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Sample records for biomechanics clinical aspects

  1. Structural and biomechanical aspects of equine sacroiliac joint function and their relationship to clinical disease.

    PubMed

    Goff, L M; Jeffcott, L B; Jasiewicz, J; McGowan, C M

    2008-06-01

    Pain originating from the sacroiliac joint (SIJ) in horses has long been associated with poor performance, yet specific diagnosis of sacroiliac dysfunction (SID) has been difficult to achieve. Clinical presentation of SID appears to fall into two categories. The first, presenting as pain and poor performance, is responsive to local analgesia of periarticular structures with poorly defined pathology. The second presents primarily as poor performance with bony pathological changes as a result of chronic instability. Diagnostic tests based on biomechanics as well as manual provocation for SIJ pain have formed the basis of tests currently used to diagnose SIJ dysfunction in humans. This review summarises the anatomy and biomechanics of the equine SIJ and current biomechanical, innervation and motor control concepts in human SID. The relationship between abnormal SIJ motion and altered neuromotor control with clinical disease of the equine SIJ are discussed. Future utilisation of these principles to develop new diagnostic and management tools for the equine SID is promising.

  2. [The sterno-clavicular joint: anatomy, biomechanic, clinical features and aspects of manual therapy].

    PubMed

    Frosi, G; Sulli, A; Testa, M; Cutolo, M

    2004-01-01

    The sterno-clavicular joint covers one remarkable importance in the complex of the shoulder girdle. This review investigates the anatomy, biomechanics, main affections and involvement of this joint in the pathological processes of the shoulder girdle in its complex. Moreover, it focuses on the opportunities offered from the conservative treatment, using in particular the manual therapy. Active and passive, as well as against isometric resistance movements, are discussed. In particular, the passive mobilization is demonstrated effective in the restoration of joint mobility. The sterno-clavicular joint is not structured in order to complete great work loads and has the tendency to become hypermotile or unstable, if subordinate to overload works, becoming painful. In this case, the techniques of passive mobilization and of modulation of the pain turn out effective.

  3. Physiological and biomechanical aspects of orienteering.

    PubMed

    Creagh, U; Reilly, T

    1997-12-01

    Orienteering is an endurance running event which differs from other running sports both in its cognitive element and in the type of terrain encountered. The demands of overcoming this terrain are not manifest in significant differences between orienteers and road runners in somatotype, though elite female orienteers have consistently been shown to have higher levels of adiposity (> 19%) than elite road runners. High aerobic power in orienteers (up to 63 and 76 ml/kg/min in women and men, respectively) is coupled with lower anaerobic performance. While leg strength is generally not high when compared with other athletic specialties, female orienteers have relatively good leg flexion strength. The energy cost of running is greatly increased in rough terrain. Oxygen cost was 26% higher while running in a forest when compared with road running. Biomechanical differences in stride pattern contribute towards this increased demand. Despite the high energy demands during competition, orienteers pace themselves such that their mean heart rate remains within the range of 167 to 172 beats/min, despite large fluctuations. The rough terrain encountered in orienteering results not only in a high energy cost but also in a higher incidence of sport-specific injuries, particularly to the ankle. Minor injuries such as cuts and bruises are common during competition.

  4. Clinical biomechanics of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Lockard, Margary

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the biomechanics of the articulations of the elbow joint that is relevant to therapists who design rehabilitation programs for patients following injuries or surgeries to the elbow. Individual and combined joint movements required for function such as activities of daily living are discussed, including normal arthrokinematics and the components that contribute to joint stability. The strain behavior of the nerves that cross the elbow is also reviewed. Therapists will understand the complexities of the biomechanics of the elbow that is necessary to design safe and effective rehabilitation programs.

  5. Clinical applications of biomechanics cinematography.

    PubMed

    Woodle, A S

    1986-10-01

    Biomechanics cinematography is the analysis of movement of living organisms through the use of cameras, image projection systems, electronic digitizers, and computers. This article is a comparison of cinematographic systems and details practical uses of the modality in research and education.

  6. Regularity Aspects in Inverse Musculoskeletal Biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Marie; Stâhl, Fredrik; Gulliksson, Mârten

    2008-09-01

    Inverse simulations of musculoskeletal models computes the internal forces such as muscle and joint reaction forces, which are hard to measure, using the more easily measured motion and external forces as input data. Because of the difficulties of measuring muscle forces and joint reactions, simulations are hard to validate. One way of reducing errors for the simulations is to ensure that the mathematical problem is well-posed. This paper presents a study of regularity aspects for an inverse simulation method, often called forward dynamics or dynamical optimization, that takes into account both measurement errors and muscle dynamics. Regularity is examined for a test problem around the optimum using the approximated quadratic problem. The results shows improved rank by including a regularization term in the objective that handles the mechanical over-determinancy. Using the 3-element Hill muscle model the chosen regularization term is the norm of the activation. To make the problem full-rank only the excitation bounds should be included in the constraints. However, this results in small negative values of the activation which indicates that muscles are pushing and not pulling, which is unrealistic but the error maybe small enough to be accepted for specific applications. These results are a start to ensure better results of inverse musculoskeletal simulations from a numerical point of view.

  7. Musculoskeletal demands on flamenco dancers: a clinical and biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Bejjani, F J; Halpern, N; Pio, A; Dominguez, R; Voloshin, A; Frankel, V H

    1988-04-01

    The flamenco dancer acts on the floor like a drummer. The percussive footwork and vibration patterns created during dancing impose unusual demands on the musculoskeletal system. This study investigated the clinical and biomechanical aspects of this task. Using the electrodynogram and skin-mounted accelerometers, foot pressures as well as hip and knee vibrations were recorded in 10 female dancers after a thorough clinical evaluation. A health questionnaire was also distributed to 29 dancers. Foot pressures and acceleration data reveal the percussive nature of the dance. Some clinical findings, like calluses, are related to pressure distribution. Urogenital disorders, as well as back and neck pain, may be related to the vibrations generated by the flamenco dance form. The hip joint seems to absorb most of the impacts. "Vibration-pressure" diagrams are suggested as a useful tool for evaluating a dancer's biomechanical behavior, as well as the effect of floors and footwear on this behavior.

  8. Automation and apps for clinical dental biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Adams, Bruce W

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this research summary is to introduce the current and ongoing work using smartphone video, tracking markers to measure musculoskeletal disorders of cranial and mandibular origin, and the potential significance of the technology to doctors and therapists. The MPA™ biomechanical measuring apps are in beta trials with various doctors and therapists. The technique requires substantial image processing and statistical analysis, best suited to server-side processing. A smartphone environment has enabled a virtual laboratory, which provides automated generation of graphics and in some cases automated interpretation. The system enables highly accurate real-time biomechanics studies using only a smartphone and tracking markers. Despite the technical challenges in setting up and testing of the virtual environment and with interpretation of clinical relevance, the trials have enabled a demonstration of real-time biomechanics studies. The technology has prompted a lot of discussion about the relevance of rapid assessment tools in clinical practice. It seems that a prior bias against motion tracking and its relevance is very strong with occlusion related use cases, yet there has been a general agreement about the use case for cranial movement tracking in managing complex issues related to the head, neck, and TMJ. Measurement of cranial and mandibular functions using a smartphone video as the input have been investigated. Ongoing research will depend upon doctors and therapists to provide feedback as to which uses are considered clinically relevant.

  9. Biomechanical aspects of sports-related head injuries.

    PubMed

    Park, Min S; Levy, Michael L

    2008-02-01

    With the increased conditioning, size, and speed of professional athletes and the increase in individuals engaging in sports and recreational activities, there is potential for rising numbers of traumatic brain injuries in sports. Fortunately, parallel strides in basic research technology and improvements in computer and video technology have created a new era of discovery in the study of the biomechanical aspects of sports-related head injuries. Although prevention will always be the most important factor in reducing the incidence of sports-related traumatic brain injuries, ongoing studies will lead to the development of newer protective equipment, improved recognition and management of concussions on the field of play, and modification of rules and guidelines to make these activities safer and more enjoyable.

  10. Using Clinical Gait Case Studies to Enhance Learning in Biomechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chester, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Clinical case studies facilitate the development of clinical reasoning strategies through knowledge and integration of the basic sciences. Case studies have been shown to be more effective in developing problem-solving abilities than the traditional lecture format. To enhance the learning experiences of students in biomechanics, clinical case…

  11. Using Clinical Gait Case Studies to Enhance Learning in Biomechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chester, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Clinical case studies facilitate the development of clinical reasoning strategies through knowledge and integration of the basic sciences. Case studies have been shown to be more effective in developing problem-solving abilities than the traditional lecture format. To enhance the learning experiences of students in biomechanics, clinical case…

  12. The Chêneau concept of bracing--biomechanical aspects.

    PubMed

    Rigo, Manuel; Weiss, Hans-Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    Current concept of bracing must take in consideration both the three-dimensional (3D) nature of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) and its pathomechanism of progression. A modern brace should be able to correct in 3D in order to break the so called 'vicious cycle' model. Generally speaking, it is necessary to create detorsional forces to derotate in the transversal plane, to correct the lateral deviation in the frontal plane and to normalize the sagittal profile of the spine. Breathing mechanics can be used to fight against the thoracic structural flat back. The original Chêneau brace was introduced at the end of the 70's and its principles were based more in anatomical observations rather than in biomechanics. A further evolution , enunciating new principles, has allowed a higher standard, improving in brace corrections and trunk modelling. This biomechanical principles have been developed under the name of Rigo-Chêneau-System (RSC) and used later in latest brace models like the Chêneau light with reduced material, and similar in brace corrections. Experience is also important to improve the end results. The blueprints to built the brace according to the anatomorradiological pattern are very helpful.

  13. Biomechanical Aspects of the Muscle-Bone Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Avin, Keith G.; Bloomfield, Susan A.; Gross, Ted S.; Warden, Stuart J.

    2014-01-01

    There is growing interest in the interaction between skeletal muscle and bone, particularly at the genetic and molecular levels. However, the genetic and molecular linkages between muscle and bone are achieved only within the context of the essential mechanical coupling of the tissues. This biomechanical and physiological linkage is readily evident as muscles attach to bone and induce exposure to varied mechanical stimuli via functional activity. The responsiveness of bone cells to mechanical stimuli, or their absence, is well established. However, questions remain regarding how muscle forces applied to bone serve to modulate bone homeostasis and adaptation. Similarly, the contributions of varied, but unique, stimuli generated by muscle to bone (such as low-magnitude, high-frequency stimuli) remains to be established. The current article focuses upon the mechanical relationship between muscle and bone. In doing so, we explore the stimuli that muscle imparts upon bone, models that enable investigation of this relationship, and recent data generated by these models. PMID:25515697

  14. Biomechanics of the thorax – research evidence and clinical expertise

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Diane Gail

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the biomechanics of the thorax is critical for understanding its role in multiple conditions since the thorax is part of many integrated systems including the musculoskeletal, respiratory, cardiac, digestive and urogynecological. The thorax is also an integrated system within itself and an element of the whole body/person. Therefore, understanding the biomechanics of the thorax is fundamental to all forms of treatment for multiple conditions. The interpretation of movement examination findings depends on one's view of optimal biomechanics and the influential factors. This article will provide a synopsis of the current state of research evidence as well as observations from clinical experience pertaining to the biomechanics of the thorax in order to help clinicians organise this knowledge and facilitate evidence-based and informed management of the, often complex, patient with or without thoracic pain and impairment. The integrated systems model (ISM) will be introduced as a way to determine when the noted biomechanical findings are relevant to a patient's clinical presentation. PMID:26309383

  15. Biomechanics of the thorax - research evidence and clinical expertise.

    PubMed

    Lee, Diane Gail

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the biomechanics of the thorax is critical for understanding its role in multiple conditions since the thorax is part of many integrated systems including the musculoskeletal, respiratory, cardiac, digestive and urogynecological. The thorax is also an integrated system within itself and an element of the whole body/person. Therefore, understanding the biomechanics of the thorax is fundamental to all forms of treatment for multiple conditions. The interpretation of movement examination findings depends on one's view of optimal biomechanics and the influential factors. This article will provide a synopsis of the current state of research evidence as well as observations from clinical experience pertaining to the biomechanics of the thorax in order to help clinicians organise this knowledge and facilitate evidence-based and informed management of the, often complex, patient with or without thoracic pain and impairment. The integrated systems model (ISM) will be introduced as a way to determine when the noted biomechanical findings are relevant to a patient's clinical presentation.

  16. Biomechanical assessment and treatment in lower extremity prosthetics and orthotics: a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Bedotto, Robert A

    2006-02-01

    article will see the need to combine their efforts to provide truly biomechanical treatment. By working together, they can expand their present knowledge and skills. In this way, treatment and outcomes can improve and serve as the guiding force for a new generation of rehabilitation specialists. This process can be expedited through the educational system by offering advanced clinical degrees specializing in biomechanical treatment specifically designed for clinical practice rather than research, administrative, or academic positions. For this idea to become reality, educational institutions representing the physical and mechanical aspects of biomechanical treatment also must work together; this would expedite the learning curve so that it would not take so long to put the pieces of the puzzle together.

  17. Clinical aspects of melatonin.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Russel J; Korkmaz, Ahmet

    2008-11-01

    Melatonin is produced in the human pineal gland, particularly at night, with the circadian rhythm of blood melatonin levels closely paralleling its production within the pineal gland. Light exposure at night, or rapid transmeridian travel severely compromises the circadian production of melatonin. The disturbed melatonin rhythm contributes to jet lag and sleep inefficiency, both of which are improved by melatonin administration. Melatonin is also a highly effective direct free radical scavenger and antioxidant. In this capacity, melatonin reduces experimental cataractogenesis, traumatic injury to the spinal cord and brain, and protects against oxidative damage to neurons and glia in models of stroke, Parkinsonism, and Alzheimer's disease. Additionally, melatonin and its metabolites are highly effective in protecting against ionizing radiation. Finally, melatonin may be a treatment for hypertension. Melatonin's high efficacy, its high safety profile, and its virtual lack of toxicity make it of interest in clinical medicine.

  18. Clinical aspects of telemedicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrell, Ronald C.

    1991-01-01

    Communication among physicians is an essential in order to combine our experiences for the elucidation and application of new knowledge and for the accurate and uniform application of established medical practice. This communication requires an adequate understanding of the culture of the patient and the social context of disease and indeed the culture of the physician. Malnutrition in Bangladesh means caloric insufficiency, and a program to lower cholesterol would be impertinent, while a program to enhance the nutrition of patients in Texas by an international effort to import more grain would be ludicrous. In the same vein a public health effort to combat alcoholic cirrhosis in Mecca would be as silly as a program to increase fiber in the diet of the Bantu. Clinical communication must acknowledge the culture of the issue at hand and the differences in the experiential base of the physicians. Not only do geography and culture affect the potential differences in the experiential bases, but the world utilizes very different traditions of education and science in training physicians. We are influenced by the diseases we treat, and learn to look for the expected at least as much as we are attentive to the unexpected. A physician in Siberia would be much more likely to recognize frostbite than one from Buenos Aires, and the Argentine doctor would much more likely consider Chaga's Disease to explain abdominal pain than a colleague in Zurich. Beyond these obvious issues in communication among physicians we must deal with the many languages and idioms used in the world. An overview of using Telemedicine SpaceBridge after the earthquake in the Republic of Armenia in 1988 is presented.

  19. Contribution of biomechanics to clinical practice in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Woo, Savio L-Y

    2004-01-01

    Biomechanics is a field that has a very long history. It was described in ancient Chinese and Greek literature as early as 400-500 BC. The foundation of biomechanics, however, was laid during a period between the 1500's to 1700's by renowned personalities, da Vinci, Galileo, Borelli, Hooke, Newton, and so (Fung, Y.C., Biomechanics: Mechanical Properties of Living Tissues, 2nd Ed. Springer Verlag, Chapter 1, 1993). Beginning in the 1950's, Muybridge, Steindler, Inman, Lissner, and Hirsch performed the pioneering work on musculoskeletal biomechanics and the foundation of orthopaedic biomechanics was formed. For the following two decades, the field has blossomed and significant contributions in the biomechanics of bone, articular cartilage, soft tissues, upper and lower extremities, spine and so on has been made. More sophisticated equipment, coupled with mathematical modeling and better engineering design, has enabled us to make great strides. Bioengineers, in collaboration with orthopaedic surgeons, have translated many laboratory discoveries into clinical practice, leading to improved patient treatment and outcome. In the past 30 years, my colleagues and I have focused our research on the biomechanics of musculoskeletal soft tissues, ligaments and tendons, in particular. Therefore, in this lecture, the function of knee ligaments, the associated homeostatic responses secondary to immobilization and exercise, and healing of the ligaments will be reviewed. Examples of scientific findings that help to guide the surgical management of injury to ligaments will be given. New ideas on functional tissue engineering to improve the healing of knee ligaments and tendons will be presented. We have learned that tendons and ligaments are indeed complex biological tissues. To fully understand their behavior, healing and remodelling processes, this author advocates major efforts be made to bring molecular biologists, morphologists, biochemists, bioengineers, physical therapists and

  20. Ethical aspects of clinical chemistry.

    PubMed Central

    BenGershôm, E

    1983-01-01

    The work performed by the clinical chemist may deeply affect the decisions of the doctor and the well-being of the patient. Yet in contrast to the doctor and to the nurse the clinical chemist usually has no personal relationship with the patient. Being encumbered by much technology and anonymity is itself a reason for scrutinising his involvement in issues of health care ethics. This is an attempt at clarifying some major aspects: the relationship of his professional ethics to medical ethics as a whole, his ethical obligations to the patient and to society, and other aspects. PMID:6199500

  1. Poor relation between biomechanical and clinical studies for the proximal femoral locking compression plate.

    PubMed

    Viberg, Bjarke; Rasmussen, Katrine M V; Overgaard, Søren; Rogmark, Cecilia

    2017-08-01

    Background and purpose - The proximal femur locking compression plate (PF-LCP) is a new concept in the treatment of hip fractures. When releasing new implants onto the market, biomechanical studies are conducted to evaluate performance of the implant. We investigated the relation between biomechanical and clinical studies on PF-LCP. Methods - A systematic literature search of relevant biomechanical and clinical studies was conducted in PubMed on December 1, 2015. 7 biomechanical studies and 15 clinical studies were included. Results - Even though the biomechanical studies showed equivalent or higher failure loads for femoral neck fracture, the clinical results were far worse, with a 37% complication rate. There were no biomechanical studies on pertrochanteric fractures. Biomechanical studies on subtrochanteric fractures showed that PF-LCP had a lower failure load than with proximal femoral nail, but higher than with angled blade plate. 4 clinical studies had complication rates less than 8% and 9 studies had complication rates between 15% and 53%. Interpretation - There was no clear relation between biomechanical and clinical studies. Biomechanical studies are generally inherently different from clinical studies, as they examine the best possible theoretical use of the implant without considering the long-term outcome in a clinical setting. Properly designed clinical studies are mandatory when introducing new implants, and they cannot be replaced by biomechanical studies.

  2. Biomechanics of human movement and its clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tung-Wu; Chang, Chu-Fen

    2012-02-01

    All life forms on earth, including humans, are constantly subjected to the universal force of gravitation, and thus to forces from within and surrounding the body. Through the study of the interaction of these forces and their effects, the form, function and motion of our bodies can be examined and the resulting knowledge applied to promote quality of life. Under gravity and other loads, and controlled by the nervous system, human movement is achieved through a complex and highly coordinated mechanical interaction between bones, muscles, ligaments and joints within the musculoskeletal system. Any injury to, or lesion in, any of the individual elements of the musculoskeletal system will change the mechanical interaction and cause degradation, instability or disability of movement. On the other hand, proper modification, manipulation and control of the mechanical environment can help prevent injury, correct abnormality, and speed healing and rehabilitation. Therefore, understanding the biomechanics and loading of each element during movement using motion analysis is helpful for studying disease etiology, making decisions about treatment, and evaluating treatment effects. In this article, the history and methodology of human movement biomechanics, and the theoretical and experimental methods developed for the study of human movement, are reviewed. Examples of motion analysis of various patient groups, prostheses and orthoses, and sports and exercises, are used to demonstrate the use of biomechanical and stereophotogrammetry-based human motion analysis studies to address clinical issues. It is suggested that further study of the biomechanics of human movement and its clinical applications will benefit from the integration of existing engineering techniques and the continuing development of new technology.

  3. [Clinical aspects of witchcraft delusions].

    PubMed

    Pashkovskiĭ, V E

    2005-01-01

    To distinguish clinical variants and to specify nosologic entity of witchcraft delusions, 69 patients (10 males, aged 15-72 years) have been examined. It was found that witchcraft delusions exist in passive and active forms. In a passive form, the patient is sure that unknown (mystic) power damaged him/her; in an active form the patient, possessing a gift for unusual abilities, can influence the others (bewitches, heals, etc). Five clinical syndromes, in the structure of which the above delusions were found, namely, paranoiac-hypochondriac, hallucination-paranoid, depressive-paranoid, paraphrenic and delirious, were identified. Psychoses of schizophrenia spectrum were diagnosed in 52 patients, organic--in 8, alcoholic--in 7 and recurrent depressive disorder--in 2. Clinical significance of witchcraft delusions is closely related to its social aspect. Being combined with ideas of persecution, poisoning and damage, it results in the brutal forms of delusions defense and may be considered as an unfavorable prognostic trait.

  4. Tularaemia: clinical aspects in Europe.

    PubMed

    Maurin, Max; Gyuranecz, Miklós

    2016-01-01

    Tularaemia is a zoonotic disease caused by Francisella tularensis, a Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacterium. Typically, human and animal infections are caused by F tularensis subspecies tularensis (type A) strains mainly in Canada and USA, and F tularensis subspecies holarctica (type B) strains throughout the northern hemisphere, including Europe. In the past, the epidemiological, clinical, therapeutic, and prognostic aspects of tularaemia reported in the English medical literature were mainly those that had been reported in the USA, where the disease was first described. Tularaemia has markedly changed in the past decade, and a large number of studies have provided novel data for the disease characteristics in Europe. In this Review we aim to emphasise the specific and variable aspects of tularaemia in different European countries. In particular, two natural lifecycles of F tularensis have been described in this continent, although not fully characterised, which are associated with different modes of transmission, clinical features, and public health burdens of tularaemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical, biomechanical and histological study on oophorectomy induced menopause

    PubMed Central

    Bordinhon, Maristela; Müller, Sérgio Swain; Silva, Maeli Dal Pai

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical implications as well as biomechanical and histological changes and in bone tissue induced by ovariectomy in 64 rats. Methods: The rats were divided into two groups: bilateral oophorectomy or placebo, and subdivided into four subgroups, according to time postoperatively: three, six, nine and 12 months. The weight of the animals at the time of sacrifice was taken into consideration. The biomechanical study was performed on the right tibia, to the maximum load and stiffness coefficient. For the histological study we calculated the trabecular bone of the left tibia. Statistical analysis of body weight and mechanical properties was performed by variance analysis, complemented with Tukey's multiple comparison tests; and trabecular area, the non-parametric variance analysis. Results: Ovariectomy-induced menopause caused an increase in body weight, reduction of diaphyseal bone resistance at six months of hormone deprivation, but this effect is equalized over time by aging; bone stiffness was smaller in the ovariectomized group and reduction of bone mass occurred. Conclusion: The removal of the ovaries produced systemic alterations, characterized by metabolic changes that caused weight gain and changes in bone tissue, associated with alteration of the mechanical profile and reduced bone mass. Level of Evidence I, Clinical Study. PMID:25328434

  6. Weightbath hydrotraction treatment: application, biomechanics, and clinical effects

    PubMed Central

    Kurutz, Márta; Bender, Tamás

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Weightbath hydrotraction treatment (WHT) is a simple noninvasive effective method of hydro- or balneotherapy to stretch the spine or lower limbs, applied successfully in hospitals and health resort sanitaria in Hungary for more than fifty years. This study aims to introduce WHT with its biomechanical and clinical effects. History, development, equipment, modes of application, biomechanics, spinal traction forces and elongations, indications and contraindications of WHT are precented. Subjects and methods: The calculation of traction forces acting along the spinal column during the treatment is described together with the mode of suspension and the position of extra weight loads applied. The biomechanics of the treatment are completed by in vivo measured elongations of lumbar segments using a special underwater ultrasound measuring method. The clinical effects, indications, and contraindications of the treatment are also presented. Results: In the underwater cervical suspension of a human body, approximately 25 N stretching load occurs in the cervical spine, and about 11 N occurs in the lumbar spine. By applying extra weights, the above tensile forces along the spinal column can be increased. Thus, the traction effect can be controlled by applying such loads during the treatment. Elongations of segments L3–L4, L4–L5, and L5–S1 were measured during the usual WHT of patients suspended cervically in water for 20 minutes, loaded by 20–20 N lead weights on the ankles. The mean initial elastic elongations of spinal segments were about 0.8 mm for patients aged under 40 years, 0.5 mm between 40–60 years, and 0.2 mm for patients over 60 years. The mean final viscoelastic elongations were 1.5 mm, 1.2 mm, and 0.6 mm for the same age classes, respectively. No significant difference was found between the sexes regarding age-dependence in tension. WHT for discopathy showed significant improvement of clinical parameters, which was still evident

  7. Biomechanical aspects of the optimal number of implants to carry a cross-arch full restoration.

    PubMed

    Brunski, John B

    2014-01-01

    A proper definition of the 'optimal' number of implants to support a full arch prosthesis should go beyond solely a listing of the number of implants used in a treatment plan; it should be based upon a biomechanical analysis that takes into account several factors: the locations of the implants in the jaw; the quality and quantity of bone into which they are placed; the loads (forces and moments) that develop on the implants; the magnitudes of stress and strain that develop in the interfacial bone as well as in the implants and prosthesis; and the relationship of the stresses and strains to limits for the materials involved. Overall, determining an 'optimal' number of implants to use in a patient is a biomechanical design problem. This paper discusses some of the approaches that are already available to aid biomechanically focused clinical treatment planning. A number of examples are presented to illustrate how relatively simple biomechanical analyses - e.g. the Skalak model - as well as more complex analyses (e.g. finite element modelling) can be used to assess the pros and cons of various arrangements of implants to support fullarch prostheses. Some of the examples considered include the use of 4 rather than 6 implants to span the same arc-length in a jaw, and the pros and cons of using tilted implants as in the 'all-on-4' approach. In evaluating the accuracy of the various biomechanical analyses, it is clear that our current prediction methods are not always perfectly accurate in vivo, although they can provide a reasonably approximate analysis of a treatment plan in many situations. In the current era of cone beam computerised tomography (CT) scans of patients in the dental office, there is significant promise for finite element analyses (FEA) based on anatomically-accurate input data. However, at the same time it has to be recognised that effective use of FEA software requires a reasonable engineering background, especially insofar as interpretations of the

  8. A biomechanical sorting of clinical risk factors affecting osteoporotic hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Luo, Y

    2016-02-01

    Osteoporotic fracture has been found associated with many clinical risk factors, and the associations have been explored dominantly by evidence-based and case-control approaches. The major challenges emerging from the studies are the large number of the risk factors, the difficulty in quantification, the incomplete list, and the interdependence of the risk factors. A biomechanical sorting of the risk factors may shed lights on resolving the above issues. Based on the definition of load-strength ratio (LSR), we first identified the four biomechanical variables determining fracture risk, i.e., the risk of fall, impact force, bone quality, and bone geometry. Then, we explored the links between the FRAX clinical risk factors and the biomechanical variables by looking for evidences in the literature. To accurately assess fracture risk, none of the four biomechanical variables can be ignored and their values must be subject-specific. A clinical risk factor contributes to osteoporotic fracture by affecting one or more of the biomechanical variables. A biomechanical variable represents the integral effect from all the clinical risk factors linked to the variable. The clinical risk factors in FRAX mostly stand for bone quality. The other three biomechanical variables are not adequately represented by the clinical risk factors. From the biomechanical viewpoint, most clinical risk factors are interdependent to each other as they affect the same biomechanical variable(s). As biomechanical variables must be expressed in numbers before their use in calculating LSR, the numerical value of a biomechanical variable can be used as a gauge of the linked clinical risk factors to measure their integral effect on fracture risk, which may be more efficient than to study each individual risk factor.

  9. Fibromyalgia: clinical and occupational aspects.

    PubMed

    Helfenstein Jr, Milton; Goldenfum, Marco Aurélio; Siena, César Augusto Fávaro

    2012-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a clinical syndrome commonly observed in daily medical practice and its etiopathogenesis is still unclear. As it is characterized by chronic musculoskeletal pain associated with several symptoms, FM may be confused with several other rheumatic and nonrheumatic diseases when they course with pictures of diffuse pain and chronic fatigue. FM treatment should be multidisciplinary, individualized, count on active participation of the patient, and based on combined pharmacological and nonpharmacological modalities. It is found both in work and non-work settings, and there is no scientific evidence in the literature showing that FM might be caused by occupation. FM seldom leads to incapacity to work. In cases where pain or fatigue do not respond to appropriate treatment, reaching significant levels, a short period away from work can be considered. As FM is a relevant subject, this review article was based on exploratory, qualitative, and bibliographic investigation, aiming to study the main clinical and occupational aspects of FM, emphasizing the theoretical-conceptual background and the experience of specialists.

  10. [Clinical aspects of corneal burns].

    PubMed

    Borderie, V

    2004-12-01

    Clinical aspects and prognosis of corneal burns mainly depend on the agent responsible for the trauma. The most severe burns are caustic burns, which should be classified as burns caused by basic agents, associated with deep and prolonged injuries, and burns caused by acidic agents, associated with more superficial injuries. At the acute stage, caustic burns induce epithelial defects, corneal edema, and ischemic necrosis of the limbus, conjunctiva, iris and ciliary body. At the early stage, reepithelialization occurs and is often associated with corneal vascularization and stromal infiltrates, followed by corneal scar formation. At the chronic stage, the following complications are possible: corneal scars, limbal stem cell insufficiency, lachrymal insufficiency, irregular astigmatism, ocular surface fibrosis, cataract, glaucoma, decreased intraocular pressure, and ocular atrophy. The Ropper-Hall classification is based on the extent of limbal ischemia. Thermal burns induce epithelial defects at the acute stage, with the more severe forms giving the same complications as caustic burns. Radiation-related burns can be caused by ultraviolet radiations (acute epithelial keratitis, pterygium, droplet-like keratitis), microwaves, infrared radiations, ionizing radiations or, laser radiations. Electrical burns are often a result of torture and give corneal stroma opacification.

  11. Clinical aspects of phage therapy.

    PubMed

    Międzybrodzki, Ryszard; Borysowski, Jan; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Fortuna, Wojciech; Letkiewicz, Sławomir; Szufnarowski, Krzysztof; Pawełczyk, Zdzisław; Rogóż, Paweł; Kłak, Marlena; Wojtasik, Elżbieta; Górski, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Phage therapy (PT) is a unique method of treatment of bacterial infections using bacteriophages (phages)-viruses that specifically kill bacteria, including their antibiotic-resistant strains. Over the last decade a marked increase in interest in the therapeutic use of phages has been observed, which has resulted from a substantial rise in the prevalence of antibiotic resistance of bacteria, coupled with an inadequate number of new antibiotics. The first, and so far the only, center of PT in the European Union is the Phage Therapy Unit (PTU) established at the Ludwik Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, Wrocław, Poland in 2005. This center continues the rich tradition of PT in Poland, which dates from the early 1920s. The main objective of this chapter is to present a detailed retrospective analysis of the results of PT of 153 patients with a wide range of infections resistant to antibiotic therapy admitted for treatment at the PTU between January 2008 and December 2010. Analysis includes the evaluation of both the efficacy and the safety of PT. In general, data suggest that PT can provide good clinical results in a significant cohort of patients with otherwise untreatable chronic bacterial infections and is essentially well tolerated. In addition, the whole complex procedure employed to obtain and characterize therapeutic phage preparations, as well as ethical aspects of PT, is discussed.

  12. Regulatory aspects of clinical xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Schuurman, Henk-Jan

    2015-11-01

    Xenotransplantation attracted interest from regulatory authorities, particularly after the demonstration of pig-to-human transmission of porcine endogenous retrovirus (1996). This added to the risk of a product, resulting in a Guidance of the US Food and Drug Administration (2003). This addresses the full flow chart in product manufacturing, starting with the designated pathogen-free status of the source animal; and special aspects regarding the recipient like informed consent and monitoring for infectious pathogens. Also archiving of records from the donor and recipient, as well as storage of samples is described. The European Medicines Agency issued a Guideline on xenogeneic cell therapy products (2009). Cell-based medicinal products are subject to specific regulations and directives, which apply also to xenogeneic products: the xenotransplant guidances/guidelines are an addition to these regulations. Noteworthy, acellular products like heart valves and decellularized cornea are not considered a cell therapy product, but rather a medical device with its own regulation. WHO issued relevant documents, especially about safety, and the International Xenotransplantation Association published consensus documents, a.o., addressing preclinical efficacy requirements before entering clinical trials. This manuscript presents an overview of the regulatory framework, with special focus on cell therapy products necause these are expected to reach the market first (i.e., pancreatic islets, hepatocytes and cellularized cornea); major illustrations are from the European situation. Albeit being complex, the regulation of xenotransplant products does not form a block in product development, but rather supports the introduction of efficacious and safe products to meet the medical need. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Biomechanics of oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junning; Ahmad, Rohana; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of prosthodontic treatment has been well recognized, and the need is continuously increasing with the ageing population. While the oral mucosa plays a critical role in the treatment outcome, the associated biomechanics is not yet fully understood. Using the literature available, this paper provides a critical review on four aspects of mucosal biomechanics, including static, dynamic, volumetric and interactive responses, which are interpreted by its elasticity, viscosity/permeability, apparent Poisson's ratio and friction coefficient, respectively. Both empirical studies and numerical models are analysed and compared to gain anatomical and physiological insights. Furthermore, the clinical applications of such biomechanical knowledge on the mucosa are explored to address some critical concerns, including stimuli for tissue remodelling (interstitial hydrostatic pressure), pressure–pain thresholds, tissue displaceability and residual bone resorption. Through this review, the state of the art in mucosal biomechanics and their clinical implications are discussed for future research interests, including clinical applications, computational modelling, design optimization and prosthetic fabrication. PMID:26224566

  14. Systemic lupus erythematosus: Clinical and experimental aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Smolen, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    This text covers questions related to the history, etiology, pathogenesis, clinical aspects and therapy of systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Both animal models and human SLE are considered. With regard to basic science, concise information on cellular immunology, autoantibodies, viral aspects and molecular biology in SLE is provided. Clinical topics then deal with medical, dermatologic, neurologic, radiologic, pathologic, and therapeutic aspects. The book not only presents the most recent information on clinical and experimental insights, but also looks at future aspects related to the diagnosis and therapy of SLE.

  15. Biomechanics of the ankle joint and clinical outcomes of total ankle replacement.

    PubMed

    Michael, Junitha M; Golshani, Ashkahn; Gargac, Shawn; Goswami, Tarun

    2008-10-01

    Until the 1970s ankle arthrodesis was considered to be the "gold-standard" to treat arthritis. But the low fusion rate of ankle arthrodeses along with the inability to achieve normal range of motion led to the growing interest in the development of total ankle replacements. Though the short-term outcomes were good, their long-term outcomes were not as promising. To date, most models do not exactly mimic the anatomical functionality of a natural ankle joint. Therefore, research is being conducted worldwide to either enhance the existing models or develop new models while understanding the intricacies of the joint more precisely. This paper reviews the anatomical and biomechanical aspects of the ankle joint. Also, the evolution and comparison of clinical outcomes of various total ankle replacements are presented.

  16. Occlusal considerations in implant therapy: clinical guidelines with biomechanical rationale.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yongsik; Oh, Tae-Ju; Misch, Carl E; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2005-02-01

    Due to lack of the periodontal ligament, osseointegrated implants, unlike natural teeth, react biomechanically in a different fashion to occlusal force. It is therefore believed that dental implants may be more prone to occlusal overloading, which is often regarded as one of the potential causes for peri-implant bone loss and failure of the implant/implant prosthesis. Overloading factors that may negatively influence on implant longevity include large cantilevers, parafunctions, improper occlusal designs, and premature contacts. Hence, it is important to control implant occlusion within physiologic limit and thus provide optimal implant load to ensure a long-term implant success. The purposes of this paper are to discuss the importance of implant occlusion for implant longevity and to provide clinical guidelines of optimal implant occlusion and possible solutions managing complications related to implant occlusion. It must be emphasized that currently there is no evidence-based, implant-specific concept of occlusion. Future studies in this area are needed to clarify the relationship between occlusion and implant success.

  17. Biomechanical and Hemodynamic Measures of Right Ventricular Diastolic Function: Translating Tissue Biomechanics to Clinical Relevance.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sae; Vanderpool, Rebecca R; Avazmohammadi, Reza; Lapshin, Eugene; Bachman, Timothy N; Sacks, Michael; Simon, Marc A

    2017-09-12

    Right ventricular (RV) diastolic function has been associated with outcomes for patients with pulmonary hypertension; however, the relationship between biomechanics and hemodynamics in the right ventricle has not been studied. Rat models of RV pressure overload were obtained via pulmonary artery banding (PAB; control, n=7; PAB, n=5). At 3 weeks after banding, RV hemodynamics were measured using a conductance catheter. Biaxial mechanical properties of the RV free wall myocardium were obtained to extrapolate longitudinal and circumferential elastic modulus in low and high strain regions (E1 and E2, respectively). Hemodynamic analysis revealed significantly increased end-diastolic elastance (Eed) in PAB (control: 55.1 mm Hg/mL [interquartile range: 44.7-85.4 mm Hg/mL]; PAB: 146.6 mm Hg/mL [interquartile range: 105.8-155.0 mm Hg/mL]; P=0.010). Longitudinal E1 was increased in PAB (control: 7.2 kPa [interquartile range: 6.7-18.1 kPa]; PAB: 34.2 kPa [interquartile range: 18.1-44.6 kPa]; P=0.018), whereas there were no significant changes in longitudinal E2 or circumferential E1 and E2. Last, wall stress was calculated from hemodynamic data by modeling the right ventricle as a sphere: stress=Pressure×radius2×thickness. RV pressure overload in PAB rats resulted in an increase in diastolic myocardial stiffness reflected both hemodynamically, by an increase in Eed, and biomechanically, by an increase in longitudinal E1. Modest increases in tissue biomechanical stiffness are associated with large increases in Eed. Hemodynamic measurements of RV diastolic function can be used to predict biomechanical changes in the myocardium. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  18. Clinical Aspects of Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rhia; Tabrizi, Sarah J

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a devastating inherited neurodegenerative condition characterized by progressive motor, cognitive, and psychiatric symptoms. Symptoms progress over 15-20 years, and there are currently no disease-modifying therapies. The causative genetic mutation is an expanded CAG repeat in the HTT gene encoding the Huntingtin protein, and is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. In this chapter we discuss the genetics, clinical presentation, and management of this condition, as well as new data from large-scale clinical research studies on the natural history of HD.

  19. Applied biomechanics in articular injuries: perspectives in the basic investigation of articular injuries and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Olson, Steven A; Brown, Thomas D; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A; Natoli, Roman M; Dirschl, Douglas R

    2011-01-01

    Joint injury is an important cause of arthritis. Although the treatment of injury, in general, has been widely studied, the contribution of injury to the development of posttraumatic arthritis is still a relatively understudied area. One of the most perplexing aspects of investigating articular injuries is the complex nature of the injury itself and the multiple facets of the injury mechanism that can potentially lead to the development of arthritis. A symposium by the Orthopaedic Research Society and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons was designed to examine the spectrum of basic science to clinical investigation in the role of biomechanics in the study of joint injury and subsequent posttraumatic arthritis. Four perspectives in the clinical aspects of managing articular injuries were investigated, including the clinical applications of basic science findings, the challenges and advancements in measuring and modeling articular fractures, the relationship of articular cartilage mechanical injuries and osteoarthritis, and the controlled creation of an intra-articular fracture to permit observations of the natural history of posttraumatic arthritis.

  20. Painful diabetic neuropathy: clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Didangelos, Triantafyllos; Doupis, John; Veves, Aristidis

    2014-01-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is one of several clinical syndromes in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) and presents a major challenge for optimal management. The epidemiology of PDN has not been extensively studied. On the basis of available data, the prevalence of pain ranges from 10% to 20% in patients with diabetes and from 40% to 50% in those with diabetic neuropathy. Neuropathic pain can be disabling and devastating, with a significant impact on the patient's quality of life and associated healthcare cost. Pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying PDN are similar to other neuropathic pain disorders and broadly invoke peripheral and central sensitization. The natural course of PDN is variable, with the majority of patients experiencing spontaneous improvement and resolution of pain. Quantifying neuropathic pain is difficult, especially in clinical practice, but has improved recently in clinical trials with the development of neuropathic pain-specific tools, such as the Neuropathic Pain Questionnaire and the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory. Hyperglycemia-induced pathways result in nerve dysfunction and damage, which lead to hyperexcitable peripheral and central pathways of pain. Glycemic control may prevent or partially reverse DPN and modulate PDN.

  1. [Clinical aspects of Marfan syndrome].

    PubMed

    Belsing, Tina Zimmermann; Lund, Allan Meldgaard; Søndergaard, Lars; Friis-Hansen, Lennart; Abildstrøm, Steen Zabell

    2011-01-31

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) and MFS-related diseases are inherited connective tissue disorders involving several organ systems. The diagnosis of MFS is difficult as the many symptoms overlap with those of other systemic connective tissue diseases. The phenotype is progressive. Effective surgical therapy and standardized follow-up programs have led to an improved lifespan for the affected individuals. Selective angiotensin II, type 1 (AT1) blockers may improve several manifestations of MFS, but the outcome of clinical trials is presently unknown. This review describes the importance of a coordinated strategy for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up.

  2. Multiple sclerosis: Experimental and clinical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Scheinberg, L.; Raine, C.S.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses the experimental and clinical aspects of multiple sclerosis. Specifically discussed are - Association of Epstein Barr Virus with pathology of central nervous system; immunology of viruses; and immunosuppression.

  3. [Current clinical aspects of AIDS].

    PubMed

    Clumeck, N

    1993-01-01

    Our knowledge of the natural history of VIH infection has considerably increased during the last years. We know now that clinical evolution will depend of host factors as well as of viral characteristics. Among the host factors, the early specific cytotoxic response to VIH components plays a major role. Phenotypic variation of the virus (syncytium inducer mutants) and viral load in the lymph node and in the circulating CD4 cells play also an important role. As far as antiviral therapeutic is concerned, at the moment we know that monotherapy with nucleosides analogues is probably of limited efficacy because of emergence of resistance. Future perspectives include combination of antivirals aimed to prevent emergence of resistance and to reduce toxicity.

  4. Thrombophilia: clinical-practical aspects.

    PubMed

    Moll, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    No consensus exists as to who should be tested for thrombophilia, mainly due to the lack of good quality clinical outcome data in relationship to presence or absence of a given thrombophilia. Testing may be considered if (a) finding a thrombophilia predicts recurrent thrombosis and, thus, influences length of anticoagulation treatment decisions; (b) identifying a thrombophilia has implications on management of asymptomatic family members who are carriers of the detected thrombophilia; (c) a patient wishes to better understand why a thrombotic event occurred. Testing may be helpful in patients with venous thromboembolism at intermediate risk of recurrence in whom the finding of a strong thrombophilia can be one of the arguments for long-term anticoagulation--the "risk-of-recurrence-triangle" may be a useful aid in this decision process. Patients whose venous thromboembolism was provoked by a major transient risk factor should not be tested for thrombophilia. Thrombophilia tests should only be ordered by health care professionals who can provide the "4P": (a) appropriately select which patient to test, (b) provide pre-test counseling, (c) properly interpret the test results, and (d) provide education and advice to the patient. If testing is embarked on in patients with venous thromboembolism, it is advisable to be done at the time of decision making whether to stop or continue anticoagulation, i.e. typically after 3 months of anticoagulant therapy. Thrombophilia testing is best not done at the time of an acute thrombotic event and while a patient is on an anticoagulant.

  5. [Somnambulism: clinical and eletrophysiological aspects].

    PubMed

    Szúcs, Anna; Halász, Péter

    2005-06-05

    The authors review the literature on the epidemiology, the clinical and electrophysiological symptoms of somnambulism. The disorder specified as "nREM parasomnia with awakening disorder" belongs to the nREM sleep (awakening) parasomnias. In most of the cases its occurence is familial with the highest prevalence at age 12 year. Above age 12 year most cases recover whereas 6% of prevalence is reported in adults. It is probable that most patients seek medical help only in severe cases associated with injuries, accidents or violence. Its etiology is unknown; in essence it is a sleep regulation disorder characterised by a dissociated state of partial awakening from nREM sleep: the motor system becomes awake while consciousness remains clouded. There are several medicines inducing somnambulism in patients otherwise free from this disorder. In somnambule patients the most important provoking factors are sleep deprivation as well as pathological states and circumstances evoking sleep loss. Somnambulism should be differentiated from complex partial epileptic seizures and REM behaviour disorder. As there is no specific treatment at the moment it is important to assure safe sleeping circumstances - ground flour, closed windows, and no fragile furniture. Clonazepam and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors prove sometimes effective, but the most effective methods in decreasing the frequency of somnambule episodes are the regular sleep-wakefulness schedule and the avoidance of sleep deprivation.

  6. Clinical aspects of symptomatic hyponatremia

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Andreas; Höybye, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Hyponatremia (HN) is a common condition, with a large number of etiologies and a complicated treatment. Although chronic HN has been shown to be a predictor of poor outcome, sodium-increasing treatments in chronic stable and asymptomatic HN have not proven to increase life expectancy. For symptomatic HN, in contrast, the necessity for urgent treatment has broadly been accepted to avoid the development of fatal cerebral edema. On the other hand, a too rapid increase of serum sodium in chronic HN may result in cerebral damage due to osmotic demyelinisation. Recently, administration of hypertonic saline bolus has been recommended as first-line treatment in patients with moderate-to-severe symptomatic HN. This approach is easy to memorize and holds the potential to greatly facilitate the initial treatment of symptomatic HN. First-line treatment of chronic HN is fluid restriction and if ineffective treatment with tolvaptan or in some patients other agents should be considered. A number of recommendations and guidelines have been published on HN. In the present review, the management of patients with HN in relation to everyday clinical practice is summarized with focus on the acute management. PMID:27609587

  7. Biomechanical modeling of the three-dimensional aspects of human vocal fold dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Anxiong; Lohscheller, Jörg; Berry, David A.; Becker, Stefan; Eysholdt, Ulrich; Voigt, Daniel; Döllinger, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Human voice originates from the three-dimensional (3D) oscillations of the vocal folds. In previous studies, biomechanical properties of vocal fold tissues have been predicted by optimizing the parameters of simple two-mass-models to fit its dynamics to the high-speed imaging data from the clinic. However, only lateral and longitudinal displacements of the vocal folds were considered. To extend previous studies, a 3D mass-spring, cover-model is developed, which predicts the 3D vibrations of the entire medial surface of the vocal fold. The model consists of five mass planes arranged in vertical direction. Each plane contains five longitudinal, mass-spring, coupled oscillators. Feasibility of the model is assessed using a large body of dynamical data previously obtained from excised human larynx experiments, in vivo canine larynx experiments, physical models, and numerical models. Typical model output was found to be similar to existing findings. The resulting model enables visualization of the 3D dynamics of the human vocal folds during phonation for both symmetric and asymmetric vibrations. PMID:20136223

  8. Frontiers in Head and Neck Trauma: Clinical and Biomechanical.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-19

    restricting flexion but less effective in limiting extension and rotation. Modification of wire fixation has been developed to assist in the treatment of...physiologic flexion , extension , lateral bending, axial rotation and compression, as well as complex loadings, together with the effects of surgical...Again, the biomechanical effects of these iatrogenically altered conditions were evaluated under physiologic flexion , extension , lateral bending

  9. Biomechanical Modeling to Improve Coronary Artery Bifurcation Stenting: Expert Review Document on Techniques and Clinical Implementation.

    PubMed

    Antoniadis, Antonios P; Mortier, Peter; Kassab, Ghassan; Dubini, Gabriele; Foin, Nicolas; Murasato, Yoshinobu; Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Tu, Shengxian; Iwasaki, Kiyotaka; Hikichi, Yutaka; Migliavacca, Francesco; Chiastra, Claudio; Wentzel, Jolanda J; Gijsen, Frank; Reiber, Johan H C; Barlis, Peter; Serruys, Patrick W; Bhatt, Deepak L; Stankovic, Goran; Edelman, Elazer R; Giannoglou, George D; Louvard, Yves; Chatzizisis, Yiannis S

    2015-08-24

    Treatment of coronary bifurcation lesions remains an ongoing challenge for interventional cardiologists. Stenting of coronary bifurcations carries higher risk for in-stent restenosis, stent thrombosis, and recurrent clinical events. This review summarizes the current evidence regarding application and use of biomechanical modeling in the study of stent properties, local flow dynamics, and outcomes after percutaneous coronary interventions in bifurcation lesions. Biomechanical modeling of bifurcation stenting involves computational simulations and in vitro bench testing using subject-specific arterial geometries obtained from in vivo imaging. Biomechanical modeling has the potential to optimize stenting strategies and stent design, thereby reducing adverse outcomes. Large-scale clinical studies are needed to establish the translation of pre-clinical findings to the clinical arena.

  10. Translating Ocular Biomechanics into Clinical Practice: Current State and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Michaël J.A.; Dupps, William J.; Baskaran, Mani; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Yun, Seok H.; Quigley, Harry A.; Sigal, Ian A.; Strouthidis, Nicholas G.

    2014-01-01

    Biomechanics – the study of the relationship between forces and function in living organisms – is thought to play a critical role in a significant number of ophthalmic disorders. This is not surprising, as the eye is a pressure vessel that requires a delicate balance of forces to maintain its homeostasis. Over the past few decades, basic science research in ophthalmology mostly confirmed that ocular biomechanics could explain in part the mechanisms involved in almost all major ophthalmic disorders such as optic nerve head neuropathies, angle closure, ametropia, presbyopia, cataract, corneal pathologies, retinal detachment, and macular degeneration. Translational biomechanics in ophthalmology, however, is still in its infancy. It is believed that its use could make significant advances in diagnosis and treatment. Several translational biomechanics strategies are already emerging, such as corneal stiffening for the treatment of keratoconus, and more are likely to follow. This review aims to cultivate the idea that biomechanics plays a major role in ophthalmology and that its clinical translation, lead by collaborative teams of clinicians and biomedical engineers, will benefit our patients. Specifically, recent advances and future prospects in corneal, iris, trabecular meshwork, crystalline lens, scleral and lamina cribrosa biomechanics are discussed. PMID:24832392

  11. Translating ocular biomechanics into clinical practice: current state and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Girard, Michaël J A; Dupps, William J; Baskaran, Mani; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Yun, Seok H; Quigley, Harry A; Sigal, Ian A; Strouthidis, Nicholas G

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanics is the study of the relationship between forces and function in living organisms and is thought to play a critical role in a significant number of ophthalmic disorders. This is not surprising, as the eye is a pressure vessel that requires a delicate balance of forces to maintain its homeostasis. Over the past few decades, basic science research in ophthalmology mostly confirmed that ocular biomechanics could explain in part the mechanisms involved in almost all major ophthalmic disorders such as optic nerve head neuropathies, angle closure, ametropia, presbyopia, cataract, corneal pathologies, retinal detachment and macular degeneration. Translational biomechanics in ophthalmology, however, is still in its infancy. It is believed that its use could make significant advances in diagnosis and treatment. Several translational biomechanics strategies are already emerging, such as corneal stiffening for the treatment of keratoconus, and more are likely to follow. This review aims to cultivate the idea that biomechanics plays a major role in ophthalmology and that the clinical translation, lead by collaborative teams of clinicians and biomedical engineers, will benefit our patients. Specifically, recent advances and future prospects in corneal, iris, trabecular meshwork, crystalline lens, scleral and lamina cribrosa biomechanics are discussed.

  12. Biomechanical properties of the spinal cord: implications for tissue engineering and clinical translation.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Richard D; Choi, David; Phillips, James B

    2016-10-01

    Spinal cord injury is a severely debilitating condition which can leave individuals paralyzed and suffering from autonomic dysfunction. Regenerative medicine may offer a promising solution to this problem. Previous research has focused primarily on exploring the cellular and biological aspects of the spinal cord, yet relatively little remains known about the biomechanical properties of spinal cord tissue. Given that a number of regenerative strategies aim to deliver cells and materials in the form of tissue-engineered therapies, understanding the biomechanical properties of host spinal cord tissue is important. We review the relevant biomechanical properties of spinal cord tissue and provide the baseline knowledge required to apply these important physical concepts to spinal cord tissue engineering.

  13. Biomechanical testing and clinical experience with the OMEGA-21 spinal fixation system.

    PubMed

    Cook, S D; Salkeld, S L; Whitecloud, T S; Barberá, J

    2001-05-01

    The role of spinal instrumentation is to provide mechanical stability, obtain and maintain anatomic alignment, and promote fusion. The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) introduced guidelines and procedures so that biomechanical properties of different implant designs could be compared in a consistent manner. Combined with biomechanical analyses, clinical evaluation allows the safety and efficacy of a spinal implant system to be determined before construction. The objective of our study was to determine the biomechanical properties and clinical performance of the OMEGA-21 Spinal Fixation System. Static and dynamic (fatigue) biomechanical testing was performed per ASTM guidelines and recommendations on individual components and on the system assembled in a corpectomy model. Clinical and radiographic evaluation of 57 consecutive patients with indications for instrumented spinal arthrodesis of the lower dorsal lumbar and sacral segments of the spine was performed at a mean follow-up of 31.9 months. Static and fatigue testing revealed superior biomechanical properties of the individual components and of the assembled system. The mechanical-strength values of the system were comparable with maximum reported values for existing implant designs. At final clinical follow-up, 86% of patients obtained relief of their symptoms; 84% considered their clinical results to be excellent or good. Ninety-one percent of patients satisfied radiographic criteria for bony fusion. There were 5 implant-related complications: 2 misplaced screws (2 patients), local pain above the implant (2 patients), and 2 broken expansive screws (1 patient). Biomechanical and clinical results indicate that the OMEGA-21 system is feasible and performs well as a spinal instrumentation system for the lower dorsal, lumbar, and sacral spine.

  14. Hybrid surgery for multilevel cervical degenerative disc diseases: a systematic review of biomechanical and clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhiwei; Mo, Zhongjun; Ding, Fan; He, Qing; Fan, Yubo; Ruan, Dike

    2014-08-01

    The optimal surgical technique for multilevel cervical degenerative disc diseases (DDD) remains controversial. Hybrid surgery (HS) incorporating anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and cervical disc replacement (CDR) is increasingly performed for cervical DDD. This study aims to evaluate the biomechanical and clinical evidence available for HS and to provide a systematic review of current understanding of HS. This systematic review was undertaken by following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Statement. Multiple databases and online registers of clinical trials were searched up to February 2014. The biomechanical and clinical studies on HS for cervical DDD written in English were included. Two authors independently assessed methodological quality and extracted data. Fifteen studies including eight biomechanical studies and seven clinical studies were indentified. The biomechanical studies showed that HS was benefit to motion preservation of the operative levels and revealed less adverse effect on adjacent segments. All clinical studies demonstrated improvement in validated functional scores after HS. Segment motion and immobilization were achieved at the arthroplasty level and arthrodesis level, respectively. Postoperative assessments and complication rate were similar or in favor of HS when comparing with ACDF or CDR. However, the overall quality of evidence for HS was low to very low. There is a paucity of high quality evidence for HS. HS may be a safe and efficacious technique to benefit a select group of multilevel cervical DDD, which is needed to be confirmed by further prospective, randomized controlled trials.

  15. [Pharmacology and clinical aspects of benzodiazepines].

    PubMed

    Mendlewicz, J; Sevy, S

    1985-01-01

    The widespread use of benzodiazepines has led the authors to review the pharmacological and clinical aspects of these substances. On a molecular level, the benzodiazepines have an effect on receptors in relation with the GABA system. Presently, endogenous ligand(s) to these receptors have not yet been fully demonstrated. The main benzodiazepines are also compared for their kinetics which is function of absorption, metabolisation and various factors such as binding to the receptor, age, hepatic and renal disorders. These pharmacological studies have clinical implications. The authors finally make a brief review of the clinical indications of the benzodiazepines.

  16. Psychological and Biomechanical Aspects of Patient Adaptation to Diabetic Neuropathy and Foot Ulceration.

    PubMed

    Vileikyte, Loretta; Crews, Ryan T; Reeves, Neil D

    2017-09-23

    The purpose of this review was to elucidate how psychological and biomechanical factors interrelate in shaping patients' experience with diabetic symmetric polyneuropathy (DSPN) and its sequela-diabetic foot ulceration (DFU). Recent findings emphasize the importance not only of neuropathic pain but also of other DSPN symptoms, such as unsteadiness. We highlight the negative spiral between unsteadiness, falls, and psychological distress. Moreover, unsteadiness is a key determinant of non-adherence to offloading resulting in the delayed DFU healing. While depression is an established predictor of incident DFU, findings linking depression and DFU healing remain inconclusive. Examination of physical activity in DFU development and healing represents the most recent application of research to this field. Research evidence indicates that DSPN markedly impairs physical and emotional functioning and suggests that there is an unmet need for the development of multifaceted interventions that address both psychological distress and biomechanical challenges experienced by patients with this debilitating complication of diabetes.

  17. Biomechanical aspects of new techniques in alpine skiing and ski-jumping.

    PubMed

    Müller, Erich; Schwameder, Hermann

    2003-09-01

    There have been considerable changes in equipment design and movement patterns in the past few years both in alpine skiing and ski-jumping. These developments have been matched by methods of analysing movements in field conditions. They have yielded new insights into the skills of these specific winter sports. Analytical techniques have included electromyography, kinetic and kinematic methods and computer simulations. Our aim here is to review biomechanical research in alpine skiing and ski-jumping. We present in detail the techniques currently used in alpine skiing (carving technique) and ski-jumping (V-technique), primarily using data from the authors' own research. Finally, we present a summary of the most important results in biomechanical research both in alpine skiing and ski-jumping. This includes an analysis of specific conditions in alpine skiing (type of turn, terrain, snow, speed, etc.) and the effects of equipment, materials and individual-specific abilities on performance, safety and joint loading in ski-jumping.

  18. [Rotator cuff repair: single- vs double-row. Clinical and biomechanical results].

    PubMed

    Baums, M H; Kostuj, T; Klinger, H-M; Papalia, R

    2016-02-01

    The goal of rotator cuff repair is a high initial mechanical stability as a requirement for adequate biological recovery of the tendon-to-bone complex. Notwithstanding the significant increase in publications concerning the topic of rotator cuff repair, there are still controversies regarding surgical technique. The aim of this work is to present an overview of the recently published results of biomechanical and clinical studies on rotator cuff repair using single- and double-row techniques. The review is based on a selective literature research of PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Database on the subject of the clinical and biomechanical results of single- and double-row repair. In general, neither the biomechanical nor the clinical evidence can recommend the use of a double-row concept for the treatment for every rotator cuff tear. Only tears of more than 3 cm seem to benefit from better results on both imaging and in clinical outcome studies compared with the use of single-row techniques. Despite a significant increase in publications on the surgical treatment of rotator cuff tears in recent years, the clinical results were not significantly improved in the literature so far. Unique information and algorithms, from which the optimal treatment of this entity can be derived, are still inadequate. Because of the cost-effectiveness and the currently vague evidence, the double-row techniques cannot be generally recommended for the repair of all rotator cuff tears.

  19. Biomechanical and biological aspects of defect treatment in fractures using helical plates.

    PubMed

    Perren, S M; Regazzoni, P; Fernandez, A A D

    2014-01-01

    The clinical case of figure 1 through figure 11 shows a series of impressive failures of plate fixation. The plates were repeatedly applied bridging a comminuted bone segment in a heavy patient. The biomechanical analysis elaborates why this happened and proposes an unconventional procedure to prevent this failure with a minimally invasive procedure. A plate bridging an open gap or a defect in a long bone diaphysis is exposed to full functional load. According to clinical observations such plate application often fails even without external load such as weight bearing. The plate risks to break through fatigue when exposed during a long time to cyclic loading. This type of failure has been observed even with broad plates as well in femoral as in tibiae. The first option to avoid such failure consists in protecting the plate by installing load sharing between plate and either bone or an additional implant. This reduces the load carried by the plate to a safe level. Load sharing with bone may be installed at surgery by establishing solid mechanical bridge between the two main fragments of the fractured bone. The optimal load sharing relies on a solid compressed contact between the main fragments. It can be established because the bone is able to take a large load which results in optimal protection of the plate. In the case of an extended comminuted bone segment it may be very difficult, traumatizing and inefficient to reconstruct the bone. In the present case it was impossible to establish load sharing through the bone. The second option protecting the plate is provided by callus bridging of the gap or defect. The formation of a solid callus bridge takes time but the fatigue failure of the plate also takes time. Therefore, the callus bridge may prevent a late fatigue failure. The surgeon may select one of several options: - Replacing the lack of bone support using a second plate which immediately alleviates plate loading. The drawback of application of a second

  20. Selenium. Nutritional, toxicologic, and clinical aspects.

    PubMed Central

    Fan, A. M.; Kizer, K. W.

    1990-01-01

    Despite the recent findings of environmental contamination, selenium toxicosis in humans is exceedingly rare in the United States, with the few known cases resulting from industrial accidents and an episode involving the ingestion of superpotent selenium supplements. Chronic selenosis is essentially unheard of in this country because of the typical diversity of the American diet. Nonetheless, because of the growing public interest in selenium as a dietary supplement and the occurrence of environmental selenium contamination, medical practitioners should be familiar with the nutritional, toxicologic, and clinical aspects of this trace element. PMID:2219873

  1. [Primary ciliary dyskinesia: clinical and genetic aspects].

    PubMed

    D'Auria, E; Palazzo, S; Argirò, S; El, Oksha S; Riva, E

    2012-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare, genetically heterogeneous disease, characterized by ciliary disfunction and impaired mucociliary clearance, resulting in a range of clinical manifestations such as chronic bronchitis, bronchiectasis, chronic rhino-sinusitis, chronic otitis media, situs viscerum inversus in almost 40-50% of cases and male infertility. The triad situs viscerum inversus, bronchiectasis and sinusitis is known as Kartagener syndrome. Up to now little is known about genetic, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of primary motile ciliary diseases in children: for this reason, diagnosis is generally delayed and almost all treatments for PCD are not based on randomized studies but extrapolated from cystic fibrosis guidelines. The aim of this review is to propose to pediatricians a summary of current clinical and diagnostic evidence to obtain better knoledwge of this condition. The earlier diagnosis and the right treatment are both crucial to improve the prognosis of PCD.

  2. [Clinical aspects of congenital maxillofacial deformities].

    PubMed

    Sólya, Kitti; Dézsi, Csilla; Vanya, Melinda; Szabó, János; Sikovanyecz, János; Kozinszky, Zoltán; Szili, Károly

    2015-09-13

    The cleft lip and palate deformity is one of the most common type of congenital abnormalities. The aim of this paper is to summarise the literature knowledge about cleft lip and/or palate. The authors review and discuss international literature data on the prevention, genetic and environmental predisposing factors, anatomical and embryological features, as well as pre- and post-natal diagnosis and treatment of these deformities. The aetiology is multifactorial, driven by both genetic and environmental factors which lead to multifaceted phenotypes and clinical features of these malformations. The lack of the multidisciplinary knowledge about prenatal diagnosis, prevention, genetic aspects and treatment strategy could result in serious diagnostic errors, hence clinical teamwork is critically important to solve the problems of this pathology. Only the professional teamwork and multidisciplinary cooperation can guarantee the optimal level of health care and better quality of life for these patients and their families.

  3. Ventricular dysphonia: clinical aspects and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Maryn, Youri; De Bodt, Marc S; Van Cauwenberge, Paul

    2003-05-01

    Ventricular dysphonia, also known as dysphonia plica ventricularis, refers to the pathological interference of the false vocal folds during phonation. Despite its low incidence and prevalence, Vd is a well-known phenomenon in voice clinics. The present report reviews symptoms, etiology, diagnosis, and therapeutic options regarding this voice disorder. Literature review and case studies. The literature pertaining to all clinical aspects of V(D) was reviewed to define diagnostic and therapeutic clinical decision making. Ventricular dysphonia is characterized by a typical rough, low-pitched voice quality resulting from false vocal fold vibration. Ventricular dysphonia may be compensatory when true vocal folds are affected (resection, paralysis). Noncompensatory types may be of habitual, psychoemotional, or idiopathic origin. Because perceptual symptoms may vary considerably, diagnosis should rely on a meticulous voice assessment, including laryngeal videostroboscopic, perceptual, aerodynamic, and acoustic evaluation. Various therapeutic approaches for the noncompensatory type of ventricular dysphonia may be considered: voice therapy, psychotherapy, anesthetic or botulinum toxin injections, or surgery. The study presents the state of the art with respect to ventricular dysphonia and may be helpful in diagnosis and therapeutic decision-making.

  4. [Some clinical aspects of sodium homeostasis disorders].

    PubMed

    Sulyok, Endre

    2013-09-22

    In this review three major issues of sodium homeostasis are addressed. Specifically, volume-dependent (salt-sensitive) hypertension, sodium chloride content of maintenance fluid and clinical evaluation of hyponatremia are discussed. Regarding volume-dependent hypertension the endocrine/paracrine systems mediating renal sodium retention, the relationship between salt intake, plasma sodium levels and blood pressure, as well as data on the dissociation of sodium and volume regulation are presented. The concept of perinatal programming of salt-preference is also mentioned. Some theoretical and practical aspects of fluid therapy are summarized with particular reference to using hypotonic sodium chloride solution for maintenance fluid as opposed to the currently proposed isotonic sodium chloride solution. Furthermore, the incidence, the aetiological classification and central nervous system complications of hyponatremia are presented, too. In addition, clinical and pathophysical features of hyponatremic encephalophathy and osmotic demyelinisation are given. The adaptive reactions of the brain to hypotonic stress are also described with particular emphasis on the role of brain-specific water channel proteins (aquaporin-4) and the benzamil-inhibitable sodium channels. In view of the outmost clinical significance of hyponatremia, the principles of efficient and safe therapeutic approaches are outlined.

  5. Clinical aspects of Marburg hemorrhagic fever

    PubMed Central

    Mehedi, Masfique; Groseth, Allison; Feldmann, Heinz; Ebihara, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    Marburg virus belongs to the genus Marburgvirus in the family Filoviridae and causes a severe hemorrhagic fever, known as Marburg hemorrhagic fever (MHF), in both humans and nonhuman primates. Similar to the more widely known Ebola hemorrhagic fever, MHF is characterized by systemic viral replication, immunosuppression and abnormal inflammatory responses. These pathological features of the disease contribute to a number of systemic dysfunctions including hemorrhages, edema, coagulation abnormalities and, ultimately, multiorgan failure and shock, often resulting in death. A detailed understanding of the pathological processes that lead to this devastating disease remains elusive, a fact that contributes to the lack of licensed vaccines or effective therapeutics. This article will review the clinical aspects of MHF and discuss the pathogenesis and possible options for diagnosis, treatment and prevention. PMID:22046196

  6. The effects of the arm swing on biomechanical and physiological aspects of roller ski skating.

    PubMed

    Hegge, Ann Magdalen; Ettema, Gertjan; de Koning, Jos J; Rognstad, Asgeir Bakken; Hoset, Martin; Sandbakk, Øyvind

    2014-08-01

    This study analyzed the biomechanical and physiological effects of the arm swing in roller ski skating, and compared leg-skating (i.e. ski skating without poles) using a pronounced arm swing (SWING) with leg-skating using locked arms (LOCKED). Sixteen elite male cross-country skiers performed submaximal stages at 10, 15 and 20kmh(-1) on a 2% inclined treadmill in the two techniques. SWING demonstrated higher peak push-off forces and a higher force impulse at all speeds, but a longer cycle length only at the highest speed (all P<.05), indicating a lower force effectiveness with SWING at the two lowest speeds. Additionally, the flexion-extension movement in the lower limbs was more pronounced for SWING. Oxygen uptake was higher for SWING at the two lowest speeds (both P<.05) without any differences in blood lactate. At the highest speed, oxygen uptake did not differ between SWING and LOCKED, but the RER, blood lactate and ventilation were lower with SWING (all P<.05). Taken together, these results demonstrate that utilizing the arm swing in roller ski skating increases the ski forces and aerobic energy cost at low and moderate speeds, whereas the greater forces at high speed lead to a longer cycle length and smaller anaerobic contribution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Uromodulin storage diseases: clinical aspects and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Scolari, Francesco; Caridi, Gianluca; Rampoldi, Luca; Tardanico, Regina; Izzi, Claudia; Pirulli, Doroti; Amoroso, Antonio; Casari, Giorgio; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2004-12-01

    The recent discovery of mutations in the uromodulin gene ( UMOD ) in patients with medullary cystic kidney disease type 2 (MCKD2), familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy (FJHN), and glomerulocystic kidney disease (GCKD) provides the opportunity for a revision of pathogenic aspects and puts forth the basis for a renewed classification. This review focuses on clinical, pathological, and cell biology advances in UMOD -related pathological states, including a review of the associated clinical conditions described to date in the literature. Overall, 31 UMOD mutations associated with MCKD2 and FJHN (205 patients) and 1 mutation associated with GCKD (3 patients) have been described, with a cluster at exons 4 and 5. Most are missense mutations causing a cysteine change in uromodulin sequence. No differences in clinical symptoms between carriers of cysteine versus polar residue changes have been observed; clinical phenotypes invariably are linked to classic MCKD2/FJHN. A common motif among all reports is that many overlapping symptoms between MCKD2 and FJHN are present, and a separation between these 2 entities seems unwarranted or redundant. Cell experiments with mutant variants indicated a delay in intracellular maturation and export dynamics, with consequent uromodulin storage within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Patchy uromodulin deposits in tubule cells were found by means of immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy showed dense fibrillar material in the ER. Mass spectrometry showed only unmodified uromodulin in urine of patients with UMOD mutations. Lack of uromodulin function(s) is associated with impairments in tubular function, particularly the urine-concentrating process, determining water depletion and hyperuricemia. Intracellular uromodulin trapping within the ER probably has a major role in determining tubulointerstitial fibrosis and renal failure. We propose the definition of uromodulin storage diseases for conditions with proven UMOD mutations.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of the pelvic floor: from clinical to biomechanical imaging.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Sofia; Da Roza, Thuane; Parente, Marco; Ramos, Isabel; Mascarenhas, Teresa; Natal Jorge, Renato M

    2013-12-01

    This article reviews the current role of magnetic resonance imaging in the study of the pelvic floor anatomy and pelvic floor dysfunction. The application of static and dynamic magnetic resonance imaging in the clinical context and for biomechanical simulation modeling is assessed, and the main findings are summarized. Additionally, magnetic resonance-based diffusion tensor imaging is presented as a potential tool to evaluate muscle fiber morphology. In this article, focus is set on pelvic floor muscle damage related to urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse, sometimes as a consequence of vaginal delivery. Modeling applications that evaluate anatomical and physiological properties of pelvic floor are presented to further illustrate their particular characteristics. Finally, finite element method is described as a method for modeling and analyzing pelvic floor structures' biomechanical performance, based on material and behavioral properties of the tissues, and considering pressure loads that mimic real-life conditions such as active contraction or Valsalva maneuver.

