Most existing assays are endpoint assays, in which data are collected at one time point after termination of the experiment. The time point at which toxicity of a compound is evident, however, depends on the mechanism of that compound. An ideal cell viability assay allows the determination of compound toxicity kinetically without having to terminate the assay prematurely. We optimized and validated a reagent-addition-free cell viability assay using an autoluminescent HEK293 cell line that stably expresses bacterial luciferase and all substrates necessary for bioluminescence. This cell viability assay can be used for real-time, long-term measurement of compound cytotoxicity in live cells with a signal-to-basal ratio of 20- to 200-fold and Z-factors of ~0.6 after 24-, 48- 72-, or 96-h incubation with compound. We also found that the potencies of nine cytotoxic compounds correlated well with those measured by four other commonly used cell viability assays. The results demonstrated that this kinetic cell viability assay using the HEK293(lux) autoluminescent cell line is useful for high-throughput evaluation of compound cytotoxicity.

  5. Bioluminescence-Based Tumor Quantification Method for Monitoring Tumor Progression and Treatment Effects in Mouse Lymphoma Models

    PubMed Central

    Cosette, Jeremie; Ben Abdelwahed, Rym; Donnou-Triffault, Sabrina; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Although bioluminescence imaging (BLI) shows promise for monitoring tumor burden in animal models of cancer, these analyses remain mostly qualitative. Here we describe a method for bioluminescence imaging to obtain a semi-quantitative analysis of tumor burden and treatment response. This method is based on the calculation of a luminoscore, a value that allows comparisons of two animals from the same or different experiments. Current BLI instruments enable the calculation of this luminoscore, which relies mainly on the acquisition conditions (back and front acquisitions) and the drawing of the region of interest (manual markup around the mouse). Using two previously described mouse lymphoma models based on cell engraftment, we show that the luminoscore method can serve as a noninvasive way to verify successful tumor cell inoculation, monitor tumor burden, and evaluate the effects of in situ cancer treatment (CpG-DNA). Finally, we show that this method suits different experimental designs. We suggest that this method be used for early estimates of treatment response in preclinical small-animal studies. PMID:27501019

  6. Development of a Filtration-Based Bioluminescence Assay for Detection of Microorganisms in Tea Beverages.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki, Yohei; Igarashi, Toshinori; Harada, Yasuhiro

    2016-03-01

    The market for tea drinks as healthy beverages has been steadily expanding, and ready-to-drink beverages in polyethylene terephthalate bottles have been popular. To more rapidly and accurately test tea beverages bottled in polyethylene terephthalate for microbial contamination, a newly developed filtration device and a washing method with a commercial bioluminescence assay were combined to detect low numbers of bacterial spores, fungal conidia, and ascospores. Washing buffers were formulated with nonionic detergents from the Tween series. Commercially available tea beverages were used to evaluate the filtration capacity of the filtration device, the effect of washing buffers, and the performance of the assay. The assay was tested with serially diluted suspensions of colonies of two bacterial strains, spores of three Bacillus strains, conidia of five fungal strains, and ascospores of four fungal strains. The filtration device enabled filtration of a large sample volume (100 to 500 ml), and the washing buffer significantly decreased the background bioluminescence intensity of tea samples when compared with the no-washing method. Low numbers (1 to 10 CFU/100 ml) of the tested strains of bacteria were detected within 8 to 18 h of cultivation, and fungi were detected within 24 to 48 h. Furthermore, a whole bottle (500 ml) of mixed tea was filtered through the filtration device and microbes were detected. This method could be used for quality control of bottled beverages without preincubation.

  7. Illuminating insights into firefly luciferase and other bioluminescent reporters used in chemical biology

    PubMed Central

    Thorne, Natasha; Inglese, James; Auld, Douglas S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Understanding luciferase enzymology and the structure of compounds that modulate luciferase activity can be used to improve the design of luminescence-based assays. This review provides an overview of these popular reporters with an emphasis on the commonly used firefly luciferase from Photinus pyralis (FLuc). Large-scale chemical profile studies have identified a variety of scaffolds that inhibit FLuc. In some cell-based assays these inhibitors can act in a counter-intuitive way –leading to a gain in luminescent signal. Although formerly attributed to transcriptional activation, intracellular stabilization of FLuc is the primary mechanism underlying this observation. FLuc inhibition/stabilization can be complex, as illustrated by the compound PTC124, which is converted by FLuc in the presence of ATP to a high affinity multi-substrate-adduct inhibitor, PTC124-AMP. The potential influence these findings can have on drug discovery efforts is provided here. PMID:20609414

  8. On-line monitoring of aerobic bioremediation with bioluminescent reporter microbes. Final report, July 1991--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Sayler, G.S.

    1995-03-01

    A critical issue in the biological characterization of contaminated sites and in the evaluation of relative bioremediation treatment efficiencies is the development of appropriate monitoring methods for the assessment of pollutant bioavailability and microbial in situ activity potential. In nature, pollutants are found dispersed among the solid, liquid and gaseous phases of the complex environments rendering the analytical estimation of their bioavailability and degradation more difficult and irrelevant. Ex situ and extractive analytical techniques have only been misrepresentative of the natural conditions and often resulted in inaccurate estimates of pollutants mass transfer. In this project, the bioluminescent bioreporter bacterium P. Fluorescens HK44 was integrated to an optical device, capable of conducting emitted light, and used as an online biosensor of naphthalene and salicylate. The physiological requirements of the bacteria and the physical limitations of the biosensor were also determined.

  9. Biological toxicity of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) against the luxCDABE-based bioluminescent bioreporter Escherichia coli 652T7.

    PubMed

    Du, Liyu; Arnholt, Kelly; Ripp, Steven; Sayler, Gary; Wang, Siqun; Liang, Chenghua; Wang, Jingkuan; Zhuang, Jie

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the biological toxicity of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) using the constitutively bioluminescent luxCDABE-based bioreporter Escherichia coli 652T7. The effects of CNCs on E. c oli 652T7 biotoxicity were investigated at different CNC concentrations, reaction times, and IC50 values. CNC toxicity was also compared with and without ultrasonic dispersion to establish dispersibility effects. The results demonstrated that CNCs were not significantly toxic at concentrations at or below 250 mg/L. At concentrations higher than 300 mg/L, toxicity increased linearly as CNC concentrations increased up to 2000 mg/L. IC50 calculations demonstrated an increase in cytotoxicity as CNC exposure times increased, and elevated dispersibility of the CNCs were shown to increase cytotoxicity effects. These results suggest that CNCs can impact microbial populations if elevated concentration thresholds are met.

  10. Bioluminescence-Based High-Throughput Screen Identifies Pharmacological Agents That Target Neurotransmitter Signaling in Small Cell Lung Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Improgo, Ma. Reina D.; Johnson, Christopher W.; Tapper, Andrew R.; Gardner, Paul D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Frontline treatment of small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) relies heavily on chemotherapeutic agents and radiation therapy. Though SCLC patients respond well to initial cycles of chemotherapy, they eventually develop resistance. Identification of novel therapies against SCLC is therefore imperative. Methods and Findings We have designed a bioluminescence-based cell viability assay for high-throughput screening of anti-SCLC agents. The assay was first validated via standard pharmacological agents and RNA interference using two human SCLC cell lines. We then utilized the assay in a high-throughput screen using the LOPAC1280 compound library. The screening identified several drugs that target classic cancer signaling pathways as well as neuroendocrine markers in SCLC. In particular, perturbation of dopaminergic and serotonergic signaling inhibits SCLC cell viability. Conclusions The convergence of our pharmacological data with key SCLC pathway components reiterates the importance of neurotransmitter signaling in SCLC etiology and points to possible leads for drug development. PMID:21931655

  11. The Chemical Basis of Fungal Bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Purtov, Konstantin V; Petushkov, Valentin N; Baranov, Mikhail S; Mineev, Konstantin S; Rodionova, Natalja S; Kaskova, Zinaida M; Tsarkova, Aleksandra S; Petunin, Alexei I; Bondar, Vladimir S; Rodicheva, Emma K; Medvedeva, Svetlana E; Oba, Yuichi; Oba, Yumiko; Arseniev, Alexander S; Lukyanov, Sergey; Gitelson, Josef I; Yampolsky, Ilia V

    2015-07-06

    Many species of fungi naturally produce light, a phenomenon known as bioluminescence, however, the fungal substrates used in the chemical reactions that produce light have not been reported. We identified the fungal compound luciferin 3-hydroxyhispidin, which is biosynthesized by oxidation of the precursor hispidin, a known fungal and plant secondary metabolite. The fungal luciferin does not share structural similarity with the other eight known luciferins. Furthermore, it was shown that 3-hydroxyhispidin leads to bioluminescence in extracts from four diverse genera of luminous fungi, thus suggesting a common biochemical mechanism for fungal bioluminescence.

  12. A Causal Relation between Bioluminescence and Oxygen to Quantify the Cell Niche

    PubMed Central

    Lambrechts, Dennis; Roeffaers, Maarten; Goossens, Karel; Hofkens, Johan; Van de Putte, Tom; Schrooten, Jan; Van Oosterwyck, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Bioluminescence imaging assays have become a widely integrated technique to quantify effectiveness of cell-based therapies by monitoring fate and survival of transplanted cells. To date these assays are still largely qualitative and often erroneous due to the complexity and dynamics of local micro-environments (niches) in which the cells reside. Here, we report, using a combined experimental and computational approach, on oxygen that besides being a critical niche component responsible for cellular energy metabolism and cell-fate commitment, also serves a primary role in regulating bioluminescent light kinetics. We demonstrate the potential of an oxygen dependent Michaelis-Menten relation in quantifying intrinsic bioluminescence intensities by resolving cell-associated oxygen gradients from bioluminescent light that is emitted from three-dimensional (3D) cell-seeded hydrogels. Furthermore, the experimental and computational data indicate a strong causal relation of oxygen concentration with emitted bioluminescence intensities. Altogether our approach demonstrates the importance of oxygen to evolve towards quantitative bioluminescence and holds great potential for future microscale measurement of oxygen tension in an easily accessible manner. PMID:24840204

  13. Analysis of genetically modified organisms by pyrosequencing on a portable photodiode-based bioluminescence sequencer.

    PubMed

    Song, Qinxin; Wei, Guijiang; Zhou, Guohua

    2014-07-01

    A portable bioluminescence analyser for detecting the DNA sequence of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) was developed by using a photodiode (PD) array. Pyrosequencing on eight genes (zSSIIb, Bt11 and Bt176 gene of genetically modified maize; Lectin, 35S-CTP4, CP4EPSPS, CaMV35S promoter and NOS terminator of the genetically modified Roundup ready soya) was successfully detected with this instrument. The corresponding limit of detection (LOD) was 0.01% with 35 PCR cycles. The maize and soya available from three different provenances in China were detected. The results indicate that pyrosequencing using the small size of the detector is a simple, inexpensive, and reliable way in a farm/field test of GMO analysis.

  14. Marine Bioluminescence: Mechanisms and Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-30

    bioluminescent systems Gelatinous zooplankton - Analysis of bioluminescence spectra as a function of depth of occurrence was completed and published (Haddock...attraction of zooplankton predators we have used a new profiling bioluminescence detector system in an examination of the fine scale bioluminescence...bioluminescent systems. J. Mol. Evolution 19, 309-321. PUBLICATIONS Haddock, S.H.D. (1999): Bioluminescent spectra of shallow and deep-sea gelatinous

  15. GMO detection using a bioluminescent real time reporter (BART) of loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) suitable for field use

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is an increasing need for quantitative technologies suitable for molecular detection in a variety of settings for applications including food traceability and monitoring of genetically modified (GM) crops and their products through the food processing chain. Conventional molecular diagnostics utilising real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and fluorescence-based determination of amplification require temperature cycling and relatively complex optics. In contrast, isothermal amplification coupled to a bioluminescent output produced in real-time (BART) occurs at a constant temperature and only requires a simple light detection and integration device. Results Loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) shows robustness to sample-derived inhibitors. Here we show the applicability of coupled LAMP and BART reactions (LAMP-BART) for determination of genetically modified (GM) maize target DNA at low levels of contamination (0.1-5.0% GM) using certified reference material, and compare this to RT-PCR. Results show that conventional DNA extraction methods developed for PCR may not be optimal for LAMP-BART quantification. Additionally, we demonstrate that LAMP is more tolerant to plant sample-derived inhibitors, and show this can be exploited to develop rapid extraction techniques suitable for simple field-based qualitative tests for GM status determination. We also assess the effect of total DNA assay load on LAMP-BART quantitation. Conclusions LAMP-BART is an effective and sensitive technique for GM detection with significant potential for quantification even at low levels of contamination and in samples derived from crops such as maize with a large genome size. The resilience of LAMP-BART to acidic polysaccharides makes it well suited to rapid sample preparation techniques and hence to both high throughput laboratory settings and to portable GM detection applications. The impact of the plant sample matrix and genome loading within a reaction must

  16. Combining fluorescence and bioluminescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Goda, Kazuhito; Hatta-Ohashi, Yoko; Akiyoshi, Ryutaro; Sugiyama, Takashi; Sakai, Ikuko; Takahashi, Takeo; Suzuki, Hirobumi

    2015-08-01

    Bioluminescence microscopy has revealed that gene expression in individual cells can respond differently to the same stimulus. To understand this phenomenon, it is important to sequentially observe the series of events from cellular signal transduction to gene expression regulated by specific transcription factors derived from signaling cascades in individual cells. However, these processes have been separately analyzed with fluorescence and bioluminescence microscopy. Furthermore, in culture medium, the background fluorescence of luciferin-a substrate of luciferase in promoter assays of gene expression in cultured cells-confounds the simultaneous observation of fluorescence and bioluminescence. Therefore, we optimized conditions for optical filter sets based on spectral properties and the luciferin concentration based on cell permeability for fluorescence observation combined with bioluminescence microscopy. An excitation and emission filter set (492-506 nm and 524-578 nm) was suitable for green fluorescent protein and yellow fluorescent protein imaging of cells, and >100 μM luciferin was acceptable in culture medium based on kinetic constants and the estimated intracellular concentration. Using these parameters, we present an example of sequential fluorescence and bioluminescence microscopic observation of signal transduction (translocation of protein kinase C alpha from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane) coupled with activation of gene expression by nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide B in individual cells and show that the gene expression response is not completely concordant with upstream signaling following stimulation with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate. Our technique is a powerful imaging tool for analysis of heterogeneous gene expression together with upstream signaling in live single cells.

  17. Hybrid radiosity-SP{sub 3} equation based bioluminescence tomography reconstruction for turbid medium with low- and non-scattering regions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xueli E-mail: jimleung@mail.xidian.edu.cn; Zhang, Qitan; Yang, Defu; Liang, Jimin E-mail: jimleung@mail.xidian.edu.cn

    2014-01-14

    To provide an ideal solution for a specific problem of gastric cancer detection in which low-scattering regions simultaneously existed with both the non- and high-scattering regions, a novel hybrid radiosity-SP{sub 3} equation based reconstruction algorithm for bioluminescence tomography was proposed in this paper. In the algorithm, the third-order simplified spherical harmonics approximation (SP{sub 3}) was combined with the radiosity equation to describe the bioluminescent light propagation in tissues, which provided acceptable accuracy for the turbid medium with both low- and non-scattering regions. The performance of the algorithm was evaluated with digital mouse based simulations and a gastric cancer-bearing mouse based in situ experiment. Primary results demonstrated the feasibility and superiority of the proposed algorithm for the turbid medium with low- and non-scattering regions.

  18. Circadian control sheds light on fungal bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Anderson G; Stevani, Cassius V; Waldenmaier, Hans E; Viviani, Vadim; Emerson, Jillian M; Loros, Jennifer J; Dunlap, Jay C

    2015-03-30

    Bioluminescence, the creation and emission of light by organisms, affords insight into the lives of organisms doing it. Luminous living things are widespread and access diverse mechanisms to generate and control luminescence [1-5]. Among the least studied bioluminescent organisms are phylogenetically rare fungi-only 71 species, all within the ∼ 9,000 fungi of the temperate and tropical Agaricales order-are reported from among ∼ 100,000 described fungal species [6, 7]. All require oxygen [8] and energy (NADH or NADPH) for bioluminescence and are reported to emit green light (λmax 530 nm) continuously, implying a metabolic function for bioluminescence, perhaps as a byproduct of oxidative metabolism in lignin degradation. Here, however, we report that bioluminescence from the mycelium of Neonothopanus gardneri is controlled by a temperature-compensated circadian clock, the result of cycles in content/activity of the luciferase, reductase, and luciferin that comprise the luminescent system. Because regulation implies an adaptive function for bioluminescence, a controversial question for more than two millennia [8-15], we examined interactions between luminescent fungi and insects [16]. Prosthetic acrylic resin "mushrooms," internally illuminated by a green LED emitting light similar to the bioluminescence, attract staphilinid rove beetles (coleopterans), as well as hemipterans (true bugs), dipterans (flies), and hymenopterans (wasps and ants), at numbers far greater than dark control traps. Thus, circadian control may optimize energy use for when bioluminescence is most visible, attracting insects that can in turn help in spore dispersal, thereby benefitting fungi growing under the forest canopy, where wind flow is greatly reduced.

  19. Circadian Control Sheds Light on Fungal Bioluminescence

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Anderson G.; Stevani, Cassius V.; Waldenmaier, Hans E.; Viviani, Vadim; Emerson, Jillian M.; Loros, Jennifer J.; Dunlap, Jay C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bioluminescence, the creation and emission of light by organisms, affords insight into the lives of organisms doing it. Luminous living things are widespread and access diverse mechanisms to generate and control luminescence [1-5]. Among the least studied bioluminescent organisms are phylogenetically rare fungi – only 71 species, all within the ~9000 fungi of the temperate and tropical Agaricales Order - are reported from among ~100,000 described fungal species [6,7]. All require oxygen [8] and energy (NADH or NADPH) for bioluminescence, and are reported to emit green light (λmax 530 nm) continuously, implying a metabolic function for bioluminescence, perhaps as a by-product of oxidative metabolism in lignin degradation. Here, however, we report that bioluminescence from the mycelium of Neonothopanus gardneri is controlled by a temperature compensated circadian clock, the result of cycles in content/activity of the luciferase, reductase, and the luciferin that comprise the luminescent system. Because regulation implies an adaptive function for bioluminescence, a controversial question for more than two millenia [8-15], we examined interactions between luminescent fungi and insects [16]. Prosthetic acrylic resin “mushrooms”, internally illuminated by a green LED emitting light similar to the bioluminescence, attract staphilinid rove beetles (coleopterans) as well as hemipterans (true bugs), dipterans (flies), and hymenopterans (wasps and ants) at numbers far greater than dark control traps. Thus, circadian control may optimize energy use for when bioluminescence is most visible, attracting insects that can in turn help in spore dispersal, thereby benefitting fungi growing under the forest canopy where wind flow is greatly reduced. PMID:25802150

  20. Laser-induced bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, G.D.; Lynch, R.V. III

    1981-01-01

    A project has been initiated to determine the feasibility of developing a complete airborne remote sensing system for rapidly mapping high concentration patches of bioluminescent organisms in the world's oceans. Conceptually, this system would be composed of a laser illuminator to induce bioluminescence and a low light level image intensifier for detection of light. Initial laboratory measurements consisted of using a 2-J flash lamp pulsed optical dye laser to excite bioluminescence in the marine dinoflagellate Pyrocustis lunula at ambient temperature using Rhodamine 6G as the lasing dye (585 nm) and a laser pulse width of 1 microsec. After a latency period of 15-20 msec, the bioluminescence maximum occurred in the blue (480 nm is the wavelength maximum for most dinoflagellate bioluminescence) with the peaking occurring approximately 65 msec after the laser pulse. Planned experiments will investigate the effect of different excitation wavelengths and energies at various temperatures and salinities of the cultures.

  1. Bioluminescence assay for cell viability.

    PubMed

    Lomakina, G Yu; Modestova, Yu A; Ugarova, N N

    2015-06-01

    Theoretical aspects of the adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence assay based on the use of the firefly luciferin-luciferase system are considered, as well as its application for assessing cell viability in microbiology, sanitation, medicine, and ecology. Various approaches for the analysis of individual or mixed cultures of microorganisms are presented, and capabilities of the method for investigation of biological processes in live cells including necrosis, apoptosis, as well as for investigation of the dynamics of metabolism are described.

  2. Theoretical tuning of the firefly bioluminescence spectra by the modification of oxyluciferin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Zhu, Jia; Liu, Ya-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Extending the firefly bioluminescence is of practical significance for the improved visualization of living cells and the development of a multicolor reporter. Tuning the color of bioluminescence in fireflies mainly involves the modification of luciferase and luciferin. In this Letter, we theoretically studied the emission spectra of 9 firefly oxyluciferin analogs in the gas phase and in solutions. Three density functionals, including B3LYP, CAM-B3LYP and M06-2X, were employed to theoretically predict the efficiently luminescent analogs. The reliable functionals for calculating the targeted systems were suggested. The luminescence efficiency, solvent effects, and substituent effects are discussed based on the calculated results.

  3. High throughput and quantitative approaches for measuring circadian rhythms in cyanobacteria using bioluminescence

    PubMed Central

    Shultzaberger, Ryan K.; Paddock, Mark L.; Katsuki, Takeo; Greenspan, Ralph J.; Golden, Susan S.

    2016-01-01

    The temporal measurement of a bioluminescent reporter has proven to be one of the most powerful tools for characterizing circadian rhythms in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus. Primarily, two approaches have been used to automate this process: (1) detection of cell culture bioluminescence in 96-well plates by a photomultiplier tube-based plate-cycling luminometer (TopCount Microplate Scintillation and Luminescence Counter, Perkin Elmer) and (2) detection of individual colony bioluminescence by iteratively rotating a Petri dish under a cooled CCD camera using a computer-controlled turntable. Each approach has distinct advantages. The TopCount provides a more quantitative measurement of bioluminescence, enabling the direct comparison of clock output levels among strains. The computer-controlled turntable approach has a shorter set-up time and greater throughput, making it a more powerful phenotypic screening tool. While the latter approach is extremely useful, only a few labs have been able to build such an apparatus because of technical hurdles involved in coordinating and controlling both the camera and the turntable, and in processing the resulting images. This protocol provides instructions on how to construct, use, and process data from a computer-controlled turntable to measure the temporal changes in bioluminescence of individual cyanobacterial colonies. Furthermore, we describe how to prepare samples for use with the TopCount to minimize experimental noise, and generate meaningful quantitative measurements of clock output levels for advanced analysis. PMID:25662451

  4. High-throughput and quantitative approaches for measuring circadian rhythms in cyanobacteria using bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Shultzaberger, Ryan K; Paddock, Mark L; Katsuki, Takeo; Greenspan, Ralph J; Golden, Susan S

    2015-01-01

    The temporal measurement of a bioluminescent reporter has proven to be one of the most powerful tools for characterizing circadian rhythms in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus. Primarily, two approaches have been used to automate this process: (1) detection of cell culture bioluminescence in 96-well plates by a photomultiplier tube-based plate-cycling luminometer (TopCount Microplate Scintillation and Luminescence Counter, Perkin Elmer) and (2) detection of individual colony bioluminescence by iteratively rotating a Petri dish under a cooled CCD camera using a computer-controlled turntable. Each approach has distinct advantages. The TopCount provides a more quantitative measurement of bioluminescence, enabling the direct comparison of clock output levels among strains. The computer-controlled turntable approach has a shorter set-up time and greater throughput, making it a more powerful phenotypic screening tool. While the latter approach is extremely useful, only a few labs have been able to build such an apparatus because of technical hurdles involved in coordinating and controlling both the camera and the turntable, and in processing the resulting images. This protocol provides instructions on how to construct, use, and process data from a computer-controlled turntable to measure the temporal changes in bioluminescence of individual cyanobacterial colonies. Furthermore, we describe how to prepare samples for use with the TopCount to minimize experimental noise and generate meaningful quantitative measurements of clock output levels for advanced analysis.

  5. In vitro influence of hypoxia on bioluminescence imaging in brain tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriyama, Eduardo H.; Jarvi, Mark; Niedre, Mark; Mocanu, Joseph D.; Moriyama, Yumi; Li, Buhong; Lilge, Lothar; Wilson, Brian C.

    2007-02-01

    Bioluminescence Imaging (BLI) has been employed as an imaging modality to identify and characterize fundamental processes related to cancer development and response at cellular and molecular levels. This technique is based on the reaction of luciferin with oxygen in the presence of luciferase and ATP. A major concern in this technique is that tumors are generally hypoxic, either constitutively and/or as a result of treatment, therefore the oxygen available for the bioluminescence reaction could possibly be reduced to limiting levels, and thus leading to underestimation of the actual number of luciferase-labeled cells during in vivo procedures. In this report, we present the initial in vitro results of the oxygen dependence of the bioluminescence signal in rat gliosarcoma 9L cells tagged with the luciferase gene (9L luc cells). Bioluminescence photon emission from cells exposed to different oxygen tensions was detected by a sensitive CCD camera upon exposure to luciferin. The results showed that bioluminescence signal decreased at administered pO II levels below about 5%, falling by approximately 50% at 0.2% pO II. Additional experiments showed that changes in BLI was due to the cell inability to maintain normal levels of ATP during the hypoxic period reducing the ATP concentration to limiting levels for BLI.

  6. A combination of NADHP and hispidin is not essential for bioluminescence in luminous fungal living gills of Mycena chlorophos.

    PubMed

    Teranishi, Katsunori

    2017-01-05

    The chemical mechanisms underlying visible bioluminescence in the fungus Mycena chlorophos are not clear. A combination of dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) and hispidin, which has been reported to increase the intensity of in vitro luminescence in crude cold-water extracts prepared from the bioluminescent fruiting bodies of M. chlorophos, exhibited potential bioluminescence activation in the early bioluminescence stages, in which the bioluminescence was ultra-weak, for living gills and luminescence activation for non-bioluminescent gills, which was collapsed by freezing and subsequent thawing, at all bioluminescence stages. These abilities were not evident in considerably bioluminescent gills. These abilities were blocked by trans-4-hydroxycinnamic acid and trans-3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid, which were identified as in vivo bioluminescence-activating components. Original bioluminescence and bioluminescence produced from the addition of trans-4-hydroxycinnamic acid and trans-3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid in living gills were almost completely inhibited by 10 mM NaN3 , whereas the luminescence produced form the combination of NADPH and hispidin in thawed non-bioluminescent and living gills at the early weak bioluminescence stages was not inhibited by 10 mM NaN3 . Thus, the combination of NADPH and hispidin plays different roles in luminescence systems compared with essential bioluminescence systems, and the combination of NADPH and hispidin was not essential for visible bioluminescence in living gills.

  7. Bioluminescence in the Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddock, Steven H. D.; Moline, Mark A.; Case, James F.

    2010-01-01

    Bioluminescence spans all oceanic dimensions and has evolved many times—from bacteria to fish—to powerfully influence behavioral and ecosystem dynamics. New methods and technology have brought great advances in understanding of the molecular basis of bioluminescence, its physiological control, and its significance in marine communities. Novel tools derived from understanding the chemistry of natural light-producing molecules have led to countless valuable applications, culminating recently in a related Nobel Prize. Marine organisms utilize bioluminescence for vital functions ranging from defense to reproduction. To understand these interactions and the distributions of luminous organisms, new instruments and platforms allow observations on individual to oceanographic scales. This review explores recent advances, including the chemical and molecular, phylogenetic and functional, community and oceanographic aspects of bioluminescence.

  8. A Modular, Tn7-Based System for Making Bioluminescent or Fluorescent Salmonella and Escherichia coli Strains

    PubMed Central

    Shivak, Dylan J.; MacKenzie, Keith D.; Watson, Nikole L.; Pasternak, J. Alex; Jones, Brian D.; Wang, Yejun; DeVinney, Rebekah; Wilson, Heather L.; Surette, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Our goal was to develop a robust tagging method that can be used to track bacterial strains in vivo. To address this challenge, we adapted two existing systems: a modular plasmid-based reporter system (pCS26) that has been used for high-throughput gene expression studies in Salmonella and Escherichia coli and Tn7 transposition. We generated kanamycin- and chloramphenicol-resistant versions of pCS26 with bacterial luciferase, green fluorescent protein (GFP), and mCherry reporters under the control of σ70-dependent promoters to provide three different levels of constitutive expression. We improved upon the existing Tn7 system by modifying the delivery vector to accept pCS26 constructs and moving the transposase genes from a nonreplicating helper plasmid into a temperature-sensitive plasmid that can be conditionally maintained. This resulted in a 10- to 30-fold boost in transposase gene expression and transposition efficiencies of 10−8 to 10−10 in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and E. coli APEC O1, whereas the existing Tn7 system yielded no successful transposition events. The new reporter strains displayed reproducible signaling in microwell plate assays, confocal microscopy, and in vivo animal infections. We have combined two flexible and complementary tools that can be used for a multitude of molecular biology applications within the Enterobacteriaceae. This system can accommodate new promoter-reporter combinations as they become available and can help to bridge the gap between modern, high-throughput technologies and classical molecular genetics. IMPORTANCE This article describes a flexible and efficient system for tagging bacterial strains. Using our modular plasmid system, a researcher can easily change the reporter type or the promoter driving expression and test the parameters of these new constructs in vitro. Selected constructs can then be stably integrated into the chromosomes of desired strains in two simple steps. We demonstrate the

  9. Glu311 and Arg337 Stabilize a Closed Active-site Conformation and Provide a Critical Catalytic Base and Countercation for Green Bioluminescence in Beetle Luciferases.

    PubMed

    Viviani, V R; Simões, A; Bevilaqua, V R; Gabriel, G V M; Arnoldi, F G C; Hirano, T

    2016-08-30

    Beetle luciferases elicit the emission of different bioluminescence colors from green to red. Whereas firefly luciferases emit yellow-green light and are pH-sensitive, undergoing a typical red-shift at acidic pH and higher temperatures and in the presence of divalent heavy metals, click beetle and railroadworm luciferases emit a wider range of colors from green to red but are pH-independent. Despite many decades of study, the structural determinants and mechanisms of bioluminescence colors and pH sensitivity remain enigmatic. Here, through modeling studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and spectral and kinetic studies using recombinant luciferases from the three main families of bioluminescent beetles that emit different colors of light (Macrolampis sp2 firefly, Phrixotrix hirtus railroadworm, and Pyrearinus termitilluminans click beetle), we investigated the role of E311 and R337 in bioluminescence color determination. All mutations of these residues in firefly luciferase produced red mutants, indicating that the preservation of opposite charges and the lengths of the side chains of E311 and R337 are essential for keeping a salt bridge that stabilizes a closed hydrophobic conformation favorable for green light emission. Kinetic studies indicate that residue R337 is important for binding luciferin and creating a positively charged environment around excited oxyluciferin phenolate. In Pyrearinus green-emitting luciferase, the R334A mutation causes a 27 nm red-shift, whereas in Phrixotrix red-emitting luciferase, the L334R mutation causes a blue-shift that is no longer affected by guanidine. These results provide compelling evidence that the presence of arginine at position 334 is essential for blue-shifting the emission spectra of most beetle luciferases. Therefore, residues E311 and R337 play both structural and catalytic roles in bioluminescence color determination, by stabilizing a closed hydrophobic conformation favorable for green light emission, and also

  10. Image-guided simulation for bioluminescence tomographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Durairaj; Cong, Wenxiang; Thiesse, Jacqueline; Nixon, Earl; Meinel, John, Jr.; Cong, Alex; McLennan, Geoffrey; Hoffman, Eric A.; Ming, Jiang; Wang, Ge

    2005-04-01

    Noninvasive imaging of the reporter gene expression based on bioluminescence is playing an important role in the areas of cancer biology, cell biology, and gene therapy. The central problem for the bioluminescence tomography (BLT) we are developing is to reconstruct the underlying bioluminescent source distribution in a small animal using a modality fusion approach. To solve this inversion problem, a mathematical model of the mouse is built from a CT/micro-CT scan, which enables the assignment of optical parameters to various regions in the model. This optical geometrical model is used in the Monte Carlo simulation to calculate the flux distribution on the animal body surface, as a key part of the BLT process. The model development necessitates approximations in surface simplification, and so on. It leads to the model mismatches of different kinds. To overcome such discrepancies, instead of developing a mathematical model, segmented CT images are directly used in our simulation software. While the simulation code is executed, those images that are relevant are assessed according to the location of the propagating photon. Depending upon the segmentation rules including the pixel value range, appropriate optical parameters are selected for statistical sampling of the free path and weight of the photon. In this paper, we report luminescence experiments using a physical mouse phantom to evaluate this image-guided simulation procedure, which suggest both the feasibility and some advantages of this technique over the existing methods.

  11. Metal-enhanced bioluminescence: An approach for monitoring biological luminescent processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eltzov, Evgeni; Prilutsky, Daria; Kushmaro, Ariel; Marks, Robert S.; Geddes, Chris D.

    2009-02-01

    In this letter, the observation of metal (plasmon)-enhanced bioluminescence is reported. Bacteria, which are capable of generating specific bioluminescence signatures upon metabolic changes (general toxicity), have been studied from both glass and silvered glass microwell bottoms, where the silvered microwells have been modified with surface deposited silver island films (SiFs). The presence of the SiFs plasmon amplifies the near-field bioluminescence signatures, ≈<50 nm from the surface, enabling amplified detection of the reporter bioluminescence indicating sample toxicity. Using our approach a greater than fivefold enhancement in far-field bioluminescence occurs with much greater enhancements in the near-field predicted.

  12. Monitoring of environmental pollutants by bioluminescent bacteria.

    PubMed

    Girotti, Stefano; Ferri, Elida Nora; Fumo, Maria Grazia; Maiolini, Elisabetta

    2008-02-04

    This review deals with the applications of bioluminescent bacteria to the environmental analyses, published during the years 2000-2007. The ecotoxicological assessment, by bioassays, of the environmental risks and the luminescent approaches are reported. The review includes a brief introduction to the characteristics and applications of bioassays, a description of the characteristics and applications of natural bioluminescent bacteria (BLB), and a collection of the main applications to organic and inorganic pollutants. The light-emitting genetically modified bacteria applications, as well as the bioluminescent immobilized systems and biosensors are outlined. Considerations about commercially available BLB and BLB catalogues are also reported. Most of the environmental applications, here mentioned, of luminescent organisms are on wastewater, seawater, surface and ground water, tap water, soil and sediments, air. Comparison to other bioindicators and bioassay has been also made. Various tables have been inserted, to make easier to take a rapid glance at all possible references concerning the topic of specific interest.

  13. Thoughts on the diversity of convergent evolution of bioluminescence on earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldenmaier, Hans E.; Oliveira, Anderson G.; Stevani, Cassius V.

    2012-10-01

    The widespread independent evolution of analogous bioluminescent systems is one of the most impressive and diverse examples of convergent evolution on earth. There are roughly 30 extant bioluminescent systems that have evolved independently on Earth, with each system likely having unique enzymes responsible for catalysing the bioluminescent reaction. Bioluminescence is a chemical reaction involving a luciferin molecule and a luciferase or photoprotein that results in the emission of light. Some independent systems utilize the same luciferin, such as the use of tetrapyrrolic compounds by krill and dinoflagellates, and the wide use of coelenterazine by marine organisms, while the enzymes involved are unique. One common thread among all the different bioluminescent systems is the requirement of molecular oxygen. Bioluminescence is found in most forms of life, especially marine organisms. Bioluminescence in known to benefit the organism by: attraction, repulsion, communication, camouflage, and illumination. The marine ecosystem is significantly affected by bioluminescence, the only light found in the pelagic zone and below is from bioluminescent organisms. Transgenic bioluminescent organisms have revolutionized molecular research, medicine and the biotechnology industry. The use of bioluminescence in studying molecular pathways and disease allows for non-invasive and real-time analysis. Bioluminescence-based assays have been developed for several analytes by coupling luminescence to many enzyme-catalysed reactions.

  14. Immobilized Bioluminescent Reagents in Flow Injection Analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Abdul

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Bioluminescent reactions exhibits two important characteristics from an analytical viewpoint; they are selective and highly sensitive. Furthermore, bioluminescent emissions are easily measured with a simple flow-through detector based on a photomultiplier tube and the rapid and reproducible mixing of sample and expensive reagent is best achieved by a flow injection manifold. The two most important bioluminescent systems are the enzyme (luciferase)/substrate (luciferin) combinations extracted from fireflies (Photinus pyralis) and marine bacteria (Virio harveyi) which requires ATP and NAD(P)H respectively as cofactors. Reactions that generate or consume these cofactors can also be coupled to the bioluminescent reaction to provide assays for a wide range of clinically important species. A flow injection manifold for the study of bioluminescent reactions is described, as are procedures for the extraction, purification and immobilization of firefly and bacterial luciferase and oxidoreductase. Results are presented for the determination of ATP using firefly system and the determination of other enzymes and substrates participating in ATP-converting reactions e.g. creatine kinase, ATP-sulphurylase, pyruvate kinase, creatine phosphate, pyrophosphate and phophoenolypyruvate. Similarly results are presented for the determination of NAD(P)H, FMN, FMNH_2 and several dehydrogenases which produce NAD(P)H and their substrates, e.g. alcohol, L-lactate, L-malate, L-glutamate, Glucose-6-phosphate and primary bile acid.

  15. Homogeneous, bioluminescent proteasome assays.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Martha A; Moravec, Richard A; Riss, Terry L; Bulleit, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    Protein degradation is mediated predominantly through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The importance of the proteasome in regulating degradation of proteins involved in cell-cycle control, apoptosis, and angiogenesis led to the recognition of the proteasome as a therapeutic target for cancer. The proteasome is also essential for degrading misfolded and aberrant proteins, and impaired proteasome function has been implicated in neurodegerative and cardiovascular diseases. Robust, sensitive assays are essential for monitoring proteasome activity and for developing inhibitors of the proteasome. Peptide-conjugated fluorophores are widely used as substrates for monitoring proteasome activity, but fluorogenic substrates can exhibit significant background and can be problematic for screening because of cellular autofluorescence or interference from fluorescent library compounds. Furthermore, fluorescent proteasome assays require column-purified 20S or 26S proteasome (typically obtained from erythrocytes), or proteasome extracts from whole cells, as their samples. To provide assays more amenable to high-throughput screening, we developed a homogeneous, bioluminescent method that combines peptide-conjugated aminoluciferin substrates and a stabilized luciferase. Using substrates for the chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like, and caspase-like proteasome activities in combination with a selective membrane permeabilization step, we developed single-step, cell-based assays to measure each of the proteasome catalytic activities. The homogeneous method eliminates the need to prepare individual cell extracts as samples and has adequate sensitivity for 96- and 384-well plates. The simple "add and read" format enables sensitive and rapid proteasome assays ideal for inhibitor screening.

  16. Characterization of bioluminescent derivatives of assimilable organic carbon test bacteria.

    PubMed

    Haddix, Pryce L; Shaw, Nancy J; LeChevallier, Mark W

    2004-02-01

    The assimilable organic carbon (AOC) test is a standardized measure of the bacterial growth potential of treated water. We describe the design and initial development of an AOC assay that uses bioluminescent derivatives of AOC test bacteria. Our assay is based on the observation that bioluminescence peaks at full cell yield just prior to the onset of the stationary phase during growth in a water sample. Pseudomonas fluorescens P-17 and Spirillum sp. strain NOX bacteria were mutagenized with luxCDABE operon fusion and inducible transposons and were selected on minimal medium. Independent mutants were screened for high luminescence activity and predicted AOC assay sensitivity. All mutants tested were able to grow in tap water under AOC assay conditions. Strains P-17 I5 (with p-aminosalicylate inducer) and NOX I3 were chosen for use in the bioluminescence AOC test. Peak bioluminescence and plate count AOC were linearly related for both test bacteria, though data suggest that the P-17 bioluminescence assay requires more consistent luminescence monitoring. Bioluminescence results were obtained 2 or 3 days postinoculation, compared with 5 days for the ATP luminescence AOC assay and 8 days for the plate count assay. Plate count AOC assay results for nonmutant and bioluminescent bacteria from 36 water samples showed insignificant differences, indicating that the luminescent bacteria retained a full range of AOC measurement capability. This bioluminescence method is amenable to automation with a microplate format with programmable reagent injection.

  17. Efficiency of peracetic acid in inactivating bacteria, viruses, and spores in water determined with ATP bioluminescence, quantitative PCR, and culture-based methods.

    PubMed

    Park, Eunyoung; Lee, Cheonghoon; Bisesi, Michael; Lee, Jiyoung

    2014-03-01

    The disinfection efficiency of peracetic acid (PAA) was investigated on three microbial types using three different methods (filtration-based ATP (adenosine-triphosphate) bioluminescence, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), culture-based method). Fecal indicator bacteria (Enterococcus faecium), virus indicator (male-specific (F(+)) coliphages (coliphages)), and protozoa disinfection surrogate (Bacillus subtilis spores (spores)) were tested. The mode of action for spore disinfection was visualized using scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that PAA concentrations of 5 ppm (contact time: 5 min), 50 ppm (10 min), and 3,000 ppm (5 min) were needed to achieve 3-log reduction of E. faecium, coliphages, and spores, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy observation showed that PAA targets the external layers of spores. The lower reduction rates of tested microbes measured with qPCR suggest that qPCR may overestimate the surviving microbes. Collectively, PAA showed broad disinfection efficiency (susceptibility: E. faecium > coliphages > spores). For E. faecium and spores, ATP bioluminescence was substantially faster (∼5 min) than culture-based method (>24 h) and qPCR (2-3 h). This study suggests PAA as an effective alternative to inactivate broad types of microbial contaminants in water. Together with the use of rapid detection methods, this approach can be useful for urgent situations when timely response is needed for ensuring water quality.

  18. Optimized chromatographic and bioluminescent methods for inorganic pyrophosphate based on its conversion to ATP by firefly luciferase.

    PubMed

    Marques, Simone M; Peralta, Filipe; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C G

    2009-02-15

    Two new methods for inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) quantification are described. They are based on the enzymatic conversion of PPi into ATP by firefly luciferase (Luc, E.C. 1.13.12.7) in the presence of dehydroluciferyl-adenylate (L-AMP) followed by the determination of ATP by one of two different procedures, either UV-monitored (260 nm) ion-pair-HPLC (IP-HPLC) (method A) or luciferase-dependent bioluminescence in the presence of its substrate, firefly luciferin (D-LH(2)) (method B). These methods were subjected to optimization using experimental design methodologies to obtain optimum values for the selected factors: method A-incubation time (t(inc)=15 min), inactivation time of the enzyme (t(inac)=2 min), pH of the reaction mixture (pH 7.50) and the concentrations of L-AMP ([L-AMP]=40 microM) and luciferase ([Luc]=0.1 microM); method B-concentrations of L-AMP ([L-AMP]=2 microM), luciferase ([Luc]=50 nM) and luciferin ([LH(2)]=30 microM). Method A has a linear response over the range of 0.1-20 microM of PPi, with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.5 microM and a limit of quantitation (LOQ) of 1.8 microM. Precision, expressed as relative standard deviation (R.S.D.), is 7.4% at 1 microM PPi and 5.9% at 8 microM PPi. Method B has a linear response over the range of 0.75-6.0 microM of PPi, with LOD and LOQ of 0.624 and 2.23 microM, respectively, and a R.S.D. of 5.1% at 2.5 microM PPi and 4.9% at 5 microM PPi. Under optimized conditions sensitive and robust methods can be obtained for the analysis of PPi impurities in commercial nucleotides and tripolyphosphate (P(3)).

  19. Bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Michael L.; Sayler, Gary S.; Paulus, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed are monolithic bioelectronic devices comprising a bioreporter and an OASIC. These bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit are useful in detecting substances such as pollutants, explosives, and heavy-metals residing in inhospitable areas such as groundwater, industrial process vessels, and battlefields. Also disclosed are methods and apparatus for environmental pollutant detection, oil exploration, drug discovery, industrial process control, and hazardous chemical monitoring.

  20. A Prototype Bioluminescence Photometer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    Seliger et al., 1962) provided maximum mechanical stimulation to dino - flagellates , and incorporated light baffles to permit continuous measurement...was deployed in a shallow coastal area relatively free of any mixing. The principle bioluminescent plankton were the dino - flagellates , as evidenced

  1. Bioluminescence-based identification of nisin producers - a rapid and simple screening method for nisinogenic bacteria in food samples.

    PubMed

    Virolainen, Nina; Guglielmetti, Simone; Arioli, Stefania; Karp, Matti

    2012-08-17

    We present a simple and rapid method for screening nisin producers that directly identifies nisinogenic bacteria by induction of bioluminescence within the Lactococcus lactis NZ9800lux biosensor strain (Immonen and Karp, 2007, Biosensors and Bioelectronics 22, 1982-7). An overlay of putative nisinogenic colonies with the biosensor strain gives identification results within 1h. Functionality and specificity of the method were verified by screening nisin producers among 144 raw milk colonies and a panel of 91 lactococcal strains. Studies performed on strains and colonies that did not induce bioluminescence but inhibited growth of the biosensor demonstrated that only nisinogenic bacteria can cause induction. Bacteria known to produce bacteriocins other than nisin failed to induce bioluminescence, further verifying the specificity of the assay. We discovered a non-inducing but inhibitory lactococcal strain harboring a modified nisin Z gene, and demonstrated that the source of the inhibitory action is not a non-inducing variant of nisin, but a bacteriocin of lower molecular weight. The concentration of nisin producers in a raw milk sample was 1.3 × 10(2)CFU/ml. We identified from raw milk a total of seven nisin Z producing L. lactis subsp. lactis colonies, which were shown by genetic fingerprinting to belong to three different groups. Among the panel of 91 lactococci, four strains were nisin A producers, and one strain harbored the modified nisin Z gene. The method presented here is robust, cost-effective and simple to perform, and avoids the pitfalls of traditional screening methods by directly specifying the identity of the inhibitory substance.

  2. The first report of luminescent liver tissue in fishes: evolution and structure of bioluminescent organs in the deep-sea naked barracudinas (Aulopiformes: Lestidiidae).

    PubMed

    Ghedotti, Michael J; Barton, Ryan W; Simons, Andrew M; Davis, Matthew P

    2015-03-01

    Bioluminescent organs that provide ventral camouflage are common among fishes in the meso-bathypelagic zones of the deep sea. However, the anatomical structures that have been modified to produce light vary substantially among different groups of fishes. Although the anatomical structure and evolutionary derivation of some of these organs have been well studied, the light organs of the naked barracudinas have received little scientific attention. This study describes the anatomy and evolution of bioluminescent organs in the Lestidiidae (naked barracudinas) in the context of a new phylogeny of barracudinas and closely related alepisauroid fishes. Gross and histological examination of bioluminescent organs or homologous structures from preserved museum specimens indicate that the ventral light organ is derived from hepatopancreatic tissue and that the antorbital spot in Lestrolepis is, in fact, a second dermal light organ. In the context of the phylogeny generated from DNA-sequence data from eight gene fragments (7 nuclear and 1 mitochondrial), a complex liver with a narrow ventral strand running along the ventral midline evolves first in the Lestidiidae. The ventral hepatopancreatic tissue later evolves into a ventral bioluminescent organ in the ancestor of Lestidium and Lestrolepis with the lineage leading to the genus Lestrolepis evolving a dermal antorbital bioluminescent organ, likely for light-intensity matching. This is the first described hepatopancreatic bioluminescent organ in fishes.

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading, Genetically Engineered Bioluminescent Bioreporter Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Archana; Layton, Alice C.; Williams, Daniel E.; Smartt, Abby E.; Ripp, Steven; Karpinets, Tatiana V.; Brown, Steven D.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strain HK44 (DSM 6700) is a genetically engineered lux-based bioluminescent bioreporter. Here we report the draft genome sequence of strain HK44. Annotation of ∼6.1 Mb of sequence indicates that 30% of the traits are unique and distributed over five genomic islands, a prophage, and two plasmids. PMID:21742869

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading, Genetically Engineered Bioluminescent Bioreporter Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44

    SciTech Connect

    Chauhan, Archana; Layton, Alice; Williams, Daniel W; Smart, Abby E.; Ripp, Steven Anthony; Karpinets, Tatiana V; Brown, Steven D; Sayler, Gary Steven

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strain HK44 (DSM 6700) is a genetically engineered lux-based bioluminescent bioreporter. Here we report the draft genome sequence of strain HK44. Annotation of {approx}6.1 Mb sequence indicates that 30% of the traits are unique and distributed over 5 genomic islands, a prophage and two plasmids.

  5. Dual-Color Monitoring Overcomes the Limitations of Single Bioluminescent Reporters in Fast-Growing Microbes and Reveals Phase-Dependent Protein Productivity during the Metabolic Rhythms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamoorthy, Archana

    2015-01-01

    Luciferase is a useful, noninvasive reporter of gene regulation that can be continuously monitored over long periods of time; however, its use is problematic in fast-growing microbes like bacteria and yeast because rapidly changing cell numbers and metabolic states also influence bioluminescence, thereby confounding the reporter's signal. Here we show that these problems can be overcome in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by simultaneously monitoring bioluminescence from two different colors of beetle luciferase, where one color (green) reports activity of a gene of interest, while a second color (red) is stably expressed and used to continuously normalize green bioluminescence for fluctuations in signal intensity that are unrelated to gene regulation. We use this dual-luciferase strategy in conjunction with a light-inducible promoter system to test whether different phases of yeast respiratory oscillations are more suitable for heterologous protein production than others. By using pulses of light to activate production of a green luciferase while normalizing signal variation to a red luciferase, we show that the early reductive phase of the yeast metabolic cycle produces more luciferase than other phases. PMID:26162874

  6. Dual-Color Monitoring Overcomes the Limitations of Single Bioluminescent Reporters in Fast-Growing Microbes and Reveals Phase-Dependent Protein Productivity during the Metabolic Rhythms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Archana; Robertson, J Brian

    2015-09-01

    Luciferase is a useful, noninvasive reporter of gene regulation that can be continuously monitored over long periods of time; however, its use is problematic in fast-growing microbes like bacteria and yeast because rapidly changing cell numbers and metabolic states also influence bioluminescence, thereby confounding the reporter's signal. Here we show that these problems can be overcome in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by simultaneously monitoring bioluminescence from two different colors of beetle luciferase, where one color (green) reports activity of a gene of interest, while a second color (red) is stably expressed and used to continuously normalize green bioluminescence for fluctuations in signal intensity that are unrelated to gene regulation. We use this dual-luciferase strategy in conjunction with a light-inducible promoter system to test whether different phases of yeast respiratory oscillations are more suitable for heterologous protein production than others. By using pulses of light to activate production of a green luciferase while normalizing signal variation to a red luciferase, we show that the early reductive phase of the yeast metabolic cycle produces more luciferase than other phases.

  7. Bioluminescence lights the way to food safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovko, Lubov Y.; Griffiths, Mansel W.

    2003-07-01

    The food industry is increasingly adopting food safety and quality management systems that are more proactive and preventive than those used in the past which have tended to rely on end product testing and visual inspection. The regulatory agencies in many countries are promoting one such management tool, Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP), as a way to achieve a safer food supply and as a basis for harmonization of trading standards. Verification that the process is safe must involve microbiological testing but the results need not be generated in real-time. Of all the rapid microbiological tests currently available, the only ones that come close to offering real-time results are bioluminescence-based methods. Recent developments in application of bioluminescence for food safety issues are presented in the paper. These include the use of genetically engineered microorganisms with bioluminescent and fluorescent phenotypes as a real time indicator of physiological state and survival of food-borne pathogens in food and food processing environments as well as novel bioluminescent-based methods for rapid detection of pathogens in food and environmental samples. Advantages and pitfalls of the methods are discussed.

  8. Multicolor Bioluminescence Obtained Using Firefly Luciferin.

    PubMed

    Kiyama, Masahiro; Saito, Ryohei; Iwano, Satoshi; Obata, Rika; Niwa, Haruki; Maki, Shojiro A

    2016-01-01

    Firefly bioluminescence is widely used in life science research as a useful analysis tool. For example, the adenosine-5`-triphosphate (ATP)-dependent enzymatic firefly bioluminescence reaction has long been utilized as a microbial monitoring tool. Rapid and sensitive firefly luciferin-luciferase combinations are used not only to measure cell viability but also for reporter-gene assays. Recently, bioluminescence was utilized as a noninvasive, real-time imaging tool for living subjects to monitor cells and biological events. However, the number of commercialized luciferase genes is limited and tissue-permeable near-infrared (NIR) region emitting light is required for in vivo imaging. In this review, recent studies describing synthetic luciferin analogues predicted to have red-shifted bioluminescence are summarized. Luciferase substrates emitting red, green, and blue light that were designed and developed in our laboratory are presented. The longest emission wavelength of the synthesized luciferin analogues was recorded at 675 nm, which is within the NIR region. This compound is now commercially available as "Aka Lumine®".

  9. Rational and random mutagenesis of firefly luciferase to identify an efficient emitter of red bioluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branchini, Bruce R.; Southworth, Tara L.; Khattak, Neelum F.; Murtiashaw, Martha H.; Fleet, Sarah E.

    2004-06-01

    Firefly luciferase, which emits yellow-green (557 nm) light, and the corresponding cDNA have been used successfully as a bioluminescence reporter of gene expression. One particularly exciting application is in the area of in vivo bioluminescence imaging. Our interest is in developing improved reagents by identifying Photinus pyralis luciferase mutants that efficiently emit red bioluminescence. In this way, the proven advantages of the P. pyralis protein can be combined with the potential advantages of a red-shifted emitter. Using site-directed mutagenesis techniques, we have identified many mutants emitting red bioluminescence. Unfortunately, these enzymes generally have significantly decreased bioluminescence activity. Interestingly, we discovered a mutation, Ile351Ala, that produced a moderate 16 nm red-shift, while maintaining excellent bioluminescence activity. We then undertook a random mutagenesis approach to identify luciferase mutants that emit further red-shifted bioluminescence with minimal loss of activity. Libraries of mutants were created using an error-prone PCR method and the Ile351Ala luciferase mutant as the template DNA. The libraries were screened by in vivo bacterial assays and the promising mutants were purified to enable accurate determination of bioluminescence emission spectra and total bioluminescence activity. We will report the characterization results, including the identification of the randomly altered amino acids, of several mutants that catalyze bioluminescence with emission maxima of approximately 600 nm.

  10. Theoretical Study of Dinoflagellate Bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-Yu; Liu, Ya-Jun

    2017-03-01

    Dinoflagellates are the most ubiquitous luminescent protists in the marine environment and have drawn much attention for their crucial roles in marine ecosystems. Dinoflagellate bioluminescence has been applied in underwater target detection. The luminescent system of dinoflagellates is a typical luciferin-luciferase one. However, the excited-state oxyluciferin is not the light emitter of dinoflagellate bioluminescence as in most luciferin-luciferase bioluminescent organisms. The oxyluciferin of bioluminescent dinoflagellates is not fluorescent, whereas its luciferin emits bright fluorescence with similar wavelength of the bioluminescence. What is the light emitter of dinoflagellate bioluminescence and what is the chemical process of the light emission like? These questions have not been answered by the limited experimental evidence so far. In this study, for the first time, the density functional calculation is employed to investigate the geometries and properties of luciferin and oxyluciferin of bioluminescent dinoflagellate. The calculated results agree with the experimental observations and indicate the luciferin or its analogue, rather than oxyluciferin, is the bioluminophore of dinoflagellate bioluminescence. A rough mechanism involving energy transfer is proposed for dinoflagellate bioluminescence.

  11. Bioluminescent bioreporter sensing of foodborne toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraley, Amanda C.; Ripp, Steven; Sayler, Gary S.

    2004-06-01

    Histamine is the primary etiological agent in the foodborne disease scombrotoxicosis, one of the most common food toxicities related to fish consumption. Procedures for detecting histamine in fish products are available, but are often too expensive or too complex for routine use. As an alternative, a bacterial bioluminescent bioreporter has been constructed to develop a biosensor system that autonomously responds to low levels of histamine. The bioreporter contains a promoterless Photorhabdus luminescens lux operon (luxCDABE) fused with the Vibrio anguillarum angR regulatory gene promoter of the anguibactin biosynthetic operon. The bioreporter emitted 1.46 times more bioluminescence than background, 30 minutes after the addition of 100mM histamine. However, specificity was not optimal, as this biosensor generated significant bioluminescence in the presence of L-proline and L-histidine. As a means towards improving histamine specificity, the promoter region of a histamine oxidase gene from Arthrobacter globiformis was cloned upstream of the promotorless lux operon from Photorhabdus luminescens. This recently constructed whole-cell, lux-based bioluminescent bioreporter is currently being tested for optimal performance in the presence of histamine in order to provide a rapid, simple, and inexpensive model sensor for the detection of foodborne toxins.

  12. Validation of constitutively expressed bioluminescent Pseudomonas aeruginosa as a rapid microbiological quantification tool.

    PubMed

    Shah, N; Naseby, D C

    2015-06-15

    Whole cell biosensors have been extensively used for monitoring toxicity and contamination of various compounds and xenobiotics in environmental biology and microbial ecology; their application in the pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries has been limited. According to several pharmacopoeias, pharmaceutical products must be tested for microbial activity using traditional viable count techniques; the use of whole cell microbial biosensors potentially provides an alternative, fast, and efficient method. However there is a lack of a validated bioluminescence method. Prototype whole cell microbial biosensors have already been developed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027. Validation of the bioluminescent strains was performed in accordance with the pharmacopoeia, Parenteral Drug Association and International Organisation of Standardisation. These strains demonstrated that the bioluminescent method was accurate, precise and equivalent, as compared with plate counting at a range of 10(3)-10(7) CFU/mL. Percentage recoveries using the bioluminescent method were between 70% and 130% for all bioluminescent strains and therefore the bioluminescent method was accurate according to the criteria set in PDA technical report 33. The method was also more precise (relative standard deviation less than 15%) than the traditional plate counting method or the ATP bioluminescent method. The lower limit of detection was 10(3) CFU/mL. Two-way ANOVA showed no significant difference between the traditional plate counting and the novel bioluminescent method for all bioluminescent strains. The bioluminescent constructs passed/exceeded pharmacopoeia-specified criteria for range, limit of detection, accuracy, precision and equivalence.

  13. A novel luciferase fusion protein for highly sensitive optical imaging: from single-cell analysis to in vivo whole-body bioluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Mezzanotte, Laura; Blankevoort, Vicky; Löwik, Clemens W G M; Kaijzel, Eric L

    2014-09-01

    Fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging have different advantages and disadvantages depending on the application. Bioluminescence imaging is now the most sensitive optical technique for tracking cells, promoter activity studies, or for longitudinal in vivo preclinical studies. Far-red and near-infrared fluorescence imaging have the advantage of being suitable for both ex vivo and in vivo analysis and have translational potential, thanks to the availability of very sensitive imaging instrumentation. Here, we report the development and validation of a new luciferase fusion reporter generated by the fusion of the firefly luciferase Luc2 to the far-red fluorescent protein TurboFP635 by a 14-amino acid linker peptide. Expression of the fusion protein, named TurboLuc, was analyzed in human embryonic kidney cells, (HEK)-293 cells, via Western blot analysis, fluorescence microscopy, and in vivo optical imaging. The created fusion protein maintained the characteristics of the original bioluminescent and fluorescent protein and showed no toxicity when expressed in living cells. To assess the sensitivity of the reporter for in vivo imaging, transfected cells were subcutaneously injected in animals. Detection limits of cells were 5 × 10(3) and 5 × 10(4) cells for bioluminescent and fluorescent imaging, respectively. In addition, hydrodynamics-based in vivo gene delivery using a minicircle vector expressing TurboLuc allowed for the analysis of luminescent signals over time in deep tissue. Bioluminescence could be monitored for over 30 days in the liver of animals. In conclusion, TurboLuc combines the advantages of both bioluminescence and fluorescence and allows for highly sensitive optical imaging ranging from single-cell analysis to in vivo whole-body bioluminescence imaging.

