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Sample records for biomasse ein lehrmaterial

  1. Biomass

    Treesearch

    Bernard R. Parresol

    2001-01-01

    Biomass, the contraction for biological mass, is the amount of living material provided by a given area or volume of the earth's surface, whether terrestrial or aquatic. Biomass is important for commercial uses (e.g., fuel and fiber) and for national development planning, as well as for scientific studies of ecosystem productivity, energy and nutrient flows, and...

  2. EIN Software Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Interuniversity Communications Council (EDUCOM), Boston, MA.

    The EIN (Educational Information Network) is a non-profit operation which coordinates the sharing of educational computing resources. It is administered by EDUCOM and funded jointly by the U. S. Office of Education and the National Science Foundation. EIN maintains a group of contact personnel at member institutions to serve as a liaison between…

  3. Ein Kredit für Weihnachtsbaumkugeln

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutsch, Sina

    Eine Mathematikerin aus dem DFG-Forschungszentrum Matheon arbeitet an Methoden zur dreidimensionalen Visualisierung. Sie hat die Geschäftsidee, Weihnachtsbaumkugeln mit bewegten Hologrammen herzustellen, die sich individuell gestalten lassen, und plant eine Existenzgründung. Aus einem öffentlichen Förderprogramm erhält sie ein günstiges Darlehen in Höhe von 50 000 Euro. Für die Startphase ihres Unternehmens benötigt sie jedoch den vierfachen Betrag.

  4. EIN Software Catalog; Entries, Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Interuniversity Communications Council (EDUCOM), Boston, MA.

    The EIN (Educational Information Network) is a non-profit operation which coordinates the sharing of educational computing resources. It is administered by EDUCOM and funded jointly by the U. S. Office of Education and the National Science Foundation. EIN maintains a group of contact personnel at member institutions to serve as a liaison between…

  5. EIN Software Catalog; Entries, Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Interuniversity Communications Council (EDUCOM), Boston, MA.

    The EIN (Educational Information Network) is a non-profit operation which coordinates the sharing of educational computing resources. It is administered by EDUCOM and funded by the U. S. Office of Education and the National Science Foundation. EIN maintains a group of contact personnel at member institutions to serve as a liaison between the…

  6. EIN Software Catalog; Entries, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Interuniversity Communications Council (EDUCOM), Boston, MA.

    The EIN (Educational Information Network) is a non-profit operation which coordinates the sharing of educational computing resources. It is administered by EDUCOM and funded jointly by the U. S. Office of Education and the National Science Foundation. EIN maintains a group of contact personnel at member institutions to serve as a liaison between…

  7. Biomass Burning

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-07-27

    Projects:  Biomass Burning Definition/Description:  Biomass Burning: This data set represents the geographical and temporal distribution of total amount of biomass burned. These data may be used in general circulation models (GCMs) and ...

  8. City-Management - Eine Erfolgsstory?!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuron, Irene

    2002-03-01

    Seit geraumer Zeit wird das Thema Innenstadt kontrovers diskutiert. Neben dem Niedergang der City und der Konkurrenz zur "Grünen Wiese" werden zugleich die europäische urbane Stadt heraufbeschworen und zahlreiche Aktivitäten zur (Re-)Vitalisierung unternommen. Von privaten Initiativen, Händlergemeinschaften über public-private-partnership-Projekte, wie z.B. Ab in die Mitte" in Nordrhein-Westfalen, bis zum städtischen City-Manager und Landesförderung für Innenstadtprojekte reicht das Repertoire. City-Management ist dabei ein wesentliches Instrument. Wie City-Management in Deutschland aussieht und wie es sich entwickelt, zeigt der folgende Beitrag.

  9. Biomass pretreatment

    DOEpatents

    Hennessey, Susan Marie; Friend, Julie; Elander, Richard T; Tucker, III, Melvin P

    2013-05-21

    A method is provided for producing an improved pretreated biomass product for use in saccharification followed by fermentation to produce a target chemical that includes removal of saccharification and or fermentation inhibitors from the pretreated biomass product. Specifically, the pretreated biomass product derived from using the present method has fewer inhibitors of saccharification and/or fermentation without a loss in sugar content.

  10. Biomass Logistics

    SciTech Connect

    J. Richard Hess; Kevin L. Kenney; William A. Smith; Ian Bonner; David J. Muth

    2015-04-01

    Equipment manufacturers have made rapid improvements in biomass harvesting and handling equipment. These improvements have increased transportation and handling efficiencies due to higher biomass densities and reduced losses. Improvements in grinder efficiencies and capacity have reduced biomass grinding costs. Biomass collection efficiencies (the ratio of biomass collected to the amount available in the field) as high as 75% for crop residues and greater than 90% for perennial energy crops have also been demonstrated. However, as collection rates increase, the fraction of entrained soil in the biomass increases, and high biomass residue removal rates can violate agronomic sustainability limits. Advancements in quantifying multi-factor sustainability limits to increase removal rate as guided by sustainable residue removal plans, and mitigating soil contamination through targeted removal rates based on soil type and residue type/fraction is allowing the use of new high efficiency harvesting equipment and methods. As another consideration, single pass harvesting and other technologies that improve harvesting costs cause biomass storage moisture management challenges, which challenges are further perturbed by annual variability in biomass moisture content. Monitoring, sampling, simulation, and analysis provide basis for moisture, time, and quality relationships in storage, which has allowed the development of moisture tolerant storage systems and best management processes that combine moisture content and time to accommodate baled storage of wet material based upon “shelf-life.” The key to improving biomass supply logistics costs has been developing the associated agronomic sustainability and biomass quality technologies and processes that allow the implementation of equipment engineering solutions.

  11. Biomass [updated

    SciTech Connect

    Turhollow Jr, Anthony F

    2016-01-01

    Biomass resources and conversion technologies are diverse. Substantial biomass resources exist including woody crops, herbaceous perennials and annuals, forest resources, agricultural residues, and algae. Conversion processes available include fermentation, gasification, pyrolysis, anaerobic digestion, combustion, and transesterification. Bioderived products include liquid fuels (e.g. ethanol, biodiesel, and gasoline and diesel substitutes), gases, electricity, biochemical, and wood pellets. At present the major sources of biomass-derived liquid fuels are from first generation biofuels; ethanol from maize and sugar cane (89 billion L in 2013) and biodiesel from vegetable oils and fats (24 billion liters in 2011). For other than traditional uses, policy in the forms of mandates, targets, subsidies, and greenhouse gas emission targets has largely been driving biomass utilization. Second generation biofuels have been slow to take off.

  12. Biomass Burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.; Cofer, Wesley R., III; Pinto, Joseph P.

    1993-01-01

    Biomass burning may be the overwhelming regional or continental-scale source of methane (CH4) as in tropical Africa and a significant global source of CH4. Our best estimate of present methane emissions from biomass burning is about 51.9 Tg/yr, or 10% of the annual methane emissions to the atmosphere. Increased frequency of fires that may result as the Earth warms up may result in increases in this source of atmospheric methane.

  13. Biomass energy

    SciTech Connect

    Smil, V.

    1983-01-01

    This book offers a broad, interdisciplinary approach to assessing the factors that are key determinants to the use of biomass energies, stressing their limitations, complexities, uncertainties, links, and consequences. Considers photosynthesis, energy costs of nutrients, problems with monoculture, and the energy analysis of intensive tree plantations. Subjects are examined in terms of environmental and economic impact. Emphasizes the use and abuse of biomass energies in China, India, and Brazil. Topics include forests, trees for energy, crop residues, fuel crops, aquatic plants, and animal and human wastes. Recommended for environmental engineers and planners, and those involved in ecology, systematics, and forestry.

  14. Rudolf Clausius. Ein Versuch, ihn zu verstehen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöpf, Hans-Georg

    Es wird dargelegt, daß Clausius' Originalarbeiten über die Begründung des zweiten Hauptsatzes schwerlich vom Standpunkt konventioneller Lehrbücher verstanden werden können. Vielmehr erweist sich eine mit einem quasi-ökonomischen Modell arbeitende Denkweise als Schlüssel zum Verständnis.Translated AbstractRudolf Clausius. An Attempt to Understand HimIt is shown that Clausius' original papers on the foundation of the Second Law can scarcely be understood from the view-point of conventional textbooks. But reasoning with the aid of a quasi-economic model turns out to be the key of comprehension.

  15. Automatisierte VHDL-Code-Generierung eines Delta-Sigma Modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilka, R.; Ostermann, T.

    2006-09-01

    Im vorliegenden Beitrag wird eine automatische Generierung des VHDL-Codes eines Delta-Sigma Modulators präsentiert. Die Koeffizientenmultiplikation wird hierbei durch Bit-Serielle-Addition durchgeführt. Mit Hilfe zweier neuer Matlab Funktionen wird der Systementwurf durch die bekannte Delta-Sigma Toolbox von R. Schreier erweitert und direkt synthesefähiger VHDL Code erzeugt.

  16. EIN3 and SOS2 synergistically modulate plant salt tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Ruidang; Wang, Juan; Yang, Dexin; Zhang, Haiwen; Zhang, Zhijin; Huang, Rongfeng

    2017-01-01

    Ethylene biosynthesis and the ethylene signaling pathway regulate plant salt tolerance by activating the expression of downstream target genes such as those related to ROS and Na+/K+ homeostasis. The Salt Overly Sensitive (SOS) pathway regulates Na+/K+ homeostasis in Arabidopsis under salt stress. However, the connection between these two pathways is unclear. Through genetic screening, we identified two sos2 alleles as salt sensitive mutants in the ein3-1 background. Neither Ethylene-Insensitive 2 (EIN2) nor EIN3 changed the expression patterns of SOS genes including SOS1, SOS2, SOS3 and SOS3-like Calcium Binding Protein 8 (SCaBP8), but SOS2 activated the expression of one target gene of EIN3, Ethylene and Salt-inducible ERF 1 (ESE1). Moreover, Ser/Thr protein kinase SOS2 phosphorylated EIN3 in vitro mainly at the S325 site and weakly at the S35, T42 and S606 sites. EIN3 S325A mutation reduced its transcriptional activating activity on ESE1 promoter:GUS in a transient GUS assay, and impaired its ability to rescue ein3-1 salt hypersensitivity. Furthermore, SOS2 activated salt-responsive ESE1 target gene expression under salt stress. Therefore, EIN3-SOS2 might link the ethylene signaling pathway and the SOS pathway in Arabidopsis salt responses. PMID:28300216

  17. Eine FPAA-Architektur zur rekonfigurierbaren Instantiierung von zeitkontinuierlichen Analogfiltern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J.; Manoli, Y.

    2005-05-01

    Im Folgenden wird eine neue Methodik von FPAAs (Field Programmable Analog Arrays) gezeigt, die speziell für die Instantiierung von zeitkontinuierlichen (continuous-time, CT) Analogfiltern in Hardware entwickelt wurde. Die Chiptopologie beinhaltet 17 digital konfigurierbare analoge Blöcke (configurable analog blocks, CABs), die durch ein hexagonales Netzwerk miteinander verbunden sind. Jeder CAB ist aus einstellbaren Gm-C Integratoren aufgebaut, welche das analoge Signal sowohl formen und seinen Weg durch die Matrix festlegen, gleichzeitig aber auch die Grundbausteine für zeitkontinuierliche Hochfrequenzfilter darstellen. Intelligente Pufferspeicher für die Ein-/Ausgänge (IO-buffer) garantieren die Rekonfigurierung der Matrix mit minimaler Störung des kontinuierlichen Analogsignals. Die Architektur wird als Hardwareplattform für beliebige Schaltungen, welche aus einer gegebenen Anzahl an Gm-C-Zellen bestehen, eingeführt und verifiziert bevor eine exemplarische Instantiierung eines Butterworth Filters 4. Ordnung in Biquad Anordnung gezeigt wird.

  18. Biomass shock pretreatment

    DOEpatents

    Holtzapple, Mark T.; Madison, Maxine Jones; Ramirez, Rocio Sierra; Deimund, Mark A.; Falls, Matthew; Dunkelman, John J.

    2014-07-01

    Methods and apparatus for treating biomass that may include introducing a biomass to a chamber; exposing the biomass in the chamber to a shock event to produce a shocked biomass; and transferring the shocked biomass from the chamber. In some aspects, the method may include pretreating the biomass with a chemical before introducing the biomass to the chamber and/or after transferring shocked biomass from the chamber.

  19. Nagelbefall kann bei Patienten mit Psoriasis auf eine Enthesiopathie hinweisen.

    PubMed

    Castellanos-González, Maria; Joven, Beatriz Esther; Sánchez, Julio; Andrés-Esteban, Eva María; Vanaclocha-Sebastián, Francisco; Romero, Pablo Ortiz; Díaz, Raquel Rivera

    2016-11-01

    Obwohl subklinische Enthesiopathie ein gut etabliertes diagnostisches Merkmal der Psoriasisarthritis (PsA) ist, wird sie häufig übersehen, da viele Patienten asymptomatisch sind. Gäbe es klinische Hinweise auf das Vorliegen einer Enthesiopathie, würde dies den Klinikern die Möglichkeit eröffnen, eine PsA frühzeitig zu diagnostizieren. Es wurde eine monozentrische prospektive Studie mit insgesamt 90 Psoriasis-Patienten durchgeführt, um mittels Ultraschall das Vorliegen von Enthesenanomalien zu untersuchen und eine Korrelation mit dem Befall der Nägel festzustellen. Enthesenanomalien wurden bei 23 Patienten (25,5 %) gefunden, von denen 19 (82,6 %) Nagelbefall aufwiesen. Bei 4 Patienten waren die Nägel nicht betroffen. Enthesiopathie lag bei 31,1 % (19/61) der Patienten mit Onychopathie vor, von den Patienten ohne Nagelbefall litten nur 13,8 % (4/29) an Enthesiopathie (p = 0,07). Zwischen dem Target-NAPSI-Score und dem Vorliegen einer Enthesiopathie bestand eine signifikante Korrelation. Eine signifikante Korrelation bestand darüber hinaus auch zwischen dem Vorliegen einer Enthesiopathie und der Anzahl der betroffenen Nägel (p = 0,035). Klinische Belege für eine Onychopathie können der Schlüssel für die frühe Diagnose einer Enthesiopathie bei Psoriasis-Patienten sein. © 2016 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Eine selbstkonsistente Carleman Linearisierung zur Analyse von Oszillatoren

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Harry; Mathis, Wolfgang

    2017-09-01

    Die Analyse nichtlinearer dynamischer Schaltungen ist bis heute eine herausfordernde Aufgabe, da nur selten analytische Lösungen angegeben werden können. Daher wurden eine Vielzahl von Methoden entwickelt, um eine qualitative oder quantitative Näherung für die Lösungen der Netzwerkgleichung zu erhalten. Oftmals wird beispielsweise eine Kleinsignalanalyse mit Hilfe einer Taylorreihe in einem Arbeitspunkt durchgeführt, die nach den Gliedern erster Ordnung abgebrochen wird. Allerdings ist diese Linearisierung nur in der Nähe des stabilen Arbeitspunktes für hyperbolische Systeme gültig. Besonders für die Analyse des dynamischen Verhaltens von Oszillatoren treten jedoch nicht-hyperbolische Systeme auf, sodass diese Methode nicht angewendet werden kann Mathis(2000). Carleman hat gezeigt, dass nichtlineare Differentialgleichungen mit polynomiellen Nichtlinearitäten in ein unendliches System von linearen Differentialgleichungen transformiert werden können Carleman(1932). Wird das unendlichdimensionale Gleichungssystem für numerische Zwecke abgebrochen, kann bei Oszillatoren der Übergang in eine stationäre Schwingung (Grenzzyklus) nicht wiedergegeben werden.

    In diesem Beitrag wird eine selbstkonsistente Carleman Linearisierung zur Untersuchung von Oszillatoren vorgestellt, die auch dann anwendbar ist, wenn die Nichtlinearitäten keinen Polynomen entsprechen. Anstelle einer linearen Näherung um einen Arbeitspunkt, erfolgt mit Hilfe der Carleman Linearisierung eine Approximation auf einem vorgegebenen Gebiet. Da es jedoch mit der selbstkonsistenten Technik nicht möglich ist, das stationäre Verhalten von Oszillatoren zu beschreiben, wird die Berechnung einer Poincaré-Abbildung durchgeführt. Mit dieser ist eine anschließende Analyse des Oszillators möglich.

  1. Transrapid und Rad-Schiene-Hochgeschwindigkeitsbahn: Ein gesamtheitlicher Systemvergleich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schach, R.; Jehle, P.; Naumann, R.

    Der Transrapid bietet im Hochgeschwindigkeitsbereich eine sehr interessante Alternative. Über Vor-und Nachteile des Transrapid im Vergleich mit konventionellen Rad-Schiene-Systemen, im Hochgeschwindigkeitsbereich auf Strecken zwischen 150 und 800 Kilometernund als peer-to-peer-Verbindung im Kurzstreckenbereich, wurden viele einze lne Aspekte behandelt, darunter sachliche wie politische Statements. Ein Systemvergleich muß aber alle technischen, wirtschaftlichen und ökologischen Faktoren einschließen.

  2. Biomass torrefaction mill

    DOEpatents

    Sprouse, Kenneth M.

    2016-05-17

    A biomass torrefaction system includes a mill which receives a raw biomass feedstock and operates at temperatures above 400 F (204 C) to generate a dusty flue gas which contains a milled biomass product.

  3. Biomass Energy Research

    SciTech Connect

    Traylor, T.D.; Pitsenbarger, J.

    1996-03-01

    Biomass Energy Research announces on a bimonthly basis the current worldwide research and development (R&D) information available on biomass power systems, alternate feedstocks from biomass, and biofuels supply options.

  4. Energy from Biomass for Conversion of Biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abolins, J.; Gravitis, J.

    2009-01-01

    Along with estimates of minimum energy required by steam explosion pre-treatment of biomass some general problems concerning biomass conversion into chemicals, materials, and fuels are discussed. The energy necessary for processing biomass by steam explosion auto-hydrolysis is compared with the heat content of wood and calculated in terms of the amount of saturated steam consumed per unit mass of the dry content of wood biomass. The fraction of processed biomass available for conversion after steam explosion pre-treatment is presented as function of the amount of steam consumed per unit mass of the dry content of wood. The estimates based on a simple model of energy flows show the energy required by steam explosion pre-treatment of biomass being within 10% of the heat content of biomass - a realistic amount demonstrating that energy for the process can be supplied from a reasonable proportion of biomass used as the source of energy for steam explosion pre-treatment.

  5. My Biomass, Your Biomass, Our Solution

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The US is pursuing an array of renewable energy sources to reduce reliance on imported fossil fuels and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Biomass energy and biomass ethanol are key components in the pursuit. The need for biomass feedstock to produce sufficient ethanol to meet any of the numerous stat...

  6. Biomass treatment method

    DOEpatents

    Friend, Julie; Elander, Richard T.; Tucker, III; Melvin P.; Lyons, Robert C.

    2010-10-26

    A method for treating biomass was developed that uses an apparatus which moves a biomass and dilute aqueous ammonia mixture through reaction chambers without compaction. The apparatus moves the biomass using a non-compressing piston. The resulting treated biomass is saccharified to produce fermentable sugars.

  7. Rheology of concentrated biomass

    Treesearch

    J.R. Samaniuk; J. Wang; T.W. Root; C.T. Scott; D.J. Klingenberg

    2011-01-01

    Economic processing of lignocellulosic biomass requires handling the biomass at high solids concentration. This creates challenges because concentrated biomass behaves as a Bingham-like material with large yield stresses. Here we employ torque rheometry to measure the rheological properties of concentrated lignocellulosic biomass (corn stover). Yield stresses obtained...

  8. Methods for pretreating biomass

    DOEpatents

    Balan, Venkatesh; Dale, Bruce E; Chundawat, Shishir; Sousa, Leonardo

    2017-05-09

    A method for pretreating biomass is provided, which includes, in a reactor, allowing gaseous ammonia to condense on the biomass and react with water present in the biomass to produce pretreated biomass, wherein reactivity of polysaccharides in the biomass is increased during subsequent biological conversion as compared to the reactivity of polysaccharides in biomass which has not been pretreated. A method for pretreating biomass with a liquid ammonia and recovering the liquid ammonia is also provided. Related systems which include a biochemical or biofuel production facility are also disclosed.

  9. Simulation eines rekonfigurierbaren Gm-C filter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrici, F.; Becker, J.; Manoli, Y.

    2007-06-01

    Es wird ein Gm-C Filter für den Einsatz in rekonfigurierbaren Analogfiltern (FPAAs) präsentiert. Das Filter ist auf den Einsatz in FPAAs mit hexagonalem Grid und auf den Verzicht auf Transmissiongates optimiert. Trotzdem können nicht nur die Parameter der instanziierten Filter geändert werden, sondern auch ihre Struktur. Beim Design des digital programmierbaren Transkonduktors musste auf die hohe Anzahl parallel geschalteter, gleichartiger Transkonduktoren und ihre parasitären Kapazitäten Rücksicht genommen werden. Ein FPAA mit 49 Gm-Zellen erreicht in Simulationen in einem 130 nm 1.2 V CMOS Prozess eine maximale Bandbreite von 164 MHz. Die Verzerrung beträgt weniger als -70 dB bei einem 50m V @1 MHz Signal.

  10. Ein routine-integrierbares Planungswerkzeug zur operativen Rekonstruktion der Orbita

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiner, Melanie; Schulze, Dirk; Voss, Pit Jakob; Deserno, Thomas M.

    Bei Frakturen des Orbitabodens kann ein Titangitter zur Rekonstruktion operativ eingesetzt werden. In dieser Arbeit wird ein Planungswerkzeug entwickelt, welches mit Hilfe eines aktiven Konturmodells die Orbita in CT Daten segmentiert, ihr Volumen berechnet und visualisiert. Neben den technischen Integrationsstufen der Funktions- und Präsentationsintegration, welche durch den Einsatz des Medical Imaging Interaction Toolkit (MITK) erreicht werden, sowie der Daten-, und Kontextintegration ist vor allem die Stabilität der eingesetzten Algorithmik für die Routine-Integrierbarkeit wichtig. Erste Stabilitätsuntersuchungen basieren auf 3 von 100 zufällig ausgewählten CT-Datensätzen, wobei das Volumen mit je 50 verschiedenen Startpunkten berechnet wurde. Die so ermittelten Variationskoeffizienten liegen deutlich unterhalb der kritischen 5 % Schwelle.

  11. Was leistet ein Sportler? Kraft, Leistung und Energie im Muskel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaller, Sigrid; Mathelitsch, Leopold

    2006-01-01

    Der Leistungsbegriff ist im Sport weiter gefasst als in der Physik. In beiden Fällen liegt der Fokus jedoch auf einer pro Zeiteinheit erfolgten Energieumsetzung. Allerdings gibt die rein physikalische Leistung nicht immer Auskunft über den Energieumsatz der Muskeln. Die Muskelkraft hängt von der Kontraktionsgeschwindigkeit des Muskels ab. Ein Muskel verhält sich also anders als eine Feder. Für den Hochleistungssport müssen die Energieumsätze der Muskeln durch spezielle Trainings- und Nahrungsprogramme optimiert werden.

  12. Mol-Gastronomie Käsefondue: eine kolloidale Schmelze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilgis, Thomas A.

    2004-11-01

    An Weihnachten oder zum Jahreswechsel kommt gern das Fonduegeschirr zum Einsatz, weil sich damit viele hungrige Gäste unterhaltsam sättigen lassen. Käsefondues sind allerdings eine physikalisch anspruchsvolle Angelegenheit. Die Kunst besteht darin, die viskoelastische Käseschmelze während des Genusses homogen zu halten.

  13. A Progenitor Candidate for SN 2017ein in NGC 3938

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Fox, Ori D.; Kelly, Patrick L.; Milisavljevic, Dan; Smith, Nathan

    2017-06-01

    We report the identification of a progenitor candidate for the Type Ic SN 2017ein in NGC 3938 (ATel #10434, #10481) in archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images obtained with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) on 2007 December 11 UT in bands F555W and F814W, as part of program GO-10877 (PI: A.V. Filippenko).

  14. Energy from Biomass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carioca, J. O. B.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Discusses how biomass in the form of fuelwood, crop residues, and animal dung can be converted into fuels such as biogas and ethanol to replace or supplement fossil fuels. Argues for future decentralized, integrated biomass energy development. (TW)

  15. Education Highlights: Forest Biomass

    ScienceCinema

    Barone, Rachel; Canter, Christina

    2016-07-12

    Argonne intern Rachel Barone from Ithaca College worked with Argonne mentor Christina Canter in studying forest biomass. This research will help scientists develop large scale use of biofuels from forest biomass.

  16. Energy from Biomass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carioca, J. O. B.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Discusses how biomass in the form of fuelwood, crop residues, and animal dung can be converted into fuels such as biogas and ethanol to replace or supplement fossil fuels. Argues for future decentralized, integrated biomass energy development. (TW)

  17. Biomass energy development

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.H.

    1986-01-01

    This book describes strategies to develop biomass energy; capture and use waste when possible; select and improve plant species as energy crops adaptable to both terrestrial and aquatic environments; advance both biological and thermochemical conversion technologies to produce needed fuel forms (solids, liquids, or gases); and adapt these to compatible utilization options. More specifically, some topics include: characteristics of industrial wood energy users; research on short-rotation woody crops in the South; biomass production and nutrient removal by leucaena in colder subtropics; biomass programs of the Southern Agricultural Energy Center; biomass production from herbaceous plants; marine biomass production; harvesting systems for aquatic biomass; thermochemical processes for bioenergy production; utilization of biomass fuel for production of electric power; gas cleaning systems for small scale gasifiers; prediction of methane yields from biomass; methane production and utilization at fuel alcohol production facilities; ethanol fermentations; production of ethanol from wood by acid hydrolysis and fermentation; and material and energy balances for processing high fiber sugarcane.

  18. Education Highlights: Forest Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Barone, Rachel; Canter, Christina

    2016-01-27

    Argonne intern Rachel Barone from Ithaca College worked with Argonne mentor Christina Canter in studying forest biomass. This research will help scientists develop large scale use of biofuels from forest biomass.

  19. Biomass for Electricity Generation

    EIA Publications

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines issues affecting the uses of biomass for electricity generation. The methodology used in the National Energy Modeling System to account for various types of biomass is discussed, and the underlying assumptions are explained.

  20. Pretreated densified biomass products

    DOEpatents

    Dale, Bruce E; Ritchie, Bryan; Marshall, Derek

    2014-03-18

    A product comprising at least one densified biomass particulate of a given mass having no added binder and comprised of a plurality of lignin-coated plant biomass fibers is provided, wherein the at least one densified biomass particulate has an intrinsic density substantially equivalent to a binder-containing densified biomass particulate of the same given mass and h a substantially smooth, non-flakey outer surface. Methods for using and making the product are also described.

  1. Biomass Program Biopower Factsheet

    SciTech Connect

    2010-03-01

    Generating electricity and thermal energy from biomass has the potential to help meet national goals for renewable energy. The forest products industry has used biomass for power and heat for many decades, yet widespread use of biomass to supply electricity to the U.S. power grid and other applications is relatively recent.

  2. BIOMASS DRYING TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report examines the technologies used for drying of biomass and the energy requirements of biomass dryers. Biomass drying processes, drying methods, and the conventional types of dryers are surveyed generally. Drying methods and dryer studies using superheated steam as the d...

  3. BIOMASS DRYING TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report examines the technologies used for drying of biomass and the energy requirements of biomass dryers. Biomass drying processes, drying methods, and the conventional types of dryers are surveyed generally. Drying methods and dryer studies using superheated steam as the d...

  4. Understanding Biomass Feedstock Variability

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin L. Kenney; Garold L. Gresham; William A. Smith; Tyler L. Westover

    2013-01-01

    If the singular goal of biomass logistics and the design of biomass feedstock supply systems is to reduce the per-ton supply cost of biomass, these systems may very well develop with ultimate unintended consequences of highly variable and reduced quality biomass feedstocks. This paper demonstrates that, due to inherent species variabilities, production conditions and differing harvest, collection and storage practices, this is a very real scenario that biomass producers and suppliers as well as conversion developers should be aware of. Biomass feedstock attributes of ash, carbohydrates, moisture and particle morphology will be discussed. We will also discuss specifications for these attributes, inherent variability of these attributes in biomass feedstocks, and approaches and solutions for reducing variability for improving feedstock quality.

  5. Understanding Biomass Feedstock Variability

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin L. Kenney; William A. Smith; Garold L. Gresham; Tyler L. Westover

    2013-01-01

    If the singular goal of biomass logistics and the design of biomass feedstock supply systems is to reduce the per ton supply cost of biomass, these systems may very well develop with ultimate unintended consequences of highly variable and reduced quality biomass feedstocks. This paper demonstrates that due to inherent species variabilities, production conditions, and differing harvest, collection, and storage practices, this is a very real scenario that biomass producers and suppliers as well as conversion developers should be aware of. Biomass feedstock attributes of ash, carbohydrates, moisture, and particle morphology will be discussed. We will also discuss specifications for these attributes, inherent variability of these attributes in biomass feedstocks, and approaches and solutions for reducing variability for improving feedstock quality.

  6. Ein Unscented Kalman Filter zur Schätzung von Schaltungsnichtidealitäten eines zeitkontinuierlichen Sigma-Delta Wandlers mit impliziter Dezimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhmann, A.; Keller, M.; Maurer, M.; Ortmanns, M.; Manoli, Y.

    2008-05-01

    Nichtidealitäten einer Schaltung, wie z.B. nicht ideale Charakteristik des Operationsverstärkers und Streuungen in den Filterkoeffizienten, sind dahingehend bekannt die Effizienz von zeitkontinuierlichen Sigma-Delta Wandlern in drastischer Weise zu reduzieren. Daher stellt diese Veröffentlichung eine mögliche Methode vor, um die genannten Nichtidealitäten durch eine Schätzung mit Hilfe eines Unscented Kalman Filters zu bestimmen und in einem möglichen weiteren Schritt zu korrigieren. Des Weiteren kann durch eine leichte Modifikation des vorgestellten Algorithmus auch gleichzeitig eine implizite Dezimation des Ausgangssignals durchgeführt werden. Hierdurch wird die Gesamteffizienz des vorgestellten Ansatzes gesteigert, da kein zusätzlicher Dezimationsfilter mehr benötigt wird. Simulationsergebnisse des Filteralgorithmus zeigen die prinzipielle Funktion des Algorithmus.

  7. Synthese von analogen Filtern auf einer rekonfigurierbaren Hardware-Architektur mittels eines Genetischen Algorithmus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trendelenburg, S.; Becker, J.; Henrici, F.; Manoli, Y.

    2008-05-01

    Rekonfigurierbare Analog-Arrays (FPAAs) sind der Versuch, die Vorteile der aus der digitalen Welt bekannten FPGAs (Flexibilität, Entwurfsgeschwindigkeit) auch für analoge Anwendungen verfügbar zu machen. Aufgrund der Vielfalt der analogen Schaltungstechnik ist die Abbildung von vorgegebenen Schaltungskonzepten auf eine FPAA-Architektur nicht immer einfach lösbar. Diese Arbeit stellt einen neuen Ansatz für die Synthese von Filtern auf einer FPAA-Architektur für zeitkontinuierliche Analogfilter mittels eines Genetischen Algorithmus (GA) vor. Anhand eines Matlab-Modells des FPAA, das eine gute übereinstimmung mit Simulationen des FPAA auf Transistorebene aufweist, wurde gezeigt, dass eine große Vielzahl verschiedener Filterstrukturen auf dieser Architektur dargestellt werden kann. Daraufhin wurde ein Genetischer Algorithmus entwickelt, der es erlaubt, aus einer gegebenen Filterspezifikation Konfigurationsdatensätze zu synthetisieren, die den gewünschten Filter auf die FPAA-Architektur abbilden.

  8. Complex pendulum biomass sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskinson, Reed L.; Kenney, Kevin L.; Perrenoud, Ben C.

    2007-12-25

    A complex pendulum system biomass sensor having a plurality of pendulums. The plurality of pendulums allow the system to detect a biomass height and density. Each pendulum has an angular deflection sensor and a deflector at a unique height. The pendulums are passed through the biomass and readings from the angular deflection sensors are fed into a control system. The control system determines whether adjustment of machine settings is appropriate and either displays an output to the operator, or adjusts automatically adjusts the machine settings, such as the speed, at which the pendulums are passed through the biomass. In an alternate embodiment, an entanglement sensor is also passed through the biomass to determine the amount of biomass entanglement. This measure of entanglement is also fed into the control system.

  9. Gasification of Woody Biomass.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jianjun; Saayman, Jean; Grace, John R; Ellis, Naoko

    2015-01-01

    Interest in biomass to produce heat, power, liquid fuels, hydrogen, and value-added chemicals with reduced greenhouse gas emissions is increasing worldwide. Gasification is becoming a promising technology for biomass utilization with a positive environmental impact. This review focuses specifically on woody biomass gasification and recent advances in the field. The physical properties, chemical structure, and composition of biomass greatly affect gasification performance, pretreatment, and handling. Primary and secondary catalysts are of key importance to improve the conversion and cracking of tars, and lime-enhanced gasification advantageously combines CO2 capture with gasification. These topics are covered here, including the reaction mechanisms and biomass characterization. Experimental research and industrial experience are investigated to elucidate concepts, processes, and characteristics of woody biomass gasification and to identify challenges.

  10. Thermophilic biogasification of biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.; Klass, D.L.; Edwards, V.H.; Christopher, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    Secondary sewage effluent- and fresh-water-grown water hyacinths (Eichhornia crassipes), Coastal Bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon), and a hyacinth-grass-municipal solid waste-sludge (biomass-waste) blend were used as test feeds to develop a fast thermophilic biomass- digestion process. For the pure biomass feeds thermophilic digestion has no apparent advantage over mesophilic digestion, but the reverse is true for the biomass-waste blend. Alkaline pretreatment of the feed improved thermophilic digester performance substantially. For a given plant feed load, the reactor volume, culture-heating requirements, and CH4 production rate for thermophilic digestion of the pretreated biomass-waste feed were 18,46, and 135% of those for conventional mesophilic digestion. For a biomass-waste feed the respective volatile solids reduction and energy recovery efficiencies were 46 and 49% for thermophilic and 36 and 43% for mesophilic digestions.

  11. Apple EIN3 BINDING F-box 1 inhibits the activity of three apple EIN3-like transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Tacken, Emma J.; Ireland, Hilary S.; Wang, Yen-Yi; Putterill, Jo; Schaffer, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Fruit ripening in Malus× domestica (apple) is controlled by ethylene. Work in model species has shown that following the detection of ethylene, the ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE 3 (EIN3) transcription factor is stabilized, leading to an increase in transcript accumulation of ethylene-responsive genes, such as POLYGALACTURONASE1 (PG1). In the absence of ethylene, the EIN3 BINDING F-box (EBF) proteins rapidly degrade EIN3 via the ubiquitination/SCF (Skp, Cullin, F-Box) proteasome pathway. In this study, we aim to identify and characterize the apple EBF genes, and test their activity against apple EIN3-like proteins (EILs). Methodology The apple genome sequence was mined for EBF-like genes. The expression of EBF-like genes was measured during fruit development. Using a transient assay in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, the activity of three apple EILs was tested against the PG1 promoter, with and without ethylene and EBF1. Principal results Four EBF-like genes in apple were identified and grouped into two sub-clades. Sub-clade I genes had constant expression over fruit development while sub-clade II genes increased in expression at ripening. EBF1 was shown to reduce the transactivation of the apple PG1 promoter by the EIL1, EIL2 and EIL3 transcription factors in the presence of ethylene. Conclusions The apple EBF1 gene identified here is likely to be a functionally conserved EBF orthologue, modulating EIL activity in apples. The activity of EBF1 suggests that it is not specific to a single EIL, instead acting as a global regulator of apple EIL transcription factors. PMID:23585922

  12. Biomass Processing Photolibrary

    DOE Data Explorer

    Research related to bioenergy is a major focus in the U.S. as science agencies, universities, and commercial labs seek to create new energy-efficient fuels. The Biomass Processing Project is one of the funded projects of the joint USDA-DOE Biomass Research and Development Initiative. The Biomass Processing Photolibrary has numerous images, but there are no accompanying abstracts to explain what you are seeing. The project website, however, makes available the full text of presentations and publications and also includes an exhaustive biomass glossary that is being developed into an ASAE Standard.

  13. Process for treating biomass

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Timothy J; Teymouri, Farzaneh

    2015-11-04

    This invention is directed to a process for treating biomass. The biomass is treated with a biomass swelling agent within the vessel to swell or rupture at least a portion of the biomass. A portion of the swelling agent is removed from a first end of the vessel following the treatment. Then steam is introduced into a second end of the vessel different from the first end to further remove swelling agent from the vessel in such a manner that the swelling agent exits the vessel at a relatively low water content.

  14. Process for treating biomass

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Timothy J.; Teymouri, Farzaneh

    2015-08-11

    This invention is directed to a process for treating biomass. The biomass is treated with a biomass swelling agent within the vessel to swell or rupture at least a portion of the biomass. A portion of the swelling agent is removed from a first end of the vessel following the treatment. Then steam is introduced into a second end of the vessel different from the first end to further remove swelling agent from the vessel in such a manner that the swelling agent exits the vessel at a relatively low water content.

  15. Biomass resources in California

    SciTech Connect

    Tiangco, V.M.; Sethi, P.S.

    1993-12-31

    The biomass resources in California which have potential for energy conversion were assessed and characterized through the project funded by the California Energy Commission and the US Department of Energy`s Western Regional Biomass Energy Program (WRBEP). The results indicate that there is an abundance of biomass resources as yet untouched by the industry due to technical, economic, and environmental problems, and other barriers. These biomass resources include residues from field and seed crops, fruit and nut crops, vegetable crops, and nursery crops; food processing wastes; forest slash; energy crops; lumber mill waste; urban wood waste; urban yard waste; livestock manure; and chaparral. The estimated total potential of these biomass resource is approximately 47 million bone dry tons (BDT), which is equivalent to 780 billion MJ (740 trillion Btu). About 7 million BDT (132 billion MJ or 124 trillion Btu) of biomass residue was used for generating electricity by 66 direct combustion facilities with gross capacity of about 800 MW. This tonnage accounts for only about 15% of the total biomass resource potential identified in this study. The barriers interfering with the biomass utilization both in the on-site harvesting, collection, storage, handling, transportation, and conversion to energy are identified. The question whether these barriers present significant impact to biomass {open_quotes}availability{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}sustainability{close_quotes} remains to be answered.

  16. Gasification-based biomass

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The gasification-based biomass section of the Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations describes the technical and economic status of this emerging renewable energy option for electricity supply.

  17. Biomass Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, Kevin; Wright, Christopher; Shelton-Davis, Colleen

    2011-01-01

    INL's mission is to achieve DOE's vision of supplying high-quality raw biomass; preprocessing biomass into advanced bioenergy feedstocks; and delivering bioenergy commodities to biorefineries. You can learn more about research like this at the lab's facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  18. Biomass Research Program

    ScienceCinema

    Kenney, Kevin; Wright, Christopher; Shelton-Davis, Colleen

    2016-07-12

    INL's mission is to achieve DOE's vision of supplying high-quality raw biomass; preprocessing biomass into advanced bioenergy feedstocks; and delivering bioenergy commodities to biorefineries. You can learn more about research like this at the lab's facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  19. Energetische Verwertung von Biomasse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahoransky, Richard; Allelein, Hans-Josef; Bollin, Elmar; Oehler, Helmut; Schelling, Udo

    Etwa 0,1% der Solarenergie wandeln sich durch Photosynthese aus dem Kohlendioxid der Luft in Biomasse um. Die Biomassen sind als Festbrennstoff nutzbar oder zu gasförmigen Brennstoffen weiterverarbeitbar. Zwei Arten von Biomassen sind zu unterscheiden: Anfallende Biomasse

  20. Rheology of concentrated biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaniuk, J. R.; Wang, J.; Root, T. W.; Scott, C. T.; Klingenberg, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Economic processing of lignocellulosic biomass requires handling the biomass at high solids concentration. This creates challenges because concentrated biomass behaves as a Bingham-like material with large yield stresses. Here we employ torque rheometry to measure the rheological properties of concentrated lignocellulosic biomass (corn stover). Yield stresses obtained using torque rheometry agree with those obtained using other rheometric methods, but torque rheometry can be used at much larger solids concentration (weight fractions of insoluble solids greater than 0.2). Yield stresses decrease with severity of hydrolysis, decrease when water-soluble polymers are added (for nonhydrolyzed biomass), and increase with particle length. Experimental results are qualitatively consistent with those obtained from particle-level simulations.

  1. Biomass energy conversion in Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Ritschard, R.L.; Ghirardi, A.

    1981-06-01

    Materials and processes for producing liquid fuels from biomass are discussed. Direct combustion of biomass is discussed as follows: sugar industry products, tree crops, municipal solid wastes, other biomass resources, and environmental impacts of direct combustion systems. (MHR)

  2. Assoziativspeicher und eine erste Skizze von Konrad Zuse aus dem Jahre 1943

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldschmidt, Klaus

    In dem Beitrag wird eine Handskizze von Konrad Zuse aus dem Jahre 1943 eines assoziativen Speichers in Relaistechnik diskutiert. Die Diskussion ist eingebettet in die Grundlagen des assoziativen Speicherproblems. Zum Schluss des Beitrages werden einige Vorschläge zu MOSRealisierung der Zuse-Schaltung unterbreitet.

  3. Bifurkationsanalyse eines LC Tank VCOs unter Berücksichtigung der variablen Kapazität

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremer, J.-K.; Zorn, C.; Mathis, W.

    2009-05-01

    In dieser Arbeit präsentieren wir einen neuartigen Ansatz für den systematischen Entwurf von integrierten LC Tank VCO-Schaltungen basierend auf dem Andronov Hopf Theorem und der Störungstheorie. Der Ansatz ermöglicht es, eine Abschätzung des resultierenden Abstimmbereichs, eine Stabilitätsanalyse und eine Berechnung der Amplitude des VCOs im Vorfeld des eigentlichen Entwurfs durchzuführen. Des Weiteren erlaubt die vorgestellte Methode eine Optimierung des VCOs hinsichtlich der in den Spezifikationen geforderte Amplitude und eine Minimierung der höheren Harmonischen. Mit Hilfe eines ladungsbasierten MOS-Modells ist es möglich die spannungsabhängige Kapazität der Varaktortransistoren durch einen analytischen Ausdruck zu beschreiben. Auf Basis dieses analytischen Ausdrucks wird die amplitudenabhängige Großsignalkapazität des VCOs in Abhängigkeit von Designparametern und der Tuningspannung modelliert. Die Gültigkeit der vorgestellte Entwurfsmethode wird anhand eines Beispielentwurfes eines 2.4 GHz VCO unter Verwendung einer 0.25 μm HF-CMOS Technologie verifiziert.

  4. Biomass CHP Catalog of Technologies

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report reviews the technical and economic characterization of biomass resources, biomass preparation, energy conversion technologies, power production systems, and complete integrated CHP systems.

  5. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of the ethylene insensitive3 (EIN3) gene in cucumber (Cucumis sativus).

    PubMed

    Bie, B B; Pan, J S; He, H L; Yang, X Q; Zhao, J L; Cai, R

    2013-10-07

    The plant gaseous hormone ethylene regulates many aspects of plant growth, development, and responses to the environment. Ethylene insensitive3 (EIN3) is a key transcription factor involved in the ethylene signal transduction pathway. To gain a better understanding of this particular pathway in cucumber, the full-length cDNA encoding EIN3 (designated as CsEIN3) was cloned from cucumber for the first time by rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The full length of CsEIN3 was 2560 bp, with an open reading frame of 1908 bp encoding 635 amino acids. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses revealed that CsEIN3 has high homology with other plant EIN3/EIL proteins that were derived from a common ancestor during evolution, and CsEIN3 was grouped into a cluster along with melon. Homology modeling demonstrated that CsEIN3 has a highly similar structure to the specific DNA-binding domain contained in EIN3/EIL proteins. Based on quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis, we found that CsEIN3 was constitutively expressed in all organs examined, and was increased during flower development and maturation in both male and female flowers. Our results suggest that CsEIN3 is involved in processes of flower development. In conclusion, this study will provide the basis for further study on the role of EIN3 in relevant biological processes of cucumber and on the molecular mechanism of the cucumber ethylene signaling pathway.

  6. Converting Biomass to Products

    SciTech Connect

    Graybeal, Judith W.

    2006-06-01

    For nearly 30 years, PNNL has been developing and applying novel thermal, chemical and biological processes to convert biomass to industrial and consumer products, fuels and energy. Honors for technologies resulting from this research include the Presidential Green Chemistry Award and several Federal Laboratory Consortium and R&D 100 Awards. PNNL’s research and development activities address the complete processing scheme, from feedstock pretreatment to purified product recovery. The laboratory applies fundamental science and advanced engineering capabilities to biomass conversion and processing to ensure effective recovery of optimal value from biomass; carbohydrate polymer systems to maximize energy efficiencies; and micro-technology systems for separation and conversion processes. For example, bioproducts researchers in the laboratory’s Institute for Interfacial Catalysis develop and demonstrate the utility of new catalyst formulations for production of bio-based chemicals. This article describes a sampling of current and recent catalysis projects for biomass conversion.

  7. Biomass -- A new assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hartung, H.A.

    1999-07-01

    Photo-conversion of atmospheric CO{sub 2} to biomass by plants is the world's basic source of food, fiber, oxygen and fossil fuel; for many people and some industries, biomass combustion supplies a significant amount of the energy they need. Much ingenuity has been applied to developing strategies for recovering energy directly from biomass by cleaning burning, gasification and liquid fuel production; these processes generally have economic or ecological features that keep them out of the main stream of technological development. By contrast, fresh biomass can be digested anaerobically at high conversion, with stimulation, to methane-rich gas and a stabilized organic residue, using technology already at hand. As an example, methane can be produced from sugarcane at a total cost of about $.50/mcf. This process, originally devised to control the level of CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere, provides opportunities to contribute to that goal while supplying clean pipeline gas, electricity or petrochemicals.

  8. 2007 Biomass Program Overview

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2009-10-27

    The Biomass Program is actively working with public and private partners to meet production and technology needs. With the corn ethanol market growing steadily, researchers are unlocking the potential of non-food biomass sources, such as switchgrass and forest and agricultural residues. In this way, the Program is helping to ensure that cost-effective technologies will be ready to support production goals for advanced biofuels.

  9. Northeast Regional Biomass Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lusk, P.D.

    1992-12-01

    The Northeast Regional Biomass Program has been in operation for a period of nine years. During this time, state managed programs and technical programs have been conducted covering a wide range of activities primarily aim at the use and applications of wood as a fuel. These activities include: assessments of available biomass resources; surveys to determine what industries, businesses, institutions, and utility companies use wood and wood waste for fuel; and workshops, seminars, and demonstrations to provide technical assistance. In the Northeast, an estimated 6.2 million tons of wood are used in the commercial and industrial sector, where 12.5 million cords are used for residential heating annually. Of this useage, 1504.7 mw of power has been generated from biomass. The use of wood energy products has had substantial employment and income benefits in the region. Although wood and woodwaste have received primary emphasis in the regional program, the use of municipal solid waste has received increased emphasis as an energy source. The energy contribution of biomass will increase as potentia users become more familiar with existing feedstocks, technologies, and applications. The Northeast Regional Biomass Program is designed to support region-specific to overcome near-term barriers to biomass energy use.

  10. Biomass cogeneration. A business assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Skelton, J.C.

    1981-11-01

    This guide serves as an overview of the biomass cogeneration area and provides direction for more detailed analysis. The business assessment is based in part on discussions with key officials from firms that have adopted biomass cogeneration systems and from organizations such as utilities, state and federal agencies, and banks that would be directly involved in a biomass cogeneration project. The guide is organized into five chapters: biomass cogeneration systems, biomass cogeneration business considerations, biomass cogeneration economics, biomass cogeneration project planning, and case studies.

  11. Hydrogen production from biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, John J.

    Biomass energy encompasses a broad category of energy derived from plants and animals as well as the residual materials from each. Hydrogen gas is an effective energy carrier which burns cleanly producing water as the only product. Hydrogen produced from a renewable source such as biomass provides a domestically available, CO2 neutral, non-polluting form of energy. The goal of the work presented in this thesis was to develop two different methods to produce hydrogen gas using biomass as a renewable energy source. The first method was to produce hydrogen using photosynthetic algae. C. reinhardtii has been shown to produce hydrogen using light as an energy source. The objective of this work was to increase hydrogen production by (a) manipulating process variables such as cell concentration, light intensity, and reactor design and (b) immobilizing the algal cells to increase photosynthetic efficiency and address production limitations. The second method of hydrogen production explored was gasification of biomass using supercritical water (SCW). A continuous SCW reactor was constructed to increase capacity and understand the optimum conditions necessary to gasify model compounds. Increasing the capacity of SCW reactors and understanding how basic components of biomass react may lead to further development of this technology.

  12. Ein Organic Computing Ansatz zur Steuerung einer sechsbeinigen Laufmaschine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auf, Adam El Sayed; Larionova, Svetlana; Mösch, Florian; Litza, Marek; Jakimovski, Bojan; Maehle, Erik

    Obwohl die Rechengeschwindigkeit von Computern und die Komplexität unserer Systeme ständig zunimmt, sind die heutigen Laufmaschinen nicht in der Lage, sich mit den Fähigkeiten von Landtieren wie zum Beispiel Insekten zu messen. Das Verständnis biologischer Konzepte und das Lernen von der Natur könnten zur Verbesserung der heutigen Maschinen beitragen und sie ein wenig “lebensähnlicher“ machen. Dieser Artikel stellt einen Kontrollarchitekturansatz basierend auf “Organic Computing“-Prinzipien vor, der die Nutzung von Dezentralisierung und Selbstorganisation an einer sechsbeinigen Laufmaschine demonstriert. Die vorliegende Arbeit erklärt die elementaren Mechanismen für das gerade Laufen, das Kurvenlaufen sowie das Drehen auf der Stelle und den Umgang mit strukturellen körperlichen Änderungen wie einer Beinamputation und stellt die Ergebnisse experimenteller Versuche vor.

  13. Evolutionstheorie als Geschichtstheorie - Ein neuer Ansatz historischer Institutionenforschung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patzelt, Werner J.

    Werden und Vergehen kennzeichnen die Natur. Dass Einzelwesen geboren werden, reifen, altern und sterben, lernen schon Kinder. Dass auch Arten, einschließlich der des Menschen, entstehen und vergehen, gerät während der Schulzeit ins Blickfeld. Erwachsene begreifen dann, dass Individuen gleichsam die Träger und "Realisatoren“ des Bauplans einer Art sind: Als solche werden sie gezeugt, als solche tragen sie ihre Art während der eigenen Lebensspanne, als solche geben viele den ihnen eingeschriebenen Bauplan an Nachfolger weiter, und all dies leistend wirken Einzelwesen wie "Durchlaufposten“ ihrer Art. Diese besteht zwar nie ohne ihre Individuen; doch meist kommt es auf kein einzelnes Lebewesen als solches an, um dessen Art fortbestehen zu lassen. Zu verdanken ist der Wandel einer Art mancherlei Veränderungen (z. B. Variationen, Rekombinationen) bei der Weitergabe des Bauplans von Individuum zu Individuum, desgleichen den Besonderheiten einer je konkreten Realisierung des allgemeinen Bauplans einer Art unter spezifischen Umständen. Durchsetzungskraft, weitere Verbreitung und somit Dauerhaftigkeit ("Mutation“) erlangt solcher Wandel dann, wenn die bei der Weitergabe unterlaufenen Veränderungen und die von der Umwelt oder der ökologischen Nische einem Individuum oder einer Gruppe von Individuen aufgezwungenen Variationen ihrerseits Weitergabevorteile bei der Reproduktion des Bauplans eröffnen. Die individueller Veränderung geschuldete Ausnahme mag dann nach einigen Generationen sogar der Normalfall geworden sein. Umwelt ist dabei alles, was ein Individuum oder eine Art umgibt. Die "ökologische Nische“ ist hingegen jener Teil der Umwelt, welcher für das Individuum oder die Art unmittelbar wichtig ist, vor allem weil aus ihr die nötigen Ressourcen bezogen werden oder in ihr die Auseinandersetzung mit Konkurrenten zu bestehen ist.

  14. Sustainable Biomass Supply Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Erin Searcy; Dave Muth; Erin Wilkerson; Shahab Sokansanj; Bryan Jenkins; Peter Titman; Nathan Parker; Quinn Hart; Richard Nelson

    2009-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) aims to displace 30% of the 2004 gasoline use (60 billion gal/yr) with biofuels by 2030 as outlined in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, which will require 700 million tons of biomass to be sustainably delivered to biorefineries annually. Lignocellulosic biomass will make an important contribution towards meeting DOE’s ethanol production goals. For the biofuels industry to be an economically viable enterprise, the feedstock supply system (i.e., moving the biomass from the field to the refinery) cannot contribute more that 30% of the total cost of the biofuel production. The Idaho National Laboratory in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of California, Davis and Kansas State University are developing a set of tools for identifying economical, sustainable feedstocks on a regional basis based on biorefinery siting.