  9. [Mystery of alar ligament rupture: value of MRI in whiplash injuries--biomechanical, anatomical and clinical studies].

    PubMed

    Bitterling, H; Stäbler, A; Brückmann, H

    2007-11-01

    Whiplash injury of the cervical spine is a frequent issue in medical expertise and causes enormous consequential costs for motor insurance companies. Some authors accuse posttraumatic changes of alar ligaments to be causative for consequential disturbances. Review of recent studies on biomechanics, anatomical and clinical MR imaging. Biomechanical experiments can not induce according injuries of alar ligaments. Although MRI provides excellent visualization of alar ligaments, the range of normal variants is high. Biomechanical studies give no evidence of alar ligament involvement in whiplash disease. Using MRI, signal alterations of alar ligaments can hardly be differentiated from common normal variants. Functional MRI provides no diagnostic yield.

  10. [Negative symptoms: clinical and psychometric aspects].

    PubMed

    Adida, M; Azorin, J-M; Belzeaux, R; Fakra, E

    2015-12-01

    Recent investigations performing exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis have suggested that negative symptoms are multidimensional, including evidence for at least two distinct negative symptom subdomains: diminished expression and amotivation. Guidance for selection of instruments for measurement of negative symptoms is rapidly evolving. As there are continuing advances in the description of negative symptoms, new instruments are under development, and new data on the performance of instruments emerge from clinical trials. The Scale for Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS), the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), and the Negative Symptom Assessment-16 (NSA-16) are considered to be reliable and valid measures for negative symptom trials but differ with respect to their domain coverage, use of informants, integration of global scores, administration time and comprehensiveness of their structured interviews. In response to the 2005 NIMH - MATRICS consensus statement, work groups are field testing and refining two new measures, the Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms (CAINS) and the Brief Negative Symptom Scale (BNSS). Both address the five currently recognized domains of negative symptoms, differentiate appetitive from consummatory aspects of anhedonia and address desire for social relationships. Thus far, both have exhibited promising psychometric properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Ricin Toxicity: Clinical and Molecular Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Moshiri, Mohammad; Hamid, Fatemeh; Etemad, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Seeds of the castor bean plant Ricinuscommunis L (CB) contain ricin toxin (RT), one of the most poisonous naturally-occurring substances known. Ricin toxin, a water-soluble glycoprotein that does not partition into the oil extract, is a ribosome-inactivating toxin composed of two chains, labeled A and B. Severity of the toxicity varies depending on the route of exposure to the toxin. Inhalational is the most toxic route, followed by oral ingestion. Orally-ingested RT accumulates in the liver and spleen but other cells are also affected. The main clinical manifestations are also related to the administration route. Oral ingestion of CB or RT results in abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, and various types of gastrointestinal bleeding that leading to volume depletion, hypovolemic shock, and renal failure. Inhalation of the toxin presents with non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, diffuse necrotizing pneumonia, interstitial and alveolar inflammation, and edema. Local injection of RT induces indurations at the injection site, swelling of regional lymph nodes, hypotension, and death. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has been developed to detect RT in animal tissues and fluids. Ricinine, an alkaloid of CB, can be detected in rat urine within 48 h of RT exposure. Supportive care is the basic treatment and standard biowarfare decontamination protocols are used for RT intoxication. Dexamethasone and difluoromethylornithine might be effective treatments. This review examines the clinical and molecular aspects of ricin toxicity. PMID:27536698

  12. Clinical and molecular aspects of severe malaria.

    PubMed

    Kirchgatter, Karin; Del Portillo, Hernando A

    2005-09-01

    The erythrocytic cycle of Plasmodium falciparum presents a particularity in relation to other Plasmodium species that infect man. Mature trophozoites and schizonts are sequestered from the peripheral circulation due to adhesion of infected erythrocytes to host endothelial cells. Modifications in the surface of infected erythrocytes, termed knobs, seem to facilitate adhesion to endothelium and other erythrocytes. Adhesion provides better maturation in the microaerophilic venous atmosphere and allows the parasite to escape clearance by the spleen which recognizes the erythrocytes loss of deformability. Adhesion to the endothelium, or cytoadherence, has an important role in the pathogenicity of the disease, causing occlusion of small vessels and contributing to failure of many organs. Cytoadherence can also describe adhesion of infected erythrocytes to uninfected erythrocytes, a phenomenon widely known as rosetting. Clinical aspects of severe malaria, as well as the host receptors and parasite ligands involved in cytoadherence and rosetting, are reviewed here. The erythrocyte membrane protein 1 of P. falciparum (PfEMP1) appears to be the principal adhesive ligand of infected erythrocytes and will be discussed in more detail. Understanding the role of host receptors and parasite ligands in the development of different clinical syndromes is urgently needed to identify vaccination targets in order to decrease the mortality rates of this disease.

  13. Blau syndrome, clinical and genetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Sfriso, Paolo; Caso, Francesco; Tognon, Sofia; Galozzi, Paola; Gava, Alessandra; Punzi, Leonardo

    2012-11-01

    Blau syndrome (BS) is a rare autosomal dominant, autoinflammatory syndrome characterized by the clinical triad of granulomatous recurrent uveitis, dermatitis and symmetric arthritis. The gene responsible for BS has been identified in the caspase recruitment domain gene CARD15/NOD2. In the majority of patients, the disease is characterized by early onset, usually before 3-4years of age. The manifestations at disease onset are usually represented by articular and cutaneous involvement signs, generally followed later by ocular manifestations which are often the most relevant morbidity of BS. In some cases the presence of fever is also observed; atypical cases of BS have been reported with cardiovascular, neurological, renal, intestinal and other organ involvement. The rarity and the variations in the severity and evolution of its expressions do not permit sufficient data about optimal treatment for patients with BS. The first step of therapy is represented by the use of corticosteroids and successively, in case of unsatisfactory response, by additional treatment with immunosuppressive agents. The results with biologic anti-cytokine agents, such as anti-TNFα and anti-IL1β, are different, particularly with regard to ocular morbidity. Clinical and genetic aspects of the familial and the sporadic form of BS will be discussed and focused on. A description of a case study of an Italian family is also included.

  14. [Cystinuria update: clinical, biochemical and genetic aspects].

    PubMed

    Orts Costa, J A; Zúñiga Cabrera, A; Martínez de la Cára y Salmerón, J

    2003-06-01

    Cystinuria is an autosomal recessive disorder with an estimated incidence of 1 case in 7000 live births, that results in elevated urinary excretion of cystine and dibasic aminoacids: ornithine, lysine and arginine. Discussed by Sir Archibald Edward Garrod, in 1908, as one of the four first known inborn errors of metabolism, it is characterized by a defect in transport of cystine and dibasic aminoacids, that affects their reabsortion in both renal tubule and gastrointestinal tract. To date, according to the recent molecular findings, two genes have been identified as responsible for this disease: SLC3A1 and SLC7A9. A more accurate pheno/genotyping identification of cystinuric patients will allow to improve prophilaxis and therapy for this illness. Cystinuria only causes recurrent urolithiasis (about 1-2 / of renal calculi in adults) and its associated complications as clinical feature because of poor cystine solubility at low pH. An accurate control over prohylaxis (based on high water intake and potassium citrate treatment, on first line, and tiol-derivatives treatment, on second line) must be taken in patients -like homozygous type I- with high lithiasis risk. However, approximately one half of patients under prophylaxis control will develop recurrent lithiasis; in this case, only urology or surgical approaches would be possible. 474 Updated knowledge about biochemical, genetic, clinical, diagnosis, prevention, treatment and prognosis aspects of this, relatively unusual, disease has been reviewed in this article.

  15. Clinical biomechanics of wear in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, John J; Pedersen, Douglas R; Johnston, Richard C; Brown, Thomas D

    2003-01-01

    Complementary clinical and laboratory studies were performed to identify variables associated with polyethylene wear following total hip replacement, and to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for accelerated wear in the total hip arthroplasty construct. Observational cohort studies were performed using a prospective clinical database of more than 4000 consecutive primary total hip arthroplasties performed by a single surgeon, to identify wear-related variables. These variables included head size, acetabular/femoral component impingement, and third body debris. Novel digital edge detection techniques were developed and employed to accurately measure wear, and to determine the relationships of head size and third body debris to acceleration of wear. A novel sliding-distance-coupled finite element model was formulated and employed to examine the mechanisms responsible for wear. The long-term cohort studies demonstrated smaller head sizes to be associated with less wear. Third body debris generated from cable fretting was associated with an increase in wear, osteolysis, and acetabular loosening, especially with larger head sizes. The sliding-distance-coupled finite element model replicated the wear rates occurring in vitro and in vivo, demonstrating the importance of sliding distance on polyethylene wear following total hip arthroplasty. It also demonstrated substantial increases in wear associated with femoral head scratching from third body debris. Further extension of the finite element formulation demonstrated the potential for acetabular component rim damage from impingement wear, and the enhanced potential for third body ingress to the bearing surface with larger head sizes. Edge detection wear measurement techniques demonstrated that early wear rates were predictive of long-term wear rates. These complementary clinical and laboratory investigations have provided insight into 1) the significance of sliding distance and physiologic loci of motion as contributing

  16. Clinical Biomechanics of Wear in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan, John J; Pedersen, Douglas R; Johnston, Richard C; Brown, Thomas D

    2003-01-01

    Complementary clinical and laboratory studies were performed to identify variables associated with polyethylene wear following total hip replacement, and to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for accelerated wear in the total hip arthroplasty construct. Observational cohort studies were performed using a prospective clinical database of more than 4000 consecutive primary total hip arthroplasties performed by a single surgeon, to identify wear-related variables. These variables included head size, acetabular/femoral component impingement, and third body debris. Novel digital edge detection techniques were developed and employed to accurately measure wear, and to determine the relationships of head size and third body debris to acceleration of wear. A novel slidingdistance-coupled finite element model was formulated and employed to examine the mechanisms responsible for wear. The long-term cohort studies demonstrated smaller head sizes to be associated with less wear. Third body debris generated from cable fretting was associated with an increase in wear, osteolysis, and acetabular loosening, especially with larger head sizes. The sliding-distance-coupled finite element model replicated the wear rates occurring in vitro and in vivo, demonstrating the importance of sliding distance on polyethylene wear following total hip arthroplasty. It also demonstrated substantial increases in wear associated with femoral head scratching from third body debris. Further extension of the finite element formulation demonstrated the potential for acetabular component rim damage from impingement wear, and the enhanced potential for third body ingress to the bearing surface with larger head sizes. Edge detection wear measurement techniques demonstrated that early wear rates were predictive of long-term wear rates. These complementary clinical and laboratory investigations have provided insight into 1) the significance of sliding distance and physiologic loci of motion as contributing

  17. Clinical, Biomechanical, and Physiological Translational Interpretations of Human Resting Myofascial Tone or Tension

    PubMed Central

    Masi, Alfonse T.; Nair, Kalyani; Evans, Tyler; Ghandour, Yousef

    2010-01-01

    Background Myofascial tissues generate integrated webs and networks of passive and active tensional forces that provide stabilizing support and that control movement in the body. Passive [central nervous system (CNS)–independent] resting myofascial tension is present in the body and provides a low-level stabilizing component to help maintain balanced postures. This property was recently called “human resting myofascial tone” (HRMT). The HRMT model evolved from electromyography (EMG) research in the 1950s that showed lumbar muscles usually to be EMG-silent in relaxed gravity-neutral upright postures. Methods Biomechanical, clinical, and physiological studies were reviewed to interpret the passive stiffness properties of HRMT that help to stabilize various relaxed functions such as quiet balanced standing. Biomechanical analyses and experimental studies of the lumbar multifidus were reviewed to interpret its passive stiffness properties. The lumbar multifidus was illustrated as the major core stabilizing muscle of the spine, serving an important passive biomechanical role in the body. Results Research into muscle physiology suggests that passive resting tension (CNS-independent) is generated in sarcomeres by the molecular elasticity of low-level cycling cross-bridges between the actomyosin filaments. In turn, tension is complexly transmitted to intimately enveloping fascial matrix fibrils and other molecular elements in connective tissue, which, collectively, constitute the myofascial unit. Postural myofascial tonus varies with age and sex. Also, individuals in the population are proposed to vary in a polymorphism of postural HRMT. A few people are expected to have outlier degrees of innate postural hypotonicity or hypertonicity. Such biomechanical variations likely predispose to greater risk of related musculoskeletal disorders, a situation that deserves greater attention in clinical practice and research. Axial myofascial hypertonicity was hypothesized to

  18. Clinical and biomechanical factors which predict timed up and down stairs test performance in hemiparetic patients.

    PubMed

    Bonnyaud, Céline; Zory, Raphael; Pradon, Didier; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Roche, Nicolas

    2013-07-01

    The ability to ascend and descend a flight of stairs is considered as one of the best predictors of free-living activity and is correlated with domestic extrinsic activity in hemiparetic patients. However, the relationship between timed-stair performance and clinical and biomechanical parameters has never been studied this population. The aim of this study was to determine if performance on the Timed Up and Down Stairs (TUDS) test was related to clinical variables (maximal gait speed, strength and spasticity) and to biomechanical gait parameters (spatio-temporal, kinematic and kinetic gait parameters) in hemiparetic patients. Sixty hemiparetic patients performed the TUDS test, underwent 3D gait-analysis and a clinical assessment. Pearson's correlations and two stepwise multiple linear regression analyses were carried out to identify the parameters which were the most highly correlated with TUDS test performance among the clinical variables and gait parameters on the paretic side. Maximal walking speed on the 10-m walk test and strength of the ankle dorsiflexors were the clinical variables that were the most related to TUDS test performance (63% of variance explained). The percentage of single support phase on the paretic side was the biomechanical gait parameter which was the most related to TUDS test performance (58% of variance explained). The results of this study identified three parameters which predicted the performance to ascend and descend a flight of stairs as fast as possible in hemiparetic patients. Rehabilitation programs which aim to improve stair performance and independence in daily life activities should focus on these three parameters. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. LDL-Apheresis: Technical and Clinical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Bambauer, Rolf; Bambauer, Carolin; Lehmann, Boris; Latza, Reinhard; Schiel, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The prognosis of patients suffering from severe hyperlipidemia, sometimes combined with elevated lipoprotein (a) levels, and coronary heart disease refractory to diet and lipid-lowering drugs is poor. For such patients, regular treatment with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis is the therapeutic option. Today, there are five different LDL-apheresis systems available: cascade filtration or lipid filtration, immunoadsorption, heparin-induced LDL precipitation, dextran sulfate LDL adsorption, and the LDL hemoperfusion. There is a strong correlation between hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. Besides the elimination of other risk factors, in severe hyperlipidemia therapeutic strategies should focus on a drastic reduction of serum lipoproteins. Despite maximum conventional therapy with a combination of different kinds of lipid-lowering drugs, sometimes the goal of therapy cannot be reached. Hence, in such patients, treatment with LDL-apheresis is indicated. Technical and clinical aspects of these five different LDL-apheresis methods are shown here. There were no significant differences with respect to or concerning all cholesterols, or triglycerides observed. With respect to elevated lipoprotein (a) levels, however, the immunoadsorption method seems to be most effective. The different published data clearly demonstrate that treatment with LDL-apheresis in patients suffering from severe hyperlipidemia refractory to maximum conservative therapy is effective and safe in long-term application. PMID:22654591

  20. Clinical and Neurobiological Aspects of Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Nishino, Seiji

    2007-01-01

    Narcolepsy is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), cataplexy and/or other dissociated manifestations of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep (hypnagogic hallucinations and sleep paralysis). Narcolepsy is currently treated with amphetamine-like central nervous system (CNS) stimulants (for EDS) and antidepressants (for cataplexy). Some other classes of compounds such as modafinil (a non-amphetamine wake-promoting compound for EDS) and gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB, a short-acting sedative for EDS/fragmented nighttime sleep and cataplexy) given at night are also employed. The major pathophysiology of human narcolepsy has been recently elucidated based on the discovery of narcolepsy genes in animals. Using forward (i.e., positional cloning in canine narcolepsy) and reverse (i.e., mouse gene knockout) genetics, the genes involved in the pathogenesis of narcolepsy (hypocretin/orexin ligand and its receptor) in animals have been identified. Hypocretins/orexins are novel hypothalamic neuropeptides also involved in various hypothalamic functions such as energy homeostasis and neuroendocrine functions. Mutations in hypocretin-related genes are rare in humans, but hypocretin-ligand deficiency is found in many narcolepsy-cataplexy cases. In this review, the clinical, pathophysiological and pharmacological aspects of narcolepsy are discussed. PMID:17470414

  1. [Clinical and radiological aspects of mucormycosis].

    PubMed

    Herbrecht, Raoul; Sabou, Marcela; Ledoux, Marie-Pierre

    2013-03-01

    Mucormycosis is an infection caused by filamentous fungi of the Mucorales order. The predisposing factors are mostly diabetic ketoacidosis and severe immunosuppressive conditions such as prolonged neutropenia, steroid or T-cell suppressor therapy, solid organ transplantation or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Mucormycosis can also occur in immunocompetent patients, especially after trauma, burns or direct inoculation of the fungi (e.g. intravenous drug abuse). The most frequently targeted primary sites of infection are sinuses with a rapid spread to the adjacent tissues including the brain, the lower respiratory tract, the digestive tract and the skin. Mucorales are able to invade the vessels causing hematogenous dissemination, vascular thrombosis and, ultimately, necrosis of the lesions. Clinical and radiological aspects are similar to those observed in other invasive filamentous fungi infections such as invasive aspergillosis, fusariosis or scedosporiosis. CT-scan or MRI are mandatory to assess the extension of the lesions. The diagnosis remains difficult and is often delayed resulting in a poor outcome. © 2013 médecine/sciences – Inserm / SRMS.

  2. Adult diaphyseal both-bone forearm fractures: A clinical and biomechanical comparison of four different fixations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X F; Huang, J W; Mao, H X; Chen, W B; Luo, Y

    2016-05-01

    Although there have been a small number of studies reporting single bone fixation of either radius or ulna as well as hybrid fixation, the paucity of data for the hybrid fixation method still remains. Hybrid fixation with plate and IM nailing would achieve good fixation and functional outcome, minimal damage to soft tissues and lower re-fracture risk. Forty cadavers (20 males, 20 females; mean age 68.06, SD 1.58years) were selected in biomechanical study under axial loading, bending loading, and torsional loading. Eighty-seven patients (47 males, 40 females; mean age 38.03±0.88years) were enrolled in the clinical study and randomly received different fixation: both-bone plate fixation or both-bone intramedullary nailing, plate fixation of ulna and intramedullary nailing of radius and intramedullary nailing of ulna and plate fixation of radius. In the biomechanical study, intramedullary nailing of ulna and plate fixation of radius had similar results with that using both-bone plate method under axial, bending and torsional loading (All P>0.05), suggesting the more stable fixation compared with the other two groups (All P<0.05). In clinical research, both-bone intramedullary nailing was related to shortest operative time, smallest wound size and periosteal stripping area compared with other three groups (P<0.05). Patients receiving intramedullary nailing of ulna and plate fixation of radius showed the lowest incidence of postoperative complications and the best functional recovery outcome comparing with other three groups of patients (Both P<0.05). The hybrid fixation method of intramedullary nailing of ulna and plate fixation of radius showed good stability in biomechanics, fewer complications and better functional clinical outcomes. Level II, prospective randomised study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Knee stability assessment on anterior cruciate ligament injury: Clinical and biomechanical approaches

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Mak-Ham; Fong, Daniel TP; Yung, Patrick SH; Ho, Eric PY; Chan, Wood-Yee; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is common in knee joint accounting for 40% of sports injury. ACL injury leads to knee instability, therefore, understanding knee stability assessments would be useful for diagnosis of ACL injury, comparison between operation treatments and establishing return-to-sport standard. This article firstly introduces a management model for ACL injury and the contribution of knee stability assessment to the corresponding stages of the model. Secondly, standard clinical examination, intra-operative stability measurement and motion analysis for functional assessment are reviewed. Orthopaedic surgeons and scientists with related background are encouraged to understand knee biomechanics and stability assessment for ACL injury patients. PMID:19712449

  4. Multidirectional instability of the shoulder: biomechanics, clinical presentation, and treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Merolla, Giovanni; Cerciello, Simone; Chillemi, Claudio; Paladini, Paolo; De Santis, Elisa; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2015-08-01

    Multidirectional instability (MDI) of the shoulder is a condition where the dislocation occurs in more than one direction with minimal or no causative trauma. Its pathoanatomy is complex and characterized by a redundant capsule, resulting in increased glenohumeral joint volume. The fact that several further factors may contribute to symptom onset complicates the diagnosis and hampers the identification of a therapeutic approach suitable for all cases. There is general agreement that the initial treatment should be conservative and that surgery should be reserved for patients who have not responded to an ad hoc rehabilitation program. We review the biomechanics, clinical presentation, and treatment strategies of shoulder MDI.

  5. Design rationale and biomechanics of Maverick Total Disc arthroplasty with early clinical results.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Hallett H; Lehuec, Jean-Charles; Friesem, Tai; Zdeblick, Thomas; Eisermann, Lukas

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews the design criteria, biomechanical and biological (wear and safety) testing of this chrome cobalt metal-on-metal, ball and socket design prosthesis. The surgical technique and early clinical results of the initial implantations are also reviewed. Initial results of 7 Maverick implantations showed all 7 patients attaining a 15 point Oswestry improvement within 3 months after implantation. This early result in a small sample is significantly quicker in recovery and improvement when compared to the historical control of the LT cage with Infuse IDE study. Longer term results and more careful study are needed of this interesting and optimistic finding.

  6. Clinical and Biomechanical Evaluation of an All-Arthroscopic Suprapectoral Biceps Tenodesis

    PubMed Central

    Kahlenberg, Cynthia A.; Patel, Ronak M.; Nair, Rueben; Deshmane, Prashant P.; Harnden, Galen; Terry, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pathology of the long head of the biceps (LHB) is a well-recognized cause of shoulder pain in the adult population and can be managed surgically with tenotomy or tenodesis. Purpose: To compare the biomechanical strength of an all-arthroscopic biceps tenodesis technique that places the LHB distal to the bicipital groove in the suprapectoral region with a more traditional mini-open subpectoral tenodesis. This study also evaluates the clinical outcomes of patients who underwent biceps tenodesis using the all-arthroscopic technique. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study and case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: For the biomechanical evaluation of the all-arthroscopic biceps tenodesis technique, in which the biceps tendon is secured to the suprapectoral region distal to the bicipital groove with an interference screw, 14 fresh-frozen human cadaveric shoulders (7 matched pairs) were used to compare load to failure and displacement at peak load with a traditional open subpectoral location. For the clinical evaluation, 49 consecutive patients (51 shoulders) with a mean follow-up of 2.4 years who underwent an all-arthroscopic biceps tenodesis were evaluated using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score preoperatively and at last follow-up, as well as the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Shoulder Score at last follow-up. Results: On biomechanical evaluation, there was no significant difference in peak failure load, displacement at peak load, or displacement after cyclic testing between the arthroscopic suprapectoral and mini-open subpectoral groups. In the clinical evaluation, the mean preoperative ASES score was 65.4, compared with 87.1 at last follow-up. The mean UCLA score at last follow-up was 30.2. Forty-eight (94.1%) patients reported satisfaction with the surgery. In subgroup analysis comparing patients who had a rotator cuff repair or labral repair at time of tenodesis with patients who did not have either of these

  7. Vesicle-like biomechanics governs important aspects of nuclear geometry in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Lim H W, Gerald; Huber, Greg; Torii, Yoshihiro; Hirata, Aiko; Miller, Jonathan; Sazer, Shelley

    2007-09-26

    It has long been known that during the closed mitosis of many unicellular eukaryotes, including the fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), the nuclear envelope remains intact while the nucleus undergoes a remarkable sequence of shape transformations driven by elongation of an intranuclear mitotic spindle whose ends are capped by spindle pole bodies embedded in the nuclear envelope. However, the mechanical basis of these normal cell cycle transformations, and abnormal nuclear shapes caused by intranuclear elongation of microtubules lacking spindle pole bodies, remain unknown. Although there are models describing the shapes of lipid vesicles deformed by elongation of microtubule bundles, there are no models describing normal or abnormal shape changes in the nucleus. We describe here a novel biophysical model of interphase nuclear geometry in fission yeast that accounts for critical aspects of the mechanics of the fission yeast nucleus, including the biophysical properties of lipid bilayers, forces exerted on the nuclear envelope by elongating microtubules, and access to a lipid reservoir, essential for the large increase in nuclear surface area during the cell cycle. We present experimental confirmation of the novel and non-trivial geometries predicted by our model, which has no free parameters. We also use the model to provide insight into the mechanical basis of previously described defects in nuclear division, including abnormal nuclear shapes and loss of nuclear envelope integrity. The model predicts that (i) despite differences in structure and composition, fission yeast nuclei and vesicles with fluid lipid bilayers have common mechanical properties; (ii) the S. pombe nucleus is not lined with any structure with shear resistance, comparable to the nuclear lamina of higher eukaryotes. We validate the model and its predictions by analyzing wild type cells in which ned1 gene overexpression causes elongation of an intranuclear microtubule bundle that deforms the

  8. [RESEARCH PROGRESS OF BIOMECHANICS OF PROXIMAL ROW CARPAL INSTABILITY].

    PubMed

    Guo, Jinhai; Huang, Fuguo

    2015-01-01

    To review the research progress of the biomechanics of proximal row carpal instability (IPRC). The related literature concerning IPRC was extensively reviewed. The biomechanical mechanism of the surrounding soft tissue in maintaining the stability of the proximal row carpal (PRC) was analyzed, and the methods to repair or reconstruct the stability and function of the PRC were summarized from two aspects including basic biomechanics and clinical biomechanics. The muscles and ligaments of the PRC are critical to its stability. Most scholars have reached a consensus about biomechanical mechanism of the PRC, but there are still controversial conclusions on the biomechanics mechanism of the surrounding soft tissue to stability of distal radioulnar joint when the triangular fibrocartilage complex are damaged and the biomechanics mechanism of the scapholunate ligament. At present, there is no unified standard about the methods to repair or reconstruct the stability and function of the PRC. So, it is difficult for clinical practice. Some strides have been made in the basic biomechanical study on muscle and ligament and clinical biomechanical study on the methods to repair or reconstruct the stability and function of PRC, but it will be needed to further study the morphology of carpal articular surface and the adjacent articular surface, the pressure of distal carpals to proximal carpal and so on.

  9. Biomechanical and clinical study of single posterior oblique cage POLIF in the treatment of degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Zagra, Antonino; Scaramuzzo, Laura; Galbusera, Fabio; Minoia, Leone; Archetti, Marino; Giudici, Fabrizio

    2015-11-01

    Aim of the study was to evaluate the biomechanical stability and the clinical efficacy of a lumbar interbody fusion obtained by single oblique cage implanted by a posterior approach. Through the realization of three finite element models (FEMs), the biomechanics of POLIF was compared to PLIF and TLIF. Ninety-four patients underwent interbody fusion by POLIF with instrumented posterolateral fusion. Clinical and radiographic outcomes were evaluated at regular intervals for at least 6 months. The FEMs showed no statistically significant differences in stability in compression and flexion-extension. Mean preoperative VAS score was 7.1, decreased to 2.1 at follow-up. Mean preoperative SF-12 value was 34.5 %, increased to 75.4 % at follow-up. All patients showed a good fusion rate and no hardware failure. POLIF associated to instrumented posterolateral fusion is a viable and safe surgical technique, which ensures a biomechanical stability similar to other surgical techniques.

  10. Plantar Fasciitis and the Windlass Mechanism: A Biomechanical Link to Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Terry R.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Plantar fasciitis is a prevalent problem, with limited consensus among clinicians regarding the most effective treatment. The purpose of this literature review is to provide a systematic approach to the treatment of plantar fasciitis based on the windlass mechanism model. Data Sources: We searched MEDLINE, SPORT Discus, and CINAHL from 1966 to 2003 using the key words plantar fasciitis, windlass mechanism, pronation, heel pain, and heel spur. Data Synthesis: We offer a biomechanical application for the evaluation and treatment of plantar fasciitis based on a review of the literature for the windlass mechanism model. This model provides a means for describing plantar fasciitis conditions such that clinicians can formulate a potential causal relationship between the conditions and their treatments. Conclusions/Recommendations: Clinicians' understanding of the biomechanical causes of plantar fasciitis should guide the decision-making process concerning the evaluation and treatment of heel pain. Use of this approach may improve clinical outcomes because intervention does not merely treat physical symptoms but actively addresses the influences that resulted in the condition. Principles from this approach might also provide a basis for future research investigating the efficacy of plantar fascia treatment. PMID:16558682

  11. Clinical aspects of dermatophytosis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Lechowski, R; Karaś-Tecza, J; Mieczkowska, J

    2004-01-01

    Dermatophytosis in dogs is variable and can clinically mimics other skin diseases. Diagnosis based on clinical presentation may be misleading and additional laboratory tests are needed for a final diagnosis. A systematic diagnostic procedure can prevent a wrong diagnosis and allow for the right treatment.

  12. Myocardial Na,K-ATPase: Clinical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Kjeldsen, Keld

    2003-01-01

    The specific binding of digitalis glycosides to Na,K-ATPase is used as a tool for Na,K-ATPase quantification with high accuracy and precision. In myocardial biopsies from patients with heart failure, total Na,K-ATPase concentration is decreased by around 40%; a correlation exists between a decrease in heart function and a decrease in Na,K-ATPase concentration. During digitalization, around 30% of remaining pumps are occupied by digoxin. Myocardial Na,K-ATPase is also influenced by other drugs used for the treatment of heart failure. Thus, potassium loss during diuretic therapy has been found to reduce myocardial Na,K-ATPase, whereas angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors may stimulate Na,K pump activity. Furthermore, hyperaldosteronism induced by heart failure has been found to decrease Na,K-ATPase activity. Accordingly, treatment with the aldosterone antagonist, spironolactone, may also influence Na,K-ATPase activity. The importance of Na,K pump modulation with heart disease, inhibition in digitalization and other effects of medication should be considered in the context of sodium, potassium and calcium regulation. It is recommended that digoxin be administered to heart failure patients who, after institution of mortality-reducing therapy, still have heart failure symptoms, and that the therapy be continued if symptoms are revealed or reduced. Digitalis glycosides are the only safe inotropic drugs for oral use that improve hemodynamics in heart failure. An important aspect of myocardial Na,K pump affection in heart disease is its influence on extracellular potassium (Ke) homeostasis. Two important aspects should be considered: potassium handling among myocytes, and effects of potassium entering the extracellular space of the heart via the bloodstream. It should be noted that both of these aspects of Ke homeostasis are affected by regulatory aspects, eg, regulation of the Na,K pump by physiological and pathophysiological conditions, as well as by medical

  13. Cerebral blood flow: Physiologic and clinical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 46 chapters divided among nine sections. The section titles are: Historical Perspectives; Cerebrovascular Anatomy; Cerebrovascular Physiology; Methods of Clinical Measurement; Experimental Methods; Imaging of Cerebral Circulation; Cerebrovascular Pathophysiology; Cerebrovascular Pharmacology; and Surgical and Interventional Augmentation.

  14. ["Ledderhose" disease. Plantar fibromatosis--clinical aspects].

    PubMed

    Parnitzke, B; Decker, O; Neumann, U

    1991-01-01

    The Ledderhose's diseases is a relatively rare and not well known clinical picture. Even there are tight pathomorphological and clinical relations to the Dupuytren's contracture, the genesis is also here quite unknown. Because of inefficiency of conventional therapy the surgical treatment is the only alternative. On the sample of 12 operations in 7 patients from 1979 to 1989 surgical procedure and long-term results are discussed.

  15. [Microbiological and clinical aspects of tularaemia].

    PubMed

    Pavliš, Oto; Pohanka, Miroslav

    2011-10-01

    Francisella tularensis belongs to the most important biological agents potentially applicable in biological warfare and bioterrorism. High virulence, easy and rapid spread among individual vectors, stability of the cells in aerosol and good penetration into the lungs make F. tularensis one of the most important biological warfare agents in both human and veterinary medicine. The text provides comprehensive data about tularaemia and outlines the fate of the pathogen in the host. Special attention is paid to immunological aspects of the disease, therapy, and diagnostic methods.

  16. Clinical, biomechanical and morphological assessment of anterior cruciate ligament Kevlar®-based artificial prosthesis in rabbit model.

    PubMed

    de la Garza-Castro, Santiago; González-Rivera, Carlos E; Vílchez-Cavazos, Félix; Morales-Avalos, Rodolfo; Barrera-Flores, Francisco J; Elizondo-Omaña, Rodrigo E; Soto-Dominguez, Adolfo; Acosta-Olivo, Carlos; Mendoza-Lemus, Oscar F

    2017-07-27

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical, biomechanical and morphological characteristics of a Kevlar®-based prosthetic ligament as a synthetic graft of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in an experimental animal model in rabbits. A total of 27 knees of rabbits randomly divided into 3 groups (control, ACL excision and ACL replacement with a Kevlar® prosthesis) were analyzed using clinical, biomechanical and morphological tests at 6, 12 and 18 weeks postprocedure. The mean displacement in mechanical testing was 0.73 ± 0.06 mm, 1.58 ± 0.19 mm and 0.94 ± 0.20 mm for the control, ACL excision and ACL replacement with synthetic prosthesis groups, respectively. The results showed an improvement in the stability of the knee with the use of the Kevlar® synthetic prosthesis in the biomechanical testing (p<0.05) compared with rabbits that underwent ACL excision, in addition to displacements that were larger but comparable to that in the control group (p>0.05), between the replacement group and the control group. The histological study revealed a good morphological adaptation of the synthetic material to the knee. This study proposes a new animal model for the placement and evaluation of Kevlar®-based synthetic ACL implants. The studied prosthesis showed promising behavior in the clinical and biomechanical tests and in the histological analysis. This study lays the foundation for further basic and clinical studies of artificial ACL prostheses using this material.

  17. [Clinical and genetic aspects of monogenic obesity].

    PubMed

    Lesayová, D; Staník, J; Gasperíková, D; Klimes, I

    2010-10-01

    High prevalence of obesity in all of age categories is currently one of the biggest problem in medicine. Identification of etiology of obesity can individualise an approach to the patient and it is essential for choosing a target management and therapy. Beside the largest group with polygenic inheritance are clinically important also patients with "syndromic obesity", where obesity is only one of the signs and monogenic obesity, where obesity is the major clinical phenotype (patients with mutations in gene for leptin, leptine receptor, prohormone convertase 1, melanocortine receptor 4, brain-derived neurotropic factor and tyrosin kinase receptor B). The monogenic obesity includes 3-4% of all patients with obesity. This review article brings newest insight on genetics, clinical manifestation, diagnostics and therapy of these diseases.

  18. Clinical and molecular aspects of malaria fever.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Miranda S; Gerald, Noel; McCutchan, Thomas F; Aravind, L; Kumar, Sanjai

    2011-10-01

    Although clinically benign, malaria fever is thought to have significant relevance in terms of parasite growth and survival and its virulence which in turn may alter the clinical course of illness. In this article, the historical literature is reviewed, providing some evolutionary perspective on the genesis and biological relevance of malaria fever, and the available molecular data on the febrile-temperature-inducible parasite factors that may contribute towards the regulation of parasite density and alteration of virulence in the host is also discussed. The potential molecular mechanisms that could be responsible for the induction and regulation of cyclical malaria fevers caused by different species of Plasmodium are also discussed.

  19. [Clinical aspects and classification of echinococcosis].

    PubMed

    Nabokov, Sh A; Vasil'ev, R Kh

    1978-04-01

    350 cases of alveococcosis were examined with the use of clinical and generally available methods of laboratory analysis. This study helped to find out the characteristic symptoms of the disease and their incidence rate. A clinico-anatomical classification of alveoccoccosis, based on local and general manifestations, localization of a primary focus, anatomic form of the growth of an alveococcal node and the degree of its propagation in the liver parenchima, has been developed. The suggested classification promotes a correct construction of a detailed clinical diagnosis and complete solution of the problems of therapeutic tactics.

  20. [Surgical site infection: clinical and microbiological aspects].

    PubMed

    Sikora, Agnieszka; Kozioł-Montewska, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is one of the most common and serious postoperative complication of modern surgery. It contributes to an increase of morbidity, mortality, prolonged hospitalization and costs of treatment. The optimal strategy in order to reduce wound infections in surgery is SSI knowledge of risk factors associated with a patient, surgery and postoperative care as well as the caution of fundamental recommendations concerning prevention, which include: preparation of patient for surgery, preparation of antiseptic principles for hand skin of the operation team, the proceedings in the case of allegation of infection or colonization within the operation team members, preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis, procedures and aspects of aseptic surgical technique, postoperative care and the rules for monitoring infections in the surgical ward.

  1. Acting Out; Theoretical and Clinical Aspects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abt, Lawrence Edwin, Ed.; Weissman, Stuart L.

    The beneficial and harmful effects of acting out are studied in a series of short essays by numerous authors. Included are four articles on the theoretical and dynamic considerations of acting out, along with five clinical manifestations of acting out involving suicide and criminality in adolescents and adults. Special forms of harmful acting out…

  2. Acting Out; Theoretical and Clinical Aspects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abt, Lawrence Edwin, Ed.; Weissman, Stuart L.

    The beneficial and harmful effects of acting out are studied in a series of short essays by numerous authors. Included are four articles on the theoretical and dynamic considerations of acting out, along with five clinical manifestations of acting out involving suicide and criminality in adolescents and adults. Special forms of harmful acting out…

  3. Palmoplantar keratodermas: clinical and genetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Has, Cristina; Technau-Hafsi, Kristin

    2016-02-01

    Palmoplantar keratodermas comprise a diverse group of acquired and hereditary disorders marked by excessive thickening of the epidermis of palms and soles. Early onset and positive family history suggest a genetic cause. While hereditary forms of palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK) may represent the sole or dominant clinical feature, they may also be associated with other ectodermal defects or extracutaneous manifestations. In recent years, much progress has been made in deciphering the genetic basis of PPK, which has led to the emergence of new disorders and syndromes. The elucidation of disease mechanisms has opened new avenues for specific therapies, increasingly sparking interest in this field. Given the high heterogeneity with respect to clinical features, genetic defects, and disease mechanisms, the classification of PPK is based on various criteria. These include extent of disease manifestations, morphology of palmoplantar skin involvement, inheritance patterns, and molecular pathogenesis. Though not always feasible, the clinical distinction of various PPK entities is based on fine-tuned criteria or clues. Remarkably, apparently distinct disorders have been shown to be allelic, as they are caused by mutations in the same gene. By contrast, similar clinical pictures may result from mutations in different genes. Because of this complexity, mutation analysis is required to determine the precise type of PPK. The best-defined entities are described in this review.

  4. [Focal epithelial hyperplasia. An unusual clinical aspect].

    PubMed

    Bodokh, I; Lacour, J P; Rainero, C; Orth, G; Perrin, C; Hoffman, P; Santini, J; Ortonne, J P

    1993-01-01

    We report a case of focal epithelial hyperplasia in a child born in France of Algerian parents. The clinical appearance was unusual in that certain lesions were verrucous and pediculate. A virological study revealed the presence of papillomavirus 32, one of the two types of HPV specifically associated with this entity.

  5. Clinical Aspects of Feline Retroviruses: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Katrin

    2012-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are retroviruses with global impact on the health of domestic cats. The two viruses differ in their potential to cause disease. FeLV is more pathogenic, and was long considered to be responsible for more clinical syndromes than any other agent in cats. FeLV can cause tumors (mainly lymphoma), bone marrow suppression syndromes (mainly anemia), and lead to secondary infectious diseases caused by suppressive effects of the virus on bone marrow and the immune system. Today, FeLV is less commonly diagnosed than in the previous 20 years; prevalence has been decreasing in most countries. However, FeLV importance may be underestimated as it has been shown that regressively infected cats (that are negative in routinely used FeLV tests) also can develop clinical signs. FIV can cause an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome that increases the risk of opportunistic infections, neurological diseases, and tumors. In most naturally infected cats, however, FIV itself does not cause severe clinical signs, and FIV-infected cats may live many years without any health problems. This article provides a review of clinical syndromes in progressively and regressively FeLV-infected cats as well as in FIV-infected cats. PMID:23202500

  6. The prevention of diabetic foot ulceration: how biomechanical research informs clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    DiLiberto, Frank E.; Baumhauer, Judith F.; Nawoczenski, Deborah A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Implementation of interprofessional clinical guidelines for the prevention of neuropathic diabetic foot ulceration has demonstrated positive effects regarding ulceration and amputation rates. Current foot care recommendations are primarily based on research regarding the prevention of ulcer recurrence and focused on reducing the magnitude of plantar stress (pressure overload). Yet, foot ulceration remains to be a prevalent and debilitating consequence of Diabetes Mellitus. There is limited evidence targeting the prevention of first-time ulceration, and there is a need to consider additional factors of plantar stress to supplement current guidelines. Objectives The first purpose of this article is to discuss the biomechanical theory underpinning diabetic foot ulcerations and illustrate how plantar tissue underloading may precede overloading and breakdown. The second purpose of this commentary is to discuss how advances in biomechanical foot modeling can inform clinical practice in the prevention of first-time ulceration. Discussion Research demonstrates that progressive weight-bearing activity programs to address the frequency of plantar stress and avoid underloading do not increase ulceration risk. Multi-segment foot modeling studies indicate that dynamic foot function of the midfoot and forefoot is compromised in people with diabetes. Emerging research demonstrates that implementation of foot-specific exercises may positively influence dynamic foot function and improve plantar stress in people with diabetes. Conclusion Continued work is needed to determine how to best design and integrate activity recommendations and foot-specific exercise programs into the current interprofessional paradigm for the prevention of first-time ulceration in people with Diabetes Mellitus. PMID:27849290

  7. Muscle-bone interactions: basic and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Cianferotti, Luisella; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2014-03-01

    Muscle and bone are anatomically and functionally closely connected. The traditional concept that skeletal muscles serve to load bone and transform skeletal segments into a system of levers has been further refined into the mechanostat theory, according to which striated muscle is essential for bone development and maintenance, modelling and remodelling. Besides biomechanical function, skeletal muscle and bone are endocrine organs able to secrete factors capable of modulating biological function within their microenvironment, in nearby tissues or in distant organs. The endocrine properties of muscle and bone may serve to sense and transduce biomechanical signals such as loading, unloading or exercise, or systemic hormonal stimuli into biochemical signals. Nonetheless, given the close anatomical relationship between skeletal muscle and bone, paracrine interactions particularly at the periosteal interface can be hypothesized. These mechanisms can assume particular importance during bone and muscle healing after musculoskeletal injury. Basic studies in vitro and in rodents have helped to dissect the multiple influences of skeletal muscle on bone and/or expression of inside-organ metabolism and have served to explain clinical observations linking muscle-to-bone quality. Recent evidences pinpoint that also bone tissue is able to modulate directly or indirectly skeletal muscle metabolism, thus empowering the crosstalk hypothesis to be further tested in humans in vivo.

  8. [Glucotransporters: clinical, molecular and genetic aspects].

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Muñiz, Roberto de Jesús; Vargas-Guerrero, Belinda; Flores-Alvarado, Luis Javier; Gurrola-Díaz, Carmen Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Oxidation of glucose is the major source of obtaining cell energy, this process requires glucose transport into the cell. However, cell membranes are not permeable to polar molecules such as glucose; therefore its internalization is accomplished by transporter proteins coupled to the cell membrane. In eukaryotic cells, there are two types of carriers coupled to the membrane: 1) cotransporter Na+-glucose (SGLT) where Na+ ion provides motive power for the glucose´s internalization, and 2) the glucotransporters (GLUT) act by facilitated diffusion. This review will focus on the 14 GLUT so far described. Despite the structural homology of GLUT, different genetic alterations of each GLUT cause specific clinical entities. Therefore, the aim of this review is to gather the molecular and biochemical available information of each GLUT as well as the particular syndromes and pathologies related with GLUT´s alterations and their clinical approaches.

  9. Clinical aspects of hereditary hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Kochhar, Amit; Hildebrand, Michael S; Smith, Richard J H

    2007-07-01

    Hearing loss is an etiologically diverse condition with many disease-related complications and major clinical, social, and quality of life implications. As the rate of acquired hearing loss secondary to environmental causes decreases and improvements in the diagnosis of abnormalities occur, the significance of genetic factors that lead to deafness increases. Advancements in molecular biology have led to improved detection and earlier intervention in patients with hearing loss. Subsequently, earlier implementation of educational services and cochlear implant technology in patients with profound hearing loss now results in superior communication skills and enhanced language development. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive framework underlying the causes of hearing impairment and to detail the clinical management for patients with hereditary hearing loss.

  10. [Clinical and genetic aspects of albinism].

    PubMed

    Arveiler, Benoit; Lasseaux, Eulalie; Morice-Picard, Fanny

    Albinism is a genetic disease affecting 1/17,000 person worldwide. It constitutes the second cause of congenital loss of visual acuity after optic atrophy. Albinism is heterogeneous both at the clinical and genetic levels. It is characterized by ocular development anomalies and by a variable degree of hypopigmentation. Clinically, three forms of the disease are described: oculocutaneous, ocular and syndromic (Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome, Chediak-Higashi syndrome). Nineteen genes involved in the different types of albinism have been described so far. The broad phenotypic variability between the different forms but also within a particular form renders the establishment of phenotype-genotype correlations impossible. A genetic test exploring all 19 genes is necessary to establish the diagnosis and to distinguish between syndromic and non-syndromic forms. We present the creation of an albinism-dedicated Day Hospital at the University Hospital of Bordeaux. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Invasive Aspergillosis: Epidemiology, Clinical Aspects, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Kevin S; Kauffman, Carol A

    2015-10-01

    Invasive aspergillosis remains an often fatal, difficult-to treat infection in immunocompromised patients. Patients not classically defined as immunocompromised, especially those in an intensive care unit setting, also develop invasive aspergillosis. Clinical clues suggesting angioinvasion and radiographic modalities, especially computed tomographic scans, combined with newer non-culture-based diagnostic techniques, have allowed earlier recognition of invasive aspergillosis. Although mortality remains high, it has greatly decreased over the past 15 years. Voriconazole has supplanted amphotericin B, with its various toxicities, as primary treatment for invasive aspergillosis. Combination therapy with voriconazole and an echinocandin for initial therapy, based on results from a recent controlled clinical trial, could become the standard of care in high-risk patients.

  12. Rosmarinic Acid--Pharmaceutical and Clinical Aspects.

    PubMed

    Amoah, Solomon K S; Sandjo, Louis P; Kratz, Jadel M; Biavatti, Maique W

    2016-03-01

    The biosynthesis and biotechnological production of Rosmarinic acid, a phenolic ester that is widespread in the plant kingdom, has been widely investigated. This compound has shown many remarkable biological and pharmacological activities, which have led to its pharmaceutical and analytical development, as well as clinical studies, which are summarized and analyzed here for the first time. This review compiles data from the Pubmed, Scopus, Scifinder, Web Of Science, and Science Direct databases published between 1990 and 2015, restricting the search to works with the keywords "Rosmarinic acid" in the title. The initial search identified more than 800 articles; after an initial screening and removal of duplicate works, the search was further refined, resulting in approximately 300 articles that were scrutinized and comprise this review. The articles were organized to describe extraction and isolation, analytical methods, pharmaceutical development, and biological and pharmacological activities [divided into nonclinical (in vitro, in vivo) and clinical studies], pharmacokinetic studies, and stability studies.

  13. [Spigelian hernia: clinical, diagnostic and therapeutical aspects].

    PubMed

    Versaci, A; Rossitto, M; Centorrino, T; Barbera, A; Fonti, M T; Broccio, M; Ciccolo, A

    1998-01-01

    The Authors describing a case of Spigelian hernia observed point out clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic considerations about this rare pathology of abdominal wall. They specify the anatomic characteristics of the region and underline as any diagnostic difficulties are by passed by use of USG and TC imaging for formulation of correct preoperative diagnosis. They confirm as surgical treatment by a correct access isn't different by a normal hernioplasty and guarantee the long term surgical outcome.

  14. Fluids and electrolytes--clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Jospe, N; Forbes, G

    1996-11-01

    Medical practice rests on the foundation of science. Clinicians are constantly making practical decisions and dealing with immediate situations that demand solutions. Time should be taken to focus on those scientific principles that underlie our diagnostic and therapuetic maneuvers. This section of Pediatrics in Review presents selected topics that are relevant to practice from the areas of physiology, pharmacology, biochemistry, and other disciplines; clarification of these will augment the pediatrician's understanding of clinical procedures.

  15. Cholera in pregnancy: Clinical and immunological aspects.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ashraful I; Chowdhury, Fahima; Leung, Daniel T; Larocque, Regina C; Harris, Jason B; Ryan, Edward T; Calderwood, Stephen B; Qadri, Firdausi

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the clinical and immunological features of cholera in pregnancy. Women of reproductive age presenting to the icddr,b Dhaka hospital with cholera, and enrolled as part of a larger cohort study, were tested for pregnancy on admission. We compared initial clinical features and immune responses of pregnant patients with non-pregnant female patients at days 2, 7 and 21 after infection. Among reproductive age women enrolled between January 2001 and May 2006, 9.7% (14/144) were pregnant. The duration of diarrhoea prior to admission tended to be higher in pregnant compared to non-pregnant patients (p=0.08), but other clinical characteristics did not differ. Antibody responses to cholera toxin B subunit (CtxB), toxin-coregulated pilus A (TcpA), Vibrio cholerae lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and serum vibriocidal antibody responses, were comparable between pregnant and non-pregnant patients. There were no deaths among the pregnant cases or non-pregnant controls, and no adverse foetal outcomes, including stillbirths, during 21 days of follow up of pregnant cases. To our knowledge, this is the first report of immune responses in pregnant women with cholera. We found that pregnant woman early in pregnancy has comparable clinical illness and subsequent immune responses compared to non-pregnant women. These findings suggest that the evaluation of safety and immunogenicity of oral cholera vaccines in pregnancy should be an area of future investigations. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical and biochemical aspects of chromium deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wallach, S

    1985-01-01

    The essentiality of chromium (Cr) in animal and human nutrition is now well accepted. In animals, Cr deficiency can cause a diabetic-like state, impaired growth, elevated blood lipids, increased aortic plaque formation, and decreased fertility and longevity. The ability of Cr to potentiate insulin sensitivity has considerable experimental support. In the human, Cr deficiency has been demonstrated unequivocally in only one clinical situation, patients on total parenteral nutrition without added Cr. In such patients, impaired glucose tolerance, hyperglycemia, relative insulin resistance, peripheral neuropathy, and a metabolic encephalopathy have been noted with reversal of the clinical phenomena by Cr repletion. Many studies have been performed to determine whether Cr deficiency may be important in other clinical conditions, namely, diabetes mellitus, pregnant and parous women, and the aged population. Available data indicate that Cr supplementation can improve glucose metabolism in glucose intolerant individuals and decrease the total/HDL cholesterol ratio regardless of the status of glucose tolerance. However, whether Cr supplementation has long-term health benefits is unknown. Further, despite many tantalizing observations, it is still unclear whether Cr deficiency, latent or overt, is common in any human situation other than generalized malnutrition and total parenteral nutrition without added Cr. Technical uncertainties in the analysis of Cr, Cr contamination of food by the use of stainless steel processing equipment and eating utensils, and the lack of a clinically feasible test for Cr deficiency continue to impede progress in Cr research. Nevertheless, there is considerably more clarity as to plasma and urine Cr levels, food and tissue Cr content, and metabolic pathways of Cr metabolism than existed a decade ago. It is expected that progress will accelerate, since critical questions can now be addressed regarding the role of Cr in human nutrition.

  17. Erythrocyte aggregation: basic aspects and clinical importance.

    PubMed

    Baskurt, Oguz K; Meiselman, Herbert J

    2013-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) aggregate to form two- and three-dimensional structures when suspended in aqueous solutions containing large plasma proteins or polymers; this aggregation is reversible and shear dependent (i.e., dispersed at high shear and reformed at low or stasis). The extent of aggregation is the main determinant of low shear blood viscosity, thus predicting an inverse relationship between aggregation and in vivo blood flow. However, the effects of aggregation on hemodynamic mechanisms (e.g., plasma skimming, Fåhraeus Effect, microvascular hematocrit) may promote rather than impede vascular blood flow. The impact of enhanced RBC aggregation on endothelial function and hemostatic mechanisms adds further complexity, thereby requiring specific attention to the nature, extent and time course of aggregation when considering its overall influence on tissue perfusion. A detailed understanding of aggregation effects is important from a clinical point of view since it may be enhanced during a variety of pathophysiological processes, including infections, circulatory and metabolic disorders, hematological pathologies and several other disease states. Altered RBC aggregation may be an indicator of disease as well as a factor affecting the course of the clinical condition; the prognostic value of RBC aggregation indices has been demonstrated in various diseases. Currently, RBC aggregation is an easily and accurately measurable parameter, and therefore may be expected to have broader clinical usage in the future.

  18. Clinical Aspects of Uncomplicated and Severe Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Bartoloni, Alessandro; Zammarchi, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    The first symptoms of malaria, common to all the different malaria species, are nonspecific and mimic a flu-like syndrome. Although fever represents the cardinal feature, clinical findings in malaria are extremely diverse and may range in severity from mild headache to serious complications leading to death, particularly in falciparum malaria. As the progression to these complications can be rapid, any malaria patient must be assessed and treated rapidly, and frequent observations are needed to look for early signs of systemic complications. In fact, severe malaria is a life threatening but treatable disease. The protean and nonspecific clinical findings occurring in malaria (fever, malaise, headache, myalgias, jaundice and sometimes gastrointestinal symptoms of nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea) may lead physicians who see malaria infrequently to a wrong diagnosis, such as influenza (particularly during the seasonal epidemic flu), dengue, gastroenteritis, typhoid fever, viral hepatitis, encephalitis. Physicians should be aware that malaria is not a clinical diagnosis but must be diagnosed, or excluded, by performing microscopic examination of blood films. Prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment are then crucial to prevent morbidity and fatal outcomes. Although Plasmodium falciparum malaria is the major cause of severe malaria and death, increasing evidence has recently emerged that Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium knowlesi can also be severe and even fatal. PMID:22708041

  19. [Fundamental and clinical aspects of cystatin C].

    PubMed

    Itoh, Yoshihisa; Kawabata, Isao; Akasaka, Kazumi; Kino, Shuichi

    2012-08-01

    Recent progress of fundamental and clinical studies on cystatin C was reviewed. Most of key studies are indebted to prof. Grubb A and his groups. International contributions from Japanese research work are included here. The protein is a basic low molecular weight protein of 13,300 with 120 amino acid residues and pI 9.3, functioning as a cysteine protease inhibitor. With an introduction of ERM-DA471, international reference material for serum cystatin C, global standardization for immunoassay systems has been much facilitated. No serious problems are present in the pre-analytical stage. Serum reference intervals are properly set in all Asian populations including Japanese with age and gender-related differences. The protein is a powerful serum intrinsic marker for glomerular filtration rate. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFRcysC) in coupled with eGFRCr will definitely be a clinical routine for early detection and prevention of altered kidney function and cardiovascular events in general population. Genetic tests clinically indicated include hereditary cystatin C amyloid angiopathy (L68Q) and adult macular degeneration (A25T) although their frequency is extremely low.

  20. Molecular and Clinical Aspects of Angelman Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dagli, A; Buiting, K; Williams, C A

    2012-04-01

    The Angelman syndrome is caused by disruption of the UBE3A gene and is clinically delineated by the combination of severe mental disability, seizures, absent speech, hypermotoric and ataxic movements, and certain remarkable behaviors. Those with the syndrome have a predisposition toward apparent happiness and paroxysms of laughter, and this finding helps distinguish Angelman syndrome from other conditions involving severe developmental handicap. Accurate diagnosis rests on a combination of clinical criteria and molecular and/or cytogenetic testing. Analysis of parent-specific DNA methylation imprints in the critical 15q11.2-q13 genomic region identifies 75-80% of all individuals with the syndrome, including those with cytogenetic deletions, imprinting center defects and paternal uniparental disomy. In the remaining group, UBE3A sequence analysis identifies an additional percentage of patients, but 5-10% will remain who appear to have the major clinical phenotypic features but do not have any identifiable genetic abnormalities. Genetic counseling for recurrence risk is complicated because multiple genetic mechanisms can disrupt the UBE3A gene, and there is also a unique inheritance pattern associated with UBE3A imprinting. Angelman syndrome is a prototypical developmental syndrome due to its remarkable behavioral phenotype and because UBE3A is so crucial to normal synaptic function and neural plasticity.

  1. Molecular and Clinical Aspects of Angelman Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dagli, A.; Buiting, K.; Williams, C.A.

    2012-01-01

    The Angelman syndrome is caused by disruption of the UBE3A gene and is clinically delineated by the combination of severe mental disability, seizures, absent speech, hypermotoric and ataxic movements, and certain remarkable behaviors. Those with the syndrome have a predisposition toward apparent happiness and paroxysms of laughter, and this finding helps distinguish Angelman syndrome from other conditions involving severe developmental handicap. Accurate diagnosis rests on a combination of clinical criteria and molecular and/or cytogenetic testing. Analysis of parent-specific DNA methylation imprints in the critical 15q11.2–q13 genomic region identifies 75–80% of all individuals with the syndrome, including those with cytogenetic deletions, imprinting center defects and paternal uniparental disomy. In the remaining group, UBE3A sequence analysis identifies an additional percentage of patients, but 5–10% will remain who appear to have the major clinical phenotypic features but do not have any identifiable genetic abnormalities. Genetic counseling for recurrence risk is complicated because multiple genetic mechanisms can disrupt the UBE3A gene, and there is also a unique inheritance pattern associated with UBE3A imprinting. Angelman syndrome is a prototypical developmental syndrome due to its remarkable behavioral phenotype and because UBE3A is so crucial to normal synaptic function and neural plasticity. PMID:22670133

  2. Clinical aspects of infection with Trichinella spp.

    PubMed Central

    Capó, V; Despommier, D D

    1996-01-01

    Isolated cases and outbreaks of infection with Trichinella spp. occur frequently throughout the world, sometimes resulting in fatalities. The clinical presentations of signs and symptoms are remarkably constant for most of the species of Trichinella, but in infections with Trichinella nativa and Trichinella britovi, classical symptoms of trichinellosis may be absent. It is important to be able to correlate the clinical presentation of trichinellosis with the life cycle of these helminths in order to make an accurate diagnosis. Knowledge of the epidemiology of the disease enables the physician to identify other potential cases, since most epidemics can be traced back to a common source of raw or undercooked meat. A comprehensive summary relating the most important clinical variables is presented graphically for easy reference to the text. Symptoms and signs are considered in relation to severity of infection. Laboratory findings and diagnostic techniques, including new modalities (e.g., DNA and antigen detection), are discussed. A discussion of treatment and preventive measures concludes our review. PMID:8665476

  3. Placebo effects: clinical aspects and neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Oken, Barry S

    2008-11-01

    Placebo effects are beneficial health outcomes not related to the relatively direct biological effects of an intervention and can be elicited by an agent that, by itself, is inert. Understanding these placebo effects will help to improve clinical trial design, especially for interventions such as surgery, CNS-active drugs and behavioural interventions which are often non-blinded. A literature review was performed to retrieve articles discussing placebo implications of clinical trials, the neurobiology of placebo effects and the implications of placebo effect for several disorders of neurological relevance. Recent research in placebo analgesia and other conditions has demonstrated that several neurotransmitter systems, such as opiate and dopamine, are involved with the placebo effect. Brain regions including anterior cingulate cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and basal ganglia have been activated following administration of placebo. A patient's expectancy of improvement may influence outcomes as much as some active interventions and this effect may be greater for novel interventions and for procedures. Maximizing this expectancy effect is important for clinicians to optimize the health of their patient. There have been many relatively acute placebo studies that are now being extended into clinically relevant models of placebo effect.

  4. [Mesenteric cyst--clinical and pathological aspects].

    PubMed

    Santana, Wagner Barreto de; Poderoso, Wendell Luiz Santos; Alves, José Antonio Barreto; Melo, Valdinaldo Aragão de; Barros, Celso de; Fakhouri, Ricardo

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate epidemiologic, clinical, pathologic and therapeutic characteristics of the mesenteric cysts in hospitals of Sergipe, Brazil. Mesenteric cysts were assessed by a non-interventional cross-sectional study from the archives of the Pathology Laboratory of Federal University of Sergipe between 1995 and 2007. The charts of the patients were reviewed in order to find out: gender, age, clinical findings, complementary exams and therapeutic approach. Eighteen cases of mesenteric cysts were found. Females were more affected (72.2%). Mean of age of the patients was 30.46. More frequent symptoms were pain and abdominal mass. Ultrasonography of abdomen, performed in all patients, was not conclusive in half of the cases. CTscan of abdomen with contrast was performed in six cases, being cystic tumor well identified in all of them. Regarding histopathology, 6 lymphangiomas, 8 mesotheliomas, 1 hemorrhagic cyst in organization and 1 mucinous cyst were found. Surgical treatment was performed in all cases. Intracystic bleeding was the main complication in 3 cases. The mesenteric cysts presented clinically with unspecific symptoms. CTscan was more effective than ultrasonography for the diagnosis. Lymphangiomas and mesothelioma had been found in equal ratios. The complete resection of the cyst was the treatment of election. There were no deaths in postoperative period.

  5. Enterovirus Infections: Etiologic, Epidemiologic and Clinical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Horstmann, Dorothy M.

    1965-01-01

    The term enteroviruses was introduced in 1957 to bring together in one large family the polioviruses, Coxsackie A and B and echoviruses, all agents for which the human alimentary tract is the natural habitat. At present more than 60 distinct members are recognized: three polioviruses, 24 Coxsackie A, six Coxsackie B and 30 echoviruses. The list of new members, particularly in the echo-group, grows regularly. The viruses are frequently widely disseminated in the summer and fall of the year, circulating chiefly among young children, causing both apparent and inapparent infection. The enteroviruses are responsible for a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, including non-specific febrile illness, sometimes with rash, aseptic meningitis, paralytic disease, respiratory infections, pericarditis and myocarditis. There is considerable overlap in biologic behavior, and the same syndrome can be induced by many different agents. In a few instances the clinical pattern is distinct enough to suggest the group of agents involved. Thus, herpangina is associated with the Coxsackie A viruses and epidemic myalgia (devil's grip) with the Coxsackie B group. Paralytic disease is caused primarily by the polioviruses, but recently it has been found that other members, particularly the Coxsackie B viruses and Coxsackie A7 can also cause “paralytic poliomyelitis.” The ultimate potential of enteroviruses in terms of central nervous system disease and other manifestations is unpredictable. Great variety in terms of clinical and epidemiologic behavior of known and “new” viruses has been the pattern in the past, and is likely to continue. PMID:14336786

  6. Clinical and genetic aspects of KBG syndrome.

    PubMed

    Low, Karen; Ashraf, Tazeen; Canham, Natalie; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Deshpande, Charu; Donaldson, Alan; Fisher, Richard; Flinter, Frances; Foulds, Nicola; Fryer, Alan; Gibson, Kate; Hayes, Ian; Hills, Alison; Holder, Susan; Irving, Melita; Joss, Shelagh; Kivuva, Emma; Lachlan, Kathryn; Magee, Alex; McConnell, Vivienne; McEntagart, Meriel; Metcalfe, Kay; Montgomery, Tara; Newbury-Ecob, Ruth; Stewart, Fiona; Turnpenny, Peter; Vogt, Julie; Fitzpatrick, David; Williams, Maggie; Smithson, Sarah

    2016-11-01

    KBG syndrome is characterized by short stature, distinctive facial features, and developmental/cognitive delay and is caused by mutations in ANKRD11, one of the ankyrin repeat-containing cofactors. We describe 32 KBG patients aged 2-47 years from 27 families ascertained via two pathways: targeted ANKRD11 sequencing (TS) in a group who had a clinical diagnosis of KBG and whole exome sequencing (ES) in a second group in whom the diagnosis was unknown. Speech delay and learning difficulties were almost universal and variable behavioral problems frequent. Macrodontia of permanent upper central incisors was seen in 85%. Other clinical features included short stature, conductive hearing loss, recurrent middle ear infection, palatal abnormalities, and feeding difficulties. We recognized a new feature of a wide anterior fontanelle with delayed closure in 22%. The subtle facial features of KBG syndrome were recognizable in half the patients. We identified 20 ANKRD11 mutations (18 novel: all truncating) confirmed by Sanger sequencing in 32 patients. Comparison of the two ascertainment groups demonstrated that facial/other typical features were more subtle in the ES group. There were no conclusive phenotype-genotype correlations. Our findings suggest that mutation of ANKRD11 is a common Mendelian cause of developmental delay. Affected patients may not show the characteristic KBG phenotype and the diagnosis is therefore easily missed. We propose updated diagnostic criteria/clinical recommendations for KBG syndrome and suggest that inclusion of ANKRD11 will increase the utility of gene panels designed to investigate developmental delay. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Natal primary molar: clinical and histological aspects.

    PubMed

    Ruschel, Henrique C; Spiguel, Monica H; Piccinini, Daniela D; Ferreira, Simone H; Feldens, Eliane G

    2010-06-01

    The authors report a case of natal primary molar in a healthy 14-day-old child. The diagnosis of the case and the treatment plan are discussed, as well as histological analyses of the natal tooth. The tooth presented an immature appearance, with high mobility and insertion only in soft tissue, and therefore the clinical option adopted was dental extraction. Histological analyses revealed enamel hypoplasia and dentin showing a typical tubular pattern without alterations. The soft tissue had young and richly vascularized pulp with areas of chronic inflammatory infiltration.

  8. Inherited epidermolysis bullosa: clinical and therapeutic aspects*

    PubMed Central

    Boeira, Vanessa Lys Simas Yamakawa; Souza, Erica Sales; Rocha, Bruno de Oliveira; Oliveira, Pedro Dantas; de Oliveira, Maria de Fátima Santos Paim; Rêgo, Vitória Regina Pedreira de Almeida; Follador, Ivonise

    2013-01-01

    Inherited epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders that present with skin and, in some cases, mucosal fragility, predisposing patients to the development of blisters and/or erosions after minimal trauma or friction. Children with a recurrent history of these kinds of lesions or neonates that present them in the absence of another reasonable explanation should be investigated. Diagnosis must be based on clinical and histopathological findings. To date, management of inherited EB basically consists in avoiding traumas that trigger lesions, as well as preventing infection and facilitating healing of the wounds with the systematic use of bandages. PMID:23739692

  9. [Lichen sclerosus--clinical and therapeutic aspects].

    PubMed

    Manolova, G; Pehlivanov, G; Bakardzhiev, I; Saleva, M; Yungareva, I; Lozanova, P; Prisadashka, K; Karagiozova, Zh

    2014-01-01

    Lichen sclerosus (LS) is a lymphocyte-mediated inflammatory dermatosis with a characteristic location (85-98%) in the anogenital region. The authors point out the main features in the epidemiology and clinical presentation of the disease and the possible approach to neoplastic development. Expanded differential diagnosis of LS sparked not only dermatologists but also gynecologists, urologists and GPs. Points are the chronic course of the disease and resistance to therapy. Discuss the results of the treatment of LS with less potent topical corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, phototherapy and photodynamic therapy, surgery.

  10. Bovine neosporosis: clinical and practical aspects.

    PubMed

    Almería, S; López-Gatius, F

    2013-10-01

    Neospora caninum is a protozoan parasite with a wide host range but with a preference for cattle and dogs. Since the description of N. caninum as a new genus and species in 1988, bovine neosporosis has become a disease of international concern as it is among the main causes of abortion in cattle. At present there is no effective treatment or vaccine. This review focuses on the epidemiology of the disease and on prospects for its control in cattle. Finally, based on the implications of clinical findings reported to date, a set of recommendations is provided for veterinarians and cattle farmers.

  11. [Clinical aspects of premedication in obstetrics].

    PubMed

    Mitterschiffthaler, G

    1989-01-01

    The goals of premedication in obstetric anaesthesia with particularly high risk due to high maternal morbidity and mortality are: reduction of preoperative apprehension, psychological preparation by adequate evaluation and an extensive clinical round, prevention of aspiration of gastric contents, administration of antacids, H-2-receptor-blocking and gastrokinetic agents. Due to their rapid passage across the placenta, opioids, benzodiazepines and anticholinergic drugs may influence the newborn and so arguments for and against must be considered individually. Despite all measures, the high anaesthesiological risk remains, since there is no "safe" gastric content regarding amount an pH. Anaesthetic technique and the experience of the anaesthetist play a significant role.

  12. [Clinical application of biomechanic and functional anatomical findings of the knee joint].

    PubMed

    Friederich, N F; Müller, W; O'Brien, W R

    1992-02-01

    In order to study the functional anatomy of the knee joint, careful anatomical dissections were conducted on over 130 fresh-frozen cadaveric knee specimens. We found no evidence to support the two-bundle and three-bundle theories of cruciate ligament fiber patterns. The longest fibers in the anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) measured 37 mm, and the longest in the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), 41 mm. Cruciate ligament insertions follow a transition line on tibia and femur. Usually not all the fibers of the cruciate ligaments are taut at the same time. They are progressively recruited according to the biomechanical demands placed on them. Fibre recruitment in the ACL is from knee flexion to extension and in the PCL from extension to flexion. The concept of fiber recruitment was recently evaluated mathematically. As a working hypothesis, the knee joint can be looked upon as a biological realization of the crossed four-bar linkage, even in three dimensions. In vitro measurements have shown that correct graft placement in cruciate reconstructions is critical for knee biomechanics. Incorrect placement of grafts may lead to decreased range of motion and/or increased laxity. Distance changes of 3 mm between femoral origin and tibial insertion of a graft may lead to a 400% increase of graft preload and will thus easily reach published pull-out forces for some of the graft fixation methods (button = 248 N). Precise drill guides and isometers may be helpful in any operative technique (open, arthroscopic). Using the IKDC evaluation form and the KT-1000 arthrometer, our studies on 25 patients demonstrated a direct correlation between intraoperative graft tracking and the clinical outcome 2 years after operation. Biomechanical studies to investigate in vivo strain patterns of the anterior cruciate ligament and in vitro strain patterns of isometrically placed cruciate graft reconstructions showed that they did not reach critical fixation failure or graft rupture loads. The

  13. Alcohol and suicide: neurobiological and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Sher, Leo

    2006-06-21

    Alcohol, primarily in the form of ethyl alcohol (ethanol), has occupied an important place in the history of humankind for at least 8,000 years. In most Western societies, at least 90% of people consume alcohol at some time during their lives, and 30% or more of drinkers develop alcohol-related problems. Severe alcohol-related life impairment, alcohol dependence (alcoholism), is observed at some time during their lives in about 10% of men and 3-5% of women. An additional 5-10% of each sex develops persistent, but less intense, problems that are diagnosed as alcohol abuse. It this review, neurobiological aspects of suicidal behavior in alcoholism is discussed. In individuals with comorbid depression and alcoholism, greater serotonergic impairment may be associated with higher risk of completed suicide. Dopaminergic dysfunction may play an important role in the pathophysiology of suicidal behavior in alcoholism. Brain damage and neurobehavioral deficits are associated with alcohol use disorders and may contribute to suicidal behavior in persons with alcohol dependence or abuse. Aggression/impulsivity and alcoholism severity affect risk for suicide among individuals with alcoholism. Major depressive episodes and stressful life events particularly, partner-relationship disruptions, may precipitate suicidal behavior in individuals with alcohol use disorders. Alcohol misuse and psychosocial adversity can combine to increase stress on the person, and, thereby, potentially, increase the risk for suicidal behavior. The management of suicidal patients with alcohol use disorders is also discussed. It is to be hoped that the efforts of clinicians will reduce morbidity and mortality associated with alcohol misuse.