  14. A sensitive and specific assay for superoxide anion released by neutrophils or macrophages based on bioluminescence of polynoidin.

    PubMed

    Colepicolo, P; Camarero, V C; Nicolas, M T; Bassot, J M; Karnovsky, M L; Hastings, J W

    1990-02-01

    Using the luminescent protein polynoidin, present in the bioluminescent system isolated from the marine annelid Harmothoe lunulata, we have developed a new method to measure, specifically, superoxide anion (O2-) released by macrophages or neutrophils. A small quantity of an aqueous crude extract of polynoidin is used to detect O2- released by stimulated cells. Light emission is linearly dependent on the number of cells over a wide range (10(3) to 10(7) cells), and the assay is thus more sensitive than either luminol or ferricytochrome c reduction. Luminescence is enhanced 20% by mannitol, 80% by catalase, and is totally quenched by superoxide dismutase. For the same number of cells, neutrophils showed a threefold higher release of O2- and a twofold faster first-order light decay than stimulated macrophages, in accordance with data obtained by other methods.

  15. Selected Least Studied but not Forgotten Bioluminescent Systems.

    PubMed

    Oba, Yuichi; Stevani, Cassius V; Oliveira, Anderson G; Tsarkova, Aleksandra S; Chepurnykh, Tatiana V; Yampolsky, Ilia V

    2017-03-01

    Bioluminescence is a form of chemiluminescence generated by luminous organisms. Luminous taxa have currently been reported from about 800 genera and probably over 10 000 species in the world. On the other hand, their bioluminescent systems, including chemical structures of luciferins/chromophores and the genes encoding luciferases/photoproteins, have been elucidated from only a few taxonomic groups, for example beetles, bacteria, dinoflagellates, ostracods and some cnidarians. Research efforts to understand unknown bioluminescence systems are being conducted around the world, and recently, for example, novel luciferin structures of luminous enchytraeid potworms and fungi were identified by the authors. In this study, we review the current status and perspectives, in the context of postgenomic era, of most likely novel but less-revealed bioluminescence systems of ten selected organisms: earthworm, parchment tubeworm, fireworm, scaleworm, limpet, millipede, brittle star, acorn worms, tunicate and shark, which indeed are the next focus of our international collaboration.

  16. Marine Bioluminescence: Mechanisms and Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-30

    study of bioluminescence in the S. California Bight using moored detectors, (3) continue study of luminescence in gelatinous zooplankton and marine snow...preparation were the principal efforts in the work on gelatinous zooplankton and marine snow. (4) Cytoskeletal investigations of Pyrocystis...potential adaptive significance of the wavelengths of light produced by gelatinous zooplankton . Bioluminescence spectra were measured from 100

  17. Developing a Predictive Capability for Bioluminescence Signatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    naval nighttime operations because the flow field associated with their motion stimulates naturally occurring plankton . In the littoral, the primary...sources of bioluminescence are dinoflagellates, common unicellular plankton that are also known to form red tides. Dinoflagellate bioluminescence is...bioluminescent “signatures” of some swimming fish are distinct enough to differentiate species; nocturnally foraging predators may use bioluminescent

  18. Developing a Predictive Capability for Bioluminescence Signatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    naval nighttime operations because the flow field associated with their motion stimulates naturally occurring plankton . In the littoral, the primary...sources of bioluminescence are dinoflagellates, common unicellular plankton that are also known to form red tides. Dinoflagellate bioluminescence is...bioluminescent signatures of some swimming fish are distinct enough to differentiate species; nocturnally foraging predators may use bioluminescent

  19. A Bioluminescent Whole-Cell Reporter for Detection of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid and 2,4-Dichlorophenol in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Anthony G.; Rice, James F.; Applegate, Bruce M.; Bright, Nathan G.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2000-01-01

    A bioreporter was made containing a tfdRPDII-luxCDABE fusion in a modified mini-Tn5 construct. When it was introduced into the chromosome of Ralstonia eutropha JMP134, the resulting strain, JMP134-32, produced a sensitive bioluminescent response to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) at concentrations of 2.0 μM to 5.0 mM. This response was linear (R2 = 0.9825) in the range of 2.0 μM to 1.1 × 102 μM. Saturation occurred at higher concentrations, with maximal bioluminescence occurring in the presence of approximately 1.2 mM 2,4-D. A sensitive response was also recorded in the presence of 2,4-dichlorophenol at concentrations below 1.1 × 102 μM; however, only a limited bioluminescent response was recorded in the presence of 3-chlorobenzoic acid at concentrations below 1.0 mM. A significant bioluminescent response was also recorded when strain JMP134-32 was incubated with soils containing aged 2,4-D residues. PMID:11010925

  20. Strengths and weaknesses in the determination of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell viability by ATP-based bioluminescence assay.

    PubMed

    Paciello, Lucia; Falco, Francesco Cristino; Landi, Carmine; Parascandola, Palma

    2013-03-05

    Due to its sensitivity and speed of execution, detection of ATP by luciferin-luciferase reaction is a widely spread system to highlight cell viability. The paper describes the methodology followed to successfully run the assay in the presence of yeast cells of two strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, BY4741 and CEN.PK2-1C and emphasizes the importance of correctly determining the contact time between the lysing agent and the yeast cells. Once this was established, luciferin-luciferase reaction was exploited to determine the maximum specific rate of growth, as well as cell viability in a series of routine tests. The results obtained in this preliminary study highlighted that using luciferin-luciferase can imply an over-estimation of maximum specific growth rate with respect to that determined by optical density and/or viable count. On the contrary, the bioluminescence assay gave the possibility to highlight, if employed together with viable count, physiological changes occurring in yeast cells as response to stressful environmental conditions such as those deriving from exposure of yeast cells to high temperature or those depending on the operative conditions applied during fed-batch operations.

  1. Bioluminescence imaging: a shining future for cardiac regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Roura, Santiago; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Bayes-Genis, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Advances in bioanalytical techniques have become crucial for both basic research and medical practice. One example, bioluminescence imaging (BLI), is based on the application of natural reactants with light-emitting capabilities (photoproteins and luciferases) isolated from a widespread group of organisms. The main challenges in cardiac regeneration remain unresolved, but a vast number of studies have harnessed BLI with the discovery of aequorin and green fluorescent proteins. First described in the luminous hydromedusan Aequorea victoria in the early 1960s, bioluminescent proteins have greatly contributed to the design and initiation of ongoing cell-based clinical trials on cardiovascular diseases. In conjunction with advances in reporter gene technology, BLI provides valuable information about the location and functional status of regenerative cells implanted into numerous animal models of disease. The purpose of this review was to present the great potential of BLI, among other existing imaging modalities, to refine effectiveness and underlying mechanisms of cardiac cell therapy. We recount the first discovery of natural primary compounds with light-emitting capabilities, and follow their applications to bioanalysis. We also illustrate insights and perspectives on BLI to illuminate current efforts in cardiac regeneration, where the future is bright. PMID:23402217

  2. Bioluminescence imaging: a shining future for cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Roura, Santiago; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Bayes-Genis, Antoni

    2013-06-01

    Advances in bioanalytical techniques have become crucial for both basic research and medical practice. One example, bioluminescence imaging (BLI), is based on the application of natural reactants with light-emitting capabilities (photoproteins and luciferases) isolated from a widespread group of organisms. The main challenges in cardiac regeneration remain unresolved, but a vast number of studies have harnessed BLI with the discovery of aequorin and green fluorescent proteins. First described in the luminous hydromedusan Aequorea victoria in the early 1960s, bioluminescent proteins have greatly contributed to the design and initiation of ongoing cell-based clinical trials on cardiovascular diseases. In conjunction with advances in reporter gene technology, BLI provides valuable information about the location and functional status of regenerative cells implanted into numerous animal models of disease. The purpose of this review was to present the great potential of BLI, among other existing imaging modalities, to refine effectiveness and underlying mechanisms of cardiac cell therapy. We recount the first discovery of natural primary compounds with light-emitting capabilities, and follow their applications to bioanalysis. We also illustrate insights and perspectives on BLI to illuminate current efforts in cardiac regeneration, where the future is bright.

  3. Measurement of Bacterial Bioluminescence Intensity and Spectrum: Current Physical Techniques and Principles.

    PubMed

    Jia, Kun; Ionescu, Rodica Elena

    2016-01-01

    : Bioluminescence is light production by living organisms, which can be observed in numerous marine creatures and some terrestrial invertebrates. More specifically, bacterial bioluminescence is the "cold light" produced and emitted by bacterial cells, including both wild-type luminescent and genetically engineered bacteria. Because of the lively interplay of synthetic biology, microbiology, toxicology, and biophysics, different configurations of whole-cell biosensors based on bacterial bioluminescence have been designed and are widely used in different fields, such as ecotoxicology, food toxicity, and environmental pollution. This chapter first discusses the background of the bioluminescence phenomenon in terms of optical spectrum. Platforms for bacterial bioluminescence detection using various techniques are then introduced, such as a photomultiplier tube, charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), and complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) based integrated circuit. Furthermore, some typical biochemical methods to optimize the analytical performances of bacterial bioluminescent biosensors/assays are reviewed, followed by a presentation of author's recent work concerning the improved sensitivity of a bioluminescent assay for pesticides. Finally, bacterial bioluminescence as implemented in eukaryotic cells, bioluminescent imaging, and cancer cell therapies is discussed.

  4. Quantification of bioluminescence from the surface to the deep sea demonstrates its predominance as an ecological trait.

    PubMed

    Martini, Séverine; Haddock, Steven H D

    2017-04-04

    The capability of animals to emit light, called bioluminescence, is considered to be a major factor in ecological interactions. Because it occurs across diverse taxa, measurements of bioluminescence can be powerful to detect and quantify organisms in the ocean. In this study, 17 years of video observations were recorded by remotely operated vehicles during surveys off the California Coast, from the surface down to 3,900 m depth. More than 350,000 observations are classified for their bioluminescence capability based on literature descriptions. The organisms represented 553 phylogenetic concepts (species, genera or families, at the most precise taxonomic level defined from the images), distributed within 13 broader taxonomic categories. The importance of bioluminescent marine taxa is highlighted in the water column, as we showed that 76% of the observed individuals have bioluminescence capability. More than 97% of Cnidarians were bioluminescent, and 9 of the 13 taxonomic categories were found to be bioluminescent dominant. The percentage of bioluminescent animals is remarkably uniform over depth. Moreover, the proportion of bioluminescent and non-bioluminescent animals within taxonomic groups changes with depth for Ctenophora, Scyphozoa, Chaetognatha, and Crustacea. Given these results, bioluminescence has to be considered an important ecological trait from the surface to the deep-sea.

  5. Quantification of bioluminescence from the surface to the deep sea demonstrates its predominance as an ecological trait

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Séverine; Haddock, Steven H. D.

    2017-01-01

    The capability of animals to emit light, called bioluminescence, is considered to be a major factor in ecological interactions. Because it occurs across diverse taxa, measurements of bioluminescence can be powerful to detect and quantify organisms in the ocean. In this study, 17 years of video observations were recorded by remotely operated vehicles during surveys off the California Coast, from the surface down to 3,900 m depth. More than 350,000 observations are classified for their bioluminescence capability based on literature descriptions. The organisms represented 553 phylogenetic concepts (species, genera or families, at the most precise taxonomic level defined from the images), distributed within 13 broader taxonomic categories. The importance of bioluminescent marine taxa is highlighted in the water column, as we showed that 76% of the observed individuals have bioluminescence capability. More than 97% of Cnidarians were bioluminescent, and 9 of the 13 taxonomic categories were found to be bioluminescent dominant. The percentage of bioluminescent animals is remarkably uniform over depth. Moreover, the proportion of bioluminescent and non-bioluminescent animals within taxonomic groups changes with depth for Ctenophora, Scyphozoa, Chaetognatha, and Crustacea. Given these results, bioluminescence has to be considered an important ecological trait from the surface to the deep-sea. PMID:28374789

  6. On the pH dependent behavior of the firefly bioluminescence: protein dynamics and water content in the active pocket.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Woo; Rhee, Young Min

    2013-06-20

    Understanding bioluminescence presents fascinating challenges for fundamental sciences and numerous opportunities for practical applications. As a representative example, the firefly bioluminescent system has been intensively studied in both experimental and computational areas. However, there are still remaining questions regarding especially the detailed protein dynamics and the mechanisms of its color modulation. Here, we report on the pH dependent behavior of the firefly bioluminescence primarily based on molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the overall protein structure is generally resilient to pH variations. As the protein does not exhibit any structural distortions that can affect the emission property, we next focus on the dynamics in the active pocket and its effect on color modulation by adopting different protonation states in the pocket. With this, we observe red-shifted emissions at acidic conditions as consistent with previous studies. Most importantly, we find that a water molecule in the active pocket can mediate flexible motions of neighboring groups, which can subsequently modify the emission properties to a substantial degree. Based on the observations, we propose that the active pocket is in a dry condition during the luminescence process. Our results highlight the importance of understanding the role of the dynamics near the active pocket in modulating bioluminescence.

  7. Phage-amplified bioluminescent bioreporters for the detection of foodborne pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripp, Steven; Young, Jacque C.; Ozen, Aysu; Jegier, Patricia; Johnson, Courtney; Daumer, Kathleen; Garland, Jay; Sayler, Gary S.

    2004-06-01

    The objective of this investigation is to develop a bioluminescent bioreporter system for the detection and monitoring of pathogenic microbial species. Current detection methodologies typically rely on time-consuming sample pre-enrichment steps to elevate pathogen concentrations to detectable levels or DNA based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques that require extensive user training and expensive instrumentation. Detection utilizing bioluminescent bioreporter organisms, however, can provide a simple and rapid means of monitoring foodborne pathogens. Bioluminescent bioreporters are engineered to produce light in response to specific environmental inducers. The light signal is then measured with photodetector devices to generate a quantitative assessment of inducer concentration. The immediate goal of this research effort is to integrate key quorum sensing signal transduction elements into pathogen specific bacteriophages. Upon infection of a unique pathogenic species by the bacteriophages, quorum sensing signals will be generated that will subsequently stimulate bioluminescence in neighboring bioluminescent bioreporter cells. Utilizing both bacteriophages and bioluminescent bioreporters, we realize exceptional pathogen specificity while attaining enhanced bioluminescence production. This integrative approach will lead to rapid pathogen identification without requisite sample pre-enrichment. Additionally, since the bioluminescent response is completely intrinsic to the bioreporter organism, no user interventions are required for generating light signals; the protocol requires only addition of the food sample with the bacteriophage/bioluminescent bioreporter system. Measurement of light responses can be achieved using high-throughput microtiter plate readers, hand-held photomultiplier units, or microchip luminometers.

  8. A Photinus pyralis and Luciola italica chimeric firefly luciferase produces enhanced bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Branchini, Bruce R; Southworth, Tara L; Fontaine, Danielle M; Davis, Audrey L; Behney, Curran E; Murtiashaw, Martha H

    2014-10-14

    We report the enhanced bioluminescence properties of a chimeric enzyme (PpyLit) that contains the N-domain of recombinant Photinus pyralis luciferase joined to the C-domain of recombinant Luciola italica luciferase. Compared to the P. pyralis enzyme, the novel PpyLit chimera exhibited 1.8-fold enhanced flash-height specific activity, 2.0-fold enhanced integration-based specific activity, 2.9-fold enhanced catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km), and a 1.4-fold greater bioluminescence quantum yield. The results of this study provide an underlying basis of this unusual example of a chimeric enzyme with enhanced catalytic properties that are not simply the sum of the contributions of the two luciferases.

  9. Determination of pyruvic acid concentration using a bioluminescence system from Photobacterium leiognathi.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Guanhua; Lu, Xiaodong; Wang, Jingxue; Lin, Hong; Liu, Huihui

    2015-06-01

    A novel, highly sensitive and selective bacterial luminescence method for the detection of pyruvic acid (PA) is reported here. This method is based on a reaction system catalyzed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) with the bacterial luciferase-FMN:NADH oxidoreductase bioluminescence system in vitro. The reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) involved in the LDH reaction system could be quantitatively analyzed by the bioluminescence system. A good linear relationship between the luminescence intensity and pyruvic acid concentration was exhibited within the range of 0.00014-0.001 mol l(-1), and the pyruvic acid detection limit was found to be 8.537 × 10(-5) mol l(-1). This method was successfully applied to the detection of PA in quail serum with a good recovery of over 70%.

  10. Cumulative bioluminescence; A potential rapid test of drilling fluid toxicity: development study

    SciTech Connect

    Stiffey, A.V. )

    1992-03-01

    A new rapid test of drilling fluid toxicity is based on the spontaneous bioluminescence of Pyrocystis lunula, an easy-to-culture alga that vigorously responds to shear stress (mixing) by emitting a sharp burst of light. In contrast to other bioluminescence methods, a cumulative flux of light is measured with a photomultiplier that eliminates the effect of exposure time on test results. Light quenching, caused by the presence of a toxicant, results in the dose/response relationship (DSR) typical for the enzymatic reaction kinetics. The Michaelis-Menten (dissociation) constant is used as a direct measure of toxicity. The evaluation study involved multiple experiments with 60 samples of drilling fluids from the U.S. gulf coast, as well as such typical toxicants as diesel oil, mineral oil, and chrome lignosulfonate (CLS). In this paper, the results of the test error analysis and comparisons with the Microtox and Mysid shrimp assays are reported.

  11. Chemiluminescence and bioluminescence microbe detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. E.; Chappelle, E.; Picciolo, G. L.; Jeffers, E. L.; Thomas, R. R.

    1978-01-01

    Automated biosensors for online use with NASA Water Monitoring System employs bioluminescence and chemiluminescence techniques to rapidly measure microbe contamination of water samples. System eliminates standard laboratory procedures requiring time duration of 24 hours or longer.

  12. Quorum Sensing Influences Vibrio harveyi Growth Rates in a Manner Not Fully Accounted For by the Marker Effect of Bioluminescence

    PubMed Central

    Nackerdien, Zeena E.; Keynan, Alexander; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Lederberg, Joshua; Thaler, David S.

    2008-01-01

    Background The light-emitting Vibrios provide excellent material for studying the interaction of cellular communication with growth rate because bioluminescence is a convenient marker for quorum sensing. However, the use of bioluminescence as a marker is complicated because bioluminescence itself may affect growth rate, e.g. by diverting energy. Methodology/Principal Findings The marker effect was explored via growth rate studies in isogenic Vibrio harveyi (Vh) strains altered in quorum sensing on the one hand, and bioluminescence on the other. By hypothesis, growth rate is energy limited: mutants deficient in quorum sensing grow faster because wild type quorum sensing unleashes bioluminescence and bioluminescence diverts energy. Findings reported here confirm a role for bioluminescence in limiting Vh growth rate, at least under the conditions tested. However, the results argue that the bioluminescence is insufficient to explain the relationship of growth rate and quorum sensing in Vh. A Vh mutant null for all genes encoding the bioluminescence pathway grew faster than wild type but not as fast as null mutants in quorum sensing. Vh quorum sensing mutants showed altered growth rates that do not always rank with their relative increase or decrease in bioluminescence. In addition, the cell-free culture fluids of a rapidly growing Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp) strain increased the growth rate of wild type Vh without significantly altering Vh's bioluminescence. The same cell-free culture fluid increased the bioluminescence of Vh quorum mutants. Conclusions/Significance The effect of quorum sensing on Vh growth rate can be either positive or negative and includes both bioluminescence-dependent and independent components. Bioluminescence tends to slow growth rate but not enough to account for the effects of quorum sensing on growth rate. PMID:18301749

  13. Enhanced Landweber algorithm via Bregman iterations for bioluminescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yi; Zhang, Meng

    2014-09-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) is an important optical molecular imaging modality aimed at visualizing physiological and pathological processes at cellular and molecular levels. While the forward process of light propagation is described by the diffusion approximation to radiative transfer equation, BLT is the inverse problem to reconstruct the 3D localization and quantification of internal bioluminescent sources distribution. Due to the inherent ill-posedness of the BLT problem, regularization is generally indispensable to obtain more favorable reconstruction. In particular, total variation (TV) regularization is known to be effective for piecewise-constant source distribution which can permit sharp discontinuities and preserve edges. However, total variation regularization generally suffers from the unsatisfactory staircasing effect. In this work, we introduce the Bregman iterative regularization to alleviate this degeneration and enhance the numerical reconstruction of BLT. Based on the existing Landweber method (LM), we put forward the Bregman-LM-TV algorithm for BLT. Numerical experiments are carried out and preliminary simulation results are reported to evaluate the proposed algorithms. It is found that Bregman-LM-TV can significantly outperform the individual Landweber method for BLT when the source distribution is piecewise-constant.

  14. Bioluminescence tracking of alginate micro-encapsulated cell transplants.

    PubMed

    Tiernan, Aubrey R; Sambanis, Athanassios

    2017-02-01

    Cell-based therapies to treat loss-of-function hormonal disorders such as diabetes and Parkinson's disease are routinely coupled with encapsulation strategies, but an understanding of when and why grafts fail in vivo is lacking. Consequently, investigators cannot clearly define the key factors that influence graft success. Although bioluminescence is a popular method to track the survival of free cells transplanted in preclinical models, little is known of the ability to use bioluminescence for real-time tracking of microencapsulated cells. Furthermore, the impact that dynamic imaging distances may have, due to freely-floating microcapsules in vivo, on cell survival monitoring is unknown. This work addresses these questions by applying bioluminescence to a pancreatic substitute based on microencapsulated cells. Recombinant insulin-secreting cells were transduced with a luciferase lentivirus and microencapsulated in Ba(2+) crosslinked alginate for in vitro and in vivo studies. In vitro quantitative bioluminescence monitoring was possible and viable microencapsulated cells were followed in real time under both normoxic and anoxic conditions. Although in vivo dispersion of freely-floating microcapsules in the peritoneal cavity limited the analysis to a qualitative bioluminescence evaluation, signals consistently four orders of magnitude above background were clear indicators of temporal cell survival. Strong agreement between in vivo and in vitro cell proliferation over time was discovered by making direct bioluminescence comparisons between explanted microcapsules and parallel in vitro cultures. Broader application of this bioluminescence approach to retrievable transplants, in supplement to currently used end-point physiological tests, could improve understanding and accelerate development of cell-based therapies for critical clinical applications. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Bioluminescence Potential Modeling and Forecasting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-22

    bioluminescence in the wakes of ships, breaking waves, around the bodies of rapidly moving fish and mammals , and from simple agitation of the water with one’s hand...history of brilliant displays of bioluminescence in the wakes of ships, breaking waves, around the bodies of rapidly moving fish and mammals , and from...during the earlier stages of upwelling development. Later, the observed deep offshore BL potential maximum disappeared and became a shallower and much

  16. Use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae BLYES Expressing Bacterial Bioluminescence for Rapid, Sensitive Detection of Estrogenic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Sanseverino, John; Gupta, Rakesh K.; Layton, Alice C.; Patterson, Stacey S.; Ripp, Steven A.; Saidak, Leslie; Simpson, Michael L.; Schultz, T. Wayne; Sayler, Gary S.

    2005-01-01

    An estrogen-inducible bacterial lux-based bioluminescent reporter was developed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for applications in chemical sensing and environmental assessment of estrogen disruptor activity. The strain, designated S. cerevisiae BLYES, was constructed by inserting tandem estrogen response elements between divergent yeast promoters GPD and ADH1 on pUTK401 (formerly pUA12B7) that constitutively express luxA and luxB to create pUTK407. Cotransformation of this plasmid with a second plasmid (pUTK404) containing the genes required for aldehyde synthesis (luxCDE) and FMN reduction (frp) yielded a bioluminescent bioreporter responsive to estrogen-disrupting compounds. For validation purposes, results with strain BLYES were compared to the colorimetric-based estrogenic assay that uses the yeast lacZ reporter strain (YES). Strains BLYES and YES were exposed to 17β-estradiol over the concentration range of 1.2 × 10−8 through 5.6 × 10−12 M. Calculated 50% effective concentration values from the colorimetric and bioluminescence assays (n = 7) were similar at (4.4 ± 1.1) × 10−10 and (2.4 ± 1.0) × 10−10 M, respectively. The lower and upper limits of detection for each assay were also similar and were approximately 4.5 × 10−11 to 2.8 × 10−9 M. Bioluminescence was observed in as little as 1 h and reached its maximum in 6 h. In comparison, the YES assay required a minimum of 3 days for results. Strain BLYES fills the niche for rapid, high-throughput screening of estrogenic compounds and has the ability to be used for remote, near-real-time monitoring of estrogen-disrupting chemicals in the environment. PMID:16085836

  17. Selective ligand activity at Nur/retinoid X receptor complexes revealed by dimer-specific bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based sensors

    PubMed Central

    Giner, Xavier C; Cotnoir-White, David; Mader, Sylvie; Lévesque, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Retinoid X receptors (RXR) play a role as master regulators due to their capacity to form heterodimers with other nuclear receptors. Accordingly, retinoid signaling is involved in multiple biological processes, including development, cell differentiation, metabolism and cell death. However, the role and functions of RXR in different heterodimer complexes remain unsolved, mainly because most RXR drugs (called rexinoids) are not selective to specific heterodimer complexes. This also strongly limits the use of rexinoids for specific therapeutic approaches. In order to better characterize rexinoids at specific nuclear receptor complexes, we have developed and optimized luciferase protein complementation-based Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET) assays, which can directly measure recruitment of a co-activator motif fused to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) by specific nuclear receptor dimers. To validate the assays, we compared rexinoid modulation of co-activator recruitment by RXR homodimer, and heterodimers Nur77/RXR and Nurr1/RXR. Results reveal that some rexinoids display selective co-activator recruitment activities with homo- or hetero-dimer complexes. In particular, SR11237 (BMS649) has increased potency for recruitment of co-activator motif and transcriptional activity with the Nur77/RXR heterodimer compared to other complexes. This technology should prove useful to identify new compounds with specificity for individual dimeric species formed by nuclear receptors. PMID:26148973

  18. Using bioluminescent biosensors for hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) in wastewater control.

    PubMed

    Valat, C; Champiat, D; Degorce-Dumas, J R; Thomas, O

    2004-01-01

    Starting from a new approach for water pollution control and wastewater treatment plant management, the hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) quality concept, the interest for the development of new rapid and sensitive methods such as bioluminescence-based methods is evident. After an introduction of the HACCP procedure, a bibliographic study of the bioluminescence potentiality is presented and discussed.

  19. Simultaneous monitoring of intracellular ATP and oxygen levels in chondrogenic differentiation using a dual-color bioluminescence reporter.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyuck Joon; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Yasuda, Kazunori

    2014-12-01

    A number of assay methods which measure cellular metabolic activity have only measured intracellular ATP levels because it has been speculated that ATP production and oxygen consumption are obligatorily coupled to each other under normal conditions. However, there exist many cases in which ATP production and oxygen consumption are uncoupled. Therefore, measurement of only intracellular ATP levels has a limit for understanding the overall metabolic states during various cellular functions. Here, we report a novel system for simultaneously monitoring intracellular ATP and oxygen levels using a red-emitting Phrixothrix hirtus luciferase (PxRe) and a blue-emitting Renilla luciferase (Rluc). Using this system, we monitored the dynamic changes in both intracellular ATP and oxygen levels during chondrogenesis. We found that the oxygen level oscillated at twice the frequency of ATP in chondrogenesis and the oxygen oscillations have an antiphase mode to the ATP oscillations; we also found an independent mode for the ATP oscillations. This result indicates that both mitochondrial and non-mitochondrial respiration oscillate and thus play a role in chondrogenesis. This dual-color monitoring system is useful for studying metabolic regulations that underlie diverse cellular processes.

  20. Main Technological Advancements in Bacterial Bioluminescent Biosensors Over the Last Two Decades.

    PubMed

    Jouanneau, S; Durand, M J; Lahmar, A; Thouand, G

    2015-10-17

    Environmental quality assessment is an extensive field of research due to the permanent increase of the stringency imposed by the legislative framework. To complete the wide panel of measurement methods, essentially based on physicochemical tools, some scientists focused on the development of alternative biological methods such as those based on the use of bioluminescent bacteria biosensors. The first report dedicated to the development of such biosensors dates back to 1967 and describes an analytical system designed to address the problem of air toxicity assessment. Nevertheless the available technologies in the photosensitive sensors field were not mature enough and, as a result, limited biosensor development possibilities. For about 20 years, the wide democratisation of photosensors coupled with advances in the genetic engineering field have allowed the expansion of the scope of possibilities of bioluminescent bacterial biosensors, allowing a significant emergence of these biotechnologies. This chapter retraces the history of the main technological evolutions that bacterial bioluminescent biosensors have known over the last two decades. Graphical Abstract.

  1. Developing a Predictive Capability for Bioluminescence Signatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    to flow stimulation of naturally occurring plankton. In the littoral, the primary sources of bioluminescence are dinoflagellates, common unicellular ...littoral, the primary sources of bioluminescence are dinoflagellates, common unicellular plankton that exhibit a wide range of abundance. Dinoflagellate

  2. Engineering Bioluminescent Proteins: Expanding their Analytical Potential

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Laura; Dikici, Emre; Daunert, Sylvia

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Bioluminescence has been observed in nature since the dawn of time, but now, scientists are harnessing it for analytical applications. Laura Rowe, Emre Dikici, and Sylvia Daunert of the University of Kentucky describe the origins of bioluminescent proteins and explore their uses in the modern chemistry laboratory. The cover features spectra of bioluminescent light superimposed on an image of jellyfish, which are a common source of bioluminescent proteins. Images courtesy of Emre Dikici and Shutterstock. PMID:19725502

  3. Bioluminescent monitoring of in vivo colonization and clearance dynamics by light-emitting bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Siouxsie; Robertson, Brian D; Frankel, Gad; Kerton, Angela

    2009-01-01

    Bioluminescence is an excellent reporter system for analysing bacterial colonization and clearance dynamics in vivo. Many bacterial species have been rendered bioluminescent, allowing the sensitive detection of bacterial burden and metabolic activity in real-time and in situ in living animals. In this chapter we describe the protocols for characterizing in vivo infection models using bioluminescent bacteria: from real-time imaging in living animals by bioluminescence imaging (BLI) to ex vivo BLI of harvested organs and tissues and, finally, to quantification of bacterial numbers in organ and tissue homogenates by luminometry and viable counts. While the lux operon from Photorhabdus luminescens is ideally suited for use in such models, there may be times when alternative luciferases, such as those from the firefly (luc) or marine copepods (Gluc), may be more appropriate. Here we describe the protocols required to monitor colonization and clearance dynamics using bioluminescent bacteria that are lux-, luc-, or Gluc-positive.

  4. Spectrally resolved bioluminescence tomography using the reciprocity approach

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Hamid; Davis, Scott C.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2008-01-01

    Spectrally resolved bioluminescence optical tomography is an approach to recover images of, for example, Luciferase activity within a volume using multiwavelength emission data from internal bioluminescence sources. The underlying problem of uniqueness associated with nonspectrally resolved intensity-based bioluminescence tomography is demonstrated and it is shown that using a non-negative constraint inverse algorithm, an accurate solution for the source distribution can be calculated from the measured data. Reconstructed images of bioluminescence are presented using both simulated complex and heterogeneous small animal models as well as real multiwavelength data from a tissue-simulating phantom. The location of the internal bioluminescence source using experimental data is obtained with 0.5 mm accuracy and it is shown that small (2.5 mm diameter) sources of up to 12.5 mm deep, within a complex mouse model, can be resolved accurately using a single view data collection strategy. Finally, using the reciprocity approach for image reconstruction, a dramatic improvement in computational time is shown without loss to image accuracy with both experimental and simulated data, potentially reducing computing time from 402 to 3.75 h. PMID:19070220

  5. CCD imaging of basal bioluminescence in larval fireflies: clues on the anatomic origin and evolution of bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Viviani, V R; Okawachi, F M; Scorsato, V; Abdalla, F C

    2008-04-01

    The anatomic and biochemical origin of beetle bioluminescence is still poorly understood. Through CCD imaging we report that larvae and pupae of the Brazilian fireflies Aspisoma lineatum and Cratomorphus sp emit a continuous weak glow throughout the entire body during all stages. This luminescence is especially developed after feeding, ecdysis and in the pupal stage, gradually disappearing as the cuticle becomes sclerotized and the adult emerges. This weak glow arises from the fat body, which consists of small lobes spread all over the body cavity. According to their pigmentation, these lobes can be divided in whitish and pinkish, and display different luciferase isozymes. Morphological studies suggest that the jelly-like ventral lanterns in the 8th abdominal segment evolved from these white lobes, providing a rationale for the widespread location of lanterns in larvae of different bioluminescent beetles. The biological and biochemical function of this weak diffuse bioluminescence is discussed in the context of the larval life-history.

  6. Iterative reconstruction for bioluminescence tomography with total variation regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Wenma; He, Yonghong

    2012-12-01

    Bioluminescence tomography(BLT) is an instrumental molecular imaging modality designed for the 3D location and quantification of bioluminescent sources distribution in vivo. In our context, the diffusion approximation(DA) to radiative transfer equation(RTE) is utilized to model the forward process of light propagation. Mathematically, the solution uniqueness does not hold for DA-based BLT which is an inverse source problem of partial differential equations and hence is highly ill-posed. In the current work, we concentrate on a general regularization framework for BLT with Bregman distance as data fidelity and total variation(TV) as regularization. Two specializations of the Bregman distance, the least squares(LS) distance and Kullback-Leibler(KL) divergence, which correspond to the Gaussian and Poisson environments respectively, are demonstrated and the resulting regularization problems are denoted as LS+TV and KL+TV. Based on the constrained Landweber(CL) scheme and expectation maximization(EM) algorithm for BLT, iterative algorithms for the LS+TV and KL+TV problems in the context of BLT are developed, which are denoted as CL-TV and EM-TV respectively. They are both essentially gradient-based algorithms alternatingly performing the standard CL or EM iteration step and the TV correction step which requires the solution of a weighted ROF model. Chambolle's duality-based approach is adapted and extended to solving the weighted ROF subproblem. Numerical experiments for a 3D heterogeneous mouse phantom are carried out and preliminary results are reported to verify and evaluate the proposed algorithms. It is found that for piecewise-constant sources both CL-TV and EM-TV outperform the conventional CL and EM algorithms for BLT.

  7. Bacterial bioluminescence as a lure for marine zooplankton and fish.

    PubMed

    Zarubin, Margarita; Belkin, Shimshon; Ionescu, Michael; Genin, Amatzia

    2012-01-17

    The benefits of bioluminescence for nonsymbiotic marine bacteria have not been elucidated fully. One of the most commonly cited explanations, proposed more than 30 y ago, is that bioluminescence augments the propagation and dispersal of bacteria by attracting fish to consume the luminous material. This hypothesis, based mostly on the prevalence of luminous bacteria in fish guts, has not been tested experimentally. Here we show that zooplankton that contacts and feeds on the luminescent bacterium Photobacterium leiognathi starts to glow, and demonstrate by video recordings that glowing individuals are highly vulnerable to predation by nocturnal fish. Glowing bacteria thereby are transferred to the nutritious guts of fish and zooplankton, where they survive digestion and gain effective means for growth and dispersal. Using bioluminescence as bait appears to be highly beneficial for marine bacteria, especially in food-deprived environments of the deep sea.

  8. Bacterial bioluminescence as a lure for marine zooplankton and fish

    PubMed Central

    Zarubin, Margarita; Belkin, Shimshon; Ionescu, Michael; Genin, Amatzia

    2012-01-01

    The benefits of bioluminescence for nonsymbiotic marine bacteria have not been elucidated fully. One of the most commonly cited explanations, proposed more than 30 y ago, is that bioluminescence augments the propagation and dispersal of bacteria by attracting fish to consume the luminous material. This hypothesis, based mostly on the prevalence of luminous bacteria in fish guts, has not been tested experimentally. Here we show that zooplankton that contacts and feeds on the luminescent bacterium Photobacterium leiognathi starts to glow, and demonstrate by video recordings that glowing individuals are highly vulnerable to predation by nocturnal fish. Glowing bacteria thereby are transferred to the nutritious guts of fish and zooplankton, where they survive digestion and gain effective means for growth and dispersal. Using bioluminescence as bait appears to be highly beneficial for marine bacteria, especially in food-deprived environments of the deep sea. PMID:22203999

  9. Bioluminescent Reaction by Immobilized Luciferase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Ryuta; Takahama, Eriko; Iinuma, Masataka; Ikeda, Takeshi; Kadoya, Yutaka; Kuroda, Akio

    We have investigated an effect of immobilization of luciferase molecules at the optical fiber end on a bioluminescent reaction. The time dependence of measured count rates of emitted photons has been analyzed by fitting with numerical solution of differential equations including the effect of the product-inhibitor and the deactivation of the luciferase. Through the analysis, we have successfully extracted kinetic constants such as, reaction rate, number of active luciferase molecules, etc. Ratio of active molecules to total luciferase molecules in immobilization was one order of magnitude lower than that in solution. The reaction rate of the bioluminescent process was also different from the one of free luciferase in solution.

  10. Biofilm Ecology of Bioluminescent Bacteria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-10

    F.V. Lamberti , Z. Policova, W. Zingg, C.J. van Oss, and A.W. Neumann. 1983. Surface thermodynamics of bacterial adhesion. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 46...of bacterial adhesion in a shear gradient with bioluminescence by a Pseudomonas fluorescens (lux) strain . J. Microbiol. Meth. 15:53-60. Mittelman, M.W

  11. Expression of a Humanized Viral 2A-Mediated lux Operon Efficiently Generates Autonomous Bioluminescence in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tingting; Ripp, Steven; Sayler, Gary S.; Close, Dan M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Expression of autonomous bioluminescence from human cells was previously reported to be impossible, suggesting that all bioluminescent-based mammalian reporter systems must therefore require application of a potentially influential chemical substrate. While this was disproven when the bacterial luciferase (lux) cassette was demonstrated to function in a human cell, its expression required multiple genetic constructs, was functional in only a single cell type, and generated a significantly reduced signal compared to substrate-requiring systems. Here we investigate the use of a humanized, viral 2A-linked lux genetic architecture for the efficient introduction of an autobioluminescent phenotype across a variety of human cell lines. Methodology/Principal Findings The lux cassette was codon optimized and assembled into a synthetic human expression operon using viral 2A elements as linker regions. Human kidney, breast cancer, and colorectal cancer cell lines were both transiently and stably transfected with the humanized operon and the resulting autobioluminescent phenotype was evaluated using common imaging instrumentation. Autobioluminescent cells were screened for cytotoxic effects resulting from lux expression and their utility as bioreporters was evaluated through the demonstration of repeated monitoring of single populations over a prolonged period using both a modified E-SCREEN assay for estrogen detection and a classical cytotoxic compound detection assay for the antibiotic Zeocin. Furthermore, the use of self-directed bioluminescent initiation in response to target detection was assessed to determine its amenability towards deployment as fully autonomous sensors. In all cases, bioluminescent measurements were supported with traditional genetic and transcriptomic evaluations. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate that the viral 2A-linked, humanized lux genetic architecture successfully produced autobioluminescent phenotypes in all cell lines

  12. Dynamic Modeling of Marine Bioluminescence and Night Time Leaving Radiance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    physical model is based on the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM), the biochemical model simulates dynamics of two sizes of phytoplankton, zooplankton ...layer of bioluminescent zooplankton were replaced by water masses advected from the northern coast of the bay with a relatively high presence of mostly

  13. Upgrading bioluminescent bacterial bioreporter performance by splitting the lux operon.

    PubMed

    Yagur-Kroll, Sharon; Belkin, Shimshon

    2011-05-01

    Bioluminescent bacterial bioreporters harbor a fusion of bacterial bioluminescence genes (luxCDABE), acting as the reporting element, to a stress-response promoter, serving as the sensing element. Upon exposure to conditions that activate the promoter, such as an environmental stress or the presence of an inducing chemical, the promoter::reporter fusion generates a dose-dependent bioluminescent signal. In order to improve bioluminescent bioreporter performance we have split the luxCDABE genes of Photorhabdus luminescens into two smaller functional units: luxAB, that encode for the luciferase enzyme, which catalyzes the luminescence reaction, and luxCDE that encode for the enzymatic complex responsible for synthesis of the reaction's substrate, a long-chain aldehyde. The expression of each subunit was put under the control of either an inducible stress-responsive promoter or a synthetic constitutive promoter, and different combinations of the two units were tested for their response to selected chemicals in Escherichia coli. In all cases tested, the split combinations proved to be superior to the native luxCDABE configuration, suggesting an improved efficiency in the transcription and/or translation of two small gene units instead of a larger one with the same genes. The best combination was that of an inducible luxAB and a constitutive luxCDE, indicating that aldehyde availability is limited when the five genes are expressed together in E. coli, and demonstrating that improved biosensor performance may be achieved by rearrangement of the lux operon genes.

  14. Dynamic Camouflage in Benthic and Pelagic Cephalopods: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Crypsis Based on Color, Reflection, and Bioluminescence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Dynamic Camouflage in Benthic and Pelagic Cephalopods : An...In particular, we plan to characterize and understand the perceptual abilities of several species of benthic and pelagic cephalopods , the aspects... cephalopod and model both the shallow and deep-water world from the animals’ points of view. Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No

  15. Dynamic Camouflage in Benthic and Pelagic Cephalopods: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Crypsis Based on Color, Reflection, and Bioluminescence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    public release; distribution is unlimited. Dynamic Camouflage in Benthic and Pelagic Cephalopods : An interdisciplinary approach to crypsis based on...several species of benthic and pelagic cephalopods , the aspects of their optical environment that affect their camouflage behavior, the characterization...To determine the visual abilities of several species of cephalopod and model both the shallow and deep-water world from the animals’ points of view

  16. Metabolic self-organization of bioluminescent Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Simkus, Remigijus; Baronas, Romas

    2011-01-01

    A possible reason for the complexity of the signals produced by bioluminescent biosensors might be self-organization of the cells. In order to verify this possibility, bioluminescence images of cultures of lux gene reporter Escherichia coli were recorded for several hours after being placed into 8-10 mm diameter cylindrical containers. It was found that luminous cells distribute near the three-phase contact line, forming irregular azimuthal waves. As we show, space-time plots of quasi-one-dimensional bioluminescence measured along the contact line can be simulated by reaction-diffusion-chemotaxis equations, in which the reaction term for the cells is a logistic (autocatalytic) growth function. It was found that the growth rate of the luminous cells (~0.02 s(-1)) is >100 times higher than the growth rate of E. coli. We provide an explanation for this result by assuming that E. coli exhibits considerable respiratory flexibility (the ability of oxygen-induced switching from one metabolic pathway to another). According to the simple two-state model presented here, the number of oxic (luminous) cells grows at the expense of anoxic (dark) cells, whereas the total number of (oxic and anoxic) cells remains unchanged. It is conjectured that the corresponding reaction-diffusion-chemotaxis model for bioluminescence pattern formation can be considered as a model for the energy-taxis and metabolic self-organization in the population of the metabolically flexible bacteria under hypoxic conditions.

  17. Leukocyte esterase-nitrite and bioluminescence assays as urine screens.

    PubMed Central

    Males, B M; Bartholomew, W R; Amsterdam, D

    1985-01-01

    The 1-min leukocyte esterase (LE)-nitrite test (Chemstrip 9; Biodynamics, Division of Boehringer Mannheim Biochemicals, Indianapolis, Ind.) and a bioluminescence assay (Monolight centrifugation method; Analytical Luminescence Laboratory, Inc., San Diego, Calif.) were tested for their efficacy as urine screens among 453 patients at a tertiary-care teaching hospital. Both methods had the capacity to exclude significant bacteriuria (greater than or equal to 10(5) CFU/ml) when compared with the results of conventional culture methods, with predictive values of 99 and 93%, respectively, for a negative test. Bioluminescence was the more accurate nonculture method used. Sensitivity and specificity values were 97 and 71%, respectively, for bioluminescence, 82 and 60%, respectively, for LE with nitrite, and 72 and 64%, respectively, for LE without nitrite. At reduced levels of bacteriuria less than 10(5) CFU/ml), the sensitivities of LE-nitrite and bioluminescence were decreased but comparable. The addition of protein and blood test results in the Chemstrip 9, along with LE-nitrite as bacteriuria indicators, were unsatisfactory because of the large numbers of false-positive results attributed to protein and blood determinations. LE activity as detected by the LE test was a poor predictor of significant bacteriuria in both male and female patients. The sensitivity (71%) and specificity (57%) of the LE test in male patients were significantly lower than those previously reported and varied with the patient population studied. PMID:3935662

  18. Microtiter plate tests for segregation of bioluminescent bacteria.

    PubMed

    Šimkus, Remigijus; Meškienė, Rita; Ledas, Žilvinas; Baronas, Romas; Meškys, Rolandas

    2016-02-01

    It has been recently shown that bioluminescence imaging can be usefully applied to provide new insights into bacterial self-organization. In this work we employ bioluminescence imaging to record images of nutrient rich liquid cultures of the lux-gene reporter Escherichia coli in microtiter plate wells. The images show that patterns of inhomogenous bioluminescence form along the three-phase contact lines. The paper analyzes the dependencies of the average number of luminous aggregates (clouds) on various environmental factors. In particular, our results show that optimal (neutral) pH and high aeration rates determine the highest mean number of clouds, and that spatiotemporal patterns do not form in the pH buffered suspensions. In addition, a sigmoidal (switch-like) dependence of the number of aggregates on the rate of aeration was observed. The obtained bioluminescence imaging data was interpreted by employing the Keller-Segel-Fisher (KSF) model of chemotaxis and logistic growth, adapted to systems of metabolically flexible (two-state) bacteria. The modified KSF model successfully simulated the observed switch-like responses. The results of the microtiter plate tests and their simulations indicate that the segregation of bacteria with different activities proceeds in the three-phase contact line region.

  19. Bioluminescent system for dynamic imaging of cell and animal behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Hara-Miyauchi, Chikako; Tsuji, Osahiko; Hanyu, Aki; Okada, Seiji; Yasuda, Akimasa; Fukano, Takashi; Akazawa, Chihiro; Nakamura, Masaya; Imamura, Takeshi; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Okano, Hirotaka James; and others

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We combined a yellow variant of GFP and firefly luciferase to make ffLuc-cp156. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ffLuc-cp156 showed improved photon yield in cultured cells and transgenic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ffLuc-cp156 enabled video-rate bioluminescence imaging of freely-moving animals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ffLuc-cp156 mice enabled tracking real-time drug delivery in conscious animals. -- Abstract: The current utility of bioluminescence imaging is constrained by a low photon yield that limits temporal sensitivity. Here, we describe an imaging method that uses a chemiluminescent/fluorescent protein, ffLuc-cp156, which consists of a yellow variant of Aequorea GFP and firefly luciferase. We report an improvement in photon yield by over three orders of magnitude over current bioluminescent systems. We imaged cellular movement at high resolution including neuronal growth cones and microglial cell protrusions. Transgenic ffLuc-cp156 mice enabled video-rate bioluminescence imaging of freely moving animals, which may provide a reliable assay for drug distribution in behaving animals for pre-clinical studies.

  20. Unanimous Model for Describing the Fast Bioluminescence Kinetics of Ca(2+) -regulated Photoproteins of Different Organisms.

    PubMed

    Eremeeva, Elena V; Bartsev, Sergey I; van Berkel, Willem J H; Vysotski, Eugene S

    2017-03-01

    Upon binding their metal ion cofactors, Ca(2+) -regulated photoproteins display a rapid increase of light signal, which reaches its peak within milliseconds. In the present study, we investigate bioluminescence kinetics of the entire photoprotein family. All five recombinant hydromedusan Ca(2+) -regulated photoproteins-aequorin from Aequorea victoria, clytin from Clytia gregaria, mitrocomin from Mitrocoma cellularia and obelins from Obelia longissima and Obelia geniculata-demonstrate the same bioluminescent kinetics pattern. Based on these findings, for the first time we propose a unanimous kinetic model describing the bioluminescence mechanism of Ca(2+) -regulated photoproteins.

  1. Near-infrared bioluminescent proteins for two-color multimodal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rumyantsev, Konstantin A.; Turoverov, Konstantin K.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence imaging became a widely used technique for noninvasive study of biological processes in small animals. Bioluminescent probes with emission in near-infrared (NIR) spectral region confer the advantage of having deep tissue penetration capacity. However, there are a very limited number of currently available luciferases that exhibit NIR bioluminescence. Here, we engineered two novel chimeric probes based on RLuc8 luciferase fused with iRFP670 and iRFP720 NIR fluorescent proteins. Due to an intramolecular bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) between RLuc8 and iRFPs, the chimeric luciferases exhibit NIR bioluminescence with maxima at 670 nm and 720 nm, respectively. The 50 nm spectral shift between emissions of the two iRFP chimeras enables combined multicolor bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and the respective multicolor fluorescence imaging (FLI) of the iRFPs. We show that for subcutaneously implanted cells, NIR bioluminescence provided a 10-fold increase in sensitivity compared to NIR FLI. In deep tissues, NIR BLI enabled detection of as low as 104 cells. Both BLI and FLI allowed monitoring of tumor growth and metastasis from early to late stages. Multimodal imaging, which combines concurrent BLI and FLI, provides continuous spatiotemporal analysis of metastatic cells in animals, including their localization and quantification. PMID:27833162

  2. Uniqueness theorems in bioluminescence tomography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ge; Li, Yi; Jiang, Ming

    2004-08-01

    Motivated by bioluminescent imaging needs for studies on gene therapy and other applications in the mouse models, a bioluminescence tomography (BLT) system is being developed in the University of Iowa. While the forward imaging model is described by the well-known diffusion equation, the inverse problem is to recover an internal bioluminescent source distribution subject to Cauchy data. Our primary goal in this paper is to establish the solution uniqueness for BLT under practical constraints despite the ill-posedness of the inverse problem in the general case. After a review on the inverse source literature, we demonstrate that in the general case the BLT solution is not unique by constructing the set of all the solutions to this inverse problem. Then, we show the uniqueness of the solution in the case of impulse sources. Finally, we present our main theorem that solid/hollow ball sources can be uniquely determined up to nonradiating sources. For better readability, the exact conditions for and rigorous proofs of the theorems are given in the Appendices. Further research directions are also discussed.

  3. Microbiological assay using bioluminescent organism

    SciTech Connect

    Stiffey, A.V.

    1987-12-21

    This invention relates to testing processes for toxicity involving microorganisms and, more particularly, to testing processes for toxicity involving bioluminescent organisms. The present known method of testing oil-well drilling fluids for toxicity employs the mysid shrimp (Mysidopsis bahia) as the assay organism. The shrimp are difficult to raise and handle as laboratory assay organisms. This method is labor-intensive, because it requires a assay time of about 96 hours. Summary of the Invention: A microbiological assay in which the assay organism is the dinoflagellate, Pyrocystis lunula. A sample of a substance to be assayed is added to known numbers of the bioluminescent dinoflagellate and the mixture is agitated to subject the organisms to a shear stress causing them to emit light. The amount of light emitted is measured and compared with the amount of light emitted by a known non-toxic control mixture to determine if there is diminution or non-diminution of light emitted by the sample under test which is an indication of the presence or absence of toxicity, respectively. Accordingly, an object of the present invention is the provision of an improved method of testing substances for toxicity. A further object of the invention is the provision of an improved method of testing oil-well drilling fluids for toxicity using bioluminescent dinoflagellate (Pyrocystis lunula).

  4. Murine Bioluminescent Hepatic Tumour Model

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Simon; Salwa, Slawomir; Gao, Xuefeng; Tabirca, Sabin; O'Hanlon, Deirdre; O'Sullivan, Gerald C.; Tangney, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This video describes the establishment of liver metastases in a mouse model that can be subsequently analysed by bioluminescent imaging. Tumour cells are administered specifically to the liver to induce a localised liver tumour, via mobilisation of the spleen and splitting into two, leaving intact the vascular pedicle for each half of the spleen. Lewis lung carcinoma cells that constitutively express the firefly luciferase gene (luc1) are inoculated into one hemi-spleen which is then resected 10 minutes later. The other hemi-spleen is left intact and returned to the abdomen. Liver tumour growth can be monitored by bioluminescence imaging using the IVIS whole body imaging system. Quantitative imaging of tumour growth using IVIS provides precise quantitation of viable tumour cells. Tumour cell death and necrosis due to drug treatment is indicated early by a reduction in the bioluminescent signal. This mouse model allows for investigating the mechanisms underlying metastatic tumour-cell survival and growth and can be used for the evaluation of therapeutics of liver metastasis. PMID:20689502

  5. Increased bioassay sensitivity of bioactive molecule discovery using metal-enhanced bioluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golberg, Karina; Elbaz, Amit; McNeil, Ronald; Kushmaro, Ariel; Geddes, Chris D.; Marks, Robert S.

    2014-12-01

    We report the use of bioluminescence signal enhancement via proximity to deposited silver nanoparticles for bioactive compound discovery. This approach employs a whole-cell bioreporter harboring a plasmid-borne fusion of a specific promoter incorporated with a bioluminescence reporter gene. The silver deposition process was first optimized to provide optimal nanoparticle size in the reaction time dependence with fluorescein. The use of silver deposition of 350 nm particles enabled the doubling of the bioluminescent signal amplitude by the bacterial bioreporter when compared to an untouched non-silver-deposited microtiter plate surface. This recording is carried out in the less optimal but necessary far-field distance. SEM micrographs provided a visualization of the proximity of the bioreporter to the silver nanoparticles. The electromagnetic field distributions around the nanoparticles were simulated using Finite Difference Time Domain, further suggesting a re-excitation of non-chemically excited bioluminescence in addition to metal-enhanced bioluminescence. The possibility of an antiseptic silver effect caused by such a close proximity was eliminated disregarded by the dynamic growth curves of the bioreporter strains as seen using viability staining. As a highly attractive biotechnology tool, this silver deposition technique, coupled with whole-cell sensing, enables increased bioluminescence sensitivity, making it especially useful for cases in which reporter luminescence signals are very weak.

  6. European ring exercise on water toxicity using different bioluminescence inhibition tests based on Vibrio fischeri, in support to the implementation of the water framework directive.

    PubMed

    Farré, Marinella; Martínez, Elena; Hernando, M-D; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo; Fritz, Johann; Unruh, Eckehardt; Mihail, Otilia; Sakkas, Vasilis; Morbey, Ana; Albanis, Triantafyllos; Brito, Fatima; Hansen, Peter D; Barceló, Damià

    2006-04-15

    An inter-laboratory comparison exercise was conducted under the European Union funded project entitled: Screening Methods for Water Data Information in Support of the Implementation of the Water Framework Directive (SWIFT-WFD) and coordinated by the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), in order to evaluate the reproducibility of different toxicity tests based on the bioluminescence inhibition of Vibrio fischeri, for the rapid water toxicity assessment. For the first time, this type of exercise has been organized in Europe, and using different tests based on the same principle. In this exercise, 10 laboratories from 8 countries (Austria, Cyprus, Germany, Greece, Italy, Portugal, Romania, and Spain) took place, and a total number of 360 samples were distributed. During the exercise, six series of six samples were analyzed along 5 months. Every batch of samples was composed by three real samples and three standard solutions. The real samples were: a raw influent and the effluent of a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), and a sample from a first settlement of the WWTP spiked with a mixture of toxicant standards. A final number of 330 (91.7%) samples was analyzed, 3300 values in duplicate were collected, and the results for each sample were expressed as the 50% effective concentration (EC(50)) values calculated through five points of dilution inhibition curves, after 5 and 15min of incubation times. A statistical study was initiated using 660 results. The mean values, standard deviations (sigma), variances (sigma(2)), and upper and lower warning limits (UWL and LWL) were obtained, using the EC(50) values calculated with the result from the participating laboratories. The main objectives of this toxicity ring study were to evaluate the repeatability (r) and reproducibility (R) when different laboratories conduct the test, the influence of complex matrix samples, the variability between different tests based on the same principle, and to determine the

  7. Determination of the Genetic Diversity of Different Bioluminescent Bacteria by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE)

    PubMed Central

    Ersoy Omeroglu, Esra

    2015-01-01

    . harveyi and other strains, respectively. Conclusions: The obtained results revealed that there has been a high rate of genetic diversity in bioluminescent strains isolated from Gulf of Izmir and V. lentus and V. crassostreae strains could be also bioluminescent for the first report. At the same time, PFGE analysis of bioluminescent bacteria including four different genera and ten different species were shown for the first time by this study. It is considered that data acquired by this study will contribute evolution and mechanism of bioluminescence to further works to be done. PMID:26421141

  8. Roles of biogenic amines in regulating bioluminescence in the Australian glowworm Arachnocampa flava.

    PubMed

    Rigby, Lisa M; Merritt, David J

    2011-10-01

    The glowworm Arachnocampa flava is a carnivorous fly larva (Diptera) that uses light to attract prey into its web. The light organ is derived from cells of the Malpighian tubules, representing a bioluminescence system that is unique to the genus. Bioluminescence is modulated through the night although light levels change quite slowly compared with the flashing of the better-known fireflies (Coleoptera). The existing model for the neural regulation of bioluminescence in Arachnocampa, based on use of anaesthetics and ligations, is that bioluminescence is actively repressed during the non-glowing phase and the repression is partially released during the bioluminescence phase. The effect of the anaesthetic, carbon dioxide, on the isolated light organ from the present study indicates that the repression is at least partially mediated at the light organ itself rather than less directly through the central nervous system. Blocking of neural signals from the central nervous system through ligation leads to uncontrolled release of bioluminescence but light is emitted at relatively low levels compared with under anaesthesia. Candidate biogenic amines were introduced by several methods: feeding prey items injected with test solution, injecting the whole larva, injecting a ligated section containing the light organ or bathing the isolated light organ in test solution. Using these methods, dopamine, serotonin and tyramine do not affect bioluminescence output. Exposure to elevated levels of octopamine via feeding, injection or bathing of the isolated light organ indicates that it is involved in the regulation of repression. Administration of the octopamine antagonists phentolamine or mianserin results in very high bioluminescence output levels, similar to the effect of anaesthetics, but only mianserin acts directly on the light organ.

  9. New bioreactor for in situ simultaneous measurement of bioluminescence and cell density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picart, Pascal; Bendriaa, Loubna; Daniel, Philippe; Horry, Habib; Durand, Marie-José; Jouvanneau, Laurent; Thouand, Gérald

    2004-03-01

    This article presents a new device devoted to the simultaneous measurement of bioluminescence and optical density of a bioluminescent bacterial culture. It features an optoelectronic bioreactor with a fully autoclavable module, in which the bioluminescent bacteria are cultivated, a modulated laser diode dedicated to optical density measurement, and a detection head for the acquisition of both bioluminescence and optical density signals. Light is detected through a bifurcated fiber bundle. This setup allows the simultaneous estimation of the bioluminescence and the cell density of the culture medium without any sampling. The bioluminescence is measured through a highly sensitive photomultiplier unit which has been photometrically calibrated to allow light flux measurements. This was achieved by considering the bioluminescence spectrum and the full optical transmission of the device. The instrument makes it possible to measure a very weak light flux of only a few pW. The optical density is determined through the laser diode and a photodiode using numerical synchronous detection which is based on the power spectrum density of the recorded signal. The detection was calibrated to measure optical density up to 2.5. The device was validated using the Vibrio fischeri bacterium which was cultivated under continuous culture conditions. A very good correlation between manual and automatic measurements processed with this instrument has been demonstrated. Furthermore, the optoelectronic bioreactor enables determination of the luminance of the bioluminescent bacteria which is estimated to be 6×10-5 W sr-1 m-2 for optical density=0.3. Experimental results are presented and discussed.