  15. YEAR 2 BIOMASS UTILIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    2004-11-01

    This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) Year 2 Biomass Utilization Final Technical Report summarizes multiple projects in biopower or bioenergy, transportation biofuels, and bioproducts. A prototype of a novel advanced power system, termed the high-temperature air furnace (HITAF), was tested for performance while converting biomass and coal blends to energy. Three biomass fuels--wood residue or hog fuel, corn stover, and switchgrass--and Wyoming subbituminous coal were acquired for combustion tests in the 3-million-Btu/hr system. Blend levels were 20% biomass--80% coal on a heat basis. Hog fuel was prepared for the upcoming combustion test by air-drying and processing through a hammer mill and screen. A K-Tron biomass feeder capable of operating in both gravimetric and volumetric modes was selected as the HITAF feed system. Two oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys that would be used in the HITAF high-temperature heat exchanger were tested for slag corrosion rates. An alumina layer formed on one particular alloy, which was more corrosion-resistant than a chromia layer that formed on the other alloy. Research activities were completed in the development of an atmospheric pressure, fluidized-bed pyrolysis-type system called the controlled spontaneous reactor (CSR), which is used to process and condition biomass. Tree trimmings were physically and chemically altered by the CSR process, resulting in a fuel that was very suitable for feeding into a coal combustion or gasification system with little or no feed system modifications required. Experimental procedures were successful for producing hydrogen from biomass using the bacteria Thermotoga, a deep-ocean thermal vent organism. Analytical procedures for hydrogen were evaluated, a gas chromatography (GC) method was derived for measuring hydrogen yields, and adaptation culturing and protocols for mutagenesis were initiated to better develop strains that can use biomass cellulose. Fly ash derived from

  16. Biomass ash utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Bristol, D.R.; Noel, D.J.; O`Brien, B.; Parker, B.

    1993-12-31

    This paper demonstrates that with careful analysis of ash from multiple biomass and waste wood fired power plants that most of the ash can serve a useful purpose. Some applications require higher levels of consistency than others. Examples of ash spreading for agricultural purposes as a lime supplement for soil enhancement in Maine and North Carolina, as well as a roadbase material in Maine are discussed. Use of ash as a horticultural additive is explored, as well as in composting as a filtering media and as cover material for landfills. The ash utilization is evaluated in a framework of environmental responsibility, regulations, handling and cost. Depending on the chemical and physical properties of the biomass derived fly ash and bottom ash, it can be used in one or more applications. Developing a program that utilizes ash produced in biomass facilities is environmentally and socially sound and can be financially attractive.

  17. SERI Biomass Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, P. W.; Corder, R. E.; Hill, A. M.; Lindsey, H.; Lowenstein, M. Z.

    1983-02-01

    The biomass with which this report is concerned includes aquatic plants, which can be converted into liquid fuels and chemicals; organic wastes (crop residues as well as animal and municipal wastes), from which biogas can be produced via anerobic digestion; and organic or inorganic waste streams, from which hydrogen can be produced by photobiological processes. The Biomass Program Office supports research in three areas which, although distinct, all use living organisms to create the desired products. The Aquatic Species Program (ASP) supports research on organisms that are themselves processed into the final products, while the Anaerobic Digestion (ADP) and Photo/Biological Hydrogen Program (P/BHP) deals with organisms that transform waste streams into energy products. The P/BHP is also investigating systems using water as a feedstock and cell-free systems which do not utilize living organisms. This report summarizes the progress and research accomplishments of the SERI Biomass Program during FY 1982.

  18. Clean fuels from biomass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Y.-Y.

    1976-01-01

    The paper discusses the U.S. resources to provide fuels from agricultural products, the present status of conversion technology of clean fuels from biomass, and a system study directed to determine the energy budget, and environmental and socioeconomic impacts. Conversion processes are discussed relative to pyrolysis and anaerobic fermentation. Pyrolysis breaks the cellulose molecules to smaller molecules under high temperature in the absence of oxygen, wheras anaerobic fermentation is used to convert biomass to methane by means of bacteria. Cost optimization and energy utilization are also discussed.

  19. Clean fuels from biomass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Y.-Y.

    1976-01-01

    The paper discusses the U.S. resources to provide fuels from agricultural products, the present status of conversion technology of clean fuels from biomass, and a system study directed to determine the energy budget, and environmental and socioeconomic impacts. Conversion processes are discussed relative to pyrolysis and anaerobic fermentation. Pyrolysis breaks the cellulose molecules to smaller molecules under high temperature in the absence of oxygen, wheras anaerobic fermentation is used to convert biomass to methane by means of bacteria. Cost optimization and energy utilization are also discussed.

  20. Minimally refined biomass fuel

    DOEpatents

    Pearson, Richard K.; Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1984-01-01

    A minimally refined fluid composition, suitable as a fuel mixture and derived from biomass material, is comprised of one or more water-soluble carbohydrates such as sucrose, one or more alcohols having less than four carbons, and water. The carbohydrate provides the fuel source; water solubilizes the carbohydrates; and the alcohol aids in the combustion of the carbohydrate and reduces the vicosity of the carbohydrate/water solution. Because less energy is required to obtain the carbohydrate from the raw biomass than alcohol, an overall energy savings is realized compared to fuels employing alcohol as the primary fuel.

  1. Fixed Bed Biomass Gasifier

    SciTech Connect

    Carl Bielenberg

    2006-03-31

    The report details work performed by Gazogen to develop a novel biomass gasifier for producimg electricity from commercially available hardwood chips. The research conducted by Gazogen under this grant was intended to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of a new means of producing electricity from wood chips and other biomass and carbonaceous fuels. The technical feasibility of the technology has been furthered as a result of the DOE grant, and work is expected to continue. The economic feasibility can only be shown when all operational problems have been overocme. The technology could eventually provide a means of producing electricity on a decentralized basis from sustainably cultivated plants or plant by-products.

  2. Biomass production in Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.H.; Dowd, M.L.

    1981-08-01

    Florida posseses climatic, land, and water resources favorable for abundant biomass production. Therefore, a statewide program has been initiated to determine adapted species for the available array of production sites. Plant resources under investigation include woody, aquatic, grasses, hydrocarbon, and root crop species. The goal is to produce a continuous stream of biomass for the various biofuel conversion options. Preliminary yields from energy cropping experiments range from about 10 to nearly 90 metric tons per hectare per year, depending on the crop and the production systems employed. (Refs. 15).

  3. Method for pretreating lignocellulosic biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzhiyil, Najeeb M.; Brown, Robert C.; Dalluge, Dustin Lee

    2015-08-18

    The present invention relates to a method for pretreating lignocellulosic biomass containing alkali and/or alkaline earth metal (AAEM). The method comprises providing a lignocellulosic biomass containing AAEM; determining the amount of the AAEM present in the lignocellulosic biomass; identifying, based on said determining, the amount of a mineral acid sufficient to completely convert the AAEM in the lignocellulosic biomass to thermally-stable, catalytically-inert salts; and treating the lignocellulosic biomass with the identified amount of the mineral acid, wherein the treated lignocellulosic biomass contains thermally-stable, catalytically inert AAEM salts.

  4. The Arabidopsis EIN2 restricts organ growth by retarding cell expansion

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Guanping; Liu, Gang; Xiao, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    The growth of plant organ to its characteristic size is a fundamental developmental process, but the mechanism is still poorly understood. Plant hormones play a great role in organ size control by modulating cell division and/or cell expansion. ETHYLENE INSENSITVE 2 (EIN2) was first identified by a genetic screen for ethylene insensitivity and is regarded as a central component of ethylene signaling, but its role in cell growth has not been reported. Here we demonstrate that changed expression of EIN2 led to abnormity of cell expansion by morphological and cytological analyses of EIN2 loss-of-function mutants and the overexpressing transgenic plant. Our findings suggest that EIN2 controls final organ size by restricting cell expansion. PMID:26039475

  5. Berechnung der auftretenden lokalen Kräfte auf der magnetischen Beschichtung eines magnetischen Rasterkraftmikroskops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preisner, T.; Mathis, W.

    2009-05-01

    Die numerische Berechnung entstehender Kraftwirkungen auf Körper aufgrund magnetischer Wechselwirkungen zwischen diesen, ist in Bezug auf die mechanische Deformation dieser Körper ein noch nicht vollständig gelöstes Problem. In dieser Arbeit wird ein Vergleich vorhandener Kraftberechnungsmethoden hinsichtlich der totalen Kraft anhand eines analytisch berechenbaren Beispiels vorgestellt, sowie Unterschiede der lokalen Kraftdichten dieser Methoden in Anwendung auf die magnetische Beschichtung eines magnetischen Rasterkraftmikroskops aufgezeigt. Due to magnetic interactions between magnetic field inducing bodies, force effects occur on the materials. The numerical computation of those occuring forces with respect to a subsequent structural analysis of a deformable material is still a topic of interest in research. In this paper a comparison between several existent force calculation methods regarding the total force is given for an example with two magnetic cubes. Furthermore, differences are shown concerning the local force densities on the magnetic coating of a magnetic force microscope.

  6. Sustainable biomass removal rates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crop non-grain biomass (straw or stover) is a potential bioenergy feedstock suitable for thermochemical (controlled combustion) or fermentation to ethanol platforms. It is critical to prevent soil degradation; thereby, maintain soil's capacity to produce food, feed, fiber and fuel. Overharvest of cr...

  7. Biomass Conversion Factsheet

    SciTech Connect

    2016-06-05

    To efficiently convert algae, diverse types of cellulosic biomass, and emerging feedstocks into renewable fuels, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports research, development, and demonstration of technologies. This research will help ensure that these renewable fuels are compatible with today’s vehicles and infrastructure.

  8. Biomass Scenario Model

    SciTech Connect

    2015-09-01

    The Biomass Scenario Model (BSM) is a unique, carefully validated, state-of-the-art dynamic model of the domestic biofuels supply chain which explicitly focuses on policy issues, their feasibility, and potential side effects. It integrates resource availability, physical/technological/economic constraints, behavior, and policy. The model uses a system dynamics simulation (not optimization) to model dynamic interactions across the supply chain.

  9. Activated carbon from biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manocha, S.; Manocha, L. M.; Joshi, Parth; Patel, Bhavesh; Dangi, Gaurav; Verma, Narendra

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon are unique and versatile adsorbents having extended surface area, micro porous structure, universal adsorption effect, high adsorption capacity and high degree of surface reactivity. Activated carbons are synthesized from variety of materials. Most commonly used on a commercial scale are cellulosic based precursors such as peat, coal, lignite wood and coconut shell. Variation occurs in precursors in terms of structure and carbon content. Coir having very low bulk density and porous structure is found to be one of the valuable raw materials for the production of highly porous activated carbon and other important factor is its high carbon content. Exploration of good low cost and non conventional adsorbent may contribute to the sustainability of the environment and offer promising benefits for the commercial purpose in future. Carbonization of biomass was carried out in a horizontal muffle furnace. Both carbonization and activation were performed in inert nitrogen atmosphere in one step to enhance the surface area and to develop interconnecting porosity. The types of biomass as well as the activation conditions determine the properties and the yield of activated carbon. Activated carbon produced from biomass is cost effective as it is easily available as a waste biomass. Activated carbon produced by combination of chemical and physical activation has higher surface area of 2442 m2/gm compared to that produced by physical activation (1365 m2/gm).

  10. Marine biomass research advances

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, E.

    1980-08-01

    This paper reports on research in California, New York and elsewhere into marine biomass. A manmade marine farm moored four miles off the coast of southern California pumps deep water up a 450 m pipe to fertilize giant kelp. After harvesting and chopping by existing commercial methods, the kelp would be converted, by either anaerobic bacteria or thermal processes, into methane and other products.

  11. Switchgrass for biomass energy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) is a native warm-season grass and is the model herbaceous perennial biomass energy feedstock for the USA. More than 75-years of experience confirm that switchgrass will be productive and sustainable on rain-fed marginally-productive cropland east of the 100th meridian....

  12. Electrochemical fermentation of biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Brumm, T.J.; Day, D.L.; Steinberg, M.P.

    1983-12-01

    This paper summarizes research or the integration of aerobic biomass treatment and in situ electrolysis. Water is split into oxygen (used for microbial respiration) and hydrogen. The microflora greatly enhanced hydrogen production; Faraday current efficiencies > 100% were seen. There was, however, evidence of microbial inhibition due to the electrolysis.

  13. Roll Splitting of Biomass

    Treesearch

    Colin Ashmore

    1984-01-01

    This presentation is to make you aware of a biomass harvesting research project just initiated between TVA in Norris, Tennessee and the U.S. Forest Service in Auburn, Alabama, and hopefully, to generate your and your company's input in the form of questions, comments, and concerns, to problems you may have experienced in your rights-of-way (ROW) management program...

  14. Native grasses for biomass

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Considerable breeding and genetic research is currently dedicated to the development of warm-season perennial grasses, such as switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), as dedicated biomass crops. However, the Great Basin and other large regions of the western United States and World are dominated by cool-se...

  15. Biomass Program Factsheet

    SciTech Connect

    2010-03-01

    The emerging U.S. bioindustry is using a range of biomass resources to provide a secure and growing supply of transportation fuels and electric power. Displacing an increasing portion of our imported oil with renewable, domestic bioenergy will provide clear benefits:Reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions; A cleaner, more secure energy future; Sustainable transportation fuels; Opportunities for economic growth

  16. Biomass in the Netherlands

    SciTech Connect

    Kwant, K.W. Jr.; Smakman, G.J.J.; Nillesen, F.H.G.

    1995-11-01

    The energy production from waste and biomass is one of the most promising methods of exploiting renewable energy in the Netherlands. The position of Dutch industry can be improved by means of technological development. An action plan for energy from waste and biomass will be implemented to double the energy output from the present 26 PJ to 54 PJ in 2000. Actions focus on targeted Research and Development with industry and market introduction with the energy production and distribution sector. The government will impose an energy tax (20%) on electricity and natural gas for households. Being a densely populated country the biomass resources originate mainly from waste and residue streams, while as a condition for conversion processes strict environmental regulations have to be met. Landfill gas is widely extracted and converted into energy. Part of the organic fraction of MSW is source separated, digested and upgraded to natural gas quality, while the digestate is used as compost. New development are in the area of cocombustion of wastewood in coal fired power stations. The first plant is under construction. A major R&D programme is set up with industry and research institutes on gasification of residues and biomass. At laboratory and pilotplant scale gasification experiments will be carried out with the different available streams. The major effect will be devoted to blending streams and gas cleaning.

  17. Ein Framework für echtzeitfähige Ethernet-Netzwerke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dopatka, Frank

    Im Rahmen dieser Arbeit wird die Entwicklung eines formalen Framewoks vorgestellt, mit dessen Hilfe zwischen der Kompatibilität zum verbreiteten baumförmigen Standard-Ethernet und der Einhaltung von Echtzeitanforderungen einer automatisierten Anlage variiert werden kann. Damit kann bereits vor der Auswahl einer bestimmten Technologie eine Schedule der Echtzeit-Übertragungen offline kalkuliert und simuliert werden, sobald die Anforderungen der Geräte im industriellen Echtzeit-Netzwerk bekannt sind.

  18. Two distinct EIN2 genes cooperatively regulate ethylene signaling in Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Kana; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Nakagawa, Tomomi

    2013-09-01

    Leguminous plants establish a mutualistic symbiosis with bacteria, collectively referred to as rhizobia. Host plants positively and negatively regulate the symbiotic processes to keep the symbiosis at an appropriate level. Although the plant hormone ethylene is known as a negative regulator of symbiotic processes, the molecular mechanisms of ethylene signaling remain unresolved, especially in the model plant Lotus japonicus. Here, we identified two genes, LjEIN2-1 and LjEIN2-2, from L. japonicus. These genes share moderate similarity in their amino acid sequences, are located on different chromosomes and are composed of different numbers of exons. Suppression of either LjEIN2-1 or LjEIN2-2 expression significantly promoted the root growth of transformed plants on plates containing 1-amino-cyclopropane-carboxylic acid (ACC), the biosynthetic precursor of ethylene. Simultaneous suppression of both LjEIN2-1 and LjEIN2-2 markedly increased the ethylene insensitivity of transgenic roots and resulted in an increased nodulation phenotype. These results indicate that LjEIN2-1 and LjEIN2-2 concertedly regulate ethylene signaling in L. japonicus. We also observed that Nod factor (NF) induced the expression of the ethylene-responsive gene LjACO2, and simultaneous treatment with NF and ACC markedly increases its transcript level compared with either NF or ACC alone. Because LjACO2 encodes ACC oxidase, which is a key enzyme in ethylene biosynthesis, this result suggests the existence of an NF-triggered negative feedback mechanism through ethylene signaling.

  19. Carbon Fiber from Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Milbrandt, Anelia; Booth, Samuel

    2016-09-01

    Carbon fiber (CF), known also as graphite fiber, is a lightweight, strong, and flexible material used in both structural (load-bearing) and non-structural applications (e.g., thermal insulation). The high cost of precursors (the starting material used to make CF, which comes predominately from fossil sources) and manufacturing have kept CF a niche market with applications limited mostly to high-performance structural materials (e.g., aerospace). Alternative precursors to reduce CF cost and dependence on fossil sources have been investigated over the years, including biomass-derived precursors such as rayon, lignin, glycerol, and lignocellulosic sugars. The purpose of this study is to provide a comprehensive overview of CF precursors from biomass and their market potential. We examine the potential CF production from these precursors, the state of technology and applications, and the production cost (when data are available). We discuss their advantages and limitations. We also discuss the physical properties of biomass-based CF, and we compare them to those of polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based CF. We also discuss manufacturing and end-product considerations for bio-based CF, as well as considerations for plant siting and biomass feedstock logistics, feedstock competition, and risk mitigation strategies. The main contribution of this study is that it provides detailed technical and market information about each bio-based CF precursor in one document while other studies focus on one precursor at a time or a particular topic (e.g., processing). Thus, this publication allows for a comprehensive view of the CF potential from all biomass sources and serves as a reference for both novice and experienced professionals interested in CF production from alternative sources.

  20. Nitric oxide regulates dark-induced leaf senescence through EIN2 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yun-Han; Guo, Fang-Qing

    2012-08-01

    The nitric oxide (NO)-deficient mutant nos1/noa1 exhibited an early leaf senescence phenotype. ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE 2 (EIN2) was previously reported to function as a positive regulator of ethylene-induced senescence. The aim of this study was to address the question of how NO interacts with ethylene to regulate leaf senescence by characterizing the double mutant ein2-1 nos1/noa1 (Arabidopsis thaliana). Double mutant analysis revealed that the nos1/noa1-mediated, dark-induced early senescence phenotype was suppressed by mutations in EIN2, suggesting that EIN2 is involved in nitric oxide signaling in the regulation of leaf senescence. The results showed that chlorophyll degradation in the double mutant leaves was significantly delayed. In addition, nos1/noa1-mediated impairment in photochemical efficiency and integrity of thylakoid membranes was reverted by EIN2 mutations. The rapid upregulation of the known senescence marker genes in the nos1/noa1 mutant was severely inhibited in the double mutant during leaf senescence. Interestingly, the response of dark-grown nos1/noa1 mutant seedlings to ethylene was similar to that of wild type seedlings. Taken together, our findings suggest that EIN2 is involved in the regulation of early leaf senescence caused by NO deficiency, but NO deficiency caused by NOS1/NOA1 mutations does not affect ethylene signaling. © 2012 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  1. Enzymes for improved biomass conversion

    DOEpatents

    Brunecky, Roman; Himmel, Michael E.

    2016-02-02

    Disclosed herein are enzymes and combinations of the enzymes useful for the hydrolysis of cellulose and the conversion of biomass. Methods of degrading cellulose and biomass using enzymes and cocktails of enzymes are also disclosed.

  2. Synfuels from biomass grow slowly

    SciTech Connect

    Black, J.; Wedlock, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    Current developments in the manufacture of synfuels are discussed with emphasis on the sources of biomass suitable for synfuels production, processes for converting biomass to synfuels, and the economics of the technology. The sources include wood, nonwood crops, root crops, aquatic biomass, and oils from plants such as soybean, safflower, and peanut. The biomass conversion processes discussed include pyrolysis, gasification, liquefaction, and aerobic and anaerobic digestion.

  3. Biomass and biomass change in lodgepole pine stands in Alberta.

    PubMed

    Monserud, Robert A; Huang, Shongming; Yang, Yuqing

    2006-06-01

    We describe methods and results for broad-scale estimation and mapping of forest biomass for the Canadian province of Alberta. Differences over successive decades provided an estimate of biomass change. Over 1500 permanent sample plots (PSP) were analyzed from across the range of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia Engelm.), the major forest tree species of Alberta. The PSP network is densest in stands aged between 70 and 100 years and is well-represented by stands of all ages to 150 years of age. Stand biomass (Mg ha(-1)) was estimated for each PSP plot as the sum of the respective biomass components for each tree (live and standing dead). The biomass components for live trees were stem, bark, branches, foliage and roots. The components for standing dead trees excluded foliage. Equations from previous biomass studies were used for biomass component estimation. Biomass estimates of additional non-tree components were attempted, but without much success. Biomass of the soil organic layer was estimated once on 452 PSPs and a mean estimate of total dead fuels on the ground (28.4 Mg ha(-1)) was available only for the entire distribution of lodgepole pine. However, values of these two components were essentially constant over time and therefore did not alter the analysis or conclusions obtained by analyzing total tree biomass alone. We then used this spatial network of 1549 plots as the basis for mapping biomass across Alberta. Mapping methods were based on Australian National University SPLINe (ANUSPLIN) software, Hutchinson's thin-plate smoothing spline in four dimensions (latitude, longitude, elevation and biomass). Total tree biomass (mean = 172 Mg ha(-1)) was dominated by stem biomass (mean = 106 Mg ha(-1)), which was an order of magnitude greater than the mean estimates for the bark (11 Mg ha(-1)), branch (12 Mg ha(-1)) and foliage (12 Mg ha(-1)) components. A close relationship was found between total tree biomass and stand stem volume (R(2) = 0

  4. Reburn system with feedlot biomass

    DOEpatents

    Annamalai, Kalyan; Sweeten, John M.

    2005-12-13

    The present invention pertains to the use of feedlot biomass as reburn fuel matter to reduce NO.sub.x emissions. According to one embodiment of the invention, feedlot biomass is used as the reburn fuel to reduce NO.sub.x. The invention also includes burners and boiler in which feedlot biomass serves a reburn fuel.

  5. High Pressure Biomass Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Pradeep K

    2016-07-29

    According to the Billion Ton Report, the U.S. has a large supply of biomass available that can supplement fossil fuels for producing chemicals and transportation fuels. Agricultural waste, forest residue, and energy crops offer potential benefits: renewable feedstock, zero to low CO2 emissions depending on the specific source, and domestic supply availability. Biomass can be converted into chemicals and fuels using one of several approaches: (i) biological platform converts corn into ethanol by using depolymerization of cellulose to form sugars followed by fermentation, (ii) low-temperature pyrolysis to obtain bio-oils which must be treated to reduce oxygen content via HDO hydrodeoxygenation), and (iii) high temperature pyrolysis to produce syngas (CO + H2). This last approach consists of producing syngas using the thermal platform which can be used to produce a variety of chemicals and fuels. The goal of this project was to develop an improved understanding of the gasification of biomass at high pressure conditions and how various gasification parameters might affect the gasification behavior. Since most downstream applications of synags conversion (e.g., alcohol synthesis, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis etc) involve utilizing high pressure catalytic processes, there is an interest in carrying out the biomass gasification at high pressure which can potentially reduce the gasifier size and subsequent downstream cleaning processes. It is traditionally accepted that high pressure should increase the gasification rates (kinetic effect). There is also precedence from coal gasification literature from the 1970s that high pressure gasification would be a beneficial route to consider. Traditional approach of using thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) or high-pressure themogravimetric analyzer (PTGA) worked well in understanding the gasification kinetics of coal gasification which was useful in designing high pressure coal gasification processes. However

  6. Biomass sustainability and certification.

    PubMed

    Pavanan, Krishna C; Bosch, Roeland A; Cornelissen, Rob; Philp, Jim C

    2013-07-01

    The major challenges for humanity include energy security, food security, climate change, and a growing world population. They are all linked together by an instinctive, and yet increasingly complex and evolving concept, that of sustainability. Industrial biotechnology is seen as part of the overall solution, principally to combat climate change and strengthen energy security. At its beating heart is a huge policy challenge - the sustainability of biomass.

  7. Hydrolysis of biomass material

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Andrew J.; Orth, Rick J.; Franz, James A.; Alnajjar, Mikhail

    2004-02-17

    A method for selective hydrolysis of the hemicellulose component of a biomass material. The selective hydrolysis produces water-soluble small molecules, particularly monosaccharides. One embodiment includes solubilizing at least a portion of the hemicellulose and subsequently hydrolyzing the solubilized hemicellulose to produce at least one monosaccharide. A second embodiment includes solubilizing at least a portion of the hemicellulose and subsequently enzymatically hydrolyzing the solubilized hemicellulose to produce at least one monosaccharide. A third embodiment includes solubilizing at least a portion of the hemicellulose by heating the biomass material to greater than 110.degree. C. resulting in an aqueous portion that includes the solubilized hemicellulose and a water insoluble solids portion and subsequently separating the aqueous portion from the water insoluble solids portion. A fourth embodiment is a method for making a composition that includes cellulose, at least one protein and less than about 30 weight % hemicellulose, the method including solubilizing at least a portion of hemicellulose present in a biomass material that also includes cellulose and at least one protein and subsequently separating the solubilized hemicellulose from the cellulose and at least one protein.

  8. Thermophilic biogasification of biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.; Klass, D.L.; Christopher, R.W.; Edwards, V.H.

    1980-01-01

    Mesophilic and thermophilic digestion runs were conducted with the pure land-based biomass species, water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) and Coastal Bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon), and a blend of hyacinth, grass, MSW, and sewage sludge. A mixed biomass-waste hybrid feed was included because it has a superior nutritional balance relative to the pure feeds and it facilitates year-round operation of a biomass-to-SNG process. (7) The studies were conducted at 35/sup 0/ and 55/sup 0/C, generally believed to be optimum for mesophilic and thermophilic digestion of organic feeds. Results of mesophilic digestion were to provide baseline performance data for evaluation of thermophilic digester performance. It was decided that the feed affording the best thermophilic performance would be pretreated with dilute sodium hydroxide solution at the selected digestion temperature of 55/sup 0/C to improve methane production rate and yield. In addition, thermophilic runs were planned to investigate ways to reduce chemical requirements for alkaline pretreatment and feed slurry neutralization.

  9. Innovative BI-Lösungen als Basis für eine erfolgreiche Transformation zu Utility 4.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillipp, Daniel; Ebert, Sebastian

    Für eine erfolgreiche Transformation, vom reinen Energieversorger hin zum Energiedienstleister, werden innovative Business-Intelligence-Lösungen notwendig sein und eine zentrale Rolle einnehmen. Dabei ist es zunächst essenziell, die Herausforderungen zu kennen und ihnen mit geeigneten Analysen zu begegnen. Die Basis hierzu bildet eine abgestimmte und auf die strategischen Unternehmensziele ausgerichtete Architektur und Vorgehensweise. Zwei Beispiele veranschaulichen, wie ein gesamtheitlicher Ansatz, auch bei Datenvielfalt und hoher Komplexität, operative Prozesse optimiert, und fortgeschrittene Analysen zukünftig einen Beitrag zum Unternehmenserfolg liefern können.

  10. Prediction of coexistent carcinomas risks by subjective EIN diagnosis and comparison with WHO classification in endometrial hyperplasias.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-Feng; Liao, Ying-Yang; Peng, Ning-Fu; Li, Le-Qun; Xie, Shu-Rui; Wang, Run-Bang

    2012-12-15

    Endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia (EIN) classification is proposed as a new diagnostic system to resolve the limitations of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification in routine practice. Our aim was to find out whether EIN classification excels the WHO classification regarding the accurate prediction of coexisting endometrial carcinomas (EC) in biopsy specimens. We retrospectively re-classified 139 WHO-classified endometrial hyperplasia (EH) cases by subjective EIN diagnosis and compared the incidence of coexisting carcinomas using two classification systems by re-evaluating biopsy and corresponding hysterectomy specimens. Of 139 WHO-classified hyperplasia cases, 36 and 103 were classified as benign and EIN cases, respectively. Forty of 93 cases with atypical EH had EC at hysterectomy as compared with 2/46 cases without atypical EH, while EC was detected in 42/103 cases with EIN, and in 0 of 36 cases without EIN. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for atypical EH vs. non-atypical EH in biopsy specimen was 95.2%, 45.4%, 43.0% and 95.7%, respectively. For EIN vs. benign, the sensitivity was 100% and the specificity was 37.1%. The incidence of coexisting carcinomas in EIN cases was similar to that in atypical EH cases. However, regarding the exclusion of coexisting carcinomas, EIN criteria of benign lesions excelled the WHO criteria of non-atypical EH/CH.

  11. Biofuel from "humified" biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kpogbemabou, D.; Lemée, L.; Amblès, A.

    2009-04-01

    In France, 26% of the emissions of greenhouse effect gas originate from transportation which depends for 87% on fossil fuels. Nevertheless biofuels can contribute to the fight against climate change while reducing energetic dependence. Indeed biomass potentially represents in France 30 Mtoe a year that is to say 15% national consumption. But 80% of these resources are made of lignocellulosic materials which are hardly exploitable. First-generation biofuels are made from sugar, starch, vegetable oil, or animal fats. Due to their competition with human food chain, first-generation biofuels could lead to food shortages and price rises. At the contrary second-generation biofuel production can use a variety of non food crops while using the lignocellulosic part of biomass [1]. Gasification, fermentation and direct pyrolysis are the most used processes. However weak yields and high hydrogen need are limiting factors. In France, the National Program for Research on Biofuels (PNRB) aims to increase mobilizable biomass resource and to develop lignocellulosic biomass conversion. In this context, the LIGNOCARB project studies the liquefaction of biodegraded biomass in order to lower hydrogen consumption. Our aim was to develop and optimize the biodegradation of the biomass. Once the reactor was achieved, the influence of different parameters (starting material, aeration, moisture content) on the biotransformation process was studied. The monitored parameters were temperature, pH and carbon /nitrogen ratio. Chemical (IHSS protocol) and biochemical (van Soest) fractionations were used to follow the maturity ("humic acid"/"fulvic acid" ratio) and the biological stability (soluble, hemicelluloses, celluloses, lignin) of the organic matter (OM). In example, the increase in lignin can be related to the stabilization since the OM becomes refractory to biodegradation whereas the increase in the AH/AF ratio traduces "humification". However, contrarily to the composting process, we do

  12. Datenkompression, Prozessoptimierung, Aerodynamik: Eine Tour Durch die Skalen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Wolfgang; Marquardt, Wolfgang

    Enorm gestiegene Rechnerkapazitäten ermutigen zu einer immer genaueren Erschließung komplexer Prozesse in Natur- und Ingenieurwissenschaften durch numerische Simulation. Die Mathematik als Schnittstelle zwischen realer und digitaler Welt liefert einerseits die Grundlagen zur Formulierung notwendigerweise vereinfachter Modelle der Realität. Andererseits bietet sie aber auch die methodischen Grundlagen für den Entwurf effizienter Algorithmen, die aus solchen Modellen quantitative Information gewinnen können. Eine zentrale Herausforderung liegt dabei in der Tatsache, dass reale Prozesse meist durch relevante Anteile auf einer riesigen Spannweite von Längenskalen getrieben werden. Die Entwicklung mathematischer Methoden zur Behandlung von Mehrskaligkeit ist daher von wesentlicher Bedeutung. In diesem Artikel wird dies anhand jüngster Entwicklungen in ganz unterschiedlichen Anwendungsbereichen erklärt und illustriert, auch um deutlich zu machen, wieviele "Fliegen“ man mit einer "mathematischen Klappe“ schlagen kann. Insbesondere werden grundlegende, auf Waveletzerlegung beruhende Prinzipien zunächst im Rahmen der Bildkompression und -kodierung auf weitgehend elementare Weise erklärt. Es wird dann aufgezeigt, dass diese Konzepte in ganz ähnlicher Weise bei der Datenanalyse im Zusammenhang mit verfahrenstechnischen Anwendungen, bei großskaligen Optimierungsproblemen der Prozessindustrie sowie bei komplexen Strömungsproblemen wie in aerodynamischen Anwendungen zum Tragen kommen. Stabile Zerlegungen in Anteile unterschiedlicher Längenskalen eröffnen dabei einen Zugang zu adaptiven Lösungskonzepten, die in der Lage sind, automatisch Rechnerresourcen dort zu plazieren, wo sie zu einer ökonomischen Realisierung der gewünschten Lösungsqualität, etwa in Form von Genauigkeitstoleranzen, benötigt werden.

  13. Catalysis in biomass gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, E.G.; Mudge, L.K.

    1984-06-01

    The objective of these studies is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of producing specific gas products by catalytic gasification of biomass. Catalyst performance is a key factor in the feasibility of catalytic gasification processes. The results of studies designed to gain a fundamental understanding of catalytic mechanisms and causes of deactivation, and discussion of the state-of-the-art of related catalytic processes are presented. Experiments with primary and secondary catalysts were conducted in a 5-cm-diameter, continuous-wood-feed, fixed-catalyst-bed reactor. The primary catalysts used in the experiments were alkali carbonates mixed with the biomass feed; the secondary catalysts included nickel or other transition metals on supports such as alumina, silica, or silica-alumina. The primary catalysts were found to influence wood pyrolysis as well as the char/steam reaction. Secondary catalysts were used in a fixed-bed configuration to direct gas phase reactions. Results of the performance of these catalysts are presented. Secondary catalysts were found to be highly effective for conversion of biomass to specific gas products: synthesis gases and methane-rich gas. With an active catalyst, equilibrium gas composition are obtained, and all liquid pyrolysis products are converted to gases. The major cause of catalyst deactivation was carbon deposition, or coking. Loss of surface area by sintering was also inportant. Catalyst deactivation by sulfur poisoning was observed when bagasse was used as the feedstock for catalytic gasification. Mechanisms of catalyst activity and deactivation are discussed. Model compounds (methane, ethylene, and phenol) were used to determine coking behavior of catalysts. Carbon deposition is more prevalent with ethylene and phenol than with methane. Catalyst formulations that are resistant to carbon deposition are presented. 60 references, 10 figures, 21 tables.

  14. Biomass process handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Descriptions are given of 42 processes which use biomass to produce chemical products. Marketing and economic background, process description, flow sheets, costs, major equipment, and availability of technology are given for each of the 42 processes. Some of the chemicals discussed are: ethanol, ethylene, acetaldehyde, butanol, butadiene, acetone, citric acid, gluconates, itaconic acid, lactic acid, xanthan gum, sorbitol, starch polymers, fatty acids, fatty alcohols, glycerol, soap, azelaic acid, perlargonic acid, nylon-11, jojoba oil, furfural, furfural alcohol, tetrahydrofuran, cellulose polymers, products from pulping wastes, and methane. Processes include acid hydrolysis, enzymatic hydrolysis, fermentation, distillation, Purox process, and anaerobic digestion.

  15. Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2010-12-10

    Hydrothermal liquefaction technology is describes in its relationship to fast pyrolysis of biomass. The scope of work at PNNL is discussed and some intial results are presented. HydroThermal Liquefaction (HTL), called high-pressure liquefaction in earlier years, is an alternative process for conversion of biomass into liquid products. Some experts consider it to be pyrolysis in solvent phase. It is typically performed at about 350 C and 200 atm pressure such that the water carrier for biomass slurry is maintained in a liquid phase, i.e. below super-critical conditions. In some applications catalysts and/or reducing gases have been added to the system with the expectation of producing higher yields of higher quality products. Slurry agents ('carriers') evaluated have included water, various hydrocarbon oils and recycled bio-oil. High-pressure pumping of biomass slurry has been a major limitation in the process development. Process research in this field faded away in the 1990s except for the HydroThermal Upgrading (HTU) effort in the Netherlands, but has new resurgence with other renewable fuels in light of the increased oil prices and climate change concerns. Research restarted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 2007 with a project, 'HydroThermal Liquefaction of Agricultural and Biorefinery Residues' with partners Archer-Daniels-Midland Company and ConocoPhillips. Through bench-scale experimentation in a continuous-flow system this project investigated the bio-oil yield and quality that could be achieved from a range of biomass feedstocks and derivatives. The project was completed earlier this year with the issuance of the final report. HydroThermal Liquefaction research continues within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium with the effort focused at PNNL. The bench-scale reactor is being used for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass including pine forest residue and corn stover. A complementary project is an international collaboration with

  16. Biomass energy industry sourcebook

    SciTech Connect

    Troxell, D.L.

    1989-03-01

    The report is a directory of persons/establishments involved with different aspects of the biomass energy industry. These include consulting, engineering design, construction, manufacturing, retail, information, education, and research. Listings include name, address, phone, and a brief description of each firm/organization. Entries are categorized as follows: Consultants and Engineers, Alcohol Production Equipment/Systems, Methane Production Equipment/Systems, Combustion Equipment/Systems, Fuel Processing, Harvesting Equipment/Systems, Silviculture, Transportation, Storage, and Handling, Information Sources, and Databases. The report has been expanded and revised from a previous edition.

  17. Fuels from biomass and wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klass, D. L.; Emert, G. H.

    The production, use, and effects of fuels from biomass and waste energy sources are discussed. Biomass procurement from silviculture, including hybrid poplar and sycamore farms, in addition to the growth of mass algal culture and Jerusalem artichokes for fuels are considered. The conversion of biomass and solid waste materials through biological and thermal gasification, hydrolysis and extraction, and fermentation to produce ethanol, along with natural and thermal liquefaction processes involving euphorbia lathyris and cellulosic materials are elaborated. Environmental and health aspects of biomass and waste conversion systems are outlined, noting the large land surface areas needed for significant contributions to total demands from biomass, specific instances and case studies are reviewed for biomass use in Indiana, the Dominican Republic, the southeast U.S., and in small wood stoves.

  18. Estimating Phytoplankton Biomass and Productivity.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    Identlfy by block nuusbet) -Estimates of phytoplankton biomass and rates of production can provide a manager with some insight into questions concerning...and growth. Phytoplankton biomass is the amount of algal material present, whereas productivity is the rate at which algal cell material is produced...biomass and productivity parameters. Munawar et al. (1974) reported that cell volume was better correlated to chlorophyll a and photosynthe- sis rates

  19. Rekonfigurationstechniken und Anwendungsgebiete für ein programmierbares Gm-C Analog-Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J.; Henrici, F.; Manoli, Y.

    2006-09-01

    FPAAs (Field Programmable Analog Arrays) erlauben es, analoge Signalübertragungsfunktionen auf Hardware abzubilden, die von veränderbaren digitalen Konfigurationsdaten abhängen. Sowohl für das Design von Filterstrukturen auf Systemebene als auch für die genaue Simulation ihrer analogen Übertragungsfunktion auf Transistorebene ist es dabei notwendig, die entsprechenden Konfigurationsdaten einzugeben bevor die Phasen/Betragsanalyse durchgeführt werden kann. Die vorliegende Arbeit stellt ein graphisches Entwurfsprogramm zur Instantiierung von analogen Filtern für ein FPAA mit 17 gm-C Blöcken vor. Es wird über erste Simulationsergebnisse berichtet, die die Machbarkeit mit Eckfrequenzen bis zu hundert Mhz bestätigen. Simulierte Übertragungsfunktionen von grundlegenden Bausteinen werden mit der Theorie verglichen und zu einer exemplarischen Instantiierung eines Butterworth-Filters der vierten Ordnung weitergeführt.

  20. Eine Beziehung seit 650 Jahren: Universität Wien und Kloster Melk - Katalog zur Sonderausstellung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruckmüller, Ernst; Niederkorn-Bruck, Meta; Beck, Paul G.; Deibl, Jakob; Deibl, Johannes; Denk, Ulrike; Ellegast, Burkard; Floßmann, Gerhard; Glaßner, Gottfried; Kalteis, Bernadette; Kowarik, Wilfried; Rotheneder, Martin

    2015-04-01

    University of Vienna was founded in 1365 and celebrates its 650 anniversary in 2015. Due to the university's anniversary, the Benedictine abbey of Melk, Austria presents an exhibition, depicting six and half centuries of university history and collaboration between the university as well as the abbey in all disciplines present at medieval universities. The publication describes the historic frame work as well as case-by-case descriptions of displayed manuscripts, prints and artifacts. Die Universität Wien wurde 1365 gegründet und feiert 2015 ihr 650jähriges Bestehen. Aus Anlass dieses Jubiläums präsentiert das Benediktiner Stift Melk eine Ausstellung, in der sechseinhalb Jahrhunderte Universistaetsgeschichte aufgearbeitet werden, sowie die Zusammenarbeit zwischen Universität und Abtei auf allen Themenbereichen, die an mittelalterlichen Universitäten angeboten wurden. Die Publikation bietet eine historische Zusammenfassung sowie eine Detailbeschreibung der ausgestellten Handschriften, Drucke sowie Gegenstände.

  1. Catalytic liquefaction of biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, H.; Figueroa, C.; Karatas, C.; Kloden, D.; Schaleger, L.; Yaghoubzadeh, N.

    1981-10-01

    The bench-scale continuous liquefaction unit or CLU is in operation as a back-mixed reactor. Its capabilities include temperatures up to 370/sup 0/C, reaction times of about 10 to 30 minutes and pressures up to 4000 PSIG. It is in use exploring a factorial experiment in temperature, time, slurry pH, gas to slurry feed ratio and other variables. From early runs at times of about 20 minutes, temperatures of 350/sup 0/C or higher and slurry pH's above 8 are desirable. The reactor has been used only on Douglas fir wood slurries. However, it is available for a wide range of biomass or even fossil feedstocks. New methods of characterizing oil and water-soluble products have been developed and applied to CLU products. Conditions under which formate ion, probable intermediate in both water gas shift reaction and reduction of biomass oxygen by CO, is formed in large quantities have been found. Raw wood chips have been shown to undergo solvolysis - total dissolution - when mixed with wood liquefaction oil and heated under certain conditions. This phenomenon must occur to some degree in the initial stages of the PERC process. Solvolysis is suggested as a possible way to get the benefits of oil recycle without the uneconomicaly high recycle ratios of the PERC process.

  2. PHA recovery from biomass.

    PubMed

    Madkour, Mohamed H; Heinrich, Daniel; Alghamdi, Mansour A; Shabbaj, Ibraheem I; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2013-09-09

    The recovery of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) from biomass, that is, from bacterial cells, is one of the major obstacles in the industrial production of these polyesters. Since PHAs are naturally synthesized as intracellular storage compounds for carbon and energy and are for this deposited in the cytoplasm of the bacterial cell, PHAs are more or less tightly linked with the entire biomass, and the polyesters must be released from the cells before their isolation and purification can be conducted. This additional step, that is, the release from the cells, is a major difference from most other biotechnological processes where the product occurs outside of the cells because it is secreted into the medium in a bioreactor or because it is synthesized in vitro in an enzyme reactor in a cell free system. This additional step contributes significantly to the overall costs of production. In this review we provide an overview about the different processes that result in the release of PHA from the cells, and we evaluate these processes with regard to the suitability at large scale in the industry.

  3. Transcriptome Analysis Provides a Preliminary Regulation Route of the Ethylene Signal Transduction Component, SlEIN2, during Tomato Ripening.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Heng; Yuan, Xin-Yu; Meng, Lan-Huan; Zhu, Ben-Zhong; Zhu, Hong-Liang; Luo, Yun-Bo; Fu, Da-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Ethylene is crucial in climacteric fruit ripening. The ethylene signal pathway regulates several physiological alterations such as softening, carotenoid accumulation and sugar level reduction, and production of volatile compounds. All these physiological processes are controlled by numerous genes and their expression simultaneously changes at the onset of ripening. Ethylene insensitive 2 (EIN2) is a key component for ethylene signal transduction, and its mutation causes ethylene insensitivity. In tomato, silencing SlEIN2 resulted in a non-ripening phenotype and low ethylene production. RNA sequencing of SlEIN2-silenced and wild type tomato, and differential gene expression analyses, indicated that silencing SlEIN2 caused changes in more than 4,000 genes, including those related to photosynthesis, defense, and secondary metabolism. The relative expression level of 28 genes covering ripening-associated transcription factors, ethylene biosynthesis, ethylene signal pathway, chlorophyll binding proteins, lycopene and aroma biosynthesis, and defense pathway, showed that SlEIN2 influences ripening inhibitor (RIN) in a feedback loop, thus controlling the expression of several other genes. SlEIN2 regulates many aspects of fruit ripening, and is a key factor in the ethylene signal transduction pathway. Silencing SlEIN2 ultimately results in lycopene biosynthesis inhibition, which is the reason why tomato does not turn red, and this gene also affects the expression of several defense-associated genes. Although SlEIN2-silenced and green wild type fruits are similar in appearance, their metabolism is significantly different at the molecular level.

  4. OBSERVING TERRESTRIAL BIOMASS GLOBALLY: http://biomass.geo-wiki.org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, S.; Shchepashchenko, D.; McCallum, I.; Perger, C.; Schill, C.; Baccini, A.; Gallaun, H.; Kindermann, G.; Obersteiner, M.; Santoro, M.; Schmullius, C. C.; Shvidenko, A.

    2011-12-01

    Terrestrial biomass has been recognized as an essential climate variable and as such represents an important dataset for the scientific community. While a lot of effort has gone into producing such datasets in recent years, there is a need to begin to harmonize efforts. To that end, http://Biomass.Geo-Wiki.org presents a collection of global, regional and in-situ biomass datasets produced by a number of institutions, overlaid on the Google Earth platform (Table). Datasets contain above ground live biomass, forest woody biomass and in-situ forest biomass measurements and span spatial scales from global to national, regional and plot measurements in the northern Eurasia (Table). All datasets obtained were converted into unified units and a common color scheme and are available for visual comparison. As we assemble further datasets, the goal is to perform various scientific tasks including: gap analysis, cross-product validation, possible harmonization and hybrid product development. Furthermore, this tool could potentially provide the necessary scientific platform to enhance collaboration in the area of global biomass monitoring.
    Onboard Biomass Datasets Description

  5. Biomass and biomass change in lodgepole pine stands in Alberta

    Treesearch

    Robert A. Monserud; Shongming Huang; Yuqing Yang

    2006-01-01

    We describe methods and results for broad-scale estimation and mapping of forest biomass for the Canadian province of Alberta. Differences over successive decades provided an estimate of biomass change. Over 1500 permanent sample plots (PSP) were analyzed from across the range of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia Engelm...

  6. Biomass in the Deregulated Marketplace: Current Issues for Biomass Power

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1998-12-01

    This issue brief provides readers with a monthly review and analysis of electric utility deregulation as it impacts biomass power production and distribution. The topical areas to be routinely covered will include Federal activities, State activities, Current challenges, and Current opportunities. Additionally, a monthly highlighted topic will provide more in-depth analysis of current issue impacting biomass power.

  7. EIN3 interferes with the sulfur deficiency signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana through direct interaction with the SLIM1 transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Wawrzyńska, Anna; Sirko, Agnieszka

    2016-12-01

    Sulfur deficiency in plants leads to metabolic reprogramming through changes of gene expression. SLIM1 is so far the only characterized transcription factor associated strictly with sulfur deficiency stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. It belongs to the same protein family as EIN3, a major positive switch of ethylene signaling pathway. It binds to the specific cis sequence called UPE-box. Here we show that SLIM1 interacts with UPE-box as a homodimer. Interestingly, the same region of the protein is used for heterodimerization with EIN3; however, the heterodimer is not able to recognize UPE-box. Expression of several SLIM1-dependent genes is enhanced in sulfur deficiency grown Arabidopsis ein3-1 seedlings (with mutated EIN3 protein). This implies a possible regulatory mechanism of ethylene in sulfur metabolism through direct EIN3-SLIM1 interaction.

  8. System and process for biomass treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Dunson, Jr., James B; Tucker, III, Melvin P; Elander, Richard T; Lyons, Robert C

    2013-08-20

    A system including an apparatus is presented for treatment of biomass that allows successful biomass treatment at a high solids dry weight of biomass in the biomass mixture. The design of the system provides extensive distribution of a reactant by spreading the reactant over the biomass as the reactant is introduced through an injection lance, while the biomass is rotated using baffles. The apparatus system to provide extensive assimilation of the reactant into biomass using baffles to lift and drop the biomass, as well as attrition media which fall onto the biomass, to enhance the treatment process.

  9. Mobile Biomass Pelletizing System

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Mason

    2009-04-16

    This grant project examines multiple aspects of the pelletizing process to determine the feasibility of pelletizing biomass using a mobile form factor system. These aspects are: the automatic adjustment of the die height in a rotary-style pellet mill, the construction of the die head to allow the use of ceramic materials for extreme wear, integrating a heat exchanger network into the entire process from drying to cooling, the use of superheated steam for adjusting the moisture content to optimum, the economics of using diesel power to operate the system; a break-even analysis of estimated fixed operating costs vs. tons per hour capacity. Initial development work has created a viable mechanical model. The overall analysis of this model suggests that pelletizing can be economically done using a mobile platform.

  10. Forest biomass sustainability and availability

    Treesearch

    K.E. Skog; John Stanturf

    2011-01-01

    This chapter provides a synthesis of information on potential supply of forest biomass given needs for sustainable development of forestry. Sustainability includes maintenance of water supply, biodiversity, and carbon storage as well as timber products, community development, and recreation. Biomass removals can reduce fire hazard and insect and disease attack, restore...

  11. Growing perennial forages for biomass

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recent attention given to converting biomass into ethanol to fuel cars and trucks or burning it to generate electricity has captured society’s interest. There are three main routes for converting biomass into usable forms of energy or other chemical end products: (i) biochemical, (ii) thermochemical...

  12. Process for concentrated biomass saccharification

    DOEpatents

    Hennessey, Susan M.; Seapan, Mayis; Elander, Richard T.; Tucker, Melvin P.

    2010-10-05

    Processes for saccharification of pretreated biomass to obtain high concentrations of fermentable sugars are provided. Specifically, a process was developed that uses a fed batch approach with particle size reduction to provide a high dry weight of biomass content enzymatic saccharification reaction, which produces a high sugars concentration hydrolysate, using a low cost reactor system.

  13. Ammonia emissions from biomass burning

    Treesearch

    Dean A. Hegg; Lawrence F. Radke; Peter V. Hobbs; Philip J. Riggan

    1988-01-01

    Measurements in the plumes from seven forest fires show that the concentrations of NH3 were considerably in excess of ambient values. Calculation of NH3 emissions from the fires, based on the ratio of NH3/CO in the plumes and emissions of CO from biomass burning, suggest that biomass burning may be a...

  14. Woody biomass logistics [Chapter 14

    Treesearch

    Robert Keefe; Nathaniel Anderson; John Hogland; Ken Muhlenfeld

    2014-01-01

    The economics of using woody biomass as a fuel or feedstock for bioenergy applications is often driven by logistical considerations. Depending on the source of the woody biomass, the acquisition cost of the material is often quite low, sometimes near zero. However, the cost of harvesting, collection, processing, storage, and transportation from the harvest site to end...

  15. Forest biomass-based energy

    Treesearch

    Janaki R. R. Alavalapati; Pankaj Lal; Andres Susaeta; Robert C. Abt; David N. Wear

    2013-01-01

    Key FindingsHarvesting woody biomass for use as bioenergy is projected to range from 170 million to 336 million green tons by 2050, an increase of 54 to 113 percent over current levels.Consumption projections for forest biomass-based energy, which are based on Energy Information Administration projections, have a high level of...

  16. Additivity of nonlinear biomass equations

    Treesearch

    Bernard R. Parresol

    2001-01-01

    Two procedures that guarantee the property of additivity among the components of tree biomass and total tree biomass utilizing nonlinear functions are developed. Procedure 1 is a simple combination approach, and procedure 2 is based on nonlinear joint-generalized regression (nonlinear seemingly unrelated regressions) with parameter restrictions. Statistical theory is...

  17. Biomass pretreatment: fundamentals toward application.

    PubMed

    Agbor, Valery B; Cicek, Nazim; Sparling, Richard; Berlin, Alex; Levin, David B

    2011-01-01

    Development of sustainable energy systems based on renewable biomass feedstocks is now a global effort. Lignocellulosic biomass contains polymers of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, bound together in a complex structure. Liquid biofuels, such as ethanol, can be made from biomass via fermentation of sugars derived from the cellulose and hemicellulose within lignocellulosic materials, but the biomass must be subjected to pretreatment processes to liberate the sugars needed for fermentation. Production of value-added co-products along-side biofuels through integrated biorefinery processes creates the need for selectivity during pretreatment. This paper presents a survey of biomass pretreatment technologies with emphasis on concepts, mechanism of action and practicability. The advantages and disadvantages, and the potential for industrial applications of different pretreatment technologies are the highlights of this paper. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Conditioning biomass for microbial growth

    DOEpatents

    Bodie, Elizabeth A; England, George

    2015-03-31

    The present invention relates to methods for improving the yield of microbial processes that use lignocellulose biomass as a nutrient source. The methods comprise conditioning a composition comprising lignocellulose biomass with an enzyme composition that comprises a phenol oxidizing enzyme. The conditioned composition can support a higher rate of growth of microorganisms in a process. In one embodiment, a laccase composition is used to condition lignocellulose biomass derived from non-woody plants, such as corn and sugar cane. The invention also encompasses methods for culturing microorganisms that are sensitive to inhibitory compounds in lignocellulose biomass. The invention further provides methods of making a product by culturing the production microorganisms in conditioned lignocellulose biomass.