  14. Vitamin D and cancer: Clinical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Woloszynska-Read, Anna; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.

    2015-01-01

    There are substantial preclinical and epidemiologic data that suggest that vitamin D plays a role in the prevention and treatment of cancer. Numerous observational studies have shown that low blood levels of 25(OH) vitamin D (cholecalciferol), estimated by geographical location, diet and activity assessment or measured serum levels are associated with a higher risk of cancer and worse cancer-specific survival as well as numerous morbidities to e.g. cardiovascular disease, stroke, infection, autoimmune disease, and neuromuscular dysfunction among large populations. A considerable number of in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that the most active metabolite of vitamin D – 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol or calcitriol – has anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, pro-differentiating, and anti-angiogenic properties. Combined treatment of calcitriol and many types of cytotoxic agents has synergistic or at least additive effects. However, clinical trials testing these hypotheses have been less encouraging, though a number of methodological, pharmacological, and pharmaceutical issues confound all trials ever conducted. In order to properly assess the clinical value of vitamin D, its metabolites and analogs in cancer prevention and treatment, more studies are needed. PMID:21872802

  15. Vestibular migraine: clinical and epidemiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Morganti, Ligia Oliveira Gonçalves; Salmito, Márcio Cavalcante; Duarte, Juliana Antoniolli; Bezerra, Karina Cavalcanti; Simões, Juliana Caminha; Ganança, Fernando Freitas

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM) is one of the most often common diagnoses in neurotology, but only recently has been recognized as a disease. To analyze the clinical and epidemiological profile of patients with VM. This was a retrospective, observational, and descriptive study, with analysis of patients' records from an outpatient VM clinic. 94.1% of patients were females and 5.9% were males. The mean age was 46.1 years; 65.6% of patients had had headache for a longer period than dizziness. A correlation was detected between VM symptoms and the menstrual period. 61.53% of patients had auditory symptoms, with tinnitus the most common, although tonal audiometry was normal in 68.51%. Vectoelectronystagmography was normal in 67.34%, 10.20% had hyporeflexia, and 22.44% had vestibular hyperreflexia. Electrophysiological assessment showed no abnormalities in most patients. Fasting plasma glucose and glycemic curve were normal in most patients, while the insulin curve was abnormal in 75%. 82% of individuals with MV showed abnormalities on the metabolism of carbohydrates. VM affects predominantly middle-aged women, with migraine headache representing the first symptom, several years before vertigo. Physical, auditory, and vestibular evaluations are usually normal. The most frequent vestibular abnormality was hyperreflexia. Most individuals showed abnormality related to carbohydrate metabolism. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Foot orthoses in the treatment of symptomatic midfoot osteoarthritis using clinical and biomechanical outcomes: a randomised feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Halstead, Jill; Chapman, Graham J; Gray, Janine C; Grainger, Andrew J; Brown, Sarah; Wilkins, Richard A; Roddy, Edward; Helliwell, Philip S; Keenan, Anne-Maree; Redmond, Anthony C

    2016-04-01

    This randomised feasibility study aimed to examine the clinical and biomechanical effects of functional foot orthoses (FFOs) in the treatment of midfoot osteoarthritis (OA) and the feasibility of conducting a full randomised controlled trial. Participants with painful, radiographically confirmed midfoot OA were recruited and randomised to receive either FFOs or a sham control orthosis. Feasibility measures included recruitment and attrition rates, practicality of blinding and adherence rates. Clinical outcome measures were: change from baseline to 12 weeks for severity of pain (numerical rating scale), foot function (Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Index) and patient global impression of change scale. To investigate the biomechanical effect of foot orthoses, in-shoe foot kinematics and plantar pressures were evaluated at 12 weeks. Of the 119 participants screened, 37 were randomised and 33 completed the study (FFO = 18, sham = 15). Compliance with foot orthoses and blinding of the intervention was achieved in three quarters of the group. Both groups reported improvements in pain, function and global impression of change; the FFO group reporting greater improvements compared to the sham group. The biomechanical outcomes indicated the FFO group inverted the hindfoot and increased midfoot maximum plantar force compared to the sham group. The present findings suggest FFOs worn over 12 weeks may provide detectable clinical and biomechanical benefits compared to sham orthoses. This feasibility study provides useful clinical, biomechanical and statistical information for the design and implementation of a definitive randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of FFOs in treating painful midfoot OA.

  17. [Clinical aspects of the Niigata Minamata disease].

    PubMed

    Shimohata, Takayoshi; Hirota, Koichi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Nishizawa, Masatoyo

    2015-01-01

    The Minamata disease was discovered in the Minamata region, Kumamoto Prefecture, Japan, in 1956. Symptoms of this disease included cerebellar ataxia, sensory disturbance, narrowing of the visual field, and hearing and speech disturbances. In 1965, similar conditions were identified in persons living around the Agano River area, Niigata Prefecture, Japan and accordingly termed as the Niigata Minamata disease or the second Minamata disease. Both the diseases have been attributed to poisoning with methyl mercury that was generated during the production of acetaldehyde using mercury as a catalyst. The discharged methyl mercury accumulated in fishes and shellfishes and caused poisoning on consumption. This review discusses the history, clinical presentation including atypical forms, and autopsy findings of the Niigata Minamata disease. In addition, it highlights the problems about criteria for official recognition and the therapeutic trial for this disease.

  18. Legal aspects of clinical ethics committees.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, J

    2001-04-01

    In an increasingly litigious society where ritual demands for accountability and "taking responsibility" are now commonplace, it is not surprising that members of clinical ethics committees (CECs) are becoming more aware of their potential legal liability. Yet the vulnerability of committee members to legal action is difficult to assess with any certainty. This is because the CECs which have been set up in the UK are--if the American experience is followed--likely to vary significantly in terms of their functions, procedures, composition, structures and authority. As a consequence it is difficult to generalize about the legal implications. Nevertheless, despite these difficulties this article will outline the broad legal principles governing the potential liability of committee members. It will also consider the relationship between CECs and the courts. It begins, however, with a brief analysis of the relationship between ethics and law in committee deliberations, and in particular of the role of law and legal expertise on CECs.

  19. Prader-Willi Syndrome: Clinical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Elena, Grechi; Bruna, Cammarata; Benedetta, Mariani; Stefania, Di Candia; Giuseppe, Chiumello

    2012-01-01

    Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) is a complex multisystem genetic disorder that shows great variability, with changing clinical features during a patient's life. The syndrome is due to the loss of expression of several genes encoded on the proximal long arm of chromosome 15 (15q11.2–q13). The complex phenotype is most probably caused by a hypothalamic dysfunction that is responsible for hormonal dysfunctions and for absence of the sense of satiety. For this reason a Prader-Willi (PW) child develops hyperphagia during the initial stage of infancy that can lead to obesity and its complications. During infancy many PW child display a range of behavioural problems that become more noticeable in adolescence and adulthood and interfere mostly with quality of life. Early diagnosis of PWS is important for effective long-term management, and a precocious multidisciplinary approach is fundamental to improve quality of life, prevent complications, and prolong life expectancy. PMID:23133744

  20. Prader-willi syndrome: clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Elena, Grechi; Bruna, Cammarata; Benedetta, Mariani; Stefania, Di Candia; Giuseppe, Chiumello

    2012-01-01

    Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) is a complex multisystem genetic disorder that shows great variability, with changing clinical features during a patient's life. The syndrome is due to the loss of expression of several genes encoded on the proximal long arm of chromosome 15 (15q11.2-q13). The complex phenotype is most probably caused by a hypothalamic dysfunction that is responsible for hormonal dysfunctions and for absence of the sense of satiety. For this reason a Prader-Willi (PW) child develops hyperphagia during the initial stage of infancy that can lead to obesity and its complications. During infancy many PW child display a range of behavioural problems that become more noticeable in adolescence and adulthood and interfere mostly with quality of life. Early diagnosis of PWS is important for effective long-term management, and a precocious multidisciplinary approach is fundamental to improve quality of life, prevent complications, and prolong life expectancy.

  1. Hyperprolactinemia and schizophrenia: mechanisms and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Halbreich, Uriel; Kahn, Linda S

    2003-09-01

    The association between elevated prolactin levels and conventional antipsychotics is well-established. The novel antipsychotic, risperidone, has also been shown to elevate prolactin levels. Patients undergoing treatment with these medications are at high risk for developing hyperprolactinemia, which is associated with decreased bone mineral density, osteoporosis, menstrual disruptions and infertility, galactorrhea, breast cancer, cardiovascular disorders, and sexual impairment. Patients treated with conventional antipsychotics and risperidone should be routinely screened for hyperprolactinemia, and monitored for known sequelae. Optimally, patients with hyperprolactinemia secondary to antipsychotic drug treatment should be switched to a prolactin-sparing antipsychotic. This review will briefly highlight the regulation and function of prolactin secretion, discuss clinical effects of antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia, and suggest a course of treatment.

  2. Clinical and genetic aspects of phaeochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Opocher, Giuseppe; Schiavi, Francesca; Conton, Pierantonio; Scaroni, Carla; Mantero, Franco

    2003-01-01

    Phaeochromocytoma is a tumour of the adrenal medulla, which, although rare, is a major cause of correctable hypertension with a prevalence of 0.1-0.5% in the hypertensive population. Clinical symptoms include attacks of paroxysmal headache, sweating, palpitations, stress and a sense of imminent death. Often associated with the above is an increase in blood pressure. Despite the fact that the underlying genetic mechanisms of phaeochromocytoma have been well investigated, they are still incompletely understood. In approximately 80% of cases the tumour occurs sporadically, but it may occur in association with type 2 multiple endocrine neoplasia, type 1 neurofibromatosis or von Hippel-Lindau disease. Molecular evidence suggests that other genes such as SDHD or SDHB may control its development; the possibility of other putative phaeochromocytoma genes is currently being investigated.

  3. The ART approach: clinical aspects reviewed

    PubMed Central

    MOLINA, Gustavo Fabián; CABRAL, Ricardo Juan; FRENCKEN, Jo E.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT The success of ART as a caries management approach is supported by more than 20 years of scientific evidence. ART follows the contemporary concepts of modern cariology and restorative dentistry. It challenges treatment concepts such as step-wise excavation and the need for complete removal of affected dentine. The ART approach so far has mainly used high-viscosity glass-ionomer as the sealant and restorative material. Cariostatic and remineralization properties have been ascribed to this material which requires further research to establish its clinical relevance. The adhesion of high-viscosity glass-ionomer to enamel in pits and fissures is apparently strong, as its remnants, blocking the pits and fissures, have been considered a possible reason for the low prevalence of carious lesion development after the glass-ionomer has clinically disappeared from it. encapsulated high-viscosity glass-ionomers may lead to higher restoration survival results than those of the hand-mixed version and should, therefore, not be neglected when using ART. Similarly, the use of resin-modified glass-ionomer with ART should be researched. The effectiveness of ART when compared to conventional caries management approaches has been shown in numerous studies. Proper case selection is an important factor for long-lasting ART restoration survival. This is based on the caries risk situation of the individual, the size of the cavity opening, the strategic position of the cavitated tooth and the presence of adequate caries control measures. As the operator is one of the main causes for failure of ART restorations, attending a well-conducted ART training course is mandatory for successful implementation of ART. PMID:21499662

  4. The ART approach: clinical aspects reviewed.

    PubMed

    Molina, Gustavo Fabián; Cabral, Ricardo Juan; Frencken, Jo E

    2009-01-01

    The success of ART as a caries management approach is supported by more than 20 years of scientific evidence. ART follows the contemporary concepts of modern cariology and restorative dentistry. It challenges treatment concepts such as step-wise excavation and the need for complete removal of affected dentine. The ART approach so far has mainly used high-viscosity glass-ionomer as the sealant and restorative material. Cariostatic and remineralization properties have been ascribed to this material which requires further research to establish its clinical relevance. The adhesion of high-viscosity glass-ionomer to enamel in pits and fissures is apparently strong, as its remnants, blocking the pits and fissures, have been considered a possible reason for the low prevalence of carious lesion development after the glass-ionomer has clinically disappeared from it. Encapsulated high-viscosity glass-ionomers may lead to higher restoration survival results than those of the hand-mixed version and should, therefore, not be neglected when using ART. Similarly, the use of resin-modified glass-ionomer with ART should be researched. The effectiveness of ART when compared to conventional caries management approaches has been shown in numerous studies. Proper case selection is an important factor for long-lasting ART restoration survival. This is based on the caries risk situation of the individual, the size of the cavity opening, the strategic position of the cavitated tooth and the presence of adequate caries control measures. As the operator is one of the main causes for failure of ART restorations, attending a well-conducted ART training course is mandatory for successful implementation of ART.

  5. Clinical and genetic aspects of Angelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Williams, Charles A; Driscoll, Daniel J; Dagli, Aditi I

    2010-07-01

    Angelman syndrome is characterized by severe developmental delay, speech impairment, gait ataxia and/or tremulousness of the limbs, and a unique behavioral phenotype that includes happy demeanor and excessive laughter. Microcephaly and seizures are common. Developmental delays are first noted at 3 to 6 months age, but the unique clinical features of the syndrome do not become manifest until after age 1 year. Management includes treatment of gastrointestinal symptoms, use of antiepileptic drugs for seizures, and provision of physical, occupational, and speech therapy with an emphasis on nonverbal methods of communication. The diagnosis rests on a combination of clinical criteria and molecular and/or cytogenetic testing. Analysis of parent-specific DNA methylation imprints in the 15q11.2-q13 chromosome region detects approximately 78% of individuals with lack of maternal contribution. Less than 1% of individuals have a visible chromosome rearrangement. UBE3A sequence analysis detects mutations in an additional 11% of individuals. The remaining 10% of individuals with classic phenotypic features of Angelman syndrome have a presently unidentified genetic mechanism and thus are not amenable to diagnostic testing. The risk to sibs of a proband depends on the genetic mechanism of the loss of the maternally contributed Angelman syndrome/Prader-Willi syndrome region: typically <1% for probands with a deletion or uniparental disomy; as high as 50% for probands with an imprinting defect or a mutation of UBE3A. Members of the mother's extended family are also at increased risk when an imprinting defect or a UBE3A mutation is present. Chromosome rearrangements may be inherited or de novo. Prenatal testing is possible for certain genetic mechanisms.

  6. [Epidemiology and clinical aspects of imported schistosomiasis].

    PubMed

    Jelinek, T; von Sonnenburg, F; Nothdurft, H D

    1997-01-15

    Travel and medical histories as well as clinical features of 62 German and 21 native patients with schistosomiasis who were presented to a German outpatient clinic for infectious and tropical diseases were investigated in order to identify the risk factor leading to infection in travellers and expatriates. All patients were able to remember the incidents which led to a likely exposure to cercariae of schistosoma spp. Fifty-nine German patients (95%) acquired infection in Africa, 2 (3%) in South America and one each (2% each) in the Euphrat and the Mekong River, respectively. All but 1 native patients acquired infection in Africa. The highest proportion of infection (45% in Germans and 37% in native patients) was imported from West Africa. Patients returning from this area had had either contact with tributaries of the Niger or with waters of the Volta River, notably the Lake Volta and/or its delta. The most sensitive method for detection of schistosomiasis appeared to be a combination of thorough travel history and serological testing (IHA, IFAT and ELISA) of all patients with possible infection. In the investigated group, most infections were acquired by travellers on a lengthy and adventurous journey or by expatriates venturing outside their normal areas of activity. Most patients knew that they travelled in an area endemic for schistosomiasis but were uninformed about the risks they took with their behaviour in a specific setting. Others simply could not avoid skin exposure to freshwater like backpacking tourists travelling in boats on the Niger or Congo River and native patients. Travellers to the tropics should therefore be informed thoroughly about the dangers of water-related diseases such as schistosomiasis.

  7. ASB clinical biomechanics award winner 2006 prospective study of the biomechanical factors associated with iliotibial band syndrome.

    PubMed

    Noehren, Brian; Davis, Irene; Hamill, Joseph

    2007-11-01

    Iliotibial band syndrome is the leading cause of lateral knee pain in runners. Despite its high prevalence, little is known about the biomechanics that lead to this syndrome. The purpose of this study was to prospectively compare lower extremity kinematics and kinetics between a group of female runners who develop iliotibial band syndrome compared to healthy controls. It was hypothesized that runners who develop iliotibial band syndrome will exhibit greater peak hip adduction, knee internal rotation, rearfoot eversion and no difference in knee flexion at heel strike. Additionally, the iliotibial band syndrome group were expected to have greater hip abduction, knee external rotation, and rearfoot inversion moments. A group of healthy female recreational runners underwent an instrumented gait analysis and were then followed for two years. Eighteen runners developed iliotibial band syndrome. Their initial running mechanics were compared to a group of age and mileage matched controls with no history of knee or hip pain. Comparisons of peak hip, knee, rearfoot angles and moments were made during the stance phase of running. Variables of interest were averaged over the five running trials, and then averaged across groups. The iliotibial band syndrome group exhibited significantly greater hip adduction and knee internal rotation. However, rearfoot eversion and knee flexion were similar between groups. There were no differences in moments between groups. The development of iliotibial band syndrome appears to be related to increased peak hip adduction and knee internal rotation. These combined motions may increase iliotibial band strain causing it to compress against the lateral femoral condyle. These data suggest that treatment interventions should focus on controlling these secondary plane movements through strengthening, stretching and neuromuscular re-education.

  8. Hepatitis delta: virological and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Botelho-Souza, Luan Felipo; Vasconcelos, Mariana Pinheiro Alves; Dos Santos, Alcione de Oliveira; Salcedo, Juan Miguel Villalobos; Vieira, Deusilene Souza

    2017-09-13

    There are an estimated 400 million chronic carriers of HBV worldwide; between 15 and 20 million have serological evidence of exposure to HDV. Traditionally, regions with high rates of endemicity are central and northern Africa, the Amazon Basin, eastern Europe and the Mediterranean, the Middle East and parts of Asia. There are two types of HDV/HBV infection which are differentiated by the previous status infection by HBV for the individual. Individuals with acute HBV infection contaminated by HDV is an HDV/HBV co-infection, while individuals with chronic HBV infection contaminated by HDV represent an HDV/HBV super-infection. The appropriate treatment for chronic hepatitis delta is still widely discussed since it does not have an effective drug. Alpha interferon is currently the only licensed therapy for the treatment of chronic hepatitis D. The most widely used drug is pegylated interferon but only approximately 25% of patients maintain a sustained viral response after 1 year of treatment. The best marker of therapeutic success would be the clearance of HBsAg, but this data is rare in clinical practice. Therefore, the best way to predict a sustained virologic response is the maintenance of undetectable HDV RNA levels.

  9. Feline sporotrichosis: epidemiological and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Gremião, Isabella D F; Menezes, Rodrigo C; Schubach, Tânia M P; Figueiredo, Anna B F; Cavalcanti, Maíra C H; Pereira, Sandro A

    2015-01-01

    Feline sporotrichosis, which is caused by species of the Sporothrix schenckii complex, is endemic to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. More than 4000 cases of the disease were diagnosed at Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Brazil, between 1998 and 2012. Sporotrichosis in cats has been reported in several countries, but nowhere has an outbreak of animal sporotrichosis been as large as that seen in Brazil. The clinical manifestations of the disease range from an isolated skin lesion that can progress to multiple skin lesions and even fatal systemic involvement. Nodules and ulcers are the most common types of lesions, and respiratory signs and mucosa involvement are frequent. The definitive diagnosis depends on isolation of the etiologic agent in culture. Cytology, histopathology, and serology are useful tools for preliminary diagnosis. Severe pyogranulomatous inflammatory infiltrate, high fungal load, and extension of lesions to mucosa, cartilage, and bone in the nose of cats are indicative of an agent of high virulence in this endemic region. Itraconazole is the drug of choice, while, in refractory cases, amphotericin B or potassium iodide might be alternative treatments; however, recurrence after discharge may occur. Sporotrichosis persists as a neglected disease in Rio de Janeiro, and the treatment of cats remains a challenging and long-term endeavor.

  10. Clinical and laboratory aspects of filariasis.

    PubMed Central

    Nanduri, J; Kazura, J W

    1989-01-01

    Human filarial infections afflict over 150 million persons worldwide and are major causes of morbidity in many developing countries. Onchocerca volvulus infection is a leading preventable cause of blindness, while bancroftian and brugian filariasis may produce lymphatic obstruction of the genitalia and extremities (elephantiasis). Definitive diagnosis of these helminthic infections currently depends on demonstration of microfilariae in host tissues, i.e., the skin in the case of O. volvulus and the bloodstream in the cases of Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia malayi. Many investigations are now directed at developing specific and sensitive serum antigen assays that will allow diagnosis of active infection (i.e., presence of adult-stage parasites) in the absence of detectable microfilariae. With respect to the immunology of these parasitic infections, efforts are being directed at elucidating the role of T- and B-cell responses in the development of pathologic lesions and resistance to reinfection. These data as well as molecular biologic approaches to identify and study filarial molecules which are immunogenic are discussed. Finally, since treatment of filariases at present depends on antiparasitic drugs, the clinical indications and dosages of diethylcarbamazine and ivermectin are summarized. PMID:2644023

  11. Nursing home care: part II. Clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Unwin, Brian K; Porvaznik, Mary; Spoelhof, Gerard David

    2010-05-15

    Understanding the distinctions between the management of clinical problems in nursing homes compared with the community setting helps improve the overall care of nursing home residents. Liberalizing diets helps avoid unintentional weight loss in nursing home residents, although the use of feeding tubes usually does not improve nutrition or decrease aspiration risk. Medical assessment, treatment of comorbidities, and appropriate use of rehabilitation therapies minimize the frequency of falls. Toileting programs may be used to treat incontinence and retention in cooperative patients. Adverse effects and drug interactions should be considered when initiating pharmacologic treatment of overactive bladder. Urinary tract infection and pneumonia are the most common bacterial infections in nursing home residents. Signs and symptoms of infection include fever or hypothermia, and functional decline. Virus identification is recommended for influenza-like illnesses. Nonpharmacologic behavioral management strategies are the preferred treatment for dementia-related problem behaviors. The Beers criteria, which outline potentially inappropriate medication use in older persons, provide guidance for medication use in the nursing home.

  12. Noonan Syndrome: Clinical Aspects and Molecular Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglia, M.; Zampino, G.; Gelb, B.D.

    2010-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is a relatively common, clinically variable and genetically heterogeneous developmental disorder characterized by postnatally reduced growth, distinctive facial dysmorphism, cardiac defects and variable cognitive deficits. Other associated features include ectodermal and skeletal defects, cryptorchidism, lymphatic dysplasias, bleeding tendency, and, rarely, predisposition to hematologic malignancies during childhood. NS is caused by mutations in the PTPN11, SOS1, KRAS, RAF1, BRAF and MEK1 (MAP2K1) genes, accounting for approximately 70% of affected individuals. SHP2 (encoded by PTPN11), SOS1, BRAF, RAF1 and MEK1 positively contribute to RAS-MAPK signaling, and possess complex autoinhibitory mechanisms that are impaired by mutations. Similarly, reduced GTPase activity or increased guanine nucleotide release underlie the aberrant signal flow through the MAPK cascade promoted by most KRAS mutations. More recently, a single missense mutation in SHOC2, which encodes a cytoplasmic scaffold positively controlling RAF1 activation, has been discovered to cause a closely related phenotype previously termed Noonan-like syndrome with loose anagen hair. This mutation promotes aberrantly acquired N-myristoylation of the protein, resulting in its constitutive targeting to the plasma membrane and dysregulated function. PTPN11, BRAF and RAF1 mutations also account for approximately 95% of LEOPARD syndrome, a condition which resembles NS phenotypically but is characterized by multiple lentigines dispersed throughout the body, café-au-lait spots, and a higher prevalence of electrocardiographic conduction abnormalities, obstructive cardiomyopathy and sensorineural hearing deficits. These recent discoveries demonstrate that the substantial phenotypic variation characterizing NS and related conditions can be ascribed, in part, to the gene mutated and even the specific molecular lesion involved. PMID:20648242

  13. PFAPA syndrome: new clinical aspects disclosed

    PubMed Central

    Tasher, D; Somekh, E; Dalal, I

    2006-01-01

    Background The recently described PFAPA (Periodic Fever, Aphthous stomatitis, Pharyngitis and Adenitis) syndrome is characterised by periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenitis. However, there are currently relatively few data on the natural history of this syndrome. Objective To describe the presentation, clinical course, doctors' awareness, therapeutic response and long‐term follow‐up of children with PFAPA syndrome. Methods Children with PFAPA syndrome referred over a 5‐year period (from January 1999 to January 2004) were enrolled in the study. Data were gathered from medical records, parents' interviews, physical examination and telephone calls. Results 54 patients with PFAPA syndrome were evaluated. Our patients had a higher rate of abdominal pain (65%) and a lower rate of aphthous stomatitis (39%) than those in previous reports. Four different patterns of disease evolution were identified, including the relatively common (n = 14, 26%) and newly described course of alternating remissions and relapses. The remissions lasted 8.5 months on average (range 4–36 months). Diagnosis was established by primary paediatricians in 30 of 54 (56%) patients. However, a substantial delay in diagnosis was apparent (mean 15 months). Episodes were curtailed by a much lower dose of prednisone or equivalent corticosteroid (mean 0.6 mg/kg/day, range 0.15–1.5 mg/kg/day) than reported previously. Tonsillectomy was successful in the prevention of recurrence of further episodes in all six patients who underwent the procedure. Conclusions We describe several new characteristics of PFAPA syndrome in children, contributing to our knowledge of this relatively unrecognised but troublesome syndrome. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment can markedly improve the quality of life of both patients and families. PMID:16595648

  14. PFAPA syndrome: new clinical aspects disclosed.

    PubMed

    Tasher, D; Somekh, E; Dalal, I

    2006-12-01

    The recently described PFAPA (Periodic Fever, Aphthous stomatitis, Pharyngitis and Adenitis) syndrome is characterised by periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenitis. However, there are currently relatively few data on the natural history of this syndrome. To describe the presentation, clinical course, doctors' awareness, therapeutic response and long-term follow-up of children with PFAPA syndrome. Children with PFAPA syndrome referred over a 5-year period (from January 1999 to January 2004) were enrolled in the study. Data were gathered from medical records, parents' interviews, physical examination and telephone calls. 54 patients with PFAPA syndrome were evaluated. Our patients had a higher rate of abdominal pain (65%) and a lower rate of aphthous stomatitis (39%) than those in previous reports. Four different patterns of disease evolution were identified, including the relatively common (n = 14, 26%) and newly described course of alternating remissions and relapses. The remissions lasted 8.5 months on average (range 4-36 months). Diagnosis was established by primary paediatricians in 30 of 54 (56%) patients. However, a substantial delay in diagnosis was apparent (mean 15 months). Episodes were curtailed by a much lower dose of prednisone or equivalent corticosteroid (mean 0.6 mg/kg/day, range 0.15-1.5 mg/kg/day) than reported previously. Tonsillectomy was successful in the prevention of recurrence of further episodes in all six patients who underwent the procedure. We describe several new characteristics of PFAPA syndrome in children, contributing to our knowledge of this relatively unrecognised but troublesome syndrome. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment can markedly improve the quality of life of both patients and families.

  15. Fracture blisters: clinical and pathological aspects.

    PubMed

    Varela, C D; Vaughan, T K; Carr, J B; Slemmons, B K

    1993-01-01

    Fracture blisters are tense vesicles or bullae that arise on markedly swollen skin directly overlying a fracture. There is very little objective data in the literature detailing their characteristics and management. All fracture blisters that occurred over a 3 1/2-year period were studied retrospectively at four hospitals, of which three were level I trauma centers. A total of 53 blisters developed in 51 patients. They occurred in characteristic locations along the human musculoskeleton, most commonly overlying the tibia, ankle, and elbow. They arose within 24-48 h of acute injury in most instances. The timing of surgical intervention affected the occurrence of fracture blisters. Those patients with acute fractures who underwent open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) within 24 h of injury had the lowest incidence of fracture blisters (2.0%) compared with those delayed for > 24 h (8.0%) (p < 0.001). In those patients with fracture blisters present at time of surgery, patient care was affected in 10 of 13 cases (71%). Two of these were major complications occurring as postoperative wound infections. Other management problems consisted of delaying surgery, and changing in the operative plan. There were no adverse affects on patient care when the fracture blister developed postoperatively. Twenty-one fractures with blisters were treated by closed means, with the presence of fractures blisters delaying closed reduction and casting in two. Biopsy examination of 15 blisters supported the clinical impression that fracture blisters are subepidermal vesicles. The blister fluid was found to be a sterile transudate. Microbial evaluation of 11 ruptured fracture blisters demonstrated colonization (primarily with skin pathogens), occurred soon after blister rupture, and continued until reepithelialization.

  16. Pain following hysterectomy: epidemiological and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Brandsborg, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that different surgical procedures like amputation, thoracotomy, inguinal herniotomy, and mastectomy are associated with a risk of developing chronic postsurgical pain. Hysterectomy is the most frequent gynecological procedure with an annual frequency of 5000 hysterectomies for a benign indication in Denmark, but is has not previously been documented in detail to what extent this procedure leads to chronic pain. The aim of this PhD thesis was therefore to describe the epidemiology, type of pain, risk factors, and predictive factors associated with chronic pain after hysterectomy for a benign indication. The thesis includes four papers, of which one is based on a questionnaire study, two are based on a prospective clinical study, and one is a review of chronic pain after hysterectomy. The questionnaire paper included 1135 women one year after hysterectomy. A postal questionnaire about pain before and after hysterectomy was combined with data from the Danish Hysterectomy Database. Chronic postoperative pain was described by 32%, and the identified risk factors were preoperative pelvic pain, previous cesarean section, other pain problems and pain as an indication for hysterectomy. Spinal anesthesia was associated with a decreased risk of having pain after one year. The type of surgery (i.e. abdominal or vaginal hysterectomy) did not influence chronic pain. The prospective paper included 90 women referred for a hysterectomy on benign indication. The tests were performed before, on day 1, and 4 months after surgery and included questionnaires about pain, coping, and quality of life together with quantitative sensory testing of pain thresholds. Seventeen percent had pain after 4 months, and the risk factors were preoperative pain problems elsewhere and a high intensity of acute postoperative pain. Type of surgery was not a risk factor. Preoperative brush-evoked allodynia, pinprick hyperalgesia, and vaginal pain threshold were associated with a high

  17. Clinical and biomechanical outcome of minimal invasive and open repair of the Achilles tendon

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction With evolutions in surgical techniques, minimally invasive surgical (MIS) repair with Achillon applicator has been introduced. However, there is still a lack of literature to investigate into the clinical merits of MIS over open surgery. This study aims to investigate the correlation between clinical outcome, gait analysis and biomechanical properties comparing both surgical methods. Materials and methods A single centre retrospective review on all the consecutive operated patients between January 2004 and December 2008 was performed. Twenty-six patients (19 male and 7 female; age 40.4 ± 9.2 years) had experienced a complete Achilles tendon rupture with operative repair. Nineteen of the patients, 10 MIS versus 9 open repairs (13 men with a mean age of 40.54 ± 10.43 (range 23-62 yrs) and 6 women with a mean age of 45.33 ± 7.71 (range 35-57 yrs) were further invited to attend a thorough clinical assessment using Holz's scale and biomechanical evaluation at a mean of 25.3 months after operation. This study utilized the Cybex II isokinetic dynamometer to assess the isokinetic peak force of plantar-flexion and dorsiflexion of both ankles. The patients were also invited to return to our Gait Laboratory for analysis. The eight-infrared camera motion capture system (VICON, UK) was utilized for the acquisition of kinematic variables. Their anthropometric data was measured according to the Davis and coworkers' standard. Results The mean operative time and length of hospital stay were shorter in the MIS group. The operative time was 54.55 ± 15.15 minutes versus 68.80 ± 18.23 minutes of the MIS group and Open group respectively (p = 0.045), whereas length of stay was 3.36 ± 1.21 days versus 6.40 ± 3.70 days respectively (p = 0.039). There is statistically significant decrease (p = 0.005) in incision length in MIS group than the open surgery group, 3.23 ± 1.10 cm versus 9.64 ± 2.55 cm respectively. Both groups attained similar Holz's scores, 11.70 ± 0

  18. Patellofemoral anatomy and biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Seth L; Plackis, Andreas C; Nuelle, Clayton W

    2014-07-01

    Patellofemoral disorders are common. There is a broad spectrum of disease, ranging from patellofemoral pain and instability to focal cartilage disease and arthritis. Regardless of the specific condition, abnormal anatomy and biomechanics are often the root cause of patellofemoral dysfunction. A thorough understanding of normal patellofemoral anatomy and biomechanics is critical for the treating physician. Recognizing and addressing abnormal anatomy will optimize patellofemoral biomechanics and may ultimately translate into clinical success. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Clinical aspects of the visually evoked potential.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, G W

    1977-01-01

    The visually evoked potential (VEP) was studied in normal and abnormal human subjects, and in Rhesus monkeys with central, paracentral, and peripheral photocoagulation lesions. A relatively simple protocol for clinical VEP testing is described. The monkeys showed similar VEP responses but these were smaller in amplitude than those obtained from human subjects. Central, but not paracentral or peripheral retinal lesions were associated with VEP abnormalities. For both monkey and human subjects, some variability of responses between normal and subjects was noted. Generally, there are differences in VEP responses obtained from the affected eye of abnormal subjects who had one eye which could serve as a control, as compared to responses from the normal eye. In these subjects as well as in subjects with two abnormal eyes, computer analysis of digitized VEP data from 10 Hz stimulus responses was performed. Fourier transformation analyses showed abnormalities which could be detected easily by evaluating the pattern of the amplitudes of the fundamental and first three harmonics. With this technique, it was possible to group correctly normal VEP's with eyes with normal visual acuity (greater than or equal to 20/30 or 0.67), and abnormal VEP's with eyes with poor visual acuity (less than 20/30 or 0.67) in 72% of cases. Analysis of the data obtained with 1 Hz and 10 Hz stimulation suggests that the components of the VEP related to visual acuity occur within the first 60-100 msec of the response, corresponding to the primary evoked response of Chiganek. The second, smaller wave of the response complex to 10 Hz flash stimuli corresponds to the primary evoked response, and is closely related to visual acuity. This was further supported in another series in which the digitized data was filtered around the stimulating frequency. It was possible to recognize visually this VEP waveform and subjectively interpret the record correctly in 85% of eyes with regard to visual acuity

  20. Biomechanical Rupture Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture is a local event in the aneurysm wall that naturally demands tools to assess the risk for local wall rupture. Consequently, global parameters like the maximum diameter and its expansion over time can only give very rough risk indications; therefore, they frequently fail to predict individual risk for AAA rupture. In contrast, the Biomechanical Rupture Risk Assessment (BRRA) method investigates the wall’s risk for local rupture by quantitatively integrating many known AAA rupture risk factors like female sex, large relative expansion, intraluminal thrombus-related wall weakening, and high blood pressure. The BRRA method is almost 20 years old and has progressed considerably in recent years, it can now potentially enrich the diameter indication for AAA repair. The present paper reviews the current state of the BRRA method by summarizing its key underlying concepts (i.e., geometry modeling, biomechanical simulation, and result interpretation). Specifically, the validity of the underlying model assumptions is critically disused in relation to the intended simulation objective (i.e., a clinical AAA rupture risk assessment). Next, reported clinical BRRA validation studies are summarized, and their clinical relevance is reviewed. The BRRA method is a generic, biomechanics-based approach that provides several interfaces to incorporate information from different research disciplines. As an example, the final section of this review suggests integrating growth aspects to (potentially) further improve BRRA sensitivity and specificity. Despite the fact that no prospective validation studies are reported, a significant and still growing body of validation evidence suggests integrating the BRRA method into the clinical decision-making process (i.e., enriching diameter-based decision-making in AAA patient treatment). PMID:27757402

  1. Biomechanical Role of Bone Anisotropy Estimated on Clinical CT Scans by Image Registration.

    PubMed

    Taghizadeh, Elham; Reyes, Mauricio; Zysset, Philippe; Latypova, Adeliya; Terrier, Alexandre; Büchler, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    Image-based modeling is a popular approach to perform patient-specific biomechanical simulations. Accurate modeling is critical for orthopedic application to evaluate implant design and surgical planning. It has been shown that bone strength can be estimated from the bone mineral density (BMD) and trabecular bone architecture. However, these findings cannot be directly and fully transferred to patient-specific modeling since only BMD can be derived from clinical CT. Therefore, the objective of this study was to propose a method to predict the trabecular bone structure using a µCT atlas and an image registration technique. The approach has been evaluated on femurs and patellae under physiological loading. The displacement and ultimate force for femurs loaded in stance position were predicted with an error of 2.5% and 3.7%, respectively, while predictions obtained with an isotropic material resulted in errors of 7.3% and 6.9%. Similar results were obtained for the patella, where the strain predicted using the registration approach resulted in an improved mean squared error compared to the isotropic model. We conclude that the registration of anisotropic information from of a single template bone enables more accurate patient-specific simulations from clinical image datasets than isotropic model.

  2. Open Knee: Open Source Modeling & Simulation to Enable Scientific Discovery and Clinical Care in Knee Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Erdemir, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Virtual representations of the knee joint can provide clinicians, scientists, and engineers the tools to explore mechanical function of the knee and its tissue structures in health and disease. Modeling and simulation approaches such as finite element analysis also provide the possibility to understand the influence of surgical procedures and implants on joint stresses and tissue deformations. A large number of knee joint models are described in the biomechanics literature. However, freely accessible, customizable, and easy-to-use models are scarce. Availability of such models can accelerate clinical translation of simulations, where labor intensive reproduction of model development steps can be avoided. The interested parties can immediately utilize readily available models for scientific discovery and for clinical care. Motivated by this gap, this study aims to describe an open source and freely available finite element representation of the tibiofemoral joint, namely Open Knee, which includes detailed anatomical representation of the joint's major tissue structures, their nonlinear mechanical properties and interactions. Three use cases illustrate customization potential of the model, its predictive capacity, and its scientific and clinical utility: prediction of joint movements during passive flexion, examining the role of meniscectomy on contact mechanics and joint movements, and understanding anterior cruciate ligament mechanics. A summary of scientific and clinically directed studies conducted by other investigators are also provided. The utilization of this open source model by groups other than its developers emphasizes the premise of model sharing as an accelerator of simulation-based medicine. Finally, the imminent need to develop next generation knee models are noted. These are anticipated to incorporate individualized anatomy and tissue properties supported by specimen-specific joint mechanics data for evaluation, all acquired in vitro from varying age

  3. Clinical and biomechanical researches of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) rods for semi-rigid lumbar fusion: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Li, Chan; Liu, Lei; Shi, Jian-Yong; Yan, Kai-Zhong; Shen, Wei-Zhong; Yang, Zhen-Rong

    2016-07-08

    Lumbar spinal fusion using rigid rods is a common surgical technique. However, adjacent segment disease and other adverse effects can occur. Dynamic stabilization devices preserve physiologic motion and reduce painful stress but have a high rate of construct failure and reoperation. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) rods for semi-rigid fusions have a similar stiffness and adequate stabilization power compared with titanium rods, but with improved load sharing and reduced mechanical failure. The purpose of this paper is to review and evaluate the clinical and biomechanical performance of PEEK rods. A systematic review of clinical and biomechanical studies was conducted. A literature search using the PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases identified studies that met the eligibility criteria. Eight clinical studies and 15 biomechanical studies were included in this systematic review. The visual analog scale and the Oswestry disability index improved significantly in most studies, with satisfactory fusion rates. The occurrence of adjacent segment disease was low. In biomechanical studies, PEEK rods demonstrated a superior load-sharing distribution, a larger adjacent segment range of motion, and reduced stress at the rod-screw/screw-bone interfaces compared with titanium rods. The PEEK rod construct was simple to assemble and had a reliable in vivo performance compared with dynamic devices. The quality of clinical studies was low with confounding results, although results from mechanical studies were encouraging. There is no evidence strong enough to confirm better outcomes with PEEK rods than titanium rods. More studies with better protocols, a larger sample size, and a longer follow-up time are needed.

  4. The relationship between clinically measured hip rotational motion and shoulder biomechanics during the pitching motion.

    PubMed

    Laudner, Kevin; Wong, Regan; Onuki, Takashi; Lynall, Robert; Meister, Keith

    2015-09-01

    To examine how clinically measured hip motion is related to shoulder biomechanics during the pitching motion. Cross-sectional. Bilateral hip rotational range of motion was measured clinically among 34 collegiate baseball pitchers. External rotation torque and maximum horizontal adduction range of motion of the throwing shoulder were measured using a three-dimensional, high speed video capture system. Separate standard multiple regression analyses showed that the total hip rotational range of motion of the lead leg had a significant relationship with shoulder external rotation torque during the throwing motion (r=0.56, P=0.003). Both lead leg hip external rotation range of motion (r=-0.39, P=0.02) and internal rotation range of motion (r=0.42, P=0.009) made significant contributions to this dependent variable. Lead leg external rotation range of motion also had a significant negative relationship with shoulder horizontal adduction range of motion (r=-0.36, P=0.04). The total rotational range of motion of the trail leg had a significant relationship with shoulder horizontal adduction range of motion (r=0.43, P=0.04). However, trail leg external rotation range of motion was the only significant contributor to this relationship (r=-0.35, P=0.04). No other significant relationships were noted (r<0.37, P>0.11). Our results demonstrate that altered hip rotational range of motion, measured clinically, has a direct effect on the amount of external rotation torque and horizontal adduction range of motion of the shoulder during the throwing motion. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Pediatric crushing head injury: biomechanics and clinical features of an uncommon type of craniocerebral trauma.

    PubMed

    López-Guerrero, Antonio López; Martínez-Lage, Juan F; González-Tortosa, José; Almagro, María-José; García-Martínez, Silvia; Reyes, Susana B

    2012-12-01

    Head injuries constitute one of the leading causes of pediatric morbidity and mortality. Most injuries result from accidents involving an acceleration/deceleration mechanism. However, a special type of head injury occurs when the children sustain a traumatism whose main component is a static load in relation to a crushing mechanism with the head relatively immobile. We report a series of children who sustained a craniocerebral injury of variable severity produced by head crushing. We also analyze epidemiological and clinical data, and biomechanics in these injuries. Mean age of the group (13 boys/6 girls) was 4.1 years. All patients showed external lesions (scalp wounds or hemorrhage from the nose, ears, or throat). Eleven children were initially unconscious. Six children presented cranial nerve deficits in addition to impaired hearing. Skull base fractures were seen in most cases with extension to the vault in 11 instances. Fourteen patients had an associated intracranial lesion, including two with diffuse axonal injury. Surgery was performed in three instances. Only seven patients were left with sequelae. The observed skull, brain, and cranial nerve lesions corresponded to a mechanism of bilateral compression of the children's heads mainly occasioned by a static load, although an associated component of dynamic forces was also involved. The skull and its covering and the cranial nerves were the most severely affected structures while the brain seemed to be relatively well preserved. Most crush injuries appear to be preventable by the appropriate supervision of the children.

  6. Functional and biomechanic aspects of the scapular girdle and forelimbs of Unaysaurus tolentinoiLeal et al., 2004 (Saurischia: Sauropodomorpha)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas-Peixoto, Dilson; Da-Rosa, Átila Augusto Stock; Gallo de França, Marco Aurélio

    2015-08-01

    This study presents evidence about the biomechanics and forelimbs functionality of the basal sauropodomorph Unaysaurus tolentinoi (upper portion of the SM2 sequence, Santa Maria Supersequence, Upper Triassic from southern Brazil). Maximum and minimum motion angles were inferred in the joints, disregarding the presence and/or thickness of cartilage. Furthermore, processes and external structures of the bones were analyzed in attributing the functionality of forelimbs. Unaysaurus tolentinoi had well-developed grapple ability. However, the preserved elements and their osteological features are not conclusive about strictly bipedalism or quadrupedalism in U. tolentinoi.

  7. Basilar Invagination, Basilar Impression, and Platybasia: Clinical and Imaging Aspects.

    PubMed

    Pinter, Nandor K; McVige, Jennifer; Mechtler, Laszlo

    2016-08-01

    The congenital and acquired deformities of the craniovertebral junction (CVJ), such as basilar invagination, basilar impression, or platybasia, can present in the form of slowly progressive or acute neurologic deterioration. In many cases, an insidious headache is the only symptom and can be a diagnostic challenge for the neurologist. Proper imaging studies as well as recognizing often associated neurologic or systemic conditions are required for early diagnosis and effective therapy. In the current report, the primary focus will be on clinical aspects of these CVJ abnormalities; the pathologic and radiologic aspects, such as developmental and pathophysiologic background or radiographic analysis, will be discussed briefly, confined to clinically relevant data.

  8. Kinect One-based biomechanical assessment of upper-limb performance compared to clinical scales in post-stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Scano, Alessandro; Caimmi, Marco; Chiavenna, Andrea; Malosio, Matteo; Tosatti, Lorenzo Molinari

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a Kinect One sensor-based protocol for the evaluation of the motor-performances of the upper limb of neurological patients during rehabilitative sessions. The assessment provides evaluations of kinematic, dynamic, motor and postural control variables. A pilot study was conducted on three post-stroke neurological patients, comparing Kinect-One biomechanical assessment with the outcomes of some of the most common clinical scales for the evaluation of the upper-limb functionality. Preliminary results indicate coherency between the clinical and instrumental evaluation. Moreover, the Kinect-One assessment seems to provide some complementary quantitative information, consistently integrating the clinical assessment.

  9. Clinical and Biomechanical Evaluations of Staged Bilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty Patients with Two Different Implant Designs

    PubMed Central

    Renaud, Alexandre; Fuentes, Alexandre; Hagemeister, Nicola; Lavigne, Martin; Vendittoli, Pascal-André

    2016-01-01

    Background: Various implants of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are used in clinical practice and each presents specific design characteristics. No implant managed this day to reproduce perfectly the biomechanics of the natural knee during gait. Objectives: We therefore asked whether (1) differences in tridimensional (3D) kinematic data during gait could be observed in two different designs of TKA on the same patients, (2) if those gait kinematic data are comparable with those of asymptomatic knees and (3) if difference in clinical subjective scores can be observed between the two TKA designs on the same patient. Methods: We performed knee kinematic analysis on 15 patients (30 TKAs) with two different TKA implant designs (Nexgen, Zimmer and Triathlon, Stryker) on each knee and on 25 asymptomatic subjects (35 knees). Clinical evaluation included range of motion, weight bearing radiographs, questionnaire of joint perception, KOOS, WOMAC and SF-12. Results: Comparison between TKAs and asymptomatic knees revealed that asymptomatic knees had significantly less knee flexion at initial contact (p < 0.04) and more flexion for most of the swing phase (p between 0.004 and 0.04). Asymptomatic knees also had less varus at loading response, during stance phase and during most of the swing phase (p between 0.001 - 0.05). Transverse plane analysis showed a tendency for asymptomatic knees to be more in internal rotation during stance phase (p 0.02 - 0.04). Comparing both TKA designs, NexgenTM implant had significantly more flexion at the end of swing phase (p = 0.04) compared to knees with the TriathlonTM implant. In frontal plane, from initial contact to maximum mid stance angle and between the mean mid stance angle and initial contact NexgenTM TKA had significantly more adduction (varus, p =0.02 – 0.03). Clinical scores of both TKAs did not have significant difference. Conclusions: TKA with the tested implants did not reproduce natural knee kinematics during gait. In our cohort

  10. Epilepsy in Down Syndrome: Clinical Aspects and Possible Mechanisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stafstrom, Carl E.

    1993-01-01

    This review examines clinical aspects of seizures among individuals with Down's syndrome and explores possible mechanisms by which the trisomy 21 brain may generate seizures. Evidence suggests an interplay between pathologically hyperexcitable membrane properties, altered neuronal structure, and abnormal inhibitory neurotransmission. (Author/JDD)

  11. Epilepsy in Down Syndrome: Clinical Aspects and Possible Mechanisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stafstrom, Carl E.

    1993-01-01

    This review examines clinical aspects of seizures among individuals with Down's syndrome and explores possible mechanisms by which the trisomy 21 brain may generate seizures. Evidence suggests an interplay between pathologically hyperexcitable membrane properties, altered neuronal structure, and abnormal inhibitory neurotransmission. (Author/JDD)

  12. American Society of Biomechanics Clinical Biomechanics Award 2012: plantar shear stress distributions in diabetic patients with and without neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, Metin

    2014-02-01

    The exact pathology of diabetic foot ulcers remains to be resolved. Evidence suggests that plantar shear forces play a major role in diabetic ulceration. Unfortunately, only a few manuscripts exist on the clinical implications of plantar shear. The purpose of this study was to compare global and regional peak plantar stress values in three groups; diabetic patients with neuropathy, diabetic patients without neuropathy and healthy control subjects. Fourteen diabetic neuropathic patients, 14 non-neuropathic diabetic control and 11 non-diabetic control subjects were recruited. Subjects walked on a custom-built stress plate that quantified plantar pressures and shear. Four stress variables were analyzed; peak pressure, peak shear, peak pressure-time and shear-time integral. Global peak values of peak shear (p = 0.039), shear-time integral (p = 0.002) and pressure-time integral (p = 0.003) were significantly higher in the diabetic neuropathic group. The local peak shear stress and shear-time integral were also significantly higher in diabetic neuropathic patients compared to both control groups, in particular, at the hallux and central forefoot. The local peak pressure and pressure-time integral were significantly different between the three groups at the medial and lateral forefoot. Plantar shear and shear-time integral magnitudes were elevated in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy, which indicates the potential clinical significance of these factors in ulceration. It is thought that further investigation of plantar shear would lead to a better understanding of ulceration pathomechanics, which in turn will assist researchers in developing more effective preventive devices and strategies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Biomechanics and tennis.

    PubMed

    Elliott, B

    2006-05-01

    Success in tennis requires a mix of player talent, good coaching, appropriate equipment, and an understanding of those aspects of sport science pertinent to the game. This paper outlines the role that biomechanics plays in player development from sport science and sport medicine perspectives. Biomechanics is a key area in player development because all strokes have a fundamental mechanical structure and sports injuries primarily have a mechanical cause.

  14. Biomechanics and tennis

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, B

    2006-01-01

    Success in tennis requires a mix of player talent, good coaching, appropriate equipment, and an understanding of those aspects of sport science pertinent to the game. This paper outlines the role that biomechanics plays in player development from sport science and sport medicine perspectives. Biomechanics is a key area in player development because all strokes have a fundamental mechanical structure and sports injuries primarily have a mechanical cause. PMID:16632567

  15. THE CLINICAL, FUNCTIONAL AND BIOMECHANICAL PRESENTATION OF PATIENTS WITH SYMPTOMATIC HIP ABDUCTOR TENDON TEARS

    PubMed Central

    Retheesh, Theertha; Mutreja, Rinky; Janes, Gregory C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hip abductor tendon (HAT) tearing is commonly implicated in greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS), though limited information exists on the disability associated with this condition and specific presentation of these patients. Purpose To describe the clinical, functional and biomechanical presentation of patients with symptomatic HAT tears. Secondary purposes were to investigate the association between these clinical and functional measures, and to compare the pain and disability reported by HAT tear patients to those with end-stage hip osteoarthritis (OA). Study Design Prospective case series. Methods One hundred forty-nine consecutive patients with symptomatic HAT tears were evaluated using the Harris (HHS) and Oxford (OHS) Hip Scores, SF-12, an additional series of 10 questions more pertinent to those with lateral hip pain, active hip range of motion (ROM), maximal isometric hip abduction strength, six-minute walk capacity and 30-second single limb stance (SLS) test. The presence of a Trendelenburg sign and pelvis-on-femur (POF) angle were determined via 2D video analysis. An age matched comparative sample of patients with end-stage hip OA was recruited for comparison of all patient-reported outcome scores. Independent t-tests investigated group and limb differences, while analysis of variance evaluated pain changes during the functional tests. Pearson's correlation coefficients investigated the correlation between clinical measures in the HAT tear group. Results No differences existed in patient demographics and patient-reported outcome scores between HAT tear and hip OA cohorts, apart from significantly worse SF-12 mental subscale scores (p = 0.032) in the HAT tear group. Patients with HAT tears demonstrated significantly lower (p < 0.05) hip abduction strength and active ROM in all planes of motion on their affected limb. Pain significantly increased throughout the 30-second SLS test for the HAT tear group, with 57% of HAT tear patients

  16. Sexually transmitted diseases: epidemiological and clinical aspects in adults.

    PubMed

    Siracusano, Salvatore; Silvestri, Tommaso; Casotto, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are the first 10 causes of unpleased diseases in young adult women in the world. The concept of STDs includes a series of syndromes caused by pathogens that can be acquired by sexual intercourse or sexual activity.Adolescents and young adults are responsible for only 25% of the sexually active population and they represent almost 50% of all newly acquired STDs.In this way, we evaluated the epidemiological and clinical aspects of most relevant pathogens as Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Treponema pallidum, Haemophilus Ducreyi, Trichomonas vaginalis, herpes simplex virus, human papilloma virus (HPV) with the exception of hepatitis, and HIV infections for which we suggest specific guidelines.To attain this objective, we analyzed the results of epidemiological and clinical aspects of STDs through a review of the literature using MEDLINE and PubMed database for original articles published using the terms "sexual transmitted disease, epidemiology, diagnosis and therapy" from 2005 to 2014.

  17. Methodological Aspects in Studies Based on Clinical Routine Data.

    PubMed

    Kennes, Lieven Nils

    2017-09-12

    Randomized controlled clinical trials are regarded as the gold standard for comparing different clinical interventions, but generally their conduct is operationally cumbersome, time-consuming, and expensive. Studies and investigations based on clinical routine data on the contrary utilize existing data acquired under real-life conditions and are increasingly popular among practitioners. In this paper, methodological aspects of studies based on clinical routine data are discussed. Important limitations and considerations as well as unique strengths of these types of studies are indicated and exemplarily demonstrated in a recent real-case study based on clinical routine data. In addition two simulation studies reveal the impact of bias in studies based on clinical routine data on the type I error rate and false decision rate in favor of the inferior intervention. It is concluded that correctly analyzing clinical routine data yields a valuable addition to clinical research; however, as a result of a lack of statistical foundation, internal validity, and comparability, generalizing results and inferring properties derived from clinical routine data to all patients of interest has to be considered with extreme caution. Grünenthal GmbH.

  18. Trachyonychia: Review and Update on Clinical Aspects, Histology, and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Haber, Jessica S.; Chairatchaneeboon, Manasmon; Rubin, Adam I.

    2017-01-01

    Trachyonychia is a disorder of the nail unit that most commonly presents with rough, longitudinally ridged nails (opaque trachyonychia) or less frequently, uniform, opalescent nails with pits (shiny trachyonychia). The term trachyonychia refers to ‘rough nails.’ This article comprehensively reviews the clinical, histologic, and therapeutic aspects of trachyonychia. The authors' preferred evaluation and management strategies of trachyonychia are included. PMID:28232917

  19. Biomechanical model of the coronary blood flow and its relation to certain aspects of auxiliary circulation research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogan, V. A.

    1981-11-01

    Whereas under experimental conditions it is possible to investigate the responses of the self-regulatory mechanisms of the coronary circulation either with a constant load on the myocardium and variable conditions of perfusion of the coronary system [17] or vice-versa [18], in the case of balloon pulsation both these factors act togetherandin animal experiments cannot be distinguished. At the same time, their separate evaluation is important in studying the hemodynamic efficiency of the counterpulsation method. The proposed model of the biomechanics of the coronary circulation is sensitive to changes in the conditions of perfusion of the myocardium and at the same time maintains a constant value of the coronary resistance irrespective of the energy consumption of the heart. Accordingly, by comparing the results of modeling and the experimental data it is possible to estimate the contribution of the self-regulatory mechanisms of the coronary blood flow to the change in the transport functions of the coronary circulation associated with intraaortic balloon pulsation. Thus, the proposed model can be used as a tool for investigating the blood supply to the normal heart and for the partial evaluation of the hemodynamic efficiency of the intraaortic counterpulsation method.

  20. Arthrogryposis: an update on clinical aspects, etiology, and treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Feluś, Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    Arthrogryposes – multiple joint contractures – are a clinically and etiologically heterogeneous class of diseases, where accurate diagnosis, recognition of the underlying pathology and classification are of key importance for the prognosis as well as for selection of appropriate management. This treatment remains challenging and optimally in arthrogrypotic patients should be carried out by a team of specialists familiar with all aspects of arthrogryposis pathology and treatment modalities: rehabilitation, orthotics and surgery. In this comprehensive review article, based on literature and clinical experience, the authors present an update on current knowledge on etiology, classifications and treatment options for skeletal deformations possible in arthrogryposis. PMID:26925114

  1. Chronic Mountain Sickness: Clinical Aspects, Etiology, Management, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Villafuerte, Francisco C; Corante, Noemí

    2016-06-01

    Villafuerte, Francisco C., and Noemí Corante. Chronic mountain sickness: clinical aspects, etiology, management, and treatment. High Alt Med Biol. 17:61-69, 2016.-Millions of people worldwide live at a high altitude, and a significant number are at risk of developing Chronic Mountain Sickness (CMS), a progressive incapacitating syndrome caused by lifelong exposure to hypoxia. CMS is characterized by severe symptomatic excessive erythrocytosis (EE; Hb ≥19 g/dL for women and Hb ≥21 g/dL for men) and accentuated hypoxemia, which are frequently associated with pulmonary hypertension. In advanced cases, the condition may evolve to cor pulmonale and congestive heart failure. Current knowledge indicates a genetic predisposition to develop CMS. However, there are important risk factors and comorbidities that may trigger and aggravate the condition. Thus, appropriate medical information on CMS is necessary to provide adequate diagnosis and healthcare to high-altitude inhabitants. After reviewing basic clinical aspects of CMS, including its definition, diagnosis, and common clinical findings, we discuss aspects of its etiology, and address its epidemiology, risk factors, and treatment.

  2. Chronic Mountain Sickness: Clinical Aspects, Etiology, Management, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Corante, Noemí

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Villafuerte, Francisco C., and Noemí Corante. Chronic mountain sickness: clinical aspects, etiology, management, and treatment. High Alt Med Biol. 17:61–69, 2016.—Millions of people worldwide live at a high altitude, and a significant number are at risk of developing Chronic Mountain Sickness (CMS), a progressive incapacitating syndrome caused by lifelong exposure to hypoxia. CMS is characterized by severe symptomatic excessive erythrocytosis (EE; Hb ≥19 g/dL for women and Hb ≥21 g/dL for men) and accentuated hypoxemia, which are frequently associated with pulmonary hypertension. In advanced cases, the condition may evolve to cor pulmonale and congestive heart failure. Current knowledge indicates a genetic predisposition to develop CMS. However, there are important risk factors and comorbidities that may trigger and aggravate the condition. Thus, appropriate medical information on CMS is necessary to provide adequate diagnosis and healthcare to high-altitude inhabitants. After reviewing basic clinical aspects of CMS, including its definition, diagnosis, and common clinical findings, we discuss aspects of its etiology, and address its epidemiology, risk factors, and treatment. PMID:27218284

  3. Fungal infections of the immunocompromised host: clinical and laboratory aspects.

    PubMed Central

    Musial, C E; Cockerill, F R; Roberts, G D

    1988-01-01

    Fungal infections of the immunocompromised host are being seen with greater frequency than ever before. In addition, a growing list of unusual and unexpected etiologic agents presents a unique and difficult challenge to the clinician and microbiologist. The clinical manifestations of opportunistic fungal infections are often not characteristic and, in many instances, may prevent a rapid diagnosis from being made. Clinical microbiology laboratories should consider any organism as a potential etiologic agent. This requires that all fungi recovered from immunocompromised patients be thoroughly identified and reported so that their clinical significance may be assessed. This review presents a brief discussion of the clinical and laboratory aspects of some fungal infections seen in this important group of patients. PMID:3069198

  4. Towards clinical management of traumatic brain injury: a review of models and mechanisms from a biomechanical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Namjoshi, Dhananjay R.; Good, Craig; Cheng, Wai Hang; Panenka, William; Richards, Darrin; Cripton, Peter A.; Wellington, Cheryl L.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major worldwide healthcare problem. Despite promising outcomes from many preclinical studies, the failure of several clinical studies to identify effective therapeutic and pharmacological approaches for TBI suggests that methods to improve the translational potential of preclinical studies are highly desirable. Rodent models of TBI are increasingly in demand for preclinical research, particularly for closed head injury (CHI), which mimics the most common type of TBI observed clinically. Although seemingly simple to establish, CHI models are particularly prone to experimental variability. Promisingly, bioengineering-oriented research has advanced our understanding of the nature of the mechanical forces and resulting head and brain motion during TBI. However, many neuroscience-oriented laboratories lack guidance with respect to fundamental biomechanical principles of TBI. Here, we review key historical and current literature that is relevant to the investigation of TBI from clinical, physiological and biomechanical perspectives, and comment on how the current challenges associated with rodent TBI models, particularly those involving CHI, could be improved. PMID:24046354

  5. Characteristics of clinical measurements between biomechanical responders and non-responders to a shoe designed for knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yongwook; Richards, Jim; Lidtke, Roy H; Trede, Renato

    2017-09-29

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of biomechanical and clinical measurements in relation to the knee adduction moment when wearing a standard shoe and a shoe design for individuals with knee osteoarthritis (Flex-OA). Kinematic and kinetic data were collected from thirty-two healthy individuals (64 knees) using a ten camera motion analysis system and four force plates. Subjects performed 5 walking trials under the two conditions and the magnitude of individuals' biomechanical responses where explored in relation to the clinical assessment of the Foot Posture Index, hip rotation range, strength of hip rotators, and active ankle-foot motion, all of which have been described as possible compensation mechanisms in knee osteoarthritis. Significant reductions in the first peak of the knee adduction moment (KAM) during stance phase (9.3%) were recorded (p<0.0001). However, despite this difference, 22 of 64 knees showed either no change or an increased KAM, indicating a non-response or negative-response to the Flex-OA shoe. Significant differences were observed between the responder and non-responder subgroups in the hip rotation range ratio (p=0.044) and the hip rotators strength ratio (p=0.028). Significant differences were seen in clinical assessments of hip rotation range and hip rotator strength between responders and non-responders using a cut-off of 0.02Nm/kg change in the KAM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Towards clinical management of traumatic brain injury: a review of models and mechanisms from a biomechanical perspective.

    PubMed

    Namjoshi, Dhananjay R; Good, Craig; Cheng, Wai Hang; Panenka, William; Richards, Darrin; Cripton, Peter A; Wellington, Cheryl L

    2013-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major worldwide healthcare problem. Despite promising outcomes from many preclinical studies, the failure of several clinical studies to identify effective therapeutic and pharmacological approaches for TBI suggests that methods to improve the translational potential of preclinical studies are highly desirable. Rodent models of TBI are increasingly in demand for preclinical research, particularly for closed head injury (CHI), which mimics the most common type of TBI observed clinically. Although seemingly simple to establish, CHI models are particularly prone to experimental variability. Promisingly, bioengineering-oriented research has advanced our understanding of the nature of the mechanical forces and resulting head and brain motion during TBI. However, many neuroscience-oriented laboratories lack guidance with respect to fundamental biomechanical principles of TBI. Here, we review key historical and current literature that is relevant to the investigation of TBI from clinical, physiological and biomechanical perspectives, and comment on how the current challenges associated with rodent TBI models, particularly those involving CHI, could be improved.

  7. Pedicle-Screw-Based Dynamic Systems and Degenerative Lumbar Diseases: Biomechanical and Clinical Experiences of Dynamic Fusion with Isobar TTL

    PubMed Central

    Barrey, Cédric; Perrin, Gilles; Champain, Sabina

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic systems in the lumbar spine are believed to reduce main fusion drawbacks such as pseudarthrosis, bone rarefaction, and mechanical failure. Compared to fusion achieved with rigid constructs, biomechanical studies underlined some advantages of dynamic instrumentation including increased load sharing between the instrumentation and interbody bone graft and stresses reduction at bone-to-screw interface. These advantages may result in increased fusion rates, limitation of bone rarefaction, and reduction of mechanical complications with the ultimate objective to reduce reoperations rates. However published clinical evidence for dynamic systems remains limited. In addition to providing biomechanical evaluation of a pedicle-screw-based dynamic system, the present study offers a long-term (average 10.2 years) insight view of the clinical outcomes of 18 patients treated by fusion with dynamic systems for degenerative lumbar spine diseases. The findings outline significant and stable symptoms relief, absence of implant-related complications, no revision surgery, and few adjacent segment degenerative changes. In spite of sample limitations, this is the first long-term report of outcomes of dynamic fusion that opens an interesting perspective for clinical outcomes of dynamic systems that need to be explored at larger scale. PMID:25031874

  8. Interstitial Lung Disease in Childhood: Clinical and Genetic Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Kitazawa, Hiroshi; Kure, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) in childhood is a heterogeneous group of rare pulmonary conditions presenting chronic respiratory disorders. Many clinical features of ILD still remain unclear, making the treatment strategies mainly investigative. Guidelines may provide physicians with an overview on the diagnosis and therapeutic directions. However, the criteria used in different clinical studies for the classification and diagnosis of ILDs are not always the same, making the development of guidelines difficult. Advances in genetic testing have thrown light on some etiologies of ILD, which were formerly classified as ILDs of unknown origins. The need of genetic testing for unexplained ILD is growing, and new classification criteria based on the etiology should be adopted to better understand the disease. The purpose of this review is to give an overview of the clinical and genetic aspects of ILD in children. PMID:26512209

  9. Good clinical practice: historical background and key aspects.

    PubMed

    Otte, Andreas; Maier-Lenz, Herbert; Dierckx, Rudi A

    2005-07-01

    Clinical research trials (both academic and industry sponsored) are increasingly playing a role in various medical disciplines, including younger fields of clinical trial interest, such as nuclear medicine research. Knowledge for and compliance with good clinical practice (GCP) is essential for anyone involved. In this review article, key aspects of GCP and the responsibilities of investigators, monitors and sponsors are described. In addition, a comprehensive overview of the historical background on the development of GCP from the US Pure Food and Drugs Act of 1906 over the Nuremberg Code, the Kefauver-Harris Amendments and the Declaration of Helsinki until now is given. Knowledge of the historical background may help understand the developments in GCP.

  10. The Clinical Biomechanics Award 2013 -- presented by the International Society of Biomechanics: new observations on the morphology of the talar dome and its relationship to ankle kinematics.

    PubMed

    Siegler, Sorin; Toy, Jason; Seale, Damani; Pedowitz, David

    2014-01-01

    Ankle passive kinematics is determined primarily by articular surface morphology and ligament constraints. Previous morphological studies concluded that the talar dome can be approximated by a truncated cone, whose apex is directed medially and whose major axis is the axis of rotation of the ankle. This and other functional morphology concepts were evaluated in this study whose goal was to describe and quantify the 3D morphology of the talus using 3D image-based bone models and engineering software tools. CT data from 26 healthy adults were processed to produce 3D renderings of the talus and were followed by morphological measurements including the radii of curvature of circles fitted to the medial and lateral borders of the trochlea and radii of curvature of coronal sections. The surfaces containing the medial and lateral borders of the trochlea are not parallel and the radius of curvature of the medial border is larger than the lateral border. In the coronal plane the trochlear surface was mostly concave. The trochlear surface can be modeled as a skewed truncated conic saddle shape with its apex oriented laterally rather than medially as postulated by Inman. Such shape is compatible, as opposed to Inman's cone postulate, with the observed pronation/supination and provides stable congruency in movements of inversion/eversion. The results challenge the fundamental theories of functional morphology of the ankle and suggest that these new findings should be considered in future biomechanical research and in clinical applications such as design of total ankle replacements. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Chronic cholesteatomatous otitis media: the histopathological and clinical aspects].

    PubMed

    Marcato, P; Giuritti, P; Pozzo, T; Vitiello, R; Valente, G; Giordano, C; Sartoris, A

    1991-01-01

    In recent years the immunologic aspects of the normal and pathological ear have been studied by several authors, with particular attention given to the histopathologic aspects of the epidermis of the tympanic membranes of the outer ear canal and of the middle ear mucosa in normal physiologic as well as in inflammatory conditions. Such studies may help in giving a more precise definition to the pathogenesis and clinical behavior of middle ear cholesteatoma. In this paper we report the results of an immunohistopathologic study carried out using the immunohistochemical technique of monoclonal antibodies on cholesteatoma matrix samples taken during radical mastoidectomy or tympanoplasty. In particular, the presence of T-lymphocytes and Langerhans cells was evaluated using selective monoclonal antibodies and a relationship between the data collected and the clinical expression of the disease in each case was sought. In this study it was not possible to establish a close relationship between clinical behavior and immunohistopathological findings, which appeared rather similar in all the cases. The presence of Langerhans' cells may confirm the hypothesized role they play in phlogistic reactions and bone reabsorption due to the presence of the cholesteatoma in the middle ear. Yet, in order to evaluate their true role correctly, more detailed studies should be carried out on the spatial distribution of T-lymphocytes and Langerhans' cells in the cholesteatoma matrix as well as on their ultrastructural characteristics.

  12. Medical ethics, clinical research, and special aspects in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Corrao, S; Arnone, G; Arnone, S; Baldari, S

    2004-09-01

    Medical ethics is the science of survival. It studies the working out of judgments on right or wrong referred to the human being as a biological entity interacting with the whole ecosystem. Medical ethics in clinical research raises numerous moral and technical issues. Methodological aspects are essential for carrying out the aim of clinical research. Medical ethics documents are inspired by the Nuremberg Code and culminate in the recently updated Helsinki Declaration of 1964. In Italy 2 ministerial decrees in 1997 and 1998 laid the basis for the work of a medical ethics committee. They acknowledge the European Good Clinical Practice Guidelines and set professional needs within ethical committees. In clinical research the use of ionising radiation merits special consideration. In the recent past, serious human rights abuses in radiation experiments of the 1950s and 1960s have been found. As regards research in this field we can refer to the publication of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and to the report of the World Health Organisation (WHO). Legislative decree no. 187 of May 26, 2000, which transposed the 97/43/ EURATOM Directive represents the most comprehensive and recent normative reference to clinical research using ionising radiation. However, law no. 39 of March 1, 2002 is important for the partial modifications of previous decrees (art. 108 of L.D. no. 230 of March 17, 1995 and, art. 4 and attachment III of L.D. no. 187 of May 26). In this paper medical ethics, research, methodological issues and aspects of ionizing radiation are discussed.

  13. [Key aspects in interpreting clinical trials in radiology].