  10. Strategies for enhancing bioluminescent bacterial sensor performance by promoter region manipulation.

    PubMed

    Yagur-Kroll, Sharon; Bilic, Benny; Belkin, Shimshon

    2010-05-01

    Bioluminescent bacterial sensors are based upon the fusion of bacterial bioluminescence (lux) genes, acting as a reporter element, to selected bacterial stress-response gene promoters. Depending upon the nature of the promoter, the resulting constructs react to diverse types of environmental stress, including the presence of toxic chemicals, by dose-dependant light emission. Two bacterial sensors, harbouring sulA::luxCDABE and grpE::luxCDABE fusions, activated by the model chemicals nalidixic acid (NA) and ethanol, respectively, were subjected to molecular manipulations of the promoter region, in order to enhance the intensity and speed of their response and lower their detection thresholds. By manipulating the length of the promoter-containing segment (both promoters), by introducing random or specific mutations in the promoter sequence or by duplicating the promoter sequence (sulA only), major improvements in sensor performance were obtained. Improvements included significantly enhanced sensitivity, earlier response times and an increase in signal intensity. The general approaches described herein may be of general applicability for optimizing bacterial sensor performance, regardless of the sensing or reporting elements employed.

  11. Discovery of a glowing millipede in California and the gradual evolution of bioluminescence in Diplopoda

    PubMed Central

    Marek, Paul E.; Moore, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    The rediscovery of the Californian millipede Xystocheir bistipita surprisingly reveals that the species is bioluminescent. Using molecular phylogenetics, we show that X. bistipita is the evolutionary sister group of Motyxia, the only genus of New World bioluminescent millipedes. We demonstrate that bioluminescence originated in the group’s most recent common ancestor and evolved by gradual, directional change through diversification. Because bioluminescence in Motyxia has been experimentally demonstrated to be aposematic, forewarning of the animal’s cyanide-based toxins, these results are contrary to aposematic theory and empirical evidence that a warning pattern cannot evolve gradually in unpalatable prey. However, gradual evolution of a warning pattern is plausible if faint light emission served another function and was co-opted as an aposematic signal later in the diversification of the genus. Luminescence in Motyxia stem-group taxa may have initially evolved to cope with reactive oxygen stress triggered by a hot, dry environment and was repurposed for aposematism by high-elevation crown-group taxa colonizing new habitats with varying levels of predation. The discovery of bioluminescence in X. bistipita and its pivotal phylogenetic location provides insight into the independent and repeated evolution of bioluminescence across the tree of life. PMID:25941389

  12. Discovery of a glowing millipede in California and the gradual evolution of bioluminescence in Diplopoda.

    PubMed

    Marek, Paul E; Moore, Wendy

    2015-05-19

    The rediscovery of the Californian millipede Xystocheir bistipita surprisingly reveals that the species is bioluminescent. Using molecular phylogenetics, we show that X. bistipita is the evolutionary sister group of Motyxia, the only genus of New World bioluminescent millipedes. We demonstrate that bioluminescence originated in the group's most recent common ancestor and evolved by gradual, directional change through diversification. Because bioluminescence in Motyxia has been experimentally demonstrated to be aposematic, forewarning of the animal's cyanide-based toxins, these results are contrary to aposematic theory and empirical evidence that a warning pattern cannot evolve gradually in unpalatable prey. However, gradual evolution of a warning pattern is plausible if faint light emission served another function and was co-opted as an aposematic signal later in the diversification of the genus. Luminescence in Motyxia stem-group taxa may have initially evolved to cope with reactive oxygen stress triggered by a hot, dry environment and was repurposed for aposematism by high-elevation crown-group taxa colonizing new habitats with varying levels of predation. The discovery of bioluminescence in X. bistipita and its pivotal phylogenetic location provides insight into the independent and repeated evolution of bioluminescence across the tree of life.

  13. Detection of a bioluminescent milky sea from space

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Steven D.; Haddock, Steven H. D.; Elvidge, Christopher D.; Lee, Thomas F.

    2005-01-01

    On many occasions over the centuries, mariners have reported witnessing surreal nocturnal displays where the surface of the sea produces an intense, uniform, and sustained glow that extends to the horizon in all directions. Although such emissions cannot be fully reconciled with the known features of any light-emitting organism, these so-called “milky seas” are hypothesized to be manifestations of unusually strong bioluminescence produced by colonies of bacteria in association with a microalgal bloom in the surface waters. Because of their ephemeral nature and the paucity of scientific observations, an explanation of milky seas has remained elusive. Here, we report the first satellite observations of the phenomenon. An ≈15,400-km2 area of the northwestern Indian Ocean, roughly the size of the state of Connecticut, was observed to glow over 3 consecutive nights, corroborated on the first night by a ship-based account. This unanticipated application of satellite remote-sensing technology provides insights pertaining to the formation and scale of these poorly understood events. PMID:16186481

  14. Detection of a bioluminescent milky sea from space.

    PubMed

    Miller, Steven D; Haddock, Steven H D; Elvidge, Christopher D; Lee, Thomas F

    2005-10-04

    On many occasions over the centuries, mariners have reported witnessing surreal nocturnal displays where the surface of the sea produces an intense, uniform, and sustained glow that extends to the horizon in all directions. Although such emissions cannot be fully reconciled with the known features of any light-emitting organism, these so-called "milky seas" are hypothesized to be manifestations of unusually strong bioluminescence produced by colonies of bacteria in association with a microalgal bloom in the surface waters. Because of their ephemeral nature and the paucity of scientific observations, an explanation of milky seas has remained elusive. Here, we report the first satellite observations of the phenomenon. An approximately 15,400-km(2) area of the northwestern Indian Ocean, roughly the size of the state of Connecticut, was observed to glow over 3 consecutive nights, corroborated on the first night by a ship-based account. This unanticipated application of satellite remote-sensing technology provides insights pertaining to the formation and scale of these poorly understood events.

  15. Bioluminescent bacterial imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Baban, Chwanrow K; Cronin, Michelle; Akin, Ali R; O'Brien, Anne; Gao, Xuefeng; Tabirca, Sabin; Francis, Kevin P; Tangney, Mark

    2012-11-04

    This video describes the use of whole body bioluminesce imaging (BLI) for the study of bacterial trafficking in live mice, with an emphasis on the use of bacteria in gene and cell therapy for cancer. Bacteria present an attractive class of vector for cancer therapy, possessing a natural ability to grow preferentially within tumors following systemic administration. Bacteria engineered to express the lux gene cassette permit BLI detection of the bacteria and concurrently tumor sites. The location and levels of bacteria within tumors over time can be readily examined, visualized in two or three dimensions. The method is applicable to a wide range of bacterial species and tumor xenograft types. This article describes the protocol for analysis of bioluminescent bacteria within subcutaneous tumor bearing mice. Visualization of commensal bacteria in the Gastrointestinal tract (GIT) by BLI is also described. This powerful, and cheap, real-time imaging strategy represents an ideal method for the study of bacteria in vivo in the context of cancer research, in particular gene therapy, and infectious disease. This video outlines the procedure for studying lux-tagged E. coli in live mice, demonstrating the spatial and temporal readout achievable utilizing BLI with the IVIS system.

  16. Detection of Organic Compounds with Whole-Cell Bioluminescent Bioassays

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan; Smartt, Abby; Ripp, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Natural and manmade organic chemicals are widely deposited across a diverse range of ecosystems including air, surface water, groundwater, wastewater, soil, sediment, and marine environments. Some organic compounds, despite their industrial values, are toxic to living organisms and pose significant health risks to humans and wildlife. Detection and monitoring of these organic pollutants in environmental matrices therefore is of great interest and need for remediation and health risk assessment. Although these detections have traditionally been performed using analytical chemical approaches that offer highly sensitive and specific identification of target compounds, these methods require specialized equipment and trained operators, and fail to describe potential bioavailable effects on living organisms. Alternatively, the integration of bioluminescent systems into whole-cell bioreporters presents a new capacity for organic compound detection. These bioreporters are constructed by incorporating reporter genes into catabolic or signaling pathways that are present within living cells and emit a bioluminescent signal that can be detected upon exposure to target chemicals. Although relatively less specific compared to analytical methods, bioluminescent bioassays are more cost-effective, more rapid, can be scaled to higher throughput, and can be designed to report not only the presence but also the bioavailability of target substances. This chapter reviews available bacterial and eukaryotic whole-cell bioreporters for sensing organic pollutants and their applications in a variety of sample matrices. PMID:25084996

  17. Flexible peritoneal windows for quantitative fluorescence and bioluminescence preclinical imaging.

    PubMed

    Souris, Jeffrey S; Hickson, Jonathan A; Msezane, Lambda; Rinker-Schaeffer, Carrie W; Chen, Chin-Tu

    2013-01-01

    At present, there is considerable interest in the use of in vivo fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging to track the onset and progression of pathologic processes in preclinical models of human disease. Optical quantitation of such phenomena, however, is often problematic, frequently complicated by the overlying tissue's scattering and absorption of light, as well as the presence of endogenous cutaneous and subcutaneous fluorophores. To partially circumvent this information loss, we report here the development of flexible, surgically implanted, transparent windows that enhance quantitative in vivo fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging of optical reporters. These windows are metal and glass free and thus compatible with computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, and single-photon emission computed tomography; they also permit visualization of much larger areas with fewer impediments to animal locomotion and grooming than those previously described. To evaluate their utility in preclinical imaging, we surgically implanted these windows in the abdominal walls of female athymic nude mice and subsequently inoculated each animal with 1 × 10(4) to 1 × 10(6) bioluminescent human ovarian cancer cells (SKOV3ip.1-luc). Longitudinal imaging studies of fenestrated animals revealed up to 48-fold gains in imaging sensitivity relative to nonfenestrated animals, with relatively few complications, allowing wide-field in vivo visualization of nascent metastatic ovarian cancer colonization.

  18. QM/MM study on the light emitters of aequorin chemiluminescence, bioluminescence, and fluorescence: a general understanding of the bioluminescence of several marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-Feng; Ferré, Nicolas; Liu, Ya-Jun

    2013-06-24

    Aequorea victoria is a type of jellyfish that is known by its famous protein, green fluorescent protein (GFP), which has been widely used as a probe in many fields. Aequorea has another important protein, aequorin, which is one of the members of the EF-hand calcium-binding protein family. Aequorin has been used for intracellular calcium measurements for three decades, but its bioluminescence mechanism remains largely unknown. One of the important reasons is the lack of clear and reliable knowledge about the light emitters, which are complex. Several neutral and anionic forms exist in chemiexcited, bioluminescent, and fluorescent states and are connected with the H-bond network of the binding cavity in the protein. We first theoretically investigated aequorin chemiluminescence, bioluminescence, and fluorescence in real proteins by performing hybrid quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics methods combined with a molecular dynamics method. For the first time, this study reported the origin and clear differences in the chemiluminescence, bioluminescence and fluorescence of aequorin, which is important for understanding the bioluminescence not only of jellyfish, but also of many other marine organisms (that have the same coelenterazine caved in different coelenterazine-type luciferases).

  19. A genetic screen for bioluminescence genes in the fungus Armillaria mellea, through the use of Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated random insertional mutagenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioluminescence is reported from 71 saprobic species of fungi from four, distant lineages in the order Agaricales. Analyses of the fungal luminescent chemistry shows that all four lineages share a functionally conserved substrate and luciferase, indicating that the bioluminescent pathway is likely c...

  20. Repeated and Widespread Evolution of Bioluminescence in Marine Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Matthew P.; Sparks, John S.; Smith, W. Leo

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence is primarily a marine phenomenon with 80% of metazoan bioluminescent genera occurring in the world’s oceans. Here we show that bioluminescence has evolved repeatedly and is phylogenetically widespread across ray-finned fishes. We recover 27 independent evolutionary events of bioluminescence, all among marine fish lineages. This finding indicates that bioluminescence has evolved many more times than previously hypothesized across fishes and the tree of life. Our exploration of the macroevolutionary patterns of bioluminescent lineages indicates that the present day diversity of some inshore and deep-sea bioluminescent fish lineages that use bioluminescence for communication, feeding, and reproduction exhibit exceptional species richness given clade age. We show that exceptional species richness occurs particularly in deep-sea fishes with intrinsic bioluminescent systems and both shallow water and deep-sea lineages with luminescent systems used for communication. PMID:27276229

  1. Repeated and Widespread Evolution of Bioluminescence in Marine Fishes.

    PubMed

    Davis, Matthew P; Sparks, John S; Smith, W Leo

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence is primarily a marine phenomenon with 80% of metazoan bioluminescent genera occurring in the world's oceans. Here we show that bioluminescence has evolved repeatedly and is phylogenetically widespread across ray-finned fishes. We recover 27 independent evolutionary events of bioluminescence, all among marine fish lineages. This finding indicates that bioluminescence has evolved many more times than previously hypothesized across fishes and the tree of life. Our exploration of the macroevolutionary patterns of bioluminescent lineages indicates that the present day diversity of some inshore and deep-sea bioluminescent fish lineages that use bioluminescence for communication, feeding, and reproduction exhibit exceptional species richness given clade age. We show that exceptional species richness occurs particularly in deep-sea fishes with intrinsic bioluminescent systems and both shallow water and deep-sea lineages with luminescent systems used for communication.

  2. Structural basis for the spectral difference in luciferase bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Nakatsu, Toru; Ichiyama, Susumu; Hiratake, Jun; Saldanha, Adrian; Kobashi, Nobuyuki; Sakata, Kanzo; Kato, Hiroaki

    2006-03-16

    Fireflies communicate with each other by emitting yellow-green to yellow-orange brilliant light. The bioluminescence reaction, which uses luciferin, Mg-ATP and molecular oxygen to yield an electronically excited oxyluciferin species, is carried out by the enzyme luciferase. Visible light is emitted during relaxation of excited oxyluciferin to its ground state. The high quantum yield of the luciferin/luciferase reaction and the change in bioluminescence colour caused by subtle structural differences in luciferase have attracted much research interest. In fact, a single amino acid substitution in luciferase changes the emission colour from yellow-green to red. Although the crystal structure of luciferase from the North American firefly (Photinus pyralis) has been described, the detailed mechanism for the bioluminescence colour change is still unclear. Here we report the crystal structures of wild-type and red mutant (S286N) luciferases from the Japanese Genji-botaru (Luciola cruciata) in complex with a high-energy intermediate analogue, 5'-O-[N-(dehydroluciferyl)-sulfamoyl]adenosine (DLSA). Comparing these structures to those of the wild-type luciferase complexed with AMP plus oxyluciferin (products) reveals a significant conformational change in the wild-type enzyme but not in the red mutant. This conformational change involves movement of the hydrophobic side chain of Ile 288 towards the benzothiazole ring of DLSA. Our results indicate that the degree of molecular rigidity of the excited state of oxyluciferin, which is controlled by a transient movement of Ile 288, determines the colour of bioluminescence during the emission reaction.

  3. Analytical Applications of Bioluminescence and Chemiluminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W. (Editor); Picciolo, G. L. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    Bioluminescence and chemiluminescence studies were used to measure the amount of adenosine triphosphate and therefore the amount of energy available. Firefly luciferase - luciferin enzyme system was emphasized. Photometer designs are also considered.

  4. Continuous, real-time bioimaging of chemical bioavailability and toxicology using autonomously bioluminescent human cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan M.; Webb, James D.; Price, Sarah L.; Ripp, Steven A.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    Bioluminescent imaging is an emerging biomedical surveillance strategy that uses external cameras to detect in vivo light generated in small animal models of human physiology or in vitro light generated in tissue culture or tissue scaffold mimics of human anatomy. The most widely utilized of reporters is the firefly luciferase (luc) gene; however, it generates light only upon addition of a chemical substrate, thus only generating intermittent single time point data snapshots. To overcome this disadvantage, we have demonstrated substrate-independent bioluminescent imaging using an optimized bacterial bioluminescence (lux) system. The lux reporter produces bioluminescence autonomously using components found naturally within the cell, thereby allowing imaging to occur continuously and in real-time over the lifetime of the host. We have validated this technology in human cells with demonstrated chemical toxicological profiling against exotoxin exposures at signal strengths comparable to existing luc systems (~1.33 × 107 photons/second). As a proof-in-principle demonstration, we have engineered breast carcinoma cells to express bioluminescence for real-time screening of endocrine disrupting chemicals and validated detection of 17β-estradiol (EC50 = ~ 10 pM). These and other applications of this new reporter technology will be discussed as potential new pathways towards improved models of target chemical bioavailability, toxicology, efficacy, and human safety. PMID:26516295

  5. Continuous, real-time bioimaging of chemical bioavailability and toxicology using autonomously bioluminescent human cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan M.; Webb, James D.; Price, Sarah L.; Ripp, Steven A.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2013-05-01

    Bioluminescent imaging is an emerging biomedical surveillance strategy that uses external cameras to detect in vivo light generated in small animal models of human physiology or in vitro light generated in tissue culture or tissue scaffold mimics of human anatomy. The most widely utilized of reporters is the firefly luciferase (luc) gene; however, it generates light only upon addition of a chemical substrate, thus only generating intermittent single time point data snapshots. To overcome this disadvantage, we have demonstrated substrate-independent bioluminescent imaging using an optimized bacterial bioluminescence (lux) system. The lux reporter produces bioluminescence autonomously using components found naturally within the cell, thereby allowing imaging to occur continuously and in real-time over the lifetime of the host. We have validated this technology in human cells with demonstrated chemical toxicological profiling against exotoxin exposures at signal strengths comparable to existing luc systems (~1.33 × 107 photons/second). As a proof-in-principle demonstration, we have engineered breast carcinoma cells to express bioluminescence for real-time screening of endocrine disrupting chemicals and validated detection of 17β-estradiol (EC50 = ~ 10 pM). These and other applications of this new reporter technology will be discussed as potential new pathways towards improved models of target chemical bioavailability, toxicology, efficacy, and human safety.

  6. Ecology of colors of firefly bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Lall, A.B.; Seliger, H.H.; Biggley, W.H.; Lloyd, J.E.

    1980-10-31

    Dark-active North American fireflies emit green bioluminescence and dusk-active species emit yellow, in general. Yellow light and yellow visual spectral sensitivity may be adaptations to increase the signal-to-noise (that is, foliage-reflected ambient light) ratio for sexual signaling during twilight. The peaks of the electroretinogram visual spectral sensitivities of four species tested, two dark- and two dusk-active, correspond with the peak of their bioluminescent emissions.

  7. Spectrally resolved bioluminescence tomography with the third-order simplified spherical harmonics approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yujie; Douraghy, Ali; Machado, Hidevaldo B.; Stout, David; Tian, Jie; Herschman, Harvey; Chatziioannou, Arion F.

    2009-11-01

    Bioluminescence imaging has been extensively applied to in vivo small animal imaging. Quantitative three-dimensional bioluminescent source information obtained by using bioluminescence tomography can directly and much more accurately reflect biological changes as opposed to planar bioluminescence imaging. Preliminary simulated and experimental reconstruction results demonstrate the feasibility and promise of bioluminescence tomography. However, the use of multiple approximations, particularly the diffusion approximation theory, affects the quality of in vivo small animal-based image reconstructions. In the development of new reconstruction algorithms, high-order approximation models of the radiative transfer equation and spectrally resolved data introduce new challenges to the reconstruction algorithm and speed. In this paper, an SP3-based (the third-order simplified spherical harmonics approximation) spectrally resolved reconstruction algorithm is proposed. The simple linear relationship between the unknown source distribution and the spectrally resolved data is established in this algorithm. A parallel version of this algorithm is realized, making BLT reconstruction feasible for the whole body of small animals especially for fine spatial domain discretization. In simulation validations, the proposed algorithm shows improved reconstruction quality compared with diffusion approximation-based methods when high absorption, superficial sources and detection modes are considered. In addition, comparisons between fine and coarse mesh-based BLT reconstructions show the effects of numerical errors in reconstruction image quality. Finally, BLT reconstructions using in vivo mouse experiments further demonstrate the potential and effectiveness of the SP3-based reconstruction algorithm.

  8. Robust image modeling technique with a bioluminescence image segmentation application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jianghong; Wang, Ruiping; Tian, Jie

    2009-02-01

    A robust pattern classifier algorithm for the variable symmetric plane model, where the driving noise is a mixture of a Gaussian and an outlier process, is developed. The veracity and high-speed performance of the pattern recognition algorithm is proved. Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has recently gained wide acceptance in the field of in vivo small animal molecular imaging. So that it is very important for BLT to how to acquire the highprecision region of interest in a bioluminescence image (BLI) in order to decrease loss of the customers because of inaccuracy in quantitative analysis. An algorithm in the mode is developed to improve operation speed, which estimates parameters and original image intensity simultaneously from the noise corrupted image derived from the BLT optical hardware system. The focus pixel value is obtained from the symmetric plane according to a more realistic assumption for the noise sequence in the restored image. The size of neighborhood is adaptive and small. What's more, the classifier function is base on the statistic features. If the qualifications for the classifier are satisfied, the focus pixel intensity is setup as the largest value in the neighborhood.Otherwise, it will be zeros.Finally,pseudo-color is added up to the result of the bioluminescence segmented image. The whole process has been implemented in our 2D BLT optical system platform and the model is proved.

  9. Development of a new procedure based on the energy charge measurement using ATP bioluminescence assay for the detection of living mould from graphic documents.

    PubMed

    Rakotonirainy, Malalanirina Sylvia; Arnold, Sylvia

    2008-01-01

    Fungal contamination is a major cause of deterioration in libraries and archives. Curators and conservators increasingly need rapid microbiological analyses. This paper presents a rapid detection method for the fungal contaminants on documents. A previous study showed that the calculation of energy charge, using bioluminescence ATP assays, provides a useful indicator to determinate the viability of fungal strains. We argue that this sensitive and time-saving method is better than traditional culture techniques. However, the procedure needs to be modified to make it usable for lay persons. An improved and simplified protocol is proposed here for the extraction of adenylate nucleotides (AN) from fungal spores and for their measurements. Our new procedure can detect the existence of viable fungal strains on documents, presenting suspect spots within minutes. The extraction is performed by filtration with DMSO-TE solution as extractant. The different step of the measurement of AN content is carried out successively in a single test tube instead of the three tubes necessary in the initial method. The new procedure was tested on 12 strains among those most frequently found in archives and libraries and validated on swab samples from real documents.

  10. Bioluminescence in Dinoflagellates: Evidence that the Adaptive Value of Bioluminescence in Dinoflagellates is Concentration Dependent.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Karen A; Widder, Edith A

    2017-03-01

    Three major hypotheses have been proposed to explain why dinoflagellate bioluminescence deters copepod grazing: startle response, aposematic warning, and burglar alarm. These hypotheses propose dinoflagellate bioluminescence (A) startles predatory copepods, (B) warns potential predators of toxicity, and (C) draws the attention of higher order visual predators to the copepod's location. While the burglar alarm is the most commonly accepted hypothesis, it requires a high concentration of bioluminescent dinoflagellates to be effective, meaning the bioluminescence selective advantage at lower, more commonly observed, dinoflagellate concentrations may result from another function (e.g. startle response or aposematic warning). Therefore, a series of experiments was conducted to evaluate copepod grazing (Acartia tonsa) on bioluminescent dinoflagellates (during bioluminescent and nonbioluminescent phases, corresponding to night and day, respectively) at different concentrations (10, 1000, and 3000 cells mL(-1) ), on toxic (Pyrodinium bahamense var. bahamense) and nontoxic (Lingulodinium polyedrum) bioluminescent dinoflagellates, and in the presence of nonluminescent diatoms (Thalassiosira eccentrica). Changes in copepod ingestion rates, clearance rates, and feeding preferences as a result of these experimental factors, particularly during the mixed trails with nonluminescent diatoms, indicate there is a concentration threshold at which the burglar alarm becomes effective and below which dinoflagellate bioluminescence functions as an aposematic warning.

  11. A bioluminescent arsenite biosensor designed for inline water analyzer.

    PubMed

    Prévéral, Sandra; Brutesco, Catherine; Descamps, Elodie C T; Escoffier, Camille; Pignol, David; Ginet, Nicolas; Garcia, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Whole-cell biosensors based on the reporter gene system can offer rapid detection of trace levels of organic or metallic compounds in water. They are well characterized in laboratory conditions, but their transfer into technological devices for the surveillance of water networks remains at a conceptual level. The development of a semi-autonomous inline water analyzer stumbles across the conservation of the bacterial biosensors over a period of time compatible with the autonomy requested by the end-user while maintaining a satisfactory sensitivity, specificity, and time response. We focused here on assessing the effect of lyophilization on two biosensors based on the reporter gene system and hosted in Escherichia coli. The reporter gene used here is the entire bacterial luciferase lux operon (luxCDABE) for an autonomous bioluminescence emission without the need to add any substrate. In the cell-survival biosensor that is used to determine the overall fitness of the bacteria when mixed with the water sample, lux expression is driven by a constitutive E. coli promoter PrpoD. In the arsenite biosensor, the arsenite-inducible promoter P ars involved in arsenite resistance in E. coli controls lux expression. Evaluation of the shelf life of these lyophilized biosensors kept at 4 °C over a year evidenced that about 40 % of the lyophilized cells can be revived in such storage conditions. The performances of the lyophilized biosensor after 7 months in storage are maintained, with a detection limit of 0.2 μM arsenite for a response in about an hour with good reproducibility. These results pave the way to the use in tandem of both biosensors (one for general toxicity and one for arsenite contamination) as consumables of an autonomous analyzer in the field.

  12. Pharmacological investigation of the bioluminescence signaling pathway of the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum: evidence for the role of stretch-activated ion channels.

    PubMed

    Jin, Kelly; Klima, Jason C; Deane, Grant; Dale Stokes, Malcolm; Latz, Michael I

    2013-08-01

    Dinoflagellate bioluminescence serves as a whole-cell reporter of mechanical stress, which activates a signaling pathway that appears to involve the opening of voltage-sensitive ion channels and release of calcium from intracellular stores. However, little else is known about the initial signaling events that facilitate the transduction of mechanical stimuli. In the present study using the red tide dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum (Stein) Dodge, two forms of dinoflagellate bioluminescence, mechanically stimulated and spontaneous flashes, were used as reporter systems to pharmacological treatments that targeted various predicted signaling events at the plasma membrane level of the signaling pathway. Pretreatment with 200 μM Gadolinium III (Gd(3+) ), a nonspecific blocker of stretch-activated and some voltage-gated ion channels, resulted in strong inhibition of both forms of bioluminescence. Pretreatment with 50 μM nifedipine, an inhibitor of L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels that inhibits mechanically stimulated bioluminescence, did not inhibit spontaneous bioluminescence. Treatment with 1 mM benzyl alcohol, a membrane fluidizer, was very effective in stimulating bioluminescence. Benzyl alcohol-stimulated bioluminescence was inhibited by Gd(3+) but not by nifedipine, suggesting that its role is through stretch activation via a change in plasma membrane fluidity. These results are consistent with the presence of stretch-activated and voltage-gated ion channels in the bioluminescence mechanotransduction signaling pathway, with spontaneous flashing associated with a stretch-activated component at the plasma membrane.

  13. A posteriori correction for source decay in 3D bioluminescent source localization using multiview measured data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li; Wang, Pu; Tian, Jie; Liu, Dan; Wang, Ruifang

    2009-02-01

    As a novel optical molecular imaging technique, bioluminescence tomography (BLT) can be used to monitor the biological activities non-invasively at the cellular and molecular levels. In most of known BLT studies, however, the time variation of the bioluminescent source is neglected. It gives rise to the inconsistent views during the multiview continuous wave measurement. In other words, the real measured data from different measured views come from 'different' bioluminescent sources. It could bring large errors in bioluminescence reconstruction. In this paper, a posteriori correction strategy for adaptive FEM-based reconstruction is proposed and developed. The method helps to improve the source localization considering the bioluminescent energy variance during the multiview measurement. In the method, the correction for boundary signals by means of a posteriori correction strategy, which adopts the energy ratio of measured data in the overlapping domains between the adjacent measurements as the correcting factor, can eliminate the effect of the inconsistent views. Then the adaptive mesh refinement with a posteriori error estimation helps to improve the precision and efficiency of BLT reconstruction. In addition, a priori permissible source region selection based on the surface measured data further reduces the ill-posedness of BLT and enhances numerical stability. Finally, three-dimension numerical simulations using the heterogeneous phantom are performed. The numerically measured data is generated by Monte Carlo (MC) method which is known as the Gold standard and can avoid the inverse crime. The reconstructed result with correction shows more accuracy compared to that without correction.

  14. A label-free bioluminescent sensor for real-time monitoring polynucleotide kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Du, Jiao; Xu, Qinfeng; Lu, Xiaoquan; Zhang, Chun-yang

    2014-08-19

    Polynucleotide kinase (PNK) plays a crucial role in maintaining the genomic stability of cells and is becoming a potential target in the radio-therapeutic treatment of cancers. The fluorescent method is usually used to measure the PNK activity, but it is impossible to obtain the real-time monitoring without the employment of the labeled DNA probes. Here, we report a label-free bioluminescent sensor for PNK activity assay through real-time monitoring of the phosphorylation-dependent DNA ligation reaction. In this bioluminescent sensor, two hairpin DNA probes with 5'-protruding terminal are designed as the phosphate acceptor, and the widely used phosphate donor of ATP is substituted by dCTP. In the absence of PNK, the ligation reaction cannot be triggered due to the lack of 5'-phosphoryl groups in the probes, and the background signal is negligible. With the addition of PNK, the phosphorylation-ligation reaction of the probes is initiated with the release of AMP, and the subsequent conversion of AMP to ATP leads to the generation of distinct bioluminescence signal. The PNK activity assay can be performed in real time by continuously monitoring the bioluminescence signal. This bioluminescent sensor is much simpler, label-free, cost-effective, and free from the autofluorescence interference of biological matrix, and can be further used for quantitative, kinetic, and inhibition assay.

  15. An adaptive regularization parameter choice strategy for multispectral bioluminescence tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Jinchao; Qin Chenghu; Jia Kebin; Han Dong; Liu Kai; Zhu Shouping; Yang Xin; Tian Jie

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) provides an effective tool for monitoring physiological and pathological activities in vivo. However, the measured data in bioluminescence imaging are corrupted by noise. Therefore, regularization methods are commonly used to find a regularized solution. Nevertheless, for the quality of the reconstructed bioluminescent source obtained by regularization methods, the choice of the regularization parameters is crucial. To date, the selection of regularization parameters remains challenging. With regards to the above problems, the authors proposed a BLT reconstruction algorithm with an adaptive parameter choice rule. Methods: The proposed reconstruction algorithm uses a diffusion equation for modeling the bioluminescent photon transport. The diffusion equation is solved with a finite element method. Computed tomography (CT) images provide anatomical information regarding the geometry of the small animal and its internal organs. To reduce the ill-posedness of BLT, spectral information and the optimal permissible source region are employed. Then, the relationship between the unknown source distribution and multiview and multispectral boundary measurements is established based on the finite element method and the optimal permissible source region. Since the measured data are noisy, the BLT reconstruction is formulated as l{sub 2} data fidelity and a general regularization term. When choosing the regularization parameters for BLT, an efficient model function approach is proposed, which does not require knowledge of the noise level. This approach only requests the computation of the residual and regularized solution norm. With this knowledge, we construct the model function to approximate the objective function, and the regularization parameter is updated iteratively. Results: First, the micro-CT based mouse phantom was used for simulation verification. Simulation experiments were used to illustrate why multispectral data were used

  16. Copper toxicity to bioluminescent Nitrosomonas europaea in soil is explained by the free metal ion activity in pore water.

    PubMed

    Ore, S; Mertens, J; Brandt, K K; Smolders, E

    2010-12-01

    The terrestrial biotic ligand model (BLM) for metal toxicity in soil postulates that metal toxicity depends on the free metal ion activity in solution and on ions competing for metal sorption to the biotic ligand. Unequivocal evidence for the BLM assumptions is most difficult to obtain for native soil microorganisms because the abiotic and biotic compartments cannot be experimentally separated. Here, we report copper (Cu) toxicity to a bioluminescent Nitrosomonas europaea reporter strain that was used in a solid phase-contact assay and in corresponding soil extracts and artificial soil solutions. The Cu(2+) ion activities that halve bioluminescence (EC50) in artificial solutions ranged 10(-5) to 10(-7) M and increased with increasing activities of H(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) according to the BLM concept. The solution based Cu(2+) EC50 values of N. europaea in six contaminated soils ranged 2 × 10(-6) to 2 × 10(-9) M and these thresholds for both solid phase or soil extract based assays were well predicted by the ion competition model fitted to artificial solution data. In addition, solution based Cu(2+) EC50 of the solid phase-contact assay were never smaller than corresponding values in soil extracts suggesting no additional solid phase toxic route. By restricting the analysis to the same added species, we show that the Cu(2+) in solution represents the toxic species to this bacterium.

  17. Discovery of New Substrates for LuxAB Bacterial Bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tianyu; Wang, Weishan; Wu, Xingkang; Wu, Wenxiao; Bai, Haixiu; Ma, Zhao; Shen, Yuemao; Yang, Keqian; Li, Minyong

    2016-08-01

    In this article, four novel substrates with long halftime have been designed and synthesized successfully for luxAB bacterial bioluminescence. After in vitro and in vivo biological evaluation, these molecules can emit obvious bioluminescence emission with known bacterial luciferase, thus indicating a new promising approach to developing the bacterial bioluminescent system.

  18. Characterization of an anthraquinone fluor from the bioluminescent, pelagic polychaete Tomopteris

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Warren R; Powers, Meghan L; Haddock, Steven H D

    2014-01-01

    Tomopteris is a cosmopolitan genus of polychaetes. Many species produce yellow luminescence in the parapodia when stimulated. Yellow bioluminescence is rare in the ocean, and the components of this luminescent reaction have not been identified. Only a brief description, half a century ago, noted fluorescence in the parapodia with a remarkably similar spectrum to the bioluminescence, which suggested that it may be the luciferin or terminal light-emitter. Here, we report the isolation of the fluorescent yellow–orange pigment found in the luminous exudate and in the body of the animals. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed the mass to be 270 m/z with a molecular formula of C15H10O5, which ultimately was shown to be aloe-emodin, an anthraquinone previously found in plants. We speculate that aloe-emodin could be a factor for resonant-energy transfer or the oxyluciferin for Tomopteris bioluminescence. PMID:24760626

  19. Characterization of an anthraquinone fluor from the bioluminescent, pelagic polychaete Tomopteris.

    PubMed

    Francis, Warren R; Powers, Meghan L; Haddock, Steven H D

    2014-12-01

    Tomopteris is a cosmopolitan genus of polychaetes. Many species produce yellow luminescence in the parapodia when stimulated. Yellow bioluminescence is rare in the ocean, and the components of this luminescent reaction have not been identified. Only a brief description, half a century ago, noted fluorescence in the parapodia with a remarkably similar spectrum to the bioluminescence, which suggested that it may be the luciferin or terminal light-emitter. Here, we report the isolation of the fluorescent yellow-orange pigment found in the luminous exudate and in the body of the animals. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed the mass to be 270 m/z with a molecular formula of C(15)H(10)O(5), which ultimately was shown to be aloe-emodin, an anthraquinone previously found in plants. We speculate that aloe-emodin could be a factor for resonant-energy transfer or the oxyluciferin for Tomopteris bioluminescence.

  20. Genetically encoded bioluminescent voltage indicator for multi-purpose use in wide range of bioimaging

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki, Shigenori; Tsutsui, Hidekazu; Suzuki, Kazushi; Agetsuma, Masakazu; Arai, Yoshiyuki; Jinno, Yuka; Bai, Guirong; Daniels, Matthew J.; Okamura, Yasushi; Matsuda, Tomoki; Nagai, Takeharu

    2017-01-01

    We report development of the first genetically encoded bioluminescent indicator for membrane voltage called LOTUS-V. Since it is bioluminescent, imaging LOTUS-V does not require external light illumination. This allows bidirectional optogenetic control of cellular activity triggered by Channelrhodopsin2 and Halorhodopsin during voltage imaging. The other advantage of LOTUS-V is the robustness of a signal-to-background ratio (SBR) wherever it expressed, even in the specimens where autofluorescence from environment severely interferes fluorescence imaging. Through imaging of moving cardiomyocyte aggregates, we demonstrated the advantages of LOTUS-V in long-term imaging are attributable to the absence of phototoxicity, and photobleaching in bioluminescent imaging, combined with the ratiometric aspect of LOTUS-V design. Collectively LOTUS-V extends the scope of excitable cell control and simultaneous voltage phenotyping, which should enable applications in bioscience, medicine and pharmacology previously not possible. PMID:28205521

  1. Bioluminescent bioreporter assays for targeted detection of chemical and biological agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripp, Steven; Jegier, Pat; Johnson, Courtney; Moser, Scott; Islam, Syed; Sayler, Gary

    2008-04-01

    Bioluminescent bioreporters carrying the bacterial lux gene cassette have been well established for the sensing and monitoring of select chemical agents. Their ability to generate target specific visible light signals with no requirement for extraneous additions of substrate or other hands-on manipulations affords a real-time, repetitive assaying technique that is remarkable in its simplicity and accuracy. Although the predominant application of lux-based bioluminescent bioreporters has been towards chemical compound detection, novel genetic engineering schemes are yielding a variety of new bioreporter systems that extend the lux sensing mechanism beyond mere analyte discrimination. For example, the unique specificity of bacteriophage (bacterial viruses) has been exploited in lux bioluminescent assays for specific identification of foodborne bacterial pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7. With the concurrent ability to interface bioluminescent bioreporter assays onto integrated circuit microluminometers (BBICs; bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuits), the potential exists for the development of sentinel microchips that can function as environmental monitors for multiplexed recognition of chemical and biological agents in air, food, and water. The size and portability of BBIC biosensors may ultimately provide a deployable, interactive network sensing technology adaptable towards chem/bio defense.

  2. Development of bioluminescent bioreporters for in vitro and in vivo tracking of Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yanwen; Connor, Michael G; Pennington, Jarrod M; Lawrenz, Matthew B

    2012-01-01

    Yersinia pestis causes an acute infection known as the plague. Conventional techniques to enumerate Y. pestis can be labor intensive and do not lend themselves to high throughput assays. In contrast, bioluminescent bioreporters produce light that can be detected using plate readers or optical imaging platforms to monitor bacterial populations as a function of luminescence. Here, we describe the development of two Y. pestis chromosomal-based luxCDABE bioreporters, Lux(PtolC) and Lux(PcysZK). These bioreporters use constitutive promoters to drive expression of luxCDABE that allow for sensitive detection of bacteria via bioluminescence in vitro. Importantly, both bioreporters demonstrate a direct correlation between bacterial numbers and bioluminescence, which allows for bioluminescence to be used to compare bacterial numbers. We demonstrate the use of these bioreporters to test antimicrobial inhibitors (Lux(PtolC)) and monitor intracellular survival (Lux(PtolC) and Lux(PcysZK)) in vitro. Furthermore, we show that Y. pestis infection of the mouse model can be monitored using whole animal optical imaging in real time. Using optical imaging, we observed Y. pestis dissemination and differentiated between virulence phenotypes in live animals via bioluminescence. Finally, we demonstrate that whole animal optical imaging can identify unexpected colonization patterns in mutant-infected animals.

  3. Experimental Study on Bioluminescence Tomography with Multimodality Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Yujie; Tian, Jie; Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2007-01-01

    To verify the influence of a priori information on the nonuniqueness problem of bioluminescence tomography (BLT), the multimodality imaging fusion based BLT experiment is performed by multiview noncontact detection mode, which incorporates the anatomical information obtained by the microCT scanner and the background optical properties based on diffuse reflectance measurements. In the reconstruction procedure, the utilization of adaptive finite element methods (FEMs) and a priori permissible source region refines the reconstructed results and improves numerical robustness and efficiency. The comparison between the absence and employment of a priori information shows that multimodality imaging fusion is essential to quantitative BLT reconstruction. PMID:18256736

  4. Crystal structures of the F88Y obelin mutant before and after bioluminescence provide molecular insight into spectral tuning among hydromedusan photoproteins.

    PubMed

    Natashin, Pavel V; Markova, Svetlana V; Lee, John; Vysotski, Eugene S; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2014-03-01

    Ca(2+) -regulated photoproteins are responsible for the bioluminescence of a variety of marine coelenterates. All hydromedusan photoproteins are a single-chain polypeptide to which 2-hydroperoxycoelenterazine is tightly but non-covalently bound. Bioluminescence results from oxidative decarboxylation of 2-hydroperoxycoelenterazine, generating protein-bound coelenteramide in an excited state. The bioluminescence spectral maxima of recombinant photoproteins vary in the range 462-495 nm, despite a high degree of identity of amino acid sequences and spatial structures of these photoproteins. Based on studies of obelin and aequorin mutants with substitution of Phe to Tyr and Tyr to Phe, respectively [Stepanyuk GA et al. (2005) FEBS Lett 579, 1008-1014], it was suggested that the spectral differences may be accounted for by an additional hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl group of a Tyr residue and an oxygen atom of the 6-(p-hydroxyphenyl) substituent of coelenterazine. Here, we report the crystal structures of two conformation states of the F88Y obelin mutant that has bioluminescence and product fluorescence spectra resembling those of aequorin. Comparison of spatial structures of the F88Y obelin conformation states with those of wild-type obelin clearly shows that substitution of Phe to Tyr does not affect the overall structures of either F88Y obelin or its product following Ca(2+) discharge, compared to the conformation states of wild-type obelin. The hydrogen bond network in F88Y obelin being due to the Tyr substitution clearly supports the suggestion that different hydrogen bond patterns near the oxygen of the 6-(p-hydroxyphenyl) substituent are the basis for spectral modifications between hydromedusan photoproteins.

  5. A bright cyan-excitable orange fluorescent protein facilitates dual-emission microscopy and enhances bioluminescence imaging in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jun; Oh, Young-Hee; Sens, Alex; Ataie, Niloufar; Dana, Hod; Macklin, John J.; Laviv, Tal; Welf, Erik S.; Dean, Kevin M.; Zhang, Feijie; Kim, Benjamin B.; Tang, Clement Tran; Hu, Michelle; Baird, Michelle A.; Davidson, Michael W.; Kay, Mark A.; Fiolka, Reto; Yasuda, Ryohei; Kim, Douglas S.; Ng, Ho-Leung; Lin, Michael Z.

    2016-01-01

    Orange-red fluorescent proteins (FPs) are widely used in biomedical research for multiplexed epifluorescence microscopy with GFP-based probes, but their different excitation requirements make multiplexing with new advanced microscopy methods difficult. Separately, orange-red FPs are useful for deep-tissue imaging in mammals due to the relative tissue transmissibility of orange-red light, but their dependence on illumination limits their sensitivity as reporters in deep tissues. Here we describe CyOFP1, a bright engineered orange-red FP that is excitable by cyan light. We show that CyOFP1 enables single-excitation multiplexed imaging with GFP-based probes in single-photon and two-photon microscopy, including time-lapse imaging in light-sheet systems. CyOFP1 also serves as an efficient acceptor for resonance energy transfer from the highly catalytic blue-emitting luciferase NanoLuc. An optimized fusion of CyOFP1 and NanoLuc, called Antares, functions as a highly sensitive bioluminescent reporter in vivo, producing substantially brighter signals from deep tissues than firefly luciferase and other bioluminescent proteins. PMID:27240196

  6. In vivo cell tracking with bioluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Eun; Kalimuthu, Senthilkumar; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol

    2015-03-01

    Molecular imaging is a fast growing biomedical research that allows the visual representation, characterization and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and subcellular levels within intact living organisms. In vivo tracking of cells is an indispensable technology for development and optimization of cell therapy for replacement or renewal of damaged or diseased tissue using transplanted cells, often autologous cells. With outstanding advantages of bioluminescence imaging, the imaging approach is most commonly applied for in vivo monitoring of transplanted stem cells or immune cells in order to assess viability of administered cells with therapeutic efficacy in preclinical small animal models. In this review, a general overview of bioluminescence is provided and recent updates of in vivo cell tracking using the bioluminescence signal are discussed.

  7. Optimisation of acquisition time in bioluminescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Shelley L.; Mason, Suzannah K. G.; Glinton, Sophie; Cobbold, Mark; Styles, Iain B.; Dehghani, Hamid

    2015-03-01

    Decreasing the acquisition time in bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and bioluminescence tomography (BLT) will enable animals to be imaged within the window of stable emission of the bioluminescent source, a higher imaging throughput and minimisation of the time which an animal is anaesthetised. This work investigates, through simulation using a heterogeneous mouse model, two methods of decreasing acquisition time: 1. Imaging at fewer wavelengths (a reduction from five to three); and 2. Increasing the bandwidth of filters used for imaging. The results indicate that both methods are viable ways of decreasing the acquisition time without a loss in quantitative accuracy. Importantly, when choosing imaging wavelengths, the spectral attenuation of tissue and emission spectrum of the source must be considered, in order to choose wavelengths at which a high signal can be achieved. Additionally, when increasing the bandwidth of the filters used for imaging, the bandwidth must be accounted for in the reconstruction algorithm.

  8. Bioluminescent imaging of bacteria during mouse infection.

    PubMed

    Warawa, Jonathan M; Lawrenz, Matthew B

    2014-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging is a powerful tool that has recently been applied towards the study of infectious diseases. Optical imaging of bioluminescently labeled bacteria in infected animals allows for real-time analysis of bacterial proliferation and dissemination during infection without sacrificing the animal. Imaging also allows for tracking of disease progression in an individual subject over time, has the potential to reveal previously overlooked sites of infection, and reduces the number of research animals used in pathogenesis studies. Here, we describe the use of a deep-cooled CCD camera imager to record light emitted from bacteria during infection. We also describe the process of correlating bioluminescence to bacterial numbers by ex vivo imaging of necropsied tissues. Together these techniques can be used to estimate bacterial burdens in host tissues both in vivo and ex vivo using bioluminescent imaging.

  9. Monitoring of bacterial contamination of dental unit water lines using adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, A; Tamaki, N; Yokota, K; Matsuyama, M; Kokeguchi, S

    2016-12-01

    Bacterial contamination of dental unit waterlines (DUWLs) was evaluated using ATP bioluminescence analysis and a conventional culture method. Water samples (N=44) from DUWLs were investigated for heterotrophic bacteria by culture on R2A agar, which gave counts ranging from 1.4×10(3) to 2.7×10(5) cfu/mL. The ATP bioluminescence results for DUWL samples ranged from 6 to 1189 relative light units and could be obtained within 1min; these correlated well with the culture results (r=0.727-0.855). We conclude that the results of the ATP bioluminescence assay accurately reflect the results of conventional culture-based testing. This method is potentially useful for rapid and simple monitoring of DUWL bacterial contamination.

  10. Use of Bioluminescence Markers To Detect Pseudomonas spp. in the Rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    de Weger, Letty A.; Dunbar, Paul; Mahafee, Walter F.; Lugtenberg, Ben J. J.; Sayler, Gary S.

    1991-01-01

    The use of bioluminescence as a sensitive marker for detection of Pseudomonas spp. in the rhizosphere was investigated. Continuous expression of the luxCDABE genes, required for bioluminescence, was not detectable in the rhizosphere. However, when either a naphthalene-inducible luxCDABE construct or a constitutive luxAB construct (coding only for the luciferase) was introduced into the Pseudomonas cells, light emission could be initiated just prior to measurement by the addition of naphthalene or the substrate for luciferase, n-decyl aldehyde, respectively. These Pseudomonas cells could successfully be detected in the rhizosphere by using autophotography or optical fiber light measurement techniques. Detection required the presence of 103 to 104 CFU/cm of root, showing that the bioluminescence technique is at least 1,000-fold more sensitive than β-galactosidase-based systems. Images PMID:16348610

  11. Use of bioluminescence markers to detect Pseudomonas spp. in the Rhizosphere

    SciTech Connect

    De Weger, L.A.; Lugtenberg, B.J.J. ); Dunbar, P.; Sayler, G.S. ); Mahafee, W.F. )

    1991-12-01

    The use of bioluminescence as a sensitive marker for detection of Pseudomonas spp. in the rhizosphere was investigated. Continuous expression of the luxCDABE genes, required for bioluminescence, was not detectable in the rhizosphere. However, when either a naphthalene-inducible luxCDABE construct or a constitutive luxAB construct (coding only for the luciferase) was introduced into the Pseudomonas cells, light emission could be initiated just prior to measurement by the addition of naphthalene or the substrate for luciferase, n-decyl aldehyde, respectively. These Pseudomonas cells could successfully be detected in rhizosphere by using autophotography or optical fiber light measurement techniques. Detection required the presence of 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 4} CFU/cm of root, showing that the bioluminescence technique is at least 1,000-fold more sensitive than {beta}-galactosidase-based systems.

  12. Monitoring of recombinant protein production using bioluminescence in a semiautomated fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Trezzani, I; Nadri, M; Dorel, C; Lejeune, P; Bellalou, J; Lieto, J; Hammouri, H; Longin, R; Dhurjati, P

    2003-01-01

    On-line optimization of fermentation processes can be greatly aided by the availability of information on the physiological state of the cell. The goal of our "BioLux" research project was to design a recombinant cell capable of intracellular monitoring of product synthesis and to use it as part of an automated fermentation system. A recombinant plasmid was constructed containing an inducible promoter that controls the gene coding for a model protein and the genes necessary for bioluminescence. The cells were cultured in microfermenters equipped with an on-line turbidity sensor and a specially designed on-line light sensor capable of continuous measurement of bioluminescence. Initial studies were done under simple culture conditions, and a linear correlation between luminescence and protein production was obtained. Such specially designed recombinant bioluminescent cells can potentially be applied for model-based inference of intracellular product formation, as well as for optimization and control of recombinant fermentation processes.

  13. A Multichannel Bioluminescence Determination Platform for Bioassays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Bae; Naganawa, Ryuichi

    2016-01-01

    The present protocol introduces a multichannel bioluminescence determination platform allowing a high sample throughput determination of weak bioluminescence with reduced standard deviations. The platform is designed to carry a multichannel conveyer, an optical filter, and a mirror cap. The platform enables us to near-simultaneously determine ligands in multiple samples without the replacement of the sample tubes. Furthermore, the optical filters beneath the multichannel conveyer are designed to easily discriminate colors during assays. This optical system provides excellent time- and labor-efficiency to users during bioassays.

  14. Real time detection of live microbes using a highly sensitive bioluminescent nitroreductase probe.

    PubMed

    Wong, Roger H F; Kwong, Thomas; Yau, Kwok-Hei; Au-Yeung, Ho Yu

    2015-03-14

    A highly sensitive and selective nitroreductase probe, showing a rapid and strong bioluminescence enhancement (>100-fold in 5 minutes), and its initial application in the real time detection of both Gram positive and Gram negative live bacteria and monitoring of their growth has been reported.

  15. Antioxidant assay using genetically engineered bioluminescent Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolome, Amelita; Macalino, Bernadette; Pastoral, Ian Lemuel; Sevilla, Fortunato, III

    2006-02-01

    A new antioxidant activity assay based on the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-inducible bacterial strain (E. coli DPD2511) is described. The strain harbors the plasmid pKatG::luxCDABE and responds to hydrogen peroxide treatment by increasing light emission at 490 nm. Antioxidant capacity is evaluated through the ability of an agent to inhibit the hydrogen peroxide-induced bioluminescence of E. coli DPD2511. Applicability of the developed assay in detecting levels of antioxidants in various aqueous plant extracts is demonstrated. The assay was validated against 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, a known antioxidant assay.

  16. Bioluminescence Tomography: Biomedical Background, Mathematical Theory, and Numerical Approximation 1)

    PubMed Central

    Han, Weimin; Wang, Ge

    2010-01-01

    Over the last couple of years molecular imaging has been rapidly developed to study physiological and pathological processes in vivo at the cellular and molecular levels. Among molecular imaging modalities, optical imaging stands out for its unique advantages, especially performance and cost-effectiveness. Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) is an emerging optical imaging mode with promising biomedical advantages. In this survey paper, we explain the biomedical significance of BLT, summarize theoretical results on the analysis and numerical solution of a diffusion based BLT model, and comment on a few extensions for the study of BLT. PMID:20617105

  17. Bioluminescence tomography guided radiation therapy for preclinical research

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Yu, Jingjing; Eslami, Sohrab; Iordachita, Iulian; Reyes, Juvenal; Malek, Reem; Tran, Phuoc T.; Patterson, Michael S.; Wong, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In pre-clinical radiation research, it is challenging to localize soft tissue targets based on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guidance. As a more effective method to localize soft tissue targets, we developed an online bioluminescence tomography (BLT) system for the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP). We demonstrated BLT-guided radiotherapy and validated targeting accuracy, based on a newly developed reconstruction algorithm. Methods and Materials The BLT system was designed to dock onto the SARRP for image acquisition and to be detached before radiation delivery. A 3-mirror system was devised to reflect the bioluminescence emitted from the subject to a stationary CCD camera. Multispectral BLT and the incomplete variables truncated conjugate gradient method with a permissible region shrinking strategy were employed as the optimization scheme to reconstruct bioluminescent source distributions. To validate BLT targeting accuracy, a small cylindrical light source with high CBCT contrast was placed in a phantom and also in the abdomen of a mouse carcass. The center of mass (CoM) of the source was recovered from BLT and used to guide radiation delivery. The accuracy of the BLT-guided targeting was validated with films and compared with the CBCT-guided delivery. In vivo experiments were conducted to demonstrate the BLT localization capability for various source geometries. Results Online BLT was able to recover the CoM of the imbedded light source with an average accuracy of 1 mm compared to CBCT localization. The difference between the BLT- and CBCT-guided irradiation shown on the films was consistent with the source localization revealed in the BLT and CBCT images. The in vivo results demonstrated that our BLT system could potentially be applied for multiple targets and tumors. Conclusions The online BLT/CBCT/SARRP system provides an effective solution for soft tissue targeting, particularly for small, non-palpable, or orthotopic tumor

  18. Rapid Detection of Bacillus anthracis in Complex Food Matrices Using Phage-Mediated Bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Natasha J; Vandamm, Joshua P; Molineux, Ian J; Schofield, David A

    2015-05-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, is considered a high-priority agent that may be used in a food-related terrorist attack because it can be contracted by ingestion and it also forms spores with heat and chemical resistance. Thus, novel surveillance methodologies to detect B. anthracis on adulterated foods are important for bioterrorism preparedness. We describe the development of a phage-based bioluminescence assay for the detection of B. anthracis on deliberately contaminated foods. We previously engineered the B. anthracis phage Wβ with genes encoding bacterial luciferase (luxA and luxB) to create a "light-tagged" reporter (Wβ::luxAB) that is able to rapidly detect B. anthracis by transducing a bioluminescent signal response. Here, we investigate the ability of Wβ::luxAB to detect B. anthracis Sterne, an attenuated select agent strain, in inoculated food (ground beef) and milk (2%, baby formula, and half and half) matrices after incubation with spores for 72 h at 4°C as per AOAC testing guidelines. The majority of B. anthracis bacilli remained in spore form, and thus were potentially infectious, within each of the liquid matrices for 14 days. Detection limits were 80 CFU/ml after 7 h of enrichment; sensitivity of detection increased to 8 CFU/ml when enrichment was extended to 16 h. The limit of detection in ground beef was 3.2 × 10(3) CFU/g after 7 h of enrichment, improving to 3.2 × 10(2) CFU/g after 16 h. Because the time to result is rapid and minimal processing is required, and because gastrointestinal anthrax can be fatal, the reporter technology displays promise for the protection of our food supply following a deliberate release of this priority pathogen.

  19. A portable toxicity biosensor using freeze-dried recombinant bioluminescent bacteria.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sue Hyung; Gu, Man Bock

    2002-05-01

    A portable biosensor has been developed to meet the demands of field toxicity analysis. This biosensor consists of three parts, a freeze-dried biosensing strain within a vial, a small light-proof test chamber, and an optic-fiber connected between the sample chamber and a luminometer. Various genetically engineered bioluminescent bacteria were freeze-dried to measure different types of toxicity based upon their modes of action. GC2 (lac::luxCDABE), a constitutively bioluminescent strain, was used to monitor the general toxicity of samples through a decrease in its bioluminescence, while specific toxicity was detected through the use of strains such as DPD2540 (fabA::luxCDABE), TV1061 (grpE::luxCDABE), DPD2794 (recA::luxCDABE), and DPD2511 (katG::luxCDABE). These inducible strains show an increase in bioluminescence under specific stressful conditions, i.e. membrane-, protein-, DNA-, and oxidative-stress, respectively. The toxicity of a sample could be detected by measuring the bioluminescence 30 min after addition to the freeze-dried strains. In an attempt to enhance the sensitivity of the freeze-dried cells, glucose and Tween 80 were tested as additives. It was found that the addition of glucose had a negative effect on the viability of the freeze-dried cells, while samples having Tween 80 showed an increase in their viability. On the other hand, the addition of either Tween 80 or glucose decreased the final bioluminescent response of DPD2540 in response to 4-chlorophenol. Using these strains, many different chemicals were tested and characterized. This portable biosensor, with a very simple protocol, can be used for field sample analysis and the monitoring of various water systems on-site.

  20. Bioluminescence: from chemical bonds to photons.

    PubMed

    Hastings, J W

    1975-01-01

    The biological transformation of chemical to photic energy involves an enzyme-mediated chemiluminescent reaction, in which one of the products exists in an electronically excited state, emitting a photon as it returns to the ground state. The colour of bioluminescence differs in different organisms, ranging from the deep blue (460 nm) of certain crustacea, through the bluish green (490 nm) of some bacteria, the green (530 nm) of mushrooms to the red (about 600 nm) of the railroad worm. In one case, energy transfer has been demonstrated from the enzyme system to material that emits light with a longer wavelength. The energies involved range from about 165 to 250 kJ/einstein (40 to 60 kcal/einstein). Boyle first showed that air was involved in bioluminescence in 1668 in his experiments with an air pump. Over the past 100 years, it has become clear that most if not all bioluminescent systems require molecular oxygen. The recent isolation and characterization of an oxygen-containing (peroxide) enzyme intermediate from the bacterial system is described and a reaction mechanism is postulated. This scheme is compared with other hypothetical mechanisms, in particular those involving a four-membered ring intermediate, a dioxetane, in which the simultaneous cleavage of two bonds leaves one product in an excited state. I shall discuss the special role of luciferases in bioluminescence, especially in flashing mechanisms involving 'precharged' intermediates.

  1. High-Resolution Measurements of Coastal Bioluminescence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-30

    seen at the canyon edge. The bioluminescence signal confirms that this is biological, and likely a swarm of krill , which it also detects high levels...lifesci.ucsb.edu/~biolum/ Invited talks, Outreach articles: Sep. 2006. Science Year 2007. Photos and research discussion in Worldbook supplement

  2. Bioluminescence for determining energy state of plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ching, T. M.

    1975-01-01

    Bioluminescence produced by the luciferin-luciferase system is a very sensitive assay for ATP content in extracts of plant materials. The ATP test for seed and pollen viability and vigor is presented, along with prediction of high growth potential and productivity in new crosses and selections of breeding materials. ATP as an indicator for environmental quality, stresses, and metabolic regulation is also considered.