  19. Biomass resources for alcohol fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDowell, J. E.

    The production of alcohol fuel from biomass represents a fast and practical means of adding to the dwindling petroleum supply. The biomass feed-stocks which will feed the alcohol distilleries must be carefully selected. Using food chain biomass crops for conversion to alcohol will cause a reduction in the amount of food available and increase the cost of food and alcohol feedstocks. The food chains should not be drastically interrupted, and agricultural economic balances should not be altered. Various alternatives to alcohol production are presented, which lie within the confines of selected biomass feedstocks and will not interrupt normal agricultural activities. A corn processing and distillation process is shown graphically as an example; the biomass to alcohol conversion potential of feedstocks is given, and the potential cropland for conversion in the U.S.A. is shown as a percentage of the nation's total land area.

  20. Treatment of biomass to obtain fermentable sugars

    DOEpatents

    Dunson, Jr., James B.; Tucker, Melvin [Lakewood, CO; Elander, Richard [Evergreen, CO; Hennessey, Susan M [Avondale, PA

    2011-04-26

    Biomass is pretreated using a low concentration of aqueous ammonia at high biomass concentration. Pretreated biomass is further hydrolyzed with a saccharification enzyme consortium. Fermentable sugars released by saccharification may be utilized for the production of target chemicals by fermentation.

  1. Separation anxiety: An analysis of ethylene-induced cleavage of EIN2

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Since the discovery of the CTR1 protein kinase and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized EIN2 protein nearly 20 y ago, plant biologists have wondered how these proteins respectively serve as negative and positive regulators of ethylene-mediated signal transduction in plants. Now with the publicat...

  2. BSCL Use Plan: Solving Biomass Recalcitrance

    SciTech Connect

    Himmel, M.; Vinzant, T.; Bower, S.; Jechura, J.

    2005-08-01

    Technical report describing NREL's new Biomass Surface Characterization Laboratory (BSCL). The BSCL was constructed to provide the most modern commercial surface characterization equipment for studying biomass surfaces.

  3. New paradigm in ethylene signaling: EIN2, the central regulator of the signaling pathway, interacts directly with the upstream receptors.

    PubMed

    Bisson, Melanie M A; Groth, Georg

    2011-01-01

    The membrane protein ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE2 (EIN2), which is supposed to act between the soluble serine/threonine kinase CTR1 and the EIN3/EIL family of transcription factors, is a central and most critical element of the ethylene signaling pathway in Arabidopsis. In a recent study, we have identified that EIN2 interacts tightly with all members of the Arabidopsis ethylene receptor family - proteins that mark the starting point of the signaling pathway. Our studies show consistently that the kinase domain of the receptors is essential for the formation of the EIN2-receptor complex. Furthermore, mutational analysis demonstrates that phosphorylation is a key mechanism in controlling the interaction of EIN2 and the ethylene receptors. Interaction studies in the presence of the ethylene agonist cyanide revealed a causal link between hormone binding and complex formation. In the presence of the plant hormone agonist the auto-kinase activity of the receptors is inhibited and the non-phosphorylated kinase domain of the receptors binds tightly to the carboxyl-terminal domain of EIN2. In the absence of cyanide inhibition of the auto-kinase activity is relieved and complex formation with the phosphorylated kinase domain of the receptors is reduced. Our data suggest a novel model on the integration of EIN2 in the ethylene signaling pathway.

  4. ORA59 and EIN3 interaction couples jasmonate-ethylene synergistic action to antagonistic salicylic acid regulation of PDF expression.

    PubMed

    He, Xiang; Jiang, Jishan; Wang, Changquan; Dehesh, Katayoon

    2017-02-07

    Hormonal crosstalk is central for tailoring plant responses to the nature of challenges encountered. The role of antagonism between the two major defense hormones, salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA), and modulation of this interplay by ethylene (ET) in favor of JA signaling pathway in plant stress responses is well recognized, but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we show the opposing function of two transcription factors, ethylene insensitive3 (EIN3) and EIN3-Like1 (EIL1), in SA-mediated suppression and JA-mediated activation of PLANT DEFENSIN1.2 (PDF1.2). This functional duality is mediated via their effect on protein, not transcript levels of the PDF1.2 transcriptional activator octadecanoid-responsive arabidopsis59 (ORA59). Specifically, JA induces ORA59 protein levels independently of EIN3/EIL1, whereas SA reduces the protein levels dependently of EIN3/EIL1. Co-infiltration assays revealed nuclear co-localization of ORA59 and EIN3, and split-luciferase together with yeast-two-hybrid assays established their physical interaction. The functional ramification of the physical interaction is EIN3-dependent degradation of ORA59 by the 26S proteasome. These findings allude to SA-responsive reduction of ORA59 levels mediated by EIN3 binding to and targeting of ORA59 for degradation, thus nominating ORA59 pool as a coordination node for the antagonistic function of ET/JA and SA.

  5. Plasma Treatments and Biomass Gasification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luche, J.; Falcoz, Q.; Bastien, T.; Leninger, J. P.; Arabi, K.; Aubry, O.; Khacef, A.; Cormier, J. M.; Lédé, J.

    2012-02-01

    Exploitation of forest resources for energy production includes various methods of biomass processing. Gasification is one of the ways to recover energy from biomass. Syngas produced from biomass can be used to power internal combustion engines or, after purification, to supply fuel cells. Recent studies have shown the potential to improve conventional biomass processing by coupling a plasma reactor to a pyrolysis cyclone reactor. The role of the plasma is twofold: it acts as a purification stage by reducing production of tars and aerosols, and simultaneously produces a rich hydrogen syngas. In a first part of the paper we present results obtained from plasma treatment of pyrolysis oils. The outlet gas composition is given for various types of oils obtained at different experimental conditions with a pyrolysis reactor. Given the complexity of the mixtures from processing of biomass, we present a study with methanol considered as a model molecule. This experimental method allows a first modeling approach based on a combustion kinetic model suitable to validate the coupling of plasma with conventional biomass process. The second part of the paper is summarizing results obtained through a plasma-pyrolysis reactor arrangement. The goal is to show the feasibility of this plasma-pyrolysis coupling and emphasize more fundamental studies to understand the role of the plasma in the biomass treatment processes.

  6. Biomass for energy: Supply prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, D.O.; Rosillo-Calle, F.; Woods, J.; Williams, R.H.

    1993-12-31

    Biomass for energy can be obtained from residues of ongoing agricultural and forest-product industries, from harvesting forests, and from dedicated plantations. The harvesting of forests for biomass is likely to be limited by environmental concerns. Over the next couple of decades new bioenergy industries will be launched primarily using residues as feedstocks. Subsequently, the industrial base will shift to plantations, the largest potential source of biomass. The most promising sites for plantations are deforested and otherwise degraded lands in developing countries and excess croplands in the industrialized countries. Revenues from the sale of biomass crops grown on plantations established on degraded lands can help finance the restoration of these lands. Establishing plantations on excess croplands can be a new livelihood to farmers who might otherwise abandon their land because of foodcrop overproduction. In either case, biomass plantations can, with careful planning, substantially improve these lands ecologically relative to their present uses. But a substantial and sustained research and development effort is needed to ensure the realization and sustainability of high yields under a wide range of growing conditions. Moreover, the establishment and maintenance of biomass plantations must be carried out in the framework of sustainable economic development in ways that are acceptable and beneficial to the local people. Ultimately, land and water resource constraints will limit the contributions that biomass can make as an energy source in advanced societies. But biomass energy can nevertheless make major contributions to sustainable development before these limits are reached, if biomass is grown productively and sustainably and is efficiently converted to modern energy carriers that are used in energy-efficient end-use technologies. 88 refs., 5 figs., 13 tabs.

  7. Biomass resource assessment in Jamaica

    SciTech Connect

    Breakenridge, M.

    1983-12-01

    This paper reviews the past work that has been done in the field of Biomass Resource Assessment in Jamaica. The progress to date and what is planned for the future will also be discussed. Jamaica being an island in the tropics is well endowed with biomass resources. This resource in the past was both under-utilized and used wrongly. If more proven scientific ways are adopted, biomass can make a significant contribution to Jamaica's effort in reducing its 90% dependency on imported fuel.

  8. Catalytic gasification of biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertus, R. J.; Mudge, L. K.; Sealock, L. J., Jr.; Mitchell, D. H.; Weber, S. L.

    1981-12-01

    Methane and methanol synthesis gas can be produced by steam gasification of biomass in the presence of appropriate catalysts. This concept is to use catalysts in a fluidized bed reactor which is heated indirectly. The objective is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of the concept. Technically the concept has been demonstrated on a 50 lb per hr scale. Potential advantages over conventional processes include: no oxygen plant is needed, little tar is produced so gas and water treatment are simplified, and yields and efficiencies are greater than obtained by conventional gasification. Economic studies for a plant processing 2000 T/per day dry wood show that the cost of methanol from wood by catalytic gasification is competitive with the current price of methanol. Similar studies show the cost of methane from wood is competitive with projected future costs of synthetic natural gas. When the plant capacity is decreased to 200 T per day dry wood, neither product is very attractive in today's market.

  9. Biothermal gasification of biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Chynoweth, D.P.; Srivastava, V.J.; Henry, M.P.; Tarman, P.B.

    1980-01-01

    The BIOTHERMGAS Process is described for conversion of biomass, organic residues, and peat to substitute natural gas (SNG). This new process, under development at IGT, combines biological and thermal processes for total conversion of a broad variety of organic feeds (regardless of water or nutrient content). The process employs thermal gasification for conversion of refractory digester residues. Ammonia and other inorganic nutrients are recycled from the thermal process effluent to the bioconversion unit. Biomethanation and catalytic methanation are presented as alternative processes for methanation of thermal conversion product gases. Waste heat from the thermal component is used to supply the digester heat requirements of the bioconversion component. The results of a preliminary systems analysis of three possible applications of this process are presented: (1) 10,000 ton/day Bermuda grass plant with catalytic methanation; (2) 10,000 ton/day Bermuda grass plant with biomethanation; and (3) 1000 ton/day municipal solid waste (MSW) sewage sludge plant with biomethanation. The results indicate that for these examples, performance is superior to that expected for biological or thermal processes used separately. The results of laboratory studies presented suggest that effective conversion of thermal product gases can be accomplished by biomethanation.

  10. Delano Biomass Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, M.; Hendershaw, W.K.; Corbin, H.R.; Taylor, T.A.

    1995-12-31

    The Delano Biomass Power Plant utilizes orchard prunings, urban wood waste, almond shells, and cotton stalks to fuel a boiler for steam generation. The steam is condensed in a steam turbine/generator to produce 31.8 MW of power. The electrical power generated (27 MW net) is then sold to Southern California Edison Co. for distribution. By incorporating a cooling tower, demineralizer, brine concentration tower, and evaporation ponds this system is able to achieve zero discharge. Steam at 97{degrees}F is condensed with cooling water. The cooling water is recirculated through an evaporator tower. Due to the temperature of the water entering the tower (83{degrees}F), evaporation occurs leaving behind concentrated salts. A blowdown is used to remove these salts from the tower. Losses from evaporation or leaks require make up to the tower. Wastewater from various processes in the plant are passed to a brine concentration tower. This concentrate is then taken to the evaporation ponds. Concentrated blowdown of small volumes (approximately 2-4 gpm) from the brine tower is disposed of in evaporation ponds.

  11. Northeast Regional Biomass Energy Program

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, R.A.

    1992-02-01

    The Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) is entering its ninth year of operation. The management and the objectives have virtually remained unchanged and are stated as follows. The program conducted by NRBP has three basic features: (1) a state grant component that provides funds (with a 50 percent matching requirement) to each of the states in the region to strengthen and integrate the work of state agencies involved in biomass energy; (2) a series of technical reports and studies in areas that have been identified as being of critical importance to the development of biomass energy in the region; and (3) a continuous long range planning component with heavy private sector involvement that helps to identify activities necessary to spur greater development and use of biomass energy in the Northeast.

  12. Washington State biomass data book

    SciTech Connect

    Deshaye, J.A.; Kerstetter, J.D.

    1991-07-01

    This is the first edition of the Washington State Biomass Databook. It assess sources and approximate costs of biomass fuels, presents a view of current users, identifies potential users in the public and private sectors, and lists prices of competing energy resources. The summary describes key from data from the categories listed above. Part 1, Biomass Supply, presents data increasing levels of detail on agricultural residues, biogas, municipal solid waste, and wood waste. Part 2, Current Industrial and Commercial Use, demonstrates how biomass is successfully being used in existing facilities as an alternative fuel source. Part 3, Potential Demand, describes potential energy-intensive public and private sector facilities. Part 4, Prices of Competing Energy Resources, shows current suppliers of electricity and natural gas and compares utility company rates. 49 refs., 43 figs., 72 tabs.

  13. Biomass statistics for Maryland--1986

    Treesearch

    Thomas S. Frieswyk; Dawn M. DiGiovanni; Dawn M. DiGiovanni

    1990-01-01

    A statistical report on the fourth forest survey of Maryland (1986). Findings are displayed in 97 tables containing estimates of forest area, tree biomass, and timber volume. Data are presented by state and county level.

  14. Northeast Regional Biomass Energy Program

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, R.A.

    1992-04-01

    The Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) is entering its ninth year of operation. The management and the objectives have virtually remained unchanged and are stated as follows. The program conducted by NRBP has three basic features: (1) a state grant component that provides funds (with a 50 percent matching requirement) to each of the states in the region to strengthen and integrate the work of state agencies involved in biomass energy; (2) a series of technical reports and studies in areas that have been identified as being of critical importance to the development of biomass energy in the region; and (3) a continuous long range planning component with heavy private sector involvement that helps to identify activities necessary to spur greater development and use of biomass energy in the Northeast.

  15. Biomass Burning Data and Information

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-04-21

    ... amount of biomass burned. These data may be used in general circulation models (GCMs) and in photochemical models of the atmosphere. ... Location:  Central & South America, Africa, Tropical Asia Spatial Coverage:  Central & South America, ...

  16. Canadian biomass reserves for biorefining.

    PubMed

    Mabee, Warren E; Fraser, Evan D G; McFarlane, Paul N; Saddler, John N

    2006-01-01

    A lignocellulosic-based biorefining strategy may be supported by biomass reserves, created initially with residues from wood product processing or agriculture. Biomass reserves might be expanded using innovative management techniques that reduce vulnerability of feedstock in the forest products or agricultural supply chain. Forest-harvest residue removal, disturbance isolation, and precommercial thinnings might produce 20-33 x 10(6) mt/yr of feedstock for Canadian biorefineries. Energy plantations on marginal Canadian farmland might produce another 9-20 mt. Biomass reserves should be used to support first-generation biorefining installations for bioethanol production, development of which will lead to the creation of future high-value coproducts. Suggestions for Canadian policy reform to support biomass reserves are provided.

  17. Analysis of biomass production systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mishoe, J.W.; Fluck, R.C.; Jones, J.W.; Lorber, M.N.; Peart, R.M.

    1983-06-01

    Methodology is presented to analyze biomass production systems using a modeling and simulation approach. To illustrate the concepts, example studies are presented for sugarcane, water hyacinth, and napier grass. Economics and energetic analysis are described using methane as the output.

  18. On biomass of parasitic plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J. H.; Mo, L.-F.

    2008-02-01

    An extremely simple and elementary but rigorous derivation of maximal biomass of parasitic plants is given using an assumption that metabolic rate of the parasite should not be larger than that of its host organ

  19. Plant biomass degradation by fungi.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, Miia R; Donofrio, Nicole; de Vries, Ronald P

    2014-11-01

    Plant biomass degradation by fungi has implications for several fields of science. The enzyme systems employed by fungi for this are broadly used in various industrial sectors such as food & feed, pulp & paper, detergents, textile, wine, and more recently biofuels and biochemicals. In addition, the topic is highly relevant in the field of plant pathogenic fungi as they degrade plant biomass to either gain access to the plant or as carbon source, resulting in significant crop losses. Finally, fungi are the main degraders of plant biomass in nature and as such have an essential role in the global carbon cycle and ecology in general. In this review we provide a global view on the development of this research topic in saprobic ascomycetes and basidiomycetes and in plant pathogenic fungi and link this to the other papers of this special issue on plant biomass degradation by fungi. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bin; Dai, Ziyu; Ding, Shi-You; Wyman, Charles E.

    2011-08-22

    Biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals offers the high yields to products vital to economic success and the potential for very low costs. Enzymatic hydrolysis that converts lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars may be the most complex step in this process due to substrate-related and enzyme-related effects and their interactions. Although enzymatic hydrolysis offers the potential for higher yields, higher selectivity, lower energy costs, and milder operating conditions than chemical processes, the mechanism of enzymatic hydrolysis and the relationship between the substrate structure and function of various glycosyl hydrolase components are not well understood. Consequently, limited success has been realized in maximizing sugar yields at very low cost. This review highlights literature on the impact of key substrate and enzyme features that influence performance to better understand fundamental strategies to advance enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass for biological conversion to fuels and chemicals. Topics are summarized from a practical point of view including characteristics of cellulose (e.g., crystallinity, degree of polymerization, and accessible surface area) and soluble and insoluble biomass components (e.g., oligomeric xylan, lignin, etc.) released in pretreatment, and their effects on the effectiveness of enzymatic hydrolysis. We further discuss the diversity, stability, and activity of individual enzymes and their synergistic effects in deconstructing complex lignocellulosic biomass. Advanced technologies to discover and characterize novel enzymes and to improve enzyme characteristics by mutagenesis, post-translational modification, and over-expression of selected enzymes and modifications in lignocellulosic biomass are also discussed.

  1. Tree biomass in the North Central Region.

    Treesearch

    Gerhard K. Raile; Pamela J. Jakes

    1982-01-01

    Methods for calculating tree biomass are outlined, and the biomass on commercial forest land is estimated for 11 north-central states. Tree biomass in the North Central Region totals 3.6 billion tons, or 50 tons per commercial forest acre. For all species, total tree biomass is concentrated in growing-stock boles.

  2. Biomass statistics for the Northern United States

    Treesearch

    Eric H. Wharton; Gerhard K. Raile

    1984-01-01

    The USDA Forest Service now estimates biomass during periodic resource inventories. Such biomass estimates quantify more of the forest resource than do traditional volume inventories that concentrate on tree boles. More than 48 percent of the aboveground tree biomass in the northern United States can be found in woody material outside of the boles. Tree biomass in the...

  3. "Hochleistern über die Schulter geschaut" - Konzeption eines Lehrvideos zur Vermittlung von Problemlösekompetenz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujath, Bertold; Schwill, Andreas

    Leistungsstarke Problemlöser zeigen ein deutlich anderes Vorgehen beim Bearbeiten von typischen Informatikproblemen als schwächere Problemlöser, das hat eine Vergleichsstudie mit Hoch- und Niedrigleistern ergeben. Auffällig war das Fehlen informatikspezifischer Herangehensweisen bei der Problembearbeitung durch Niedrigleister, obwohl die dazu notwendigen Werkzeuge wie etwa Baumstrukturen oder Rekursion durchaus bekannt waren. Aber auch viele allgemeine Empfehlungen der Problemlöseforschung, wie etwa das Zerlegen eines Problems in Teilprobleme oder das Durchführen einer Problemanalyse vor der eigentlichen Bearbeitung, bleiben bei schwachen Problemlösern unbeachtet. Die Frage, wie nun die deutlich effizienteren Strategien der Hochleister didaktisch aufgearbeitet werden können, um sie an Niedrigleister zu vermitteln, soll im vorliegen Beitrag anhand der Konzeption eines Lehrvideos beantwortet werden.

  4. Biomass conversion processes for energy and fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofer, S. S.; Zaborsky, O. R.

    The book treats biomass sources, promising processes for the conversion of biomass into energy and fuels, and the technical and economic considerations in biomass conversion. Sources of biomass examined include crop residues and municipal, animal and industrial wastes, agricultural and forestry residues, aquatic biomass, marine biomass and silvicultural energy farms. Processes for biomass energy and fuel conversion by direct combustion (the Andco-Torrax system), thermochemical conversion (flash pyrolysis, carboxylolysis, pyrolysis, Purox process, gasification and syngas recycling) and biochemical conversion (anaerobic digestion, methanogenesis and ethanol fermentation) are discussed, and mass and energy balances are presented for each system.

  5. Seaweed and Biomass production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadiradze, K. T.

    2016-02-01

    The Black Sea has a sensitive ecosystem, vulnerable to the potential impacts by climate, water quality, pollution and etc. Successfully restoring and sustaining healthy Black Sea aqua cultural farming will require concreted action by private sector, civil society, farmer organizations and other stakeholders. But to achieve agri-environmental goals at scale, well-organized policy goals, framework and strategy for Sea Agriculture Green energy, Algae Biomass, Sapropel Production, aquacultures farming are essential for Georgian Farmers. But we must recognizes the most sustainable and at least risky farming systems will be those that build in aqua cultural, environmental, and social management practices resilient to climate ch ange and other risks and shocks evident in Georgia and whole in a Black Sea Basin Countries. Black Sea has more than 600 kinds of seaweeds; these species contain biologically active substances also present in fish - vitamins and omega fatty acids. The task is to specify how Black Sea seaweeds can be used in preparing nutrition additives, medicines and cosmetic products. As elsewhere around the world, governments, civil society, and the private sector in Georgia should work together to develop and implement `Blue Economy' and Green Growth strategies to generate equitable, sustainable economic development through strengthening Sea Agriculture. We are very interested to develop Black Sea seaweed plantation ad farming for multiply purposes fo r livestock as food additives, for human as great natural source of iodine as much iodine are released by seaweeds into the atmosphere to facilitate the development of better models or aerosol formation and atmospheric chemistry. It is well known, that earth's oceans are thought to have absorbed about one quarter of the CO2 humans pumped into the atmosphere over the past 20 years. The flip side of this process is that, as they absorb co2, oceans also become more acidic with dramatic consequences for sea life

  6. Pyrolytic sugars from cellulosic biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzhiyil, Najeeb

    Sugars are the feedstocks for many promising advanced cellulosic biofuels. Traditional sugars derived from starch and sugar crops are limited in their availability. In principle, more plentiful supply of sugars can be obtained from depolymerization of cellulose, the most abundant form of biomass in the world. Breaking the glycosidic bonds between the pyranose rings in the cellulose chain to liberate glucose has usually been pursued by enzymatic hydrolysis although a purely thermal depolymerization route to sugars is also possible. Fast pyrolysis of pure cellulose yields primarily levoglucosan, an anhydrosugar that can be hydrolyzed to glucose. However, naturally occurring alkali and alkaline earth metals (AAEM) in biomass are strongly catalytic toward ring-breaking reactions that favor formation of light oxygenates over anhydrosugars. Removing the AAEM by washing was shown to be effective in increasing the yield of anhydrosugars; but this process involves removal of large amount of water from biomass that renders it energy intensive and thereby impractical. In this work passivation of the AAEM (making them less active or inactive) using mineral acid infusion was explored that will increase the yield of anhydrosugars from fast pyrolysis of biomass. Mineral acid infusion was tried by previous researchers, but the possibility of chemical reactions between infused acid and AAEM in the biomass appears to have been overlooked, possibly because metal cations might be expected to already be substantially complexed to chlorine or other strong anions that are found in biomass. Likewise, it appears that previous researchers assumed that as long as AAEM cations were in the biomass, they would be catalytically active regardless of the nature of their complexion with anions. On the contrary, we hypothesized that AAEM can be converted to inactive or less active salts using mineral acids. Various biomass feedstocks were infused with mineral (hydrochloric, nitric, sulfuric and

  7. Transcriptome Analysis Provides a Preliminary Regulation Route of the Ethylene Signal Transduction Component, SlEIN2, during Tomato Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui-Heng; Yuan, Xin-Yu; Meng, Lan-Huan; Zhu, Ben-Zhong; Zhu, Hong-liang; Luo, Yun-Bo; Fu, Da-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Ethylene is crucial in climacteric fruit ripening. The ethylene signal pathway regulates several physiological alterations such as softening, carotenoid accumulation and sugar level reduction, and production of volatile compounds. All these physiological processes are controlled by numerous genes and their expression simultaneously changes at the onset of ripening. Ethylene insensitive 2 (EIN2) is a key component for ethylene signal transduction, and its mutation causes ethylene insensitivity. In tomato, silencing SlEIN2 resulted in a non-ripening phenotype and low ethylene production. RNA sequencing of SlEIN2-silenced and wild type tomato, and differential gene expression analyses, indicated that silencing SlEIN2 caused changes in more than 4,000 genes, including those related to photosynthesis, defense, and secondary metabolism. The relative expression level of 28 genes covering ripening-associated transcription factors, ethylene biosynthesis, ethylene signal pathway, chlorophyll binding proteins, lycopene and aroma biosynthesis, and defense pathway, showed that SlEIN2 influences ripening inhibitor (RIN) in a feedback loop, thus controlling the expression of several other genes. SlEIN2 regulates many aspects of fruit ripening, and is a key factor in the ethylene signal transduction pathway. Silencing SlEIN2 ultimately results in lycopene biosynthesis inhibition, which is the reason why tomato does not turn red, and this gene also affects the expression of several defense-associated genes. Although SlEIN2-silenced and green wild type fruits are similar in appearance, their metabolism is significantly different at the molecular level. PMID:27973616

  8. Ein mobiler und offener Kernspintomograph: Kernspintomographie für Medizin und Materialforschung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümich, Bernhard; Kölker, Christian; Casanova, Federico; Perlo, Juan; Felder, Jörg

    2005-09-01

    An der RWTH Aachen wurde der erste offene und mobile Kernspintomograph entwickelt. Anders als die normalerweise riesigen und unbeweglichen Geräte besitzt er keine enge Magnetröhre. So kann er auch in große Untersuchungsobjekte hinein schauen, ohne dass diese zerstört werden müssen. Wie eine Lupe erfasst er dabei ein begrenztes Volumen um den Aufsatzpunkt herum. Neben der Medizin ermöglicht der offene Tomograph viele neue Anwendungsgebiete, vor allem in der Materialprüfung und Qualitätskontrolle. Der Aachener Prototyp kann auch das Fließprofil und die Geschwindigkeitsverteilung strömender Flüssigkeiten sichtbar machen. Sein offenes Prinzip erforderte neue technische Komponenten und modifizierte bildgebende Verfahren. Die Messzeit pro Bild kann heute schon unter einer Viertelstunde liegen.

  9. Die chronische venöse Insuffizienz - Eine Zusammenfassung der Pathophysiologie, Diagnostik und Therapie.

    PubMed

    Santler, Bettina; Goerge, Tobias

    2017-05-01

    Die chronische Venenerkrankung ist eine weit verbreitete Krankheit, die in späteren Stadien mit einer Vielzahl an Symptomen, aber auch Komplikationen wie dem Ulcus cruris, einhergeht. Dies wiederum hat weitreichende Auswirkungen auf die Lebensqualität der Patienten wie auch auf das Gesundheitssystem. Für die Diagnostik der chronischen Venenerkrankungen steht eine Auswahl an Verfahren zur Verfügung, wobei sich die farbkodierte Duplexsonographie als Goldstandard etabliert hat. Im Bereich der Therapie kam es in den letzten Jahrzehnten zu großen Fortschritten, sodass heute auch Alternativen zum klassischen Stripping durch die endoluminalen Verfahren zur Verfügung stehen. Die Wahl der Therapieoption ist jedoch weiterhin stark abhängig von mehreren Faktoren, unter anderem von den anatomischen Gegebenheiten und dem Krankheitsstadium. Im folgenden Artikel werden die Anatomie und Pathophysiologie, sowie die aktuellen Standards der Diagnostik und Therapie zusammengefasst. © 2017 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Variationeller Ansatz für eine integrierte Segmentierung und nicht-lineare Registrierung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt-Richberg, Alexander; Ehrhardt, Jan; Handels, Heinz

    Vierdimensionale tomographische Bilddaten ermöglichen neuartige Therapie- und Diagnoseverfahren in der medizinischen Praxis. Voraussetzung dafür sind oft die räumlich-zeitliche Segmentierung anatomischer Strukturen in den 4D- Daten und die Bestimmung ihrer dynamischen Eigenschaften durch Schätzung der 3D-Bewegungsfelder mittels nicht-linearer Registrierungsverfahren. In dieser Arbeit wird ein Ansatz vorgestellt, mit dem sich Level-Set-Segmentierung und diffusive, nicht-lineare Registrierung unter Berücksichtigung ihrer wechelseitigen Abhängigkeiten integriert lösen lassen. Die Aufgabe wird als Energieminimierung formuliert und ein variationelles Lösungsverfahren angegeben. Anschließend wird der Ansatz an Phantom- und CT-Patientendaten am Beispiel der Leber validiert.

  11. COFIRING BIOMASS WITH LIGNITE COAL

    SciTech Connect

    Darren D. Schmidt

    2002-01-01

    The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center, in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) biomass cofiring program, completed a Phase 1 feasibility study investigating aspects of cofiring lignite coal with biomass relative to utility-scale systems, specifically focusing on a small stoker system located at the North Dakota State Penitentiary (NDSP) in Bismarck, North Dakota. A complete biomass resource assessment was completed, the stoker was redesigned to accept biomass, fuel characterization and fireside modeling tests were performed, and an engineering economic analysis was completed. In general, municipal wood residue was found to be the most viable fuel choice, and the modeling showed that fireside problems would be minimal. Experimental ash deposits from firing 50% biomass were found to be weaker and more friable compared to baseline lignite coal. Experimental sulfur and NO{sub x} emissions were reduced by up to 46%. The direct costs savings to NDSP, from cogeneration and fuel saving, results in a 15- to 20-year payback on a $1,680,000 investment, while the total benefits to the greater community would include reduced landfill burden, alleviation of fees for disposal by local businesses, and additional jobs created both for the stoker system as well as from the savings spread throughout the community.

  12. Biomass of cocoa and sugarcane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siswanto; Sumanto; Hartati, R. S.; Prastowo, B.

    2017-05-01

    The role of the agricultural sector is very important as the upstream addressing downstream sectors and national energy needs. The agricultural sector itself is also highly dependent on the availability of energy. Evolving from it then it must be policies and strategies for agricultural development Indonesia to forward particularly agriculture as producers as well as users of biomass energy or bioenergy for national development including agriculture balance with agriculture and food production. Exports of biomass unbridled currently include preceded by ignorance, indifference and the lack of scientific data and potential tree industry in the country. This requires adequate scientific supporting data. This study is necessary because currently there are insufficient data on the potential of biomass, including tree biomasanya detailing the benefits of bioenergy, feed and food is very necessary as a basis for future policy. Measurement of the main estate plants biomass such as cocoa and sugarcane be done in 2015. Measurements were also conducted on its lignocellulose content. Tree biomass sugarcane potential measured consist of leaves, stems and roots, with the weight mostly located on the stem. Nevertheless, not all the potential of the stem is a good raw material for bioethanol. For cocoa turned out leaves more prospective because of its adequate hemicellulose content. For sugarcane, leaf buds contain a good indicator of digestion of feed making it more suitable for feed.

  13. Toolmanagement - Werkzeuge und Prozesse als Schlüssel für eine effiziente Produktion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enßle, Magnus

    In Bezug auf die Fertigungskosten nehmen die Werkzeugkosten mit 3% einen sehr kleinen und daher vermeintlich unwichtigen Posten ein. HoheKosten ergeben sich aber meist indirekt durch Maschinenstillstandszeiten wegen fehlender oder falscher Werkzeuge, wegen ineffektiven Rüstvorgängen, umständlicher Werkzeuglogistik, unnötig hoher Bestände, unabgestimmter Abläufe, nicht aktueller Fertigungsunterlagen sowie mangelhafter Informationsflüsse zwischen Planung, Vorbereitung und Ausführung in der Fertigung [1].

  14. Ustekinumab in der Therapie der Pustulosis palmoplantaris - Eine Fallserie mit neun Patienten.

    PubMed

    Buder, Valeska; Herberger, Katharina; Jacobi, Arnd; Augustin, Matthias; Radtke, Marc Alexander

    2016-11-01

    Die Pustulosis palmoplantaris ist eine chronisch entzündliche Hauterkrankung, die mit bedeutenden Einschränkungen der Lebensqualität und der Belastbarkeit einhergeht. Aufgrund von Zulassungsbeschränkungen und einem häufig therapierefraktären Verlauf sind die Behandlungsmöglichkeiten limitiert. Nach zuvor frustranen Therapien erhielten 9 Patienten mit Pustulosis palmoplantaris nach Ausschluss einer latenten Tuberkulose Ustekinumab (45 mg Ustekinumab bei < 100 kg Körpergewicht [KG], 90 mg Ustekinumab > 100 kg KG) in Woche 0, 4, 12 und 24. Reguläre Visiten erfolgten nach 4 und 12 Wochen, im weiteren Verlauf alle 12 Wochen. Das Durchschnittsalter bei Therapiebeginn betrug 48 Jahre. Drei Patienten waren männlich. Bei n  =  4 Patienten (44,4 %) wurde eine Verbesserung um 75 % des Palmoplantar-Psoriasis-Area-Severity-Index (PPPASI) erreicht. Insgesamt verbesserte sich der PPPASI nach 24 Wochen durchschnittlich um 71,6 %. Eine komplette Abheilung zeigte sich bei n  =  2 Patienten nach 24 Wochen. Bis auf lokale Injektionsreaktionen und leichte Infekte wurden keine unerwünschten Wirkungen beobachtet. Die Fallserie ist ein weiterer Beleg für die Wirksamkeit und Verträglichkeit von Ustekinumab in der Therapie der Pustulosis palmoplantaris. Zur Beurteilung der Langzeitwirkung und -sicherheit sowie der Wirksamkeit einer intermittierenden Therapie sind kontrollierte Studiendaten sowie Beobachtungen im Rahmen von Patientenregistern notwendig. © 2016 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Pax2 expression in simultaneously diagnosed WHO and EIN classification systems.

    PubMed

    Joiner, Amy K; Quick, Charles M; Jeffus, Susanne K

    2015-01-01

    PAX2 has been cited as a technically robust biomarker which nicely delineates precancerous lesions of the endometrium when the endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia (EIN) classification scheme is used. Its utility in distinguishing between atypical and nonatypical hyperplasia when applied within the 1994 World Health Organization classification system is questionable. The purpose of this study was to evaluate PAX2 in a side by side comparison of its staining patterns in a series of endometrial samples that were classified using both systems. A total of 108 precancerous endometrial cases were identified, of which 30 cases were deemed nonhyperplastic by consensus agreement and 11 cases lost the tissue of interest on deeper sections. The remaining 67 cases were categorized according to the 1994 World Health Organization criteria and EIN scheme by 2 gynecologic pathologists. PAX2 staining was scored in lesional tissue as normal or altered (lost, increased, or decreased) compared with nonlesional background. The most common pattern of alteration was complete loss of nuclear PAX2 staining (86.3%) followed by decreased staining (11.3%) and markedly increased staining (2.3%). PAX2 alterations correlated well with EIN diagnoses (33/36, 92%) compared with benign hyperplasia (2/13, 15%) but were less useful when the 1994 World Health Organization classification system was applied (PAX2 alteration in 22/25 (88%) of atypical hyperplasia cases versus 16/25 (64%) of nonatypical hyperplasia cases). Forty-five percent of follow-up hysterectomies with a previous PAX2-altered biopsy case harbored adenocarcinoma. In conclusion, PAX2 may be a helpful adjunct stain and training tool when the features of atypical hyperplasia/EIN are in question.

  16. Antikollisionssystem PRORETA - Integrierte Lösung für ein unfallvermeidendes Fahrzeug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isermann, Rolf; Bender, Eva; Bruder, Ralph; Darms, Michael; Schorn, Matthias; Stählin, Ulrich; Winner, Hermann

    Dank einer zunehmenden Verbreitung von aktiven und passiven Sicherheitssystemen in Kraftfahrzeugen konnte die Zahl der Verkehrstoten in den letzten Jahren stetig gesenkt werden. Bei der Bearbeitung des Projekts PRORETA wurde mit der Entwicklung eines elektronischen Fahrerassistenzsystems zur Unfallvermeidung das Ziel verfolgt, durch Notbremsen und Notausweichen Unfälle zu vermeiden. Das System wurde an der TU Darmstadt in Kooperation mit der Continental AG entwickelt. Im Folgenden werden die Grundlagen des Systems, Fahrversuche und Ergebnisse einer ergonomischen Studie dargestellt.

  17. Unsere Sonne - ein rätselhafter Stern? Erkenntnisse und Spekulationen der Astrophysik.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribbin, J.

    This book is a German translation, by A. Ehlers, of the English original "Blinded by the light. The secret life of the Sun", published in 1991. Contents: 1. Vorgeschichte. 2. Quelle gewaltiger Energien. 3. Im Innern der Sonne. 4. Zuwenig Geister. 5. Ein verrückter Gedanke. 6. Die atmende Sonne. 7. Die zitternde Sonne. 8. Das Große und das Kleine. 9. Der Beitrag der Supernova.

  18. Die histologischen Typen der lymphomatoiden Papulose - Ein Vorschlag für die Vereinfachung des Buchstabenchaos.

    PubMed

    Kempf, Werner; Mitteldorf, Christina; Karai, Laszlo J; Robson, Alistair

    2017-04-01

    Die lymphomatoide Papulose (LYP) ist klinisch durch rezidivierende papulonoduläre Läsionen charakterisiert. Im Gegensatz zu dieser stereotypen klinischen Präsentation zeigt die Erkrankung ein breites histologisches Spektrum mit verschiedenen Infiltratmustern, unterschiedlichen Tumorzellgrößen und variablen Phänotypen. Die revidierte WHO-Klassifikation 2016 umfasst die histologischen LYP-Typen A bis E und einen sechsten Typ, dem eine spezielle Mutation zugrunde liegt. Darüber hinaus werden jedoch immer wieder neue Typen vorgeschlagen, wobei sich die Ausweitung nicht ausschließlich auf histologische Muster bezieht, sondern sich auch auf klinische und genetische Aspekte ausdehnt. Dies führt zu einer Ausweitung der alphabetischen Liste mit zunehmender Komplexität der Terminologie und kann anstelle eines vereinfachten diagnostischen Zugangs zur Verwirrung führen. Zudem kann es zu Überschneidungen unterschiedlicher Typen kommen. Diese Entwicklung wirft die Frage auf, wie die Terminologie der lymphomatoiden Papulose vereinfacht werden kann, ohne dabei auf die histologischen Besonderheiten zu verzichten. Wir schlagen daher einen praktischen Zugang zur Terminologie der lymphomatoide Papulosen vor, welcher sich ausschließlich auf deskriptive Begriffe beschränkt und nicht auf einer alphabetischen Bezeichnung der LYP-Typen beruht. Unser Vorschlag soll einen praktikablen und benutzerfreundlichen Zugang zur Terminologie der lymphomatoiden Papulose ermöglichen und damit den diagnostischen Prozess sowie die Kommunikation zwischen Klinikern und Pathologen vereinfachen. © 2017 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Untersuchung der Richtwirkung der Einkopplung von ebenen Wellen in eine Leitung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdowski, M.; Vick, R.

    2013-07-01

    Elektrische Leitungen und Kabel stellen häufig die Haupteinfallstore für elektromagnetische Felder in die daran angeschlossenen Geräte und Systeme dar. Für die Einkopplung einer ebenen Welle kann der in eine Leitung eingekoppelte Strom unter bestimmten Voraussetzungen mit Hilfe der Leitungstheorie sehr effizient bestimmt werden. Er hängt dabei von den Abmessungen der Leitung, den Leitungsabschlüssen sowie der Amplitude, der Wellenlänge und der Einfallsrichtung der ebenen Welle ab. In dieser Arbeit wird die Abhängigkeit der Einkopplung von der Einfallsrichtung näher untersucht. Dazu werden Richtdiagramme der Einkopplung berechnet, dargestellt und hinsichtlich der mittleren und maximalen Einkopplung über alle Einfallsrichtungen und Polarisationen ausgewertet. Die Ergebnisse werden genutzt, um die maximale Direktivität der Einkopplung in eine Leitung zu bestimmen. Fasst man die Einkopplung externer Felder in eine Leitung als einen Störfestigkeitstest auf, so kann die maximale Direktivität benutzt werden, um einen Vergleich zwischen unterschiedlichen Messumgebungen wie Absorberhallen und Modenverwirbelungskammern herzustellen.

  20. Hydrothermal carbonization of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ling-Ping; Shi, Zheng-Jun; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang

    2012-08-01

    Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a novel thermochemical conversion process to convert lignocellulosic biomass into value-added products. HTC processes were studied using two different biomass feedstocks: corn stalk and Tamarix ramosissima. The treatment brought an increase of the higher heating values up to 29.2 and 28.4 MJ/kg for corn stalk and T. ramosissima, respectively, corresponding to an increase of 66.8% and 58.3% as compared to those for the raw materials. The resulting lignite-like solid products contained mainly lignin with a high degree of aromatization and a large amount of oxygen-containing groups. Liquid products extracted with ethyl acetate were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The identified degradation products were phenolic compounds and furan derivatives, which may be desirable feedstocks for biodiesel and chemical production. Based on these results, HTC is considered to be a potential treatment in a lignocellulosic biomass refinery.

  1. Biomass conversion to mixed alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzapple, M.T.; Loescher, M.; Ross, M.

    1996-10-01

    This paper discusses the MixAlco Process which converts a wide variety of biomass materials (e.g. municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, agricultural residues) to mixed alcohols. First, the biomass is treated with lime to enhance its digestibility. Then, a mixed culture of acid-forming microorganisms converts the lime-treated biomass to volatile fatty acids (VFA) such as acetic, propionic, and butyric acids. To maintain fermentor pH, a neutralizing agent (e.g. calcium carbonate or lime) is added, so the fermentation actually produces VFA salts such as calcium acetate, propionate, and butyrate. The VFA salts are recovered and thermally converted to ketones (e.g. acetone, methylethyl ketone, diethyl ketone) which are subsequently hydrogenated to mixed alcohols (e.g. isopropanol, isobutanol, isopentanol). Processing costs are estimated at $0.72/gallon of mixed alcohols making it potentially attractive for transportation fuels.

  2. Biomass utilization by gut microbiomes.

    PubMed

    White, Bryan A; Lamed, Raphael; Bayer, Edward A; Flint, Harry J

    2014-01-01

    Mammals rely entirely on symbiotic microorganisms within their digestive tract to gain energy from plant biomass that is resistant to mammalian digestive enzymes. Especially in herbivorous animals, specialized organs (the rumen, cecum, and colon) have evolved that allow highly efficient fermentation of ingested plant biomass by complex anaerobic microbial communities. We consider here the two most intensively studied, representative gut microbial communities involved in degradation of plant fiber: those of the rumen and the human large intestine. These communities are dominated by bacteria belonging to the Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes phyla. In Firmicutes, degradative capacity is largely restricted to the cell surface and involves elaborate cellulosome complexes in specialized cellulolytic species. By contrast, in the Bacteroidetes, utilization of soluble polysaccharides, encoded by gene clusters (PULs), entails outer membrane binding proteins, and degradation is largely periplasmic or intracellular. Biomass degradation involves complex interplay between these distinct groups of bacteria as well as (in the rumen) eukaryotic microorganisms.

  3. Enthanol fuels from biomass projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, B. C. B.

    About 100 projects are proposed or underway to convert organic crops such as corn and grains or waste organic material into a clean usable ethyl alcohol fuel. Total production capacity could reach more than two billion gallons per year in 1985, excluding beverage and industrial uses. Congressional appropriation of approximately one-half billion dollars to DOE/USDA for loan guarantees and federal and state laws exempting excise taxes can make this ethanol fuel from biomass possible. An overview and status of the projects will be reviewed. Net energy production of ethyl alcohol from biomass and the impacts of increasing alcohol fuel use will also be discussed.

  4. A sustainable woody biomass biorefinery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shijie; Lu, Houfang; Hu, Ruofei; Shupe, Alan; Lin, Lu; Liang, Bin

    2012-01-01

    Woody biomass is renewable only if sustainable production is imposed. An optimum and sustainable biomass stand production rate is found to be one with the incremental growth rate at harvest equal to the average overall growth rate. Utilization of woody biomass leads to a sustainable economy. Woody biomass is comprised of at least four components: extractives, hemicellulose, lignin and cellulose. While extractives and hemicellulose are least resistant to chemical and thermal degradation, cellulose is most resistant to chemical, thermal, and biological attack. The difference or heterogeneity in reactivity leads to the recalcitrance of woody biomass at conversion. A selection of processes is presented together as a biorefinery based on incremental sequential deconstruction, fractionation/conversion of woody biomass to achieve efficient separation of major components. A preference is given to a biorefinery absent of pretreatment and detoxification process that produce waste byproducts. While numerous biorefinery approaches are known, a focused review on the integrated studies of water-based biorefinery processes is presented. Hot-water extraction is the first process step to extract value from woody biomass while improving the quality of the remaining solid material. This first step removes extractives and hemicellulose fractions from woody biomass. While extractives and hemicellulose are largely removed in the extraction liquor, cellulose and lignin largely remain in the residual woody structure. Xylo-oligomers, aromatics and acetic acid in the hardwood extract are the major components having the greatest potential value for development. Higher temperature and longer residence time lead to higher mass removal. While high temperature (>200°C) can lead to nearly total dissolution, the amount of sugars present in the extraction liquor decreases rapidly with temperature. Dilute acid hydrolysis of concentrated wood extracts renders the wood extract with monomeric sugars

  5. The Interplay of Chromatin Landscape and DNA-Binding Context Suggests Distinct Modes of EIN3 Regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Zemlyanskaya, Elena V.; Levitsky, Victor G.; Oshchepkov, Dmitry Y.; Grosse, Ivo; Mironova, Victoria V.

    2017-01-01

    The plant hormone ethylene regulates numerous developmental processes and stress responses. Ethylene signaling proceeds via a linear pathway, which activates transcription factor (TF) EIN3, a primary transcriptional regulator of ethylene response. EIN3 influences gene expression upon binding to a specific sequence in gene promoters. This interaction, however, might be considerably affected by additional co-factors. In this work, we perform whole genome bioinformatics study to identify the impact of epigenetic factors in EIN3 functioning. The analysis of publicly available ChIP-Seq data on EIN3 binding in Arabidopsis thaliana showed bimodality of distribution of EIN3 binding regions (EBRs) in gene promoters. Besides a sharp peak in close proximity to transcription start site, which is a common binding region for a wide variety of TFs, we found an additional extended peak in the distal promoter region. We characterized all EBRs with respect to the epigenetic status appealing to previously published genome-wide map of nine chromatin states in A. thaliana. We found that the implicit distal peak was associated with a specific chromatin state (referred to as chromatin state 4 in the primary source), which was just poorly represented in the pronounced proximal peak. Intriguingly, EBRs corresponding to this chromatin state 4 were significantly associated with ethylene response, unlike the others representing the overwhelming majority of EBRs related to the explicit proximal peak. Moreover, we found that specific EIN3 binding sequences predicted with previously described model were enriched in the EBRs mapped to the chromatin state 4, but not to the rest ones. These results allow us to conclude that the interplay of genetic and epigenetic factors might cause the distinct modes of EIN3 regulation. PMID:28119721

  6. Biomass Power for Rural Development

    SciTech Connect

    2000-06-01

    The U.S. Departments of Energy and Agriculture work together to advance the development of electricity generation systems that use biomass instead of fossil fuels. The national benefits include lower sulfur emissions (which contribute to acid rain), reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, and less dependence on fossil fuels.

  7. Biomass energy systems program summary

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-01

    Research programs in biomass which were funded by the US DOE during fiscal year 1978 are listed in this program summary. The conversion technologies and their applications have been grouped into program elements according to the time frame in which they are expected to enter the commercial market. (DMC)

  8. Harnessing energy from plant biomass.

    PubMed

    Chang, Michelle C Y

    2007-12-01

    Biofuels derived from renewable plant biomass offer a potential carbon-neutral replacement for current liquid transportation fuels. Progress toward this initiative requires development of new methods to engineer energy crops with the desired chemical composition and physical characteristics, depolymerize lignocellulose to fermentable units, and program microbial metabolism for efficient conversion of sugars to ethanol.

  9. Biomass supply logistics and infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Hess, J Richard

    2009-01-01

    Feedstock supply system encompasses numerous unit operations necessary to move lignocellulosic feedstock from the place where it is produced (in the field or on the stump) to the start of the conversion process (reactor throat) of the biorefinery. These unit operations, which include collection, storage, preprocessing, handling, and transportation, represent one of the largest technical and logistics challenges to the emerging lignocellulosic biorefining industry. This chapter briefly reviews the methods of estimating the quantities of biomass, followed by harvesting and collection processes based on current practices on handling wet and dry forage materials. Storage and queuing are used to deal with seasonal harvest times, variable yields, and delivery schedules. Preprocessing can be as simple as grinding and formatting the biomass for increased bulk density or improved conversion efficiency, or it can be as complex as improving feedstock quality through fractionation, tissue separation, drying, blending, and densification. Handling and transportation consists of using a variety of transport equipment (truck, train, ship) for moving the biomass from one point to another. The chapter also provides typical cost figures for harvest and processing of biomass.

  10. Biomass in a petrochemical world

    PubMed Central

    Roddy, Dermot J.

    2013-01-01

    The world's increasingly voracious appetite for fossil fuels is driven by fast-growing populations and ever-rising aspirations for the lifestyles and standard of living exemplified in the developed world. Forecasts for higher electricity consumption, more comfortable living environments (via heating or cooling) and greater demand for transport fuels are well known. Similar growth in demand is projected for petrochemical-based products in the form of man-made fibres for clothing, ubiquitous plastic artefacts, cosmetics, etc. All drawing upon the same finite oil, gas and coal feedstocks. Biomass can, in principle, substitute for all of these feedstocks. Although ultimately finite, biomass resources can be expanded and renewed if this is a societal priority. This paper examines the projected growth of an energy-intensive international petrochemicals industry, considers its demand for both utilities and feedstocks, and considers the extent to which biomass can substitute for fossil fuels. The scope of this study includes biomass component extraction, direct chemical conversion, thermochemical conversion and biochemical conversion. Noting that the petrochemicals industry consumes around 10 per cent of the world's fossil fuels as feedstocks and almost as much again in utilities, various strategies for addressing future demand are considered. The need for long-term infrastructure and logistics planning is highlighted. PMID:24427511

  11. Biomass Program Partners Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-27

    Meeting ambitious national targets for biofuels requires a radically accelerated level of technology research and infrastructure development. To expedite progress, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Biomass Program is forging collaborative partnerships with industry, academia, state governments, and diverse stakeholder groups.

  12. CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-10-01

    The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications.

  13. Biomass Supply Logistics and Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine

    2009-04-01

    Feedstock supply system encompasses numerous unit operations necessary to move lignocellulosic feedstock from the place where it is produced (in the field or on the stump) to the start of the conversion process (reactor throat) of the Biorefinery. These unit operations, which include collection, storage, preprocessing, handling, and transportation, represent one of the largest technical and logistics challenges to the emerging lignocellulosic biorefining industry. This chapter briefly reviews methods of estimating the quantities of biomass followed by harvesting and collection processes based on current practices on handling wet and dry forage materials. Storage and queuing are used to deal with seasonal harvest times, variable yields, and delivery schedules. Preprocessing can be as simple as grinding and formatting the biomass for increased bulk density or improved conversion efficiency, or it can be as complex as improving feedstock quality through fractionation, tissue separation, drying, blending, and densification. Handling and Transportation consists of using a variety of transport equipment (truck, train, ship) for moving the biomass from one point to another. The chapter also provides typical cost figures for harvest and processing of biomass.

  14. Aboveground biomass in Tibetan grasslands

    Treesearch

    Y.H. Yang; J.Y. Fang; Y.D. Pan; C.J. Ji

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated spatial patterns and environmental controls of aboveground biomass (AGB) in alpine grasslands on the Tibetan Plateau by integrating AGB data collected from 135 sites during 2001-2004 and concurrent enhanced vegetation index derived from MODIS data sets. The AGB was estimated at 68.8 gm-2, with a larger value (90.8 gm

  15. Chemicals from biomass by fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Hinman, R.L.

    1993-12-31

    The status of fermentation processing is reviewed in terms of the various types of products-antibiotics, commodity chemicals, and genetically engineered proteins. The contribution of biomass to the manufacture of these products is addressed in terms of technical requirements, cost, and environmental considerations.

  16. Torrefied biomass-polypropylene composites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Torrefied almond shells and wood chips were incorporated into polypropylene as fillers to produce torrefied biomass-polymer composites. Response surface methodology was used to examine the effects of filler concentration, filler size, and lignin factor (relative lignin to cellulose concentration) on...

  17. Biomass in a petrochemical world.

    PubMed

    Roddy, Dermot J

    2013-02-06

    The world's increasingly voracious appetite for fossil fuels is driven by fast-growing populations and ever-rising aspirations for the lifestyles and standard of living exemplified in the developed world. Forecasts for higher electricity consumption, more comfortable living environments (via heating or cooling) and greater demand for transport fuels are well known. Similar growth in demand is projected for petrochemical-based products in the form of man-made fibres for clothing, ubiquitous plastic artefacts, cosmetics, etc. All drawing upon the same finite oil, gas and coal feedstocks. Biomass can, in principle, substitute for all of these feedstocks. Although ultimately finite, biomass resources can be expanded and renewed if this is a societal priority. This paper examines the projected growth of an energy-intensive international petrochemicals industry, considers its demand for both utilities and feedstocks, and considers the extent to which biomass can substitute for fossil fuels. The scope of this study includes biomass component extraction, direct chemical conversion, thermochemical conversion and biochemical conversion. Noting that the petrochemicals industry consumes around 10 per cent of the world's fossil fuels as feedstocks and almost as much again in utilities, various strategies for addressing future demand are considered. The need for long-term infrastructure and logistics planning is highlighted.