    PubMed

    Díaz Gómez, L; García Villar, C; Seguro Fernández, Á

    2015-01-01

    A clinical trial is an experimental study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a treatment or diagnostic technique in human beings. To ensure the methodological quality of a clinical trial and the validity of its results, various checklists have been elaborated to identify biases that could invalidate its conclusions. This article focuses on the points we need to consider in the critical evaluation of a clinical trial. We can usually find this information in the "materials and methods" and "results" sections of articles. Randomization, follow-up (or analysis of losses), blinding, and equivalence between groups (apart from the intervention itself) are some key aspects related to design. In the "results" section, we need to consider what measures of clinical efficacy were used (relative risk, odds ratio, or number needed to treat, among others) and the precision of the results (confidence intervals). Once we have confirmed that the clinical trial fulfills these criteria, we need to determine whether the results can be applied in our environment and whether the benefits obtained justify the risks and costs involved.

  14. Blepharospasm: Update on Epidemiology, Clinical Aspects, and Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Valls-Sole, Josep; Defazio, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Blepharospasm (BSP) is a rather distressing form of focal dystonia. Although many aspects of its pathophysiological mechanisms are already known, we lack fundamental evidence on etiology, prevention, and treatment. To advance in our knowledge, we need to review what is already known in various aspects of the disorder and use these bases to find future lines of interest. Some of the signs observed in BSP are cause, while others are consequence of the disorder. Non-motor symptoms and signs may be a cue for understanding better the disease. Various cerebral sites have been shown to be functionally abnormal in BSP, including the basal ganglia, the cortex, and the cerebellum. However, we still do not know if the dysfunction or structural change affecting these brain regions is cause or consequence of BSP. Further advances in neurophysiology and neuroimaging may eventually clarify the pathophysiological mechanisms implicated. In this manuscript, we aim to update what is known regarding epidemiology, clinical aspects, and pathophysiology of the disorder and speculate on the directions of research worth pursuing in the near future. PMID:27064462

  15. Piezosurgery applied to implant dentistry: clinical and biological aspects.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Cassiano Costa Silva; Gealh, Walter Cristiano; Meorin-Nogueira, Lamis; Garcia-Júnior, Idelmo Rangel; Okamoto, Roberta

    2014-07-01

    Piezosurgery is a new and modern technique of bone surgery in implantology. Selective cutting is possible for different ultrasonic frequencies acting only in hard tissues (mineralized), saving vital anatomical structures. With the piezoelectric osteotomy technique, receptor site preparation for implants, autogenous bone graft acquistition (particles and blocks), osteotomy for alveolar bone crest expansion, maxillary sinus lifting, and dental implant removal can be performed accurately and safely, providing excellent clinical and biological results, especially for osteocyte viability. The aim of this review was, through literature review, to present clinical applications of piezosurgery in implant dentistry and outline their advantages and disadvantages over conventional surgical systems. Moreover, this study addressed the biological aspects related to piezosurgery that differentiate it from those of bone tissue approaches. Overall, piezosurgery enables critical operations in simple and fully executable procedures; and effectively, areas that are difficult to access have less risk of soft tissue and neurovascular tissue damage via piezosurgery.

  16. Diabetes in Cushing syndrome: basic and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Mazziotti, Gherardo; Gazzaruso, Carmine; Giustina, Andrea

    2011-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a frequent complication of Cushing syndrome (CS) which is caused by chronic exposure to glucocorticoid excess, either endogenous or exogenous, and that is characterized by several clinical symptoms such as central obesity, purple striae, proximal muscle weakness, acne, hirsutism and neuropsychological disturbances. Diabetes occurs as a consequence of an insulin-resistant state together with impaired insulin secretion which are induced by glucocorticoid excess. The management of patients with CS and diabetes mellitus includes the treatment of hyperglycemia and, when possible, the correction of glucocorticoid excess. This review focuses on the disorders of glucose metabolism in patients exposed to glucocorticoid excess, addressing both the pathophysiological aspects and the clinical and therapeutic implications.

  17. Early application of deep brain stimulation: clinical and ethical aspects.

    PubMed

    Woopen, Christiane; Pauls, K Amande M; Koy, Anne; Moro, Elena; Timmermann, Lars

    2013-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has proven to be a successful therapeutic approach in several patients with movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease and dystonia. Hitherto its application was mainly restricted to advanced disease patients resistant to medication or with severe treatment side effects. However, there is now growing interest in earlier application of DBS, aimed at improving clinical outcomes, quality of life, and avoiding psychosocial consequences of chronic disease-related impairments. We address the clinical and ethical aspects of two "early" uses of DBS, (1) DBS early in the course of the disease, and (2) DBS early in life (i.e. in children). Possible benefits, risks and burdens are discussed and thoroughly considered. Further research is needed to obtain a careful balance between exposing vulnerable patients to potential severe surgical risks and excluding them from a potentially good outcome.

  18. [Paraneoplastic syndromes: pathogenetic theories, clinical aspects and therapeutic approach].

    PubMed

    Ngonga, Gaelle Flore Ketchandja; Ferrari, Daniela; Lorusso, Lorenzo; Gasparetto, Chiara; Neznama, Eva; D'Abramo, Manuela; Ricevuti, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes are uncommon diseases with different pathogenesis and clinical manifestations, correlated with neoplasms but not due to the tumor, metastasis or other distant effects. The aim of the present article is to describe the main paraneoplastic syndromes (neurological, endocrine-metabolic, rheumatological, osteo-articular, dermatological, hematological, vascular and nephrological), the associated pathogenetic theories (theory of the common embryonal sketches, theory of reactivation of the information and autoimmune theory) and the most important therapeutic approaches, on the basis of the literature. Experimental works, reviews and clinical observations, in some cases still in progress, regarding the described syndromes, their pathogenesis and their therapeutic approach have been examined. No meta-analyses regarding paraneoplastic syndromes have been published in the literature. The better described pathogenesis is the autoimmune one, characteristic of neurological, nephrologic and some dermatologic syndromes, for which the clinical and laboratory findings have been well supported. The pathogenetic theories associated with the other syndromes have been correlated on the basis of the literature. Paraneoplastic syndromes are important because their identification permits an early diagnosis of tumors and rapid treatment, with a largely improved prognosis and life expectancy for the patient. They often represent the only signal of a silent neoplasm; sometimes they precede the tumor itself. More studies are necessary for a better definition of their clinical aspects and pathogenesis and to delineate standard guidelines for a diagnostic-therapeutic approach to these diseases.

  19. Feasibility study of using viscoplastic bone cement for vertebroplasty: an in vivo clinical trial and in vitro cadaveric biomechanical examination.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Wei; Chiang, Chun-Kai; Yang, Chi-Lin; Wang, Jaw-Lin

    2010-05-01

    An in vivo clinical trial, and an in vitro cadaveric biomechanical and micromorphologic analysis. To find the feasibility of using viscoplastic bone cement for vertebroplasty. Vertebroplasty involved in bone cement reinforcement of fractured vertebra has shown promising clinical results. The most frequently observed complication of vertebroplasty is the cement leakage during surgery. Many methods were proposed and were successful at reducing the risk of leakage, such as creating a void within vertebra to reduce the injection pressure, increasing the cement viscosity to reduce the cement infiltration, etc. Nevertheless, a more cost-effective and safer surgery method is still the goal for many spine surgeons and researchers. To deliver the viscoplastic bone cement into the vertebra, a unipedicular tract and a void in the vertebra was created using a curette. The viscoplastic bone cement was then delivered into the void piece by piece and tamped for compactness with a blunt end tool. For the in vitro biomechanical test, 7 thoracic vertebrae were used. The intact specimens were compressed to lose 25% of its intact height, and then augmented with viscoplastic bone cement. Postaugmentation CT scanning was taken to examine the cement distribution, leakage path, and cement filling ratio within the vertebra. Postaugmentation compression test was conducted to examine the vertebral strength and stiffness, and then compared with the intact ones. Finally, the vertebrae were cut into slices for micromorphologic analysis. The 6 in vivo clinical trials were all successfully operated with significant pain relief and showed no leakage during and after the surgery. The in vitro biomechanical test showed the cement augmentation significantly increased the vertebral strength (pre 3164 (229) N vs. post 3905 (484) N, P < 0.003), but tentatively decreased the vertebral stiffness (pre 1074 (74) N/mm vs. post 801 (370) N/mm, P = 0.081). The postaugmentation CT scanning showed the cement was

  20. The appropriate use of radiography in clinical practice: a report of two cases of biomechanical versus malignant spine pain

    PubMed Central

    Pringle, Roger Kevin; Wyatt, Lawrence H

    2006-01-01

    Background To describe the evaluation, treatment, management and referral of two patients with back pain with an eventual malignant etiology, who were first thought to have a non-organic biomechanical disorder. Clinical features The study was a retrospective review of the clinical course of two patients seen by a chiropractor in a multi-disciplinary outpatient facility, who presented with what was thought to be non-organic biomechanical spine pain. Clinical examination by both medical and chiropractic physicians did not indicate the need for radiography in the early course of management of either patient. Upon subsequent re-evaluation, it was decided that certain clinical factors required investigation with advanced imaging. In one instance, the patient responded to conservative care of low back pain for nine weeks, after which she developed severe pain in the pelvis. In the second case, the patient presented with signs and symptoms consistent with uncomplicated musculoskeletal pain that failed to respond to a course of conservative care. He was referred for medical therapy which also failed to relieve his pain. In both patients, malignancy was eventually discovered with magnetic resonance imaging and both patients are now deceased, resulting in an inability to obtain informed consent for the publication of this manuscript. Conclusion In these two cases, the prudent use of diagnostic plain film radiography did not significantly alter the appropriate long-term management of patients with neuromusculoskeletal signs and symptoms. The judicious use of magnetic resonance imaging was an effective procedure when investigating recalcitrant neuromusculoskeletal pain in these two patients. PMID:16734899

  1. Biomechanics of occlusion--implications for oral rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Peck, C C

    2016-03-01

    The dental occlusion is an important aspect of clinical dentistry; there are diverse functional demands ranging from highly precise tooth contacts to large crushing forces. Further, there are dogmatic, passionate and often diverging views on the relationship between the dental occlusion and various diseases and disorders including temporomandibular disorders, non-carious cervical lesions and tooth movement. This study provides an overview of the biomechanics of the masticatory system in the context of the dental occlusion's role in function. It explores the adaptation and precision of dental occlusion, its role in bite force, jaw movement, masticatory performance and its influence on the oro-facial musculoskeletal system. Biomechanics helps us better understand the structure and function of biological systems and consequently an understanding of the forces on, and displacements of, the dental occlusion. Biomechanics provides insight into the relationships between the dentition, jaws, temporomandibular joints, and muscles. Direct measurements of tooth contacts and forces are difficult, and biomechanical models have been developed to better understand the relationship between the occlusion and function. Importantly, biomechanical research will provide knowledge to help correct clinical misperceptions and inform better patient care. The masticatory system demonstrates a remarkable ability to adapt to a changing biomechanical environment and changes to the dental occlusion or other components of the musculoskeletal system tend to be well tolerated. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Mid- to Long-term Clinical Outcome and Gait Biomechanics After Realignment Surgery in Asymmetric Ankle Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Nüesch, Corina; Huber, Cora; Paul, Jochen; Henninger, Heath B; Pagenstert, Geert; Valderrabano, Victor; Barg, Alexej

    2015-08-01

    Joint-preserving, realignment surgical procedures have gained increasing popularity as treatment of asymmetric early- and mid-stage ankle osteoarthritis. The aim of the present study was to quantify bilateral gait biomechanics in patients who underwent ankle realignment surgery by supramalleolar osteotomies. Eight patients, a minimum of 7 years after realignment surgery, and 8 healthy controls were included in this study. Three-dimensional instrumented gait analysis was used to assess spatiotemporal parameters, bilateral joint angles, and moments. Furthermore, a clinical evaluation on pain, ankle function, and quality of life was performed. Compared with the healthy controls, the patients walked more slowly, had a smaller sagittal hindfoot range of motion on their affected leg, and had a lower peak ankle dorsiflexion moment (P < .05). There were no significant differences compared with controls for the ranges of motion in the foot segments of the nonaffected foot and for the knee and hip joint ranges of motion and peak moments of both legs. Additionally, patients and controls did not differ in the quality of life score. However, in the pain subscore, the patients reported significantly more pain than the healthy persons. Despite different gait biomechanics of the affected foot after ankle realignment surgery, the quality of life for patients was comparable to that of healthy controls. Therefore, supramalleolar osteotomies should be considered as a promising treatment option in patients with asymmetric non-end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. Level III, comparative study. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. [Biomechanical evaluation and clinical correlation of 3 methods of internal fixation of metacarpophalangeal arthrodesis of the thumb].

    PubMed

    Leroux, M; Harris, P; Fowles, J V; Boudreault, F; Yahia, L

    1998-01-01

    Three methods of internal fixation for MCP arthrodesis of fifteen cadaveric thumbs were used to analyze the biomechanical stability by applying a palmar force, lateral force, and torsion moment. The techniques used included two K-wires 0.045 in parallel (BK), 2 cerclage metallic wires #25 perpendicular to each other (CP), and a 6-holes plate and screws construct from Synthes (PV). The initial rigidity was measured using a Bionix MTS-858. The results after statistical analysis showed: 1) CP was just as rigid as PV for the palmar and lateral tests; 2) CP was, overall, superior to BK in palmar and lateral tests; 3) no difference existed in torsion between the three types of fixation. A comparison was done between the rigidity of the fixation techniques used and the rates of bony nonunion found in the literature. The mean rates of nonunion were reported to be 0-4.0% for the following techniques: CP, tension band wiring (TB), plate and screws, external fixation, compression screw. The rates of nonunion were higher, 7.5-12.5%, for BK, cerclages not perpendicular (CM), bone pegs. According to the results of this biomechanical study and the review of the literature, fixation with BK is the least rigid, and fixation with CP is just as rigid as with PV. The success clinically of CP is yet to be demonstrated. Other studies on the properties of CP for fatigue would be necessary to give a better analysis.

  4. Feline cowpoxvirus infections in Germany: clinical and epidemiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Appl, Caroline; von Bomhard, Wolf; Hanczaruk, Matthias; Meyer, Hermann; Bettenay, Sonya; Mueller, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Clinical and epidemiological aspects of cats with cowpox in Germany from the years 2004 to 2010 are described and discussed. Questionnaires were sent to veterinarians and owners of affected cats identified with the help of a number of pathology laboratories. Of 69 mailed questionnaires, 45 veterinary and 26 owner questionnaires were returned and a total of 46 feline poxcases were evaluated. The cases were distributed all over Germany although there was an accumulation of cases in specific geographic areas. The clinical and epidemiological observations match those of other studies. The majority of cats were outdoor cats, came from a rural environment and developed clinical signs in late summer or autumn. All cats showed skin lesions which were predominantly localized on the anterior part of the body, 61% of the cats showed other clinical signs in addition to the skin lesions. Approximately half of the cats lived in a multi-pet household, but in only one case clinical signs typical for cowpox were observed in another cat of the household. In two cases a cat-to-human transmission was assumed. In addition, to evaluate the prevalence of pox virus infections in outdoor cats in areas with previous reports of such infections, 92 apparently unaffected outdoor cats were tested for orthopoxvirus antibodies using an indirect immunofluorescence assay. Sixteen (17%) of the tested serum samples were seropositive against orthopoxvirus (titre between 1:20 and 1:40).This is a higher serum prevalence than in previously published studies from Germany. A possible explanation is selection of a population of outdoor cats from regions with previous known clinical cases.

  5. Inertial Measures of Motion for Clinical Biomechanics: Comparative Assessment of Accuracy under Controlled Conditions – Changes in Accuracy over Time

    PubMed Central

    Lebel, Karina; Boissy, Patrick; Hamel, Mathieu; Duval, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background Interest in 3D inertial motion tracking devices (AHRS) has been growing rapidly among the biomechanical community. Although the convenience of such tracking devices seems to open a whole new world of possibilities for evaluation in clinical biomechanics, its limitations haven’t been extensively documented. The objectives of this study are: 1) to assess the change in absolute and relative accuracy of multiple units of 3 commercially available AHRS over time; and 2) to identify different sources of errors affecting AHRS accuracy and to document how they may affect the measurements over time. Methods This study used an instrumented Gimbal table on which AHRS modules were carefully attached and put through a series of velocity-controlled sustained motions including 2 minutes motion trials (2MT) and 12 minutes multiple dynamic phases motion trials (12MDP). Absolute accuracy was assessed by comparison of the AHRS orientation measurements to those of an optical gold standard. Relative accuracy was evaluated using the variation in relative orientation between modules during the trials. Findings Both absolute and relative accuracy decreased over time during 2MT. 12MDP trials showed a significant decrease in accuracy over multiple phases, but accuracy could be enhanced significantly by resetting the reference point and/or compensating for initial Inertial frame estimation reference for each phase. Interpretation The variation in AHRS accuracy observed between the different systems and with time can be attributed in part to the dynamic estimation error, but also and foremost, to the ability of AHRS units to locate the same Inertial frame. Conclusions Mean accuracies obtained under the Gimbal table sustained conditions of motion suggest that AHRS are promising tools for clinical mobility assessment under constrained conditions of use. However, improvement in magnetic compensation and alignment between AHRS modules are desirable in order for AHRS to reach their

  6. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: clinical, metabolic, genetic and pathophysiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Stephan; Berger, Johannes; Aubourg, Patrick

    2012-09-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is the most frequent peroxisomal disease. The two main clinical phenotypes of X-ALD are adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) and inflammatory cerebral ALD that manifests either in children or more rarely in adults. About 65% of heterozygote females develop symptoms by the age of 60years. Mutations in the ABCD1 gene affect the function of the encoded protein ALDP, an ATP-binding-cassette (ABC) transporter located in the peroxisomal membrane protein. ALDP deficiency impairs the peroxisomal beta-oxidation of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) and facilitates their further chain elongation by ELOVL1 resulting in accumulation of VLCFA in plasma and tissues. While all patients have mutations in the ABCD1 gene, there is no general genotype-phenotype correlation. Environmental factors and a multitude of modifying genes appear to determine the clinical manifestation in this monogenetic but multifactorial disease. This review focuses on the clinical, biochemical, genetic and pathophysiological aspects of X-ALD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cutaneous field cancerization: clinical, histopathological and therapeutic aspects*

    PubMed Central

    Torezan, Luís Antônio Ribeiro; Festa-Neto, Cyro

    2013-01-01

    The concept of "field cancerization" was first introduced by Slaughter in 1953 when studying the presence of histologically abnormal tissue surrounding oral squamous cell carcinoma. It was proposed to explain the development of multiple primary tumors and locally recurrent cancer. Organ systems in which field cancerization has been described since then are: head and neck (oral cavity, oropharynx, and larynx), lung, vulva, esophagus, cervix, breast, skin, colon, and bladder. Recent molecular studies support the carcinogenesis model in which the development of a field with genetically altered cells plays a central role. An important clinical implication is that fields often remain after the surgery for the primary tumor and may lead to new cancers, designated presently as "a second primary tumor" or "local recurrence," depending on the exact site and time interval. In conclusion, the development of an expanding pre-neoplastic field appears to be a critical step in epithelial carcinogenesis with important clinical consequences. Diagnosis and treatment of epithelial cancers should not only be focused on the tumor but also on the field from which it developed. The most important etiopathogenetic, clinical, histopathological and therapeutic aspects of field cancerization are reviewed in this article. PMID:24173184

  8. The coronary sinus reducer: clinical evidence and technical aspects.

    PubMed

    Giannini, Francesco; Aurelio, Andrea; Jabbour, Richard J; Ferri, Luca; Colombo, Antonio; Latib, Azeem

    2017-01-01

    Chronic refractory angina is often a disabling condition, predominantly due to severe obstructive coronary artery disease, that is inadequately controlled by optimal medical therapy and not amenable to further percutaneous or surgical revascularization. mortality rates associated with this condition are relatively low in clinically stable patients. however, it is associated with a high hospitalization rate and a reduction in both exercise capacity and quality of life. due to the paucity of available treatment options, there is an unmet need for new therapies for these patients and for a reduction in the associated economic healthcare burden. Areas covered: This review is focusing on the clinical evidence and technical aspects of this new therapeutic modality in refractory angina patients unsuitable for revascularization. Expert commentary: The Coronary Sinus Reducer (Neovasc Inc. Richmond B.C., Canada) is a new percutaneous device designed to achieve a controlled narrowing of the coronary sinus that may alleviate myocardial ischemia, possibly by redistributing blood from the less ischemic sub-epicardium to the more ischemic sub-endocardium, or by neoangiogenesis. Recently, a randomized, double-blind, multi-center clinical trial demonstrated a benefit in improving symptoms in 104 refractory angina patients, when compared to placebo.

  9. [Ethical aspects of clinical trials in rare diseases].

    PubMed

    Hasford, Joerg; Koch, Armin

    2017-03-08

    It is estimated that there are about four million people suffering from rare diseases in Germany. For roughly the last 20 years, there has been an increasing interest in therapeutic research for rare diseases. Drug research is highly regulated via numerous laws, regulations and ethical conventions that do not offer any waivers for clinical trials in rare diseases. Thus the ethical assessment of the clinical trial application for a rare disease is basically the same as for a common disease. As the ethical standards of clinical research, for example regarding informed consent, are derived from constitutional rights and have been codified in the German drug law, it is no surprise that they cannot depend on the frequency of a disease. A very important aspect of the ethical assessment is the biometric quality with regard to study design, sample size estimation and statistical analysis, as methodologically poor research with humans is per se unethical. Problems with sample size estimations and pilot studies will be addressed in more detail. Pilot studies should be avoided and sample size estimations should not assume overoptimistic effect sizes and should not increase the error probability beyond 5% two-sided.

  10. Dermatophytosis in animals: epidemiological, clinical and zoonotic aspects.

    PubMed

    Moretti, A; Agnetti, F; Mancianti, F; Nardoni, S; Righi, C; Moretta, I; Morganti, G; Papini, M

    2013-12-01

    Dermatophytosis are the most frequent fungal infections of pets and livestock and play an important role in animal and human health due to their zoonotic potential. Another important aspect of these infections is linked to the economic consequences in farm animal and fur production systems. An overview of dermatophytosis in animals is described in this paper. Epidemiological, clinical and zoonotic aspects are addressed, considering individual species, both pets and farmed animals. In particular, most recent investigations in the field of animal mycology, carried out in Central Italy, are reported, with particular reference to rabbit, ruminants, horse, dog, cat and some wild species. The information in this article show how dermatophytes infect a wide range of animals which may be in contact with human beings either directly or indirectly. Consequently they are frequently a source of infection for human beings who, vice versa, may sometimes become contagious for animals. Fungal pathogens derive their power to spread from contamination of the animal's habitat - whether the animal is a conventional pet or not, a farm animal or living in the wild. Thus if treatment of the animal or human patient is to achieve optimal efficacy, it needs to be associated with adequate environmental measures.

  11. X-linked creatine transporter deficiency: clinical aspects and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    van de Kamp, Jiddeke M; Mancini, Grazia M; Salomons, Gajja S

    2014-09-01

    Creatine transporter deficiency was discovered in 2001 as an X-linked cause of intellectual disability characterized by cerebral creatine deficiency. This review describes the current knowledge regarding creatine metabolism, the creatine transporter and the clinical aspects of creatine transporter deficiency. The condition mainly affects the brain while other creatine requiring organs, such as the muscles, are relatively spared. Recent studies have provided strong evidence that creatine synthesis also occurs in the brain, leading to the intriguing question of why cerebral creatine is deficient in creatine transporter deficiency. The possible mechanisms explaining the cerebral creatine deficiency are discussed. The creatine transporter knockout mouse provides a good model to study the disease. Over the past years several treatment options have been explored but no treatment has been proven effective. Understanding the pathogenesis of creatine transporter deficiency is of paramount importance in the development of an effective treatment.

  12. [Basilar ectasia and stroke: clinical aspects of 21 cases].

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, R de M; Cardeal, J O; Lima, J G

    1997-09-01

    Ectasia of the basilar artery (EB) occurs when its diameter is greater than normal along all or part of its course, and/or when it is abnormally tortuous. EB may cause cranial nerve dysfunction, ischemic stroke or subarachnoid hemorrhage, pseudotumor or hydrocephalus. We tried to describe cases of stroke associated with EB, analyze its frequency, clinical aspects, and the mechanisms involved in different forms of its presentation. We found 21 patients with stroke and EB. The association between EB and stroke was more prevalent in males over the age of fifty. Main symptoms were hemiparesia, cranial nerves dysfunction, and cerebellar ataxia. Cerebral infarcts associated with EB were due to different mechanisms: arterial thrombosis, artery-to-artery embolism, mass effect with angulation and obstruction of the vertebral and basilar branches.

  13. Immigration and hepatitis B virus: epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic aspects.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, E; Scotto, G; Cibelli, D C; Faleo, G; Saracin, A; Angarano, G

    2008-01-01

    This study in Italy aimed to evaluate the epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic aspects of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in a population of recent (< 6 months) immigrants. Between February 2003 and December 2004, 83 (9.3%) out of 890 immigrants tested positive for hepatitis B surface antigen. All were men and 62.6% came-from Africa, 21.6% from Asia and 16.8% from Eastern Europe. About half (54.3%) of the patients had elevated alanine aminotransferase levels and detectable serum HBV DNA. Genotype distribution was as follows: E (20 cases), D (14 cases) and A (11 cases). Our study underscores the potential of migratory flow to introduce genotype non-D hepatitis B virus into our country.

  14. [Clinical and neuropathological aspects of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome].

    PubMed

    Zubaran, C; Fernandes, J; Martins, F; Souza, J; Machado, R; Cadore, M

    1996-12-01

    Alcohol abuse is one of most serious problems in public health and the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome one of the gravest consequences of alcoholism. The pathology is often undiagnosed in its less evident presentations, therefore an accurate diagnostic approach is a critical step in planning treatment. Besides new pharmacological proposals, treatment is based on the restoration of thiamine, although this is insufficient to prevent the psychological decline of a great number of patients. The cognitive impact of the pathology is derived from the interaction of alcoholic neurotoxicity, thiamine deficiency and personal susceptibility. In this article the history, epidemiology, clinical and neuropathological features of the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, as well as some aspects of its treatment and prognosis, are described.

  15. Proximal Hamstring Tendinopathy: Clinical Aspects of Assessment and Management.

    PubMed

    Goom, Thomas S H; Malliaras, Peter; Reiman, Michael P; Purdam, Craig R

    2016-06-01

    Synopsis Proximal hamstring tendinopathy (PHT) typically manifests as deep buttock pain at the hamstring common origin. Both athletic and nonathletic populations are affected by PHT. Pain and dysfunction are often long-standing and limit sporting and daily functions. There is limited evidence regarding diagnosis, assessment, and management; for example, there are no randomized controlled trials investigating rehabilitation of PHT. Some of the principles of management established in, for example, Achilles and patellar tendinopathy would appear to apply to PHT but are not as well documented. This narrative review and commentary will highlight clinical aspects of assessment and management of PHT, drawing on the available evidence and current principles of managing painful tendinopathy. The management outline presented aims to guide clinicians as well as future research. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(6):483-493. Epub 15 Apr 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.5986.

  16. [Clinical, laboratory and therapeutics aspects of Sheehan's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Soares, Débora Vieira; Conceição, Flávia Lúcia; Vaisman, Mário

    2008-07-01

    Sheehan's syndrome is characterized by hypopituitarism that occurs as a result of ischemic pituitary necrosis due to severe postpartum hemorrhage. Nowadays it is not usually seen in developed countries because of the improvements in obstetric care. However, in developing countries it is still frequent and probably one of the most common causes of hypopituitarism. Most patients usually present it months to years later, with a history of failure of postpartum lactation, failure to resume menses and other signs of panhypopituitarism. In mild forms of the disease, patients may remain undetected and do not receive treatment for many years. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are important to reduce the morbimortality of the patients with Sheehan's syndrome. The aim of this review is to describe clinical, laboratory and therapeutic aspects of Sheehan's syndrome, including our experience in the replacement of recombinant GH in these patients.

  17. Clinical, Biomechanical, and Anatomic Investigation of Colles Fascia and Pubic Ramus Periosteum for Use During Medial Thighplasty.

    PubMed

    Carney, Martin J; Matatov, Tim; Freeman, Matthew; Miller, John; Vemula, Rahul; Schuster, Jason; Dancisak, Michael; Lindsey, John; Rae, Guenevere

    2017-06-01

    The medial thighplasty is a procedure where patients may attain superior mobility, hygiene, and cosmesis. Most surgeons use attachment of the superficial fascial system (SFS) of the thigh flap to the Colles fascia, whereas others attach the SFS to the pubic ramus periosteum. Because of a high complication profile, we aim to elucidate the clinical, biomechanical, and anatomic qualities of the Colles fascia versus the pubic ramus periosteum. We performed a 17-year retrospective review documenting clinical complications, a biomechanical analysis of sutures placed in different tissue layers of the thigh, and a histologic analysis surrounding the ischiopubic ramus. Separate suture pull-out strength testing was conducted on cadaveric tissue using an Admet MTEST Quattro with no. 1 Vicryl suture and tissue grips at a displacement rate of 2.12 mm/s. Simultaneous displacement and force were acquired at 100 Hz and with measurements obtained at regular intervals between the pubic symphysis and the ischial tuberosity in both the Colles fascia and the deeper periosteal layers of the thigh. A histologic analysis was performed at 3 points along the ischiopubic ramus using paraffin-embedded large mount tissue sections stained with hematoxylin, eosin, and Gomori trichrome. Thirty-nine patients underwent medial thighplasty with a 46.16% complication rate. Suture pull-out force of the suspected superficial Colles fascia sites was, on average, 72.8% less than values from the deeper periosteum tissue. Anchor points in the Colles fascia elongated 17.4% further before failure than those in the periosteum. There was noticeable variability between anchor points and across samples. The histologic sections suggest that the Colles fascia from the different regions of the ischiopubic ramus varies considerably in both continuity and collagen fiber content with no discernible pattern. The periosteal and muscular fascial layers were more continuous histologically with direct attachments into the

  18. Psoas Major: a case report and review of its anatomy, biomechanics, and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Sajko, Sandy; Stuber, Kent

    2009-01-01

    A 25-year-old male professional hockey player with right sided hip pain was diagnosed with myofascopathy of the right psoas major and rectus femoris. The patient maintained a conservative treatment regimen and was prescribed a four week active strengthening program. The program progressed from resisted concentric exercise to eccentric abduction/adduction exercises along with balance training, core stabilizing and endurance exercises in the first two weeks. In the final two weeks the program progressed to include sport specific exercises. At three weeks the patient was able to participate in non-contact practice and was clear for full contact at five weeks. The anatomy, biomechanics, and function of the psoas major muscle are discussed as is its influence on lumbar spine stability. Evidence-based evaluation and management strategies for psoas dysfunction are presented. PMID:20037696

  19. Plaque hemorrhage in carotid artery disease: Pathogenesis, clinical and biomechanical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Zhongzhao; Sadat, Umar; Brown, Adam J.; Gillard, Jonathan H.

    2014-01-01

    Stroke remains the most prevalent disabling illness today, with internal carotid artery luminal stenosis due to atheroma formation responsible for the majority of ischemic cerebrovascular events. Severity of luminal stenosis continues to dictate both patient risk stratification and the likelihood of surgical intervention. But there is growing evidence to suggest that plaque morphology may help improve pre-existing risk stratification criteria. Plaque components such a fibrous tissue, lipid rich necrotic core and calcium have been well investigated but plaque hemorrhage (PH) has been somewhat overlooked. In this review we discuss the pathogenesis of PH, its role in dictating plaque vulnerability, PH imaging techniques, marterial properties of atherosclerotic tissues, in particular, those obtained based on in vivo measurements and effect of PH in modulating local biomechanics. PMID:24485514

  20. [Dynamic instrumentation of the lumbar spine. Clinical and biomechanical analysis of success factors].

    PubMed

    Charles, Y P; Walter, A; Schuller, S; Steib, J-P

    2011-08-01

    Total disc replacement and posterior dynamic stabilization represent alternatives to lumbar spinal fusion which should reduce the risk of adjacent segment degeneration. Disc replacement is indicated for pure discopathy without facet joint degeneration. Spinopelvic balance influences the implant's biomechanics. Therefore pelvic incidence, sacral slope, segmental lordosis and the mean axis of rotation need to be considered. Dynamic stabilization is indicated in moderate discopathy and facet joint degeneration, in degenerative spondylolisthesis grade I with a hypermobile segment and in dynamic lumbar stenosis. The combination of caudal fusion and cranial dynamic stabilization allows a better maintenance of lordosis with multiple level instrumentation and prevents adjacent segment degeneration. If pelvic incidence and sacral slope are high, L5-S1 should be fused because of elevated shear forces.

  1. Inertial Measures of Motion for Clinical Biomechanics: Comparative Assessment of Accuracy under Controlled Conditions - Effect of Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Lebel, Karina; Boissy, Patrick; Hamel, Mathieu; Duval, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Background Inertial measurement of motion with Attitude and Heading Reference Systems (AHRS) is emerging as an alternative to 3D motion capture systems in biomechanics. The objectives of this study are: 1) to describe the absolute and relative accuracy of multiple units of commercially available AHRS under various types of motion; and 2) to evaluate the effect of motion velocity on the accuracy of these measurements. Methods The criterion validity of accuracy was established under controlled conditions using an instrumented Gimbal table. AHRS modules were carefully attached to the center plate of the Gimbal table and put through experimental static and dynamic conditions. Static and absolute accuracy was assessed by comparing the AHRS orientation measurement to those obtained using an optical gold standard. Relative accuracy was assessed by measuring the variation in relative orientation between modules during trials. Findings Evaluated AHRS systems demonstrated good absolute static accuracy (mean error < 0.5o) and clinically acceptable absolute accuracy under condition of slow motions (mean error between 0.5o and 3.1o). In slow motions, relative accuracy varied from 2o to 7o depending on the type of AHRS and the type of rotation. Absolute and relative accuracy were significantly affected (p<0.05) by velocity during sustained motions. The extent of that effect varied across AHRS. Interpretation Absolute and relative accuracy of AHRS are affected by environmental magnetic perturbations and conditions of motions. Relative accuracy of AHRS is mostly affected by the ability of all modules to locate the same global reference coordinate system at all time. Conclusions Existing AHRS systems can be considered for use in clinical biomechanics under constrained conditions of use. While their individual capacity to track absolute motion is relatively consistent, the use of multiple AHRS modules to compute relative motion between rigid bodies needs to be optimized according to

  2. Tourette syndrome: clinical and psychological aspects of 250 cases.

    PubMed

    Comings, D E; Comings, B G

    1985-05-01

    Tourette syndrome is a common hereditary neuropsychiatric disorder consisting of multiple tics and vocal noises. We summarize here clinical aspects of 250 consecutive cases seen over a period of 3 years. The sex ratio was four males to one female, and the mean age of onset was 6.9 years. Only 10% were Jewish, indicating that it is not more prevalent in Ashkenazi Jews. Only 33% had compulsive swearing (coprolalia), indicating that this is not necessary for the diagnosis. The most frequent initial symptoms were rapid eye-blinking, facial grimacing, and throat-clearing. In this series, it was clear that Tourette syndrome is a psychiatric as well as a neurological disorder. Significant discipline problems and/or problems with anger and violence occurred in 61%, and 54% had attention-deficit disorder with hyperactivity. Some degree of exhibitionism was present in 15.9% of males and 6.1% of females. Obsessive-compulsive behavior was seen in 32%. Other than tics and vocal noises, the most common parental complaints were of short temper and everything being a confrontation. There were no significant clinical differences between familial and sporadic cases. Whenever a child presents with a learning disorder, attention-deficit disorder, or significant discipline or emotional problems, the parents should be questioned about the presence of tics or vocal noises in the patient and other family members.

  3. Forensic psychiatric nursing: skills and competencies: II clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Mason, T; Coyle, D; Lovell, A

    2008-03-01

    This study reports on research undertaken to identify the skills and competencies of forensic psychiatric nurses working in secure psychiatric services in the UK. The rationale for this research is the lack of clarity in the role definition of nurses working in these environments and the specific content that may underscore the curriculum for training forensic nurses. Over 3300 questionnaires were distributed to forensic psychiatric nurses, non-forensic psychiatric nurses and other disciplines and information obtained on (1) the perceived clinical problems that give forensic nurses the most difficulty; (2) the skills best suited to overcome those problems; and (3) the priority aspects of clinical nursing care that needs to be developed. A 35% response rate was obtained with 1019 forensic psychiatric nurses, 110 non-forensic psychiatric nurses and 43 other disciplines. The results highlighted a 'top ten' list of main problems with possible solutions and main areas for development. The conclusions drawn include a focus on skills and competencies regarding the management of personality disorders and the management of violence and aggression.

  4. [Autism in females: clinical, neurobiological and genetic aspects].

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, V L; Arberas, C L

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders are more prevalent in males than in females, and the proportion can range from 1.4 to 1, depending on the samples that are analysed. The smaller difference has been related to those who also manifest an associated intellectual disability, and it is accepted that in those cases females are far more seriously affected. There is likely to be a subregister of females with autism spectrum disorder, especially in those who have high cognitive performance, that is possibly related with the assessment techniques that are used and even with the lack of suitable levels of arousal in girls. In general, females with autism have better early language development, better social skills and their playing can even develop in the expected way. Their interests can be similar to those of their peer group, although they usually vary in intensity and quality. It is accepted as a fact that the difference in the social skills becomes more apparent in adolescence. The extreme male brain theory, the female-specific protective factor, variants in brain plasticity (lower threshold in males with greater susceptibility) and genetic and epigenetic factors, among others, are put forward as possible hypotheses to justify this lower prevalence and the clinical variants in females. This work aims to analyse the clinical and developmental aspects, the variability of expression in females with respect to males, and some of the possible neurobiological and genetic bases that account for the higher prevalence and the differences in expression.

  5. Clinical and cytopathological aspects in phyllodes tumors of the breast.

    PubMed

    Pătraşcu, Anca; Popescu, Carmen Florina; Pleşea, I E; Bădulescu, Adriana; Tănase, Florentina; Mateescu, Garofiţa

    2009-01-01

    The frequency of mesenchymal breast tumors is very low, being represented mostly by tumors with biphasic proliferation (phyllodes tumors) and less by other types of non-epithelial tumors. From clinical point of view, phyllodes tumors (PT) can mimic a breast carcinoma. Therefore, the preoperative diagnosis by cytological examination on material obtained by fine needle aspiration (FNA) is very important for adequate treatment of these tumors. In current study, we assessed clinical aspects of 79 phyllodes tumors regarding patient's age and localization of the tumors. In 17 out of 79 cases, it has been performed FNA within the tumors with further cytological examination on the smears obtained. The median age of the patients was 46.07-year-old, being progressively higher with grade of the tumors with significant values between benign and borderline tumors (p=0.04954) and between benign and malignant ones (p=0.02890). The distinguish on the smears of stromal fragments and naked stromal nuclei with variable grade of atypia regarding the tumoral type, in detriment of epithelial elements have been conclusive for fibroepithelial lesion as cytopathological diagnosis. The preoperative differentiation between a breast phyllodes tumor and a breast carcinoma is extremely important for avoiding of a useless radical surgery for the patient. If the fine needle aspiration was correctly performed, the accuracy of the cytodiagnosis has been 82% in current study.

  6. Tourette syndrome: clinical and psychological aspects of 250 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Comings, D E; Comings, B G

    1985-01-01

    Tourette syndrome is a common hereditary neuropsychiatric disorder consisting of multiple tics and vocal noises. We summarize here clinical aspects of 250 consecutive cases seen over a period of 3 years. The sex ratio was four males to one female, and the mean age of onset was 6.9 years. Only 10% were Jewish, indicating that it is not more prevalent in Ashkenazi Jews. Only 33% had compulsive swearing (coprolalia), indicating that this is not necessary for the diagnosis. The most frequent initial symptoms were rapid eye-blinking, facial grimacing, and throat-clearing. In this series, it was clear that Tourette syndrome is a psychiatric as well as a neurological disorder. Significant discipline problems and/or problems with anger and violence occurred in 61%, and 54% had attention-deficit disorder with hyperactivity. Some degree of exhibitionism was present in 15.9% of males and 6.1% of females. Obsessive-compulsive behavior was seen in 32%. Other than tics and vocal noises, the most common parental complaints were of short temper and everything being a confrontation. There were no significant clinical differences between familial and sporadic cases. Whenever a child presents with a learning disorder, attention-deficit disorder, or significant discipline or emotional problems, the parents should be questioned about the presence of tics or vocal noises in the patient and other family members. PMID:3859204

  7. Primordial dwarfism: overview of clinical and genetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Khetarpal, Preeti; Das, Satrupa; Panigrahi, Inusha; Munshi, Anjana

    2016-02-01

    Primordial dwarfism is a group of genetic disorders which include Seckel Syndrome, Silver-Russell Syndrome, Microcephalic Osteodysplastic Primordial Dwarfism types I/III, II and Meier-Gorlin Syndrome. This genetic disorder group is characterized by intra-uterine growth retardation and post-natal growth abnormalities which occur as a result of disorganized molecular and genomic changes in embryonic stage and, thus, it represents a unique area to study growth and developmental abnormalities. Lot of research has been carried out on different aspects; however, a consolidated review that discusses an overall spectrum of this disorder is not accessible. Recent research in this area points toward important molecular and cellular mechanisms in human body that regulate the complexity of growth process. Studies have emerged that have clearly associated with a number of abnormal chromosomal, genetic and epigenetic alterations that can predispose an embryo to develop PD-associated developmental defects. Finding and associating such fundamental changes to its subtypes will help in re-examination of alleged functions at both cellular and developmental levels and thus reveal the intrinsic mechanism that leads to a balanced growth. Although such findings have unraveled a subtle understanding of growth process, we further require active research in terms of identification of reliable biomarkers for different subtypes as an immediate requirement for clinical utilization. It is hoped that further study will advance the understanding of basic mechanisms regulating growth relevant to human health. Therefore, this review has been written with an aim to present an overview of chromosomal, molecular and epigenetic modifications reported to be associated with different subtypes of this heterogenous disorder. Further, latest findings with respect to clinical and molecular genetics research have been summarized to aid the medical fraternity in their clinical utility, for diagnosing disorders

  8. Corneal biomechanics: a review.

    PubMed

    Piñero, David P; Alcón, Natividad

    2015-03-01

    Biomechanics is often defined as 'mechanics applied to biology'. Due to the variety and complexity of the behaviour of biological structures and materials, biomechanics is better defined as the development, extension and application of mechanics for a better understanding of physiology and physiopathology and consequently for a better diagnosis and treatment of disease and injury. Different methods for the characterisation of corneal biomechanics are reviewed in detail, including those that are currently commercially available (Ocular Response Analyzer and CorVis ST). The clinical applicability of the parameters provided by these devices are discussed, especially in the fields of glaucoma, detection of ectatic disorders and orthokeratology. Likewise, other methods are also reviewed, such as Brillouin microscopy or dynamic optical coherence tomography and others with potential application to clinical practice but not validated for in vivo measurements, such as ultrasonic elastography. Advantages and disadvantages of all these techniques are described. Finally, the concept of biomechanical modelling is revised as well as the requirements for developing biomechanical models, with special emphasis on finite element modelling. © 2014 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2014 Optometry Australia.

  9. Biomechanical Perspectives on Concussion in Sport.

    PubMed

    Rowson, Steven; Bland, Megan L; Campolettano, Eamon T; Press, Jaclyn N; Rowson, Bethany; Smith, Jake A; Sproule, David W; Tyson, Abigail M; Duma, Stefan M

    2016-09-01

    Concussions can occur in any sport. Often, clinical and biomechanical research efforts are disconnected. This review paper analyzes current concussion issues in sports from a biomechanical perspective and is geared toward Sports Med professionals. Overarching themes of this review include the biomechanics of the brain during head impact, role of protective equipment, potential population-based differences in concussion tolerance, potential intervention strategies to reduce the incidence of injury, and common biomechanical misconceptions.

  10. ASPECT

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Able to deploy within one hour of notification, EPA's Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology (ASPECT) is the nation’s only airborne real-time chemical and radiological detection, infrared and photographic imagery platform.

  11. The Korsakoff syndrome: clinical aspects, psychology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Kopelman, Michael D; Thomson, Allan D; Guerrini, Irene; Marshall, E Jane

    2009-01-01

    The Korsakoff syndrome is a preventable memory disorder that usually emerges (although not always) in the aftermath of an episode of Wernicke's encephalopathy. The present paper reviews the clinical and scientific literature on this disorder. A systematic review of the clinical and scientific literature on Wernicke's encephalopathy and the alcoholic Korsakoff syndrome. The Korsakoff syndrome is most commonly associated with chronic alcohol misuse, and some heavy drinkers may have a genetic predisposition to developing the syndrome. The characteristic neuropathology includes neuronal loss, micro-haemorrhages and gliosis in the paraventricular and peri-aqueductal grey matter. Lesions in the mammillary bodies, the mammillo-thalamic tract and the anterior thalamus may be more important to memory dysfunction than lesions in the medial dorsal nucleus of the thalamus. Episodic memory is severely affected in the Korsakoff syndrome, and the learning of new semantic memories is variably affected. 'Implicit' aspects of memory are preserved. These patients are often first encountered in general hospital settings where they can occupy acute medical beds for lengthy periods. Abstinence is the cornerstone of any rehabilitation programme. Korsakoff patients are capable of new learning, particularly if they live in a calm and well-structured environment and if new information is cued. There are few long-term follow-up studies, but these patients are reported to have a normal life expectancy if they remain abstinent from alcohol. Although we now have substantial knowledge about the nature of this disorder, scientific questions (e.g. regarding the underlying genetics) remain. More particularly, there is a dearth of appropriate long-term care facilities for these patients, given that empirical research has shown that good practice has beneficial effects.

  12. Socio-demographic and clinical aspects of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Owino, B O; Oyoo, G O; Otieno, C F

    2009-05-01

    To determine the socio-demographic profiles and some clinical aspects of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Prospective, cross-sectional study. Ambulatory out- patient clinics of Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH), a public national and referral hospital. Out of 180 patients interviewed and examined, 60 met American College of Rheumatology (ACR) diagnostic criteria of RA. Of the 60 patients recruited 52 (87%) were females with male: female ratio of 1: 6.5. The mean age of patients was 41.38(+/- 16.8) years. There were two peaks of age of occurrence, 20-29 and 40-49 years. In 75% of the study patients, one or more of metacarpophalangeal joints of the hand were involved in the disease. Other frequently involved sites were--wrists, elbows, knees, ankles and glenohumeral joints of shoulders in a symmetrical manner. Serum rheumatoid factor was positive in 78.9% while rheumatoid nodules were present in 13.3% of the study patients. A large majority of patients (88%) had active disease with 18% having mild disease, 38% moderate activity and 32% having severe disease. Only 12% of patients had disease in remission. Forty six point seven per cent (46.7%) of the study patients were on at least one Disease Modifying anti Rheumatic Drugs (DMARD) from a selection of methotrexate, sulphasalazine, hydroxychloroquine and leflunamide. The most frequent drug combination was methotrexate plus prednisolone at 30% of the study population; while 66.7% were on oral prednisolone with 25% of the study patients taking only Non-Steroidal anti Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDS). A large majority of ambulatory patients with RA had active disease. Most of them were sub-optimally treated, especially the use of DMARDS. About two thirds were on oral steroids. Sub-optimal therapy in relatively young patients, peak 20-29 and 40-49 years is likely to impact negatively on their disease control and quality of life.

  13. Biological and Clinical Aspects of Lanthanide Coordination Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Sudhindra N.; M., Indira Devi; Shukla, Ram S.

    2004-01-01

    The coordinating chemistry of lanthanides, relevant to the biological, biochemical and medical aspects, makes a significant contribution to understanding the basis of application of lanthanides, particularly in biological and medical systems. The importance of the applications of lanthanides, as an excellent diagnostic and prognostic probe in clinical diagnostics, and an anticancer material, is remarkably increasing. Lanthanide complexes based X-ray contrast imaging and lanthanide chelates based contrast enhancing agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are being excessively used in radiological analysis in our body systems. The most important property of the chelating agents, in lanthanide chelate complex, is its ability to alter the behaviour of lanthanide ion with which it binds in biological systems, and the chelation markedly modifies the biodistribution and excretion profile of the lanthanide ions. The chelating agents, especially aminopoly carboxylic acids, being hydrophilic, increase the proportion of their complex excreted from complexed lanthanide ion form biological systems. Lanthanide polyamino carboxylate-chelate complexes are used as contrast enhancing agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Conjugation of antibodies and other tissue specific molecules to lanthanide chelates has led to a new type of specific MRI contrast agents and their conjugated MRI contrast agents with improved relaxivity, functioning in the body similar to drugs. Many specific features of contrast agent assisted MRI make it particularly effective for musculoskeletal and cerebrospinal imaging. Lanthanide-chelate contrast agents are effectively used in clinical diagnostic investigations involving cerebrospinal diseases and in evaluation of central nervous system. Chelated lanthanide complexes shift reagent aided 23Na NMR spectroscopic analysis is used in cellular, tissue and whole organ systems. PMID:18365075

  14. Brugada Syndrome: Clinical, Genetic, Molecular, Cellular, and Ionic Aspects.

    PubMed

    Antzelevitch, Charles; Patocskai, Bence

    2016-01-01

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is an inherited cardiac arrhythmia syndrome first described as a new clinical entity in 1992. Electrocardiographically characterized by distinct coved type ST segment elevation in the right-precordial leads, the syndrome is associated with a high risk for sudden cardiac death in young adults, and less frequently in infants and children. The electrocardiographic manifestations of BrS are often concealed and may be unmasked or aggravated by sodium channel blockers, a febrile state, vagotonic agents, as well as by tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants. An implantable cardioverter defibrillator is the most widely accepted approach to therapy. Pharmacologic therapy is designed to produce an inward shift in the balance of currents active during the early phases of the right ventricular action potential (AP) and can be used to abort electrical storms or as an adjunct or alternative to device therapy when use of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator is not possible. Isoproterenol, cilostazol, and milrinone boost calcium channel current and drugs like quinidine, bepridil, and the Chinese herb extract Wenxin Keli inhibit the transient outward current, acting to diminish the AP notch and thus to suppress the substrate and trigger for ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation. Radiofrequency ablation of the right ventricular outflow tract epicardium of patients with BrS has recently been shown to reduce arrhythmia vulnerability and the electrocardiographic manifestation of the disease, presumably by destroying the cells with more prominent AP notch. This review provides an overview of the clinical, genetic, molecular, and cellular aspects of BrS as well as the approach to therapy.

  15. Brugada Syndrome. Clinical, Genetic, Molecular, Cellular and Ionic Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Antzelevitch, Charles; Patocskai, Bence

    2015-01-01

    The Brugada syndrome (BrS) is an inherited cardiac arrhythmia syndrome first described as a new clinical entity in 1992. Electrocardiographically characterized by distinct coved type ST segment elevation in the right precordial leads, the syndrome is associated with a high risk for sudden cardiac death in young adults, and less frequently in infants and children. The ECG manifestations of the BrS are often concealed and may be unmasked or aggravated by sodium channel blockers, a febrile state, vagotonic agents, as well as by tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants. An implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is the most widely accepted approach to therapy. Pharmacological therapy is designed to produce an inward shift in the balance of currents active during the early phases of the right ventricular action potential and can be used to abort electrical storms or as an adjunct or alternative to device therapy when use of an ICD is not possible. Isoproterenol, cilostazol and milrinone boost calcium channel current and drugs like quinidine, bepridil and the Chinese herb extract Wenxin Keli inhibit the transient outward current, acting to diminish the action potential (AP) notch and thus to suppress the substrate and trigger for VT/VF. Radiofrequency ablation of the right ventricular outflow tract epicardium of BrS patients has recently been shown to reduce arrhythmia-vulnerability and the ECG-manifestation of the disease, presumably by destroying the cells with more prominent AP notch. This review provides an overview of the clinical, genetic, molecular and cellular aspects of the BrS as well as the approach to therapy. PMID:26671757

  16. Optical principles, biomechanics, and initial clinical performance of a dual-optic accommodating intraocular lens (an American Ophthalmological Society thesis).

    PubMed

    McLeod, Stephen D

    2006-01-01

    To design and develop an accommodating intraocular lens (IOL) for endocapsular fixation with extended accommodative range that can be adapted to current standard extracapsular phacoemulsification technique. Ray tracing analysis and lens design; finite element modeling of biomechanical properties; cadaver eye implantation; initial clinical evaluation. Ray tracing analysis indicated that a dual-optic design with a high plus-power front optic coupled to an optically compensatory minus posterior optic produced greater change in conjugation power of the eye compared to that produced by axial movement of a single-optic IOL, and that magnification effects were unlikely to account for improved near vision. Finite element modeling indicated that the two optics can be linked by spring-loaded haptics that allow anterior and posterior axial displacement of the front optic in response to changes in ciliary body tone and capsular tension. A dual-optic single-piece foldable silicone lens was constructed based on these principles. Subsequent initial clinical evaluation in 24 human eyes after phacoemulsification for cataract indicated mean 3.22 diopters of accommodation (range, 1 to 5 D) based on defocus curve measurement. Accommodative amplitude evaluation at 1- and 6-month follow-up in all eyes indicated that the accommodative range was maintained and that the lens was well tolerated. A dual-optic design increases the accommodative effect of axial optic displacement, with minimal magnification effect. Initial clinical trials suggest that IOLs designed on this principle might provide true pseudophakic accommodation following cataract extraction and lens implantation.

  17. Zika virus congenital syndrome: experimental models and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Polonio, Carolina Manganeli; de Freitas, Carla Longo; Zanluqui, Nagela Ghabdan; Peron, Jean Pierre Schatzmann

    2017-01-01

    Viral infections have long been the cause of severe diseases to humans, increasing morbidity and mortality rates worldwide, either in rich or poor countries. Yellow fever virus, H1N1 virus, HIV, dengue virus, hepatitis B and C are well known threats to human health, being responsible for many million deaths annually, associated to a huge economic and social cost. In this context, a recently introduced flavivirus in South America, called Zika virus (ZIKV), led the WHO to declare in February 1st 2016 a warning on Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC). ZIKV is an arbovirus of the Flaviviridae family firstly isolated from sentinels Rhesus sp. monkeys at the Ziika forest in Uganda, Africa, in 1947. Lately, the virus has well adapted to the worldwide spread Aedes aegypti mosquito, the vector for DENV, CHIKV, YFV and many others. At first, it was not considered a threat to human health, but everything changed when a skyrocketing number of babies born with microcephaly and adults with Guillain-Barré syndrome were reported, mainly in northeastern Brazil. It is now well established that the virus is responsible for the so called congenital Zika syndrome (CZS), whose most dramatic features are microcephaly, arthrogryposis and ocular damage. Thus, in this review, we provide a brief discussion of these main clinical aspects of the CZS, correlating them with the experimental animal models described so far.

  18. [Pediatric dysphasia. 1. The concept and clinical aspects].

    PubMed

    Njiokiktjien, C

    1993-01-01

    This survey deals with the early diagnosis and treatment of children with developmental dysphasia, which may prevent the progression of learning and behavior disorders. In the pre-verbal and early verbal stage, the severity of the clinical picture is primarily determined by concomitant motor pathology (motor dysfunction, dysarthria, general and oral dyspraxia) and by receptive pathology (hearing and auditory perception). In the verbal period, linguistic problems start to play a role, and often combine with oral motor symptoms to present a mixed picture. Various language syndromes do not become clear until some time later. After the kindergarten period, the oral motor and perceptual problems decrease and the language disorders continue to play a role and influence the child's conversation, internal speech reading and spelling at school. In a relatively small number of children without oral motor, perceptual or memory problems, there can be a basic syndrome of "pure dysphasia" without any other neurological signs. In somewhat more than half the patients, the basic syndrome of pure dysphasia is accompanied by other neurological signs. Treatment should not be confined to speech therapy techniques, but can only be optimally given by a highly trained team whose expertise also extends to the schooling aspect.

  19. Clinical and technical aspects of bipolar transurethral prostate resection.

    PubMed

    Faul, Peter; Schlenker, Boris; Gratzke, Christian; Stief, Christian G; Reich, Oliver; Hahn, Robert Gustaw

    2008-01-01

    This review aims to provide an overview and critical assessment of the developments in transurethral electroresection in non-conductive and conductive irrigants. In the 1970s, measurements of the electric pathway in saline were performed for different locations of the neutral electrode. It was then concluded that the current pathway and the possible hazards of burn injuries to the patient should be investigated separately for each arrangement of the neutral electrode. The position and shape of the neutral electrode have decisive effects on the current flow in the patient. Thus, different electrode arrangements of the various bipolar resection systems need to be analysed separately. Furthermore, not only electrical power, but also conductivity and quality of the lubricant gel have to be considered as critical factors with regard to electrothermal injuries of the urethra. The supposedly better cutting quality seems to be based more on subjective observations than on scientific valid data. When performing "bipolar" TUR it is necessary to consider all electrotechnical and clinical aspects, particularly with regard to the potential risk of thermoelectrical urethral damage.

  20. Biomechanics and muscle coordination of human walking: part II: lessons from dynamical simulations and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Zajac, Felix E; Neptune, Richard R; Kautz, Steven A

    2003-02-01

    Principles of muscle coordination in gait have been based largely on analyses of body motion, ground reaction force and EMG measurements. However, data from dynamical simulations provide a cause-effect framework for analyzing these measurements; for example, Part I (Gait Posture, in press) of this two-part review described how force generation in a muscle affects the acceleration and energy flow among the segments. This Part II reviews the mechanical and coordination concepts arising from analyses of simulations of walking. Simple models have elucidated the basic multisegmented ballistic and passive mechanics of walking. Dynamical models driven by net joint moments have provided clues about coordination in healthy and pathological gait. Simulations driven by muscle excitations have highlighted the partial stability afforded by muscles with their viscoelastic-like properties and the predictability of walking performance when minimization of metabolic energy per unit distance is assumed. When combined with neural control models for exciting motoneuronal pools, simulations have shown how the integrative properties of the neuro-musculo-skeletal systems maintain a stable gait. Other analyses of walking simulations have revealed how individual muscles contribute to trunk support and progression. Finally, we discuss how biomechanical models and simulations may enhance our understanding of the mechanics and muscle function of walking in individuals with gait impairments.

  1. Invertebrate biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Patek, S N; Summers, A P

    2017-05-22

    Invertebrate biomechanics focuses on mechanical analyses of non-vertebrate animals, which at root is no different in aim and technique from vertebrate biomechanics, or for that matter the biomechanics of plants and fungi. But invertebrates are special - they are fabulously diverse in form, habitat, and ecology and manage this without the use of hard, internal skeletons. They are also numerous and, in many cases, tractable in an experimental and field setting. In this Primer, we will probe three axes of invertebrate diversity: worms (Phylum Annelida), spiders (Class Arachnida) and insects (Class Insecta); three habitats: subterranean, terrestrial and airborne; and three integrations with other fields: ecology, engineering and evolution. Our goal is to capture the field of invertebrate biomechanics, which has blossomed from having a primary focus on discoveries at the interface of physics and biology to being inextricably linked with integrative challenges that span biology, physics, mathematics and engineering. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Anterior cruciate ligament biomechanics during robotic and mechanical simulations of physiologic and clinical motion tasks: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bates, Nathaniel A; Myer, Gregory D; Shearn, Jason T; Hewett, Timothy E

    2015-01-01

    Investigators use in vitro joint simulations to invasively study the biomechanical behaviors of the anterior cruciate ligament. The aims of these simulations are to replicate physiologic conditions, but multiple mechanisms can be used to drive in vitro motions, which may influence biomechanical outcomes. The objective of this review was to examine, summarize, and compare biomechanical evidence related to anterior cruciate ligament function from in vitro simulations of knee motion. A systematic review was conducted (2004 to 2013) in Scopus, PubMed/Medline, and SPORTDiscus to identify peer-reviewed studies that reported kinematic and kinetic outcomes from in vitro simulations of physiologic or clinical tasks at the knee. Inclusion criteria for relevant studies were articles published in English that reported on whole-ligament anterior cruciate ligament mechanics during the in vitro simulation of physiologic or clinical motions on cadaveric knees that were unaltered outside of the anterior-cruciate-ligament-intact, -deficient, and -reconstructed conditions. A meta-analysis was performed to synthesize biomechanical differences between the anterior-cruciate-ligament-intact and reconstructed conditions. 77 studies met our inclusion/exclusion criteria and were reviewed. Combined joint rotations have the greatest impact on anterior cruciate ligament loads, but the magnitude by which individual kinematic degrees of freedom contribute to ligament loading during in vitro simulations is technique-dependent. Biomechanical data collected in prospective, longitudinal studies corresponds better with robotic-manipulator simulations than mechanical-impact simulations. Robotic simulation indicated that the ability to restore intact anterior cruciate ligament mechanics with anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions was dependent on loading condition and degree of freedom examined. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Biomechanics During Robotic and Mechanical Simulations of Physiologic and Clinical Motion Tasks: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Nathaniel A.; Myer, Gregory D.; Shearn, Jason T.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Investigators use in vitro joint simulations to invasively study the biomechanical behaviors of the anterior cruciate ligament. The aims of these simulations are to replicate physiologic conditions, but multiple mechanisms can be used to drive in vitro motions, which may influence biomechanical outcomes. The objective of this review was to examine, summarize, and compare biomechanical evidence related to anterior cruciate ligament function from in vitro simulations of knee motion. A systematic review was conducted (2004 to 2013) in Scopus, PubMed/Medline, and SPORTDiscus to identify peer-reviewed studies that reported kinematic and kinetic outcomes from in vitro simulations of physiologic or clinical tasks at the knee. Inclusion criteria for relevant studies were articles published in English that reported on whole-ligament anterior cruciate ligament mechanics during the in vitro simulation of physiologic or clinical motions on cadaveric knees that were unaltered outside of the anterior-cruciate-ligament-intact, -deficient, and -reconstructed conditions. A meta-analysis was performed to synthesize biomechanical differences between the anterior-cruciate-ligament-intact and reconstructed conditions. 77 studies met our inclusion/exclusion criteria and were reviewed. Combined joint rotations have the greatest impact on anterior cruciate ligament loads, but the magnitude by which individual kinematic degrees of freedom contribute to ligament loading during in vitro simulations is technique-dependent. Biomechanical data collected in prospective, longitudinal studies corresponds better with robotic-manipulator simulations than mechanical-impact simulations. Robotic simulation indicated that the ability to restore intact anterior cruciate ligament mechanics with anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions was dependent on loading condition and degree of freedom examined. PMID:25547070

  4. Voice Disorders in Teachers: Clinical, Videolaryngoscopical, and Vocal Aspects.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Eny Regina Bóia Neves; Tavares, Elaine Lara Mendes; Martins, Regina Helena Garcia

    2015-09-01

    Dysphonia is more prevalent in teachers than among the general population. The objective of this study was to analyze clinical, vocal, and videolaryngoscopical aspects in dysphonic teachers. Ninety dysphonic teachers were inquired about their voice, comorbidities, and work conditions. They underwent vocal auditory-perceptual evaluation (maximum phonation time and GRBASI scale), acoustic voice analysis, and videolaryngoscopy. The results were compared with a control group consisting of 90 dysphonic nonteachers, of similar gender and ages, and with professional activities excluding teaching and singing. In both groups, there were 85 women and five men (age range 31-50 years). In the controls, the majority of subjects worked in domestic activities, whereas the majority of teachers worked in primary (42.8%) and secondary school (37.7%). Teachers and controls reported, respectively: vocal abuse (76.7%; 37.8%), weekly hours of work between 21 and 40 years (72.2%; 80%), under 10 years of practice (36%; 23%), absenteeism (23%; 0%), sinonasal (66%; 20%) and gastroesophageal symptoms (44%; 22%), hoarseness (82%; 78%), throat clearing (70%; 62%), and phonatory effort (72%; 52%). In both groups, there were decreased values of maximum phonation time, impairment of the G parameter in the GRBASI scale (82%), decrease of F0 and increase of the rest of acoustic parameters. Nodules and laryngopharyngeal reflux were predominant in teachers; laryngopharyngeal reflux, polyps, and sulcus vocalis predominated in the controls. Vocal symptoms, comorbidities, and absenteeism were predominant among teachers. The vocal analyses were similar in both groups. Nodules and laryngopharyngeal reflux were predominant among teachers, whereas polyps, laryngopharyngeal reflux, and sulcus were predominant among controls. Copyright © 2015 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Tityus asthenes scorpion stings: epidemiological, clinical and toxicological aspects].

    PubMed

    Gómez, Juan P; Quintana, Juan C; Arbeláez, Patricia; Fernández, Jorge; Silva, Juan F; Barona, Jacqueline; Gutiérrez, Juan C; Díaz, Abel; Otero, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Scorpion stings are a public health problem in many countries. However, in Colombia, very few epidemiological, clinical or toxicological studies have been undertaken. Ecological and epidemiological aspects were related to the prevalence of scorpion stings by Tityus asthenes. The clinical features of envenomization were described in patients and in an experimental animal model. The study was conducted in four localities of Mutatá and Urabá Counties in the province of Antioquia, Colombia. The sample consisted of 1,593 (929 urban, 664 rural) of the 5,305 exposed people, inhabitating 324 households (188 urban (58%); 136 rural (42%) of 1,448 houses total in the study area. An interview survey was performed in every selected family for a more realistic estimate of sting prevalence. Additionally, a prospective study was directed toward patients presenting scorpion stings at care at the local hospital over an 18-month period. The probability was 12.9 times greater of finding T. asthenes inside or around houses in places near to forest and high agrarian plantations (odds ratio = 13). Eighty scorpion stings were reported in the retrospective study (4.1% prevalence [95% CI 3.3-4.8%] ), but only 14 of the patients (17.5%) sought care in the local hospital (an 82.5% underreportage). Seventy percent of the stings occurred in rural places; 50% occurred in the locality of Caucheras, with an attack rate of 10.6%. The overall household infestation rate was 269% (95% CI 22.9-30.8%) and an area dispersion ratio of 100%. Signs of systemic envenomization occurred mainly in children (67%). The 50% lethal dose of T. asthenes venom was 121.6 µg for 18-20 g Swiss Webster rats (95% CI 103.7-139.6). Immunodetection of T. asthenes and Centruroides gracilis/C.margantatus venoms in the experimental animals was possible when were tested by Western blot against Alacramyn (Instituto Bioclón, México) and Soro antiaracnídico (Instituto Butantan, Brasil) antivenoms. Scorpion interspecific

  6. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: clinical and genetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Sessa, A; Ghiggeri, G M; Turco, A E

    1997-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is an inherited systemic disease caused by at least three different genes. The renal and extrarenal clinical manifestations, and the systemic complications due to cystic and non-cystic abnormalities in ADPKD patients have been widely investigated. Cellular and molecular aspects of cystogenetic mechanisms concern epithelial tubular cell proliferation, remodelling of extracellular matrix, fluid secretion and accumulation, and relations between cell proliferation and apoptosis. In vitro studies on cystogenesis suggest a key role of cell-to-cell or cell-to-matrix interactions. Surface proteins mediating cell-to-cell contact, such as E-cadherin (polycystin?), integrin interactions, growth factors, receptor expression, are involved in the process of differentiation of the cellular condition and of the extracellular matrix. Blocking any one of these complex mechanisms should influence the orientation and polarization of epithelial tubular cells and should mediate the inversion of fluid secretion which ends in renal cystogenesis. ADPKD comprises at least three phenotypically indistinguishable but genetically distinct entities, caused by mutations in three autosomal genes: PKD1 (chromosome 16p13.3) is present in about 85% of patients; PKD2 (chromosome 4q13q23) in 10%; PKD3 (unknown chromosome) in a few families. PCR-based mutation detection methods, automated DNA sequencing, and other "functional" methods are used to screen and analyse ADPKD patients. It is not yet known whether the mutations identified so far in PKD1 and PKD2 inactivate the genes or generate an aberrant product. The products of PKD1 and PKD2 genes have been called polycystin 1 and 2. Polycystins are members of a family of interactive proteins involved in complex adhesive cell-cell, cell-matrix, protein-protein, and protein-carbohydrate interactions in the extracellular compartment, and are involved in the same pathway (ion channel regulator? ion channel

  7. [Regulatory aspects and medicolegal considerations regarding clinical drug trials].

    PubMed

    Cammarano, Andrea; De Dominicis, Enrico; Marella, Gian Luca; Maurici, Massimo; Arcudi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    This article aims to explore the regulatory and medicolegal aspects of experimental drug trials. Firstly, the authors provide definitions of drug according to WHO, the European Community and our official Pharmacopoeia, and that of experimental studies. They then explain the distinction between pure or basic research and drug trials and explain the various phases of the latter. Besides providing definitions, and exploring doctrinal, theoretical but also practical aspects of drug trials, the authors also discuss and analyze legislative aspects, with particular reference to the Italian legislative framework, and medicolegal issues, including informed consent, effects on humans, and professional responsibility.

  8. Chirality and drugs in clinical practice and its ethical aspect.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Molly; Biswas, Indranil; Halder, Swaraj

    2009-01-01

    Recently specific enantiomer of different chiral molecules are being launched in the market as drugs. Here the rationality of scopes and uses of these drugs in therapeutic medicine is discussed including the ethical aspect.