  3. Bioluminescence imaging of bone metastasis in rodents.

    PubMed

    Snoeks, Thomas J A; van Beek, Ermond; Que, Ivo; Kaijzel, Eric L; Löwik, Clemens W G M

    2012-01-01

    Optical imaging is a valuable technique for visualizing and quantifying biological processes in living -organisms. Optical imaging can be divided into two main imaging modalities: bioluminescence imaging and fluorescence imaging. This chapter describes the use of these imaging techniques to image tumour cells in mouse models of cancer and to detect early bone metastasis.

  4. Bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit detection methods

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, Michael L.; Paulus, Michael J.; Sayler, Gary S.; Applegate, Bruce M.; Ripp, Steven A.

    2005-06-14

    Disclosed are monolithic bioelectronic devices comprising a bioreporter and an OASIC. These bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit are useful in detecting substances such as pollutants, explosives, and heavy-metals residing in inhospitable areas such as groundwater, industrial process vessels, and battlefields. Also disclosed are methods and apparatus for detection of particular analytes, including ammonia and estrogen compounds.

  5. The in vitro and in vivo effects of constitutive light expression on a bioluminescent strain of the mouse enteropathogen Citrobacter rodentium

    PubMed Central

    Read, Hannah M.; Mills, Grant; Johnson, Sarah; Tsai, Peter; Dalton, James; Barquist, Lars; Print, Cristin G.; Patrick, Wayne M.

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescent reporter genes, such as those from fireflies and bacteria, let researchers use light production as a non-invasive and non-destructive surrogate measure of microbial numbers in a wide variety of environments. As bioluminescence needs microbial metabolites, tagging microorganisms with luciferases means only live metabolically active cells are detected. Despite the wide use of bioluminescent reporter genes, very little is known about the impact of continuous (also called constitutive) light expression on tagged bacteria. We have previously made a bioluminescent strain of Citrobacter rodentium, a bacterium which infects laboratory mice in a similar way to how enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) infect humans. In this study, we compared the growth of the bioluminescent C. rodentium strain ICC180 with its non-bioluminescent parent (strain ICC169) in a wide variety of environments. To understand more about the metabolic burden of expressing light, we also compared the growth profiles of the two strains under approximately 2,000 different conditions. We found that constitutive light expression in ICC180 was near-neutral in almost every non-toxic environment tested. However, we also found that the non-bioluminescent parent strain has a competitive advantage over ICC180 during infection of adult mice, although this was not enough for ICC180 to be completely outcompeted. In conclusion, our data suggest that constitutive light expression is not metabolically costly to C. rodentium and supports the view that bioluminescent versions of microbes can be used as a substitute for their non-bioluminescent parents to study bacterial behaviour in a wide variety of environments. PMID:27366640

  6. The in vitro and in vivo effects of constitutive light expression on a bioluminescent strain of the mouse enteropathogen Citrobacter rodentium.

    PubMed

    Read, Hannah M; Mills, Grant; Johnson, Sarah; Tsai, Peter; Dalton, James; Barquist, Lars; Print, Cristin G; Patrick, Wayne M; Wiles, Siouxsie

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescent reporter genes, such as those from fireflies and bacteria, let researchers use light production as a non-invasive and non-destructive surrogate measure of microbial numbers in a wide variety of environments. As bioluminescence needs microbial metabolites, tagging microorganisms with luciferases means only live metabolically active cells are detected. Despite the wide use of bioluminescent reporter genes, very little is known about the impact of continuous (also called constitutive) light expression on tagged bacteria. We have previously made a bioluminescent strain of Citrobacter rodentium, a bacterium which infects laboratory mice in a similar way to how enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) infect humans. In this study, we compared the growth of the bioluminescent C. rodentium strain ICC180 with its non-bioluminescent parent (strain ICC169) in a wide variety of environments. To understand more about the metabolic burden of expressing light, we also compared the growth profiles of the two strains under approximately 2,000 different conditions. We found that constitutive light expression in ICC180 was near-neutral in almost every non-toxic environment tested. However, we also found that the non-bioluminescent parent strain has a competitive advantage over ICC180 during infection of adult mice, although this was not enough for ICC180 to be completely outcompeted. In conclusion, our data suggest that constitutive light expression is not metabolically costly to C. rodentium and supports the view that bioluminescent versions of microbes can be used as a substitute for their non-bioluminescent parents to study bacterial behaviour in a wide variety of environments.

  7. Conditions required for the stimulation of bioluminescence activity of the genetically engineered bacteria, P. putida mt-2 KG1206, preserved by deep-freezing.

    PubMed

    Ko, K S; Kong, In Chul

    2009-03-15

    Herein the conditions required for the stimulation of bioluminescence activity in a genetically engineered strain of Pseudomonas putida mt-2 KG1206, containing the intact TOL plasmid and a constructed plasmid with the P(m)-lux gene, are reported upon. Both sodium lactate (SL) and potassium nitrate (KNO(3)) were able to stimulate the bioluminescence activity, but a greater increase was observed with nitrogen amendment. This selected stimulant was then tested on reconstituted cells that had been preserved by deep-freezing and mixed with pure inducer solution or groundwater samples. The stimulation of bioluminescence activities for deep-frozen strain was in the range of 101-238% of the control. The effect of KNO(3) was found to be dependent on the type of inducers used and the cell conditions. In general, high bioluminescence activity was observed with groundwater samples, contaminated with high inducer compounds. However, no significant correlation was observed between the bioluminescence intensity and the total inducer concentration in the environmental samples contaminated with complex mixtures with inducers. These results should be useful when other recombinant bioluminescence strains are to be used for environmental monitoring. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate the stimulant conditions for the bioluminescence activity of genetically engineered bacteria, and suggest the potential for preliminary application of this deep-frozen engineered strain in a field-ready bioassay to conveniently detect or monitor a specific group of environmental contaminants.

  8. Firefly bioluminescence: a mechanistic approach of luciferase catalyzed reactions.

    PubMed

    Marques, Simone M; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C G

    2009-01-01

    Luciferase is a general term for enzymes catalyzing visible light emission by living organisms (bioluminescence). The studies carried out with Photinus pyralis (firefly) luciferase allowed the discovery of the reaction leading to light production. It can be regarded as a two-step process: the first corresponds to the reaction of luciferase's substrate, luciferin (LH(2)), with ATP-Mg(2+) generating inorganic pyrophosphate and an intermediate luciferyl-adenylate (LH(2)-AMP); the second is the oxidation and decarboxylation of LH(2)-AMP to oxyluciferin, the light emitter, producing CO(2), AMP, and photons of yellow-green light (550- 570 nm). In a dark reaction LH(2)-AMP is oxidized to dehydroluciferyl-adenylate (L-AMP). Luciferase also shows acyl-coenzyme A synthetase activity, which leads to the formation of dehydroluciferyl-coenzyme A (L-CoA), luciferyl-coenzyme A (LH(2)-CoA), and fatty acyl-CoAs. Moreover luciferase catalyzes the synthesis of dinucleoside polyphosphates from nucleosides with at least a 3'-phosphate chain plus an intact terminal pyrophosphate moiety. The LH(2) stereospecificity is a particular feature of the bioluminescent reaction where each isomer, D-LH(2) or L-LH(2), has a specific function. Practical applications of the luciferase system, either in its native form or with engineered proteins, encloses the analytical assay of metabolites like ATP and molecular biology studies with luc as a reporter gene, including the most recent and increasing field of bioimaging.

  9. Bioluminescence as an ecological factor during high Arctic polar night

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Heather A.; Cohen, Jonathan H.; Berge, Jørgen; Johnsen, Geir; Moline, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence commonly influences pelagic trophic interactions at mesopelagic depths. Here we characterize a vertical gradient in structure of a generally low species diversity bioluminescent community at shallower epipelagic depths during the polar night period in a high Arctic fjord with in situ bathyphotometric sampling. Bioluminescence potential of the community increased with depth to a peak at 80 m. Community composition changed over this range, with an ecotone at 20–40 m where a dinoflagellate-dominated community transitioned to dominance by the copepod Metridia longa. Coincident at this depth was bioluminescence exceeding atmospheric light in the ambient pelagic photon budget, which we term the bioluminescence compensation depth. Collectively, we show a winter bioluminescent community in the high Arctic with vertical structure linked to attenuation of atmospheric light, which has the potential to influence pelagic ecology during the light-limited polar night. PMID:27805028

  10. Bioluminescence as an ecological factor during high Arctic polar night.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Heather A; Cohen, Jonathan H; Berge, Jørgen; Johnsen, Geir; Moline, Mark A

    2016-11-02

    Bioluminescence commonly influences pelagic trophic interactions at mesopelagic depths. Here we characterize a vertical gradient in structure of a generally low species diversity bioluminescent community at shallower epipelagic depths during the polar night period in a high Arctic fjord with in situ bathyphotometric sampling. Bioluminescence potential of the community increased with depth to a peak at 80 m. Community composition changed over this range, with an ecotone at 20-40 m where a dinoflagellate-dominated community transitioned to dominance by the copepod Metridia longa. Coincident at this depth was bioluminescence exceeding atmospheric light in the ambient pelagic photon budget, which we term the bioluminescence compensation depth. Collectively, we show a winter bioluminescent community in the high Arctic with vertical structure linked to attenuation of atmospheric light, which has the potential to influence pelagic ecology during the light-limited polar night.

  11. Bioluminescence microscopy using a short focal-length imaging lens.

    PubMed

    Ogoh, K; Akiyoshi, R; May-Maw-Thet; Sugiyama, T; Dosaka, S; Hatta-Ohashi, Y; Suzuki, H

    2014-03-01

    Bioluminescence from cells is so dim that bioluminescence microscopy is performed using an ultra low-light imaging camera. Although the image sensor of such cameras has been greatly improved over time, such improvements have not been made commercially available for microscopes until now. Here, we customized the optical system of a microscope for bioluminescence imaging. As a result, bioluminescence images of cells could be captured with a conventional objective lens and colour imaging camera. As bioluminescence microscopy requires no excitation light, it lacks the photo-toxicity associated with fluorescence imaging and permits the long-term, nonlethal observation of living cells. Thus, bioluminescence microscopy would be a powerful tool in cellular biology that complements fluorescence microscopy.

  12. Bioluminescence as an ecological factor during high Arctic polar night

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, Heather A.; Cohen, Jonathan H.; Berge, Jørgen; Johnsen, Geir; Moline, Mark A.

    2016-11-01

    Bioluminescence commonly influences pelagic trophic interactions at mesopelagic depths. Here we characterize a vertical gradient in structure of a generally low species diversity bioluminescent community at shallower epipelagic depths during the polar night period in a high Arctic fjord with in situ bathyphotometric sampling. Bioluminescence potential of the community increased with depth to a peak at 80 m. Community composition changed over this range, with an ecotone at 20–40 m where a dinoflagellate-dominated community transitioned to dominance by the copepod Metridia longa. Coincident at this depth was bioluminescence exceeding atmospheric light in the ambient pelagic photon budget, which we term the bioluminescence compensation depth. Collectively, we show a winter bioluminescent community in the high Arctic with vertical structure linked to attenuation of atmospheric light, which has the potential to influence pelagic ecology during the light-limited polar night.

  13. Autonomously Bioluminescent Mammalian Cells for Continuous and Real-time Monitoring of Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan M.; Webb, James D.; Ripp, Steven A.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian cell-based in vitro assays have been widely employed as alternatives to animal testing for toxicological studies but have been limited due to the high monetary and time costs of parallel sample preparation that are necessitated due to the destructive nature of firefly luciferase-based screening methods. This video describes the utilization of autonomously bioluminescent mammalian cells, which do not require the destructive addition of a luciferin substrate, as an inexpensive and facile method for monitoring the cytotoxic effects of a compound of interest. Mammalian cells stably expressing the full bacterial bioluminescence (luxCDABEfrp) gene cassette autonomously produce an optical signal that peaks at 490 nm without the addition of an expensive and possibly interfering luciferin substrate, excitation by an external energy source, or destruction of the sample that is traditionally performed during optical imaging procedures. This independence from external stimulation places the burden for maintaining the bioluminescent reaction solely on the cell, meaning that the resultant signal is only detected during active metabolism. This characteristic makes the lux-expressing cell line an excellent candidate for use as a biosentinel against cytotoxic effects because changes in bioluminescent production are indicative of adverse effects on cellular growth and metabolism. Similarly, the autonomous nature and lack of required sample destruction permits repeated imaging of the same sample in real-time throughout the period of toxicant exposure and can be performed across multiple samples using existing imaging equipment in an automated fashion. PMID:24193545

  14. Controlled field release of a bioluminescent genetically engineered microorganism for bioremediation process monitoring and control

    SciTech Connect

    Ripp, S.; Nivens, D.E.; Ahn, Y.; Werner, C.; Jarrell, J. IV; Easter, J.P.; Cox, C.D.; Burlage, R.S.; Sayler, G.S.

    2000-03-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44 represents the first genetically engineered microorganism approved for field testing in the United States for bioremediation purposes. Strain HK44 harbors an introduced lux gene fused within a naphthalene degradative pathway, thereby allowing this recombinant microbe to bioluminescent as it degrades specific polyaromatic hydrocarbons such as naphthalene. The bioremediation process can therefore be monitored by the detection of light. P. fluorescens HK44 was inoculated into the vadose zone of intermediate-scale, semicontained soil lysimeters contaminated with naphthalene, anthracene, and phenanthrene, and the population dynamics were followed over an approximate 2-year period in order to assess the long-term efficacy of using strain HK44 for monitoring and controlling bioremediation processes. Results showed that P. fluorescens HK44 was capable of surviving initial inoculation into both hydrocarbon contaminated and uncontaminated soils and was recoverable from these soils 660 days post inoculation. It was also demonstrated that strain HK44 was capable of generating bioluminescence in response to soil hydrocarbon bioavailability. Bioluminescence approaching 166,000 counts/s was detected in fiber optic-based biosensor devices responding to volatile polyaromatic hydrocarbons, while a portable photomultiplier module detected bioluminescence at an average of 4300 counts/s directly from soil-borne HK44 cells within localized treatment areas. The utilization of lux-based bioreporter microorganisms therefore promises to be a viable option for in situ determination of environmental contaminant bioavailability and biodegradation process monitoring and control.

  15. A single-cell bioluminescence imaging system for monitoring cellular gene expression in a plant body.

    PubMed

    Muranaka, Tomoaki; Kubota, Saya; Oyama, Tokitaka

    2013-12-01

    Gene expression is a fundamental cellular process and expression dynamics are of great interest in life science. We succeeded in monitoring cellular gene expression in a duckweed plant, Lemna gibba, using bioluminescent reporters. Using particle bombardment, epidermal and mesophyll cells were transfected with the luciferase gene (luc+) under the control of a constitutive [Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV35S)] and a rhythmic [Arabidopsis thaliana CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (AtCCA1)] promoter. Bioluminescence images were captured using an EM-CCD (electron multiply charged couple device) camera. Luminescent spots of the transfected cells in the plant body were quantitatively measured at the single-cell level. Luminescence intensities varied over a 1,000-fold range among CaMV35S::luc+-transfected cells in the same plant body and showed a log-normal-like frequency distribution. We monitored cellular gene expression under light-dark conditions by capturing bioluminescence images every hour. Luminescence traces of ≥50 individual cells in a frond were successfully obtained in each monitoring procedure. Rhythmic and constitutive luminescence behaviors were observed in cells transfected with AtCCA1::luc+ and CaMV35S::luc+, respectively. Diurnal rhythms were observed in every AtCCA1::luc+-introduced cell with traceable luminescence, and slight differences were detected in their rhythmic waveforms. Thus the single-cell bioluminescence monitoring system was useful for the characterization of cellular gene expression in a plant body.

  16. Crystal structure of native and a mutant of Lampyris turkestanicus luciferase implicate in bioluminescence color shift.

    PubMed

    Kheirabadi, Mitra; Sharafian, Zohreh; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein; Heineman, Udo; Gohlke, Ulrich; Hosseinkhani, Saman

    2013-12-01

    Firefly bioluminescence reaction in the presence of Mg(2+), ATP and molecular oxygen is carried out by luciferase. The luciferase structure alterations or modifications of assay conditions determine the bioluminescence color of firefly luciferase. Among different beetle luciferases, Phrixothrix hirtus railroad worm emits either yellow or red bioluminescence color. Sequence alignment analysis shows that the red-emitter luciferase from Phrixothrix hirtus has an additional arginine residue at 353 that is absent in other firefly luciferases. It was reported that insertion of Arg in an important flexible loop350-359 showed changes in bioluminescence color from green to red and the optimum temperature activity was also increased. To explain the color tuning mechanism of firefly luciferase, the structure of native and a mutant (E354R/356R/H431Y) of Lampyris turkestanicus luciferase is determined at 2.7Å and 2.2Å resolutions, respectively. The comparison of structure of both types of Lampyris turkestanicus luciferases reveals that the conformation of this flexible loop is significantly changed by addition of two Arg in this region. Moreover, its surface accessibility is affected considerably and some ionic bonds are made by addition of two positive charge residues. Furthermore, we noticed that the hydrogen bonding pattern of His431 with the flexible loop is changed by replacing this residue with Tyr at this position. Juxtaposition of a flexible loop (residues 351-359) in firefly luciferase and corresponding ionic and hydrogen bonds are essential for color emission.

  17. Polyphyly of non-bioluminescent Vibrio fischeri sharing a lux-locus deletion.

    PubMed

    Wollenberg, M S; Preheim, S P; Polz, M F; Ruby, E G

    2012-03-01

    This study reports the first description and molecular characterization of naturally occurring, non-bioluminescent strains of Vibrio fischeri. These 'dark' V. fischeri strains remained non-bioluminescent even after treatment with both autoinducer and aldehyde, substrate additions that typically maximize light production in dim strains of luminous bacteria. Surprisingly, the entire lux locus (eight genes) was absent in over 97% of these dark V. fischeri strains. Although these strains were all collected from a Massachusetts (USA) estuary in 2007, phylogenetic reconstructions allowed us to reject the hypothesis that these newly described non-bioluminescent strains exhibit monophyly within the V. fischeri clade. These dark strains exhibited a competitive disadvantage against native bioluminescent strains when colonizing the light organ of the model V. fischeri host, the Hawaiian bobtail squid Euprymna scolopes. Significantly, we believe that the data collected in this study may suggest the first observation of a functional, parallel locus-deletion event among independent lineages of a non-pathogenic bacterial species.

  18. Analysis of neurogenesis during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis reveals pitfalls of bioluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Ayzenberg, Ilya; Schlevogt, Sibylle; Metzdorf, Judith; Stahlke, Sarah; Pedreitturia, Xiomara; Hunfeld, Anika; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien; Kleiter, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Bioluminescence imaging is a sensitive approach for longitudinal neuroimaging. Transgenic mice expressing luciferase under the promoter of doublecortin (DCX-luc), a specific marker of neuronal progenitor cells (NPC), allow monitoring of neurogenesis in living mice. Since the extent and time course of neurogenesis during autoimmune brain inflammation are controversial, we investigated neurogenesis in MOG-peptide induced experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) using DCX-luc reporter mice. We observed a marked, 2- to 4-fold increase of the bioluminescence signal intensity 10 days after EAE induction and a gradual decline 1-2 weeks thereafter. In contrast, immunostaining for DCX revealed no differences between EAE and control mice 2 and 4 weeks after immunization in zones of adult murine neurogenesis such as the dentate gyrus. Ex vivo bioluminescence imaging showed similar luciferase expression in brain homogenates of EAE and control animals. Apart from complete immunization including MOG-peptide also incomplete immunization with complete Freund´s adjuvant and pertussis toxin resulted in a rapid increase of the in vivo bioluminescence signal. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage was demonstrated 10 days after both complete and incomplete immunization and might explain the increased bioluminescence signal in vivo. We conclude, that acute autoimmune inflammation in EAE does not alter neurogenesis, at least at the stage of DCX-expressing NPC. Effects of immunization on the BBB integrity must be considered when luciferase is used as a reporter within the CNS during the active stage of EAE. Models with stable CNS-restricted luciferase expression could serve as technically convenient way to evaluate BBB integrity in a longitudinal manner.

  19. FNR-mediated regulation of bioluminescence and anaerobic respiration in the light-organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri

    PubMed Central

    Septer, Alecia N.; Bose, Jeffrey L.; Dunn, Anne K.; Stabb, Eric V.

    2010-01-01

    Vibrio fischeri induces both anaerobic respiration and bioluminescence during symbiotic infection. In many bacteria, the oxygen-sensitive regulator FNR activates anaerobic respiration, and a preliminary study using the light-generating lux genes from V. fischeri MJ1 cloned in Escherichia coli suggested that FNR stimulates bioluminescence. To test for FNR-mediated regulation of bioluminescence and anaerobic respiration in V. fischeri, we generated fnr mutants of V. fischeri strains MJ1 and ES114. In both strains, FNR was required for normal fumarate- and nitrate-dependent respiration. However, contrary to the report in transgenic E. coli, FNR mediated repression of lux. ArcA represses bioluminescence, and ParcA-lacZ reporters showed reduced expression in fnr mutants, suggesting a possible indirect effect of FNR on bioluminescence via arcA. Finally, the fnr mutant of ES114 was not impaired in colonization of its host squid, Euprymna scolopes. This study extends characterization of FNR to the Vibrionaceae and underscores the importance of studying lux regulation in its native background. PMID:20298504

  20. FNR-mediated regulation of bioluminescence and anaerobic respiration in the light-organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri.

    PubMed

    Septer, Alecia N; Bose, Jeffrey L; Dunn, Anne K; Stabb, Eric V

    2010-05-01

    Vibrio fischeri induces both anaerobic respiration and bioluminescence during symbiotic infection. In many bacteria, the oxygen-sensitive regulator FNR activates anaerobic respiration, and a preliminary study using the light-generating lux genes from V. fischeri MJ1 cloned in Escherichia coli suggested that FNR stimulates bioluminescence. To test for FNR-mediated regulation of bioluminescence and anaerobic respiration in V. fischeri, we generated fnr mutants of V. fischeri strains MJ1 and ES114. In both strains, FNR was required for normal fumarate- and nitrate-dependent respiration. However, contrary to the report in transgenic E. coli, FNR mediated the repression of lux. ArcA represses bioluminescence, and P(arcA)-lacZ reporters showed reduced expression in fnr mutants, suggesting a possible indirect effect of FNR on bioluminescence via arcA. Finally, the fnr mutant of ES114 was not impaired in colonization of its host squid, Euprymna scolopes. This study extends the characterization of FNR to the Vibrionaceae and underscores the importance of studying lux regulation in its native background.

  1. Transformation Experiment Using Bioluminescence Genes of "Vibrio fischeri."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slock, James

    1995-01-01

    Bioluminescence transformation experiments show students the excitement and power of recombinant DNA technology. This laboratory experiment utilizes two plasmids of "Vibrio fischeri" in a transformation experiment. (LZ)

  2. Bioluminescent assay for human lymphocyte blast transformation.

    PubMed

    Bulanova, E G; Budagyan, V M; Romanova, N A; Brovko LYu; Ugarova, N N

    1995-05-01

    One of the basic tests of in vitro evaluation of immune cell functional activity is a proliferative response of lymphocytes on the action of external stimuli such as mitogenic lectines, antigens, etc. We compared two methods used to assess the lymphocyte functional status. (1) [3H]thymidine incorporation and (2) bioluminescence for determination of intracellular ATP in blast cells. Comparison has been done for healthy donors and patients with proven low immunological status. The proposed bioluminescent method for evaluation of the proliferative response was shown to be sensitive enough for diagnostic purposes. This method allows one to process a large number of samples at the same time and correlates highly with the radionuclide test use hazardous radioactive materials.

  3. Bioluminescence imaging of myeloperoxidase activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Shimon; Gammon, Seth T; Moss, Britney L; Rauch, Daniel; Harding, John; Heinecke, Jay W; Ratner, Lee; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2010-01-01

    The myeloperoxidase (MPO) system of activated phagocytes is central to normal host defense mechanisms, and dysregulated MPO contributes to the pathogenesis of inflammatory disease states ranging from atherosclerosis to cancer. Here we show that upon systemic administration, the small molecule luminol enables noninvasive bioluminescence imaging (BLI) of MPO activity in vivo. Luminol-BLI allowed quantitative longitudinal monitoring of MPO activity in animal models of acute dermatitis, mixed allergic contact hypersensitivity, focal arthritis and spontaneous large granular lymphocytic tumors. Bioluminescence colocalized with histological sites of inflammation and was totally abolished in gene-deleted Mpo−/− mice, despite massive tissue infiltration of neutrophils and activated eosinophils, indicating that eosinophil peroxidase did not contribute to luminol-BLI in vivo. Thus, luminol-BLI provides a noninvasive, specific and highly sensitive optical readout of phagocyte-mediated MPO activity in vivo and may enable new diagnostic applications in a wide range of acute and chronic inflammatory conditions. PMID:19305414

  4. Analysis of river water by bioluminescent biotests.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, A M; Rodicheva, E K; Medvedeva, S E

    1999-01-01

    The bacterial bioluminescence has high sensitivity to the action of various inhibitors of biological activity. The lyophilized luminous bacteria Photobacterium phosphoreum (Microbiosensor B17 677F) and luminous strain Escherichia coli (Microbiosensor EC) from the Culture Collection IBSO were used to create bioluminescent biotests. They have been applied in ecological monitoring to determine the overall toxicity of the Yenisei and Angara Rivers and some water sources of Altai Territory. As a rule the heaviest pollution of water in studied rivers was registered near cities and settlements. The luminous bacteria biotests are simple and convenient in work, standardized and quantitative, have rapid response to actions of different substances and high sensitivity to environmental pollutants. It takes less than 30 min to do the biotest (the other biotests take 48--96 h).

  5. Bioluminescence imaging of myeloperoxidase activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gross, Shimon; Gammon, Seth T; Moss, Britney L; Rauch, Daniel; Harding, John; Heinecke, Jay W; Ratner, Lee; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2009-04-01

    The myeloperoxidase (MPO) system of activated phagocytes is central to normal host defense mechanisms, and dysregulated MPO contributes to the pathogenesis of inflammatory disease states ranging from atherosclerosis to cancer. Here we show that upon systemic administration, the small molecule luminol enables noninvasive bioluminescence imaging (BLI) of MPO activity in vivo. Luminol-BLI allowed quantitative longitudinal monitoring of MPO activity in animal models of acute dermatitis, mixed allergic contact hypersensitivity, focal arthritis and spontaneous large granular lymphocytic tumors. Bioluminescence colocalized with histological sites of inflammation and was totally abolished in gene-deleted Mpo(-/-) mice, despite massive tissue infiltration of neutrophils and activated eosinophils, indicating that eosinophil peroxidase did not contribute to luminol-BLI in vivo. Thus, luminol-BLI provides a noninvasive, specific and highly sensitive optical readout of phagocyte-mediated MPO activity in vivo and may enable new diagnostic applications in a wide range of acute and chronic inflammatory conditions.

  6. Polymer Drag Reduction and Bioluminescence Reduction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-30

    jet to cavitate is also reduced by the presence of trace amounts of polymer. Imaging of bioluminescence stimulated by a turbulent jet will assess...regulated by a computer-controlled pump system located downstream of the pipe. Upstream of the pipe is a tapered nozzle to assure laminar flow at the...inlet even at high flow rates. Flow rate is measured by a mass flow meter downstream of the pump and the pressure drop within the pipe is measured

  7. Bioluminescence for Detection of Trace Compounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-08

    Photobacterium leiognathi and their expression in Escherichia coli, Qene. 54:203-210. Eberhard, A., Burlingame, A.L., Eberhard, C., Kenyon, G.L., Nealson, K.H...1985). The stimulation of bioluminescence in Photobacterium leiognathi as a potential prescreen for antitumor agents. L Antibiotics. 39:1401-1407... Photobacterium leiognatii PL721 ligated into the plasmid pACYCI84 (Figure 2), was selected for this research because of its known response to carcinogens

  8. Bioluminescence ATP Monitoring for the Routine Assessment of Food Contact Surface Cleanliness in a University Canteen

    PubMed Central

    Osimani, Andrea; Garofalo, Cristiana; Clementi, Francesca; Tavoletti, Stefano; Aquilanti, Lucia

    2014-01-01

    ATP bioluminescence monitoring and traditional microbiological analyses (viable counting of total mesophilic aerobes, coliforms and Escherichia coli) were used to evaluate the effectiveness of Sanitation Standard Operating Procedures (SSOP) at a university canteen which uses a HACCP-based approach. To that end, 10 cleaning control points (CPs), including food contact surfaces at risk of contamination from product residues or microbial growth, were analysed during an 8-month monitoring period. Arbitrary acceptability limits were set for both microbial loads and ATP bioluminescence readings. A highly significant correlation (r = 0.99) between the means of ATP bioluminescence readings and the viable counts of total mesophilic aerobes was seen, thus revealing a strong association of these parameters with the level of surface contamination. Among CPs, the raw meat and multi-purpose chopping boards showed the highest criticalities. Although ATP bioluminescence technology cannot substitute traditional microbiological analyses for the determination of microbial load on food contact surfaces, it has proved to be a powerful tool for the real time monitoring of surface cleanliness at mass catering plants, for verify the correct application of SSOP, and hence for their implementation/revision in the case of poor hygiene. PMID:25329534

  9. Rapid identification of marine bioluminescent bacteria by amplified 16S ribosomal RNA gene restriction analysis.

    PubMed

    Kita-Tsukamoto, Kumiko; Wada, Minoru; Yao, Katomi; Kamiya, Akiko; Yoshizawa, Susumu; Uchiyama, Nami; Kogure, Kazuhiro

    2006-03-01

    To rapidly identify natural isolates of marine bioluminescent bacteria, we developed amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) methods. ARDRA, which is based on the restriction patterns of 16S rRNA gene digested with five enzymes (EcoRI, DdeI, HhaI, HinfI, RsaI), clearly distinguished the 14 species of marine bioluminescent bacteria currently known, which belong to the genera Vibrio, Photobacterium, and Shewanella. When we applied ARDRA to 129 natural isolates from two cruises in Sagami Bay, Japan, 127 were grouped into six ARDRA types with distinctive restriction patterns; these isolates represented the bioluminescent species, P. angustum, P. leiognathi, P. phosphoreum, S. woodyi, V. fischeri, and V. harveyi. The other two isolates showing unexpected ARDRA patterns turned out to have 16S rRNA gene sequences similar to P. leiognathi and P. phosphoreum. Nevertheless, ARDRA provides a simple and fairly robust means for rapid identification of the natural isolates of marine bioluminescent bacteria, and is therefore useful in studying their diversity.

  10. Bioluminophore and Flavin Mononucleotide Fluorescence Quenching of Bacterial Bioluminescence-A Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yanling; Liu, Ya-Jun

    2016-11-02

    Bacterial bioluminescence with continuous glow has been applied to the fields of environmental toxin monitoring, drug screening, and in vivo imaging. Nonetheless, the chemical form of the bacterial bioluminophore is still a bone of contention. Flavin mononucleotide (FMN), one of the light-emitting products, and 4a-hydroxy-5-hydro flavin mononucleotide (HFOH), an intermediate of the chemical reactions, have both been assumed candidates for the light emitter because they have similar molecular structures and fluorescence wavelengths. The latter is preferred in experiments and was assigned in our previous density functional study. HFOH displays weak fluorescence in solutions, but exhibits strong bioluminescence in the bacterial luciferase. FMN shows the opposite behavior; its fluorescence is quenched when it is bound to the luciferase. This is the first example of flavin fluorescence quenching observed in bioluminescent systems and is merely an observation, both the quenching mechanism and quencher are still unclear. Based on theoretical analysis of high-level quantum mechanics (QM), combined QM and molecular mechanics (QM/MM), and molecular dynamics (MD), this paper confirms that HFOH in its first singlet excited state is the bioluminophore of bacterial bioluminescence. More importantly, the computational results indicate that Tyr110 in the luciferase quenches the FMN fluorescence via an electron-transfer mechanism.

  11. Total evidence phylogeny and the evolution of adult bioluminescence in fireflies (Coleoptera: Lampyridae).

    PubMed

    Martin, Gavin J; Branham, Marc A; Whiting, Michael F; Bybee, Seth M

    2017-02-01

    Fireflies are some of the most captivating organisms on the planet. They have a rich history as subjects of scientific study, especially in relation to their bioluminescent behavior. Yet, the phylogenetic relationships of fireflies are still poorly understood. Here, we present the first total evidence approach to reconstruct lampyrid phylogeny using both a molecular matrix from six loci and an extensive morphological matrix. Using this phylogeny we test the hypothesis that adult bioluminescence evolved after the origin of the firefly clade. The ancestral state of adult bioluminescence is recovered as non-bioluminescent with one to six gains and five to ten subsequent losses. The monophyly of the family, as well as the subfamilies is also tested. Ototretinae, Cyphonocerinae, Luciolinae (incl. Pristolycus), Amydetinae, "cheguevarinae" sensu Jeng 2008, and Photurinae are highly supported as monophyletic. With the exception of four taxa, Lampyrinae is also recovered as monophyletic with high support. Based on phylogenetic and morphological data Lamprohiza, Phausis, and Lamprigera are transferred to Lampyridae incertae sedis.

  12. Bioluminescence ATP monitoring for the routine assessment of food contact surface cleanliness in a university canteen.

    PubMed

    Osimani, Andrea; Garofalo, Cristiana; Clementi, Francesca; Tavoletti, Stefano; Aquilanti, Lucia

    2014-10-17

    ATP bioluminescence monitoring and traditional microbiological analyses (viable counting of total mesophilic aerobes, coliforms and Escherichia coli) were used to evaluate the effectiveness of Sanitation Standard Operating Procedures (SSOP) at a university canteen which uses a HACCP-based approach. To that end, 10 cleaning control points (CPs), including food contact surfaces at risk of contamination from product residues or microbial growth, were analysed during an 8-month monitoring period. Arbitrary acceptability limits were set for both microbial loads and ATP bioluminescence readings. A highly significant correlation (r = 0.99) between the means of ATP bioluminescence readings and the viable counts of total mesophilic aerobes was seen, thus revealing a strong association of these parameters with the level of surface contamination. Among CPs, the raw meat and multi-purpose chopping boards showed the highest criticalities. Although ATP bioluminescence technology cannot substitute traditional microbiological analyses for the determination of microbial load on food contact surfaces, it has proved to be a powerful tool for the real time monitoring of surface cleanliness at mass catering plants, for verify the correct application of SSOP, and hence for their implementation/revision in the case of poor hygiene.

  13. Promising Biological Indicator of Heavy Metal Pollution: Bioluminescent Bacterial Strains Isolated and Characterized from Marine Niches of Goa, India.

    PubMed

    Thakre, Neha A; Shanware, Arti S

    2015-09-01

    In present study, several marine water samples collected from the North Goa Beaches, India for isolation of luminescent bacterial species. Isolates obtained labelled as DP1-5 and AB1-6. Molecular characterization including identification of a microbial culture using 16S rRNA gene based molecular technique and phylogenetic analysis confirmed that DP3 & AB1 isolates were Vibrio harveyi. All of the isolates demonstrated multiple metal resistances in terms of growth, with altered luminescence with variable metal concentration. Present investigations were an attempt towards exploring and reporting an updated diversity of bioluminescent bacterial species from various sites around the Goa, India which would be explored in future for constructing luminescence based biosensor for efficiently monitoring the level of hazardous metals in the environment.

  14. Imaging long distance propagating calcium signals in intact plant leaves with the BRET-based GFP-aequorin reporter.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Tou Cheu; Ronzier, Elsa; Sanchez, Frédéric; Corratgé-Faillie, Claire; Mazars, Christian; Thibaud, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-01-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) is a second messenger involved in many plant signaling processes. Biotic and abiotic stimuli induce Ca(2+) signals within plant cells, which, when decoded, enable these cells to adapt in response to environmental stresses. Multiple examples of Ca(2+) signals from plants containing the fluorescent yellow cameleon sensor (YC) have contributed to the definition of the Ca(2+) signature in some cell types such as root hairs, pollen tubes and guard cells. YC is, however, of limited use in highly autofluorescent plant tissues, in particular mesophyll cells. Alternatively, the bioluminescent reporter aequorin enables Ca(2+) imaging in the whole plant, including mesophyll cells, but this requires specific devices capable of detecting the low amounts of emitted light. Another type of Ca(2+) sensor, referred to as GFP-aequorin (G5A), has been engineered as a chimeric protein, which combines the two photoactive proteins from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the bioluminescent protein aequorin. The Ca(2+)-dependent light-emitting property of G5A is based on a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) between aequorin and GFP. G5A has been used for over 10 years for enhanced in vivo detection of Ca(2+) signals in animal tissues. Here, we apply G5A in Arabidopsis and show that G5A greatly improves the imaging of Ca(2+) dynamics in intact plants. We describe a simple method to image Ca(2+) signals in autofluorescent leaves of plants with a cooled charge-coupled device (cooled CCD) camera. We present data demonstrating how plants expressing the G5A probe can be powerful tools for imaging of Ca(2+) signals. It is shown that Ca(2+) signals propagating over long distances can be visualized in intact plant leaves and are visible mainly in the veins.

  15. Real-Time Bioluminescent Tracking of Cellular Population Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Close, Dan; Sayler, Gary Steven; Xu, Tingting; Ripp, Steven Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Cellular population dynamics are routinely monitored across many diverse fields for a variety of purposes. In general, these dynamics are assayed either through the direct counting of cellular aliquots followed by extrapolation to the total population size, or through the monitoring of signal intensity from any number of externally stimulated reporter proteins. While both viable methods, here we describe a novel technique that allows for the automated, non-destructive tracking of cellular population dynamics in real-time. This method, which relies on the detection of a continuous bioluminescent signal produced through expression of the bacterial luciferase gene cassette, provides a low cost, low time-intensive means for generating additional data compared to alternative methods.

  16. Enhanced Beetle Luciferase for High-Resolution Bioluminescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Yoshihiro; Yamazaki, Tomomi; Nishii, Shigeaki; Noguchi, Takako; Hoshino, Hideto; Niwa, Kazuki; Viviani, Vadim R.; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro

    2010-01-01

    We developed an enhanced green-emitting luciferase (ELuc) to be used as a bioluminescence imaging (BLI) probe. ELuc exhibits a light signal in mammalian cells that is over 10-fold stronger than that of the firefly luciferase (FLuc), which is the most widely used luciferase reporter gene. We showed that ELuc produces a strong light signal in primary cells and tissues and that it enables the visualization of gene expression with high temporal resolution at the single-cell level. Moreover, we successfully imaged the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of importin α by fusing ELuc at the intracellular level. These results demonstrate that the use of ELuc allows a BLI spatiotemporal resolution far greater than that provided by FLuc. PMID:20368807

  17. Two-phase flow cell for chemiluminescence and bioluminescence measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mullin, J.L.; Seitz, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    A new approach to two-phase CL (chemiluminescence) measurements is reported. A magnetically stirred reagent phase is separated from the analyte phase by a dialysis membrane so that only smaller molecules can go from one phase to the other. The system is designed so that the analyte phase flows through a spiral groove on an aluminum block that is flush against the dialysis membrane. As solution flows through the spiral grove, analyte diffuses into the reagent phase where it reacts to produce light. A simple model is developed to predict how this system will behave. Experimentally, the system is evaluated by using the luminol reaction catalyzed by peroxidase, the firefly reaction, and the bacterial bioluminescence reaction. 10 references, 4 tables, 6 figures.

  18. Real-Time Bioluminescent Tracking of Cellular Population Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Close, Dan; Xu, Tingling; Ripp, Steven; Sayler, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Cellular population dynamics are routinely monitored across many diverse fields for a variety of purposes. In general, these dynamics are assayed either through the direct counting of cellular aliquots followed by extrapolation to the total population size, or through the monitoring of signal intensity from any number of externally stimulated reporter proteins. While both viable methods, here we describe a novel technique that allows for the automated, non-destructive tracking of cellular population dynamics in real-time. This method, which relies on the detection of a continuous bioluminescent signal produced through expression of the bacterial luciferase gene cassette, provides a low cost, low time-intensive means for generating additional data compared to alternative methods. PMID:24166372

  19. Impact of site-directed mutant luciferase on quantitative green and orange/red emission intensities in firefly bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Terakado, Kanako; Nakatsu, Toru

    2013-01-01

    Firefly bioluminescence has attracted great interest because of its high quantum yield and intriguing modifiable colours. Modifications to the structure of the enzyme luciferase can change the emission colour of firefly bioluminescence, and the mechanism of the colour change has been intensively studied by biochemists, structural biologists, optical physicists, and quantum-chemistry theorists. Here, we report on the quantitative spectra of firefly bioluminescence catalysed by wild-type and four site-directed mutant luciferases. While the mutation caused different emission spectra, the spectra differed only in the intensity of the green component (λmax ~ 560 nm). In contrast, the orange (λmax ~ 610 nm) and red (λmax ~ 650 nm) components present in all the spectra were almost unaffected by the modifications to the luciferases and changes in pH. Our results reveal that the intensity of the green component is the unique factor that is influenced by the luciferase structure and other reaction conditions.

  20. A REVIEW OF ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS OF BIOLUMINESCENCE MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review of the recent literature on environmental applications of bioluminescence systems will focus on in vivo and in vitro bioluminescence methods that have been utilized to elucidate properties of chemicals, toxic and mutagenic effects, and to estimate biomass. The unifyin...

  1. Single-cell bioluminescence and GFP in biofilm research

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.J. Jr, Sayler, G., White, D.C.; Phiefer, C.

    1996-12-31

    Using flow cells and a combination of microscopy techniques, we can unequivocally identify single bacterial cells that express bioluminescent and fluorescent bioreporters. We have shown that, for attached cells, bioluminescence output within a bacterial strain can vary greatly from cell to cell.

  2. Detection of ATP and NADH: A Bioluminescent Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selig, Ted C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Described is a bioluminescent assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and reduced nicotineamide-adenine dinucleotide (NADH) that meets the requirements of an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course. The 3-hour experiment provides students with experience in bioluminescence and analytical biochemistry yet requires limited instrumentation,…

  3. Use of a Sampling Area-Adjusted Adenosine Triphosphate Bioluminescence Assay Based on Digital Image Quantification to Assess the Cleanliness of Hospital Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Yu-Huai; Wang, Lih-Shinn; Jiang, Hui-Li; Chang, Chih-Hui; Hsieh, Chia-Jung; Chang, Dan-Chi; Tu, Hsin-Yu; Chiu, Tan-Yun; Chao, Huei-Jen; Tseng, Chun-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    Contaminated surfaces play an important role in the transmission of pathogens. We sought to establish a criterion that could indicate “cleanliness” using a sampling area–adjusted adenosine triphosphate (ATP) assay. In the first phase of the study, target surfaces were selected for swab sampling before and after daily cleaning; then, an aerobic colony count (ACC) plate assay of bacteria and antibiotic-resistant bacteria was conducted. ATP swabs were also tested, and the ATP readings were reported as relative light units (RLUs). The results of the ACC and ATP assays were adjusted according to the sampling area. During the second phase of the study, a new cleaning process employing sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) was implemented for comparison. Using the criterion of 2.5 colony-forming units (CFU)/cm2, 45% of the sampled sites were successfully cleaned during phase one of the study. During phase two, the pass rates of the surface samples (64%) were significantly improved, except under stringent (5 RLU/cm2) and lax (500 RLU) ATP criteria. Using receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis, the best cut-off point for an area-adjusted ATP level was 7.34 RLU/cm2, which corresponded to culture-assay levels of <2.5 CFU/cm2. An area adjustment of the ATP assay improved the degree of correlation with the ACC-assay results from weak to moderate. PMID:27294944

  4. Use of a Sampling Area-Adjusted Adenosine Triphosphate Bioluminescence Assay Based on Digital Image Quantification to Assess the Cleanliness of Hospital Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yu-Huai; Wang, Lih-Shinn; Jiang, Hui-Li; Chang, Chih-Hui; Hsieh, Chia-Jung; Chang, Dan-Chi; Tu, Hsin-Yu; Chiu, Tan-Yun; Chao, Huei-Jen; Tseng, Chun-Chieh

    2016-06-09

    Contaminated surfaces play an important role in the transmission of pathogens. We sought to establish a criterion that could indicate "cleanliness" using a sampling area-adjusted adenosine triphosphate (ATP) assay. In the first phase of the study, target surfaces were selected for swab sampling before and after daily cleaning; then, an aerobic colony count (ACC) plate assay of bacteria and antibiotic-resistant bacteria was conducted. ATP swabs were also tested, and the ATP readings were reported as relative light units (RLUs). The results of the ACC and ATP assays were adjusted according to the sampling area. During the second phase of the study, a new cleaning process employing sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) was implemented for comparison. Using the criterion of 2.5 colony-forming units (CFU)/cm², 45% of the sampled sites were successfully cleaned during phase one of the study. During phase two, the pass rates of the surface samples (64%) were significantly improved, except under stringent (5 RLU/cm²) and lax (500 RLU) ATP criteria. Using receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis, the best cut-off point for an area-adjusted ATP level was 7.34 RLU/cm², which corresponded to culture-assay levels of <2.5 CFU/cm². An area adjustment of the ATP assay improved the degree of correlation with the ACC-assay results from weak to moderate.

  5. In Vivo Follow-up of Brain Tumor Growth via Bioluminescence Imaging and Fluorescence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Genevois, Coralie; Loiseau, Hugues; Couillaud, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Reporter gene-based strategies are widely used in experimental oncology. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) using the firefly luciferase (Fluc) as a reporter gene and d-luciferin as a substrate is currently the most widely employed technique. The present paper compares the performances of BLI imaging with fluorescence imaging using the near infrared fluorescent protein (iRFP) to monitor brain tumor growth in mice. Fluorescence imaging includes fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI), fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (fDOT), and fluorescence molecular Imaging (FMT®). A U87 cell line was genetically modified for constitutive expression of both the encoding Fluc and iRFP reporter genes and assayed for cell, subcutaneous tumor and brain tumor imaging. On cultured cells, BLI was more sensitive than FRI; in vivo, tumors were first detected by BLI. Fluorescence of iRFP provided convenient tools such as flux cytometry, direct detection of the fluorescent protein on histological slices, and fluorescent tomography that allowed for 3D localization and absolute quantification of the fluorescent signal in brain tumors. PMID:27809256

  6. Whole-cell bioluminescent bioreporter sensing of foodborne toxicants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripp, Steve A.; Applegate, Bruce M.; Simpson, Michael L.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2001-03-01

    The presence of biologically derived toxins in foods is of utmost significance to food safety and human health concerns. Biologically active amines, referred to as biogenic amines, serve as a noteworthy example, having been implicated as the causative agent in numerous food poisoning episodes. Of the various biogenic amines encountered, histamine, putrescine, cadaverine, tyramine, tryptamine, beta-phenylethylamine, spermine, and spermidine are considered to be the most significant, and can be used as hygienic-quality indicators of food. Biogenic amines can be monitored using whole-cell bioluminescent bioreporters, which represent a family of genetically engineered microorganisms that generate visible light in response to specific chemical or physical agents in their environment. The light response occurs due to transcriptional activation of a genetically incorporated lux cassette, and can be measured using standard photomultiplier devices. We have successfully engineered a lux-based bioreporter capable of detecting and monitoring the biogenic amine beta-phenylethylamine. This research represents a biologically-based sensor technology that can be readily integrated into Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point programs to provide a rugged monitoring regime that can be uniformly applied for field-based and in-house laboratory quality control analyses. Since the bioreporter and biosensing elements are completely self-contained within the sensor design, this system provides ease of use, with operational capabilities realized by simply combining the food sample with the bioreporter and allowing the sensor to process the ensuing bioluminescent signal and communicate the results. The application of this technology to the critically important issue of food safety and hygienic quality represents a novel method for detecting, monitoring, and preventing biologically active toxins in food commodities.

  7. High-throughput bioluminescence screening of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway inhibitors from chemical and natural sources.

    PubMed

    Ausseil, Frederic; Samson, Arnaud; Aussagues, Yannick; Vandenberghe, Isabelle; Creancier, Laurent; Pouny, Isabelle; Kruczynski, Anna; Massiot, Georges; Bailly, Christian

    2007-02-01

    To discover original inhibitors of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, the authors have developed a cell-based bioluminescent assay and used it to screen collections of plant extracts and chemical compounds. They first established a DLD-1 human colon cancer cell line that stably expresses a 4Ubiquitin-Luciferase (4Ub-Luc) reporter protein, efficiently targeted to the ubiquitin-proteasome degradation pathway. The assay was then adapted to 96- and 384-well plate formats and calibrated with reference proteasome inhibitors. Assay robustness was carefully assessed, particularly cell toxicity, and the statistical Z factor value was calculated to 0.83, demonstrating a good performance level of the assay. A total of 18,239 molecules and 15,744 plant extracts and fractions thereof were screened for their capacity to increase the luciferase activity in DLD-1 4Ub-Luc cells, and 21 molecules and 66 extracts inhibiting the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway were identified. The fractionation of an active methanol extract of Physalis angulata L. aerial parts was performed to isolate 2 secosteroids known as physalin B and C. In a cell-based Western blot assay, the ubiquitinated protein accumulation was confirmed after a physalin treatment confirming the accuracy of the screening process. The method reported here thus provides a robust approach to identify novel ubiquitin-proteasome pathway inhibitors in large collections of chemical compounds and natural products.

  8. Bioluminescence microscopy: application to ATP measurements in single living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brau, Frederic; Helle, Pierre; Bernengo, Jean C.

    1997-12-01

    Bioluminescence microscopy can be used to measure intracellular cofactors and ionic concentrations (Ca2+, K+, ATP, NADH), as an alternative to micro- spectrophotometry and micro-fluorimetry, due to the development of sensitive detectors (cooled photomultipliers tubes and CCD). The main limitation comes from the very small and brief intensity of the emitted light. Our instrumentation based on an inverted microscope, equipped with high aperture immersion lenses is presented. Light intensity measurements are carried out through a photomultiplier sorted for low dark current and cooled at -5 degree(s)C to reduce thermal noise. Our first aim is to quantify ATP on single living cells using the firefly luciferin-luciferase couple. Experimental and kinetic aspects are presented to emphasize the potentialities of the technique.

  9. Estimating the toxicities of organic chemicals to bioluminescent bacteria and activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shijin; Frymier, Paul D

    2002-10-01

    Toxicity assays based on bioluminescent bacteria have several advantages including a quick response and an easily measured signal. The Shk1 assay is a procedure for wastewater toxicity testing based on the bioluminescent bacterium Shk1. Using the Shk1 assay, the toxicity of 98 organic chemicals were measured and EC50 values were obtained. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models based on the logarithm of the octanol-water partition coefficient (log(Kow)) were developed for individual groups of organic chemicals with different functional groups. The correlation coefficients for different groups of organic compounds varied between 0.69 and 0.99. An overall QSAR model without discriminating the functional groups, which can be used for a quick estimate of the toxicities of organic chemicals, was also developed and model predictions were compared to experimental data. The model accuracy was found to be one order of magnitude from the observed values.

  10. Regulation of Bioluminescence in Photobacterium leiognathi Strain KNH6

    PubMed Central

    Rader, Bethany A.; Stabb, Eric V.; Mandel, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial bioluminescence is taxonomically restricted to certain proteobacteria, many of which belong to the Vibrionaceae. In the most well-studied cases, pheromone signaling plays a key role in regulation of light production. However, previous reports have indicated that certain Photobacterium strains do not use this regulatory method for controlling luminescence. In this study, we combined genome sequencing with genetic approaches to characterize the regulation of luminescence in Photobacterium leiognathi strain KNH6, an extremely bright isolate. Using transposon mutagenesis and screening for decreased luminescence, we identified insertions in genes encoding components necessary for the luciferase reaction (lux, lum, and rib operons) as well as in nine other loci. These additional loci encode gene products predicted to be involved in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, DNA and RNA metabolism, transcriptional regulation, and the synthesis of cytochrome c, peptidoglycan, and fatty acids. The mutagenesis screen did not identify any mutants with disruptions of predicted pheromone-related loci. Using targeted gene insertional disruptions, we demonstrate that under the growth conditions tested, luminescence levels do not appear to be controlled through canonical pheromone signaling systems in this strain. IMPORTANCE Despite the long-standing interest in luminous bacteria, outside a few model organisms, little is known about the regulation and function of luminescence. Light-producing marine bacteria are widely distributed and have diverse lifestyles, suggesting that the control and significance of luminescence may be similarly diverse. In this study, we apply genetic tools to the study of regulation of light production in the extremely bright isolate Photobacterium leiognathi KNH6. Our results suggest an unusual lack of canonical pheromone-mediated control of luminescence and contribute to a better understanding of alternative strategies for regulation of a

  11. Ultrasound-modulated bioluminescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, Guillaume; Schotland, John C.

    2014-03-01

    We propose a method to reconstruct the density of a luminescent source in a highly scattering medium from ultrasound-modulated optical measurements. Our approach is based on the solution to a hybrid inverse source problem for the diffusion equation.

  12. Photon Counting System for High-Sensitivity Detection of Bioluminescence at Optical Fiber End.

    PubMed

    Iinuma, Masataka; Kadoya, Yutaka; Kuroda, Akio

    2016-01-01

    The technique of photon counting is widely used for various fields and also applicable to a high-sensitivity detection of luminescence. Thanks to recent development of single photon detectors with avalanche photodiodes (APDs), the photon counting system with an optical fiber has become powerful for a detection of bioluminescence at an optical fiber end, because it allows us to fully use the merits of compactness, simple operation, highly quantum efficiency of the APD detectors. This optical fiber-based system also has a possibility of improving the sensitivity to a local detection of Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by high-sensitivity detection of the bioluminescence. In this chapter, we are introducing a basic concept of the optical fiber-based system and explaining how to construct and use this system.

  13. Fimbrolide Natural Products Disrupt Bioluminescence of Vibrio By Targeting Autoinducer Biosynthesis and Luciferase Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weining; Lorenz, Nicola; Jung, Kirsten; Sieber, Stephan A

    2016-01-18

    Vibrio is a model organism for the study of quorum sensing (QS) signaling and is used to identify QS-interfering drugs. Naturally occurring fimbrolides are important tool compounds known to affect QS in various organisms; however, their cellular targets have so far remained elusive. Here we identify the irreversible fimbrolide targets in the proteome of living V. harveyi and V. campbellii via quantitative mass spectrometry utilizing customized probes. Among the major hits are two protein targets with essential roles in Vibrio QS and bioluminescence. LuxS, responsible for autoinducer 2 biosynthesis, and LuxE, a subunit of the luciferase complex, were both covalently modified at their active-site cysteines leading to inhibition of activity. The identification of LuxE unifies previous reports suggesting inhibition of bioluminescence downstream of the signaling cascade and thus contributes to a better mechanistic understanding of these QS tool compounds.

  14. Experimental Support for a Single Electron-Transfer Oxidation Mechanism in Firefly Bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Branchini, Bruce R; Behney, Curran E; Southworth, Tara L; Fontaine, Danielle M; Gulick, Andrew M; Vinyard, David J; Brudvig, Gary W

    2015-06-24

    Firefly luciferase produces light by converting substrate beetle luciferin into the corresponding adenylate that it subsequently oxidizes to oxyluciferin, the emitter of bioluminescence. We have confirmed the generally held notions that the oxidation step is initiated by formation of a carbanion intermediate and that a hydroperoxide (anion) is involved. Additionally, structural evidence is presented that accounts for the delivery of oxygen to the substrate reaction site. Herein, we report key convincing spectroscopic evidence of the participation of superoxide anion in a related chemical model reaction that supports a single electron-transfer pathway for the critical oxidative process. This mechanism may be a common feature of bioluminescence processes in which light is produced by an enzyme in the absence of cofactors.

  15. Marine Bioluminescence: Mechanisms and Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-30

    response curve is being created based on the sensitivity changes of the BL system at the different concentrations of CD tested. Also being tested is the...fusiformis cells were exposed to this drug and then their ability to produce BL in response to fluid shear was compared with control cells. A dose

  16. Quantitative bioluminescent detection of bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    Phosphoflavins in sample are measured using photobacterial luciferase assay technique for flavin mononucleotide (FMN). Boiling perchloric acid is used to rupture cells to free bound flavin and to hydrolyze flavin adenine dinucleotide to FMN. Base-stabilized water solution of sodium borohydride is used as reactant.

  17. In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging of Intratumoral Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Michelle; Akin, Ali R; Francis, Kevin P; Tangney, Mark

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the use of whole-body bioluminescent imaging (BLI) for the study of bacterial trafficking in live mice, with an emphasis on the use of bacteria in therapy of cancer. Bacteria present an attractive class of vector for cancer therapy, possessing a natural ability to grow preferentially within tumors following systemic administration. Bacteria engineered to express the lux gene cassette permit BLI detection of the bacteria and tumor sites concurrently. The location and levels of bacteria within tumors over time can be readily examined, visualized in two or three dimensions. The method is applicable to a wide range of bacterial species and tumor xenograft types. This article describes the protocol for analysis of bioluminescent bacteria within subcutaneous tumor-bearing mice. This powerful, and inexpensive, real-time imaging strategy represents an ideal method for the study of bacteria in vivo in the context of cancer research. This protocol outlines the procedure for studying lux-tagged Escherichia coli and Bifidobacterium breve in mice, demonstrating the spatial and temporal readout from 2D and 3D BLI achievable with whole-body in vivo luminescence imaging.

  18. Bioluminescence of beetle luciferases with 6'-amino-D-luciferin analogues reveals excited keto-oxyluciferin as the emitter and phenolate/luciferin binding site interactions modulate bioluminescence colors.

    PubMed

    Viviani, Vadim R; Neves, Deimison Rodrigues; Amaral, Danilo Trabuco; Prado, Rogilene A; Matsuhashi, Takuto; Hirano, Takashi

    2014-08-19

    Beetle luciferases produce different bioluminescence colors from green to red using the same d-luciferin substrate. Despite many studies of the mechanisms and structural determinants of bioluminescence colors with firefly luciferases, the identity of the emitters and the specific active site interactions responsible for bioluminescence color modulation remain elusive. To address these questions, we analyzed the bioluminescence spectra with 6'-amino-D-luciferin (aminoluciferin) and its 5,5-dimethyl analogue using a set of recombinant beetle luciferases that naturally elicit different colors and different pH sensitivities (pH-sensitive, Amydetes vivianii λmax=538 nm, Macrolampis sp2 λmax=564 nm; pH-insensitive, Phrixotrix hirtus λmax=623 nm, Phrixotrix vivianii λmax=546 nm, and Pyrearinus termitilluminans λmax=534 nm), a luciferase-like enzyme (Tenebrionidae, Zophobas morio λmax=613 nm), and mutants of C311 (S314). The green-yellow-emitting luciferases display red-shifted bioluminescence spectra with aminoluciferin in relation to those with D-luciferin, whereas the red-emitting luciferases displayed blue-shifted spectra. Bioluminescence spectra with 5,5-dimethylaminoluciferin, in which enolization is blocked, were almost identical to those of aminoluciferin. Fluorescence probing using 2-(4-toluidino)naphthalene-6-sulfonate and inference with aminoluciferin confirm that the luciferin binding site of the red-shifted luciferases is more polar than in the case of the green-yellow-emitting luciferases. Altogether, the results show that the keto form of excited oxyluciferin is the emitter in beetle bioluminescence and that bioluminescence colors are essentially modulated by interactions of the 6'-hydroxy group of oxyluciferin and basic moieties under the influence of the microenvironment polarity of the active site: a strong interaction between a base moiety and oxyluciferin phenol in a hydrophobic microenvironment promotes green-yellow emission, whereas a more polar

  19. 106 ASSESSMENT OF ANTI-BACTERIAL EFFECTS OF PEGYLATED SILVER-COATED CARBON NANOTUBES ON CAUSATIVE BACTERIA OF BOVINE INFERTILITY USING BIOLUMINESCENCE IMAGING SYSTEM.