  18. Enzyme nanoassemblies for biomass conversion

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biomass represents a vast resource for the production of the world’s fuel and chemical feedstock needs. The use of enzymes to effect these bioconversions offers an alternative that is potentially more specific and environmentally-friendly than harsher chemical methodologies. Some species of anaero...

  19. Fiscalini Farms Biomass Energy Project

    SciTech Connect

    William Stringfellow; Mary Kay Camarillo; Jeremy Hanlon; Michael Jue; Chelsea Spier

    2011-09-30

    In this final report describes and documents research that was conducted by the Ecological Engineering Research Program (EERP) at the University of the Pacific (Stockton, CA) under subcontract to Fiscalini Farms LP for work under the Assistance Agreement DE-EE0001895 'Measurement and Evaluation of a Dairy Anaerobic Digestion/Power Generation System' from the United States Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory. Fiscalini Farms is operating a 710 kW biomass-energy power plant that uses bio-methane, generated from plant biomass, cheese whey, and cattle manure via mesophilic anaerobic digestion, to produce electricity using an internal combustion engine. The primary objectives of the project were to document baseline conditions for the anaerobic digester and the combined heat and power (CHP) system used for the dairy-based biomass-energy production. The baseline condition of the plant was evaluated in the context of regulatory and economic constraints. In this final report, the operation of the plant between start-up in 2009 and operation in 2010 are documented and an interpretation of the technical data is provided. An economic analysis of the biomass energy system was previously completed (Appendix A) and the results from that study are discussed briefly in this report. Results from the start-up and first year of operation indicate that mesophilic anaerobic digestion of agricultural biomass, combined with an internal combustion engine, is a reliable source of alternative electrical production. A major advantage of biomass energy facilities located on dairy farms appears to be their inherent stability and ability to produce a consistent, 24 hour supply of electricity. However, technical analysis indicated that the Fiscalini Farms system was operating below capacity and that economic sustainability would be improved by increasing loading of feedstocks to the digester. Additional operational modifications, such as increased utilization of waste

  20. Biomass Supply Logistics and Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Hess, J. Richard

    Feedstock supply system encompasses numerous unit operations necessary to move lignocellulosic feedstock from the place where it is produced (in the field or on the stump) to the start of the conversion process (reactor throat) of the biorefinery. These unit operations, which include collection, storage, preprocessing, handling, and transportation, represent one of the largest technical and logistics challenges to the emerging lignocellulosic biorefining industry. This chapter briefly reviews the methods of estimating the quantities of biomass, followed by harvesting and collection processes based on current practices on handling wet and dry forage materials. Storage and queuing are used to deal with seasonal harvest times, variable yields, and delivery schedules. Preprocessing can be as simple as grinding and formatting the biomass for increased bulk density or improved conversion efficiency, or it can be as complex as improving feedstock quality through fractionation, tissue separation, drying, blending, and densification. Handling and transportation consists of using a variety of transport equipment (truck, train, ship) for moving the biomass from one point to another. The chapter also provides typical cost figures for harvest and processing of biomass.

  1. Biomass energies: resources, links, constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Smil, V.

    1983-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: radiation and photosynthesis; primary production and biomass; resources; wood for energy; silviculture; requirements and effects; crop residues; residues for energy conversion; sugar crops and grain; cassava; fuel crops; aquatic plants; freshwater plants; ocean algae; animal wastes; Chinese biogas generation; and ecodisasters.

  2. Biomass Program Recovery Act Factsheet

    SciTech Connect

    2010-03-01

    The Biomass Program has awarded about $718 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (Recovery Act) funds. The projects the Program is supporting are intended to: Accelerate advanced biofuels research, development, and demonstration; Speed the deployment and commercialization of advanced biofuels and bioproducts; Further the U.S. bioindustry through market transformation and creating or saving a range of jobs.

  3. Atmospheric Effects of Biomass Burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne M.

    2000-01-01

    Biomass fires are both natural and anthropogenic in origin. The natural trigger is lightning, which leads to mid- and high-latitude fires and episodes of smoke and pollution associated with them. Lightning is also prominent in tropical regions when the dry season gives way to the wet season and lightning in convective systems ignites dry vegetation. Atmospheric consequences of biomass fires are complex. When considering the impacts of fires for a given ecosystem, inputs of fires must be compared to other process that emit trace gases and particles into the atmosphere. Other processes include industrial activity, fires for household purposes and biogenic sources which may themselves interact with fires. That is, fires may promote or restrict biogenic processes. Several books have presented various aspects of fire interactions with atmospheric chemistry and a cross-disciplinary review of a 1992 fire-oriented experiment appears in SAFARI: The Role of southern African Fires in Atmospheric and Ecological Environments. The IGAC/BIBEX core activity (see acronyms at end of Chapter) has sponsored field campaigns that integrate multiple aspects of fires ground-based measurements with an ecological perspective, atmospheric measurements with chemical and meteorological components, and remote sensing. This Chapter presents two aspects of biomass fires and the environment. Namely, the relationship between biomass burning and ozone is described, starting with a brief description of the chemical reactions involved and illustrative measurements and interpretation. Second, because of the need to observe biomass burning and its consequences globally, a summary of remote sensing approaches to the study of fires and trace gases is given. Examples in this Chapter are restricted to tropical burning for matters of brevity and because most burning activity globally is within this zone.

  4. CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Francis S. Lau

    2003-09-01

    The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Natural gas and waste coal fines were evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. A design was developed for a cofiring combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures in a power generation boiler, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. Following the preliminary design, GTI evaluated the gasification characteristics of selected feedstocks for the project. To conduct this work, GTI assembled an existing ''mini-bench'' unit to perform the gasification tests. The results of the test were used to confirm the process design completed in Phase Task 1. As a result of the testing and modeling effort, the selected biomass feedstocks gasified very well, with a carbon conversion of over 98% and individual gas component yields that matched the RENUGAS{reg_sign} model. As a result of this work, the facility appears very attractive from a commercial standpoint. Similar facilities can be profitable if they have access to low cost fuels and have attractive wholesale or retail electrical rates for electricity sales. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications. Phase II has not been approved for construction at this time.

  5. Biomass Resources for the Federal Sector

    SciTech Connect

    R. Robichaud; A. Crawley; and L. Poole: NREL

    2005-09-09

    Biomass Resources for the Federal Sector is a fact sheet that explains how biomass resources can be incorporated into the federal sector, and also how they can provide opportunities to meet federal renewable energy goals.

  6. Biomass Resources for the Federal Sector

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-08-01

    Biomass Resources for the Federal Sector is a fact sheet that explains how biomass resources can be incorporated into the federal sector, and also how they can provide opportunities to meet federal renewable energy goals.

  7. Treatment of biomass to obtain ethanol

    DOEpatents

    Dunson, Jr., James B.; Elander, Richard T [Evergreen, CO; Tucker, III, Melvin P.; Hennessey, Susan Marie [Avondale, PA

    2011-08-16

    Ethanol was produced using biocatalysts that are able to ferment sugars derived from treated biomass. Sugars were obtained by pretreating biomass under conditions of high solids and low ammonia concentration, followed by saccharification.

  8. New market potential: Torrefaction of Woody Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; J. Richard Hess

    2015-07-01

    According to researchers in Idaho National Laboratory’s Bioenergy Program, torrefaction of woody biomass could reduce variability in biomass feedstock and enable development of a commodity-type product for green energy generation and usage.

  9. Biomass Feedstock Composition and Property Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Biomass Program works with industry, academia and national laboratory partners on a balanced portfolio of research in biomass feedstocks and conversion technologies. Through research, development, and demonstration efforts geared at the development of integrated biorefineries, the Biomass Program is helping transform the nation's renewable and abundant biomass resources into cost competitive, high performance biofuels, bioproducts, and biopower.(From the Biomass Program's home page at http://www1.eere.energy.gov/biomass/) The Biomass Feedstock Composition and Property Database allows the user to choose from more than 150 types of biomass samples. The specialized interface then guides the user through choices within the sample (such as "Ash" as a choice in the "Hardwood" sample and displays tables based on choice of composition properties, structure properties, elemental properties, extractive properties, etc.)

  10. Spouting of biomass particles: a review.

    PubMed

    Cui, Heping; Grace, John R

    2008-07-01

    Recent research on biomass multiphase flow in spouted beds is reviewed, beginning with fundamental work on hydrodynamic parameters, such as minimum spouting velocity, pressure drop and fountain height. We then consider experimental studies on biomass multiphase flow in such processes as pulp drying, liquid spouting of pulp fibres, drying and coating of agricultural biomass, and bioreactors. Finally, we summarize modelling efforts with respect to spouting of biomass particles.

  11. Ice nuclei emissions from biomass burning

    Treesearch

    Markus D. Petters; Matthew T. Parsons; Anthony J. Prenni; Paul J. DeMott; Sonia M. Kreidenweis; Christian M. Carrico; Amy P. Sullivan; Gavin R. McMeeking; Ezra Levin; Cyle E. Wold; Jeffrey L. Collett; Hans Moosmuller

    2009-01-01

    Biomass burning is a significant source of carbonaceous aerosol in many regions of the world. When present, biomass burning particles may affect the microphysical properties of clouds through their ability to function as cloud condensation nuclei or ice nuclei. We report on measurements of the ice nucleation ability of biomass burning particles performed on laboratory-...

  12. Estimating total forest biomass in Maine, 1995

    Treesearch

    Eric H. Wharton; Douglas M. Griffith; Douglas M. Griffith

    1998-01-01

    Presents methods for synthesizing information from existing biomass literature for estimating biomass over extensive forest areas with specific applications to Maine. Tables of appropriate regression equations and the tree and shrub species to which these equations can be applied are presented as well as biomass estimates at the county and state level.

  13. Microwave moisture measurements of flowing biomass

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Production of pelleted biomass is a significant emerging industry in the United States. A primary quality attribute of pelleted biomass is moisture content. This parameter is critical in pricing, binding, combustion, and storage of pelleted biomass. In order to produce pellets of a high quality mois...

  14. Evaluation of total aboveground biomass and total merchantable biomass in Missouri

    Treesearch

    Michael E. Goerndt; David R. Larsen; Charles D. Keating

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the state of Missouri has been converting to biomass weight rather than volume as the standard measurement of wood for buying and selling sawtimber. Therefore, there is a need to identify accurate and precise methods of estimating whole tree biomass and merchantable biomass of harvested trees as well as total standing biomass of live timber for...

  15. Moisture sorption kinetics of switchgrass, big bluestem, and bromegrass biomass

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Moisture status in biomass is the most influential factor of biomass storage, and hydration kinetics control the dynamic moisture condition of the biomass, thus affecting biomass storage and processing operations and final utilization applications. Moisture hydration characteristics of switchgrass, ...

  16. Methods for producing and using densified biomass products containing pretreated biomass fibers

    DOEpatents

    Dale, Bruce E.; Ritchie, Bryan; Marshall, Derek

    2015-05-26

    A process is provided comprising subjecting a quantity of plant biomass fibers to a pretreatment to cause at least a portion of lignin contained within each fiber to move to an outer surface of said fiber, wherein a quantity of pretreated tacky plant biomass fibers is produced; and densifying the quantity of pretreated tacky plant biomass fibers to produce one or more densified biomass particulates, wherein said biomass fibers are densified without using added binder.

  17. Metabolome-ionome-biomass interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Diego H; Redestig, Henning; Krämer, Ute; Udvardi, Michael K

    2008-01-01

    Long-term exposure of plants to saline soil results in mineral ion imbalance, altered metabolism and reduced growth. Currently, the interaction between ion content and plant metabolism under salt-stress is poorly understood. Here we present a multivariate correlation study on the metabolome, ionome and biomass changes of Lotus japonicus challenged by salt stress. Using latent variable models, we show that increasing salinity leads to reproducible changes of metabolite, ion and nutrient pools. Strong correlations between the metabolome and the ionome or biomass may allow one to estimate the degree of salt stress experienced by a plant based on metabolite profiles. Despite the apparently high predictive power of the models, it remains to be investigated whether such metabolite profiles of non- or moderately-stressed plants can be used by breeding programs as ideal ideotypes for the selection of enhanced salt-tolerant genotypes. PMID:19704810

  18. Agricultural Residues and Biomass Energy Crops

    SciTech Connect

    2016-06-01

    There are many opportunities to leverage agricultural resources on existing lands without interfering with production of food, feed, fiber, or forest products. In the recently developed advanced biomass feedstock commercialization vision, estimates of potentially available biomass supply from agriculture are built upon the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA’s) Long-Term Forecast, ensuring that existing product demands are met before biomass crops are planted. Dedicated biomass energy crops and agricultural crop residues are abundant, diverse, and widely distributed across the United States. These potential biomass supplies can play an important role in a national biofuels commercialization strategy.

  19. Chapter 8: Biomass Pyrolysis Oils

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, Robert L.; Baldwin, Robert M.; Arbogast, Stephen; Bellman, Don; Paynter, Dave; Wykowski, Jim

    2016-09-06

    Fast pyrolysis is heating on the order of 1000 degrees C/s in the absence of oxygen to 40-600 degrees C, which causes decomposition of the biomass. Liquid product yield from biomass can be as much as 80% of starting dry weight and contains up to 75% of the biomass energy content. Other products are gases, primarily carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and methane, as well as solid char and ash. Residence time in the reactor is only 0.5-2 s so that relatively small, low-capital-cost reactors can be used. The low capital cost combined with greenhouse gas emission reductions relative to petroleum fuels of 50-95% makes pyrolysis an attractive process. The pyrolysis liquids have been investigated as a refinery feedstock and as stand-alone fuels. Utilization of raw pyrolysis oil has proven challenging. The organic fraction is highly corrosive because of its high organic acid content. High water content lowers the net heating value and can increase corrosivity. It can be poorly soluble in petroleum or petroleum products and can readily absorb water. Distillation residues can be as high as 50%, viscosity can be high, oils can exhibit poor stability in storage, and they can contain suspended solids. The ignition quality of raw pyrolysis oils is poor, with cetane number estimates ranging from 0 to 35, but more likely to be in the lower end of that range. While the use of raw pyrolysis oils in certain specific applications with specialized combustion equipment may be possible, raw oils must be significantly upgraded for use in on-highway spark-ignition (SI) and compression-ignition (CI) engines. Upgrading approaches most often involve catalytic hydrodeoxygenation, one of a class of reactions known as hydrotreating or hydroprocessing. This chapter discusses the properties of raw and upgraded pyrolysis oils, as well as the potential for integrating biomass pyrolysis with a petroleum refinery to significantly reduce the hydroprocessing cost.

  20. CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-12-31

    The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications. During this Performance Period work efforts focused on completion of the Topical Report, summarizing the design and techno-economic study of the project's feasibility. GTI received supplemental authorization A002 from DOE contracts for additional work to be performed under Phase I that will further extend the performance period until the end of 2002. GTI worked with DOE to develop the Statement of Work for the supplemental activities. DOE granted an interim extension of the project until the end of January 2002 to complete the contract paperwork. GTI worked with Calla Energy to develop request for continued funding to proceed with Phase II, submitted to DOE on November 1, 2001.

  1. CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2002-06-30

    The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications. During this Performance Period work efforts focused on completion of the Topical Report, summarizing the design and techno-economic study of the project's feasibility. GTI received supplemental authorization A002 from DOE contracts for additional work to be performed under Phase I that will further extend the performance period until the end of February 2003. The additional scope of work is for GTI to develop the gasification characteristics of selected feedstock for the project. To conduct this work, GTI will assemble an existing ''mini-bench'' unit to perform the gasification tests. The results of the test will be used to confirm or if necessary update the process design completed in Phase Task 1.

  2. CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2002-03-31

    The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications. During this Performance Period work efforts focused on completion of the Topical Report, summarizing the design and techno-economic study of the project's feasibility. GTI received supplemental authorization A002 from DOE contracts for additional work to be performed under Phase I that will further extend the performance period until the end of February 2003. The additional scope of work is for GTI to develop the gasification characteristics of selected feedstock for the project. To conduct this work, GTI will assemble an existing ''mini-bench'' unit to perform the gasification tests. The results of the test will be used to confirm or if necessary update the process design completed in Phase Task 1.

  3. CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2002-09-30

    The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications. During this Performance Period work efforts focused on completion of the Topical Report, summarizing the design and techno-economic study of the project's feasibility. GTI received supplemental authorization A002 from DOE contracts for additional work to be performed under Phase I that will further extend the performance period until the end of February 2003. The additional scope of work is for GTI to develop the gasification characteristics of selected feedstock for the project. To conduct this work, GTI will assemble an existing ''mini-bench'' unit to perform the gasification tests. The results of the test will be used to confirm or if necessary update the process design completed in Phase Task 1.

  4. Biogas purification with biomass ash.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Delgado Juárez, M; Mostbauer, P; Knapp, A; Müller, W; Tertsch, S; Bockreis, A; Insam, H

    2017-10-07

    The aim of the study was to investigate the option to purify biogas from small-scale biogas plants by entrapping CO2 and H2S with regionally available biomass ash. Connected to the existing biogas plant Neustift (Tyrol) wood ash placed in a 1 m(3) container was used as a trap for CO2 and H2S in the biogas. With the process conditions chosen, for a period of a few hours CO2 was trapped resulting in pure methane. The removal of H2S was much longer-lasting (up to 34 d). The cumulative H2S uptake by the biomass ash ranged from 0.56 to 1.25 kg H2S per ton of ash. The pH of the ash and the leachability of Lead and Barium were reduced by the flushing with biogas, however toxicity towards plants was increased thus reducing the potential of ash use in agriculture. It can be concluded that biomass ash may be used for removal of hydrogen sulphide from biogas in small and medium biogas plants. The economic evaluation, however, indicated that the application of this system is limited by transport distances for the ash and its potential use afterwards. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Engineered plant biomass feedstock particles

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, James H [Federal Way, WA; Lanning, David N [Federal Way, WA; Broderick, Thomas F [Lake Forest Park, WA

    2012-04-17

    A new class of plant biomass feedstock particles characterized by consistent piece size and shape uniformity, high skeletal surface area, and good flow properties. The particles of plant biomass material having fibers aligned in a grain are characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially parallel to the grain and defining a substantially uniform distance along the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L. In particular, the L.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers, the W.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel end surfaces characterized by crosscut fibers and end checking between fibers, and the L.times.W dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel top and bottom surfaces. The L.times.W surfaces of particles with L/H dimension ratios of 4:1 or less are further elaborated by surface checking between longitudinally arrayed fibers. The length dimension L is preferably aligned within 30.degree. parallel to the grain, and more preferably within 10.degree. parallel to the grain. The plant biomass material is preferably selected from among wood, agricultural crop residues, plantation grasses, hemp, bagasse, and bamboo.

  6. Fungal pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Wan, Caixia; Li, Yebo

    2012-01-01

    Pretreatment is a crucial step in the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars and biofuels. Compared to thermal/chemical pretreatment, fungal pretreatment reduces the recalcitrance of lignocellulosic biomass by lignin-degrading microorganisms and thus potentially provides an environmentally-friendly and energy-efficient pretreatment technology for biofuel production. This paper provides an overview of the current state of fungal pretreatment by white rot fungi for biofuel production. The specific topics discussed are: 1) enzymes involved in biodegradation during the fungal pretreatment; 2) operating parameters governing performance of the fungal pretreatment; 3) the effect of fungal pretreatment on enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol production; 4) efforts for improving enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol production through combinations of fungal pretreatment and physical/chemical pretreatment; 5) the treatment of lignocellulosic biomass with lignin-degrading enzymes isolated from fungal pretreatment, with a comparison to fungal pretreatment; 6) modeling, reactor design, and scale-up of solid state fungal pretreatment; and 7) the limitations and future perspective of this technology.

  7. Biomass waste utilization for cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, L.D.; Janarthanan, A.K.; Parker, F.D.

    1996-12-31

    Application of biomass gasification technologies for electrical power production offers an opportunity to couple waste management with energy cogeneration. These applications call for reliable pyrolysis/gasification systems that are feedstock versatile and economically competitive, particularly at smaller biomass capacities. The Spouted Bed Gasifier (SBG) system being developed jointly by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and Utilities Management Group has been designed specifically to address the niche for applications producing up to 10 MWe. This paper describes the use of the SBG system as the fuel conversion module in waste management - electrical cogeneration systems sized to fit a large institutional setting (a university), an animal production facility (cattle feed lot) and a food processing plant (sugar cane mill). The paper uses pilot plant data for wood gasification as the basis for biomass conversion performance to estimate capital cost and economic return for cogeneration in each of the settings. For institutional applications ranging from 0.15 to 5 MWe capacity, the capital investment ranges from $650,000 to $7,000,000. Payback times range from 3 to 6 years.

  8. Irradiation enhancement of biomass conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, G. S.; Kiesling, H. E.; Galyean, M. L.; Bader, J. R.

    The vast supply of cellulosic agricultural residues and industrial by-products that is produced each year is a prospective resource of biomass suitable for conversion to useful products such as feedstock for the chemicals industry and feedstuffs for the livestock industry. Conversions of such biomass is poor at present, and utilization is inefficient, because of physio-chemical barriers to biological degradation and (or) anti-quality components such as toxicants that restrict biological usages. Improvements in biodegradability of ligno-cellulosic materials have been accomplished by gamma-ray and electron-beam irradiation at intermediate dosage (˜ 50 Mrad; .5 MGy); but applications of the technology have been hampered by questionable interpretations of results. Recent research with organic wastes such as sewage sludge and straw suggests opportunity for important applications of irradiation technology in enhancement of biomass conversion. Data from experiments using irradiated straw as feed for ruminants are presented and discussed in relation to research on prospective usage of sewage products as feed for ruminants. Findings are discussed in regard to prospective applications in industrial fermentation processes. Possible usage of irradiation technology for destruction of toxicants in exotic plants is considered in regard to prospective new feedstuffs.

  9. ETHYLENE-INSENSITIVE5 encodes a 5'-->3' exoribonuclease required for regulation of the EIN3-targeting F-box proteins EBF1/2.

    PubMed

    Olmedo, Gabriela; Guo, Hongwei; Gregory, Brian D; Nourizadeh, Saeid D; Aguilar-Henonin, Laura; Li, Hongjiang; An, Fengying; Guzman, Plinio; Ecker, Joseph R

    2006-09-05

    Ethylene is a gaseous plant growth regulator that controls a multitude of developmental and stress responses. Recently, the levels of Arabidopsis EIN3 protein, a key transcription factor mediating ethylene-regulated gene expression, have been demonstrated to increase in response to the presence of ethylene gas. Furthermore, in the absence of ethylene, EIN3 is quickly degraded through a ubiquitin/proteasome pathway mediated by two F-box proteins, EBF1 and EBF2. Here we report the identification of ETHYLENE-INSENSITIVE5 as the 5'-->3' exoribonuclease XRN4. Specifically, we demonstrate that EIN5 is a component of the ethylene signal transduction cascade acting downstream of CTR1 that is required for ethylene-mediated gene expression changes. Furthermore, we find that the ethylene insensitivity of ein5 mutant plants is a consequence of the over-accumulation of EBF1 and EBF2 mRNAs resulting in the under-accumulation of EIN3 even in the presence of ethylene gas. Together, our results suggest that the role of EIN5 in ethylene perception is to antagonize the negative feedback regulation on EIN3 by promoting EBF1 and EBF2 mRNA decay, which consequently allows the accumulation of EIN3 protein to trigger the ethylene response.

  10. EIN2-dependent regulation of acetylation of histone H3K14 and non-canonical histone H3K23 in ethylene signalling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Qi, Bin; Wang, Likai; Zhao, Bo; Rode, Siddharth; Riggan, Nathaniel D.; Ecker, Joseph R.; Qiao, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Ethylene gas is essential for many developmental processes and stress responses in plants. EIN2 plays a key role in ethylene signalling but its function remains enigmatic. Here, we show that ethylene specifically elevates acetylation of histone H3K14 and the non-canonical acetylation of H3K23 in etiolated seedlings. The up-regulation of these two histone marks positively correlates with ethylene-regulated transcription activation, and the elevation requires EIN2. Both EIN2 and EIN3 interact with a SANT domain protein named EIN2 nuclear associated protein 1 (ENAP1), overexpression of which results in elevation of histone acetylation and enhanced ethylene-inducible gene expression in an EIN2-dependent manner. On the basis of these findings we propose a model where, in the presence of ethylene, the EIN2 C terminus contributes to downstream signalling via the elevation of acetylation at H3K14 and H3K23. ENAP1 may potentially mediate ethylene-induced histone acetylation via its interactions with EIN2 C terminus. PMID:27694846

  11. Overview of IEA biomass combustion activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hustad, J. E.

    1994-07-01

    The objectives of the International Energy Agency (IEA) bioenergy program are: (1) to encourage cooperative research, development and use of energy and the increased utilization of alternatives to oil; and (2) to establish increased program and project cooperation between participants in the whole field of bioenergy. There are four Task Annexes to the Implementing Agreement during the period 1992-1994: Efficient and Environmentally Sound Biomass Production Systems; Harvesting and Supply of Woody Biomass for Energy; Biomass Utilization; and Conversion of Municipal Solid Waste Feedstock to Energy. The report describes the following biomass combustion activities during the period 1992-1994: Round robin test of a wood stove; Emissions from biomass combustion; A pilot project cofiring biomass with oil to reduce SO2 emissions; Small scale biomass chip handling; Energy from contaminated wood waste combustion; Modeling of biomass combustion; Wood chip cogeneration; Combustion of wet biomass feedstocks, ash reinjection and carbon burnout; Oxidation of wet biomass; Catalytic combustion in small wood burning appliances; Characterization of biomass fuels and ashes; Measurement techniques (FTIR).

  12. Biomass energy systems and the environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braunstein, H. M.; Kanciruk, P.; Roop, R. D.; Sharples, F. E.; Tatum, J. S.; Oakes, K. M.

    The technology, resources, applied, and experimental features of biomass energy resources are explored, with an emphasis on environmental and social implications of large-scale biomass development. The existing land and water based biomass resource is described in terms of available energy, ecological concerns, agricultural crops, livestock production, freshwater systems, and ocean systems. Attention is given to proposed systems of biomass energy production from forestry and silviculture, agricultural crops, livestock wastes, and freshwater and ocean systems. A survey is made of various biomass materials, techniques for conversion to gas, liquid fuels, or for direct combustion, and impacts of large-scale biomass production and harvest are examined. Particular note is made of the effects of scaling biomass conversion systems, including near- and long-term applications, and ethics and aesthetic concerns.

  13. Endometrial Intraepithelial Neoplasia (EIN) in endometrial biopsy specimens categorized by the 1994 World Health Organization classification for endometrial hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Chao; Song, Wen-Jing

    2013-01-01

    Our study is to determine the presence of endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia (EIN) in endometrial biopsy specimens classified by the 1994 World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for endometrial hyperplasia. Endometrial biopsy specimens that were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (HE) were examined and categorized by the WHO 1994 criteria and for the presence of EIN as defined by the International Endometrial Collaborative Group. β-catenin expression was examined by immunohistochemistry. A total of 474 cases of HE stained endometrial biopsy tissues were reviewed. There were 379 cases of simple endometrial hyperplasia, 16 with simple atypical endometrial hyperplasia, 48 with complex endometrial hyperplasia, and 31 with complex atypical endometrial hyperplasia. Among the 474 endometrial hyperplasia cases, there were 46 (9.7%) that were classified as EIN. Of these 46 cases, 11(2.9%) were classified as simple endometrial hyperplasia, 1 (6.3%) as simple atypical endometrial hyperplasia, 6 (12.5%) as complex endometrial hyperplasia, and 28 (90.3%) as complex atypical endometrial hyperplasia. EIN was associated with a higher rate of β-catenin positivity than endometrium classified as benign hyperplasia (72% vs. 22.5%, respectively, P < 0.001), but a lower rate than endometrial adenocarcinoma (72% vs. 96.2%, respectively, P < 0.001). In benign endometrial hyperplasia, high β-catenin expression was noted in the cell membranes, whereas in EIN and endometrial adenocarcinoma high expression was noted in the cytoplasm. In conclusion, EIN is more accurate than the WHO classification for the diagnosis of precancerous lesions of the endometrium.

  14. Sustainable Elastomers from Renewable Biomass.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongkai; Yuan, Liang; Tang, Chuanbing

    2017-07-18

    Sustainable elastomers have undergone explosive growth in recent years, partly due to the resurgence of biobased materials prepared from renewable natural resources. However, mounting challenges still prevail: How can the chemical compositions and macromolecular architectures of sustainable polymers be controlled and broadened? How can their processability and recyclability be enabled? How can they compete with petroleum-based counterparts in both cost and performance? Molecular-biomass-derived polymers, such as polymyrcene, polymenthide, and poly(ε-decalactone), have been employed for constructing thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs). Plant oils are widely used for fabricating thermoset elastomers. We use abundant biomass, such as plant oils, cellulose, rosin acids, and lignin, to develop elastomers covering a wide range of structure-property relationships in the hope of delivering better performance. In this Account, recent progress in preparing monomers and TPEs from biomass is first reviewed. ABA triblock copolymer TPEs were obtained with a soft middle block containing a soybean-oil-based monomer and hard outer blocks containing styrene. In addition, a combination of biobased monomers from rosin acids and soybean oil was formulated to prepare triblock copolymer TPEs. Together with the above-mentioned approaches based on block copolymers, multigraft copolymers with a soft backbone and rigid side chains are recognized as the first-generation and second-generation TPEs, respectively. It has been recently demonstrated that multigraft copolymers with a rigid backbone and elastic side chains can also be used as a novel architecture of TPEs. Natural polymers, such as cellulose and lignin, are utilized as a stiff, macromolecular backbone. Cellulose/lignin graft copolymers with side chains containing a copolymer of methyl methacrylate and butyl acrylate exhibited excellent elastic properties. Cellulose graft copolymers with biomass-derived polymers as side chains were

  15. Lime pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shushien

    Lignocellulose is a valuable alternative energy source. The susceptibility of lignocellulosic biomass to enzymatic hydrolysis is constrained due to its structural features, so pretreatment is essential to enhance enzymatic digestibility. Of the chemicals used as pretreatment agents, it has been reported that alkalis improve biomass digestibility significantly. In comparison with other alkalis such as NaOH and ammonia, lime (calcium hydroxide) has many advantages; it is very inexpensive, is safe, and can be recovered by carbonating wash water. The effects of lime pretreatment were explored on switchgrass and poplar wood, representing herbaceous and woody biomass, respectively. The effects of pretreatment conditions (time, temperature, lime loading, water loading, particle size, and oxygen pressure) have been systematically studies. Lime alone enhances the digestibility of switchgrass significantly; under the recommended conditions, the 3-d total sugar (glucose + xylose) yields of lime-treated switchgrass were 7 times that of untreated sample. When treating poplar wood, lime must be combined with oxygen to achieve high digestibility; oxidative lime pretreatment increased the 3-d total sugar yield of poplar wood to 12 times that of untreated sample. In a fundamental study, to determine why lime pretreatment is effective, the effects of three structural features on enzymatic digestibility were studied: lignin content, acetyl content, and crystallinity index (CrI). Poplar wood was treated with peracetic acid, potassium hydroxide, and ball milling to produce model lignocelluloses with a broad spectrum of lignin contents, acetyl contents, and CrI, respectively. Enzymatic hydrolysis was performed on the model lignocelluloses to determine the digestibility. Correlations between lignin/carbohydrate ratio, acetyl/carbohydrate ratio, CrI and digestibility were developed. The 95% prediction intervals show that the correlations predict the 1-h and 3-d total sugar conversions of

  16. 40 CFR Table Mm-2 to Subpart Mm of... - Default Factors for Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Default Factors for Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass MM Table MM-2 to Subpart MM of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass Biomass-based fuel and biomass Column A:Density (metric tons/bbl) Column B...

  17. 40 CFR Table Mm-2 to Subpart Mm of... - Default Factors for Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Default Factors for Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass MM Table MM-2 to Subpart MM of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass Biomass-based fuel and biomass Column A:Density (metric tons/bbl) Column B...

  18. 40 CFR Table Mm-2 to Subpart Mm of... - Default Factors for Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Factors for Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass MM Table MM-2 to Subpart MM of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass Biomass-based fuel and biomass Column A:Density (metric tons/bbl) Column B...

  19. 40 CFR Table Mm-2 to Subpart Mm of... - Default Factors for Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Factors for Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass MM Table MM-2 to Subpart MM of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass Biomass-based fuel and biomass Column A:Density (metric tons/bbl) Column B...

  20. EIN3 and ORE1 Accelerate Degreening during Ethylene-Mediated Leaf Senescence by Directly Activating Chlorophyll Catabolic Genes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Kai; Li, Zhongpeng; Yang, Zhen; Chen, Junyi; Wu, Shouxin; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Gao, Shan; Gao, Jiong; Ren, Guodong; Kuai, Benke; Zhou, Xin

    2015-07-01

    Degreening, caused by chlorophyll degradation, is the most obvious symptom of senescing leaves. Chlorophyll degradation can be triggered by endogenous and environmental cues, and ethylene is one of the major inducers. ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE3 (EIN3) is a key transcription factor in the ethylene signaling pathway. It was previously reported that EIN3, miR164, and a NAC (NAM, ATAF, and CUC) transcription factor ORE1/NAC2 constitute a regulatory network mediating leaf senescence. However, how this network regulates chlorophyll degradation at molecular level is not yet elucidated. Here we report a feed-forward regulation of chlorophyll degradation that involves EIN3, ORE1, and chlorophyll catabolic genes (CCGs). Gene expression analysis showed that the induction of three major CCGs, NYE1, NYC1 and PAO, by ethylene was largely repressed in ein3 eil1 double mutant. Dual-luciferase assay revealed that EIN3 significantly enhanced the promoter activity of NYE1, NYC1 and PAO in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Furthermore, Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) indicated that EIN3 could directly bind to NYE1, NYC1 and PAO promoters. These results reveal that EIN3 functions as a positive regulator of CCG expression during ethylene-mediated chlorophyll degradation. Interestingly, ORE1, a senescence regulator which is a downstream target of EIN3, could also activate the expression of NYE1, NYC1 and PAO by directly binding to their promoters in EMSA and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. In addition, EIN3 and ORE1 promoted NYE1 and NYC1 transcriptions in an additive manner. These results suggest that ORE1 is also involved in the direct regulation of CCG transcription. Moreover, ORE1 activated the expression of ACS2, a major ethylene biosynthesis gene, and subsequently promoted ethylene production. Collectively, our work reveals that EIN3, ORE1 and CCGs constitute a coherent feed-forward loop involving in the robust regulation of ethylene-mediated chlorophyll degradation

  1. Arabidopsis thaliana responses to mechanical stimulation do not require ETR1 or EIN2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, K. A.; Sistrunk, M. L.; Polisensky, D. H.; Braam, J.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Plants exposed to repetitive touch or wind are generally shorter and stockier than sheltered plants. These mechanostimulus-induced developmental changes are termed thigmomorphogenesis and may confer resistance to subsequent stresses. An early response of Arabidopsis thaliana to touch or wind is the up-regulation of TCH (touch) gene expression. The signal transduction pathway that leads to mechanostimulus responses is not well defined. A role for ethylene has been proposed based on the observation that mechanostimulation of plants leads to ethylene evolution and exogenous ethylene leads to thigmomorphogenetic-like changes. To determine whether ethylene has a role in plant responses to mechanostimulation, we assessed the ability of two ethylene-insensitive mutants, etr1-3 and ein2-1, to undergo thigmomorphogenesis and TCH gene up-regulation of expression. The ethylene-insensitive mutants responded to wind similarly to the wild type, with a delay in flowering, decrease in inflorescence elongation rate, shorter mature primary inflorescences, more rosette paraclades, and appropriate TCH gene expression changes. Also, wild-type and mutant Arabidopsis responded to vibrational stimulation, with an increase in hypocotyl elongation and up-regulation of TCH gene expression. We conclude that the ETR1 and EIN2 protein functions are not required for the developmental and molecular responses to mechanical stimulation.

  2. Arabidopsis thaliana responses to mechanical stimulation do not require ETR1 or EIN2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, K. A.; Sistrunk, M. L.; Polisensky, D. H.; Braam, J.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Plants exposed to repetitive touch or wind are generally shorter and stockier than sheltered plants. These mechanostimulus-induced developmental changes are termed thigmomorphogenesis and may confer resistance to subsequent stresses. An early response of Arabidopsis thaliana to touch or wind is the up-regulation of TCH (touch) gene expression. The signal transduction pathway that leads to mechanostimulus responses is not well defined. A role for ethylene has been proposed based on the observation that mechanostimulation of plants leads to ethylene evolution and exogenous ethylene leads to thigmomorphogenetic-like changes. To determine whether ethylene has a role in plant responses to mechanostimulation, we assessed the ability of two ethylene-insensitive mutants, etr1-3 and ein2-1, to undergo thigmomorphogenesis and TCH gene up-regulation of expression. The ethylene-insensitive mutants responded to wind similarly to the wild type, with a delay in flowering, decrease in inflorescence elongation rate, shorter mature primary inflorescences, more rosette paraclades, and appropriate TCH gene expression changes. Also, wild-type and mutant Arabidopsis responded to vibrational stimulation, with an increase in hypocotyl elongation and up-regulation of TCH gene expression. We conclude that the ETR1 and EIN2 protein functions are not required for the developmental and molecular responses to mechanical stimulation.

  3. Einstellung und Wissen von Lehramtsstudierenden zur Evolution - ein Vergleich zwischen Deutschland und der Türkei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Dittmar; Soran, Haluk

    Es wird eine Untersuchung vorgestellt, in der Wissen und Überzeugungen von Lehramtsstudierenden aller Fächer zum Thema Evolution an zwei Universitäten in Deutschland und der Türkei erhoben worden sind. Die Befragung wurde in Dortmund und in Ankara durchgeführt. Es stellte sich heraus, dass ausgeprägte Defizite im Verständnis der Evolutionsmechanismen herrschen. Viele Studierende, insbesondere aus der Türkei, sind nicht von der Faktizität der Evolution überzeugt. Dies gilt sowohl für Studierende mit Fach Biologie als auch für Studierende mit anderen Fächern. Näher untersucht worden sind die Faktoren, die die Überzeugungen zur Evolution beeinflussen können, was ja in Anbetracht der hohen Ablehnungsrate der Evolution von besonderem Interesse ist. Das Vertrauen in die Wissenschaft spielt hierbei eine besondere Rolle: Wer der Wissenschaft vertraut, ist auch eher von der Evolution überzeugt, als diejenigen, die skeptisch gegenüber der Wissenschaft sind.

  4. Biomass Energy Data Book, 2011, Edition 4

    DOE Data Explorer

    Wright, L.; Boundy, B.; Diegel, S. W.; Davis, S. C.

    The Biomass Energy Data Book is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Biomass Program in the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program of the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a convenient reference, the book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize the biomass industry, from the production of biomass feedstocks to their end use, including discussions on sustainability. This is the fourth edition of the Biomass Energy Data Book which is only available online in electronic format. There are five main sections to this book. The first section is an introduction which provides an overview of biomass resources and consumption. Following the introduction to biomass, is a section on biofuels which covers ethanol, biodiesel and bio-oil. The biopower section focuses on the use of biomass for electrical power generation and heating. The fourth section is on the developing area of biorefineries, and the fifth section covers feedstocks that are produced and used in the biomass industry. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also four appendices which include frequently needed conversion factors, a table of selected biomass feedstock characteristics, and discussions on sustainability.

  5. Biomass Energy Data Book: Edition 1

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Lynn L; Boundy, Robert Gary; Perlack, Robert D; Davis, Stacy Cagle; Saulsbury, Bo

    2006-09-01

    The Biomass Energy Data Book is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of the Biomass Program and the Office of Planning, Budget and Analysis in the Department of Energy's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize the biomass industry, from the production of biomass feedstocks to their end use. This is the first edition of the Biomass Energy Data Book and is currently only available online in electronic format. There are five main sections to this book. The first section is an introduction which provides an overview of biomass resources and consumption. Following the introduction to biomass is a section on biofuels which covers ethanol, biodiesel and BioOil. The biopower section focuses on the use of biomass for electrical power generation and heating. The fourth section is about the developing area of biorefineries, and the fifth section covers feedstocks that are produced and used in the biomass industry. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include measures of conversions, biomass characteristics and assumptions for selected tables and figures. A glossary of terms and a list of acronyms are also included for the reader's convenience.

  6. Biomass Energy Data Book: Edition 2

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Lynn L; Boundy, Robert Gary; Badger, Philip C; Perlack, Robert D; Davis, Stacy Cagle

    2009-12-01

    The Biomass Energy Data Book is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Biomass Program in the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program of the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a convenient reference, the book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize the biomass industry, from the production of biomass feedstocks to their end use, including discussions on sustainability. This is the second edition of the Biomass Energy Data Book which is only available online in electronic format. There are five main sections to this book. The first section is an introduction which provides an overview of biomass resources and consumption. Following the introduction to biomass, is a section on biofuels which covers ethanol, biodiesel and bio-oil. The biopower section focuses on the use of biomass for electrical power generation and heating. The fourth section is on the developing area of biorefineries, and the fifth section covers feedstocks that are produced and used in the biomass industry. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also four appendices which include frequently needed conversion factors, a table of selected biomass feedstock characteristics, assumptions for selected tables and figures, and discussions on sustainability. A glossary of terms and a list of acronyms are also included for the reader's convenience.

  7. Biomass Energy Data Book: Edition 4

    SciTech Connect

    Boundy, Robert Gary; Diegel, Susan W; Wright, Lynn L; Davis, Stacy Cagle

    2011-12-01

    The Biomass Energy Data Book is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Biomass Program in the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program of the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a convenient reference, the book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize the biomass industry, from the production of biomass feedstocks to their end use, including discussions on sustainability. This is the fourth edition of the Biomass Energy Data Book which is only available online in electronic format. There are five main sections to this book. The first section is an introduction which provides an overview of biomass resources and consumption. Following the introduction to biomass, is a section on biofuels which covers ethanol, biodiesel and bio-oil. The biopower section focuses on the use of biomass for electrical power generation and heating. The fourth section is on the developing area of biorefineries, and the fifth section covers feedstocks that are produced and used in the biomass industry. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also two appendices which include frequently needed conversion factors, a table of selected biomass feedstock characteristics, and discussions on sustainability. A glossary of terms and a list of acronyms are also included for the reader's convenience.

  8. Biomass Energy Data Book: Edition 3

    SciTech Connect

    Boundy, Robert Gary; Davis, Stacy Cagle

    2010-12-01

    The Biomass Energy Data Book is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Biomass Program in the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program of the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a convenient reference, the book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize the biomass industry, from the production of biomass feedstocks to their end use, including discussions on sustainability. This is the third edition of the Biomass Energy Data Book which is only available online in electronic format. There are five main sections to this book. The first section is an introduction which provides an overview of biomass resources and consumption. Following the introduction to biomass, is a section on biofuels which covers ethanol, biodiesel and bio-oil. The biopower section focuses on the use of biomass for electrical power generation and heating. The fourth section is on the developing area of biorefineries, and the fifth section covers feedstocks that are produced and used in the biomass industry. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also four appendices which include frequently needed conversion factors, a table of selected biomass feedstock characteristics, and discussions on sustainability. A glossary of terms and a list of acronyms are also included for the reader's convenience.

  9. Thermophilic degradation of cellulosic biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, T.; Zeikus, J. G.

    1982-12-01

    The conversion of cellulosic biomass to chemical feedstocks and fuel by microbial fermentation is an important objective of developing biotechnology. Direct fermentation of cellulosic derivatives to ethanol by thermophilic bacteria offers a promising approach to this goal. Fermentations at elevated temperatures lowers the energy demand for cooling and also facilitates the recovery of volatile products. In addition, thermophilic microorganisms possess enzymes with greater stability than those from mesophilic microorganisms. Three anaerobic thermophilic cocultures that ferment cellulosic substrate mainly to ethanol have been described: Clostridium thermocellum/Clostriidium thermohydrosulfuricum, C. thermocellum/Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum, and C. thermocellum/Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus sp. nov. The growth characteristics and metabolic features of these cocultures are reviewed.

  10. Biomass Resource Allocation among Competing End Uses

    SciTech Connect

    Newes, E.; Bush, B.; Inman, D.; Lin, Y.; Mai, T.; Martinez, A.; Mulcahy, D.; Short, W.; Simpkins, T.; Uriarte, C.; Peck, C.

    2012-05-01

    The Biomass Scenario Model (BSM) is a system dynamics model developed by the U.S. Department of Energy as a tool to better understand the interaction of complex policies and their potential effects on the biofuels industry in the United States. However, it does not currently have the capability to account for allocation of biomass resources among the various end uses, which limits its utilization in analysis of policies that target biomass uses outside the biofuels industry. This report provides a more holistic understanding of the dynamics surrounding the allocation of biomass among uses that include traditional use, wood pellet exports, bio-based products and bioproducts, biopower, and biofuels by (1) highlighting the methods used in existing models' treatments of competition for biomass resources; (2) identifying coverage and gaps in industry data regarding the competing end uses; and (3) exploring options for developing models of biomass allocation that could be integrated with the BSM to actively exchange and incorporate relevant information.

  11. BIOMASS REBURNING - MODELING/ENGINEERING STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-20

    This project is designed to develop engineering and modeling tools for a family of NO{sub x} control technologies utilizing biomass as a reburning fuel. The forth reporting period (July 1 - September 30) included ongoing kinetic modeling of the reburning process while firing biomass. Modeling of biomass reburning concentrated on description of biomass performance at different reburning heat inputs. Reburning fuel was assumed to undergo rapid breakdown to produce various gaseous products. Modeling shows that the efficiency of biomass is affected by its composition. The kinetic model agrees with experimental data for a wide range of initial conditions and thus can be used for process optimization. Experimental data on biomass reburning are included in Appendix 2.

  12. Microwave induced pyrolysis of oil palm biomass.

    PubMed

    Salema, Arshad Adam; Ani, Farid Nasir

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this paper was to carry out microwave induced pyrolysis of oil palm biomass (shell and fibers) with the help of char as microwave absorber (MA). Rapid heating and yield of microwave pyrolysis products such as bio-oil, char, and gas was found to depend on the ratio of biomass to microwave absorber. Temperature profiles revealed the heating characteristics of the biomass materials which can rapidly heat-up to high temperature within seconds in presence of MA. Some characterization of pyrolysis products was also presented. The advantage of this technique includes substantial reduction in consumption of energy, time and cost in order to produce bio-oil from biomass materials. Large biomass particle size can be used directly in microwave heating, thus saving grinding as well as moisture removal cost. A synergistic effect was found in using MA with oil palm biomass.

  13. Simulation study on combustion of biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, M. L.; Liu, X.; Cheng, J. W.; Liu, Y.; Jin, Y. A.

    2017-01-01

    Biomass combustion is the most common energy conversion technology, offering the advantages of low cost, low risk and high efficiency. In this paper, the transformation and transfer of biomass in the process of combustion are discussed in detail. The process of furnace combustion and gas phase formation was analyzed by numerical simulation. The experimental results not only help to optimize boiler operation and realize the efficient combustion of biomass, but also provide theoretical basis for the improvement of burner technology.

  14. California's biomass and its energy potential

    SciTech Connect

    Lucarelli, F.B. Jr.

    1980-04-01

    The potentials for using California's biomass for energy have been assessed. The study relies on the recent work of Amory Lovins and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's (LBL) Distributed Energy System's Project to specify an energy future for Californians. These works identify transportation fuels as the most valuable energy conversion for biomass. Within this context, the extent of five categories of terrestial biomass is estimated, in addition to the environmental impacts and monetary cost of collecting and transporting each biomass category. Estimates of the costs of transforming biomass into different fuels as well as a survey of government's role in a biomass energy program are presented. The major findings are summarized below. (1) California's existing biomass resources are sufficient to provide only 20 percent of its future liquid fuel requirements. (2) Meeting the full transportation demand with biomass derived fuels will require the development of exotic biomass sources such as kelp farms and significant reductions in automobile travel in the State. (3) Under assumptions of moderate increases in gasoline prices and without major new government incentives, the cost of transforming biomass into transport fuels will be competitive with the price of gasoline on a Btu basis by the year 1990. (4) The environmental impacts of collecting most forms of biomass are beneficial and should reduce air pollution from agricultural burning and water pollution from feedlot and dairy farm runoff. Moreover, the collection of logging residues should improve timber stand productivity and the harvest of chaparral should reduce the risk of wildfire in the State. (5) The institutional context for implementing biomass energy projects is complex and fragmented.

  15. Estimates of US biomass energy consumption 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-06

    This report is the seventh in a series of publications developed by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to quantify the biomass-derived primary energy used by the US economy. It presents estimates of 1991 and 1992 consumption. The objective of this report is to provide updated estimates of biomass energy consumption for use by Congress, Federal and State agencies, biomass producers and end-use sectors, and the public at large.

  16. Biomass Compositional Analysis Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-07-01

    At the Biomass Compositional Analysis Laboratory, NREL scientists have more than 20 years of experience supporting the biomass conversion industry. They develop, refine, and validate analytical methods to determine the chemical composition of biomass samples before, during, and after conversion processing. These high-quality compositional analysis data are used to determine feedstock compositions as well as mass balances and product yields from conversion processes.

  17. Bamboo: An Overlooked Biomass Resource?

    SciTech Connect

    Scurlock, J.M.O.

    2000-02-01

    Bamboo is the common term applied to a broad group (1250 species) of large woody grasses, ranging from 10 cm to 40 m in height. Already in everyday use by about 2.5 billion people, mostly for fiber and food within Asia, bamboo may have potential as a bioenergy or fiber crop for niche markets, although some reports of its high productivity seem to be exaggerated. Literature on bamboo productivity is scarce, with most reports coming from various parts of Asia. There is little evidence overall that bamboo is significantly more productive than many other candidate bioenergy crops, but it shares a number of desirable fuel characteristics with certain other bioenergy feedstocks, such as low ash content and alkali index. Its heating value is lower than many woody biomass feedstocks but higher than most agricultural residues, grasses and straws. Although non-fuel applications of bamboo biomass may be actually more profitable than energy recovery, there may also be potential for co-productio n of bioenergy together with other bamboo processing. A significant drawback is the difficulty of selective breeding, given the lack of knowledge of flowering physiology. Further research is also required on propagation techniques, establishment and stand management, and mechanized harvesting needs to be developed.

  18. Lignocellulosic Biomass Pretreatment Using AFEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balan, Venkatesh; Bals, Bryan; Chundawat, Shishir P. S.; Marshall, Derek; Dale, Bruce E.

    Although cellulose is the most abundant organic molecule, its susceptibility to hydrolysis is restricted due to the rigid lignin and hemicellulose protection surrounding the cellulose micro fibrils. Therefore, an effective pretreatment is necessary to liberate the cellulose from the lignin-hemicellulose seal and also reduce cellulosic crystallinity. Some of the available pretreatment techniques include acid hydrolysis, steam explosion, ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX), alkaline wet oxidation, and hot water pretreatment. Besides reducing lignocellulosic recalcitrance, an ideal pretreatment must also minimize formation of degradation products that inhibit subsequent hydrolysis and fermentation. AFEX is an important pretreatment technology that utilizes both physical (high temperature and pressure) and chemical (ammonia) processes to achieve effective pretreatment. Besides increasing the surface accessibility for hydrolysis, AFEX promotes cellulose decrystallization and partial hemicellulose depolymerization and reduces the lignin recalcitrance in the treated biomass. Theoretical glucose yield upon optimal enzymatic hydrolysis on AFEX-treated corn stover is approximately 98%. Furthermore, AFEX offers several unique advantages over other pretreatments, which include near complete recovery of the pretreatment chemical (ammonia), nutrient addition for microbial growth through the remaining ammonia on pretreated biomass, and not requiring a washing step during the process which facilitates high solid loading hydrolysis. This chapter provides a detailed practical procedure to perform AFEX, design the reactor, determine the mass balances, and conduct the process safely.

  19. Engineered plant biomass feedstock particles

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, James H.; Lanning, David N.; Broderick, Thomas F.

    2011-10-18

    A novel class of flowable biomass feedstock particles with unusually large surface areas that can be manufactured in remarkably uniform sizes using low-energy comminution techniques. The feedstock particles are roughly parallelepiped in shape and characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially with the grain direction and defining a substantially uniform distance along the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L. The particles exhibit a disrupted grain structure with prominent end and surface checks that greatly enhances their skeletal surface area as compared to their envelope surface area. The L.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers. The W.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel end surfaces characterized by crosscut fibers and end checking between fibers. The L.times.W dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel top surfaces characterized by some surface checking between longitudinally arrayed fibers. At least 80% of the particles pass through a 1/4 inch screen having a 6.3 mm nominal sieve opening but are retained by a No. 10 screen having a 2 mm nominal sieve opening. The feedstock particles are manufactured from a variety of plant biomass materials including wood, crop residues, plantation grasses, hemp, bagasse, and bamboo.