  9. Evidence-based protocol for structural rehabilitation of the spine and posture: review of clinical biomechanics of posture (CBP®) publications

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, Paul A.; Harrison, Donald D.; Harrison, Deed E.; Haas, Jason W.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although practice protocols exist for SMT and functional rehabilitation, no practice protocols exist for structural rehabilitation. Traditional chiropractic practice guidelines have been limited to acute and chronic pain treatment, with limited inclusion of functional and exclusion of structural rehabilitation procedures. OBJECTIVE (1) To derive an evidence-based practice protocol for structural rehabilitation from publications on Clinical Biomechanics of Posture (CBP®) methods, and (2) to compare the evidence for Diversified, SMT, and CBP®. METHODS Clinical control trials utilizing CBP® methods and spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) were obtained from searches in Mantis, CINAHL, and Index Medicus. Using data from SMT review articles, evidence for Diversified Technique (as taught in chiropractic colleges), SMT, and CBP® were rated and compared. RESULTS From the evidence from Clinical Control Trials on SMT and CBP®, there is very little evidence support for Diversified (our rating = 18), as taught in chiropractic colleges, for the treatment of pain subjects, while CBP® (our rating = 46) and SMT for neck pain (rating = 58) and low back pain (our rating = 202) have evidence-based support. CONCLUSIONS While CBP® Technique has approximately as much evidence-based support as SMT for neck pain, CBP® has more evidence to support its methods than the Diversified technique taught in chiropractic colleges, but not as much as SMT for low back pain. The evolution of chiropractic specialization has occurred, and doctors providing structural-based chiropractic care require protocol guidelines for patient quality assurance and standardization. A structural rehabilitation protocol was developed based on evidence from CBP® publications. PMID:17549209

  10. OPTICAL PRINCIPLES, BIOMECHANICS, AND INITIAL CLINICAL PERFORMANCE OF A DUAL-OPTIC ACCOMMODATING INTRAOCULAR LENS (AN AMERICAN OPHTHALMOLOGICAL SOCIETY THESIS)

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Stephen D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose To design and develop an accommodating intraocular lens (IOL) for endocapsular fixation with extended accommodative range that can be adapted to current standard extracapsular phacoemulsification technique. Methods Ray tracing analysis and lens design; finite element modeling of biomechanical properties; cadaver eye implantation; initial clinical evaluation. Results Ray tracing analysis indicated that a dual-optic design with a high plus-power front optic coupled to an optically compensatory minus posterior optic produced greater change in conjugation power of the eye compared to that produced by axial movement of a single-optic IOL, and that magnification effects were unlikely to account for improved near vision. Finite element modeling indicated that the two optics can be linked by spring-loaded haptics that allow anterior and posterior axial displacement of the front optic in response to changes in ciliary body tone and capsular tension. A dual-optic single-piece foldable silicone lens was constructed based on these principles. Subsequent initial clinical evaluation in 24 human eyes after phacoemulsification for cataract indicated mean 3.22 diopters of accommodation (range, 1 to 5 D) based on defocus curve measurement. Accommodative amplitude evaluation at 1- and 6-month follow-up in all eyes indicated that the accommodative range was maintained and that the lens was well tolerated. Conclusions A dual-optic design increases the accommodative effect of axial optic displacement, with minimal magnification effect. Initial clinical trials suggest that IOLs designed on this principle might provide true pseudophakic accommodation following cataract extraction and lens implantation. PMID:17471355

  11. Biomechanics of abdominal injuries.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, N; Pintar, F A; Maltese, M R

    2001-01-01

    Although considerable efforts have been advanced to investigate the biomechanical aspects of abdominal injuries, reviews have been very limited. The purpose of this article is to present a comprehensive review of the topic. Traumatic abdominal injuries occur due to penetrating or blunt loading. However, the present review is focused on blunt trauma. Because of the complexity of the abdomen, biomechanically relevant anatomical characteristics of the various abdominal organs are presented. The proposed mechanism of injury for these organs and methods for abdominal injury quantification are described. This is followed by a detailed analysis of the biomechanical literature with particular emphasis on experiments aimed to duplicate real world injuries and attempt to quantify trauma in terms of parameters such as force, deflection, viscous criteria, pressure criteria, and correlation of these variables with the severity of abdominal injury. Experimental studies include tests using primates, pigs, rats, beagles, and human cadavers. The effects of velocity, compression, padding, and impactor characteristics on tolerance; effects of pressurization and postmortem characteristics on abdominal injury; deduction of abdominal response corridors; and force-deflection responses (of the different abdominal regions and organs) are discussed. Output of initial research is presented on the development of a device to record the biomechanical parameters in an anthropomorphic test dummy during impact. Based on these studies and the current need for abdominal protection, recommendations are given for further research.

  12. Biomechanics of foetal movement.

    PubMed

    Nowlan, N C

    2015-01-02

    Foetal movements commence at seven weeks of gestation, with the foetal movement repertoire including twitches, whole body movements, stretches, isolated limb movements, breathing movements, head and neck movements, jaw movements (including yawning, sucking and swallowing) and hiccups by ten weeks of gestational age. There are two key biomechanical aspects to gross foetal movements; the first being that the foetus moves in a dynamically changing constrained physical environment in which the freedom to move becomes increasingly restricted with increasing foetal size and decreasing amniotic fluid. Therefore, the mechanical environment experienced by the foetus affects its ability to move freely. Secondly, the mechanical forces induced by foetal movements are crucial for normal skeletal development, as evidenced by a number of conditions and syndromes for which reduced or abnormal foetal movements are implicated, such as developmental dysplasia of the hip, arthrogryposis and foetal akinesia deformation sequence. This review examines both the biomechanical effects of the physical environment on foetal movements through discussion of intrauterine factors, such as space, foetal positioning and volume of amniotic fluid, and the biomechanical role of gross foetal movements in human skeletal development through investigation of the effects of abnormal movement on the bones and joints. This review also highlights computational simulations of foetal movements that attempt to determine the mechanical forces acting on the foetus as it moves. Finally, avenues for future research into foetal movement biomechanics are highlighted, which have potential impact for a diverse range of fields including foetal medicine, musculoskeletal disorders and tissue engineering.

  13. Premise and Prediction – How Optic Nerve Head Biomechanics Underlies the Susceptibility and Clinical Behavior of the Aged Optic Nerve Head

    PubMed Central

    Burgoyne, Claude F.; Downs, J. Crawford

    2009-01-01

    We propose that age-related alterations in optic nerve head (ONH) biomechanics underlie the clinical behavior and increased susceptibility of the aged ONH to glaucomatous damage. The literature which suggests that the aged ONH is more susceptible to glaucomatous damage at all levels of intraocular pressure is reviewed. The relevant biomechanics of the aged ONH are discussed and a biomechanical explanation for why, on average, the stiffened peripapillary scleral and lamina cribrosa connective tissues of the aged eye should lead to a shallow (senile sclerotic) form of cupping is proposed. A logic for why age-related axon loss and the optic neuropathy of glaucoma in the aged eye may overlap is discussed. Finally, we argue for a need to characterize all forms of clinical cupping into prelaminar and laminar components so as to add precision to the discussion of clinical cupping which does not currently exist. Such characterization may lead to the early detection of ONH axonal and connective tissue pathology in ocular hypertension and eventually aid in the assessment of etiology in all forms of optic neuropathy including those that may be purely age-related. PMID:18552618

  14. [Scientific, practical and educational aspects of clinical epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Briko, N I

    2012-01-01

    This article defines clinical epidemiology and describes its goal and objectives. The author claims that clinical epidemiology is a section of epidemiology which underlies the development of evidence-based standards for diagnostics, treatment and prevention and helps to select the appropriate algorithm for each clinical case. The study provides a comprehensive overview of the relationship between clinical epidemiology and evidence-based medicine. Epidemiological research is shown to be methodological basis of clinical epidemiology and evidence-based medicine with randomized controlled trials being the "gold standard" for obtaining reliable data. The key stages in the history of clinical epidemiology are discussed and further development of clinical epidemiology and the integration of courses on clinical epidemiology in education is outlined for progress in medical research and health care practice.

  15. Compliant flooring to prevent fall-related injuries in older adults: A scoping review of biomechanical efficacy, clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and workplace safety

    PubMed Central

    Jurkowski, Michal P.; Dymarz, Ania C.; Robinovitch, Stephen N.; Feldman, Fabio; Laing, Andrew C.; Mackey, Dawn C.

    2017-01-01

    Background Compliant flooring, broadly defined as flooring systems or floor coverings with some level of shock absorbency, may reduce the incidence and severity of fall-related injuries in older adults; however, a lack of synthesized evidence may be limiting widespread uptake. Methods Informed by the Arksey and O’Malley framework and guided by a Research Advisory Panel of knowledge users, we conducted a scoping review to answer: what is presented about the biomechanical efficacy, clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and workplace safety associated with compliant flooring systems that aim to prevent fall-related injuries in healthcare settings? We searched academic and grey literature databases. Any record that discussed a compliant flooring system and at least one of biomechanical efficacy, clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, or workplace safety was eligible for inclusion. Two independent reviewers screened and abstracted records, charted data, and summarized results. Results After screening 3611 titles and abstracts and 166 full-text articles, we included 84 records plus 56 companion (supplementary) reports. Biomechanical efficacy records (n = 50) demonstrate compliant flooring can reduce fall-related impact forces with minimal effects on standing and walking balance. Clinical effectiveness records (n = 20) suggest that compliant flooring may reduce injuries, but may increase risk for falls. Preliminary evidence suggests that compliant flooring may be a cost-effective strategy (n = 12), but may also result in increased physical demands for healthcare workers (n = 17). Conclusions In summary, compliant flooring is a promising strategy for preventing fall-related injuries from a biomechanical perspective. Additional research is warranted to confirm whether compliant flooring (i) prevents fall-related injuries in real-world settings, (ii) is a cost-effective intervention strategy, and (iii) can be installed without negatively impacting workplace

  16. Porcelain veneering of titanium--clinical and technical aspects.

    PubMed

    Haag, Per

    2011-01-01

    Gold and other alloys have long been used for the production of crowns and bridges as replacements for damaged or lost teeth. However, doubts have arisen on the suitability of using these materials for dental restorations, as gold has also shown a capacity to cause side-effects such as allergic reactions. This is especially valid for alloys, which during the last decades have been used as porcelain-fused-to metal restorations. This fact has led to an interest in using titanium instead of these alloys. Trials to use titanium for this purpose were initiated in Japan in the early 1980s. Titanium as an unalloyed metal differs in two aspects from the above named alloys: it has a phase transformation at 882 degrees C, which changes its outer and inner properties, and it has an expansion that lies between that of the porcelain types available on the market at the time. In Japan a technique for casting titanium was developed, where the after-treatment of the casting was elaborate, to re-establish the original properties of titanium. The porcelain developed for veneering had shortcomings as the rendering produced a rough surface and non satisfactory esthetics. In Sweden a new concept was introduced in 1989. Here the processing of titanium was performed by industrial methods such as milling, spark erosion and laser welding. The idea behind this was to avoid phase transformation. During the 1990s a number of porcelain products were launched and a vast number of both laboratory and clinical studies were performed and published, with varying results. In the first study of this thesis a prospective clinical trial was performed at a public dental health clinic in Sweden. Twenty-five patients were provided with 40 copings of pure titanium, which were veneered with porcelain. After 2 years 36 of these crowns were evaluated and the patients were also interviewed regarding problems such as shooting pains or difficulties in cleaning around the teeth that were crowned. This evaluation

  17. A Static Biomechanical Load Carriage Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-05-01

    three categories: physiological studies, biomechanical studies, and subjective appraisal studies. Most of the biomechanical studies concentrate on gait ... analysis (e.g. DeVita et al., 1991). As there are several comprehensive survey articles on various aspects of load carriage (e.g. Rorke, 1990; Haisman

  18. Conformal piezoelectric systems for clinical and experimental characterization of soft tissue biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagdeviren, Canan; Shi, Yan; Joe, Pauline; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Balooch, Guive; Usgaonkar, Karan; Gur, Onur; Tran, Phat L.; Crosby, Jessi R.; Meyer, Marcin; Su, Yewang; Chad Webb, R.; Tedesco, Andrew S.; Slepian, Marvin J.; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A.

    2015-07-01

    Mechanical assessment of soft biological tissues and organs has broad relevance in clinical diagnosis and treatment of disease. Existing characterization methods are invasive, lack microscale spatial resolution, and are tailored only for specific regions of the body under quasi-static conditions. Here, we develop conformal and piezoelectric devices that enable in vivo measurements of soft tissue viscoelasticity in the near-surface regions of the epidermis. These systems achieve conformal contact with the underlying complex topography and texture of the targeted skin, as well as other organ surfaces, under both quasi-static and dynamic conditions. Experimental and theoretical characterization of the responses of piezoelectric actuator-sensor pairs laminated on a variety of soft biological tissues and organ systems in animal models provide information on the operation of the devices. Studies on human subjects establish the clinical significance of these devices for rapid and non-invasive characterization of skin mechanical properties.

  19. Biomechanical impact of provisional stenting and balloon dilatation on coronary bifurcation: clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Henry Y; Al-Saadon, Khalid; Louvard, Yves; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2017-07-01

    In-stent restenosis (ISR) and stent thrombosis remain clinically significant problems for bifurcations. Although the role of wall shear stress (WSS) has been well investigated, the role of circumferential wall stresses (CWS) has not been well studied in provisional stenting with and without final kissing balloon (FKB). We hypothesized that the perturbation of CWS at the SB in provisional stenting and balloon dilatation is an important factor in addition to WSS, and, hence, may affect restenosis rates (i.e., higher CWS correlates with higher restenosis). To test this hypothesis, we developed computational models of stent, FKB at bifurcation, and finite element simulations that considered both fluid and solid mechanics of the vessel wall. We computed the stress ratio (CWS/WSS) to show potential correlation with restenosis in clinical studies (i.e., higher stress ratio correlates with higher restenosis). Our simulation results show that stenting in the main branch (MB) increases the maximum CWS in the side branch (SB) and, hence, yields a higher stress ratio in the SB, as compared with the MB. FKB dilatation decreases the CWS and increases WSS, which collectively lowers the stress ratio in the SB. The changes of stress ratio were correlated positively with clinical data in provisional stenting and FKB. Both fluid and solid mechanics need to be evaluated when considering various stenting techniques at bifurcations, as solid stresses also play an important role in clinical outcome. An integrative index of bifurcation mechanics is the stress ratio that considers both CWS and WSS.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Although the role of wall shear stress (WSS) has been well investigated, the role of circumferential wall stresses (CWS) has not been well studied in provisional stenting with and without final kissing balloon. Both fluid and solid mechanics need to be evaluated when considering various stenting techniques at bifurcations. An integrative index of bifurcation mechanics is the

  20. PSYCHOLOGY IN COMMUNITY SETTINGS--CLINICAL, EDUCATIONAL, VOCATIONAL, SOCIAL ASPECTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SARASON, SEYMOUR B.; AND OTHERS

    IN THIS DESCRIPTION OF THE PSYCHOEDUCATIONAL CLINIC IN THE DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY AT YALE UNIVERSITY, THE CLINIC'S HISTORICAL AND PROFESSIONAL ORIGINS ARE REVIEWED, AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO THE SCHOOLS THAT IT SERVES DISCUSSED. SPECIFIC TOPICS CONSIDERED ARE (1) THE APPROACH TO THE SCHOOLS, (2) TEACHING IS A LONELY PROFESSION, (3) HELPING TO…

  1. [Biomechanical-clinical interpretation of firearm wounds. General problems. IX. Propedeutic ABC of terminal ballistics].

    PubMed

    Marini, F; Radin, S; Dagradi, V; Carolo, F; Mangiante, G; Tenci, A; Dalla Giacoma, C; Giarolli, M; Massari, S; Prati, G

    1993-01-01

    In this chapter, the leading role is played by the mechanical-thermal-ballistic device, issued as a long-barrelled regulation firearm to modern armies. The most accurate description of this type of firearm and its present and possible future development seeks to be in line with the objective comparison between the biological matter and the mechanical material, which constitutes the essential basis for any optimal nosological, aetiological, or pathogenetic classification of bullet wounds. We should not forget that the advent of the M 16 A 1 has aroused great technical interest, particularly--though not only--as regards the hydroshock aspect, and that the technological developments in future can hardly fail to increasingly confirm the singular nature of bullet wounds, which refuse to be encompassed merely within the somewhat limited sphere of their strictly local effects, but carry a broader significance in a critical context open to further verification in the future. There can be no denying that this unique nature of modern bullet wounds makes them ideal candidates bearing witness to a new interpretation of traumatism, which at present is only in its infancy.

  2. Regulatory aspects for translating gene therapy research into the clinic.

    PubMed

    Laurencot, Carolyn M; Ruppel, Sheryl

    2009-01-01

    Gene therapy products are highly regulated, therefore moving a promising candidate from the laboratory into the clinic can present unique challenges. Success can only be achieved by proper planning and communication within the clinical development team, as well as consultation with the regulatory scientists who will eventually review the clinical plan. Regulators should not be considered as obstacles but rather as collaborators whose advice can significantly expedite the product development. Sound scientific data is required and reviewed by the regulatory agencies to determine whether the potential benefit to the patient population outweighs the risk. Therefore, compliance with Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) and Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) principles to ensure quality, safety, purity, and potency of the product, and to establish "proof of concept" for efficacy, and for safety information, respectively, is essential. The design and conduct of the clinical trial must adhere to Good Clinical Practice (GCP) principals. The clinical protocol should contain adequate rationale, supported by nonclinical data, to justify the starting dose and regimen, and adequate safety monitoring based on the patient population and the anticipated toxicities. Proper review and approval of gene therapy clinical studies by numerous committees, and regulatory agencies before and throughout the study allows for ongoing risk assessment of these novel and innovative products. The ethical conduct of clinical trials must be a priority for all clinical investigators and sponsors. As history has shown us, only a few fatal mistakes can dramatically alter the regulation of investigational products for all individuals involved in gene therapy clinical research, and further delay the advancement of gene therapy to licensed medicinal products.

  3. Physical modelling in biomechanics.

    PubMed Central

    Koehl, M A R

    2003-01-01

    Physical models, like mathematical models, are useful tools in biomechanical research. Physical models enable investigators to explore parameter space in a way that is not possible using a comparative approach with living organisms: parameters can be varied one at a time to measure the performance consequences of each, while values and combinations not found in nature can be tested. Experiments using physical models in the laboratory or field can circumvent problems posed by uncooperative or endangered organisms. Physical models also permit some aspects of the biomechanical performance of extinct organisms to be measured. Use of properly scaled physical models allows detailed physical measurements to be made for organisms that are too small or fast to be easily studied directly. The process of physical modelling and the advantages and limitations of this approach are illustrated using examples from our research on hydrodynamic forces on sessile organisms, mechanics of hydraulic skeletons, food capture by zooplankton and odour interception by olfactory antennules. PMID:14561350

  4. Mathematical foundations of biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Niederer, Peter F

    2010-01-01

    The aim of biomechanics is the analysis of the structure and function of humans, animals, and plants by means of the methods of mechanics. Its foundations are in particular embedded in mathematics, physics, and informatics. Due to the inherent multidisciplinary character deriving from its aim, biomechanics has numerous connections and overlapping areas with biology, biochemistry, physiology, and pathophysiology, along with clinical medicine, so its range is enormously wide. This treatise is mainly meant to serve as an introduction and overview for readers and students who intend to acquire a basic understanding of the mathematical principles and mechanics that constitute the foundation of biomechanics; accordingly, its contents are limited to basic theoretical principles of general validity and long-range significance. Selected examples are included that are representative for the problems treated in biomechanics. Although ultimate mathematical generality is not in the foreground, an attempt is made to derive the theory from basic principles. A concise and systematic formulation is thereby intended with the aim that the reader is provided with a working knowledge. It is assumed that he or she is familiar with the principles of calculus, vector analysis, and linear algebra.

  5. [Biodegradable synthetic implant materials : clinical applications and immunological aspects].

    PubMed

    Witte, F; Calliess, T; Windhagen, H

    2008-02-01

    In the last decade biodegradable synthetic implant materials have been established for various clinical applications. Ceramic materials such as calcium phosphate, bioglass and polymers are now routinely used as degradable implants in the clinical practice. Additionally these materials are now also used as coating materials or as microspheres for controlled drug release and belong to a series of examples for applications as scaffolds for tissue engineering. Because immense local concentrations of degradation products are produced during biodegradation, this review deals with the question whether allergic immune reactions, which have been reported for classical metallic and organic implant materials, also play a role in the clinical routine for synthetic biodegradable materials. Furthermore, possible explanatory theories will be developed to clarify the lack of clinical reports on allergy or sensitization to biodegradable synthetic materials.

  6. Laboratory, clinical, and epidemiological aspects of coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, M A; Herwaldt, L A

    1988-01-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci, particularly Staphylococcus epidermidis, are increasingly important causes of nosocomial infection. Microbiologists and clinicians no longer can afford to disregard clinical isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci as contaminants. Accurate species identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing, in a clinically relevant time frame, are important aids in the diagnosis and management of serious coagulase-negative staphylococcal infections. Emphasis in the clinical laboratory should be placed on the routine identification of S. epidermidis and Staphylococcus saprophyticus, with identification of other species of coagulase-negative staphylococci as clinically indicated. The application of newer techniques, such as plasmid analysis and tests for slime production and adherence, contribute to our understanding of the epidemiology and pathogenesis of coagulase-negative staphylococci and may also be helpful in establishing the diagnosis of infection. PMID:3058297

  7. Cutaneous tuberculosis: epidemiologic, etiopathogenic and clinical aspects - Part I*

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Josemir Belo; Figueiredo, Ana Roberta; Ferraz, Cláudia Elise; de Oliveira, Márcia Helena; da Silva, Perla Gomes; de Medeiros, Vanessa Lucília Silveira

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous tuberculosis (CTB) is the result of a chronic infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M. ovis and occasionally by the Calmette-Guerin bacillus. The clinical manifestations are variable and depend on the interaction of several factors including the site of infection and the host's immunity. This article revises the current knowledge about this disease's physiopathology and immunology as well as detailing the possible clinical presentations. PMID:24770496

  8. Palmar hyperhidrosis: clinical, pathophysiological, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects*

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Flávio Ramalho; Haddad, Gabriela Roncada; Miot, Hélio Amante; Cataneo, Daniele Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Palmar hyperhidrosis affects up to 3% of the population and inflict significant impact on quality of life. It is characterized by chronic excessive sweating, not related to the necessity of heat loss. It evolves from a localized hyperactivity of the sympathetic autonomic system and can be triggered by stressful events. In this study, the authors discuss clinical findings, pathophysiological, diagnostic and therapeutic issues (clinical and surgical) related to palmar hyperhidrosis. PMID:28099590

  9. New developments in clinical aspects of lymphatic disease

    PubMed Central

    Mortimer, Peter S.; Rockson, Stanley G.

    2014-01-01

    The lymphatic system is fundamentally important to cardiovascular disease, infection and immunity, cancer, and probably obesity — the four major challenges in healthcare in the 21st century. This Review will consider the manner in which new knowledge of lymphatic genes and molecular mechanisms has demonstrated that lymphatic dysfunction should no longer be considered a passive bystander in disease but rather an active player in many pathological processes and, therefore, a genuine target for future therapeutic developments. The specific roles of the lymphatic system in edema, genetic aspects of primary lymphedema, infection (cellulitis/erysipelas), Crohn’s disease, obesity, cancer, and cancer-related lymphedema are highlighted. PMID:24590276

  10. Multiple sclerosis in children: clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic aspects.

    PubMed

    Rostásy, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common inflammatory disease of human central nervous system (CNS), which is characterized by inflammatory demyelination and neuroaxonal injury/loss. The majority of MS patients are diagnosed in early- to mid-adulthood; however, the onset of MS in childhood is being increasingly recognized. Although adults and children share important aspects of the disease, several features including course of the disease and a broader differential diagnosis are unique to children. This chapter summarizes recent insights and emphasizes that children with MS should be started on immunomodulatory therapies early in order to prevent future disability.

  11. Biomechanical assessment and clinical analysis of different intramedullary nailing systems for oblique fractures.

    PubMed

    Alierta, J A; Pérez, M A; Seral, B; García-Aznar, J M

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the fracture union or non-union for a specific patient that presented oblique fractures in tibia and fibula, using a mechanistic-based bone healing model. Normally, this kind of fractures can be treated through an intramedullary nail using two possible configurations that depends on the mechanical stabilisation: static and dynamic. Both cases are simulated under different fracture geometries in order to understand the effect of the mechanical stabilisation on the fracture healing outcome. The results of both simulations are in good agreement with previous clinical experience. From the results, it is demonstrated that the dynamization of the fracture improves healing in comparison with a static or rigid fixation of the fracture. This work shows the versatility and potential of a mechanistic-based bone healing model to predict the final outcome (union, non-union, delayed union) of realistic 3D fractures where even more than one bone is involved.

  12. Ankle syndesmosis injuries: anatomy, biomechanics, mechanism of injury, and clinical guidelines for diagnosis and intervention.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Feng; Gross, Michael L; Weinhold, Paul

    2006-06-01

    Syndesmosis injuries are rare, but very debilitating and frequently misdiagnosed. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to review the mechanisms of syndesmotic injuries, clinical examination methods, diagnosis, and management of the injuries. Cadaveric studies of the syndesmosis and deltoid ligaments are also reviewed for further understanding of stress transmission and the roles of different structures in stabilizing the distal syndesmosis. External rotation and excessive dorsiflexion of the foot on the leg have been reported as the most common mechanisms of injury. The injury is most often incurred by individuals who participate in skiing, football, soccer, and other sport activities played on turf. The external rotation and squeeze tests are reliable tests to detect this injury. The ability of imaging studies to assist in an accurate diagnosis may depend on the severity of the injury. The results of cadaveric studies indicate the importance of the deltoid ligament in maintaining stability of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis and the congruency of the ankle mortise. Intervention programs with early rigid immobilization and pain relief strategies, followed by strengthening and balance training are recommended. Heel lift and posterior splint intervention can be used to avoid separation of the distal syndesmosis induced by excessive dorsiflexion of the ankle joint. Application of a rigid external device should be used with caution to prevent medial-lateral compression of the leg superior to the ankle mortise, thereby inducing separation of the distal syndesmosis articulation. Surgical intervention is an option when a complete tear of the syndesmotic ligaments is present or when fractures are observed.

  13. Rebound-associated vertebral fractures after discontinuation of denosumab-from clinic and biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Popp, A W; Zysset, P K; Lippuner, K

    2016-05-01

    Rebound-associated vertebral fractures may follow treatment discontinuation of highly potent reversible bone antiresorptives, resulting from the synergy of rapid bone resorption and accelerated microdamage accumulation in trabecular bone. The purposes of this study are to characterize rebound-associated vertebral fractures following the discontinuation of a highly potent reversible antiresorptive therapy based on clinical observation and propose a pathophysiological rationale. This study is a case report of multiple vertebral fractures early after discontinuation of denosumab therapy in a patient with hormone receptor-positive non-metastatic breast cancer treated with an aromatase inhibitor. Discontinuation of highly potent reversible bone antiresorptives such as denosumab may expose patients to an increased fracture risk due to the joined effects of absent microdamage repair during therapy followed by synchronous excess activation of multiple bone remodelling units at the time of loss-of-effect. We suggest the term rebound-associated vertebral fractures (RVF) for this phenomenon characterized by the presence of multiple new clinical vertebral fractures, associated with either no or low trauma, in a context consistent with the presence of high bone turnover and rapid loss of lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) occurring within 3 to 12 months after discontinuation (loss-of-effect) of a reversible antiresorptive therapy in the absence of secondary causes of bone loss or fractures. Unlike atypical femoral fractures that emerge from failure of microdamage repair in cortical bone with long-term antiresorptive treatment, RVF originate from the synergy of rapid bone resorption and accelerated microdamage accumulation in trabecular bone triggered by the discontinuation of highly potent reversible antiresorptives. Studies are urgently needed to i) prove the underlying pathophysiological processes suggested above, ii) establish the predictive criteria exposing patients

  14. Aspects of vulnerable patients and informed consent in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Kuthning, Maria; Hundt, Ferdinand

    2013-01-01

    Scope: To discuss the rationale behind informed consent in clinical trials focusing on vulnerable patients from a European and German viewpoint. Methods: Scientific literature search via PubMed, Medline, Google. Results: Voluntary informed consent is the cornerstone of policies regulating clinical trials. To enroll a patient into a clinical trial without having obtained written and signed consent is to be considered as a serious issue in the conduct of a clinical trial. Development of ethical guidance for physicians started before Christ Era with the Hippocratic Oath. Main function of consent, as articulated in all guidelines developed for clinical research, is to facilitate an individual’s freedom of choice, respect autonomy, and thus to ensure welfare of the participants in clinical trials. Minors are unable to provide legally binding informed consent, this issue is addressed through a combination of parental permission and minor’s assent. Illiteracy is a critical problem that affects all corners of our earth; it has no boundaries and exists among every race and ethnicity, age group, and economic class. New strategies to improve communication with patients including the use of videotapes or animated cartoon illustrations could be taught. Finally the time with the potential participant seems to be the best way to improve understanding. Conclusion: Discovery of life saving and life enhancing new treatments requires partnership that is based on good communication and trust between patients and researchers, sponsors, ethics committees, authorities, lawyers and politicians so that vulnerable patients can benefit from the results of well controlled clinical trials. PMID:23346043

  15. Clinical aspects of leishmaniasis with special reference to the USSR*

    PubMed Central

    Moškovskij, Š. D.; Southgate, B. A.

    1971-01-01

    The wide variety of clinical syndromes produced in man by infection with members of the genus Leishmania has caused a great deal of confusion for many years, and has proved a serious obstacle to the rational classification of the leishmaniases. The situation has been complicated still further by the morphological identity of many species of Leishmania and by the behavioural similarities in vitro and in laboratory animals of species and strains producing distinct clinical or epidemiological patterns in humans. There has been a general failure to use standardized, comparable, and reproducible techniques in experimental studies of the various species of Leishmania; in particular, with one or two notable exceptions, there has been failure to adopt quantitative methods when studying Leishmania and the leishmaniases. This paper therefore attempts to classify the leishmaniases from clinical and epidemiological standpoints, and illustrates the provisional classification adopted with special reference to the situation in the USSR. PMID:5316251

  16. Immunoregulation by Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Biological Aspects and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Manrreza, Marta E.; Montesinos, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells capable of differentiation into mesenchymal lineages and that can be isolated from various tissues and easily cultivated in vitro. Currently, MSCs are of considerable interest because of the biological characteristics that confer high potential applicability in the clinical treatment of many diseases. Specifically, because of their high immunoregulatory capacity, MSCs are used as tools in cellular therapies for clinical protocols involving immune system alterations. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge about the capacity of MSCs for the immunoregulation of immunocompetent cells and emphasize the effects of MSCs on T cells, principal effectors of the immune response, and the immunosuppressive effects mediated by the secretion of soluble factors and membrane molecules. We also describe the mechanisms of MSC immunoregulatory modulation and the participation of MSCs as immune response regulators in several autoimmune diseases, and we emphasize the clinical application in graft versus host disease (GVHD). PMID:25961059

  17. Familial renal cell carcinoma: clinical and molecular genetic aspects

    PubMed Central

    Maher, E.R.; Yates, J.R.W.

    1991-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for 2% of all human cancer, but familial cases are infrequent. Riches (1963) and Griffin et al. (1984) in a population-based case-control study found a family history of renal cell carcinoma in 2.4% of affected patients compared to 1.4% of controls. Nevertheless the importance of inherited tumours in clinical practice and medical research is disproportionate to their frequency. In clinical practice recognition of familial RCC can provide opportunities to prevent morbidity and mortality by appropriate screening. In medical research recent advances in molecular genetics offer the prospect of isolating the genes involved in the pathogenesis of familial RCC and of the more common sporadic cases. In this article we review the clinical and molecular genetics of inherited renal cell carcinoma (adenocarcinoma or hypernephroma). PMID:1997093

  18. Biomechanical gait features associated with hip osteoarthritis: Towards a better definition of clinical hallmarks.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Christophe A G; Corten, Kristoff; Fieuws, Steffen; Deschamps, Kevin; Monari, Davide; Wesseling, Mariska; Simon, Jean-Pierre; Desloovere, Kaat

    2015-10-01

    Critical appraisal of the literature highlights that the discriminative power of gait-related features in patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA) has not been fully explored. We aimed to reduce the number of gait-related features and define the most discriminative ones comparing the three-dimensional gait analysis of 20 patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA) with those of 17 healthy peers. First, principal component analysis was used to reduce the high-dimensional gait data into a reduced set of interpretable variables for further analysis, including tests for group differences. These differences were indicative for the selection of the top 10 variables to be included into linear discriminant analysis models (LDA). Our findings demonstrated the successful data reduction of hip osteoarthritic-related gait features with a high discriminatory power. The combination of the top variables into LDA models clearly separated groups, with a maximum misclassification error rate of 19%, estimated by cross-validation. Decreased hip/knee extension, hip flexion and internal rotation moment were gait features with the highest discriminatory power. This study listed the most clinically relevant gait features characteristics of hip OA. Moreover, it will help clinicians and physiotherapists understand the movement pathomechanics related to hip OA useful in the management and design of rehabilitation intervention.

  19. An overview on clinical aspects in magnetic seizure therapy.

    PubMed

    Engel, Alice; Kayser, Sarah

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the presented work is to provide an overview on the clinical data of the promising convulsive brain stimulation technique, the magnetic seizure therapy (MST). We review the advantages and disadvantages of MST, focusing on rationale, development and current treatment procedure. We also provide a summary of the current literature including clinical trials and case reports found in the PubMed database. Furthermore, we consider effectiveness and side effects, emphasizing on crucial issues to be addressed for a better understanding of this potential new treatment option in treatment-resistant depression (TRD).

  20. Clinical aspects of neurointestinal disease: Pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Allan M; Thapar, Nikhil; Karunaratne, Tennekoon Buddhika; De Giorgio, Roberto

    2016-09-15

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) is involved in the regulation of virtually all gut functions. Conditions referred to as enteric neuropathies are the result of various mechanisms including abnormal development, degeneration or loss of enteric neurons that affect the structure and functional integrity of the ENS. In the past decade, clinical and molecular research has led to important conceptual advances in our knowledge of the pathogenetic mechanisms of these disorders. In this review we consider ENS disorders from a clinical perspective and highlight the advancing knowledge regarding their pathophysiology. We also review current therapies for these diseases and present potential novel reparative approaches for their treatment.

  1. Oncolytic Virus: Regulatory Aspects from Quality Control to Clinical Studies.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Teruhide; Uchida, Eriko

    2017-02-22

    Oncolytic viruses, which include both naturally occurring wild-type viruses/attenuated viruses and genetically modified viruses, have recently been developed for use in innovative cancer therapies. Genetically modified oncolytic viruses possess the unique ability to replicate conditionally as a unique gene therapy product. Since oncolytic viruses exhibit prolonged persistence in patients, viral shedding and transmission to third parties should be major concerns for clinical trials, along with the clinical safety and efficacy. Accordingly, studies are now underway to establish the safety and efficacy of oncolytic viruses.

  2. The Pathophysiology and Clinical Aspects of Hypercalcemic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lee, David B. N.; Zawada, Edward T.; Kleeman, Charles R.

    1978-01-01

    For the purposes of this review, the vast and increasingly complex subject of hypercalcemic disorders can be broken down into the following categories: (1) Physiochemical state of calcium in circulation. (2) Pathophysiological basis of hypercalcemia. (3) Causes of hypercalcemia encountered in clinical practice: causes indicated by experience at the University of California, Los Angeles; neoplasia; hyperparathyroidism; nonparathyroid endocrinopathies; pharmacological agents; possible increased sensitivity to vitamin D; miscellaneous causes. (4) Clinical manifestations and diagnostic considerations of hypercalcemic disorders. (5) The management of hypercalcemic disorders: general measures; measures for lowering serum calcium concentration; measures for correcting primary causes—the management of asymptomatic hyperparathyroidism. PMID:362722

  3. Modified fixations for distal femur fractures following total knee arthroplasty: a biomechanical and clinical relevance study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Hao; Tai, Ching-Lung; Yu, Tzai-Chiu; Wang, Chih-Wei; Lin, Chia-Wei; Chen, Chen-Yu; Liu, Keng-Chang

    2016-10-01

    Distal femur fractures adjacent to total knee arthroplasty are a rare yet complex problem. Recently, extramedullary locking plate and retrograde intramedullary nail fixations have become popular options, but the complication rates associated with these procedures are 15-20 %. Modified fixations were assessed in an effort to reduce complications from unstable periprosthetic fractures. Using experimental and finite element methods, this study compared the construct behaviours of a locking plate, a retrograde intramedullary nail, and their modifications (a spiral-blade supplemented in an intramedullary nail or a locking plate/allograft hybrid) when subjected to various fracture types, locations, loading conditions, and bony strength. The implanted models were used to assess construct stiffness, fracture micromotion, and implant stress under different osteoporotic conditions. Finally, we collected 40 cases for radiological analysis to indicate the appropriate procedure for treating periprosthetic fractures following total knee arthroplasty. Regardless of the fracture type, femoral constructs fixed with a conventional or spiral-blade supplemented intramedullary nail exhibited higher axial but lower torsional stiffness than those fixed with a locking plate. Torsional deformation occurred if the lower-positioned fracture had no medial support. The locking plate/allograft construct exhibited the highest stiffness and the least micromotion. A review of 40 clinical cases confirmed the above findings regarding the locking plate/allograft construct. The spiral-blade supplement of retrograde intramedullary nail and locking plate/allograft modified constructs significantly stabilizes the unstable fractured gaps. The locking plate/allograft is recommended for the periprosthetic fractures with deficient bone stock and severe osteoporosis to improve alignment and healing potentials.

  4. Statistical aspect of translational and correlative studies in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Herbert; Wang, Xiaofei

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we describe statistical issues related to the conduct of translational and correlative studies in cancer clinical trials. In the era of personalized medicine, proper biomarker discovery and validation is crucial for producing groundbreaking research. In order to carry out the framework outlined in this article, a team effort between oncologists and statisticians is the key for success. PMID:26932435

  5. Research and clinical aspects of the late effects of poliomyelitis

    SciTech Connect

    Halstead, L.S.; Wiechers, D.O.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 32 selections. Some of the titles are: Late effects of Polio: Historical Perspectives; Sleep-Disordered Breathing as a Late Effect of Poliomyelitis; Clinical Subtypes, DNA Repair Efficiency, and Therapeutic Trials in the Post-Polio Syndromes; and Post-Polio Muscle Function.

  6. THE CLINICAL ASPECTS, DIAGNOSIS AND EPIDEMIOLOGY OF HISTOPLASMOSIS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Histoplasmosis in adults can have an acute, subacute, or chronic course. In children, particularly in the early ages, the disease has an acute...this its clinical manifestations are extremely varied. Generalized histoplasmosis is accompanied by an irregular type fever, splenohepatomegaly, anemia, lymphadenopathy, and sharp emaciation.

  7. Clinical, pathological, and etiologic aspects of acquired dermal melanocytosis.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, M; Murakami, F; Ito, M; Asano, M; Baba, T; Kawa, Y; Kubota, Y

    1997-06-01

    To study the pathogenesis of acquired dermal melanocytosis (ADM), we reviewed the clinical, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural features of 34 cases (female, 33, and male, 1) of ADM. The patients' ages at onset ranged from 8 to 51 years and averaged 26.8 +/- 12.7 years. There was a positive family history. Gray-brown macules were mostly recognized on the face. Not only active dermal melanocytes but also non-pigmented c-KIT- and TRP-2-positive immature melanocytes were detected in the dermis. Taken together those clinical and histological findings, activation of pre-existing immature melanocytes by sunlight, estrogen, and/or progesterone, and some other factors, may be the most likely mode of the development of ADM. Moreover, using cultured murine neural crest cells as a model of c-KIT-positive immature melanocytes, we confirmed that endothelin-1, which is produced and secreted by keratinocytes after UV-irradiation, affects melanocytes and accelerated melanogenesis.

  8. BK Polyomavirus: Clinical Aspects, Immune Regulation, and Emerging Therapies.

    PubMed

    Ambalathingal, George R; Francis, Ross S; Smyth, Mark J; Smith, Corey; Khanna, Rajiv

    2017-04-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKV) causes frequent infections during childhood and establishes persistent infections within renal tubular cells and the uroepithelium, with minimal clinical implications. However, reactivation of BKV in immunocompromised individuals following renal or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may cause serious complications, including BKV-associated nephropathy (BKVAN), ureteric stenosis, or hemorrhagic cystitis. Implementation of more potent immunosuppression and increased posttransplant surveillance has resulted in a higher incidence of BKVAN. Antiviral immunity plays a crucial role in controlling BKV replication, and our increasing knowledge about host-virus interactions has led to the development of improved diagnostic tools and clinical management strategies. Currently, there are no effective antiviral agents for BKV infection, and the mainstay of managing reactivation is reduction of immunosuppression. Development of immune-based therapies to combat BKV may provide new and exciting opportunities for the successful treatment of BKV-associated complications.

  9. Pediatric Flexible Flatfoot; Clinical Aspects and Algorithmic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Halabchi, Farzin; Mazaheri, Reza; Mirshahi, Maryam; Abbasian, Ladan

    2013-01-01

    Flatfoot constitutes the major cause of clinic visits for pediatric foot problems. The reported prevalence of flatfoot varies widely due to numerous factors. It can be divided into flexible and rigid flatfoot. Diagnosis and management of pediatric flatfoot has long been the matter of controversy. Common assessment tools include visual inspection, anthropometric values, footprint parameters and radiographic evaluation. Most flexible flatfeet are physiologic, asymptomatic, and require no treatment. Otherwise, the physician should treat symptomatic flexible flatfeet. Initial treatment options include activity modification, proper shoe and orthoses, exercises and medication. Furthermore, comorbidities such as obesity and ligamenous laxity should be identified and managed, if applicable. When all nonsurgical treatment options faile, surgery can be considered. Our purpose in this article is to present a clinical algorithmic approach to pediatric flatfoot. PMID:23795246

  10. Molecular approaches to epidemiology and clinical aspects of malaria.

    PubMed

    Brown, G V; Beck, H P; Molyneux, M; Marsh, K

    2000-10-01

    Malaria is a problem of global importance, responsible for 1-2 million deaths per year, mainly in African children, as well as considerable morbidity manifested as severe anaemia and encephalopathy in young children. Fundamental to the development of new tools for malaria control in humans is an increased understanding of key features of malaria infection, such as the diversity of outcome in different individuals, the understanding of different manifestations of the disease and of the mechanisms of immunity that allow clinical protection in the face of ongoing low-grade infection (concomitant immunity or premunition). Here, Graham Brown and colleagues review some of the ways in which molecular approaches might be used to increase our understanding of the epidemiology and clinical manifestations of malaria, as discussed at the Molecular Approaches to Malaria conference (MAM2000), Lorne, Australia, 2-5 February 2000.

  11. Pericoronitis: a reappraisal of its clinical and microbiologic aspects.

    PubMed

    Nitzan, D W; Tal, O; Sela, M N; Shteyer, A

    1985-07-01

    Pericoronitis is an infectious disease of the operculum overlying an erupting or semi-impacted tooth. It manifests itself mainly in late adolescence and young adulthood and nearly always occurs around the lower third molar. The distinctive location, age, clinical picture, and link with predisposing factors warranted a reappraisal of pericoronitis and its etiology. Spirochetes and fusobacteria proved prevalent at all stages of the disease. The presence of these microbacteria may provide a clue as to the late appearance, particular location, and singular clinical picture of pericoronitis. The fact that spirochetes and fusobacteria are also found in acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, and have been associated with alveolar osteitis, indicates a possible relationship between these disorders and pericoronitis.

  12. Coryneform bacteria in infectious diseases: clinical and laboratory aspects.

    PubMed Central

    Coyle, M B; Lipsky, B A

    1990-01-01

    Coryneform isolates from clinical specimens frequently cannot be identified by either reference laboratories or research laboratories. Many of these organisms are skin flora that belong to a large number of taxonomic groups, only 40% of which are in the genus Corynebacterium. This review provides an update on clinical presentations, microbiological features, and pathogenic mechanisms of infections with nondiphtheria Corynebacterium species and other pleomorphic gram-positive rods. The early literature is also reviewed for a few coryneforms, especially those whose roles as pathogens are controversial. Recognition of newly emerging opportunistic coryneforms is dependent on sound identification schemes which cannot be developed until cell wall analyses and nucleic acid studies have defined the taxonomic groups and all of the reference strains within each taxon have been shown by molecular methods to be authentic members. Only then can reliable batteries of biochemical tests be selected for distinguishing each taxon. PMID:2116939

  13. [Clinical and endoscopic aspects of laryngeal dyskinesia in the infant].

    PubMed

    Denoyelle, F; Roger, G; Garabedian, E N

    1994-01-01

    Laryngeal dyskinesia, also called function stridor or stridor by cordal dysfunction, has been described in older children and in adults as episodes of acute dyspnea sometimes induced by exertion and in a particular psychological context. We report 5 cases of infants with stridor due to defective abduction of the vocal cords and normal laryngeal opening which occurred at rest or at awakening after anaesthesia. The common point was the clinical course of the stridor comparable with stridor which occurs during rapid respiration (crying) seen at birth then disappearing during the first 18 months of life, and also clinically observed gastro-oesophageal reflux which was confirmed by oesophageal pH measurements. Two infants had malaise with vagal hyperactivity. Disappearance of the stridor had no times relationship with the initiation of anti-reflux treatment and disappeared progressively near the end of the first year of life.

  14. [Compatibility of science and clinical aspects. Between realism and utopia].

    PubMed

    Stange, R; Perl, M; Münzberg, M; Histing, T

    2013-01-01

    The working environment for young residents in orthopedic surgery has changed tremendously over the past 10 years. Due to cumulative clinical requirements and increasing demands on work-life balance research activity has become less attractive. Successful incorporation of research into the career of residents is a challenging project for the future. The young forum of the German Association for Orthopedics and Traumatology (DGOU) provides different approaches to enhance the quality of research and to help young orthopedists and trauma surgeons.

  15. Sex-related clinical aspects in insect venom anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Nittner-Marszalska, Marita; Liebhart, Jerzy; Dor-Wojnarowska, Anna

    2015-06-01

    Experimental studies, epidemiological data, and clinical observations suggest that the gender factor is involved in the development and manifestation of IgE-dependent allergic diseases. We intend to answer the question if sex-related factors may play a role in Hymenoptera venom allergy (HVA). In the majority of recent studies the frequency of HVA symptoms with respect to both LL and SYS reactions is similar for men and women, while proven sensitization to insect venom is less frequent in women. Studies assessing clinical reactivity in HVA indicate that male sex and vespid venom allergy are factors increasing the risk of severe allergic reactions. Regarding the risk of adverse events associated with gender in the course of venom immunotherapy (VIT), the results of two large EAACI multicenter studies are discordant. In the first study, women showed increased risk of VIT adverse events. In the latter, systemic allergic side effects were not associated with gender. Despite theoretical premises and certain clinical observations indicating an important role of estrogens in allergic diseases, their influence on stinging insects' venom hypersensitivity is not unequivocal and remains still open. Further studies on the safety of VIT in females seem to be advisable. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Clinical Aspects of Cerebral Venous Thrombosis: Experiences in Two Institutions

    PubMed Central

    Rim, Hyun Taek; Jun, Hyo Sub; Ahn, Jun Hyong; Kim, Ji Hee; Oh, Jae Keun; Song, Joon Ho; Cho, Byung Moon

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare condition for which few clinical reviews have been conducted in Korea. Our aim was to investigate, risk factors, clinical presentations/courses, and outcomes of 22 patients treated for CVT at two centers. Materials and Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted, selecting 22 patients diagnosed with and treated for CVT at two patient care centers over a 10-year period (January 1, 2004 to August 31, 2015). Patient data, pathogenetic concerns (laboratory findings), risk factors, locations, symptoms, treatments, and clinical outcomes were reviewed. Results Mean patient age at diagnosis was 54.41 ± 16.19. Patients most often presented with headache (40%), followed by seizure (27%) and altered mental status (18%). Focal motor deficits (5%), visual symptoms (5%), and dysarthria (5%) were less common. Important predisposing factors in CVT included prothrombotic conditions (35%), infections (14%), hyperthyroidism (18%), trauma (14%), and malignancy (4%). By location, 9 patients (40%) experienced thrombosis of superior sagittal sinus predominantly, with involvement of transverse sinus in 20 (90%), sigmoid sinus in 12 (40%), and the deep venous system in 5 (23%). Treatment generally consisted of anticoagulants (63%) or antiplatelet (23%) drugs, but surgical decompression was considered if warranted (14%). Medical therapy in CVT yields good functional outcomes. Conclusion Mean age of patients with CVT in our study exceeded that reported in Europe or in America and had difference in risk factors. Functional outcomes are good with use of antithrombotic medication, whether or not hemorrhagic infarction is evident. PMID:27847760

  17. [Current clinical aspects of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring].

    PubMed

    Sauza-Sosa, Julio César; Cuéllar-Álvarez, José; Villegas-Herrera, Karla Montserrat; Sierra-Galán, Lilia Mercedes

    2016-01-01

    Systemic arterial hypertension is the prevalentest disease worldwide that significantly increases cardiovascular risk. An early diagnosis together to achieve goals decreases the risk of complications significatly. Recently have been updated the diagnostic criteria for hypertension and the introduction of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. The introduction into clinical practice of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was to assist the diagnosis of «white coat hypertension» and «masked hypertension». Today has also shown that ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is better than the traditional method of recording blood pressure in the office, to the diagnosis and to adequate control and adjustment of drug treatment. Also there have been introduced important new concepts such as isloted nocturnal hypertension, morning blood pressure elevation altered and altered patterns of nocturnal dip in blood pressure; which have been associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Several studies have shown significant prognostic value in some stocks. There are still other concepts on which further study is needed to properly establish their introduction to clinical practice as hypertensive load variability, pulse pressure and arterial stiffness. In addition to setting values according to further clinical studies in populations such as elderly and children.

  18. Clinical aspects of posterior uveitis in ocular sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Svetlana V; Jovanović, Zorica D; Radotić, Filip M; Srećković, Suncica B; Paunović, Svetlana S; Stojanović, Jasmina D

    2012-06-01

    Two clinical forms of the "white spot" syndrome in patients with posterior uveitis in definitive and presumable ocular sarcoidosis were analyzed. Group 1 was characterized by periphlebitis and discrete white spots around the vein of the retina, so-called "candle-wax", whereas group 2 showed yellow-orange solitary nodules located at the choroid, i.e. multifocal choroiditis. Visual acuity and the severity of clinical presentation were assessed in both groups. Visual acuity, Snellen equivalent was 0.52 +/- 0.36 in group 1 and 0.82 +/- 0.39 in group 2 with lesions at the level of choroid. One-way analysis of variance ANOVA showed a statistically significant between-group difference in visual acuity (p = 0.03). The mean severity of clinical presentation was 11.80 +/- 2.04 points in group 1 and 5.80 +/- 4.18 points in group 2. T-test for independent samples yielded a statistically significant difference between the groups (p = 0.02). A statistically significant difference in visual acuity was the result of vasculitis in the group with the "candle-wax" phenomenon, which is associated with retinal vasculitis and causes cystoid macular edema and reduction of visual acuity. Complications such as cataract, glaucoma and neovascularization, which also decrease visual acuity, were more frequent in group 1.

  19. Clinical aspects of melatonin intervention in Alzheimer's disease progression.

    PubMed

    Cardinali, Daniel P; Furio, Analía M; Brusco, Luis I

    2010-09-01

    Melatonin secretion decreases in Alzheimer´s disease (AD) and this decrease has been postulated as responsible for the circadian disorganization, decrease in sleep efficiency and impaired cognitive function seen in those patients. Half of severely ill AD patients develop chronobiological day-night rhythm disturbances like an agitated behavior during the evening hours (so-called "sundowning"). Melatonin replacement has been shown effective to treat sundowning and other sleep wake disorders in AD patients. The antioxidant, mitochondrial and antiamyloidogenic effects of melatonin indicate its potentiality to interfere with the onset of the disease. This is of particularly importance in mild cognitive impairment (MCI), an etiologically heterogeneous syndrome that precedes dementia. The aim of this manuscript was to assess published evidence of the efficacy of melatonin to treat AD and MCI patients. PubMed was searched using Entrez for articles including clinical trials and published up to 15 January 2010. Search terms were "Alzheimer" and "melatonin". Full publications were obtained and references were checked for additional material where appropriate. Only clinical studies with empirical treatment data were reviewed. The analysis of published evidence made it possible to postulate melatonin as a useful ad-on therapeutic tool in MCI. In the case of AD, larger randomized controlled trials are necessary to yield evidence of effectiveness (i.e. clinical and subjective relevance) before melatonin´s use can be advocated.

  20. Biosimilar monoclonal antibodies: preclinical and clinical development aspects.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, João; Araújo, Filipe; Cutolo, Maurizio; Fonseca, João Eurico

    2016-01-01

    Biological drugs and their originated biosimilars are large, highly complex molecules derived from living cells or organisms. Traditional medicines, by contrast, are usually simple molecules of low molecular weight, synthesised by chemical means. The distinct complexities and methods of manufacture create an important difference between biosimilars and conventional generic drugs: while chemical generics can be fully characterised as identical to the originator product, biosimilars cannot. In addition, biological therapies are inherently variable, creating unavoidable differences between even subsequent batches of the same product. An expiring patent does not necessarily mean that the manufacturing process of the originator product becomes available to the biosimilar developers (for instance, the relevant cell line clone and growth medium). Therefore, it cannot be guaranteed that biosimilar products are identical to their reference product on a molecular level. This difference has important implications for the regulation and licensing of biosimilars. While conventional generic drugs require only a limited comparison and demonstration of identical chemical structure to the reference product, biosimilars require far more rigorous testing. In general, there must be a thorough comparison of structural and functional characteristics between biosimilar and originator drug. Stepwise nonclinical in vitro and in vivo approaches are recommended to evaluate the similarity of both drugs and any identified micro-heterogeneities must then be assessed for their impact on safety and clinical performance. Subsequently, clinical pharmacokinetic (PK) studies need to be performed in order to demonstrate a similar PK profile, prior to conducting clinical efficacy trials.

  1. [Geriatric particularities of Parkinson's disease: Clinical and therapeutic aspects].

    PubMed

    Belin, J; Houéto, J L; Constans, T; Hommet, C; de Toffol, B; Mondon, K

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a frequent and complex progressive neurological disorder that increases in incidence with age. Although historically PD has been characterized by the presence of progressive dopaminergic neuronal loss of the substantia nigra, the disease process also involves neurotransmitters other that dopamine and regions of the nervous system outside the basal ganglia. Its clinical presentation in elderly subjects differs from that in younger subjects, with more rapid progression, less frequent tremor, more pronounced axial signs, more frequent non-motor signs linked to concomitant degeneration of non-dopaminergic systems, and more frequent associated lesions. Despite the high prevalence of PD in elderly subjects, few therapeutic trials have been conducted in geriatric patients. Nevertheless, to improve functional disability while ensuring drug tolerance, the principles of optimized and multidisciplinary clinical management have to be known. The aim of this review is to provide an update on clinical and therapeutic features of PD specifically observed in elderly subjects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. [Radiologic and clinical aspects of osteoarticular amyloidosis caused by dialysis].

    PubMed

    Baldrati, L; Rocchi, A; Balbi, B; Bonsanto, R; Mughetti, M; Pasini, A; Feletti, C; Capponcini, C; Docci, D

    1991-06-01

    Many long-term (greater than 60 months) hemodialysis patients develop a severe osteoarticular disease, called "dialysis arthropathy", which is characterized by the deposition in bone and synovia of a new type of amyloid made mainly of beta 2-microglobulin. In the present study, 31 patients (17 males, 14 females; age 54.1 +/- 13 years), undergoing chronic hemodialysis for 60-125 months, were examined for dialysis arthropathy by means of clinics and of radiological investigations (conventional radiography and computed tomography). Sixteen patients (51.6%) had radiographic evidence of dialysis arthropathy: geodes (shoulders, 12 cases; wrists, 11; hips, 2; knees, 2) and/or destructive arthropathies (cervical spine, 13 cases, dorsolumbar spine, 2; hands, 2; hips, 1). Within 24 months, these lesions were found to progress slowly in the majority of cases. In the diagnostic process, CT should be employed in the study of spine, shoulders and hips when the lesions have not been sufficiently demonstrated by conventional radiography in the presence of evident clinical signs. Patients with dialysis arthropathy had undergone dialysis for longer periods than those without it (p less than 0.005) and showed a significantly higher incidence of both carpal tunnel syndrome (p less than 0.0005) and shoulder pain (p less than 0.005). Our findings confirm the high incidence and clinical importance of dialysis arthropathy in long-term hemodialysis patients and the value of diagnostic imaging in screening such patients for those lesions.

  3. Delayed union and nonunions: epidemiology, clinical issues, and financial aspects.

    PubMed

    Hak, David J; Fitzpatrick, Daniel; Bishop, Julius A; Marsh, J Lawrence; Tilp, Susanne; Schnettler, Reinhard; Simpson, Hamish; Alt, Volker

    2014-06-01

    Fracture healing is a critically important clinical event for fracture patients and for clinicians who take care of them. The clinical evaluation of fracture healing is based on both radiographic findings and clinical findings. Risk factors for delayed union and nonunion include patient dependent factors such as advanced age, medical comorbidities, smoking, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory use, various genetic disorders, metabolic disease and nutritional deficiency. Patient independent factors include fracture pattern, location, and displacement, severity of soft tissue injury, degree of bone loss, quality of surgical treatment and presence of infection. Established nonunions can be characterised in terms of biologic capacity, deformity, presence or absence of infection, and host status. Hypertrophic, oligotrophic and atrophic radiographic appearances allow the clinician to make inferences about the degree of fracture stability and the biologic viability of the fracture fragments while developing a treatment plan. Non-unions are difficult to treat and have a high financial impact. Indirect costs, such as productivity losses, are the key driver for the overall costs in fracture and non-union patients. Therefore, all strategies that help to reduce healing time with faster resumption of work and activities not only improve medical outcome for the patient, they also help reduce the financial burden in fracture and non-union patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical aspects and outcome of suspected severe pediatric malaria.

    PubMed

    Losimba Likwela, J; D'Alessandro, U; Donnen, P; Wilmet Dramaix, M

    2012-07-01

    The authors had for aim to evaluate diagnosis and treatment practices applied to children with clinically suspected severe malaria, in two referral hospitals of Kisangani. A prospective study was carried out between January 1, 2010 and February 28, 2011 including all children admitted for clinically suspected severe malaria, with at least one of the WHO severity criteria. One thousand one hundred and fifty-four children were admitted in the two hospitals, 427 (37.0%, n=1.154) for clinically suspected severe malaria: 155 (36.3%, n=427) had a positive thick drop examination (TDE), 198 (46.4%, n=427) a negative one, and 74 (17.3%, n=427) without thick blood smear examination. Prostration (48.0%) and anemia (40.3%) were the most common severity criteria, while 14.5% and 9.8% presented with convulsions and impaired consciousness respectively. The etiological treatment was quinine infusion. The case specific fatality rate was 19.4% (n=427), 7.7% (n=155) in confirmed cases, 9.6% (n=198) in patients with negative thick blood smear, and 70.3% (n=74) in patients without any TDE (P <0.001). Poor technical support and inadequate organization of the patient circuit can result in underestimating the metabolic complications of severe malaria and of other severe infections of early childhood. This is detrimental to the patients, even when effective drugs are available. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  5. Lupus erythematosus: considerations about clinical, cutaneous and therapeutic aspects*

    PubMed Central

    Moura Filho, Jucélio Pereira; Peixoto, Raiza Luna; Martins, Lívia Gomes; de Melo, Sillas Duarte; de Carvalho, Ligiana Leite; Pereira, Ana Karine F. da Trindade C.; Freire, Eutilia Andrade Medeiros

    2014-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is a chronic inflammatory disease with multifactorial etiology. Although clinical manifestations are varied, the skin is an important target-organ, which contributes to the inclusion of skin lesions in 4 out of the 17 new criteria for the diagnosis of the disease, according to the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics. The cutaneous manifestations of lupus are pleomorphic. Depending on their clinical characteristics, they can be classified into Acute Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus, Subacute Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus, Chronic Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus and Intermittent Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus. Treatment is based on preventive measures, reversal of inflammation, prevention of damage to target organs and relief of adverse events due to pharmacological therapy. The most commonly used treatment options are topical, systemic and surgical treatment, as well as phototherapy. The correct handling of the cases depends on a careful evaluation of the morphology of the lesions and the patient's general status, always taking into consideration not only the benefits but also the side effects of each therapeutic proposal. PMID:24626656

  6. Clinical aspects of hemimegalencephaly by means of a nationwide survey.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Masayuki; Hashimoto, Toshiaki; Furushima, Wakana; Okada, Mari; Kinoshita, Satoru; Fujikawa, Yoshinao; Sugai, Kenji

    2005-04-01

    We surveyed Japanese patients with hemimegalencephaly by means of a questionnaire. Clinical findings, including intellectual and motor function levels and epileptic symptoms, were investigated. All 44 patients (28 males and 16 females) with hemimegalencephaly were sporadic. Sixteen patients had underlying neurocutaneous syndromes. The number of patients with right-sided hemimegalencephaly (n = 29) was almost twice that of patients with left-sided hemimegalencephaly (n = 15). Forty-one patients had mental retardation and hemiparesis and 14 patients were bedridden. All patients had epileptic seizures, which first appeared within a month in 18 cases and within 6 months in 11 cases. In 42 patients, magnetic resonance imaging revealed both cortical and white-matter abnormalities in the affected hemisphere. Antiepileptic drugs were not very effective. Fifteen patients were surgically treated. Eleven patients underwent functional hemispherectomy, which resulted in fairly good seizure control and improved development. There is a correlation between the onset of epilepsy and the degree of clinical severity of motor deficit and intellectual level. Neither underlying disorders nor laterality of the affected side was related to the degree of clinical severity.

  7. Future aspects of cellular and molecular research in clinical voice treatment aspects of optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Mette; Mahmood, Sanila

    2015-02-01

    Focus is upon our clinical experience in a prospective cohort study on cure of dystonia where the mode of treatment was fexofenadine tablets and local budesonide inhaler in the larynx, and in a randomized controlled trial of lifestyle change related to acid provocation of food and habits in laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). The advanced high-speed films is one new tool, another being optical coherence tomography (OCT), which should be used in the future in randomized controlled trials. We are focusing on OCT of the swallowing process in the oesophagaus and larynx as well as the vocal fold function. It can be shown on OCT how the layer of the vocal folds develop, possibly corresponding to hormonal and paediatric development. The arytenoid area in the larynx should also be focused upon with OCT in pathology. The thyroid function is related to voice and the swallowing function, both hormonally and pathoanatomically. We know too little about voice and thyroid hormones in an updated way as well as the outer anatomic supporting muscular structure of the larynx, related to thyroid immune degeneration and cysts. Also, here OCT analyses might be of value.

  8. Pubourethral ligaments in women: anatomical and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Vazzoler, N; Soulié, M; Escourrou, G; Seguin, P; Pontonnier, F; Bécue, J; Plante, P

    2002-02-01

    The anatomy and histological structure of the proximal (PPUL), distal (DPUL) and intermediate (IPUL) pubourethral ligaments in women was examined to improve the understanding of their roles in female urethral physiology. An anatomical study of the pelvis was carried out in 10 adult female cadavers (60-102 years), the pelvis being removed and frozen prior to dissection. The pubourethral ligaments (PUL) were dissected in sagittal sections in seven specimens and in a frontal section in one specimen; the remaining two pelves were dissected using a hypogastric approach. The location, insertion, direction and histological structure of the ligamentous structures were studied. The PUL were identified in all 10 dissections, being paired, symmetrical, pearly-white, fibrous and resistant to stretching. The bony (parietal) insertion was variable on the posterior surface of the pubis, while the visceral insertion was located on the dorsal aspect of the proximal third of the urethra and neck of the bladder for the PPUL and on the distal third of the urethra for the DPUL. Histologically, the ligaments were composed of dense collagen fibres and bundles of axially orientated smooth muscle fibres. The PPUL was closely associated with the sphincter urogenitalis muscle, whereas the DPUL appeared to reinforce the role of the compressor urethra. It is suggested that the PUL plays an effective role in passive and active suspension of the urethra. The pubourethral ligaments are a constant anatomical entity which should be spared in urethral surgery in women in order to ensure an intact urogenital sphincter.

  9. Clinical aspects of pancreatogenic diabetes secondary to hereditary pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Dytz, Marcio Garrison; Marcelino, Pedro Arthur Hamamoto; de Castro Santos, Olga; Zajdenverg, Lenita; Conceição, Flavia Lucia; Ortiga-Carvalho, Tânia Maria; Rodacki, Melanie

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare inherited form of pancreatitis, characterized by recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis with early onset and/or chronic pancreatitis, and presenting brittle diabetes, composed of episodes of nonketotic hyperglycemia and severe hypoglycemia. The existing literature regarding this form of diabetes is scarce. In this report, clinical features of pancreatogenic diabetes secondary to hereditary pancreatitis are presented along with recommendations for appropriate medical treatment. Clinical data from five patients of a family with pancreatogenic diabetes secondary to hereditary pancreatitis were analyzed. The average time between hereditary pancreatitis and diabetes diagnosis was 80 ± 24 months (range: 60-180 months) with a mean age of 25.6 ± 14.7 years (range: 8-42 years), four patients used antidiabetic agents for 46 ± 45 months and all progressed to insulin therapy with a mean dose of 0.71 ± 0.63 IU/kg (range: 0.3-1.76 IU/kg). The glycemic control had a high variability with average capillary blood glucose of 217.00 ± 69.44 mg/dl (range: 145-306 mg/dl) and the average HbA1c was 9.9 ± 1.9% (range: 7.6-11.6%). No ketoacidosis episodes occurred and there were several episodes of hospitalization for severe hypoglycemia. Diabetes mellitus secondary to hereditary pancreatitis presents with early onset, diverse clinical presentation and with extremely labile glycemic control. Diabetes treatment varies according to the presentation and insulin is frequently necessary for glycemic control.

  10. Clinical aspects of ALS in Gulf War veterans.

    PubMed

    Kasarskis, Edward J; Lindquist, Jennifer H; Coffman, Cynthia J; Grambow, Steven C; Feussner, John R; Allen, Kelli D; Oddone, Eugene Z; Kamins, Kimberly A; Horner, Ronnie D

    2009-02-01

    The increased incidence of ALS in military veterans of the first Persian Gulf War raised speculation that they may have a 'Persian Gulf' variant of ALS with atypical clinical features. Medical records of military veterans with ALS, previously identified in our epidemiological study, were evaluated for clinical features (age and site of onset, race, unexplained atypical findings) and ventilator-free survival. Comparisons between deployed versus non-deployed cohorts were made with deployment status based on designation by the Department of Defense Manpower Data Center (DMDC) or by self-report. Other than the young age of onset in both cohorts (40.8 years overall mean; 40.1 years for DMDC deployed, 41.2 years for DMDC non-deployed), review of the medical records failed to document any atypical features. After adjusting for bulbar onset, median survival from symptom onset in those > or =40 years of age was 35.5 months (2.96 years) compared to 64.7 months (5.39 years) in the group <40 years of age (hazard ratio (HR)=0.47, 95% CI 0.30-0.73, p=0.0006). After adjusting for age, median survival was 45.4 months (3.78 years) and 54.8 months (4.57 years) in bulbar- versus non-bulbar onset groups, respectively (HR=1.41, 95% CI 0.83-2.39, p=0.20). After adjusting for age and site of onset, deployed veterans had significantly shorter survival than non-deployed (40.2 vs. 57.0 months, HR=0.62, 95% CI 0.40-0.96, p=0.03) using DMDC data. In conclusion, although veterans developing ALS after deployment to the Persian Gulf in 1990-1991 exhibited otherwise typical clinical features, they experienced shorter ventilator-free survival than non-deployed veterans.

  11. Clinical aspects of accidents resulting in acute total body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cronkite, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    That the management of whole body radiation injury involves: (1) watchful waiting, (2) observation of the hematologic parameters, (3) use of antibiotics, platelet red cell and possibly granulocyte transfusions, (4) administration of hemopoietic molecular regulators of granulopoiesis, and (5) bone marrow transplantation as the last line of defense. The clinical indication for the preceding will not be discussed, since this will be a subject of later speakers in this conference. Certainly, if a radiation casualty is fortunate enough to have an identical twin, a marrow transplant may be lifesaving and certainly can do no harm to the patient, and there is little risk to the donor.

  12. Alcoholic liver disease: pathologic, pathogenetic and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Ishak, K G; Zimmerman, H J; Ray, M B

    1991-02-01

    Alcoholic liver disease includes steatosis, alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis. Other liver diseases of genetic origin, but with a curious association with alcohol intake, are hemochromatosis and porphyria cutanea tarda. The attribution of chronic hepatitis to alcohol intake remains speculative, and the association may reflect hepatitis C infection. Hepatic injury attributed to alcohol includes the changes reported in the fetal alcohol syndrome. Steatosis, the characteristic consequence of excess alcohol intake, is usually macrovesicular and rarely microvesicular. Acute intrahepatic cholestasis, which in rare instances accompanies steatosis, must be distinguished from other causes of intrahepatic cholestasis (e.g., drug-induced) and from mechanical obstruction of the intrahepatic bile ducts (e.g., pancreatitis, choledocholithiasis) before being accepted. Alcoholic hepatitis (steatonecrosis) is characterized by a constellation of lesions: steatosis, Mallory bodies (with or without a neutrophilic inflammatory response), megamitochondria, occlusive lesions of terminal hepatic venules, and a lattice-like pattern of pericellular fibrosis. All these lesions mainly affect zone 3 of the hepatic acinus. Other changes, observed at the ultrastructural level, are of importance in progression of the disease. They include widespread cytoplasmic shedding, and capillarization and defenestration of sinusoids. Progressive fibrosis complicating alcoholic hepatitis eventually leads to cirrhosis that is typically micronodular but can evolve to a mixed or macronodular pattern. Hepatocellular carcinoma occurs in 5 to 15% of patients with alcoholic liver disease. The clinical syndrome of alcoholic liver disease is the result of three factors--parenchymal insufficiency, portal hypertension and the clinical consequences of extrahepatic damage produced by alcohol. At the several phases of the life history of alcoholic liver disease, the individual factors play a different role. The clinical

  13. Elastoma: clinical and histopathological aspects of a rare disease*

    PubMed Central

    Maciel, Marina Gagheggi; Enokihara, Milvia Maria Simões e Silva; Seize, Maria Bandeira de Melo Paiva; Marcassi, Aline Pantano; Piazza, Christiane Affonso De Donato; Cestari, Silmara da Costa Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Elastoma is a connective tissue nevus characterized by changes in elastic fibers. It can be congenital or acquired, and is usually diagnosed before puberty. Associated with osteopoikilosis, it is known as Buschke-Ollendorff syndrome. Histopathology with specific staining for elastic fibers is critical for a diagnostic conclusion. This report describes the case of a 7-year-old male patient with lesions diagnosed as elastoma, with absence of bone changes in the radiological imaging. This study aims to report the clinical presentation and histological examination of such unusual disease.

  14. Nonmotor Symptoms in Parkinson's Disease in 2012: Relevant Clinical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Anne Marie; Jutras, Marie France; Czernecki, Virginie; Corvol, Jean Christophe; Vidailhet, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Nonmotor symptoms (NMSs) of Parkinson's disease (PD) are common, but they are often underrecognized in clinical practice, because of the lack of spontaneous complaints by the patients, and partly because of the absence of systematic questioning by the consulting physician. However, valid specific instruments for identification and assessment of these symptoms are available in 2012. The administration of the self-completed screening tool, NMSQuest, associated with questioning during the consultation, improves the diagnosis of NMSs. NMSs play a large role in degradation of quality of life. More relevant NMSs are described in this review, mood disorders, impulse control disorders, cognitive deficits, hallucinations, pain, sleep disorders, and dysautonomia. PMID:22888466

  15. [FeLV infection in the cat: clinically relevant aspects].

    PubMed

    Boretti, F S; Lutz, H; Hofmann-Lehmann, R

    2011-11-01

    The feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is a retrovirus of the domestic cat that was described almost 50 years ago. The FeLV-infection may lead to fatal diseases in domestic and small wild cats. The use of efficacious diagnostics assays and vaccines led to a reduction of the FeLV prevalence; however, FeLV still poses a problem for the cat presented with the infection. This article aims to describe recent developments in diagnostics and findings in the infection pathogenesis that are clinically relevant.