    PubMed

    Park, S; Chaudhari, A A; Pillai, S; Singh, S R; Willard, S T; Ryan, P L; Feugang, J M

    2016-01-01

    OD values did not always reflect bacteria concentrations, and varied according to nanotube concentrations. No significant differences in anti-bacterial activities were revealed between pSWCNTs-Ag and SWCNTs-Ag based on OD values during 6h of incubation (P>0.05); meanwhile, pSWCNTs-Ag nanotubes exhibited stronger anti-bacterial effects than SWCNTs-Ag during the same period using BLI (P<0.05). In summary, we confirmed previous reports showing dose-dependent eliminations of pathogenic bacteria by silver nanotubes. Pegylated nanotubes exhibited high anti-bacterial activity compared to non-pegylated nanotubes. Bioluminescence imaging system revealed superior resolution to enable precise investigation of anti-bacterial kinetics of silver nanotubes. This feature could be useful for the study of bacterial infections that impair livestock fertility.

  20. [Use of the bioluminescent method for the determination of bacterial adenosinetriphosphate (ATP-metry) in microbiology].

    PubMed

    Kuzikov, A N; Bondarenko, V M; Latkin, A T

    2003-01-01

    The attention of a wide circle of specialists has recently been attracted by different methods for rapid determination of pathogenic microorganisms in biological specimens, environmental objects and foodstuffs, as well as in cases of possible acts of bioterrorism. In this respect the bioluminescent method for determination of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) contained in microbial cells is of interest. The method is based on the interaction ATP, luciferase and luciferin, accompanied by giving off energy in the form of light emission. When compared with routine methods, the use of this method considerably reduces the duration of the analysis, and its high sensitivity is comparable with that of the polymerase chain reaction. In this review the data on the prospects of the practical use of the bioluminescent method of ATP-metry are presented.

  1. Trace metals in arcid clam Scapharca inaequivalvis: effects of molluscan extracts on bioluminescent bacteria.

    PubMed

    Girotti, S; Bolelli, L; Fini, F; Monari, M; Andreani, G; Isani, G; Carpené, E

    2006-10-01

    The relationship between a supposed effect of molluscan extracts on bioluminescent bacteria and metal concentrations in the extracts was investigated. For this purpose a biotoxicological assay based on bioluminescent bacteria (BLB) and extracts from metal exposed molluscs, Scapharca inaequivalvis, was optimized to monitor Cd and Cu marine pollution. Cu and Cd concentrations increased in tissues of experimentally exposed molluscs. Molluscan extracts inhibited the bacterial luminescence, the inhibition decreasing as the time of mollusc exposure to metals increased, suggesting a reduction of the "bioactive" metals. In regard to the use of BLB test in environmental monitoring, the analysis of Cu, Cd, and metallothionein (MT) was first performed in tissues from molluscs collected in three different areas of Northern Adriatic Sea. Metal concentrations reached maximum values in the gills, while Cd was mostly bound to MT in the kidney. Significant differences in metals and MT concentrations were found depending on the sampling sites. The biotoxicological assay resulted slightly correlated with the biochemical parameters.

  2. Measuring IL-1β Processing by Bioluminescence Sensors I: Using a Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Compan, Vincent; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    IL-1β processing is one of the hallmarks of inflammasome activation and drives the initiation of the inflammatory response. For decades, Western blot or ELISA have been extensively used to study this inflammatory event. Here, we describe the use of a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) biosensor to monitor IL-1β processing in real time and in living macrophages either using a plate reader or a microscope.

  3. Melatonin Entrains PER2::LUC Bioluminescence Circadian Rhythm in the Mouse Cornea

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Kenkichi; Davidson, Alec J.; Tosini, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies have reported the presence of a circadian rhythm in PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE (PER2::LUC) bioluminescence in mouse photoreceptors, retina, RPE, and cornea. Melatonin (MLT) modulates many physiological functions in the eye and it is believed to be one of the key circadian signals within the eye. The aim of the present study was to investigate the regulation of the PER2::LUC circadian rhythm in mouse cornea and to determine the role played by MLT. Methods Corneas were obtained from PER2::LUC mice and cultured to measure bioluminescence rhythmicity in isolated tissue using a Lumicycle or CCD camera. To determine the time-dependent resetting of the corneal circadian clocks in response to MLT or IIK7 (a melatonin type 2 receptor, MT2, agonist) was added to the cultured corneas at different times of the day. We also defined the location of the MT2 receptor within different corneal layers using immunohistochemistry. Results A long-lasting bioluminescence rhythm was recorded from cultured PER2::LUC cornea and PER2::LUC signal was localized to the corneal epithelium and endothelium. MLT administration in the early night delayed the cornea rhythm, whereas administration of MLT at late night to early morning advanced the cornea rhythm. Treatment with IIK7 mimicked the MLT phase-shifting effect. Consistent with these results, MT2 immunoreactivity was localized to the corneal epithelium and endothelium. Conclusions Our work demonstrates that MLT entrains the PER2::LUC bioluminescence rhythm in the cornea. Our data indicate that the cornea may represent a model to study the molecular mechanisms by which MLT affects the circadian clock. PMID:26207312

  4. Point mutations in firefly luciferase C-domain demonstrate its significance in green color of bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Modestova, Yulia; Koksharov, Mikhail I; Ugarova, Natalia N

    2014-09-01

    Firefly luciferase is a two-domain enzyme that catalyzes the bioluminescent reaction of firefly luciferin oxidation. Color of the emitted light depends on the structure of the enzyme, yet the exact color-tuning mechanism remains unknown by now, and the role of the C-domain in it is rarely discussed, because a very few color-shifting mutations in the C-domain were described. Recently we reported a strong red-shifting mutation E457K in the C-domain; the bioluminescence spectra of this enzyme were independent of temperature or pH. In the present study we investigated the role of the residue E457 in the enzyme using the Luciola mingrelica luciferase with a thermostabilized N-domain as a parent enzyme for site-directed mutagenesis. We obtained a set of mutants and studied their catalytic properties, thermal stability and bioluminescence spectra. Experimental spectra were represented as a sum of two components (bioluminescence spectra of putative "red" and "green" emitters); λmax of these components were constant for all the mutants, but the ratio of these emitters was defined by temperature and mutations in the C-domain. We suggest that each emitter is stabilized by a specific conformation of the active site; thus, enzymes with two forms of the active site coexist in the reactive media. The rigid structure of the C-domain is crucial for maintaining the conformation corresponding to the "green" emitter. We presume that the emitters are the keto- and enol forms of oxyluciferin.

  5. Novel Bioluminescent Binding Assays for Ligand–Receptor Interaction Studies of the Fibroblast Growth Factor Family

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ge; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Wu, Qing-Ping; Xu, Zeng-Guang; Liu, Ya-Li; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed novel bioluminescent binding assays for several protein/peptide hormones to study their interactions with receptors using the so far brightest NanoLuc reporter. To validate the novel bioluminescent binding assay using a variety of protein/peptide hormones, in the present work we applied it to the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family using the prototype member FGF2 as an example. A fully active recombinant FGF2 retaining a unique exposed cysteine (Cys) residue was chemically conjugated with an engineered NanoLuc carrying a unique exposed Cys residue at the C-terminus via formation of an intermolecular disulfide linkage. The NanoLuc-conjugated FGF2 (FGF2-Luc) retained high binding affinity to the overexpressed FGFR1 and the endogenous FGF receptor with the calculated dissociation constants of 161 ± 21 pM (n = 3) and 25 ± 4 pM (n = 3), respectively. In competition binding assays using FGF2-Luc as a tracer, receptor-binding potencies of wild-type or mutant FGF2s were accurately quantified. Thus, FGF2-Luc represents a novel non-radioactive tracer for the quantitative measurement of ligand–receptor interactions in the FGF family. These data suggest that the novel bioluminescent binding assay can be applied to a variety of protein/peptide hormones for ligand–receptor interaction studies. PMID:27414797

  6. Profiling the biological effects of wastewater samples via bioluminescent bacterial biosensors combined with estrogenic assays.

    PubMed

    Bazin, Ingrid; Seo, Ho Bin; Suehs, Carey M; Ramuz, Marc; De Waard, Michel; Gu, Man Bock

    2017-01-01

    Various water samples were successfully evaluated using a panel of different recombinant bioluminescent bacteria and estrogenic activity analysis. The bioluminescent bacteria strains induced by oxidative (superoxide radical or hydroxyl radical), protein damage, cell membrane damage, or cellular toxicity were used. Estrogenic activities were examined by using the yeast strain BY4741, which carries the β-galactosidase reporter gene under the control of the estrogen-responsive element (ERE). A total of 14 samples from three wastewater treatment plants, one textile factory, and seawater locations in Tunisia were analyzed. A wide range of bio-responses were described. Site/sample heterogeneity was prevalent, in combination with generally high relative bioluminescence scores for oxidative stress (OH•). Estrogenic activity was detected at all sites and was particularly elevated at certain sites. Our perspectives include the future exploration of the variation detected in relation to treatment plant operations and environmental impacts. In conclusion, this new multi-experimental method can be used for rapid bio-response profile monitoring and the evaluation of environmental samples spanning a wide range of domains. This study confirms that bio-reactive wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents are discharged into seawater, where they may impact coastal populations.

  7. Bioluminescence: a versatile technique for imaging cellular and molecular features

    PubMed Central

    Paley, Miranda A.

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence is a ubiquitous imaging modality for visualizing biological processes in vivo. This technique employs visible light and interfaces readily with most cell and tissue types, making it a versatile technology for preclinical studies. Here we review basic bioluminescence imaging principles, along with applications of the technology that are relevant to the medicinal chemistry community. These include noninvasive cell tracking experiments, analyses of protein function, and methods to visualize small molecule metabolites. In each section, we also discuss how bioluminescent tools have revealed insights into experimental therapies and aided drug discovery. Last, we highlight the development of new bioluminescent tools that will enable more sensitive and multi-component imaging experiments and, thus, expand our broader understanding of living systems. PMID:27594981

  8. Bioluminescence for USP sterility testing of pharmaceutical suspension products.

    PubMed Central

    Bussey, D M; Tsuji, K

    1986-01-01

    Bioluminescence measurement significantly improved the accuracy, sensitivity, precision, and reliability of the current visual endpoint determination for the USP sterility test and eliminated the day 7 transfer/dilution step required for testing suspension products. Thirteen strains of bacteria and fungi (representing potential contaminants in sterile products), three pharmaceutical suspension products, and four media were used in the experiment. No interference from suspension products was encountered in the detection of microbial growth by the bioluminescence measurement. The poor fungal growth encountered was attributed to insufficient diffusion of oxygen into the medium and was circumvented by use of a large tube size (38 by 200 mm) or by vortexing the medium once during the 2-week incubation period. Bioluminescence measurement would facilitate automated handling of the sterility test endpoint readout operation. The optimum parameters of bioluminescence measurement for application in sterility testing were determined. PMID:3954348

  9. Bioluminescence-Activated Deep-Tissue Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yi Rang; Kim, Seonghoon; Choi, Jin Woo; Choi, Sung Yong; Lee, Sang-Hee; Kim, Homin; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Koh, Gou Young; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Optical energy can trigger a variety of photochemical processes useful for therapies. Owing to the shallow penetration of light in tissues, however, the clinical applications of light-activated therapies have been limited. Bioluminescence resonant energy transfer (BRET) may provide a new way of inducing photochemical activation. Here, we show that efficient bioluminescence energy-induced photodynamic therapy (PDT) of macroscopic tumors and metastases in deep tissue. For monolayer cell culture in vitro incubated with Chlorin e6, BRET energy of about 1 nJ per cell generated as strong cytotoxicity as red laser light irradiation at 2.2 mW/cm2 for 180 s. Regional delivery of bioluminescence agents via draining lymphatic vessels killed tumor cells spread to the sentinel and secondary lymph nodes, reduced distant metastases in the lung and improved animal survival. Our results show the promising potential of novel bioluminescence-activated PDT. PMID:26000054

  10. Bioluminescence-activated deep-tissue photodynamic therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yi Rang; Kim, Seonghoon; Choi, Jin Woo; Choi, Sung Yong; Lee, Sang-Hee; Kim, Homin; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Koh, Gou Young; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Optical energy can trigger a variety of photochemical processes useful for therapies. Owing to the shallow penetration of light in tissues, however, the clinical applications of light-activated therapies have been limited. Bioluminescence resonant energy transfer (BRET) may provide a new way of inducing photochemical activation. Here, we show that efficient bioluminescence energy-induced photodynamic therapy (PDT) of macroscopic tumors and metastases in deep tissue. For monolayer cell culture in vitro incubated with Chlorin e6, BRET energy of about 1 nJ per cell generated as strong cytotoxicity as red laser light irradiation at 2.2 mW/cm(2) for 180 s. Regional delivery of bioluminescence agents via draining lymphatic vessels killed tumor cells spread to the sentinel and secondary lymph nodes, reduced distant metastases in the lung and improved animal survival. Our results show the promising potential of novel bioluminescence-activated PDT.

  11. Digital spectral separation methods and systems for bioluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ge; Shen, Haiou; Liu, Ying; Cong, Alex; Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Yue; Dubey, Purnima

    2008-02-04

    We propose a digital spectral separation (DSS) system and methods to extract spectral information optimally from a weak multi-spectral signal such as in the bioluminescent imaging (BLI) studies. This system utilizes our newly invented spatially-translated spectral-image mixer (SSM), which consists of dichroic beam splitters, a mirror, and a DSS algorithm. The DSS approach overcomes the shortcomings of the data acquisition scheme used for the current BLI systems. Primarily, using our DSS scheme, spectral information will not be filtered out. Accordingly, truly parallel multi-spectral multi-view acquisition is enabled for the first time to minimize experimental time and optimize data quality. This approach also permits recovery of the bioluminescent signal time course, which is useful to study the kinetics of multiple bioluminescent probes using multi-spectral bioluminescence tomography (MSBT).

  12. Biological water quality monitoring using chemiluminescent and bioluminescent techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. R.

    1978-01-01

    Automated chemiluminescence and bioluminescence sensors were developed for the continuous monitoring of microbial levels in water supplies. The optimal chemical procedures were determined for the chemiluminescence system to achieve maximum sensitivity. By using hydrogen peroxide, reaction rate differentiation, ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), and carbon monoxide pretreatments, factors which cause interference were eliminated and specificity of the reaction for living and dead bacteria was greatly increased. By employing existing technology with some modifications, a sensitive and specific bioluminescent system was developed.

  13. Bioluminescence imaging of Chlamydia muridarum ascending infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jessica; Huang, Yumeng; Liu, Yuanjun; Schenken, Robert; Arulanandam, Bernard; Zhong, Guangming

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydial pathogenicity in the upper genital tract relies on chlamydial ascending from the lower genital tract. To monitor chlamydial ascension, we engineered a luciferase-expressing C. muridarum. In cells infected with the luciferase-expressing C. muridarum, luciferase gene expression and enzymatic activity (measured as bioluminescence intensity) correlated well along the infection course, suggesting that bioluminescence can be used for monitoring chlamydial replication. Following an intravaginal inoculation with the luciferase-expressing C. muridarum, 8 of 10 mice displayed bioluminescence signal in the lower with 4 also in the upper genital tracts on day 3 after infection. By day 7, all 10 mice developed bioluminescence signal in the upper genital tracts. The bioluminescence signal was maintained in the upper genital tract in 6 and 2 mice by days 14 and 21, respectively. The bioluminescence signal was no longer detectable in any of the mice by day 28. The whole body imaging approach also revealed an unexpected airway infection following the intravaginal inoculation. Although the concomitant airway infection was transient and did not significantly alter the genital tract infection time courses, caution should be taken during data interpretation. The above observations have demonstrated that C. muridarum can not only achieve rapid ascending infection in the genital tract but also cause airway infection following a genital tract inoculation. These findings have laid a foundation for further optimizing the C. muridarum intravaginal infection murine model for understanding chlamydial pathogenic mechanisms.

  14. Stimulation of bioluminescence in Noctiluca sp. using controlled temperature changes.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Li, GuiJuan; Liu, HuanYing; Hu, HaoHao; Zhang, XueGang

    2013-01-01

    Bioluminescence induced by multifarious stimuli has long been observed and is remains under investigation because of its great complexity. In particular, the exact mechanism underlying bioluminescence is not yet fully understood. This work presents a new experimental method for studying Noctiluca sp. bioluminescence under temperature change stimulation. It is a study of Noctiluca sp. bioluminescence using controlled temperature changes in a tank. A characteristic of this experiment is the large volume of water used (1 m(3) in a tank of 2 × 1 × 1 m). Temperature changes were controlled by two methods. In the first, a flask filled with hot water was introduced into the tank and in the second, a water heater was used in the tank. Temperature changes were recorded using sensors. Noctiluca sp. bioluminescence was recorded using a Canon 5D Mark II and this allowed the characteristics of Noctiluca sp. bioluminescence under temperature change stimulation to be monitored.

  15. Fast monitoring of indoor bioaerosol concentrations with ATP bioluminescence assay using an electrostatic rod-type sampler.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Woon; Park, Chul Woo; Lee, Sung Hwa; Hwang, Jungho

    2015-01-01

    A culture-based colony counting method is the most widely used analytical technique for monitoring bioaerosols in both indoor and outdoor environments. However, this method requires several days for colony formation. In this study, our goal was fast monitoring (Sampling: 3 min, Detection: < 1 min) of indoor bioaerosol concentrations with ATP bioluminescence assay using a bioaerosol sampler. For this purpose, a novel hand-held electrostatic rod-type sampler (110 mm wide, 115 mm long, and 200 mm tall) was developed and used with a commercial luminometer, which employs the Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence method. The sampler consisted of a wire-rod type charger and a cylindrical collector, and was operated with an applied voltage of 4.5 kV and a sampling flow rate of 150.7 lpm. Its performance was tested using Staphylococcus epidermidis which was aerosolized with an atomizer. Bioaerosol concentrations were measured using ATP bioluminescence method with our sampler and compared with the culture-based method using Andersen cascade impactor under controlled laboratory conditions. Indoor bioaerosol concentrations were also measured using both methods in various indoor environments. A linear correlation was obtained between both methods in lab-tests and field-tests. Our proposed sampler with ATP bioluminescence method may be effective for fast monitoring of indoor bioaerosol concentrations.

  16. Fast Monitoring of Indoor Bioaerosol Concentrations with ATP Bioluminescence Assay Using an Electrostatic Rod-Type Sampler

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji-Woon; Park, Chul Woo; Lee, Sung Hwa; Hwang, Jungho

    2015-01-01

    A culture-based colony counting method is the most widely used analytical technique for monitoring bioaerosols in both indoor and outdoor environments. However, this method requires several days for colony formation. In this study, our goal was fast monitoring (Sampling: 3 min, Detection: < 1 min) of indoor bioaerosol concentrations with ATP bioluminescence assay using a bioaerosol sampler. For this purpose, a novel hand-held electrostatic rod-type sampler (110 mm wide, 115 mm long, and 200 mm tall) was developed and used with a commercial luminometer, which employs the Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence method. The sampler consisted of a wire-rod type charger and a cylindrical collector, and was operated with an applied voltage of 4.5 kV and a sampling flow rate of 150.7 lpm. Its performance was tested using Staphylococcus epidermidis which was aerosolized with an atomizer. Bioaerosol concentrations were measured using ATP bioluminescence method with our sampler and compared with the culture-based method using Andersen cascade impactor under controlled laboratory conditions. Indoor bioaerosol concentrations were also measured using both methods in various indoor environments. A linear correlation was obtained between both methods in lab-tests and field-tests. Our proposed sampler with ATP bioluminescence method may be effective for fast monitoring of indoor bioaerosol concentrations. PMID:25950929

  17. Sustained accurate recording of intracellular acidification in living tissues with a photo-controllable bioluminescent protein.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Mitsuru; Haga, Sanae; Takakura, Hideo; Ozaki, Michitaka; Ozawa, Takeaki

    2013-06-04

    Regulation of an intracellular acidic environment plays a pivotal role in biological processes and functions. However, spatiotemporal analysis of the acidification in complex tissues of living subjects persists as an important challenge. We developed a photo-inactivatable bioluminescent indicator, based on a combination of luciferase-fragment complementation and a photoreaction of a light, oxygen, and voltage domain from Avena sativa Phototropin1 (LOV2), to visualize temporally dynamic acidification in living tissue samples. Bioluminescence of the indicator diminished upon light irradiation and it recovered gradually in the dark state thereafter. The recovery rate was remarkably sensitive to pH changes but unsusceptible to fluctuation of luciferin or ATP concentrations. Bioluminescence imaging, taken as an index of the recovery rates, enabled long-time recording of acidification in apoptotic and autophagous processes in a cell population and an ischemic condition in living mice. This technology using the indicator is widely applicable to sense organelle-specific acidic changes in target biological tissues.

  18. Sustained accurate recording of intracellular acidification in living tissues with a photo-controllable bioluminescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Mitsuru; Haga, Sanae; Takakura, Hideo; Ozaki, Michitaka; Ozawa, Takeaki

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of an intracellular acidic environment plays a pivotal role in biological processes and functions. However, spatiotemporal analysis of the acidification in complex tissues of living subjects persists as an important challenge. We developed a photo-inactivatable bioluminescent indicator, based on a combination of luciferase-fragment complementation and a photoreaction of a light, oxygen, and voltage domain from Avena sativa Phototropin1 (LOV2), to visualize temporally dynamic acidification in living tissue samples. Bioluminescence of the indicator diminished upon light irradiation and it recovered gradually in the dark state thereafter. The recovery rate was remarkably sensitive to pH changes but unsusceptible to fluctuation of luciferin or ATP concentrations. Bioluminescence imaging, taken as an index of the recovery rates, enabled long-time recording of acidification in apoptotic and autophagous processes in a cell population and an ischemic condition in living mice. This technology using the indicator is widely applicable to sense organelle-specific acidic changes in target biological tissues. PMID:23690604

  19. Design and development of high bioluminescent resonance energy transfer efficiency hybrid-imaging constructs.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Kovalski, Letícia; Broyles, David; Hunt, Eric A; Daftarian, Pirouz; Dikici, Emre; Daunert, Sylvia; Deo, Sapna K

    2016-04-01

    Here we describe the design and construction of an imaging construct with high bioluminescent resonance energy transfer (BRET) efficiency that is composed of multiple quantum dots (QDs; λem = 655 nm) self-assembled onto a bioluminescent protein, Renilla luciferase (Rluc). This is facilitated by the streptavidin-biotin interaction, allowing the facile formation of a hybrid-imaging construct (HIC) comprising up to six QDs (acceptor) grafted onto a light-emitting Rluc (donor) core. The resulting assembly of multiple acceptors surrounding a donor permits this construct to exhibit high resonance energy transfer efficiency (∼64.8%). The HIC was characterized using fluorescence excitation anisotropy measurements and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. To demonstrate the application of our construct, a generation-5 (G5) polyamidoamine dendrimer (PAMAM) nanocarrier was loaded with our HIC for in vitro and in vivo imaging. We envision that this design of multiple acceptors and bioluminescent donor will lead to the development of new BRET-based systems useful in sensing, imaging, and other bioanalytical applications.

  20. Detection of protein-protein interactions using Aequorea victoria bioluminescence resonance energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinokurov, Leonid M.; Gorokhovatsky, Andrey Y.; Rudenko, Natalia V.; Marchenkov, Victor V.; Skosyrev, Vitaly S.; Arzhanov, Maxim A.; Zakharov, Mikhail V.; Burkhardt, Nils; Semisotnov, Gennady V.; Alakhov, Yuli B.

    2003-07-01

    Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) is a naturally occurring phenomenon taking place in some marine coelenterates. Emission of light in these organisms involves the energy transfer between chromophores of donor luciferase and acceptor fluorescent protein. Due to the strict dependence of BRET efficiency on the inter-chromophore distance, the phenomenon has been applied to study protein-protein interactions by fusing interacting partners with either donor or acceptor proteins. Here we describe a BRET-based homogeneous protein-protein interaction assay exploiting novel donor-acceptor pair formed by photoproteins of jellyfish Aequorea victoria bioluminescent system, aequorin and green fluorescent protein enhanced variant (EGFP). Two known interacting proteins, streptavidin (SAV) and biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) were fused, respectively, with aequorin and EGFP. The fusions were purified after expression of the corresponding genes in Escherichia coli cells. Association of SAV-Aequorin and BCCP-EGFP was followed by BRET between aequorin (donor) and EGFP (acceptor) resulting in significantly increasing 510 nm and decreasing 470 nm bioluminescence intensity. It was shown that free biotin inhibited BRET due to its competition with BCCP-EGFP for binding to SAV-Aequorin. These properties were exploited to demonstrate competitive homogeneous BRET assay for biotin.

  1. A dip-stick type biosensor using bioluminescent bacteria encapsulated in color-coded alginate microbeads for detection of water toxicity.

    PubMed

    Jung, Insup; Seo, Ho Bin; Lee, Ji-eun; Kim, Byoung Chan; Gu, Man Bock

    2014-09-21

    The use of genetically engineered bioluminescent bacteria, in which bioluminescence is induced by different modes of toxic action, represents an alternative to acute toxicity tests using living aquatic organisms (plants, vertebrates, or invertebrates) in an aqueous environment. A number of these bacterial strains have been developed, but there have been no attempts to develop a hand-held type of biosensor for monitoring or identification of toxicity. We report a facile dip-stick type biosensor using genetically engineered bioluminescent bacteria as a new platform for classification and identification of toxicity in water environments. This dip-stick type biosensor is composed of eight different optically color-coded functional alginate beads that each encapsulates a different bioluminescent bacterial strain and its corresponding fluorescent microbead. These color-coded microbeads exhibit easy identification of encapsulated microbeads, since each microbead has a different color code depending on the bioluminescent bacterial strain contained and improved cell-stability compared to liquid culture. This dip-stick type biosensor can discriminate different modes of toxic actions (i.e. DNA damage, oxidative damage, cell-membrane damage, or protein damage) of sample water tested by simply dipping the stick into the water samples. It was found that each color-coded microbead emitted distinct bioluminescence, and each dip-stick type biosensor showed different bioluminescence patterns within 2 hours, depending on the toxic chemicals contained in LB medium, tap water, or river water samples. This dip-stick type biosensor can, therefore, be widely and practically used in checking toxicity of water in the environment primarily in situ, possibly indicating the status of biodiversity.

  2. AquaLite, a bioluminescent label for immunoassay and nucleic acid detection: quantitative analyses at the attomol level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David F.; Stults, Nancy L.

    1996-04-01

    AquaLiteR is a direct, bioluminescent label capable of detecting attomol levels of analyte in clinical immunoassays and assays for the quantitative measurement of nucleic acids. Bioluminescent immunoassays (BIAs) require no radioisotopes and avoid complex fluorescent measurements and many of the variables of indirect enzyme immunoassays (EIAs). AquaLite, a recombinant form of the photoprotein aequorin from a bioluminescent jellyfish, is coupled directly to antibodies to prepare bioluminescent conjugates for assay development. When the AquaLite-antibody complex is exposed to a solution containing calcium ions, a flash of blue light ((lambda) max equals 469 nm) is generated. The light signal is measured in commercially available luminometers that simultaneously inject a calcium solution and detect subattomol photoprotein levies in either test tubes or microtiter plates. Immunometric or 'sandwich' type assays are available for the quantitative measurement of human endocrine hormones and nucleic acids. The AquaLite TSH assay can detect 1 attomol of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in 0.2 mL of human serum and is a useful clinical tool for diagnosing hyperthyroid patients. AquaLite-based nucleic acid detection permits quantifying attomol levels of specific nucleic acid markers and represents possible solution to the difficult problem of quantifying the targets of nucleic acid amplification methods.

  3. Bioluminescent bacteria have potential as a marker of drowning in seawater: two immersed cadavers retrieved near estuaries.

    PubMed

    Kakizaki, Eiji; Kozawa, Shuji; Sakai, Masahiro; Yukawa, Nobuhiro

    2009-03-01

    We detected numerous bioluminescent bacteria in blood samples from two cadavers that had been immersed in estuarine environments. Autopsy, diatomaceous and toxicological findings indicated death by drowning, which agreed with environmental aspects and the findings of police investigations. Bioluminescent bacteria appeared in blood samples cultured on selective agar containing 2%, 3% and 4% NaCl after about 18h. Blood from the left side of the heart, the right side of the heart and the femoral vein generated 7.0 x 10(2), 2.0 x 10(4) and 8.0 x 10(2) cfu/ml of blood (case 1), and 1.8 x 10(4), 1.1 x 10(3) and 2.5 x 10(1) cfu/ml (case 2) of bioluminescent colonies, respectively, in agar containing 4% NaCl. Homologous analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene also identified the bioluminescent colonies as Vibrio fischeri and V. harveyi, which normally inhabit seawater. This simple assay might serve as an additional indicator to support a conclusion of death by drowning together with the diatom test.

  4. In vivo Bioluminescence Imaging of Burkholderia mallei Respiratory Infection and Treatment in the Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Shane; Johnston, Katie; Mott, Tiffany M.; Judy, Barbara M.; Kvitko, Brian H.; Schweizer, Herbert P.; Estes, D. Mark; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2011-01-01

    Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) technology is a powerful tool for monitoring infectious disease progression and treatment approaches. BLI is particularly useful for tracking fastidious intracellular pathogens that might be difficult to recover from certain organs. Burkholderia mallei, the causative agent of glanders, is a facultative intracellular pathogen and has been classified by the CDC as a Category B select agent due to its highly infectious nature and potential use as a biological weapon. Very little is known regarding pathogenesis or treatment of glanders. We investigated the use of bioluminescent reporter constructs to monitor the dynamics of infection as well as the efficacy of therapeutics for B. mallei in real-time. A stable luminescent reporter B. mallei strain was created using the pUTmini-Tn5::luxKm2 plasmid and used to monitor glanders in the BALB/c murine model. Mice were infected via the intranasal route with 5 × 103 bacteria and monitored by BLI at 24, 48, and 72 h. We verified that our reporter construct maintained similar virulence and growth kinetics compared to wild-type B. mallei and confirmed that it maintains luminescent stability in the presence or absence of antibiotic selection. The luminescent signal was initially seen in the lungs, and progressed to the liver and spleen over the course of infection. We demonstrated that antibiotic treatment 24 h post-infection resulted in reduction of bioluminescence that can be attributed to decreased bacterial burden in target organs. These findings suggest that BLI can be used to monitor disease progression and efficacy of therapeutics during glanders infections. Finally, we report an alternative method to mini-Tn5::luxKm2 transposon using mini-Tn7-lux elements that insert site-specifically at known genomic attachment sites and that can also be used to tag bacteria. PMID:21904535

  5. Effect of halogenated fluorescent compounds on bioluminescent reactions.

    PubMed

    Kirillova, Tamara N; Gerasimova, Marina A; Nemtseva, Elena V; Kudryasheva, Nadezhda S

    2011-04-01

    The paper investigates an application of luminescent bioassays to monitor the toxicity of organic halides. Effects of xanthene dyes (fluorescein, eosin Y, and erythrosin B), used as model compounds, on bioluminescent reactions of firefly Luciola mingrelica, marine bacteria Photobacterium leiognathi, and hydroid polyp Obelia longissima were studied. Dependence of bioluminescence quenching constants on the atomic weight of halogen substituents in dye molecules was demonstrated. Bacterial bioluminescence was shown to be most sensitive to heavy halogen atoms involved in molecular structure; hence, it is suitable for construction of sensors to monitor toxicity of halogenated compounds. Mechanisms of bioluminescence quenching--energy transfer processes, collisional interactions, and enzyme-dye binding--were considered. Changes of bioluminescence (BL) spectra in the presence of the dyes were analyzed. Interactions of the dyes with enzymes were studied using fluorescence characteristics of the dyes in steady-state and time-resolved experiments. The dependences of fluorescence anisotropy of enzyme-bound dyes, the average fluorescence lifetime, and the number of exponential components in fluorescence decay on the atomic weight of halogen substituents were demonstrated. The results are discussed in terms of "dark effect of heavy halogen atom" in the process of enzyme-dye binding; hydrophobic interactions were assumed to be responsible for the effect.

  6. Detection of DNA adducts by bioluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shunqing; Tan, Xianglin; Yao, Qunfeng; He, Min; Zhou, Yikai; Chen, Jian

    2001-09-01

    Luminescent assay for detection ATP is very sensitive with limitation of 10-17 moles. ATP using styrene oxide as a model carcinogen we currently apply a luminescence technique to detect the very low levels of carcinogen-DNA adducts in vitro and in vivo. The bioluminescent assay of DNA adducts entails three consecutive steps: digestion of modified DNA to adducted dinucleoside monophosphate and normal nucleotide are hydrolyzed to nucleosides (N) by nuclease P1 and prostatic acid phosphomonesterase (PAP); incorporation of (gamma) -P of ATP into normal nucleoside(N); detection of consumption of ATP by luminescence. This assay does not require separate manipulation because of the selective property of nuclease P1. One fmol of carcinogen- DNA adducts was detected by luminescent assay. A good correlation between results of luminescent assay and 32P-postlabeling procedures has been observed. We detect 1 adduct in 108 nucleotides for 10(mu) g DNA sample. The procedures of luminescent method is very simple and low- cost. IT appears applicable to the ultra sensitive detection of low levels of DNA adducts without radioactive isotope.

  7. [Activation of the bioluminescence of the sensor Escherichia coli strains used for detecting N-acyl-homoserine lactones in the presence of nitrofurans and NO generators].

    PubMed

    Zaĭtseva, Iu V; Granik, V G; Belik, A S; Koksharova, O A; Khmel', I A

    2010-01-01

    Nitrofurans (nitrofurazone, nitrofurantoin, furazidin, nifuroxazide), and nitric oxide generators (sodium nitroprusside and isosorbide mononitrate) in subinhibitory concentrations were shown to significantly increase the bioluminescence of the sensor Escherichia coli strains used for detecting N-acyl-homoserine lactones, signaling molecules of Quorum Sensing (QS) regulatory systems. The highest activation of bioluminescence (up to 250-400 fold) was observed in the presence of nitrofurazone on E. coli DH5alpha biosensors containing lux-reporter plasmids pSB401 or pSB536. However, this activation was not specifically associated with the functioning of QS systems. We suggest that the effect observed results from a direct action of nitrofurans and NO donors on the process of bioluminescence. The data indicate the necessity of using the biosensors that make it possible to detect specific effects of substances tested on QS regulation.

  8. Quantum/molecular mechanics study of firefly bioluminescence on luciferase oxidative conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto da Silva, Luís; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C. G.

    2014-07-01

    This is the first report of a computational study of the color tuning mechanism of firefly bioluminescence, using the oxidative conformation of luciferase. The results of these calculations demonstrated that the electrostatic field generated by luciferase is fundamental both for the emission shift and efficiency. Further calculations indicated that a shift in emission is achieved by modulating the energy, at different degrees, of the emissive and ground states. These differences in energy modulation will then lead to changes in the energy gap between the states.

  9. Novel peptide chemistry in terrestrial animals: natural luciferin analogues from the bioluminescent earthworm Fridericia heliota.

    PubMed

    Dubinnyi, Maxim A; Tsarkova, Aleksandra S; Petushkov, Valentin N; Kaskova, Zinaida M; Rodionova, Natalja S; Kovalchuk, Sergey I; Ziganshin, Rustam H; Baranov, Mikhail S; Mineev, Konstantin S; Yampolsky, Ilia V

    2015-03-02

    We report isolation and structure elucidation of AsLn5, AsLn7, AsLn11 and AsLn12: novel luciferin analogs from the bioluminescent earthworm Fridericia heliota. They were found to be highly unusual modified peptides, comprising either of the two tyrosine-derived chromophores, CompX or CompY and a set of amino acids, including threonine, gamma-aminobutyric acid, homoarginine, and unsymmetrical N,N-dimethylarginine. These natural compounds represent a unique peptide chemistry found in terrestrial animals and rise novel questions concerning their biosynthetic origin.

  10. [An adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence assay for detecting the number of living cells].

    PubMed

    Liu, S; Peng, Z; Wang, H; Lou, J; He, B; Tang, Q; Qiu, D

    2000-06-01

    The method for detecting the number of living cells was studied. Using an adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence assay, the present authors reported a perfect linear relationship between lg ATP concentrations and lg luminescence counts (r = 0.9963) as well as a relationship between lg number of cells and lg ATP luminescence counts (r = 0.9922). The detectable cells ranged from 10(2) to 10(6) cells/ml, the coefficients of variation 1-3%. This method is simple, accurate and sensitive and has a high reproducibility.

  11. Integrated CMOS photodetectors and signal processing for very low-level chemical sensing with the bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolton, Eric K.; Sayler, Gary S.; Nivens, David E.; Rochelle, James M.; Ripp, Steven; Simpson, Michael L.

    2002-01-01

    We report an integrated CMOS microluminometer optimized for the detection of low-level bioluminescence as part of the bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit (BBIC). This microluminometer improves on previous devices through careful management of the sub-femtoampere currents, both signal and leakage, that flow in the front-end processing circuitry. In particular, the photodiode is operated with a reverse bias of only a few mV, requiring special attention to the reset circuitry of the current-to-frequency converter (CFC) that forms the front-end circuit. We report a sub-femtoampere leakage current and a minimum detectable signal (MDS) of 0.15 fA (1510 s integration time) using a room temperature 1.47 mm2 CMOS photodiode. This microluminometer can detect luminescence from as few as 5000 fully induced Pseudomonas fluorescens 5RL bacterial cells. c2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The Expanding Toolbox of In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan; Handagama, Winode; Marr, Enolia; Sayler, Gary; Ripp, Steven

    2016-01-01

    In vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI) permits the visualization of engineered bioluminescence from living cells and tissues to provide a unique perspective toward the understanding of biological processes as they occur within the framework of an authentic in vivo environment. The toolbox of in vivo BLI includes an inventory of luciferase compounds capable of generating bioluminescent light signals along with sophisticated and powerful instrumentation designed to detect and quantify these light signals non-invasively as they emit from the living subject. The information acquired reveals the dynamics of a wide range of biological functions that play key roles in the physiological and pathological control of disease and its therapeutic management. This mini review provides an overview of the tools and applications central to the evolution of in vivo BLI as a core technology in the preclinical imaging disciplines. PMID:27446798

  13. In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging for Longitudinal Monitoring of Inflammation in Animal Models of Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Gutowski, Michal B.; Wilson, Leslie; Van Gelder, Russell N.; Pepple, Kathryn L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We develop a quantitative bioluminescence assay for in vivo longitudinal monitoring of inflammation in animal models of uveitis. Methods Three models of experimental uveitis were induced in C57BL/6 albino mice: primed mycobacterial uveitis (PMU), endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU), and experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). Intraperitoneal injection of luminol sodium salt, which emits light when oxidized, provided the bioluminescence substrate. Bioluminescence images were captured by a PerkinElmer In Vivo Imaging System (IVIS) Spectrum and total bioluminescence was analyzed using Living Image software. Bioluminescence on day zero was compared to bioluminescence on the day of peak inflammation for each model. Longitudinal bioluminescence imaging was performed in EIU and EAU. Results In the presence of luminol, intraocular inflammation generates detectable bioluminescence in three mouse models of uveitis. Peak bioluminescence in inflamed PMU eyes (1.46 × 105 photons/second [p/s]) was significantly increased over baseline (1.47 × 104 p/s, P = 0.01). Peak bioluminescence in inflamed EIU eyes (3.18 × 104 p/s) also was significantly increased over baseline (1.09 × 104 p/s, P = 0.04), and returned to near baseline levels by 48 hours. In EAU, there was a nonsignificant increase in bioluminescence at peak inflammation. Conclusions In vivo bioluminescence may be used as a noninvasive, quantitative measure of intraocular inflammation in animal models of uveitis. Primed mycobacterial uveitis and EIU are both acute models with robust anterior inflammation and demonstrated significant changes in bioluminescence corresponding with peak inflammation. Experimental autoimmune uveitis is a more indolent posterior uveitis and generated a more modest bioluminescent signal. In vivo imaging system bioluminescence is a nonlethal, quantifiable assay that can be used for monitoring inflammation in animal models of uveitis. PMID:28278321

  14. Dual-color bioluminescent bioreporter for forensic analysis: evidence of androgenic and anti-androgenic activity of illicit drugs.

    PubMed

    Cevenini, Luca; Michelini, Elisa; D'Elia, Marcello; Guardigli, Massimo; Roda, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    Bioassays represent promising complementary techniques to conventional analytical approaches used in doping analysis to detect illicit drugs like anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS). The fact that all AAS share a common mechanism of action via the human androgen receptor (hAR) enables the use of bioassays, relying on the activation of hAR as antidoping screening tools. Previously, we developed a dual-color bioreporter based on yeast cells engineered to express hAR and androgen response elements driving the expression of the bioluminescent (BL) reporter protein Photinus pyralis luciferase. A second reporter protein, the red-emitting luciferase PpyRE8, was introduced in the bioreporter as internal viability control. Here, we report the first forensic application of a straightforward, accurate, and cost-effective bioassay, relying on spectral resolution of the two BL signals, in 96-microwell format. The bioreporter responds to dihydrotestosterone as reference androgen in a concentration-dependent manner from 0.08 to 1,000 nM with intra- and inter-assay variation coefficients of 11.4 % and 13.1 %, respectively. We also demonstrated the suitability of this dual-color bioreporter to assess (anti)-androgenic activity of pure AAS, mixtures of AAS, and other illicit drugs provided by the Scientific Police. Significant anti-androgenic activity was observed in samples labeled as marijuana and hashish, containing Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol as major constituent.

  15. Monitoring of gene expression in bacteria during infections using an adaptable set of bioluminescent, fluorescent and colorigenic fusion vectors.

    PubMed

    Uliczka, Frank; Pisano, Fabio; Kochut, Annika; Opitz, Wiebke; Herbst, Katharina; Stolz, Tatjana; Dersch, Petra

    2011-01-01

    A family of versatile promoter-probe plasmids for gene expression analysis was developed based on a modular expression plasmid system (pZ). The vectors contain different replicons with exchangeable antibiotic cassettes to allow compatibility and expression analysis on a low-, midi- and high-copy number basis. Suicide vector variants also permit chromosomal integration of the reporter fusion and stable vector derivatives can be used for in vivo or in situ expression studies under non-selective conditions. Transcriptional and translational fusions to the reporter genes gfp(mut3.1), amCyan, dsRed2, luxCDABE, phoA or lacZ can be constructed, and presence of identical multiple cloning sites in the vector system facilitates the interchange of promoters or reporter genes between the plasmids of the series. The promoter of the constitutively expressed gapA gene of Escherichia coli was included to obtain fluorescent and bioluminescent expression constructs. A combination of the plasmids allows simultaneous detection and gene expression analysis in individual bacteria, e.g. in bacterial communities or during mouse infections. To test our vector system, we analyzed and quantified expression of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis virulence genes under laboratory conditions, in association with cells and during the infection process.

  16. A non-invasive in vivo imaging system to study dissemination of bioluminescent Yersinia pestis CO92 in a mouse model of pneumonic plague

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Jian; Rosenzweig, Jason A.; Kirtley, Michelle L.; van Lier, Christina J.; Fitts, Eric C.; Kozlova, Elena V.; Erova, Tatiana E.; Tiner, Bethany L.; Chopra, Ashok K.

    2012-01-01

    The gold standard in microbiology for monitoring bacterial dissemination in infected animals has always been viable plate counts. This method, despite being quantitative, requires sacrificing the infected animals. Recently, however, an alternative method of in vivo imaging of bioluminescent bacteria (IVIBB) for monitoring microbial dissemination within the host has been employed. Yersina pestis is a Gram-negative bacterium capable of causing bubonic, septicemic, and pneumonic plague. In this study, we compared the conventional counting of bacterial colony forming units (cfu) in the various infected tissues to IVIBB in monitoring Y. pestis dissemination in a mouse model of pneumonic plague. By using a transposon mutagenesis system harboring the luciferase (luc) gene, we screened approximately 4000 clones and obtained a fully virulent, luc-positive Y. pestis CO92 (Y. pestis-luc2) reporter strain in which transposition occurred within the largest pMT1 plasmid which possesses murine toxin and capsular antigen encoding genes. The aforementioned reporter strain and the wild-type CO92 exhibited similar growth curves, formed capsule based on immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, and had a similar LD50. Intranasal infection of mice with 15 LD50 of CO92-luc2 resulted in animal mortality by 72 h, and an increasing number of bioluminescent bacteria were observed in various mouse organs over a 24–72 h period when whole animals were imaged. However, following levofloxacin treatment (10 mg/kg/day) for 6 days 24 h post infection, no luminescence was observed after 72 h of infection, indicating that the tested antimicrobial killed bacteria preventing their detection in host peripheral tissues. Overall, we demonstrated that IVIBB is an effective and non-invasive way of monitoring bacterial dissemination in animals following pneumonic plague having strong correlation with cfu, and our reporter CO92-luc2 strain can be employed as a useful tool to monitor the efficacy of

  17. A non-invasive in vivo imaging system to study dissemination of bioluminescent Yersinia pestis CO92 in a mouse model of pneumonic plague.

    PubMed

    Sha, Jian; Rosenzweig, Jason A; Kirtley, Michelle L; van Lier, Christina J; Fitts, Eric C; Kozlova, Elena V; Erova, Tatiana E; Tiner, Bethany L; Chopra, Ashok K

    2013-02-01

    The gold standard in microbiology for monitoring bacterial dissemination in infected animals has always been viable plate counts. This method, despite being quantitative, requires sacrificing the infected animals. Recently, however, an alternative method of in vivo imaging of bioluminescent bacteria (IVIBB) for monitoring microbial dissemination within the host has been employed. Yersinia pestis is a Gram-negative bacterium capable of causing bubonic, septicemic, and pneumonic plague. In this study, we compared the conventional counting of bacterial colony forming units (cfu) in the various infected tissues to IVIBB in monitoring Y. pestis dissemination in a mouse model of pneumonic plague. By using a transposon mutagenesis system harboring the luciferase (luc) gene, we screened approximately 4000 clones and obtained a fully virulent, luc-positive Y. pestis CO92 (Y. pestis-luc2) reporter strain in which transposition occurred within the largest pMT1 plasmid which possesses murine toxin and capsular antigen encoding genes. The aforementioned reporter strain and the wild-type CO92 exhibited similar growth curves, formed capsule based on immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, and had a similar LD(50). Intranasal infection of mice with 15 LD(50) of CO92-luc2 resulted in animal mortality by 72 h, and an increasing number of bioluminescent bacteria were observed in various mouse organs over a 24-72 h period when whole animals were imaged. However, following levofloxacin treatment (10 mg/kg/day) for 6 days 24 h post infection, no luminescence was observed after 72 h of infection, indicating that the tested antimicrobial killed bacteria preventing their detection in host peripheral tissues. Overall, we demonstrated that IVIBB is an effective and non-invasive way of monitoring bacterial dissemination in animals following pneumonic plague having strong correlation with cfu, and our reporter CO92-luc2 strain can be employed as a useful tool to monitor the efficacy

  18. In vivo quantitative imaging of point-like bioluminescent and fluorescent sources: Validation studies in phantoms and small animals post mortem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comsa, Daria Craita

    2008-10-01

    There is a real need for improved small animal imaging techniques to enhance the development of therapies in which animal models of disease are used. Optical methods for imaging have been extensively studied in recent years, due to their high sensitivity and specificity. Methods like bioluminescence and fluorescence tomography report promising results for 3D reconstructions of source distributions in vivo. However, no standard methodology exists for optical tomography, and various groups are pursuing different approaches. In a number of studies on small animals, the bioluminescent or fluorescent sources can be reasonably approximated as point or line sources. Examples include images of bone metastases confined to the bone marrow. Starting with this premise, we propose a simpler, faster, and inexpensive technique to quantify optical images of point-like sources. The technique avoids the computational burden of a tomographic method by using planar images and a mathematical model based on diffusion theory. The model employs in situ optical properties estimated from video reflectometry measurements. Modeled and measured images are compared iteratively using a Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm to improve estimates of the depth and strength of the bioluminescent or fluorescent inclusion. The performance of the technique to quantify bioluminescence images was first evaluated on Monte Carlo simulated data. Simulated data also facilitated a methodical investigation of the effect of errors in tissue optical properties on the retrieved source depth and strength. It was found that, for example, an error of 4 % in the effective attenuation coefficient led to 4 % error in the retrieved depth for source depths of up to 12mm, while the error in the retrieved source strength increased from 5.5 % at 2mm depth, to 18 % at 12mm depth. Experiments conducted on images from homogeneous tissue-simulating phantoms showed that depths up to 10mm could be estimated within 8 %, and the relative

  19. [Expression of Photobacterium leiognathi bioluminescence system genes in Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Ptitsyn, L R; Fatova, M A; Stepanov, A I

    1990-02-01

    Expression of Photobacterium leiognathi bioluminescence genes under the control of lac, tac, tet promoters in Escherichia coli cells has been studied. The position of the genes for aliphatic aldehyde biosynthesis and for the synthesis of luciferase subunits was identified. The plasmid pBRPL1 has been constructed containing the system of bioluminescence genes devoid of promoter following the polylinker DNA fragment. The plasmid can be used for selection of promoter containing DNA sequences as well as for studying the promoters regulation in process of Escherichia coli cells growth.

  20. Aequorea victoria bioluminescence moves into an exciting new era.

    PubMed

    Kendall, J M; Badminton, M N

    1998-05-01

    Bioluminescence has revolutionized research into many cellular and molecular-biological processes, ranging from intracellular signalling to gene transcription. This article focuses on the chemistry and biotechnological exploitation of the two proteins involved in bioluminescence of the jellyfish Aequorea victoria--aequorin and green fluorescent protein. Engineered recombinant aequorin has led to a novel technological approach to monitoring calcium signals in organelles and subcellular domains. A new generation of intracellular calcium indicators has been produced in which engineered variants of green fluorescent protein are used to probe their ionic environment using intramolecular fluorescence-resonance-energy transfer.

  1. Registration of planar bioluminescence to magnetic resonance and x-ray computed tomography images as a platform for the development of bioluminescence tomography reconstruction algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beattie, Bradley J.; Klose, Alexander D.; Le, Carl H.; Longo, Valerie A.; Dobrenkov, Konstantine; Vider, Jelena; Koutcher, Jason A.; Blasberg, Ronald G.

    2009-03-01

    The procedures we propose make possible the mapping of two-dimensional (2-D) bioluminescence image (BLI) data onto a skin surface derived from a three-dimensional (3-D) anatomical modality [magnetic resonance (MR) or computed tomography (CT)] dataset. This mapping allows anatomical information to be incorporated into bioluminescence tomography (BLT) reconstruction procedures and, when applied using sources visible to both optical and anatomical modalities, can be used to evaluate the accuracy of those reconstructions. Our procedures, based on immobilization of the animal and a priori determined fixed projective transforms, should be more robust and accurate than previously described efforts, which rely on a poorly constrained retrospectively determined warping of the 3-D anatomical information. Experiments conducted to measure the accuracy of the proposed registration procedure found it to have a mean error of 0.36+/-0.23 mm. Additional experiments highlight some of the confounds that are often overlooked in the BLT reconstruction process, and for two of these confounds, simple corrections are proposed.

  2. Registration of planar bioluminescence to magnetic resonance and x-ray computed tomography images as a platform for the development of bioluminescence tomography reconstruction algorithms.

    PubMed

    Beattie, Bradley J; Klose, Alexander D; Le, Carl H; Longo, Valerie A; Dobrenkov, Konstantine; Vider, Jelena; Koutcher, Jason A; Blasberg, Ronald G

    2009-01-01

    The procedures we propose make possible the mapping of two-dimensional (2-D) bioluminescence image (BLI) data onto a skin surface derived from a three-dimensional (3-D) anatomical modality [magnetic resonance (MR) or computed tomography (CT)] dataset. This mapping allows anatomical information to be incorporated into bioluminescence tomography (BLT) reconstruction procedures and, when applied using sources visible to both optical and anatomical modalities, can be used to evaluate the accuracy of those reconstructions. Our procedures, based on immobilization of the animal and a priori determined fixed projective transforms, should be more robust and accurate than previously described efforts, which rely on a poorly constrained retrospectively determined warping of the 3-D anatomical information. Experiments conducted to measure the accuracy of the proposed registration procedure found it to have a mean error of 0.36+/-0.23 mm. Additional experiments highlight some of the confounds that are often overlooked in the BLT reconstruction process, and for two of these confounds, simple corrections are proposed.

  3. Fusion of Aequorea victoria GFP and aequorin provides their Ca(2+)-induced interaction that results in red shift of GFP absorption and efficient bioluminescence energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Gorokhovatsky, Andrey Yu; Marchenkov, Victor V; Rudenko, Natalia V; Ivashina, Tanya V; Ksenzenko, Vladimir N; Burkhardt, Nils; Semisotnov, Gennady V; Vinokurov, Leonid M; Alakhov, Yuli B

    2004-07-30

    The bioluminescence emitted by Aequorea victoria jellyfish is greenish while its single bioluminescent photoprotein aequorin emits blue light. This phenomenon may be explained by a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) from aequorin chromophore to green fluorescent protein (GFP) co-localized with it. However, a slight overlapping of the aequorin bioluminescence spectrum with the GFP absorption spectrum and the absence of marked interaction between these proteins in vitro pose a question on the mechanism providing the efficient BRET in A. victoria. Here we report the in vitro study of BRET between homologous Ca(2+)-activated photoproteins, aequorin or obelin (Obelia longissima), as bioluminescence energy donors, and GFP, as an acceptor. The fusions containing donor and acceptor proteins linked by a 19 aa peptide were purified after expressing their genes in Escherichia coli cells. It was shown that the GFP-aequorin fusion has a significantly greater BRET efficiency, compared to the GFP-obelin fusion. Two main factors responsible for the difference in BRET efficiency of these fusions were revealed. First, it is the presence of Ca(2+)-induced interaction between the donor and acceptor in the aequorin-containing fusion and the absence of the interaction in the obelin-containing fusion. Second, it is a red shift of GFP absorption toward better overlapping with aequorin bioluminescence induced by the interaction of aequorin with GFP. Since the connection of the two proteins in vitro mimics their proximity in vivo, Ca(2+)-induced interaction between aequorin and GFP may occur in A. victoria jellyfish providing efficient BRET in this organism.

  4. Toxicity assessment of Hanford Site wastes by bacterial bioluminescence. [Photobacter phosphoreum:a3

    SciTech Connect

    Rebagay, T.V.; Dodd, D.A.; Voogd, J.A.

    1991-09-01

    This paper examines the toxicity of the nonradioactive component of low-level wastes stored in tanks on the Hanford reservation. The use of a faster, cheaper bioassay to replace the 96 hour fish acute toxicity test is examined. The new bioassay is based on loss of bioluminescence of {und Photobacter phosphoreum} (commonly called Microtox) following exposure to toxic materials. This bioassay is calibrated and compares well to the standard fish acute toxicity test for characterization of Hanford Wastes. 4 refs., 11 figs., 11 tabs. (MHB)

  5. Catalog of data bases and reports

    SciTech Connect

    Burtis, M.D.

    1992-04-01

    The Catalog of Data Bases and Reports provides information about the many reports and other materials made available by the US Department of Energy's Global Change Research Program (GCRP). It is divided into six sections plus an author and a title index: (1) Research plans and budget summaries (2) technical reports; (3) workshops, proceedings, and reports; (4) other reports; (5) USDA reports on response of vegetation to carbon dioxide; and, (6) numeric data packages and computer model packages.

  6. Catalog of data bases and reports

    SciTech Connect

    Burtis, M.D.

    1992-04-01

    The Catalog of Data Bases and Reports provides information about the many reports and other materials made available by the US Department of Energy`s Global Change Research Program (GCRP). It is divided into six sections plus an author and a title index: (1) Research plans and budget summaries (2) technical reports; (3) workshops, proceedings, and reports; (4) other reports; (5) USDA reports on response of vegetation to carbon dioxide; and, (6) numeric data packages and computer model packages.

  7. Reporting guidelines for music-based interventions.

    PubMed

    Robb, Sheri L; Burns, Debra S; Carpenter, Janet S

    2011-03-01

    Music-based interventions are used to address a variety of problems experienced by individuals across the developmental lifespan (infants to elderly adults). In order to improve the transparency and specificity of reporting music-based interventions, a set of specific reporting guidelines is recommended. Recommendations pertain to seven different components of music-based interventions, including theory, content, delivery schedule, interventionist, treatment fidelity, setting, and unit of delivery. Recommendations are intended to support Consolidated Standards for Reporting Trials (CONSORT) and Transparent Reporting of Evaluations with Non-randomized Designs (TREND) statements for transparent reporting of interventions while taking into account the variety, complexity, and uniqueness of music-based interventions.

  8. Glioblastoma Therapy with Cytotoxic Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Optimized by Bioluminescence Imaging of Tumor and Therapeutic Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Alieva, Maria; Bagó, Juli R.; Aguilar, Elisabet; Soler-Botija, Carolina; Vila, Olaia F.; Molet, Joan; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Rubio, Nuria; Blanco, Jerónimo

    2012-01-01

    Genetically modified adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hAMSCs) with tumor homing capacity have been proposed for localized therapy of chemo- and radiotherapy resistant glioblastomas. We demonstrate an effective procedure to optimize glioblastoma therapy based on the use of genetically modified hAMSCs and in vivo non invasive monitoring of tumor and therapeutic cells. Glioblastoma U87 cells expressing Photinus pyralis luciferase (Pluc) were implanted in combination with hAMSCs expressing a trifunctional Renilla reniformis luciferase-red fluorescent protein-thymidine kinase reporter in the brains of SCID mice that were subsequently treated with ganciclovir (GCV). The resulting optimized therapy was effective and monitoring of tumor cells by bioluminescence imaging (BLI) showed that after 49 days GCV treatment reduced significantly the hAMSC treated tumors; by a factor of 104 relative to controls. Using a Pluc reporter regulated by an endothelial specific promoter and in vivo BLI to image hAMSC differentiation we gained insight on the therapeutic mechanism. Implanted hAMSCs homed to tumor vessels, where they differentiated to endothelial cells. We propose that the tumor killing efficiency of genetically modified hAMSCs results from their association with the tumor vascular system and should be useful vehicles to deliver localized therapy to glioblastoma surgical borders following tumor resection. PMID:22529983

  9. Comparisons of hybrid radiosity-diffusion model and diffusion equation for bioluminescence tomography in cavity cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xueli; Yang, Defu; Qu, Xiaochao; Hu, Hao; Liang, Jimin; Gao, Xinbo; Tian, Jie

    2012-06-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has been successfully applied to the detection and therapeutic evaluation of solid cancers. However, the existing BLT reconstruction algorithms are not accurate enough for cavity cancer detection because of neglecting the void problem. Motivated by the ability of the hybrid radiosity-diffusion model (HRDM) in describing the light propagation in cavity organs, an HRDM-based BLT reconstruction algorithm was provided for the specific problem of cavity cancer detection. HRDM has been applied to optical tomography but is limited to simple and regular geometries because of the complexity in coupling the boundary between the scattering and void region. In the provided algorithm, HRDM was first applied to three-dimensional complicated and irregular geometries and then employed as the forward light transport model to describe the bioluminescent light propagation in tissues. Combining HRDM with the sparse reconstruction strategy, the cavity cancer cells labeled with bioluminescent probes can be more accurately reconstructed. Compared with the diffusion equation based reconstruction algorithm, the essentiality and superiority of the HRDM-based algorithm were demonstrated with simulation, phantom and animal studies. An in vivo gastric cancer-bearing nude mouse experiment was conducted, whose results revealed the ability and feasibility of the HRDM-based algorithm in the biomedical application of gastric cancer detection.