  20. Engineered plant biomass feedstock particles

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, James H.; Lanning, David N.; Broderick, Thomas F.

    2011-10-11

    A novel class of flowable biomass feedstock particles with unusually large surface areas that can be manufactured in remarkably uniform sizes using low-energy comminution techniques. The feedstock particles are roughly parallelepiped in shape and characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially with the grain direction and defining a substantially uniform distance along the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L. The particles exhibit a disrupted grain structure with prominent end and surface checks that greatly enhances their skeletal surface area as compared to their envelope surface area. The L.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers. The W.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel end surfaces characterized by crosscut fibers and end checking between fibers. The L.times.W dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel top surfaces characterized by some surface checking between longitudinally arrayed fibers. The feedstock particles are manufactured from a variety of plant biomass materials including wood, crop residues, plantation grasses, hemp, bagasse, and bamboo.

  1. Producing liquid fuels from biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solantausta, Yrjo; Gust, Steven

    The aim of this survey was to compare, on techno-economic criteria, alternatives of producing liquid fuels from indigenous raw materials in Finland. Another aim was to compare methods under development and prepare a proposal for steering research related to this field. Process concepts were prepared for a number of alternatives, as well as analogous balances and production and investment cost assessments for these balances. Carbon dioxide emissions of the alternatives and the price of CO2 reduction were also studied. All the alternatives for producing liquid fuels from indigenous raw materials are utmost unprofitable. There are great differences between the alternatives. While the production cost of ethanol is 6 to 9 times higher than the market value of the product, the equivalent ratio for substitute fuel oil produced from peat by pyrolysis is 3 to 4. However, it should be borne in mind that the technical uncertainties related to the alternatives are of different magnitude. Production of ethanol from barley is of commercial technology, while biomass pyrolysis is still under development. If the aim is to reach smaller carbon dioxide emissions by using liquid biofuels, the most favorable alternative is pyrolysis oil produced from wood. Fuels produced from cultivated biomass are more expensive ways of reducing CO2 emissions. Their potential of reducing CO2 emissions in Finland is insignificant. Integration of liquid fuel production to some other production line is more profitable.

  2. Agricultural policies and biomass fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaim, S.; Hertzmark, D.

    The potentials for biomass energy derived from agricultural products are examined. The production of energy feedstocks from grains is discussed for the example of ethanol production from grain, with consideration given to the beverage process and the wet milling process for obtaining fuel ethanol from grains and sugars, the nonfeedstock costs and energy requirements for ethanol production, the potential net energy gain from ethanol fermentation, the effect of ethanol fuel production on supplies of protein, oils and feed and of ethanol coproducts, net ethanol costs, and alternatives to corn as an ethanol feedstock. Biomass fuel production from crop residues is then considered; the constraints of soil fertility on crop residue removal for energy production are reviewed, residue yields with conventional practices and with reduced tillage are determined, technologies for the direct conversion of cellulose to ethanol and methanol are described, and potential markets for the products of these processes are identified. Implications for agricultural policy of ethanol production from grain and fuel and chemical production from crop residues are also discussed.

  3. Lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment using AFEX.

    PubMed

    Balan, Venkatesh; Bals, Bryan; Chundawat, Shishir P S; Marshall, Derek; Dale, Bruce E

    2009-01-01

    Although cellulose is the most abundant organic molecule, its susceptibility to hydrolysis is restricted due to the rigid lignin and hemicellulose protection surrounding the cellulose micro fibrils. Therefore, an effective pretreatment is necessary to liberate the cellulose from the lignin-hemicellulose seal and also reduce cellulosic crystallinity. Some of the available pretreatment techniques include acid hydrolysis, steam explosion, ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX), alkaline wet oxidation, and hot water pretreatment. Besides reducing lignocellulosic recalcitrance, an ideal pretreatment must also minimize formation of degradation products that inhibit subsequent hydrolysis and fermentation. AFEX is an important pretreatment technology that utilizes both physical (high temperature and pressure) and chemical (ammonia) processes to achieve effective pretreatment. Besides increasing the surface accessibility for hydrolysis, AFEX promotes cellulose decrystallization and partial hemicellulose depolymerization and reduces the lignin recalcitrance in the treated biomass. Theoretical glucose yield upon optimal enzymatic hydrolysis on AFEX-treated corn stover is approximately 98%. Furthermore, AFEX offers several unique advantages over other pretreatments, which include near complete recovery of the pretreatment chemical (ammonia), nutrient addition for microbial growth through the remaining ammonia on pretreated biomass, and not requiring a washing step during the process which facilitates high solid loading hydrolysis. This chapter provides a detailed practical procedure to perform AFEX, design the reactor, determine the mass balances, and conduct the process safely.

  4. Biomass development in slow sand filters.

    PubMed

    Campos, L C; Su, M F J; Graham, N J D; Smith, S R

    2002-11-01

    Microbial biomass development in the sand and schmutzdecke layer was determined in two full-scale slow sand filters, operated with and without a light excluding cover. A standard chloroform fumigation-extraction technique was adapted to routinely measure microbial biomass concentrations in the sand beds. Sand was sampled to a depth of 10 cm and schmutzdecke was also collected at the same random positions on the uncovered filter. Interstitial microbial biomass in the uncovered sand bed increased with time and decreased with sampling depth. There was a small accumulation of sand biomass with time in the covered filter, but no relationship was apparent between biomass concentration and depth in this filter. Schmutzdecke did not develop on the covered filter and was spatially highly variable in the uncovered condition compared to the consistent patterns observed in interstitial biomass production. It is speculated that microbial biomass in the sand of uncovered filters is largely related to carbon inputs from photosynthetic activity in the schmutzdecke and involves mechanisms that spatially distribute carbon substrate from the schmutzdecke to the sand. However, total organic carbon and dissolved organic carbon removals were similar in both filters suggesting that relatively small biomass populations in covered filters are sufficient to remove residual labile carbon during advanced water treatment and little further advantage to water purification and organic carbon removal is gained by the increased production of biomass in uncovered slow sand filter beds.

  5. Combustion, pyrolysis, gasification, and liquefaction of biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, T.B.

    1980-09-01

    All the products now obtained from oil can be provided by thermal conversion of the solid fuels biomass and coal. As a feedstock, biomass has many advantages over coal and has the potential to supply up to 20% of US energy by the year 2000 and significant amounts of energy for other countries. However, it is imperative that in producing biomass for energy we practice careful land use. Combustion is the simplest method of producing heat from biomass, using either the traditional fixed-bed combustion on a grate or the fluidized-bed and suspended combustion techniques now being developed. Pyrolysis of biomass is a particularly attractive process if all three products - gas, wood tars, and charcoal - can be used. Gasification of biomass with air is perhaps the most flexible and best-developed process for conversion of biomass to fuel today, yielding a low energy gas that can be burned in existing gas/oil boilers or in engines. Oxygen gasification yields a gas with higher energy content that can be used in pipelines or to fire turbines. In addition, this gas can be used for producing methanol, ammonia, or gasoline by indirect liquefaction. Fast pyrolysis of biomass produces a gas rich in ethylene that can be used to make alcohols or gasoline. Finally, treatment of biomass with high pressure hydrogen can yield liquid fuels through direct liquefaction.

  6. EERC Center for Biomass Utilization 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Zygarlicke, Christopher J.; Hurley, John P.; Aulich, Ted R.; Folkedahl, Bruce C.; Strege, Joshua R.; Patel, Nikhil; Shockey, Richard E.

    2009-05-27

    The Center for Biomass Utilization® 2006 project at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) consisted of three tasks related to applied fundamental research focused on converting biomass feedstocks to energy, liquid transportation fuels, and chemicals. Task 1, entitled Thermochemical Conversion of Biomass to Syngas and Chemical Feedstocks, involved three activities. Task 2, entitled Crop Oil Biorefinery Process Development, involved four activities. Task 3, entitled Management, Education, and Outreach, focused on overall project management and providing educational outreach related to biomass technologies through workshops and conferences.

  7. EIN3-like gene expression during fruit ripening of Cavendish banana (Musa acuminata cv. Grande naine).

    PubMed

    Mbéguié-A-Mbéguié, Didier; Hubert, Olivier; Fils-Lycaon, Bernard; Chillet, Marc; Baurens, Franc-Christophe

    2008-06-01

    Ethylene signal transduction initiates with ethylene binding at receptor proteins and terminates in a transcription cascade involving the EIN3/EIL transcription factors. Here, we have isolated four cDNAs homologs of the Arabidopsis EIN3/EIN3-like gene, MA-EILs (Musa acuminata ethylene insensitive 3-like) from banana fruit. Sequence comparison with other banana EIL gene already registered in the database led us to conclude that, at this day, at least five different genes namely MA-EIL1, MA-EIL2/AB266318, MA-EIL3/AB266319, MA-EIL4/AB266320 and AB266321 exist in banana. Phylogenetic analyses included all banana EIL genes within a same cluster consisting of rice OsEILs, a monocotyledonous plant as banana. However, MA-EIL1, MA-EIL2/AB266318, MA-EIL4/AB266320 and AB266321 on one side, and MA-EIL3/AB266319 on the other side, belong to two distant subclusters. MA-EIL mRNAs were detected in all examined banana tissues but at lower level in peel than in pulp. According to tissues, MA-EIL genes were differentially regulated by ripening and ethylene in mature green fruit and wounding in old and young leaves. MA-EIL2/AB266318 was the unique ripening- and ethylene-induced gene; MA-EIL1, MA-EIL4/Ab266320 and AB266321 genes were downregulated, while MA-EIL3/AB266319 presented an unusual pattern of expression. Interestingly, a marked change was observed mainly in MA-EIL1 and MA-EIL3/Ab266319 mRNA accumulation concomitantly with changes in ethylene responsiveness of fruit. Upon wounding, the main effect was observed in MA-EIL4/AB266320 and AB266321 mRNA levels, which presented a markedly increase in both young and old leaves, respectively. Data presented in this study suggest the importance of a transcriptionally step control in the regulation of EIL genes during banana fruit ripening.

  8. CTR1 phosphorylates the central regulator EIN2 to control ethylene hormone signaling from the ER membrane to the nucleus in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ju, Chuanli; Yoon, Gyeong Mee; Shemansky, Jennifer Marie; Lin, David Y; Ying, Z Irene; Chang, Jianhong; Garrett, Wesley M; Kessenbrock, Mareike; Groth, Georg; Tucker, Mark L; Cooper, Bret; Kieber, Joseph J; Chang, Caren

    2012-11-20

    The gaseous phytohormone ethylene C(2)H(4) mediates numerous aspects of growth and development. Genetic analysis has identified a number of critical elements in ethylene signaling, but how these elements interact biochemically to transduce the signal from the ethylene receptor complex at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane to transcription factors in the nucleus is unknown. To close this gap in our understanding of the ethylene signaling pathway, the challenge has been to identify the target of the CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1 (CTR1) Raf-like protein kinase, as well as the molecular events surrounding ETHYLENE-INSENSITIVE2 (EIN2), an ER membrane-localized Nramp homolog that positively regulates ethylene responses. Here we demonstrate that CTR1 interacts with and directly phosphorylates the cytosolic C-terminal domain of EIN2. Mutations that block the EIN2 phosphorylation sites result in constitutive nuclear localization of the EIN2 C terminus, concomitant with constitutive activation of ethylene responses in Arabidopsis. Our results suggest that phosphorylation of EIN2 by CTR1 prevents EIN2 from signaling in the absence of ethylene, whereas inhibition of CTR1 upon ethylene perception is a signal for cleavage and nuclear localization of the EIN2 C terminus, allowing the ethylene signal to reach the downstream transcription factors. These findings significantly advance our understanding of the mechanisms underlying ethylene signal transduction.

  9. Inzidenz von bullösen Autoimmunerkrankungen in Serbien: eine retrospektive Studie über 20 Jahre.

    PubMed

    Milinković, Mirjana; Janković, Slavenka; Medenica, Ljiljana; Nikolić, Miloš; Reljić, Vesna; Popadić, Svetlana; Janković, Janko

    2016-10-01

    Die meisten früheren Arbeiten zu den klinisch-epidemiologischen Merkmalen von bullösen Autoimmunerkrankungen (AIBD) konzentrierten sich vor allem auf eine einzige Krankheitsentität oder nur eine Krankheitsgruppe; nur in wenigen Studien wurde die Inzidenz verschiedener AIBD untersucht. Bei der vorliegenden Studie war es unser Ziel, das gesamte Spektrum der AIBD zu betrachten, die Inzidenz der häufigsten AIBD zu ermitteln und die zeitlichen Trends ihres Auftretens in Zentralserbien über einen Zeitraum von 20 Jahren zu untersuchen. Wir rekrutierten retrospektiv 1161 AIBD-Fälle, die in Zentralserbien von Januar 1991 bis Dezember 2010 neu diagnostiziert wurden. Die Diagnose stützte sich auf eine strikte klinische, histologische und immunhistologische Beurteilung. Folgende Inzidenzraten wurden für die einzelnen Erkrankungen ermittelt: 4,35 pro eine Million Einwohner/Jahr (pME/Jahr) für Pemphigus, 4,47 pME/Jahr für Pemphigoid, 1,42 pME/Jahr für Dermatitis herpetiformis (DH), 0,25 pME/Jahr IgA-Dermatose und 0,08 pME/Jahr für Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita. Im betrachteten Zeitraum stieg die altersbereinigte Inzidenzrate für Pemphigus und insbesondere für Pemphigoid signifikant an, während sie für DH, allerdings nicht signifikant, abnahm. Unsere Studie befasst sich zum ersten Mal mit den Inzidenzraten des gesamten Spektrums der AIBD in Serbien und untersucht die zeitlichen Trends ihres Auftretens über einen Zeitraum von 20 Jahren. Nach unserem besten Wissen wurde ein ähnlicher Befund wie der unsere, dass nämlich die Inzidenzraten von Pemphigus und Pemphigoid vergleichbar sind, bisher noch nicht publiziert. © 2016 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. AtMYB44 regulates resistance to the green peach aphid and diamondback moth by activating EIN2-affected defences in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lü, B-B; Li, X-J; Sun, W-W; Li, L; Gao, R; Zhu, Q; Tian, S-M; Fu, M-Q; Yu, H-L; Tang, X-M; Zhang, C-L; Dong, H-S

    2013-09-01

    Recently we showed that the transcription activator AtMYB44 regulates expression of EIN2, a gene essential for ethylene signalling and insect resistance, in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis). To link the transactivation with insect resistance, we investigated the wild-type and atmyb44 mutant plants, genetically Complemented atmyb44 (Catmyb44) and AtMYB44-Overexpression Transgenic Arabidopsis (MYB44OTA). We found that AtMYB44 played a critical role in Arabidopsis resistance to the phloem-feeding generalist green peach aphid (Myzus persicae Sulzer) and leaf-chewing specialist caterpillar diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella L.). AtMYB44 was required not only for the development of constitutive resistance but also for the induction of resistance by both herbivorous insects. Levels of constitutive and herbivore-induced resistance were consistent with corresponding amounts of the AtMYB44 protein constitutively produced in MYB44OTA and induced by herbivory in Catmyb44. In both cases, AtMYB44 promoted EIN2 expression to a greater extent in MYB44OTA than in Catmyb44. However, AtMYB44-promoted EIN2 expression was arrested with reduced resistance levels in the EIN2-deficient Arabidopsis mutant ein2-1 and the MYB44OTA ein2-1 hybrid. In the different plant genotypes, only MYB44OTA constitutively displayed phloem-based defences, which are specific to phloem-feeding insects, and robust expression of genes involved in the biosynthesis of glucosinolates, which are the secondary plant metabolites known as deterrents to generalist herbivores. Phloem-based defences and glucosinolate-related gene expression were not detected in ein2-1 and MYB44OTA ein2-1. These results establish a genetic connection between the regulatory role of AtMYB44 in EIN2 expression and the development of Arabidopsis resistance to insects.

  11. Residue distribution and biomass recovery following biomass harvest of plantation pine

    Treesearch

    Johnny Grace III; John Klepac; S. Taylor; Dana Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    Forest biomass is anticipated to play a significant role in addressing an alternative energy supply. However, the efficiencies of current state-of-the-art recovery systems operating in forest biomass harvests are still relatively unknown. Forest biomass harvest stands typically have higher stand densities and smaller diameter trees than conventional stands which may...

  12. Root biomass and exudates link plant diversity with soil bacterial and fungal biomass

    PubMed Central

    Eisenhauer, Nico; Lanoue, Arnaud; Strecker, Tanja; Scheu, Stefan; Steinauer, Katja; Thakur, Madhav P.; Mommer, Liesje

    2017-01-01

    Plant diversity has been shown to determine the composition and functioning of soil biota. Although root-derived organic inputs are discussed as the main drivers of soil communities, experimental evidence is scarce. While there is some evidence that higher root biomass at high plant diversity increases substrate availability for soil biota, several studies have speculated that the quantity and diversity of root inputs into the soil, i.e. though root exudates, drive plant diversity effects on soil biota. Here we used a microcosm experiment to study the role of plant species richness on the biomass of soil bacteria and fungi as well as fungal-to-bacterial ratio via root biomass and root exudates. Plant diversity significantly increased shoot biomass, root biomass, the amount of root exudates, bacterial biomass, and fungal biomass. Fungal biomass increased most with increasing plant diversity resulting in a significant shift in the fungal-to-bacterial biomass ratio at high plant diversity. Fungal biomass increased significantly with plant diversity-induced increases in root biomass and the amount of root exudates. These results suggest that plant diversity enhances soil microbial biomass, particularly soil fungi, by increasing root-derived organic inputs. PMID:28374800

  13. Root biomass and exudates link plant diversity with soil bacterial and fungal biomass.

    PubMed

    Eisenhauer, Nico; Lanoue, Arnaud; Strecker, Tanja; Scheu, Stefan; Steinauer, Katja; Thakur, Madhav P; Mommer, Liesje

    2017-04-04

    Plant diversity has been shown to determine the composition and functioning of soil biota. Although root-derived organic inputs are discussed as the main drivers of soil communities, experimental evidence is scarce. While there is some evidence that higher root biomass at high plant diversity increases substrate availability for soil biota, several studies have speculated that the quantity and diversity of root inputs into the soil, i.e. though root exudates, drive plant diversity effects on soil biota. Here we used a microcosm experiment to study the role of plant species richness on the biomass of soil bacteria and fungi as well as fungal-to-bacterial ratio via root biomass and root exudates. Plant diversity significantly increased shoot biomass, root biomass, the amount of root exudates, bacterial biomass, and fungal biomass. Fungal biomass increased most with increasing plant diversity resulting in a significant shift in the fungal-to-bacterial biomass ratio at high plant diversity. Fungal biomass increased significantly with plant diversity-induced increases in root biomass and the amount of root exudates. These results suggest that plant diversity enhances soil microbial biomass, particularly soil fungi, by increasing root-derived organic inputs.

  14. Soil mycoflora from the Dead Sea Oases of Ein Gedi and Einot Zuqim (Israel).

    PubMed

    Steiman, R; Guiraud, P; Sage, L; Seigle-Murandi, F

    1997-10-01

    Samples were taken from the top 10 cm of soils from 24 points in the Ein Gedi area. Among 329 isolates, 142 species were identified: 11 genera of ascomycetes, one genus of coelomycetes, 28 genera of hyphomycetes, 7 genera of zygomycetes and one yeast, in addition to some unidentified basidiomycetes. The hyphomycetes were represented by 17 dematiaceous, 9 mucedinaceous and two tuberculariaceous. Melanconiaceous and stilbellaceous genera were not found. Two new varieties of Microascus recently described were reisolated. No strict thermophiles or halophiles were obtained. There is apparently no very characteristic or specific fungal flora of the Dead Sea Oases although it was different from that found in the desert soil surrounding this area.

  15. Gasohol - Analysis and biomass alternatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-11-01

    The economics of fermentation ethanol as a near-term alternative to liquid hydrocarbon fuels are analyzed and alternatives to grain-fermented ethanol are examined. Based on estimates of raw material and production costs and energy consumption, it is shown that net production costs for alcohol fuel from corn amount to $2.14/gallon, with no significant net consumption or gain in energy. It is also pointed out that the use of grain for alcohol production will influence quantities available for livestock production and export, and that land available for grain production is limited. Consideration is then given to the economic potential of using cellulosic biomass from agricultural and forest residues in the production of ethanol fuels and coal gasification for methanol production, and it is pointed out that these alternatives offer economic, energy and oil-savings advantages over ethanol production from grains.

  16. Improvements of biomass deconstruction enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Sale, K. L.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and DSM Innovation, Inc. collaborated on the investigation of the structure and function of cellulases from thermophilic fungi. Sandia's role was to use its expertise in protein structure determination and X-ray crystallography to solve the structure of these enzymes in their native state and in their substrate and product bound states. Sandia was also tasked to work with DSM to use the newly solved structure to, using computational approaches, analyze enzyme interactions with both bound substrate and bound product; the goal being to develop approaches for rationally designing improved cellulases for biomass deconstruction. We solved the structures of five cellulases from thermophilic fungi. Several of these were also solved with bound substrate/product, which allowed us to predict mutations that might enhance activity and stability.

  17. Tropospheric Ozone and Biomass Burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, Sushil; Ziemke, J. R.; Bhartia, P. K.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper studies the significance of pyrogenic (e.g., biomass burning) emissions in the production of tropospheric ozone in the tropics associated with the forest and savanna fires in the African, South American, and Indonesian regions. Using aerosol index (Al) and tropospheric column ozone (TCO) time series from 1979 to 2000 derived from the Nimbus-7 and Earth Probe TOMS measurements, our study shows significant differences in the seasonal and spatial characteristics of pyrogenic emissions north and south of the equator in the African region and Brazil in South America. In general, they are not related to the seasonal and spatial characteristics of tropospheric ozone in these regions. In the Indonesian region, the most significant increase in TCO occurred during September and October 1997, following large-scale forest and savanna fires associated with the El Nino-induced dry season. However, the increase in TCO extended over most of the western Pacific well outside the burning region and was accompanied by a decrease in the eastern Pacific resembling a west-to-east dipole about the date-line. The net increase in TCO integrated over the tropical region between 15 deg N and 15 deg S was about 6-8 Tg (1 Tg = 10(exp 12) gm) over the mean climatological value of about 72 Tg. This increase is well within the range of interannual variability of TCO in the tropical region and does not necessarily suggest a photochemical source related to biomass burning. The interannual variability in TCO appears to be out of phase with the interannual variability of stratospheric column ozone (SCO). These variabilities seem to be manifestations of solar cycle and quasibiennial oscillations.

  18. Mini-biomass electric generation

    SciTech Connect

    Elliot, G.

    1997-12-01

    Awareness of the living standards achieved by others has resulted in a Russian population which is yearning for a higher standard of living. Such a situation demands access to affordable electricity in remote areas. Remote energy requirements creates the need to transport power or fossil fuels over long distances. Application of local renewable energy resources could eliminate the need for and costs of long distance power supply. Vast forest resources spread over most of Russia make biomass an ideal renewable energy candidate for many off-grid villages. The primary objective for this preliminary evaluation is to examine the economic feasibility of replacing distillate and gasoline fuels with local waste biomass as the primary fuel for village energy in outlying regions of Russia. Approximately 20 million people live in regions where Russia`s Unified Electric System grid does not penetrate. Most of these people are connected to smaller independent power grids, but approximately 8 million Russians live in off-grid villages and small towns served by stand-alone generation systems using either diesel fuel or gasoline. The off-grid villages depend on expensive distillate fuels and gasoline for combustion in small boilers and engines. These fuels are used for both electricity generation and district heating. Typically, diesel generator systems with a capacity of up to 1 MW serve a collective farm, settlement and their rural enterprises (there are an estimated 10,000 such systems in Russia). Smaller gasoline-fueled generator systems with capacities in the range of 0.5 - 5 kW serve smaller farms or rural enterprises (there are about 60,000 such systems in Russia).

  19. Carbon Monoxide from Biomass Burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This pair of images shows levels of carbon monoxide at the atmospheric pressure level of 700 millibars (roughly 12,000 feet in altitude) over the continent of South America, as observed by the Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere (MOPITT) sensor flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. Data for producing the image on the left were acquired on March 3, 2000, and for the image on the right on September 7, 2000. Blue pixels show low values, yellows show intermediate values, and the red to pink and then white pixels are progressively higher values. In the lefthand image (March 3), notice the fairly low levels of carbon monoxide over the entire continent. The slightly higher equatorial values are the result of burning emissions in sub-Saharan Africa that are convected at the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and spread by the trade winds. Also, notice the effect of the elevated surface topography across the Andes Mountains running north to south along the western coastline. (In this region, white pixels show no data.) In the righthand image (September 7), a large carbon monoxide plume is seen over Brazil, produced primarily by biomass burning across Amazonia and lofted into the atmosphere by strong cloud convection. The generally higher carbon monoxide levels as compared to March are both the result of South American fire emissions and the transport of carbon monoxide across the Atlantic Ocean from widespread biomass burning over Southern Africa. These images were produced using MOPITT data, which are currently being validated. These data were assimilated into an atmospheric chemical transport model using wind vectors provided by the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). Although there is good confidence in the relative seasonal values and geographic variation measured by MOPITT, that team anticipates their level of confidence will improve further with ongoing intensive validation campaigns and comparisons with in situ and ground

  20. Global repowering opportunities for biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Demeter, C.P.; Gray, E.E.; Lindsey, C.A.

    1996-12-31

    Global demand for electricity is growing during a time of significant structural change in electric markets. Many countries are creating more competitive markets for power production and sales through regulation and ownership structure. Governments are reducing monopolies, enhancing competition and unbundling electricity services. Equipment suppliers, developers, and service providers are expanding into the global market. Meeting future electric energy needs has forced the power community to examine alternatives to Greenfield Development. Repowering existing facilities to gain a competitive advantage is a promising option. Repowering has the potential to offer increased capacity, heat rate reductions, and improved environmental profiles in a manner consistent with an asset and capital deployment rationalization strategy that appears to characterize the future of the power industry. It is also a defensive strategy for extending the life of existing assets. The breadth of repowering options continues to expand as technologies are introduced to increase plant capacities, efficiencies or both. Some options such as feedwater heater repowering appear to offer advantages to repowering with biomass fuels as an alternative to natural gas projects. By repowering solid fueled facilities, developed and developing countries can receive multiple benefits. Most developing countries are largely agrarian with traditional policies that have relied on trickle-down rural development. By turning agricultural and forestry by-products into commodities, farmers and foresters can benefit from a sustainable source of income. As power demand and biomass requirements are expanded to a regional scale, the government can reduce some agricultural subsidies and shift that money to other economically and socially beneficial programs. Furthermore, rural development can minimize rural-to-urban flight and thus lessen the strain on already overburdened urban infrastructure.

  1. Carbon Monoxide from Biomass Burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This pair of images shows levels of carbon monoxide at the atmospheric pressure level of 700 millibars (roughly 12,000 feet in altitude) over the continent of South America, as observed by the Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere (MOPITT) sensor flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. Data for producing the image on the left were acquired on March 3, 2000, and for the image on the right on September 7, 2000. Blue pixels show low values, yellows show intermediate values, and the red to pink and then white pixels are progressively higher values. In the lefthand image (March 3), notice the fairly low levels of carbon monoxide over the entire continent. The slightly higher equatorial values are the result of burning emissions in sub-Saharan Africa that are convected at the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and spread by the trade winds. Also, notice the effect of the elevated surface topography across the Andes Mountains running north to south along the western coastline. (In this region, white pixels show no data.) In the righthand image (September 7), a large carbon monoxide plume is seen over Brazil, produced primarily by biomass burning across Amazonia and lofted into the atmosphere by strong cloud convection. The generally higher carbon monoxide levels as compared to March are both the result of South American fire emissions and the transport of carbon monoxide across the Atlantic Ocean from widespread biomass burning over Southern Africa. These images were produced using MOPITT data, which are currently being validated. These data were assimilated into an atmospheric chemical transport model using wind vectors provided by the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). Although there is good confidence in the relative seasonal values and geographic variation measured by MOPITT, that team anticipates their level of confidence will improve further with ongoing intensive validation campaigns and comparisons with in situ and ground

  2. Biomass of freshwater turtles: a geographic comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Congdon, J.D.; Greene, J.L.; Gibbons, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    Standing crop biomass of freshwater turtles and minimum annual biomass of egg production were calculated for marsh and farm pond habitats in South Caroling and in Michigan. The species in South Carolina included Chelydra serpentina, Deirochelys reticularia, Kinosternon subrubrum, Pseudemys floridana, P. scripta and Sternotherus odoratus. The species in Michigan were Chelydra serpentina, Chrysemys picta and Emydoidea blandingi. Biomass was also determined for a single species population of P. scripta on a barrier island near Charleston, South Carolina. Population density and biomass of Pseudemys scripta in Green Pond on Capers Island were higher than densities and biomass of the entire six-species community studied on the mainland. In both the farm pond and marsh habitat in South Carolina P. scripta was the numerically dominant species and had the highest biomass. In Michigan, Chrysemys picta was the numerically dominant species; however, the biomass of Chelydra serpentina was higher. The three-species community in Michigan in two marshes (58 kg ha/sup -1/ and 46 kg ha/sup -1/) and farm ponds (23 kg ha/sup -1/) had lower biomasses than did the six-species community in a South Carolina marsh (73 kg/sup -1/). Minimum annual egg production by all species in South Carolina averaged 1.93 kg ha/sup -1/ and in Michigan averaged 2.89 kg ha/sup -1/ of marsh.

  3. Pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass using Fenton chemistry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pretreatment is a necessary step in “biomass to biofuel conversion” due to the recalcitrant nature of lignocellulosic biomass. White-rot fungi utilize peroxidases and hydrogen peroxide (in vivo Fenton chemistry) to degrade lignin. In an attempt to mimic this process, solution phase Fenton chemistry ...

  4. Dedicated herbaceous biomass feedstock genetics and development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biofuels and bio-based products can be produced from a wide variety of plant feedstocks. To supply enough biomass to meet the proposed need for a bio-based economy a suite of dedicated biomass species must be developed to accommodate a range of growing environments throughout the United States. Re...

  5. Agriculture, land use, and commercial biomass energy

    SciTech Connect

    Edmonds, J.A.; Wise, M.A.; Sands, R.D.; Brown, R.A.; Kheshgi, H.

    1996-06-01

    In this paper we have considered commercial biomass energy in the context of overall agriculture and land-use change. We have described a model of energy, agriculture, and land-use and employed that model to examine the implications of commercial biomass energy or both energy sector and land-use change carbon emissions. In general we find that the introduction of biomass energy has a negative effect on the extent of unmanaged ecosystems. Commercial biomass introduces a major new land use which raises land rental rates, and provides an incentive to bring more land into production, increasing the rate of incursion into unmanaged ecosystems. But while the emergence of a commercial biomass industry may increase land-use change emissions, the overall effect is strongly to reduce total anthropogenic carbon emissions. Further, the higher the rate of commercial biomass energy productivity, the lower net emissions. Higher commercial biomass energy productivity, while leading to higher land-use change emissions, has a far stronger effect on fossil fuel carbon emissions. Highly productive and inexpensive commercial biomass energy technologies appear to have a substantial depressing effect on total anthropogenic carbon emissions, though their introduction raises the rental rate on land, providing incentives for greater rates of deforestation than in the reference case.

  6. Manufacture of Prebiotics from Biomass Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gullón, Patricia; Gullón, Beatriz; Moure, Andrés; Alonso, José Luis; Domínguez, Herminia; Parajó, Juan Carlos

    Biomass from plant material is the most abundant and widespread renewable raw material for sustainable development, and can be employed as a source of polymeric and oligomeric carbohydrates. When ingested as a part of the diet, some biomass polysaccharides and/or their oligomeric hydrolysis products are selectively fermented in the colon, causing prebiotic effects.

  7. Environmental implications of increased biomass energy use

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, T.R. Sr.; Miles, T.R. Jr. , Portland, OR )

    1992-03-01

    This study reviews the environmental implications of continued and increased use of biomass for energy to determine what concerns have been and need to be addressed and to establish some guidelines for developing future resources and technologies. Although renewable biomass energy is perceived as environmentally desirable compared with fossil fuels, the environmental impact of increased biomass use needs to be identified and recognized. Industries and utilities evaluating the potential to convert biomass to heat, electricity, and transportation fuels must consider whether the resource is reliable and abundant, and whether biomass production and conversion is environmentally preferred. A broad range of studies and events in the United States were reviewed to assess the inventory of forest, agricultural, and urban biomass fuels; characterize biomass fuel types, their occurrence, and their suitability; describe regulatory and environmental effects on the availability and use of biomass for energy; and identify areas for further study. The following sections address resource, environmental, and policy needs. Several specific actions are recommended for utilities, nonutility power generators, and public agencies.

  8. Structural Studies of Biomass Degrading Enzyme Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lunin, Vladimir V.; Alahuhta, Markus; Brunecky, Roman; Donohoe, Bryon; Xu, Qi; Bomble, Yannick J.; Himmel, Michael E.

    2014-08-05

    Renewable energy today comprises wind, photovoltaics, geothermal, and biofuels. Biomass is the leading source of renewable, sustainable energy used for the production of liquid transportation fuels. While the focus is shifting today from the ethanol towards next generation or advanced biofuels the real challenge however remains the same: reducing the recalcitrance of biomass to deconstruction, which yields the sugars needed for further processing.

  9. Biomass Program 2007 Accomplishments - Full Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2009-10-27

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EERE’s) Biomass Program works with industry, academia and its national laboratory partners on a balanced portfolio of research in biomass feedstocks and conversion technologies. This document provides Program accomplishments for 2007.

  10. Biomass resilience of Neotropical secondary forests.

    PubMed

    Poorter, Lourens; Bongers, Frans; Aide, T Mitchell; Almeyda Zambrano, Angélica M; Balvanera, Patricia; Becknell, Justin M; Boukili, Vanessa; Brancalion, Pedro H S; Broadbent, Eben N; Chazdon, Robin L; Craven, Dylan; de Almeida-Cortez, Jarcilene S; Cabral, George A L; de Jong, Ben H J; Denslow, Julie S; Dent, Daisy H; DeWalt, Saara J; Dupuy, Juan M; Durán, Sandra M; Espírito-Santo, Mario M; Fandino, María C; César, Ricardo G; Hall, Jefferson S; Hernandez-Stefanoni, José Luis; Jakovac, Catarina C; Junqueira, André B; Kennard, Deborah; Letcher, Susan G; Licona, Juan-Carlos; Lohbeck, Madelon; Marín-Spiotta, Erika; Martínez-Ramos, Miguel; Massoca, Paulo; Meave, Jorge A; Mesquita, Rita; Mora, Francisco; Muñoz, Rodrigo; Muscarella, Robert; Nunes, Yule R F; Ochoa-Gaona, Susana; de Oliveira, Alexandre A; Orihuela-Belmonte, Edith; Peña-Claros, Marielos; Pérez-García, Eduardo A; Piotto, Daniel; Powers, Jennifer S; Rodríguez-Velázquez, Jorge; Romero-Pérez, I Eunice; Ruíz, Jorge; Saldarriaga, Juan G; Sanchez-Azofeifa, Arturo; Schwartz, Naomi B; Steininger, Marc K; Swenson, Nathan G; Toledo, Marisol; Uriarte, Maria; van Breugel, Michiel; van der Wal, Hans; Veloso, Maria D M; Vester, Hans F M; Vicentini, Alberto; Vieira, Ima C G; Bentos, Tony Vizcarra; Williamson, G Bruce; Rozendaal, Danaë M A

    2016-02-11

    Land-use change occurs nowhere more rapidly than in the tropics, where the imbalance between deforestation and forest regrowth has large consequences for the global carbon cycle. However, considerable uncertainty remains about the rate of biomass recovery in secondary forests, and how these rates are influenced by climate, landscape, and prior land use. Here we analyse aboveground biomass recovery during secondary succession in 45 forest sites and about 1,500 forest plots covering the major environmental gradients in the Neotropics. The studied secondary forests are highly productive and resilient. Aboveground biomass recovery after 20 years was on average 122 megagrams per hectare (Mg ha(-1)), corresponding to a net carbon uptake of 3.05 Mg C ha(-1) yr(-1), 11 times the uptake rate of old-growth forests. Aboveground biomass stocks took a median time of 66 years to recover to 90% of old-growth values. Aboveground biomass recovery after 20 years varied 11.3-fold (from 20 to 225 Mg ha(-1)) across sites, and this recovery increased with water availability (higher local rainfall and lower climatic water deficit). We present a biomass recovery map of Latin America, which illustrates geographical and climatic variation in carbon sequestration potential during forest regrowth. The map will support policies to minimize forest loss in areas where biomass resilience is naturally low (such as seasonally dry forest regions) and promote forest regeneration and restoration in humid tropical lowland areas with high biomass resilience.

  11. Biomass thermal conversion research at SERI

    SciTech Connect

    Milne, T. A.; Desrosiers, R. E.; Reed, T. B.

    1980-09-01

    SERI's involvement in the thermochemical conversion of biomass to fuels and chemicals is reviewed. The scope and activities of the Biomass Thermal Conversion and Exploratory Branch are reviewed. The current status and future plans for three tasks are presented: (1) Pyrolysis Mechanisms; (2) High Pressure O/sub 2/ Gasifier; and (3) Gasification Test Facility.

  12. Processes for pretreating lignocellulosic biomass: A review

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, J D

    1992-11-01

    This paper reviews existing and proposed pretreatment processes for biomass. The focus is on the mechanisms by which the various pretreatments act and the influence of biomass structure and composition on the efficacy of particular pretreatment techniques. This analysis is used to identify pretreatment technologies and issues that warrant further research.

  13. Biomass smoke exposure and chronic lung disease.

    PubMed

    Assad, Nour A; Kapoor, Vidit; Sood, Akshay

    2016-03-01

    Approximately 3 billion people worldwide rely on coal and biomass fuel for cooking and heating. Biomass smoke exposure is associated with several chronic lung diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma-COPD overlap syndrome, usual interstitial pneumonitis, hut lung, and bronchial anthracofibrosis. Household air pollution primarily from biomass smoke is the biggest risk factor for COPD worldwide. Despite the significant burden of biomass smoke-related respiratory disease, the exposure is still underappreciated worldwide, especially in high-income countries. Recent literature highlights the immunoinflammatory differences between biomass smoke-related COPD and tobacco smoke-related COPD that may lead to better understanding of the differences in the clinical phenotypes between the two entities, suggests an association with the recently recognized asthma-COPD overlap syndrome, and elucidates the burden of disease in high-income countries. The current review focuses on the association between biomass smoke and common chronic respiratory diseases, discuss differences between biomass smoke-related COPD and tobacco smoke-related COPD, highlights chronic respiratory diseases that are specific for biomass smoke exposure such as hut lung and bronchial anthracofibrosis, and discusses the known impact of beneficial interventions.

  14. Lessons learned from existing biomass power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltsee, G.

    2000-02-24

    This report includes summary information on 20 biomass power plants, which represent some of the leaders in the industry. In each category an effort is made to identify plants that illustrate particular points. The project experiences described capture some important lessons learned that lead in the direction of an improved biomass power industry.

  15. Spatial modeling of potential woody biomass flow

    Treesearch

    Woodam Chung; Nathaniel Anderson

    2012-01-01

    The flow of woody biomass to end users is determined by economic factors, especially the amount available across a landscape and delivery costs of bioenergy facilities. The objective of this study develop methodology to quantify landscape-level stocks and potential biomass flows using the currently available spatial database road network analysis tool. We applied this...

  16. Biomass Program 2007 Accomplishments - Report Introduction

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2009-10-27

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EERE’s) Biomass Program works with industry, academia and its national laboratory partners on a balanced portfolio of research in biomass feedstocks and conversion technologies. This document provides the introduction to the 2007 Program Accomplishments Report.

  17. Advanced gasification-based biomass power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.H.; Larson, E.D.

    1993-12-31

    A promising strategy for modernizing bioenergy is the production of electricity or the cogeneration of electricity and heat using gasified biomass with advanced conversion technologies. Major advances that have been made in coal gasification technology, to marry the gas turbine to coal, are readily adaptable to biomass applications. Integrating biomass gasifiers with aeroderivative gas turbines in particular makes it possible to achieve high efficiencies and low unit capital costs at the modest scales required for bioenergy systems. Electricity produced with biomass-integrated gasifier/gas turbine (BIG/GT) power systems not only offers major environmental benefits but also would be competitive with electricity produced from fossil fuels and nuclear energy under a wide range of circumstances. Initial applications will be with biomass residues generated in the sugarcane, pulp and paper, and other agro- and forest-product industries. Eventually, biomass grown for energy purposes on dedicated energy farms will also be used to fuel these gas turbine systems. Continuing improvements in jet engine and biomass gasification technologies will lead to further gains in the performance of BIG/GT systems over the next couple of decades. Fuel cells operated on gasified biomass offer the promise of even higher performance levels in the period beyond the turn of the century. 79 refs., 21 figs., 11 tabs.

  18. Processes for pretreating lignocellulosic biomass: A review

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, J.D.

    1992-11-01

    This paper reviews existing and proposed pretreatment processes for biomass. The focus is on the mechanisms by which the various pretreatments act and the influence of biomass structure and composition on the efficacy of particular pretreatment techniques. This analysis is used to identify pretreatment technologies and issues that warrant further research.

  19. Biomass resilience of Neotropical secondary forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poorter, Lourens; Bongers, Frans; Aide, T. Mitchell; Almeyda Zambrano, Angélica M.; Balvanera, Patricia; Becknell, Justin M.; Boukili, Vanessa; Brancalion, Pedro H. S.; Broadbent, Eben N.; Chazdon, Robin L.; Craven, Dylan; de Almeida-Cortez, Jarcilene S.; Cabral, George A. L.; de Jong, Ben H. J.; Denslow, Julie S.; Dent, Daisy H.; Dewalt, Saara J.; Dupuy, Juan M.; Durán, Sandra M.; Espírito-Santo, Mario M.; Fandino, María C.; César, Ricardo G.; Hall, Jefferson S.; Hernandez-Stefanoni, José Luis; Jakovac, Catarina C.; Junqueira, André B.; Kennard, Deborah; Letcher, Susan G.; Licona, Juan-Carlos; Lohbeck, Madelon; Marín-Spiotta, Erika; Martínez-Ramos, Miguel; Massoca, Paulo; Meave, Jorge A.; Mesquita, Rita; Mora, Francisco; Muñoz, Rodrigo; Muscarella, Robert; Nunes, Yule R. F.; Ochoa-Gaona, Susana; de Oliveira, Alexandre A.; Orihuela-Belmonte, Edith; Peña-Claros, Marielos; Pérez-García, Eduardo A.; Piotto, Daniel; Powers, Jennifer S.; Rodríguez-Velázquez, Jorge; Romero-Pérez, I. Eunice; Ruíz, Jorge; Saldarriaga, Juan G.; Sanchez-Azofeifa, Arturo; Schwartz, Naomi B.; Steininger, Marc K.; Swenson, Nathan G.; Toledo, Marisol; Uriarte, Maria; van Breugel, Michiel; van der Wal, Hans; Veloso, Maria D. M.; Vester, Hans F. M.; Vicentini, Alberto; Vieira, Ima C. G.; Bentos, Tony Vizcarra; Williamson, G. Bruce; Rozendaal, Danaë M. A.

    2016-02-01

    Land-use change occurs nowhere more rapidly than in the tropics, where the imbalance between deforestation and forest regrowth has large consequences for the global carbon cycle. However, considerable uncertainty remains about the rate of biomass recovery in secondary forests, and how these rates are influenced by climate, landscape, and prior land use. Here we analyse aboveground biomass recovery during secondary succession in 45 forest sites and about 1,500 forest plots covering the major environmental gradients in the Neotropics. The studied secondary forests are highly productive and resilient. Aboveground biomass recovery after 20 years was on average 122 megagrams per hectare (Mg ha-1), corresponding to a net carbon uptake of 3.05 Mg C ha-1 yr-1, 11 times the uptake rate of old-growth forests. Aboveground biomass stocks took a median time of 66 years to recover to 90% of old-growth values. Aboveground biomass recovery after 20 years varied 11.3-fold (from 20 to 225 Mg ha-1) across sites, and this recovery increased with water availability (higher local rainfall and lower climatic water deficit). We present a biomass recovery map of Latin America, which illustrates geographical and climatic variation in carbon sequestration potential during forest regrowth. The map will support policies to minimize forest loss in areas where biomass resilience is naturally low (such as seasonally dry forest regions) and promote forest regeneration and restoration in humid tropical lowland areas with high biomass resilience.

  20. Synthetic and Biomass Alternate Fueling in Aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Bushnell, Dennis M.

    2009-01-01

    Must use earth's most abundant natural resources - Biomass, Solar, Arid land (43%), Seawater (97%) with nutrients (80%) plus brackish waters and nutrients resolve environmental triangle of conflicts energy-food-freshwater and ultrafine particulate hazards. Requires Paradigm Shift - Develop and Use Solar* for energy; Biomass for aviation and hybrid-electric-compressed air mobility fueling with transition to hydrogen long term.

  1. Heterois in Switchgrass: Biomass Yield in Swards

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Improving the biomass yield of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) will improve its utility as a dedicated energy crop by increasing energy yield per acre. In a previous space-transplanted study, mid-parent heterosis for biomass yield was reported for population and specific F1 hybrids of the lowland-...

  2. ORNL researchers cultivate biomass energy program

    SciTech Connect

    Bowdle, K.

    1992-01-01

    The main obstacle to the widespread use of biomass - derived fuels has been their cost. However, by developing more productive crops and by continuing to decrease production and conversion costs, researchers believe biomass-derived ethanol costs could be lowered to 60 + 70 cents per gallon within the next 5 to 10 years.

  3. Modeling integrated biomass gasification business concepts

    Treesearch

    Peter J. Ince; Ted Bilek; Mark A. Dietenberger

    2011-01-01

    Biomass gasification is an approach to producing energy and/or biofuels that could be integrated into existing forest product production facilities, particularly at pulp mills. Existing process heat and power loads tend to favor integration at existing pulp mills. This paper describes a generic modeling system for evaluating integrated biomass gasification business...

  4. SERI Biomass Program. FY 1983 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Corder, R.E.; Hill, A.M.; Lindsey, H.; Lowenstein, M.Z.; McIntosh, R.P.

    1984-02-01

    This report summarizes the progress and research accomplishments of the SERI Biomass Program during FY 1983. The SERI Biomass Program consists of three elements: Aquatic Species, Anaerobic Digestion, and Photo/Biological Hydrogen. Each element has been indexed separately. 2 references, 44 figures, 22 tables.

  5. The relative cost of biomass energy transport.

    PubMed

    Searcy, Erin; Flynn, Peter; Ghafoori, Emad; Kumar, Amit

    2007-04-01

    Logistics cost, the cost of moving feedstock or products, is a key component of the overall cost of recovering energy from biomass. In this study, we calculate for small- and large-project sizes, the relative cost of transportation by truck, rail, ship, and pipeline for three biomass feedstocks, by truck and pipeline for ethanol, and by transmission line for electrical power. Distance fixed costs (loading and unloading) and distance variable costs (transport, including power losses during transmission), are calculated for each biomass type and mode of transportation. Costs are normalized to a common basis of a giga Joules of biomass. The relative cost of moving products vs feedstock is an approximate measure of the incentive for location of biomass processing at the source of biomass, rather than at the point of ultimate consumption of produced energy. In general, the cost of transporting biomass is more than the cost of transporting its energy products. The gap in cost for transporting biomass vs power is significantly higher than the incremental cost of building and operating a power plant remote from a transmission grid. The cost of power transmission and ethanol transport by pipeline is highly dependent on scale of project. Transport of ethanol by truck has a lower cost than by pipeline up to capacities of 1800 t/d. The high cost of transshipment to a ship precludes shipping from being an economical mode of transport for distances less than 800 km (woodchips) and 1500 km (baled agricultural residues).

  6. Uncertainty in countrywide forest biomass estimates.

    Treesearch

    C.E. Peterson; D. Turner

    1994-01-01

    Country-wide estimates of forest biomass are the major driver for estimating and understanding carbon pools and flux, a critical component of global change research. Important determinants in making these estimates include the areal extent of forested lands and their associated biomass. Estimates for these parameters may be derived from surface-based data, photo...

  7. Multiresource Inventories: Woody Biomass in North Carolina

    Treesearch

    Noel D. Cost

    1986-01-01

    North Carolina's 31.2 million acres of land area support 1.7 billion tons of woody biomass. Of this total, 94 percent is on timberland, 3 percent on nonforest areas, and 3 percent on reserved timberland and woodland areas. Over the next two decades, more than 12.8 million tons of woody biomass could be harvested annually from timberland without adversely...

  8. Biomass yield from an urban landscape

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Utilizing biomass from urban landscapes could significantly contribute to the nation’s renewable energy needs. In 2007, an experiment was begun to evaluate the biomass production from a bermudagrass, Cynodon dactylon var. dactylon (L.) Pers., lawn in Woodward, Oklahoma and to estimate the potential...

  9. Biomass Estimates for Five Western States.

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, James O.

    1990-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the woody biomass resource within US Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Biomass Program, comprised of southeast Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington. In addition to the regional forest biomass assessment, information will be presented for logging residue, which represents current energy conversion opportunities. The information presented in the report is based on data and relationships already published. Regionally applicable biomass equations are generally not available for species occurring in the west. Because of this, a number of assumptions were made to develop whole-tree biomass tables. These assumptions are required to link algorithms from biomass studies to regional timber inventory data published by the Forest Inventory and Analysis Research Units (FIA), of the Pacific Northwest and Intermountain Research Stations, US Forest Service. These sources and assumptions will be identified later in this report. Tabular biomass data will be presented for 11 resource areas, identified in the FS inventory publications. This report does not include information for the vast area encompassing interior Alaska. Total tress biomass as defined in the report refers to the above ground weight of a tree above a 1.0 foot stump, and exclusive of foliage. A glossary is included that defines specific terms as used in the report. Inventory terminology is derived from forest inventory reports from Forest Inventory and Analysis units at the Intermountain and Pacific Northwest Research Stations. 39 refs., 15 figs., 23 tabs.

  10. A tree biomass and carbon estimation system

    Treesearch

    Emily B. Schultz; Thomas G. Matney; Donald L. Grebner

    2013-01-01

    Appropriate forest management decisions for the developing woody biofuel and carbon credit markets require inventory and growth-and-yield systems reporting component tree dry weight biomass estimates. We have developed an integrated growth-and-yield and biomass/carbon calculator. The objective was to provide Mississippi’s State inventory system with bioenergy economic...

  11. 90% Below 10m: Summer Biomass and Productivity are Invisible to Satellites and Surface Transects in Modern Lake Michigan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuhel, R. L.; Aguilar, C.

    2013-12-01

    Deep biomass maxima, often identified through in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence profiles (DCM or deep chlorophyll maximum), have been common 'forever' in Lake Michigan. Usually present in the upper thermocline zone of 15-25m, summer DCM populations were characteristically dominated by diatoms. Increased light transmission in quagga mussel (QM) engineered Lake Michigan waters now has enabled phytoplankton to proliferate in discrete layers as deep as 50m. Instances of multiple fluorescence maxima and transmission minima, often not coincident, document the habitat diversity available in clear, often sequentially stratified offshore waters and MidLake Reef Complex locations. Phytoplankton population structure has also changed, and diatoms have become a much smaller component of algal biomass. Discrete layers of chromatically adapted picoplankton now dominate the deepest biomass maxima. Photosynthetic characteristics differ substantially among leading edge, principal biomass or fluorescence, and deep trailing edge populations. Saturation coefficients are often as low as 25 uEin/m2/sec, or 1% of midday summer surface radiance. In vivo fluorescence is only loosely related to biomass, which is greatest in shallower zones of beam transmission minima. On a daily basis, areal primary productivity post-QM is less than half of previous levels, and seasonality has been muted. Spring bloom enhancement no longer exists, and the depth zone of maximum productivity is 10-20m deeper than during the diatom epoch. Altered phytoplankton community structure and decreased productivity left strong signals in biogeochemical time series measurements. A clear discontinuity in silicate cycling indicates dampened diatom productivity and consequently lower silica loss through deposition and burial. Porewater analysis pre- and post-QM shows evidence of reduced organic sedimentation overall, with an especially strong signal in decreased potential silicate efflux. Biogeochemical consequences include

  12. Assessment of Biomass Resources in Liberia

    SciTech Connect

    Milbrandt, A.

    2009-04-01

    Biomass resources meet about 99.5% of the Liberian population?s energy needs so they are vital to basic welfare and economic activity. Already, traditional biomass products like firewood and charcoal are the primary energy source used for domestic cooking and heating. However, other more efficient biomass technologies are available that could open opportunities for agriculture and rural development, and provide other socio-economic and environmental benefits.The main objective of this study is to estimate the biomass resources currently and potentially available in the country and evaluate their contribution for power generation and the production of transportation fuels. It intends to inform policy makers and industry developers of the biomass resource availability in Liberia, identify areas with high potential, and serve as a base for further, more detailed site-specific assessments.