  16. Quantitation of Cytomegalovirus: Methodologic Aspects and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Boeckh, Michael; Boivin, Guy

    1998-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is an important pathogen in transplant recipients and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. Major progress has been made in developing quantitative detection methods for CMV in recent years. Due to their high sensitivity, these assays can detect CMV early, and quantitation may be useful in predicting the patient’s risk for disease and in monitoring the effect of antiviral therapy. This review discusses methodological aspects of currently used quantitative assays for CMV (i.e., viral culture techniques, antigen detection assays, DNA detection assays including PCR, branched-DNA assay, and the DNA hybrid capture assay) and addresses the correlation of systemic and site-specific CMV load and CMV disease in different populations of immunosuppressed patients as well as the response to antiviral treatment. To date, direct antigen detection and molecular techniques have largely replaced traditional culture-based techniques for CMV quantitation. In general, a high systemic CMV load is correlated with CMV disease. This correlation is strong in the HIV-infected population and in solid-organ transplant recipients but less clear in allogeneic marrow transplant recipients. Measuring the viral load at specific anatomic sites may be an alternative way to assess disease activity in situations where the systemic viral load correlates poorly with disease activity. A reduction of the systemic CMV load also correlates with a response to antiviral treatment, but more research is needed to evaluate the role of viral load as a surrogate marker for drug resistance. Due to the widespread use of quantitative CMV detection techniques to direct and monitor antiviral treatment, there is a great need for an assessment of the reproducibility of test results and better standardization of the assays. PMID:9665982

  17. Andersen-Tawil syndrome: clinical and molecular aspects.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hoai-Linh; Pieper, Gerard H; Wilders, Ronald

    2013-12-05

    Andersen–Tawil syndrome (ATS) is a rare hereditary multisystem disorder. Ventricular arrhythmias, periodic paralysis and dysmorphic features constitute the classic triad of ATS symptoms. The expressivity of these symptoms is, however, extremely variable, even within single ATS affected families, and not all ATS patients present with the full triad of symptoms. ATS patients may show a prolongation of the QT interval,which explains the classification as long QT syndrome type 7 (LQT7), and specific neurological or neurocognitive defects. In ATS type 1 (ATS1), the syndrome is associated with a loss-of-function mutation in the KCNJ2 gene,which encodes the Kir2.1 inward rectifier potassium channel. In ATS type 2 (ATS2), which does not differ from ATS1 in its clinical symptoms, the genetic defect is unknown. Consequently, ATS2 comprises all cases of ATS in which genetic testing did not reveal a mutation in KCNJ2. The loss-of-function mutations in KCNJ2 in ATS1 affect the excitability of both skeletal and cardiac muscle, which underlies the cardiac arrhythmias and periodic paralysis associated with ATS. Thus far, the molecular mechanism of the dysmorphic features is only poorly understood. In this review, we summarize the clinical symptoms, the underlying genetic and molecular defects, and the management and treatment of ATS.

  18. Impact of alcohol consumption on clinical aspects of gambling disorder.

    PubMed

    Del Pino-Gutiérrez, Amparo; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Granero, Roser; Tárrega, Salomé; Valdepérez, Ana; Agüera, Zaida; Håkansson, Anders; Sauvaget, Anne; Aymamí, Neus; Gómez-Peña, Mónica; Moragas, Laura; Baño, Marta; Honrubia, María; Menchón, José M; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana

    2017-04-01

    Similarities between gambling disorder and substance use disorders have been extensively described. To date, however, few studies using large clinical samples have been carried out that reliably assess the relationship between different levels of alcohol consumption and gambling disorders. The present study aimed to assess the impact of baseline alcohol consumption levels on the clinical profile in a large sample of treatment-seeking individuals. Nine hundred and fifty-one consecutive outpatients diagnosed with gambling disorder according to DSM-IV criteria were compared after being included in three alcohol consumption groups (low risk, abuse and risk of dependence) based on their total raw scores on the AUDIT questionnaire. Results showed a high prevalence of risk of alcohol dependence in GD patients who were immigrants, unemployed, and had a low level of education. A positive linear trend was also found between alcohol consumption level and the prevalence of other current and life-time comorbid mental disorders, and for the presence of drug abuse. Statistically significant differences were found between the three alcohol consumption groups in terms of the evolution and severity of the gambling disorder, self-directedness personality trait, and levels of general psychopathology, hostility and paranoid ideation. In conclusion, the results showed an association between increased alcohol consumption and greater dysfunction. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  19. [Heterotopic gray matter: MR findings and clinical aspects].

    PubMed

    Schuierer, G; Stefan, H; Wenzel, D; Kurlemann, G

    1995-01-01

    Heterotopias are conglomerates of neurons and glial cells in an abnormal location and belong to a group of malformations, which are the result of a disturbed migration of neurons during the embryonic development of the brain. The MRI-appearance and clinical symptoms of 14 patients with nodular or lamellar heterotopias are presented. Seizures were the leading symptom (12 of 14 patients), in children also a developmental deficit (4/10) with or without seizures. Most of the children (9/10) had further brain malformations especially of the corpus callosum or the cerebellar vermis. Nodular heterotopias without further malformations were found in 4 patients, two of them developing grand-mal seizures after childhood. On MRI heterotopias are characterized by a signal isointense to gray matter in all sequences. MRI-scans in at least 2 orientations are necessary to detect these anomalies reliably. MRI is the optimum method for the demonstration of these anomalies and should always be performed if seizures develop during childhood. At least in nodular heterotopias there is no definite correlation between the extent of the anomalies, the EEG-findings and the clinical symptoms. However there is a frequent combination of heterotopias with further cerebral malformations.

  20. Periodontal disease in diabetic patients - clinical and histopathological aspects.

    PubMed

    Corlan Puşcu, Dorina; Ciuluvică, Radu Constantin; Anghel, Andreea; Mălăescu, Gheorghe Dan; Ciursaş, Adina Nicoleta; Popa, Gabriel Valeriu; Agop Forna, Doriana; Busuioc, Cristina Jana; Siloşi, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease is one of the most frequent diseases affecting people all over the world. The relation between periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus raised the interest both of dentists and doctors treating metabolic diseases, as the two conditions influence one another. In our study, we analyzed a number of 75 patients with diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease that presented to the medical consultory for conditions of the dental maxillary system. The clinical study showed that periodontal disease and diabetes may affect young adults as well, still this pathological association more frequently appears after the age of 50. The disease was identified especially in the women living in urban area. The clinical examination of the dental maxillary system identified the presence of gingival ulcerations, dental calculus, gingival bleeding, radicular leftovers with anfractuous margins, fixed prostheses with an inappropriate cervical adjustment. Of the systemic diseases associated to periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus, there was observed that 66.66% of the patients also suffered from cardiovascular diseases (high blood pressure, ischemic cardiopathy, heart failure), and 37.33% suffered from obesity. The histopathological and immunohistochemical tests highlighted the presence of an inflammatory chronic, intense reaction, mainly formed of lymphocytes, plasmocytes, macrophages and granulocytes, heterogeneously disseminated and alteration of the structure of marginal and superficial periodontium. The inflammatory reaction in the patients with periodontal disease and diabetes was more intense than in the patients with periodontal disease without diabetes.

  1. Food hypersensitivity among adult patients: epidemiological and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Castillo, R; Delgado, J; Quiralte, J; Blanco, C; Carrillo, T

    1996-01-01

    Food hypersensitivity (FH) is lesser frequent among adult patients than in childhood. Foods implicated in hypersensitivity reactions vary with sociocultural and diet habits from a geographic place to other. We studied 142 adult patients sensitized to foods, among 7698 patients visited at our Outpatient Clinic. Hundred and twenty patients referred clinical symptoms after consumption of one or more foods consistently. From the latest, 107 patients (89.2%) were atopics (92 of them sensitizes to dust mites) and 54 (45%) referred atopic familiar background. Most frequent recorded symptoms were: urticaria/angioedema 84 cases (70%), oral syndrome 65 (54%), asthma 48 (37%) and anaphylaxis 33 patients (27.5%). Shellfish sensitization occurred in 50 patients, fresh fruits in 33 and nuts in 29 cases. Shrimp (48 patients), squid (33), kiwi (14), papaya (14), avocado (13) and banana (12 cases) were the most frequent causes of FH. Significant statistical association between foods and inhalants was observed for fresh fruits and latex (p < 0.001), fresh fruits and pollens (p < 0.01), and shellfish and Blatta germanica (p < 0.001). Prevalence of FH among patients at our Area is around 1.6%. Tropical fruits, as other kind of fruits, seem to share common IgE-epitopes to pollens. High prevalence of shellfish and cockroach hypersensitivity could be more easily developed by previous domestic mites sensitization.

  2. The radiotherapy clinical trials projects at the ESRF: technical aspects.

    PubMed

    Renier, M; Brochard, Th; Nemoz, C; Requardt, H; Bräuer, E; Esteve, F; Balosso, J; Suortti, P; Baruchel, J; Elleaume, H; Berruyer, G; Berkvens, P; Bravin, A

    2008-12-01

    The radiotherapy clinical trials projects, both aiming at treating aggressive brain tumors, require several major modifications and new constructions at the ESRF ID17 Biomedical beamline. The application of the Stereotactic Synchrotron Radiation Therapy (SSRT) technique mainly necessitates an upgrade of the existing patient positioning system, which was formerly used for the angiography program. It will allow for accurate positioning, translation and rotation of the patient during the treatment. For the Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) clinical trials project, a new white beam hutch will be constructed to accommodate a dedicated patient positioning system. Consequently, the existing control hutches and the related installations will also be completely refurbished. Furthermore, the foreseen installation of a second X-ray source, which will allow doubling the currently available photon flux at high energies, requires a redesign of most optical components to handle the increased power and power densities. Starting from the current ID17 Biomedical beamline layout, the paper will present an update of the different modification/construction projects, including the general organization and planning.

  3. Clinical aspects of feline immunodeficiency and feline leukemia virus infection.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Katrin

    2011-10-15

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are retroviruses with a global impact on the health of domestic cats. The two viruses differ in their potential to cause disease. FIV can cause an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome that increases the risk of developing opportunistic infections, neurological diseases, and tumors. In most naturally infected cats, however, FIV itself does not cause severe clinical signs, and FIV-infected cats may live many years without any health problems. FeLV is more pathogenic, and was long considered to be responsible for more clinical syndromes than any other agent in cats. FeLV can cause tumors (mainly lymphoma), bone marrow suppression syndromes (mainly anemia) and lead to secondary infectious diseases caused by suppressive effects of the virus on bone marrow and the immune system. Today, FeLV is less important as a deadly infectious agent as in the last 20 years prevalence has been decreasing in most countries. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Psychological aspects of prostate cancer: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    De Sousa, A; Sonavane, S; Mehta, J

    2012-06-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer in men. It is fraught with both physical and psychological symptomatology. Depression, anxiety, stress, fatigue, pain and psychosocial factors all affect the patient with prostate cancer. Impotence, erectile dysfunction, sexual issues and incontinence in these patients complicate matters further. Anxiety may exist both before testing and while awaiting test results. Confusion over choosing from various interventions often adds to anxiety and depression in these patients. Various demographic factors and the developmental stage of the couple affect these psychological symptoms. The caregiver may undergo significant psychological turmoil while caring for a patient diagnosed with prostate cancer, which is addressed. The role of nurses in the management of prostate cancer is discussed. The present review looks at psychological issues in patients with prostate cancer from a clinical perspective, with the aim of highlighting these issues for the clinical urologist dealing with these patients. It also explores the consultation-liaison relationship between psychiatrists, psychologists and urologists as a team for the multimodal management of prostate cancer.

  5. Taxonomy, biology, and clinical aspects of Fusarium species.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, P E; Dignani, M C; Anaissie, E J

    1994-01-01

    There are several taxonomic systems available for identifying Fusarium species. The philosophy used in each taxonomic system is discussed as well as problems encountered in working with Fusarium species in culture. Fusarium species are toxigenic, and the mycotoxins produced by these organisms are often associated with animal and human diseases. The implications for the association of the carcinogens, fumonisins, produced by Fusarium moniliforme and other Fusarium species with human diseases are discussed. Foreign-body-associated fusarial infection such as keratitis in contact lens wearers, onychomycosis, skin infections, and disseminated multiorgan infections are discussed. Disseminated fusarial hyalohyphomycosis has emerged as a significant, usually fatal infection in the immunocompromised host. Successful outcome is determined by the degree of immunosuppression, the extent of the infection, and the presence of a removable focus such as an indwelling central venous catheter. These infections may be clinically suspected on the basis of a constellation of clinical and laboratory findings, which should lead to prompt therapy, probably with one of the newer antifungal agents. Perhaps the use of such agents or the use of colony-stimulating factors may improve the outcome of this devastating infection. However, until new approaches for treatment develop, effective preventive measures are urgently needed. Images PMID:7834602

  6. Urinary proteins of tubular origin: basic immunochemical and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Scherberich, J E

    1990-01-01

    A variety of tubular marker proteins, as compared to healthy controls, are excreted at an increased rate in the urine of patients with renal damage. Beside cytoplasmic glutathione-S-transferase and lysosomal beta-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (beta-NAG) the majority of kidney-related urine proteins derives from membrane surface components of the most vulnerable proximal tubule epithelia, among them ala-(leu-gly)-aminopeptidase, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), the tubular portion of angiotensinase A, the major brush border glycoprotein 'SGP-240' and adenosine-deaminase-binding protein. Urinary tissue proteins, e.g. brush border (BB) microvilli, are immunologically identical with those antigens prepared from cell membranes of the human kidney itself. BB antigens are shed into the urine of patients with glomerulonephritis, interstitial nephritis, systemic diseases, e.g. systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), diabetes mellitus and multiple myeloma, arterial hypertension, infectious diseases (malaria, AIDS) and after operations, renal grafting and administration of X-ray contrast media, aminoglycosides or certain cytostatics (cis-platinum). Tissue proteinuria of tubular proteins is determined by enzyme-kinetic or quantitative immunological assays applying either poly- or monoclonal antikidney antibodies. Clinical, ultrastructural and histochemical studies support the idea that both 'soluble' and high-molecular-weight membrane particles (vacuolar blebs, greater than 10(6) dalton) as well as microfilamental components of the epithelial cytoskeleton contribute to tubular 'histuria' which appears as a sensitive parameter in monitoring tubular damage under clinical conditions at a very early phase.

  7. Clinical, molecular, and pharmacological aspects of FMR1 related disorders.

    PubMed

    Pugin, A; Faundes, V; Santa María, L; Curotto, B; Aliaga, S; Salas, I; Soto, P; Bravo, P; Peña, M I; Alliende, M A

    2017-05-01

    Fragile X syndrome, the most common inherited cause of intellectual disability, is associated with a broad spectrum of disorders across different generations of a single family. This study reviews the clinical manifestations of fragile X-associated disorders as well as the spectrum of mutations of the fragile X mental retardation 1 gene (FMR1) and the neurobiology of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), and also provides an overview of the potential therapeutic targets and genetic counselling. This disorder is caused by expansion of the CGG repeat (>200 repeats) in the 5 prime untranslated region of FMR1, resulting in a deficit or absence of FMRP. FMRP is an RNA-binding protein that regulates the translation of several genes that are important in synaptic plasticity and dendritic maturation. It is believed that CGG repeat expansions in the premutation range (55 to 200 repeats) elicit an increase in mRNA levels of FMR1, which may cause neuronal toxicity. These changes manifest clinically as developmental problems such as autism and learning disabilities as well as neurodegenerative diseases including fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS). Advances in identifying the molecular basis of fragile X syndrome may help us understand the causes of neuropsychiatric disorders, and they will probably contribute to development of new and specific treatments. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Prostate cancer in dogs: comparative and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Bruce E; Northrup, Nicole

    2009-05-01

    The canine prostate gland shares many morphological and functional similarities with the human prostate and dogs are the only other large mammals that commonly develop spontaneous prostate cancer. However, the incidence of prostate cancer is much lower in dogs and the precise cell of origin is not known. Dogs with prostate cancer usually present with advanced disease that does not respond to androgen deprivation therapy. Similar to humans, affected dogs often develop osteoblastic bone metastases in the pelvis and/or lumbar spine with associated pain and neurological deficits. Other clinical signs include weight loss, lethargy, and abnormal urination and/or defecation. Surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation have been used to treat dogs with prostate cancer, but success has been limited by the location and aggressive nature of the disease. It is evident that better methods of early detection and more effective therapies are needed for prostate cancer in dogs and advanced prostate carcinoma in men. Dogs with naturally-occurring prostate cancer are relevant models for the disease in humans and pre-clinical studies of new diagnostics and therapies in dogs may benefit both humans and dogs with prostate cancer.

  9. [Clinical aspects of chromosomal aberrations - problems of semiotics and nosography].

    PubMed

    Leiber, B

    1975-01-01

    Despite intense clinical and cytogenetic research for more than 15 years we are far from knowing any definite relations between karyotype and phenotype. Both cytogeneticists and clinicians are working on the methodological improvements which are still necessary. In the methods of clinical recording there is still very great weakness of exact documentation of findings. Above all there is a lack of reproducible qualitative, and especially quantitative standards which constitute the basis of any practicable nosography. Some procedures for quantifying dysplastic facial features which have hardly been described so far (graphic statistics) are reported briefly. Also the summation of symptoms, a method currently used in the field of chromosomopathy syndromes, is subject to critical consideration. In this group of diseases a total list of symptoms of about 250 items can be obtained which includes multilocular minor stigmata, dysplasias, errors of differentiation and gross malformations of organs. An extraordinarily high degree of overlapping of symptoms is characteristic of these syndromes and makes accurate diagnosis difficult. However, for the trisomy-syndromes we succeeded in working out a diagnostic guideline by differentiating between an unspecified basic symptomatology concerning all trisomias and a pattern-forming additional symptomatology of each single syndrome. Thereby the diverse total symptomatology is reduced to the crucial and the recognition of patterns in daily practice is facilitated considerably. The comparatively specific additional symptomatologies of trisomy 13 -- 14 (Patau), trisomy 17 -- 18 (EDWARDS), and trisomy 21 (DOWN) are demonstrated in graphic views.

  10. Clinical, Cellular, and Molecular Aspects in the Pathophysiology of Rosacea

    PubMed Central

    Steinhoff, Martin; Buddenkotte, Jörg; Aubert, Jerome; Sulk, Mathias; Novak, Pawel; Schwab, Verena D.; Mess, Christian; Cevikbas, Ferda; Rivier, Michel; Carlavan, Isabelle; Déret, Sophie; Rosignoli, Carine; Metze, Dieter; Luger, Thomas A.; Voegel, Johannes J.

    2013-01-01

    Rosacea is a chronic inflammatory skin disease of unknown etiology. Although described centuries ago, the pathophysiology of this disease is still poorly understood. Epidemiological studies indicate a genetic component, but a rosacea gene has not been identified yet. Four subtypes and several variants of rosacea have been described. It is still unclear whether these subtypes represent a “developmental march” of different stages or are merely part of a syndrome that develops independently but overlaps clinically. Clinical and histopathological characteristics of rosacea make it a fascinating “human disease model” for learning about the connection between the cutaneous vascular, nervous, and immune systems. Innate immune mechanisms and dysregulation of the neurovascular system are involved in rosacea initiation and perpetuation, although the complex network of primary induction and secondary reaction of neuroimmune communication is still unclear. Later, rosacea may result in fibrotic facial changes, suggesting a strong connection between chronic inflammatory processes and skin fibrosis development. This review highlights recent molecular (gene array) and cellular findings and aims to integrate the different body defense mechanisms into a modern concept of rosacea pathophysiology. PMID:22076321

  11. Early-onset Coronary Artery Disease Clinical and Hereditary Aspects.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Morten Krogh

    2017-09-01

    A family history of coronary artery disease (CAD) is an important risk factor for adverse coronary events, in particular if the disease has an early onset. The risk of CAD is influenced by genetic and environmental factors with a greater genetic contribution earlier in life. Through recent years the advances in genetic techniques has led to an increased understanding of the genetic background of CAD, which may potentially be translated into clinical use. The studies of this thesis aimed to investigate the burden of conventional risk factors and control in early-onset CAD (i.e. < 40 years), and to characterize and quantify subclinical atherosclerosis in their relatives. Furthermore, the aim was to explore the impact of common genetic risk variants on the age of onset, familial clustering and disease severity. In study I, 143 patients with early-onset CAD were recruited from the Western Denmark Heart Registry and risk factor control was evaluated. The study revealed that risk factors are common in early-onset CAD and that a large room for risk factor improvement remains. In study II, we used coronary computed tomography angiography to compare the coronary plaque burden and characteristics between 88 first-degree relatives of patients with early-onset CAD and 88 controls with no familial predisposition. Relatives had a significantly increased coronary plaque burden, which displayed characteristics associated with myocardial ischemia and adverse coronary events. In study III, 134 patients with early-onset CAD, a cohort of 446 late-onset CAD patients (onset > 55/65 years in males/females), and 89 healthy controls were genotyped for 45 common genetic risk variants and a genetic risk score was calculated as a measure of the polygenetic burden. Early-onset CAD patients had a modestly increased genetic burden compared with late-onset CAD patients and healthy controls; however, the burden did not associate with familial clustering of CAD. Additionally, familial clustering

  12. [Clinical toxicology in the historical and contemporary aspects].

    PubMed

    Kłys, Małgorzata

    2011-01-01

    Analyzing the problem of poisons and poisonings over the centuries can be seen that despite the different genealogies, the development of clinical and forensic toxicology runs parallel. However, slightly different areas of interests have been needed to produce. Staying in parallel position and complement each other, they form a single discipline - Toxicology. The analytics is the core of toxicology, because the turning point of the toxicology evolution was the development of laboratory diagnostic methods, whose role is still increasing, enabling decision-making and consultative medical examination. The toxicology history is fascinating and covers wide issues of the poisonings epidemiology, research methods, cognitive sphere, including the mechanisms of poisoning, expanding the practice through the casuistry and jurisdiction in terms of criminal responsibility, medical errors and the cause of death.

  13. [Chronic inflammatory bowel diseases. Clinical aspects and new therapy approaches].

    PubMed

    Siegmund, B

    2012-11-01

    There is a continuously increasing incidence in inflammatory bowel diseases affecting mostly young people who are in a vulnerable phase of life. Thus, early diagnosis and initiation of an effective therapeutic regimen is critical in order to maintain a good quality of life. In Germany, the standard therapeutic strategy is an accelerated step up approach, including the introduction of early immunosuppressive therapy if required. Although novel therapeutic strategies have found their way into clinical use there is still a substantial subgroup of patients where effective therapy is lacking. The future introduction of anti-adhesion molecule antibodies might provide a realistic option for this subgroup. Equally important is the availability of predictive markers allowing stratification of patients into subgroups at the time of diagnosis. Assuming that the CD8(+) T cell transcriptome approach will be confirmed in prospective trials, personalized therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease will be the next step.

  14. Herpes genitalis without frontiers: from clinical aspects to viral identification.

    PubMed

    Papini, M

    2012-10-01

    Genital herpes simplex virus infection is a recurrent, lifelong disease with no cure. The strongest predictor for infection is a person's number of lifetime sex partners. HSV-2 is the commonest responsible, although infections caused by HSV-1 are rapidly increasing, particularly in adolescents, women and men who have sex with men. The natural history includes first-episode of mucocutaneous infection, establishment of latency in the dorsal root ganglion, and subsequent reactivation. Most infections are transmitted via asymptomatic viral shedding. Atypical manifestations are common. Genital HSV-2 recurs six times more frequently than type 1. Laboratory confirmation of the clinical diagnosis is recommended in all patients in order to guide a correct counselling and management. Real-time PCR and viral culture represent the gold standard for diagnosis. Serologic testing can be useful in persons with a questionable history. Counselling patients about the risk of transmission is crucial and helps prevent the spread of disease and neonatal complications.

  15. Clinical Effects and Lethal and Forensic Aspects of Propofol*

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Propofol is a potent intravenous anesthetic agent that rapidly induces sedation and unconsciousness. The potential for propofol dependency, recreational use and abuse has only recently been recognized and several cases of accidental overdose and suicide have emerged. In addition, the first documented case of murder using propofol was reported a few months ago and a high profile case of suspected homicide with propofol is currently under investigation. A number of analytical methods have been employed to detect and quantify propofol concentrations in biological specimens. The reported propofol related deaths and post-mortem blood and tissue levels are reviewed. Importantly, limitations of propofol detection are discussed and future considerations are presented. Because propofol has the potential for diversion with lethal consequences, the forensic scientist must have a basic understanding of its clinical indications and uses, pharmacologic properties, and detection methods. In addition, medical institutions should develop systems to prevent and detect diversion of this potential drug of abuse. PMID:20950316

  16. Status epilepticus in the elderly: epidemiology, clinical aspects and treatment

    PubMed Central

    de Assis, Telma M.R.; Costa, Gersonita; Bacellar, Aroldo; Orsini, Marco; Nascimento, Osvaldo J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to review the epidemiology, clinical profile and discuss the etiology, prognosis and treatment options in patients aged 60 years or older presenting with status epilepticus. We performed a systematic review involving studies published from 1996 to 2010, in Medline/PubMed, Scientific Electronic Library on line (Scielo), Latin-American and Caribbean Center of Health Sciences Information (Lilacs) databases and textbooks. Related articles published before 1996, when relevant for discussing epilepsy in older people, were also included. Several population studies had shown an increased incidence of status epilepticus after the age of 60 years. Status epilepticus is a medical and neurological emergency that is associated with high morbidity and mortality, and is a major concern in the elderly compared to the general population. Prompt diagnosis and effective treatment of convulsive status epilepticus are crucial to avoid brain injury and reduce the fatality rate in this age group. PMID:23355930

  17. Methyltin intoxication in six men; toxicologic and clinical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Rey, C.; Reinecke, H.J.; Besser, R.

    1984-04-01

    Neurologic and psychiatric symptoms such as headache, tinnitus, defective hearing, changing desorientation and aggressiveness are initial symptoms of methyltin chloride intoxication. Some patients also developed epileptic equivalents, such as dreamy attacks and central ventilation transaminases. Laboratory findings included low levels of serum potassium, leucocytosis and elevated transaminases. The excretion rate of tin in the urine correlated with the severity of the intoxication. There was no measurable effect of plasma separation or d-penicillamine therapy on tin excretion in the urine or on the clinical picture. The long-term prognosis of severely intoxicated persons is poor. To prevent such events workers need to be warned of the risk and dangers of working with organo-metallic compounds. The effectiveness of protective clothes and gas masks should be checked. In exposed workers regular testing is advised of tin concentrations in the urine.

  18. [Paraquat poisoning: clinical and anatomopathologic aspects in 3 cases].

    PubMed

    Pazos, M R; Reig, R; Sanz, P; Nogue, S; Boix, D; Palomar, M; Tenorio, L; Corbella, J

    1989-03-01

    3 cases of suicide due to ingestion of 150, 200 and 4 gr. of paraquat, respectively, are presented. Two of them were brothers and agricultural industrialists, the other one was a farmer. The first two cases died 16 and 10 hours after intake. The farmer died 21 days after ingestion. All of them had progressive hypoxemia and renal failure the two brothers had heart conduction system glycemia (23 mg/dl) a few hours after ingestion. The postmortem study showed edema, hemorrhage and congestion of the lungs, alveolitis, fibrosis and lobar atelectasia; renal tubular necrosis adrenal necrosis; colestasia; hepatic steatosis focal miocarditis. The clinical evolution, particularly short in the first two patients, is commented on, as well as the post-mortem findings, comparing them with those described in the literature. Finally, due to the high toxicity of this herbicide, we insist in prompt transport to herbicide, we insist in prompt transport to the hospital in order to apply early treatment.

  19. Lyme borreliosis: reviewing potential vaccines, clinical aspects and health economics.

    PubMed

    Šmit, Renata; Postma, Maarten J

    2015-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis (LB) is a multisystem infectious disease with a growing burden in many parts of North America, Asia and Europe. Persistent infection of LB can usually be treated effectively with antibiotic therapy, but it may be followed by post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome. Therefore, it is important to begin with treatment in the early phase of the disease. Vaccination shows potential as the most effective way of preventing LB and reducing its burden in these continents. It is concluded that there is a need for continuous effort in research from all perspectives on LB, especially regarding prevention with novel vaccines, their development, clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness. This review may help to further develop (cost-) effective strategies for prevention and control of the disease to reduce its burden and achieve population-wide health benefits.

  20. Helicobacter pylori infection: New pathogenetic and clinical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Hagymási, Krisztina; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infects more than half of the world’s human population, but only 1% to 3% of infected people consequently develop gastric adenocarcinomas. The clinical outcome of the infection is determined by host genetic predisposition, bacterial virulence factors, and environmental factors. The association between H. pylori infection and chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric cell carcinoma, and B cell mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma has been well established. With the exception of unexplained iron deficiency anemia and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, H. pylori infection has no proven role in extraintestinal diseases. On the other hand, there is data showing that H. pylori infection could be beneficial for some human diseases. The unpredictability of the long-term consequences of H. pylori infection and the economic challenge in eradicating it is why identification of high-risk individuals is crucial. PMID:24914360

  1. [Clinical and pharmacological aspects of pancreatic enzyme substitution therapy].

    PubMed

    Löser, C; Fölsch, U R

    1991-03-01

    The adequate therapy of pancreatic enzyme replacement in patients with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is still a difficult clinical problem especially in patients following pancreatectomys, with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis or cystic fibrosis. The substitution of lipase to eliminate steatorrhoea is the most important aim but due to its acid lability even the most serious problem in pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy. Various different medications are meanwhile available: conventional preparations from porcine pancreatin or fungal enzymes as rizolipase, enteric-coated tablets or even enteric-coated microspheres or adjunctive therapy with H2-receptor antagonists. While dosage requirements vary widely and therefore have to be tried out individually, the choice of the adequate preparation should be influenced by the realization of the physiological and pathophysiological characteristics of the individual patient and the pharmaceutical characteristics of the different supplements. The advantages and disadvantages of the various medications for enzyme replacement therapy in patients with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency are reviewed in this article.

  2. HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome: A review of clinical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Baril, Jean-Guy; Junod, Patrice; LeBlanc, Roger; Dion, Harold; Therrien, Rachel; Laplante, François; Falutz, Julian; Côté, Pierre; Hébert, Marie-Nicole; Lalonde, Richard; Lapointe, Normand; Lévesque, Dominic; Pinault, Lyse; Rouleau, Danielle; Tremblay, Cécile; Trottier, Benoît; Trottier, Sylvie; Tsoukas, Chris; Weiss, Karl

    2005-01-01

    Approximately two years after the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy for the treatment of HIV infection, body shape changes and metabolic abnormalities were increasingly observed. Initially, these were ascribed to protease inhibitors, but it is now clear that nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors also contribute to lipodystrophy syndrome. The syndrome groups together clinical conditions describing changes in body fat distribution that include lipoatrophy, lipoaccumulation or both. However, there does not appear to be a direct link between lipoatrophy and lipoaccumulation that would support a single mechanism for the redistribution of body fat. Currently, there is no clear definition of lipodystrophy, which explains the difficulty in determining its prevalence and etiology. There are no current guidelines for the treatment of fat distribution abnormalities that occur in the absence of other metabolic complications. The present article reviews the current state of knowledge of the definition, symptoms, risk factors, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of the morphological changes associated with lipodystrophy syndrome. PMID:18159551

  3. [Clinical and preclinical aspects of adrenal Cushing syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, B; Re, T; Passini, E; Peverelli, S; Sartorio, A; Colombo, P

    1995-03-01

    Cushing's syndrome of adrenal origin encompasses different entities: besides the occurrence of adenoma and carcinoma, a not homogeneous group includes the ACTH-independent macro- or micronodular bilateral hyperplasia and the familial pigmented nodular hyperplasia (Carney's syndrome). Moreover, isolated cases of immunological origin and food-dependence have recently described. On clinical grounds no major characteristics may help to identify the adrenal origin of Cushing's syndrome, except for few situations as carcinoma or nodular dysplasia. Laboratory investigations of patients with adrenocortical tumor are based on ACTH and cortisol determinations in basal conditions and in response to high dose dexamethasone and CRH tests. However, isolated diagnostic problems may occur, as the presence of a black adrenocortical adenoma or the uncommon persistence of a circadian rhythmicity of glucocorticoid secretion. The evaluation of new markers of bone turnover (BGP, ICTP) and of collagen turnover (PIIINP) confirms the existence of corticosteroid-induced bone and collagen damages and may also be a useful prognostic index after treatment. Although up to now food-dependent Cushing's syndrome appears to be very rare, the adrenocortical sensitivity to GIP has been investigated in patients with either pituitary Cushing's disease, or clinically silent adrenal masses. No evidence of GIP-dependent cortisol secretion during the peptide infusion or after endogenous stimulation by OGTT was observed in any case. Since the wide availability of sensitive and noninvasive imaging techniques (CT and NMR), in recent years the finding of incidentalomas has become fairly common. In patients with incidentaloma abnormalities of the endocrine function are frequently encountered, and the "preclinical" Cushing's syndrome is increasingly recognized.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Free testosterone: clinical utility and important analytical aspects of measurement.

    PubMed

    Shea, Jennifer L; Wong, Pui-Yuen; Chen, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Testosterone, the most abundant androgen in men, is a steroid hormone that is synthesized predominantly by the testes. In women, minor amounts are synthesized in the ovaries. Androgen precursors are also produced and secreted from the adrenal glands in both sexes, where they undergo peripheral conversion to testosterone. Circulating concentrations are approximately 15-25 times higher in adult men compared to women. Maintenance of these levels is necessary for development and maintenance of secondary sexual characteristics, libido, growth, prevention of osteoporosis, and most importantly in men, spermatogenesis. Most testosterone circulates tightly bound to sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) or weakly bound to albumin. A minor amount circulates as free testosterone, and it is believed that this is the metabolically active fraction. Measurement of free testosterone is important in the diagnosis of many diseases, most importantly disorders of androgen deficiency in men (i.e., hypogonadism) and androgen excess in women (i.e., polycystic ovary syndrome and hirsutism). Many methodologies are available for free testosterone measurement including the reference methods (equilibrium dialysis and ultrafiltration), analog immunoassay, and calculated free testosterone based on measurement of total testosterone, SHBG, and albumin. Moreover, measurement of bioavailable testosterone, a combination of albumin-bound and free testosterone, also has clinical utility and can be measured by selective protein precipitation or calculation. In this review, the advantages and limitations of each of these methods will be discussed in the context of clinical utility and implementation into a routine hospital laboratory. Furthermore, up and coming methodologies for free testosterone measurement, including liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, will also be discussed.

  5. Qualitative biomechanical principles for application in coaching.

    PubMed

    Knudson, Duane

    2007-01-01

    Many aspects of human movements in sport can be readily understood by Newtonian rigid-body mechanics. Many of these laws and biomechanical principles, however, are counterintuitive to a lot of people. There are also several problems in the application of biomechanics to sports, so the application of biomechanics in the qualitative analysis of sport skills by many coaches has been limited. Biomechanics scholars have long been interested in developing principles that facilitate the qualitative application of biomechanics to improve movement performance and reduce the risk of injury. This paper summarizes the major North American efforts to establish a set of general biomechanical principles of movement, and illustrates how principles can be used to improve the application of biomechanics in the qualitative analysis of sport technique. A coach helping a player with a tennis serve is presented as an example. The standardization of terminology for biomechanical principles is proposed as an important first step in improving the application ofbiomechanics in sport. There is also a need for international cooperation and research on the effectiveness of applying biomechanical principles in the coaching of sport techniques.

  6. Biomechanics of Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Palepu, V.; Kodigudla, M.; Goel, V. K.

    2012-01-01

    Disc degeneration and associated disorders are among the most debated topics in the orthopedic literature over the past few decades. These may be attributed to interrelated mechanical, biochemical, and environmental factors. The treatment options vary from conservative approaches to surgery, depending on the severity of degeneration and response to conservative therapies. Spinal fusion is considered to be the “gold standard” in surgical methods till date. However, the association of adjacent level degeneration has led to the evolution of motion preservation technologies like spinal arthroplasty and posterior dynamic stabilization systems. These new technologies are aimed to address pain and preserve motion while maintaining a proper load sharing among various spinal elements. This paper provides an elaborative biomechanical review of the technologies aimed to address the disc degeneration and reiterates the point that biomechanical efficacy followed by long-term clinical success will allow these nonfusion technologies as alternatives to fusion, at least in certain patient population. PMID:22745914

  7. Clinical aspects of obesity in childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Kiess, W; Galler, A; Reich, A; Müller, G; Kapellen, T; Deutscher, J; Raile, K; Kratzsch, J

    2001-02-01

    The level of fatness of a child at which morbidity acutely and/or later in life increases is determined on an acturial basis. Direct measurements of body fat content, e.g. hydrodensitometry, bioimpedance, or DEXA, are useful tools in scientific studies. However, body mass index (BMI) is easy to calculate and is generally accepted now to be used to define obesity in children and adolescents clinically. An increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease in adults has been found in subjects whose BMI had been greater than the 75th percentile as adolescents. Childhood obesity seems to substantially increase the risk of subsequent morbidity whether or not obesity persists into adulthood. The genetic basis of childhood obesity has been elucidated to some extent through the discovery of leptin, the ob gene product, and the increasing knowledge on the role of neuropeptides such as POMC, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and the melanocyte concentrating hormone receptors (for example, MC4R). Environmental/exogenous factors largely contribute to the development of a high degree of body fatness early in life. Twin studies suggest that approximately 50% of the tendency toward obesity is inherited. There are numerous disorders including a number of endocrine disorders (Cushing's syndrome, hypothyroidism, etc.) and genetic syndromes (Prader-Labhard-Willi syndrome, Bardet Biedl syndrome, etc.) that can present with obesity. A simple diagnostic algorithm allows for the differentiation between primary or secondary obesity. Among the most common sequelae of primary childhood obesity are hypertension, dyslipidemia, back pain and psychosocial problems. Therapeutic strategies include psychological and family therapy, lifestyle/behaviour modification and nutrition education. The role of regular exercise and exercise programmes is emphasized. Surgical procedures and drugs used in adult obesity are still not generally recommended in children and adolescents with obesity. As obesity is the most

  8. Shoulder biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Lugo, Roberto; Kung, Peter; Ma, C Benjamin

    2008-10-01

    The biomechanics of the glenohumeral joint depend on the interaction of both static and dynamic-stabilizing structures. Static stabilizers include the bony anatomy, negative intra-articular pressure, the glenoid labrum, and the glenohumeral ligaments along with the joint capsule. The dynamic-stabilizing structures include the rotator cuff muscles and the other muscular structures surrounding the shoulder joint. The combined effect of these stabilizers is to support the multiple degrees of motion within the glenohumeral joint. The goal of this article is to review how these structures interact to provide optimal stability and how failure of some of these mechanisms can lead to shoulder joint pathology.

  9. Novel biological and clinical aspects of thyroid hormone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dumitrescu, Alexandra M; Refetoff, Samuel

    2007-01-01

    Intracellular metabolism of thyroid hormone (TH) and availability of the active hormone T3 is regulated by three selenoprotein iodothyronine deiodinases (Ds). D1 and D2 convert the precursor T4 into the active hormone, T3. D3 is the principal inactivator of T4 and T3 to their respective metabolites, rT3 and T2. While acquired changes in D activities are common, inherited defects in humans were not known. Recently, two families with abnormal thyroid function tests, high serum T4, high rT3, low T3 and slightly increased TSH, were identified. Linkage analysis and sequencing excluded abnormalities in all 3 DIO genes, yet clinical studies showed reduced responsiveness to T4 but not to T3. Extensive search for putative defects in genes involved in D2 metabolism led to the identification of mutations in the Sec insertion sequence binding protein (SBP)2 gene, involved in the synthesis of selenoproteins, including Ds. Affected children were either homozygous or compound heterozygous for these mutations. Other selenoproteins, including glutathione peroxidase, were also reduced in affected subjects, confirming a generalized effect of the SBP2 defect. Opposite thyroid test abnormalities are found in mutations of the TH transporter MCT8, and appear to be caused by the resulting increases in D2 and D1 activities.

  10. Clinical aspects of Alzheimer's disease in black and white patients.

    PubMed Central

    Hargrave, R.; Stoeklin, M.; Haan, M.; Reed, B.

    1998-01-01

    This article examines the association between ethnicity and psychiatric symptoms in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Data from a cross-sectional study of patients evaluated at nine California Department of Health Alzheimer's Disease Diagnostic and Treatment Centers (ADDTCs) were used. Using the ADDTC patient database, sociodemographic and clinical variables in 207 black patients and 1818 white patients with probable and possible Alzheimer's disease were compared. Logistic and linear regression analysis indicated the following results: 1) black patients had fewer years of education and more often had hypertension, 2) black patients reported shorter duration of illness at the time of initial diagnosis of dementia, 3) black patients had lower Mini-Mental State Examination scores and higher Blessed Roth Dementia Rating Scale scores at the time of initial diagnosis, and 4) black patients more frequently reported insomnia and less frequently reported anxiety. Additional studies are needed to validate these findings and to generate hypotheses about the role of cardiovascular disease and pathophysiology of psychiatric symptoms in ethnic populations with Alzheimer's disease. PMID:9510621

  11. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: clinical, biochemical and pathogenetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Berger, Johannes; Gärtner, Jutta

    2006-12-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a clinically heterogeneous disorder ranging from the severe childhood cerebral form to asymptomatic persons. The overall incidence is 1:16,800 including hemizygotes as well as heterozygotes. The principal molecular defect is due to inborn mutations in the ABCD1 gene encoding the adrenoleukodystrophy protein (ALDP), a transporter in the peroxisome membrane. ALDP is involved in the transport of substrates from the cytoplasm into the peroxisomal lumen. ALDP defects lead to characteristic accumulation of saturated very long-chain fatty acids, the diagnostic disease marker. The pathogenesis is unclear. Different molecular mechanisms seem to induce inflammatory demyelination, neurodegeneration and adrenocortical insufficiency involving the primary ABCD1 defect, environmental factors and modifier genes. Important information has been derived from the X-ALD mouse models; species differences however complicate the interpretation of results. So far, bone marrow transplantation is the only effective long-term treatment for childhood cerebral X-ALD, however, only when performed at an early-stage of disease. Urgently needed novel therapeutic strategies are under consideration ranging from dietary approaches to gene therapy.

  12. Clinical and molecular aspects of varicella zoster virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Gilden, Don; Nagel, Maria A.; Mahalingam, Ravi; Mueller, Niklaus H.; Brazeau, Elizabeth A.; Pugazhenthi, Subbiah; Cohrs, Randall J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary A declining cell-mediated immunity to varicella zoster virus (VZV) with advancing age or immunosuppression results in virus reactivation from latently infected human ganglia anywhere along the neuraxis. Virus reactivation produces zoster, often followed by chronic pain (postherpetic neuralgia or PHN) as well as vasculopathy, myelopathy, retinal necrosis and cerebellitis. VZV reactivation also produces pain without rash (zoster sine herpete). Vaccination after age 60 reduces the incidence of shingles by 51%, PHN by 66% and the burden of illness by 61%. However, even if every healthy adult over age 60 years is vaccinated, there would still be about 500,000 zoster cases annually in the United States alone, about 200,000 of whom will experience PHN. Analyses of viral nucleic acid and gene expression in latently infected human ganglia and in an animal model of varicella latency in primates are serving to determine the mechanism(s) of VZV reactivation with the aim of preventing reactivation and the clinical sequelae. PMID:19946620

  13. [Williams syndrome: its clinical aspects and molecular bases].

    PubMed

    Antonell, A; Del Campo, M; Flores, R; Campuzano, V; Perez-Jurado, L A

    2006-01-07

    Williams syndrome is a developmental disorder with an estimated prevalence of 1 in 7,500 newborns. Its phenotype is characterized by distinctive facial features, mild to moderate mental retardation and general cognitive deficits with a non-uniform profile, having problems in some areas (psychomotricity, visuospatial integration) and relative preservation of others (language, musicality), friendly personality, occasional hypercalcemia of infancy, and a vasculopathy with supravalvular aortic stenosis. Williams syndrome is caused by a submicroscopic deletion of 1.55 Mb in the chromosome band 7q11.23, which includes 26-28 genes. The mutational mechanism consists in a misalignment between regions of almost identical sequence and the subsequent unequal recombination. The reciprocal product of this rearrangement is the duplication of this region, causing a language specific disorder. Clinical-molecular correlations establishment through a good phenotypic characterization and the precise analysis of breakpoints in patients with atypical and typical deletions, altogether with the design of animal models and functional studies in vitro for the genes of the interval will be important to be able to determine the exact contribution of the genes to the phenotype, to know their pathogenesis and physiopathology, and to identify therapeutic methods.

  14. Clinical aspects of X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, A; Phillips, D I; Brown, R; Harper, P S

    1987-01-01

    Boys with X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia and their families were studied. Many suffered severe illness in early childhood and nearly 30% died; many had feeding problems, severe fever, atopic disease, and recurrent respiratory infections. Some infants failed to thrive. We found no consistent common endocrine or immunological abnormality, although, most had abnormal immunoglobulin production. This may be related to the abnormal mucosa of the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts which exacerbates the chronic obstructive airways disease found later in life in those who smoke. Mental handicap was not a feature, although convulsions sometimes occurred during fever. Early diagnosis is important to avoid attacks of severe fever and so that rational management may be planned for other problems that arise. Dental advice should be sought before school age and genetic counselling may also be required. Many female carriers may be recognised at clinical examination: their affected sons can then be diagnosed more readily. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:2445301

  15. Nonaccidental trauma: clinical aspects and epidemiology of child abuse.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Christopher J; Bilo, Robert A C

    2009-05-01

    Radiologists play a key role in the recognition of child abuse. In the last century, radiologists pioneered the identification of nonaccidental injuries, including fractures and brain injury, and together with colleagues in paediatrics advocated the protection of children from abuse. Prevalence studies in many countries have revealed the widespread and hidden nature of child maltreatment. New and complex forms of abuse, e.g. fabricated or induced illness, have been recognized. Physical abuse affects 7-9% of children in the UK, although fewer suffer the severe or life-threatening injuries seen by radiologists. A high index of suspicion of nonaccidental trauma is required where known patterns of injury or inconsistencies of presentation and history are detected. In many cases the diagnosis is readily made, although some cases remain contentious or controversial and consume much clinical time and energy. Differences of view between doctors are tested in the courts. Adverse publicity has made this work unpopular in the UK. Knowledge of the differential diagnosis of unexplained or apparent injury is essential for accurate diagnosis, vital where errors in either direction can be disastrous. New UK radiological guidelines will assist radiologists in achieving best evidence-based practice.

  16. [Beta-thalassemias: molecular, epidemiological, diagnostical and clinical aspects].

    PubMed

    Joly, Philippe; Pondarre, Corinne; Badens, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Beta-thalassemia is one of most common autosomal recessive disorders worldwide. In France, 5 to 10 new major or intermedia forms are diagnosed annually and the global prevalence is about 500 cases. Since 20 years and thanks to the generalization of iron chelator treatments, the life expectancy has dramatically increased. Nearly 90% of the β-thalassemic alleles are point mutations easily identified by Sanger sequencing or dedicated methods. The remaining 10% are deletions detectable by MLPA or CGH Array. The alpha-globin genotype is also essential in the exploration of beta-thalassemia because an alpha-thalassemia improves the clinical state whereas an alpha triplication worsens it. The additional genotyping of a few HbF inducer polymorphisms allows to predict the age of the first transfusion, thanks to a recent dedicated algorithm, making beta-thalassemia one of the first potential application of predictive medicine. Gene therapy, pre-implantatory diagnosis and new drugs (Sotatercept®, hepcidin-like molecules) have also recently contributed to make beta-thalassemia a main scientific topic again.

  17. Pathophysiological and clinical aspects of gastric hyperplastic polyps.

    PubMed

    Markowski, Adam Roman; Markowska, Agnieszka; Guzinska-Ustymowicz, Katarzyna

    2016-10-28

    Gastric polyps become a major clinical problem because of high prevalence and tendency to malignant transformation of some of them. The development of gastric hyperplastic polyps results from excessive proliferation of foveolar cells accompanied by their increased exfoliation, and they are macroscopically indistinguishable from other polyps with lower or higher malignant potential. Panendoscopy allows detection and differentiation of gastric polyps, usually after obtaining histopathological biopsy specimens. Unremoved gastric hyperplastic polyps may enlarge and sometimes spontaneously undergo a sequential progression to cancer. For this reason, gastric hyperplastic polyps larger than 5 mm in size should be removed in one piece. After excision of polyps with atypical focal lesion, endoscopic surveillance is suggested depending on histopathological diagnosis and possibility of confirming the completeness of endoscopic resection. Because of the risk of cancer development also in gastric mucosa outside the polyp, neighboring fragments of gastric mucosa should undergo microscopic investigations. This procedure allows for identification of patients who can benefit most from oncological endoscopic surveillance. If Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection of the gastric mucosa is confirmed, treatment strategies should include eradication of bacteria, which may prevent progression of intestinal metaplasia. The efficacy of H. pylori eradication should be checked 3-6 mo later.

  18. Pathophysiological and clinical aspects of gastric hyperplastic polyps

    PubMed Central

    Markowski, Adam Roman; Markowska, Agnieszka; Guzinska-Ustymowicz, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Gastric polyps become a major clinical problem because of high prevalence and tendency to malignant transformation of some of them. The development of gastric hyperplastic polyps results from excessive proliferation of foveolar cells accompanied by their increased exfoliation, and they are macroscopically indistinguishable from other polyps with lower or higher malignant potential. Panendoscopy allows detection and differentiation of gastric polyps, usually after obtaining histopathological biopsy specimens. Unremoved gastric hyperplastic polyps may enlarge and sometimes spontaneously undergo a sequential progression to cancer. For this reason, gastric hyperplastic polyps larger than 5 mm in size should be removed in one piece. After excision of polyps with atypical focal lesion, endoscopic surveillance is suggested depending on histopathological diagnosis and possibility of confirming the completeness of endoscopic resection. Because of the risk of cancer development also in gastric mucosa outside the polyp, neighboring fragments of gastric mucosa should undergo microscopic investigations. This procedure allows for identification of patients who can benefit most from oncological endoscopic surveillance. If Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection of the gastric mucosa is confirmed, treatment strategies should include eradication of bacteria, which may prevent progression of intestinal metaplasia. The efficacy of H. pylori eradication should be checked 3-6 mo later. PMID:27833379

  19. Angelman syndrome: a review of the clinical and genetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Clayton-Smith, J; Laan, L

    2003-02-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterised by severe learning difficulties, ataxia, a seizure disorder with a characteristic EEG, subtle dysmorphic facial features, and a happy, sociable disposition. Most children present with delay in developmental milestones and slowing of head growth during the first year of life. In the majority of cases speech does not develop. Patients with AS have a characteristic behavioural phenotype with jerky movements, frequent and sometimes inappropriate laughter, a love of water, and sleep disorder. The facial features are subtle and include a wide, smiling mouth, prominent chin, and deep set eyes. It is caused by a variety of genetic abnormalities involving the chromosome 15q11-13 region, which is subject to genomic imprinting. These include maternal deletion, paternal uniparental disomy, imprinting defects, and point mutations or small deletions within the UBE3A gene, which lies within this region. UBE3A shows tissue specific imprinting, being expressed exclusively from the maternal allele in brain. The genetic mechanisms identified so far in AS are found in 85-90% of those with the clinical phenotype and all interfere with UBE3A expression.

  20. Pathogenesis and clinical aspects of pain in patients with osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Mediati, Rocco Domenico; Vellucci, Renato; Dodaro, Lucia

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bone pain is one of the most frequent kinds of chronic pain, mainly in elderly patients. It causes a significant worsening of functional capacity and deterioration in the quality of life in people affected. Mechanisms of pain in osteoporosis are poorly known and often extrapolated by other pathologies or other experimental model. One of principal causes would be a “hyper-remodeling” of bone, that involves osteoclasts activity and pathological modifications of bone innervation. Several studies show that osteoclasts play a significant role in bone pain etiology. Pain in osteoporosis is mainly nociceptive, if it become persistent a sensitization of peripheral and central nervous system can occur, so underlining the transition to a chronic pain syndrome. Central sensitization mechanisms are complex and involve several neuromediators and receptors (Substance P, NMDA, etc.). Most common manifestations of osteoporosis are vertebral compression fractures that cause persistent pain, though to differentiate from pain originating in structures as joint or muscle. First manifestation can be an acute pain due to pathological fracture, those of hip often causes disability. Pain in osteoporosis is an important clinical challenge. Often its complications and consequences on patient quality of life are underestimated with not negligible social implications. A balanced and early multimodal pain therapy including opioids as necessary, even in cases of acute pain, improve the functional capacity of patients and helps to prevent neurological alterations that seems to contribute in significant way in causing irreversible pain chronic syndromes. PMID:25568647

  1. [Confronting bioterrorism: Epidemiologic, clinical, and preventive aspects of smallpox].

    PubMed

    Franco-Paredes, Carlos; del Río, Carlos; Nava-Frías, Margarita; Rangel-Frausto, Sigfrido; Téllez, Ildefonso; Santos-Preciado, José Ignacio

    2003-01-01

    The worldwide eradication of smallpox, a major achievement in public health, is currently threatened by the risk of bioterrorism. The debate on the destruction of the Variola virus in the two reference laboratories of the World Health Organization has dramatically switched to the preservation of the remaining virus after the September 2001 terrorist events in the U.S. along with the intentional release of Bacillus anthracis in the U.S. The risk of intentional release of Variola virus constitutes a minimal, yet possible risk. A smallpox epidemic could have a devastating impact due to its elevated morbidity and mortality that would inflict in non-immune human population, in addition to the ensuing panic and social unrest. Therefore, the development of national preparedness and response plans along with the availability of smallpox vaccine to be used in the post-exposure phase represent a fundamental part of the preventive efforts to cope with bioterrorism. Reestablishing a preventive vaccination program was recently recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). However, the vaccine currently available has historically been associated with serious adverse reactions, even death. Thus, this recommendation has not been universally accepted. To counter an epidemic of smallpox, medical personnel in the frontline need to be prepared with updated smallpox information to identify, diagnose, isolate, and treat cases if a bioterrorist attack should occur. Herein we present an indepth review for health care personnel with relevant epidemiologic, clinical, and preventive information on smallpox.

  2. Hemimegalencephaly: part 1. Genetic, clinical, and imaging aspects.

    PubMed

    Flores-Sarnat, Laura

    2002-05-01

    Hemimegalencephaly is a rare hamartomatous malformation of the brain, remarkable for its extreme asymmetry. It can be isolated or associated with several neurocutaneous syndromes; less frequently, it also involves the brain stem and cerebellum. Traditionally, hemimegalencephaly has been considered a primary neuroblast migratory disturbance. At present, genetic theories of pathogenesis and modern histopathology provide a basis for this complex malformation as a primary disturbance in cellular lineage, differentiation, and proliferation, interacting with a disturbance in gene expression of body symmetry, with earlier onset than radial neuroblast migration. From my personal experience with 10 patients with hemimegalencephaly and review of the literature, I have found the same clinical neurologic, neuroimaging, and neuropathologic features in isolated and syndromic hemimegalencephaly. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reveals abnormal gyration, ventriculomegaly, colpocephaly, an "occipital sign" (displacement of the occipital lobe across the midline), and increased volume and T2 signal of white matter, in addition to the overall increased size of the involved hemisphere. Mild, moderate, and severe grades of severity can be recognized, providing a functional neurologic prognosis and therapeutic plan. Early diagnosis is crucial because despite neuroimaging and pathologic evidence, hemimegalencephaly sometimes still is unrecognized. Also, misdiagnosis of obstructive hydrocephalus or cerebral neoplasm can lead to unnecessary surgical procedures. Although hemispherectomy has a high morbidity, it is recommended early for patients with severe, intractable epilepsy. The mildest forms of hemimegalencephaly are infrequent and the least recognized.

  3. Insecticide resistance in head lice: clinical, parasitological and genetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Durand, R; Bouvresse, S; Berdjane, Z; Izri, A; Chosidow, O; Clark, J M

    2012-04-01

    Insecticide treatment resistance is considered to be a major factor in the increasing number of infestations by head lice. The large insecticide selection pressure induced by conventional topical pediculicides has led to the emergence and spread of resistance in many parts of the world. Possible mechanisms of resistance include accelerated detoxification of insecticides by enzyme-mediated reduction, esterification, oxidation that may be overcome by synergistic agents such as piperonyl butoxide, alteration of the binding site, e.g. altered acetylcholinesterase or altered nerve voltage-gated sodium channel, and knockdown resistance (kdr). Clinical, parasitological and molecular data on resistance to conventional topical pediculicides show that treatments with neurotoxic insecticides have suffered considerable loss of activity worldwide. In particular, resistance to synthetic pyrethroids has become prominent, probably because of their extensive use. As other treatment options, including non-insecticidal pediculicides such as dimeticone, are now available, the use of older insecticides, such as lindane and carbaryl, should be minimized, owing to their loss of efficacy and safety concerns. The organophosphorus insecticide malathion remains effective, except in the UK, mostly in formulations that include terpineol.

  4. Clinical and therapeutic aspects of Klinefelter's syndrome: sexual function.

    PubMed

    Vignozzi, L; Corona, G; Forti, G; Jannini, E A; Maggi, M

    2010-06-01

    Klinefelter's syndrome (KS) is the most common sex chromosomal aberration among men, with estimated prevalence of about 1 in 500 newborn males. The classical phenotype of KS is widely recognized, but many affected subjects present only very mild signs. While the association between KS and infertility has been well documented, few studies have investigated sexual function in the KS patients. In the present paper we reviewed studies addressed to emotional processing and sexual function in KS. We searched the following databases Medline, Pubmed, Embase, for Klinefelter's syndrome, sexuality. We focus on the peculiar contribution of genetic and hormonal background, which characterizes sexual dysfunction in KS. Abnormal structure and function of the emotional brain circuits have been described in KS. These alterations were less pronounced when the patients underwent to testosterone replacement therapy suggesting that they were mediated by testosterone deficiency. Accordingly, clinical studies indicate that sexual dysfunctions, eventually present in KS, are not specifically associated with the syndrome but are related to the underlying hypogonadism. In conclusion, androgen deficiency more than chromosomal abnormality is the major pathogenic factor of sexual dysfunction in KS.

  5. Clinical and electrophysiological aspects of tics in children.

    PubMed

    Safiullina, G I; Safiullina, A A

    2015-01-01

    Tics are diverse in nature inappropriate movements or vocalizations. They significantly degrade patients' quality of life, lead to social difficulties, and disturbance of learning especially during exacerbations. The prevalence of tics among children ranges from 4% to 24%, thus emphasizing the relevance of the problem. To study clinical and electrophysiological features of tics in children with development of new treatment methods. We conducted a comprehensive clinical and electrophysiological examination of 50 patients with tics, aged 5 to 15 years. The control group consisted of 20 healthy children. The research included a thorough study of the history, neurological examination, manual testing of skeletal muscles, psychological testing. Electrophysiological examination included a review of the functional state of corticospinal tract (CST) by the method of magnetic stimulation (MS), study of polysynaptic reflex excitability (PRE) according to a late component of the blink reflex (BR). Statistical analysis included parametric and nonparametric methods of data processing. All children of the study group showed signs of minimal brain dysfunction (MBD), they had complicated antenatal and postnatal history (trauma, disease, occurring with intoxication). There was a trend towards the increase of MBD signs with worsening of tics. Manual diagnosis in patients identified functional blockade at different levels of the vertebral column, sacroiliac joints, we identified latent myofascial trigger points (MFTP) mainly in the cervical-collar zone, in the area of the paravertebral muscles, periosteal triggers in the area of the sacroiliac joints.The research allowed determining decrease in propagation velocity of excitation (PVE) throughout CST in patients with tics. Correlation analysis revealed a negative correlation between the severity of tics and PVE (r = -0.38; p < 0.001).When studying polysynaptic reflex excitability (PRE) a significant predominance of hyper-excited types

  6. Clinical aspects of coenzyme Q10: an update.

    PubMed

    Littarru, Gian Paolo; Tiano, Luca

    2010-03-01

    The fundamental role of coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) in mitochondrial bioenergetics and its well-acknowledged antioxidant properties constitute the basis for its clinical applications, although some of its effects may be related to a gene induction mechanism. Cardiovascular disease is still the main field of study and the latest findings confirm a role of CoQ(10) in improving endothelial function. The possible relation between CoQ(10) deficiency and statin side effects is highly debated, particularly the key issue of whether CoQ(10) supplementation counteracts statin myalgias. Furthermore, in cardiac patients, plasma CoQ(10) was found to be an independent predictor of mortality. Studies on CoQ(10) and physical exercise have confirmed its effect in improving subjective fatigue sensation and physical performance and in opposing exercise-related damage. In the field of mitochondrial myopathies, primary CoQ(10) deficiencies have been identified, involving different genes of the CoQ(10) biosynthetic pathway; some of these conditions were found to be highly responsive to CoQ(10) administration. The initial observations of CoQ(10) effects in Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases have been extended to Friedreich's ataxia, where CoQ(10) and other quinones have been tested. CoQ(10) is presently being used in a large phase III trial in Parkinson's disease. CoQ(10) has been found to improve sperm count and motility on asthenozoospermia. Moreover, for the first time CoQ(10) was found to decrease the incidence of preeclampsia in pregnancy. The ability of CoQ(10) to mitigate headache symptoms in adults was also verified in pediatric and adolescent populations.

  7. Clinical aspects of SDHx-related pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma

    PubMed Central

    Timmers, Henri J L M; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule; Mannelli, Massimo; Pacak, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Paragangliomas (PGLs) derive from either sympathetic chromaffin tissue in adrenal and extra-adrenal abdominal or thoracic locations, or from parasympathetic tissue of the head and neck. Mutations of nuclear genes encoding subunits B, C, and D of the mitochondrial enzyme succinate dehydrogenase (SDHB 1p35-p36.1, SDHC 1q21, SDHD 11q23) give rise to hereditary PGL syndromes PGL4, PGL3, and PGL1 respectively. The susceptibility gene for PGL2 on 11q13.1 remains unidentified. Mitochondrial dysfunction due to SDHx mutations have been linked to tumorigenesis by upregulation of hypoxic and angiogenesis pathways, apoptosis resistance and developmental culling of neuronal precursor cells. SDHB-, SDHC-, and SDHD-associated PGLs give rise to more or less distinct clinical phenotypes. SDHB mutations mainly predispose to extra-adrenal, and to a lesser extent, adrenal PGLs, with a high malignant potential, but also head and neck paragangliomas (HNPGL). SDHD mutations are typically associated with multifocal HNPGL and usually benign adrenal and extra-adrenal PGLs. SDHC mutations are a rare cause of mainly HNPGL. Most abdominal and thoracic SDHB-PGLs hypersecrete either norepinephrine or norepinephrine and dopamine. However, only some hypersecrete dopamine, are biochemically silent. The biochemical phenotype of SDHD-PGL has not been systematically studied. For the localization of PGL, several positron emission tomography (PET) tracers are available. Metastatic SDHB-PGL is the best localized by [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose PET. The identification of SDHx mutations in patients with PGL is warranted for a tailor-made approach to the biochemical diagnosis, imaging, treatment, follow-up, and family screening. PMID:19190077

  8. Microbiological and Clinical Aspects of Infection Associated with Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

    PubMed Central

    Denton, Miles; Kerr, Kevin G.

    1998-01-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is increasingly recognized as an important cause of nosocomial infection. Infection occurs principally, but not exclusively, in debilitated and immunosuppressed individuals. Management of S. maltophilia-associated infection is problematic because many strains of the bacterium manifest resistance to multiple antibiotics. These difficulties are compounded by methodological problems in in vitro susceptibility testing for which there are, as yet, no formal guidelines. Despite its acknowledged importance as a nosocomial pathogen, little is known of the epidemiology of S. maltophilia, and although it is considered an environmental bacterium, its sources and reservoirs are often not readily apparent. Molecular typing systems may contribute to our knowledge of the epidemiology of S. maltophilia infection, thus allowing the development of strategies to interrupt the transmission of the bacterium in the hospital setting. Even less is known of pathogenic mechanisms and putative virulence factors involved in the natural history of S. maltophilia infection and this, coupled with difficulties in distinguishing colonization from true infection, has fostered the view that the bacterium is essentially nonpathogenic. This article aims to review the current taxonomic status of S. maltophilia, and it discusses the laboratory identification of the bacterium. The epidemiology of the organism is considered with particular reference to nosocomial outbreaks, several of which have been investigated by molecular typing techniques. Risk factors for acquisition of the bacterium are also reviewed, and the ever-expanding spectrum of clinical syndromes associated with S. maltophilia is surveyed. Antimicrobial resistance mechanisms, pitfalls in in vitro susceptibility testing, and therapy of S. maltophilia infections are also discussed. PMID:9457429

  9. Gastrointestinal carcinoid tumours. Histogenetic, histochemical, immunohistochemical, clinical and therapeutic aspects.

    PubMed

    Wilander, E; Lundqvist, M; Oberg, K

    1989-01-01

    The increased knowledge of the pathobiology of gastrointestinal carcinoid (neuroendocrine) tumours and the improved therapeutic possibilities have brought a demand for more precise diagnosis. Although the carcinoid tumours can often be tentatively recognized in routinely processed microscopic slides, their more accurate identification requires additional diagnostic procedures. General neuroendocrine markers such as the argyrophil reaction of Grimelius and immunohistochemistry with application of antibodies against chromogranin A and of neuron-specific enolase are discriminatory staining methods which are used to reveal the neuroendocrine origin of almost all highly differentiated carcinoid tumours of the gastrointestinal tract. Mid-gut carcinoids, which predominate among these tumours almost unexceptionally contain serotonin. This biogenic amine can be demonstrated by the argentaffin reaction of Masson, serotonin immunoreactively or by formalin-induced fluorescence. The characteristic staining pattern of mid-gut carcinoids is almost invariably preserved in the metastatic deposits and consequently the staining methods for identifying serotonin can also be used on metastases to reveal a primary mid-gut carcinoid. The enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cell carcinoids of the body and fundic area of the stomach often seen in association with pernicious anaemia are argyrophil with the Sevier-Munger silver stain. Other neuroendocrine tumours, viz. antral, duodenal and rectal carcinoids should be studied by a battery of relevant peptide hormone antisera for adequate diagnosis. During the last decade new peptide hormones have been found in circulation in patients with carcinoid tumours, but serotonin and urinary 5-HIAA are still the most important markers for carcinoids of the mid-gut origin. Other clinically useful tumour markers are chromogranin A + B, pancreatic polypeptide, human chorionic gonadotropin alpha and beta subunits. For localizing procedures, angiography is the

  10. New Clinical and Morphologic Aspects in Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Tanrikulu, Levent; Hastreiter, Peter; Bassemir, Teresa; Bischoff, Barbara; Buchfelder, Michael; Dörfler, Arnd; Naraghi, Ramin

    2016-08-01

    High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging can be used to delineate the morphology of neurovascular compression (NVC) in detail. This study focuses on essential morphologic parameters in relation to the clinical appearance of patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN). A total of 180 patients with TN underwent magnetic resonance-constructive interference in steady state/time of flight. Parameters of the affected nerves (length) and causative vessels were examined: (1) the relationship between the NVC site (caudal/cranial/laterocaudal/mediocranial) and affected area (V1, V2, V3); (2) nerve deformity; (3) vascular loop; (4) existence of a "cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sign" by a separation of trigeminal fascicles by a vessel; and (5) localization of the causative vessel. A total of 10 patients with V1 affection showed 6 caudal, 0 cranial and laterocaudal, and 4 mediocranial NVC; 26 patients with V2 affection showed 17 caudal, 0 cranial, 1 laterocaudal, and 8 mediocranial NVC; 29 patients with V3 affection showed 23 caudal, 1 cranial, 3 laterocaudal, and 2 mediocranial NVC; 25 patients with V1 and V2 affection showed 17 caudal, 1 cranial, 0 laterocaudal, and 7 mediocranial NVC; 36 patients with V2 and V3 affection showed 30 caudal, 3 cranial, 1 laterocaudal, and 2 mediocranial NVC; and 6 patients with V1, V2, and V3 affection showed 4 caudal, 1 cranial, 0 laterocaudal, and 1 mediocranial NVC. A total of 63 patients (35%) showed nerval deformity by distorsion of the trigeminal fascicles from compressing vessel; 37 of 39 patients (95%) with right-sided deformity showed right-sided TN; and 21 of 22 patients (95%) with left-sided TN showed left-sided nerve deformation. Two patients with bilateral nerve deformity showed bilateral TN. Rostral superior cerebellar artery (SCA) loop compression was seen in 24 patients (17%), caudal SCA loop compression was seen in 10 patients (7%), and double SCA loop compression was seen in 33 patients (23%). Sandwich compression was seen in 18 (12

  11. [Epidemiologic and clinical aspects of toxic waste poisoning in Abidjan].

    PubMed

    Tiembre, Issaka; Koné, Blaise A; Dongo, Kouassi; Tanner, Marcel; Zinsstag, Jakob; Cissé, Guéladio

    2009-01-01

    In the nights of 19 to 21 August, 2006, highly toxic waste products were dumped at various sites in Abidjan, and numerous cases of poisoning were reported to the health authorities, who were unprepared for such a problem. The research group on Environment and Health in Urban Environment from the Swiss Center of Scientific Research and its partners at the Swiss Tropical Institute undertook this study whose objectives were to: describe the epidemiologic profile of the people poisoned; identify the main clinical symptoms and the risk factors for poisoning; and recommend steps to attenuate the effects and to prevent intermediate- and long-term consequences. This cross-sectional study examined the populations living around the discharge sites (n=6). The sample size was calculated at 619 people per site, to identify a 1% risk and a standard error of 0.4%, because of variability of the human impact factor at the different sites. Households were chosen at each site by the transect technique. Six teams, each including a physician, a public health agent and a local guide collected the data, after specific training. A pilot investigation made it possible to validate the final questionnaire. Of 4573 people surveyed, 4344 people, about 95%, were home during the toxic waste discharge. In all, 2369 (51.8%) had signs of poisoning. Sex, district of residence, and presence at home at the time of the discharge were all statistically related to poisoning. The distribution of poison victims according to health centre shows that 1297 people (64.4%) visited a health center AA(3/4) 615 of them (about 47.4%) a public or official centre, and 778 (about 60%), an unofficial centre; 379 (29.2%) were managed by an NGO, 159 individuals (12.3%) by mobile units, 63 individuals (4.8%) by the unofficial public health centre, and 35 (2.7%) at an unspecified site. Of those who sought care, 673 people (about 51.8%) received a medical prescription, and 815 (or 62.7%) had been given the drug directly

  12. American Society of Biomechanics Clinical Biomechanics Award 2013: tibiofemoral contact location changes associated with lateral heel wedging--a weight bearing MRI study.

    PubMed

    Barrance, Peter J; Gade, Venkata; Allen, Jerome; Cole, Jeffrey L

    2014-11-01

    Vertically open magnetic resonance imaging permits study of knee joint contact during weight bearing. Lateral wedging is a low cost intervention for knee osteoarthritis that may influence load distribution and contact. This study assessed the ability of feedback-assisted weight bearing magnetic resonance imaging to detect changes in tibiofemoral contact associated with lateral wedging. One knee in each of fourteen subjects with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis was studied, without specification of compartmental involvement. Knees were imaged during upright standing and at 20° knee flexion. Bilateral external heel wedges were used to provide non-wedged and 5° lateral wedging conditions. Computer modeling was used to measure the medial and lateral compartment contact patch center coordinates on the tibial plateau and the respective contact areas. Lateral heel wedging in flexion was associated with a significant anterior shift of the contact patch of the lateral femoral condyle. Changes with knee flexion were similar to previous reports: both medial and lateral contact centers moved posteriorly with flexion, and lateral condyle contact also moved laterally. Lateral condyle contact area significantly reduced with flexion, while lateral wedging did not significantly affect contact areas. In symptomatic knee osteoarthritis patients standing in knee flexion, weight bearing magnetic resonance imaging recorded an anterior shift of lateral condyle contact in response to lateral heel wedging. Future studies may investigate lateral wedging effects more specifically in candidates for this clinical intervention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Researches in forensic biomechanics].