  10. The mechanism of electronic excitation in the bacterial bioluminescent reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemtseva, E. V.; Kudryasheva, N. S.

    2007-01-01

    The current state of the problem of formation of the electron-excited product in the chemiluminescent reaction that underlies the bacterial luminescence is analysed. Various schemes of chemical transformations capable of producing a bacterial bioluminescence emitter are presented. The problem of excitation of secondary emitters is considered; two possible mechanisms of their excitation are analysed.

  11. Monitoring Bloom Dynamics of a Common Coastal Bioluminescent Ctenophore

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-30

    potential in the coastal zone environment. OBJECTIVES Blooms of bioluminescent jellyfish , especially of Mnemiopsis leidyi, are a common occurrence... jellyfish populations are done with net collections by hand at stations weekly, monthly, or seasonally. These time scales severely limit our knowledge...the collection of both biotic and abiotic data continuously. 5 IMPACT/APPLICATIONS As incidents of jellyfish blooms, especially Mnemiopsis

  12. Vision in lanternfish (Myctophidae): Adaptations for viewing bioluminescence in the deep-sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, J. R.; White, E. M.; Collins, M. A.; Partridge, J. C.; Douglas, R. H.

    2009-06-01

    The sensitivity hypothesis seeks to explain the correlation between the wavelength of visual pigment absorption maxima ( λmax) and habitat type in fish and other marine animals in terms of the maximisation of photoreceptor photon catch. In recent years its legitimacy has been called into question as studies have either not tested data against the output of a predictive model or are confounded by the wide phylogeny of species used. We have addressed these issues by focussing on the distribution of λmax values in one family of marine teleosts, the lanternfish (Myctophidae). Visual pigment extract spectrophotometry has shown that 54 myctophid species have a single pigment in their retinae with a λmax falling within the range 480-492 nm. A further 4 species contain two visual pigments in their retinae. The spectral distribution of these visual pigments seems relatively confined when compared to other mesopelagic fishes. Mathematical modelling based on the assumptions of the sensitivity hypothesis shows that, contrary to the belief that deep-sea fishes' visual pigments are shortwave shifted to maximise their sensitivity to downwelling sunlight, the visual pigments of myctophids instead seem better placed for the visualisation of bioluminescence. The predicted maximum visualisation distance of a blue/green bioluminescent point source by a myctophid was up to 30 m under ideal conditions. Two species ( Myctophum nitidulum and Bolinichthys longipes) have previously been shown to have longwave-shifted spectral sensitivities and we show that they could theoretically detect stomiid far-red bioluminescence from as far as ca. 7 m.

  13. Semi-automated Image Processing for Preclinical Bioluminescent Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Slavine, Nikolai V; McColl, Roderick W

    2015-01-01

    Objective Bioluminescent imaging is a valuable noninvasive technique for investigating tumor dynamics and specific biological molecular events in living animals to better understand the effects of human disease in animal models. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a strategy behind automated methods for bioluminescence image processing from the data acquisition to obtaining 3D images. Methods In order to optimize this procedure a semi-automated image processing approach with multi-modality image handling environment was developed. To identify a bioluminescent source location and strength we used the light flux detected on the surface of the imaged object by CCD cameras. For phantom calibration tests and object surface reconstruction we used MLEM algorithm. For internal bioluminescent sources we used the diffusion approximation with balancing the internal and external intensities on the boundary of the media and then determined an initial order approximation for the photon fluence we subsequently applied a novel iterative deconvolution method to obtain the final reconstruction result. Results We find that the reconstruction techniques successfully used the depth-dependent light transport approach and semi-automated image processing to provide a realistic 3D model of the lung tumor. Our image processing software can optimize and decrease the time of the volumetric imaging and quantitative assessment. Conclusion The data obtained from light phantom and lung mouse tumor images demonstrate the utility of the image reconstruction algorithms and semi-automated approach for bioluminescent image processing procedure. We suggest that the developed image processing approach can be applied to preclinical imaging studies: characteristics of tumor growth, identify metastases, and potentially determine the effectiveness of cancer treatment. PMID:26618187

  14. Novel rat tail discitis model using bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Bostian, Phillip A; Karnes, Jonathan M; Cui, Shari; Robinson, Lisa J; Daffner, Scott D; Witt, Michelle R; Emery, Sanford E

    2016-12-05

    Management of spondylodiscitis is a challenging clinical problem requiring medical and surgical treatment strategies. The purpose of this study was to establish a rat model of spondylodiscitis that utilizes bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), thus permitting in vivo surveillance of infection intensity. Inocula of the bioluminescent S. aureus strain XEN36 were created in concentrations of 10(2) CFU/0.1 ml, 10(4)  CFU/0.1 ml, and 10(6)  CFU/0.1 ml. Three groups of rats were injected with the bacteria in the most proximal intervertebral tail segment. The third most proximal tail segment was injected with saline as a control. Bioluminescence was measured at baseline, 3 days, and weekly for a total of 6 weeks. Detected bioluminescence for each group peaked at day 3 and returned to baseline in 21 days. The average intensity was highest for the experimental group injected with the most concentrated bacterial solution (10(6)  CFU/0.1 ml). Radiographic analysis revealed loss of intervertebral disc space and evidence of osseous bridging. Saline-injected spaces exhibited no decrease in intervertebral spacing as compared to distal sites. Histologic analysis revealed neutrophilic infiltrates, destruction of the annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus, destruction of vertebral endplates, and osseous bridging. Saline-injected discs exhibited preserved annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus on histology. This study demonstrates that injection of bioluminescent S. aureus into the intervertebral disc of a rat tail is a viable animal model for spondylodiscitis research. This model allows for real-time, in vivo quantification of infection intensity, which may decrease the number of animals required for infection studies of the intervertebral disc. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.

  15. Reporting Guidelines for Music-based Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Robb, Sheri L.; Burns, Debra S.; Carpenter, Janet S.

    2013-01-01

    Music-based interventions are used to address a variety of problems experienced by individuals across the developmental lifespan (infants to elderly adults). In order to improve the transparency and specificity of reporting music-based interventions, a set of specific reporting guidelines is recommended. Recommendations pertain to reporting seven different components of music-based interventions including intervention theory, intervention content, intervention delivery schedule, interventionist, treatment fidelity, setting, and unit of delivery. Recommendations are intended to support CONSORT and TREND statements for transparent reporting of interventions while taking into account the variety, complexity, and uniqueness of music-based interventions. PMID:23646227

  16. Reporting Guidelines for Music-based Interventions.

    PubMed

    Robb, Sheri L; Burns, Debra S; Carpenter, Janet S

    2011-10-01

    Music-based interventions are used to address a variety of problems experienced by individuals across the developmental lifespan (infants to elderly adults). In order to improve the transparency and specificity of reporting music-based interventions, a set of specific reporting guidelines is recommended. Recommendations pertain to reporting seven different components of music-based interventions including intervention theory, intervention content, intervention delivery schedule, interventionist, treatment fidelity, setting, and unit of delivery. Recommendations are intended to support CONSORT and TREND statements for transparent reporting of interventions while taking into account the variety, complexity, and uniqueness of music-based interventions.

  17. Quantitative measurement of cell membrane receptor internalization by the nanoluciferase reporter: Using the G protein-coupled receptor RXFP3 as a model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Song, Ge; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Ya-Li; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2015-02-01

    Nanoluciferase (NanoLuc) is a newly developed small luciferase reporter with the brightest bioluminescence to date. In the present work, we developed NanoLuc as a sensitive bioluminescent reporter to measure quantitatively the internalization of cell membrane receptors, based on the pH dependence of the reporter activity. The G protein-coupled receptor RXFP3, the cognate receptor of relaxin-3/INSL7, was used as a model receptor. We first generated stable HEK293T cells that inducibly coexpressed a C-terminally NanoLuc-tagged human RXFP3 and a C-terminally enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged human RXFP3. The C-terminal EGFP-tag and NanoLuc-tag had no detrimental effects on the ligand-binding potency and intracellular trafficking of RXFP3. Based on the fluorescence of the tagged EGFP reporter, the ligand-induced RXFP3 internalization was visualized directly under a fluorescence microscope. Based on the bioluminescence of the tagged NanoLuc reporter, the ligand-induced RXFP3 internalization was measured quantitatively by a convenient bioluminescent assay. Coexpression of an EGFP-tagged inactive [E141R]RXFP3 had no detrimental effect on the ligand-binding potency and ligand-induced internalization of the NanoLuc-tagged wild-type RXFP3, suggesting that the mutant RXFP3 and wild-type RXFP3 worked independently. The present bioluminescent internalization assay could be extended to other G protein-coupled receptors and other cell membrane receptors to study ligand-receptor and receptor-receptor interactions.

  18. Influence of antibiotic pressure on bacterial bioluminescence, with emphasis on Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Daghighi, Seyedmojtaba; Sjollema, Jelmer; Harapanahalli, Akshay; Dijkstra, Rene J B; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2015-12-01

    Bioluminescence imaging is used for longitudinal evaluation of bacteria in live animals. Clear relations exist between bacterial numbers and their bioluminescence. However, bioluminescence images of Staphylococcus aureus Xen29, S. aureus Xen36 and Escherichia coli Xen14 grown on tryptone soy agar in Etests demonstrated increased bioluminescence at sub-MICs of different antibiotics. This study aimed to further evaluate the influence of antibiotic pressure on bioluminescence in S. aureus Xen29. Bioluminescence of S. aureus Xen29, grown planktonically in tryptone soy broth, was quantified in the absence and presence of different concentrations of vancomycin, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin or chloramphenicol and was related to expression of the luxA gene under antibiotic pressure measured using real-time PCR. In the absence of antibiotics, staphylococcal bioluminescence increased over time until a maximum after ca. 6h of growth, and subsequently decreased to the detection threshold after 24h of growth owing to reduced bacterial metabolic activity. Up to MICs of the antibiotics, bioluminescence increased according to a similar pattern up to 6h of growth, but after 24h bioluminescence was higher than in the absence of antibiotics. Contrary to expectations, bioluminescence per organism (CFU) after different growth periods in the absence and at MICs of different antibiotics decreased with increasing expression of luxA. Summarising, antibiotic pressure impacts the relation between CFU and bioluminescence. Under antibiotic pressure, bioluminescence is not controlled by luxA expression but by co-factors impacting the bacterial metabolic activity. This conclusion is of utmost importance when evaluating antibiotic efficacy in live animals using bioluminescent bacterial strains.

  19. Application of bioluminescence ATP measurement for evaluation of fungal viability of foxing spots on old documents.

    PubMed

    Rakotonirainy, Malalanirina Sylvia; Dubar, Pauline

    2013-01-01

    An adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence-based protocol was tested to assess the viability of fungal species in old documents damaged by foxing. Foxing appears as scattered yellow brownish-red stains, damaging the aesthetics of documents and their long-term readability. In the field of cultural heritage conservation, the debate over the mechanism of foxing is ongoing. Previous studies found evidence of mold-like structures in some coloured areas; however, many species have not yet been identified and their role in the phenomenon is not understood. To better understand their involvement in this type of paper decay, we focused our attention first on their viability. We demonstrated the reliability and sensitivity of the ATP bioluminescence assay compared with conventional methods based on cultivation, which has rarely given rise to in vitro growth from foxed papers. From nine books dating back from the 19th and 20th centuries, the mean ATP amount of foxed spots ranged from 0.29 to 3.63 ng/cm(2), suggesting the presence of strains inside the brownish spots and providing evidence of their viability. Outside the spots, ATP content was considered negligible, with a mean ATP amount of 0 to 0.03 ng/cm(2). ATP assay appears to be a useful and robust method for the detection and quantification of viable elements in foxing spots.

  20. A rapid bioluminescence assay for measuring myeloperoxidase activity in human plasma

    PubMed Central

    Goiffon, Reece J.; Martinez, Sara C.; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2015-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a circulating cardiovascular disease (CVD) biomarker used to estimate clinical risk and patient prognosis. Current enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for MPO concentration are costly and time-intensive. Here we report a novel bioluminescence assay, designated MPO activity on a polymer surface (MAPS), for measuring MPO activity in human plasma samples using the bioluminescent substrate L-012. The method delivers a result in under an hour and is resistant to confounding effects from endogenous MPO inhibitors. In a pilot clinical study, we compared MAPS and two clinical ELISAs using 72 plasma samples from cardiac catheterization patients. Results from parallel MAPS and ELISAs were concordant within 2±11 μg l−1 MPO with similar uncertainty and reproducibility. Results between parallel MAPS and ELISA were in better agreement than those between independent ELISAs. MAPS may provide an inexpensive and rapid assay for determining MPO activity in plasma samples from patients with CVD or potentially other immune and inflammatory disorders. PMID:25666092

  1. Nanoluciferase signal brightness using furimazine substrates opens bioluminescence resonance energy transfer to widefield microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiho; Grailhe, Regis

    2016-08-01

    Fluorescence and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (FRET, BRET) techniques are powerful tools for studying protein-protein interactions in cellular assays. In contrast to fluorescent proteins, chemiluminescent proteins do not require excitation light, known to trigger autofluorescence, phototoxicity, and photobleaching. Regrettably, low signal intensity of luciferase systems restricts their usage as they require specialized microscopes equipped with ultra low-light imaging cameras. In this study, we report that bioluminescence quantification in living cells using a standard widefield automated microscope dedicated to screening and high content analysis is possible with the newer luciferase systems, Nanoluciferase (Nluc). With such equipment, we showed that robust intramolecular BRET can be measured using a combination of Nluc and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Using the human Superoxide Dismutase 1 (SOD1) dimer model, we next validated that intermolecular BRET could be quantified at a single cell level. The enhanced signal brightness of Nluc enabling BRET imaging to widefield microscopy shows strong potential to open up single cell protein-protein interactions studies to a wider audience. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  2. Real-time imaging and quantification of bioluminescent bacteria in root canals in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sedgley, Christine; Applegate, Bruce; Nagel, Aaron; Hall, Dan

    2004-12-01

    The detection of microorganisms in root canals is generally limited to qualitative or semiquantitative methods. We describe a new and nondestructive in vitro method to quantify root-canal bacteria over sequential treatment procedures using real-time imaging in conjunction with the bioluminescent reporter strain Pseudomonas fluorescens 5RL. Induced bacterial photon emission can be monitored by sensitive optical photonic imaging and luminometry, providing images as well as spatial and quantitative measurements. Bioluminescence imaging and luminometry determined that the lower limit of detection of bacteria in root canals occurred between 2 x 10(2) and 2 x 10(3) cells, with high correlation between cell counts and detection devices (r > or = 0.981). A preliminary study assessed the efficacy of sequential irrigation procedures to remove 5 x 10(6) bacteria from root canals (n = 5; apical size 60) using a 28-gauge, endodontic needle positioned 1 mm from working length; 9.2% +/- 3.1% and 8% +/- 3.6% of bacteria remained after 3 and 6 ml irrigation, respectively (p = 0.03), corresponding to approximately 4 x 10(5) bacteria remaining after 6 ml. This method can be used to study the efficacy of sequential endodontic treatment procedures in removing bacteria from root canals.

  3. Identification of a vacuolar proton channel that triggers the bioluminescent flash in dinoflagellates

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Juan D.; Haq, Saddef; Bachvaroff, Tsvetan; Nowak, Kristine F.; Nowak, Scott J.; Morgan, Deri; Cherny, Vladimir V.; Sapp, Maredith M.; Bernstein, Steven; Bolt, Andrew; DeCoursey, Thomas E.; Place, Allen R.; Smith, Susan M. E.

    2017-01-01

    In 1972, J. Woodland Hastings and colleagues predicted the existence of a proton selective channel (HV1) that opens in response to depolarizing voltage across the vacuole membrane of bioluminescent dinoflagellates and conducts protons into specialized luminescence compartments (scintillons), thereby causing a pH drop that triggers light emission. HV1 channels were subsequently identified and demonstrated to have important functions in a multitude of eukaryotic cells. Here we report a predicted protein from Lingulodinium polyedrum that displays hallmark properties of bona fide HV1, including time-dependent opening with depolarization, perfect proton selectivity, and characteristic ΔpH dependent gating. Western blotting and fluorescence confocal microscopy of isolated L. polyedrum scintillons immunostained with antibody to LpHV1 confirm LpHV1’s predicted organellar location. Proteomics analysis demonstrates that isolated scintillon preparations contain peptides that map to LpHV1. Finally, Zn2+ inhibits both LpHV1 proton current and the acid-induced flash in isolated scintillons. These results implicate LpHV1 as the voltage gated proton channel that triggers bioluminescence in L. polyedrum, confirming Hastings’ hypothesis. The same channel likely mediates the action potential that communicates the signal along the tonoplast to the scintillon. PMID:28178296

  4. Identification of a vacuolar proton channel that triggers the bioluminescent flash in dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Juan D; Haq, Saddef; Bachvaroff, Tsvetan; Nowak, Kristine F; Nowak, Scott J; Morgan, Deri; Cherny, Vladimir V; Sapp, Maredith M; Bernstein, Steven; Bolt, Andrew; DeCoursey, Thomas E; Place, Allen R; Smith, Susan M E

    2017-01-01

    In 1972, J. Woodland Hastings and colleagues predicted the existence of a proton selective channel (HV1) that opens in response to depolarizing voltage across the vacuole membrane of bioluminescent dinoflagellates and conducts protons into specialized luminescence compartments (scintillons), thereby causing a pH drop that triggers light emission. HV1 channels were subsequently identified and demonstrated to have important functions in a multitude of eukaryotic cells. Here we report a predicted protein from Lingulodinium polyedrum that displays hallmark properties of bona fide HV1, including time-dependent opening with depolarization, perfect proton selectivity, and characteristic ΔpH dependent gating. Western blotting and fluorescence confocal microscopy of isolated L. polyedrum scintillons immunostained with antibody to LpHV1 confirm LpHV1's predicted organellar location. Proteomics analysis demonstrates that isolated scintillon preparations contain peptides that map to LpHV1. Finally, Zn2+ inhibits both LpHV1 proton current and the acid-induced flash in isolated scintillons. These results implicate LpHV1 as the voltage gated proton channel that triggers bioluminescence in L. polyedrum, confirming Hastings' hypothesis. The same channel likely mediates the action potential that communicates the signal along the tonoplast to the scintillon.

  5. Monitoring and quantitative assessment of tumor burden using in vivo bioluminescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chia-Chi; Hwang, Jeng-Jong; Ting, Gann; Tseng, Yun-Long; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Whang-Peng, Jaqueline

    2007-02-01

    In vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is a sensitive imaging modality that is rapid and accessible, and may comprise an ideal tool for evaluating tumor growth. In this study, the kinetic of tumor growth has been assessed in C26 colon carcinoma bearing BALB/c mouse model. The ability of BLI to noninvasively quantitate the growth of subcutaneous tumors transplanted with C26 cells genetically engineered to stably express firefly luciferase and herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (C26/ tk-luc). A good correlation ( R2=0.998) of photon emission to the cell number was found in vitro. Tumor burden and tumor volume were monitored in vivo over time by quantitation of photon emission using Xenogen IVIS 50 and standard external caliper measurement, respectively. At various time intervals, tumor-bearing mice were imaged to determine the correlation of in vivo BLI to tumor volume. However, a correlation of BLI to tumor volume was observed when tumor volume was smaller than 1000 mm 3 ( R2=0.907). γ Scintigraphy combined with [ 131I]FIAU was another imaging modality used for verifying the previous results. In conclusion, this study showed that bioluminescence imaging is a powerful and quantitative tool for the direct assay to monitor tumor growth in vivo. The dual reporter genes transfected tumor-bearing animal model can be applied in the evaluation of the efficacy of new developed anti-cancer drugs.

  6. Evaluation of biolistic gene transfer methods in vivo using non-invasive bioluminescent imaging techniques

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gene therapy continues to hold great potential for treating many different types of disease and dysfunction. Safe and efficient techniques for gene transfer and expression in vivo are needed to enable gene therapeutic strategies to be effective in patients. Currently, the most commonly used methods employ replication-defective viral vectors for gene transfer, while physical gene transfer methods such as biolistic-mediated ("gene-gun") delivery to target tissues have not been as extensively explored. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of biolistic gene transfer techniques in vivo using non-invasive bioluminescent imaging (BLI) methods. Results Plasmid DNA carrying the firefly luciferase (LUC) reporter gene under the control of the human Cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter/enhancer was transfected into mouse skin and liver using biolistic methods. The plasmids were coupled to gold microspheres (1 μm diameter) using different DNA Loading Ratios (DLRs), and "shot" into target tissues using a helium-driven gene gun. The optimal DLR was found to be in the range of 4-10. Bioluminescence was measured using an In Vivo Imaging System (IVIS-50) at various time-points following transfer. Biolistic gene transfer to mouse skin produced peak reporter gene expression one day after transfer. Expression remained detectable through four days, but declined to undetectable levels by six days following gene transfer. Maximum depth of tissue penetration following biolistic transfer to abdominal skin was 200-300 μm. Similarly, biolistic gene transfer to mouse liver in vivo also produced peak early expression followed by a decline over time. In contrast to skin, however, liver expression of the reporter gene was relatively stable 4-8 days post-biolistic gene transfer, and remained detectable for nearly two weeks. Conclusions The use of bioluminescence imaging techniques enabled efficient evaluation of reporter gene expression in vivo. Our results demonstrate that

  7. Optimisations and Challenges Involved in the Creation of Various Bioluminescent and Fluorescent Influenza A Virus Strains for In Vitro and In Vivo Applications.

    PubMed

    Spronken, Monique I; Short, Kirsty R; Herfst, Sander; Bestebroer, Theo M; Vaes, Vincent P; van der Hoeven, Barbara; Koster, Abraham J; Kremers, Gert-Jan; Scott, Dana P; Gultyaev, Alexander P; Sorell, Erin M; de Graaf, Miranda; Bárcena, Montserrat; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Fouchier, Ron A

    2015-01-01

    Bioluminescent and fluorescent influenza A viruses offer new opportunities to study influenza virus replication, tropism and pathogenesis. To date, several influenza A reporter viruses have been described. These strategies typically focused on a single reporter gene (either bioluminescent or fluorescent) in a single virus backbone. However, whilst bioluminescence is suited to in vivo imaging, fluorescent viruses are more appropriate for microscopy. Therefore, the idea l reporter virus varies depending on the experiment in question, and it is important that any reporter virus strategy can be adapted accordingly. Herein, a strategy was developed to create five different reporter viruses in a single virus backbone. Specifically, enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), far-red fluorescent protein (fRFP), near-infrared fluorescent protein (iRFP), Gaussia luciferase (gLUC) and firefly luciferase (fLUC) were inserted into the PA gene segment of A/PR/8/34 (H1N1). This study provides a comprehensive characterisation of the effects of different reporter genes on influenza virus replication and reporter activity. In vivo reporter gene expression, in lung tissues, was only detected for eGFP, fRFP and gLUC expressing viruses. In vitro, the eGFP-expressing virus displayed the best reporter stability and could be used for correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM). This strategy was then used to create eGFP-expressing viruses consisting entirely of pandemic H1N1, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 and H7N9. The HPAI H5N1 eGFP-expressing virus infected mice and reporter gene expression was detected, in lung tissues, in vivo. Thus, this study provides new tools and insights for the creation of bioluminescent and fluorescent influenza A reporter viruses.

  8. Optimisations and Challenges Involved in the Creation of Various Bioluminescent and Fluorescent Influenza A Virus Strains for In Vitro and In Vivo Applications

    PubMed Central

    Herfst, Sander; Bestebroer, Theo M.; Vaes, Vincent P.; van der Hoeven, Barbara; Koster, Abraham J.; Kremers, Gert-Jan; Scott, Dana P.; Gultyaev, Alexander P.; Sorell, Erin M.; de Graaf, Miranda; Bárcena, Montserrat; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.; Fouchier, Ron A.

    2015-01-01

    Bioluminescent and fluorescent influenza A viruses offer new opportunities to study influenza virus replication, tropism and pathogenesis. To date, several influenza A reporter viruses have been described. These strategies typically focused on a single reporter gene (either bioluminescent or fluorescent) in a single virus backbone. However, whilst bioluminescence is suited to in vivo imaging, fluorescent viruses are more appropriate for microscopy. Therefore, the idea l reporter virus varies depending on the experiment in question, and it is important that any reporter virus strategy can be adapted accordingly. Herein, a strategy was developed to create five different reporter viruses in a single virus backbone. Specifically, enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), far-red fluorescent protein (fRFP), near-infrared fluorescent protein (iRFP), Gaussia luciferase (gLUC) and firefly luciferase (fLUC) were inserted into the PA gene segment of A/PR/8/34 (H1N1). This study provides a comprehensive characterisation of the effects of different reporter genes on influenza virus replication and reporter activity. In vivo reporter gene expression, in lung tissues, was only detected for eGFP, fRFP and gLUC expressing viruses. In vitro, the eGFP-expressing virus displayed the best reporter stability and could be used for correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM). This strategy was then used to create eGFP-expressing viruses consisting entirely of pandemic H1N1, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 and H7N9. The HPAI H5N1 eGFP-expressing virus infected mice and reporter gene expression was detected, in lung tissues, in vivo. Thus, this study provides new tools and insights for the creation of bioluminescent and fluorescent influenza A reporter viruses. PMID:26241861

  9. Modelling dinoflagellates as an approach to the seasonal forecasting of bioluminescence in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcinko, Charlotte L. J.; Martin, Adrian P.; Allen, John T.

    2014-11-01

    Bioluminescence within ocean surface waters is of significant interest because it can enhance the study of subsurface movement and organisms. Little is known about how bioluminescence potential (BPOT) varies spatially and temporally in the open ocean. However, light emitted from dinoflagellates often dominates the stimulated bioluminescence field. As a first step towards forecasting surface ocean bioluminescence in the open ocean, a simple ecological model is developed which simulates seasonal changes in dinoflagellate abundance. How forecasting seasonal changes in BPOT may be achieved through combining such a model with relationships derived from observations is discussed and an example is given. The study illustrates a potential new approach to forecasting BPOT through explicitly modelling the population dynamics of a prolific bioluminescent phylum. The model developed here offers a promising platform for the future operational forecasting of the broad temporal changes in bioluminescence within the North Atlantic. Such forecasting of seasonal patterns could provide valuable information for the targeting of scientific field campaigns.

  10. Activity of upper electron-excited states in bioluminescence of coelenterates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belogurova, N. V.; Alieva, R. R.; Kudryasheva, N. S.

    2009-04-01

    The involvement of upper electron-excited states as the primary excited states into bioluminescence of coelenterates was experimentally verified. A series of fluorescent molecules was used as foreign energy acceptors in this bioluminescent reaction. The fluorescent aromatic compounds - pyrene, 2-methoxy-naphtalene, naphthalene, and 1,4-diphenylbutadiene - were selected, with fluorescent state energies ranging from 26,700 to 32,500 cm -1. Excitation of these molecules by Forster singlet-singlet energy transfer from S of bioluminescence emitter and by light absorption were excluded. The weak sensitized fluorescence of three compounds was found in the course of bioluminescent reaction. Energy of the upper electron-excited states of the bioluminescent emitter was located around 31,000 cm -1. Localization of the primary excitation on a carbonyl group of coelenteramide molecule is discussed. Comparison of the primary excitation in bioluminescent processes of coelenterates and bacteria is provided.

  11. Determination of acute Zn toxicity in pore water from soils previously treated with sewage sludge using bioluminescence assays

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudri, A.M.; Knight, B.P.; Barbosa-Jefferson, V.L.

    1999-06-01

    The effects of increasing concentrations of Zn and Cu in soil pore water from soils of a long-term sewage sludge field experiment on microbial bioluminescence were investigated. Concentrations of total soluble Zn, free Zn{sup 2+}, and soluble Cu increased sharply in soil pore water with increasing total soil metal concentrations above 140 mg of Zn kg{sup {minus}1} or 100 mg of Cu kg{sup {minus}1}. Two luminescence bioassays were tested, based on two bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens) with the lux genes encoding bacterial luminescence inserted into them. The bioluminescence response of the two microorganisms declined as total soil Zn, soil pore water soluble Zn, and soil pore water free Zn{sup 2+} concentrations increased. The EC{sub 25} values for E. coli and P. fluorescens were 1.3 {+-} 0.2 and 4.3 {+-} 0.5 mg L{sup {minus}1} on a free Zn{sup 2+} basis, respectively. The EC{sub 50} values were 2.5 {+-} 0.2 and 9.6 {+-} 0.9 mg of free Zn{sup 2+} L{sup {minus}1}, respectively. Copper had no significant effect on bioluminescence in the two assays, even at the largest soil pore water concentration of about 620 {micro}g L{sup {minus}1}, corresponding to a total Cu concentration in bulk soil of about 350 mg kg{sup {minus}1}. Thus, the decline in bioluminescence of the two assays was ascribed to increasing soil pore water free Zn{sup 2+} and not soluble Cu.

  12. Determination of spatial and temporal colonization of enteropathogenic E. coli and enterohemorrhagic E. coli in mice using bioluminescent in vivo imaging.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Ki-Jong; Cheng, Hao; Harris, Antoneicka; Morin, Cara; Kaper, James B; Hecht, Gail

    2011-01-01

    Infectious diarrhea is a major contributor of child morbidity and mortality in developing nations. Murine models to study the pathogenesis of infectious diarrhea caused by organisms such as enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) are not fully characterized. More emphasis has been placed on infection of mice with the murine specific pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. While these three organisms are genetically related they are not identical. Our goal was to better characterize the murine model of EPEC and EHEC infection by using bioluminescent bacteria to determine temporal and spatial colonization of these two human pathogens. EPEC and EHEC were transformed with a bacterial luciferase expression plasmid containing the constitutive OmpC promoter. C57BL/6 mice were orally inoculated with bioluminescent EPEC or EHEC and bacterial localization in the intestine was monitored ex vivo and in vivo by IVIS. At 3 days after infection, EPEC, EHEC and Citrobacter rodentium were all localized in the cecum and colon. EPEC colonization peaked at day 2-3 and was undetectable by day 7. The bioluminescent EPEC adheres to the cecum and colon of the mouse intestine. However, when EPEC infected mice were administered xylazine/ketamine for in vivo live imaging, the EPEC persisted at high densities for up to 31 days. This is the first report of a bioluminescent imaging of luciferase expressing EPEC in a mouse model.

  13. Real-time monitoring of bioaerosols via cell-lysis by air ion and ATP bioluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Park, Chul Woo; Park, Ji-Woon; Lee, Sung Hwa; Hwang, Jungho

    2014-02-15

    In this study, we introduce a methodology for disrupting cell membranes with air ions coupled with ATP bioluminescence detection for real-time monitoring of bioaerosol concentrations. A carbon fiber ionizer was used to extract ATP from bacterial cells for generating ATP bioluminescence. Our methodology was tested using Staphylococcus epidermidis and Escherichia coli, which were aerosolized with an atomizer, and then indoor bioaerosols were also used for testing the methodology. Bioaerosol concentrations were estimated without culturing which requires several days for colony formation. Correlation equations were obtained for results acquired using our methodology (Relative Luminescent Unit (RLU)/m(3)) and a culture-based (Colony Forming Unit (CFU)/m(3)) method; CFU/m(3)=1.8 × measured RLU/m(3) for S. epidermidis and E. coli, and CFU/m(3)=1.1 × measured RLU/m(3) for indoor bioaerosols under the experimental conditions. Our methodology is an affordable solution for rapidly monitoring bioaerosols due to rapid detection time (cell-lysis time: 3 min; bioluminescence detection time: <1 min) and easy operation.

  14. Efficacy of Lantibiotic Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Skin Infections, Monitored by In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Heunis, Tiaan; Smith, Carine; Deane, Shelly

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a bacterial pathogen responsible for the majority of skin and soft tissue infections. Antibiotics are losing their efficacy as treatment for skin and soft tissue infections as a result of increased resistance in a variety of pathogens, including S. aureus. It is thus imperative to explore alternative antimicrobial treatments to ensure future treatment options for skin and soft tissue infections. A select few lantibiotics, a group of natural defense peptides produced by bacteria, inhibit the growth of numerous clinical S. aureus isolates, including methicillin-resistant strains. In this study, the antimicrobial activities of nisin, clausin, and amyloliquecidin, separately administered, were compared to that of a mupirocin-based ointment, which is commonly used as treatment for S. aureus-induced skin infections. Full-thickness excisional wounds, generated on the dorsal surfaces of mice, were infected with a bioluminescent strain of S. aureus (strain Xen 36). The infections were monitored in real time using in vivo bioluminescent imaging. Lantibiotic treatments significantly reduced the bioluminescence of S. aureus Xen 36 to a level similar to that recorded with mupirocin treatment. Wound closure, however, was more pronounced during lantibiotic treatment. Lantibiotics thus have the potential to be used as an alternative treatment option for S. aureus-induced skin infections. PMID:27067340

  15. Efficacy of Lantibiotic Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Skin Infections, Monitored by In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging.

    PubMed

    van Staden, Anton Du Preez; Heunis, Tiaan; Smith, Carine; Deane, Shelly; Dicks, Leon M T

    2016-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a bacterial pathogen responsible for the majority of skin and soft tissue infections. Antibiotics are losing their efficacy as treatment for skin and soft tissue infections as a result of increased resistance in a variety of pathogens, including S. aureus It is thus imperative to explore alternative antimicrobial treatments to ensure future treatment options for skin and soft tissue infections. A select few lantibiotics, a group of natural defense peptides produced by bacteria, inhibit the growth of numerous clinical S. aureus isolates, including methicillin-resistant strains. In this study, the antimicrobial activities of nisin, clausin, and amyloliquecidin, separately administered, were compared to that of a mupirocin-based ointment, which is commonly used as treatment for S. aureus-induced skin infections. Full-thickness excisional wounds, generated on the dorsal surfaces of mice, were infected with a bioluminescent strain of S. aureus (strain Xen 36). The infections were monitored in real time using in vivo bioluminescent imaging. Lantibiotic treatments significantly reduced the bioluminescence of S. aureus Xen 36 to a level similar to that recorded with mupirocin treatment. Wound closure, however, was more pronounced during lantibiotic treatment. Lantibiotics thus have the potential to be used as an alternative treatment option for S. aureus-induced skin infections.

  16. Impact of Anesthesia Protocols on In Vivo Bioluminescent Bacteria Imaging Results.

    PubMed

    Chuzel, Thomas; Sanchez, Violette; Vandamme, Marc; Martin, Stéphane; Flety, Odile; Pager, Aurélie; Chabanel, Christophe; Magnier, Luc; Foskolos, Marie; Petit, Océane; Rokbi, Bachra; Chereul, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Infectious murine models greatly benefit from optical imaging using bioluminescent bacteria to non-invasively and repeatedly follow in vivo bacterial infection. In this context, one of the most critical parameters is the bioluminescence sensitivity to reliably detect the smallest number of bacteria. Another critical point is the anesthetic approaches that have been demonstrated to impact the bioluminescence flux emission in studies with luciferase-transfected tumor cells. However, this impact has never been assessed on bacteria bioluminescent models. To this end, we investigated the effects of four anesthesia protocols on the bioluminescence flux in a central venous catheter murine model (SKH1-hr(hr) mice) infected by a bioluminescent S. aureus Xen36 strain. Bioluminescence imaging was performed on mice anesthetized by either ketamine/xylazine (with or without oxygen supplementation), or isoflurane carried with air or oxygen. Total flux emission was determined in vivo daily for 3 days and ex vivo at the end of the study together with a CFU counting of the biofilm in the catheter. Bioluminescence flux differences appear between the different anesthetic protocols. Using a ketamine/xylazine anesthesia (with air), bacteria detection was impossible since the bioluminescence signal remains in the background signal. Mice anesthetized with isoflurane and oxygen led to a signal significantly higher to the background all along the kinetics. The use of isoflurane in air presents a bioluminescence signal similar to the use of ketamine/xylazine with oxygen. These data highlight the importance of oxygen to improve bioluminescence flux by bacteria with isoflurane as well as with ketamine/xylazine anesthetics. As a conclusion, we recommend the use of isoflurane anesthetic with oxygen to increase the bioluminescence sensitivity in this kind of study.

  17. The reaction process of firefly bioluminescence triggered by photolysis of caged-ATP.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Takeshi; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Sekiya, Takao; Ohno, Shin-Ya; Wada, Naohisa

    2011-01-01

    The reaction process of firefly bioluminescence was studied by photolyzing caged-ATP to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) within 100 ms. The intensity of luminescence increases markedly to reach a maximum within 1 s, maintains almost the same intensity up to 5 s and then decays monotonically. The rise γ(1) and decay γ(2) rate constants were determined to be about 5 s(-1) and 1 × 10(-2) s(-1), respectively, so as to phenomenologically fit the time course. A second luminescence peak appears after around 350 s. The dependence of the rate constants on the concentrations of reactants and a viscous reagent revealed that two kinds of reaction contribute the observed time course: (1) an intrinsic reaction by ATP photolyzed from caged-ATP that is already trapped in luciferase; and (2) a diffusion-controlled reaction by free ATP in the buffer solution outside luciferase. Numerical analysis based on reaction kinetics related γ(1) and γ(2) to the rate constants of a three-step reaction model, and accurately described the effects of concentration of reactants and a viscous reagent on the time courses of bioluminescence. Thus, it has been clearly concluded that the binding mode of caged-ATP at the catalytic center of luciferase is very different from that of ATP.

  18. Toxicological study of pesticides in air and precipitations of Paris by means of a bioluminescence method.

    PubMed

    Trajkovska, S; Mbaye, M; Gaye Seye, M D; Aaron, J J; Chevreuil, M; Blanchoud, H

    2009-06-01

    A detailed toxicological study on several pesticides, including chlorothalonil, cyprodynil, dichlobénil, pendimethaline, trifluraline, and alpha-endosulfan, present at trace levels in air and total atmospheric precipitations of Paris is presented. The pesticides contained in the atmospheric samples, collected during sampling campaigns in February-March 2007, are identified and quantified by a high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC)-UV detection method. The toxicity measurements are performed by means of the Microtox bioluminescence method, based on the evaluation of the bioluminescence inhibition of the Vibrio fischeri marine bacteria at two exposure times to the pesticide solutions. The specific toxicity, corresponding to the particular toxicity of the compound under study and represented by the EC(50) parameter, is determined for these pesticides. Also, the global toxicity, which is the toxicity of all micro-pollutants present in the sample under study, is estimated for the extracts of air and atmospheric precipitation (rainwater) samples. The specific toxicities strongly vary with the nature of the pesticide, the EC(50) parameter values being comprised between 0.17 and 0.83 mg/mL and 0.15 and 0.66 mg/mL, respectively, for exposure times of 5 and 15 min. The importance of the atmospheric samples' global toxicity and the respective contribution of the toxic potency of the various pesticides contained in these samples are discussed.

  19. Multi-atlas registration and adaptive hexahedral voxel discretization for fast bioluminescence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Shenghan; Hu, Haihong; Li, Gen; Cao, Xu; Zhu, Shouping; Chen, Xueli; Liang, Jimin

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has been a valuable optical molecular imaging technique to non-invasively depict the cellular and molecular processes in living animals with high sensitivity and specificity. Due to the inherent ill-posedness of BLT, a priori information of anatomical structure is usually incorporated into the reconstruction. The structural information is usually provided by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In order to obtain better quantitative results, BLT reconstruction with heterogeneous tissues needs to segment the internal organs and discretize them into meshes with the finite element method (FEM). It is time-consuming and difficult to handle the segmentation and discretization problems. In this paper, we present a fast reconstruction method for BLT based on multi-atlas registration and adaptive voxel discretization to relieve the complicated data processing procedure involved in the hybrid BLT/CT system. A multi-atlas registration method is first adopted to estimate the internal organ distribution of the imaged animal. Then, the animal volume is adaptively discretized into hexahedral voxels, which are fed into FEM for the following BLT reconstruction. The proposed method is validated in both numerical simulation and an in vivo study. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can reconstruct the bioluminescence source efficiently with satisfactory accuracy. PMID:27446674

  20. Rapid detection of pathogens using antibody-coated microbeads with bioluminescence in microfluidic chips.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiao; Zhang, Hui-jing; Bi, Yin-nan; Zhang, Li; Hao, Dun-ling

    2010-08-01

    Detection of pathogens was demonstrated in a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)/glass microfluidic chip with which microbead-based immunoseparation platform and the bioluminescence technology were integrated. Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157:H7 was used as the model bacteria. The microchamber in microfluidic chip was filled with glass beads coated with antibodies which could capture specific organism, and the capture efficiency of the chip for the bacteria was about 91.75% approximately 95.62%. Then the concentration of bacteria was determined by detecting adenosine triphosphate (ATP) employing bioluminescence reaction of firefly luciferin-lucifera-ATP on chip. The method allowed reliable detection of E. coli O157:H7 concentrations from 3.2 x 10(1) cfu/microL to 3.2 x 10(5) cfu/microL within 20 min. This research demonstrated excellent reproducibility, stability, and specificity, and could accurately detect the pathogenic bacteria in food samples. The microfluidic chip and the equipments used in this method are easy to miniaturize, thus the method has great potential to be developed to a portable device for rapid detection of pathogens.

  1. Bioluminescence in the Ocean: Origins of Biological, Chemical, and Ecological Diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widder, E. A.

    2010-05-01

    From bacteria to fish, a remarkable variety of marine life depends on bioluminescence (the chemical generation of light) for finding food, attracting mates, and evading predators. Disparate biochemical systems and diverse phylogenetic distribution patterns of light-emitting organisms highlight the ecological benefits of bioluminescence, with biochemical and genetic analyses providing new insights into the mechanisms of its evolution. The origins and functions of some bioluminescent systems, however, remain obscure. Here, I review recent advances in understanding bioluminescence in the ocean and highlight future research efforts that will unite molecular details with ecological and evolutionary relationships.

  2. Monitoring of Bioluminescent Lactobacillus plantarum in a Complex Food Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Narbad, Arjan

    2017-01-01

    A bioluminescent Lactobacillus plantarum (pLuc2) strain was constructed. The luminescent signal started to increase during the early exponential phase and reached its maximum in the mid-exponential phase in a batch culture of the strain. The signal detection sensitivity of the strain was the highest in PBS (phosphate buffered saline), followed by milk and MRS broth, indicating that the sensitivity was influenced by the matrix effect. The strain was used in millet seed fermentation which has a complex matrix and native lactic acid bacteria (LAB). The luminescent signal was gradually increased until 9 h during fermentation and abolished at 24 h, indicating that the strain could be specifically tracked in the complex matrix and microflora. Therefore, the bioluminescent labeling system can be used for monitoring LAB in food and dairy sciences and industries. PMID:28316482

  3. Fluorescence and Bioluminescence Imaging of Orthotopic Brain Tumors in Mice.

    PubMed

    McKinnon, Emilie; Moore, Alfred; Dixit, Suraj; Zhu, Yun; Broome, Ann-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Optical imaging strategies, such as fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging, are non-invasive, in vivo whole body imaging techniques utilized to study cancer. Optical imaging is widely used in preclinical work because of its ease of use and cost-friendliness. It also provides the opportunity to study animals and biological responses longitudinally over time. Important considerations include depth of tissue penetration, photon scattering, absorption and the choice of light emitting probe, all of which affect the resolution (image quality and data information) and the signal to noise ratio of the image. We describe how to use bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging to track a chemotherapeutic delivery nanocarrier conjugated with a fluorophore to determine its localization in vivo.

  4. Monitoring of Bioluminescent Lactobacillus plantarum in a Complex Food Matrix.

    PubMed

    Moon, Gi-Seong; Narbad, Arjan

    2017-01-01

    A bioluminescent Lactobacillus plantarum (pLuc2) strain was constructed. The luminescent signal started to increase during the early exponential phase and reached its maximum in the mid-exponential phase in a batch culture of the strain. The signal detection sensitivity of the strain was the highest in PBS (phosphate buffered saline), followed by milk and MRS broth, indicating that the sensitivity was influenced by the matrix effect. The strain was used in millet seed fermentation which has a complex matrix and native lactic acid bacteria (LAB). The luminescent signal was gradually increased until 9 h during fermentation and abolished at 24 h, indicating that the strain could be specifically tracked in the complex matrix and microflora. Therefore, the bioluminescent labeling system can be used for monitoring LAB in food and dairy sciences and industries.

  5. Report on Pairing-based Cryptography

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Dustin; Peralta, Rene; Perlner, Ray; Regenscheid, Andrew; Roginsky, Allen; Chen, Lily

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes study results on pairing-based cryptography. The main purpose of the study is to form NIST’s position on standardizing and recommending pairing-based cryptography schemes currently published in research literature and standardized in other standard bodies. The report reviews the mathematical background of pairings. This includes topics such as pairing-friendly elliptic curves and how to compute various pairings. It includes a brief introduction to existing identity-based encryption (IBE) schemes and other cryptographic schemes using pairing technology. The report provides a complete study of the current status of standard activities on pairing-based cryptographic schemes. It explores different application scenarios for pairing-based cryptography schemes. As an important aspect of adopting pairing-based schemes, the report also considers the challenges inherent in validation testing of cryptographic algorithms and modules. Based on the study, the report suggests an approach for including pairing-based cryptography schemes in the NIST cryptographic toolkit. The report also outlines several questions that will require further study if this approach is followed. PMID:26958435

  6. Dynamic Modeling of Marine Bioluminescence and Night Time Leaving Radiance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    2003 by using BP data from four AUVs sections: DORADO sections taken 13 August and 14 August, and AUV REMUS sections taken on 14 August (Figure 1...and AUV REMUS data. 3 Figure 1. (A) V-shaped transect of CalPoly AUV REMUS and sections sampled by AUV DORADO ; (B) AUV REMUS observed...chlorophyll, backscattering and bioluminescence during 11-15 August. Solid vertical lines indicate location of the M1 mooring; (C) AUV DORADO observed

  7. Bioluminescent bacteria as indicators of chemical contamination of coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Frischer, M E; Danforth, J M; Foy, T F; Juraske, R

    2005-01-01

    The ratio of bioluminescent to total bacteria (bioluminescent ratio, BLR) as an indicator of a variety of types of anthropogenic contamination of estuarine ecosystems was evaluated through a series of laboratory and field studies. Laboratory studies indicated that the BLR of natural bacterioplankton communities was proportionally reduced in the presence of a number of contaminants including diesel fuel and saltmarsh sediments co-contaminated with mercury and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Bioluminescent ratio inhibition was observed after short-term exposure to a contaminant suggesting a physiological rather than a population response of native microbial communities. Simulated eutrophication did not suppress the BLR. Field observations of the BLR were conducted weekly for a 2-yr period in the Skidaway River estuary, Georgia, USA. These observations revealed considerable seasonal variability associated with the BLR. Bioluminescent ratios were highest during the summer (25 +/- 15%), lower in the fall (6 +/- 5%) and spring (3 +/- 2%), and near zero during the winter. Although the BLR was not significantly correlated to salinity at a single site (Skidaway River estuary), the BLR was significantly correlated with salinity when sites within the same estuary system were compared (r2 = 0.93). Variation in BLR was not correlated to standard bacteriological indicators of water quality including total and fecal coliform bacteria. Comparison of the BLR from impacted and pristine estuarine sites during the fall suggested that anthropogenically impacted sites exhibited lower BLR than predicted from salinity versus BLR relationships developed in pristine systems. These observations suggest that the BLR could be used as a simple and reliable initial indicator of chemical contamination of estuarine systems resulting from human activity.

  8. Bacterial bioluminescence and Gumbel statistics: From quorum sensing to correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delle Side, Domenico; Velardi, Luciano; Nassisi, Vincenzo; Pennetta, Cecilia; Alifano, Pietro; Talà, Adelfia; Salvatore Tredici, Maurizio

    2013-12-01

    We show that, in particular experimental conditions, the time course of the radiant fluxes, measured from a bioluminescent emission of a Vibrio harveyi related strain, collapse after suitable rescaling onto the Gumbel distribution of extreme value theory. We argue that the activation times of the strain luminous emission follow the universal behavior described by this statistical law, in spite of the fact that no extremal process is known to occur.

  9. Relationship between stability and bioluminescence color of firefly luciferase.

    PubMed

    Maghami, Parvaneh; Ranjbar, Bijan; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Ghasemi, Atiyeh; Moradi, Ali; Gill, Pooria

    2010-03-01

    Firefly luciferase catalyzes the oxidation of luciferin in the presence of ATP, Mg(2+) and molecular oxygen. The bioluminescence color of firefly luciferases is identified by the luciferase structure and assay conditions. Amongst different types of beetles, luciferase from Phrixotrix railroad worm (PhRE) with a unique additional residue (Arg353) naturally emits red bioluminescence color. By insertion of Arg356 in luciferase of Lampyris turkestanicus, corresponding to Arg353 in Phrixotrix hirtus, the color of the emitted light was changed to red. To understand the effect of this position on the bioluminescence color shift, four residues with similar sizes but different charges (Arg, Lys, Glu, and Gln) were inserted into Photinus pyralis luciferase. Comparison of mutants with native luciferase shows that mutation brought an increase in the content of secondary structure and globular compactness of (P. pylalis) luciferase. Comparative study of chemical denaturation of native and mutant luciferases by activity measurement, intrinsic and extrinsic fluorescence, circular dichroism, and DSC techniques revealed that insertion of positively charged residues (Arg, Lys) in the flexible loop (352-358) plays a significant role on the stability of (P. pyralis) luciferase and changes the light color to red.

  10. Catabolic gene expression is monitored by bioluminescence in bioreactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Burlage, R.S.; Kuo, D.; Palumbo, A.V.

    1993-01-01

    In order to study the expression of specific catabolic genes under defined conditions, and to determine whether certain conditions tend to increase or decrease metal catabolic activities, a bioreporter gene can be introduced into the microorganism. Activity from such bioreporter gene would indicate successful bioremediation. Our laboratory has produced several bioreporter strains using the bioluminescent lux genes of Vibrio fischeri. A bioreporter producing visible light when genetic expression is induced. The bioluminescent system include sensitivity of detection, analysis of response in real- time, and on-line capability. We constructed a bioreporter strain aimed at following the degradation of toluene and related compounds in order to study expression of the catabolic genes with various substrates and under optimized bioreactor conditions. We have been able to detect the induction of a specific operon in response to the addition of oxylene, as a gratuitous inducer of the catabolic genes. A strong bioluminescent signal in these studies. We have varied the medium of an induced bioreactor culture of RB1401, and our data suggest that conditions for optimal expression of the catabolic operon might not be identical with optimal growth conditions.

  11. Catabolic gene expression is monitored by bioluminescence in bioreactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Burlage, R.S.; Kuo, D.; Palumbo, A.V.

    1993-03-01

    In order to study the expression of specific catabolic genes under defined conditions, and to determine whether certain conditions tend to increase or decrease metal catabolic activities, a bioreporter gene can be introduced into the microorganism. Activity from such bioreporter gene would indicate successful bioremediation. Our laboratory has produced several bioreporter strains using the bioluminescent lux genes of Vibrio fischeri. A bioreporter producing visible light when genetic expression is induced. The bioluminescent system include sensitivity of detection, analysis of response in real- time, and on-line capability. We constructed a bioreporter strain aimed at following the degradation of toluene and related compounds in order to study expression of the catabolic genes with various substrates and under optimized bioreactor conditions. We have been able to detect the induction of a specific operon in response to the addition of oxylene, as a gratuitous inducer of the catabolic genes. A strong bioluminescent signal in these studies. We have varied the medium of an induced bioreactor culture of RB1401, and our data suggest that conditions for optimal expression of the catabolic operon might not be identical with optimal growth conditions.

  12. BarTeL, a Genetically Versatile, Bioluminescent and Granule Neuron Precursor-Targeted Mouse Model for Medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Mahdi, Min Y.; Gonzalez-Gomez, Ignacio; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; D’Apuzzo, Massimo; Erdreich-Epstein, Anat; Moats, Rex A.

    2016-01-01

    Medulloblastomas are the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor and have been divided into four major molecular subgroups. Animal models that mimic the principal molecular aberrations of these subgroups will be important tools for preclinical studies and allow greater understanding of medulloblastoma biology. We report a new transgenic model of medulloblastoma that possesses a unique combination of desirable characteristics including, among others, the ability to incorporate multiple and variable genes of choice and to produce bioluminescent tumors from a limited number of somatic cells within a normal cellular environment. This model, termed BarTeL, utilizes a Barhl1 homeobox gene promoter to target expression of a bicistronic transgene encoding both the avian retroviral receptor TVA and an eGFP-Luciferase fusion protein to neonatal cerebellar granule neuron precursor (cGNP) cells, which are cells of origin for the sonic hedgehog (SHH) subgroup of human medulloblastomas. The Barhl1 promoter-driven transgene is expressed strongly in mammalian cGNPs and weakly or not at all in mature granule neurons. We efficiently induced bioluminescent medulloblastomas expressing eGFP-luciferase in BarTeL mice by infection of a limited number of somatic cGNPs with avian retroviral vectors encoding the active N-terminal fragment of SHH and a stabilized MYCN mutant. Detection and quantification of the increasing bioluminescence of growing tumors in young BarTeL mice was facilitated by the declining bioluminescence of their uninfected maturing cGNPs. Inclusion of eGFP in the transgene allowed enriched sorting of cGNPs from neonatal cerebella. Use of a single bicistronic avian vector simultaneously expressing both Shh and Mycn oncogenes increased the medulloblastoma incidence and aggressiveness compared to mixed virus infections. Bioluminescent tumors could also be produced by ex vivo transduction of neonatal BarTeL cerebellar cells by avian retroviruses and subsequent

  13. BarTeL, a Genetically Versatile, Bioluminescent and Granule Neuron Precursor-Targeted Mouse Model for Medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Shackleford, Gregory M; Shi, Xiang-He; Swanson, Kimberly S; Mahdi, Min Y; Gonzalez-Gomez, Ignacio; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; D'Apuzzo, Massimo; Erdreich-Epstein, Anat; Moats, Rex A

    2016-01-01

    Medulloblastomas are the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor and have been divided into four major molecular subgroups. Animal models that mimic the principal molecular aberrations of these subgroups will be important tools for preclinical studies and allow greater understanding of medulloblastoma biology. We report a new transgenic model of medulloblastoma that possesses a unique combination of desirable characteristics including, among others, the ability to incorporate multiple and variable genes of choice and to produce bioluminescent tumors from a limited number of somatic cells within a normal cellular environment. This model, termed BarTeL, utilizes a Barhl1 homeobox gene promoter to target expression of a bicistronic transgene encoding both the avian retroviral receptor TVA and an eGFP-Luciferase fusion protein to neonatal cerebellar granule neuron precursor (cGNP) cells, which are cells of origin for the sonic hedgehog (SHH) subgroup of human medulloblastomas. The Barhl1 promoter-driven transgene is expressed strongly in mammalian cGNPs and weakly or not at all in mature granule neurons. We efficiently induced bioluminescent medulloblastomas expressing eGFP-luciferase in BarTeL mice by infection of a limited number of somatic cGNPs with avian retroviral vectors encoding the active N-terminal fragment of SHH and a stabilized MYCN mutant. Detection and quantification of the increasing bioluminescence of growing tumors in young BarTeL mice was facilitated by the declining bioluminescence of their uninfected maturing cGNPs. Inclusion of eGFP in the transgene allowed enriched sorting of cGNPs from neonatal cerebella. Use of a single bicistronic avian vector simultaneously expressing both Shh and Mycn oncogenes increased the medulloblastoma incidence and aggressiveness compared to mixed virus infections. Bioluminescent tumors could also be produced by ex vivo transduction of neonatal BarTeL cerebellar cells by avian retroviruses and subsequent

  14. Mission-Based Reporting in Academic Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anders, Thomas F.; Hales, Robert E.; Shahrokh, Narriman C.; Howell, Lydia P.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: This article describes a data entry and analysis system called Mission-Based Reporting (MBR) that is used to measure faculty and department activities related to specific academic missions and objectives. The purpose of MBR is to provide a reporting tool useful in evaluating faculty effort and in helping chairs 1) to better assess their…

  15. Synchronization of circadian bioluminescence as a group-foraging strategy in cave glowworms.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Andrew J; Merritt, David J

    2013-07-01

    Flies of the genus Arachnocampa are sit-and-lure predators that use bioluminescence to attract flying prey to their silk webs. Some species are most common in rainforest habitat and others inhabit both caves and rainforest. We have studied the circadian regulation of bioluminescence in two species: one found in subtropical rainforest with no known cave populations and the other found in temperate rainforest with large populations in limestone caves. The rainforest species is typical of most nocturnal animals in that individuals are entrained by the light:dark (LD) cycle to be active at night; in this case, their propensity to bioluminesce is greatest at night. The dual-habitat species shows an opposite phase response to the same entrainment; its bioluminescence propensity rhythm is entrained by LD exposure to peak during the day. Nevertheless, in LD environments, individuals do not bioluminesce during the day because ambient light inhibits their bioluminescence (negative masking), pushing bioluminescence into the dark period. This unusual and unexpected phenomenon could be related to their association with caves and has been suggested to be an adaptation of the circadian system that promotes synchronization of a colony's output of bioluminescence. Here, we use controlled laboratory experiments to show that individuals do synchronize their bioluminescence rhythms when in visual contact with each other. Entrainment of the bioluminescence rhythm to the biological photophase causes colony-wide synchronization, creating a daily sinusoidal rhythm of the intensity of bioluminescence in the many thousands of individuals making up a colony. This synchronization could provide a group-foraging advantage, allowing the colony to glow most brightly when the prey are most likely to be active.

  16. Radiofrequency transmission line for bioluminescent Vibrio sp. irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassisi, V.; Alifano, P.; Talà, A.; Velardi, L.

    2012-07-01

    We present the study and the analyses of a transmission line for radiofrequency (RF) irradiation of bacteria belonging to Vibrio harveyi-related strain PS1, a bioluminescent bacterium living in symbiosis with many marine organisms. The bioluminescence represents a new biologic indicator which is useful for studying the behaviour of living samples in the presence of RF waves due to the modern communication systems. A suitable transmission line, used as an irradiating cell and tested up to the maximum frequency used by the global system for mobile communications and universal mobile telecommunications system transmissions, was characterized. In this experiment, the RF voltage applied to the transmission line was 1 V. Due to short dimensions of the line and the applied high frequencies, standing waves were produced in addition to progressing waves and the electric field strength varies particularly along the longitudinal direction. The magnetic field map was not strongly linked to the electric one due to the presence of standing waves and of the outgoing irradiation. RF fields were measured by two homemade suitable probes able to diagnostic fields of high frequency. The field measurements were performed without any specimens inside the line. Being our sample made of living matter, the real field was modified and its value was estimated by a simulation code. The bioluminescence experiments were performed only at 900 MHz for two different measured electric fields, 53 and 140 V/m. The light emission was measured right from the beginning and after 7 and 25 h. Under RF irradiation, we found that the bioluminescence activity decreased. Compared with the control sample, the diminution was 6.8% and 44% after 7 and 25 h of irradiation, respectively, both with the low or high field. No changes of the survival factor for all the samples were observed. Besides, to understand the emission processes, we operated the deconvolution of the spectra by two Gaussian curves. The Gaussian

  17. The nucleotide sequence of Beneckea harveyi 5S rRNA. [bioluminescent marine bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luehrsen, K. R.; Fox, G. E.