  13. Bioconversion of waste biomass to useful products

    DOEpatents

    Grady, James L.; Chen, Guang Jiong

    1998-01-01

    A process is provided for converting waste biomass to useful products by gasifying the biomass to produce synthesis gas and converting the synthesis gas substrate to one or more useful products. The present invention is directed to the conversion of biomass wastes including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, plastic, tires, agricultural residues and the like, as well as coal, to useful products such as hydrogen, ethanol and acetic acid. The overall process includes the steps of gasifying the waste biomass to produce raw synthesis gas, cooling the synthesis gas, converting the synthesis gas to the desired product or products using anaerobic bioconversion, and then recovering the product or products. In accordance with a particular embodiment of the present invention, waste biomass is converted to synthesis gas containing carbon monoxide and, then, the carbon monoxide is converted to hydrogen by an anaerobic microorganism ERIH2, bacillus smithii ATCC No. 55404.

  14. Bioconversion of waste biomass to useful products

    DOEpatents

    Grady, J.L.; Chen, G.J.

    1998-10-13

    A process is provided for converting waste biomass to useful products by gasifying the biomass to produce synthesis gas and converting the synthesis gas substrate to one or more useful products. The present invention is directed to the conversion of biomass wastes including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, plastic, tires, agricultural residues and the like, as well as coal, to useful products such as hydrogen, ethanol and acetic acid. The overall process includes the steps of gasifying the waste biomass to produce raw synthesis gas, cooling the synthesis gas, converting the synthesis gas to the desired product or products using anaerobic bioconversion, and then recovering the product or products. In accordance with a particular embodiment of the present invention, waste biomass is converted to synthesis gas containing carbon monoxide and, then, the carbon monoxide is converted to hydrogen by an anaerobic microorganism ERIH2, Bacillus smithii ATCC No. 55404. 82 figs.

  15. Electricity and heat production by biomass cogeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marčič, Simon; Marčič, Milan

    2017-07-01

    In Slovenia, approximately 2 % of electricity is generated using cogeneration systems. Industrial and district heating networks ensure the growth of such technology. Today, many existing systems are outdated, providing myriad opportunities for reconstruction. One concept for the development of households and industry envisages the construction of several small biomass units and the application of natural gas as a fuel with a relatively extensive distribution network. This concept has good development potential in Slovenia. Forests cover 56 % of the surface area in Slovenia, which has, as a result, a lot of waste wood to be turned into biomass. Biomass is an important fuel in Slovenia. Biomass is gasified in a gasifier, and the wood gas obtained is used to power the gas engine. This paper describes a biomass cogeneration system as the first of this type in Slovenia, located in Ruše.

  16. Superheater Corrosion Produced By Biomass Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, William; Singbeil, Douglas; Keiser, James R

    2012-01-01

    About 90% of the world's bioenergy is produced by burning renewable biomass fuels. Low-cost biomass fuels such as agricultural wastes typically contain more alkali metals and chlorine than conventional fuels. Although the efficiency of a boiler's steam cycle can be increased by raising its maximum steam temperature, alkali metals and chlorine released in biofuel boilers cause accelerated corrosion and fouling at high superheater steam temperatures. Most alloys that resist high temperature corrosion protect themselves with a surface layer of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. However, this Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} can be fluxed away by reactions that form alkali chromates or volatilized as chromic acid. This paper reviews recent research on superheater corrosion mechanisms and superheater alloy performance in biomass boilers firing black liquor, biomass fuels, blends of biomass with fossil fuels and municipal waste.

  17. BIOMASS COGASIFICATION AT POLK POWER STATION

    SciTech Connect

    John McDaniel

    2002-05-01

    Part of a closed loop biomass crop was recently harvested to produce electricity in Tampa Electric's Polk Power Station Unit No.1. No technical impediments to incorporating a small percentage of biomass into Polk Power Station's fuel mix were identified. Appropriate dedicated storage and handling equipment would be required for routine biomass use. Polk Unit No.1 is an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant. IGCC is a new approach to generating electricity cleanly from solid fuels such as coal, petroleum coke, The purpose of this experiment was to demonstrate the Polk Unit No.1 could process biomass as a fraction of its fuel without an adverse impact on availability and plant performance. The biomass chosen for the test was part of a crop of closed loop Eucalyptus trees.

  18. Freshwater aquatic plant biomass production in Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, K.R.; Sutton, D.L.; Bowes, G.

    1983-01-01

    About 8% (1.2 million ha) of the total surface area of Florida is occupied by freshwater. Many of these water bodies are eutrophic. Nutrients present in these water bodies can be potentially used to culture aquatic plants as a possible feedstock for methane production. This paper summarizes the results of known research findings on biomass production potential of freshwater aquatic plants in Florida and identifies key research needs to improve the quality and quantity of biomass yields. Among floating aquatic plants, biomass yield potential was in the order of water-hyacinth > water lettuce > pennywort > salvinia > duckweed > azolla. Pennywort, duckweed, and azolla appear to perform well during the cooler months compared to other aquatic plants. Among emergent plants, biomass yield potential was in the order of southern wild rice > cattails > soft rush > bulrush. Cultural techniques, nutrient management, and environmental factors influencing the biomass yields were discussed. 68 references.

  19. IMPROVING BIOMASS LOGISTICS COST WITHIN AGRONOMIC SUSTAINABILITY CONSTRAINTS AND BIOMASS QUALITY TARGETS

    SciTech Connect

    J. Richard Hess; Kevin L. Kenney; Christopher T. Wright; David J. Muth; William Smith

    2012-10-01

    Equipment manufacturers have made rapid improvements in biomass harvesting and handling equipment. These improvements have increased transportation and handling efficiencies due to higher biomass densities and reduced losses. Improvements in grinder efficiencies and capacity have reduced biomass grinding costs. Biomass collection efficiencies (the ratio of biomass collected to the amount available in the field) as high as 75% for crop residues and greater than 90% for perennial energy crops have also been demonstrated. However, as collection rates increase, the fraction of entrained soil in the biomass increases, and high biomass residue removal rates can violate agronomic sustainability limits. Advancements in quantifying multi-factor sustainability limits to increase removal rate as guided by sustainable residue removal plans, and mitigating soil contamination through targeted removal rates based on soil type and residue type/fraction is allowing the use of new high efficiency harvesting equipment and methods. As another consideration, single pass harvesting and other technologies that improve harvesting costs cause biomass storage moisture management challenges, which challenges are further perturbed by annual variability in biomass moisture content. Monitoring, sampling, simulation, and analysis provide basis for moisture, time, and quality relationships in storage, which has allowed the development of moisture tolerant storage systems and best management processes that combine moisture content and time to accommodate baled storage of wet material based upon “shelf-life.” The key to improving biomass supply logistics costs has been developing the associated agronomic sustainability and biomass quality technologies and processes that allow the implementation of equipment engineering solutions.

  20. Biomass in Serbia - potential of beech forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasanac-Bosanac, Lj.; Cirkovic-Mitrovic, T.; Popovic, V.; Jokanovic, D.

    2012-04-01

    As for the renewable sources for energy production, biomass from forests and wood processing industry comes to the second place. The woody biomass accounts for 1.0 Mtoe, that is equivalent with 1.0 Mtoe of oil. Due to current evaluations, the greatest part of woody biomass would be used for briquettes and pallets production. As the biomass from forests is increasingly becoming the interest of national and international market, a detailed research on overall potential of woody supply from Serbian forests is required. Beech forests account for 29.4 % of forest cover of Serbia. They also have the greatest standing volume (42.4 % of the overall standing volume) and the greatest mean annual increment (32.3 %)(Bankovic,et.al.2009). Herewith, the aim of this poster is to determine the long-term biomass production of these forests.For this purpose a management unit called Lomnicka reka has been chosen. As these beech forests have similar structural development, this location is considered representative for whole Serbia. DBH of all trees were measured with clipper and the accuracy of 0.01 mm, and the heights with a Vertex 3 device (with accuracy of 0.1 m). All measurements were performed on the fields each 500 m2 (square meters). The overall quantity of root biomass was calculated using the allometric equations. The poster shows estimated biomass stocks of beech forests located in Rasina area. Dates are evaluated using non-linear regression (Wutzler,T.et.al.2008). Biomass potential of Serbian beech forests will enable the evaluation of long-term potential of energy generation from woody biomass in agreement with principles of sustainable forest management. The biomass from such beech forests can represent an important substitution for energy production from fossil fuels (e.g. oil) and herewith decrease the CO2 emissions.

  1. Driftless Area Initiative Biomass Energy Project

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Angie; Bertjens, Steve; Lieurance, Mike; Berguson, Bill; Buchman, Dan

    2012-12-31

    The Driftless Area Initiative Biomass Energy Project evaluated the potential for biomass energy production and utilization throughout the Driftless Region of Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconsin. The research and demonstration aspect of the project specifically focused on biomass energy feedstock availability and production potential in the region, as well as utilization potential of biomass feedstocks for heat, electrical energy production, or combined heat and power operations. The Driftless Region was evaluated because the topography of the area offers more acres of marginal soils on steep slopes, wooded areas, and riparian corridors than the surrounding “Corn Belt”. These regional land characteristics were identified as potentially providing opportunity for biomass feedstock production that could compete with traditional agriculture commodity crops economically. The project researched establishment methods and costs for growing switchgrass on marginal agricultural lands to determine the economic and quantitative feasibility of switchgrass production for biomass energy purposes. The project was successful in identifying the best management and establishment practices for switchgrass in the Driftless Area, but also demonstrated that simple economic payback versus commodity crops could not be achieved at the time of the research. The project also analyzed the availability of woody biomass and production potential for growing woody biomass for large scale biomass energy production in the Driftless Area. Analysis determined that significant resources exist, but costs to harvest and deliver to the site were roughly 60% greater than that of natural gas at the time of the study. The project contributed significantly to identifying both production potential of biomass energy crops and existing feedstock availability in the Driftless Area. The project also analyzed the economic feasibility of dedicated energy crops in the Driftless Area. High commodity crop prices

  2. The cause of Barents Sea biomass dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yndestad, Harald

    2004-01-01

    The fluctuations of the biomasses in the Barents Sea have been poorly understood and caused problems in biomass management. Better long-term forecasting is thus crucial for an economical and sustainable utilization of the biomass. The present paper presents a wavelet analysis of the Kola temperature series and the biomass time series of Barents Sea Shrimp ( Pandalus borealis), Barents Sea capelin ( Mallotus villosus), Norwegian spring spawning herring ( Clupea harengus), Northeast Arctic cod ( Gadus morhua), and Northeast Arctic haddock ( Melanogrammus aeglefinus). The wavelet shows a close relation between the 18.6-year lunar nodal tide and dominant temperature cycles in the Kola temperature series. It also shows that all biomass time series are correlated to dominant cycles of 18.6/3=6.2, 18.6 and 3∗18.6=55.8 years in the Kola section. This indicates that fluctuations of the temperature and the biomass in the Barents Sea are a deterministic process caused by the lunar nodal cycle. The close relation to the stationary 18.6-year lunar tide opens new possibilities for better forecasting and long-term management. The deterministic relation between biomass growth and the Kola cycles opens a possibility of more optimal management in short-term periods of 6 years, medium-term management of 18 years and long-term management of 55-75 years. The stationary biomass cycles can be represented by a simple phase-clock which indicates the current state of the biomass. This method represents a new possibility of long-term biomass forecasting.

  3. Difficulties of biomass estimation over natural grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, Péter; Gecse, Bernadett; Pintér, Krisztina; Fóti, Szilvia; Nagy, Zoltán

    2017-04-01

    Estimation of biomass amount in grasslands using remote sensing is a challenge due to the high diversity and different phenologies of the constituting plant species. The aim of this study was to estimate the biomass amount (dry weight per area) during the vegetation period of a diverse semi-natural grassland with remote sensing. A multispectral camera (Tetracam Mini-MCA 6) was used with 3 cm ground resolution. The pre-processing method includes noise reduction, the correction for the vignetting effect and the calculation of the reflectance using an Incident Light Sensor (ILS). Calibration was made with ASD spectrophotometer as reference. To estimate biomass Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR) statistical method was used with 5 bands and NDVI as input variables. Above ground biomass was cut in 15 quadrats (50×50 cm) as reference. The best prediction was attained in spring (r2=0.94, RMSE: 26.37 g m-2). The average biomass amount was 167 g m-2. The variability of the biomass is mainly determined by the relief, which causes the high and low biomass patches to be stable. The reliability of biomass estimation was negatively affected by the appearance of flowers and by the senescent plant parts during the summer. To determine the effects of flower's presence on the biomass estimation, 20 dominant species with visually dominant flowers in the area were selected and cover of flowers (%) were estimated in permanent plots during measurement campaigns. If the cover of flowers was low (<25%), the biomass amount estimation was successful (r2 >0,9), while at higher cover of flowers (>30%), the estimation failed (r2 <0,2). This effect restricts the usage of the remote sensing method to the spring - early summer period in diverse grasslands.

  4. High-Speed Pipeline Revs Up Biomass Analysis (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed a new biomass evaluation process that opens up research avenues into understanding and manipulating biomass recalcitrance.

  5. Simulation of Biomass Accumulation Pattern in Vapor-Phase Biofilters

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Jin-Ying; Hu, Hong-Ying; Zhang, Xian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Existence of inert biomass and its impact on biomass accumulation patterns and biofilter performance were investigated. Four biofilters were set up in parallel to treat gaseous toluene. Each biofilter operated under different inlet toluene loadings for 100 days. Two microbial growth models, one with an inert biomass assumption and the other without, were established and compared. Results from the model with the inert biomass assumption showed better agreement with the experimental data than those based on the model without the inert biomass assumption thus verifying that inert biomass accumulation cannot be ignored in the long-term operation of biofilters. According to the model with an inert biomass assumption, the ratio of active biomass to total biomass will decrease and the inert biomass will become dominant in total biomass after a period of time. Filter bed structure simulation results showed that the void fraction is more sensitive to biomass accumulation than the specific surface area. The final void fraction of the biofilters with the highest inlet toluene loading is only 67% of its initial level while the final specific surface area is 82%. Identification and quantification of inert biomass will give a better understanding of biomass accumulation in biofilters and will result in a more exact simulation of biomass change during long-term operations. Results also indicate that an ideal biomass control technique should be able to remove most inert biomass while simultaneously preserving as much active biomass as possible. PMID:22693411

  6. Static viscoelasticity of biomass polyethylene composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Keyan; Cai, Hongzhen; Yi, Weiming; Zhang, Qingfa; Zhao, Kunpeng

    The biomass polyethylene composites filled with poplar wood flour, rice husk, cotton stalk or corn stalk were prepared by extrusion molding. The static viscoelasticity of composites was investigated by the dynamic thermal mechanical analyzer (DMA). Through the stress-strain scanning, it is found that the linear viscoelasticity interval of composites gradually decreases as the temperature rises, and the critical stress and strain values are 0.8 MPa and 0.03% respectively. The experiment shows that as the temperature rises, the creep compliance of biomass polyethylene composites is increased; under the constant temperature, the creep compliance decreases with the increase of content of biomass and calcium carbonate. The biomass and calcium carbonate used to prepare composites as filler can improve damping vibration attenuation and reduce stress deformation of composites. The stress relaxation modulus of composites is reduced and the relaxation rate increases at the higher temperature. The biomass and calcium carbonate used to prepare composites as filler not only can reduce costs, but also can increase stress relaxation modulus and improve the size thermostability of composites. The corn stalk is a good kind of biomass raw material for composites since it can improve the creep resistance property and the stress relaxation resistance property of composites more effectively than other three kinds of biomass (poplar wood flour, rice husk and cotton stalk).

  7. Development of a bench scale biomass torrefier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Ja'afar, M. N.; Abd Rahman, A.; Shamsuddin, A. H.

    2013-06-01

    Cofiring biomass with coal has become very popular with power utilities to reduce fossil fuel carbon dioxide (CO2) emission. It is relatively easy to implement on most common pulverised coal plants. However, raw biomass is difficult to utilise and requires upgrading to a higher quality fuel to substitute coal. Upgrading by torrefaction can improve the properties of biomass close to low rank coals suitable for cofiring. In this study, a bench scale torrefier was developed to produce torrefied biomass samples for further studies of its properties and combustion behaviour. The torrefier was developed from a domestic 1600W electric oven. Biomass pellets was then torrefied at 250 °C for 1 hour using this torrefier. Proximate analysis and gross calorific value (GCV) of the torrefied biomass were carried out. The results showed that GCV of the torrefied biomass had increased when compared to raw. The moisture content and volatile matter had decreased, and ash content and fixed carbon had increased as expected.

  8. Organic Solvent Effects in Biomass Conversion Reactions.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Li; Luterbacher, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Transforming lignocellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals has been intensely studied in recent years. A large amount of work has been dedicated to finding suitable solvent systems, which can improve the transformation of biomass into value-added chemicals. These efforts have been undertaken based on numerous research results that have shown that organic solvents can improve both conversion and selectivity of biomass to platform molecules. We present an overview of these organic solvent effects, which are harnessed in biomass conversion processes, including conversion of biomass to sugars, conversion of sugars to furanic compounds, and production of lignin monomers. A special emphasis is placed on comparing the solvent effects on conversion and product selectivity in water with those in organic solvents while discussing the origins of the differences that arise. We have categorized results as benefiting from two major types of effects: solvent effects on solubility of biomass components including cellulose and lignin and solvent effects on chemical thermodynamics including those affecting reactants, intermediates, products, and/or catalysts. Finally, the challenges of using organic solvents in industrial processes are discussed from the perspective of solvent cost, solvent stability, and solvent safety. We suggest that a holistic view of solvent effects, the mechanistic elucidation of these effects, and the careful consideration of the challenges associated with solvent use could assist researchers in choosing and designing improved solvent systems for targeted biomass conversion processes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Comparison of biomass and coal char reactivities

    SciTech Connect

    Huey, S.P.; Davis, K.A.; Hurt, R.H.; Wornat, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    Char combustion is typically the rate limiting step during the combustion of solid fuels. The magnitude and variation of char reactivity during combustion are, therefore, of primary concern when comparing solid fuels such as coal and biomass. In an effort to evaluate biomass potential as a sustainable and renewable energy source, the change in reactivities with the extent of burnout of both biomass and coal chars were compared using Sandia`s Captive Particle Imaging (CPI) apparatus. This paper summarizes the experimental approach used to examine biomass and coal char reactivities and extinction behaviors and presents results from CPI experiments. The reactivity as a function of extent of burnout for six types of char particles, two high-rank coal chars, two low-rank coal chars, and two biomass chars, was investigated using the CPI apparatus. Results indicate that both of the high-rank coal chars have relatively low reactivities when compared with the higher reactivities measured for the low-rank coal and the biomass chars. In addition, extinction behavior of the chars support related investigations that suggest carbonaceous structural ordering is an important consideration in understanding particle reactivity as a function of extent of burnout. High-rank coal chars were found to have highly ordered carbon structures, where as, both low-rank coal and biomass chars were found to have highly disordered carbon structures.

  10. Electricity from biomass: A development strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-04-01

    The purpose of this document is to review the current status of biomass power technology and to evaluate the future directions for development that could significantly enhance the contribution of biomass power to U.S. production of electricity. This document reviews the basic principles of biomass electric systems, the previous contributions of industry and the National Biomass Energy Programs to technology development, and the options for future technology development. It discusses the market for biomass electric technology and future needs for electric power production to help establish a market-oriented development strategy. It projects trends in the performance and cost of the technology and examines the changing dynamics of the power generation market place to evaluate specific opportunities for biomass power development. In a separate document, the Biomass Power Program Five Year R&D Plan, the details of schedules, funding, and roles of participating R&D organizations within the R&D program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are presented. In evaluating the future directions for research and development, two cases are examined.

  11. Preprocessing Moist Lignocellulosic Biomass for Biorefinery Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Neal Yancey; Christopher T. Wright; Craig Conner; J. Richard Hess

    2009-06-01

    Biomass preprocessing is one of the primary operations in the feedstock assembly system of a lignocellulosic biorefinery. Preprocessing is generally accomplished using industrial grinders to format biomass materials into a suitable biorefinery feedstock for conversion to ethanol and other bioproducts. Many factors affect machine efficiency and the physical characteristics of preprocessed biomass. For example, moisture content of the biomass as received from the point of production has a significant impact on overall system efficiency and can significantly affect the characteristics (particle size distribution, flowability, storability, etc.) of the size-reduced biomass. Many different grinder configurations are available on the market, each with advantages under specific conditions. Ultimately, the capacity and/or efficiency of the grinding process can be enhanced by selecting the grinder configuration that optimizes grinder performance based on moisture content and screen size. This paper discusses the relationships of biomass moisture with respect to preprocessing system performance and product physical characteristics and compares data obtained on corn stover, switchgrass, and wheat straw as model feedstocks during Vermeer HG 200 grinder testing. During the tests, grinder screen configuration and biomass moisture content were varied and tested to provide a better understanding of their relative impact on machine performance and the resulting feedstock physical characteristics and uniformity relative to each crop tested.

  12. The regional environmental impact of biomass production

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, R.L.

    1994-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a broad overview of the potential environmental impacts of biomass energy from energy crops. The subject is complex because the environmental impact of using biomass for energy must be considered in the context of alternative energy options while the environmental impact of producing biomass from energy crops must be considered in the context of the alternative land-uses. Using biomass-derived energy can reduce greenhouse gas emissions or increase them; growing biomass energy crops can enhance soil fertility or degrade it. Without knowing the context of the biomass energy, one can say little about its specific environmental impacts. The primary focus of this paper is an evaluation of the environmental impacts of growing energy crops. I present an approach for quantitatively evaluating the potential environmental impact of growing energy crops at a regional scale that accounts for the environmental and economic context of the crops. However, to set the stage for this discussion, I begin by comparing the environmental advantages and disadvantages of biomass-derived energy relative to other energy alternatives such as coal, hydropower, nuclear power, oil/gasoline, natural gas and photovoltaics.

  13. Estimation of liquid fuel yields from biomass.

    PubMed

    Singh, Navneet R; Delgass, W Nicholas; Ribeiro, Fabio H; Agrawal, Rakesh

    2010-07-01

    We have estimated sun-to-fuel yields for the cases when dedicated fuel crops are grown and harvested to produce liquid fuel. The stand-alone biomass to liquid fuel processes, that use biomass as the main source of energy, are estimated to produce one-and-one-half to three times less sun-to-fuel yield than the augmented processes. In an augmented process, solar energy from a fraction of the available land area is used to produce other forms of energy such as H(2), heat etc., which are then used to increase biomass carbon recovery in the conversion process. However, even at the highest biomass growth rate of 6.25 kg/m(2).y considered in this study, the much improved augmented processes are estimated to have sun-to-fuel yield of about 2%. We also propose a novel stand-alone H(2)Bioil-B process, where a portion of the biomass is gasified to provide H(2) for the fast-hydropyrolysis/hydrodeoxygenation of the remaining biomass. This process is estimated to be able to produce 125-146 ethanol gallon equivalents (ege)/ton of biomass of high energy density oil but needs experimental development. The augmented version of fast-hydropyrolysis/hydrodeoxygenation, where H(2) is generated from a nonbiomass energy source, is estimated to provide liquid fuel yields as high as 215 ege/ton of biomass. These estimated yields provide reasonable targets for the development of efficient biomass conversion processes to provide liquid fuel for a sustainable transport sector.

  14. EERC Center for Biomass Utilization 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Zygarlicke, C J; Schmidt, D D; Olson, E S; Leroux, K M; Wocken, C A; Aulich, T A; WIlliams, K D

    2008-07-28

    Biomass utilization is one solution to our nation’s addiction to oil and fossil fuels. What is needed now is applied fundamental research that will cause economic technology development for the utilization of the diverse biomass resources in the United States. This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) applied fundamental research project contributes to the development of economical biomass utilization for energy, transportation fuels, and marketable chemicals using biorefinery methods that include thermochemical and fermentation processes. The fundamental and basic applied research supports the broad scientific objectives of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Biomass Program, especially in the area of developing alternative renewable biofuels, sustainable bioenergy, technologies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and environmental remediation. Its deliverables include 1) identifying and understanding environmental consequences of energy production from biomass, including the impacts on greenhouse gas production, carbon emission abatement, and utilization of waste biomass residues and 2) developing biology-based solutions that address DOE and national needs related to waste cleanup, hydrogen production from renewable biomass, biological and chemical processes for energy and fuel production, and environmental stewardship. This project serves the public purpose of encouraging good environmental stewardship by developing biomass-refining technologies that can dramatically increase domestic energy production to counter current trends of rising dependence upon petroleum imports. Decreasing the nation’s reliance on foreign oil and energy will enhance national security, the economy of rural communities, and future competitiveness. Although renewable energy has many forms, such as wind and solar, biomass is the only renewable energy source that can be governed through agricultural methods and that has an energy density that can realistically compete with

  15. NO reduction in decoupling combustion of biomass and biomass-coal blend

    SciTech Connect

    Li Dong; Shiqiu Gao; Wenli Song; Jinghai Li; Guangwen Xu

    2009-01-15

    Biomass is a form of energy that is CO{sub 2}-neutral. However, NOx emissions in biomass combustion are often more than that of coal on equal heating-value basis. In this study, a technology called decoupling combustion was investigated to demonstrate how it reduces NO emissions in biomass and biomass-coal blend combustion. The decoupling combustion refers to a two-step combustion method, in which fuel pyrolysis and the burning of char and pyrolysis gas are separated and the gas burns out during its passage through the burning-char bed. Tests in a quartz dual-bed reactor demonstrated that, in decoupling combustion, NO emissions from biomass and biomass-coal blends were both less than those in traditional combustion and that NO emission from combustion of blends of biomass and coal decreased with increasing biomass percentage in the blend. Co-firing rice husk and coal in a 10 kW stove manufactured according to the decoupling combustion technology further confirmed that the decoupling combustion technology allows for truly low NO emission as well as high efficiency for burning biomass and biomass-coal blends, even in small-scale stoves and boilers. 22 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Engineering verification of the biomass production chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, R. P.; Knott, W. M., III; Sager, J. C.; Jones, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    The requirements for life support systems, both biological and physical-chemical, for long-term human attended space missions are under serious study throughout NASA. The KSC 'breadboard' project has focused on biomass production using higher plants for atmospheric regeneration and food production in a special biomass production chamber. This chamber is designed to provide information on food crop growth rate, contaminants in the chamber that alter plant growth requirements for atmospheric regeneration, carbon dioxide consumption, oxygen production, and water utilization. The shape and size, mass, and energy requirements in relation to the overall integrity of the biomass production chamber are under constant study.

  17. [Low temperature plasma technology for biomass refinery].

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaoguo; Chen, Hongzhang

    2014-05-01

    Biorefinery that utilizes renewable biomass for production of fuels, chemicals and bio-materials has become more and more important in chemical industry. Recently, steam explosion technology, acid and alkali treatment are the main biorefinery treatment technologies. Meanwhile, low temperature plasma technology has attracted extensive attention in biomass refining process due to its unique chemical activity and high energy. We systemically summarize the research progress of low temperature plasma technology for pretreatment, sugar platflow, selective modification, liquefaction and gasification in biomass refinery. Moreover, the mechanism of low temperature plasma in biorefinery and its further development were also discussed.

  18. Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Strategy Workshop Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-07-01

    This report is based on the proceedings of the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Strategy Workshop. The workshop, held March 20–21, 2014, in Golden, Colorado, discussed and detailed the research and development needs for biomass indirect liquefaction. Discussions focused on pathways that convert biomass-based syngas (or any carbon monoxide, hydrogen gaseous stream) to liquid intermediates (alcohols or acids) and further synthesize those intermediates to liquid hydrocarbons that are compatible as either a refinery feed or neat fuel.

  19. Fuels from biomass. Technology and feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.S. .

    1980-01-01

    This book for engineers, research workers and managers is concerned with decreasing conventional fuel consumption and increasing the use of synthetic fuels. There are 10 chapters: Sources of biomass - wastes and residues (including forestry residues); Sources of biomass - energy farms (including silviculture and aquaculture); Thermal conversion methods; Primary biochemical conversions (production of methane and glucose); Secondary conversion processes (methanol, hydrocarbons, ammonia, ethanol etc.); Case studies and economics - describing pyrolysis methods, production of methane by anaerobic fermentation, and biomass sources (3 chapters); Market penetration analysis; and Environmental impacts. Extensive illustrative data is a list of sourand a listes.

  20. Putney Basketville Site Biomass CHP Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hunsberger, Randolph; Mosey, Gail

    2013-10-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response Center for Program Analysis developed the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to reuse contaminated sites for renewable energy generation when aligned with the community's vision for the site. The Putney, Vermont, Basketville site, formerly the location of a basket-making facility and a paper mill andwoolen mill, was selected for a feasibility study under the program. Biomass was chosen as the renewable energy resource based on abundant woody-biomass resources available in the area. Biomass combined heat and power (CHP) was selected as the technology due to nearby loads, including Putney Paper and Landmark College.

  1. Studies of biomass fuelled MCFC systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivisaari, Timo; Björnbom, Pehr; Sylwan, Christopher

    In the present work, the methods, techniques and results obtained during the studies of biomass fuelled molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) systems within the Swedish national fuel cell program are presented. The power plants are 60 MW class, utilising biomass (i.e. wood chips) as the primary fuel. The biomass is converted via pressurised gasification into a gaseous form that, after subsequent cleaning, can be used in the fuel cells. An investigation of the effects of gasification pressure, temperature and the influence of internal reforming on the overall system performance is presented. All studies were carried out using the Aspen Plus™ with Model Manager™ simulation package.

  2. Renewable energy: ethanol from biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, J.T.; NeSmith, C.C.

    1985-08-01

    Information is provided on the current status of renewable energy in Florida. Florida can expect continued increases in the use of ethanol for blends of unleaded gasoline. The sales for 1984 represent about 10% of Florida gasoline consumption. Federal and state tax incentives and other financial assistance are in place to encourage the development and growth of the fuel ethanol industry in Florida. However, it is not expected that Florida will become a major force in the production of ethanol in the short term. All existing commercial ethanol producing facilities employ established fermentation processes that utilize grain or molasses for the most part as feedstocks. Florida is not a large grain producing state and there is not a sufficient supply of molasses to support large scale ethanol production. The use of these feedstocks for Florida ethanol producing facilities is not competitive with the Mid-West grain areas, for example. Research has shown that much of the abundant biomass materials naturally or commercially grown in Florida can be converted to alcohol, but commercial scale facilities have not yet been built. To attract investment money, the non-commercial fermentation technology must progress beyond the laboratory stage and reach a proven and tested pilot plant stage. If the pilot stage indicates a full scale plant will be economical, then the next step is commercialization. 23 refs.

  3. Biomass production from inland brines

    SciTech Connect

    Reach, C.D. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of utilizing inland saline waters to produce biomass through the application of marine aquaculture was investigated. From available data, the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum and the crustacea Artemia salina were selected as the experimental marine organisms. The proposed diatom served to establish primary productivity and concurrently provide a food source for the herbivorus crustacea. The objective of the first phase research was to investigate the ability of P. tricornutum and A. salina to survive in the inland saline environment. Clarified activated sludge and anaerobic digester effluents were evaluated as nutrient sources for the diatom cultures. Experimental results indicated that diatom and crustacea growth in the inland brine was equivalent to control cultures utilizing seawater. Wastewater effluents were successful as nutrient sources for the diatom cultures. Bioassay experiments conducted with petroleum related brines yielded mixed results respect to the survival and growth of the P. tricornutum and A. salina organisms. A second series of experiments involved cholornaphthalene, chlorophenanthene, and chlorophenanthrene, and chloroanthracene as the experimental hydrocarbons. Results of the diatom studies show chloroanthracene to induce toxic effects at a concentration of 500 ug/L. Artemia studies showed no acutely toxic effects relative to the test hydrocarbons at 50 and 100 ug/L.

  4. RCN1-regulated phosphatase activity and EIN2 modulate hypocotyl gravitropism by a mechanism that does not require ethylene signaling.

    PubMed

    Muday, Gloria K; Brady, Shari R; Argueso, Cristiana; Deruère, Jean; Kieber, Joseph J; DeLong, Alison

    2006-08-01

    The roots curl in naphthylphthalamic acid1 (rcn1) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) has altered auxin transport, gravitropism, and ethylene response, providing an opportunity to analyze the interplay between ethylene and auxin in control of seedling growth. Roots of rcn1 seedlings were previously shown to have altered auxin transport, growth, and gravitropism, while rcn1 hypocotyl elongation exhibited enhanced ethylene response. We have characterized auxin transport and gravitropism phenotypes of rcn1 hypocotyls and have explored the roles of auxin and ethylene in controlling these phenotypes. As in roots, auxin transport is increased in etiolated rcn1 hypocotyls. Hypocotyl gravity response is accelerated, although overall elongation is reduced, in etiolated rcn1 hypocotyls. Etiolated, but not light grown, rcn1 seedlings also overproduce ethylene, and mutations conferring ethylene insensitivity restore normal hypocotyl elongation to rcn1. Auxin transport is unaffected by treatment with the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane carboxylic acid in etiolated hypocotyls of wild-type and rcn1 seedlings. Surprisingly, the ethylene insensitive2-1 (ein2-1) and ein2-5 mutations dramatically reduce gravitropic bending in hypocotyls. However, the ethylene resistant1-3 (etr1-3) mutation does not significantly affect hypocotyl gravity response. Furthermore, neither the etr1 nor the ein2 mutation abrogates the accelerated gravitropism observed in rcn1 hypocotyls, indicating that both wild-type gravity response and enhanced gravity response in rcn1 do not require an intact ethylene-signaling pathway. We therefore conclude that the RCN1 protein affects overall hypocotyl elongation via negative regulation of ethylene synthesis in etiolated seedlings, and that RCN1 and EIN2 modulate hypocotyl gravitropism and ethylene responses through independent pathways.

  5. Activation of HLS1 by Mechanical Stress via Ethylene-Stabilized EIN3 Is Crucial for Seedling Soil Emergence

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xing; Li, Yanli; Pan, Ying; Zhong, Shangwei

    2016-01-01

    The seeds of terrestrial flowering plants often start their life cycle in subterranean darkness. To protect the fragile apical meristematic tissues and cotyledons from mechanical injuries during soil penetration, dicotyledonous seedlings form an elegant apical hook at the top of the hypocotyl. The apical hook has been considered as an adaption structure to the subterranean environment. However, the role of the apical hook in seedling emergence and the molecular mechanism of apical hook formation under real-life conditions remain highly speculative. Here, we find that HOOKLESS 1 (HLS1), a critical gene in apical hook formation in Arabidopsis thaliana, is required for seedling emergence from the soil. When grown under soil, hls1 mutant exhibits severe emergence defects. By contrast, HLS1 overexpression in the hls1 background fully restores emergence defects and displays better emergence capacity than that of WT. Our results indicate that HLS1 transcription is stimulated in response to the mechanical stress of soil cover, which is dependent on the function of the transcription factors ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE 3 (EIN3) and EIN3-LIKE 1 (EIL1). Soil-conferred mechanical stress activates the ethylene signaling pathway to stabilize EIN3 by repressing the activity of the F-box proteins EBF1 and EBF2. These combined results reveal a signaling pathway in which plant seedlings transduce the mechanical pressure of soil cover to correctly modulate apical hook formation during soil emergence. PMID:27822221

  6. Activation of HLS1 by Mechanical Stress via Ethylene-Stabilized EIN3 Is Crucial for Seedling Soil Emergence.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xing; Li, Yanli; Pan, Ying; Zhong, Shangwei

    2016-01-01

    The seeds of terrestrial flowering plants often start their life cycle in subterranean darkness. To protect the fragile apical meristematic tissues and cotyledons from mechanical injuries during soil penetration, dicotyledonous seedlings form an elegant apical hook at the top of the hypocotyl. The apical hook has been considered as an adaption structure to the subterranean environment. However, the role of the apical hook in seedling emergence and the molecular mechanism of apical hook formation under real-life conditions remain highly speculative. Here, we find that HOOKLESS 1 (HLS1), a critical gene in apical hook formation in Arabidopsis thaliana, is required for seedling emergence from the soil. When grown under soil, hls1 mutant exhibits severe emergence defects. By contrast, HLS1 overexpression in the hls1 background fully restores emergence defects and displays better emergence capacity than that of WT. Our results indicate that HLS1 transcription is stimulated in response to the mechanical stress of soil cover, which is dependent on the function of the transcription factors ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE 3 (EIN3) and EIN3-LIKE 1 (EIL1). Soil-conferred mechanical stress activates the ethylene signaling pathway to stabilize EIN3 by repressing the activity of the F-box proteins EBF1 and EBF2. These combined results reveal a signaling pathway in which plant seedlings transduce the mechanical pressure of soil cover to correctly modulate apical hook formation during soil emergence.

  7. The woody biomass resource of Tennessee, 1989

    Treesearch

    James F. Rosson

    1993-01-01

    Tabulates fresh and dry biomass estimates of major trees in Tennessee by forest type, ownership, species, stand basal area, tree class, diameter, and height. Information is presented for total tree, stem, and crown components.

  8. Protein measurements of microalgal and cyanobacterial biomass.

    PubMed

    López, Cynthia Victoria González; García, María del Carmen Cerón; Fernández, Francisco Gabriel Acién; Bustos, Cristina Segovia; Chisti, Yusuf; Sevilla, José María Fernández

    2010-10-01

    The protein content of dry biomass of the microalgae Porphyridium cruentum, Scenedesmus almeriensis, and Muriellopsis sp. and of the cyanobacteria Synechocystis aquatilis and Arthrospira platensis was measured by the Lowry method following disruption of the cells by milling with inert ceramic particles. The measurements were compared with the Kjeldahl method and by elemental analysis. The nitrogen-to-protein conversion factors for biomass obtained from exponentially growing cells with a steady state doubling time of approximately 23 h were 5.95 for nitrogen measured by Kjeldahl and 4.44 for total nitrogen measured by elemental analysis. The protein content in dry biomass ranged from 30% to 55%. The above conversion factors are useful for estimating the protein content of microalgal biomass produced in rapid steady state growth as encountered in many commercial production processes.

  9. Biomass accessibility analysis using electron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkle, Jacob D.; Ciesielski, Peter N.; Gruchalla, Kenny; Munch, Kristin R.; Donohoe, Bryon S.

    2015-12-25

    Substrate accessibility to catalysts has been a dominant theme in theories of biomass deconstruction. Furthermore, current methods of quantifying accessibility do not elucidate mechanisms for increased accessibility due to changes in microstructure following pretreatment.

  10. 2011 Biomass Program Platform Peer Review. Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Lindauer, Alicia

    2012-02-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the 2011 U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program’s Infrastructure Platform Review meeting.

  11. Rangeland biomass estimation demonstration. [Texas Experimenta Ranch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, R. W. (Principal Investigator); Boyd, W. E.; Clark, B. V.

    1982-01-01

    Because of their sensitivity to chlorophyll density, green leaf density, and leaf water density, two hand-held radiometers which have sensor bands coinciding with thematic mapper bands 3, 4, and 5 were used to calibrate green biomass to LANDSAT spectral ratios as a step towards using portable radiometers to speed up ground data acquisition. Two field reflectance panels monitored incoming radiation concurrently with sampling. Software routines were developed and used to extract data from uncorrected tapes of MSS data provided in NASA LANDSAT universal format. A LANDSAT biomass calibration curve estimated the range biomass over a four scene area and displayed this information spatially as a product in a format of use to ranchers. The regional biomass contour map is discussed.

  12. Biomass in conifer plantations of northeastern Minnesota.

    Treesearch

    Lewis F. Ohmann

    1984-01-01

    Provides biomass (pounds/acre) estimates for vegetative strata and herb-low shrub species for 53 conifer plantations in Northeastern Minnesota. The estimates are analyzed by plantation age and silvicultural practices used to establish and release the plantations.

  13. 2011 Biomass Program Platform Peer Review: Feedstock

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, Laura

    2012-02-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the 2011 U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program’s Feedstock Platform Review meeting.

  14. Assessment of Biomass Resources in Afghanistan

    SciTech Connect

    Milbrandt, A.; Overend, R.

    2011-01-01

    Afghanistan is facing many challenges on its path of reconstruction and development. Among all its pressing needs, the country would benefit from the development and implementation of an energy strategy. In addition to conventional energy sources, the Afghan government is considering alternative options such as energy derived from renewable resources (wind, solar, biomass, geothermal). Biomass energy is derived from a variety of sources -- plant-based material and residues -- and can be used in various conversion processes to yield power, heat, steam, and fuel. This study provides policymakers and industry developers with information on the biomass resource potential in Afghanistan for power/heat generation and transportation fuels production. To achieve this goal, the study estimates the current biomass resources and evaluates the potential resources that could be used for energy purposes.

  15. 2011 Biomass Program Platform Peer Review: Algae

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Joyce

    2012-02-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the 2011 U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program’s Algae Platform Review meeting.

  16. CFD studies on biomass thermochemical conversion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiqun; Yan, Lifeng

    2008-06-01

    Thermochemical conversion of biomass offers an efficient and economically process to provide gaseous, liquid and solid fuels and prepare chemicals derived from biomass. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling applications on biomass thermochemical processes help to optimize the design and operation of thermochemical reactors. Recent progression in numerical techniques and computing efficacy has advanced CFD as a widely used approach to provide efficient design solutions in industry. This paper introduces the fundamentals involved in developing a CFD solution. Mathematical equations governing the fluid flow, heat and mass transfer and chemical reactions in thermochemical systems are described and sub-models for individual processes are presented. It provides a review of various applications of CFD in the biomass thermochemical process field.

  17. Energy biomass characteristics of chosen plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szyszlak-Bargłowicz, J.; Zając, G.; Piekarski, W.

    2012-04-01

    The chosen energy plants species: willow, mallow and Miscanthus are presented. Result of analysis of combustion heat and heating value of these species biomass indicate on possibility of their utilization as fuel for combustion and energy and heat production.

  18. Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification of Wet Biomass Feedstock

    SciTech Connect

    2006-04-01

    Industries and municipalities generate substantial amounts of biomass as high-moisture waste streams, such as animal manure, food processing sludge, stillage from ethanol production, and municipal wastewater sludge.

  19. CFD Studies on Biomass Thermochemical Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiqun; Yan, Lifeng

    2008-01-01

    Thermochemical conversion of biomass offers an efficient and economically process to provide gaseous, liquid and solid fuels and prepare chemicals derived from biomass. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling applications on biomass thermochemical processes help to optimize the design and operation of thermochemical reactors. Recent progression in numerical techniques and computing efficacy has advanced CFD as a widely used approach to provide efficient design solutions in industry. This paper introduces the fundamentals involved in developing a CFD solution. Mathematical equations governing the fluid flow, heat and mass transfer and chemical reactions in thermochemical systems are described and sub-models for individual processes are presented. It provides a review of various applications of CFD in the biomass thermochemical process field. PMID:19325848

  20. Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program: 1986 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Wood and crop residues constitute a vast majority of the biomass feedstocks available for conversion, and thermochemical processes are well suited for conversion of these materials. Thermochemical conversion processes can generate a variety of products such as gasoline hydrocarbon fuels, natural gas substitutes, or heat energy for electric power generation. The US Department of Energy is sponsoring research on biomass conversion technologies through its Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. Pacific Northwest Laboratory has been designated the Technical Field Management Office for the Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program with overall responsibility for the Program. This report briefly describes the Thermochemical Conversion Program structure and summarizes the activities and major accomplishments during fiscal year 1986. 88 refs., 31 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Biomass conversion inhibitors and in situ detoxification

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Inhibitory compounds derived from lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment are classified into aldehydes, ketones, organic acids, and phenols based on their chemical functional group that are toxic to fermentative microorganisms. Inhibitors and effects of inhibition to fermentative microbes vary depend...

  2. Understanding Ionic Liquid Pretreatment of Lignocellulosic Biomasses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pretreatment of biomass is essential for breaking apart highly ordered and crystalline plant cell walls and loosening the lignin and hemicellulose conjugation to cellulose microfibrills, thereby facilitating enzyme accessibility and adsorption and reducing costs of downstream saccharification proces...

  3. Biomass gasification: A demonstration in Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, P.

    1994-09-01

    Biomass Integrated Gasification-Gas Turbine (BIG-GT) cycles offer considerable opportunities for improved efficiency in biomass power systems. As a result of international collaboration, a full-scale plant in Brazil will be the first commercial scale demonstration plant to utilise this system. The project, if successful, will lead to the commercial development of highly efficient, relatively easily installed biomass energy plants. The global implications could be significant, with biomass possibly contributing to power supplies in a scale similar to nuclear and hydro by the mid 21st century. It could provide a basis for rural development and employment in developing countries, and utilization of excess crop land in the industrial world.

  4. 2011 Biomass Program Platform Peer Review: Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Haq, Zia

    2012-02-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the 2011 U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program’s Analysis Platform Review meeting.

  5. 2011 Biomass Program Platform Peer Review. Sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    Eng, Alison Goss

    2012-02-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the 2011 U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program’s Sustainability Platform Review meeting.

  6. Enzyme Systems of Anaerobes for Biomass Conversion.

    PubMed

    Munir, Riffat; Levin, David B

    Biofuels from abundantly available cellulosic biomass are an attractive alternative to current petroleum-based fuels (fossil fuels). Although several strategies exist for commercial production of biofuels, conversion of biomass to biofuels via consolidated bioprocessing offers the potential to reduce production costs and increase processing efficiencies. In consolidated bioprocessing (CBP), enzyme production, cellulose hydrolysis, and fermentation are all carried out in a single-step by microorganisms that efficiently employ a multitude of intricate enzymes which act synergistically to breakdown cellulose and its associated cell wall components. Various strategies employed by anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria for biomass hydrolysis are described in this chapter. In addition, the regulation of CAZymes, the role of "omics" technologies in assessing lignocellulolytic ability, and current strategies for improving biomass hydrolysis for optimum biofuel production are highlighted.

  7. Butanol production from renewable biomass by clostridia.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yu-Sin; Malaviya, Alok; Cho, Changhee; Lee, Joungmin; Lee, Sang Yup

    2012-11-01

    Global energy crisis and limited supply of petroleum fuels have rekindled the worldwide focus towards development of a sustainable technology for alternative fuel production. Utilization of abundant renewable biomass offers an excellent opportunity for the development of an economical biofuel production process at a scale sufficiently large to have an impact on sustainability and security objectives. Additionally, several environmental benefits have also been linked with the utilization of renewable biomass. Butanol is considered to be superior to ethanol due to its higher energy content and less hygroscopy. This has led to an increased research interest in butanol production from renewable biomass in recent years. In this paper, we review the various aspects of utilizing renewable biomass for clostridial butanol production. Focus is given on various alternative substrates that have been used for butanol production and on fermentation strategies recently reported to improve butanol production.

  8. Polyhydroxyalkanoate copolymers from forest biomass.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Thomas M; Nakas, James P; Tanenbaum, Stuart W

    2006-07-01

    The potential for the use of woody biomass in poly-beta-hydroxyalkanoate (PHA) biosynthesis is reviewed. Based on previously cited work indicating incorporation of xylose or levulinic acid (LA) into PHAs by several bacterial strains, we have initiated a study for exploring bioconversion of forest resources to technically relevant copolymers. Initially, PHA was synthesized in shake-flask cultures of Burkholderia cepacia grown on 2.2% (w/v) xylose, periodically amended with varying concentrations of levulinic acid [0.07-0.67% (w/v)]. Yields of poly(beta-hydroxybutyrate-co-beta-hydroxyvalerate) [P(3HB-co-3HV)] from 1.3 to 4.2 g/l were obtained and could be modulated to contain from 1.0 to 61 mol% 3-hydroxyvalerate (3HV), as determined by 1H and 13C NMR analyses. No evidence for either the 3HB or 4HV monomers was found. Characterization of these P(3HB-co-3HV) samples, which ranged in molecular mass (viscometric, Mv) from 511-919 kDa, by differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) provided data which were in agreement for previously reported P(3HB-co-3HV) copolymers. For these samples, it was noted that melting temperature (Tm) and glass transition temperature (Tg) decreased as a function of 3HVcontent, with Tm demonstrating a pseudoeutectic profile as a function of mol% 3HV content. In order to extend these findings to the use of hemicellulosic process streams as an inexpensive carbon source, a detoxification procedure involving sequential overliming and activated charcoal treatments was developed. Two such detoxified process hydrolysates (NREL CF: aspen and CESF: maple) were each fermented with appropriate LA supplementation. For the NREL CF hydrolysate-based cultures amended with 0.25-0.5% LA, P(3HB-co-3HV) yields, PHA contents (PHA as percent of dry biomass), and mol% 3HV compositions of 2.0 g/l, 40% (w/w), and 16-52 mol% were obtained, respectively. Similarly, the CESF hydrolysate-based shake-flask cultures yielded 1.6 g/l PHA, 39% (w

  9. Appendix B - GPRA06 biomass program documentation

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    This appendix discusses the assumptions and methods employed in the biomass benefits analysis that is part of the fiscal year 2006 GPRA benefits analysis for all of the Department of Energy’s Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) research and deployment programs. The biomass benefits analysis focuses on the benefits of future achievements by the program and excludes retrospective benefits and benefits resulting from industry’s own initiative and funding.

  10. Tax issues and incentives for biomass products

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, K.

    1995-11-01

    The more sophisticated developers of biomass projects figure out ways to structure their projects to take advantage of tax subsidies. The federal government offers at least eight tax subsidies for biomass. This is rather like building a house. One tries to design the house to build in as many of these features as possible. The more tax benefits that can be built into the ownership structure for a project, the less the project will cost at the end of the day.

  11. Direct conversion of algal biomass to biofuel

    DOEpatents

    Deng, Shuguang; Patil, Prafulla D; Gude, Veera Gnaneswar

    2014-10-14

    A method and system for providing direct conversion of algal biomass. Optionally, the method and system can be used to directly convert dry algal biomass to biodiesels under microwave irradiation by combining the reaction and combining steps. Alternatively, wet algae can be directly processed and converted to fatty acid methyl esters, which have the major components of biodiesels, by reacting with methanol at predetermined pressure and temperature ranges.

  12. Process for the treatment of lignocellulosic biomass

    DOEpatents

    Dale, Bruce E.

    2014-07-08

    A process for the treatment of biomass to render structural carbohydrates more accessible and/or digestible using concentrated ammonium hydroxide with or without anhydrous ammonia addition, is described. The process preferably uses steam to strip ammonia from the biomass for recycling. The process yields of monosaccharides from the structural carbohydrates are good, particularly as measured by the enzymatic hydrolysis of the structural carbohydrates. The monosaccharides are used as animal feeds and energy sources for ethanol production.

  13. Process for the treatment of lignocellulosic biomass

    DOEpatents

    Dale, Bruce E.; Lynd, Lee R.; Laser, Mark

    2013-03-12

    A process for the treatment of biomass to render structural carbohydrates more accessible and/or digestible using concentrated ammonium hydroxide with or without anhydrous ammonia addition, is described. The process preferably uses steam to strip ammonia from the biomass for recycling. The process yields of monosaccharides from the structural carbohydrates are good, particularly as measured by the enzymatic hydrolysis of the structural carbohydrates. The monosaccharides are used as animal feeds and energy sources for ethanol production.

  14. The woody biomass resource of Arkansas, 1988

    Treesearch

    James F. Rosson

    1993-01-01

    Data from the 1988 Arkansas forest survey were used to derive fresh and dry biomass estimates for all trees, on timberland, greater than 1.0 inch in diameter at breast height (d.b.h). There are 383.2 million fresh tons in softwood species and 939.7 million fresh tons in hardwood species. Most of this biomass is in the stem portion of the trees—85 percent for softwoods...

  15. Public communication in unplanned biomass burning events.

    PubMed

    Damon, Scott A; Naylor, Roger; Therriault, Shannon

    2010-02-01

    Public communication related to emergency, unplanned, or "wildfire" biomass burning is best understood as a function of the audience for that communication. Two enduring communication models, the Health Belief Model and the Stages of Change or Transtheoretical Model, are instructive in analyzing and preparing differing communication response strategies that are indicated for communities with varying degrees of experience in responding to unplanned biomass burning smoke events.

  16. Airflow resistance of selected biomass materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, S.C.; Sumner, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    Pressure drop created when air was forced through beds of selected biomass materials was determined. Materials tested included peanut hulls, peanut hull pellets, maize cobs, and wood shavings, chips and bark. The data were presented as logarithmic plots and equations of pressure drop versus airflow. The airflow resistances of the biomass materials increased with an increase in bulk density and were found to be in the range between values for ear and shelled maize. 12 references.

  17. Multiresource inventories: woody biomass in Virginia

    Treesearch

    Noel D. Cost

    1988-01-01

    Virginia's 25 .. 4 million acres of land area support 1.5 billion J tons of woody biomass. Of this total, 93 percent is on timberland, I 5 percent on reserved timberland and woodland areas, and 2 percent I on nonforest areas. Over the next two decades, more than 9 million I t tons of woody biomass could be harvested annually from timberland I I without adversely...

  18. Wood biomass: The potential of willow

    SciTech Connect

    White, E.H.; Abrahamson, L.P. . Coll. of Environmental Science and Forestry)

    1991-10-01

    Experiments were established in central New York State in spring, 1987, to evaluate the potential of Salix for wood biomass production using ultrashort-rotation intensive-culture techniques. Five selected willow clones and one hybrid poplar clone planted at 1 {times} 1 foot spacing were tested for biomass production with annual coppicing. This report presents results of this research as of December 31, 1990. (VC)

  19. Biomass reburning - Modeling/engineering studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sheldon, M.; Marquez, A.; Zamansky, V.