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Fan, Yubo; Yu, Xiaojun

    2004-02-01

    Forensic biomechanics is the science of proof, which applies the biomechanical theory and technology to resolve problems related to mechanics in the process of expert witness. It belongs to the realm of a new subject combining biomechanics and forensics. Forensic biomechanics is a new branch of modern biomechanics and at the same time a new important branch of forensics, and it is one of the most potential research areas in forensics of injury. In this paper, the task of forensic biomechanics expert witness, the procedure of expert witness, and the forensic biomechanics research methods and cases are reviewed.

  14. Diminished abductor muscular strength in patients with valgus-impacted femoral neck fractures treated by internal fixation: Clinical study and biomechanical considerations.

    PubMed

    Noda, Mitsuaki; Saegusa, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Masayasu; Kuroda, Yuichi; Takada, Yuma; Yoshikawa, Chihiro; Wakabayashi, Mimami; Adachi, Kazuhiko; Nakamura, Yukiko

    2017-01-01

    Valgus-impacted femoral neck fractures treated with internal fixation occasionally result in unsatisfactory postoperative locomotive function, partially due to muscle shortening and a decrease in the moment arm. This study quantifies the degree of diminished abduction strength both clinically and biomechanically. Fifteen patients were enrolled in this study. Twelve patients with fracture healed in valgus-impacted position were further evaluated. Muscular strength around hip was examined, and values between the nonoperated and operated side were compared and analyzed. For the biomechanical study, two three-dimensional models were prepared: model I (control model without displacement) and model II (simulated malunion of a 15° valgus-impacted fracture). Two sets of hip flexion angles in each of the models were simulated with flexion angles of 0° and 23°. Mean and standard deviation values for muscle strength from the nonoperative/operative side among the valgus group are as follows: flexion strength was 9.2 ± 4.0/9.2 ± 3.2, extension strength was 5.8 ± 2.8/6.1 ± 3.2, abduction strength at 0° was 9.1 ± 3.7/7.4 ± 3.6, abduction strength at 10° was 6.7 ± 3.0/5.5 ± 2.2, and knee extension strength was 15.3 ± 6.2/15.1 ± 6.0 (kgf). When comparing values between the nonoperative and operative sides, statistical significance was only observed in abduction strength ( p < 0.01). The biomechanical models prove that valgus impaction decreases the moment arm by approximately 10% at both flexion angle. A significant decrease in abductor strength at 0° and 10° was observed in the valgus-healed group. This may be related to a decrease in the moment arm. Further research should be done to define the acceptable limit of deformity for the satisfactory postoperative functioning.

  15. [Biomechanical aspects of load-bearing capacity after total endoprosthesis replacement of the hip joint. An evaluation of current knowledge and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Wirtz, D C; Heller, K D; Niethard, F U

    1998-01-01

    Purpose of the study was to summarize the current scientific knowledge of the interaction between rehabilitative procedures and the periprosthetic bone remodeling processes in the early postoperative phase of total hip arthroplasties. In a comprehensive review of the international literature we analysed the interdependence between osseointegration, primary implant stability, relative micromotion of implant versus bone, and joint loading forces during mobilisation or physiotherapy. Accordingly, guidelines for the rehabilitation of cemented as well as cementless hip arthroplasties were established in order to eliminate factors disturbing prosthetic integration and hence provide for the best long-term stability of the implanted prosthesis possible. Osseointegration of cementless implants is impossible if relative micromotions exceed > 150 microns. Furthermore, torsional stresses (i.e. alternate climbing of stairs, rising from seated position without arm support) will destabilize uncemented femoral shaft implants. Cemented prostheses may be loaded with full body weight. Uncemented implants should be loaded only partially for at least 6 weeks. Loadings of the hip joint with more than twice the body-weight (i.e. walking without crutches, physical exercise against high resistances or long levers) are to be avoided for 3 months. The transition from the three-points walking to the two-points walking technique depends particularly on the conditions of the muscles stabilizing the hip joint. The rehabilitation of patients after total hip arthroplasty has to be brought into line with the changed biomechanical situation, the particulars of the implants and the individual requirements of the patients.

  16. Effects of short-term fatigue on biomechanical and physiological aspects of double poling in high-level cross-country skiers.

    PubMed

    Zoppirolli, Chiara; Pellegrini, Barbara; Bortolan, Lorenzo; Schena, Federico

    2016-06-01

    The study aim was to evaluate biomechanical and physiological alterations in double poling technique (DP) after a short-term fatiguing exercise. Eight high-level skiers performed a sub-maximal DP trial (20kmh(-1), 1°) before (PRE) and after (POST) a DP test to exhaustion while roller skiing on a treadmill. An integrated analysis of DP technique during PRE and POST included measurement of pole, joint, and centre of mass (COM) kinematics, poling forces, cycle timing, and metabolic parameters. Muscle fatigue in three upper-body muscles was assessed by calculating the Dimitrov' fatigue index (FInms5) of specific electromyographic segments. FInms5 tended to increase in the latissimus dorsi and teres major muscles (P=0.023 and P=0.030, respectively) across consecutive DP cycles, as did blood lactate concentration (P=0.001) and rating of perceived exertion (P=0.005). The changes indicated a state of fatigue during POST and coincided with the reduction in poling force exertion capacity (P=0.020). Pole, joint and COM kinematics did not differ between PRE and POST (P>0.050), whereas recovery phase and cycle times were shorter at POST (P<0.001 and P=0.001, respectively). Short-term fatigue led to a reduction in poling force exertion capacity and cycle time in high-level skiers, without altering body and pole kinematics.

  17. Oropouche Virus: Clinical, Epidemiological, and Molecular Aspects of a Neglected Orthobunyavirus

    PubMed Central

    Travassos da Rosa, Jorge Fernando; de Souza, William Marciel; Pinheiro, Francisco de Paula; Figueiredo, Mário Luiz; Cardoso, Jedson Ferreira; Acrani, Gustavo Olszanski; Nunes, Márcio Roberto Teixeira

    2017-01-01

    Oropouche virus (OROV) is an important cause of arboviral illness in Latin American countries, more specifically in the Amazon region of Brazil, Venezuela and Peru, as well as in other countries such as Panama. In the past decades, the clinical, epidemiological, pathological, and molecular aspects of OROV have been published and provide the basis for a better understanding of this important human pathogen. Here, we describe the milestones in a comprehensive review of OROV epidemiology, pathogenesis, and molecular biology, including a description of the first isolation of the virus, the outbreaks during the past six decades, clinical aspects of OROV infection, diagnostic methods, genome and genetic traits, evolution, and viral dispersal. PMID:28167595

  18. Oropouche Virus: Clinical, Epidemiological, and Molecular Aspects of a Neglected Orthobunyavirus.

    PubMed

    Travassos da Rosa, Jorge Fernando; de Souza, William Marciel; Pinheiro, Francisco de Paula; Figueiredo, Mário Luiz; Cardoso, Jedson Ferreira; Acrani, Gustavo Olszanski; Nunes, Márcio Roberto Teixeira

    2017-05-01

    AbstractOropouche virus (OROV) is an important cause of arboviral illness in Latin American countries, more specifically in the Amazon region of Brazil, Venezuela and Peru, as well as in other countries such as Panama. In the past decades, the clinical, epidemiological, pathological, and molecular aspects of OROV have been published and provide the basis for a better understanding of this important human pathogen. Here, we describe the milestones in a comprehensive review of OROV epidemiology, pathogenesis, and molecular biology, including a description of the first isolation of the virus, the outbreaks during the past six decades, clinical aspects of OROV infection, diagnostic methods, genome and genetic traits, evolution, and viral dispersal.

  19. Dinosaur biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, R. McNeill

    2006-01-01

    Biomechanics has made large contributions to dinosaur biology. It has enabled us to estimate both the speeds at which dinosaurs generally moved and the maximum speeds of which they may have been capable. It has told us about the range of postures they could have adopted, for locomotion and for feeding, and about the problems of blood circulation in sauropods with very long necks. It has made it possible to calculate the bite forces of predators such as Tyrannosaurus, and the stresses they imposed on its skull; and to work out the remarkable chewing mechanism of hadrosaurs. It has shown us how some dinosaurs may have produced sounds. It has enabled us to estimate the effectiveness of weapons such as the tail spines of Stegosaurus. In recent years, techniques such as computational tomography and finite element analysis, and advances in computer modelling, have brought new opportunities. Biomechanists should, however, be especially cautious in their work on animals known only as fossils. The lack of living specimens and even soft tissues oblige us to make many assumptions. It is important to be aware of the often wide ranges of uncertainty that result. PMID:16822743

  20. Dinosaur biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Alexander, R McNeill

    2006-08-07

    Biomechanics has made large contributions to dinosaur biology. It has enabled us to estimate both the speeds at which dinosaurs generally moved and the maximum speeds of which they may have been capable. It has told us about the range of postures they could have adopted, for locomotion and for feeding, and about the problems of blood circulation in sauropods with very long necks. It has made it possible to calculate the bite forces of predators such as Tyrannosaurus, and the stresses they imposed on its skull; and to work out the remarkable chewing mechanism of hadrosaurs. It has shown us how some dinosaurs may have produced sounds. It has enabled us to estimate the effectiveness of weapons such as the tail spines of Stegosaurus. In recent years, techniques such as computational tomography and finite element analysis, and advances in computer modelling, have brought new opportunities. Biomechanists should, however, be especially cautious in their work on animals known only as fossils. The lack of living specimens and even soft tissues oblige us to make many assumptions. It is important to be aware of the often wide ranges of uncertainty that result.

  1. The Clinical Aspects of Mirror Therapy in Rehabilitation: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothgangel, Andreas Stefan; Braun, Susy M.; Beurskens, Anna J.; Seitz, Rudiger J.; Wade, Derick T.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical aspects of mirror therapy (MT) interventions after stroke, phantom limb pain and complex regional pain syndrome. A systematic literature search of the Cochrane Database of controlled trials, PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, PEDro, RehabTrials and Rehadat, was made by two…

  2. The Clinical Aspects of Mirror Therapy in Rehabilitation: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothgangel, Andreas Stefan; Braun, Susy M.; Beurskens, Anna J.; Seitz, Rudiger J.; Wade, Derick T.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical aspects of mirror therapy (MT) interventions after stroke, phantom limb pain and complex regional pain syndrome. A systematic literature search of the Cochrane Database of controlled trials, PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, PEDro, RehabTrials and Rehadat, was made by two…

  3. Effects of sodium-hyaluronate and glucosamine-chondroitin sulfate on remodeling stage of tenotomized superficial digital flexor tendon in rabbits: a clinical, histopathological, ultrastructural, and biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Oryan, Ahmad; Moshiri, Ali; Meimandiparizi, Abdul-Hamid

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of sodium-hyaluronate (NaH) combined with glucosamine HCl-chondroitin sulfate (GlcN-CS) on the post-surgical repair of tendon rupture on day 84 post injury. Twenty white New Zealand female rabbits were divided randomly into two equal groups of injured treated and injured untreated. After tenotomy and surgical repair, using the modified Kessler technique and running pattern, the injured legs were casted for 14 days. NaH was injected subcutaneously over the lesion on days 3, 7, and 10 and was followed by daily oral administration of GlcN-CS on days 3 to 23 post injury. The control animals received normal saline injection and oral placebo similarly. The weight of the animals, tendon diameter, clinical manifestations, and radiographic and ultrasonographic evaluations were conducted for 12 weeks. The rabbits were euthanized 84 days post injury and the tendons were evaluated at macroscopic, histopathologic, and ultrastructural level and were assessed for biomechanical and percentage dry-weight parameters. Treatment significantly reduced the tendon diameter and ultimate and yield strain, and increased the echogenicity, dry-weight content, ultimate and yield strength, and stress and stiffness of the injured tendons compared to those of the untreated ones. Treatment also significantly enhanced the maturation rate of the tenoblasts, fibrillogenesis, the diameters of the collagen fibrils, and fibrillar density. These findings suggest that a combined treatment of NaH and GlcN-CS could be effective in restoring the morphological and biomechanical properties of injured superficial digital flexor tendon of rabbits and might be helpful for future clinical trial studies in tendon ruptures.

  4. Biomechanics in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, J. F. V.

    1980-01-01

    Examines current usage of the term "biomechanics" and emphasizes the importance of differentiating between structure and material. Describes current prolects in biomechanics and lists four points about the educational significance of the field. (GS)

  5. Biomechanics in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, J. F. V.

    1980-01-01

    Examines current usage of the term "biomechanics" and emphasizes the importance of differentiating between structure and material. Describes current prolects in biomechanics and lists four points about the educational significance of the field. (GS)

  6. [Abdominal masses in pediatric age; clinical aspects and diagnostic approach in 52 cases (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Perrelli, L; Calisti, A; Molle, P

    1981-01-01

    A large series of malignant and benign conditions are generally collected under the term of abdominal masses. Their common aspect is the lack, in most of the cases, of peculiar clinical features which may help early differential diagnosis. In many cases the mass is detected late after a long period of vague, aspecific symptoms. 40% of these space occupying lesions of the abdomen are of malignant origin and delayed detection and investigation affect clinical course. Preoperative study of abdominal masses is a problem of primary importance in pediatric surgical practice. A changing attitude is registered towards many diagnostic procedures and the role of largely diffused techniques like angiography is controversial. The introduction of ultrasonography makes in many cases intensive radiologic investigation unwarranted and academic. The Authors discuss the real role and targets of preoperative investigations of abdominal masses and refer on their experience based on 52 cases, to underline some clinical aspects and analyse their diagnostic approach to this pathology.

  7. Biomechanics or Necromechanics? Or How to Interpret Biomechanical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Richard A

    2002-01-01

    The field of biomechanics is inextricably linked with orthopaedic surgery: loads and load distribution play a major role in the problems we treat and in the success and failure of many of our treatments. Nonetheless, despite powerful investigational tools, I would argue biomechanics has made a relatively minor impact in clinical practice primarily because most studies fail to account for the major distinction between living and nonliving systems: adaptability. While any study requires a clear question or hypothesis or goal, without accounting for adaptability and tissue tolerance, these studies might well be termed "necromechanical." These studies will always have limited clinical relevance unless they contain several key features: 1.) A choice of a mechanical parameter which is arguably a surrogate for relevant biological behavior; 2.) A set of loading regimens which arguably represent the entire range of loadings experienced in vivo; 3.) An explicit discussion of tissue tolerance to the mechanical perturbations of the study; 4.) When appropriate (i.e., the question relates to longer-term effects), an explicit exploration of tissue adaptation over time. Without meeting these requirements, any biomechanical study is suspect and requires interpretation with great caution. When meeting these requirements, biomechanics can provide powerful tools to explain the function of the body and to predict the success or failure of treatments prior to using them on patients. PMID:12180603

  8. Research Techniques in Biomechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Terry

    Biomechanics involves the biological human beings interacting with his/her mechanical environment. Biomechanics research is being done in connection with sport, physical education, and general motor behavior, and concerns mechanics independent of implements. Biomechanics research falls in the following two general categories: (1) that specific…

  9. Biomechanics of corneal ectasia and biomechanical treatments

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Cynthia J.; Dupps, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Many algorithms exist for the topographic/tomographic detection of corneas at risk for post-refractive surgery ectasia. It is proposed that the reason for the difficulty to find a universal screening tool based on corneal morphologic features is that curvature, elevation, and pachymetric changes are all secondary signs of keratoconus and post-refractive surgery ectasia and that the primary abnormality is in the biomechanical properties. It is further proposed that the biomechanical modification is focal in nature, rather than a uniform generalized weakening, and that the focal reduction in elastic modulus precipitates a cycle of biomechanical decompensation that is driven by asymmetry in the biomechanical properties. This initiates a repeating cycle of increased strain, stress redistribution, and subsequent focal steepening and thinning. Various interventions are described in terms of how this cycle of biomechanical decompensation is interrupted, such as intrastromal corneal ring segments, which redistribute the corneal stress, and collagen crosslinking, which modifies the basic structural properties. PMID:24774009

  10. Art therapy for patients with depression: expert opinions on its main aspects for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Blomdahl, Christina; Gunnarsson, Birgitta A; Guregård, Suzanne; Rusner, Marie; Wijk, Helle; Björklund, Anita

    2016-12-01

    Art therapy is based mainly on clinical experience and is rarely described and evaluated scientifically. There is a need for further exploration of its use in patients with depression. The aim of this study was to explore what experts consider to be the main aspects of art therapy in clinical practice for patients with depression. Eighteen occupational therapists experienced and educated in art therapy participated. The experts answered three rounds of Delphi questionnaires and ranked their agreement with 74 assertions. Consensus was defined as 70% or higher. The experts agreed more on assertions about theoretical frames of reference than about clinical practice. The main aspects of art therapy were agreed to be the patients' opportunity to express themselves verbally and through making art. It was equally important that art tasks provided an opportunity to address depressive thoughts, feelings, life experiences, and physical symptoms. Experts in the field of art therapy considered that the main aspect of clinical practice in art therapy for patients with depression is that art themes should promote expression related to both to depression and personal history.

  11. Biomechanical Stability of Dental Implants in Augmented Maxillary Sites: Results of a Randomized Clinical Study with Four Different Biomaterials and PRF and a Biological View on Guided Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Angelo, Troedhan; Marcel, Wainwright; Andreas, Kurrek; Izabela, Schlichting

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Bone regenerates mainly by periosteal and endosteal humoral and cellular activity, which is given only little concern in surgical techniques and choice of bone grafts for guided bone regeneration. This study investigates on a clinical level the biomechanical stability of augmented sites in maxillary bone when a new class of moldable, self-hardening calcium-phosphate biomaterials (SHB) is used with and without the addition of Platelet Rich Fibrin (aPRF) in the Piezotome-enhanced subperiosteal tunnel-technique (PeSPTT). Material and Methods. 82 patients with horizontal atrophy of anterior maxillary crest were treated with PeSPTT and randomly assigned biphasic (60% HA/40% bTCP) or monophasic (100% bTCP) SHB without or with addition of aPRF. 109 implants were inserted into the augmented sites after 8.3 months and the insertion-torque-value (ITV) measured as clinical expression of the (bio)mechanical stability of the augmented bone and compared to ITVs of a prior study in sinus lifting. Results. Significant better results of (bio)mechanical stability almost by two-fold, expressed by higher ITVs compared to native bone, were achieved with the used biomaterials and more constant results with the addition of aPRF. Conclusion. The use of SHB alone or combined with aPRF seems to be favourable to achieve a superior (bio)mechanical stable restored alveolar bone. PMID:25954758

  12. Diseases in the cranio-cervical junction: Anatomical and pathological aspects and detailed clinical accounts

    SciTech Connect

    Voth, D.; Glees, P.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 40 selections. Some of the titles are: Radionuclide imaging of the cranio-cervical region; Magnetic resonance imaging in the cranio-cervical region: Experiences in 194 cases; NMR-finding in a case of Morquio's syndrome with syncope; The dynamic evaluation of the cervical spinal canal and spinal cord by magnetic resonance imaging during movement; and A review of clinical and radiological aspects of rheumatoid arthritis of head joints.

  13. C-arm cone-beam computed tomography in interventional oncology: technical aspects and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Floridi, Chiara; Radaelli, Alessandro; Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Grass, Micheal; Lin, Ming De; Chiaradia, Melanie; Geschwind, Jean-Francois; Kobeiter, Hishman; Squillaci, Ettore; Maleux, Geert; Giovagnoni, Andrea; Brunese, Luca; Wood, Bradford; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Rotondo, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    C-arm cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a new imaging technology integrated in modern angiographic systems. Due to its ability to obtain cross-sectional imaging and the possibility to use dedicated planning and navigation software, it provides an informed platform for interventional oncology procedures. In this paper, we highlight the technical aspects and clinical applications of CBCT imaging and navigation in the most common loco-regional oncological treatments. PMID:25012472

  14. Migraine with aura white matter lesions: preliminary data on clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Galli, Alberto; Di Fiore, P; D'Arrigo, G; Uggetti, C; Squarza, S; Leone, M; D'Amico, D; Frediani, F

    2017-05-01

    A few clinic-based magnetic resonance imaging studies report an increased risk of signal abnormalities in migraineurs brain's white matter, especially in migraine with aura subjects. A vascular genesis has been hypnotized and migraine with aura was considered an independent risk factor for stroke. Available data of magnetic resonance imaging alterations are often nonspecific and sometimes controversial. The aim of our study is to investigate migraine with aura patients with standardized brain magnetic resonance imaging to detect and to quantify the presence of white matter lesions and to analyze their relation with clinical data. We report preliminary data about first 90 subjects. We did not recognize any clinical aspect in close relationship with these alterations. The only clinical feature that seems to play a role in the presence of alterations is the age, and only in migraineurs women.

  15. Minimal residual disease detection in mantle cell lymphoma: technical aspects and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Pott, Christiane

    2011-07-01

    The prognostic impact of minimal residual disease (MRD) has been demonstrated for several hematologic malignancies. While in acute lymphoblastic leukemias MRD assessment by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods has been established as an important tool for clinical risk assessment and is part of clinical management, data demonstrating a prognostic value of MRD in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) were sparse and results from randomized trials have been published only recently. In the present review technical aspects of different MRD detection methods are discussed, as well as the prognostic relevance of MRD in the context of clinical trials in patients with MCL. Furthermore, recommendations are given for workflow and useful implication of MRD in future clinical trials design.

  16. Methodological aspects of clinical trials in tinnitus: A proposal for an international standard

    PubMed Central

    Landgrebe, Michael; Azevedo, Andréia; Baguley, David; Bauer, Carol; Cacace, Anthony; Coelho, Claudia; Dornhoffer, John; Figueiredo, Ricardo; Flor, Herta; Hajak, Goeran; van de Heyning, Paul; Hiller, Wolfgang; Khedr, Eman; Kleinjung, Tobias; Koller, Michael; Lainez, Jose Miguel; Londero, Alain; Martin, William H.; Mennemeier, Mark; Piccirillo, Jay; De Ridder, Dirk; Rupprecht, Rainer; Searchfield, Grant; Vanneste, Sven; Zeman, Florian; Langguth, Berthold

    2013-01-01

    Chronic tinnitus is a common condition with a high burden of disease. While many different treatments are used in clinical practice, the evidence for the efficacy of these treatments is low and the variance of treatment response between individuals is high. This is most likely due to the great heterogeneity of tinnitus with respect to clinical features as well as underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. There is a clear need to find effective treatment options in tinnitus, however, clinical trials differ substantially with respect to methodological quality and design. Consequently, the conclusions that can be derived from these studies are limited and jeopardize comparison between studies. Here, we discuss our view of the most important aspects of trial design in clinical studies in tinnitus and make suggestions for an international methodological standard in tinnitus trials. We hope that the proposed methodological standard will stimulate scientific discussion and will help to improve the quality of trials in tinnitus. PMID:22789414

  17. Analysis of severely fractured glenoid components: clinical consequences of biomechanics, design, and materials selection on implant performance.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Farzana; Lee, Taylor; Malito, Louis; Martin, Audrey; Gunther, Stephen B; Harmsen, Samuel; Norris, Tom R; Ries, Mike; Van Citters, Douglas; Pruitt, Lisa

    2016-07-01

    The longevity of total shoulder replacement is primarily limited by the performance of the ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) glenoid component in vivo. Variations in glenoid design (conformity, thickness), biomechanics (joint kinematics), and UHMWPE material selection (sterilization, cross-linking) distinguish total shoulder replacements from hip and knee arthroplasty devices. These variables can lead to severe mechanical failures, including gross fracture. Sixteen retrieved glenoids with severe fracture were analyzed. The explant cohort included 3 material groups (gamma-sterilized Hylamer; gamma-sterilized UHMWPE; and gas plasma-sterilized, remelted, highly cross-linked UHMWPE [HXL]) and a range of conformities (0- to 10-mm radial mismatch). Analysis included fractography (optical and scanning electron microscopy) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy for oxidative analysis. Fracture primarily occurred along the exterior rim for all 16 explants. Fourier transform infrared analysis and fractography revealed significant oxidative embrittlement for all gamma-sterilized glenoids. Fatigue striations and internal flaws were evident on the fracture surface of the HXL glenoid, with little oxidation detected. Fracture initiated at the external rim of all devices. Elevated oxidation levels and visible material distortion for representative gamma-sterilized conventional and Hylamer devices suggest oxidative embrittlement as a driving force for crack inception and subsequent fracture. Brittle fracture of theHXL glenoid resulted from a combination of elevated contact stress due to a nonconforming surface, an internal flaw, and reduced resistance to fatigue crack growth. This demonstrates that glenoid fracture associated with oxidation has not been eliminated with the advent of modern materials (HXL) in the shoulder domain. Basic Science Study; Implant Retrieval Study. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by

  18. Mitochondrial Disease: Clinical Aspects, Molecular Mechanisms, Translational Science, and Clinical Frontiers

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Ben; Cohen, Bruce; Copeland, William; Maria, Bernard L.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial medicine provides a metabolic perspective on the pathology of conditions linked with inadequate oxidative phosphorylation. Dysfunction in the mitochondrial machinery can result in improper energy production, leading to cellular injury or even apoptosis. Clinical presentations are often subtle, so clinicians must have a high index of suspicion to make early diagnoses. Symptoms could include muscle weakness and pain, seizures, loss of motor control, decreased visual and auditory functions, metabolic acidosis, acute developmental regression, and immune system dysfunction. The 2013 Neurobiology of Disease in Children Symposium, held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Child Neurology Society, aimed to (1) describe accepted clinical phenotypes of mitochondrial disease produced from various mitochondrial mutations, (2) discuss contemporary understanding of molecular mechanisms that contribute to disease pathology, (3) highlight the systemic effects produced by dysfunction within the mitochondrial machinery, and (4) introduce current strategies that are being translated from bench to bedside as potential therapeutics. PMID:24916430

  19. Mitochondrial disease: clinical aspects, molecular mechanisms, translational science, and clinical frontiers.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Ben; Cohen, Bruce; Copeland, William; Maria, Bernard L

    2014-09-01

    Mitochondrial medicine provides a metabolic perspective on the pathology of conditions linked with inadequate oxidative phosphorylation. Dysfunction in the mitochondrial machinery can result in improper energy production, leading to cellular injury or even apoptosis. Clinical presentations are often subtle, so clinicians must have a high index of suspicion to make early diagnoses. Symptoms could include muscle weakness and pain, seizures, loss of motor control, decreased visual and auditory functions, metabolic acidosis, acute developmental regression, and immune system dysfunction. The 2013 Neurobiology of Disease in Children Symposium, held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Child Neurology Society, aimed to (1) describe accepted clinical phenotypes of mitochondrial disease produced from various mitochondrial mutations, (2) discuss contemporary understanding of molecular mechanisms that contribute to disease pathology, (3) highlight the systemic effects produced by dysfunction within the mitochondrial machinery, and (4) introduce current strategies that are being translated from bench to bedside as potential therapeutics.

  20. Clinical and biomechanical evaluation of three bioscaffold augmentation devices used for superficial digital flexor tenorrhaphy in donkeys (Equus asinus): An experimental study.

    PubMed

    El-Shafaey, El-Sayed A; Karrouf, Gamal I; Zaghloul, Adel E

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to carry out an in vivo and in vitro comparative evaluation of three bio-scaffold augmentation devices used for superficial digital flexor tenorrhaphy in donkeys. Twenty-four clinically healthy donkeys were assigned for three treatment trials (n = 8) using one of three bioscaffold materials (glycerolized bovine pericardium xenograft, tendon allograft and allograft with glycerolized by bovine pericardium). In addition, eight clinically healthy donkeys were selected to serve as control. Clinical signs of each animal were scored and the sum of all clinical indexes was calculated at each time point of the experiment. Four donkeys from each group were euthanized at 45 and 90 days postoperatively, respectively, for biomechanical and histopathological evaluation of treated superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT). The failure stress in allograft shielding group significantly increased compared to the corresponding values of the other groups at 45 (62.7 ± 6.5 N mm(-2)) and 90 (88.8 ± 3.5 N mm(-2)) days postoperatively. The fetlock angle in the allograft shielding group at both 45 (112.8° ± 4.4) and 90 (123.8° ± 1.1) days postoperatively showed a significant increase (p < 0.05) relative to the values of the other groups and a significant decrease (p < 0.05) when compared to normal angle (125° ± 0). However, the histomorphological findings revealed no remarkable changes between the treatment groups. In conclusion, the failure stress, fetlock angle and histomorphological findings may provide useful information about the healing characteristics of SDFT tenorrhaphy. The bio-scaffold augmentation devices, either xenogenic or allogenic, provide good alternative techniques accelerating SDFT healing with minimal adhesions in donkeys.

  1. [The German Clinical Trials Register: reasons, general and technical aspects, international integration].

    PubMed

    Dreier, G; Hasselblatt, H; Antes, G; Schumacher, M

    2009-04-01

    In order to provide a central portal for information on clinical research in Germany and thus to facilitate the search of planned, ongoing and completed clinical trials, the German Clinical Trials Register (GermanCTR) was implemented in cooperation with the WHO's registries network. It is an open access online register of clinical trials conducted in Germany, which allows all users to search for, register and share information on clinical trials. The project is funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research and is implemented at the Institute for Medical Biometry and Medical Informatics of the University Medical Center Freiburg as a joint project of the Clinical Trials Center Freiburg and the German Cochrane Center. Since October 2008 the GermanCTR is an approved WHO Primary Registry and allows clinical trial registration in Germany according to the requirements of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE). Reasons for a national trials register, general and technical aspects of implementing the GermanCTR as well as the national and international integration are described here.

  2. Clinical aspects and potential clinical applications of laser accelerated proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spatola, C.; Privitera, G.

    2013-07-01

    Proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT), as well as the other forms of hadrontherapy, is in use in the treatment of neoplastic diseases, to realize a high selective irradiation with maximum sparing of surrounding organs. The main characteristic of such a particles is to have an increased radiobiological effectiveness compared to conventional photons (about 10% more) and the advantage to deposit the energy in a defined space through the tissues (Bragg peak phenomenon). The goal of ELIMED Project is the realization of a laser accelerated proton beam line to prove its potential use for clinical application in the field of hadrontherapy. To date, there are several potential clinical applications of PBRT, some of which have become the treatment of choice for a specific tumour, for others it is under investigation as a therapeutic alternative to conventional X-ray radiotherapy, to increase the dose to the tumour and reduce the side effects. For almost half of cancers, an increased local tumour control is the mainstay for increased cancer curability.

  3. Granuloma faciale: clinical, morphological and immunohistochemical aspects in a series of 10 patients*

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Cristiano Claudino; Ianhez, Pedro Eugênio de Carvalho; Marques, Silvio Alencar; Marques, Mariângela Esther Alencar

    2016-01-01

    Granuloma faciale is a chronic, benign, cutaneous vasculitis with well-established clinical and morphological patterns, but with an unknown etiology. This study describes clinical and pathologic aspects of patients diagnosed with granuloma faciale. The authors analyzed demographic, clinical, morphological and immunohistochemical data from patients with a final diagnosis of granuloma faciale, confirmed between 1998 and 2012. There was a proportional and mixed inflammatory infiltrate, Grenz zones were present in almost all the samples. Immunophenotyping confirmed a higher intensity of T lymphocytes than B lymphocytes in thirteen samples, with a predominance of T CD8 lymphocytes in 64% of cases, in contrast to the literature, which indicates that the major component is T CD4 lymphocytes. All cases were positive for IgG4 but the majority (12/14) had less than 25% of stained cells. The pathogenesis of granuloma faciale remains poorly understood, making studies of morphological and immunohistochemical characterization important to better understand it. PMID:28099604

  4. Regulatory transparency: social, technical, and ethical aspects of clinical trial data access.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Varley Dias; Silveira, Dâmaris

    2015-06-01

    In the field of health regulation, enabling public access to data from clinical trials is a process currently undergoing consolidation by the principal regulators worldwide. This paper discusses recent developments in public policy regarding regulatory transparency, and the risks and benefits of a regulatory impact-analysis on clinical trial reports, from the perspective of the key stakeholders (i.e., patients, prescribers, government, society, industry, and regulators). Additionally, the social, technical, and ethical aspects of the datasharing process are highlighted, including access limits, commercially-confidential data and patent rights, privacy of research subjects, arrangements and publicity tools, and clinical trials registration. Furthermore, perspectives on improvement and expansion of regulatory transparency policies are presented, contextualizing North American, Latin American, and European experiences, and highlighting in-teragency cooperation and collaboration initiatives that aim to harmonize health programs and regulatory convergence.

  5. [Etiopathogenetic aspects and clinical implications of insulin resistance in polycystic ovary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Scarpitta, A M; Sinagra, D

    1997-06-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous pathological condition characterized by a number of clinical, endocrine and pathological anatomic aspects. The heterogeneity of these factors and the variability of their presence makes it difficult to classify the syndrome and define it precisely as a separate nosographic entity. It is also difficult to position it with precision among the insulin-resistant syndromes in view of the multiple pathogenetic hypotheses that have been proposed over the years which are still the subject of numerous studies and deserve further confirmation. Data regarding beta-cell secretion in PCOS are also discordant; numerous experimental findings are therefore required to define this aspect correctly. On the basis of the most recent data reported in the international literature, the authors affirm the importance of considering this syndrome both from a purely endocrine point of view and in metabolic terms, for the therapeutic purpose of restoring hormone status and preventing, where possible, the onset of metabolic changes.

  6. Aspects of dosimetry and clinical practice of skin brachytherapy: The American Brachytherapy Society working group report.

    PubMed

    Ouhib, Zoubir; Kasper, Michael; Perez Calatayud, Jose; Rodriguez, Silvia; Bhatnagar, Ajay; Pai, Sujatha; Strasswimmer, John

    2015-01-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) are the most common type of human malignancy. Although surgical techniques are the standard treatment, radiation therapy using photons, electrons, and brachytherapy (BT) (radionuclide-based and electronic) has been an important mode of treatment in specific clinical situations. The purpose of this work is to provide a clinical and dosimetric summary of the use of BT for the treatment of NMSC and to describe the different BT approaches used in treating cutaneous malignancies. A group of experts from the fields of radiation oncology, medical physics, and dermatology, who specialize in managing cutaneous malignancies reviewed the literature and compiled their clinical experience regarding the clinical and dosimetric aspects of skin BT. A dosimetric and clinical review of both high dose rate ((192)Ir) and electronic BT treatment including surface, interstitial, and custom mold applicators is given. Patient evaluation tools such as staging, imaging, and patient selection criteria are discussed. Guidelines for clinical and dosimetric planning, appropriate margin delineation, and applicator selection are suggested. Dose prescription and dose fractionation schedules, as well as prescription depth are discussed. Commissioning and quality assurance requirements are also outlined. Given the limited published data for skin BT, this article is a summary of the limited literature and best practices currently in use for the treatment of NMSC. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The clinical and biomechanical effects of fascial-muscular lengthening therapy on tight hip flexor patients with and without low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Avrahami, Daniel; Potvin, Jim R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Many patients have tight hip flexors with or without low back pain. Manual fascial-muscular lengthening therapy (FMLT) is one commonly used treatment for this population. Objective: Investigate the clinical and biomechanical effects of manual FMLT on tight hip flexor patients with and without low back pain. Methods: A nonrandomized trial, before-and-after experiment with multiple baselines conducted on two different patient populations: 1) Mechanical low back pain patients with tight hip flexors (n = 10) and 2) Asymptomatic group with tight hip flexors (n = 8). Four treatments of manual FMLT were performed on the hip flexor of the two groups of patients over a two-week period. Primary outcome measures over the two-week period were 1) Maximum voluntary trunk flexor and extensor moments, 2) Disability (Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire) and pain (10-cm Visual Analogue Scale), 3) Passive hip extension mobility. Results: Primary outcome analysis involved within-groups comparisons. Maximum voluntary trunk extension demonstrated increases for the low back pain patients. The low back pain patients demonstrated a small, but significant, reduction in disability and pain. Both groups demonstrated an increase in passive hip extension measurements. Conclusion: This preliminary study demonstrated interesting results from manual FMLT on two tight hip flexor patient populations with and without low back pain. However, there were several significant limitations from this study, which restrict the ability to generalize the results. PMID:25550670

  8. The adaptation problems of patients undergoing hemodialysis: socio-economic and clinical aspects1

    PubMed Central

    Frazão, Cecília Maria Farias de Queiroz; de Sá, Jéssica Dantas; Medeiros, Ana Beatriz de Almeida; Fernandes, Maria Isabel da Conceição Dias; Lira, Ana Luisa Brandão de Carvalho; Lopes, Marcos Venícios de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to identify adaptation problems under Roy's Model in patients undergoing hemodialysis and to correlate them with the socioeconomic and clinical aspects. METHOD: a transversal study, undertaken using a questionnaire. The sample was made up of 178 individuals. The Chi-squared and Mann-Whitney U tests were undertaken. RESULTS: the adaptation problems and the socioeconomic and clinical aspects which presented statistical associations were: Hyperkalemia and age; Edema and income; Impairment of a primary sense: touch and income; Role failure and age; Sexual dysfunction and marital status and sex; Impairment of a primary sense: vision and years of education; Intolerance to activity and years of education; Chronic pain and sex and years of education; Impaired skin integrity and age: Hypocalcemia and access; Potential for injury and age and years of education; Nutrition below the organism's requirements and age; Impairment of a primary sense: hearing and sex and kinetic evaluation of urea; Mobility in gait and/or coordination restricted, and months of hemodialysis; and, Loss of ability for self-care, and months of hemodialysis and months of illness. CONCLUSION: adaptation problems in the clientele undergoing hemodialysis can be influenced by socioeconomic/clinical data. These findings contribute to the development of the profession, fostering the nurse's reflection regarding the care. PMID:25591091

  9. Clinical and Non-Clinical Aspects of Distal Radioulnar Joint Instability

    PubMed Central

    Wijffels, MME; Brink, PRG; Schipper, IB

    2012-01-01

    Untreated distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) injuries can give rise to long lasting complaints. Although common, diagnosis and treatment of DRUJ injuries remains a challenge. The articulating anatomy of the distal radius and ulna, among others, enables an extensive range of forearm pronosupination movements. Stabilization of this joint is provided by both intrinsic and extrinsic stabilizers and the joint capsule. These structures transmit the load and prevent the DRUJ from luxation during movement. Several clinical tests have been suggested to determine static or dynamic DRUJ stability, but their predictive value is unclear. Radiologic evaluation of DRUJ instability begins with conventional radiographs in anterioposterior and true lateral view. If not conclusive, CT-scan seems to be the best additional modality to evaluate the osseous structures. MRI has proven to be more sensitive and specific for TFCC tears, potentially causing DRUJ instability. DRUJ instability may remain asymptomatic. Symptomatic DRUJ injuries treatment can be conservative or operative. Operative treatment should consist of restoration of osseous and ligamenteous anatomy. If not successful, salvage procedures can be performed to regain stability. PMID:22675411

  10. [The clinical history in surgical processes. Bioethical aspects and basic professional ethics].

    PubMed

    Collazo Chao, Eliseo

    2008-11-01

    Surgeons are increasingly facing multiple civil liability claims from their patients. Against this background and taking any eventual liability claims into account, surgeons must be increasingly aware of the importance of maintaining patient medical histories, which raises numerous questions on the length of time and form of keeping them. Ethical and legal obligations need to be taken into account in order to identify the controversial aspects related to patients and their environment, as well as shedding light on the most appropriate behaviour in each case. We must never forget the case history is a clinical document, subjected to the medical art and medical ethics which regulate it.

  11. [The role of Czech physicians in the etiology, clinical aspects and epidemiology of exanthematous typhus].

    PubMed

    Pospisil, R

    1999-11-01

    Typhus fever was a lethal disease of mankind. Elucidation of its origin and spread was due to more or less unscientific approaches at the time. Only in the second half of the 19th and at the beginning of the 20th century the period of a scientific approach to knowledge of its etiology, clinical aspects and epidemiology started. A great contribution was made in this respect by Czech doctors. The latter included Professor Hlava who made a series of experiments which were among the first which investigated the etiology of this disease. He may be therefore quite rightly included among one of the discoverers of the origin of typhus fever.

  12. Stüve-Wiedemann Syndrome: Update on Clinical and Genetic Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Romeo Bertola, Débora; Honjo, Rachel S.; Baratela, Wagner A.R.

    2016-01-01

    Stüve-Wiedemann syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by bowed long bones, joint restrictions, dysautonomia, and respiratory and feeding difficulties, leading to death in the neonatal period and infancy in several occasions. Since the first cases in 1971, much has been learned about this condition, including its molecular basis - mutations in the leukemia inhibitory factor receptor gene (LIFR) -, natural history and management possibilities. This review aims to highlight the clinical aspects, radiological features, molecular findings, and management strategies in Stüve-Wiedemann syndrome. PMID:27194968

  13. Technical and clinical aspects of spectrometric analysis of trace elements in clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Chan, S; Gerson, B; Reitz, R E; Sadjadi, S A

    1998-12-01

    Jarvisalo as well as by Chan and Gerson. Lutz et al observed the ranges in blood shown in Table 4. We have adopted the ranges listed in Table 5 in urines of healthy, ambulatory, and community-dwelling individuals through a limited in-house study and review of literature. In conclusion, differentiation of trace element abnormalities (primary intoxication or disease versus secondary underlying disease) can be made only by utilizing results from trace element analyses in clinical specimens, medical history, and careful observation of symptoms. Repeat analysis on a second specimen collection is recommended when contamination is suspected.

  14. Importance of accurately assessing biomechanics of the cornea.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Cynthia J

    2016-07-01

    This article summarizes the state-of-the-art in clinical corneal biomechanics, including procedures in which biomechanics play a role, and the clinical consequences in terms of error in estimating intraocular pressure (IOP). Corneal biomechanical response to refractive surgery can be categorized into either stable alteration of surface shape and thus visual outcome, or unstable biomechanical decompensation. The stable response is characterized by central flattening and peripheral steepening that is potentiated in a stiffer cornea. Two clinical devices for assessing corneal biomechanics do not yet measure classic biomechanical properties, but rather provide assessment of corneal deformation response. Biomechanical parameters are a function of IOP, and both the cornea and sclera become stiffer as IOP increases. Any assessment of biomechanical parameters must include IOP, and one value of stiffness does not adequately characterize a cornea. Corneal biomechanics plays a role in the outcomes of any procedure in which lamellae are transected. Once the corneal structure has been altered in a manner that includes central thinning, IOP measurements with applanation tonometry are likely not valid, and other technologies should be used.

  15. Release of palladium from biomechanical prostheses in body fluids can induce or support PD-specific IFNgamma T cell responses and the clinical setting of a palladium hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Cristaudo, A; Bordignon, V; Petrucci, F; Caimi, S; De Rocco, M; Picardo, M; Cordiali Fei, P; Ensoli, F

    2009-01-01

    The increased use of Palladium (Pd) for biomedical applications, which has more than doubled in the last ten years, appears to be associated with an increased frequency of adverse reactions to Pd. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between the implant of a biomechanical apparatus containing Pd and the setting of a hypersensitivity to Pd by determining the levels of the metal released in biological fluids, assessing the effects of Pd on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cytokine production and exploring the clinical setting of skin sensitization. Of a total of 3,093 subjects examined in 2006, sensitization to Pd alone or in association with nickel (Ni) was observed in 1.6% and 13.03% of the individuals, respectively. Of these, a group of six subjects positive to Pd and negative to Ni at patch testing were selected on the basis of the oral clinical symptoms in order to measure both the levels of Pd in biological fluids and the degradation of the dental prostheses. Specific Pd measurements were carried out on salivary fluid, urine and serum samples by High Resolution Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry. In addition, the degradation of the dental prostheses was assessed by both a leaching test and an analysis of the micro morphology of orthodontic prostheses. The induction of IFN-gamma production by Pd was assessed in PBMC by the ELISpot assay. Skin sensitization to Pd was evaluated by patch testing and clinical examination. Ten healthy subjects were comparatively tested as controls. We found a specific induction of an IFN-gamma response by Pd in PBMC collected from all the subjects positive to Pd at patch testing. On the contrary, control subjects did not show any response to Pd as assessed by IFN-gamma ELISpot assay or by skin testing. Remarkably, the levels of Pd in all biological samples (saliva, sera, urine) were significantly higher in Pd-sensitized patients than in those collected from controls, reaching the highest

  16. Leprosy: review of the epidemiological, clinical, and etiopathogenic aspects - Part 1*

    PubMed Central

    Lastória, Joel Carlos; de Abreu, Marilda Aparecida Milanez Morgado

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy is caused by Mycobacterium leprae and has been known since biblical times. It is still endemic in many regions of the world and a public health problem in Brazil. The prevalence rate in 2011 reached 1.54 cases per 10,000 inhabitants in Brazil. The mechanism of transmission of leprosy consists of prolonged close contact between susceptible and genetically predisposed individuals and untreated multibacillary patients. Transmission occurs through inhalation of bacilli present in upper airway secretion. The nasal mucosa is the main entry or exit route of M. leprae. The deeper understanding of the structural and biological characteristics of M. leprae, the sequencing of its genome, along with the advances in understanding the mechanisms of host immune response against the bacilli, dependent on genetic susceptibility, have contributed to the understanding of the pathogenesis, variations in the clinical characteristics, and progression of the disease. This article aims to update dermatologist on epidemiological, clinical, and etiopathogenic leprosy aspects. PMID:24770495

  17. Diphtheria outbreak in Maranhão, Brazil: microbiological, clinical and epidemiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Santos, L S; Sant'anna, L O; Ramos, J N; Ladeira, E M; Stavracakis-Peixoto, R; Borges, L L G; Santos, C S; Napoleão, F; Camello, T C F; Pereira, G A; Hirata, R; Vieira, V V; Cosme, L M S S; Sabbadini, P S; Mattos-Guaraldi, A L

    2015-03-01

    We describe microbiological, clinical and epidemiological aspects of a diphtheria outbreak that occurred in Maranhão, Brazil. The majority of the 27 confirmed cases occurred in partially (n = 16) or completely (n = 10) immunized children (n = 26). Clinical signs and characteristic symptoms of diphtheria such as cervical lymphadenopathy and pseudomembrane formation were absent in 48% and 7% of the cases, respectively. Complications such as paralysis of lower limbs were observed. Three cases resulted in death, two of them in completely immunized children. Microbiological analysis identified the isolates as Corynebacterium diphtheriae biovar intermedius with a predominant PFGE type. Most of them were toxigenic and some showed a decrease in penicillin G susceptibility. In conclusion, diphtheria remains endemic in Brazil. Health professionals need to be aware of the possibility of atypical cases of C. diphtheriae infection, including pharyngitis without pseudomembrane formation.

  18. Clinical and Pharmacological Aspects of Inflammatory Demyelinating Diseases in Childhood: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Spalice, Alberto; Parisi, Pasquale; Papetti, Laura; Nicita, Francesco; Ursitti, Fabiana; Del Balzo, Francesca; Properzi, Enrico; Verrotti, Alberto; Ruggieri, Martino; Iannetti, Paola

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory demyelinating diseases comprise a spectrum of disorders affecting the myelin of the central and peripheral nervous system. These diseases can usually be differentiated on the basis of clinical, radiological, laboratory and pathological findings. Recent studies have contributed to current awareness that inflammatory demyelinating diseases are not restricted to the adult age group, but are more common in pediatric age than previously believed. Some of pediatric inflammatory demyelinating diseases carry an unfavorable long-term prognosis but appropriate treatments can improve the outcome. The possibility of physical and cognitive disability resulting from these diseases, highlights the urgent need for therapeutic strategies for neurorehabilitation, neuroregeneration, and neurorepair. This review discusses characteristics of primary demyelinating diseases more frequently observed in childhood, focusing on epidemiology, clinical aspects and treatments. PMID:21119885

  19. [Anorexia nervosa in adolescents. Clinical aspects of the diagnosis and a follow-up].

    PubMed

    Saccomani, L; Savoini, M; Naselli, A; Cirrincione, M; Matricardi, A

    1989-01-01

    In a brief review of the literature, the diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic criteria of anorexia nervosa in adolescence are considered. An interdisciplinary approach (child neuropsychiatrists, clinical psychologists, auxological pediatricians) was adopted in 52 cases with a diagnosis of anorexia nervosa (46 females, 6 males; mean age 14). The results of the analysis of somatic disturbances (weight loss, anomalous sexual maturation), psychological aspects (cognitive level, organization of the personality), environmental implications (familial, social and school adjustment; mother-child relationship; pedagogic modalities; social and economic factors) are reported. The data from a follow-up of 29 patients (26 females, 3 males; mean age 19) are reported, and the degree of recovery assessed as follows: 1) clinical recovery at somatic-adjustment level (79% complete, 17% with atypical characteristics); 2) achievement of a harmonic organization of the personality (48%). The paper concludes with some remarks on the treatment, prognosis and prospects for prevention of the condition.

  20. L-carnitine in cardiogenic shock therapy: pharmacodynamic aspects and clinical data.

    PubMed

    Corbucci, G G; Loche, F

    1993-01-01

    Following our previous work on biochemical and clinical aspects of cardiogenic shock, we carried out an open study on 27 patients hospitalized in shock condition and investigated for the entire period of permanence in intensive care units (ICU). The subjects were treated with high doses of L-carnitine following previous results on the use of this molecule in conditions of oxidative damage due to acute cellular hypoxia. When compared with the data reported in the literature, the results obtained in this study show a surprisingly positive trend for the carnitine-treated patients in terms of survival rate to the cardiogenic shock. This finding and statistical analysis of the clinical parameters confirm the suggestion that L-carnitine could be credited with a new and interesting role in the therapy of cardiogenic shock.

  1. [Biomechanics and aging].

    PubMed

    Struck, H J

    1991-01-01

    Starting from the physical basics of the biomechanics of connective tissues, organ structures and the corresponding age-related changes of skin, tendons, ligaments, cartilage, bones, blood vessels, and lungs are described. Finally, exogenous factors such as nutrition, hormones, immobilization, activity and adaptive mechanisms and their influence on the biomechanical properties of connective tissue are represented.

  2. Recent microfluidic devices for studying gamete and embryo biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Lai, David; Takayama, Shuichi; Smith, Gary D

    2015-06-25

    The technical challenges of biomechanic research such as single cell analysis at a high monetary cost, labor, and time for just a small number of measurements is a good match to the strengths of microfluidic devices. New scientific discoveries in the fertilization and embryo development process, of which biomechanics is a major subset of interest, is crucial to fuel the continual improvement of clinical practice in assisted reproduction. The following review will highlight some recent microfluidic devices tailored for gamete and embryo biomechanics where biomimicry arises as a major theme of microfluidic device design and function, and the application of fundamental biomechanic principles are used to improve outcomes of cryopreservation.

  3. Measurement of head impacts in collegiate football players: relationship between head impact biomechanics and acute clinical outcome after concussion.

    PubMed

    Guskiewicz, Kevin M; Mihalik, Jason P; Shankar, Viswanathan; Marshall, Stephen W; Crowell, Dean H; Oliaro, Scott M; Ciocca, Mario F; Hooker, Daniel N

    2007-12-01

    To determine the relationship between recorded head accelerations and impact locations and acute clinical outcome of symptomatology, neuropsychological, and postural stability tests after cerebral concussion in Division I collegiate football players. A prospective field study was used in which accelerometers were embedded in the football helmets of 88 collegiate football players. Linear and rotational accelerations of all head impacts sustained over the course of 2004 to 2006 National Collegiate Athletic Association football seasons were collected in real-time. Change scores were calculated on clinical measures from the players' preseason baseline to postinjury (within 48 h) and regressed against the recorded linear and rotational accelerations of the head at the time of the concussion. Thirteen concussions were recorded ranging in impact magnitudes of 60.51 to 168.71 g. Linear regression showed no significant relationships between impact magnitude (linear or rotational acceleration) or impact location and change scores for symptom severity, postural stability, or neurocognitive function (P > 0.05). Our findings suggest that football players are concussed by impacts to the head that occur at a wide range of magnitudes and that clinical measures of acute symptom severity, postural stability, and neuropsychological function all appear to be largely independent of impact magnitude and location. Because of the varying magnitudes and locations of impacts resulting in concussion as well as other factors such as the frequency of subconcussive impacts and number of previous concussions, it may be difficult to establish a threshold for concussive injury that can be applied to all football players.

  4. Associations between aspects of culturally competent care and clinical outcomes among patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Alicia; Seligman, Hilary; Quan, Judy; Stern, Rachel J; Jacobs, Elizabeth A

    2012-09-01

    Culturally competent care may be associated with clinical outcomes in diabetes management, which requires effective physician-patient collaboration. The recent development and validation of the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems Cultural Competence tool enables investigation of possible associations. To assess whether 3 aspects of culturally competent care are associated with glycemic, lipid, and blood pressure control among ethnically diverse patients with diabetes. Survey and chart review study of patients recruited from urban safety net clinics in 2 cities. A total of 600 patients with type 2 diabetes and a primary care physician. We used multivariate logistic regression to assess the independent relationships between the 3 domains of the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems Cultural Competence (Doctor Communication-Positive Behaviors, Trust, and Doctor Communication-Health Promotion) and glycemic, lipid, and systolic blood pressure control after adjusting for sociodemographic and clinical factors. In adjusted analysis, high Trust was associated with lower likelihood of poor glycemic control (odds ratio, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.41-0.84) and high Doctor Communication-Health Promotion was associated with a higher likelihood of poor glycemic control (odds ratio, 1.49, 95% CI, 1.02-2.19). None of the 3 aspects of culturally competent care examined were associated with lipid or systolic blood pressure control after adjustment. Trust in physician, a core component of culturally competent care, but not doctor communication behavior, was associated with a lower likelihood of poor glycemic control in a safety net population with diabetes. Glycemic control may be more sensitive to patient physician partnership than blood pressure and hyperlipidemia control.

  5. Identity and individuality in the nouveau-religious patient: theoretical and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Spero, M H

    1987-02-01

    Revitalized interest in the clinical complexities of psychotherapy with religious patients (for example, Bradford 1984; Lovinger 1984; Spero 1985a; Stern 1985) has drawn attention to the need for perspectives on religious personality development that account for healthy and adaptational aspects as well as psychopathological aspects of particular forms and levels of religious beliefs, enabling more creative, enriching psychotherapy. This search represents movement beyond the significance of infantile wish-fulfillment aspects of religiosity toward the broader domain of ego functioning and quality of object relations. Rizzuto (1976, 1979) and McDargh (1983) emphasize qualitative similarities between interpersonal object representations and God representations. Elkind (1971), using a Piagetian model, views religious beliefs and rituals as forms of constructive adaptation to normal cognitive needs for conservation, representation, symbols of relation, and comprehension. Meissner (1984) highlights the role of God concepts as transitional phenomena. In earlier papers, I have demonstrated the relationship between patients' use of religious themes and legends, quality of psychosexual and object relational achievements, and the consolidation of religious identity (Spero 1982a,b, 1986a,b). Throughout the preceding there is unequivocal recognition that religious development recapitulates many important aspects of healthy psychological development, and that in the case of pathological or dysfunctional religiosity something has gone wrong in an otherwise normal process. There is need to understand and if necessary distinguish between the development of religious belief in individuals whose ideological commitment is relatively constant from earliest childhood and its development in those who adopt or modify religious belief in later life, in conjunction with the many technical implications for psychotherapy. Clinical experience has taught that the process of religious change in

  6. Biomechanics of concussion.

    PubMed

    Stemper, Brian D; Pintar, Frank A

    2014-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the biomechanics associated with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), also known as concussion. Specifically, the role of angular acceleration in modulating concussion onset and severity is highlighted. Studies conducted and published from the 1960s to the 1980s provided initial estimates for TBI tolerance due to high rate head rotation. However, injury levels in those studies were more severe than what is considered to be concussion in the contemporary environment. Therefore, this issue deserves additional attention to provide quantitative estimates for concussive tolerance due to head rotational acceleration focusing on the types of clinical outcomes described today. Likewise, concussion in military personnel has notably increased in current conflicts due to the incorporation of improvised explosive devices and roadside bombs. Clinical evidence indicates that outcomes from concussion due to blast may be quite different from those due to head rotational acceleration. This report also provides an overview of blast concussion mechanisms and highlights some of the recent preclinical work in this area. As with head rotational acceleration, blast tolerance is necessary to understand the scope of this problem, better protect these personnel, and provide more informed return-to-duty guidelines for service members.

  7. Biomechanical determinants of the stability of dental implants: influence of the bone-implant interface properties.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Vincent; Vayron, Romain; Richard, Gilles; Lambert, Grégory; Naili, Salah; Meningaud, Jean-Paul; Haiat, Guillaume

    2014-01-03

    Dental implants are now widely used for the replacement of missing teeth in fully or partially edentulous patients and for cranial reconstructions. However, risks of failure, which may have dramatic consequences, are still experienced and remain difficult to anticipate. The stability of biomaterials inserted in bone tissue depends on multiscale phenomena of biomechanical (bone-implant interlocking) and of biological (mechanotransduction) natures. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of the biomechanical behavior of the bone-dental implant interface as a function of its environment by considering in silico, ex vivo and in vivo studies including animal models as well as clinical studies. The biomechanical determinants of osseointegration phenomena are related to bone remodeling in the vicinity of the implants (adaptation of the bone structure to accommodate the presence of a biomaterial). Aspects related to the description of the interface and to its space-time multiscale nature will first be reviewed. Then, the various approaches used in the literature to measure implant stability and the bone-implant interface properties in vitro and in vivo will be described. Quantitative ultrasound methods are promising because they are cheap, non invasive and because of their lower spatial resolution around the implant compared to other biomechanical approaches.

  8. Training for Women's Basketball: A Biomechanical Emphasis for Preventing Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettitt, Robert W.; Bryson, Erin R.

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes proposed variables linked with higher incidences of anterior cruciate ligament tears in females and the biomechanical aspects of the lower extremity during the performance of common basketball skills, focusing on gender differences in knee joint stability and neuromuscular control, biomechanical aspects of lower extremity skills in…

  9. Training for Women's Basketball: A Biomechanical Emphasis for Preventing Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettitt, Robert W.; Bryson, Erin R.

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes proposed variables linked with higher incidences of anterior cruciate ligament tears in females and the biomechanical aspects of the lower extremity during the performance of common basketball skills, focusing on gender differences in knee joint stability and neuromuscular control, biomechanical aspects of lower extremity skills in…

  10. A multiscale model for the study of cardiac biomechanics in single-ventricle surgeries: a clinical case.

    PubMed

    Meoli, Alessio; Cutrì, Elena; Krishnamurthy, Adarsh; Dubini, Gabriele; Migliavacca, Francesco; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Pennati, Giancarlo; Taylor, Andrew; Giardini, Alessandro; Khambadkone, Sachin; Schievano, Silvia; de Leval, Marc; Hsia, T-Y; Bove, Edward; Dorfman, Adam; Baker, G Hamilton; Hlavacek, Anthony; Migliavacca, Francesco; Pennati, Giancarlo; Dubini, Gabriele; Marsden, Alison; Feinstein, Jeffrey; Vignon-Clementel, Irene; Figliola, Richard; McGregor, John

    2015-04-06

    Complex congenital heart disease characterized by the underdevelopment of one ventricular chamber (single ventricle (SV) circulation) is normally treated with a three-stage surgical repair. This study aims at developing a multiscale computational framework able to couple a patient-specific three-dimensional finite-element model of the SV to a patient-specific lumped parameter (LP) model of the whole circulation, in a closed-loop fashion. A sequential approach was carried out: (i) cardiocirculatory parameters were estimated by using a fully LP model; (ii) ventricular material parameters and unloaded geometry were identified by means of the stand-alone, three-dimensional model of the SV; and (iii) the three-dimensional model of SV was coupled to the LP model of the circulation, thus closing the loop and creating a multiscale model. Once the patient-specific multiscale model was set using pre-operative clinical data, the virtual surgery was performed, and the post-operative conditions were simulated. This approach allows the analysis of local information on ventricular function as well as global parameters of the cardiovascular system. This methodology is generally applicable to patients suffering from SV disease for surgical planning at different stages of treatment. As an example, a clinical case from stage 1 to stage 2 is considered here.

  11. Optic Nerve Head Biomechanics in Aging and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Downs, J. Crawford

    2015-01-01

    This nontechnical review is focused upon educating the reader on optic nerve head biomechanics in both aging and disease along two main themes: what is known about how mechanical forces and the resulting deformations are distributed in the posterior pole and ONH (biomechanics) and what is known about how the living system responds to those deformations (mechanobiology). We focus on how ONH responds to IOP elevations as a structural system, insofar as the acute mechanical response of the lamina cribrosa is confounded with the responses of the peripapillary sclera, prelaminar neural tissues, and retrolaminar optic nerve. We discuss the biomechanical basis for IOP-driven changes in connective tissues, blood flow, and cellular responses. We use glaucoma as the primary framework to present the important aspects of ONH biomechanics in aging and disease, as ONH biomechanics, aging, and the posterior pole extracellular matrix (ECM) are thought to be centrally involved in glaucoma susceptibility, onset and progression. PMID:25819451

  12. Bovine laminitis: clinical aspects, pathology and pathogenesis with reference to acute equine laminitis.

    PubMed

    Boosman, R; Németh, F; Gruys, E

    1991-07-01

    This review deals with the features of clinical and subclinical laminitis in cattle. Prominent clinical signs of acute laminitis are a tender gait and arched back. The sole horn reveals red and yellowish discolourations within five days. In subacute and chronic cases clinical signs are less severe. In chronic laminitis the shape of the claws is altered. Laminitis is frequently followed by sole ulceration and white zone lesions. Blood tests showed no significant changes for laminitic animals. Arteriographic studies of claws affected by laminitis indicated that blood vessels had narrowed lumens. Gross pathology revealed congestion of the corium and rotation of the distal phalanx. Histopathologic studies indicate that laminitis is associated with changes of the vasculature. Peripartum management and nutrition are important factors in its aetiology. It is hypothesised that laminitis is evoked by disturbed digital circulation. In the pathogenesis of acute laminitis three factors are considered important: the occurrence of thrombosis, haemodynamic aspects of the corium, and endotoxins which trigger these pathologic events.

  13. [Respiratory changes in obesity. Functional and clinical aspects. Study of 26 cases].

    PubMed

    Martínez Guerra, M L; Fernández Bonetti, P; Lupi Herrera, E; Rotberg, T; Elizalde, A

    1975-01-01

    A study was made, at the altitude of Mexico City, of the clinic aspects and of the pulmonary function of 26 obese subjects more than 45% overweight. This excess weight habitually produces severe disturbances in pulmonary and/or heart function. In 50% of the patients, clinic, radiologic and electrocardiographic manifestations were found which suggested the existence of pulmonary arterial hypertension. This provoked right heart failure in 19% of the cases. The most constant alterations in the pulmonary volumes was the decrease in the VER, which occurred in 96% of the cases. Most of the patients had hypoxemia (92.5), which was produced mainly by the increase in venoarterial shunts. Although the clinic manifestations were similar to those described in Pickwick's syndrome, alveolar hypoventilation was presented in only a minority of the cases. No relationship was found between the degree of obesity and alveolar hypoventilation. Altitudes of 2,200 meters or more apparently favor hypoxemia in obese patients, and "protects" them from the hypercapnea. The altitude of Mexico City may be one of the reasons why alveolar hypoventilation is observed in only 15% of the cases.

  14. Review of renal carcinoid tumor with focus on clinical and pathobiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, N; Tanaka, A; Ohe, C; Mikami, S; Nagashima, Y; Inoue, K; Shuin, T; Taguchi, T; Tominaga, A; Alvarado-Cabrero, I; Petersson, F; Brunelli, M; Martignoni, G; Michal, M; Hes, O

    2013-01-01

    Renal carcinoid tumor is a rare neoplasm. In this article, we review this neoplasm with a focus on clinical and pathobiological aspects. The majority of patients present in the fourth to seventh decades, but there is no gender predilection. Clinically, patients with renal carcinoid tumor frequently present with abdominal, back or flank pain. This tumor is occassionally associated with horseshoe kidney and/or mature cystic teratoma located in the kidney. Macroscopically, these tumors are well demarcated with a lobulated appearance and yellow or tan-brown color cut surface. Microscopically, these tumors are composed of monomorphic round to polygonal cells with granular amphophilic to eosinophilic cytoplasm. Tumor cells are arranged in trabecular, ribbon-like, gyriform, insular, glandular and solid patterns. The nuclei are round to oval and with evenly distributed nuclear chromatin, frequently with a "salt and pepper"-pattern. Immunohistochemically, tumor cells demonstrate immuno-labeling for chromogranin A and synaptophysin. Ultrastructurally, the neoplastic cells contain abundant dense core neurosecretory granules. In previous genetic studies, abnormalities of chromosomes 3 or 13 have been reported. The clinical behavior of renal carcinoid tumors is variable, but is more indolent than most renal cell carcinomas. Further investigations are warranted in order to elucidate the critical genetic abnormalities responsible for the pathogenesis of this rare entity in renal neoplastic pathology.

  15. Biomechanics of Corneal Ring Implants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the biomechanics of corneal ring implants by providing a related mathematical theory and biomechanical model for the treatment of myopia and keratoconus. Methods: The spherical dome model considers the inhomogeneity of the tunica of the eye, dimensions of the cornea, lamellar structure of the corneal stroma, and asphericity of the cornea. It is used in this study for calculating a strengthening factor sf for the characterization of different ring-shaped corneal implant designs. The strengthening factor is a measure of the amount of strengthening of the cornea induced by the implant. Results: For ring segments and incomplete rings, sf = 1.0, which indicates that these implants are not able to strengthen the cornea. The intracorneal continuous complete ring (MyoRing) has a strengthening factor of up to sf = 3.2. The MyoRing is, therefore, able to strengthen the cornea significantly. Conclusions: The result of the presented biomechanical analysis of different ring-shaped corneal implant designs can explain the different postoperative clinical results of different implant types in myopia and keratoconus. PMID:26312619

  16. Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer: Review of clinical, molecular genetics, and counseling aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Bellacosa, A.; Genuardi, M.; Anti, M.; Viel, A.; Ponz de Leon, M.

    1996-04-24

    Lynch syndrome, or hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC), is an autosomal dominant disease accounting for approximately 1-5% of all colorectal cancer cases. Due to the lack of pathognomonic morphological or biomolecular markers, HNPCC has traditionally posed unique problems to clinicians and geneticists alike, both in terms of diagnosis and clinical management. Recently, novel insight into the pathogenesis of this syndrome has been provided by the identification of its molecular basis. In HNPCC families, germline mutations in any of four genes encoding proteins of a specialized DNA repair system, the mismatch repair, predispose to cancer development. Mutations in mismatch repair genes lead to an overall increase of the mutation rate and are associated with a phenotype of length instability of microsatellite loci. The present report summarizes the clinicopathological aspects of HNPCC and reviews the most recent molecular and biochemical findings. 115 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Anti-Adhesion Therapies in Inflammatory Bowel Disease-Molecular and Clinical Aspects.

    PubMed

    Zundler, Sebastian; Becker, Emily; Weidinger, Carl; Siegmund, Britta

    2017-01-01

    The number of biologicals for the therapy of immunologically mediated diseases is constantly growing. In contrast to other agents that were previously introduced in rheumatologic or dermatologic diseases and only later adopted for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), the field of IBD was ground breaking for the concept of anti-adhesion blockade. Anti-adhesion antibodies selectively target integrins controlling cell homing to the intestine, which leads to reduction of inflammatory infiltration to the gut in chronic intestinal inflammation. Currently, the anti-α4β7-antibody vedolizumab is successfully used for both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis worldwide. In this mini-review, we will summarize the fundamental basis of intestinal T cell homing and explain the molecular groundwork underlying current and potential future anti-adhesion therapies. Finally, we will comment on noteworthy clinical aspects of anti-adhesion therapy and give an outlook to the future of anti-integrin antibodies and inhibitors.

  18. [Epidemiologic and clinical aspects of acute hepatitis B in the past decade].

    PubMed

    Mihalache, Doina; Vâţă, Andrei; Vâţă, Alla; Corcaci, Carmen; Hurmuzache, M; Scurtu, Roxana

    2003-01-01

    To study the clinical and epidemiological aspects of acute B hepatitis during the last 11 years. We retrospectively studied 1712 patient files, admitted in the Department of Infectious Diseases Iaşi, with acute B hepatitis between 1992-2002. The majority of the patients (69%) had an urban origin. Teenagers and young adults were predominantly affected (59% had between 15 and 34 years). A point of entry of the pathogen was identified only in 20% of the patients. The mean incubation period was 4 month. 24% of the patients had a prolonged form of the disease (over 30 days of jaundice). A fulminant evolution was noted in 1.2% of cases. Extrahepatic involvement was described in 25% of the patients. The global mortality was 1.15%. The number of patients with acute B hepatitis decreased by half during the last 11 years.

  19. An Update on Hidradenitis Suppurativa (Part I): Epidemiology, Clinical Aspects, and Definition of Disease Severity.

    PubMed

    Martorell, A; García-Martínez, F J; Jiménez-Gallo, D; Pascual, J C; Pereyra-Rodriguez, J; Salgado, L; Vilarrasa, E

    2015-11-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa is a chronic inflammatory disorder that has attracted increasing attention in recent years due to underestimations of prevalence and the considerable impact of the condition on interpersonal relationships, physical appearance, self-esteem, and body image. Although hidradenitis suppurative has a significant psychological impact on patients and can even cause physical limitations when thick scarring results in limb mobility limitation, until very recently little evidence was available relating to its epidemiology, etiology, or pathogenesis. In this review, we highlight the latest advances in our understanding of the epidemiological and clinical aspects of hidradenitis suppurativa. We will also look at the different classification systems for hidradenitis suppurativa and discuss the emergence of skin ultrasound as a promising technique for monitoring the course of this chronic inflammatory disease.

  20. Periodontal disease in HIV-infected adults in the HAART era: Clinical, immunological, and microbiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Lucio Souza; Gonçalves, Barbara Mulatinho Lopo; Fontes, Tatiana Vasconcellos

    2013-10-01

    The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has decreased the incidence and prevalence of several oral manifestations such as oral candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, and Kaposi's sarcoma in HIV-infected patients. Regarding periodontal disease the findings are not clear. This disease represents a group of chronic oral diseases characterized by infection and inflammation of the periodontal tissues. These tissues surround the teeth and provide periodontal protection (the gingival tissue) and periodontal support (periodontal ligament, root cementum, alveolar bone). Clinical, immunological, and microbiological aspects of these diseases, such as linear gingival erythema (LGE), necrotizing periodontal diseases (NPD) (necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis [NUG], necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis [NUP] and necrotizing stomatitis), and chronic periodontitis, have been widely studied in HIV-infected individuals, but without providing conclusive results. The purpose of this review was to contribute to a better overall understanding of the probable impact of HIV-infection on the characteristics of periodontal infections.