    1981-01-01

    The primary sequence of the 5S ribosomal RNA isolated from the free-living bioluminescent marine bacterium Beneckea harveyi is reported and discussed in regard to indications of phylogenetic relationships with the bacteria Escherichia coli and Photobacterium phosphoreum. Sequences were determined for oligonucleotide products generated by digestion with ribonuclease T1, pancreatic ribonuclease and ribonuclease T2. The presence of heterogeneity is indicated for two sites. The B. harveyi sequence can be arranged into the same four helix secondary structures as E. coli and other prokaryotic 5S rRNAs. Examination of the 5S-RNS sequences of the three bacteria indicates that B. harveyi and P. phosphoreum are specifically related and share a common ancestor which diverged from an ancestor of E. coli at a somewhat earlier time, consistent with previous studies.

  18. Evaluation of ATP bioluminescence assays for potential use in a hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Aiken, Zoie A; Wilson, Michael; Pratten, Jonathan

    2011-05-01

    ATP bioluminescence is being applied in hospitals to measure surface contamination. We compared commercial luminometers for detecting the number Staphylococcus aureus associated with surfaces. The data showed that the ATP bioluminescence methods tested were not robust enough to generate quantitative data on bacterial numbers, especially at low concentrations.

  19. Bioluminescent reporters for catabolic gene expression and pollutant bioavailability

    SciTech Connect

    Heitzer, A.; DiGrazia, P.M.; Sayler, G.S. . Center for Environmental Biotechnology); Burlage, R.S. )

    1991-01-01

    The application of visualized catabolic nah-gene expression using a luxCDABE gene fusion provides a valuable method to measure quantitatively and specifically naphthalene and salicylate bioavailability. It has been demonstrated that the physiological state of the test culture together with the intrinsic regulation mechanisms of the naphthalene degradation pathway as well as the physiological aspects of the lux gene fusion have to be taken into account. The method presented provides a high potential for in situ bioprocess monitoring. In addition, the results obtained with immobilized cells provide a basis for the development of biosensors for environmental applications in specific pollutant monitoring in waste streams and soil slurry systems but, as a general method, also for more conventional biotechnological process control. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. High resolution in vivo bioluminescent imaging for the study of bacterial tumour targeting.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Michelle; Akin, Ali R; Collins, Sara A; Meganck, Jeff; Kim, Jae-Beom; Baban, Chwanrow K; Joyce, Susan A; van Dam, Gooitzen M; Zhang, Ning; van Sinderen, Douwe; O'Sullivan, Gerald C; Kasahara, Noriyuki; Gahan, Cormac G; Francis, Kevin P; Tangney, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The ability to track microbes in real time in vivo is of enormous value for preclinical investigations in infectious disease or gene therapy research. Bacteria present an attractive class of vector for cancer therapy, possessing a natural ability to grow preferentially within tumours following systemic administration. Bioluminescent Imaging (BLI) represents a powerful tool for use with bacteria engineered to express reporter genes such as lux. BLI is traditionally used as a 2D modality resulting in images that are limited in their ability to anatomically locate cell populations. Use of 3D diffuse optical tomography can localize the signals but still need to be combined with an anatomical imaging modality like micro-Computed Tomography (μCT) for interpretation.In this study, the non-pathogenic commensal bacteria E. coli K-12 MG1655 and Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003, or Salmonella Typhimurium SL7207 each expressing the luxABCDE operon were intravenously (i.v.) administered to mice bearing subcutaneous (s.c) FLuc-expressing xenograft tumours. Bacterial lux signal was detected specifically in tumours of mice post i.v.-administration and bioluminescence correlated with the numbers of bacteria recovered from tissue. Through whole body imaging for both lux and FLuc, bacteria and tumour cells were co-localised. 3D BLI and μCT image analysis revealed a pattern of multiple clusters of bacteria within tumours. Investigation of spatial resolution of 3D optical imaging was supported by ex vivo histological analyses. In vivo imaging of orally-administered commensal bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) was also achieved using 3D BLI. This study demonstrates for the first time the potential to simultaneously image multiple BLI reporter genes three dimensionally in vivo using approaches that provide unique information on spatial locations.

  1. The presence of lateral photophores correlates with increased speciation in deep-sea bioluminescent sharks

    PubMed Central

    Claes, Julien M.; Nilsson, Dan-Eric; Mallefet, Jérôme; Straube, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of species within the lanternshark genus Etmopterus harbour complex luminescent markings on their flanks, whose functional significance has long remained obscure. Recent studies, however, suggest these enigmatic photophore aggregations to play a role in intraspecific communication. Using visual modelling based on in vivo luminescence measurements from a common lanternshark species, we show that etmopterid flank markings can potentially work as a medium range signal for intraspecific detection/recognition. In addition, using molecular phylogenetic analyses, we demonstrate that the Etmopterus clade exhibits a greater than expected species richness given its age. This is not the case for other bioluminescent shark clades with no (or only few) species with flank markings. Our results therefore suggest that etmopterid flank markings may provide a way for reproductive isolation and hence may have facilitated speciation in the deep-sea. PMID:26587280

  2. Characteristics and genetic diversity of bioluminescent Shewanella woodyi strains isolated from the Gulf of Izmir, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ersoy Omeroglu, Esra; Karaboz, Ismail; Sudagidan, Mert

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to isolate bioluminescent strains and to phenotypically and biochemically identify them based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of the 11 isolates revealed that they belonged to Shewanella woodyi. Nevertheless, they were determined to exhibit various growth characteristics, enzymatic activities, assimilation of carbon and nitrogen sources, and different characteristics in antibiotic resistance profiles, and also, it was determined that different growth conditions affect the amount of biofilm. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of S. woodyi strains performed with SmaI and NotI restriction enzymes revealed that they exhibited restriction fragment pattern homology ranging from 56 to 89 % and from 82 to 94 %, respectively. As a result, PFGE analysis of the genome S. woodyi (as the first record) revealed that although these strains inhabiting the Gulf of Izmir exhibit common characteristics, they also have high levels of genomic polymorphism.

  3. Bioluminescent bacteria assay of veterinary drugs in excreta of food-producing animals.

    PubMed

    Bolelli, L; Bobrovová, Z; Ferri, E; Fini, F; Menotta, S; Scandurra, S; Fedrizzi, G; Girotti, S

    2006-09-11

    The residues of pharmacological treatments on food-producing animals, present in the manure dispersed on agricultural land, can impact environmental and human health through toxic, genotoxic, and drug-resistance development effects. Biotoxicity assays can easily reveal the presence of noxious substances and those based on bioluminescent bacteria (BLB) are particularly simple and rapid. A BLB assay was developed as microplate format by using various strains of Vibrio sp. and was employed to evaluate their response to pure antibiotic solutions and to residues extracted from excreta of antibiotic treated pigs and turkeys. The residues were quantified by HPLC analysis. The BLB assay can be proposed as an easy-to-perform screening tool to assess the presence of residues due to undeclared current, or recently ended, pharmacological treatments, as well as to evaluate their permanence in manure.

  4. High Sensitivity Detection of ATP Using Bioluminescence at An Optical Fiber End

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iinuma, Masataka; Ushio, Yasuaki; Kuroda, Akio; Kadoya, Yutaka

    We investigated the sensitivity of ATP detection based on bioluminescence at an optical fiber end where luciferase molecules were immobilized via silica-binding protein molecules. Luminescence was detected by an avalanche photo diode (APD), with coupling optics to make full use of the merit of compactness, high quantum efficiency and low noise of the APD. The core diameter and the numerical aperture of the optical fiber, as well as the design of the coupling optics, were optimized so as to realize high photon-collection efficiency. A detection limit of about 10-10 M was obtained, which corresponds to 10-15 mol of ATP. A rough estimation shows that the photon count rate is still two orders of magnitude lower than that limited by diffusion or reaction processes, implying a possibility of further improvement of the sensitivity.

  5. Quenching the firefly bioluminescence by various ions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huateng; Bai, Haixiu; Jiang, Tianyu; Ma, Zhao; Cheng, Yanna; Zhou, Yubin; Du, Lupei; Li, Minyong

    2016-02-01

    The luciferase reporter gene assay system is broadly applied in various biomedical aspects, including signaling pathway dissection, transcriptional activity analysis, and genetic toxicity testing. It significantly improves the experimental accuracy and reduces the experimental error by the addition of an internal control. In the current research, we discovered some specific ions that could selectively inhibit firefly luciferase while having a negligible effect on renilla luciferase in vitro in the dual-reporter gene assay. We showed that these ionic compounds had a high potential of being utilized as quench-and-activate reagents in the dual-reporter assay. Furthermore, results from kinetic studies on ion-mediated quenching effects indicated that different ions have distinct inhibition modes. Our study is anticipated to guide a more affordable design of quench-and-activate reagents in biomedicine and pharmaceutical analysis.

  6. Mutagenesis and Characterization Studies to Develop Novel Bioluminescent Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-12

    Doyle, S.M. Burns , C.H. Contag, In vivo bioluminescence imaging for integrated studies of infection, Cellular Microbiology 6 (2004) 303-317. [14] C.M...37 °C in LB broth supplemented with 100 g/ml ampicillin to mid log phase (A600 = 0.6-0.9), transferred to a 22 °C incubator and, after...13230. (30) Branchini, B. R., Magyar, R. A., Murtiashaw, M. H., and Portier, N. C. (2001) The role of active site residue arginine 218 in firefly

  7. Assessing laser-tissue damage with bioluminescent imaging.

    PubMed

    Wilmink, Gerald J; Opalenik, Susan R; Beckham, Joshua T; Davidson, Jeffrey M; Jansen, E Duco

    2006-01-01

    Effective medical laser procedures are achieved by selecting laser parameters that minimize undesirable tissue damage. Traditionally, human subjects, animal models, and monolayer cell cultures have been used to study wound healing, tissue damage, and cellular effects of laser radiation. Each of these models has significant limitations, and consequently, a novel skin model is needed. To this end, a highly reproducible human skin model that enables noninvasive and longitudinal studies of gene expression was sought. In this study, we present an organotypic raft model (engineered skin) used in combination with bioluminescent imaging (BLI) techniques. The efficacy of the raft model was validated and characterized by investigating the role of heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) as a sensitive marker of thermal damage. The raft model consists of human cells incorporated into an extracellular matrix. The raft cultures were transfected with an adenovirus containing a murine hsp70 promoter driving transcription of luciferase. The model enables quantitative analysis of spatiotemporal expression of proteins using BLI. Thermal stress was induced on the raft cultures by means of a constant temperature water bath or with a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser (lambda=10.6 microm, 0.679 to 2.262 Wcm2, cw, unfocused Gaussian beam, omegaL=4.5 mm, 1 min exposure). The bioluminescence was monitored noninvasively with an IVIS 100 Bioluminescent Imaging System. BLI indicated that peak hsp70 expression occurs 4 to 12 h after exposure to thermal stress. A minimum irradiance of 0.679 Wcm2 activated the hsp70 response, and a higher irradiance of 2.262 Wcm2 was associated with a severe reduction in hsp70 response due to tissue ablation. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that hsp70 mRNA levels increased with prolonged heating exposures. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent protein assays confirmed that luciferase was an accurate surrogate for hsp70 intracellular protein levels. Hematoxylin

  8. Luciferase-dependent oxygen consumption by bioluminescent vibrios.

    PubMed Central

    Makemson, J C

    1986-01-01

    Oxygen uptake due to luciferase in two luminous Vibrio species was estimated in vivo by utilizing inhibitors having specificities for luciferase (decanol) and cytochromes (cyanide). Cyanide titration of respiration revealed a component of oxygen uptake less sensitive to cyanide which was completely inhibitable by low concentrations of decanol. From this it was estimated that in vivo luciferase is responsible for less than 12% (Vibrio harveyi) or 20% (Vibrio fischeri) of the total respiration. From these data in vivo bioluminescent quantum yields are estimated to be not lower than 1.7 and 2.6%, respectively. PMID:3944057

  9. Luciferase-dependent oxygen consumption by bioluminescent vibrios

    SciTech Connect

    Makemson, J.C.

    1986-02-01

    Oxygen uptake due to luciferase in two luminous Vibrio species was estimated in vivo by utilizing inhibitors having specificities for luciferase (decanol) and cytochromes (cyanide). Cyanide titration of respiration revealed a component of oxygen uptake less sensitive to cyanide which was completely inhibitable by low concentrations of decanol. From this it was estimated that in vivo luciferase is responsible for less than 12% (Vibrio harveyi) or 20% (Vibrio fischeri) of the total respiration. From these data in vivo bioluminescent quantum yields are estimated to be not lower than 1.7 and 2.6%, respectively.

  10. Bioluminescence monitor and method for enzymatic determinations. [Patents

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, W.D.; Denton, M.S.; Dinsmore, S.R.

    1981-04-28

    An on-line, nonreferenced apparatus for measuring the concentration of a biomarker species in authentic biological samples in solution comprises conduit means for conducting said sample solution from a source of said solution, stream diversion means disposed within the conduit for diverting a predetermined amount of said sample for analysis, means for introducing and independently regulating the flow of one or more reactants disposed in fluid communication with said diverted stream, incubating means within the diverted stream for reacting said reactants and biomarkers to produce a bioluminescence emission, and means disposed within the diverted stream for monitoring said emission intensity which is correlatable to said biomarker concentration.

  11. Assessing laser-tissue damage with bioluminescent imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmink, Gerald J.; Opalenik, Susan R.; Beckham, Josh T.; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Jansen, Eric D.

    2006-07-01

    Effective medical laser procedures are achieved by selecting laser parameters that minimize undesirable tissue damage. Traditionally, human subjects, animal models, and monolayer cell cultures have been used to study wound healing, tissue damage, and cellular effects of laser radiation. Each of these models has significant limitations, and consequently, a novel skin model is needed. To this end, a highly reproducible human skin model that enables noninvasive and longitudinal studies of gene expression was sought. In this study, we present an organotypic raft model (engineered skin) used in combination with bioluminescent imaging (BLI) techniques. The efficacy of the raft model was validated and characterized by investigating the role of heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) as a sensitive marker of thermal damage. The raft model consists of human cells incorporated into an extracellular matrix. The raft cultures were transfected with an adenovirus containing a murine hsp70 promoter driving transcription of luciferase. The model enables quantitative analysis of spatiotemporal expression of proteins using BLI. Thermal stress was induced on the raft cultures by means of a constant temperature water bath or with a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser (λ=10.6 µm, 0.679 to 2.262 W/cm2, cw, unfocused Gaussian beam, ωL=4.5 mm, 1 min exposure). The bioluminescence was monitored noninvasively with an IVIS 100 Bioluminescent Imaging System. BLI indicated that peak hsp70 expression occurs 4 to 12 h after exposure to thermal stress. A minimum irradiance of 0.679 W/cm2 activated the hsp70 response, and a higher irradiance of 2.262 W/cm2 was associated with a severe reduction in hsp70 response due to tissue ablation. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that hsp70 mRNA levels increased with prolonged heating exposures. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent protein assays confirmed that luciferase was an accurate surrogate for hsp70 intracellular protein levels. Hematoxylin and

  12. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer using luciferase-immobilized quantum dots for self-illuminated photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chia-Yen; Chen, Ching-Wen; Yu, Hsiu-Ping; Lin, Yan-Fu; Lai, Ping-Shan

    2013-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an innovative method for cancer treatment that involves the administration of a photosensitizing agent followed by exposure to visible light. An appreciable amount of a particular light source is a key to activate photosensitizers in PDT. However, the external excitation light source is a problem for clinical application because of the limitation of tissue-penetrating properties. Additionally, the wavelength of laser emission should match the absorption wavelength of each photosensitizer for efficient generation of reactive oxygen species and cell killing. In this study, Renilla luciferase-immobilized quantum dots-655 (QD-RLuc8) was used for bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-mediated PDT to resolve these problems. The bioluminescent QD-RLuc8 conjugate exhibits self-illumination at 655 nm after coelenterazine addition, which can activate the photosensitizer, Foscan(®)-loaded micelles for PDT. Our results show that BRET-mediated PDT by QD-RLuc8 plus coelenterazine (20 μg/mL) successfully generated reactive oxygen species (40.8%), killed ~ 50% A549 cells at 2 μg/mL equivalent Foscan(®)in vitro and significantly delayed tumor growth in vivo due to cell apoptosis under TUNEL analysis without obvious weight loss. Based on immunohistochemical observations, the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-negative area of tumor sections after BRET-mediated PDT was obviously increased compared to the PDT-untreated groups without an external light source. We conclude that this nanotechnology-based PDT possesses several clinical benefits, such as overcoming light penetration issues and treating deeper lesions that are intractable by PDT alone.

  13. Interlaboratory study of the bioluminescence inhibition tests for rapid wastewater toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Farré, Marinella; Arranz, Francesc; Ribó, Joan; Barceló, Damià

    2004-02-27

    Several toxicity procedures are currently being used for the wastewater toxicity assessment. We have undertaken an interlaboratory comparison of the use of different bioluminescence inhibition toxicity tests based on Vibrio fischeri, in order to evaluate their reproducibility for the rapid wastewater toxicity assessment. Twenty-two laboratories took part in this study organized by the Institut Català de Tecnologia (ICT) and the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC). During the exercise, six series of six samples were analyzed along 5 months. Every batch of samples was composed by three real samples and three standard solutions. The real samples were: an untreated effluent of a paper industry, a sample from a first settlement of a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) and the final effluent of the WWTP. The goals of the interlaboratory study were to evaluate the repeatability (r) and reproducibility (R) when different laboratories conduct the test, the influence of different matrix samples, the variability between different tests based on the same principle: the bioluminescence inhibition of V. fischeri, but involving different commercial devices and to determine the rate at which participating laboratories successfully completed tests initiated. The maximum number of outlier values was corresponding to a non-treated effluent from a paper industry. This also was the most complex and toxic sample analyzed. An increase on the non-convergent values obtained for the participants was observed at higher matrix complexity and at lower toxicity level. In comparison with other editions of this interlaboratory study the matrixes of real samples analyzed were more complex, nevertheless the final variability coefficient for the exercise was nearby to the average value for the past editions. Due to the high complexity of some samples involved in this intercalibration the stability of real samples were also followed during the test. On the other hand, no relation

  14. Phylogenetic diversity and cosymbiosis in the bioluminescent symbioses of "Photobacterium mandapamensis".

    PubMed

    Kaeding, Allison J; Ast, Jennifer C; Pearce, Meghan M; Urbanczyk, Henryk; Kimura, Seishi; Endo, Hiromitsu; Nakamura, Masaru; Dunlap, Paul V

    2007-05-01

    "Photobacterium mandapamensis" (proposed name) and Photobacterium leiognathi are closely related, phenotypically similar marine bacteria that form bioluminescent symbioses with marine animals. Despite their similarity, however, these bacteria can be distinguished phylogenetically by sequence divergence of their luminescence genes, luxCDAB(F)E, by the presence (P. mandapamensis) or the absence (P. leiognathi) of luxF and, as shown here, by the sequence divergence of genes involved in the synthesis of riboflavin, ribBHA. To gain insight into the possibility that P. mandapamensis and P. leiognathi are ecologically distinct, we used these phylogenetic criteria to determine the incidence of P. mandapamensis as a bioluminescent symbiont of marine animals. Five fish species, Acropoma japonicum (Perciformes, Acropomatidae), Photopectoralis panayensis and Photopectoralis bindus (Perciformes, Leiognathidae), Siphamia versicolor (Perciformes, Apogonidae), and Gadella jordani (Gadiformes, Moridae), were found to harbor P. mandapamensis in their light organs. Specimens of A. japonicus, P. panayensis, and P. bindus harbored P. mandapamensis and P. leiognathi together as cosymbionts of the same light organ. Regardless of cosymbiosis, P. mandapamensis was the predominant symbiont of A. japonicum, and it was the apparently exclusive symbiont of S. versicolor and G. jordani. In contrast, P. leiognathi was found to be the predominant symbiont of P. panayensis and P. bindus, and it appears to be the exclusive symbiont of other leiognathid fishes and a loliginid squid. A phylogenetic test for cospeciation revealed no evidence of codivergence between P. mandapamensis and its host fishes, indicating that coevolution apparently is not the basis for this bacterium's host preferences. These results, which are the first report of bacterial cosymbiosis in fish light organs and the first demonstration that P. leiognathi is not the exclusive light organ symbiont of leiognathid fishes

  15. Phylogenetic Diversity and Cosymbiosis in the Bioluminescent Symbioses of “Photobacterium mandapamensis”▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kaeding, Allison J.; Ast, Jennifer C.; Pearce, Meghan M.; Urbanczyk, Henryk; Kimura, Seishi; Endo, Hiromitsu; Nakamura, Masaru; Dunlap, Paul V.

    2007-01-01

    “Photobacterium mandapamensis” (proposed name) and Photobacterium leiognathi are closely related, phenotypically similar marine bacteria that form bioluminescent symbioses with marine animals. Despite their similarity, however, these bacteria can be distinguished phylogenetically by sequence divergence of their luminescence genes, luxCDAB(F)E, by the presence (P. mandapamensis) or the absence (P. leiognathi) of luxF and, as shown here, by the sequence divergence of genes involved in the synthesis of riboflavin, ribBHA. To gain insight into the possibility that P. mandapamensis and P. leiognathi are ecologically distinct, we used these phylogenetic criteria to determine the incidence of P. mandapamensis as a bioluminescent symbiont of marine animals. Five fish species, Acropoma japonicum (Perciformes, Acropomatidae), Photopectoralis panayensis and Photopectoralis bindus (Perciformes, Leiognathidae), Siphamia versicolor (Perciformes, Apogonidae), and Gadella jordani (Gadiformes, Moridae), were found to harbor P. mandapamensis in their light organs. Specimens of A. japonicus, P. panayensis, and P. bindus harbored P. mandapamensis and P. leiognathi together as cosymbionts of the same light organ. Regardless of cosymbiosis, P. mandapamensis was the predominant symbiont of A. japonicum, and it was the apparently exclusive symbiont of S. versicolor and G. jordani. In contrast, P. leiognathi was found to be the predominant symbiont of P. panayensis and P. bindus, and it appears to be the exclusive symbiont of other leiognathid fishes and a loliginid squid. A phylogenetic test for cospeciation revealed no evidence of codivergence between P. mandapamensis and its host fishes, indicating that coevolution apparently is not the basis for this bacterium's host preferences. These results, which are the first report of bacterial cosymbiosis in fish light organs and the first demonstration that P. leiognathi is not the exclusive light organ symbiont of leiognathid fishes

  16. Interchange of Data Bases. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Rita G.; And Others

    This report describes the methods, developed by the American Institute of Physics in cooperation with Engineering Index, Inc., by which both organizations could reduce costs by eliminating duplication of keyboarding and indexing. The three sets of problems that confronted the interchange of their data bases (classification and indexing, formats,…

  17. 2005 Base Closure and Realignment Commission Report

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The 2005 Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission is proud to present its Final Report for your consideration. As required by law, the Commission thoroughly and objectively reviewed the domestic installation closure and realignment recommendations proposed by the Secretary of Defense on May 13, 2005.

  18. Dual-color bioluminescence imaging assay using green- and red-emitting beetle luciferases at subcellular resolution.

    PubMed

    Yasunaga, Mayu; Nakajima, Yoshihiro; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro

    2014-09-01

    Bioluminescence imaging is widely used to monitor cellular events, including gene expression in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, recent advances in luciferase technology have made possible imaging at the single-cell level. To improve the bioluminescence imaging system, we have developed a dual-color imaging system in which the green-emitting luciferase from a Brazilian click beetle (Emerald Luc, ELuc) and the red-emitting luciferase from a railroad worm (Stable Luciferase Red, SLR) were used as reporters, which were localized to the peroxisome and the nucleus, respectively. We clearly captured simultaneously the subcellular localization of ELuc in the peroxisome and SLR in the nucleus of a single cell using a high-magnification objective lens with 3-min exposure time without binning using a combination of optical filters. Furthermore, to apply this system to quantitative time-lapse imaging, the activation of nuclear factor triggered by tumor necrosis factor α was measured using nuclear-targeted SLR and peroxisome-targeted ELuc as the test and internal control reporters, respectively. We successfully quantified the kinetics of activation of nuclear factor κB using nuclear-targeted SLR and the transcriptional change of the internal control promoter using peroxisome-targeted ELuc simultaneously in a single cell, and showed that the activation kinetics, including activation rate and amplitude, differed among cells. The results demonstrated that this imaging system can visualize the subcellular localization of reporters and track the expressions of two genes simultaneously at subcellular resolution.

  19. Cloud-based Architecture Capabilities Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Vang, Leng; Prescott, Steven R; Smith, Curtis

    2014-09-01

    In collaborating scientific research arena it is important to have an environment where analysts have access to a shared of information documents, software tools and be able to accurately maintain and track historical changes in models. A new cloud-based environment would be accessible remotely from anywhere regardless of computing platforms given that the platform has available of Internet access and proper browser capabilities. Information stored at this environment would be restricted based on user assigned credentials. This report reviews development of a Cloud-based Architecture Capabilities (CAC) as a web portal for PRA tools.

  20. Evaluation of toxicity of Cercospora piaropi in a mycoherbicide formulation by using bacterial bioluminescence and the Ames mutagenicity tests.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Maricela Martínez; Villasana, Ana María Sandoval

    2009-04-01

    An evaluation of the potential hazards associated with mutagenicity and acute toxicity of a mycoherbicide formulation based on the fungal pathogen Cercospora piaropi was performed. Neither the mycoherbicide nor any of its components were mutagenic to Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100 with or without metabolic activation. Both the C. piaropi and the mycoherbicide formulation were shown to be moderately toxic with a bacterial bioluminescence assay. No acute toxicity was found in water samples taken from tanks after treatment of water hyacinth with the mycoherbicide.

  1. Evaluation of an improved bioluminescence assay for the detection of bacteria in soy milk.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki, Yohei; Sato, Jun; Igarashi, Toshinori; Suzuki, Shigeya; Nishimoto, Kazunori; Harada, Yasuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Because soy milk is nutrient rich and nearly neutral in pH, it favors the growth of microbial contaminants. To ensure that soy milk meets food-safety standards, it must be pasteurized and have its sterility confirmed. ATP bioluminescence assay has become a widely accepted means of detecting food microorganisms. However, the high background bioluminescence intensity of soy milk has rendered it unsuitable for ATP analysis. Here, we tested the efficacy of an improved pre-treated bioluminescence assay on soy milk. By comparing background bioluminescence intensities obtained by the conventional and improved methods, we demonstrated that our method significantly reduces soy milk background bioluminescence. The dose-response curve of the assay was tested with serial dilutions of Bacillus sp. culture. An extremely strong log-linear relation between the bioluminescence intensity relative light units and colony formation units CFU/ml emerged for the tested strain. The detection limit of the assay was estimated as 5.2×10(3) CFU/ml from the dose-response curve and an imposed signal limit was three times the background level. The results showed that contaminated samples could be easily detected within 24 h using our improved bioluminescence assay.

  2. Bioluminescence in the ghost fungus Omphalotus nidiformis does not attract potential spore dispersing insects.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Philip; Delean, Steven; Wood, Tom; Austin, Andrew D

    2016-12-01

    Bioluminescence has been known from fungi since ancient times, but little work has been done to establish its potential role. There is evidence that some bioluminescent fungi differentially attract potential spore-dispersing insects, and we aimed to establish if this was the case for the ghost fungus, Omphalotus nidiformis (Agaricales,Marasmiaceae), a widespread Australian temperate zone species. We examined three corroborative lines of evidence: circadian rhythmicity of bioluminescence; field-recorded insect abundance at the time of basidiome production; and attractiveness of glowing fungi to flying insects. Basidiomes glowed continuously day and night, and were present in winter (June-July) when insect abundance was low. To assess attractiveness, we deployed sticky-traps in open woodland in the absence of light pollution, in Treatment (baited with fresh bioluminescent O. nidiformis) and Control pairs, for 480 trap-hours on moonless nights. There was no statistical difference in mean insect abundance between Treatment and Control traps (mean 0.33 and 0.54 individuals per trap night, respectively). To interpret these results, we provide a brief review of competing hypotheses for fungal bioluminescence, and conclude that for some fungi, bioluminescence may be an incidental by-product of metabolism rather than conferring any selective advantage. It is possible that the role of bioluminescence differs among evolutionary lineages of fungi and/or with attributes of their growth environments that could affect spore dispersal, such as wind and insect abundance.

  3. Foraging in the darkness of the Southern Ocean: influence of bioluminescence on a deep diving predator.

    PubMed

    Vacquié-Garcia, Jade; Royer, François; Dragon, Anne-Cécile; Viviant, Morgane; Bailleul, Frédéric; Guinet, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    How non-echolocating deep diving marine predators locate their prey while foraging remains mostly unknown. Female southern elephant seals (SES) (Mirounga leonina) have vision adapted to low intensity light with a peak sensitivity at 485 nm. This matches the wavelength of bioluminescence produced by a large range of marine organisms including myctophid fish, SES's main prey. In this study, we investigated whether bioluminescence provides an accurate estimate of prey occurrence for SES. To do so, four SES were satellite-tracked during their post-breeding foraging trip and were equipped with Time-Depth-Recorders that also recorded light levels every two seconds. A total of 3386 dives were processed through a light-treatment model that detected light events higher than ambient level, i.e. bioluminescence events. The number of bioluminescence events was related to an index of foraging intensity for SES dives deep enough to avoid the influence of natural ambient light. The occurrence of bioluminescence was found to be negatively related to depth both at night and day. Foraging intensity was also positively related to bioluminescence both during day and night. This result suggests that bioluminescence likely provides SES with valuable indications of prey occurrence and might be a key element in predator-prey interactions in deep-dark marine environments.

  4. Effect of low-level alpha-radiation on bioluminescent assay systems of various complexity.

    PubMed

    Rozhko, Tatiana V; Kudryasheva, Nadezhda S; Kuznetsov, Alexander M; Vydryakova, Galina A; Bondareva, Lydia G; Bolsunovsky, Alexander Ya

    2007-01-01

    This study addresses the effects of low-level alpha-radiation on bioluminescent assay systems of different levels of organization: in vivo and in vitro. Three bioluminescent assay systems are used: intact bacteria, lyophilized bacteria, and bioluminescent system of coupled enzyme reactions. Solutions of 241Am(NO3)3 are used as a source of alpha-radiation. It has been shown that activation processes predominate in all the three bioluminescent assay systems subjected to short-term exposure (20-55 h) and inhibition processes in the systems subjected to longer-term exposure to radiation. It has been found that these effects are caused by the radiation component of 241Am3+ impact. The intensity of the 241Am3+ effect on the bioluminescent assay systems has been shown to depend on the 241Am3+ concentration, level of organization and integrity of the bioluminescent assay system. The bioluminescent assay systems in vivo have been found to be highly sensitive to 241Am3+ (up to 10(-17) M).

  5. Photodynamic inactivation of recombinant bioluminescent Escherichia coli by cationic porphyrins under artificial and solar irradiation.

    PubMed

    Alves, Eliana; Carvalho, Carla M B; Tomé, João P C; Faustino, Maria A F; Neves, Maria G P M S; Tomé, Augusto C; Cavaleiro, José A S; Cunha, Angela; Mendo, Sónia; Almeida, Adelaide

    2008-11-01

    A faster and simpler method to monitor the photoinactivation process of Escherichia coli involving the use of recombinant bioluminescent bacteria is described here. Escherichia coli cells were transformed with luxCDABE genes from the marine bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri and the recombinant bioluminescent indicator strain was used to assess, in real time, the effect of three cationic meso-substituted porphyrin derivatives on their metabolic activity, under artificial (40 W m(-2)) and solar irradiation (approximately 620 W m(-2)). The photoinactivation of bioluminescent E. coli is effective (>4 log bioluminescence decrease) with the three porphyrins used, the tricationic porphyrin Tri-Py+-Me-PF being the most efficient compound. The photoinactivation process is efficient both with solar and artificial light, for the three porphyrins tested. The results show that bioluminescence analysis is an efficient and sensitive approach being, in addition, more affordable, faster, cheaper and much less laborious than conventional methods. This approach can be used as a screening method for bacterial photoinactivation studies in vitro and also for the monitoring of the efficiency of novel photosensitizer molecules. As far as we know, this is the first study involving the use of bioluminescent bacteria to monitor the antibacterial activity of porphyrins under environmental conditions.

  6. Foraging in the Darkness of the Southern Ocean: Influence of Bioluminescence on a Deep Diving Predator

    PubMed Central

    Vacquié-Garcia, Jade; Royer, François; Dragon, Anne-Cécile; Viviant, Morgane; Bailleul, Frédéric; Guinet, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    How non-echolocating deep diving marine predators locate their prey while foraging remains mostly unknown. Female southern elephant seals (SES) (Mirounga leonina) have vision adapted to low intensity light with a peak sensitivity at 485 nm. This matches the wavelength of bioluminescence produced by a large range of marine organisms including myctophid fish, SES’s main prey. In this study, we investigated whether bioluminescence provides an accurate estimate of prey occurrence for SES. To do so, four SES were satellite-tracked during their post-breeding foraging trip and were equipped with Time-Depth-Recorders that also recorded light levels every two seconds. A total of 3386 dives were processed through a light-treatment model that detected light events higher than ambient level, i.e. bioluminescence events. The number of bioluminescence events was related to an index of foraging intensity for SES dives deep enough to avoid the influence of natural ambient light. The occurrence of bioluminescence was found to be negatively related to depth both at night and day. Foraging intensity was also positively related to bioluminescence both during day and night. This result suggests that bioluminescence likely provides SES with valuable indications of prey occurrence and might be a key element in predator-prey interactions in deep-dark marine environments. PMID:22952706

  7. Metabolic imaging in tumours by means of bioluminescence.

    PubMed Central

    Tamulevicius, P.; Streffer, C.

    1995-01-01

    A bioluminescence technique involving single photon imaging was used to quantify the spatial distribution of the metabolites ATP, glucose and lactate in cryosections of various solid tumours and normal tissue. Each section was covered with an enzyme cocktail linking the metabolite in question to luciferase with light emission proportional to the metabolite concentration. The photons emitted are imaged directly through a microscope and an imaging photon counting system. In some cases, good agreement was observed between the distribution of relatively high concentrations of ATP and glucose in viable cell regions of the periphery, while the reverse was seen in more necrotic tumour centres with comparatively high lactate levels. In general, lactate was distributed more diffusely over the sections while ATP was more highly localised and glucose assumed an intermediate pattern. In contrast to the large degree of heterogeneity seen in tumours, distribution patterns of metabolites were much more homogeneous in normal tissue, such as heart muscle. Mean values for metabolite levels in cryosections using bioluminescence are in good agreement with those obtained from the same tumour by conventional methods. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7577454

  8. Aequorin fusion proteins as bioluminescent tracers for competitive immunoassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirasoli, Mara; Michelini, Elisa; Deo, Sapna K.; Dikici, Emre; Roda, Aldo; Daunert, Sylvia

    2004-06-01

    The use of bio- and chemiluminescence for the development of quantitative binding assays offers undoubted advantages over other detection systems, such as spectrophotometry, fluorescence, or radioactivity. Indeed, bio- and chemiluminescence detection provides similar, or even better, sensitivity and detectability than radioisotopes, while avoiding the problems of health hazards, waste disposal, and instability associated with the use of radioisotopes. Among bioluminescent labels, the calcium-activated photoprotein aequorin, originally isolated from Aequorea victoria and today available as a recombinant product, is characterized by very high detectability, down to attomole levels. It has been used as a bioluminescent label for developing a variety of highly sensitive immunoassays, using various analyte-aequorin conjugation strategies. When the analyte is a protein or a peptide, genetic engineering techniques can be used to produce protein fusions where the analyte is in-frame fused with aequorin, thus producing homogeneous one-to-one conjugation products, available in virtually unlimited amount. Various assays were developed using this strategy: a short review of the most interesting applications is presented, as well as the cloning, purification and initial characterization of an endothelin-1-aequorin conjugate suitable for developing a competitive immunoassay for endothelin-1, a potent vasoconstrictor peptide, involved in hypertension.

  9. Bioluminescent properties of obelin and aequorin with novel coelenterazine analogues.

    PubMed

    Gealageas, Ronan; Malikova, Natalia P; Picaud, Sandrine; Borgdorff, Aren J; Burakova, Ludmila P; Brûlet, Philippe; Vysotski, Eugene S; Dodd, Robert H

    2014-04-01

    The main analytical use of Ca(2+)-regulated photoproteins from luminous coelenterates is for real-time non-invasive visualization of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) dynamics in cells and whole organisms. A limitation of this approach for in vivo deep tissue imaging is the fact that blue light emitted by the photoprotein is highly absorbed by tissue. Seven novel coelenterazine analogues were synthesized and their effects on the bioluminescent properties of recombinant obelin from Obelia longissima and aequorin from Aequorea victoria were evaluated. Only analogues having electron-donating groups (m-OCH3 and m-OH) on the C6 phenol moiety or an extended resonance system at the C8 position (1-naphthyl and α-styryl analogues) showed a significant red shift of light emission. Of these, only the α-styryl analogue displayed a sufficiently high light intensity to allow eventual tissue penetration. The possible suitability of this compound for in vivo assays was corroborated by studies with aequorin which allowed the monitoring of [Ca(2+)]i dynamics in cultured CHO cells and in hippocampal brain slices. Thus, the α-styryl coelenterazine analogue might be potentially useful for non-invasive, in vivo bioluminescence imaging in deep tissues of small animals.

  10. [ATP pool and bioluminescence in psychrophilic bacteria Photobacterium phosphoreum].

    PubMed

    Alekserova, L É; Alenina, K A; Efremenko, E N; Mazhul', M M; Piskunova, N F; Ismailov, A D

    2014-01-01

    Bioluminescence activity and ATP pool were investigated in the culture of psychrophilic bacteria Photobacterium phosphoreum collected-from the exponential and stationary growth phases, as well as immobilized in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel. In liquid culture, ATP pool remained at an almost a constant level throughout the luminescence cycle (over 100 h). The ATP pool in the stationary-phase and PVA-immobilizedl cells remained constant throughout their incubation in the medium (over 200 h) and in 3% NaCl solution (over 100 h): Quantitative assessment of integral photon yield and ATP pool indicated that bioluminescence decay in growing or stationary cells was not caused by limitation by the energy substrates of the luciferase reaction. Kinetic and quantitative parameters of emission activity and ATP pool excluded the possibility of formation of the aldehyde substrate for luciferase via reduction of the relevant fatty acids in NADPH and ATP-dependent reductase reaction and its oxidation in the monooxygenase reaction. Our results indicate that the aliphatic aldehyde is not utilized in the process of light emission.

  11. Bioluminescence regenerative cycle (BRC) system for nucleic acid quantification assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassibi, Arjang; Lee, Thomas H.; Davis, Ronald W.; Pourmand, Nader

    2003-07-01

    A new label-free methodology for nucleic acid quantification has been developed where the number of pyrophosphate molecules (PPi) released during polymerization of the target nucleic acid is counted and correlated to DNA copy number. The technique uses the enzymatic complex of ATP-sulfurylase and firefly luciferase to generate photons from PPi. An enzymatic unity gain positive feedback is also implemented to regenerate the photon generation process and compensate any decay in light intensity by self regulation. Due to this positive feedback, the total number of photons generated by the bioluminescence regenerative cycle (BRC) can potentially be orders of magnitude higher than typical chemiluminescent processes. A system level kinetic model that incorporates the effects of contaminations and detector noise was used to show that the photon generation process is in fact steady and also proportional to the nucleic acid quantity. Here we show that BRC is capable of detecting quantities of DNA as low as 1 amol (10-18 mole) in 40μlit aqueous solutions, and this enzymatic assay has a controllable dynamic range of 5 orders of magnitude. The sensitivity of this technology, due to the excess number of photons generated by the regenerative cycle, is not constrained by detector performance, but rather by possible PPi or ATP (adenosine triphosphate) contamination, or background bioluminescence of the enzymatic complex.

  12. A synthetic luciferin improves in vivo bioluminescence imaging of gene expression in cardiovascular brain regions.

    PubMed

    Simonyan, Hayk; Hurr, Chansol; Young, Colin N

    2016-10-01

    Bioluminescence imaging is an effective tool for in vivo investigation of molecular processes. We have demonstrated the applicability of bioluminescence imaging to spatiotemporally monitor gene expression in cardioregulatory brain nuclei during the development of cardiovascular disease, via incorporation of firefly luciferase into living animals, combined with exogenous d-luciferin substrate administration. Nevertheless, d-luciferin uptake into the brain tissue is low, which decreases the sensitivity of bioluminescence detection, particularly when considering small changes in gene expression in tiny central areas. Here, we tested the hypothesis that a synthetic luciferin, cyclic alkylaminoluciferin (CycLuc1), would be superior to d-luciferin for in vivo bioluminescence imaging in cardiovascular brain regions. Male C57B1/6 mice underwent targeted delivery of an adenovirus encoding the luciferase gene downstream of the CMV promoter to the subfornical organ (SFO) or paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus (PVN), two crucial cardioregulatory neural regions. While bioluminescent signals could be obtained following d-luciferin injection (150 mg/kg), CycLuc1 administration resulted in a three- to fourfold greater bioluminescent emission from the SFO and PVN, at 10- to 20-fold lower substrate concentrations (7.5-15 mg/kg). This CycLuc1-mediated enhancement in bioluminescent emission was evident early following substrate administration (i.e., 6-10 min) and persisted for up to 1 h. When the exposure time was reduced from 60 s to 1,500 ms, minimal signal in the PVN was detectable with d-luciferin, whereas bioluminescent images could be reliably captured with CycLuc1. These findings demonstrate that bioluminescent imaging with the synthetic luciferin CycLuc1 provides an improved physiological genomics tool to investigate molecular events in discrete cardioregulatory brain nuclei.

  13. Nanoluciferase as a novel quantitative protein fusion tag: Application for overexpression and bioluminescent receptor-binding assays of human leukemia inhibitory factor.

    PubMed

    He, Sheng-Xiang; Song, Ge; Shi, Jia-Ping; Guo, Yu-Qi; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2014-11-01

    Nanoluciferase (NanoLuc) is a newly developed small luciferase reporter with the brightest bioluminescence reported to date. In the present work, we developed NanoLuc as a novel quantitative protein fusion tag for efficient overexpression in Escherichia coli and ultrasensitive bioluminescent assays using human leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) as a model protein. LIF is an interleukin 6 family cytokine that elicits pleiotropic effects on a diverse range of cells by activating a heterodimeric LIFR/gp130 receptor. Recombinant preparation of the biologically active LIF protein is quite difficult due to its hydrophobic nature and three disulfide bonds. Using the novel NanoLuc-fusion approach, soluble 6×His-NanoLuc-LIF fusion protein was efficiently overexpressed in E. coli and enzymatically converted to monomeric mature LIF. Both the mature LIF and the NanoLuc-fused LIF had high biological activities in a leukemia M1 cell proliferation inhibition assay and in a STAT3 signaling activation assay. The NanoLuc-fused LIF retained high binding affinities with the overexpressed LIFR (Kd = 1.4 ± 0.4 nM, n = 3), the overexpressed LIFR/gp130 (Kd = 115 ± 8 pM, n = 3), and the endogenously expressed LIFR/gp130 (Kd = 33.1 ± 3.2 pM, n = 3), with a detection limit of less than 10 receptors per cell. Thus, the novel NanoLuc-fusion strategy not only provided an efficient approach for preparation of recombinant LIF protein but also provided a novel ultrasensitive bioluminescent tracer for ligand-receptor interaction studies. The novel NanoLuc-fusion approach could be extended to other proteins for both efficient sample preparation and various bioluminescent quantitative assays in future studies.

  14. A Panel of Trypanosoma brucei Strains Tagged with Blue and Red-Shifted Luciferases for Bioluminescent Imaging in Murine Infection Models

    PubMed Central

    Van Reet, Nick; Van de Vyver, Hélène; Pyana, Patient Pati; Van der Linden, Anne Marie; Büscher, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic engineering with luciferase reporter genes allows monitoring Trypanosoma brucei (T.b.) infections in mice by in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Until recently, luminescent T.b. models were based on Renilla luciferase (RLuc) activity. Our study aimed at evaluating red-shifted luciferases for in vivo BLI in a set of diverse T.b. strains of all three subspecies, including some recently isolated from human patients. Methodology/Principal findings We transfected T.b. brucei, T.b. rhodesiense and T.b. gambiense strains with either RLuc, click beetle red (CBR) or Photinus pyralis RE9 (PpyRE9) luciferase and characterised their in vitro luciferase activity, growth profile and drug sensitivity, and their potential for in vivo BLI. Compared to RLuc, the red-shifted luciferases, CBR and PpyRE9, allow tracking of T.b. brucei AnTaR 1 trypanosomes with higher details on tissue distribution, and PpyRE9 allows detection of the parasites with a sensitivity of at least one order of magnitude higher than CBR luciferase. With CBR-tagged T.b. gambiense LiTaR1, T.b. rhodesiense RUMPHI and T.b. gambiense 348 BT in an acute, subacute and chronic infection model respectively, we observed differences in parasite tropism for murine tissues during in vivo BLI. Ex vivo BLI on the brain confirmed central nervous system infection by all luminescent strains of T.b. brucei AnTaR 1, T.b. rhodesiense RUMPHI and T.b. gambiense 348 BT. Conclusions/Significance We established a genetically and phenotypically diverse collection of bioluminescent T.b. brucei, T.b. gambiense and T.b. rhodesiense strains, including drug resistant strains. For in vivo BLI monitoring of murine infections, we recommend trypanosome strains transfected with red-shifted luciferase reporter genes, such as CBR and PpyRE9. Red-shifted luciferases can be detected with a higher sensitivity in vivo and at the same time they improve the spatial resolution of the parasites in the entire body due to the better

  15. A model system for pathogen detection using a two-component bacteriophage/bioluminescent signal amplification assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, Nathan G.; Carroll, Richard J.; Applegate, Bruce M.

    2004-03-01

    Microbial contamination has become a mounting concern the last decade due to an increased emphasis of minimally processed food products specifically produce, and the recognition of foodborne pathogens such as Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Listeria monocytogenes. This research investigates a detection approach utilizing bacteriophage pathogen specificity coupled with a bacterial bioluminescent bioreporter utilizing the quorum sensing molecule from Vibrio fischeri, N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL). The 3-oxo-C6-HSL molecules diffuse out of the target cell after infection and induce bioluminescence from a population of 3-oxo-C6-HSL bioreporters (ROLux). E. coli phage M13, a well-characterized bacteriophage, offers a model system testing the use of bacteriophage for pathogen detection through cell-to-cell communication via a LuxR/3-oxo-C6-HSL system. Simulated temperate phage assays tested functionality of the ROLux reporter and production of 3-oxo-C6-HSL by various test strains. These assays showed detection limits of 102cfu after 24 hours in a varietry of detection formats. Assays incorporating the bacteriophage M13-luxI with the ROLux reporter and a known population of target cells were subsequently developed and have shown consistent detection limits of 105cfu target organisms. Measurable light response from high concentrations of target cells was almost immediate, suggesting an enrichment step to further improve detection limits and reduce assay time.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF A DUAL MODALITY TOMOGRAPHIC IMAGING SYSTEM FOR BIOLUMINESCENCE AND PET

    SciTech Connect

    CHATZIIOANNOU, ARION

    2011-12-21

    The goal of this proposal was to develop a new hybrid imaging modality capable to simultaneously image optical bioluminescence signals, as well as radionuclide emissions from the annihilation of positrons originating from molecular imaging probes in preclinical mouse models. This new technology enables the simultaneous in-vivo measurements of both emissions that could be produced from a single or a combination of two different biomarkers. It also facilitates establishing the physical limitations of bioluminescence imaging, its tomographic and spectral image reconstruction potential and the quantification of bioluminescence signals.

  17. Ultraweak bioluminescence dynamics and singlet oxygen correlations during injury repair in sweet potato

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossu, Marius; Ma, Lun; Chen, Wei

    2011-03-01

    Ultraweak bioluminescence at the level of hundreds of photons per second per square centimeter after cutting injury of sweet potato was investigated. A small emission peak immediate after cutting and a later and higher peak were observed. Selective singlet oxygen inhibitors and sensors have been use to study the contribution of singlet oxygen during the curing process, demonstrating increased presence of singlet oxygen during and after the late bioemission peak. It was confirmed that singlet oxygen has direct contribution to ultraweak bioluminescence but also induces the formation of other exited luminescent species that are responsible for the recorded bioluminescence.

  18. High resolution in vitro bioluminescence imaging using a multimodal optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altabella, L.; Gigliotti, C. R.; Perani, L.; Crippa, M. P.; Boschi, F.; Spinelli, A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence in vitro studies are usually performed with dedicated microscopes. In this work, we developed a novel image recovery algorithm and a multimodal system prototype to perform bioluminescence microscopy. We performed a feasibility study using GEANT4 Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of bioluminescent cells acquired at low SNR frames and processed using a Super Resolution Regularization Algorithm (SRRA). The method was also tested using in vitro cell acquisition. The results obtained with MC simulations showed an improvement in the spatial resolution from 90 μ m to 10 μ m and from 110 μ m to 13 μ m for in vitro imaging of mesothelioma cells.

  19. A multi-phase level set framework for source reconstruction in bioluminescence tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Heyu; Qu Xiaochao; Liang Jimin; He Xiaowei; Chen Xueli; Yang Da'an; Tian Jie

    2010-07-01

    We propose a novel multi-phase level set algorithm for solving the inverse problem of bioluminescence tomography. The distribution of unknown interior source is considered as piecewise constant and represented by using multiple level set functions. The localization of interior bioluminescence source is implemented by tracing the evolution of level set function. An alternate search scheme is incorporated to ensure the global optimal of reconstruction. Both numerical and physical experiments are performed to evaluate the developed level set reconstruction method. Reconstruction results show that the proposed method can stably resolve the interior source of bioluminescence tomography.

  20. Study of firefly luciferin oxidation and isomerism as possible inhibition pathways for firefly bioluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto da Silva, Luís; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C. G.

    2014-01-01

    Firefly bioluminescence presents a light emitting profile with a form of a flash, due to the firefly luciferase-catalyzed formation of inhibitory products. These impair the binding of the substrate luciferin to the active site of the enzyme. However, this luciferase catalyzed pathways may not be the only ones responsible for the flash profile. The oxidation and isomerisation of the substrate luciferin lead to the formation of compounds that are also known inhibitors of firefly bioluminescence. So, the objective of this Letter was to analyze if these reactions could be capable of interfering with the bioluminescence reaction.

  1. [Bioluminescent method of determining antiprotease activity].

    PubMed

    Gitel'zon, I I; Rykov, S A; Kratasiuk, G A; Petushkov, V N; Shvetskiĭ, A G

    1985-11-01

    A method for antiprotease activity measurement based on the use of luminous bacteria luciferase as protein substrate of proteases is suggested. Antiprotease is incubated with protease for 1 to 2 min at 30 degrees C and then it is added to the reaction mixture containing luciferase, NADH: FMN-oxidoreductase and their substrates--myristic aldehyde, FMN and NADH. Biofluorescence is measured in a temperature-controlled cuvette for 1 min. The total time of the measurement is 3 min. The method can be applied both in fine biochemical assays and in medical rapid diagnosis.

  2. A novel luciferase based reporter system to monitor activation of the ErbB2/Her2/neu pathway non-invasively during radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Frank; Li, Wenrong; Li, Fang; Li, Chuan-Yuan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To develop a split-luciferase based reporter system that allows for non-invasive monitoring of activation of the Her2/neu pathway in vivo in a quantitative and sensitive manner. Methods and Materials Fusion proteins of the ErbB2/Her2/neu receptor to the N-terminal fragment of luciferase as well as of its downstream binding partner Shc to the C-terminal fragment of luciferase have been engineered based on the rationale that upon activation and binding of the Her2 receptor molecule to Shc, luciferase function will be reconstituted. Thus the resulting bioluminescence signals can serve as a surrogate measure of receptor activation. Results We show that our reporter systems functions well in vitro in breast cancer cells and in vivo in xenograft tumors. In particular, the activities of Her2/neu in xenograft tumors could be monitored serially for an extended period of time after radiotherapy. Conclusions We believe that the novel ErbB2/Her2/neu reporter presented here is a powerful tool to study the biology of the Her2-neu pathway in vitro as well as in vivo. It should also facilitate the development and rapid evaluation of new Her2/neu targeted therapeutics. PMID:20934271

  3. Bioanalytical Applications of Real-Time ATP Imaging Via Bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenhagen, Jason Alan

    2003-01-01

    The research discussed within involves the development of novel applications of real-time imaging of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). ATP was detected via bioluminescence and the firefly luciferase-catalyzed reaction of ATP and luciferin. The use of a microscope and an imaging detector allowed for spatially resolved quantitation of ATP release. Employing this method, applications in both biological and chemical systems were developed. First, the mechanism by which the compound 48/80 induces release of ATP from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was investigated. Numerous enzyme activators and inhibitors were utilized to probe the second messenger systems involved in release. Compound 48/80 activated a G{sub q}-type protein to initiate ATP release from HUVECs. Ca2+ imaging along with ATP imaging revealed that activation of phospholipase C and induction of intracellular Ca2+ signaling were necessary for release of ATP. Furthermore, activation of protein kinase C inhibited the activity of phospholipase C and thus decreased the magnitude of ATP release. This novel release mechanism was compared to the existing theories of extracellular release of ATP. Bioluminescence imaging was also employed to examine the role of ATP in the field of neuroscience. The central nervous system (CNS) was dissected from the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Electrophysiological experiments demonstrated that the neurons of the Lymnaea were not damaged by any of the components of the imaging solution. ATP was continuously released by the ganglia of the CNS for over eight hours and varied from ganglion to ganglion and within individual ganglia. Addition of the neurotransmitters K+ and serotonin increased release of ATP in certain regions of the Lymnaea CNS. Finally, the ATP imaging technique was investigated for the study of drug release systems. MCM-41-type mesoporous nanospheres were loaded with ATP and end-capped with mercaptoethanol

  4. The Theoretical Estimation of the Bioluminescent Efficiency of the Firefly via a Nonadiabatic Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Yue, Ling; Lan, Zhenggang; Liu, Ya-Jun

    2015-02-05

    The firefly is famous for its high bioluminescent efficiency, which has attracted both scientific and public attention. The chemical origin of firefly bioluminescence is the thermolysis of the firefly dioxetanone anion (FDO(-)). Although considerable theoretical research has been conducted, and several mechanisms were proposed to elucidate the high efficiency of the chemi- and bioluminescence of FDO(-), there is a lack of direct experimental and theoretical evidence. For the first time, we performed a nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulation on the chemiluminescent decomposition of FDO(-) under the framework of the trajectory surface hopping (TSH) method and theoretically estimated the chemiluminescent quantum yield. The TSH simulation reproduced the gradually reversible charge-transfer initiated luminescence mechanism proposed in our previous study. More importantly, the current study, for the first time, predicted the bioluminescence efficiency of the firefly from a theoretical viewpoint, and the theoretical prediction efficiency is in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  5. Facile synthesis of gold-silver alloy nanoparticles for application in metal enhanced bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Abhijith, K S; Sharma, Richa; Ranjan, Rajeev; Thakur, M S

    2014-07-01

    In the present study we explored metal enhanced bioluminescence in luciferase enzymes for the first time. For this purpose a simple and reproducible one pot synthesis of gold-silver alloy nanoparticles was developed. By changing the molar ratio of tri-sodium citrate and silver nitrate we could synthesize spherical Au-Ag colloids of sizes ranging from 10 to 50 nm with a wide range of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peaks (450-550 nm). The optical tunability of the Au-Ag colloids enabled their effective use in enhancement of bioluminescence in a luminescent bacterium Photobacterium leiognathi and in luciferase enzyme systems from fireflies and bacteria. Enhancement of bioluminescence was 250% for bacterial cells, 95% for bacterial luciferase and 52% for firefly luciferase enzyme. The enhancement may be a result of energy transfer or plasmon induced enhancement. Such an increase can lead to higher sensitivity in detection of bioluminescent signals with potential applications in bio-analysis.

  6. Interaction between in vivo bioluminescence and extracellular electron transfer in Shewanella woodyi via charge and discharge.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiaochun; Zhao, Feng; You, Lexing; Wu, Xuee; Zheng, Zhiyong; Wu, Ranran; Jiang, Yanxia; Sun, Shigang

    2017-01-18

    Extracellular electron transfer (EET) and bioluminescence are both important for microbial growth and metabolism, but the mechanism of interaction between EET and bioluminescence is poorly understood. Herein, we demonstrate an exclusively respiratory luminous bacterium, Shewanella woodyi, which possesses EET ability and electron communication at the interface of S. woodyi and solid substrates via charge and discharge methods. Using an electro-chemiluminescence apparatus, our results confirmed that the FMN/FMNH2 content and the redox status of cytochrome c conjointly regulated the bioluminescence intensity when the potential of an indium-tin oxide electrode was changed. More importantly, this work revealed that there is an interaction between the redox reaction of single cells and bioluminescence of group communication via the EET pathway.

  7. Bioluminescence: A Potentially Convergent Signature of Life in Future Exploration of Europa's Subsurface Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores Martinez, C. L.

    2014-02-01

    This presentation deals with theoretical and evolutionary aspects pertaining to the nature and degree of biological complexity that is expectable among putative organisms on Europa. Bioluminescence is suggested as a new type of biosignature.

  8. Bioluminescent luciferase-modified magnetic nanoparticles as potential imaging agents for mammalian spermatozoa detection and tracking

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Nanoparticles have emerged as key materials for developing applications in nanomedicine, nanobiotechnology, bioimaging and theranostics. Existing bioimaging technologies include bioluminescent resonance energy transfer-conjugated quantum dots (BRET-QDs). Despite the current use of BRET-Q...

  9. Bacterial bioluminescence response to long-term exposure to reverse osmosis treated effluents from dye industries.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, J; Manikandan, B; Shirodkar, P V; Francis, K X; Mani Murali, R; Vethamony, P

    2014-10-01

    The bacterial bioluminescence assay is one of the novel means for toxicity detection. The bioluminescence response of 2 marine bioluminescent bacteria was tested upon their long-term exposure to 9 different reverse osmosis (RO) rejects with varying chemical composition sampled from various dye industries. Bioluminescent bacteria were cultured in the RO reject samples, at different concentrations, and their growth rate and luminescence was measured for 24 h. The RO reject samples caused sublethal effects upon exposure and retarded the growth of bacteria, confirming their toxic nature. Further, continuation of the exposure showed that the initial luminescence, though reduced, recovered and increased beyond the control cultures irrespective of cell density, and finally decreased once again. The present study emphasizes the need of evolving a long-term exposure assay and shows that the method followed in this study is suitable to evaluate the toxicants that exert delayed toxicity, using lower concentrations of toxicants as well as coloured samples.