    2000-07-27

    This project is designed to develop engineering and modeling tools for a family of NO{sub x} control technologies utilizing biomass as a reburning fuel. During the eleventh reporting period (April 1--June 30, 2000), EER and NETL R&D group continued to work on Tasks 2, 3, 4, and 5. This report includes results from Task 3 physical modeling of the introduction of biomass reburning in a working coal-fired utility boiler.

  20. Closed photobioreactors for production of microalgal biomasses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bei; Lan, Christopher Q; Horsman, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Microalgal biomasses have been produced industrially for a long history for application in a variety of different fields. Most recently, microalgae are established as the most promising species for biofuel production and CO(2) bio-sequestration owing to their high photosynthesis efficiency. Nevertheless, design of photobioreactors that maximize solar energy capture and conversion has been one of the major challenges in commercial microalga biomass production. In this review, we systematically survey the recent developments in this field.

  1. EMERY BIOMASS GASIFICATION POWER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin Phillips; Scott Hassett; Harry Gatley

    2002-11-27

    Emery Recycling Corporation (now Emery Energy Company, LLC) evaluated the technical and economical feasibility of the Emery Biomass Gasification Power System (EBGPS). The gasifier technology is owned and being developed by Emery. The Emery Gasifier for this project was an oxygen-blown, pressurized, non-slagging gasification process that novelly integrates both fixed-bed and entrained-flow gasification processes into a single vessel. This unique internal geometry of the gasifier vessel will allow for tar and oil destruction within the gasifier. Additionally, the use of novel syngas cleaning processes using sorbents is proposed with the potential to displace traditional amine-based and other syngas cleaning processes. The work scope within this project included: one-dimensional gasifier modeling, overall plant process modeling (ASPEN), feedstock assessment, additional analyses on the proposed syngas cleaning process, plant cost estimating, and, market analysis to determine overall feasibility and applicability of the technology for further development and commercial deployment opportunities. Additionally, the project included the development of a detailed technology development roadmap necessary to commercialize the Emery Gasification technology. Process modeling was used to evaluate both combined cycle and solid oxide fuel cell power configurations. Ten (10) cases were evaluated in an ASPEN model wherein nine (9) cases were IGCC configurations with fuel-to-electricity efficiencies ranging from 38-42% and one (1) case was an IGFC solid oxide case where 53.5% overall plant efficiency was projected. The cost of electricity was determined to be very competitive at scales from 35-71 MWe. Market analysis of feedstock availability showed numerous market opportunities for commercial deployment of the technology with modular capabilities for various plant sizes based on feedstock availability and power demand.

  2. Biomass for thermochemical conversion: targets and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Tanger, Paul; Field, John L.; Jahn, Courtney E.; DeFoort, Morgan W.; Leach, Jan E.

    2013-01-01

    Bioenergy will be one component of a suite of alternatives to fossil fuels. Effective conversion of biomass to energy will require the careful pairing of advanced conversion technologies with biomass feedstocks optimized for the purpose. Lignocellulosic biomass can be converted to useful energy products via two distinct pathways: enzymatic or thermochemical conversion. The thermochemical pathways are reviewed and potential biotechnology or breeding targets to improve feedstocks for pyrolysis, gasification, and combustion are identified. Biomass traits influencing the effectiveness of the thermochemical process (cell wall composition, mineral and moisture content) differ from those important for enzymatic conversion and so properties are discussed in the language of biologists (biochemical analysis) as well as that of engineers (proximate and ultimate analysis). We discuss the genetic control, potential environmental influence, and consequences of modification of these traits. Improving feedstocks for thermochemical conversion can be accomplished by the optimization of lignin levels, and the reduction of ash and moisture content. We suggest that ultimate analysis and associated properties such as H:C, O:C, and heating value might be more amenable than traditional biochemical analysis to the high-throughput necessary for the phenotyping of large plant populations. Expanding our knowledge of these biomass traits will play a critical role in the utilization of biomass for energy production globally, and add to our understanding of how plants tailor their composition with their environment. PMID:23847629

  3. BARRIER ISSUES TO THE UTILIZATION OF BIOMASS

    SciTech Connect

    Jay R. Gunderson; Bruce C. Folkedahl; Darren D. Schmidt; Greg F. Weber; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    2002-05-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is conducting a project to examine the fundamental issues limiting the use of biomass in small industrial steam/power systems in order to increase the future use of this valuable domestic resource. Specifically, the EERC is attempting to elucidate the ash-related problems--grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling--associated with cofiring coal and biomass in grate-fired systems. Utilization of biomass in stoker boilers designed for coal can be a cause of concern for boiler operators. Boilers that were designed for low-volatile fuels with lower reactivities can experience damaging fouling when switched to higher-volatile and more reactive lower-rank fuels, such as when cofiring biomass. Higher heat release rates at the grate can cause more clinkering or slagging at the grate because of higher temperatures. Combustion and loss of volatile matter can start too early with biomass fuels compared to design fuel, vaporizing alkali and chlorides which then condense on rear walls and heat exchange tube banks in the convective pass of the boiler, causing noticeable increases in fouling. In addition, stoker-fired boilers that switch to biomass blends may encounter new chemical species such as potassium sulfates and various chlorides in combination with different flue gas temperatures because of changes in fuel heating value, which can adversely affect ash deposition behavior.

  4. Evaluation on Microalgae Biomass for Bioethanol Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chng, L. M.; Lee, K. T.; Chan, D. C. J.

    2017-06-01

    The depletion of energy resources has triggered worldwide concern for alternative sources, especially renewable energy. Microalgae biomass offers the most promising feedstock for renewable energy because of their impressive efficient growing characteristics and valuable composition. Simple cell structure of the microalgae would simplify the pretreatment technology thus increase the cost-effectiveness of biofuel production. Scenedesmus dimorphus is a carbohydrate-rich microalgae that has potential as biomass for bioethanol. The cultivation of Scenedesmus dimorphus under aeration of carbon dioxide enriched air resulted 1.47 g/L of dry biomass with composition of 12 w/w total lipid, 53.7 w/w carbohydrate and 17.4 protein. Prior to ethanolic fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, various pre-treatment methods were investigated to release and degrade the complex carbohydrate in cell biomass thus obtaining the maximal amount of digestible sugar for ethanolic yeast. In this study, sulfuric acid was used as hydrolysis agent while amyloglucosidase as enzymatic agent. Dried biomass via hydrothermal acidic hydrolysis yielded sugar which is about 89 of total carbohydrate at reaction temperature of 125 °C and acid concentration of 4 v/v. While combination of organosolv treatment (mixture of methanol and chloroform) with enzymatic hydrolysis yielded comparable amount of sugar with 0.568 g glucose/g treated-biomass. In this study, the significant information in pre-treatment process ensures the sustainability of the biofuel produced.

  5. Review: Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bin; Dai, Ziyu; Ding, Shi-You; Wyman, Charles E.

    2011-07-16

    Biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals offers the high yields to products vital to economic success and the potential for very low costs. Enzymatic hydrolysis that converts lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars may be the most complex step in this process due to substrate-related and enzyme-related effects and their interactions. Although enzymatic hydrolysis offers the potential for higher yields, higher selectivity, lower energy costs, and milder operating conditions than chemical processes, the mechanism of enzymatic hydrolysis and the relationship between the substrate structure and function of various glycosyl hydrolase components are not well understood. Consequently, limited success has been realized in maximizing sugar yields at very low cost. This review highlights literature on the impact of key substrate and enzyme features that influence performance to better understand fundamental strategies to advance enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass for biological conversion to fuels and chemicals. Topics are summarized from a practical point of view including characteristics of cellulose (e.g., crystallinity, degree of polymerization, and accessible surface area) and soluble and insoluble biomass components (e.g., oligomeric xylan, lignin, etc.) released in pretreatment, and their effects on the effectiveness of enzymatic hydrolysis. We further discuss the diversity, stability, and activity of individual enzymes and their synergistic effects in deconstructing complex lignocellulosic biomass. Advanced technologies to discover and characterize novel enzymes and to improve enzyme characteristics by mutagenesis, post-translational modification, and over-expression of selected enzymes and modifications in lignocellulosic biomass are also discussed.

  6. Miscanthus as cellulosic biomass for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wen-Chien; Kuan, Wei-Chih

    2015-06-01

    The members of the genus Miscanthus are potential feedstocks for biofuels because of the promising high yields of biomass per unit of planted area. This review addresses species, cultivation, and lignocellulose composition of Miscanthus, as well as pretreatment and enzyme saccharification of Miscanthus biomass for ethanol fermentation. The average cellulose contents in dried biomass of Miscanthus floridulus, Miscanthus sinensis, Miscanthus sacchariflorus, and Miscanthus × giganteus (M × G) are 37.2, 37.6, 38.9, and 41.1% wt/wt, respectively. A number of pretreatment methods have been applied in order to enhance digestibility of Miscanthus biomass for enzymatic saccharification. Pretreatment of Miscanthus using liquid hot water or alkaline results in a significant release of glucose; while glucose yields can be 90% or higher if a pretreatment like AFEX that combines both chemical and physical processes is used. As ethanol is produced by yeast fermentation of the hydrolysate from enzymatic hydrolysis of residual solids (pulp) after pretreatment, theoretical ethanol yields are 0.211-0.233 g/g-raw biomass if only cellulose is taken into account. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of pretreated M × G and M. lutarioriparius results in experimental ethanol yields of 0.13 and 0.15 g/g-raw biomass, respectively. Co-production of value-added products can reduce the overall production cost of bioethanol. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Energy from biomass: the environmental effects

    SciTech Connect

    Plotkin, S.E.

    1980-11-01

    Biomass as an energy source has environmental and economic appeal for its advocates, who overlook the devastation in other parts of the world from large-scale biomass energy uses. Now producing 2% of the energy consumed in the US, biomass could contribute most of the 20% goal set for solar and renewable sources with support from the government. Biomass is used for direct burning or to make biogas and alcohol fuels, although a major controversy is developing over the wisdom of converting croplands to fuel-producing land. A comparison of the probable economic and environmental effects of ethanol and methanol production shows the latter to be less damaging. The loss of forest lands from increased harvesting will introduce problems of soil depletion, while pressures to log more timber will deplete high-quality stands and change the character of those forests that are poorly managed. Poaching and other illegal practices will also have adverse effects. The use of biomass will require large-scale land conversion and fuel substitution that could reduce the atmospheric buildup of carbon dioxide. Policies should require periodic reviews of biomass management until there is a better understanding of all these effects. 30 references. (DCK)

  8. Preparation of gasification feedstock from leafy biomass.

    PubMed

    Shone, C M; Jothi, T J S

    2016-05-01

    Dried leaves are a potential source of energy although these are not commonly used beside to satisfy daily energy demands in rural areas. This paper aims at preparing a leafy biomass feedstock in the form of briquettes which can be directly used for combustion or to extract the combustible gas using a gasifier. Teak (Tectona grandis) and rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) leaves are considered for the present study. A binder-assisted briquetting technique with tapioca starch as binder is adopted. Properties of these leafy biomass briquettes such as moisture content, calorific value, compressive strength, and shatter index are determined. From the study, briquettes with biomass-to-binder ratio of 3:5 are found to be stable. Higher mass percentage of binder is considered for preparation of briquettes due to the fact that leafy biomasses do not adhere well on densification with lower binder content. Ultimate analysis test is conducted to analyze the gasification potential of the briquettes. Results show that the leafy biomass prepared from teak and rubber leaves has calorific values of 17.5 and 17.8 MJ/kg, respectively, which are comparable with those of existing biomass feedstock made of sawdust, rice husk, and rice straw.

  9. Biomass energy analysis for crop dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Whittier, J.P.; Haase, S.G.; Quinn, M.W.

    1994-12-31

    In 1994, an agricultural processing facility was constructed in southern New Mexico for spice and herb dehydration. Annual operational costs are dominated by energy costs, due primarily to the energy intensity of dehydration. A feasibility study was performed to determine whether the use of biomass resources as a feedstock for a cogeneration system would be an economical option. The project location allowed access to unusual biomass feedstocks including cotton gin trash, pecan shells and in-house residues. A resource assessment of the immediate project area determined that approximately 120,000 bone dry tons of biomass feedstocks are available annually. Technology characterization for the plant energy requirements indicated gasification systems offer fuel flexibility advantages over combustion systems although vendor support and commercial experience are limited. Regulatory siting considerations introduce a level of uncertainty because of a lack of a precedent in New Mexico for gasification technology and because vendors of commercial gasifiers have little experience operating such a facility nor gathering emission data. A public opinion survey indicated considerable support for renewable energy use and biomass energy utilization. However, the public opinion survey also revealed limited knowledge of biomass technologies and concerns regarding siting of a biomass facility within the geographic area. The economic analysis conducted for the study is based on equipment vendor quotations, and indicates there will be difficulty competing with current prices of natural gas.

  10. Biomass fermentation to augment biological phosphorus removal.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Q; Oleszkiewicz, J A

    2010-01-01

    A combination of a lab scale biological phosphorus removal sequencing batch reactor (called mother reactor) and a side-stream biomass fermenter was setup. It was found that when fermented biomass was recirculated back into the mother reactor as volatile fatty acid (VFA) supplement, the phosphate concentration in the effluent decreased from 6 in the control reactor to 4.5 mgL(-1) in the effluent from mother reactor. The addition of the fermentation effluent into the mother reactor increased the phosphate and ammonium loads and resulted in deterioration of nitrification. Phosphorus removal and nitrification improved when the fermented biomass was separated from the liquid phase using an up-flow system, followed by the addition of MgO to the supernatant to precipitate phosphate and ammonium. Phosphorus removal was further improved by delaying the time of VFA addition into mother reactor during the anaerobic period as soon as denitrification ceased. Biomass fermentation was found to generate 157 mg VFA-COD by fermenting 1g of biomass at a solids retention time of 5d. Acetate (78% of generated COD) and propionic acid (10%) were the major components of the produced VFA. It was concluded that biomass fermentation to augment a biological nutrient removal process can be effective if generated phosphate and ammonia are removed, e.g. through struvite precipitation.

  11. Verbesserte Ausbildung für neue Betriebsleiter und -ingenieure - eine wichtige Investition in die Zukunft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franta, Oliver

    Bedingt durch die Globalisierung und die damit einhergehende Verschärfung des Wettbewerbs befinden sich die Produktionsbetriebe der chemischen Industrie in stetigem Wandel. Für Betriebsleiter und Betriebsingenieure werden damit Fähigkeiten wie Kostenmanagement, Sozial- und Organisationskompetenz, Führungsqualifikationen und unternehmerisches Handeln immer wichtiger. Neben den Anforderungsprofilen bei Neueinstellungen ist dies auch bei der Fortbildung zu berücksichtigen. Das Trainingsprogramm der Evonik Degussa wurde daher durch die Konzeption neuer Seminare und die Anpassung bestehender Weiterbildungsmaßnahmen weiterentwickelt. Neben Vorträgen und Fallbeispielen sind ebenfalls die Durchführung von Planspielen sowie das Kennenlernen eines Produktionsbetriebes einer anderen Organisationseinheit enthalten. Ziel ist es vor allem die unternehmerische Orientierung neuer Betriebsleiter und -ingenieure zu fördern, die Innovationsgeschwindigkeit zu erhöhen und durch Kenntnis und Nutzung bereits anderweitig entwickelter Lösungen und Methoden die Produktivität zu steigern. Die Produktionsmeister werden aufgrund der Bedeutung dieser Funktion für die Führung der Mitarbeiter und bei der Umsetzung von Veränderungsprojekten in das Ausbildungsprogramm einbezogen. Der Erfolg des Trainingsprogramms zeigt sich an den Teilnehmerzahlen und den ausgesprochen positiven Rückmeldungen.

  12. Schönheit und andere Provokationen - Eine neue evolutionsbiologische Theorie der Kunst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junker, Thomas

    Die Evolution hat viele spektakuläre Phänomene hervorgebracht - von der Eleganz des Vogelflugs über die gigantischen Körper der Dinosaurier und die farbenprächtige Vielfalt der Korallenriffe bis hin zu ihrem jüngsten Geniestreich - der menschlichen Kunst. Die schönen Künste - Malerei, Bildhauerei und Architektur, Theater, Tanz, Oper und Filmkunst, Musik und Literatur - Produkte der Evolution? Diese Vorstellung mutet vielen Menschen fremd an, aber wie könnte es anders sein? Denn wenn Charles Darwin recht hat, dann sind nicht nur die körperlichen Merkmale der Menschen als Antworten auf die Erfordernisse des Lebens entstanden, sondern auch ihre geistigen Fähigkeiten und Verhaltensweisen. Im Jahr 1859 hatte er auf den letzten Seiten seines berühmten Buches über die Entstehung der Arten eine kühne Prophezeiung gemacht: Durch die Evolutionstheorie werde es "zu einer bemerkenswerten Revolution in der Naturwissenschaft kommen […]. Die Psychologie wird auf die neue Grundlage gestellt, dass jede geistige Kraft und Fähigkeit notwendigerweise durch graduelle Übergänge erworben wird“ (Darwin 1859, S. 484, 488; Junker 2008).

  13. Structure of the NPr:EIN(Ntr) Complex: Mechanism for Specificity in Paralogous Phosphotransferase Systems.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Madeleine; Stanley, Ann Marie; Wang, Guangshun; Botos, Istvan; Schwieters, Charles D; Buchanan, Susan K; Peterkofsky, Alan; Tjandra, Nico

    2016-12-06

    Paralogous enzymes arise from gene duplication events that confer a novel function, although it is unclear how cross-reaction between the original and duplicate protein interaction network is minimized. We investigated HPr:EI(sugar) and NPr:EI(Ntr), the initial complexes of paralogous phosphorylation cascades involved in sugar import and nitrogen regulation in bacteria, respectively. Although the HPr:EI(sugar) interaction has been well characterized, involving multiple complexes and transient interactions, the exact nature of the NPr:EI(Ntr) complex was unknown. We set out to identify the key features of the interaction by performing binding assays and elucidating the structure of NPr in complex with the phosphorylation domain of EI(Ntr) (EIN(Ntr)), using a hybrid approach involving X-ray, homology, and sparse nuclear magnetic resonance. We found that the overall fold and active-site structure of the two complexes are conserved in order to maintain productive phosphorylation, however, the interface surface potential differs between the two complexes, which prevents cross-reaction.

  14. Nahal Ein Gev II, a Late Natufian Community at the Sea of Galilee

    PubMed Central

    Grosman, Leore; Munro, Natalie D.; Abadi, Itay; Boaretto, Elisabetta; Shaham, Dana; Belfer-Cohen, Anna; Bar-Yosef, Ofer

    2016-01-01

    The Natufian culture is of great importance as a starting point to investigate the dynamics of the transition to agriculture. Given its chronological position at the threshold of the Neolithic (ca. 12,000 years ago) and its geographic setting in the productive Jordan Valley, the site of Nahal Ein Gev II (NEG II) reveals aspects of the Late Natufian adaptations and its implications for the transition to agriculture. The size of the site, the thick archaeological deposits, invested architecture and multiple occupation sub-phases reveal a large, sedentary community at least on par with Early Natufian camps in the Mediterranean zone. Although the NEG II lithic tool kit completely lacks attributes typical of succeeding Pre Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA) assemblages, the artistic style is more closely related to the early PPNA world, despite clear roots in Early Natufian tradition. The site does not conform to current perceptions of the Late Natufians as a largely mobile population coping with reduced resource productivity caused by the Younger Dryas. Instead, the faunal and architectural data suggest that the sedentary populations of the Early Natufian did not revert back to a nomadic way of life in the Late Natufian in the Jordan Valley. NEG II encapsulates cultural characteristics typical of both Natufian and PPNA traditions and thus bridges the crossroads between Late Paleolithic foragers and Neolithic farmers. PMID:26815363

  15. Ein Entscheidungsmodell zur Weitergabe persönlicher Daten im Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treiblmaier, Horst

    In den vergangenen zwei Jahrzehnten wandelte sich das Internet von einer Spielwiese für technikbegeisterte Computerspezialisten zu einem vielseitig einsetzbaren weltweiten Netzwerk für Privatpersonen und Unternehmen. Maßgeblichen Anteil daran besaß die rasante Entwicklung des World Wide Web (WWW), das, durch die Möglichkeit multimediale Inhalte zu vermitteln, für einen großen Teil der Bevölkerung industrialisierter Länder zu einem wesentlichen Bestandteil des täglichen Lebens wurde. Dass diese Entwicklung noch lange nicht abgeschlossen ist, zeigt die derzeitige Diskussion zum Thema Web 2.0 bzw. 3.0. Waren es in den letzten Jahren die hohen Umsatzzuwächse im E-Commerce und multimedial gestaltete Webseiten in Kombination mit aufwändigen Applikationen, die für ständig steigende Nutzerzahlen im World Wide Web sorgten, so wird dieser Innovationsschub nunmehr durch eine Vielzahl von Anwendungen fortgesetzt, die sich durch die zunehmende Vernetzung der Nutzer untereinander auszeichnen.

  16. Yield mapping of high-biomass sorghum with aerial imagery

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To reach the goals laid out by the U.S. Government for displacing fossil fuels with biofuels, agricultural production of dedicated biomass crops is required. High-biomass sorghum is advantageous across wide regions because it requires less water per unit dry biomass and can produce very high biomass...

  17. 48 CFR 1452.237-71 - Utilization of Woody Biomass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Biomass. 1452.237-71 Section 1452.237-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Utilization of Woody Biomass. As prescribed in § 1437.7202, insert the following clause: Utilization of Woody Biomass (MAY 2005) (a) The contractor may remove and utilize woody biomass, if: (1) Project work is...

  18. Method of producing hydrogen, and rendering a contaminated biomass inert

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N [Idaho Falls, ID; Klingler, Kerry M [Idaho Falls, ID; Wilding, Bruce M [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-02-23

    A method for rendering a contaminated biomass inert includes providing a first composition, providing a second composition, reacting the first and second compositions together to form an alkaline hydroxide, providing a contaminated biomass feedstock and reacting the alkaline hydroxide with the contaminated biomass feedstock to render the contaminated biomass feedstock inert and further producing hydrogen gas, and a byproduct that includes the first composition.

  19. 48 CFR 1452.237-71 - Utilization of Woody Biomass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Biomass. 1452.237-71 Section 1452.237-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Utilization of Woody Biomass. As prescribed in § 1437.7202, insert the following clause: Utilization of Woody Biomass (MAY 2005) (a) The contractor may remove and utilize woody biomass, if: (1) Project work is...

  20. 48 CFR 1452.237-71 - Utilization of Woody Biomass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Biomass. 1452.237-71 Section 1452.237-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Utilization of Woody Biomass. As prescribed in § 1437.7202, insert the following clause: Utilization of Woody Biomass (MAY 2005) (a) The contractor may remove and utilize woody biomass, if: (1) Project work is...

  1. 48 CFR 1452.237-71 - Utilization of Woody Biomass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Biomass. 1452.237-71 Section 1452.237-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Utilization of Woody Biomass. As prescribed in § 1437.7202, insert the following clause: Utilization of Woody Biomass (MAY 2005) (a) The contractor may remove and utilize woody biomass, if: (1) Project work is...

  2. 48 CFR 1452.237-71 - Utilization of Woody Biomass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Biomass. 1452.237-71 Section 1452.237-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Utilization of Woody Biomass. As prescribed in § 1437.7202, insert the following clause: Utilization of Woody Biomass (MAY 2005) (a) The contractor may remove and utilize woody biomass, if: (1) Project work is...

  3. Biomass for biorefining: Resources, allocation, utilization, and policies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The importance of biomass in the development of renewable energy, the availability and allocation of biomass, its preparation for use in biorefineries, and the policies affecting biomass are discussed in this chapter. Bioenergy development will depend on maximizing the amount of biomass obtained fro...

  4. Carbonic Acid Retreatment of Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor university

    2003-06-01

    This project sought to address six objectives, outlined below. The objectives were met through the completion of ten tasks. (1) Solidify the theoretical understanding of the binary CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O system at reaction temperatures and pressures. The thermodynamics of pH prediction have been improved to include a more rigorous treatment of non-ideal gas phases. However it was found that experimental attempts to confirm theoretical pH predictions were still off by a factor of about 1.8 pH units. Arrhenius experiments were carried out and the activation energy for carbonic acid appears to be substantially similar to sulfuric acid. Titration experiments have not yet confirmed or quantified the buffering or acid suppression effects of carbonic acid on biomass. (2) Modify the carbonic acid pretreatment severity function to include the effect of endogenous acid formation and carbonate buffering, if necessary. It was found that the existing severity functions serve adequately to account for endogenous acid production and carbonate effects. (3) Quantify the production of soluble carbohydrates at different reaction conditions and severity. Results show that carbonic acid has little effect on increasing soluble carbohydrate concentrations for pretreated aspen wood, compared to pretreatment with water alone. This appears to be connected to the release of endogenous acids by the substrate. A less acidic substrate such as corn stover would derive benefit from the use of carbonic acid. (4) Quantify the production of microbial inhibitors at selected reaction conditions and severity. It was found that the release of inhibitors was correlated to reaction severity and that carbonic acid did not appear to increase or decrease inhibition compared to pretreatment with water alone. (5) Assess the reactivity to enzymatic hydrolysis of material pretreated at selected reaction conditions and severity. Enzymatic hydrolysis rates increased with severity, but no advantage was detected for

  5. Carbonic Acid Pretreatment of Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    G. Peter van Walsum; Kemantha Jayawardhana; Damon Yourchisin; Robert McWilliams; Vanessa Castleberry

    2003-05-31

    This project sought to address six objectives, outlined below. The objectives were met through the completion of ten tasks. 1) Solidify the theoretical understanding of the binary CO2/H2O system at reaction temperatures and pressures. The thermodynamics of pH prediction have been improved to include a more rigorous treatment of non-ideal gas phases. However it was found that experimental attempts to confirm theoretical pH predictions were still off by a factor of about 1.8 pH units. Arrhenius experiments were carried out and the activation energy for carbonic acid appears to be substantially similar to sulfuric acid. Titration experiments have not yet confirmed or quantified the buffering or acid suppression effects of carbonic acid on biomass. 2) Modify the carbonic acid pretreatment severity function to include the effect of endogenous acid formation and carbonate buffering, if necessary. It was found that the existing severity functions serve adequately to account for endogenous acid production and carbonate effects. 3) Quantify the production of soluble carbohydrates at different reaction conditions and severity. Results show that carbonic acid has little effect on increasing soluble carbohydrate concentrations for pretreated aspen wood, compared to pretreatment with water alone. This appears to be connected to the release of endogenous acids by the substrate. A less acidic substrate such as corn stover would derive benefit from the use of carbonic acid. 4) Quantify the production of microbial inhibitors at selected reaction conditions and severity. It was found that the release of inhibitors was correlated to reaction severity and that carbonic acid did not appear to increase or decrease inhibition compared to pretreatment with water alone. 5) Assess the reactivity to enzymatic hydrolysis of material pretreated at selected reaction conditions and severity. Enzymatic hydrolysis rates increased with severity, but no advantage was detected for the use of carbonic

  6. Quantifying the Carbon Intensity of Biomass Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodson, E. L.; Wise, M.; Clarke, L.; McJeon, H.; Mignone, B.

    2012-12-01

    Regulatory agencies at the national and regional level have recognized the importance of quantitative information about greenhouse gas emissions from biomass used in transportation fuels or in electricity generation. For example, in the recently enacted California Low-Carbon Fuel Standard, the California Air Resources Board conducted a comprehensive study to determine an appropriate methodology for setting carbon intensities for biomass-derived transportation fuels. Furthermore, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is currently conducting a multi-year review to develop a methodology for estimating biogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from stationary sources. Our study develops and explores a methodology to compute carbon emission intensities (CIs) per unit of biomass energy, which is a metric that could be used to inform future policy development exercises. To compute CIs for biomass, we use the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), which is an integrated assessment model that represents global energy, agriculture, land and physical climate systems with regional, sectoral, and technological detail. The GCAM land use and land cover component includes both managed and unmanaged land cover categories such as food crop production, forest products, and various non-commercial land uses, and it is subdivided into 151 global land regions (wiki.umd.edu/gcam), ten of which are located in the U.S. To illustrate a range of values for different biomass resources, we use GCAM to compute CIs for a variety of biomass crops grown in different land regions of the U.S. We investigate differences in emissions for biomass crops such as switchgrass, miscanthus and willow. Specifically, we use GCAM to compute global carbon emissions from the land use change caused by a marginal increase in the amount of biomass crop grown in a specific model region. Thus, we are able to explore how land use change emissions vary by the type and location of biomass crop grown in the U.S. Direct

  7. Optimizing pneumatic conveying of biomass materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiCianni, Matthew Edward Michael

    2011-12-01

    Biomass is a readily available but underutilized energy resource. One of the main challenges is the inability of biomass feed stocks like corn stover or wood chips to flow freely without intermittent jamming. This research integrated an automated pneumatic conveying system to efficiently transport biomass into a biomass reactor. Material was held in a storage container until an end effector attached to a 3-axis controller engaged the material to flow through pneumatic vacuum in the carrier fluid of air. The material was disengaged from the carrier fluid through centripetal forces induced by a cyclone separator. As the air was pulled out of the cyclone, the biomass drops out the bottom due to gravitational forces and fell into a secondary storage hopper. The second storage container was for testing purposes only, where the actual apparatus would use a vertically oriented lock hopper to feed material into the biomass reactor. In the experimental test apparatus, sensors measured the storage hopper weight (mass-flow rate), pressure drop from the blower, and input power consumption of the motor. Parameters that were adjusted during testing include pipe diameter, material type, and motor speed. Testing indicated that decreasing the motor speed below its maximum still allows for conveyance of the material without blockage forming in the piping. The data shows that the power consumption of the system can be reduced based on the size and weight of the material introduced to the conveying pipe. Also, conveying certain materials proved to be problematic with particular duct diameters. Ultimately, an optimal duct diameter that can perform efficiently for a broad range of materials was chosen for the given system. Through these improvements, the energy return on investment will be improved for biomass feed stocks, which is taking a step in the right direction to secure the nation's energy independence.

  8. Biomass combustion technologies for power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltsee, G.A. Jr.; McGowin, C.R.; Hughes, E.E.

    1993-12-31

    Technology in power production from biomass has been advancing rapidly. Industry has responded to government incentives such as the PURPA legislation in the US and has recognized that there are environmental advantages to using waste biomass as fuel. During the 1980s many new biomass power plants were built. The relatively mature stoker boiler technology was improved by the introduction of water-cooled grates, staged combustion air, larger boiler sizes up to 60 MW, higher steam conditions, and advanced sootblowing systems. Circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) technology achieved full commercial status, and now is the leading process for most utility-scale power applications, with more complete combustion, lower emissions, and better fuel flexibility than stoker technology. Bubbling fluidized-bed (BFB) technology has an important market niche as the best process for difficult fuels such as agricultural wastes, typically in smaller plants. Other biomass power generation technologies are being developed for possible commercial introduction in the 1990s. Key components of Whole Tree Energy{trademark} technology have been tested, conceptual design studies have been completed with favorable results, and plans are being made for the first integrated process demonstration. Fluidized-bed gasification processes have advanced from pilot to demonstration status, and the world`s first integrated wood gasification/combined cycle utility power plant is starting operation in Sweden in early 1993. Several European vendors offer biomass gasification processes commercially. US electric utilities are evaluating the cofiring of biomass with fossil fuels in both existing and new plants. Retrofitting existing coal-fired plants gives better overall cost and performance results than any biomass technologies;but retrofit cofiring is {open_quotes}fuel-switching{close_quotes} that provides no new capacity and is attractive only with economic incentives.

  9. Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. 1983 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1984-08-01

    Highlights of progress achieved in the program of thermochemical conversion of biomass into clean fuels during 1983 are summarized. Gasification research projects include: production of a medium-Btu gas without using purified oxygen at Battelle-Columbus Laboratories; high pressure (up to 500 psia) steam-oxygen gasification of biomass in a fluidized bed reactor at IGT; producing synthesis gas via catalytic gasification at PNL; indirect reactor heating methods at the Univ. of Missouri-Rolla and Texas Tech Univ.; improving the reliability, performance, and acceptability of small air-blown gasifiers at Univ. of Florida-Gainesville, Rocky Creek Farm Gasogens, and Cal Recovery Systems. Liquefaction projects include: determination of individual sequential pyrolysis mechanisms at SERI; research at SERI on a unique entrained, ablative fast pyrolysis reactor for supplying the heat fluxes required for fast pyrolysis; work at BNL on rapid pyrolysis of biomass in an atmosphere of methane to increase the yields of olefin and BTX products; research at the Georgia Inst. of Tech. on an entrained rapid pyrolysis reactor to produce higher yields of pyrolysis oil; research on an advanced concept to liquefy very concentrated biomass slurries in an integrated extruder/static mixer reactor at the Univ. of Arizona; and research at PNL on the characterization and upgrading of direct liquefaction oils including research to lower oxygen content and viscosity of the product. Combustion projects include: research on a directly fired wood combustor/gas turbine system at Aerospace Research Corp.; adaptation of Stirling engine external combustion systems to biomass fuels at United Stirling, Inc.; and theoretical modeling and experimental verification of biomass combustion behavior at JPL to increase biomass combustion efficiency and examine the effects of additives on combustion rates. 26 figures, 1 table.

  10. Investigation into calculating tree biomass and carbon in the FIADB using a biomass expansion factor approach

    Treesearch

    Linda S. Heath; Mark Hansen; James E. Smith; Patrick D. Miles; Brad W. Smith

    2009-01-01

    The official U.S. forest carbon inventories (U.S. EPA 2008) have relied on tree biomass estimates that utilize diameter based prediction equations from Jenkins and others (2003), coupled with U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) sample tree measurements and forest area estimates. However, these biomass prediction equations are not the equations used...

  11. FIA's volume-to-biomass conversion method (CRM) generally underestimates biomass in comparison to published equations

    Treesearch

    David. C. Chojnacky

    2012-01-01

    An update of the Jenkins et al. (2003) biomass estimation equations for North American tree species resulted in 35 generalized equations developed from published equations. These 35 equations, which predict aboveground biomass of individual species grouped according to a taxa classification (based on genus or family and sometimes specific gravity), generally predicted...

  12. Algal biofuels from urban wastewaters: maximizing biomass yield using nutrients recycled from hydrothermal processing of biomass.

    PubMed

    Selvaratnam, T; Pegallapati, A K; Reddy, H; Kanapathipillai, N; Nirmalakhandan, N; Deng, S; Lammers, P J

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies have proposed algal cultivation in urban wastewaters for the dual purpose of waste treatment and bioenergy production from the resulting biomass. This study proposes an enhancement to this approach that integrates cultivation of an acidophilic strain, Galdieria sulphuraria 5587.1, in a closed photobioreactor (PBR); hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of the wet algal biomass; and recirculation of the nutrient-rich aqueous product (AP) of HTL to the PBR to achieve higher biomass productivity than that could be achieved with raw wastewater. The premise is that recycling nutrients in the AP can maintain optimal C, N and P levels in the PBR to maximize biomass growth to increase energy returns. Growth studies on the test species validated growth on AP derived from HTL at temperatures from 180 to 300°C. Doubling N and P concentrations over normal levels in wastewater resulted in biomass productivity gains of 20-25% while N and P removal rates also doubled.

  13. Empowerment model of biomass in west java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulyana, C.; Fitriani, N. I.; Saad, A.; Yuliah, Y.

    2017-06-01

    Scarcity of fossil energy accelerates the search of renewable energy sources as the substitution. In West Java, biomass has potential to be developed into bio-briquette because the resources are abundant. The objectives of this research are mapping the potency of biomass as bio-briquette in West Java, and making the model of the empowerment biomass potential involving five fundamental step which are raw material, pre-processing process, conversion mechanism, products, and end user. The main object of this model focused on 3 forms which are solid, liquid, and gas which was made by involving the community component as the owner biomass, district government, academics and researcher communities, related industries as users of biomass, and the central government as the policy holders and investors as a funder. In the model was described their respective roles and mutual relationship one with another so that the bio-briquette as a substitute of fossil fuels can be realized. Application of this model will provide the benefits in renewability energy sources, environmental, socio economical and energy security.

  14. Estimating slash pine biomass using radar backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussin, Yousif Ali; Reich, Robin M.; Hoffer, Roger M.

    1991-01-01

    L-band HV multiple-incidence-angle aircraft synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data were analyzed in relation to average stand biomass, basal area, and tree height for 55 slash pine plantations located in northern Florida. This information was used to develop a system of equations to predict average stand biomass as a function of L-band (24.5-cm) radar backscatter. The system of equations developed in this study using three-stage least-squares and combinatorial screening accounted for 97 percent of the variability observed in average stand biomass per hectare. When applied to an independent data set, the biomass equations had an average bias of less than 1 percent with a standard error of approximately 3 percent. These results indicate that future Shuttle Imaging Radar Systems (e.g., SIR-C, which will have cross-polarized radar sensors) should be able to obtain better estimates of forest biomass than were obtained with previous satellite radar missions, which utilized only HH-polarized SAR data.

  15. Immunological Approaches to Biomass Characterization and Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Pattathil, Sivakumar; Avci, Utku; Zhang, Tiantian; Cardenas, Claudia L.; Hahn, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Plant biomass is the major renewable feedstock resource for sustainable generation of alternative transportation fuels to replace fossil carbon-derived fuels. Lignocellulosic cell walls are the principal component of plant biomass. Hence, a detailed understanding of plant cell wall structure and biosynthesis is an important aspect of bioenergy research. Cell walls are dynamic in their composition and structure, varying considerably among different organs, cells, and developmental stages of plants. Hence, tools are needed that are highly efficient and broadly applicable at various levels of plant biomass-based bioenergy research. The use of plant cell wall glycan-directed probes has seen increasing use over the past decade as an excellent approach for the detailed characterization of cell walls. Large collections of such probes directed against most major cell wall glycans are currently available worldwide. The largest and most diverse set of such probes consists of cell wall glycan-directed monoclonal antibodies (McAbs). These McAbs can be used as immunological probes to comprehensively monitor the overall presence, extractability, and distribution patterns among cell types of most major cell wall glycan epitopes using two mutually complementary immunological approaches, glycome profiling (an in vitro platform) and immunolocalization (an in situ platform). Significant progress has been made recently in the overall understanding of plant biomass structure, composition, and modifications with the application of these immunological approaches. This review focuses on such advances made in plant biomass analyses across diverse areas of bioenergy research. PMID:26579515

  16. Biomass burning a driver for global change

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, J.S.; Cofer, W.R. III; Cahoon, D.R. Jr.; Winstead, E.L.

    1995-03-01

    Recent research has identified another biospheric process that has instantaneous and longer term effects on the production of atmospheric gases: biomass burning. Biomass burning includes the burning of the world`s vegetation-forests, savannas. and agricultural lands, to clear the land and change its use. Only in the past decade have researchers realized the important contributions of biomass burning to the global budgets of many radiatively and chemically active gases - carbon dioxide, methane, nitric oxide, tropospheric ozone, methyl chloride - and elemental carbon particulates. International field experiments and satellite data are yielding a clearer understanding of this important global source of atmospheric gases and particulates. It is seen that in addition to being a significant instantaneous global source of atmospheric gases and particulates, burning enhances the biogenic emissions of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide from the world`s soils. Biomass burning affects the reflectivity and emissivity of the Earth`s surface as well as the hydrological cycle by changing rates of land evaporation and water runoff. For these reasons, it appears that biomass burning is a significant driver of global change. 20 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Smart film actuators using biomass plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneyama, Satoshi; Tanaka, Nobuo

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents a novel smart film actuator based on the use of a biomass plastic as a piezoelectric film. Conventional polymeric smart sensors and actuators have been based upon synthetic piezoelectric polymer films such as PVDF. Almost all synthetic polymers are made from nearly depleted oil resources. In addition combustion of their materials releases carbon dioxide, thereby contributing to global warming. Thus at least two important sustainability principles are violated when employing synthetic polymers: avoiding depletable resources and avoiding ecosystem destruction. To overcome such problems, industrial plastic products made from synthetic polymers were developed to replace oil-based plastics with biomass plastics. This paper applies a biomass plastic with piezoelectricity such as poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA). As a result, PLLA film becomes a distributed parameter actuator per se, hence an environmentally conscious smart film actuator is developed. Firstly, this paper overviews the fundamental properties of piezoelectric synthetic polymers and biopolymers. The concept of carbon neutrality using biopolymers is mentioned. Then a two-dimensional modal actuator for exciting a specific structural mode is proposed. Furthermore, a biomass plastic-based cantilever beam with the capability of modal actuation is developed, the validity of the proposed smart film actuator based upon a biomass plastic being analytically as well as experimentally verified.

  18. BIOMASS TO BIO-OIL BY LIQUEFACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Huamin; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-10

    Significant efforts have been devoted to develop processes for the conversion of biomass, an abundant and sustainable source of energy, to liquid fuels and chemicals, in order to replace diminishing fossil fuels and mitigate global warming. Thermochemical and biochemical methods have attracted the most attention. Among the thermochemical processes, pyrolysis and liquefaction are the two major technologies for the direct conversion of biomass to produce a liquid product, often called bio-oil. This chapter focuses on the liquefaction, a medium-temperature and high-pressure thermochemical process for the conversion of biomass to bio-oil. Water has been most commonly used as a solvent and the process is known as hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL). Fundamentals of HTL process, key factors determining HTL behavior, role of catalyst in HTL, properties of produced bio-oil, and the current status of the technology are summarized. The liquefaction of biomass by using organic solvents, a process called solvolysis, is also discussed. A wide range of biomass feedstocks have been tested for liquefaction including wood, crop residues, algae, food processing waste, and animal manure.

  19. Biomass energy inventory and mapping system

    SciTech Connect

    Kasile, J.D.

    1993-12-31

    A four-stage biomass energy inventory and mapping system was conducted for the entire State of Ohio. The product is a set of maps and an inventory of the State of Ohio. The set of amps and an inventory of the State`s energy biomass resource are to a one kilometer grid square basis on the Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) system. Each square kilometer is identified and mapped showing total British Thermal Unit (BTU) energy availability. Land cover percentages and BTU values are provided for each of nine biomass strata types for each one kilometer grid square. LANDSAT satellite data was used as the primary stratifier. The second stage sampling was the photointerpretation of randomly selected one kilometer grid squares that exactly corresponded to the LANDSAT one kilometer grid square classification orientation. Field sampling comprised the third stage of the energy biomass inventory system and was combined with the fourth stage sample of laboratory biomass energy analysis using a Bomb calorimeter and was then used to assign BTU values to the photointerpretation and to adjust the LANDSAT classification. The sampling error for the whole system was 3.91%.

  20. Biomass energy analysis for crop dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Whittier, J.P.; Haase, S.G.; Quinn, M.W.; Zachritz, W.; Lansford, R.; Swanson, D.

    1995-06-01

    In 1994, an agricultural processing facility began constructing a new spice and herb dehydration facility in southern New Mexico. Because of the considerable energy intensity of the dehydration operation, management of energy costs is of special concern to the facility. Biomass energy conversion offers the potential for firms to reduce annual operating costs-especially firms with access to low-cost resources. Because the selected facility produces a biomass by-product as a result of its dehydration operation, it is appropriate to explore the technical, regulatory, institutional and economic conditions that affect the successful utilization of biomass resources. The facility is characterized as a small-scale installation, relative to other energy users. In this context, small-scale represents less than 100 million Btu per hour of thermal load and less than 1 MWe of electrical load. However, the projected annual energy bill is approximately $1.1 million and represents a significant portion of operational costs for the firm. For this study, the biomass resources in southern New Mexico and western Texas are detailed. Annual supplies of various biomass resources (i.e., wood chips, pecan shells, discarded tires and cotton gin trash) were inventoried. Further, delivered costs are projected for each of the resource forms. A technical assessment for the small-scale gasification and combustion systems is presented.

  1. Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. 1984 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the program is to generate scientific data and conversion process information that will lead to establishment of cost-effective process for converting biomass resources into clean fuels. The goal of the program is to develop the data base for biomass thermal conversion by investigating the fundamental aspects of conversion technologies and by exploring those parameters that are critical to the conversion processes. The research activities can be divided into: (1) gasification technology; (2) liquid fuels technology; (3) direct combustion technology; and (4) program support activities. These activities are described in detail in this report. Outstanding accomplishments during fiscal year 1984 include: (1) successful operation of 3-MW combustor/gas turbine system; (2) successful extended term operation of an indirectly heated, dual bed gasifier for producing medium-Btu gas; (3) determination that oxygen requirements for medium-Btu gasification of biomass in a pressurized, fluidized bed gasifier are low; (4) established interdependence of temperature and residence times on biomass pyrolysis oil yields; and (5) determination of preliminary technical feasibility of thermally gasifying high moisture biomass feedstocks. A bibliography of 1984 publications is included. 26 figs., 1 tab.

  2. 1982 annual report: Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    This report provides a brief overview of the Thermochemical Conversion Program's activities and major accomplishments during fiscal year 1982. The objective of the Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program is to generate scientific data and fundamental biomass converison process information that, in the long term, could lead to establishment of cost effective processes for conversion of biomass resources into clean fuels and petrochemical substitutes. The goal of the program is to improve the data base for biomass conversion by investigating the fundamental aspects of conversion technologies and exploring those parameters which are critical to these conversion processes. To achieve this objective and goal, the Thermochemical Conversion Program is sponsoring high-risk, long-term research with high payoff potential which industry is not currently sponsoring, nor is likely to support. Thermochemical conversion processes employ elevated temperatures to convert biomass materials into energy. Process examples include: combustion to produce heat, steam, electricity, direct mechanical power; gasification to produce fuel gas or synthesis gases for the production of methanol and hydrocarbon fuels; direct liquefaction to produce heavy oils or distillates; and pyrolysis to produce a mixture of oils, fuel gases, and char. A bibliography of publications for 1982 is included.

  3. Biomass compositional analysis for energy applications.

    PubMed

    Hames, Bonnie R

    2009-01-01

    In its broadest definition, biomass can be described as all material that was or is a part of a living organism. For renewable energy applications, however, the definition of biomass is usually limited to include only materials that are plant-derived such as agricultural residues (e.g., wheat straw, corn stover) by-products of industrial processes (e.g., sawdust, sugar cane bagasse, pulp residues, distillers grains), or dedicated energy crops (e.g., switchgrass, sorghum, Miscanthus, short-rotation woody crops). This chapter describes analytical methods developed to measure plant components with an emphasis on the measurement of components that are important for biomass conversion. The methods described here can be viewed as a portfolio of analytical methods, with consistent assumptions and compatible sample preparation steps, selected for simplicity, robust application, and the ability to obtain a summative mass closure on most samples that accurately identifies greater than 95% of the mass of a plant biomass sample. The portfolio of methods has been successfully applied to a wide variety of biomass feedstock as well as liquid and solid fractions of both thermochemical pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification (1).

  4. Ansätze für eine Bifurkationsanalyse von RF LC-Tank VCOs unter Berücksichtigung nichtlinearer Bauelementegleichungen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorn, C.; Bremer, J.-K.; Mathis, W.

    2008-05-01

    Es wird ein alternativer Ansatz zum Entwurf von vollintegrierten LC Oszillatoren mit Hilfe der Andronov-Hopf Bifurkationsanalyse unter Einbeziehung eines nichtlinearen Overall-Modells für MOS-Transistoren (EKV-Modell) vorgestellt. Das in dieser Arbeit vorgestellte Verfahren beschreibt die MOS-Kapazität des VCOs über geometrische Gundgrößen, die damit nur als Längen- und Weitenverhältnisse in die Bifurkationsanalyse eingehen. Zur Beschreibung der MOS-Kapazität wurde ein Basic-Charge-Modell, wie es in den Arbeiten von Enz und Vittoz vorgestellt wurde, in Verbindung einer expliziten analytischen Näherung des Oberflächenpotenzials verwendet. Das Verfahren ermöglicht es, als zusätzlichen Freiheitsgrad für den Designer auch die Amplitude zur Optimierung der Bauteilparameter heranzuziehen und vorab eine genauere Abschätzung der Parameter des Varaktors zu erhalten. Zusammengefasst in einer Toolbox führt die Anwendung des Verfahrens auf einen grafischen Optimierungsprozess, mit dessen Hilfe die Parameter analytisch bestimmt werden können. Die verwendete Methode erweitert den von Hajimiri und Ham vorgestellten Entwurfsprozess von LC-Tank VCOs um eine Stabilitätsanalyse, die Berücksichtigung harmonischer höherer Ordnung und die physikalisch exakte Modellierung der Varaktorkapazitäten.

  5. [Homöopathisch-phytotherapeutische Behandlung des Reizdarmsyndroms mit Magen-Darm-Entoxin N®: Eine Anwendungsbeobachtung].

    PubMed

    Märtens, Diane; Range, Natasha; Günnewich, Nils; Gruber, Nicola; Schmidt, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Hintergrund: In dieser Anwendungsbeobachtung wird zum ersten Mal die Behandlung des Reizdarmsyndroms (RDS) mit einem homöopathisch-phytotherapeutischen Komplexpräparat beschrieben. Methodik: Ziel der 6-wöchigen Therapie mit dem Magen-Darm-Entoxin N® war die Reduzierung der RDS-Symptomatik sowie die Verbesserung der Lebensqualität. Zielkriterien waren die Veränderungen in der Irritable Bowel Syndrome - Severity Scoring System (IBS-SSS) und der Irritable Bowel Syndrome - Quality-of-Life Scale (IBS-QoL). Die Patient/innen (N = 41; Alter 44,0 ± 15,74 Jahre) wurden zu gleichen Teilen in einer Hausarztpraxis (N = 20) und einer Heilpraktikerpraxis (N = 21) rekrutiert. Ergebnisse: Der IBS-QoL-Score verringerte sich signifikant (prä: 35,9 ± 16,3; post: 20,1 ± 13,4; t = 8,504; p < 0,001). Die Effektstärke betrug 1,34 (Cohens d). Der IBS-SSS-Score verringerte sich ebenfalls signifikant (prä: 239,4 ± 83,4; post: 123,7 ± 80,9; t = 7,825; p < 0,001) mit einer Effektstärke von d = 1,24. Die Neben- und Wechselwirkungen waren minimal und signifikante Unterschiede zwischen beiden Praxen wurden nicht gefunden. Schlussfolgerungen: Magen-Darm-Entoxin N® ist eine sichere und sinnvolle Therapieoption bei der Behandlung des RDS. Allerdings sollten randomisierte kontrollierte Studien folgen, um die Spezifizität der Ergebnisse dieser Anwendungsbeobachtung zu stützen. © 2017 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  6. Specialists' workshop on fast pyrolysis of biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This workshop brought together most of those who are currently working in or have published significant findings in the area of fast pyrolysis of biomass or biomass-derived materials, with the goal of attaining a better understanding of the dominant mechanisms which produce olefins, oxygenated liquids, char, and tars. In addition, background papers were given in hydrocarbon pyrolysis, slow pyrolysis of biomass, and techniques for powdered-feedstock preparation in order that the other papers did not need to introduce in depth these concepts in their presentations for continuity. In general, the authors were requested to present summaries of experimental data with as much interpretation of that data as possible with regard to mechanisms and process variables such as heat flux, temperatures, partial pressure, feedstock, particle size, heating rates, residence time, etc. Separate abstracts have been prepared of each presentation for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

  7. BARRIER ISSUES TO THE UTILIZATION OF BIOMASS

    SciTech Connect

    Greg F. Weber; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    2001-05-01

    In summary, stoker-fired boilers that cofire or switch to biomass fuel may potentially have to deal with ash behavior issues such as production of different concentrations and quantities of fine particulate or aerosols and ash-fouling deposition. Stoker boiler operators that are considering switching to biomass and adding potential infrastructure to accommodate the switch may also at the same time be looking into upgrades that will allow for generating additional power for sale on the grid. This is the case for the feasibility study being done currently for a small (<1-MW) stoker facility at the North Dakota State Penitentiary, which is considering not only the incorporation of a lower-cost biomass fuel but also a refurbishing of the stoker boiler to burn slightly hotter with the ability to generate more power and sell excess energy on the grid. These types of fuel and boiler changes can greatly affect ash behavior issues.

  8. Synthetic and Biomass Alternate Fueling in Aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R.C.; Bushnell, D.M.

    2009-01-01

    Worldwide, aviation alone uses 85 to 95 billion gallons of nonrenewable fossil fuel per year (2008). General transportation fueling can accommodate several different fuels; however, aviation fuels have very specific requirements. Biofuels have been flight demonstrated, are considered renewable, have the capacity to become "drop-in" replacements for Jet-A fuel, and solve the CO2 climate change problem. The major issue is cost; current biomass biofuels are not economically competitive. Biofuel feedstock sources being researched are halophytes, algae, cyanobacteria, weeds-to-crops, wastes with contingent restraints on use of crop land, freshwater, and climate change. There are five major renewable energy sources: solar thermal, solar photovoltaic, wind, drilled geothermal and biomass, each of which have an order of magnitude greater capacity to meet all energy needs. All five address aspects of climate change; biomass has massive potential as an energy fuel feedstock.

  9. Flotation of cadmium-loaded biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Matis, K.A.; Zouboulis, A.I. . Chemical Technology Div.)