  1. EAST syndrome: Clinical, pathophysiological, and genetic aspects of mutations in KCNJ10

    PubMed Central

    Iancu, Daniela; Stanescu, Horia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT EAST syndrome is a recently described autosomal recessive disorder secondary to mutations in KCNJ10 (Kir4.1), a gene encoding a potassium channel expressed in the brain, eye, ear and kidney. This condition is characterized by 4 cardinal features; Epilepsy, Ataxia, Sensorineural deafness, and (a renal salt-wasting) Tubulopathy, hence the acronym EAST syndrome. Here we review reported clinical manifestations, in particular the neurological signs and symptoms which typically have the most impact on the quality of life of patients. In addition we review the pathophysiology and genetic aspects of the disease. So far 14 different KCNJ10 mutations have been published which either directly affect channel function or may lead to mislocalisation. Investigations of the pathophysiology may provide clues to potential treatments. PMID:27500072

  2. Biomechanics of Interspinous Devices

    PubMed Central

    Parchi, Paolo D.; Evangelisti, Gisberto; Vertuccio, Antonella; Piolanti, Nicola; Andreani, Lorenzo; Cervi, Valentina; Giannetti, Christian; Calvosa, Giuseppe; Lisanti, Michele

    2014-01-01

    A number of interspinous devices (ISD) have been introduced in the lumbar spine implant market. Unfortunately, the use of these devices often is not associated with real comprehension of their biomechanical role. The aim of this paper is to review the biomechanical studies about interspinous devices available in the literature to allow the reader a better comprehension of the effects of these devices on the treated segment and on the adjacent segments of the spine. For this reason, our analysis will be limited to the interspinous devices that have biomechanical studies published in the literature. PMID:25114923

  3. Change of prevalence and clinical aspects of fungal ball according to temporal difference.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Seok; Shin, Seung Youp; Lee, Kun Hee; Kim, Sung Wan; Cho, Joong Saeng

    2013-05-01

    Fungal ball in paranasal sinus was reported to be rare, but these days we have encountered numerous cases. We retrospectively analyzed the data of 4,485 patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) who underwent sinus surgery from 1999 to 2010. Patients were categorized into group A (patients from 1999 to 2004) and group B (patients from 2005 to 2010). We compared the prevalence and clinical aspects of fungal ball between the two groups by analyzing the medical records, PNS CT findings, surgical findings, and pathologic reports. One hundred and twelve patients were diagnosed with fungal ball during the study periods. The prevalence of fungal ball was 0.9 % (23/2,333) in group A and 4.1 % (89/2,152) in group B, showing that it increased 4.6 times over 6 years. The prevalence of underlying diseases was 21.7 % (5/23) for hypertension and 8.7 % (2/23) for diabetes in group A, and 23.6 % (21/89) for hypertension and 14.6 % (13/89) for diabetes in group B. On PNS CT examination, calcification was identified in 78.2 % (18/23) of cases in group A and 44.9 % (40/89) in group B. The most involved paranasal sinus in group A was the co-involved maxillary and ethmoid sinuses at 26.1 % (6/23), whereas, the most prevalent involved sinus in group B was the maxillary sinus at 33.7 % (30/89). We found that the prevalence of fungal ball has increased steadily each year since 2005, accompanied by changes in the clinical aspects. These facts should be kept in mind when diagnosing and treating patients with medically intractable CRS.

  4. Clinical and economic aspects of sevelamer therapy in end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Ossareh, Shahrzad

    2014-01-01

    Phosphate control is still a great challenge in chronic kidney disease (CKD), and in spite of the great improvements in dialysis techniques, achievement of the goals for mineral metabolism control is still far from ideal. Aluminum hydroxide has been largely abandoned due to the high risk of aluminum toxicity, while the use of calcium-based phosphate binders may cause hypercalcemia, overzealous parathyroid suppression, and extraskeletal calcification. Sevelamer hydrochloride has been introduced as an efficient medication for phosphate control, with a lower risk of hypercalcemia and parathyroid suppression. Various clinical trials have compared the risk of vascular calcification between sevelamer and calcium salts with inconsistent results. In spite of these inconsistencies, the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (KDOQI) suggests non-calcium phosphate binders as the preferred phosphate binder in dialysis patients with severe vascular and/or other soft-tissue calcifications and in those with hypercalcemia or parathyroid hormone (PTH) <150 mg/dL. The Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcome (KDIGO) limits the use of non-calcium phosphate binders to patients with hypercalcemia. Regarding the effect on mortality, the results of clinical trials are again inconsistent. The other important aspect of using sevelamer is the issue of price, which is substantially higher than calcium-based phosphate binders. Reviewing the studies on economic aspects shows that sevelamer increases quality-adjusted life-years (QALY) and possibly life years, with a higher cost compared to calcium-based phosphate binders. In conclusion, sevelamer is a very useful drug for phosphate control, reduction of hypercalcemia, and lessening the risk of adynamic bone disease, with probable reduction in vascular calcification and possible reduction in mortality rate. It has a higher economic burden on health care systems compared to calcium-based phosphate binders. This may affect its extensive use

  5. The clinical aspects of mirror therapy in rehabilitation: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Rothgangel, Andreas Stefan; Braun, Susy M; Beurskens, Anna J; Seitz, Rüdiger J; Wade, Derick T

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical aspects of mirror therapy (MT) interventions after stroke, phantom limb pain and complex regional pain syndrome. A systematic literature search of the Cochrane Database of controlled trials, PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, PEDro, RehabTrials and Rehadat, was made by two investigators independently (A.S.R. and M.J.). No restrictions were made regarding study design and type or localization of stroke, complex regional pain syndrome and amputation. Only studies that had MT given as a long-term treatment were included. Two authors (A.S.R. and S.M.B.) independently assessed studies for eligibility and risk of bias by using the Amsterdam-Maastricht Consensus List. Ten randomized trials, seven patient series and four single-case studies were included. The studies were heterogeneous regarding design, size, conditions studied and outcome measures. Methodological quality varied; only a few studies were of high quality. Important clinical aspects, such as assessment of possible side effects, were only insufficiently addressed. For stroke there is a moderate quality of evidence that MT as an additional intervention improves recovery of arm function, and a low quality of evidence regarding lower limb function and pain after stroke. The quality of evidence in patients with complex regional pain syndrome and phantom limb pain is also low. Firm conclusions could not be drawn. Little is known about which patients are likely to benefit most from MT, and how MT should preferably be applied. Future studies with clear descriptions of intervention protocols should focus on standardized outcome measures and systematically register adverse effects.

  6. The ROI-C zero-profile anchored spacer for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: biomechanical profile and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bucci, Michael N; Oh, Dennis; Cowan, R Scott; Davis, Reginald J; Jackson, Robert J; Tyndall, Dwight S; Nehls, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) has been the gold standard for treating cervical degenerative disc disease (cDDD). The use of anterior plates in ACDF poses an increased risk of complications such as screw or plate dislodgement, soft tissue injury, esophagus perforation, and dysphagia. The ROI-C™ implant system consists of a zero-profile interbody fusion cage with self-locking plates designed for stand-alone fusion without external plates or screws. Objective The purpose of this report is to describe the ROI-C™ implant system with VerteBRIDGE™ anchor plates, including indications for use, surgical technique, preclinical testing, and clinical study results. The objectives of the clinical study were to assess fusion status, incidence of dysphagia and other device-related complications, and patient reported outcomes. Methods This was a retrospective, multicenter cohort study of 110 patients who underwent ACDF with ROI-C at seven study centers. Patient charts and radiographs were reviewed for any complications or device malfunction. The final follow-up was conducted prospectively and included collection of neck disability index, and visual analog scale (VAS) neck and arm pain scores. Results The mean operation time was 73 minutes, and mean blood loss was 25 mL (range 0–75 mL). Mean follow-up was 20.7 months (range 9.5–42.2). Dysphagia was reported in two patients (1.8%), and 99.1% of patients achieved fusion. One patient had radiographically confirmed pseudarthrosis at 12 months that was asymptomatic and did not require surgery. One patient had subsequent surgery owing to adjacent level degeneration. The mean neck disability index, VAS neck pain, and VAS right and left arm pain scores at final follow-up were 19, 26.5, 12.5, and 15.3, respectively. Conclusion The ROI-C interbody cage with VerteBRIDGE anchor plates achieved a high rate of fusion, with a low incidence of dysphagia. These patients had similar or better outcomes compared

  7. Dermatophytosis in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection: clinical aspects and etiologic agents.

    PubMed

    Costa, J E F; Neves, R P; Delgado, M M; Lima-Neto, R G; Morais, V M S; Coêlho, M R C D

    2015-10-01

    Dermatophytosis in individuals with human immunodeficiency virus infection seems to manifest with atypical, multiple, or extensive lesions more frequently. In addition, there are reports of presentations with little inflammation, called anergics. Less common etiologic agents have been isolated in these individuals, such as Microsporum species. To describe clinical aspects and etiologic agents of dermatophytosis in individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Patients with clinical diagnosis of dermatophytosis underwent scarification for mycological diagnosis through direct microscopic examination and fungal isolation in culture on Sabouraud dextrose agar. Sixty individuals had a clinical hypothesis of dermatophytosis. In 20 (33.3%) of the 60 patients, dermatophytosis was confirmed through a mycological study. Tinea corporis, diagnosed in 14 patients, was the most frequent clinical form, followed by tinea unguium in 7, tinea cruris in 5, and tinea pedis in 1 patient. Most of the lesions of tinea corporis were anergic. Five patients with tinea unguium had involvement of multiple nails, with onychodystrophy as the predominant subtype. Multiple cutaneous lesions occurred in 3 patients and extensive cutaneous lesions in 4. Regarding the agent, Trichophyton rubrum was the most commonly isolated. The high occurrence of anergic skin lesions and involvement of multiple nails, especially as onychodystrophy, corroborates the hypothesis that atypical, disseminated, and more severe presentations are common in individuals with HIV infection. However, no Microsporum species was isolated even in atypical, extensive, or disseminated cases, in disagreement with previous reports. Therefore, the approach of squamous lesions in HIV-positive patients must include a mycological study, in view of the possibility of anergic dermatophytosis, to promote the introduction of a suitable therapeutic agent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Biomechanics and mechanobiology in functional tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Guilak, Farshid; Butler, David L; Goldstein, Steven A; Baaijens, Frank P T

    2014-06-27

    The field of tissue engineering continues to expand and mature, and several products are now in clinical use, with numerous other preclinical and clinical studies underway. However, specific challenges still remain in the repair or regeneration of tissues that serve a predominantly biomechanical function. Furthermore, it is now clear that mechanobiological interactions between cells and scaffolds can critically influence cell behavior, even in tissues and organs that do not serve an overt biomechanical role. Over the past decade, the field of "functional tissue engineering" has grown as a subfield of tissue engineering to address the challenges and questions on the role of biomechanics and mechanobiology in tissue engineering. Originally posed as a set of principles and guidelines for engineering of load-bearing tissues, functional tissue engineering has grown to encompass several related areas that have proven to have important implications for tissue repair and regeneration. These topics include measurement and modeling of the in vivo biomechanical environment; quantitative analysis of the mechanical properties of native tissues, scaffolds, and repair tissues; development of rationale criteria for the design and assessment of engineered tissues; investigation of the effects biomechanical factors on native and repair tissues, in vivo and in vitro; and development and application of computational models of tissue growth and remodeling. Here we further expand this paradigm and provide examples of the numerous advances in the field over the past decade. Consideration of these principles in the design process will hopefully improve the safety, efficacy, and overall success of engineered tissue replacements.

  9. Biomechanics and mechanobiology in functional tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Guilak, Farshid; Butler, David L.; Goldstein, Steven A.; Baaijens, Frank P.T.

    2014-01-01

    The field of tissue engineering continues to expand and mature, and several products are now in clinical use, with numerous other preclinical and clinical studies underway. However, specific challenges still remain in the repair or regeneration of tissues that serve a predominantly biomechanical function. Furthermore, it is now clear that mechanobiological interactions between cells and scaffolds can critically influence cell behavior, even in tissues and organs that do not serve an overt biomechanical role. Over the past decade, the field of “functional tissue engineering” has grown as a subfield of tissue engineering to address the challenges and questions on the role of biomechanics and mechanobiology in tissue engineering. Originally posed as a set of principles and guidelines for engineering of load-bearing tissues, functional tissue engineering has grown to encompass several related areas that have proven to have important implications for tissue repair and regeneration. These topics include measurement and modeling of the in vivo biomechanical environment; quantitative analysis of the mechanical properties of native tissues, scaffolds, and repair tissues; development of rationale criteria for the design and assessment of engineered tissues; investigation of the effects biomechanical factors on native and repair tissues, in vivo and in vitro; and development and application of computational models of tissue growth and remodeling. Here we further expand this paradigm and provide examples of the numerous advances in the field over the past decade. Consideration of these principles in the design process will hopefully improve the safety, efficacy, and overall success of engineered tissue replacements. PMID:24818797

  10. Corneal biomechanics - a review.

    PubMed

    Kling, Sabine; Hafezi, Farhad

    2017-05-01

    In recent years, the interest in corneal biomechanics has strongly increased. The material properties of the cornea determine its shape and therefore play an important role in corneal ectasia and related pathologies. This review addresses the molecular origin of biomechanical properties, models for their description, methods for their characterisation, techniques for their modification, and computational simulation approaches. Recent research has focused on developing non-contact techniques to measure the biomechanical properties in vivo, on determining structural and molecular abnormalities in pathological corneas, on developing and optimising techniques to reinforce the corneal tissue and on the computational simulation of surgical interventions. A better understanding of corneal biomechanics will help to improve current refractive surgeries, allow an earlier diagnosis of ectatic disorders and a better quantification of treatments aiming at reinforcing the corneal tissue. © 2017 The Authors Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2017 The College of Optometrists.

  11. Biomechanically Engineered Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Tekla S.

    1991-01-01

    The real-world meeting of electronics, computer monitoring, control systems, and mathematics, introduced in the context of sports, is described. Recent advances in the field of biomechanics and its use in improving athletic performance are discussed. (KR)

  12. Biomechanically Engineered Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Tekla S.

    1991-01-01

    The real-world meeting of electronics, computer monitoring, control systems, and mathematics, introduced in the context of sports, is described. Recent advances in the field of biomechanics and its use in improving athletic performance are discussed. (KR)

  13. [The prevalence and clinical aspects of Barrett's esophagus in the population of Eastern Siberia].

    PubMed

    Butorin, N N; Bichurina, T B; Tsukanov, V V; Kasparov, E V; Kuklin, D V; Timoshenko, V O; Shtygasheva, O V; Maady, A S; Vasiutin, A V

    2013-01-01

    To study the prevalence and clinical aspects of Barrett's esophagus (BE) in natives and newcomers in East Siberia. Clinical examinations and esophagogastroduodenoscopy were performed in 12975 Caucasoids and 1489 Khakases in Abakan (Khakasia), 1861 Caucasoids and 5829 Tuvinians in Kyzyl (Republic of Tuva), and 1177 Caucasoids in Dudinka (Taimyr). The diagnosis of BE was verified by morphological study. Among the Caucasoids, the total prevalence of BE was 1.6% (2.4% in men and 0.8% in women; odds ratio (OR) was 3.21 with 95% CI 2.40-4.29; p < 0.001); among the Mongoloids, that was 3.1% (4.5% in men and 2% in women; OR, 2.3 with 95% CI 1.75-3.04; p < 0.001). Heartburn and other typical symptoms was more prevalent in patients with BE. The risk factors of BE in all the examined populations were male sex, age over 40 years, smoking more than 20 cigarettes a day for 10 years or more in men, and obesity. There were ethnic differences in the prevalence of BE, which were prevalent in East Siberia in the Mongoloids as compared to the Caucasoids.

  14. Retinal blinding disorders and gene therapy--molecular and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Birgit; Preising, Markus; Stieger, Knut

    2010-10-01

    Retinal blinding disorders together have a prevalence of 1 in 2000 humans world wide and represent a significant impact on the quality of life as well as the possibility to attain personal achievements. Mutations in genes that are expressed either in RPE cells, photoreceptors or bipolar cells can cause varying forms of degenerative or stationary retinal disorders, as the presence of the encoded proteins is crucial for normal function, maintenance and synaptic interaction. The degree of damage caused by different mutations depends upon the type of mutation within the gene, resulting in either total absence or the presence of a non-functional or potentially toxic protein. Potential treatment strategies require the identification of the cell type, in which the mutated gene is expressed for later targeting by viral vector mediated gene transfer. In the first part of this review, the authors present different cellular pathways that take place either in the RPE, photoreceptors, or bipolar cells. Furthermore, the authors demonstrate why genetic and molecular testing methods, which clearly identify the disease causing mutations, are crucial for attaining the correct diagnosis in order to identify patients suitable to be treated by upcoming new therapeutic methods. In the second part, a short clinical classification of the most important forms of retinal blinding disorders is given, together with clinical aspects concerning the problems that arise when facing low residual visual perception and the enormous heterogeneity of symptoms within these disorders.

  15. Correlation between classification in risk categories and clinical aspects and outcomes 1

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Gabriella Novelli; Vancini-Campanharo, Cássia Regina; Lopes, Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira; Barbosa, Dulce Aparecida; Okuno, Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Batista, Ruth Ester Assayag

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to correlate classification in risk categories with the clinical profiles, outcomes and origins of patients. Method: analytical cross-sectional study conducted with 697 medical forms of adult patients. The variables included: age, sex, origin, signs and symptoms, exams, personal antecedents, classification in risk categories, medical specialties, and outcome. The Chi-square and likelihood ratio tests were used to associate classifications in risk categories with origin, signs and symptoms, exams, personal antecedents, medical specialty, and outcome. Results: most patients were women with an average age of 44.5 years. Pain and dyspnea were the symptoms most frequently reported while hypertension and diabetes mellitus were the most common comorbidities. Classifications in the green and yellow categories were the most frequent and hospital discharge the most common outcome. Patients classified in the red category presented the highest percentage of ambulance origin due to surgical reasons. Those classified in the orange and red categories also presented the highest percentage of hospitalization and death. Conclusion: correlation between clinical aspects and outcomes indicate there is a relationship between the complexity of components in the categories with greater severity, evidenced by the highest percentage of hospitalization and death. PMID:27982310

  16. An elective course on the basic and clinical sciences aspects of vitamins and minerals.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammed A

    2013-02-12

    Objective. To develop and implement an elective course on vitamins and minerals and their usefulness as dietary supplements. Design. A 2-credit-hour elective course designed to provide students with the most up-to-date basic and clinical science information on vitamins and minerals was developed and implemented in the doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) curriculum. In addition to classroom lectures, an active-learning component was incorporated in the course in the form of group discussion. Assessment. Student learning was demonstrated by examination scores. Performance on pre- and post-course surveys administered in 2011 demonstrated a significant increase in students' knowledge of the basic and clinical science aspects of vitamins and minerals, with average scores increasing from 61% to 86%. At the end of the semester, students completed a standard course evaluation. Conclusion. An elective course on vitamin and mineral supplements was well received by pharmacy students and helped them to acquire knowledge and competence in patient counseling regarding safe, appropriate, effective, and economical use of these products.

  17. Biological, nutritional and clinical aspects of feeding preterm infants with human milk.

    PubMed

    Bertino, E; Arslanoglu, S; Martano, C; Di Nicola, P; Giuliani, F; Peila, C; Cester, E; Pirra, A; Coscia, A; Moro, G

    2012-01-01

    Benefits of breastfeeding are widely recognized, during the last decades human milk has been identified as the normative standard for infant feeding and nutrition. Recent evidence focused on specific bioactive and immunomodulatory factors, such as oligosaccharides, lactose, glycosaminoglycans of human milk and the variability of their concentrations during lactation in both term and preterm milk. Human milk should be fortified with proteins, minerals and vitamins to ensure optimal nutrient intake for preterm VLBWI infants. Best fortification strategies as well as the optimal composition of fortifiers are still object of research. Short and long-term clinical, metabolic, immunologic and neurodevelopmental advantages of breastfeeding ndividualizes fortification - particulary adjustable fortification- has proven to be effective when compared to formula are well documented. Moreover several non-experimental studies observed that clinical feeding tolerance is improved and the attainment of full enteral feeding is quicker by a diet of human milk. In addition, benefits of breastfeeding on psychological and relational aspects have to be considered. Mother’s own milk remains the first choice for all neonates, when it is not available or not sufficient despite significant lactation support, donor milk represents the second best alternative and although some nutritional elements are inactivated by the pasteurization process, it still has documented advantages compared to formula.

  18. Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws: an update on clinical, pathological and management aspects.

    PubMed

    Ficarra, Giuseppe; Beninati, Francesco

    2007-12-01

    Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (BRONJ) is mainly observed in patients with multiple myeloma and bone metastasis from solid tumors receiving iv bisphosphonate therapy. The reported incidence of BRONJ is significantly higher with the iv preparations zoledronic acid and pamidronate while the risk appears to be minimal for patients receiving oral bisphosphonates. Currently available published incidence data for BRONJ are based on retrospective studies and estimates of cumulative incidence range from 0.8 to 12%. The mandible is more commonly affected than the maxilla (2:1 ratio), and 60-70% of cases are preceded by a dental surgical procedure. The signs and symptoms that may occur before the appearance of clinical evident osteonecrosis include changes in the health of periodontal tissues, non-healing mucosal ulcers, loose teeth and unexplained soft-tissue infection. Although the definitive role of bisphosphonates remains to be elucidated, the inhibition of physiologic bone remodeling and angiogenesis by these potent drugs impairs the regenerative capacity of the bone causing the development of BRONJ. Tooth extraction as a precipitating event is a common observation. The significant benefits that bisphosphonates offer to patients clearly surpass the risk of potential side effects; however, any patient for whom prolonged bisphosphonate therapy is indicated, should be provided with preventive dental care in order to minimize the risk of developing this severe condition. This article provides an update review of current knowledge about clinical, pathological and management aspects of BRONJ.

  19. Generalized Glucocorticoid Resistance: Clinical Aspects, Molecular Mechanisms, and Implications of a Rare Genetic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Charmandari, Evangelia; Kino, Tomoshige; Ichijo, Takamasa; Chrousos, George P.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Primary generalized glucocorticoid resistance is a rare genetic condition characterized by generalized, partial, target-tissue insensitivity to glucocorticoids. We review the clinical aspects, molecular mechanisms, and implications of this disorder. Evidence Acquisition: We conducted a systematic review of the published, peer-reviewed medical literature using MEDLINE (1975 through February 2008) to identify original articles and reviews on this topic. Evidence Synthesis: We have relied on the experience of a number of experts in the field, including our extensive personal experience. Conclusions: The clinical spectrum of primary generalized glucocorticoid resistance is broad, ranging from asymptomatic to severe cases of hyperandrogenism, fatigue, and/or mineralocorticoid excess. The molecular basis of the condition has been ascribed to mutations in the human glucocorticoid receptor (hGR) gene, which impair glucocorticoid signal transduction and reduce tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids. A consequent increase in the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis compensates for the reduced sensitivity of peripheral tissues to glucocorticoids at the expense of ACTH hypersecretion-related pathology. The study of functional defects of natural hGR mutants enhances our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of hGR action and highlights the importance of integrated cellular and molecular signaling mechanisms for maintaining homeostasis and preserving normal physiology. PMID:18319312

  20. miRNA assays in the clinical laboratory: workflow, detection technologies and automation aspects.

    PubMed

    Kappel, Andreas; Keller, Andreas

    2017-05-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression in eukaryotes. Their differential abundance is indicative or even causative for a variety of pathological processes including cancer or cardiovascular disorders. Due to their important biological function, miRNAs represent a promising class of novel biomarkers that may be used to diagnose life-threatening diseases, and to monitor disease progression. Further, they may guide treatment selection or dosage of drugs. miRNAs from blood or derived fractions are particularly interesting candidates for routine laboratory applications, as they can be measured in most clinical laboratories already today. This assures a good accessibility of respective tests. Albeit their great potential, miRNA-based diagnostic tests have not made their way yet into the clinical routine, and hence no standardized workflows have been established to measure miRNAs for patients' benefit. In this review we summarize the detection technologies and workflow options that exist to measure miRNAs, and we describe the advantages and disadvantages of each of these options. Moreover, we also provide a perspective on data analysis aspects that are vital for translation of raw data into actionable diagnostic test results.

  1. Neuropharmacological Aspects of Crocus sativus L.: A Review of Preclinical Studies and Ongoing Clinical Research.

    PubMed

    Singh, Damanpreet

    2015-01-01

    Crocus sativus L. (Iridaceae) is an important member of the genus Crocus having high medicinal value. Its dried stigmas, known as "saffron" are being widely used form past many centuries as a food additive, coloring agent, flavoring agent and a potential source of traditional medicine. The stigmas along with other botanical parts of Crocus sativus are being extensively used in ethnomedical treatment of varied central nervous system diseases. In line with its ethnomedical importance, several preclinical studies have been carried out to validate its traditional uses, identify active principle(s), understand pharmacological basis of therapeutic action and explore novel medicinal uses. The bioactive components of Crocus sativus have been found to modulate several synaptic processes via direct/indirect interplay with neurotransmitter receptor functions, interaction with neuronal death/survival pathways and alteration in neuronal proteins expression. Many clinical studies proving beneficial effect of Crocus sativus in depressive disorders, Alzheimer's disease and some other neurological abnormalities have also been carried out. Based on the vast literature reports available, an attempt has been made to comprehend the fragmented information on neuropharmacological aspects, chemistry and safety of Crocus sativus. Although the plant has been well explored, but still a large scope of future preclinical and clinical research exist to explore its potential in neurological diseases, that has been discussed in depth in the present review.

  2. An Elective Course on the Basic and Clinical Sciences Aspects of Vitamins and Minerals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To develop and implement an elective course on vitamins and minerals and their usefulness as dietary supplements. Design. A 2-credit-hour elective course designed to provide students with the most up-to-date basic and clinical science information on vitamins and minerals was developed and implemented in the doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) curriculum. In addition to classroom lectures, an active-learning component was incorporated in the course in the form of group discussion. Assessment. Student learning was demonstrated by examination scores. Performance on pre- and post-course surveys administered in 2011 demonstrated a significant increase in students’ knowledge of the basic and clinical science aspects of vitamins and minerals, with average scores increasing from 61% to 86%. At the end of the semester, students completed a standard course evaluation. Conclusion. An elective course on vitamin and mineral supplements was well received by pharmacy students and helped them to acquire knowledge and competence in patient counseling regarding safe, appropriate, effective, and economical use of these products. PMID:23463149

  3. Clinical, Microbial, and Biochemical Aspects of the Exfoliative Toxins Causing Staphylococcal Scalded-Skin Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ladhani, Shamez; Joannou, Christopher L.; Lochrie, Denise P.; Evans, Robert W.; Poston, Susan M.

    1999-01-01

    The exfoliative (epidermolytic) toxins of Staphylococcus aureus are the causative agents of the staphylococcal scalded-skin syndrome (SSSS), a blistering skin disorder that predominantly affects children. Clinical features of SSSS vary along a spectrum, ranging from a few localized blisters to generalized exfoliation covering almost the entire body. The toxins act specifically at the zona granulosa of the epidermis to produce the characteristic exfoliation, although the mechanism by which this is achieved is still poorly understood. Despite the availability of antibiotics, SSSS carries a significant mortality rate, particularly among neonates with secondary complications of epidermal loss and among adults with underlying diseases. The aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the literature spanning more than a century and to cover all aspects of the disease. The epidemiology, clinical features, potential complications, risk factors, susceptibility, diagnosis, differential diagnoses, investigations currently available, treatment options, and preventive measures are all discussed in detail. Recent crystallographic data on the toxins has provided us with a clearer and more defined approach to studying the disease. Understanding their mode of action has important implications in future treatment and prevention of SSSS and other diseases, and knowledge of their specific site of action may provide a useful tool for physiologists, dermatologists, and pharmacologists. PMID:10194458

  4. Elbow Biomechanics of Pitching

    PubMed Central

    Fehr, Shayne; Damrow, Derek; Kilian, Christopher; Lyon, Roger; Liu, Xue-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Elbow pain and elbow injuries are common in youth baseball players. It is not clear whether pitching experience and/or age creates biomechanical differences at the elbow and whether these differences place an athlete at greater risk. Hypotheses: (1) Youth pitchers will have differing elbow kinematics with regard to flexion/extension, internal/external rotation, and pronation/supination when compared with nonbaseball athletes and (2) younger youth pitchers will have differing elbow kinematics when compared with older youth pitchers. Study Design: Case-control study. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Methods: Twenty-seven healthy male youths age 10 to 18 years were recruited and divided into an experience group (n = 18 pitchers) and a no experience group (n = 9 nonbaseball athletes). The experience group was subdivided by age into the younger experience subgroup (n = 10 pitchers) and the older experience subgroup (n = 8 pitchers). Biomechanics were recorded using an electromagnetic motion tracking system. Subjects from each group were averaged together, and a Mann-Whitney U test was utilized for statistical analysis. Results: The experience group had greater external rotation during late cocking (−47.8° vs 5.8°) and greater flexion during early cocking (112.8° vs 100.1°). The younger experience subgroup had greater range of motion with supination-pronation during early cocking (21.9° vs 11.2°) and late cocking (5.9° vs 2.0°). Conclusion: Youth athletes with pitching experience had an increase in maximal external rotation in late cocking and maximal flexion in early cocking, which suggests experience may be a factor to these parameters. The age of experienced baseball pitchers may be a factor due to differences observed with supination and pronation. Clinical Relevance: Learning to throw is a skill that leads to changes in elbow motion; however, these changes may be stable once athletes reach grade school age. Minimal differences were noted between the

  5. Model depicting aspects of audit and feedback that impact physicians' acceptance of clinical performance feedback.

    PubMed

    Payne, Velma L; Hysong, Sylvia J

    2016-07-13

    Audit and feedback (A&F) is a strategy that has been used in various disciplines for performance and quality improvement. There is limited research regarding medical professionals' acceptance of clinical-performance feedback and whether feedback impacts clinical practice. The objectives of our research were to (1) investigate aspects of A&F that impact physicians' acceptance of performance feedback; (2) determine actions physicians take when receiving feedback; and (3) determine if feedback impacts physicians' patient-management behavior. In this qualitative study, we employed grounded theory methods to perform a secondary analysis of semi-structured interviews with 12 VA primary care physicians. We analyzed a subset of interview questions from the primary study, which aimed to determine how providers of high, low and moderately performing VA medical centers use performance feedback to maintain and improve quality of care, and determine perceived utility of performance feedback. Based on the themes emergent from our analysis and their observed relationships, we developed a model depicting aspects of the A&F process that impact feedback acceptance and physicians' patient-management behavior. The model is comprised of three core components - Reaction, Action and Impact - and depicts elements associated with feedback recipients' reaction to feedback, action taken when feedback is received, and physicians modifying their patient-management behavior. Feedback characteristics, the environment, external locus-of-control components, core values, emotion and the assessment process induce or deter reaction, action and impact. Feedback characteristics (content and timeliness), and the procedural justice of the assessment process (unjust penalties) impact feedback acceptance. External locus-of-control elements (financial incentives, competition), the environment (patient volume, time constraints) and emotion impact patient-management behavior. Receiving feedback generated

  6. Biology, Epidemiology, Clinical Aspects of Hepatocellular Carcinoma and the Role of Sorafenib.

    PubMed

    Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Miele, Luca; Oben, Jude; Grieco, Antonio; Vinciguerra, Manlio

    2016-01-01

    Sorafenib is a small molecular inhibitor of intracellular tyrosine and serine/threonine protein kinases (VEGFR, PDGFR, CRAF and BRAF), and is thought also to induce autophagy, a chief mechanism influencing tumor growth. Sorafenib shows efficacy in the management of non-resectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which is refractory to other chemotherapeutic drugs. HCC represents a major end point of chronic liver diseases and the third leading cause of cancer-related death. In HCC patients Sorafenib increases overall survival compared to placebo. The most common chronic liver disease affecting up to 30% of the population in Western countries is non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), an intra-hepatic amassing of triglycerides deemed as the hepatic manifestation of insulin resistance and obesity. NAFLD encompasses a range of disorders with grades of liver damage varying from steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), hallmarked by hepatocellular injury/inflammation in the presence or not of fibrosis. NAFLD patients progress to NASH in 10% of cases, which may progress to cirrhosis and HCC. Recent exciting studies uncovered a potential therapeutic role for Sorafenib that goes beyond HCC, and extends to cirrhotic portal hypertensive syndrome during cirrhosis, and to selective anti-fibrotic effects mediated through direct inhibition of activated hepatic stellate cells (HSC), the cellular mediators of intra-hepatic matrix deposition. The aim of this review is to concisely summarize our current knowledge of the biology, epidemiology and clinical aspects of HCC, as well as the previously under-appreciated therapeutic efficacy of Sorafenib beyond HCC. The review therefore utilizes data along the spectrum of liver diseases, including from experimental via pre-clinical to clinical.

  7. [Orbital and periorbital cellulitis in children. Epidemiological, clinical, therapeutic aspects and course].

    PubMed

    Daoudi, A; Ajdakar, S; Rada, N; Draiss, G; Hajji, I; Bouskraoui, M

    2016-09-01

    Orbital cellulitis in children is a rare but potentially serious condition. The goal of this study is to analyze the epidemiological, clinical, therapeutic aspects and typical course of orbital and periorbital cellulitis in children, so as to propose a clinical management protocol adapted to our context. During the retrospective study period (2008-2014), 28 cases were hospitalized in the pediatric department at the Mohammed VI university medical center in Marrakech. Eighty-five percent of the cases were diagnosed as preseptal cellulitis, and 15% as retroseptal cellulitis. The age of the patients ranged from 6 months to 14 years with a mean age of 3 years. We report a female predominance with a prevalence of 58%. In our study, the most common cause is extension of infection from sinusitis. Clinically, fever was present in 19 patients (68%), eyelid edema was universal, proptosis and chemosis were noted in 2 cases, and ptosis in one patient. Bacteriological testing identified micro-organisms in 6 cases. Orbital computed tomography performed in 57% of the cases showed preseptal cellulitis in 12 cases, orbital cellulitis in one case, a subperiosteal abscess in 2 cases, and orbital abscess in one case. Medical treatment was based on amoxicillin-clavulanic acid or the combination of ceftriaxone, metronidazole±aminoglycoside. However, surgical drainage was necessary in 1 case. The outcome of all cases was favorable. Orbital cellulitis in children is usually preseptal, and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid is considered to be the standard empiric treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. [Clinical, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic aspects in elderly hypertensive patients in Senegal].

    PubMed

    Sarr, Simon Antoine; Babaka, Kana; Mboup, Mouhamadou Cherif; Fall, Pape Diadie; Dia, Khadidiatou; Bodian, Malick; Ndiaye, Mouhamadou Bamba; Kane, Adama; Diao, Maboury; Ba, Serigne Abdou

    2016-01-01

    Arterial hypertension (HTA) in the elderly is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Our study aims to describe the clinical, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic aspects of Arterial hypertension in elderly patients. We conducted a descriptive, cross-sectional study from January to September 2013. Hypertensive patients =60 years treated in Outpatient Cardiology Department at the Principal Hospital in Dakar were included in the study. Statistical data were analyzed using Epi Info 7 software and a p-value < 0.05 was taken as significant. A total of 208 patients were enrolled in the study. The average age was 69.9 years with a female predominance (sex ratio 0.85). Average blood pressure was 162/90 mm Hg. HTA was under control in 13% of cases. The ECG showed evidence of rhythm disturbance (17.78%), left atrial enlargement (45.19%), left ventricular hypertrophy (28.85%) and complete atrioventricular block in 2 cases. Holter ECG revealed non-sustained ventricular tachycardia (Lown class IVb) in 4 cases, paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in 6 cases and paroxysmal atrial flutter in 1 case. Echocardiography performed in 140 patients showed mainly concentric left ventricular hypertrophy in 25 patients, occuring more frequently in males (p=0,04) and dilated left atrium in 56,42% of cases, occuring more frequently in elderly patients (p= 0,01). Electrocardiographic and echocardiographic aspects in elderly hypertensive population are characterized by concentric left ventricular hypertrophy and by the frequency of arrhythmias sometimes revealed by long-term continuous external electrocardiographic recording.

  9. Epidemiological and clinical aspects of urogenital schistosomiasis in women, in Burkina Faso, West Africa.

    PubMed

    Zida, Adama; Briegel, Janika; Kabré, Ibrahim; Sawadogo, Marcel P; Sangaré, Ibrahim; Bamba, Sanata; Yacouba, Abdourahamane; Ouédraogo, Amado; Yonli, Dieudonné; Drabo, François; Traoré, Lady Kady; Ouédraogo-Traoré, Ramata; Guiguemdé, Robert Tinga; Wacker, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    Because infections with Schistosoma Haematobium usually peak in childhood, the majority of studies on schistosomiasis have focused on school-aged children. This study aimed to assess the epidemiological and clinical aspects of urogenital schistosomiasis in women in Burkina Faso, West Africa. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a mesoendemic region (Kombissiri) and a hyperendemic region (Dori) for schistosomiasis in Burkina Faso. A total of 287 females aged 5 to 50 years were included in the study. S. haematobium infection was assessed using the urine filtration method and dipsticks were used for the detection of hematuria. Interviews were conducted to identify clinical aspects and risk factors related to urogenital schistosomiasis. The overall prevalence of S. haematobium infection in Dori was 21.3 %, where as Kombissiri was less affected with a prevalence of 4.6 %. The most affected age group was the 10- to 14-year-olds (41.2 %), followed by the 15- to 19-year-olds (26.3 %). Risk factors significantly associated with schistosomiasis (P <0.05) were place of residence, age, contact with open water in the past year, and distance of home to open water. The percentage of participants who had contact with open water was significantly higher among the women living in Dori compared to Kombissiri. Females over 15 years of age showed a significant higher rate of water contact compared to the 5- to 15-year-olds. A significant correlation between schistosomiasis and hematuria was established. Microhematuria showed a sensitivity of 80.6 %, a specificity of 92.7 %, and a positive predictive value of 61.7 %, whereas macrohematuria had a sensitivity of 47.2 %, a specificity of 99.2 %, and a positive predictive value of 89.5 %. The mass distribution of praziquantel in Burkina Faso is well established. However, over half of the participants with schistosomiasis in this study said they took praziquantel in the past 6 months, which indicates a high reinfection rate

  10. Early Specialization in Youth Sport: A Biomechanical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Jeffrey M.; Richards, Jim

    2010-01-01

    This article examines, from a biomechanical perspective, three issues related to early specialization: overuse injuries, the developmental aspects, and the performance aspects. It concludes that "there is no evidence that early specialization causes overuse injuries or hinders growth and maturation." At the same time, early specialization has…

  11. Early Specialization in Youth Sport: A Biomechanical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Jeffrey M.; Richards, Jim

    2010-01-01

    This article examines, from a biomechanical perspective, three issues related to early specialization: overuse injuries, the developmental aspects, and the performance aspects. It concludes that "there is no evidence that early specialization causes overuse injuries or hinders growth and maturation." At the same time, early specialization has…

  12. Biomechanics of slips.

    PubMed

    Redfern, M S; Cham, R; Gielo-Perczak, K; Grönqvist, R; Hirvonen, M; Lanshammar, H; Marpet, M; Pai, C Y; Powers, C

    2001-10-20

    The biomechanics of slips are an important component in the prevention of fall-related injuries. The purpose of this paper is to review the available literature on the biomechanics of gait relevant to slips. This knowledge can be used to develop slip resistance testing methodologies and to determine critical differences in human behaviour between slips leading to recovery and those resulting in falls. Ground reaction forces at the shoe-floor interface have been extensively studied and are probably the most critical biomechanical factor in slips. The ratio of the shear to normal foot forces generated during gait, known as the required coefficient of friction (RCOF) during normal locomotion on dry surfaces or 'friction used/achievable' during slips, has been one biomechanical variable most closely associated with the measured frictional properties of the shoe/floor interface (usually the coefficient of friction or COF). Other biomechanical factors that also play an important role are the kinematics of the foot at heel contact and human responses to slipping perturbations, often evident in the moments generated at the lower extremity joints and postural adaptations. In addition, it must be realized that the biomechanics are dependent upon the capabilities of the postural control system, the mental set of the individual, and the perception of the environment, particularly, the danger of slipping. The focus of this paper is to review what is known regarding the kinematics and kinetics of walking on surfaces under a variety of environmental conditions. Finally, we discuss future biomechanical research needs to help to improve walkway-friction measurements and safety.

  13. Risk factors and clinical aspects of delirium in elderly hospitalized patients in Iran.

    PubMed

    Foroughan, Mahshid; Delbari, Ahmad; Said, Said Ebn; AkbariKamrani, Ahmad Ali; Rashedi, Vahid; Zandi, Taher

    2016-04-01

    Recognition of the risk factors of delirium has been clearly advantageous in preventing and managing it as it occurs. The main aims of this study were to investigate the occurrence of delirium and identify the associated risk factors in a sample of hospitalized elderly in Southwestern Iran. A cross-sectional, hospital-based study was performed on a total of 200 elderly patients, admitted to a general hospital for various health reasons. Data were gathered over a 3-month period of time in 2010. Abbreviated Mental Test score (AMTs) used for delirium detection in post-admission days 1, 3, and 5, followed by clinical diagnostic confirmation according to the DSM-IV-TR criteria for delirium. Information regarding physical, cognitive, emotional, and functional states of the participants was collected, too. Delirium developed in 22 % of the participants. The demographic characteristics of the patients with delirium indicated that they were typically single, older men who lived alone and had a lower level of education and poorer functional status. Among other variables, the following were significantly associated with delirium: hemoglobin ≤12 (P < 0.001); Blood urea nitrogen/creatinine ratio ≥1/20 (P < 0.005); and positive C-reactive protein (P = 0.022); depressive symptoms (P < 0.001), and previous cognitive decline (P < 0.001). Patients with more than six different categories of medications were at high risk for delirium as well. Delirium is a serious and common problem in people over 60 years of age who are admitted to hospitals. Understanding risk factors and clinical aspects of delirium in elderly hospitalized patients will provide us with a better delirium management strategy.

  14. Aspects of communication in Alzheimer's disease: clinical features and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Michael

    2013-06-01

    During the course of Alzheimer's disease (AD), cognitive processes, including language and communication, become increasingly impaired. The aim of this review was to highlight the impact of communication deficits in AD, and discuss the need for effective treatments. PubMed was searched for studies relating to language and communication in AD. The publications identified were used as a basis for the commentary in this paper. Studies relating to the clinical effectiveness of pharmacological treatment for language and communication issues were identified systematically. Communication deficits are common in AD. From the earliest disease stage, the patient's capacity for communication declines as problems develop with the use of language and all aspects of functional communication. There is a loss of the ability to communicate thoughts and needs, and it becomes increasingly difficult to interact socially and sustain personal relationships with caregivers, family, and friends. It is unsurprising that patients become frustrated at their loss of self-expression, and studies have demonstrated that impaired communication is strongly linked with the development of significant behavioral concerns. Overall, poor communication contributes to caregiver strain, and adds notably to the burden of disease. Clinical data and post-hoc analyses provide preliminary indications that anti-AD therapies (memantine and the cholinesterase inhibitors, ChEIs) and non-pharmacological cognitive-linguistic stimulation techniques may be helpful in addressing communication difficulties. The capacity to treat or slow the progression of communication deficits in AD would prolong patient independence, and have a profound impact on the quality of life of patients and caregivers. The use of pharmacological (anti-AD therapies) and non-pharmacological (cognitive-linguistic stimulation) treatments may be useful management methods and warrant further investigation.

  15. [Methodological aspects of clinical and economic impact of vaccine interventions and HTA. Focus on HPV vaccination].

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, W; Dirodi, B; Bonanni, P; Capri, S; Castiglia, P; Gabutti, G; Gasparini, R; Giorgi Rossi, P; Grilli, G; La Torre, G

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to analyze the methodological and technical aspects of Health Technology Assessment (HTA) as a tool for the clinical and economic impact of vaccine interventions, describe and comment the main studies at the national level, with a particular focus on HPV vaccination. The work was conducted in 3 phases: a) revision of the scientific literature, strictly linked to methodologies adopted in different studies on economic evaluations on HPV vaccines and analysis of Guidelines for building models for the economic assessment; b) analysis of the peculiarities and critical elements of economic evaluations in the field of vaccinology, from the clinical and epidemiological point of view, as well as the recognition of lack of knowledge on HPV infection dynamics; c) a comparative analysis of the two italian studies and of the results coming from them. Many differences between studies were found. Nevertheless, there is a general agreement on the economic profile of HPV vaccination for adolescent girls, if compared with the actual practice on the prevention of cervical carcinoma (pap-test screening). All the models showed a significant impact in terms of reduction of the incidence of cervical carcinoma and related mortality, in the long run, as well as a reduction of pre-cancer lesions and abnormal Pap tests. HTA approach has been recently recognized as a tool for decision making in vaccinology, and its methodologies and procedures are currently debated by public health experts. There is a strong need to continue the work in improving the model techniques of economic evaluations concerning HPV vaccination, as well as the adoption of homogeneous methods and standards, with the aim of helping the decision process in the field of Public Health.

  16. Clinical trials update: IMPROVEMENT-HF, COPERNICUS, MUSTIC, ASPECT-II, APRICOT and HEART.

    PubMed

    Witte, K; Thackray, S; Clark, A L; Cooklin, M; Cleland, J G

    2000-12-01

    Important new studies relevant to the field of heart failure reported at the annual congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC), held in Amsterdam in August 2000, are reviewed. The IMPROVEMENT of Heart Failure survey investigated the knowledge and perceptions of over 1300 primary care physicians from 14 ESC member nations and the actual practice in over 11000 of their patients. Guidelines and clinical practice were compared. The survey suggested, in this large sample, that the quality of care was higher than previous smaller surveys have suggested but have also identified important deficiencies in knowledge and management that should be rectified. The COPERNICUS study demonstrated that carvedilol was remarkably well tolerated even in patients with very severe heart failure and that treatment was associated with a substantial reduction in mortality even among patients that would conventionally not be considered, by many, for beta-blocker therapy. The MUSTIC trial suggested that cardiac resynchronisation using biventricular pacing improved patients symptomatically whether or not the patient was in atrial fibrillation. Morbidity and mortality studies of cardiac resynchronisation are now underway. The ASPECT-II and APRICOT-II studies investigated the role of warfarin, aspirin and their combination for the long-term management of myocardial infarction. One interpretation of the data from these studies is that the combination of aspirin and warfarin is about as effective as warfarin alone but with a much higher incidence of side effects. Warfarin alone appeared superior to aspirin alone. In summary, the annual congress of the ESC provided important new information for clinical practice and, to date, was, by far, the most important cardiology congress in the world this year.

  17. To Use or Not? Evaluating ASPECTS of Smartphone Apps and Mobile Technology for Clinical Care in Psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Torous, John B; Chan, Steven R; Yellowlees, Peter M; Boland, Robert

    2016-06-01

    In this commentary, we discuss smartphone apps for psychiatry and the lack of resources to assist clinicians in evaluating the utility, safety, and efficacy of apps. Evaluating an app requires new considerations that are beyond those employed in evaluating a medication or typical clinical intervention. Based on our software engineering, informatics, and clinical knowledge and experiences, we propose an evaluation framework, "ASPECTS," to spark discussion about apps and aid clinicians in determining whether an app is Actionable, Secure, Professional, Evidence-based, Customizable, and TranSparent. Clinicians who use the ASPECTS guide will be more informed and able to make more thorough evaluations of apps.

  18. Comparative Analysis between Total Disc Replacement and Posterior Foraminotomy for Posterolateral Soft Disc Herniation with Unilateral Radiculopathy : Clinical and Biomechanical Results of a Minimum 5 Years Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Tae; Cho, Dae-Chul; Sung, Joo-Kyung; Kim, Young-Baeg; Kim, Du Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Objective To compare the clinical outcomes and biomechanical effects of total disc replacement (TDR) and posterior cervical foraminotomy (PCF) and to propose relative inclusion criteria. Methods Thirty-five patients who underwent surgery between 2006 and 2008 were included. All patients had single-level disease and only radiculopathy. The overall sagittal balance and angle and height of a functional segmental unit (FSU; upper and lower vertebral body of the operative lesion) were assessed by preoperative and follow-up radiographs. C2–7 range of motion (ROM), FSU, and the adjacent segment were also checked. Results The clinical outcome of TDR (group A) was tended to be superior to that of PCF (group B) without statistical significance. In the group A, preoperative and postoperative upper adjacent segment level motion values were 8.6±2.3 and 8.4±2.0, and lower level motion values were 8.4±2.2 and 8.3±1.9. Preoperative and postoperative FSU heights were 37.0±2.1 and 37.1±1.8. In the group B, upper level adjacent segment motion values were 8.1±2.6 and 8.2±2.8, and lower level motion values were 6.5±3.3 and 6.3±3.1. FSU heights were 37.1±2.0 and 36.2±1.8. The postoperative FSU motion and height changes were significant (p<0.05). The patient’s satisfaction rates for surgery were 88.2% in group A and 88.8% in group B. Conclusion TDR and PCF have favorable outcomes in patients with unilateral soft disc herniation. However, patients have different biomechanical backgrounds, so the patient’s biomechanical characteristics and economic status should be understood and treated using the optimal procedure. PMID:28061490

  19. Anti-Adhesion Therapies in Inflammatory Bowel Disease—Molecular and Clinical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Zundler, Sebastian; Becker, Emily; Weidinger, Carl; Siegmund, Britta

    2017-01-01

    The number of biologicals for the therapy of immunologically mediated diseases is constantly growing. In contrast to other agents that were previously introduced in rheumatologic or dermatologic diseases and only later adopted for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), the field of IBD was ground breaking for the concept of anti-adhesion blockade. Anti-adhesion antibodies selectively target integrins controlling cell homing to the intestine, which leads to reduction of inflammatory infiltration to the gut in chronic intestinal inflammation. Currently, the anti-α4β7-antibody vedolizumab is successfully used for both Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis worldwide. In this mini-review, we will summarize the fundamental basis of intestinal T cell homing and explain the molecular groundwork underlying current and potential future anti-adhesion therapies. Finally, we will comment on noteworthy clinical aspects of anti-adhesion therapy and give an outlook to the future of anti-integrin antibodies and inhibitors. PMID:28804488

  20. The wolf in sheep’s clothing: Microtomographic aspects of clinically incipient radiation-related caries

    PubMed Central

    Morais-Faria, Karina; Neves-Silva, Rodrigo; Lopes, Marcio-Ajudarte; Ribeiro, Ana-Carolina-Prado; de Castro Jr, Gilberto; da Conceição-Vasconcelos, Karina-Gondim-Moutinho; Brandão, Thais-Bianca; Santos-Silva, Alan-Roger

    2016-01-01

    Background Radiation-related caries (RRC) can cause rapid progression, with a high potential for dental destruction affecting mainly cervical and incisal areas. Unlike the injuries that occur in the conventional caries, incipient RRC present in unusual surfaces have difficult diagnosis and classification stages of cavitation. Material and Methods Evaluate the radiographic patterns of demineralization of RRC by using micro-CT. Ten teeth with incipient RRC and 10 teeth with incipient conventional caries (control group) matched by anatomic teeth group and caries affected surfaces were evaluated by X-ray microtomography (micro-CT) Skyscan 1174V2 (50Kv, 1.3 megapixel, Kontich, Belgium). Teeth were placed in a standard position for micro-CT (coronal, transaxial and sagittal sections) during images acquisition. Lesions were classified according to the depth of invasion and relationship with enamel, dentin and pulp. Results RRC samples presented deeper lesions with higher involvement of enamel and dentin. Control group presented focal and superficial lesions with lower involvement of enamel and dentin. Conclusions Incipient RRC present aggressive microtomographic patterns of demineralization when compared to conventional caries, as indicated by deep lesions, regardless of its clinically incipient aspects. Key words:Head and neck cancer, radiotherapy, microtomography, radiation caries. PMID:26946198

  1. Rare hereditary red blood cell enzymopathies associated with hemolytic anemia - pathophysiology, clinical aspects, and laboratory diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Koralkova, P; van Solinge, W W; van Wijk, R

    2014-06-01

    Hereditary red blood cell enzymopathies are genetic disorders affecting genes encoding red blood cell enzymes. They cause a specific type of anemia designated hereditary nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia (HNSHA). Enzymopathies affect cellular metabolism, which, in the red cell, mainly consists of anaerobic glycolysis, the hexose monophosphate shunt, glutathione metabolism, and nucleotide metabolism. Enzymopathies are commonly associated with normocytic normochromic hemolytic anemia. In contrast to other hereditary red cell disorders such as membrane disorders or hemoglobinopathies, the morphology of the red blood cell shows no specific abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on detection of reduced specific enzyme activity and molecular characterization of the defect on the DNA level. The most common enzyme disorders are deficiencies of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and pyruvate kinase (PK). However, there are a number of other enzyme disorders, often much less known, causing HNSHA. These disorders are rare and often underdiagnosed, and the purpose of this review. In this brief review, we provide an overview of clinically relevant enzymes, their function in red cell metabolism, and key aspects of laboratory diagnosis.

  2. Cardiac Alpha1-Adrenergic Receptors: Novel Aspects of Expression, Signaling Mechanisms, Physiologic Function, and Clinical Importance

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Timothy D.; Jensen, Brian C.; Baker, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Adrenergic receptors (AR) are G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that have a crucial role in cardiac physiology in health and disease. Alpha1-ARs signal through Gαq, and signaling through Gq, for example, by endothelin and angiotensin receptors, is thought to be detrimental to the heart. In contrast, cardiac alpha1-ARs mediate important protective and adaptive functions in the heart, although alpha1-ARs are only a minor fraction of total cardiac ARs. Cardiac alpha1-ARs activate pleiotropic downstream signaling to prevent pathologic remodeling in heart failure. Mechanisms defined in animal and cell models include activation of adaptive hypertrophy, prevention of cardiac myocyte death, augmentation of contractility, and induction of ischemic preconditioning. Surprisingly, at the molecular level, alpha1-ARs localize to and signal at the nucleus in cardiac myocytes, and, unlike most GPCRs, activate “inside-out” signaling to cause cardioprotection. Contrary to past opinion, human cardiac alpha1-AR expression is similar to that in the mouse, where alpha1-AR effects are seen most convincingly in knockout models. Human clinical studies show that alpha1-blockade worsens heart failure in hypertension and does not improve outcomes in heart failure, implying a cardioprotective role for human alpha1-ARs. In summary, these findings identify novel functional and mechanistic aspects of cardiac alpha1-AR function and suggest that activation of cardiac alpha1-AR might be a viable therapeutic strategy in heart failure. PMID:24368739

  3. Endemic Lassa fever in Liberia. I. Clinical and epidemiological aspects at Curran Lutheran Hospital, Zorzor, Liberia.

    PubMed

    Monson, M H; Frame, J D; Jahrling, P B; Alexander, K

    1984-01-01

    In a study to assess the epidemiological and clinical aspects of endemic Lassa fever (LF) in Liberia at Curran Lutheran Hospital (CLH), 44 cases were diagnosed by virological and serological techniques over a 22-month period. During one calendar month, testing of febrile patients admitted to the medical-surgical ward revealed six cases of LF, 13% of all febrile cases and 17% of those who were tested. As the study progressed the diagnostic skills of the hospital staff improved. The most common mistake was the diagnosis of a case of LF as pneumonia; the most potentially serious diagnostic problem was differentiating LF from typhoid fever, a readily treatable infection. LF may also mimic other diseases such as aseptic meningitis, pelvic inflammatory disease, gastroenteritis or arbovirus infection. We found a previously unreported symptom of LF, rib tenderness typical of costochondritis. The mortality rate in the medical-surgical ward was 5.4%; the over-all case-fatality rate was 13.6%. Women outnumbered men by nearly three to one, and had a higher mortality particularly noted in the pregnant. LF is common at CLH, and as many as 100 cases may occur annually at this hospital.

  4. Clinical, hematological, biochemical, and ultrasonographic aspects of Platynosomum sp. (Trematoda: Dicrocoeliidae) infection of captive Callithrix penicillata.

    PubMed

    Mattioli, Mariana Portugal; Batista, Juliana dos Santos; Ferrari, Marlon; Paludo, Giane Regina; Dias, Cecília Azevedo; Hoppe, Estevam G L; da Rocha, Gino Chaves; Monteiro, Rafael Veríssimo

    2016-04-01

    Trematodes from the genus Platynosomum have been found to infect Neotropical primates in captivity, but little is known about their pathogeny in such hosts. This study evaluated the physiological effects of natural infection by the liver-dwelling trematode Platynosomum sp. in ten males and ten females of Callithrix penicillata kept in captivity at the Primate Center of the University of Brasília. The marmosets were examined twice, 6 months apart. The following parameters were analyzed: complete blood count, bleeding time, serum total protein, albumin, and the liver enzymes AST and ALT, and both a stool analysis and a liver ultrasonic evaluation were performed. We were able to characterize a group of abnormalities associated with this trematode infection which were mainly derived from the hepatitis caused by it: coagulation disorders, abnormal red blood cells, hypoalbuminemia, and abnormal levels of liver-linked serum enzymes. Eosinophilia and thrombocytopenia were also commonly seen. All of the aforementioned abnormalities were in good accord with typical effects of trematodes on liver parenchyma. We suggest that this set of abnormalities is characteristic of the infection of C. penicillata with Platynosomum sp., and should be among the most prominent aspects that the veterinary surgeon considers when suspecting such an infection. We also suggest that these clinical signs and abnormalities will be similar in other liver-dwelling trematode-infected primate species.

  5. Meteorological and agricultural effects on airborne Alternaria and Cladosporium spores and clinical aspects in Valladolid (Spain).

    PubMed

    Reyes, Estefanía Sánchez; de la Cruz, David Rodríguez; Merino, Ma Eugenia Sanchís; Sánchez, José Sánchez

    2009-01-01

    The aeropalynological monitoring was carried out from 1 February 2005-31 January 2007. The total number of spores collected during the main spore season (MSS) in 2005 was 4,500 for Alternaria and 93,744 in the case of Cladosporium, whereas in 2006 values were increased (8,385 for Alternaria and 150,144 for Cladosporium), reaching the maximum concentrations on 18 July and 17 June 2006 with 344 and 5,503 spores, respectively. The influence of the main meteorological parameters on spore concentrations was studied, resulting in a positive correlation with temperature. Rainfall, relative humidity and frequency of calms obtained negative correlations in the case of Alternaria, and positive for Cladosporium, the total daily hours of sunshine having an inverse influence on them. The intra-diurnal pattern was very similar for both genera, with a greater representation towards the central hours of the day and at night. Finally, some clinical aspects for the Alternaria spore type were analyzed, with a low percentage of sensitized patients though (9.5%). Only one patient showed positive skin test reaction to Cladosporium.

  6. The Iceberg Nature of Fibromyalgia Burden: The Clinical and Economic Aspects.

    PubMed

    Ghavidel-Parsa, Banafsheh; Bidari, Ali; Amir Maafi, Alireza; Ghalebaghi, Babak

    2015-07-01

    This review has focused on important but less visible aspects of fibromyalgia (FM) with respect to the high impact of this disorder on patients and societies. FM is a common but challengeable illness. It is characterized by chronic widespread pain, which can be accompanied by other symptoms including fatigue, sleep disturbances, cognitive dysfunction, anxiety and depressive episodes. While our understanding of this debilitating disorder is limited, diagnosis and treatment of this condition is very difficult, even in the hands of experts. Due to the nature of disease, where patients experience invalidation by medical services, their families and societies regarding the recognition and management of disease, direct, indirect and immeasurable costs are considerable. These clinical and economic costs are comparable with other common diseases, such as diabetes, hypertension and osteoarthritis, but the latter usually receives much more attention from healthcare and non-healthcare resources. Present alarming data shows the grave and "iceberg-like" burden of FM despite the benign appearance of this disorder and highlights the urgent need both for greater awareness of the disease among medical services and societies, as well as for more research focused on easily used diagnostic methods and target specific treatment.

  7. Nannizziopsis guarroi infection in 2 Inland Bearded Dragons (Pogona vitticeps): clinical, cytologic, histologic, and ultrastructural aspects.

    PubMed

    Le Donne, Viviana; Crossland, Nicholas; Brandão, João; Sokolova, Yuliya; Fowlkes, Natalie; Nevarez, Javier G; Langohr, Ingeborg M; Gaunt, Stephen D

    2016-06-01

    Chrysosporium-related infections have been increasingly reported in reptiles over the last 2 decades. In this report, we describe clinical, cytologic, histopathologic, and ultrastructural aspects of Chrysosporium-related infection in 2 Inland Bearded Dragons (Pogona vitticeps). Case 1 was presented for an enlarging raised lesion over the left eye and multiple additional masses over the dorsum. Case 2 was submitted to necropsy by the referring veterinarian for suspected yellow fungus disease. Impression smears of the nodules in case 1 revealed granulomatous to pyogranulomatous inflammation and many septate, variably long, 4-10 μm wide, often undulated hyphae, and very rare conidia. Postmortem impression smears of the superficial lesions of case 2 contained large numbers of solitary conidia and arthroconidia and low numbers of hyphae with similar morphology to case 1. Histopathology of the 2 cases revealed severe, multifocal, chronic, ulcerative, nodular pyogranulomatous dermatitis, with myriad intralesional septate hyphae, and arthroconidia. Fungal culture and molecular sequencing in both cases indicated infection with Nannizziopsis guarroi.

  8. Biomechanical analysis of a new carbon fiber/flax/epoxy bone fracture plate shows less stress shielding compared to a standard clinical metal plate.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Zahra S; Tavakkoli Avval, Pouria; Bougherara, Habiba; Aziz, Mina S R; Schemitsch, Emil H; Zdero, Radovan

    2014-09-01

    Femur fracture at the tip of a total hip replacement (THR), commonly known as Vancouver B1 fracture, is mainly treated using rigid metallic bone plates which may result in "stress shielding" leading to bone resorption and implant loosening. To minimize stress shielding, a new carbon fiber (CF)/Flax/Epoxy composite plate has been developed and biomechanically compared to a standard clinical metal plate. For fatigue tests, experiments were done using six artificial femurs cyclically loaded through the femoral head in axial compression for four stages: Stage 1 (intact), stage 2 (after THR insertion), stage 3 (after plate fixation of a simulated Vancouver B1 femoral midshaft fracture gap), and stage 4 (after fracture gap healing). For fracture fixation, one group was fitted with the new CF/Flax/Epoxy plate (n = 3), whereas another group was repaired with a standard clinical metal plate (Zimmer, Warsaw, IN) (n = 3). In addition to axial stiffness measurements, infrared thermography technique was used to capture the femur and plate surface stresses during the testing. Moreover, finite element analysis (FEA) was performed to evaluate the composite plate's axial stiffness and surface stress field. Experimental results showed that the CF/Flax/Epoxy plated femur had comparable axial stiffness (fractured = 645 ± 67 N/mm; healed = 1731 ± 109 N/mm) to the metal-plated femur (fractured = 658 ± 69 N/mm; healed = 1751 ± 39 N/mm) (p = 1.00). However, the bone beneath the CF/Flax/Epoxy plate was the only area that had a significantly higher average surface stress (fractured = 2.10 ± 0.66 MPa; healed = 1.89 ± 0.39 MPa) compared to bone beneath the metal plate (fractured = 1.18 ± 0.93 MPa; healed = 0.71 ± 0.24 MPa) (p < 0.05). FEA bone surface stresses yielded peak of 13 MPa at distal epiphysis (stage 1), 16 MPa at distal epiphysis (stage 2), 85 MPa for composite and 129

  9. Biomechanics in dermatology: Recent advances and future directions.

    PubMed

    Lewinson, Ryan T; Haber, Richard M

    2017-02-01

    Biomechanics is increasingly being recognized as an important research area in dermatology. To highlight only a few examples, biomechanics has contributed to the development of novel topical therapies for aesthetic and medical purposes, enhanced our understanding of the pathogenesis of plantar melanoma, and provided insight into the epidemiology of psoriatic disease. This article summarizes the findings from recent studies to demonstrate the important role that biomechanics may have in dermatologic disease and therapy and places these biomechanical findings in a clinical context for the practicing physician. In addition, areas for future biomechanics research and development in dermatology are discussed. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical and epidemiological aspects of complicated malaria in Colombia, 2007-2013.

    PubMed

    Chaparro-Narváez, Pablo E; Lopez-Perez, Mary; Rengifo, Lina Marcela; Padilla, Julio; Herrera, Sócrates; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam

    2016-05-10

    During the last decade, Colombia presented a significant decrease in malaria clinical cases and associated mortality. However, there is a lack of reliable information about the prevalence and characteristics of complicated malaria cases as well as its association with different Plasmodium species. A description of the epidemiological and clinical aspects of complicated malaria in Colombia is presented here. A descriptive study was conducted using data collected between 2007 and 2013 by the Public Health Surveillance System (SIVIGILA). Demographic and clinical features were described. Frequency of complicated malaria cases, annual parasite index (API) and annual percent change (APC) for trend modelling by gender and age were also calculated. A total of 547,542 malaria cases were recorded by SIVIGILA during the study period, of which 2553 (0.47 %) corresponded to complicated cases with similar distribution by Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum species. Mixed infections were found in 153 cases (6.0 %). Trend modelling of the API for complicated malaria for all parasite species showed a non-significant increase throughout the years (APC 14.4 %; 95 % CI -4.3 to 36.6 %). Complicated malaria individuals were mostly males (62.2 %) and young adults (median age of 23 years). Notably, 72.4 % of the patients attended for malaria diagnosis >72 h after symptoms onset and 17 % reported malaria episodes in the last 30 days. All patients received anti-malarial treatment, but only 40 % received the first-line as recommended by the Colombian guidelines. Overall, hepatic and renal complications were the most common severe manifestations (63.6 %). Whereas hepatic and pulmonary complications were more common in P. vivax infections, renal and cerebral complications were significantly more frequent in patients with P. falciparum. In contrast with mono-infected patients, severe anaemia and shock were more frequent in patients with mixed infection. In contrast with the

  11. Clinical and Therapeutic Aspects of Childhood Narcolepsy-Cataplexy: A Retrospective Study of 51 Children

    PubMed Central

    Aran, Adi; Einen, Mali; Lin, Ling; Plazzi, Guiseppe; Nishino, Seiji; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    reports on the clinical features of childhood narcolepsy and documents the safe use of treatments commonly used in adults in young children. Citation: Aran A; Einen M; Lin L; Plazzi G; Nishino S; Mignot E. Clinical and therapeutic aspects of childhood narcolepsy-cataplexy: a retrospective study of 51 children. SLEEP 2010;33(11):1457-1464. PMID:21102987

  12. The Influence of Acetyl Salicylic Acid (Aspirin) and Acetaminophen on Clinical and Histologic Aspects of Orthodontic Tooth Movement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    of this lipid family. :., t z, , understood but has neverthele’s Iej t,.. ,I nI,-al ramifications. 6f particular !ntor; ,’Jrr.ly I orthodontic ...inhibitors, on clinical and histologic aspects of orthodontic tooth movement. Clinical and histologic results revealed no statistical differences among...against the use of prostaglandin inhibitors for the relief of orthodontic discomfort. However, this study did not produce evidence to contraindicate

  13. Cutaneous approach towards clinical and pathophysiological aspects of hyperglycemia by ATR FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eikje, Natalja Skrebova; Sota, Takayuki; Aizawa, Katsuo

    2007-07-01

    Attempts were made to non-invasively detect glucose-specific spectral signals in the skin by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. In vivo spectra were collected from the inner wrists of healthy, prediabetes and diabetes subjects in the 750-4000 cm -1 region, with a closer assessment of the glucose-related region between 1000 and 1180 cm -1. Spectra in vivo showed glucose-specific peaks at 1030, 1080, 1118 and 1151 cm -1, as a variety of glucose solutions are found in vitro. Based on the differences of intensities at 1030 and 1118 cm -1 two spectral patterns were seen: I 1118 > I 1030 for a diabetes and I 1030> I 1118 for non-diabetes subjects. The peak at 1030 cm -1 was used to assess glucose concentrations in the skin due to its good correlation with glucose concentrations in vitro. Calculated mean values of the peak at 1030 cm -1 showed evidence of correlation with blood glucose levels when grouped as <= 140, 140-200 and >= 200 mg/dL, though there was no constant correlation between them when compared before/after OGTT or at the fasting/postprandial states. Absorbances at 1030 cm -1 were not only increased in a dose-dependent manner in a diabetes patient, but were also generally higher than in non-diabetes subjects at 30 min OGTT assessment. Also we could monitor absorbances at 1030 cm -1 and determine their changes in the skin tissue at different times of OGTT. We assume that our approach to in vivo measurement and monitoring of glucose concentrations at 1030 cm -1 may be one of the indicators to assess glucose activity level and its changes in the skin tissue, and has further implications in the study of clinical and pathophysiological aspects of hyperglycemia in diabetes and non-diabetes subjects by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy.

  14. Clinical and pathological aspects of microscopic thymoma with myasthenia gravis and review of published reports.

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Mitsuro; Higuchi, Mitsunori; Owada, Yuki; Inoue, Takuya; Watanabe, Yuzuru; Yamaura, Takumi; Muto, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Takeo; Suzuki, Hiroyuki

    2017-06-01

    Microscopic thymomas, defined as epithelial proliferations smaller than 1 mm in diameter, characteristically occur in patients with myasthenia gravis without macroscopic thymic epithelial tumors. However, some clinical and pathological aspects of this entity are still unclear. This retrospective study includes five consecutive patients who had undergone extended thymectomy for myasthenia gravis at our institution from April 2007 to March 2016 and in whom microscopic thymomas were diagnosed by histopathological examination of the resected specimens. During the same period, we performed 32 extended transsternal thymothymectomies/thymectomies in patients with myasthenia gravis, including the above five cases. We here review 18 cases of microscopic thymoma, including our five cases and 13 previously reported cases. The incidence of previously undiagnosed microscopic thymoma in patients undergoing thymectomy for myasthenia gravis in our institution is 15.2%. Serum preoperative anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody (anti-AchR Ab) titers were abnormally high in all of our five cases h (74.4±53.3 nmol/L) and decreased significantly after surgery (11.7±13.5 nmol/L, P=0.037). We divided our cases into the following three groups: microscopic thymoma group (Group M), thymoma group (Group T) and non-thymic tumor group (Group N). The mean preoperative anti-AchR Ab titers of these groups were 74.4, 26.5, and 368 nmol/L, respectively. All these values decreased postoperatively. The mean anti-AchR Ab titer was significantly higher in Group M than in Group T (P=0.034). All five cases in Group M were found by post-operative pathological examination to have multifocal type A thymomas. Microscopic thymomas tend to be multifocal type A thymomas. Anti-AchR Ab titers decreased significantly in all groups. It is very important to both perform complete extended thymectomies in patients with myasthenia gravis and pathological examination of thin slices of thymic tissue to maximize detection

  15. Somatosensory-evoked spikes on electroencephalography (EEG): longitudinal clinical and EEG aspects in 313 children.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Lineu Corrêa; Tedrus, Gloria M A S

    2012-01-01

    Somatosensory-evoked spikes (ESp) are high-voltage potentials registered on the EEG, which accompany each of the percussions on the feet or hands. The objective of this research was to study the longitudinal clinical and EEG aspects of children with ESp. A total of 313 children, 53.7% male, showing ESp on the EEG and with an average initial age of 6.82 (range from 2 to 14 years) were followed for a mean period of 35.7 months. In the initial evaluation, 118 (37.7%) had a history of nonfebrile epileptic seizures (ES). Epileptiform activity (EA) was observed on the EEG in 61% and showed a significantly greater occurrence in children with ES