  10. Coal based electric generation comparative technologies report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-26

    Ohio Clean Fuels, Inc., (OCF) has licensed technology that involves Co-Processing (Co-Pro) poor grade (high sulfur) coal and residual oil feedstocks to produce clean liquid fuels on a commercial scale. Stone Webster is requested to perform a comparative technologies report for grassroot plants utilizing coal as a base fuel. In the case of Co-Processing technology the plant considered is the nth plant in a series of applications. This report presents the results of an economic comparison of this technology with other power generation technologies that use coal. Technologies evaluated were:Co-Processing integrated with simple cycle combustion turbine generators, (CSC); Co-Processing integrated with combined cycle combustion turbine generators, (CCC); pulverized coal-fired boiler with flue gas desulfurization and steam turbine generator, (PC) and Circulating fluidized bed boiler and steam turbine generator, (CFB). Conceptual designs were developed. Designs were based on approximately equivalent net electrical output for each technology. A base case of 310 MWe net for each technology was established. Sensitivity analyses at other net electrical output sizes varying from 220 MWe's to 1770 MWe's were also performed. 4 figs., 9 tabs.

  11. Seasonal Changes of Bioluminescence in Photosynthetic and Heterotrophic Dinoflagellates at San Clemente Island

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    the northern Sargasso Sea : seasonal and vertical distribution. Mar. Biol. 104: 153- 164 Seasonal Changes of Bioluminescence in Photosynthetic and...bioluminescence in the northern Sargasso Sea . Mar. Biol. 113: 329-339 Bityukov, E.P., Rybasov, V.P., Shaida, V.G. (1967). Annual variations of the...geographically. Dinoflagellates are most abundant in coastal waters and inland seas and are less abundant in the open ocean (Colebrook and Robinson, 1965

  12. Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility determination of uropathogens in clinical urine specimens by use of ATP bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Ivancic, Vesna; Mastali, Mitra; Percy, Neil; Gornbein, Jeffrey; Babbitt, Jane T; Li, Yang; Landaw, Elliot M; Bruckner, David A; Churchill, Bernard M; Haake, David A

    2008-04-01

    We describe the first direct testing of the antimicrobial susceptibilities of bacterial pathogens in human clinical fluid samples by the use of ATP bioluminescence. We developed an ATP bioluminescence assay that eliminates somatic sources of ATP to selectively quantify the bacterial load in clinical urine specimens with a sensitivity of <1,000 CFU per milliliter. There was a log-log relationship between light emission and the numbers of CFU in clinical urine specimens. A clinical study was performed to evaluate the accuracy of the ATP bioluminescence assay for determination of the antimicrobial susceptibilities of uropathogens in clinical urine specimens tested in a blinded manner. ATP bioluminescent bacterial density quantitation was used to determine the inoculation volume in growth medium with and without antibiotics. After incubation at 37 degrees C for 120 min, the ATP bioluminescence assay was repeated to evaluate the uropathogen response to antibiotics. The ability of the ATP bioluminescence assay to discriminate between antimicrobial susceptibility and resistance was determined by comparison of the results obtained by the ATP bioluminescence assay with the results obtained by standard clinical microbiology methods. Receiver operator characteristic curves were used to determine the optimal threshold for discriminating between susceptibility and resistance. Susceptibility and resistance were correctly predicted in 87% and 95% of cases, respectively, for an overall unweighted accuracy of 91%, when the results were stratified by antibiotic. For samples in which the pathogen was susceptible, the accuracy improved to 95% when the results for samples with less than a 25-fold increase in the amount of bacterial ATP in the medium without antibiotics were excluded. These data indicate that a rapid bioluminescent antimicrobial susceptibility assay may be useful for the management of urinary tract infections.

  13. Morphogenesis and bioluminescence in germination of red bean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kai, Shoichi; Mitani, Tomohiko; Fujikawa, Masahiro

    1994-10-01

    Spontaneous bioluminescence and morphogenesis were investigated for the germination and the growth processes of a red bean seed under suppression of photosynthesis. Three types of shape in seed growth were observed in well controlled conditions: (1) no root hair and leaves, (2) with root hairs and leaves and (3) no root growth. In this article, growth dynamics for the first case was investigated. The average growth dynamics of the root length of a red bean after germination and its variance were well described by a simple logistic equation with a noise term. It was observed that the scaling property for the growth dynamics has held. Strong luminescence was observed at two inflection points of the logistic curve of the root growth. By the use of a two dimensional photon counting method, it was clarified that the strong emission was mainly radiated from the cell division zone near a root cap and rather less emission from an elongation area.

  14. Preservative efficacy screening of pharmaceutical formulations using ATP bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Mateja; Suklje-Debeljak, Helena; Kmetec, Vojko

    2008-05-01

    The preservative challenge test is a method used to determine the efficacy of a preservation system in a pharmaceutical or cosmetic formulation. However, such testing is a labor-intensive, repetitive task often requiring days before results can be generated. Several alternatives to traditional colony-count techniques have been developed. A study using pure suspensions of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albicans, and Aspergillus niger showed that the accuracy, repeatability, and linearity of the Pallchek luminometer ATP bioluminescence (ATP-B) system was equivalent to the traditional colony-count method. In any case, the method proved sensitive enough to follow the effect of preservatives on a number of test microorganisms, indicating the applicability of the ATP-B method for preservative screening studies in various pharmaceutical formulations.

  15. Use of bioluminescent Escherichia coli O157:H7 to study intra-protozoan survival of bacteria within Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Shona M; Cooper, Alison A A; Taylor, Elaine L; Salisbury, Vyvyan C

    2003-06-06

    A method was developed that enabled real-time monitoring of the uptake and survival of bioluminescent Escherichia coli O157 within the freshwater ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis. Constitutively bioluminescent E. coli O157 pLITE27 was cocultured with T. pyriformis in nutrient-deficient (Chalkley's) and in nutrient-rich (proteose peptone, yeast extract) media. Non-internalised bacteria were inactivated by addition of colistin, indicated by a decline in bioluminescence. Protozoa were subsequently lysed with Triton X-100 which lead to a further drop in bioluminescence, consistent with release of live internal bacteria from T. pyriformis into the colistin-containing environment. Bioluminescence measurements for non-lysed cultures indicated that internalised E. coli O157 pLITE27 cells were only slowly digested by T. pyriformis, in both media, over the time period studied. The results suggest that bioluminescent bacteria are useful tools in the study of bacterial intra-protozoan survival.

  16. A luciferin analogue generating near-infrared bioluminescence achieves highly sensitive deep-tissue imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kuchimaru, Takahiro; Iwano, Satoshi; Kiyama, Masahiro; Mitsumata, Shun; Kadonosono, Tetsuya; Niwa, Haruki; Maki, Shojiro; Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae

    2016-01-01

    In preclinical cancer research, bioluminescence imaging with firefly luciferase and D-luciferin has become a standard to monitor biological processes both in vitro and in vivo. However, the emission maximum (λmax) of bioluminescence produced by D-luciferin is 562 nm where light is not highly penetrable in biological tissues. This emphasizes a need for developing a red-shifted bioluminescence imaging system to improve detection sensitivity of targets in deep tissue. Here we characterize the bioluminescent properties of the newly synthesized luciferin analogue, AkaLumine-HCl. The bioluminescence produced by AkaLumine-HCl in reactions with native firefly luciferase is in the near-infrared wavelength ranges (λmax=677 nm), and yields significantly increased target-detection sensitivity from deep tissues with maximal signals attained at very low concentrations, as compared with D-luciferin and emerging synthetic luciferin CycLuc1. These characteristics offer a more sensitive and accurate method for non-invasive bioluminescence imaging with native firefly luciferase in various animal models. PMID:27297211

  17. Second bioluminescence-activating component in the luminous fungus Mycena chlorophos.

    PubMed

    Teranishi, Katsunori

    2017-03-01

    Mycena chlorophos is an oxygen-dependent bioluminescent fungus. The mechanisms underlying its light emission are unknown. A component that increased the bioluminescence intensity of the immature living gills of M. chlorophos was isolated from mature M. chlorophos gills and chemically characterized. The bioluminescence-activating component was found to be trans-3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid and its bioluminescence activation was highly structure-specific. (13) C- and (18) O-labelling studies using the immature living gills showed that trans-3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid was synthesized from trans-4-hydroxycinnamic acid in the gills by hydroxylation with molecular oxygen as well as by the general metabolism, and trans-3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid did not produce hispidin (detection-limit concentration: 10 pmol/1 g wet gill). Addition of 0.01 mM hispidin to the immature living gills generated no bioluminescence activation. These results suggested that the prompt bioluminescence activation resulting from addition of trans-3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid could not be attributed to the generation of hispidin. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. A luciferin analogue generating near-infrared bioluminescence achieves highly sensitive deep-tissue imaging.

    PubMed

    Kuchimaru, Takahiro; Iwano, Satoshi; Kiyama, Masahiro; Mitsumata, Shun; Kadonosono, Tetsuya; Niwa, Haruki; Maki, Shojiro; Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae

    2016-06-14

    In preclinical cancer research, bioluminescence imaging with firefly luciferase and D-luciferin has become a standard to monitor biological processes both in vitro and in vivo. However, the emission maximum (λmax) of bioluminescence produced by D-luciferin is 562 nm where light is not highly penetrable in biological tissues. This emphasizes a need for developing a red-shifted bioluminescence imaging system to improve detection sensitivity of targets in deep tissue. Here we characterize the bioluminescent properties of the newly synthesized luciferin analogue, AkaLumine-HCl. The bioluminescence produced by AkaLumine-HCl in reactions with native firefly luciferase is in the near-infrared wavelength ranges (λmax=677 nm), and yields significantly increased target-detection sensitivity from deep tissues with maximal signals attained at very low concentrations, as compared with D-luciferin and emerging synthetic luciferin CycLuc1. These characteristics offer a more sensitive and accurate method for non-invasive bioluminescence imaging with native firefly luciferase in various animal models.

  19. ATP bioluminescence rapid detection of total viable count in soy sauce.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shou-Lei; Miao, Su-Na; Deng, Shao-Ya; Zou, Min-Juan; Zhong, Fo-Sheng; Huang, Wen-Biao; Pan, Si-Yi; Wang, Qing-Zhang

    2012-01-01

    The adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence rapid determination method may be useful for enumerating the total viable count (TVC) in soy sauce, as it has been previously used in food and beverages for sanitation with good precision. However, many factors interfere with the correlation between total aerobic plate counts and ATP bioluminescence. This study investigated these interfering factors, including ingredients of soy sauce and bacteria at different physiological stages. Using the ATP bioluminescence method, TVC was obtained within 4 h, compared to 48 h required for the conventional aerobic plate count (APC) method. Our results also indicated a high correlation coefficient (r = 0.90) between total aerobic plate counts and ATP bioluminescence after filtration and resuscitation with special medium. The limit of quantification of the novel detection method is 100 CFU/mL; there is a good linear correlation between the bioluminescence intensity and TVC in soy sauce in the range 1 × 10(2) -3 × 10(4) CFU/mL and even wider. The method employed a luminescence recorder (Tristar LB-941) and 96-well plates and could analyse 50-100 samples simultaneously at low cost. In this study, we evaluated and eliminated the interfering factors and made the ATP bioluminescence rapid method available for enumerating TVC in soy sauce.

  20. The influence of hypoxia on bioluminescence in luciferase-transfected gliosarcoma tumor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Eduardo H; Niedre, Mark J; Jarvi, Mark T; Mocanu, Joseph D; Moriyama, Yumi; Subarsky, Patrick; Li, Buhong; Lilge, Lothar D; Wilson, Brian C

    2008-06-01

    Firefly luciferase catalyzes the emission of light from luciferin in the presence of oxygen and adenosine triphosphate. This bioluminescence is commonly employed in imaging mode to monitor tumor growth and treatment responses in vivo. A potential concern is that, since solid tumors are often hypoxic, either constitutively and/or as a result of treatment, the oxygen available for the bioluminescence reaction could be reduced to limiting levels, leading to underestimation of the actual number of luciferase-labeled cells during in vivo experiments. We present studies of the oxygen dependence of bioluminescence in vitro in rat 9 L gliosarcoma cells tagged with the firefly luciferase gene (9L(luc)). We demonstrate that the bioluminescence signal decreases at pO(2) bioluminescence reaction and so is responsible for the reduction of bioluminescence signal in 9L(luc) cells in acute hypoxia, rather than luciferase expression or oxygen itself.

  1. Novel Luciferase-Based Reporter System to Monitor Activation of ErbB2/Her2/neu Pathway Noninvasively During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Frank; Li Wenrong; Li Fang; Li Chuanyuan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a split-luciferase-based reporter system that allows for noninvasive monitoring of activation of the Her2/neu pathway in vivo in a quantitative and sensitive manner. Methods and Materials: Fusion proteins of the ErbB2/Her2/neu receptor to the N-terminal fragment of luciferase and of its downstream binding partner Shc to the C-terminal fragment of luciferase have been engineered owing to the rationale that on activation and binding of the Her2 receptor molecule to Shc, luciferase function will be reconstituted. Thus, the resulting bioluminescence signals can serve as a surrogate measure of receptor activation. Results: We have shown that our reporter systems functions well in vitro in breast cancer cells and in vivo in xenograft tumors. In particular, the activities of Her2/neu in xenograft tumors could be monitored serially for an extended period after radiotherapy. Conclusions: We believe that the novel ErbB2/Her2/neu reporter we have presented is a powerful tool to study the biology of the Her2-neu pathway in vitro and in vivo. It should also facilitate the development and rapid evaluation of new Her2/neu-targeted therapeutic agents.

  2. Bioluminescence imaging of chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infections reveals tissue-specific parasite dynamics and heart disease in the absence of locally persistent infection

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Michael D; Fortes Francisco, Amanda; Taylor, Martin C; Burrell-Saward, Hollie; McLatchie, Alex P; Miles, Michael A; Kelly, John M

    2014-01-01

    Summary Chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infections lead to cardiomyopathy in 20–30% of cases. A causal link between cardiac infection and pathology has been difficult to establish because of a lack of robust methods to detect scarce, focally distributed parasites within tissues. We developed a highly sensitive bioluminescence imaging system based on T. cruzi expressing a novel luciferase that emits tissue-penetrating orange-red light. This enabled long-term serial evaluation of parasite burdens in individual mice with an in vivo limit of detection of significantly less than 1000 parasites. Parasite distributions during chronic infections were highly focal and spatiotemporally dynamic, but did not localize to the heart. End-point ex vivo bioluminescence imaging allowed tissue-specific quantification of parasite loads with minimal sampling bias. During chronic infections, the gastro-intestinal tract, specifically the colon and stomach, was the only site where T. cruzi infection was consistently observed. Quantitative PCR-inferred parasite loads correlated with ex vivo bioluminescence and confirmed the gut as the parasite reservoir. Chronically infected mice developed myocarditis and cardiac fibrosis, despite the absence of locally persistent parasites. These data identify the gut as a permissive niche for long-term T. cruzi infection and show that canonical features of Chagas disease can occur without continual myocardium-specific infection. PMID:24712539

  3. Firefly luciferase inhibitor-conjugated peptide quenches bioluminescence: a versatile tool for real time monitoring cellular uptake of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Poutiainen, Pekka K; Rönkkö, Teemu; Hinkkanen, Ari E; Palvimo, Jorma J; Närvänen, Ale; Turhanen, Petri; Laatikainen, Reino; Weisell, Janne; Pulkkinen, Juha T

    2014-01-15

    In this paper, novel firefly luciferase-specific inhibitor compounds (FLICs) are evaluated as potential tools for cellular trafficking of transporter conjugates. As a proof-of-concept, we designed FLICs that were suitable for solid phase peptide synthesis and could be covalently conjugated to peptides via an amide bond. The spacer between inhibitor and peptide was optimized to gain efficient inhibition of recombinant firefly luciferase (FLuc) without compromising the activity of the model peptides. The hypothesis of using FLICs as tools for cellular trafficking studies was ensured with U87Fluc glioblastoma cells expressing firefly luciferase. Results show that cell penetrating peptide (penetratin) FLIC conjugate 9 inhibited FLuc penetrated cells efficiently (IC50 = 1.6 μM) and inhibited bioluminescence, without affecting the viability of the cells. Based on these results, peptide-FLIC conjugates can be used for the analysis of cellular uptake of biomolecules in a new way that can at the same time overcome some downsides seen with other methods. Thus, FLICs can be considered as versatile tools that broaden the plethora of methods that take advantage of the bioluminescence phenomena.

  4. FY04 Engineering Technology Reports Technology Base

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, R M

    2005-01-27

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Engineering Directorate has two primary discretionary avenues for its investment in technologies: the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program and the ''Tech Base'' program. This volume summarizes progress on the projects funded for technology-base efforts in FY2004. The Engineering Technical Reports exemplify Engineering's more than 50-year history of researching and developing (LDRD), and reducing to practice (technology-base) the engineering technologies needed to support the Laboratory's missions. Engineering has been a partner in every major program and project at the Laboratory throughout its existence, and has prepared for this role with a skilled workforce and technical resources. This accomplishment is well summarized by Engineering's mission: ''Enable program success today and ensure the Laboratory's vitality tomorrow''. LDRD is the vehicle for creating those technologies and competencies that are cutting edge. These require a significant level of research or contain some unknown that needs to be fully understood. Tech Base is used to apply those technologies, or adapt them to a Laboratory need. The term commonly used for Tech Base projects is ''reduction to practice''. Tech Base projects effect the natural transition to reduction-to-practice of scientific or engineering methods that are well understood and established. They represent discipline-oriented, core competency activities that are multi-programmatic in application, nature, and scope. The objectives of technology-base funding include: (1) the development and enhancement of tools and processes to provide Engineering support capability, such as code maintenance and improved fabrication methods; (2) support of Engineering science and technology infrastructure, such as the installation or integration of a new capability; (3) support for technical and administrative leadership through our technology Centers; and (4) the initial scoping and

  5. Molecular Detection of Bioluminescent Dinoflagellates in Surface Waters of the Patagonian Shelf during Early Austral Summer 2008

    PubMed Central

    Valiadi, Martha; Painter, Stuart C.; Allen, John T.; Balch, William M.; Iglesias-Rodriguez, M. Debora

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the distribution of bioluminescent dinoflagellates in the Patagonian Shelf region using “universal” PCR primers for the dinoflagellate luciferase gene. Luciferase gene sequences and single cell PCR tests, in conjunction with taxonomic identification by microscopy, allowed us to identify and quantify bioluminescent dinoflagellates. We compared these data to coincidental discrete optical measurements of stimulable bioluminescence intensity. Molecular detection of the luciferase gene showed that bioluminescent dinoflagellates were widespread across the majority of the Patagonian Shelf region. Their presence was comparatively underestimated by optical bioluminescence measurements, whose magnitude was affected by interspecific differences in bioluminescence intensity and by the presence of other bioluminescent organisms. Molecular and microscopy data showed that the complex hydrography of the area played an important role in determining the distribution and composition of dinoflagellate populations. Dinoflagellates were absent south of the Falkland Islands where the cold, nutrient-rich, and well-mixed waters of the Falklands Current favoured diatoms instead. Diverse populations of dinoflagellates were present in the warmer, more stratified waters of the Patagonian Shelf and Falklands Current as it warmed northwards. Here, the dinoflagellate population composition could be related to distinct water masses. Our results provide new insight into the prevalence of bioluminescent dinoflagellates in Patagonian Shelf waters and demonstrate that a molecular approach to the detection of bioluminescent dinoflagellates in natural waters is a promising tool for ecological studies of these organisms. PMID:24918444

  6. High-Throughput Giardia lamblia Viability Assay Using Bioluminescent ATP Content Measurements▿

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Catherine Z.; Kulakova, Liudmila; Southall, Noel; Marugan, Juan J.; Galkin, Andrey; Austin, Christopher P.; Herzberg, Osnat; Zheng, Wei

    2011-01-01

    The human pathogen Giardia lamblia is an anaerobic protozoan parasite that causes giardiasis, one of the most common diarrheal diseases worldwide. Although several drugs are available for the treatment of giardiasis, drug resistance has been reported and is likely to increase, and recurrent infections are common. The search for new drugs that can overcome the drug-resistant strains of Giardia is an unmet medical need. New drug screen methods can facilitate the drug discovery process and aid with the identification of new drug targets. Using a bioluminescent ATP content assay, we have developed a phenotypic drug screen method to identify compounds that act against the actively growing trophozoite stage of the parasite. This assay is homogeneous, robust, and suitable for high-throughput screening of large compound collections. A screen of 4,096 pharmacologically active small molecules and approved drugs revealed 43 compounds with selective anti-Giardia properties, including 32 previously reported and 11 novel anti-Giardia agents. The most potent novel compound was fumagillin, which showed 50% inhibitory concentrations of 10 nM against the WB isolate and 2 nM against the GS isolate. PMID:21078930

  7. Noninvasive bioluminescence imaging of the dynamics of sanguinarine induced apoptosis via activation of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yunpeng; Shi, Yaru; Zeng, Qi; Wang, Fu

    2016-01-01

    Most chemotherapeutic drugs exert their anti-tumor effects primarily by triggering a final pathway leading to apoptosis. Noninvasive imaging of apoptotic events in preclinical models would greatly facilitate the development of apoptosis-inducing compounds and evaluation of their therapeutic efficacy. Here we employed a cyclic firefly luciferase (cFluc) reporter to screen potential pro-apoptotic compounds from a number of natural agents. We demonstrated that sanguinarine (SANG) could induce apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner in UM-SCC-22B head and neck cancer cells. Moreover, SANG-induced apoptosis was associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) signal pathways. After intravenous administration with SANG in 22B-cFluc xenograft models, a dramatic increase of luminescence signal can be detected as early as 48 h post-treatment, as revealed by longitudinal bioluminescence imaging in vivo. Remarkable apoptotic cells reflected from ex vivo TUNEL staining confirmed the imaging results. Importantly, SANG treatment caused distinct tumor growth retardation in mice compared with the vehicle-treated group. Taken together, our results showed that SANG is a candidate anti-tumor drug and noninvasive imaging of apoptosis using cFluc reporter could provide a valuable tool for drug development and therapeutic efficacy evaluation. PMID:26968950

  8. In vivo imaging of mice infected with bioluminescent Trypanosoma cruzi unveils novel sites of infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The development of techniques that allow the imaging of animals infected with parasites expressing luciferase opens up new possibilities for following the fate of parasites in infected mammals. Methods D-luciferin potassium salt stock solution was prepared in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at 15 mg/ml. To produce bioluminescence, infected and control mice received an intraperitoneal injection of luciferin stock solution (150 mg/kg). All mice were immediately anesthetized with 2% isofluorane, and after 10 minutes were imaged. Ex vivo evaluation of infected tissues and organs was evaluated in a 24-well plate in 150 μg/ml D-luciferin diluted in PBS. Images were captured using the IVIS Lumina image system (Xenogen). Dissected organs were also evaluated by microscopy of hematoxylin-eosin stained sections. Results Here we describe the results obtained using a genetically modified Dm28c strain of T. cruzi expressing the firefly luciferase to keep track of infection by bioluminescence imaging. Progression of infection was observed in vivo in BALB/c mice at various intervals after infection with transgenic Dm28c-luc. The bioluminescent signal was immediately observed at the site of T. cruzi inoculation, and one day post infection (dpi) it was disseminated in the peritoneal cavity. A similar pattern in the cavity was observed on 7 dpi, but the bioluminescence was more intense in the terminal region of the large intestine, rectum, and gonads. On 14 and 21 dpi, bioluminescent parasites were also observed in the heart, snout, paws, hind limbs, and forelimbs. From 28 dpi to 180 dpi in chronically infected mice, bioluminescence declined in regions of the body but was concentrated in the gonad region. Ex vivo evaluation of dissected organs and tissues by bioluminescent imaging confirmed the in vivo bioluminescent foci. Histopathological analysis of dissected organs demonstrated parasite nests at the rectum and snout, in muscle fibers of mice infected with Dm28c

  9. The origins of marine bioluminescence: turning oxygen defence mechanisms into deep-sea communication tools.

    PubMed

    Rees, J F; de Wergifosse, B; Noiset, O; Dubuisson, M; Janssens, B; Thompson, E M

    1998-04-01

    Bioluminescence, the emission of ecologically functional light by living organisms, emerged independently on several occasions, yet the evolutionary origins of most bioluminescent systems remain obscure. We propose that the luminescent substrates of the luminous reactions (luciferins) are the evolutionary core of most systems, while luciferases, the enzymes catalysing the photogenic oxidation of the luciferin, serve to optimise the expression of the endogenous chemiluminescent properties of the luciferin. Coelenterazine, a luciferin occurring in many marine bioluminescent groups, has strong antioxidative properties as it is highly reactive with reactive oxygen species such as the superoxide anion or peroxides. We suggest that the primary function of coelenterazine was originally the detoxification of the deleterious oxygen derivatives. The functional shift from its antioxidative to its light-emitting function might have occurred when the strength of selection for antioxidative defence mechanisms decreased. This might have been made possible when marine organisms began colonising deeper layers of the oceans, where exposure to oxidative stress is considerably reduced because of reduced light irradiance and lower oxygen levels. A reduction in metabolic activity with increasing depth would also have decreased the endogenous production of reactive oxygen species. Therefore, in these organisms, mechanisms for harnessing the chemiluminescence of coelenterazine in specialised organs could have developed, while the beneficial antioxidative properties were maintained in other tissues. The full range of graded irradiance in the mesopelagic zone, where the majority of organisms are bioluminescent, would have provided a continuum for the selection and improvement of proto-bioluminescence. Although the requirement for oxygen or reactive oxygen species observed in bioluminescent systems reflects the high energy required to produce visible light, it may suggest that oxygen

  10. U-SPECT-BioFluo: an integrated radionuclide, bioluminescence, and fluorescence imaging platform

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In vivo bioluminescence, fluorescence, and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging provide complementary information about biological processes. However, to date these signatures are evaluated separately on individual preclinical systems. In this paper, we introduce a fully integrated bioluminescence-fluorescence-SPECT platform. Next to an optimization in logistics and image fusion, this integration can help improve understanding of the optical imaging (OI) results. Methods An OI module was developed for a preclinical SPECT system (U-SPECT, MILabs, Utrecht, the Netherlands). The applicability of the module for bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging was evaluated in both a phantom and in an in vivo setting using mice implanted with a 4 T1-luc + tumor. A combination of a fluorescent dye and radioactive moiety was used to directly relate the optical images of the module to the SPECT findings. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) was compared to the localization of the fluorescence signal in the tumors. Results Both the phantom and in vivo mouse studies showed that superficial fluorescence signals could be imaged accurately. The SPECT and bioluminescence images could be used to place the fluorescence findings in perspective, e.g. by showing tracer accumulation in non-target organs such as the liver and kidneys (SPECT) and giving a semi-quantitative read-out for tumor spread (bioluminescence). Conclusions We developed a fully integrated multimodal platform that provides complementary registered imaging of bioluminescent, fluorescent, and SPECT signatures in a single scanning session with a single dose of anesthesia. In our view, integration of these modalities helps to improve data interpretation of optical findings in relation to radionuclide images. PMID:25386389

  11. Bioluminescent imaging of bacterial biofilm infections in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kadurugamuwa, Jagath L; Francis, Kevin P

    2008-01-01

    Whole body biophotonic imaging (BPI) is a technique that has contributed significantly to the way researchers study bacterial pathogens and develop pre-clinical treatments to combat their ensuing infections in vivo. Not only does this approach allow disease profiles and drug efficacy studies to be conducted non-destructively in live animals over the entire course of the disease, but in many cases, it enables investigators to observe disease profiles that could otherwise easily be missed using conventional methodologies. The principles of this technique are that bacterial pathogens engineered to express bioluminescence (visible light) can be readily monitored from outside of the living animal using specialized low-light imaging equipment, enabling their movement, expansion and treatment to be seen completely non-invasively. Moreover, because the same group of animals can be imaged at each time-point throughout the study, the overall number of animals used is dramatically reduced, saving lives, time, and money. Also, as each animal acts as its own control over time, the issues associated with animal-to-animal variation are circumvented, thus improving the quality of the biostatistical data generated. The ability to monitor infections in vivo in a longitudinal fashion is especially appealing to assess chronic infections such as those involving implanted devices. Typically, bacteria grow as biofilms on these foreign bodies and are reputably difficult to monitor with conventional methods. Because of the non-destructive and non-invasive nature of BPI, the procedure can be performed repeatedly in the same animal, allowing the biofilm to be studied in situ without detachment or disturbance. This ability not only allows unique patterns of disease relapse to be seen following termination of antibiotic therapy but also in vivo resistance development during prolonged treatment, both of which are common occurrences with device-related infections. This chapter describes the

  12. Monitoring bacterial chemotaxis by using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer: Absence of feedback from the flagellar motors

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Thomas S.; Delalez, Nicolas; Pichler, Klemens; Berg, Howard C.

    2006-01-01

    We looked for a feedback system in Escherichia coli that might sense the rotational bias of flagellar motors and regulate the activity of the chemotaxis receptor kinase. Our search was based on the assumption that any machinery that senses rotational bias will be perturbed if flagellar rotation stops. We monitored the activity of the kinase in swimming cells by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) between Renilla luciferase fused to the phosphatase, CheZ, and yellow fluorescent protein fused to the response regulator, CheY. Then we jammed the flagellar motors by adding an antifilament antibody that crosslinks adjacent filaments in flagellar bundles. At steady state, the rate of phosphorylation of CheY is equal to the rate of dephosphorylation of CheY-P, which is proportional to the degree of association between CheZ and CheY-P, the quantity sensed by BRET. No changes were observed, even upon addition of an amount of antibody that stopped the swimming of >95% of cells within a few seconds. So, the kinase does not appear to be sensitive to motor output. The BRET technique is complementary to one based on FRET, described previously. Its reliability was confirmed by measurements of the response of cells to the addition of attractants. PMID:16452163

  13. Molecular basis for the blue bioluminescence of the Australian glow-worm Arachnocampa richardsae (Diptera: Keroplatidae).

    PubMed

    Trowell, Stephen C; Dacres, Helen; Dumancic, Mira M; Leitch, Virginia; Rickards, Rodney W

    2016-09-16

    Bioluminescence is the emission of visible light by living organisms. Here we describe the isolation and characterisation of a cDNA encoding a MW ≈ 59,000 Da luciferase from the Australian glow-worm, Arachnocampa richardsae. The enzyme is a member of the acyl-CoA ligase superfamily and produces blue light on addition of D-luciferin. These results are contrary to earlier reports (Lee, J., Photochem Photobiol 24, 279-285 (1976), Viviani, V. R., Hastings, J. W. & Wilson, T., Photochem Photobiol 75, 22-27 (2002)), which suggested glow-worm luciferase has MW ≈ 36,000 Da and is unreactive with beetle luciferin. There are more than 2000 species of firefly, which all produce emissions from D-luciferin in the green to red regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Although blue-emitting luciferases are known from marine organisms, they belong to different structural families and use a different substrate. The observation of blue emission from a D-luciferin-using enzyme is therefore unprecedented.

  14. Catalog of data bases and reports

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This document provides information about the many reports and other materials made available by the US Department Energy`s (DOE`s) Global Change Research Program (GCRP). It is divided into eight sections plus author and title indexes: US Department of Energy Global Change Research Program Research plans and summaries, US Department of Energy Global Change Research Program technical reports, US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Program reports, other US Department of Energy reports, CDIAC reports, CDAIC numeric data and computer model distribution, USDA reports on response of vegetation to carbon dioxide, and other publications.

  15. Noninvasive bioluminescence imaging of dengue virus infection in the brain of A129 mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Feng; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Zhao, Hui; Ye, Qing; Wang, Hong-Jiang; Li, Shi-Hua; Zhu, Shun-Ya; Shi, Pei-Yong; Qin, E-De; Zhang, Bo; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2013-05-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection is one of the most important public health threats globally; however, no vaccines or effective antivirals are currently available. The bioluminescence imaging technique has emerged as a powerful tool for studies on viral pathogenesis in vitro and in vivo. In this study, using a recombinant DENV that stably expressed Renilla luciferase (Rluc-DENV), we used bioluminescence for imaging of DENV infection in the brain of A129 mice that lacked type I interferon receptors. Upon intracranial inoculation with Rluc-DENV, A129 mice developed typical neurological symptoms and rapidly succumbed to viral infection. Real-time bioluminescence intensity analysis revealed the replication kinetics of Rluc-DENV in the brain of A129 mice. Linear regression analyses showed a good correlation between photon flux and viral titers (R(2) = 0.9923). Finally, the bioluminescence model was validated using a known mouse monoclonal antibody, 2A10G6, and the therapeutic effects of this neutralizing antibody were readily monitored by live imaging in the same animal. The noninvasive bioluminescence imaging of DENV infection as described here shows distinct advantages over traditional animal models and provides a powerful tool for potential antiviral or vaccine assays against DENV infection in vivo.

  16. Autonomous Bioluminescent Expression of the Bacterial Luciferase Gene Cassette (lux) in a Mammalian Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Close, Dan M.; Patterson, Stacey S.; Ripp, Steven; Baek, Seung J.; Sanseverino, John; Sayler, Gary S.

    2010-01-01

    Background The bacterial luciferase (lux) gene cassette consists of five genes (luxCDABE) whose protein products synergistically generate bioluminescent light signals exclusive of supplementary substrate additions or exogenous manipulations. Historically expressible only in prokaryotes, the lux operon was re-synthesized through a process of multi-bicistronic, codon-optimization to demonstrate for the first time self-directed bioluminescence emission in a mammalian HEK293 cell line in vitro and in vivo. Methodology/Principal Findings Autonomous in vitro light production was shown to be 12-fold greater than the observable background associated with untransfected control cells. The availability of reduced riboflavin phosphate (FMNH2) was identified as the limiting bioluminescence substrate in the mammalian cell environment even after the addition of a constitutively expressed flavin reductase gene (frp) from Vibrio harveyi. FMNH2 supplementation led to a 151-fold increase in bioluminescence in cells expressing mammalian codon-optimized luxCDE and frp genes. When injected subcutaneously into nude mice, in vivo optical imaging permitted near instantaneous light detection that persisted independently for the 60 min length of the assay with negligible background. Conclusions/Significance The speed, longevity, and self-sufficiency of lux expression in the mammalian cellular environment provides a viable and powerful alternative for real-time target visualization not currently offered by existing bioluminescent and fluorescent imaging technologies. PMID:20805991

  17. Environmental and synthetic sulphydryl group inhibitors: effects on bioluminescence and respiration in Vibrio fischeri.

    PubMed

    Kalciene, Virginija; Cetkauskaite, Anolda

    2007-03-01

    Elemental sulphur (as S0 and S8) is abundant in anaerobic sediments and soil, and is highly toxic in the Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence test. This mode of S0 action remains uncertain. The objective of this research was the analysis of the toxic effects of S0 on bioluminescence and respiration in V. fischeri, in joint action with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) or 2,4-dithio-DL-threitol (DTT), which are -SH group inhibiting and maintaining synthetic agents, respectively. Non-toxic DTT immediately protected cell bioluminescence against S0 inhibition at low (5.5ppb) and high (55ppb) concentrations of S0, whilst restoration of the inhibitory effect of S0 took up to 30 minutes. NEM (62.5ppb) diminished cell bioluminescence by up to 50% after 5 minutes, but after 60 minutes, the inhibition reached 100%. DTT restored the bioluminescence function inhibited in vivo and in vitro by S0 and NEM. Enhancement of cell respiration by up to 20% and 33% was observed at 2.2ppm of S0 and 36.8ppm of 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-DNP; an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation), respectively; whilst NEM (3.1ppm) caused a reduction of up to 40%. This comparative analysis confirmed that S0 has multiple modes of action--it acts as both an -SH group inhibitor and an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation in V. fischeri cells.

  18. Development and Validation of Non-Integrative, Self-Limited, and Replicating Minicircles for Safe Reporter Gene Imaging of Cell-Based Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ronald, John A.; Cusso, Lorena; Chuang, Hui-Yen; Yan, Xinrui; Dragulescu-Andrasi, Anca; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2013-01-01

    Reporter gene (RG) imaging of cell-based therapies provides a direct readout of therapeutic efficacy by assessing the fate of implanted cells. To permit long-term cellular imaging, RGs are traditionally required to be integrated into the cellular genome. This poses a potential safety risk and regulatory bottleneck for clinical translation as integration can lead to cellular transformation. To address this issue, we have developed non-integrative, replicating minicircles (MCs) as an alternative platform for safer monitoring of cells in living subjects. We developed both plasmids and minicircles containing the scaffold/matrix attachment regions (S/MAR) of the human interferon-beta gene, driven by the CMV promoter, and expressing the bioluminescence RG firefly luciferase. Constructs were transfected into breast cancer cells, and expanded S/MAR minicircle clones showed luciferase signal for greater than 3 months in culture and minicircles remained as episomes. Importantly, luciferase activity in clonal populations was slowly lost over time and this corresponded to a loss of episome, providing a way to reversibly label cells. To monitor cell proliferation in vivo, 1.5×106 cells carrying the S/MAR minicircle were implanted subcutaneously into mice (n = 5) and as tumors developed significantly more bioluminescence signal was noted at day 35 and 43 compared to day 7 post-implant (p<0.05). To our knowledge, this is the first work examining the use of episomal, self-limited, replicating minicircles to track the proliferation of cells using non-invasive imaging in living subjects. Continued development of S/MAR minicircles will provide a broadly applicable vector platform amenable with any of the numerous RG technologies available to allow therapeutic cell fate to be assessed in individual patients, and to achieve this without the need to manipulate the cell's genome so that safety concerns are minimized. This will lead to safe tools to assess treatment response at

  19. Tomographic bioluminescence imaging by an iteratively re-weighted minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ping; Liu, Kai; Xue, Zhenwen; Guo, Wei; Qin, Chenghu; Tian, Jie

    2012-03-01

    Tomographic bioluminescence imaging (TBI), with visible light emission in living organisms, is an effective way of molecular imaging, which allows for the study of ongoing tumor biological processes in vivo and non-invasively. This newly developed technology enables three-dimensional accuracy localization and quantitative analysis of the target tumor cells in small animal via reconstructing the images acquired by the high-resolution imaging system. Due to the difficulty of reconstruction, which is often referred to an ill-posed inverse problem, continuous efforts are still made to find more practical and efficient approaches. In this paper, an iteratively re-weighted minimization (IRM) has been applied to reconstruct the entire source distribution, which is known as sparse signals, inside the target tissue with the limited outgoing photon density on its boundary. By introducing a weight function into the objective function, we convert the lp norm problem into a more simple form of l2 norm to reduce the computational complexity. The weight function is updated in each iterative step to compute the final optimal solution more efficiently. This method is proved to be robust to different parameters, and mouse experiments are conducted to validate the feasibility of IRM approach, which is also reliable at whole-body imaging.

  20. Detection of Metal and Organometallic Compounds with Bioluminescent Bacterial Bioassays.

    PubMed

    Durand, M J; Hua, A; Jouanneau, S; Cregut, M; Thouand, G

    2015-10-17

    Chemical detection of metal and organometallic compounds is very specific and sensitive, but these techniques are time consuming and expensive. Although these techniques provide information about the concentrations of compounds, they fail to inform us about the toxicity of a sample. Because the toxic effects of metals and organometallic compounds are influenced by a multitude of environmental factors, such as pH, the presence of chelating agents, speciation, and organic matter, bioassays have been developed for ecotoxicological studies. Among these bioassays, recombinant luminescent bacteria have been developed over the past 20 years, and many of them are specific for the detection of metals and metalloids. These bioassays are simple to use, are inexpensive, and provide information on the bioavailable fraction of metals and organometals. Thus, they are an essential complementary tool for providing information beyond chemical analysis. In this chapter, we propose to investigate the detection of metals and organometallic compounds with bioluminescent bacterial bioassays and the applications of these bioassays to environmental samples. Graphical Abstract.

  1. Bioluminescence to reveal structure and interaction of coastal planktonic communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moline, Mark A.; Blackwell, Shelley M.; Case, James F.; Haddock, Steven H. D.; Herren, Christen M.; Orrico, Cristina M.; Terrill, Eric

    2009-02-01

    Ecosystem function will in large part be determined by functional groups present in biological communities. The simplest distinction with respect to functional groups of an ecosystem is the differentiation between primary and secondary producers. A challenge thus far has been to examine these groups simultaneously with sufficient temporal and spatial resolution for observations to be relevant to the scales of change in coastal oceans. This study takes advantage of general differences in the bioluminescence flash kinetics between planktonic dinoflagellates and zooplankton to measure relative abundances of the two groups within the same-time space volume. This novel approach for distinguishing these general classifications using a single sensor is validated using fluorescence data and exclusion experiments. The approach is then applied to data collected from an autonomous underwater vehicle surveying >500 km in Monterey Bay and San Luis Obispo Bay, CA during the summers of 2002-2004. The approach also reveals that identifying trophic interaction between the two planktonic communities may also be possible.

  2. A biocompatible in vivo ligation reaction and its application for noninvasive bioluminescent imaging of protease activity in living mice.

    PubMed

    Godinat, Aurélien; Park, Hyo Min; Miller, Stephen C; Cheng, Ke; Hanahan, Douglas; Sanman, Laura E; Bogyo, Matthew; Yu, Allen; Nikitin, Gennady F; Stahl, Andreas; Dubikovskaya, Elena A

    2013-05-17

    The discovery of biocompatible reactions had a tremendous impact on chemical biology, allowing the study of numerous biological processes directly in complex systems. However, despite the fact that multiple biocompatible reactions have been developed in the past decade, very few work well in living mice. Here we report that D-cysteine and 2-cyanobenzothiazoles can selectively react with each other in vivo to generate a luciferin substrate for firefly luciferase. The success of this "split luciferin" ligation reaction has important implications for both in vivo imaging and biocompatible labeling strategies. First, the production of a luciferin substrate can be visualized in a live mouse by bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and furthermore allows interrogation of targeted tissues using a "caged" luciferin approach. We therefore applied this reaction to the real-time noninvasive imaging of apoptosis associated with caspase 3/7. Caspase-dependent release of free D-cysteine from the caspase 3/7 peptide substrate Asp-Glu-Val-Asp-D-Cys (DEVD-(D-Cys)) allowed selective reaction with 6-amino-2-cyanobenzothiazole (NH(2)-CBT) in vivo to form 6-amino-D-luciferin with subsequent light emission from luciferase. Importantly, this strategy was found to be superior to the commercially available DEVD-aminoluciferin substrate for imaging of caspase 3/7 activity. Moreover, the split luciferin approach enables the modular construction of bioluminogenic sensors, where either or both reaction partners could be caged to report on multiple biological events. Lastly, the luciferin ligation reaction is 3 orders of magnitude faster than Staudinger ligation, suggesting further applications for both bioluminescence and specific molecular targeting in vivo.

  3. How Reliable Are ATP Bioluminescence Meters in Assessing Decontamination of Environmental Surfaces in Healthcare Settings?

    PubMed Central

    Omidbakhsh, Navid; Ahmadpour, Faraz; Kenny, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Background Meters based on adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence measurements in relative light units (RLU) are often used to rapidly assess the level of cleanliness of environmental surfaces in healthcare and other settings. Can such ATP measurements be adversely affected by factors such as soil and cleaner-disinfectant chemistry? Objective This study tested a number of leading ATP meters for their sensitivity, linearity of the measurements, correlation of the readings to the actual microbial contamination, and the potential disinfectant chemicals’ interference in their readings. Methods First, solutions of pure ATP in various concentrations were used to construct a standard curve and determine linearity and sensitivity. Serial dilutions of a broth culture of Staphylococcus aureus, as a representative nosocomial pathogen, were then used to determine if a given meter’s ATP readings correlated with the actual CFUs. Next, various types of disinfectant chemistries were tested for their potential to interfere with the standard ATP readings. Results All four ATP meters tested herein demonstrated acceptable linearity and repeatability in their readings. However, there were significant differences in their sensitivity to detect the levels of viable microorganisms on experimentally contaminated surfaces. Further, most disinfectant chemistries tested here quenched the ATP readings variably in different ATP meters evaluated. Conclusions Apart from their limited sensitivity in detecting low levels of microbial contamination, the ATP meters tested were also prone to interference by different disinfectant chemistries. PMID:24940751

  4. Experimental infection of Phlebotomus perniciosus by bioluminescent Leishmania infantum using murine model and artificial feeder

    PubMed Central

    Cannet, Arnaud; Akhoundi, Mohammad; Michel, Gregory; Marty, Pierre; Delaunay, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease that is transmitted by sandflies and caused by obligate intracellular protozoa of the genus Leishmania. In the present study, we carried out a screening on the experimental infection of Phlebotomus pernioucus by bioluminescent Leishmania infantum using murine model and artificial feeder. We developed a real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)-based method to determine individually the number of Leishmania promastigotes fed by infected flies. Among 1840 new emerged female sand flies, 428 were fed on the infected mice. After their death, they were analysed individually by RT-PCR. Our results demonstrated just a single Leishmania positive female at sixth day post meal. A total of 1070 female sand flies were exposed in contact with artificial feeder containing the human blood with two different quantities of Leishmania parasites: 2.106/mL and 1.107/mL. A blood meal including 1.107/mL LUC-promastigotes was proposed to 270 females and 75 (28%) flies were engorged. Among them, 44 (59%) were positive by RT-PCR analysis, with a relative average of 50551 Leishmania parasites. In case of blood feeding of females with 2.106/mL promastigotes, 57 out of 800 (7%) females succeed to feed from artificial feeder which 22 (39%) were positive with a relative average of 6487 parasites. PMID:27439032

  5. A fast full-body fluorescence/bioluminescence imaging system for small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong Hwan; Kim, Hyun Keol; Jia, Jingfei; Fong, Christopher; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2013-03-01

    Whole body in vivo optical imaging of small animals has widened its applications and increased the capabilities for preclinical researches. However, most commercial and prototype optical imaging systems are camera-based systems using epi- or trans- illumination mode, with limited views of small animals. And for more accurate tomographic image reconstruction, additional data and information of a target animal is necessary. To overcome these issues, researchers have suggested several approaches such as maximizing the detection area or using the information of other highresolution modalities such as CT, MRI or Ultrasound, or using multi-spectral signals. As one of ways to maximizing the detection area of a target animal, we present a new fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging system for small animals, which can image entire surface of a target animal simultaneously. This system uses double mirror reflection scheme and it consists of input unit, imaging unit with two conical mirrors, the source illumination part and the surface scanner, and the detection unit with an intensified CCD camera system. Two conical mirrors are configured that a larger size mirror captures a target animal surface, and a smaller size mirror projects this captured image onto a CCD camera with one acquisition. With this scheme, we could capture entire surface of a target animal simultaneously and improve back reflection issue between a mirror and an animal surface of a single conical mirror scheme. Additionally, we could increase accessibility to an animal for multi-modality integration by providing unobstructed space around a target animal.

  6. Vibrational spectra of chemical and isotopic variants of oxyluciferin, the light emitter of firefly bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Maltsev, Oleg V; Yue, Ling; Rebarz, Mateusz; Hintermann, Lukas; Sliwa, Michel; Ruckebusch, Cyril; Pejov, Ljupčo; Liu, Ya-Jun; Naumov, Panče

    2014-08-18

    The chemical complexity of oxyluciferin (OxyLH2), the light-emitting molecule in the bioluminescence of fireflies, originates from the possibility of keto/enol tautomerism and single or double deprotonation. Herein, we present detailed infrared spectroscopic analysis of OxyLH2 and several of its chemical isomers and isotopomers. To facilitate the future characterization of its biogenic forms, we provide accurate assignments of the solid-state and solution FTIR spectra of OxyLH2 based on comparison to six isotopically labeled variants ([2-(13)C]-OxyLH2, [3-(15)N]-OxyLH2, [4-(13)C]-OxyLH2, [5-(13)C]-OxyLH2, [2'-(13)C]-OxyLH2, [3'-(15)N]-OxyLH2), five closely related structural analogues, and theoretically computed spectra. The computed DFT harmonic vibrational force fields (B3LYP and M06 functionals with basis sets of varying flexibility up to 6-311++G**) reproduce well the observed shifts in the IR spectra of both isotopically labeled and structurally related analogues.

  7. Incorporating MRI structural information into bioluminescence tomography: system, heterogeneous reconstruction and in vivo quantification

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Chen, Duofang; Liang, Jimin; Xue, Huadan; Lei, Jing; Wang, Qin; Chen, Dongmei; Meng, Ming; Jin, Zhengyu; Tian, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Combining two or more imaging modalities to provide complementary information has become commonplace in clinical practice and in preclinical and basic biomedical research. By incorporating the structural information provided by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the ill poseness nature of bioluminescence tomography (BLT) can be reduced significantly, thus improve the accuracies of reconstruction and in vivo quantification. In this paper, we present a small animal imaging system combining multi-view and multi-spectral BLT with MRI. The independent MRI-compatible optical device is placed at the end of the clinical MRI scanner. The small animal is transferred between the light tight chamber of the optical device and the animal coil of MRI via a guide rail during the experiment. After the optical imaging and MRI scanning procedures are finished, the optical images are mapped onto the MRI surface by interactive registration between boundary of optical images and silhouette of MRI. Then, incorporating the MRI structural information, a heterogeneous reconstruction algorithm based on finite element method (FEM) with L 1 normalization is used to reconstruct the position, power and region of the light source. In order to validate the feasibility of the system, we conducted experiments of nude mice model implanted with artificial light source and quantitative analysis of tumor inoculation model with MDA-231-GFP-luc. Preliminary results suggest the feasibility and effectiveness of the prototype system. PMID:24940545

  8. Algorithm for localized adaptive diffuse optical tomography and its application in bioluminescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naser, Mohamed A.; Patterson, Michael S.; Wong, John W.

    2014-04-01

    A reconstruction algorithm for diffuse optical tomography based on diffusion theory and finite element method is described. The algorithm reconstructs the optical properties in a permissible domain or region-of-interest to reduce the number of unknowns. The algorithm can be used to reconstruct optical properties for a segmented object (where a CT-scan or MRI is available) or a non-segmented object. For the latter, an adaptive segmentation algorithm merges contiguous regions with similar optical properties thereby reducing the number of unknowns. In calculating the Jacobian matrix the algorithm uses an efficient direct method so the required time is comparable to that needed for a single forward calculation. The reconstructed optical properties using segmented, non-segmented, and adaptively segmented 3D mouse anatomy (MOBY) are used to perform bioluminescence tomography (BLT) for two simulated internal sources. The BLT results suggest that the accuracy of reconstruction of total source power obtained without the segmentation provided by an auxiliary imaging method such as x-ray CT is comparable to that obtained when using perfect segmentation.

  9. Toxicity Testing of Pristine and Aged Silver Nanoparticles in Real Wastewaters Using Bioluminescent Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Mallevre, Florian; Alba, Camille; Milne, Craig; Gillespie, Simon; Fernandes, Teresa F.; Aspray, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Impact of aging on nanoparticle toxicity in real matrices is scarcely investigated due to a lack of suitable methodologies. Herein, the toxicity of pristine and aged silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) to a bioluminescent Pseudomonas putida bioreporter was measured in spiked crude and final wastewater samples (CWs and FWs, respectively) collected from four wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Results showed lower toxicity of pristine Ag NPs in CWs than in FWs. The effect of the matrix on the eventual Ag NP toxicity was related to multiple physico-chemical parameters (biological oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total suspended solids (TSS) pH, ammonia, sulfide and chloride) based on a multivariate analysis. However, no collection site effect was concluded. Aged Ag NPs (up to eight weeks) were found less toxic than pristine Ag NPs in CWs; evident increased aggregation and decreased dissolution were associated with aging. However, Ag NPs exhibited consistent toxicity in FWs despite aging; comparable results were obtained in artificial wastewater (AW) simulating effluent. The study demonstrates the potency of performing nanoparticle acute toxicity testing in real and complex matrices such as wastewaters using relevant bacterial bioreporters. PMID:28344306

  10. Bioluminescence imaging for assessment of immune responses following implantation of engineered heart tissue (EHT).

    PubMed

    Conradi, Lenard; Pahrmann, Christiane; Schmidt, Stephanie; Deuse, Tobias; Hansen, Arne; Eder, Alexandra; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Robbins, Robert C; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Schrepfer, Sonja

    2011-06-01

    Various techniques of cardiac tissue engineering have been pursued in the past decades including scaffolding strategies using either native or bioartificial scaffold materials, entrapment of cardiac myocytes in hydrogels such as fibrin or collagen and stacking of myocyte monolayers. These concepts aim at restoration of compromised cardiac function (e.g. after myocardial infarction) or as experimental models (e.g. predictive toxicology and substance screening or disease modelling). Precise monitoring of cell survival after implantation of engineered heart tissue (EHT) has now become possible using in-vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) techniques. Here we describe the generation of fibrin-based EHT from a transgenic rat strain with ubiquitous expression of firefly luciferase (ROSA/luciferase-LEW Tg; ). Implantation is performed into the greater omentum of different rat strains to assess immune responses of the recipient organism following EHT implantation. Comparison of results generated by BLI and the Enzyme Linked Immuno Spot Technique (ELISPOT) confirm the usability of BLI for the assessment of immune responses.

  11. Immunomagnetic separation and rapid detection of bacteria using bioluminescence and microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jingmin; Zhou, Yun; Chen, Hui; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2009-08-15

    This paper describes an immunomagnetic separation of target bacterial cells from others by using magnetic bead. The surface of bead was coated with antibodies which can capture specific organism. The binding efficiency of immunomagnetic bead (IMB) capturing target bacterial cells was higher than 98% when the concentrations of target and interferent bacterial cells were at the same level. The concentration of bacteria was determined indirectly by detecting adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) employing bioluminescence (BL) reaction of firefly luciferin-ATP. Benzalkonium chloride (BAC) was used as an ATP extractant from living bacterial cells. We found that BAC could enhance the light emission when the concentration of BAC was less than 5.3 x 10(-2)% (w/v) and the BL intensity reached its maximum at the concentration of BAC was 2.7 x 10(-2)%, which was 10-fold stronger than that without BAC. Based on the principle of the IMB, a microfluidic chip combined with immunofluorescence assay for separating and detecting bacteria simultaneously was also developed. The IMBs were magnetically fixed in the bead-beds of chip channels with a 3-mm diameter of NdFeB permanent magnet. The target bacterial cells can be captured magnetically and observed by a fluorescent microscope.

  12. Application of ATP bioluminescence for evaluation of surface cleanliness of milking equipment.

    PubMed

    Vilar, M J; Rodríguez-Otero, J L; Diéguez, F J; Sanjuán, M L; Yus, E

    2008-07-31

    The ATP bioluminescence method was used to evaluate the cleanliness of milking equipment surfaces (teat cup rubbers, teat dip containers, milk receivers, and pipeline joints) in dairy farms in Galicia (northwest Spain) with parlour, pipeline tie-stall or bucket tie-stall milking systems. The cleanest surfaces were teat cup rubbers. The use of non-chlorinated water for cleaning, and of pipeline or bucket tie-stall milking systems, was associated with high ATP bioluminescence values. However, ATP bioluminescence values only explained 12% of the variability in bulk-tank bacterial count; this is attributable to the importance of other factors (notably the correct functioning of the tank cooling system) for maintenance of low bacterial count.

  13. Four new bioluminescent taxa of Mycena sect. Calodontes from Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Chew, Audrey L C; Tan, Yee-Shin; Desjardin, Dennis E; Musa, Md Yusoff; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2014-01-01

    Three new species and one new variety of bioluminescent Mycena collected from Peninsular Malaysia are described herein. All new species belong to Mycena sect. Calodontes in what is known as the Mycena pura complex. Comprehensive descriptions, photographs, illustrations and comparisons with phenetically similar species are provided. Molecular sequences data from the nuclear internal transcribed spacers (ITS-1 and ITS-2, including the 5.8S rRNA) were used to infer relationships within sect. Calodontes. Axenic cultures were obtained to provide data on culture morphology. This is the first published photographic documentation of bioluminescent basidiomes of members of Mycena sect. Calodontes. Also, this addition brings the total known bioluminescent fungi to 77 species.

  14. The stimulation of bioluminescence in Photobacterium leiognathi as a potential prescreen for antitumor agents.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, D A; Peterson, G A; White, R J; Maiese, W M

    1985-10-01

    The stimulation of bioluminescence in Photobacterium leiognathi has previously been described as a test for genotoxic compounds. An adaptation of this procedure has been developed which uses a dim variant of P. leiognathi and permits the prescreening of microbial fermentation broths for potential antitumor agents. Bioluminescence in this organism was stimulated by compounds which bind to DNA or affect DNA synthesis. Antibiotics with target sites such as protein, cell wall or RNA synthesis, did not alter bioluminescence. Fermentation broths from over 5,000 soil isolates were prescreened in this assay and 95 (1.6%) were defined as active. Further analysis of selected cultures suggested that about half produced compound(s) with DNA-binding activity. These results suggest that the photobacterium induction assay (PIA) may be useful as a prescreen for potential antitumor agents. The assay is rapid, simple and requires only microgram quantities of material for testing.

  15. [Bioluminescent analysis of the SOS-response of Escherichia coli cells].

    PubMed

    Ptistsyn, L R

    1996-03-01

    We constructed a recombinant plasmid pPLS-1 to estimate the level of SOS response in Escherichia coli by the bioluminescent method. A 6.7-kb promoterless operon of bioluminescence from Photobacterium leiognathi was cloned into a pBR322 vector, in which its expression was controlled by the SOS promoter of gene cda from a plasmid ColD. The sequence between the 5'-terminal Sph1 site of the operon and start codon ATG of the luxC gene was shown to be 56 bp in length and had no effect on the level of light emission. SOS-inducing potency of six mutagenic substances was tested in E. coli strain C600(pPLS-1). The bioluminescent method proved to be very sensitive for estimating the level of SOS response. The results obtained by this method showed good correlation with results obtained by SOS Chromotest, umu-test, and Ames' test.

  16. A two-hour antibiotic susceptibility test by ATP-bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    March Rosselló, Gabriel Alberto; García-Loygorri Jordán de Urries, María Cristina; Gutiérrez Rodríguez, María Purificación; Simarro Grande, María; Orduña Domingo, Antonio; Bratos Pérez, Miguel Ángel

    2016-01-01

    The antibiotic susceptibility test (AST) in Clinical Microbiology laboratories is still time-consuming, and most procedures take 24h to yield results. In this study, a rapid antimicrobial susceptibility test using ATP-bioluminescence has been developed. The design of method was performed using five ATCC collection strains of known susceptibility. This procedure was then validated against standard commercial methods on 10 strains of enterococci, 10 staphylococci, 10 non-fermenting gram negative bacilli, and 13 Enterobacteriaceae from patients. The agreement obtained in the sensitivity between the ATP-bioluminescence method and commercial methods (E-test, MicroScan and VITEK2) was 100%. In summary, the preliminary results obtained in this work show that the ATP-bioluminescence method could provide a fast and reliable AST in two hours.

  17. Chemiluminescence and Bioluminescence as an Excitation Source in the Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer: A Critical Review.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Carla M; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C G; Pinto da Silva, Luís

    2016-08-04

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer is known for its limited number of side effects, and requires light, oxygen and photosensitizer. However, PDT is limited by poor penetration of light into deeply localized tissues, and the use of external light sources is required. Thus, researchers have been studying ways to improve the effectiveness of this phototherapy and expand it for the treatment of the deepest cancers, by using chemiluminescent or bioluminescent formulations to excite the photosensitizer