    1994-07-01

    Biosorption of heavy metal ions such as Cd[sup 2+] by dead biomass has been recognized as a potential alternative to existing removal technologies applied to wastewater treatment. Two bacterial strains were studied in the laboratory, Streptomyces griseus and S. clavuligerus, an industrial by-product. Both washed and unwashed samples were examined. Foam flotation is proposed in this work as the separation stage following biosorption. Effective biomass separation was conducted in the presence of a frother, ethanol. The pH of the solution was a crucial parameter for flotation and also for metal binding. Other basic parameters of flotation examined were the initial cadmium concentration in the dilute aqueous solution and the quantity of biomass used. A study of [zeta]-potential measurements of the actinomycetes was carried out under the conditions used in the separation; surface tension was also measured. These provided useful information on the process.

  10. Biomass Burning Emissions from Fire Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichoku, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the emission source strengths of different (particulate and gaseous) atmospheric constituents is one of the principal ingredients upon which the modeling and forecasting of their distribution and impacts depend. Biomass burning emissions are complex and difficult to quantify. However, satellite remote sensing is providing us tremendous opportunities to measure the fire radiative energy (FRE) release rate or power (FRP), which has a direct relationship with the rates of biomass consumption and emissions of major smoke constituents. In this presentation, we will show how the satellite measurement of FRP is facilitating the quantitative characterization of biomass burning and smoke emission rates, and the implications of this unique capability for improving our understanding of smoke impacts on air quality, weather, and climate. We will also discuss some of the challenges and uncertainties associated with satellite measurement of FRP and how they are being addressed.

  11. Fermentable sugars by chemical hydrolysis of biomass

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Joseph B.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2010-01-01

    Abundant plant biomass has the potential to become a sustainable source of fuels and chemicals. Realizing this potential requires the economical conversion of recalcitrant lignocellulose into useful intermediates, such as sugars. We report a high-yielding chemical process for the hydrolysis of biomass into monosaccharides. Adding water gradually to a chloride ionic liquid-containing catalytic acid leads to a nearly 90% yield of glucose from cellulose and 70–80% yield of sugars from untreated corn stover. Ion-exclusion chromatography allows recovery of the ionic liquid and delivers sugar feedstocks that support the vigorous growth of ethanologenic microbes. This simple chemical process, which requires neither an edible plant nor a cellulase, could enable crude biomass to be the sole source of carbon for a scalable biorefinery. PMID:20194793

  12. Resolution of grass canopy biomass classes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, C. J.

    1977-01-01

    Analysis of variance methods has been applied to in situ grassland spectral reflectance data in order to determine the classes or levels of total wet biomass that can be resolved spectrally by a single narrow band measurement. Ground-truth clipping of blue grama grass plots was performed immediately following spectral reflectance measurements at 91 wavelength intervals which were 0.005 microns apart over the spectral range from 0.350 to 0.800 microns. It was found that the photographic infrared region of 0.750 to 0.800 microns could be used to distinguish three classes or levels of total wet biomass. Four or five classes, particularly at higher biomass levels, could not be distinguished by this technique.

  13. Biomass Burning Emissions from Fire Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichoku, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the emission source strengths of different (particulate and gaseous) atmospheric constituents is one of the principal ingredients upon which the modeling and forecasting of their distribution and impacts depend. Biomass burning emissions are complex and difficult to quantify. However, satellite remote sensing is providing us tremendous opportunities to measure the fire radiative energy (FRE) release rate or power (FRP), which has a direct relationship with the rates of biomass consumption and emissions of major smoke constituents. In this presentation, we will show how the satellite measurement of FRP is facilitating the quantitative characterization of biomass burning and smoke emission rates, and the implications of this unique capability for improving our understanding of smoke impacts on air quality, weather, and climate. We will also discuss some of the challenges and uncertainties associated with satellite measurement of FRP and how they are being addressed.

  14. SERI biomass program annual technical report: 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeron, P.W.; Corder, R.E.; Hill, A.M.; Lindsey, H.; Lowenstein, M.Z.

    1983-02-01

    The biomass with which this report is concerned includes aquatic plants, which can be converted into liquid fuels and chemicals; organic wastes (crop residues as well as animal and municipal wastes), from which biogas can be produced via anerobic digestion; and organic or inorganic waste streams, from which hydrogen can be produced by photobiological processes. The Biomass Program Office supports research in three areas which, although distinct, all use living organisms to create the desired products. The Aquatic Species Program (ASP) supports research on organisms that are themselves processed into the final products, while the Anaerobic Digestion (ADP) and Photo/Biological Hydrogen Program (P/BHP) deals with organisms that transform waste streams into energy products. The P/BHP is also investigating systems using water as a feedstock and cell-free systems which do not utilize living organisms. This report summarizes the progress and research accomplishments of the SERI Biomass Program during FY 1982.

  15. Resolution of grass canopy biomass classes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, C. J.

    1977-01-01

    Analysis of variance methods has been applied to in situ grassland spectral reflectance data in order to determine the classes or levels of total wet biomass that can be resolved spectrally by a single narrow band measurement. Ground-truth clipping of blue grama grass plots was performed immediately following spectral reflectance measurements at 91 wavelength intervals which were 0.005 microns apart over the spectral range from 0.350 to 0.800 microns. It was found that the photographic infrared region of 0.750 to 0.800 microns could be used to distinguish three classes or levels of total wet biomass. Four or five classes, particularly at higher biomass levels, could not be distinguished by this technique.

  16. Coal and biomass to fuels and power.

    PubMed

    Williams, Robert H; Liu, Guangjian; Kreutz, Thomas G; Larson, Eric D

    2011-01-01

    Systems with CO(2) capture and storage (CCS) that coproduce transportation fuels and electricity from coal plus biomass can address simultaneously challenges of climate change from fossil energy and dependence on imported oil. Under a strong carbon policy, such systems can provide competitively clean low-carbon energy from secure domestic feedstocks by exploiting the negative emissions benefit of underground storage of biomass-derived CO(2), the low cost of coal, the scale economies of coal energy conversion, the inherently low cost of CO(2) capture, the thermodynamic advantages of coproduction, and expected high oil prices. Such systems require much less biomass to make low-carbon fuels than do biofuels processes. The economics are especially attractive when these coproduction systems are deployed as alternatives to CCS for stand-alone fossil fuel power plants. If CCS proves to be viable as a major carbon mitigation option, the main obstacles to deployment of coproduction systems as power generators would be institutional.

  17. Fermentable sugars by chemical hydrolysis of biomass.

    PubMed

    Binder, Joseph B; Raines, Ronald T

    2010-03-09

    Abundant plant biomass has the potential to become a sustainable source of fuels and chemicals. Realizing this potential requires the economical conversion of recalcitrant lignocellulose into useful intermediates, such as sugars. We report a high-yielding chemical process for the hydrolysis of biomass into monosaccharides. Adding water gradually to a chloride ionic liquid-containing catalytic acid leads to a nearly 90% yield of glucose from cellulose and 70-80% yield of sugars from untreated corn stover. Ion-exclusion chromatography allows recovery of the ionic liquid and delivers sugar feedstocks that support the vigorous growth of ethanologenic microbes. This simple chemical process, which requires neither an edible plant nor a cellulase, could enable crude biomass to be the sole source of carbon for a scalable biorefinery.

  18. Fuel from biomass - with emphasis on alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    McIloy, D.L.

    1981-11-01

    It takes nature millions of years to transform organic matter into valuable fossil fuel. By moving to biomass sources of energy, one can reduce that processing or lag time to a matter of hours. Biomass can be converted into useful fuels through various processes. Methane gas can be produced by bacterial digestion or by burning biomass under anaerobic conditions. Vegetable oils can be extracted from many seeds and burned as fuel in diesel engines. By fermentation of sugar with yeast, one can produce fuel alcohol. This review paper is presented under headings - alcohol fuels; use of fuel alcohol; performance of gasoline; upgrading fuels; energy balance or liquid fuel gain; ethane versus fossil fuels; feed stocks; food, feed and fuel; production goals.

  19. Ethanol from biomass: A status report

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.

    1996-12-31

    Programmatic and technical activities of SWAN Biomass, a company formed by Amoco Corporation and Stone & Webster, to convert non-grain biomass material to ethanol, are highlighted in this presentation. The potential ethanol markets identified are: (1) fuel oxygenate and octane additive, and (2) waste reduction in the agricultural and forestry industries and in municipal waste streams. Differences in the SWAN process from that used in corn-based ethanol facilities include more intense pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass, different enzymes, hydrolysis and fermentation of sugar polymers is performed in the same vessel, and a typical solid residue of lignin. The major market and technical risks have been assessed as being manageable. 8 figs., 8 tabs.

  20. Cofiring biomass with coal: Opportunities for Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, A. A.; Shamsuddin, A. H.

    2013-06-01

    Malaysia generated 108,175 GWh of electricity in 2010 where 39.51 % was sourced from coal. Coal power generation is also planned to overtake natural gas as the main fuel for electricity generation within the next two decades. Malaysia also has a vast biomass resource that is currently under-utilised for electricity generation. This paper studies the option of cofiring biomass in existing Malaysian coal power plants to increase the nation's renewable energy mix as well as to reduce its power sector carbon dioxide emission. Benefits of cofiring to the nation were discussed and agricultural residues from palm oil and paddy was identified as a potential source of biomass for cofiring. It was also found that there is a willingness for cofiring by stakeholders but barriers existed in the form of technical issues and lack of clear direction and mechanism.

  1. Validating Community-Led Forest Biomass Assessments

    PubMed Central

    Venter, Michelle; Venter, Oscar; Edwards, Will; Bird, Michael I.

    2015-01-01

    The lack of capacity to monitor forest carbon stocks in developing countries is undermining global efforts to reduce carbon emissions. Involving local people in monitoring forest carbon stocks could potentially address this capacity gap. This study conducts a complete expert remeasurement of community-led biomass inventories in remote tropical forests of Papua New Guinea. By fully remeasuring and isolating the effects of 4,481 field measurements, we demonstrate that programmes employing local people (non-experts) can produce forest monitoring data as reliable as those produced by scientists (experts). Overall, non-experts reported lower biomass estimates by an average of 9.1%, equivalent to 55.2 fewer tonnes of biomass ha-1, which could have important financial implications for communities. However, there were no significant differences between forest biomass estimates of expert and non-expert, nor were there significant differences in some of the components used to calculate these estimates, such as tree diameter at breast height (DBH), tree counts and plot surface area, but were significant differences between tree heights. At the landscape level, the greatest biomass discrepancies resulted from height measurements (41%) and, unexpectedly, a few large missing trees contributing to a third of the overall discrepancies. We show that 85% of the biomass discrepancies at the tree level were caused by measurement taken on large trees (DBH ≥50cm), even though they consisted of only 14% of the stems. We demonstrate that programmes that engage local people can provide high-quality forest carbon data that could help overcome barriers to reducing forest carbon emissions in developing countries. Nonetheless, community-based monitoring programmes should prioritise reducing errors in the field that lead to the most important discrepancies, notably; overcoming challenges to accurately measure large trees. PMID:26126186

  2. An Experimental Research of Biomass Crushing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yue

    2017-05-01

    Biomass crushing is precondition for utilization and transformation of biomass energy. Compressive strength of biomass raw materials is generally small with long fiber, and multiple crushing methods like shocking, shearing and grinding should be used to realize high-efficiency crushing. Based on this, this paper researched and developed a set of biomass fine crushing system, and conducted an optimized study of main parameters influencing crushing process—revolving speed, between blade and cutter head and material moisture content. Results indicated that this set of crushing system could complete fine crushing of biomass, particle size of crushed products was controlled below 250µm, crushing energy consumption was between 70—120kwh/t, both of which were mainly decided by material moisture content and operating parameters of crusher. Revolving speed of crusher was elevated, proportion of particles (d<106µm) with fine particle size in crushed products increased, and unit energy consumption of crushing increased; narrowing space between blade and cutter head could improve crushing effect of biomass, but unit energy consumption increased; the higher the moisture content was, the less the content of fine particles in crushed products would be, and the greater unit energy consumption would be. By comprehensive comparison, the optimal operating conditions for crushing were: revolving speed was 3600r/min, space between impulse blade and cutter head was 8mm, moisture content was 10.6%, energy consumption was 98kwh/t, product particle size distribution was: those with particle size below 106µm occupied 71.5% and those between 106µm—250µm occupied 28.5%.

  3. Validating Community-Led Forest Biomass Assessments.

    PubMed

    Venter, Michelle; Venter, Oscar; Edwards, Will; Bird, Michael I

    2015-01-01

    The lack of capacity to monitor forest carbon stocks in developing countries is undermining global efforts to reduce carbon emissions. Involving local people in monitoring forest carbon stocks could potentially address this capacity gap. This study conducts a complete expert remeasurement of community-led biomass inventories in remote tropical forests of Papua New Guinea. By fully remeasuring and isolating the effects of 4,481 field measurements, we demonstrate that programmes employing local people (non-experts) can produce forest monitoring data as reliable as those produced by scientists (experts). Overall, non-experts reported lower biomass estimates by an average of 9.1%, equivalent to 55.2 fewer tonnes of biomass ha(-1), which could have important financial implications for communities. However, there were no significant differences between forest biomass estimates of expert and non-expert, nor were there significant differences in some of the components used to calculate these estimates, such as tree diameter at breast height (DBH), tree counts and plot surface area, but were significant differences between tree heights. At the landscape level, the greatest biomass discrepancies resulted from height measurements (41%) and, unexpectedly, a few large missing trees contributing to a third of the overall discrepancies. We show that 85% of the biomass discrepancies at the tree level were caused by measurement taken on large trees (DBH ≥50 cm), even though they consisted of only 14% of the stems. We demonstrate that programmes that engage local people can provide high-quality forest carbon data that could help overcome barriers to reducing forest carbon emissions in developing countries. Nonetheless, community-based monitoring programmes should prioritise reducing errors in the field that lead to the most important discrepancies, notably; overcoming challenges to accurately measure large trees.

  4. Vernachlässigte klinische Merkmale der follikulotropen Mycosis fungoides: eine große klinische Fallserie.

    PubMed

    Baykal, Can; Atci, Tugba; Ozturk Sari, Sule; Polat Ekinci, Algun; Buyukbabani, Nesimi

    2017-03-01

    Als seltene Form der Mycosis fungoides (MF), ist die follikulotrope MF (FMF) durch ein breites Spektrum klinischer Symptome gekennzeichnet. Dazu gehören, neben den vorherrschenden follikulären Läsionen, auch viele atypische Manifestationen. Das Ziel der vorliegenden Studie war eine klinische Bewertung von FMF-Patienten, unter besonderer Berücksichtigung von vernachlässigten dermatologischen Merkmalen. Insgesamt wurden 27 FMF-Patienten aus dem 572 Patienten umfassenden MF-Register unserer Abteilung retrospektiv bezüglich ihrer Demographie sowie der klinischen Merkmale, Behandlungsformen, Nachsorge und Therapieergebnisse bewertet. Neben den bekannten klinischen Symptomen der FMF fanden wir Lichen-spinulosus-artige Läsionen mit begleitender Hypopigmentierung (n = 3) und Alopezie (n = 2), infiltrierte/erhabene, erythematöse Plaques im Gesicht, die zunächst als Lupus tumidus angesehen wurden (n = 2), pseudotumorale Läsionen, die klinisch eine MF im Tumorstadium vortäuschten (n = 1), dauerhafte Exkoriationen (n = 1), erythematöse, Rosazea-artige Papeln im Gesicht (n = 1) sowie kuppelförmige, asymptomatische, mit Muzin gefüllte (in der Histologie) Papeln/Knoten (n = 2), die andere krankheitsbedingte Läsionen überlagerten. Es kamen mehrere Therapieansätze mit unterschiedlichem Ergebnis zur Anwendung. Acht (29,6 %) Patienten hatten FMF im Spätstadium. Das Bewusstsein für vernachlässigte klinische Symptome kann wesentlich dazu beitragen, verspätete Diagnosen dieser aggressiven MF-Variante zu verringern. © 2017 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Spectral procedures for estimating crop biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Wanjura, D.F.; Hatfield, J.L.

    1985-05-01

    Spectral reflectance was measured semi-weekly and used to estimate leaf area and plant dry weight accumulation in cotton, soybeans, and sunflower. Integration of spectral crop growth cycle curves explained up to 95 and 91%, respectively, of the variation in cotton lint yield and dry weight. A theoretical relationship for dry weight accumulation, in which only intercepted radiation or intercepted radiation and solar energy to biomass conversion efficiency were spectrally estimated, explained 99 and 96%, respectively, of the observed plant dry weight variation of the three crops. These results demonstrate the feasibility of predicting crop biomass from spectral measurements collected frequently during the growing season. 15 references.

  6. New market potential: Torrefaction of woody biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Tumuluru, Jaya Shankar; Hess, J. Richard

    2015-06-02

    Biomass was the primary source of energy worldwide until a few generations ago, when the energy-density, storability and transportability of fossil fuels enabled one of the most rapid cultural transformations in the history of humankind: the industrial revolution. In just a few hundred years, coal, oil and natural gas have prompted the development of highly efficient, high-volume manufacturing and transportation systems that have become the foundation of the world economy. But over-reliance on fossil resources has also led to environmental and energy security concerns. In addition, one of the greatest advantages of using biomass to replace fossil fuels is reduced greenhouse gas emissions and carbon footprint.

  7. Methane production from global biomass burning

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Min Hao; Ward, D.E.

    1993-11-20

    Emissions of methane from various sources of biomass burning are determined quantitatively for tropical, temperate, and boreal regions. About 85% of the total CH{sub 4} is emitted in the tropical area, which is mainly the result of shifting cultivation, fuelwood use, and deforestation. Methane emissions from biomass burning may have increased by at least 9% during the last decade because of increases in tropical deforestation and the use of fuelwood. Changes in land use practices and population growth in the tropics are possible causes of the increase of atmospheric CH{sub 4} concentration. 31 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  8. BARRIER ISSUES TO THE UTILIZATION OF BIOMASS

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce C. Folkedahl; Jay R. Gunderson; Darren D. Schmidt; Greg F. Weber; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    2002-09-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has completed a project to examine fundamental issues that could limit the use of biomass in small industrial steam/power systems in order to increase the future use of this valuable domestic resource. Specifically, the EERC attempted to elucidate the ash-related problems--grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling--associated with cofiring coal and biomass in grate-fired systems. Utilization of biomass in stoker boilers designed for coal can be a cause of concern for boiler operators. Boilers that were designed for low-volatile fuels with lower reactivities can experience problematic fouling when switched to higher-volatile and more reactive coal-biomass blends. Higher heat release rates at the grate can cause increased clinkering or slagging at the grate due to higher temperatures. Combustion and loss of volatile matter can start much earlier for biomass fuels compared to design fuel, vaporizing alkali and chlorides which then condense on rear walls and heat exchange tube banks in the convective pass of the stoker, causing noticeable increases in fouling. In addition, stoker-fired boilers that switch to biomass blends may encounter new chemical species such as potassium sulfates, various chlorides, and phosphates. These species in combination with different flue gas temperatures, because of changes in fuel heating value, can adversely affect ash deposition behavior. The goal of this project was to identify the primary ash mechanisms related to grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling associated with cofiring coal and biomass--specifically wood and agricultural residuals--in grate-fired systems, leading to future mitigation of these problems. The specific technical objectives of the project were: (1) Modification of an existing pilot-scale combustion system to simulate a grate-fired system. (2) Verification testing of the simulator. (3) Laboratory-scale testing and fuel characterization to

  9. BARRIER ISSUES TO THE UTILIZATION OF BIOMASS

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce C. Folkedahl; Darren D. Schmidt; Greg F. Weber; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    2001-10-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is conducting a project to examine the fundamental issues limiting the use of biomass in small industrial steam/power systems in order to increase the future use of this valuable domestic resource. Specifically, the EERC is attempting to elucidate the ash-related problems--grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling--associated with cofiring coal and biomass in grate-fired systems. Utilization of biomass in stoker boilers designed for coal can be a cause of concern for boiler operators. Boilers that were designed for low volatile fuels with lower reactivities can experience damaging fouling when switched to higher volatile and more reactive lower-rank fuels, such as when cofiring biomass. Higher heat release rates at the grate can cause more clinkering or slagging at the grate because of higher temperatures. Combustion and loss of volatile matter can start too early for biomass fuels compared to the design fuel, vaporizing alkali and chlorides which then condense on rear walls and heat exchange tube banks in the convective pass of the stoker, causing noticeable increases in fouling. In addition, stoker-fired boilers that switch to biomass blends may encounter new chemical species such as potassium sulfates and various chlorides, in combination with different flue gas temperatures because of changes in fuel heating value which can adversely affect ash deposition behavior. The goal of this project is to identify the primary ash mechanisms related to grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling associated with cofiring coal and biomass--specifically wood and agricultural residuals--in grate-fired systems, leading to future mitigation of these problems. The specific technical objectives of the project are: Modification of an existing EERC pilot-scale combustion system to simulate a grate-fired system; Verification testing of the simulator; Laboratory-scale testing and fuel characterization to determine ash

  10. Environmental analysis of biomass-ethanol facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Corbus, D.; Putsche, V.

    1995-12-01

    This report analyzes the environmental regulatory requirements for several process configurations of a biomass-to-ethanol facility. It also evaluates the impact of two feedstocks (municipal solid waste [MSW] and agricultural residues) and three facility sizes (1000, 2000, and 3000 dry tons per day [dtpd]) on the environmental requirements. The basic biomass ethanol process has five major steps: (1) Milling, (2) Pretreatment, (3) Cofermentation, (4) Enzyme production, (5) Product recovery. Each step could have environmental impacts and thus be subject to regulation. Facilities that process 2000 dtpd of MSW or agricultural residues would produce 69 and 79 million gallons of ethanol, respectively.

  11. Biomass thermochemical conversion program. 1985 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Wood and crop residues constitute a vast majority of the biomass feedstocks available for conversion, and thermochemical processes are well suited for conversion of these materials. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring research on this conversion technology for renewable energy through its Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. The Program is part of DOE's Biofuels and Municipal Waste Technology Division, Office of Renewable Technologies. This report briefly describes the Thermochemical Conversion Program structure and summarizes the activities and major accomplishments during fiscal year 1985. 32 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Production of chemicals and fuels from biomass

    DOEpatents

    Woods, Elizabeth; Qiao, Ming; Myren, Paul; Cortright, Randy D.; Kania, John

    2015-12-15

    Described are methods, reactor systems, and catalysts for converting biomass to fuels and chemicals in a batch and/or continuous process. The process generally involves the conversion of water insoluble components of biomass, such as hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin, to volatile C.sub.2+O.sub.1-2 oxygenates, such as alcohols, ketones, cyclic ethers, esters, carboxylic acids, aldehydes, and mixtures thereof. In certain applications, the volatile C.sub.2+O.sub.1-2 oxygenates can be collected and used as a final chemical product, or used in downstream processes to produce liquid fuels, chemicals and other products.

  13. Biomass Burning Observation Project Science Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinman, KI; Sedlacek, AJ

    2013-09-01

    Aerosols from biomass burning perturb Earth’s climate through the direct radiative effect (both scattering and absorption) and through influences on cloud formation and precipitation and the semi-direct effect. Despite much effort, quantities important to determining radiative forcing such as the mass absorption coefficients (MAC) of light-absorbing carbon, secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation rates, and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity remain in doubt. Field campaigns in northern temperate latitudes have been overwhelmingly devoted to other aerosol sources in spite of biomass burning producing about one-third of the fine particles (PM2.5) in the U.S.

  14. Biomass Gasifier Facility (BGF). Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The Pacific International Center for High Technology Research (PICHTR) is planning, to design, construct and operate a Biomass Gasifier Facility (BGF). This facility will be located on a site easement near the Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar company (KC&S) Paia Sugar Factory on Maui, Hawaii. The proposed BGF Project is a scale-up facility, intended to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of emerging biomass gasification technology for commercialization. This Executive Summary summarizes the uses of this Environmental Assessment, the purpose and need for the project, project,description, and project alternatives.

  15. Genetic manipulation of lignocellulosic biomass for bioenergy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Dudareva, Natalia; Morgan, John A; Chapple, Clint

    2015-12-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass represents an abundant and sustainable raw material for biofuel production. The recalcitrance of biomass to degradation increases the estimated cost of biofuel production and limits its competitiveness in the market. Genetic engineering of lignin, a major recalcitrance factor, improves saccharification and thus the potential yield of biofuels. Recently, our understanding of lignification and its regulation has been advanced by new studies in various systems, all of which further enhances our ability to manipulate the biosynthesis and deposition of lignin in energy crops for producing cost-effective second generation biofuels.

  16. From research plots to prototype biomass plantations

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, W.A.; Vanstone, B.J.; Gambles, R.L.; Zsuffa, L.

    1993-12-31

    The development of biomass energy plantations is now expanding from the research plot phase into the next level of development at larger scale plantings. This is necessary to provide: more accurate information on biomass yields, realistic production cost figures, venues to test harvesting equipment, demonstration sites for potential producers, and a supply of feedstock for prototype conversion facilities. The paper will discuss some of these objectives and some of the challenges encountered in the scale-up process associated with a willow prototype plantation project currently under development in Eastern Canada.

  17. Biomass thermochemical conversion program: 1987 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of the Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program is to generate a base of scientific data and conversion process information that will lead to establishment of cost-effective processes for conversion of biomass resources into clean fuels. To accomplish this objective, in fiscal year 1987 the Thermochemical Conversion Program sponsored research activities in the following four areas: Liquid Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology; Gasification Technology; Direct Combustion Technology; Program Support Activities. In this report an overview of the Thermochemical Conversion Program is presented. Specific research projects are then described. Major accomplishments for 1987 are summarized.

  18. Microbial production of energy sources from biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righelato, R. C.

    1980-02-01

    The biochemical options available for the microbial production of energy sources from biomass is reviewed and some of the technology available for microbial conversion is discussed with particular reference to present limitations and how they may be overcome. Attention is given to the chemical process of anaerobic fermentation emphasizing the chemical reaction of glucose into pyruvic acid. The capital costs and energy consumption of ethanol and methane and their production are discussed. It is concluded that anaerobic fermentation of carbohydrates and digestion of biomass-containing effluents can be used as methods for achieving greater energy availability.

  19. Emissions of nitrous oxide from biomass burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winstead, Edward L.; Cofer, Wesley R., III; Levine, Joel S.

    1991-01-01

    A study has been conducted which compared N2O results obtained over large prescribed fires or wildfires, in which 'grab-sampling' with storage had been used with N2O measurements made in near-real time. CO2-normalized emission ratios obtained initially from the laboratory fires are substantially lower than those obtained over large-scale biomass fires. Combustion may not be the only source of N2O in large fire smoke plumes; physical, chemical, and biochemical processes in the soil may be altered by large biomass fires, leading to large N2O releases.

  20. Microbial conversion of biomass to methane

    SciTech Connect

    Chynoweth, D.P.

    1981-01-01

    Laboratory studies have investigated the anaerobic digestion of a variety of feedstocks including sea kelp, water hyacinth, terrestrial herbaceous and woody plants, sewage sludge, municipal solid waste, and biomass-organic waste blends. The results of these and other studies are used to illustrate key factors which influence methane production rates and yields, including feed organic composition, nutrients, inoculum, temperature, retention time, feed concentration, particle size, and mixing. A new process recently developed which combines biological and thermal operations for conversion of biomass to substitute natural gas is described.

  1. Hydrolysis and fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass

    DOEpatents

    Torget, Robert W.; Padukone, Nandan; Hatzis, Christos; Wyman, Charles E.

    2000-01-01

    A multi-function process is described for the hydrolysis and fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass to separate hemicellulosic sugars from other biomass components such as extractives and proteins; a portion of the solubilized lignin; cellulose; glucose derived from cellulose; and insoluble lignin from said biomass comprising one or more of the following: optionally, as function 1, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0 into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing a lignocellulosic biomass material at a temperature of about 94 to about 160.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 120 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of extractives, lignin, and protein by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; as function 2, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0, either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing either fresh biomass or the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 1 at a temperature of about 94-220.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of hemicellulosic sugars, semisoluble sugars and other compounds, and amorphous glucans by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; as function 3, optionally, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0 either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 2 at a temperature of about 180-280.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of cellulosic sugars by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; and as function 4

  2. Investigating combustion as a method of processing inedible biomass produced in NASA's biomass production chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreschel, T. W.; Wheeler, R. M.; Hinkle, C. R.; Sager, J. C.; Knott, W. M.

    1991-01-01

    The Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) Breadboard Project at the John F. Kennedy Space Center is a research program to integrate and evaluate biological processes to provide air, water, and food for humans in closed environments for space habitation. This project focuses on the use of conventional crop plants as grown in the Biomass Production Chamber (BPC) for the production and recycling of oxygen, food, and water. The inedible portion of these crops has the potential to be converted to edible biomass or directly to the elemental constituents for direct recycling. Converting inedible biomass directly, by combustion, to carbon dioxide, water, and minerals could provide a baseline for estimating partitioning of the mass balance during recycling in a CELSS. Converting the inedible biomass to carbon dioxide and water requires the same amount of oxygen that was produced by photosynthesis. The oxygen produced during crop growth is just equal to the oxygen required to oxidize all the biomass produced during growth. Thus, the amount of oxygen produced that is available for human consumption is in proportion to the amount of biomass actually utilized by humans. The remaining oxygen must be available to oxidize the rest of the biomass back to carbon dioxide and water or the system will not be a regenerative one.

  3. High yielding biomass genotypes of willow (Salix spp.) show differences in below ground biomass allocation

    PubMed Central

    Cunniff, Jennifer; Purdy, Sarah J.; Barraclough, Tim J.P.; Castle, March; Maddison, Anne L.; Jones, Laurence E.; Shield, Ian F.; Gregory, Andrew S.; Karp, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Willows (Salix spp.) grown as short rotation coppice (SRC) are viewed as a sustainable source of biomass with a positive greenhouse gas (GHG) balance due to their potential to fix and accumulate carbon (C) below ground. However, exploiting this potential has been limited by the paucity of data available on below ground biomass allocation and the extent to which it varies between genotypes. Furthermore, it is likely that allocation can be altered considerably by environment. To investigate the role of genotype and environment on allocation, four willow genotypes were grown at two replicated field sites in southeast England and west Wales, UK. Above and below ground biomass was intensively measured over two two-year rotations. Significant genotypic differences in biomass allocation were identified, with below ground allocation differing by up to 10% between genotypes. Importantly, the genotype with the highest below ground biomass also had the highest above ground yield. Furthermore, leaf area was found to be a good predictor of below ground biomass. Growth environment significantly impacted allocation; the willow genotypes grown in west Wales had up to 94% more biomass below ground by the end of the second rotation. A single investigation into fine roots showed the same pattern with double the volume of fine roots present. This greater below ground allocation may be attributed primarily to higher wind speeds, plus differences in humidity and soil characteristics. These results demonstrate that the capacity exists to breed plants with both high yields and high potential for C accumulation. PMID:26339128

  4. High yielding biomass genotypes of willow (Salix spp.) show differences in below ground biomass allocation.

    PubMed

    Cunniff, Jennifer; Purdy, Sarah J; Barraclough, Tim J P; Castle, March; Maddison, Anne L; Jones, Laurence E; Shield, Ian F; Gregory, Andrew S; Karp, Angela

    2015-09-01

    Willows (Salix spp.) grown as short rotation coppice (SRC) are viewed as a sustainable source of biomass with a positive greenhouse gas (GHG) balance due to their potential to fix and accumulate carbon (C) below ground. However, exploiting this potential has been limited by the paucity of data available on below ground biomass allocation and the extent to which it varies between genotypes. Furthermore, it is likely that allocation can be altered considerably by environment. To investigate the role of genotype and environment on allocation, four willow genotypes were grown at two replicated field sites in southeast England and west Wales, UK. Above and below ground biomass was intensively measured over two two-year rotations. Significant genotypic differences in biomass allocation were identified, with below ground allocation differing by up to 10% between genotypes. Importantly, the genotype with the highest below ground biomass also had the highest above ground yield. Furthermore, leaf area was found to be a good predictor of below ground biomass. Growth environment significantly impacted allocation; the willow genotypes grown in west Wales had up to 94% more biomass below ground by the end of the second rotation. A single investigation into fine roots showed the same pattern with double the volume of fine roots present. This greater below ground allocation may be attributed primarily to higher wind speeds, plus differences in humidity and soil characteristics. These results demonstrate that the capacity exists to breed plants with both high yields and high potential for C accumulation.

  5. Unterstützung der IT-Service-Management-Prozesse an der Technischen Universität München durch eine Configuration-Management-Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knittl, Silvia

    Hochschulprozesse in Lehre und Verwaltung erfordern durch die steigende Integration und IT-Unterstützung ein sogenanntes Business Alignment der IT und damit auch ein professionelleres IT-Service-Management (ITSM). Die IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL) mit ihrer Beschreibung von in der Praxis bewährten Prozessen hat sich zum de-facto Standard im ITSM etabliert. Ein solcher Prozess ist das Konfigurationsmanagement. Es bildet die IT-Infrastruktur als Konfigurationselemente und deren Beziehungen in einem Werkzeug, genannt Configuration Management Database (CMDB), ab und unterstützt so das ITSM. Dieser Bericht beschreibt die Erfahrungen mit der prototypischen Einführung einer CMDB an der Technischen Universität München.

  6. Biomass pretreatment strategies via control of rheological behavior of biomass suspensions and reactive twin screw extrusion processing.

    PubMed

    Senturk-Ozer, Semra; Gevgilili, Halil; Kalyon, Dilhan M

    2011-10-01

    Twin screw extrusion based pretreatment of biomass is an attractive option due to its flexibility to carry out chemical reactions under relatively high stresses, temperatures and pressures. However, extrusion processes are rarely utilized in biomass pretreatment because such processing is constrained by rheological behavior of typical biomass suspensions. Without the manipulation of their rheological behavior, biomass suspensions become unprocessable within the extruder at modest biomass concentrations. Here it is demonstrated that gelation agents can render biomass suspensions processable. Specifically, carboxy methyl cellulose, CMC, could be used in conjunction with alkaline pretreatment of hardwood-type biomass and enabled separation of lignin from cellulose fibers. Furthermore, recycled black liquor, obtained upon pretreatment, was determined to be as effective as CMC for rendering biomass suspensions flowable by again facilitating the concomitant application of high shearing stresses and chemical treatment for the pretreatment of the biomass in the twin screw extruder.

  7. Analytical Methods for Biomass Characterization during Pretreatment and Bioconversion

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, Yunqiao; Meng, Xianzhi; Yoo, Chang Geun; Li, Mi; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2016-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass has been introduced as a promising resource for alternative fuels and chemicals because of its abundance and complement for petroleum resources. Biomass is a complex biopolymer and its compositional and structural characteristics largely vary depending on its species as well as growth environments. Because of complexity and variety of biomass, understanding its physicochemical characteristics is a key for effective biomass utilization. Characterization of biomass does not only provide critical information of biomass during pretreatment and bioconversion, but also give valuable insights on how to utilize the biomass. For better understanding biomass characteristics, good grasp and proper selection of analytical methods are necessary. This chapter introduces existing analytical approaches that are widely employed for biomass characterization during biomass pretreatment and conversion process. Diverse analytical methods using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, gel permeation chromatography (GPC), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for biomass characterization are reviewed. In addition, biomass accessibility methods by analyzing surface properties of biomass are also summarized in this chapter.

  8. Biomass-energy-technology program summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-06-01

    An account is given of the ongoing research, development, and demonstration efforts of the Biomass Energy Technology program. Descriptions are given for each of the program projects funded and/or in existence during Fiscal Year 1981, reflecting their status as of September 30, 1981. The summaries are grouped as follows: feedstock production, conversion systems, market development, and general support and analysis.

  9. Environmental issues related to biomass: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, M.; Ranney, J.W.

    1993-12-31

    Now that public attention has grown increasingly focused on environmentalism and climate change, the commercial use of biomass could greatly accelerate. Renewable feedstocks like biomass can provide better environmentally balanced sources of energy and other nonfood products than fossil fuels. The future of biomass is uncertain, however, because public attention focuses on both its potential and its challenges. This paper is divided into five sections. Section 2 briefly addresses economic environmental issues. The extent to which externalities are accounted for in the market price of fuels plays a significant role in determining both the ultimate size of biofuel markets and the extent of the environmental benefits of feedstock cultivation and conversion processes. Sections 3 and 4 catalog the main hazards and benefits that are likely to arise in the large-scale commercialization of biomass fuel and note where the major uncertainties lay. Environmental issues arise with the cultivation of each feedstock and with each step in the process of its conversion to fuel. Feedstocks are discussed in Section 3 in terms of three main groups: wastes, energy crops, and traditional agricultural crops. In Section 4, conversion processes are also divided into three groups, on the basis of the end energy carrier: gas, liquid, and solid and electricity. Section 5 provides a conclusion and summary.

  10. Emissions from biomass burning in the Yucatan

    Treesearch

    R. J. Yokelson; J. D. Crounse; P. F. DeCarlo; T. Karl; S. Urbanski; E. Atlas; T. Campos; Y. Shinozuka; V. Kapustin; A. D. Clarke; A. Weinheimer; D. J. Knapp; D. D. Montzka; J. Holloway; P. Weibring; F. Flocke; W. Zheng; D. Toohey; P. O. Wennberg; C. Wiedinmyer; L. Mauldin; A. Fried; D. Richter; J. Walega; J. L. Jimenez; K. Adachi; P. R. Buseck; S. R. Hall; R. Shetter

    2009-01-01

    In March 2006 two instrumented aircraft made the first detailed field measurements of biomass burning (BB) emissions in the Northern Hemisphere tropics as part of the MILAGRO project. The aircraft were the National Center for Atmospheric Research C-130 and a University of Montana/ US Forest Service Twin Otter. The initial emissions of up to 49 trace gas or particle...

  11. Method for making adhesive from biomass

    DOEpatents

    Russell, J.A.; Riemath, W.F.

    1984-03-30

    A method is described for making adhesive from biomass. A liquefaction oil is prepared from lignin-bearing plant material and a phenolic fraction is extracted therefrom. The phenolic fraction is reacted with formaldehyde to yield a phenol-formaldehyde resin. 2 figures.

  12. Biomass externally fired gas turbine cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Eidensten, L.; Yan, J.; Svedberg, G.

    1996-07-01

    This paper is a presentation of a systematic study on externally fired gas turbine cogeneration fueled by biomass. The gas turbine is coupled in series with a biomass combustion furnace in which the gas turbine exhaust is used to support combustion. Three cogeneration systems have been simulated. They are systems without a gas turbine, with a non-top-fired gas turbine, and a top-fired gas turbine. For all systems, three types of combustion equipment have been selected: circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler, grate fired steam boiler, and grate fired hot water boiler. The sizes of biomass furnaces have been chosen as 20 MW and 100 MW fuel inputs. The total efficiencies based on electricity plus process heat, electrical efficiencies, and the power-to-heat ratios for various alternatives have been calculated. For each of the cogeneration systems, part-load performance with varying biomass fuel input is presented. Systems with CFB boilers have a higher total efficiency and electrical efficiency than other systems when a top-fired gas turbine is added. However, the systems with grate fired steam boilers allow higher combustion temperature in the furnace than CFB boilers do. Therefore, a top combustor may not be needed when high temperature is already available. Only one low-grade fuel system is then needed and the gas turbine can operate with a very clean working medium.

  13. Allometry and biomass of pollarded black locust

    Treesearch

    David M. Burner; Daniel H. Pote; Adrian Ares

    2006-01-01

    Climatic constraints can cause forage deficits in the summer in west-central Arkansas, necessitating expensive, supplemental hay feeding. Black locust could be used for summer browse, but the temporal distribution of foliar biomass has not been adequately tested. Our objective was to determine effects of harvest date, fertilization (0 and 600 kg P ha-1...

  14. Process for decomposing lignin in biomass

    DOEpatents

    Rector, Kirk Davin; Lucas, Marcel; Wagner, Gregory Lawrence; Kimball, David Bryan; Hanson, Susan Kloek

    2014-10-28

    A mild inexpensive process for treating lignocellulosic biomass involves oxidative delignification of wood using an aqueous solution prepared by dissolving a catalytic amount of manganese (III) acetate into water and adding hydrogen peroxide. Within 4 days and without agitation, the solution was used to convert poplar wood sections into a fine powder-like delignified, cellulose rich materials that included individual wood cells.

  15. Woody biomass from short rotation energy crops

    Treesearch

    R.S. Zalesny; M.W. Cunningham; R.B. Hall; J. Mirck; D.L. Rockwood; John Stanturf; T.A. Volk

    2011-01-01

    Short rotation woody crops (SRWCs) are ideal for woody biomass production and management systems because they are renewable energy feedstocks for biofuels, bioenergy, and bioproducts that can be strategically placed in the landscape to conserve soil and water, recycle nutrients, and sequester carbon. This chapter is a synthesis of the regional implications of producing...

  16. Biotechnological production of methanol from waste biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Kozak, R.; Morris, D.

    1995-12-01

    The production of methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) from waste biomass is possible through the use of genetically modified bacteria. The biomass to methanol conversion process makes use of a naturally occurring, direct aerobic enzymatic system referred to as oxidative demethylation. Methoxy groups are stripped off of lignin and lignin like plant substances (approximately fifty percent of all plant biomass) and hydrolyzed to form methanol. Since the biotech process is stoichiometric, potentially every methoxy group in the lignin feedstock can be converted to methanol fuel. Approximately 30-35% of lignin is a methoxy compound that can be converted. Biotechnological conversion could produce up to 100 gallons/ton or 20 billion gallons a year of methanol from waste biomass. Current work has focused on the genetic modification of the enzymatic conversion process to reach commercial production. The goals of this research are; increase product yields, implement an operon {open_quotes}switch{close_quotes} mechanism to exploit multiple feedstocks, and produce environmentally safe by-products. Progress on these topics will be reported.

  17. Lead removal by Spirulina platensis biomass.

    PubMed

    Al-Homaidan, Ali A; Al-Abbad, Aljawharah F; Al-Hazzani, Amal A; Al-Ghanayem, Abdullah A; Alabdullatif, Jamila A

    2016-01-01

    In this investigation, we report on the biosorption of Pb (II) from aqueous solutions by the nonliving biomass of the micro-alga (cyanobacterium) Spirulina platensis. Propagation of the micro-alga was carried out in outside oblong raceway ponds. The biomass was cleaned, dried and used for the investigation. The effects of pH, adsorbent dose, temperature, initial concentration of Pb (II), and contact time on the adsorption of lead by the dry biomass were studied. The experiments were carried out in 250 ml conical flasks containing 100 ml of test solutions using an orbital incubator at 150 rpm. Concentrations of the metal before and after the experiments were measured using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. Very high levels of Pb (II) removal (>91%) were obtained. The optimum conditions for maximal adsorption by S. platensis were found to be pH 3; 2 g of adsorbent dose; incubation at 26°C; 100 mg/l of lead initial concentration and 60 minutes of contact time. The experimental data fitted well with Freundlich isotherm equation with R(2) values greater than 0.97. Based on our results, we recommend the utilization of S. platensis biomass for heavy metal removal from aqueous solutions.

  18. Outlook for Biomass Ethanol Production and Demand

    EIA Publications

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a midterm forecast for biomass ethanol production under three different technology cases for the period 2000 to 2020, based on projections developed from the Energy Information Administration's National Energy Modeling System. An overview of cellulose conversion technology and various feedstock options and a brief history of ethanol usage in the United States are also presented.

  19. Coal + Biomass → Liquids + Electricity (with CCS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this presentation, Matt Aitken applies the MARKet ALlocation energy system model to evaluate the market potential for a class of technologies that convert coal and biomass to liquid fuels and electricity (CBtLE), paired with carbon capture and storage (CCS). The technology is ...

  20. Study on fusion characteristics of biomass ash.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yanqing; Tan, Hongzhang; Wang, Xuebin; Liu, Zhengning; Liu, Haiyu; Liu, Yang; Xu, Tongmo

    2010-12-01

    The ash fusion characteristics (AFC) of Capsicum stalks ashes, cotton stalks ashes and wheat stalks ashes that all prepared by ashing at 400 degrees C, 600 degrees C and 815 degrees C are consistent after 860 degrees C, 990 degrees C and 840 degrees C, respectively in the ash fusion temperature test and TG. Initial deformation temperature (IDT) increases with decreased K(2)O and went up with increased MgO, CaO, Fe(2)O(3) and Al(2)O(3). Softening temperature (ST), hemispherical temperature (HT) and fluid temperature (FT) do not affected by the concentrations of each element and the ashing temperature obviously. Therefore, the IDT may be as an evaluation index of biomass AFC rather than the ST used as an evaluation index of coal AFC. XRD shows that no matter what the ashing temperature is, the biomass ashes contain same high-temperature molten material. Therefore, evaluation of the biomass AFC should not be simply on the proportion of elements except IDT, but the high-temperature molten material in biomass ash. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. SMALL SCALE BIOMASS FUELED GAS TURBINE ENGINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new generation of small scale (less than 20 MWe) biomass fueled, power plants are being developed based on a gas turbine (Brayton cycle) prime mover. These power plants are expected to increase the efficiency and lower the cost of generating power from fuels such as wood. The n...

  2. A sustainable legume biomass energy farming system

    SciTech Connect

    Neathery, J.; Rubel, A.; Stencel, J.; Collins, M.

    1996-12-31

    Before environmentally sensitive areas are converted to biomass energy production, the production, the potential for sustainability of such systems must be assessed. The focus has been on woody or grass crops because of their high potential yields; however, yield sustainability is dependent on the application of fertilizer and lining materials, which in turn contribute to large costs. Growing legumes or mixtures of legumes with grasses could lower or alleviate the need for nitrate fertilizers. The incorporation of legumes into energy cropping systems could: (1) add soil organic matter; (2) introduce biologically fixed N; (3) improve soil structure and texture; (4) reduce soil erosion; (5) reduce production costs; and (6) decrease nitrate run-off in surface waters. Through the {open_quotes}rotation effect{close_quotes}, legumes cause increases in yield of subsequent non-legume crops beyond that accounted for by biologically-fixed N alone. In this paper, we describe a biomass energy system combining legume and grass biomass energy with fertilizer production from these same materials. Preliminary agronomic and engineering assessments for this type of biomass system are presented. The technologies needed to integrate nitrate production with legume energy farming and energy production through legume energy conversion are identified.

  3. Method for making adhesive from biomass

    DOEpatents

    Russell, Janet A.; Riemath, William F.

    1985-01-01

    A method is described for making adhesive from biomass. A liquefaction oil is prepared from lignin-bearing plant material and a phenolic fraction is extracted therefrom. The phenolic fraction is reacted with formaldehyde to yield a phenol-formaldehyde resin.

  4. Accurate Biomass Estimation via Bayesian Adaptive Sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Kevin R.; Knuth, Kevin H.; Castle, Joseph P.; Lvov, Nikolay

    2005-01-01

    The following concepts were introduced: a) Bayesian adaptive sampling for solving biomass estimation; b) Characterization of MISR Rahman model parameters conditioned upon MODIS landcover. c) Rigorous non-parametric Bayesian approach to analytic mixture model determination. d) Unique U.S. asset for science product validation and verification.

  5. Archaebacterial Fuel Production: Methane from Biomass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennox, John E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Discusses microbial production of methane from biomass. Topics include methogens (bacteria producing methane), ecology of methanogenesis, methanogenesis in ruminant/nonruminant and other environments, role of methanogenesis in nature, and methane production in sewage treatment plants. Also discusses construction of methane digesters (and related…

  6. Archaebacterial Fuel Production: Methane from Biomass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennox, John E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Discusses microbial production of methane from biomass. Topics include methogens (bacteria producing methane), ecology of methanogenesis, methanogenesis in ruminant/nonruminant and other environments, role of methanogenesis in nature, and methane production in sewage treatment plants. Also discusses construction of methane digesters (and related…

  7. SMALL SCALE BIOMASS FUELED GAS TURBINE ENGINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new generation of small scale (less than 20 MWe) biomass fueled, power plants are being developed based on a gas turbine (Brayton cycle) prime mover. These power plants are expected to increase the efficiency and lower the cost of generating power from fuels such as wood. The n...

  8. Method for making adhesive from biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, J.A.; Riemath, W.F.

    1985-04-02

    A method is described for making adhesive from biomass. A liquefaction oil is prepared from lignin-bearing plant material and a phenolic fraction is extracted therefrom. The phenolic fraction is reacted with formaldehyde to yield a phenol-formaldehyde resin.

  9. Nanostructure enzyme assemblies for biomass conversion

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biomass represents a vast resource for production of the world’s fuel and chemical feedstock needs. The use of enzymes to effect these bioconversions offers an alternative that is potentially more specific and environmentally-friendly than harsher chemical methodologies. Some species of anaerobic ...

  10. Solvent Extraction of Furfural From Biomass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    Solvent-extraction method reduces energy required to remove furfural produced during acid hydrolysis of biomass. Acid hydrolysis performed in vessel containing both solvents and reacting ingredients. With intimate contact between solvents and aqueous hydrolyis liqour, furfural removed form liquor almost as fast as it forms.

  11. Determining switchgrass biomass supplies for cellulosic biorefineries

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is being developed into a bioenergy crop for use in temperate regions of the USA. Information on spatial and temporial variation for stands and biomass yield among and within fields in large agroecoregions is not available. A reliable feedstock supply will be essent...

  12. Maximum-biomass prediction of homofermentative Lactobacillus.

    PubMed

    Cui, Shumao; Zhao, Jianxin; Liu, Xiaoming; Chen, Yong Q; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Fed-batch and pH-controlled cultures have been widely used for industrial production of probiotics. The aim of this study was to systematically investigate the relationship between the maximum biomass of different homofermentative Lactobacillus and lactate accumulation, and to develop a prediction equation for the maximum biomass concentration in such cultures. The accumulation of the end products and the depletion of nutrients by various strains were evaluated. In addition, the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of acid anions for various strains at pH 7.0 were examined. The lactate concentration at the point of complete inhibition was not significantly different from the MIC of lactate for all of the strains, although the inhibition mechanism of lactate and acetate on Lactobacillus rhamnosus was different from the other strains which were inhibited by the osmotic pressure caused by acid anions at pH 7.0. When the lactate concentration accumulated to the MIC, the strains stopped growing. The maximum biomass was closely related to the biomass yield per unit of lactate produced (YX/P) and the MIC (C) of lactate for different homofermentative Lactobacillus. Based on the experimental data obtained using different homofermentative Lactobacillus, a prediction equation was established as follows: Xmax - X0 = (0.59 ± 0.02)·YX/P·C.

  13. Forest biodiversity and woody biomass harvesting

    Treesearch

    Deahn M. Donner; T. Bently Wigley; Darren A. Miller

    2017-01-01

    With the expected increase in demand for woody biomass to help meet renewable energy needs, one principal sustainability question has been whether this material can be removed from forest stands while still conserving biological diversity and retaining ecosystem functioning (Hecht et al. 2009; Berch, Morris, and Malcolm 2011; Ridley et al. 2013). In general,...

  14. Urban biomass - not an urban legend

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Utilizing biomass from urban landscapes could significantly contribute to the nation’s renewable energy needs. There is an estimated 16.4 million hectares of land in urban areas cultivated with turfgrass and associated vegetation. Vegetation in urban areas is intensely managed which lead to regula...

  15. Sustainable Production of Switchgrass for Biomass Energy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a C4 grass native to the North American tallgrass prairies, which historically extended from Mexico to Canada. It is the model perennial warm-season grass for biomass energy. USDA-ARS in Lincoln, NE has studied switchgrass continuously since 1936. Plot-scale rese...

  16. Tree height and tropical forest biomass estimation

    Treesearch

    M.O. Hunter; M. Keller; D. Vitoria; D.C. Morton

    2013-01-01

    Tropical forests account for approximately half of above-ground carbon stored in global vegetation. However, uncertainties in tropical forest carbon stocks remain high because it is costly and laborious to quantify standing carbon stocks. Carbon stocks of tropical forests are determined using allometric relations between tree stem diameter and height and biomass....

  17. 75 FR 6263 - Biomass Crop Assistance Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-08

    ..., other vegetative waste material, animal waste, food waste, and yard waste; diesel-equivalent fuel derived from renewable biomass including vegetable oil and animal fat; biogas (including landfill gas and... to be a complete ban to protect soils from wind and water erosion and that no agricultural residue...

  18. Alkali slagging problems with biomass fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, T.R.; Miles, T.R. Jr.; Baxter, L.L.; Jenkins, B.M.; Oden, L.L.

    1993-12-31

    Biomass fueled power boilers are unable to burn more than minor percentages of annually generated agricultural fuels. Determining the mechanisms of deposit formation, and developing means of increasing the proportion of these annual biofuels to be fired are the aims of the ongoing Alkali Deposit Investigation sponsored by DOE/NREL with matching funds from industry sponsors, combining Science, Engineering and Industry.

  19. Air quality on biomass harvesting operations

    Treesearch

    Dana Mitchell

    2011-01-01

    The working environment around logging operations can be very dusty. But, air quality around logging operations is not well documented. Equipment movements and trafficking on the landing can cause dust to rise into the air. The addition of a biomass chipper creates different air flow patterns and may stir up additional dust. This project addresses two topics related to...

  20. BSCL use plan: Solving biomass recalcitrance

    SciTech Connect

    Himmel, M.; Vinzant, T.; Bower, S.; Jechura, J.

    2005-08-01

    Saccharification of lignocellulosic biomass has long been recognized as a potential low-cost source of mixed sugars for fermentation to fuel ethanol or chemicals. Several technologies have been developed over the years that allow this conversion process to occur, yet the significant challenge remaining is to make the process cost competitive.